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Sample records for 18f-labeled choline derivates

  1. Synthesis of [18F]-labelled Maltose Derivatives as PET Tracers for Imaging Bacterial Infection

    PubMed Central

    Namavari, Mohammad; Gowrishankar, Gayatri; Hoehne, Aileen; Jouannot, Erwan; Gambhir, Sanjiv S

    2015-01-01

    Purpose To develop novel positron emission tomography (PET) agents for visualization and therapy monitoring of bacterial infections. Procedures It is known that maltose and maltodextrins are energy sources for bacteria. Hence, 18F-labelled maltose derivatives could be a valuable tool for imaging bacterial infections. We have developed methods to synthesize 4-O-(α-D-glucopyranosyl)-6-deoxy-6-[18F]fluoro-D-glucopyranoside (6-[18F]fluoromaltose) and 4-O-(α-D-glucopyranosyl)-1-deoxy-1-[18F]fluoro-D-glucopyranoside (1-[18F]fluoromaltose) as bacterial infection PET imaging agents. 6-[18F]fluoromaltose was prepared from precursor 1,2,3-tri-O-acetyl-4-O-(2′,3′,-di-O-acetyl-4′,6′-benzylidene-α-D-glucopyranosyl)-6-deoxy-6-nosyl-D-glucopranoside (5). The synthesis involved the radio-fluorination of 5 followed by acidic and basic hydrolysis to give 6-[18F]fluoromaltose. In an analogous procedure, 1-[18F]fluoromaltose was synthesized from 2,3, 6-tri-O-acetyl-4-O-(2′,3′,4′,6-tetra-O-acetyl-α-D-glucopyranosyl)-1-deoxy-1-O-triflyl-D-glucopranoside (9). Stability of 6-[18F]fluoromaltose in phosphate-buffered saline (PBS) and human and mouse serum at 37 °C was determined. Escherichia coli uptake of 6-[18F]fluoromaltose was examined. Results A reliable synthesis of 1- and 6-[18F]fluoromaltose has been accomplished with 4–6 and 5–8 % radiochemical yields, respectively (decay-corrected with 95 % radiochemical purity). 6-[18F]fluoromaltose was sufficiently stable over the time span needed for PET studies (~96 % intact compound after 1-h and ~65 % after 2-h incubation in serum). Bacterial uptake experiments indicated that E. coli transports 6-[18F]fluoromaltose. Competition assays showed that the uptake of 6-[18F]fluoromaltose was completely blocked by co-incubation with 1 mM of the natural substrate maltose. Conclusion We have successfully synthesized 1- and 6-[18F]fluoromaltose via direct fluorination of appropriate protected maltose precursors. Bacterial uptake

  2. Synthesis and evaluation of 18F labeled alanine derivatives as potential tumor imaging agents

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Limin; Zha, Zhihao; Qu, Wenchao; Qiao, Hongwen; Lieberman, Brian P.; Plössl, Karl; Kung, Hank F.

    2012-01-01

    Introduction This paper reports the synthesis and labeling of 18F alanine derivatives. We also investigate their biological characteristics as potential tumor imaging agents mediated by alanine-serine-cysteine preferring (ASC) transporter system. Methods Three new 18F alanine derivatives were prepared from corresponding tosylate-precursors through a two-step labelling reaction. In vitro uptake studies to evaluate and to compare these three analogs were carried out in 9L glioma and PC-3 prostate cancer cell lines. Potential transport mechanisms, protein incorporation and stability of 3-(1-[18F]fluoromethyl)-L-alanine (L[18F]FMA) were investigated in 9L glioma cells. Its biodistribution was determined in a rat-bearing 9L tumor model. PET imaging studies were performed on rat bearing 9L glioma tumors and transgenic mouse carrying spontaneous generated M/tomND tumor (mammary gland adenocarcinoma). Results New 18F alanine derivatives were prepared with 7–34% uncorrected radiochemical yields, excellent enantiomeric purity (>99%) and good radiochemical purity (>99%). In vitro uptake of the L-[18F]FMA in 9L glioma and PC-3 prostate cancer cells was higher than those observed for other two alanine derivatives and [18F]FDG in first 1 h. Inhibition of cell uptake studies suggested that L-[18F]FMA uptake in 9L glioma was predominantly via transport system ASC. After entering into cells, L-[18F]FMA remained stable and was not incorporated into protein within 2 h. In vivo biodistribution studies demonstrated that L-[18F]FMA had relatively high uptake in liver and kidney. Tumor uptake was fast, reaching a maximum within 30 min. The tumor-to-muscle, tumor-to-blood and tumor-to-brain ratios at 60 min post injection were 2.2, 1.9 and 3.0, respectively. In PET imaging studies, tumors were visualized with L-[18F]FMA in both 9L rat and transgenic mouse. Conclusion L-[18F]FMA showed promising properties as a PET imaging agent for up-regulated ASC transporter associated with tumor

  3. Radiosynthesis and preliminary biological evaluation of a new (18)F-labeled triethylene glycol derivative of triphenylphosphonium.

    PubMed

    Tominaga, Takahiro; Ito, Hiroaki; Ishikawa, Yoichi; Iwata, Ren; Ishiwata, Kiichi; Furumoto, Shozo

    2016-03-01

    Delocalized lipophilic cations such as [(18)F]fluorobenzyltriphenylphosphonium ([(18)F]FBnTP) can accumulate in mitochondria and have been used in myocardial perfusion imaging (MPI). In this study, we established a simplified method for [(18)F]FBnTP synthesis using triphenylphosphine hydrobromide (PPh3 •HBr) without preparing an intermediate that contains benzyl bromide structure. Applying this new method, we synthesized and evaluated a novel (18)F-labeled PEGylated BnTP derivative ([(18)F]FPEGBnTP). In vitro cellular uptake study demonstrated that [(18)F]FPEGBnTP accumulated in cells in proportion to the relative intensity of mitochondrial membrane potential. Biodistribution study revealed that the heart : liver uptake ratio of [(18)F]FPEGBnTP (4.00 at 60 min) was superior to that of [(18)F]FBnTP (1.50 at 60 min). However, [(18)F]FPEGBnTP showed slow blood clearance and high radioactivity uptake in bone at 120-min post-injection. These results imply the possibility of [(18)F]FPEGBnTP being used as a MPI agent. However, there is a need of further structural optimization and flow-dependent uptake study. PMID:26861736

  4. Evaluation of treatment response using integrated 18F-labeled choline positron emission tomography/magnetic resonance imaging in adolescents with intracranial non-germinomatous germ cell tumours.

    PubMed

    Tsouana, Eva; Stoneham, Sara; Fersht, Naomi; Kitchen, Neil; Gaze, Mark; Bomanji, Jamshed; Fraioli, Francesco; Hargrave, Darren; Shankar, Ananth

    2015-09-01

    The efficacy of hybrid 18F-Fluroethyl-Choline (FEC) positron emission tomography (PET)/magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) was investigated as an imaging modality for diagnosis and assessment of treatment response and remission status in four patients with proven or suspected intracranial non-germinomatous germ cell tumours (NGGCT). In two patients faint or absent choline avidity correlated with negative histology, whereas in other two patients, persistent choline avidity in the residual mass was suggestive of presence of viable tumour, subsequently confirmed histologically. We conclude that FEC-PET/MRI may be an effective imaging tool in detecting viable residual tumour in patients with intracranial NGGCT post treatment. PMID:25854508

  5. 18F-Labeling Using Click Cycloadditions

    PubMed Central

    Ross, Tobias L.

    2014-01-01

    Due to expanding applications of positron emission tomography (PET) there is a demand for developing new techniques to introduce fluorine-18 (t1/2 = 109.8 min). Considering that most novel PET tracers are sensitive biomolecules and that direct introduction of fluorine-18 often needs harsh conditions, the insertion of 18F in those molecules poses an exceeding challenge. Two major challenges during 18F-labeling are a regioselective introduction and a fast and high yielding way under mild conditions. Furthermore, attention has to be paid to functionalities, which are usually present in complex structures of the target molecule. The Cu-catalyzed azide-alkyne cycloaddition (CuAAC) and several copper-free click reactions represent such methods for radiolabeling of sensitive molecules under the above-mentioned criteria. This minireview will provide a quick overview about the development of novel 18F-labeled prosthetic groups for click cycloadditions and will summarize recent trends in copper-catalyzed and copper-free click 18F-cycloadditions. PMID:25003110

  6. One-step (18)F labeling of biomolecules using organotrifluoroborates.

    PubMed

    Liu, Zhibo; Lin, Kuo-Shyan; Bénard, François; Pourghiasian, Maral; Kiesewetter, Dale O; Perrin, David M; Chen, Xiaoyuan

    2015-09-01

    Herein we present a general protocol for the functionalization of biomolecules with an organotrifluoroborate moiety so that they can be radiolabeled with aqueous (18)F fluoride ((18)F(-)) and used for positron emission tomography (PET) imaging. Among the β(+)-emitting radionuclides, fluorine-18 ((18)F) is the isotope of choice for PET, and it is produced, on-demand, in many hospitals worldwide. Organotrifluoroborates can be (18)F-labeled in one step in aqueous conditions via (18)F-(19)F isotope exchange. This protocol features a recently designed ammoniomethyltrifluoroborate, and it describes the following: (i) a synthetic strategy that affords modular synthesis of radiolabeling precursors via a copper-catalyzed 'click' reaction; and (ii) a one-step (18)F-labeling method that obviates the need for HPLC purification. Within 30 min, (18)F-labeled PET imaging probes, such as peptides, can be synthesized in good chemical and radiochemical purity (>98%), satisfactory radiochemical yield of 20-35% (n > 20, non-decay corrected) and high specific activity of 40-111 GBq/μmol (1.1-3.0 Ci/μmol). The entire procedure, including the precursor preparation and (18)F radiolabeling, takes 7-10 d. PMID:26313478

  7. (18)F-labeling syntheses and preclinical evaluation of functionalized nanoliposomes for Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Rokka, Johanna; Snellman, Anniina; Kaasalainen, Martti; Salonen, Jarno; Zona, Cristiano; La Ferla, Barbara; Nicotra, Francesco; Re, Francesca; Masserini, Massimo; Forsback, Sarita; Lopez-Picon, Francisco; Rinne, Juha O; Haaparanta-Solin, Merja; Solin, Olof

    2016-06-10

    The aim of the present study was to synthesize functionalized (18)F-labeled NLs ((18)F-NLs) and evaluate their biological behavior in mouse models of Alzheimer's disease (AD) using positron emission tomography (PET) and ex vivo brain autoradiography. (18)F-fluorine was introduced to (18)F-NLs either by using a core forming (18)F-lipid or by encapsulating a (18)F-tracer, (18)F-treg-curcumin inside the NLs. Phosphatidic acid (PA) and curcumin derivative (Curc) functionalized (18)F-NLs with or without additional mApoE functionalization were produced using thin film hydration. The biodistribution and β-amyloid plaque-binding ability of (18)F-NLs were studied in wild type mice and AD mouse models using in vivo PET imaging and ex vivo brain autoradiography at 60min after (18)F-NL injection. Functionalized (18)F-NLs were successfully synthesized. The preclinical evaluation in mice showed that the functional group affected the biodistribution of (18)F-NLs. Further functionalization with mApoE increased the brain-to-blood ratio of (18)F-NLs but the overall brain uptake remained low with all functionalized (18)F-NLs. The liposomal encapsulation of (18)F-treg-curcumin was not successful and preclinical results of encapsulated (18)F-treg-curcumin and plain (18)F-treg-curcumin were identical. Although the studied functionalized (18)F-NLs were not suitable for PET imaging as such, the synthesis techniques introduced in this study can be utilized to modify the biological behavior of (18)F-labeled NLs. PMID:26993963

  8. 18F-Labelled Intermediates for Radiosynthesis by Modular Build-Up Reactions: Newer Developments

    PubMed Central

    Ermert, Johannes

    2014-01-01

    This brief review gives an overview of newer developments in 18F-chemistry with the focus on small 18F-labelled molecules as intermediates for modular build-up syntheses. The short half-life (<2 h) of the radionuclide requires efficient syntheses of these intermediates considering that multistep syntheses are often time consuming and characterized by a loss of yield in each reaction step. Recent examples of improved synthesis of 18F-labelled intermediates show new possibilities for no-carrier-added ring-fluorinated arenes, novel intermediates for tri[18F]fluoromethylation reactions, and 18F-fluorovinylation methods. PMID:25343144

  9. Synthesis and characterization of (18)F-labeled active site inhibited factor VII (ASIS).

    PubMed

    Erlandsson, Maria; Nielsen, Carsten H; Jeppesen, Troels E; Kristensen, Jesper B; Petersen, Lars C; Madsen, Jacob; Kjaer, Andreas

    2015-05-15

    Activated factor VII blocked in the active site with Phe-Phe-Arg-chloromethyl ketone (active site inhibited factor VII (ASIS)) is a 50-kDa protein that binds with high affinity to its receptor, tissue factor (TF). TF is a transmembrane glycoprotein that plays an important role in, for example, thrombosis, metastasis, tumor growth, and tumor angiogenesis. The aim of this study was to develop an (18)F-labeled ASIS derivative to assess TF expression in tumors. Active site inhibited factor VII was labeled using N-succinimidyl-4-[(18)F]fluorobenzoate, and the [(18)F]ASIS was purified on a PD-10 desalting column. The radiochemical yield was 25 ± 6%, the radiochemical purity was >97%, and the pseudospecific radioactivity was 35 ± 9 GBq/µmol. The binding efficacy was evaluated in pull-down experiments, which monitored the binding of unlabeled ASIS and [(18)F]ASIS to TF and to a specific anti-factor VII antibody (F1A2-mAb). No significant difference in binding efficacy between [(18)F]ASIS and ASIS could be detected. Furthermore, [(18)F]ASIS was relatively stable in vitro and in vivo in mice. In conclusion, [(18)F]ASIS has for the first time been successfully synthesized as a possible positron emission tomography tracer to image TF expression levels. In vivo positron emission tomography studies to evaluate the full potential of [(18)F]ASIS are in progress. PMID:25820758

  10. Convergent synthesis and evaluation of 18F-labeled azulenic COX2 probes for cancer imaging

    PubMed Central

    Nolting, Donald D.; Nickels, Michael; Tantawy, Mohammed N.; Yu, James Y. H.; Xie, Jingping; Peterson, Todd E.; Crews, Brenda C.; Marnett, Larry; Gore, John C.; Pham, Wellington

    2013-01-01

    The overall objectives of this research are to (i) develop azulene-based positron emission tomography (PET) probes and (ii) image COX2 as a potential biomarker of breast cancer. Several lines of research have demonstrated that COX2 is overexpressed in breast cancer and that its presence correlates with poor prognoses. While other studies have reported that COX2 inhibition can be modulated and used beneficially as a chemopreventive strategy in cancer, no viable mechanism for achieving that approach has yet been developed. This shortfall could be circumvented through in vivo imaging of COX2 activity, particularly using sensitive imaging techniques such as PET. Toward that goal, our laboratory focuses on the development of novel 18F-labled COX2 probes. We began the synthesis of the probes by transforming tropolone into a lactone, which was subjected to an [8 + 2] cycloaddition reaction to yield 2-methylazulene as the core ring of the probe. After exploring numerous synthetic routes, the final target molecule and precursor PET compounds were prepared successfully using convergent synthesis. Conventional 18F labeling methods caused precursor decomposition, which prompted us to hypothesize that the acidic protons of the methylene moiety between the azulene and thiazole rings were readily abstracted by a strong base such as potassium carbonate. Ultimately, this caused the precursors to disintegrate. This observation was supported after successfully using an 18F labeling strategy that employed a much milder phosphate buffer. The 18F-labeled COX2 probe was tested in a breast cancer xenograft mouse model. The data obtained via successive whole-body PET/CT scans indicated probe accumulation and retention in the tumor. Overall, the probe was stable in vivo and no defluorination was observed. A biodistribution study and Western blot analysis corroborate with the imaging data. In conclusion, this novel COX2 PET probe was shown to be a promising agent for cancer imaging and

  11. Enhanced Aqueous Suzuki–Miyaura Coupling Allows Site-Specific Polypeptide 18F-Labeling

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    The excesses of reagents used in protein chemistry are often incompatible with the reduced or even inverse stoichiometries used for efficient radiolabeling. Analysis and screening of aqueous Pd(0) ligand systems has revealed the importance of a guanidine core and the discovery of 1,1-dimethylguanidine as an enhanced ligand for aqueous Suzuki–Miyaura cross-coupling. This novel Pd catalyst system has now allowed the labeling of small molecules, peptides, and proteins with the fluorine-18 prosthetic [18F]4-fluorophenylboronic acid. These findings now enable site-specific protein 18F-labeling under biologically compatible conditions using a metal-triggered reaction. PMID:23991754

  12. Design, synthesis and evaluation of (18)F-labeled bradykinin B1 receptor-targeting small molecules for PET imaging.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Zhengxing; Kuo, Hsiou-Ting; Lau, Joseph; Jenni, Silvia; Zhang, Chengcheng; Zeisler, Jutta; Bénard, François; Lin, Kuo-Shyan

    2016-08-15

    Two fluorine-18 ((18)F) labeled bradykinin B1 receptor (B1R)-targeting small molecules, (18)F-Z02035 and (18)F-Z02165, were synthesized and evaluated for imaging with positron emission tomography (PET). Z02035 and Z02165 were derived from potent antagonists, and showed high binding affinity (0.93±0.44 and 2.80±0.50nM, respectively) to B1R. (18)F-Z02035 and (18)F-Z02165 were prepared by coupling 2-[(18)F]fluoroethyl tosylate with their respective precursors, and were obtained in 10±5 (n=4) and 22±14% (n=3), respectively, decay-corrected radiochemical yield with >99% radiochemical purity. (18)F-Z02035 and (18)F-Z02165 exhibited moderate lipophilicity (LogD7.4=1.10 and 0.59, respectively), and were stable in mouse plasma. PET imaging and biodistribution studies in mice showed that both tracers enabled visualization of the B1R-positive HEK293T::hB1R tumor xenografts with better contrast than control B1R-negative HEK293T tumors. Our data indicate that small molecule antagonists can be used as pharmacophores for the design of B1R-targeting PET tracers. PMID:27390067

  13. High-yielding aqueous 18F-labeling of peptides via Al18F chelation.

    PubMed

    D'Souza, Christopher A; McBride, William J; Sharkey, Robert M; Todaro, Louis J; Goldenberg, David M

    2011-09-21

    The coordination chemistry of a new pentadentate bifunctional chelator (BFC), NODA-MPAA 1, containing the 1,4,7-triazacyclononane-1,4-diacetate (NODA) motif with a methylphenylacetic acid (MPAA) backbone, and its ability to form stable Al(18)F chelates were investigated. The organofluoroaluminates were easily accessible from the reaction of 1 and AlF(3). X-ray diffraction studies revealed aluminum at the center of a slightly distorted octahedron, with fluorine occupying one of the axial positions. The tert-butyl protected prochelator 7, which can be synthesized in one step, is useful for coupling to biomolecules on solid phase or in solution. High yield (55-89%) aqueous (18)F-labeling was achieved in 10-15 min with a tumor-targeting peptide 4 covalently linked to 1. Defluorination was not observed for at least 4 h in human serum at 37 °C. These results demonstrate the facile application of Al(18)F chelation using BFC 1 as a versatile labeling method for radiofluorinating other heat-stable peptides for positron emission imaging. PMID:21805975

  14. sup 18 F-labeled insulin: A prosthetic group methodology for incorporation of a positron emitter into peptides and proteins

    SciTech Connect

    Shai, Y.; Kirk, K.L.; Channing, M.A.; Dunn, B.B.; Lesniak, M.A.; Eastman, R.C.; Finn, R.D.; Roth, J.; Jacobson, K.A. )

    1989-05-30

    In the present study we synthesize {sup 18}F-labeled insulin of high specific radioactivity. A new prosthetic group methodology, in which ({sup 18}F)fluoride displaces a bromide group of 4-(bromomethyl)-benzoylamine intermediates, was used. The 4-(fluoromethyl)benzoyl product was chemically stable. {sup 18}F-Labeled insulin retains the essential biological properties of native insulin, as measured in vitro by binding to insulin receptors on human cells and stimulation of glucose metabolism in rat adipocytes. The overall process can be carried out speedily to yield a product of sufficient purity to permit in vivo studies. The method appears to be applicable to a wide variety of peptides.

  15. Synthesis and pre-clinical evaluation of an 18F-labeled single-chain antibody fragment for PET imaging of epithelial ovarian cancer

    PubMed Central

    Sharma, Sai Kiran; Wuest, Melinda; Way, Jenilee D; Bouvet, Vincent R; Wang, Monica; Wuest, Frank R

    2016-01-01

    Anti-CA125 antibodies have been used in immunoassays to quantify levels of shed antigen in the serum of patients who are under surveillance for epithelial ovarian cancer (EOC). However, there is currently no molecular imaging probe in the clinic for the assessment of CA125 expression in vivo. The present study describes the development of an 18F-labeled single-chain variable fragment (scFv) for PET imaging of CA125 in preclinical EOC models. Anti-CA125 scFv was derived from MAb-B43.13 by recombinant expression of the fragment in E.coli. Fragment scFv-B43.13 was purified via immobilized metal affinity chromatography and characterized for antigen binding via immuno-staining and flow cytometry. Prosthetic group N-succinimidyl 4-[18F]fluorobenzoate ([18F]SFB) was used for radiolabeling of scFv-B43.13. Preclinical ovarian cancer models were developed based on ovarian cancer cell lines OVCAR3 (CA125-positive) and SKOV3 (CA125-negative) in NIH-III mice. The radiopharmacological profile of 18F-labeled scFv-B43.13 ([18F]FBz-scFv-B43.13) was studied with PET. [18F]FBz-scFv-B43.13 was prepared in radiochemical yields of 3.7 ± 1.8% (n = 5) at an effective specific activity of 3.88 ± 0.76 GBq/µmol (n = 5). The radiotracer demonstrated selective uptake in CA125-positive OVCAR3 cells and virtually no uptake in CA125-negative SKOV3 cells. Standardized uptake values (SUV) of radioactivity uptake in OVCAR3 tumors was 0.5 (n = 3) and 0.3 (n = 2) in SKOV3 tumors after 60 min post injection (p.i.). PMID:27508105

  16. Synthesis and pre-clinical evaluation of an (18)F-labeled single-chain antibody fragment for PET imaging of epithelial ovarian cancer.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Sai Kiran; Wuest, Melinda; Way, Jenilee D; Bouvet, Vincent R; Wang, Monica; Wuest, Frank R

    2016-01-01

    Anti-CA125 antibodies have been used in immunoassays to quantify levels of shed antigen in the serum of patients who are under surveillance for epithelial ovarian cancer (EOC). However, there is currently no molecular imaging probe in the clinic for the assessment of CA125 expression in vivo. The present study describes the development of an (18)F-labeled single-chain variable fragment (scFv) for PET imaging of CA125 in preclinical EOC models. Anti-CA125 scFv was derived from MAb-B43.13 by recombinant expression of the fragment in E.coli. Fragment scFv-B43.13 was purified via immobilized metal affinity chromatography and characterized for antigen binding via immuno-staining and flow cytometry. Prosthetic group N-succinimidyl 4-[(18)F]fluorobenzoate ([(18)F]SFB) was used for radiolabeling of scFv-B43.13. Preclinical ovarian cancer models were developed based on ovarian cancer cell lines OVCAR3 (CA125-positive) and SKOV3 (CA125-negative) in NIH-III mice. The radiopharmacological profile of (18)F-labeled scFv-B43.13 ([(18)F]FBz-scFv-B43.13) was studied with PET. [(18)F]FBz-scFv-B43.13 was prepared in radiochemical yields of 3.7 ± 1.8% (n = 5) at an effective specific activity of 3.88 ± 0.76 GBq/µmol (n = 5). The radiotracer demonstrated selective uptake in CA125-positive OVCAR3 cells and virtually no uptake in CA125-negative SKOV3 cells. Standardized uptake values (SUV) of radioactivity uptake in OVCAR3 tumors was 0.5 (n = 3) and 0.3 (n = 2) in SKOV3 tumors after 60 min post injection (p.i.). PMID:27508105

  17. Synthesis and Evaluation of 4-[18F]Fluoropropoxy-3-iodobenzylguanidine ([18F]FPOIBG): A Novel 18F-labeled Analogue of MIBG

    PubMed Central

    Vaidyanathan, Ganesan; McDougald, Darryl; Koumarianou, Eftychia; Choi, Jaeyeon; Hens, Marc; Zalutsky, Michael R.

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Radioiodinated meta-iodobenzylguanidine (MIBG), a norepinephrine transporter (NET) substrate, has been extensively used as an imaging agent to study the pathophysiology of the heart and for the diagnosis and treatment of neuroendocrine tumors. The goal of this study was to develop an 18F-labeled analogue of MIBG that like MIBG itself could be synthesized in a single radiochemical step. Towards this end, we designed 4-fluoropropoxy-3-iodobenzylguanidine (FPOIBG). Methods Standards of FPOIBG and 4-fluoropropoxy-3-bromobenzylguanidine (FPOBBG) as well as their tosylate precursors for labeling with 18F, and a tin precursor for the preparation of radioiodinated FPOIBG were synthesized. Radiolabeled derivatives were synthesized by nucleophilic substitution and electrophilic iododestannylation from the corresponding precursors. Labeled compounds were evaluated for NET transporter recognition in in vitro assays using three NET-expressing cell lines and in biodistribution experiments in normal mice, with all studies performed in a paired-label format. Competitive inhibition of [125I]MIBG uptake by unlabeled benzylguanidine compounds was performed in UVW-NAT cell line to determine IC50 values. Results [18F]FPOIBG was synthesized from the corresponding tosylate precursor in 5.2 ± 0.5% (n = 6) overall radiochemical yields starting with aqueous fluoride in about 105 min. In a paired-label in vitro assay, the uptake of [18F]FPOIBG at 2 h was 10.2 ± 1.5%, 39.6 ± 13.4%, and 13.3 ± 2.5%, in NET-expressing SK-N-SH, UVW-NAT, and SK-N-BE(2c) cells, respectively, while these values for [125I]MIBG were 57.3 ± 8.1%, 82.7 ± 8.9%, and 66.3 ± 3.6%. The specificity of uptake of both tracers was demonstrated by blocking with desipramine. The 125I-labeled congener of FPOIBG gave similar results. On the other hand, [18F]FPOBBG, a compound recently reported in the literature, demonstrated much higher uptake, albeit less than that of co-incubated [125I]MIBG. IC50 values for

  18. Radiosynthesis and evaluation of an 18F-labeled positron emission tomography (PET) radioligand for metabotropic glutamate receptor subtype 4 (mGlu4).

    PubMed

    Kil, Kun-Eek; Poutiainen, Pekka; Zhang, Zhaoda; Zhu, Aijun; Choi, Ji-Kyung; Jokivarsi, Kimmo; Brownell, Anna-Liisa

    2014-11-13

    Four 4-phthalimide derivatives of N-(3-chlorophenyl)-2-picolinamide were synthesized as potential ligands for the PET imaging of mGlu4 in the brain. Of these compounds, N-(3-chloro-4-(4-fluoro-1,3-dioxoisoindolin-2-yl)phenyl)-2-picolinamide (3, KALB001) exhibited improved binding affinity (IC50 = 5.1 nM) compared with ML128 (1) and was subsequently labeled with (18)F. When finally formulated in 0.1 M citrate buffer (pH 4) with 10% ethanol, the specific activity of [(18)F]3 at the end of synthesis (EOS) was 233.5 ± 177.8 GBq/μmol (n = 4). The radiochemical yield of [(18)F]3 was 16.4 ± 4.8% (n = 4), and the purity was over 98%. In vivo imaging studies in a monkey showed that the radiotracer quickly penetrated the brain with the highest accumulation in the brain areas known to express mGlu4. Despite some unfavorable radiotracer properties like fast washout in rodent studies, [(18)F]3 is the first (18)F-labeled mGlu4 radioligand, which can be further modified to improve pharmacokinetics and brain penetrability for future human studies. PMID:25330258

  19. An improved strategy for the synthesis of [18F]-labeled arabinofuranosyl nuclosides

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Hanwen; Cantorias, Melchor V.; Pillarsetty, NagaVaraKishore; Burnazi, Eva M.; Cai, Shangde; Lewis, Jason S.

    2012-01-01

    The expression of the herpes simplex virus type-1 thymidine kinase (HSV1-tk) gene can be imaged efficaciously using a variety of 2′-[18F]fluoro-2′-deoxy-1-b-D-arabinofuranosyl-uracil derivatives [[18F]-FXAU, X= I(iodo), E(ethyl), and M(methyl)]. However, the application of these derivatives in clinical and translational studies has been impeded by their complicated and long syntheses (3–5 h). To remedy these issues, in the study at hand we have investigated whether microwave or combined catalysts could facilitate the coupling reaction between sugar and nucleobase and, further, have probed the feasibility of establishing a novel approach for [18F]-FXAU synthesis. We have demonstrated that the rate of the trimethylsilyl trifluoromethanesulfonate (TMSOTf)-catalyzed coupling reaction between the 2-deoxy-sugar and uracil derivatives at 90°C can be significantly accelerated by microwave-driven heating or by the addition of Lewis acid catalyst (SnCl4). Further, we have observed that the stability of the α- and β-anomers of [18F]-FXAU derivatives differs during the hydrolysis step. Using the microwave-driven heating approach, overall decay-corrected radiochemical yields of 19–27% were achieved for [18F]-FXAU in 120 min at a specific activity of >22 MBq/nmol (595 Ci/mmol). Ultimately, we believe that these high yielding syntheses of [18F]-FIAU, [18F]-FMAU and [18F]-FEAU will facilitate routine production for clinical applications. PMID:22819195

  20. Comparison of two site-specifically (18)F-labeled affibodies for PET imaging of EGFR positive tumors.

    PubMed

    Su, Xinhui; Cheng, Kai; Jeon, Jongho; Shen, Bin; Venturin, Gianina Teribele; Hu, Xiang; Rao, Jianghong; Chin, Frederick T; Wu, Hua; Cheng, Zhen

    2014-11-01

    The epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) serves as an attractive target for cancer molecular imaging and therapy. Our previous positron emission tomography (PET) studies showed that the EGFR-targeting affibody molecules (64)Cu-DOTA-ZEGFR:1907 and (18)F-FBEM-ZEGFR:1907 can discriminate between high and low EGFR-expression tumors and have the potential for patient selection for EGFR-targeted therapy. Compared with (64)Cu, (18)F may improve imaging of EGFR-expression and is more suitable for clinical application, but the labeling reaction of (18)F-FBEM-ZEGFR:1907 requires a long synthesis time. The aim of the present study is to develop a new generation of (18)F labeled affibody probes (Al(18)F-NOTA-ZEGFR:1907 and (18)F-CBT-ZEGFR:1907) and to determine whether they are suitable agents for imaging of EGFR expression. The first approach consisted of conjugating ZEGFR:1907 with NOTA and radiolabeling with Al(18)F to produce Al(18)F-NOTA-ZEGFR:1907. In a second approach the prosthetic group (18)F-labeled-2-cyanobenzothiazole ((18)F-CBT) was conjugated to Cys-ZEGFR:1907 to produce (18)F-CBT-ZEGFR:1907. Binding affinity and specificity of Al(18)F-NOTA-ZEGFR:1907 and (18)F-CBT-ZEGFR:1907 to EGFR were evaluated using A431 cells. Biodistribution and PET studies were conducted on mice bearing A431 xenografts after injection of Al(18)F-NOTA-ZEGFR:1907 or (18)F-CBT-ZEGFR:1907 with or without coinjection of unlabeled affibody proteins. The radiosyntheses of Al(18)F-NOTA-ZEGFR:1907 and (18)F-CBT-ZEGFR:1907 were completed successfully within 40 and 120 min with a decay-corrected yield of 15% and 41% using a 2-step, 1-pot reaction and 2-step, 2-pot reaction, respectively. Both probes bound to EGFR with low nanomolar affinity in A431 cells. Although (18)F-CBT-ZEGFR:1907 showed instability in vivo, biodistribution studies revealed rapid and high tumor accumulation and quick clearance from normal tissues except the bones. In contrast, Al(18)F-NOTA-ZEGFR:1907 demonstrated high in

  1. Imaging integrin alpha-v-beta-3 expression in tumors with an 18F-labeled dimeric RGD peptide

    PubMed Central

    Dijkgraaf, Ingrid; Terry, Samantha; McBride, William J.; Goldenberg, David M.; Laverman, Peter; Franssen, Gerben M.; Oyen, Wim J. G.; Boerman, Otto C.

    2014-01-01

    Integrin αvβ3 receptors are expressed on activated endothelial cells during neovascularization to maintain tumor growth. Many radiolabeled probes utilize the tight and specific association between the arginine-glycine-aspartatic acid (RGD) peptide and integrin αvβ3, but one main obstacle for any clinical application of these probes is the laborious multistep radiosynthesis of 18F. In this study, the dimeric RGD peptide, E-[c(RGDfK)]2, was conjugated with NODAGA and radiolabeled with 18F in a simple one-pot process with a radiolabeling yield of 20%; the whole process lasting only 45 min. NODAGA-E-[c(RGDfK)]2 labeled with 18F at a specific activity of 1.8 MBq/nmol and a radiochemical purity of 100% could be achieved. Log P value of 18F-labeled NODAGA-E-[c(RGDfK)]2 was −4.26 ± 0.02. In biodistribution studies, 18F-NODAGA-E-[c(RGDfK)]2 cleared rapidly from the blood with 0.03 ± 0.01 %ID/g in the blood at 2 h p.i., mainly via the kidneys and showed good in vivo stability. Tumor uptake of 18F-NODAGA-E-[c(RGDfK)]2 (3.44 ± 0.20 %ID/g, 2 h p.i.) was significantly lower than that of reference compounds 68Ga-labeled NODAGA-E-[c(RGDfK)]2 (6.26 ± 0.76 %ID/g; P <0.001) and 111In-labeled NODAGA-E-[c(RGDfK)]2 (4.99 ± 0.64 %ID/g; P < 0.01). Co-injection of an excess of unlabeled NODAGA-E-[c(RGDfK)]2 along with 18F-NODAGA-E-[c(RGDfK)]2 resulted in significantly reduced radioactivity concentrations in the tumor (0.85 ± 0.13 %ID/g). The αvβ3 integrin-expressing SK-RC-52 tumor could be successfully visualized by microPET with 18F-labeled NODAGA-E-[c(RGDfK)]2. In conclusion, NODAGA-E-[c(RGDfK)]2 could be labeled rapidly with 18F using a direct aqueous, one-pot method and it accumulated specifically in αvβ3 integrin-expressing SK-RC-52 tumors, allowing for visualization by microPET. PMID:23606427

  2. Efficient 18F-Labeling of Large 37-Amino Acid pHLIP Peptide Analogues and their Biological Evaluation

    PubMed Central

    Daumar, Pierre; Wanger-Baumann, Cindy A.; Pillarsetty, NagaVaraKishore; Fabrizio, Laura; Carlin, Sean D.; Andreev, Oleg A.; Reshetnyak, Yana K.; Lewis, Jason S.

    2012-01-01

    Solid tumors often develop an acidic microenvironment, which plays a critical role in tumor progression and is associated with increased level of invasion and metastasis. The 37-residue pH (low) insertion peptide (pHLIP®) is under study as an imaging platform because of its unique ability to insert into cell membranes at a low extracellular pH (pHe<7). Labeling of peptides with [18F]-fluorine is usually performed via prosthetic groups using chemoselective coupling reactions. One of the most successful procedures involves the alkyne-azide copper(I) catalyzed cycloaddition (CuAAC). However, none of the known “click” methods have been applied to peptides as large as pHLIP. We designed a novel prosthetic group and extended the use of the CuAAC “click chemistry” for the simple and efficient 18F-labeling of large peptides. For the evaluation of this labeling approach, a D-amino acid analogue of WT-pHLIP and a L-amino acid control peptide K-pHLIP, both functionalized at the N-terminus with 6-azidohexanoic acid, were used. The novel 6-[18F]fluoro-2-ethynylpyridine prosthetic group, was obtained via nucleophilic substitution on the corresponding bromo-precursor after 10 min at 130 °C with a radiochemical yield of 27.5 ± 6.6% (decay corrected) with high radiochemical purity ≥ 98%. The subsequent CuI catalyzed “click” reaction with the azido functionalized pHLIP peptides was quantitative within 5 min at 70 °C in a mixture of water and ethanol using Cu-acetate and sodium L-ascorbate. [18F]-D-WT-pHLIP and [18F]-L-K-pHLIP were obtained with total radiochemical yields of 5–20% after HPLC purification. The total reaction time was only 85 min including formulation. In vitro stability tests revealed high stability of the [18F]-D-WT-pHLIP in human and mouse plasma after 120 min, with the parent tracer remaining intact at 65 and 85%, respectively. PET imaging and biodistribution studies in LNCaP and PC-3 xenografted mice with the [18F]-D-WT-pHLIP and the negative

  3. Synthesis and evaluation of 18F labeled FET prodrugs for tumor imaging

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Limin; Lieberman, Brian P.; Ploessl, Karl; Kung, Hank F.

    2013-01-01

    Introduction O-(2-[18F]fluoroethyl)-L-tyrosine (FET, [18F]1) is a useful amino-acid-based imaging agent for brain tumors. This paper reports the synthesis and evaluation of three FET prodrugs, O-(2-[18F]fluoroethyl)-L-tyrosyl-L-glycine (FET-Gly, [18F]2), O-(2-[18F]fluoroethyl)-L-tyrosyl-L-alanine (FET-Ala, [18F]3) and N-acetyl O-(2-[18F]fluoroethyl)-L-tyrosine (AcFET, [18F]4), which could be readily hydrolyzed to FET in vivo for tumor imaging. We investigated their metabolism in the blood and imaging properties in comparison to FET ([18F]1). Methods Three new [18F]FET derivatives, 2 – 4, were prepared from their corresponding tosylate-precursors through nucleophilic fluorination and subsequent deprotection reactions. In vitro uptake studies were carried out in 9L glioma cancer cell lines. In vitro and in vivo hydrolysis studies were conducted to evaluate the hydrolysis of FET prodrugs in blood and in Fisher 344 rats. Biodistribution and PET imaging studies were then performed in rats bearing 9L tumors. Results New FET prodrugs were prepared with 3 – 28 % decay corrected radiochemical yields, good enantiomeric purity (> 95 %) and high radiochemical purity (> 95 %). FET-Gly ([18F]2), FET-Ala ([18F]3), and AcFET ([18F]4) exhibited negligible uptake in comparison to the high uptake of FET ([18F]1) in 9L cells. Metabolism studies of FET-Gly ([18F]2), FET-Ala ([18F]3), and AcFET ([18F]4) in rat and human blood showed that FET-Ala ([18F]3) was hydrolyzed to FET ([18F]1) faster than FET-Gly ([18F]2) or AcFET ([18F]4). Most of the FET-Ala (79 %) was converted to FET ([18F]1) within 5 min in blood in vivo. Biodistribution studies demonstrated that FET-Ala ([18F]3) displayed the highest tumor uptake. The tumor-to-background ratios of FET-Ala ([18F]3) and FET ([18F]1) were comparable and appeared to be better than those of FET-Gly ([18F]2) and AcFET ([18F]4). PET imaging studies showed that both FET ([18F]1) and FET-Ala ([18F]3) could visualize tumors effectively, and that

  4. Functional analysis of [methyl-(3)H]choline uptake in glioblastoma cells: Influence of anti-cancer and central nervous system drugs.

    PubMed

    Taguchi, Chiaki; Inazu, Masato; Saiki, Iwao; Yara, Miki; Hara, Naomi; Yamanaka, Tsuyoshi; Uchino, Hiroyuki

    2014-04-01

    Positron emission tomography (PET) and PET/computed tomography (PET-CT) studies with (11)C- or (18)F-labeled choline derivatives are used for PET imaging in glioblastoma patients. However, the nature of the choline transport system in glioblastoma is poorly understood. In this study, we performed a functional characterization of [methyl-(3)H]choline uptake and sought to identify the transporters that mediate choline uptake in the human glioblastoma cell lines A-172 and U-251MG. In addition, we examined the influence of anti-cancer drugs and central nervous system drugs on the transport of [methyl-(3)H]choline. High- and low-affinity choline transport systems were present in A-172 cells, U-251MG cells and astrocytes, and these were Na(+)-independent and pH-dependent. Cell viability in A-172 cells was not affected by choline deficiency. However, cell viability in U-251MG cells was significantly inhibited by choline deficiency. Both A-172 and U-251MG cells have two different choline transporters, choline transporter-like protein 1 (CTL1) and CTL2. In A-172 cells, CTL1 is predominantly expressed, whereas in U-251MG cells, CTL2 is predominantly expressed. Treatment with anti-cancer drugs such as cisplatin, etoposide and vincristine influenced [methyl-(3)H]choline uptake in U-251MG cells, but not A-172 cells. Central nervous system drugs such as imipramine, fluvoxamine, paroxetine, reboxetine, citalopram and donepezil did not affect cell viability or [methyl-(3)H]choline uptake. The data presented here suggest that CTL1 and CTL2 are functionally expressed in A-172 and U-251MG cells and are responsible for [methyl-(3)H]choline uptake that relies on a directed H(+) gradient as a driving force. Furthermore, while anti-cancer drugs altered [methyl-(3)H]choline uptake, central nervous system drugs did not affect [methyl-(3)H]choline uptake. PMID:24530235

  5. Synthesis and evaluation of 18F-labeled ATP competitive inhibitors of topoisomerase II as probes for imaging topoisomerase II expression

    PubMed Central

    Daumar, Pierre; Zeglis, Brian M.; Ramos, Nicholas; Divilov, Vadim; Sevak, Kuntal Kumar; Pillarsetty, NagaVaraKishore; Lewis, Jason S.

    2015-01-01

    Type II topoisomerase (Topo-II) is an ATP-dependent enzyme that is essential in the transcription, replication, and chromosome segregation processes and, as such, represents an attractive target for cancer therapy. Numerous studies indicate that the response to treatment with Topo-II inhibitors is highly dependent on both the levels and the activity of the enzyme. Consequently, a non-invasive assay to measure tumoral Topo-II levels has the potential to differentiate responders from non-responders. With the ultimate goal of developing a radiofluorinated tracer for positron emission tomography (PET) imaging, we have designed, synthesized, and evaluated a set of fluorinated compounds based on the structure of the ATP-competitive Topo-II inhibitor QAP1. Compounds 18 and 19b showed inhibition of Topo-II in in vitro assays and exhibited moderate, Topo-II level dependent cytotoxicity in SK-BR-3 and MCF-7 cell lines. Based on these results, 18F-labeled analogs of these two compounds were synthesized and evaluated as PET probes for imaging Topo-II overexpression in mice bearing SK-BR-3 xenografts. [18F]-18 and [18F]-19b were synthesized from their corresponding protected tosylated derivatives by fluorination and subsequent deprotection. Small animal PET imaging studies indicated that both compounds do not accumulate in tumors and exhibit poor pharmacokinetics, clearing from the blood pool very rapidly and getting metabolized over. The insights gained from the current study will surely aid in the design and construction of future generations of PET agents for the non-invasive delineation of Topo-II expression. PMID:25240701

  6. Synthesis of a Potent Aminopyridine-Based nNOS-Inhibitor by Two Recent No-Carrier-Added (18)F-Labelling Methods.

    PubMed

    Drerup, Christian; Ermert, Johannes; Coenen, Heinz H

    2016-01-01

    Nitric oxide (NO), an important multifunctional signaling molecule, is produced by three isoforms of NO-synthase (NOS) and has been associated with neurodegenerative disorders. Selective inhibitors of the subtypes iNOS (inducible) or nNOS (neuronal) are of great interest for decoding neurodestructive key factors, and (18)F-labelled analogues would allow investigating the NOS-function by molecular imaging with positron emission tomography. Especially, the highly selective nNOS inhibitor 6-((3-((3-fluorophenethylamino)methyl)phenoxy)methyl)-4-methylpyridin-2-amine (10) lends itself as suitable compound to be (18)F-labelled in no-carrier-added (n.c.a.) form. For preparation of the (18)F-labelled nNOS-Inhibitor [(18)F]10 a "build-up" radiosynthesis was developed based on a corresponding iodonium ylide as labelling precursor. The such activated phenethyl group of the compound was efficiently and regioselectively labelled with n.c.a. [(18)F]fluoride in 79% radiochemical yield (RCY). After conversion by reductive amination and microwave assisted displacement of the protecting groups, the desired nNOS-inhibitor was obtained in about 15% total RCY. Alternatively, for a simplified "late-stage" (18)F-labelling procedure a corresponding boronic ester precursor was synthesized and successfully used in a newer, copper(II) mediated n.c.a. (18)F-fluoro-deboroniation reaction, achieving the same total RCY. Thus, both methods proved comparatively suited to provide the highly selective NOS-inhibitor [(18)F]10 as probe for preclinical in vivo studies. PMID:27598109

  7. A high-affinity [18F]-labeled phosphoramidate peptidomimetic PSMA-targeted inhibitor for PET imaging of prostate cancer

    PubMed Central

    Ganguly, Tanushree; Dannoon, Shorouk; Hopkins, Mark R.; Murphy, Stephanie; Cahaya, Hendry; Blecha, Joseph E.; Jivan, Salma; Drake, Christopher R.; Barinka, Cyril; Jones, Ella F.; VanBrocklin, Henry F.; Berkman, Clifford E.

    2015-01-01

    Introduction In this study, a structurally modified phosphoramidate scaffold, with improved prostate-specific membrane antigen (PSMA) avidity, stability and in vivo characteristics, as a PET imaging agent for prostate cancer (PCa), was prepared and evaluated. Methods p-Fluorobenzoyl-aminohexanoate and 2-(3-hydroxypropyl)glycine were introduced into the PSMA-targeting scaffold yielding phosphoramidate 5. X-ray crystallography was performed on the PSMA/5 complex. [18F]5 was synthesized, and cell uptake and internalization studies were conducted in PSMA(+) LNCaP and CWR22Rv1 cells and PSMA(−) PC-3 cells. In vivo PET imaging and biodistribution studies were performed at 1 and 4 h post injection in mice bearing CWR22Rv1 tumor, with or without blocking agent. Results The crystallographic data showed interaction of the p-fluorobenzoyl group with an arene-binding cleft on the PSMA surface. In vitro studies revealed elevated uptake of [18F]5 in PSMA(+) cells (2.2% in CWR22Rv1 and 12.1% in LNCaP) compared to PSMA(−) cells (0.08%) at 4 h. In vivo tumor uptake of 2.33% ID/g and tumor-to-blood ratio of 265:1 was observed at 4 h. Conclusions We have successfully synthesized, radiolabeled and evaluated a new PSMA-targeted PET agent. The crystal structure of the PSMA/5 complex highlighted the interactions within the arene-binding cleft contributing to the overall complex stability. The high target uptake and rapid non-target clearance exhibited by [18F]5 in PSMA(+) xenografts substantiates its potential use for PET imaging of PCa. Advances in Knowledge The only FDA-approved imaging agent for PCa, Prostascint®, targets PSMA but suffers from inherent shortcomings. The data acquired in this manuscript confirmed that our new generation of [18F]-labeled PSMA inhibitor exhibited promising in vivo performance as a PET imaging agent for PCa and is well-positioned for subsequent clinical trials. Implications for Patient Care Our preliminary data demonstrate that this tracer possesses

  8. Energy for Wild-Type Acetylcholine Receptor Channel Gating from Different Choline Derivatives

    PubMed Central

    Bruhova, Iva; Gregg, Timothy; Auerbach, Anthony

    2013-01-01

    Agonists, including the neurotransmitter acetylcholine (ACh), bind at two sites in the neuromuscular ACh receptor channel (AChR) to promote a reversible, global change in protein conformation that regulates the flow of ions across the muscle cell membrane. In the synaptic cleft, ACh is hydrolyzed to acetate and choline. Replacement of the transmitter’s ester acetyl group with a hydroxyl (ACh→choline) results in a +1.8 kcal/mol reduction in the energy for gating generated by each agonist molecule from a low- to high-affinity change of the transmitter binding site (ΔGB). To understand the distinct actions of structurally related agonist molecules, we measured ΔGB for 10 related choline derivatives. Replacing the hydroxyl group of choline with different substituents, such as hydrogen, chloride, methyl, or amine, increased the energy for gating (i.e., it made ΔGB more negative relative to choline). Extending the ethyl hydroxide tail of choline to propyl and butyl hydroxide also increased this energy. Our findings reveal the amount of energy that is available for the AChR conformational change provided by different, structurally related agonists. We speculate that a hydrogen bond between the choline hydroxyl and the backbone carbonyl of αW149 positions this agonist’s quaternary ammonium group so as to reduce the cation-π interaction between this moiety and the aromatic groups at the binding site. PMID:23442907

  9. Synthesis of acetylcholine from choline derived from phosphatidylcholine in a human neuronal cell line

    SciTech Connect

    Blusztajn, J.K.; Liscovitch, M.; Richardson, U.I.

    1987-08-01

    Cholinergic neurons are unique among cells since they alone utilize choline not only as a component of major membrane phospholipids, such as phosphatidylcholine (Ptd-Cho), but also as a precursor of their neurotransmitter acetylcholine (AcCho). It has been hypothesized that choline-phospholipids might serve as a storage pool of choline for AcCho synthesis. The selective vulnerability of cholinergic neurons in certain neurodegenerative diseases (e.g., Alzheimer disease, motor neuron disorders) might result from the abnormally accelerated liberation of choline (to be used a precursor of AcCho) from membrane phospholipids, resulting in altered membrane composition and function and compromised neuronal viability. However, the proposed metabolic link between membrane turnover and AcCho synthesis has been difficult to demonstrate because of the heterogeneity of the preparations used. Here the authors used a population of purely cholinergic cells (human neuroblastomas, LA-N-2), incubated in the presence of (methyl-/sup 3/H)methionine to selectively label PtdCho synthesized by methylation of phosphatidylethanolamine, the only pathway of de novo choline synthesis. Three peaks of radioactive material that cochromatographed with authentic AcCho, choline, and phosphocholine were observed when the water-soluble metabolites of the (/sup 3/H)PtdCho were purified by high-performance liquid chromatography. The results demonstrate that AcCho can be synthesized from choline derived from the degradation of endogenous PtdCho formed de novo by methylation of phosphatidylethanolamine.

  10. Preparation of 18F-labeled peptides using the copper(I)-catalyzed azide-alkyne 1,3-dipolar cycloaddition.

    PubMed

    Gill, Herman S; Marik, Jan

    2011-11-01

    An optimized procedure for preparing fluorine-18 ((18)F)-labeled peptides by the copper-catalyzed azide-alkyne 1,3-dipolar cyloaddition (CuAAC) is presented here. The two-step radiosynthesis begins with the microwave-assisted nucleophilic (18)F-fluorination of a precursor containing a terminal p-toluenesulfonyl, terminal azide and polyethylene glycol backbone. The resulting (18)F-fluorinated azide-containing building block is coupled to an alkyne-decorated peptide by the CuAAC. The reaction is accelerated by the copper(I)-stabilizing ligand bathophenanthroline disulfonate and can be performed in either reducing or nonreducing conditions (e.g., to preserve disulfide bonds). After an HPLC purification, (18)F-labeled peptide can be obtained with a 31 ± 6% radiochemical yield (n = 4, decay-corrected from (18)F-fluoride elution) and a specific activity of 39.0 ± 12.4 Ci μmol(-1) within 77 ± 4 min. PMID:22011654

  11. Synthesis and Bio-Evaluation of New (18) F-Labeled Pyridaben Analogs with Improved Stability for Myocardial Perfusion Imaging in Mice.

    PubMed

    Mou, Tiantian; Zhao, Zuoquan; Zhang, Pu; Fang, Wei; Peng, Cheng; Lu, Jie; Wang, Qian; Ma, Yunchuan; Zhang, Xianzhong

    2015-09-01

    To improve the stability of (18) F-labeled pyridaben analogs for myocardial perfusion imaging, three new analogs of pyridaben ([(18) F]FPTP2, [(18) F]FPTP-P2, and [(18) F]FPTP-P3) were synthesized with 'side chain' modifications. The radiolabeled tracers and corresponding non-radioactive compounds were obtained by substituting tosyl group with (18/19) F. The effect of structure modification on myocardial targeting and physicochemical properties of new tracers were evaluated in vitro and in vivo. The total radiosynthesis time of these tracers was approximately 70-90 min with high decay-corrected radiochemical yields (36-65%) and good radiochemical purity (> 98%). These lipophilic tracers exhibited obvious improved stability in water. Studies of their biodistribution in normal Kunming mice demonstrated that [(18) F]FPTP2 exhibited very high initial heart uptake (39.70 ± 2.81 %ID/g at 2 min after injection) and low background in the liver, blood, and soft tissues. The heart-to-liver, heart-to-lung, and heart-to-blood ratios were 3.59, 19.34, and 67.34 at 15 min postinjection, respectively. Favorable myocardial targeting property and remarkable improvement of stability of [(18) F]FPTP2 suggest that the substitution of the phenyl 'sidechain' with other non-phenyl rings has no effect on the myocardial targeting property of (18) F-labeled pyridaben analogs. PMID:25529021

  12. In vivo biodistribution of two [18F]-labelled muscarinic cholinergic receptor ligands: 2-[18F]- and 4-[18F]-fluorodexetimide.

    PubMed

    Wilson, A A; Scheffel, U A; Dannals, R F; Stathis, M; Ravert, H T; Wagner, H N

    1991-01-01

    Two [18F]-labelled analogues of the potent muscarinic cholinergic receptor (m-AChR) antagonist, dexetimide, were evaluated as potential ligands for imaging m-AChR by positron emission tomography (PET). Intravenous administration of both 2-[18F]- or 4-[18F]-fluorodexetimide resulted in high brain uptake of radioactivity in mice. High binding levels were observed in m-AChR rich areas, such as cortex and striatum, with low levels in the receptor-poor cerebellum. Uptake of radioactivity was saturable and could be blocked by pre-administration of dexetimide or atropine. Drugs with different sites of action were ineffective at blocking receptor binding. The results indicate that both radiotracers are promising candidates for use in PET studies. PMID:2008155

  13. Dosimetry of 18F-Labeled Tyrosine Kinase Inhibitor SKI-249380, a Dasatinib-Tracer for PET Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Dunphy, Mark P. S.; Zanzonico, Pat; Veach, Darren; Somwar, Romel; Pillarsetty, Nagavarakishore; Lewis, Jason; Larson, Steven

    2011-01-01

    Purpose To obtain estimates of human normal-organ radiation doses of 18F-SKI-249380, as a prerequisite step towards first-in-human trial. 18F-SKI-249380 is a first-of-its-kind PET tracer for imaging the in vivo pharmacokinetics of dasatinib, an investigational targeted therapy for solid malignancies. Procedures Isoflurane-anesthetized mice received tracer dose via tail vein. Organ time-integrated activity coefficients, fractional urinary and hepatobiliary excretion, and total-body clearance kinetics were derived from PET data, with allometric extrapolation to the Standard Man anatomic model and normal-organ-absorbed dose calculations using OLINDA/EXM software. Results The human effective dose was 0.031 mSv/MBq. The critical organ was the upper large intestine, with a dose equivalent of 0.25 mSv/MBq. A 190-MBq administered activity of 18F-SKI-249380 is thus predicted to expose an adult human to radiation doses generally comparable to those of routinely used diagnostic radiopharmaceuticals. Conclusions Animal-based human dose estimates support first-in-human testing of 18F-SKI-249380. PMID:21161687

  14. Synthesis, uptake mechanism characterization and biological evaluation of 18F labeled fluoroalkyl phenylalanine analogs as potential PET imaging agents

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Limin; Qu, Wenchao; Lieberman, Brian P.; Plössl, Karl; Kung, Hank F.

    2010-01-01

    Introduction Amino acids based tracers represent a promising class of tumor metabolic imaging agents with successful clinical applications. Two new phenylalanine derivatives, p-(2-[18F]fluoroethyl)-L-phenylalanine (FEP, [18F]2) and p-(3-[18F]fluoropropyl)-L-phenylalanine (FPP, [18F]3) were synthesized and evaluated in comparison to clinically utilized O-(2-[18F]fluoroethyl)-L-tyrosine (FET, [18F]1). Methods FEP ([18F]2) and FPP ([18F]3) were successfully synthesized by a rapid and efficient two-step nucleophilic fluorination of tosylate precursors and deprotection reaction. In vitro cell uptake studies were carried out in 9L glioma cells. In vivo studies, 9L tumor xenografts were implanted in Fisher 344 rats. Results FEP ([18F]2) and FPP ([18F]3) could be efficiently labeled within 90 min with good enantiomeric purity (>95%), good yield (11–37%) and high specific activity (21–69 GBq/μmol). Cell uptake studies showed FEP had higher uptake than FPP as well as reference ligand FET ([18F]1). Uptake mechanism studies suggested that FEP is a selective substrate for system L and prefers its subtype LAT1. In vivo biodistribution studies demonstrated FEP had specific accumulation in tumor cells and tumor to background ratio reached 1.45 at 60 min. Small animal PET imaging studies showed FEP was comparable to FET for imaging rats bearing 9L tumor model. FEP had high uptake in 9L tumor compared to surrounding tissue and was quickly excreted through urinary tract. Conclusion Biological evaluations indicate that FEP ([18F]2) is a potential useful tracer for tumor imaging with PET. PMID:21220129

  15. Synthesis and preliminary evaluation in tumor bearing mice of new (18)F-labeled arylsulfone matrix metalloproteinase inhibitors as tracers for positron emission tomography.

    PubMed

    Casalini, Francesca; Fugazza, Lorenza; Esposito, Giovanna; Cabella, Claudia; Brioschi, Chiara; Cordaro, Alessia; D'Angeli, Luca; Bartoli, Antonietta; Filannino, Azzurra M; Gringeri, Concetta V; Longo, Dario L; Muzio, Valeria; Nuti, Elisa; Orlandini, Elisabetta; Figlia, Gianluca; Quattrini, Angelo; Tei, Lorenzo; Digilio, Giuseppe; Rossello, Armando; Maiocchi, Alessandro

    2013-03-28

    New fluorinated, arylsulfone-based matrix metalloproteinase (MMP) inhibitors containing carboxylate as the zinc binding group were synthesized as radiotracers for positron emission tomography. Inhibitors were characterized by Ki for MMP-2 in the nanomolar range and by a fair selectivity for MMP-2/9/12/13 over MMP-1/3/14. Two of these compounds were obtained in the (18)F-radiolabeled form, with radiochemical purity and yield suitable for preliminary studies in mice xenografted with a human U-87 MG glioblastoma. Target density in xenografts was assessed by Western blot, yielding Bmax/Kd = 14. The biodistribution of the tracer was dominated by liver uptake and hepatobiliary clearance. Tumor uptake of (18)F-labeled MMP inhibitors was about 30% that of [(18)F]fluorodeoxyglucose. Accumulation of radioactivity within the tumor periphery colocalized with MMP-2 activity (evaluated by in situ zimography). However, specific tumor uptake accounted for only 18% of total uptake. The aspecific uptake was ascribed to the high binding affinity between the radiotracer and serum albumin. PMID:23458498

  16. Design, Synthesis, and In Vitro and In Vivo Evaluation of an (18)F-Labeled Sphingosine 1-Phosphate Receptor 1 (S1P1) PET Tracer.

    PubMed

    Rosenberg, Adam J; Liu, Hui; Jin, Hongjun; Yue, Xuyi; Riley, Sean; Brown, Steven J; Tu, Zhude

    2016-07-14

    Sphingosine 1-phosphate receptor 1 (S1P1) plays a pivotal signaling role in inflammatory response; because S1P1 modulation has been identified as a therapeutic target for various diseases, a PET tracer for S1P1 would be a useful tool. Fourteen fluorine-containing analogues of S1P ligands were synthesized and their in vitro binding potency measured; four had high potency and selectivity for S1P1 (S1P1 IC50 < 10 nM, >100-fold selectivity for S1P1 over S1P2 and S1P3). The most potent ligand, 28c (IC50 = 2.63 nM for S1P1) was (18)F-labeled and evaluated in a mouse model of LPS-induced acute liver injury to determine its S1P1-binding specificity. The results from biodistribution, autoradiography, and microPET imaging showed higher [(18)F]28c accumulation in the liver of LPS-treated mice than controls. Increased expression of S1P1 in the LPS model was confirmed by immunohistochemical analysis (IHC). These data suggest that [(18)F]28c is a S1P1 PET tracer with high potential for imaging S1P1 in vivo. PMID:27280499

  17. Synthesis and evaluation of new (18)F-labelled acetamidobenzoxazolone-based radioligands for imaging of the translocator protein (18 kDa, TSPO) in the brain.

    PubMed

    Tiwari, Anjani K; Fujinaga, Masayuki; Yui, Joji; Yamasaki, Tomoteru; Xie, Lin; Kumata, Katsushi; Mishra, Anil K; Shimoda, Yoko; Hatori, Akiko; Ji, Bin; Ogawa, Masanao; Kawamura, Kazunori; Wang, Feng; Zhang, Ming-Rong

    2014-12-21

    The visualization of the activated microglia/TSPO is one of the main aspects of neuroimaging. Here we describe two new (18)F-labelled molecules, 2-[5-(4-[(18)F]fluoroethoxyphenyl)- ([(18)F]2) and 2-[5-(4-[(18)F]fluoropropyloxyphenyl)- ([(18)F]3) -2-oxo-1,3-benzoxazol-3(2H)-yl]-N-methyl-N-phenylacetamide as novel PET ligands for imaging the translocator protein (18 kDa, TSPO) in the brain. The three-D pharmacophore evaluation and docking studies suggested their high affinity for the TSPO and in vitro binding assays of the TSPO showed binding affinities 6.6 ± 0.7 nM and 16.7 ± 2.5 nM for 2 and 3, respectively. The radiochemical yields for [(18)F]2 and [(18)F]3 were found to be 22 ± 4% (n = 8) and 5 ± 2% (n = 5), respectively at EOB. The radiochemical purity for both was found ≥98% and the specific activity was in the range of 98-364 GBq μmol(-1) at EOS. In vitro autoradiography with an ischemic rat brain showed significantly increased binding on the ipsilateral side compared to the contralateral side. The specificity of [(18)F]2 and [(18)F]3 for binding TSPO was confirmed using the TSPO ligands PK11195 and MBMP. The biodistribution patterns of both PET ligands were evaluated in normal mice by 1 h dynamic PET imaging. In the brain, regional radioactivity reached the maximum very rapidly within 0-4 min for both ligands, similar to (R)[(11)C]PK11195. The metabolite study of [(18)F]2 also favoured a more favourable profile for quantification in comparison to (R)[(11)C]PK11195. In summary, these data indicated that [(18)F]2 and [(18)F]3 have good potential to work as PET ligands, therefore there are merits to use these radioligands for the in vivo evaluation in animal models to see their efficacy in the living brain. PMID:25339090

  18. 18F-Labeled NaF PET-CT in Detection of Bone Metastases in Patients With Preoperative Lung Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Rao, Liangjun; Zong, Zhen; Chen, Zhifeng; Wang, Xiaoyan; Shi, Xinchong; Yi, Chang; Zhang, Xiangsong

    2016-01-01

    Abstract We compared the diagnostic accuracy of 18F-labeled sodium fluoride (18F-NaF) PET-CT with 99m-technetium methylene diphosphonate (99mTc-MDP) single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) to detect bone metastases (BMs) in patients with preoperative lung cancer. Patients with lung cancer (n = 181) were examined with 18F-NaF PET-CT, and another 167 patients with lung cancer were examined with 99mTc-MDP SPECT. 18F-NaF PET-CT and 99mTc-MDP SPECT were evaluated by 2 experienced readers. Lesions were graded on a scale of 0 (degenerative lesion) to 4 (definite BM), and equivocal lesions were determined as indifferent (grade 3). Based on patient-based analysis, there were only 4 equivocal patients in 18F-NaF PET-CT detection. However, in 99mTc-MDP SPECT detection, there were 19 equivocal patients, which indicated a significant difference in terms of occurrence ratio (χ2 = 9.005, P = 0.03). Sensitivity and specificity of PET-CT was significantly better than that of SPECT when equivocal reading was categorized as malignant or benign (P < 0.05). Based on lesions-based analysis, SPECT produced 26 equivocal lesions of 333 lesions, but PET-CT produced only 5 equivocal lesions of 991 lesions. PET-CT was significantly better than SPECT in the aspect of producing equivocal patients (χ2 = 58.141, P < 0.001). Sensitivity and specificity of PET-CT was significantly better than that of SPECT when equivocal reading was categorized as malignant or benign (P < 0.05). 18F-NaF PET-CT is a highly sensitive and specific modality for the detection of BM in patients with preoperative lung cancer. It is better than conventional 99mTc-MDP SPECT in detecting BM in patients with preoperative lung cancer. PMID:27100456

  19. Radiosynthesis and preliminary PET evaluation of (18)F-labeled 2-(1-(3-fluorophenyl)-2-oxo-5-(pyrimidin-2-yl)-1,2-dihydropyridin-3-yl)benzonitrile for imaging AMPA receptors.

    PubMed

    Yuan, Gengyang; Jones, Graham B; Vasdev, Neil; Liang, Steven H

    2016-10-01

    To prompt the development of (18)F-labeled positron emission tomography (PET) tracers for the α-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methyl-4-isoxazolepropionic acid (AMPA) receptor, we have prepared (18)F-labeled 2-(1-(3-fluorophenyl)-2-oxo-5-(pyrimidin-2-yl)-1,2-dihydropyridin-3-yl)benzonitrile ([(18)F]8). The radiosynthesis was achieved by a one-pot two-step method that utilized a spirocyclic hypervalent iodine(III) mediated radiofluorination to prepare the (18)F-labeled 1-bromo-3-fluorobenzene ([(18)F]15) intermediate with K(18)F. A subsequent copper(I) iodide mediated coupling reaction was carried out with 2-(2-oxo-5-(pyrimidin-2-yl)-1,2-dihydropyridin-3-yl)benzonitrile (10) to [(18)F]8 in 10±2% uncorrected radiochemical yield relative to starting (18)F-fluoride with >99% radiochemical purity and 29.6±7.4Gbq/μmol specific activity at the time of injection. PET imaging studies with the title radiotracer in normal mice demonstrated good brain uptake (peak standardized uptake value (SUV)=2.3±0.1) and warrants further in vivo validation. PMID:27546294

  20. Development of Purine-Derived 18F-Labeled Pro-drug Tracers for Imaging of MRP1 Activity with PET

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Multidrug resistance-associated protein 1 (MRP1) is a drug efflux transporter that has been implicated in the pathology of several neurological diseases and is associated with development of multidrug resistance. To enable measurement of MRP1 function in the living brain, a series of 6-halopurines decorated with fluorinated side chains have been synthesized and evaluated as putative pro-drug tracers. The tracers were designed to undergo conjugation with glutathione within the brain and hence form the corresponding MRP1 substrate tracers in situ. 6-Bromo-7-(2-[18F]fluoroethyl)purine showed good brain uptake and rapid metabolic conversion. Dynamic PET imaging demonstrated a marked difference in brain clearance rates between wild-type and mrp1 knockout mice, suggesting that the tracer can allow noninvasive assessment of MRP1 activity in vivo. PMID:24456310

  1. Structural autonomy of a β-hairpin peptide derived from the pneumococcal choline-binding protein LytA.

    PubMed

    Maestro, Beatriz; Santiveri, Clara M; Jiménez, M Angeles; Sanz, Jesús M

    2011-01-01

    The cell wall of Streptococcus pneumoniae and several other micro-organisms is decorated with a number of the so-called choline-binding proteins (CBPs) that recognise the choline residues in the bacterial surface by means of highly conserved, concatenated 20-aa sequences termed choline-binding repeats (CBRs), that are composed of a loop and a β-hairpin structure. In this work, we have investigated the ability to fold in aqueous solution of a 14-aa peptide (LytA₁₉₇₋₂₁₀[wt]) and a single derivative of it, LytA₁₉₇₋₂₁₀[ND], corresponding to one of the six β-hairpins of the LytA pneumococcal amidase. Intrinsic fluorescence and circular dichroism spectroscopical measurements showed that both peptides spontaneously acquire a non-random conformation which is also able to bind the natural ligand choline. Furthermore, nuclear magnetic resonance techniques allowed the calculation of the structure of the LytA₁₉₇₋₂₁₀[ND] peptide, which displayed a β-hairpin conformation highly similar to that found within the full-length C-LytA module. These results provide a structural basis for the modular organisation of CBPs and suggest the use of CBRs as new templates for the design of stable β-hairpins. PMID:21051322

  2. A choline derivate-modified nanoprobe for glioma diagnosis using MRI

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Jianfeng; Huang, Shixian; Shao, Kun; Liu, Yang; An, Sai; Kuang, Yuyang; Guo, Yubo; Ma, Haojun; Wang, Xuxia; Jiang, Chen

    2013-04-01

    Gadolinium (Gd) chelate contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is a preferred method of glioma detection and preoperative localisation because it offers high spatial resolution and non-invasive deep tissue penetration. Gd-based contrast agents, such as Gd-diethyltriaminepentaacetic acid (DTPA-Gd, Magnevist), are widely used clinically for tumor diagnosis. However, the Gd-based MRI approach is limited for patients with glioma who have an uncompromised blood-brain barrier (BBB). Moreover, the rapid renal clearance and non-specificity of such contrast agents further hinders their prevalence. We present a choline derivate (CD)-modified nanoprobe with BBB permeability, glioma specificity and a long blood half-life. Specific accumulation of the nanoprobe in gliomas and subsequent MRI contrast enhancement are demonstrated in vitro in U87 MG cells and in vivo in a xenograft nude model. BBB and glioma dual targeting by this nanoprobe may facilitate precise detection of gliomas with an uncompromised BBB and may offer better preoperative and intraoperative tumor localization.

  3. Initial prostate cancer diagnosis and disease staging--the role of choline-PET-CT.

    PubMed

    Mapelli, Paola; Picchio, Maria

    2015-09-01

    An early and correct diagnosis together with accurate staging of prostate cancer is necessary in order to plan the most appropriate treatment strategy. Morphological imaging modalities such as transrectal ultrasonography (TRUS), CT, and MRI can have some limitations regarding their accuracy for primary diagnosis and staging of prostate cancer; for instance, they have limited specificity in differentiating cancer from benign prostatic conditions and, by using size as the only criterion to characterize lymph node metastases, they might not be accurate enough for tumour characterization. In this scenario, PET-CT with (11)C-labelled or (18)F-labelled choline derivatives provides morphological and functional characterization and could overcome the limitations of the conventional imaging techniques. PET-CT is one of the most investigated molecular imaging modalities for prostate cancer diagnosis and staging. Currently, the main investigations on the role of PET-CT in the diagnosis and staging of prostate cancer have been performed on a retrospective basis and this type of analysis might be one of the main reasons why different results regarding its diagnostic accuracy have been reported. PMID:26260884

  4. Distribution and binding of 18F-labeled and 125I-labeled analogues of ACI-80, a prospective molecular imaging biomarker of disease: a whole hemisphere post mortem autoradiography study in human brains obtained from Alzheimer's disease patients.

    PubMed

    Gulyás, Balázs; Spenger, Christian; Beliczai, Zsuzsa; Gulya, Károly; Kása, Péter; Jahan, Mahabuba; Jia, Zhisheng; Weber, Urs; Pfeifer, Andrea; Muhs, Andreas; Willbold, Dieter; Halldin, Christer

    2012-01-01

    One of the major pathological landmarks of Alzheimer's disease and other neurodegenerative diseases is the presence of amyloid deposits in the brain. The early non-invasive visualization of amyloid is a major objective of recent diagnostic neuroimaging approaches, including positron emission tomography (PET), with an eye on follow-up of disease progression and/or therapy efficacy. The development of molecular imaging biomarkers with binding affinity to amyloid in the brain is therefore in the forefront of imaging biomarker and radiochemistry research. Recently, a dodecamer peptide (amino acid sequence=QSHYRHISPAQV; denominated D1 or ACI-80) was identified as a prospective ligand candidate, binding with high ex vivo affinity to L-Aβ-amyloid (K(d): 0.4 μM). In order to assess the ligand's capacity to visualize amyloid in Alzheimer's disease (AD), two (125)I labeled and three (18)F labeled analogues of the peptide were synthesized and tested in post mortem human autoradiography experiments using whole hemisphere brain slices obtained from deceased AD patients and age matched control subjects. The (18)F-labeled radioligands showed more promising visualization capacity of amyloid that the (125)I-labeled radioligands. In the case of each (18)F radioligands the grey matter uptake in the AD brains was significantly higher than that in control brains. Furthermore, the grey matter: white matter uptake ratio was over ~2, the difference being significant for each (18)F-radioligands. The regional distribution of the uptake of the various radioligands systematically shows a congruent pattern between the high uptake regions and spots in the autoradiographic images and the disease specific signals obtained in adjacent or identical brain slices labeled with histological, immunohistochemical or autoradiographic stains for amyloid deposits or activated astrocytes. The present data, using post mortem human brain autoradiography in whole hemisphere human brains obtained from deceased

  5. 18F: Labeling Chemistry and Labeled Compounds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ross, T. L.; Wester, H. J.

    Positron emission tomography (PET) is a unique tool for the investigation, localization, and quantification of physiological activities in vivo by tracing the involved or accompanying biochemical processes. Because of its nuclear and chemical properties, fluorine-18, which is commonly produced by a cyclotron using the 18O(p,n)18F or the 20Ne(d,α)18F nuclear process, is a nearly ideal positron emitting radionuclide. Its half-life of 109.7 min permits tracer syntheses and imaging protocols extending over hours and allows distribution of 18F-radiopharmaceuticals to hospitals and facilities lacking a cyclotron. The low maximum positron energy of 635 keV results in low radiation doses, short ranges in tissue, and therefore in excellent imaging resolution. Introduction of 18F-fluorine, either via nucleophilic strategies using [18F]F- or electrophilic routes using molecular [18F]F2, permits the synthesis of a broad spectrum of compounds within a time compatible with the half-life. Although fluorine is only slightly larger than a hydrogen atom, changes in the physiological behavior of bioactive compounds as a result of alteration in metabolic stability, lipophilicity, affinity to the target, or other structures, etc., are often observed even after F-for-H or F-for-OH substitutions. In this chapter, an overview of the scope and limitations of the 18F-chemistry is given. Fluorination strategies, routes, and synthetic aspects are exemplified, as far as possible, by established and selected 18F-radiopharmaceuticals with clinical relevance or with potential for further clinical application.

  6. Choline intakes exceeding recommendations during human lactation improve breast milk choline content by increasing PEMT pathway metabolites.

    PubMed

    Davenport, Crystal; Yan, Jian; Taesuwan, Siraphat; Shields, Kelsey; West, Allyson A; Jiang, Xinyin; Perry, Cydne A; Malysheva, Olga V; Stabler, Sally P; Allen, Robert H; Caudill, Marie A

    2015-09-01

    Demand for the vital nutrient choline is high during lactation; however, few studies have examined choline metabolism and requirements in this reproductive state. The present study sought to discern the effects of lactation and varied choline intake on maternal biomarkers of choline metabolism and breast milk choline content. Lactating (n=28) and control (n=21) women were randomized to 480 or 930 mg choline/day for 10-12 weeks as part of a controlled feeding study. During the last 4-6 weeks, 20% of the total choline intake was provided as an isotopically labeled choline tracer (methyl-d9-choline). Blood, urine and breast milk samples were collected for choline metabolite quantification, enrichment measurements, and gene expression analysis of choline metabolic genes. Lactating (vs. control) women exhibited higher (P < .001) plasma choline concentrations but lower (P ≤ .002) urinary excretion of choline metabolites, decreased use of choline as a methyl donor (e.g., lower enrichment of d6-dimethylglycine, P ≤ .08) and lower (P ≤ .02) leukocyte expression of most choline-metabolizing genes. A higher choline intake during lactation differentially influenced breast milk d9- vs. d3-choline metabolite enrichment. Increases (P ≤ .03) were detected among the d3-metabolites, which are generated endogenously via the hepatic phosphatidylethanolamine N-methyltransferase (PEMT), but not among the d9-metabolites generated from intact exogenous choline. These data suggest that lactation induces metabolic adaptations that increase the supply of intact choline to the mammary epithelium, and that extra maternal choline enhances breast milk choline content by increasing supply of PEMT-derived choline metabolites. This trial was registered at clinicaltrials.gov as NCT01127022. PMID:26025328

  7. Choline but not its derivative betaine blocks slow vacuolar channels in the halophyte Chenopodium quinoa: implications for salinity stress responses.

    PubMed

    Pottosin, Igor; Bonales-Alatorre, Edgar; Shabala, Sergey

    2014-11-01

    Activity of tonoplast slow vacuolar (SV, or TPC1) channels has to be under a tight control, to avoid undesirable leak of cations stored in the vacuole. This is particularly important for salt-grown plants, to ensure efficient vacuolar Na(+) sequestration. In this study we show that choline, a cationic precursor of glycine betaine, efficiently blocks SV channels in leaf and root vacuoles of the two chenopods, Chenopodium quinoa (halophyte) and Beta vulgaris (glycophyte). At the same time, betaine and proline, two major cytosolic organic osmolytes, have no significant effect on SV channel activity. Physiological implications of these findings are discussed. PMID:25240200

  8. Choline Magnesium Trisalicylate

    MedlinePlus

    Choline magnesium trisalicylate is used to relieve the pain, tenderness, inflammation (swelling), and stiffness caused by arthritis and painful ... used to relieve pain and lower fever. Choline magnesium trisalicylate is in a class of nonsteroidal anti- ...

  9. Fiber optic choline biosensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Hong; Cao, Xiaojian; Jia, Ke; Chai, Xueting; Lu, Hua; Lu, Zuhong

    2001-10-01

    A fiber optic fluorescence biosensor for choline is introduced in this paper. Choline is an important neurotransmitter in mammals. Due to the growing needs for on-site clinical monitoring of the choline, much effect has been devoted to develop choline biosensors. Fiber-optic fluorescence biosensors have many advantages, including miniaturization, flexibility, and lack of electrical contact and interference. The choline fiber-optic biosensor we designed implemented a bifurcated fiber to perform fluorescence measurements. The light of the blue LED is coupled into one end of the fiber as excitation and the emission spectrum from sensing film is monitored by fiber-spectrometer (S2000, Ocean Optics) through the other end of the fiber. The sensing end of the fiber is coated with Nafion film dispersed with choline oxidase and oxygen sensitive luminescent Ru(II) complex (Tris(2,2'-bipyridyl)dichlororuthenium(II), hexahydrate). Choline oxidase catalyzes the oxidation of choline to betaine and hydrogen peroxide while consuming oxygen. The fluorescence intensity of oxygen- sensitive Ru(II) are related to the choline concentration. The response of the fiber-optic sensor in choline solution is represented and discussed. The result indicates a low-cost, high-performance, portable choline biosensor.

  10. Choline oxidation by intact spinach chloroplasts. [Spinacia oleracea L

    SciTech Connect

    Weigel, P.; Lerma, C.; Hanson, A.D.

    1988-01-01

    Plants synthesize betaine by a two-step oxidation of choline (choline ..-->.. betaine aldehyde ..-->.. betaine). Protoplast-derived chloroplasts of spinach (Spinacia oleracea L.) carry out both reactions, more rapidly in light than in darkness. We investigated the light-stimulated oxidation of choline, using spinach chloroplasts isolated directly from leaves. The rates of choline oxidation obtained (dark and light rates: 10-50 and 100-300 nanomoles per hour per milligram chlorophyll, respectively) were approximately 20-fold higher than for protoplast-derived chloroplasts. Betaine aldehyde was the main product. Choline oxidation in darkness and light was suppressed by hypoxia. Neither uncouplers not the Calvin cycle inhibitor glyceraldehyde greatly affected choline oxidation in the light, and maximal choline oxidation was attained far below light saturation of CO/sub 2/ fixation. The light stimulation of choline oxidation was abolished by the PSII inhibitors DCMU and dibromothymoquinone, and was partially restored by adding reduced diaminodurene, an electron donor to PSI. Both methyl viologen and phenazine methosulfate prevented choline oxidation. Adding dihydroxyacetone phosphate, which can generate NADPH in organello, doubled the dark rate of choline oxidation. These results indicate that choline oxidation in chloroplasts requires oxygen, and reducing power generated from PSI. Enzymic reactions consistent with these requirements are discussed.

  11. N-Succinimidyl 3-((4-(4-[18F]fluorobutyl)-1H-1,2,3-triazol-1-yl)methyl)-5-(guanidinomethyl)benzoate ([18F]SFBTMGMB): A Residualizing Label for 18F-labeling of internalizing biomolecules

    PubMed Central

    Vaidyanathan, Ganesan; McDougald, Darryl; Choi, Jaeyeon; Pruszynski, Marek; Koumarianou, Eftychia; Zhou, Zhengyuan; Zalutsky, Michael R.

    2015-01-01

    Residualizing labeling methods for internalizing peptides and proteins are designed to trap the radionuclide inside the cell after intracellular degradation of the biomolecule. The goal of this work was to develop a residualizing label for the 18F-labeling of internalizing biomolecules based on a template used successfully for radioiodination. N-succinimidyl 3-((4-(4-[18F]fluorobutyl)-1H-1,2,3-triazol-1-yl)methyl)-5-(bis-Boc-guanidinomethyl)benzoate (Boc2-[18F]SFBTMGMB) was synthesized by click reaction of an azide precursor and [18F]fluorohexyne in 8.5 ± 2.8% average decay-corrected radiochemical yield (n =15). An anti-HER2 nanobody 5F7 was labeled with 18F using [18F]SFBTMGMB ([18F]RL-I), obtained by the deprotection of Boc2-[18F]SFBTMGMB, in 31.2 ± 6.7% (n =5) conjugation efficiency. Thus labeled nanobody had a radiochemical purity of >95%, bound to the HER2-expressing BT474M1 breast cancer cells with an affinity of 4.7 ± 0.9 nM, and had an immunoreactive fraction of 62–80%. In summary, a novel residualizing prosthetic agent for labeling biomolecules with 18F has been developed. An anti-HER2 nanobody was labeled using this prosthetic group with retention of affinity and immunoreactivity to HER2. PMID:26645790

  12. Autoradiography of phosphatidyl choline

    SciTech Connect

    Saffitz, J.E.; Gross, R.W.; Williamson, J.R.; Sobel, B.E.

    1981-03-01

    Saturated choline phosphatides are extracted during conventional tissue processing for electron microscopy. To facilitate autoradiographic subcellular localization of arrhythmogenic myocardial phospholipids, we evaluated tissue processing procedures for preservation of saturated phosphatidyl choline (PC). Suspensions, of a murine plasmacytoma were incubated with negative, unilamellar liposomes containing 14C-choline-labeled PC or 14C-1-palmitate dipalmitoyl PC. Extraction of radioactivity was monitored at each processing step by liquid scintillation spectrometry. Conventional fixation with glutaraldehyde and osmium tetroxide followed by acetone dehydration and Spurr's plastic embedding led to extraction of nearly all radioactivity. However, treatment of cells with 1.5% tannic acid after glutaraldehyde but before osmium tetroxide fixation preserved 93.1 +/- .6% of 14C-choline-labeled PC. Virtually identical results were obtained with dipalmitoyl PC. Autoradiography demonstrated no significant translocation of labeled PC from plasmacytoma cells to unlabeled avian erythrocytes, mixed in equal proportions after fixation but before dehydration and embedding.

  13. Choline oxidation by intact chloroplasts isolated directly from spinach leaves

    SciTech Connect

    Weigel, P.; Hanson, A.D.

    1986-04-01

    Illuminated chloroplasts derived from spinach leaf protoplasts synthesize betaine from choline via the intermediate betaine aldehyde (BAL) (PNAS 82:3678). Photosynthetically active chloroplasts isolated directly from spinach leaves oxidized (/sup 14/C)choline in the light at rates 10 times higher (25-80 nmol/mg chl b) than protoplast-derived chloroplasts. Up to 20% of the (/sup 14/C)choline supplied during a 30 min incubation was oxidized in the light; the main product was (/sup 14/C)BAL. Rates of (/sup 14/C)choline oxidation in darkness were only 5-30% of rates in light. Light-dependent (/sup 14/C)choline oxidation was abolished by DCMU and 5 mM DTT. Pre-illumination of the chloroplasts did not promote (/sup 14/C)choline oxidation in darkness. The uncouplers nigericin and CCCP at concentrations which eliminated CO/sub 2/-dependent O/sub 2/ evolution did not affect (/sup 14/C)choline oxidation in the light. They hypothesize that (/sup 14/C)choline oxidation is not dependent upon light activation of an enzymatic system or upon the electrochemical proton gradient but requires an oxidant generated in the light.

  14. Dietary intake and food sources of choline in European populations.

    PubMed

    Vennemann, Francy B C; Ioannidou, Sofia; Valsta, Liisa M; Dumas, Céline; Ocké, Marga C; Mensink, Gert B M; Lindtner, Oliver; Virtanen, Suvi M; Tlustos, Christina; D'Addezio, Laura; Mattison, Irene; Dubuisson, Carine; Siksna, Inese; Héraud, Fanny

    2015-12-28

    Choline is an important nutrient for humans. Choline intake of the European population was assessed considering the European Food Safety Authority European Comprehensive Food Consumption Database and the United States Department of Agriculture Nutrient Database. Average choline intake ranges were 151-210 mg/d among toddlers (1 to ≤3 years old), 177-304 mg/d among other children (3 to ≤10 years old), 244-373 mg/d among adolescents (10 to ≤18 years old), 291-468 mg/d among adults (18 to ≤65 years old), 284-450 mg/d among elderly people (65 to ≤75 years old) and 269-444 mg/d among very elderly people (≥75 years old). The intakes were higher among males compared with females, mainly due to larger quantities of food consumed per day. In most of the population groups considered, the average choline intake was below the adequate intake (AI) set by the Institute of Medicine in the USA. The main food groups contributing to choline intake were meat, milk, grain, egg and their derived products, composite dishes and fish. The main limitations of this study are related to the absence of choline composition data of foods consumed by the European population and the subsequent assumption made to assess their intake levels. Given the definition of AI, no conclusion on the adequacy of choline intake can be drawn for most European population groups. Such results improve the knowledge on choline intake in Europe that could be further refined by the collection of choline composition data for foods as consumed in Europe. PMID:26423357

  15. MTHFR C677T genotype influences the isotopic enrichment of one-carbon metabolites in folate-compromised men consuming d9-choline123

    PubMed Central

    Yan, Jian; Wang, Wei; Gregory, Jesse F; Malysheva, Olga; Brenna, J Thomas; Stabler, Sally P; Allen, Robert H; Caudill, Marie A

    2011-01-01

    Background: Homozygosity for the variant 677T allele in the methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase (MTHFR) gene increases the requirement for folate and may alter the metabolic use of choline. The choline adequate intake is 550 mg/d for men, although the metabolic consequences of consuming extra choline are unclear. Objective: Deuterium-labeled choline (d9-choline) as tracer was used to determine the differential effects of the MTHFR C677T genotype and the effect of various choline intakes on the isotopic enrichment of choline derivatives in folate-compromised men. Design: Mexican American men with the MTHFR 677CC or 677TT genotype consumed a diet providing 300 mg choline/d plus supplemental choline chloride for total choline intakes of 550 (n = 11; 4 with 677CC and 7 with 677TT) or 1100 (n = 12; 4 with 677CC and 8 with 677TT) mg/d for 12 wk. During the last 3 wk, 15% of the total choline intake was provided as d9-choline. Results: Low but measurable enrichments of the choline metabolites were achieved, including that of d3-phosphatidylcholine (d3-PtdCho)—a metabolite produced in the de novo pathway via choline-derived methyl groups. Men with the MTHFR 677TT genotype had a higher urinary enrichment ratio of betaine to choline (P = 0.041), a higher urinary enrichment of sarcosine (P = 0.041), and a greater plasma enrichment ratio of d9-betaine to d9-PtdCho with the 1100 mg choline/d intake (P = 0.033). Conclusion: These data show for the first time in humans that choline itself is a source of methyl groups for de novo PtdCho biosynthesis and indicate that the MTHFR 677TT genotype favors the use of choline as a methyl donor. PMID:21123458

  16. Concentrations of choline-containing compounds and betaine in common foods.

    PubMed

    Zeisel, Steven H; Mar, Mei-Heng; Howe, Juliette C; Holden, Joanne M

    2003-05-01

    Choline is important for normal membrane function, acetylcholine synthesis and methyl group metabolism; the choline requirement for humans is 550 mg/d for men (Adequate Intake). Betaine, a choline derivative, is important because of its role in the donation of methyl groups to homocysteine to form methionine. In tissues and foods, there are multiple choline compounds that contribute to total choline concentration (choline, glycerophosphocholine, phosphocholine, phosphatidylcholine and sphingomyelin). In this study, we collected representative food samples and analyzed the choline concentration of 145 common foods using liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry. Foods with the highest total choline concentration (mg/100 g) were: beef liver (418), chicken liver (290), eggs (251), wheat germ (152), bacon (125), dried soybeans (116) and pork (103). The foods with the highest betaine concentration (mg/100 g) were: wheat bran (1339), wheat germ (1241), spinach (645), pretzels (237), shrimp (218) and wheat bread (201). A number of epidemiologic studies have examined the relationship between dietary folic acid and cancer or heart disease. It may be helpful to also consider choline intake as a confounding factor because folate and choline methyl donation can be interchangeable. PMID:12730414

  17. 21 CFR 573.300 - Choline xanthate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Choline xanthate. 573.300 Section 573.300 Food and... Listing § 573.300 Choline xanthate. Choline xanthate may be safely used as a component of animal feed as an added source of choline to supplement the diets of poultry, ruminants, and swine in...

  18. 21 CFR 573.300 - Choline xanthate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Choline xanthate. 573.300 Section 573.300 Food and... Listing § 573.300 Choline xanthate. Choline xanthate may be safely used as a component of animal feed as an added source of choline to supplement the diets of poultry, ruminants, and swine in...

  19. 21 CFR 573.300 - Choline xanthate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Choline xanthate. 573.300 Section 573.300 Food and... Listing § 573.300 Choline xanthate. Choline xanthate may be safely used as a component of animal feed as an added source of choline to supplement the diets of poultry, ruminants, and swine in...

  20. The choline-depleted type II pneumonocyte. A model for investigating the synthesis of surfactant lipids.

    PubMed Central

    Anceschi, M M; Di Renzo, G C; Venincasa, M D; Bleasdale, J E

    1984-01-01

    When type II pneumonocytes from adult rats were maintained in a medium that lacked choline, the incorporation of [14C]glycerol into phosphatidylcholine was not greatly diminished during the period that the cells displayed characteristics of type II pneumonocytes. Cells that were maintained in choline-free medium that contained choline oxidase and catalase, however, became depleted of choline and subsequent synthesis of phosphatidylcholine by these cells was responsive to choline in the extracellular medium. Incorporation of [14C]glycerol into phosphatidylcholine by choline-depleted cells was stimulated maximally (approx. 6-fold) by extracellular choline at a concentration (0.05 mM) that also supported the greatest incorporation into phosphatidylglycerol. The incorporation of [14C]glycerol into other glycerophospholipids by choline-depleted cells was not increased by extracellular choline. When cells were incubated in the presence of [3H]cytidine, the choline-dependent stimulation of the synthesis of phosphatidylcholine and phosphatidylglycerol was accompanied by an increased recovery of [3H]CMP. This increased recovery of [3H]CMP reflected an increase in the intracellular amount of CMP from 48 +/- 9 to 76 +/- 16 pmol/10(6) cells. Choline-depleted cells that were exposed to [3H]choline contained [3H]CDP-choline as the principal water-soluble choline derivative. As the extracellular concentration of choline was increase, however, the amount of 3H in phosphocholine greatly exceeded that in all other water-soluble derivatives. Choline-depletion of cells resulted in an increase in the specific activity of CTP:phosphocholine cytidylyltransferase in cell homogenates (from 0.40 +/- 0.15 to 1.31 +/- 0.20 nmol X min-1 X mg of protein-1). These data are indicative that the biosynthesis of phosphatidylcholine is integrated with that of phosphatidylglycerol and are consistent with the proposed involvement of CMP in this integration. The choline-depleted type II pneumonocyte

  1. USDA Database for the Choline Content of Common Foods, Release Two

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Research has shown that choline is important for the synthesis of phospholipids in cell membranes, methyl metabolism, acetylcholine synthesis, and cholinergic neurotransmission in humans. Betaine, a choline derivative, is also important because of its role in the donation of methyl groups to homocy...

  2. Sex and menopausal status influence human dietary requirements for the nutrient choline2

    PubMed Central

    Fischer, Leslie M; daCosta, Kerry Ann; Kwock, Lester; Stewart, Paul W; Lu, Tsui-Shan; Stabler, Sally P; Allen, Robert H; Zeisel, Steven H

    2008-01-01

    Background Although humans require dietary choline for methyl donation, membrane function, and neurotransmission, choline can also be derived from the de novo synthesis of phosphatidylcholine, which is up-regulated by estrogen. A recommended Adequate Intake (AI) exists for choline; however, an Estimated Average Requirement has not been set because of a lack of sufficient human data. Objective The objective of the study was to evaluate the dietary requirements for choline in healthy men and women and to investigate the clinical sequelae of choline deficiency. Design Fifty-seven adult subjects (26 men, 16 premenopausal women, 15 postmenopausal women) were fed a diet containing 550 mg choline · 70 kg−1 · d−1 for 10 d followed by <50 mg choline · 70 kg−1 · d−1 with or without a folic acid supplement (400 μg/d per randomization) for up to 42 d. Subjects who developed organ dysfunction during this diet had normal organ function restored after incremental amounts of choline were added back to the diet. Blood and urine were monitored for signs of toxicity and metabolite concentrations, and liver fat was assessed by using magnetic resonance imaging. Results When deprived of dietary choline, 77% of men and 80% of postmenopausal women developed fatty liver or muscle damage, whereas only 44% of premenopausal women developed such signs of organ dysfunction. Moreover, 6 men developed these signs while consuming 550 mg choline · 70 kg−1 · d−1, the AI for choline. Folic acid supplementation did not alter the subjects’ response. Conclusion Subject characteristics (eg, menopausal status) modulated the dietary requirement for choline, and a daily intake at the current AI was not sufficient to prevent organ dysfunction in 19 of the subjects. PMID:17490963

  3. Maternal dietary choline deficiency alters angiogenesis in fetal mouse hippocampus.

    PubMed

    Mehedint, Mihai G; Craciunescu, Corneliu N; Zeisel, Steven H

    2010-07-20

    We examined whether maternal dietary choline modulates angiogenesis in fetal brain. Pregnant C57BL/6 mice were fed either a choline-deficient (CD), control (CT), or choline-supplemented diet (CS) from days 12 to 17 (E12-17) of pregnancy and then fetal brains were studied. In CD fetal hippocampus, proliferation of endothelial cells (EC) was decreased by 32% (p < 0.01 vs. CT or CS) while differentiated EC clusters (expressing factor VIII related antigen (RA)) increased by 25% (p < 0.01 vs. CT or CS). These changes were associated with > 25% decrease in the number of blood vessels in CD fetal hippocampus (p < 0.01 vs. CT and CS), with no change in total cross-sectional area of these blood vessels. Expression of genes for the angiogenic signals derived from both endothelial and neuronal progenitor cells (NPC) was increased in CD fetal hippocampus VEGF C (Vegfc), 2.0-fold, p < 0.01 vs. CT and angiopoietin 2 (Angpt2), 2.1-fold, (p < 0.01 vs. CT)). Similar increased expression was observed in NPC isolated from E14 fetal mouse brains and exposed to low (5 microM), CT (70 microM), or high choline (280 microM) media for 72 h (low choline caused a 9.7-fold increase in relative gene expression of Vegfc (p < 0.001 vs. CT and high) and a 3.4-fold increase in expression of Angpt2, (p < 0.05 vs. CT and high). ANGPT2 protein was increased 42.2% (p < 0.01). Cytosine-phosphate-guanine dinucleotide islands in the proximity of the promoter areas of Vegfc and Angpt2 were hypomethylated in low choline NPC compared to CT NPC (p < 0.01). We conclude that maternal dietary choline intake alters angiogenesis in the developing fetal hippocampus. PMID:20624989

  4. Ultraviolet radiation alters choline phospholipid metabolism in human keratinocytes

    SciTech Connect

    DeLeo, V.; Scheide, S.; Meshulam, J.; Hanson, D.; Cardullo, A.

    1988-10-01

    Ultraviolet radiation B (UVB-290-320 nm) induces inflammation and hyperproliferation in human epidermis. This response is associated with the recovery from irradiated skin of inflammatory mediators derived from membrane phospholipids. We have previously reported that UVB stimulates the production of such mediators by human keratinocytes (HK) in culture. In these studies we examined the effect of UVB on the metabolism of choline containing phospholipids in HK prelabeled with (/sup 3/H) choline. UVB (400-1600J/m2) stimulated a dose dependent release of (/sup 3/H) choline from HK within minutes of irradiation. Examination of media extracts by paper chromatography revealed that the released (/sup 3/H) choline was predominately in the form of glycerophosphorylcholine. Examination of label remaining in membranes of cells after irradiation by acid precipitation and HPLC revealed that the origin of the released (/sup 3/H) choline was the membrane phosphatidylcholine/lysophosphatidylcholine. These data support a concept of UVB stimulation of both a phospholipase A (1 or 2) and a lysophospholipase. These UVB induced alterations of HK membrane phospholipid metabolism likely have profound effects on UVB-induced inflammation and control of cell growth in human skin.

  5. Choline: An Essential Nutrient for Public Health

    PubMed Central

    da Costa, Kerry-Ann

    2009-01-01

    Choline was officially recognized as an essential nutrient by the Institute of Medicine (IOM) in 1998. There is a significant variation in the dietary requirement for choline that can be explained by common genetic polymorphisms. Because of its wide-ranging roles in human metabolism, from cell structure to neurotransmitter synthesis, choline-deficiency is now thought to have an impact on diseases such as liver disease, atherosclerosis and possibly neurological disorders. Choline is found in a wide variety of foods. Egg yolks are the most concentrated source of choline in the American diet, providing 680 milligrams per 100 grams. Mean choline intakes for older children, men, women and pregnant women are far below the Adequate Intake established by the IOM. Given the importance of choline in a wide range of critical functions in the human body, coupled with less than optimal intakes among the population, dietary guidance should be developed to encourage the intake of choline-rich foods. PMID:19906248

  6. Fewer metabolites of dietary choline reach the blood of rats after treatment with lithium

    SciTech Connect

    Pomfret, E.A.; O'Connor, S.C.; Zola, T.H.; Zeisel, S.H.

    1988-01-01

    The authors studies the effect of lithium treatment upon the appearance in blood, liver and intestine of metabolites formed from dietary choline. Rats were treated for 9 days with 2 mEq/kg lithium carbonate or water. Animals were fasted overnight, and on the 10th day were fed with a solution containing radiolabeled choline chloride. The lithium treated groups also received 2.0 mEq/kg lithium as part of this solution. After an oral dose of 1 ml of a 1 mM choline solution, the lithium-treated animals had significantly lower levels of choline derived radiolabel in blood than did controls at 30, 60, 120, and 180 minutes (47%, 51%, 59% and 74%, respectively). They observed similar decreases of the accumulation in blood, at 180 minutes after the dose, of choline-derived radiolabel when choline was administered at lower or higher concentrations. After an oral treatment containing 0.1, 1 or 10 mM choline, lithium treated animals accumulated 69%, 66% and 72% as much radiolabel in serum as did controls. Most of the radiolabel found in blood at 180 minutes was in metabolites of choline which are formed within liver. The diminished accumulation of radiolabel in serum after lithium treatment was not due to increased accumulation of label by erythrocytes, liver or gut wall. They suggest that lithium influences the release by liver of betaine and phosphatidylcholine. 36 references, 5 figures.

  7. 21 CFR 182.8250 - Choline bitartrate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Choline bitartrate. 182.8250 Section 182.8250 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) SUBSTANCES GENERALLY RECOGNIZED AS SAFE Nutrients § 182.8250 Choline bitartrate. (a) Product. Choline bitartrate....

  8. 21 CFR 182.8252 - Choline chloride.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Choline chloride. 182.8252 Section 182.8252 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) SUBSTANCES GENERALLY RECOGNIZED AS SAFE Nutrients § 182.8252 Choline chloride. (a) Product. Choline chloride....

  9. Folate intake, MTHFR genotype, and sex modulate choline metabolism in mice.

    PubMed

    Chew, Tina W; Jiang, Xinyin; Yan, Jian; Wang, Wei; Lusa, Amanda L; Carrier, Bradley J; West, Allyson A; Malysheva, Olga V; Brenna, J Thomas; Gregory, Jesse F; Caudill, Marie A

    2011-08-01

    Choline and folate are interrelated in 1-carbon metabolism, mostly because of their shared function as methyl donors for homocysteine remethylation. Folate deficiency and mutations of methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase (MTHFR) reduce the availability of a major methyl donor, 5-methyltetrahydrofolate, which in turn may lead to compensatory changes in choline metabolism. This study investigated the hypothesis that reductions in methyl group supply, either due to dietary folate deficiency or Mthfr gene deletion, would modify tissue choline metabolism in a sex-specific manner. Mthfr wild type (+/+) or heterozygous (+/-) knockout mice were randomized to a folate-deficient or control diet for 8 wk during which time deuterium-labeled choline (d9-choline) was consumed in the drinking water (~10 μmol/d). Mthfr heterozygosity did not alter brain choline metabolite concentrations, but it did enhance their labeling in males (P < 0.05) and tended to do so in females (P < 0.10), a finding consistent with greater turnover of dietary choline in brains of +/- mice. Dietary folate deficiency in females yielded 52% higher (P = 0.027) hepatic glycerophosphocholine, which suggests that phosphatidylcholine (PtdCho) degradation was enhanced. Labeling of the hepatic PtdCho in d3 form was also reduced (P < 0.001) in females, which implies that fewer of the dietary choline-derived methyl groups were used for de novo PtdCho biosynthesis under conditions of folate insufficiency. Males responded to folate restriction with a doubling (P < 0.001) of hepatic choline dehydrogenase transcripts, a finding consistent with enhanced conversion of choline to the methyl donor, betaine. Collectively, these data show that several adaptations in choline metabolism transpire as a result of mild perturbations in folate metabolism, presumably to preserve methyl group homeostasis. PMID:21697299

  10. Comparison of the computational NMR chemical shifts of choline with the experimental data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alcorn, C.; Cuperlovic-Culf, M.; Ghandi, K.

    2012-02-01

    One of the main biological markers of the presence of cancer in living patients is an over-expression of total choline (tCho), which is the sum of free choline and its derivatives. 1H Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy, or H-MRS, enables the quantification of tCho via its proton spectra, and thus has the potential to be a diagnostic tool for the presence of cancer and an accurate early indicator of the response of cancer to treatment. However, it remains difficult to quantify individual choline derivatives, since they share a large structural similarity ((CH3)3-N+-CH2-CH2-O-), of which the strongest signal detectable by MRS is that of the choline "head group": the three methyl groups bonded to the nitrogen. This work used ACENet, a high performance computing system, to attempt to model the NMR parameters of choline derivatives, with the focus of this report being free choline. Optimized structures were determined using Density Functional Theory and the B3LYP electron correlation functional. The Polarizable Continuum Model was used to evaluate solvent effects. The Gauge-Invariant Atomic Orbital method was found to be the superior method for calculating the NMR parameters of cholines.

  11. Choline intake and genetic polymorphisms influence choline metabolite concentrations in human breast milk and plasma123

    PubMed Central

    Fischer, Leslie M; da Costa, Kerry Ann; Galanko, Joseph; Sha, Wei; Stephenson, Brigitte; Vick, Julie; Zeisel, Steven H

    2010-01-01

    Background: Choline is essential for infant nutrition, and breast milk is a rich source of this nutrient. Common single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) change dietary requirements for choline intake. Objective: The aim of this study was to determine whether total choline intake and/or SNPs influence concentrations of choline and its metabolites in human breast milk and plasma. Design: We gave a total of 103 pregnant women supplemental choline or a placebo from 18 wk gestation to 45 d postpartum and genotyped the women for 370 common SNPs. At 45 d postpartum, we measured choline metabolite concentrations in breast milk and plasma and assessed the dietary intake of choline by using a 3-d food record. Results: On average, lactating women in our study ate two-thirds of the recommended intake for choline (Adequate Intake = 550 mg choline/d). Dietary choline intake (no supplement) correlated with breast-milk phosphatidylcholine and plasma choline concentrations. A supplement further increased breast-milk choline, betaine, and phosphocholine concentrations and increased plasma choline and betaine concentrations. We identified 5 SNPs in MTHFR that altered the slope of the intake–metabolite concentration relations, and we identified 2 SNPs in PEMT that shifted these curves upward. Individuals who shared sets of common SNPs were outliers in plots of intake–metabolite concentration curves; we suggest that these SNPs should be further investigated to determine how they alter choline metabolism. Conclusion: Total intake of choline and genotype can influence the concentrations of choline and its metabolites in the breast milk and blood of lactating women and thereby affect the amount of choline available to the developing infant. This study was registered at clinicaltrials.gov as NCT00678925. PMID:20534746

  12. Phosphatidylcholine and the CDP-Choline Cycle

    PubMed Central

    Fagone, Paolo; Jackowski, Suzanne

    2012-01-01

    The CDP-choline pathway of phosphatidylcholine (PtdCho) biosynthesis was first described more than 50 years ago. Investigation of the CDP-choline pathway in yeast provides a basis for understanding the CDP-choline pathway in mammals. PtdCho is considered as an intermediate in a cycle of synthesis and degradation, and the activity of a CDP-choline cycle is linked to subcellular membrane lipid movement. The components of the mammalian CDP-choline pathway include choline transport, choline kinase, phosphocholine cytidylyltransferase, and choline phosphotransferase activities. The protein isoforms and biochemical mechanisms of regulation of the pathway enzymes are related to their cell and tissue-specific functions. Regulated PtdCho turnover mediated by phospholipases or neuropathy target esterase participates in the mammalian CDP-choline cycle. Knockout mouse models define the biological functions of the CDP-choline cycle in mammalian cells and tissues. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled Phospholipids and Phospholipid Metabolism. PMID:23010477

  13. Maternal choline supplementation programs greater activity of the phosphatidylethanolamine N-methyltransferase (PEMT) pathway in adult Ts65Dn trisomic mice.

    PubMed

    Yan, Jian; Ginsberg, Stephen D; Powers, Brian; Alldred, Melissa J; Saltzman, Arthur; Strupp, Barbara J; Caudill, Marie A

    2014-10-01

    Maternal choline supplementation (MCS) induces lifelong cognitive benefits in the Ts65Dn mouse, a trisomic mouse model of Down syndrome and Alzheimer's disease. To gain insight into the mechanisms underlying these beneficial effects, we conducted a study to test the hypothesis that MCS alters choline metabolism in adult Ts65Dn offspring. Deuterium-labeled methyl-d9-choline was administered to adult Ts65Dn and disomic (2N) female littermates born to choline-unsupplemented or choline-supplemented Ts65Dn dams. Enrichment of d9-choline metabolites (derived from intact choline) and d3 + d6-choline metabolites [produced when choline-derived methyl groups are used by phosphatidylethanolamine N-methyltransferase (PEMT)] was measured in harvested tissues. Adult offspring (both Ts65Dn and 2N) of choline-supplemented (vs. choline-unsupplemented) dams exhibited 60% greater (P≤0.007) activity of hepatic PEMT, which functions in de novo choline synthesis and produces phosphatidylcholine (PC) enriched in docosahexaenoic acid. Higher (P<0.001) enrichment of PEMT-derived d3 and d6 metabolites was detected in liver, plasma, and brain in both genotypes but to a greater extent in the Ts65Dn adult offspring. MCS also yielded higher (P<0.05) d9 metabolite enrichments in liver, plasma, and brain. These data demonstrate that MCS exerts lasting effects on offspring choline metabolism, including up-regulation of the hepatic PEMT pathway and enhanced provision of choline and PEMT-PC to the brain. PMID:24963152

  14. Pseudomonas syringae BetT Is a Low-Affinity Choline Transporter That Is Responsible for Superior Osmoprotection by Choline over Glycine Betaine▿

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Chiliang; Beattie, Gwyn A.

    2008-01-01

    The plant pathogen Pseudomonas syringae derives better osmoprotection from choline than from glycine betaine, unlike most bacteria that have been characterized. In this report, we identified a betaine/carnitine/choline family transporter (BCCT) in P. syringae pv. tomato strain DC3000 that mediates the transport of choline and acetylcholine. This transporter has a particularly low affinity (Km of 876 μM) and high capacity (Vmax of 80 nmol/min/mg of protein) for choline transport relative to other known BCCTs. Although BetT activity increased in response to hyperosmolarity, BetT mediated significant uptake under low-osmolarity conditions, suggesting a role in transport for both osmoprotection and catabolism. Growth studies with mutants deficient in BetT and other choline transporters demonstrated that BetT was responsible for the superior osmoprotection conferred to P. syringae by choline over glycine betaine when these compounds were provided at high concentrations (>100 μM). These results suggest that P. syringae has evolved to survive in relatively choline-rich habitats, a prediction that is supported by the common association of P. syringae with plants and the widespread production of choline, but genus- and species-specific production of glycine betaine, by plants. Among the three putative BCCT family transporters in Pseudomonas aeruginosa and six in Pseudomonas putida, different transporters were predicted to function based on similarity to Escherichia coli BetT than to P. syringae BetT. Functional P. putida and P. aeruginosa transporters were identified, and their possession of a long C-terminal tail suggested an osmoregulatory function for this tail; this function was confirmed for P. syringae BetT using deletion derivatives. PMID:18156257

  15. Effects of Choline on DNA Methylation and Macronutrient Metabolic Gene Expression in In Vitro Models of Hyperglycemia

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Xinyin; Greenwald, Esther; Jack-Roberts, Chauntelle

    2016-01-01

    Choline is an essential nutrient that plays an important role in lipid metabolism and DNA methylation. Studies in rodents suggest that choline may adversely affect glycemic control, yet studies in humans are lacking. Using the human hepatic and placental cells, HepG2 and BeWo, respectively, we examined the interaction between choline and glucose treatments. In HepG2 cells, choline supplementation (1 mM) increased global DNA methylation and DNA methyltransferase expression in both low-glucose (5 mM) and high-glucose (35 mM) conditions. Choline supplementation increased the expression of peroxisomal acyl-coenzyme A oxidase 1 (ACOX1), which mediates fatty acid β-oxidation, especially in the high-glucose condition. High-glucose exposure increased the transcription of the gluconeogenic gene phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase (PEPCK), while choline supplementation mitigated such increase. Compared to HepG2 cells, the placenta-derived BeWo cells were relatively unresponsive to either high-glucose or -choline treatment. In conclusion, choline and glucose interacted to affect macronutrient metabolic genes, yet there was no indication that choline may worsen glycemic control in these in vitro human cell culture models. PMID:27081315

  16. 21 CFR 582.5250 - Choline bitartrate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Choline bitartrate. 582.5250 Section 582.5250 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL DRUGS, FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS SUBSTANCES GENERALLY RECOGNIZED AS SAFE Nutrients and/or Dietary Supplements 1 § 582.5250 Choline bitartrate....

  17. 21 CFR 582.5252 - Choline chloride.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Choline chloride. 582.5252 Section 582.5252 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL DRUGS, FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS SUBSTANCES GENERALLY RECOGNIZED AS SAFE Nutrients and/or Dietary Supplements 1 § 582.5252 Choline chloride....

  18. 18F-Labeled Silicon-Based Fluoride Acceptors: Potential Opportunities for Novel Positron Emitting Radiopharmaceuticals

    PubMed Central

    Bernard-Gauthier, Vadim; Wängler, Carmen; Wängler, Bjoern; Schirrmacher, Ralf

    2014-01-01

    Background. Over the recent years, radiopharmaceutical chemistry has experienced a wide variety of innovative pushes towards finding both novel and unconventional radiochemical methods to introduce fluorine-18 into radiotracers for positron emission tomography (PET). These “nonclassical” labeling methodologies based on silicon-, boron-, and aluminium-18F chemistry deviate from commonplace bonding of an [18F]fluorine atom (18F) to either an aliphatic or aromatic carbon atom. One method in particular, the silicon-fluoride-acceptor isotopic exchange (SiFA-IE) approach, invalidates a dogma in radiochemistry that has been widely accepted for many years: the inability to obtain radiopharmaceuticals of high specific activity (SA) via simple IE. Methodology. The most advantageous feature of IE labeling in general is that labeling precursor and labeled radiotracer are chemically identical, eliminating the need to separate the radiotracer from its precursor. SiFA-IE chemistry proceeds in dipolar aprotic solvents at room temperature and below, entirely avoiding the formation of radioactive side products during the IE. Scope of Review. A great plethora of different SiFA species have been reported in the literature ranging from small prosthetic groups and other compounds of low molecular weight to labeled peptides and most recently affibody molecules. Conclusions. The literature over the last years (from 2006 to 2014) shows unambiguously that SiFA-IE and other silicon-based fluoride acceptor strategies relying on 18F− leaving group substitutions have the potential to become a valuable addition to radiochemistry. PMID:25157357

  19. Single-scan rest/stress imaging 18F-labeled flow tracers

    PubMed Central

    Alpert, Nathaniel; Dean Fang, Yu-Hua; Fakhri, Georges El

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: The authors report a novel measurement strategy to obtain both rest and stress blood flow during a single, relatively short, scan session. Methods: Measurement of rest-stress myocardial blood flow with long-lived tracers usually requires separate scan sessions to remove the confounding effects of residual radioactivity concentration in the blood and tissue. The innovation of this method is to treat the rest-stress scan as a single entity in which the flow parameters change due to pharmacological challenge. With this approach the fate of a tracer molecule is naturally accounted for, no matter if it was introduced during the rest or stress phase of the study. Two new dual-injection kinetic models are considered that represent the response to pharmacological stress as a transitional or transient increase of myocardial blood flow. The authors present the theory of the method followed by the specific application of the theory to 18F-Flurpiridaz, a new myocardial flow-imaging agent. Results: Myocardial blood flow was accurately and precisely estimated from a single-scan rest/stress study for the long half-lived tracer 18F-Flurpiridaz. By accounting for the time-dependence of the kinetic parameters, the proposed models achieved good accuracy and precision (5%) under different vasodilators and different ischemic states. Conclusions: Detailed simulations predict that accurate and precise rest-stress blood flow measurements can be obtained in 20–30 min. PMID:23127055

  20. Improved 18F labeling of peptides with a fluoride-aluminum-chelate complex.

    PubMed

    McBride, William J; D'Souza, Christopher A; Sharkey, Robert M; Karacay, Habibe; Rossi, Edmund A; Chang, Chien-Hsing; Goldenberg, David M

    2010-07-21

    We reported previously the feasibility to radiolabel peptides with fluorine-18 ((18)F) using a rapid one-pot method that first mixes (18)F(-) with Al(3+) and then binds the (Al(18)F)(2+) complex to a NOTA ligand on the peptide. In this report, we examined several new NOTA ligands and determined how temperature, reaction time, and reagent concentration affected the radiolabeling yield. Four structural variations of the NOTA ligand had isolated radiolabeling yields ranging from 5.8% to 87% under similar reaction conditions. All of the Al(18)F NOTA complexes were stable in vitro in human serum, and those that were tested in vivo also were stable. The radiolabeling reactions were performed at 100 degrees C, and the peptides could be labeled in as little as 5 min. The IMP467 peptide could be labeled up to 115 GBq/micromol (3100 Ci/mmol), with a total reaction and purification time of 30 min without chromatographic purification. PMID:20540570

  1. Rapid (18)F-labeling and loading of PEGylated gold nanoparticles for in vivo applications.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Jun; Chin, Joshua; Wängler, Carmen; Wängler, Bjoern; Lennox, R Bruce; Schirrmacher, Ralf

    2014-06-18

    Water-soluble 3 nm maleimide-terminated PEGylated gold nanoparticles (maleimide-AuNP) were synthesized in both partially hydrolyzed and nonhydrolyzed forms. Both of these maleimide-AuNPs, when reacted with the silicon-fluorine prosthetic group [(18)F]SiFA-SH, resulted in radiolabeled AuNPs. These NPs were readily purified with high radiochemical yields (RCY) of 60-80% via size exclusion chromatography. Preliminary small animal positron emission tomography (PET) measurements in healthy rats gives information about the pathway of excretion and the stability of the radioactive label in vivo. The partially hydrolyzed [(18)F]SiFA-maleimide-AuNPs shows uptake in the brain region of interest (ROI) (> 0.13%ID/g) which was confirmed by ex vivo examination of the thoroughly perfused rat brain. The multiple maleimide end groups on the AuNP surface also allows for the simultaneous incorporation of [(18)F]SiFA-SH and a bioactive peptide (cysteine-modified octreotate, cys-TATE, which can bind to somatostatin receptor subtypes 2 and 5) in a proof-of-concept study. The well-defined Michael addition reaction between various thiol containing molecules and the multifunctionalized maleimide-AuNPs thus offers an opportunity to develop a new bioconjugation platform for new diagnostics as well as therapeutics. PMID:24807200

  2. An improved choline monooxygenase assay

    SciTech Connect

    Lafontaine, P.J.; Hanson, A.D. )

    1991-05-01

    Glycine betaine accumulates in leaves of plants from several angiosperm families in response to drought or salinization. Its synthesis, from the oxidation of choline, is mediated by a two step pathway. In spinach the first enzyme of this pathway is a ferredoxin-dependent choline monooxygenase (CMO). In order to purify this enzyme a sensitive and reliable assay is necessary. Two types of modifications were explored to improve the existing assay. (1) Ferredoxin reduction - one way of providing reduced Fd to CMO is by the addition of isolated spinach thylakoids in the assay mixture. In order to optimize the reduction of Fd two different systems were compared: (a) where only PS is active, by adding DCMU to inhibit electron transport from PS II and DAD as electron donor for PS I; (b) where both PS II and PS I are active. (2) Betaine aldehyde estimation - to simplify this, it is possible to couple the CMO reaction with betaine aldehyde dehydrogenase (BADH) from E. coli. BADH converts betaine aldehyde to betaine as it is formed in the assay, eliminating the need for a chemical oxidation step.

  3. Raising gestational choline intake alters gene expression in DMBA-evoked mammary tumors and prolongs survival

    PubMed Central

    Kovacheva, Vesela P.; Davison, Jessica M.; Mellott, Tiffany J.; Rogers, Adrianne E.; Yang, Shi; O'Brien, Michael J.; Blusztajn, Jan Krzysztof

    2009-01-01

    Choline is an essential nutrient that serves as a donor of metabolic methyl groups used during gestation to establish the epigenetic DNA methylation patterns that modulate tissue-specific gene expression. Because the mammary gland begins its development prenatally, we hypothesized that choline availability in utero may affect the gland’s susceptibility to cancer. During gestational days 11–17, pregnant rats were fed a control, choline-supplemented, or choline-deficient diet (8, 36, and 0 mmol/kg of choline, respectively). On postnatal day 65, the female offspring received 25 mg/kg of a carcinogen 7,12-dimethylbenz[α]anthracene. Approximately 70% of the rats developed mammary adenocarcinomas; prenatal diet did not affect tumor latency, incidence, size, and multiplicity. Tumor growth rate was inversely related to choline content in the prenatal diet, resulting in 50% longer survival until euthanasia, determined by tumor size, of the prenatally choline-supplemented rats compared with the prenatally choline-deficient rats. This was accompanied by distinct expression patterns of ∼70 genes in tumors derived from the three dietary groups. Tumors from the prenatally choline-supplemented rats overexpressed genes that confer favorable prognosis in human cancers (Klf6, Klf9, Nid2, Ntn4, Per1, and Txnip) and underexpressed those associated with aggressive disease (Bcar3, Cldn12, Csf1, Jag1, Lgals3, Lypd3, Nme1, Ptges2, Ptgs1, and Smarcb1). DNA methylation within the tumor suppressor gene, stratifin (Sfn, 14-3-3σ), was proportional to the prenatal choline supply and correlated inversely with the expression of its mRNA and protein in tumors, suggesting that an epigenetic mechanism may underlie the altered molecular phenotype and tumor growth. Our results suggest a role for adequate maternal choline nutrition during pregnancy in prevention/alleviation of breast cancer in daughters.—Kovacheva, V. P., Davison, J. M., Mellott, T. J., Rogers, A. E., Yang, S., O’Brien, M

  4. Choline transport in Leishmania major promastigotes and its inhibition by choline and phosphocholine analogs.

    PubMed

    Zufferey, Rachel; Mamoun, Choukri Ben

    2002-01-01

    Phosphatidylcholine is the most abundant phospholipid in the membranes of the human parasite Leishmania. The metabolic pathways leading to its biosynthesis are likely to play a critical role in parasite development and survival and may offer a good target for antileishmanial chemotherapy. Phosphatidylcholine synthesis via the CDP-choline pathway requires transport of the choline precursor from the host. Here, we report the first characterization of choline transport in this parasite, which is carrier-mediated and exhibits Michaelis-Menten kinetics with an apparent K(m) value of 2.5 microM for choline. This process is Na(+)-independent and requires an intact proton gradient to be fully functional. Choline transport into Leishmania is highly specific for choline and is inhibited by the choline carrier inhibitor hemicholinium-3, the channel blocker quinacrine, the antimalarial aminoquinolines quinine and quinidine, the antileishmanial phosphocholine analogs, miltefosine and edelfosine, and by choline analogs, most of which have antimalarial activities. Most importantly, choline analogs kill the promastigote form of the parasite in vitro in the low micromolar range. These results set the stage for the use of choline analogs in antileishmanial chemotherapy and shed new lights on the mechanism of action of the leishmanicidal phosphocholine analogs. PMID:12467980

  5. Choline, Its Potential Role in Nonalcoholic Fatty Liver Disease, and the Case for Human and Bacterial Genes.

    PubMed

    Sherriff, Jill L; O'Sullivan, Therese A; Properzi, Catherine; Oddo, Josephine-Lee; Adams, Leon A

    2016-01-01

    Our understanding of the impact of poor hepatic choline/phosphatidylcholine availability in promoting the steatosis characteristic of human nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) has recently advanced and possibly relates to phosphatidylcholine/phosphatidylethanolamine concentrations in various, membranes as well as cholesterol dysregulation. A role for choline/phosphatidylcholine availability in the progression of NAFLD to liver injury and serious hepatic consequences in some individuals requires further elucidation. There are many reasons for poor choline/phosphatidylcholine availability in the liver, including low intake, estrogen status, and genetic polymorphisms affecting, in particular, the pathway for hepatic de novo phosphatidylcholine synthesis. In addition to free choline, phosphatidylcholine has been identified as a substrate for trimethylamine production by certain intestinal bacteria, thereby reducing host choline bioavailability and providing an additional link to the increased risk of cardiovascular disease faced by those with NAFLD. Thus human choline requirements are highly individualized and biomarkers of choline status derived from metabolomics studies are required to predict those at risk of NAFLD induced by choline deficiency and to provide a basis for human intervention trials. PMID:26773011

  6. Pivotal role of choline metabolites in remyelination.

    PubMed

    Skripuletz, Thomas; Manzel, Arndt; Gropengießer, Karoline; Schäfer, Nora; Gudi, Viktoria; Singh, Vikramjeet; Salinas Tejedor, Laura; Jörg, Stefanie; Hammer, Anna; Voss, Elke; Vulinovic, Franca; Degen, Diane; Wolf, Rebecca; Lee, De-Hyung; Pul, Refik; Moharregh-Khiabani, Darius; Baumgärtner, Wolfgang; Gold, Ralf; Linker, Ralf A; Stangel, Martin

    2015-02-01

    Neuroprotective approaches for central nervous system regeneration have not been successful in clinical practice so far and compounds that enhance remyelination are still not available for patients with multiple sclerosis. The objective of this study was to determine potential regenerative effects of the substance cytidine-5'-diphospho (CDP)-choline in two different murine animal models of multiple sclerosis. The effects of exogenously applied CDP-choline were tested in murine myelin oligodendrocyte glycoprotein-induced experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis. In addition, the cuprizone-induced mouse model of de- and remyelination was used to specifically test the hypothesis that CDP-choline directly increases remyelination. We found that CDP-choline ameliorated the disease course of experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis and exerted beneficial effects on myelin, oligodendrocytes and axons. After cuprizone-induced demyelination, CDP-choline effectively enhanced myelin regeneration and reversed motor coordination deficits. The increased remyelination arose from an increase in the numbers of proliferating oligodendrocyte precursor cells and oligodendrocytes. Further in vitro studies suggest that this process is regulated by protein kinase C. We thus identified a new mechanism to enhance central nervous system remyelination via the choline pathway. Due to its regenerative action combined with an excellent safety profile, CDP-choline could become a promising substance for patients with multiple sclerosis as an add-on therapy. PMID:25524711

  7. Prenatal choline and the development of schizophrenia

    PubMed Central

    FREEDMAN, Robert; ROSS, Randal G.

    2015-01-01

    Background The primary prevention of illness at the population level, the ultimate aim of medicine, seems out of reach for schizophrenia. Schizophrenia has a strong genetic component, and its pathogenesis begins long before the emergence of psychosis, as early as fetal brain development. Cholinergic neurotransmission at nicotinic receptors is a pathophysiological mechanism related to one aspect of this genetic risk. Choline activates these nicotinic receptors during fetal brain development. Dietary supplementation of maternal choline thus emerges as a possible intervention in pregnancy to alter the earliest developmental course of the illness. Aim Review available literature on the relationship of choline supplementation or choline levels during pregnancy and fetal brain development. Methods A Medline search was used to identify studies assessing effects of choline in human fetal development. Studies of other prenatal risk factors for schizophrenia and the role of cholinergic neurotransmission in its pathophysiology were also identified. Results Dietary requirements for choline are high during pregnancy because of its several uses, including membrane biosynthesis, one-carbon metabolism, and cholinergic neurotransmission. Its ability to act directly at high concentrations as a nicotinic agonist is critical for normal brain circuit development. Dietary supplementation in the second and third trimesters with phosphatidyl-choline supports these functions and is associated generally with better fetal outcome. Improvement in inhibitory neuronal functions whose deficit is associated with schizophrenia and attention deficit disorder has been observed. Conclusion Prenatal dietary supplementation with phosphatidyl-choline and promotion of diets rich in choline-containing foods (meats, soybeans, and eggs) are possible interventions to promote fetal brain development and thereby decrease the risk of subsequent mental illnesses. The low risk and short (sixmonth) duration of the

  8. Choline-containing lipids in mycoplasmas.

    PubMed

    Rottem, Shlomo

    2002-07-01

    Choline-containing lipids were identified and characterized in the cell membrane of Mycoplasma fermentans and were shown to participate in the adhesion to the surface of eukaryotic cells, to stimulate mycoplasma fusion with eukaryotic cells, and to induce cytokine secretion by cells of the immune system. These findings suggest that choline-containing lipids are important mediators of tissue pathology in the infectious process caused by M. fermentans. PMID:12106789

  9. Deanol affects choline metabolism in peripheral tissues of mice.

    PubMed

    Haubrich, D R; Gerber, N H; Pflueger, A B

    1981-08-01

    Administration of 2-dimethylaminoethanol (deanol) to mice induced an increase in both the concentration and the rate of turnover of free choline in blood. Treatment with deanol also caused an increase in the concentration of choline in kidneys, and markedly inhibited the rates of oxidation and phosphorylation of intravenously administered [3H-methyl]choline. In the liver, deanol inhibited the rate of phosphorylation of [3H-methyl]choline, but did not inhibit its rate of oxidation or cause an increase in the level of free choline. These findings suggest that deanol increases the choline concentration in blood by inhibition of its metabolism in tissues. Deanol may ultimately produce its central cholinergic effects by inhibition of choline metabolism in peripheral tissues, causing free choline choline to accumulate in blood, enter the brain, and stimulate cholinergic receptors. PMID:7264671

  10. Choline incorporation by Schistosoma mansoni: distribution of choline metabolites during development and after sexual differentiation

    SciTech Connect

    Ancelin, M.L.; Torpier, G.; Vial, H.J.; Capron, A.

    1987-06-01

    Choline metabolism was investigated in Schistosoma mansoni during the main phases of its development, namely, schistosomula, 11- and 15-day-old worms, and adults. At the physiological choline concentration used in the assay (20 microM), betaine was, along with phosphatidylcholine, one of the most abundant choline metabolites, revealing considerable choline oxidation activity. Very little radioactivity was associated with CDP-choline, whereas a sustained incorporation into phosphocholine occurred. These results provide good evidence that CTP:phosphocholine cytidylyltransferase plays a regulatory role in the de novo pathway of phosphatidylcholine biosynthesis. During development, the incorporation of choline into its various metabolites was maximal in 11-day-old worms. At this stage, the oxidative pathway predominated over the Kennedy pathway, whereas at all other stages the de novo phosphatidylcholine biosynthesis was predominant. Furthermore, choline incorporation into betaine was much more important in the adult female worm than in the male, indicating a major difference in choline incorporation and distribution between the 2 sexes of the adult worms.

  11. The effect of cytidine-diphosphate choline (CDP-choline) on brain lipid changes during aging

    SciTech Connect

    De Medio, G.E.; Trovarelli, G.; Piccinin, G.L.; Porcellati, G.

    1984-01-01

    Lipid synthesis has been tested in vivo in different brain areas of 12-month-old male rats. Cortex, striatum, brainstem, and subcortex of brain have been examined. The cerebellum was discarded. Mixtures of (2-/sup 3/H)glycerol and (Me-/sup 14/C)choline were injected into the lateral ventricle of the brain as lipid precursors, and their incorporation into total lipid, water-soluble intermediates and choline-containing phospholipids was examined 1 hr after isotope injection. In another series of experiments cytidine-5'-diphosphate choline (CDP-choline) was injected intraventricularly to the aged rats 10 min before sacrifice with a simultaneous injection, and radioactivity assays were performed as above. Distribution of radioactivity content of CDP-choline among brain areas 10 min after its administration showed a noticeable enrichment of the nucleotide and water-soluble-related compounds in the examined areas, but to a lesser degree in the cerebral cortex. The incorporation of labelled glycerol, which is severely depressed in aged rats in all four areas (Gaiti et al, 1982, 1983), was increased only in the cortex, and apparently decreased in the other areas. This last result is probably due to a dilution effect brought about by the administered cold CDP-choline upon the (/sup 14/C)-containing water-soluble metabolites. As a consequence, the (/sup 3/H)/(/sup 14/C) ratio in total lipid and in isolated phosphatidylcholine and choline plasmalogen increased after CDP-choline treatment.

  12. Dietary Intake of Choline and Plasma Choline Concentrations in Pregnant Women in Jamaica

    PubMed Central

    Gossell-Williams, M; Fletcher, H; McFarlane-Anderson, N; Jacob, A; Patel, J; Zeisel, S

    2008-01-01

    Choline is an essential nutrient for humans and its availability during pregnancy is important for optimal fetal development. The Food and Nutrition Board of the Institute of Medicine in the United States of America has set the adequate choline intake during pregnancy at 450 mg/day. There is limited data available on normal plasma choline concentrations in pregnancy. Moreover, there are neither documented studies of choline intake among pregnant women in the Jamaican population nor of free plasma choline concentrations during pregnancy. Sixteen women presenting to the antenatal clinic of the University Hospital of the West Indies (UHWI) at 10−15 weeks of gestation were selected for this pilot study. A food frequency questionnaire was administered to estimate frequency of consumption of foods rich in choline. Fasting blood samples were collected by venepuncture and plasma assayed for choline using liquid chromatography electrospray ionization isotopic dilution mass spectrometry. Most of the women reported consumption of diets that delivered less than the recommended choline intake (mean ± SEM, 278.5 ± 28.9 mg). Mean plasma choline concentration was 8.4 ± 0.4 μmol/L. This falls below the normal concentration (10 μmol/L) reported for individuals that are not pregnant and pregnant (14.5 μmol/L). The results of this study may be an indication that the choline included in the diet of pregnant women in Jamaica may not be adequate to meet both the needs of the mother and fetus and that further studies are warranted to determine clinical implications. PMID:16642650

  13. Uptake of free choline by isolated perfused rat liver.

    PubMed Central

    Zeisel, S H; Story, D L; Wurtman, R J; Brunengraber, H

    1980-01-01

    The uptake of free choline by isolated perfused rat liver was characterized. A saturable uptake mechanism [Ka = 0.17 +/- 0.07 mM (SD); Vmax = 0.84 +/- 0.16 mumol/min X g dry weight] and a nonsaturable mechanism (through which uptake is proportional to choline concentration in the perfusate) were identified. Most of the choline transported into hepatocytes was converted to betaine, phosphorylcholine, or lecithin. Free choline also accumulated within the intracellular space, suggesting that choline oxidase activity does not always limit choline's uptake by the liver. PMID:6933493

  14. Prenatal choline availability modulates hippocampal neurogenesis and neurogenic responses to enriching experiences in adult female rats

    PubMed Central

    Glenn, Melissa J.; Gibson, Erin M.; Kirby, Elizabeth D.; Mellott, Tiffany J.; Blusztajn, Jan K.; Williams, Christina L.

    2008-01-01

    Increased dietary intake of choline early in life improves performance of adult rats on memory tasks and prevents their age-related memory decline. Because neurogenesis in the adult hippocampus also declines with age, we investigated whether prenatal choline availability affects hippocampal neurogenesis in adult Sprague–Dawley rats and modifies their neurogenic response to environmental stimulation. On embryonic days (ED) 12−17, pregnant rats ate a choline-supplemented (SUP-5 g/kg), choline sufficient (SFF-1.1 g/kg), or choline-free (DEF) semisynthetic diet. Adult offspring either remained in standard housing or were given 21 daily visits to explore a maze. On the last ten exploration days, all rats received daily injections of 5-bromo-2-deoxyuridine (BrdU, 100 mg/kg). The number of BrdU+ cells was significantly greater in the dentate gyrus in SUP rats compared to SFF or DEF rats. While maze experience increased the number of BrdU+ cells in SFF rats to the level seen in the SUP rats, this enriching experience did not alter cell proliferation in DEF rats. Similar patterns of cell proliferation were obtained with immunohistochemical staining for neuronal marker doublecortin, confirming that diet and exploration affected hippocampal neurogenesis. Moreover, hippocampal levels of the brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) were increased in SUP rats as compared to SFF and DEF animals. We conclude that prenatal choline intake has enduring effects on adult hippocampal neurogenesis, possibly via up-regulation of BDNF levels, and suggest that these alterations of neurogenesis may contribute to the mechanism of life-long changes in cognitive function governed by the availability of choline during gestation. PMID:17445242

  15. Choline Ameliorates Disease Phenotypes in Human iPSC Models of Rett Syndrome.

    PubMed

    Chin, Eunice W M; Marcy, Guillaume; Yoon, Su-In; Ma, Dongliang; Rosales, Francisco J; Augustine, George J; Goh, Eyleen L K

    2016-09-01

    Rett syndrome (RTT) is a postnatal neurodevelopmental disorder that primarily affects girls. Mutations in the methyl-CpG-binding protein 2 (MECP2) gene account for approximately 95 % of all RTT cases. To model RTT in vitro, we generated induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) from fibroblasts of two RTT patients with different mutations (MECP2 (R306C) and MECP2 (1155Δ32)) in their MECP2 gene. We found that these iPSCs were capable of differentiating into functional neurons. Compared to control neurons, the RTT iPSC-derived cells had reduced soma size and a decreased amount of synaptic input, evident both as fewer Synapsin 1-positive puncta and a lower frequency of spontaneous excitatory postsynaptic currents. Supplementation of the culture media with choline rescued all of these defects. Choline supplementation may act through changes in the expression of choline acetyltransferase, an important enzyme in cholinergic signaling, and also through alterations in the lipid metabolite profiles of the RTT neurons. Our study elucidates the possible mechanistic pathways for the effect of choline on human RTT cell models, thereby illustrating the potential for using choline as a nutraceutical to treat RTT. PMID:27379379

  16. Early increase in phosphatidyl choline synthesis by choline and transmethylation pathways in spreading fibroblasts

    SciTech Connect

    Maziere, C.; Maziere, J.C.; Mora, L.; Polonovski, J.

    1986-11-01

    Phosphatidyl choline (PC) synthesis in trypsinized and reattaching fibroblasts during the spreading state was studied by incorporation of (/sup 14/C)choline and (methyl-/sup 14/C)methionine. The choline and phosphatidyl-ethanolamine (PE) transmethylation pathways were both transiently increased about 2-fold during the first 2 h after replating. Maximum increase appeared to be simultaneous with maximum spreading. Incorporation of (/sup 32/P)orthophosphate showed that the increase in PC synthesis was specific and most probably related to establishment of cell-substrate adhesion sites.

  17. 21 CFR 573.580 - Iron-choline citrate complex.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Iron-choline citrate complex. 573.580 Section 573... Food Additive Listing § 573.580 Iron-choline citrate complex. Iron-choline citrate complex made by... used as a source of iron in animal feed....

  18. 21 CFR 172.370 - Iron-choline citrate complex.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Iron-choline citrate complex. 172.370 Section 172... CONSUMPTION Special Dietary and Nutritional Additives § 172.370 Iron-choline citrate complex. Iron-choline... citric acid may be safely used as a source of iron in foods for special dietary use....

  19. 21 CFR 172.370 - Iron-choline citrate complex.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Iron-choline citrate complex. 172.370 Section 172... Nutritional Additives § 172.370 Iron-choline citrate complex. Iron-choline citrate complex made by reacting... source of iron in foods for special dietary use....

  20. 21 CFR 172.370 - Iron-choline citrate complex.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Iron-choline citrate complex. 172.370 Section 172... CONSUMPTION Special Dietary and Nutritional Additives § 172.370 Iron-choline citrate complex. Iron-choline... citric acid may be safely used as a source of iron in foods for special dietary use....

  1. 21 CFR 573.580 - Iron-choline citrate complex.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Iron-choline citrate complex. 573.580 Section 573... Food Additive Listing § 573.580 Iron-choline citrate complex. Iron-choline citrate complex made by... used as a source of iron in animal feed....

  2. 21 CFR 573.580 - Iron-choline citrate complex.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Iron-choline citrate complex. 573.580 Section 573... Food Additive Listing § 573.580 Iron-choline citrate complex. Iron-choline citrate complex made by... used as a source of iron in animal feed....

  3. 21 CFR 172.370 - Iron-choline citrate complex.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2010-04-01 2009-04-01 true Iron-choline citrate complex. 172.370 Section 172... CONSUMPTION Special Dietary and Nutritional Additives § 172.370 Iron-choline citrate complex. Iron-choline... citric acid may be safely used as a source of iron in foods for special dietary use....

  4. 21 CFR 172.370 - Iron-choline citrate complex.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Iron-choline citrate complex. 172.370 Section 172... CONSUMPTION Special Dietary and Nutritional Additives § 172.370 Iron-choline citrate complex. Iron-choline... citric acid may be safely used as a source of iron in foods for special dietary use....

  5. 21 CFR 573.580 - Iron-choline citrate complex.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Iron-choline citrate complex. 573.580 Section 573... Food Additive Listing § 573.580 Iron-choline citrate complex. Iron-choline citrate complex made by... used as a source of iron in animal feed....

  6. 21 CFR 573.580 - Iron-choline citrate complex.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Iron-choline citrate complex. 573.580 Section 573... Food Additive Listing § 573.580 Iron-choline citrate complex. Iron-choline citrate complex made by... used as a source of iron in animal feed....

  7. 21 CFR 573.300 - Choline xanthate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Choline xanthate. 573.300 Section 573.300 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL DRUGS, FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS FOOD ADDITIVES PERMITTED IN FEED AND DRINKING WATER OF ANIMALS Food...

  8. 21 CFR 573.300 - Choline xanthate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Choline xanthate. 573.300 Section 573.300 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL DRUGS, FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS FOOD ADDITIVES PERMITTED IN FEED AND DRINKING WATER OF ANIMALS Food...

  9. 21 CFR 582.5252 - Choline chloride.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Choline chloride. 582.5252 Section 582.5252 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL DRUGS, FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS SUBSTANCES GENERALLY RECOGNIZED AS SAFE Nutrients and/or...

  10. 21 CFR 582.5250 - Choline bitartrate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Choline bitartrate. 582.5250 Section 582.5250 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL DRUGS, FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS SUBSTANCES GENERALLY RECOGNIZED AS SAFE Nutrients and/or...

  11. 21 CFR 582.5250 - Choline bitartrate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Choline bitartrate. 582.5250 Section 582.5250 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL DRUGS, FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS SUBSTANCES GENERALLY RECOGNIZED AS SAFE Nutrients and/or...

  12. 21 CFR 582.5252 - Choline chloride.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Choline chloride. 582.5252 Section 582.5252 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL DRUGS, FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS SUBSTANCES GENERALLY RECOGNIZED AS SAFE Nutrients and/or...

  13. 21 CFR 182.8252 - Choline chloride.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Choline chloride. 182.8252 Section 182.8252 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) FOOD FOR HUMAN CONSUMPTION (CONTINUED) SUBSTANCES GENERALLY RECOGNIZED AS SAFE Nutrients § 182.8252...

  14. 21 CFR 182.8252 - Choline chloride.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Choline chloride. 182.8252 Section 182.8252 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) FOOD FOR HUMAN CONSUMPTION (CONTINUED) SUBSTANCES GENERALLY RECOGNIZED AS SAFE Nutrients § 182.8252...

  15. 21 CFR 182.8250 - Choline bitartrate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Choline bitartrate. 182.8250 Section 182.8250 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) FOOD FOR HUMAN CONSUMPTION (CONTINUED) SUBSTANCES GENERALLY RECOGNIZED AS SAFE Nutrients § 182.8250...

  16. 21 CFR 582.5250 - Choline bitartrate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Choline bitartrate. 582.5250 Section 582.5250 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL DRUGS, FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS SUBSTANCES GENERALLY RECOGNIZED AS SAFE Nutrients and/or...

  17. 21 CFR 182.8250 - Choline bitartrate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Choline bitartrate. 182.8250 Section 182.8250 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) FOOD FOR HUMAN CONSUMPTION (CONTINUED) SUBSTANCES GENERALLY RECOGNIZED AS SAFE Nutrients § 182.8250...

  18. 21 CFR 182.8250 - Choline bitartrate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Choline bitartrate. 182.8250 Section 182.8250 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) FOOD FOR HUMAN CONSUMPTION (CONTINUED) SUBSTANCES GENERALLY RECOGNIZED AS SAFE Nutrients § 182.8250...

  19. 21 CFR 582.5252 - Choline chloride.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Choline chloride. 582.5252 Section 582.5252 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL DRUGS, FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS SUBSTANCES GENERALLY RECOGNIZED AS SAFE Nutrients and/or...

  20. 21 CFR 182.8252 - Choline chloride.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2010-04-01 2009-04-01 true Choline chloride. 182.8252 Section 182.8252 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) FOOD FOR HUMAN CONSUMPTION (CONTINUED) SUBSTANCES GENERALLY RECOGNIZED AS SAFE Nutrients § 182.8252...

  1. 21 CFR 582.5250 - Choline bitartrate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Choline bitartrate. 582.5250 Section 582.5250 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL DRUGS, FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS SUBSTANCES GENERALLY RECOGNIZED AS SAFE Nutrients and/or...

  2. 21 CFR 582.5252 - Choline chloride.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Choline chloride. 582.5252 Section 582.5252 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL DRUGS, FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS SUBSTANCES GENERALLY RECOGNIZED AS SAFE Nutrients and/or...

  3. 21 CFR 182.8250 - Choline bitartrate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2010-04-01 2009-04-01 true Choline bitartrate. 182.8250 Section 182.8250 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) FOOD FOR HUMAN CONSUMPTION (CONTINUED) SUBSTANCES GENERALLY RECOGNIZED AS SAFE Nutrients § 182.8250...

  4. 21 CFR 182.8252 - Choline chloride.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Choline chloride. 182.8252 Section 182.8252 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) FOOD FOR HUMAN CONSUMPTION (CONTINUED) SUBSTANCES GENERALLY RECOGNIZED AS SAFE Nutrients § 182.8252...

  5. USDA Choline Data for Baby Food

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Choline, a dietary component occurring naturally in high-protein and high-fat foods (e.g., eggs, meat, fish, nuts, legumes and human milk), plays a critical role in normal brain development (Zeisel et. al, 2004). It is essential to the development of cell membranes and therefore, inadequate intake b...

  6. Novel choline esterase based sensor for monitoring of organophosphorus pollutants

    SciTech Connect

    Wilkins, E.S.; Ghindilis, A.L.; Atanasov, P.

    1996-12-31

    Organophosphorus compounds are significant major environmental pollutants due to their intensive use as pesticides. The modern techniques based on inhibition of choline esterase enzyme activity are discussed. Potentiometric electrodes based on detection of choline esterase inhibition by analytes has been developed. The detection of choline esterase activity is based on the novel principle of molecular transduction. Immobilized peroxidase acting as the molecular transducer, catalyzes the electroreduction of hydrogen peroxide by direct (mediatorless) electron transfer. The sensing element consists of a carbon based electrode containing an assembly of co-immobilized enzymes: choline esterase, choline oxidase and peroxidase.

  7. Choline metabolism-based molecular diagnosis of cancer: an update

    PubMed Central

    Glunde, Kristine; Penet, Marie-France; Jiang, Lu; Jacobs, Michael A; Bhujwalla, Zaver M

    2016-01-01

    Abnormal choline metabolism continues to be identified in multiple cancers. Molecular causes of abnormal choline metabolism are changes in choline kinase-α, ethanolamine kinase-α, phosphatidylcholine-specific phospholipase C and -D and glycerophosphocholine phosphodiesterases, as well as several choline transporters. The net outcome of these enzymatic changes is an increase in phosphocholine and total choline (tCho) and, in some cancers, a relative decrease of glycerophosphocholine. The increased tCho signal detected by 1H magnetic resonance spectroscopy is being evaluated as a diagnostic marker in multiple cancers. Increased expression and activity of choline transporters and choline kinase-α have spurred the development of radiolabeled choline analogs as PET imaging tracers. Both tCho 1H magnetic resonance spectroscopy and choline PET are being investigated to detect response to treatment. Enzymes mediating the abnormal choline metabolism are being explored as targets for cancer therapy. This review highlights recent molecular, therapeutic and clinical advances in choline metabolism in cancer. PMID:25921026

  8. Caffeine potentiates the enhancement by choline of striatal acetylcholine release

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, D. A.; Ulus, I. H.; Wurtman, R. J.

    1992-01-01

    We investigated the effect of peripherally administered caffeine (50 mg/kg), choline (30, 60, or 120 mg/kg) or combinations of both drugs on the spontaneous release of acetylcholine (ACh) from the corpus striatum of anesthetized rats using in vivo microdialysis. Caffeine alone or choline in the 30 or 60 mg/kg dose failed to increase ACh in microdialysis samples; the 120 mg/kg choline dose significantly enhanced ACh during the 80 min following drug administration. Coadministration of caffeine with choline significantly increased ACh release after each of the choline doses tested. Peak microdialysate levels with the 120 mg/kg dose were increased 112% when caffeine was additionally administered, as compared with 54% without caffeine. These results indicate that choline administration can enhance spontaneous ACh release from neurons, and that caffeine, a drug known to block adenosine receptors on these neurons, can amplify the choline effect.

  9. A single-vial biphasic liquid extraction assay for choline acetyltransferease using (/sup 3/H)choline

    SciTech Connect

    Rand, J.B.; Johnson, C.D.

    1981-09-15

    A single-vial liquid extraction assay for choline acetyltransferase that uses (/sup 3/H)choline as the labeled substrate has been devised. (/sup 3/H)Choline is incubated with an excess of acetyl-CoA in a small reaction vial which also serves as a scintillation vial. After a suitable reaction period, unreacted (/sup 3/H)choline is quickly and quantitatively converted to phosphoryl-(/sup 3/H)choline by the addition of an excess of choline kinase. This treatment is followed by the addition of scintillation fluid containing sodium tetraphenylboron after which the vial is capped, shaken, and counted. A two-phase system is produced in which product (/sup 3/H)choline is selectively extracted into the scintillation fluid, where is is counted. Phosphoryl-(/sup 3/H)choline remains in the aqueous phase and is not counted. This assay is rapid, simple, and quite sensitive. In comparison to assays using acetyl-CoA as the labeled substrate, it is less sensitive to interference by other enzymes and thus more suitable for measuring choline acetyltransferase in crude extracts and in the initial stages of purificaton. Similar single-vial radiometric assays are described for choline kinase and acetyl-CoA hydrolases.

  10. Comparable Stability of Hoogsteen and Watson–Crick Base Pairs in Ionic Liquid Choline Dihydrogen Phosphate

    PubMed Central

    Tateishi-Karimata, Hisae; Nakano, Miki; Sugimoto, Naoki

    2014-01-01

    The instability of Hoogsteen base pairs relative to Watson–Crick base pairs has limited biological applications of triplex-forming oligonucleotides. Hydrated ionic liquids (ILs) provide favourable environments for a wide range of chemical reactions and are known to impact the stabilities of Watson–Crick base pairs. We found that DNA triplex formation was significantly stabilized in hydrated choline dihydrogen phosphate as compared with an aqueous buffer at neutral pH. Interestingly, the stability of Hoogsteen base pairs was found to be comparable with that of Watson–Crick base pairs in the hydrated IL. Molecular dynamics simulations of a DNA triplex in the presence of choline ions revealed that the DNA triplex was stabilized because of the binding of choline ion around the third strand in the grooves. Our finding will facilitate the development of new DNA materials. Our data also indicate that triplex formation may be stabilized inside cells where choline ions and their derivatives are abundant in vivo. PMID:24399194

  11. Comparable stability of Hoogsteen and Watson-Crick base pairs in ionic liquid choline dihydrogen phosphate.

    PubMed

    Tateishi-Karimata, Hisae; Nakano, Miki; Sugimoto, Naoki

    2014-01-01

    The instability of Hoogsteen base pairs relative to Watson-Crick base pairs has limited biological applications of triplex-forming oligonucleotides. Hydrated ionic liquids (ILs) provide favourable environments for a wide range of chemical reactions and are known to impact the stabilities of Watson-Crick base pairs. We found that DNA triplex formation was significantly stabilized in hydrated choline dihydrogen phosphate as compared with an aqueous buffer at neutral pH. Interestingly, the stability of Hoogsteen base pairs was found to be comparable with that of Watson-Crick base pairs in the hydrated IL. Molecular dynamics simulations of a DNA triplex in the presence of choline ions revealed that the DNA triplex was stabilized because of the binding of choline ion around the third strand in the grooves. Our finding will facilitate the development of new DNA materials. Our data also indicate that triplex formation may be stabilized inside cells where choline ions and their derivatives are abundant in vivo. PMID:24399194

  12. Effect of choline carboxylate ionic liquids on biological membranes

    PubMed Central

    Rengstl, Doris; Kraus, Birgit; Van Vorst, Matthew; Elliott, Gloria D.; Kunz, Werner

    2015-01-01

    Choline carboxylates, ChCm, with m = 2–10 and choline oleate are known as biocompatible substances, yet their influence on biological membranes is not well-known, and the effect on human skin has not previously been investigated. The short chain choline carboxylates ChCm with m = 2, 4, 6 act as hydrotropes, solubilizing hydrophobic compounds in aqueous solution, while the longer chain choline carboxylates ChCm with m = 8,10 and oleate are able to form micelles. In the present study, the cytotoxicity of choline carboxylates was tested using HeLa and SK-MEL-28 cells. The influence of these substances on liposomes prepared from dipalmitoylphosphatidylcholine (DPPC) was also evaluated to provide insights on membrane interactions. It was observed that the choline carboxylates with a chain length of m > 8 distinctly influence the bilayer, while the shorter ones had minimal interaction with the liposomes. PMID:25444662

  13. Exercise and neuromodulators: choline and acetylcholine in marathon runners

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Conlay, L. A.; Sabounjian, L. A.; Wurtman, R. J.

    1992-01-01

    Certain neurotransmitters (i.e., acetylcholine, catecholamines, and serotonin) are formed from dietary constituents (i.e., choline, tyrosine and tryptophan). Changing the consumption of these precursors alters release of their respective neurotransmitter products. The neurotransmitter acetylcholine is released from the neuromuscular junction and from brain. It is formed from choline, a common constituent in fish, liver, and eggs. Choline is also incorporated into cell membranes; membranes may likewise serve as an alternative choline source for acetylcholine synthesis. In trained athletes, running a 26 km marathon reduced plasma choline by approximately 40%, from 14.1 to 8.4 uM. Changes of similar magnitude have been shown to reduce acetylcholine release from the neuromuscular junction in vivo. Thus, the reductions in plasma choline associated with strenuous exercise may reduce acetylcholine release, and could thereby affect endurance or performance.

  14. Maternal choline supplementation: a nutritional approach for improving offspring health?

    PubMed

    Jiang, Xinyin; West, Allyson A; Caudill, Marie A

    2014-05-01

    The modulatory role of choline on the fetal epigenome and the impact of in utero choline supply on fetal programming and health are of great interest. Studies in animals and/or humans suggest that maternal choline supplementation during pregnancy benefits important physiologic systems such as offspring cognitive function, response to stress, and cerebral inhibition. Because alterations in offspring phenotype frequently coincide with epigenetic modifications and changes in gene expression, maternal choline supplementation may be a nutritional strategy to improve lifelong health of the child. Future studies are warranted to elucidate further the effect of choline on the fetal epigenome and to determine the level of maternal choline intake required for optimal offspring physiologic function. PMID:24680198

  15. Choline or methionine reverses impaired secretion of VLDL by hepatocytes from choline-deficient rats

    SciTech Connect

    Yao, Z.; Vance, D.E.

    1987-05-01

    Male rats fed a choline-deficient (CD) diet for three days accumulated triacylglycerol (TG) in the liver. Hepatocytes from these rats were cultured and maintained in a medium + choline. The rate of secretion of TG was reduced by 50% in the CD cells. Correspondingly, (/sup 3/H)oleate and (/sup 3/H)glycerol were incorporated at a 2-fold higher rate into TG secreted by choline-supplemented cells compared to CD cells. Isolation of lipoprotein fractions by ultracentrifugation showed that the reduced secretion of TG by CD hepatocytes was mainly due to an impaired secretion of very low density lipoprotein (VLDL). Incorporation of (/sup 3/H)leucine into secreted apoB/sub H/, apoB/sub L/ and apoE was markedly reduced in CD cells compared to choline-supplemented cells. Secretion of high density lipoprotein was not reduced in the CD hepatocytes. Normal secretion of VLDL was resumed upon addition of methionine to the CD cells.

  16. Prenatal choline deficiency increases choline transporter expression in the septum and hippocampus during postnatal development and in adulthood in rats.

    PubMed

    Mellott, Tiffany J; Kowall, Neil W; Lopez-Coviella, Ignacio; Blusztajn, Jan Krzysztof

    2007-06-01

    Supplementation of maternal diet with the essential nutrient, choline, during the second half of pregnancy in rats causes long-lasting improvements in spatial memory in the offspring and protects them from the memory decline characteristic of old age. In contrast, prenatal choline deficiency is associated with poor performance in certain cognitive tasks. The mechanism by which choline influences learning and memory remains unclear; however, it may involve changes to the hippocampal cholinergic system. Previously, we showed that the hippocampi of prenatally [embryonic days (E) 11-17] choline-deficient animals have increased synthesis of acetylcholine (ACh) from choline transported by the high-affinity choline transporter (CHT) and reduced ACh content relative to the control and to the E11-17 choline-supplemented rats. In the current study, we found that, during postnatal period [postnatal days (P) 18-480], prenatal choline deficiency increased the expression of CHT mRNA in the septum and CHT mRNA and protein levels in the hippocampus and altered the pattern of CHT immunoreactivity in the dentate gyrus. CHT immunoreactivity was more prominent in the inner molecular layer in prenatally choline-deficient rats compared to controls and prenatally choline-supplemented animals. In addition, in all groups, we observed a population of hilar interneurons that were CHT-immunoreactive. These neurons are the likely source of the hippocampal CHT mRNA as their number correlated with the levels of this mRNA. The abundance of hippocampal CHT mRNA rose between P1 and P24 and then declined reaching 60% of the P1 value by P90. These data show that prenatal availability of choline alters its own metabolism (i.e., CHT expression). While the upregulated CHT expression during the period of prenatal choline deficiency may be considered as a compensatory mechanism that could enhance ACh synthesis when choline supply is low, the persistent upregulation of CHT expression subsequent to the

  17. 18F-labeled Single-Stranded DNA Aptamer for PET Imaging of Protein Tyrosine Kinase-7 Expression

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Lu; Wang, Zhe; Yang, Xiangyu; Dewhurst, Andrew; Ma, Ying; Zhu, Guizhi; Niu, Gang; Kiesewetter, Dale O.; Vasdev, Neil; Liang, Steven H.; Chen, Xiaoyuan

    2016-01-01

    Protein tyrosine kinase-7 (PTK7), a member of receptor tyrosine kinase superfamily initially identified as colon carcinoma kinase-4 (CCK-4), is highly expressed in various human malignancies. Its expression was found to correlate with aggressive biological behaviors such as increased cell proliferation, invasiveness and migration. Despite the importance and unmet need of imaging PTK7 in vivo, there is currently no clinically-relevant method to visualize tumoral PTK7 expression noninvasively such as PET or SPECT. This study aims to develop a specific, selective and high affinity PET radioligand based on single-stranded DNA (ssDNA) aptamer to address this challenge. Methods Sgc8, a 41-oligonucleotide that targets to PTK7, was labeled with F-18 using a two-step radiochemical synthesis, which featured a direct one-step radiofluorination on the distinctive spirocyclic hypervalent iodine(III) precursor to give 18F-fluorobenzyl azide followed by copper mediated “click” conjugation with Sgc8-alkyne. 18F-Sgc8 was evaluated in vitro and in vivo in two cell lines, HCT116 and U87MG, which express high and low amounts of PTK7, respectively. Results Sgc8 was labeled efficiently with F-18 in an isolated radiochemical yield of 62 ± 2%, non-decay-corrected (ndc) based on 18F-fluorobenzyl azide. 18F-Tr-Sgc8 was found to possess high affinity binding to both cell lines, with IC50 values for HCT116 as 2.7 ± 0.6 nM and U87MG as 16.9 ± 2.1 nM. In vivo PET imaging clearly visualized PTK7 expression in HCT116 xenografted mice with tumor uptake of 0.76 ± 0.09 %ID/g at 30 min post-injection (p.i.) for the subcutaneous tumor model and greater than 1.5 %ID/g for the liver metastasis model. U87MG xenograft tumors had much lower tracer accumulation (0.13 ± 0.06 %ID/g at 30 min p.i.), which was consistent with the lower expression of PTK7 in this tumor model. The labeled aptamer was rapidly cleared from the blood through the kidneys and bladder to give high tumor-to-blood and tumor-to-muscle ratios of 7.29 ± 1.51 and 10.25 ± 2.08, respectively. Conclusions The F-18 radiolabeling methodology shown here is a very robust procedure for labeling aptamers and similar chemical moieties, and can be applied to many different targets. Quantification of PTK7 using 18F-Tr-Sgc8 may be suitable for clinical translation and might help in the future to select and monitor appropriate therapies. PMID:26315836

  18. Synthesis, In Vitro and In Vivo Evaluation of 18F-labeled PET Ligands for Imaging the Vesicular Acetylcholine Transporter

    PubMed Central

    Tu, Zhude; Efange, Simon M. N.; Xu, Jinbin; Li, Shihong; Jones, Lynne A.; Parsons, Stanley M.; Mach, Robert H.

    2009-01-01

    A new class of vesicular acetylcholine transporter inhibitor that incorporates a carbonyl group into the benzovesamicol structure was synthesized and analogs were evaluated in vitro. (±)-trans-2-Hydroxy-3-(4-(4-[18F]fluorobenzoyl)piperidino)tetralin (9e) has Ki values of 2.70 nM for VAChT, 191 nM for σ1 and 251 nM for σ2. The racemic precursor (9d) was resolved via chiral HPLC and (±)-[18F]9e, (-)-[18F]9e, and (+)-[18F]9e were respectively radiolabeled via microwave irradiation of the appropriate precursors with [18F]/F- and Kryptofix/K2CO3 in DMSO with radiochemical yields ∼50-60% and specific activities >2000 mCi/μmol. (-)-[18F]9e uptake in rat brain was consistent with in vivo selectivity for the VAChT with an initial uptake of 0.911 %ID/g in rat striatum and a striatum: cerebellum ratio of 1.88 by 30 min p.i.. MicroPET imaging of macaques demonstrated a 2.1 ratio of (-)-[18F]9e in putamen versus cerebellum at 2 h. p.i. (-)-[18F]9e has potential to be a PET tracer for clinical imaging of the VAChT. PMID:19203271

  19. Novel 18F labeling strategy for polyester-based NPs for in vivo PET-CT imaging.

    PubMed

    Di Mauro, Primiano Pio; Gómez-Vallejo, Vanessa; Baz Maldonado, Zuriñe; Llop Roig, Jordi; Borrós, Salvador

    2015-03-18

    Drug-loaded nanocarriers and nanoparticulate systems used for drug release require a careful in vivo evaluation in terms of physicochemical and pharmacokinetic properties. Nuclear imaging techniques such as positron emission tomography (PET) are ideal and noninvasive tools to investigate the biodistribution and biological fate of the nanostructures, but the incorporation of a positron emitter is required. Here we describe a novel approach for the (18)F-radiolabeling of polyester-based nanoparticles. Our approach relies on the preparation of the radiolabeled active agent 4-[(18)F]fluorobenzyl-2-bromoacetamide ([(18)F]FBBA), which is subsequently coupled to block copolymers under mild conditions. The labeled block copolymers are ultimately incorporated as constituent elements of the NPs by using a modified nano coprecipitation method. This strategy has been applied in the current work to the preparation of peptide-functionalized NPs with potential applications in drug delivery. According to the measurements of particle size and zeta potential, the radiolabeling process did not result in a statistically significant alteration of the physicochemical properties of the NPs. Moreover, radiochemical stability studies showed no detachment of the radioactivity from NPs even at 12 h after preparation. The radiolabeled NPs enabled the in vivo quantification of the biodistribution data in rats using a combination of imaging techniques, namely, PET and computerized tomography (CT). Low accumulation of the nanoparticles in the liver and their elimination mainly via urine was found. The different biodistribution pattern obtained for the "free" radiolabeled polymer suggests chemical and radiochemical integrity of the NPs under investigation. The strategy reported here may be applied to any polymeric NPs containing polymers bearing a nucleophile, and hence our novel strategy may find application for the in vivo and noninvasive investigation of a wide range of NPs. PMID:25710619

  20. One-step (18)F-labeling of peptides for positron emission tomography imaging using the SiFA methodology.

    PubMed

    Wängler, Carmen; Niedermoser, Sabrina; Chin, Joshua; Orchowski, Katy; Schirrmacher, Esther; Jurkschat, Klaus; Iovkova-Berends, Liuba; Kostikov, Alexey P; Schirrmacher, Ralf; Wängler, Björn

    2012-11-01

    Here we present a procedure to label peptides with the positron-emitting radioisotope fluorine-18 ((18)F) using the silicon-fluoride acceptor (SiFA) labeling methodology. Positron emission tomography (PET) has gained high importance in noninvasive imaging of various diseases over the past decades, and thus new specific imaging probes for PET imaging, especially those labeled with (18)F, because of the advantageous properties of this nuclide, are highly sought after. N-terminally SiFA-modified peptides can be labeled with (18)F(-) in one step at room temperature (20-25 °C) or below without forming side products, thereby producing satisfactory radiochemical yields of 46 ± 1.5% (n = 10). The degree of chemoselectivity of the (18)F-introduction, which is based on simple isotopic exchange, allows for a facile cartridge-based purification fully devoid of HPLC implementation, thereby yielding peptides with specific activities between 44.4 and 62.9 GBq μmol(-1) (1,200-1,700 Ci mmol(-1)) within 25 min. PMID:23037309

  1. Legionella bozemanae synthesizes phosphatidylcholine from exogenous choline.

    PubMed

    Palusinska-Szysz, Marta; Janczarek, Monika; Kalitynski, Rafal; Dawidowicz, Andrzej L; Russa, Ryszard

    2011-02-20

    The phospholipid class and fatty acid composition of Legionella bozemanae were determined using thin-layer chromatography, gas-liquid chromatography, and matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization-time of flight mass spectrometry. Phosphatidylcholine, phosphatidylethanolamine, and diphosphatidylglycerol were the predominant phospholipids, while phosphatidyl-N-monomethylethanolamine, phosphatidylglycerol, and phosphatidyl-N,N-dimethylethanolamine were present at low concentrations. With the use of the LC/MS technique, PC16:0/15:0, PC17:/15:0, and PE16:1/15:0 were shown to be the dominant phospholipid constituents, which may be taxonomically significant. Two independent phosphatidylcholine synthesis pathways (the three-step methylation and the one-step CDP-choline pathway) were present and functional in L. bozemanae. In the genome of L. bozemanae, genes encoding two potential phosphatidylcholine forming enzymes, phospholipid N-methyl transferase (PmtA) and phosphatidylcholine synthase (Pcs), homologous to L. longbeachae, L. drancourtii, and L. pneumophila pmtA and pcs genes were identified. Genes pmtA and pcs from L. bozemanae were sequenced and analyzed on nucleotide and amino acid levels. Bacteria grown on an artificial medium with labelled choline synthesized phosphatidylcholine predominantly via the phosphatidylcholine synthase pathway, which indicates that L. bozemanae phosphatidylcholine, similarly as in other bacteria associated with eukaryotes, is an important determinant of host-microbe interactions. PMID:20338739

  2. Compartmental model of 18F-choline

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Janzen, T.; Tavola, F.; Giussani, A.; Cantone, M. C.; Uusijärvi, H.; Mattsson, S.; Zankl, M.; Petoussi-Henß, N.; Hoeschen, C.

    2010-03-01

    The MADEIRA Project (Minimizing Activity and Dose with Enhanced Image quality by Radiopharmaceutical Administrations), aims to improve the efficacy and safety of 3D functional imaging by optimizing, among others, the knowledge of the temporal variation of the radiopharmaceuticals' uptake in and clearance from tumor and healthy tissues. With the help of compartmental modeling it is intended to optimize the time schedule for data collection and improve the evaluation of the organ doses to the patients. Administration of 18F-choline to screen for recurrence or the occurrence of metastases in prostate cancer patients is one of the diagnostic applications under consideration in the frame of the project. PET and CT images have been acquired up to four hours after injection of 18F-choline. Additionally blood and urine samples have been collected and measured in a gamma counter. The radioactivity concentration in different organs and data of plasma clearance and elimination into urine were used to set-up a compartmental model of the biokinetics of the radiopharmaceutical. It features a central compartment (blood) exchanging with organs. The structure describes explicitly liver, kidneys, spleen, plasma and bladder as separate units with a forcing function approach. The model is presented together with an evaluation of the individual and population kinetic parameters, and a revised time schedule for data collection is proposed. This optimized time schedule will be validated in a further set of patient studies.

  3. Choline associated hypersexuality in a 79-year-old man.

    PubMed

    Calabrò, Rocco Salvatore; Cordici, Francesco; Genovese, Carmelo; Bramanti, Placido

    2014-01-01

    Hypersexuality, also referred to as sexually inappropriate behavior and sexual disinhibition, involves persistent, uninhibited sexual behaviors directed at oneself or at others, sometimes associated with neurodegenerative disorders. Choline is a water-soluble essential nutrient, used as a dietary supplement in different diseases. This report was aimed at considering choline intake as a possible cause of iatrogenic hypersexuality. After an evaluation, a 79-year-old man affected by memory loss was diagnosed with mild cognitive impairment and treated with oral choline. After 6 weeks of regular choline assumption, the patient showed a pathological increase in libido with sexual urges. As choline was withdrawn, the hypersexuality disappeared within 5 days. Since hypersexuality may be an underreported and overlooked adverse effect of drugs and dietary supplements acting on the cholinergic pathway, this should be considered when treating and counselling patients with inappropriate sexual behavior. PMID:23733158

  4. Value of bimodal (18)F-choline-PET/MRI and trimodal (18)F-choline-PET/MRI/TRUS for the assessment of prostate cancer recurrence after radiation therapy and radical prostatectomy.

    PubMed

    Paparo, Francesco; Piccardo, Arnoldo; Bacigalupo, Lorenzo; Romagnoli, Andrea; Piccazzo, Riccardo; Monticone, Michela; Cevasco, Luca; Campodonico, Fabio; Conzi, Giuseppe Maria; Carmignani, Giorgio; Rollandi, Gian Andrea

    2015-08-01

    Between 27% and 53% of all patients who undergo radical prostatectomy (RP) or radiation therapy (RT) as the first-line treatment of prostate cancer (PCa) develop a biochemical recurrence. Imaging plays a pivotal role in restaging by helping to distinguish between local relapse and metastatic disease (i.e., lymph-node and skeletal metastases). At present, the most promising tools for assessing PCa patients with biochemical recurrence are multiparametric magnetic resonance imaging (mpMRI) and positron emission tomography (PET)/computed tomography (CT) with radio-labeled choline derivatives. The main advantage of mpMRI is its high diagnostic accuracy in detecting local recurrence, while choline-PET/CT is able to identify lymph-node metastases when they are not suspicious on morphological imaging. The most recent advances in the field of fusion imaging have shown that multimodal co-registration, synchronized navigation, and combined interpretation are more valuable than the individual; separate assessment offered by different diagnostic techniques. The objective of the present essay was to describe the value of bimodal choline-PET/mpMRI fusion imaging and trimodal choline-PET/mpMRI/transrectal ultrasound (TRUS) in the assessment of PCa recurrence after RP and RT. Bimodal choline-PET/mpMRI fusion imaging allows morphological, functional, and metabolic information to be combined, thereby overcoming the limitations of each separate imaging modality. In addition, trimodal real-time choline-PET/mpMRI/TRUS fusion imaging may be useful for the planning and real-time guidance of biopsy procedures in order to obtain histological confirmation of the local recurrence. PMID:25579170

  5. Substrate Binding and Catalytic Mechanism of Human Choline Acetyltransferase

    SciTech Connect

    Kim,A.; Rylett, J.; Shilton, B.

    2006-01-01

    Choline acetyltransferase (ChAT) catalyzes the synthesis of the neurotransmitter acetylcholine from choline and acetyl-CoA, and its presence is a defining feature of cholinergic neurons. We report the structure of human ChAT to a resolution of 2.2 {angstrom} along with structures for binary complexes of ChAT with choline, CoA, and a nonhydrolyzable acetyl-CoA analogue, S-(2-oxopropyl)-CoA. The ChAT-choline complex shows which features of choline are important for binding and explains how modifications of the choline trimethylammonium group can be tolerated by the enzyme. A detailed model of the ternary Michaelis complex fully supports the direct transfer of the acetyl group from acetyl-CoA to choline through a mechanism similar to that seen in the serine hydrolases for the formation of an acyl-enzyme intermediate. Domain movements accompany CoA binding, and a surface loop, which is disordered in the unliganded enzyme, becomes localized and binds directly to the phosphates of CoA, stabilizing the complex. Interactions between this surface loop and CoA may function to lower the K{sub M} for CoA and could be important for phosphorylation-dependent regulation of ChAT activity.

  6. Choline inhibition of amino acid transport in preimplantation mouse blastocysts

    SciTech Connect

    Campione, A.L.; Haghighat, N.; Gorman, J.; Van Winkle, L.J.

    1987-05-01

    Addition of 70 mM choline chloride to Brinster's medium (140 mM Na/sup +/) inhibited uptake of approx. 1 ..mu..M (/sup 3/H)glycine, leucine, lysine and alanine in blastocysts by about 50% each during a five-minute incubation period at 37/sup 0/C, whereas 70 mM LiCl, sodium acetate and NaCl or 140 mM mannitol had no effect. They attribute the apparent linear relationship between Gly transport in blastocysts and the square of the (Na/sup +/), observed when choline was substituted for Na/sup +/ in Brinster's medium, to concomitant, concentration-dependent enhancement and inhibition of transport by Na/sup +/ and choline, respectively. As expected, Gly uptake and the (Na/sup +/) were linearly related up to 116 mM Na/sup +/, when Na/sup +/ was replaced with Li/sup +/. The rates of Na/sup +/-independent Gly and Ala uptake were <5% and <2% of the total, respectively, and similar when either Li/sup +/ or choline replaced Na/sup +/. Therefore, neither Li/sup +/ nor choline appears to substitute for Na/sup +/ in supporting Na/sup +/-dependent transport in blastocysts. Na/sup +/-independent Leu uptake was 20 times faster than Gly or Ala uptake and appeared to be inhibited by choline in blastocysts since it was about 37% slower when choline instead of Li/sup +/ was substituted for Na/sup +/. In contrast to blastocysts, choline had no effect on amino acid transport in cleavage-stage mouse embryos. The unexpected sensitivity of transport to choline in blastocysts underscores the importance of testing the effects of this substance when it is used to replace Na/sup +/ in new transport studies.

  7. Transgenic overexpression of the presynaptic choline transporter elevates acetylcholine levels and augments motor endurance

    PubMed Central

    Holmstrand, Ericka C.; Lund, David; Cherian, Ajeesh Koshy; Wright, Jane; Martin, Rolicia F.; Ennis, Elizabeth A.; Stanwood, Gregg D.; Sarter, Martin; Blakely, Randy D.

    2014-01-01

    The hemicholinium-3 (HC-3) sensitive, high-affinity choline transporter (CHT) sustains cholinergic signaling via the presynaptic uptake of choline derived from dietary sources or from acetylcholinesterase (AChE)-mediated hydrolysis of acetylcholine (ACh). Loss of cholinergic signaling capacity is associated with cognitive and motor deficits in humans and in animal models. Whereas genetic elimination of CHT has revealed the critical nature of CHT in maintaining ACh stores and sustaining cholinergic signaling, the consequences of elevating CHT expression have yet to be studied. Using bacterial artificial chromosome (BAC)-mediated transgenic methods, we generated mice with integrated additional copies of the mouse Slc5a7 gene. BAC–CHT mice are viable, appear to develop normally, and breed at wild-type (WT) rates. Biochemical studies revealed a 2 to 3-fold elevation in CHT protein levels in the CNS and periphery, paralleled by significant increases in [3H]HC-3 binding and synaptosomal choline transport activity. Elevations of ACh in the BAC–CHT mice occurred without compensatory changes in the activity of either choline acetyltransferase (ChAT) or AChE. Immunohistochemistry for CHT in BAC–CHT brain sections revealed markedly elevated CHT expression in the cell bodies of cholinergic neurons and in axons projecting to regions known to receive cholinergic innervation. Behaviorally, BAC–CHT mice exhibited diminished fatigue and increased speeds on the treadmill test without evidence of increased strength. Finally, BAC–CHT mice displayed elevated horizontal activity in the open field test, diminished spontaneous alteration in the Y-maze, and reduced time in the open arms of the elevated plus maze. Together, these studies provide biochemical, pharmacological and behavioral evidence that CHT protein expression and activity can be elevated beyond that seen in wild-type animals. BAC–CHT mice thus represent a novel tool to examine both the positive and negative

  8. Choline as a fuel sweetener and sulfur antagonist

    SciTech Connect

    Roof, G.L.; Porlier, B.W.; Cravey, W.E.

    1986-06-10

    A method is described of sweetening petroleum hydrocarbon fuels and, at the same time, reducing the sulfur content thereof which comprises treating such fuels with a sweetening and sulfur-removing amount of choline.

  9. Choline for neutralizing naphthenic acid in fuel and lubricating oils

    SciTech Connect

    Ries, D.G.; Roof, G.L.

    1986-07-15

    A method is described of neutralizing at least a portion of the naphthenic acids present in fuel and lubricating oils which contain naphthenic acids which comprises treating these oils with a neutralizing amount of choline.

  10. Choline nutrition programs brain development via DNA and histone methylation.

    PubMed

    Blusztajn, Jan Krzysztof; Mellott, Tiffany J

    2012-06-01

    Choline is an essential nutrient for humans. Metabolically choline is used for the synthesis of membrane phospholipids (e.g. phosphatidylcholine), as a precursor of the neurotransmitter acetylcholine, and, following oxidation to betaine, choline functions as a methyl group donor in a pathway that produces S-adenosylmethionine. As a methyl donor choline influences DNA and histone methylation--two central epigenomic processes that regulate gene expression. Because the fetus and neonate have high demands for choline, its dietary intake during pregnancy and lactation is particularly important for normal development of the offspring. Studies in rodents have shown that high choline intake during gestation improves cognitive function in adulthood and prevents memory decline associated with old age. These behavioral changes are accompanied by electrophysiological, neuroanatomical, and neurochemical changes and by altered patterns of expression of multiple cortical and hippocampal genes including those encoding key proteins that contribute to the biochemical mechanisms of learning and memory. These actions of choline are observed long after the exposure to the nutrient ended (months) and correlate with fetal hepatic and cerebral cortical choline-evoked changes in global- and gene-specific DNA cytosine methylation and with dramatic changes of the methylation pattern of lysine residues 4, 9 and 27 of histone H3. Moreover, gestational choline modulates the expression of DNA (Dnmt1, Dnmt3a) and histone (G9a/Ehmt2/Kmt1c, Suv39h1/Kmt1a) methyltransferases. In addition to the central role of DNA and histone methylation in brain development, these processes are highly dynamic in adult brain, modulate the expression of genes critical for synaptic plasticity, and are involved in mechanisms of learning and memory. A recent study documented that in a cohort of normal elderly people, verbal and visual memory function correlated positively with the amount of dietary choline consumption

  11. Low-melting mixtures based on choline ionic liquids.

    PubMed

    Rengstl, Doris; Fischer, Veronika; Kunz, Werner

    2014-11-01

    In this article a strategy is proposed for the design of low toxic, room temperature liquid low-melting mixtures (LMMs) which are entirely composed of natural materials. From literature it is well known that, in general, deep eutectic solvents based on choline chloride and dicarboxylic acids are LMMs, but not liquids at room temperature, with one exception: a 1 : 1 molar mixture of malonic acid and choline chloride. Therefore, the starting point of this study was the decrease of the melting point of one of the components, namely the dicarboxylic acid, which is succinic, glutaric or adipic acid. For this purpose, one of the two protons of the acidic group was exchanged by a bulky unsymmetrical choline cation. The resulting ionic liquids (ILs) were still solid at room temperature, but have a reduced melting temperature compared to the corresponding acids. In the second step, mixtures of these ILs with choline chloride were prepared. It turned out that choline glutarate-choline chloride mixtures are liquids at room temperature at compositions containing 95-98 wt% of choline glutarate. Finally, urea was added as another hydrogen bond donor. Density, conductivity and viscosity measurements were performed for all obtained mixtures. Moreover, a Walden plot was drawn which indicates that all mixtures are liquids with fully dissociated ions moving independently. Therefore, they are considered as "good" ionic liquids and, thus, for example they can be used to exchange more toxic or less biodegradable ILs in application processes. A brief outlook containing application possibilities is given. It is demonstrated that choline dodecylsulfate is readily soluble in these mixtures, forming aggregates in the LMM at temperatures exceeding 55 °C. PMID:25242504

  12. Eosinophilic hepatitis after ingestion of choline magnesium trisalicylate.

    PubMed

    Nadkarni, M M; Peller, C A; Retig, J

    1992-01-01

    Choline magnesium trisalicylate is a non-acetylated salicylate used widely as a nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug. Although mild transient hepatotoxicity associated with aspirin and other salicylates has been well documented, most commonly with high-dose treatment for rheumatologic disorders 112), we report a case of severe hypersensitivity hepatitis with striking tissue and peripheral eosinophilia after ingestion of choline magnesium trisalicylate. PMID:1728115

  13. Choline Metabolism Alteration: A Focus on Ovarian Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Bagnoli, Marina; Granata, Anna; Nicoletti, Roberta; Krishnamachary, Balaji; Bhujwalla, Zaver M.; Canese, Rossella; Podo, Franca; Canevari, Silvana; Iorio, Egidio; Mezzanzanica, Delia

    2016-01-01

    Compared with normal differentiated cells, cancer cells require a metabolic reprograming to support their high proliferation rates and survival. Aberrant choline metabolism is a fairly new metabolic hallmark reflecting the complex reciprocal interactions between oncogenic signaling and cellular metabolism. Alterations of the involved metabolic network may be sustained by changes in activity of several choline transporters as well as of enzymes such as choline kinase-alpha (ChoK-α) and phosphatidylcholine-specific phospholipases C and D. Of note, the net outcome of these enzymatic alterations is an increase of phosphocholine and total choline-containing compounds, a “cholinic phenotype” that can be monitored in cancer by magnetic resonance spectroscopy. This review will highlight the molecular basis for targeting this pathway in epithelial ovarian cancer (EOC), a highly heterogeneous and lethal malignancy characterized by late diagnosis, frequent relapse, and development of chemoresistance. Modulation of ChoK-α expression impairs only EOC but not normal ovarian cells, thus supporting the hypothesis that “cholinic phenotype” is a peculiar feature of transformed cells and indicating ChoK-α targeting as a novel approach to improve efficacy of standard EOC chemotherapeutic treatments. PMID:27446799

  14. Metabolic crosstalk between choline/1-carbon metabolism and energy homeostasis.

    PubMed

    Zeisel, Steven H

    2013-03-01

    There are multiple identified mechanisms involved in energy metabolism, insulin resistance and adiposity, but there are here-to-fore unsuspected metabolic factors that also influence these processes. Studies in animal models suggest important links between choline/1-carbon metabolism and energy homeostasis. Rodents fed choline deficient diets become hypermetabolic. Mice with deletions in one of several different genes of choline metabolism have phenotypes that include increased metabolic rate, decreased body fat/lean mass ratio, increased insulin sensitivity, decreased ATP production by mitochondria, or decreased weight gain on a high fat diet. In addition, farmers have recognized that the addition of a metabolite of choline (betaine) to cattle and swine feed reduces body fat/lean mass ratio. Choline dietary intake in humans varies over a > three-fold range, and genetic variation exists that modifies individual requirements for this nutrient. Although there are some epidemiologic studies in humans suggesting a link between choline/1-carbon metabolism and energy metabolism, there have been no controlled studies in humans that were specifically designed to examine this relationship. PMID:23072856

  15. Metabolic crosstalk between choline/1-carbon metabolism and energy homeostasis

    PubMed Central

    Zeisel, Steven H.

    2013-01-01

    There are multiple identified mechanisms involved in energy metabolism, insulin resistance and adiposity, but there are here-to-fore unsuspected metabolic factors that also influence these processes. Studies in animal models suggest important links between choline/1-carbon metabolism and energy homeostasis. Rodents fed choline deficient diets become hypermetabolic. Mice with deletions in one of several different genes of choline metabolism have phenotypes that include increased metabolic rate, decreased body fat/lean mass ratio, increased insulin sensitivity, decreased ATP production by mitochondria, or decreased weight gain on a high fat diet. In addition, farmers have recognized that the addition of a metabolite of choline (betaine) to cattle and swine feed reduces body fat/lean mass ratio. Choline dietary intake in humans varies over a >three-fold range, and genetic variation exists that modifies individual requirements for this nutrient. Although there are some epidemiologic studies in humans suggesting a link between choline/1-carbon metabolism and energy metabolism, there have been no controlled studies in humans that were specifically designed to examine this relationship. PMID:23072856

  16. [Folate metabolism--epigenetic role of choline and vitamin B12 during pregnancy].

    PubMed

    Drews, Krzysztof

    2015-12-01

    Adequate choline intake during pregnancy is essential for proper fetal development. Nowadays studies suggest that even in high income countries regular pregnant women diet does not provide the satisfactory amount of choline. Choline demand during pregnancy is high and it seems to exceed present choline intake recommendations. Moreover lactation period also demands choline supplementation because of its high concentration in female milk. Numerous studies on animal model proved correlation between choline supplementation during pregnancy and proper fetal cognitive function development. Despite increased synthesis in maternal liver during pregnancy choline demand is much higher than common dietary uptake. Nowadays studies as to the nutritional recommendations during pregnancy concern also vitamin B12 supplementation. Vitamin B12 deficiency may be an important risk factor of neural tube defects development. Presented article contains a review of data on proper choline and vitamin B12 uptake during pregnancy and lactation and potential results of choline and vitamin B12 poor maternal status. PMID:26995945

  17. Choline on the Move: Perspectives on the Molecular Physiology and Pharmacology of the Presynaptic Choline Transporter.

    PubMed

    Ennis, E A; Blakely, R D

    2016-01-01

    Genetic, biochemical, physiological, and pharmacological approaches have advanced our understanding of cholinergic biology for over 100 years. High-affinity choline uptake (HACU) was one of the last features of cholinergic signaling to be defined at a molecular level, achieved through the cloning of the choline transporter (CHT, SLC5A7). In retrospect, the molecular era of CHT studies initiated with the identification of hemicholinium-3 (HC-3), a potent, competitive CHT antagonist, though it would take another 30 years before HC-3, in radiolabeled form, was used by Joseph Coyle's laboratory to identify and monitor the dynamics of CHT proteins. Though HC-3 studies provided important insights into CHT distribution and regulation, another 15 years would pass before the structure of CHT genes and proteins were identified, a full decade after the cloning of most other neurotransmitter-associated transporters. The availability of CHT gene and protein probes propelled the development of cell and animal models as well as efforts to gain insights into how human CHT gene variation affects the risk for brain and neuromuscular disorders. Most recently, our group has pursued a broadening of CHT pharmacology, elucidating novel chemical structures that may serve to advance cholinergic diagnostics and medication development. Here we provide a short review of the transformation that has occurred in HACU research and how such advances may promote the development of novel therapeutics. PMID:27288078

  18. Alterations of choline phospholipid metabolism in endometrial cancer are caused by choline kinase alpha overexpression and a hyperactivated deacylation pathway.

    PubMed

    Trousil, Sebastian; Lee, Patrizia; Pinato, David J; Ellis, James K; Dina, Roberto; Aboagye, Eric O; Keun, Hector C; Sharma, Rohini

    2014-12-01

    Metabolic rearrangements subsequent to malignant transformation are not well characterized in endometrial cancer. Identification of altered metabolites could facilitate imaging-guided diagnosis, treatment surveillance, and help to identify new therapeutic options. Here, we used high-resolution magic angle spinning magnetic resonance mass spectroscopy on endometrial cancer surgical specimens and normal endometrial tissue to investigate the key modulators that might explain metabolic changes, incorporating additional investigations using qRT-PCR, Western blotting, tissue microarrays (TMA), and uptake assays of [(3)H]-labeled choline. Lipid metabolism was severely dysregulated in endometrial cancer with various amino acids, inositols, nucleobases, and glutathione also altered. Among the most important lipid-related alterations were increased phosphocholine levels (increased 70% in endometrial cancer). Mechanistic investigations revealed that changes were not due to altered choline transporter expression, but rather due to increased expression of choline kinase α (CHKA) and an activated deacylation pathway, as indicated by upregulated expression of the catabolic enzymes LYPLA1, LYPLA2, and GPCPD1. We confirmed the significance of CHKA overexpression on a TMA, including a large series of endometrial hyperplasia, atypical hyperplasia, and adenocarcinoma tissues, supporting a role for CHKA in malignant transformation. Finally, we documented several-fold increases in the uptake of [(3)H]choline in endometrial cancer cell lines compared with normal endometrial stromal cells. Our results validate deregulated choline biochemistry as an important source of noninvasive imaging biomarkers for endometrial cancer. PMID:25267063

  19. A molecular dynamics study of the ionic liquid, choline acetate.

    PubMed

    Willcox, Jon A L; Kim, Hyunjin; Kim, Hyung J

    2016-06-01

    Structural and dynamic properties of the ionic liquid (IL) choline acetate are studied using molecular dynamics (MD) simulations. The hydroxyl group of choline shows significant hydrogen-bonding interactions with the oxygen atoms of acetate. Nearly all choline cations are found to form a hydrogen bond with acetate anions at 400 K, while about 67% of cations participate in hydrogen-bonding interactions at 600 K. At 400 K, subdiffusive and prominent non-Gaussian behavior persist for t > 10 ns. At 600 K, the usual diffusion regime is obtained after a few hundred ps of subdiffusive behavior. Analysis of reorientational motions of acetate ions, particularly those of their short axes, indicates a high degree of dynamic heterogeneity, in agreement with previous work on different IL systems. PMID:27188287

  20. A computational study on choline benzoate and choline salicylate ionic liquids in the pure state and after CO2 adsorption.

    PubMed

    Aparicio, Santiago; Atilhan, Mert

    2012-08-01

    Choline-based ionic liquids show very adequate environmental, toxicological, and economical profiles for their application in many different technological areas. We report in this work a computational study on the properties of choline benzoate and choline salicylate ionic liquids, as representatives of this family of compounds, in the pure state and after CO(2) adsorption. Quantum chemistry calculations using the density functional theory approach for ionic pairs and ions, CO(2) pairs, were carried out, and the results analyzed using natural bond orbital and atoms in a molecule approaches. Classical molecular dynamics simulations of ionic liquids were done as a function of pressure, temperature, and CO(2) concentration. Microscopic structuring and intermolecular forces are analyzed together with the dynamic behavior of the studied fluids. PMID:22738425

  1. Fine-tuning of choline metabolism is important for pneumococcal colonization.

    PubMed

    Johnston, Calum; Hauser, Christoph; Hermans, Peter W M; Martin, Bernard; Polard, Patrice; Bootsma, Hester J; Claverys, Jean-Pierre

    2016-06-01

    The human pathogen Streptococcus pneumoniae (the pneumococcus) is rare in having a strict requirement for the amino alcohol choline, which decorates pneumococcal teichoic acids. This process relies on the lic locus, containing the lic1 and lic2 operons. These operons produce eight proteins that import and metabolize choline, generate teichoic acid precursors and decorate these with choline. Three promoters control expression of lic operons, with Plic1P1 and Plic1P2 controlling lic1 and Plic2 controlling lic2. To investigate the importance of lic regulation for pneumococci, we assayed the activity of transcriptional fusions of the three lic promoters to the luciferase reporter gene. Plic1P1 , whose activity depends on the response regulator CiaR, responded to fluctuations in extracellular choline, with activity increasing greatly upon choline depletion. We uncovered a complex regulatory mechanism controlling Plic1P1 , involving activity driven by CiaR, repression by putative repressor LicR in the presence of choline, and derepression upon choline depletion mediated by LicC, a choline metabolism enzyme. Finally, the ability to regulate Plic1P1 in response to choline was important for pneumococcal colonization. We suggest that derepression of Plic1P1 upon choline depletion maximizing choline internalization constitutes an adaptive response mechanism allowing pneumococci to optimize growth and survival in environments where choline is scarce. PMID:26919406

  2. Uptake and output of various forms of choline by organs of the conscious chronically catheterized sheep.

    PubMed Central

    Robinson, B S; Snoswell, A M; Runciman, W B; Upton, R N

    1984-01-01

    The net uptake and output of plasma unesterified choline, glycerophosphocholine, phosphocholine and lipid choline by organs of the conscious chronically catheterized sheep were measured. There was significant production of plasma unesterified choline by the upper- and lower-body regions and the alimentary tract and uptake by the liver, lungs and kidneys. The upper- and lower-body regions drained by the venae cavae provided the bulk (about 82%) of the total body venous return of plasma unesterified choline. Production of plasma unesterified choline by the alimentary tract was approximately balanced by the plasma unesterified choline taken up by the liver, and was almost equal to the amount of choline secreted in the bile. There was a considerable amount of glycerophosphocholine in the liver and there was production of plasma glycerophosphocholine by the liver and uptake by the lungs and kidneys. Glycerophosphocholine was higher in the plasma of sheep than in that of rats. Plasma phosphocholine was produced by the alimentary tract and kidneys. There was production of plasma lipid choline by the upper- and lower-body regions drained by the venae cavae. The results suggest that the sheep synthesizes substantial amounts of choline in ectrahepatic tissues and has the capacity for extensive retention and recycling of bile choline. These observations, coupled with a slow turnover of the endogenous choline body pool, explain the low requirement of sheep for dietary choline in contrast with non-ruminant species. PMID:6696739

  3. Different Pathways of Choline Metabolism in Two Choline-Independent Strains of Streptococcus pneumoniae and Their Impact on Virulence▿

    PubMed Central

    Kharat, Arun S.; Denapaite, Dalia; Gehre, Florian; Brückner, Reinhold; Vollmer, Waldemar; Hakenbeck, Regine; Tomasz, Alexander

    2008-01-01

    The two recently characterized Streptococcus pneumoniae strains—R6Chi and R6Cho−—that have lost the unique auxotrophic requirement of this bacterial species for choline differ in their mechanisms of choline independence. In strain R6Chi the mechanism is caused by a point mutation in tacF, a gene that is part of the pneumococcal lic2 operon, which is essential for growth and survival of the bacteria. Cultures of lic2 mutants of the encapsulated strain D39Chi growing in choline-containing medium formed long chains, did not autolyze, had no choline in their cell wall, and were completely avirulent in the mouse intraperitoneal model. In contrast, while the Cho− strain carried a complete pneumococcal lic2 operon and had no mutations in the tacF gene, deletion of the entire lic2 operon had no effect on the growth or phenotype of strain Cho−. These observations suggest that the biochemical functions normally dependent on determinants of the pneumococcal lic2 operon may also be carried out in strain Cho− by a second set of genetic elements imported from Streptococcus oralis, the choline-independent streptococcal strain that served as the DNA donor in the heterologous transformation event that produced strain R6Cho−. The identification in R6Cho− of a large (20-kb) S. oralis DNA insert carrying both tacF and licD genes confirms this prediction and suggests that these heterologous elements may represent a “backup” system capable of catalyzing P-choline incorporation and export of teichoic acid chains under conditions in which the native lic2 operon is not functional. PMID:18621904

  4. Isolation and Characterization of Phosphatidyl Choline from Spinach Leaves.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Devor, Kenneth A.

    1979-01-01

    This inexpensive but informative experiment for undergraduate biochemistry students involves isolating phosphatidyl choline from spinach leaves. Emphasis is on introducing students to techniques of lipid extraction, separation of lipids, identification using thin layer chromatography, and identification of fatty acids. Three periods of three hours…

  5. Choline transport in the isolated rabbit corneal epithelium

    SciTech Connect

    Faust, R.L.

    1988-01-01

    In the present study, isolated epithelial sheets were obtained by performing two sequential anterior keratectomies, three weeks apart, on rabbit corneas. Light microscopy of the isolated sheets revealed a multilayered epithelium with an intact basal cell layer without contamination from other cell types. The accumulation of ({sup 3}H)choline into the epithelial sheets was studied at substrate concentrations varying from 1 to 100 {mu}Moles with and without the addition of specific metabolic and stereochemical inhibitors. Accumulation of ({sup 3}H)choline into these sheets was saturable. Kinetic analysis, performed by estimation from double-reciprocal plots, revealed a single component system with a K{sub m} of 24.9 {mu}M. The metabolic inhibitors potassium cyanide and ouabain showed no effect on the uptake of ({sup 3}H)choline; however, the stereochemical inhibitor hemicholinium-3 significantly reduced the accumulation of radiolabel at both high and low substrate concentrations. The results suggest a non-energy dependent yet a highly specific transport system for the accumulation of choline into the rabbit epithelium.

  6. Effects of cytidine diphosphate choline on rats with memory deficits.

    PubMed

    Petkov, V D; Kehayov, R A; Mosharrof, A H; Petkov, V V; Getova, D; Lazarova, M B; Vaglenova, J

    1993-08-01

    The effects of cytidine diphosphate choline (CDP-choline, CAS 987-78-0) on learning and memory in rats with memory deficits were examined using behavioral methods of active avoidance with punishment reinforcement (shuttle-box), passive avoidance with punishment reinforcement (step-through and step-down), and active avoidance with positive (alimentary) reinforcement (staircase-maze). In the majority of experiments CDP-choline was applied orally at doses of 10-50 or 100 mg/kg daily for 7 days before the training session. The experiments were carried out on young-adult (aged 5 months) and old (aged 22 months) rats and on rats with a low capability for retention of learned behavior. Memory deficits were induced by the muscarinic cholinoceptor antagonist scopolamine (in young and old rats and mice), by the alpha 2-adrenoceptor agonist clonidine, by electroconvulsive shock, and by hypoxy. Memory deficits were also induced in rats offspring of dams that had been exposed to alcohol during pregnancy and lactation. The results suggest that CDP-choline acts as a memory-enhancing drug and that its effect is particularly pronounced in animals with memory deficits. PMID:8216435

  7. Fish meal lecithin as alternative precursor of docosahexaenoate and choline.

    PubMed

    Dahlan, W; Chatnilbandhu, S; Na-Nagara, B; Carpentier, Y A

    1996-09-01

    Choline and docosahexaenoate (DHA) are essential nutrients for maintaining normal brain function. However, their existence in fish lecithin is ignored and excluded during the degumming step of conventional fish oil manufacturing process. The study aims to introduce fish lecithin as alternative precursor of choline and omega-3 fatty acids especially DHA for nutritional supplements. Four grades of Thai fish meals with protein contents ranging from 60-70% were used. Their lipid characteristics were examined. Fish meal's fats and lecithin were 9-15 and 2-3 g/100 g, respectively. Total fatty acids constitute 23-27% monoenes without erucic acid and 24-28% polyenes including 15-19% DHA. Lecithin with 50% purity was prepared from grade-1 fish meal by means of consecutive methanol/n-hexane/acetone extraction. The obtained lecithin contains choline upto 66-70 mole% with DHA reaches to 20-23%. Its peroxide value of 57 and acid value of 9 are accepted for food grade lecithin preparation, however, the further refinery process is still suggested. Since the world consumption of nutritional supplement foods is increasing steadily, the results of our study implies that fish lecithin is probably a promising source of choline and omega-3 fatty acids especially DHA for such an objective. PMID:8886341

  8. Assay, Purification, and Partial Characterization of Choline Monooxygenase from Spinach.

    PubMed Central

    Burnet, M.; Lafontaine, P. J.; Hanson, A. D.

    1995-01-01

    The osmoprotectant glycine betaine is synthesized via the path-way choline -> betaine aldehyde -> glycine betaine. In spinach (Spinacia oleracea), the first step is catalyzed by choline monooxygenase (CMO), and the second is catalyzed by betaine aldehyde dehydrogenase. Because betaine aldehyde is unstable and not easily detected, we developed a coupled radiometric assay for CMO. [14C]Choline is used as substrate; NAD+ and betaine aldehyde dehydrogenase prepared from Escherichia coli are added to oxidize [14C]betaine aldehyde to [14C]glycine betaine, which is isolated by ion exchange. The assay was used in the purification of CMO from leaves of salinized spinach. The 10-step procedure included polyethylene glycol precipitation, polyethyleneimine precipitation, hydrophobic interaction, anion exchange on choline-Sepharose, dimethyldiethanolamine-Sepharose, and Mono Q, hydroxyapatite, gel filtration, and sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. Following gel filtration, overall purification was about 600-fold and recovery of activity was 0.5%. Sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis showed a polypeptide with a molecular mass of 45 kD. Taken with the value of 98 kD estimated for native CMO (R. Brouquisse, P. Weigel, D. Rhodes, C.F. Yocum, A.D. Hanson [1989] Plant Physiol 90: 322-329), this indicates that CMO is a homodimer. CMO preparations were red-brown, showed absorption maxima at 329 and 459 nm, and lost color upon dithionite addition, suggesting that CMO is an iron-sulfur protein. PMID:12228495

  9. Spatial memory and hippocampal plasticity are differentially sensitive to the availability of choline in adulthood as a function of choline supply in utero

    PubMed Central

    Wong-Goodrich, Sarah J.E.; Glenn, Melissa J.; Mellott, Tiffany J.; Blusztajn, Jan K.; Meck, Warren H.; Williams, Christina L.

    2009-01-01

    Altered dietary choline availability early in life leads to persistent changes in spatial memory and hippocampal plasticity in adulthood. Developmental programming by early choline nutrition may determine the range of adult choline intake that is optimal for the types of neural plasticity involved in cognitive function. To test this, male Sprague-Dawley rats were exposed to a choline chloride deficient (DEF), sufficient (CON), or supplemented (SUP) diet during embryonic days 12-17 and then returned to a control diet (1.1 g choline chloride/kg). At 70 days of age, we found that DEF and SUP rats required fewer choices to locate 8 baited arms of a 12-arm radial maze than CON rats. When switched to a choline-deficient diet (0 g/kg), SUP rats showed impaired performance while CON and DEF rats were unaffected. In contrast, when switched to a choline-supplemented diet (5.0 g/kg), DEF rats' performance was significantly impaired while CON and SUP rats were less affected. These changes in performance were reversible when the rats were switched back to a control diet. In a second experiment, DEF, CON, and SUP rats were either maintained on a control diet, or the choline-supplemented diet. After 12 weeks, DEF rats were significantly impaired by choline supplementation on a matching-to-place water-maze task, which was also accompanied by a decrease in dentate cell proliferation in DEF rats only. IGF-1 levels were elevated by both prenatal and adult choline supplementation. Taken together, these findings suggest that the in utero availability of an essential nutrient, choline, causes differential behavioral and neuroplastic sensitivity to the adult choline supply. PMID:18778697

  10. Next Generation of SiFAlin-Based TATE Derivatives for PET Imaging of SSTR-Positive Tumors: Influence of Molecular Design on In Vitro SSTR Binding and In Vivo Pharmacokinetics.

    PubMed

    Litau, S; Niedermoser, S; Vogler, N; Roscher, M; Schirrmacher, R; Fricker, G; Wängler, B; Wängler, C

    2015-12-16

    The Silicon-Fluoride-Acceptor (SiFA)-(18)F-labeling strategy has been shown before to enable the straightforward and efficient (18)F-labeling of complex biologically active substances such as proteins and peptides. Especially in the case of peptides, the radiolabeling proceeds kit-like in short reaction times and without the need of complex product workup. SiFA-derivatized, (18)F-labeled Tyr(3)-octreotate (TATE) derivatives demonstrated, besides strong somatostatin receptor (SSTR) binding, favorable in vivo pharmacokinetics as well as excellent tumor visualization by PET imaging. In this study, we intended to determine the influence of the underlying molecular design and used molecular scaffolds of SiFAlin-TATE derivatives on SSTR binding as well as on the in vivo pharmacokinetics of the resulting (18)F-labeled peptides. For this purpose, new SiFAlin-(Asp)n-PEG1-TATE analogs (where n = 1-4) were synthesized, efficiently radiolabeled with (18)F in a kit-like manner and obtained in radiochemical yields of 70-80%, radiochemical purities of ≥97%, and nonoptimized specific activities of 20.1-45.2 GBq/μmol within 20-25 min starting from 0.7-1.5 GBq of (18)F. In the following, the radiotracer's lipophilicities and stabilities in human serum were determined. Furthermore, the SSTR-specific binding affinities were evaluated by a competitive displacement assay on SSTR-positive AR42J cells. The obtained in vitro results support the assumption that aspartic acids are able to considerably increase the radiotracer's hydrophilicity and that their number does not affect the SSTR binding potential of the TATE derivatives. The most promising tracer (18)F-SiFAlin-Asp3-PEG1-TATE [(18)F]6 (LogD = -1.23 ± 0.03, IC50 = 20.7 ± 2.5 nM) was further evaluated in vivo in AR42J tumor-bearing nude mice via PET/CT imaging against the clinical gold standard (68)Ga-DOTATATE as well as the previously developed SiFAlin-TATE derivative [(18)F]3. The results of these evaluations showed that [(18)F

  11. Indirect electrocatalytic determination of choline by monitoring hydrogen peroxide at the choline oxidase-prussian blue modified iron phosphate nanostructures.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Hui; Yin, Yajing; Wu, Ping; Cai, Chenxin

    2012-01-15

    Choline, as a marker of cholinergic activity in brain tissue, is very important in biological and clinical analysis, especially in the clinical detection of the neurodegenerative disorders disease. This work presents an electrochemical approach for the detection of choline based on prussian blue modified iron phosphate nanostructures (PB-FePO(4)). The obtained nanostructures showed a good catalysis toward the electroreduction of H(2)O(2), and an amperometric choline biosensor was developed by immobilizing choline oxidase on the PB-FePO(4) nanostructures. The biosensor exhibited a rapid response (ca. 2s), low detection limit (0.4±0.05 μM), wide linear range (2 μM to 3.2 mM), high sensitivity (~75.2 μAm M(-1) cm(-2)), as well as good stability and repeatability. In addition, the common interfering species, such as ascorbic acid, uric acid and 4-acetamidophenol did not cause obvious interference due to the low detection potential (-0.05 V versus saturated calomel electrode). This nanostructure could be used as a promise platform for the construction of other oxidase-based biosensors. PMID:22119562

  12. Dysregulated choline metabolism in T-cell lymphoma: role of choline kinase-α and therapeutic targeting

    PubMed Central

    Xiong, J; Bian, J; Wang, L; Zhou, J-Y; Wang, Y; Zhao, Y; Wu, L-L; Hu, J-J; Li, B; Chen, S-J; Yan, C; Zhao, W-L

    2015-01-01

    Cancer cells have distinct metabolomic profile. Metabolic enzymes regulate key oncogenic signaling pathways and have an essential role on tumor progression. Here, serum metabolomic analysis was performed in 45 patients with T-cell lymphoma (TCL) and 50 healthy volunteers. The results showed that dysregulation of choline metabolism occurred in TCL and was related to tumor cell overexpression of choline kinase-α (Chokα). In T-lymphoma cells, pharmacological and molecular silencing of Chokα significantly decreased Ras-GTP activity, AKT and ERK phosphorylation and MYC oncoprotein expression, leading to restoration of choline metabolites and induction of tumor cell apoptosis/necropotosis. In a T-lymphoma xenograft murine model, Chokα inhibitor CK37 remarkably retarded tumor growth, suppressed Ras-AKT/ERK signaling, increased lysophosphatidylcholine levels and induced in situ cell apoptosis/necropotosis. Collectively, as a regulatory gene of aberrant choline metabolism, Chokα possessed oncogenic activity and could be a potential therapeutic target in TCL, as well as other hematological malignancies with interrupted Ras signaling pathways. PMID:25768400

  13. Transport and phosphorylation of choline in higher plant cells. Phosphorus-31 nuclear magnetic resonance studies

    SciTech Connect

    Bligny, R.; Foray, M.F.; Roby, C.; Douce, R.

    1989-03-25

    When sycamore cells were suspended in basal medium containing choline, the latter was taken up by the cells very rapidly. A facilitated diffusion system appertained at low concentrations of choline and exhibited Michaelis-Menten kinetics. At higher choline concentrations simple diffusion appeared to be the principal mode of uptake. Addition of choline to the perfusate of compressed sycamore cells monitored by /sup 31/P NMR spectroscopy resulted in a dramatic accumulation of P-choline in the cytoplasmic compartment containing choline kinase and not in the vacuole. The total accumulation of P-choline over a 10-h period exhibited Michaelis-Menten kinetics. During this period, in the absence of Pi in the perfusion medium there was a marked depletion of glucose-6-P, and the cytoplasmic Pi resonance disappeared almost completely. When a threshold of cytoplasmic Pi was attained, the phosphorylation of choline was sustained by the continuous release of Pi from the vacuole although at a much lower rate. However, when 100 microM inorganic phosphate was present in the perfusion medium, externally added Pi was preferentially used to sustain P-choline synthesis. It is clear, therefore, that cytosolic choline kinase associated with a carrier-mediated transport system for choline uptake appeared as effective systems for continuously trapping cytoplasmic Pi including vacuolar Pi entering the cytoplasm.

  14. The uptake of [14C]choline into synaptosomes in vitro

    PubMed Central

    Marchbanks, R. M.

    1968-01-01

    1. The uptake of [14C]choline into synaptosomes in vitro was investigated by a gel-filtration method. Synaptosomes incubated in a medium fortified with glucose and succinate rapidly take up [14C]choline. 2. A substantial proportion of the radioactivity taken up can be released by osmotic shock, and is recoverable as choline on a thin-layer chromatogram. This suggests that choline is taken up across the limiting membrane into the cytoplasmic compartment of the synaptosome. 3. The concentration of choline in the synaptosome has a dependence on the external concentration of choline that is similar to that in erythrocytes and mouse cerebral-cortex slices. The choline influx has two components, one that is linear and one that is saturable with increasing choline concentration. 4. Omission of Na+ from the incubation medium, or addition of 100mm-K+, inhibits choline uptake. Hemicholinium no. 3 is a powerful inhibitor of the choline uptake. 5. The similarity of the choline-uptake process in synaptosomes to that in erythrocytes and cortex slices indicates that the synaptosome limiting membrane is functionally competent in this respect. PMID:5701684

  15. Importance of choline as essential nutrient and its role in prevention of various toxicities.

    PubMed

    Biswas, Somava; Giri, Sarbani

    2015-01-01

    Choline is a water-soluble essential nutrient included as a member of the vitamin B12 group owing to its structural similarities with that of the other members of the group. Its roles and functions, however, extend much wider than that of the vitamins with which it is grouped. Choline is vital for maintenance of various key metabolic processes which play a role in the prevention or progression of various health impairments. The occurrence of diseases like neural tube defect (NTD) and Alzheimer's is prevented by the metabolic role of choline. It is also indispensable for mitigation of various forms of toxic contamination. While adequate level of choline in the body is essential, an excess of choline can result in various forms of disorder. To maintain the optimal level of choline in the body can be a challenge. The vital roles played by choline together with the range of contradictions and problems that choline presents make choline an interesting area of study. This paper attempts to summarize and review some recent publications on choline that have opened up new prospect in understanding the multiple role played by choline and in throwing light on the role played by this wonder essential nutrient in mitigating various forms of toxic contamination. PMID:25923965

  16. Nano interfaced biosensor for detection of choline in triple negative breast cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Thiagarajan, Vignesh; Madhurantakam, Sasya; Sethuraman, Swaminathan; Balaguru Rayappan, John Bosco; Maheswari Krishnan, Uma

    2016-01-15

    Choline, a type of Vitamin B, is an important nutrient in the human body and is involved in key metabolic pathways. Abnormal levels of choline leads to diseased conditions. The levels of choline and its associated compounds are found to be elevated in triple negative breast cancer (TNBC) patients. The choline level ranges from 0.4 to 4.9mmol/kg in TNBC. Thus the detection of choline levels in cells can aid in diagnosing breast cancer. The present work aims to develop a nano-interfaced electrochemical biosensor for the rapid detection of choline in cancer cells. For electrochemical detection, glassy carbon electrode coated with a zinc oxide nano-interface was used as the working electrode. Zinc oxide synthesized by hydrothermal method was characterized using SEM and XRD. The choline oxidase (ChOx) enzyme was immobilized on the nano-interface by drop-casting. Choline oxidase (ChOx) converts choline to betaine and H2O2 in the presence of oxygen. The H2O2 produced was determined amperometrically. The amount of H2O2 produced is directly proportional to concentration of choline present. The sensitivity, selectivity, stability and concentration studies were carried out and quantification of choline in TNBC was also carried out. The results demonstrate that this biosensor has the potential to be developed as a clinical tool for breast cancer detection. PMID:26476202

  17. Uptake and utilization of CDP-choline in primary brain cell cultures from fetal brain

    SciTech Connect

    Vecchini, A.; Binaglia, L.; Floridi, A.; Palmerini, C.A.; Procellati, G.

    1983-03-01

    The utilization of double-labeled CDP-choline by cultured brain cells has been studied. CDP-choline is demonstrated to be rapidly hydrolysed into CMP and choline phosphate. The fragments, or their hydrolysis products, penetrate into the cells and are utilized for lipid synthesis. At short times after the isotope administration a rapid labeling of phosphatidylcholine was detected, when cells were incubated with CDP-choline. The same was not seen when cells were incubated with labeled choline. From these observations it can be inferred that either CDP- choline can penetrate the cell membrane or that some mechanism involving CDP-choline and leading to phospholipid synthesis can work at the external surface of the plasma membranes.

  18. Choline Kinase β Mutant Mice Exhibit Reduced Phosphocholine, Elevated Osteoclast Activity, and Low Bone Mass*

    PubMed Central

    Kular, Jasreen; Tickner, Jennifer C.; Pavlos, Nathan J.; Viola, Helena M.; Abel, Tamara; Lim, Bay Sie; Yang, Xiaohong; Chen, Honghui; Cook, Robert; Hool, Livia C.; Zheng, Ming Hao; Xu, Jiake

    2015-01-01

    The maintenance of bone homeostasis requires tight coupling between bone-forming osteoblasts and bone-resorbing osteoclasts. However, the precise molecular mechanism(s) underlying the differentiation and activities of these specialized cells are still largely unknown. Here, we identify choline kinase β (CHKB), a kinase involved in the biosynthesis of phosphatidylcholine, as a novel regulator of bone homeostasis. Choline kinase β mutant mice (flp/flp) exhibit a systemic low bone mass phenotype. Consistently, osteoclast numbers and activity are elevated in flp/flp mice. Interestingly, osteoclasts derived from flp/flp mice exhibit reduced sensitivity to excessive levels of extracellular calcium, which could account for the increased bone resorption. Conversely, supplementation of cytidine 5′-diphosphocholine in vivo and in vitro, a regimen that bypasses CHKB deficiency, restores osteoclast numbers to physiological levels. Finally, we demonstrate that, in addition to modulating osteoclast formation and function, loss of CHKB corresponds with a reduction in bone formation by osteoblasts. Taken together, these data posit CHKB as a new modulator of bone homeostasis. PMID:25451916

  19. Speciation of copper(II) complexes in an ionic liquid based on choline chloride and in choline chloride/water mixtures.

    PubMed

    De Vreese, Peter; Brooks, Neil R; Van Hecke, Kristof; Van Meervelt, Luc; Matthijs, Edward; Binnemans, Koen; Van Deun, Rik

    2012-05-01

    A deep-eutectic solvent with the properties of an ionic liquid is formed when choline chloride is mixed with copper(II) chloride dihydrate in a 1:2 molar ratio. EXAFS and UV-vis-near-IR optical absorption spectroscopy have been used to compare the coordination sphere of the cupric ion in this ionic liquid with that of the cupric ion in solutions of 0.1 M of CuCl(2)·2H(2)O in solvents with varying molar ratios of choline chloride and water. The EXAFS data show that species with three chloride ions and one water molecule coordinated to the cupric ion as well as species with two chloride molecules and two water molecules coordinated to the cupric ion are present in the ionic liquid. On the other hand, a fully hydrated copper(II) ion is formed in an aqueous solution free of choline chloride, and the tetrachlorocuprate(II) complex forms in aqueous choline chloride solutions with more than 50 wt % of choline chloride. In solutions with between 0 and 50 wt % of choline chloride, mixed chloro-aquo complexes occur. Upon standing at room temperature, crystals of CuCl(2)·2H(2)O and of Cu(choline)Cl(3) formed in the ionic liquid. Cu(choline)Cl(3) is the first example of a choline cation coordinating to a transition-metal ion. Crystals of [choline](3)[CuCl(4)][Cl] and of [choline](4)[Cu(4)Cl(10)O] were also synthesized from molecular or ionic liquid solvents, and their crystal structures were determined. PMID:22524435

  20. Transport and Metabolism of Radiolabeled Choline in Hepatocellular Carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Kuang, Yu; Salem, Nicolas; Corn, David J.; Erowku, Bernadette; Tian, Haibin; Wang, Fangjing; Lee, Zhenghong

    2010-01-01

    Objectives Altered choline (Cho) metabolism in cancerous cells can be used as a basis for molecular imaging with PET using radiolabeled Cho. In this study, the metabolism of tracer Cho was investigated in a woodchuck hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) cell line (WCH17) and in freshly-derived rat hepatocytes. The transporter responsible for [11C]-Cho uptake in HCC was also characterized in WCH17 cells. The study helped to define the specific mechanisms responsible for radio-Cho uptake seen on the PET images of primary liver cancer such as HCC. Methods Cells were pulsed with [14C]-Cho for 5 min and chased for varying durations in cold media to simulate the rapid circulation and clearance of [11C]-Cho. Radioactive metabolites were extracted and analyzed by radio-HPLC and radio-TLC. The Cho transporter (ChoT) was characterized in WCH17 cells. Results WCH17 cells showed higher 14C uptake than rat primary hepatocytes. [14C]-Phosphocholine (PC) was the major metabolite in WCH17. In contrast, the intracellular Cho in primary hepatocytes was found to be oxidized to betaine (partially released into media) and to a less degree, phosphorylated to PC. [14C]-Cho uptake by WCH17 cells was found to have both facilitative transport and non-facilitative diffusion components. The facilitative transport was characterized by Na+ dependence and low affinity (Km = 28.59 ± 6.75 μM) with partial energy dependence. In contrast, ChoT in primary hepatocytes is Na+ independent and low affinity. Conclusions Our data suggest that transport and phosphorylation of Cho are responsible for the tracer accumulation during [11C]-Cho PET imaging of HCC. WCH17 cells incorporate [14C]-Cho preferentially into PC. Conversion of [14C]-PC into phosphatidylcholine occurred slowly in vitro. Basal oxidation and phosphorylation activities in surrounding hepatic tissue contribute to the background seen in [11C]-Cho PET images. PMID:20698576

  1. Crystallization and preliminary X-ray diffraction studies of choline-binding protein F from Streptococcus pneumoniae

    SciTech Connect

    Molina, Rafael; González, Ana; Moscoso, Miriam; García, Pedro; Stelter, Meike; Kahn, Richard; Hermoso, Juan A.

    2007-09-01

    The modular choline-binding protein F (CbpF) from S. pneumoniae has been crystallized by the hanging-drop vapour-diffusion method. A SAD data set from a gadolinium-complex derivative has been collected to 2.1 Å resolution. Choline-binding protein F (CbpF) is a modular protein that is bound to the pneumococcal cell wall through noncovalent interactions with choline moieties of the bacterial teichoic and lipoteichoic acids. Despite being one of the more abundant proteins on the surface, along with the murein hydrolases LytA, LytB, LytC and Pce, its function is still unknown. CbpF has been crystallized using the hanging-drop vapour-diffusion method at 291 K. Diffraction-quality orthorhombic crystals belong to space group P2{sub 1}2{sub 1}2, with unit-cell parameters a = 49.13, b = 114.94, c = 75.69 Å. A SAD data set from a Gd-HPDO3A-derivatized CbpF crystal was collected to 2.1 Å resolution at the gadolinium L{sub III} absorption edge using synchrotron radiation.

  2. Effects of Maternal Choline Supplementation on the Septohippocampal Cholinergic System in the Ts65Dn Mouse Model of Down Syndrome.

    PubMed

    Kelley, Christy M; Ash, Jessica A; Powers, Brian E; Velazquez, Ramon; Alldred, Melissa J; Ikonomovic, Milos D; Ginsberg, Stephen D; Strupp, Barbara J; Mufson, Elliott J

    2016-01-01

    Down syndrome (DS), caused by trisomy of chromosome 21, is marked by intellectual disability (ID) and early onset of Alzheimer's disease (AD) neuropathology including hippocampal cholinergic projection system degeneration. Here we determined the effects of age and maternal choline supplementation (MCS) on hippocampal cholinergic deficits in Ts65Dn mice compared to 2N mice sacrificed at 6-8 and 14-18 months of age. Ts65Dn mice and disomic (2N) littermates sacrificed at ages 6-8 and 14-18 mos were used for an aging study and Ts65Dn and 2N mice derived from Ts65Dn dams were maintained on either a choline-supplemented or a choline-controlled diet (conception to weaning) and examined at 14-18 mos for MCS studies. In the latter, mice were behaviorally tested on the radial arm Morris water maze (RAWM) and hippocampal tissue was examined for intensity of choline acetyltransferase (ChAT) immunoreactivity. Hippocampal ChAT activity was evaluated in a separate cohort. ChAT-positive fiber innervation was significantly higher in the hippocampus and dentate gyrus in Ts65Dn mice compared with 2N mice, independent of age or maternal diet. Similarly, hippocampal ChAT activity was significantly elevated in Ts65Dn mice compared to 2N mice, independent of maternal diet. A significant increase with age was seen in hippocampal cholinergic innervation of 2N mice, but not Ts65Dn mice. Degree of ChAT intensity correlated negatively with spatial memory ability in unsupplemented 2N and Ts65Dn mice, but positively in MCS 2N mice. The increased innervation produced by MCS appears to improve hippocampal function, making this a therapy that may be exploited for future translational approaches in human DS. PMID:26391045

  3. Structure and biological function of ENPP6, a choline-specific glycerophosphodiester-phosphodiesterase

    PubMed Central

    Morita, Junko; Kano, Kuniyuki; Kato, Kazuki; Takita, Hiroyuki; Sakagami, Hideki; Yamamoto, Yasuo; Mihara, Emiko; Ueda, Hirofumi; Sato, Takanao; Tokuyama, Hidetoshi; Arai, Hiroyuki; Asou, Hiroaki; Takagi, Junichi; Ishitani, Ryuichiro; Nishimasu, Hiroshi; Nureki, Osamu; Aoki, Junken

    2016-01-01

    Choline is an essential nutrient for all living cells and is produced extracellularly by sequential degradation of phosphatidylcholine (PC). However, little is known about how choline is produced extracellularly. Here, we report that ENPP6, a choline-specific phosphodiesterase, hydrolyzes glycerophosphocholine (GPC), a degradation product of PC, as a physiological substrate and participates in choline metabolism. ENPP6 is highly expressed in liver sinusoidal endothelial cells and developing oligodendrocytes, which actively incorporate choline and synthesize PC. ENPP6-deficient mice exhibited fatty liver and hypomyelination, well known choline-deficient phenotypes. The choline moiety of GPC was incorporated into PC in an ENPP6-dependent manner both in vivo and in vitro. The crystal structure of ENPP6 in complex with phosphocholine revealed that the choline moiety of the phosphocholine is recognized by a choline-binding pocket formed by conserved aromatic and acidic residues. The present study provides the molecular basis for ENPP6-mediated choline metabolism at atomic, cellular and tissue levels. PMID:26888014

  4. Metabolomic profiling can predict which humans will develop liver dysfunction when deprived of dietary choline

    PubMed Central

    Sha, Wei; da Costa, Kerry-Ann; Fischer, Leslie M.; Milburn, Michael V.; Lawton, Kay A.; Berger, Alvin; Jia, Wei; Zeisel, Steven H.

    2010-01-01

    Choline is an essential nutrient, and deficiency causes liver and muscle dysfunction. Common genetic variations alter the risk of developing organ dysfunction when choline deficient, probably by causing metabolic inefficiencies that should be detectable even while ingesting a normal choline-adequate diet. We determined whether metabolomic profiling of plasma at baseline could predict whether humans will develop liver dysfunction when deprived of dietary choline. Fifty-three participants were fed a diet containing 550 mg choline/70 kg/d for 10 d and then fed <50 mg choline/70 kg/d for up to 42 d. Participants who developed organ dysfunction on this diet were repleted with a choline-adequate diet for ≥3 d. Plasma samples, obtained at baseline, end of depletion, and end of repletion, were used for targeted and nontargeted metabolomic profiling. Liver fat was assessed using magnetic resonance spectroscopy. Metabolomic profiling and targeted biochemical analyses were highly correlated for the analytes assessed by both procedures. In addition, we report relative concentration changes of other small molecules detected by the nontargeted metabolomic analysis after choline depletion. Finally, we show that metabolomic profiles of participants when they were consuming a control baseline diet could predict whether they would develop liver dysfunction when deprived of dietary choline.—Sha, W., da Costa, K., Fischer, L. M., Milburn, M. V., Lawton, K. A., Berger, A., Jia, W., Zeisel, S. H. Metabolomic profiling can predict which humans will develop liver dysfunction when deprived of dietary choline. PMID:20371621

  5. Influence of dietary protein and excess methionine on choline needs for young bobwhite quail

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Serafin, J.A.

    1982-01-01

    Experiments were conducted with young Bobwhite quail (Colinus virginianus) to investigate the effect of differing dietary protein levels and nondetrimental amounts of excess methionine on choline needs. Growth and feed consumption of quail fed an adequate (27.3%) protein purified diet supplemented with 2000 mg/kg of choline were unaffected by increasing the level of excess methionine to 1.75%; however, greater amounts (2.0%, 2.25%) of excess methionine depressed growth (P less than .01), reduced feed consumption (P less than .01), and decreased feed utilization (P less than .05). Quail fed a purified diet containing 13.85% protein and 515 mg/kg of choline grew poorly. Growth was unaffected by additional choline in this diet. Growth was suboptimal among quail fed purified diets containing adequate or high (41.55%) levels of protein in which choline was limiting; however, a high level of protein did not in itself affect performance. Growth was improved by supplemental choline in these diets. Growth of quail fed purified diets with up to 1.35% excess methionine which were limiting (531 mg/kg) in choline was less than that of groups fed 2000 mg/kg of added dietary choline (P less than .01); however, excess methionine did not significantly influence growth of quail fed choline-deficient diets. These experiments indicate that neither high dietary protein nor excess methionine, fed at non-growth-depressing levels, increases dietary choline needs for young Bobwhite quail.

  6. Comparative genomics and mutagenesis analyses of choline metabolism in the marine R oseobacter clade

    PubMed Central

    Lidbury, Ian; Kimberley, George; Scanlan, David J.; Murrell, J. Colin

    2015-01-01

    Summary Choline is ubiquitous in marine eukaryotes and appears to be widely distributed in surface marine waters; however, its metabolism by marine bacteria is poorly understood. Here, using comparative genomics and molecular genetic approaches, we reveal that the capacity for choline catabolism is widespread in marine heterotrophs of the marine Roseobacter clade (MRC). Using the model bacterium R uegeria pomeroyi, we confirm that the bet A, bet B and bet C genes, encoding choline dehydrogenase, betaine aldehyde dehydrogenase and choline sulfatase, respectively, are involved in choline metabolism. The bet T gene, encoding an organic solute transporter, was essential for the rapid uptake of choline but not glycine betaine (GBT). Growth of choline and GBT as a sole carbon source resulted in the re‐mineralization of these nitrogen‐rich compounds into ammonium. Oxidation of the methyl groups from choline requires formyltetrahydrofolate synthetase encoded by fhs in R . pomeroyi, deletion of which resulted in incomplete degradation of GBT. We demonstrate that this was due to an imbalance in the supply of reducing equivalents required for choline catabolism, which can be alleviated by the addition of formate. Together, our results demonstrate that choline metabolism is ubiquitous in the MRC and reveal the role of Fhs in methyl group oxidation in R . pomeroyi. PMID:26058574

  7. Effects of chronic manipulations of dietary choline on dynamic behavioural situations.

    PubMed

    Fundarò, A; Garassino, G; Molinengo, L

    1987-01-01

    1. The modifications in rat behaviour caused by chronic manipulations of dietary choline were studied in two schedules of operant conditioning. Adult rats were maintained on choline-deficient, low-choline and high-choline enriched diets. 2. In the "periodic conditioning" test, the schedule of reinforcement was changed from a fixed ratio to a fixed interval schedule. In the "reversal" test the contingency for food delivery was switched four times from one lever to the other in a two lever Skinner box. 3. In the "periodic conditioning" test, control and treated groups showed the same reduction of responses/reinforcement from the beginning to the end of trial. The time-course reduction of responses/reinforcement became significant in the high-choline (331 mg/kg/day) and deficient-choline groups earlier than in the low-choline (75 mg/kg/day) enriched and control groups. 4. In the "reversal" test, the low-choline (110 mg/kg/day) enriched diet improved the reinforced responses in the IV reversal; the high-choline (330 mg/kg/day) diet gave a significant impairment of the reinforced responses in the III and IV reversals. The deficient-choline diet caused a reduced number of the total responses and a worsening of the reinforced responses in the II, III and IV reversals. PMID:3423269

  8. Polyvalent choline phosphate as a universal biomembrane adhesive

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Xifei; Liu, Zonghua; Janzen, Johan; Chafeeva, Irina; Horte, Sonja; Chen, Wei; Kainthan, Rajesh K.; Kizhakkedathu, Jayachandran N.; Brooks, Donald E.

    2012-05-01

    Phospholipids in the cell membranes of all eukaryotic cells contain phosphatidyl choline (PC) as the headgroup. Here we show that hyperbranched polyglycerols (HPGs) decorated with the ’PC-inverse’ choline phosphate (CP) in a polyvalent fashion can electrostatically bind to a variety of cell membranes and to PC-containing liposomes, the binding strength depending on the number density of CP groups per macromolecule. We also show that HPG-CPs can cause cells to adhere with varying affinity to other cells, and that binding can be reversed by subsequent exposure to low molecular weight HPGs carrying small numbers of PCs. Moreover, PC-rich membranes adsorb and rapidly internalize fluorescent HPG-CP but not HPG-PC molecules, which suggests that HPG-CPs could be used as drug-delivery agents. CP-decorated polymers should find broad use, for instance as tissue sealants and in the self-assembly of lipid nanostructures.

  9. Legionella dumoffii utilizes exogenous choline for phosphatidylcholine synthesis.

    PubMed

    Palusinska-Szysz, Marta; Szuster-Ciesielska, Agnieszka; Kania, Magdalena; Janczarek, Monika; Chmiel, Elżbieta; Danikiewicz, Witold

    2014-01-01

    Phosphatidycholine (PC) is the major membrane-forming phospholipid in eukaryotes but it has been found in only a limited number of prokaryotes. Bacteria synthesize PC via the phospholipid N-methylation pathway (Pmt) or via the phosphatidylcholine synthase pathway (Pcs) or both. Here, we demonstrated that Legionella dumoffii has the ability to utilize exogenous choline for phosphatidylcholine (PC) synthesis when bacteria grow in the presence of choline. The Pcs seems to be a primary pathway for synthesis of this phospholipid in L. dumoffii. Structurally different PC species were distributed in the outer and inner membranes. As shown by the LC/ESI-MS analyses, PC15:0/15:0, PC16:0/15:0, and PC17:0/17:1 were identified in the outer membrane and PC14:0/16:0, PC16:0/17:1, and PC20:0/15:0 in the inner membrane. L. dumoffii pcsA gene encoding phosphatidylcholine synthase revealed the highest sequence identity to pcsA of L. bozemanae (82%) and L. longbeachae (81%) and lower identity to pcsA of L. drancourtii (78%) and L. pneumophila (71%). The level of TNF-α in THP1-differentiated cells induced by live and temperature-killed L. dumoffii cultured on a medium supplemented with choline was assessed. Live L. dumoffii bacteria cultured on the choline-supplemented medium induced TNF-α three-fold less efficiently than cells grown on the non-supplemented medium. There is an evident effect of PC modification, which impairs the macrophage inflammatory response. PMID:24821544

  10. Legionella dumoffii Utilizes Exogenous Choline for Phosphatidylcholine Synthesis

    PubMed Central

    Palusinska-Szysz, Marta; Szuster-Ciesielska, Agnieszka; Kania, Magdalena; Janczarek, Monika; Chmiel, Elżbieta; Danikiewicz, Witold

    2014-01-01

    Phosphatidycholine (PC) is the major membrane-forming phospholipid in eukaryotes but it has been found in only a limited number of prokaryotes. Bacteria synthesize PC via the phospholipid N-methylation pathway (Pmt) or via the phosphatidylcholine synthase pathway (Pcs) or both. Here, we demonstrated that Legionella dumoffii has the ability to utilize exogenous choline for phosphatidylcholine (PC) synthesis when bacteria grow in the presence of choline. The Pcs seems to be a primary pathway for synthesis of this phospholipid in L. dumoffii. Structurally different PC species were distributed in the outer and inner membranes. As shown by the LC/ESI-MS analyses, PC15:0/15:0, PC16:0/15:0, and PC17:0/17:1 were identified in the outer membrane and PC14:0/16:0, PC16:0/17:1, and PC20:0/15:0 in the inner membrane. L. dumoffii pcsA gene encoding phosphatidylcholine synthase revealed the highest sequence identity to pcsA of L. bozemanae (82%) and L. longbeachae (81%) and lower identity to pcsA of L. drancourtii (78%) and L. pneumophila (71%). The level of TNF-α in THP1-differentiated cells induced by live and temperature-killed L. dumoffii cultured on a medium supplemented with choline was assessed. Live L. dumoffii bacteria cultured on the choline-supplemented medium induced TNF-α three-fold less efficiently than cells grown on the non-supplemented medium. There is an evident effect of PC modification, which impairs the macrophage inflammatory response. PMID:24821544

  11. Lecithin and choline in human health and disease.

    PubMed

    Canty, D J; Zeisel, S H

    1994-10-01

    Choline is involved in methyl group metabolism and lipid transport and is a component of a number of important biological compounds including the membrane phospholipids lecithin, sphingomyelin, and plasmalogen; the neurotransmitter acetylcholine; and platelet activating factor. Although a required nutrient for several animal species, choline is not currently designated as essential for humans. However, recent clinical studies show it to be essential for normal liver function. Additionally, a large body of evidence from the fields of molecular and cell biology shows that certain phospholipids play a critical role in generating second messengers for cell membrane signal transduction. This process involves a cascade of reactions that translate an external cell stimulus such as a hormone or growth factor into a change in cell transport, metabolism, growth, function, or gene expression. Disruptions in phospholipid metabolism can interfere with this process and may underlie certain disease states such as cancer and Alzheimer's disease. These recent findings may be appropriate in the consideration of choline as an essential nutrient for humans. PMID:7816350

  12. Choline phospholipid metabolism: a target in cancer cells?

    PubMed

    Ackerstaff, Ellen; Glunde, Kristine; Bhujwalla, Zaver M

    2003-10-15

    The experience of treating cancer over the past several decades overwhelmingly demonstrates that the disease continues to evade the vast array of drugs and treatment modalities available in the twenty-first century. This is not surprising in view of the complexity of this disease, and the multiplicities of pathways available to the cancer cell to enable its survival. Although the progression of cancer arrives at a common end point of cachexia, organ failure, and death, common pathways are rare in cancer. Identifying and targeting common pathways that would act across these levels of multiplicity is essential for the successful treatment of this disease. Over the past decade, one common characteristic consistently revealed by magnetic resonance spectroscopic studies is the elevation of phosphocholine and total choline-containing compounds in cancer cells and solid tumors. This elevation has been observed in almost every single cancer type studied with NMR spectroscopy and can be used as an endogenous biomarker of cancer. In this article, we have summarized some of the observations on the choline phospholipid metabolism of cancer cells and tumors, and make a case for targeting the aberrant choline phospholipid metabolism of cancer cells. PMID:14523987

  13. A flower-like nickel oxide nanostructure: synthesis and application for choline sensing.

    PubMed

    Sattarahmady, N; Heli, H; Dehdari Vais, R

    2014-02-01

    Flower-like nickel oxide nanostructure was synthesized by a simple desolvation method. The nanostructure was then employed as the modifier of a carbon paste electrode to fabricate a choline sensor. The mechanism and kinetics of the electrocatalytic oxidation of choline on the modified electrode surface were studied by cyclic voltammetry, steady-state polarization curve, and chronoamperometry. The catalytic rate constant and the charge transfer coefficient of the choline electrooxidation process by an active nickel species, and the diffusion coefficient of choline were reported. An amperometric method was developed for determination of choline with a sensitivity of 60.5 mA mol(-1)Lcm(-2) and a limit of detection of 25.4 μmol L(-1). The sensor had the advantages of high electrocatalytic activity and sensitivity, and long-term stability toward choline, with a simple fabrication method without complications of immobilization steps and using any enzyme or reagent. PMID:24401406

  14. Effects of acute CDP-choline treatment on resting state brain oscillations in healthy volunteers.

    PubMed

    Knott, Verner; de la Salle, Sara; Smith, Dylan; Choueiry, Joelle; Impey, Danielle; Smith, Meaghan; Beaudry, Elise; Saghir, Salman; Ilivitsky, Vadim; Labelle, Alain

    2015-03-30

    CDP-choline (cytidine-5'-diphosphocholine) is a phospholipid used to treat cognitive disorders, presumably repairing and maintaining brain cell membranes. Additional mechanisms may include enhanced cholinergic neurotransmission as the α7 nicotinic receptor actions of choline and increased acetylcholine synthesis accompanying CDP-choline administration may modulate brain oscillations underlying cognitive processes. This study utilizes electroencephalographic (EEG) recordings in healthy volunteers to evaluate CDP-choline induction of an oscillatory response profile associated with nicotinic stimulation. Resting state EEG was acquired in 24 male volunteers administered low (500mg) and moderate (1000mg) doses of CDP-choline in a randomized placebo-controlled, crossover trial. Consistent with nicotinic agonist treatment, spectral analysis showed dose-dependent reductions in delta and increases in alpha oscillations, which were also accompanied by decreases in beta and gamma oscillatory activity. These findings support the posit that CDP-choline cognitive enhancement involves multiple mechanisms including facilitated nicotinic cholinergic action. PMID:25700947

  15. Common genetic polymorphisms affect the human requirement for the nutrient choline

    PubMed Central

    da Costa, Kerry-Ann; Kozyreva, Olga G.; Song, Jiannan; Galanko, Joseph A.; Fischer, Leslie M.; Zeisel, Steven H.

    2006-01-01

    Humans eating diets deficient in the essential nutrient choline can develop organ dysfunction. We hypothesized that common single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in genes involved in choline metabolism influence the dietary requirement of this nutrient. Fifty-seven humans were fed a low choline diet until they developed organ dysfunction or for up to 42 days. We tested DNA SNPs for allelic association with susceptibility to developing organ dysfunction associated with choline deficiency. We identified an SNP in the promoter region of the phosphatidylethanolamine N-methyltransferase gene (PEMT; −744 G→C; rs12325817) for which 18 of 23 carriers of the C allele (78%) developed organ dysfunction when fed a low choline diet (odds ratio 25, P=0.002). The first of two SNPs in the coding region of the choline dehydrogenase gene (CHDH; +318 A→C; rs9001) had a protective effect on susceptibility to choline deficiency, while a second CHDH variant (+432 G→T; rs12676) was associated with increased susceptibility to choline deficiency. A SNP in the PEMT coding region (+5465 G→A; rs7946) and a betaine:homocysteine methyl-transferase (BHMT) SNP (+742 G→A; rs3733890) were not associated with susceptibility to choline deficiency. Identification of common polymorphisms that affect dietary requirements for choline could enable us to identify individuals for whom we need to assure adequate dietary choline intake.—da Costa, K.-A., Kozyreva, O. G., Song, J., Galanko, J. A., Fischer, L. M., Zeisel, S. H. Common genetic polymorphisms affect the human requirement for the nutrient choline. PMID:16816108

  16. Choline is required in the diet of lactating dams to maintain maternal immune function.

    PubMed

    Dellschaft, Neele S; Ruth, Megan R; Goruk, Susan; Lewis, Erin D; Richard, Caroline; Jacobs, René L; Curtis, Jonathan M; Field, Catherine J

    2015-06-14

    Choline demands during lactation are high; however, detailed knowledge is lacking regarding the optimal dietary intake during this critical period. The present study was designed to determine the effects of varying intakes of choline on maternal immune function during lactation. Primiparous Sprague-Dawley rats (n 42) were randomised 24-48 h before birth and fed the following diets for 21 d: choline-devoid (0 g choline/kg diet; D, n 10); 1·0 g choline/kg diet (C1, n 11); 2·5 g choline/kg diet (C2·5, n 10); 6·2 g choline/kg diet (C6, n 11). Splenocytes were isolated and stimulated ex vivo with concanavalin A, lipopolysaccharide (LPS) or CD3/CD28. D and C6 dams had lower final body weight, spleen weight and average pup weight than C1 dams (P< 0·05). There was a linear relationship between free choline concentration in pup stomach contents with maternal dietary choline content (P< 0·001, r² 0·415). Compared with C1 and C2·5, D spleens had a lower proportion of mature T cells and activated suppressor cells, and this resulted in reduced cytokine production after stimulation (P< 0·05). Feeding 6·2 g choline/kg diet resulted in a higher cytokine production after stimulation with CD3/CD28 (P< 0·05). Except for a higher IL-6 production after LPS stimulation with cells from the C2·5 dams (P< 0·05), there were no differences between the C1 and C2·5 dams. For the first time, we show that feeding lactating mothers a diet free of choline has substantial effects on their immune function and on offspring growth. Additionally, excess dietary choline had adverse effects on maternal and offspring body weight but only minimal effects on maternal immune function. PMID:25902853

  17. Utilization of choline from crude soybean lecithin by chicks. 1. Growth and prevention of perosis.

    PubMed

    Lipstein, B; Bornstein, S; Budowski, P

    1977-01-01

    Data obtained with growing chicks fed a semi-purified diet indicate that choline from crude soybean lecithin is as well utilized as synthetic choline chloride, on the basis of growth, relative liver weight and prevention of perosis. Extrapolation of the results on growth and perosis prevention, obtained between 1 and 3 weeks of age, to performance on practical-type diets yields choline requirements for broiler-type chicks ranging from 800 to 1000 mg./kg. diet (as choline chloride). The requirement seems to decrease with age. PMID:564504

  18. Phospholipid biosynthesis in Candida albicans: Regulation by the precursors inositol and choline

    SciTech Connect

    Klig, L.S.; Friedli, L.; Schmid, E. )

    1990-08-01

    Phospholipid metabolism in the pathogenic fungus Candida albicans was examined. The phospholipid biosynthetic pathways of C. albicans were elucidated and were shown to be similar to those of Saccharomyces cerevisiae. However, marked differences were seen between these two fungi in the regulation of the pathways in response to exogenously provided precursors inositol and choline. In S. cerevisiae, the biosynthesis of phosphatidylcholine via methylation of phosphatidylethanolamine appears to be regulated in response to inositol and choline; provision of choline alone does not repress the activity of this pathway. The same pathway in C. albicans responds to the exogenous provision of choline. Possible explanations for the observed differences in regulation are discussed.

  19. Exogenous fatty acids affect CDP-choline pathway to increase phosphatidylcholine synthesis in granular pneumocytes

    SciTech Connect

    Chander, A.; Gullo, J.; Reicherter, J.; Fisher, A.

    1987-05-01

    Regulation of phosphatidylcholine (PC) synthesis in rat granular pneumocytes isolated by tryptic digestion of lungs and maintained in primary culture for 24 h was investigated by following effects of exogenous fatty acids on (/sup 3/H-methyl)choline incorporation into PC and disaturated PC (DSPC). At 0.1 mM choline, the rate of choline incorporation into PC and DSPC was 440 +/- and 380 +/- 50 pmol/h/ug Pi (mean +/- SE, n=3-5), respectively, and was linear for up to 3 h. PC synthesis was significantly increased by 0.1 mM each of palmitic, oleic, linoleic, or linolenic acid. However, synthesis of DSPC was increased only by palmitic acid and this increase was prevented by addition of oleic acid suggesting lack of effect on the remodeling pathway. Pulse-chase experiments with choline in absence or presence of palmitic or oleic acid showed that the label declined in choline phosphate and increased in PC more rapidly in presence of either of the fatty acids, suggesting rapid conversion of choline phosphate to PC. Microsomal choline phosphate cytidyltransferase activity in cells preincubated without or with palmitic acid for 3 h was 0.81 +/- 0.07 and 1.81 +/- 0.09 nmol choline phosphate converted/min/mg protein (n=4). These results suggest that in granular pneumocytes, exogenous fatty acids modulate PC synthesis by increasing choline phosphate cytidyltransferase activity.

  20. Reduced MTHFD1 Activity in Male Mice Perturbs Folate- and Choline-Dependent One-Carbon Metabolism as Well as Transsulfuration12

    PubMed Central

    Field, Martha S.; Shields, Kelsey S.; Abarinov, Elena V.; Malysheva, Olga V.; Allen, Robert H.; Stabler, Sally P.; Ash, Jessica A.; Strupp, Barbara J.; Stover, Patrick J.; Caudill, Marie A.

    2013-01-01

    Impaired utilization of folate is caused by insufficient dietary intake and/or genetic variation and has been shown to prompt changes in related pathways, including choline and methionine metabolism. These pathways have been shown to be sensitive to variation within the Mthfd1 gene, which codes for a folate-metabolizing enzyme responsible for generating 1-carbon (1-C)–substituted folate derivatives. The Mthfd1gt/+ mouse serves as a potential model of human Mthfd1 loss-of-function genetic variants that impair MTHFD1 function. This study investigated the effects of the Mthfd1gt/+ genotype and folate intake on markers of choline, folate, methionine, and transsulfuration metabolism. Male Mthfd1gt/+ and Mthfd1+/+ mice were randomly assigned at weaning (3 wk of age) to either a control (2 mg/kg folic acid) or folate-deficient (0 mg/kg folic acid) diet for 5 wk. Mice were killed at 8 wk of age following 12 h of food deprivation; blood and liver samples were analyzed for choline, methionine, and transsulfuration biomarkers. Independent of folate intake, mice with the Mthfd1gt/+ genotype had higher hepatic concentrations of choline (P = 0.005), betaine (P = 0.013), and dimethylglycine (P = 0.004) and lower hepatic concentrations of glycerophosphocholine (P = 0.002) relative to Mthfd1+/+ mice. Mthfd1gt/+ mice also had higher plasma concentrations of homocysteine (P = 0.0016) and cysteine (P < 0.001) as well as lower plasma concentrations of methionine (P = 0.0003) and cystathionine (P = 0.011). The metabolic alterations observed in Mthfd1gt/+ mice indicate perturbed choline and folate-dependent 1-C metabolism and support the future use of Mthfd1gt/+ mice as a tool to investigate the impact of impaired 1-C metabolism on disease outcomes. PMID:23190757

  1. Clinical applications of choline PET/CT in brain tumors.

    PubMed

    Giovannini, Elisabetta; Lazzeri, Patrizia; Milano, Amalia; Gaeta, Maria Chiara; Ciarmiello, Andrea

    2015-01-01

    Malignant gliomas and metastatic tumors are the most common forms of brain tumors. From a clinical perspective, neuroimaging plays a significant role, in diagnosis, treatment planning, and follow-up. To date MRI is considered the current clinical gold standard for imaging, however, despite providing superior structural detail it features poor specificity in identifying viable tumors in brain treated with surgery, radiation, or chemotherapy. In the last years functional neuroimaging has become largely widespread thanks to the use of molecular tracers employed in cellular metabolism which has significantly improved the management of patients with brain tumors, especially in the post-treatment phase. Despite the considerable progress of molecular imaging in oncology its use in the diagnosis of brain tumors is still limited by a few wellknown technical problems. Because 18F-FDG, the most common radiotracer used in oncology, is avidly accumulated by normal cortex, the low tumor/background signal ratio makes it difficult to distinguish the tumor from normal surrounding tissues. By contrast, radiotracers with higher specificity for the tumor are labeled with a short half-life isotopes which restricts their use to those centers equipped with a cyclotron and radiopharmacy facility. 11C-choline has been reported as a suitable tracer for neuroimaging application. The recent availability of choline labeled with a long half-life radioisotope as 18F increases the possibility of studying this tracer's potential role in the staging of brain tumors. The present review focuses on the possible clinical applications of PET/CT with choline tracers in malignant brain tumors and brain metastases, with a special focus on malignant gliomas. PMID:25225894

  2. Choline deficiency increases lymphocyte apoptosis and DNA damage in humans2,3

    PubMed Central

    da Costa, Kerry-Ann; Niculescu, Mihai D; Craciunescu, Corneliu N; Fischer, Leslie M; Zeisel, Steven H

    2008-01-01

    Background: Whereas deficiency of the essential nutrient choline is associated with DNA damage and apoptosis in cell and rodent models, it has not been shown in humans. Objective: The objective was to ascertain whether lymphocytes from choline-deficient humans had greater DNA damage and apoptosis than did those from choline-sufficient humans. Design: Fifty-one men and women aged 18–70 y were fed a diet containing the recommended adequate intake of choline (control) for 10 d. They then were fed a choline-deficient diet for up to 42 d before repletion with 138–550 mg choline/d. Blood was collected at the end of each phase, and peripheral lymphocytes were isolated. DNA damage and apoptosis were then assessed by activation of caspase-3, terminal deoxynucleotide transferase–mediated dUTP nick end-labeling, and single-cell gel electrophoresis (COMET) assays. Results: All subjects fed the choline-deficient diet had lymphocyte DNA damage, as assessed by COMET assay, twice that found when they were fed the control diet. The subjects who developed organ dysfunction (liver or muscle) when fed the choline-deficient diet had significantly more apoptotic lymphocytes, as assessed by the activated caspase-3 assay, than when fed the control diet. Conclusions: A choline-deficient diet increased DNA damage in humans. Subjects in whom these diets induced liver or muscle dys-function also had higher rates of apoptosis in their peripheral lymphocytes than did subjects who did not develop organ dysfunction. Assessment of DNA damage and apoptosis in lymphocytes appears to be a clinically useful measure in humans (such as those receiving parenteral nutrition) in whom choline deficiency is suspected. PMID:16825685

  3. CHOLINE AMELIORATES DEFICITS IN BALANCE CAUSED BY ACUTE NEONATAL ETHANOL EXPOSURE

    PubMed Central

    Bearer, Cynthia F.; Wellmann, Kristen A.; Tang, Ningfeng; He, Min; Mooney, Sandra M.

    2015-01-01

    Fetal alcohol spectrum disorder (FASD) is estimated to occur in 1% of all live births. The developing cerebellum is vulnerable to the toxic effects of alcohol. People with FASD have cerebellar hypoplasia and developmental deficits associated with cerebellar injury. Choline is an essential nutrient but many diets in the USA are choline deficient. In rats, choline given with or following alcohol exposure reduces many alcohol-induced neurobehavioral deficits, but not those associated with cerebellar function. Our objective was to determine if choline supplementation prior to alcohol exposure would ameliorate the impact of ethanol on a cerebellar-associated behavioral test in mice. Pregnant C57Bl6/J mice were maintained on a choline deficient diet from embryonic day 4.5. On postnatal day 1 (P1), pups were assigned to one of 8 treatment groups: choline (C) or saline (S) pre-treatment from P1-5, ethanol (6 g/kg) or Intralipid® on P5, C or S post-treatment from P6-20. On P30, balance and coordination were tested using the dowel crossing test. Overall, there was a significant effect of treatment and females crossed longer distances than males. Ethanol exposure significantly reduced the total distance crossed. Choline pre-treatment increased the distance crossed by males, and both pre- and post-treatment with choline significantly increased total distance crossed for females and males. There was no effect of choline on Intralipid®-exposed animals. This is the first study to show that choline ameliorates ethanol-induced effects on balance and coordination when given before ethanol exposure. Choline fortification of common foodstuffs may reduce the effects of alcohol. PMID:26085462

  4. Dietary Choline and Betaine Intakes Vary in an Adult Multiethnic Population123

    PubMed Central

    Yonemori, Kim M.; Lim, Unhee; Koga, Karin R.; Wilkens, Lynne R.; Au, Donna; Boushey, Carol J.; Le Marchand, Loïc; Kolonel, Laurence N.; Murphy, Suzanne P.

    2013-01-01

    Choline and betaine are important nutrients for human health, but reference food composition databases for these nutrients became available only recently. We tested the feasibility of using these databases to estimate dietary choline and betaine intakes among ethnically diverse adults who participated in the Multiethnic Cohort (MEC) Study. Of the food items (n = 965) used to quantify intakes for the MEC FFQ, 189 items were exactly matched with items in the USDA Database for the Choline Content of Common Foods for total choline, choline-containing compounds, and betaine, and 547 items were matched to the USDA National Nutrient Database for Standard Reference for total choline (n = 547) and 148 for betaine. When a match was not found, choline and betaine values were imputed based on the same food with a different form (124 food items for choline, 300 for choline compounds, 236 for betaine), a similar food (n = 98, 284, and 227, respectively) or the closest item in the same food category (n = 6, 191, and 157, respectively), or the values were assumed to be zero (n = 1, 1, and 8, respectively). The resulting mean intake estimates for choline and betaine among 188,147 MEC participants (aged 45–75) varied by sex (372 and 154 mg/d in men, 304 and 128 mg/d in women, respectively; P-heterogeneity < 0.0001) and by race/ethnicity among Caucasians, African Americans, Japanese Americans, Latinos, and Native Hawaiians (P-heterogeneity < 0.0001), largely due to the variation in energy intake. Our findings demonstrate the feasibility of assessing choline and betaine intake and characterize the variation in intake that exists in a multiethnic population. PMID:23616508

  5. Restoration of blood pressure by choline treatment in rats made hypotensive by haemorrhage.

    PubMed Central

    Ulus, I. H.; Arslan, B. Y.; Savci, V.; Kiran, B. K.

    1995-01-01

    1. Intracerebroventricular (i.c.v.) injection of choline (25-150 micrograms) increased blood pressure in rats made acutely hypotensive by haemorrhage. Intraperitoneal administration of choline (60 mg kg-1) also increased blood pressure, but to a lesser extent. Following i.c.v. injection of 25 micrograms or 50 micrograms of choline, heart rate did not change, while 100 micrograms or 150 micrograms i.c.v. choline produced a slight and short lasting bradycardia. Choline (150 micrograms) failed to alter the circulating residual volume of blood in haemorrhaged rats. 2. The pressor response to i.c.v. choline (50 micrograms) in haemorrhaged rats was abolished by pretreatment with mecamylamine (50 micrograms, i.c.v.) but not atropine (10 micrograms, i.c.v.). The pressor response to choline was blocked by pretreatment with hemicholinium-3 (20 micrograms, i.c.v.). 3. The pressor response to i.c.v. choline (150 micrograms) was associated with a several fold increase in plasma levels of vasopressin and adrenaline but not of noradrenaline and plasma renin. 4. The pressor response to i.c.v. choline (150 micrograms) was not altered by bilateral adrenalectomy, but was attenuated by systemic administration of either phentolamine (10 mg kg-1) or the vasopressin antagonist [beta-mercapto-beta,beta-cyclopenta-methylenepropionyl1, O-Me-Tyr2,Arg8]-vasopressin (10 micrograms kg-1). 5. It is concluded that the precursor of acetylcholine, choline, can increase and restore blood pressure in acutely haemorrhaged rats by increasing central cholinergic neurotransmission. Nicotinic receptor activation and an increase in plasma vasopressin and adrenaline level appear to be involved in this effect of choline. PMID:8528579

  6. Kinetic and structural relationships of transition monomeric and oligomeric carboxyl- and choline-esterases.

    PubMed

    Main, A R

    1983-01-01

    The kinetic and structural relationships of eight electrophoretically pure mammalian serum and liver serine carboxylesterases (CE) and cholinesterases (ChE) have been studied. Eight CE's and ChE's, which were fully resolved but only partially purified, provided additional information. Five of the electrophoretically pure esterases were monomeric, and of these, four belonged to a new and widely distributed class. These four monomeric esterases hydrolyzed choline esters, but at widely differing rates. Thus two were termed monomeric butyrylcholinesterases, mBuChE I and II, and two were monomeric CE's (mCE). The rabbit liver mCE was not a subunit of the oligomeric CE (oCE), although the oCE also hydrolyzed choline esters at a very low rate. The complex kinetics of the mCE's, mBuChE's, oCE's, and of the oligomeric BuChE's of horse and human serum could be interpreted according to a single reaction scheme involving an allosteric site and the equation derived from it. Thus activation and inhibition at high substrate concentrations, together with sigmoidal activity versus substrate concentration plots, all of which characterize the reactions of these esterases, could be interpreted by a single scheme and equation. Structural and kinetic comparisons showed a progressive transition of properties from the oCE's through the mCE's to the oBuChE's. One of the purified mCE's was from horse serum, and it exhibited physical and kinetic properties unlike those of the liver mCE's or oCE's. PMID:6339600

  7. Effects of analogues of ethanolamine and choline on phospholipid metabolism in rat hepatocytes

    PubMed Central

    Åkesson, Björn

    1977-01-01

    1. Analogues of ethanolamine and choline were incubated with different labelled precursors of phospholipids and isolated hepatocytes and the effects on phospholipid synthesis were studied. 2. 2-Aminopropan-1-ol and 2-aminobutan-1-ol were the most efficient inhibitors of [14C]ethanolamine incorporation into phospholipids, whereas the incorporation of [3H]choline was inhibited most extensively by NN-diethylethanolamine and NN-dimethylethanolamine. 3. When the analogues were incubated with [3H]glycerol and hepatocytes, the appearance of 3H in unnatural phospholipids indicated that they were incorporated, at least in part, via CDP-derivatives. The distribution of [3H]glycerol among molecular species of phospholipids containing 2-aminopropan-1-ol and 1-aminopropan-2-ol was the same as in phosphatidylethanolamine. In other phospholipid analogues the distribution of 3H was more similar to that in phosphatidylcholine. 4. NN-Diethylethanolamine stimulated both the conversion of phosphatidylethanolamine into phosphatidylcholine and the incorporation of [Me-14C]methionine into phospholipids. Other N-alkyl- or NN-dialkyl-ethanolamines also stimulated [14C]methionine incorporation, but inhibited the conversion of phosphatidylethanolamine into phosphatidylcholine. This indicates that phosphatidyl-NN-diethylethanolamine is a poor methyl acceptor, in contrast with other N-alkylated phosphatidylethanolamines. 5. These results on the regulation of phospholipid metabolism in intact cells are discussed with respect to the possible control points. They also provide guidelines for future experiments on the manipulation of phospholipid polar-headgroup composition in primary cultures of hepatocytes. PMID:606244

  8. PLASMA CHOLINE IN NORMAL NEWBORNS, INFANTS, TODDLERS, AND IN VERY-LOW-BIRTH-WEIGHT NEONATES REQUIRING TOTAL PARENTERAL NUTRITION

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Choline deficiency is associated with hepatic abnormalities in adult volunteers and patients administered total parenteral nutrition (TPN). Preliminary investigation has suggested that plasma-free choline concentration (PFCh) is greater in neonatal animals, including humans, than in adults. The aims...

  9. Determination of Cooking Yields and Nutrient Retention Factors of Choline in Meat Products

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    USDA’s recent research shows that meat products are good sources of choline. During cooking, nutrient levels are affected by moisture and fat losses and may be reduced by heating. To determine the impact of cooking on choline retention in meats, four nationwide composite samples of beef, bacon, cure...

  10. Theoretical study on the structures and properties of mixtures of urea and choline chloride.

    PubMed

    Sun, Hui; Li, Yan; Wu, Xue; Li, Guohui

    2013-06-01

    In this work, we investigated in detail the structural characteristics of mixtures of choline chloride and urea with different urea contents by performing molecular dynamic (MD) simulations, and offer possible explanations for the low melting point of the eutectic mixture of choline chloride and urea with a ratio of 1:2. The insertion of urea molecules was found to change the density distribution of cations and anions around the given cations significantly, disrupting the long-range ordered structure of choline chloride. Moreover, with increasing urea concentration, the hydrogen bond interactions between choline cations and Cl(-) anions decreased, while those among urea molecules obviously increased. From the hydrogen bond lifetimes, it was found that a ratio of 1:2 between choline chloride and urea is necessary for a reasonable strength of hydrogen bond interaction to maintain the low melting point of the mixture of choline chloride with urea. In addition, it was also deduced from the interaction energies that a urea content of 67.7 % may make the interactions of cation-anion, cation-urea and anion-urea modest, and thus results in the lower melting point of the eutectic mixture of choline chloride and urea. The present results may offer assistance to some extent for understanding the physicochemical properties of the eutectic mixture of choline chloride and urea, and give valuable information for the further development and application of deep eutectic solvents. PMID:23435478

  11. Prenatal Choline Availability Alters the Context Sensitivity of Pavlovian Conditioning in Adult Rats

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lamoureux, Jeffrey A.; Meck, Warren H.; Williams, Christina L.

    2008-01-01

    The effects of prenatal choline availability on Pavlovian conditioning were assessed in adult male rats (3-4 mo). Neither supplementation nor deprivation of prenatal choline affected the acquisition and extinction of simple Pavlovian conditioned excitation, or the acquisition and retardation of conditioned inhibition. However, prenatal choline…

  12. Choline uptake in Agrobacterium tumefaciens by the high-affinity ChoXWV transporter.

    PubMed

    Aktas, Meriyem; Jost, Kathinka A; Fritz, Christiane; Narberhaus, Franz

    2011-10-01

    Agrobacterium tumefaciens is a facultative phytopathogen that causes crown gall disease. For successful plant transformation A. tumefaciens requires the membrane lipid phosphatidylcholine (PC), which is produced via the methylation and the PC synthase (Pcs) pathways. The latter route is dependent on choline. Although choline uptake has been demonstrated in A. tumefaciens, the responsible transporter(s) remained elusive. In this study, we identified the first choline transport system in A. tumefaciens. The ABC-type choline transporter is encoded by the chromosomally located choXWV operon (ChoX, binding protein; ChoW, permease; and ChoV, ATPase). The Cho system is not critical for growth and PC synthesis. However, [14C]choline uptake is severely reduced in A. tumefaciens choX mutants. Recombinant ChoX is able to bind choline with high affinity (equilibrium dissociation constant [KD] of ≈2 μM). Since other quaternary amines are bound by ChoX with much lower affinities (acetylcholine, KD of ≈80 μM; betaine, KD of ≈470 μM), the ChoXWV system functions as a high-affinity transporter with a preference for choline. Two tryptophan residues (W40 and W87) located in the predicted ligand-binding pocket are essential for choline binding. The structural model of ChoX built on Sinorhizobium meliloti ChoX resembles the typical structure of substrate binding proteins with a so-called "Venus flytrap mechanism" of substrate binding. PMID:21803998

  13. Are dietary choline and betaine intakes determinants of total homocysteine concentration?

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Elevated homocysteine concentrations are associated with an increased risk of cardiovascular disease and a decline in cognitive function. Intakes of choline and betaine, as methyl donors, may affect homocysteine concentrations. The objective was to examine whether choline and betaine intakes, assess...

  14. Potassium activation of [3H]-choline accumulation by isolated sympathetic ganglia of the rat.

    PubMed Central

    Higgins, A. J.; Neal, M. J.

    1982-01-01

    1 The effect of K-depolarization on the uptake of low and high concentrations of [3H]-choline by isolated superior sympathetic ganglia of the rat has been studied. 2 In unstimulated ganglia, the uptake of [3H]-choline (0.1 microM) ('high affinity uptake') was unaffected by denervation or by hemicholinium-3 (HC-3), suggesting uptake by structures other than cholinergic nerve terminals. 3 K-depolarization of the ganglia increased [3H]-choline accumulation by the high affinity uptake process but in contrast the 'low affinity' accumulation of [3H]-choline (100 microM) was decreased. 4 The K-activated, 'high affinity' component of choline uptake was highly sodium-dependent, inhibited by HC-3, and was abolished by denervation. 5 In incubation conditions designed to prevent transmitter release (Ca-free medium and high-Mg medium), the K-activated uptake of [3H]-choline was abolished. 6 It is concluded that in unstimulated ganglia, there is little choline uptake by nerve terminals. However, when the terminals are depolarized, choline uptake is increased by the activation of a sodium-dependent, HC-3-sensitive transport process. The activation of this uptake process is apparently associated with the release of acetylcholine from the terminals, or by changes in ionic fluxes, and not by the depolarization per se. PMID:7150866

  15. Calixarene-Mediated Liquid Membrane Transport of Choline Conjugates 2: Transport of Drug-Choline Conjugates and Neurotransmitters

    PubMed Central

    Adhikari, Birendra Babu; Roshandel, Sahar; Fujii, Ayu

    2015-01-01

    Lower rim carboxylic acid calix[n]arenes and upper rim phosphonic acid functionalized calix[4]arenes effect selective transport of distinct molecular payloads through a liquid membrane. The secret to this success lies in the attachment of a receptor-complementary handle. We find that the trimethylammonium ethylene group present in choline is a general handle for the transport of drug and drug-like species. Furthermore, neurotransmitters possessing ionizable amine termini are also transported. Some limitations to this strategy have been uncovered as payloads become increasingly lipophilic. These developments reveal new approaches to synthetic receptor-mediated selective small molecule transport in vesicular and cellular systems. PMID:26161035

  16. Moderate Perinatal Choline Deficiency Elicits Altered Physiology and Metabolomic Profiles in the Piglet.

    PubMed

    Getty, Caitlyn M; Dilger, Ryan N

    2015-01-01

    Few studies have evaluated the impact of dietary choline on the health and well-being of swine, and those pivotal papers were aimed at determining dietary requirements for sows and growing pigs. This is of importance as the piglet is becoming a widely accepted model for human infant nutrition, but little is known about the impacts of perinatal choline status on overall health and metabolism of the growing piglet. In the present study, sows were provided either a choline deficient (CD, 625 mg choline/kg dry matter) or choline sufficient (CS, 1306 mg choline/kg dry matter) diet for the last 65 d of gestation (prenatal intervention). Piglets were weaned from the sow 48 h after farrowing and provided either a CD (477 mg choline/kg dry matter) or CS (1528 mg choline/kg dry matter) milk replacer (postnatal intervention) for 29 ± 2 d, resulting in a factorial arrangement of 4 treatment (prenatal/postnatal) groups: CS/CS, CS/CD, CD/CS, and CD/CD. Piglet growth was normal for artificially-reared piglets, and was not impacted by perinatal choline status. Piglets receiving the postnatal CD treatment had lower (P < 0.01) plasma choline and choline-containing phospholipid concentrations and higher (P < 0.05) liver enzyme (alkaline phosphatase and gamma-glutamyl transferase) values compared with piglets receiving the postnatal CS treatment. Hepatic lipid content of piglets receiving the postnatal CD treatment was higher (P < 0.01) compared with piglets receiving the postnatal CS treatment. Additionally, postnatally CD piglets had lower (P = 0.01) plasma cholesterol than postnatally CS piglets. Brain development was also impacted by perinatal choline status, with brains of piglets exposed to prenatal CD being smaller (P = 0.01) than those of prenatally CS piglets. These findings support the hypothesis that the piglet is a sensitive model for choline deficiency during the perinatal period. In the present study, piglets exhibited similarities in health markers and metabolomic

  17. Moderate Perinatal Choline Deficiency Elicits Altered Physiology and Metabolomic Profiles in the Piglet

    PubMed Central

    Getty, Caitlyn M.; Dilger, Ryan N.

    2015-01-01

    Few studies have evaluated the impact of dietary choline on the health and well-being of swine, and those pivotal papers were aimed at determining dietary requirements for sows and growing pigs. This is of importance as the piglet is becoming a widely accepted model for human infant nutrition, but little is known about the impacts of perinatal choline status on overall health and metabolism of the growing piglet. In the present study, sows were provided either a choline deficient (CD, 625 mg choline/kg dry matter) or choline sufficient (CS, 1306 mg choline/kg dry matter) diet for the last 65 d of gestation (prenatal intervention). Piglets were weaned from the sow 48 h after farrowing and provided either a CD (477 mg choline/kg dry matter) or CS (1528 mg choline/kg dry matter) milk replacer (postnatal intervention) for 29 ± 2 d, resulting in a factorial arrangement of 4 treatment (prenatal/postnatal) groups: CS/CS, CS/CD, CD/CS, and CD/CD. Piglet growth was normal for artificially-reared piglets, and was not impacted by perinatal choline status. Piglets receiving the postnatal CD treatment had lower (P < 0.01) plasma choline and choline-containing phospholipid concentrations and higher (P < 0.05) liver enzyme (alkaline phosphatase and gamma-glutamyl transferase) values compared with piglets receiving the postnatal CS treatment. Hepatic lipid content of piglets receiving the postnatal CD treatment was higher (P < 0.01) compared with piglets receiving the postnatal CS treatment. Additionally, postnatally CD piglets had lower (P = 0.01) plasma cholesterol than postnatally CS piglets. Brain development was also impacted by perinatal choline status, with brains of piglets exposed to prenatal CD being smaller (P = 0.01) than those of prenatally CS piglets. These findings support the hypothesis that the piglet is a sensitive model for choline deficiency during the perinatal period. In the present study, piglets exhibited similarities in health markers and metabolomic

  18. Fast 18F Labeling of a Near-Infrared Fluorophore Enables Positron Emission Tomography and Optical Imaging of Sentinel Lymph Nodes

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    We combine a novel boronate trap for F− with a near-infrared fluorophore into a single molecule. Attachment to targeting ligands enables localization by positron emission tomography (PET) and near-infrared fluorescence (NIRF). Our first application of this generic tag is to label Lymphoseek (tilmanocept), an agent designed for receptor-specific sentinel lymph node (SLN) mapping. The new conjugate incorporates 18F− in a single, aqueous step, targets mouse SLN rapidly (1 h) with reduced distal lymph node accumulation, permits PET or scintigraphic imaging of SLN, and enables NIRF-guided excision and histological verification even after 18F decay. This embodiment is superior to current SLN mapping agents such as nontargeted [99mTc]sulfur colloids and Isosulfan Blue, as well as the phase III targeted ligand [99mTc]SPECT Lymphoseek counterpart, species that are visible by SPECT or visible absorbance separately. Facile incorporation of 18F into a NIRF probe should promote many synergistic PET and NIRF combinations. PMID:20873712

  19. Structure-Activity Relationship of (18)F-Labeled Phosphoramidate Peptidomimetic Prostate-Specific Membrane Antigen (PSMA)-Targeted Inhibitor Analogues for PET Imaging of Prostate Cancer.

    PubMed

    Dannoon, Shorouk; Ganguly, Tanushree; Cahaya, Hendry; Geruntho, Jonathan J; Galliher, Matthew S; Beyer, Sophia K; Choy, Cindy J; Hopkins, Mark R; Regan, Melanie; Blecha, Joseph E; Skultetyova, Lubica; Drake, Christopher R; Jivan, Salma; Barinka, Cyril; Jones, Ella F; Berkman, Clifford E; VanBrocklin, Henry F

    2016-06-23

    A series of phosphoramidate-based prostate specific membrane antigen (PSMA) inhibitors of increasing lipophilicity were synthesized (4, 5, and 6), and their fluorine-18 analogs were evaluated for use as positron emission tomography (PET) imaging agents for prostate cancer. To gain insight into their modes of binding, they were also cocrystallized with the extracellular domain of PSMA. All analogs exhibited irreversible binding to PSMA with IC50 values ranging from 0.4 to 1.3 nM. In vitro assays showed binding and rapid internalization (80-95%, 2 h) of the radiolabeled ligands in PSMA(+) cells. In vivo distribution demonstrated significant uptake in CWR22Rv1 (PSMA(+)) tumor, with tumor to blood ratios of 25.6:1, 63.6:1, and 69.6:1 for [(18)F]4, [(18)F]5, and [(18)F]6, respectively, at 2 h postinjection. Installation of aminohexanoic acid (AH) linkers in the phosphoramidate scaffold improved their PSMA binding and inhibition and was critical for achieving suitable in vivo imaging properties, positioning [(18)F]5 and [(18)F]6 as favorable candidates for future prostate cancer imaging clinical trials. PMID:27228467

  20. Reusable electrochemical cell for rapid separation of [18F]fluoride from [18O]water for flow-through synthesis of 18F-labeled tracers

    PubMed Central

    Sadeghi, Saman; Liang, Vincent; Cheung, Shilin; Woo, Suh; Wu, Curtis; Ly, Jimmy; Deng, Yuliang; Eddings, Mark; van Dam, R. Michael

    2015-01-01

    A brass-platinum electrochemical micro flow cell was developed to extract [18F]fluoride from an aqueous solution and release it into an organic based solution, suitable for subsequent radio-synthesis, in a fast and reliable manner. This cell does not suffer electrode erosion and is thus reusable while operating faster by enabling increased voltages. By optimizing temperature, trapping and release potentials, flow rates, and electrode materials, an overall [18F]fluoride trapping and release efficiency of 84±5% (n=7) was achieved. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) was used to analyze electrode surfaces of various metal-metal systems and the findings were correlated with the performance of the electrochemical cell. To demonstrate the reactivity of the released [18F]fluoride, the cell was coupled to a flow-through reactor and automated synthesis of [18F]FDG with a repeatable decay-corrected yield of 56±4% (n=4) was completed in <15 min. A multi-human dose of 5.92 GBq [18F]FDG was also demonstrated. PMID:23474380

  1. Design, Synthesis, and Evaluation of an (18)F-Labeled Radiotracer Based on Celecoxib-NBD for Positron Emission Tomography (PET) Imaging of Cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2).

    PubMed

    Kaur, Jatinder; Tietz, Ole; Bhardwaj, Atul; Marshall, Alison; Way, Jenilee; Wuest, Melinda; Wuest, Frank

    2015-10-01

    A series of novel fluorine-containing cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) inhibitors was designed and synthesized based on the previously reported fluorescent COX-2 imaging agent celecoxib-NBD (3; NBD=7-nitrobenzofurazan). In vitro COX-1/COX-2 inhibitory data show that N-(4-fluorobenzyl)-4-(5-p-tolyl-3-trifluoromethylpyrazol-1-yl)benzenesulfonamide (5; IC50 =0.36 μM, SI>277) and N-fluoromethyl-4-(5-p-tolyl-3-trifluoromethylpyrazol-1-yl)benzenesulfonamide (6; IC50 =0.24 μM, SI>416) are potent and selective COX-2 inhibitors. Compound 5 was selected for radiolabeling with the short-lived positron emitter fluorine-18 ((18) F) and evaluated as a positron emission tomography (PET) imaging agent. Radiotracer [(18) F]5 was analyzed in vitro and in vivo using human colorectal cancer model HCA-7. Although radiotracer uptake into COX-2-expressing HCA-7 cells was high, no evidence for COX-2-specific binding was found. Radiotracer uptake into HCA-7 tumors in vivo was low and similar to that of muscle, used as reference tissue. PMID:26287271

  2. (11) C-labeled and (18) F-labeled PET ligands for subtype-specific imaging of histamine receptors in the brain.

    PubMed

    Funke, Uta; Vugts, Danielle J; Janssen, Bieneke; Spaans, Arnold; Kruijer, Perry S; Lammertsma, Adriaan A; Perk, Lars R; Windhorst, Albert D

    2013-01-01

    The signaling molecule histamine plays a key role in the mediation of immune reactions, in gastric secretion, and in the sensory system. In addition, it has an important function as a neurotransmitter in the central nervous system, acting in pituitary hormone secretion, wakefulness, motor and cognitive functions, as well as in itch and nociception. This has raised interest in the role of the histaminergic system for the treatment and diagnosis of various pathologies such as allergy, sleeping and eating disorders, neurodegeneration, neuroinflammation, mood disorders, and pruritus. In the past 20 years, several ligands targeting the four different histamine receptor subtypes have been explored as potential radiotracers for positron emission tomography (PET). This contribution provides an overview of the developments of subtype-selective carbon-11-labeled and fluorine-18-labeled compounds for imaging in the brain. Using specific radioligands, the H1 R expression in human brain could be examined in diseases such as schizophrenia, depression, and anorexia nervosa. In addition, the sedative effects of antihistamines could be investigated in terms of H1 R occupancy. The H3 R is of special interest because of its regulatory role in the release of various other neurotransmitters, and initial H3 R PET imaging studies in humans have been reported. The H4 R is the youngest member of the histamine receptor family and is involved in neuroinflammation and various sensory pathways. To date, two H4 R-specific (11) C-labeled ligands have been synthesized, and the imaging of the H4 R in vivo is in the early stage. PMID:24285318

  3. Choline magnesium trisalicylate in patients with aspirin-induced asthma.

    PubMed

    Szczeklik, A; Nizankowska, E; Dworski, R

    1990-05-01

    Treatment of inflammatory diseases of asthmatics can be a serious problem since some patients show intolerance to aspirin and other non-steroidal, anti-inflammatory drugs that are cyclooxygenase inhibitors. Salicylates were believed to be well tolerated, but recent reports have demonstrated that diflunisal and salicylsalicylic acid can precipitate asthma attacks in aspirin-intolerant patients. This study was designed to determine the tolerance of choline magnesium trisalicylate (CMT), a nonacetylated salicylate with potent analgesic and anti-inflammatory activity, in 23 asthmatics with aspirin hypersensitivity confirmed by oral challenge. The study consisted of three phases: 1) patients received increasing doses (50-1,500 mg) of CMT under a single-blind protocol; 2) patients received either a placebo or CMT challenge in a double-blind, randomized, cross-over design; 3) patients received CMT at daily 3,000 mg doses for 1 week. Throughout the study, pulmonary function tests, peak nasal inspiratory flow, and serum salicylate and thromboxane B2 (TXB2) levels were monitored. Results showed no airway obstruction, nasal congestion or rhinorrhea after CMT. There was no significant decrease in serum TXB2 levels, indicating the absence of cyclooxygenase inhibition with CMT. We conclude that choline magnesium trisalicylate is a safe drug for treatment of different anti-inflammatory disorders in asthmatics with aspirin hypersensitivity. PMID:2198165

  4. Brucella abortus Synthesizes Phosphatidylcholine from Choline Provided by the Host

    PubMed Central

    Comerci, Diego J.; Altabe, Silvia; de Mendoza, Diego; Ugalde, Rodolfo A.

    2006-01-01

    The Brucella cell envelope is characterized by the presence of phosphatidylcholine (PC), a common phospholipid in eukaryotes that is rare in prokaryotes. Studies on the composition of Brucella abortus 2308 phospholipids revealed that the synthesis of PC depends on the presence of choline in the culture medium, suggesting that the methylation biosynthetic pathway is not functional. Phospholipid composition of pmtA and pcs mutants indicated that in Brucella, PC synthesis occurs exclusively via the phosphatidylcholine synthase pathway. Transformation of Escherichia coli with an expression vector containing the B. abortus pcs homologue was sufficient for PC synthesis upon induction with IPTG (isopropyl-β-d-thiogalactopyranoside), while no PC formation was detected when bacteria were transformed with a vector containing pmtA. These findings imply that Brucella depends on choline provided by the host cell to form PC. We could not detect any obvious associated phenotype in the PC-deficient strain under vegetative or intracellular growth conditions in macrophages. However, the pcs mutant strain displays a reproducible virulence defect in mice, which suggests that PC is necessary to sustain a chronic infection process. PMID:16484204

  5. Brucella abortus synthesizes phosphatidylcholine from choline provided by the host.

    PubMed

    Comerci, Diego J; Altabe, Silvia; de Mendoza, Diego; Ugalde, Rodolfo A

    2006-03-01

    The Brucella cell envelope is characterized by the presence of phosphatidylcholine (PC), a common phospholipid in eukaryotes that is rare in prokaryotes. Studies on the composition of Brucella abortus 2308 phospholipids revealed that the synthesis of PC depends on the presence of choline in the culture medium, suggesting that the methylation biosynthetic pathway is not functional. Phospholipid composition of pmtA and pcs mutants indicated that in Brucella, PC synthesis occurs exclusively via the phosphatidylcholine synthase pathway. Transformation of Escherichia coli with an expression vector containing the B. abortus pcs homologue was sufficient for PC synthesis upon induction with IPTG (isopropyl-beta-d-thiogalactopyranoside), while no PC formation was detected when bacteria were transformed with a vector containing pmtA. These findings imply that Brucella depends on choline provided by the host cell to form PC. We could not detect any obvious associated phenotype in the PC-deficient strain under vegetative or intracellular growth conditions in macrophages. However, the pcs mutant strain displays a reproducible virulence defect in mice, which suggests that PC is necessary to sustain a chronic infection process. PMID:16484204

  6. Labeled choline and phosphorylcholine: body distribution and brain autoradiography: concise communication

    SciTech Connect

    Friedland, R.P.; Mathis, C.A.; Budinger, T.F.; Moyer, B.R.; Rosen, M.

    1983-09-01

    Following intravenous injection of labeled choline or phosphorylcholine in rats and mice, the brain uptake as percent injected dose was less than 0.2% with 6-12% going to kidney and 3-6% to liver. A study of (/sup 14/C)choline autoradiography in a stump-tailed macaque demonstrated a five- to sixfold greater uptake in gray matter than in white matter. Dynamic positron imaging of (/sup 11/C)choline in a rhesus monkey demonstrated rapid brain uptake followed by rapid washout, with heavy late uptake in muscle. The use of labeled choline and choline analogs as imaging agents in human studies is constrained by the low brain uptake relative to extracerebral tissues.

  7. The crystal structure of choline kinase reveals a eukaryotic protein kinase fold

    SciTech Connect

    Peisach, D.; Gee, P.; Kent, K.; Xu, Z.

    2010-03-08

    Choline kinase catalyzes the ATP-dependent phosphorylation of choline, the first committed step in the CDP-choline pathway for the biosynthesis of phosphatidylcholine. The 2.0 {angstrom} crystal structure of a choline kinase from C. elegans (CKA-2) reveals that the enzyme is a homodimeric protein with each monomer organized into a two-domain fold. The structure is remarkably similar to those of protein kinases and aminoglycoside phosphotransferases, despite no significant similarity in amino acid sequence. Comparisons to the structures of other kinases suggest that ATP binds to CKA-2 in a pocket formed by highly conserved and catalytically important residues. In addition, a choline binding site is proposed to be near the ATP binding pocket and formed by several structurally flexible loops.

  8. Labeled choline and phosphorylcholine: body distribution and brain autoradiography: concise communication

    SciTech Connect

    Friedland, R.P.; Mathis, C.A.; Budinger, T.F.; Moyer, B.R.; Rosen, M.

    1983-09-01

    Following intravenous injection of labeled choline or phosphorylcholine in rats and mice, the brain uptake as percent injected dose was less than 0.2% with 6 to 12% going to kidney and 3 to 6% to liver. A study of (/sup 14/C)choline autoradiography in a stump-tailed macaque demonstrated a five- to sixfold greater uptake in gray matter than in white matter. Dynamic positron imaging of (/sup 11/C) choline in a rhesus monkey demonstrated rapid brain uptake followed by rapid washout, with heavy late uptake in muscle. The use of labeled choline and choline analogs as imaging agents in human studies is constrained by the low brain uptake relative to extracerebral tissues.

  9. Live-cell vibrational imaging of choline metabolites by stimulated Raman scattering coupled with isotope-based metabolic labeling

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Fanghao; Wei, Lu; Zheng, Chaogu; Shen, Yihui

    2014-01-01

    Choline is a small molecule that occupies a key position in the biochemistry of all living organisms. Recent studies have strongly implicated choline metabolites in cancer, atherosclerosis and nervous system development. To detect choline and its metabolites, existing physical methods such as magnetic resonance spectroscopy and positron emission tomography, are often limited by the poor spatial resolution and substantial radiation dose. Fluorescence imaging, although with submicrometer resolution, requires introduction of bulky fluorophores and thus is difficult in labeling the small choline molecule. By combining the emerging bond-selective stimulated Raman scattering microscopy with metabolic incorporation of deuterated choline, herein we have achieved high resolution imaging of choline-containing metabolites in living mammalian cell lines, primary hippocampal neurons and multicellular organism C. elegans. Different subcellular distributions of choline metabolites are observed between cancer cells and non-cancer cells, which may reveal functional difference in the choline metabolism and lipid-mediated signaling events. In neurons, choline incorporation is visualized within both soma and neurites, where choline metabolites are more evenly distributed compared to the protein. Furthermore, choline localization is also observed in the pharynx region of C. elegans larvae, consistent with its organogenesis mechanism. These applications demonstrate the potential of isotope-based stimulated Raman scattering microscopy for future choline-related disease detection and development monitoring in vivo. PMID:24555181

  10. Evidence for negative selection of gene variants that increase dependence on dietary choline in a Gambian cohort.

    PubMed

    Silver, Matt J; Corbin, Karen D; Hellenthal, Garrett; da Costa, Kerry-Ann; Dominguez-Salas, Paula; Moore, Sophie E; Owen, Jennifer; Prentice, Andrew M; Hennig, Branwen J; Zeisel, Steven H

    2015-08-01

    Choline is an essential nutrient, and the amount needed in the diet is modulated by several factors. Given geographical differences in dietary choline intake and disparate frequencies of single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in choline metabolism genes between ethnic groups, we tested the hypothesis that 3 SNPs that increase dependence on dietary choline would be under negative selection pressure in settings where choline intake is low: choline dehydrogenase (CHDH) rs12676, methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase 1 (MTHFD1) rs2236225, and phosphatidylethanolamine-N-methyltransferase (PEMT) rs12325817. Evidence of negative selection was assessed in 2 populations: one in The Gambia, West Africa, where there is historic evidence of a choline-poor diet, and the other in the United States, with a comparatively choline-rich diet. We used 2 independent methods, and confirmation of our hypothesis was sought via a comparison with SNP data from the Maasai, an East African population with a genetic background similar to that of Gambians but with a traditional diet that is higher in choline. Our results show that frequencies of SNPs known to increase dependence on dietary choline are significantly reduced in the low-choline setting of The Gambia. Our findings suggest that adequate intake levels of choline may have to be reevaluated in different ethnic groups and highlight a possible approach for identifying novel functional SNPs under the influence of dietary selective pressure. PMID:25921832

  11. Feeding a diet devoid of choline to lactating rodents restricts growth and lymphocyte development in offspring.

    PubMed

    Lewis, E D; Goruk, S; Richard, C; Dellschaft, N S; Curtis, J M; Jacobs, R L; Field, C J

    2016-09-01

    The nutrient choline is necessary for membrane synthesis and methyl donation, with increased requirements during lactation. The majority of immune development occurs postnatally, but the importance of choline supply for immune development during this critical period is unknown. The objective of this study was to determine the importance of maternal supply of choline during suckling on immune function in their offspring among rodents. At parturition, Sprague-Dawley dams were randomised to either a choline-devoid (ChD; n 7) or choline-sufficient (ChS, 1 g/kg choline; n 10) diet with their offspring euthanised at 3 weeks of age. In a second experiment, offspring were weaned to a ChS diet until 10 weeks of age (ChD-ChS, n 5 and ChS-ChS, n 9). Splenocytes were isolated, and parameters of immune function were measured. The ChD offspring received less choline in breast milk and had lower final body and organ weight compared with ChS offspring (P<0·05), but this effect disappeared by week 10 with choline supplementation from weaning. ChD offspring had a higher proportion of T cells expressing activation markers (CD71 or CD28) and a lower proportion of total B cells (CD45RA+) and responded less to T cell stimulation (lower stimulation index and less IFN-γ production) ex vivo (P<0·05). ChD-ChS offspring had a lower proportion of total and activated CD4+ T cells, and produced less IL-6 after mitogen stimulation compared with cells from ChS-ChS (P<0·05). Our study suggests that choline is required in the suckling diet to facilitate immune development, and choline deprivation during this critical period has lasting effects on T cell function later in life. PMID:27480608

  12. Non-invasive in vivo imaging of early metabolic tumor response to therapies targeting choline metabolism.

    PubMed

    Mignion, Lionel; Danhier, Pierre; Magat, Julie; Porporato, Paolo E; Masquelier, Julien; Gregoire, Vincent; Muccioli, Giulio G; Sonveaux, Pierre; Gallez, Bernard; Jordan, Bénédicte F

    2016-04-15

    The cholinic phenotype, characterized by elevated phosphocholine and a high production of total-choline (tCho)-containing metabolites, is a metabolic hallmark of cancer. It can be exploited for targeted therapy. Non-invasive imaging biomarkers are required to evaluate an individual's response to targeted anticancer agents that usually do not rapidly cause tumor shrinkage. Because metabolic changes can manifest at earlier stages of therapy than changes in tumor size, the aim of the current study was to evaluate (1)H-MRS and diffusion-weighted MRI (DW-MRI) as markers of tumor response to the modulation of the choline pathway in mammary tumor xenografts. Inhibition of choline kinase activity was achieved with the direct pharmacological inhibitor H-89, indirect inhibitor sorafenib and down-regulation of choline-kinase α (ChKA) expression using specific short-hairpin RNA (shRNA). While all three strategies significantly decreased tCho tumor content in vivo, only sorafenib and anti-ChKA shRNA significantly repressed tumor growth. The increase of apparent-diffusion-coefficient of water (ADCw) measured by DW-MRI, was predictive of the induced necrosis and inhibition of the tumor growth in sorafenib treated mice, while the absence of change in ADC values in H89 treated mice predicted the absence of effect in terms of tumor necrosis and tumor growth. In conclusion, (1)H-choline spectroscopy can be useful as a pharmacodynamic biomarker for choline targeted agents, while DW-MRI can be used as an early marker of effective tumor response to choline targeted therapies. DW-MRI combined to choline spectroscopy may provide a useful non-invasive marker for the early clinical assessment of tumor response to therapies targeting choline signaling. PMID:26595604

  13. A modified choline-deficient, ethionine-supplemented diet reduces morbidity and retains a liver progenitor cell response in mice

    PubMed Central

    Passman, Adam M.; Strauss, Robyn P.; McSpadden, Sarah B.; Finch-Edmondson, Megan L.; Woo, Ken H.; Diepeveen, Luke A.; London, Roslyn; Callus, Bernard A.; Yeoh, George C.

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT The choline-deficient, ethionine-supplemented (CDE) dietary model induces chronic liver damage, and stimulates liver progenitor cell (LPC)-mediated repair. Long-term CDE administration leads to hepatocellular carcinoma in rodents and lineage-tracing studies show that LPCs differentiate into functional hepatocytes in this model. The CDE diet was first modified for mice by our laboratory by separately administering choline-deficient chow and ethionine in the drinking water (CD+E diet). Although this CD+E diet is widely used, concerns with variability in weight loss, morbidity, mortality and LPC response have been raised by researchers who have adopted this model. We propose that these inconsistencies are due to differential consumption of chow and ethionine in the drinking water, and that incorporating ethionine in the choline-deficient chow, and altering the strength, will achieve better outcomes. Therefore, C57Bl/6 mice, 5 and 6 weeks of age, were fed an all-inclusive CDE diet of various strengths (67% to 100%) for 3 weeks. The LPC response was quantitated and cell lines were derived. We found that animal survival, LPC response and liver damage are correlated with CDE diet strength. The 67% and 75% CDE diet administered to mice older than 5 weeks and greater than 18 g provides a consistent and acceptable level of animal welfare and induces a substantial LPC response, permitting their isolation and establishment of cell lines. This study shows that an all-inclusive CDE diet for mice reproducibly induces an LPC response conducive to in vivo studies and isolation, whilst minimizing morbidity and mortality. PMID:26496771

  14. Hyperhomocysteinemia induced by guanidinoacetic acid is effectively suppressed by choline and betaine in rats.

    PubMed

    Setoue, Minoru; Ohuchi, Seiya; Morita, Tatsuya; Sugiyama, Kimio

    2008-07-01

    Rats were fed 25% casein (25C) diets differing in choline levels (0-0.5%) with and without 0.5% guanidinoacetic acid (GAA) or 0.75% L-methionine for 7 d to determine the effects of dietary choline level on experimental hyperhomocysteinemia. The effects of dietary choline (0.30%) and betaine (0.34%) on GAA- and methionine-induced hyperhomocysteinemia were also compared. Dietary choline suppressed hyperhomocysteinemia induced by GAA, but not by methionine, in a dose-dependent manner. GAA-induced enhancement of the plasma homocysteine concentration was suppressed by choline and betaine to the same degree, but the effects of these compounds were relatively small on methionine-induced hyperhomocysteinemia. Dietary supplementation with choline and betaine significantly increased the hepatic betaine concentration in rats fed a GAA diet, but not in rats fed a methionine diet. These results indicate that choline and betaine are effective at relatively low levels in reducing plasma homocysteine, especially under the condition of betaine deficiency without a loading of homocysteine precursor. PMID:18603787

  15. Maternal dietary intake of choline in mice regulates development of the cerebral cortex in the offspring.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yanyan; Surzenko, Natalia; Friday, Walter B; Zeisel, Steven H

    2016-04-01

    Maternal diets low in choline, an essential nutrient, increase the risk of neural tube defects and lead to low performance on cognitive tests in children. However, the consequences of maternal dietary choline deficiency for the development and structural organization of the cerebral cortex remain unknown. In this study, we fed mouse dams either control (CT) or low-choline (LC) diets and investigated the effects of choline on cortical development in the offspring. As a result of a low choline supply between embryonic day (E)11 and E17 of gestation, the number of 2 types of cortical neural progenitor cells (NPCs)-radial glial cells and intermediate progenitor cells-was reduced in fetal brains (P< 0.01). Furthermore, the number of upper layer cortical neurons was decreased in the offspring of dams fed an LC diet at both E17 (P< 0.001) and 4 mo of age (P< 0.001). These effects of LC maternal diet were mediated by a decrease in epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) signaling in NPCs related to the disruption of EGFR posttranscriptional regulation. Our findings describe a novel mechanism whereby low maternal dietary intake of choline alters brain development.-Wang, Y., Surzenko, N., Friday, W. B., Zeisel, S. H. Maternal dietary intake of choline in mice regulates development of the cerebral cortex in the offspring. PMID:26700730

  16. Prenatal choline supplementation advances hippocampal development and enhances MAPK and CREB activation.

    PubMed

    Mellott, Tiffany J; Williams, Christina L; Meck, Warren H; Blusztajn, Jan Krzysztof

    2004-03-01

    Choline is an essential nutrient for animals and humans. Previous studies showed that supplementing the maternal diet with choline during the second half of gestation in rats permanently enhances memory performance of the adult offspring. Here we show that prenatal choline supplementation causes a 3-day advancement in the ability of juvenile rats to use relational cues in a water maze task, indicating that the treatment accelerates hippocampal maturation. Moreover, phosphorylation and therefore activation of hippocampal mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) and cAMP-response element binding protein (CREB) in response to stimulation by glutamate, N-methyl-D-aspartate, or depolarizing concentrations of K+ were increased by prenatal choline supplementation and reduced by prenatal choline deficiency. These data provide the first evidence that developmental plasticity of the hippocampal MAPK and CREB signaling pathways is controlled by the supply of a single essential nutrient, choline, during fetal development and point to these pathways as candidate mechanisms for the developmental and long-term cognitive enhancement induced by prenatal choline supplementation. PMID:14715695

  17. Choline oxidase, a catabolic enzyme in Arthrobacter pascens, facilitates adaptation to osmotic stress in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed Central

    Rozwadowski, K L; Khachatourians, G G; Selvaraj, G

    1991-01-01

    Choline oxidase (EC 1.1.3.17) is a bifunctional enzyme that is capable of catalyzing glycine betaine biosynthesis from choline via betaine aldehyde. A gene (cox) encoding this enzyme in the gram-positive soil bacterium Arthrobacter pascens was isolated and characterized. This gene is contained within a 1.9-kb fragment that encodes a polypeptide of approximately 66 kDa. Transfer of this gene to an Escherichia coli mutant that is defective in betaine biosynthesis resulted in an osmotolerant phenotype. This phenotype was associated with the ability of the host to synthesize and assemble an enzymatically active choline oxidase that could catalyze biosynthesis of glycine betaine from an exogenous supply of choline. Although glycine betaine functions as an osmolyte in several different organisms, it was not found to have this role in A. pascens. Instead, both choline and glycine betaine were utilized as carbon sources. In A. pascens synthesis and activity of choline oxidase were modulated by carbon sources and were susceptible to catabolite repression. Thus, cox, a gene concerned with carbon utilization in A. pascens, was found to play a role in adaptation to an environmental stress in a heterologous organism. In addition to providing a possible means of manipulating osmotolerance in other organisms, the cox gene offers a model system for the study of choline oxidation, an important metabolic process in both procaryotes and eucaryotes. Images PMID:1987142

  18. Choline acetate enhanced the catalytic performance of Candida rogusa lipase in AOT reverse micelles.

    PubMed

    Xue, Luyan; Zhao, Yin; Yu, Lijie; Sun, Yanwen; Yan, Keqian; Li, Ying; Huang, Xirong; Qu, Yinbo

    2013-05-01

    Choline acetate is an ionic liquid composed of a kosmotropic anion and a chaotropic cation. According to Hofmeister series, a kosmotropic anion and/or a chaotropic cation could stabilize an enzyme, thereby facilitating the retention of the catalytic activity of the enzyme. In this work, we first report the influence of choline acetate on the activity and stability of lipase in AOT/water/isooctane reverse micelles. The indicator reaction is the lipase-catalyzed hydrolysis of 4-nitrophenyl butyrate. The results show that a low level of choline acetate does not affect the microstructure of the AOT reverse micelles, but the ionic liquid can improve the catalytic efficiency of lipase. Fluorescence spectra show that a high level of choline acetate has an impact on the conformation of lipase, so the activation is mainly due to the influence of choline acetate on the nucleophilicity of water. Infrared spectra demonstrate that choline acetate can form stronger hydrogen bonds with water surrounding lipase, and therefore enhance the nucleophilicity of the water, which makes it easier to attack the acyl enzyme intermediate, thereby increasing the activity of the lipase-catalyzed hydrolysis of the ester. A study on the stability of lipase in AOT reverse micelles indicates that the ionic liquid is able to maintain the activity of lipase to a certain extent. The effect of choline acetate is consistent with that predicted based on Hofmeister series. PMID:23352950

  19. Choline supplementation in children with Fetal Alcohol Spectrum Disorders (FASD) has high feasibility and tolerability

    PubMed Central

    Wozniak, Jeffrey R.; Fuglestad, Anita J.; Eckerle, Judith K.; Kroupina, Maria G.; Miller, Neely C.; Boys, Christopher J.; Brearley, Ann M.; Fink, Birgit A.; Hoecker, Heather L.; Zeisel, Steven H.; Georgieff, Michael K.

    2013-01-01

    There are no biological treatments for fetal alcohol spectrum disorders (FASD), lifelong conditions associated with physical anomalies, brain damage, and neurocognitive abnormalities. In pre-clinical studies, choline partially ameliorates memory and learning deficits from prenatal alcohol exposure. This Phase I pilot study evaluated the feasibility, tolerability, and potential adverse effects of choline supplementation in children with FASD. We hypothesized that choline would be well-tolerated with minimal adverse events. The study design was a double-blind, randomized, placebo-controlled trial. Participants included 20 children, ages 2.5–4.9y, with prenatal alcohol exposure and FASD diagnoses. Participants were randomly assigned to 500 mg. choline or placebo daily for nine months (10 active; 10 placebo). Primary outcome measures included feasibility, tolerability, adverse effects, and serum choline levels. Seventeen participants completed the study. Compliance was 82–87% as evidenced by parent-completed logsheets and dose counts. Periodic 24-hour dietary recalls showed no evidence of dietary confounding. Adverse events were minimal and were equivalent in the active and placebo arms with the exception of fishy body odor, which occurred only in the active group. There were no serious adverse events to research participants. This Phase I pilot study demonstrates that choline supplementation at 500 mg per day for nine months in children ages 2–5 is feasible and has high tolerability. Further examination of the efficacy of choline supplementation in FASD is currently underway. PMID:24176229

  20. No Acute Effects of Choline Bitartrate Food Supplements on Memory in Healthy, Young, Human Adults

    PubMed Central

    Lippelt, D. P.; van der Kint, S.; van Herk, K.; Naber, M.

    2016-01-01

    Choline is a dietary component and precursor of acetylcholine, a crucial neurotransmitter for memory-related brain functions. In two double-blind, placebo-controlled cross-over experiments, we investigated whether the food supplement choline bitartrate improved declarative memory and working memory in healthy, young students one to two hours after supplementation. In experiment 1, 28 participants performed a visuospatial working memory task. In experiment 2, 26 participants performed a declarative picture memorization task. In experiment 3, 40 participants performed a verbal working memory task in addition to the visuospatial working memory and declarative picture task. All tasks were conducted approximately 60 minutes after the ingestion of 2.0–2.5g of either choline bitartrate or placebo. We found that choline did not significantly enhance memory performance during any of the tasks. The null hypothesis that choline does not improve memory performance as compared to placebo was strongly supported by Bayesian statistics. These results are in contrast with animal studies suggesting that choline supplementation boosts memory performance and learning. We conclude that choline likely has no acute effects on cholinergic memory functions in healthy human participants. PMID:27341028

  1. No Acute Effects of Choline Bitartrate Food Supplements on Memory in Healthy, Young, Human Adults.

    PubMed

    Lippelt, D P; van der Kint, S; van Herk, K; Naber, M

    2016-01-01

    Choline is a dietary component and precursor of acetylcholine, a crucial neurotransmitter for memory-related brain functions. In two double-blind, placebo-controlled cross-over experiments, we investigated whether the food supplement choline bitartrate improved declarative memory and working memory in healthy, young students one to two hours after supplementation. In experiment 1, 28 participants performed a visuospatial working memory task. In experiment 2, 26 participants performed a declarative picture memorization task. In experiment 3, 40 participants performed a verbal working memory task in addition to the visuospatial working memory and declarative picture task. All tasks were conducted approximately 60 minutes after the ingestion of 2.0-2.5g of either choline bitartrate or placebo. We found that choline did not significantly enhance memory performance during any of the tasks. The null hypothesis that choline does not improve memory performance as compared to placebo was strongly supported by Bayesian statistics. These results are in contrast with animal studies suggesting that choline supplementation boosts memory performance and learning. We conclude that choline likely has no acute effects on cholinergic memory functions in healthy human participants. PMID:27341028

  2. Behavioural effects of chronic manipulations of dietary choline in senescent rats.

    PubMed

    Fundaro, A; Paschero, A

    1990-01-01

    1. Senescent rats were maintained on choline-deficient and choline-enriched diets. The modifications in rat behaviour caused by the chronic manipulations of dietary choline were studied in two schedules of operant conditioning. 2. In the "periodic conditioning" test, the schedule of reinforcement, in a 100 min trial, was changed from a fixed ratio to a fixed interval schedule. In the "reversal" test the contingency for food delivery was switched four times from one lever to the other in a two lever Skinner box. 3. In the "periodic conditioning" test, the choline enriched group (430 mg/Kg/day) showed the same reduction of responses/reinforcement as controls, from the beginning to the end of trial; in the same group the time course reduction of responses/reinforcement became significant earlier than in the control group. The deficient-choline group in the last 40 min of "periodic conditioning" trial gave a reduction of responses/reinforcement greater than controls and one rat in the group did not learn the change of experimental schedule and extinguished its operant behaviour. 4. In the "reversal" test, the choline-enriched diet (320 mg/Kg/day) improved the reinforced responses in the IV reversal; one rat of the deficient-choline group could not learn the new operant schedule since the first reversal and continued to respond on the same lever during the whole of the test. PMID:2277854

  3. A pharmacokinetic comparison of choline magnesium trisalicylate and soluble aspirin.

    PubMed

    Helliwell, M; Gibson, T; Berry, D; Volans, G

    1984-11-01

    Claims that twice-daily dosage of choline magnesium trisalicylate (CMT) may alter salicylate disposal kinetics and result in sustained plasma levels were examined. Plasma levels, urine excretion and pharmacokinetics of salicylate were estimated in six men following the recommended twice-daily dose of CMT and a smaller dose of soluble aspirin. The plasma salicylate levels achieved with CMT were lower than those seen in previous studies but this probably reflected differences of methodology. Salicylate levels were not sustained between doses and elimination rates and half-life were similar for both preparations. No major alteration of disposal kinetics could be demonstrated for CMT with the dose used in the present study. PMID:6487934

  4. Synthesis and evaluation of (18)F-trifluoroborate derivatives of triphenylphosphonium for myocardial perfusion imaging.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Zhengxing; Jenni, Silvia; Zhang, Chengcheng; Merkens, Helen; Lau, Joseph; Liu, Zhibo; Perrin, David M; Bénard, François; Lin, Kuo-Shyan

    2016-04-01

    Four trifluoroborate derivatives of phosphonium cations 2a-d were radiolabeled with fluorine-18 ((18)F) and evaluated for imaging myocardial perfusion with positron emission tomography (PET). Tracers were radiolabeled simply via (18)F-(19)F isotope exchange reaction in acidic (pH 2) aqueous solution. On average, [(18)F]2a-d were obtained in 10-17% non-decay-corrected radiochemical yield with 25.9-48.1GBq/μmol specific activity, and >96% radiochemical purity. In vitro stability study showed no decomposition of [(18)F]2a-d after being incubated in mouse plasma for up to 2h. Myocardial uptake in mice was visualized in PET images by using [(18)F]2b-d but not [(18)F]2a. [(18)F]2a-d were stable against in vivo defluorination as no significant bone uptake was observed. Despite sub-optimal heart uptake of [(18)F]2b-d, we successfully demonstrated that (18)F-(19)F isotope exchange reaction on trifluoroborates could be a promising strategy for the design of potential (18)F-labeled tracers even for intracellular targets. PMID:26922139

  5. The antihyperalgesic effect of cytidine-5'-diphosphate-choline in neuropathic and inflammatory pain models.

    PubMed

    Bagdas, Deniz; Sonat, Fusun Ak; Hamurtekin, Emre; Sonal, Songul; Gurun, Mine Sibel

    2011-09-01

    This study was designed to test the effects of intracerebroventricularly (i.c.v.) administered CDP-choline (cytidine-5'-diphosphate-choline; citicoline) and its metabolites in rat models of inflammatory and neuropathic pain. The i.c.v. administration of CDP-choline (0.5, 1.0 and 2.0 µmol) produced a dose and time-dependent reversal of mechanical hyperalgesia in both carrageenan-induced inflammatory and chronic constriction injury-induced neuropathic pain models in rats. The antihyperalgesic effect of CDP-choline was similar to that observed with an equimolar dose of choline (1 µmol). The CDP-choline-induced antihyperalgesic effect was prevented by central administration of the neuronal high-affinity choline uptake inhibitor hemicholinium-3 (1 µg), the nonselective nicotinic receptor antagonist mecamylamine (50 µg), the α7-selective nicotinic ACh receptor antagonist, α-bungarotoxin (2 µg) and the γ-aminobutyric acid B receptor antagonist CGP-35348 (20 µg). In contrast, i.c.v. pretreatment with the nonselective opioid receptor antagonist naloxone (10 µg) only prevented the CDP-choline-induced antihyperalgesic effect in the neuropathic pain model while the nonselective muscarinic receptor antagonist atropine (10 µg) did not alter the antihyperalgesic effect in the two models. These results indicate that CDP-choline-elicited antihyperalgesic effect in different models of pain occurs through mechanisms that seem to involve an interaction with supraspinal α7-selective nicotinic ACh receptors, and γ-aminobutyric acid B receptors, whereas central opioid receptors have a role only in the neuropathic pain model. PMID:21836465

  6. Choline requirements of White Pekin ducks from hatch to 21 days of age.

    PubMed

    Wen, Z G; Tang, J; Hou, S S; Guo, Y M; Huang, W; Xie, M

    2014-12-01

    A dose-response experiment with 8 dietary choline levels (302, 496, 778, 990, 1,182, 1,414, 1,625, and 1,832 mg/kg) was conducted with male White Pekin ducks to estimate the choline requirement from hatch to 21 d of age. Three hundred eighty-four 1-d-old male White Pekin ducks were randomly assigned to 8 dietary treatments, each containing 6 replicate pens with 8 birds per pen. At 21 d of age, weight gain, feed intake, and feed/gain from each pen were calculated for feeding period, and 2 ducks selected randomly from each pen were euthanized and the liver was collected to determine total lipids, triglycerides, and phospholipids. In our study, perosis, poor growth, and high liver fat were all observed in choline-deficient ducks and incidence of perosis was zero when dietary choline was 1,182 mg/kg. As dietary choline increased, the weight gain and feed intake increased linearly or quadratically (P < 0.05). On the other hand, as dietary choline increased, the total lipid and triglyceride in liver decreased linearly and liver phospholipid increased linearly (P < 0.05), and the lipotropic activity of choline may be associated with increasing phospholipid at a high dietary choline level. According to broken-line regression, the choline requirements for weight gain and feed intake were 810 and 823 mg/kg, respectively, but higher requirement should be considered to prevent perosis and excess liver lipid deposition completely. PMID:25260528

  7. Transport of choline against a concentration gradient by isolated granular pneumocytes

    SciTech Connect

    Reicherter, J.; Kleinzeller, A.; Chander, A.; Fisher, A.B.

    1987-05-01

    Uptake of /sup 3/H-choline was studied in granular pneumocytes isolated from rat lungs by tryptic digestion, attached to Nucleopore membranes coated with rat-tail collagen, and maintained in primary culture for 24 hours. 3-0-Methyl-(/sup 14/C)-glucose was used as a tracer to calculate H/sub 2/O space of cells. To stop reaction, cells were quenched in methanol and extracted to give lipid, free-choline, and phosphorylated choline fractions. With 5 uM external choline, cellular accumulation in all three fractions was linear for 30 min and free choline reached a 9-fold accumulation (inside/outside) ratio. With 0.1 mM external choline, the accumulation ratio reached a constant value of approx. 3 after 2 min incubation. With 1.5 min incubation, cell (choline) reached a plateau at approx. 30 uM external choline with a Km for uptake of approx. 8 uM. Efflux from preloaded cells showed two cellular components with a rate constant for the slow component of 0.031/sec. Uptake was inhibited 52% by hemicholinium-3 (10/sup -4/ M), 41% by N-ethylmaleimide (10/sup -5/M), 30-50% by mitochondrial inhibitors, 15% by ouabain (0.5 mM) and 85% by incubation at 4/sup 0/. Omitting Na/sup +/ had no effect on uptake. These results indicate that granular pneumocytes accumulate choline from the medium against a concentration gradient by an energy-dependent process indicating active transport of this substrate.

  8. Incidental finding of parathyroid adenoma with 11C-choline PET/CT.

    PubMed

    Mapelli, Paola; Busnardo, Elena; Magnani, Patrizia; Freschi, Massimo; Picchio, Maria; Gianolli, Luigi; Messa, Cristina

    2012-06-01

    Positron emission tomography/computed tomography (PET/CT) with 11C-choline is an established diagnostic tool for restaging prostate cancer patients with biochemical failure after primary treatment. In the present case, 11C-choline PET/CT was performed in a prostate cancer patient with skeletal metastases, treated with hormonal therapy. In addition to the detection of pathologic uptake at prostate and vertebra, 11C-choline uptake occurred in the neck. The finding was suggestive for a parathyroid adenoma on subsequent ultrasound, then finally confirmed by parathyroid scintigraphy and histopathological analysis performed after hemithyroidectomy. PMID:22614195

  9. In vitro biofilm development of Streptococcus pneumoniae and formation of choline-binding protein-DNA complexes.

    PubMed

    Domenech, Mirian; Ruiz, Susana; Moscoso, Miriam; García, Ernesto

    2015-10-01

    Extracellular deoxyribonucleic acid (eDNA) is an essential component of bacterial biofilm matrices, and is required in their formation and maintenance. Extracellular DNA binds to exopolysaccharides or extracellular proteins, affording biofilms greater structural integrity. Recently, we reported evidence of intercellular eDNA-LytC complexes in pneumococcal biofilms. The LytC lysozyme is a member of the choline-binding family of proteins (CBPs) located on the pneumococcal surface. The present work shows that other CBPs, i.e. LytA, LytB, Pce, PspC and CbpF, which have a pI between 5 and 6, can bind DNA in vitro. This process requires the presence of divalent cations other than Mg(2+). This DNA binding capacity of CBPs appears to be independent of their enzymatic activity and, at least in the case of LytA, does not require the choline-binding domain characteristic of CBPs. Positively charged, surface-exposed, 25 amino acid-long peptides derived from the catalytic domain of LytB, were also found capable of DNA binding through electrostatic interactions. Confocal laser scanning microcopy revealed the existence of cell-associated LytB-eDNA complexes in Streptococcus pneumoniae biofilms. These and other findings suggest that these surface-located proteins of S. pneumoniae could play roles of varying importance in the colonization and/or invasion of human host where different environmental conditions exist. PMID:25950767

  10. 2′-(2-((dimethylamino)methyl)-4′-(2-fluoroalkoxy)-phenylthio)benzenamine Derivatives as Serotonin Transporter Imaging Agents

    PubMed Central

    Parhi, Ajit K.; Wang, Julie L.; Oya, Shunichi; Choi, Seok-Rye; Kung, Mei-Ping; Kung, Hank F.

    2008-01-01

    A novel series of ligands with substitutions at the 5-position on phenyl ring A and at the 4′-position on phenyl ring B of 2′-(2-((dimethylamino)methyl)-4′-(2-fluoro- alkoxy)phenylthio)benzenamine (4′-2-fluoroethoxy derivatives, 28–31 and 4′-3-fluoro propoxy derivatives, 40–42) were prepared and tested as serotonin transporter (SERT) imaging agents. The new ligands displayed high binding affinities to SERT (Ki ranging from 0.07 to 1.5 nM). The corresponding 18F labeled compounds, which can be prepared readily, showed excellent brain uptake and retention after iv injection in rats. The hypothalamus region showed high uptake values between 0.74 to 2.2 % dose/g at 120 min post iv injection. Significantly, the hypothalamus to cerebellum ratios (target to non-target ratios) at 120 min were 7.8 and 7.7 for [18F]28 and [18F]40, respectively. The selective uptake and retention in the hypothalamus, which has a high concentration of SERT binding sites, demonstrated that [18F]28 and [18F]40 are promising PET (positron emission computed tomography) imaging agents for mapping SERT binding sites in the brain. PMID:18052090

  11. Design, synthesis, crystallization and biological evaluation of new symmetrical biscationic compounds as selective inhibitors of human Choline Kinase α1 (ChoKα1)

    PubMed Central

    Schiaffino-Ortega, Santiago; Baglioni, Eleonora; Mariotto, Elena; Bortolozzi, Roberta; Serrán-Aguilera, Lucía; Ríos-Marco, Pablo; Carrasco-Jimenez, M. Paz; Gallo, Miguel A.; Hurtado-Guerrero, Ramon; Marco, Carmen; Basso, Giuseppe; Viola, Giampietro; Entrena, Antonio; López-Cara, Luisa Carlota

    2016-01-01

    A novel family of compounds derivative of 1,1′-(((ethane-1,2-diylbis(oxy))bis(4,1-phenylene))bis(methylene))-bispyridinium or –bisquinolinium bromide (10a-l) containing a pair of oxygen atoms in the spacer of the linker between the biscationic moieties, were synthesized and evaluated as inhibitors of choline kinase against a panel of cancer-cell lines. The most promising compounds in this series were 1,1′-(((ethane-1,2-diylbis(oxy))bis(4,1-phenylene))bis(methylene))bis(4-(dimethylamino)pyridinium) bromide (10a) and 1,1′-(((ethane-1,2-diylbis(oxy))bis(4,1-phenylene))bis(methylene))-bis(7-chloro-4-(pyrrolidin-1-yl)quinolinium) bromide (10l), which inhibit human choline kinase (ChoKα1) with IC50 of 1.0 and 0.92 μM, respectively, in a range similar to that of the previously reported biscationic compounds MN58b and RSM932A. Our compounds show greater antiproliferative activities than do the reference compounds, with unprecedented values of GI50 in the nanomolar range for several of the cancer-cell lines assayed, and more importantly they present low toxicity in non-tumoral cell lines, suggesting a cancer-cell-selective antiproliferative activity. Docking studies predict that the compounds interact with the choline-binding site in agreement with the binding mode of most previously reported biscationic compounds. Moreover, the crystal structure of ChoKα1 with compound 10a reveals that this compound binds to the choline-binding site and mimics HC-3 binding mode as never before. PMID:27029499

  12. Design, synthesis, crystallization and biological evaluation of new symmetrical biscationic compounds as selective inhibitors of human Choline Kinase α1 (ChoKα1).

    PubMed

    Schiaffino-Ortega, Santiago; Baglioni, Eleonora; Mariotto, Elena; Bortolozzi, Roberta; Serrán-Aguilera, Lucía; Ríos-Marco, Pablo; Carrasco-Jimenez, M Paz; Gallo, Miguel A; Hurtado-Guerrero, Ramon; Marco, Carmen; Basso, Giuseppe; Viola, Giampietro; Entrena, Antonio; López-Cara, Luisa Carlota

    2016-01-01

    A novel family of compounds derivative of 1,1'-(((ethane-1,2-diylbis(oxy))bis(4,1-phenylene))bis(methylene))-bispyridinium or -bisquinolinium bromide (10a-l) containing a pair of oxygen atoms in the spacer of the linker between the biscationic moieties, were synthesized and evaluated as inhibitors of choline kinase against a panel of cancer-cell lines. The most promising compounds in this series were 1,1'-(((ethane-1,2-diylbis(oxy))bis(4,1-phenylene))bis(methylene))bis(4-(dimethylamino)pyridinium) bromide (10a) and 1,1'-(((ethane-1,2-diylbis(oxy))bis(4,1-phenylene))bis(methylene))-bis(7-chloro-4-(pyrrolidin-1-yl)quinolinium) bromide (10l), which inhibit human choline kinase (ChoKα1) with IC50 of 1.0 and 0.92 μM, respectively, in a range similar to that of the previously reported biscationic compounds MN58b and RSM932A. Our compounds show greater antiproliferative activities than do the reference compounds, with unprecedented values of GI50 in the nanomolar range for several of the cancer-cell lines assayed, and more importantly they present low toxicity in non-tumoral cell lines, suggesting a cancer-cell-selective antiproliferative activity. Docking studies predict that the compounds interact with the choline-binding site in agreement with the binding mode of most previously reported biscationic compounds. Moreover, the crystal structure of ChoKα1 with compound 10a reveals that this compound binds to the choline-binding site and mimics HC-3 binding mode as never before. PMID:27029499

  13. Design, synthesis, crystallization and biological evaluation of new symmetrical biscationic compounds as selective inhibitors of human Choline Kinase α1 (ChoKα1)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schiaffino-Ortega, Santiago; Baglioni, Eleonora; Mariotto, Elena; Bortolozzi, Roberta; Serrán-Aguilera, Lucía; Ríos-Marco, Pablo; Carrasco-Jimenez, M. Paz; Gallo, Miguel A.; Hurtado-Guerrero, Ramon; Marco, Carmen; Basso, Giuseppe; Viola, Giampietro; Entrena, Antonio; López-Cara, Luisa Carlota

    2016-03-01

    A novel family of compounds derivative of 1,1‧-(((ethane-1,2-diylbis(oxy))bis(4,1-phenylene))bis(methylene))-bispyridinium or –bisquinolinium bromide (10a-l) containing a pair of oxygen atoms in the spacer of the linker between the biscationic moieties, were synthesized and evaluated as inhibitors of choline kinase against a panel of cancer-cell lines. The most promising compounds in this series were 1,1‧-(((ethane-1,2-diylbis(oxy))bis(4,1-phenylene))bis(methylene))bis(4-(dimethylamino)pyridinium) bromide (10a) and 1,1‧-(((ethane-1,2-diylbis(oxy))bis(4,1-phenylene))bis(methylene))-bis(7-chloro-4-(pyrrolidin-1-yl)quinolinium) bromide (10l), which inhibit human choline kinase (ChoKα1) with IC50 of 1.0 and 0.92 μM, respectively, in a range similar to that of the previously reported biscationic compounds MN58b and RSM932A. Our compounds show greater antiproliferative activities than do the reference compounds, with unprecedented values of GI50 in the nanomolar range for several of the cancer-cell lines assayed, and more importantly they present low toxicity in non-tumoral cell lines, suggesting a cancer-cell-selective antiproliferative activity. Docking studies predict that the compounds interact with the choline-binding site in agreement with the binding mode of most previously reported biscationic compounds. Moreover, the crystal structure of ChoKα1 with compound 10a reveals that this compound binds to the choline-binding site and mimics HC-3 binding mode as never before.

  14. Methionine and choline regulate the metabolic phenotype of a ketogenic diet.

    PubMed

    Pissios, Pavlos; Hong, Shangyu; Kennedy, Adam Richard; Prasad, Deepthi; Liu, Fen-Fen; Maratos-Flier, Eleftheria

    2013-01-01

    Low-carbohydrate ketogenic diets are commonly used as weight loss alternatives to low-fat diets, however the physiological and molecular adaptations to these diets are not completely understood. It is assumed that the metabolic phenotype of the ketogenic diet (KD) is caused by the absence of carbohydrate and high fat content, however in rodents the protein content of KD affects weight gain and ketosis. In this study we examined the role of methionine and choline in mediating the metabolic effects of KD. We have found that choline was more effective than methionine in decreasing the liver steatosis of KD-fed mice. On the other hand, methionine supplementation was more effective than choline in restoring weight gain and normalizing the expression of several fatty acid and inflammatory genes in the liver of KD-fed mice. Our results indicate that choline and methionine restriction rather than carbohydrate restriction underlies many of the metabolic effects of KD. PMID:24049742

  15. Formulation and utilization of choline based samples for dissolution dynamic nuclear polarization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bowen, Sean; Ardenkjaer-Larsen, Jan Henrik

    2013-11-01

    Hyperpolarization by the dissolution dynamic nuclear polarization (DNP) technique permits the generation of high spin polarization of solution state. However, sample formulation for dissolution-DNP is often difficult, as concentration and viscosity must be optimized to yield a dissolved sample with sufficient concentration, while maintaining polarization during the dissolution process. The unique chemical properties of choline permit the generation of highly soluble salts as well as deep eutectic mixtures with carboxylic acids and urea. We describe the formulation of these samples and compare their performance to more traditional sample formulations. Choline yields stable samples with exceptional polarization performance while simultaneously offering the capability to easily remove the choline after dissolution, perform experiments with the hyperpolarized choline, or anything in between.

  16. Carbon-11 choline: synthesis, purification, and brain uptake inhibition by 2-dimethylaminoethanol

    SciTech Connect

    Rosen, M.A.; Jones, R.M.; Yano, Y.; Budinger, T.F.

    1985-12-01

    We report an improved method for the synthesis and purification of (11C)methylcholine from the precursors (11C)methyliodide and 2-dimethylaminoethanol (deanol). Preparation time, including purification, is 35 min postbombardment. Forty millicuries of purified injectable (11C)choline were produced with a measured specific activity of greater than 300 Ci/mmol and a radiochemical purity greater than 98%. The decay corrected radiochemical yield for the synthesis and purification was approximately 50%. Residual precursor deanol, which inhibits brain uptake of choline, is removed by a rapid preparative high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) method using a reverse phase cyano column with a biologically compatible 100% water eluent. Evaporation alone did not completely remove the deanol precursor. Brain uptake of the (11C)choline product was six times greater after HPLC removal of deanol because doses of less than 1 microgram/kg significantly inhibit (14C)choline brain uptake.

  17. Choline metabolism as a basis for the selective vulnerability of cholinergic neurons

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wurtman, R. J.

    1992-01-01

    The unique propensity of cholinergic neurons to use choline for two purposes--ACh and membrane phosphatidylcholine synthesis--may contribute to their selective vulnerability in Alzheimer's disease and other cholinergic neurodegenerative disorders. When physiologically active, the neurons use free choline taken from the 'reservoir' in membrane phosphatidylcholine to synthesize ACh; this can lead to an actual decrease in the quantity of membrane per cell. Alzheimer's disease (but not Down's syndrome, or other neurodegenerative disorders) is associated with characteristic neurochemical lesions involving choline and ethanolamine: brain levels of these compounds are diminished, while those of glycerophosphocholine and glycerophosphoethanolamine (breakdown products of their respective membrane phosphatides) are increased, both in cholinergic and noncholinergic brain regions. Perhaps this metabolic disturbance and the tendency of cholinergic neurons to 'export' choline--in the form of ACh--underlie the selective vulnerability of the neurons. Resulting changes in membrane composition could abnormally expose intramembraneous proteins such as amyloid precursor protein to proteases.

  18. Transcriptional regulation of methionine synthase by homocysteine and choline in Aspergillus nidulans.

    PubMed Central

    Kacprzak, Magdalena M; Lewandowska, Irmina; Matthews, Rowena G; Paszewski, Andrzej

    2003-01-01

    Roles played by homocysteine and choline in the regulation of MS (methionine synthase) have been examined in fungi. The Aspergillus nidulans metH gene encoding MS was cloned and characterized. Its transcription was not regulated by methionine, but was enhanced by homocysteine and repressed by choline and betaine. MS activity levels were regulated in a similar way. The repression by betaine was due to its metabolic conversion to choline, which was found to be very efficient in A. nidulans. Betaine and choline supplementation stimulated growth of leaky metH mutants apparently by decreasing the demand for methyl groups and thus saving methionine and S -adenosylmethionine. We have also found that homocysteine stimulates transcription of MS-encoding genes in Saccharomyces cerevisiae and Schizosaccharomyces pombe. PMID:12954077

  19. 11C-Choline and FDG PET/CT Imaging of Primary Cholangiocarcinoma: A Comparative Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Chotipanich, Chanisa; Promteangtrong, Chetsadaporn; Kunawudhi, Anchisa; Chanwat, Rawisak; Sricharunrat, Thaniya; Suratako, Savitree; Wongsa, Paramest

    2015-01-01

    Objective(s): This study aimed to compare the diagnostic values of 11C-choline and 18F-fluorodeoxyglucose (18F-FDG) positron emission tomography/computed tomography (PET/CT) in patients with cholangiocarcinoma (CCA). Methods: This prospective study was conducted on 10 patients (6 males and 4 females), aged 42-69 years, suspected of having CCA based on CT or magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) results. 11C-choline and 18F-FDG PET/CT studies were performed in all patients over 1 week. PET/CT results were visually analyzed by 2 independent nuclear medicine physicians and quantitatively by calculating the tumor-to-background ratio (T/B). Results: No 11C-choline PET/CT uptake was observed in primary extrahepatic or intrahepatic CCA cases. Intense 18F-FDG avidity was detected in the tumors of 8 patients (%80). Two patients, who were 18F-FDG negative, had primary extrahepatic CCA. Ki-67 measurements were positive in all patients (range; 14.2%-39.9%). The average T/B values of 11C-choline and 18F-FDG were 0.4±0.2 and 2.0±1.0 in all cases of primary CCA, respectively; these values were significantly lower for 11C-choline (P<0.005). Both FDG and 11C-choline PET/CT detected metastatic CCA foci in all 8 patients (two patients had no metastases). Conclusion: As the results suggested, primary CCA lesions showed a poor avidity for 11C-choline, whereas 18F-FDG PET/CT was of value for the detection of most primary CCA cases. In contrast to primary lesions, metastatic CCA lesions showed 11C-choline avidity.

  20. [Diagnostic relevance of choline-PET / CT in patients with prostate cancer].

    PubMed

    Zengerling, F; Schrader, A J; Schrader, M; Jentzmik, F

    2012-01-01

    The choline-positron emissiontomography / computed tomography (choline-PET / CT) is a widely used imaging method for prostate cancer. This review concentrates on the relevance of choline-PET / CT for primary diagnosis, staging and re-staging of prostate cancer and highlights possible -applications in clinical practice. Therefore, we performed a systematic literature research via Pubmed and Medline database for original articles, reviews and editorials on choline-PET / CT and prostate cancer. Choline-PET / CT should not be routinely used for primary diagnosis of prostate cancer due to a lack of data. With regard to the definition of the local tumour extent (T-stag-ing) choline-PET / CT plays only a minor role, in contrast, for the evaluation of lymph node involvement it has a high positive predictive value and is equal to conventional scintigraphy in detecting bone metastases. Moreover, in cases of biochemical relapse following local therapy, choline-PET / CT seems to be appropriate for differentiating between local recurrence and systemic prostate cancer metastasis, particularly when patients are selected by defined criteria (PSA value > 1.0  ng / mL and / or PSAdt < 6  months and / or Gleason score > 7 and / or primary radiotherapy). The non-critical routine use of choline-PET / CT for patients with prostate cancer cannot be recommended, and this not only because of its high costs. It should be applied to definite clinical questions after thorough selection of appropriate patients. PMID:21769763

  1. High-Resolution Optical Molecular Imaging of Changes in Choline Metabolism in Oral Neoplasia1

    PubMed Central

    Luo, Zhen; Loja, Melissa; Farwell, D Greg; Luu, Quang C; Donald, Paul J; Amott, Deborah; Gandour-Edwards, Regina; Nitin, Nitin

    2013-01-01

    This study was aimed at developing an optical molecular imaging approach to measure differences in uptake and intracellular retention of choline in clinically isolated tissue biopsies from head and neck cancer patients. An optically detectable analogue of choline (propargyl choline) was synthesized and evaluated in 2D and 3D models and clinically isolated paired biopsies (n = 22 biopsies). Fluorescence contrast between clinically abnormal and normal tissues based on uptake and intracellular retention of propargyl choline was measured and correlated with pathologic diagnosis. Results in 2D and 3D models demonstrated a rapid uptake of propargyl choline in cancer cells, uniform permeation in tissue models, and specific detection of intracellular entrapped propargyl choline using the click chemistry reaction with an azide-modified Alexa 488 dye. Fluorescence imaging measurements following topical delivery of propargyl choline in clinically isolated biopsies showed that the mean fluorescence intensity (MFI) of neoplastic tissues was four-fold to five-fold higher than the MFI of clinically and pathologically normal samples. This difference in fluorescence contrast was measured on the basis of comparison of paired biopsy sets isolated from individual patients as well as comparison of clinically abnormal and normal biopsies independent of anatomic locations in the head and neck cavity and across diverse patients. In conclusion, a novel imaging approach based on monoalkyne-modified choline was developed and validated using cell and tissue models. Results in clinically isolated tissue biopsies demonstrate a significant fluorescent contrast between neoplastic and normal tissues and illustrate high specificity of the optical imaging approach. PMID:23418615

  2. Choline and betaine intakes are associated with reduced risk of nasopharyngeal carcinoma in adults: a case–control study

    PubMed Central

    Zeng, F-f; Xu, C-h; Liu, Y-t; Fan, Y-y; Lin, X-l; Lu, Y-k; Zhang, C-x; Chen, Y-m

    2014-01-01

    Background: Intakes of choline and betaine have been inversely related to the risk of various neoplasms, but scant data exist on nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC). We examined the association between consumption of choline and betaine and risk of NPC. Methods: We conducted a case–control study with 600 incident NPC patients and 600 controls 1 : 1 matched by age, sex and household type in Guangdong, China. Dietary intake was assessed by a food frequency questionnaire through face-to-face interview. Results: Intakes of total choline, betaine and choline+betaine were inversely related to NPC after adjustment for various lifestyle and dietary factors (all P-trend <0.001). Adjusted odds ratios (95% CI) for quartile 4 (vs quartile 1) were 0.42 (0.29, 0.61) for total choline, 0.50 (0.35, 0.72) for betaine and 0.44 (0.30, 0.64) for betaine+total choline. Regarding various sources of choline, lower NPC risk was associated with greater intakes of choline from phosphatidylcholine, free choline, glycerophosphocholine and phosphocholine, but not sphingomyelin. Conclusion: These findings are consistent with a beneficial effect of choline and betaine intakes on carcinogenesis. PMID:24169354

  3. Uncertainties of organ-absorbed doses to patients from 18f-choline

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, W. B.; Janzen, T.; Zankl, M.; Giussani, A.; Hoeschen, C.

    2011-03-01

    Radiation doses of radiopharmaceuticals to patients in nuclear medicine are, as the standard method, estimated by the administered activity, medical imaging (e.g. PET imaging), compartmental modeling and Monte Carlo simulation of radiation with reference digital human phantoms. However, in each of the contributing terms, individual uncertainty due to measurement techniques, patient variability and computation methods may propagate to the uncertainties of the calculated organ doses to the individual patient. To evaluate the overall uncertainties and the quality assurance of internal absorbed doses, a method was developed within the framework of the MADEIRA Project (Minimizing Activity and Dose with Enhanced Image quality by Radiopharmaceutical Administrations) to quantitatively analyze the uncertainties in each component of the organ absorbed doses after administration of 18F-choline to prostate cancer patients undergoing nuclear medicine diagnostics. First, on the basis of the organ PET and CT images of the patients as well as blood and urine samples, a model structure of 18F-choline was developed and the uncertainties of the model parameters were determined. Second, the model parameter values were sampled and biokinetic modeling using these sampled parameter values were performed. Third, the uncertainties of the new specific absorbed fraction (SAF) values derived with different phantoms representing individual patients were presented. Finally, the uncertainties of absorbed doses to the patients were calculated by applying the ICRP/ICRU adult male reference computational phantom. In addition to the uncertainty analysis, the sensitivity of the model parameters on the organ PET images and absorbed doses was indicated by coupling the model input and output using regression and partial correlation analysis. The results showed that the uncertainty factors of absorbed dose to patients are in most cases less than a factor of 2 without taking into account the uncertainties

  4. Prenatal choline supplementation attenuates spatial learning deficits of offspring rats exposed to low-protein diet during fetal period.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Cui-Hong; Wu, Ting; Jin, Yu; Huang, Bi-Xia; Zhou, Rui-Fen; Wang, Yi-Qin; Luo, Xiao-Lin; Zhu, Hui-Lian

    2016-06-01

    Prenatal intake of choline has been reported to lead to enhanced cognitive function in offspring, but little is known about the effects on spatial learning deficits. The present study examined the effects of prenatal choline supplementation on developmental low-protein exposure and its potential mechanisms. Pregnant female rats were fed either a normal or low-protein diet containing sufficient choline (1.1g/kg choline chloride) or supplemented choline (5.0g/kg choline chloride) until delivery. The Barnes maze test was performed at postnatal days 31-37. Choline and its metabolites, the synaptic structural parameters of the CA1 region in the brain of the newborn rat, were measured. The Barnes maze test demonstrated that prenatal low-protein pups had significantly greater error scale values, hole deviation scores, strategy scores and spatial search strategy and had lesser random search strategy values than normal protein pups (all P<.05). These alterations were significantly reversed by choline supplementation. Choline supplementation increased the brain levels of choline, betaine, phosphatidylethanolamine and phosphatidylcholine of newborns by 51.35% (P<.05), 33.33% (P<.001), 28.68% (P<.01) and 23.58% (P<.05), respectively, compared with the LPD group. Prenatal choline supplementation reversed the increased width of the synaptic cleft (P<.05) and decreased the curvature of the synaptic interface (P<.05) induced by a low-protein diet. Prenatal choline supplementation could attenuate the spatial learning deficits caused by prenatal protein malnutrition by increasing brain choline, betaine and phospholipids and by influencing the hippocampus structure. PMID:27142732

  5. Evidence for negative selection of gene variants that increase dependence on dietary choline in a Gambian cohort

    PubMed Central

    Silver, Matt J.; Corbin, Karen D.; Hellenthal, Garrett; da Costa, Kerry-Ann; Dominguez-Salas, Paula; Moore, Sophie E.; Owen, Jennifer; Prentice, Andrew M.; Hennig, Branwen J.; Zeisel, Steven H.

    2015-01-01

    Choline is an essential nutrient, and the amount needed in the diet is modulated by several factors. Given geographical differences in dietary choline intake and disparate frequencies of single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in choline metabolism genes between ethnic groups, we tested the hypothesis that 3 SNPs that increase dependence on dietary choline would be under negative selection pressure in settings where choline intake is low: choline dehydrogenase (CHDH) rs12676, methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase 1 (MTHFD1) rs2236225, and phosphatidylethanolamine-N-methyltransferase (PEMT) rs12325817. Evidence of negative selection was assessed in 2 populations: one in The Gambia, West Africa, where there is historic evidence of a choline-poor diet, and the other in the United States, with a comparatively choline-rich diet. We used 2 independent methods, and confirmation of our hypothesis was sought via a comparison with SNP data from the Maasai, an East African population with a genetic background similar to that of Gambians but with a traditional diet that is higher in choline. Our results show that frequencies of SNPs known to increase dependence on dietary choline are significantly reduced in the low-choline setting of The Gambia. Our findings suggest that adequate intake levels of choline may have to be reevaluated in different ethnic groups and highlight a possible approach for identifying novel functional SNPs under the influence of dietary selective pressure.—Silver, M. J., Corbin, K. D., Hellenthal, G., da Costa, K.-A., Dominguez-Salas, P., Moore, S. E., Owen, J., Prentice, A. M., Hennig, B. J., Zeisel, S. H. Evidence for negative selection of gene variants that increase dependence on dietary choline in a Gambian cohort. PMID:25921832

  6. Choline and N,N-Dimethylethanolamine as Direct Substrates for Methanogens

    PubMed Central

    Watkins, Andrew J.; Roussel, Erwan G.; Webster, Gordon; Parkes, R. John

    2012-01-01

    Choline (N,N,N-trimethylethanolamine), which is widely distributed in membrane lipids and is a component of sediment biota, has been shown to be utilized anaerobically by mixed prokaryote cultures to produce methane but not by pure cultures of methanogens. Here, we show that five recently isolated Methanococcoides strains from a range of sediments (Aarhus Bay, Denmark; Severn Estuary mudflats at Portishead, United Kingdom; Darwin Mud Volcano, Gulf of Cadiz; Napoli mud volcano, eastern Mediterranean) can directly utilize choline for methanogenesis producing ethanolamine, which is not further metabolized. Di- and monomethylethanolamine are metabolic intermediates that temporarily accumulate. Consistent with this, dimethylethanolamine was shown to be another new growth substrate, but monomethylethanolamine was not. The specific methanogen inhibitor 2-bromoethanesulfonate (BES) inhibited methane production from choline. When choline and trimethylamine are provided together, diauxic growth occurs, with trimethylamine being utilized first, and then after a lag (∼7 days) choline is metabolized. Three type strains of Methanococcoides (M. methylutens, M. burtonii, and M. alaskense), in contrast, did not utilize choline. However, two of them (M. methylutens and M. burtonii) did metabolize dimethylethanolamine. These results extend the known substrates that can be directly utilized by some methanogens, giving them the advantage that they would not be reliant on bacterial syntrophs for their substrate supply. PMID:23001649

  7. Quantum Chemical Insight into the Interactions and Thermodynamics Present in Choline Chloride Based Deep Eutectic Solvents.

    PubMed

    Wagle, Durgesh V; Deakyne, Carol A; Baker, Gary A

    2016-07-14

    We report quantum chemical calculations performed on three popular deep eutectic solvents (DESs) in order to elucidate the molecular interactions, charge transfer interactions, and thermodynamics associated with these systems. The DESs studied comprise 1:2 choline chloride/urea (reline), 1:2 choline chloride/ethylene glycol (ethaline), and 1:1 choline chloride/malonic acid (maloline). The excellent correlation between calculated and experimental vibrational spectra allowed for identification of dominant interactions in the DES systems. The DESs were found to be stabilized by both conventional hydrogen bonds and C-H···O/C-H···π interactions between the components. The hydrogen-bonding network established in the DES is clearly distinct from that which exists within the neat hydrogen-bond donor dimer. Charge decomposition analysis indicates significant charge transfer from choline and chloride to the hydrogen-bond donor with a higher contribution from the cation, and a density of states analysis confirms the direction of the charge transfer. Consequently, the sum of the bond orders of the choline-Cl(-) interactions in the DESs correlates directly with the melting temperatures of the DESs, a correlation that offers insight into the effect of the tuning of the choline-Cl(-) interactions by the hydrogen-bond donors on the physical properties of the DESs. Finally, the differences in the vibrational entropy changes upon DES formation are consistent with the trend in the overall entropy changes upon DES formation. PMID:27268431

  8. Choline chloride-thiourea, a deep eutectic solvent for the production of chitin nanofibers.

    PubMed

    Mukesh, Chandrakant; Mondal, Dibyendu; Sharma, Mukesh; Prasad, Kamalesh

    2014-03-15

    Deep eutectic solvents (DESs) consisting of the mixtures of choline halide (chloride/bromide)-urea and choline chloride-thiourea were used as solvents to prepare α-chitin nanofibers (CNFs). CNFs of diameter 20-30 nm could be obtained using the DESs comprising of the mixture of choline chloride and thiourea (CCT 1:2); however, NFs could not be obtained using the DESs having urea (CCU 1:2) as hydrogen bond donor. The physicochemical properties of thus obtained NFs were compared with those obtained using a couple of imidazolium based ionic liquids namely, 1-butyl-3-methylimidazolium hydrogen sulphate [(Bmim)HSO4] and 1-methylimidazolium hydrogen sulphate [(Hmim)HSO4] as well as choline based bio-ILs namely, choline hydrogen sulphate [(Chol)HSO4] and choline acrylate. The CNFs obtained using the DES as a solvent were used to prepare calcium alginate bio-nanocomposite gel beads having enhanced elasticity in comparison to Ca-alginate beads. The bio-nanocomposite gel beads thus obtained were used to study slow release of 5-fluorouracil, an anticancer drug. PMID:24528755

  9. Oxidative damage lipid peroxidation in the kidney of choline-deficient rats.

    PubMed

    Ossani, Georgina; Dalghi, Marianela; Repetto, Marisa

    2007-01-01

    Phosphatidylcholine is the most abundant phospholipid constituent of cell membranes and choline is a quaternary amine required for phosphatidylcholine synthesis. The impairment of membrane functions is considered as an indication of oxidative damage. In order to kinetically analyze the time course of the pathogenesis of renal necrosis following to choline deficiency in weanling rats, we determined markers of membrane lipid peroxidation (thiobarbituric acid reactive substances; TBARS and hydroperoxide-induced chemiluminescence (BOOH-CL) ) and studied the histopathological damage. Plasma TBARS (t(1/2) = 2.5 days) was an early indicator of systemic oxidative stress, likely involving liver and kidney. The levels of TBARS an BOOH-CL increased by 80% and by 183%, respectively, in kidney homogenates with t(1/2) = 1.5 days and 4 days, respectively. The levels of BOOH-CL were statistically higher in rats fed a choline-deficient diet at day 6, in a mixture of membranes (from plasmatic, smooth and rough endoplasmic reticulum and Golgi), in mitochondrial membranes and in lysosomal membranes. The results indicate that choline deficiency produces oxidative damage in kidney subcellular membranes. Necrosis involved mainly convoluted tubules and appeared with a t(1/2) = 5.5 days. An increase in the production of reactive oxygen species, triggered by NADH overproduction in the mitochondrial dysfunction associated with choline deficiency appears as one of the pathogenic mechanism of mitochondrial and cellular oxidative damage in choline-deficiency. PMID:17127370

  10. Choline Ions Stabilize A-T Base Pairs by Fitting into Minor Groove

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakano, Miki; Tateishi-Karimata, Hisae; Tanaka, Shigenori; Sugimoto, Naoki

    In a Watson-Crick base paired DNA duplex, G-C base pairs are more stable than A-T base pairs. However, in solvent containing choline ions, the stabilities of these base pairs are reversed. To elucidate the mechanism through which choline ions exert this effect from a microscopic viewpoint, we performed molecular dynamics simulations. We found that choline ions interact with a DNA duplex through multiple hydrogen bonds. The affinity of choline ion for the minor groove of A-T base pairs was higher than that for the major groove. The binding of choline ions to the minor groove of A-T base pairs supports groove formation without disturbing the formation of hydrogen bonds between the base pairs. In contrast, choline ions inhibit the formation of hydrogen bonds between G-C base pairs by binding to atoms of these bases that are involved in Watson-Crick hydrogen bonding. These findings will help us understand the stabilities of canonical DNA structures under the crowded conditions inside cells.

  11. Blood-brain barrier transport of choline is reduced in the aged rat.

    PubMed

    Mooradian, A D

    1988-02-01

    An age-related impairment in choline transport across the blood-brain barrier (BBB) may contribute to the cholinergic mechanisms of geriatric memory dysfunction. To test this hypothesis, the brain choline uptake in male Fisher 344 rats at 2, 18 and 24 months of age was studied using the Oldendorf technique. The Vmax of choline transport in the 24-month-old rats (0.05 +/- 0.04 nmol/min/g) was significantly lower than that in the 2-month-old rat (2.5 +/- 1.0 nmol/min/g) (P less than 0.05). The Km of transport in old rats (13 +/- 35 microM) was also significantly smaller than the value in 24-month-old rats (450 +/- 195 microM), while the constant of the non-saturable component of the transport, Kd, was not significantly different in older rats (1.2 +/- 0.3 vs 0.6 +/- 0.1 microliter/min/g). These results indicate that the carrier in old rats has reduced capacity and increased affinity to choline. The reduced choline carrier capacity explains the significant decrease in BBB choline transport in aged rats. PMID:3359216

  12. Role of Teichoic Acid Choline Moieties in the Virulence of Streptococcus pneumoniae▿

    PubMed Central

    Gehre, Florian; Spisek, Radek; Kharat, Arun S.; Matthews, Phillip; Kukreja, Anjli; Anthony, Robert M.; Dhodapkar, Madhav V.; Vollmer, Waldemar; Tomasz, Alexander

    2009-01-01

    In recent reports it was shown that genetically modified choline-free strains of Streptococcus pneumoniae (D39Cho−licA64 and D39ChiplicB31) expressing the type II capsular polysaccharide were virtually avirulent in the murine sepsis model, in sharp contrast to the isogenic and highly virulent strains D39Cho− and D39Chip, which have retained the choline residues at their surface. We now demonstrate that this choline-associated virulence is independent of Toll-like receptor 2 recognition. Also, despite the lack of virulence, choline-free strains of S. pneumoniae were able to activate splenic dendritic cells, induce secretion of proinflammatory cytokines, and produce specific protective immunity against subsequent challenge. However, after this transient engagement of the immune system the choline-free bacteria were rapidly cleared from the blood, while the isogenic virulent strain D39Cho− continued to grow, accompanied by prolonged expression of cytokines, eventually killing the experimental animals. The critical contribution of choline residues to the virulence potential of pneumococci appears to be the role that these amino alcohol residues play in a pneumococcal immune evasion strategy, the mechanism of which is unknown at the present time. PMID:19433549

  13. Effect of CDP-choline on learning and memory processes in rodents.

    PubMed

    Petkov, V D; Mosharrof, A H; Kehayov, R; Petkov, V V; Konstantinova, E; Getova, D

    1992-10-01

    The effects of cytidine (5') diphosphocholine (CDP-choline) on learning and memory were studied using conditioned reflex methods for passive avoidance and active avoidance with punishment reinforcement (step-through, step-down, shuttle box and maze), for active avoidance with alimentary reinforcement (staircase maze), and the Morris water maze. The majority of experiments involved comparative studies of the nootropic drugs meclofenoxate and/or piracetam. CDP-choline was administered orally, in some of the experiments also intraperitoneally, at doses of 10-500 mg/kg body weight once or twice daily for 5 or 7 days. In separate cases only single doses were administered. Trainings started one hour after the last dose of the drugs. Retention tests were given 3 h, 24 h, 7 days or 10 days after training. The results obtained with the different methods document CDP-choline's ability to improve learning and memory in rats and mice. No essential differences in the effects of CDP-choline were established upon oral and intraperitoneal administration of the drug. The learning- and memory-facilitating effects of CDP-choline were similar to those of meclofenoxate and piracetam. The results of the present study permit us to define CDP-choline as a substance capable of improving cognitive levels. PMID:1494300

  14. Choline requirements of male White Pekin ducks from 21 to 42 d of age.

    PubMed

    Wen, Z G; Hou, S S; Tang, J; Feng, Y L; Huang, W; Guo, Y M; Xie, M

    2014-01-01

    1. A dose-response experiment with 6 dietary choline concentrations (0, 342, 779, 1285, 1662 and 1962 mg/kg) was conducted with male White Pekin ducks to estimate the choline requirement from 21 to 42 d of age. 2. Ninety 21-d-old male White Pekin ducks were allotted to 6 dietary treatments, each containing 5 replicate pens with three birds per pen. At 42 d of age, final weight, weight gain, feed intake and feed/gain were measured. Liver was collected to determine total liver lipid, triglyceride and phospholipids. 3. Significant positive effects of dietary choline on final weight, weight gain and feed intake were observed. In addition, dietary choline supplementation significantly decreased liver lipid and triglyceride content and increased liver phospholipids of Pekin ducks. 4. According to broken-line regression analysis, the choline requirements of male White Pekin ducks from 21 to 42 d of age for weight gain, feed intake and total liver lipid were 980, 950 and 1130 mg/kg. Pekin ducks needed more choline to prevent excess liver lipid deposition than to maintain growth. PMID:25005232

  15. Choline and N,N-dimethylethanolamine as direct substrates for methanogens.

    PubMed

    Watkins, Andrew J; Roussel, Erwan G; Webster, Gordon; Parkes, R John; Sass, Henrik

    2012-12-01

    Choline (N,N,N-trimethylethanolamine), which is widely distributed in membrane lipids and is a component of sediment biota, has been shown to be utilized anaerobically by mixed prokaryote cultures to produce methane but not by pure cultures of methanogens. Here, we show that five recently isolated Methanococcoides strains from a range of sediments (Aarhus Bay, Denmark; Severn Estuary mudflats at Portishead, United Kingdom; Darwin Mud Volcano, Gulf of Cadiz; Napoli mud volcano, eastern Mediterranean) can directly utilize choline for methanogenesis producing ethanolamine, which is not further metabolized. Di- and monomethylethanolamine are metabolic intermediates that temporarily accumulate. Consistent with this, dimethylethanolamine was shown to be another new growth substrate, but monomethylethanolamine was not. The specific methanogen inhibitor 2-bromoethanesulfonate (BES) inhibited methane production from choline. When choline and trimethylamine are provided together, diauxic growth occurs, with trimethylamine being utilized first, and then after a lag (∼7 days) choline is metabolized. Three type strains of Methanococcoides (M. methylutens, M. burtonii, and M. alaskense), in contrast, did not utilize choline. However, two of them (M. methylutens and M. burtonii) did metabolize dimethylethanolamine. These results extend the known substrates that can be directly utilized by some methanogens, giving them the advantage that they would not be reliant on bacterial syntrophs for their substrate supply. PMID:23001649

  16. Purification and characterization of an alkaliphilic choline oxidase of Fusarium oxysporum.

    PubMed

    Enokibara, Shogo

    2012-01-01

    A novel choline oxidase found in a fungus, Fusarium oxysporum strain V2, was purified to homogeneity as determined by sodium dodecyl sulfate polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. The enzyme has a molecular mass of 128 kDa and consists of two identical subunits. The purified enzyme showed adsorption peaks at 340 nm and 450 nm. It showed alkaliphilic pH characteristics: its optimum pH was 9.0-10.0, and it was stable at pH 8.0-10.2. The Michaelis constant (Km) values for choline and betaine aldehyde were 0.28 mM and 0.39 mM respectively. Trimethylamino-alcohols, dimethylamino-alcohols, and diethylaminoethanol were substrates for the enzyme, but the Km values for them increased with decreasing numbers of methyl groups on the ammonium headgroup. A marked decrease in the maximum velocity (Vmax) and Vmax/Km values was observed when N-replaced choline analogs were used as substrate instead of choline. The enzyme had a remarkably higher affinity for choline and betaine aldehyde than do previously reported enzymes. The enzyme oxidized these two substrates more quickly than a choline oxidase from Arthrobacter globiformis, and oxidation by the V2 enzyme was accompanied by an increase in the stoichometric amount of hydrogen peroxide. PMID:23221722

  17. PET/CT in prostate cancer: non-choline radiopharmaceuticals

    PubMed Central

    CASTELLUCCI, P.; JADVAR, H.

    2012-01-01

    In this brief review, the major potential clinical applications of 18F-FDG, 11C-acetate, 18F-FDHT, 18F-FLT, 18F-FMAU, and anti-18F-FACBC in the imaging evaluation of men with prostate cancer are discussed. 18F-FDG has a limited role in primary diagnosis and staging but it may be able to reflect tumour aggressiveness, detect sites of recurrence in some men with high serum PSA after biochemical failure and assess response to chemo- and hormonal treatment in metastatic disease. 11C-acetate has been investigated for intra-prostatic primary tumour detection and staging as well as for re-staging in case of biochemical relapse with results that are overall similar to those with 18F- and 11C-labeled choline. 18F-FDHT targets the androgen receptor and may be particularly useful in the assessment of the pharmacodynamics of the androgen signalling pathway. PET in conjunction with 18F-FLT or 18F-FMAU that track the thymidine salvage pathway of DNA synthesis has also been investigated for imaging cellular proliferation in prostate cancer. Initial exprience with the radiolabeked synthetic amino acid, anti-18F-FACBC, which displays slow urinary excretion has been encouraging but further studies will be needed to decipher its exact role in the imaging management of men with prostate cancer. PMID:23013666

  18. Electrostatic Forces Mediated by Choline Dihydrogen Phosphate Stabilize Collagen.

    PubMed

    Mehta, Ami; Rao, J Raghava; Fathima, N Nishad

    2015-10-01

    Cross-linkers aid in improving biostability of collagen via different mechanisms. Choline dihydrogen phosphate (cDHP), a biocompatible ionic liquid, has been reported as a potential cross-linker for collagen. However, its mechanism is yet unclear. This study explores the effect of cDHP on the physicochemical stability of collagen and nature of its interaction. Dielectric behavior of collagen-cDHP composites signifies that cDHP enhances intermolecular forces. This was demonstrated by an increase in cross-linked groups and high denaturation temperature of collagen-cDHP composites. XRD measurements reveal minor conformational change in helices. Molecular modeling studies illustrate that the force existing between collagen and cDHP is electrostatic in nature. Herein, it is postulated that dihydrogen phosphate anion attaches to cationic functional groups of collagen, resulting in closer vicinity of various side chains of collagen, forming physical and chemical cross-links within collagen, contributing to its structural stability. Our study suggests that dihydrogen phosphate anions can be employed for developing a new class of biocompatible cross-linkers. PMID:26388068

  19. Facile pulping of lignocellulosic biomass using choline acetate.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Fangchao; Wang, Hui; Chatel, Gregory; Gurau, Gabriela; Rogers, Robin D

    2014-07-01

    Treating ground bagasse or Southern yellow pine in the biodegradable ionic liquid (IL), choline acetate ([Cho][OAc]), at 100°C for 24h led to dissolution of hemicellulose and lignin, while leaving the cellulose pulp undissolved, with a 54.3% (bagasse) or 34.3% (pine) reduction in lignin content. The IL solution of the dissolved biopolymers can be separated from the undissolved particles either by addition of water (20 wt% of IL) followed by filtration or by centrifugation. Hemicellulose (19.0 wt% of original bagasse, 10.2 wt% of original pine, containing 14-18 wt% lignin) and lignin (5.0 wt% of original bagasse, 6.0 wt% of original pine) could be subsequently precipitated. The pulp obtained from [Cho][OAc] treatment can be rapidly dissolved in 1-ethyl-3-methylimidazolium acetate (e.g., 17 h for raw bagasse vs. 7h for pulp), and precipitated as cellulose-rich material (CRM) with a lower lignin content (e.g., 23.6% for raw bagasse vs. 10.6% for CRM). PMID:24874879

  20. Saltatory conduction precedes remyelination in axons demyelinated with lysophosphatidyl choline.

    PubMed

    Smith, K J; Bostock, H; Hall, S M

    1982-04-01

    The changing electrical and morphological properties of demyelinating and remyelinating nerve fibres have been studied in rat ventral roots after intrathecal injection of lysophosphatidyl choline (LPC). The spatial distribution of electrical excitability within the lesion has been studied in undissected single fibres using high-resolution longitudinal current analysis. The distribution of excitability has been correlated with the ultrastructure of the fibres and with the distribution of the surrounding Schwann cells. Demyelinated axolemma was initially not excited, but conduction across demyelinated internodes appeared progressively from the 4th day after LPC injection. Conduction was never continuous, but proceeded via new foci of inward membrane current as early as 4 days after LPC injection, i.e. 3 days before the onset of remyelination. It is suggested that these foci (termed phi-nodes to distinguish them from the nodes of Ranvier distributed along myelinated nerve fibres) are precursors of nodes of Ranvier, and may indicate aggregates of sodium channels which form along the demyelinated axolemma prior to remyelination. PMID:6804606

  1. Choline molecular imaging with small-animal PET for monitoring tumor cellular response to photodynamic therapy of cancer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fei, Baowei; Wang, Hesheng; Wu, Chunying; Meyers, Joseph; Xue, Liang-Yan; MacLennan, Gregory; Schluchter, Mark

    2009-02-01

    We are developing and evaluating choline molecular imaging with positron emission tomography (PET) for monitoring tumor response to photodynamic therapy (PDT) in animal models. Human prostate cancer (PC-3) was studied in athymic nude mice. A second-generation photosensitizer Pc 4 was used for PDT in tumor-bearing mice. MicroPET images with 11C-choline were acquired before PDT and 48 h after PDT. Time-activity curves of 11C-choline uptake were analyzed before and after PDT. For treated tumors, normalized choline uptake decreased significantly 48 h after PDT, compared to the same tumors pre-PDT (p <~ 0.001). However, for the control tumors, normalized choline uptake increased significantly (p <~ 0.001). PET imaging with 11C-choline is sensitive to detect early tumor response to PDT in the animal model of human prostate cancer.

  2. Uptake of (N-Me-3H)-choline by synaptosomes from the central nervous system of Locusta migratoria

    SciTech Connect

    Breer, H.

    1982-03-01

    The accumulation of 3H-choline by isolated synaptosomes from the central nervous system of locust was studied at concentrations varying from 0.05 to 40 microM. Kinetic analysis of the saturable process revealed a high-affinity and a low-affinity system. The high-affinity uptake was competitively inhibited by hemicholinium-3 and was absolutely dependent on external sodium. Elevated potassium concentrations inhibited choline uptake. The choline uptake by insect synaptosomes was found to be remarkably resistant to a variety of metabolic inhibitors. The reduced choline uptake under depolarizing conditions (high potassium concentration or veratridine) in the absence of calcium implies that electrochemical gradients are important for high-affinity choline uptake. Depolarization of preloaded synaptosomes under appropriate conditions resulted in a significant release of newly accumulated choline radioactivity.

  3. [Anti-platelet actions of salicylates: in vivo, ex vivo and in vitro effects of choline salicylate].

    PubMed

    Irino, O; Saitoh, K; Ohkubo, K

    1985-07-01

    Effects of choline salicylate, sodium salicylate, choline chloride and acetylsalicylic acid on platelet aggregation in vivo, ex vivo and in vitro in mice were studied. These drugs all inhibited adenosine diphosphate (ADP)-induced respiratory depression, which is closely related to platelet aggregation in vivo, with choline salicylate showing the strongest inhibitory effect. Choline salicylate had a tendency to reduce the mortality of animals injected intravenously with endotoxin, but the other drugs had no such effect. The inhibitory effects of these drugs on ADP-induced platelet aggregation ex vivo were in the order of choline salicylate greater than acetylsalicylic acid congruent to sodium salicylate greater than choline chloride congruent to no effect, and plasma concentrations of protein-unbound salicylic acid at 1 hr after oral administration of drugs were in the order of choline salicylate greater than acetylsalicylic acid congruent to sodium salicylate. The in vitro effects of these drugs were in the order of choline salicylate congruent to sodium salicylate greater than choline chloride congruent to acetylsalicylic acid congruent to no effect. Therefore, it was considered that salicylic acid played an important role on the in vivo, ex vivo and in vitro effects of choline salicylate and that choline increased plasma concentrations of salicylic acid and consequently enhanced the in vivo and ex vivo effects of salicylic acid. Furthermore, the ex vivo effects of choline salicylate were found when ADP-induced platelet aggregation was measured with platelet-rich plasma prepared from blood collected with heparin as anti-coagulant, but not when blood was collected with citrate.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:4043866

  4. Higher Dietary Choline and Betaine Intakes Are Associated with Better Body Composition in the Adult Population of Newfoundland, Canada

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Xiang; Wang, Yongbo; Randell, Edward; Pedram, Pardis; Yi, Yanqing; Gulliver, Wayne; Sun, Guang

    2016-01-01

    Background Choline is an essential nutrient and betaine is an osmolyte and methyl donor. Both are important to maintain health including adequate lipid metabolism. Supplementation of dietary choline and betaine increase muscle mass and reduce body fat in animals. However, little data is available regarding the role of dietary choline and betaine on body composition in humans. Objective To investigate the association between dietary choline and betaine intakes with body composition in a large population based cross-sectional study. Design A total of 3214 subjects from the CODING (Complex Disease in Newfoundland population: Environment and Genetics) study were assessed. Dietary choline and betaine intakes were computed from the Willett Food Frequency questionnaire. Body composition was measured using dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry following a 12-hour fast. Major confounding factors including age, sex, total calorie intake and physical activity level were controlled in all analyses. Result Significantly inverse correlations were found between dietary choline and betaine intakes, with all obesity measurements: total percent body fat (%BF), percent trunk fat (%TF), percent android fat (%AF), percent gynoid fat (%GF) and anthropometrics: weight, body mass index, waist circumference, waist-to-hip ratio in both women and men (r range from -0.13 to -0.47 for choline and -0.09 to -0.26 for betaine, p<0.001 for all). Dietary choline intake had stronger association than betaine. Moreover, obese subjects had the lowest dietary choline and betaine intakes, with overweight subjects in the middle, and normal weight subjects consumed the highest dietary choline and betaine (p<0.001). Vice versa, when subjects were ranked according to dietary choline and betaine intakes, subjects with the highest intake of both had the lowest %TF, %AF, %GF, %BF and highest %LM among the groups in both sexes. Conclusion Our findings indicate that high dietary choline and betaine intakes are

  5. [18F]Fluoromethyl-[1,2-2H4]-choline: A novel radiotracer for imaging choline metabolism in tumors by positron emission tomography

    PubMed Central

    Leyton, Julius; Smith, Graham; Zhao, Yongjun; Perumal, Meg; Nguyen, Quang-De; Robins, Edward; Årstad, Erik; Aboagye, Eric O.

    2009-01-01

    Current radiotracers for positron emission tomography (PET) imaging of choline metabolism have poor systemic metabolic stability in vivo. We describe a novel radiotracer, [18F]fluoromethyl-[1,2-2H4]-choline (D4-FCH), that employs deuterium isotope effect to improve metabolic stability. D4-FCH proved more resistant to oxidation than its non-deuterated analog, [18F]fluoromethylcholine (FCH), in plasma, kidneys, liver and tumor, while retaining phosphorylation potential. Tumor radiotracer levels, a determinant of sensitivity in imaging studies, was improved by deuterium substitution; tumor uptake values expressed as %injected dose/voxel at 60 min were 7.43 ± 0.47 and 5.50 ± 0.49 for D4-FCH and FCH, respectively, (P = 0.04). D4-FCH was also found to be a useful response biomarker. Treatment with the mitogenic extracellular kinase inhibitor, PD0325901, resulted in a reduction in tumor radiotracer uptake that occurred in parallel with reductions in choline kinase A expression. In conclusion, D4-FCH is a very promising metabolically stable radiotracer for imaging choline metabolism in tumors. PMID:19773436

  6. (18)F-trifluoroborate derivatives of [des-arg(10)]kallidin for imaging bradykinin b1 receptor expression with positron emission tomography.

    PubMed

    Liu, Zhibo; Amouroux, Guillaume; Zhang, Zhengxing; Pan, Jinhe; Hundal-Jabal, Navjit; Colpo, Nadine; Lau, Joseph; Perrin, David M; Bénard, François; Lin, Kuo-Shyan

    2015-03-01

    Bradykinin B1 receptor (B1R) is involved in pain and inflammation pathways and is upregulated in inflamed tissues and cancer. Due to its minimal expression in healthy tissues, B1R is an attractive target for the development of therapeutic agents to treat inflammation, chronic pain, and cancer. The goal of this study is to synthesize and compare two (18)F-labeled peptides derived from potent B1R antagonists B9858 and B9958 for imaging B1R expression with positron emission tomography (PET). Azidoacetyl-B9858 2 and azidoacetyl-B9958 3 were synthesized by a solid-phase approach and subsequently clicked to ammoniomethyl-trifluoroborate (AmBF3)-conjugated alkyne 1 to obtain AmBF3-B9858 and AmBF3-B9958, respectively. AmBF3-B9858 and AmBF3-B9958 bound B1R with high affinity, with Ki values at 0.09 ± 0.08 and 0.46 ± 0.03 nM, respectively, as measured by in vitro competition binding assays. (18)F labeling was performed via an (18)F-(19)F isotope exchange reaction. The radiofluorinated tracers were obtained within a synthesis time of 30 min and with 23-32% non-decay-corrected radiochemical yield, >99% radiochemical purity, and 43-87 GBq/μmol specific activity at the end of the synthesis. PET imaging and biodistribution studies were carried out in mice bearing both B1R-positive (B1R(+)) HEK293T::hB1R and B1R-negative (B1R(-)) HEK293T tumors. Both tracers cleared rapidly from most organs/tissues, mainly through the renal pathway. High uptake in B1R(+) tumors ((18)F-AmBF3-B9858: 3.94 ± 1.24% ID/g, tumor-to-muscle ratio 21.3 ± 4.33; (18)F-AmBF3-B9958: 4.20 ± 0.98% ID/g, tumor-to-muscle ratio 48.6 ± 10.7) was observed at 1 h postinjection. These results indicate that (18)F-AmBF3-B9858 and (18)F-AmBF3-B9958 are promising agents for the in vivo imaging of B1R expression with PET. PMID:25629412

  7. Improved human visuomotor performance and pupil constriction after choline supplementation in a placebo-controlled double-blind study

    PubMed Central

    Naber, Marnix; Hommel, Bernhard; Colzato, Lorenza S.

    2015-01-01

    Only few nutrients are known to enhance cognition. Here we explore whether visuomotor performance can be improved through the intake of the nutrient choline, an essential chemical compound in a vertebrate’s diet. Choline is abundant in for example eggs and shrimps and many animal studies suggest that it serves as a cognitive enhancer. As choline is important for the communication between motor neurons and the control of skeletal muscles, we assumed that choline supplementation may have positive effects on action coordination in humans. A group of twenty-eight individuals ingested two grams of choline bitartrate or a placebo in two separate sessions. Seventy minutes post ingestion, participants performed a visuomotor aiming task in which they had to rapidly hit the centers of targets. Results showed that participants hit targets more centrally after choline supplementation. Pupil size (a cognition-sensitive biomarker) also significantly decreased after choline intake and correlated positively with the hit distance to the targets and the number of target misses, and negatively with reaction times. These findings point to a choline-induced bias towards action precision in the trade-off between speed and accuracy. The changes in pupil size suggest that choline uptake alters cholinergic functions in the nervous system. PMID:26271904

  8. Improved human visuomotor performance and pupil constriction after choline supplementation in a placebo-controlled double-blind study.

    PubMed

    Naber, Marnix; Hommel, Bernhard; Colzato, Lorenza S

    2015-01-01

    Only few nutrients are known to enhance cognition. Here we explore whether visuomotor performance can be improved through the intake of the nutrient choline, an essential chemical compound in a vertebrate's diet. Choline is abundant in for example eggs and shrimps and many animal studies suggest that it serves as a cognitive enhancer. As choline is important for the communication between motor neurons and the control of skeletal muscles, we assumed that choline supplementation may have positive effects on action coordination in humans. A group of twenty-eight individuals ingested two grams of choline bitartrate or a placebo in two separate sessions. Seventy minutes post ingestion, participants performed a visuomotor aiming task in which they had to rapidly hit the centers of targets. Results showed that participants hit targets more centrally after choline supplementation. Pupil size (a cognition-sensitive biomarker) also significantly decreased after choline intake and correlated positively with the hit distance to the targets and the number of target misses, and negatively with reaction times. These findings point to a choline-induced bias towards action precision in the trade-off between speed and accuracy. The changes in pupil size suggest that choline uptake alters cholinergic functions in the nervous system. PMID:26271904

  9. The effect of centrally injected CDP-choline on respiratory system; involvement of phospholipase to thromboxane signaling pathway.

    PubMed

    Topuz, Bora B; Altinbas, Burcin; Yilmaz, Mustafa S; Saha, Sikha; Batten, Trevor F; Savci, Vahide; Yalcin, Murat

    2014-05-01

    CDP-choline is an endogenous metabolite in phosphatidylcholine biosynthesis. Exogenous administration of CDP-choline has been shown to affect brain metabolism and to exhibit cardiovascular, neuroendocrine neuroprotective actions. On the other hand, little is known regarding its respiratory actions and/or central mechanism of its respiratory effect. Therefore the current study was designed to investigate the possible effects of centrally injected CDP-choline on respiratory system and the mediation of the central cholinergic receptors and phospholipase to thromboxane signaling pathway on CDP-choline-induced respiratory effects in anaesthetized rats. Intracerebroventricularly (i.c.v.) administration of CDP-choline induced dose- and time-dependent increased respiratory rates, tidal volume and minute ventilation of male anaesthetized Spraque Dawley rats. İ.c.v. pretreatment with atropine failed to alter the hyperventilation responses to CDP-choline whereas mecamylamine, cholinergic nicotinic receptor antagonist, mepacrine, phospholipase A2 inhibitor, and neomycin phospholipase C inhibitor, blocked completely the hyperventilation induced by CDP-choline. In addition, central pretreatment with furegrelate, thromboxane A2 synthesis inhibitor, also partially blocked CDP-choline-evoked hyperventilation effects. These data show that centrally administered CDP-choline induces hyperventilation which is mediated by activation of central nicotinic receptors and phospholipase to thromboxane signaling pathway. PMID:24560778

  10. Hepatotoxicity and endothelial dysfunction induced by high choline diet and the protective effects of phloretin in mice.

    PubMed

    Ren, Daoyuan; Liu, Yafei; Zhao, Yan; Yang, Xingbin

    2016-08-01

    The involvement of choline and its metabolite trimethylamine-N-oxide (TMAO) in endothelial dysfunction and atherosclerosis has been repeatedly confirmed. Phloretin, a dihydrochalcone flavonoid usually present in apples, possesses a variety of biological activities including vascular nutrition. This study was designed to investigate whether phloretin could alleviate or prevent high choline-induced vascular endothelial dysfunction and liver injury in mice. Mice were provided with 3% high choline water and given phloretin orally daily for 10 weeks. The high choline-treated mice showed the significant dyslipidemia and hyperglycemia with the impaired liver and vascular endothelium (p < 0.01). Administration of phloretin at 200 and 400 mg/kg bw significantly reduced the choline-induced elevation of serum TC, TG, LDL-C, AST, ALT, ET-1 and TXA2 (p < 0.01), and markedly antagonized the choline-induced decrease of serum PGI2, HDL-C and NO levels. Furthermore, phloretin elevated hepatic SOD and GSH-Px activities and decreased hepatic MDA levels of the mice exposed to high choline water. Moreover, histopathological test with the H&E and Oil Red O staining of liver sections confirmed the high choline diet-caused liver steatosis and the hepatoprotective effect of phloretin. These findings suggest that high choline causes oxidative damage, and phloretin alleviate vascular endothelial dysfunction and liver injury. PMID:27316781

  11. Brain protection against ischemic stroke using choline as a new molecular bypass treatment

    PubMed Central

    Jin, Xin; Wang, Ru-huan; Wang, Hui; Long, Chao-liang; Wang, Hai

    2015-01-01

    Aim: To determine whether administration of choline could attenuate brain injury in a rat model of ischemic stroke and the underlying mechanisms. Methods: A rat model of ischemic stroke was established through permanent middle cerebral artery occlusion (pMCAO). After the surgery, the rats were treated with choline or choline plus the specific α7 nAChR antagonist methyllycaconitine (MLA), or with the control drug nimodipine for 10 days. The neurological deficits, brain-infarct volume, pial vessel density and the number of microvessels in the cortex were assessed. Rat brain microvascular endothelial cells (rBMECs) cultured under hypoxic conditions were used in in vitro experiments. Results: Oral administration of choline (100 or 200 mg·kg−1·d−1) or nimodipine (20 mg·kg−1·d−1) significantly improved neurological deficits, and reduced infarct volume and nerve cell loss in the ischemic cerebral cortices in pMCAO rats. Furthermore, oral administration of choline, but not nimodipine, promoted the pial arteriogenesis and cerebral-cortical capillary angiogenesis in the ischemic regions. Moreover, oral administration of choline significantly augmented pMCAO-induced increases in the expression levels of α7 nAChR, HIF-1α and VEGF in the ischemic cerebral cortices as well as in the serum levels of VEGF. Choline-induced protective effects were prevented by co-treatment with MLA (1 mg·kg−1·d−1, ip). Treatment of rBMECs cultured under hypoxic conditions in vitro with choline (1, 10 and 100 μmol/L) dose-dependently promoted the endothelial-cell proliferation, migration and tube formation, as well as VEGF secretion, which were prevented by co-treatment with MLA (1 μmol/L) or by transfection with HIF-1α siRNA. Conclusion: Choline effectively attenuates brain ischemic injury in pMCAO rats, possibly by facilitating pial arteriogenesis and cerebral-cortical capillary angiogenesis via upregulating α7 nAChR levels and inducing the expression of HIF-1α and VEGF

  12. Physical and chemical immobilization of choline oxidase onto different porous solid supports: Adsorption studies.

    PubMed

    Passos, Marieta L C; Ribeiro, David S M; Santos, João L M; Saraiva, M Lúcia M F S

    2016-08-01

    This work carries out for the first time the comparison between the physical and chemical immobilization of choline oxidase onto aminated silica-based porous supports. The influence on the immobilization efficiency of concentration, pH, temperature and contact time between the support and choline oxidase, was evaluated. The immobilization efficiency was estimated taking into consideration the choline oxidase activity, which was assessed by using cadmium telluride (CdTe) quantum dots (QDs), obtained by hydrothermal synthesis, as photoluminescent probes. Hydrogen peroxide produced by enzyme activity was capable of quenching CdTe QDs photoluminescence. The magnitude of the PL quenching process was directly related with the enzyme activity. By comparing the chemical process with the physical adsorption, it was observed that the latter provided the highest choline oxidase immobilization. The equilibrium data were analyzed using Langmuir and Freundlich isotherms and kinetic data were fitted to the pseudo-first-order and pseudo-second-order models. Thermodynamic parameters, such as Gibbs free energy and entropy were also calculated. These results will certainly contribute to the development of new sensing schemes for choline, taking into account the growing demand for its quantification in biological samples. PMID:27241295

  13. Suppressed expression of choline monooxygenase in sugar beet on the accumulation of glycine betaine.

    PubMed

    Yamada, Nana; Takahashi, Hiroyuki; Kitou, Kunihide; Sahashi, Kosuke; Tamagake, Hideto; Tanaka, Yoshito; Takabe, Teruhiro

    2015-11-01

    Glycine betaine (GB) is an important osmoprotectant and synthesized by two-step oxidation of choline. Choline monooxygenase (CMO) catalyzes the first step of the pathway and is believed to be a rate limiting step for GB synthesis. Recent studies have shown the importance of choline-precursor supply for GB synthesis. In order to investigate the role of CMO for GB accumulation in sugar beet (Beta vulgaris), transgenic plants carrying the antisense BvCMO gene were developed. The antisense BvCMO plants showed the decreased activity of GB synthesis from choline compared to wild-type (WT) plants which is well related to the suppressed level of BvCMO protein. However, GB contents were similar between transgenic and WT plants with the exception of young leaves and storage roots. Transgenic plants showed enhanced susceptibility to salt stress than WT plants. These results suggest the importance of choline-precursor-supply for GB accumulation, and young leaves and storage root are sensitive sites for GB accumulation. PMID:26302482

  14. Structural and kinetic studies on the Ser101Ala variant of choline oxidase: Catalysis by compromise

    SciTech Connect

    Finnegan, S.; Orville, A.; Yuan, H.; Wang, Y.-F.; Weber, I. T.; Gadda, G.

    2010-09-15

    The oxidation of choline catalyzed by choline oxidase includes two reductive half-reactions where FAD is reduced by the alcohol substrate and by an aldehyde intermediate transiently formed in the reaction. Each reductive half-reaction is followed by an oxidative half-reaction where the reduced flavin is oxidized by oxygen. Here, we have used mutagenesis to prepare the Ser101Ala mutant of choline oxidase and have investigated the impact of this mutation on the structural and kinetic properties of the enzyme. The crystallographic structure of the Ser101Ala enzyme indicates that the only differences between the mutant and wild-type enzymes are the lack of a hydroxyl group on residue 101 and a more planar configuration of the flavin in the mutant enzyme. Kinetics established that replacement of Ser101 with alanine yields a mutant enzyme with increased efficiencies in the oxidative half-reactions and decreased efficiencies in the reductive half-reactions. This is accompanied by a significant decrease in the overall rate of turnover with choline. Thus, this mutation has revealed the importance of a specific residue for the optimization of the overall turnover of choline oxidase, which requires fine-tuning of four consecutive half-reactions for the conversion of an alcohol to a carboxylic acid.

  15. Is choline PET useful for identifying intraprostatic tumour lesions? A literature review.

    PubMed

    Chan, Joachim; Syndikus, Isabel; Mahmood, Shelan; Bell, Lynn; Vinjamuri, Sobhan

    2015-09-01

    More than 80% of patients with intermediate-risk or high-risk localized prostate cancer are cured with radiation doses of 74-78 Gy, but high doses increase the risk for late bowel and bladder toxicity among long-term survivors. Dose painting, defined as dose escalation to areas in the prostate containing the tumour, rather than to the whole gland, minimizes dose to normal tissues and hence toxicity. It requires accurate identification of the location and size of these lesions, for which functional MRI is the current gold standard. Many studies have assessed the use of choline PET in staging newly diagnosed patients. This review will discuss important imaging variables affecting the accuracy of choline PET scans, how choline PET contributes to tumour identification and is used in radiotherapy planning and how PET can improve the patient pathway involving prostate radiotherapy. In summary, the available literature shows that the accuracy of choline PET improves with higher tracer doses and delayed imaging (although the optimal uptake time is unclear), and tumour identification by MRI is improved by the addition of PET imaging. We propose future research with prolonged choline uptake time and multiphase imaging, which may further improve accuracy. PMID:25955523

  16. Plasmodium falciparum Choline Kinase Inhibition Leads to a Major Decrease in Phosphatidylethanolamine Causing Parasite Death.

    PubMed

    Serrán-Aguilera, Lucía; Denton, Helen; Rubio-Ruiz, Belén; López-Gutiérrez, Borja; Entrena, Antonio; Izquierdo, Luis; Smith, Terry K; Conejo-García, Ana; Hurtado-Guerrero, Ramon

    2016-01-01

    Malaria is a life-threatening disease caused by different species of the protozoan parasite Plasmodium, with P. falciparum being the deadliest. Increasing parasitic resistance to existing antimalarials makes the necessity of novel avenues to treat this disease an urgent priority. The enzymes responsible for the synthesis of phosphatidylcholine and phosphatidylethanolamine are attractive drug targets to treat malaria as their selective inhibition leads to an arrest of the parasite's growth and cures malaria in a mouse model. We present here a detailed study that reveals a mode of action for two P. falciparum choline kinase inhibitors both in vitro and in vivo. The compounds present distinct binding modes to the choline/ethanolamine-binding site of P. falciparum choline kinase, reflecting different types of inhibition. Strikingly, these compounds primarily inhibit the ethanolamine kinase activity of the P. falciparum choline kinase, leading to a severe decrease in the phosphatidylethanolamine levels within P. falciparum, which explains the resulting growth phenotype and the parasites death. These studies provide an understanding of the mode of action, and act as a springboard for continued antimalarial development efforts selectively targeting P. falciparum choline kinase. PMID:27616047

  17. Amperometric Choline Biosensor Fabricated through Electrostatic Assembly of Bienzyme/Polyelectrolyte Hybrid Layers on Carbon Nanotubes

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Jun; Liu, Guodong; Lin, Yuehe

    2006-03-01

    We report a flow injection amperometric choline biosensors based on the electrostatic assembly of an enzyme of choline oxidase (ChO) and a bi-enzyme of ChO and horseradish peroxidase (HRP) onto multi-wall carbon nanotubes (MWCNT) modified glassy carbon (GC) electrodes. These choline biosensors were fabricated by immobilization of enzymes on the negatively charged MWCNT surface through alternatively assembling a cationic polydiallydiimethylammonium chloride (PDDA) layer and an enzyme layer. Using this layer-by-layer assembling approach, bioactive nanocomposite film of a PDDA/ChO/PDDA/HRP/PDDA/CNT (ChO/HRP/CNT) and a PDDA/ChO/PDDA/ CNT (ChO/ CNT) were fabricated on GC surface, respectively. Owning to the electrocatalytic effect of carbon nanotubes, the measurement of faradic responses resulting from enzymatic reactions has been realized at low potential with acceptable sensitivity. It is found the ChO/HRP/CNT biosensor is more sensitive than the ChO/CNT one. Experimental parameters affecting the sensitivity of biosensors, e.g. applied potential, flow rate, etc. were optimized and potential interference was examined. The response time for this choline biosensor is fast (less than a few seconds). The linear range of detection for the choline biosensor is from 5 x 10-5 to 5 x 10-3 M and the detection limit is determined to be about 1.0 x 10-5 M.

  18. Estimation of usual intake and food sources of choline and betaine in New Zealand reproductive age women.

    PubMed

    Mygind, Vanessa L; Evans, Sophie E; Peddie, Meredith C; Miller, Jody C; Houghton, Lisa A

    2013-01-01

    Recently, choline has been associated with neurodevelopment, cognitive function and neural tube defect incidence. However, data on usual intakes are limited, and estimates of dietary intakes of choline and its metabolite betaine, are not available for New Zealanders. The objective of the present study was to determine usual intake and food sources of choline and betaine in a group of New Zealand reproductive age women. Dietary intake data were collected from a sample of 125 women, aged 18-40 years, by means of a 3-day weighed food record, and usual choline and betaine intake distributions were determined. The mean (SD) daily intakes of choline and betaine were 316 (66) mg and 178 (66) mg, respectively. The total choline intake relative to energy intake and body weight was 0.18 mg/kcal and 5.1 mg/kg, respectively. Only 16% of participants met or exceeded the Adequate Intake (AI) for adult women of 425 mg of choline. The top five major food contributors of choline were eggs, red meat, milk, bread and chicken; and of betaine were bread, breakfast cereal, pasta, grains and root vegetables (carrots, parsnips, beetroot, swedes). Our findings contribute towards the recent emergence of published reports on the range of dietary choline and betaine intakes consumed by free-living populations. In our sample of New Zealand women, few participants were meeting or exceeding the AI level. Given recent epidemiological evidence suggesting health benefits of increased choline and betaine intakes, recommendations should be made to encourage the consumption of choline and betaine-rich foods. PMID:23635379

  19. Hepatotoxicity associated with choline magnesium trisalicylate: case report and review of salicylate-induced hepatotoxicity.

    PubMed

    Cersosimo, R J; Matthews, S J

    1987-01-01

    A case of a 21-year-old woman who had developed mild hepatotoxicity while receiving choline magnesium trisalicylate therapy is described. She presented with fever and mild hepatic enzyme elevations before salicylate therapy was instituted. Liver function tests (LFT) returned to normal within five days of hospitalization but she continued to develop daily fevers. Blood, urine, and throat cultures were negative. An acute viral illness or reactivation of systemic lupus erythematosus were the suspected diagnoses. Choline magnesium trisalicylate was then administered in an effort to control her fever, and was successful. After three days of salicylate therapy her LFT values began to rise. They continued to rise for five more days before salicylate hepatotoxicity was suspected. Choline magnesium trisalicylate was discontinued after eight days and the patient's LFT quickly returned to normal. The source of fever was never identified, although infection with cytomegalovirus was considered the most likely cause. Salicylate-induced hepatotoxicity is reviewed. PMID:3301251

  20. Evolutionary Design of Choline-Inducible and -Repressible T7-Based Induction Systems.

    PubMed

    Ike, Kohei; Arasawa, Yusuke; Koizumi, Satoshi; Mihashi, Satoshi; Kawai-Noma, Shigeko; Saito, Kyoichi; Umeno, Daisuke

    2015-12-18

    By assembly and evolutionary engineering of T7-phage-based transcriptional switches made from endogenous components of the bet operon on the Escherichia coli chromosome, genetic switches inducible by choline, a safe and inexpensive compound, were constructed. The functional plasticity of the BetI repressor was revealed by rapid and high-frequency identification of functional variants with various properties, including those with high stringency, high maximum expression level, and reversed phenotypes, from a pool of BetI mutants. The plasmid expression of BetI mutants resulted in the choline-inducible (Bet-ON) or choline-repressible (Bet-OFF) switching of genes under the pT7/betO sequence at unprecedentedly high levels, while keeping the minimal leaky expression in uninduced conditions. PMID:26289535

  1. Effect of chlorphentermine on incorporation of (/sup 14/C)choline in the rat lung phospholipids

    SciTech Connect

    Gonmori, K.; Morita, T.; Mehendale, H.M.

    1986-03-01

    The effect of chlorphentermine (CP) treatment (50 mg/kg/day, per os (po)) on the incorporation of (/sup 14/C)choline into rat lung phospholipid was studied. Total phospholipid content was increased 2.0-fold and 1.7-fold after seven and /sup 14/ days, respectively, compared with the pair-fed rats. The incorporation of (14C)choline into phosphatidylcholine (PC) was significantly inhibited by either seven or 14 days of CP treatment. Nevertheless, the PC content was significantly increased by day 7 and stayed elevated at day 14 of CP treatment. Choline and phosphorylcholine contents were significantly decreased by the CP treatment. These results suggest that the higher accumulation of PC is due to inhibition of enzymes involved in the hydrolysis of phospholipids rather than to a stimulation of the phospholipid synthesis.

  2. Interaction and dynamics of ionic liquids based on choline and amino acid anions

    SciTech Connect

    Campetella, M.; Bodo, E. Caminiti, R. Martino, A.; Gontrani, L.; D’Apuzzo, F.; Lupi, S.

    2015-06-21

    The combination of amino acid anions with the choline cation gives origin to a new and potentially important class of organic ionic liquids that might represent a viable and bio-compatible alternative with respect to the traditional ones. We present here a detailed study of the bulk phase of the prototype system composed of the simplest amino acid (alanine) anion and the choline cation, based on ab initio and classical molecular dynamics. Theoretical findings have been validated by comparing with accurate experimental X-ray diffraction data and infrared spectra. We find that hydrogen bonding (HB) features in these systems are crucial in establishing their local geometric structure. We have also found that these HBs once formed are persistent and that the proton resides exclusively on the choline cation. In addition, we show that a classical force field description for this particular ionic liquid can be accurately performed by using a slightly modified version of the generalized AMBER force field.

  3. Interaction and dynamics of ionic liquids based on choline and amino acid anions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Campetella, M.; Bodo, E.; Caminiti, R.; Martino, A.; D'Apuzzo, F.; Lupi, S.; Gontrani, L.

    2015-06-01

    The combination of amino acid anions with the choline cation gives origin to a new and potentially important class of organic ionic liquids that might represent a viable and bio-compatible alternative with respect to the traditional ones. We present here a detailed study of the bulk phase of the prototype system composed of the simplest amino acid (alanine) anion and the choline cation, based on ab initio and classical molecular dynamics. Theoretical findings have been validated by comparing with accurate experimental X-ray diffraction data and infrared spectra. We find that hydrogen bonding (HB) features in these systems are crucial in establishing their local geometric structure. We have also found that these HBs once formed are persistent and that the proton resides exclusively on the choline cation. In addition, we show that a classical force field description for this particular ionic liquid can be accurately performed by using a slightly modified version of the generalized AMBER force field.

  4. Influence of 11C-choline PET/CT on radiotherapy planning in prostate cancer

    PubMed Central

    López, Escarlata; Lazo, Antonio; Gutiérrez, Antonio; Arregui, Gregorio; Núñez, Isabel; Sacchetti, Antonio

    2014-01-01

    Aim To evaluate the influence of 11C-choline PET/CT on radiotherapy planning in prostate cancer patients. Background Precise information on the extension of prostate cancer is crucial for the choice of an appropriate therapeutic strategy. 11C-choline positron emission tomography (11C-choline PET/CT) has two roles in radiation oncology (RT): (1) patient selection for treatment and (2) target volume selection and delineation. In conjunction with high-accuracy techniques, it might offer an opportunity of dose escalation and better tumour control while sparing healthy tissues. Materials and methods We carried out a retrospective study in order to analyse RT planning modification based on 11C-choline PET/CT in 16 prostate cancer patients. Patients were treated with hypofractionated step-and-shoot Intensity Modulated Radiotherapy (IMRT), or Volumetric Modulated Arc Therapy (VMAT), and a daily cone-beam CT for Image Guided Radiation Therapy (IGRT). All patients underwent a 11C-choline-PET/CT scan prior to radiotherapy. Results In 37.5% of cases, a re-delineation and new dose prescription occurred. Data show good preliminary clinical results in terms of biochemical control and toxicity. No gastrointestinal (GI)/genitourinary (GU) grade III toxicities were observed after a median follow-up of 9.5 months. Conclusions In our experience, concerning the treatment of prostate cancer (PCa), 11C-choline PET/CT may be helpful in radiotherapy planning, either for dose escalation or exclusion of selected sites. PMID:25859399

  5. Dietary folate, but not choline, modifies neural tube defect risk in Shmt1 knockout mice12345

    PubMed Central

    Beaudin, Anna E; Abarinov, Elena V; Malysheva, Olga; Perry, Cheryll A; Caudill, Marie; Stover, Patrick J

    2012-01-01

    Background: Low dietary choline intake has been proposed to increase the risk of neural tube defects (NTDs) in human populations. Mice with reduced Shmt1 expression exhibit a higher frequency of NTDs when placed on a folate- and choline-deficient diet and may represent a model of human NTDs. The individual contribution of dietary folate and choline deficiency to NTD incidence in this mouse model is not known. Objective: To dissociate the effects of dietary folate and choline deficiency on Shmt1-related NTD sensitivity, we determined NTD incidence in embryos from Shmt1-null dams fed diets deficient in either folate or choline. Design: Shmt1+/+ and Shmt1−/− dams were maintained on a standard AIN93G diet (Dyets), an AIN93G diet lacking folate (FD), or an AIN93G diet lacking choline (CD). Virgin Shmt1+/+ and Shmt1−/− dams were crossed with Shmt1+/− males, and embryos were examined for the presence of NTDs at embryonic day (E) 11.5 or E12.5. Results: Exencephaly was observed only in Shmt1−/− embryos isolated from dams maintained on the FD diet (P = 0.004). Approximately 33% of Shmt1−/−embryos (n = 18) isolated from dams maintained on the FD diet exhibited exencephaly. NTDs were not observed in any embryos isolated from dams maintained on the CD (n = 100) or control (n = 152) diets or in any Shmt1+/+ (n = 78) or Shmt1+/− embryos (n = 182). Conclusion: Maternal folate deficiency alone is sufficient to induce NTDs in response to embryonic Shmt1 disruption. PMID:22134951

  6. How polar are choline chloride-based deep eutectic solvents?

    PubMed

    Pandey, Ashish; Rai, Rewa; Pal, Mahi; Pandey, Siddharth

    2014-01-28

    Developing and characterizing green solvents with low toxicity and cost is one of the most important issues in chemistry. Deep Eutectic Solvents (DESs), in this regard, have shown tremendous promise. Compared to popular organic solvents, DESs possess negligible VOCs and are non-flammable. Compared to ionic liquids, which share many characteristics but are ionic compounds and not ionic mixtures, DESs are cheaper to make, much less toxic and mostly biodegradable. An estimate of the polarity associated with DESs is essential if they are to be used as green alternatives to common organic solvents in industries and academia. As no one physical parameter can satisfactorily represent solute-solvent interactions within a medium, polarity of DESs is assessed through solvatochromic optical spectroscopic responses of several UV-vis absorbance and molecular fluorescence probes. Information on the local microenvironment (i.e., the cybotactic region) that surrounds several solvatochromic probes [betaine dye, pyrene, pyrene-1-carboxaldehyde, 1-anilino-8-naphthalene sulfonate (ANS), p-toluidinyl-6-naphthalene sulfonate (TNS), 6-propionyl-2-(dimethylaminonaphthalene) (PRODAN), coumarin-153, and Nile Red] for four common and popular DESs formed from choline chloride combined with 1,2-ethanediol, glycerol, urea, and malonic acid, respectively, in 1 : 2 molar ratios termed ethaline, glyceline, reline, and maline is obtained and used to assess the effective polarity afforded by each of these DESs. The four DESs as indicated by these probe responses are found to be fairly dipolar in nature. Absorbance probe betaine dye and fluorescence probes ANS, TNS, PRODAN, coumarin-153, and Nile Red, whose solvatochromic responses are based on photoinduced charge-transfer, imply ethaline and glyceline, DESs formed using alcohol-based H-bond donors, to be relatively more dipolar in nature as compared to reline and maline. The pyrene polarity scale, which is based on polarity-induced changes in

  7. Choline chloride based ionic liquid analogues as tool for the fabrication of agar films with improved mechanical properties

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    In the present paper, we test the suitability of Choline-Cl/urea (DES-U) and Choline-Cl/glycerol (DES-G) eutectic mixtures at 1:2 molar ratios for the production of agar biodegradable films. A three-step process is proposed: pre-solubilization of polymer in DES followed by compression-molding and s...

  8. Effects of CDP-choline on neurologic deficits and cerebral glucose metabolism in a rat model of cerebral ischemia

    SciTech Connect

    Kakihana, M.; Fukuda, N.; Suno, M.; Nagaoka, A.

    1988-02-01

    The effects of cytidine 5'-diphosphocholine (CDP-choline) on neurologic deficits and cerebral glucose metabolism were studied in a rat model of transient cerebral ischemia. Cerebral ischemia was induced by occluding both common carotid arteries for 20 or 30 minutes 24 hours after the vertebral arteries were permanently occluded by electrocautery. CDP-choline was administered intraperitoneally twice daily for 4 days after reestablishing carotid blood flow. CDP-choline at two dosages (50 and 250 mg/kg) shortened the time required for recovery of spontaneous motor activity in a dose-related manner; recovery time was measured early after reperfusion. Neurologic signs were observed for 10 days. High-dose CDP-choline improved neurologic signs in the rats within 20-30 minutes of ischemia. When cerebral glucose metabolism was assessed on Day 4, increases in the levels of glucose and pyruvate were accompanied by decreases in the synthesis of labeled acetylcholine from uniformly labeled (/sup 14/C)glucose measured in the cerebral cortex of rats with 30 minutes of ischemia. High-dose CDP-choline also attenuated changes in these variables. CDP-(1,2-/sup 14/C)choline injected intravenously 10 minutes after reperfusion was used for membrane lipid biosynthesis. These results indicate that CDP-choline has beneficial effects on brain dysfunction induced by cerebral ischemia, which may be due in part to the restorative effects of CDP-choline on disturbed cerebral glucose metabolism, probably by stimulating phospholipid biosynthesis.

  9. Dietary folate and choline status differentially affect lipid metabolism and behavior-mediated neurotransmitters in young rats

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The relationship between choline and folate metabolisms is an important issue due to the essential role of these nutrients in brain plasticity and cognitive functions. Present study was designed to investigate whether modification of the dietary folate-choline status in young rats would affect brain...

  10. Are dietary choline and betaine intakes determinants of total homocysteine concentration?1234

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Jung Eun; Jacques, Paul F; Dougherty, Lauren; Selhub, Jacob; Giovannucci, Edward; Zeisel, Steven H

    2010-01-01

    Background: Elevated homocysteine concentrations are associated with an increased risk of cardiovascular disease and a decline in cognitive function. Intakes of choline and betaine, as methyl donors, may affect homocysteine concentrations. Objective: The objective was to examine whether choline and betaine intakes, assessed from food-frequency questionnaires, are associated with total plasma homocysteine concentrations under both fasting and post–methionine-load conditions in both pre– and post–folic acid fortification periods in the United States. Design: We assessed the association between choline and betaine intakes and fasting and post–methionine-load homocysteine concentrations using the US Department of Agriculture revised food-composition tables and evaluated whether the associations varied by folic acid fortification periods in 1325 male and 1407 female participants in the sixth examination (1995–1998) of the Framingham Offspring Study. Results: A higher choline-plus-betaine intake was associated with lower concentrations of post–methionine-load homocysteine; the multivariate geometric means were 24.1 μmol/L (95% CI: 23.4, 24.9 μmol/L) in the top quintile of intake and 25.0 μmol/L (95% CI: 24.2, 25.7 μmol/L) in the bottom quintile (P for trend = 0.01). We found an inverse association between choline-plus-betaine intake and fasting homocysteine concentrations; the multivariate geometric mean fasting homocysteine concentrations were 9.6 μmol/L (95% CI: 9.3, 9.9 μmol/L) in the top quintile and 10.1 μmol/L (95% CI: 9.8, 10.4 μmol/L) in the bottom quintile (P for trend < 0.001). When we stratified by plasma folate and vitamin B-12 concentrations, the inverse association was limited to participants with low plasma folate or vitamin B-12 concentrations. In the postfortification period, the inverse association between choline-plus-betaine intake and either fasting or post–methionine-load homocysteine was no longer present. Conclusions: Choline

  11. Plasma free choline, betaine and cognitive performance: the Hordaland Health Study.

    PubMed

    Nurk, Eha; Refsum, Helga; Bjelland, Ingvar; Drevon, Christian A; Tell, Grethe S; Ueland, Per M; Vollset, Stein E; Engedal, Knut; Nygaard, Harald A; Smith, David A

    2013-02-14

    Choline and betaine are nutrients involved in one-carbon metabolism. Choline is essential for neurodevelopment and brain function. We studied the associations between cognitive function and plasma concentrations of free choline and betaine. In a cross-sectional study, 2195 subjects (55 % women), aged 70-74 years, underwent extensive cognitive testing including the Kendrick Object Learning Test (KOLT), Trail Making Test (part A, TMT-A), modified versions of the Digit Symbol Test (m-DST), Block Design (m-BD), Mini-Mental State Examination (m-MMSE) and Controlled Oral Word Association Test (COWAT). Compared with low concentrations, high choline (>8·4 μmol/l) was associated with better test scores in the TMT-A (56·0 v. 61·5, P=0·004), m-DST (10·5 v. 9·8, P=0·005) and m-MMSE (11·5 v. 11·4, P=0·01). A generalised additive regression model showed a positive dose-response relationship between the m-MMSE and choline (P=0·012 from a corresponding linear regression model). Betaine was associated with the KOLT, TMT-A and COWAT, but after adjustments for potential confounders, the associations lost significance. Risk ratios (RR) for poor test performance roughly tripled when low choline was combined with either low plasma vitamin B₁₂ (≤257 pmol/l) concentrations (RR(KOLT)=2·6, 95 % CI 1·1, 6·1; RR(m-MMSE)=2·7, 95 % CI 1·1, 6·6; RR(COWAT)=3·1, 95 % CI 1·4, 7·2) or high methylmalonic acid (MMA) (≥3·95 μmol/l) concentrations (RR(m-BD)=2·8, 95 % CI 1·3, 6·1). Low betaine (≤31·1 μmol/l) combined with high MMA was associated with elevated RR on KOLT (RR(KOLT)=2·5, 95 % CI 1·0, 6·2). Low plasma free choline concentrations are associated with poor cognitive performance. There were significant interactions between low choline or betaine and low vitamin B₁₂ or high MMA on cognitive performance. PMID:22717142

  12. Transformation of Synechococcus with a gene for choline oxidase enhances tolerance to salt stress.

    PubMed

    Deshnium, P; Los, D A; Hayashi, H; Mustardy, L; Murata, N

    1995-12-01

    Choline oxidase, isolated from the soil bacterium Arthrobacter globiformis, converts choline to glycinebetaine (N-trimethylglycine) without a requirement for any cofactors. The gene for this enzyme, designated codA, was cloned and introduced into the cyanobacterium Synechococcus sp. PCC 7942. The codA gene was expressed under the control of a strong constitutive promoter, and the transformed cells accumulated glycinebetaine at intracellular levels of 60-80 mM. Consequently the cells acquired tolerance to salt stress, as evaluated in terms of growth, accumulation of chlorophyll and photosynthetic activity. PMID:8555454

  13. Myasthenic syndrome: effect of choline, plasmapheresis and tests for circulating factor.

    PubMed Central

    Kranz, H; Caddy, D J; Williams, A M; Gay, W

    1980-01-01

    In a patient with myasthenic syndrome neuro-muscular transmission was characterised by depression and facilitation. The relative extent of these two processes varied between muscles, and in the one muscle with time. Guanidine HCl treatment corrected the electrophysiological defect. Oral choline increased muscle action potential amplitude in response to single shocks. Intravenous choline produced features indicating cholinergic autonomic stimulation. Pimozide and plasmapheresis had no effect. Animal in-vivo and in-vitro studies performed to detect a circulating factor which interferes with neuro-muscular transmission were negative. PMID:6110709

  14. Effects of Choline on Meat Quality and Intramuscular Fat in Intrauterine Growth Retardation Pigs.

    PubMed

    Li, Bo; Li, Wei; Ahmad, Hussain; Zhang, Lili; Wang, Chao; Wang, Tian

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of choline supplementation on intramuscular fat (IMF) and lipid oxidation in IUGR pigs. Twelve normal body weight (NBW) and twelve intrauterine growth retardation (IUGR) newborn piglets were collected and distributed into 4 treatments (Normal: N, Normal+Choline: N+C, IUGR: I, and IUGR+Choline: I+C) with 6 piglets in each treatment. At 23 d of age, NBW and IUGR pigs were fed basal or choline supplemented diets. The results showed that the IUGR pigs had significantly lower (P<0.05) BW as compared with the NBW pigs at 23 d, 73 d, and 120 d of age, however, there was a slight decreased (P>0.05) in BW of IUGR pigs than the NBW pigs at 200 d. Compared with the NBW pigs, pH of meat longissimus dorsi muscle was significantly lower (P<0.05), and the meat color was improved in IUGR pigs. The malondialdehyde (MDA) levels were significantly decreased (P<0.05), while triglyceride (TG) and IMF contents were significantly higher (P<0.05) in the IUGR pigs than the NBW pigs. IUGR up-regulated the mRNA gene expression of fatty acid synthetase (FAS) and acetyl-CoA carboxylase (ACC). Dietary choline significantly increased (P<0.05) the BW at 120d of age, however, significantly decreased (P<0.05) the TG and IMF contents in both IUGR and NBW pigs. FAS and sterol regulatory element-binding proteins 1 (SREBP1) mRNA gene expressions were increased (P<0.05) while the muscle-carnitine palmityl transferase (M-CPT) and peroxisome proliferators-activated receptorγ (PPARγ) mRNA (P<0.05) gene expressions were decreased in the muscles of the IUGR pigs by choline supplementation. Furthermore, choline supplementation significantly increased (P<0.05) the MDA content as well as the O2•¯ scavenging activity in meat of IUGR pigs. The results suggested that IUGR pigs showed a permanent stunting effect on the growth performance, increased fat deposition and oxidative stress in muscles. However, dietary supplementation of choline improved the fat

  15. Morphological effects of cytidin-diphosphate-choline on rats with lesions of the substantia nigra: study using horse radish peroxidase method.

    PubMed

    Stanzani, S

    1981-09-15

    Morphological effects of Cytidin-diphosphate-Choline (CDP-choline) (Ni-cholin) on rat brain with Substantia nigra lesions were studied by using the horse radish peroxidase method (HRP). Three groups of animals were studied. Post-lesion axonal and cellular regeneration was detected only in the group of rats treated with CDP-choline q.d. i.m. for 15 days. PMID:7306424

  16. Homogeneous liquid-liquid extraction of neodymium(III) by choline hexafluoroacetylacetonate in the ionic liquid choline bis(trifluoromethylsulfonyl)imide.

    PubMed

    Onghena, Bieke; Jacobs, Jeroen; Van Meervelt, Luc; Binnemans, Koen

    2014-08-14

    The ionic liquid choline bis(trifluoromethylsulfonyl)imide, [Chol][Tf2N], was used for the extraction of neodymium(III), in combination with choline hexafluoroacetylacetonate, [Chol][hfac], as the extractant. The binary mixture of [Chol][Tf2N] and water shows temperature-dependent phase behavior, with an upper critical solution temperature of 72 °C. A novel extraction technique, homogeneous liquid-liquid extraction (HLLE), was applied to this solvent system. HLLE is based on the use of thermomorphic solvent mixtures and has the advantage of forming a homogeneous phase during mixing. Extraction is not kinetically hindered by an interface and the extraction equilibrium is reached faster than in the case of heterogeneous mixing in conventional solvent extraction. Several extraction parameters were studied for the extraction of neodymium(III) with [Chol][hfac]: temperature, pH, extractant concentration and loading of the ionic liquid phase. A speciation study was performed to determine the stoichiometry of the extracted neodymium(III) complex and a plausible extraction mechanism is proposed. Neodymium is extracted as a tetrakis hexafluoroacetylacetonate complex with one choline cation as counter ion. The crystal structure of the extracted complex showed the presence of a coordination bond between the choline counter ion and the neodymium(III) center, resulting in a coordination number of nine. The stripping of the loaded neodymium and the influence of acid and extractant concentrations on the phase behavior of the [Chol][Tf2N]-H2O system were investigated. PMID:24938933

  17. Central injection of CDP-choline suppresses serum ghrelin levels while increasing serum leptin levels in rats.

    PubMed

    Kiyici, Sinem; Basaran, Nesrin Filiz; Cavun, Sinan; Savci, Vahide

    2015-10-01

    In this study we aimed to test central administration of CDP-choline on serum ghrelin, leptin, glucose and corticosterone levels in rats. Intracerebroventricular (i.c.v.) 0.5, 1.0 and 2.0 µmol CDP-choline and saline were administered to male Wistar-Albino rats. For the measurement of serum leptin and ghrelin levels, blood samples were obtained baseline and at 5, 15, 30, 60 and 120 min following i.c.v. CDP-choline injection. Equimolar doses of i.c.v. choline (1.0 µmol) and cytidine (1.0 µmol) were administered and measurements were repeated throughout the second round of the experiment. Atropine (10 µg) and mecamylamine (50 µg) were injected intracerebroventricularly prior to CDP-choline and measurements repeated in the third round of the experiment. After 1 µmol CDP-choline injection, serum ghrelin levels were suppressed significantly at 60 min (P=0.025), whereas serum leptin levels were increased at 60 and 120 min (P=0.012 and P=0.017 respectively). CDP-choline injections also induced a dose- and time-dependent increase in serum glucose and corticosterone levels. The effect of choline on serum leptin and ghrelin levels was similar with CDP-choline while no effect was seen with cytidine. Suppression of serum ghrelin levels was eliminated through mecamylamine pretreatment while a rise in leptin was prevented by both atropine and mecamylamine pretreatments. In conclusion; centrally injected CDP-choline suppressed serum ghrelin levels while increasing serum leptin levels. The observed effects following receptor antagonist treatment suggest that nicotinic receptors play a role in suppression of serum ghrelin levels,whereas nicotinic and muscarinic receptors both play a part in the increase of serum leptin levels. PMID:26162700

  18. Functional expression of choline transporter-like protein 1 (CTL1) in small cell lung carcinoma cells: a target molecule for lung cancer therapy.

    PubMed

    Inazu, Masato; Yamada, Tomoko; Kubota, Nobuo; Yamanaka, Tsuyoshi

    2013-10-01

    Choline is essential for the synthesis of the major membrane phospholipid phosphatidylcholine and the neurotransmitter acetylcholine (ACh). Elevated levels of choline and up-regulated choline kinase activity have been detected in cancer cells. Thus, the intracellular accumulation of choline through choline transporters is the rate-limiting step in phospholipid metabolism and a prerequisite for cancer cell proliferation. However, the uptake system for choline and the functional expression of choline transporters in lung cancer cells are poorly understood. We examined the molecular and functional characterization of choline uptake in the small cell lung carcinoma cell line NCI-H69. Choline uptake was saturable and mediated by a single transport system. Interestingly, removal of Na(+) from the uptake buffer strongly enhanced choline uptake. This increase in choline uptake under the Na(+)-free conditions was inhibited by dimethylamiloride (DMA), a Na(+)/H(+) exchanger (NHE) inhibitor. Various organic cations and the choline analog hemicholinium-3 (HC-3) inhibited the choline uptake and cell viability. A correlation analysis of the potencies of organic cations for the inhibition of choline uptake and cell viability showed a strong correlation (R=0.8077). RT-PCR revealed that choline transporter-like protein 1 (CTL1) mRNA and NHE1 are mainly expressed. HC-3 and CTL1 siRNA inhibited choline uptake and cell viability, and increased caspase-3/7 activity. The conversion of choline to ACh was confirmed, and this conversion was enhanced under Na(+)-free conditions, which in turn was sensitive to HC-3. These results indicate that choline uptake through CTL1 is used for ACh synthesis. Both an acetylcholinesterase inhibitor (eserine) and a butyrylcholinesterase inhibitor (ethopropazine) increased cell proliferation, and these effects were inhibited by 4-DAMP, a mAChR3 antagonist. We conclude that NCI-H69 cells express the choline transporter CTL1 which uses a directed H

  19. Dietary intakes of choline: What We Eat In America, NHANES 2007-2008

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The purpose of this report is to present data on the choline intake of the U.S. population and the food categories that contribute to intake. The dietary data was from twenty-four hour recall provided by all 9,118 individuals who participated in What We Eat In America, NHANES 2007–2008. The analys...

  20. Choline-releasing glycerophosphodiesterase EDI3 links the tumor metabolome to signaling network activities.

    PubMed

    Marchan, Rosemarie; Lesjak, Michaela S; Stewart, Joanna D; Winter, Roland; Seeliger, Janine; Hengstler, Jan G

    2012-12-15

    Recently, EDI3 was identified as a key factor for choline metabolism that controls tumor cell migration and is associated with metastasis in endometrial carcinomas. EDI3 cleaves glycerophosphocholine (GPC) to form choline and glycerol-3-phosphate (G3P). Choline is then further metabolized to phosphatidylcholine (PtdC), the major lipid in membranes and a key player in membrane-mediated cell signaling. The second product, G3P, is a precursor molecule for several lipids with central roles in signaling, for example lysophosphatidic acid (LPA), phosphatidic acid (PA) and diacylglycerol (DAG). LPA activates intracellular signaling pathways by binding to specific LPA receptors, including membrane-bound G protein-coupled receptors and the intracellular nuclear receptor, PPARγ. Conversely, PA and DAG mediate signaling by acting as lipid anchors that bind and activate several signaling proteins. For example, binding of GTPases and PKC to PA and DAG, respectively, increases the activation of signaling networks, mediating processes such as migration, adhesion, proliferation or anti-apoptosis-all relevant for tumor development. We present a concept by which EDI3 either directly generates signaling molecules or provides "membrane anchors" for downstream signaling factors. As a result, EDI3 links choline metabolism to signaling activities resulting in a more malignant phenotype. PMID:23114620

  1. Studies on the riboflavin, pantothenic acid, nicotinic acid and choline requirements of young Embden geese

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Serafin, J.A.

    1981-01-01

    Four experiments were conducted to examine the riboflavin, pantothenic acid, nicotinic acid, and choline requirements of young Embden geese fed purified diets. Goslings fed diets deficient in either riboflavin, pantothenic acid, nicotinic acid, or choline grew poorly. Feeding a pantothenic acid-deficient diet resulted in 100% mortality. Goslings fed diets containing 530 mg/kg of choline or less developed perosis. Under the conditions of these experiments it was found that: 1) goslings require no more than 3.84 mg/kg of riboflavin and 31.2 mg/kg of nicotinic acid in the diet for rapid growth and normal development, 2) the pantothenic acid requirement of goslings is no more than 12.6 mg/kg of diet, and 3) a dietary choline level of 1530 mg/kg is adequate for both the prevention of perosis and rapid growth of goslings. The levels of vitamins found to support normal growth and development of goslings appear to be similar to requirements of other species that have been examined.

  2. Dietary CDP-Choline Supplementation Prevents Memory Impairment Caused by Impoverished Environmental Conditions in Rats

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Teather, Lisa A.; Wurtman, Richard J.

    2005-01-01

    The authors previously showed that dietary cytidine (5')-diphosphocholine (CDP-choline) supplementation could protect against the development of memory deficits in aging rats. In the present study, younger rats exposed to impoverished environmental conditions and manifesting hippocampal-dependent memory impairments similar to those observed in the…

  3. Studies on the riboflavin, pantothenic acid, nicotinic acid, and choline requirements of young Embden geese.

    PubMed

    Serafin, J A

    1981-08-01

    Four experiments were conducted to examine the riboflavin, pantothenic acid, nicotinic acid, and choline requirements of young Embden geese fed purified diets. Goslings fed diets deficient in either riboflavin, pantothenic acid, nicotinic acid, or choline grew poorly. Feeding a pantothenic acid-deficient diet resulted in 100% mortality. Goslings fed diets containing 530 mg/kg of choline or less developed perosis. Under the conditions of these experiments it was found that: 1) goslings require no more than 3.84 mg/kg of riboflavin and 31.2 mg/kg of nicotinic acid in the diet for rapid growth and normal development, 2) the pantothenic acid requirement of goslings is no more than 12.6 mg/kg of diet, and 3) a dietary choline level of 1530 mg/kg is adequate for both the prevention of perosis and rapid growth of goslings. The levels of vitamins found to support normal growth and development of goslings appear to be similar to requirements of other species that have been examined. PMID:7322986

  4. Regulation of betaine synthesis by precursor supply and choline monooxygenase expression in Amaranthus tricolor.

    PubMed

    Bhuiyan, Nazmul H; Hamada, Akira; Yamada, Nana; Rai, Vandna; Hibino, Takashi; Takabe, Teruhiro

    2007-01-01

    In plants, betaine is synthesized upon abiotic stress via choline oxidation, in which choline monooxygenase (CMO) is a key enzyme. Although it had been thought that betaine synthesis is well regulated to protect abiotic stress, it is shown here that an exogenous supply of precursors such as choline, serine, and glycine in the betaine-accumulating plant Amaranthus tricolor further enhances the accumulation of betaine under salt stress, but not under normal conditions. Addition of isonicotinic acid hydrazide, an inhibitor of glycine decarboxylase, inhibited the salinity-induced accumulation of betaine. Salt-induced accumulation of A. tricolor CMO (AmCMO) and betaine was much slower in roots than in leaves, and a transient accumulation of proline was observed in the roots. Antisense expression of AmCMO mRNA suppressed the salt-induced accumulation of AmCMO and betaine, but increased the level of choline approximately 2- 3-fold. This indicates that betaine synthesis is highly regulated by AmCMO expression. The genomic DNA, including the upstream region (1.6 kbp), of AmCMO was isolated. Deletion analysis of the AmCMO promoter region revealed that the 410 bp fragment upstream of the translation start codon contains the sequence responsive to salt stress. These data reveal that the promoter sequence of CMO, in addition to precursor supply, is important for the accumulation of betaine in the betaine-accumulating plant A. tricolor. PMID:18182425

  5. Evaluation of toxicity and biodegradability of choline chloride based deep eutectic solvents.

    PubMed

    Radošević, Kristina; Bubalo, Marina Cvjetko; Srček, Višnje Gaurina; Grgas, Dijana; Dragičević, Tibela Landeka; Redovniković, Ivana Radojčić

    2015-02-01

    Deep eutectic solvents (DESs) have been dramatically expanding in popularity as a new generation of environmentally friendly solvents with possible applications in various industrial fields, but their ecological footprint has not yet been thoroughly investigated. In the present study, three choline chloride-based DESs with glucose, glycerol and oxalic acid as hydrogen bond donors were evaluated for in vitro toxicity using fish and human cell line, phytotoxicity using wheat and biodegradability using wastewater microorganisms through closed bottle test. Obtained in vitro toxicity data on cell lines indicate that choline chloride: glucose and choline chloride:glycerol possess low cytotoxicity (EC50>10 mM for both cell lines) while choline chloride:oxalic acid possess moderate cytotoxicity (EC50 value 1.64 mM and 4.19 mM for fish and human cell line, respectively). Results on phytotoxicity imply that tested DESs are non-toxic with seed germination EC50 values higher than 5000 mg L(-1). All tested DESs were classified as'readily biodegradable' based on their high levels of mineralization (68-96%). These findings indicate that DESs have a green profile and a good prospect for a wider use in the field of green technologies. PMID:25463852

  6. Human Serial Learning: Enhancement with Arecholine and Choline and Impairment with Scopolamine

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sitaram, N.; Weingartner, Herbert

    1978-01-01

    The effects of particular drugs in human memory abilities was examined. The degree of memory enhancement produced by arecholine and choline and the impairment after scopolamaine were inversely proportional to the subject's performance in placebo; that is, "poor" performers were more vulnerable to the drugs than were "good" performers. (Author/CP)

  7. Inhibition of high affinity choline uptake by N-allyl-3-quinuclidinol

    SciTech Connect

    Asermely, K.E.; O'Neill, J.J.

    1986-03-01

    The peripheral actions of N-allyl-3-quinuclidinol (N-Al-3-OHQ) on high affinity choline uptake (HAChU) on rat phrenic nerve diaphragm are described. Endplate regions (EPA) identified by the Koelle histochemical techniques for acetylcholinesterase, were dissected from adult rat hemidiaphragms and placed in cold Krebs solution (pH-7.35). All measurements of HAChU were at 37/sup 0/C in buffers containing tritium choline (5 ..mu..M 0.124 ..mu..C/mmole) at intervals of 1, 2, 4, 8, 15 and 30 min. Tissues were washed 3x, digested in 1N NaOH and counted for tritium in Chaikoff's solution. All data are expressed as pmole Ch/g wet weight. Comparison between EPA and non-EPA tissue demonstrate HAChU and slow choline diffusion, respectively. Steady state is observed in 15 min. N-Al-3-OHQ produces 15% inhibition at 5 x 10/sup -5/ M compared with 50% inhibition on brain synaptosomes. At 5 x 10/sup -4/ M N-Al-3-OHQ, 30% inhibition is observed. Attempts to deplete ACh by pre-stimulation with high K/sup +/-ion (25 mM) were unsuccessful; tissue /sup 3/H-choline uptake appeared to oscillate over a 30 min period.

  8. Methanogenesis from choline by a coculture of Desulfovibrio sp. and Methanosarcina barkeri

    SciTech Connect

    Fiebig, K.; Gottschalk, G.

    1983-01-01

    A sulfate-reducing vibrio was isolated from a methanogenic enrichment with choline as the sole added organic substrate. This oganism was identified as a member of the genus Desulfovibrio and was designated Desulfovibrio strain G1. In a defined medium devoid of sulfate, a pure culture of Desulfovibrio strain G1 fermented choline to trimethylamine, acetate, and ethanol. In the presence of sulfate, more acetate and less ethanol were formed from choline than in the absence of sulfate. When grown in a medium containing sulfate, a coculture of Desulfovibrio strain G1 and Methanosarcina barkeri strain Fusaro degraded chloline almost completely to methane, ammonia, and hydrogen sulfide and presumably to carbon dioxide. Methanogenesis occurred in two distinct phases separated by a lag of about 6 days. During the first phase of methanogenesis choline was completely converted to trimethylamine, acetate, hydrogen sulfide, and traces of ethanol by the desulfovibrio.M. barkeri fermented trimethylamine to methane, ammonia, and presumably carbon dioxide via dimethyl- and methylamine as intermediates. Simultaneously, about 60% of the acetate expected was metabolized. In the second phase of methanogenesis, the residual acetate was almost completely catabolized.

  9. PROLONGED SURVIVAL OF FEMALE AKR MICE FED DIETS SUPPLEMENTED WITH METHIONINE AND CHOLINE

    EPA Science Inventory

    Female mice of the AKR/J(AK) strain were fed a control diet (Purina chow) or a lipotrope-supplemented diet (Purina chow plus 2% D.L-methionine and 1% choline chloride) beginning at one week after weaning. ice of this inbred strain spontaneously develop thymic lymphoma, with close...

  10. Biocompatibility of choline salts as crosslinking agents for collagen based biomaterials.

    PubMed

    Vijayaraghavan, R; Thompson, B C; MacFarlane, D R; Kumar, Ramadhar; Surianarayanan, M; Aishwarya, S; Sehgal, P K

    2010-01-14

    A series of novel choline based salts, some of which can be described as ionic liquids, are prepared and evaluated for their biocompatibility; when combined with collagenous biomaterials they exhibit good cell viability and adhesion properties as required for biomedical implant applications. PMID:20024356

  11. Studies on the riboflavin, niacin, pantothenic acid and choline requirements of young bobwhite quail

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Serafin, J.A.

    1974-01-01

    Four experiments were conducted to examine the riboflavin, niacin, pantothenic acid and choline requirements of young Bobwhite quail. Quail fed purified diets deficient in either riboflavin, niacin, pantothenic acid or choline grew poorly and high mortality occurred by 5 weeks of age. Under the conditions of these experiments, it was found that: (1) young quail require approximately 3.8 mg. riboflavin/kg. diet for satisfactory growth and survival; (2) no more than 31 mg. niacin/kg. diet are required for normal growth and survival of young quail; (3) the requirement for pantothenic acid is higher than has previously been reported, quail in these studies requiring 12.6 mg. pantothenic acid/kg. feed for growth and survival; and (4) the requirement for choline for reducing mortality is approximately 1000 mg./kg., while the amount necessary for normal growth of young quail is no greater than 1500 mg./kg. when the diet contains ample amounts of methionine. Quail fed a niacin-deficient diet developed stiff, shortened feathers and an erythema about the head; those receiving a riboflavin-deficient ration developed enlarged hocks and bowed legs, as did quail fed diets low or devoid of choline. Aside from slow growth, poor feathering was the only other indication that a deficient diet was being fed when quail were placed on a basal ration without pantothenic acid for five weeks.

  12. Relationship Between Choline and Apparent Diffusion Coefficient in Patients With Gliomas

    PubMed Central

    Khayal, Inas S.; Crawford, Forrest W.; Saraswathy, Suja; Lamborn, Kathleen R.; Chang, Susan M.; Cha, Soonmee; McKnight, Tracy R.; Nelson, Sarah J.

    2011-01-01

    Purpose To examine the relationship between apparent diffusion coefficients (ADC) from diffusion weighted imaging (DWI) and choline levels from proton magnetic resonance spectroscopic imaging (MRSI) in newly diagnosed Grade II and IV gliomas within distinct anatomic regions. Materials and Methods A total of 37 patients with Grade II and 28 patients with Grade IV glioma were scanned on a 1.5T system with 3D MRSI and DWI. Region level analysis included Spearman rank correlation between median normalized ADC and choline for each patient per grade within each distinct abnormal anatomical region. Voxel level analysis calculated a Spearman rank correlation per region, per patient. Results Grade II lesions showed no evidence of a correlation between normalized ADC and choline using either the region or voxel level analysis. Region level analysis of Grade IV lesions did not appear to correlate in the contrast enhancement or necrotic core, but did suggest a significant negative correlation in the more heterogeneous nonenhancing and combined regions. Conclusion There appears to be differences in the relationship between ADC and choline levels in Grade II and Grade IV gliomas. Correlation within these regions in Grade IV lesions was strongest when all regions were included, suggesting heterogeneity may be driving the relationship. PMID:18383265

  13. Maternal Choline Supplementation: A Potential Prenatal Treatment for Down Syndrome and Alzheimer's Disease.

    PubMed

    Strupp, Barbara J; Powers, Brian E; Velazquez, Ramon; Ash, Jessica A; Kelley, Christy M; Alldred, Melissa J; Strawderman, Myla; Caudill, Marie A; Mufson, Elliott J; Ginsberg, Stephen D

    2016-01-01

    Although Down syndrome (DS) can be diagnosed prenatally, currently there are no effective treatments to lessen the intellectual disability (ID) which is a hallmark of this disorder. Furthermore, starting as early as the third decade of life, DS individuals exhibit the neuropathological hallmarks of Alzheimer's disease (AD) with subsequent dementia, adding substantial emotional and financial burden to their families and society at large. A potential therapeutic strategy emerging from the study of trisomic mouse models of DS is to supplement the maternal diet with additional choline during pregnancy and lactation. Studies demonstrate that maternal choline supplementation (MCS) markedly improves spatial cognition and attentional function, as well as normalizes adult hippocampal neurogenesis and offers protection to basal forebrain cholinergic neurons (BFCNs) in the Ts65Dn mouse model of DS. These effects on neurogenesis and BFCNs correlate significantly with spatial cognition, suggesting functional relationships. In this review, we highlight some of these provocative findings, which suggest that supplementing the maternal diet with additional choline may serve as an effective and safe prenatal strategy for improving cognitive, affective, and neural functioning in DS. In light of growing evidence that all pregnancies would benefit from increased maternal choline intake, this type of recommendation could be given to all pregnant women, thereby providing a very early intervention for individuals with DS, and include babies born to mothers unaware that they are carrying a fetus with DS. PMID:26391046

  14. Choline and Fructooligosaccharide: Non-alcoholic Fatty Liver Disease, Cardiac Fat Deposition, and Oxidative Stress Markers

    PubMed Central

    Borges Haubert, Nadia Juliana Beraldo Goulart; Marchini, Julio Sergio; Carvalho Cunha, Selma Freire; Suen, Vivian Marques Miguel; Padovan, Gilberto Joao; Jordao, Alceu Afonso; Marchini Alves, Claudia Maria Meirelles; Marchini, Julio Flavio Meirelles; Vannucchi, Helio

    2015-01-01

    This study investigates the treatment of non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) in rats with choline and fructooligosaccharide (FOS). The healthy control group received standard diet. The other three groups consisted of animals with NAFLD. Group Estr received standard diet; group Echo received standard diet plus choline (3 g/100 g diet); and group Efos received standard diet plus FOS (10 g/100 g diet). Food intake, weight, urinary nitrogen, urinary ammonia, total cholesterol, serum triacylglyceride, liver and heart weights, tissue nitrogen, tissue fat, vitamin E, TBARS, and reduced glutathione (GSH) were measured in hepatic and heart tissue. Choline and FOS treatments resulted in total mean fat reduction in liver and heart tissue of 0.2 and 1.7 g, respectively. Both treatments were equally effective in reducing hepatic and cardiac steatosis. There were no differences in the TBARS level among experimental and control groups, indicating that the proposed treatments had no added protection against free radicals. While all experimental groups had increased vitamin E and GSH levels, choline treatment led to a significant increase compared to control. PMID:25987847

  15. Doubly ionic hydrogen bond interactions within the choline chloride-urea deep eutectic solvent.

    PubMed

    Ashworth, Claire R; Matthews, Richard P; Welton, Tom; Hunt, Patricia A

    2016-07-21

    Deep eutectic solvents (DESs) are exemplars of systems with the ability to form neutral, ionic and doubly ionic H-bonds. Herein, the pairwise interactions of the constituent components of the choline chloride-urea DES are examined. Evidence is found for a tripodal CHCl doubly ionic H-bond motif. Moreover it is found that the covalency of doubly ionic H-bonds can be greater than, or comparable with, neutral and ionic examples. In contrast to many traditional solvents, an "alphabet soup" of many different types of H-bond (OHO[double bond, length as m-dash]C, NHO[double bond, length as m-dash]C, OHCl, NHCl, OHNH, CHCl, CHO[double bond, length as m-dash]C, NHOH and NHNH) can form. These H-bonds exhibit substantial flexibility in terms of number and strength. It is anticipated that H-bonding will have a significant impact on the entropy of the system and thus could play an important role in the formation of the eutectic. The 2 : 1 urea : choline-chloride eutectic point of this DES is often associated with the formation of a [Cl(urea)2](-) complexed anion. However, urea is found to form a H-bonded urea[choline](+) complexed cation that is energetically competitive with [Cl(urea)2](-). The negative charge on [Cl(urea)2](-) is found to remain localised on the chloride, moreover, the urea[choline](+) complexed cation forms the strongest H-bond studied here. Thus, there is potential to consider a urea[choline](+)·urea[Cl](-) interaction. PMID:27328990

  16. Choline intake during pregnancy and child cognition at age 7 years.

    PubMed

    Boeke, Caroline E; Gillman, Matthew W; Hughes, Michael D; Rifas-Shiman, Sheryl L; Villamor, Eduardo; Oken, Emily

    2013-06-15

    Animal models indicate that exposure to choline in utero improves visual memory through cholinergic transmission and/or epigenetic mechanisms. Among 895 mothers in Project Viva (eastern Massachusetts, 1999-2002 to 2008-2011), we estimated the associations between intakes of choline, vitamin B12, betaine, and folate during the first and second trimesters of pregnancy and offspring visual memory (measured by the Wide Range Assessment of Memory and Learning, Second Edition (WRAML2), Design and Picture Memory subtests) and intelligence (measured using the Kaufman Brief Intelligence Test, Second Edition (KBIT-2)) at age 7 years. Mean second-trimester intakes were 328 (standard deviation (SD), 63) mg/day for choline, 10.5 (SD, 5.1) µg/day for vitamin B12, 240 (SD, 104) mg/day for betaine, and 1,268 (SD, 381) µg/day for folate. Mean age 7 test scores were 17.2 (SD, 4.4) points on the WRAML 2 Design and Picture Memory subtests, 114.3 (SD, 13.9) points on the verbal KBIT-2, and 107.8 (SD, 16.5) points on the nonverbal KBIT-2. In a model adjusting for maternal characteristics, the other nutrients, and child's age and sex, the top quartile of second-trimester choline intake was associated with a child WRAML2 score 1.4 points higher (95% confidence interval: 0.5, 2.4) than the bottom quartile (P-trend = 0.003). Results for first-trimester intake were in the same direction but weaker. Intake of the other nutrients was not associated with the cognitive tests administered. Higher gestational choline intake was associated with modestly better child visual memory at age 7 years. PMID:23425631

  17. A microelectrochemical biosensor for real-time in vivo monitoring of brain extracellular choline.

    PubMed

    Baker, Keeley L; Bolger, Fiachra B; Lowry, John P

    2015-06-01

    A first generation Pt-based polymer enzyme composite biosensor developed for real-time neurochemical monitoring was characterised in vivo for sensitive and selective detection of choline. Confirmation that the sensor responds to changes in extracellular choline was achieved using local perfusion of choline which resulted in an increase in current, and the acetylcholinesterase inhibitor neostigmine which produced a decrease. Interference by electroactive species was tested using systemic administration of sodium ascorbate which produced a rapid increase in extracellular levels before gradually returning towards baseline over several hours. There was no overall change in the response of the biosensor during the same period of monitoring. Oxygen interference was examined using pharmacological agents known to change tissue oxygenation. Chloral hydrate produced an immediate increase in O2 before gradually returning to baseline levels over 3 h. The biosensor signal displayed an initial brief decrease before increasing to a maximum after 1 h and returning to baseline within 2 h. L-NAME caused a decrease in O2 before returning to baseline levels after ca. 1.5 h. In contrast, the biosensor current increased over the same time period before slowly returning to baseline levels over several hours. Such differences in time course and direction suggest that changes in tissue O2 levels do not affect the ability of the sensor to monitor choline reliably. Although it was found to rapidly respond to behavioural activation, examination of baseline in vivo data suggests a stable viable signal for at least 14 days after implantation. Using in vitro calibration data the basal extracellular concentration of choline was estimated to be 6.3 μM. PMID:25519498

  18. Metabolism of choline in brain of the aged CBF-1 mouse

    SciTech Connect

    Saito, M.; Kindel, G.; Karczmar, A.G.; Rosenberg, A.

    1986-01-01

    In order to quantify the changes that occur in the cholinergic central nervous system with aging, we have compared acetylcholine (Ach) formation in brain cortex slice preparations from 2-year-old aged CBF-1 mouse brains and compared the findings with those in 2-4-month-old young adult mouse brain slices. Incorporation of exogenous radioactively labelled choline (31 nM (/sup 3/H) choline) into acetyl choline in incubated brain slices was linear with time for 90 min. Percentage of total choline label distributed into Ach remained constant from 5 min after starting the incubation to 90 min. In contrast, distribution of label into intracellular free choline (Ch) and phosphorylcholine (Pch) changed continuously over this period suggesting that the Ch pool for Ach synthesis in brain cortex is different from that for Pch synthesis. Incorporation of radioactivity into Ach was not influenced by administration of 10 microM eserine, showing that the increment of radioactivity in Ach reflects rate of Ach formation, independently from degradation by acetylcholine esterases. Under our experimental conditions, slices from cortices of aged 24-month-old mouse brain showed a significantly greater (27%) incorporation of radioactivity into intracellular Ach than those from young, 2-4-month-old, brain cortices. Inhibitors of Ach release, 1 mM ATP or GABA, had no effect. Since concentration of radioactive precursor in the incubation medium was very low (31 nM), the Ch pool for Ach synthesis in slices was labelled without measurably changing the size of the endogenous pool. These data suggest a compensatory acceleration of Ach synthesis or else a smaller precursor pool specific for Ach synthesis into which labelled Ch migrated in aged brain.

  19. Choline Intake During Pregnancy and Child Cognition at Age 7 Years

    PubMed Central

    Boeke, Caroline E.; Gillman, Matthew W.; Hughes, Michael D.; Rifas-Shiman, Sheryl L.; Villamor, Eduardo; Oken, Emily

    2013-01-01

    Animal models indicate that exposure to choline in utero improves visual memory through cholinergic transmission and/or epigenetic mechanisms. Among 895 mothers in Project Viva (eastern Massachusetts, 1999–2002 to 2008–2011), we estimated the associations between intakes of choline, vitamin B12, betaine, and folate during the first and second trimesters of pregnancy and offspring visual memory (measured by the Wide Range Assessment of Memory and Learning, Second Edition (WRAML2), Design and Picture Memory subtests) and intelligence (measured using the Kaufman Brief Intelligence Test, Second Edition (KBIT-2)) at age 7 years. Mean second-trimester intakes were 328 (standard deviation (SD), 63) mg/day for choline, 10.5 (SD, 5.1) µg/day for vitamin B12, 240 (SD, 104) mg/day for betaine, and 1,268 (SD, 381) µg/day for folate. Mean age 7 test scores were 17.2 (SD, 4.4) points on the WRAML 2 Design and Picture Memory subtests, 114.3 (SD, 13.9) points on the verbal KBIT-2, and 107.8 (SD, 16.5) points on the nonverbal KBIT-2. In a model adjusting for maternal characteristics, the other nutrients, and child's age and sex, the top quartile of second-trimester choline intake was associated with a child WRAML2 score 1.4 points higher (95% confidence interval: 0.5, 2.4) than the bottom quartile (P-trend = 0.003). Results for first-trimester intake were in the same direction but weaker. Intake of the other nutrients was not associated with the cognitive tests administered. Higher gestational choline intake was associated with modestly better child visual memory at age 7 years. PMID:23425631

  20. Effect of dimethylaminoethanol, an inhibitor of betaine production, on the disposition of choline in the rat kidney

    SciTech Connect

    Lohr, J.; Acara, M. )

    1990-01-01

    The choline metabolite betaine has been shown to be an important organic osmoregulatory solute in the kidney. The isolated perfused rat kidney and kidney slice incubations were used to investigate the effect of 2-dimethylaminoethanol (DMAE), a choline oxidase inhibitor, on the renal excretion and metabolism of choline. In the isolated perfused kidney, ({sup 14}C)choline, at an initial perfusate concentration of 300 microM, was effectively removed from the perfusate over 25 min, with nearly all the {sup 14}C in the perfusate accounted for by betaine during the remainder of the 90-min perfusion. DMAE at concentrations of 3.0 or 5.0 mM significantly decreased the rate of removal of ({sup 14}C)choline from the perfusate and the rate of addition of ({sup 14}C)betaine to the perfusate, yet (14C)betaine remained the only metabolite of choline in perfusate and urine. In kidney tissue slice experiments, conversion of ({sup 14}C)choline to ({sup 14}C)betaine was found in cortical, outer medullary and inner medullary regions of rat kidney. DMAE at 5.0 mM significantly inhibited ({sup 14}C)betaine production in each of the three regions studied. These data show that DMAE is an effective inhibitor of betaine production by the kidney and, as such, may be an important agent for the study of osmoregulation by the kidney.

  1. CHOLINE PARTIALLY PREVENTS THE IMPACT OF ETHANOL ON THE LIPID RAFT DEPENDENT FUNCTIONS OF L1 CELL ADHESION MOLECULE

    PubMed Central

    Tang, Ningfeng; Bamford, Penny; Jones, Jace; He, Min; Kane, Maureen A.; Mooney, Sandra M.; Bearer, Cynthia F.

    2014-01-01

    Background Fetal Alcohol Spectrum Disorder, the leading known cause of mental retardation, is caused by alcohol exposure during pregnancy. One mechanism of ethanol teratogenicity is the disruption of the function of L1 cell adhesion molecule (L1). These functions include enhancement of neurite outgrowth, trafficking through lipid rafts, and signal transduction. Recent data have shown that choline supplementation of rat pups reduces the effects of ethanol on neurobehavior. We sought to determine if choline could prevent the effect of ethanol on L1 function using a simple experimental system. Methods Cerebellar granule neurons (CGN) from postnatal day 6 rat pups were cultured with and without supplemental choline, and the effects on L1 signaling, lipid raft distribution and neurite outgrowth were measured in the presence or absence of ethanol. Results Choline significantly reduced the effect of ethanol on L1 signaling, the distribution of L1 in lipid rafts and L1 mediated neurite outgrowth. However, choline supplemented ethanol exposed cultures remained significantly different than controls. Conclusions Choline pretreatment of CGN significantly reduces the disruption of L1 function by ethanol, but does not completely return L1 function to baseline. This experimental system will enable discovery of the mechanism of the neuroprotective effect of choline. PMID:25421509

  2. Role of central arginine vasopressin receptors in the analgesic effect of CDP-choline on acute and neuropathic pain.

    PubMed

    Bagdas, Deniz; Yucel-Ozboluk, Hasret; Orhan, Fulya; Kanat, Ozkan; Isbil-Buyukcoskun, Naciye; Gurun, Mine S

    2013-12-01

    Recent studies have demonstrated that arginine vasopressin (AVP) plays a crucial role in pain modulation. In addition, our previous studies have proven that centrally administered cytidine-5'-diphosphate-choline (CDP-choline; citicoline) elicits an analgesic effect in different pain models in rats. Given that CDP-choline enhances central and peripheral vasopressin levels, the present study was designed to investigate the role of central AVP receptors in the analgesic effect of CDP-choline in acute and chronic constriction injury-induced neuropathic pain models. For this purpose, rats were pretreated intracerebroventricularly with the AVP V1 or AVP V2 receptor antagonist 15 min before intracerebroventricular injection of CDP-choline or saline, and pain threshold was determined using the Randall-Selitto test. AVP V1 and AVP V2 receptor antagonist blocked the CDP-choline-induced analgesic effect either in acute or neuropathic models of pain in rats. These results suggest, for the first time, that central AVP receptors are involved in the CDP-choline-elicited analgesic effect. PMID:24089014

  3. Characterization and Detection of a Widely Distributed Gene Cluster That Predicts Anaerobic Choline Utilization by Human Gut Bacteria

    PubMed Central

    Martínez-del Campo, Ana; Bodea, Smaranda; Hamer, Hilary A.; Marks, Jonathan A.; Haiser, Henry J.; Turnbaugh, Peter J.

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Elucidation of the molecular mechanisms underlying the human gut microbiota’s effects on health and disease has been complicated by difficulties in linking metabolic functions associated with the gut community as a whole to individual microorganisms and activities. Anaerobic microbial choline metabolism, a disease-associated metabolic pathway, exemplifies this challenge, as the specific human gut microorganisms responsible for this transformation have not yet been clearly identified. In this study, we established the link between a bacterial gene cluster, the choline utilization (cut) cluster, and anaerobic choline metabolism in human gut isolates by combining transcriptional, biochemical, bioinformatic, and cultivation-based approaches. Quantitative reverse transcription-PCR analysis and in vitro biochemical characterization of two cut gene products linked the entire cluster to growth on choline and supported a model for this pathway. Analyses of sequenced bacterial genomes revealed that the cut cluster is present in many human gut bacteria, is predictive of choline utilization in sequenced isolates, and is widely but discontinuously distributed across multiple bacterial phyla. Given that bacterial phylogeny is a poor marker for choline utilization, we were prompted to develop a degenerate PCR-based method for detecting the key functional gene choline TMA-lyase (cutC) in genomic and metagenomic DNA. Using this tool, we found that new choline-metabolizing gut isolates universally possessed cutC. We also demonstrated that this gene is widespread in stool metagenomic data sets. Overall, this work represents a crucial step toward understanding anaerobic choline metabolism in the human gut microbiota and underscores the importance of examining this microbial community from a function-oriented perspective. PMID:25873372

  4. Centrally administered CDP-choline induced cardiovascular responses are mediated by activation of the central phospholipase-prostaglandin signaling cascade.

    PubMed

    Topuz, Bora B; Altinbas, Burcin; Ilhan, Tuncay; Yilmaz, Mustafa S; Erdost, Hatice; Saha, Sikha; Savci, Vahide; Yalcin, Murat

    2014-05-14

    The present study was designed to determine the involvement of central prostaglandin synthesis on the pressor and bradycardic effect of cytidine 5'-diphosphocholine (CDP-choline). Intracerebroventricular (i.c.v.) administration of CDP-choline was made and blood pressure and heart rate were recorded in male Sprague Dawley rats throughout this study. Microdialysis and immunohistochemical studies were performed to measure extracellular total prostaglandin concentration and to show cyclooxygenase-1 and -2 (COX-1 and -2) immunoreactivities, respectively, in the posterior hypothalamic area. Moreover, rats were pretreated (i.c.v) with mepacrine [a phospholipase A2 (PLA2) inhibitor], ibuprofen [a nonselective COX inhibitor], neomycine [a phospholipase C (PLC) inhibitor] or furegrelate [a thromboxane A2 (TXA2) synthesis inhibitor] 5 min prior to the injection of CDP-choline to determine the effects of these inhibitors on cardiovascular responses to CDP-choline. Control rats were pretreated (i.c.v) with saline. CDP-choline caused a dose- and time-dependent increase in blood pressure and decrease in heart rate. Immunohistochemical studies showed that CDP-choline increased COX-1 and -2 immunoreactivities in the posterior hypothalamic area. CDP-choline also elevated hypothalamic extracellular total prostaglandin concentration by 62%, as shown in microdialysis studies. Mepacrine or ibuprofen pretreatments almost completely blocked the pressor and bradycardic responses to CDP-choline while neomycine or furegrelate partially attenuated the drug-induced cardiovascular effects. The results suggest that CDP-choline may stimulate prostaglandin synthesis through the activation of PLA2, cyclooxygenases (COX-1 and -2) and prostaglandins and at least TXA2, may mediate the drug׳s cardiovascular effects. PMID:24704528

  5. Usual choline and betaine dietary intake and incident coronary heart disease: the Atherosclerosis Risk in Communities (ARIC) Study

    PubMed Central

    Bidulescu, Aurelian; Chambless, Lloyd E; Siega-Riz, Anna Maria; Zeisel, Steven H; Heiss, Gerardo

    2007-01-01

    Background Low dietary intake of the essential nutrient choline and its metabolite betaine may increase atherogenesis both through effects on homocysteine methylation pathways as well as through choline's antioxidants properties. Nutrient values for many common foods for choline and betaine have recently become available in the U.S. nutrient composition database. Our objective was to assess the association of dietary intake of choline and betaine with incident coronary heart disease (CHD), adjusting for dietary intake measurement error. Methods We conducted a prospective investigation of the relation between usual intake of choline and betaine with the risk of CHD in 14,430 middle-aged men and women of the biethnic Atherosclerosis Risk in Communities study. A semi-quantitative food frequency questionnaire was used to assess nutrient intake. Proportional hazard regression models were used to calculate the risk of incident CHD. A regression calibration method was used to adjust for measurement error. Results During an average 14 years of follow-up (1987–2002), 1,072 incident CHD events were documented. Compared with the lowest quartile of intake, incident CHD risk was slightly and non-significantly higher in the highest quartile of choline and choline plus betaine, HR = 1.22 (0.91, 1.64) and HR = 1.14 (0.85, 1.53), controlling for age, sex, education, total energy intake, dietary intakes of folate, methionine and vitamin B6. No association was found between dietary choline intake and incident CHD when correcting for measurement error. Conclusion Higher intakes of choline and betaine were not protective for incident CHD. Similar investigations in other populations are of interest. PMID:17629908

  6. Endoscopic evaluation of the comparative effects of acetylsalicylic acid and choline magnesium trisalicylate on human gastric and duodenal mucosa.

    PubMed

    Kilander, A; Dotevall, G

    1983-02-01

    A new salicylate product, choline magnesium trisalicylate (Trilisate tablets), and acetylsalicylic acid were compared for their local effects in equipotent doses on the gastroduodenal mucosa in a randomized, double-blind, cross-over study, using 10 healthy volunteers. After five-day periods of administration, gastroduodenoscopy was performed and photographs were obtained. All subjects given acetylsalicylic acid developed multiple mucosal lesions, but in only four subjects given choline magnesium trisalicylate were slight mucosal changes noted. Mean serum salicylate levels were similar in the two groups. Our data suggest that the risk of developing mucosal lesions is much less during treatment with choline magnesium trisalicylate than with acetylsalicylic acid. PMID:6337663

  7. Intravenously injected CDP-choline increases blood pressure and reverses hypotension in haemorrhagic shock: effect is mediated by central cholinergic activation.

    PubMed

    Savci, Vahide; Goktalay, Gokhan; Cansev, Mehmet; Cavun, Sinan; Yilmaz, M Sertac; Ulus, Ismail H

    2003-05-01

    Intravenous (i.v.) administration of cytidine-5'-diphosphate choline (CDP-choline) (100, 250 and 500 mg/kg) increased blood pressure in normal rats and reversed hypotension in haemorrhagic shock. Choline (54 mg/kg; i.v.), at the dose equimolar to 250 mg/kg CDP-choline decreased blood pressure of rats in both conditions and caused the death of all hypotensive animals within 2-5 min. Equimolar dose of cytidine (124 mg/kg; i.v.) did not change cardiovascular parameters. Choline levels in plasma, lateral cerebral ventricle and hypothalamus increased after CDP-choline administration. Intracerebroventricular (i.c.v.) hemicholinium-3 pretreatment (20 microg), greatly attenuated the pressor effect of CDP-choline in both conditions. Atropine pretreatment (10 microg; i.c.v.) did not change the pressor effect of CDP-choline while mecamylamine (50 microg; i.c.v.) abolished the pressor response to drug. Besides, acetylcholine (1 micromol; i.c.v.) produced similar increases in blood pressure in normal and hypotensive conditions to that observed in CDP-choline given rats. CDP-choline (250 mg/kg; i.v.) increased plasma catecholamines and vasopressin levels but not plasma renin activity. Pretreatment of rats with either prazosin (0.5 mg/kg; i.v.) or vasopressin V(1) receptor antagonist, [beta-mercapto,beta,beta-cyclopentamethylenepropionyl(1),O-Me-Tyr(2)-Arg(8)]vasopressin (10 microg/kg; i.v.), attenuated the pressor response to CDP-choline while simultaneous administration of these antagonists before CDP-choline injection completely blocked the pressor effect. Results show that i.v. CDP-choline increases blood pressure and reverses hypotension in haemorrhagic shock. Activation of central nicotinic cholinergic mechanisms by the increases in plasma and brain choline concentrations appears to be involved in the pressor effect of this drug. Moreover, the increases in plasma catecholamines and vasopressin levels mediate these effects. PMID:12742520

  8. Distribution and metabolism of intravenously administered choline[methyl- 3-H] and synthesis in vivo of acetylcholine in various tissues of guinea pigs.

    PubMed

    Haubrich, D R; Wang, P F; Wedeking, P W

    1975-04-01

    The biosynthesis of acetylcholine and the fate of intravenously administered choline [methyl- 3-H] were studied in guinea pigs anesthetized with pentobarbital. Choline and acetylcholine were isolated by paper electrophoresis and estimated by use of a specific enzymatic (choline kinase) - radioisotopic assay. The concentration of acetylcholine ranged from 25.5 to 1.1 nmol/g in the following tissues (in order of decreasing concentration): duodenum, corpus striatum, stomach, cerebral cortex, spinal cord, abdominal fat, submaxillary gland, kidney, adrenal gland, spleen, liver, lung, heart and diaphragm. Choline [methyl- 3-H] was converted in the tissues to acetylcholine within 3 minutes after intravenous administration of the precursor. Virtually all the radioactivity in plasma at that time was present as free choline, suggesting that free choline from plasma is the immediate precursor for acetylcholine synthesized in the tissues cited. The concentration of free choline in tissues ranged from 344 nmol/g in adrenals to 40 nmol/g in heart, while that in plasma was 15 nmol/g. The initial half-life of choline in plasma, estimated from the rate of disappearance of choline after intravenous administration of either a tracer dose of choline [methyl- 3-H] (0.031 mumol/kg) or a high dose of choline chloride (200 mumol/kg), was less than 1 minute. This rapid removal of choline from plasma resulted from uptake (or binding) by tissues, with kidney and liver removing about 50% of the administered dose of choline [methyl- 3-H] within 3 minutes after its administration. Uptake of choline occurred in all tissues cited above, but there was a 20-fold difference in the uptake by the most active tissues (kidney and adrenals), as compared to that of the least active (central nervous system). Within 60 minutes after administration of choline [methyl- 3-H], most of the radioactive choline taken up by tissues had been converted to organic-soluble metabolites and to water-soluble metabolites

  9. Determination of choline in pharmaceutical formulations by reversed-phase high-performance liquid chromatography and postcolumn suppression conductivity detection.

    PubMed

    Chen, S; Soneji, V; Webster, J

    1996-07-19

    Choline is a primary degradation product of succinylcholine chloride. Determination of low concentration choline in succinylcholine chloride bulk drug and formulation is a challenge, due to the lack of sensitive detection methods. A reversed-phase separation method with postcolumn suppression conductivity detection is described for the determination of choline. Hexanesulfonic acid is employed as an ion-pair reagent in the mobile phase, which allows the accomplishment of both reversed-phase separation and a sensitive conductivity detection. Detection sensitivity is significantly enhanced by passing the mobile phase through a postcolumn cation suppressor, where hexanesulfonic acid is removed and the background conductance is reduced. This method is simple and sensitive. No sample derivatization procedure is required. The detection limit for choline is about 10 pmol. PMID:8765854

  10. Early Second Trimester Maternal Plasma Choline and Betaine Are Related to Measures of Early Cognitive Development in Term Infants

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Brian T. F.; Dyer, Roger A.; King, D. Janette; Richardson, Kelly J.; Innis, Sheila M.

    2012-01-01

    Background The importance of maternal dietary choline for fetal neural development and later cognitive function has been well-documented in experimental studies. Although choline is an essential dietary nutrient for humans, evidence that low maternal choline in pregnancy impacts neurodevelopment in human infants is lacking. We determined potential associations between maternal plasma free choline and its metabolites betaine and dimethylglycine in pregnancy and infant neurodevelopment at 18 months of age. Methodology This was a prospective study of healthy pregnant women and their full-term, single birth infants. Maternal blood was collected at 16 and 36 weeks of gestation and infant neurodevelopment was assessed at 18 months of age for 154 mother-infant pairs. Maternal plasma choline, betaine, dimethylglycine, methionine, homocysteine, cysteine, total B12, holotranscobalamin and folate were quantified. Infant neurodevelopment was evaluated using the Bayley Scales of Infant Development–III. Multivariate regression, adjusting for covariates that impact development, was used to determine the associations between maternal plasma choline, betaine and dimethylglycine and infant neurodevelopment. Results The maternal plasma free choline at 16 and 36 weeks gestation was median (interquartile range) 6.70 (5.78–8.03) and 9.40 (8.10–11.3) µmol/L, respectively. Estimated choline intakes were (mean ±SD) 383±98.6 mg/day, and lower than the recommended 450 mg/day. Betaine intakes were 142±70.2 mg/day. Significant positive associations were found between infant cognitive test scores and maternal plasma free choline (B = 6.054, SE = 2.283, p = 0.009) and betaine (B = 7.350, SE = 1.933, p = 0.0002) at 16 weeks of gestation. Maternal folate, total B12, or holotranscobalamin were not related to infant development. Conclusion We show that choline status in the first half of pregnancy is associated with cognitive development among healthy term gestation

  11. Prognostic value of choline and betaine depends on intestinal microbiota-generated metabolite trimethylamine-N-oxide

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Zeneng; Tang, W. H. Wilson; Buffa, Jennifer A.; Fu, Xiaoming; Britt, Earl B.; Koeth, Robert A.; Levison, Bruce S.; Fan, Yiying; Wu, Yuping; Hazen, Stanley L.

    2014-01-01

    Aims Recent metabolomics and animal model studies show trimethylamine-N-oxide (TMAO), an intestinal microbiota-dependent metabolite formed from dietary trimethylamine-containing nutrients such as phosphatidylcholine (PC), choline, and carnitine, is linked to coronary artery disease pathogenesis. Our aim was to examine the prognostic value of systemic choline and betaine levels in stable cardiac patients. Methods and results We examined the relationship between fasting plasma choline and betaine levels and risk of major adverse cardiac events (MACE = death, myocardial infraction, stroke) in relation to TMAO over 3 years of follow-up in 3903 sequential stable subjects undergoing elective diagnostic coronary angiography. In our study cohort, median (IQR) TMAO, choline, and betaine levels were 3.7 (2.4–6.2)μM, 9.8 (7.9–12.2)μM, and 41.1 (32.5–52.1)μM, respectively. Modest but statistically significant correlations were noted between TMAO and choline (r = 0.33, P < 0.001) and less between TMAO and betaine (r = 0.09, P < 0.001). Higher plasma choline and betaine levels were associated with a 1.9-fold and 1.4-fold increased risk of MACE, respectively (Quartiles 4 vs. 1; P < 0.01, each). Following adjustments for traditional cardiovascular risk factors and high-sensitivity C-reactive protein, elevated choline [1.34 (1.03–1.74), P < 0.05], and betaine levels [1.33 (1.03–1.73), P < 0.05] each predicted increased MACE risk. Neither choline nor betaine predicted MACE risk when TMAO was added to the adjustment model, and choline and betaine predicted future risk for MACE only when TMAO was elevated. Conclusion Elevated plasma levels of choline and betaine are each associated with incident MACE risk independent of traditional risk factors. However, high choline and betaine levels are only associated with higher risk of future MACE with concomitant increase in TMAO. PMID:24497336

  12. Maternal choline supplementation differentially alters the basal forebrain cholinergic system of young-adult Ts65Dn and disomic mice

    PubMed Central

    Kelley, Christy M.; Powers, Brian E.; Velazquez, Ramon; Ash, Jessica A.; Ginsberg, Stephen D.; Strupp, Barbara J.; Mufson, Elliott J.

    2014-01-01

    Down syndrome (DS), trisomy 21, is a multifaceted condition marked by intellectual disability and early presentation of Alzheimer’s disease (AD) neuropathological lesions including degeneration of the basal forebrain cholinergic neuron (BFCN) system. While DS is diagnosable during gestation, there is no treatment option for expectant mothers or DS individuals. Using the Ts65Dn mouse model of DS that displays age-related degeneration of the BFCN system, we investigated the effects of maternal choline supplementation on the BFCN system in adult Ts65Dn mice and disomic (2N) littermates at 4.3–7.5 mos of age. Ts65Dn dams were maintained on a choline supplemented diet (5.1 g/kg choline chloride) or a control, unsupplemented diet with adequate amounts of choline (1 g/kg choline chloride) from conception until weaning of offspring; postweaning, offspring were fed the control diet. Mice were transcardially perfused with paraformaldehyde, brains were sectioned, and immunolabeled for choline acetyltransferase (ChAT) or p75-neurotrophin receptor (p75NTR). BFCN number and size, the area of the regions, and the intensity of hippocampal labeling were determined. Ts65Dn unsupplemented mice displayed region- and immunolabel-dependent increased BFCN number, larger areas, smaller BFCNs, and overall increased hippocampal ChAT intensity compared with 2N unsupplemented mice. These effects were partially normalized by maternal choline supplementation. Taken together, the results suggest a developmental imbalance in the Ts65Dn BFCN system. Early maternal-diet choline supplementation attenuates some of the genotype-dependent alterations in the BFCN system, suggesting this naturally occurring nutrient as a treatment option for pregnant mothers with knowledge that their offspring is trisomy 21. PMID:24178831

  13. Stress-induced stimulation of choline transport in cultured choroid plexus epithelium exposed to low concentrations of cadmium

    PubMed Central

    Young, Robin K.

    2013-01-01

    The choroid plexus epithelium forms the blood-cerebrospinal fluid barrier and accumulates essential minerals and heavy metals. Choroid plexus is cited as being a “sink” for heavy metals and excess minerals, serving to minimize accumulation of these potentially toxic agents in the brain. An understanding of how low doses of contaminant metals might alter transport of other solutes in the choroid plexus is limited. Using primary cultures of epithelial cells isolated from neonatal rat choroid plexus, our objective was to characterize modulation of apical uptake of the model organic cation choline elicited by low concentrations of the contaminant metal cadmium (CdCl2). At 50–1,000 nM, cadmium did not directly decrease or increase 30-min apical uptake of 10 μM [3H]choline. However, extended exposure to 250–500 nM cadmium increased [3H]choline uptake by as much as 75% without marked cytotoxicity. In addition, cadmium induced heat shock protein 70 and heme oxygenase-1 protein expression and markedly induced metallothionein gene expression. The antioxidant N-acetylcysteine attenuated stimulation of choline uptake and induction of stress proteins. Conversely, an inhibitor of glutathione synthesis l-buthionine-sulfoximine (BSO) enhanced stimulation of choline uptake and induction of stress proteins. Cadmium also activated ERK1/2 MAP kinase. The MEK1 inhibitor PD98059 diminished ERK1/2 activation and attenuated stimulation of choline uptake. Furthermore, inhibition of ERK1/2 activation abated stimulation of choline uptake in cells exposed to cadmium with BSO. These data indicate that in the choroid plexus, exposure to low concentrations of cadmium may induce oxidative stress and consequently stimulate apical choline transport through activation of ERK1/2 MAP kinase. PMID:24401988

  14. Comparative Physiological Evidence that β-Alanine Betaine and Choline-O-Sulfate Act as Compatible Osmolytes in Halophytic Limonium Species 1

    PubMed Central

    Hanson, Andrew D.; Rathinasabapathi, Bala; Chamberlin, Beverly; Gage, Douglas A.

    1991-01-01

    The quaternary ammonium compounds accumulated in saline conditions by five salt-tolerant species of Limonium (Plumbaginaceae) were analyzed by fast atom bombardment mass spectrometry. Three species accumulated β-alanine betaine and choline-O-sulfate; the others accumulated glycine betaine and choline-O-sulfate. Three lines of evidence indicated that β-alanine betaine and choline-O-sulfate replace glycine betaine as osmo-regulatory solutes. First, tests with bacteria showed that β-alanine betaine and choline-O-sulfate have osmoprotective properties comparable to glycine betaine. Second, when β-alanine betaine and glycine betaine accumulators were salinized, the levels of their respective betaines, plus that of choline-O-sulfate, were closely correlated with leaf solute potential. Third, substitution of sulfate for chloride salinity caused an increase in the level of choline-O-sulfate and a matching decrease in glycine betaine level. Experiments with 14C-labeled precursors established that β-alanine betaine accumulators did not synthesize glycine betaine and vice versa. These experiments also showed that β-alanine betaine synthesis occurs in roots as well as leaves of β-alanine betaine accumulators and that choline-O-sulfate and glycine betaine share choline as a precursor. Unlike glycine betaine, β-alanine betaine synthesis cannot interfere with conjugation of sulfate to choline by competing for choline and does not require oxygen. These features of β-alanine betaine may be advantageous in sulfate-rich salt marsh environments. PMID:16668509

  15. Choline magnesium trisalicylate: comparative pharmacokinetic study of once-daily and twice-daily dosages.

    PubMed

    Levitt, M J; Kann, J

    1984-07-01

    This randomized crossover study compared the pharmacokinetics of choline magnesium trisalicylate tablets administered once daily (3000 mg of salicylate) or twice daily (1500 mg of salicylate) for six d. Serum salicylate levels were measured by HPLC. Mean "trough" concentrations fell within the therapeutic range (5-30 mg/dL) with either regimen and were relatively constant, indicating that the steady state had been reached. The 24-h area under the salicylate curve (AUC0-24 h) after the final 3000-mg salicylate dose averaged about twice the mean 12-h AUC after the last 1500-mg dose, indicating that the two dosing regimens were equally bioavailable. Clinical observations and results of laboratory safety studies indicate that both dosage schedules of the drug are well tolerated. The present findings support the once-daily therapeutic use of choline magnesium trisalicylate. PMID:6470965

  16. Langevin dynamics of the choline head group in a membrane environment.

    PubMed Central

    Konstant, P H; Pearce, L L; Harvey, S C

    1994-01-01

    Computer simulations of dipalmitoylphosphatidylcholine (DPPC) have been performed using Langevin dynamics and a Marcelja-type mean field. This work has focused on the dynamics of the choline head group to parameterize the empirical constraints against phosphorus-carbon dipolar couplings (Dp-c) as measured by nuclear magnetic resonance (13C-NMR). The results show good agreement with experimental values at constraints equivalent to the choline tilt observed in joint refinement of x-ray diffraction and neutron diffraction scatterings. Quadrupolar splittings for the alpha and beta positions are also calculated and compared with 2H-NMR experiments. The model predicts torsional transition rates around the alpha-beta bonds and for the two C-O-P-O torsions. It also predicts T1 relaxation times for the alpha and beta carbons. PMID:7948684

  17. Kinesin-II Is Required for Axonal Transport of Choline Acetyltransferase in Drosophila

    PubMed Central

    Ray, Krishanu; Perez, Sharon E.; Yang, Zhaohuai; Xu, Jenny; Ritchings, Bruce W.; Steller, Hermann; Goldstein, Lawrence S.B.

    1999-01-01

    KLP64D and KLP68D are members of the kinesin-II family of proteins in Drosophila. Immunostaining for KLP68D and ribonucleic acid in situ hybridization for KLP64D demonstrated their preferential expression in cholinergic neurons. KLP68D was also found to accumulate in cholinergic neurons in axonal obstructions caused by the loss of kinesin light chain. Mutations in the KLP64D gene cause uncoordinated sluggish movement and death, and reduce transport of choline acetyltransferase from cell bodies to the synapse. The inviability of KLP64D mutations can be rescued by expression of mammalian KIF3A. Together, these data suggest that kinesin-II is required for the axonal transport of a soluble enzyme, choline acetyltransferase, in a specific subset of neurons in Drosophila. Furthermore, the data lead to the conclusion that the cargo transport requirements of different classes of neurons may lead to upregulation of specific pathways of axonal transport. PMID:10545496

  18. AzoCholine Enables Optical Control of Alpha 7 Nicotinic Acetylcholine Receptors in Neural Networks.

    PubMed

    Damijonaitis, Arunas; Broichhagen, Johannes; Urushima, Tatsuya; Hüll, Katharina; Nagpal, Jatin; Laprell, Laura; Schönberger, Matthias; Woodmansee, David H; Rafiq, Amir; Sumser, Martin P; Kummer, Wolfgang; Gottschalk, Alexander; Trauner, Dirk

    2015-05-20

    Nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs) are essential for cellular communication in higher organisms. Even though a vast pharmacological toolset to study cholinergic systems has been developed, control of endogenous neuronal nAChRs with high spatiotemporal precision has been lacking. To address this issue, we have generated photoswitchable nAChR agonists and re-evaluated the known photochromic ligand, BisQ. Using electrophysiology, we found that one of our new compounds, AzoCholine, is an excellent photoswitchable agonist for neuronal α7 nAChRs, whereas BisQ was confirmed to be an agonist for the muscle-type nAChR. AzoCholine could be used to modulate cholinergic activity in a brain slice and in dorsal root ganglion neurons. In addition, we demonstrate light-dependent perturbation of behavior in the nematode, Caenorhabditis elegans. PMID:25741856

  19. Choline Chloride Catalyzed Amidation of Fatty Acid Ester to Monoethanolamide: A Green Approach.

    PubMed

    Patil, Pramod; Pratap, Amit

    2016-01-01

    Choline chloride catalyzed efficient method for amidation of fatty acid methyl ester to monoethanolamide respectively. This is a solvent free, ecofriendly, 100% chemo selective and economically viable path for alkanolamide synthesis. The Kinetics of amidation of methyl ester were studied and found to be first order with respect to the concentration of ethanolamine. The activation energy (Ea) for the amidation of lauric acid methyl ester catalyzed by choline chloride was found to be 50.20 KJ mol(-1). The 98% conversion of lauric acid monoethanolamide was obtained at 110°C in 1 h with 6% weight of catalyst and 1:1.5 molar ratio of methyl ester to ethanolamine under nitrogen atmosphere. PMID:26666271

  20. Localization of choline acetyltransferase (ChAT) immunoreactivity in the brain of a caecilian amphibian, Dermophis mexicanus (Amphibia: Gymnophiona).

    PubMed

    González, Agustín; López, Jesús M; Sánchez-Camacho, Cristina; Marín, Oscar

    2002-07-01

    The organization of the cholinergic system in the brain of anuran and urodele amphibians was recently studied, and significant differences were noted between both amphibian orders. However, comparable data are not available for the third order of amphibians, the limbless gymnophionans (caecilians). To further assess general and derived features of the cholinergic system in amphibians, we have investigated the distribution of choline acetyltransferase immunoreactive (ChAT-ir) cell bodies and fibers in the brain of the gymnophionan Dermophis mexicanus. This distribution showed particular features of gymnophionans such as the existence of a particularly large cholinergic population in the striatum, the presence of ChAT-ir cells in the mesencephalic tectum, and the organization of the cranial nerve motor nuclei. These peculiarities probably reflect major adaptations of gymnophionans to a fossorial habit. Comparison of our results with those in other vertebrates, including a segmental approach to correlate cell populations across species, shows that the general pattern of organization of cholinergic systems in vertebrates can be modified in certain species in response to adaptative processes that lead to morphological and behavioral modifications of members of a given class of vertebrates, as shown for gymnophionans. PMID:12115707

  1. Uptake of /sup 3/H-choline and synthesis of /sup 3/H-acetylcholine by human penile corpus cavernosum

    SciTech Connect

    Blanco, R.; Saenz de Tejada, I.; Azadzoi, K.; Goldstein, I.; Krane, R.J.; Wotiz, H.H.; Cohen, R.A.

    1986-03-05

    The neuroeffectors which relax penile smooth muscle and lead to erection are unknown; physiological studies of human corpus cavernosum, in vitro, have suggested a significant role of cholinergic neurotransmission. To further characterize the importance of cholinergic nerves, biopsies of human corpus cavernosum were obtained at the time of penile prosthesis implantation. Tissues were incubated in /sup 3/H-choline (10/sup -5/M, 80 Ci/mmol) in oxygenated physiological salt solution at 37/sup 0/C, pH 7.4 for 1 hour. Radiolabelled compounds were extracted with perchloric acid (0.4 M) and acetylcholine and choline were separated by HPLC; /sup 14/C-acetylcholine was used as internal standard. /sup 3/H-choline was accumulated by the tissues (20 +/- 1.9 fmol/mg), and /sup 3/H-acetylcholine was synthesized (4.0 +/- 1.1 fmol/mg). In control experiments, heating of the tissue blocked synthesis of /sup 3/H-acetylcholine. Inhibition of high affinity choline transport by hemicholinium-3 (10/sup -5/M) diminished tissue accumulation of /sup 3/H-choline and significantly reduced the synthesis of /sup 3/H-acetylcholine (0.5 +/ 0.2 fmol/mg, p < 0.05). These results provide direct evidence of neuronal accumulation of choline and enzymatic conversion to acetylcholine in human corpus cavernosum. Taken together with the physiological studies, it can be concluded that cholinergic neurotransmission in human corpus cavernosum plays a role in penile erection.

  2. Reduced myo-inositol and total choline measured with cerebral MRS in acute thyrotoxic Graves' disease.

    PubMed

    Elberling, T V; Danielsen, E R; Rasmussen, A K; Feldt-Rasmussen, U; Waldemar, G; Thomsen, C

    2003-01-14

    Neuropsychiatric symptoms in the acute thyrotoxic phase of Graves' disease suggest involvement of brain processes. Short-echo-time proton MRS was used to measure the cerebral metabolite profile in newly diagnosed and untreated Graves' disease. Sixteen patients with Graves' disease and 18 age- and sex-matched healthy volunteers were studied. The patients had significantly reduced total choline and myo-inositol in the acute phase of Graves' thyrotoxicosis compared with the healthy volunteers. PMID:12525741

  3. 75 FR 53577 - Choline hydroxide; Exemption from the Requirement of a Tolerance

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-09-01

    ...This regulation establishes an exemption from the requirement of a tolerance for residues of choline hydroxide (CAS Reg. No. 123-41- 1) when used as an inert ingredient that acts as a neutralizer in food use, acidic, preharvest herbicide products. The Dow AgroSciences, LLC, has submitted a petition to EPA under the Federal Food, Drug, and Cosmetic Act (FFDCA), requesting establishment of an......

  4. Methionine-choline deprivation alters liver and brain acetylcholinesterase activity in C57BL6 mice.

    PubMed

    Vučević, Danijela B; Cerović, Ivana B; Mladenović, Dušan R; Vesković, Milena N; Stevanović, Ivana; Jorgačević, Bojan Z; Ješić Vukićević, Rada; Radosavljević, Tatjana S

    2016-07-01

    Choline and methionine are precursors of acetylcholine, whose hydrolysis is catalyzed by acetylcholinesterase (AChE). Considering the possibility of their common deficiency, we investigated the influence of methionine-choline deprivation on AChE activity in liver and various brain regions (hypothalamus, hippocampus, cerebral cortex and striatum) in mice fed with methionine-choline deficient (MCD) diet. Male C57BL/6 mice (n = 28) were randomly and equally divided into following groups: control group fed with standard diet for 6 weeks (C) and groups fed with MCD diet for 2 weeks (MCD2), 4 weeks (MCD4) and for 6 weeks (MCD6). After the diet, mice were sacrificied and AChE activity in liver and brain was determined spectrophotometrically. Hepatic AChE activity was higher in MCD2, MCD4 and MCD6 compared to control (p < 0.01), with most prominent increase in MCD6. AChE activity in hypothalamus was higher in MCD4 and MCD6 vs. control (p < 0.05 and p < 0.01, respectively), as well as in MCD6 compared to MCD4 (p < 0.01). In hippocampus, increase in AChE activity was shown in MCD6 compared to control (p < 0.01). In cortex and striatum, increase in AChE activity was noted in MCD6 compared to control (p < 0.05). Our findings indicate the increase of hepatic and brain AChE activity in mice caused by methionine-choline deprivation. PMID:27174897

  5. The formation of choline O-sulphate by Pseudomonas C12B and other Pseudomonas species

    PubMed Central

    Fitzgerald, John W.

    1973-01-01

    Pseudomonas C12B and other Pseudomonas species released larger amounts of a 35S-labelled metabolite into the medium when cultured on growth-limiting concentrations of Na2SO4 as opposed to growth in SO42−-sufficient media. The metabolite was found at all stages of the culture cycle of Pseudomonas C12B and maximum quantities occurred in stationary-phase culture supernatants. The metabolite was not detected when the bacterium was cultured on growth-limiting concentrations of potassium phosphate. The amount of the metabolite present in the medium greatly exceeded that which could be extracted from intact cells and, except for choline chloride, it was independent of the carbon source used for growth. If choline chloride was present in high concentration, then larger amounts of the metabolite were found in the culture medium. The metabolite was not detected extracellularly or intracellularly when the bacterium was grown in SO42−-deficient media containing 5mm-l-cysteine. The same metabolite was also synthesized in vitro only when Pseudomonas C12B extracts were incubated with choline chloride, ATP, MgCl2 and Na235SO4. The metabolite-forming system was not subject to repression by Na2SO4 and was completely inhibited by 0.5mm-l-cysteine and activated by Na2SO4 (up to 1.0mm). The metabolite was identified as choline O-sulphate by electrophoresis, chromatography and isotope-dilution analysis. Another 35S-labelled metabolite was also detected in culture supernatants, but was not identified. PMID:4590202

  6. Direct Inhibition of Choline Kinase by a Near-Infrared Fluorescent Carbocyanine

    PubMed Central

    Arlauckas, Sean P.; Popov, Anatoliy V.; Delikatny, Edward J.

    2014-01-01

    Choline kinase alpha (ChoK) expression is increasingly being recognized as an important indicator of breast cancer prognosis, however previous efforts to non-invasively measure ChoK status have been complicated by the spectral limitations of in vivo magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS) and the complex network of enzymes involved in choline metabolism. The most effective ChoK inhibitors are symmetric and contain quaternary ammonium groups within heterocyclic head groups connected by an aliphatic spacer. Characterization of these bis-pyridinium and bis-quinolinium compounds has led to Phase I clinical trials to assess small molecule inhibitors of ChoK for solid tumor treatment. We report the development of a novel carbocyanine dye, JAS239, whose bis-indolium structure conforms to the parameters established for ChoK specificity and whose spacer length confers fluorescence in the near-infrared window. Fluorimetry and confocal microscopy were used to demonstrate that JAS239 rapidly enters breast cancer cells independent of the choline transporters, with accumulation in the cytosolic space where ChoK is active. Radio-tracing and 1H MRS techniques were used to determine that JAS239 binds and competitively inhibits ChoK intracellularly preventing choline phosphorylation while inducing cell death in breast cancer cell lines with similar efficacy to known ChoK inhibitors. Fluorescent molecules that report on ChoK status have potential use as companion diagnostics for non-invasive breast tumor staging, since NIR fluorescence allows for detection of real time probe accumulation in vivo. Furthermore, their ability as novel ChoK inhibitors may prove effective against aggressive, therapy-resistant tumors. PMID:25028471

  7. Identification and Characterization of ML352: A Novel, Noncompetitive Inhibitor of the Presynaptic Choline Transporter

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    The high-affinity choline transporter (CHT) is the rate-limiting determinant of acetylcholine (ACh) synthesis, yet the transporter remains a largely undeveloped target for the detection and manipulation of synaptic cholinergic signaling. To expand CHT pharmacology, we pursued a high-throughput screen for novel CHT-targeted small molecules based on the electrogenic properties of transporter-mediated choline transport. In this effort, we identified five novel, structural classes of CHT-specific inhibitors. Chemical diversification and functional analysis of one of these classes identified ML352 as a high-affinity (Ki = 92 nM) and selective CHT inhibitor. At concentrations that fully antagonized CHT in transfected cells and nerve terminal preparations, ML352 exhibited no inhibition of acetylcholinesterase (AChE) or cholineacetyltransferase (ChAT) and also lacked activity at dopamine, serotonin, and norepinephrine transporters, as well as many receptors and ion channels. ML352 exhibited noncompetitive choline uptake inhibition in intact cells and synaptosomes and reduced the apparent density of hemicholinium-3 (HC-3) binding sites in membrane assays, suggesting allosteric transporter interactions. Pharmacokinetic studies revealed limited in vitro metabolism and significant CNS penetration, with features predicting rapid clearance. ML352 represents a novel, potent, and specific tool for the manipulation of CHT, providing a possible platform for the development of cholinergic imaging and therapeutic agents. PMID:25560927

  8. Self-aggregation of sodium dodecyl sulfate within (choline chloride + urea) deep eutectic solvent.

    PubMed

    Pal, Mahi; Rai, Rewa; Yadav, Anita; Khanna, Rajesh; Baker, Gary A; Pandey, Siddharth

    2014-11-11

    Deep eutectic solvents (DESs) have shown tremendous promise as green solvents with low toxicity and cost. Understanding molecular aggregation processes within DESs will not only enhance the application potential of these solvents but also help alleviate some of the limitations associated with them. Among DESs, those comprising choline chloride and appropriate hydrogen-bond donors are inexpensive and easy to prepare. On the basis of fluorescence probe, electrical conductivity, and surface tension experiments, we present the first clear lines of evidence for self-aggregation of an anionic surfactant within a DES containing a small fraction of water. Namely, well-defined assemblies of sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS) apparently form in the archetype DES Reline comprising a 1:2 molar mixture of choline chloride and urea. Significant enhancement in the solubility of organic solvents that are otherwise not miscible in choline chloride-based DESs is achieved within Reline in the presence of SDS. The remarkably improved solubility of cyclohexane within SDS-added Reline is attributed to the presence of spontaneously formed cyclohexane-in-Reline microemulsions by SDS under ambient conditions. Surface tension, dynamic light scattering (DLS), small-angle X-ray scattering (SAXS), density, and dynamic viscosity measurements along with responses from the fluorescence dipolarity and microfluidity probes of pyrene and 1,3-bis(1-pyrenyl)propane are employed to characterize these aggregates. Such water-free oil-in-DES microemulsions are appropriately sized to be considered as a new type of nanoreactor. PMID:25314953

  9. Effect of choline magnesium trisalicylate on prostacyclin production by isolated vascular tissue of the rat.

    PubMed

    Levy, J V

    1983-01-15

    Choline Magnesium Trisalicylate (Trilisate), in therapeutic concentrations of 5, 10, 15 and 30 mg/100 ml, did not significantly affect production of prostacyclin-like (PGI2) substance by rat aortic tissue in vitro. The ED50 for inhibition of aorta PGI2-like substance production by Trilisate was 1,200 mg/100 ml. This is approximately 40 times the maximum therapeutic blood concentration achieved in humans. Choline or Magnesium salicylate produced slight but insignificant inhibition of PGI2-like substance production by rat aortic tissue in vitro. The ED50 for ibuprofen (Motrin) for inhibition of PGI2-like production of rat aortic rings was 0.65-0.92 mg/100 ml. Injection of Choline Magnesium Trisalicylate into rats (124, 250, 500 mg/kg I.P.) did not affect the normal production of PGI2-like substance of aortic tissue obtained one hour after in vivo treatment. These results suggest this anti-inflammatory salicylate does not adversely affect PGI2-like production by blood vessels, in concentrations associated with therapeutic effects in man. PMID:6342204

  10. Organization of mixed dimethyldioctadecylammonium and choline modifiers on the surface of synthetic hectorite.

    PubMed

    Andriani, Yosephine; Jack, Kevin S; Gilbert, Elliot P; Edwards, Grant A; Schiller, Tara L; Strounina, Ekaterina; Osman, Azlin F; Martin, Darren J

    2013-11-01

    Understanding the nature of mixed surfactant self-assembly on the surface of organoclays is an important step toward optimizing their performance in polymer nanocomposites and for other potential applications, where selective surface interactions are crucial. In segmented thermoplastic polyurethane nanocomposite systems, dual-modified organoclays have shown significantly better performance compared to their single-modified counterparts. Until now, we had not fully characterized the physical chemistry of these dual-modified layered silicates, but had hypothesized that the enhanced composite performance arises due to some degree of nanoscale phase separation on the nanofiller surface, which enables enhanced compatibilization and more specific and inclusive interactions with the nanoscale hard and soft domains in these thermoplastic elastomers. This work examines the organization of quaternary alkyl ammonium compounds on the surface of Lucentite SWN using X-ray diffraction (XRD), thermogravimetric analysis (TGA), attenuated total reflectance Fourier-transfer infrared (ATR FT-IR), (13)C cross-polarization (CP)/magic angle spinning (MAS) nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR), and small-angle neutron scattering (SANS). When used in combination with choline, dimethyldioctadecylammonium (DMDO) was observed to self-assemble into discontinuous hydrophobic domains. The inner part of these hydrophobic domains was essentially unaffected by the choline (CC); however, surfactant intermixing was observed either at the periphery or throughout the choline-rich phase surrounding those domains. PMID:23978291

  11. Functional characterization of choline monooxygenase, an enzyme for betaine synthesis in plants.

    PubMed

    Hibino, Takashi; Waditee, Rungaroon; Araki, Etsuko; Ishikawa, Hiroshi; Aoki, Kenji; Tanaka, Yoshito; Takabe, Teruhiro

    2002-11-01

    In plants, the first step in betaine synthesis was shown to be catalyzed by a novel Rieske-type iron-sulfur enzyme, choline monooxygenase (CMO). Although CMO so far has been found only in Chenopodiaceae and Amaranthaceae, the recent genome sequence suggests the presence of a CMO-like gene in Arabidopsis, a betaine non-accumulating plant. Here, we examined the functional properties of CMO expressed in Escherichia coli, cyanobacterium, and Arabidopsis thaliana. We found that E. coli cells in which choline dehydrogenase (CDH) was replaced with spinach CMO accumulate betaine and complement the salt-sensitive phenotype of the CDH-deleted E. coli mutant. Changes of Cys-181 in spinach CMO to Ser, Thr, and Ala and His-287 to Gly, Val, and Ala abolished the accumulation of betaine. The Arabidopsis CMO-like gene was transcribed in Arabidopsis, but its protein was not detected. When the Arabidopsis CMO-like gene was expressed in E. coli, the protein was detected but was found not to promote betaine sysnthesis. Overexpression of spinach CMO in E. coli, Synechococcus sp. PCC7942, and Arabidopsis conferred resistance to abiotic stress. These facts clearly indicate that CMO, but not the CMO-like protein, could oxidize choline and that Cys-181 and His-287 are involved in the binding of Fe-S cluster and Fe, respectively. PMID:12192001

  12. Effects of ethanolamine and choline on thiotepa cellular accumulation and cytotoxicity in L1210 cells

    SciTech Connect

    Egorin, M.J.; Snyder, S.W.; Wietharn, B.E. )

    1990-07-15

    The amino alcohols, ethanolamine and choline, were studied for their effects on (a) L1210 cell growth, (b) N,N{prime},N{double prime}-triethylenetheiphosphoramide (thiotepa)-induced growth inhibition of L1210 cells, and (c) 14C accumulation by L1210 cells incubated with (14C)thiotepa. Ethanolamine, at concentrations up to 300 microM, had no effect on L1210 cell growth but, at concentrations greater than 300 microM, produced a dose-dependent reduction in cell growth. Choline, at concentrations up to 20 mM, had no effect on L1210 cell growth. Neither ethanolamine, at 250 microM, nor choline, at 10 mM, altered the ability of thiotepa to reduce L1210 cell growth. Neither ethanolamine, at 250 microM, nor choline, at 10 mM, affected the rapid phase of 14C accumulation by L1210 cells incubated with (14C)thiotepa. The slow phase of 14C accumulation by L1210 cells incubated with 5 microM (14C)thiotepa, a process which is 80-85% due to production of (14C)phosphatidylethanolamine, was not affected by 250 microM choline. In contrast, ethanolamine produced a dose-dependent reduction in this slow rate of 14C accumulation. The reduction in the slow rate of 14C accumulation produced by ethanolamine was due almost entirely to a decrease in the accumulation of nonexchangeable 14C. Kinetic analysis of the inhibition of 14C accumulation produced by 25, 100, and 250 microM ethanolamine was compatible with competitive inhibition. Thin layer chromatography of cell extracts showed that the ability of ethanolamine to reduce 14C accumulation by L1210 cells incubated with (14C)thiotepa was due solely to reduction in production of (14C)phosphatidylethanolamine. These results are all compatible with and predicted by our previously described scheme wherein thiotepa enters cells by simple diffusion and serves as a prodrug for aziridine.

  13. Intestinal Microbiota Composition Modulates Choline Bioavailability from Diet and Accumulation of the Proatherogenic Metabolite Trimethylamine-N-Oxide

    PubMed Central

    Romano, Kymberleigh A.; Vivas, Eugenio I.

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Choline is a water-soluble nutrient essential for human life. Gut microbial metabolism of choline results in the production of trimethylamine (TMA), which upon absorption by the host is converted in the liver to trimethylamine-N-oxide (TMAO). Recent studies revealed that TMAO exacerbates atherosclerosis in mice and positively correlates with the severity of this disease in humans. However, which microbes contribute to TMA production in the human gut, the extent to which host factors (e.g., genotype) and diet affect TMA production and colonization of these microbes, and the effects TMA-producing microbes have on the bioavailability of dietary choline remain largely unknown. We screened a collection of 79 sequenced human intestinal isolates encompassing the major phyla found in the human gut and identified nine strains capable of producing TMA from choline in vitro. Gnotobiotic mouse studies showed that TMAO accumulates in the serum of animals colonized with TMA-producing species, but not in the serum of animals colonized with intestinal isolates that do not generate TMA from choline in vitro. Remarkably, low levels of colonization by TMA-producing bacteria significantly reduced choline levels available to the host. This effect was more pronounced as the abundance of TMA-producing bacteria increased. Our findings provide a framework for designing strategies aimed at changing the representation or activity of TMA-producing bacteria in the human gut and suggest that the TMA-producing status of the gut microbiota should be considered when making recommendations about choline intake requirements for humans. PMID:25784704

  14. CDP-choline attenuates scopolamine induced disruption of prepulse inhibition in rats: involvement of central nicotinic mechanism.

    PubMed

    Uslu, Gulsah; Savci, Vahide; Buyukuysal, Levent R; Goktalay, Gokhan

    2014-05-21

    It has been shown that cholinergic system plays an important role in schizophrenia-associated cognitive deficits, therefore cholinergic drugs are novel targets for the treatment of cognitive deficits seen in schizophrenia. We aimed to test the effects of CDP-choline on sensorimotor gating functioning, which is an important function for the integration of sensory and cognitive information processing and the execution of appropriate motor responses. In this study, prepulse inhibition (PPI) of the acoustic startle reflex was used to test the sensorimotor gating functioning, and the effects of CDP-choline on scopolamine induced PPI disruption were evaluated in rats. Furthermore, the contribution of the cholinergic mechanism in these effects was determined. CDP-choline (75, 250, 500mg/kg) by itself had no effect on the PPI in naïve animals. Scopolamine (0.4mg/kg; s.c.) significantly decreased the PPI levels and intraperitoneal administration of CDP-choline (250mg/kg) attenuated the effects of scopolamine. A non-specific nicotinic receptor antagonist, mecamylamine and an alpha 7 nicotinic receptor (α7-nAChR) antagonist, methyllycaconitine were used to investigate the mechanism underlying the effects of CDP-choline. Mecamylamine (3mg/kg; s.c.), and methyllycaconitine (10μg; i.c.v.) completely blocked the reversal effects of CDP-choline on scopolamine induced disruption of PPI. These results demonstrate that exogenous administration of CDP-choline attenuates scopolamine induced PPI disruption and show that the activation of central α7-nAChR may play a critical role in this effect. PMID:24708927

  15. The effect of preganglionic nerve stimulation on the accumulation of certain analogues of choline by a sympathetic ganglion.

    PubMed Central

    Collier, B; Ilson, D

    1977-01-01

    1. Cat superior cervical ganglia were perfused with a Krebs solution containing 10(-6) M [3H]homocholine (2-hydroxypropyl-trimethylammonium) or 10(-5) M [14C]triethylcholine (2-hydroxyethyl-triethylammonium). Preganglionic nerve stimulation (20 Hz) increased the accumulation of homocholine (3-2-fold) and of triethylcholine (2-1-fold). This increased accumulation during stimulation was not the result of increased metabolism. 2. The increased accumulation of homocholine or triethylcholine induced by pregnaglionic nerve stimulation was not reduced by tubocurarine or by atropine, but it was blocked by choline and by hemicholinium. These results suggested that preganglionic nerve stimulation increased choline analogue accumulation into cholinergic nerve terminals. 3. The increased accumulation of homocholine or of triethylcholine induced by preganglionic nerve stimulation was reduced when the Ca2+ concentration was reduced and was abolished in the absence of Ca2+. However, changes in the Mg2+ concentration which depressed acetylcholine (ACh) release by amounts comparable to those induced by altered Ca2+ concentrations did not alter the uptake of homocholine or triethylcholine. It is concluded that the uptake of choline analogues is not regulated by transmitter release but that stimulation increases the uptake of the choline analogues by a Ca2+-dependent mechanism. 4. The accumulation of ACh by ganglia perfused with a Krebs solution containing choline and high MgSO4 (18 mM) was measured. The ACh content of these ganglia did not increase, although choline transport presumably exceeded that necessary for ACh synthesis to replace released ACh. It is concluded that choline transport does not limit ACh synthesis in ganglia. PMID:839464

  16. Probable free radical effects on rat liver nuclei during early hepatocarcinogenesis with a choline-devoid low methionine diet.

    PubMed

    Rushmore, T H; Ghazarian, D M; Subrahmanyan, V; Farber, E; Ghoshal, A K

    1987-12-15

    Fischer-344 rats fed a choline-devoid diet show lipid peroxidation in the liver nuclei, beginning at 1 day, reaching a peak at 3 days, and subsequently declining by 35 days. Lipid peroxidation in the mitochondria was seen first at 3 days, increased to a maximum at 28 days, and decreased after 35 days to undetectable values at 49 days. Lipid peroxidation was found in both nuclear and mitochondrial fractions both before and after stripping of their outer membranes. No microsomal lipid peroxidation could be detected at any time up to 63 days. The animals fed the same diet supplemented with choline showed no lipid peroxidation in any liver fraction. Animals given CCl4 showed the expected lipid peroxidation in the microsomes but not in the nuclear fraction. The administration of the free radical trapping agent, N-tert-butyl-alpha-phenylnitrone, prevented completely or almost so, microsomal lipid peroxidation induced by CCl4 and nuclear lipid peroxidation in the animals fed the choline-devoid, low methionine diet. The genesis of free radicals in the livers of rats fed a choline-devoid diet is considered as a likely hypothesis for the observed lipid peroxidation. The lipid peroxidation in turn is considered to be closely related to the induction of liver cell death and to the production of alterations in DNA. The DNA alterations coupled with regenerative liver cell proliferation suggest an attractive hypothesis for the initiation of hepatocarcinogenesis in rats fed a choline-devoid diet. PMID:3677103

  17. Effects of low-level microwave irradiation on hippocampal and frontal cortical choline uptake are classically conditionable

    SciTech Connect

    Lai, H.; Horita, A.; Chou, C.K.; Guy, A.W.

    1987-08-01

    In previous research, we found that sodium-dependent high-affinity choline uptake in the hippocampus and frontal cortex of the rat was lowered after acute (45 min) exposure to low-level 2450-MHz pulsed microwaves (power density 1 mW/cm2; average whole body specific absorption rate, 0.6 W/kg; 2 mu sec pulses, 500 pps). In the present experiment, we investigated developments of tolerance and classical conditioning to these effects of microwaves. Rats were exposed to microwaves in cylindrical waveguides in 10 daily sessions (45 min per session). In an 11th session, we subjected the rats to either microwave (study of tolerance) or sham exposure (study of conditioned effect) for 45 min, and immediately measured choline uptake in the hippocampus and frontal cortex. We found that tolerance, a decrease in response to microwaves, developed to the effect of microwaves on choline uptake in the hippocampus, but not in the frontal cortex. Conditioned effects were also observed: an increase in choline uptake in the hippocampus and a decrease in uptake in the frontal cortex. These data suggest that the effects of microwaves on choline uptake in the hippocampus and frontal cortex are classically conditionable, probably to cues in the exposure environment.

  18. Occurrence of Choline and Glycine Betaine Uptake and Metabolism in the Family Rhizobiaceae and Their Roles in Osmoprotection

    PubMed Central

    Boncompagni, Eric; Østerås, Magne; Poggi, Marie-Christine; le Rudulier, Daniel

    1999-01-01

    The role of glycine betaine and choline in osmoprotection of various Rhizobium, Sinorhizobium, Mesorhizobium, Agrobacterium, and Bradyrhizobium reference strains which display a large variation in salt tolerance was investigated. When externally provided, both compounds enhanced the growth of Rhizobium tropici, Sinorhizobium meliloti, Sinorhizobium fredii, Rhizobium galegae, Agrobacterium tumefaciens, Mesorhizobium loti, and Mesorhizobium huakuii, demonstrating their utilization as osmoprotectants. However, both compounds were inefficient for the most salt-sensitive strains, such as Rhizobium leguminosarum (all biovars), Agrobacterium rhizogenes, Rhizobium etli, and Bradyrhizobium japonicum. Except for B. japonicum, all strains exhibit transport activity for glycine betaine and choline. When the medium osmolarity was raised, choline uptake activity was inhibited, whereas glycine betaine uptake was either increased in R. leguminosarum and S. meliloti or, more surprisingly, reduced in R. tropici, S. fredii, and M. loti. The transport of glycine betaine was increased by growing the cells in the presence of the substrate. With the exception of B. japonicum, all strains were able to use glycine betaine and choline as sole carbon and nitrogen sources. This catabolic function, reported for only a few soil bacteria, could increase competitiveness of rhizobial species in the rhizosphere. Choline dehydrogenase and betaine-aldehyde dehydrogenase activities were present in the cells of all strains with the exception of M. huakuii and B. japonicum. The main physiological role of glycine betaine in the family Rhizobiaceae seems to be as an energy source, while its contribution to osmoprotection is restricted to certain strains. PMID:10224003

  19. Structural studies on choline-carboxylate bio-ionic liquids by x-ray scattering and molecular dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tanzi, Luana; Ramondo, Fabio; Caminiti, Ruggero; Campetella, Marco; Di Luca, Andrea; Gontrani, Lorenzo

    2015-09-01

    We report a X-ray diffraction and molecular dynamics study on three choline-based bio-ionic liquids, choline formate, [Ch] [For], choline propanoate, [Ch][Pro], and choline butanoate, [Ch][But]. For the first time, this class of ionic liquids has been investigated by X-ray diffraction. Experimental and theoretical structure factors have been compared for each term of the series. Local structural organization has been obtained from ab initio calculations through static models of isolated ion pairs and dynamic simulations of small portions of liquids through twelve, ten, and nine ion pairs for [Ch][For], [Ch][Pro], and [Ch][But], respectively. All the theoretical models indicate that cations and anions are connected by strong hydrogen bonding and form stable ion pairs in the liquid that are reminiscent of the static ab initio ion pairs. Different structural aspects may affect the radial distribution function, like the local structure of ion pairs and the conformation of choline. When small portions of liquids have been simulated by dynamic quantum chemical methods, some key structural features of the X-ray radial distribution function were well reproduced whereas the classical force fields here applied did not entirely reproduce all the observed structural features.

  20. Structural studies on choline-carboxylate bio-ionic liquids by x-ray scattering and molecular dynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Tanzi, Luana; Ramondo, Fabio; Caminiti, Ruggero; Campetella, Marco; Di Luca, Andrea; Gontrani, Lorenzo

    2015-09-21

    We report a X-ray diffraction and molecular dynamics study on three choline-based bio-ionic liquids, choline formate, [Ch] [For], choline propanoate, [Ch][Pro], and choline butanoate, [Ch][But]. For the first time, this class of ionic liquids has been investigated by X-ray diffraction. Experimental and theoretical structure factors have been compared for each term of the series. Local structural organization has been obtained from ab initio calculations through static models of isolated ion pairs and dynamic simulations of small portions of liquids through twelve, ten, and nine ion pairs for [Ch][For], [Ch][Pro], and [Ch][But], respectively. All the theoretical models indicate that cations and anions are connected by strong hydrogen bonding and form stable ion pairs in the liquid that are reminiscent of the static ab initio ion pairs. Different structural aspects may affect the radial distribution function, like the local structure of ion pairs and the conformation of choline. When small portions of liquids have been simulated by dynamic quantum chemical methods, some key structural features of the X-ray radial distribution function were well reproduced whereas the classical force fields here applied did not entirely reproduce all the observed structural features.

  1. Adequate Intake levels of choline are sufficient for preventing elevations in serum markers of liver dysfunction in Mexican American men but are not optimal for minimizing plasma total homocysteine increases after a methionine load2

    PubMed Central

    Veenema, Kristin; Solis, Claudia; Li, Rui; Wang, Wei; Maletz, Charles V; Abratte, Christian M; Caudill, Marie A

    2009-01-01

    Background An adequate intake of 550 mg choline/d was established for the prevention of liver dysfunction in men, as assessed by measuring serum alanine aminotransferase concentrations. Objective This controlled feeding study investigated the influence of choline intakes ranging from 300 to 2200 mg/d on biomarkers of choline status. The effect of the methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase (MTHFR) C677T genotype on choline status was also examined. Design Mexican American men (n = 60) with different MTHFR C677T genotypes (29 677TT, 31 677CC) consumed a diet providing 300 mg choline/d plus supplemental choline intakes of 0, 250, 800, or 1900 mg/d for total choline intakes of 300, 550, 1100, or 2200 mg/d, respectively, for 12 wk; 400 μg/d as dietary folate equivalents and 173 mg betaine/d were consumed throughout the study. Results Choline intake affected the response of plasma free choline and betaine (time × choline, P < 0.001); the highest concentrations were observed in the 2200 mg/d group. Phosphatidylcholine (P = 0.026) and total cholesterol (P = 0.002) were also influenced by choline intake; diminished concentrations were observed in the 300 mg/d group. Phosphatidylcholine was modified by MTHFR genotype (P = 0.035; 677TT < 677CC). After a methionine load (100 mg/kg body wt), choline intakes of 1100 and 2200 mg/d attenuated (P = 0.016) the rise in plasma homocysteine, as did the MTHFR 677TT genotype (P < 0.001). Serum alanine aminotransferase was not influenced by the choline intakes administered in this study. Conclusions These data suggest that 550 mg choline/d is sufficient for preventing elevations in serum markers of liver dysfunction in this population under the conditions of this study; higher intakes may be needed to optimize other endpoints. PMID:18779284

  2. Sex-dependent actions of amyloid beta peptides on hippocampal choline carriers of postnatal rats.

    PubMed

    Kristofiková, Z; Rícný, J; Kozmiková, I; Rípová, D; Zach, P; Klaschka, J

    2006-03-01

    It is suggested that amyloid beta peptides (Abeta) play a role in the pathogenesis of Alzheimer disease but their physiological function is still unknown. However, low pM-nM concentrations mediate a hypofunction of a basal forebrain cholinergic system without marked signs of neurotoxicity. In this study, we compared in vitro effects of soluble nonaggregated human Abeta 1-40 and 1-42 either on synaptosomal hemicholinium-3 sensitive choline carriers or on membrane fluidity in hippocampi of male and female Wistar rats aged 7 and 14 days or 2-3 months. The results indicate age- and sex-dependent effects mediated by peptides at nM concentrations but no significant differences between both fragments. Namely, opposite actions were observed in 14-day (the increase in the choline uptake and membrane fluidity) when compared to 7-day old and adult males (the mild drops). Lineweaver-Burk plot analysis revealed that the enhancement of the high-affinity choline transport in 14-day old males occurs via alterations in K (M )and the change was accompanied by a mild increase in the specific binding of [3H]hemicholinium-3. On the other hand, no age-dependent differences were found in females. Rat Abeta 1-40 mediated similar effects on 14-day old rats as the corresponding human fragment. Moreover, higher levels of soluble peptides were detected in immature when compared to mature male brains by means of competitive ELISA. Our study indicates that Abeta could play a role in postnatal sexual differentiation of hippocampal cholinergic system. PMID:16733811

  3. Automated evaluation of protein binding affinity of anti-inflammatory choline based ionic liquids.

    PubMed

    Ribeiro, Rosa; Pinto, Paula C A G; Azevedo, Ana M O; Bica, Katharina; Ressmann, Anna K; Reis, Salette; Saraiva, M Lúcia M F S

    2016-04-01

    In this work, an automated system for the study of the interaction of drugs with human serum albumin (HSA) was developed. The methodology was based on the quenching of the intrinsic fluorescence of HSA by binding of the drug to one of its binding sites. The fluorescence quenching assay was implemented in a sequential injection analysis (SIA) system and the optimized assay was applied to ionic liquids based on the association of non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs with choline (IL-API). In each cycle, 100 µL of HSA and 100 µL of IL-API (variable concentration) were aspirated at a flow rate of 1 mL min(-1) and then sent through the reaction coil to the detector where the fluorescence intensity was measured. In the optimized conditions the effect of increasing concentrations of choline ketoprofenate and choline naproxenate (and respective starting materials: ketoprofen and naproxen) on the intrinsic fluorescence of HSA was studied and the dissociation constants (Kd) were calculated by means of models of drug-protein binding in the equilibrium. The calculated Kd showed that all the compounds bind strongly to HSA (Kd<100 µmol L(-1)) and that the use of the drugs in the IL format does not affect or can even improve their HSA binding. The obtained results were compared with those provided by a conventional batch assay and the relative errors were lower than 4.5%. The developed SIA methodology showed to be robust and exhibited good repeatability in all the assay conditions (rsd<6.5%). PMID:26838377

  4. Insulin Regulates the Activity of the High-Affinity Choline Transporter CHT.

    PubMed

    Fishwick, Katherine J; Rylett, R Jane

    2015-01-01

    Studies in humans and animal models show that neuronal insulin resistance increases the risk of developing Alzheimer's Disease (AD), and that insulin treatment may promote memory function. Cholinergic neurons play a critical role in cognitive and attentional processing and their dysfunction early in AD pathology may promote the progression of AD pathology. Synthesis and release of the neurotransmitter acetylcholine (ACh) is closely linked to the activity of the high-affinity choline transporter protein (CHT), but the impact of insulin receptor signaling and neuronal insulin resistance on these aspects of cholinergic function are unknown. In this study, we used differentiated SH-SY5Y cells stably-expressing CHT proteins to study the effect of insulin signaling on CHT activity and function. We find that choline uptake activity measured after acute addition of 20 nM insulin is significantly lower in cells that were grown for 24 h in media containing insulin compared to cells grown in the absence of insulin. This coincides with loss of ability to increase phospho-Protein Kinase B (PKB)/Akt levels in response to acute insulin stimulation in the chronic insulin-treated cells. Inhibition of phosphatidylinositol-4,5-bisphosphate 3-kinase (PI3-kinase) in cells significantly lowers phospho-PKB/Akt levels and decreases choline uptake activity. We show total internal reflection microscopy (TIRF) imaging of the dynamic movement of CHT proteins in live cells in response to depolarization and drug treatments. These data show that acute exposure of depolarized cells to insulin is coupled to transiently increased levels of CHT proteins at the cell surface, and that this is attenuated by chronic insulin exposure. Moreover, prolonged inhibition of PI3-kinase results in enhanced levels of CHT proteins at the cell surface by decreasing their rate of internalization. PMID:26161852

  5. Insulin Regulates the Activity of the High-Affinity Choline Transporter CHT

    PubMed Central

    Fishwick, Katherine J.; Rylett, R. Jane

    2015-01-01

    Studies in humans and animal models show that neuronal insulin resistance increases the risk of developing Alzheimer’s Disease (AD), and that insulin treatment may promote memory function. Cholinergic neurons play a critical role in cognitive and attentional processing and their dysfunction early in AD pathology may promote the progression of AD pathology. Synthesis and release of the neurotransmitter acetylcholine (ACh) is closely linked to the activity of the high-affinity choline transporter protein (CHT), but the impact of insulin receptor signaling and neuronal insulin resistance on these aspects of cholinergic function are unknown. In this study, we used differentiated SH-SY5Y cells stably-expressing CHT proteins to study the effect of insulin signaling on CHT activity and function. We find that choline uptake activity measured after acute addition of 20 nM insulin is significantly lower in cells that were grown for 24 h in media containing insulin compared to cells grown in the absence of insulin. This coincides with loss of ability to increase phospho-Protein Kinase B (PKB)/Akt levels in response to acute insulin stimulation in the chronic insulin-treated cells. Inhibition of phosphatidylinositol-4,5-bisphosphate 3-kinase (PI3-kinase) in cells significantly lowers phospho-PKB/Akt levels and decreases choline uptake activity. We show total internal reflection microscopy (TIRF) imaging of the dynamic movement of CHT proteins in live cells in response to depolarization and drug treatments. These data show that acute exposure of depolarized cells to insulin is coupled to transiently increased levels of CHT proteins at the cell surface, and that this is attenuated by chronic insulin exposure. Moreover, prolonged inhibition of PI3-kinase results in enhanced levels of CHT proteins at the cell surface by decreasing their rate of internalization. PMID:26161852

  6. Hepatoblastoma evaluated by 18F-fluoromethyl choline PET/CT.

    PubMed

    Bieze, Matthanja; van Gulik, Thomas M; Bennink, Roelof J

    2013-02-01

    Hepatoblastoma is a rare carcinoma mostly seen in children. Neoadjuvant chemotherapy followed by resection and adjuvant chemotherapy is the optimal treatment. We present the case of an 18-year-old woman who presented with abdominal pain, nausea, bloating, and fatigue. MRI showed 3 hepatic lesions with high signal intensity on arterial phase T1-weighted images and slight washout on the late phase, suggestive for hepatocellular carcinoma. Laboratory examinations revealed plasma α-feto-protein of 114,245 μg/L. Subsequent baseline and posttreatment F-fluoromethyl choline PET/CT were performed to possibly evaluate extent of the disease and assess disease response after neoadjuvant chemotherapy. PMID:23334143

  7. Choline Acetyltransferase Activity in Striatum of Neonatal Rats Increased by Nerve Growth Factor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mobley, William C.; Rutkowski, J. Lynn; Tennekoon, Gihan I.; Buchanan, Karen; Johnston, Michael V.

    1985-07-01

    Some neurodegenerative disorders may be caused by abnormal synthesis or utilization of trophic molecules required to support neuronal survival. A test of this hypothesis requires that trophic agents specific for the affected neurons be identified. Cholinergic neurons in the corpus striatum of neonatal rats were found to respond to intracerebroventricular administration of nerve growth factor with prominent, dose-dependent, selective increases in choline acetyltransferase activity. Cholinergic neurons in the basal forebrain also respond to nerve growth factor in this way. These actions of nerve growth factor may indicate its involvement in the normal function of forebrain cholinergic neurons as well as in neurodegenerative disorders involving such cells.

  8. In vitro behavior of human intestinal mucosa. The influence of acetyl choline on ion transport.

    PubMed Central

    Isaacs, P E; Corbett, C L; Riley, A K; Hawker, P C; Turnberg, L A

    1976-01-01

    The possibility that the autonomic nervous system may influence the function of intestinal mucosa was investigated by assessing the effect of acetyl choline on ion transport in human intestine. Isolated pieces of stripped ileal mucosa were mounted in Perspex flux-chambers and bathed in isotonic glucose Ringer's solution. Acetyl choline caused a rise in mean potential difference (8.8-12.3 mV, P less than 0.002) and short circuit current (287.7-417.2 muA-cm-2, P less than 0.01) (n = 12), observable at a concentration of 0.01 mM and maximal at 0.1 mM. This effect was enhanced by neostigmine and blocked by atropine. Isotopic flux determinations revealed a change from a small mean net Cl absorption (58) to a net Cl secretion (-4.3mueq-cm-2-h-1P less than 0.001) due predominantly to an increase in the serosal to mucosal unidirectional flux of Cl (10.63-14.35 mueq-cm-2-h-1P less than 0.05) and a smaller reduction in the mucosal to serosal flux (11.22 to 10.02 mueq-cm-2-h-1P less than 0.05). Unidirectional and net Na transport was unaffected. A similar electrical and ion transport response was observed in a single study of two pieces of jejunal mucosa. In the absence of glucose net chloride secretion was produced and again an insignificant effect on net sodium transport was noted. Acetyl choline did not provoke a sustained effect on mucosal cyclic adenine nucleotide levels although a short-lived cyclic adenine nucleotide response was seen in some tissues 20-30 s after drug addition. These studies demonstrate that acetyl choline does influence human intestinal ion transport by stimulating chloride secretion and suggest a possible mechanism by which the parasympathetic nervous system could be concerned in the control of ion transport. Images PMID:182722

  9. [The effect of locally applied Grisaldone or choline salicylate gel on bone healing after tooth extraction in animal experiments].

    PubMed

    Cendelin, E; Fröhlich, M

    1977-01-01

    Comparative histological and experimental animal studies of the effects upon bone wound healing of topically applied choline salicylate gel and Grisaldon showed that Grisaldon tends to hinder the course of reparation of bone, whereas choline salicylate gel has no appreciable influence upon the time course of wound healing. This essential difference is considered to be due predominantly to the exactly opposite behavior shown by the two pharmaceutical preparations in regard to their solubility in water. The difficultly watersoluble Grisaldon tends to exert a longer-drawn-out irritant effect upon the tissue and can be detected in alveoli even after twenty-eight days from administration thereof. By contrast, choline salicylate gel, which is known to be readily soluble in water, will be eliminated already after two days from administration thereof. PMID:150157

  10. Highly constrained guests in complexes of p-tert-butylcalix[6]arene dianion: Pentane-1,5-diammonium and choline

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lazzarotto, Márcio; Ferreira, Creusa Iara; Castellano, Eduardo Ernesto; Veglia, Alicia Viviana

    2014-06-01

    The structures of the complexes of choline and pentane-1,5-diammonium with p-t-bu-calix[6]arene dianion were determined. Both salts display the calixarene moiety at 1,2,3-alternate conformation, with two concave surfaces formed by three aromatic rings, and the phenolate units are at distal positions, interacting with two phenol units by hydrogen bonds. The salt of pentane-1,5-diammonium shows the diammonium connecting both calixarene dianion units, and one NH3+ is located endo-calix position and the other occupies an exo-calix position. The t-butyl groups and the calix cavity constrains the pentane-1,5-diammonium chain to near syn-eclipsed and gauche conformations. The other semi-calix accomodates a THF solvent molecule. The salt of choline shows the trimethylammonium groups of choline units immersed in these concave surfaces, with several interactions N+-C-H---π interactions with the aromatic semi-cavities.

  11. GABAA receptor pharmacology of fluorinated derivatives of the novel sedative-hypnotic pyrazolopyrimidine indiplon.

    PubMed

    Wegner, Florian; Deuther-Conrad, Winnie; Scheunemann, Matthias; Brust, Peter; Fischer, Steffen; Hiller, Achim; Diekers, Michael; Strecker, Karl; Wohlfarth, Kai; Allgaier, Clemens; Steinbach, Jörg; Hoepping, Alexander

    2008-02-01

    displaying the most pronounced efficacy at alpha3beta3gamma2L subtypes. In conclusion, the affinity profiles and functional properties of the newly synthesised fluorinated indiplon derivatives make compounds 2a and 2b suitable for the development of [(18)F]-labelled ligands at GABA(A) receptors containing the alpha1 subunit. PMID:18035350

  12. Dietary choline deficiency alters global and gene-specific DNA methylation in the developing hippocampus of mouse fetal brains.

    PubMed

    Niculescu, Mihai D; Craciunescu, Corneliu N; Zeisel, Steven H

    2006-01-01

    The availability of choline during critical periods of fetal development alters hippocampal development and affects memory function throughout life. Choline deficiency during fetal development reduces proliferation and migration of neuronal precursor cells in the mouse fetal hippocampus and these changes are associated with modifications in the protein levels of some cell cycle regulators and early differentiation markers. We fed C57 BL/6 mouse dams diets deficient or normal in choline content from days 12 to 17 of pregnancy, and then collected fetal brains on embryonic day 17. Using laser-capture micro-dissection we harvested cells from the ventricular and subventricular zones of Ammon's horn and from the prime germinal zone of the dentate gyrus (hippocampus). In the ventricular and subventricular zones from the choline-deficient group, we observed increased protein levels for kinase-associated phosphatase (Kap) and for p15(INK4b) (two cell cycle inhibitors). In the dentate gyrus, we observed increased levels of calretinin (an early marker of neuronal differentiation). In fetal brain from mothers fed a choline-deficient diet, DNA global methylation was decreased in the ventricular and subventricular zones of Ammon's horn. We also observed decreased gene-specific DNA methylation of the gene (Cdkn3) that encodes for Kap, correlating with increased expression of this protein. This was not the case for p15(INK4b) or calretinin (Cdkn2b and Calb2, respectively). These data suggest that choline deficiency-induced changes in gene methylation could mediate the expression of a cell cycle regulator and thereby alter brain development. PMID:16394266

  13. N-methyl-D-aspartate increases acetylcholine release from rat striatum and cortex: its effect is augmented by choline

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ulus, I. H.; Buyukuysal, R. L.; Wurtman, R. J.

    1992-01-01

    We examined the effects of N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA), a glutamate agonist, and of glutamate itself, on acetylcholine (ACh) release from superfused rat striatal slices. In a Mg(++)-free medium, NMDA (32-1000 microM) as well as glutamate (1 mM) increased basal ACh release by 35 to 100% (all indicated differences, P less than .05), without altering tissue ACh or choline contents. This augmentation was blocked by Mg++ (1.2 mM) or by MK-801 (10 microM). Electrical stimulation (15 Hz, 75 mA) increased ACh release 9-fold (from 400 to 3660 pmol/mg of protein): this was enhanced (to 4850 pmol/mg of protein) by NMDA (100 microM). ACh levels in stimulated slices fell by 50 or 65% depending on the absence or presence of NMDA. The addition of choline (40 microM) increased ACh release both basally (570 pmol/mg of protein) and with electrical stimulation (6900 pmol/mg of protein). In stimulated slices choline acted synergistically with NMDA, raising ACh release to 10,520 pmol/mg of protein. The presence of choline also blocked the fall in tissue ACh. No treatment affected tissue phospholipid or protein levels. NMDA (32-320 microM) also augmented basal ACh release from cortical but not hippocampal slices. Choline efflux from striatal and cortical (but not hippocampal) slices decreased by 34 to 50% in Mg(++)-free medium. These data indicate that NMDA-like drugs may be useful, particularly in combination with choline, to enhance striatal and cortical cholinergic activity. ACh release from rat hippocampus apparently is not affected by NMDA receptors.

  14. Folate intake and the MTHFR C677T genotype influence choline status in young Mexican American women☆

    PubMed Central

    Abratte, Christian M.; Wang, Wei; Li, Rui; Moriarty, David J.; Caudill, Marie A.

    2009-01-01

    Numerous studies have reported a relationship between folate status, the methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase (MTHFR) 677C→T variant and disease risk. Although folate and choline metabolism are inter-related, only limited data are available on the relationship between choline and folate status in humans. This study sought to examine the influences of folate intake and the MTHFR 677C→T variant on choline status. Mexican-American women (n =43; 14 CC, 12 CT and 17 TT) consumed 135 μg/day as dietary folate equivalents (DFE) for 7 weeks followed by randomization to 400 or 800 μg DFE/day for 7 weeks. Throughout the study, total choline intake remained unchanged at ∼350 mg/day. Plasma concentrations of betaine, choline, glycerophosphocholine, phosphatidylcholine and sphingomyelin were measured via LC-MS/MS for Weeks 0, 7 and 14. Phosphatidylcholine and sphingomyelin declined ( P=.001, P=.009, respectively) in response to folate restriction and increased ( P=.08, P=.029, respectively) in response to folate treatment. The increase in phosphatidylcholine occurred in response to 800 ( P=.03) not 400 ( P=.85) μg DFE/day (week×folate interaction, P=.017). The response of phosphatidylcholine to folate intake appeared to be influenced by MTHFR C677T genotype. The decline in phosphatidylcholine during folate restriction occurred primarily in women with the CC or CT genotype and not in the TT genotype (week×genotype interaction, P=.089). Moreover, when examined independent of folate status, phosphatidylcholine was higher ( P <.05) in the TT genotype relative to the CT genotype. These data suggest that folate intake and the MTHFR C677T genotype influence choline status in humans. PMID:17588738

  15. Human TMEM30a Promotes Uptake of Anti-tumor and Bioactive Choline Phospholipids into Mammalian Cells1

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Rui; Brady, Erin; McIntyre, Thomas M.

    2010-01-01

    Anti-tumor alkylphospholipids initiate apoptosis in transformed HL-60 and Jurkat cells while sparing their progenitors. Edelfosine like other short-chained phospholipids—inflammatory Platelet-activating Factor (PAF) and apoptotic oxidatively-truncated phospholipids—are proposed to have intracellular sites of action, yet a conduit for these choline phospholipids into mammalian cells is undefined. Edelfosine is also accumulated by Saccharomyces cerevisiae in process requiring the membrane protein Lem3p, and the human genome contains a Lem3p homolog TMEM30a. We show import of choline phospholipids into S. cerevisiae ⊗Lem3 is partially reconstituted by human TMEM30a and by Lem3p-TMEM30a chimeras, showing the proteins are orthologous. TMEM30a-GFP chimeras expressed in mammalian cells localized in plasma membranes, as well as internal organelles, and ectopic TMEM30a expression promoted uptake of exogenous choline and ethanolamine phospholipids. shRNA knockdown of TMEM30a reduced fluorescent choline phospholipid and [3H]PAF import. This knockdown also reduced mitochondrial depolarization from exogenous Edelfosine or the mitotoxic oxidatively truncated phospholipid azelaoyl phosphatidylcholine, and the knockdown reduced apoptosis in response to these two phospholipids. These results show extracellular choline phospholipids with short sn-2 residues can have intracellular roles and sites of metabolism because they are transport substrates for a TMEM30a phospholipid import system. Variation in this mechanism could limit sensitivity to short-chain choline phospholipids such as Edelfosine, PAF, and pro-apoptotic phospholipids. PMID:21289302

  16. Choline availability modulates human neuroblastoma cell proliferation and alters the methylation of the promoter region of the cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor 3 gene.

    PubMed

    Niculescu, Mihai D; Yamamuro, Yutaka; Zeisel, Steven H

    2004-06-01

    Choline is an important methyl donor and a component of membrane phospholipids. In this study, we tested the hypothesis that choline availability can modulate cell proliferation and the methylation of genes that regulate cell cycling. In several other model systems, hypomethylation of cytosine bases that are followed by a guanosine (CpG) sites in the promoter region of a gene is associated with increased gene expression. We found that in choline-deficient IMR-32 neuroblastoma cells, the promoter of the cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor 3 gene (CDKN3) was hypomethylated. This change was associated with increased expression of CDKN3 and increased levels of its gene product, kinase-associated phosphatase (KAP), which inhibits the G(1)/S transition of the cell cycle by dephosphorylating cyclin-dependent kinases. Choline deficiency also reduced global DNA methylation. The percentage of cells that accumulated bromodeoxyuridine (proportional to cell proliferation) was 1.8 times lower in the choline-deficient cells than in the control cells. Phosphorylated retinoblastoma (p110) levels were 3 times lower in the choline-deficient cells than in control cells. These findings suggest that the mechanism whereby choline deficiency inhibits cell proliferation involves hypomethylation of key genes regulating cell cycling. This may be a mechanism for our previously reported observation that stem cell proliferation in hippocampus neuroepithelium is decreased in choline-deficient rat and mouse fetuses. PMID:15147518

  17. Choline availability modulates human neuroblastoma cell proliferation and alters the methylation of the promoter region of the cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor 3 gene

    PubMed Central

    Niculescu, Mihai D.; Yamamuro, Yutaka; Zeisel, Steven H.

    2006-01-01

    Choline is an important methyl donor and a component of membrane phospholipids. In this study, we tested the hypothesis that choline availability can modulate cell proliferation and the methylation of genes that regulate cell cycling. In several other model systems, hypomethylation of cytosine bases that are followed by a guanosine (CpG) sites in the promoter region of a gene is associated with increased gene expression. We found that in choline-deficient IMR-32 neuroblastoma cells, the promoter of the cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor 3 gene (CDKN3) was hypomethylated. This change was associated with increased expression of CDKN3 and increased levels of its gene product, kinase-associated phosphatase (KAP), which inhibits the G1/S transition of the cell cycle by dephosphorylating cyclin-dependent kinases. Choline deficiency also reduced global DNA methylation. The percentage of cells that accumulated bromodeoxyuridine (proportional to cell proliferation) was 1.8 times lower in the choline-deficient cells than in the control cells. Phosphorylated retinoblastoma (p110) levels were 3 times lower in the choline-deficient cells than in control cells. These findings suggest that the mechanism whereby choline deficiency inhibits cell proliferation involves hypomethylation of key genes regulating cell cycling. This may be a mechanism for our previously reported observation that stem cell proliferation in hippocampus neuroepithelium is decreased in choline-deficient rat and mouse fetuses. PMID:15147518

  18. Identification of an osmo-dependent and an osmo-independent choline transporter in Acinetobacter baylyi: implications in osmostress protection and metabolic adaptation.

    PubMed

    Sand, Miriam; Stahl, Julia; Waclawska, Izabela; Ziegler, Christine; Averhoff, Beate

    2014-06-01

    Members of the genus Acinetobacter are well known for their metabolic versatility that allows them to adapt to different ecological niches. In previous studies, we have demonstrated that Acinetobacter baylyi ADP1 can cope with high salinities by uptake and accumulation of the well-known compatible solute glycine betaine. Here, we demonstrate that addition of choline restores growth at high salinities. We further show that choline was actively taken up by the cells and converted to glycine betaine. Uptake of choline was induced by high salinity and the presence of choline in the growth medium. At high salinities, glycine betaine was accumulated in the cells whereas in the absence of osmotic stress it was exported. Inspection of the genome sequence followed by mutant studies led to the identification of two genes encoding secondary transporters (BetT1 and BetT2) of the betaine-choline-carnitine transporter (BCCT) family. The BetT1 transporter lacks an extended C-terminal domain usually found in osmoregulated choline BCCTs. BetT1 was found to facilitate osmolarity-independent choline transport most likely by a uniport mechanism. We propose that BetT1 does not primarily function in osmoadaptation but might play a role in metabolic adaptation to choline-rich environments. PMID:23889709

  19. Pre-Conditioning with CDP-Choline Attenuates Oxidative Stress-Induced Cardiac Myocyte Death in a Hypoxia/Reperfusion Model

    PubMed Central

    González-Pacheco, Héctor; Méndez-Domínguez, Aurelio; Hernández, Salomón; López-Marure, Rebeca; Vazquez-Mellado, Maria J.; Aguilar, Cecilia; Rocha-Zavaleta, Leticia

    2014-01-01

    Background. CDP-choline is a key intermediate in the biosynthesis of phosphatidylcholine, which is an essential component of cellular membranes, and a cell signalling mediator. CDP-choline has been used for the treatment of cerebral ischaemia, showing beneficial effects. However, its potential benefit for the treatment of myocardial ischaemia has not been explored yet. Aim. In the present work, we aimed to evaluate the potential use of CDP-choline as a cardioprotector in an in vitro model of ischaemia/reperfusion injury. Methods. Neonatal rat cardiac myocytes were isolated and subjected to hypoxia/reperfusion using the coverslip hypoxia model. To evaluate the effect of CDP-choline on oxidative stress-induced reperfusion injury, the cells were incubated with H2O2 during reperfusion. The effect of CDP-choline pre- and postconditioning was evaluated using the cell viability MTT assay, and the proportion of apoptotic and necrotic cells was analyzed using the Annexin V determination by flow cytometry. Results. Pre- and postconditioning with 50 mg/mL of CDP-choline induced a significant reduction of cells undergoing apoptosis after hypoxia/reperfusion. Preconditioning with CDP-choline attenuated postreperfusion cell death induced by oxidative stress. Conclusion. CDP-choline administration reduces cell apoptosis induced by oxidative stress after hypoxia/reperfusion of cardiac myocytes. Thus, it has a potential as cardioprotector in ischaemia/reperfusion-injured cardiomyocytes. PMID:24578622

  20. 18F-Choline PET/CT-Positive Lytic Bone Lesions in Prostate Cancer and Accidental Myeloma Detection.

    PubMed

    Florimonte, Luigia; Orunesu, Eva; Castellani, Massimo; Longari, Virgilio; Cortelezzi, Agostino

    2016-05-01

    F-choline PET/CT was performed for suspected prostate cancer relapse in a 67-year-old man with hip pain and a rapid rise in prostate-specific antigen values (1.1 ng/mL). PET imaging showed an area of increased F-choline bone uptake in the right ischium. Coregistered CT images showed a lytic bone lesion. The infrequent CT appearance of a possible prostate carcinoma metastasis led to additional laboratory testing that showed a monoclonal γ-peak and to subsequent biopsy, which revealed a solitary plasmocytoma. PMID:26825195

  1. Electrochemical Deposition of Niobium onto the Surface of Copper Using a Novel Choline Chloride-Based Ionic Liquid

    SciTech Connect

    Wixtroma, Alex I.; Buhlera, Jessica E.; Reece, Charles E.; Abdel-Fattah, Tarek M.

    2013-06-01

    Recent research has shown that choline chloride-based solutions can be used to replace acid-based electrochemical polishing solutions. In this study niobium metal was successfully deposited on the surface of copper substrate via electrochemical deposition using a novel choline chloride-based ionic liquid. The niobium metal used for deposition on the Cu had been dissolved in the solution from electrochemical polishing of a solid niobium piece prior to the deposition. The visible coating on the surface of the Cu was analyzed using scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and electron dispersive x-ray spectroscopy (EDX). This deposition method effectively recycles previously dissolved niobium from electrochemical polishing.

  2. Assessing therapy response of secreting pineal germ cell tumor on simultaneous 18F-choline PET/MRI.

    PubMed

    Panagiotidis, Emmanouil; Shankar, Ananth; Afaq, Asim; Bomanji, Jamshed

    2014-09-01

    An 18-year-old man presented with 6 weeks' history of diplopia, early morning headaches, and blurred vision; on ophthalmologic examination, Parinaud syndrome was revealed. Brain MRI scan showed a calcified pineal mass. Brain simultaneous PET/MRI with 18F-choline showed an avid enhancing mass occupying the pineal region with restricted diffusion. A second examination after chemotherapy demonstrated reduction in both size and radiotracer activity of the mass. Our study emphasizes the potential of simultaneous 18F-choline PET/MRI being a useful tool for contribution in the diagnosis and treatment assessment in a convenient way with minimal radiation exposure and reduced throughput patient time. PMID:24217533

  3. Dietary choline regulates antibacterial activity, inflammatory response and barrier function in the gills of grass carp (Ctenopharyngodon idella).

    PubMed

    Zhao, Hua-Fu; Jiang, Wei-Dan; Liu, Yang; Jiang, Jun; Wu, Pei; Kuang, Sheng-Yao; Tang, Ling; Tang, Wu-Neng; Zhang, Yong-An; Zhou, Xiao-Qiu; Feng, Lin

    2016-05-01

    An 8-week feeding trial was conducted to determine the effects of graded levels of choline (197-1795 mg/kg) on antibacterial properties, inflammatory status and barrier function in the gills of grass carp. The results showed that optimal dietary choline supplementation significantly improved lysozyme and acid phosphatase activities, complement component 3 (C3) content, and the liver expressed antimicrobial peptide 2 and Hepcidin mRNA levels in the gills of fish (P < 0.05). In addition, appropriate dietary choline significantly decreased the oxidative damage, which might be partly due to increase copper, zinc superoxide dismutase (Cu/Zn-SOD), catalase (CAT), glutathione peroxidase (GPx), glutathione-S-transferase (GST) and glutathione reductase (GR) activities and increased glutathione content in the gills of fish (P < 0.05). Moreover, appropriate dietary choline significantly up-regulated the mRNA levels of interleukin 10 and transforming growth factor β1, Zonula occludens 1, Occludin, Claudin-b, c, 3 and 12, inhibitor of κBα, target of rapamycin, Cu/Zn-SOD, CAT, GR, GPx, GST and NF-E2-related factor 2 in the gills of fish (P < 0.05). Conversely, appropriate dietary choline significantly down-regulated the mRNA levels of pro-inflammatory cytokines, tumor necrosis factor α, interleukin 8, interferon γ, interleukin 1β, and related signaling factors, nuclear factor kappa B p65, IκB kinase β, IκB kinase γ, myosin light chain kinase and Kelch-like-ECH-associated protein 1a (Keap1a) in the gills of fish (P < 0.05). However, choline did not have a significant effect on the mRNA levels of IκB kinase α, Claudin-15 and Keap1b in the gills of fish. Collectively, appropriate dietary choline levels improved gill antibacterial properties and relative gene expression levels of tight junction proteins, and decreased inflammatory status, as well as up-regulated the mRNA levels of related signaling molecules in the gills of fish. Based on gill C3 content and AHR

  4. Non-enzymatic synthesis of the coenzymes, uridine diphosphate glucose and cytidine diphosphate choline, and other phosphorylated metabolic intermediates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mar, A.; Dworkin, J.; Oro, J.

    1987-01-01

    Using urea and cyanamide, the two condensing agents considered to have been present on the primitive earth, uridine diphosphate glucose (UDPG), cytidine diphosphate choline (CDP-choline), glucose-1-phosphate (G1P), and glucose-6-phosphate (G6P) were synthesized under simulated prebiotic conditions. The reaction products were separated and identified using paper chromatography, thin layer chromatography, enzymatic analyses, and ion-pair reverse-phase high performance liquid chromatography. The possibility of nonenzymatic synthesis of metabolic intermediates on the primitive earth from simple precursors was thus demonstrated.

  5. Overexpression, purification and crystallization of a choline-binding protein CbpI from Streptococcus pneumoniae

    SciTech Connect

    Paterson, Neil G. Riboldi-Tunicliffe, Alan; Mitchell, Timothy J.; Isaacs, Neil W.

    2006-07-01

    The choline-binding protein CbpI from S. pneumoniae has been purified and crystallized and diffraction data have been collected to 3.5 Å resolution. The choline-binding protein CbpI from Streptococcus pneumoniae is a 23.4 kDa protein with no known function. The protein has been successfully purified initially using Ni–NTA chromatography and to homogeneity using Q-Sepharose ion-exchange resin as an affinity column. CbpI was crystallized using PEG 3350 as a precipitant and X-ray crystallographic analysis showed that the crystals belonged to the tetragonal space group P4, with unit-cell parameters a = b = 83.31, c = 80.29 Å, α = β = γ = 90°. The crystal contains two molecules in the asymmetric unit with a solvent content of 55.7% (V{sub M} = 2.77 Å{sup 3} Da{sup −1}) and shows a diffraction limit of 3.5 Å.

  6. Hydride transfer made easy in the oxidation of alcohols catalyzed by choline oxidase

    SciTech Connect

    Gadda, G.; Orville, A.; Pennati, A.; Francis, K.; Quaye, O.; Yuan, H.; Rungsrisuriyachai, K.; Finnegan, S.; Mijatovic, S.; Nguyen, T.

    2008-06-08

    Choline oxidase (E.C. 1.1.3.17) catalyzes the two-step, four-electron oxidation of choline to glycine betaine with betaine aldehyde as enzyme-associated intermediate and molecular oxygen as final electron acceptor (Scheme 1). The gem-diol, hydrated species of the aldehyde intermediate of the reaction acts as substrate for aldehyde oxidation, suggesting that the enzyme may use similar strategies for the oxidation of the alcohol substrate and aldehyde intermediate. The determination of the chemical mechanism for alcohol oxidation has emerged from biochemical, mechanistic, mutagenetic, and structural studies. As illustrated in the mechanism of Scheme 2, the alcohol substrate is initially activated in the active site of the enzyme by removal of the hydroxyl proton. The resulting alkoxide intermediate is then stabilized in the enzyme-substrate complex via electrostatic interactions with active site amino acid residues. Alcohol oxidation then occurs quantum mechanically via the transfer of the hydride ion from the activated substrate to the N(5) flavin locus. An essential requisite for this mechanism of alcohol oxidation is the high degree of preorganization of the activated enzyme-substrate complex, which is achieved through an internal equilibrium of the Michaelis complex occurring prior to, and independently from, the subsequent hydride transfer reaction. The experimental evidence that support the mechanism for alcohol oxidation shown in Scheme 2 is briefly summarized in the Results and Discussion section.

  7. Glutamate and Choline Levels Predict Individual Differences in Reading Ability in Emergent Readers

    PubMed Central

    Frost, Stephen J.; Rothman, Douglas L.; Hoeft, Fumiko; Del Tufo, Stephanie N.; Mason, Graeme F.; Molfese, Peter J.; Mencl, W. Einar; Grigorenko, Elena L.; Landi, Nicole; Preston, Jonathan L.; Jacobsen, Leslie; Seidenberg, Mark S.; Fulbright, Robert K.

    2014-01-01

    Reading disability is a brain-based difficulty in acquiring fluent reading skills that affects significant numbers of children. Although neuroanatomical and neurofunctional networks involved in typical and atypical reading are increasingly well characterized, the underlying neurochemical bases of individual differences in reading development are virtually unknown. The current study is the first to examine neurochemistry in children during the critical period in which the neurocircuits that support skilled reading are still developing. In a longitudinal pediatric sample of emergent readers whose reading indicators range on a continuum from impaired to superior, we examined the relationship between individual differences in reading and reading-related skills and concentrations of neurometabolites measured using magnetic resonance spectroscopy. Both continuous and group analyses revealed that choline and glutamate concentrations were negatively correlated with reading and related linguistic measures in phonology and vocabulary (such that higher concentrations were associated with poorer performance). Correlations with behavioral scores obtained 24 months later reveal stability for the relationship between glutamate and reading performance. Implications for neurodevelopmental models of reading and reading disability are discussed, including possible links of choline and glutamate to white matter anomalies and hyperexcitability. These findings point to new directions for research on gene-brain-behavior pathways in human studies of reading disability. PMID:24623786

  8. Alcohol consumption significantly influences the MR signal of frontal choline-containing compounds.

    PubMed

    Ende, Gabriele; Walter, Sigi; Welzel, Helga; Demirakca, Traute; Wokrina, Tim; Ruf, Matthias; Ulrich, Marco; Diehl, Alexander; Henn, Fritz A; Mann, Karl

    2006-08-15

    The aim of this work was to evaluate the relationship between the amount of alcohol consumption of a group of social drinkers and the magnetic resonance spectroscopy signal of choline-containing compounds (Cho) in the frontal lobe. Two independent long echo (TE = 135 ms) (1)H MRSI studies, the first comprising 24 subjects with very low alcohol consumption, the second 18 subjects with a more widespread alcohol consumption were conducted. Significant correlations of Cho measures from frontal white matter and from the anterior cingulate gyrus with alcohol consumption in the last 90 days prior to the MR examination were found. Age, gender, and smoking did not show significant effects on the metabolite measures. Partialling out the effect of the voxel white matter content did not change the correlation of choline measures with alcohol consumption. The main conclusion from the repeated finding of a positive correlation of alcohol consumption and frontal Cho signals is that monitoring for alcohol consumption is mandatory in MRS studies where pathology depended Cho changes are hypothesized. PMID:16759881

  9. The role of rumen-protected choline in hepatic function and performance of transition dairy cows.

    PubMed

    Shahsavari, Arash; D'Occhio, Michael J; Al Jassim, Rafat

    2016-07-01

    High-producing dairy cows enter a period of negative energy balance during the first weeks of lactation. Energy intake is usually sufficient to cover the increase in energy requirements for fetal growth during the period before calving, but meeting the demand for energy is often difficult during the early stages of lactation. A catabolic state predominates during the transition period, leading to the mobilisation of energy reserves (NEFA and amino acids) that are utilised mainly by the liver and muscle. Increased uptake of mobilised NEFA by the liver, combined with the limited capacity of hepatocytes to either oxidise fatty acids for energy or to incorporate esterified fatty acids into VLDL results in fatty liver syndrome and ketosis. This metabolic disturbance can affect the general health, and it causes economic losses. Different nutritional strategies have been used to restrict negative effects associated with the energy challenge in transition cows. The provision of choline in the form of rumen-protected choline (RPC) can potentially improve liver function by increasing VLDL exportation from the liver. RPC increases gene expression of microsomal TAG transfer protein and APOB100 that are required for VLDL synthesis and secretion. Studies with RPC have looked at gene expression, metabolic hormones, metabolite profiles, milk production and postpartum reproduction. A reduction in liver fat and enhanced milk production has been observed with RPC supplementation. However, the effects of RPC on health and reproduction are equivocal, which could reflect the lack of sufficient dose-response studies. PMID:27138530

  10. In vitro inhibition of choline acetyltransferase by a series of 2-benzylidene-3-quinuclidinones

    SciTech Connect

    Capacio, B.R.

    1988-01-01

    Ten substituted 2-benzylidene-3-quinuclidinones were synthesized and evaluated for their relative potency as in vitro inhibitors of choline acetyltransferase (ChAT). Acetylcholine (ACh) synthesis was followed radiometrically by the incorporation of labeled acetate originating from {sup 14}C-acetyl-CoA. Woolf-Augustinsson-Hofstee data analysis was used to calculate Vmax, Km, and Ki values. The inhibition was found to be noncompetitive or uncompetitive with respect to choline. Quantitative structure activity relationship correlations demonstrated a primary dependence on {kappa}-{sigma}, as well as steric properties of the substituted benzene ring. Additional radiometric and spectrophotometric were performed with 2-(3{prime}-methyl)-benzylidene-3-quinuclidinone, one of the more potent analogs, to further elucidate the inhibitory mechanism. ChAT-mediated cleavage of ACh was measured spectrophotometrically by following the appearance of NADH at 340 nanometers in an enzyme coupled assay. Lineweaver-Burk analysis indicated mixed or uncompetitive inhibition with respect to both substrates of the forward reaction, suggesting interference with a rate limiting step.

  11. Multisite monitoring of choline using biosensor microprobe arrays in combination with CMOS circuitry.

    PubMed

    Frey, Olivier; Rothe, Jörg; Heer, Flavio; van der Wal, Peter D; de Rooij, Nico F; Hierlemann, Andreas

    2014-08-01

    A miniature device enabling parallel in vivo detection of the neurotransmitter choline in multiple brain regions of freely behaving rodents is presented. This is achieved by combining a biosensor microprobe array with a custom-developed CMOS chip. Each silicon microprobe comprises multiple platinum electrodes that are coated with an enzymatic membrane and a permselective layer for selective detection of choline. The biosensors, based on the principle of amperometric detection, exhibit a sensitivity of 157±35 µA mM(-1) cm(-2), a limit of detection of below 1 µM, and a response time in the range of 1 s. With on-chip digitalization and multiplexing, parallel recordings can be performed at a high signal-to-noise ratio with minimal space requirements and with substantial reduction of external signal interference. The layout of the integrated circuitry allows for versatile configuration of the current range and can, therefore, also be used for functionalization of the electrodes before use. The result is a compact, highly integrated system, very convenient for on-site measurements. PMID:24145056

  12. Choline kinase alpha expression during RA-induced neuronal differentiation: role of C/EBPβ.

    PubMed

    Domizi, Pablo; Aoyama, Chieko; Banchio, Claudia

    2014-04-01

    Neuronal differentiation is a complex process characterized by a halt in proliferation and extension of neurites from the cell body. This process is accompanied by changes in gene expression that mediate the redirection leading to neurite formation and function. Acceleration of membrane phospholipids synthesis is associated with neurite elongation, and phosphatidylcholine (PtdCho) is the major membrane phospholipid in mammalian cells. The transcription of two genes in particular encoding key enzymes in the CDP-choline pathway for PtdCho biosynthesis are stimulated; the Chka gene for choline kinase (CK) alpha isoform and the Pcyt1a gene for the CTP:phosphocholine cytidylyltransferase (CCT) alpha isoform. We report that the stimulation of CKα expression during retinoic acid (RA) induced differentiation depends on a promoter region that contains two CCAAT/Enhancer-binding Protein-β (C/EBPβ) sites. We demonstrate that during neuronal differentiation of Neuro-2a cells, RA induces Chka expression by a mechanism that involves ERK1/2 activation which triggers C/EBPβ expression. Elevated levels of C/EBPβ bind to the Chka proximal promoter (Box1) inducing CKα expression. In addition we identified a downstream sequence named Box2 which together with Box1 is required for the promoter to reach the full induction. This is the first elucidation of the mechanism by which the expression of Chka is coordinately regulated during neuronal differentiation. PMID:24440820

  13. A multi-year assessment of the environmental impact of transgenic Eucalyptus trees harboring a bacterial choline oxidase gene on biomass, precinct vegetation and the microbial community.

    PubMed

    Oguchi, Taichi; Kashimura, Yuko; Mimura, Makiko; Yu, Xiang; Matsunaga, Etsuko; Nanto, Kazuya; Shimada, Teruhisa; Kikuchi, Akira; Watanabe, Kazuo N

    2014-10-01

    A 4-year field trial for the salt tolerant Eucalyptus globulus Labill. harboring the choline oxidase (codA) gene derived from the halobacterium Arthrobacter globiformis was conducted to assess the impact of transgenic versus non-transgenic trees on biomass production, the adjacent soil microbial communities and vegetation by monitoring growth parameters, seasonal changes in soil microbes and the allelopathic activity of leaves. Three independently-derived lines of transgenic E. globulus were compared with three independent non-transgenic lines including two elite clones. No significant differences in biomass production were detected between transgenic lines and non-transgenic controls derived from same seed bulk, while differences were seen compared to two elite clones. Significant differences in the number of soil microbes present were also detected at different sampling times but not between transgenic and non-transgenic lines. The allelopathic activity of leaves from both transgenic and non-transgenic lines also varied significantly with sampling time, but the allelopathic activity of leaves from transgenic lines did not differ significantly from those from non-transgenic lines. These results indicate that, for the observed variables, the impact on the environment of codA-transgenic E. globulus did not differ significantly from that of the non-transformed controls on this field trial. PMID:24927812

  14. Neurochemical Alterations in Methamphetamine-Dependent Patients Treated with Cytidine-5′-Diphosphate Choline: A Longitudinal Proton Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy Study

    PubMed Central

    Yoon, Sujung J; Lyoo, In Kyoon; Kim, Hengjun J; Kim, Tae-Suk; Sung, Young Hoon; Kim, Namkug; Lukas, Scott E; Renshaw, Perry F

    2010-01-01

    Cytidine-5′-diphosphate choline (CDP-choline), as an important intermediate for major membrane phospholipids, may exert neuroprotective effects in various neurodegenerative disorders. This longitudinal proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy (1H-MRS) study aimed to examine whether a 4-week CDP-choline treatment could alter neurometabolite levels in patients with methamphetamine (MA) dependence and to investigate whether changes in neurometabolite levels would be associated with MA use. We hypothesized that the prefrontal levels of N-acetyl-aspartate (NAA), a neuronal marker, and choline-containing compound (Cho), which are related to membrane turnover, would increase with CDP-choline treatment in MA-dependent patients. We further hypothesized that this increase would correlate with the total number of negative urine results. Thirty-one treatment seekers with MA dependence were randomly assigned to receive CDP-choline (n=16) or placebo (n=15) for 4 weeks. Prefrontal NAA and Cho levels were examined using 1H-MRS before medication, and at 2 and 4 weeks after treatment. Generalized estimating equation regression analyses showed that the rate of change in prefrontal NAA (p=0.005) and Cho (p=0.03) levels were greater with CDP-choline treatment than with placebo. In the CDP-choline-treated patients, changes in prefrontal NAA levels were positively associated with the total number of negative urine results (p=0.03). Changes in the prefrontal Cho levels, however, were not associated with the total number of negative urine results. These preliminary findings suggest that CDP-choline treatment may exert potential neuroprotective effects directly or indirectly because of reductions in drug use by the MA-dependent patients. Further studies with a larger sample size of MA-dependent patients are warranted to confirm a long-term efficacy of CDP-choline in neuroprotection and abstinence. PMID:20043005

  15. Effect of choline on antioxidant defenses and gene expressions of Nrf2 signaling molecule in the spleen and head kidney of juvenile Jian carp (Cyprinus carpio var. Jian).

    PubMed

    Wu, Pei; Jiang, Wei-Dan; Liu, Yang; Chen, Gang-Fu; Jiang, Jun; Li, Shu-Hong; Feng, Lin; Zhou, Xiao-Qiu

    2014-06-01

    The present work evaluates the effects of various levels of dietary choline on antioxidant defenses and gene expressions of Nrf2 signaling molecule in spleen and head kidney of juvenile Jian carp (Cyprinus carpio var. Jian). Fish were fed with six different experimental diets containing graded levels of choline at 165 (choline-deficient control), 310, 607, 896, 1167 and 1820 mg kg(-1) diet for 65 days. At the end of the feeding trail, fish were challenged with Aeromonas hydrophila and mortalities were recorded over 17 days. Dietary choline significantly decreased malondialdehyde and protein carbonyl contents in spleen and head kidney. However, anti-superoxide anion and anti-hydroxyl radical activities in spleen and head kidney also decreased. Interestingly, activities of superoxide dismutase (SOD), catalase (CAT), glutathione peroxidase (GPx), glutathione-S-transferase (GST) and glutathione reductase (GR) in spleen, GPx activity in head kidney, and glutathione contents in spleen and head kidney were decreased with increase of dietary choline levels up to a certain point, whereas, activities of SOD, GST and GR in head kidney showed no significantly differences among groups. Similarly, expression levels of CuZnSOD, MnSOD, CAT, GPx1a, GPx1b and GR gene in spleen and head kidney were significantly lower in group with choline level of 607 mg kg(-1) diet than those in the choline-deficient group. The relative gene expressions of Nrf2 in head kidney and Keap1a in spleen and head kidney were decreased with increasing of dietary choline up to a certain point. However, the relative gene expression of Nrf2 in spleen were not significantly affected by dietary choline. In conclusion, dietary choline decreased the oxidant damage and regulated the antioxidant system in immune organs of juvenile Jian carp. PMID:24751923

  16. Role of bone marrow cells in the development of pancreatic fibrosis in a rat model of pancreatitis induced by a choline-deficient/ethionine-supplemented diet

    SciTech Connect

    Akita, Shingo; Kubota, Koji; Kobayashi, Akira; Misawa, Ryosuke; Shimizu, Akira; Nakata, Takenari; Yokoyama, Takahide; Takahashi, Masafumi; Miyagawa, Shinichi

    2012-04-20

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer BMC-derived PSCs play a role in a rat CDE diet-induced pancreatitis model. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer BMC-derived PSCs contribute mainly to the early stage of pancreatic fibrosis. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer BMC-derived activated PSCs can produce PDGF and TGF {beta}1. -- Abstract: Bone marrow cell (BMC)-derived myofibroblast-like cells have been reported in various organs, including the pancreas. However, the contribution of these cells to pancreatic fibrosis has not been fully discussed. The present study examined the possible involvement of pancreatic stellate cells (PSCs) originating from BMCs in the development of pancreatic fibrosis in a clinically relevant rat model of acute pancreatitis induced by a choline-deficient/ethionine-supplemented (CDE) diet. BMCs from female transgenic mice ubiquitously expressing green fluorescent protein (GFP) were transplanted into lethally irradiated male rats. Once chimerism was established, acute pancreatitis was induced by a CDE diet. Chronological changes in the number of PSCs originating from the donor BMCs were examined using double immunofluorescence for GFP and markers for PSCs, such as desmin and alpha smooth muscle actin ({alpha}SMA), 1, 3 and 8 weeks after the initiation of CDE feeding. We also used immunohistochemical staining to evaluate whether the PSCs from the BMCs produce growth factors, such as platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF) and transforming growth factor (TGF) {beta}1. The percentage of BMC-derived activated PSCs increased significantly, peaking after 1 week of CDE treatment (accounting for 23.3 {+-} 0.9% of the total population of activated PSCs) and then decreasing. These cells produced both PDGF and TGF{beta}1 during the early stage of pancreatic fibrosis. Our results suggest that PSCs originating from BMCs contribute mainly to the early stage of pancreatic injury, at least in part, by producing growth factors in a rat CDE diet-induced pancreatitis model.

  17. Suppression effects of betaine-enriched spinach on hyperhomocysteinemia induced by guanidinoacetic acid and choline deficiency in rats.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yi-Qun; Jia, Zheng; Han, Feng; Inakuma, Takahiro; Miyashita, Tatsuya; Sugiyama, Kimio; Sun, Li-Cui; Xiang, Xue-Song; Huang, Zhen-Wu

    2014-01-01

    Betaine is an important natural component of rich food sources, especially spinach. Rats were fed diets with betaine or spinach powder at the same level of betaine for 10 days to investigate the dose-dependent effects of spinach powder supplementation on hyperhomocysteinemia induced by guanidinoacetic acid (GAA) addition and choline deprivation. The GAA-induced hyperhomocysteinemia in rats fed 25% casein diet (25 C) was significantly suppressed by supplementation with betaine or spinach, and it was completely suppressed by taking 11.0% spinach supplementation. The choline deprivation-induced enhancement of plasma homocysteine concentration in rats fed 25% soybean protein diet (25S) was markedly suppressed by 3.82% spinach. Supplementation with betaine or spinach partially prevented the effects of GAA on hepatic concentrations of methionine metabolites. The decrease in activity of betaine-homocysteine S-methyltransferase (BHMT) and cystathionine β-synthase (CBS) in GAA-induced hyperhomocysteinemia was recovered by supplementation with betaine or spinach. Supplementation with betaine or spinach did not affect BHMT activity, whereas it partially restored CBS activity in choline-deprived 25S. The results indicated that betaine or spinach could completely suppress the hyperhomocysteinemia induced by choline deficiency resulting from stimulating the homocysteine removal by both remethylation and cystathionine formation. PMID:25250392

  18. Suppression Effects of Betaine-Enriched Spinach on Hyperhomocysteinemia Induced by Guanidinoacetic Acid and Choline Deficiency in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Yi-Qun; Jia, Zheng; Han, Feng; Inakuma, Takahiro; Miyashita, Tatsuya; Sugiyama, Kimio; Sun, Li-Cui; Xiang, Xue-Song; Huang, Zhen-Wu

    2014-01-01

    Betaine is an important natural component of rich food sources, especially spinach. Rats were fed diets with betaine or spinach powder at the same level of betaine for 10 days to investigate the dose-dependent effects of spinach powder supplementation on hyperhomocysteinemia induced by guanidinoacetic acid (GAA) addition and choline deprivation. The GAA-induced hyperhomocysteinemia in rats fed 25% casein diet (25C) was significantly suppressed by supplementation with betaine or spinach, and it was completely suppressed by taking 11.0% spinach supplementation. The choline deprivation-induced enhancement of plasma homocysteine concentration in rats fed 25% soybean protein diet (25S) was markedly suppressed by 3.82% spinach. Supplementation with betaine or spinach partially prevented the effects of GAA on hepatic concentrations of methionine metabolites. The decrease in activity of betaine-homocysteine S-methyltransferase (BHMT) and cystathionine β-synthase (CBS) in GAA-induced hyperhomocysteinemia was recovered by supplementation with betaine or spinach. Supplementation with betaine or spinach did not affect BHMT activity, whereas it partially restored CBS activity in choline-deprived 25S. The results indicated that betaine or spinach could completely suppress the hyperhomocysteinemia induced by choline deficiency resulting from stimulating the homocysteine removal by both remethylation and cystathionine formation. PMID:25250392

  19. The effect of the non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug choline magnesium trisalicylate on gastric mucosal cell exfoliation.

    PubMed

    Mitchell, K G; Hearns, J; Crean, G P

    1984-01-01

    Gastric mucosal cell exfoliation was measured in 10 normal subjects taking choline magnesium trisalicylate (CMT), aspirin and placebo. Both drugs resulted in significantly elevated rates of exfoliation although the serum salicylate levels achieved with aspirin were lower than those achieved by CMT. Side-effects of tinnitus, nausea and increased faecal blood loss were more common while subjects were taking CMT. PMID:6691886

  20. Mice fed a lipogenic methionine-choline-deficient diet develop hypermetabolism coincident with hepatic suppression of SCD-1.

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Lipogenic diets that are completely devoid of methionine and choline (MCD) induce hepatic steatosis. MCD feeding also provokes systemic weight loss, for unclear reasons. In this study, we found that MCD feeding causes profound hepatic suppression of the gene encoding stearoyl-coenzyme A desaturase-1...

  1. Antiplasmodial Activity and Mechanism of Action of RSM-932A, a Promising Synergistic Inhibitor of Plasmodium falciparum Choline Kinase

    PubMed Central

    Zimmerman, Tahl; Moneriz, Carlos; Diez, Amalia; Bautista, José Manuel; Gómez del Pulgar, Teresa; Cebrián, Arancha

    2013-01-01

    We have investigated the mechanism of action of inhibition of the choline kinase of P. falciparum (p.f.-ChoK) by two inhibitors of the human ChoKα, MN58b and RSM-932A, which have previously been shown to be potent antitumoral agents. The efficacy of these inhibitors against p.f.-ChoK is investigated using enzymatic and in vitro assays. While MN58b may enter the choline/phosphocholine binding site, RSM-932A appears to have an altogether novel mechanism of inhibition and is synergistic with respect to both choline and ATP. A model of inhibition for RSM-932A in which this inhibitor traps p.f.-ChoK in a phosphorylated intermediate state blocking phosphate transfer to choline is presented. Importantly, MN58b and RSM-932A have in vitro inhibitory activity in the low nanomolar range and are equally effective against chloroquine-sensitive and chloroquine-resistant strains. RSM-932A and MN58b significantly reduced parasitemia and induced the accumulation of trophozoites and schizonts, blocking intraerythrocytic development and interfering with parasite egress or invasion, suggesting a delay of the parasite maturation stage. The present data provide two new potent structures for the development of antimalarial compounds and validate p.f.-ChoK as an accessible drug target against the parasite. PMID:24041883

  2. CDP-choline: effects of the procholine supplement on sensory gating and executive function in healthy volunteers stratified for low, medium and high P50 suppression.

    PubMed

    Knott, Verner; Smith, Dylan; de la Salle, Sara; Impey, Danielle; Choueiry, Joelle; Beaudry, Elise; Smith, Meaghan; Saghir, Salman; Ilivitsky, Vadim; Labelle, Alain

    2014-12-01

    Diminished auditory sensory gating and associated neurocognitive deficits in schizophrenia have been linked to altered expression and function of the alpha-7 nicotinic acetycholinergic receptor (α7 nAChR), the targeting of which may have treatment potential. Choline is a selective α7 nAChR agonist and the aim of this study was to determine whether cytidine 5'-diphosphocholine (CDP-choline), or citicoline, a dietary source of choline, increases sensory gating and cognition in healthy volunteers stratified for gating level. In a randomized, placebo-controlled, double-blind design involving acute administration of low, moderate doses (500 mg, 1000 mg) of CDP-choline, 24 healthy volunteers were assessed for auditory gating as indexed by suppression of the P50 event-related potential (ERP) in a paired-stimulus (S1, S2) paradigm, and for executive function as measured by the Groton Maze Learning Task (GMLT) of the CogState Schizophrenia Battery. CDP-choline improved gating (1000 mg) and suppression of the S2 P50 response (500 mg, 1000 mg), with the effects being selective for individuals with low gating (suppression) levels. Tentative support was also shown for increased GMLT performance (500 mg) in low suppressors. These preliminary findings with CDP-choline in a healthy, schizophrenia-like surrogate sample are consistent with a α7 nAChR mechanism and support further trials with choline as a pro-cognitive strategy. PMID:25315828

  3. Associations of gut-flora-dependent metabolite trimethylamine-N-oxide, betaine and choline with non-alcoholic fatty liver disease in adults

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Yu-ming; Liu, Yan; Zhou, Rui-fen; Chen, Xiao-ling; Wang, Cheng; Tan, Xu-ying; Wang, Li-jun; Zheng, Rui-dan; Zhang, Hong-wei; Ling, Wen-hua; Zhu, Hui-lian

    2016-01-01

    Many studies suggest that trimethylamine-N-oxide (TMAO), a gut-flora-dependent metabolite of choline, contributes to the risk of cardiovascular diseases, but little is known for non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD). We examined the association of circulating TMAO, choline and betaine with the presence and severity of NAFLD in Chinese adults. We performed a hospital-based case-control study (CCS) and a cross-sectional study (CSS). In the CCS, we recruited 60 biopsy-proven NAFLD cases and 35 controls (18–60 years) and determined serum concentrations of TMAO, choline and betaine by HPLC-MS/MS. For the CSS, 1,628 community-based adults (40-75 years) completed the blood tests and ultrasonographic NAFLD evaluation. In the CCS, analyses of covariance showed adverse associations of ln-transformed serum levels of TMAO, choline and betaine/choline ratio with the scores of steatosis and total NAFLD activity (NAS) (all P-trend <0.05). The CSS revealed that a greater severity of NAFLD was independently correlated with higher TMAO but lower betaine and betaine/choline ratio (all P-trend <0.05). No significant choline-NAFLD association was observed. Our findings showed adverse associations between the circulating TMAO level and the presence and severity of NAFLD in hospital- and community-based Chinese adults, and a favorable betaine-NAFLD relationship in the community-based participants. PMID:26743949

  4. Supplemental choline does not attenuate the effects of neonatal ethanol administration on habituation of the heart rate orienting response in rats.

    PubMed

    Hunt, Pamela S; Jacobson, Sarah E; Kim, Sarah

    2014-01-01

    Several studies using rodent subjects have now shown that extra dietary choline may prevent or even reverse the deleterious effects of pre- and early post-natal ethanol administration. Choline supplementation has been shown to attenuate many, although not all, of ethanol's effects on brain development and behavior. Our laboratory has consistently reported impaired habituation of the heart rate orienting response to a novel olfactory stimulus in animals exposed to ethanol on postnatal days (PD) 4-9. Here we examine whether supplemental choline given both during and after ethanol administration could alleviate these ethanol-induced deficits. Subjects were given 5g/kg/day ethanol or sham intubations on PD 4-9. Half of the subjects in each group were given a single daily s.c. injection of choline chloride on PD 4-20, while the other half were injected daily with saline. Pups were tested for heart rate orienting and response habituation in a single test session on PD 23. Results replicated the ethanol-induced impairment in response habituation. However, choline supplementation had no effect on orienting or habituation in either neonatal treatment group. These findings indicate that habituation deficits induced by ethanol are not alleviated by extra dietary choline using these parameters. Choline holds great promise as a treatment for some fetal alcohol effects, but is not an effective treatment for all ethanol-related deficits. PMID:24907459

  5. Infantile cobalamin deficiency with cerebral lactate accumulation and sustained choline depletion.

    PubMed

    Horstmann, M; Neumaier-Probst, E; Lukacs, Z; Steinfeld, R; Ullrich, K; Kohlschütter, A

    2003-06-01

    A remarkable, intermittent sudden-onset vigilance and movement disorder in an exclusively breast-fed infant is reported, which was caused by cobalamin depletion due to maternal vitamin B12 malabsorption. The lack of cobalamin caused a severe encephalopathy in the infant, whose brain displayed a striking loss of volume and a delay of myelination. Proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy revealed an accumulation of lactate in the gray and white matter of the brain and a sustained depletion of choline-containing compounds in the white matter, reflecting a reversible disturbance of oxidative energy metabolism in brain cells and a long-lasting hypomyelination disorder. The clinical picture in conjunction with MRI and spectroscopic data of this case study yields more insight into the functions of cobalamin in the cerebral metabolism. PMID:14598232

  6. Choline chloride/urea as an effective plasticizer for production of cellulose films.

    PubMed

    Wang, Sha; Peng, Xinwen; Zhong, Linxin; Jing, Shuangshuang; Cao, Xuefei; Lu, Fachuang; Sun, Runcang

    2015-03-01

    Recently, choline chloride/urea (ChCl/urea), a typical deep eutectic solvent (DES), has been found to possess various applications in organic synthesis, electrochemistry, and nanomaterial preparation. Herein we reported the first attempt to plasticize regenerated cellulose film (RCF) using ChCl/urea as an effective plasticizer. Meanwhile, RCFs plasticized with glycerol and sorbitol were also prepared for comparison. The plasticized RCFs were investigated by Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR) spectroscopy, wide-angle X-ray diffraction (XRD), atomic force microscopy (AFM), and mechanical testing. Transparent and soft RCFs could be successfully prepared in the presence of ChCl/urea, and high elongation at break (34.88%) suggested a significant plasticizing efficiency. No new crystal and phase separation occurred to ChCl/urea plasticized RCFs. The thermal stability of ChCl/urea plasticized RCF was lowered. These results indicated that ChCl/urea was an effective plasticizer for producing cellulose films. PMID:25498618

  7. Electrochemical Polishing Applications and EIS of a Novel Choline Chloride-Based Ionic Liquid

    SciTech Connect

    Wixtrom, Alex I.; Buhler, Jessica E.; Reece, Charles E.; Abdel-Fattah, Tarek M.

    2013-06-01

    Minimal surface roughness is a critical feature for high-field superconducting radio frequency (SRF) cavities used to engineer particle accelerators. Current methods for polishing Niobium cavities typically utilize solutions containing a mixture of concentrated sulfuric and hydrofluoric acid. Polishing processes such as these are effective, yet there are many hazards and costs associated with the use (and safe disposal) of the concentrated acid solutions. An alternative method for electrochemical polishing of the cavities was explored using a novel ionic liquid solution containing choline chloride. Potentiostatic electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) was used to analyze the ionic polishing solution. Final surface roughness of the Nb was found to be comparable to that of the acid-polishing method, as assessed by atomic force microscopy (AFM). This indicates that ionic liquid-based electrochemical polishing of Nb is a viable replacement for acid-based methods for preparation of SRF cavities.

  8. Cathodic deposition of BiTe as thermoelectric films using choline chloride based ionic liquids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Golgovici, Florentina; Visan, Teodor

    2012-06-01

    This paper reports the electrodeposition of BiTe by potential control electrolysis using a ionic liquid based on choline chloride and malonic acid mixture (1:1 moles) in the 25-60°C temperature range. From cyclic voltammetry and impedance experiments carried out in order to characterize the cathodic process on Pt electrode it was found that the deposition of BiTe from electrolytes occurs on a Te-covered Pt substrate at less negative potentials than for deposition of singular Bi or Te films. Nyquist and Bode impedance spectra showed differences in Pt behavior due to its polarization at various cathodic potentials. The morphology and chemical composition of BiTe films deposited on Cu were determined by AFM, SEM and TEM microscopy.

  9. Low Temperature Magnetic Ordering of the Magnetic Ionic Plastic Crystal, Choline[FeCl4

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Pedro, I.; García-Saiz, A.; Andreica, D.; Fernández Barquín, L.; Fernández-Díaz, M. T.; Blanco, J. A.; Amato, A.; Rodríguez Fernández, J.

    2015-11-01

    We report on the nature of the low temperature magnetic ordering of a magnetic ionic plastic crystal, Choline[FeCl4]. This investigation was carried out using heat capacity measurements, neutron diffraction experiments and muon spin relaxation (μSR) spectroscopy. The calorimetric measurements show the onset of an unusual magnetic ordering below 4 K with a possible second magnetic phase transition below 2 K. Low temperature neutron diffraction data reveal a three dimensional antiferromagnetic ordering at 2 K compatible with the previous magnetometry results. The analysis of μSR spectra indicates a magnetic phase transition below 2.2 K. At 1.6 K, the analysis of the shape of the μSR spectra suggests the existence of an additional magnetic phase with features of a possible incommensurate magnetic structure.

  10. Ionic Grease Lubricants: Protic [Triethanolamine][Oleic Acid] and Aprotic [Choline][Oleic Acid].

    PubMed

    Mu, Liwen; Shi, Yijun; Ji, Tuo; Chen, Long; Yuan, Ruixia; Wang, Huaiyuan; Zhu, Jiahua

    2016-02-01

    Ionic liquid lubricants or lubricant additives have been studied intensively over past decades. However, ionic grease serving as lubricant has rarely been investigated so far. In this work, novel protic [triethanolamine][oleic acid] and aprotic [choline][oleic acid] ionic greases are successfully synthesized. These ionic greases can be directly used as lubricants without adding thickeners or other additives. Their distinct thermal and rheological properties are investigated and are well-correlated to their tribological properties. It is revealed that aprotic ionic grease shows superior temperature- and pressure-tolerant lubrication properties over those of protic ionic grease. The lubrication mechanism is studied, and it reveals that strong physical adsorption of ionic grease onto friction surface plays a dominating role for promoted lubrication instead of tribo-chemical film formation. PMID:26815603

  11. Surfactant Behavior of Sodium Dodecylsulfate in Deep Eutectic Solvent Choline Chloride/Urea.

    PubMed

    Arnold, T; Jackson, A J; Sanchez-Fernandez, A; Magnone, D; Terry, A E; Edler, K J

    2015-12-01

    Deep eutectic solvents (DES) resemble ionic liquids but are formed from an ionic mixture instead of being a single ionic compound. Here we present some results that demonstrate that surfactant sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS) remains surface-active and shows self-assembly phenomena in the most commonly studied DES, choline chloride/urea. X-ray reflectivity (XRR) and small angle neutron scattering (SANS) suggest that the behavior is significantly different from that in water. Our SANS data supports our determination of the critical micelle concentration using surface-tension measurements and suggests that the micelles formed in DES do not have the same shape and size as those seen in water. Reflectivity measurements have also demonstrated that the surfactants remain surface-active below this concentration. PMID:26540438

  12. Mesoporous and biocompatible surface active silica aerogel synthesis using choline formate ionic liquid.

    PubMed

    Meera, Kamal Mohamed Seeni; Sankar, Rajavelu Murali; Jaisankar, Sellamuthu N; Mandal, Asit Baran

    2011-09-01

    In this paper, we report the preparation and characterization of mesoporous and biocompatible transparent silica aerogel by the sol-gel polymerization of tetraethyl orthosilicate using ionic liquid. Choline cation based ionic liquid allows the silica framework to form in a non collapsing environment and controls the pore size of the gel. FT-IR spectra reveal the interaction of ionic liquid with surface -OH of the gel. DSC thermogram giving the evidence of confinement of ionic liquid within the silica matrix, which helps to avoid the shrinkage of the gel during the aging process. Nitrogen sorption measurements of gel prepared with ionic liquid exhibit a low surface area of 100.53 m2/g and high average pore size of 3.74 nm. MTT assay proves the biocompatibility and cell viability of the prepared gels. This new nanoporous silica material can be applied to immobilize biological molecules, which may retain their stability over a longer period. PMID:21565470

  13. Effects of dietary amino acids, carbohydrates, and choline on neurotransmitter synthesis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wurtman, Richard J.

    1988-01-01

    The ability of a meal to increase or decrease brain neurotransmitter synthesis has been studied. It is concluded that brain serotonin synthesis is directly controlled by the proportions of carbohydrate to protein in meals and snacks that increase or decrease brain tryptophan levels, thereby changing the substrate saturation of tryptophan hydroxylase and the rate of serotonin synthesis. The ability of serotoninergic neurons to have their output coupled to dietary macronutrients enables them to function as sensors of peripheral metabolism, and to subserve an important role in the control of appetite. The robust and selective responses of catecholaminergic and cholinergic neurons to supplemental tyrosine and choline suggest that these compounds may become useful as a new type of drug for treating deseases or conditions in which adequate quantities of the transmitter would otherwise be unavailable.

  14. Construction of an acetylcholinesterase-choline oxidase biosensor for aldicarb determination.

    PubMed

    Kok, Fatma N; Bozoglu, Faruk; Hasirci, Vasif

    2002-06-01

    In this study, acetylcholinesterase and choline oxidase were co-immobilized on poly(2-hydroxyethyl methacrylate) membranes and the change in oxygen consumption upon aldicarb introduction was measured. Immobilization of the enzymes was achieved either by entrapment or by surface attachment via a hybrid immobilization method including epichlorohydrin and Cibacron Blue F36A activation. Immobilized enzymes had a long-storage stability (only 15% activity decrease in 2 months in wet storage and no activity loss in dry storage). Aldicarb detection studies showed that a linear working range of 10-500 and 10-250 ppb aldicarb could be achieved by entrapped and surface immobilized enzymes, respectively. Enzymes immobilized on membrane surfaces responded to aldicarb presence more quickly than entrapped enzymes. Aldicarb concentrations as low as 23 and 12 ppb could be detected by entrapped and surface immobilized enzymes, respectively, in 25 min. PMID:11959475

  15. Determination of binary pesticide mixtures by an acetylcholinesterase-choline oxidase biosensor.

    PubMed

    Kok, Fatma N; Hasirci, Vasif

    2004-02-15

    In this study, acetylcholinesterase (AChE) and choline oxidase (ChO) were co-immobilized on poly(2-hydroxyethyl methacrylate) (pHEMA) membranes to construct a biosensor for the detection of anti-cholinesterase compounds. pHEMA membranes were prepared with the addition of SnCl(4) to achieve the desired porosity. Immobilization of the enzymes was done by surface attachment via epichlorohydrin (Epi) and Cibacron Blue F3G-A (CB) activation. Enzyme immobilized membrane was used in the detection of anti-cholinesterase activity of aldicarb (AS), carbofuran (CF) and carbaryl (CL), as well as two mixtures, (AS+CF) and (AS+CL). The total anti-cholinesterase activity of binary pesticide mixtures was found to be lower than the sum of the individual inhibition values. PMID:14709383

  16. Elevated prefrontal myo-inositol and choline following breast cancer chemotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Watson, Christa; Koovakkattu, Della; Lee, Clement; O’Hara, Ruth; Mahaffey, Misty L.; Wefel, Jeffrey S.

    2013-01-01

    Breast cancer survivors are at increased risk for cognitive dysfunction, which reduces quality of life. Neuroimaging studies provide critical insights regarding the mechanisms underlying these cognitive deficits as well as potential biologic targets for interventions. We measured several metabolite concentrations using 1H magnetic resonance spectroscopy as well as cognitive performance in 19 female breast cancer survivors and 17 age-matched female controls. Women with breast cancer were all treated with chemotherapy. Results indicated significantly increased choline (Cho) and myo-inositol (mI) with correspondingly decreased N-acetylaspartate (NAA)/Cho and NAA/mI ratios in the breast cancer group compared to controls. The breast cancer group reported reduced executive function and memory, and subjective memory ability was correlated with mI and Cho levels in both groups. These findings provide preliminary evidence of an altered metabolic profile that increases our understanding of neurobiologic status post-breast cancer and chemotherapy. PMID:23536015

  17. Role of choline deficiency in the Fatty liver phenotype of mice fed a low protein, very low carbohydrate ketogenic diet.

    PubMed

    Schugar, Rebecca C; Huang, Xiaojing; Moll, Ashley R; Brunt, Elizabeth M; Crawford, Peter A

    2013-01-01

    Though widely employed for clinical intervention in obesity, metabolic syndrome, seizure disorders and other neurodegenerative diseases, the mechanisms through which low carbohydrate ketogenic diets exert their ameliorative effects still remain to be elucidated. Rodent models have been used to identify the metabolic and physiologic alterations provoked by ketogenic diets. A commonly used rodent ketogenic diet (Bio-Serv F3666) that is very high in fat (~94% kcal), very low in carbohydrate (~1% kcal), low in protein (~5% kcal), and choline restricted (~300 mg/kg) provokes robust ketosis and weight loss in mice, but through unknown mechanisms, also causes significant hepatic steatosis, inflammation, and cellular injury. To understand the independent and synergistic roles of protein restriction and choline deficiency on the pleiotropic effects of rodent ketogenic diets, we studied four custom diets that differ only in protein (5% kcal vs. 10% kcal) and choline contents (300 mg/kg vs. 5 g/kg). C57BL/6J mice maintained on the two 5% kcal protein diets induced the most significant ketoses, which was only partially diminished by choline replacement. Choline restriction in the setting of 10% kcal protein also caused moderate ketosis and hepatic fat accumulation, which were again attenuated when choline was replete. Key effects of the 5% kcal protein diet - weight loss, hepatic fat accumulation, and mitochondrial ultrastructural disarray and bioenergetic dysfunction - were mitigated by choline repletion. These studies indicate that synergistic effects of protein restriction and choline deficiency influence integrated metabolism and hepatic pathology in mice when nutritional fat content is very high, and support the consideration of dietary choline content in ketogenic diet studies in rodents to limit hepatic mitochondrial dysfunction and fat accumulation. PMID:24009777

  18. Dietary choline supplementation to dams during pregnancy and lactation mitigates the effects of in utero stress exposure on adult anxiety-related behaviors.

    PubMed

    Schulz, Kalynn M; Pearson, Jennifer N; Gasparrini, Mary E; Brooks, Kayla F; Drake-Frazier, Chakeer; Zajkowski, Megan E; Kreisler, Alison D; Adams, Catherine E; Leonard, Sherry; Stevens, Karen E

    2014-07-15

    Brain cholinergic dysfunction is associated with neuropsychiatric illnesses such as depression, anxiety, and schizophrenia. Maternal stress exposure is associated with these same illnesses in adult offspring, yet the relationship between prenatal stress and brain cholinergic function is largely unexplored. Thus, using a rodent model, the current study implemented an intervention aimed at buffering the potential effects of prenatal stress on the developing brain cholinergic system. Specifically, control and stressed dams were fed choline-supplemented or control chow during pregnancy and lactation, and the anxiety-related behaviors of adult offspring were assessed in the open field, elevated zero maze and social interaction tests. In the open field test, choline supplementation significantly increased center investigation in both stressed and nonstressed female offspring, suggesting that choline-supplementation decreases female anxiety-related behavior irrespective of prenatal stress exposure. In the elevated zero maze, prenatal stress increased anxiety-related behaviors of female offspring fed a control diet (normal choline levels). However, prenatal stress failed to increase anxiety-related behaviors in female offspring receiving supplemental choline during gestation and lactation, suggesting that dietary choline supplementation ameliorated the effects of prenatal stress on anxiety-related behaviors. For male rats, neither prenatal stress nor diet impacted anxiety-related behaviors in the open field or elevated zero maze. In contrast, perinatal choline supplementation mitigated prenatal stress-induced social behavioral deficits in males, whereas neither prenatal stress nor choline supplementation influenced female social behaviors. Taken together, these data suggest that perinatal choline supplementation ameliorates the sex-specific effects of prenatal stress. PMID:24675162

  19. Long-term improvements in sensory inhibition with gestational choline supplementation linked to α7 nicotinic receptors through studies in Chrna7 null mutation mice.

    PubMed

    Stevens, Karen E; Choo, Kevin S; Stitzel, Jerry A; Marks, Michael J; Adams, Catherine E

    2014-03-13

    Perinatal choline supplementation has produced several benefits in rodent models, from improved learning and memory to protection from the behavioral effects of fetal alcohol exposure. We have shown that supplemented choline through gestation and lactation produces long-term improvement in deficient sensory inhibition in DBA/2 mice which models a similar deficit in schizophrenia patients. The present study extends that research by feeding normal or supplemented choline diets to DBA/2 mice carrying the null mutation for the α7 nicotinic receptor gene (Chrna7). DBA/2 mice heterozygotic for Chrna7 were bred together. Dams were placed on supplemented (5 gm/kg diet) or normal (1.1 gm/kg diet) choline at mating and remained on the specific diet until offspring weaning. Thereafter, offspring were fed standard rodent chow. Adult offspring were assessed for sensory inhibition. Brains were obtained to ascertain hippocampal α7 nicotinic receptor levels. Choline-supplemented mice heterozygotic or null-mutant for Chrna7 failed to show improvement in sensory inhibition. Only wildtype choline-supplemented mice showed improvement with the effect solely through a decrease in test amplitude. This supports the hypothesis that gestational-choline supplementation is acting through the α7 nicotinic receptor to improve sensory inhibition. Although there was a significant gene-dose-related change in hippocampal α7 receptor numbers, binding studies did not reveal any choline-dose-related change in binding in any hippocampal region, the interaction being driven by a significant genotype main effect (wildtype>heterozygote>null mutant). These data parallel a human study wherein the offspring of pregnant women receiving choline supplementation during gestation, showed better sensory inhibition than offspring of women on placebo. PMID:24462939

  20. Role of Choline Deficiency in the Fatty Liver Phenotype of Mice Fed a Low Protein, Very Low Carbohydrate Ketogenic Diet

    PubMed Central

    Schugar, Rebecca C.; Huang, Xiaojing; Moll, Ashley R.; Brunt, Elizabeth M.; Crawford, Peter A.

    2013-01-01

    Though widely employed for clinical intervention in obesity, metabolic syndrome, seizure disorders and other neurodegenerative diseases, the mechanisms through which low carbohydrate ketogenic diets exert their ameliorative effects still remain to be elucidated. Rodent models have been used to identify the metabolic and physiologic alterations provoked by ketogenic diets. A commonly used rodent ketogenic diet (Bio-Serv F3666) that is very high in fat (~94% kcal), very low in carbohydrate (~1% kcal), low in protein (~5% kcal), and choline restricted (~300 mg/kg) provokes robust ketosis and weight loss in mice, but through unknown mechanisms, also causes significant hepatic steatosis, inflammation, and cellular injury. To understand the independent and synergistic roles of protein restriction and choline deficiency on the pleiotropic effects of rodent ketogenic diets, we studied four custom diets that differ only in protein (5% kcal vs. 10% kcal) and choline contents (300 mg/kg vs. 5 g/kg). C57BL/6J mice maintained on the two 5% kcal protein diets induced the most significant ketoses, which was only partially diminished by choline replacement. Choline restriction in the setting of 10% kcal protein also caused moderate ketosis and hepatic fat accumulation, which were again attenuated when choline was replete. Key effects of the 5% kcal protein diet – weight loss, hepatic fat accumulation, and mitochondrial ultrastructural disarray and bioenergetic dysfunction – were mitigated by choline repletion. These studies indicate that synergistic effects of protein restriction and choline deficiency influence integrated metabolism and hepatic pathology in mice when nutritional fat content is very high, and support the consideration of dietary choline content in ketogenic diet studies in rodents to limit hepatic mitochondrial dysfunction and fat accumulation. PMID:24009777

  1. Role of Valine 464 in the Flavin Oxidation Reaction Catalyzed by Choline Oxidase

    SciTech Connect

    Finnegan, Steffan; Agniswamy, Johnson; Weber, Irene T.; Gadda, Giovanni

    2010-11-03

    The oxidation of reduced flavin cofactors by oxygen is a very important reaction that is central to the chemical versatility of hundreds of flavoproteins classified as monooxygenases and oxidases. These enzymes are characterized by bimolecular rate constants {ge} 10{sup 5} M{sup -1} s{sup -1} and produce water and hydrogen peroxide, respectively. A hydrophobic cavity close to the reactive flavin C(4a) atom has been previously identified in the 3D structure of monooxygenases but not in flavoprotein oxidases. In the present study, we have investigated by X-ray crystallography, mutagenesis, steady-state, and rapid reaction approaches the role of Val464, which is <6 {angstrom} from the flavin C(4a) atom in choline oxidase. The 3D structure of the Val464Ala enzyme was essentially identical to that of the wild-type enzyme as shown by X-ray crystallography. Time-resolved anaerobic substrate reduction of the enzymes showed that replacement of Val464 with alanine or threonine did not affect the reductive half-reaction. Steady-state and rapid kinetics as well as enzyme-monitored turnovers indicated that the oxidative half-reaction in the Ala464 and Thr464 enzymes was decreased by 50-fold with respect to the wild-type enzyme. We propose that the side chain of Val464 in choline oxidase provides a nonpolar site that is required to guide oxygen in proximity of the C(4a) atom of the flavin, where it will subsequently react via electrostatic catalysis. Visual analysis of available structures suggests that analogous nonpolar sites are likely present in most flavoprotein oxidases. Mechanistic considerations provide rationalization for the differences between sites in monooxygenases and oxidases.

  2. Electrodeposition of copper composites from deep eutectic solvents based on choline chloride.

    PubMed

    Abbott, Andrew P; El Ttaib, Khalid; Frisch, Gero; McKenzie, Katy J; Ryder, Karl S

    2009-06-01

    Here we describe for the first time the electrolytic deposition of copper and copper composites from a solution of the metal chloride salt in either urea-choline chloride, or ethylene glycol-choline chloride based eutectics. We show that the deposition kinetics and thermodynamics are quite unlike those in aqueous solution under comparable conditions and that the copper ion complexation is also different. The mechanism of copper nucleation is studied using chronoamperometry and it is shown that progressive nucleation leads to a bright nano-structured deposit. In contrast, instantaneous nucleation, at lower concentrations of copper ions, leads to a dull deposit. This work also pioneers the use of the electrochemical quartz crystal microbalance (EQCM) to monitor both current efficiency and the inclusion of inert particulates into the copper coatings. This technique allows the first in situ quantification or particulate inclusion. It was found that the composition of composite material was strongly dependent on the amount of species suspended in solution. It was also shown that the majority of material was dragged onto the surface rather than settling on to it. The distribution of the composite material was found to be even throughout the coating. This technology is important because it facilitates deposition of bright copper coatings without co-ligands such as cyanide. The incorporation of micron-sized particulates into ionic liquids has resulted, in one case, in a decrease in viscosity. This observation is both unusual and surprising; we explain this here in terms of an increase in the free volume of the liquid and local solvent perturbation. PMID:19458829

  3. Phosphorylation of Human Choline Kinase Beta by Protein Kinase A: Its Impact on Activity and Inhibition

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Ching Ching; Few, Ling Ling; Konrad, Manfred; See Too, Wei Cun

    2016-01-01

    Choline kinase beta (CKβ) is one of the CK isozymes involved in the biosynthesis of phosphatidylcholine. CKβ is important for normal mitochondrial function and muscle development as the lack of the ckβ gene in human and mice results in the development of muscular dystrophy. In contrast, CKα is implicated in tumorigenesis and has been extensively studied as an anticancer target. Phosphorylation of human CKα was found to regulate the enzyme’s activity and its subcellular location. This study provides evidence for CKβ phosphorylation by protein kinase A (PKA). In vitro phosphorylation of CKβ by PKA was first detected by phosphoprotein staining, as well as by in-gel kinase assays. The phosphorylating kinase was identified as PKA by Western blotting. CKβ phosphorylation by MCF-7 cell lysate was inhibited by a PKA-specific inhibitor peptide, and the intracellular phosphorylation of CKβ was shown to be regulated by the level of cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP), a PKA activator. Phosphorylation sites were located on CKβ residues serine-39 and serine-40 as determined by mass spectrometry and site-directed mutagenesis. Phosphorylation increased the catalytic efficiencies for the substrates choline and ATP about 2-fold, without affecting ethanolamine phosphorylation, and the S39D/S40D CKβ phosphorylation mimic behaved kinetically very similar. Remarkably, phosphorylation drastically increased the sensitivity of CKβ to hemicholinium-3 (HC-3) inhibition by about 30-fold. These findings suggest that CKβ, in concert with CKα, and depending on its phosphorylation status, might play a critical role as a druggable target in carcinogenesis. PMID:27149373

  4. Regulation of CTP:choline-phosphate cytidylyltransferase by polyunsaturated n-3 fatty acids.

    PubMed

    Mallampalli, R K; Salome, R G; Spector, A A

    1994-12-01

    Disaturated phosphatidylcholine (DSPC) is the most distinctive surface-active lipid in pulmonary surfactant. The feeding of docosahexanoic acid (DHA) 22:6 n-3 has recently been described to elevate the levels of DSPC in rodent lung. The purpose of the present study was to determine the mechanisms by which this n-3 fatty acid might regulate CTP:choline-phosphate cytidylyltransferase, a key enzyme required for phosphatidylcholine (PC) synthesis. Cytidylyltransferase exists in lung cytosol as a large lipid-associated aggregate (H form) which is active, and as an inactive, low-molecular-weight species (L form). Fatty acids in vitro stimulate and aggregate the inactive L form to the active H form. Short-term (2-h) and long-term (24-h) exposure of fetal lung explants to DHA (150 microM) stimulated choline incorporation into PC by 54 and 64%, respectively. The fatty acid also enhanced DSPC synthesis by 88%. These changes were associated with an increase in the activity of cytidylyltransferase by 63% after addition of DHA to the explant medium. In vitro, DHA (50 microM) stimulated L form nearly 15-fold and appeared to be a more potent activator and aggregator of the enzyme than either linoleic 18:2 n-6 or arachidonic 20:4 n-6 acids. The effect of DHA on L-form activation was comparable, however, with other members of the n-3 family. Kinetic studies revealed that DHA increased the maximum velocity of enzyme reaction for cytidylyltransferase, although it did not alter the Michaelis constant of the enzyme for CTP. These observations provide in vitro evidence that n-3 fatty acids may play an important role in the regulation of surfactant PC biosynthesis. PMID:7810669

  5. Electrocatalytic Microelectrode Detectors for Choline and Acetylcholine following Separation by Capillary Electrophoresis

    PubMed Central

    Mukherjee, Jhindan; Kirchhoff, Jon R.

    2009-01-01

    Two electrocatalytic enzyme modified microelectrode systems were employed as end-column amperometric detectors of choline (Ch) and acetylcholine (ACh) following separation by capillary electrophoresis (CE). Horseradish peroxidase crosslinked in an Os based redox polymer hydrogel (HRP-Os) was physically adsorbed on Au microelectrodes followed by chemical crosslinking of the enzymes acetylcholinesterase (AChE) and choline oxidase (ChO). An alternative approach utilized the deposition of the transition metal catalyst, Prussian Blue (PB), on Pt microelectrodes as the electrocatalyst. Utilizing butyrylcholine (BuCh) as an internal standard, the HRP-Os/AChE-ChO and PB/AChE-ChO electrodes exhibited excellent linear responses from 2–2000 μM and 10–2000 μM, respectively, for both Ch and ACh. Detection limits of 0.1 μM or 38 amol were determined for the HRP-Os/AChE-ChO electrode. The limit of detection for ACh and Ch at the PB/AChE-ChO electrode was 5 μM or 9.5 fmol. The electrodes were operated at potentials of +0.10 and −0.10 V vs. Ag/AgCl (3M NaCl), respectively, and thus minimized the potential response from oxidizable interferences. In addition, both electrocatalytic electrodes showed good operational stability for more than 70 hours. The enhanced detection capability of the HRP-Os/AChE-ChO and PB/AChE-ChO electrodes in combination with efficient CE separation of Ch and ACh provides a new sensitive and selective strategy for monitoring and quantifying these cholinergic biomarkers in biological fluids. PMID:20337384

  6. Functional Consequences and Structural Interpretation of Mutations of Human Choline Acetyltransferase

    PubMed Central

    Shen, Xin-Ming; Crawford, Thomas O.; Brengman, Joan; Acsadi, Gyula; Iannaconne, Susan; Karaca, Emin; Khoury, Chaouky; Mah, Jean K.; Edvardson, Shimon; Bajzer, Zeljko; Rodgers, David; Engel, Andrew G.

    2011-01-01

    Choline acetyltransferase (ChAT; EC 2.3.1.6) catalyzes synthesis of acetylcholine from acetyl-CoA and choline in cholinergic neurons. Mutations in CHAT (MIM # 118490) cause potentially lethal congenital myasthenic syndromes associated with episodic apnea (ChAT-CMS) (MIM # 254210). Here we analyze the functional consequences of 12 missense and 1 nonsense mutations of CHAT in 11 patients. Nine of the mutations are novel. We examine expression of the recombinant missense mutants in Bosc 23 cells, determine their kinetic properties and thermal stability, and interpret the functional effects of 11 mutations in the context of the atomic structural model of human ChAT. Five mutations (p.Trp421Ser, p.Ser498Pro, p.Thr553Asn, p.Ala557Thr, p.Ser572Trp) reduce enzyme expression to <50% of wild-type. Mutations with severe kinetic effects are located in the active-site tunnel (p.Met202Arg, p.Thr553Asn and p.Ala557Thr) or adjacent to the substrate binding site (p.Ser572Trp), or exert their effect allosterically (p.Trp421Ser and p.Ile689Ser). Two mutations with milder kinetic effects (p.Val136Met, p.Ala235Thr) are also predicted to act allosterically. One mutation (p.Thr608Asn) below the nucleotide binding site of CoA enhances dissociation of AcCoA from the enzyme-substrate complex. Two mutations introducing a proline residue into an α-helix (p.Ser498Pro and p.Ser704Pro) impair the thermal stability of ChAT. PMID:21786365

  7. Regulatory region in choline acetyltransferase gene directs developmental and tissue-specific expression in transgenic mice.

    PubMed Central

    Lönnerberg, P; Lendahl, U; Funakoshi, H; Arhlund-Richter, L; Persson, H; Ibáñez, C F

    1995-01-01

    Acetylcholine, one of the main neurotransmitters in the nervous system, is synthesized by the enzyme choline acetyltransferase (ChAT; acetyl-CoA:choline O-acetyltransferase, EC 2.3.1.6). The molecular mechanisms controlling the establishment, maintenance, and plasticity of the cholinergic phenotype in vivo are largely unknown. A previous report showed that a 3800-bp, but not a 1450-bp, 5' flanking segment from the rat ChAT gene promoter directed cell type-specific expression of a reporter gene in cholinergic cells in vitro. Now we have characterized a distal regulatory region of the ChAT gene that confers cholinergic specificity on a heterologous downstream promoter in a cholinergic cell line and in transgenic mice. A 2342-bp segment from the 5' flanking region of the ChAT gene behaved as an enhancer in cholinergic cells but as a repressor in noncholinergic cells in an orientation-independent manner. Combined with a heterologous basal promoter, this fragment targeted transgene expression to several cholinergic regions of the central nervous system of transgenic mice, including basal forebrain, cortex, pons, and spinal cord. In eight independent transgenic lines, the pattern of transgene expression paralleled qualitatively and quantitatively that displayed by endogenous ChAT mRNA in various regions of the rat central nervous system. In the lumbar enlargement of the spinal cord, 85-90% of the transgene expression was targeted to the ventral part of the cord, where cholinergic alpha-motor neurons are located. Transgene expression in the spinal cord was developmentally regulated and responded to nerve injury in a similar way as the endogenous ChAT gene, indicating that the 2342-bp regulatory sequence contains elements controlling the plasticity of the cholinergic phenotype in developing and injured neurons. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 PMID:7732028

  8. Cytidine 5'-diphosphocholine (CDP-choline) adversely effects on pilocarpine seizure-induced hippocampal neuronal death.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jin Hee; Lee, Dong Won; Choi, Bo Young; Sohn, Min; Lee, Song Hee; Choi, Hui Chul; Song, Hong Ki; Suh, Sang Won

    2015-01-21

    Citicoline (CDP-choline; cytidine 5'-diphosphocholine) is an important intermediate in the biosynthesis of cell membrane phospholipids. Citicoline serves as a choline donor in the biosynthetic pathways of acetylcholine and neuronal membrane phospholipids, mainly phosphatidylcholine. The ability of citicoline to reverse neuronal injury has been tested in animal models of cerebral ischemia and clinical trials have been performed in stroke patients. However, no studies have examined the effect of citicoline on seizure-induced neuronal death. To clarify the potential therapeutic effects of citicoline on seizure-induced neuronal death, we used an animal model of pilocarpine-induced epilepsy. Temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE) was induced by intraperitoneal injection of pilocarpine (25mg/kg) in adult male rats. Citicoline (100 or 300 mg/kg) was injected into the intraperitoneal space two hours after seizure onset and a second injection was performed 24h after the seizure. Citicoline was injected once per day for one week after pilocarpine- or kainate-induced seizure. Neuronal injury and microglial activation were evaluated at 1 week post-seizure. Surprisingly, rather than offering protection, citicoline treatment actually enhanced seizure-induced neuronal death and microglial activation in the hippocampus compared to vehicle treated controls. Citicoline administration after seizure-induction increased immunoglobulin leakage via BBB disruption in the hippocampus compared with the vehicle-only group. To clarify if this adverse effect of citicoline is generalizable across alternative seizure models, we induced seizure by kainate injection (10mg/kg, i.p.) and then injected citicoline as in pilocarpine-induced seizure. We found that citicoline did not modulate kainate seizure-induced neuronal death, BBB disruption or microglial activation. These results suggest that citicoline may not have neuroprotective effects after seizure and that clinical application of citicoline after

  9. Choline dehydrogenase interacts with SQSTM1/p62 to recruit LC3 and stimulate mitophagy

    PubMed Central

    Park, Sungwoo; Choi, Seon-Guk; Yoo, Seung-Min; Son, Jin H; Jung, Yong-Keun

    2014-01-01

    CHDH (choline dehydrogenase) is an enzyme catalyzing the dehydrogenation of choline to betaine aldehyde in mitochondria. Apart from this well-known activity, we report here a pivotal role of CHDH in mitophagy. Knockdown of CHDH expression impairs CCCP-induced mitophagy and PARK2/parkin-mediated clearance of mitochondria in mammalian cells, including HeLa cells and SN4741 dopaminergic neuronal cells. Conversely, overexpression of CHDH accelerates PARK2-mediated mitophagy. CHDH is found on both the outer and inner membranes of mitochondria in resting cells. Interestingly, upon induction of mitophagy, CHDH accumulates on the outer membrane in a mitochondrial potential-dependent manner. We found that CHDH is not a substrate of PARK2 but interacts with SQSTM1 independently of PARK2 to recruit SQSTM1 into depolarized mitochondria. The FB1 domain of CHDH is exposed to the cytosol and is required for the interaction with SQSTM1, and overexpression of the FB1 domain only in cytosol reduces CCCP-induced mitochondrial degradation via competitive interaction with SQSTM1. In addition, CHDH, but not the CHDH FB1 deletion mutant, forms a ternary protein complex with SQSTM1 and MAP1LC3 (LC3), leading to loading of LC3 onto the damaged mitochondria via SQSTM1. Further, CHDH is crucial to the mitophagy induced by MPP+ in SN4741 cells. Overall, our results suggest that CHDH is required for PARK2-mediated mitophagy for the recruitment of SQSTM1 and LC3 onto the mitochondria for cargo recognition. PMID:25483962

  10. Choline dehydrogenase interacts with SQSTM1/p62 to recruit LC3 and stimulate mitophagy.

    PubMed

    Park, Sungwoo; Choi, Seon-Guk; Yoo, Seung-Min; Son, Jin H; Jung, Yong-Keun

    2014-01-01

    CHDH (choline dehydrogenase) is an enzyme catalyzing the dehydrogenation of choline to betaine aldehyde in mitochondria. Apart from this well-known activity, we report here a pivotal role of CHDH in mitophagy. Knockdown of CHDH expression impairs CCCP-induced mitophagy and PARK2/parkin-mediated clearance of mitochondria in mammalian cells, including HeLa cells and SN4741 dopaminergic neuronal cells. Conversely, overexpression of CHDH accelerates PARK2-mediated mitophagy. CHDH is found on both the outer and inner membranes of mitochondria in resting cells. Interestingly, upon induction of mitophagy, CHDH accumulates on the outer membrane in a mitochondrial potential-dependent manner. We found that CHDH is not a substrate of PARK2 but interacts with SQSTM1 independently of PARK2 to recruit SQSTM1 into depolarized mitochondria. The FB1 domain of CHDH is exposed to the cytosol and is required for the interaction with SQSTM1, and overexpression of the FB1 domain only in cytosol reduces CCCP-induced mitochondrial degradation via competitive interaction with SQSTM1. In addition, CHDH, but not the CHDH FB1 deletion mutant, forms a ternary protein complex with SQSTM1 and MAP1LC3 (LC3), leading to loading of LC3 onto the damaged mitochondria via SQSTM1. Further, CHDH is crucial to the mitophagy induced by MPP+ in SN4741 cells. Overall, our results suggest that CHDH is required for PARK2-mediated mitophagy for the recruitment of SQSTM1 and LC3 onto the mitochondria for cargo recognition. PMID:25483962

  11. Betaine aldehyde, betaine, and choline levels in rat livers during ethanol metabolism.

    PubMed

    Chern, M K; Gage, D A; Pietruszko, R

    2000-12-01

    Betaine aldehyde levels were determined in rat livers following 4 weeks of ethanol feeding, employing the Lieber-De Carli liquid diet. The results showed that the levels of betaine aldehyde are unaffected by alcohol feeding to rats. These levels in both experimental and control animals were found to be quite low, 5.5 nmol/g liver. Betaine aldehyde levels have not been determined previously in mammalian liver because of methodological difficulties. This investigation employed fast atom bombardment-mass spectroscopy to determine the levels of betaine aldehyde, betaine, and choline. The decrease in betaine levels following ethanol administration confirmed the results of other investigators. Choline levels determined during this investigation were lower than previously reported. The reason for starting this investigation was the fact that the enzyme that catalyzes betaine aldehyde dehydrogenation to betaine, which is distributed in both mitochondria and the cytoplasm, was found to also metabolize acetaldehyde with K(m) and V(max) values lower than those for betaine aldehyde. Thus, it appeared likely that the metabolism of acetaldehyde during ethanol metabolism might inhibit betaine aldehyde conversion to betaine and thereby result in decreased betaine levels (Barak et al., Alcohol 13: 395-398, 1996). The fact that betaine aldehyde levels in alcohol-fed animals were similar to those in controls demonstrates that competition between acetaldehyde and betaine aldehyde for the same enzyme does not occur. This complete lack of competition suggests that betaine aldehyde dehydrogenase in the mitochondrial matrix may totally metabolize betaine aldehyde to betaine without any involvement of cytoplasmic betaine aldehyde dehydrogenase. PMID:11077045

  12. Comparative effects of aluminum and ouabain on synaptosomal choline uptake, acetylcholine release and (Na+/K+)ATPase.

    PubMed

    Silva, Virgília S; Nunes, M Alexandra; Cordeiro, J Miguel; Calejo, Ana I; Santos, Sofia; Neves, Paulo; Sykes, António; Morgado, Fernando; Dunant, Yves; Gonçalves, Paula P

    2007-07-17

    Closing the gap between adverse health effects of aluminum and its mechanisms of action still represents a huge challenge. Cholinergic dysfunction has been implicated in neuronal injury induced by aluminum. Previously reported data also indicate that in vivo and in vitro exposure to aluminum inhibits the mammalian (Na(+)/K(+))ATPase, an ubiquitous plasma membrane pump. This study was undertaken with the specific aim of determining whether in vitro exposure to AlCl(3) and ouabain, the foremost utilized selective inhibitor of (Na(+)/K(+))ATPase, induce similar functional modifications of cholinergic presynaptic nerve terminals, by comparing their effects on choline uptake, acetylcholine release and (Na(+)/K(+))ATPase activity, on subcellular fractions enriched in synaptic nerve endings isolated from rat brain, cuttlefish optic lobe and torpedo electric organ. Results obtained show that choline uptake by rat synaptosomes was inhibited by submillimolar AlCl(3), whereas the amount of choline taken up by synaptosomes isolated from cuttlefish and torpedo remained unchanged. Conversely, choline uptake was reduced by ouabain to a large extent in all synaptosomal preparations analyzed. In contrast to ouabain, which modified the K(+) depolarization evoked release of acetylcholine by rat, cuttlefish and torpedo synaptosomal fractions, AlCl(3) induced reduction of stimulated acetylcholine release was only observed when rat synaptosomes were challenged. Finally, it was observed that the aluminum effect on cuttlefish and torpedo synaptosomal (Na(+)/K(+))ATPase activity was slight when compared to its inhibitory action on mammalian (Na(+)/K(+))ATPase. In conclusion, inhibition of (Na(+)/K(+))ATPase by AlCl(3) and ouabain jeopardized the high-affinity (Na(+)-dependent, hemicholinium-3 sensitive) uptake of choline and the Ca(2+)-dependent, K(+) depolarization evoked release of acetylcholine by rat, cuttlefish and torpedo synaptosomal fractions. The effects of submillimolar AlCl(3

  13. Choline in infant formula and adult nutritionals by ion chromatography and suppressed conductivity: First Action 2012.20.

    PubMed

    Oates, Kassandra; Chen, Lillian; De Borba, Brian; Mohindra, Deepali; Rohrer, Jeffrey; Dowell, Dawn

    2013-01-01

    Single-laboratory validation (SLV) data from a method for the determination of choline in infant formula and adult nutritionals by ion chromatography (IC) and suppressed conductivity were generated and presented to the Stakeholder Panel on Infant Formula and Adult Nutritionals (SPIFAN) Expert Review Panel (ERP) at the AOAC Annual Meeting held in Las Vegas, NV, during September 30 to October 3, 2012. The ERP reviewed the data and concluded that the data met the standard method performance requirements (SMPRs) established and approved the method as AOAC Official First Action. At the ERP's request, a second, full SLV was performed on 17 SPIFAN matrixes that included fortified and placebo products. Prior to IC analysis, microwave-assisted acid hydrolysis was used to digest and release bound choline from powder and ready-to-feed (RTF) infant formula and adult nutritional samples. Following hydrolysis, separation of choline from common cations was achieved on a Thermo Scientific Dionex IonPac CS19 column followed by suppressed conductivity detection. Total choline was measured and reported as the choline ion in mg/100 g reconstituted material or RTF as-is. The system was calibrated over the analytical range specified in the SMPR (2-250 mg/100 g). Recoveries of spiked samples at 50 and 100% of the fortified choline amounts ranged from 93.1 to 100.7% with RSDs < or = 6.7% for product containing < 2 mg/100 g and < or = 4.1% for product containing 2-100 mg/100 g. Accuracy for the National Institute of Standards and Technology Standard Reference Material 1849a was determined over a 6-day interval and found to be 10.2 +/- 0.2 mg/100 g calculated as the reconstituted powder with an RSD of 1.8%. The LOD was determined to be 0.009, and the LOQ 0.012 mg/100 g, well below the SMPR requirements of 0.7 and 2 mg/100 g, respectively. Repeatability RSDs over the range of the assay (2-200 mg/100 g) ranged from 1.0 to 5.93% PMID:24645521

  14. The role of positron emission tomography using carbon-11 and fluorine-18 choline in tumors other than prostate cancer: a systematic review.

    PubMed

    Treglia, Giorgio; Giovannini, Elisabetta; Di Franco, Davide; Calcagni, Maria Lucia; Rufini, Vittoria; Picchio, Maria; Giordano, Alessandro

    2012-07-01

    To systematically review published data on the role of positron emission tomography (PET) or PET/computed tomography (PET/CT) using either Carbon-11 ((11)C) or Fluorine-18 ((18)F) choline tracer in tumors other than prostatic cancer. A comprehensive literature search of studies published in PubMed/MEDLINE and Embase databases through January 2012 and regarding (11)C-choline or (18)F-choline PET or PET/CT in patients with tumors other than prostatic cancer was carried out. Fifty-two studies comprising 1800 patients were included and discussed. Brain tumors were evaluated in 15 articles, head and neck tumors in 6, thoracic tumors (including lung and mediastinal neoplasms) in 14, liver tumors (including hepatocellular carcinoma) in 5, gynecologic malignancies (including breast tumors) in 5, bladder and upper urinary tract tumors in 5, and musculoskeletal tumors in 7. Radiolabeled choline PET or PET/CT is useful to differentiate high-grade from low-grade gliomas and malignant from benign brain lesions, to early detect brain tumor recurrences and to guide the stereotactic biopsy sampling. The diagnostic accuracy of radiolabeled choline PET is superior compared to Fluorine-18 fluorodeoxyglucose ((18)F-FDG) PET in this setting. Radiolabeled choline PET or PET/CT seems to be accurate in differential diagnosis between malignant and benign thoracic lesions and in staging lung tumors; nevertheless, a superiority of radiolabeled choline compared to (18)F-FDG has not been demonstrated in this setting, except for the detection of brain metastases. Few but significant studies on radiolabeled choline PET and PET/CT in patients with hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) and musculoskeletal tumors are reported in the literature. The combination of radiolabeled choline and (18)F-FDG PET increases the detection rate of HCC. The diagnostic accuracy of radiolabeled choline PET or PET/CT seems to be superior compared to (18)F-FDG PET or PET/CT and conventional imaging methods in patients with

  15. Lymphocyte gene expression in subjects fed a low-choline diet differs between those who develop organ dysfunction and those who do not2

    PubMed Central

    Niculescu, Mihai D; da Costa, Kerry-Ann; Fischer, Leslie M; Zeisel, Steven H

    2008-01-01

    Background Some humans fed a low-choline diet develop hepatosteatosis, liver and muscle damage, and lymphocyte apoptosis. The risk of developing such organ dysfunction is increased by the presence of single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in genes involved in folate and choline metabolism. Objective We investigated whether these changes that occur in the expression of many genes when humans are fed a low-choline diet differ between subjects who develop organ dysfunction and those who do not. We also investigated whether expression changes were dependent on the presence of the SNPs of interest. Design Thirty-three subjects aged 20−67 y were fed for 10 d a baseline diet containing the recommended adequate intake of choline. They then were fed a low-choline diet for up to 42 d or until they developed organ dysfunction. Blood was collected at the end of each phase, and peripheral lymphocytes were isolated and used for genotyping and for gene expression profiling with the use of microarray hybridization. Results Feeding a low-choline diet changed the expression of 259 genes, and the profiles of subjects who developed and those who did not develop signs of organ dysfunction differed. Group clustering and gene ontology analyses found that the diet-induced changes in gene expression profiles were significantly influenced by the SNPs of interest and that the gene expression phenotype of the variant gene carriers differed significantly even with the baseline diet. Conclusion These findings support our hypothesis that a person's susceptibility to organ dysfunction when fed a low-choline diet is modulated by specific SNPs in genes involved in folate and choline metabolism. PMID:17616785

  16. INS, DFT and temperature dependent IR investigations of dynamical properties of low temperature phase of choline chloride

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pawlukojć, A.; Hetmańczyk, Ł.

    2014-12-01

    Within the framework of the research the inelastic neutron scattering and temperature dependent infra-red spectroscopy investigations of the low temperature phase of choline chloride were performed. The infra-red spectra in wavenumber region 4000-80 cm-1 and in a temperature range 9-300 K were collected. The density functional theory calculations with the periodic boundary conditions for determination and description of the normal modes in the vibration spectra of choline chloride were applied. Bands assigned to the CH3 torsional vibration were observed at 288 and 249 cm-1. From the analysis of the temperature dependence of the full-width-at-half-maximum the activation energy for CH3 group reorientation is found to be equal to 1.6 ± 0.2 kcal/mol.

  17. Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy and Imaging Guidance in Molecular Medicine: Targeting and Monitoring of Choline and Glucose Metabolism in Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Glunde, Kristine; Jiang, Lu; Moestue, Siver A.; Gribbestad, Ingrid S.

    2011-01-01

    Magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS) and spectroscopic imaging (MRSI) are valuable tools to detect metabolic changes in tumors. The currently emerging era of molecular medicine, which is shaped by molecularly targeted anticancer therapies combined with molecular imaging of the effects of such therapies, requires powerful imaging technologies that are able to detect molecular information. MRS and MRSI (MRS/I) are such technologies that are able to detect metabolites arising from glucose and choline metabolism in noninvasive in vivo settings and at higher resolution in tissue samples. The roles that MRS/I plays in diagnosing different types of cancer as well as in early monitoring of tumor response to traditional chemotherapies are reviewed. Emerging roles of MRS/I in the development and detection of novel targeted anticancer therapies that target oncogenic signaling pathways or targets in choline or glucose metabolism are discussed. PMID:21793073

  18. Utility of 18F-choline photon emission tomography/computed tomography in the diagnosis of parathyroid adenoma

    PubMed Central

    Damle, Nishikant Avinash; Tripathi, Madhavi; Behera, Abhishek; Aggarwal, Sameer; Bal, Chandrasekhar; Aggarwal, Shipra; Aggarwal, Vivek; Kandasamy, Devasenathipathi; Taywade, Sameer

    2016-01-01

    Recently, the role of 18F-choline in the detection of parathyroid adenomas has been reported. At our institution, we are currently studying the role of this tracer in comparison to the standard methoxy-isobutyl-isonitrile.(MIBI) scan with single photon emission tomography/computed tomography. Our initial results show that 18F-choline is at least as good as 99mTc-MIBI scan. We present here a representative case of a 45-year-old woman with multiple skeletal lytic lesions and a high parathyroid hormone.(PTH) who underwent both these imaging techniques with concordant results, further confirmed by histopathology and postoperative fall in serum PTH levels. PMID:27385893

  19. Utility of (18)F-choline photon emission tomography/computed tomography in the diagnosis of parathyroid adenoma.

    PubMed

    Damle, Nishikant Avinash; Tripathi, Madhavi; Behera, Abhishek; Aggarwal, Sameer; Bal, Chandrasekhar; Aggarwal, Shipra; Aggarwal, Vivek; Kandasamy, Devasenathipathi; Taywade, Sameer

    2016-01-01

    Recently, the role of (18)F-choline in the detection of parathyroid adenomas has been reported. At our institution, we are currently studying the role of this tracer in comparison to the standard methoxy-isobutyl-isonitrile.(MIBI) scan with single photon emission tomography/computed tomography. Our initial results show that (18)F-choline is at least as good as 99mTc-MIBI scan. We present here a representative case of a 45-year-old woman with multiple skeletal lytic lesions and a high parathyroid hormone.(PTH) who underwent both these imaging techniques with concordant results, further confirmed by histopathology and postoperative fall in serum PTH levels. PMID:27385893

  20. Independently recruited oxidases from the glucose-methanol-choline oxidoreductase family enabled chemical defences in leaf beetle larvae (subtribe Chrysomelina) to evolve

    PubMed Central

    Rahfeld, Peter; Kirsch, Roy; Kugel, Susann; Wielsch, Natalie; Stock, Magdalena; Groth, Marco; Boland, Wilhelm; Burse, Antje

    2014-01-01

    Larvae of the leaf beetle subtribe Chrysomelina sensu stricto repel their enemies by displaying glandular secretions that contain defensive compounds. These repellents can be produced either de novo (iridoids) or by using plant-derived precursors (e.g. salicylaldehyde). The autonomous production of iridoids, as in Phaedon cochleariae, is the ancestral chrysomeline chemical defence and predates the evolution of salicylaldehyde-based defence. Both biosynthesis strategies include an oxidative step of an alcohol intermediate. In salicylaldehyde-producing species, this step is catalysed by salicyl alcohol oxidases (SAOs) of the glucose-methanol-choline (GMC) oxidoreductase superfamily, but the enzyme oxidizing the iridoid precursor is unknown. Here, we show by in vitro as well as in vivo experiments that P. cochleariae also uses an oxidase from the GMC superfamily for defensive purposes. However, our phylogenetic analysis of chrysomeline GMC oxidoreductases revealed that the oxidase of the iridoid pathway originated from a GMC clade different from that of the SAOs. Thus, the evolution of a host-independent chemical defence followed by a shift to a host-dependent chemical defence in chrysomeline beetles coincided with the utilization of genes from different GMC subfamilies. These findings illustrate the importance of the GMC multi-gene family for adaptive processes in plant–insect interactions. PMID:24943369

  1. Maternal choline supplementation improves spatial mapping and increases basal forebrain cholinergic neuron number and size in aged Ts65Dn mice

    PubMed Central

    Ash, Jessica A.; Velazquez, Ramon; Kelley, Christy M.; Powers, Brian E.; Ginsberg, Stephen D.; Mufson, Elliott J.; Strupp, Barbara J.

    2014-01-01

    Down syndrome (DS) is marked by intellectual disability (ID) and early-onset of Alzheimer’s disease (AD) neuropathology, including basal forebrain cholinergic neuron (BFCN) degeneration. The present study tested the hypothesis that maternal choline supplementation (MCS) lessens hippocampal dysfunction and protects against BFCN degeneration in the Ts65Dn mouse model of DS and AD. During pregnancy and lactation, dams were assigned to either a choline sufficient (1.1 g/kg choline chloride) or choline supplemented (5.0 g/kg choline chloride) diet. Between 13 and 17 months of age, offspring were tested in the radial arm water maze (RAWM) to examine spatial learning and memory followed by unbiased quantitative morphometry of BFCNs. Spatial mapping was significantly impaired in unsupplemented Ts65Dn mice relative to normal disomic (2N) littermates. Additionally, a significantly lower number and density of medial septum (MS) hippocampal projection BFCNs was also found in unsupplemented Ts65Dn mice. Notably, MCS significantly improved spatial mapping and increased number, density, and size of MS BFCNs in Ts65Dn offspring. Moreover, the density and number of MS BFCNs correlated significantly with spatial memory proficiency, providing powerful support for a functional relationship between these behavioral and morphometric effects of MCS for the trisomic offspring. Thus, increasing maternal choline intake during pregnancy may represent a safe and effective treatment approach for expectant mothers carrying a DS fetus, as well as a possible means of BFCN neuroprotection during aging for the population at large. PMID:24932939

  2. The α-tocopherol status and expression of α-tocopherol-related proteins in methionine-choline deficient rats treated with vitamin E

    PubMed Central

    Miyazaki, Hiroshi; Takitani, Kimitaka; Koh, Maki; Yoden, Atsushi; Tamai, Hiroshi

    2014-01-01

    Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease is the most common liver disorder in developed countries, and its incidence is increasing in all population groups. As an antioxidant, vitamin E is effective in the treatment of non-alcoholic fatty liver disease, although the mechanism is still unclear. Methionine-choline deficient Wistar rats (n = 5) used as an experimental model of non-alcoholic fatty liver disease were fed a vitamin E-enriched diet (500 mg/kg) for 4 weeks. The effects were assessed by measuring lipid peroxidation, α-tocopherol levels, and the expression of α-tocopherol-related proteins in the liver. In vitamin E-treated methionine-choline deficient rats, lipid peroxidation was reduced, but liver histopathological changes were not improved. Hepatic α-tocopherol levels in these rats were significantly elevated compared to normal rats treated with vitamin E. Expression of liver α-tocopherol transfer protein in vitamin E-treated methionine-choline deficient rats was significantly repressed compared to methionine-choline deficient rats. The expression of liver cytochrome P450 4F2 and ATP-binding cassette transporter protein 1, involved in metabolism and transport of α-tocopherol, respectively, was significantly repressed in vitamin E-treated methionine-choline deficient rats. In methionine-choline deficient rats, vitamin E treatment altered the hepatic α-tocopherol-related protein expression, which may affect α-tocopherol status in the liver, leading to reduced lipid peroxidation. PMID:24895482

  3. Maternal choline supplementation improves spatial mapping and increases basal forebrain cholinergic neuron number and size in aged Ts65Dn mice.

    PubMed

    Ash, Jessica A; Velazquez, Ramon; Kelley, Christy M; Powers, Brian E; Ginsberg, Stephen D; Mufson, Elliott J; Strupp, Barbara J

    2014-10-01

    Down syndrome (DS) is marked by intellectual disability (ID) and early-onset of Alzheimer's disease (AD) neuropathology, including basal forebrain cholinergic neuron (BFCN) degeneration. The present study tested the hypothesis that maternal choline supplementation (MCS) improves spatial mapping and protects against BFCN degeneration in the Ts65Dn mouse model of DS and AD. During pregnancy and lactation, dams were assigned to either a choline sufficient (1.1g/kg choline chloride) or choline supplemented (5.0g/kg choline chloride) diet. Between 13 and 17months of age, offspring were tested in the radial arm water maze (RAWM) to examine spatial mapping followed by unbiased quantitative morphometry of BFCNs. Spatial mapping was significantly impaired in unsupplemented Ts65Dn mice relative to normal disomic (2N) littermates. Additionally, a significantly lower number and density of medial septum (MS) hippocampal projection BFCNs was also found in unsupplemented Ts65Dn mice. Notably, MCS significantly improved spatial mapping and increased number, density, and size of MS BFCNs in Ts65Dn offspring. Moreover, the density and number of MS BFCNs correlated significantly with spatial memory proficiency, providing support for a functional relationship between these behavioral and morphometric effects of MCS for trisomic offspring. Thus, increasing maternal choline intake during pregnancy may represent a safe and effective treatment approach for expectant mothers carrying a DS fetus, as well as a possible means of BFCN neuroprotection during aging for the population at large. PMID:24932939

  4. Effects of rumen-protected choline supplementation on metabolic and performance responses of transition dairy cows.

    PubMed

    Leiva, T; Cooke, R F; Brandão, A P; Marques, R S; Vasconcelos, J L M

    2015-04-01

    The objective of this experiment was to compare metabolic and milk production parameters in dairy cows supplemented and nonsupplemented with rumen-protected choline (RPC) during the transition period. Twenty-three nonlactating, multiparous, pregnant Holstein cows were ranked by BW and BCS 21 d before expected date of calving and immediately were assigned to receive (n = 12) or not receive (control; n = 11) RPC until 45 d in milk (DIM). Cows supplemented with RPC received (as-fed basis) 50 and 100 g/d of RPC (18.8% choline) before and after calving, respectively. Before calving, cows were maintained in 2 drylot pens according to treatment with ad libitum access to corn silage, and individually they received (as-fed basis) 3 kg/cow daily of a concentrate. Upon calving, cows were moved to 2 adjacent drylot pens according to treatment, milked twice daily, offered (as-fed basis) 35 kg/cow daily of corn silage, and individually received a concentrate formulated to meet their nutritional requirements after milking. The RPC was individually offered to cows as a topdressing into the morning concentrate feeding. Before calving, cow BW and BCS were recorded weekly, and blood samples were collected every 5 d beginning on d -21 relative to expected calving date. Upon calving and until 45 DIM, BW and BCS were recorded weekly, individual milk production was recorded daily, and milk samples were collected once a week and analyzed for fat, protein, and total solids. Blood samples were collected every other day from 0 to 20 DIM and every 5 d from 20 to 45 DIM. Based on actual calving dates, cows receiving RPC or control began receiving treatments 16.8 ± 1.7 and 17.3 ± 2.0 d before calving, respectively. No treatment effects were detected (P ≥ 0.18) on postpartum concentrate intake, BW and BCS, or serum concentrations of cortisol, β-hydroxybutyrate, NEFA, glucose, and IGF-I. Cows supplemented with RPC had greater (P ≤ 0.01) mean serum haptoglobin and insulin concentrations

  5. Cholinergic activation of the murine trachealis muscle via non-vesicular acetylcholine release involving low-affinity choline transporters.

    PubMed

    Nassenstein, Christina; Wiegand, Silke; Lips, Katrin S; Li, Guanfeng; Klein, Jochen; Kummer, Wolfgang

    2015-11-01

    In addition to quantal, vesicular release of acetylcholine (ACh), there is also non-quantal release at the motor endplate which is insufficient to evoke postsynaptic responses unless acetylcholinesterase (AChE) is inhibited. We here addressed potential non-quantal release in the mouse trachea by organ bath experiments and (immuno)histochemical methods. Electrical field stimulation (EFS) of nerve terminals elicited tracheal constriction that is largely due to ACh release. Classical enzyme histochemistry demonstrated acetylcholinesterase (AChE) activity in nerve fibers in the muscle and butyrylcholinesterase (BChE) activity in the smooth muscle cells. Acute inhibition of both esterases by eserine significantly raised tracheal tone which was fully sensitive to atropine. This effect was reduced, but not abolished, in AChE, but not in BChE gene-deficient mice. The eserine-induced increase in tracheal tone was unaffected by vesamicol (10(-5)M), an inhibitor of the vesicular acetylcholine transporter, and by corticosterone (10(-4)M), an inhibitor of organic cation transporters. Hemicholinium-3, in low concentrations an inhibitor of the high-affinity choline transporter-1 (CHT1), completely abrogated the eserine effects when applied in high concentrations (10(-4)M) pointing towards an involvement of low-affinity choline transporters. To evaluate the cellular sources of non-quantal ACh release in the trachea, expression of low-affinity choline transporter-like family (CTL1-5) was evaluated by RT-PCR analysis. Even though these transporters were largely abundant in the epithelium, denudation of airway epithelial cells had no effect on eserine-induced tracheal contraction, indicating a non-quantal release of ACh from non-epithelial sources in the airways. These data provide evidence for an epithelium-independent non-vesicular, non-quantal ACh release in the mouse trachea involving low-affinity choline transporters. PMID:26278668

  6. Ultrasensitive immunoassay based on a pseudobienzyme amplifying system of choline oxidase and luminol-reduced Pt@Au hybrid nanoflowers.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Ying; Zhuo, Ying; Liao, Ni; Chai, Yaqin; Yuan, Ruo

    2014-12-01

    A multi-functional luminol-reduced Pt@Au hybrid flower-like nanocomposite (luminol-Pt@AuNF) which not only acts as an efficient signal probe but also constitutes a pseudobienzyme amplifying system with choline oxidase (ChOx) was firstly synthesized and applied to the construction of a solid-state luminol electrochemiluminescence (ECL) immunosensor for cardiac troponin I (cTnI) detection. PMID:25313990

  7. No evidence for role of extracellular choline-acetyltransferase in generation of gamma oscillations in rat hippocampal slices in vitro.

    PubMed

    Hollnagel, J O; ul Haq, R; Behrens, C J; Maslarova, A; Mody, I; Heinemann, U

    2015-01-22

    Acetylcholine (ACh) is well known to induce persistent γ-oscillations in the hippocampus when applied together with physostigmine, an inhibitor of the ACh degrading enzyme acetylcholinesterase (AChE). Here we report that physostigmine alone can also dose-dependently induce γ-oscillations in rat hippocampal slices. We hypothesized that this effect was due to the presence of choline in the extracellular space and that this choline is taken up into cholinergic fibers where it is converted to ACh by the enzyme choline-acetyltransferase (ChAT). Release of ACh from cholinergic fibers in turn may then induce γ-oscillations. We therefore tested the effects of the choline uptake inhibitor hemicholinium-3 (HC-3) on persistent γ-oscillations either induced by physostigmine alone or by co-application of ACh and physostigmine. We found that HC-3 itself did not induce γ-oscillations and also did not prevent physostigmine-induced γ-oscillation while washout of physostigmine and ACh-induced γ-oscillations was accelerated. It was recently reported that ChAT might also be present in the extracellular space (Vijayaraghavan et al., 2013). Here we show that the effect of physostigmine was prevented by the ChAT inhibitor (2-benzoylethyl)-trimethylammonium iodide (BETA) which could indicate extracellular synthesis of ACh. However, when we tested for effects of extracellularly applied acetyl-CoA, a substrate of ChAT for synthesis of ACh, physostigmine-induced γ-oscillations were attenuated. Together, these findings do not support the idea that ACh can be synthesized by an extracellularly located ChAT. PMID:25453770

  8. Choline Binding Proteins from Streptococcus pneumoniae: A Dual Role as Enzybiotics and Targets for the Design of New Antimicrobials

    PubMed Central

    Maestro, Beatriz; Sanz, Jesús M.

    2016-01-01

    Streptococcus pneumoniae (pneumococcus) is an important pathogen responsible for acute invasive and non-invasive infections such as meningitis, sepsis and otitis media, being the major cause of community-acquired pneumonia. The fight against pneumococcus is currently hampered both by insufficient vaccine coverage and by rising antimicrobial resistances to traditional antibiotics, making necessary the research on novel targets. Choline binding proteins (CBPs) are a family of polypeptides found in pneumococcus and related species, as well as in some of their associated bacteriophages. They are characterized by a structural organization in two modules: a functional module (FM), and a choline-binding module (CBM) that anchors the protein to the choline residues present in the cell wall through non-covalent interactions. Pneumococcal CBPs include cell wall hydrolases, adhesins and other virulence factors, all playing relevant physiological roles for bacterial viability and virulence. Moreover, many pneumococcal phages also make use of hydrolytic CBPs to fulfill their infectivity cycle. Consequently, CBPs may play a dual role for the development of novel antipneumococcal drugs, both as targets for inhibitors of their binding to the cell wall and as active cell lytic agents (enzybiotics). In this article, we review the current state of knowledge about host- and phage-encoded pneumococcal CBPs, with a special focus on structural issues, together with their perspectives for effective anti-infectious treatments. PMID:27314398

  9. Choline Dehydrogenase Polymorphism rs12676 Is a Functional Variation and Is Associated with Changes in Human Sperm Cell Function

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, Amy R.; Lao, Sai; Wang, Tongwen; Galanko, Joseph A.; Zeisel, Steven H.

    2012-01-01

    Approximately 15% of couples are affected by infertility and up to half of these cases arise from male factor infertility. Unidentified genetic aberrations such as chromosomal deletions, translocations and single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) may be the underlying cause of many cases of idiopathic male infertility. Deletion of the choline dehydrogenase (Chdh) gene in mice results in decreased male fertility due to diminished sperm motility; sperm from Chdh−/− males have decreased ATP concentrations likely stemming from abnormal sperm mitochondrial morphology and function in these cells. Several SNPs have been identified in the human CHDH gene that may result in altered CHDH enzymatic activity. rs12676 (G233T), a non-synonymous SNP located in the CHDH coding region, is associated with increased susceptibility to dietary choline deficiency and risk of breast cancer. We now report evidence that this SNP is also associated with altered sperm motility patterns and dysmorphic mitochondrial structure in sperm. Sperm produced by men who are GT or TT for rs12676 have 40% and 73% lower ATP concentrations, respectively, in their sperm. rs12676 is associated with decreased CHDH protein in sperm and hepatocytes. A second SNP located in the coding region of IL17BR, rs1025689, is linked to altered sperm motility characteristics and changes in choline metabolite concentrations in sperm. PMID:22558321

  10. Serum Levels of Choline-Containing Compounds Are Associated with Aerobic Fitness Level: The HUNT-Study

    PubMed Central

    Aspenes, Stian T.; Giskeødegård, Guro F.; Gribbestad, Ingrid S.; Wisløff, Ulrik; Bathen, Tone F.

    2012-01-01

    Background Cardiovascular disease (CVD) is a leading cause of death worldwide, and the number of people at risk is continuously growing. New methods for early risk prediction are therefore needed to actuate prevention strategies before the individuals are diagnosed with CVD. Several studies report that aerobic fitness level, measured as maximal oxygen uptake (VO2max), is the single best predictor of future CVD mortality in healthy people. Based on this, we wanted to study differences between healthy individuals with a large difference in VO2max-level to identify new biomarkers of low aerobic fitness that may also have potential as early biomarkers of CVD risk. Methodology/Principal Findings Serum samples from 218 healthy individuals with a low VO2max (n = 108, 63 women) or high VO2max (n = 110, 64 women) were analysed with MR metabolomics. In addition, standard clinical-chemical analyses for glucose, lipids, liver enzymes, micro-CRP, and colorimetric analysis on circulating choline were performed. Individuals in the low VO2max-group had increased serum levels of free choline, decreased phosphatidylcholine, increased glucosę and decreased unsaturated fatty acids compared to the individuals in the high VO2max–group. Conclusions/Significance Aerobic fitness dependent differences in serum levels of free choline and phosphatidylcholine are observed. They should be further studied as potential early markers of CVD risk. PMID:22860113

  11. Quantification of glycine betaine, choline and trimethylamine N-oxide in seawater particulates: Minimisation of seawater associated ion suppression.

    PubMed

    Beale, Rachael; Airs, Ruth

    2016-09-28

    A liquid chromatography/mass spectrometry (LC/MS, electrospray ionisation) method has been developed for the quantification of nitrogenous osmolytes (N-osmolytes) in the particulate fraction of natural water samples. Full method validation demonstrates the validity of the method for measuring glycine betaine (GBT), choline and trimethylamine N-oxide (TMAO) in particulates from seawater. Limits of detection were calculated as 3.5, 1.2 and 5.9 pg injected onto column (equivalent to 1.5, 0.6 and 3.9 nmol per litre) for GBT, choline and TMAO respectively. Precision of the method was typically 3% for both GBT and choline and 6% for TMAO. Collection of the particulate fraction of natural samples was achieved via in-line filtration. Resulting chromatography and method sensitivity was assessed and compared for the use of both glass fibre and polycarbonate filters during sample collection. Ion suppression was shown to be a significant cause of reduced instrument response to N-osmolytes and was associated with the presence of seawater in the sample matrix. PMID:27619093

  12. Choline Binding Proteins from Streptococcus pneumoniae: A Dual Role as Enzybiotics and Targets for the Design of New Antimicrobials.

    PubMed

    Maestro, Beatriz; Sanz, Jesús M

    2016-01-01

    Streptococcus pneumoniae (pneumococcus) is an important pathogen responsible for acute invasive and non-invasive infections such as meningitis, sepsis and otitis media, being the major cause of community-acquired pneumonia. The fight against pneumococcus is currently hampered both by insufficient vaccine coverage and by rising antimicrobial resistances to traditional antibiotics, making necessary the research on novel targets. Choline binding proteins (CBPs) are a family of polypeptides found in pneumococcus and related species, as well as in some of their associated bacteriophages. They are characterized by a structural organization in two modules: a functional module (FM), and a choline-binding module (CBM) that anchors the protein to the choline residues present in the cell wall through non-covalent interactions. Pneumococcal CBPs include cell wall hydrolases, adhesins and other virulence factors, all playing relevant physiological roles for bacterial viability and virulence. Moreover, many pneumococcal phages also make use of hydrolytic CBPs to fulfill their infectivity cycle. Consequently, CBPs may play a dual role for the development of novel antipneumococcal drugs, both as targets for inhibitors of their binding to the cell wall and as active cell lytic agents (enzybiotics). In this article, we review the current state of knowledge about host- and phage-encoded pneumococcal CBPs, with a special focus on structural issues, together with their perspectives for effective anti-infectious treatments. PMID:27314398

  13. Human Neural Stem Cells Overexpressing Choline Acetyltransferase Restore Unconditioned Fear in Rats with Amygdala Injury

    PubMed Central

    Shin, Kyungha; Cha, Yeseul; Kim, Kwang Sei; Choi, Ehn-Kyoung; Choi, Youngjin; Guo, Haiyu; Ban, Young-Hwan; Kim, Jong-Choon; Park, Dongsun; Kim, Yun-Bae

    2016-01-01

    Amygdala is involved in the fear memory that recognizes certain environmental cues predicting threatening events. Manipulation of neurotransmission within the amygdala affects the expression of conditioned and unconditioned emotional memories such as fear freezing behaviour. We previously demonstrated that F3.ChAT human neural stem cells (NSCs) overexpressing choline acetyltransferase (ChAT) improve cognitive function of Alzheimer's disease model rats with hippocampal or cholinergic nerve injuries by increasing acetylcholine (ACh) level. In the present study, we examined the effect of F3.ChAT cells on the deficit of unconditioned fear freezing. Rats given N-methyl-d-aspartate (NMDA) in their amygdala 2 weeks prior to cat odor exposure displayed very short resting (freezing) time compared to normal animals. NMDA induced neuronal degeneration in the amygdala, leading to a decreased ACh concentration in cerebrospinal fluid. However, intracerebroventricular transplantation of F3.ChAT cells attenuated amygdala lesions 4 weeks after transplantation. The transplanted cells were found in the NMDA-injury sites and produced ChAT protein. In addition, F3.ChAT-receiving rats recuperated freezing time staying remote from the cat odor source, according to the recovery of brain ACh concentration. The results indicate that human NSCs overexpressing ChAT may facilitate retrieval of unconditioned fear memory by increasing ACh level. PMID:27087745

  14. A critical role for Choline Kinase alpha in the aggressiveness of bladder carcinomas

    PubMed Central

    Hernando, Eva; Sarmentero-Estrada, Jacinto; Koppie, Theresa; Belda-Iniesta, Cristóbal; de Molina, Victor Ramírez; Cejas, Paloma; Ozu, Choichiro; Le, Carl; Sánchez, Jose Javier; González-Barón, Manuel; Koutcher, Jason; Cordón-Cardó, Carlos; Bochner, Bernard H.; Lacal, Juan Carlos; Ramírez de Molina, Ana

    2010-01-01

    Bladder cancer is one of the most common causes of death in industrialized countries. New tumor markers and therapeutic approaches are still needed to improve management of bladder cancer patients. Choline Kinase alpha (ChoKα) is a metabolic enzyme that has a role in cell proliferation and transformation. Inhibitors of ChoKα display antitumoral activity and are expected to be soon in clinical trials. This study is aimed to asses whether ChoKα plays a role in the aggressiveness of bladder tumors and constitute a new approach for bladder cancer treatment. We demonstrate here that ChoKα is constitutively altered in human bladder tumor cells. Furthermore, in vivo murine models including an orthotopic model to mimic as much as possible the physiological conditions, revealed that increased levels of ChoKα potentiates both tumor formation (p≤0.0001) and aggressiveness of the disease over different endpoints (p=0.011). Accordingly, increased levels of ChoKα significantly reduces survival of mice with bladder cancer (p=0.05). Finally, treatment with ChoKα specific inhibitor resulted in a significant inhibition of tumor growth (p=0.02) and in a relevant increase in survival (p=0.03). PMID:19448670

  15. Electrochemical fabrication of nanoporous copper films in choline chloride-urea deep eutectic solvent.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Q B; Abbott, Andrew P; Yang, C

    2015-06-14

    Nanoporous copper films were fabricated by a facile electrochemical alloying/dealloying process without the need of a template. A deep eutectic solvent made from choline chloride (ChCl) and urea was used with zinc oxide as the metal salt. Cyclic voltammetry was used to characterise the electrochemical reduction of zinc and follow Cu-Zn alloy formation on the copper substrate at elevated temperatures from 353 to 393 K. The alloy formation was confirmed by X-ray diffraction spectra. 3D, open and bicontinuous nanoporous copper films were obtained by in situ electrochemically etching (dealloying) of the zinc component in the Cu-Zn surface alloys at an appropriate potential (-0.4 V vs. Ag). This dealloying process was found to be highly temperature dependent and surface diffusion controlled, which involved the self-assembly of copper atoms at the alloy/electrolyte interface. Additionally, the effects of the deposition parameters, including deposition temperature, current density as well as total charge density on resulting the microstructure were investigated by scanning electron microscopy, and atomic force microscope. PMID:25972227

  16. Therapeutic potential of choline magnesium trisalicylate as an alternative to aspirin for patients with bleeding tendencies.

    PubMed

    Danesh, B J; Saniabadi, A R; Russell, R I; Lowe, G D

    1987-12-01

    We have compared the effects of acetyl salicylic acid (ASA, aspirin) and choline magnesium trisalicylate (CMT), a non-acetylated salicylate product, on platelet aggregation in human whole blood ex-vivo. Using a whole blood platelet counter, platelet aggregation was quantified by measuring the fall in the number of single platelets at peak aggregation in response to collagen, arachidonic acid (AA), as well as spontaneous aggregation. In double blind and random order, 12 healthy volunteers received, on two separate occasions 10 days apart, a single oral dose of 652 mg ASA or 655 mg CMT. Despite a comparable absorption of salicylic acid from the two drugs, ingestion of ASA resulted in a marked inhibition of platelet aggregation induced by collagen (p less than 0.005), AA (p less than 0.01) and spontaneous aggregation (p less than 0.01), whereas such effects were not observed after CMT ingestion. We suggest that CMT may have therapeutic potential as an alternative to aspirin when inhibition of platelet aggregation can induce bleeding complications. PMID:3329766

  17. Human Neural Stem Cells Overexpressing Choline Acetyltransferase Restore Unconditioned Fear in Rats with Amygdala Injury.

    PubMed

    Shin, Kyungha; Cha, Yeseul; Kim, Kwang Sei; Choi, Ehn-Kyoung; Choi, Youngjin; Guo, Haiyu; Ban, Young-Hwan; Kim, Jong-Choon; Park, Dongsun; Kim, Yun-Bae

    2016-01-01

    Amygdala is involved in the fear memory that recognizes certain environmental cues predicting threatening events. Manipulation of neurotransmission within the amygdala affects the expression of conditioned and unconditioned emotional memories such as fear freezing behaviour. We previously demonstrated that F3.ChAT human neural stem cells (NSCs) overexpressing choline acetyltransferase (ChAT) improve cognitive function of Alzheimer's disease model rats with hippocampal or cholinergic nerve injuries by increasing acetylcholine (ACh) level. In the present study, we examined the effect of F3.ChAT cells on the deficit of unconditioned fear freezing. Rats given N-methyl-d-aspartate (NMDA) in their amygdala 2 weeks prior to cat odor exposure displayed very short resting (freezing) time compared to normal animals. NMDA induced neuronal degeneration in the amygdala, leading to a decreased ACh concentration in cerebrospinal fluid. However, intracerebroventricular transplantation of F3.ChAT cells attenuated amygdala lesions 4 weeks after transplantation. The transplanted cells were found in the NMDA-injury sites and produced ChAT protein. In addition, F3.ChAT-receiving rats recuperated freezing time staying remote from the cat odor source, according to the recovery of brain ACh concentration. The results indicate that human NSCs overexpressing ChAT may facilitate retrieval of unconditioned fear memory by increasing ACh level. PMID:27087745

  18. The use of ionic liquids based on choline chloride for metal deposition: A green alternative?

    PubMed

    Haerens, Kurt; Matthijs, Edward; Chmielarz, Andrzej; Van der Bruggen, Bart

    2009-08-01

    Ionic liquids are studied intensively for different applications. They tend to be denoted as "green solvents", largely because of their low vapour pressure. In recent years toxicity and biotoxicity of ionic liquids have also been investigated, which proved that not all of these are "green". In this paper the use of ionic liquids based on choline chloride and ethylene glycol in electrochemistry is discussed in the context of their use as green solvents. Due to their low toxicity and ready biodegradability, these deep eutectic solvents are promising for the electrodeposition of metals. The influence of the use of these liquids as metal deposition baths on the waste water is investigated. Drag-out was found to be the most influencing parameter on the environmental impact of the process, as it is three times higher compared to classical solutions due to the higher viscosity of the ionic liquid. There are no major changes needed in the rinsing configuration of classic electroplating plants, and ion exchange to remove the metal out of the waste water was not hindered by the presence of the ionic liquid. The formation of by-products during the deposition of metals has to be further investigated and evaluated in consideration of the environmental impact. PMID:19523749

  19. Novel ligands of Choline Acetyltransferase designed by in silico molecular docking, hologram QSAR and lead optimization

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Rajnish; Långström, Bengt; Darreh-Shori, Taher

    2016-01-01

    Recent reports have brought back the acetylcholine synthesizing enzyme, choline acetyltransferase in the mainstream research in dementia and the cholinergic anti-inflammatory pathway. Here we report, a specific strategy for the design of novel ChAT ligands based on molecular docking, Hologram Quantitative Structure Activity Relationship (HQSAR) and lead optimization. Molecular docking was performed on a series of ChAT inhibitors to decipher the molecular fingerprint of their interaction with the active site of ChAT. Then robust statistical fragment HQSAR models were developed. A library of novel ligands was generated based on the pharmacophoric and shape similarity scoring function, and evaluated in silico for their molecular interactions with ChAT. Ten of the top scoring invented compounds are reported here. We confirmed the activity of α-NETA, the only commercially available ChAT inhibitor, and one of the seed compounds in our model, using a new simple colorimetric ChAT assay (IC50 ~ 88 nM). In contrast, α-NETA exhibited an IC50 of ~30 μM for the ACh-degrading cholinesterases. In conclusion, the overall results may provide useful insight for discovering novel ChAT ligands and potential positron emission tomography tracers as in vivo functional biomarkers of the health of central cholinergic system in neurodegenerative disorders, such as Alzheimer’s disease. PMID:27507101

  20. Choline-induced selective fluorescence quenching of acetylcholinesterase conjugated Au@BSA clusters.

    PubMed

    Mathew, Meegle S; Baksi, Ananya; Pradeep, T; Joseph, Kuruvilla

    2016-07-15

    We have developed a highly selective sensitive fluorescent detection of acetylcholine (ACh) using bovine serum albumin (BSA) protected atomically precise clusters of gold. The gold quantum clusters (AuQC@BSA) synthesized using bovine serum albumin and conjugated with acetylcholinesterase (AChE), an enzyme specific for acetylcholine, resulting in AuQC@BSA-AChE. The enzyme, AChE hydrolyzes acetylcholine (ACh) to choline (Ch) which in turn interacts with AuQC@BSA-AChE and quenches its fluorescence, enabling sensing. We have carried out the real time monitoring of the hydrolysis of ACh using electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (ESI MS) to find out the mechanism of fluorescent quenching. The validity of present method for determination of concentration of acetylcholine in real system such as blood was demonstrated. Further, the sensor, AuQC@BSA-AChE can be easily coated on paper and an efficient and cheap sensor can be developed and detection limit for ACh is found to be 10nM. The fluorescent intensity of AuQC@BSA-AChE is sensitive towards acetylcholine in range of 10nM to 6.4µM. This suggests that AuQC@BSA-AChE has an excellent potential to be used for diagnosis of various neuropsychological and neuropsychiatric disorders. PMID:26921554

  1. A critical role for choline kinase-alpha in the aggressiveness of bladder carcinomas.

    PubMed

    Hernando, E; Sarmentero-Estrada, J; Koppie, T; Belda-Iniesta, C; Ramírez de Molina, V; Cejas, P; Ozu, C; Le, C; Sánchez, J J; González-Barón, M; Koutcher, J; Cordón-Cardó, C; Bochner, B H; Lacal, J C; Ramírez de Molina, A

    2009-07-01

    Bladder cancer is one of the most common causes of death in industrialized countries. New tumor markers and therapeutic approaches are still needed to improve the management of bladder cancer patients. Choline kinase-alpha (ChoKalpha) is a metabolic enzyme that has a role in cell proliferation and transformation. Inhibitors of ChoKalpha show antitumoral activity and are expected to be introduced soon in clinical trials. This study aims to assess whether ChoKalpha plays a role in the aggressiveness of bladder tumors and constitutes a new approach for bladder cancer treatment. We show here that ChoKalpha is constitutively altered in human bladder tumor cells. Furthermore, in vivo murine models, including an orthotopic model to mimic as much as possible the physiological conditions, revealed that increased levels of ChoKalpha potentiate both tumor formation (P< or =0.0001) and aggressiveness of the disease on different end points (P=0.011). Accordingly, increased levels of ChoKalpha significantly reduce survival of mice with bladder cancer (P=0.05). Finally, treatment with a ChoKalpha-specific inhibitor resulted in a significant inhibition of tumor growth (P=0.02) and in a relevant increase in survival (P=0.03). PMID:19448670

  2. Novel ligands of Choline Acetyltransferase designed by in silico molecular docking, hologram QSAR and lead optimization.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Rajnish; Långström, Bengt; Darreh-Shori, Taher

    2016-01-01

    Recent reports have brought back the acetylcholine synthesizing enzyme, choline acetyltransferase in the mainstream research in dementia and the cholinergic anti-inflammatory pathway. Here we report, a specific strategy for the design of novel ChAT ligands based on molecular docking, Hologram Quantitative Structure Activity Relationship (HQSAR) and lead optimization. Molecular docking was performed on a series of ChAT inhibitors to decipher the molecular fingerprint of their interaction with the active site of ChAT. Then robust statistical fragment HQSAR models were developed. A library of novel ligands was generated based on the pharmacophoric and shape similarity scoring function, and evaluated in silico for their molecular interactions with ChAT. Ten of the top scoring invented compounds are reported here. We confirmed the activity of α-NETA, the only commercially available ChAT inhibitor, and one of the seed compounds in our model, using a new simple colorimetric ChAT assay (IC50 ~ 88 nM). In contrast, α-NETA exhibited an IC50 of ~30 μM for the ACh-degrading cholinesterases. In conclusion, the overall results may provide useful insight for discovering novel ChAT ligands and potential positron emission tomography tracers as in vivo functional biomarkers of the health of central cholinergic system in neurodegenerative disorders, such as Alzheimer's disease. PMID:27507101

  3. Effects of choline chloride on electrodeposited Ni coating from a Watts-type bath

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Yurong; Yang, Caihong; He, Jiawei; Wang, Wenchang; Mitsuzak, Naotoshi; Chen, Zhidong

    2016-05-01

    Electrodeposition of bright nickel (Ni) was carried out in a Watts-type bath. Choline chloride (ChCl) was applied as a multifunctional additive and substitute for nickel chloride (NiCl2) in a Watts-type bath. The function of ChCl was investigated through conductivity tests, anodic polarization, and cathodic polarization experiments. The studies revealed that ChCl performed well as a conducting salt, anodic activator, and cathodic inhibitor. The effects of ChCl on deposition rate, preferred orientation, grain size, surface morphology, and microhardness of Ni coatings were also studied. The deposition rate reached a maximum value of greater than 27 μm h-1 when 20 g L-1 ChCl was introduced to the bath. Using X-ray diffraction, it was confirmed that progressive addition of ChCl promoted the preferred crystal orientation modification from (2 0 0) and (2 2 0) to (1 1 1), refined grain size, and enhanced microhardness. The presence of ChCl lowered the roughness of the coating.

  4. Novel Small Molecule Inhibitors of Choline Kinase Identified by Fragment-Based Drug Discovery.

    PubMed

    Zech, Stephan G; Kohlmann, Anna; Zhou, Tianjun; Li, Feng; Squillace, Rachel M; Parillon, Lois E; Greenfield, Matthew T; Miller, David P; Qi, Jiwei; Thomas, R Mathew; Wang, Yihan; Xu, Yongjin; Miret, Juan J; Shakespeare, William C; Zhu, Xiaotian; Dalgarno, David C

    2016-01-28

    Choline kinase α (ChoKα) is an enzyme involved in the synthesis of phospholipids and thereby plays key roles in regulation of cell proliferation, oncogenic transformation, and human carcinogenesis. Since several inhibitors of ChoKα display antiproliferative activity in both cellular and animal models, this novel oncogene has recently gained interest as a promising small molecule target for cancer therapy. Here we summarize our efforts to further validate ChoKα as an oncogenic target and explore the activity of novel small molecule inhibitors of ChoKα. Starting from weakly binding fragments, we describe a structure based lead discovery approach, which resulted in novel highly potent inhibitors of ChoKα. In cancer cell lines, our lead compounds exhibit a dose-dependent decrease of phosphocholine, inhibition of cell growth, and induction of apoptosis at low micromolar concentrations. The druglike lead series presented here is optimizable for improvements in cellular potency, drug target residence time, and pharmacokinetic parameters. These inhibitors may be utilized not only to further validate ChoKα as antioncogenic target but also as novel chemical matter that may lead to antitumor agents that specifically interfere with cancer cell metabolism. PMID:26700752

  5. Prenatal choline supplementation attenuates neuropathological response to status epilepticus in the adult rat hippocampus

    PubMed Central

    Wong-Goodrich, Sarah J. E.; Mellott, Tiffany J.; Glenn, Melissa J.; Blusztajn, Jan K.; Williams, Christina L.

    2008-01-01

    Prenatal choline supplementation (SUP) protects adult rats against spatial memory deficits observed after excitotoxin-induced status epilepticus (SE). To examine the mechanism underlying this neuroprotection, we determined the effects of SUP on a variety of hippocampal markers known to change in response to SE and thought to underlie ensuing cognitive deficits. Adult offspring from rat dams that received either a Control or SUP diet on embryonic days 12–17 were administered saline or kainic acid (i.p.) to induce SE and were euthanized 16 days later. SUP markedly attenuated seizure-induced hippocampal neurodegeneration, dentate cell proliferation, hippocampal GFAP mRNA expression levels, prevented the loss of hippocampal GAD65 protein and mRNA expression, and altered growth factor expression patterns. SUP also enhanced pre-seizure hippocampal levels of BDNF, NGF, and IGF-1, which may confer a neuroprotective hippocampal microenvironment that dampens the neuropathological response to and/or helps facilitate recovery from SE to protect cognitive function. PMID:18353663

  6. Enzyme-Catalyzed Henry Reaction in Choline Chloride-Based Deep Eutectic Solvents.

    PubMed

    Tian, Xuemei; Zhang, Suoqin; Zheng, Liangyu

    2016-01-01

    The enzyme-catalyzed Henry reaction was realized using deep eutectic solvents (DESs) as a reaction medium. The lipase from Aspergillus niger (lipase AS) showed excellent catalytic activity toward the substrates aromatic aldehydes and nitromethane in choline chloride:glycerol at a molar ratio of 1:2. Addition of 30 vol% water to DES further improved the lipase activity and inhibited DES-catalyzed transformation. A final yield of 92.2% for the lipase AS-catalyzed Henry reaction was achieved under optimized reaction conditions in only 4 h. In addition, the lipase AS activity was improved by approximately 3-fold in a DES-water mixture compared with that in pure water, which produced a final yield of only 33.4%. Structural studies with fluorescence spectroscopy showed that the established strong hydrogen bonds between DES and water may be the main driving force that affects the spatial conformation of the enzyme, leading to a change in lipase activity. The methodology was also extended to the aza-Henry reaction, which easily occurred in contrast to that in pure water. The enantioselectivity of both Henry and aza-Henry reactions was not found. However, the results are still remarkable, as we report the first use of DES as a reaction medium in a lipase-catalyzed Henry reaction. PMID:26437947

  7. Toxicity profile of choline chloride-based deep eutectic solvents for fungi and Cyprinus carpio fish.

    PubMed

    Juneidi, Ibrahim; Hayyan, Maan; Mohd Ali, Ozair

    2016-04-01

    An investigation on the toxicological assessment of 10 choline chloride (ChCl)-based deep eutectic solvents (DESs) towards four fungi strains and Cyprinus carpio fish was conducted. ChCl was combined with materials from different chemical groups such as alcohols, sugars, acids and others to form DESs. The study was carried out on the individual DES components, their aqueous mixture before DES formation and their formed DESs. The agar disc diffusion method was followed to investigate their toxicity on four fungi strains selected as a model of eukaryotic microorganisms (Phanerochaete chrysosporium, Aspergillus niger, Lentinus tigrinus and Candida cylindracea). Among these DESs, ChCl:ZnCl2 exhibited the highest inhibition zone diameter towards the tested fungi growth in vitro, followed by the acidic group (malonic acid and p-toluenesulfonic acid). Another study was conducted to test the acute toxicity and determine the lethal concentration at 50 % (LC50) of the same DESs on C. carpio fish. The inhibition range and LC50 of DESs were found to be different from their individual components. DESs were found to be less toxic than their mixture or individual components. The LC50 of ChCl:MADES is much higher than that of ChCl:MAMix. Moreover, the DESs acidic group showed a lower inhibition zone on fungi growth. Thus, DESs should be considered as new components with different physicochemical properties and toxicological profiles, and not merely compositions of compounds. PMID:26743645

  8. Effects of davunetide on N-acetylaspartate and choline in dorsolateral prefrontal cortex in patients with schizophrenia.

    PubMed

    Jarskog, L Fredrik; Dong, Zhengchao; Kangarlu, Alayar; Colibazzi, Tiziano; Girgis, Ragy R; Kegeles, Lawrence S; Barch, Deanna M; Buchanan, Robert W; Csernansky, John G; Goff, Donald C; Harms, Michael P; Javitt, Daniel C; Keefe, Richard Se; McEvoy, Joseph P; McMahon, Robert P; Marder, Stephen R; Peterson, Bradley S; Lieberman, Jeffrey A

    2013-06-01

    Schizophrenia is associated with extensive neurocognitive and behavioral impairments. Studies indicate that N-acetylaspartate (NAA), a marker of neuronal integrity, and choline, a marker of cell membrane turnover and white matter integrity, may be altered in schizophrenia. Davunetide is a neurotrophic peptide that can enhance cognitive function in animal models of neurodegeneration. Davunetide has recently demonstrated modest functional improvement in a study of people with schizophrenia. In a subset of these subjects, proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy ((1)H-MRS) was conducted to explore the effects of davunetide on change in NAA/creatine (NAA/Cr) and choline/creatine (choline/Cr) over 12 weeks of treatment. Of 63 outpatients with schizophrenia who received randomized davunetide (5 and 30 mg/day) or placebo in the parent clinical trial, 18 successfully completed (1)H-MRS in dorsolateral prefrontal cortex (DLPFC) at baseline and at 12 weeks. Cognition was assessed using the MATRICS Consensus Cognitive Battery (MCCB). NAA/Cr was unchanged for combined high- and low-dose davunetide groups (N=11). NAA/Cr in the high-dose davunetide group (N=8) suggested a trend increase of 8.0% (P=0.072) over placebo (N=7). Choline/Cr for combined high- and low-dose davunetide groups suggested a 6.4% increase (P=0.069), while the high-dose group showed a 7.9% increase (P=0.040) over placebo. Baseline NAA/Cr correlated with the composite MCCB score (R=0.52, P=0.033), as did individual cognitive domains of attention/vigilance, verbal learning, and social cognition; however, neither metabolite correlated with functional capacity. In this exploratory study, 12 weeks of adjunctive davunetide appeared to produce modest increases in NAA/Cr and choline/Cr in DLPFC in people with schizophrenia. This is consistent with a potential neuroprotective mechanism for davunetide. The data also support use of MRS as a useful biomarker of baseline cognitive function in schizophrenia. Future

  9. A quantitative study of the interactive effects of glycine and serine with threonine and choline on growth performance in broilers.

    PubMed

    Siegert, W; Ahmadi, H; Helmbrecht, A; Rodehutscord, M

    2015-07-01

    Differences in the optimal dietary concentrations of Gly (glycine) and Ser (serine) in broiler diets may be due to levels of endogenous Gly precursors that differ in literature. Therefore, we measured the extent of the interactive effects between equivalents of Gly and Ser (Glyequi) and the endogenous Gly precursors choline and Thr (threonine) on growth performance. A fractional central composite design included concentrations of 15-25 g/kg DM, 0.6-2.0 g/kg DM, and 6.4-10.4 g/kg DM for Glyequi, choline, and Thr, respectively, in 5 levels each. The various concentrations were achieved by adding Gly, choline chloride, and l-Thr to a basal mix. Except for 20 replicates of the central diet, all treatments were tested with 5 replicates, each with 10 birds. Food was provided for ad libitum consumption throughout the experiment. The data were evaluated using artificial neural networks. Digestibility was studied for selected diets using separate birds. Since average daily feed intake (ADFI) varied between replicates, the intake of prececal digestible Glyequi, choline, and prececal digestible Thr were more adequate independent variables than the dietary concentration of each amino acid. From d 1 to d 7, no treatment effects on G:F and average daily gain (ADG) were detected; subsequent results refer to the period from d 7 to d 21. Increasing prececal digestible Thr intake considerably decreased the need for prececal digestible Glyequi to achieve certain levels of G:F and ADG. The extent of this effect cannot be explained only by the endogenous metabolism of Thr to Gly. Since essential amino acids were present above the recommended levels, Thr probably limited performance, and excessive intake of other essential amino acids prompted a Gly-dissipating process. Choline exerted a considerable effect on the required intake of prececal digestible Glyequi and prececal digestible Thr to achieve certain levels of G:F and ADG. The results of this study partly explain the previously

  10. Effects of rumen-protected methionine and choline supplementation on the preimplantation embryo in Holstein cows.

    PubMed

    Acosta, D A V; Denicol, A C; Tribulo, P; Rivelli, M I; Skenandore, C; Zhou, Z; Luchini, D; Corrêa, M N; Hansen, P J; Cardoso, F C

    2016-06-01

    Our objective was to determine the effects of supplementing methionine and choline during the prepartum and postpartum periods on preimplantation embryos of Holstein cows. Multiparous cows were assigned in a randomized complete-block design into four treatments from 21 days before calving to 30 days in milk (DIM). Treatments (TRT) were MET (n = 9, fed the basal diet + rumen-protected methionine at a rate of 0.08% [w:w] of the dry matter [DM], Smartamine M), CHO (n = 8, fed the basal diet + choline 60 g/d, Reashure), MIX (n = 11, fed the basal diet + Smartamine M and 60 g/d Reashure), and CON (n = 8, no supplementation, fed the close-up and fresh cow diets). Cows were randomly reassigned to two new groups (GRP) to receive the following diets from 31 to 72 DIM; control (CNT, n = 16, fed a basal diet) and SMT (n = 20, fed the basal diet + 0.08% [w:w] of the dry matter intake as methionine). An progesterone intravaginal insert (CIDR) device was inserted in all cows after follicular aspiration (60 DIM) and superovulation began at Day 61.5 using FSH in eight decreasing doses at 12-hour intervals over a 4-day period. On Days 63 and 64, all cows received two injections of PGF2α, and CIDR was removed on Day 65. Twenty-four hours after CIDR removal, ovulation was induced with GnRH. Cows received artificial insemination at 12 hours and 24 hours after GnRH. Embryos were flushed 6.5 days after artificial insemination. Global methylation of the embryos was assessed by immunofluorescent labeling of 5-methylcytosine, whereas lipid content was assessed by staining with Nile red. Nuclear staining was used to count the total number of cells per embryo. There was no difference between TRT, GRP, or their interaction (P > 0.05) for embryo recovery, embryos recovered, embryo quality, embryo stage, or cells per embryo. Methylation of the DNA had a TRT by GRP interaction (P = 0.01). Embryos from cows in CON-CNT had greater (P = 0.04) methylation (0.87

  11. Enhanced ubiquitination and proteasomal degradation of catalytically deficient human choline acetyltransferase mutants.

    PubMed

    Morey, Trevor M; Albers, Shawn; Shilton, Brian H; Rylett, R Jane

    2016-05-01

    Choline acetyltransferase (ChAT) is essential for cholinergic neuron function as it mediates synthesis of the neurotransmitter acetylcholine. ChAT mutations have been linked to the neuromuscular disorder congenital myasthenic syndrome (CMS). One CMS-related ChAT mutation, V18M, reduces enzyme activity and cellular protein levels, and is positioned within a highly conserved proline-rich motif with the sequence 14 PKLPVPP20 . We demonstrate that N-terminal truncation that includes this proline-rich motif, as well as mutation of prolines-17/19 together to alanine (P17A/P19A), dramatically reduces ChAT steady-state protein levels and cellular activity when expressed in cholinergic SN56 neural cells. The in vitro activity of bacterially expressed recombinant P17A/P19A-ChAT is also reduced, although this is not caused by changes in protein secondary structure or thermal stability. Treatment of SN56 cells with the proteasome inhibitor MG132 increases cellular P17A/P19A-ChAT steady-state protein levels, and by immunoprecipitation we found that ChAT is ubiquitinated and that polyubiquitination of P17A/P19A-ChAT is increased compared to wild-type (WT) ChAT. Using a novel fluorescent-biorthogonal pulse-chase protocol in SN56 cells, we determined that the protein half-life of P17A/P19A-ChAT (2.2 h) is substantially reduced compared to WT-ChAT (19.7 h). Lastly, we show that two CMS-related ChAT mutants (V18M and A513T) have enhanced ubiquitination, and that treatment with MG132 can partially restore both the steady-state protein levels as well as cellular activity of some CMS-mutant ChAT. These results identify a novel mechanism for regulation of ChAT through the ubiquitin-proteasome system that is influenced by the conserved N-terminal proline-rich motif of ChAT and may be implicated in CMS pathology. Choline acetyltransferase (ChAT) synthesizes acetylcholine in cholinergic neurons. In this study we find that steady-state protein levels of human 69-kDa ChAT are regulated by

  12. Choline Kinase Alpha as an Androgen Receptor Chaperone and Prostate Cancer Therapeutic Target

    PubMed Central

    Asim, Mohammad; Massie, Charles E.; Orafidiya, Folake; Pértega-Gomes, Nelma; Warren, Anne Y.; Esmaeili, Mohsen; Selth, Luke A.; Zecchini, Heather I.; Luko, Katarina; Qureshi, Arham; Baridi, Ajoeb; Menon, Suraj; Madhu, Basetti; Escriu, Carlos; Lyons, Scott; Vowler, Sarah L.; Zecchini, Vincent R.; Shaw, Greg; Hessenkemper, Wiebke; Russell, Roslin; Mohammed, Hisham; Stefanos, Niki; Lynch, Andy G.; Grigorenko, Elena; D’Santos, Clive; Taylor, Chris; Lamb, Alastair; Sriranjan, Rouchelle; Yang, Jiali; Stark, Rory; Dehm, Scott M.; Rennie, Paul S.; Carroll, Jason S.; Griffiths, John R.; Tavaré, Simon; Mills, Ian G.; McEwan, Iain J.; Baniahmad, Aria; Tilley, Wayne D.; Neal, David E.

    2016-01-01

    Background: The androgen receptor (AR) is a major drug target in prostate cancer (PCa). We profiled the AR-regulated kinome to identify clinically relevant and druggable effectors of AR signaling. Methods: Using genome-wide approaches, we interrogated all AR regulated kinases. Among these, choline kinase alpha (CHKA) expression was evaluated in benign (n = 195), prostatic intraepithelial neoplasia (PIN) (n = 153) and prostate cancer (PCa) lesions (n = 359). We interrogated how CHKA regulates AR signaling using biochemical assays and investigated androgen regulation of CHKA expression in men with PCa, both untreated (n = 20) and treated with an androgen biosynthesis inhibitor degarelix (n = 27). We studied the effect of CHKA inhibition on the PCa transcriptome using RNA sequencing and tested the effect of CHKA inhibition on cell growth, clonogenic survival and invasion. Tumor xenografts (n = 6 per group) were generated in mice using genetically engineered prostate cancer cells with inducible CHKA knockdown. Data were analyzed with χ2 tests, Cox regression analysis, and Kaplan-Meier methods. All statistical tests were two-sided. Results: CHKA expression was shown to be androgen regulated in cell lines, xenografts, and human tissue (log fold change from 6.75 to 6.59, P = .002) and was positively associated with tumor stage. CHKA binds directly to the ligand-binding domain (LBD) of AR, enhancing its stability. As such, CHKA is the first kinase identified as an AR chaperone. Inhibition of CHKA repressed the AR transcriptional program including pathways enriched for regulation of protein folding, decreased AR protein levels, and inhibited the growth of PCa cell lines, human PCa explants, and tumor xenografts. Conclusions: CHKA can act as an AR chaperone, providing, to our knowledge, the first evidence for kinases as molecular chaperones, making CHKA both a marker of tumor progression and a potential therapeutic target for PCa. PMID:26657335

  13. Solvatochromic probe behavior within choline chloride-based deep eutectic solvents: effect of temperature and water.

    PubMed

    Pandey, Ashish; Pandey, Siddharth

    2014-12-18

    Deep eutectic solvents (DESs) have shown potential as promising environmentally friendly alternatives to conventional solvents. Many common and popular DESs are obtained by simply mixing a salt and a H-bond donor. Properties of such a DES depend on its constituents. Change in temperature and addition of water, a benign cosolvent, can change the physicochemical properties of DESs. The effect of changing temperature and addition of water on solvatochromic probe behavior within three DESs formed from choline chloride combined with 1,2-ethanediol, glycerol, and urea, respectively, in 1:2 mol ratios termed ethaline, glyceline, and reline is presented. Increase in temperature results in reduced H-bond donating acidity of the DESs. Dipolarity/polarizability and H-bond accepting basicity do not change with changing temperature of the DESs. The response of the fluorescence probe pyrene also indicates a decrease in the polarity of the DESs as temperature is increased. Addition of water to DES results in increased dipolarity/polarizability and a decrease in H-bond accepting basicity. Except for pyrene, solvatochromic probes exhibit responses close to those predicted from ideal-additiv