Science.gov

Sample records for 18f-labeled choline derivates

  1. Synthesis of [18F]-labelled Maltose Derivatives as PET Tracers for Imaging Bacterial Infection

    PubMed Central

    Namavari, Mohammad; Gowrishankar, Gayatri; Hoehne, Aileen; Jouannot, Erwan; Gambhir, Sanjiv S

    2015-01-01

    Purpose To develop novel positron emission tomography (PET) agents for visualization and therapy monitoring of bacterial infections. Procedures It is known that maltose and maltodextrins are energy sources for bacteria. Hence, 18F-labelled maltose derivatives could be a valuable tool for imaging bacterial infections. We have developed methods to synthesize 4-O-(α-D-glucopyranosyl)-6-deoxy-6-[18F]fluoro-D-glucopyranoside (6-[18F]fluoromaltose) and 4-O-(α-D-glucopyranosyl)-1-deoxy-1-[18F]fluoro-D-glucopyranoside (1-[18F]fluoromaltose) as bacterial infection PET imaging agents. 6-[18F]fluoromaltose was prepared from precursor 1,2,3-tri-O-acetyl-4-O-(2′,3′,-di-O-acetyl-4′,6′-benzylidene-α-D-glucopyranosyl)-6-deoxy-6-nosyl-D-glucopranoside (5). The synthesis involved the radio-fluorination of 5 followed by acidic and basic hydrolysis to give 6-[18F]fluoromaltose. In an analogous procedure, 1-[18F]fluoromaltose was synthesized from 2,3, 6-tri-O-acetyl-4-O-(2′,3′,4′,6-tetra-O-acetyl-α-D-glucopyranosyl)-1-deoxy-1-O-triflyl-D-glucopranoside (9). Stability of 6-[18F]fluoromaltose in phosphate-buffered saline (PBS) and human and mouse serum at 37 °C was determined. Escherichia coli uptake of 6-[18F]fluoromaltose was examined. Results A reliable synthesis of 1- and 6-[18F]fluoromaltose has been accomplished with 4–6 and 5–8 % radiochemical yields, respectively (decay-corrected with 95 % radiochemical purity). 6-[18F]fluoromaltose was sufficiently stable over the time span needed for PET studies (~96 % intact compound after 1-h and ~65 % after 2-h incubation in serum). Bacterial uptake experiments indicated that E. coli transports 6-[18F]fluoromaltose. Competition assays showed that the uptake of 6-[18F]fluoromaltose was completely blocked by co-incubation with 1 mM of the natural substrate maltose. Conclusion We have successfully synthesized 1- and 6-[18F]fluoromaltose via direct fluorination of appropriate protected maltose precursors. Bacterial uptake

  2. (18) F-labeled folic acid derivatives for imaging of the folate receptor via positron emission tomography.

    PubMed

    Schieferstein, Hanno; Ross, Tobias L

    2013-01-01

    The folate receptor (FR) is already known as a proven target in diagnostics and therapy of cancer. Furthermore, the FR is involved in inflammatory and autoimmune diseases. The major advantage as a valuable target is its strongly limited expression in healthy tissues. Over the past two decades, several folic acid-based radiopharmaceuticals addressing the FR have been developed, and some of them show great potential for applications in clinical routine. However, most of these radiofolates were developed for single photon emission computed tomography imaging, and only a few can be used for positron emission tomography (PET) imaging. The development of suitable (18) F-labeled derivatives for PET imaging of the FR has aroused great interest and recent studies revealed very promising candidates for further development and translation into human applications. In this review, we focus on the development of (18) F-labeled folic acid derivatives for PET imaging of the FR and discuss various radiochemical strategies and approaches towards (18) F-folates. Besides radiochemistry and (18) F-labeling, we briefly look into the crucial pharmacological parameters and the preclinical in vivo performance of those (18) F-folates.

  3. Synthesis and evaluation of 18F labeled alanine derivatives as potential tumor imaging agents

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Limin; Zha, Zhihao; Qu, Wenchao; Qiao, Hongwen; Lieberman, Brian P.; Plössl, Karl; Kung, Hank F.

    2012-01-01

    Introduction This paper reports the synthesis and labeling of 18F alanine derivatives. We also investigate their biological characteristics as potential tumor imaging agents mediated by alanine-serine-cysteine preferring (ASC) transporter system. Methods Three new 18F alanine derivatives were prepared from corresponding tosylate-precursors through a two-step labelling reaction. In vitro uptake studies to evaluate and to compare these three analogs were carried out in 9L glioma and PC-3 prostate cancer cell lines. Potential transport mechanisms, protein incorporation and stability of 3-(1-[18F]fluoromethyl)-L-alanine (L[18F]FMA) were investigated in 9L glioma cells. Its biodistribution was determined in a rat-bearing 9L tumor model. PET imaging studies were performed on rat bearing 9L glioma tumors and transgenic mouse carrying spontaneous generated M/tomND tumor (mammary gland adenocarcinoma). Results New 18F alanine derivatives were prepared with 7–34% uncorrected radiochemical yields, excellent enantiomeric purity (>99%) and good radiochemical purity (>99%). In vitro uptake of the L-[18F]FMA in 9L glioma and PC-3 prostate cancer cells was higher than those observed for other two alanine derivatives and [18F]FDG in first 1 h. Inhibition of cell uptake studies suggested that L-[18F]FMA uptake in 9L glioma was predominantly via transport system ASC. After entering into cells, L-[18F]FMA remained stable and was not incorporated into protein within 2 h. In vivo biodistribution studies demonstrated that L-[18F]FMA had relatively high uptake in liver and kidney. Tumor uptake was fast, reaching a maximum within 30 min. The tumor-to-muscle, tumor-to-blood and tumor-to-brain ratios at 60 min post injection were 2.2, 1.9 and 3.0, respectively. In PET imaging studies, tumors were visualized with L-[18F]FMA in both 9L rat and transgenic mouse. Conclusion L-[18F]FMA showed promising properties as a PET imaging agent for up-regulated ASC transporter associated with tumor

  4. Radiosynthesis and preliminary biological evaluation of a new (18)F-labeled triethylene glycol derivative of triphenylphosphonium.

    PubMed

    Tominaga, Takahiro; Ito, Hiroaki; Ishikawa, Yoichi; Iwata, Ren; Ishiwata, Kiichi; Furumoto, Shozo

    2016-03-01

    Delocalized lipophilic cations such as [(18)F]fluorobenzyltriphenylphosphonium ([(18)F]FBnTP) can accumulate in mitochondria and have been used in myocardial perfusion imaging (MPI). In this study, we established a simplified method for [(18)F]FBnTP synthesis using triphenylphosphine hydrobromide (PPh3 •HBr) without preparing an intermediate that contains benzyl bromide structure. Applying this new method, we synthesized and evaluated a novel (18)F-labeled PEGylated BnTP derivative ([(18)F]FPEGBnTP). In vitro cellular uptake study demonstrated that [(18)F]FPEGBnTP accumulated in cells in proportion to the relative intensity of mitochondrial membrane potential. Biodistribution study revealed that the heart : liver uptake ratio of [(18)F]FPEGBnTP (4.00 at 60 min) was superior to that of [(18)F]FBnTP (1.50 at 60 min). However, [(18)F]FPEGBnTP showed slow blood clearance and high radioactivity uptake in bone at 120-min post-injection. These results imply the possibility of [(18)F]FPEGBnTP being used as a MPI agent. However, there is a need of further structural optimization and flow-dependent uptake study. PMID:26861736

  5. Fluorine-18 labeling of small molecules: the use of 18F-labeled aryl fluorides derived from no-carrier-added [18F]fluoride as labeling precursors.

    PubMed

    Wuest, F

    2007-01-01

    The favourable long-half life, the ease of production and the low energy of the emitted positron make 18F an ideal radionuclide for PET imaging. Radiochemistry of 18F basically relies on two distinctive types of reactions: nucleophilic and electrophilic reactions. All syntheses of 18F-labeled radiotracers are based on either [18F]fluoride ion or [18F]fluorine gas as simple primary labeling precursors which are obtained directly from the cyclotron. They can be applied either directly to the radiosynthesis or they can be transformed into more complex labeling precursors enabling the multi-step build-up of organic tracer molecules. The topic of this review is a survey on the application of several 18F-labeled aryl fluorides as building blocks derived from no-carrier-added (n.c.a.) [18F] fluoride to build up small monomeric PET radiotracers at high specific radioactivity by multi-step synthesis procedures.

  6. Synthesis of a potent and selective (18)F-labeled delta-opioid receptor antagonist derived from the Dmt-Tic pharmacophore for positron emission tomography imaging.

    PubMed

    Ryu, Eun Kyoung; Wu, Zhanhong; Chen, Kai; Lazarus, Lawrence H; Marczak, Ewa D; Sasaki, Yusuke; Ambo, Akihiro; Salvadori, Severo; Ren, Chuancheng; Zhao, Heng; Balboni, Gianfranco; Chen, Xiaoyuan

    2008-03-27

    Identification and pharmacological characterization of two new selective delta-opioid receptor antagonists, derived from the Dmt-Tic pharmacophore, of potential utility in positron emission tomography (PET) imaging are described. On the basis of its high delta selectivity, H-Dmt-Tic--Lys(Z)-OH (reference compound 1) is a useful starting point for the synthesis of (18)F-labeled compounds prepared by the coupling of N-succinimidyl 4-[ (18)F]fluorobenzoate ([(18)F]SFB) with Boc-Dmt-Tic--Lys(Z)-OH under slightly basic conditions at 37 degrees C for 15 min, deprotection with TFA, and HPLC purification. The total synthesis time was 120 min, and the decay-corrected radiochemical yield of [(18)F]- 1 was about 25-30% ( n = 5) starting from [(18)F]SFB ( n = 5) with an effective specific activity about 46 GBq/micromol. In vitro autoradiography studies showed prominent uptake of [ (18)F]- 1 in the striatum and cortex with significant blocking by 1 and UFP-501 (selective delta-opioid receptor antagonist), suggesting high specific binding of [(18)F]- 1 to delta-opioid receptors. Noninvasive microPET imaging studies revealed the absence of [(18)F]- 1 in rat brain, since it fails to cross the blood-brain barrier. This study demonstrates the suitability of [ (18)F]- 1 for imaging peripheral delta-opioid receptors.

  7. 18F-labeling using click cycloadditions.

    PubMed

    Kettenbach, Kathrin; Schieferstein, Hanno; Ross, Tobias L

    2014-01-01

    Due to expanding applications of positron emission tomography (PET) there is a demand for developing new techniques to introduce fluorine-18 (t 1/2 = 109.8 min). Considering that most novel PET tracers are sensitive biomolecules and that direct introduction of fluorine-18 often needs harsh conditions, the insertion of (18)F in those molecules poses an exceeding challenge. Two major challenges during (18)F-labeling are a regioselective introduction and a fast and high yielding way under mild conditions. Furthermore, attention has to be paid to functionalities, which are usually present in complex structures of the target molecule. The Cu-catalyzed azide-alkyne cycloaddition (CuAAC) and several copper-free click reactions represent such methods for radiolabeling of sensitive molecules under the above-mentioned criteria. This minireview will provide a quick overview about the development of novel (18)F-labeled prosthetic groups for click cycloadditions and will summarize recent trends in copper-catalyzed and copper-free click (18)F-cycloadditions. PMID:25003110

  8. Synthesis and Evaluation of Two 18F-Labeled 6-Iodo-2-(4′-N,N-dimethylamino)phenylimidazo[1,2-a]pyridine Derivatives as Prospective Radioligands for β-Amyloid in Alzheimer’s Disease

    PubMed Central

    Cai, Lisheng; Chin, Frederick T.; Pike, Victor W.; Toyama, Hiroshi; Liow, Jeih-San; Zoghbi, Sami S.; Modell, Kendra; Briard, Emmanuelle; Shetty, H. Umesha; Sinclair, Kathryn; Donohue, Sean; Tipre, Dnyanesh; Kung, Mei-Ping; Dagostin, Claudio; Widdowson, David A.; Green, Michael; Gao, Weiyi; Herman, Mary M.; Ichise, Masanori; Innis, Robert B.

    2014-01-01

    This study evaluated 18F-labeled IMPY [6-iodo-2-(4′-N,N-dimethylamino)phenylimidazo[1,2-a]pyridine] derivatives as agents for imaging β-amyloid plaque with positron emission tomography (PET). The precursor for radiolabeling and reference compounds was synthesized in up to five steps from commercially accessible starting materials. One of the two N-methyl groups of IMPY was substituted with either a 3-fluoropropyl (FPM-IMPY) or a 2-fluoroethyl (FEM-IMPY) group. FPM-IMPY and FEM-IMPY were found to have moderate affinity for Aβ- aggregates with Ki = 27 ± 8 and 40 ± 5 nM, respectively. A “one-pot” method for 18F-2-fluoroethylation and 18F-3-fluoropropylation of the precursor was developed. The overall decay-corrected radiochemical yields were 26–51%. In PET experiments with normal mouse, high uptake of activity was obtained in the brain after iv injection of each probe: 6.4% ID/g for [18F]FEM-IMPY at 1.2 min, and 5.7% ID/g for [18F]FPM-IMPY at 0.8 min. These values were similar to those of [123I/125I]IMPY (7.2% ID/g at 2 min). Polar and nonpolar radioactive metabolites were observed in both plasma and brain homogenates after injection of [18F]FEM or [18F]FPM-IMPY. In contrast to the single-exponential washout of [123I/125I]IMPY, the washouts of brain activity for the two fluorinated analogues were biphasic, with an initial rapid phase over 20 min and a subsequent much slower phase. Residual brain activity at 2 h, which may represent polar metabolites trapped in the brain, was 4.5% ID/g for [18F]FEM-IMPY and 2.1% ID/g for [18F]FPM-IMPY. Substantial skull uptake of [18F]fluoride was also clearly observed. With a view to slow the metabolism of [18F]FEM-IMPY, an analogue was prepared with deuteriums substituted for the four ethyl hydrogens. However, D4-[18F]FEM-IMPY showed the same brain uptake and clearance as the protio analogue. Metabolism of the [18F]FEM-IMPY was appreciably slower in rhesus monkey than in mouse. Autoradiography of postmortem brain sections

  9. One-step (18)F labeling of biomolecules using organotrifluoroborates.

    PubMed

    Liu, Zhibo; Lin, Kuo-Shyan; Bénard, François; Pourghiasian, Maral; Kiesewetter, Dale O; Perrin, David M; Chen, Xiaoyuan

    2015-09-01

    Herein we present a general protocol for the functionalization of biomolecules with an organotrifluoroborate moiety so that they can be radiolabeled with aqueous (18)F fluoride ((18)F(-)) and used for positron emission tomography (PET) imaging. Among the β(+)-emitting radionuclides, fluorine-18 ((18)F) is the isotope of choice for PET, and it is produced, on-demand, in many hospitals worldwide. Organotrifluoroborates can be (18)F-labeled in one step in aqueous conditions via (18)F-(19)F isotope exchange. This protocol features a recently designed ammoniomethyltrifluoroborate, and it describes the following: (i) a synthetic strategy that affords modular synthesis of radiolabeling precursors via a copper-catalyzed 'click' reaction; and (ii) a one-step (18)F-labeling method that obviates the need for HPLC purification. Within 30 min, (18)F-labeled PET imaging probes, such as peptides, can be synthesized in good chemical and radiochemical purity (>98%), satisfactory radiochemical yield of 20-35% (n > 20, non-decay corrected) and high specific activity of 40-111 GBq/μmol (1.1-3.0 Ci/μmol). The entire procedure, including the precursor preparation and (18)F radiolabeling, takes 7-10 d. PMID:26313478

  10. 18F-Labelled Intermediates for Radiosynthesis by Modular Build-Up Reactions: Newer Developments

    PubMed Central

    Ermert, Johannes

    2014-01-01

    This brief review gives an overview of newer developments in 18F-chemistry with the focus on small 18F-labelled molecules as intermediates for modular build-up syntheses. The short half-life (<2 h) of the radionuclide requires efficient syntheses of these intermediates considering that multistep syntheses are often time consuming and characterized by a loss of yield in each reaction step. Recent examples of improved synthesis of 18F-labelled intermediates show new possibilities for no-carrier-added ring-fluorinated arenes, novel intermediates for tri[18F]fluoromethylation reactions, and 18F-fluorovinylation methods. PMID:25343144

  11. Tetrazine-trans-cyclooctene ligation for the rapid construction of 18F labeled probes.

    PubMed

    Li, Zibo; Cai, Hancheng; Hassink, Matthew; Blackman, Melissa L; Brown, Richard C D; Conti, Peter S; Fox, Joseph M

    2010-11-14

    A radiolabeling method for bioconjugation based on the Diels-Alder reaction between 3,6-diaryl-s-tetrazines and an (18)F-labeled trans-cyclooctene is described. The reaction proceeds with exceptionally fast rates, making it an effective conjugation method within seconds at low micromolar concentrations.

  12. Convergent synthesis and evaluation of 18F-labeled azulenic COX2 probes for cancer imaging

    PubMed Central

    Nolting, Donald D.; Nickels, Michael; Tantawy, Mohammed N.; Yu, James Y. H.; Xie, Jingping; Peterson, Todd E.; Crews, Brenda C.; Marnett, Larry; Gore, John C.; Pham, Wellington

    2013-01-01

    The overall objectives of this research are to (i) develop azulene-based positron emission tomography (PET) probes and (ii) image COX2 as a potential biomarker of breast cancer. Several lines of research have demonstrated that COX2 is overexpressed in breast cancer and that its presence correlates with poor prognoses. While other studies have reported that COX2 inhibition can be modulated and used beneficially as a chemopreventive strategy in cancer, no viable mechanism for achieving that approach has yet been developed. This shortfall could be circumvented through in vivo imaging of COX2 activity, particularly using sensitive imaging techniques such as PET. Toward that goal, our laboratory focuses on the development of novel 18F-labled COX2 probes. We began the synthesis of the probes by transforming tropolone into a lactone, which was subjected to an [8 + 2] cycloaddition reaction to yield 2-methylazulene as the core ring of the probe. After exploring numerous synthetic routes, the final target molecule and precursor PET compounds were prepared successfully using convergent synthesis. Conventional 18F labeling methods caused precursor decomposition, which prompted us to hypothesize that the acidic protons of the methylene moiety between the azulene and thiazole rings were readily abstracted by a strong base such as potassium carbonate. Ultimately, this caused the precursors to disintegrate. This observation was supported after successfully using an 18F labeling strategy that employed a much milder phosphate buffer. The 18F-labeled COX2 probe was tested in a breast cancer xenograft mouse model. The data obtained via successive whole-body PET/CT scans indicated probe accumulation and retention in the tumor. Overall, the probe was stable in vivo and no defluorination was observed. A biodistribution study and Western blot analysis corroborate with the imaging data. In conclusion, this novel COX2 PET probe was shown to be a promising agent for cancer imaging and

  13. Enhanced Aqueous Suzuki–Miyaura Coupling Allows Site-Specific Polypeptide 18F-Labeling

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    The excesses of reagents used in protein chemistry are often incompatible with the reduced or even inverse stoichiometries used for efficient radiolabeling. Analysis and screening of aqueous Pd(0) ligand systems has revealed the importance of a guanidine core and the discovery of 1,1-dimethylguanidine as an enhanced ligand for aqueous Suzuki–Miyaura cross-coupling. This novel Pd catalyst system has now allowed the labeling of small molecules, peptides, and proteins with the fluorine-18 prosthetic [18F]4-fluorophenylboronic acid. These findings now enable site-specific protein 18F-labeling under biologically compatible conditions using a metal-triggered reaction. PMID:23991754

  14. Synthesis and in vitro and in vivo evaluation of an (18)F-labeled neuropeptide Y analogue for imaging of breast cancer by PET.

    PubMed

    Hofmann, Sven; Maschauer, Simone; Kuwert, Torsten; Beck-Sickinger, Annette G; Prante, Olaf

    2015-04-01

    tumor-to-blood ratios from 1.2 to 2.4, and a tumor retention of 76 ± 4% (n = 4; 45-90 min p.i.). PET imaging studies with MCF-7 tumor-bearing nude mice demonstrated uptake of the (18)F-labeled glycopeptide in the tumor region at 60 min p.i., whereas only negligible tumor uptake was observed in animals injected with a nonbinding (18)F-labeled glycopeptide pendant as a measure of nonspecific binding. In conclusion, PET imaging experiments with the (18)F-labeled NPY glycopeptide revealed Y1R-specific binding uptake in MCF-7 tumors in vivo together with decreased kidney uptake compared to DOTA-derivatives of this peptide. We consider this glycopeptide to be a potent lead peptide for the design of improved (18)F-glycopeptides with shorter amino acid sequences that would further facilitate PET imaging studies of Y1R-positive breast tumors.

  15. Site-specific (18)F-labeling of the protein hormone leptin using a general two-step ligation procedure.

    PubMed

    Flavell, Robert R; Kothari, Paresh; Bar-Dagan, Maya; Synan, Michael; Vallabhajosula, Shankar; Friedman, Jeffrey M; Muir, Tom W; Ceccarini, Giovanni

    2008-07-16

    The protein hormone leptin acts to regulate body fat and energy expenditure. Resistance to this hormone is implicated in human obesity and its pathophysiological consequences. In order to gain insight into the mechanism of leptin resistance, an (18)F-labeled derivative was developed to study the biodistribution of the hormone using positron emission tomography (PET). A two-step, site specific ligation approach was developed for this purpose, in which an aminooxy-reactive group was incorporated at the C-terminus of leptin using expressed protein ligation (EPL), which was subsequently derivatized with [ (18)F]fluorobenzaldehyde using an aniline-accelerated radiochemical oximation reaction. The modified hormone was shown to be biologically active in vitro and in vivo, and it was applied to PET imaging in ob/ ob mice. These protocols will allow for the routine production of site-specifically (18)F radiolabeled leptin, as well as other proteins, for use in PET imaging in systems from mouse to man.

  16. Design, synthesis and evaluation of (18)F-labeled bradykinin B1 receptor-targeting small molecules for PET imaging.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Zhengxing; Kuo, Hsiou-Ting; Lau, Joseph; Jenni, Silvia; Zhang, Chengcheng; Zeisler, Jutta; Bénard, François; Lin, Kuo-Shyan

    2016-08-15

    Two fluorine-18 ((18)F) labeled bradykinin B1 receptor (B1R)-targeting small molecules, (18)F-Z02035 and (18)F-Z02165, were synthesized and evaluated for imaging with positron emission tomography (PET). Z02035 and Z02165 were derived from potent antagonists, and showed high binding affinity (0.93±0.44 and 2.80±0.50nM, respectively) to B1R. (18)F-Z02035 and (18)F-Z02165 were prepared by coupling 2-[(18)F]fluoroethyl tosylate with their respective precursors, and were obtained in 10±5 (n=4) and 22±14% (n=3), respectively, decay-corrected radiochemical yield with >99% radiochemical purity. (18)F-Z02035 and (18)F-Z02165 exhibited moderate lipophilicity (LogD7.4=1.10 and 0.59, respectively), and were stable in mouse plasma. PET imaging and biodistribution studies in mice showed that both tracers enabled visualization of the B1R-positive HEK293T::hB1R tumor xenografts with better contrast than control B1R-negative HEK293T tumors. Our data indicate that small molecule antagonists can be used as pharmacophores for the design of B1R-targeting PET tracers. PMID:27390067

  17. Design, synthesis and evaluation of (18)F-labeled bradykinin B1 receptor-targeting small molecules for PET imaging.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Zhengxing; Kuo, Hsiou-Ting; Lau, Joseph; Jenni, Silvia; Zhang, Chengcheng; Zeisler, Jutta; Bénard, François; Lin, Kuo-Shyan

    2016-08-15

    Two fluorine-18 ((18)F) labeled bradykinin B1 receptor (B1R)-targeting small molecules, (18)F-Z02035 and (18)F-Z02165, were synthesized and evaluated for imaging with positron emission tomography (PET). Z02035 and Z02165 were derived from potent antagonists, and showed high binding affinity (0.93±0.44 and 2.80±0.50nM, respectively) to B1R. (18)F-Z02035 and (18)F-Z02165 were prepared by coupling 2-[(18)F]fluoroethyl tosylate with their respective precursors, and were obtained in 10±5 (n=4) and 22±14% (n=3), respectively, decay-corrected radiochemical yield with >99% radiochemical purity. (18)F-Z02035 and (18)F-Z02165 exhibited moderate lipophilicity (LogD7.4=1.10 and 0.59, respectively), and were stable in mouse plasma. PET imaging and biodistribution studies in mice showed that both tracers enabled visualization of the B1R-positive HEK293T::hB1R tumor xenografts with better contrast than control B1R-negative HEK293T tumors. Our data indicate that small molecule antagonists can be used as pharmacophores for the design of B1R-targeting PET tracers.

  18. Efficient 18F labeling of cysteine-containing peptides and proteins using tetrazine-trans-cyclooctene ligation.

    PubMed

    Liu, Shuanglong; Hassink, Matthew; Selvaraj, Ramajeyam; Yap, Li-Peng; Park, Ryan; Wang, Hui; Chen, Xiaoyuan; Fox, Joseph M; Li, Zibo; Conti, Peter S

    2013-01-01

    18F positron emission tomography (PET) has a number of attributes that make it clinically attractive, including nearly 100% positron efficiency, very high specific radioactivity, and a short half-life of ≈ 110 minutes. However, the short half-life of 18F and the poor nucleophilicity of fluoride introduce challenges for the incorporation of 18F into complex molecules. Recently, the tetrazine-trans-cyclooctene ligation was introduced as a novel 18F labeling method that proceeds with fast reaction rates without catalysis. Herein we report an efficient method for 18F labeling of free cysteines of peptides and proteins based on sequential ligation with a bifunctional tetrazinyl-maleimide and an 18F-labeled trans-cyclooctene. The newly developed method was tested for site-specific labeling of both c(RGDyC) peptide and vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF)-SH protein. Starting with 4 mCi of 18F-trans-cyclooctene and only 10 μg of tetrazine-RGD (80-100 μM) or 15 μg of tetrazine-VEGF (6.0 μM), 18F-labeled RGD peptide and VEGF protein could be obtained within 5 minutes in 95% yield and 75% yield, respectively. The obtained tracers were then evaluated in mice. In conclusion, a highly efficient method has been developed for site-specific 18F labeling of cysteine-containing peptides and proteins. The special characteristics of the tetrazine-trans-cyclooctene ligation provide unprecedented opportunities to synthesize 18F-labeled probes with high specific activity for PET applications.

  19. (18)F-Labeling of Mannan for Inflammation Research with Positron Emission Tomography.

    PubMed

    Li, Xiang-Guo; Hagert, Cecilia; Siitonen, Riikka; Virtanen, Helena; Sareila, Outi; Liljenbäck, Heidi; Tuisku, Jouni; Knuuti, Juhani; Bergman, Jörgen; Holmdahl, Rikard; Roivainen, Anne

    2016-09-01

    Recently mannan from Saccharomyces cerevisiae has been shown to be able to induce psoriasis and psoriatic arthritis in mice, and the phenotypes resemble the corresponding human diseases. To investigate the pathological processes, we set out to label mannan with fluorine-18 ((18)F) and study the (18)F-labeled mannan in vitro and in vivo with positron emission tomography (PET). Accordingly, mannan has been transformed into (18)F-fluoromannan with (18)F-bicyclo[6.1.0]nonyne. In mouse aorta, the binding of [(18)F]fluoromannan to the atherosclerotic lesions was clearly visualized and was significantly higher compared to blocking assays (P < 0.001) or healthy mouse aorta (P < 0.001). In healthy rats the [(18)F]fluoromannan radioactivity accumulated largely in the macrophage-rich organs such as liver, spleen, and bone marrow and the excess excreted in urine. Furthermore, the corresponding (19)F-labeled mannan has been used to induce psoriasis and psoriatic arthritis in mice, which indicates that the biological function of mannan is preserved after the chemical modifications. PMID:27660685

  20. (18)F-Labeling of Mannan for Inflammation Research with Positron Emission Tomography.

    PubMed

    Li, Xiang-Guo; Hagert, Cecilia; Siitonen, Riikka; Virtanen, Helena; Sareila, Outi; Liljenbäck, Heidi; Tuisku, Jouni; Knuuti, Juhani; Bergman, Jörgen; Holmdahl, Rikard; Roivainen, Anne

    2016-09-01

    Recently mannan from Saccharomyces cerevisiae has been shown to be able to induce psoriasis and psoriatic arthritis in mice, and the phenotypes resemble the corresponding human diseases. To investigate the pathological processes, we set out to label mannan with fluorine-18 ((18)F) and study the (18)F-labeled mannan in vitro and in vivo with positron emission tomography (PET). Accordingly, mannan has been transformed into (18)F-fluoromannan with (18)F-bicyclo[6.1.0]nonyne. In mouse aorta, the binding of [(18)F]fluoromannan to the atherosclerotic lesions was clearly visualized and was significantly higher compared to blocking assays (P < 0.001) or healthy mouse aorta (P < 0.001). In healthy rats the [(18)F]fluoromannan radioactivity accumulated largely in the macrophage-rich organs such as liver, spleen, and bone marrow and the excess excreted in urine. Furthermore, the corresponding (19)F-labeled mannan has been used to induce psoriasis and psoriatic arthritis in mice, which indicates that the biological function of mannan is preserved after the chemical modifications.

  1. Sultone opening with [18F]fluoride: an efficient 18F-labelling strategy for PET imaging.

    PubMed

    Schmitt, Sébastien; Bouteiller, Cédric; Barré, Louisa; Perrio, Cécile

    2011-11-01

    Sultones were subject to ring opening by nucleophilic attack with [(18)F]fluoride to afford easily purified (18)F-labelled hydrophilic sulfonated products in high yields. A two-step sequence including radiofluorination and coupling to lysine was then developed from a bis-sultone precursor as a model approach for the labelling of biopolymers.

  2. Synthesis and pre-clinical evaluation of an (18)F-labeled single-chain antibody fragment for PET imaging of epithelial ovarian cancer.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Sai Kiran; Wuest, Melinda; Way, Jenilee D; Bouvet, Vincent R; Wang, Monica; Wuest, Frank R

    2016-01-01

    Anti-CA125 antibodies have been used in immunoassays to quantify levels of shed antigen in the serum of patients who are under surveillance for epithelial ovarian cancer (EOC). However, there is currently no molecular imaging probe in the clinic for the assessment of CA125 expression in vivo. The present study describes the development of an (18)F-labeled single-chain variable fragment (scFv) for PET imaging of CA125 in preclinical EOC models. Anti-CA125 scFv was derived from MAb-B43.13 by recombinant expression of the fragment in E.coli. Fragment scFv-B43.13 was purified via immobilized metal affinity chromatography and characterized for antigen binding via immuno-staining and flow cytometry. Prosthetic group N-succinimidyl 4-[(18)F]fluorobenzoate ([(18)F]SFB) was used for radiolabeling of scFv-B43.13. Preclinical ovarian cancer models were developed based on ovarian cancer cell lines OVCAR3 (CA125-positive) and SKOV3 (CA125-negative) in NIH-III mice. The radiopharmacological profile of (18)F-labeled scFv-B43.13 ([(18)F]FBz-scFv-B43.13) was studied with PET. [(18)F]FBz-scFv-B43.13 was prepared in radiochemical yields of 3.7 ± 1.8% (n = 5) at an effective specific activity of 3.88 ± 0.76 GBq/µmol (n = 5). The radiotracer demonstrated selective uptake in CA125-positive OVCAR3 cells and virtually no uptake in CA125-negative SKOV3 cells. Standardized uptake values (SUV) of radioactivity uptake in OVCAR3 tumors was 0.5 (n = 3) and 0.3 (n = 2) in SKOV3 tumors after 60 min post injection (p.i.). PMID:27508105

  3. Synthesis and pre-clinical evaluation of an 18F-labeled single-chain antibody fragment for PET imaging of epithelial ovarian cancer

    PubMed Central

    Sharma, Sai Kiran; Wuest, Melinda; Way, Jenilee D; Bouvet, Vincent R; Wang, Monica; Wuest, Frank R

    2016-01-01

    Anti-CA125 antibodies have been used in immunoassays to quantify levels of shed antigen in the serum of patients who are under surveillance for epithelial ovarian cancer (EOC). However, there is currently no molecular imaging probe in the clinic for the assessment of CA125 expression in vivo. The present study describes the development of an 18F-labeled single-chain variable fragment (scFv) for PET imaging of CA125 in preclinical EOC models. Anti-CA125 scFv was derived from MAb-B43.13 by recombinant expression of the fragment in E.coli. Fragment scFv-B43.13 was purified via immobilized metal affinity chromatography and characterized for antigen binding via immuno-staining and flow cytometry. Prosthetic group N-succinimidyl 4-[18F]fluorobenzoate ([18F]SFB) was used for radiolabeling of scFv-B43.13. Preclinical ovarian cancer models were developed based on ovarian cancer cell lines OVCAR3 (CA125-positive) and SKOV3 (CA125-negative) in NIH-III mice. The radiopharmacological profile of 18F-labeled scFv-B43.13 ([18F]FBz-scFv-B43.13) was studied with PET. [18F]FBz-scFv-B43.13 was prepared in radiochemical yields of 3.7 ± 1.8% (n = 5) at an effective specific activity of 3.88 ± 0.76 GBq/µmol (n = 5). The radiotracer demonstrated selective uptake in CA125-positive OVCAR3 cells and virtually no uptake in CA125-negative SKOV3 cells. Standardized uptake values (SUV) of radioactivity uptake in OVCAR3 tumors was 0.5 (n = 3) and 0.3 (n = 2) in SKOV3 tumors after 60 min post injection (p.i.). PMID:27508105

  4. Synthesis and Evaluation of 4-[18F]Fluoropropoxy-3-iodobenzylguanidine ([18F]FPOIBG): A Novel 18F-labeled Analogue of MIBG

    PubMed Central

    Vaidyanathan, Ganesan; McDougald, Darryl; Koumarianou, Eftychia; Choi, Jaeyeon; Hens, Marc; Zalutsky, Michael R.

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Radioiodinated meta-iodobenzylguanidine (MIBG), a norepinephrine transporter (NET) substrate, has been extensively used as an imaging agent to study the pathophysiology of the heart and for the diagnosis and treatment of neuroendocrine tumors. The goal of this study was to develop an 18F-labeled analogue of MIBG that like MIBG itself could be synthesized in a single radiochemical step. Towards this end, we designed 4-fluoropropoxy-3-iodobenzylguanidine (FPOIBG). Methods Standards of FPOIBG and 4-fluoropropoxy-3-bromobenzylguanidine (FPOBBG) as well as their tosylate precursors for labeling with 18F, and a tin precursor for the preparation of radioiodinated FPOIBG were synthesized. Radiolabeled derivatives were synthesized by nucleophilic substitution and electrophilic iododestannylation from the corresponding precursors. Labeled compounds were evaluated for NET transporter recognition in in vitro assays using three NET-expressing cell lines and in biodistribution experiments in normal mice, with all studies performed in a paired-label format. Competitive inhibition of [125I]MIBG uptake by unlabeled benzylguanidine compounds was performed in UVW-NAT cell line to determine IC50 values. Results [18F]FPOIBG was synthesized from the corresponding tosylate precursor in 5.2 ± 0.5% (n = 6) overall radiochemical yields starting with aqueous fluoride in about 105 min. In a paired-label in vitro assay, the uptake of [18F]FPOIBG at 2 h was 10.2 ± 1.5%, 39.6 ± 13.4%, and 13.3 ± 2.5%, in NET-expressing SK-N-SH, UVW-NAT, and SK-N-BE(2c) cells, respectively, while these values for [125I]MIBG were 57.3 ± 8.1%, 82.7 ± 8.9%, and 66.3 ± 3.6%. The specificity of uptake of both tracers was demonstrated by blocking with desipramine. The 125I-labeled congener of FPOIBG gave similar results. On the other hand, [18F]FPOBBG, a compound recently reported in the literature, demonstrated much higher uptake, albeit less than that of co-incubated [125I]MIBG. IC50 values for

  5. (18)F-labeled positron emission tomographic radiopharmaceuticals in oncology: an overview of radiochemistry and mechanisms of tumor localization.

    PubMed

    Vallabhajosula, Shankar

    2007-11-01

    Molecular imaging is the visualization, characterization, and measurement of biological processes at the molecular and cellular levels in a living system. At present, positron emission tomography/computed tomography (PET/CT) is one the most rapidly growing areas of medical imaging, with many applications in the clinical management of patients with cancer. Although [(18)F]fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG)-PET/CT imaging provides high specificity and sensitivity in several kinds of cancer and has many applications, it is important to recognize that FDG is not a "specific" radiotracer for imaging malignant disease. Highly "tumor-specific" and "tumor cell signal-specific" PET radiopharmaceuticals are essential to meet the growing demand of radioisotope-based molecular imaging technology. In the last 15 years, many alternative PET tracers have been proposed and evaluated in preclinical and clinical studies to characterize the tumor biology more appropriately. The potential clinical utility of several (18)F-labeled radiotracers (eg, fluoride, FDOPA, FLT, FMISO, FES, and FCH) is being reviewed by several investigators in this issue. An overview of design and development of (18)F-labeled PET radiopharmaceuticals, radiochemistry, and mechanism(s) of tumor cell uptake and localization of radiotracers are presented here. The approval of clinical indications for FDG-PET in the year 2000 by the Food and Drug Administration, based on a review of literature, was a major breakthrough to the rapid incorporation of PET into nuclear medicine practice, particularly in oncology. Approval of a radiopharmaceutical typically involves submission of a "New Drug Application" by a manufacturer or a company clearly documenting 2 major aspects of the drug: (1) manufacturing of PET drug using current good manufacturing practices and (2) the safety and effectiveness of a drug with specific indications. The potential routine clinical utility of (18)F-labeled PET radiopharmaceuticals depends also on

  6. Radiosynthesis and Evaluation of an 18F-Labeled Positron Emission Tomography (PET) Radioligand for Metabotropic Glutamate Receptor Subtype 4 (mGlu4)

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Four 4-phthalimide derivatives of N-(3-chlorophenyl)-2-picolinamide were synthesized as potential ligands for the PET imaging of mGlu4 in the brain. Of these compounds, N-(3-chloro-4-(4-fluoro-1,3-dioxoisoindolin-2-yl)phenyl)-2-picolinamide (3, KALB001) exhibited improved binding affinity (IC50 = 5.1 nM) compared with ML128 (1) and was subsequently labeled with 18F. When finally formulated in 0.1 M citrate buffer (pH 4) with 10% ethanol, the specific activity of [18F]3 at the end of synthesis (EOS) was 233.5 ± 177.8 GBq/μmol (n = 4). The radiochemical yield of [18F]3 was 16.4 ± 4.8% (n = 4), and the purity was over 98%. In vivo imaging studies in a monkey showed that the radiotracer quickly penetrated the brain with the highest accumulation in the brain areas known to express mGlu4. Despite some unfavorable radiotracer properties like fast washout in rodent studies, [18F]3 is the first 18F-labeled mGlu4 radioligand, which can be further modified to improve pharmacokinetics and brain penetrability for future human studies. PMID:25330258

  7. An improved strategy for the synthesis of [18F]-labeled arabinofuranosyl nuclosides

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Hanwen; Cantorias, Melchor V.; Pillarsetty, NagaVaraKishore; Burnazi, Eva M.; Cai, Shangde; Lewis, Jason S.

    2012-01-01

    The expression of the herpes simplex virus type-1 thymidine kinase (HSV1-tk) gene can be imaged efficaciously using a variety of 2′-[18F]fluoro-2′-deoxy-1-b-D-arabinofuranosyl-uracil derivatives [[18F]-FXAU, X= I(iodo), E(ethyl), and M(methyl)]. However, the application of these derivatives in clinical and translational studies has been impeded by their complicated and long syntheses (3–5 h). To remedy these issues, in the study at hand we have investigated whether microwave or combined catalysts could facilitate the coupling reaction between sugar and nucleobase and, further, have probed the feasibility of establishing a novel approach for [18F]-FXAU synthesis. We have demonstrated that the rate of the trimethylsilyl trifluoromethanesulfonate (TMSOTf)-catalyzed coupling reaction between the 2-deoxy-sugar and uracil derivatives at 90°C can be significantly accelerated by microwave-driven heating or by the addition of Lewis acid catalyst (SnCl4). Further, we have observed that the stability of the α- and β-anomers of [18F]-FXAU derivatives differs during the hydrolysis step. Using the microwave-driven heating approach, overall decay-corrected radiochemical yields of 19–27% were achieved for [18F]-FXAU in 120 min at a specific activity of >22 MBq/nmol (595 Ci/mmol). Ultimately, we believe that these high yielding syntheses of [18F]-FIAU, [18F]-FMAU and [18F]-FEAU will facilitate routine production for clinical applications. PMID:22819195

  8. Efficient (18)F-Labeling of Synthetic Exendin-4 Analogues for Imaging Beta Cells.

    PubMed

    Keliher, Edmund J; Reiner, Thomas; Thurber, Greg M; Upadhyay, Rabi; Weissleder, Ralph

    2012-08-01

    A number of exendin derivatives have been developed to target glucagon-like peptide 1 (GLP-1) receptors on beta cells in vivo. Modifications of exendin analogues have been shown to have significant effects on pharmacokinetics and, as such, have been used to develop a variety of therapeutic compounds. Here, we show that an exendin-4, modified at position 12 with a cysteine conjugated to a tetrazine, can be labeled with (18)F-trans-cyclooctene and converted into a PET imaging agent at high yields and with good selectivity. The agent accumulates in beta cells in vivo and has sufficiently high accumulation in mouse models of insulinomas to enable in vivo imaging.

  9. Efficient (18)F-Labeling of Synthetic Exendin-4 Analogues for Imaging Beta Cells.

    PubMed

    Keliher, Edmund J; Reiner, Thomas; Thurber, Greg M; Upadhyay, Rabi; Weissleder, Ralph

    2012-08-01

    A number of exendin derivatives have been developed to target glucagon-like peptide 1 (GLP-1) receptors on beta cells in vivo. Modifications of exendin analogues have been shown to have significant effects on pharmacokinetics and, as such, have been used to develop a variety of therapeutic compounds. Here, we show that an exendin-4, modified at position 12 with a cysteine conjugated to a tetrazine, can be labeled with (18)F-trans-cyclooctene and converted into a PET imaging agent at high yields and with good selectivity. The agent accumulates in beta cells in vivo and has sufficiently high accumulation in mouse models of insulinomas to enable in vivo imaging. PMID:23997998

  10. Efficient 18F-Labeling of Synthetic Exendin-4 Analogues for Imaging Beta Cells

    PubMed Central

    Keliher, Edmund J; Reiner, Thomas; Thurber, Greg M; Upadhyay, Rabi; Weissleder, Ralph

    2012-01-01

    A number of exendin derivatives have been developed to target glucagon-like peptide 1 (GLP-1) receptors on beta cells in vivo. Modifications of exendin analogues have been shown to have significant effects on pharmacokinetics and, as such, have been used to develop a variety of therapeutic compounds. Here, we show that an exendin-4, modified at position 12 with a cysteine conjugated to a tetrazine, can be labeled with 18F-trans-cyclooctene and converted into a PET imaging agent at high yields and with good selectivity. The agent accumulates in beta cells in vivo and has sufficiently high accumulation in mouse models of insulinomas to enable in vivo imaging. PMID:23997998

  11. Comparison of two site-specifically (18)F-labeled affibodies for PET imaging of EGFR positive tumors.

    PubMed

    Su, Xinhui; Cheng, Kai; Jeon, Jongho; Shen, Bin; Venturin, Gianina Teribele; Hu, Xiang; Rao, Jianghong; Chin, Frederick T; Wu, Hua; Cheng, Zhen

    2014-11-01

    The epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) serves as an attractive target for cancer molecular imaging and therapy. Our previous positron emission tomography (PET) studies showed that the EGFR-targeting affibody molecules (64)Cu-DOTA-ZEGFR:1907 and (18)F-FBEM-ZEGFR:1907 can discriminate between high and low EGFR-expression tumors and have the potential for patient selection for EGFR-targeted therapy. Compared with (64)Cu, (18)F may improve imaging of EGFR-expression and is more suitable for clinical application, but the labeling reaction of (18)F-FBEM-ZEGFR:1907 requires a long synthesis time. The aim of the present study is to develop a new generation of (18)F labeled affibody probes (Al(18)F-NOTA-ZEGFR:1907 and (18)F-CBT-ZEGFR:1907) and to determine whether they are suitable agents for imaging of EGFR expression. The first approach consisted of conjugating ZEGFR:1907 with NOTA and radiolabeling with Al(18)F to produce Al(18)F-NOTA-ZEGFR:1907. In a second approach the prosthetic group (18)F-labeled-2-cyanobenzothiazole ((18)F-CBT) was conjugated to Cys-ZEGFR:1907 to produce (18)F-CBT-ZEGFR:1907. Binding affinity and specificity of Al(18)F-NOTA-ZEGFR:1907 and (18)F-CBT-ZEGFR:1907 to EGFR were evaluated using A431 cells. Biodistribution and PET studies were conducted on mice bearing A431 xenografts after injection of Al(18)F-NOTA-ZEGFR:1907 or (18)F-CBT-ZEGFR:1907 with or without coinjection of unlabeled affibody proteins. The radiosyntheses of Al(18)F-NOTA-ZEGFR:1907 and (18)F-CBT-ZEGFR:1907 were completed successfully within 40 and 120 min with a decay-corrected yield of 15% and 41% using a 2-step, 1-pot reaction and 2-step, 2-pot reaction, respectively. Both probes bound to EGFR with low nanomolar affinity in A431 cells. Although (18)F-CBT-ZEGFR:1907 showed instability in vivo, biodistribution studies revealed rapid and high tumor accumulation and quick clearance from normal tissues except the bones. In contrast, Al(18)F-NOTA-ZEGFR:1907 demonstrated high in

  12. Synthesis and evaluation of 18F labeled FET prodrugs for tumor imaging

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Limin; Lieberman, Brian P.; Ploessl, Karl; Kung, Hank F.

    2013-01-01

    Introduction O-(2-[18F]fluoroethyl)-L-tyrosine (FET, [18F]1) is a useful amino-acid-based imaging agent for brain tumors. This paper reports the synthesis and evaluation of three FET prodrugs, O-(2-[18F]fluoroethyl)-L-tyrosyl-L-glycine (FET-Gly, [18F]2), O-(2-[18F]fluoroethyl)-L-tyrosyl-L-alanine (FET-Ala, [18F]3) and N-acetyl O-(2-[18F]fluoroethyl)-L-tyrosine (AcFET, [18F]4), which could be readily hydrolyzed to FET in vivo for tumor imaging. We investigated their metabolism in the blood and imaging properties in comparison to FET ([18F]1). Methods Three new [18F]FET derivatives, 2 – 4, were prepared from their corresponding tosylate-precursors through nucleophilic fluorination and subsequent deprotection reactions. In vitro uptake studies were carried out in 9L glioma cancer cell lines. In vitro and in vivo hydrolysis studies were conducted to evaluate the hydrolysis of FET prodrugs in blood and in Fisher 344 rats. Biodistribution and PET imaging studies were then performed in rats bearing 9L tumors. Results New FET prodrugs were prepared with 3 – 28 % decay corrected radiochemical yields, good enantiomeric purity (> 95 %) and high radiochemical purity (> 95 %). FET-Gly ([18F]2), FET-Ala ([18F]3), and AcFET ([18F]4) exhibited negligible uptake in comparison to the high uptake of FET ([18F]1) in 9L cells. Metabolism studies of FET-Gly ([18F]2), FET-Ala ([18F]3), and AcFET ([18F]4) in rat and human blood showed that FET-Ala ([18F]3) was hydrolyzed to FET ([18F]1) faster than FET-Gly ([18F]2) or AcFET ([18F]4). Most of the FET-Ala (79 %) was converted to FET ([18F]1) within 5 min in blood in vivo. Biodistribution studies demonstrated that FET-Ala ([18F]3) displayed the highest tumor uptake. The tumor-to-background ratios of FET-Ala ([18F]3) and FET ([18F]1) were comparable and appeared to be better than those of FET-Gly ([18F]2) and AcFET ([18F]4). PET imaging studies showed that both FET ([18F]1) and FET-Ala ([18F]3) could visualize tumors effectively, and that

  13. A (18)F-labeled glucose analog: synthesis using a click labeling method and in vitro evaluation.

    PubMed

    Kim, Dong Hyun; Choe, Yearn Seong; Jung, Kyung-Ho; Lee, Kyung-Han; Choi, Joon Young; Choi, Yong; Kim, Byung-Tae

    2008-05-01

    A (18)F-labeled glucose analog, 4-[(2-[(18)F]fluoroethyl)-1-(beta-D: -glucopyranosyl)]-1H-1,2,3-triazole ([(18)F]1), was synthesized using a click labeling method and evaluated in vitro for its cellular transportation via glucose transporter (Glut-1) and its potential as a hexokinase substrate. The click labeling method was superior to conventional labeling method, due to a higher decay-corrected radiochemical yield (30% vs. 21%), higher specific activity (59.9 GBq/mumol vs. 23.5 GBq/mumol), and shorter synthesis time (75-80 min vs. 95-100 min). In vitro evaluation demonstrated that [(18)F]1 does not act as a hexokinase substrate and has low and non-specific uptake by SNU-C5 cells. These results suggest that click chemistry offers a rapid and efficient radiolabeling method which does not require the protection of functional groups, although a triazole moiety at C1 of [(18)F]1 is incompatible for hexokinase phosphorylation and facilitative diffusion via Glut-1. PMID:18481013

  14. Synthesis and evaluation of (18)F-labeled ATP competitive inhibitors of topoisomerase II as probes for imaging topoisomerase II expression.

    PubMed

    Daumar, Pierre; Zeglis, Brian M; Ramos, Nicholas; Divilov, Vadim; Sevak, Kuntal Kumar; Pillarsetty, NagaVaraKishore; Lewis, Jason S

    2014-10-30

    Type II topoisomerase (Topo-II) is an ATP-dependent enzyme that is essential in the transcription, replication, and chromosome segregation processes and, as such, represents an attractive target for cancer therapy. Numerous studies indicate that the response to treatment with Topo-II inhibitors is highly dependent on both the levels and the activity of the enzyme. Consequently, a non-invasive assay to measure tumoral Topo-II levels has the potential to differentiate responders from non-responders. With the ultimate goal of developing a radiofluorinated tracer for positron emission tomography (PET) imaging, we have designed, synthesized, and evaluated a set of fluorinated compounds based on the structure of the ATP-competitive Topo-II inhibitor QAP1. Compounds 18 and 19b showed inhibition of Topo-II in in vitro assays and exhibited moderate, Topo-II level dependent cytotoxicity in SK-BR-3 and MCF-7 cell lines. Based on these results, (18)F-labeled analogs of these two compounds were synthesized and evaluated as PET probes for imaging Topo-II overexpression in mice bearing SK-BR-3 xenografts. [(18)F]-18 and [(18)F]-19b were synthesized from their corresponding protected tosylated derivatives by fluorination and subsequent deprotection. Small animal PET imaging studies indicated that both compounds do not accumulate in tumors and exhibit poor pharmacokinetics, clearing from the blood pool very rapidly and getting metabolized over. The insights gained from the current study will surely aid in the design and construction of future generations of PET agents for the non-invasive delineation of Topo-II expression.

  15. Synthesis and evaluation of 18F-labeled ATP competitive inhibitors of topoisomerase II as probes for imaging topoisomerase II expression

    PubMed Central

    Daumar, Pierre; Zeglis, Brian M.; Ramos, Nicholas; Divilov, Vadim; Sevak, Kuntal Kumar; Pillarsetty, NagaVaraKishore; Lewis, Jason S.

    2015-01-01

    Type II topoisomerase (Topo-II) is an ATP-dependent enzyme that is essential in the transcription, replication, and chromosome segregation processes and, as such, represents an attractive target for cancer therapy. Numerous studies indicate that the response to treatment with Topo-II inhibitors is highly dependent on both the levels and the activity of the enzyme. Consequently, a non-invasive assay to measure tumoral Topo-II levels has the potential to differentiate responders from non-responders. With the ultimate goal of developing a radiofluorinated tracer for positron emission tomography (PET) imaging, we have designed, synthesized, and evaluated a set of fluorinated compounds based on the structure of the ATP-competitive Topo-II inhibitor QAP1. Compounds 18 and 19b showed inhibition of Topo-II in in vitro assays and exhibited moderate, Topo-II level dependent cytotoxicity in SK-BR-3 and MCF-7 cell lines. Based on these results, 18F-labeled analogs of these two compounds were synthesized and evaluated as PET probes for imaging Topo-II overexpression in mice bearing SK-BR-3 xenografts. [18F]-18 and [18F]-19b were synthesized from their corresponding protected tosylated derivatives by fluorination and subsequent deprotection. Small animal PET imaging studies indicated that both compounds do not accumulate in tumors and exhibit poor pharmacokinetics, clearing from the blood pool very rapidly and getting metabolized over. The insights gained from the current study will surely aid in the design and construction of future generations of PET agents for the non-invasive delineation of Topo-II expression. PMID:25240701

  16. Noninvasive positron emission tomography imaging of cell death using a novel small-molecule probe, (18)F labeled bis(zinc(II)-dipicolylamine) complex.

    PubMed

    Wang, Hongliang; Tang, Xiaolan; Tang, Ganghua; Huang, Tingting; Liang, Xiang; Hu, Kongzhen; Deng, Huaifu; Yi, Chang; Shi, Xinchong; Wu, Kening

    2013-08-01

    The synthetic bis(zinc(II)-dipicolylamine) (DPAZn2) coordination complexes are known to have a high specific and selective affinity to target the exposed phosphatidylserine (PS) on the surface of dead and dying cells. An (18)F-labeled DPAZn2 complex (4-(18)F-Fluoro-benzoyl-bis(zinc(II)-dipicolylamine), (18)F-FB-DPAZn2) as positron emission tomography (PET) tracer was developed and evaluated for in vivo imaging of tumor treated with a chemical agent. The in vitro cell stain studies revealed that fluorescent DPAZn2 complexes (Dansyl-DPAZn2) stained the same cells (apoptotic and necrotic cells) as fluorescein isothiocyanate (FITC) labeled Annexin V (FITC-Annexin V). The radiosynthesis of (18)F-FB-DPAZn2 was achieved through the amidation the precursor bis(2,2'-dipicolylamine) derivative (DPA2) with the prosthetic group N-succinimidyl-4-[(18)F]-fluorobenzoate ((18)F-SFB) and chelation with zinc nitrate. In the biodistribution study, the fast clearance of (18)F-FB-DPAZn2 from blood and kidney was observed and high uptake in liver and intestine within 90 min postinjection was also found. For the PET imaging, significantly higher tumor uptake of (18)F-FB-DPAZn2 was observed in the adriamycin (ADM)-treated Hepa1-6 hepatocellular carcinoma-bearing mice than that in the untreated tumor-model mice, while a slightly decreased tumor uptake of (18)F-FDG was found in the ADM-treated tumor-bearing mice. The results indicate that (18)F-FB-DPAZn2 has the similar capability of apoptosis detection as FITC-Annexin V and seems to be a potential PET tracer for noninvasive evaluation and monitoring of anti-tumor chemotherapy. The high uptake of (18)F-FB-DPAZn2 in the abdomen needs to optimize the structure for improving its pharmacokinetics characteristics in the future work.

  17. A high-affinity [18F]-labeled phosphoramidate peptidomimetic PSMA-targeted inhibitor for PET imaging of prostate cancer

    PubMed Central

    Ganguly, Tanushree; Dannoon, Shorouk; Hopkins, Mark R.; Murphy, Stephanie; Cahaya, Hendry; Blecha, Joseph E.; Jivan, Salma; Drake, Christopher R.; Barinka, Cyril; Jones, Ella F.; VanBrocklin, Henry F.; Berkman, Clifford E.

    2015-01-01

    Introduction In this study, a structurally modified phosphoramidate scaffold, with improved prostate-specific membrane antigen (PSMA) avidity, stability and in vivo characteristics, as a PET imaging agent for prostate cancer (PCa), was prepared and evaluated. Methods p-Fluorobenzoyl-aminohexanoate and 2-(3-hydroxypropyl)glycine were introduced into the PSMA-targeting scaffold yielding phosphoramidate 5. X-ray crystallography was performed on the PSMA/5 complex. [18F]5 was synthesized, and cell uptake and internalization studies were conducted in PSMA(+) LNCaP and CWR22Rv1 cells and PSMA(−) PC-3 cells. In vivo PET imaging and biodistribution studies were performed at 1 and 4 h post injection in mice bearing CWR22Rv1 tumor, with or without blocking agent. Results The crystallographic data showed interaction of the p-fluorobenzoyl group with an arene-binding cleft on the PSMA surface. In vitro studies revealed elevated uptake of [18F]5 in PSMA(+) cells (2.2% in CWR22Rv1 and 12.1% in LNCaP) compared to PSMA(−) cells (0.08%) at 4 h. In vivo tumor uptake of 2.33% ID/g and tumor-to-blood ratio of 265:1 was observed at 4 h. Conclusions We have successfully synthesized, radiolabeled and evaluated a new PSMA-targeted PET agent. The crystal structure of the PSMA/5 complex highlighted the interactions within the arene-binding cleft contributing to the overall complex stability. The high target uptake and rapid non-target clearance exhibited by [18F]5 in PSMA(+) xenografts substantiates its potential use for PET imaging of PCa. Advances in Knowledge The only FDA-approved imaging agent for PCa, Prostascint®, targets PSMA but suffers from inherent shortcomings. The data acquired in this manuscript confirmed that our new generation of [18F]-labeled PSMA inhibitor exhibited promising in vivo performance as a PET imaging agent for PCa and is well-positioned for subsequent clinical trials. Implications for Patient Care Our preliminary data demonstrate that this tracer possesses

  18. Synthesis of a Potent Aminopyridine-Based nNOS-Inhibitor by Two Recent No-Carrier-Added (18)F-Labelling Methods.

    PubMed

    Drerup, Christian; Ermert, Johannes; Coenen, Heinz H

    2016-01-01

    Nitric oxide (NO), an important multifunctional signaling molecule, is produced by three isoforms of NO-synthase (NOS) and has been associated with neurodegenerative disorders. Selective inhibitors of the subtypes iNOS (inducible) or nNOS (neuronal) are of great interest for decoding neurodestructive key factors, and (18)F-labelled analogues would allow investigating the NOS-function by molecular imaging with positron emission tomography. Especially, the highly selective nNOS inhibitor 6-((3-((3-fluorophenethylamino)methyl)phenoxy)methyl)-4-methylpyridin-2-amine (10) lends itself as suitable compound to be (18)F-labelled in no-carrier-added (n.c.a.) form. For preparation of the (18)F-labelled nNOS-Inhibitor [(18)F]10 a "build-up" radiosynthesis was developed based on a corresponding iodonium ylide as labelling precursor. The such activated phenethyl group of the compound was efficiently and regioselectively labelled with n.c.a. [(18)F]fluoride in 79% radiochemical yield (RCY). After conversion by reductive amination and microwave assisted displacement of the protecting groups, the desired nNOS-inhibitor was obtained in about 15% total RCY. Alternatively, for a simplified "late-stage" (18)F-labelling procedure a corresponding boronic ester precursor was synthesized and successfully used in a newer, copper(II) mediated n.c.a. (18)F-fluoro-deboroniation reaction, achieving the same total RCY. Thus, both methods proved comparatively suited to provide the highly selective NOS-inhibitor [(18)F]10 as probe for preclinical in vivo studies. PMID:27598109

  19. Synthesis of a Potent Aminopyridine-Based nNOS-Inhibitor by Two Recent No-Carrier-Added (18)F-Labelling Methods.

    PubMed

    Drerup, Christian; Ermert, Johannes; Coenen, Heinz H

    2016-09-01

    Nitric oxide (NO), an important multifunctional signaling molecule, is produced by three isoforms of NO-synthase (NOS) and has been associated with neurodegenerative disorders. Selective inhibitors of the subtypes iNOS (inducible) or nNOS (neuronal) are of great interest for decoding neurodestructive key factors, and (18)F-labelled analogues would allow investigating the NOS-function by molecular imaging with positron emission tomography. Especially, the highly selective nNOS inhibitor 6-((3-((3-fluorophenethylamino)methyl)phenoxy)methyl)-4-methylpyridin-2-amine (10) lends itself as suitable compound to be (18)F-labelled in no-carrier-added (n.c.a.) form. For preparation of the (18)F-labelled nNOS-Inhibitor [(18)F]10 a "build-up" radiosynthesis was developed based on a corresponding iodonium ylide as labelling precursor. The such activated phenethyl group of the compound was efficiently and regioselectively labelled with n.c.a. [(18)F]fluoride in 79% radiochemical yield (RCY). After conversion by reductive amination and microwave assisted displacement of the protecting groups, the desired nNOS-inhibitor was obtained in about 15% total RCY. Alternatively, for a simplified "late-stage" (18)F-labelling procedure a corresponding boronic ester precursor was synthesized and successfully used in a newer, copper(II) mediated n.c.a. (18)F-fluoro-deboroniation reaction, achieving the same total RCY. Thus, both methods proved comparatively suited to provide the highly selective NOS-inhibitor [(18)F]10 as probe for preclinical in vivo studies.

  20. Choline Derivate-Modified Doxorubicin Loaded Micelle for Glioma Therapy.

    PubMed

    Li, Jianfeng; Yang, Huiying; Zhang, Yujie; Jiang, Xutao; Guo, Yubo; An, Sai; Ma, Haojun; He, Xi; Jiang, Chen

    2015-09-30

    Ligand-mediated polymeric micelles have enormous potential for improving the efficacy of glioma therapy. Linear-dendritic drug-polymer conjugates composed of doxorubicin (DOX) and polyethylene glycol (PEG) were synthesized with or without modification of choline derivate (CD). The resulting MeO-PEG-DOX8 and CD-PEG-DOX8 could self-assemble into polymeric micelles with a nanosized diameter around 30 nm and a high drug loading content up to 40.6 and 32.3%, respectively. The optimized formulation 20% CD-PEG-DOX8 micelles had superior cellular uptake and antitumor activity against MeO-PEG-DOX8 micelles. The subcellular distribution using confocal study revealed that 20% CD-PEG-DOX8 micelles preferentially accumulated in the mitochondria. Pharmacokinetic study showed area under the plasma concentration-time curve (AUC0-t) and Cmax for 20% CD-PEG-DOX8 micelles and DOX solution were 1336.58 ± 179.43 mg/L·h, 96.35 ± 3.32 mg/L and 1.40 ± 0.19 mg/L·h, 1.15 ± 0.25 mg/L, respectively. Biodistribution study showed the DOX concentration of 20% CD-PEG-DOX8 micelles treated group at 48 h was 2.37-fold higher than that of MeO-PEG-DOX8 micelles treated group at 48 h and was 24 fold-higher than that of DOX solution treated group at 24 h. CD-PEG-DOX8 micelles (20%) were well tolerated with reduced cardiotoxicity, as evaluated in the body weight change and HE staining studies, while they induced most significant antitumor activity with longest media survival time in an orthotopic mouse model of U87-luci glioblastoma model as displayed in the bioluminescence imaging and survival curve studies. Our findings consequently indicated that 20% CD-PEG-DOX8 micelles are promising drug delivery system for glioma chemotherapy. PMID:26356793

  1. In vivo biodistribution of two ( sup 18 F)-labelled muscarinic cholinergic receptor ligands: 2-( sup 18 F)- and 4-( sup 18 F)-fluorodexetimide

    SciTech Connect

    Wilson, A.A.; Scheffel, U.A.; Dannals, R.F.; Stathis, M.; Ravert, H.T.; Wagner, H.N. Jr. )

    1991-01-01

    Two ({sup 18}F)-labelled analogues of the potent muscarinic cholinergic receptor (m-AChR) antagonist, dexetimide, were evaluated as potential ligands for imaging m-AChR by positron emission tomography (PET). Intravenous administration of both 2-({sup 18}F)- or 4-({sup 18}F)-fluorodexetimide resulted in high brain uptake of radioactivity in mice. High binding levels were observed in m-AChR rich areas, such as cortex and striatum, with low levels in the receptor-poor cerebellum. Uptake of radioactivity was saturable and could be blocked by pre-administration of dexetimide or atropine. Drugs with different sites of action were ineffective at blocking receptor binding. The results indicate that both radiotracers are promising candidates for use in PET studies.

  2. In vivo biodistribution of two [18F]-labelled muscarinic cholinergic receptor ligands: 2-[18F]- and 4-[18F]-fluorodexetimide.

    PubMed

    Wilson, A A; Scheffel, U A; Dannals, R F; Stathis, M; Ravert, H T; Wagner, H N

    1991-01-01

    Two [18F]-labelled analogues of the potent muscarinic cholinergic receptor (m-AChR) antagonist, dexetimide, were evaluated as potential ligands for imaging m-AChR by positron emission tomography (PET). Intravenous administration of both 2-[18F]- or 4-[18F]-fluorodexetimide resulted in high brain uptake of radioactivity in mice. High binding levels were observed in m-AChR rich areas, such as cortex and striatum, with low levels in the receptor-poor cerebellum. Uptake of radioactivity was saturable and could be blocked by pre-administration of dexetimide or atropine. Drugs with different sites of action were ineffective at blocking receptor binding. The results indicate that both radiotracers are promising candidates for use in PET studies. PMID:2008155

  3. (11)C- and (18)F-Labeled Radioligands for P-Glycoprotein Imaging by Positron Emission Tomography.

    PubMed

    Cantore, Mariangela; Benadiba, Marcel; Elsinga, Philip H; Kwizera, Chantal; Dierckx, Rudi A J O; Colabufo, Nicola Antonio; Luurtsema, Gert

    2016-01-01

    P-Glycoprotein (P-gp) is an efflux transporter widely expressed at the human blood-brain barrier. It is involved in xenobiotics efflux and in onset and progression of neurodegenerative disorders. For these reasons, there is great interest in the assessment of P-gp expression and function by noninvasive techniques such as positron emission tomography (PET). Three radiolabeled aryloxazole derivatives: 2-[2-(2-methyl-((11)C)-5-methoxyphenyl)oxazol-4-ylmethyl]-6,7-dimethoxy-1,2,3,4-tetrahydroisoquinoline ([(11)C]-5); 2-[2-(2-fluoromethyl-((18)F)-5-methoxyphenyl)oxazol-4-ylmethyl]-6,7-dimethoxy-1,2,3,4-tetra-hydroisoquinoline ([(18)F]-6); and 2-[2-(2-fluoroethyl-((18)F)-5-methoxyphenyl)oxazol-4-ylmethyl]-6,7-dimethoxy-1,2,3,4-tetrahydroisoquinoline ([(18)F]-7), were tested in several in vitro biological assays to assess the effect of the aryl substituent in terms of potency and mechanism of action toward P-gp. Methyl derivative [(11)C]-5 is a potent P-gp substrate, whereas the corresponding fluoroethyl derivative [(18)F]-7 is a P-gp inhibitor. Fluoromethyl compound [(18)F]-6 is classified as a non-transported P-gp substrate, because its efflux increases after cyclosporine A modulation. These studies revealed a promising substrate and inhibitor, [(11)C]-5 and [(18)F]-7, respectively, for in vivo imaging of P-gp by using PET.

  4. Synthesis, uptake mechanism characterization and biological evaluation of 18F labeled fluoroalkyl phenylalanine analogs as potential PET imaging agents

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Limin; Qu, Wenchao; Lieberman, Brian P.; Plössl, Karl; Kung, Hank F.

    2010-01-01

    Introduction Amino acids based tracers represent a promising class of tumor metabolic imaging agents with successful clinical applications. Two new phenylalanine derivatives, p-(2-[18F]fluoroethyl)-L-phenylalanine (FEP, [18F]2) and p-(3-[18F]fluoropropyl)-L-phenylalanine (FPP, [18F]3) were synthesized and evaluated in comparison to clinically utilized O-(2-[18F]fluoroethyl)-L-tyrosine (FET, [18F]1). Methods FEP ([18F]2) and FPP ([18F]3) were successfully synthesized by a rapid and efficient two-step nucleophilic fluorination of tosylate precursors and deprotection reaction. In vitro cell uptake studies were carried out in 9L glioma cells. In vivo studies, 9L tumor xenografts were implanted in Fisher 344 rats. Results FEP ([18F]2) and FPP ([18F]3) could be efficiently labeled within 90 min with good enantiomeric purity (>95%), good yield (11–37%) and high specific activity (21–69 GBq/μmol). Cell uptake studies showed FEP had higher uptake than FPP as well as reference ligand FET ([18F]1). Uptake mechanism studies suggested that FEP is a selective substrate for system L and prefers its subtype LAT1. In vivo biodistribution studies demonstrated FEP had specific accumulation in tumor cells and tumor to background ratio reached 1.45 at 60 min. Small animal PET imaging studies showed FEP was comparable to FET for imaging rats bearing 9L tumor model. FEP had high uptake in 9L tumor compared to surrounding tissue and was quickly excreted through urinary tract. Conclusion Biological evaluations indicate that FEP ([18F]2) is a potential useful tracer for tumor imaging with PET. PMID:21220129

  5. Fully automated production of diverse 18F-labeled PET tracers on the ELIXYS multi-reactor radiosynthesizer without hardware modification

    PubMed Central

    Lazari, Mark; Collins, Jeffrey; Shen, Bin; Farhoud, Mohammed; Yeh, Daniel; Maraglia, Brandon; Chin, Frederick T.; Nathanson, David A.; Moore, Melissa; van Dam, R. Michael

    2015-01-01

    Fully-automated radiosynthesizers are continuing to be developed to meet the growing need for the reliable production of positron emission tomography (PET) tracers made under current good manufacturing practice (cGMP) guidelines. There is a current trend towards supporting “kit-like” disposable cassettes that come preconfigured for particular tracers, thus eliminating the need for cleaning protocols between syntheses and enabling quick transitions to synthesizing other tracers. Though ideal for production, these systems are often limited for the development of novel tracers due to pressure, temperature, and chemical compatibility considerations. This study demonstrates the versatile use of the ELIXYS fully-automated radiosynthesizer to adapt and produce eight different 18F-labeled PET tracers of varying complexity. Methods Three reactor syntheses of D-[18F]FAC, L-[18F]FMAU, and D-[18F]FEAU along with the one reactor syntheses of D-[18F]FEAU, [18F]FDG, [18F]FLT, [18F]Fallypride, [18F]FHBG, and [18F]SFB were all produced using ELIXYS without the need for any hardware modifications or reconfiguration. Synthesis protocols were adapted, and slightly modified from literature, but not fully optimized. Furthermore, [18F]FLT, [18F]FDG, and [18F]Fallypride were produced sequentially on the same day and used for preclinical imaging of A431 tumor-bearing SCID mice and wild-type BALB/c mice, respectively. To assess future translation to the clinical setting, several batches of tracers were subjected to a full set of quality control tests. Results All tracers were produced with radiochemical yields comparable to those in literature. [18F]FLT, [18F]FDG, and [18F]Fallypride were successfully used to image the mice with results consistent with literature. All tracers subjected to clinical quality control tests passed. Conclusion The ELIXYS radiosynthesizer facilitates rapid tracer development and is capable of producing multiple 18F-labeled PET tracers suitable for clinical

  6. Improved radiosynthesis and preliminary in vivo evaluation of a (18)F-labeled glycopeptide-peptoid hybrid for PET imaging of neurotensin receptor 2.

    PubMed

    Maschauer, Simone; Greff, Cornelia; Einsiedel, Jürgen; Ott, Julian; Tripal, Philipp; Hübner, Harald; Gmeiner, Peter; Prante, Olaf

    2015-07-15

    The neurotensin receptor 2 (NTS2) is an attractive target for cancer imaging, as it is overexpressed in a variety of tumor types including prostate, pancreas and breast carcinoma. The aim of this study was the development of the first NTS2 subtype selective (18)F-labeled radioligand for imaging NTS2 expression in vivo by positron emission tomography (PET). The radiosynthesis of glycopeptoid (18)F-4 was realized by copper(I)-catalyzed azide-alkyne cycloaddition (CuAAC), applying the prosthetic group 6-deoxy-6-[(18)F]fluoroglucosyl azide for (18)F-fluoroglycosylation of the alkyne-terminated NT(8-13) analog Pra-N-Me-Arg-Arg-Pro-N-homo-Tyr-Ile-Leu-OH. The binding affinity of the peptide-peptoid 4 for NTS2 was 7nM with excellent subtype selectivity over NTS1 (260-fold). In vitro autoradiography studies of rat brain slices confirmed the high selectivity of (18)F-4 for NTS2. Biodistribution experiments using HT29 and PC3 tumor-bearing nude mice revealed high renal and only moderate tumor uptake, while PET imaging experiments revealed specific binding of (18)F-4 in NTS2-positive tumors. As (18)F-4 displayed high stability in vitro but fast degradation in vivo, future work will focus on the development of metabolically more stable NT(8-13) analogs.

  7. Synthesis and Evaluation of (18)F-labeled Pyridaben Analogues for Myocardial Perfusion Imaging in Mice, Rats and Chinese mini-swine.

    PubMed

    Mou, Tiantian; Zhao, Zuoquan; You, Linyi; Li, Yesen; Wang, Qian; Fang, Wei; Lu, Jie; Peng, Cheng; Zhang, Xianzhong

    2016-01-01

    This study reports three novel (18)F-labeled pyridaben analogues for potential myocardial perfusion imaging (MPI). Three precursors and the corresponding nonradioactive compounds were synthesized and characterized. The radiolabeled tracers were obtained by substituting tosyl with (18)F. The total radiosynthesis time of these tracers was 70-90 min. Typical decay-corrected radiochemical yields were 47-58%, with high radiochemical purities (>98%). Tracers were evaluated as MPI agents in vitro, ex vivo and in vivo. In the mouse biodistribution study, all three radiotracers showed high initial heart uptake (34-54% ID/g at 2 min after injection) and fast liver clearance. In the microPET imaging study, [(18)F]Fmpp2 produced heart images with good quality in both mice and rats. In the whole-body PET/CT images of mini-swine, [(18)F]Fmpp2 showed excellent initial heart standardized uptake value (SUV) (7.12 at 5 min p.i.) and good retention (5.75 at 120 min p.i.). The heart/liver SUV ratios were 4.12, 5.42 and 5.99 at 30, 60 and 120 min after injection, respectively. The favorable biological properties of [(18)F]Fmpp2 suggest that it is worth further investigation as a potential MPI agent. PMID:27646847

  8. Single-step High-yield Radiosynthesis and Evaluation of a Sensitive 18F-Labeled Ligand for Imaging Brain Peripheral Benzodiazepine Receptors with PET

    PubMed Central

    Briard, Emmanuelle; Zoghbi, Sami S.; Siméon, Fabrice G.; Imaizumi, Masao; Gourley, Jonathan P.; Shetty, H. Umesha; Lu, Shuiyu; Fujita, Masahiro; Innis, Robert B.; Pike, Victor W.

    2009-01-01

    Elevated levels of peripheral benzodiazepine receptors (PBR) are associated with activated microglia in their response to inflammation. Hence, PBR imaging in vivo is valuable for investigating brain inflammatory conditions. Sensitive, easily prepared and readily available radioligands for imaging with positron emission tomography (PET) are desirable for this purpose. We describe a new 18F-labeled PBR radioligand, namely [18F]N-fluoroacetyl-N-(2,5-dimethoxybenzyl)-2-phenoxyaniline ([18F]9). [18F]9 was produced easily through a single and highly efficient step, the reaction of [18F]fluoride ion with the corresponding bromo precursor, 8. Ligand 9 exhibited high affinity for PBR in vitro. PET showed that [18F]9 was avidly taken into monkey brain and gave a high ratio of PBR-specific to nonspecific binding. [18F]9 was devoid of defluorination in rat and monkey and gave predominantly polar radiometabolite(s). In rat, a low level radiometabolite of intermediate lipophilicity was identified as [18F]2-fluoro-N-(2-phenoxyphenyl)acetamide ([18F]11). [18F]9 is a promising radioligand for future imaging of PBR in living human brain. PMID:19119848

  9. Synthesis and Evaluation of 18F-labeled Pyridaben Analogues for Myocardial Perfusion Imaging in Mice, Rats and Chinese mini-swine

    PubMed Central

    Mou, Tiantian; Zhao, Zuoquan; You, Linyi; Li, Yesen; Wang, Qian; Fang, Wei; Lu, Jie; Peng, Cheng; Zhang, Xianzhong

    2016-01-01

    This study reports three novel 18F-labeled pyridaben analogues for potential myocardial perfusion imaging (MPI). Three precursors and the corresponding nonradioactive compounds were synthesized and characterized. The radiolabeled tracers were obtained by substituting tosyl with 18F. The total radiosynthesis time of these tracers was 70–90 min. Typical decay-corrected radiochemical yields were 47–58%, with high radiochemical purities (>98%). Tracers were evaluated as MPI agents in vitro, ex vivo and in vivo. In the mouse biodistribution study, all three radiotracers showed high initial heart uptake (34–54% ID/g at 2 min after injection) and fast liver clearance. In the microPET imaging study, [18F]Fmpp2 produced heart images with good quality in both mice and rats. In the whole-body PET/CT images of mini-swine, [18F]Fmpp2 showed excellent initial heart standardized uptake value (SUV) (7.12 at 5 min p.i.) and good retention (5.75 at 120 min p.i.). The heart/liver SUV ratios were 4.12, 5.42 and 5.99 at 30, 60 and 120 min after injection, respectively. The favorable biological properties of [18F]Fmpp2 suggest that it is worth further investigation as a potential MPI agent. PMID:27646847

  10. Synthesis and evaluation of new (18)F-labelled acetamidobenzoxazolone-based radioligands for imaging of the translocator protein (18 kDa, TSPO) in the brain.

    PubMed

    Tiwari, Anjani K; Fujinaga, Masayuki; Yui, Joji; Yamasaki, Tomoteru; Xie, Lin; Kumata, Katsushi; Mishra, Anil K; Shimoda, Yoko; Hatori, Akiko; Ji, Bin; Ogawa, Masanao; Kawamura, Kazunori; Wang, Feng; Zhang, Ming-Rong

    2014-12-21

    The visualization of the activated microglia/TSPO is one of the main aspects of neuroimaging. Here we describe two new (18)F-labelled molecules, 2-[5-(4-[(18)F]fluoroethoxyphenyl)- ([(18)F]2) and 2-[5-(4-[(18)F]fluoropropyloxyphenyl)- ([(18)F]3) -2-oxo-1,3-benzoxazol-3(2H)-yl]-N-methyl-N-phenylacetamide as novel PET ligands for imaging the translocator protein (18 kDa, TSPO) in the brain. The three-D pharmacophore evaluation and docking studies suggested their high affinity for the TSPO and in vitro binding assays of the TSPO showed binding affinities 6.6 ± 0.7 nM and 16.7 ± 2.5 nM for 2 and 3, respectively. The radiochemical yields for [(18)F]2 and [(18)F]3 were found to be 22 ± 4% (n = 8) and 5 ± 2% (n = 5), respectively at EOB. The radiochemical purity for both was found ≥98% and the specific activity was in the range of 98-364 GBq μmol(-1) at EOS. In vitro autoradiography with an ischemic rat brain showed significantly increased binding on the ipsilateral side compared to the contralateral side. The specificity of [(18)F]2 and [(18)F]3 for binding TSPO was confirmed using the TSPO ligands PK11195 and MBMP. The biodistribution patterns of both PET ligands were evaluated in normal mice by 1 h dynamic PET imaging. In the brain, regional radioactivity reached the maximum very rapidly within 0-4 min for both ligands, similar to (R)[(11)C]PK11195. The metabolite study of [(18)F]2 also favoured a more favourable profile for quantification in comparison to (R)[(11)C]PK11195. In summary, these data indicated that [(18)F]2 and [(18)F]3 have good potential to work as PET ligands, therefore there are merits to use these radioligands for the in vivo evaluation in animal models to see their efficacy in the living brain.

  11. 18F-Labeled NaF PET-CT in Detection of Bone Metastases in Patients With Preoperative Lung Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Rao, Liangjun; Zong, Zhen; Chen, Zhifeng; Wang, Xiaoyan; Shi, Xinchong; Yi, Chang; Zhang, Xiangsong

    2016-01-01

    Abstract We compared the diagnostic accuracy of 18F-labeled sodium fluoride (18F-NaF) PET-CT with 99m-technetium methylene diphosphonate (99mTc-MDP) single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) to detect bone metastases (BMs) in patients with preoperative lung cancer. Patients with lung cancer (n = 181) were examined with 18F-NaF PET-CT, and another 167 patients with lung cancer were examined with 99mTc-MDP SPECT. 18F-NaF PET-CT and 99mTc-MDP SPECT were evaluated by 2 experienced readers. Lesions were graded on a scale of 0 (degenerative lesion) to 4 (definite BM), and equivocal lesions were determined as indifferent (grade 3). Based on patient-based analysis, there were only 4 equivocal patients in 18F-NaF PET-CT detection. However, in 99mTc-MDP SPECT detection, there were 19 equivocal patients, which indicated a significant difference in terms of occurrence ratio (χ2 = 9.005, P = 0.03). Sensitivity and specificity of PET-CT was significantly better than that of SPECT when equivocal reading was categorized as malignant or benign (P < 0.05). Based on lesions-based analysis, SPECT produced 26 equivocal lesions of 333 lesions, but PET-CT produced only 5 equivocal lesions of 991 lesions. PET-CT was significantly better than SPECT in the aspect of producing equivocal patients (χ2 = 58.141, P < 0.001). Sensitivity and specificity of PET-CT was significantly better than that of SPECT when equivocal reading was categorized as malignant or benign (P < 0.05). 18F-NaF PET-CT is a highly sensitive and specific modality for the detection of BM in patients with preoperative lung cancer. It is better than conventional 99mTc-MDP SPECT in detecting BM in patients with preoperative lung cancer. PMID:27100456

  12. Radiosynthesis and preliminary PET evaluation of (18)F-labeled 2-(1-(3-fluorophenyl)-2-oxo-5-(pyrimidin-2-yl)-1,2-dihydropyridin-3-yl)benzonitrile for imaging AMPA receptors.

    PubMed

    Yuan, Gengyang; Jones, Graham B; Vasdev, Neil; Liang, Steven H

    2016-10-01

    To prompt the development of (18)F-labeled positron emission tomography (PET) tracers for the α-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methyl-4-isoxazolepropionic acid (AMPA) receptor, we have prepared (18)F-labeled 2-(1-(3-fluorophenyl)-2-oxo-5-(pyrimidin-2-yl)-1,2-dihydropyridin-3-yl)benzonitrile ([(18)F]8). The radiosynthesis was achieved by a one-pot two-step method that utilized a spirocyclic hypervalent iodine(III) mediated radiofluorination to prepare the (18)F-labeled 1-bromo-3-fluorobenzene ([(18)F]15) intermediate with K(18)F. A subsequent copper(I) iodide mediated coupling reaction was carried out with 2-(2-oxo-5-(pyrimidin-2-yl)-1,2-dihydropyridin-3-yl)benzonitrile (10) to [(18)F]8 in 10±2% uncorrected radiochemical yield relative to starting (18)F-fluoride with >99% radiochemical purity and 29.6±7.4Gbq/μmol specific activity at the time of injection. PET imaging studies with the title radiotracer in normal mice demonstrated good brain uptake (peak standardized uptake value (SUV)=2.3±0.1) and warrants further in vivo validation. PMID:27546294

  13. Radiosynthesis and preliminary PET evaluation of (18)F-labeled 2-(1-(3-fluorophenyl)-2-oxo-5-(pyrimidin-2-yl)-1,2-dihydropyridin-3-yl)benzonitrile for imaging AMPA receptors.

    PubMed

    Yuan, Gengyang; Jones, Graham B; Vasdev, Neil; Liang, Steven H

    2016-10-01

    To prompt the development of (18)F-labeled positron emission tomography (PET) tracers for the α-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methyl-4-isoxazolepropionic acid (AMPA) receptor, we have prepared (18)F-labeled 2-(1-(3-fluorophenyl)-2-oxo-5-(pyrimidin-2-yl)-1,2-dihydropyridin-3-yl)benzonitrile ([(18)F]8). The radiosynthesis was achieved by a one-pot two-step method that utilized a spirocyclic hypervalent iodine(III) mediated radiofluorination to prepare the (18)F-labeled 1-bromo-3-fluorobenzene ([(18)F]15) intermediate with K(18)F. A subsequent copper(I) iodide mediated coupling reaction was carried out with 2-(2-oxo-5-(pyrimidin-2-yl)-1,2-dihydropyridin-3-yl)benzonitrile (10) to [(18)F]8 in 10±2% uncorrected radiochemical yield relative to starting (18)F-fluoride with >99% radiochemical purity and 29.6±7.4Gbq/μmol specific activity at the time of injection. PET imaging studies with the title radiotracer in normal mice demonstrated good brain uptake (peak standardized uptake value (SUV)=2.3±0.1) and warrants further in vivo validation.

  14. Development of Purine-Derived 18F-Labeled Pro-drug Tracers for Imaging of MRP1 Activity with PET

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Multidrug resistance-associated protein 1 (MRP1) is a drug efflux transporter that has been implicated in the pathology of several neurological diseases and is associated with development of multidrug resistance. To enable measurement of MRP1 function in the living brain, a series of 6-halopurines decorated with fluorinated side chains have been synthesized and evaluated as putative pro-drug tracers. The tracers were designed to undergo conjugation with glutathione within the brain and hence form the corresponding MRP1 substrate tracers in situ. 6-Bromo-7-(2-[18F]fluoroethyl)purine showed good brain uptake and rapid metabolic conversion. Dynamic PET imaging demonstrated a marked difference in brain clearance rates between wild-type and mrp1 knockout mice, suggesting that the tracer can allow noninvasive assessment of MRP1 activity in vivo. PMID:24456310

  15. Distribution and binding of 18F-labeled and 125I-labeled analogues of ACI-80, a prospective molecular imaging biomarker of disease: a whole hemisphere post mortem autoradiography study in human brains obtained from Alzheimer's disease patients.

    PubMed

    Gulyás, Balázs; Spenger, Christian; Beliczai, Zsuzsa; Gulya, Károly; Kása, Péter; Jahan, Mahabuba; Jia, Zhisheng; Weber, Urs; Pfeifer, Andrea; Muhs, Andreas; Willbold, Dieter; Halldin, Christer

    2012-01-01

    One of the major pathological landmarks of Alzheimer's disease and other neurodegenerative diseases is the presence of amyloid deposits in the brain. The early non-invasive visualization of amyloid is a major objective of recent diagnostic neuroimaging approaches, including positron emission tomography (PET), with an eye on follow-up of disease progression and/or therapy efficacy. The development of molecular imaging biomarkers with binding affinity to amyloid in the brain is therefore in the forefront of imaging biomarker and radiochemistry research. Recently, a dodecamer peptide (amino acid sequence=QSHYRHISPAQV; denominated D1 or ACI-80) was identified as a prospective ligand candidate, binding with high ex vivo affinity to L-Aβ-amyloid (K(d): 0.4 μM). In order to assess the ligand's capacity to visualize amyloid in Alzheimer's disease (AD), two (125)I labeled and three (18)F labeled analogues of the peptide were synthesized and tested in post mortem human autoradiography experiments using whole hemisphere brain slices obtained from deceased AD patients and age matched control subjects. The (18)F-labeled radioligands showed more promising visualization capacity of amyloid that the (125)I-labeled radioligands. In the case of each (18)F radioligands the grey matter uptake in the AD brains was significantly higher than that in control brains. Furthermore, the grey matter: white matter uptake ratio was over ~2, the difference being significant for each (18)F-radioligands. The regional distribution of the uptake of the various radioligands systematically shows a congruent pattern between the high uptake regions and spots in the autoradiographic images and the disease specific signals obtained in adjacent or identical brain slices labeled with histological, immunohistochemical or autoradiographic stains for amyloid deposits or activated astrocytes. The present data, using post mortem human brain autoradiography in whole hemisphere human brains obtained from deceased

  16. Structural autonomy of a β-hairpin peptide derived from the pneumococcal choline-binding protein LytA.

    PubMed

    Maestro, Beatriz; Santiveri, Clara M; Jiménez, M Angeles; Sanz, Jesús M

    2011-01-01

    The cell wall of Streptococcus pneumoniae and several other micro-organisms is decorated with a number of the so-called choline-binding proteins (CBPs) that recognise the choline residues in the bacterial surface by means of highly conserved, concatenated 20-aa sequences termed choline-binding repeats (CBRs), that are composed of a loop and a β-hairpin structure. In this work, we have investigated the ability to fold in aqueous solution of a 14-aa peptide (LytA₁₉₇₋₂₁₀[wt]) and a single derivative of it, LytA₁₉₇₋₂₁₀[ND], corresponding to one of the six β-hairpins of the LytA pneumococcal amidase. Intrinsic fluorescence and circular dichroism spectroscopical measurements showed that both peptides spontaneously acquire a non-random conformation which is also able to bind the natural ligand choline. Furthermore, nuclear magnetic resonance techniques allowed the calculation of the structure of the LytA₁₉₇₋₂₁₀[ND] peptide, which displayed a β-hairpin conformation highly similar to that found within the full-length C-LytA module. These results provide a structural basis for the modular organisation of CBPs and suggest the use of CBRs as new templates for the design of stable β-hairpins. PMID:21051322

  17. A choline derivate-modified nanoprobe for glioma diagnosis using MRI

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Jianfeng; Huang, Shixian; Shao, Kun; Liu, Yang; An, Sai; Kuang, Yuyang; Guo, Yubo; Ma, Haojun; Wang, Xuxia; Jiang, Chen

    2013-04-01

    Gadolinium (Gd) chelate contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is a preferred method of glioma detection and preoperative localisation because it offers high spatial resolution and non-invasive deep tissue penetration. Gd-based contrast agents, such as Gd-diethyltriaminepentaacetic acid (DTPA-Gd, Magnevist), are widely used clinically for tumor diagnosis. However, the Gd-based MRI approach is limited for patients with glioma who have an uncompromised blood-brain barrier (BBB). Moreover, the rapid renal clearance and non-specificity of such contrast agents further hinders their prevalence. We present a choline derivate (CD)-modified nanoprobe with BBB permeability, glioma specificity and a long blood half-life. Specific accumulation of the nanoprobe in gliomas and subsequent MRI contrast enhancement are demonstrated in vitro in U87 MG cells and in vivo in a xenograft nude model. BBB and glioma dual targeting by this nanoprobe may facilitate precise detection of gliomas with an uncompromised BBB and may offer better preoperative and intraoperative tumor localization.

  18. Initial prostate cancer diagnosis and disease staging--the role of choline-PET-CT.

    PubMed

    Mapelli, Paola; Picchio, Maria

    2015-09-01

    An early and correct diagnosis together with accurate staging of prostate cancer is necessary in order to plan the most appropriate treatment strategy. Morphological imaging modalities such as transrectal ultrasonography (TRUS), CT, and MRI can have some limitations regarding their accuracy for primary diagnosis and staging of prostate cancer; for instance, they have limited specificity in differentiating cancer from benign prostatic conditions and, by using size as the only criterion to characterize lymph node metastases, they might not be accurate enough for tumour characterization. In this scenario, PET-CT with (11)C-labelled or (18)F-labelled choline derivatives provides morphological and functional characterization and could overcome the limitations of the conventional imaging techniques. PET-CT is one of the most investigated molecular imaging modalities for prostate cancer diagnosis and staging. Currently, the main investigations on the role of PET-CT in the diagnosis and staging of prostate cancer have been performed on a retrospective basis and this type of analysis might be one of the main reasons why different results regarding its diagnostic accuracy have been reported.

  19. Choline Oxidation by Intact Spinach Chloroplasts 1

    PubMed Central

    Weigel, Pierre; Lerma, Claudia; Hanson, Andrew D.

    1988-01-01

    Plants synthesize betaine by a two-step oxidation of choline (choline → betaine aldehyde → betaine). Protoplast-derived chloroplasts of spinach (Spinacia oleracea L.) carry out both reactions, more rapidly in light than in darkness (AD Hanson et al. 1985 Proc Natl Acad Sci USA 82: 3678-3682). We investigated the light-stimulated oxidation of choline, using spinach chloroplasts isolated directly from leaves. The rates of choline oxidation obtained (dark and light rates: 10-50 and 100-300 nanomoles per hour per milligram chlorophyll, respectively) were approximately 20-fold higher than for protoplast-derived chloroplasts. Betaine aldehyde was the main product. Choline oxidation in darkness and light was suppressed by hypoxia. Neither uncouplers nor the Calvin cycle inhibitor glyceraldehyde greatly affected choline oxidation in the light, and maximal choline oxidation was attained far below light saturation of CO2 fixation. The light stimulation of choline oxidation was abolished by the PSII inhibitors DCMU and dibromothymoquinone, and was partially restored by adding reduced diaminodurene, an electron donor to PSI. Both methyl viologen and phenazine methosulfate prevented choline oxidation. Adding dihydroxyacetone phosphate, which can generate NADPH in organello, doubled the dark rate of choline oxidation. These results indicate that choline oxidation in chloroplasts requires oxygen, and reducing power generated from PSI. Enzymic reactions consistent with these requirements are discussed. Images Fig. 1 PMID:16665893

  20. Perinatal choline influences brain structure and function.

    PubMed

    Zeisel, Steven H; Niculescu, Mihai D

    2006-04-01

    Choline is derived not only from the diet, but also from de novo synthesis. It is important for methyl-group metabolism, the formation of membranes, kidney function, and neurotransmission. When deprived of dietary choline, most adult men and postmenopausal women develop signs of organ dysfunction (fatty liver or muscle damage) and have a decreased capacity to convert homocysteine to methionine. Choline is critical during fetal development, when it influences stem cell proliferation and apoptosis, thereby altering brain structure and function (memory is permanently enhanced in rodents exposed to choline during the latter part of gestation). PMID:16673755

  1. Choline but not its derivative betaine blocks slow vacuolar channels in the halophyte Chenopodium quinoa: implications for salinity stress responses.

    PubMed

    Pottosin, Igor; Bonales-Alatorre, Edgar; Shabala, Sergey

    2014-11-01

    Activity of tonoplast slow vacuolar (SV, or TPC1) channels has to be under a tight control, to avoid undesirable leak of cations stored in the vacuole. This is particularly important for salt-grown plants, to ensure efficient vacuolar Na(+) sequestration. In this study we show that choline, a cationic precursor of glycine betaine, efficiently blocks SV channels in leaf and root vacuoles of the two chenopods, Chenopodium quinoa (halophyte) and Beta vulgaris (glycophyte). At the same time, betaine and proline, two major cytosolic organic osmolytes, have no significant effect on SV channel activity. Physiological implications of these findings are discussed.

  2. Choline but not its derivative betaine blocks slow vacuolar channels in the halophyte Chenopodium quinoa: implications for salinity stress responses.

    PubMed

    Pottosin, Igor; Bonales-Alatorre, Edgar; Shabala, Sergey

    2014-11-01

    Activity of tonoplast slow vacuolar (SV, or TPC1) channels has to be under a tight control, to avoid undesirable leak of cations stored in the vacuole. This is particularly important for salt-grown plants, to ensure efficient vacuolar Na(+) sequestration. In this study we show that choline, a cationic precursor of glycine betaine, efficiently blocks SV channels in leaf and root vacuoles of the two chenopods, Chenopodium quinoa (halophyte) and Beta vulgaris (glycophyte). At the same time, betaine and proline, two major cytosolic organic osmolytes, have no significant effect on SV channel activity. Physiological implications of these findings are discussed. PMID:25240200

  3. Choline Magnesium Trisalicylate

    MedlinePlus

    Choline magnesium trisalicylate is used to relieve the pain, tenderness, inflammation (swelling), and stiffness caused by arthritis and painful ... used to relieve pain and lower fever. Choline magnesium trisalicylate is in a class of nonsteroidal anti- ...

  4. High performance liquid chromatography of phenolic choline ester fragments derived by chemical and enzymatic fragmentation processes: analysis of sinapine in rape seed.

    PubMed

    Li, Juan; El Rassi, Ziad

    2002-03-13

    High-performance liquid chromatography methods based on reversed-phase chromatography (RPC) and normal phase chromatography (NPC) were introduced for the separation of some representative phenolic acids, choline and betaine, which are the fragments of phenolic choline esters. Sinapine, which is the major phenolic choline ester found in rape seed, was quantitatively hydrolyzed to choline and sinapic acid upon treatment with a solution of sodium hydroxide at room temperature. Choline was further converted to betaine by incubating the base hydrolyzate with choline oxidase. Both sinapic acid and betaine formed the basis for the quantitative determination of sinapine in rape seed by RPC and NPC, respectively. The amounts of sinapine found in rape seed via either of the two fragments (i.e., sinapic acid or betaine) were in very close agreement.

  5. Diet-gene interactions underlie metabolic individuality and influence brain development: implications for clinical practice derived from studies on choline metabolism.

    PubMed

    Zeisel, Steven H

    2012-01-01

    One of the underlying mechanisms for metabolic individuality is genetic variation. Single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in genes of metabolic pathways can create metabolic inefficiencies that alter the dietary requirement for, and responses to, nutrients. These SNPs can be detected using genetic profiling and the metabolic inefficiencies they cause can be detected using metabolomic profiling. Studies on the human dietary requirement for choline illustrate how useful these new approaches can be, as this requirement is influenced by SNPs in genes of choline and folate metabolism. In adults, these SNPs determine whether people develop fatty liver, liver damage and muscle damage when eating diets low in choline. Because choline is very important for fetal development, these SNPs may identify women who need to eat more choline during pregnancy. Some of the actions of choline are mediated by epigenetic mechanisms that permit 'retuning' of metabolic pathways during early life.

  6. Choline oxidation by intact spinach chloroplasts. [Spinacia oleracea L

    SciTech Connect

    Weigel, P.; Lerma, C.; Hanson, A.D.

    1988-01-01

    Plants synthesize betaine by a two-step oxidation of choline (choline ..-->.. betaine aldehyde ..-->.. betaine). Protoplast-derived chloroplasts of spinach (Spinacia oleracea L.) carry out both reactions, more rapidly in light than in darkness. We investigated the light-stimulated oxidation of choline, using spinach chloroplasts isolated directly from leaves. The rates of choline oxidation obtained (dark and light rates: 10-50 and 100-300 nanomoles per hour per milligram chlorophyll, respectively) were approximately 20-fold higher than for protoplast-derived chloroplasts. Betaine aldehyde was the main product. Choline oxidation in darkness and light was suppressed by hypoxia. Neither uncouplers not the Calvin cycle inhibitor glyceraldehyde greatly affected choline oxidation in the light, and maximal choline oxidation was attained far below light saturation of CO/sub 2/ fixation. The light stimulation of choline oxidation was abolished by the PSII inhibitors DCMU and dibromothymoquinone, and was partially restored by adding reduced diaminodurene, an electron donor to PSI. Both methyl viologen and phenazine methosulfate prevented choline oxidation. Adding dihydroxyacetone phosphate, which can generate NADPH in organello, doubled the dark rate of choline oxidation. These results indicate that choline oxidation in chloroplasts requires oxygen, and reducing power generated from PSI. Enzymic reactions consistent with these requirements are discussed.

  7. N-Succinimidyl 3-((4-(4-[18F]fluorobutyl)-1H-1,2,3-triazol-1-yl)methyl)-5-(guanidinomethyl)benzoate ([18F]SFBTMGMB): A Residualizing Label for 18F-labeling of internalizing biomolecules

    PubMed Central

    Vaidyanathan, Ganesan; McDougald, Darryl; Choi, Jaeyeon; Pruszynski, Marek; Koumarianou, Eftychia; Zhou, Zhengyuan; Zalutsky, Michael R.

    2015-01-01

    Residualizing labeling methods for internalizing peptides and proteins are designed to trap the radionuclide inside the cell after intracellular degradation of the biomolecule. The goal of this work was to develop a residualizing label for the 18F-labeling of internalizing biomolecules based on a template used successfully for radioiodination. N-succinimidyl 3-((4-(4-[18F]fluorobutyl)-1H-1,2,3-triazol-1-yl)methyl)-5-(bis-Boc-guanidinomethyl)benzoate (Boc2-[18F]SFBTMGMB) was synthesized by click reaction of an azide precursor and [18F]fluorohexyne in 8.5 ± 2.8% average decay-corrected radiochemical yield (n =15). An anti-HER2 nanobody 5F7 was labeled with 18F using [18F]SFBTMGMB ([18F]RL-I), obtained by the deprotection of Boc2-[18F]SFBTMGMB, in 31.2 ± 6.7% (n =5) conjugation efficiency. Thus labeled nanobody had a radiochemical purity of >95%, bound to the HER2-expressing BT474M1 breast cancer cells with an affinity of 4.7 ± 0.9 nM, and had an immunoreactive fraction of 62–80%. In summary, a novel residualizing prosthetic agent for labeling biomolecules with 18F has been developed. An anti-HER2 nanobody was labeled using this prosthetic group with retention of affinity and immunoreactivity to HER2. PMID:26645790

  8. N-Succinimidyl 3-((4-(4-[(18)F]fluorobutyl)-1H-1,2,3-triazol-1-yl)methyl)-5-(guanidinomethyl)benzoate ([(18)F]SFBTMGMB): a residualizing label for (18)F-labeling of internalizing biomolecules.

    PubMed

    Vaidyanathan, Ganesan; McDougald, Darryl; Choi, Jaeyeon; Pruszynski, Marek; Koumarianou, Eftychia; Zhou, Zhengyuan; Zalutsky, Michael R

    2016-01-28

    Residualizing labeling methods for internalizing peptides and proteins are designed to trap the radionuclide inside the cell after intracellular degradation of the biomolecule. The goal of this work was to develop a residualizing label for the (18)F-labeling of internalizing biomolecules based on a template used successfully for radioiodination. N-Succinimidyl 3-((4-(4-[(18)F]fluorobutyl)-1H-1,2,3-triazol-1-yl)methyl)-5-(bis-Boc-guanidinomethyl)benzoate ([(18)F]SFBTMGMB-Boc2) was synthesized by a click reaction of an azide precursor and [(18)F]fluorohexyne in 8.5 ± 2.8% average decay-corrected radiochemical yield (n = 15). An anti-HER2 nanobody 5F7 was labeled with (18)F using [(18)F]SFBTMGMB ([(18)F]RL-I), obtained by the deprotection of [(18)F]SFBTMGMB-Boc2, in 31.2 ± 6.7% (n = 5) conjugation efficiency. The labeled nanobody had a radiochemical purity of >95%, bound to HER2-expressing BT474M1 breast cancer cells with an affinity of 4.7 ± 0.9 nM, and had an immunoreactive fraction of 62-80%. In summary, a novel residualizing prosthetic agent for labeling biomolecules with (18)F has been developed. An anti-HER2 nanobody was labeled using this prosthetic group with retention of affinity and immunoreactivity to HER2.

  9. Choline oxidation by intact chloroplasts isolated directly from spinach leaves

    SciTech Connect

    Weigel, P.; Hanson, A.D.

    1986-04-01

    Illuminated chloroplasts derived from spinach leaf protoplasts synthesize betaine from choline via the intermediate betaine aldehyde (BAL) (PNAS 82:3678). Photosynthetically active chloroplasts isolated directly from spinach leaves oxidized (/sup 14/C)choline in the light at rates 10 times higher (25-80 nmol/mg chl b) than protoplast-derived chloroplasts. Up to 20% of the (/sup 14/C)choline supplied during a 30 min incubation was oxidized in the light; the main product was (/sup 14/C)BAL. Rates of (/sup 14/C)choline oxidation in darkness were only 5-30% of rates in light. Light-dependent (/sup 14/C)choline oxidation was abolished by DCMU and 5 mM DTT. Pre-illumination of the chloroplasts did not promote (/sup 14/C)choline oxidation in darkness. The uncouplers nigericin and CCCP at concentrations which eliminated CO/sub 2/-dependent O/sub 2/ evolution did not affect (/sup 14/C)choline oxidation in the light. They hypothesize that (/sup 14/C)choline oxidation is not dependent upon light activation of an enzymatic system or upon the electrochemical proton gradient but requires an oxidant generated in the light.

  10. Choline and Choline Metabolite Patterns and Associations in Blood and Milk during Lactation in Dairy Cows

    PubMed Central

    Artegoitia, Virginia M.; Middleton, Jesse L.; Harte, Federico M.; Campagna, Shawn R.; de Veth, Michael J.

    2014-01-01

    Milk and dairy products are an important source of choline, a nutrient essential for human health. Infant formula derived from bovine milk contains a number of metabolic forms of choline, all contribute to the growth and development of the newborn. At present, little is known about the factors that influence the concentrations of choline metabolites in milk. The objectives of this study were to characterize and then evaluate associations for choline and its metabolites in blood and milk through the first 37 weeks of lactation in the dairy cow. Milk and blood samples from twelve Holstein cows were collected in early, mid and late lactation and analyzed for acetylcholine, free choline, betaine, glycerophosphocholine, lysophosphatidylcholine, phosphatidylcholine, phosphocholine and sphingomyelin using hydrophilic interaction liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry, and quantified using stable isotope-labeled internal standards. Total choline concentration in plasma, which was almost entirely phosphatidylcholine, increased 10-times from early to late lactation (1305 to 13,535 µmol/L). In milk, phosphocholine was the main metabolite in early lactation (492 µmol/L), which is a similar concentration to that found in human milk, however, phosphocholine concentration decreased exponentially through lactation to 43 µmol/L in late lactation. In contrast, phosphatidylcholine was the main metabolite in mid and late lactation (188 µmol/L and 659 µmol/L, respectively), with the increase through lactation positively correlated with phosphatidylcholine in plasma (R2 = 0.78). Unlike previously reported with human milk we found no correlation between plasma free choline concentration and milk choline metabolites. The changes in pattern of phosphocholine and phosphatidylcholine in milk through lactation observed in the bovine suggests that it is possible to manufacture infant formula that more closely matches these metabolites profile in human milk. PMID:25157578

  11. Choline and choline metabolite patterns and associations in blood and milk during lactation in dairy cows.

    PubMed

    Artegoitia, Virginia M; Middleton, Jesse L; Harte, Federico M; Campagna, Shawn R; de Veth, Michael J

    2014-01-01

    Milk and dairy products are an important source of choline, a nutrient essential for human health. Infant formula derived from bovine milk contains a number of metabolic forms of choline, all contribute to the growth and development of the newborn. At present, little is known about the factors that influence the concentrations of choline metabolites in milk. The objectives of this study were to characterize and then evaluate associations for choline and its metabolites in blood and milk through the first 37 weeks of lactation in the dairy cow. Milk and blood samples from twelve Holstein cows were collected in early, mid and late lactation and analyzed for acetylcholine, free choline, betaine, glycerophosphocholine, lysophosphatidylcholine, phosphatidylcholine, phosphocholine and sphingomyelin using hydrophilic interaction liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry, and quantified using stable isotope-labeled internal standards. Total choline concentration in plasma, which was almost entirely phosphatidylcholine, increased 10-times from early to late lactation (1305 to 13,535 µmol/L). In milk, phosphocholine was the main metabolite in early lactation (492 µmol/L), which is a similar concentration to that found in human milk, however, phosphocholine concentration decreased exponentially through lactation to 43 µmol/L in late lactation. In contrast, phosphatidylcholine was the main metabolite in mid and late lactation (188 µmol/L and 659 µmol/L, respectively), with the increase through lactation positively correlated with phosphatidylcholine in plasma (R2 = 0.78). Unlike previously reported with human milk we found no correlation between plasma free choline concentration and milk choline metabolites. The changes in pattern of phosphocholine and phosphatidylcholine in milk through lactation observed in the bovine suggests that it is possible to manufacture infant formula that more closely matches these metabolites profile in human milk.

  12. Dietary intake and food sources of choline in European populations.

    PubMed

    Vennemann, Francy B C; Ioannidou, Sofia; Valsta, Liisa M; Dumas, Céline; Ocké, Marga C; Mensink, Gert B M; Lindtner, Oliver; Virtanen, Suvi M; Tlustos, Christina; D'Addezio, Laura; Mattison, Irene; Dubuisson, Carine; Siksna, Inese; Héraud, Fanny

    2015-12-28

    Choline is an important nutrient for humans. Choline intake of the European population was assessed considering the European Food Safety Authority European Comprehensive Food Consumption Database and the United States Department of Agriculture Nutrient Database. Average choline intake ranges were 151-210 mg/d among toddlers (1 to ≤3 years old), 177-304 mg/d among other children (3 to ≤10 years old), 244-373 mg/d among adolescents (10 to ≤18 years old), 291-468 mg/d among adults (18 to ≤65 years old), 284-450 mg/d among elderly people (65 to ≤75 years old) and 269-444 mg/d among very elderly people (≥75 years old). The intakes were higher among males compared with females, mainly due to larger quantities of food consumed per day. In most of the population groups considered, the average choline intake was below the adequate intake (AI) set by the Institute of Medicine in the USA. The main food groups contributing to choline intake were meat, milk, grain, egg and their derived products, composite dishes and fish. The main limitations of this study are related to the absence of choline composition data of foods consumed by the European population and the subsequent assumption made to assess their intake levels. Given the definition of AI, no conclusion on the adequacy of choline intake can be drawn for most European population groups. Such results improve the knowledge on choline intake in Europe that could be further refined by the collection of choline composition data for foods as consumed in Europe. PMID:26423357

  13. Dietary intake and food sources of choline in European populations.

    PubMed

    Vennemann, Francy B C; Ioannidou, Sofia; Valsta, Liisa M; Dumas, Céline; Ocké, Marga C; Mensink, Gert B M; Lindtner, Oliver; Virtanen, Suvi M; Tlustos, Christina; D'Addezio, Laura; Mattison, Irene; Dubuisson, Carine; Siksna, Inese; Héraud, Fanny

    2015-12-28

    Choline is an important nutrient for humans. Choline intake of the European population was assessed considering the European Food Safety Authority European Comprehensive Food Consumption Database and the United States Department of Agriculture Nutrient Database. Average choline intake ranges were 151-210 mg/d among toddlers (1 to ≤3 years old), 177-304 mg/d among other children (3 to ≤10 years old), 244-373 mg/d among adolescents (10 to ≤18 years old), 291-468 mg/d among adults (18 to ≤65 years old), 284-450 mg/d among elderly people (65 to ≤75 years old) and 269-444 mg/d among very elderly people (≥75 years old). The intakes were higher among males compared with females, mainly due to larger quantities of food consumed per day. In most of the population groups considered, the average choline intake was below the adequate intake (AI) set by the Institute of Medicine in the USA. The main food groups contributing to choline intake were meat, milk, grain, egg and their derived products, composite dishes and fish. The main limitations of this study are related to the absence of choline composition data of foods consumed by the European population and the subsequent assumption made to assess their intake levels. Given the definition of AI, no conclusion on the adequacy of choline intake can be drawn for most European population groups. Such results improve the knowledge on choline intake in Europe that could be further refined by the collection of choline composition data for foods as consumed in Europe.

  14. MTHFR C677T genotype influences the isotopic enrichment of one-carbon metabolites in folate-compromised men consuming d9-choline123

    PubMed Central

    Yan, Jian; Wang, Wei; Gregory, Jesse F; Malysheva, Olga; Brenna, J Thomas; Stabler, Sally P; Allen, Robert H; Caudill, Marie A

    2011-01-01

    Background: Homozygosity for the variant 677T allele in the methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase (MTHFR) gene increases the requirement for folate and may alter the metabolic use of choline. The choline adequate intake is 550 mg/d for men, although the metabolic consequences of consuming extra choline are unclear. Objective: Deuterium-labeled choline (d9-choline) as tracer was used to determine the differential effects of the MTHFR C677T genotype and the effect of various choline intakes on the isotopic enrichment of choline derivatives in folate-compromised men. Design: Mexican American men with the MTHFR 677CC or 677TT genotype consumed a diet providing 300 mg choline/d plus supplemental choline chloride for total choline intakes of 550 (n = 11; 4 with 677CC and 7 with 677TT) or 1100 (n = 12; 4 with 677CC and 8 with 677TT) mg/d for 12 wk. During the last 3 wk, 15% of the total choline intake was provided as d9-choline. Results: Low but measurable enrichments of the choline metabolites were achieved, including that of d3-phosphatidylcholine (d3-PtdCho)—a metabolite produced in the de novo pathway via choline-derived methyl groups. Men with the MTHFR 677TT genotype had a higher urinary enrichment ratio of betaine to choline (P = 0.041), a higher urinary enrichment of sarcosine (P = 0.041), and a greater plasma enrichment ratio of d9-betaine to d9-PtdCho with the 1100 mg choline/d intake (P = 0.033). Conclusion: These data show for the first time in humans that choline itself is a source of methyl groups for de novo PtdCho biosynthesis and indicate that the MTHFR 677TT genotype favors the use of choline as a methyl donor. PMID:21123458

  15. Concentrations of choline-containing compounds and betaine in common foods.

    PubMed

    Zeisel, Steven H; Mar, Mei-Heng; Howe, Juliette C; Holden, Joanne M

    2003-05-01

    Choline is important for normal membrane function, acetylcholine synthesis and methyl group metabolism; the choline requirement for humans is 550 mg/d for men (Adequate Intake). Betaine, a choline derivative, is important because of its role in the donation of methyl groups to homocysteine to form methionine. In tissues and foods, there are multiple choline compounds that contribute to total choline concentration (choline, glycerophosphocholine, phosphocholine, phosphatidylcholine and sphingomyelin). In this study, we collected representative food samples and analyzed the choline concentration of 145 common foods using liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry. Foods with the highest total choline concentration (mg/100 g) were: beef liver (418), chicken liver (290), eggs (251), wheat germ (152), bacon (125), dried soybeans (116) and pork (103). The foods with the highest betaine concentration (mg/100 g) were: wheat bran (1339), wheat germ (1241), spinach (645), pretzels (237), shrimp (218) and wheat bread (201). A number of epidemiologic studies have examined the relationship between dietary folic acid and cancer or heart disease. It may be helpful to also consider choline intake as a confounding factor because folate and choline methyl donation can be interchangeable. PMID:12730414

  16. USDA Database for the Choline Content of Common Foods, Release Two

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Research has shown that choline is important for the synthesis of phospholipids in cell membranes, methyl metabolism, acetylcholine synthesis, and cholinergic neurotransmission in humans. Betaine, a choline derivative, is also important because of its role in the donation of methyl groups to homocy...

  17. Sex and menopausal status influence human dietary requirements for the nutrient choline2

    PubMed Central

    Fischer, Leslie M; daCosta, Kerry Ann; Kwock, Lester; Stewart, Paul W; Lu, Tsui-Shan; Stabler, Sally P; Allen, Robert H; Zeisel, Steven H

    2008-01-01

    Background Although humans require dietary choline for methyl donation, membrane function, and neurotransmission, choline can also be derived from the de novo synthesis of phosphatidylcholine, which is up-regulated by estrogen. A recommended Adequate Intake (AI) exists for choline; however, an Estimated Average Requirement has not been set because of a lack of sufficient human data. Objective The objective of the study was to evaluate the dietary requirements for choline in healthy men and women and to investigate the clinical sequelae of choline deficiency. Design Fifty-seven adult subjects (26 men, 16 premenopausal women, 15 postmenopausal women) were fed a diet containing 550 mg choline · 70 kg−1 · d−1 for 10 d followed by <50 mg choline · 70 kg−1 · d−1 with or without a folic acid supplement (400 μg/d per randomization) for up to 42 d. Subjects who developed organ dysfunction during this diet had normal organ function restored after incremental amounts of choline were added back to the diet. Blood and urine were monitored for signs of toxicity and metabolite concentrations, and liver fat was assessed by using magnetic resonance imaging. Results When deprived of dietary choline, 77% of men and 80% of postmenopausal women developed fatty liver or muscle damage, whereas only 44% of premenopausal women developed such signs of organ dysfunction. Moreover, 6 men developed these signs while consuming 550 mg choline · 70 kg−1 · d−1, the AI for choline. Folic acid supplementation did not alter the subjects’ response. Conclusion Subject characteristics (eg, menopausal status) modulated the dietary requirement for choline, and a daily intake at the current AI was not sufficient to prevent organ dysfunction in 19 of the subjects. PMID:17490963

  18. Maternal dietary choline deficiency alters angiogenesis in fetal mouse hippocampus.

    PubMed

    Mehedint, Mihai G; Craciunescu, Corneliu N; Zeisel, Steven H

    2010-07-20

    We examined whether maternal dietary choline modulates angiogenesis in fetal brain. Pregnant C57BL/6 mice were fed either a choline-deficient (CD), control (CT), or choline-supplemented diet (CS) from days 12 to 17 (E12-17) of pregnancy and then fetal brains were studied. In CD fetal hippocampus, proliferation of endothelial cells (EC) was decreased by 32% (p < 0.01 vs. CT or CS) while differentiated EC clusters (expressing factor VIII related antigen (RA)) increased by 25% (p < 0.01 vs. CT or CS). These changes were associated with > 25% decrease in the number of blood vessels in CD fetal hippocampus (p < 0.01 vs. CT and CS), with no change in total cross-sectional area of these blood vessels. Expression of genes for the angiogenic signals derived from both endothelial and neuronal progenitor cells (NPC) was increased in CD fetal hippocampus VEGF C (Vegfc), 2.0-fold, p < 0.01 vs. CT and angiopoietin 2 (Angpt2), 2.1-fold, (p < 0.01 vs. CT)). Similar increased expression was observed in NPC isolated from E14 fetal mouse brains and exposed to low (5 microM), CT (70 microM), or high choline (280 microM) media for 72 h (low choline caused a 9.7-fold increase in relative gene expression of Vegfc (p < 0.001 vs. CT and high) and a 3.4-fold increase in expression of Angpt2, (p < 0.05 vs. CT and high). ANGPT2 protein was increased 42.2% (p < 0.01). Cytosine-phosphate-guanine dinucleotide islands in the proximity of the promoter areas of Vegfc and Angpt2 were hypomethylated in low choline NPC compared to CT NPC (p < 0.01). We conclude that maternal dietary choline intake alters angiogenesis in the developing fetal hippocampus. PMID:20624989

  19. 21 CFR 582.5250 - Choline bitartrate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... DRUGS, FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS SUBSTANCES GENERALLY RECOGNIZED AS SAFE Nutrients and/or Dietary Supplements 1 § 582.5250 Choline bitartrate. (a) Product. Choline bitartrate. (b) Conditions of use....

  20. 21 CFR 582.5252 - Choline chloride.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... DRUGS, FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS SUBSTANCES GENERALLY RECOGNIZED AS SAFE Nutrients and/or Dietary Supplements 1 § 582.5252 Choline chloride. (a) Product. Choline chloride. (b) Conditions of use....

  1. 21 CFR 582.5252 - Choline chloride.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... DRUGS, FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS SUBSTANCES GENERALLY RECOGNIZED AS SAFE Nutrients and/or Dietary Supplements 1 § 582.5252 Choline chloride. (a) Product. Choline chloride. (b) Conditions of use....

  2. 21 CFR 582.5250 - Choline bitartrate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... DRUGS, FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS SUBSTANCES GENERALLY RECOGNIZED AS SAFE Nutrients and/or Dietary Supplements 1 § 582.5250 Choline bitartrate. (a) Product. Choline bitartrate. (b) Conditions of use....

  3. 21 CFR 582.5250 - Choline bitartrate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... DRUGS, FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS SUBSTANCES GENERALLY RECOGNIZED AS SAFE Nutrients and/or Dietary Supplements 1 § 582.5250 Choline bitartrate. (a) Product. Choline bitartrate. (b) Conditions of use....

  4. 21 CFR 582.5250 - Choline bitartrate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... DRUGS, FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS SUBSTANCES GENERALLY RECOGNIZED AS SAFE Nutrients and/or Dietary Supplements 1 § 582.5250 Choline bitartrate. (a) Product. Choline bitartrate. (b) Conditions of use....

  5. 21 CFR 582.5252 - Choline chloride.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... DRUGS, FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS SUBSTANCES GENERALLY RECOGNIZED AS SAFE Nutrients and/or Dietary Supplements 1 § 582.5252 Choline chloride. (a) Product. Choline chloride. (b) Conditions of use....

  6. 21 CFR 582.5250 - Choline bitartrate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... DRUGS, FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS SUBSTANCES GENERALLY RECOGNIZED AS SAFE Nutrients and/or Dietary Supplements 1 § 582.5250 Choline bitartrate. (a) Product. Choline bitartrate. (b) Conditions of use....

  7. 21 CFR 582.5252 - Choline chloride.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... DRUGS, FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS SUBSTANCES GENERALLY RECOGNIZED AS SAFE Nutrients and/or Dietary Supplements 1 § 582.5252 Choline chloride. (a) Product. Choline chloride. (b) Conditions of use....

  8. 21 CFR 582.5252 - Choline chloride.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... DRUGS, FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS SUBSTANCES GENERALLY RECOGNIZED AS SAFE Nutrients and/or Dietary Supplements 1 § 582.5252 Choline chloride. (a) Product. Choline chloride. (b) Conditions of use....

  9. 21 CFR 182.8252 - Choline chloride.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Choline chloride. 182.8252 Section 182.8252 Food... HUMAN CONSUMPTION (CONTINUED) SUBSTANCES GENERALLY RECOGNIZED AS SAFE Nutrients § 182.8252 Choline chloride. (a) Product. Choline chloride. (b) Conditions of use. This substance is generally recognized...

  10. 21 CFR 182.8252 - Choline chloride.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2010-04-01 2009-04-01 true Choline chloride. 182.8252 Section 182.8252 Food... HUMAN CONSUMPTION (CONTINUED) SUBSTANCES GENERALLY RECOGNIZED AS SAFE Nutrients § 182.8252 Choline chloride. (a) Product. Choline chloride. (b) Conditions of use. This substance is generally recognized...

  11. 21 CFR 182.8250 - Choline bitartrate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Choline bitartrate. 182.8250 Section 182.8250 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) SUBSTANCES GENERALLY RECOGNIZED AS SAFE Nutrients § 182.8250 Choline bitartrate. (a) Product. Choline bitartrate....

  12. 21 CFR 182.8252 - Choline chloride.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Choline chloride. 182.8252 Section 182.8252 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) SUBSTANCES GENERALLY RECOGNIZED AS SAFE Nutrients § 182.8252 Choline chloride. (a) Product. Choline chloride....

  13. Safety assessment of bacterial choline oxidase protein introduced in transgenic crops for tolerance against abiotic stress.

    PubMed

    Singh, Abinav K; Singh, Bhanu P; Prasad, G B K S; Gaur, Shailendra N; Arora, Naveen

    2008-12-24

    Genetically modified crops have resistance to abiotic stress by introduction of choline oxidase protein. In the present study, the safety of choline oxidase protein derived from Arthrobacter globiformis was assessed for toxicity and allergenicity. The protein was stable at 90 degrees C for 1 h. Toxicity studies of choline oxidase in mice showed no significant difference (p > 0.05) from control in terms of growth, body weight, food consumption, and blood biochemical indices. Histology of gut tissue of mice fed protein showed normal gastric mucosal lining and villi in jejunum and ileum sections. Specific IgE in serum and IL-4 release in splenic culture supernatant were low in choline oxidase treated mice, comparable to control. Intravenous challenge with choline oxidase did not induce any adverse reaction, unlike ovalbumin group mice. Histology of lung tissues from choline oxidase sensitized mice showed normal airways, whereas ovalbumin-sensitized mice showed inflamed airways with eosinophilic infiltration and bronchoconstriction. ELISA carried out with food allergic patients' sera revealed no significant IgE affinity with choline oxidase. Also, choline oxidase did not show any symptoms of toxicity and allergenicity in mice.

  14. Competitive, reversible inhibition of cytosolic phospholipase A2 at the lipid-water interface by choline derivatives that partially partition into the phospholipid bilayer.

    PubMed

    Burke, J R; Witmer, M R; Zusi, F C; Gregor, K R; Davern, L B; Padmanabha, R; Swann, R T; Smith, D; Tredup, J A; Micanovic, R; Manly, S P; Villafranca, J J; Tramposch, K M

    1999-07-01

    Cytosolic phospholipase A2 (cPLA2) catalyzes the selective release of arachidonic acid from the sn-2 position of phospholipids and is believed to play a key cellular role in the generation of arachidonic acid. When assaying the human recombinant cPLA2 using membranes isolated from [3H]arachidonate-labeled U937 cells as substrate, 2-(2'-benzyl-4-chlorophenoxy)ethyl-dimethyl-n-octadecyl-ammonium chloride (compound 1) was found to inhibit the enzyme in a dose-dependent manner (IC50 = 5 microM). It was over 70 times more selective for the cPLA2 as compared with the human nonpancreatic secreted phospholipase A2, and it did not inhibit other phospholipases. Additionally, it inhibited arachidonate production in N-formyl-methionyl-leucyl-phenylalanine-stimulated U937 cells. To further characterize the mechanism of inhibition, an assay in which the enzyme is bound to vesicles of 1,2-dimyristoyl-sn -glycero-3-phosphomethanol containing 6-10 mol % of 1-palmitoyl-2-[1-14C]arachidonoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine was employed. With this substrate system, the dose-dependent inhibition could be defined by kinetic equations describing competitive inhibition at the lipid-water interface. The apparent equilibrium dissociation constant for the inhibitor bound to the enzyme at the interface (KI*app) was determined to be 0.097 +/- 0.032 mol % versus an apparent dissociation constant for the arachidonate-containing phospholipid of 0.3 +/- 0.1 mol %. Thus, compound 1 represents a novel structural class of inhibitor of cPLA2 that partitions into the phospholipid bilayer and competes with the phospholipid substrate for the active site. Shorter n-alkyl-chained (C-4, C-6, C-8) derivatives of compound 1 were shown to have even smaller KI*app values. However, these short-chained analogs were less potent in terms of bulk inhibitor concentration needed for inhibition when using the [3H]arachidonate-labeled U937 membranes as substrate. This discrepancy was reconciled by showing that these shorter

  15. The widespread plant-colonizing bacterial species Pseudomonas syringae detects and exploits an extracellular pool of choline in hosts.

    PubMed

    Chen, Chiliang; Li, Shanshan; McKeever, Dana R; Beattie, Gwyn A

    2013-09-01

    The quaternary ammonium compound (QAC) choline is a major component of membrane lipids in eukaryotes and, if available to microbial colonists of plants, could provide benefits for growth and protection from stress. Free choline is found in homogenized plant tissues, but its subcellular location and availability to plant microbes are not known. Whole-cell bacterial bioreporters of the phytopathogen Pseudomonas syringae were constructed that couple a QAC-responsive transcriptional fusion with well-characterized bacterial QAC transporters. These bioreporters demonstrated the presence of abundant free choline compounds released from germinating seeds and seedlings of the bean Phaseolus vulgaris, and a smaller but consistently detectable amount of QACs, probably choline, from leaves. The localization of P. syringae bioreporter cells to the surface and intercellular sites of plant tissues demonstrated the extracellular location of these QAC pools. Moreover, P. syringae mutants that were deficient in the uptake of choline compounds exhibited reduced fitness on leaves, highlighting the importance of extracellular choline to P. syringae on leaves. Our data support a model in which this choline pool is derived from the phospholipid phosphatidylcholine through plant-encoded phospholipases that release choline into the intercellular spaces of plant tissues, such as for membrane lipid recycling. The consequent extracellular release of choline compounds enables their interception and exploitation by plant-associated microbes, and thus provides a selective advantage for microbes such as P. syringae that are adapted to maximally exploit choline.

  16. Comparison of the computational NMR chemical shifts of choline with the experimental data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alcorn, C.; Cuperlovic-Culf, M.; Ghandi, K.

    2012-02-01

    One of the main biological markers of the presence of cancer in living patients is an over-expression of total choline (tCho), which is the sum of free choline and its derivatives. 1H Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy, or H-MRS, enables the quantification of tCho via its proton spectra, and thus has the potential to be a diagnostic tool for the presence of cancer and an accurate early indicator of the response of cancer to treatment. However, it remains difficult to quantify individual choline derivatives, since they share a large structural similarity ((CH3)3-N+-CH2-CH2-O-), of which the strongest signal detectable by MRS is that of the choline "head group": the three methyl groups bonded to the nitrogen. This work used ACENet, a high performance computing system, to attempt to model the NMR parameters of choline derivatives, with the focus of this report being free choline. Optimized structures were determined using Density Functional Theory and the B3LYP electron correlation functional. The Polarizable Continuum Model was used to evaluate solvent effects. The Gauge-Invariant Atomic Orbital method was found to be the superior method for calculating the NMR parameters of cholines.

  17. Choline and betaine food sources and intakes in Taiwanese.

    PubMed

    Chu, Da-Ming; Wahlqvist, Mark L; Chang, Hsing-Yi; Yeh, Nai-Hua; Lee, Meei-Shyuan

    2012-01-01

    Choline and betaine are involved in several similar health-relevant metabolic pathways, but the foods sources are different. We have assessed their intakes (individual, sums and ratios) from a dominantly Chinese food cultural point of view. A representative free-living Taiwanese population aged 13-64 years was drawn from the Nutrition and Health Survey in Taiwan (NAHSIT) 1993-1996. Food intake was derived from interviews as 24-hour recalls. The USDA database, with adaptations for Taiwan, provided choline and betaine food compositions. Major food contributors of these nutrients were identified and compared with data from the US Framingham offspring study. Mean and variance reduced median nutrient intakes were calculated. Top ten major food contributors of choline in Taiwan were eggs, pork, chicken, fish, soybean and its products, dark leafy vegetables, dairy, fruit, wheat products and light leafy vegetables in sequence. For betaine, the top ten were dark leafy vegetables, wheat products, fish, pork, bread, chicken, cake/cookies, grain-based alcoholic beverages, rice and its products and sauces. The main contributors of choline in Taiwan and the USA were, respectively, eggs and red meat; and for betaine, greens were similarly best contributor. The rankings of the main food contributors of choline and betaine differed substantially between Taiwan and the USA. The total daily intakes (mean±SE, mg) in Taiwan for choline were 372±19 (median=348) in men and 265±9 (median 261) for women; for betaine, values were 101±3 (median 93) in men and 78±8 (median 76) for women. These allow for health outcome considerations.

  18. Choline intake and genetic polymorphisms influence choline metabolite concentrations in human breast milk and plasma123

    PubMed Central

    Fischer, Leslie M; da Costa, Kerry Ann; Galanko, Joseph; Sha, Wei; Stephenson, Brigitte; Vick, Julie; Zeisel, Steven H

    2010-01-01

    Background: Choline is essential for infant nutrition, and breast milk is a rich source of this nutrient. Common single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) change dietary requirements for choline intake. Objective: The aim of this study was to determine whether total choline intake and/or SNPs influence concentrations of choline and its metabolites in human breast milk and plasma. Design: We gave a total of 103 pregnant women supplemental choline or a placebo from 18 wk gestation to 45 d postpartum and genotyped the women for 370 common SNPs. At 45 d postpartum, we measured choline metabolite concentrations in breast milk and plasma and assessed the dietary intake of choline by using a 3-d food record. Results: On average, lactating women in our study ate two-thirds of the recommended intake for choline (Adequate Intake = 550 mg choline/d). Dietary choline intake (no supplement) correlated with breast-milk phosphatidylcholine and plasma choline concentrations. A supplement further increased breast-milk choline, betaine, and phosphocholine concentrations and increased plasma choline and betaine concentrations. We identified 5 SNPs in MTHFR that altered the slope of the intake–metabolite concentration relations, and we identified 2 SNPs in PEMT that shifted these curves upward. Individuals who shared sets of common SNPs were outliers in plots of intake–metabolite concentration curves; we suggest that these SNPs should be further investigated to determine how they alter choline metabolism. Conclusion: Total intake of choline and genotype can influence the concentrations of choline and its metabolites in the breast milk and blood of lactating women and thereby affect the amount of choline available to the developing infant. This study was registered at clinicaltrials.gov as NCT00678925. PMID:20534746

  19. Phosphatidylcholine and the CDP-Choline Cycle

    PubMed Central

    Fagone, Paolo; Jackowski, Suzanne

    2012-01-01

    The CDP-choline pathway of phosphatidylcholine (PtdCho) biosynthesis was first described more than 50 years ago. Investigation of the CDP-choline pathway in yeast provides a basis for understanding the CDP-choline pathway in mammals. PtdCho is considered as an intermediate in a cycle of synthesis and degradation, and the activity of a CDP-choline cycle is linked to subcellular membrane lipid movement. The components of the mammalian CDP-choline pathway include choline transport, choline kinase, phosphocholine cytidylyltransferase, and choline phosphotransferase activities. The protein isoforms and biochemical mechanisms of regulation of the pathway enzymes are related to their cell and tissue-specific functions. Regulated PtdCho turnover mediated by phospholipases or neuropathy target esterase participates in the mammalian CDP-choline cycle. Knockout mouse models define the biological functions of the CDP-choline cycle in mammalian cells and tissues. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled Phospholipids and Phospholipid Metabolism. PMID:23010477

  20. Maternal choline supplementation programs greater activity of the phosphatidylethanolamine N-methyltransferase (PEMT) pathway in adult Ts65Dn trisomic mice.

    PubMed

    Yan, Jian; Ginsberg, Stephen D; Powers, Brian; Alldred, Melissa J; Saltzman, Arthur; Strupp, Barbara J; Caudill, Marie A

    2014-10-01

    Maternal choline supplementation (MCS) induces lifelong cognitive benefits in the Ts65Dn mouse, a trisomic mouse model of Down syndrome and Alzheimer's disease. To gain insight into the mechanisms underlying these beneficial effects, we conducted a study to test the hypothesis that MCS alters choline metabolism in adult Ts65Dn offspring. Deuterium-labeled methyl-d9-choline was administered to adult Ts65Dn and disomic (2N) female littermates born to choline-unsupplemented or choline-supplemented Ts65Dn dams. Enrichment of d9-choline metabolites (derived from intact choline) and d3 + d6-choline metabolites [produced when choline-derived methyl groups are used by phosphatidylethanolamine N-methyltransferase (PEMT)] was measured in harvested tissues. Adult offspring (both Ts65Dn and 2N) of choline-supplemented (vs. choline-unsupplemented) dams exhibited 60% greater (P≤0.007) activity of hepatic PEMT, which functions in de novo choline synthesis and produces phosphatidylcholine (PC) enriched in docosahexaenoic acid. Higher (P<0.001) enrichment of PEMT-derived d3 and d6 metabolites was detected in liver, plasma, and brain in both genotypes but to a greater extent in the Ts65Dn adult offspring. MCS also yielded higher (P<0.05) d9 metabolite enrichments in liver, plasma, and brain. These data demonstrate that MCS exerts lasting effects on offspring choline metabolism, including up-regulation of the hepatic PEMT pathway and enhanced provision of choline and PEMT-PC to the brain. PMID:24963152

  1. Improved 18F Labeling of Peptides with a Fluoride-Aluminum-Chelate Complex

    PubMed Central

    McBride, William J.; D’Souza, Christopher A.; Sharkey, Robert M.; Karacay, Habibe; Rossi, Edmund A.; Chang, Chien-Hsing; Goldenberg, David M.

    2010-01-01

    We reported previously the feasibility to radiolabel peptides with fluorine-18 (18F) using a rapid, one-pot, method that first mixes 18F− with Al3+, and then binds the (Al18F)2+ complex to a NOTA ligand on the peptide. In this report, we examined several new NOTA ligands and determined how temperature, reaction time, and reagent concentration affected the radiolabeling yield. Four structural variations of the NOTA ligand had isolated radiolabeling yields ranging from 5.8% to 87% under similar reaction conditions. All of the Al18F NOTA complexes were stable in vitro in human serum and those that were tested in vivo also were stable. The radiolabeling reactions were performed at 100°C and the peptides could be labeled in as little as five minutes. The IMP467 peptide could be labeled up to 115 GBq/μmol (3100 Ci/mmol), with a total reaction and purification time of 30 min without chromatographic purification. PMID:20540570

  2. 18F Labeled Nanoparticles for in Vivo PET-CT Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Devaraj, Neal K.; Keliher, Edmund J.; Thurber, Greg M.; Nahrendorf, Matthias; Weissleder, Ralph

    2009-01-01

    We report the synthesis and in vivo characterization of an 18F modified trimodal nanoparticle (18F-CLIO). This particle consists of cross-linked dextran held together in core–shell formation by a superparamagnetic iron oxide core and functionalized with the radionuclide 18F in high yield via “click” chemistry. The particle can be detected with positron emission tomography, fluorescence molecular tomography, and magnetic resonance imaging. The presence of 18F dramatically lowers the detection threshold of the nanoparticles, while the facile conjugation chemistry provides a simple platform for rapid and efficient nanoparticle labeling. PMID:19138113

  3. 18F-Labeled Silicon-Based Fluoride Acceptors: Potential Opportunities for Novel Positron Emitting Radiopharmaceuticals

    PubMed Central

    Bernard-Gauthier, Vadim; Wängler, Carmen; Wängler, Bjoern; Schirrmacher, Ralf

    2014-01-01

    Background. Over the recent years, radiopharmaceutical chemistry has experienced a wide variety of innovative pushes towards finding both novel and unconventional radiochemical methods to introduce fluorine-18 into radiotracers for positron emission tomography (PET). These “nonclassical” labeling methodologies based on silicon-, boron-, and aluminium-18F chemistry deviate from commonplace bonding of an [18F]fluorine atom (18F) to either an aliphatic or aromatic carbon atom. One method in particular, the silicon-fluoride-acceptor isotopic exchange (SiFA-IE) approach, invalidates a dogma in radiochemistry that has been widely accepted for many years: the inability to obtain radiopharmaceuticals of high specific activity (SA) via simple IE. Methodology. The most advantageous feature of IE labeling in general is that labeling precursor and labeled radiotracer are chemically identical, eliminating the need to separate the radiotracer from its precursor. SiFA-IE chemistry proceeds in dipolar aprotic solvents at room temperature and below, entirely avoiding the formation of radioactive side products during the IE. Scope of Review. A great plethora of different SiFA species have been reported in the literature ranging from small prosthetic groups and other compounds of low molecular weight to labeled peptides and most recently affibody molecules. Conclusions. The literature over the last years (from 2006 to 2014) shows unambiguously that SiFA-IE and other silicon-based fluoride acceptor strategies relying on 18F− leaving group substitutions have the potential to become a valuable addition to radiochemistry. PMID:25157357

  4. Neither azeotropic drying, nor base nor other additives: a minimalist approach to (18)F-labeling.

    PubMed

    Richarz, R; Krapf, P; Zarrad, F; Urusova, E A; Neumaier, B; Zlatopolskiy, B D

    2014-10-28

    A novel, efficient, time-saving and reliable radiolabeling procedure via nucleophilic substitution with [(18)F]fluoride is described. Different radiolabeled aliphatic and aromatic compounds were prepared in high radiochemical yields simply by heating of quaternary anilinium, diaryliodonium and triarylsulfonium [(18)F]fluorides in suitable solvents. The latter were obtained via direct elution of (18)F(-) from an anion exchange resin with alcoholic solutions of onium precursors. Neither azeotropic evaporation of water, nor a base, nor any other additives like cryptands or crown ethers were necessary. Due to its simplicity this method should be highly suitable for automated radiosyntheses, especially in microfluidic devices. PMID:25190038

  5. Magnetic resonance spectroscopy for detection of choline kinase inhibition in the treatment of brain tumors

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Manoj; Arlauckas, Sean P.; Saksena, Sona; Verma, Gaurav; Ittyerah, Ranjit; Pickup, Stephen; Popov, Anatoliy V.; Delikatny, Edward J.; Poptani, Harish

    2015-01-01

    Abnormal choline metabolism is a hallmark of cancer and is associated with oncogenesis and tumor progression. Increased choline is consistently observed in both pre-clinical tumor models and in human brain tumors by proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS). Thus, inhibition of choline metabolism using specific choline kinase inhibitors such as MN58b may be a promising new strategy for treatment of brain tumors. We demonstrate the efficacy of MN58b in suppressing phosphocholine production in three brain tumor cell lines. In vivo MRS studies of rats with intra-cranial F98-derived brain tumors showed a significant decrease in tumor total choline concentration after treatment with MN58b. High resolution MRS of tissue extracts confirmed that this decrease was due to a significant reduction in phosphocholine. Concomitantly, a significant increase in poly-unsaturated lipid resonances was also observed in treated tumors, indicating apoptotic cell death. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) based volume measurements demonstrated a significant growth arrest in the MN58b-treated tumors in comparison to saline-treated controls. Histologically, MN58b-treated tumors showed decreased cell density, as well as increased apoptotic cells. These results suggest that inhibition of choline kinase can be used as an adjuvant to chemotherapy in the treatment of brain tumors and that decreases in total choline observed by MRS can be used as an effective phamacodynamic biomarker of treatment response. PMID:25657334

  6. Measurement of the abundance of choline and the distribution of choline-containing moieties in meat.

    PubMed

    Lewis, Erin D; Zhao, Yuan-Yuan; Richard, Caroline; Bruce, Heather L; Jacobs, René L; Field, Catherine J; Curtis, Jonathan M

    2015-01-01

    Epidemiological studies identify meat as a major source of choline; however, the most comprehensive reference for food choline content, the United States Department of Agriculture (USDA) database for dietary choline, does not include values for meats of importance in some regions. In this work, the total choline and choline-containing moieties of 20 samples of meat were analyzed by LC-MS/MS; 16 samples analyzed are absent from the USDA database and 4 samples included for comparison. Average total choline for one serving (75 g) was 50 ± 12 mg, which was 82.6% ± 5.5% phosphatidylcholine. There was general agreement between total choline levels in the meats analyzed in this work and USDA values. A strong negative correlation (r = -0.777, p < 0.001) between total choline and fat content was found. This research added choline composition data to a food group that is a major source of choline and ultimately this data will assist in obtaining more accurate estimates of dietary choline.

  7. Nutritional importance of choline for brain development.

    PubMed

    Zeisel, Steven H

    2004-12-01

    Choline is a dietary component essential for normal function of all cells. In 1998 the National Academy of Sciences, USA, issued a report identifying choline as a required nutrient for humans and recommended daily intake amounts. In ongoing studies we are finding that men have a higher requirement than do postmenopausal women, who in turn need more than premenopausal women. Pregnancy and lactation are periods when maternal reserves of choline are depleted. At the same time, the availability of choline for normal development of brain is critical. When rat pups received choline supplements (in utero or during the second week of life), their brain function is changed, resulting in lifelong memory enhancement. This change in memory function appears to be due to changes in the development of the memory center (hippocampus) in brain. These changes are so important that investigators can pick out the groups of animals whose mothers had extra choline even when these animals are elderly. Thus, memory function in the aged is, in part, determined by what mother ate. Foods highest in total choline concentrations per 100 g were beef liver (418 mg), chicken liver (290 mg), and eggs (251 mg). We suggest that choline-rich foods are an important component of the diet and that especially during pregnancy it would be prudent to include them as part of a healthy diet. PMID:15640516

  8. An improved choline monooxygenase assay

    SciTech Connect

    Lafontaine, P.J.; Hanson, A.D. )

    1991-05-01

    Glycine betaine accumulates in leaves of plants from several angiosperm families in response to drought or salinization. Its synthesis, from the oxidation of choline, is mediated by a two step pathway. In spinach the first enzyme of this pathway is a ferredoxin-dependent choline monooxygenase (CMO). In order to purify this enzyme a sensitive and reliable assay is necessary. Two types of modifications were explored to improve the existing assay. (1) Ferredoxin reduction - one way of providing reduced Fd to CMO is by the addition of isolated spinach thylakoids in the assay mixture. In order to optimize the reduction of Fd two different systems were compared: (a) where only PS is active, by adding DCMU to inhibit electron transport from PS II and DAD as electron donor for PS I; (b) where both PS II and PS I are active. (2) Betaine aldehyde estimation - to simplify this, it is possible to couple the CMO reaction with betaine aldehyde dehydrogenase (BADH) from E. coli. BADH converts betaine aldehyde to betaine as it is formed in the assay, eliminating the need for a chemical oxidation step.

  9. Raising gestational choline intake alters gene expression in DMBA-evoked mammary tumors and prolongs survival

    PubMed Central

    Kovacheva, Vesela P.; Davison, Jessica M.; Mellott, Tiffany J.; Rogers, Adrianne E.; Yang, Shi; O'Brien, Michael J.; Blusztajn, Jan Krzysztof

    2009-01-01

    Choline is an essential nutrient that serves as a donor of metabolic methyl groups used during gestation to establish the epigenetic DNA methylation patterns that modulate tissue-specific gene expression. Because the mammary gland begins its development prenatally, we hypothesized that choline availability in utero may affect the gland’s susceptibility to cancer. During gestational days 11–17, pregnant rats were fed a control, choline-supplemented, or choline-deficient diet (8, 36, and 0 mmol/kg of choline, respectively). On postnatal day 65, the female offspring received 25 mg/kg of a carcinogen 7,12-dimethylbenz[α]anthracene. Approximately 70% of the rats developed mammary adenocarcinomas; prenatal diet did not affect tumor latency, incidence, size, and multiplicity. Tumor growth rate was inversely related to choline content in the prenatal diet, resulting in 50% longer survival until euthanasia, determined by tumor size, of the prenatally choline-supplemented rats compared with the prenatally choline-deficient rats. This was accompanied by distinct expression patterns of ∼70 genes in tumors derived from the three dietary groups. Tumors from the prenatally choline-supplemented rats overexpressed genes that confer favorable prognosis in human cancers (Klf6, Klf9, Nid2, Ntn4, Per1, and Txnip) and underexpressed those associated with aggressive disease (Bcar3, Cldn12, Csf1, Jag1, Lgals3, Lypd3, Nme1, Ptges2, Ptgs1, and Smarcb1). DNA methylation within the tumor suppressor gene, stratifin (Sfn, 14-3-3σ), was proportional to the prenatal choline supply and correlated inversely with the expression of its mRNA and protein in tumors, suggesting that an epigenetic mechanism may underlie the altered molecular phenotype and tumor growth. Our results suggest a role for adequate maternal choline nutrition during pregnancy in prevention/alleviation of breast cancer in daughters.—Kovacheva, V. P., Davison, J. M., Mellott, T. J., Rogers, A. E., Yang, S., O’Brien, M

  10. Choline and the Brain: An Epigenetic Perspective.

    PubMed

    Bekdash, Rola Aldana

    2016-01-01

    Choline is an essential nutrient that is required for normal development of the brain. Via its metabolite betaine, it participates in the synthesis of S-adenosylmethionine, a major methyl donor for histone and DNA methylation, two epigenetic mechanisms that regulate gene expression and may alter brain function. Besides its role in methyl group metabolism, choline also has pivotal functions, including the maintenance of structural integrity of membranes and modulation of cholinergic neurotransmission, functions that are often dysregulated in some neurodegenerative disorders. Emerging evidence suggests that environmental factors, including lifestyle or diet, sometimes cause epigenetic changes in the expression of neuronal genes resulting in long-term changes in brain function. Recently, choline has been implicated as an epigenetic modifier of the genome that may alter gene methylation, expression, and cellular function. Abnormal level of choline during fetal or early postnatal life has been shown to alter memory functions during adulthood. It may also contribute to the etiology of stress-related disorders and age-related decline in memory later in life. Conversely, rodent studies suggested that perinatal choline supplementation enhances performance in memory-related tasks during adulthood. In this chapter, we will focus on the impact of choline-gene interaction on brain function in early life and during adulthood. In particular, we will emphasize the potential role of choline as a neuroprotectant that may mitigate some of the adverse effects of neurodegenerative disorders and protect mental health across the lifespan. PMID:27651265

  11. Choline transporter-targeting and co-delivery system for glioma therapy.

    PubMed

    Li, Jianfeng; Guo, Yubo; Kuang, Yuyang; An, Sai; Ma, Haojun; Jiang, Chen

    2013-12-01

    Combination of gene therapy and chemotherapy is a promising approach for glioma therapy. In this study, a co-delivery system of plasmid encoding human tumor necrosis factor-related apoptosis-inducing ligand (pORF-hTRAIL, Trail) and doxorubicin (DOX) has been simply constructed in two steps. Firstly, DOX was intercalated into Trail to form a stable complex. Secondly, DOX-Trail complex was condensed by Dendrigraft poly-L-lysine (DGL) to form a nanoscaled co-delivery system. Choline transporters are both expressed on blood-brain barrier (BBB) and glioma, Herein, a choline derivate with high choline transporter affinity was chosen as BBB and glioma dual targeting ligand. Choline-derivate modified co-delivery system showed higher cellular uptake efficiency and cytotoxicity than unmodified co-delivery system in U87 MG cells. In comparison with single medication or unmodified delivery system, Choline-derivate modified co-delivery system induced more apoptosis both in vitro and in vivo. The therapeutic efficacy on U87 MG bearing xenografts further confirmed the predominance of this dual targeting and co-delivery system.

  12. Prenatal choline and the development of schizophrenia

    PubMed Central

    FREEDMAN, Robert; ROSS, Randal G.

    2015-01-01

    Background The primary prevention of illness at the population level, the ultimate aim of medicine, seems out of reach for schizophrenia. Schizophrenia has a strong genetic component, and its pathogenesis begins long before the emergence of psychosis, as early as fetal brain development. Cholinergic neurotransmission at nicotinic receptors is a pathophysiological mechanism related to one aspect of this genetic risk. Choline activates these nicotinic receptors during fetal brain development. Dietary supplementation of maternal choline thus emerges as a possible intervention in pregnancy to alter the earliest developmental course of the illness. Aim Review available literature on the relationship of choline supplementation or choline levels during pregnancy and fetal brain development. Methods A Medline search was used to identify studies assessing effects of choline in human fetal development. Studies of other prenatal risk factors for schizophrenia and the role of cholinergic neurotransmission in its pathophysiology were also identified. Results Dietary requirements for choline are high during pregnancy because of its several uses, including membrane biosynthesis, one-carbon metabolism, and cholinergic neurotransmission. Its ability to act directly at high concentrations as a nicotinic agonist is critical for normal brain circuit development. Dietary supplementation in the second and third trimesters with phosphatidyl-choline supports these functions and is associated generally with better fetal outcome. Improvement in inhibitory neuronal functions whose deficit is associated with schizophrenia and attention deficit disorder has been observed. Conclusion Prenatal dietary supplementation with phosphatidyl-choline and promotion of diets rich in choline-containing foods (meats, soybeans, and eggs) are possible interventions to promote fetal brain development and thereby decrease the risk of subsequent mental illnesses. The low risk and short (sixmonth) duration of the

  13. Choline incorporation by Schistosoma mansoni: distribution of choline metabolites during development and after sexual differentiation

    SciTech Connect

    Ancelin, M.L.; Torpier, G.; Vial, H.J.; Capron, A.

    1987-06-01

    Choline metabolism was investigated in Schistosoma mansoni during the main phases of its development, namely, schistosomula, 11- and 15-day-old worms, and adults. At the physiological choline concentration used in the assay (20 microM), betaine was, along with phosphatidylcholine, one of the most abundant choline metabolites, revealing considerable choline oxidation activity. Very little radioactivity was associated with CDP-choline, whereas a sustained incorporation into phosphocholine occurred. These results provide good evidence that CTP:phosphocholine cytidylyltransferase plays a regulatory role in the de novo pathway of phosphatidylcholine biosynthesis. During development, the incorporation of choline into its various metabolites was maximal in 11-day-old worms. At this stage, the oxidative pathway predominated over the Kennedy pathway, whereas at all other stages the de novo phosphatidylcholine biosynthesis was predominant. Furthermore, choline incorporation into betaine was much more important in the adult female worm than in the male, indicating a major difference in choline incorporation and distribution between the 2 sexes of the adult worms.

  14. Dietary choline requirement of juvenile hybrid striped bass.

    PubMed

    Griffin, M E; Wilson, K A; White, M R; Brown, P B

    1994-09-01

    Two experiments were conducted to estimate the dietary choline requirement and to determine the effects of dietary choline on liver lipid deposition in juvenile hybrid striped bass (Monrone saxatilis x M. chrysops). Experimental diets contained 0.73 g total sulfur amino acids/100 g diet (0.47 g methionine + 0.26 g cyst(e)ine/100 g diet), thus meeting, but not exceeding, the requirement. Graded levels of choline bitartrate in Experiment 1 and choline chloride in Experiment 2 were added to the basal diet, resulting in eight dietary treatments in each experiment. Dietary treatments were 0, 250, 500, 1000, 2000, 4000, 6000 and 8000 mg choline/kg dry diet. Diets were fed for 12 and 10 wk in Experiments 1 and 2, respectively. Dietary choline concentrations significantly affected weight gain, feed efficiency, survival and total liver lipid concentrations in each experiment. Weight gain and feed efficiency were greatest in fish fed 500 mg choline/kg dry diet as choline bitartrate. Total liver lipid concentrations were variable but tended to be lowest in fish fed diets containing at least 2000 mg choline/kg diet. Survival was significantly lower in the group of fish fed 8000 mg choline/kg diet supplied by choline bitartrate. Weight gain and feed efficiency were greatest and total liver lipid concentration was lowest in groups of fish fed at least 500 mg choline/kg diet as choline chloride; survival was unaffected by dietary treatment. Therefore, choline chloride seems to be a better source of dietary choline than choline bitartrate and 500 mg choline/kg diet is adequate for maximum weight gain and prevention of increased liver lipid concentration in juvenile hybrid striped bass.

  15. Choline Ameliorates Disease Phenotypes in Human iPSC Models of Rett Syndrome.

    PubMed

    Chin, Eunice W M; Marcy, Guillaume; Yoon, Su-In; Ma, Dongliang; Rosales, Francisco J; Augustine, George J; Goh, Eyleen L K

    2016-09-01

    Rett syndrome (RTT) is a postnatal neurodevelopmental disorder that primarily affects girls. Mutations in the methyl-CpG-binding protein 2 (MECP2) gene account for approximately 95 % of all RTT cases. To model RTT in vitro, we generated induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) from fibroblasts of two RTT patients with different mutations (MECP2 (R306C) and MECP2 (1155Δ32)) in their MECP2 gene. We found that these iPSCs were capable of differentiating into functional neurons. Compared to control neurons, the RTT iPSC-derived cells had reduced soma size and a decreased amount of synaptic input, evident both as fewer Synapsin 1-positive puncta and a lower frequency of spontaneous excitatory postsynaptic currents. Supplementation of the culture media with choline rescued all of these defects. Choline supplementation may act through changes in the expression of choline acetyltransferase, an important enzyme in cholinergic signaling, and also through alterations in the lipid metabolite profiles of the RTT neurons. Our study elucidates the possible mechanistic pathways for the effect of choline on human RTT cell models, thereby illustrating the potential for using choline as a nutraceutical to treat RTT.

  16. [Focus: Prostate cancer and PET-choline].

    PubMed

    Brenot-Rossi, I

    2014-01-01

    PET with (18)F-Fluorocholine has authorization for the diagnosis of bone metastases. There are no limitations to the realization of this exam but androgen deprivation treatment should not be initiated or modified before performing TEP-choline. Some studies have shown a good correlation between choline uptake within the prostate and the tumor, if the size is greater than 5 mm; this exam is interesting in case of negative biopsy. In the initial staging of high-risk prostate cancer, metastatic nodes could be detected if there are more than 5 mm, especially those localized outside the lymphadenectomy area. TEP-choline is the most efficient exam that could detect intra-medullary bone metastases. It could realize the staging N and M in one procedure, and it could replace conventional imaging exams to detect lesions at an early stage. In the evaluation of recurrent disease, TEP-choline is able to detect the site of relapse--local, pelvic nodal or bone metastases--from a threshold of 1 ng/mL, less if the velocity value is greater than 1 ng/mL per year or the doubling time less than 6 months. For low PSA value, (around 5 ng/mL), relapse is usually isolated, either be local or nodal or metastatic. TEP-choline could be carried out in a first intention to consider a local salvage treatment. Bladder accumulation of choline can hide local small volume recurrence: overcome this drawback by the administration of Furosemide. In case of high-level PSA, Standard examinations (scintigraphy, CT…) are sufficient to detect the site of relapse.

  17. 21 CFR 573.580 - Iron-choline citrate complex.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Iron-choline citrate complex. 573.580 Section 573... Food Additive Listing § 573.580 Iron-choline citrate complex. Iron-choline citrate complex made by... used as a source of iron in animal feed....

  18. 21 CFR 573.580 - Iron-choline citrate complex.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Iron-choline citrate complex. 573.580 Section 573... Food Additive Listing § 573.580 Iron-choline citrate complex. Iron-choline citrate complex made by... used as a source of iron in animal feed....

  19. 21 CFR 172.370 - Iron-choline citrate complex.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Iron-choline citrate complex. 172.370 Section 172... CONSUMPTION Special Dietary and Nutritional Additives § 172.370 Iron-choline citrate complex. Iron-choline... citric acid may be safely used as a source of iron in foods for special dietary use....

  20. 21 CFR 172.370 - Iron-choline citrate complex.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2010-04-01 2009-04-01 true Iron-choline citrate complex. 172.370 Section 172... CONSUMPTION Special Dietary and Nutritional Additives § 172.370 Iron-choline citrate complex. Iron-choline... citric acid may be safely used as a source of iron in foods for special dietary use....

  1. 21 CFR 172.370 - Iron-choline citrate complex.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Iron-choline citrate complex. 172.370 Section 172... CONSUMPTION Special Dietary and Nutritional Additives § 172.370 Iron-choline citrate complex. Iron-choline... citric acid may be safely used as a source of iron in foods for special dietary use....

  2. 21 CFR 172.370 - Iron-choline citrate complex.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Iron-choline citrate complex. 172.370 Section 172... Nutritional Additives § 172.370 Iron-choline citrate complex. Iron-choline citrate complex made by reacting... source of iron in foods for special dietary use....

  3. 21 CFR 172.370 - Iron-choline citrate complex.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Iron-choline citrate complex. 172.370 Section 172... CONSUMPTION Special Dietary and Nutritional Additives § 172.370 Iron-choline citrate complex. Iron-choline... citric acid may be safely used as a source of iron in foods for special dietary use....

  4. 21 CFR 573.580 - Iron-choline citrate complex.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ...) ANIMAL DRUGS, FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS FOOD ADDITIVES PERMITTED IN FEED AND DRINKING WATER OF ANIMALS Food Additive Listing § 573.580 Iron-choline citrate complex. Iron-choline citrate complex made by... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Iron-choline citrate complex. 573.580 Section...

  5. 21 CFR 573.580 - Iron-choline citrate complex.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ...) ANIMAL DRUGS, FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS FOOD ADDITIVES PERMITTED IN FEED AND DRINKING WATER OF ANIMALS Food Additive Listing § 573.580 Iron-choline citrate complex. Iron-choline citrate complex made by... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Iron-choline citrate complex. 573.580 Section...

  6. 21 CFR 573.580 - Iron-choline citrate complex.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ...) ANIMAL DRUGS, FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS FOOD ADDITIVES PERMITTED IN FEED AND DRINKING WATER OF ANIMALS Food Additive Listing § 573.580 Iron-choline citrate complex. Iron-choline citrate complex made by... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Iron-choline citrate complex. 573.580 Section...

  7. 21 CFR 182.8252 - Choline chloride.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Choline chloride. 182.8252 Section 182.8252 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) FOOD FOR HUMAN CONSUMPTION (CONTINUED) SUBSTANCES GENERALLY RECOGNIZED AS SAFE Nutrients § 182.8252...

  8. 21 CFR 182.8250 - Choline bitartrate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Choline bitartrate. 182.8250 Section 182.8250 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) FOOD FOR HUMAN CONSUMPTION (CONTINUED) SUBSTANCES GENERALLY RECOGNIZED AS SAFE Nutrients § 182.8250...

  9. 21 CFR 182.8250 - Choline bitartrate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Choline bitartrate. 182.8250 Section 182.8250 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) FOOD FOR HUMAN CONSUMPTION (CONTINUED) SUBSTANCES GENERALLY RECOGNIZED AS SAFE Nutrients § 182.8250...

  10. 21 CFR 182.8250 - Choline bitartrate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Choline bitartrate. 182.8250 Section 182.8250 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) FOOD FOR HUMAN CONSUMPTION (CONTINUED) SUBSTANCES GENERALLY RECOGNIZED AS SAFE Nutrients § 182.8250...

  11. 21 CFR 182.8250 - Choline bitartrate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2010-04-01 2009-04-01 true Choline bitartrate. 182.8250 Section 182.8250 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) FOOD FOR HUMAN CONSUMPTION (CONTINUED) SUBSTANCES GENERALLY RECOGNIZED AS SAFE Nutrients § 182.8250...

  12. 21 CFR 182.8252 - Choline chloride.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Choline chloride. 182.8252 Section 182.8252 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) FOOD FOR HUMAN CONSUMPTION (CONTINUED) SUBSTANCES GENERALLY RECOGNIZED AS SAFE Nutrients § 182.8252...

  13. 21 CFR 573.300 - Choline xanthate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Choline xanthate. 573.300 Section 573.300 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL DRUGS, FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS FOOD ADDITIVES PERMITTED IN FEED AND DRINKING WATER OF ANIMALS Food...

  14. 21 CFR 573.300 - Choline xanthate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Choline xanthate. 573.300 Section 573.300 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL DRUGS, FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS FOOD ADDITIVES PERMITTED IN FEED AND DRINKING WATER OF ANIMALS Food...

  15. 21 CFR 573.300 - Choline xanthate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Choline xanthate. 573.300 Section 573.300 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL DRUGS, FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS FOOD ADDITIVES PERMITTED IN FEED AND DRINKING WATER OF ANIMALS Food...

  16. 21 CFR 573.300 - Choline xanthate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Choline xanthate. 573.300 Section 573.300 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL DRUGS, FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS FOOD ADDITIVES PERMITTED IN FEED AND DRINKING WATER OF ANIMALS Food...

  17. 21 CFR 573.300 - Choline xanthate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Choline xanthate. 573.300 Section 573.300 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL DRUGS, FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS FOOD ADDITIVES PERMITTED IN FEED AND DRINKING WATER OF ANIMALS Food...

  18. USDA Choline Data for Baby Food

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Choline, a dietary component occurring naturally in high-protein and high-fat foods (e.g., eggs, meat, fish, nuts, legumes and human milk), plays a critical role in normal brain development (Zeisel et. al, 2004). It is essential to the development of cell membranes and therefore, inadequate intake b...

  19. Novel choline esterase based sensor for monitoring of organophosphorus pollutants

    SciTech Connect

    Wilkins, E.S.; Ghindilis, A.L.; Atanasov, P.

    1996-12-31

    Organophosphorus compounds are significant major environmental pollutants due to their intensive use as pesticides. The modern techniques based on inhibition of choline esterase enzyme activity are discussed. Potentiometric electrodes based on detection of choline esterase inhibition by analytes has been developed. The detection of choline esterase activity is based on the novel principle of molecular transduction. Immobilized peroxidase acting as the molecular transducer, catalyzes the electroreduction of hydrogen peroxide by direct (mediatorless) electron transfer. The sensing element consists of a carbon based electrode containing an assembly of co-immobilized enzymes: choline esterase, choline oxidase and peroxidase.

  20. Choline metabolism-based molecular diagnosis of cancer: an update

    PubMed Central

    Glunde, Kristine; Penet, Marie-France; Jiang, Lu; Jacobs, Michael A; Bhujwalla, Zaver M

    2016-01-01

    Abnormal choline metabolism continues to be identified in multiple cancers. Molecular causes of abnormal choline metabolism are changes in choline kinase-α, ethanolamine kinase-α, phosphatidylcholine-specific phospholipase C and -D and glycerophosphocholine phosphodiesterases, as well as several choline transporters. The net outcome of these enzymatic changes is an increase in phosphocholine and total choline (tCho) and, in some cancers, a relative decrease of glycerophosphocholine. The increased tCho signal detected by 1H magnetic resonance spectroscopy is being evaluated as a diagnostic marker in multiple cancers. Increased expression and activity of choline transporters and choline kinase-α have spurred the development of radiolabeled choline analogs as PET imaging tracers. Both tCho 1H magnetic resonance spectroscopy and choline PET are being investigated to detect response to treatment. Enzymes mediating the abnormal choline metabolism are being explored as targets for cancer therapy. This review highlights recent molecular, therapeutic and clinical advances in choline metabolism in cancer. PMID:25921026

  1. Caffeine potentiates the enhancement by choline of striatal acetylcholine release

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, D. A.; Ulus, I. H.; Wurtman, R. J.

    1992-01-01

    We investigated the effect of peripherally administered caffeine (50 mg/kg), choline (30, 60, or 120 mg/kg) or combinations of both drugs on the spontaneous release of acetylcholine (ACh) from the corpus striatum of anesthetized rats using in vivo microdialysis. Caffeine alone or choline in the 30 or 60 mg/kg dose failed to increase ACh in microdialysis samples; the 120 mg/kg choline dose significantly enhanced ACh during the 80 min following drug administration. Coadministration of caffeine with choline significantly increased ACh release after each of the choline doses tested. Peak microdialysate levels with the 120 mg/kg dose were increased 112% when caffeine was additionally administered, as compared with 54% without caffeine. These results indicate that choline administration can enhance spontaneous ACh release from neurons, and that caffeine, a drug known to block adenosine receptors on these neurons, can amplify the choline effect.

  2. Comparable Stability of Hoogsteen and Watson–Crick Base Pairs in Ionic Liquid Choline Dihydrogen Phosphate

    PubMed Central

    Tateishi-Karimata, Hisae; Nakano, Miki; Sugimoto, Naoki

    2014-01-01

    The instability of Hoogsteen base pairs relative to Watson–Crick base pairs has limited biological applications of triplex-forming oligonucleotides. Hydrated ionic liquids (ILs) provide favourable environments for a wide range of chemical reactions and are known to impact the stabilities of Watson–Crick base pairs. We found that DNA triplex formation was significantly stabilized in hydrated choline dihydrogen phosphate as compared with an aqueous buffer at neutral pH. Interestingly, the stability of Hoogsteen base pairs was found to be comparable with that of Watson–Crick base pairs in the hydrated IL. Molecular dynamics simulations of a DNA triplex in the presence of choline ions revealed that the DNA triplex was stabilized because of the binding of choline ion around the third strand in the grooves. Our finding will facilitate the development of new DNA materials. Our data also indicate that triplex formation may be stabilized inside cells where choline ions and their derivatives are abundant in vivo. PMID:24399194

  3. Effect of choline carboxylate ionic liquids on biological membranes

    PubMed Central

    Rengstl, Doris; Kraus, Birgit; Van Vorst, Matthew; Elliott, Gloria D.; Kunz, Werner

    2015-01-01

    Choline carboxylates, ChCm, with m = 2–10 and choline oleate are known as biocompatible substances, yet their influence on biological membranes is not well-known, and the effect on human skin has not previously been investigated. The short chain choline carboxylates ChCm with m = 2, 4, 6 act as hydrotropes, solubilizing hydrophobic compounds in aqueous solution, while the longer chain choline carboxylates ChCm with m = 8,10 and oleate are able to form micelles. In the present study, the cytotoxicity of choline carboxylates was tested using HeLa and SK-MEL-28 cells. The influence of these substances on liposomes prepared from dipalmitoylphosphatidylcholine (DPPC) was also evaluated to provide insights on membrane interactions. It was observed that the choline carboxylates with a chain length of m > 8 distinctly influence the bilayer, while the shorter ones had minimal interaction with the liposomes. PMID:25444662

  4. Increases in choline levels in rat brain elicited by meclofenoxate.

    PubMed

    Wood, P L; Péloquin, A

    1982-04-01

    Meclofenoxate, the p-cholorophenoxyacetic acid ester of deanol, was found to dramatically elevate choline (Ch) levels in the rat CNS. In the hippocampus, this elevation in choline was accompanied by a new elevated steady state level in acetylcholine (ACh). No such coupling was observed in the striatum or parietal cortex. Deanol also elevated choline levels in the CNS but was about half as potent as meclofenoxate; p-chlorophenoxyacetic acid was inactive in this respect. Lesions of striatal neurons with kainic acid and of hippocampal cholinergic nerve endings with surgical section of the fimbria indicated that the changes in choline levels were mainly extraneuronal. In spite of the changes in choline and ACh levels, no consistant alterations in ACh turnover were measured. In summary, meclofenoxate induced dramatic alterations in CNS choline metabolism and may, therefore, be a useful therapeutic tool for potentiating depressed cholinergic neurons.

  5. Maternal choline supplementation: a nutritional approach for improving offspring health?

    PubMed

    Jiang, Xinyin; West, Allyson A; Caudill, Marie A

    2014-05-01

    The modulatory role of choline on the fetal epigenome and the impact of in utero choline supply on fetal programming and health are of great interest. Studies in animals and/or humans suggest that maternal choline supplementation during pregnancy benefits important physiologic systems such as offspring cognitive function, response to stress, and cerebral inhibition. Because alterations in offspring phenotype frequently coincide with epigenetic modifications and changes in gene expression, maternal choline supplementation may be a nutritional strategy to improve lifelong health of the child. Future studies are warranted to elucidate further the effect of choline on the fetal epigenome and to determine the level of maternal choline intake required for optimal offspring physiologic function. PMID:24680198

  6. Exercise and neuromodulators: choline and acetylcholine in marathon runners

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Conlay, L. A.; Sabounjian, L. A.; Wurtman, R. J.

    1992-01-01

    Certain neurotransmitters (i.e., acetylcholine, catecholamines, and serotonin) are formed from dietary constituents (i.e., choline, tyrosine and tryptophan). Changing the consumption of these precursors alters release of their respective neurotransmitter products. The neurotransmitter acetylcholine is released from the neuromuscular junction and from brain. It is formed from choline, a common constituent in fish, liver, and eggs. Choline is also incorporated into cell membranes; membranes may likewise serve as an alternative choline source for acetylcholine synthesis. In trained athletes, running a 26 km marathon reduced plasma choline by approximately 40%, from 14.1 to 8.4 uM. Changes of similar magnitude have been shown to reduce acetylcholine release from the neuromuscular junction in vivo. Thus, the reductions in plasma choline associated with strenuous exercise may reduce acetylcholine release, and could thereby affect endurance or performance.

  7. Maternal choline supplementation: a nutritional approach for improving offspring health?

    PubMed

    Jiang, Xinyin; West, Allyson A; Caudill, Marie A

    2014-05-01

    The modulatory role of choline on the fetal epigenome and the impact of in utero choline supply on fetal programming and health are of great interest. Studies in animals and/or humans suggest that maternal choline supplementation during pregnancy benefits important physiologic systems such as offspring cognitive function, response to stress, and cerebral inhibition. Because alterations in offspring phenotype frequently coincide with epigenetic modifications and changes in gene expression, maternal choline supplementation may be a nutritional strategy to improve lifelong health of the child. Future studies are warranted to elucidate further the effect of choline on the fetal epigenome and to determine the level of maternal choline intake required for optimal offspring physiologic function.

  8. Nonoisotopic Assay for the Presynaptic Choline Transporter Reveals Capacity for Allosteric Modulation of Choline Uptake

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Current therapies to enhance CNS cholinergic function rely primarily on extracellular acetylcholinesterase (AChE) inhibition, a pharmacotherapeutic strategy that produces dose-limiting side effects. The Na+-dependent, high-affinity choline transporter (CHT) is an unexplored target for cholinergic medication development. Although functional at the plasma membrane, CHT at steady-state is localized to synaptic vesicles such that vesicular fusion can support a biosynthetic response to neuronal excitation. To identify allosteric potentiators of CHT activity, we mapped endocytic sequences in the C-terminus of human CHT, identifying transporter mutants that exhibit significantly increased transport function. A stable HEK-293 cell line was generated from one of these mutants (CHT LV-AA) and used to establish a high-throughput screen (HTS) compatible assay based on the electrogenic nature of the transporter. We established that the addition of choline to these cells, at concentrations appropriate for high-affinity choline transport at presynaptic terminals, generates a hemicholinium-3 (HC-3)-sensitive, membrane depolarization that can be used for the screening of CHT inhibitors and activators. Using this assay, we discovered that staurosporine increased CHT LV-AA choline uptake activity, an effect mediated by a decrease in choline KM with no change in Vmax. As staurosporine did not change surface levels of CHT, nor inhibit HC-3 binding, we propose that its action is directly or indirectly allosteric in nature. Surprisingly, staurosporine reduced choline-induced membrane depolarization, suggesting that increased substrate coupling to ion gradients, arising at the expense of nonstoichiometric ion flow, accompanies a shift of CHT to a higher-affinity state. Our findings provide a new approach for the identification of CHT modulators that is compatible with high-throughput screening approaches and presents a novel model by which small molecules can enhance substrate flux

  9. CDP-choline-induced blood histamine changes in Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Fernández-Novoa, L; Alvarez, X A; Franco-Maside, A; Caamaño, J; Cacabelos, R

    1994-05-01

    Histamine (HA) is a known neurotransmitter with a wide spectrum of biological actions at the central and peripheral levels. Recently, it has been found that HA is involved in the regulation of immune cell function, acting as an immunomodulator. A hyperactivation in the histaminergic system has been demonstrated in Alzheimer's disease (AD), including increased levels of HA in brain, serum, and cerebrospinal fluid of AD patients. In addition, changes in phospholipid metabolism and neuroimmune function have been reported in AD. CDP-choline (cytidine-5-diphosphate-choline) participates in the phospholipid metabolism pathway incorporating free choline into phosphatidyl-choline and choline plasmalogens in several tissues, including the central nervous system. In this study we have measured the concentration of HA in blood from patients with early-onset AD (EOAD) and late-onset AD (LOAD) under treatment with CDP-choline (1000 mg p.o. x30 days). HA was measured by high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) with fluorometric detection. CDP-choline reduced the basal levels of blood HA in both EOAD and LOAD by 2-fold. The reduction in blood HA content was observed 2 h after CDP-choline administration and gradually progressed for 30 days of treatment. These results confirm the potential immunogenic effects of CDP-choline and also that an excess of HA might influence some etiopathogenic events in AD.

  10. 18F-labeled Single-Stranded DNA Aptamer for PET Imaging of Protein Tyrosine Kinase-7 Expression

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Lu; Wang, Zhe; Yang, Xiangyu; Dewhurst, Andrew; Ma, Ying; Zhu, Guizhi; Niu, Gang; Kiesewetter, Dale O.; Vasdev, Neil; Liang, Steven H.; Chen, Xiaoyuan

    2016-01-01

    Protein tyrosine kinase-7 (PTK7), a member of receptor tyrosine kinase superfamily initially identified as colon carcinoma kinase-4 (CCK-4), is highly expressed in various human malignancies. Its expression was found to correlate with aggressive biological behaviors such as increased cell proliferation, invasiveness and migration. Despite the importance and unmet need of imaging PTK7 in vivo, there is currently no clinically-relevant method to visualize tumoral PTK7 expression noninvasively such as PET or SPECT. This study aims to develop a specific, selective and high affinity PET radioligand based on single-stranded DNA (ssDNA) aptamer to address this challenge. Methods Sgc8, a 41-oligonucleotide that targets to PTK7, was labeled with F-18 using a two-step radiochemical synthesis, which featured a direct one-step radiofluorination on the distinctive spirocyclic hypervalent iodine(III) precursor to give 18F-fluorobenzyl azide followed by copper mediated “click” conjugation with Sgc8-alkyne. 18F-Sgc8 was evaluated in vitro and in vivo in two cell lines, HCT116 and U87MG, which express high and low amounts of PTK7, respectively. Results Sgc8 was labeled efficiently with F-18 in an isolated radiochemical yield of 62 ± 2%, non-decay-corrected (ndc) based on 18F-fluorobenzyl azide. 18F-Tr-Sgc8 was found to possess high affinity binding to both cell lines, with IC50 values for HCT116 as 2.7 ± 0.6 nM and U87MG as 16.9 ± 2.1 nM. In vivo PET imaging clearly visualized PTK7 expression in HCT116 xenografted mice with tumor uptake of 0.76 ± 0.09 %ID/g at 30 min post-injection (p.i.) for the subcutaneous tumor model and greater than 1.5 %ID/g for the liver metastasis model. U87MG xenograft tumors had much lower tracer accumulation (0.13 ± 0.06 %ID/g at 30 min p.i.), which was consistent with the lower expression of PTK7 in this tumor model. The labeled aptamer was rapidly cleared from the blood through the kidneys and bladder to give high tumor-to-blood and tumor-to-muscle ratios of 7.29 ± 1.51 and 10.25 ± 2.08, respectively. Conclusions The F-18 radiolabeling methodology shown here is a very robust procedure for labeling aptamers and similar chemical moieties, and can be applied to many different targets. Quantification of PTK7 using 18F-Tr-Sgc8 may be suitable for clinical translation and might help in the future to select and monitor appropriate therapies. PMID:26315836

  11. Synthesis, In Vitro and In Vivo Evaluation of 18F-labeled PET Ligands for Imaging the Vesicular Acetylcholine Transporter

    PubMed Central

    Tu, Zhude; Efange, Simon M. N.; Xu, Jinbin; Li, Shihong; Jones, Lynne A.; Parsons, Stanley M.; Mach, Robert H.

    2009-01-01

    A new class of vesicular acetylcholine transporter inhibitor that incorporates a carbonyl group into the benzovesamicol structure was synthesized and analogs were evaluated in vitro. (±)-trans-2-Hydroxy-3-(4-(4-[18F]fluorobenzoyl)piperidino)tetralin (9e) has Ki values of 2.70 nM for VAChT, 191 nM for σ1 and 251 nM for σ2. The racemic precursor (9d) was resolved via chiral HPLC and (±)-[18F]9e, (-)-[18F]9e, and (+)-[18F]9e were respectively radiolabeled via microwave irradiation of the appropriate precursors with [18F]/F- and Kryptofix/K2CO3 in DMSO with radiochemical yields ∼50-60% and specific activities >2000 mCi/μmol. (-)-[18F]9e uptake in rat brain was consistent with in vivo selectivity for the VAChT with an initial uptake of 0.911 %ID/g in rat striatum and a striatum: cerebellum ratio of 1.88 by 30 min p.i.. MicroPET imaging of macaques demonstrated a 2.1 ratio of (-)-[18F]9e in putamen versus cerebellum at 2 h. p.i. (-)-[18F]9e has potential to be a PET tracer for clinical imaging of the VAChT. PMID:19203271

  12. Small-molecule inhibition of choline catabolism in Pseudomonas aeruginosa and other aerobic choline-catabolizing bacteria.

    PubMed

    Fitzsimmons, Liam F; Flemer, Stevenson; Wurthmann, A Sandy; Deker, P Bruce; Sarkar, Indra Neil; Wargo, Matthew J

    2011-07-01

    Choline is abundant in association with eukaryotes and plays roles in osmoprotection, thermoprotection, and membrane biosynthesis in many bacteria. Aerobic catabolism of choline is widespread among soil proteobacteria, particularly those associated with eukaryotes. Catabolism of choline as a carbon, nitrogen, and/or energy source may play important roles in association with eukaryotes, including pathogenesis, symbioses, and nutrient cycling. We sought to generate choline analogues to study bacterial choline catabolism in vitro and in situ. Here we report the characterization of a choline analogue, propargylcholine, which inhibits choline catabolism at the level of Dgc enzyme-catalyzed dimethylglycine demethylation in Pseudomonas aeruginosa. We used genetic analyses and 13C nuclear magnetic resonance to demonstrate that propargylcholine is catabolized to its inhibitory form, propargylmethylglycine. Chemically synthesized propargylmethylglycine was also an inhibitor of growth on choline. Bioinformatic analysis suggests that there are genes encoding DgcA homologues in a variety of proteobacteria. We examined the broader utility of propargylcholine and propargylmethylglycine by assessing growth of other members of the proteobacteria that are known to grow on choline and possess putative DgcA homologues. Propargylcholine showed utility as a growth inhibitor in P. aeruginosa but did not inhibit growth in other proteobacteria tested. In contrast, propargylmethylglycine was able to inhibit choline-dependent growth in all tested proteobacteria, including Pseudomonas mendocina, Pseudomonas fluorescens, Pseudomonas putida, Burkholderia cepacia, Burkholderia ambifaria, and Sinorhizobium meliloti. We predict that chemical inhibitors of choline catabolism will be useful for studying this pathway in clinical and environmental isolates and could be a useful tool to study proteobacterial choline catabolism in situ.

  13. Choline alphoscerate (alpha-glyceryl-phosphoryl-choline) an old choline- containing phospholipid with a still interesting profile as cognition enhancing agent.

    PubMed

    Traini, Enea; Bramanti, Vincenzo; Amenta, Francesco

    2013-12-01

    Cholinergic precursors have represented the first approach to counter cognitive impairment occurring in adultonset dementia disorders. These compounds were early leaved because their clinical efficacy was not clearly demonstrated. This is probably not true for some choline-containing phospholipids including choline alphoscerate. Choline alphoscerate increases the release of acetylcholine in rat hippocampus, facilitates learning and memory in experimental animals, improves brain transduction mechanisms and decreases age-dependent structural changes occurring in rat brain areas involved in learning and memory. The compound exerts neuroprotective effects in models of altered cholinergic neurotransmission and of brain vascular injury. In clinical studies choline alphoscerate improved memory and attention impairment, as well as affective and somatic symptoms in dementia disorders. An ongoing trial indicates that association between the acetylcholinesterase inhibitor donepezil and choline alphoscerate is accompanied by an improvement in several cognitive tests superior to that induced by donepezil alone. It is suggested that this association may represent a therapeutic option to prolong beneficial effects of cholinergic therapies in Alzheimer's disease patients with concomitant ischemic cerebrovascular disorders. In summary, choline alphoscerate has significant effects on cognitive function with a good safety profile and tolerability. Although limited both in terms of size of the samples investigated and of the length of treatment, preclinical and clinical results presented suggest that cognitive enhancing capabilities of choline alphoscerate merit of being further investigated in appropriate trials.

  14. Nutritional genomics: defining the dietary requirement and effects of choline.

    PubMed

    Zeisel, Steven H

    2011-03-01

    As it becomes evident that single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in humans can create metabolic inefficiencies, it is reasonable to ask if such SNPs influence dietary requirements. Epidemiologic studies that examine SNPs relative to risks for diseases are common, but there are few examples of clinically sized nutrition studies that examine how SNPs influence metabolism. Studies on how SNPs influence the dietary requirement for choline provide a model for how we might begin examining the effects of SNPs on nutritional phenotypes using clinically sized studies (clinical nutrigenomics). Most men and postmenopausal women develop liver or muscle dysfunction when deprived of dietary choline. More than one-half of premenopausal women may be resistant to choline deficiency-induced organ dysfunction, because estrogen induces the gene [phosphatidylethanolamine-N-methyltransferase (PEMT)] that catalyzes endogenous synthesis of phosphatidylcholine, which can subsequently yield choline. Those premenopausal women that do require a dietary source of choline have a SNP in PEMT, making them unresponsive to estrogen induction of PEMT. It is important to recognize differences in dietary requirements for choline in women, because during pregnancy, maternal dietary choline modulates fetal brain development in rodent models. Because choline metabolism and folate metabolism intersect at the methylation of homocysteine, manipulations that limit folate availability also increase the use of choline as a methyl donor. People with a SNPs in MTHFD1 (a gene of folate metabolism that controls the use of folate as a methyl donor) are more likely to develop organ dysfunction when deprived of choline; their dietary requirement is increased because of increased need for choline as a methyl donor. PMID:21270363

  15. Compartmental model of 18F-choline

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Janzen, T.; Tavola, F.; Giussani, A.; Cantone, M. C.; Uusijärvi, H.; Mattsson, S.; Zankl, M.; Petoussi-Henß, N.; Hoeschen, C.

    2010-03-01

    The MADEIRA Project (Minimizing Activity and Dose with Enhanced Image quality by Radiopharmaceutical Administrations), aims to improve the efficacy and safety of 3D functional imaging by optimizing, among others, the knowledge of the temporal variation of the radiopharmaceuticals' uptake in and clearance from tumor and healthy tissues. With the help of compartmental modeling it is intended to optimize the time schedule for data collection and improve the evaluation of the organ doses to the patients. Administration of 18F-choline to screen for recurrence or the occurrence of metastases in prostate cancer patients is one of the diagnostic applications under consideration in the frame of the project. PET and CT images have been acquired up to four hours after injection of 18F-choline. Additionally blood and urine samples have been collected and measured in a gamma counter. The radioactivity concentration in different organs and data of plasma clearance and elimination into urine were used to set-up a compartmental model of the biokinetics of the radiopharmaceutical. It features a central compartment (blood) exchanging with organs. The structure describes explicitly liver, kidneys, spleen, plasma and bladder as separate units with a forcing function approach. The model is presented together with an evaluation of the individual and population kinetic parameters, and a revised time schedule for data collection is proposed. This optimized time schedule will be validated in a further set of patient studies.

  16. Choline associated hypersexuality in a 79-year-old man.

    PubMed

    Calabrò, Rocco Salvatore; Cordici, Francesco; Genovese, Carmelo; Bramanti, Placido

    2014-01-01

    Hypersexuality, also referred to as sexually inappropriate behavior and sexual disinhibition, involves persistent, uninhibited sexual behaviors directed at oneself or at others, sometimes associated with neurodegenerative disorders. Choline is a water-soluble essential nutrient, used as a dietary supplement in different diseases. This report was aimed at considering choline intake as a possible cause of iatrogenic hypersexuality. After an evaluation, a 79-year-old man affected by memory loss was diagnosed with mild cognitive impairment and treated with oral choline. After 6 weeks of regular choline assumption, the patient showed a pathological increase in libido with sexual urges. As choline was withdrawn, the hypersexuality disappeared within 5 days. Since hypersexuality may be an underreported and overlooked adverse effect of drugs and dietary supplements acting on the cholinergic pathway, this should be considered when treating and counselling patients with inappropriate sexual behavior. PMID:23733158

  17. Use of canonical variate analysis biplot in examination of choline content data of some foods.

    PubMed

    Alkan, Baris; Atakan, Cemal

    2011-03-01

    Adequate intake (AI) of choline as part of the daily diet can help prevent major diseases. Low choline intake is a major risk factor for liver and several neurological disorders. Extreme choline consumption may cause diseases such as hypotension, sweating, diarrhea, and fishy body odor. The AI of choline is 425 mg/day for adult women; higher for pregnant and lactating women. The AI for adult men is 550 mg/day. The total choline content of foods is calculated as the sum of free choline, glycerophosphocholine, phosphocholine, phosphatidylcholine and sphingomyelin. These are called the choline variables. Observed values of choline variables may be different in amounts of nutrients. So different food groups in terms of choline variables are useful to compare. The present paper shows the advantages of using canonical variate analysis biplot to optimally separate groups and explore the differentiality of choline variables amounts in foods.

  18. Pharmacophore-Based Virtual Screening to Discover New Active Compounds for Human Choline Kinase α1.

    PubMed

    Serrán-Aguilera, Lucía; Nuti, Roberto; López-Cara, Luisa C; Mezo, Miguel Á Gallo; Macchiarulo, Antonio; Entrena, Antonio; Hurtado-Guerrero, Ramón

    2015-06-01

    Choline kinase (CK) catalyses the transfer of the ATP γ-phosphate to choline to generate phosphocholine and ADP in the presence of magnesium leading to the synthesis of phosphatidylcholine. Of the three isoforms of CK described in humans, only the α isoforms (HsCKα) are strongly associated with cancer and have been validated as drug targets to treat this disease. Over the years, a large number of Hemicholinium-3 (HC-3)-based HsCKα biscationic inhibitors have been developed though the relevant common features important for the biological function have not been defined. Here, selecting a large number of previous HC-3-based inhibitors, we discover through computational studies a pharmacophore model formed by five moieties that are included in the 1-benzyl-4-(N-methylaniline)pyridinium fragment. Using a pharmacophore-guided virtual screening, we then identified 6 molecules that showed binding affinities in the low μM range to HsCKα1. Finally, protein crystallization studies suggested that one of these molecules is bound to the choline and ATP-binding sites. In conclusion, we have developed a pharmacophore model that not only allowed us to dissect the structural important features of the previous HC-3 derivatives, but also enabled the identification of novel chemical tools with good ligand efficiencies to investigate the biological functions of HsCKα1. PMID:27490389

  19. Transgenic overexpression of the presynaptic choline transporter elevates acetylcholine levels and augments motor endurance

    PubMed Central

    Holmstrand, Ericka C.; Lund, David; Cherian, Ajeesh Koshy; Wright, Jane; Martin, Rolicia F.; Ennis, Elizabeth A.; Stanwood, Gregg D.; Sarter, Martin; Blakely, Randy D.

    2014-01-01

    The hemicholinium-3 (HC-3) sensitive, high-affinity choline transporter (CHT) sustains cholinergic signaling via the presynaptic uptake of choline derived from dietary sources or from acetylcholinesterase (AChE)-mediated hydrolysis of acetylcholine (ACh). Loss of cholinergic signaling capacity is associated with cognitive and motor deficits in humans and in animal models. Whereas genetic elimination of CHT has revealed the critical nature of CHT in maintaining ACh stores and sustaining cholinergic signaling, the consequences of elevating CHT expression have yet to be studied. Using bacterial artificial chromosome (BAC)-mediated transgenic methods, we generated mice with integrated additional copies of the mouse Slc5a7 gene. BAC–CHT mice are viable, appear to develop normally, and breed at wild-type (WT) rates. Biochemical studies revealed a 2 to 3-fold elevation in CHT protein levels in the CNS and periphery, paralleled by significant increases in [3H]HC-3 binding and synaptosomal choline transport activity. Elevations of ACh in the BAC–CHT mice occurred without compensatory changes in the activity of either choline acetyltransferase (ChAT) or AChE. Immunohistochemistry for CHT in BAC–CHT brain sections revealed markedly elevated CHT expression in the cell bodies of cholinergic neurons and in axons projecting to regions known to receive cholinergic innervation. Behaviorally, BAC–CHT mice exhibited diminished fatigue and increased speeds on the treadmill test without evidence of increased strength. Finally, BAC–CHT mice displayed elevated horizontal activity in the open field test, diminished spontaneous alteration in the Y-maze, and reduced time in the open arms of the elevated plus maze. Together, these studies provide biochemical, pharmacological and behavioral evidence that CHT protein expression and activity can be elevated beyond that seen in wild-type animals. BAC–CHT mice thus represent a novel tool to examine both the positive and negative

  20. Choline nutrition programs brain development via DNA and histone methylation.

    PubMed

    Blusztajn, Jan Krzysztof; Mellott, Tiffany J

    2012-06-01

    Choline is an essential nutrient for humans. Metabolically choline is used for the synthesis of membrane phospholipids (e.g. phosphatidylcholine), as a precursor of the neurotransmitter acetylcholine, and, following oxidation to betaine, choline functions as a methyl group donor in a pathway that produces S-adenosylmethionine. As a methyl donor choline influences DNA and histone methylation--two central epigenomic processes that regulate gene expression. Because the fetus and neonate have high demands for choline, its dietary intake during pregnancy and lactation is particularly important for normal development of the offspring. Studies in rodents have shown that high choline intake during gestation improves cognitive function in adulthood and prevents memory decline associated with old age. These behavioral changes are accompanied by electrophysiological, neuroanatomical, and neurochemical changes and by altered patterns of expression of multiple cortical and hippocampal genes including those encoding key proteins that contribute to the biochemical mechanisms of learning and memory. These actions of choline are observed long after the exposure to the nutrient ended (months) and correlate with fetal hepatic and cerebral cortical choline-evoked changes in global- and gene-specific DNA cytosine methylation and with dramatic changes of the methylation pattern of lysine residues 4, 9 and 27 of histone H3. Moreover, gestational choline modulates the expression of DNA (Dnmt1, Dnmt3a) and histone (G9a/Ehmt2/Kmt1c, Suv39h1/Kmt1a) methyltransferases. In addition to the central role of DNA and histone methylation in brain development, these processes are highly dynamic in adult brain, modulate the expression of genes critical for synaptic plasticity, and are involved in mechanisms of learning and memory. A recent study documented that in a cohort of normal elderly people, verbal and visual memory function correlated positively with the amount of dietary choline consumption

  1. Low-melting mixtures based on choline ionic liquids.

    PubMed

    Rengstl, Doris; Fischer, Veronika; Kunz, Werner

    2014-11-01

    In this article a strategy is proposed for the design of low toxic, room temperature liquid low-melting mixtures (LMMs) which are entirely composed of natural materials. From literature it is well known that, in general, deep eutectic solvents based on choline chloride and dicarboxylic acids are LMMs, but not liquids at room temperature, with one exception: a 1 : 1 molar mixture of malonic acid and choline chloride. Therefore, the starting point of this study was the decrease of the melting point of one of the components, namely the dicarboxylic acid, which is succinic, glutaric or adipic acid. For this purpose, one of the two protons of the acidic group was exchanged by a bulky unsymmetrical choline cation. The resulting ionic liquids (ILs) were still solid at room temperature, but have a reduced melting temperature compared to the corresponding acids. In the second step, mixtures of these ILs with choline chloride were prepared. It turned out that choline glutarate-choline chloride mixtures are liquids at room temperature at compositions containing 95-98 wt% of choline glutarate. Finally, urea was added as another hydrogen bond donor. Density, conductivity and viscosity measurements were performed for all obtained mixtures. Moreover, a Walden plot was drawn which indicates that all mixtures are liquids with fully dissociated ions moving independently. Therefore, they are considered as "good" ionic liquids and, thus, for example they can be used to exchange more toxic or less biodegradable ILs in application processes. A brief outlook containing application possibilities is given. It is demonstrated that choline dodecylsulfate is readily soluble in these mixtures, forming aggregates in the LMM at temperatures exceeding 55 °C.

  2. Low-melting mixtures based on choline ionic liquids.

    PubMed

    Rengstl, Doris; Fischer, Veronika; Kunz, Werner

    2014-11-01

    In this article a strategy is proposed for the design of low toxic, room temperature liquid low-melting mixtures (LMMs) which are entirely composed of natural materials. From literature it is well known that, in general, deep eutectic solvents based on choline chloride and dicarboxylic acids are LMMs, but not liquids at room temperature, with one exception: a 1 : 1 molar mixture of malonic acid and choline chloride. Therefore, the starting point of this study was the decrease of the melting point of one of the components, namely the dicarboxylic acid, which is succinic, glutaric or adipic acid. For this purpose, one of the two protons of the acidic group was exchanged by a bulky unsymmetrical choline cation. The resulting ionic liquids (ILs) were still solid at room temperature, but have a reduced melting temperature compared to the corresponding acids. In the second step, mixtures of these ILs with choline chloride were prepared. It turned out that choline glutarate-choline chloride mixtures are liquids at room temperature at compositions containing 95-98 wt% of choline glutarate. Finally, urea was added as another hydrogen bond donor. Density, conductivity and viscosity measurements were performed for all obtained mixtures. Moreover, a Walden plot was drawn which indicates that all mixtures are liquids with fully dissociated ions moving independently. Therefore, they are considered as "good" ionic liquids and, thus, for example they can be used to exchange more toxic or less biodegradable ILs in application processes. A brief outlook containing application possibilities is given. It is demonstrated that choline dodecylsulfate is readily soluble in these mixtures, forming aggregates in the LMM at temperatures exceeding 55 °C. PMID:25242504

  3. Choline Metabolism Alteration: A Focus on Ovarian Cancer.

    PubMed

    Bagnoli, Marina; Granata, Anna; Nicoletti, Roberta; Krishnamachary, Balaji; Bhujwalla, Zaver M; Canese, Rossella; Podo, Franca; Canevari, Silvana; Iorio, Egidio; Mezzanzanica, Delia

    2016-01-01

    Compared with normal differentiated cells, cancer cells require a metabolic reprograming to support their high proliferation rates and survival. Aberrant choline metabolism is a fairly new metabolic hallmark reflecting the complex reciprocal interactions between oncogenic signaling and cellular metabolism. Alterations of the involved metabolic network may be sustained by changes in activity of several choline transporters as well as of enzymes such as choline kinase-alpha (ChoK-α) and phosphatidylcholine-specific phospholipases C and D. Of note, the net outcome of these enzymatic alterations is an increase of phosphocholine and total choline-containing compounds, a "cholinic phenotype" that can be monitored in cancer by magnetic resonance spectroscopy. This review will highlight the molecular basis for targeting this pathway in epithelial ovarian cancer (EOC), a highly heterogeneous and lethal malignancy characterized by late diagnosis, frequent relapse, and development of chemoresistance. Modulation of ChoK-α expression impairs only EOC but not normal ovarian cells, thus supporting the hypothesis that "cholinic phenotype" is a peculiar feature of transformed cells and indicating ChoK-α targeting as a novel approach to improve efficacy of standard EOC chemotherapeutic treatments. PMID:27446799

  4. Choline Metabolism Alteration: A Focus on Ovarian Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Bagnoli, Marina; Granata, Anna; Nicoletti, Roberta; Krishnamachary, Balaji; Bhujwalla, Zaver M.; Canese, Rossella; Podo, Franca; Canevari, Silvana; Iorio, Egidio; Mezzanzanica, Delia

    2016-01-01

    Compared with normal differentiated cells, cancer cells require a metabolic reprograming to support their high proliferation rates and survival. Aberrant choline metabolism is a fairly new metabolic hallmark reflecting the complex reciprocal interactions between oncogenic signaling and cellular metabolism. Alterations of the involved metabolic network may be sustained by changes in activity of several choline transporters as well as of enzymes such as choline kinase-alpha (ChoK-α) and phosphatidylcholine-specific phospholipases C and D. Of note, the net outcome of these enzymatic alterations is an increase of phosphocholine and total choline-containing compounds, a “cholinic phenotype” that can be monitored in cancer by magnetic resonance spectroscopy. This review will highlight the molecular basis for targeting this pathway in epithelial ovarian cancer (EOC), a highly heterogeneous and lethal malignancy characterized by late diagnosis, frequent relapse, and development of chemoresistance. Modulation of ChoK-α expression impairs only EOC but not normal ovarian cells, thus supporting the hypothesis that “cholinic phenotype” is a peculiar feature of transformed cells and indicating ChoK-α targeting as a novel approach to improve efficacy of standard EOC chemotherapeutic treatments. PMID:27446799

  5. Choline on the Move: Perspectives on the Molecular Physiology and Pharmacology of the Presynaptic Choline Transporter.

    PubMed

    Ennis, E A; Blakely, R D

    2016-01-01

    Genetic, biochemical, physiological, and pharmacological approaches have advanced our understanding of cholinergic biology for over 100 years. High-affinity choline uptake (HACU) was one of the last features of cholinergic signaling to be defined at a molecular level, achieved through the cloning of the choline transporter (CHT, SLC5A7). In retrospect, the molecular era of CHT studies initiated with the identification of hemicholinium-3 (HC-3), a potent, competitive CHT antagonist, though it would take another 30 years before HC-3, in radiolabeled form, was used by Joseph Coyle's laboratory to identify and monitor the dynamics of CHT proteins. Though HC-3 studies provided important insights into CHT distribution and regulation, another 15 years would pass before the structure of CHT genes and proteins were identified, a full decade after the cloning of most other neurotransmitter-associated transporters. The availability of CHT gene and protein probes propelled the development of cell and animal models as well as efforts to gain insights into how human CHT gene variation affects the risk for brain and neuromuscular disorders. Most recently, our group has pursued a broadening of CHT pharmacology, elucidating novel chemical structures that may serve to advance cholinergic diagnostics and medication development. Here we provide a short review of the transformation that has occurred in HACU research and how such advances may promote the development of novel therapeutics. PMID:27288078

  6. Synthesis, isolation and purification of [11C]-choline

    PubMed Central

    Jadwiński, Michał; Chmura, Agnieszka; Gorczewski, Kamil; Sokół, Maria

    2016-01-01

    [11C]-choline is an effective PET tracer used for imaging of neoplastic lesions and metastases of the prostate cancer. However, its production can be a challenge for manufacturers, as it has not yet been described in Polish or European pharmacopoeia. In this study the technical aspects of [11C]-choline production are described and detailed process parameters are provided. The quality control procedures for releasing [11C]-choline as solutio iniectabilis are also presented. The purity and quality of the radiopharmaceutical obtained according to the proposed method were find to be high enough to safely administrate the radiopharmaceutical to patients. Application of an automated synthesizer makes it possible to carry out the entire process of [11C]-choline production, isolation and purification within 20 minutes. It is crucial to maintain all aspects of the process as short as possible, since the decay half-time of carbon-11 is 20.4 minutes. The resulting radiopharmaceutical is sterile and pyrogen-free and of a high chemical, radiochemical, and radionuclide purity proved by chromatographic techniques. The yield of the process is up to 20%. [11C]-choline PET scanning can be used as accurate and effective diagnostic tool in all centers equipped with [11C]-target containing cyclotron.

  7. Synthesis, isolation and purification of [(11)C]-choline.

    PubMed

    Szydło, Marcin; Jadwiński, Michał; Chmura, Agnieszka; Gorczewski, Kamil; Sokół, Maria

    2016-01-01

    [(11)C]-choline is an effective PET tracer used for imaging of neoplastic lesions and metastases of the prostate cancer. However, its production can be a challenge for manufacturers, as it has not yet been described in Polish or European pharmacopoeia. In this study the technical aspects of [(11)C]-choline production are described and detailed process parameters are provided. The quality control procedures for releasing [(11)C]-choline as solutio iniectabilis are also presented. The purity and quality of the radiopharmaceutical obtained according to the proposed method were find to be high enough to safely administrate the radiopharmaceutical to patients. Application of an automated synthesizer makes it possible to carry out the entire process of [(11)C]-choline production, isolation and purification within 20 minutes. It is crucial to maintain all aspects of the process as short as possible, since the decay half-time of carbon-11 is 20.4 minutes. The resulting radiopharmaceutical is sterile and pyrogen-free and of a high chemical, radiochemical, and radionuclide purity proved by chromatographic techniques. The yield of the process is up to 20%. [(11)C]-choline PET scanning can be used as accurate and effective diagnostic tool in all centers equipped with [(11)C]-target containing cyclotron. PMID:27660552

  8. Synthesis, isolation and purification of [(11)C]-choline.

    PubMed

    Szydło, Marcin; Jadwiński, Michał; Chmura, Agnieszka; Gorczewski, Kamil; Sokół, Maria

    2016-01-01

    [(11)C]-choline is an effective PET tracer used for imaging of neoplastic lesions and metastases of the prostate cancer. However, its production can be a challenge for manufacturers, as it has not yet been described in Polish or European pharmacopoeia. In this study the technical aspects of [(11)C]-choline production are described and detailed process parameters are provided. The quality control procedures for releasing [(11)C]-choline as solutio iniectabilis are also presented. The purity and quality of the radiopharmaceutical obtained according to the proposed method were find to be high enough to safely administrate the radiopharmaceutical to patients. Application of an automated synthesizer makes it possible to carry out the entire process of [(11)C]-choline production, isolation and purification within 20 minutes. It is crucial to maintain all aspects of the process as short as possible, since the decay half-time of carbon-11 is 20.4 minutes. The resulting radiopharmaceutical is sterile and pyrogen-free and of a high chemical, radiochemical, and radionuclide purity proved by chromatographic techniques. The yield of the process is up to 20%. [(11)C]-choline PET scanning can be used as accurate and effective diagnostic tool in all centers equipped with [(11)C]-target containing cyclotron.

  9. Synthesis, isolation and purification of [11C]-choline

    PubMed Central

    Jadwiński, Michał; Chmura, Agnieszka; Gorczewski, Kamil; Sokół, Maria

    2016-01-01

    [11C]-choline is an effective PET tracer used for imaging of neoplastic lesions and metastases of the prostate cancer. However, its production can be a challenge for manufacturers, as it has not yet been described in Polish or European pharmacopoeia. In this study the technical aspects of [11C]-choline production are described and detailed process parameters are provided. The quality control procedures for releasing [11C]-choline as solutio iniectabilis are also presented. The purity and quality of the radiopharmaceutical obtained according to the proposed method were find to be high enough to safely administrate the radiopharmaceutical to patients. Application of an automated synthesizer makes it possible to carry out the entire process of [11C]-choline production, isolation and purification within 20 minutes. It is crucial to maintain all aspects of the process as short as possible, since the decay half-time of carbon-11 is 20.4 minutes. The resulting radiopharmaceutical is sterile and pyrogen-free and of a high chemical, radiochemical, and radionuclide purity proved by chromatographic techniques. The yield of the process is up to 20%. [11C]-choline PET scanning can be used as accurate and effective diagnostic tool in all centers equipped with [11C]-target containing cyclotron. PMID:27660552

  10. Modification by choline of adrenergic transmission in rat mesenteric arteries

    PubMed Central

    Malik, K. U.; McGiff, J. C.

    1971-01-01

    1. The action of choline on the vasoconstrictor responses of the perfused mesenteric arteries of the rat to sympathetic nerve stimulation and to injected noradrenaline has been investigated. 2. The infusion of choline (500 μg/ml), for periods of 15 s, increased the response to sympathetic nerve stimulation, whereas the infusion of the same concentration for 20 min greatly reduced the response to nerve stimulation. Choline (up to 500 μg/ml), infused either for short or long periods, did not alter the response to injected noradrenaline. 3. The inhibitory action of choline on the response to nerve stimulation was abolished either by an increase in the calcium concentration from 1·8 to 5·4 mM or by simultaneous infusion of (+)-amphetamine or atropine. 4. The results suggest that choline in concentrations of 500 μg/ml has the same effect on adrenergic transmission in mesenteric arteries as acetylcholine at concentrations of 5 ng/ml. PMID:4339884

  11. Membrane transport mechanisms of choline in human intestinal epithelial LS180 cells.

    PubMed

    Horie, Asuka; Ishida, Kazuya; Watanabe, Yuri; Shibata, Kaito; Hashimoto, Yukiya

    2014-12-01

    The aim of the present study was to investigate the membrane transport mechanisms of choline using human intestinal epithelial LS180 cells. The mRNA of choline transporter-like proteins (CTLs) was expressed significantly in LS180 cells, and the rank order was CTL1 > CTL4 > CTL3 > CTL2 > CTL5. In contrast, the mRNA expression of other choline transporters, organic cation transporter (OCT) 1, OCT2 and high-affinity choline transporter 1 (CHT1), was considerably lower in LS180 cells. Five mm unlabelled choline, hemicolinium-3 and guanidine, but not tetraethylammonium, inhibited the cellular uptake of 100 µm choline in LS180 cells. The uptake of choline into LS180 cells was virtually Na(+)-independent. The uptake of choline was significantly decreased by acidification of the extracellular pH; however, it was not increased by alkalization of the extracellular pH. In addition, both acidification and alkalization of intracellular pH decreased the uptake of choline, indicating that the choline uptake in LS180 cells is not stimulated by the outward H(+) gradient. On the other hand, the uptake of choline was decreased by membrane depolarization along with increasing extracellular K(+) concentration. In addition, the Na(+)-independent uptake of choline was saturable, and the Km value was estimated to be 108 µm. These findings suggest that the uptake of choline into LS180 cells is membrane potential-dependent, but not outward H(+) gradient-dependent.

  12. Prenatal choline availability alters the context sensitivity of Pavlovian conditioning in adult rats.

    PubMed

    Lamoureux, Jeffrey A; Meck, Warren H; Williams, Christina L

    2008-12-01

    The effects of prenatal choline availability on Pavlovian conditioning were assessed in adult male rats (3-4 mo). Neither supplementation nor deprivation of prenatal choline affected the acquisition and extinction of simple Pavlovian conditioned excitation, or the acquisition and retardation of conditioned inhibition. However, prenatal choline availability significantly altered the contextual control of these learned behaviors. Both control and choline-deprived rats exhibited context specificity of conditioned excitation as exhibited by a loss in responding when tested in an alternate context after conditioning; in contrast, choline-supplemented rats showed no such effect. When switched to a different context following extinction, however, both choline-supplemented and control rats showed substantial contextual control of responding, whereas choline-deficient rats did not. These data support the view that configural associations that rely on hippocampal function are selectively sensitive to prenatal manipulations of dietary choline during prenatal development.

  13. Prenatal choline availability alters the context sensitivity of Pavlovian conditioning in adult rats

    PubMed Central

    Lamoureux, Jeffrey A.; Meck, Warren H.; Williams, Christina L.

    2008-01-01

    The effects of prenatal choline availability on Pavlovian conditioning were assessed in adult male rats (3–4 mo). Neither supplementation nor deprivation of prenatal choline affected the acquisition and extinction of simple Pavlovian conditioned excitation, or the acquisition and retardation of conditioned inhibition. However, prenatal choline availability significantly altered the contextual control of these learned behaviors. Both control and choline-deprived rats exhibited context specificity of conditioned excitation as exhibited by a loss in responding when tested in an alternate context after conditioning; in contrast, choline-supplemented rats showed no such effect. When switched to a different context following extinction, however, both choline-supplemented and control rats showed substantial contextual control of responding, whereas choline-deficient rats did not. These data support the view that configural associations that rely on hippocampal function are selectively sensitive to prenatal manipulations of dietary choline during prenatal development. PMID:19050158

  14. Nutrition in pregnancy: the argument for including a source of choline.

    PubMed

    Zeisel, Steven H

    2013-01-01

    Women, during pregnancy and lactation, should eat foods that contain adequate amounts of choline. A mother delivers large amounts of choline across the placenta to the fetus, and after birth she delivers large amounts of choline in milk to the infant; this greatly increases the demand on the choline stores of the mother. Adequate intake of dietary choline may be important for optimal fetal outcome (birth defects, brain development) and for maternal liver and placental function. Diets in many low income countries and in approximately one-fourth of women in high income countries, like the United States, may be too low in choline content. Prenatal vitamin supplements do not contain an adequate source of choline. For women who do not eat foods containing milk, meat, eggs, or other choline-rich foods, a diet supplement should be considered.

  15. Choline-sensing carbon paste electrode containing polyaniline (pani)-silicon dioxide composite-modified choline oxidase.

    PubMed

    Özdemir, Merve; Arslan, Halit

    2014-02-01

    In this study, a novel carbon paste electrode (CPE) was prepared using the salt form of polyaniline (pani)-silicon dioxide composite that is sensitive to choline. Choline oxidase (ChO) enzyme was immobilized to modified carbon paste electrode (MCPE) by cross-linking with glutaraldehyde. Determination of choline was carried out by the oxidation of enzymatically produced H2O2 at 0.4 V vs. Ag/AgCl. The effects of pH and temperature were investigated, and the optimum parameters were found to be 6.0 and 60°C, respectively. The linear working range of the electrode was 5.0 × 10(-7)-1.0 × 10(-5) M, R(2) = 0.922. The storage stability and operation stability of the enzyme electrode were also studied.

  16. Darmstoff analogues. 3. Actions of choline esters of acetal phosphatidic acids on visceral smooth muscle.

    PubMed

    Marx, M H; Wiley, R A; Satchell, D G; Maguire, M H

    1989-06-01

    A number of naturally occurring phospholipids, e.g. the acetal phosphatidic acid derivatives that comprise Darmstoff (1) and the phosphatidylcholine derivative platelet activating factor (PAF), cause contraction of certain visceral smooth muscles and cause platelet activation. Because the Darmstoff phosphatidic acids and PAF are structurally similar, it was of interest to compare the biological actions of choline esters of Darmstoff with those of PAF and of the parent Darmstoff phosphatidic acids. To this end, [(2-pentadecyl-1,3-dioxolan-4-yl)methyl]phosphocholine (3a), [[2-(cis-8-heptadecenyl)-1,3-dioxolan-4-yl]methyl]phosphocho line (3b), and [[2-(cis-8-pentadecenyl)-1,3-dioxolan-4-yl]methyl]phosphocho line (3c) were synthesized. Compounds 3a, 3b, 3c, and PAF caused dose-dependent relaxation of taenia coli strips. In contrast, the unesterified materials 1a and 1b, as well as lyso-PAF, caused contraction in taenia coli strips. Thus, the contractile effect of Darmstoff is reversed on esterification with choline. In preparations of whole trachea, both 1a and 3a had contractile effects similar to those of PAF.

  17. Next Generation of SiFAlin-Based TATE Derivatives for PET Imaging of SSTR-Positive Tumors: Influence of Molecular Design on In Vitro SSTR Binding and In Vivo Pharmacokinetics.

    PubMed

    Litau, S; Niedermoser, S; Vogler, N; Roscher, M; Schirrmacher, R; Fricker, G; Wängler, B; Wängler, C

    2015-12-16

    The Silicon-Fluoride-Acceptor (SiFA)-(18)F-labeling strategy has been shown before to enable the straightforward and efficient (18)F-labeling of complex biologically active substances such as proteins and peptides. Especially in the case of peptides, the radiolabeling proceeds kit-like in short reaction times and without the need of complex product workup. SiFA-derivatized, (18)F-labeled Tyr(3)-octreotate (TATE) derivatives demonstrated, besides strong somatostatin receptor (SSTR) binding, favorable in vivo pharmacokinetics as well as excellent tumor visualization by PET imaging. In this study, we intended to determine the influence of the underlying molecular design and used molecular scaffolds of SiFAlin-TATE derivatives on SSTR binding as well as on the in vivo pharmacokinetics of the resulting (18)F-labeled peptides. For this purpose, new SiFAlin-(Asp)n-PEG1-TATE analogs (where n = 1-4) were synthesized, efficiently radiolabeled with (18)F in a kit-like manner and obtained in radiochemical yields of 70-80%, radiochemical purities of ≥97%, and nonoptimized specific activities of 20.1-45.2 GBq/μmol within 20-25 min starting from 0.7-1.5 GBq of (18)F. In the following, the radiotracer's lipophilicities and stabilities in human serum were determined. Furthermore, the SSTR-specific binding affinities were evaluated by a competitive displacement assay on SSTR-positive AR42J cells. The obtained in vitro results support the assumption that aspartic acids are able to considerably increase the radiotracer's hydrophilicity and that their number does not affect the SSTR binding potential of the TATE derivatives. The most promising tracer (18)F-SiFAlin-Asp3-PEG1-TATE [(18)F]6 (LogD = -1.23 ± 0.03, IC50 = 20.7 ± 2.5 nM) was further evaluated in vivo in AR42J tumor-bearing nude mice via PET/CT imaging against the clinical gold standard (68)Ga-DOTATATE as well as the previously developed SiFAlin-TATE derivative [(18)F]3. The results of these evaluations showed that [(18)F

  18. Isolation and Characterization of Phosphatidyl Choline from Spinach Leaves.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Devor, Kenneth A.

    1979-01-01

    This inexpensive but informative experiment for undergraduate biochemistry students involves isolating phosphatidyl choline from spinach leaves. Emphasis is on introducing students to techniques of lipid extraction, separation of lipids, identification using thin layer chromatography, and identification of fatty acids. Three periods of three hours…

  19. Assay, Purification, and Partial Characterization of Choline Monooxygenase from Spinach.

    PubMed

    Burnet, M.; Lafontaine, P. J.; Hanson, A. D.

    1995-06-01

    The osmoprotectant glycine betaine is synthesized via the path-way choline -> betaine aldehyde -> glycine betaine. In spinach (Spinacia oleracea), the first step is catalyzed by choline monooxygenase (CMO), and the second is catalyzed by betaine aldehyde dehydrogenase. Because betaine aldehyde is unstable and not easily detected, we developed a coupled radiometric assay for CMO. [14C]Choline is used as substrate; NAD+ and betaine aldehyde dehydrogenase prepared from Escherichia coli are added to oxidize [14C]betaine aldehyde to [14C]glycine betaine, which is isolated by ion exchange. The assay was used in the purification of CMO from leaves of salinized spinach. The 10-step procedure included polyethylene glycol precipitation, polyethyleneimine precipitation, hydrophobic interaction, anion exchange on choline-Sepharose, dimethyldiethanolamine-Sepharose, and Mono Q, hydroxyapatite, gel filtration, and sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. Following gel filtration, overall purification was about 600-fold and recovery of activity was 0.5%. Sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis showed a polypeptide with a molecular mass of 45 kD. Taken with the value of 98 kD estimated for native CMO (R. Brouquisse, P. Weigel, D. Rhodes, C.F. Yocum, A.D. Hanson [1989] Plant Physiol 90: 322-329), this indicates that CMO is a homodimer. CMO preparations were red-brown, showed absorption maxima at 329 and 459 nm, and lost color upon dithionite addition, suggesting that CMO is an iron-sulfur protein.

  20. Nano interfaced biosensor for detection of choline in triple negative breast cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Thiagarajan, Vignesh; Madhurantakam, Sasya; Sethuraman, Swaminathan; Balaguru Rayappan, John Bosco; Maheswari Krishnan, Uma

    2016-01-15

    Choline, a type of Vitamin B, is an important nutrient in the human body and is involved in key metabolic pathways. Abnormal levels of choline leads to diseased conditions. The levels of choline and its associated compounds are found to be elevated in triple negative breast cancer (TNBC) patients. The choline level ranges from 0.4 to 4.9mmol/kg in TNBC. Thus the detection of choline levels in cells can aid in diagnosing breast cancer. The present work aims to develop a nano-interfaced electrochemical biosensor for the rapid detection of choline in cancer cells. For electrochemical detection, glassy carbon electrode coated with a zinc oxide nano-interface was used as the working electrode. Zinc oxide synthesized by hydrothermal method was characterized using SEM and XRD. The choline oxidase (ChOx) enzyme was immobilized on the nano-interface by drop-casting. Choline oxidase (ChOx) converts choline to betaine and H2O2 in the presence of oxygen. The H2O2 produced was determined amperometrically. The amount of H2O2 produced is directly proportional to concentration of choline present. The sensitivity, selectivity, stability and concentration studies were carried out and quantification of choline in TNBC was also carried out. The results demonstrate that this biosensor has the potential to be developed as a clinical tool for breast cancer detection. PMID:26476202

  1. Importance of choline as essential nutrient and its role in prevention of various toxicities.

    PubMed

    Biswas, Somava; Giri, Sarbani

    2015-01-01

    Choline is a water-soluble essential nutrient included as a member of the vitamin B12 group owing to its structural similarities with that of the other members of the group. Its roles and functions, however, extend much wider than that of the vitamins with which it is grouped. Choline is vital for maintenance of various key metabolic processes which play a role in the prevention or progression of various health impairments. The occurrence of diseases like neural tube defect (NTD) and Alzheimer's is prevented by the metabolic role of choline. It is also indispensable for mitigation of various forms of toxic contamination. While adequate level of choline in the body is essential, an excess of choline can result in various forms of disorder. To maintain the optimal level of choline in the body can be a challenge. The vital roles played by choline together with the range of contradictions and problems that choline presents make choline an interesting area of study. This paper attempts to summarize and review some recent publications on choline that have opened up new prospect in understanding the multiple role played by choline and in throwing light on the role played by this wonder essential nutrient in mitigating various forms of toxic contamination. PMID:25923965

  2. Mechanism of choline deficiency and membrane alteration in postural orthostatic tachycardia syndrome primary skin fibroblasts.

    PubMed

    Schenkel, Laila C; Singh, Ratnesh K; Michel, Vera; Zeisel, Steven H; da Costa, Kerry-Ann; Johnson, Amy R; Mudd, Harvey S; Bakovic, Marica

    2015-05-01

    Fibroblasts from a patient with postural orthostatic tachycardia syndrome (POTS), who presented with low plasma choline and betaine, were studied to determine the metabolic characteristics of the choline deficiency. Choline is required for the synthesis of the phospholipid phosphatidylcholine (PC) and for betaine, an important osmoregulator. Here, choline transport, lipid homeostasis, and mitochondria function were analyzed in skin fibroblasts from POTS and compared with control cells. The choline transporter-like protein 1/solute carrier 44A1 (CTL1/SLC44A1) and mRNA expression were 2-3 times lower in POTS fibroblasts, and choline uptake was reduced 60% (P < 0.05). Disturbances of membrane homeostasis were observed by reduced ratios between PC:phosphatidylethanolamine and sphingomyelin:cholesterol, as well as by modified phospholipid fatty acid composition. Choline deficiency also impaired mitochondria function, which was observed by a reduction in oxygen consumption, mitochondrial potential, and glycolytic activity. When POTS cells were treated with choline, transporter was up-regulated, and uptake of choline increased, offering an option for patient treatment. The characteristics of the POTS fibroblasts described here represent a first model of choline and CTL1/SLC44A1 deficiency, in which choline transport, membrane homeostasis, and mitochondrial function are impaired.

  3. Transport and phosphorylation of choline in higher plant cells. Phosphorus-31 nuclear magnetic resonance studies

    SciTech Connect

    Bligny, R.; Foray, M.F.; Roby, C.; Douce, R.

    1989-03-25

    When sycamore cells were suspended in basal medium containing choline, the latter was taken up by the cells very rapidly. A facilitated diffusion system appertained at low concentrations of choline and exhibited Michaelis-Menten kinetics. At higher choline concentrations simple diffusion appeared to be the principal mode of uptake. Addition of choline to the perfusate of compressed sycamore cells monitored by /sup 31/P NMR spectroscopy resulted in a dramatic accumulation of P-choline in the cytoplasmic compartment containing choline kinase and not in the vacuole. The total accumulation of P-choline over a 10-h period exhibited Michaelis-Menten kinetics. During this period, in the absence of Pi in the perfusion medium there was a marked depletion of glucose-6-P, and the cytoplasmic Pi resonance disappeared almost completely. When a threshold of cytoplasmic Pi was attained, the phosphorylation of choline was sustained by the continuous release of Pi from the vacuole although at a much lower rate. However, when 100 microM inorganic phosphate was present in the perfusion medium, externally added Pi was preferentially used to sustain P-choline synthesis. It is clear, therefore, that cytosolic choline kinase associated with a carrier-mediated transport system for choline uptake appeared as effective systems for continuously trapping cytoplasmic Pi including vacuolar Pi entering the cytoplasm.

  4. Choline Kinase β Mutant Mice Exhibit Reduced Phosphocholine, Elevated Osteoclast Activity, and Low Bone Mass*

    PubMed Central

    Kular, Jasreen; Tickner, Jennifer C.; Pavlos, Nathan J.; Viola, Helena M.; Abel, Tamara; Lim, Bay Sie; Yang, Xiaohong; Chen, Honghui; Cook, Robert; Hool, Livia C.; Zheng, Ming Hao; Xu, Jiake

    2015-01-01

    The maintenance of bone homeostasis requires tight coupling between bone-forming osteoblasts and bone-resorbing osteoclasts. However, the precise molecular mechanism(s) underlying the differentiation and activities of these specialized cells are still largely unknown. Here, we identify choline kinase β (CHKB), a kinase involved in the biosynthesis of phosphatidylcholine, as a novel regulator of bone homeostasis. Choline kinase β mutant mice (flp/flp) exhibit a systemic low bone mass phenotype. Consistently, osteoclast numbers and activity are elevated in flp/flp mice. Interestingly, osteoclasts derived from flp/flp mice exhibit reduced sensitivity to excessive levels of extracellular calcium, which could account for the increased bone resorption. Conversely, supplementation of cytidine 5′-diphosphocholine in vivo and in vitro, a regimen that bypasses CHKB deficiency, restores osteoclast numbers to physiological levels. Finally, we demonstrate that, in addition to modulating osteoclast formation and function, loss of CHKB corresponds with a reduction in bone formation by osteoblasts. Taken together, these data posit CHKB as a new modulator of bone homeostasis. PMID:25451916

  5. Transport and Metabolism of Radiolabeled Choline in Hepatocellular Carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Kuang, Yu; Salem, Nicolas; Corn, David J.; Erowku, Bernadette; Tian, Haibin; Wang, Fangjing; Lee, Zhenghong

    2010-01-01

    Objectives Altered choline (Cho) metabolism in cancerous cells can be used as a basis for molecular imaging with PET using radiolabeled Cho. In this study, the metabolism of tracer Cho was investigated in a woodchuck hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) cell line (WCH17) and in freshly-derived rat hepatocytes. The transporter responsible for [11C]-Cho uptake in HCC was also characterized in WCH17 cells. The study helped to define the specific mechanisms responsible for radio-Cho uptake seen on the PET images of primary liver cancer such as HCC. Methods Cells were pulsed with [14C]-Cho for 5 min and chased for varying durations in cold media to simulate the rapid circulation and clearance of [11C]-Cho. Radioactive metabolites were extracted and analyzed by radio-HPLC and radio-TLC. The Cho transporter (ChoT) was characterized in WCH17 cells. Results WCH17 cells showed higher 14C uptake than rat primary hepatocytes. [14C]-Phosphocholine (PC) was the major metabolite in WCH17. In contrast, the intracellular Cho in primary hepatocytes was found to be oxidized to betaine (partially released into media) and to a less degree, phosphorylated to PC. [14C]-Cho uptake by WCH17 cells was found to have both facilitative transport and non-facilitative diffusion components. The facilitative transport was characterized by Na+ dependence and low affinity (Km = 28.59 ± 6.75 μM) with partial energy dependence. In contrast, ChoT in primary hepatocytes is Na+ independent and low affinity. Conclusions Our data suggest that transport and phosphorylation of Cho are responsible for the tracer accumulation during [11C]-Cho PET imaging of HCC. WCH17 cells incorporate [14C]-Cho preferentially into PC. Conversion of [14C]-PC into phosphatidylcholine occurred slowly in vitro. Basal oxidation and phosphorylation activities in surrounding hepatic tissue contribute to the background seen in [11C]-Cho PET images. PMID:20698576

  6. Crystallization and preliminary X-ray diffraction studies of choline-binding protein F from Streptococcus pneumoniae

    SciTech Connect

    Molina, Rafael; González, Ana; Moscoso, Miriam; García, Pedro; Stelter, Meike; Kahn, Richard; Hermoso, Juan A.

    2007-09-01

    The modular choline-binding protein F (CbpF) from S. pneumoniae has been crystallized by the hanging-drop vapour-diffusion method. A SAD data set from a gadolinium-complex derivative has been collected to 2.1 Å resolution. Choline-binding protein F (CbpF) is a modular protein that is bound to the pneumococcal cell wall through noncovalent interactions with choline moieties of the bacterial teichoic and lipoteichoic acids. Despite being one of the more abundant proteins on the surface, along with the murein hydrolases LytA, LytB, LytC and Pce, its function is still unknown. CbpF has been crystallized using the hanging-drop vapour-diffusion method at 291 K. Diffraction-quality orthorhombic crystals belong to space group P2{sub 1}2{sub 1}2, with unit-cell parameters a = 49.13, b = 114.94, c = 75.69 Å. A SAD data set from a Gd-HPDO3A-derivatized CbpF crystal was collected to 2.1 Å resolution at the gadolinium L{sub III} absorption edge using synchrotron radiation.

  7. Effects of Maternal Choline Supplementation on the Septohippocampal Cholinergic System in the Ts65Dn Mouse Model of Down Syndrome.

    PubMed

    Kelley, Christy M; Ash, Jessica A; Powers, Brian E; Velazquez, Ramon; Alldred, Melissa J; Ikonomovic, Milos D; Ginsberg, Stephen D; Strupp, Barbara J; Mufson, Elliott J

    2016-01-01

    Down syndrome (DS), caused by trisomy of chromosome 21, is marked by intellectual disability (ID) and early onset of Alzheimer's disease (AD) neuropathology including hippocampal cholinergic projection system degeneration. Here we determined the effects of age and maternal choline supplementation (MCS) on hippocampal cholinergic deficits in Ts65Dn mice compared to 2N mice sacrificed at 6-8 and 14-18 months of age. Ts65Dn mice and disomic (2N) littermates sacrificed at ages 6-8 and 14-18 mos were used for an aging study and Ts65Dn and 2N mice derived from Ts65Dn dams were maintained on either a choline-supplemented or a choline-controlled diet (conception to weaning) and examined at 14-18 mos for MCS studies. In the latter, mice were behaviorally tested on the radial arm Morris water maze (RAWM) and hippocampal tissue was examined for intensity of choline acetyltransferase (ChAT) immunoreactivity. Hippocampal ChAT activity was evaluated in a separate cohort. ChAT-positive fiber innervation was significantly higher in the hippocampus and dentate gyrus in Ts65Dn mice compared with 2N mice, independent of age or maternal diet. Similarly, hippocampal ChAT activity was significantly elevated in Ts65Dn mice compared to 2N mice, independent of maternal diet. A significant increase with age was seen in hippocampal cholinergic innervation of 2N mice, but not Ts65Dn mice. Degree of ChAT intensity correlated negatively with spatial memory ability in unsupplemented 2N and Ts65Dn mice, but positively in MCS 2N mice. The increased innervation produced by MCS appears to improve hippocampal function, making this a therapy that may be exploited for future translational approaches in human DS. PMID:26391045

  8. High affinity choline uptake (HACU) and choline acetyltransferase (ChAT) activity in neuronal cultures for mechanistic and drug discovery studies

    PubMed Central

    Ray, Balmiki; Bailey, Jason A.; Simon, Jay R.; Lahiri, Debomoy K.

    2012-01-01

    Acetylcholine (ACh) is the neurotransmitter used by cholinergic neurons at the neuromuscular junction and in parasympathetic nerve terminals in the periphery, as well as important memory-related circuits in the brain and also takes part in several critical functions. ACh is synthesized from choline and acetyl coenzyme-A by the enzyme choline acetyltransferase (ChAT). The formation of acetylcholine in cholinergic nerve terminals requires both the transport of choline into the cells from the extracellular space, and the activity of ChAT. High affinity choline uptake (HACU) represents the majority of choline uptake into the nerve terminal, and is the acutely regulated, rate-limiting step in ACh synthesis. The HACU component of choline uptake can be differentiated from non-specific choline uptake by inhibition of the choline transporter with hemicholinium. Several methods have been described previously to measure HACU and ChAT simultaneously in synaptosomes, but a well-documented protocol for cultured cells is lacking. We describe a procedure to simultaneously measure HACU and ChAT in cultured cells by simple radionuclide-based techniques. In this procedure we have quantitatively determined HACU and ChAT activity in cholinergically differentiated human neuroblastoma (SK-N-SH) cells. These simple methods can be used for neurochemical and drug discovery studies relevant to several disorders including Alzheimer’s disease, myasthenia gravis, and cardiovascular disease. PMID:22752895

  9. Metabolomic profiling can predict which humans will develop liver dysfunction when deprived of dietary choline

    PubMed Central

    Sha, Wei; da Costa, Kerry-Ann; Fischer, Leslie M.; Milburn, Michael V.; Lawton, Kay A.; Berger, Alvin; Jia, Wei; Zeisel, Steven H.

    2010-01-01

    Choline is an essential nutrient, and deficiency causes liver and muscle dysfunction. Common genetic variations alter the risk of developing organ dysfunction when choline deficient, probably by causing metabolic inefficiencies that should be detectable even while ingesting a normal choline-adequate diet. We determined whether metabolomic profiling of plasma at baseline could predict whether humans will develop liver dysfunction when deprived of dietary choline. Fifty-three participants were fed a diet containing 550 mg choline/70 kg/d for 10 d and then fed <50 mg choline/70 kg/d for up to 42 d. Participants who developed organ dysfunction on this diet were repleted with a choline-adequate diet for ≥3 d. Plasma samples, obtained at baseline, end of depletion, and end of repletion, were used for targeted and nontargeted metabolomic profiling. Liver fat was assessed using magnetic resonance spectroscopy. Metabolomic profiling and targeted biochemical analyses were highly correlated for the analytes assessed by both procedures. In addition, we report relative concentration changes of other small molecules detected by the nontargeted metabolomic analysis after choline depletion. Finally, we show that metabolomic profiles of participants when they were consuming a control baseline diet could predict whether they would develop liver dysfunction when deprived of dietary choline.—Sha, W., da Costa, K., Fischer, L. M., Milburn, M. V., Lawton, K. A., Berger, A., Jia, W., Zeisel, S. H. Metabolomic profiling can predict which humans will develop liver dysfunction when deprived of dietary choline. PMID:20371621

  10. Influence of dietary protein and excess methionine on choline needs for young bobwhite quail

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Serafin, J.A.

    1982-01-01

    Experiments were conducted with young Bobwhite quail (Colinus virginianus) to investigate the effect of differing dietary protein levels and nondetrimental amounts of excess methionine on choline needs. Growth and feed consumption of quail fed an adequate (27.3%) protein purified diet supplemented with 2000 mg/kg of choline were unaffected by increasing the level of excess methionine to 1.75%; however, greater amounts (2.0%, 2.25%) of excess methionine depressed growth (P less than .01), reduced feed consumption (P less than .01), and decreased feed utilization (P less than .05). Quail fed a purified diet containing 13.85% protein and 515 mg/kg of choline grew poorly. Growth was unaffected by additional choline in this diet. Growth was suboptimal among quail fed purified diets containing adequate or high (41.55%) levels of protein in which choline was limiting; however, a high level of protein did not in itself affect performance. Growth was improved by supplemental choline in these diets. Growth of quail fed purified diets with up to 1.35% excess methionine which were limiting (531 mg/kg) in choline was less than that of groups fed 2000 mg/kg of added dietary choline (P less than .01); however, excess methionine did not significantly influence growth of quail fed choline-deficient diets. These experiments indicate that neither high dietary protein nor excess methionine, fed at non-growth-depressing levels, increases dietary choline needs for young Bobwhite quail.

  11. Comparative genomics and mutagenesis analyses of choline metabolism in the marine R oseobacter clade

    PubMed Central

    Lidbury, Ian; Kimberley, George; Scanlan, David J.; Murrell, J. Colin

    2015-01-01

    Summary Choline is ubiquitous in marine eukaryotes and appears to be widely distributed in surface marine waters; however, its metabolism by marine bacteria is poorly understood. Here, using comparative genomics and molecular genetic approaches, we reveal that the capacity for choline catabolism is widespread in marine heterotrophs of the marine Roseobacter clade (MRC). Using the model bacterium R uegeria pomeroyi, we confirm that the bet A, bet B and bet C genes, encoding choline dehydrogenase, betaine aldehyde dehydrogenase and choline sulfatase, respectively, are involved in choline metabolism. The bet T gene, encoding an organic solute transporter, was essential for the rapid uptake of choline but not glycine betaine (GBT). Growth of choline and GBT as a sole carbon source resulted in the re‐mineralization of these nitrogen‐rich compounds into ammonium. Oxidation of the methyl groups from choline requires formyltetrahydrofolate synthetase encoded by fhs in R . pomeroyi, deletion of which resulted in incomplete degradation of GBT. We demonstrate that this was due to an imbalance in the supply of reducing equivalents required for choline catabolism, which can be alleviated by the addition of formate. Together, our results demonstrate that choline metabolism is ubiquitous in the MRC and reveal the role of Fhs in methyl group oxidation in R . pomeroyi. PMID:26058574

  12. Comparative genomics and mutagenesis analyses of choline metabolism in the marine Roseobacter clade.

    PubMed

    Lidbury, Ian; Kimberley, George; Scanlan, David J; Murrell, J Colin; Chen, Yin

    2015-12-01

    Choline is ubiquitous in marine eukaryotes and appears to be widely distributed in surface marine waters; however, its metabolism by marine bacteria is poorly understood. Here, using comparative genomics and molecular genetic approaches, we reveal that the capacity for choline catabolism is widespread in marine heterotrophs of the marine Roseobacter clade (MRC). Using the model bacterium Ruegeria pomeroyi, we confirm that the betA, betB and betC genes, encoding choline dehydrogenase, betaine aldehyde dehydrogenase and choline sulfatase, respectively, are involved in choline metabolism. The betT gene, encoding an organic solute transporter, was essential for the rapid uptake of choline but not glycine betaine (GBT). Growth of choline and GBT as a sole carbon source resulted in the re-mineralization of these nitrogen-rich compounds into ammonium. Oxidation of the methyl groups from choline requires formyltetrahydrofolate synthetase encoded by fhs in R. pomeroyi, deletion of which resulted in incomplete degradation of GBT. We demonstrate that this was due to an imbalance in the supply of reducing equivalents required for choline catabolism, which can be alleviated by the addition of formate. Together, our results demonstrate that choline metabolism is ubiquitous in the MRC and reveal the role of Fhs in methyl group oxidation in R. pomeroyi. PMID:26058574

  13. The reaction of choline dehydrogenase with some electron acceptors.

    PubMed Central

    Barrett, M C; Dawson, A P

    1975-01-01

    1. The choline dehydrogenase (EC 1.1.99.1) WAS SOLUBILIZED FROM ACETONE-DRIED POWDERS OF RAT LIVER MITOCHONDRIA BY TREATMENT WITH Naja naja venom. 2. The kinetics of the reaction of enzyme with phenazine methosulphate and ubiquinone-2 as electron acceptors were investigated. 3. With both electron acceptors the reaction mechanism appears to involve a free, modified-enzyme intermediate. 4. With some electron acceptors the maximum velocity of the reaction is independent of the nature of the acceptor. With phenazine methosulphate and ubiquinone-2 as acceptors the Km value for choline is also independent of the nature of the acceptor molecule. 5. The mechanism of the Triton X-100-solubilized enzyme is apparently the smae as that for the snake venom solubilized enzyme. PMID:1218095

  14. The reaction of choline dehydrogenase with some electron acceptors.

    PubMed

    Barrett, M C; Dawson, A P

    1975-12-01

    1. The choline dehydrogenase (EC 1.1.99.1) WAS SOLUBILIZED FROM ACETONE-DRIED POWDERS OF RAT LIVER MITOCHONDRIA BY TREATMENT WITH Naja naja venom. 2. The kinetics of the reaction of enzyme with phenazine methosulphate and ubiquinone-2 as electron acceptors were investigated. 3. With both electron acceptors the reaction mechanism appears to involve a free, modified-enzyme intermediate. 4. With some electron acceptors the maximum velocity of the reaction is independent of the nature of the acceptor. With phenazine methosulphate and ubiquinone-2 as acceptors the Km value for choline is also independent of the nature of the acceptor molecule. 5. The mechanism of the Triton X-100-solubilized enzyme is apparently the smae as that for the snake venom solubilized enzyme.

  15. Postnatal choline supplementation in preweanling mice: sexually dimorphic behavioral and neurochemical effects.

    PubMed

    Ricceri, L; Berger-Sweeney, J

    1998-12-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of postnatal choline supplementation on neurochemical and behavioral parameters in preweanling BALB/cByJ mice. Mouse pups were injected daily subcutaneously with choline chloride (0.85 mM/g body weight) from Postnatal Day (PND) 1 to PND 16. Pups performed a passive avoidance (PA) learning task on PND 17-18 and a 30-min locomotor activity test on PND 19. The choline treatment affected retention of the PA task on PND 18. The treatment also increased locomotor activity in females, but not in males, on PND 19. Choline acetyltransferase (ChAT) enzymatic activity was measured on PND 20 and revealed that choline administration in the first 2 weeks of postnatal life selectively affects male pups. Choline's effect, as seen in previous rat experiments, was to decrease ChAT activity in the hippocampal region.

  16. Influence of chain length and double bond on the aqueous behavior of choline carboxylate soaps.

    PubMed

    Rengstl, Doris; Diat, Olivier; Klein, Regina; Kunz, Werner

    2013-02-26

    In preceding studies, we demonstrated that choline carboxylates ChC(m) with alkyl chain lengths of m = 12 - 18 are highly water-soluble (for m = 12, soluble up to 93 wt % soap and 0 °C). In addition, choline soaps are featured by an extraordinary lyotropic phase behavior. With decreasing water concentration, the following phases were found: micellar phase (L(1)), discontinuous cubic phase (I(1)' and I(1)"), hexagonal phase (H(1)), bicontinuous cubic phase (V(1)), and lamellar phase (L(α)). The present work is also focused on the lyotropic phase behavior of choline soaps but with shorter alkyl chains or different alkyl chain properties. We have investigated the aqueous phase behavior of choline soaps with C(8) and C(10) chain-lengths (choline octanoate and choline decanoate) and with a C(18) chain-length with a cis-double bond (choline oleate). We found that choline decanoate follows the lyotropic phase behavior of the longer-chain homologues mentioned above. Choline octanoate in water shows no discontinuous cubic phases, but an extended, isotropic micellar solution phase. In addition, choline octanoate is at the limit between a surfactant and a hydrotrope. The double bond in choline oleate leads also to a better solubility in water and a decrease of the solubilization temperature. It also influences the Gaussian curvature of the aggregates which results in a loss of discontinuous cubic phases in the binary phase diagram. The different lyotropic mesophases were identified by the penetration scan technique with polarizing light microscope and visual observations. To clarify the structural behavior small (SAXS) and wide (WAXS) angle X-ray scattering were performed. To further characterize the extended, isotropic micellar solution phase in the binary phase diagram of choline octanoate viscosity and conductivity measurements were also carried out.

  17. Rumen-protected choline: A significance effect on dairy cattle nutrition

    PubMed Central

    Jayaprakash, G.; Sathiyabarathi, M.; Robert, M. Arokia; Tamilmani, T.

    2016-01-01

    Choline is a vitamin-like substance it has multi-function in animal production, reproduction, and health. The transition period is most crucial stage in lactation cycle of dairy cows due to its association with negative hormonal and energy balances. Unfortunately, unprotected choline easily degrades in the rumen; therefore, choline added to the diet in a rumen-protected form. The use of rumen-protected choline (RPC) is a preventive measurement for the fatty liver syndrome and ketosis; may improve milk production as well as milk composition and reproduction parameters. This review summarizes the effectiveness of RPC on animal production, health, and reproduction.

  18. Choline requirements of White Pekin ducks from hatch to 21 days of age.

    PubMed

    Wen, Z G; Tang, J; Hou, S S; Guo, Y M; Huang, W; Xie, M

    2014-12-01

    A dose-response experiment with 8 dietary choline levels (302, 496, 778, 990, 1,182, 1,414, 1,625, and 1,832 mg/kg) was conducted with male White Pekin ducks to estimate the choline requirement from hatch to 21 d of age. Three hundred eighty-four 1-d-old male White Pekin ducks were randomly assigned to 8 dietary treatments, each containing 6 replicate pens with 8 birds per pen. At 21 d of age, weight gain, feed intake, and feed/gain from each pen were calculated for feeding period, and 2 ducks selected randomly from each pen were euthanized and the liver was collected to determine total lipids, triglycerides, and phospholipids. In our study, perosis, poor growth, and high liver fat were all observed in choline-deficient ducks and incidence of perosis was zero when dietary choline was 1,182 mg/kg. As dietary choline increased, the weight gain and feed intake increased linearly or quadratically (P < 0.05). On the other hand, as dietary choline increased, the total lipid and triglyceride in liver decreased linearly and liver phospholipid increased linearly (P < 0.05), and the lipotropic activity of choline may be associated with increasing phospholipid at a high dietary choline level. According to broken-line regression, the choline requirements for weight gain and feed intake were 810 and 823 mg/kg, respectively, but higher requirement should be considered to prevent perosis and excess liver lipid deposition completely.

  19. Rumen-protected choline: A significance effect on dairy cattle nutrition

    PubMed Central

    Jayaprakash, G.; Sathiyabarathi, M.; Robert, M. Arokia; Tamilmani, T.

    2016-01-01

    Choline is a vitamin-like substance it has multi-function in animal production, reproduction, and health. The transition period is most crucial stage in lactation cycle of dairy cows due to its association with negative hormonal and energy balances. Unfortunately, unprotected choline easily degrades in the rumen; therefore, choline added to the diet in a rumen-protected form. The use of rumen-protected choline (RPC) is a preventive measurement for the fatty liver syndrome and ketosis; may improve milk production as well as milk composition and reproduction parameters. This review summarizes the effectiveness of RPC on animal production, health, and reproduction. PMID:27651671

  20. Rumen-protected choline: A significance effect on dairy cattle nutrition.

    PubMed

    Jayaprakash, G; Sathiyabarathi, M; Robert, M Arokia; Tamilmani, T

    2016-08-01

    Choline is a vitamin-like substance it has multi-function in animal production, reproduction, and health. The transition period is most crucial stage in lactation cycle of dairy cows due to its association with negative hormonal and energy balances. Unfortunately, unprotected choline easily degrades in the rumen; therefore, choline added to the diet in a rumen-protected form. The use of rumen-protected choline (RPC) is a preventive measurement for the fatty liver syndrome and ketosis; may improve milk production as well as milk composition and reproduction parameters. This review summarizes the effectiveness of RPC on animal production, health, and reproduction. PMID:27651671

  1. 18F-Choline, 11C-choline and 11C-acetate PET/CT: comparative analysis for imaging prostate cancer patients.

    PubMed

    Brogsitter, Claudia; Zöphel, Klaus; Kotzerke, Jörg

    2013-07-01

    Prostate cancer (PCA) is the second most common tumour in men worldwide. Whereas prostate specific antigen (PSA) is an established biochemical marker, the optimal imaging method for all clinical scenarios has not yet been found. With the rising number of PET centres there is an increasing availability and use of (18)F-/(11)C-choline or (11)C-acetate for staging of PCA. However, to date no final conclusion has been reached as to whether acetate or choline tracers should be preferred. In this review we provide an overview of the performance of choline and acetate PET for staging the primary and recurrent disease and lymph nodes in PCA, based on the literature of the last 10 years. Although predominantly choline has been used rather than acetate, both tracers performed in a similar manner in published studies. Choline as well as acetate have insufficient diagnostic accuracy for the staging of the primary tumour, due to a minimum detectable tumour size of 5 mm and inability to differentiate PCA from benign prostate hyperplasia, chronic prostatitis and high-grade intraepithelial neoplasia. Regarding lymph node staging, choline tracers have demonstrated a high specificity. Unfortunately, the sensitivity is only moderate. For staging recurrent disease, sensitivity depends on the level of serum PSA (PSA should be >2 ng/ml). This applies to both choline and acetate. However, despite these limitations, a significant number of patients with recurrent disease can benefit from PET imaging by a change in treatment planning.

  2. Cellular accumulation of 18F-labelled boronophenylalanine depending on DNA synthesis and melanin incorporation: a double-tracer microautoradiographic study of B16 melanomas in vivo.

    PubMed

    Kubota, R; Yamada, S; Ishiwata, K; Tada, M; Ido, T; Kubota, K

    1993-04-01

    The cellular distribution of 4-borono-2-[18F]fluoro-L-phenylalanine ([18F]FBPA, an analog of p-boronophenylaline), a potential agent for boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT), and [6-3H]thymidine ([3H]Thd, a DNA precursor) in murine two B16 melanoma sublines and FM3A mammary carcinoma was studied in vivo using double-tracer microautoradiography. Tumour volume, tumour age, cell density in the tissues and the proportion of S phase cells in the cell cycle were the same in the three tumour models. Volume doubling time, which represents tumour growth rate, was fastest in B16F10, followed by B16F1 (P < 0.05), the slowest being in FM3A (P < 0.001). The rate of DNA synthesis in S phase cells corresponded to the volume doubling time. The greatest amount of [18F]FBPA was observed in S phase melanocytes and the lowest amount was found in non-S phase non-melanocytes. The [18F]FBPA accumulation was primarily related to the activity of DNA synthesis and, secondarily, to the degree of pigmentation in melanocytes. The therapeutic efficacy of BNCT with p-boronophenylalanine may be greater in melanoma that exhibits greater DNA synthesis activity and higher melanin content.

  3. Cellular accumulation of 18F-labelled boronophenylalanine depending on DNA synthesis and melanin incorporation: a double-tracer microautoradiographic study of B16 melanomas in vivo.

    PubMed Central

    Kubota, R.; Yamada, S.; Ishiwata, K.; Tada, M.; Ido, T.; Kubota, K.

    1993-01-01

    The cellular distribution of 4-borono-2-[18F]fluoro-L-phenylalanine ([18F]FBPA, an analog of p-boronophenylaline), a potential agent for boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT), and [6-3H]thymidine ([3H]Thd, a DNA precursor) in murine two B16 melanoma sublines and FM3A mammary carcinoma was studied in vivo using double-tracer microautoradiography. Tumour volume, tumour age, cell density in the tissues and the proportion of S phase cells in the cell cycle were the same in the three tumour models. Volume doubling time, which represents tumour growth rate, was fastest in B16F10, followed by B16F1 (P < 0.05), the slowest being in FM3A (P < 0.001). The rate of DNA synthesis in S phase cells corresponded to the volume doubling time. The greatest amount of [18F]FBPA was observed in S phase melanocytes and the lowest amount was found in non-S phase non-melanocytes. The [18F]FBPA accumulation was primarily related to the activity of DNA synthesis and, secondarily, to the degree of pigmentation in melanocytes. The therapeutic efficacy of BNCT with p-boronophenylalanine may be greater in melanoma that exhibits greater DNA synthesis activity and higher melanin content. Images Figure 1 PMID:8471428

  4. PET Imaging of Extracellular pH in Tumors with (64)Cu- and (18)F-Labeled pHLIP Peptides: A Structure-Activity Optimization Study.

    PubMed

    Demoin, Dustin Wayne; Wyatt, Linden C; Edwards, Kimberly J; Abdel-Atti, Dalya; Sarparanta, Mirkka; Pourat, Jacob; Longo, Valerie A; Carlin, Sean D; Engelman, Donald M; Andreev, Oleg A; Reshetnyak, Yana K; Viola-Villegas, Nerissa; Lewis, Jason S

    2016-09-21

    pH (low) insertion peptides (pHLIP peptides) target acidic extracellular environments in vivo due to pH-dependent cellular membrane insertion. Two variants (Var3 and Var7) and wild-type (WT) pHLIP peptides have shown promise for in vivo imaging of breast cancer. Two positron emitting radionuclides ((64)Cu and (18)F) were used to label the NOTA- and NO2A-derivatized Var3, Var7, and WT peptides for in vivo biodistribution studies in 4T1 orthotopic tumor-bearing BALB/c mice. All of the constructs were radiolabeled with (64)Cu or [(18)F]-AlF in good yield. The in vivo biodistribution of the 12 constructs in 4T1 orthotopic allografted female BALB/c mice indicated that NO2A-cysVar3, radiolabeled with either (18)F (4T1 uptake; 8.9 ± 1.7%ID/g at 4 h p.i.) or (64)Cu (4T1 uptake; 8.2 ± 0.9%ID/g at 4 h p.i. and 19.2 ± 1.8% ID/g at 24 h p.i.), shows the most promise for clinical translation. Additional studies to investigate other tumor models (melanoma, prostate, and brain tumor models) indicated the universality of tumor targeting of these tracers. From this study, future clinical translation will focus on (18)F- or (64)Cu-labeled NO2A-cysVar3. PMID:27396694

  5. PET Imaging of Extracellular pH in Tumors with 64Cu- and 18F-Labeled pHLIP Peptides: A Structure–Activity Optimization Study

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    pH (low) insertion peptides (pHLIP peptides) target acidic extracellular environments in vivo due to pH-dependent cellular membrane insertion. Two variants (Var3 and Var7) and wild-type (WT) pHLIP peptides have shown promise for in vivo imaging of breast cancer. Two positron emitting radionuclides (64Cu and 18F) were used to label the NOTA- and NO2A-derivatized Var3, Var7, and WT peptides for in vivo biodistribution studies in 4T1 orthotopic tumor-bearing BALB/c mice. All of the constructs were radiolabeled with 64Cu or [18F]-AlF in good yield. The in vivo biodistribution of the 12 constructs in 4T1 orthotopic allografted female BALB/c mice indicated that NO2A-cysVar3, radiolabeled with either 18F (4T1 uptake; 8.9 ± 1.7%ID/g at 4 h p.i.) or 64Cu (4T1 uptake; 8.2 ± 0.9%ID/g at 4 h p.i. and 19.2 ± 1.8% ID/g at 24 h p.i.), shows the most promise for clinical translation. Additional studies to investigate other tumor models (melanoma, prostate, and brain tumor models) indicated the universality of tumor targeting of these tracers. From this study, future clinical translation will focus on 18F- or 64Cu-labeled NO2A-cysVar3. PMID:27396694

  6. Structure-Activity Relationship of (18)F-Labeled Phosphoramidate Peptidomimetic Prostate-Specific Membrane Antigen (PSMA)-Targeted Inhibitor Analogues for PET Imaging of Prostate Cancer.

    PubMed

    Dannoon, Shorouk; Ganguly, Tanushree; Cahaya, Hendry; Geruntho, Jonathan J; Galliher, Matthew S; Beyer, Sophia K; Choy, Cindy J; Hopkins, Mark R; Regan, Melanie; Blecha, Joseph E; Skultetyova, Lubica; Drake, Christopher R; Jivan, Salma; Barinka, Cyril; Jones, Ella F; Berkman, Clifford E; VanBrocklin, Henry F

    2016-06-23

    A series of phosphoramidate-based prostate specific membrane antigen (PSMA) inhibitors of increasing lipophilicity were synthesized (4, 5, and 6), and their fluorine-18 analogs were evaluated for use as positron emission tomography (PET) imaging agents for prostate cancer. To gain insight into their modes of binding, they were also cocrystallized with the extracellular domain of PSMA. All analogs exhibited irreversible binding to PSMA with IC50 values ranging from 0.4 to 1.3 nM. In vitro assays showed binding and rapid internalization (80-95%, 2 h) of the radiolabeled ligands in PSMA(+) cells. In vivo distribution demonstrated significant uptake in CWR22Rv1 (PSMA(+)) tumor, with tumor to blood ratios of 25.6:1, 63.6:1, and 69.6:1 for [(18)F]4, [(18)F]5, and [(18)F]6, respectively, at 2 h postinjection. Installation of aminohexanoic acid (AH) linkers in the phosphoramidate scaffold improved their PSMA binding and inhibition and was critical for achieving suitable in vivo imaging properties, positioning [(18)F]5 and [(18)F]6 as favorable candidates for future prostate cancer imaging clinical trials. PMID:27228467

  7. 18F-Labeled NaF PET-CT in Detection of Bone Metastases in Patients With Preoperative Lung Cancer.

    PubMed

    Rao, Liangjun; Zong, Zhen; Chen, Zhifeng; Wang, Xiaoyan; Shi, Xinchong; Yi, Chang; Zhang, Xiangsong

    2016-04-01

    We compared the diagnostic accuracy of F-labeled sodium fluoride (F-NaF) PET-CT with 99m-technetium methylene diphosphonate (Tc-MDP) single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) to detect bone metastases (BMs) in patients with preoperative lung cancer. Patients with lung cancer (n = 181) were examined with F-NaF PET-CT, and another 167 patients with lung cancer were examined with Tc-MDP SPECT. F-NaF PET-CT and Tc-MDP SPECT were evaluated by 2 experienced readers. Lesions were graded on a scale of 0 (degenerative lesion) to 4 (definite BM), and equivocal lesions were determined as indifferent (grade 3). Based on patient-based analysis, there were only 4 equivocal patients in F-NaF PET-CT detection. However, in Tc-MDP SPECT detection, there were 19 equivocal patients, which indicated a significant difference in terms of occurrence ratio (χ = 9.005, P = 0.03). Sensitivity and specificity of PET-CT was significantly better than that of SPECT when equivocal reading was categorized as malignant or benign (P < 0.05). Based on lesions-based analysis, SPECT produced 26 equivocal lesions of 333 lesions, but PET-CT produced only 5 equivocal lesions of 991 lesions. PET-CT was significantly better than SPECT in the aspect of producing equivocal patients (χ = 58.141, P < 0.001). Sensitivity and specificity of PET-CT was significantly better than that of SPECT when equivocal reading was categorized as malignant or benign (P < 0.05). F-NaF PET-CT is a highly sensitive and specific modality for the detection of BM in patients with preoperative lung cancer. It is better than conventional Tc-MDP SPECT in detecting BM in patients with preoperative lung cancer.

  8. Synthesis and evaluation of (18)F-labeled bile acid compound: a potential PET imaging agent for FXR-related diseases.

    PubMed

    Jia, Lina; Jiang, Dawei; Hu, Pengcheng; Li, Xiao; Shi, Hongcheng; Cheng, Dengfeng; Zhang, Lan

    2014-07-01

    The farnesoid-X-receptor (FXR) is a member of the nuclear hormone receptor superfamily. The FXR has critical functions in maintaining bile acid synthesis and homeostasis, liver regeneration and tumorigenesis, intestinal diseases, intestinal tumorigenesis, cholesterol gallstone disease, cholestasis, and atherosclerosis. FXR expression is strongly downregulated in liver fibrosis, hepatocellular adenoma and hepatocellular carcinoma compared to expression levels in adjacent normal tissues. Chenodeoxycholic acid (CDCA) is the most potent physiological ligand for FXR. CDCA was radiolabeled with (18)F based on the efficiency click reaction of 1,3-dipolar cycloaddition of terminal alkynes and organic azides for noninvasively evaluating the relationship between FXR and FXR-related disease. The PET tracer [(18)F]8 was produced by 'click' labeling and showed a high non-decay corrected radiochemical yield (end of synthesis (EOS) yield=42±3% (n=5) from aqueous [(18)F]fluoride), high radiochemical purity ( >99%), and high specific activity (>320GBq/μmol). [(18)F]8 had a high metabolic stability in vitro and in vivo. PET imaging studies in nude mice indicated a rapid uptake of the tracer into liver tissue with uniform distribution of radioactivity in the liver. Significant accumulation of radioactivity was found in the liver, gallbladder, and intestine, while no obvious uptake was observed in other organs, such as the bladder, heart, and brain. Thus, this PET tracer represents a novel tool for early detection of abnormalities in the liver and staging of neoplasms.

  9. Radiosynthesis and evaluation of an 18F-labeled positron emission tomography (PET) radioligand for brain histamine subtype-3 receptors based on a nonimidazole 2-aminoethylbenzofuran chemotype

    PubMed Central

    Bao, Xiaofeng; Lu, Shuiyu; Liow, Jeih-San; Zoghbi, Sami S.; Jenko, Kimberly J.; Clark, David T.; Gladding, Robert L.; Innis, Robert B.; Pike, Victor W.

    2012-01-01

    A known chemotype of H3 receptor ligand was explored for development of a radioligand for imaging brain histamine subtype 3 (H3) receptors in vivo with positron emission tomography (PET), namely non-imidazole 2-aminoethylbenzofurans, represented by the compound (R)-(2-(2-(2-methylpyrrolidin-1-yl)ethyl)benzofuran-5-yl)(4-fluorophenyl)methanone (9). Compound 9 was labeled with fluorine-18 (t1/2= 109.7 min) in high specific activity by treating the prepared nitro analog (12) with cyclotron-produced [18F]fluoride ion. [18F]9 was studied with PET in mouse and in monkey after intravenous injection. [18F]9 showed favorable properties as a candidate PET radioligand, including moderately high brain uptake with a high proportion of H3 receptor-specific signal in the absence of radiodefluorination. The nitro compound 12 was found to have even higher H3 receptor affinity, indicating the potential of this chemotype for the development of further promising PET radioligands. PMID:22313227

  10. 18F-Labeled NaF PET-CT in Detection of Bone Metastases in Patients With Preoperative Lung Cancer.

    PubMed

    Rao, Liangjun; Zong, Zhen; Chen, Zhifeng; Wang, Xiaoyan; Shi, Xinchong; Yi, Chang; Zhang, Xiangsong

    2016-04-01

    We compared the diagnostic accuracy of F-labeled sodium fluoride (F-NaF) PET-CT with 99m-technetium methylene diphosphonate (Tc-MDP) single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) to detect bone metastases (BMs) in patients with preoperative lung cancer. Patients with lung cancer (n = 181) were examined with F-NaF PET-CT, and another 167 patients with lung cancer were examined with Tc-MDP SPECT. F-NaF PET-CT and Tc-MDP SPECT were evaluated by 2 experienced readers. Lesions were graded on a scale of 0 (degenerative lesion) to 4 (definite BM), and equivocal lesions were determined as indifferent (grade 3). Based on patient-based analysis, there were only 4 equivocal patients in F-NaF PET-CT detection. However, in Tc-MDP SPECT detection, there were 19 equivocal patients, which indicated a significant difference in terms of occurrence ratio (χ = 9.005, P = 0.03). Sensitivity and specificity of PET-CT was significantly better than that of SPECT when equivocal reading was categorized as malignant or benign (P < 0.05). Based on lesions-based analysis, SPECT produced 26 equivocal lesions of 333 lesions, but PET-CT produced only 5 equivocal lesions of 991 lesions. PET-CT was significantly better than SPECT in the aspect of producing equivocal patients (χ = 58.141, P < 0.001). Sensitivity and specificity of PET-CT was significantly better than that of SPECT when equivocal reading was categorized as malignant or benign (P < 0.05). F-NaF PET-CT is a highly sensitive and specific modality for the detection of BM in patients with preoperative lung cancer. It is better than conventional Tc-MDP SPECT in detecting BM in patients with preoperative lung cancer. PMID:27100456

  11. (11) C-labeled and (18) F-labeled PET ligands for subtype-specific imaging of histamine receptors in the brain.

    PubMed

    Funke, Uta; Vugts, Danielle J; Janssen, Bieneke; Spaans, Arnold; Kruijer, Perry S; Lammertsma, Adriaan A; Perk, Lars R; Windhorst, Albert D

    2013-01-01

    The signaling molecule histamine plays a key role in the mediation of immune reactions, in gastric secretion, and in the sensory system. In addition, it has an important function as a neurotransmitter in the central nervous system, acting in pituitary hormone secretion, wakefulness, motor and cognitive functions, as well as in itch and nociception. This has raised interest in the role of the histaminergic system for the treatment and diagnosis of various pathologies such as allergy, sleeping and eating disorders, neurodegeneration, neuroinflammation, mood disorders, and pruritus. In the past 20 years, several ligands targeting the four different histamine receptor subtypes have been explored as potential radiotracers for positron emission tomography (PET). This contribution provides an overview of the developments of subtype-selective carbon-11-labeled and fluorine-18-labeled compounds for imaging in the brain. Using specific radioligands, the H1 R expression in human brain could be examined in diseases such as schizophrenia, depression, and anorexia nervosa. In addition, the sedative effects of antihistamines could be investigated in terms of H1 R occupancy. The H3 R is of special interest because of its regulatory role in the release of various other neurotransmitters, and initial H3 R PET imaging studies in humans have been reported. The H4 R is the youngest member of the histamine receptor family and is involved in neuroinflammation and various sensory pathways. To date, two H4 R-specific (11) C-labeled ligands have been synthesized, and the imaging of the H4 R in vivo is in the early stage.

  12. Reusable electrochemical cell for rapid separation of [18F]fluoride from [18O]water for flow-through synthesis of 18F-labeled tracers

    PubMed Central

    Sadeghi, Saman; Liang, Vincent; Cheung, Shilin; Woo, Suh; Wu, Curtis; Ly, Jimmy; Deng, Yuliang; Eddings, Mark; van Dam, R. Michael

    2015-01-01

    A brass-platinum electrochemical micro flow cell was developed to extract [18F]fluoride from an aqueous solution and release it into an organic based solution, suitable for subsequent radio-synthesis, in a fast and reliable manner. This cell does not suffer electrode erosion and is thus reusable while operating faster by enabling increased voltages. By optimizing temperature, trapping and release potentials, flow rates, and electrode materials, an overall [18F]fluoride trapping and release efficiency of 84±5% (n=7) was achieved. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) was used to analyze electrode surfaces of various metal-metal systems and the findings were correlated with the performance of the electrochemical cell. To demonstrate the reactivity of the released [18F]fluoride, the cell was coupled to a flow-through reactor and automated synthesis of [18F]FDG with a repeatable decay-corrected yield of 56±4% (n=4) was completed in <15 min. A multi-human dose of 5.92 GBq [18F]FDG was also demonstrated. PMID:23474380

  13. Synthesis of isomers of 18F-labelled amino acid radiopharmaceutical: position 2- and 3-L-18F-alpha-methyltyrosine using a separation and purification system.

    PubMed

    Tomiyoshi, K; Amed, K; Muhammad, S; Higuchi, T; Inoue, T; Endo, K; Yang, D

    1997-02-01

    To diagnose cancers with radiolabelled amino acid using positron emission tomography, we have constructed a separation and purification system for the production of L-18F-alpha-methyltyrosine (L-18FAmT). This system could provide radioprotection and consistent production of L-18FAmT. L-18FAmT was synthesized and purified and the efficiency of the system was examined. The radiochemical yield of L-18FAmT was 20.3 +/- 5.1% (n = 5) based on the radioactivity trapped in the reaction vessel. The radiochemical purity was greater than 99.4 +/- 0.3% (n = 5). The radiochemical stability in phosphate-buffered saline and human plasma was examined and little decomposition was observed by HPLC analysis. Our results indicate that the separation and purification system gave simple and quick synthesis of L-18FAmT with a large reduction in radiation exposure and consistent production of L-18FAmT.

  14. Reduced MTHFD1 Activity in Male Mice Perturbs Folate- and Choline-Dependent One-Carbon Metabolism as Well as Transsulfuration12

    PubMed Central

    Field, Martha S.; Shields, Kelsey S.; Abarinov, Elena V.; Malysheva, Olga V.; Allen, Robert H.; Stabler, Sally P.; Ash, Jessica A.; Strupp, Barbara J.; Stover, Patrick J.; Caudill, Marie A.

    2013-01-01

    Impaired utilization of folate is caused by insufficient dietary intake and/or genetic variation and has been shown to prompt changes in related pathways, including choline and methionine metabolism. These pathways have been shown to be sensitive to variation within the Mthfd1 gene, which codes for a folate-metabolizing enzyme responsible for generating 1-carbon (1-C)–substituted folate derivatives. The Mthfd1gt/+ mouse serves as a potential model of human Mthfd1 loss-of-function genetic variants that impair MTHFD1 function. This study investigated the effects of the Mthfd1gt/+ genotype and folate intake on markers of choline, folate, methionine, and transsulfuration metabolism. Male Mthfd1gt/+ and Mthfd1+/+ mice were randomly assigned at weaning (3 wk of age) to either a control (2 mg/kg folic acid) or folate-deficient (0 mg/kg folic acid) diet for 5 wk. Mice were killed at 8 wk of age following 12 h of food deprivation; blood and liver samples were analyzed for choline, methionine, and transsulfuration biomarkers. Independent of folate intake, mice with the Mthfd1gt/+ genotype had higher hepatic concentrations of choline (P = 0.005), betaine (P = 0.013), and dimethylglycine (P = 0.004) and lower hepatic concentrations of glycerophosphocholine (P = 0.002) relative to Mthfd1+/+ mice. Mthfd1gt/+ mice also had higher plasma concentrations of homocysteine (P = 0.0016) and cysteine (P < 0.001) as well as lower plasma concentrations of methionine (P = 0.0003) and cystathionine (P = 0.011). The metabolic alterations observed in Mthfd1gt/+ mice indicate perturbed choline and folate-dependent 1-C metabolism and support the future use of Mthfd1gt/+ mice as a tool to investigate the impact of impaired 1-C metabolism on disease outcomes. PMID:23190757

  15. Choline Ameliorates Deficits in Balance Caused by Acute Neonatal Ethanol Exposure.

    PubMed

    Bearer, Cynthia F; Wellmann, Kristen A; Tang, Ningfeng; He, Min; Mooney, Sandra M

    2015-08-01

    Fetal alcohol spectrum disorder (FASD) is estimated to occur in 1 % of all live births. The developing cerebellum is vulnerable to the toxic effects of alcohol. People with FASD have cerebellar hypoplasia and developmental deficits associated with cerebellar injury. Choline is an essential nutrient, but many diets in the USA are choline deficient. In rats, choline given with or following alcohol exposure reduces many alcohol-induced neurobehavioral deficits but not those associated with cerebellar function. Our objective was to determine if choline supplementation prior to alcohol exposure would ameliorate the impact of ethanol on a cerebellar-associated behavioral test in mice. Pregnant C57Bl6/J mice were maintained on a choline-deficient diet from embryonic day 4.5. On postnatal day 1 (P1), pups were assigned to one of eight treatment groups: choline (C) or saline (S) pre-treatment from P1 to P5, ethanol (6 g/kg) or Intralipid(®) on P5, C and or S post-treatment from P6 to P20. On P30, balance and coordination were tested using the dowel crossing test. Overall, there was a significant effect of treatment and females crossed longer distances than males. Ethanol exposure significantly reduced the total distance crossed. Choline pre-treatment increased the distance crossed by males, and both pre- and post-treatment with choline significantly increased total distance crossed for females and males. There was no effect of choline on Intralipid®-exposed animals. This is the first study to show that choline ameliorates ethanol-induced effects on balance and coordination when given before ethanol exposure. Choline fortification of common foodstuffs may reduce the effects of alcohol.

  16. Dietary choline and betaine intakes vary in an adult multiethnic population.

    PubMed

    Yonemori, Kim M; Lim, Unhee; Koga, Karin R; Wilkens, Lynne R; Au, Donna; Boushey, Carol J; Le Marchand, Loïc; Kolonel, Laurence N; Murphy, Suzanne P

    2013-06-01

    Choline and betaine are important nutrients for human health, but reference food composition databases for these nutrients became available only recently. We tested the feasibility of using these databases to estimate dietary choline and betaine intakes among ethnically diverse adults who participated in the Multiethnic Cohort (MEC) Study. Of the food items (n = 965) used to quantify intakes for the MEC FFQ, 189 items were exactly matched with items in the USDA Database for the Choline Content of Common Foods for total choline, choline-containing compounds, and betaine, and 547 items were matched to the USDA National Nutrient Database for Standard Reference for total choline (n = 547) and 148 for betaine. When a match was not found, choline and betaine values were imputed based on the same food with a different form (124 food items for choline, 300 for choline compounds, 236 for betaine), a similar food (n = 98, 284, and 227, respectively) or the closest item in the same food category (n = 6, 191, and 157, respectively), or the values were assumed to be zero (n = 1, 1, and 8, respectively). The resulting mean intake estimates for choline and betaine among 188,147 MEC participants (aged 45-75) varied by sex (372 and 154 mg/d in men, 304 and 128 mg/d in women, respectively; P-heterogeneity < 0.0001) and by race/ethnicity among Caucasians, African Americans, Japanese Americans, Latinos, and Native Hawaiians (P-heterogeneity < 0.0001), largely due to the variation in energy intake. Our findings demonstrate the feasibility of assessing choline and betaine intake and characterize the variation in intake that exists in a multiethnic population.

  17. Choline deficiency increases lymphocyte apoptosis and DNA damage in humans2,3

    PubMed Central

    da Costa, Kerry-Ann; Niculescu, Mihai D; Craciunescu, Corneliu N; Fischer, Leslie M; Zeisel, Steven H

    2008-01-01

    Background: Whereas deficiency of the essential nutrient choline is associated with DNA damage and apoptosis in cell and rodent models, it has not been shown in humans. Objective: The objective was to ascertain whether lymphocytes from choline-deficient humans had greater DNA damage and apoptosis than did those from choline-sufficient humans. Design: Fifty-one men and women aged 18–70 y were fed a diet containing the recommended adequate intake of choline (control) for 10 d. They then were fed a choline-deficient diet for up to 42 d before repletion with 138–550 mg choline/d. Blood was collected at the end of each phase, and peripheral lymphocytes were isolated. DNA damage and apoptosis were then assessed by activation of caspase-3, terminal deoxynucleotide transferase–mediated dUTP nick end-labeling, and single-cell gel electrophoresis (COMET) assays. Results: All subjects fed the choline-deficient diet had lymphocyte DNA damage, as assessed by COMET assay, twice that found when they were fed the control diet. The subjects who developed organ dysfunction (liver or muscle) when fed the choline-deficient diet had significantly more apoptotic lymphocytes, as assessed by the activated caspase-3 assay, than when fed the control diet. Conclusions: A choline-deficient diet increased DNA damage in humans. Subjects in whom these diets induced liver or muscle dys-function also had higher rates of apoptosis in their peripheral lymphocytes than did subjects who did not develop organ dysfunction. Assessment of DNA damage and apoptosis in lymphocytes appears to be a clinically useful measure in humans (such as those receiving parenteral nutrition) in whom choline deficiency is suspected. PMID:16825685

  18. CHOLINE AMELIORATES DEFICITS IN BALANCE CAUSED BY ACUTE NEONATAL ETHANOL EXPOSURE

    PubMed Central

    Bearer, Cynthia F.; Wellmann, Kristen A.; Tang, Ningfeng; He, Min; Mooney, Sandra M.

    2015-01-01

    Fetal alcohol spectrum disorder (FASD) is estimated to occur in 1% of all live births. The developing cerebellum is vulnerable to the toxic effects of alcohol. People with FASD have cerebellar hypoplasia and developmental deficits associated with cerebellar injury. Choline is an essential nutrient but many diets in the USA are choline deficient. In rats, choline given with or following alcohol exposure reduces many alcohol-induced neurobehavioral deficits, but not those associated with cerebellar function. Our objective was to determine if choline supplementation prior to alcohol exposure would ameliorate the impact of ethanol on a cerebellar-associated behavioral test in mice. Pregnant C57Bl6/J mice were maintained on a choline deficient diet from embryonic day 4.5. On postnatal day 1 (P1), pups were assigned to one of 8 treatment groups: choline (C) or saline (S) pre-treatment from P1-5, ethanol (6 g/kg) or Intralipid® on P5, C or S post-treatment from P6-20. On P30, balance and coordination were tested using the dowel crossing test. Overall, there was a significant effect of treatment and females crossed longer distances than males. Ethanol exposure significantly reduced the total distance crossed. Choline pre-treatment increased the distance crossed by males, and both pre- and post-treatment with choline significantly increased total distance crossed for females and males. There was no effect of choline on Intralipid®-exposed animals. This is the first study to show that choline ameliorates ethanol-induced effects on balance and coordination when given before ethanol exposure. Choline fortification of common foodstuffs may reduce the effects of alcohol. PMID:26085462

  19. Effects of analogues of ethanolamine and choline on phospholipid metabolism in rat hepatocytes

    PubMed Central

    Åkesson, Björn

    1977-01-01

    1. Analogues of ethanolamine and choline were incubated with different labelled precursors of phospholipids and isolated hepatocytes and the effects on phospholipid synthesis were studied. 2. 2-Aminopropan-1-ol and 2-aminobutan-1-ol were the most efficient inhibitors of [14C]ethanolamine incorporation into phospholipids, whereas the incorporation of [3H]choline was inhibited most extensively by NN-diethylethanolamine and NN-dimethylethanolamine. 3. When the analogues were incubated with [3H]glycerol and hepatocytes, the appearance of 3H in unnatural phospholipids indicated that they were incorporated, at least in part, via CDP-derivatives. The distribution of [3H]glycerol among molecular species of phospholipids containing 2-aminopropan-1-ol and 1-aminopropan-2-ol was the same as in phosphatidylethanolamine. In other phospholipid analogues the distribution of 3H was more similar to that in phosphatidylcholine. 4. NN-Diethylethanolamine stimulated both the conversion of phosphatidylethanolamine into phosphatidylcholine and the incorporation of [Me-14C]methionine into phospholipids. Other N-alkyl- or NN-dialkyl-ethanolamines also stimulated [14C]methionine incorporation, but inhibited the conversion of phosphatidylethanolamine into phosphatidylcholine. This indicates that phosphatidyl-NN-diethylethanolamine is a poor methyl acceptor, in contrast with other N-alkylated phosphatidylethanolamines. 5. These results on the regulation of phospholipid metabolism in intact cells are discussed with respect to the possible control points. They also provide guidelines for future experiments on the manipulation of phospholipid polar-headgroup composition in primary cultures of hepatocytes. PMID:606244

  20. Prenatal Choline Availability Alters the Context Sensitivity of Pavlovian Conditioning in Adult Rats

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lamoureux, Jeffrey A.; Meck, Warren H.; Williams, Christina L.

    2008-01-01

    The effects of prenatal choline availability on Pavlovian conditioning were assessed in adult male rats (3-4 mo). Neither supplementation nor deprivation of prenatal choline affected the acquisition and extinction of simple Pavlovian conditioned excitation, or the acquisition and retardation of conditioned inhibition. However, prenatal choline…

  1. Choline uptake in Agrobacterium tumefaciens by the high-affinity ChoXWV transporter.

    PubMed

    Aktas, Meriyem; Jost, Kathinka A; Fritz, Christiane; Narberhaus, Franz

    2011-10-01

    Agrobacterium tumefaciens is a facultative phytopathogen that causes crown gall disease. For successful plant transformation A. tumefaciens requires the membrane lipid phosphatidylcholine (PC), which is produced via the methylation and the PC synthase (Pcs) pathways. The latter route is dependent on choline. Although choline uptake has been demonstrated in A. tumefaciens, the responsible transporter(s) remained elusive. In this study, we identified the first choline transport system in A. tumefaciens. The ABC-type choline transporter is encoded by the chromosomally located choXWV operon (ChoX, binding protein; ChoW, permease; and ChoV, ATPase). The Cho system is not critical for growth and PC synthesis. However, [14C]choline uptake is severely reduced in A. tumefaciens choX mutants. Recombinant ChoX is able to bind choline with high affinity (equilibrium dissociation constant [KD] of ≈2 μM). Since other quaternary amines are bound by ChoX with much lower affinities (acetylcholine, KD of ≈80 μM; betaine, KD of ≈470 μM), the ChoXWV system functions as a high-affinity transporter with a preference for choline. Two tryptophan residues (W40 and W87) located in the predicted ligand-binding pocket are essential for choline binding. The structural model of ChoX built on Sinorhizobium meliloti ChoX resembles the typical structure of substrate binding proteins with a so-called "Venus flytrap mechanism" of substrate binding. PMID:21803998

  2. Conversion of choline to phosphatidylcholine in the isolated-ventilated-perfused neonatal rabbit lung.

    PubMed

    Zachman, R D; Cotter, P W; Tsao, F H

    1983-01-01

    The isolated-ventilated-perfused neonatal rabbit lung model was used to study pulse dosed 14C-choline incorporation into 14C-phosphatidylcholine (PC) and 14C-disaturated phosphatidylcholine (DSPC). 14C-PC and 14C-DSPC synthesis were linearly dependent upon perfusion time to 30 min and upon the pulse dose of 14C-choline of 20-250 nmol at both 10 and 30 min of perfusion. 2-3% of the pulse-dosed choline was taken up by the lung. The water-soluble metabolites of choline found in lung after 10-30 min of perfusion were: choline, 50-60%; betaine 2.4-3.0%; phosphorylcholine, 26-41%, and CDP-choline, trace-10%. 1-day-old perfused lungs incorporated pulse-dosed 14C-choline into 14C-PC and 14C-DSPC at slightly higher rates than at 10 days old. Newborn rabbits receiving an intraperitoneal injection of 0.1 mg dexamethasone/100 g body weight 16 and 22 h prior to perfusion incorporated significantly more 14C-choline into 14C-PC and 14C-DSPC than saline-injected controls. PMID:6626622

  3. The association of serum choline with linear growth failure in young children from rural Malawi

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Choline is an essential nutrient for cell structure, cell signaling, neurotransmission, lipid transport, and bone formation. Choline can be irreversibly converted to betaine, a major source of methyl groups. Trimethylene N-oxide (TMAO), a proatherogenic molecule, is produced from the metabolism of d...

  4. Are dietary choline and betaine intakes determinants of total homocysteine concentration?

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Elevated homocysteine concentrations are associated with an increased risk of cardiovascular disease and a decline in cognitive function. Intakes of choline and betaine, as methyl donors, may affect homocysteine concentrations. The objective was to examine whether choline and betaine intakes, assess...

  5. Theoretical study on the structures and properties of mixtures of urea and choline chloride.

    PubMed

    Sun, Hui; Li, Yan; Wu, Xue; Li, Guohui

    2013-06-01

    In this work, we investigated in detail the structural characteristics of mixtures of choline chloride and urea with different urea contents by performing molecular dynamic (MD) simulations, and offer possible explanations for the low melting point of the eutectic mixture of choline chloride and urea with a ratio of 1:2. The insertion of urea molecules was found to change the density distribution of cations and anions around the given cations significantly, disrupting the long-range ordered structure of choline chloride. Moreover, with increasing urea concentration, the hydrogen bond interactions between choline cations and Cl(-) anions decreased, while those among urea molecules obviously increased. From the hydrogen bond lifetimes, it was found that a ratio of 1:2 between choline chloride and urea is necessary for a reasonable strength of hydrogen bond interaction to maintain the low melting point of the mixture of choline chloride with urea. In addition, it was also deduced from the interaction energies that a urea content of 67.7 % may make the interactions of cation-anion, cation-urea and anion-urea modest, and thus results in the lower melting point of the eutectic mixture of choline chloride and urea. The present results may offer assistance to some extent for understanding the physicochemical properties of the eutectic mixture of choline chloride and urea, and give valuable information for the further development and application of deep eutectic solvents. PMID:23435478

  6. What Choline Metabolism Can Tell Us About the Underlying Mechanisms of Fetal Alcohol Spectrum Disorders

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    The consequences of fetal exposure to alcohol are very diverse and the likely molecular mechanisms involved must be able to explain how so many developmental processes could go awry. If pregnant rat dams are fed alcohol, their pups develop abnormalities characteristic of fetal alcohol spectrum disorders (FASD), but if these rat dams were also treated with choline, the effects from ethanol were attenuated in their pups. Choline is an essential nutrient in humans, and is an important methyl group donor. Alcohol exposure disturbs the metabolism of choline and other methyl donors. Availability of choline during gestation directly influences epigenetic marks on DNA and histones, and alters gene expression needed for normal neural and endothelial progenitor cell proliferation. Maternal diets low in choline alter development of the mouse hippocampus, and decrement memory for life. Women eating low-choline diets have an increased risk of having an infant with a neural tube or or ofacial cleft birth defect. Thus, the varied effects of choline could affect the expression of FASD, and studies on choline might shed some light on the underlying molecular mechanisms responsible for FASD. PMID:21259123

  7. Choline Essentiality and Its Requirement in Diets for Juvenile Parrot Fish (Oplegnathus fasciatus)

    PubMed Central

    Khosravi, Sanaz; Jang, Ji-Woong; Rahimnejad, Samad; Song, Jin-Woo; Lee, Kyeong-Jun

    2015-01-01

    A 12-wk feeding trial was conducted to evaluate the essentiality of choline supplementation in diets for parrot fish. Five isonitrogenous and isocaloric diets were supplemented with 0 (as control), 500, 1,000, and 2,000 mg choline per kg diet, and a positive control diet without choline contained 0.3% of 2-amino-2-methyl-1-propanol as choline biosynthesis inhibitor (designated as Con, C500, C1000, C2000 and Con+, respectively). Triplicate groups of fish (body weight, 8.8±0.01 g) were fed one of the experimental diets at a rate of 4% body weight twice daily. The fish fed Con+ diet revealed significantly lower growth performance and feed utilization efficiency than other fish groups. Supplementation of choline to the basal diet did not significantly influence fish growth. The highest liver lipid content was observed in fish fed the Con+ diet and inversely correlated with liver choline concentration although the differences were not significant. Also, significantly higher liver linoleic, eicosapentaenoic and docosahexaenoic acid contents were found in fish fed the Con+ diet. Innate immune parameters including respiratory burst and myeloperoxidase activities were not significantly affected by dietary choline levels. The findings in this study conclude that choline concentration of approximately 230 mg kg−1 diet meets the requirement of parrot fish. PMID:25924958

  8. Determination of Cooking Yields and Nutrient Retention Factors of Choline in Meat Products

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    USDA’s recent research shows that meat products are good sources of choline. During cooking, nutrient levels are affected by moisture and fat losses and may be reduced by heating. To determine the impact of cooking on choline retention in meats, four nationwide composite samples of beef, bacon, cure...

  9. Moderate Perinatal Choline Deficiency Elicits Altered Physiology and Metabolomic Profiles in the Piglet.

    PubMed

    Getty, Caitlyn M; Dilger, Ryan N

    2015-01-01

    Few studies have evaluated the impact of dietary choline on the health and well-being of swine, and those pivotal papers were aimed at determining dietary requirements for sows and growing pigs. This is of importance as the piglet is becoming a widely accepted model for human infant nutrition, but little is known about the impacts of perinatal choline status on overall health and metabolism of the growing piglet. In the present study, sows were provided either a choline deficient (CD, 625 mg choline/kg dry matter) or choline sufficient (CS, 1306 mg choline/kg dry matter) diet for the last 65 d of gestation (prenatal intervention). Piglets were weaned from the sow 48 h after farrowing and provided either a CD (477 mg choline/kg dry matter) or CS (1528 mg choline/kg dry matter) milk replacer (postnatal intervention) for 29 ± 2 d, resulting in a factorial arrangement of 4 treatment (prenatal/postnatal) groups: CS/CS, CS/CD, CD/CS, and CD/CD. Piglet growth was normal for artificially-reared piglets, and was not impacted by perinatal choline status. Piglets receiving the postnatal CD treatment had lower (P < 0.01) plasma choline and choline-containing phospholipid concentrations and higher (P < 0.05) liver enzyme (alkaline phosphatase and gamma-glutamyl transferase) values compared with piglets receiving the postnatal CS treatment. Hepatic lipid content of piglets receiving the postnatal CD treatment was higher (P < 0.01) compared with piglets receiving the postnatal CS treatment. Additionally, postnatally CD piglets had lower (P = 0.01) plasma cholesterol than postnatally CS piglets. Brain development was also impacted by perinatal choline status, with brains of piglets exposed to prenatal CD being smaller (P = 0.01) than those of prenatally CS piglets. These findings support the hypothesis that the piglet is a sensitive model for choline deficiency during the perinatal period. In the present study, piglets exhibited similarities in health markers and metabolomic

  10. Moderate Perinatal Choline Deficiency Elicits Altered Physiology and Metabolomic Profiles in the Piglet

    PubMed Central

    Getty, Caitlyn M.; Dilger, Ryan N.

    2015-01-01

    Few studies have evaluated the impact of dietary choline on the health and well-being of swine, and those pivotal papers were aimed at determining dietary requirements for sows and growing pigs. This is of importance as the piglet is becoming a widely accepted model for human infant nutrition, but little is known about the impacts of perinatal choline status on overall health and metabolism of the growing piglet. In the present study, sows were provided either a choline deficient (CD, 625 mg choline/kg dry matter) or choline sufficient (CS, 1306 mg choline/kg dry matter) diet for the last 65 d of gestation (prenatal intervention). Piglets were weaned from the sow 48 h after farrowing and provided either a CD (477 mg choline/kg dry matter) or CS (1528 mg choline/kg dry matter) milk replacer (postnatal intervention) for 29 ± 2 d, resulting in a factorial arrangement of 4 treatment (prenatal/postnatal) groups: CS/CS, CS/CD, CD/CS, and CD/CD. Piglet growth was normal for artificially-reared piglets, and was not impacted by perinatal choline status. Piglets receiving the postnatal CD treatment had lower (P < 0.01) plasma choline and choline-containing phospholipid concentrations and higher (P < 0.05) liver enzyme (alkaline phosphatase and gamma-glutamyl transferase) values compared with piglets receiving the postnatal CS treatment. Hepatic lipid content of piglets receiving the postnatal CD treatment was higher (P < 0.01) compared with piglets receiving the postnatal CS treatment. Additionally, postnatally CD piglets had lower (P = 0.01) plasma cholesterol than postnatally CS piglets. Brain development was also impacted by perinatal choline status, with brains of piglets exposed to prenatal CD being smaller (P = 0.01) than those of prenatally CS piglets. These findings support the hypothesis that the piglet is a sensitive model for choline deficiency during the perinatal period. In the present study, piglets exhibited similarities in health markers and metabolomic

  11. Moderate Perinatal Choline Deficiency Elicits Altered Physiology and Metabolomic Profiles in the Piglet.

    PubMed

    Getty, Caitlyn M; Dilger, Ryan N

    2015-01-01

    Few studies have evaluated the impact of dietary choline on the health and well-being of swine, and those pivotal papers were aimed at determining dietary requirements for sows and growing pigs. This is of importance as the piglet is becoming a widely accepted model for human infant nutrition, but little is known about the impacts of perinatal choline status on overall health and metabolism of the growing piglet. In the present study, sows were provided either a choline deficient (CD, 625 mg choline/kg dry matter) or choline sufficient (CS, 1306 mg choline/kg dry matter) diet for the last 65 d of gestation (prenatal intervention). Piglets were weaned from the sow 48 h after farrowing and provided either a CD (477 mg choline/kg dry matter) or CS (1528 mg choline/kg dry matter) milk replacer (postnatal intervention) for 29 ± 2 d, resulting in a factorial arrangement of 4 treatment (prenatal/postnatal) groups: CS/CS, CS/CD, CD/CS, and CD/CD. Piglet growth was normal for artificially-reared piglets, and was not impacted by perinatal choline status. Piglets receiving the postnatal CD treatment had lower (P < 0.01) plasma choline and choline-containing phospholipid concentrations and higher (P < 0.05) liver enzyme (alkaline phosphatase and gamma-glutamyl transferase) values compared with piglets receiving the postnatal CS treatment. Hepatic lipid content of piglets receiving the postnatal CD treatment was higher (P < 0.01) compared with piglets receiving the postnatal CS treatment. Additionally, postnatally CD piglets had lower (P = 0.01) plasma cholesterol than postnatally CS piglets. Brain development was also impacted by perinatal choline status, with brains of piglets exposed to prenatal CD being smaller (P = 0.01) than those of prenatally CS piglets. These findings support the hypothesis that the piglet is a sensitive model for choline deficiency during the perinatal period. In the present study, piglets exhibited similarities in health markers and metabolomic

  12. Brucella abortus Synthesizes Phosphatidylcholine from Choline Provided by the Host

    PubMed Central

    Comerci, Diego J.; Altabe, Silvia; de Mendoza, Diego; Ugalde, Rodolfo A.

    2006-01-01

    The Brucella cell envelope is characterized by the presence of phosphatidylcholine (PC), a common phospholipid in eukaryotes that is rare in prokaryotes. Studies on the composition of Brucella abortus 2308 phospholipids revealed that the synthesis of PC depends on the presence of choline in the culture medium, suggesting that the methylation biosynthetic pathway is not functional. Phospholipid composition of pmtA and pcs mutants indicated that in Brucella, PC synthesis occurs exclusively via the phosphatidylcholine synthase pathway. Transformation of Escherichia coli with an expression vector containing the B. abortus pcs homologue was sufficient for PC synthesis upon induction with IPTG (isopropyl-β-d-thiogalactopyranoside), while no PC formation was detected when bacteria were transformed with a vector containing pmtA. These findings imply that Brucella depends on choline provided by the host cell to form PC. We could not detect any obvious associated phenotype in the PC-deficient strain under vegetative or intracellular growth conditions in macrophages. However, the pcs mutant strain displays a reproducible virulence defect in mice, which suggests that PC is necessary to sustain a chronic infection process. PMID:16484204

  13. Choline Acetyltransferase-Deficient Mutants of the Nematode CAENORHABDITIS ELEGANS

    PubMed Central

    Rand, James B.; Russell, Richard L.

    1984-01-01

    We have identified five independent allelic mutations, defining the gene cha-1, that result in decreased choline acetyltransferase (ChAT) activity in Caenorhabditis elegans. Four of the mutant alleles, when homozygous, lead to ChAT reductions of>98%, as well as recessive phenotypes of uncoordinated behavior, small size, slow growth and resistance to cholinesterase inhibitors. Animals homozygous for the fifth allele retain approximately 10% of the wild-type enzyme level; purified enzyme from this mutant has altered Km values for both choline and acetyl-CoA and is more thermolabile than the wild-type enzyme. These qualitative alterations, together with gene dosage data, argue that cha-1 is the structural gene for ChAT. cha-1 has been mapped to the left arm of linkage group IV and is within 0.02 map unit of the gene unc-17, mutant alleles of which lead to all of the phenotypes of cha-1 mutants except for the ChAT deficiency. Extensive complementation studies of cha-1 and unc-17 alleles reveal a complex complementation pattern, suggesting that both loci may be part of a single complex gene. PMID:6698395

  14. Labeled choline and phosphorylcholine: body distribution and brain autoradiography: concise communication

    SciTech Connect

    Friedland, R.P.; Mathis, C.A.; Budinger, T.F.; Moyer, B.R.; Rosen, M.

    1983-09-01

    Following intravenous injection of labeled choline or phosphorylcholine in rats and mice, the brain uptake as percent injected dose was less than 0.2% with 6-12% going to kidney and 3-6% to liver. A study of (/sup 14/C)choline autoradiography in a stump-tailed macaque demonstrated a five- to sixfold greater uptake in gray matter than in white matter. Dynamic positron imaging of (/sup 11/C)choline in a rhesus monkey demonstrated rapid brain uptake followed by rapid washout, with heavy late uptake in muscle. The use of labeled choline and choline analogs as imaging agents in human studies is constrained by the low brain uptake relative to extracerebral tissues.

  15. Labeled choline and phosphorylcholine: body distribution and brain autoradiography: concise communication

    SciTech Connect

    Friedland, R.P.; Mathis, C.A.; Budinger, T.F.; Moyer, B.R.; Rosen, M.

    1983-09-01

    Following intravenous injection of labeled choline or phosphorylcholine in rats and mice, the brain uptake as percent injected dose was less than 0.2% with 6 to 12% going to kidney and 3 to 6% to liver. A study of (/sup 14/C)choline autoradiography in a stump-tailed macaque demonstrated a five- to sixfold greater uptake in gray matter than in white matter. Dynamic positron imaging of (/sup 11/C) choline in a rhesus monkey demonstrated rapid brain uptake followed by rapid washout, with heavy late uptake in muscle. The use of labeled choline and choline analogs as imaging agents in human studies is constrained by the low brain uptake relative to extracerebral tissues.

  16. Structure and Function of CutC Choline Lyase from Human Microbiota Bacterium Klebsiella pneumoniae*

    PubMed Central

    Kalnins, Gints; Kuka, Janis; Grinberga, Solveiga; Makrecka-Kuka, Marina; Liepinsh, Edgars; Dambrova, Maija; Tars, Kaspars

    2015-01-01

    CutC choline trimethylamine-lyase is an anaerobic bacterial glycyl radical enzyme (GRE) that cleaves choline to produce trimethylamine (TMA) and acetaldehyde. In humans, TMA is produced exclusively by the intestinal microbiota, and its metabolite, trimethylamine oxide, has been associated with a higher risk of cardiovascular diseases. Therefore, information about the three-dimensional structures of TMA-producing enzymes is important for microbiota-targeted drug discovery. We have cloned, expressed, and purified the CutC GRE and the activating enzyme CutD from Klebsiella pneumoniae, a representative of the human microbiota. We have determined the first crystal structures of both the choline-bound and choline-free forms of CutC and have discovered that binding of choline at the ligand-binding site triggers conformational changes in the enzyme structure, a feature that has not been observed for any other characterized GRE. PMID:26187464

  17. Choline-based ionic liquids-enhanced biodegradation of azo dyes.

    PubMed

    Sekar, Sudharshan; Surianarayanan, Mahadevan; Ranganathan, Vijayaraghavan; MacFarlane, Douglas R; Mandal, Asit Baran

    2012-05-01

    Industrial wastewaters such as tannery and textile processing effluents are often characterized by a high content of dissolved organic dyes, resulting in large values of chemical and biological oxygen demand (COD and BOD) in the aquatic systems into which they are discharged. Such wastewater streams are of rapidly growing concern as a major environmental issue in developing countries. Hence there is a need to mitigate this challenge by effective approaches to degrade dye-contaminated wastewater. In this study, several choline-based salts originally developed for use as biocompatible hydrated ionic liquids (i.e., choline sacchrinate (CS), choline dihydrogen phosphate (CDP), choline lactate (CL), and choline tartarate (CT)) have been successfully employed as the cosubstrate with S. lentus in the biodegradation of an azo dye in aqueous solution. We also demonstrate that the azo dye has been degraded to less toxic components coupled with low biomass formation.

  18. Optimization of choline administration regimen for correction of cognitive functions in rats after brain injury.

    PubMed

    Guseva, M V; Kamenskii, A A; Gusev, V B

    2013-06-01

    Choline diet promotes improvement of the brain cognitive functions in rats with moderate-to-severe traumatic brain injury. In previous studies, the rats received choline being standard (0.2%) or choline-supplemented (2%) diet for 2 weeks prior to and 2 weeks after experimental brain injury. To the end of the experiments (in 4 weeks), the post-traumatic disturbances in the cognitive functions were observed in both groups, although they were less pronounced than in the rats kept on the choline-supplemented diet. Based on original mathematical model, this paper proposes a method to calculate the most efficient use of choline to correct the brain cognitive functions. In addition to evaluating the cognitive functions, the study assessed expression of α7 nicotinic acetylcholine receptors, the amount of consumed food and water, and the dynamics of body weight.

  19. The crystal structure of choline kinase reveals a eukaryotic protein kinase fold

    SciTech Connect

    Peisach, D.; Gee, P.; Kent, K.; Xu, Z.

    2010-03-08

    Choline kinase catalyzes the ATP-dependent phosphorylation of choline, the first committed step in the CDP-choline pathway for the biosynthesis of phosphatidylcholine. The 2.0 {angstrom} crystal structure of a choline kinase from C. elegans (CKA-2) reveals that the enzyme is a homodimeric protein with each monomer organized into a two-domain fold. The structure is remarkably similar to those of protein kinases and aminoglycoside phosphotransferases, despite no significant similarity in amino acid sequence. Comparisons to the structures of other kinases suggest that ATP binds to CKA-2 in a pocket formed by highly conserved and catalytically important residues. In addition, a choline binding site is proposed to be near the ATP binding pocket and formed by several structurally flexible loops.

  20. Live-cell vibrational imaging of choline metabolites by stimulated Raman scattering coupled with isotope-based metabolic labeling

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Fanghao; Wei, Lu; Zheng, Chaogu; Shen, Yihui

    2014-01-01

    Choline is a small molecule that occupies a key position in the biochemistry of all living organisms. Recent studies have strongly implicated choline metabolites in cancer, atherosclerosis and nervous system development. To detect choline and its metabolites, existing physical methods such as magnetic resonance spectroscopy and positron emission tomography, are often limited by the poor spatial resolution and substantial radiation dose. Fluorescence imaging, although with submicrometer resolution, requires introduction of bulky fluorophores and thus is difficult in labeling the small choline molecule. By combining the emerging bond-selective stimulated Raman scattering microscopy with metabolic incorporation of deuterated choline, herein we have achieved high resolution imaging of choline-containing metabolites in living mammalian cell lines, primary hippocampal neurons and multicellular organism C. elegans. Different subcellular distributions of choline metabolites are observed between cancer cells and non-cancer cells, which may reveal functional difference in the choline metabolism and lipid-mediated signaling events. In neurons, choline incorporation is visualized within both soma and neurites, where choline metabolites are more evenly distributed compared to the protein. Furthermore, choline localization is also observed in the pharynx region of C. elegans larvae, consistent with its organogenesis mechanism. These applications demonstrate the potential of isotope-based stimulated Raman scattering microscopy for future choline-related disease detection and development monitoring in vivo. PMID:24555181

  1. Feeding a diet devoid of choline to lactating rodents restricts growth and lymphocyte development in offspring.

    PubMed

    Lewis, E D; Goruk, S; Richard, C; Dellschaft, N S; Curtis, J M; Jacobs, R L; Field, C J

    2016-09-01

    The nutrient choline is necessary for membrane synthesis and methyl donation, with increased requirements during lactation. The majority of immune development occurs postnatally, but the importance of choline supply for immune development during this critical period is unknown. The objective of this study was to determine the importance of maternal supply of choline during suckling on immune function in their offspring among rodents. At parturition, Sprague-Dawley dams were randomised to either a choline-devoid (ChD; n 7) or choline-sufficient (ChS, 1 g/kg choline; n 10) diet with their offspring euthanised at 3 weeks of age. In a second experiment, offspring were weaned to a ChS diet until 10 weeks of age (ChD-ChS, n 5 and ChS-ChS, n 9). Splenocytes were isolated, and parameters of immune function were measured. The ChD offspring received less choline in breast milk and had lower final body and organ weight compared with ChS offspring (P<0·05), but this effect disappeared by week 10 with choline supplementation from weaning. ChD offspring had a higher proportion of T cells expressing activation markers (CD71 or CD28) and a lower proportion of total B cells (CD45RA+) and responded less to T cell stimulation (lower stimulation index and less IFN-γ production) ex vivo (P<0·05). ChD-ChS offspring had a lower proportion of total and activated CD4+ T cells, and produced less IL-6 after mitogen stimulation compared with cells from ChS-ChS (P<0·05). Our study suggests that choline is required in the suckling diet to facilitate immune development, and choline deprivation during this critical period has lasting effects on T cell function later in life. PMID:27480608

  2. Role for 11C-choline PET in active surveillance of prostate cancer

    PubMed Central

    Boychak, Oleksandr; Vos, Larissa; Makis, William; Buteau, Francois-Alexandre; Pervez, Nadeem; Parliament, Matthew; McEwan, Alexander J.B.; Usmani, Nawaid

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: Active surveillance (AS) is an increasingly popular management strategy for men diagnosed with low-risk indolent prostate cancer. Current tests (prostate-specific antigen [PSA], clinical staging, and prostate biopsies) to monitor indolent disease lack accuracy. 11C-choline positron emission tomography (PET) has excellent detection rates in local and distant recurrence of prostate cancer. We examine 11C-choline PET for identifying aggressive prostate cancer warranting treatment in the AS setting. Methods: In total, 24 patients on AS had clinical assessment and PSA testing every 6 months and 11C-choline PET and prostate biopsies annually. The sensitivity and specificity to identify prostate cancer and progressive disease (PD) were calculated for each 11C-choline PET scan. Results: In total, 62 biopsy-paired, serial 11C-choline PET scans were analyzed using a series of standard uptake value-maximum (SUVmax) cut-off thresholds. During follow-up (mean 25.3 months), 11 of the 24 low-risk prostate cancer patients developed PD and received definitive treatment. The prostate cancer detection rate with 11C-choline PET had moderate sensitivity (72.1%), but low specificity (45.0%). PD prediction from baseline 11C-choline PET had satisfactory sensitivity (81.8%), but low specificity (38.5%). The addition of clinical parameters to the baseline 11C-choline PET improved specificity (69.2%), with a slight reduction in sensitivity (72.7%) for PD prediction. Conclusions: Addition of 11C-choline PET imaging during AS may help to identify aggressive disease earlier than traditional methods. However, 11C-choline PET alone has low specificity due to overlap of SUV values with benign pathologies. Triaging low-risk prostate cancer patients into AS versus therapy will require further optimization of PET protocols or consideration of alternative strategies (i.e., magnetic resonance imaging, biomarkers). PMID:25844108

  3. Non-invasive in vivo imaging of early metabolic tumor response to therapies targeting choline metabolism.

    PubMed

    Mignion, Lionel; Danhier, Pierre; Magat, Julie; Porporato, Paolo E; Masquelier, Julien; Gregoire, Vincent; Muccioli, Giulio G; Sonveaux, Pierre; Gallez, Bernard; Jordan, Bénédicte F

    2016-04-15

    The cholinic phenotype, characterized by elevated phosphocholine and a high production of total-choline (tCho)-containing metabolites, is a metabolic hallmark of cancer. It can be exploited for targeted therapy. Non-invasive imaging biomarkers are required to evaluate an individual's response to targeted anticancer agents that usually do not rapidly cause tumor shrinkage. Because metabolic changes can manifest at earlier stages of therapy than changes in tumor size, the aim of the current study was to evaluate (1)H-MRS and diffusion-weighted MRI (DW-MRI) as markers of tumor response to the modulation of the choline pathway in mammary tumor xenografts. Inhibition of choline kinase activity was achieved with the direct pharmacological inhibitor H-89, indirect inhibitor sorafenib and down-regulation of choline-kinase α (ChKA) expression using specific short-hairpin RNA (shRNA). While all three strategies significantly decreased tCho tumor content in vivo, only sorafenib and anti-ChKA shRNA significantly repressed tumor growth. The increase of apparent-diffusion-coefficient of water (ADCw) measured by DW-MRI, was predictive of the induced necrosis and inhibition of the tumor growth in sorafenib treated mice, while the absence of change in ADC values in H89 treated mice predicted the absence of effect in terms of tumor necrosis and tumor growth. In conclusion, (1)H-choline spectroscopy can be useful as a pharmacodynamic biomarker for choline targeted agents, while DW-MRI can be used as an early marker of effective tumor response to choline targeted therapies. DW-MRI combined to choline spectroscopy may provide a useful non-invasive marker for the early clinical assessment of tumor response to therapies targeting choline signaling. PMID:26595604

  4. Feeding a diet devoid of choline to lactating rodents restricts growth and lymphocyte development in offspring.

    PubMed

    Lewis, E D; Goruk, S; Richard, C; Dellschaft, N S; Curtis, J M; Jacobs, R L; Field, C J

    2016-09-01

    The nutrient choline is necessary for membrane synthesis and methyl donation, with increased requirements during lactation. The majority of immune development occurs postnatally, but the importance of choline supply for immune development during this critical period is unknown. The objective of this study was to determine the importance of maternal supply of choline during suckling on immune function in their offspring among rodents. At parturition, Sprague-Dawley dams were randomised to either a choline-devoid (ChD; n 7) or choline-sufficient (ChS, 1 g/kg choline; n 10) diet with their offspring euthanised at 3 weeks of age. In a second experiment, offspring were weaned to a ChS diet until 10 weeks of age (ChD-ChS, n 5 and ChS-ChS, n 9). Splenocytes were isolated, and parameters of immune function were measured. The ChD offspring received less choline in breast milk and had lower final body and organ weight compared with ChS offspring (P<0·05), but this effect disappeared by week 10 with choline supplementation from weaning. ChD offspring had a higher proportion of T cells expressing activation markers (CD71 or CD28) and a lower proportion of total B cells (CD45RA+) and responded less to T cell stimulation (lower stimulation index and less IFN-γ production) ex vivo (P<0·05). ChD-ChS offspring had a lower proportion of total and activated CD4+ T cells, and produced less IL-6 after mitogen stimulation compared with cells from ChS-ChS (P<0·05). Our study suggests that choline is required in the suckling diet to facilitate immune development, and choline deprivation during this critical period has lasting effects on T cell function later in life.

  5. Tissue methionine cycle activity and homocysteine metabolism in female rats: impact of dietary methionine and folate plus choline.

    PubMed

    Wilson, Fiona A; van den Borne, Joost J G C; Calder, A Graham; O'Kennedy, Niamh; Holtrop, Grietje; Rees, William D; Lobley, Gerald E

    2009-04-01

    Impaired transfer of methyl groups via the methionine cycle leads to plasma hyperhomocysteinemia. The tissue sources of plasma homocysteine in vivo have not been quantified nor whether hyperhomocysteinemia is due to increased entry or decreased removal. These issues were addressed in female rats offered diets with either adequate or excess methionine (additional methyl groups) with or without folate and choline (impaired methyl group transfer) for 5 wk. Whole body and tissue metabolism was measured based on isotopomer analysis following infusion with either [1-(13)C,methyl-(2)H3]methionine or [U-(13)C]methionine plus [1-(13)C]homocysteine. Although the fraction of intracellular methionine derived from methylation of homocysteine was highest in liver (0.18-0.21), most was retained. In contrast, the pancreas exported to plasma more of methionine synthesized de novo. The pancreas also exported homocysteine to plasma, and this matched the contribution from liver. Synthesis of methionine from homocysteine was reduced in most tissues with excess methionine supply and was also lowered in liver (P<0.01) with diets devoid of folate and choline. Plasma homocysteine concentration (P<0.001) and flux (P=0.001) increased with folate plus choline deficiency, although the latter still represented <12% of estimated tissue production. Hyperhomocysteinemia also increased (P<0.01) the inflow of homocysteine into most tissues, including heart. These findings indicate that a full understanding of hyperhomocysteinemia needs to include metabolism in a variety of organs, rather than an exclusive focus on the liver. Furthermore, the high influx of homocysteine into cardiac tissue may relate to the known association between homocysteinemia and hypertension.

  6. A modified choline-deficient, ethionine-supplemented diet reduces morbidity and retains a liver progenitor cell response in mice.

    PubMed

    Passman, Adam M; Strauss, Robyn P; McSpadden, Sarah B; Finch-Edmondson, Megan L; Woo, Ken H; Diepeveen, Luke A; London, Roslyn; Callus, Bernard A; Yeoh, George C

    2015-12-01

    The choline-deficient, ethionine-supplemented (CDE) dietary model induces chronic liver damage, and stimulates liver progenitor cell (LPC)-mediated repair. Long-term CDE administration leads to hepatocellular carcinoma in rodents and lineage-tracing studies show that LPCs differentiate into functional hepatocytes in this model. The CDE diet was first modified for mice by our laboratory by separately administering choline-deficient chow and ethionine in the drinking water (CD+E diet). Although this CD+E diet is widely used, concerns with variability in weight loss, morbidity, mortality and LPC response have been raised by researchers who have adopted this model. We propose that these inconsistencies are due to differential consumption of chow and ethionine in the drinking water, and that incorporating ethionine in the choline-deficient chow, and altering the strength, will achieve better outcomes. Therefore, C57Bl/6 mice, 5 and 6 weeks of age, were fed an all-inclusive CDE diet of various strengths (67% to 100%) for 3 weeks. The LPC response was quantitated and cell lines were derived. We found that animal survival, LPC response and liver damage are correlated with CDE diet strength. The 67% and 75% CDE diet administered to mice older than 5 weeks and greater than 18 g provides a consistent and acceptable level of animal welfare and induces a substantial LPC response, permitting their isolation and establishment of cell lines. This study shows that an all-inclusive CDE diet for mice reproducibly induces an LPC response conducive to in vivo studies and isolation, whilst minimizing morbidity and mortality.

  7. Fluorescence of the Flavin group in choline oxidase. Insights and analytical applications for the determination of choline and betaine aldehyde.

    PubMed

    Ortega, E; de Marcos, S; Sanz-Vicente, I; Ubide, C; Ostra, M; Vidal, M; Galbán, J

    2016-01-15

    Choline oxidase (ChOx) is a flavoenzyme catalysing the oxidation of choline (Ch) to betaine aldehyde (BA) and glycine betaine (GB). In this paper a fundamental study of the intrinsic fluorescence properties of ChOx due to Flavin Adenine Dinucleotide (FAD) is presented and some analytical applications are studied in detail. Firstly, an unusual alteration in the excitation spectra, in comparison with the absorption spectra, has been observed as a function of the pH. This is ascribed to a change of polarity in the excited state. Secondly, the evolution of the fluorescence spectra during the reaction seems to indicate that the reaction takes place in two consecutive, but partially overlapped, steps and each of them follows a different mechanism. Thirdly, the chemical system can be used to determine the Ch concentration in the range from 5×10(-6)M to 5×10(-5)M (univariate and multivariate calibration) in the presence of BA as interference, and the joint Ch+BA concentration in the range 5×10(-6)-5×10(-4)M (multivariate calibration) with mean errors under 10%; a semiquantitative determination of the BA concentration can be deduced by difference. Finally, Ch has been successfully determined in an infant milk sample.

  8. Synthesis and evaluation of (18)F-trifluoroborate derivatives of triphenylphosphonium for myocardial perfusion imaging.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Zhengxing; Jenni, Silvia; Zhang, Chengcheng; Merkens, Helen; Lau, Joseph; Liu, Zhibo; Perrin, David M; Bénard, François; Lin, Kuo-Shyan

    2016-04-01

    Four trifluoroborate derivatives of phosphonium cations 2a-d were radiolabeled with fluorine-18 ((18)F) and evaluated for imaging myocardial perfusion with positron emission tomography (PET). Tracers were radiolabeled simply via (18)F-(19)F isotope exchange reaction in acidic (pH 2) aqueous solution. On average, [(18)F]2a-d were obtained in 10-17% non-decay-corrected radiochemical yield with 25.9-48.1GBq/μmol specific activity, and >96% radiochemical purity. In vitro stability study showed no decomposition of [(18)F]2a-d after being incubated in mouse plasma for up to 2h. Myocardial uptake in mice was visualized in PET images by using [(18)F]2b-d but not [(18)F]2a. [(18)F]2a-d were stable against in vivo defluorination as no significant bone uptake was observed. Despite sub-optimal heart uptake of [(18)F]2b-d, we successfully demonstrated that (18)F-(19)F isotope exchange reaction on trifluoroborates could be a promising strategy for the design of potential (18)F-labeled tracers even for intracellular targets.

  9. Maternal dietary intake of choline in mice regulates development of the cerebral cortex in the offspring.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yanyan; Surzenko, Natalia; Friday, Walter B; Zeisel, Steven H

    2016-04-01

    Maternal diets low in choline, an essential nutrient, increase the risk of neural tube defects and lead to low performance on cognitive tests in children. However, the consequences of maternal dietary choline deficiency for the development and structural organization of the cerebral cortex remain unknown. In this study, we fed mouse dams either control (CT) or low-choline (LC) diets and investigated the effects of choline on cortical development in the offspring. As a result of a low choline supply between embryonic day (E)11 and E17 of gestation, the number of 2 types of cortical neural progenitor cells (NPCs)-radial glial cells and intermediate progenitor cells-was reduced in fetal brains (P< 0.01). Furthermore, the number of upper layer cortical neurons was decreased in the offspring of dams fed an LC diet at both E17 (P< 0.001) and 4 mo of age (P< 0.001). These effects of LC maternal diet were mediated by a decrease in epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) signaling in NPCs related to the disruption of EGFR posttranscriptional regulation. Our findings describe a novel mechanism whereby low maternal dietary intake of choline alters brain development.-Wang, Y., Surzenko, N., Friday, W. B., Zeisel, S. H. Maternal dietary intake of choline in mice regulates development of the cerebral cortex in the offspring. PMID:26700730

  10. The fetal origins of memory: the role of dietary choline in optimal brain development.

    PubMed

    Zeisel, Steven H

    2006-11-01

    Fetal nutrition sets the stage for organ function in later life. In this review we discuss the fetal and neonatal origins of brain function. Numerous research observations point to the importance of choline for the developing fetus and neonate. This essential nutrient is involved in 1-carbon metabolism and is the precursor for many important compounds, including phospholipids, acetylcholine, and the methyl donor betaine. Dietary intake of choline by the pregnant mother and later by the infant directly affects brain development and results in permanent changes in brain function. In rodents, perinatal supplementation of choline enhances memory and learning functions, changes that endure across the lifespan. Conversely, choline deficiency during these sensitive periods results in memory and cognitive deficits that also persist. Furthermore, recent studies suggest that perinatal choline supplementation can reduce the behavioral effects of prenatal stress and the cognitive effects of prenatal alcohol exposure in offspring. The likely mechanism for these effects of choline involves DNA methylation, altered gene expression, and associated changes in stem cell proliferation and differentiation. The currently available animal data on choline and hippocampal development are compelling, but studies are needed to determine whether the same is true in humans. PMID:17212955

  11. No Acute Effects of Choline Bitartrate Food Supplements on Memory in Healthy, Young, Human Adults

    PubMed Central

    Lippelt, D. P.; van der Kint, S.; van Herk, K.; Naber, M.

    2016-01-01

    Choline is a dietary component and precursor of acetylcholine, a crucial neurotransmitter for memory-related brain functions. In two double-blind, placebo-controlled cross-over experiments, we investigated whether the food supplement choline bitartrate improved declarative memory and working memory in healthy, young students one to two hours after supplementation. In experiment 1, 28 participants performed a visuospatial working memory task. In experiment 2, 26 participants performed a declarative picture memorization task. In experiment 3, 40 participants performed a verbal working memory task in addition to the visuospatial working memory and declarative picture task. All tasks were conducted approximately 60 minutes after the ingestion of 2.0–2.5g of either choline bitartrate or placebo. We found that choline did not significantly enhance memory performance during any of the tasks. The null hypothesis that choline does not improve memory performance as compared to placebo was strongly supported by Bayesian statistics. These results are in contrast with animal studies suggesting that choline supplementation boosts memory performance and learning. We conclude that choline likely has no acute effects on cholinergic memory functions in healthy human participants. PMID:27341028

  12. Choline and betaine consumption lowers cancer risk: a meta-analysis of epidemiologic studies

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Shanwen; Li, Xiao; Ren, Anjing; Du, Mulong; Du, Haina; Shu, Yongqian; Zhu, Lingjun; Wang, Wei

    2016-01-01

    A number of human and animal in vitro or in vivo studies have investigated the relationship between dietary choline and betaine and cancer risk, suggesting that choline and betaine consumption may be protective for cancer. There are also a few epidemiologic studies exploring this relationship, however, with inconsistent conclusions. The PubMed and Embase were searched, from their inception to March 2016, to identify relevant studies and we brought 11 articles into this meta-analysis eventually. The pooled relative risks (RRs) of cancer for the highest versus the lowest range were 0.82 (95% CI, 0.70 to 0.97) for choline consumption only, 0.86 (95%CI, 0.76 to 0.97) for betaine consumption only and 0.60 (95%CI, 0.40 to 0.90) for choline plus betaine consumption, respectively. Significant protective effect of dietary choline and betaine for cancer was observed when stratified by study design, location, cancer type, publication year, sex and quality score of study. An increment of 100 mg/day of choline plus betaine intake helped reduce cancer incidence by 11% (0.89, 95% CI, 0.87 to 0.92) through a dose-response analysis. To conclude, choline and betaine consumption lowers cancer incidence in this meta-analysis, but further studies are warranted to verify the results. PMID:27759060

  13. Anaerobic choline metabolism in microcompartments promotes growth and swarming of P roteus mirabilis

    PubMed Central

    Jameson, Eleanor; Fu, Tiantian; Brown, Ian R.; Paszkiewicz, Konrad; Purdy, Kevin J.

    2015-01-01

    Summary Gammaproteobacteria are important gut microbes but only persist at low levels in the healthy gut. The ecology of G ammaproteobacteria in the gut environment is poorly understood. Here, we demonstrate that choline is an important growth substrate for representatives of G ammaproteobacteria. Using P roteus mirabilis as a model, we investigate the role of choline metabolism and demonstrate that the cut C gene, encoding a choline‐trimethylamine lyase, is essential for choline degradation to trimethylamine by targeted mutagenesis of cut C and subsequent complementation experiments. P roteus mirabilis can rapidly utilize choline to enhance growth rate and cell yield in broth culture. Importantly, choline also enhances swarming‐associated colony expansion of P . mirabilis under anaerobic conditions on a solid surface. Comparative transcriptomics demonstrated that choline not only induces choline‐trimethylamine lyase but also genes encoding shell proteins for the formation of bacterial microcompartments. Subsequent analyses by transmission electron microscopy confirmed the presence of such novel microcompartments in cells cultivated in liquid broth and hyper‐flagellated swarmer cells from solid medium. Together, our study reveals choline metabolism as an adaptation strategy for P . mirabilis and contributes to better understand the ecology of this bacterium in health and disease. PMID:26404097

  14. Choline supplementation in children with fetal alcohol spectrum disorders has high feasibility and tolerability.

    PubMed

    Wozniak, Jeffrey R; Fuglestad, Anita J; Eckerle, Judith K; Kroupina, Maria G; Miller, Neely C; Boys, Christopher J; Brearley, Ann M; Fink, Birgit A; Hoecker, Heather L; Zeisel, Steven H; Georgieff, Michael K

    2013-11-01

    There are no biological treatments for fetal alcohol spectrum disorders (FASDs), lifelong conditions associated with physical anomalies, brain damage, and neurocognitive abnormalities. In preclinical studies, choline partially ameliorates memory and learning deficits from prenatal alcohol exposure. This phase I pilot study evaluated the feasibility, tolerability, and potential adverse effects of choline supplementation in children with FASD. We hypothesized that choline would be well tolerated with minimal adverse events. The study design was a double-blind, randomized, placebo-controlled trial. Participants included 20 children aged 2.5 to 4.9 years with prenatal alcohol exposure and FASD diagnoses. Participants were randomly assigned to 500 mg choline or placebo daily for 9 months (10 active, 10 placebo). Primary outcome measures included feasibility, tolerability, adverse effects, and serum choline levels. Seventeen participants completed the study. Compliance was 82% to 87%, as evidenced by parent-completed log sheets and dose counts. Periodic 24-hour dietary recalls showed no evidence of dietary confounding. Adverse events were minimal and were equivalent in the active and placebo arms with the exception of fishy body odor, which occurred only in the active group. There were no serious adverse events to research participants. This phase I pilot study demonstrates that choline supplementation at 500 mg/d for 9 months in children aged 2 to 5 years is feasible and has high tolerability. Further examination of the efficacy of choline supplementation in FASD is currently underway.

  15. No Acute Effects of Choline Bitartrate Food Supplements on Memory in Healthy, Young, Human Adults.

    PubMed

    Lippelt, D P; van der Kint, S; van Herk, K; Naber, M

    2016-01-01

    Choline is a dietary component and precursor of acetylcholine, a crucial neurotransmitter for memory-related brain functions. In two double-blind, placebo-controlled cross-over experiments, we investigated whether the food supplement choline bitartrate improved declarative memory and working memory in healthy, young students one to two hours after supplementation. In experiment 1, 28 participants performed a visuospatial working memory task. In experiment 2, 26 participants performed a declarative picture memorization task. In experiment 3, 40 participants performed a verbal working memory task in addition to the visuospatial working memory and declarative picture task. All tasks were conducted approximately 60 minutes after the ingestion of 2.0-2.5g of either choline bitartrate or placebo. We found that choline did not significantly enhance memory performance during any of the tasks. The null hypothesis that choline does not improve memory performance as compared to placebo was strongly supported by Bayesian statistics. These results are in contrast with animal studies suggesting that choline supplementation boosts memory performance and learning. We conclude that choline likely has no acute effects on cholinergic memory functions in healthy human participants.

  16. ELUCIDATION OF HUMAN CHOLINE KINASE CRYSTAL STRUCTURES IN COMPLEX WITH THE PRODUCTS ADP OR PHOSPHOCHOLINE

    PubMed Central

    Malito, Enrico; Sekulic, Nikolina; Too, Wei Cun See; Konrad, Manfred; Lavie, Arnon

    2006-01-01

    Summary Choline kinase, responsible for the phosphorylation of choline to phosphocholine as the first step of the CDP-choline pathway for the biosynthesis of phosphatidylcholine, has been recognized as a new target for anticancer therapy. Crystal structures of human choline kinase in its apo, ADP- and phosphocholine-bound complexes, respectively, reveal the molecular details of the substrate binding sites. ATP binds in a cavity where residues from both the N- and C-terminal lobes contribute to form a cleft, while the choline-binding site constitutes a deep hydrophobic groove in the C-terminal domain with a rim composed of negatively charged residues. Upon binding of choline, the enzyme undergoes conformational changes independently affecting the N-terminal domain and the ATP-binding loop. From this structural analysis and comparison with other kinases, and from mutagenesis data on the homologous C. elegans choline kinase, a model of the ternary ADP·Phosphocholine complex was built that reveals the molecular basis for the phosphoryl transfer activity of this enzyme. PMID:17007874

  17. Elucidation of human choline kinase crystal structures in complex with the products ADP or phosphocholine.

    PubMed

    Malito, Enrico; Sekulic, Nikolina; Too, Wei Cun See; Konrad, Manfred; Lavie, Arnon

    2006-11-24

    Choline kinase, responsible for the phosphorylation of choline to phosphocholine as the first step of the CDP-choline pathway for the biosynthesis of phosphatidylcholine, has been recognized as a new target for anticancer therapy. Crystal structures of human choline kinase in its apo, ADP and phosphocholine-bound complexes, respectively, reveal the molecular details of the substrate binding sites. ATP binds in a cavity where residues from both the N and C-terminal lobes contribute to form a cleft, while the choline-binding site constitutes a deep hydrophobic groove in the C-terminal domain with a rim composed of negatively charged residues. Upon binding of choline, the enzyme undergoes conformational changes independently affecting the N-terminal domain and the ATP-binding loop. From this structural analysis and comparison with other kinases, and from mutagenesis data on the homologous Caenorhabditis elegans choline kinase, a model of the ternary ADP.phosphocholine complex was built that reveals the molecular basis for the phosphoryl transfer activity of this enzyme.

  18. Design, synthesis, crystallization and biological evaluation of new symmetrical biscationic compounds as selective inhibitors of human Choline Kinase α1 (ChoKα1).

    PubMed

    Schiaffino-Ortega, Santiago; Baglioni, Eleonora; Mariotto, Elena; Bortolozzi, Roberta; Serrán-Aguilera, Lucía; Ríos-Marco, Pablo; Carrasco-Jimenez, M Paz; Gallo, Miguel A; Hurtado-Guerrero, Ramon; Marco, Carmen; Basso, Giuseppe; Viola, Giampietro; Entrena, Antonio; López-Cara, Luisa Carlota

    2016-01-01

    A novel family of compounds derivative of 1,1'-(((ethane-1,2-diylbis(oxy))bis(4,1-phenylene))bis(methylene))-bispyridinium or -bisquinolinium bromide (10a-l) containing a pair of oxygen atoms in the spacer of the linker between the biscationic moieties, were synthesized and evaluated as inhibitors of choline kinase against a panel of cancer-cell lines. The most promising compounds in this series were 1,1'-(((ethane-1,2-diylbis(oxy))bis(4,1-phenylene))bis(methylene))bis(4-(dimethylamino)pyridinium) bromide (10a) and 1,1'-(((ethane-1,2-diylbis(oxy))bis(4,1-phenylene))bis(methylene))-bis(7-chloro-4-(pyrrolidin-1-yl)quinolinium) bromide (10l), which inhibit human choline kinase (ChoKα1) with IC50 of 1.0 and 0.92 μM, respectively, in a range similar to that of the previously reported biscationic compounds MN58b and RSM932A. Our compounds show greater antiproliferative activities than do the reference compounds, with unprecedented values of GI50 in the nanomolar range for several of the cancer-cell lines assayed, and more importantly they present low toxicity in non-tumoral cell lines, suggesting a cancer-cell-selective antiproliferative activity. Docking studies predict that the compounds interact with the choline-binding site in agreement with the binding mode of most previously reported biscationic compounds. Moreover, the crystal structure of ChoKα1 with compound 10a reveals that this compound binds to the choline-binding site and mimics HC-3 binding mode as never before. PMID:27029499

  19. Design, synthesis, crystallization and biological evaluation of new symmetrical biscationic compounds as selective inhibitors of human Choline Kinase α1 (ChoKα1)

    PubMed Central

    Schiaffino-Ortega, Santiago; Baglioni, Eleonora; Mariotto, Elena; Bortolozzi, Roberta; Serrán-Aguilera, Lucía; Ríos-Marco, Pablo; Carrasco-Jimenez, M. Paz; Gallo, Miguel A.; Hurtado-Guerrero, Ramon; Marco, Carmen; Basso, Giuseppe; Viola, Giampietro; Entrena, Antonio; López-Cara, Luisa Carlota

    2016-01-01

    A novel family of compounds derivative of 1,1′-(((ethane-1,2-diylbis(oxy))bis(4,1-phenylene))bis(methylene))-bispyridinium or –bisquinolinium bromide (10a-l) containing a pair of oxygen atoms in the spacer of the linker between the biscationic moieties, were synthesized and evaluated as inhibitors of choline kinase against a panel of cancer-cell lines. The most promising compounds in this series were 1,1′-(((ethane-1,2-diylbis(oxy))bis(4,1-phenylene))bis(methylene))bis(4-(dimethylamino)pyridinium) bromide (10a) and 1,1′-(((ethane-1,2-diylbis(oxy))bis(4,1-phenylene))bis(methylene))-bis(7-chloro-4-(pyrrolidin-1-yl)quinolinium) bromide (10l), which inhibit human choline kinase (ChoKα1) with IC50 of 1.0 and 0.92 μM, respectively, in a range similar to that of the previously reported biscationic compounds MN58b and RSM932A. Our compounds show greater antiproliferative activities than do the reference compounds, with unprecedented values of GI50 in the nanomolar range for several of the cancer-cell lines assayed, and more importantly they present low toxicity in non-tumoral cell lines, suggesting a cancer-cell-selective antiproliferative activity. Docking studies predict that the compounds interact with the choline-binding site in agreement with the binding mode of most previously reported biscationic compounds. Moreover, the crystal structure of ChoKα1 with compound 10a reveals that this compound binds to the choline-binding site and mimics HC-3 binding mode as never before. PMID:27029499

  20. The ligand binding site of the synaptosomal choline transporter: a provisional model based on inhibition studies.

    PubMed

    Roberts, E; Tamaru, M

    1992-05-01

    A topographic model of the ligand binding site of the choline transporter was deduced from inhibition studies with the help of CPK molecular models. It is posited that there are two identical or closely similar hydrophilic anionic sites separated from each other by an hinged, essentially planar but conformationally flexible cationic hydrophobic domain. Subsequently to attachment of external choline to either one of the anionic sites, both sites cooperate in enveloping the ligand by a Venus fly-trap mechanism. This leads to rapid configurational changes by which the closed-liganded form of the transporter opens up to the interior to release the bound choline. Intracellular K+, a ligand for the choline-binding site, is proposed to be counter-transported by a reversal of the above mechanism.

  1. Choline metabolism as a basis for the selective vulnerability of cholinergic neurons

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wurtman, R. J.

    1992-01-01

    The unique propensity of cholinergic neurons to use choline for two purposes--ACh and membrane phosphatidylcholine synthesis--may contribute to their selective vulnerability in Alzheimer's disease and other cholinergic neurodegenerative disorders. When physiologically active, the neurons use free choline taken from the 'reservoir' in membrane phosphatidylcholine to synthesize ACh; this can lead to an actual decrease in the quantity of membrane per cell. Alzheimer's disease (but not Down's syndrome, or other neurodegenerative disorders) is associated with characteristic neurochemical lesions involving choline and ethanolamine: brain levels of these compounds are diminished, while those of glycerophosphocholine and glycerophosphoethanolamine (breakdown products of their respective membrane phosphatides) are increased, both in cholinergic and noncholinergic brain regions. Perhaps this metabolic disturbance and the tendency of cholinergic neurons to 'export' choline--in the form of ACh--underlie the selective vulnerability of the neurons. Resulting changes in membrane composition could abnormally expose intramembraneous proteins such as amyloid precursor protein to proteases.

  2. Formulation and utilization of choline based samples for dissolution dynamic nuclear polarization.

    PubMed

    Bowen, Sean; Ardenkjaer-Larsen, Jan Henrik

    2013-11-01

    Hyperpolarization by the dissolution dynamic nuclear polarization (DNP) technique permits the generation of high spin polarization of solution state. However, sample formulation for dissolution-DNP is often difficult, as concentration and viscosity must be optimized to yield a dissolved sample with sufficient concentration, while maintaining polarization during the dissolution process. The unique chemical properties of choline permit the generation of highly soluble salts as well as deep eutectic mixtures with carboxylic acids and urea. We describe the formulation of these samples and compare their performance to more traditional sample formulations. Choline yields stable samples with exceptional polarization performance while simultaneously offering the capability to easily remove the choline after dissolution, perform experiments with the hyperpolarized choline, or anything in between. PMID:24036470

  3. Formulation and utilization of choline based samples for dissolution dynamic nuclear polarization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bowen, Sean; Ardenkjaer-Larsen, Jan Henrik

    2013-11-01

    Hyperpolarization by the dissolution dynamic nuclear polarization (DNP) technique permits the generation of high spin polarization of solution state. However, sample formulation for dissolution-DNP is often difficult, as concentration and viscosity must be optimized to yield a dissolved sample with sufficient concentration, while maintaining polarization during the dissolution process. The unique chemical properties of choline permit the generation of highly soluble salts as well as deep eutectic mixtures with carboxylic acids and urea. We describe the formulation of these samples and compare their performance to more traditional sample formulations. Choline yields stable samples with exceptional polarization performance while simultaneously offering the capability to easily remove the choline after dissolution, perform experiments with the hyperpolarized choline, or anything in between.

  4. Selective extraction of metals from mixed oxide matrixes using choline-based ionic liquids.

    PubMed

    Abbott, Andrew P; Capper, Glen; Davies, David L; Rasheed, Raymond K; Shikotra, Pragna

    2005-09-19

    The solubility of a range of metal oxides in a eutectic mixture of urea/choline chloride is quantified, and it is shown that the dissolved metals can be reclaimed from a mixed metal oxide matrix using electrodeposition. PMID:16156600

  5. Prenatal choline supplementation mitigates the adverse effects of prenatal alcohol exposure on development in rats.

    PubMed

    Thomas, Jennifer D; Abou, Elizabeth J; Dominguez, Hector D

    2009-01-01

    Prenatal alcohol exposure can lead to a range of physical, neurological, and behavioral alterations referred to as fetal alcohol spectrum disorders (FASD). Variability in outcome observed among children with FASD is likely related to various pre- and postnatal factors, including nutritional variables. Choline is an essential nutrient that influences brain and behavioral development. Recent animal research indicates that prenatal choline supplementation leads to long-lasting cognitive enhancement, as well as changes in brain morphology, electrophysiology and neurochemistry. The present study examined whether choline supplementation during ethanol exposure effectively reduces fetal alcohol effects. Pregnant dams were exposed to 6.0g/kg/day ethanol via intubation from gestational days (GD) 5-20; pair-fed and lab chow controls were included. During treatment, subjects from each group received choline chloride (250mg/kg/day) or vehicle. Physical development and behavioral development (righting reflex, geotactic reflex, cliff avoidance, reflex suspension and hindlimb coordination) were examined. Subjects prenatally exposed to alcohol exhibited reduced birth weight and brain weight, delays in eye opening and incisor emergence, and alterations in the development of all behaviors. Choline supplementation significantly attenuated ethanol's effects on birth and brain weight, incisor emergence, and most behavioral measures. In fact, behavioral performance of ethanol-exposed subjects treated with choline did not differ from that of controls. Importantly, choline supplementation did not influence peak blood alcohol level or metabolism, indicating that choline's effects were not due to differential alcohol exposure. These data indicate early dietary supplements may reduce the severity of some fetal alcohol effects, findings with important implications for children of women who drink alcohol during pregnancy.

  6. Uncertainties of organ-absorbed doses to patients from 18f-choline

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, W. B.; Janzen, T.; Zankl, M.; Giussani, A.; Hoeschen, C.

    2011-03-01

    Radiation doses of radiopharmaceuticals to patients in nuclear medicine are, as the standard method, estimated by the administered activity, medical imaging (e.g. PET imaging), compartmental modeling and Monte Carlo simulation of radiation with reference digital human phantoms. However, in each of the contributing terms, individual uncertainty due to measurement techniques, patient variability and computation methods may propagate to the uncertainties of the calculated organ doses to the individual patient. To evaluate the overall uncertainties and the quality assurance of internal absorbed doses, a method was developed within the framework of the MADEIRA Project (Minimizing Activity and Dose with Enhanced Image quality by Radiopharmaceutical Administrations) to quantitatively analyze the uncertainties in each component of the organ absorbed doses after administration of 18F-choline to prostate cancer patients undergoing nuclear medicine diagnostics. First, on the basis of the organ PET and CT images of the patients as well as blood and urine samples, a model structure of 18F-choline was developed and the uncertainties of the model parameters were determined. Second, the model parameter values were sampled and biokinetic modeling using these sampled parameter values were performed. Third, the uncertainties of the new specific absorbed fraction (SAF) values derived with different phantoms representing individual patients were presented. Finally, the uncertainties of absorbed doses to the patients were calculated by applying the ICRP/ICRU adult male reference computational phantom. In addition to the uncertainty analysis, the sensitivity of the model parameters on the organ PET images and absorbed doses was indicated by coupling the model input and output using regression and partial correlation analysis. The results showed that the uncertainty factors of absorbed dose to patients are in most cases less than a factor of 2 without taking into account the uncertainties

  7. Choline chloride-thiourea, a deep eutectic solvent for the production of chitin nanofibers.

    PubMed

    Mukesh, Chandrakant; Mondal, Dibyendu; Sharma, Mukesh; Prasad, Kamalesh

    2014-03-15

    Deep eutectic solvents (DESs) consisting of the mixtures of choline halide (chloride/bromide)-urea and choline chloride-thiourea were used as solvents to prepare α-chitin nanofibers (CNFs). CNFs of diameter 20-30 nm could be obtained using the DESs comprising of the mixture of choline chloride and thiourea (CCT 1:2); however, NFs could not be obtained using the DESs having urea (CCU 1:2) as hydrogen bond donor. The physicochemical properties of thus obtained NFs were compared with those obtained using a couple of imidazolium based ionic liquids namely, 1-butyl-3-methylimidazolium hydrogen sulphate [(Bmim)HSO4] and 1-methylimidazolium hydrogen sulphate [(Hmim)HSO4] as well as choline based bio-ILs namely, choline hydrogen sulphate [(Chol)HSO4] and choline acrylate. The CNFs obtained using the DES as a solvent were used to prepare calcium alginate bio-nanocomposite gel beads having enhanced elasticity in comparison to Ca-alginate beads. The bio-nanocomposite gel beads thus obtained were used to study slow release of 5-fluorouracil, an anticancer drug. PMID:24528755

  8. Quantum Chemical Insight into the Interactions and Thermodynamics Present in Choline Chloride Based Deep Eutectic Solvents.

    PubMed

    Wagle, Durgesh V; Deakyne, Carol A; Baker, Gary A

    2016-07-14

    We report quantum chemical calculations performed on three popular deep eutectic solvents (DESs) in order to elucidate the molecular interactions, charge transfer interactions, and thermodynamics associated with these systems. The DESs studied comprise 1:2 choline chloride/urea (reline), 1:2 choline chloride/ethylene glycol (ethaline), and 1:1 choline chloride/malonic acid (maloline). The excellent correlation between calculated and experimental vibrational spectra allowed for identification of dominant interactions in the DES systems. The DESs were found to be stabilized by both conventional hydrogen bonds and C-H···O/C-H···π interactions between the components. The hydrogen-bonding network established in the DES is clearly distinct from that which exists within the neat hydrogen-bond donor dimer. Charge decomposition analysis indicates significant charge transfer from choline and chloride to the hydrogen-bond donor with a higher contribution from the cation, and a density of states analysis confirms the direction of the charge transfer. Consequently, the sum of the bond orders of the choline-Cl(-) interactions in the DESs correlates directly with the melting temperatures of the DESs, a correlation that offers insight into the effect of the tuning of the choline-Cl(-) interactions by the hydrogen-bond donors on the physical properties of the DESs. Finally, the differences in the vibrational entropy changes upon DES formation are consistent with the trend in the overall entropy changes upon DES formation. PMID:27268431

  9. Choline and N,N-Dimethylethanolamine as Direct Substrates for Methanogens

    PubMed Central

    Watkins, Andrew J.; Roussel, Erwan G.; Webster, Gordon; Parkes, R. John

    2012-01-01

    Choline (N,N,N-trimethylethanolamine), which is widely distributed in membrane lipids and is a component of sediment biota, has been shown to be utilized anaerobically by mixed prokaryote cultures to produce methane but not by pure cultures of methanogens. Here, we show that five recently isolated Methanococcoides strains from a range of sediments (Aarhus Bay, Denmark; Severn Estuary mudflats at Portishead, United Kingdom; Darwin Mud Volcano, Gulf of Cadiz; Napoli mud volcano, eastern Mediterranean) can directly utilize choline for methanogenesis producing ethanolamine, which is not further metabolized. Di- and monomethylethanolamine are metabolic intermediates that temporarily accumulate. Consistent with this, dimethylethanolamine was shown to be another new growth substrate, but monomethylethanolamine was not. The specific methanogen inhibitor 2-bromoethanesulfonate (BES) inhibited methane production from choline. When choline and trimethylamine are provided together, diauxic growth occurs, with trimethylamine being utilized first, and then after a lag (∼7 days) choline is metabolized. Three type strains of Methanococcoides (M. methylutens, M. burtonii, and M. alaskense), in contrast, did not utilize choline. However, two of them (M. methylutens and M. burtonii) did metabolize dimethylethanolamine. These results extend the known substrates that can be directly utilized by some methanogens, giving them the advantage that they would not be reliant on bacterial syntrophs for their substrate supply. PMID:23001649

  10. Evolutionary Ancestry of Eukaryotic Protein Kinases and Choline Kinases.

    PubMed

    Lai, Shenshen; Safaei, Javad; Pelech, Steven

    2016-03-01

    The reversible phosphorylation of proteins catalyzed by protein kinases in eukaryotes supports an important role for eukaryotic protein kinases (ePKs) in the emergence of nucleated cells in the third superkingdom of life. Choline kinases (ChKs) could also be critical in the early evolution of eukaryotes, because of their function in the biosynthesis of phosphatidylcholine, which is unique to eukaryotic membranes. However, the genomic origins of ePKs and ChKs are unclear. The high degeneracy of protein sequences and broad expansion of ePK families have made this fundamental question difficult to answer. In this study, we identified two class-I aminoacyl-tRNA synthetases with high similarities to consensus amino acid sequences of human protein-serine/threonine kinases. Comparisons of primary and tertiary structures supported that ePKs and ChKs evolved from a common ancestor related to glutaminyl aminoacyl-tRNA synthetases, which may have been one of the key factors in the successful of emergence of ancient eukaryotic cells from bacterial colonies.

  11. Facile pulping of lignocellulosic biomass using choline acetate.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Fangchao; Wang, Hui; Chatel, Gregory; Gurau, Gabriela; Rogers, Robin D

    2014-07-01

    Treating ground bagasse or Southern yellow pine in the biodegradable ionic liquid (IL), choline acetate ([Cho][OAc]), at 100°C for 24h led to dissolution of hemicellulose and lignin, while leaving the cellulose pulp undissolved, with a 54.3% (bagasse) or 34.3% (pine) reduction in lignin content. The IL solution of the dissolved biopolymers can be separated from the undissolved particles either by addition of water (20 wt% of IL) followed by filtration or by centrifugation. Hemicellulose (19.0 wt% of original bagasse, 10.2 wt% of original pine, containing 14-18 wt% lignin) and lignin (5.0 wt% of original bagasse, 6.0 wt% of original pine) could be subsequently precipitated. The pulp obtained from [Cho][OAc] treatment can be rapidly dissolved in 1-ethyl-3-methylimidazolium acetate (e.g., 17 h for raw bagasse vs. 7h for pulp), and precipitated as cellulose-rich material (CRM) with a lower lignin content (e.g., 23.6% for raw bagasse vs. 10.6% for CRM). PMID:24874879

  12. PET/CT in prostate cancer: non-choline radiopharmaceuticals

    PubMed Central

    CASTELLUCCI, P.; JADVAR, H.

    2012-01-01

    In this brief review, the major potential clinical applications of 18F-FDG, 11C-acetate, 18F-FDHT, 18F-FLT, 18F-FMAU, and anti-18F-FACBC in the imaging evaluation of men with prostate cancer are discussed. 18F-FDG has a limited role in primary diagnosis and staging but it may be able to reflect tumour aggressiveness, detect sites of recurrence in some men with high serum PSA after biochemical failure and assess response to chemo- and hormonal treatment in metastatic disease. 11C-acetate has been investigated for intra-prostatic primary tumour detection and staging as well as for re-staging in case of biochemical relapse with results that are overall similar to those with 18F- and 11C-labeled choline. 18F-FDHT targets the androgen receptor and may be particularly useful in the assessment of the pharmacodynamics of the androgen signalling pathway. PET in conjunction with 18F-FLT or 18F-FMAU that track the thymidine salvage pathway of DNA synthesis has also been investigated for imaging cellular proliferation in prostate cancer. Initial exprience with the radiolabeked synthetic amino acid, anti-18F-FACBC, which displays slow urinary excretion has been encouraging but further studies will be needed to decipher its exact role in the imaging management of men with prostate cancer. PMID:23013666

  13. PET/CT in prostate cancer: non-choline radiopharmaceuticals.

    PubMed

    Castellucci, P; Jadvar, H

    2012-08-01

    In this brief review, the major potential clinical applications of 18F-FDG, 11C-acetate, 18F-FDHT, 18F-FLT, 18F-FMAU, and anti-18F-FACBC in the imaging evaluation of men with prostate cancer are discussed. 18F-FDG has a limited role in primary diagnosis and staging but it may be able to reflect tumour aggressiveness, detect sites of recurrence in some men with high serum PSA after biochemical failure and assess response to chemo- and hormonal treatment in metastatic disease. 11C-acetate has been investigated for intra-prostatic primary tumour detection and staging as well as for re-staging in case of biochemical relapse with results that are overall similar to those with 18F- and 11C-labeled choline. 18F-FDHT targets the androgen receptor and may be particularly useful in the assessment of the pharmacodynamics of the androgen signalling pathway. PET in conjunction with 18F-FLT or 18F-FMAU that track the thymidine salvage pathway of DNA synthesis has also been investigated for imaging cellular proliferation in prostate cancer. Initial experience with the radiolabeled synthetic amino acid, anti-18F-FACBC, which displays slow urinary excretion has been encouraging but further studies will be needed to decipher its exact role in the imaging management of men with prostate cancer.

  14. Choline kinase beta is required for normal endochondral bone formation

    PubMed Central

    Li, Zhuo; Wu, Gengshu; Sher, Roger B.; Khavandgar, Zohreh; Hermansson, Martin; Cox, Gregory A.; Doschak, Michael R.; Murshed, Monzur; Beier, Frank; Vance, Dennis E.

    2014-01-01

    Background Choline kinase has three isoforms encoded by the genes Chka and Chkb. Inactivation of Chka in mice results in embryonic lethality, whereas Chkb−/− mice display neonatal forelimb bone deformations. Methods To understand the mechanisms underlying the bone deformations, we compared the biology and biochemistry of bone formation from embryonic to young adult wild-type (WT) and Chkb−/− mice. Results The deformations are specific to the radius and ulna during the late embryonic stage. The radius and ulna of Chkb−/− mice display expanded hypertrophic zones, unorganized proliferative columns in their growth plates, and delayed formation of primary ossification centers. The differentiation of chondrocytes of Chkb−/− mice was impaired, as was chondrocyte proliferation and expression of matrix metalloproteinases 9 and 13. In chondrocytes from Chkb−/− mice, phosphatidylcholine was slightly lower than in WT mice whereas the amount of phosphocholine was decreased by approximately 75%. In addition, the radius and ulna from Chkb−/− mice contained fewer osteoclasts along the cartilage/bone interface. Conclusions Chkb has a critical role in the normal embryogenic formation of the radius and ulna in mice. PMID:24637075

  15. Uptake of Choline and Its Conversion to Glycine Betaine by Bacteria in Estuarine Waters†

    PubMed Central

    Kiene, Ronald P.

    1998-01-01

    The uptake and degradation of nanomolar levels of [methyl-14C]choline in estuarine water samples and in seawater filtrate cultures composed mainly of natural free-living bacteria was studied. Uptake of [14C]choline exhibited Michaelis-Menten kinetics, with Kt + Sn values of 1.7 to 2.9 nM in filtrate cultures and 1.7 to 4.1 nM in estuarine-water samples. Vmax values ranged from 0.5 to 3.3 nM · h−1. The uptake system for choline in natural microbial assemblages therefore displays very high affinity and appears able to scavenge this compound at the concentrations expected in seawater. Uptake of choline was inhibited by some natural structural analogs and p-chloromercuribenzoate, indicating that the transporter may be multifunctional and may involve a thiol binding site. When 11 nM [14C]choline was added to water samples, a significant fraction (>50%) of the methyl carbon was respired to CO2 in incubations lasting 10 to 53 h. Cells taking up [14C]choline produced [14C]glycine betaine ([14C]GBT), and up to 80% of the radioactivity retained by cells was in the form of GBT, a well-known osmolyte. Alteration of the salinity in filtrate cultures affected the relative proportion of [14C]choline degraded or converted to [14C]GBT, without substantially affecting the total metabolism of choline. Increasing the salinity from 14 to 25 or 35 ppt caused more [14C]GBT to be produced from choline but less 14CO2 to be produced than in the controls. Lowering the salinity to 7 ppt decreased [14C]GBT production and increased 14CO2 production slightly. Intracellular accumulations of [14C]GBT in the salt-stressed cultures were osmotically significant (34 mM). Choline may be used as an energy substrate by estuarine bacteria and may also serve as a precursor of the osmoprotectant GBT, particularly as bacteria are mixed into higher-salinity waters. PMID:16349511

  16. Uptake of (N-Me-3H)-choline by synaptosomes from the central nervous system of Locusta migratoria

    SciTech Connect

    Breer, H.

    1982-03-01

    The accumulation of 3H-choline by isolated synaptosomes from the central nervous system of locust was studied at concentrations varying from 0.05 to 40 microM. Kinetic analysis of the saturable process revealed a high-affinity and a low-affinity system. The high-affinity uptake was competitively inhibited by hemicholinium-3 and was absolutely dependent on external sodium. Elevated potassium concentrations inhibited choline uptake. The choline uptake by insect synaptosomes was found to be remarkably resistant to a variety of metabolic inhibitors. The reduced choline uptake under depolarizing conditions (high potassium concentration or veratridine) in the absence of calcium implies that electrochemical gradients are important for high-affinity choline uptake. Depolarization of preloaded synaptosomes under appropriate conditions resulted in a significant release of newly accumulated choline radioactivity.

  17. Homogeneous liquid-liquid extraction of neodymium(III) by choline hexafluoroacetylacetonate in the ionic liquid choline bis(trifluoromethylsulfonyl)imide.

    PubMed

    Onghena, Bieke; Jacobs, Jeroen; Van Meervelt, Luc; Binnemans, Koen

    2014-08-14

    The ionic liquid choline bis(trifluoromethylsulfonyl)imide, [Chol][Tf2N], was used for the extraction of neodymium(III), in combination with choline hexafluoroacetylacetonate, [Chol][hfac], as the extractant. The binary mixture of [Chol][Tf2N] and water shows temperature-dependent phase behavior, with an upper critical solution temperature of 72 °C. A novel extraction technique, homogeneous liquid-liquid extraction (HLLE), was applied to this solvent system. HLLE is based on the use of thermomorphic solvent mixtures and has the advantage of forming a homogeneous phase during mixing. Extraction is not kinetically hindered by an interface and the extraction equilibrium is reached faster than in the case of heterogeneous mixing in conventional solvent extraction. Several extraction parameters were studied for the extraction of neodymium(III) with [Chol][hfac]: temperature, pH, extractant concentration and loading of the ionic liquid phase. A speciation study was performed to determine the stoichiometry of the extracted neodymium(III) complex and a plausible extraction mechanism is proposed. Neodymium is extracted as a tetrakis hexafluoroacetylacetonate complex with one choline cation as counter ion. The crystal structure of the extracted complex showed the presence of a coordination bond between the choline counter ion and the neodymium(III) center, resulting in a coordination number of nine. The stripping of the loaded neodymium and the influence of acid and extractant concentrations on the phase behavior of the [Chol][Tf2N]-H2O system were investigated.

  18. Higher Dietary Choline and Betaine Intakes Are Associated with Better Body Composition in the Adult Population of Newfoundland, Canada

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Xiang; Wang, Yongbo; Randell, Edward; Pedram, Pardis; Yi, Yanqing; Gulliver, Wayne; Sun, Guang

    2016-01-01

    Background Choline is an essential nutrient and betaine is an osmolyte and methyl donor. Both are important to maintain health including adequate lipid metabolism. Supplementation of dietary choline and betaine increase muscle mass and reduce body fat in animals. However, little data is available regarding the role of dietary choline and betaine on body composition in humans. Objective To investigate the association between dietary choline and betaine intakes with body composition in a large population based cross-sectional study. Design A total of 3214 subjects from the CODING (Complex Disease in Newfoundland population: Environment and Genetics) study were assessed. Dietary choline and betaine intakes were computed from the Willett Food Frequency questionnaire. Body composition was measured using dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry following a 12-hour fast. Major confounding factors including age, sex, total calorie intake and physical activity level were controlled in all analyses. Result Significantly inverse correlations were found between dietary choline and betaine intakes, with all obesity measurements: total percent body fat (%BF), percent trunk fat (%TF), percent android fat (%AF), percent gynoid fat (%GF) and anthropometrics: weight, body mass index, waist circumference, waist-to-hip ratio in both women and men (r range from -0.13 to -0.47 for choline and -0.09 to -0.26 for betaine, p<0.001 for all). Dietary choline intake had stronger association than betaine. Moreover, obese subjects had the lowest dietary choline and betaine intakes, with overweight subjects in the middle, and normal weight subjects consumed the highest dietary choline and betaine (p<0.001). Vice versa, when subjects were ranked according to dietary choline and betaine intakes, subjects with the highest intake of both had the lowest %TF, %AF, %GF, %BF and highest %LM among the groups in both sexes. Conclusion Our findings indicate that high dietary choline and betaine intakes are

  19. Cloning, expression, and purification of choline dehydrogenase from the moderate halophile Halomonas elongata.

    PubMed

    Gadda, Giovanni; McAllister-Wilkins, Elien Elizabeth

    2003-04-01

    Choline dehydrogenase (EC 1.1.99.1) catalyzes the four-electron oxidation of choline to glycine-betaine via a betaine-aldehyde intermediate. Such a reaction is of considerable interest for biotechnological applications in that transgenic plants engineered with bacterial glycine-betaine-synthesizing enzymes have been shown to have enhanced tolerance towards various environmental stresses, such as hypersalinity, freezing, and high temperatures. To date, choline dehydrogenase has been poorly characterized in its biochemical and kinetic properties, mainly because its purification has been hampered by instability of the enzyme in vitro. In the present report, we cloned and expressed in Escherichia coli the betA gene from the moderate halophile Halomonas elongata which codes for a hypothetical choline dehydrogenase. The recombinant enzyme was purified to more than 70% homogeneity as judged by sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis and by treatment with 30 to 50% saturation of ammonium sulfate followed by column chromatography using DEAE-Sepharose. The purified enzyme showed similar substrate specificities with either choline or betaine-aldehyde as the substrate, as indicated by the apparent V/K values (where V is the maximal velocity and K is the Michaelis constant) of 0.9 and 0.6 micro mol of O(2) min(-1) mg(-1) mM(-1) at pH 7 and 25 degrees C, respectively. With 1 mM phenazine methosulfate as the primary electron acceptor, the apparent V(max) values for choline and betaine-aldehyde were 10.9 and 5.7 micro mol of O(2) min(-1) mg(-1), respectively. These V(max) values decreased four- to sevenfold when molecular oxygen was used as the electron acceptor. Altogether, the kinetic data are consistent with the conclusion that H. elongata betA codes for a choline dehydrogenase that can also act as an oxidase when electron acceptors other than molecular oxygen are not available.

  20. Hepatotoxicity and endothelial dysfunction induced by high choline diet and the protective effects of phloretin in mice.

    PubMed

    Ren, Daoyuan; Liu, Yafei; Zhao, Yan; Yang, Xingbin

    2016-08-01

    The involvement of choline and its metabolite trimethylamine-N-oxide (TMAO) in endothelial dysfunction and atherosclerosis has been repeatedly confirmed. Phloretin, a dihydrochalcone flavonoid usually present in apples, possesses a variety of biological activities including vascular nutrition. This study was designed to investigate whether phloretin could alleviate or prevent high choline-induced vascular endothelial dysfunction and liver injury in mice. Mice were provided with 3% high choline water and given phloretin orally daily for 10 weeks. The high choline-treated mice showed the significant dyslipidemia and hyperglycemia with the impaired liver and vascular endothelium (p < 0.01). Administration of phloretin at 200 and 400 mg/kg bw significantly reduced the choline-induced elevation of serum TC, TG, LDL-C, AST, ALT, ET-1 and TXA2 (p < 0.01), and markedly antagonized the choline-induced decrease of serum PGI2, HDL-C and NO levels. Furthermore, phloretin elevated hepatic SOD and GSH-Px activities and decreased hepatic MDA levels of the mice exposed to high choline water. Moreover, histopathological test with the H&E and Oil Red O staining of liver sections confirmed the high choline diet-caused liver steatosis and the hepatoprotective effect of phloretin. These findings suggest that high choline causes oxidative damage, and phloretin alleviate vascular endothelial dysfunction and liver injury. PMID:27316781

  1. Improved human visuomotor performance and pupil constriction after choline supplementation in a placebo-controlled double-blind study

    PubMed Central

    Naber, Marnix; Hommel, Bernhard; Colzato, Lorenza S.

    2015-01-01

    Only few nutrients are known to enhance cognition. Here we explore whether visuomotor performance can be improved through the intake of the nutrient choline, an essential chemical compound in a vertebrate’s diet. Choline is abundant in for example eggs and shrimps and many animal studies suggest that it serves as a cognitive enhancer. As choline is important for the communication between motor neurons and the control of skeletal muscles, we assumed that choline supplementation may have positive effects on action coordination in humans. A group of twenty-eight individuals ingested two grams of choline bitartrate or a placebo in two separate sessions. Seventy minutes post ingestion, participants performed a visuomotor aiming task in which they had to rapidly hit the centers of targets. Results showed that participants hit targets more centrally after choline supplementation. Pupil size (a cognition-sensitive biomarker) also significantly decreased after choline intake and correlated positively with the hit distance to the targets and the number of target misses, and negatively with reaction times. These findings point to a choline-induced bias towards action precision in the trade-off between speed and accuracy. The changes in pupil size suggest that choline uptake alters cholinergic functions in the nervous system. PMID:26271904

  2. The effect of centrally injected CDP-choline on respiratory system; involvement of phospholipase to thromboxane signaling pathway.

    PubMed

    Topuz, Bora B; Altinbas, Burcin; Yilmaz, Mustafa S; Saha, Sikha; Batten, Trevor F; Savci, Vahide; Yalcin, Murat

    2014-05-01

    CDP-choline is an endogenous metabolite in phosphatidylcholine biosynthesis. Exogenous administration of CDP-choline has been shown to affect brain metabolism and to exhibit cardiovascular, neuroendocrine neuroprotective actions. On the other hand, little is known regarding its respiratory actions and/or central mechanism of its respiratory effect. Therefore the current study was designed to investigate the possible effects of centrally injected CDP-choline on respiratory system and the mediation of the central cholinergic receptors and phospholipase to thromboxane signaling pathway on CDP-choline-induced respiratory effects in anaesthetized rats. Intracerebroventricularly (i.c.v.) administration of CDP-choline induced dose- and time-dependent increased respiratory rates, tidal volume and minute ventilation of male anaesthetized Spraque Dawley rats. İ.c.v. pretreatment with atropine failed to alter the hyperventilation responses to CDP-choline whereas mecamylamine, cholinergic nicotinic receptor antagonist, mepacrine, phospholipase A2 inhibitor, and neomycin phospholipase C inhibitor, blocked completely the hyperventilation induced by CDP-choline. In addition, central pretreatment with furegrelate, thromboxane A2 synthesis inhibitor, also partially blocked CDP-choline-evoked hyperventilation effects. These data show that centrally administered CDP-choline induces hyperventilation which is mediated by activation of central nicotinic receptors and phospholipase to thromboxane signaling pathway.

  3. Brain protection against ischemic stroke using choline as a new molecular bypass treatment

    PubMed Central

    Jin, Xin; Wang, Ru-huan; Wang, Hui; Long, Chao-liang; Wang, Hai

    2015-01-01

    Aim: To determine whether administration of choline could attenuate brain injury in a rat model of ischemic stroke and the underlying mechanisms. Methods: A rat model of ischemic stroke was established through permanent middle cerebral artery occlusion (pMCAO). After the surgery, the rats were treated with choline or choline plus the specific α7 nAChR antagonist methyllycaconitine (MLA), or with the control drug nimodipine for 10 days. The neurological deficits, brain-infarct volume, pial vessel density and the number of microvessels in the cortex were assessed. Rat brain microvascular endothelial cells (rBMECs) cultured under hypoxic conditions were used in in vitro experiments. Results: Oral administration of choline (100 or 200 mg·kg−1·d−1) or nimodipine (20 mg·kg−1·d−1) significantly improved neurological deficits, and reduced infarct volume and nerve cell loss in the ischemic cerebral cortices in pMCAO rats. Furthermore, oral administration of choline, but not nimodipine, promoted the pial arteriogenesis and cerebral-cortical capillary angiogenesis in the ischemic regions. Moreover, oral administration of choline significantly augmented pMCAO-induced increases in the expression levels of α7 nAChR, HIF-1α and VEGF in the ischemic cerebral cortices as well as in the serum levels of VEGF. Choline-induced protective effects were prevented by co-treatment with MLA (1 mg·kg−1·d−1, ip). Treatment of rBMECs cultured under hypoxic conditions in vitro with choline (1, 10 and 100 μmol/L) dose-dependently promoted the endothelial-cell proliferation, migration and tube formation, as well as VEGF secretion, which were prevented by co-treatment with MLA (1 μmol/L) or by transfection with HIF-1α siRNA. Conclusion: Choline effectively attenuates brain ischemic injury in pMCAO rats, possibly by facilitating pial arteriogenesis and cerebral-cortical capillary angiogenesis via upregulating α7 nAChR levels and inducing the expression of HIF-1α and VEGF

  4. Amperometric Choline Biosensor Fabricated through Electrostatic Assembly of Bienzyme/Polyelectrolyte Hybrid Layers on Carbon Nanotubes

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Jun; Liu, Guodong; Lin, Yuehe

    2006-03-01

    We report a flow injection amperometric choline biosensors based on the electrostatic assembly of an enzyme of choline oxidase (ChO) and a bi-enzyme of ChO and horseradish peroxidase (HRP) onto multi-wall carbon nanotubes (MWCNT) modified glassy carbon (GC) electrodes. These choline biosensors were fabricated by immobilization of enzymes on the negatively charged MWCNT surface through alternatively assembling a cationic polydiallydiimethylammonium chloride (PDDA) layer and an enzyme layer. Using this layer-by-layer assembling approach, bioactive nanocomposite film of a PDDA/ChO/PDDA/HRP/PDDA/CNT (ChO/HRP/CNT) and a PDDA/ChO/PDDA/ CNT (ChO/ CNT) were fabricated on GC surface, respectively. Owning to the electrocatalytic effect of carbon nanotubes, the measurement of faradic responses resulting from enzymatic reactions has been realized at low potential with acceptable sensitivity. It is found the ChO/HRP/CNT biosensor is more sensitive than the ChO/CNT one. Experimental parameters affecting the sensitivity of biosensors, e.g. applied potential, flow rate, etc. were optimized and potential interference was examined. The response time for this choline biosensor is fast (less than a few seconds). The linear range of detection for the choline biosensor is from 5 x 10-5 to 5 x 10-3 M and the detection limit is determined to be about 1.0 x 10-5 M.

  5. Structural and kinetic studies on the Ser101Ala variant of choline oxidase: Catalysis by compromise

    SciTech Connect

    Finnegan, S.; Orville, A.; Yuan, H.; Wang, Y.-F.; Weber, I. T.; Gadda, G.

    2010-09-15

    The oxidation of choline catalyzed by choline oxidase includes two reductive half-reactions where FAD is reduced by the alcohol substrate and by an aldehyde intermediate transiently formed in the reaction. Each reductive half-reaction is followed by an oxidative half-reaction where the reduced flavin is oxidized by oxygen. Here, we have used mutagenesis to prepare the Ser101Ala mutant of choline oxidase and have investigated the impact of this mutation on the structural and kinetic properties of the enzyme. The crystallographic structure of the Ser101Ala enzyme indicates that the only differences between the mutant and wild-type enzymes are the lack of a hydroxyl group on residue 101 and a more planar configuration of the flavin in the mutant enzyme. Kinetics established that replacement of Ser101 with alanine yields a mutant enzyme with increased efficiencies in the oxidative half-reactions and decreased efficiencies in the reductive half-reactions. This is accompanied by a significant decrease in the overall rate of turnover with choline. Thus, this mutation has revealed the importance of a specific residue for the optimization of the overall turnover of choline oxidase, which requires fine-tuning of four consecutive half-reactions for the conversion of an alcohol to a carboxylic acid.

  6. Suppressed expression of choline monooxygenase in sugar beet on the accumulation of glycine betaine.

    PubMed

    Yamada, Nana; Takahashi, Hiroyuki; Kitou, Kunihide; Sahashi, Kosuke; Tamagake, Hideto; Tanaka, Yoshito; Takabe, Teruhiro

    2015-11-01

    Glycine betaine (GB) is an important osmoprotectant and synthesized by two-step oxidation of choline. Choline monooxygenase (CMO) catalyzes the first step of the pathway and is believed to be a rate limiting step for GB synthesis. Recent studies have shown the importance of choline-precursor supply for GB synthesis. In order to investigate the role of CMO for GB accumulation in sugar beet (Beta vulgaris), transgenic plants carrying the antisense BvCMO gene were developed. The antisense BvCMO plants showed the decreased activity of GB synthesis from choline compared to wild-type (WT) plants which is well related to the suppressed level of BvCMO protein. However, GB contents were similar between transgenic and WT plants with the exception of young leaves and storage roots. Transgenic plants showed enhanced susceptibility to salt stress than WT plants. These results suggest the importance of choline-precursor-supply for GB accumulation, and young leaves and storage root are sensitive sites for GB accumulation.

  7. Plasmodium falciparum Choline Kinase Inhibition Leads to a Major Decrease in Phosphatidylethanolamine Causing Parasite Death.

    PubMed

    Serrán-Aguilera, Lucía; Denton, Helen; Rubio-Ruiz, Belén; López-Gutiérrez, Borja; Entrena, Antonio; Izquierdo, Luis; Smith, Terry K; Conejo-García, Ana; Hurtado-Guerrero, Ramon

    2016-01-01

    Malaria is a life-threatening disease caused by different species of the protozoan parasite Plasmodium, with P. falciparum being the deadliest. Increasing parasitic resistance to existing antimalarials makes the necessity of novel avenues to treat this disease an urgent priority. The enzymes responsible for the synthesis of phosphatidylcholine and phosphatidylethanolamine are attractive drug targets to treat malaria as their selective inhibition leads to an arrest of the parasite's growth and cures malaria in a mouse model. We present here a detailed study that reveals a mode of action for two P. falciparum choline kinase inhibitors both in vitro and in vivo. The compounds present distinct binding modes to the choline/ethanolamine-binding site of P. falciparum choline kinase, reflecting different types of inhibition. Strikingly, these compounds primarily inhibit the ethanolamine kinase activity of the P. falciparum choline kinase, leading to a severe decrease in the phosphatidylethanolamine levels within P. falciparum, which explains the resulting growth phenotype and the parasites death. These studies provide an understanding of the mode of action, and act as a springboard for continued antimalarial development efforts selectively targeting P. falciparum choline kinase. PMID:27616047

  8. Plasmodium falciparum Choline Kinase Inhibition Leads to a Major Decrease in Phosphatidylethanolamine Causing Parasite Death

    PubMed Central

    Serrán-Aguilera, Lucía; Denton, Helen; Rubio-Ruiz, Belén; López-Gutiérrez, Borja; Entrena, Antonio; Izquierdo, Luis; Smith, Terry K.; Conejo-García, Ana; Hurtado-Guerrero, Ramon

    2016-01-01

    Malaria is a life-threatening disease caused by different species of the protozoan parasite Plasmodium, with P. falciparum being the deadliest. Increasing parasitic resistance to existing antimalarials makes the necessity of novel avenues to treat this disease an urgent priority. The enzymes responsible for the synthesis of phosphatidylcholine and phosphatidylethanolamine are attractive drug targets to treat malaria as their selective inhibition leads to an arrest of the parasite’s growth and cures malaria in a mouse model. We present here a detailed study that reveals a mode of action for two P. falciparum choline kinase inhibitors both in vitro and in vivo. The compounds present distinct binding modes to the choline/ethanolamine-binding site of P. falciparum choline kinase, reflecting different types of inhibition. Strikingly, these compounds primarily inhibit the ethanolamine kinase activity of the P. falciparum choline kinase, leading to a severe decrease in the phosphatidylethanolamine levels within P. falciparum, which explains the resulting growth phenotype and the parasites death. These studies provide an understanding of the mode of action, and act as a springboard for continued antimalarial development efforts selectively targeting P. falciparum choline kinase. PMID:27616047

  9. Suppressed expression of choline monooxygenase in sugar beet on the accumulation of glycine betaine.

    PubMed

    Yamada, Nana; Takahashi, Hiroyuki; Kitou, Kunihide; Sahashi, Kosuke; Tamagake, Hideto; Tanaka, Yoshito; Takabe, Teruhiro

    2015-11-01

    Glycine betaine (GB) is an important osmoprotectant and synthesized by two-step oxidation of choline. Choline monooxygenase (CMO) catalyzes the first step of the pathway and is believed to be a rate limiting step for GB synthesis. Recent studies have shown the importance of choline-precursor supply for GB synthesis. In order to investigate the role of CMO for GB accumulation in sugar beet (Beta vulgaris), transgenic plants carrying the antisense BvCMO gene were developed. The antisense BvCMO plants showed the decreased activity of GB synthesis from choline compared to wild-type (WT) plants which is well related to the suppressed level of BvCMO protein. However, GB contents were similar between transgenic and WT plants with the exception of young leaves and storage roots. Transgenic plants showed enhanced susceptibility to salt stress than WT plants. These results suggest the importance of choline-precursor-supply for GB accumulation, and young leaves and storage root are sensitive sites for GB accumulation. PMID:26302482

  10. Physical and chemical immobilization of choline oxidase onto different porous solid supports: Adsorption studies.

    PubMed

    Passos, Marieta L C; Ribeiro, David S M; Santos, João L M; Saraiva, M Lúcia M F S

    2016-08-01

    This work carries out for the first time the comparison between the physical and chemical immobilization of choline oxidase onto aminated silica-based porous supports. The influence on the immobilization efficiency of concentration, pH, temperature and contact time between the support and choline oxidase, was evaluated. The immobilization efficiency was estimated taking into consideration the choline oxidase activity, which was assessed by using cadmium telluride (CdTe) quantum dots (QDs), obtained by hydrothermal synthesis, as photoluminescent probes. Hydrogen peroxide produced by enzyme activity was capable of quenching CdTe QDs photoluminescence. The magnitude of the PL quenching process was directly related with the enzyme activity. By comparing the chemical process with the physical adsorption, it was observed that the latter provided the highest choline oxidase immobilization. The equilibrium data were analyzed using Langmuir and Freundlich isotherms and kinetic data were fitted to the pseudo-first-order and pseudo-second-order models. Thermodynamic parameters, such as Gibbs free energy and entropy were also calculated. These results will certainly contribute to the development of new sensing schemes for choline, taking into account the growing demand for its quantification in biological samples. PMID:27241295

  11. Evolutionary Design of Choline-Inducible and -Repressible T7-Based Induction Systems.

    PubMed

    Ike, Kohei; Arasawa, Yusuke; Koizumi, Satoshi; Mihashi, Satoshi; Kawai-Noma, Shigeko; Saito, Kyoichi; Umeno, Daisuke

    2015-12-18

    By assembly and evolutionary engineering of T7-phage-based transcriptional switches made from endogenous components of the bet operon on the Escherichia coli chromosome, genetic switches inducible by choline, a safe and inexpensive compound, were constructed. The functional plasticity of the BetI repressor was revealed by rapid and high-frequency identification of functional variants with various properties, including those with high stringency, high maximum expression level, and reversed phenotypes, from a pool of BetI mutants. The plasmid expression of BetI mutants resulted in the choline-inducible (Bet-ON) or choline-repressible (Bet-OFF) switching of genes under the pT7/betO sequence at unprecedentedly high levels, while keeping the minimal leaky expression in uninduced conditions.

  12. Interaction and dynamics of ionic liquids based on choline and amino acid anions

    SciTech Connect

    Campetella, M.; Bodo, E. Caminiti, R. Martino, A.; Gontrani, L.; D’Apuzzo, F.; Lupi, S.

    2015-06-21

    The combination of amino acid anions with the choline cation gives origin to a new and potentially important class of organic ionic liquids that might represent a viable and bio-compatible alternative with respect to the traditional ones. We present here a detailed study of the bulk phase of the prototype system composed of the simplest amino acid (alanine) anion and the choline cation, based on ab initio and classical molecular dynamics. Theoretical findings have been validated by comparing with accurate experimental X-ray diffraction data and infrared spectra. We find that hydrogen bonding (HB) features in these systems are crucial in establishing their local geometric structure. We have also found that these HBs once formed are persistent and that the proton resides exclusively on the choline cation. In addition, we show that a classical force field description for this particular ionic liquid can be accurately performed by using a slightly modified version of the generalized AMBER force field.

  13. Evidence for an increased rate of choline efflux across erythrocyte membranes in Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Butterfield, D A; Nicholas, M M; Markesbery, W R

    1985-07-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD), the major dementing disorder of the elderly, is associated with cholinergic neuronal loss and decreased activity of choline acetyltransferase (CAT). Previous biophysical studies had suggested an altered conformation of membrane proteins in AD erythrocyte ghosts. Since erythrocytes have a choline transport system and cholinergic neurons are implicated in AD, the present experiments were undertaken to determine if the efflux rate of [14C]choline was altered in AD erythrocytes. The mean efflux rate constant was highly significantly increased (P less than 0.01) by greater than 25% in 9 drug-free AD patients compared to 9 sex-matched, drug-free controls of similar age. These results are discussed in terms of potential molecular mechanisms to account for cholinergic neuronal loss in AD.

  14. Evolutionary Design of Choline-Inducible and -Repressible T7-Based Induction Systems.

    PubMed

    Ike, Kohei; Arasawa, Yusuke; Koizumi, Satoshi; Mihashi, Satoshi; Kawai-Noma, Shigeko; Saito, Kyoichi; Umeno, Daisuke

    2015-12-18

    By assembly and evolutionary engineering of T7-phage-based transcriptional switches made from endogenous components of the bet operon on the Escherichia coli chromosome, genetic switches inducible by choline, a safe and inexpensive compound, were constructed. The functional plasticity of the BetI repressor was revealed by rapid and high-frequency identification of functional variants with various properties, including those with high stringency, high maximum expression level, and reversed phenotypes, from a pool of BetI mutants. The plasmid expression of BetI mutants resulted in the choline-inducible (Bet-ON) or choline-repressible (Bet-OFF) switching of genes under the pT7/betO sequence at unprecedentedly high levels, while keeping the minimal leaky expression in uninduced conditions. PMID:26289535

  15. Selective retrograde labeling of cholinergic neurons with (/sup 3/H)choline

    SciTech Connect

    Bagnoli, P.; Beaudet, A.; Stella, M.; Cuenod, M.

    1981-07-01

    Evidence is presented which is consistent with a specific retrograde labeling of cholinergic neurons following (/sup 3/H)choline application in their zone of termination. (/sup 3/H)Choline injection in the rat hippocampus leads to perikaryal retrograde labeling in the ipsilateral medial septal nuclease and nucleus of the diagonal band, thus delineating an established cholinergic pathway, while only diffuse presumably anterograde labeling was observed in the lateral septum, the entorhinal cortex, and the opposite hippocampus. After (/sup 3/H)choline injection in the pigeon visual Wulst, only the ipsilateral thalamic relay, of all inputs, showed similar perikaryal retrograde labeling, an observation supporting the suggestion that at least some thalamo-Wulst neurons are cholinergic.

  16. Dietary folate, but not choline, modifies neural tube defect risk in Shmt1 knockout mice12345

    PubMed Central

    Beaudin, Anna E; Abarinov, Elena V; Malysheva, Olga; Perry, Cheryll A; Caudill, Marie; Stover, Patrick J

    2012-01-01

    Background: Low dietary choline intake has been proposed to increase the risk of neural tube defects (NTDs) in human populations. Mice with reduced Shmt1 expression exhibit a higher frequency of NTDs when placed on a folate- and choline-deficient diet and may represent a model of human NTDs. The individual contribution of dietary folate and choline deficiency to NTD incidence in this mouse model is not known. Objective: To dissociate the effects of dietary folate and choline deficiency on Shmt1-related NTD sensitivity, we determined NTD incidence in embryos from Shmt1-null dams fed diets deficient in either folate or choline. Design: Shmt1+/+ and Shmt1−/− dams were maintained on a standard AIN93G diet (Dyets), an AIN93G diet lacking folate (FD), or an AIN93G diet lacking choline (CD). Virgin Shmt1+/+ and Shmt1−/− dams were crossed with Shmt1+/− males, and embryos were examined for the presence of NTDs at embryonic day (E) 11.5 or E12.5. Results: Exencephaly was observed only in Shmt1−/− embryos isolated from dams maintained on the FD diet (P = 0.004). Approximately 33% of Shmt1−/−embryos (n = 18) isolated from dams maintained on the FD diet exhibited exencephaly. NTDs were not observed in any embryos isolated from dams maintained on the CD (n = 100) or control (n = 152) diets or in any Shmt1+/+ (n = 78) or Shmt1+/− embryos (n = 182). Conclusion: Maternal folate deficiency alone is sufficient to induce NTDs in response to embryonic Shmt1 disruption. PMID:22134951

  17. Contribution of flavin covalent linkage with histidine 99 to the reaction catalyzed by choline oxidase.

    PubMed

    Quaye, Osbourne; Cowins, Sharonda; Gadda, Giovanni

    2009-06-19

    The FAD-dependent choline oxidase has a flavin cofactor covalently attached to the protein via histidine 99 through an 8alpha-N(3)-histidyl linkage. The enzyme catalyzes the four-electron oxidation of choline to glycine betaine, forming betaine aldehyde as an enzyme-bound intermediate. The variant form of choline oxidase in which the histidine residue has been replaced with asparagine was used to investigate the contribution of the 8alpha-N(3)-histidyl linkage of FAD to the protein toward the reaction catalyzed by the enzyme. Decreases of 10-fold and 30-fold in the k(cat)/K(m) and k(cat) values were observed as compared with wild-type choline oxidase at pH 10 and 25 degrees C, with no significant effect on k(cat)/K(O) using choline as substrate. Both the k(cat)/K(m) and k(cat) values increased with increasing pH to limiting values at high pH consistent with the participation of an unprotonated group in the reductive half-reaction and the overall turnover of the enzyme. The pH independence of both (D)(k(cat)/K(m)) and (D)k(cat), with average values of 9.2 +/- 3.3 and 7.4 +/- 0.5, respectively, is consistent with absence of external forward and reverse commitments to catalysis, and the chemical step of CH bond cleavage being rate-limiting for both the reductive half-reaction and the overall enzyme turnover. The temperature dependence of the (D)k(red) values suggests disruption of the preorganization in the asparagine variant enzyme. Altogether, the data presented in this study are consistent with the FAD-histidyl covalent linkage being important for the optimal positioning of the hydride ion donor and acceptor in the tunneling reaction catalyzed by choline oxidase.

  18. How polar are choline chloride-based deep eutectic solvents?

    PubMed

    Pandey, Ashish; Rai, Rewa; Pal, Mahi; Pandey, Siddharth

    2014-01-28

    Developing and characterizing green solvents with low toxicity and cost is one of the most important issues in chemistry. Deep Eutectic Solvents (DESs), in this regard, have shown tremendous promise. Compared to popular organic solvents, DESs possess negligible VOCs and are non-flammable. Compared to ionic liquids, which share many characteristics but are ionic compounds and not ionic mixtures, DESs are cheaper to make, much less toxic and mostly biodegradable. An estimate of the polarity associated with DESs is essential if they are to be used as green alternatives to common organic solvents in industries and academia. As no one physical parameter can satisfactorily represent solute-solvent interactions within a medium, polarity of DESs is assessed through solvatochromic optical spectroscopic responses of several UV-vis absorbance and molecular fluorescence probes. Information on the local microenvironment (i.e., the cybotactic region) that surrounds several solvatochromic probes [betaine dye, pyrene, pyrene-1-carboxaldehyde, 1-anilino-8-naphthalene sulfonate (ANS), p-toluidinyl-6-naphthalene sulfonate (TNS), 6-propionyl-2-(dimethylaminonaphthalene) (PRODAN), coumarin-153, and Nile Red] for four common and popular DESs formed from choline chloride combined with 1,2-ethanediol, glycerol, urea, and malonic acid, respectively, in 1 : 2 molar ratios termed ethaline, glyceline, reline, and maline is obtained and used to assess the effective polarity afforded by each of these DESs. The four DESs as indicated by these probe responses are found to be fairly dipolar in nature. Absorbance probe betaine dye and fluorescence probes ANS, TNS, PRODAN, coumarin-153, and Nile Red, whose solvatochromic responses are based on photoinduced charge-transfer, imply ethaline and glyceline, DESs formed using alcohol-based H-bond donors, to be relatively more dipolar in nature as compared to reline and maline. The pyrene polarity scale, which is based on polarity-induced changes in

  19. How polar are choline chloride-based deep eutectic solvents?

    PubMed

    Pandey, Ashish; Rai, Rewa; Pal, Mahi; Pandey, Siddharth

    2014-01-28

    Developing and characterizing green solvents with low toxicity and cost is one of the most important issues in chemistry. Deep Eutectic Solvents (DESs), in this regard, have shown tremendous promise. Compared to popular organic solvents, DESs possess negligible VOCs and are non-flammable. Compared to ionic liquids, which share many characteristics but are ionic compounds and not ionic mixtures, DESs are cheaper to make, much less toxic and mostly biodegradable. An estimate of the polarity associated with DESs is essential if they are to be used as green alternatives to common organic solvents in industries and academia. As no one physical parameter can satisfactorily represent solute-solvent interactions within a medium, polarity of DESs is assessed through solvatochromic optical spectroscopic responses of several UV-vis absorbance and molecular fluorescence probes. Information on the local microenvironment (i.e., the cybotactic region) that surrounds several solvatochromic probes [betaine dye, pyrene, pyrene-1-carboxaldehyde, 1-anilino-8-naphthalene sulfonate (ANS), p-toluidinyl-6-naphthalene sulfonate (TNS), 6-propionyl-2-(dimethylaminonaphthalene) (PRODAN), coumarin-153, and Nile Red] for four common and popular DESs formed from choline chloride combined with 1,2-ethanediol, glycerol, urea, and malonic acid, respectively, in 1 : 2 molar ratios termed ethaline, glyceline, reline, and maline is obtained and used to assess the effective polarity afforded by each of these DESs. The four DESs as indicated by these probe responses are found to be fairly dipolar in nature. Absorbance probe betaine dye and fluorescence probes ANS, TNS, PRODAN, coumarin-153, and Nile Red, whose solvatochromic responses are based on photoinduced charge-transfer, imply ethaline and glyceline, DESs formed using alcohol-based H-bond donors, to be relatively more dipolar in nature as compared to reline and maline. The pyrene polarity scale, which is based on polarity-induced changes in

  20. Choline chloride based ionic liquid analogues as tool for the fabrication of agar films with improved mechanical properties

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    In the present paper, we test the suitability of Choline-Cl/urea (DES-U) and Choline-Cl/glycerol (DES-G) eutectic mixtures at 1:2 molar ratios for the production of agar biodegradable films. A three-step process is proposed: pre-solubilization of polymer in DES followed by compression-molding and s...

  1. Dietary folate and choline status differentially affect lipid metabolism and behavior-mediated neurotransmitters in young rats

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The relationship between choline and folate metabolisms is an important issue due to the essential role of these nutrients in brain plasticity and cognitive functions. Present study was designed to investigate whether modification of the dietary folate-choline status in young rats would affect brain...

  2. On the plasmalogenation of myocardial choline glycerophospholipid during maturation of various vertebrates.

    PubMed

    Hack, M H; Helmy, F M

    1988-01-01

    1. The plasmalogen profiles of a series of hearts from fish to mammals were obtained by various TLC analyses. 2. All specimens (ventricular) contained ethanolamine plasmalogen and some choline plasmalogen, as well. 3. The distribution of these two plasmalogen species was relatable, in part, to (a) phylogeny and (b) ontogeny. 4. There were exceptions. 5. The appearance of choline plasmalogen was preceded by its alkylacyl precursor, suggesting plasmalogenation by a base-specific delta 1-alkyl desaturase. 6. From the data, we have raised some questions as to the metabolic role played by the plasmalogens and precursors as occupants of myocardial mitchondrial membranes.

  3. Central injection of CDP-choline suppresses serum ghrelin levels while increasing serum leptin levels in rats.

    PubMed

    Kiyici, Sinem; Basaran, Nesrin Filiz; Cavun, Sinan; Savci, Vahide

    2015-10-01

    In this study we aimed to test central administration of CDP-choline on serum ghrelin, leptin, glucose and corticosterone levels in rats. Intracerebroventricular (i.c.v.) 0.5, 1.0 and 2.0 µmol CDP-choline and saline were administered to male Wistar-Albino rats. For the measurement of serum leptin and ghrelin levels, blood samples were obtained baseline and at 5, 15, 30, 60 and 120 min following i.c.v. CDP-choline injection. Equimolar doses of i.c.v. choline (1.0 µmol) and cytidine (1.0 µmol) were administered and measurements were repeated throughout the second round of the experiment. Atropine (10 µg) and mecamylamine (50 µg) were injected intracerebroventricularly prior to CDP-choline and measurements repeated in the third round of the experiment. After 1 µmol CDP-choline injection, serum ghrelin levels were suppressed significantly at 60 min (P=0.025), whereas serum leptin levels were increased at 60 and 120 min (P=0.012 and P=0.017 respectively). CDP-choline injections also induced a dose- and time-dependent increase in serum glucose and corticosterone levels. The effect of choline on serum leptin and ghrelin levels was similar with CDP-choline while no effect was seen with cytidine. Suppression of serum ghrelin levels was eliminated through mecamylamine pretreatment while a rise in leptin was prevented by both atropine and mecamylamine pretreatments. In conclusion; centrally injected CDP-choline suppressed serum ghrelin levels while increasing serum leptin levels. The observed effects following receptor antagonist treatment suggest that nicotinic receptors play a role in suppression of serum ghrelin levels,whereas nicotinic and muscarinic receptors both play a part in the increase of serum leptin levels.

  4. Human Serial Learning: Enhancement with Arecholine and Choline and Impairment with Scopolamine

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sitaram, N.; Weingartner, Herbert

    1978-01-01

    The effects of particular drugs in human memory abilities was examined. The degree of memory enhancement produced by arecholine and choline and the impairment after scopolamaine were inversely proportional to the subject's performance in placebo; that is, "poor" performers were more vulnerable to the drugs than were "good" performers. (Author/CP)

  5. Studies on the riboflavin, niacin, pantothenic acid and choline requirements of young bobwhite quail

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Serafin, J.A.

    1974-01-01

    Four experiments were conducted to examine the riboflavin, niacin, pantothenic acid and choline requirements of young Bobwhite quail. Quail fed purified diets deficient in either riboflavin, niacin, pantothenic acid or choline grew poorly and high mortality occurred by 5 weeks of age. Under the conditions of these experiments, it was found that: (1) young quail require approximately 3.8 mg. riboflavin/kg. diet for satisfactory growth and survival; (2) no more than 31 mg. niacin/kg. diet are required for normal growth and survival of young quail; (3) the requirement for pantothenic acid is higher than has previously been reported, quail in these studies requiring 12.6 mg. pantothenic acid/kg. feed for growth and survival; and (4) the requirement for choline for reducing mortality is approximately 1000 mg./kg., while the amount necessary for normal growth of young quail is no greater than 1500 mg./kg. when the diet contains ample amounts of methionine. Quail fed a niacin-deficient diet developed stiff, shortened feathers and an erythema about the head; those receiving a riboflavin-deficient ration developed enlarged hocks and bowed legs, as did quail fed diets low or devoid of choline. Aside from slow growth, poor feathering was the only other indication that a deficient diet was being fed when quail were placed on a basal ration without pantothenic acid for five weeks.

  6. Evaluation of toxicity and biodegradability of choline chloride based deep eutectic solvents.

    PubMed

    Radošević, Kristina; Bubalo, Marina Cvjetko; Srček, Višnje Gaurina; Grgas, Dijana; Dragičević, Tibela Landeka; Redovniković, Ivana Radojčić

    2015-02-01

    Deep eutectic solvents (DESs) have been dramatically expanding in popularity as a new generation of environmentally friendly solvents with possible applications in various industrial fields, but their ecological footprint has not yet been thoroughly investigated. In the present study, three choline chloride-based DESs with glucose, glycerol and oxalic acid as hydrogen bond donors were evaluated for in vitro toxicity using fish and human cell line, phytotoxicity using wheat and biodegradability using wastewater microorganisms through closed bottle test. Obtained in vitro toxicity data on cell lines indicate that choline chloride: glucose and choline chloride:glycerol possess low cytotoxicity (EC50>10 mM for both cell lines) while choline chloride:oxalic acid possess moderate cytotoxicity (EC50 value 1.64 mM and 4.19 mM for fish and human cell line, respectively). Results on phytotoxicity imply that tested DESs are non-toxic with seed germination EC50 values higher than 5000 mg L(-1). All tested DESs were classified as'readily biodegradable' based on their high levels of mineralization (68-96%). These findings indicate that DESs have a green profile and a good prospect for a wider use in the field of green technologies.

  7. Dietary CDP-Choline Supplementation Prevents Memory Impairment Caused by Impoverished Environmental Conditions in Rats

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Teather, Lisa A.; Wurtman, Richard J.

    2005-01-01

    The authors previously showed that dietary cytidine (5')-diphosphocholine (CDP-choline) supplementation could protect against the development of memory deficits in aging rats. In the present study, younger rats exposed to impoverished environmental conditions and manifesting hippocampal-dependent memory impairments similar to those observed in the…

  8. Choline and Fructooligosaccharide: Non-alcoholic Fatty Liver Disease, Cardiac Fat Deposition, and Oxidative Stress Markers

    PubMed Central

    Borges Haubert, Nadia Juliana Beraldo Goulart; Marchini, Julio Sergio; Carvalho Cunha, Selma Freire; Suen, Vivian Marques Miguel; Padovan, Gilberto Joao; Jordao, Alceu Afonso; Marchini Alves, Claudia Maria Meirelles; Marchini, Julio Flavio Meirelles; Vannucchi, Helio

    2015-01-01

    This study investigates the treatment of non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) in rats with choline and fructooligosaccharide (FOS). The healthy control group received standard diet. The other three groups consisted of animals with NAFLD. Group Estr received standard diet; group Echo received standard diet plus choline (3 g/100 g diet); and group Efos received standard diet plus FOS (10 g/100 g diet). Food intake, weight, urinary nitrogen, urinary ammonia, total cholesterol, serum triacylglyceride, liver and heart weights, tissue nitrogen, tissue fat, vitamin E, TBARS, and reduced glutathione (GSH) were measured in hepatic and heart tissue. Choline and FOS treatments resulted in total mean fat reduction in liver and heart tissue of 0.2 and 1.7 g, respectively. Both treatments were equally effective in reducing hepatic and cardiac steatosis. There were no differences in the TBARS level among experimental and control groups, indicating that the proposed treatments had no added protection against free radicals. While all experimental groups had increased vitamin E and GSH levels, choline treatment led to a significant increase compared to control. PMID:25987847

  9. Evaluation of toxicity and biodegradability of choline chloride based deep eutectic solvents.

    PubMed

    Radošević, Kristina; Bubalo, Marina Cvjetko; Srček, Višnje Gaurina; Grgas, Dijana; Dragičević, Tibela Landeka; Redovniković, Ivana Radojčić

    2015-02-01

    Deep eutectic solvents (DESs) have been dramatically expanding in popularity as a new generation of environmentally friendly solvents with possible applications in various industrial fields, but their ecological footprint has not yet been thoroughly investigated. In the present study, three choline chloride-based DESs with glucose, glycerol and oxalic acid as hydrogen bond donors were evaluated for in vitro toxicity using fish and human cell line, phytotoxicity using wheat and biodegradability using wastewater microorganisms through closed bottle test. Obtained in vitro toxicity data on cell lines indicate that choline chloride: glucose and choline chloride:glycerol possess low cytotoxicity (EC50>10 mM for both cell lines) while choline chloride:oxalic acid possess moderate cytotoxicity (EC50 value 1.64 mM and 4.19 mM for fish and human cell line, respectively). Results on phytotoxicity imply that tested DESs are non-toxic with seed germination EC50 values higher than 5000 mg L(-1). All tested DESs were classified as'readily biodegradable' based on their high levels of mineralization (68-96%). These findings indicate that DESs have a green profile and a good prospect for a wider use in the field of green technologies. PMID:25463852

  10. Maternal Choline Supplementation: A Potential Prenatal Treatment for Down Syndrome and Alzheimer's Disease.

    PubMed

    Strupp, Barbara J; Powers, Brian E; Velazquez, Ramon; Ash, Jessica A; Kelley, Christy M; Alldred, Melissa J; Strawderman, Myla; Caudill, Marie A; Mufson, Elliott J; Ginsberg, Stephen D

    2016-01-01

    Although Down syndrome (DS) can be diagnosed prenatally, currently there are no effective treatments to lessen the intellectual disability (ID) which is a hallmark of this disorder. Furthermore, starting as early as the third decade of life, DS individuals exhibit the neuropathological hallmarks of Alzheimer's disease (AD) with subsequent dementia, adding substantial emotional and financial burden to their families and society at large. A potential therapeutic strategy emerging from the study of trisomic mouse models of DS is to supplement the maternal diet with additional choline during pregnancy and lactation. Studies demonstrate that maternal choline supplementation (MCS) markedly improves spatial cognition and attentional function, as well as normalizes adult hippocampal neurogenesis and offers protection to basal forebrain cholinergic neurons (BFCNs) in the Ts65Dn mouse model of DS. These effects on neurogenesis and BFCNs correlate significantly with spatial cognition, suggesting functional relationships. In this review, we highlight some of these provocative findings, which suggest that supplementing the maternal diet with additional choline may serve as an effective and safe prenatal strategy for improving cognitive, affective, and neural functioning in DS. In light of growing evidence that all pregnancies would benefit from increased maternal choline intake, this type of recommendation could be given to all pregnant women, thereby providing a very early intervention for individuals with DS, and include babies born to mothers unaware that they are carrying a fetus with DS.

  11. Methionine-choline deprivation alters liver and brain acetylcholinesterase activity in C57BL6 mice.

    PubMed

    Vučević, Danijela B; Cerović, Ivana B; Mladenović, Dušan R; Vesković, Milena N; Stevanović, Ivana; Jorgačević, Bojan Z; Ješić Vukićević, Rada; Radosavljević, Tatjana S

    2016-07-01

    Choline and methionine are precursors of acetylcholine, whose hydrolysis is catalyzed by acetylcholinesterase (AChE). Considering the possibility of their common deficiency, we investigated the influence of methionine-choline deprivation on AChE activity in liver and various brain regions (hypothalamus, hippocampus, cerebral cortex and striatum) in mice fed with methionine-choline deficient (MCD) diet. Male C57BL/6 mice (n = 28) were randomly and equally divided into following groups: control group fed with standard diet for 6 weeks (C) and groups fed with MCD diet for 2 weeks (MCD2), 4 weeks (MCD4) and for 6 weeks (MCD6). After the diet, mice were sacrificied and AChE activity in liver and brain was determined spectrophotometrically. Hepatic AChE activity was higher in MCD2, MCD4 and MCD6 compared to control (p < 0.01), with most prominent increase in MCD6. AChE activity in hypothalamus was higher in MCD4 and MCD6 vs. control (p < 0.05 and p < 0.01, respectively), as well as in MCD6 compared to MCD4 (p < 0.01). In hippocampus, increase in AChE activity was shown in MCD6 compared to control (p < 0.01). In cortex and striatum, increase in AChE activity was noted in MCD6 compared to control (p < 0.05). Our findings indicate the increase of hepatic and brain AChE activity in mice caused by methionine-choline deprivation.

  12. Studies on the riboflavin, pantothenic acid, nicotinic acid and choline requirements of young Embden geese

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Serafin, J.A.

    1981-01-01

    Four experiments were conducted to examine the riboflavin, pantothenic acid, nicotinic acid, and choline requirements of young Embden geese fed purified diets. Goslings fed diets deficient in either riboflavin, pantothenic acid, nicotinic acid, or choline grew poorly. Feeding a pantothenic acid-deficient diet resulted in 100% mortality. Goslings fed diets containing 530 mg/kg of choline or less developed perosis. Under the conditions of these experiments it was found that: 1) goslings require no more than 3.84 mg/kg of riboflavin and 31.2 mg/kg of nicotinic acid in the diet for rapid growth and normal development, 2) the pantothenic acid requirement of goslings is no more than 12.6 mg/kg of diet, and 3) a dietary choline level of 1530 mg/kg is adequate for both the prevention of perosis and rapid growth of goslings. The levels of vitamins found to support normal growth and development of goslings appear to be similar to requirements of other species that have been examined.

  13. Incorporation of choline and ethanolamine into phospholipids in germinating soya bean.

    PubMed

    Dykes, C W; Kay, J; Harwood, J L

    1976-09-15

    1. Incorporation of [Me-14C]choline and [2-14C]ethanolamine into lipids was studied in germinating soya bean (Glycine max L.) seeds. The precursors are only incorporated into phosphatidylcholine and into phosphatidylethanolamine respectively. 2. Base-labelling via a phospholipase-D type of reaction was eliminated as a significant factor. 3. Cyclo heximide inhibited labelling of phosphatidylcholine from [Me-14C]choline but did not affect labelling of the aqueous choline pool. It had no effect on [2-14C]ethanolamine uptake or incorporation into phosphatidylethanolamine. 4. Hemicholinium-15 at 10mM concentrations decreased uptake and lipid labelling from the both bases. 5. There was no evidence for base competition. 6. The endogenous pool of choline was much larger than that of ethanolamine, which resulted in higher specific radioactivities for phosphatidyl-ethanolamine than for phosphatidylcholine. 7. The results can be interpreted as indicating that the kinase and phosphoryltransferase enzymes of the CDP-base pathways are separate for each phospholipid.

  14. Maternal Choline Supplementation: A Potential Prenatal Treatment for Down Syndrome and Alzheimer's Disease.

    PubMed

    Strupp, Barbara J; Powers, Brian E; Velazquez, Ramon; Ash, Jessica A; Kelley, Christy M; Alldred, Melissa J; Strawderman, Myla; Caudill, Marie A; Mufson, Elliott J; Ginsberg, Stephen D

    2016-01-01

    Although Down syndrome (DS) can be diagnosed prenatally, currently there are no effective treatments to lessen the intellectual disability (ID) which is a hallmark of this disorder. Furthermore, starting as early as the third decade of life, DS individuals exhibit the neuropathological hallmarks of Alzheimer's disease (AD) with subsequent dementia, adding substantial emotional and financial burden to their families and society at large. A potential therapeutic strategy emerging from the study of trisomic mouse models of DS is to supplement the maternal diet with additional choline during pregnancy and lactation. Studies demonstrate that maternal choline supplementation (MCS) markedly improves spatial cognition and attentional function, as well as normalizes adult hippocampal neurogenesis and offers protection to basal forebrain cholinergic neurons (BFCNs) in the Ts65Dn mouse model of DS. These effects on neurogenesis and BFCNs correlate significantly with spatial cognition, suggesting functional relationships. In this review, we highlight some of these provocative findings, which suggest that supplementing the maternal diet with additional choline may serve as an effective and safe prenatal strategy for improving cognitive, affective, and neural functioning in DS. In light of growing evidence that all pregnancies would benefit from increased maternal choline intake, this type of recommendation could be given to all pregnant women, thereby providing a very early intervention for individuals with DS, and include babies born to mothers unaware that they are carrying a fetus with DS. PMID:26391046

  15. Incorporation of choline and ethanolamine into phospholipids in germinating soya bean.

    PubMed Central

    Dykes, C W; Kay, J; Harwood, J L

    1976-01-01

    1. Incorporation of [Me-14C]choline and [2-14C]ethanolamine into lipids was studied in germinating soya bean (Glycine max L.) seeds. The precursors are only incorporated into phosphatidylcholine and into phosphatidylethanolamine respectively. 2. Base-labelling via a phospholipase-D type of reaction was eliminated as a significant factor. 3. Cyclo heximide inhibited labelling of phosphatidylcholine from [Me-14C]choline but did not affect labelling of the aqueous choline pool. It had no effect on [2-14C]ethanolamine uptake or incorporation into phosphatidylethanolamine. 4. Hemicholinium-15 at 10mM concentrations decreased uptake and lipid labelling from the both bases. 5. There was no evidence for base competition. 6. The endogenous pool of choline was much larger than that of ethanolamine, which resulted in higher specific radioactivities for phosphatidyl-ethanolamine than for phosphatidylcholine. 7. The results can be interpreted as indicating that the kinase and phosphoryltransferase enzymes of the CDP-base pathways are separate for each phospholipid. PMID:988830

  16. Doubly ionic hydrogen bond interactions within the choline chloride-urea deep eutectic solvent.

    PubMed

    Ashworth, Claire R; Matthews, Richard P; Welton, Tom; Hunt, Patricia A

    2016-07-21

    Deep eutectic solvents (DESs) are exemplars of systems with the ability to form neutral, ionic and doubly ionic H-bonds. Herein, the pairwise interactions of the constituent components of the choline chloride-urea DES are examined. Evidence is found for a tripodal CHCl doubly ionic H-bond motif. Moreover it is found that the covalency of doubly ionic H-bonds can be greater than, or comparable with, neutral and ionic examples. In contrast to many traditional solvents, an "alphabet soup" of many different types of H-bond (OHO[double bond, length as m-dash]C, NHO[double bond, length as m-dash]C, OHCl, NHCl, OHNH, CHCl, CHO[double bond, length as m-dash]C, NHOH and NHNH) can form. These H-bonds exhibit substantial flexibility in terms of number and strength. It is anticipated that H-bonding will have a significant impact on the entropy of the system and thus could play an important role in the formation of the eutectic. The 2 : 1 urea : choline-chloride eutectic point of this DES is often associated with the formation of a [Cl(urea)2](-) complexed anion. However, urea is found to form a H-bonded urea[choline](+) complexed cation that is energetically competitive with [Cl(urea)2](-). The negative charge on [Cl(urea)2](-) is found to remain localised on the chloride, moreover, the urea[choline](+) complexed cation forms the strongest H-bond studied here. Thus, there is potential to consider a urea[choline](+)·urea[Cl](-) interaction. PMID:27328990

  17. Doubly ionic hydrogen bond interactions within the choline chloride-urea deep eutectic solvent.

    PubMed

    Ashworth, Claire R; Matthews, Richard P; Welton, Tom; Hunt, Patricia A

    2016-07-21

    Deep eutectic solvents (DESs) are exemplars of systems with the ability to form neutral, ionic and doubly ionic H-bonds. Herein, the pairwise interactions of the constituent components of the choline chloride-urea DES are examined. Evidence is found for a tripodal CHCl doubly ionic H-bond motif. Moreover it is found that the covalency of doubly ionic H-bonds can be greater than, or comparable with, neutral and ionic examples. In contrast to many traditional solvents, an "alphabet soup" of many different types of H-bond (OHO[double bond, length as m-dash]C, NHO[double bond, length as m-dash]C, OHCl, NHCl, OHNH, CHCl, CHO[double bond, length as m-dash]C, NHOH and NHNH) can form. These H-bonds exhibit substantial flexibility in terms of number and strength. It is anticipated that H-bonding will have a significant impact on the entropy of the system and thus could play an important role in the formation of the eutectic. The 2 : 1 urea : choline-chloride eutectic point of this DES is often associated with the formation of a [Cl(urea)2](-) complexed anion. However, urea is found to form a H-bonded urea[choline](+) complexed cation that is energetically competitive with [Cl(urea)2](-). The negative charge on [Cl(urea)2](-) is found to remain localised on the chloride, moreover, the urea[choline](+) complexed cation forms the strongest H-bond studied here. Thus, there is potential to consider a urea[choline](+)·urea[Cl](-) interaction.

  18. Choline availability during embryonic development alters progenitor cell mitosis in developing mouse hippocampus.

    PubMed

    Craciunescu, Corneliu N; Albright, Craig D; Mar, Mei-Heng; Song, Jiannan; Zeisel, Steven H

    2003-11-01

    Previously, we reported that dietary choline influences development of the hippocampus in fetal rat brain. It is important to know whether similar effects of choline occur in developing fetal mouse brain because interesting new experimental approaches are now available using several transgenic mouse models. Timed-pregnant mice were fed choline-supplemented (CS), control (CT) or choline-deficient (CD) AIN-76 diet from embryonic day 12 to 17 (E12-17). Fetuses from CD dams had diminished concentrations of phosphocholine and phosphatidylcholine in their brains compared with CT or CS fetuses (P < 0.05). When we analyzed fetal hippocampus on day E17 for cells with mitotic phase-specific expression of phosphorylated histone H3, we detected fewer labeled cells at the ventricular surface of the ventricular zone in the CD group (14.8 +/- 1.9) compared with the CT (30.7 +/- 1.9) or CS (36.6 +/- 2.6) group (P < 0.05). At the same time, we detected more apoptotic cells in E17 hippocampus using morphology in the CD group (11.8 +/- 1.4) than in CT (5.6 +/- 0.6) or CS (4.2 +/- 0.7) group (P < 0.05). This was confirmed using terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase (TdT)-mediated dUTP-digoxigenin anti-digoxigenin fluorescein conjugate antibody nick end-labeling (TUNEL) and activated caspase-3 immunoreactivity. We conclude that the dietary availability of choline to the mouse dam influences progenitor cell proliferation and apoptosis in the fetal brain.

  19. Vitamin A, folate, and choline as a possible preventive intervention to fetal alcohol syndrome.

    PubMed

    Ballard, Mark S; Sun, Muxin; Ko, Jenny

    2012-04-01

    It is recognized that alcohol consumption during pregnancy is associated with fetal alcohol syndrome (FAS). Alcohol can trigger a pattern of neurodegeneration in rat brains similar to other known gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) specific agonists. However this does not seem to explain FAS entirely, as impoverished care-giving environments have been shown to increase the risk of FAS. Individuals living under the poverty level are at risk for micronutrient deficiencies due to insufficient intake. In particular, three nutrients commonly found to be deficient are folate, choline and vitamin A. There is evidence to suggest that ethanol alone may not explain the entire spectrum of anomalies seen in individuals with FAS. It is hypothesized that FAS may be caused more by the nutritional deficiencies that are exacerbated by alcohol than by direct alcoholic neurotoxicity. It is known that ethanol inhibits folate, choline, and vitamin A/retinoic acid metabolism at multiple steps. Additionally, mice exposed to ethanol demonstrated epigenetic changes, or variations in the methylation of DNA to control gene expression. Folate is important in the production of methyl groups, which are subsequently used to create and methylate DNA. Choline (which is metabolized to acetylcholine) is important in neurotransmission and neurodevelopment. It is also involved in an alternative pathway in the production of methyl groups. In fact a study by Thomas et al. in 2009 found that nutritional supplementation with choline in rats exposed to ethanol in utero almost completely mitigated the degenerative effects of ethanol on development and behaviour. Lastly, vitamin A and retinoic acid metabolism is associated with the regulation of one sixth of the entire proteome. Thus supplementation of folate, choline and vitamin A to mothers may mitigate the effects of the alcohol and reduce the severity or prevalence of FAS.

  20. CHOLINE PARTIALLY PREVENTS THE IMPACT OF ETHANOL ON THE LIPID RAFT DEPENDENT FUNCTIONS OF L1 CELL ADHESION MOLECULE

    PubMed Central

    Tang, Ningfeng; Bamford, Penny; Jones, Jace; He, Min; Kane, Maureen A.; Mooney, Sandra M.; Bearer, Cynthia F.

    2014-01-01

    Background Fetal Alcohol Spectrum Disorder, the leading known cause of mental retardation, is caused by alcohol exposure during pregnancy. One mechanism of ethanol teratogenicity is the disruption of the function of L1 cell adhesion molecule (L1). These functions include enhancement of neurite outgrowth, trafficking through lipid rafts, and signal transduction. Recent data have shown that choline supplementation of rat pups reduces the effects of ethanol on neurobehavior. We sought to determine if choline could prevent the effect of ethanol on L1 function using a simple experimental system. Methods Cerebellar granule neurons (CGN) from postnatal day 6 rat pups were cultured with and without supplemental choline, and the effects on L1 signaling, lipid raft distribution and neurite outgrowth were measured in the presence or absence of ethanol. Results Choline significantly reduced the effect of ethanol on L1 signaling, the distribution of L1 in lipid rafts and L1 mediated neurite outgrowth. However, choline supplemented ethanol exposed cultures remained significantly different than controls. Conclusions Choline pretreatment of CGN significantly reduces the disruption of L1 function by ethanol, but does not completely return L1 function to baseline. This experimental system will enable discovery of the mechanism of the neuroprotective effect of choline. PMID:25421509

  1. Editor's Highlight: Perfluorooctane Sulfonate-Choline Ion Pair Formation: A Potential Mechanism Modulating Hepatic Steatosis and Oxidative Stress in Mice.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Limin; Krishnan, Prasad; Ehresman, David J; Smith, Philip B; Dutta, Mainak; Bagley, Bradford D; Chang, Shu-Ching; Butenhoff, John L; Patterson, Andrew D; Peters, Jeffrey M

    2016-09-01

    The mechanisms underlying perfluorooctane sulfonate (PFOS)-induced steatosis remain unclear. The hypothesis that PFOS causes steatosis and other hepatic effects by forming an ion pair with choline was examined. C57BL/6 mice were fed either a control diet or a marginal methionine/choline-deficient (mMCD) diet, with and without 0.003, 0.006, or 0.012% potassium PFOS. Dietary PFOS caused a dose-dependent decrease in body weight, and increases in the relative liver weight, hepatic triglyceride concentration and serum markers of liver toxicity and oxidative stress. Some of these effects were exacerbated in mice fed the mMCD diet supplemented with 0.012% PFOS compared with those fed the control diet supplemented with 0.012% PFOS. Surprisingly, serum PFOS concentrations were higher while liver PFOS concentrations were lower in mMCD-fed mice compared with corresponding control-fed mice. To determine if supplemental dietary choline could prevent PFOS-induced hepatic effects, C57BL/6 mice were fed a control diet, or a choline supplemental diet (1.2%) with or without 0.003% PFOS. Lipidomic analysis demonstrated that PFOS caused alterations in hepatic lipid metabolism in the PFOS-fed mice compared with controls, and supplemental dietary choline prevented these PFOS-induced changes. Interestingly, dietary choline supplementation also prevented PFOS-induced oxidative damage. These studies are the first to suggest that PFOS may cause hepatic steatosis and oxidative stress by effectively reducing the choline required for hepatic VLDL production and export by forming an ion pair with choline, and suggest that choline supplementation may prevent and/or treat PFOS-induced hepatic steatosis and oxidative stress. PMID:27413108

  2. Characterization and Detection of a Widely Distributed Gene Cluster That Predicts Anaerobic Choline Utilization by Human Gut Bacteria

    PubMed Central

    Martínez-del Campo, Ana; Bodea, Smaranda; Hamer, Hilary A.; Marks, Jonathan A.; Haiser, Henry J.; Turnbaugh, Peter J.

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Elucidation of the molecular mechanisms underlying the human gut microbiota’s effects on health and disease has been complicated by difficulties in linking metabolic functions associated with the gut community as a whole to individual microorganisms and activities. Anaerobic microbial choline metabolism, a disease-associated metabolic pathway, exemplifies this challenge, as the specific human gut microorganisms responsible for this transformation have not yet been clearly identified. In this study, we established the link between a bacterial gene cluster, the choline utilization (cut) cluster, and anaerobic choline metabolism in human gut isolates by combining transcriptional, biochemical, bioinformatic, and cultivation-based approaches. Quantitative reverse transcription-PCR analysis and in vitro biochemical characterization of two cut gene products linked the entire cluster to growth on choline and supported a model for this pathway. Analyses of sequenced bacterial genomes revealed that the cut cluster is present in many human gut bacteria, is predictive of choline utilization in sequenced isolates, and is widely but discontinuously distributed across multiple bacterial phyla. Given that bacterial phylogeny is a poor marker for choline utilization, we were prompted to develop a degenerate PCR-based method for detecting the key functional gene choline TMA-lyase (cutC) in genomic and metagenomic DNA. Using this tool, we found that new choline-metabolizing gut isolates universally possessed cutC. We also demonstrated that this gene is widespread in stool metagenomic data sets. Overall, this work represents a crucial step toward understanding anaerobic choline metabolism in the human gut microbiota and underscores the importance of examining this microbial community from a function-oriented perspective. PMID:25873372

  3. Choline supplementation inhibits diethanolamine-induced morphological transformation in syrian hamster embryo cells: evidence for a carcinogenic mechanism.

    PubMed

    Lehman-McKeeman, L D; Gamsky, E A

    2000-06-01

    DEA, an amino alcohol, and its fatty acid condensates are widely used in commerce. DEA is hepatocarcinogenic in mice, but shows no evidence of mutagenicity or clastogenicity in a standard testing battery. However, it increased the number of morphologically transformed colonies in the Syrian hamster embryo (SHE) cell morphologic transformation assay. The goal of this work was to test the hypothesis that DEA treatment causes morphologic transformation by a mechanism involving altered cellular choline homeostasis. As a first step, the ability of DEA to disrupt the uptake and intracellular utilization of choline was characterized. SHE cells were cultured in medium containing DEA (500 microg/ml), and (33)P-phosphorus or (14)C-choline was used to label phospholipid pools. After 48 h, SHE cells were harvested, lipids were extracted, and radioactive phospholipids were quantified by autoradiography after thin layer chromatographic separation. In control cells, phosphatidylcholine (PC) was the major phospholipid, accounting for 43 +/- 1% of total phospholipid synthesis. However, with DEA treatment, PC was reduced to 14 +/- 2% of total radioactive phospholipids. DEA inhibited choline uptake into SHE cells at concentrations > or = 50 microg /ml, reaching a maximum 80% inhibition at 250-500 microg/ml. The concentration dependence of the inhibition of PC synthesis by DEA (0, 10, 50, 100, 250, and 500 microg/ml) was determined in SHE cells cultured over a 7-day period under the conditions of the transformation assay and in the presence or absence of excess choline (30 mM). DEA treatment decreased PC synthesis at concentrations > or = 100 microg/ml, reaching a maximum 60% reduction at 500 microg/ml. However, PC synthesis was unaffected when DEA-treated cells were cultured with excess choline. Under 7-day culture conditions, (14)C-DEA was incorporated into SHE lipids, and this perturbation was also inhibited by choline supplementation. Finally, DEA (10-500 microg/ml) transformed

  4. A fluoro versus a nitro derivative-a high-performance liquid chromatography study of two basic analytes with different reversed phases and silica phases as basis for the separation of a positron emission tomography radiotracer.

    PubMed

    Wenzel, Barbara; Günther, Robert; Brust, Peter; Steinbach, Jörg

    2013-10-11

    To develop a basis for the separation of a (18)F-labeled PET radiotracer from its nitro precursor, we performed an analytical HPLC study using the unlabeled reference compound and the corresponding nitro precursor. Aim of the study was to find a separation in which the fluoro derivative elutes in front of the nitro precursor with appropriate separation parameters. Several RP phases as well as a bare silica column were investigated with ACN and MeOH as organic modifiers and aqueous NH4OAc because of the basic character of the analytes. Four types of separation were observed based on different interaction mechanisms. When ACN/20mM NH4OAc aq. was used mainly cationic-exchange and hydrophobic interactions contributed to the retention. A reversal of elution order could be observed starting from 95% ACN and subsequent increasing of the water content. This phenomenon was observed for all RP phases and seems to be independent of the different spacers bound to the silica. By contrast, using MeOH/20mM NH4OAc aq. the elution order depends on the phase material. Two columns with the potential to perform π-π interactions showed different separation behavior compared to the other RP phases.

  5. Crystal structure of CbpF, a bifunctional choline-binding protein and autolysis regulator from Streptococcus pneumoniae

    PubMed Central

    Molina, Rafael; González, Ana; Stelter, Meike; Pérez-Dorado, Inmaculada; Kahn, Richard; Morales, María; Campuzano, Susana; Campillo, Nuria E; Mobashery, Shahriar; García, José L; García, Pedro; Hermoso, Juan A

    2009-01-01

    Phosphorylcholine, a crucial component of the pneumococcal cell wall, is essential in bacterial physiology and in human pathogenesis because it binds to serum components of the immune system and acts as a docking station for the family of surface choline-binding proteins. The three-dimensional structure of choline-binding protein F (CbpF), one of the most abundant proteins in the pneumococcal cell wall, has been solved in complex with choline. CbpF shows a new modular structure composed both of consensus and non-consensus choline-binding repeats, distributed along its length, which markedly alter its shape, charge distribution and binding ability, and organizing the protein into two well-defined modules. The carboxy-terminal module is involved in cell wall binding and the amino-terminal module is crucial for inhibition of the autolytic LytC muramidase, providing a regulatory function for pneumococcal autolysis. PMID:19165143

  6. CHOLINE SUPPLEMENTATION AND DNA METHYLATION IN THE HIPPOCAMPUS AND PREFRONTAL CORTEX OF RATS EXPOSED TO ALCOHOL DURING DEVELOPMENT

    PubMed Central

    Otero, Nicha K. H.; Thomas, Jennifer D.; Saski, Christopher A.; Xia, Xiaoxia; Kelly, Sandra J.

    2012-01-01

    Background Some of the most frequent deficits seen in children with FASD and in animal models of FASD are spatial memory impairments and impaired executive functioning, which are likely related to alcohol-induced alterations of the hippocampus and prefrontal cortex (PFC), respectively. Choline, a nutrient supplement, has been shown in a rat model to ameliorate some of alcohol's teratogenic effects and this effect may be mediated through choline' effects on DNA methylation. Methods Alcohol was given by intragastric intubation to rat pups during the neonatal period (postnatal days 2–10) (ET group), which is equivalent to the third trimester in humans and a period of heightened vulnerability of the brain to alcohol exposure. Control groups included an intubated control group given the intubation procedure without alcohol (IC) and a non-treated control group (NC). Choline or saline was administered subcutaneously to each subject from postnatal day 2 to 20. On postnatal day 21, the brains of the subjects were removed and assayed for global DNA methylation patterning as measured by chemiluminescence using the cpGlobal assay in both the hippocampal region and PFC. Results Alcohol exposure caused hypermethylation in the hippocampus and PFC, which was significantly reduced after choline supplementation. In contrast, control animals showed increases in DNA methylation in both regions after choline supplementation, suggesting that choline supplementation has different effects depending upon the initial state of the brain. Conclusions This study is the first to show changes in global DNA methylation of the hippocampal region and PFC after neonatal alcohol exposure. Choline supplementation impacts global DNA methylation in these two brain regions in alcohol-exposed and control animals in a differential manner. The current findings suggest that both alcohol and choline have substantial impact on the epigenome in the prefrontal cortex and hippocampus and future studies will be

  7. Regulation of the high-affinity choline transporter activity and trafficking by its association with cholesterol-rich lipid rafts.

    PubMed

    Cuddy, Leah K; Winick-Ng, Warren; Rylett, Rebecca Jane

    2014-03-01

    The sodium-coupled, hemicholinium-3-sensitive, high-affinity choline transporter (CHT) is responsible for transport of choline into cholinergic nerve terminals from the synaptic cleft following acetylcholine release and hydrolysis. In this study, we address regulation of CHT function by plasma membrane cholesterol. We show for the first time that CHT is concentrated in cholesterol-rich lipid rafts in both SH-SY5Y cells and nerve terminals from mouse forebrain. Treatment of SH-SY5Y cells expressing rat CHT with filipin, methyl-β-cyclodextrin (MβC) or cholesterol oxidase significantly decreased choline uptake. In contrast, CHT activity was increased by addition of cholesterol to membranes using cholesterol-saturated MβC. Kinetic analysis of binding of [(3)H]hemicholinium-3 to CHT revealed that reducing membrane cholesterol with MβC decreased both the apparent binding affinity (KD) and maximum number of binding sites (Bmax ); this was confirmed by decreased plasma membrane CHT protein in lipid rafts in cell surface protein biotinylation assays. Finally, the loss of cell surface CHT associated with lipid raft disruption was not because of changes in CHT internalization. In summary, we provide evidence that CHT association with cholesterol-rich rafts is critical for transporter function and localization. Alterations in plasma membrane cholesterol cholinergic nerve terminals could diminish cholinergic transmission by reducing choline availability for acetylcholine synthesis. The sodium-coupled choline transporter CHT moves choline into cholinergic nerve terminals to serve as substrate for acetylcholine synthesis. We show for the first time that CHT is concentrated in cholesterol-rich lipid rafts, and decreasing membrane cholesterol significantly reduces both choline uptake activity and cell surface CHT protein levels. CHT association with cholesterol-rich rafts is critical for its function, and alterations in plasma membrane cholesterol could diminish cholinergic

  8. Stress-induced stimulation of choline transport in cultured choroid plexus epithelium exposed to low concentrations of cadmium.

    PubMed

    Young, Robin K; Villalobos, Alice R A

    2014-03-01

    The choroid plexus epithelium forms the blood-cerebrospinal fluid barrier and accumulates essential minerals and heavy metals. Choroid plexus is cited as being a "sink" for heavy metals and excess minerals, serving to minimize accumulation of these potentially toxic agents in the brain. An understanding of how low doses of contaminant metals might alter transport of other solutes in the choroid plexus is limited. Using primary cultures of epithelial cells isolated from neonatal rat choroid plexus, our objective was to characterize modulation of apical uptake of the model organic cation choline elicited by low concentrations of the contaminant metal cadmium (CdCl₂). At 50-1,000 nM, cadmium did not directly decrease or increase 30-min apical uptake of 10 μM [(3)H]choline. However, extended exposure to 250-500 nM cadmium increased [(3)H]choline uptake by as much as 75% without marked cytotoxicity. In addition, cadmium induced heat shock protein 70 and heme oxygenase-1 protein expression and markedly induced metallothionein gene expression. The antioxidant N-acetylcysteine attenuated stimulation of choline uptake and induction of stress proteins. Conversely, an inhibitor of glutathione synthesis l-buthionine-sulfoximine (BSO) enhanced stimulation of choline uptake and induction of stress proteins. Cadmium also activated ERK1/2 MAP kinase. The MEK1 inhibitor PD98059 diminished ERK1/2 activation and attenuated stimulation of choline uptake. Furthermore, inhibition of ERK1/2 activation abated stimulation of choline uptake in cells exposed to cadmium with BSO. These data indicate that in the choroid plexus, exposure to low concentrations of cadmium may induce oxidative stress and consequently stimulate apical choline transport through activation of ERK1/2 MAP kinase.

  9. [Histochemistry and choline acetyltransferase in cat spinal cord and spinal ganglia].

    PubMed

    Motavkin, P A; Okhotin, V E

    1978-09-01

    Cytochemical activity of choline acetyltransferase has been studied in the pericaryon of motor neurons of the spinal enlargement and sensitive neurocytes of the intervertebral ganglia in the cat by means of Burt's method. It has been demonstrated that cytoplasm of all motor neurons positively reacts with acetyl KoA. According to the activity of choline acetyltransferase, four groups of neurons have been determined. In cerebrospinal ganglia, the enzyme is present in 58% of pseudounipolar cells, which seem to be cholinergic neurocytes. It has been stated that for all nonspecific reactions the presence of massive and dense residue in all the neurons, walls of small blood vessels and sometimes in astrocytes is a characteristic feature. PMID:718431

  10. Langevin dynamics of the choline head group in a membrane environment.

    PubMed Central

    Konstant, P H; Pearce, L L; Harvey, S C

    1994-01-01

    Computer simulations of dipalmitoylphosphatidylcholine (DPPC) have been performed using Langevin dynamics and a Marcelja-type mean field. This work has focused on the dynamics of the choline head group to parameterize the empirical constraints against phosphorus-carbon dipolar couplings (Dp-c) as measured by nuclear magnetic resonance (13C-NMR). The results show good agreement with experimental values at constraints equivalent to the choline tilt observed in joint refinement of x-ray diffraction and neutron diffraction scatterings. Quadrupolar splittings for the alpha and beta positions are also calculated and compared with 2H-NMR experiments. The model predicts torsional transition rates around the alpha-beta bonds and for the two C-O-P-O torsions. It also predicts T1 relaxation times for the alpha and beta carbons. PMID:7948684

  11. AzoCholine Enables Optical Control of Alpha 7 Nicotinic Acetylcholine Receptors in Neural Networks.

    PubMed

    Damijonaitis, Arunas; Broichhagen, Johannes; Urushima, Tatsuya; Hüll, Katharina; Nagpal, Jatin; Laprell, Laura; Schönberger, Matthias; Woodmansee, David H; Rafiq, Amir; Sumser, Martin P; Kummer, Wolfgang; Gottschalk, Alexander; Trauner, Dirk

    2015-05-20

    Nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs) are essential for cellular communication in higher organisms. Even though a vast pharmacological toolset to study cholinergic systems has been developed, control of endogenous neuronal nAChRs with high spatiotemporal precision has been lacking. To address this issue, we have generated photoswitchable nAChR agonists and re-evaluated the known photochromic ligand, BisQ. Using electrophysiology, we found that one of our new compounds, AzoCholine, is an excellent photoswitchable agonist for neuronal α7 nAChRs, whereas BisQ was confirmed to be an agonist for the muscle-type nAChR. AzoCholine could be used to modulate cholinergic activity in a brain slice and in dorsal root ganglion neurons. In addition, we demonstrate light-dependent perturbation of behavior in the nematode, Caenorhabditis elegans. PMID:25741856

  12. Choline Chloride Catalyzed Amidation of Fatty Acid Ester to Monoethanolamide: A Green Approach.

    PubMed

    Patil, Pramod; Pratap, Amit

    2016-01-01

    Choline chloride catalyzed efficient method for amidation of fatty acid methyl ester to monoethanolamide respectively. This is a solvent free, ecofriendly, 100% chemo selective and economically viable path for alkanolamide synthesis. The Kinetics of amidation of methyl ester were studied and found to be first order with respect to the concentration of ethanolamine. The activation energy (Ea) for the amidation of lauric acid methyl ester catalyzed by choline chloride was found to be 50.20 KJ mol(-1). The 98% conversion of lauric acid monoethanolamide was obtained at 110°C in 1 h with 6% weight of catalyst and 1:1.5 molar ratio of methyl ester to ethanolamine under nitrogen atmosphere. PMID:26666271

  13. Localization of choline acetyltransferase (ChAT) immunoreactivity in the brain of a caecilian amphibian, Dermophis mexicanus (Amphibia: Gymnophiona).

    PubMed

    González, Agustín; López, Jesús M; Sánchez-Camacho, Cristina; Marín, Oscar

    2002-07-01

    The organization of the cholinergic system in the brain of anuran and urodele amphibians was recently studied, and significant differences were noted between both amphibian orders. However, comparable data are not available for the third order of amphibians, the limbless gymnophionans (caecilians). To further assess general and derived features of the cholinergic system in amphibians, we have investigated the distribution of choline acetyltransferase immunoreactive (ChAT-ir) cell bodies and fibers in the brain of the gymnophionan Dermophis mexicanus. This distribution showed particular features of gymnophionans such as the existence of a particularly large cholinergic population in the striatum, the presence of ChAT-ir cells in the mesencephalic tectum, and the organization of the cranial nerve motor nuclei. These peculiarities probably reflect major adaptations of gymnophionans to a fossorial habit. Comparison of our results with those in other vertebrates, including a segmental approach to correlate cell populations across species, shows that the general pattern of organization of cholinergic systems in vertebrates can be modified in certain species in response to adaptative processes that lead to morphological and behavioral modifications of members of a given class of vertebrates, as shown for gymnophionans.

  14. Localization of choline acetyltransferase (ChAT) immunoreactivity in the brain of a caecilian amphibian, Dermophis mexicanus (Amphibia: Gymnophiona).

    PubMed

    González, Agustín; López, Jesús M; Sánchez-Camacho, Cristina; Marín, Oscar

    2002-07-01

    The organization of the cholinergic system in the brain of anuran and urodele amphibians was recently studied, and significant differences were noted between both amphibian orders. However, comparable data are not available for the third order of amphibians, the limbless gymnophionans (caecilians). To further assess general and derived features of the cholinergic system in amphibians, we have investigated the distribution of choline acetyltransferase immunoreactive (ChAT-ir) cell bodies and fibers in the brain of the gymnophionan Dermophis mexicanus. This distribution showed particular features of gymnophionans such as the existence of a particularly large cholinergic population in the striatum, the presence of ChAT-ir cells in the mesencephalic tectum, and the organization of the cranial nerve motor nuclei. These peculiarities probably reflect major adaptations of gymnophionans to a fossorial habit. Comparison of our results with those in other vertebrates, including a segmental approach to correlate cell populations across species, shows that the general pattern of organization of cholinergic systems in vertebrates can be modified in certain species in response to adaptative processes that lead to morphological and behavioral modifications of members of a given class of vertebrates, as shown for gymnophionans. PMID:12115707

  15. Effect of choline supplementation on rapid weight loss and biochemical variables among female taekwondo and judo athletes.

    PubMed

    Elsawy, Gehan; Abdelrahman, Osama; Hamza, Amr

    2014-03-27

    Taekwondo and judo competitions are divided into weight categories. Many athletes reduce their body mass a few days before competition in order to obtain a competitive advantage over lighter opponents. To achieve fast body mass reduction, athletes use a number of nutritional strategies, including choline supplementation. The goal of this study was to identify the effects of choline supplementation on body mass reduction and leptin levels among female taekwondo and judo athletes. Twenty-two female athletes (15 taekwondo and 7 judo athletes) were selected from different weight categories and divided into two groups, according to weight. The players in the experimental group took choline tablets for one week before a competition. The results revealed significant differences between pre- and post-competition measurements of leptin, free plasma choline, urine choline and urine malondialdehyde levels; body mass was also reduced in the post-competition measurements. In conclusion, choline supplementation could rapidly reduce body mass without any side effects on biochemical levels or static strength.

  16. Choline supplementation alters some amino acid concentrations with no change in homocysteine in children with cystic fibrosis and pancreatic insufficiency.

    PubMed

    Alshaikh, Belal; Schall, Joan I; Maqbool, Asim; Mascarenhas, Maria; Bennett, Michael J; Stallings, Virginia A

    2016-05-01

    The present study determined the plasma amino acid status in children with cystic fibrosis (CF) and pancreatic insufficiency (PI) in the modern medical and nutritional care setting and investigated the effect of choline supplementation on amino acid status. A total of 110 children aged 5 to 18 years with CF and PI were randomized to receive choline-enriched structured lipid (LYM-X-SORB) or placebo with similar energy and fat content. Plasma amino acids were measured at baseline and 3 and 12 months. We hypothesized that choline supplementation would result in lower plasma homocysteine concentrations in children with CF. At baseline, dietary protein intake was high and the amino acid profile was within laboratory reference ranges in most participants. Alanine and cysteine were elevated in 24% and 36% of participants, respectively. Children with baseline alanine above reference range had improved weight, body mass index, and fat-free mass. Low homocysteine was found in 62% of children 11 years and older. After 3 and 12 months, there was no effect of choline supplementation on methionine or homocysteine status. Compared with placebo, choline supplementation resulted in increased glycine and decreased threonine, histidine, valine, and total branch chained amino acids at 12 months. In conclusion, daily choline supplementation with LYM-X-SORB did not alter methionine-homocysteine metabolism but did result in alterations in other amino acids in children with CF and PI.

  17. Effect of Choline Supplementation on Rapid Weight Loss and Biochemical Variables Among Female Taekwondo and Judo Athletes

    PubMed Central

    Elsawy, Gehan; Abdelrahman, Osama; Hamza, Amr

    2014-01-01

    Taekwondo and judo competitions are divided into weight categories. Many athletes reduce their body mass a few days before competition in order to obtain a competitive advantage over lighter opponents. To achieve fast body mass reduction, athletes use a number of nutritional strategies, including choline supplementation. The goal of this study was to identify the effects of choline supplementation on body mass reduction and leptin levels among female taekwondo and judo athletes. Twenty-two female athletes (15 taekwondo and 7 judo athletes) were selected from different weight categories and divided into two groups, according to weight. The players in the experimental group took choline tablets for one week before a competition. The results revealed significant differences between pre- and post-competition measurements of leptin, free plasma choline, urine choline and urine malondialdehyde levels; body mass was also reduced in the post-competition measurements. In conclusion, choline supplementation could rapidly reduce body mass without any side effects on biochemical levels or static strength. PMID:25031675

  18. Direct Inhibition of Choline Kinase by a Near-Infrared Fluorescent Carbocyanine

    PubMed Central

    Arlauckas, Sean P.; Popov, Anatoliy V.; Delikatny, Edward J.

    2014-01-01

    Choline kinase alpha (ChoK) expression is increasingly being recognized as an important indicator of breast cancer prognosis, however previous efforts to non-invasively measure ChoK status have been complicated by the spectral limitations of in vivo magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS) and the complex network of enzymes involved in choline metabolism. The most effective ChoK inhibitors are symmetric and contain quaternary ammonium groups within heterocyclic head groups connected by an aliphatic spacer. Characterization of these bis-pyridinium and bis-quinolinium compounds has led to Phase I clinical trials to assess small molecule inhibitors of ChoK for solid tumor treatment. We report the development of a novel carbocyanine dye, JAS239, whose bis-indolium structure conforms to the parameters established for ChoK specificity and whose spacer length confers fluorescence in the near-infrared window. Fluorimetry and confocal microscopy were used to demonstrate that JAS239 rapidly enters breast cancer cells independent of the choline transporters, with accumulation in the cytosolic space where ChoK is active. Radio-tracing and 1H MRS techniques were used to determine that JAS239 binds and competitively inhibits ChoK intracellularly preventing choline phosphorylation while inducing cell death in breast cancer cell lines with similar efficacy to known ChoK inhibitors. Fluorescent molecules that report on ChoK status have potential use as companion diagnostics for non-invasive breast tumor staging, since NIR fluorescence allows for detection of real time probe accumulation in vivo. Furthermore, their ability as novel ChoK inhibitors may prove effective against aggressive, therapy-resistant tumors. PMID:25028471

  19. Regulation of choline deficiency apoptosis by epidermal growth factor in CWSV-1 rat hepatocytes.

    PubMed

    Albright, Craig D; da Costa, Kerry-Ann; Craciunescu, Corneliu N; Klem, Erich; Mar, Mei-Heng; Zeisel, Steven H

    2005-01-01

    Previous studies show that acute choline deficiency (CD) triggers apoptosis in cultured rat hepatocytes (CWSV-1 cells). We demonstrate that prolonged EGF stimulation (10 ng/mL x 48 hrs) restores cell proliferation, as assessed by BrdU labeling, and protects cells from CD-induced apoptosis, as assessed by TUNEL labeling and cleavage of poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase. However, EGF rescue was not accompanied by restoration of depleted intracellular concentrations of choline, glycerphosphocholine, phosphocholine, or phosphatidylcholine. In contrast, we show that EGF stimulation blocks apoptosis by restoring mitochondrial membrane potential (Delta Psi(m)), as determined using the potential-sensitive dye chloromethyl-X-rosamine, and by preventing the release and nuclear localization of cytochrome c. We investigated whether EGF rescue involves EGF receptor phosphorylation and activation of the down-stream cell survival factor Akt. Compared to cells in control medium (CT, 70 micromol choline x 48 hrs), cells in CD medium (5 micromol choline) were less sensitive to EGF-induced (0-300 ng/mL x 5 min) receptor tyrosine phosphorylation. Compared to cells in CT medium, cells in CD medium treated with EGF (10 ng/mL x 5 min) exhibited higher levels of phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K)-dependent phosphorylation of AktSer473. Inactivation of PI3K was sufficient to block EGF-stimulated activation of Akt, restoration of mitochondrial Delta Psi(m), and prevention of cytochrome c release. These studies indicate that stimulation with EGF activates a cell survival response against CD-apoptosis by restoring mitochondrial membrane potential and preventing cytochrome c release and nuclear translocation which are mediated by activation of Akt in hepatocytes. PMID:15665516

  20. Accumulation of glycerophosphocholine (GPC) by renal cells: Osmotic regulation of GPC:choline phosphodiesterase

    SciTech Connect

    Zablocki, K.; Miller, S.P.F.; Garcia-Perez, A.; Burg, M.B. )

    1991-09-01

    Although GPC has long been recognized as a degradation product of phosphatidylcholine, only recently is there wide appreciation of its role as a compatible and counteracting osmolyte that protects cells from osmotic stress. GPC is osmotically regulated in renal cells. Its level varies directly with extracellular osmolality. Cells in the kidney medulla in vivo and in renal epithelial cell cultures (MDCK) accumulate large amounts of GPC when exposed to high concentrations of NaCl and urea. Osmotic regulation of GPC requires choline in the medium, presumably as a precursor for synthesis of GPC. Choline transport into the cells, however, is not osmoregulated. The purpose of the present studies was to use MDCK cell cultures as a defined model to distinguish whether osmotically induced accumulation of GPC results from increased GPC synthesis or decreased GPC disappearance. The rate of incorporation of {sup 14}C from ({sup 14}C)choline into GPC, the steady-state GPC synthesis rate, and the activity of phospholipase A{sub 2} are not increased by high NaCl and urea. In fact all are decreased by approximately one-third. Therefore, the authors find no evidence that high NaCl and urea increases the GPC synthesis rate. They conclude that high NaCl and urea increase the level of GPC by inhibiting its enzymatic degradation.

  1. Key Players in Choline Metabolic Reprograming in Triple-Negative Breast Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Iorio, Egidio; Caramujo, Maria José; Cecchetti, Serena; Spadaro, Francesca; Carpinelli, Giulia; Canese, Rossella; Podo, Franca

    2016-01-01

    Triple-negative breast cancer (TNBC), defined as lack of estrogen and progesterone receptors in the absence of protein overexpression/gene amplification of human epidermal growth factor receptor 2, is still a clinical challenge despite progress in breast cancer care. 1H magnetic resonance spectroscopy allows identification and non-invasive monitoring of TNBC metabolic aberrations and elucidation of some key mechanisms underlying tumor progression. Thus, it has the potential to improve in vivo diagnosis and follow-up and also to identify new targets for treatment. Several studies have shown an altered phosphatidylcholine (PtdCho) metabolism in TNBCs, both in patients and in experimental models. Upregulation of choline kinase-alpha, an enzyme of the Kennedy pathway that phosphorylates free choline (Cho) to phosphocholine (PCho), is a major contributor to the increased PCho content detected in TNBCs. Phospholipase-mediated PtdCho headgroup hydrolysis also contributes to the build-up of a PCho pool in TNBC cells. The oncogene-driven PtdCho cycle appears to be fine tuned in TNBC cells in at least three ways: by modulating the choline import, by regulating the activity or expression of specific metabolic enzymes, and by contributing to the rewiring of the entire metabolic network. Thus, only by thoroughly dissecting these mechanisms, it will be possible to effectively translate this basic knowledge into further development and implementation of Cho-based imaging techniques and novel classes of therapeutics. PMID:27747192

  2. Self-aggregation of sodium dodecyl sulfate within (choline chloride + urea) deep eutectic solvent.

    PubMed

    Pal, Mahi; Rai, Rewa; Yadav, Anita; Khanna, Rajesh; Baker, Gary A; Pandey, Siddharth

    2014-11-11

    Deep eutectic solvents (DESs) have shown tremendous promise as green solvents with low toxicity and cost. Understanding molecular aggregation processes within DESs will not only enhance the application potential of these solvents but also help alleviate some of the limitations associated with them. Among DESs, those comprising choline chloride and appropriate hydrogen-bond donors are inexpensive and easy to prepare. On the basis of fluorescence probe, electrical conductivity, and surface tension experiments, we present the first clear lines of evidence for self-aggregation of an anionic surfactant within a DES containing a small fraction of water. Namely, well-defined assemblies of sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS) apparently form in the archetype DES Reline comprising a 1:2 molar mixture of choline chloride and urea. Significant enhancement in the solubility of organic solvents that are otherwise not miscible in choline chloride-based DESs is achieved within Reline in the presence of SDS. The remarkably improved solubility of cyclohexane within SDS-added Reline is attributed to the presence of spontaneously formed cyclohexane-in-Reline microemulsions by SDS under ambient conditions. Surface tension, dynamic light scattering (DLS), small-angle X-ray scattering (SAXS), density, and dynamic viscosity measurements along with responses from the fluorescence dipolarity and microfluidity probes of pyrene and 1,3-bis(1-pyrenyl)propane are employed to characterize these aggregates. Such water-free oil-in-DES microemulsions are appropriately sized to be considered as a new type of nanoreactor. PMID:25314953

  3. Identification and Characterization of ML352: A Novel, Noncompetitive Inhibitor of the Presynaptic Choline Transporter

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    The high-affinity choline transporter (CHT) is the rate-limiting determinant of acetylcholine (ACh) synthesis, yet the transporter remains a largely undeveloped target for the detection and manipulation of synaptic cholinergic signaling. To expand CHT pharmacology, we pursued a high-throughput screen for novel CHT-targeted small molecules based on the electrogenic properties of transporter-mediated choline transport. In this effort, we identified five novel, structural classes of CHT-specific inhibitors. Chemical diversification and functional analysis of one of these classes identified ML352 as a high-affinity (Ki = 92 nM) and selective CHT inhibitor. At concentrations that fully antagonized CHT in transfected cells and nerve terminal preparations, ML352 exhibited no inhibition of acetylcholinesterase (AChE) or cholineacetyltransferase (ChAT) and also lacked activity at dopamine, serotonin, and norepinephrine transporters, as well as many receptors and ion channels. ML352 exhibited noncompetitive choline uptake inhibition in intact cells and synaptosomes and reduced the apparent density of hemicholinium-3 (HC-3) binding sites in membrane assays, suggesting allosteric transporter interactions. Pharmacokinetic studies revealed limited in vitro metabolism and significant CNS penetration, with features predicting rapid clearance. ML352 represents a novel, potent, and specific tool for the manipulation of CHT, providing a possible platform for the development of cholinergic imaging and therapeutic agents. PMID:25560927

  4. (18)F-AmBF3-MJ9: a novel radiofluorinated bombesin derivative for prostate cancer imaging.

    PubMed

    Pourghiasian, Maral; Liu, Zhibo; Pan, Jinhe; Zhang, Zhengxing; Colpo, Nadine; Lin, Kuo-Shyan; Perrin, David M; Bénard, François

    2015-04-01

    A novel radiofluorinated derivative of bombesin, (18)F-AmBF3-MJ9, was synthesized and evaluated for its potential to image prostate cancer by targeting the gastrin releasing peptide receptor (GRPR). AmBF3-MJ9 was prepared from an ammoniomethyl-trifluoroborate (AmBF3) conjugated alkyne 2 and azidoacetyl-MJ9 via a copper-catalyzed click reaction, and had good binding affinity for GRPR (Ki=0.5±0.1nM). The (18)F-labeling was performed via a facile one-step (18)F-(19)F isotope exchange reaction, and (18)F-AmBF3-MJ9 was obtained in 23±5% (n=3) radiochemical yield in 25min with >99% radiochemical purity and 100±32GBq/μmol specific activity. (18)F-AmBF3-MJ9 was stable in mouse plasma, and was partially (22-30%) internalized after binding to GRPR. Positron emission tomography (PET) imaging and biodistribution studies in mice showed fast renal excretion and good uptake of (18)F-AmBF3-MJ9 by GRPR-expressing pancreas and PC-3 prostate cancer xenografts. Tumor uptake was 1.37±0.25%ID/g at 1h, and 2.20±0.13%ID/g at 2h post-injection (p.i.) with low background uptake and excellent tumor visualization (tumor-to-muscle ratios of 75.4±5.5). These data suggest that (18)F-AmBF3-MJ9 is a promising PET tracer for imaging GRPR-expressing prostate cancers.

  5. The influences of rearing environment and neonatal choline dietary supplementation on spatial learning and memory in adult rats.

    PubMed

    Tees, R C

    1999-11-15

    The facilitative effects of early environmental enrichment and perinatal choline chloride dietary supplementation on adult rat spatial learning and memory were examined using delayed match-to-place (DMTP) and delayed spatial win-shift (DSWSh) discrimination tasks. Animals were either maintained in a standard lighted colony (LR) or were given supplementary exposure to a complex environment (CR) for 2-h daily from 20 to 90 days of age. In each case, half the animals were exposed to the choline supplementation both prenatally (through the diet of pregnant rats) and postnatally (subcutaneous injection) for 24 days. In the first experiment, all 90-day-old rats were given trials in which they first found a hidden platform in a Morris water maze (MWM) in a particular location (acquisition trial), and then were required to remember that position 10 min later (test trial). Both environmental enrichment and early diet had significant impacts on performance. CR animals, given neonatal choline pretreatment, found the platform on test trials significantly faster than any of the other groups. CR animals exposed to the control saline diet showed better retention than did the LR animals given the early choline diet, which in turn, were superior to animals given neither environmental enrichment nor choline. All animals were subsequently tested in the same paradigm immediately following atropine sulfate injections. The atropine eliminated the difference between the four groups of animals on test trials. In a second experiment, both CR, and neonatal choline treatment facilitated performance on a DSWSh radial arm maze (RAM) task previously found to be sensitive to hippocampal and/or medial prefrontal lesions. Performance differences between groups were facilitated by the anticholinesterase drug, tacrine and attenuated by the cholinergic antagonist, Atropine. The present study extends the descriptions of long-term functional enhancements produced by perinatal choline supplementation

  6. Low fish intake is associated with low blood concentrations of vitamin D, choline and n-3 DHA in pregnant women.

    PubMed

    Wu, Brian T; Dyer, Roger A; King, D Janette; Innis, Sheila M

    2013-03-14

    Several studies have investigated the potential health benefits, including those associated with neurological function, of the n-3 fatty acid DHA. This has arisen in part because of the association between higher intakes of fish, which is a major dietary source of DHA, and reduced disease risk. In addition to DHA, fish also provides choline and vitamin D. The objective of the present study was to assess whether women in the first half of pregnancy with low fish intake also had low blood concentrations of vitamin D, choline and DHA. A total of 222 pregnant women at 16 weeks of gestation were examined for dietary intake, erythrocyte (phosphatidylethanolamine PE) DHA, plasma free choline and 25-hydroxyvitamin D (25(OH)D). Women who consumed ≤ 75 g fish/week (n 56) compared to ≥ 150 g fish/week (n 116) had lower dietary intake of DHA, total choline and vitamin D (P< 0·001), and lower erythrocyte PE DHA (5·25 (sd 1·27), 6·83 (sd 1·62) g/100 g total fatty acid, respectively, P< 0·01), plasma free choline (6·59 (sd 1·65), 7·40 (sd 2·05) μmol/l, respectively, P= 0·023) and 25(OH)D (50·3 (sd 20·0), 62·5 (sd 29·8) nmol/l, respectively, P< 0·01). DHA intake was positively related to the intake of vitamin D from foods (ρ 0·47, P< 0·001) and total choline (ρ 0·32, P< 0·001). Dietary intakes and biomarkers of DHA, choline and vitamin D status were assessed to be linked. This raises the possibility that unidentified concurrent nutrient inadequacies might have an impact on the results of studies addressing the benefits of supplemental DHA. PMID:22691303

  7. Effect of rumen-protected choline on performance, blood metabolites, and hepatic triacylglycerols of periparturient dairy cattle.

    PubMed

    Zom, R L G; van Baal, J; Goselink, R M A; Bakker, J A; de Veth, M J; van Vuuren, A M

    2011-08-01

    The effects of a dietary supplement of rumen-protected choline on feed intake, milk yield, milk composition, blood metabolites, and hepatic triacylglycerol were evaluated in periparturient dairy cows. Thirty-eight multiparous cows were blocked into 19 pairs and then randomly allocated to either one of 2 treatments. The treatments were supplementation either with or without (control) rumen-protected choline. Treatments were applied from 3 wk before until 6 wk after calving. Both groups received the same basal diet, being a mixed feed of grass silage, corn silage, straw, and soybean meal, and a concentrate mixture delivered through transponder-controlled feed dispensers. For all cows, the concentrate mixture was gradually increased from 0 kg/day (wk -3) to 0.9 kg of dry matter (DM)/d (day of calving) and up to 8.1 kg of DM/d on d 17 postcalving until the end of the experiment. Additionally, a mixture of 60 g of a rumen-protected choline supplement (providing 14.4 g of choline) and of 540 g of soybean meal or a (isoenergetic) mixture of 18 g of palm oil and 582 g of soybean meal (control) was offered individually in feed dispensers. Individual feed intake, milk yield, and body weight were recorded daily. Milk samples were analyzed weekly for fat, protein, and lactose content. Blood was sampled at wk -3, d 1, d 4, d 7, d 10, wk 2, wk 3, and wk 6 and analyzed for glucose, nonesterified fatty acids, and β-hydroxybutyric acid. Liver biopsies were taken from 8 randomly selected pairs of cows at wk -3, wk 1, wk 4, and wk 6 and analyzed for triacylglycerol concentration. We found that choline supplementation increased DM intake from 14.4 to 16.0 kg/d and, hence, net energy intake from 98.2 to 109.1 MJ/d at the intercept of the lactation curve at 1 day in milk (DIM), but the effect of choline on milk protein yield gradually decreased during the course of the study. Choline supplementation had no effect on milk yield, milk fat yield, or lactose yield. Milk protein yield was

  8. Cloning, sequence analysis, and purification of choline oxidase from Arthrobacter globiformis: a bacterial enzyme involved in osmotic stress tolerance.

    PubMed

    Fan, Fan; Ghanem, Mahmoud; Gadda, Giovanni

    2004-01-01

    Choline oxidase catalyzes the four-electron oxidation of choline to glycine betaine, one of a limited number of compounds that accumulate to high levels in the cytoplasm of cells to prevent dehydration and plasmolysis in adverse hyperosmotic environments. In the present study, the highly GC rich codA gene encoding for choline oxidase was cloned from genomic DNA of Arthrobacter globiformis strain ATCC 8010 and expressed to high yields in Escherichia coli strain Rosetta(DE3)pLysS. The resulting enzyme was purified to high levels in a single chromatographic step using DEAE-Sepharose, as shown by SDS-PAGE analysis. Denaturation and mass spectroscopic analyses showed that the covalent linkage between the FAD cofactor and the protein is preserved in recombinant choline oxidase, consistent with protein flavinylation being a self-catalytic process. The enzyme was shown to be a homodimer of 120,000 Da by size-exclusion chromatography and to be active with both choline and betaine aldehyde as substrate. Sequencing analysis indicated that the nucleotide sequence of codA originally reported in GenBank contains seven flaws, resulting in a translated protein with a significantly altered amino acid sequence between position 298 and 410.

  9. Role of choline and glycine betaine in the formation of N,N-dimethylpiperidinium (mepiquat) under Maillard reaction conditions.

    PubMed

    Bessaire, Thomas; Tarres, Adrienne; Stadler, Richard H; Delatour, Thierry

    2014-01-01

    This study is the first to examine the role of choline and glycine betaine, naturally present in some foods, in particular in cereal grains, to generate N,N-dimethylpiperidinium (mepiquat) under Maillard conditions via transmethylation reactions involving the nucleophile piperidine. The formation of mepiquat and its intermediates piperidine - formed by cyclisation of free lysine in the presence of reducing sugars - and N-methylpiperidine were monitored over time (240°C, up to 180 min) using high-resolution mass spectrometry in a model system comprised of a ternary mixture of lysine/fructose/alkylating agent (choline or betaine). The reaction yield was compared with data recently determined for trigonelline, a known methylation agent present naturally in coffee beans. The role of choline and glycine betaine in nucleophilic displacement reactions was further supported by experiments carried out with stable isotope-labelled precursors (¹³C- and deuterium-labelled). The results unequivocally demonstrated that the piperidine ring of mepiquat originates from the carbon chain of lysine, and that either choline or glycine betaine furnishes the N-methyl groups. The kinetics of formation of the corresponding demethylated products of both choline and glycine betaine, N,N-demethyl-2-aminoethanol and N,N-dimethylglycine, respectively, were also determined using high-resolution mass spectrometry. PMID:25333319

  10. Structural studies on choline-carboxylate bio-ionic liquids by x-ray scattering and molecular dynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Tanzi, Luana; Ramondo, Fabio; Caminiti, Ruggero; Campetella, Marco; Di Luca, Andrea; Gontrani, Lorenzo

    2015-09-21

    We report a X-ray diffraction and molecular dynamics study on three choline-based bio-ionic liquids, choline formate, [Ch] [For], choline propanoate, [Ch][Pro], and choline butanoate, [Ch][But]. For the first time, this class of ionic liquids has been investigated by X-ray diffraction. Experimental and theoretical structure factors have been compared for each term of the series. Local structural organization has been obtained from ab initio calculations through static models of isolated ion pairs and dynamic simulations of small portions of liquids through twelve, ten, and nine ion pairs for [Ch][For], [Ch][Pro], and [Ch][But], respectively. All the theoretical models indicate that cations and anions are connected by strong hydrogen bonding and form stable ion pairs in the liquid that are reminiscent of the static ab initio ion pairs. Different structural aspects may affect the radial distribution function, like the local structure of ion pairs and the conformation of choline. When small portions of liquids have been simulated by dynamic quantum chemical methods, some key structural features of the X-ray radial distribution function were well reproduced whereas the classical force fields here applied did not entirely reproduce all the observed structural features.

  11. Occurrence of Choline and Glycine Betaine Uptake and Metabolism in the Family Rhizobiaceae and Their Roles in Osmoprotection

    PubMed Central

    Boncompagni, Eric; Østerås, Magne; Poggi, Marie-Christine; le Rudulier, Daniel

    1999-01-01

    The role of glycine betaine and choline in osmoprotection of various Rhizobium, Sinorhizobium, Mesorhizobium, Agrobacterium, and Bradyrhizobium reference strains which display a large variation in salt tolerance was investigated. When externally provided, both compounds enhanced the growth of Rhizobium tropici, Sinorhizobium meliloti, Sinorhizobium fredii, Rhizobium galegae, Agrobacterium tumefaciens, Mesorhizobium loti, and Mesorhizobium huakuii, demonstrating their utilization as osmoprotectants. However, both compounds were inefficient for the most salt-sensitive strains, such as Rhizobium leguminosarum (all biovars), Agrobacterium rhizogenes, Rhizobium etli, and Bradyrhizobium japonicum. Except for B. japonicum, all strains exhibit transport activity for glycine betaine and choline. When the medium osmolarity was raised, choline uptake activity was inhibited, whereas glycine betaine uptake was either increased in R. leguminosarum and S. meliloti or, more surprisingly, reduced in R. tropici, S. fredii, and M. loti. The transport of glycine betaine was increased by growing the cells in the presence of the substrate. With the exception of B. japonicum, all strains were able to use glycine betaine and choline as sole carbon and nitrogen sources. This catabolic function, reported for only a few soil bacteria, could increase competitiveness of rhizobial species in the rhizosphere. Choline dehydrogenase and betaine-aldehyde dehydrogenase activities were present in the cells of all strains with the exception of M. huakuii and B. japonicum. The main physiological role of glycine betaine in the family Rhizobiaceae seems to be as an energy source, while its contribution to osmoprotection is restricted to certain strains. PMID:10224003

  12. Postnatal dietary supplementation with either gangliosides or choline: effects on spatial short-term memory in artificially-reared rats.

    PubMed

    Wainwright, Patricia E; Lomanowska, Anna M; McCutcheon, Dawn; Park, Eek J; Clandinin, M Thomas; Ramanujam, Kalathur S

    2007-01-01

    This study addressed the hypothesis that dietary supplementation with either gangliosides or choline during the brain growth spurt would enhance short-term spatial memory. Male Long-Evans rats were reared artificially from postnatal days (PD) 5-18 and were fed diets containing either (i) choline chloride 1250 mg/l (CHL), (ii) choline chloride 250 mg/l and GD3 24 mg/l (GNG) or (iii) choline chloride 250 mg/l (STD). A fourth group (SCK) was reared normally. Rats were weaned onto AIN 93G diet and on PD 35 were trained on a cued delayed- matching-to-place version of the Morris water maze. All groups learned to swim to the beacon that indicated the platform position on the first trial; similarly, on the second un-cued trial, the distance swam to reach the platform decreased to the same extent in all groups over the five days of training. The groups also responded in the same way to an increase in delay between the first and second trial from 1 min to 1 h, showing an increase in the distance swam, accompanied by a decrease in the number of direct swims to the platform. Thus, all rats were equally proficient at using spatial short-term memory, regardless of the choline or ganglioside content of the preweaning diet.

  13. Adequate Intake levels of choline are sufficient for preventing elevations in serum markers of liver dysfunction in Mexican American men but are not optimal for minimizing plasma total homocysteine increases after a methionine load2

    PubMed Central

    Veenema, Kristin; Solis, Claudia; Li, Rui; Wang, Wei; Maletz, Charles V; Abratte, Christian M; Caudill, Marie A

    2009-01-01

    Background An adequate intake of 550 mg choline/d was established for the prevention of liver dysfunction in men, as assessed by measuring serum alanine aminotransferase concentrations. Objective This controlled feeding study investigated the influence of choline intakes ranging from 300 to 2200 mg/d on biomarkers of choline status. The effect of the methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase (MTHFR) C677T genotype on choline status was also examined. Design Mexican American men (n = 60) with different MTHFR C677T genotypes (29 677TT, 31 677CC) consumed a diet providing 300 mg choline/d plus supplemental choline intakes of 0, 250, 800, or 1900 mg/d for total choline intakes of 300, 550, 1100, or 2200 mg/d, respectively, for 12 wk; 400 μg/d as dietary folate equivalents and 173 mg betaine/d were consumed throughout the study. Results Choline intake affected the response of plasma free choline and betaine (time × choline, P < 0.001); the highest concentrations were observed in the 2200 mg/d group. Phosphatidylcholine (P = 0.026) and total cholesterol (P = 0.002) were also influenced by choline intake; diminished concentrations were observed in the 300 mg/d group. Phosphatidylcholine was modified by MTHFR genotype (P = 0.035; 677TT < 677CC). After a methionine load (100 mg/kg body wt), choline intakes of 1100 and 2200 mg/d attenuated (P = 0.016) the rise in plasma homocysteine, as did the MTHFR 677TT genotype (P < 0.001). Serum alanine aminotransferase was not influenced by the choline intakes administered in this study. Conclusions These data suggest that 550 mg choline/d is sufficient for preventing elevations in serum markers of liver dysfunction in this population under the conditions of this study; higher intakes may be needed to optimize other endpoints. PMID:18779284

  14. Effects of genotype and environment on the contents of betaine, choline, and trigonelline in cereal grains.

    PubMed

    Corol, Delia-Irina; Ravel, Catherine; Raksegi, Mariann; Bedo, Zoltan; Charmet, Gilles; Beale, Michael H; Shewry, Peter R; Ward, Jane L

    2012-05-30

    This study examined the environmental and genetic variation in methyl donor contents and compositions of 200 cereal genotypes. Glycine betaine, choline, and trigonelline contents were determined by (1)H NMR, and significant differences were observed between cereal types (G) and across harvesting years and growing locations (E). Glycine betaine was the most abundant methyl donor in all of the 200 lines grown on a single site, and concentrations ranged from 0.43 ± 0.09 mg/g dm in oats to 2.57 ± 0.25 mg/g dm in diploid Einkorn varieties. In bread wheat genotypes there was a 3-fold difference in glycine betaine content. Choline contents, in the same lines, were substantially lower, and mean concentrations ranged from 0.17 mg/g dm in oats to 0.27 mg/g dm in durum wheat. Trigonelline was by far the least abundant of the methyl donors studied. Despite this, however, there were large differences between cereal types. Twenty-six wheat genotypes were grown in additional years at four European locations. The average glycine betaine content was highest in grains grown in Hungary and lowest in those grown in the United Kingdom. Across the six environments, there was a 3.8-fold difference in glycine betaine content. Glycine betaine levels, although moderately heritable (0.36), were found to be the most susceptible to the environmental conditions. Free choline concentrations were less variable across genotypes, but heritability of this component was the lowest of all methyl donor components (0.25) and showed a high G × E interaction. Trigonelline showed the most variation due to genotype. Heritability of this metabolite was the highest (0.59), but given that it is at a very low concentration in wheat, it is probably not attractive to plant breeders.

  15. Deciphering the role of multiple betaine-carnitine-choline transporters in the Halophile Vibrio parahaemolyticus.

    PubMed

    Ongagna-Yhombi, Serge Y; McDonald, Nathan D; Boyd, E Fidelma

    2015-01-01

    Vibrio parahaemolyticus is a halophile that is the predominant cause of bacterial seafood-related gastroenteritis worldwide. To survive in the marine environment, V. parahaemolyticus must have adaptive strategies to cope with salinity changes. Six putative compatible solute (CS) transport systems were previously predicted from the genome sequence of V. parahaemolyticus RIMD2210633. In this study, we determined the role of the four putative betaine-carnitine-choline transporter (BCCT) homologues VP1456, VP1723, VP1905, and VPA0356 in the NaCl stress response. Expression analysis of the four BCCTs subjected to NaCl upshock showed that VP1456, VP1905, and VPA0356, but not VP1723, were induced. We constructed in-frame single-deletion mutant strains for all four BCCTs, all of which behaved similarly to the wild-type strain, demonstrating a redundancy of the systems. Growth analysis of a quadruple mutant and four BCCT triple mutants demonstrated the requirement for at least one BCCT for efficient CS uptake. We complemented Escherichia coli MHK13, a CS synthesis- and transporter-negative strain, with each BCCT and examined CS uptake by growth analysis and (1)H nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy analyses. These data demonstrated that VP1456 had the most diverse substrate transport ability, taking up glycine betaine (GB), proline, choline, and ectoine. VP1456 was the sole ectoine transporter. In addition, the data demonstrated that VP1723 can transport GB, proline, and choline, whereas VP1905 and VPA0356 transported only GB. Overall, the data showed that the BCCTs are functional and that there is redundancy among them.

  16. Crystal Structures of Human Choline Kinase Isoforms in Complex with Hemicholinium-3

    PubMed Central

    Hong, Bum Soo; Allali-Hassani, Abdellah; Tempel, Wolfram; Finerty, Patrick J.; MacKenzie, Farrell; Dimov, Svetoslav; Vedadi, Masoud; Park, Hee-Won

    2010-01-01

    Human choline kinase (ChoK) catalyzes the first reaction in phosphatidylcholine biosynthesis and exists as ChoKα (α1 and α2) and ChoKβ isoforms. Recent studies suggest that ChoK is implicated in tumorigenesis and emerging as an attractive target for anticancer chemotherapy. To extend our understanding of the molecular mechanism of ChoK inhibition, we have determined the high resolution x-ray structures of the ChoKα1 and ChoKβ isoforms in complex with hemicholinium-3 (HC-3), a known inhibitor of ChoK. In both structures, HC-3 bound at the conserved hydrophobic groove on the C-terminal lobe. One of the HC-3 oxazinium rings complexed with ChoKα1 occupied the choline-binding pocket, providing a structural explanation for its inhibitory action. Interestingly, the HC-3 molecule co-crystallized with ChoKβ was phosphorylated in the choline binding site. This phosphorylation, albeit occurring at a very slow rate, was confirmed experimentally by mass spectroscopy and radioactive assays. Detailed kinetic studies revealed that HC-3 is a much more potent inhibitor for ChoKα isoforms (α1 and α2) compared with ChoKβ. Mutational studies based on the structures of both inhibitor-bound ChoK complexes demonstrated that Leu-401 of ChoKα2 (equivalent to Leu-419 of ChoKα1), or the corresponding residue Phe-352 of ChoKβ, which is one of the hydrophobic residues neighboring the active site, influences the plasticity of the HC-3-binding groove, thereby playing a key role in HC-3 sensitivity and phosphorylation. PMID:20299452

  17. Identification of new genetic polymorphisms that alter the dietary requirement for choline and vary in their distribution across ethnic and racial groups.

    PubMed

    da Costa, Kerry-Ann; Corbin, Karen D; Niculescu, Mihai D; Galanko, Joseph A; Zeisel, Steven H

    2014-07-01

    Effect alleles (alleles with a polymorphism that is associated with the effect being measured) in a small number of single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) are known to influence the dietary requirement for choline. In this study, we examined a much larger number of SNPs (n=200) in 10 genes related to choline metabolism for associations with development of organ dysfunction (liver or muscle) when 79 humans were fed a low-choline diet. We confirmed that effect alleles in SNPs such as the C allele of PEMT rs12325817 increase the risk of developing organ dysfunction in women when they consume a diet low in choline, and we identified novel effect alleles, such as the C allele of CHKA SNP rs7928739, that alter dietary choline requirements. When fed a low-choline diet, some people presented with muscle damage rather than liver damage; several effect alleles in SLC44A1 (rs7873937, G allele; rs2771040, G; rs6479313, G; rs16924529, A; and rs3199966, C) and one in CHKB (rs1557502, A) were more common in these individuals. This suggests that pathways related to choline metabolism are more important for normal muscle function than previously thought. In European, Mexican, and Asian Americans, and in individuals of African descent, we examined the prevalence of the effect alleles in SNPs that alter choline requirement and found that they are differentially distributed among people of different ethnic and racial backgrounds. Overall, our study has identified novel genetic variants that modulate choline requirements and suggests that the dietary requirement for choline may be different across racial and ethnic groups.-Da Costa, K.-A., Corbin, K. D., Niculescu, M. D., Galanko, J. A., Zeisel, S. H. Identification of new genetic polymorphisms that alter the dietary requirement for choline and vary in their distribution across ethnic and racial groups.

  18. Transient expression of choline acetyltransferase-like immunoreactivity in Purkinje cells of the developing rat cerebellum.

    PubMed

    Gould, E; Butcher, L L

    1987-08-01

    The expression of choline acetyltransferase (ChAT)-like immunoreactivity was studied immunohistochemically in the cerebelli of developing rats. Brains were examined from the day of birth (postnatal day 1: P1) until adulthood. From P4 through P21, several Purkinje cells in the uvula, nodule, and flocculus of the cerebellum demonstrated ChAT-like immunoreactivity. After P23, no ChAT-positive neurons were observed in any region of the cerebellum. This finding paralleled the transient expression of acetylcholinesterase in Purkinje cells of these same cerebellar areas during development.

  19. GABAA receptor pharmacology of fluorinated derivatives of the novel sedative-hypnotic pyrazolopyrimidine indiplon.

    PubMed

    Wegner, Florian; Deuther-Conrad, Winnie; Scheunemann, Matthias; Brust, Peter; Fischer, Steffen; Hiller, Achim; Diekers, Michael; Strecker, Karl; Wohlfarth, Kai; Allgaier, Clemens; Steinbach, Jörg; Hoepping, Alexander

    2008-02-01

    displaying the most pronounced efficacy at alpha3beta3gamma2L subtypes. In conclusion, the affinity profiles and functional properties of the newly synthesised fluorinated indiplon derivatives make compounds 2a and 2b suitable for the development of [(18)F]-labelled ligands at GABA(A) receptors containing the alpha1 subunit.

  20. Overexpression of DYRK1A inhibits choline acetyltransferase induction by oleic acid in cellular models of Down syndrome.

    PubMed

    Hijazi, Maruan; Fillat, Cristina; Medina, José M; Velasco, Ana

    2013-01-01

    Histological brain studies of individuals with DS have revealed an aberrant formation of the cerebral cortex. Previous work from our laboratory has shown that oleic acid acts as a neurotrophic factor and induces neuronal differentiation. In order to characterize the effects of oleic acid in a cellular model of DS, immortalized cell lines derived from the cortex of trisomy Ts16 (CTb) and normal mice (CNh) were incubated in the absence or presence of oleic acid. Oleic acid increased choline acetyltransferase expression (ChAT), a marker of cholinergic differentiation in CNh cells. However, in trisomic cells (CTb line) oleic acid failed to increase ChAT expression. These results suggest that the overdose of specific genes in trisomic lines delays differentiation in the presence of oleic acid by inhibiting acetylcholine production mediated by ChAT. The dual-specificity tyrosine (Y) phosphorylation-regulated kinase 1A (DYRK1A) gene is located on human chromosome 21 and encodes a proline-directed protein kinase. It has been proposed that DYRK1A plays a prominent role in several biological functions, leading to mental retardation in DS patients. Here we explored the potential role of DYRK1A in the modulation of ChAT expression in trisomic cells and in the signaling pathways of oleic acid. Down-regulation of DYRK1A by siRNA in trisomic CTb cells rescued ChAT expression up to levels similar to those of normal cells in the presence of oleic acid. In agreement with these results, oleic acid was unable to increase ChAT expression in neuronal cultures of transgenic mice overexpressing DYRK1A. In summary, our results highlight the role played by DYRK1A in brain development through the control of ChAT expression. In addition, the overexpression of DYRK1A in DS models prevented the neurotrophic effect of oleic acid, a fact that may account for mental retardation in DS patients. PMID:23124096

  1. Choline metabolism in glycinebetaine accumulating and non-accumulating near-isogenic lines of Zea mays and Sorghum bicolor.

    PubMed

    Peel, Gregory J; Mickelbart, Michael V; Rhodes, David

    2010-03-01

    Glycinebetaine (GB) is a compatible solute that is accumulated by some plant species, especially under conditions leading to tissue osmotic stress. Genetic modification for accumulation of GB in an attempt to produce more stress tolerant plants has been a focus for several groups in recent years. However, attempts to increase tissue GB concentrations have been unsuccessful, with many transgenic lines accumulating far lower concentrations than naturally-occurring GB accumulators. A better understanding of the metabolic regulation of GB synthesis is necessary for successful molecular breeding and biotechnology. We utilized previously developed near-isogenic lines for GB accumulation to characterize the biochemical basis for GB deficiency in maize and sorghum. Salinity resulted in increased accumulation of choline in both accumulating and non-accumulating lines. When grown in the presence of NaCl, GB-non-accumulating lines had increased concentrations of choline and phosphocholine, but not GB. Decreased GB synthesis can be explained from the increased concentrations of phosphocholine in planta and the strong inhibition of N-phosphoethanolamine methyltransferase by phosphocholine observed in vitro. The lack of GB accumulation in GB-/- homozygous NILs was not due to the lack of the putative choline monooxygenase (the enzyme responsible for choline oxidation to betaine aldehyde) gene or protein that we describe. The previously identified bet1 locus does not appear to be choline monooxygenase. However, the lack of GB synthesis does affect the synthesis and turnover of choline moieties in GB non-accumulating lines, which may lead to alterations in overall 1-carbon metabolism in plants.

  2. Folate intake and the MTHFR C677T genotype influence choline status in young Mexican American women☆

    PubMed Central

    Abratte, Christian M.; Wang, Wei; Li, Rui; Moriarty, David J.; Caudill, Marie A.

    2009-01-01

    Numerous studies have reported a relationship between folate status, the methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase (MTHFR) 677C→T variant and disease risk. Although folate and choline metabolism are inter-related, only limited data are available on the relationship between choline and folate status in humans. This study sought to examine the influences of folate intake and the MTHFR 677C→T variant on choline status. Mexican-American women (n =43; 14 CC, 12 CT and 17 TT) consumed 135 μg/day as dietary folate equivalents (DFE) for 7 weeks followed by randomization to 400 or 800 μg DFE/day for 7 weeks. Throughout the study, total choline intake remained unchanged at ∼350 mg/day. Plasma concentrations of betaine, choline, glycerophosphocholine, phosphatidylcholine and sphingomyelin were measured via LC-MS/MS for Weeks 0, 7 and 14. Phosphatidylcholine and sphingomyelin declined ( P=.001, P=.009, respectively) in response to folate restriction and increased ( P=.08, P=.029, respectively) in response to folate treatment. The increase in phosphatidylcholine occurred in response to 800 ( P=.03) not 400 ( P=.85) μg DFE/day (week×folate interaction, P=.017). The response of phosphatidylcholine to folate intake appeared to be influenced by MTHFR C677T genotype. The decline in phosphatidylcholine during folate restriction occurred primarily in women with the CC or CT genotype and not in the TT genotype (week×genotype interaction, P=.089). Moreover, when examined independent of folate status, phosphatidylcholine was higher ( P <.05) in the TT genotype relative to the CT genotype. These data suggest that folate intake and the MTHFR C677T genotype influence choline status in humans. PMID:17588738

  3. Dietary choline deficiency alters global and gene-specific DNA methylation in the developing hippocampus of mouse fetal brains.

    PubMed

    Niculescu, Mihai D; Craciunescu, Corneliu N; Zeisel, Steven H

    2006-01-01

    The availability of choline during critical periods of fetal development alters hippocampal development and affects memory function throughout life. Choline deficiency during fetal development reduces proliferation and migration of neuronal precursor cells in the mouse fetal hippocampus and these changes are associated with modifications in the protein levels of some cell cycle regulators and early differentiation markers. We fed C57 BL/6 mouse dams diets deficient or normal in choline content from days 12 to 17 of pregnancy, and then collected fetal brains on embryonic day 17. Using laser-capture micro-dissection we harvested cells from the ventricular and subventricular zones of Ammon's horn and from the prime germinal zone of the dentate gyrus (hippocampus). In the ventricular and subventricular zones from the choline-deficient group, we observed increased protein levels for kinase-associated phosphatase (Kap) and for p15(INK4b) (two cell cycle inhibitors). In the dentate gyrus, we observed increased levels of calretinin (an early marker of neuronal differentiation). In fetal brain from mothers fed a choline-deficient diet, DNA global methylation was decreased in the ventricular and subventricular zones of Ammon's horn. We also observed decreased gene-specific DNA methylation of the gene (Cdkn3) that encodes for Kap, correlating with increased expression of this protein. This was not the case for p15(INK4b) or calretinin (Cdkn2b and Calb2, respectively). These data suggest that choline deficiency-induced changes in gene methylation could mediate the expression of a cell cycle regulator and thereby alter brain development.

  4. Immunohistochemical determination of the extracellular matrix modulation in a rat model of choline-deprived myocardium: the effects of carnitine.

    PubMed

    Strilakou, Athina; Perelas, Apostolos; Lazaris, Andreas; Papavdi, Asteria; Karkalousos, Petros; Giannopoulou, Ioanna; Kriebardis, Anastasios; Panayiotides, Ioannis; Liapi, Charis

    2016-02-01

    Choline has been identified as an essential nutrient with crucial role in many vital biological functions. Recent studies have demonstrated that heart dysfunction can develop in the setting of choline deprivation even in the absence of underlying heart disease. Matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) are responsible for extracellular matrix degradation, and the dysregulation of MMP-2 and MMP-9 has been involved in the pathogenesis of various cardiovascular disorders. The aim of the study was to investigate the role of MMPs and their inhibitors (TIMPs), in the pathogenesis of choline deficiency-induced cardiomyopathy, and the way they are affected by carnitine supplementation. Male Wistar Albino adult rats were divided into four groups and received standard or choline-deficient diet with or without L-carnitine in drinking water (0.15% w/v) for 1 month. Heart tissue immunohistochemistry for MMP-2, MMP-9, TIMP-1, and TIMP-2 was performed. Choline deficiency was associated with suppressed immunohistochemical expression of MMP-2 and an increased expression of TIMP-2 compared to control, while it had no impact on TIMP-1. MMP-9 expression was decreased without, however, reaching statistical significance. Carnitine did not affect MMP-2, MMP-9, TIMP-1 or TIMP-2 expression. The pattern of TIMP and MMP modulation observed in a choline deficiency setting appears to promote fibrosis. Carnitine, although shown to suppress fibrosis, does not seem to affect MMP-2, MMP-9, TIMP-1 or TIMP-2 expression. Further studies will be required to identify the mechanism underlying the beneficial effects of carnitine.

  5. N-methyl-D-aspartate increases acetylcholine release from rat striatum and cortex: its effect is augmented by choline

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ulus, I. H.; Buyukuysal, R. L.; Wurtman, R. J.

    1992-01-01

    We examined the effects of N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA), a glutamate agonist, and of glutamate itself, on acetylcholine (ACh) release from superfused rat striatal slices. In a Mg(++)-free medium, NMDA (32-1000 microM) as well as glutamate (1 mM) increased basal ACh release by 35 to 100% (all indicated differences, P less than .05), without altering tissue ACh or choline contents. This augmentation was blocked by Mg++ (1.2 mM) or by MK-801 (10 microM). Electrical stimulation (15 Hz, 75 mA) increased ACh release 9-fold (from 400 to 3660 pmol/mg of protein): this was enhanced (to 4850 pmol/mg of protein) by NMDA (100 microM). ACh levels in stimulated slices fell by 50 or 65% depending on the absence or presence of NMDA. The addition of choline (40 microM) increased ACh release both basally (570 pmol/mg of protein) and with electrical stimulation (6900 pmol/mg of protein). In stimulated slices choline acted synergistically with NMDA, raising ACh release to 10,520 pmol/mg of protein. The presence of choline also blocked the fall in tissue ACh. No treatment affected tissue phospholipid or protein levels. NMDA (32-320 microM) also augmented basal ACh release from cortical but not hippocampal slices. Choline efflux from striatal and cortical (but not hippocampal) slices decreased by 34 to 50% in Mg(++)-free medium. These data indicate that NMDA-like drugs may be useful, particularly in combination with choline, to enhance striatal and cortical cholinergic activity. ACh release from rat hippocampus apparently is not affected by NMDA receptors.

  6. Choline supplementation mitigates trace, but not delay, eyeblink conditioning deficits in rats exposed to alcohol during development.

    PubMed

    Thomas, Jennifer D; Tran, Tuan D

    2012-03-01

    Children exposed to alcohol prenatally suffer from a range of physical, neuropathological, and behavioral alterations, referred to as fetal alcohol spectrum disorders (FASD). Both the cerebellum and hippocampus are affected by alcohol exposure during development, which may contribute to behavioral and cognitive deficits observed in children with FASD. Despite the known neuropathology associated with prenatal alcohol exposure, many pregnant women continue to drink (heavy drinkers, in particular), creating a need to identify effective treatments for their children who are adversely affected by alcohol. We previously reported that choline supplementation can mitigate alcohol's effects on cognitive development, specifically on tasks which depend on the functional integrity of the hippocampus. The present study examined whether choline supplementation could differentially mitigate alcohol's effects on trace eyeblink classical conditioning (ECC, a hippocampal-dependent task) and delay ECC (a cerebellar-dependent task). Long-Evans rats were exposed to 5.25 g/kg/day alcohol via gastric intubation from postnatal days (PD) 4-9, a period of brain development equivalent to late gestation in humans. A sham-intubated control group was included. From PD 10-30, subjects received subcutaneous injections of 100 mg/kg choline chloride or vehicle. Beginning on PD 32-34, subjects were trained on either delay or trace eyeblink conditioning. Performance of subjects exposed to alcohol was significantly impaired on both tasks, as indicated by significant reductions in percentage and amplitude of conditioned eyeblink responses, an effect that was attenuated by choline supplementation on the trace, but not delay conditioning task. Indeed, alcohol-exposed subjects treated with choline performed at control levels on the trace eyeblink conditioning task. There were no significant main or interactive effects of sex. These data indicate that choline supplementation can significantly reduce the

  7. Supplemental choline during the periweaning period protects against trace conditioning impairments attributable to post-training ethanol exposure in adolescent rats.

    PubMed

    Hunt, Pamela S

    2012-08-01

    Supplemental choline during early stages of development can result in long-lasting improvements to memory function. In addition, pre- or postnatal choline has been shown to be protective against some of the adverse effects of early alcohol exposure. The present experiment examined whether supplemental choline given to rats would protect against the effects of posttraining alcohol administration on trace fear conditioning. Posttraining alcohol exposure in adolescent rats results in poor performance in this hippocampus-dependent task, although delay conditioning is unaffected. Here, rats were given an s.c. injection of either saline or choline chloride daily on postnatal days (PD) 15-26. On PD 30 subjects were trained in a trace fear conditioning procedure. For the next 3 days animals were administered 2.5 g/kg ethanol or water control, and conditional stimulus (CS)-elicited freezing was measured on PD 34. Results indicated that posttraining alcohol disrupted the expression of trace conditioning and that supplemental choline on PD 15-26 was protective against this effect. That is, choline-treated animals subsequently given posttraining ethanol performed as well as animals not given ethanol. These results indicate that supplemental choline given during the periweaning period protects against ethanol-induced impairments in a hippocampus-dependent learning task. Findings contribute to the growing literature showing improvements in learning and memory in subjects given extra dietary choline during critical periods of brain development.

  8. Simultaneous determination of free carnitine and total choline by liquid chromatography/mass spectrometry in infant formula and health-care products: single-laboratory validation.

    PubMed

    Andrieux, Pierre; Kilinc, Tamara; Perrin, Christian; Campos-Giménez, Esther

    2008-01-01

    A single-laboratory validation study was conducted for a liquid chromatographic/mass spectrometric (LCIMS) method for the simultaneous determination of the free carnitine and total choline in milk-based infant formula and health-care products. The sample preparation used for both carnitine and choline was adapted from AOAC Official Method 999.14, with an acidic and enzymatic hydrolysis of esterified forms of choline. Carnitine and choline were quantified by ion-pair chromatography with single-quadrupole MS detection, using their respective deuterated internal standards. The repeatability relative standard deviation was < or =2.5 and 2.1%, respectively, for carnitine and choline. The intermediate reproducibility relative standard deviation was <4.7 and 2.4%, respectively, for carnitine and choline. The ranges of the average product-specific recoveries were 92-98 and 94-103%, respectively, for carnitine and choline. Choline concentration determined in infant formula reference material SRM 1846 was in agreement with the reference value. The proposed method was compared with the enzymatic methods for a range of products; good correlation (r = 0.99) was obtained, although a significant bias was observed for both analytes. The method, with a short chromatographic run time (7 min), is convenient for routine analysis to enhance analytical throughput and is a good alternative to enzymatic assays.

  9. Electrochemical Deposition of Niobium onto the Surface of Copper Using a Novel Choline Chloride-Based Ionic Liquid

    SciTech Connect

    Wixtroma, Alex I.; Buhlera, Jessica E.; Reece, Charles E.; Abdel-Fattah, Tarek M.

    2013-06-01

    Recent research has shown that choline chloride-based solutions can be used to replace acid-based electrochemical polishing solutions. In this study niobium metal was successfully deposited on the surface of copper substrate via electrochemical deposition using a novel choline chloride-based ionic liquid. The niobium metal used for deposition on the Cu had been dissolved in the solution from electrochemical polishing of a solid niobium piece prior to the deposition. The visible coating on the surface of the Cu was analyzed using scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and electron dispersive x-ray spectroscopy (EDX). This deposition method effectively recycles previously dissolved niobium from electrochemical polishing.

  10. Non-enzymatic synthesis of the coenzymes, uridine diphosphate glucose and cytidine diphosphate choline, and other phosphorylated metabolic intermediates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mar, A.; Dworkin, J.; Oro, J.

    1987-01-01

    Using urea and cyanamide, the two condensing agents considered to have been present on the primitive earth, uridine diphosphate glucose (UDPG), cytidine diphosphate choline (CDP-choline), glucose-1-phosphate (G1P), and glucose-6-phosphate (G6P) were synthesized under simulated prebiotic conditions. The reaction products were separated and identified using paper chromatography, thin layer chromatography, enzymatic analyses, and ion-pair reverse-phase high performance liquid chromatography. The possibility of nonenzymatic synthesis of metabolic intermediates on the primitive earth from simple precursors was thus demonstrated.

  11. Pituitary Non-Functioning Adenoma Disclosed at 18F-Choline PET/CT to Investigate a Prostate Cancer Relapse.

    PubMed

    Maffione, Anna Margherita; Mandoliti, Giovanni; Pasini, Felice; Colletti, Patrick M; Rubello, Domenico

    2016-10-01

    We report the incidental finding of a pituitary macroadenoma on an F-choline PET/CT in a patient with recurrent prostate cancer. The pituitary gland was clearly enlarged and intensely FDG avid (SUVmax, 6.6). The diagnosis was confirmed by a subsequent contrast-enhanced MR evaluation, and the macroadenoma was classified as nonfunctioning on the basis of normality of the specific serum hormonal profile. A follow-up F-choline PET/CT scan performed after 6 months revealed stable dimension, and uptake of the pituitary macroadenoma patient deceased 1 month later. At autopsy, intracytoplasmic vesicles containing growth and prolactin hormones were observed at immunohistochemistry. PMID:27500509

  12. Visualizing preparation using asymmetrical choline-like ionic liquids for scanning electron microscope observation of non-conductive biological samples.

    PubMed

    Abe, Shigeaki; Hyono, Atsushi; Kawai, Koji; Yonezawa, Tetsu

    2014-03-01

    In this study, we investigated conductivity preparation for scanning electron microscope (SEM) observation that used novel asymmetrical choline-type room temperature ionic liquids (RTIL). By immersion in only an RTIL solution, clear SEM images of several types of biological samples were successfully observed. In addition, we could visualize protozoans using RTILs without any dilution. These results suggested that the asymmetrical choline-type RTILs used in this study are suitable for visualizing of biological samples by SEM. Treatment without the need for dilution can obviate the need for adjusting the RTIL concentration and provide for a rapid and easy conductivity treatment for insulating samples.

  13. Dietary choline regulates antibacterial activity, inflammatory response and barrier function in the gills of grass carp (Ctenopharyngodon idella).

    PubMed

    Zhao, Hua-Fu; Jiang, Wei-Dan; Liu, Yang; Jiang, Jun; Wu, Pei; Kuang, Sheng-Yao; Tang, Ling; Tang, Wu-Neng; Zhang, Yong-An; Zhou, Xiao-Qiu; Feng, Lin

    2016-05-01

    An 8-week feeding trial was conducted to determine the effects of graded levels of choline (197-1795 mg/kg) on antibacterial properties, inflammatory status and barrier function in the gills of grass carp. The results showed that optimal dietary choline supplementation significantly improved lysozyme and acid phosphatase activities, complement component 3 (C3) content, and the liver expressed antimicrobial peptide 2 and Hepcidin mRNA levels in the gills of fish (P < 0.05). In addition, appropriate dietary choline significantly decreased the oxidative damage, which might be partly due to increase copper, zinc superoxide dismutase (Cu/Zn-SOD), catalase (CAT), glutathione peroxidase (GPx), glutathione-S-transferase (GST) and glutathione reductase (GR) activities and increased glutathione content in the gills of fish (P < 0.05). Moreover, appropriate dietary choline significantly up-regulated the mRNA levels of interleukin 10 and transforming growth factor β1, Zonula occludens 1, Occludin, Claudin-b, c, 3 and 12, inhibitor of κBα, target of rapamycin, Cu/Zn-SOD, CAT, GR, GPx, GST and NF-E2-related factor 2 in the gills of fish (P < 0.05). Conversely, appropriate dietary choline significantly down-regulated the mRNA levels of pro-inflammatory cytokines, tumor necrosis factor α, interleukin 8, interferon γ, interleukin 1β, and related signaling factors, nuclear factor kappa B p65, IκB kinase β, IκB kinase γ, myosin light chain kinase and Kelch-like-ECH-associated protein 1a (Keap1a) in the gills of fish (P < 0.05). However, choline did not have a significant effect on the mRNA levels of IκB kinase α, Claudin-15 and Keap1b in the gills of fish. Collectively, appropriate dietary choline levels improved gill antibacterial properties and relative gene expression levels of tight junction proteins, and decreased inflammatory status, as well as up-regulated the mRNA levels of related signaling molecules in the gills of fish. Based on gill C3 content and AHR activity

  14. Immunolocalization of choline acetyltransferase of common type in the central brain mass of Octopus vulgaris

    PubMed Central

    Casini, A.; Vaccaro, R.; D'Este, L.; Sakaue, Y.; Bellier, J.P.; Kimura, H.; Renda, T.G.

    2012-01-01

    Acetylcholine, the first neurotransmitter to be identified in the vertebrate frog, is widely distributed among the animal kingdom. The presence of a large amount of acetylcholine in the nervous system of cephalopods is well known from several biochemical and physiological studies. However, little is known about the precise distribution of cholinergic structures due to a lack of a suitable histochemical technique for detecting acetylcholine. The most reliable method to visualize the cholinergic neurons is the immunohistochemical localization of the enzyme choline acetyltransferase, the synthetic enzyme of acetylcholine. Following our previous study on the distribution patterns of cholinergic neurons in the Octopus vulgaris visual system, using a novel antibody that recognizes choline acetyltransferase of the common type (cChAT), now we extend our investigation on the octopus central brain mass. When applied on sections of octopus central ganglia, immunoreactivity for cChAT was detected in cell bodies of all central brain mass lobes with the notable exception of the subfrontal and subvertical lobes. Positive varicosed nerves fibers where observed in the neuropil of all central brain mass lobes. PMID:23027350

  15. Overexpression, purification and crystallization of a choline-binding protein CbpI from Streptococcus pneumoniae

    SciTech Connect

    Paterson, Neil G. Riboldi-Tunicliffe, Alan; Mitchell, Timothy J.; Isaacs, Neil W.

    2006-07-01

    The choline-binding protein CbpI from S. pneumoniae has been purified and crystallized and diffraction data have been collected to 3.5 Å resolution. The choline-binding protein CbpI from Streptococcus pneumoniae is a 23.4 kDa protein with no known function. The protein has been successfully purified initially using Ni–NTA chromatography and to homogeneity using Q-Sepharose ion-exchange resin as an affinity column. CbpI was crystallized using PEG 3350 as a precipitant and X-ray crystallographic analysis showed that the crystals belonged to the tetragonal space group P4, with unit-cell parameters a = b = 83.31, c = 80.29 Å, α = β = γ = 90°. The crystal contains two molecules in the asymmetric unit with a solvent content of 55.7% (V{sub M} = 2.77 Å{sup 3} Da{sup −1}) and shows a diffraction limit of 3.5 Å.

  16. The role of rumen-protected choline in hepatic function and performance of transition dairy cows.

    PubMed

    Shahsavari, Arash; D'Occhio, Michael J; Al Jassim, Rafat

    2016-07-01

    High-producing dairy cows enter a period of negative energy balance during the first weeks of lactation. Energy intake is usually sufficient to cover the increase in energy requirements for fetal growth during the period before calving, but meeting the demand for energy is often difficult during the early stages of lactation. A catabolic state predominates during the transition period, leading to the mobilisation of energy reserves (NEFA and amino acids) that are utilised mainly by the liver and muscle. Increased uptake of mobilised NEFA by the liver, combined with the limited capacity of hepatocytes to either oxidise fatty acids for energy or to incorporate esterified fatty acids into VLDL results in fatty liver syndrome and ketosis. This metabolic disturbance can affect the general health, and it causes economic losses. Different nutritional strategies have been used to restrict negative effects associated with the energy challenge in transition cows. The provision of choline in the form of rumen-protected choline (RPC) can potentially improve liver function by increasing VLDL exportation from the liver. RPC increases gene expression of microsomal TAG transfer protein and APOB100 that are required for VLDL synthesis and secretion. Studies with RPC have looked at gene expression, metabolic hormones, metabolite profiles, milk production and postpartum reproduction. A reduction in liver fat and enhanced milk production has been observed with RPC supplementation. However, the effects of RPC on health and reproduction are equivocal, which could reflect the lack of sufficient dose-response studies. PMID:27138530

  17. Immunolocalization of choline acetyltransferase of common type in the central brain mass of Octopus vulgaris.

    PubMed

    Casini, A; Vaccaro, R; D'Este, L; Sakaue, Y; Bellier, J P; Kimura, H; Renda, T G

    2012-07-19

    Acetylcholine, the first neurotransmitter to be identified in the vertebrate frog, is widely distributed among the animal kingdom. The presence of a large amount of acetylcholine in the nervous system of cephalopods is well known from several biochemical and physiological studies. However, little is known about the precise distribution of cholinergic structures due to a lack of a suitable histochemical technique for detecting acetylcholine. The most reliable method to visualize the cholinergic neurons is the immunohistochemical localization of the enzyme choline acetyltransferase, the synthetic enzyme of acetylcholine. Following our previous study on the distribution patterns of cholinergic neurons in the Octopus vulgaris visual system, using a novel antibody that recognizes choline acetyltransferase of the common type (cChAT), now we extend our investigation on the octopus central brain mass. When applied on sections of octopus central ganglia, immunoreactivity for cChAT was detected in cell bodies of all central brain mass lobes with the notable exception of the subfrontal and subvertical lobes. Positive varicosed nerves fibers where observed in the neuropil of all central brain mass lobes.

  18. Hydride transfer made easy in the oxidation of alcohols catalyzed by choline oxidase

    SciTech Connect

    Gadda, G.; Orville, A.; Pennati, A.; Francis, K.; Quaye, O.; Yuan, H.; Rungsrisuriyachai, K.; Finnegan, S.; Mijatovic, S.; Nguyen, T.

    2008-06-08

    Choline oxidase (E.C. 1.1.3.17) catalyzes the two-step, four-electron oxidation of choline to glycine betaine with betaine aldehyde as enzyme-associated intermediate and molecular oxygen as final electron acceptor (Scheme 1). The gem-diol, hydrated species of the aldehyde intermediate of the reaction acts as substrate for aldehyde oxidation, suggesting that the enzyme may use similar strategies for the oxidation of the alcohol substrate and aldehyde intermediate. The determination of the chemical mechanism for alcohol oxidation has emerged from biochemical, mechanistic, mutagenetic, and structural studies. As illustrated in the mechanism of Scheme 2, the alcohol substrate is initially activated in the active site of the enzyme by removal of the hydroxyl proton. The resulting alkoxide intermediate is then stabilized in the enzyme-substrate complex via electrostatic interactions with active site amino acid residues. Alcohol oxidation then occurs quantum mechanically via the transfer of the hydride ion from the activated substrate to the N(5) flavin locus. An essential requisite for this mechanism of alcohol oxidation is the high degree of preorganization of the activated enzyme-substrate complex, which is achieved through an internal equilibrium of the Michaelis complex occurring prior to, and independently from, the subsequent hydride transfer reaction. The experimental evidence that support the mechanism for alcohol oxidation shown in Scheme 2 is briefly summarized in the Results and Discussion section.

  19. Choline acetyltransferase in the hippocampus is associated with learning strategy preference in adult male rats.

    PubMed

    Hawley, Wayne R; Witty, Christine F; Daniel, Jill M; Dohanich, Gary P

    2015-08-01

    One principle of the multiple memory systems hypothesis posits that the hippocampus-based and striatum-based memory systems compete for control over learning. Consistent with this notion, previous research indicates that the cholinergic system of the hippocampus plays a role in modulating the preference for a hippocampus-based place learning strategy over a striatum-based stimulus--response learning strategy. Interestingly, in the hippocampus, greater activity and higher protein levels of choline acetyltransferase (ChAT), the enzyme that synthesizes acetylcholine, are associated with better performance on hippocampus-based learning and memory tasks. With this in mind, the primary aim of the current study was to determine if higher levels of ChAT and the high-affinity choline uptake transporter (CHT) in the hippocampus were associated with a preference for a hippocampus-based place learning strategy on a task that also could be solved by relying on a striatum-based stimulus--response learning strategy. Results confirmed that levels of ChAT in the dorsal region of the hippocampus were associated with a preference for a place learning strategy on a water maze task that could also be solved by adopting a stimulus-response learning strategy. Consistent with previous studies, the current results support the hypothesis that the cholinergic system of the hippocampus plays a role in balancing competition between memory systems that modulate learning strategy preference.

  20. Glutamate and choline levels predict individual differences in reading ability in emergent readers.

    PubMed

    Pugh, Kenneth R; Frost, Stephen J; Rothman, Douglas L; Hoeft, Fumiko; Del Tufo, Stephanie N; Mason, Graeme F; Molfese, Peter J; Mencl, W Einar; Grigorenko, Elena L; Landi, Nicole; Preston, Jonathan L; Jacobsen, Leslie; Seidenberg, Mark S; Fulbright, Robert K

    2014-03-12

    Reading disability is a brain-based difficulty in acquiring fluent reading skills that affects significant numbers of children. Although neuroanatomical and neurofunctional networks involved in typical and atypical reading are increasingly well characterized, the underlying neurochemical bases of individual differences in reading development are virtually unknown. The current study is the first to examine neurochemistry in children during the critical period in which the neurocircuits that support skilled reading are still developing. In a longitudinal pediatric sample of emergent readers whose reading indicators range on a continuum from impaired to superior, we examined the relationship between individual differences in reading and reading-related skills and concentrations of neurometabolites measured using magnetic resonance spectroscopy. Both continuous and group analyses revealed that choline and glutamate concentrations were negatively correlated with reading and related linguistic measures in phonology and vocabulary (such that higher concentrations were associated with poorer performance). Correlations with behavioral scores obtained 24 months later reveal stability for the relationship between glutamate and reading performance. Implications for neurodevelopmental models of reading and reading disability are discussed, including possible links of choline and glutamate to white matter anomalies and hyperexcitability. These findings point to new directions for research on gene-brain-behavior pathways in human studies of reading disability.

  1. A multi-year assessment of the environmental impact of transgenic Eucalyptus trees harboring a bacterial choline oxidase gene on biomass, precinct vegetation and the microbial community.

    PubMed

    Oguchi, Taichi; Kashimura, Yuko; Mimura, Makiko; Yu, Xiang; Matsunaga, Etsuko; Nanto, Kazuya; Shimada, Teruhisa; Kikuchi, Akira; Watanabe, Kazuo N

    2014-10-01

    A 4-year field trial for the salt tolerant Eucalyptus globulus Labill. harboring the choline oxidase (codA) gene derived from the halobacterium Arthrobacter globiformis was conducted to assess the impact of transgenic versus non-transgenic trees on biomass production, the adjacent soil microbial communities and vegetation by monitoring growth parameters, seasonal changes in soil microbes and the allelopathic activity of leaves. Three independently-derived lines of transgenic E. globulus were compared with three independent non-transgenic lines including two elite clones. No significant differences in biomass production were detected between transgenic lines and non-transgenic controls derived from same seed bulk, while differences were seen compared to two elite clones. Significant differences in the number of soil microbes present were also detected at different sampling times but not between transgenic and non-transgenic lines. The allelopathic activity of leaves from both transgenic and non-transgenic lines also varied significantly with sampling time, but the allelopathic activity of leaves from transgenic lines did not differ significantly from those from non-transgenic lines. These results indicate that, for the observed variables, the impact on the environment of codA-transgenic E. globulus did not differ significantly from that of the non-transformed controls on this field trial. PMID:24927812

  2. Effect of choline on antioxidant defenses and gene expressions of Nrf2 signaling molecule in the spleen and head kidney of juvenile Jian carp (Cyprinus carpio var. Jian).

    PubMed

    Wu, Pei; Jiang, Wei-Dan; Liu, Yang; Chen, Gang-Fu; Jiang, Jun; Li, Shu-Hong; Feng, Lin; Zhou, Xiao-Qiu

    2014-06-01

    The present work evaluates the effects of various levels of dietary choline on antioxidant defenses and gene expressions of Nrf2 signaling molecule in spleen and head kidney of juvenile Jian carp (Cyprinus carpio var. Jian). Fish were fed with six different experimental diets containing graded levels of choline at 165 (choline-deficient control), 310, 607, 896, 1167 and 1820 mg kg(-1) diet for 65 days. At the end of the feeding trail, fish were challenged with Aeromonas hydrophila and mortalities were recorded over 17 days. Dietary choline significantly decreased malondialdehyde and protein carbonyl contents in spleen and head kidney. However, anti-superoxide anion and anti-hydroxyl radical activities in spleen and head kidney also decreased. Interestingly, activities of superoxide dismutase (SOD), catalase (CAT), glutathione peroxidase (GPx), glutathione-S-transferase (GST) and glutathione reductase (GR) in spleen, GPx activity in head kidney, and glutathione contents in spleen and head kidney were decreased with increase of dietary choline levels up to a certain point, whereas, activities of SOD, GST and GR in head kidney showed no significantly differences among groups. Similarly, expression levels of CuZnSOD, MnSOD, CAT, GPx1a, GPx1b and GR gene in spleen and head kidney were significantly lower in group with choline level of 607 mg kg(-1) diet than those in the choline-deficient group. The relative gene expressions of Nrf2 in head kidney and Keap1a in spleen and head kidney were decreased with increasing of dietary choline up to a certain point. However, the relative gene expression of Nrf2 in spleen were not significantly affected by dietary choline. In conclusion, dietary choline decreased the oxidant damage and regulated the antioxidant system in immune organs of juvenile Jian carp.

  3. Role of bone marrow cells in the development of pancreatic fibrosis in a rat model of pancreatitis induced by a choline-deficient/ethionine-supplemented diet

    SciTech Connect

    Akita, Shingo; Kubota, Koji; Kobayashi, Akira; Misawa, Ryosuke; Shimizu, Akira; Nakata, Takenari; Yokoyama, Takahide; Takahashi, Masafumi; Miyagawa, Shinichi

    2012-04-20

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer BMC-derived PSCs play a role in a rat CDE diet-induced pancreatitis model. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer BMC-derived PSCs contribute mainly to the early stage of pancreatic fibrosis. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer BMC-derived activated PSCs can produce PDGF and TGF {beta}1. -- Abstract: Bone marrow cell (BMC)-derived myofibroblast-like cells have been reported in various organs, including the pancreas. However, the contribution of these cells to pancreatic fibrosis has not been fully discussed. The present study examined the possible involvement of pancreatic stellate cells (PSCs) originating from BMCs in the development of pancreatic fibrosis in a clinically relevant rat model of acute pancreatitis induced by a choline-deficient/ethionine-supplemented (CDE) diet. BMCs from female transgenic mice ubiquitously expressing green fluorescent protein (GFP) were transplanted into lethally irradiated male rats. Once chimerism was established, acute pancreatitis was induced by a CDE diet. Chronological changes in the number of PSCs originating from the donor BMCs were examined using double immunofluorescence for GFP and markers for PSCs, such as desmin and alpha smooth muscle actin ({alpha}SMA), 1, 3 and 8 weeks after the initiation of CDE feeding. We also used immunohistochemical staining to evaluate whether the PSCs from the BMCs produce growth factors, such as platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF) and transforming growth factor (TGF) {beta}1. The percentage of BMC-derived activated PSCs increased significantly, peaking after 1 week of CDE treatment (accounting for 23.3 {+-} 0.9% of the total population of activated PSCs) and then decreasing. These cells produced both PDGF and TGF{beta}1 during the early stage of pancreatic fibrosis. Our results suggest that PSCs originating from BMCs contribute mainly to the early stage of pancreatic injury, at least in part, by producing growth factors in a rat CDE diet-induced pancreatitis model.

  4. Mice fed a lipogenic methionine-choline-deficient diet develop hypermetabolism coincident with hepatic suppression of SCD-1.

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Lipogenic diets that are completely devoid of methionine and choline (MCD) induce hepatic steatosis. MCD feeding also provokes systemic weight loss, for unclear reasons. In this study, we found that MCD feeding causes profound hepatic suppression of the gene encoding stearoyl-coenzyme A desaturase-1...

  5. The effect of the non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug choline magnesium trisalicylate on gastric mucosal cell exfoliation.

    PubMed Central

    Mitchell, K G; Hearns, J; Crean, G P

    1984-01-01

    Gastric mucosal cell exfoliation was measured in 10 normal subjects taking choline magnesium trisalicylate (CMT), aspirin and placebo. Both drugs resulted in significantly elevated rates of exfoliation although the serum salicylate levels achieved with aspirin were lower than those achieved by CMT. Side-effects of tinnitus, nausea and increased faecal blood loss were more common while subjects were taking CMT. PMID:6691886

  6. Antiplasmodial Activity and Mechanism of Action of RSM-932A, a Promising Synergistic Inhibitor of Plasmodium falciparum Choline Kinase

    PubMed Central

    Zimmerman, Tahl; Moneriz, Carlos; Diez, Amalia; Bautista, José Manuel; Gómez del Pulgar, Teresa; Cebrián, Arancha

    2013-01-01

    We have investigated the mechanism of action of inhibition of the choline kinase of P. falciparum (p.f.-ChoK) by two inhibitors of the human ChoKα, MN58b and RSM-932A, which have previously been shown to be potent antitumoral agents. The efficacy of these inhibitors against p.f.-ChoK is investigated using enzymatic and in vitro assays. While MN58b may enter the choline/phosphocholine binding site, RSM-932A appears to have an altogether novel mechanism of inhibition and is synergistic with respect to both choline and ATP. A model of inhibition for RSM-932A in which this inhibitor traps p.f.-ChoK in a phosphorylated intermediate state blocking phosphate transfer to choline is presented. Importantly, MN58b and RSM-932A have in vitro inhibitory activity in the low nanomolar range and are equally effective against chloroquine-sensitive and chloroquine-resistant strains. RSM-932A and MN58b significantly reduced parasitemia and induced the accumulation of trophozoites and schizonts, blocking intraerythrocytic development and interfering with parasite egress or invasion, suggesting a delay of the parasite maturation stage. The present data provide two new potent structures for the development of antimalarial compounds and validate p.f.-ChoK as an accessible drug target against the parasite. PMID:24041883

  7. An overview of evidence for a causal relationship between dietary availability of choline during development and cognitive function in offspring.

    PubMed

    McCann, Joyce C; Hudes, Mark; Ames, Bruce N

    2006-01-01

    This review is part of a series intended for non-specialists that will provide an overview of evidence for causal relationships between micronutrient deficiencies and brain function. Here, we review 34 studies in rodents linking the availability of choline during gestation and perinatal development to neurological function or performance of offspring in cognitive and behavioral tests. Experimental designs, major results, and statistical criteria are summarized in Tables 1-4. Based on our reading of the literature, the evidence suggests that choline supplementation during development results in improved performance of offspring in cognitive or behavioral tests, and in changes in a variety of neurological functional indicators: (1) enhanced performance was observed, particularly on more difficult tasks; (2) increases (choline supplementation) or decreases (choline deficiency) were observed in electrophysiological responsiveness and size of neurons in offspring; and (3) supplementation resulted in some protection against adverse effects of several neurotoxic agents (including alcohol) in offspring. Discussion topics include methodological issues, such as the importance of independent replication, causal criteria, and uncertainties in interpreting test results.

  8. Dietary choline reverses some, but not all, effects of folate deficiency on neurogenesis and apoptosis in fetal mouse brain.

    PubMed

    Craciunescu, Corneliu N; Johnson, Amy R; Zeisel, Steven H

    2010-06-01

    In mice, maternal dietary folate, a cofactor in 1-carbon metabolism, modulates neurogenesis and apoptosis in the fetal brain. Similarly, maternal dietary choline, an important methyl-donor, also influences these processes. Choline and folate are metabolically interrelated, and we determined whether choline supplementation could reverse the effects of folate deficiency on brain development. Timed-pregnant mice were fed control (CT), folate-deficient (FD), or folate-deficient, choline-supplemented (FDCS) AIN-76 diets from d 11 to 17 (E11-17) of pregnancy, and on E17, fetal brains were collected for analysis. Compared with the CT group, the FD group had fewer neural progenitor cells undergoing mitosis in the ventricular zones of the developing mouse brain septum (47%; P < 0.01), hippocampus (29%; P < 0.01), striatum (34%; P < 0.01), and anterior and mid-posterior neocortex (33% in both areas; P < 0.01). In addition, compared with CT, the FD diet almost doubled the rate of apoptosis in the fetal septum and hippocampus (P < 0.01). In the FDCS group, the mitosis rates generally were intermediate between those of the CT and FD groups; mitosis rates in the septum and striatum were significantly greater compared with the FD group and were significantly lower than in the CT group only in the septum and neocortex. In the FDCS group, the hippocampal apoptosis rate was significantly lower than in the FD group (P < 0.01) and was the same as in the CT group. In the septum, the apotosis rate in the FDCS group was intermediate between the CT and FD groups' rates. These results suggest that neural progenitor cells in fetal forebrain are sensitive to maternal dietary folate during late gestation and that choline supplementation can modify some, but not all, of these effects. PMID:20392884

  9. Phosphatidylcholine supplementation in pregnant women consuming moderate-choline diets does not enhance infant cognitive function: a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial123

    PubMed Central

    Goldman, Barbara Davis; Fischer, Leslie M; da Costa, Kerry-Ann; Reznick, J Steven; Zeisel, Steven H

    2012-01-01

    Background: Choline is essential for fetal brain development, and it is not known whether a typical American diet contains enough choline to ensure optimal brain development. Objective: The study was undertaken to determine whether supplementing pregnant women with phosphatidylcholine (the main dietary source of choline) improves the cognitive abilities of their offspring. Design: In a double-blind, randomized controlled trial, 140 pregnant women were randomly assigned to receive supplemental phosphatidylcholine (750 mg) or a placebo (corn oil) from 18 wk gestation through 90 d postpartum. Their infants (n = 99) were tested for short-term visuospatial memory, long-term episodic memory, language development, and global development at 10 and 12 mo of age. Results: The women studied ate diets that delivered ∼360 mg choline/d in foods (∼80% of the recommended intake for pregnant women, 65% of the recommended intake for lactating women). The phosphatidylcholine supplements were well tolerated. Groups did not differ significantly in global development, language development, short-term visuospatial memory, or long-term episodic memory. Conclusions: Phosphatidylcholine supplementation of pregnant women eating diets containing moderate amounts of choline did not enhance their infants’ brain function. It is possible that a longer follow-up period would reveal late-emerging effects. Moreover, future studies should determine whether supplementing mothers eating diets much lower in choline content, such as those consumed in several low-income countries, would enhance infant brain development. This trial was registered at clinicaltrials.gov as NCT00678925. PMID:23134891

  10. Electrochemical Polishing Applications and EIS of a Novel Choline Chloride-Based Ionic Liquid

    SciTech Connect

    Wixtrom, Alex I.; Buhler, Jessica E.; Reece, Charles E.; Abdel-Fattah, Tarek M.

    2013-06-01

    Minimal surface roughness is a critical feature for high-field superconducting radio frequency (SRF) cavities used to engineer particle accelerators. Current methods for polishing Niobium cavities typically utilize solutions containing a mixture of concentrated sulfuric and hydrofluoric acid. Polishing processes such as these are effective, yet there are many hazards and costs associated with the use (and safe disposal) of the concentrated acid solutions. An alternative method for electrochemical polishing of the cavities was explored using a novel ionic liquid solution containing choline chloride. Potentiostatic electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) was used to analyze the ionic polishing solution. Final surface roughness of the Nb was found to be comparable to that of the acid-polishing method, as assessed by atomic force microscopy (AFM). This indicates that ionic liquid-based electrochemical polishing of Nb is a viable replacement for acid-based methods for preparation of SRF cavities.

  11. Chronic pancreatitis in mice by treatment with choline-deficient ethionine-supplemented diet.

    PubMed

    Ida, Satoshi; Ohmuraya, Masaki; Hirota, Masahiko; Ozaki, Nobuyuki; Hiramatsu, Sayaka; Uehara, Hitoshi; Takamori, Hiroshi; Araki, Kimi; Baba, Hideo; Yamamura, Ken-ichi

    2010-01-01

    Although chronic pancreatitis is a risk factor for pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDA), the relationship between chronic pancreatitis and PDA remains obscure. A critical obstacle to understanding the role of chronic pancreatitis is the lack of animal models. To develop one such model, mice were fed long-term with a choline deficient ethionine-supplemented (CDE) diet. Histological evaluation revealed that chronic pancreatitis, characterized by acinar atrophy, fibrosis and well-developed tubular complexes (TCs), was observed after 24 weeks of CDE diet treatment. Furthermore, expression of epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) and its ligands; serine protease inhibitor Kazal type 3 (Spink3) and transforming growth factor alpha (TGF alpha) and activation of K-Ras (GTP-Ras formation), which are frequently observed in human PDA, were indeed observed in parallel with TCs formation. Neoplastic lesions were not found after 54 weeks of treatment, suggesting that a continuation of CDE diet or another insult is required for the development of PDA.

  12. Ionic Grease Lubricants: Protic [Triethanolamine][Oleic Acid] and Aprotic [Choline][Oleic Acid].

    PubMed

    Mu, Liwen; Shi, Yijun; Ji, Tuo; Chen, Long; Yuan, Ruixia; Wang, Huaiyuan; Zhu, Jiahua

    2016-02-01

    Ionic liquid lubricants or lubricant additives have been studied intensively over past decades. However, ionic grease serving as lubricant has rarely been investigated so far. In this work, novel protic [triethanolamine][oleic acid] and aprotic [choline][oleic acid] ionic greases are successfully synthesized. These ionic greases can be directly used as lubricants without adding thickeners or other additives. Their distinct thermal and rheological properties are investigated and are well-correlated to their tribological properties. It is revealed that aprotic ionic grease shows superior temperature- and pressure-tolerant lubrication properties over those of protic ionic grease. The lubrication mechanism is studied, and it reveals that strong physical adsorption of ionic grease onto friction surface plays a dominating role for promoted lubrication instead of tribo-chemical film formation.

  13. Mesoporous and biocompatible surface active silica aerogel synthesis using choline formate ionic liquid.

    PubMed

    Meera, Kamal Mohamed Seeni; Sankar, Rajavelu Murali; Jaisankar, Sellamuthu N; Mandal, Asit Baran

    2011-09-01

    In this paper, we report the preparation and characterization of mesoporous and biocompatible transparent silica aerogel by the sol-gel polymerization of tetraethyl orthosilicate using ionic liquid. Choline cation based ionic liquid allows the silica framework to form in a non collapsing environment and controls the pore size of the gel. FT-IR spectra reveal the interaction of ionic liquid with surface -OH of the gel. DSC thermogram giving the evidence of confinement of ionic liquid within the silica matrix, which helps to avoid the shrinkage of the gel during the aging process. Nitrogen sorption measurements of gel prepared with ionic liquid exhibit a low surface area of 100.53 m2/g and high average pore size of 3.74 nm. MTT assay proves the biocompatibility and cell viability of the prepared gels. This new nanoporous silica material can be applied to immobilize biological molecules, which may retain their stability over a longer period.

  14. Surfactant Behavior of Sodium Dodecylsulfate in Deep Eutectic Solvent Choline Chloride/Urea.

    PubMed

    Arnold, T; Jackson, A J; Sanchez-Fernandez, A; Magnone, D; Terry, A E; Edler, K J

    2015-12-01

    Deep eutectic solvents (DES) resemble ionic liquids but are formed from an ionic mixture instead of being a single ionic compound. Here we present some results that demonstrate that surfactant sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS) remains surface-active and shows self-assembly phenomena in the most commonly studied DES, choline chloride/urea. X-ray reflectivity (XRR) and small angle neutron scattering (SANS) suggest that the behavior is significantly different from that in water. Our SANS data supports our determination of the critical micelle concentration using surface-tension measurements and suggests that the micelles formed in DES do not have the same shape and size as those seen in water. Reflectivity measurements have also demonstrated that the surfactants remain surface-active below this concentration. PMID:26540438

  15. Choline chloride/urea as an effective plasticizer for production of cellulose films.

    PubMed

    Wang, Sha; Peng, Xinwen; Zhong, Linxin; Jing, Shuangshuang; Cao, Xuefei; Lu, Fachuang; Sun, Runcang

    2015-03-01

    Recently, choline chloride/urea (ChCl/urea), a typical deep eutectic solvent (DES), has been found to possess various applications in organic synthesis, electrochemistry, and nanomaterial preparation. Herein we reported the first attempt to plasticize regenerated cellulose film (RCF) using ChCl/urea as an effective plasticizer. Meanwhile, RCFs plasticized with glycerol and sorbitol were also prepared for comparison. The plasticized RCFs were investigated by Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR) spectroscopy, wide-angle X-ray diffraction (XRD), atomic force microscopy (AFM), and mechanical testing. Transparent and soft RCFs could be successfully prepared in the presence of ChCl/urea, and high elongation at break (34.88%) suggested a significant plasticizing efficiency. No new crystal and phase separation occurred to ChCl/urea plasticized RCFs. The thermal stability of ChCl/urea plasticized RCF was lowered. These results indicated that ChCl/urea was an effective plasticizer for producing cellulose films. PMID:25498618

  16. Effects of dietary amino acids, carbohydrates, and choline on neurotransmitter synthesis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wurtman, Richard J.

    1988-01-01

    The ability of a meal to increase or decrease brain neurotransmitter synthesis has been studied. It is concluded that brain serotonin synthesis is directly controlled by the proportions of carbohydrate to protein in meals and snacks that increase or decrease brain tryptophan levels, thereby changing the substrate saturation of tryptophan hydroxylase and the rate of serotonin synthesis. The ability of serotoninergic neurons to have their output coupled to dietary macronutrients enables them to function as sensors of peripheral metabolism, and to subserve an important role in the control of appetite. The robust and selective responses of catecholaminergic and cholinergic neurons to supplemental tyrosine and choline suggest that these compounds may become useful as a new type of drug for treating deseases or conditions in which adequate quantities of the transmitter would otherwise be unavailable.

  17. Role of Valine 464 in the Flavin Oxidation Reaction Catalyzed by Choline Oxidase

    SciTech Connect

    Finnegan, Steffan; Agniswamy, Johnson; Weber, Irene T.; Gadda, Giovanni

    2010-11-03

    The oxidation of reduced flavin cofactors by oxygen is a very important reaction that is central to the chemical versatility of hundreds of flavoproteins classified as monooxygenases and oxidases. These enzymes are characterized by bimolecular rate constants {ge} 10{sup 5} M{sup -1} s{sup -1} and produce water and hydrogen peroxide, respectively. A hydrophobic cavity close to the reactive flavin C(4a) atom has been previously identified in the 3D structure of monooxygenases but not in flavoprotein oxidases. In the present study, we have investigated by X-ray crystallography, mutagenesis, steady-state, and rapid reaction approaches the role of Val464, which is <6 {angstrom} from the flavin C(4a) atom in choline oxidase. The 3D structure of the Val464Ala enzyme was essentially identical to that of the wild-type enzyme as shown by X-ray crystallography. Time-resolved anaerobic substrate reduction of the enzymes showed that replacement of Val464 with alanine or threonine did not affect the reductive half-reaction. Steady-state and rapid kinetics as well as enzyme-monitored turnovers indicated that the oxidative half-reaction in the Ala464 and Thr464 enzymes was decreased by 50-fold with respect to the wild-type enzyme. We propose that the side chain of Val464 in choline oxidase provides a nonpolar site that is required to guide oxygen in proximity of the C(4a) atom of the flavin, where it will subsequently react via electrostatic catalysis. Visual analysis of available structures suggests that analogous nonpolar sites are likely present in most flavoprotein oxidases. Mechanistic considerations provide rationalization for the differences between sites in monooxygenases and oxidases.

  18. Choline dehydrogenase interacts with SQSTM1/p62 to recruit LC3 and stimulate mitophagy.

    PubMed

    Park, Sungwoo; Choi, Seon-Guk; Yoo, Seung-Min; Son, Jin H; Jung, Yong-Keun

    2014-01-01

    CHDH (choline dehydrogenase) is an enzyme catalyzing the dehydrogenation of choline to betaine aldehyde in mitochondria. Apart from this well-known activity, we report here a pivotal role of CHDH in mitophagy. Knockdown of CHDH expression impairs CCCP-induced mitophagy and PARK2/parkin-mediated clearance of mitochondria in mammalian cells, including HeLa cells and SN4741 dopaminergic neuronal cells. Conversely, overexpression of CHDH accelerates PARK2-mediated mitophagy. CHDH is found on both the outer and inner membranes of mitochondria in resting cells. Interestingly, upon induction of mitophagy, CHDH accumulates on the outer membrane in a mitochondrial potential-dependent manner. We found that CHDH is not a substrate of PARK2 but interacts with SQSTM1 independently of PARK2 to recruit SQSTM1 into depolarized mitochondria. The FB1 domain of CHDH is exposed to the cytosol and is required for the interaction with SQSTM1, and overexpression of the FB1 domain only in cytosol reduces CCCP-induced mitochondrial degradation via competitive interaction with SQSTM1. In addition, CHDH, but not the CHDH FB1 deletion mutant, forms a ternary protein complex with SQSTM1 and MAP1LC3 (LC3), leading to loading of LC3 onto the damaged mitochondria via SQSTM1. Further, CHDH is crucial to the mitophagy induced by MPP+ in SN4741 cells. Overall, our results suggest that CHDH is required for PARK2-mediated mitophagy for the recruitment of SQSTM1 and LC3 onto the mitochondria for cargo recognition.

  19. Choline dehydrogenase interacts with SQSTM1/p62 to recruit LC3 and stimulate mitophagy

    PubMed Central

    Park, Sungwoo; Choi, Seon-Guk; Yoo, Seung-Min; Son, Jin H; Jung, Yong-Keun

    2014-01-01

    CHDH (choline dehydrogenase) is an enzyme catalyzing the dehydrogenation of choline to betaine aldehyde in mitochondria. Apart from this well-known activity, we report here a pivotal role of CHDH in mitophagy. Knockdown of CHDH expression impairs CCCP-induced mitophagy and PARK2/parkin-mediated clearance of mitochondria in mammalian cells, including HeLa cells and SN4741 dopaminergic neuronal cells. Conversely, overexpression of CHDH accelerates PARK2-mediated mitophagy. CHDH is found on both the outer and inner membranes of mitochondria in resting cells. Interestingly, upon induction of mitophagy, CHDH accumulates on the outer membrane in a mitochondrial potential-dependent manner. We found that CHDH is not a substrate of PARK2 but interacts with SQSTM1 independently of PARK2 to recruit SQSTM1 into depolarized mitochondria. The FB1 domain of CHDH is exposed to the cytosol and is required for the interaction with SQSTM1, and overexpression of the FB1 domain only in cytosol reduces CCCP-induced mitochondrial degradation via competitive interaction with SQSTM1. In addition, CHDH, but not the CHDH FB1 deletion mutant, forms a ternary protein complex with SQSTM1 and MAP1LC3 (LC3), leading to loading of LC3 onto the damaged mitochondria via SQSTM1. Further, CHDH is crucial to the mitophagy induced by MPP+ in SN4741 cells. Overall, our results suggest that CHDH is required for PARK2-mediated mitophagy for the recruitment of SQSTM1 and LC3 onto the mitochondria for cargo recognition. PMID:25483962

  20. Choline dehydrogenase interacts with SQSTM1/p62 to recruit LC3 and stimulate mitophagy.

    PubMed

    Park, Sungwoo; Choi, Seon-Guk; Yoo, Seung-Min; Son, Jin H; Jung, Yong-Keun

    2014-01-01

    CHDH (choline dehydrogenase) is an enzyme catalyzing the dehydrogenation of choline to betaine aldehyde in mitochondria. Apart from this well-known activity, we report here a pivotal role of CHDH in mitophagy. Knockdown of CHDH expression impairs CCCP-induced mitophagy and PARK2/parkin-mediated clearance of mitochondria in mammalian cells, including HeLa cells and SN4741 dopaminergic neuronal cells. Conversely, overexpression of CHDH accelerates PARK2-mediated mitophagy. CHDH is found on both the outer and inner membranes of mitochondria in resting cells. Interestingly, upon induction of mitophagy, CHDH accumulates on the outer membrane in a mitochondrial potential-dependent manner. We found that CHDH is not a substrate of PARK2 but interacts with SQSTM1 independently of PARK2 to recruit SQSTM1 into depolarized mitochondria. The FB1 domain of CHDH is exposed to the cytosol and is required for the interaction with SQSTM1, and overexpression of the FB1 domain only in cytosol reduces CCCP-induced mitochondrial degradation via competitive interaction with SQSTM1. In addition, CHDH, but not the CHDH FB1 deletion mutant, forms a ternary protein complex with SQSTM1 and MAP1LC3 (LC3), leading to loading of LC3 onto the damaged mitochondria via SQSTM1. Further, CHDH is crucial to the mitophagy induced by MPP+ in SN4741 cells. Overall, our results suggest that CHDH is required for PARK2-mediated mitophagy for the recruitment of SQSTM1 and LC3 onto the mitochondria for cargo recognition. PMID:25483962

  1. Betaine aldehyde, betaine, and choline levels in rat livers during ethanol metabolism.

    PubMed

    Chern, M K; Gage, D A; Pietruszko, R

    2000-12-01

    Betaine aldehyde levels were determined in rat livers following 4 weeks of ethanol feeding, employing the Lieber-De Carli liquid diet. The results showed that the levels of betaine aldehyde are unaffected by alcohol feeding to rats. These levels in both experimental and control animals were found to be quite low, 5.5 nmol/g liver. Betaine aldehyde levels have not been determined previously in mammalian liver because of methodological difficulties. This investigation employed fast atom bombardment-mass spectroscopy to determine the levels of betaine aldehyde, betaine, and choline. The decrease in betaine levels following ethanol administration confirmed the results of other investigators. Choline levels determined during this investigation were lower than previously reported. The reason for starting this investigation was the fact that the enzyme that catalyzes betaine aldehyde dehydrogenation to betaine, which is distributed in both mitochondria and the cytoplasm, was found to also metabolize acetaldehyde with K(m) and V(max) values lower than those for betaine aldehyde. Thus, it appeared likely that the metabolism of acetaldehyde during ethanol metabolism might inhibit betaine aldehyde conversion to betaine and thereby result in decreased betaine levels (Barak et al., Alcohol 13: 395-398, 1996). The fact that betaine aldehyde levels in alcohol-fed animals were similar to those in controls demonstrates that competition between acetaldehyde and betaine aldehyde for the same enzyme does not occur. This complete lack of competition suggests that betaine aldehyde dehydrogenase in the mitochondrial matrix may totally metabolize betaine aldehyde to betaine without any involvement of cytoplasmic betaine aldehyde dehydrogenase. PMID:11077045

  2. Electrocatalytic Microelectrode Detectors for Choline and Acetylcholine following Separation by Capillary Electrophoresis

    PubMed Central

    Mukherjee, Jhindan; Kirchhoff, Jon R.

    2009-01-01

    Two electrocatalytic enzyme modified microelectrode systems were employed as end-column amperometric detectors of choline (Ch) and acetylcholine (ACh) following separation by capillary electrophoresis (CE). Horseradish peroxidase crosslinked in an Os based redox polymer hydrogel (HRP-Os) was physically adsorbed on Au microelectrodes followed by chemical crosslinking of the enzymes acetylcholinesterase (AChE) and choline oxidase (ChO). An alternative approach utilized the deposition of the transition metal catalyst, Prussian Blue (PB), on Pt microelectrodes as the electrocatalyst. Utilizing butyrylcholine (BuCh) as an internal standard, the HRP-Os/AChE-ChO and PB/AChE-ChO electrodes exhibited excellent linear responses from 2–2000 μM and 10–2000 μM, respectively, for both Ch and ACh. Detection limits of 0.1 μM or 38 amol were determined for the HRP-Os/AChE-ChO electrode. The limit of detection for ACh and Ch at the PB/AChE-ChO electrode was 5 μM or 9.5 fmol. The electrodes were operated at potentials of +0.10 and −0.10 V vs. Ag/AgCl (3M NaCl), respectively, and thus minimized the potential response from oxidizable interferences. In addition, both electrocatalytic electrodes showed good operational stability for more than 70 hours. The enhanced detection capability of the HRP-Os/AChE-ChO and PB/AChE-ChO electrodes in combination with efficient CE separation of Ch and ACh provides a new sensitive and selective strategy for monitoring and quantifying these cholinergic biomarkers in biological fluids. PMID:20337384

  3. Functional Consequences and Structural Interpretation of Mutations of Human Choline Acetyltransferase

    PubMed Central

    Shen, Xin-Ming; Crawford, Thomas O.; Brengman, Joan; Acsadi, Gyula; Iannaconne, Susan; Karaca, Emin; Khoury, Chaouky; Mah, Jean K.; Edvardson, Shimon; Bajzer, Zeljko; Rodgers, David; Engel, Andrew G.

    2011-01-01

    Choline acetyltransferase (ChAT; EC 2.3.1.6) catalyzes synthesis of acetylcholine from acetyl-CoA and choline in cholinergic neurons. Mutations in CHAT (MIM # 118490) cause potentially lethal congenital myasthenic syndromes associated with episodic apnea (ChAT-CMS) (MIM # 254210). Here we analyze the functional consequences of 12 missense and 1 nonsense mutations of CHAT in 11 patients. Nine of the mutations are novel. We examine expression of the recombinant missense mutants in Bosc 23 cells, determine their kinetic properties and thermal stability, and interpret the functional effects of 11 mutations in the context of the atomic structural model of human ChAT. Five mutations (p.Trp421Ser, p.Ser498Pro, p.Thr553Asn, p.Ala557Thr, p.Ser572Trp) reduce enzyme expression to <50% of wild-type. Mutations with severe kinetic effects are located in the active-site tunnel (p.Met202Arg, p.Thr553Asn and p.Ala557Thr) or adjacent to the substrate binding site (p.Ser572Trp), or exert their effect allosterically (p.Trp421Ser and p.Ile689Ser). Two mutations with milder kinetic effects (p.Val136Met, p.Ala235Thr) are also predicted to act allosterically. One mutation (p.Thr608Asn) below the nucleotide binding site of CoA enhances dissociation of AcCoA from the enzyme-substrate complex. Two mutations introducing a proline residue into an α-helix (p.Ser498Pro and p.Ser704Pro) impair the thermal stability of ChAT. PMID:21786365

  4. Electrodeposition of copper composites from deep eutectic solvents based on choline chloride.

    PubMed

    Abbott, Andrew P; El Ttaib, Khalid; Frisch, Gero; McKenzie, Katy J; Ryder, Karl S

    2009-06-01

    Here we describe for the first time the electrolytic deposition of copper and copper composites from a solution of the metal chloride salt in either urea-choline chloride, or ethylene glycol-choline chloride based eutectics. We show that the deposition kinetics and thermodynamics are quite unlike those in aqueous solution under comparable conditions and that the copper ion complexation is also different. The mechanism of copper nucleation is studied using chronoamperometry and it is shown that progressive nucleation leads to a bright nano-structured deposit. In contrast, instantaneous nucleation, at lower concentrations of copper ions, leads to a dull deposit. This work also pioneers the use of the electrochemical quartz crystal microbalance (EQCM) to monitor both current efficiency and the inclusion of inert particulates into the copper coatings. This technique allows the first in situ quantification or particulate inclusion. It was found that the composition of composite material was strongly dependent on the amount of species suspended in solution. It was also shown that the majority of material was dragged onto the surface rather than settling on to it. The distribution of the composite material was found to be even throughout the coating. This technology is important because it facilitates deposition of bright copper coatings without co-ligands such as cyanide. The incorporation of micron-sized particulates into ionic liquids has resulted, in one case, in a decrease in viscosity. This observation is both unusual and surprising; we explain this here in terms of an increase in the free volume of the liquid and local solvent perturbation. PMID:19458829

  5. Phosphorylation of Human Choline Kinase Beta by Protein Kinase A: Its Impact on Activity and Inhibition

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Ching Ching; Few, Ling Ling; Konrad, Manfred; See Too, Wei Cun

    2016-01-01

    Choline kinase beta (CKβ) is one of the CK isozymes involved in the biosynthesis of phosphatidylcholine. CKβ is important for normal mitochondrial function and muscle development as the lack of the ckβ gene in human and mice results in the development of muscular dystrophy. In contrast, CKα is implicated in tumorigenesis and has been extensively studied as an anticancer target. Phosphorylation of human CKα was found to regulate the enzyme’s activity and its subcellular location. This study provides evidence for CKβ phosphorylation by protein kinase A (PKA). In vitro phosphorylation of CKβ by PKA was first detected by phosphoprotein staining, as well as by in-gel kinase assays. The phosphorylating kinase was identified as PKA by Western blotting. CKβ phosphorylation by MCF-7 cell lysate was inhibited by a PKA-specific inhibitor peptide, and the intracellular phosphorylation of CKβ was shown to be regulated by the level of cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP), a PKA activator. Phosphorylation sites were located on CKβ residues serine-39 and serine-40 as determined by mass spectrometry and site-directed mutagenesis. Phosphorylation increased the catalytic efficiencies for the substrates choline and ATP about 2-fold, without affecting ethanolamine phosphorylation, and the S39D/S40D CKβ phosphorylation mimic behaved kinetically very similar. Remarkably, phosphorylation drastically increased the sensitivity of CKβ to hemicholinium-3 (HC-3) inhibition by about 30-fold. These findings suggest that CKβ, in concert with CKα, and depending on its phosphorylation status, might play a critical role as a druggable target in carcinogenesis. PMID:27149373

  6. Purification and properties of cholesterol oxidase and choline phosphohydrolase from Rhodococcus equi.

    PubMed Central

    Machang'u, R S; Prescott, J F

    1991-01-01

    Cholesterol oxidase (CO) and choline phosphohydrolase (CPH) exoenzymes were isolated from culture supernatants of Rhodococcus equi ATCC 33701 and their hemolytic and cytotoxic activities examined. The purifications involved differential ammonium sulphate precipitation, ion exchange and gel filtration chromatography. A purification of 32.8-fold and a yield of 0.3% of CO were determined by synergistic hemolysis of sheep red blood cells (SRBC) presensitized with Staphylococcus aureus beta toxin. The enzymatic activity of CO was also demonstrated by oxidation of aqueous cholesterol suspensions. The activity of CO was reversibly inhibited by concentration. A purification of 412.4-fold and a yield of 1.7% of CPH were determined by hydrolysis of p-nitrophenyphosphorylcholine. Purity of both exoenzymes was confirmed by immunoblotting. On sodium dodecyl sulphate polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis, the CO had a molecular mass (Mr) of 60 kd and the CPH a Mr of 65 kd. Choline phosphohydrolase did not hydrolyse sphingomyelin. Sphingomyelinase C (SMC) activity was however demonstrated in concentrated culture supernatants. This dissociation of SMC from CPH activity indicates that R. equi produces two distinct phospholipase C exoenzymes, a CPH and a SMC. Both CO and CPH combined, or individually, did not lyse native SRBC even with subsequent chilling of the cells at 4 degrees C ("hot-cold" treatment). Purified CO lysed beta toxin-sensitized SRBC. The CPH showed only minor hemolytic activity against such sensitized SRBC even at high concentrations. Combination of CO and CPH in lysis of beta toxin sensitized SRBC showed only minor additive rather than synergistic effects.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) Images Fig. 2. Fig. 5. PMID:1790488

  7. Regulatory region in choline acetyltransferase gene directs developmental and tissue-specific expression in transgenic mice.

    PubMed Central

    Lönnerberg, P; Lendahl, U; Funakoshi, H; Arhlund-Richter, L; Persson, H; Ibáñez, C F

    1995-01-01

    Acetylcholine, one of the main neurotransmitters in the nervous system, is synthesized by the enzyme choline acetyltransferase (ChAT; acetyl-CoA:choline O-acetyltransferase, EC 2.3.1.6). The molecular mechanisms controlling the establishment, maintenance, and plasticity of the cholinergic phenotype in vivo are largely unknown. A previous report showed that a 3800-bp, but not a 1450-bp, 5' flanking segment from the rat ChAT gene promoter directed cell type-specific expression of a reporter gene in cholinergic cells in vitro. Now we have characterized a distal regulatory region of the ChAT gene that confers cholinergic specificity on a heterologous downstream promoter in a cholinergic cell line and in transgenic mice. A 2342-bp segment from the 5' flanking region of the ChAT gene behaved as an enhancer in cholinergic cells but as a repressor in noncholinergic cells in an orientation-independent manner. Combined with a heterologous basal promoter, this fragment targeted transgene expression to several cholinergic regions of the central nervous system of transgenic mice, including basal forebrain, cortex, pons, and spinal cord. In eight independent transgenic lines, the pattern of transgene expression paralleled qualitatively and quantitatively that displayed by endogenous ChAT mRNA in various regions of the rat central nervous system. In the lumbar enlargement of the spinal cord, 85-90% of the transgene expression was targeted to the ventral part of the cord, where cholinergic alpha-motor neurons are located. Transgene expression in the spinal cord was developmentally regulated and responded to nerve injury in a similar way as the endogenous ChAT gene, indicating that the 2342-bp regulatory sequence contains elements controlling the plasticity of the cholinergic phenotype in developing and injured neurons. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 PMID:7732028

  8. Relation of pontine choline acetyltransferase immunoreactive neurons with cells which increase discharge during REM sleep.

    PubMed

    Shiromani, P J; Armstrong, D M; Bruce, G; Hersh, L B; Groves, P M; Gillin, J C

    1987-03-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine whether neurons in the medial pontine reticular formation with high discharge rates during REM sleep could be localized in regions of the brainstem having neurons displaying choline acetyltransferase immunoreactivity. Six cats were implanted with sleep recording electrodes and microwires to record extracellular potentials of neurons in the pontine reticular formation. Single-units with a S:N ratio greater than 2:1 were recorded for at least two REM sleep cycles. A total of 49 units was recorded from the pontine reticular formation at medial-lateral planes ranging from 0.8 to 3.7 mm. The greatest proportion of the units (28.6%) showed highest discharge during active waking and phasic REM sleep compared to quiet waking, non-REM sleep, transition into REM sleep or quiet REM sleep periods. A percentage (20.4%) of the cells had high discharge associated with phasic REM sleep periods while 8.2% of the cells showed a progressive increase in discharge from waking to REM sleep. Subsequent examination of the distribution of choline acetyltransferase immunoreactive cells in the PRF revealed that cells showing high discharge during REM sleep were not localized near presumed cholinergic neurons. Indeed, we did not find any ChAT immunoreactive somata in the medial PRF, an area which has traditionally been implicated in the generation of REM sleep. These results suggest that while increased discharge of PRF cells may be instrumental to REM sleep generation, these cells are not cholinergic.

  9. Long-term improvements in sensory inhibition with gestational choline supplementation linked to α7 nicotinic receptors through studies in Chrna7 null mutation mice.

    PubMed

    Stevens, Karen E; Choo, Kevin S; Stitzel, Jerry A; Marks, Michael J; Adams, Catherine E

    2014-03-13

    Perinatal choline supplementation has produced several benefits in rodent models, from improved learning and memory to protection from the behavioral effects of fetal alcohol exposure. We have shown that supplemented choline through gestation and lactation produces long-term improvement in deficient sensory inhibition in DBA/2 mice which models a similar deficit in schizophrenia patients. The present study extends that research by feeding normal or supplemented choline diets to DBA/2 mice carrying the null mutation for the α7 nicotinic receptor gene (Chrna7). DBA/2 mice heterozygotic for Chrna7 were bred together. Dams were placed on supplemented (5 gm/kg diet) or normal (1.1 gm/kg diet) choline at mating and remained on the specific diet until offspring weaning. Thereafter, offspring were fed standard rodent chow. Adult offspring were assessed for sensory inhibition. Brains were obtained to ascertain hippocampal α7 nicotinic receptor levels. Choline-supplemented mice heterozygotic or null-mutant for Chrna7 failed to show improvement in sensory inhibition. Only wildtype choline-supplemented mice showed improvement with the effect solely through a decrease in test amplitude. This supports the hypothesis that gestational-choline supplementation is acting through the α7 nicotinic receptor to improve sensory inhibition. Although there was a significant gene-dose-related change in hippocampal α7 receptor numbers, binding studies did not reveal any choline-dose-related change in binding in any hippocampal region, the interaction being driven by a significant genotype main effect (wildtype>heterozygote>null mutant). These data parallel a human study wherein the offspring of pregnant women receiving choline supplementation during gestation, showed better sensory inhibition than offspring of women on placebo. PMID:24462939

  10. Dietary choline supplementation to dams during pregnancy and lactation mitigates the effects of in utero stress exposure on adult anxiety-related behaviors

    PubMed Central

    Schulz, Kalynn M.; Pearson, Jennifer N.; Gasparrini, Mary E.; Brooks, Kayla F.; Drake-Frazier, Chakeer; Zajkowski, Megan E.; Kreisler, Alison D.; Adams, Catherine E.; Leonard, Sherry; Stevens, Karen E.

    2014-01-01

    Brain cholinergic dysfunction is associated with neuropsychiatric illnesses such as depression, anxiety, and schizophrenia. Maternal stress exposure is associated with these same illnesses in adult offspring, yet the relationship between prenatal stress and brain cholinergic function is largely unexplored. Thus, using a rodent model, the current study implemented an intervention aimed at buffering the potential effects of prenatal stress on the developing brain cholinergic system. Specifically, control and stressed dams were fed choline-supplemented or control chow during pregnancy and lactation, and the anxiety-related behaviors of adult offspring were assessed in the open field, elevated zero maze and social interaction tests. In the open field test, choline supplementation significantly increased center investigation in both stressed and nonstressed female offspring, suggesting that choline-supplementation decreases female anxiety-related behavior irrespective of prenatal stress exposure. In the elevated zero maze, prenatal stress increased anxiety-related behaviors of female offspring fed a control diet (normal choline levels). However, prenatal stress failed to increase anxiety-related behaviors in female offspring receiving supplemental choline during gestation and lactation, suggesting that dietary choline supplementation ameliorated the effects of prenatal stress on anxiety-related behaviors. For male rats, neither prenatal stress nor diet impacted anxiety-related behaviors in the open field or elevated zero maze. In contrast, perinatal choline supplementation mitigated prenatal stress-induced social behavioral deficits in males, whereas neither prenatal stress nor choline supplementation influenced female social behaviors. Taken together, these data suggest that perinatal choline supplementation ameliorates the sex-specific effects of prenatal stress. PMID:24675162

  11. Low-Q peak in X-ray patterns of choline-phenylalanine and -homophenylalanine: A combined effect of chain and stacking

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Campetella, Marco; Martino, Delia Chillura; Scarpellini, Eleonora; Gontrani, Lorenzo

    2016-09-01

    In this contribution we report for the first time the X-ray patterns of choline-phenylalanine and choline-homophenylalanine ionic liquids. The presence of a low Q peak in both systems is another evidence that a long alkyl chain is not always needed to establish a nanodomain segregation in the liquid sufficient to be revealed by the diffraction experiment. These new data are compared with the diffraction patterns and the theoretical calculations of other choline-aminoacid ionic liquids recently reported. A significant role might be played by the stacking interactions between aromatic rings.

  12. Choline Supplementation Mitigates Trace, but not Delay, Eyeblink Conditioning Deficits in Rats Exposed to Alcohol During Development

    PubMed Central

    Thomas, Jennifer D.; Tran, Tuan D.

    2013-01-01

    Children exposed to alcohol prenatally suffer from a range of physical, neuropathological and behavioral alterations, referred to as Fetal Alcohol Spectrum Disorders (FASD). Both the cerebellum and hippocampus are affected by alcohol exposure during development, which may contribute to behavioral and cognitive deficits observed in children with FASD. Despite the known neuropathology associated with prenatal alcohol exposure, many pregnant women continue to drink (heavy drinkers, in particular), creating a need to identify effective treatments for their children who are adversely affected by alcohol. We previously reported that choline supplementation can mitigate alcohol’s effects on cognitive development, specifically on tasks which depend on the functional integrity of the hippocampus. The present study examined whether choline supplementation could differentially mitigate ethanol’s effects on trace eyeblink classical conditioning (a hippocampal-dependent task) and delay eyeblink classical conditioning (a cerebellar-dependent task). Long-Evans rats were exposed to 5.25 g/kg/day alcohol via gastric intubation from postnatal days (PD) 4-9, a period of brain development equivalent to late gestation in humans. A sham-intubated control group was included. From PD 10-30, subjects received subcutaneous injections of 100 mg/kg choline chloride or vehicle. Beginning on PD 32-34, subjects were trained on either delay or trace eyeblink conditioning. Performance of subjects exposed to alcohol was significantly impaired on both tasks, as indicated by significant reductions in percentage and amplitude of conditioned eyeblink responses, an effect that was attenuated by choline supplementation on the trace, but not delay conditioning task. Indeed, ethanol-exposed subjects treated with choline performed at control levels on the trace eyeblink conditioning task. There were no significant main or interactive effects of sex. These data indicate that choline supplementation can

  13. Analysis of phenolic choline esters from seeds of Arabidopsis thaliana and Brassica napus by capillary liquid chromatography/electrospray- tandem mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Böttcher, Christoph; von Roepenack-Lahaye, Edda; Schmidt, Jürgen; Clemens, Stephan; Scheel, Dierk

    2009-04-01

    Total phenolic choline ester fractions prepared from seeds of Arabidopsis thaliana and Brassica napus were analyzed by capillary LC/ESI-QTOF-MS and direct infusion ESI-FTICR-MS. In addition to the dominating sinapoylcholine, 30 phenolic choline esters could be identified based on accurate mass measurements, interpretation of collision-induced dissociation (CID) mass spectra, and synthesis of selected representatives. The compounds identified so far include substituted hydroxycinnamoyl- and hydroxybenzoylcholines, respective monohexosides as well as oxidative coupling products of phenolic choline esters and monolignols. Phenolic choline esters are well separable by reversed-phase liquid chromatography and sensitively detectable using electrospray ionization mass spectrometry in positive ion mode. CID mass spectra obtained from molecular ions facilitate the characterization of both the type and substitution pattern of such compounds. Therefore, LC/ESI-MS/MS represents a valuable tool for comprehensive qualitative and quantitative analysis of this compound class. PMID:19034950

  14. Lymphocyte gene expression in subjects fed a low-choline diet differs between those who develop organ dysfunction and those who do not2

    PubMed Central

    Niculescu, Mihai D; da Costa, Kerry-Ann; Fischer, Leslie M; Zeisel, Steven H

    2008-01-01

    Background Some humans fed a low-choline diet develop hepatosteatosis, liver and muscle damage, and lymphocyte apoptosis. The risk of developing such organ dysfunction is increased by the presence of single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in genes involved in folate and choline metabolism. Objective We investigated whether these changes that occur in the expression of many genes when humans are fed a low-choline diet differ between subjects who develop organ dysfunction and those who do not. We also investigated whether expression changes were dependent on the presence of the SNPs of interest. Design Thirty-three subjects aged 20−67 y were fed for 10 d a baseline diet containing the recommended adequate intake of choline. They then were fed a low-choline diet for up to 42 d or until they developed organ dysfunction. Blood was collected at the end of each phase, and peripheral lymphocytes were isolated and used for genotyping and for gene expression profiling with the use of microarray hybridization. Results Feeding a low-choline diet changed the expression of 259 genes, and the profiles of subjects who developed and those who did not develop signs of organ dysfunction differed. Group clustering and gene ontology analyses found that the diet-induced changes in gene expression profiles were significantly influenced by the SNPs of interest and that the gene expression phenotype of the variant gene carriers differed significantly even with the baseline diet. Conclusion These findings support our hypothesis that a person's susceptibility to organ dysfunction when fed a low-choline diet is modulated by specific SNPs in genes involved in folate and choline metabolism. PMID:17616785

  15. Supplemental choline for prevention and alleviation of fatty liver in dairy cattle.

    PubMed

    Cooke, R F; Silva Del Río, N; Caraviello, D Z; Bertics, S J; Ramos, M H; Grummer, R R

    2007-05-01

    Two experiments were conducted to evaluate if supplementing rumen-protected choline (RPC; Reashure, Balchem Encapsulates, Slate Hill, NY) could prevent or alleviate fatty liver in dairy cattle. The first experiment evaluated the effect of supplementing RPC on hepatic triacylglycerol (TAG) accumulation during fatty liver induction. Twenty-four dry cows between 45 to 60 d prepartum were paired by body weight (BW) and body condition score (BCS) and randomly assigned to control or supplementation with 15 g of choline as RPC/d. From d 0 to 6, before treatment application, all cows were fed 1.4 kg/d of concentrate and forage ad libitum. Samples of blood and liver, obtained during the pretreatment period, were used for covariate adjustment of blood metabolites and liver composition data. During fatty liver induction (d 7 to 17), cows were fed 1.4 kg/d of concentrate with or without supplementation with RPC, and forage intake was restricted, so cows consumed 30% of the total energy requirements for pregnancy and maintenance. Supplementation with RPC during fatty liver induction did not affect plasma glucose and plasma beta-hydroxybutyrate (BHBA) concentration but did decrease plasma nonesterified fatty acid (NEFA; 703 vs. 562 microEq/L, SE = 40) and liver TAG accumulation (16.7 vs. 9.3 microg/microg of DNA, SE = 2.0). In the second experiment, we evaluated the effect of supplementing RPC on the clearance of liver TAG when cows were fed ad libitum after the induction of fatty liver by feed restriction. Twenty-eight cows between 45 and 60 d prepartum were paired according to BCS and BW and assigned to treatments. Fatty liver was induced by feeding 1.4 kg/d of concentrate (without RPC) and restricting forage intake, so cows consumed 30% of maintenance and pregnancy energy requirements for 10 d. From d 11 to 16, after feed restriction, cows were fed forage ad libitum and 1.4 kg/d of concentrate with or without RPC. Treatments were not applied during fatty liver induction

  16. Utility of 18F-choline photon emission tomography/computed tomography in the diagnosis of parathyroid adenoma

    PubMed Central

    Damle, Nishikant Avinash; Tripathi, Madhavi; Behera, Abhishek; Aggarwal, Sameer; Bal, Chandrasekhar; Aggarwal, Shipra; Aggarwal, Vivek; Kandasamy, Devasenathipathi; Taywade, Sameer

    2016-01-01

    Recently, the role of 18F-choline in the detection of parathyroid adenomas has been reported. At our institution, we are currently studying the role of this tracer in comparison to the standard methoxy-isobutyl-isonitrile.(MIBI) scan with single photon emission tomography/computed tomography. Our initial results show that 18F-choline is at least as good as 99mTc-MIBI scan. We present here a representative case of a 45-year-old woman with multiple skeletal lytic lesions and a high parathyroid hormone.(PTH) who underwent both these imaging techniques with concordant results, further confirmed by histopathology and postoperative fall in serum PTH levels. PMID:27385893

  17. Optimization of the choline transporter (CHT) inhibitor ML352: Development of VU6001221, an improved in vivo tool compound.

    PubMed

    Bertron, Jeanette L; Ennis, Elizabeth A; Tarr, Christopher J; Wright, Jane; Dickerson, Jonathan W; Locuson, Charles W; Blobaum, Anna L; Rook, Jerri M; Blakely, Randy D; Lindsley, Craig W

    2016-10-01

    This Letter describes the further lead optimization of the CHT inhibitor probe, ML352 (VU0476201), and the development of VU6001221, an improved in vivo tool. A multi-dimensional optimization effort encountered steep SAR, and ultimately, subtle tuning of the electronics of the central phenyl core provided VU6001221, a CHT inhibitor with comparable potency for choline uptake inhibition as ML352, yet improved PK and CNS penetration. Moreover, VU6001221 enabled evaluation, for the first time, of a CHT inhibitor in a standard preclinical rodent cognition model, novel object recognition (NOR). We observed VU6001221 to elicit a dose-responsive increase in NOR, raising the possibility of agonism of synaptic α7 nicotinic ACh receptors by elevated extracellular choline, that if confirmed would represent a novel molecular strategy to enhance cognition. PMID:27575469

  18. Independently recruited oxidases from the glucose-methanol-choline oxidoreductase family enabled chemical defences in leaf beetle larvae (subtribe Chrysomelina) to evolve.

    PubMed

    Rahfeld, Peter; Kirsch, Roy; Kugel, Susann; Wielsch, Natalie; Stock, Magdalena; Groth, Marco; Boland, Wilhelm; Burse, Antje

    2014-08-01

    Larvae of the leaf beetle subtribe Chrysomelina sensu stricto repel their enemies by displaying glandular secretions that contain defensive compounds. These repellents can be produced either de novo (iridoids) or by using plant-derived precursors (e.g. salicylaldehyde). The autonomous production of iridoids, as in Phaedon cochleariae, is the ancestral chrysomeline chemical defence and predates the evolution of salicylaldehyde-based defence. Both biosynthesis strategies include an oxidative step of an alcohol intermediate. In salicylaldehyde-producing species, this step is catalysed by salicyl alcohol oxidases (SAOs) of the glucose-methanol-choline (GMC) oxidoreductase superfamily, but the enzyme oxidizing the iridoid precursor is unknown. Here, we show by in vitro as well as in vivo experiments that P. cochleariae also uses an oxidase from the GMC superfamily for defensive purposes. However, our phylogenetic analysis of chrysomeline GMC oxidoreductases revealed that the oxidase of the iridoid pathway originated from a GMC clade different from that of the SAOs. Thus, the evolution of a host-independent chemical defence followed by a shift to a host-dependent chemical defence in chrysomeline beetles coincided with the utilization of genes from different GMC subfamilies. These findings illustrate the importance of the GMC multi-gene family for adaptive processes in plant-insect interactions.

  19. Two new crystal forms of the choline-binding domain of the major pneumococcal autolysin: insights into the dynamics of the active homodimer.

    PubMed

    Fernández-Tornero, Carlos; García, Ernesto; López, Rubens; Giménez-Gallego, Guillermo; Romero, Antonio

    2002-08-01

    Very little is known about the in vivo regulation of the catalytic activity of the major pneumococcal autolysin (LytA), a surface-exposed enzyme that rules the self-destruction of pneumococcal cells through degradation of their peptidoglycan backbone. Two new crystal forms of the cell wall anchoring domain of LytA were obtained, and their structures were solved and refined to 2.4A and 2.8A resolution. The domain is a homodimer with a boomerang-like shape in which the tertiary structure of each monomer is comprised by six independent beta hairpins arranged in a superhelical fashion. Choline molecules at the hydrophobic interface of consecutive hairpins maintain this unique structure. The C-terminal hairpin (last 13 residues of LytA) in the solenoid is responsible for the formation of the catalytically active homodimer. Although the general fold in the structures derived from both crystal forms is essentially the same, two different conformations of the basic homodimer are observed. Biochemical approaches have demonstrated the fundamental role of the 11 C-terminal residues in the catalytic activity of LytA. The studies reported here reveal the importance of some amino acid residues at the C terminus in the determination of the relative distance of the active dimeric form of the autolysin, which appears to be essential for the catalytic activity of this enzyme.

  20. Independently recruited oxidases from the glucose-methanol-choline oxidoreductase family enabled chemical defences in leaf beetle larvae (subtribe Chrysomelina) to evolve

    PubMed Central

    Rahfeld, Peter; Kirsch, Roy; Kugel, Susann; Wielsch, Natalie; Stock, Magdalena; Groth, Marco; Boland, Wilhelm; Burse, Antje

    2014-01-01

    Larvae of the leaf beetle subtribe Chrysomelina sensu stricto repel their enemies by displaying glandular secretions that contain defensive compounds. These repellents can be produced either de novo (iridoids) or by using plant-derived precursors (e.g. salicylaldehyde). The autonomous production of iridoids, as in Phaedon cochleariae, is the ancestral chrysomeline chemical defence and predates the evolution of salicylaldehyde-based defence. Both biosynthesis strategies include an oxidative step of an alcohol intermediate. In salicylaldehyde-producing species, this step is catalysed by salicyl alcohol oxidases (SAOs) of the glucose-methanol-choline (GMC) oxidoreductase superfamily, but the enzyme oxidizing the iridoid precursor is unknown. Here, we show by in vitro as well as in vivo experiments that P. cochleariae also uses an oxidase from the GMC superfamily for defensive purposes. However, our phylogenetic analysis of chrysomeline GMC oxidoreductases revealed that the oxidase of the iridoid pathway originated from a GMC clade different from that of the SAOs. Thus, the evolution of a host-independent chemical defence followed by a shift to a host-dependent chemical defence in chrysomeline beetles coincided with the utilization of genes from different GMC subfamilies. These findings illustrate the importance of the GMC multi-gene family for adaptive processes in plant–insect interactions. PMID:24943369

  1. Downregulation of Choline Kinase-Alpha Enhances Autophagy in Tamoxifen-Resistant Breast Cancer Cells

    PubMed Central

    Jung, Minji; Choi, Sul Ki; Sun, Yujin; Kim, Hyeonjin; Moon, Woo Kyung

    2015-01-01

    Choline kinase-α (Chk-α) and autophagy have gained much attention, as they relate to the drug-resistance of breast cancer. Here, we explored the potential connection between Chk-α and autophagy in the mechanisms driving to tamoxifen (TAM) resistance, in estrogen receptor positive (ER+) breast cancer cells (BCCs). Human BCC lines (MCF-7 and TAM-resistant MCF-7 (MCF-7/TAM) cells) were used. Chk-α expression and activity was suppressed by the transduction of shRNA (shChk-α) with lentivirus and treatment with CK37, a Chk-α inhibitor. MCF-7/TAM cells had higher Chk-α expression and phosphocholine levels than MCF-7 cells. A specific downregulation of Chk-α by the transduction of shChk-α exhibited a significant decrease in phosphocholine levels in MCF-7 and MCF-7/TAM cells. The autophagy-related protein, cleaved microtubule-associated protein light chain 3 (LC3) and autophagosome-like structures were significantly increased in shChk-α-transduced or CK37-treated MCF-7 and MCF-7/TAM cells. The downregulation of Chk-α attenuated the phosphorylation of AKT, ERK1/2, and mTOR in both MCF-7 and MCF-7/TAM cells. In MCF-7 cells, the downregulation of Chk-α resulted in an induction of autophagy, a decreased proliferation ability and an activation of caspase-3. In MCF-7/TAM cells, despite a significant decrease in proliferation ability and an increase in the percentage of cells in the G0/G1 phase of the cell cycle, the downregulation of Chk-α did not induced caspase-dependent cell death and further enhanced autophagy and G0/G1 phase arrest. An autophagy inhibitor, methyladenine (3-MA) induced death and attenuated the level of elevated LC3 in MCF-7/TAM cells. Elucidating the interplay between choline metabolism and autophagy will provide unique opportunities to identify new therapeutic targets and develop novel treatment strategies that preferentially target TAM-resistance. PMID:26496360

  2. Effects of rumen-protected choline supplementation on metabolic and performance responses of transition dairy cows.

    PubMed

    Leiva, T; Cooke, R F; Brandão, A P; Marques, R S; Vasconcelos, J L M

    2015-04-01

    The objective of this experiment was to compare metabolic and milk production parameters in dairy cows supplemented and nonsupplemented with rumen-protected choline (RPC) during the transition period. Twenty-three nonlactating, multiparous, pregnant Holstein cows were ranked by BW and BCS 21 d before expected date of calving and immediately were assigned to receive (n = 12) or not receive (control; n = 11) RPC until 45 d in milk (DIM). Cows supplemented with RPC received (as-fed basis) 50 and 100 g/d of RPC (18.8% choline) before and after calving, respectively. Before calving, cows were maintained in 2 drylot pens according to treatment with ad libitum access to corn silage, and individually they received (as-fed basis) 3 kg/cow daily of a concentrate. Upon calving, cows were moved to 2 adjacent drylot pens according to treatment, milked twice daily, offered (as-fed basis) 35 kg/cow daily of corn silage, and individually received a concentrate formulated to meet their nutritional requirements after milking. The RPC was individually offered to cows as a topdressing into the morning concentrate feeding. Before calving, cow BW and BCS were recorded weekly, and blood samples were collected every 5 d beginning on d -21 relative to expected calving date. Upon calving and until 45 DIM, BW and BCS were recorded weekly, individual milk production was recorded daily, and milk samples were collected once a week and analyzed for fat, protein, and total solids. Blood samples were collected every other day from 0 to 20 DIM and every 5 d from 20 to 45 DIM. Based on actual calving dates, cows receiving RPC or control began receiving treatments 16.8 ± 1.7 and 17.3 ± 2.0 d before calving, respectively. No treatment effects were detected (P ≥ 0.18) on postpartum concentrate intake, BW and BCS, or serum concentrations of cortisol, β-hydroxybutyrate, NEFA, glucose, and IGF-I. Cows supplemented with RPC had greater (P ≤ 0.01) mean serum haptoglobin and insulin concentrations

  3. Maternal choline supplementation improves spatial mapping and increases basal forebrain cholinergic neuron number and size in aged Ts65Dn mice.

    PubMed

    Ash, Jessica A; Velazquez, Ramon; Kelley, Christy M; Powers, Brian E; Ginsberg, Stephen D; Mufson, Elliott J; Strupp, Barbara J

    2014-10-01

    Down syndrome (DS) is marked by intellectual disability (ID) and early-onset of Alzheimer's disease (AD) neuropathology, including basal forebrain cholinergic neuron (BFCN) degeneration. The present study tested the hypothesis that maternal choline supplementation (MCS) improves spatial mapping and protects against BFCN degeneration in the Ts65Dn mouse model of DS and AD. During pregnancy and lactation, dams were assigned to either a choline sufficient (1.1g/kg choline chloride) or choline supplemented (5.0g/kg choline chloride) diet. Between 13 and 17months of age, offspring were tested in the radial arm water maze (RAWM) to examine spatial mapping followed by unbiased quantitative morphometry of BFCNs. Spatial mapping was significantly impaired in unsupplemented Ts65Dn mice relative to normal disomic (2N) littermates. Additionally, a significantly lower number and density of medial septum (MS) hippocampal projection BFCNs was also found in unsupplemented Ts65Dn mice. Notably, MCS significantly improved spatial mapping and increased number, density, and size of MS BFCNs in Ts65Dn offspring. Moreover, the density and number of MS BFCNs correlated significantly with spatial memory proficiency, providing support for a functional relationship between these behavioral and morphometric effects of MCS for trisomic offspring. Thus, increasing maternal choline intake during pregnancy may represent a safe and effective treatment approach for expectant mothers carrying a DS fetus, as well as a possible means of BFCN neuroprotection during aging for the population at large.

  4. Maternal choline supplementation improves spatial mapping and increases basal forebrain cholinergic neuron number and size in aged Ts65Dn mice.

    PubMed

    Ash, Jessica A; Velazquez, Ramon; Kelley, Christy M; Powers, Brian E; Ginsberg, Stephen D; Mufson, Elliott J; Strupp, Barbara J

    2014-10-01

    Down syndrome (DS) is marked by intellectual disability (ID) and early-onset of Alzheimer's disease (AD) neuropathology, including basal forebrain cholinergic neuron (BFCN) degeneration. The present study tested the hypothesis that maternal choline supplementation (MCS) improves spatial mapping and protects against BFCN degeneration in the Ts65Dn mouse model of DS and AD. During pregnancy and lactation, dams were assigned to either a choline sufficient (1.1g/kg choline chloride) or choline supplemented (5.0g/kg choline chloride) diet. Between 13 and 17months of age, offspring were tested in the radial arm water maze (RAWM) to examine spatial mapping followed by unbiased quantitative morphometry of BFCNs. Spatial mapping was significantly impaired in unsupplemented Ts65Dn mice relative to normal disomic (2N) littermates. Additionally, a significantly lower number and density of medial septum (MS) hippocampal projection BFCNs was also found in unsupplemented Ts65Dn mice. Notably, MCS significantly improved spatial mapping and increased number, density, and size of MS BFCNs in Ts65Dn offspring. Moreover, the density and number of MS BFCNs correlated significantly with spatial memory proficiency, providing support for a functional relationship between these behavioral and morphometric effects of MCS for trisomic offspring. Thus, increasing maternal choline intake during pregnancy may represent a safe and effective treatment approach for expectant mothers carrying a DS fetus, as well as a possible means of BFCN neuroprotection during aging for the population at large. PMID:24932939

  5. Cholinergic activation of the murine trachealis muscle via non-vesicular acetylcholine release involving low-affinity choline transporters.

    PubMed

    Nassenstein, Christina; Wiegand, Silke; Lips, Katrin S; Li, Guanfeng; Klein, Jochen; Kummer, Wolfgang

    2015-11-01

    In addition to quantal, vesicular release of acetylcholine (ACh), there is also non-quantal release at the motor endplate which is insufficient to evoke postsynaptic responses unless acetylcholinesterase (AChE) is inhibited. We here addressed potential non-quantal release in the mouse trachea by organ bath experiments and (immuno)histochemical methods. Electrical field stimulation (EFS) of nerve terminals elicited tracheal constriction that is largely due to ACh release. Classical enzyme histochemistry demonstrated acetylcholinesterase (AChE) activity in nerve fibers in the muscle and butyrylcholinesterase (BChE) activity in the smooth muscle cells. Acute inhibition of both esterases by eserine significantly raised tracheal tone which was fully sensitive to atropine. This effect was reduced, but not abolished, in AChE, but not in BChE gene-deficient mice. The eserine-induced increase in tracheal tone was unaffected by vesamicol (10(-5)M), an inhibitor of the vesicular acetylcholine transporter, and by corticosterone (10(-4)M), an inhibitor of organic cation transporters. Hemicholinium-3, in low concentrations an inhibitor of the high-affinity choline transporter-1 (CHT1), completely abrogated the eserine effects when applied in high concentrations (10(-4)M) pointing towards an involvement of low-affinity choline transporters. To evaluate the cellular sources of non-quantal ACh release in the trachea, expression of low-affinity choline transporter-like family (CTL1-5) was evaluated by RT-PCR analysis. Even though these transporters were largely abundant in the epithelium, denudation of airway epithelial cells had no effect on eserine-induced tracheal contraction, indicating a non-quantal release of ACh from non-epithelial sources in the airways. These data provide evidence for an epithelium-independent non-vesicular, non-quantal ACh release in the mouse trachea involving low-affinity choline transporters. PMID:26278668

  6. No evidence for role of extracellular choline-acetyltransferase in generation of gamma oscillations in rat hippocampal slices in vitro.

    PubMed

    Hollnagel, J O; ul Haq, R; Behrens, C J; Maslarova, A; Mody, I; Heinemann, U

    2015-01-22

    Acetylcholine (ACh) is well known to induce persistent γ-oscillations in the hippocampus when applied together with physostigmine, an inhibitor of the ACh degrading enzyme acetylcholinesterase (AChE). Here we report that physostigmine alone can also dose-dependently induce γ-oscillations in rat hippocampal slices. We hypothesized that this effect was due to the presence of choline in the extracellular space and that this choline is taken up into cholinergic fibers where it is converted to ACh by the enzyme choline-acetyltransferase (ChAT). Release of ACh from cholinergic fibers in turn may then induce γ-oscillations. We therefore tested the effects of the choline uptake inhibitor hemicholinium-3 (HC-3) on persistent γ-oscillations either induced by physostigmine alone or by co-application of ACh and physostigmine. We found that HC-3 itself did not induce γ-oscillations and also did not prevent physostigmine-induced γ-oscillation while washout of physostigmine and ACh-induced γ-oscillations was accelerated. It was recently reported that ChAT might also be present in the extracellular space (Vijayaraghavan et al., 2013). Here we show that the effect of physostigmine was prevented by the ChAT inhibitor (2-benzoylethyl)-trimethylammonium iodide (BETA) which could indicate extracellular synthesis of ACh. However, when we tested for effects of extracellularly applied acetyl-CoA, a substrate of ChAT for synthesis of ACh, physostigmine-induced γ-oscillations were attenuated. Together, these findings do not support the idea that ACh can be synthesized by an extracellularly located ChAT. PMID:25453770

  7. Self-assembly of myristic acid in the presence of choline hydroxide: effect of molar ratio and temperature.

    PubMed

    Arnould, Audrey; Perez, Adrian A; Gaillard, Cédric; Douliez, Jean-Paul; Cousin, Fabrice; Santiago, Liliana G; Zemb, Thomas; Anton, Marc; Fameau, Anne-Laure

    2015-05-01

    Salt-free catanionic systems based on fatty acids exhibit a broad polymorphism by simply tuning the molar ratio between the two components. For fatty acid combined with organic amino counter-ions, very few data are available on the phase behavior obtained as a function of the molar ratio between the counter-ion and the fatty acid. We investigated the choline hydroxide/myristic acid system by varying the molar ratio, R=n(choline hydroxide)/n(myristic acid), and the temperature. Myristic acid ionization state was determined by coupling pH, conductivity and infra-red spectroscopy measurements. Self-assemblies were characterized by small angle neutron scattering and microscopy experiments. Self-assembly thermal behavior was investigated by differential scanning calorimetry, wide angle X-ray scattering and nuclear magnetic resonance. For R<1, ionized and protonated myristic acid molecules coexisted leading to the formation of facetted self-assemblies and lamellar phases. The melting process between the gel and the fluid state of these bilayers induced a structural change from facetted or lamellar objects to spherical vesicles. For R>1, myristic acid molecules were ionized and formed spherical micelles. Our study highlights that both R and temperature are two key parameters to finely control the self-assembly structure formed by myristic acid in the presence of choline hydroxide.

  8. Amperometric choline biosensor based on multiwalled carbon nanotubes/zirconium oxide nanoparticles electrodeposited on glassy carbon electrode.

    PubMed

    Pundir, S; Chauhan, N; Narang, J; Pundir, C S

    2012-08-01

    A bienzymatic choline biosensor was constructed by coimmobilizing acetylcholinesterase (AChE) and choline oxidase (ChO) onto nanocomposite of carboxylated multiwalled carbon nanotubes (c-MWCNTs) and zirconium oxide nanoparticles (ZrO(2)NPs) electrodeposited on the surface of a glassy carbon electrode (GCE) and using it (AChE-ChO/c-MWCNT/ZrO(2)NPs/GCE) as working electrode, Ag/AgCl as reference electrode, and Pt wire as auxiliary electrode connected through a potentiostat. The enzyme electrode was characterized by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy, and cyclic voltammetry (CV) studies, optimized, and evaluated. The biosensor exhibited optimum response within 4 s at +0.2V, pH 7.4, and 25 °C. The detection limit and working range of the biosensor were 0.01 μM and 0.05 to 200 μM, respectively. The half-life of the enzyme electrode was 60 days at 4 °C. The serum choline level, as measured by the biosensor, was 9.0 to 12.8 μmol/L (with a mean of 10.81 μmol/L) in apparently healthy persons and 5.0 to 8.4 μmol/L (with a mean of 6.53 μmol/L) in persons suffering from Alzheimer's disease. The enzyme electrode was unaffected by a number of serum substances.

  9. Choline Binding Proteins from Streptococcus pneumoniae: A Dual Role as Enzybiotics and Targets for the Design of New Antimicrobials

    PubMed Central

    Maestro, Beatriz; Sanz, Jesús M.

    2016-01-01

    Streptococcus pneumoniae (pneumococcus) is an important pathogen responsible for acute invasive and non-invasive infections such as meningitis, sepsis and otitis media, being the major cause of community-acquired pneumonia. The fight against pneumococcus is currently hampered both by insufficient vaccine coverage and by rising antimicrobial resistances to traditional antibiotics, making necessary the research on novel targets. Choline binding proteins (CBPs) are a family of polypeptides found in pneumococcus and related species, as well as in some of their associated bacteriophages. They are characterized by a structural organization in two modules: a functional module (FM), and a choline-binding module (CBM) that anchors the protein to the choline residues present in the cell wall through non-covalent interactions. Pneumococcal CBPs include cell wall hydrolases, adhesins and other virulence factors, all playing relevant physiological roles for bacterial viability and virulence. Moreover, many pneumococcal phages also make use of hydrolytic CBPs to fulfill their infectivity cycle. Consequently, CBPs may play a dual role for the development of novel antipneumococcal drugs, both as targets for inhibitors of their binding to the cell wall and as active cell lytic agents (enzybiotics). In this article, we review the current state of knowledge about host- and phage-encoded pneumococcal CBPs, with a special focus on structural issues, together with their perspectives for effective anti-infectious treatments. PMID:27314398

  10. Quantification of glycine betaine, choline and trimethylamine N-oxide in seawater particulates: Minimisation of seawater associated ion suppression.

    PubMed

    Beale, Rachael; Airs, Ruth

    2016-09-28

    A liquid chromatography/mass spectrometry (LC/MS, electrospray ionisation) method has been developed for the quantification of nitrogenous osmolytes (N-osmolytes) in the particulate fraction of natural water samples. Full method validation demonstrates the validity of the method for measuring glycine betaine (GBT), choline and trimethylamine N-oxide (TMAO) in particulates from seawater. Limits of detection were calculated as 3.5, 1.2 and 5.9 pg injected onto column (equivalent to 1.5, 0.6 and 3.9 nmol per litre) for GBT, choline and TMAO respectively. Precision of the method was typically 3% for both GBT and choline and 6% for TMAO. Collection of the particulate fraction of natural samples was achieved via in-line filtration. Resulting chromatography and method sensitivity was assessed and compared for the use of both glass fibre and polycarbonate filters during sample collection. Ion suppression was shown to be a significant cause of reduced instrument response to N-osmolytes and was associated with the presence of seawater in the sample matrix. PMID:27619093

  11. Choline Binding Proteins from Streptococcus pneumoniae: A Dual Role as Enzybiotics and Targets for the Design of New Antimicrobials.

    PubMed

    Maestro, Beatriz; Sanz, Jesús M

    2016-01-01

    Streptococcus pneumoniae (pneumococcus) is an important pathogen responsible for acute invasive and non-invasive infections such as meningitis, sepsis and otitis media, being the major cause of community-acquired pneumonia. The fight against pneumococcus is currently hampered both by insufficient vaccine coverage and by rising antimicrobial resistances to traditional antibiotics, making necessary the research on novel targets. Choline binding proteins (CBPs) are a family of polypeptides found in pneumococcus and related species, as well as in some of their associated bacteriophages. They are characterized by a structural organization in two modules: a functional module (FM), and a choline-binding module (CBM) that anchors the protein to the choline residues present in the cell wall through non-covalent interactions. Pneumococcal CBPs include cell wall hydrolases, adhesins and other virulence factors, all playing relevant physiological roles for bacterial viability and virulence. Moreover, many pneumococcal phages also make use of hydrolytic CBPs to fulfill their infectivity cycle. Consequently, CBPs may play a dual role for the development of novel antipneumococcal drugs, both as targets for inhibitors of their binding to the cell wall and as active cell lytic agents (enzybiotics). In this article, we review the current state of knowledge about host- and phage-encoded pneumococcal CBPs, with a special focus on structural issues, together with their perspectives for effective anti-infectious treatments. PMID:27314398

  12. Novel ligands of Choline Acetyltransferase designed by in silico molecular docking, hologram QSAR and lead optimization.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Rajnish; Långström, Bengt; Darreh-Shori, Taher

    2016-01-01

    Recent reports have brought back the acetylcholine synthesizing enzyme, choline acetyltransferase in the mainstream research in dementia and the cholinergic anti-inflammatory pathway. Here we report, a specific strategy for the design of novel ChAT ligands based on molecular docking, Hologram Quantitative Structure Activity Relationship (HQSAR) and lead optimization. Molecular docking was performed on a series of ChAT inhibitors to decipher the molecular fingerprint of their interaction with the active site of ChAT. Then robust statistical fragment HQSAR models were developed. A library of novel ligands was generated based on the pharmacophoric and shape similarity scoring function, and evaluated in silico for their molecular interactions with ChAT. Ten of the top scoring invented compounds are reported here. We confirmed the activity of α-NETA, the only commercially available ChAT inhibitor, and one of the seed compounds in our model, using a new simple colorimetric ChAT assay (IC50 ~ 88 nM). In contrast, α-NETA exhibited an IC50 of ~30 μM for the ACh-degrading cholinesterases. In conclusion, the overall results may provide useful insight for discovering novel ChAT ligands and potential positron emission tomography tracers as in vivo functional biomarkers of the health of central cholinergic system in neurodegenerative disorders, such as Alzheimer's disease.

  13. Novel ligands of Choline Acetyltransferase designed by in silico molecular docking, hologram QSAR and lead optimization

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Rajnish; Långström, Bengt; Darreh-Shori, Taher

    2016-01-01

    Recent reports have brought back the acetylcholine synthesizing enzyme, choline acetyltransferase in the mainstream research in dementia and the cholinergic anti-inflammatory pathway. Here we report, a specific strategy for the design of novel ChAT ligands based on molecular docking, Hologram Quantitative Structure Activity Relationship (HQSAR) and lead optimization. Molecular docking was performed on a series of ChAT inhibitors to decipher the molecular fingerprint of their interaction with the active site of ChAT. Then robust statistical fragment HQSAR models were developed. A library of novel ligands was generated based on the pharmacophoric and shape similarity scoring function, and evaluated in silico for their molecular interactions with ChAT. Ten of the top scoring invented compounds are reported here. We confirmed the activity of α-NETA, the only commercially available ChAT inhibitor, and one of the seed compounds in our model, using a new simple colorimetric ChAT assay (IC50 ~ 88 nM). In contrast, α-NETA exhibited an IC50 of ~30 μM for the ACh-degrading cholinesterases. In conclusion, the overall results may provide useful insight for discovering novel ChAT ligands and potential positron emission tomography tracers as in vivo functional biomarkers of the health of central cholinergic system in neurodegenerative disorders, such as Alzheimer’s disease. PMID:27507101

  14. Human Neural Stem Cells Overexpressing Choline Acetyltransferase Restore Unconditioned Fear in Rats with Amygdala Injury

    PubMed Central

    Shin, Kyungha; Cha, Yeseul; Kim, Kwang Sei; Choi, Ehn-Kyoung; Choi, Youngjin; Guo, Haiyu; Ban, Young-Hwan; Kim, Jong-Choon; Park, Dongsun; Kim, Yun-Bae

    2016-01-01

    Amygdala is involved in the fear memory that recognizes certain environmental cues predicting threatening events. Manipulation of neurotransmission within the amygdala affects the expression of conditioned and unconditioned emotional memories such as fear freezing behaviour. We previously demonstrated that F3.ChAT human neural stem cells (NSCs) overexpressing choline acetyltransferase (ChAT) improve cognitive function of Alzheimer's disease model rats with hippocampal or cholinergic nerve injuries by increasing acetylcholine (ACh) level. In the present study, we examined the effect of F3.ChAT cells on the deficit of unconditioned fear freezing. Rats given N-methyl-d-aspartate (NMDA) in their amygdala 2 weeks prior to cat odor exposure displayed very short resting (freezing) time compared to normal animals. NMDA induced neuronal degeneration in the amygdala, leading to a decreased ACh concentration in cerebrospinal fluid. However, intracerebroventricular transplantation of F3.ChAT cells attenuated amygdala lesions 4 weeks after transplantation. The transplanted cells were found in the NMDA-injury sites and produced ChAT protein. In addition, F3.ChAT-receiving rats recuperated freezing time staying remote from the cat odor source, according to the recovery of brain ACh concentration. The results indicate that human NSCs overexpressing ChAT may facilitate retrieval of unconditioned fear memory by increasing ACh level. PMID:27087745

  15. Choline-induced selective fluorescence quenching of acetylcholinesterase conjugated Au@BSA clusters.

    PubMed

    Mathew, Meegle S; Baksi, Ananya; Pradeep, T; Joseph, Kuruvilla

    2016-07-15

    We have developed a highly selective sensitive fluorescent detection of acetylcholine (ACh) using bovine serum albumin (BSA) protected atomically precise clusters of gold. The gold quantum clusters (AuQC@BSA) synthesized using bovine serum albumin and conjugated with acetylcholinesterase (AChE), an enzyme specific for acetylcholine, resulting in AuQC@BSA-AChE. The enzyme, AChE hydrolyzes acetylcholine (ACh) to choline (Ch) which in turn interacts with AuQC@BSA-AChE and quenches its fluorescence, enabling sensing. We have carried out the real time monitoring of the hydrolysis of ACh using electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (ESI MS) to find out the mechanism of fluorescent quenching. The validity of present method for determination of concentration of acetylcholine in real system such as blood was demonstrated. Further, the sensor, AuQC@BSA-AChE can be easily coated on paper and an efficient and cheap sensor can be developed and detection limit for ACh is found to be 10nM. The fluorescent intensity of AuQC@BSA-AChE is sensitive towards acetylcholine in range of 10nM to 6.4µM. This suggests that AuQC@BSA-AChE has an excellent potential to be used for diagnosis of various neuropsychological and neuropsychiatric disorders.

  16. A critical role for Choline Kinase alpha in the aggressiveness of bladder carcinomas

    PubMed Central

    Hernando, Eva; Sarmentero-Estrada, Jacinto; Koppie, Theresa; Belda-Iniesta, Cristóbal; de Molina, Victor Ramírez; Cejas, Paloma; Ozu, Choichiro; Le, Carl; Sánchez, Jose Javier; González-Barón, Manuel; Koutcher, Jason; Cordón-Cardó, Carlos; Bochner, Bernard H.; Lacal, Juan Carlos; Ramírez de Molina, Ana

    2010-01-01

    Bladder cancer is one of the most common causes of death in industrialized countries. New tumor markers and therapeutic approaches are still needed to improve management of bladder cancer patients. Choline Kinase alpha (ChoKα) is a metabolic enzyme that has a role in cell proliferation and transformation. Inhibitors of ChoKα display antitumoral activity and are expected to be soon in clinical trials. This study is aimed to asses whether ChoKα plays a role in the aggressiveness of bladder tumors and constitute a new approach for bladder cancer treatment. We demonstrate here that ChoKα is constitutively altered in human bladder tumor cells. Furthermore, in vivo murine models including an orthotopic model to mimic as much as possible the physiological conditions, revealed that increased levels of ChoKα potentiates both tumor formation (p≤0.0001) and aggressiveness of the disease over different endpoints (p=0.011). Accordingly, increased levels of ChoKα significantly reduces survival of mice with bladder cancer (p=0.05). Finally, treatment with ChoKα specific inhibitor resulted in a significant inhibition of tumor growth (p=0.02) and in a relevant increase in survival (p=0.03). PMID:19448670

  17. Toxicity profile of choline chloride-based deep eutectic solvents for fungi and Cyprinus carpio fish.

    PubMed

    Juneidi, Ibrahim; Hayyan, Maan; Mohd Ali, Ozair

    2016-04-01

    An investigation on the toxicological assessment of 10 choline chloride (ChCl)-based deep eutectic solvents (DESs) towards four fungi strains and Cyprinus carpio fish was conducted. ChCl was combined with materials from different chemical groups such as alcohols, sugars, acids and others to form DESs. The study was carried out on the individual DES components, their aqueous mixture before DES formation and their formed DESs. The agar disc diffusion method was followed to investigate their toxicity on four fungi strains selected as a model of eukaryotic microorganisms (Phanerochaete chrysosporium, Aspergillus niger, Lentinus tigrinus and Candida cylindracea). Among these DESs, ChCl:ZnCl2 exhibited the highest inhibition zone diameter towards the tested fungi growth in vitro, followed by the acidic group (malonic acid and p-toluenesulfonic acid). Another study was conducted to test the acute toxicity and determine the lethal concentration at 50 % (LC50) of the same DESs on C. carpio fish. The inhibition range and LC50 of DESs were found to be different from their individual components. DESs were found to be less toxic than their mixture or individual components. The LC50 of ChCl:MADES is much higher than that of ChCl:MAMix. Moreover, the DESs acidic group showed a lower inhibition zone on fungi growth. Thus, DESs should be considered as new components with different physicochemical properties and toxicological profiles, and not merely compositions of compounds.

  18. Effects of choline chloride on electrodeposited Ni coating from a Watts-type bath

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Yurong; Yang, Caihong; He, Jiawei; Wang, Wenchang; Mitsuzak, Naotoshi; Chen, Zhidong

    2016-05-01

    Electrodeposition of bright nickel (Ni) was carried out in a Watts-type bath. Choline chloride (ChCl) was applied as a multifunctional additive and substitute for nickel chloride (NiCl2) in a Watts-type bath. The function of ChCl was investigated through conductivity tests, anodic polarization, and cathodic polarization experiments. The studies revealed that ChCl performed well as a conducting salt, anodic activator, and cathodic inhibitor. The effects of ChCl on deposition rate, preferred orientation, grain size, surface morphology, and microhardness of Ni coatings were also studied. The deposition rate reached a maximum value of greater than 27 μm h-1 when 20 g L-1 ChCl was introduced to the bath. Using X-ray diffraction, it was confirmed that progressive addition of ChCl promoted the preferred crystal orientation modification from (2 0 0) and (2 2 0) to (1 1 1), refined grain size, and enhanced microhardness. The presence of ChCl lowered the roughness of the coating.

  19. Interaction Mechanism Insights on the Solvation of Fullerene B(80)with Choline-based Ionic Liquids.

    PubMed

    García, Gregorio; Atilhan, Mert; Aparicio, Santiago

    2015-09-24

    Beyond carbon allotropes, other nanostructures such as fullerene B80 are attracting a growing interest due to their potential applications. The use of new materials based on fullerene B80 is still in a premature stage; however many of these applications would require the use of B80 in solution. This paper reports an unprecedented density functional theory (DFT) analysis on the interaction mechanism between B80 and two choline-based ionic liquids as a first insight for the fullerene B80 solvation by ionic liquids. The analysis of properties such as binding energies, charge distributions or intermolecular interactions shed light on the main features, which should govern interaction between ionic liquids and fullerene B80. In addition, the optimization of systems composed by six ionic pairs around a fullerene B80 has supplied some information about the first solvation shell at the molecular level. As a summary, this paper provides the first insights in the rational design of ionic liquids with suitable properties for the solvation of B80.

  20. Novel ligands of Choline Acetyltransferase designed by in silico molecular docking, hologram QSAR and lead optimization.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Rajnish; Långström, Bengt; Darreh-Shori, Taher

    2016-01-01

    Recent reports have brought back the acetylcholine synthesizing enzyme, choline acetyltransferase in the mainstream research in dementia and the cholinergic anti-inflammatory pathway. Here we report, a specific strategy for the design of novel ChAT ligands based on molecular docking, Hologram Quantitative Structure Activity Relationship (HQSAR) and lead optimization. Molecular docking was performed on a series of ChAT inhibitors to decipher the molecular fingerprint of their interaction with the active site of ChAT. Then robust statistical fragment HQSAR models were developed. A library of novel ligands was generated based on the pharmacophoric and shape similarity scoring function, and evaluated in silico for their molecular interactions with ChAT. Ten of the top scoring invented compounds are reported here. We confirmed the activity of α-NETA, the only commercially available ChAT inhibitor, and one of the seed compounds in our model, using a new simple colorimetric ChAT assay (IC50 ~ 88 nM). In contrast, α-NETA exhibited an IC50 of ~30 μM for the ACh-degrading cholinesterases. In conclusion, the overall results may provide useful insight for discovering novel ChAT ligands and potential positron emission tomography tracers as in vivo functional biomarkers of the health of central cholinergic system in neurodegenerative disorders, such as Alzheimer's disease. PMID:27507101

  1. Enzyme-Catalyzed Henry Reaction in Choline Chloride-Based Deep Eutectic Solvents.

    PubMed

    Tian, Xuemei; Zhang, Suoqin; Zheng, Liangyu

    2016-01-01

    The enzyme-catalyzed Henry reaction was realized using deep eutectic solvents (DESs) as a reaction medium. The lipase from Aspergillus niger (lipase AS) showed excellent catalytic activity toward the substrates aromatic aldehydes and nitromethane in choline chloride:glycerol at a molar ratio of 1:2. Addition of 30 vol% water to DES further improved the lipase activity and inhibited DES-catalyzed transformation. A final yield of 92.2% for the lipase AS-catalyzed Henry reaction was achieved under optimized reaction conditions in only 4 h. In addition, the lipase AS activity was improved by approximately 3-fold in a DES-water mixture compared with that in pure water, which produced a final yield of only 33.4%. Structural studies with fluorescence spectroscopy showed that the established strong hydrogen bonds between DES and water may be the main driving force that affects the spatial conformation of the enzyme, leading to a change in lipase activity. The methodology was also extended to the aza-Henry reaction, which easily occurred in contrast to that in pure water. The enantioselectivity of both Henry and aza-Henry reactions was not found. However, the results are still remarkable, as we report the first use of DES as a reaction medium in a lipase-catalyzed Henry reaction.

  2. Electrochemical fabrication of nanoporous copper films in choline chloride-urea deep eutectic solvent.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Q B; Abbott, Andrew P; Yang, C

    2015-06-14

    Nanoporous copper films were fabricated by a facile electrochemical alloying/dealloying process without the need of a template. A deep eutectic solvent made from choline chloride (ChCl) and urea was used with zinc oxide as the metal salt. Cyclic voltammetry was used to characterise the electrochemical reduction of zinc and follow Cu-Zn alloy formation on the copper substrate at elevated temperatures from 353 to 393 K. The alloy formation was confirmed by X-ray diffraction spectra. 3D, open and bicontinuous nanoporous copper films were obtained by in situ electrochemically etching (dealloying) of the zinc component in the Cu-Zn surface alloys at an appropriate potential (-0.4 V vs. Ag). This dealloying process was found to be highly temperature dependent and surface diffusion controlled, which involved the self-assembly of copper atoms at the alloy/electrolyte interface. Additionally, the effects of the deposition parameters, including deposition temperature, current density as well as total charge density on resulting the microstructure were investigated by scanning electron microscopy, and atomic force microscope. PMID:25972227

  3. Exogenous nerve growth factor stimulates choline acetyltransferase activity in aging Fischer 344 male rats.

    PubMed

    Williams, L R

    1991-01-01

    The effect of age and exogenous nerve growth factor (NGF) infusion on choline acetyltransferase (ChAT) specific activity is examined in microdissections of cerebral and hippocampal cortices, and the cholinergic nuclei of the medial septum and diagonal band of Broca (MS/DB), the nucleus basalis magnocellularis (NBM), and striatum of Fischer 344 male rats. Significant, 20% losses in ChAT activity are found in the MS/DB and striatum of 24-month-old rats (n = 21) compared to 4-month-old animals, but there is no apparent loss of enzyme activity in the NBM. Loss of ChAT activity in the MS/DB is only observed in animals older than 19 months of age, while a striatal deficit is found in animals older than 7 months. Treatment for 2 weeks with NGF at 1.2 micrograms/day results in significant 70% increases of ChAT activity in the MS/DB and striatum of 24-month-old rats compared to untreated and vehicle-treated 4-month-old rats, but does not stimulate activity in the NBM. Sensitivity of ChAT activity in the MS/DB and striatum to exogenous NGF increases with age. These experiments indicate that in the MS/DB, NBM, and striatum of Fischer 344 male rat there is an age-associated, differential regulation of ChAT enzyme activity and sensitivity to exogenous NGF.

  4. Effects of sex hormones, forskolin, and nicotine on choline acetyltransferase activity in human isolated placenta.

    PubMed

    Wessler, Ignaz; Schwarze, Sören; Brockerhoff, Peter; Bittinger, Fernando; Kirkpatrick, Charles James; Kilbinger, Heinz

    2003-04-01

    The activity of choline acetyltransferase (ChAT) was investigated in the human placenta before and after long-term incubation (24 h) to test the effects of sex hormones, nicotine and forskolin. ChAT activity differed considerably between the amnion (0.03 micromol/mg protein/h) and the villus (0.56). After long-term incubation, ChAT activity persisted in the latter but declined in the amnion. Neither sex hormones (beta-estradiol, testosterone, progesterone; 10 or 100 nM each) nor follicle stimulating hormone and luteinizing hormone (FSH/LH; 8.4 U/ml each) modified ChAT activity. Also nicotine (1 nM-100 microM) did not affect ChAT activity. Forskolin, an activitor of adenylyl cyclase, reduced ChAT activity in the villus but not in amnion. The present model offers the possibility to investigate ChAT regulation in intact tissue under long-term incubation. The risks of maternal smoking during pregnancy cannot be attributed to an effect of nicotine on placental ChAT activity. Differences in the regulation of ChAT appear to exist between neuronal and nonneuronal cells.

  5. Human Neural Stem Cells Overexpressing Choline Acetyltransferase Restore Unconditioned Fear in Rats with Amygdala Injury.

    PubMed

    Shin, Kyungha; Cha, Yeseul; Kim, Kwang Sei; Choi, Ehn-Kyoung; Choi, Youngjin; Guo, Haiyu; Ban, Young-Hwan; Kim, Jong-Choon; Park, Dongsun; Kim, Yun-Bae

    2016-01-01

    Amygdala is involved in the fear memory that recognizes certain environmental cues predicting threatening events. Manipulation of neurotransmission within the amygdala affects the expression of conditioned and unconditioned emotional memories such as fear freezing behaviour. We previously demonstrated that F3.ChAT human neural stem cells (NSCs) overexpressing choline acetyltransferase (ChAT) improve cognitive function of Alzheimer's disease model rats with hippocampal or cholinergic nerve injuries by increasing acetylcholine (ACh) level. In the present study, we examined the effect of F3.ChAT cells on the deficit of unconditioned fear freezing. Rats given N-methyl-d-aspartate (NMDA) in their amygdala 2 weeks prior to cat odor exposure displayed very short resting (freezing) time compared to normal animals. NMDA induced neuronal degeneration in the amygdala, leading to a decreased ACh concentration in cerebrospinal fluid. However, intracerebroventricular transplantation of F3.ChAT cells attenuated amygdala lesions 4 weeks after transplantation. The transplanted cells were found in the NMDA-injury sites and produced ChAT protein. In addition, F3.ChAT-receiving rats recuperated freezing time staying remote from the cat odor source, according to the recovery of brain ACh concentration. The results indicate that human NSCs overexpressing ChAT may facilitate retrieval of unconditioned fear memory by increasing ACh level. PMID:27087745

  6. Mutant SOD1 impairs axonal transport of choline acetyltransferase and acetylcholine release by sequestering KAP3

    PubMed Central

    Tateno, Minako; Kato, Shinsuke; Sakurai, Takashi; Nukina, Nobuyuki; Takahashi, Ryosuke; Araki, Toshiyuki

    2009-01-01

    Mutations in the superoxide dismutase 1 (sod1) gene cause familial amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (FALS), likely due to the toxic properties of misfolded mutant SOD1 protein. Here we demonstrated that, starting from the pre-onset stage of FALS, misfolded SOD1 species associates specifically with kinesin-associated protein 3 (KAP3) in the ventral white matter of SOD1G93A-transgenic mouse spinal cord. KAP3 is a kinesin-2 subunit responsible for binding to cargos including choline acetyltransferase (ChAT). Motor axons in SOD1G93A-Tg mice also showed a reduction in ChAT transport from the pre-onset stage. By employing a novel FALS modeling system using NG108-15 cells, we showed that microtubule-dependent release of acetylcholine was significantly impaired by misfolded SOD1 species. Furthermore, such impairment was able to be normalized by KAP3 overexpression. KAP3 was incorporated into SOD1 aggregates in human FALS cases as well. These results suggest that KAP3 sequestration by misfolded SOD1 species and the resultant inhibition of ChAT transport play a role in the dysfunction of ALS. PMID:19088126

  7. Proteomic analysis of mice fed methionine and choline deficient diet reveals marker proteins associated with steatohepatitis.

    PubMed

    Lee, Su Jin; Kang, Jeong Han; Iqbal, Waqas; Kwon, Oh-Shin

    2015-01-01

    The mechanisms underlying the progression of simple steatosis to steatohepatitis are yet to be elucidated. To identify the proteins involved in the development of liver tissue inflammation, we performed comparative proteomic analysis of non-alcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH). Mice fed a methionine and choline deficient diet (MCD) developed hepatic steatosis characterized by increased free fatty acid (FFA) and triglyceride levels as well as alpha-SMA. Two-dimensional proteomic analysis revealed that the change from the normal diet to the MCD diet affected the expressions of 50 proteins. The most-pronounced changes were observed in the expression of proteins involved in Met metabolism and oxidative stress, most of which were significantly downregulated in NASH model animals. Peroxiredoxin (Prx) is the most interesting among the modulated proteins identified in this study. In particular, cross-regulated Prx1 and Prx6 are likely to participate in cellular defense against the development of hepatitis. Thus, these Prx isoforms may be a useful new marker for early stage steatohepatitis. Moreover, curcumin treatment results in alleviation of the severity of hepatic inflammation in steatohepatitis. Notably, curcumin administration in MCD-fed mice dramatically reduced CYP2E1 as well as Prx1 expression, while upregulating Prx6 expression. These findings suggest that curcumin may have a protective role against MCD fed-induced oxidative stress.

  8. Toxicity profile of choline chloride-based deep eutectic solvents for fungi and Cyprinus carpio fish.

    PubMed

    Juneidi, Ibrahim; Hayyan, Maan; Mohd Ali, Ozair

    2016-04-01

    An investigation on the toxicological assessment of 10 choline chloride (ChCl)-based deep eutectic solvents (DESs) towards four fungi strains and Cyprinus carpio fish was conducted. ChCl was combined with materials from different chemical groups such as alcohols, sugars, acids and others to form DESs. The study was carried out on the individual DES components, their aqueous mixture before DES formation and their formed DESs. The agar disc diffusion method was followed to investigate their toxicity on four fungi strains selected as a model of eukaryotic microorganisms (Phanerochaete chrysosporium, Aspergillus niger, Lentinus tigrinus and Candida cylindracea). Among these DESs, ChCl:ZnCl2 exhibited the highest inhibition zone diameter towards the tested fungi growth in vitro, followed by the acidic group (malonic acid and p-toluenesulfonic acid). Another study was conducted to test the acute toxicity and determine the lethal concentration at 50 % (LC50) of the same DESs on C. carpio fish. The inhibition range and LC50 of DESs were found to be different from their individual components. DESs were found to be less toxic than their mixture or individual components. The LC50 of ChCl:MADES is much higher than that of ChCl:MAMix. Moreover, the DESs acidic group showed a lower inhibition zone on fungi growth. Thus, DESs should be considered as new components with different physicochemical properties and toxicological profiles, and not merely compositions of compounds. PMID:26743645

  9. Prenatal choline supplementation attenuates neuropathological response to status epilepticus in the adult rat hippocampus

    PubMed Central

    Wong-Goodrich, Sarah J. E.; Mellott, Tiffany J.; Glenn, Melissa J.; Blusztajn, Jan K.; Williams, Christina L.

    2008-01-01

    Prenatal choline supplementation (SUP) protects adult rats against spatial memory deficits observed after excitotoxin-induced status epilepticus (SE). To examine the mechanism underlying this neuroprotection, we determined the effects of SUP on a variety of hippocampal markers known to change in response to SE and thought to underlie ensuing cognitive deficits. Adult offspring from rat dams that received either a Control or SUP diet on embryonic days 12–17 were administered saline or kainic acid (i.p.) to induce SE and were euthanized 16 days later. SUP markedly attenuated seizure-induced hippocampal neurodegeneration, dentate cell proliferation, hippocampal GFAP mRNA expression levels, prevented the loss of hippocampal GAD65 protein and mRNA expression, and altered growth factor expression patterns. SUP also enhanced pre-seizure hippocampal levels of BDNF, NGF, and IGF-1, which may confer a neuroprotective hippocampal microenvironment that dampens the neuropathological response to and/or helps facilitate recovery from SE to protect cognitive function. PMID:18353663

  10. Choline reverses scopolamine-induced memory impairment by improving memory reconsolidation.

    PubMed

    Blake, M G; Boccia, M M; Krawczyk, M C; Delorenzi, A; Baratti, C M

    2012-09-01

    It is widely known that pre-training systemic administration of the muscarinic antagonist scopolamine (SCP) (0.5mg/kg, i.p.) leads to anterograde memory impairment in retention tests. The administration of the α(7)-nicotinic receptor agonist choline (Ch) in the dorsal hippocampus (0.8μg/hippocampus) immediately after memory reactivation allowed recovery from scopolamine-induced memory impairment. This effect of Ch was time-dependent, and retention performance was not affected in drug-treated mice that were not subjected to memory reactivation, suggesting that the performance effects are not due to non-specific effects of the drug. The effects of Ch also depended on the age of the reactivated memory. Altogether, our results suggest that Ch exerts its effects by modulating memory reconsolidation, and that the memory impairment induced by low doses of SCP is a memory expression failure and not a storage deficit. Therefore, reconsolidation, among other functions, might serve to change memory expression in later tests. Summarizing, our results open new avenues about the behavioral significance and the physiological functions of memory reconsolidation, providing new strategies for recovering memories from some types of amnesia.

  11. Lipid metabolite profiles and milk production for Holstein and Jersey cows fed rumen-protected choline during the periparturient period.

    PubMed

    Guretzky, N A Janovick; Carlson, D B; Garrett, J E; Drackley, J K

    2006-01-01

    Choline is important for assembly of very low density lipoproteins to export triglyceride from liver; however, studies to assess the effect of rumen-protected choline (RPC) supplementation on blood lipid metabolites in periparturient dairy cows have not been conducted. Thirty-two multiparous Holstein and 10 multiparous Jersey cows were randomly assigned to control or RPC treatments. A close-up diet was fed from approximately 3 wk before parturition through parturition, followed by a lactation diet from parturition through 49 d postpartum. For RPC, diets were top-dressed once daily with 60 g of a RPC product (25% choline as choline chloride) from 21 d before expected parturition through 21 d postpartum. Treatment did not affect dry matter intake either prepartum (12.0 vs. 12.1 kg/d for RPC and control, respectively) or during the first 3 wk postpartum (14.8 vs. 15.7 kg/d, respectively). Daily yields of 3.5% fat-corrected milk (39.4 vs. 37.4 kg/d), fat (1.46 vs. 1.38 kg/d), and protein (1.09 vs. 1.05 kg/d) did not differ statistically by treatment (RPC vs. control, respectively). Jersey cows in the control group had lower concentrations of nonesterified fatty acids and beta-hydroxybutyrate in plasma during d 1 to 10 postpartum than did other breed and treatment combinations. Cows fed RPC tended to have greater serum triglycerides prepartum (17.0 vs. 14.7 mg/dL) and lower plasma phospholipid at parturition (65.2 vs. 78.1 mg/dL) than control cows. Treatment did not affect cholesterol and phospholipid at other time points, but concentrations followed patterns of dry matter intake pre- and postpartum. Cows were in moderate body condition score (mean = 3.3) at the start of the study and did not lose excessive condition by 3 wk postpartum (mean body condition score loss = 0.5); therefore, cows might not have been at great risk for hepatic lipid accumulation. Additionally, calculated Met balance was negative postpartum; supplemental RPC might not have spared enough Met to

  12. Maternal choline modifies fetal liver copper, gene expression, DNA methylation, and neonatal growth in the tx-j mouse model of Wilson disease

    PubMed Central

    Medici, Valentina; Shibata, Noreene M; Kharbanda, Kusum K; Islam, Mohammad S; Keen, Carl L; Kim, Kyoungmi; Tillman, Brittany; French, Samuel W; Halsted, Charles H; LaSalle, Janine M

    2014-01-01

    Maternal diet can affect fetal gene expression through epigenetic mechanisms. Wilson disease (WD), which is caused by autosomal recessive mutations in ATP7B encoding a biliary copper transporter, is characterized by excessive hepatic copper accumulation, but variability in disease severity. We tested the hypothesis that gestational supply of dietary methyl groups modifies fetal DNA methylation and expression of genes involved in methionine and lipid metabolism that are impaired prior to hepatic steatosis in the toxic milk (tx-j) mouse model of WD. Female C3H control and tx-j mice were fed control (choline 8 mmol/Kg of diet) or choline-supplemented (choline 36 mmol/Kg of diet) diets for 2 weeks throughout mating and pregnancy to gestation day 17. A second group of C3H females, half of which were used to cross foster tx-j pups, received the same diet treatments that extended during lactation to 21 d postpartum. Compared with C3H, fetal tx-j livers had significantly lower copper concentrations and significantly lower transcript levels of Cyclin D1 and genes related to methionine and lipid metabolism. Maternal choline supplementation prevented the transcriptional deficits in fetal tx-j liver for multiple genes related to cell growth and metabolism. Global DNA methylation was increased by 17% in tx-j fetal livers after maternal choline treatment (P < 0.05). Maternal dietary choline rescued the lower body weight of 21 d tx-j mice. Our results suggest that WD pathogenesis is modified by maternal in utero factors, including dietary choline. PMID:24220304

  13. Choline acetyltransferase mutations causing congenital myasthenic syndrome: molecular findings and genotype-phenotype correlations

    PubMed Central

    Arredondo, Juan; Lara, Marian; Gospe, Sídney M.; Mazia, Claudio G.; Vaccarezza, Maria; Garcia-Erro, Marcela; Bowe, Constance; Chang, Celia; Mezei, Michelle; Maselli, Ricardo A.

    2015-01-01

    Choline acetyltransferase catalyzes the synthesis of acetylcholine at cholinergic nerves. Mutations in human CHAT cause a congenital myasthenic syndrome (CMS) due to impaired synthesis of ACh; this severe variant of the disease is frequently associated with unexpected episodes of potentially fatal apnea. The severity of this condition varies remarkably, and the molecular factors determining this variability are poorly understood. Furthermore, genotype–phenotype correlations have been difficult to establish in patients with biallelic mutations. We analyzed the protein expression of seven ChAT mutations, p.Val136Met, p.Arg207His, p.Arg186Trp, p.Val194Leu, p.Pro211Ala, p.Arg566Cys and p.Ser694Cys, in HEK-293 cells to phosphorylated ChAT, determined their enzyme kinetics and thermal instability, and examined their structural changes. Three mutations, p.Arg207His, p.Arg186Trp and p.Arg566Cys, are novel, and p.Val136Met and p.Arg207His are homozygous in three families and associated with severe disease. The characterization of mutants showed a decrease in the overall catalytic efficiency of ChAT; in particular, those located near the active-site tunnel produced the most seriously disruptive phenotypic effects. On the other hand, p.Val136Met is located far from both active and substrate-binding sites produced the most drastic reduction of ChAT expression. Overall, CHAT mutations producing low enzyme expression and severe kinetic effects are associated with the most severe phenotypes. PMID:26080897

  14. Origins of spinal cholinergic pathways in amphibians demonstrated by retrograde transport and choline acetyltransferase immunohistochemistry.

    PubMed

    López, Jesús M; Morona, Ruth; Moreno, Nerea; Domínguez, Laura; González, Agustín

    2007-09-25

    The existence of propriospinal cholinergic pathways and the origin of supraspinal cholinergic descending projections have been investigated in anuran and urodele amphibians. Retrograde tract tracing techniques with dextran amines injected in the spinal cord at different levels were combined with immunohistochemistry for choline acetyltransferase (ChAT). The analysis of the brachial, thoracic and lumbar spinal cord demonstrated that doubly labeled cells were present only close to the injection site. Thus, the participation of the spinal cholinergic cells in distant intersegmental connections is not present, or is very limited, in amphibians. In anurans, tracer applications to the brachial cord revealed cholinergic cells of origin of spinal projections located in four distinct brain nuclei. The most rostrally located cells were found bilaterally in the preoptic area, among the magnocellular cells. In the ipsilateral isthmic region, the laterodorsal tegmental nucleus also showed doubly labeled cells. Throughout the brainstem, abundant codistribution was observed but actual coexistence of the tracer and ChAT was only found in the nucleus of the solitary tract and the inferior reticular nucleus. In the case of the urodele, abundant codistribution between retrogradely labeled cells and ChAT-positive neurons in zones like the suprachiasmatic nucleus, the isthmic region and the rhombencephalic reticular formation was observed, but the only doubly labeled cells were the Mauthner neurons. The present results in amphibians contrast with previous data in mammals in which is striking the presence of a widespread intrinsic cholinergic innervation of the spinal cord and the virtual absence of cholinergic projections descending from the brainstem.

  15. Hepatic Effects of a Methionine-Choline-Deficient Diet in Hepatocyte RXRα-null Mice

    PubMed Central

    Gyamfi, Maxwell Afari; Tanaka, Yuji; He, Lin; Klaassen, Curtis D.; Wan, Yu-Jui Yvonne

    2009-01-01

    Retinoid X receptor-α (RXRα) is an obligate partner for several nuclear hormone receptors that regulate important physiological processes in the liver. In this study the impact of hepatocyte RXRα deficiency on methionine and choline deficient (MCD) diet-induced steatosis, oxidative stress, inflammation, and hepatic transporters gene expression were examined. The mRNA of sterol regulatory element-binding protein (SREBP)-regulated genes, important for lipid synthesis, were not altered in wild type (WT) mice, but were increased 2.0- to 5.4-fold in hepatocyte RXRα-null (H-RXRα-null) mice fed a MCD diet for 14 days. Furthermore, hepatic mRNAs and proteins essential for fatty acid β-oxidation were not altered in WT mice, but were decreased in the MCD diet-fed H-RXRα-null mice, resulting in increased hepatic free fatty acid levels. Cyp2e1 enzyme activity and lipid peroxide levels were induced only in MCD-fed WT mice. In contrast, hepatic mRNA levels of pro-inflammatory factors were increased only in H-RXRα-null mice fed the MCD diet. Hepatic uptake transporters Oatp1a1 and Oatp1b2 mRNA levels were decreased in WT mice fed the MCD diet, whereas the efflux transporter Mrp4 was increased. However, in the H-RXRα-null mice, the MCD diet only moderately decreased Oatp1a1 and induced both Oatp1a4 and Mrp4 gene expression. Whereas the MCD diet increased serum bile acid levels and alkaline phosphatase activity in both WT and H-RXRα-null mice, serum ALT levels were induced (2.9-fold) only in the H-RXRα-null mice. In conclusion, these data suggest a critical role for RXRα in hepatic fatty acid homeostasis and protection against MCD-induced hepatocyte injury. PMID:18952117

  16. Hepatic effects of a methionine-choline-deficient diet in hepatocyte RXR{alpha}-null mice

    SciTech Connect

    Gyamfi, Maxwell Afari; Tanaka, Yuji; He Lin; Klaassen, Curtis D.; Wan, Y.-J.Y.

    2009-01-15

    Retinoid X receptor-{alpha} (RXR{alpha}) is an obligate partner for several nuclear hormone receptors that regulate important physiological processes in the liver. In this study the impact of hepatocyte RXR{alpha} deficiency on methionine and choline deficient (MCD) diet-induced steatosis, oxidative stress, inflammation, and hepatic transporters gene expression were examined. The mRNA of sterol regulatory element-binding protein (SREBP)-regulated genes, important for lipid synthesis, were not altered in wild type (WT) mice, but were increased 2.0- to 5.4-fold in hepatocyte RXR{alpha}-null (H-RXR{alpha}-null) mice fed a MCD diet for 14 days. Furthermore, hepatic mRNAs and proteins essential for fatty acid {beta}-oxidation were not altered in WT mice, but were decreased in the MCD diet-fed H-RXR{alpha}-null mice, resulting in increased hepatic free fatty acid levels. Cyp2e1 enzyme activity and lipid peroxide levels were induced only in MCD-fed WT mice. In contrast, hepatic mRNA levels of pro-inflammatory factors were increased only in H-RXR{alpha}-null mice fed the MCD diet. Hepatic uptake transporters Oatp1a1 and Oatp1b2 mRNA levels were decreased in WT mice fed the MCD diet, whereas the efflux transporter Mrp4 was increased. However, in the H-RXR{alpha}-null mice, the MCD diet only moderately decreased Oatp1a1 and induced both Oatp1a4 and Mrp4 gene expression. Whereas the MCD diet increased serum bile acid levels and alkaline phosphatase activity in both WT and H-RXR{alpha}-null mice, serum ALT levels were induced (2.9-fold) only in the H-RXR{alpha}-null mice. In conclusion, these data suggest a critical role for RXR{alpha} in hepatic fatty acid homeostasis and protection against MCD-induced hepatocyte injury.

  17. The effect of polyene phosphatidyl choline intervention on nonalcoholic steatohepatitis and related mechanism

    PubMed Central

    Cao, Mingbo; Li, Xiuling; Zhang, Bingyong; Han, Shuangyin; Yang, Yuxiu; Zhou, Bingxi; Zhang, Yanri

    2016-01-01

    Nonalcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH) has similar clinical pathological changes to alcoholic hepatitis. It shows increased incidence and young trend year by year. Polyene phosphatidyl choline (PPC) is widely used in clinic for liver disease treatment. The effect and mechanism of PPC on NASH have not been fully elucidated. Thirty healthy male Wistar rats were randomly equally divided into control, NASH group, and PPC group. NASH model was established by high fat diet. PPC was intraperitoneal injected to NASH rat from the second week at 80 mg/kg·d for three weeks. Body weight, liver weight index, ALT, AST, TG, and TC were tested. TNF-α and IL-1β levels were detected by ELISA. NF-κB mRNA and protein expression in liver tissue were determined by real time PCR and Western blot. SOD activity and ROS content were measured by colorimetry. NASH rat presented significantly elevated body weight and liver weight index, increased ROS content, declined SOD activity, enhanced liver function and inflammatory factors expression, and upregulated NF-κB mRNA and protein levels compared with control (P < 0.05). PPC intervention obviously reduced body weight and liver weight index, declined ROS content, amplified SOD activity, decreased liver function, weakened inflammatory factor TNF-α and IL-1β expression, and downregulated NF-κB mRNA and protein levels compared with NASH group (P < 0.05). PPC can play a treatment effect on NASH through regulating oxidative balance, inhibiting inflammatory factors and NF-κB signaling pathway. PMID:27347340

  18. Circulating microRNA 122 in the Methionine and Choline Deficient Mouse Model of Nonalcoholic Steatohepatitis

    PubMed Central

    Clarke, John D.; Sharapova, Tatiana; Lake, April D.; Blomme, Eric; Maher, Jonathan; Cherrington, Nathan J.

    2014-01-01

    Nonalcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH) is a progressive form of nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) and is a major cause of liver cirrhosis and hepatic failure. The methionine choline-deficient diet (MCD) is a frequently used hepatotoxicity animal model of NASH that induces hepatic transaminase (ALT, AST) elevations and hepatobiliary histological changes similar to those observed in human NASH. Liver-specific microRNA-122 (miR-122) has been shown as a key regulator of cholesterol and fatty acid metabolism in adult liver, and has recently been proposed as a sensitive and specific circulating biomarker of hepatic injury. The purpose of this study was to assess miR-122 serum levels in mice receiving an MCD diet for 0, 3, 7, 14, 28 and 56 days and compare the performance versus routine clinical chemistry when benchmarked against the histopathological liver findings. MiR-122 levels were quantified in serum using RT-qPCR. Both miR-122 and ALT/AST levels were significantly elevated in serum at all timepoints. MiR-122 levels increased on average by 40-fold after 3 days of initiating the MCD diet, while ALT and AST changes were 4.8- and 3.3-fold, respectively. In general, miR-122 levels remained elevated across all timepoints, whereas the ALT/AST increases were less robust but correlated with the progressive severity of NASH as assessed by histopathology. In conclusion, serum levels of miR-122 can potentially be used as a sensitive biomarker for early detection of hepatotoxicity and can aid in monitoring the extent of NAFLD-associated liver injury in mouse efficacy models. PMID:24217942

  19. Solvatochromic probe behavior within choline chloride-based deep eutectic solvents: effect of temperature and water.

    PubMed

    Pandey, Ashish; Pandey, Siddharth

    2014-12-18

    Deep eutectic solvents (DESs) have shown potential as promising environmentally friendly alternatives to conventional solvents. Many common and popular DESs are obtained by simply mixing a salt and a H-bond donor. Properties of such a DES depend on its constituents. Change in temperature and addition of water, a benign cosolvent, can change the physicochemical properties of DESs. The effect of changing temperature and addition of water on solvatochromic probe behavior within three DESs formed from choline chloride combined with 1,2-ethanediol, glycerol, and urea, respectively, in 1:2 mol ratios termed ethaline, glyceline, and reline is presented. Increase in temperature results in reduced H-bond donating acidity of the DESs. Dipolarity/polarizability and H-bond accepting basicity do not change with changing temperature of the DESs. The response of the fluorescence probe pyrene also indicates a decrease in the polarity of the DESs as temperature is increased. Addition of water to DES results in increased dipolarity/polarizability and a decrease in H-bond accepting basicity. Except for pyrene, solvatochromic probes exhibit responses close to those predicted from ideal-additive behavior with slight preferential solvation by DES within the aqueous mixtures. Pyrene response reveals significant preferential solvation by DES and/or the presence of solvent-solvent interactions, especially within aqueous mixtures of ethaline and glyceline, the DESs constituted of H-bond donors with hydroxyl functionalities. FTIR absorbance and Raman spectroscopic measurements of aqueous DES mixtures support the outcomes from solvatochromic probe responses. Aqueous mixtures of ethaline and glyceline possess relatively more interspecies H-bonds as compared to aqueous mixtures of reline, where interstitial accommodation of water within the reline molecular network appears to dominate. PMID:25418894

  20. Coimmobilization of acetylcholinesterase and choline oxidase on gold nanoparticles: stoichiometry, activity, and reaction efficiency.

    PubMed

    Keighron, Jacqueline D; Åkesson, Sebastian; Cans, Ann-Sofie

    2014-09-30

    Hybrid structures constructed from biomolecules and nanomaterials have been used in catalysis and bioanalytical applications. In the design of many chemically selective biosensors, enzymes conjugated to nanoparticles or carbon nanotubes have been used in functionalization of the sensor surface for enhancement of the biosensor functionality and sensitivity. The conditions for the enzyme:nanomaterial conjugation should be optimized to retain maximal enzyme activity, and biosensor effectiveness. This is important as the tertiary structure of the enzyme is often altered when immobilized and can significantly alter the enzyme catalytic activity. Here we show that characterization of a two-enzyme:gold nanoparticle (AuNP) conjugate stoichiometry and activity can be used to gauge the effectiveness of acetylcholine detection by acetylcholine esterase (AChE) and choline oxidase (ChO). This was done by using an analytical approach to quantify the number of enzymes bound per AuNP and monitor the retained enzyme activity after the enzyme:AuNP synthesis. We found that the amount of immobilized enzymes differs from what would be expected from bulk solution chemistry. This analysis was further used to determine the optimal ratio of AChE:ChO added at synthesis to achieve optimum sequential enzyme activity for the enzyme:AuNP conjugates, and reaction efficiencies of greater than 70%. We here show that the knowledge of the conjugate stoichiometry and retained enzyme activity can lead to more efficient detection of acetylcholine by controlling the AChE:ChO ratio bound to the gold nanoparticle material. This approach of optimizing enzyme gold nanoparticle conjugates should be of great importance in the architecture of enzyme nanoparticle based biosensors to retain optimal sensor sensitivity.

  1. Impaired Presynaptic High-Affinity Choline Transporter Causes a Congenital Myasthenic Syndrome with Episodic Apnea.

    PubMed

    Bauché, Stéphanie; O'Regan, Seana; Azuma, Yoshiteru; Laffargue, Fanny; McMacken, Grace; Sternberg, Damien; Brochier, Guy; Buon, Céline; Bouzidi, Nassima; Topf, Ana; Lacène, Emmanuelle; Remerand, Ganaelle; Beaufrere, Anne-Marie; Pebrel-Richard, Céline; Thevenon, Julien; El Chehadeh-Djebbar, Salima; Faivre, Laurence; Duffourd, Yannis; Ricci, Federica; Mongini, Tiziana; Fiorillo, Chiara; Astrea, Guja; Burloiu, Carmen Magdalena; Butoianu, Niculina; Sandu, Carmen; Servais, Laurent; Bonne, Gisèle; Nelson, Isabelle; Desguerre, Isabelle; Nougues, Marie-Christine; Bœuf, Benoit; Romero, Norma; Laporte, Jocelyn; Boland, Anne; Lechner, Doris; Deleuze, Jean-François; Fontaine, Bertrand; Strochlic, Laure; Lochmuller, Hanns; Eymard, Bruno; Mayer, Michèle; Nicole, Sophie

    2016-09-01

    The neuromuscular junction (NMJ) is one of the best-studied cholinergic synapses. Inherited defects of peripheral neurotransmission result in congenital myasthenic syndromes (CMSs), a clinically and genetically heterogeneous group of rare diseases with fluctuating fatigable muscle weakness as the clinical hallmark. Whole-exome sequencing and Sanger sequencing in six unrelated families identified compound heterozygous and homozygous mutations in SLC5A7 encoding the presynaptic sodium-dependent high-affinity choline transporter 1 (CHT), which is known to be mutated in one dominant form of distal motor neuronopathy (DHMN7A). We identified 11 recessive mutations in SLC5A7 that were associated with a spectrum of severe muscle weakness ranging from a lethal antenatal form of arthrogryposis and severe hypotonia to a neonatal form of CMS with episodic apnea and a favorable prognosis when well managed at the clinical level. As expected given the critical role of CHT for multisystemic cholinergic neurotransmission, autonomic dysfunctions were reported in the antenatal form and cognitive impairment was noticed in half of the persons with the neonatal form. The missense mutations induced a near complete loss of function of CHT activity in cell models. At the human NMJ, a delay in synaptic maturation and an altered maintenance were observed in the antenatal and neonatal forms, respectively. Increased synaptic expression of butyrylcholinesterase was also observed, exposing the dysfunction of cholinergic metabolism when CHT is deficient in vivo. This work broadens the clinical spectrum of human diseases resulting from reduced CHT activity and highlights the complexity of cholinergic metabolism at the synapse. PMID:27569547

  2. Choline Kinase Alpha as an Androgen Receptor Chaperone and Prostate Cancer Therapeutic Target

    PubMed Central

    Asim, Mohammad; Massie, Charles E.; Orafidiya, Folake; Pértega-Gomes, Nelma; Warren, Anne Y.; Esmaeili, Mohsen; Selth, Luke A.; Zecchini, Heather I.; Luko, Katarina; Qureshi, Arham; Baridi, Ajoeb; Menon, Suraj; Madhu, Basetti; Escriu, Carlos; Lyons, Scott; Vowler, Sarah L.; Zecchini, Vincent R.; Shaw, Greg; Hessenkemper, Wiebke; Russell, Roslin; Mohammed, Hisham; Stefanos, Niki; Lynch, Andy G.; Grigorenko, Elena; D’Santos, Clive; Taylor, Chris; Lamb, Alastair; Sriranjan, Rouchelle; Yang, Jiali; Stark, Rory; Dehm, Scott M.; Rennie, Paul S.; Carroll, Jason S.; Griffiths, John R.; Tavaré, Simon; Mills, Ian G.; McEwan, Iain J.; Baniahmad, Aria; Tilley, Wayne D.; Neal, David E.

    2016-01-01

    Background: The androgen receptor (AR) is a major drug target in prostate cancer (PCa). We profiled the AR-regulated kinome to identify clinically relevant and druggable effectors of AR signaling. Methods: Using genome-wide approaches, we interrogated all AR regulated kinases. Among these, choline kinase alpha (CHKA) expression was evaluated in benign (n = 195), prostatic intraepithelial neoplasia (PIN) (n = 153) and prostate cancer (PCa) lesions (n = 359). We interrogated how CHKA regulates AR signaling using biochemical assays and investigated androgen regulation of CHKA expression in men with PCa, both untreated (n = 20) and treated with an androgen biosynthesis inhibitor degarelix (n = 27). We studied the effect of CHKA inhibition on the PCa transcriptome using RNA sequencing and tested the effect of CHKA inhibition on cell growth, clonogenic survival and invasion. Tumor xenografts (n = 6 per group) were generated in mice using genetically engineered prostate cancer cells with inducible CHKA knockdown. Data were analyzed with χ2 tests, Cox regression analysis, and Kaplan-Meier methods. All statistical tests were two-sided. Results: CHKA expression was shown to be androgen regulated in cell lines, xenografts, and human tissue (log fold change from 6.75 to 6.59, P = .002) and was positively associated with tumor stage. CHKA binds directly to the ligand-binding domain (LBD) of AR, enhancing its stability. As such, CHKA is the first kinase identified as an AR chaperone. Inhibition of CHKA repressed the AR transcriptional program including pathways enriched for regulation of protein folding, decreased AR protein levels, and inhibited the growth of PCa cell lines, human PCa explants, and tumor xenografts. Conclusions: CHKA can act as an AR chaperone, providing, to our knowledge, the first evidence for kinases as molecular chaperones, making CHKA both a marker of tumor progression and a potential therapeutic target for PCa. PMID:26657335

  3. Impaired Presynaptic High-Affinity Choline Transporter Causes a Congenital Myasthenic Syndrome with Episodic Apnea.

    PubMed

    Bauché, Stéphanie; O'Regan, Seana; Azuma, Yoshiteru; Laffargue, Fanny; McMacken, Grace; Sternberg, Damien; Brochier, Guy; Buon, Céline; Bouzidi, Nassima; Topf, Ana; Lacène, Emmanuelle; Remerand, Ganaelle; Beaufrere, Anne-Marie; Pebrel-Richard, Céline; Thevenon, Julien; El Chehadeh-Djebbar, Salima; Faivre, Laurence; Duffourd, Yannis; Ricci, Federica; Mongini, Tiziana; Fiorillo, Chiara; Astrea, Guja; Burloiu, Carmen Magdalena; Butoianu, Niculina; Sandu, Carmen; Servais, Laurent; Bonne, Gisèle; Nelson, Isabelle; Desguerre, Isabelle; Nougues, Marie-Christine; Bœuf, Benoit; Romero, Norma; Laporte, Jocelyn; Boland, Anne; Lechner, Doris; Deleuze, Jean-François; Fontaine, Bertrand; Strochlic, Laure; Lochmuller, Hanns; Eymard, Bruno; Mayer, Michèle; Nicole, Sophie

    2016-09-01

    The neuromuscular junction (NMJ) is one of the best-studied cholinergic synapses. Inherited defects of peripheral neurotransmission result in congenital myasthenic syndromes (CMSs), a clinically and genetically heterogeneous group of rare diseases with fluctuating fatigable muscle weakness as the clinical hallmark. Whole-exome sequencing and Sanger sequencing in six unrelated families identified compound heterozygous and homozygous mutations in SLC5A7 encoding the presynaptic sodium-dependent high-affinity choline transporter 1 (CHT), which is known to be mutated in one dominant form of distal motor neuronopathy (DHMN7A). We identified 11 recessive mutations in SLC5A7 that were associated with a spectrum of severe muscle weakness ranging from a lethal antenatal form of arthrogryposis and severe hypotonia to a neonatal form of CMS with episodic apnea and a favorable prognosis when well managed at the clinical level. As expected given the critical role of CHT for multisystemic cholinergic neurotransmission, autonomic dysfunctions were reported in the antenatal form and cognitive impairment was noticed in half of the persons with the neonatal form. The missense mutations induced a near complete loss of function of CHT activity in cell models. At the human NMJ, a delay in synaptic maturation and an altered maintenance were observed in the antenatal and neonatal forms, respectively. Increased synaptic expression of butyrylcholinesterase was also observed, exposing the dysfunction of cholinergic metabolism when CHT is deficient in vivo. This work broadens the clinical spectrum of human diseases resulting from reduced CHT activity and highlights the complexity of cholinergic metabolism at the synapse.

  4. 11C-choline vs. 18F-FDG PET/CT in assessing bone involvement in patients with multiple myeloma

    PubMed Central

    Nanni, Cristina; Zamagni, Elena; Cavo, Michele; Rubello, Domenico; Tacchetti, Paola; Pettinato, Cinzia; Farsad, Mohsen; Castellucci, Paolo; Ambrosini, Valentina; Montini, Gian Carlo; Al-Nahhas, Adil; Franchi, Roberto; Fanti, Stefano

    2007-01-01

    Background Multiple Myeloma (MM) is a B cell neoplasm causing lytic or osteopenic bone abnormalities. Whole body skeletal survey (WBSS), Magnetic resonance (MR) and 18F-FDG PET/CT are imaging techniques routinely used for the evaluation of bone involvement in MM patients. Aim As MM bone lesions may present low 18F-FDG uptake; the aim of this study was to assess the possible added value and limitations of 11C-Choline to that of 18F-FDG PET/CT in patients affected with MM. Methods Ten patients affected with MM underwent a standard 11C-Choline PET/CT and an 18F-FDG PET/CT within one week. The results of the two scans were compared in terms of number, sites and SUVmax of lesions. Results Four patients (40%) had a negative concordant 11C-Choline and 18F-FDG PET/CT scans. Two patients (20%) had a positive 11C-Choline and 18F-FDG PET/CT scans that identified the same number and sites of bone lesions. The remaining four patients (40%) had a positive 11C-Choline and 18F-FDG PET/CT scan, but the two exams identified different number of lesions. Choline showed a mean SUVmax of 5 while FDG showed a mean SUVmax of 3.8 (P = 0.042). Overall, 11C-Choline PET/CT scans detected 37 bone lesions and 18F-FDG PET/CT scans detected 22 bone lesions but the difference was not significant (P = 0.8). Conclusion According to these preliminary data, 11C-Choline PET/CT appears to be more sensitive than 18F-FDG PET/CT for the detection of bony myelomatous lesions. If these data are confirmed in larger series of patients, 11C-Choline may be considered a more appropriate functional imaging in association with MRI for MM bone staging. PMID:17584499

  5. Novel fenofibric acid-loaded controlled release pellet bioequivalent to choline fenofibrate-loaded commercial product in beagle dogs.

    PubMed

    Kim, Kyung Soo; Jin, Sung Giu; Mustapha, Omer; Yousaf, Abid Mehmood; Kim, Dong Wuk; Kim, Young Hun; Kim, Jong Oh; Yong, Chul Soon; Woo, Jong Soo; Choi, Han-Gon

    2015-07-25

    The objective of this study was to develop a novel fenofibric acid-loaded controlled release pellet showing enhanced, or equivalent to, bioavailability compared with two commercially available products containing fenofibrate or choline fenofibrate. The effect of solubilizing agents on drug solubility and the impact of fillers on core properties were investigated. Among them, magnesium carbonate most improved drug solubility, and κ-carrageenan provided the best spherical cores. The fenofibric acid-loaded pellet was prepared with magnesium carbonate and κ-carrageenan employing the extrusion/spheronizing technique followed by coating with ethylcellulose. Furthermore, dissolution and pharmacokinetic study in beagle dogs were performed compared to the fenofibrate-loaded commercial tablet (FCT) and choline fenofibrate-loaded commercial mini-tablet (CFCM). This fenofibric acid-loaded pellet showed controlled release of the drug in phosphate buffer (pH 6.8) and 0.025 M sodium laurylsulfate within 4h. Furthermore, this pellet and CFCM exhibited similar dissolution profiles. Plasma concentrations greater than 1,000 ng/ml were maintained from 30 min to 8h, suggesting a sustained release pattern. Also, the fenofibric acid-loaded pellet gave significantly higher AUC and Cmax values than FCT, indicating that it improved the bioavailability of fenofibrate due to enhanced solubility and sustained release. In addition, this pellet and CFCM were not significantly different in terms of pharmacokinetic parameters including AUC, Cmax and Tmax. Thus, this pellet was bioequivalent to CFCM in beagle dogs. In conclusion, this fenofibric acid-loaded controlled release pellet would be a potential alternative to the choline fenofibrate-loaded commercial product.

  6. Choline kinase-alpha by regulating cell aggressiveness and drug sensitivity is a potential druggable target for ovarian cancer

    PubMed Central

    Granata, A; Nicoletti, R; Tinaglia, V; De Cecco, L; Pisanu, M E; Ricci, A; Podo, F; Canevari, S; Iorio, E; Bagnoli, M; Mezzanzanica, D

    2014-01-01

    Background: Aberrant choline metabolism has been proposed as a novel cancer hallmark. We recently showed that epithelial ovarian cancer (EOC) possesses an altered MRS-choline profile, characterised by increased phosphocholine (PCho) content to which mainly contribute over-expression and activation of choline kinase-alpha (ChoK-alpha). Methods: To assess its biological relevance, ChoK-alpha expression was downmodulated by transient RNA interference in EOC in vitro models. Gene expression profiling by microarray analysis and functional analysis was performed to identify the pathway/functions perturbed in ChoK-alpha-silenced cells, then validated by in vitro experiments. Results: In silenced cells, compared with control, we observed: (I) a significant reduction of both CHKA transcript and ChoK-alpha protein expression; (II) a dramatic, proportional drop in PCho content ranging from 60 to 71%, as revealed by 1H-magnetic spectroscopy analysis; (III) a 35–36% of cell growth inhibition, with no evidences of apoptosis or modification of the main cellular survival signalling pathways; (IV) 476 differentially expressed genes, including genes related to lipid metabolism. Ingenuity pathway analysis identified cellular functions related to cell death and cellular proliferation and movement as the most perturbed. Accordingly, CHKA-silenced cells displayed a significant delay in wound repair, a reduced migration and invasion capability were also observed. Furthermore, although CHKA silencing did not directly induce cell death, a significant increase of sensitivity to platinum, paclitaxel and doxorubicin was observed even in a drug-resistant context. Conclusion: We showed for the first time in EOC that CHKA downregulation significantly decreased the aggressive EOC cell behaviour also affecting cells' sensitivity to drug treatment. These observations open the way to further analysis for ChoK-alpha validation as a new EOC therapeutic target to be used alone or in combination with

  7. Increases in cholinergic neurotransmission measured by using choline-sensitive microelectrodes: enhanced detection by hydrolysis of acetylcholine on recording sites?

    PubMed Central

    Giuliano, Chiara; Parikh, Vinay; Ward, Josh.R.; Chiamulera, Christian; Sarter, Martin

    2008-01-01

    Previous experiments demonstrated that second-based transient increases in choline concentrations measured by electrodes coated with choline oxidase (ChOx) and the amperometric detection of hydrogen peroxide validly indicate the depolarization-dependent release of acetylcholine (ACh) and its hydrolysis by endogenous acetylcholinesterase (AChE). Therefore, choline-sensitive microelectrodes have become valuable tools in neuropharmacological and behavioral research. The present experiments were designed to test the possibility that co-immobilization of ChOx plus AChE on recording sites increases the level of detection for evoked ACh release in the brain. If newly released ACh is not completely hydrolyzed by endogenous AChE and capable of reaching the extracellular space, currents recorded via sites equipped with both enzymes should be greater when compared with sites coated with ChOx only. Pairs of Platinum-recordings sites were coated either with AChE plus ChOx or ChOx alone. Potassium or nicotine-evoked currents were recorded throughout the entire dorsal-ventral extent of the medial prefrontal cortex (mPFC). The amplitudes of evoked cholinergic signals did not differ significantly between AChE+ChOx and ChOx-only coated recording sites. Additional experiments controlling for several potential confounds suggested that, in vivo, ACh levels ≥150 fmol were detected by recordings sites featuring dual enzyme coating. Collectively, these results indicate that co-coating of microelectrodes with AChE does not enhance the detection of cholinergic activity in the cortex compared with measurements via recording sites coated only with ChOx. PMID:18346819

  8. Alpha-lipoic acid affects the oxidative stress in various brain structures in mice with methionine and choline deficiency.

    PubMed

    Veskovic, Milena; Mladenovic, Dusan; Jorgacevic, Bojan; Stevanovic, Ivana; de Luka, Silvio; Radosavljevic, Tatjana

    2015-04-01

    Deficiency in methionine or choline can induce oxidative stress in various organs such as liver, kidney, heart, and brain. This study was to examine the effects of alpha-lipoic acid (LA) on oxidative stress induced by methionine and choline deficiency (MCD) in several brain structures. Male mice C57BL/6 (n = 28) were divided into four groups: (1) control - continuously fed with standard chow; (2) LA - fed with standard chow and receiving LA; (3) MCD2 - fed with MCD diet for two weeks, and (4) MCD2+LA - fed with MCD diet for two weeks and receiving LA (100 mg/kg/day intraperitonealy [i.p.]). Brain tissue (cortex, hypothalamus, striatum and hippocampus) was taken for determination of oxidative stress parameters. MCD diet induced a significant increase in malondialdehyde and NOx concentration in all brain regions, while LA restored their content to normal values. Similar to this, in MCD2 group, activity of total SOD, MnSOD, and Cu/ZnSOD was reduced by MCD diet, while LA treatment improved their activities in all brain structures. Besides, in MCD2 group a decrease in catalase activity in cortex and GSH content in hypothalamus was evident, while LA treatment induced an increase in catalase activity in cortex and striatum and GSH content in hypothalamus. LA treatment can significantly reduce lipid peroxidation and nitrosative stress, caused by MCD diet, in all brain regions by restoring antioxidant enzymes activities, predominantly total SOD, MnSOD, and Cu/ZnSOD, and to a lesser extent by modulating catalase activity and GSH content. LA supplementation may be used in order to prevent brain oxidative injury induced by methionine and choline deficiency.

  9. Alpha-lipoic acid affects the oxidative stress in various brain structures in mice with methionine and choline deficiency

    PubMed Central

    Veskovic, Milena; Mladenovic, Dusan; Jorgacevic, Bojan; Stevanovic, Ivana; de Luka, Silvio

    2015-01-01

    Deficiency in methionine or choline can induce oxidative stress in various organs such as liver, kidney, heart, and brain. This study was to examine the effects of alpha-lipoic acid (LA) on oxidative stress induced by methionine and choline deficiency (MCD) in several brain structures. Male mice C57BL/6 (n = 28) were divided into four groups: (1) control – continuously fed with standard chow; (2) LA – fed with standard chow and receiving LA; (3) MCD2 – fed with MCD diet for two weeks, and (4) MCD2+LA – fed with MCD diet for two weeks and receiving LA (100 mg/kg/day intraperitonealy [i.p.]). Brain tissue (cortex, hypothalamus, striatum and hippocampus) was taken for determination of oxidative stress parameters. MCD diet induced a significant increase in malondialdehyde and NOx concentration in all brain regions, while LA restored their content to normal values. Similar to this, in MCD2 group, activity of total SOD, MnSOD, and Cu/ZnSOD was reduced by MCD diet, while LA treatment improved their activities in all brain structures. Besides, in MCD2 group a decrease in catalase activity in cortex and GSH content in hypothalamus was evident, while LA treatment induced an increase in catalase activity in cortex and striatum and GSH content in hypothalamus. LA treatment can significantly reduce lipid peroxidation and nitrosative stress, caused by MCD diet, in all brain regions by restoring antioxidant enzymes activities, predominantly total SOD, MnSOD, and Cu/ZnSOD, and to a lesser extent by modulating catalase activity and GSH content. LA supplementation may be used in order to prevent brain oxidative injury induced by methionine and choline deficiency. PMID:25193852

  10. Miscibility and Langmuir Studies of the Interaction of E2 (279-298) Peptide Sequence of Hepatitis G Virus/GB Virus-C with Dipalmitoylphosphatidyl Choline and Dimiristoylphosphatidyl Choline Phospholipids.

    PubMed

    Miñones, J; Muñoz, M; Miñones Trillo, J; Haro, I; Busquets, M A; Alsina, M A

    2015-09-22

    Mixed monolayers of E2(279-298), a synthetic peptide belonging to the structural protein E2 of the GB virus C (GBV-C), formerly know as hepatitis G virus (HGV), and the phospholipids dipalmitoylphosphatidyl choline (DPPC) and dimiristoylphosphatidyl choline (DMPC),which differ in acyl chains length, were obtained at the A/W interface (monolayers of extension) in order to provide new insights on E2/phospholipids interaction. Analysis of the surface pressure-area isotherms, Brewster angle microscopy images, relative thickness, and mean areas per molecule has allowed us to establish the conditions under which the mixed components of the monolayer are miscible or immiscible and know how the level of the E2/phospholipid interaction varies with the composition of the mixed films, the surface pressure, and the hydrocarbon chains length of the phospholipids. The steric hindrance caused by the penetration of the polymer strands into the more or less ordered hydrocarbon chains of the phospholipids was suggested to explain the differences in the peptide interaction with the phospholipids studied. Therefore, the novelty of results obtained with the Langmuir film balance technique, supplemented with BAM images allow us to achieve a deeper understanding of the interaction.

  11. The ASCOMALVA (Association between the Cholinesterase Inhibitor Donepezil and the Cholinergic Precursor Choline Alphoscerate in Alzheimer's Disease) Trial: interim results after two years of treatment.

    PubMed

    Amenta, Francesco; Carotenuto, Anna; Fasanaro, Angiola Maria; Rea, Raffaele; Traini, Enea

    2014-01-01

    Cholinesterase inhibitors (ChE-Is) are used for symptomatic treatment of mild-to-moderate Alzheimer's disease (AD), but long-term effects of these compounds are mild and not always obvious. Preclinical studies have shown that combination of ChE-Is and the cholinergic precursor choline alphoscerate increases brain acetylcholine levels more effectively than single compounds alone. ASCOMALVA (Effect of association between a ChE-I and choline alphoscerate on cognitive deficits in AD associated with cerebrovascular injury) is a double-blind trial investigating if the ChE-I donepezil and choline alphoscerate in combination are more effective that donepezil alone. The trial has recruited AD patients suffering from ischemic brain damage documented by neuroimaging and has completed 2 years of observation in 113 patients of the 210 planned. Patients were randomly allotted to an active treatment group (donepezil + choline alphoscerate) or to a reference group (donepezil + placebo). Cognitive functions were assessed by the Mini-Mental State Evaluation and Alzheimer's Disease Assessment Scale Cognitive subscale. Daily activity was evaluated by the basic and instrumental activities of daily living tests. Behavioral symptoms were assessed by the Neuropsychiatric Inventory. Over the 24-month observation period, patients of the reference group showed a moderate time-dependent worsening in all the parameters investigated. Treatment with donepezil plus choline alphoscerate significantly slowed changes of the different items analyzed. These findings suggest that the combination of choline alphoscerate with a ChE-I may prolong/increase the effectiveness of cholinergic therapies in AD with concomitant ischemic cerebrovascular injury.

  12. Development of choline acetyltransferase-immunoreactive neurons in normal and intracranially transplanted retinas in rats.

    PubMed

    Guo, Q X; Chau, R M; Yang, S Z; Jen, L S

    1991-10-21

    Retinas from embryonic day 14 (E14) Sprague-Dawley rats were transplanted to the tectum of newborn (P0) recipient rats, and the distribution pattern of choline acetyltransferase immunoreactivity (ChAT-I) in developing transplants was studied and compared with those observed in the retinas of normal developing rats. In normal retinas, ChAT-I cells were first identified in restricted regions in the ganglion cell layer (GCL) at P4, but were found to cover the entire GCL by P6. A second population of ChAT-I cells was detected in the inner nuclear layer (INL) at P8, and they were observed in most parts of the INL on P10 when two immunoreactive sublaminae began to appear in the inner plexiform layer (IPL). The adult pattern of having two distinct populations of ChAT-I cells, organized in mirror symmetrical fashion in the inner retinal layers was basically established by P12. The time course of development and overall distribution pattern of ChAT-I cells in developing retinal transplants on the whole were very similar to those observed in normal retinas. The first identification of these cells and the establishment of their final distribution pattern were made at stages corresponding to P4 and P12 of normal developing retinas respectively. However, ChAT-I somata were located in the INL at a much earlier stage compared with their counterparts in the normal retina, and a transient population of immunoreactive cells with their processes extending to retinal layers other than the IPL was observed in some transplants from P6 to P10. These features were not observed in normal developing retinas. These results suggest that the development of cholinergic neurons, especially the expression of their characteristic antigen and their final distribution pattern is largely determined by programmes which are intrinsic to the original retinal tissue, despite some minor deviation or variation in the developmental process which may occur under certain abnormal conditions. PMID:1769097

  13. Sex-dependent differences in estrogen regulation of choline acetyltransferase are altered by neonatal treatments.

    PubMed

    Luine, V N; Renner, K J; McEwen, B S

    1986-08-01

    We investigated whether estrogenic actions of testosterone during development which mediate the suppression of feminine reproductive behavior and cyclic gonadotropin secretion also contribute to reported sex differences in the induction of choline acetyltransferase (ChAT) after estrogen priming in the diagonal band region of the preoptic area. Newborn female rats received estradiol (E2 females); newborn males received 1,4,6-androstatrien-3,17-dione (ATD), an inhibitor of aromatase (ATD males); and some of both sexes received vehicle treatment (control). In adulthood, feminine sexual behavior (lordosis) was tested after E2 plus progesterone priming. The neonatal treatments reversed the sex-specific response pattern; E2 females were defeminized and displayed minimal lordosis, as did control males, while ATD males showed maximal lordosis, as did control females. E2 was then administered, and ChAT activity was measured in the horizontal and vertical nuclei of the diagonal bands (hDB and vDB, respectively). Controls exhibited the normal sex-specific response to E2. Females showed increased ChAT activity in the hDB and unaltered activity in the vDB: males had unaltered ChAT activity in the hDB and decreased activity in the vDB. In neonatally treated males and females, ChAT activity after E2 administration was not altered from the normal sex-specific pattern in the hDB, i.e. all females showed increased hDB ChAT after E2, and no male responded. In the vDB, groups defeminized in terms of lordosis (E2 females and control males) showed higher ChAT activity in the absence of E2 priming, and E2 treatment decreased vDB ChAT in these groups. In addition, ATD males showed a unique response to E2 in the vDB, namely increased ChAT activity. Although neonatal E2 and ATD treatments did not completely reverse the sex-specific pattern of E2 priming on ChAT activity, the results obtained suggest that a net increase in diagonal band cholinergic function, as indexed by increased Ch

  14. Short-term nutritional folate deficiency in rats has a greater effect on choline and acetylcholine metabolism in the peripheral nervous system than in the brain, and this effect escalates with age

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The hypothesis that age- and tissue-specific differences in choline metabolism is differentially affected by folate deficiency (FD) was tested by comparing choline and acetylcholine levels in male Sprague Dawley rats, who were fed for 10 weeks either a control diet or a folate deficient diet startin...

  15. Flesh Shear Force, Cooking Loss, Muscle Antioxidant Status and Relative Expression of Signaling Molecules (Nrf2, Keap1, TOR, and CK2) and Their Target Genes in Young Grass Carp (Ctenopharyngodon idella) Muscle Fed with Graded Levels of Choline

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Wei-Dan; Liu, Yang; Jiang, Jun; Wu, Pei; Zhao, Juan; Kuang, Sheng-Yao; Tang, Ling; Tang, Wu-Neng; Zhang, Yong-An; Zhou, Xiao-Qiu

    2015-01-01

    Six groups of grass carp (average weight 266.9 ± 0.6 g) were fed diets containing 197, 385, 770, 1082, 1436 and 1795 mg choline/kg, for 8 weeks. Fish growth, and muscle nutrient (protein, fat and amino acid) content of young grass carp were significantly improved by appropriate dietary choline. Furthermore, muscle hydroxyproline concentration, lactate content and shear force were improved by optimum dietary choline supplementation. However, the muscle pH value, cooking loss and cathepsins activities showed an opposite trend. Additionally, optimum dietary choline supplementation attenuated muscle oxidative damage in grass carp. The muscle antioxidant enzyme (catalase and glutathione reductase did not change) activities and glutathione content were enhanced by optimum dietary choline supplementation. Muscle cooking loss was negatively correlated with antioxidant enzyme activities and glutathione content. At the gene level, these antioxidant enzymes, as well as the targets of rapamycin, casein kinase 2 and NF-E2-related factor 2 transcripts in fish muscle were always up-regulated by suitable choline. However, suitable choline significantly decreased Kelch-like ECH-associated protein 1 a (Keap1a) and Kelch-like ECH-associated protein 1 b (Keap1b) mRNA levels in muscle. In conclusion, suitable dietary choline enhanced fish flesh quality, and the decreased cooking loss was due to the elevated antioxidant status that may be regulated by Nrf2 signaling. PMID:26600252

  16. Novel choline-based ionic liquids as safe electrolytes for high-voltage lithium-ion batteries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yong, Tianqiao; Zhang, Lingzhi; Wang, Jinglun; Mai, Yongjin; Yan, Xiaodan; Zhao, Xinyue

    2016-10-01

    Three choline-based ionic liquids functionalized with trimethylsilyl, allyl, and cynoethyl groups are synthesized in an inexpensive route as safe electrolytes for high-voltage lithium-ion batteries. The thermal stabilities, viscosities, conductivities, and electrochemical windows of these ILs are reported. Hybrid electrolytes were formulated by doping with 0.6 M LiPF6/0.4 M lithium oxalydifluoroborate (LiODFB) as salts and dimethyl carbonate (DMC) as co-solvent. By using 0.6 M LiPF6/0.4 M LiODFB trimethylsilylated choline-based IL (SN1IL-TFSI)/DMC as electrolyte, LiCoO2/graphite full cell showed excellent cycling performance with a capacity of 152 mAh g-1 and 99% capacity retention over 90 cycles at a cut-off voltage of 4.4 V. The propagation rate of SN1IL-TFSI)/DMC electrolyte is only one quarter of the commercial electrolyte (1 M LiPF6 EC/DEC/DMC, v/v/v = 1/1/1), suggesting a better safety feature.

  17. The Nudix Hydrolase CDP-Chase, a CDP-Choline Pyrophosphatase, Is an Asymmetric Dimer with Two Distinct Enzymatic Activities

    SciTech Connect

    Duong-Ly, Krisna C.; Gabelli, Sandra B.; Xu, WenLian; Dunn, Christopher A.; Schoeffield, Andrew J.; Bessman, Maurice J.; Amzel, L. Mario

    2011-09-06

    A Nudix enzyme from Bacillus cereus catalyzes the hydrolysis of CDP-choline to produce CMP and phosphocholine. Here, we show that in addition, the enzyme has a 3{prime} {yields} 5{prime} RNA exonuclease activity. The structure of the free enzyme, determined to a 1.8-{angstrom} resolution, shows that the enzyme is an asymmetric dimer. Each monomer consists of two domains, an N-terminal helical domain and a C-terminal Nudix domain. The N-terminal domain is placed relative to the C-terminal domain such as to result in an overall asymmetric arrangement with two distinct catalytic sites: one with an 'enclosed' Nudix pyrophosphatase site and the other with a more open, less-defined cavity. Residues that may be important for determining the asymmetry are conserved among a group of uncharacterized Nudix enzymes from Gram-positive bacteria. Our data support a model where CDP-choline hydrolysis is catalyzed by the enclosed Nudix site and RNA exonuclease activity is catalyzed by the open site. CDP-Chase is the first identified member of a novel Nudix family in which structural asymmetry has a profound effect on the recognition of substrates.

  18. Adsorption of choline benzoate ionic liquid on graphene, silicene, germanene and boron-nitride nanosheets: a DFT perspective.

    PubMed

    García, Gregorio; Atilhan, Mert; Aparicio, Santiago

    2015-07-01

    The adsorption of choline benzoate ([CH][BE]) ionic liquid (IL) on the surface of different hexagonal nanosheets has been studied using Density Functional Theory (DFT) methods. For this, the interaction mechanism, binding energies and electronic structure of [CH][BE] ionic liquid on four types of nanosheets, i.e., graphene, silicene, germanene and boron-nitride, were estimated and compared. The adsorption of [CH][BE] ionic liquid on different nanosheets is mainly featured by van der Waals forces, leading to strong benzoate ion-surface π-stacking. Likewise, there is also an important charge transfer from the anion to the sheet. The electronic structure analysis shows that Si- and Ge-based sheets lead to the largest changes in the HOMO and LUMO levels of choline benzoate. This paper provides new insights into the capability of DFT methods to provide useful information about the adsorption of ionic liquids on nanosheets and how ionic liquid features could be tuned through the adsorption on the suitable nanosheet. PMID:26040507

  19. Nonenzymatic role of acetylcholinesterase in neuritic sprouting: regional changes in acetylcholinesterase and choline acetyltransferase after neonatal 6-hydroxydopamine lesions.

    PubMed

    Slotkin, Theodore A; Ryde, Ian T; Wrench, Nicola; Card, Jennifer A; Seidler, Frederic J

    2009-01-01

    Acetylcholinesterase (AChE) is postulated to play a nonenzymatic role in the development of neuritic projections. We gave the specific neurotoxin, 6-OHDA to rats on postnatal day (PN) 1, a treatment that destroys noradrenergic nerve terminals in the forebrain while producing reactive sprouting in the brainstem. AChE showed profound decreases in the forebrain that persisted in males over the entire phase of major synaptogenesis, from PN4 through PN21; in the brainstem, AChE was increased. Parallel examinations of choline acetyltransferase, an enzymatic marker for cholinergic nerve terminals, showed a different pattern of 6-OHDA-induced alterations, with initial decreases in both forebrain and brainstem in males and regression toward normal by PN21; females were far less affected. The sex differences are in accord with the greater plasticity of the female brain and its more rapid recovery from neurotoxic injury; our findings indicate that these differences are present well before puberty. These results support the view that AChE is involved in neurite formation, unrelated to its enzymatic role in cholinergic neurotransmission. Further, the results for choline acetyltransferase indicate that early depletion of norepinephrine compromises development of acetylcholine systems, consistent with a trophic role for this neurotransmitter.

  20. Nonenzymatic role of acetylcholinesterase in neuritic sprouting: regional changes in acetylcholinesterase and choline acetyltransferase after neonatal 6-hydroxydopamine lesions.

    PubMed

    Slotkin, Theodore A; Ryde, Ian T; Wrench, Nicola; Card, Jennifer A; Seidler, Frederic J

    2009-01-01

    Acetylcholinesterase (AChE) is postulated to play a nonenzymatic role in the development of neuritic projections. We gave the specific neurotoxin, 6-OHDA to rats on postnatal day (PN) 1, a treatment that destroys noradrenergic nerve terminals in the forebrain while producing reactive sprouting in the brainstem. AChE showed profound decreases in the forebrain that persisted in males over the entire phase of major synaptogenesis, from PN4 through PN21; in the brainstem, AChE was increased. Parallel examinations of choline acetyltransferase, an enzymatic marker for cholinergic nerve terminals, showed a different pattern of 6-OHDA-induced alterations, with initial decreases in both forebrain and brainstem in males and regression toward normal by PN21; females were far less affected. The sex differences are in accord with the greater plasticity of the female brain and its more rapid recovery from neurotoxic injury; our findings indicate that these differences are present well before puberty. These results support the view that AChE is involved in neurite formation, unrelated to its enzymatic role in cholinergic neurotransmission. Further, the results for choline acetyltransferase indicate that early depletion of norepinephrine compromises development of acetylcholine systems, consistent with a trophic role for this neurotransmitter. PMID:19452616

  1. Mass spectrometry imaging reveals new biological roles for choline esters and Tyrian purple precursors in muricid molluscs

    PubMed Central

    Rudd, David; Ronci, Maurizio; Johnston, Martin R.; Guinan, Taryn; Voelcker, Nicolas H.; Benkendorff, Kirsten

    2015-01-01

    Despite significant advances in chemical ecology, the biodistribution, temporal changes and ecological function of most marine secondary metabolites remain unknown. One such example is the association between choline esters and Tyrian purple precursors in muricid molluscs. Mass spectrometry imaging (MSI) on nano-structured surfaces has emerged as a sophisticated platform for spatial analysis of low molecular mass metabolites in heterogeneous tissues, ideal for low abundant secondary metabolites. Here we applied desorption-ionisation on porous silicon (DIOS) to examine in situ changes in biodistribution over the reproductive cycle. DIOS-MSI showed muscle-relaxing choline ester murexine to co-localise with tyrindoxyl sulfate in the biosynthetic hypobranchial glands. But during egg-laying, murexine was transferred to the capsule gland, and then to the egg capsules, where chemical ripening resulted in Tyrian purple formation. Murexine was found to tranquilise the larvae and may relax the reproductive tract. This study shows that DIOS-MSI is a powerful tool that can provide new insights into marine chemo-ecology. PMID:26324173

  2. Membrane-associated glucose-methanol-choline oxidoreductase family enzymes PhcC and PhcD are essential for enantioselective catabolism of dehydrodiconiferyl alcohol.

    PubMed

    Takahashi, Kenji; Hirose, Yusaku; Kamimura, Naofumi; Hishiyama, Shojiro; Hara, Hirofumi; Araki, Takuma; Kasai, Daisuke; Kajita, Shinya; Katayama, Yoshihiro; Fukuda, Masao; Masai, Eiji

    2015-12-01

    Sphingobium sp. strain SYK-6 is able to degrade various lignin-derived biaryls, including a phenylcoumaran-type compound, dehydrodiconiferyl alcohol (DCA). In SYK-6 cells, the alcohol group of the B-ring side chain of DCA is initially oxidized to the carboxyl group to generate 3-(2-(4-hydroxy-3-methoxyphenyl)-3-(hydroxymethyl)-7-methoxy-2,3-dihydrobenzofuran-5-yl) acrylic acid (DCA-C). Next, the alcohol group of the A-ring side chain of DCA-C is oxidized to the carboxyl group, and then the resulting metabolite is catabolized through vanillin and 5-formylferulate. In this study, the genes involved in the conversion of DCA-C were identified and characterized. The DCA-C oxidation activities in SYK-6 were enhanced in the presence of flavin adenine dinucleotide and an artificial electron acceptor and were induced ca. 1.6-fold when the cells were grown with DCA. Based on these observations, SLG_09480 (phcC) and SLG_09500 (phcD), encoding glucose-methanol-choline oxidoreductase family proteins, were presumed to encode DCA-C oxidases. Analyses of phcC and phcD mutants indicated that PhcC and PhcD are essential for the conversion of (+)-DCA-C and (-)-DCA-C, respectively. When phcC and phcD were expressed in SYK-6 and Escherichia coli, the gene products were mainly observed in their membrane fractions. The membrane fractions of E. coli that expressed phcC and phcD catalyzed the specific conversion of DCA-C into the corresponding carboxyl derivatives. In the oxidation of DCA-C, PhcC and PhcD effectively utilized ubiquinone derivatives as electron acceptors. Furthermore, the transcription of a putative cytochrome c gene was significantly induced in SYK-6 grown with DCA. The DCA-C oxidation catalyzed by membrane-associated PhcC and PhcD appears to be coupled to the respiratory chain. PMID:26362985

  3. Membrane-Associated Glucose-Methanol-Choline Oxidoreductase Family Enzymes PhcC and PhcD Are Essential for Enantioselective Catabolism of Dehydrodiconiferyl Alcohol

    PubMed Central

    Takahashi, Kenji; Hirose, Yusaku; Kamimura, Naofumi; Hishiyama, Shojiro; Hara, Hirofumi; Araki, Takuma; Kasai, Daisuke; Kajita, Shinya; Katayama, Yoshihiro; Fukuda, Masao

    2015-01-01

    Sphingobium sp. strain SYK-6 is able to degrade various lignin-derived biaryls, including a phenylcoumaran-type compound, dehydrodiconiferyl alcohol (DCA). In SYK-6 cells, the alcohol group of the B-ring side chain of DCA is initially oxidized to the carboxyl group to generate 3-(2-(4-hydroxy-3-methoxyphenyl)-3-(hydroxymethyl)-7-methoxy-2,3-dihydrobenzofuran-5-yl) acrylic acid (DCA-C). Next, the alcohol group of the A-ring side chain of DCA-C is oxidized to the carboxyl group, and then the resulting metabolite is catabolized through vanillin and 5-formylferulate. In this study, the genes involved in the conversion of DCA-C were identified and characterized. The DCA-C oxidation activities in SYK-6 were enhanced in the presence of flavin adenine dinucleotide and an artificial electron acceptor and were induced ca. 1.6-fold when the cells were grown with DCA. Based on these observations, SLG_09480 (phcC) and SLG_09500 (phcD), encoding glucose-methanol-choline oxidoreductase family proteins, were presumed to encode DCA-C oxidases. Analyses of phcC and phcD mutants indicated that PhcC and PhcD are essential for the conversion of (+)-DCA-C and (−)-DCA-C, respectively. When phcC and phcD were expressed in SYK-6 and Escherichia coli, the gene products were mainly observed in their membrane fractions. The membrane fractions of E. coli that expressed phcC and phcD catalyzed the specific conversion of DCA-C into the corresponding carboxyl derivatives. In the oxidation of DCA-C, PhcC and PhcD effectively utilized ubiquinone derivatives as electron acceptors. Furthermore, the transcription of a putative cytochrome c gene was significantly induced in SYK-6 grown with DCA. The DCA-C oxidation catalyzed by membrane-associated PhcC and PhcD appears to be coupled to the respiratory chain. PMID:26362985

  4. Choline and Cystine Deficient Diets in Animal Models with Hepatocellular Injury: Evaluation of Oxidative Stress and Expression of RAGE, TNF-α, and IL-1β

    PubMed Central

    Santos, Juliana Célia F.; de Araújo, Orlando R. P.; Valentim, Iara B.; de Andrade, Kívia Queiroz; Moura, Fabiana Andréa; Smaniotto, Salete; dos Santos, John Marques; Gelain, Daniel P.; Goulart, Marília O. F.

    2015-01-01

    This study aims to evaluate the effects of diets deficient in choline and/or cystine on hepatocellular injury in animal models (young male Wistar rats, aged 21 days), by monitoring some of the oxidative stress biomarkers and the expression of RAGE, TNF-α, and IL-1β. The animals were divided into 6 groups (n = 10) and submitted to different diets over 30 days: AIN-93 diet (standard, St), AIN-93 choline deficient (CD) diet and AIN-93 choline and cystine deficient (CCD) diet, in the pellet (pl) and powder (pw) diet forms. Independently of the diet form, AIN-93 diet already led to hepatic steatosis and CD/CCD diets provoked hepatic damage. The increase of lipid peroxidation, represented by the evaluation of thiobarbituric acid reactive species, associated with the decrease of levels of antioxidant enzymes, were the parameters with higher significance toward redox profile in this model of hepatic injury. Regarding inflammation, in relation to TNF-α, higher levels were evidenced in CD(pl), while, for IL-1β, no significant alteration was detected. RAGE expression was practically the same in all groups, with exception of CCD(pw) versus CCD(pl). These results together confirm that AIN-93 causes hepatic steatosis and choline and/or cysteine deficiencies produce important hepatic injury associated with oxidative stress and inflammatory profiles. PMID:26137185

  5. A facile and practical biosensor for choline based on manganese dioxide nanoparticles synthesized in-situ at the surface of electrode by one-step electrodeposition.

    PubMed

    Yu, Guangxia; Zhao, Qiang; Wu, Weixiang; Wei, Xiaoyun; Lu, Qing

    2016-01-01

    In this paper, a facile and sensitive biocompatible biosensor based on Nafion/choline oxidase/manganese dioxide composite film was developed for the determination of choline chloride. Manganese dioxide (MnO2) nanoparticles, possessing the advantages of large specific surface areas, good hydrophilicity, great permeability as well as excellent biocompatibility, were synthesized in-situ at the surface of the glassy carbon electrode (GCE) by one-step electrodeposition. And then, choline oxidase (ChOx) was immobilized on the MnO2 modified GCE with coating a Nafion film to hold the ChOx/MnO2 film on the electrode surface firmly. Upon optimized conditions, a linear range of 8.0-1.0 mM was obtained for the sensor in a cyclic voltammetry method, with a detection limit as low as 5.0 µM. Besides, the biosensor was successfully employed to detect choline in milk, milk powder and feedstuff samples, providing a promising alternative for the practical application.

  6. Alpha7 Nicotinic Acetylcholine Receptors and Temporal Memory: Synergistic Effects of Combining Prenatal Choline and Nicotine on Reinforcement-Induced Resetting of an Interval Clock

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cheng, Ruey-Kuang; Meck, Warren H.; Williams, Christina L.

    2006-01-01

    We previously showed that prenatal choline supplementation could increase the precision of timing and temporal memory and facilitate simultaneous temporal processing in mature and aged rats. In the present study, we investigated the ability of adult rats to selectively control the reinforcement-induced resetting of an internal clock as a function…

  7. Choline and Cystine Deficient Diets in Animal Models with Hepatocellular Injury: Evaluation of Oxidative Stress and Expression of RAGE, TNF-α, and IL-1β.

    PubMed

    Santos, Juliana Célia F; de Araújo, Orlando R P; Valentim, Iara B; de Andrade, Kívia Queiroz; Moura, Fabiana Andréa; Smaniotto, Salete; dos Santos, John Marques; Gasparotto, Juciano; Gelain, Daniel P; Goulart, Marília O F

    2015-01-01

    This study aims to evaluate the effects of diets deficient in choline and/or cystine on hepatocellular injury in animal models (young male Wistar rats, aged 21 days), by monitoring some of the oxidative stress biomarkers and the expression of RAGE, TNF-α, and IL-1β. The animals were divided into 6 groups (n = 10) and submitted to different diets over 30 days: AIN-93 diet (standard, St), AIN-93 choline deficient (CD) diet and AIN-93 choline and cystine deficient (CCD) diet, in the pellet (pl) and powder (pw) diet forms. Independently of the diet form, AIN-93 diet already led to hepatic steatosis and CD/CCD diets provoked hepatic damage. The increase of lipid peroxidation, represented by the evaluation of thiobarbituric acid reactive species, associated with the decrease of levels of antioxidant enzymes, were the parameters with higher significance toward redox profile in this model of hepatic injury. Regarding inflammation, in relation to TNF-α, higher levels were evidenced in CD(pl), while, for IL-1β, no significant alteration was detected. RAGE expression was practically the same in all groups, with exception of CCD(pw) versus CCD(pl). These results together confirm that AIN-93 causes hepatic steatosis and choline and/or cysteine deficiencies produce important hepatic injury associated with oxidative stress and inflammatory profiles.

  8. Characterization of Leishmania major phosphatidylethanolamine methyltransferases LmjPEM1 and LmjPEM2 and their inhibition by choline analogs.

    PubMed

    Bibis, Stergios S; Dahlstrom, Kelly; Zhu, Tongtong; Zufferey, Rachel

    2014-09-01

    Phosphatidylcholine (PC) is the most abundant phospholipid in the membranes of the human parasite Leishmania. It is synthesized via two metabolic routes, the de novo pathway that starts with the uptake of choline, and the threefold methylation of phosphatidylethanolamine. Choline was shown to be dispensable for Leishmania; thus, the methylation pathway likely represents the primary route for PC production. Here, we have identified and characterized two phosphatidylethanolamine methyltransferases, LmjPEM1 and LmjPEM2. Both enzymes are expressed in promastigotes as well as in the vertebrate form amastigotes, suggesting that these methyltransferases are important for the development of the parasite throughout its life cycle. These enzymes are maximally expressed during the log phase of growth which correlates with the demand of PC synthesis during cell multiplication. Immunofluorescence studies combined with cell fractionation have shown that both methyltransferases are localized at the endoplasmic reticulum membrane. Heterologous expression in yeast has demonstrated that LmjPEM1 and LmjPEM2 complement the choline auxotrophy phenotype of a yeast double null mutant lacking phosphatidylethanolamine methyltransferase activity. LmjPEM1 catalyzes the first, and to a lesser extent, the second methylation reaction. In contrast, LmjPEM2 has the capacity to add the second and third methyl group onto phosphatidylethanolamine to yield (lyso)PC; it can also add the first methyl group, albeit with very low efficiency. Finally, we have demonstrated using inhibition studies with choline analogs that miltefosine and octadecyltrimethylammonium bromide are potent inhibitors of this metabolic pathway. PMID:25176160

  9. Catalytic dehydration of carbohydrates suspended in organic solvents promoted by AlCl3 /SiO2 coated with choline chloride.

    PubMed

    Yang, Jie; De Oliveira Vigier, Karine; Gu, Yanlong; Jérôme, François

    2015-01-01

    We show that the coating of choline chloride on silica-supported AlCl3 allows the dehydration of carbohydrates to successfully proceed in low boiling point organic solvents. The concept is based on the in situ formation of a deep eutectic liquid phase on the catalyst surface, thus facilitating the interaction between the solid catalyst and insoluble carbohydrate. PMID:25404114

  10. Catalytic dehydration of carbohydrates suspended in organic solvents promoted by AlCl3 /SiO2 coated with choline chloride.

    PubMed

    Yang, Jie; De Oliveira Vigier, Karine; Gu, Yanlong; Jérôme, François

    2015-01-01

    We show that the coating of choline chloride on silica-supported AlCl3 allows the dehydration of carbohydrates to successfully proceed in low boiling point organic solvents. The concept is based on the in situ formation of a deep eutectic liquid phase on the catalyst surface, thus facilitating the interaction between the solid catalyst and insoluble carbohydrate.

  11. Characterization of Leishmania major phosphatidylethanolamine methyltransferases LmjPEM1 and LmjPEM2 and their inhibition by choline analogs.

    PubMed

    Bibis, Stergios S; Dahlstrom, Kelly; Zhu, Tongtong; Zufferey, Rachel

    2014-09-01

    Phosphatidylcholine (PC) is the most abundant phospholipid in the membranes of the human parasite Leishmania. It is synthesized via two metabolic routes, the de novo pathway that starts with the uptake of choline, and the threefold methylation of phosphatidylethanolamine. Choline was shown to be dispensable for Leishmania; thus, the methylation pathway likely represents the primary route for PC production. Here, we have identified and characterized two phosphatidylethanolamine methyltransferases, LmjPEM1 and LmjPEM2. Both enzymes are expressed in promastigotes as well as in the vertebrate form amastigotes, suggesting that these methyltransferases are important for the development of the parasite throughout its life cycle. These enzymes are maximally expressed during the log phase of growth which correlates with the demand of PC synthesis during cell multiplication. Immunofluorescence studies combined with cell fractionation have shown that both methyltransferases are localized at the endoplasmic reticulum membrane. Heterologous expression in yeast has demonstrated that LmjPEM1 and LmjPEM2 complement the choline auxotrophy phenotype of a yeast double null mutant lacking phosphatidylethanolamine methyltransferase activity. LmjPEM1 catalyzes the first, and to a lesser extent, the second methylation reaction. In contrast, LmjPEM2 has the capacity to add the second and third methyl group onto phosphatidylethanolamine to yield (lyso)PC; it can also add the first methyl group, albeit with very low efficiency. Finally, we have demonstrated using inhibition studies with choline analogs that miltefosine and octadecyltrimethylammonium bromide are potent inhibitors of this metabolic pathway.

  12. Effect of rumen-protected choline supplementation on liver and adipose gene expression during the transition period in dairy cattle.

    PubMed

    Goselink, R M A; van Baal, J; Widjaja, H C A; Dekker, R A; Zom, R L G; de Veth, M J; van Vuuren, A M

    2013-02-01

    We previously reported that supplementation of rumen-protected choline (RPC) reduces the hepatic triacylglycerol concentration in periparturient dairy cows during early lactation. Here, we investigated the effect of RPC on the transcript levels of lipid metabolism-related genes in liver and adipose tissue biopsies, taken at wk -3, 1, 3, and 6 after calving, to elucidate the mechanisms underlying this RPC-induced reduction of hepatic lipidosis. Sixteen multiparous cows were blocked into 8 pairs and randomly allocated to either 1 o