Science.gov

Sample records for 18f-labelled boronophenylalanine depending

  1. 18F-Labeling Using Click Cycloadditions

    PubMed Central

    Ross, Tobias L.

    2014-01-01

    Due to expanding applications of positron emission tomography (PET) there is a demand for developing new techniques to introduce fluorine-18 (t1/2 = 109.8 min). Considering that most novel PET tracers are sensitive biomolecules and that direct introduction of fluorine-18 often needs harsh conditions, the insertion of 18F in those molecules poses an exceeding challenge. Two major challenges during 18F-labeling are a regioselective introduction and a fast and high yielding way under mild conditions. Furthermore, attention has to be paid to functionalities, which are usually present in complex structures of the target molecule. The Cu-catalyzed azide-alkyne cycloaddition (CuAAC) and several copper-free click reactions represent such methods for radiolabeling of sensitive molecules under the above-mentioned criteria. This minireview will provide a quick overview about the development of novel 18F-labeled prosthetic groups for click cycloadditions and will summarize recent trends in copper-catalyzed and copper-free click 18F-cycloadditions. PMID:25003110

  2. One-step 18F labeling of biomolecules using organotrifluoroborates

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Zhibo; Lin, Kuo-Shyan; Bénard, François; Pourghiasian, Maral; Kiesewetter, Dale O; Perrin, David M; Chen, Xiaoyuan

    2017-01-01

    Herein we present a general protocol for the functionalization of biomolecules with an organotrifluoroborate moiety so that they can be radiolabeled with aqueous 18F fluoride (18F−) and used for positron emission tomography (PET) imaging. Among the β+-emitting radionuclides, fluorine-18 (18F) is the isotope of choice for PET, and it is produced, on-demand, in many hospitals worldwide. Organotrifluoroborates can be 18F-labeled in one step in aqueous conditions via 18F–19F isotope exchange. This protocol features a recently designed ammoniomethyltrifluoroborate, and it describes the following: (i) a synthetic strategy that affords modular synthesis of radiolabeling precursors via a copper-catalyzed ‘click’ reaction; and (ii) a one-step 18F-labeling method that obviates the need for HPLC purification. Within 30 min, 18F-labeled PET imaging probes, such as peptides, can be synthesized in good chemical and radiochemical purity (>98%), satisfactory radiochemical yield of 20–35% (n > 20, non-decay corrected) and high specific activity of 40–111 GBq/µmol (1.1–3.0 Ci/µmol). The entire procedure, including the precursor preparation and 18F radiolabeling, takes 7–10 d. PMID:26313478

  3. Synthesis and Reactivity of (18)F-Labeled α,α-Difluoro-α-(aryloxy)acetic Acids.

    PubMed

    Khotavivattana, Tanatorn; Calderwood, Samuel; Verhoog, Stefan; Pfeifer, Lukas; Preshlock, Sean; Vasdev, Neil; Collier, Thomas L; Gouverneur, Véronique

    2017-02-03

    In this work, we describe the (18)F-labeling of α,α-difluoro-α-(aryloxy)acetic acid derivatives and demonstrate that these building blocks are amenable to post-(18)F-fluorination functionalization. Protodecarboxylation offers a new entry to (18)F-difluoromethoxyarene, and the value of this approach is further demonstrated with coupling processes leading to representative (18)F-labeled TRPV1 inhibitors and TRPV1 antagonists.

  4. 18F-Labelled Intermediates for Radiosynthesis by Modular Build-Up Reactions: Newer Developments

    PubMed Central

    Ermert, Johannes

    2014-01-01

    This brief review gives an overview of newer developments in 18F-chemistry with the focus on small 18F-labelled molecules as intermediates for modular build-up syntheses. The short half-life (<2 h) of the radionuclide requires efficient syntheses of these intermediates considering that multistep syntheses are often time consuming and characterized by a loss of yield in each reaction step. Recent examples of improved synthesis of 18F-labelled intermediates show new possibilities for no-carrier-added ring-fluorinated arenes, novel intermediates for tri[18F]fluoromethylation reactions, and 18F-fluorovinylation methods. PMID:25343144

  5. (18)F-labeled positron emission tomographic radiopharmaceuticals in oncology: an overview of radiochemistry and mechanisms of tumor localization.

    PubMed

    Vallabhajosula, Shankar

    2007-11-01

    Molecular imaging is the visualization, characterization, and measurement of biological processes at the molecular and cellular levels in a living system. At present, positron emission tomography/computed tomography (PET/CT) is one the most rapidly growing areas of medical imaging, with many applications in the clinical management of patients with cancer. Although [(18)F]fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG)-PET/CT imaging provides high specificity and sensitivity in several kinds of cancer and has many applications, it is important to recognize that FDG is not a "specific" radiotracer for imaging malignant disease. Highly "tumor-specific" and "tumor cell signal-specific" PET radiopharmaceuticals are essential to meet the growing demand of radioisotope-based molecular imaging technology. In the last 15 years, many alternative PET tracers have been proposed and evaluated in preclinical and clinical studies to characterize the tumor biology more appropriately. The potential clinical utility of several (18)F-labeled radiotracers (eg, fluoride, FDOPA, FLT, FMISO, FES, and FCH) is being reviewed by several investigators in this issue. An overview of design and development of (18)F-labeled PET radiopharmaceuticals, radiochemistry, and mechanism(s) of tumor cell uptake and localization of radiotracers are presented here. The approval of clinical indications for FDG-PET in the year 2000 by the Food and Drug Administration, based on a review of literature, was a major breakthrough to the rapid incorporation of PET into nuclear medicine practice, particularly in oncology. Approval of a radiopharmaceutical typically involves submission of a "New Drug Application" by a manufacturer or a company clearly documenting 2 major aspects of the drug: (1) manufacturing of PET drug using current good manufacturing practices and (2) the safety and effectiveness of a drug with specific indications. The potential routine clinical utility of (18)F-labeled PET radiopharmaceuticals depends also on

  6. Convergent synthesis and evaluation of (18)F-labeled azulenic COX2 probes for cancer imaging.

    PubMed

    Nolting, Donald D; Nickels, Michael; Tantawy, Mohammed N; Yu, James Y H; Xie, Jingping; Peterson, Todd E; Crews, Brenda C; Marnett, Larry; Gore, John C; Pham, Wellington

    2012-01-01

    The overall objectives of this research are to (i) develop azulene-based positron emission tomography (PET) probes and (ii) image COX2 as a potential biomarker of breast cancer. Several lines of research have demonstrated that COX2 is overexpressed in breast cancer and that its presence correlates with poor prognoses. While other studies have reported that COX2 inhibition can be modulated and used beneficially as a chemopreventive strategy in cancer, no viable mechanism for achieving that approach has yet been developed. This shortfall could be circumvented through in vivo imaging of COX2 activity, particularly using sensitive imaging techniques such as PET. Toward that goal, our laboratory focuses on the development of novel (18)F-labled COX2 probes. We began the synthesis of the probes by transforming tropolone into a lactone, which was subjected to an [8 + 2] cycloaddition reaction to yield 2-methylazulene as the core ring of the probe. After exploring numerous synthetic routes, the final target molecule and precursor PET compounds were prepared successfully using convergent synthesis. Conventional (18)F labeling methods caused precursor decomposition, which prompted us to hypothesize that the acidic protons of the methylene moiety between the azulene and thiazole rings were readily abstracted by a strong base such as potassium carbonate. Ultimately, this caused the precursors to disintegrate. This observation was supported after successfully using an (18)F labeling strategy that employed a much milder phosphate buffer. The (18)F-labeled COX2 probe was tested in a breast cancer xenograft mouse model. The data obtained via successive whole-body PET/CT scans indicated probe accumulation and retention in the tumor. Overall, the probe was stable in vivo and no defluorination was observed. A biodistribution study and Western blot analysis corroborate with the imaging data. In conclusion, this novel COX2 PET probe was shown to be a promising agent for cancer imaging

  7. Convergent synthesis and evaluation of 18F-labeled azulenic COX2 probes for cancer imaging

    PubMed Central

    Nolting, Donald D.; Nickels, Michael; Tantawy, Mohammed N.; Yu, James Y. H.; Xie, Jingping; Peterson, Todd E.; Crews, Brenda C.; Marnett, Larry; Gore, John C.; Pham, Wellington

    2013-01-01

    The overall objectives of this research are to (i) develop azulene-based positron emission tomography (PET) probes and (ii) image COX2 as a potential biomarker of breast cancer. Several lines of research have demonstrated that COX2 is overexpressed in breast cancer and that its presence correlates with poor prognoses. While other studies have reported that COX2 inhibition can be modulated and used beneficially as a chemopreventive strategy in cancer, no viable mechanism for achieving that approach has yet been developed. This shortfall could be circumvented through in vivo imaging of COX2 activity, particularly using sensitive imaging techniques such as PET. Toward that goal, our laboratory focuses on the development of novel 18F-labled COX2 probes. We began the synthesis of the probes by transforming tropolone into a lactone, which was subjected to an [8 + 2] cycloaddition reaction to yield 2-methylazulene as the core ring of the probe. After exploring numerous synthetic routes, the final target molecule and precursor PET compounds were prepared successfully using convergent synthesis. Conventional 18F labeling methods caused precursor decomposition, which prompted us to hypothesize that the acidic protons of the methylene moiety between the azulene and thiazole rings were readily abstracted by a strong base such as potassium carbonate. Ultimately, this caused the precursors to disintegrate. This observation was supported after successfully using an 18F labeling strategy that employed a much milder phosphate buffer. The 18F-labeled COX2 probe was tested in a breast cancer xenograft mouse model. The data obtained via successive whole-body PET/CT scans indicated probe accumulation and retention in the tumor. Overall, the probe was stable in vivo and no defluorination was observed. A biodistribution study and Western blot analysis corroborate with the imaging data. In conclusion, this novel COX2 PET probe was shown to be a promising agent for cancer imaging and

  8. Enhanced Aqueous Suzuki–Miyaura Coupling Allows Site-Specific Polypeptide 18F-Labeling

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    The excesses of reagents used in protein chemistry are often incompatible with the reduced or even inverse stoichiometries used for efficient radiolabeling. Analysis and screening of aqueous Pd(0) ligand systems has revealed the importance of a guanidine core and the discovery of 1,1-dimethylguanidine as an enhanced ligand for aqueous Suzuki–Miyaura cross-coupling. This novel Pd catalyst system has now allowed the labeling of small molecules, peptides, and proteins with the fluorine-18 prosthetic [18F]4-fluorophenylboronic acid. These findings now enable site-specific protein 18F-labeling under biologically compatible conditions using a metal-triggered reaction. PMID:23991754

  9. New Chelators for Low Temperature Al(18)F-Labeling of Biomolecules.

    PubMed

    Cleeren, Frederik; Lecina, Joan; Billaud, Emilie M F; Ahamed, Muneer; Verbruggen, Alfons; Bormans, Guy M

    2016-03-16

    The Al(18)F labeling method is a relatively new approach that allows radiofluorination of biomolecules such as peptides and proteins in a one-step procedure and in aqueous solution. However, the chelation of the {Al(18)F}(2+) core with the macrocyclic chelators NOTA or NODA requires heating to 100-120 °C. Therefore, we have developed new polydentate ligands for the complexation of {Al(18)F}(2+) with good radiochemical yields at a temperature of 40 °C. The stability of the new Al(18)F-complexes was tested in phosphate buffered saline (PBS) at pH 7.4 and in rat serum. The stability of the Al(18)F-L3 complex was found to be comparable to that of the previously reported Al(18)F-NODA complex up to 60 min in rat serum. Moreover, the biodistribution of Al(18)F-L3 in healthy mice showed the absence of in vivo defluorination since no significant bone uptake was observed, whereas the major fraction of activity at 60 min p.i. was observed in liver and intestines, indicating hepatobiliary clearance of the radiolabeled ligand. The acyclic chelator H3L3 proved to be a good lead candidate for labeling of heat-sensitive biomolecules with fluorine-18. In order to obtain a better understanding of the different factors influencing the formation and stability of the complex, we carried out more in-depth experiments with ligand H3L3. As a proof of concept, we successfully conjugated the new AlF-chelator with the urea-based PSMA inhibitor Glu-NH-CO-NH-Lys to form Glu-NH-CO-NH-Lys(Ahx)L3, and a biodistribution study in healthy mice was performed with the Al(18)F-labeled construct. This new class of AlF-chelators may have a great impact on PET radiochemical space as it will stimulate the rapid development of new fluorine-18 labeled peptides and other heat-sensitive biomolecules.

  10. sup 18 F-labeled insulin: A prosthetic group methodology for incorporation of a positron emitter into peptides and proteins

    SciTech Connect

    Shai, Y.; Kirk, K.L.; Channing, M.A.; Dunn, B.B.; Lesniak, M.A.; Eastman, R.C.; Finn, R.D.; Roth, J.; Jacobson, K.A. )

    1989-05-30

    In the present study we synthesize {sup 18}F-labeled insulin of high specific radioactivity. A new prosthetic group methodology, in which ({sup 18}F)fluoride displaces a bromide group of 4-(bromomethyl)-benzoylamine intermediates, was used. The 4-(fluoromethyl)benzoyl product was chemically stable. {sup 18}F-Labeled insulin retains the essential biological properties of native insulin, as measured in vitro by binding to insulin receptors on human cells and stimulation of glucose metabolism in rat adipocytes. The overall process can be carried out speedily to yield a product of sufficient purity to permit in vivo studies. The method appears to be applicable to a wide variety of peptides.

  11. Synthesis and preliminary evaluation of [18F]-labeled 2-oxoquinoline derivatives for PET imaging of cannabinoid CB2 receptor

    PubMed Central

    Turkman, Nashaat; Paolillo, Vincenzo; Shavrin, Aleksander; Yeh, Hsin Hsien; Flores, Leo; Soghomonian, Suren; Ravinovich, Brian; Volgin, Andrei; Gelovani, Juri; Alauddin, Mian

    2011-01-01

    Introduction The cannabinoid receptor type 2 (CB2) is an important target for development of drugs and imaging agents for diseases, such as neuroinflammation, neurodegeneration, and cancer. Recently we reported synthesis and results of in vitro receptor binding of a focused library of fluorinated 2-oxoquinoline derivatives as CB2 receptor ligands. Some of the compounds demonstrated as good CB2-specific ligands with Ki values in the nanomolar to sub-nanomolar concentrations; therefore, we pursued the development of their 18F-labeled analogues that should be useful for PET imaging of CB2 receptor expression. Here, we report the radiosynthesis of two 18F-labeled 2-oxoquinoline derivatives, and preliminary in vitro and ex-vivo evaluation of one compound as a CB2-specific radioligand. Methods 4-[18F]Fluorobenzyl amine [18F]-3 was prepared by radiofluorination of 4-cyano-N,N,N-trimethylanilinium triflate salt followed by reduction with LiAlH4 and then coupled with acid chlorides 11 and 12 to afford [18F]-13 and [18F]-14. In vitro CB2 receptor binding assay was performed using U87 cells transduced with CB2- and CB1-receptor. Ex-vivo autoradiography was performed with [18F]-14 on spleen, CB2- and CB1-expressing and wild type U87 subcutaneous tumors grown in mice. Results The radiochemical yields of [18F]-13 and [18F]-14 were 10%-15.0% with an average of 12% (n=10); radiochemical purity was > 99% with specific activity 1200 mCi/μmole. The dissociation constant Kd for [18F]-14 was 3.4 nM. Ex-vivo autoradiography showed accumulation of [18F]-14 in the CB2-expressing tumor. Conclusion Two new [18F]-labeled CB2 ligands have been synthesized. Compound [18F]-14 appears to be a potential PET imaging agent for the assessment of CB2 receptor expression in vivo. PMID:22226022

  12. Single-scan rest/stress imaging 18F-labeled flow tracers

    PubMed Central

    Alpert, Nathaniel; Dean Fang, Yu-Hua; Fakhri, Georges El

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: The authors report a novel measurement strategy to obtain both rest and stress blood flow during a single, relatively short, scan session. Methods: Measurement of rest-stress myocardial blood flow with long-lived tracers usually requires separate scan sessions to remove the confounding effects of residual radioactivity concentration in the blood and tissue. The innovation of this method is to treat the rest-stress scan as a single entity in which the flow parameters change due to pharmacological challenge. With this approach the fate of a tracer molecule is naturally accounted for, no matter if it was introduced during the rest or stress phase of the study. Two new dual-injection kinetic models are considered that represent the response to pharmacological stress as a transitional or transient increase of myocardial blood flow. The authors present the theory of the method followed by the specific application of the theory to 18F-Flurpiridaz, a new myocardial flow-imaging agent. Results: Myocardial blood flow was accurately and precisely estimated from a single-scan rest/stress study for the long half-lived tracer 18F-Flurpiridaz. By accounting for the time-dependence of the kinetic parameters, the proposed models achieved good accuracy and precision (5%) under different vasodilators and different ischemic states. Conclusions: Detailed simulations predict that accurate and precise rest-stress blood flow measurements can be obtained in 20–30 min. PMID:23127055

  13. Design, synthesis and evaluation of (18)F-labeled bradykinin B1 receptor-targeting small molecules for PET imaging.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Zhengxing; Kuo, Hsiou-Ting; Lau, Joseph; Jenni, Silvia; Zhang, Chengcheng; Zeisler, Jutta; Bénard, François; Lin, Kuo-Shyan

    2016-08-15

    Two fluorine-18 ((18)F) labeled bradykinin B1 receptor (B1R)-targeting small molecules, (18)F-Z02035 and (18)F-Z02165, were synthesized and evaluated for imaging with positron emission tomography (PET). Z02035 and Z02165 were derived from potent antagonists, and showed high binding affinity (0.93±0.44 and 2.80±0.50nM, respectively) to B1R. (18)F-Z02035 and (18)F-Z02165 were prepared by coupling 2-[(18)F]fluoroethyl tosylate with their respective precursors, and were obtained in 10±5 (n=4) and 22±14% (n=3), respectively, decay-corrected radiochemical yield with >99% radiochemical purity. (18)F-Z02035 and (18)F-Z02165 exhibited moderate lipophilicity (LogD7.4=1.10 and 0.59, respectively), and were stable in mouse plasma. PET imaging and biodistribution studies in mice showed that both tracers enabled visualization of the B1R-positive HEK293T::hB1R tumor xenografts with better contrast than control B1R-negative HEK293T tumors. Our data indicate that small molecule antagonists can be used as pharmacophores for the design of B1R-targeting PET tracers.

  14. Synthesis and evaluation of 18F-labeled ATP competitive inhibitors of topoisomerase II as probes for imaging topoisomerase II expression

    PubMed Central

    Daumar, Pierre; Zeglis, Brian M.; Ramos, Nicholas; Divilov, Vadim; Sevak, Kuntal Kumar; Pillarsetty, NagaVaraKishore; Lewis, Jason S.

    2015-01-01

    Type II topoisomerase (Topo-II) is an ATP-dependent enzyme that is essential in the transcription, replication, and chromosome segregation processes and, as such, represents an attractive target for cancer therapy. Numerous studies indicate that the response to treatment with Topo-II inhibitors is highly dependent on both the levels and the activity of the enzyme. Consequently, a non-invasive assay to measure tumoral Topo-II levels has the potential to differentiate responders from non-responders. With the ultimate goal of developing a radiofluorinated tracer for positron emission tomography (PET) imaging, we have designed, synthesized, and evaluated a set of fluorinated compounds based on the structure of the ATP-competitive Topo-II inhibitor QAP1. Compounds 18 and 19b showed inhibition of Topo-II in in vitro assays and exhibited moderate, Topo-II level dependent cytotoxicity in SK-BR-3 and MCF-7 cell lines. Based on these results, 18F-labeled analogs of these two compounds were synthesized and evaluated as PET probes for imaging Topo-II overexpression in mice bearing SK-BR-3 xenografts. [18F]-18 and [18F]-19b were synthesized from their corresponding protected tosylated derivatives by fluorination and subsequent deprotection. Small animal PET imaging studies indicated that both compounds do not accumulate in tumors and exhibit poor pharmacokinetics, clearing from the blood pool very rapidly and getting metabolized over. The insights gained from the current study will surely aid in the design and construction of future generations of PET agents for the non-invasive delineation of Topo-II expression. PMID:25240701

  15. A high-affinity [18F]-labeled phosphoramidate peptidomimetic PSMA-targeted inhibitor for PET imaging of prostate cancer

    PubMed Central

    Ganguly, Tanushree; Dannoon, Shorouk; Hopkins, Mark R.; Murphy, Stephanie; Cahaya, Hendry; Blecha, Joseph E.; Jivan, Salma; Drake, Christopher R.; Barinka, Cyril; Jones, Ella F.; VanBrocklin, Henry F.; Berkman, Clifford E.

    2015-01-01

    Introduction In this study, a structurally modified phosphoramidate scaffold, with improved prostate-specific membrane antigen (PSMA) avidity, stability and in vivo characteristics, as a PET imaging agent for prostate cancer (PCa), was prepared and evaluated. Methods p-Fluorobenzoyl-aminohexanoate and 2-(3-hydroxypropyl)glycine were introduced into the PSMA-targeting scaffold yielding phosphoramidate 5. X-ray crystallography was performed on the PSMA/5 complex. [18F]5 was synthesized, and cell uptake and internalization studies were conducted in PSMA(+) LNCaP and CWR22Rv1 cells and PSMA(−) PC-3 cells. In vivo PET imaging and biodistribution studies were performed at 1 and 4 h post injection in mice bearing CWR22Rv1 tumor, with or without blocking agent. Results The crystallographic data showed interaction of the p-fluorobenzoyl group with an arene-binding cleft on the PSMA surface. In vitro studies revealed elevated uptake of [18F]5 in PSMA(+) cells (2.2% in CWR22Rv1 and 12.1% in LNCaP) compared to PSMA(−) cells (0.08%) at 4 h. In vivo tumor uptake of 2.33% ID/g and tumor-to-blood ratio of 265:1 was observed at 4 h. Conclusions We have successfully synthesized, radiolabeled and evaluated a new PSMA-targeted PET agent. The crystal structure of the PSMA/5 complex highlighted the interactions within the arene-binding cleft contributing to the overall complex stability. The high target uptake and rapid non-target clearance exhibited by [18F]5 in PSMA(+) xenografts substantiates its potential use for PET imaging of PCa. Advances in Knowledge The only FDA-approved imaging agent for PCa, Prostascint®, targets PSMA but suffers from inherent shortcomings. The data acquired in this manuscript confirmed that our new generation of [18F]-labeled PSMA inhibitor exhibited promising in vivo performance as a PET imaging agent for PCa and is well-positioned for subsequent clinical trials. Implications for Patient Care Our preliminary data demonstrate that this tracer possesses

  16. Fluorine-18 labeling of small molecules: the use of 18F-labeled aryl fluorides derived from no-carrier-added [18F]fluoride as labeling precursors.

    PubMed

    Wuest, F

    2007-01-01

    The favourable long-half life, the ease of production and the low energy of the emitted positron make 18F an ideal radionuclide for PET imaging. Radiochemistry of 18F basically relies on two distinctive types of reactions: nucleophilic and electrophilic reactions. All syntheses of 18F-labeled radiotracers are based on either [18F]fluoride ion or [18F]fluorine gas as simple primary labeling precursors which are obtained directly from the cyclotron. They can be applied either directly to the radiosynthesis or they can be transformed into more complex labeling precursors enabling the multi-step build-up of organic tracer molecules. The topic of this review is a survey on the application of several 18F-labeled aryl fluorides as building blocks derived from no-carrier-added (n.c.a.) [18F] fluoride to build up small monomeric PET radiotracers at high specific radioactivity by multi-step synthesis procedures.

  17. Synthesis and in vitro and in vivo evaluation of an (18)F-labeled neuropeptide Y analogue for imaging of breast cancer by PET.

    PubMed

    Hofmann, Sven; Maschauer, Simone; Kuwert, Torsten; Beck-Sickinger, Annette G; Prante, Olaf

    2015-04-06

    Imaging of Y1R expression in breast cancer is still a challenging task. Herein, we report a suitable (18)F-labeled high-molecular-weight glycopeptide for imaging of peripheral neuropeptide Y (NPY) Y1 receptor (Y1R)-positive tumors by preclinical small-animal positron emission tomography (PET). The Y1R-preferring NPY [F(7),P(34)]NPY analogue was functionalized with an alkyne-bearing propargylglycine (Pra) in position 4. The corresponding fluoroglycosylated (FGlc) peptide analogue [Pra(4)(FGlc),F(7),P(34)]NPY and its (18)F-labeled analogue were synthesized by click chemistry-based fluoroglycosylation. The radiosynthesis was performed by (18)F-fluoroglycosylation starting from the 2-triflate of the β-mannosylazide and the alkyne peptide [Pra(4),F(7),P(34)]NPY. The radiosynthesis of the(18)F-labeled analogue was optimized using a minimum amount of peptide precursor (40 nmol), proceeding with an overall radiochemical yield of 20-25% (nondecay corrected) in a total synthesis time of 75 min with specific activities of 40-70 GBq/μmol. In comparison to NPY and [F(7),P(34)]NPY, in vitro Y1R and Y2R activation studies with the cold [Pra(4)(FGlc),F(7),P(34)]NPY on stably transfected COS-7 cells displayed a high potency for the induction of Y1R-specific inositol accumulation (pEC50 = 8.5 ± 0.1), whereas the potency at Y2R was significantly decreased. Internalization studies on stably transfected HEK293 cells confirmed a strong glycopeptide-mediated Y1R internalization and a substantial Y1R subtype selectivity over Y2R. In vitro autoradiography with Y1R-positive MCF-7 tumor tissue slices indicated high specific binding of the (18)F-labeled glycopeptide, when binding was reduced by 95% ([Pra(4),F(7),P(34)]NPY) and by 86% (BIBP3226 Y1R antagonist) in competition studies. Biodistribution and small-animal PET studies on MCF-7 breast tumor-bearing nude mice revealed radiotracer uptake in the MCF-7 tumor of 1.8%ID/g at 20 min p.i. and 0.7%ID/g at 120 min p.i. (n = 3-4), increasing

  18. Preparation of 18F-labeled peptides using the copper(I)-catalyzed azide-alkyne 1,3-dipolar cycloaddition.

    PubMed

    Gill, Herman S; Marik, Jan

    2011-10-13

    An optimized procedure for preparing fluorine-18 ((18)F)-labeled peptides by the copper-catalyzed azide-alkyne 1,3-dipolar cyloaddition (CuAAC) is presented here. The two-step radiosynthesis begins with the microwave-assisted nucleophilic (18)F-fluorination of a precursor containing a terminal p-toluenesulfonyl, terminal azide and polyethylene glycol backbone. The resulting (18)F-fluorinated azide-containing building block is coupled to an alkyne-decorated peptide by the CuAAC. The reaction is accelerated by the copper(I)-stabilizing ligand bathophenanthroline disulfonate and can be performed in either reducing or nonreducing conditions (e.g., to preserve disulfide bonds). After an HPLC purification, (18)F-labeled peptide can be obtained with a 31 ± 6% radiochemical yield (n = 4, decay-corrected from (18)F-fluoride elution) and a specific activity of 39.0 ± 12.4 Ci μmol(-1) within 77 ± 4 min.

  19. In vivo biodistribution of two ( sup 18 F)-labelled muscarinic cholinergic receptor ligands: 2-( sup 18 F)- and 4-( sup 18 F)-fluorodexetimide

    SciTech Connect

    Wilson, A.A.; Scheffel, U.A.; Dannals, R.F.; Stathis, M.; Ravert, H.T.; Wagner, H.N. Jr. )

    1991-01-01

    Two ({sup 18}F)-labelled analogues of the potent muscarinic cholinergic receptor (m-AChR) antagonist, dexetimide, were evaluated as potential ligands for imaging m-AChR by positron emission tomography (PET). Intravenous administration of both 2-({sup 18}F)- or 4-({sup 18}F)-fluorodexetimide resulted in high brain uptake of radioactivity in mice. High binding levels were observed in m-AChR rich areas, such as cortex and striatum, with low levels in the receptor-poor cerebellum. Uptake of radioactivity was saturable and could be blocked by pre-administration of dexetimide or atropine. Drugs with different sites of action were ineffective at blocking receptor binding. The results indicate that both radiotracers are promising candidates for use in PET studies.

  20. Synthesis and pre-clinical evaluation of an 18F-labeled single-chain antibody fragment for PET imaging of epithelial ovarian cancer

    PubMed Central

    Sharma, Sai Kiran; Wuest, Melinda; Way, Jenilee D; Bouvet, Vincent R; Wang, Monica; Wuest, Frank R

    2016-01-01

    Anti-CA125 antibodies have been used in immunoassays to quantify levels of shed antigen in the serum of patients who are under surveillance for epithelial ovarian cancer (EOC). However, there is currently no molecular imaging probe in the clinic for the assessment of CA125 expression in vivo. The present study describes the development of an 18F-labeled single-chain variable fragment (scFv) for PET imaging of CA125 in preclinical EOC models. Anti-CA125 scFv was derived from MAb-B43.13 by recombinant expression of the fragment in E.coli. Fragment scFv-B43.13 was purified via immobilized metal affinity chromatography and characterized for antigen binding via immuno-staining and flow cytometry. Prosthetic group N-succinimidyl 4-[18F]fluorobenzoate ([18F]SFB) was used for radiolabeling of scFv-B43.13. Preclinical ovarian cancer models were developed based on ovarian cancer cell lines OVCAR3 (CA125-positive) and SKOV3 (CA125-negative) in NIH-III mice. The radiopharmacological profile of 18F-labeled scFv-B43.13 ([18F]FBz-scFv-B43.13) was studied with PET. [18F]FBz-scFv-B43.13 was prepared in radiochemical yields of 3.7 ± 1.8% (n = 5) at an effective specific activity of 3.88 ± 0.76 GBq/µmol (n = 5). The radiotracer demonstrated selective uptake in CA125-positive OVCAR3 cells and virtually no uptake in CA125-negative SKOV3 cells. Standardized uptake values (SUV) of radioactivity uptake in OVCAR3 tumors was 0.5 (n = 3) and 0.3 (n = 2) in SKOV3 tumors after 60 min post injection (p.i.). PMID:27508105

  1. Early identification of antigen-specific immune responses in vivo by [18F]-labeled 3'-fluoro-3'-deoxy-thymidine ([18F]FLT) PET imaging.

    PubMed

    Aarntzen, Erik H J G; Srinivas, Mangala; De Wilt, Johannes H W; Jacobs, Joannes F M; Lesterhuis, W Joost; Windhorst, Albert D; Troost, Esther G; Bonenkamp, Johannes J; van Rossum, Michelle M; Blokx, Willeke A M; Mus, Roel D; Boerman, Otto C; Punt, Cornelis J A; Figdor, Carl G; Oyen, Wim J G; de Vries, I Jolanda M

    2011-11-08

    Current biomarkers are unable to adequately predict vaccine-induced immune protection in humans with infectious disease or cancer. However, timely and adequate assessment of antigen-specific immune responses is critical for successful vaccine development. Therefore, we have developed a method for the direct assessment of immune responses in vivo in a clinical setting. Melanoma patients with lymph node (LN) metastases received dendritic cell (DC) vaccine therapy, injected intranodally, followed by [(18)F]-labeled 3'-fluoro-3'-deoxy-thymidine ([(18)F]FLT) PET at varying time points after vaccination. Control LNs received saline or DCs without antigen. De novo immune responses were readily visualized in treated LNs early after the prime vaccination, and these signals persisted for up to 3 wk. This selective [(18)F]FLT uptake was markedly absent in control LNs, although tracer uptake in treated LNs increased profoundly with as little as 4.5 × 10(5) DCs. Immunohistochemical staining confirmed injected DC dispersion to T-cell areas and resultant activation of CD4(+) and CD8(+) T cells. The level of LN tracer uptake significantly correlates to the level of circulating antigen-specific IgG antibodies and antigen-specific proliferation of T cells in peripheral blood. Furthermore, this correlation was not observed with [(18)F]-labeled fluoro-2-deoxy-2-D-glucose. Therefore, [(18)F]FLT PET offers a sensitive tool to study the kinetics, localization, and involvement of lymphocyte subsets in response to vaccination. This technique allows for early discrimination of responding from nonresponding patients in anti-cancer vaccination and aid physicians in individualized decisionmaking.

  2. Fully automated production of diverse 18F-labeled PET tracers on the ELIXYS multi-reactor radiosynthesizer without hardware modification

    PubMed Central

    Lazari, Mark; Collins, Jeffrey; Shen, Bin; Farhoud, Mohammed; Yeh, Daniel; Maraglia, Brandon; Chin, Frederick T.; Nathanson, David A.; Moore, Melissa; van Dam, R. Michael

    2015-01-01

    Fully-automated radiosynthesizers are continuing to be developed to meet the growing need for the reliable production of positron emission tomography (PET) tracers made under current good manufacturing practice (cGMP) guidelines. There is a current trend towards supporting “kit-like” disposable cassettes that come preconfigured for particular tracers, thus eliminating the need for cleaning protocols between syntheses and enabling quick transitions to synthesizing other tracers. Though ideal for production, these systems are often limited for the development of novel tracers due to pressure, temperature, and chemical compatibility considerations. This study demonstrates the versatile use of the ELIXYS fully-automated radiosynthesizer to adapt and produce eight different 18F-labeled PET tracers of varying complexity. Methods Three reactor syntheses of D-[18F]FAC, L-[18F]FMAU, and D-[18F]FEAU along with the one reactor syntheses of D-[18F]FEAU, [18F]FDG, [18F]FLT, [18F]Fallypride, [18F]FHBG, and [18F]SFB were all produced using ELIXYS without the need for any hardware modifications or reconfiguration. Synthesis protocols were adapted, and slightly modified from literature, but not fully optimized. Furthermore, [18F]FLT, [18F]FDG, and [18F]Fallypride were produced sequentially on the same day and used for preclinical imaging of A431 tumor-bearing SCID mice and wild-type BALB/c mice, respectively. To assess future translation to the clinical setting, several batches of tracers were subjected to a full set of quality control tests. Results All tracers were produced with radiochemical yields comparable to those in literature. [18F]FLT, [18F]FDG, and [18F]Fallypride were successfully used to image the mice with results consistent with literature. All tracers subjected to clinical quality control tests passed. Conclusion The ELIXYS radiosynthesizer facilitates rapid tracer development and is capable of producing multiple 18F-labeled PET tracers suitable for clinical

  3. Synthesis of a potent and selective (18)F-labeled delta-opioid receptor antagonist derived from the Dmt-Tic pharmacophore for positron emission tomography imaging.

    PubMed

    Ryu, Eun Kyoung; Wu, Zhanhong; Chen, Kai; Lazarus, Lawrence H; Marczak, Ewa D; Sasaki, Yusuke; Ambo, Akihiro; Salvadori, Severo; Ren, Chuancheng; Zhao, Heng; Balboni, Gianfranco; Chen, Xiaoyuan

    2008-03-27

    Identification and pharmacological characterization of two new selective delta-opioid receptor antagonists, derived from the Dmt-Tic pharmacophore, of potential utility in positron emission tomography (PET) imaging are described. On the basis of its high delta selectivity, H-Dmt-Tic--Lys(Z)-OH (reference compound 1) is a useful starting point for the synthesis of (18)F-labeled compounds prepared by the coupling of N-succinimidyl 4-[ (18)F]fluorobenzoate ([(18)F]SFB) with Boc-Dmt-Tic--Lys(Z)-OH under slightly basic conditions at 37 degrees C for 15 min, deprotection with TFA, and HPLC purification. The total synthesis time was 120 min, and the decay-corrected radiochemical yield of [(18)F]- 1 was about 25-30% ( n = 5) starting from [(18)F]SFB ( n = 5) with an effective specific activity about 46 GBq/micromol. In vitro autoradiography studies showed prominent uptake of [ (18)F]- 1 in the striatum and cortex with significant blocking by 1 and UFP-501 (selective delta-opioid receptor antagonist), suggesting high specific binding of [(18)F]- 1 to delta-opioid receptors. Noninvasive microPET imaging studies revealed the absence of [(18)F]- 1 in rat brain, since it fails to cross the blood-brain barrier. This study demonstrates the suitability of [ (18)F]- 1 for imaging peripheral delta-opioid receptors.

  4. Radiosynthesis and Evaluation of an 18F-Labeled Positron Emission Tomography (PET) Radioligand for Metabotropic Glutamate Receptor Subtype 4 (mGlu4)

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Four 4-phthalimide derivatives of N-(3-chlorophenyl)-2-picolinamide were synthesized as potential ligands for the PET imaging of mGlu4 in the brain. Of these compounds, N-(3-chloro-4-(4-fluoro-1,3-dioxoisoindolin-2-yl)phenyl)-2-picolinamide (3, KALB001) exhibited improved binding affinity (IC50 = 5.1 nM) compared with ML128 (1) and was subsequently labeled with 18F. When finally formulated in 0.1 M citrate buffer (pH 4) with 10% ethanol, the specific activity of [18F]3 at the end of synthesis (EOS) was 233.5 ± 177.8 GBq/μmol (n = 4). The radiochemical yield of [18F]3 was 16.4 ± 4.8% (n = 4), and the purity was over 98%. In vivo imaging studies in a monkey showed that the radiotracer quickly penetrated the brain with the highest accumulation in the brain areas known to express mGlu4. Despite some unfavorable radiotracer properties like fast washout in rodent studies, [18F]3 is the first 18F-labeled mGlu4 radioligand, which can be further modified to improve pharmacokinetics and brain penetrability for future human studies. PMID:25330258

  5. Synthesis and Evaluation of 18F-labeled Pyridaben Analogues for Myocardial Perfusion Imaging in Mice, Rats and Chinese mini-swine

    PubMed Central

    Mou, Tiantian; Zhao, Zuoquan; You, Linyi; Li, Yesen; Wang, Qian; Fang, Wei; Lu, Jie; Peng, Cheng; Zhang, Xianzhong

    2016-01-01

    This study reports three novel 18F-labeled pyridaben analogues for potential myocardial perfusion imaging (MPI). Three precursors and the corresponding nonradioactive compounds were synthesized and characterized. The radiolabeled tracers were obtained by substituting tosyl with 18F. The total radiosynthesis time of these tracers was 70–90 min. Typical decay-corrected radiochemical yields were 47–58%, with high radiochemical purities (>98%). Tracers were evaluated as MPI agents in vitro, ex vivo and in vivo. In the mouse biodistribution study, all three radiotracers showed high initial heart uptake (34–54% ID/g at 2 min after injection) and fast liver clearance. In the microPET imaging study, [18F]Fmpp2 produced heart images with good quality in both mice and rats. In the whole-body PET/CT images of mini-swine, [18F]Fmpp2 showed excellent initial heart standardized uptake value (SUV) (7.12 at 5 min p.i.) and good retention (5.75 at 120 min p.i.). The heart/liver SUV ratios were 4.12, 5.42 and 5.99 at 30, 60 and 120 min after injection, respectively. The favorable biological properties of [18F]Fmpp2 suggest that it is worth further investigation as a potential MPI agent. PMID:27646847

  6. Noninvasive positron emission tomography imaging of cell death using a novel small-molecule probe, (18)F labeled bis(zinc(II)-dipicolylamine) complex.

    PubMed

    Wang, Hongliang; Tang, Xiaolan; Tang, Ganghua; Huang, Tingting; Liang, Xiang; Hu, Kongzhen; Deng, Huaifu; Yi, Chang; Shi, Xinchong; Wu, Kening

    2013-08-01

    The synthetic bis(zinc(II)-dipicolylamine) (DPAZn2) coordination complexes are known to have a high specific and selective affinity to target the exposed phosphatidylserine (PS) on the surface of dead and dying cells. An (18)F-labeled DPAZn2 complex (4-(18)F-Fluoro-benzoyl-bis(zinc(II)-dipicolylamine), (18)F-FB-DPAZn2) as positron emission tomography (PET) tracer was developed and evaluated for in vivo imaging of tumor treated with a chemical agent. The in vitro cell stain studies revealed that fluorescent DPAZn2 complexes (Dansyl-DPAZn2) stained the same cells (apoptotic and necrotic cells) as fluorescein isothiocyanate (FITC) labeled Annexin V (FITC-Annexin V). The radiosynthesis of (18)F-FB-DPAZn2 was achieved through the amidation the precursor bis(2,2'-dipicolylamine) derivative (DPA2) with the prosthetic group N-succinimidyl-4-[(18)F]-fluorobenzoate ((18)F-SFB) and chelation with zinc nitrate. In the biodistribution study, the fast clearance of (18)F-FB-DPAZn2 from blood and kidney was observed and high uptake in liver and intestine within 90 min postinjection was also found. For the PET imaging, significantly higher tumor uptake of (18)F-FB-DPAZn2 was observed in the adriamycin (ADM)-treated Hepa1-6 hepatocellular carcinoma-bearing mice than that in the untreated tumor-model mice, while a slightly decreased tumor uptake of (18)F-FDG was found in the ADM-treated tumor-bearing mice. The results indicate that (18)F-FB-DPAZn2 has the similar capability of apoptosis detection as FITC-Annexin V and seems to be a potential PET tracer for noninvasive evaluation and monitoring of anti-tumor chemotherapy. The high uptake of (18)F-FB-DPAZn2 in the abdomen needs to optimize the structure for improving its pharmacokinetics characteristics in the future work.

  7. Synthesis and evaluation of an (18) F-labeled derivative of F3 for targeting surface-expressed nucleolin in cancer and tumor endothelial cells.

    PubMed

    Lam, Phoebe Y H; Hillyar, Christopher R T; Able, Sarah; Vallis, Katherine A

    2016-10-01

    The surface overexpression of nucleolin provides an anchor for the specific attachment of biomolecules to cancer and angiogenic endothelial cells. The peptide F3 is a high-affinity ligand of the nucleolin receptor (NR) that has been investigated as a carrier to deliver biologically active molecules to tumors for both therapeutic and imaging applications. A site-specific PEGylated F3 derivative was radiolabeled with [(18) F]Al-F. The binding affinity and cellular distribution of the compound was assessed in tumor (H2N) and tumor endothelial (2H-11) cells. Specific uptake via the NR was demonstrated by the siRNA knockdown of nucleolin in both cell lines. The partition and the plasma stability of the compound were assessed at 37°C. The enzyme-mediated site-specific modification of F3 to give NODA-PEG-F3 (NP-F3) was achieved. Radiolabeling with [(18) F]Al-F gave (18) F-NP-F3. (18) F-NP-F3 demonstrated high affinity for cancer and tumor endothelial cells. The siRNA knockdown of nucleolin resulted in a binding affinity reduction of 50% to 60%, confirming cell surface binding via the NR. NP-F3 was stable in serum for 2 h. (18) F-NP-F3 is reported as the first (18) F-labeled F3 derivative. It was obtained in a site-specific, high-yield, and efficient manner and binds to surface NR in the low nanomolar range, suggesting it has potential as a tumor and angiogenesis tracer.

  8. PET imaging of apoptosis in tumor-bearing mice and rabbits after paclitaxel treatment with 18F-Labeled recombinant human His10-annexin V

    PubMed Central

    Qin, Haidong; Zhang, Ming-Rong; Xie, Lin; Hou, Yanjie; Hua, Zichun; Hu, Minjin; Wang, Zizheng; Wang, Feng

    2015-01-01

    Monitoring response to chemo- or radiotherapy is of great importance in clinical practice. Apoptosis imaging serves as a very useful tool for the early evaluation of tumor response. The goal of this study was PET imaging of apoptosis with 18F-labeled recombinant human annexin V linked with 10 histidine tag (18F-rh-His10-annexin V) in nude mice bearing an A549 tumor and rabbits bearing a VX2 lung cancer after paclitaxel therapy. 18F-rh-His10-annexin V was prepared by conjugation of rh-His10-annexin V with N-succinimidyl 4-[18F]fluorobenzoate. Biodistribution was determined in mice by the dissection method and small-animal PET. Single-dose paclitaxel (175 mg/m2) was used to induce apoptosis in A549 and VX2 tumor models. 18F-rh-His10-annexin V was injected into A549 mice and VX rabbits to acquire dynamic and static PET images 72 h after paclitaxel treatment. The uptake of 18F-rh-His10-annexin V in apoptotic cells 4 h after induction was 6.45±0.52 fold higher than that in non-induced cells. High focal uptake of 18F-rh-His10-annexin V was visualized in A549 (SUVmax: 0.35±0.13) and VX2 (0.41±0.23) tumor models after paclitaxel treatment, whereas lower uptake was found in the corresponding tumors before treatment (A549 SUVmax: 0.04±0.02; VX2: 0.009±0.002). The apoptotic index was 75.61±11.56% in the treated VX2 cancer, much higher than that in the untreated VX2 (8.03±2.81%). This study demonstrated the feasibility of 18F-rh-His10-annexin V for the detection of apoptosis after chemotherapy in A549 and VX2 tumor models. PMID:25625024

  9. Radiosynthesis and preliminary PET evaluation of (18)F-labeled 2-(1-(3-fluorophenyl)-2-oxo-5-(pyrimidin-2-yl)-1,2-dihydropyridin-3-yl)benzonitrile for imaging AMPA receptors.

    PubMed

    Yuan, Gengyang; Jones, Graham B; Vasdev, Neil; Liang, Steven H

    2016-10-01

    To prompt the development of (18)F-labeled positron emission tomography (PET) tracers for the α-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methyl-4-isoxazolepropionic acid (AMPA) receptor, we have prepared (18)F-labeled 2-(1-(3-fluorophenyl)-2-oxo-5-(pyrimidin-2-yl)-1,2-dihydropyridin-3-yl)benzonitrile ([(18)F]8). The radiosynthesis was achieved by a one-pot two-step method that utilized a spirocyclic hypervalent iodine(III) mediated radiofluorination to prepare the (18)F-labeled 1-bromo-3-fluorobenzene ([(18)F]15) intermediate with K(18)F. A subsequent copper(I) iodide mediated coupling reaction was carried out with 2-(2-oxo-5-(pyrimidin-2-yl)-1,2-dihydropyridin-3-yl)benzonitrile (10) to [(18)F]8 in 10±2% uncorrected radiochemical yield relative to starting (18)F-fluoride with >99% radiochemical purity and 29.6±7.4Gbq/μmol specific activity at the time of injection. PET imaging studies with the title radiotracer in normal mice demonstrated good brain uptake (peak standardized uptake value (SUV)=2.3±0.1) and warrants further in vivo validation.

  10. Preclinical Evaluation of 18F-Labeled Anti-HER2 Nanobody Conjugates for Imaging HER2 Receptor Expression by ImmunoPET

    PubMed Central

    Vaidyanathan, Ganesan; McDougald, Darryl; Choi, Jaeyeon; Koumarianou, Eftychia; Weitzel, Douglas; Osada, Takuya; Lyerly, H. Kim; Zalutsky, Michael R.

    2016-01-01

    The human growth factor receptor type 2 (HER2) is overexpressed in breast as well as other types of cancer. ImmunoPET, a noninvasive imaging procedure that could assess HER2 status in both primary and metastatic lesions simultaneously, could be a valuable tool for optimizing application of HER2-targeted therapies in individual patients. Herein, we have evaluated the tumor targeting potential of the 5F7 anti-HER2 Nanobody (single-domain antibody fragment; ~13 kDa) after 18F labeling by two methods. Methods The 5F7 Nanobody was labeled with 18F using the novel residualizing label N-succinimidyl 3-((4-(4-18F-fluorobutyl)-1H-1,2,3-triazol-1-yl)methyl)-5-(guanidinomethyl)benzoate (18F-SFBTMGMB; 18F-RL-I) and also via the most commonly utilized 18F protein labeling prosthetic agent, N-succinimidyl 3-18F-fluorobenzoate (18F-SFB). For comparison, 5F7 Nanobody was also labeled using the residualizing radioiodination agent N-succinimidyl 4-guanidinomethyl-3-125I-iodobenzoate (125I-SGMIB). Paired label (18F/125I) internalization assays and biodistribution studies were performed on HER2-expressing BT474M1 breast carcinoma cells and in mice with BT474M1 subcutaneous xenografts, respectively. Micro positron emission tomography/computed tomography (microPET/CT) imaging of 5F7 Nanobody labeled using 18F-RL-I also was performed. Results Internalization assays indicated that intracellularly retained radioactivity for 18F-RL-I-5F7 was similar to that for co-incubated 125I-SGMIB-5F7, while that for 18F-SFB-5F7 was lower than co-incubated 125I-SGMIB-5F7 and decreased with time. BT474M1 tumor uptake of 18F-RL-I-5F7 was 28.97 ± 3.88 %ID/g at 1 h and 36.28 ± 14.10 %ID/g at 2 h, reduced by >90% trastuzumab blocking, indicating HER2-specificity of uptake, and also 26–28% higher (P < 0.05) than that of 18F-SFB-5F7. At 2 h, the tumor-to-blood ratio for 18F-RL-I-5F7 (47.4 ± 13.1) was significantly higher (P < 0.05) than for 18F-SFB-5F7 (25.4 ± 10.3); however, kidney uptake was 28–36

  11. Distribution and binding of 18F-labeled and 125I-labeled analogues of ACI-80, a prospective molecular imaging biomarker of disease: a whole hemisphere post mortem autoradiography study in human brains obtained from Alzheimer's disease patients.

    PubMed

    Gulyás, Balázs; Spenger, Christian; Beliczai, Zsuzsa; Gulya, Károly; Kása, Péter; Jahan, Mahabuba; Jia, Zhisheng; Weber, Urs; Pfeifer, Andrea; Muhs, Andreas; Willbold, Dieter; Halldin, Christer

    2012-01-01

    One of the major pathological landmarks of Alzheimer's disease and other neurodegenerative diseases is the presence of amyloid deposits in the brain. The early non-invasive visualization of amyloid is a major objective of recent diagnostic neuroimaging approaches, including positron emission tomography (PET), with an eye on follow-up of disease progression and/or therapy efficacy. The development of molecular imaging biomarkers with binding affinity to amyloid in the brain is therefore in the forefront of imaging biomarker and radiochemistry research. Recently, a dodecamer peptide (amino acid sequence=QSHYRHISPAQV; denominated D1 or ACI-80) was identified as a prospective ligand candidate, binding with high ex vivo affinity to L-Aβ-amyloid (K(d): 0.4 μM). In order to assess the ligand's capacity to visualize amyloid in Alzheimer's disease (AD), two (125)I labeled and three (18)F labeled analogues of the peptide were synthesized and tested in post mortem human autoradiography experiments using whole hemisphere brain slices obtained from deceased AD patients and age matched control subjects. The (18)F-labeled radioligands showed more promising visualization capacity of amyloid that the (125)I-labeled radioligands. In the case of each (18)F radioligands the grey matter uptake in the AD brains was significantly higher than that in control brains. Furthermore, the grey matter: white matter uptake ratio was over ~2, the difference being significant for each (18)F-radioligands. The regional distribution of the uptake of the various radioligands systematically shows a congruent pattern between the high uptake regions and spots in the autoradiographic images and the disease specific signals obtained in adjacent or identical brain slices labeled with histological, immunohistochemical or autoradiographic stains for amyloid deposits or activated astrocytes. The present data, using post mortem human brain autoradiography in whole hemisphere human brains obtained from deceased

  12. PET Imaging of Extracellular pH in Tumors with 64Cu- and 18F-Labeled pHLIP Peptides: A Structure–Activity Optimization Study

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    pH (low) insertion peptides (pHLIP peptides) target acidic extracellular environments in vivo due to pH-dependent cellular membrane insertion. Two variants (Var3 and Var7) and wild-type (WT) pHLIP peptides have shown promise for in vivo imaging of breast cancer. Two positron emitting radionuclides (64Cu and 18F) were used to label the NOTA- and NO2A-derivatized Var3, Var7, and WT peptides for in vivo biodistribution studies in 4T1 orthotopic tumor-bearing BALB/c mice. All of the constructs were radiolabeled with 64Cu or [18F]-AlF in good yield. The in vivo biodistribution of the 12 constructs in 4T1 orthotopic allografted female BALB/c mice indicated that NO2A-cysVar3, radiolabeled with either 18F (4T1 uptake; 8.9 ± 1.7%ID/g at 4 h p.i.) or 64Cu (4T1 uptake; 8.2 ± 0.9%ID/g at 4 h p.i. and 19.2 ± 1.8% ID/g at 24 h p.i.), shows the most promise for clinical translation. Additional studies to investigate other tumor models (melanoma, prostate, and brain tumor models) indicated the universality of tumor targeting of these tracers. From this study, future clinical translation will focus on 18F- or 64Cu-labeled NO2A-cysVar3. PMID:27396694

  13. Synthesis and Evaluation of Two 18F-Labeled 6-Iodo-2-(4′-N,N-dimethylamino)phenylimidazo[1,2-a]pyridine Derivatives as Prospective Radioligands for β-Amyloid in Alzheimer’s Disease

    PubMed Central

    Cai, Lisheng; Chin, Frederick T.; Pike, Victor W.; Toyama, Hiroshi; Liow, Jeih-San; Zoghbi, Sami S.; Modell, Kendra; Briard, Emmanuelle; Shetty, H. Umesha; Sinclair, Kathryn; Donohue, Sean; Tipre, Dnyanesh; Kung, Mei-Ping; Dagostin, Claudio; Widdowson, David A.; Green, Michael; Gao, Weiyi; Herman, Mary M.; Ichise, Masanori; Innis, Robert B.

    2014-01-01

    This study evaluated 18F-labeled IMPY [6-iodo-2-(4′-N,N-dimethylamino)phenylimidazo[1,2-a]pyridine] derivatives as agents for imaging β-amyloid plaque with positron emission tomography (PET). The precursor for radiolabeling and reference compounds was synthesized in up to five steps from commercially accessible starting materials. One of the two N-methyl groups of IMPY was substituted with either a 3-fluoropropyl (FPM-IMPY) or a 2-fluoroethyl (FEM-IMPY) group. FPM-IMPY and FEM-IMPY were found to have moderate affinity for Aβ- aggregates with Ki = 27 ± 8 and 40 ± 5 nM, respectively. A “one-pot” method for 18F-2-fluoroethylation and 18F-3-fluoropropylation of the precursor was developed. The overall decay-corrected radiochemical yields were 26–51%. In PET experiments with normal mouse, high uptake of activity was obtained in the brain after iv injection of each probe: 6.4% ID/g for [18F]FEM-IMPY at 1.2 min, and 5.7% ID/g for [18F]FPM-IMPY at 0.8 min. These values were similar to those of [123I/125I]IMPY (7.2% ID/g at 2 min). Polar and nonpolar radioactive metabolites were observed in both plasma and brain homogenates after injection of [18F]FEM or [18F]FPM-IMPY. In contrast to the single-exponential washout of [123I/125I]IMPY, the washouts of brain activity for the two fluorinated analogues were biphasic, with an initial rapid phase over 20 min and a subsequent much slower phase. Residual brain activity at 2 h, which may represent polar metabolites trapped in the brain, was 4.5% ID/g for [18F]FEM-IMPY and 2.1% ID/g for [18F]FPM-IMPY. Substantial skull uptake of [18F]fluoride was also clearly observed. With a view to slow the metabolism of [18F]FEM-IMPY, an analogue was prepared with deuteriums substituted for the four ethyl hydrogens. However, D4-[18F]FEM-IMPY showed the same brain uptake and clearance as the protio analogue. Metabolism of the [18F]FEM-IMPY was appreciably slower in rhesus monkey than in mouse. Autoradiography of postmortem brain sections

  14. Enantioselective synthesis of L-(-)-4- boronophenylalanine (L-BPA)

    DOEpatents

    Samsel, E.G.

    1992-10-20

    A method of making substantially pure L-BPA is disclosed. The method includes the steps of reacting 4-bromobenzaldehyde with ethylene glycol to form 4-bromobenzaldehyde ethylene glycol acetal, sequentially reacting 4-bromobenzaldehyde ethyleneglycol acetal with Mg to produce the Grignard reagent and thereafter reacting with tributyl borate and then converting to an acid environment to form 4-boronobenzaldehyde, reacting 4-boronobenzaldehyde with diethanol amine to form 4-boronobenzaldehyde diethanolamine ester, condensing the 4-boronobenzaldehyde diethanolamine ester with 2-phenyl-2-oxazolin-5-one to form an azlactone, reacting the azlactone with an alkali metal hydroxide to form z-[alpha]-benzoylamino-4boronocinnamic acid, asymmetrically hydrogenating the z-[alpha]-benzoylamino-4-boronocinnamic acid in the presence of a catalyst of a cheltate complex of rhodium (I) with chiral bisphosphines to form L-(+)-N-benzoyl-4-boronophenylalanine, and thereafter acidifying the L-(+)-N-benzoyl-4-boronophenylalanine in an organic medium to produce L-BPA. 3 figs.

  15. Enantioselective synthesis of L-(-)-4- boronophenylalanine (L-BPA)

    DOEpatents

    Samsel, Edward G.

    1992-01-01

    A method of making substantially pure L-BPA is disclosed. The method includes the steps of reacting 4-bromobenzaldehyde with ethylene glycol to form 4-bromobenzaldehyde ethylene glycol acetal, sequentially reacting 4-bromobenzaldehyde ethyleneglycol acetal with Mg to produce the Grignard reagent and thereafter reacting with tributyl borate and then converting to an acid environment to form 4-boronobenzaldehyde, reacting 4-boronobenzaldehyde with diethanol amine to form 4-boronobenzaldehyde diethanolamine ester, condensing the 4-boronobenzaldehyde diethanolamine ester with 2-phenyl-2-oxazolin-5-one to form an azlactone, reacting the azlactone with an alkali metal hydroxide to form z-.alpha.-benzoylamino-4-boronocinnamic acid, asymmetrically hydrogenating the z-.alpha.-benzoylamino-4-boronocinnamic acid in the presence of a catalyst of a cheltate complex of rhodium (I) with chiral bisphosphines to form L-(+)-N-benzoyl-4-boronophenylalanine, and thereafter acidifying the L-(+)-N-benzoyl-4-boronophenylalanine in an organic medium to produce L-BPA.

  16. A Phase 1 biodistribution study of p-boronophenylalanine

    SciTech Connect

    Coderre, J.A.

    1991-01-01

    The objectives of the Phase I BPA biodistribution study are as follows: Objective 1: To establish the safety of orally administered boronophenylalanine (BPA) as determined by monitoring of patient's vital signs and by clinical analysis of blood before and after BPA administration. Objective 2: To establish BPA pharmacokinetics by monitoring the rates of boron absorption into and clearance from the blood and the rate of urinary excretion of boron. Objective 3: To measure the amount of boron incorporated into human tumors (melanoma, glioma, and breast carcinoma) using samples obtained at surgery or biopsy. This report presents the results obtained from the first thirteen patients entered into the study. Three additional glioblastoma patients have been studied recently at Stony Brook, the tissues are still being analyzed.

  17. A Phase 1 biodistribution study of p-boronophenylalanine

    SciTech Connect

    Coderre, J.A.

    1991-12-31

    The objectives of the Phase I BPA biodistribution study are as follows: Objective 1: To establish the safety of orally administered boronophenylalanine (BPA) as determined by monitoring of patient`s vital signs and by clinical analysis of blood before and after BPA administration. Objective 2: To establish BPA pharmacokinetics by monitoring the rates of boron absorption into and clearance from the blood and the rate of urinary excretion of boron. Objective 3: To measure the amount of boron incorporated into human tumors (melanoma, glioma, and breast carcinoma) using samples obtained at surgery or biopsy. This report presents the results obtained from the first thirteen patients entered into the study. Three additional glioblastoma patients have been studied recently at Stony Brook, the tissues are still being analyzed.

  18. N-Succinimidyl 3-((4-(4-[18F]fluorobutyl)-1H-1,2,3-triazol-1-yl)methyl)-5-(guanidinomethyl)benzoate ([18F]SFBTMGMB): A Residualizing Label for 18F-labeling of internalizing biomolecules

    PubMed Central

    Vaidyanathan, Ganesan; McDougald, Darryl; Choi, Jaeyeon; Pruszynski, Marek; Koumarianou, Eftychia; Zhou, Zhengyuan; Zalutsky, Michael R.

    2015-01-01

    Residualizing labeling methods for internalizing peptides and proteins are designed to trap the radionuclide inside the cell after intracellular degradation of the biomolecule. The goal of this work was to develop a residualizing label for the 18F-labeling of internalizing biomolecules based on a template used successfully for radioiodination. N-succinimidyl 3-((4-(4-[18F]fluorobutyl)-1H-1,2,3-triazol-1-yl)methyl)-5-(bis-Boc-guanidinomethyl)benzoate (Boc2-[18F]SFBTMGMB) was synthesized by click reaction of an azide precursor and [18F]fluorohexyne in 8.5 ± 2.8% average decay-corrected radiochemical yield (n =15). An anti-HER2 nanobody 5F7 was labeled with 18F using [18F]SFBTMGMB ([18F]RL-I), obtained by the deprotection of Boc2-[18F]SFBTMGMB, in 31.2 ± 6.7% (n =5) conjugation efficiency. Thus labeled nanobody had a radiochemical purity of >95%, bound to the HER2-expressing BT474M1 breast cancer cells with an affinity of 4.7 ± 0.9 nM, and had an immunoreactive fraction of 62–80%. In summary, a novel residualizing prosthetic agent for labeling biomolecules with 18F has been developed. An anti-HER2 nanobody was labeled using this prosthetic group with retention of affinity and immunoreactivity to HER2. PMID:26645790

  19. Accumulation of boron in malignant and normal cells incubated in vitro with boronophenylalanine, mercaptoborane or boric acid.

    PubMed

    Capala, J; Makar, M S; Coderre, J A

    1996-11-01

    The short (< 10 microns) ranges of alpha and 7Li particles produced during boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) make the partitioning of the boronated drug within and without the cell of critical importance. The evaluation of the potential usefulness of a boron-containing substance for BNCT requires information about its intracellular accumulation. In the present report, an in vitro method is described for direct measurement of intracellular boron based on rapid centrifugation of cells through a layer of mineral oil and silicon oil to strip away extracellular growth medium. The intracellular concentrations of boronophenylalanine (BPA), mercaptoborane (BSH) and horic acid in malignant cells and in normal cells have been compared. The accumulation ratio is defined as the ratio of the intracellular to the extracellular boron concentration. Boric acid showed an accumulation ratio of 1 while the ratios for BSH and BPA were dependent on cell type and tended to be greater for BPA than for BSH in malignant but not in normal cells.

  20. A Phase 1 trial of intravenous boronophenylalanine-fructose complex in patients with glioblastoma multiforme

    SciTech Connect

    Bergland, R.; Elowitz, E.; Chadha, M.; Coderre, J.A.; Joel, D.

    1996-10-01

    Boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) of glioblastoma multiforme was initially performed at the Brookhaven National Laboratory in the early 1950`s While this treatment for malignant brain tumors has continued in Japan, new worldwide interest has been stimulated by the development of new and more selective boron compounds. Boronophenylalanine (BPA) is a blood-brain barrier penetrating compound that has been used in BNCT of malignant melanomas. SPA has been employed experimentally in BNCT of rat gliosarcoma and has potential use in the treatment of human glioblastoma. As a preface to clinical BNCT trials, we studied the biodistribution of SPA in patients with glioblastoma.

  1. RADIOSYNTHESIS AND CHIRAL SEPARATION OF C-11 LABELED BORONOPHENYLALANINE FOR BNCT STUDIES WITH PET.

    SciTech Connect

    STUDENOV,A.; DING,Y.S.; FERRIERI,R.; MIURA,M.; CODERRE,J.; FOWLER,J.S.

    2001-06-10

    The overall goal of this research is to combine two powerful methodologies, boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) and positron emission tomography (PET), to advance the treatment of patients with malignant brain tumors. BNCT is a method to selectively deliver lethal alpha radiation to a tumor through the administration of a boron-10 containing drug, and irradiation of the tumor area with neutrons [1]. L-Boronophenylalanine (L-{sup 10}BPA) is a boron-10 containing amino acid currently used for BNCT [4]. In order to perform neutron dosimetry, it is essential to determine tumor boron-10 levels in the course of the therapy. PET has the ability to measure the concentration of drugs labeled with positron-emitting isotopes in the human body [2]. 2-Fluoro-4-borono-phenylalanine ([{sup 18}F]FBPA) has been labeled as a surrogate marker for L-BPA for pharmacokinetic studies in brain tumor patients [3]. However, [{sup 18}F]FBPA is a different drug than L-BPA because it contains a fluorine atom. We report here the labeling of L-BPA with C-11, which has the advantage of being chemically identical to L-BPA. Carbon-11 is also well suited to repeated studies within the same PET scanning session.

  2. Boron neutron capture therapy of ocular melanoma and intracranial glioma using p-boronophenylalanine

    SciTech Connect

    Coderre, J.A.; Greenberg, D.; Micca, P.L.; Joel, D.D.; Saraf, S. ); Packer, S. . Div. of Ophthalmology)

    1990-01-01

    During conventional radiotherapy, the dose that can be delivered to the tumor is limited by the tolerance of the surrounding normal tissue within the treatment volume. Boron Neutron Capture Therapy (BNCT) represents a promising modality for selective tumor irradiation. The key to effective BNCT is selective localization of {sup 10}B in the tumor. We have shown that the synthetic amino acid p-boronophenylalanine (BPA) will selectively deliver boron to melanomas and other tumors such as gliosarcomas and mammary carcinomas. Systemically delivered BPA may have general utility as a boron delivery agent for BNCT. In this paper, BNCT with BPA is used in treatment of experimentally induced gliosarcoma in rats and nonpigmented melanoma in rabbits. The tissue distribution of boron is described, as is response to the BNCT. 6 refs., 4 figs., 1 tab.

  3. Inborn errors in metabolism and 4-boronophenylalanine-fructose-based boron neutron capture therapy.

    PubMed

    Laakso, Juha; Ruokonen, Inkeri; Lapatto, Risto; Kallio, Merja

    2003-11-01

    Infusions of boronophenylalanine-fructose complex (BPA-F), at doses up to 900 mg/kg of BPA and 860 mg/kg of fructose, have been used to deliver boron to cancer tissue for boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT). In patients with phenylketonuria (PKU), phenylalanine accumulates, which is harmful in the long run. PKU has been an exclusion criterion for BPA-F-mediated BNCT. Fructose is harmful to individuals with hereditary fructose intolerance (HFI) in amounts currently used in BNCT. The harmful effects are mediated through induction of hypoglycemia and acidosis, which may lead to irreversible organ damage or even death. Consequently, HFI should be added as an exclusion criterion for BNCT if fructose-containing solutions are used in boron carriers. Non-HFI subjects may also develop symptoms, such as gastrointestinal pain, if the fructose infusion rate is high. We therefore recommend monitoring of glucose levels and correcting possible hypoglycemia promptly. Except for some populations with extremely low PKU prevalence, HFI and PKU prevalences are similar, approximately 1 or 2 per 20,000.

  4. Biodistribution of boronophenylalanine in patients with glioblastoma multiforme: boron concentration correlates with tumor cellularity.

    PubMed

    Coderre, J A; Chanana, A D; Joel, D D; Elowitz, E H; Micca, P L; Nawrocky, M M; Chadha, M; Gebbers, J O; Shady, M; Peress, N S; Slatkin, D N

    1998-02-01

    Boron-10 (10B) concentrations were measured in 107 surgical samples from 15 patients with glioblastoma multiforme who were infused with 95 atom% 10B-enriched p-boronophenylalanine (BPA) intravenously for 2 h just prior to surgery at doses ranging from 98 to 290 mg BPA/kg body weight. The blood 10B concentration reached a maximum at the end of the infusion (ranging from 9.3 to 26.0 microg 10B/g) and was proportional to the amount of BPA infused. The boron concentrations in excised tumor samples ranged from 2.7 to 41.3 microg 10B/g over the range of administered BPA doses and varied considerably among multiple samples from individual patients and among patients at the same BPA dose. A morphometric index of the density of viable-appearing tumor cells in histological sections obtained from samples adjacent to, and macroscopically similar to, the tumor samples used for boron analysis correlated linearly with the boron concentrations. From that correlation it is estimated that 10B concentrations in glioblastoma tumor cells were over four times greater than concurrent blood 10B concentrations. Thus, in the dose range of 98 to 290 mg BPA/kg, the accumulation of boron in tumor cells is a linear function of BPA dose and the variations observed in boron concentrations of tumor specimens obtained surgically are largely due to differences in the proportion of nontumor tissue (i.e. necrotic tissue, normal brain) present in the samples submitted for boron analysis. The tumor:blood 10B concentration ratio derived from this analysis provides a rationale for estimating the fraction of the radiation dose to viable tumor cells resulting from the boron neutron capture reaction based on measured boron concentrations in the blood at the time of BNCT without the need for analysis of tumor samples from individual patients.

  5. Dose-response analysis for boron neutron capture therapy of the B16 murine melanoma using p-boronophenylalanine

    SciTech Connect

    Coderre, J.A.; Micca, P.L.; Slatkin, D.N.; Makar, M.S.

    1990-01-01

    Boron Neutron Capture Therapy (BNCT) of a well-pigmented B16 melanoma implanted subcutaneously in the mouse thigh has been carried out at the Brookhaven Medical Research Reactor (BMRR) using the synthetic amino acid p-boronophenylalanine (BPA) as the boron delivery agent. The response of the B16 melanoma to BNCT was compared with the response to 250 kVp x-rays using both tumor growth delay and in vivo/in vitro assay that measures clonogenic survival. These experiments allow a comparison of tumor growth delay, log cell kill and damage to normal tissues produced by BNCT or photon irradiation.

  6. Clinical Experience with (18)F-Labeled Small Molecule Inhibitors of Prostate-Specific Membrane Antigen.

    PubMed

    Rowe, Steven P; Gorin, Michael A; Salas Fragomeni, Roberto A; Drzezga, Alexander; Pomper, Martin G

    2017-04-01

    Prostate cancer (PCa) is the most common noncutaneous malignancy diagnosed in men. Despite the large number of men who will suffer from PCa at some point during their lives, conventional imaging modalities for this important disease (contrast-enhanced computed tomography, bone scan, and MR imaging) have provided only marginal to moderate success in appropriately guiding patient management in certain clinical contexts. In this review, the authors discuss radiofluorinated small molecule radiotracers that have been developed to bind to the transmembrane glycoprotein prostate-specific membrane antigen, a target that is nearly universally overexpressed on PCa epithelial cells.

  7. An improved strategy for the synthesis of [18F]-labeled arabinofuranosyl nuclosides

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Hanwen; Cantorias, Melchor V.; Pillarsetty, NagaVaraKishore; Burnazi, Eva M.; Cai, Shangde; Lewis, Jason S.

    2012-01-01

    The expression of the herpes simplex virus type-1 thymidine kinase (HSV1-tk) gene can be imaged efficaciously using a variety of 2′-[18F]fluoro-2′-deoxy-1-b-D-arabinofuranosyl-uracil derivatives [[18F]-FXAU, X= I(iodo), E(ethyl), and M(methyl)]. However, the application of these derivatives in clinical and translational studies has been impeded by their complicated and long syntheses (3–5 h). To remedy these issues, in the study at hand we have investigated whether microwave or combined catalysts could facilitate the coupling reaction between sugar and nucleobase and, further, have probed the feasibility of establishing a novel approach for [18F]-FXAU synthesis. We have demonstrated that the rate of the trimethylsilyl trifluoromethanesulfonate (TMSOTf)-catalyzed coupling reaction between the 2-deoxy-sugar and uracil derivatives at 90°C can be significantly accelerated by microwave-driven heating or by the addition of Lewis acid catalyst (SnCl4). Further, we have observed that the stability of the α- and β-anomers of [18F]-FXAU derivatives differs during the hydrolysis step. Using the microwave-driven heating approach, overall decay-corrected radiochemical yields of 19–27% were achieved for [18F]-FXAU in 120 min at a specific activity of >22 MBq/nmol (595 Ci/mmol). Ultimately, we believe that these high yielding syntheses of [18F]-FIAU, [18F]-FMAU and [18F]-FEAU will facilitate routine production for clinical applications. PMID:22819195

  8. Improved 18F Labeling of Peptides with a Fluoride-Aluminum-Chelate Complex

    PubMed Central

    McBride, William J.; D’Souza, Christopher A.; Sharkey, Robert M.; Karacay, Habibe; Rossi, Edmund A.; Chang, Chien-Hsing; Goldenberg, David M.

    2010-01-01

    We reported previously the feasibility to radiolabel peptides with fluorine-18 (18F) using a rapid, one-pot, method that first mixes 18F− with Al3+, and then binds the (Al18F)2+ complex to a NOTA ligand on the peptide. In this report, we examined several new NOTA ligands and determined how temperature, reaction time, and reagent concentration affected the radiolabeling yield. Four structural variations of the NOTA ligand had isolated radiolabeling yields ranging from 5.8% to 87% under similar reaction conditions. All of the Al18F NOTA complexes were stable in vitro in human serum and those that were tested in vivo also were stable. The radiolabeling reactions were performed at 100°C and the peptides could be labeled in as little as five minutes. The IMP467 peptide could be labeled up to 115 GBq/μmol (3100 Ci/mmol), with a total reaction and purification time of 30 min without chromatographic purification. PMID:20540570

  9. 18F-Labeled Silicon-Based Fluoride Acceptors: Potential Opportunities for Novel Positron Emitting Radiopharmaceuticals

    PubMed Central

    Bernard-Gauthier, Vadim; Wängler, Carmen; Wängler, Bjoern; Schirrmacher, Ralf

    2014-01-01

    Background. Over the recent years, radiopharmaceutical chemistry has experienced a wide variety of innovative pushes towards finding both novel and unconventional radiochemical methods to introduce fluorine-18 into radiotracers for positron emission tomography (PET). These “nonclassical” labeling methodologies based on silicon-, boron-, and aluminium-18F chemistry deviate from commonplace bonding of an [18F]fluorine atom (18F) to either an aliphatic or aromatic carbon atom. One method in particular, the silicon-fluoride-acceptor isotopic exchange (SiFA-IE) approach, invalidates a dogma in radiochemistry that has been widely accepted for many years: the inability to obtain radiopharmaceuticals of high specific activity (SA) via simple IE. Methodology. The most advantageous feature of IE labeling in general is that labeling precursor and labeled radiotracer are chemically identical, eliminating the need to separate the radiotracer from its precursor. SiFA-IE chemistry proceeds in dipolar aprotic solvents at room temperature and below, entirely avoiding the formation of radioactive side products during the IE. Scope of Review. A great plethora of different SiFA species have been reported in the literature ranging from small prosthetic groups and other compounds of low molecular weight to labeled peptides and most recently affibody molecules. Conclusions. The literature over the last years (from 2006 to 2014) shows unambiguously that SiFA-IE and other silicon-based fluoride acceptor strategies relying on 18F− leaving group substitutions have the potential to become a valuable addition to radiochemistry. PMID:25157357

  10. Synthesis and evaluation of 18F labeled alanine derivatives as potential tumor imaging agents

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Limin; Zha, Zhihao; Qu, Wenchao; Qiao, Hongwen; Lieberman, Brian P.; Plössl, Karl; Kung, Hank F.

    2012-01-01

    Introduction This paper reports the synthesis and labeling of 18F alanine derivatives. We also investigate their biological characteristics as potential tumor imaging agents mediated by alanine-serine-cysteine preferring (ASC) transporter system. Methods Three new 18F alanine derivatives were prepared from corresponding tosylate-precursors through a two-step labelling reaction. In vitro uptake studies to evaluate and to compare these three analogs were carried out in 9L glioma and PC-3 prostate cancer cell lines. Potential transport mechanisms, protein incorporation and stability of 3-(1-[18F]fluoromethyl)-L-alanine (L[18F]FMA) were investigated in 9L glioma cells. Its biodistribution was determined in a rat-bearing 9L tumor model. PET imaging studies were performed on rat bearing 9L glioma tumors and transgenic mouse carrying spontaneous generated M/tomND tumor (mammary gland adenocarcinoma). Results New 18F alanine derivatives were prepared with 7–34% uncorrected radiochemical yields, excellent enantiomeric purity (>99%) and good radiochemical purity (>99%). In vitro uptake of the L-[18F]FMA in 9L glioma and PC-3 prostate cancer cells was higher than those observed for other two alanine derivatives and [18F]FDG in first 1 h. Inhibition of cell uptake studies suggested that L-[18F]FMA uptake in 9L glioma was predominantly via transport system ASC. After entering into cells, L-[18F]FMA remained stable and was not incorporated into protein within 2 h. In vivo biodistribution studies demonstrated that L-[18F]FMA had relatively high uptake in liver and kidney. Tumor uptake was fast, reaching a maximum within 30 min. The tumor-to-muscle, tumor-to-blood and tumor-to-brain ratios at 60 min post injection were 2.2, 1.9 and 3.0, respectively. In PET imaging studies, tumors were visualized with L-[18F]FMA in both 9L rat and transgenic mouse. Conclusion L-[18F]FMA showed promising properties as a PET imaging agent for up-regulated ASC transporter associated with tumor proliferation. PMID:22542392

  11. 18F-labeled FECNT: a selective radioligand for PET imaging of brain dopamine transporters.

    PubMed

    Goodman, M M; Kilts, C D; Keil, R; Shi, B; Martarello, L; Xing, D; Votaw, J; Ely, T D; Lambert, P; Owens, M J; Camp, V M; Malveaux, E; Hoffman, J M

    2000-01-01

    Fluorine-18 labeled 2beta-carbomethoxy-3beta-(4-chlorophenyl)-8-(2-fluoroethyl)nort ropane (FECNT) was synthesized in the development of a dopamine transporter (DAT) imaging ligand for positron emission tomography (PET). The methods of radiolabeling and ligand synthesis of FECNT, and the results of the in vitro characterization and in vivo tissue distribution in rats and in vivo PET imaging in rhesus monkeys of [18F]FECNT are described. Fluorine-18 was introduced into 2beta-carbomethoxy-3beta-(4-chlorophenyl)-8-(2-fluoroethyl)nort ropane (4) by preparation of 1-[18F]fluoro-2-tosyloxyethane (2) followed by alkylation of 2beta-carbomethoxy-3beta-(4-chlorophenyl)nortropane (3) in 21% radiochemical yield (decay corrected to end of bombardment [EOB]). Competition binding in cells stably expressing the transfected human DAT serotonin transporter (SERT) and norepinephrine transporter (NET) labeled by [3H]WIN 35428, [3H]citalopram, and [3H]nisoxetine, respectively, indicated the following order of DAT affinity: GBR 12909 > CIT > 2beta-carbomethoxy-3beta-(4-chlorophenyl)-8-(3-fluoropropyl) nortropane (FPCT) > FECNT. The affinity of FECNT for SERT and NET was 25- and 156-fold lower, respectively, than for DAT. Blocking studies were performed in rats with a series of transporter-specific agents and demonstrated that the brain uptake of [18F]FECNT was selective and specific for DAT-rich regions. PET brain imaging studies in monkeys demonstrated high [18F]FECNT uptake in the caudate and putamen that resulted in caudate-to-cerebellum and putamen-to-cerebellum ratios of 10.5 at 60 min. [18F]FECNT uptake in the caudate/putamen peaked in less than 75 min and exhibited higher caudate- and putamen-to-cerebellum ratios at transient equilibrium than reported for 11C-WIN 35,428, [11C]CIT/RTI-55, or [18F]beta-CIT-FP. Analysis of monkey arterial plasma samples using high performance liquid chromatography determined that there was no detectable formation of lipophilic radiolabeled metabolites capable of entering the brain. In equilibrium displacement experiments with CIT in rhesus monkeys, radioactivity in the putamen was displaced with an average half-time of 10.2 min. These results indicate that [18F]FECNT is a radioligand that is superior to 11C-WIN 35,428, [11C]CIT/RTI-55, [18F]beta-CIT-FP, and [18F]FPCT for mapping brain DAT in humans using PET.

  12. Boron neutron capture therapy of glioblastoma multiforme using the p- boronophenylalanine-fructose complex and epithermal neutrons

    SciTech Connect

    Coderre, J.A.; Chanana, A.D.; Joel, D.D.; Liu, H.B.; Slatkin, D.N.; Wielopolski, L.; Bergland, R.; Elowitz, E.; Chadha, M.

    1994-12-31

    The amino acid analogue p-boronophenylalanine (BPA) is under investigation as a neutron capture agent for BNCT of glioblastoma multiforme. A series of patients undergoing surgical removal of tumor received BPA orally as the free amino acid. Favorable tumor/blood boron concentration ratios were obtained but the absolute amount of boron in the tumor would have been insufficient for BNCT. BPA can be solubilized at neutral pH by complexation with fructose (BPA-F). Studies with rats suggest that intraperitoneal injection of BPA-F complex produces a much higher tumor boron concentration to rat intracerebral 9L gliosarcoma that were possible with oral BPA. Higher boron concentrations have allowed higher tumor radiation doses to be delivered while maintaining the dose to the normal brain vascular endothelium below the threshold of tolerance. The experience to date of the administration of BPA-F to one patient is provided in this report.

  13. Biodistribution of boron concentration on melanoma-bearing hamsters after administration of p-, m-, o-boronophenylalanine.

    PubMed

    Hiratsuka, J; Yoshino, K; Kondoh, H; Imajo, Y; Mishima, Y

    2000-04-01

    Although p-boronophenylalanine (p-BPA), a boronate analogue of tyrosine, has proven to be one of the most successful compounds for boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) of malignant melanoma, the selective uptake mechanism of this compound into melanoma cells is not well understood. Therefore, the relationship between the structure of BPA and its specific affinity to melanoma cells appears worthy of investigation. In the present study, m- and o-boronophenylalanine (m- and o-BPA) were administered to melanoma-bearing hamsters and their uptake was measured. The time courses (0.5, 2.0, 4.0 and 48.0 h) of boron concentrations in melanoma, normal skin, and blood were determined in male Syrian (golden) hamsters bearing Greene's melanomas following a single intraperitoneal injection of either p-, m- or o-BPA (100 mg/kg of BPA fructose in 1.0 ml of saline). The boron concentrations in these tissues were measured by inductively coupled plasma-atomic emission spectrometry (ICP-AES). In melanoma, the order of boron uptake was p- > m- > o-BPA at all time points, and the boron concentrations obtained with p-BPA and m-BPA resembled each other in that they had a peak at 2 h after administration and decreased with time. The melanoma/skin boron concentration ratio of p-BPA had a peak at 4 h after administration and the ratio ranged between 7/1 and 8/1. On the other hand, m-BPA and o-BPA had a peak at 2 h and their ratios ranged between 4/1 and 5/1. The difference in the accumulations of p-BPA and m-BPA could be due to a difference in the property of p-BPA as a tyrosine analogue for melanin synthesis. The accumulation of m-BPA into melanoma might indicate the baseline level of metabolism-related amino acid transport. Our experimental findings indicate that this melanin synthesis, or the structural analogy between the boron compound and tyrosine as a precursor of melanin, is an important factor in the increased accumulation of p-BPA in melanoma cells.

  14. Boronophenylalanine, a boron delivery agent for boron neutron capture therapy, is transported by ATB0,+, LAT1 and LAT2.

    PubMed

    Wongthai, Printip; Hagiwara, Kohei; Miyoshi, Yurika; Wiriyasermkul, Pattama; Wei, Ling; Ohgaki, Ryuichi; Kato, Itsuro; Hamase, Kenji; Nagamori, Shushi; Kanai, Yoshikatsu

    2015-03-01

    The efficacy of boron neutron capture therapy relies on the selective delivery of boron carriers to malignant cells. p-Boronophenylalanine (BPA), a boron delivery agent, has been proposed to be localized to cells through transporter-mediated mechanisms. In this study, we screened aromatic amino acid transporters to identify BPA transporters. Human aromatic amino acid transporters were functionally expressed in Xenopus oocytes and examined for BPA uptake and kinetic parameters. The roles of the transporters in BPA uptake were characterized in cancer cell lines. For the quantitative assessment of BPA uptake, HPLC was used throughout the study. Among aromatic amino acid transporters, ATB(0,+), LAT1 and LAT2 were found to transport BPA with Km values of 137.4 ± 11.7, 20.3 ± 0.8 and 88.3 ± 5.6 μM, respectively. Uptake experiments in cancer cell lines revealed that the LAT1 protein amount was the major determinant of BPA uptake at 100 μM, whereas the contribution of ATB(0,+) became significant at 1000 μM, accounting for 20-25% of the total BPA uptake in MCF-7 breast cancer cells. ATB(0,+), LAT1 and LAT2 transport BPA at affinities comparable with their endogenous substrates, suggesting that they could mediate effective BPA uptake in vivo. The high and low affinities of LAT1 and ATB(0,+), respectively, differentiate their roles in BPA uptake. ATB(0,+), as well as LAT1, could contribute significantly to the tumor accumulation of BPA at clinical dose.

  15. 18F-labeled Single-Stranded DNA Aptamer for PET Imaging of Protein Tyrosine Kinase-7 Expression

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Lu; Wang, Zhe; Yang, Xiangyu; Dewhurst, Andrew; Ma, Ying; Zhu, Guizhi; Niu, Gang; Kiesewetter, Dale O.; Vasdev, Neil; Liang, Steven H.; Chen, Xiaoyuan

    2016-01-01

    Protein tyrosine kinase-7 (PTK7), a member of receptor tyrosine kinase superfamily initially identified as colon carcinoma kinase-4 (CCK-4), is highly expressed in various human malignancies. Its expression was found to correlate with aggressive biological behaviors such as increased cell proliferation, invasiveness and migration. Despite the importance and unmet need of imaging PTK7 in vivo, there is currently no clinically-relevant method to visualize tumoral PTK7 expression noninvasively such as PET or SPECT. This study aims to develop a specific, selective and high affinity PET radioligand based on single-stranded DNA (ssDNA) aptamer to address this challenge. Methods Sgc8, a 41-oligonucleotide that targets to PTK7, was labeled with F-18 using a two-step radiochemical synthesis, which featured a direct one-step radiofluorination on the distinctive spirocyclic hypervalent iodine(III) precursor to give 18F-fluorobenzyl azide followed by copper mediated “click” conjugation with Sgc8-alkyne. 18F-Sgc8 was evaluated in vitro and in vivo in two cell lines, HCT116 and U87MG, which express high and low amounts of PTK7, respectively. Results Sgc8 was labeled efficiently with F-18 in an isolated radiochemical yield of 62 ± 2%, non-decay-corrected (ndc) based on 18F-fluorobenzyl azide. 18F-Tr-Sgc8 was found to possess high affinity binding to both cell lines, with IC50 values for HCT116 as 2.7 ± 0.6 nM and U87MG as 16.9 ± 2.1 nM. In vivo PET imaging clearly visualized PTK7 expression in HCT116 xenografted mice with tumor uptake of 0.76 ± 0.09 %ID/g at 30 min post-injection (p.i.) for the subcutaneous tumor model and greater than 1.5 %ID/g for the liver metastasis model. U87MG xenograft tumors had much lower tracer accumulation (0.13 ± 0.06 %ID/g at 30 min p.i.), which was consistent with the lower expression of PTK7 in this tumor model. The labeled aptamer was rapidly cleared from the blood through the kidneys and bladder to give high tumor-to-blood and tumor-to-muscle ratios of 7.29 ± 1.51 and 10.25 ± 2.08, respectively. Conclusions The F-18 radiolabeling methodology shown here is a very robust procedure for labeling aptamers and similar chemical moieties, and can be applied to many different targets. Quantification of PTK7 using 18F-Tr-Sgc8 may be suitable for clinical translation and might help in the future to select and monitor appropriate therapies. PMID:26315836

  16. A high-affinity [18F]-labeled phosphoramidate peptidomimetic PSMA-targeted inhibitor for PET imaging of prostate cancer

    DOE PAGES

    Ganguly, Tanushree; Dannoon, Shorouk; Hopkins, Mark R.; ...

    2015-06-09

    Here in this study, a structurally modified phosphoramidate scaffold, with improved prostate-specific membrane antigen (PSMA) avidity, stability and in vivo characteristics, as a PET imaging agent for prostate cancer (PCa), was prepared and evaluated. p-Fluorobenzoyl-aminohexanoate and 2-(3-hydroxypropyl)glycine were introduced into the PSMA-targeting scaffold yielding phosphoramidate 5. X-ray crystallography was performed on the PSMA/5 complex. [18F]5 was synthesized, and cell uptake and internalization studies were conducted in PSMA(+) LNCaP and CWR22Rv1 cells and PSMA(-) PC-3 cells. In vivo PET imaging and biodistribution studies were performed at 1 and 4 h post injection in mice bearing CWR22Rv1 tumor, with or without blockingmore » agent. The crystallographic data showed interaction of the p-fluorobenzoyl group with an arene-binding cleft on the PSMA surface. In vitro studies revealed elevated uptake of [18F]5 in PSMA(+) cells (2.2% in CWR22Rv1 and 12.1% in LNCaP) compared to PSMA(-) cells (0.08%) at 4 h. In vivo tumor uptake of 2.33% ID/g and tumor-to-blood ratio of 265:1 was observed at 4 h. In conclusion, we have successfully synthesized, radiolabeled and evaluated a new PSMA-targeted PET agent. The crystal structure of the PSMA/5 complex highlighted the interactions within the arene-binding cleft contributing to the overall complex stability. The high target uptake and rapid non-target clearance exhibited by [18F]5 in PSMA(+) xenografts substantiates its potential use for PET imaging of PCa.« less

  17. Novel 18F labeling strategy for polyester-based NPs for in vivo PET-CT imaging.

    PubMed

    Di Mauro, Primiano Pio; Gómez-Vallejo, Vanessa; Baz Maldonado, Zuriñe; Llop Roig, Jordi; Borrós, Salvador

    2015-03-18

    Drug-loaded nanocarriers and nanoparticulate systems used for drug release require a careful in vivo evaluation in terms of physicochemical and pharmacokinetic properties. Nuclear imaging techniques such as positron emission tomography (PET) are ideal and noninvasive tools to investigate the biodistribution and biological fate of the nanostructures, but the incorporation of a positron emitter is required. Here we describe a novel approach for the (18)F-radiolabeling of polyester-based nanoparticles. Our approach relies on the preparation of the radiolabeled active agent 4-[(18)F]fluorobenzyl-2-bromoacetamide ([(18)F]FBBA), which is subsequently coupled to block copolymers under mild conditions. The labeled block copolymers are ultimately incorporated as constituent elements of the NPs by using a modified nano coprecipitation method. This strategy has been applied in the current work to the preparation of peptide-functionalized NPs with potential applications in drug delivery. According to the measurements of particle size and zeta potential, the radiolabeling process did not result in a statistically significant alteration of the physicochemical properties of the NPs. Moreover, radiochemical stability studies showed no detachment of the radioactivity from NPs even at 12 h after preparation. The radiolabeled NPs enabled the in vivo quantification of the biodistribution data in rats using a combination of imaging techniques, namely, PET and computerized tomography (CT). Low accumulation of the nanoparticles in the liver and their elimination mainly via urine was found. The different biodistribution pattern obtained for the "free" radiolabeled polymer suggests chemical and radiochemical integrity of the NPs under investigation. The strategy reported here may be applied to any polymeric NPs containing polymers bearing a nucleophile, and hence our novel strategy may find application for the in vivo and noninvasive investigation of a wide range of NPs.

  18. Quantitative bioimaging of p-boronophenylalanine in thin liver tissue sections as a tool for treatment planning in boron neutron capture therapy.

    PubMed

    Reifschneider, Olga; Schütz, Christian L; Brochhausen, Christoph; Hampel, Gabriele; Ross, Tobias; Sperling, Michael; Karst, Uwe

    2015-03-01

    An analytical method using laser ablation-inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry (LA-ICP-MS) was developed and applied to assess enrichment of 10B-containing p-boronophenylalanine-fructose (BPA-f) and its pharmacokinetic distribution in human tissues after application for boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT). High spatial resolution (50 μm) and limits of detection in the low parts-per-billion range were achieved using a Nd:YAG laser of 213 nm wavelength. External calibration by means of 10B-enriched standards based on whole blood proved to yield precise quantification results. Using this calibration method, quantification of 10B in cancerous and healthy tissue was carried out. Additionally, the distribution of 11B was investigated, providing 10B enrichment in the investigated tissues. Quantitative imaging of 10B by means of LA-ICP-MS was demonstrated as a new option to characterise the efficacy of boron compounds for BNCT.

  19. Specific killing effect of 10B1-para-boronophenylalanine in thermal neutron capture therapy of malignant melanoma: in vitro radiobiological evaluation

    SciTech Connect

    Ichihashi, M.; Nakanishi, T.; Mishima, Y.

    1982-03-01

    A 10B-dopa analogue, 10B1-para-boronophenylalanine (10B1-BPA) has been found to have a marked melanoma killing effect as expressed by the Do value, 0.9-1.2 X 10(12) n/cm2. The Do value of the neutron alone is 2.8 X 10(12) n/cm2. After the introduction of high LET irradiation into radiotherapy, its higher energy deposition in the target cancer cells is one of the major problems currently to be solved. This can be achieved by our thermal neutron capture therapy in the order of cellular dimensions when we have highly tumor-seeking 10B-compounds available. Our present evidence seems to indicate that our new 10B1-BPA can highly concentrate 10B into melanoma cells, to as much as 11 times the level of the medium in the in vitro system.

  20. L-Boronophenylalanine-Mediated Boron Neutron Capture Therapy for Malignant Glioma Progressing After External Beam Radiation Therapy: A Phase I Study

    SciTech Connect

    Kankaanranta, Leena; Seppaelae, Tiina; Koivunoro, Hanna; Vaelimaeki, Petteri; Beule, Annette; Collan, Juhani; Kortesniemi, Mika; Uusi-Simola, Jouni; Kotiluoto, Petri; Auterinen, Iiro; Seren, Tom; Paetau, Anders; Saarilahti, Kauko; Savolainen, Sauli; Joensuu, Heikki

    2011-06-01

    Purpose: To investigate the safety of boronophenylalanine-mediated boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) in the treatment of malignant gliomas that progress after surgery and conventional external beam radiation therapy. Methods and Materials: Adult patients who had histologically confirmed malignant glioma that had progressed after surgery and external beam radiotherapy were eligible for this Phase I study, provided that >6 months had elapsed from the last date of radiation therapy. The first 10 patients received a fixed dose, 290 mg/kg, of L-boronophenylalanine-fructose (L-BPA-F) as a 2-hour infusion before neutron irradiation, and the remaining patients were treated with escalating doses of L-BPA-F, either 350 mg/kg, 400 mg/kg, or 450 mg/kg, using 3 patients on each dose level. Adverse effects were assessed using National Cancer Institute Common Toxicity Criteria version 2.0. Results: Twenty-two patients entered the study. Twenty subjects had glioblastoma, and 2 patients had anaplastic astrocytoma, and the median cumulative dose of prior external beam radiotherapy was 59.4 Gy. The maximally tolerated L-BPA-F dose was reached at the 450 mg/kg level, where 4 of 6 patients treated had a grade 3 adverse event. Patients who were given >290 mg/kg of L-BPA-F received a higher estimated average planning target volume dose than those who received 290 mg/kg (median, 36 vs. 31 Gy [W, i.e., a weighted dose]; p = 0.018). The median survival time following BNCT was 7 months. Conclusions: BNCT administered with an L-BPA-F dose of up to 400 mg/kg as a 2-hour infusion is feasible in the treatment of malignant gliomas that recur after conventional radiation therapy.

  1. Selectivity of boron carriers for boron neutron capture therapy: pharmacological studies with borocaptate sodium, L-boronophenylalanine and boric acid in murine tumors.

    PubMed

    Gregoire, V; Begg, A C; Huiskamp, R; Verrijk, R; Bartelink, H

    1993-04-01

    Borocaptate sodium (BSH) and L-boronophenylalanine (L-BPA) are two boron carriers used for boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) in the treatment of glioblastoma and melanoma, respectively. The suitability of these two compounds was evaluated on the basis of pharmacokinetic studies aiming at characterizing their biodistribution, tumor uptake and tumor selectivity. Boric acid was also used as a reference compound since it is nonselective and relatively freely diffusible. The compounds were investigated in two tumor models, a B16 pigmented melanoma and the RIF1 sarcoma. Mice were sacrificed after different boron doses at various post-injection times and tissue and plasma levels measured using inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectroscopy (ICP-AES). The proposed minimum effective tumor boron concentration of 15 ppm was achieved in both tumor models for the three compounds tested, although only for L-BPA in the melanoma was this achieved when tumor-plasma ratios were above 1. In the RIF1 model, maximum tumor concentrations of 44 and 31 ppm B were reached after administration of 50 micrograms B/g body weight for boric acid and BSH, respectively. After administration of 12.5 micrograms B/g of L-BPA, maximum concentrations of 15 and 21 ppm were found in the RIF1 and B16 models, respectively. Tumor-plasma ratios (TPR) for BSH remained close to or below unity at all times studied in both tumors. Brain levels of BSH were very low, however, leading to tumor-brain ratios markedly greater than 1 at all times. L-BPA and boric acid showed TPR values above unity in both tumor models, reaching 3.2 in B16.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  2. SIMS ion microscopy imaging of boronophenylalanine (BPA) and 13C15N-labeled phenylalanine in human glioblastoma cells: Relevance of subcellular scale observations to BPA-mediated boron neutron capture therapy of cancer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chandra, Subhash; Lorey, Daniel R., II

    2007-02-01

    p-Boronophenylalanine (BPA) is a clinically approved boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) agent currently being used in clinical trials of glioblastoma multiforme, melanoma and liver metastases. Secondary ion mass spectrometry (SIMS) observations from the Cornell SIMS Laboratory provided support for using a 6 h infusion of BPA, instead of a 2 h infusion, for achieving higher levels of boron in brain tumor cells. These observations were clinically implemented in Phase II experimental trials of glioblastoma multiforme in Sweden. However, the mechanisms for higher BPA accumulation with longer infusions have remained unknown. In this work, by using 13C15N-labeled phenylalanine and T98G human glioblastoma cells, comparisons between the 10B-delivery of BPA and the accumulation of labeled phenylalanine after 2 and 6 h treatments were made with a Cameca IMS-3f SIMS ion microscope at 500 nm spatial resolution in fast frozen, freeze-fractured, freeze-dried cells. Due to the presence of the Na-K-ATPase in the plasma membrane of most mammalian cells, the cells maintain an approximately 10/1 ratio of K/Na in the intracellular milieu. Therefore, the quantitative imaging of these highly diffusible species in the identical cell in which the boron or labeled amino acid was imaged provides a rule-of-thumb criterion for validation of SIMS observations and the reliability of the cryogenic sampling. The labeled phenylalanine was detected at mass 28, as the 28(13C15N)- molecular ion. Correlative analysis with optical and confocal laser scanning microscopy revealed that fractured freeze-dried glioblastoma cells contained well-preserved ultrastructural details with three discernible subcellular regions: a nucleus or multiple nuclei, a mitochondria-rich perinuclear cytoplasmic region and the remaining cytoplasm. SIMS analysis revealed that the overall cellular signals of both 10B from BPA and 28CN- from labeled phenylalanine increased approximately 1.6-fold between the 2 and 6 h exposures

  3. Long-term infusions of p-boronophenylalanine for boron neutron capture therapy: evaluation using rat brain tumor and spinal cord models.

    PubMed

    Morris, G M; Micca, P L; Nawrocky, M M; Weissfloch, L E; Coderre, J A

    2002-12-01

    Rat 9L gliosarcoma cells infiltrating the normal brain have been shown previously to accumulate only approximately 30% as much boron as the intact tumor after administration of the boronated amino acid p-boronophenylalanine (BPA). Long-term i.v. infusions of BPA were shown previously to increase the boron content of these infiltrating tumor cells significantly. Experiments to determine whether this improved BPA distribution into infiltrating tumor cells after a long-term i.v. infusion improves tumor control after BNCT in this brain tumor model and whether it has any deleterious effects in the response of the rat spinal cord to BNCT are the subjects of the present report. BPA was administered in a fructose solution at a dose of 650 mg BPA/kg by single i.p. injection or by i.v. infusion for 2 h or 6 h, at 330 mg BPA/kg h(-1). At 1 h after the end of either the 2-h or the 6-h infusion, the CNS:blood (10)B partition ratio was 0.9:1. At 3 h after the single i.p. injection, the ratio was 0.6:1. After spinal cord irradiations, the ED(50) for myeloparesis was 14.7 +/- 0.4 Gy after i.p. administration of BPA and 12.9 +/- 0.3 Gy in rats irradiated after a 6-h i.v. infusion of BPA; these values were significantly different (P < 0.001). After irradiation with 100 kVp X rays, the ED(50) was 18.6 +/- 0.1 Gy. The boron compound biological effectiveness (CBE) factors calculated for the boron neutron capture dose component were 1.2 +/- 0.1 for the i.p. BPA administration protocol and 1.5 +/- 0.1 after irradiation using the 6-h i.v. BPA infusion protocol (P < 0.05). In the rat 9L gliosarcoma brain tumor model, the blood boron concentrations at 1 h after the end of the 2-h infusion (330 mg BPA/kg h(-1); n = 15) or after the 6-h infusion (190 mg BPA/kg h(-1); n = 13) were 18.9 +/- 2.2 microg 10B/g and 20.7 +/- 1.8 microg 10B/g, respectively. The irradiation times were adjusted individually, based on the preirradiation blood sample, to deliver a predicted 50% tumor control dose of 8

  4. Sulfonation of Tyrosine as a Method to Improve Biodistribution of Peptide-Based Radiotracers: Novel (18)F-Labelled Cyclic RGD Analogues.

    PubMed

    Haskali, Mohammad Baqir; Denoyer, Delphine; Noonan, Wayne; Cullinane, Carleen; Rangger, Christine; Pouliot, Normand; Haubner, Roland; Roselt, Peter D; Hicks, Rodney J; Hutton, Craig A

    2017-02-13

    The labeling of peptides with positron emitting radionuclides has long held the promise of a wide range of PET agents possessing high affinity and selectivity. Not surprisingly, controlling the biodistribution of these agents has proven to be a major challenge in their successful application. Modification of peptide hydrophilicity in order to increase renal clearance has been a common endeavor to improve overall biodistribution. Herein, we examine the effect of site-specific sulfonation of tyrosine moieties in cyclic(RGDyK) peptides as a means to enhance their hydrophilicity and improve their biodistribution. The novel sulfonated cyclic(RGDyK) peptides were conjugated directly to 4-nitrophenyl 2-[18F]fluoropropionate and the biodistribution of the radiolabeled peptides was compared with that of their non-sulfonated, clinically relevant counterparts, [18F]GalactoRGD and [18F]FPPRGD2. Site-specific sulfonation of the tyrosine residues was shown to increase hydrophilicity and improve biodistribution of the RGD peptides, despite contributing just 79 Da towards the MW, compared with 189 Da for both the 'Galacto' and mini-PEG moieties, suggesting this may be a broadly applicable approach to enhancing biodistribution of radiolabelled peptides.

  5. No-carrier-added nucleophilic 18F-labelling in an electrochemical cell exemplified by the routine production of [18F]altanserin.

    PubMed

    Hamacher, K; Coenen, H H

    2006-09-01

    A new type of electrochemical cell with anodic deposition of no-carrier-added [(18)F]fluoride and variable reaction volume has been developed. The reactor is designed for small reaction volumes and non-thermal drying of [(18)F]fluoride. The implementation of this reactor into a complete remotely controlled synthesis device is described for the routine production of [(18)F]altanserin. A radiochemical yield of 23+/-5% was obtained via cryptate-mediated nucleophilic (18)F-fluorination. Batches of up to 6 GBq [(18)F]altanserin, suitable for human application, with a molar activity of >500 GBq/micromol were obtained within 75 min.

  6. Design and Investigation of a [(18)F]-Labeled Benzamide Derivative as a High Affinity Dual Sigma Receptor Subtype Radioligand for Prostate Tumor Imaging.

    PubMed

    Yang, Dongzhi; Comeau, Anthony; Bowen, Wayne D; Mach, Robert H; Ross, Brian D; Hong, Hao; Van Dort, Marcian E

    2017-03-06

    High overexpression of sigma (σ) receptors (σ1 and σ2 subtypes) in a variety of human solid tumors has prompted the development of σ receptor-targeting radioligands, as imaging agents for tumor detection. A majority of these radioligands to date target the σ2 receptor, a potential marker of tumor proliferative status. The identification of approximately equal proportions of both σ receptor subtypes in prostate tumors suggests that a high affinity, dual σ receptor-targeting radioligand could potentially provide enhanced tumor targeting efficacy in prostate cancer. To accomplish this goal, we designed a series of ligands which bind to both σ receptor subtypes with high affinity. Ligand 3a in this series, displaying optimal dual σ receptor subtype affinity (σ1, 6.3 nM; σ2, 10.2 nM) was radiolabeled with fluorine-18 ((18)F) to give [(18)F]3a and evaluated as a σ receptor-targeting radioligand in the mouse PC-3 prostate tumor model. Cellular assays with PC-3 cells demonstrated that a major proportion of [(18)F]3a was localized to cell surface σ receptors, while ∼10% of [(18)F]3a was internalized within cells after incubation for 3.5 h. Serial PET imaging in mice bearing PC-3 tumors revealed that uptake of [(18)F]3a was 1.6 ± 0.8, 4.4 ± 0.3, and 3.6 ± 0.6% ID/g (% injection dose per gram) in σ receptor-positive prostate tumors at 15 min, 1.5 h, and 3.5 h postinjection, respectively (n = 3) resulting in clear tumor visualization. Blocking studies conducted with haloperidol (a nonselective inhibitor for both σ receptor subtypes) confirmed that the uptake of [(18)F]3a was σ receptor-mediated. Histology analysis confirmed similar expression of σ1 and σ2 in PC-3 tumors which was significantly greater than its expression in normal organs/tissues such as liver, kidney, and muscle. Metabolite studies revealed that >50% of radioactivity in PC-3 tumors at 30 min postinjection represented intact [(18)F]3a. Prominent σ receptor-specific uptake of [(18)F]3a in prostate tumors and its subsequent clear visualization with PET imaging indicate potential utility for the diagnosis of prostate carcinoma.

  7. Specific, reversible binding of [18F]benperidol to baboon D2 receptors: PET evaluation of an improved 18F-labeled ligand.

    PubMed

    Moerlein, S M; Perlmutter, J S; Welch, M J

    1995-08-01

    [18F]Benperidol ([18F]BP), a positron-emitting analogue of the dopaminergic D2 antagonist benperidol, was evaluated as a radiopharmaceutical for use with positron emission tomography (PET). PET imaging of baboons after i.v. injection of [18F]BP indicated that the radiofluorinated ligand rapidly localized in vivo within dopaminergic receptor-rich cerebral tissues, and that selective disposition was retained for over 2 h. Pretreatment of an animal with unlabeled receptor-specific antagonists prior to injection of [18F]BP confirmed that the radioligand bound specifically to central D2 receptors in vivo, and not to S2 or D1 receptors. [18F]BP bound to D2 receptors in a reversible manner; unlabeled eticlopride displaced D2 receptor-bound [18F]BP in vivo. The radioligand was metabolized in the periphery to polar metabolites which are not expected to cross the blood-brain barrier. [18F]BP has advantages over other tracers as a radiopharmaceutical for PET study of central D2 receptor activity, and can be applied for noninvasive evaluation of the interaction of unlabeled drugs with central D2 receptor sites.

  8. Cell cycle dependence of boron uptake from two boron compounds used for clinical neutron capture therapy.

    PubMed

    Yoshida, F; Matsumura, A; Shibata, Y; Yamamoto, T; Nakauchi, H; Okumura, M; Nose, T

    2002-12-10

    In neutron capture therapy, it is important that the boron is selectively uptaken by tumor cells. In the present study, we used flow cytometry to sort the cells in the G0/G1 phase and those in the G2/M phase, and the boron concentration in each fraction was measured with inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectroscopy. The results revealed that sodium borocaptate and boronophenylalanine (BPA), were associated with higher rates of boron uptake in the G2/M than in the G0/G1 phase. However, the difference was more prominent in the case of BPA. The G2/M:G0/G1 ratio decreased as a function of exposure time in BPA containing culture medium, thereby indicating the cell cycle dependency of BPA uptake. Such heterogeneity of boron uptake by tumor cells should be considered for microdosimetry.

  9. Synthesis of 2'-deoxy-2'-[18F]fluoro-beta-D-arabinofuranosyl nucleosides, [18F]FAU, [18F]FMAU, [18F]FBAU and [18F]FIAU, as potential PET agents for imaging cellular proliferation. Synthesis of [18F]labelled FAU, FMAU, FBAU, FIAU.

    PubMed

    Mangner, Thomas J; Klecker, Raymond W; Anderson, Lawrence; Shields, Anthony F

    2003-04-01

    An efficient and reliable synthesis of 2'-deoxy-2'-[(18)F]fluoro-beta-D-arabinofuranosyl nucleosides is presented. Overall decay-corrected radiochemical yields of 35-45% of 4 analogs, FAU, FMAU, FBAU and FIAU are routinely obtained in >98% radiochemical purity and with specific activities of greater than 3 Ci/micromol (110 MBq/micromol) in a synthesis time of approximately 3 hours. When approximately 220 mCi (8.15 GBq) of starting [(18)F]fluoride is used, 25 -30 mCi (0.93 -1.11 GBq) of product (enough to image two patients sequentially) is typically obtained.

  10. [Affective dependency].

    PubMed

    Scantamburlo, G; Pitchot, W; Ansseau, M

    2013-01-01

    Affective dependency is characterized by emotional distress (insecure attachment) and dependency to another person with a low self-esteem and reassurance need. The paper proposes a reflection on the definition of emotional dependency and the confusion caused by various denominations. Overprotective and authoritarian parenting, cultural and socio-environmental factors may contribute to the development of dependent personality. Psychological epigenetic factors, such as early socio-emotional trauma could on neuronal circuits in prefronto-limbic regions that are essential for emotional behaviour.We also focus on the interrelations between dependent personality, domestic violence and addictions. The objective for the clinician is to propose a restoration of self-esteem and therapeutic strategies focused on autonomy.

  11. Opioid dependence

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    Introduction Dependence on opioids is a multifactorial condition involving genetic and psychosocial factors. There are three approaches to treating opioid dependence. Stabilisation is usually by opioid substitution treatments, and aims to ensure that the drug use becomes independent of mental state (such as craving and mood) and independent of circumstances (such as finance and physical location). The next stage is to withdraw (detox) from opioids. The final aim is relapse prevention. Methods and outcomes We conducted a systematic review and aimed to answer the following clinical questions: What are the effects of drug treatments for stabilisation (maintenance) in people with opioid dependence? What are the effects of drug treatments for withdrawal in people with opioid dependence? What are the effects of drug treatments for relapse prevention in people with opioid dependence? We searched: Medline, Embase, The Cochrane Library, and other important databases up to May 2008 (Clinical Evidence reviews are updated periodically; please check our website for the most up-to-date version of this review). We included harms alerts from relevant organisations such as the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) and the UK Medicines and Healthcare products Regulatory Agency (MHRA). Results We found 23 systematic reviews, RCTs, or observational studies that met our inclusion criteria. We performed a GRADE evaluation of the quality of evidence for interventions. Conclusions In this systematic review, we present information relating to the effectiveness and safety of the following interventions: buprenorphine; clonidine; lofexidine; methadone; naltrexone; and ultra-rapid withdrawal regimes. PMID:21696648

  12. Opioid dependence

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Introduction Dependence on opioids is a multifactorial condition involving genetic and psychosocial factors. There are three stages to treating opioid dependence. Stabilisation is usually by opioid substitution treatments, and aims to ensure that the drug use becomes independent of mental state (such as craving and mood) and independent of circumstances (such as finance and physical location). The next stage is to withdraw (detox) from opioids. The final stage is relapse prevention. This treatment process contributes to recovery of the individual, which also includes improved overall health and wellbeing, as well as engagement in society. Methods and outcomes We conducted a systematic review and aimed to answer the following clinical questions: What are the effects of drug treatments for stabilisation (maintenance) in people with opioid dependence? What are the effects of drug treatments for withdrawal in people with opioid dependence? What are the effects of drug treatments for relapse prevention in people with opioid dependence? We searched: Medline, Embase, The Cochrane Library, and other important databases up to March 2011 (Clinical Evidence reviews are updated periodically; please check our website for the most up-to-date version of this review). We included harms alerts from relevant organisations such as the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) and the UK Medicines and Healthcare products Regulatory Agency (MHRA). Results We found 26 systematic reviews, RCTs, or observational studies that met our inclusion criteria. We performed a GRADE evaluation of the quality of evidence for interventions. Conclusions In this systematic review, we present information relating to the effectiveness and safety of the following interventions: buprenorphine; clonidine; lofexidine; methadone; naltrexone; and ultra-rapid withdrawal regimens. PMID:21929827

  13. Phenibut dependence.

    PubMed

    Samokhvalov, Andriy V; Paton-Gay, C Lindsay; Balchand, Kam; Rehm, Jürgen

    2013-02-06

    Phenibut is a γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA) agonist designed and used as an anxiolytic in Russia. In Western countries, phenibut is not a registered medication but is available through online stores as a supplement. We present a case of a patient who used phenibut to self-medicate anxiety, insomnia and cravings for alcohol. While phenibut was helpful initially, the patient developed dependence including tolerance, significant withdrawal symptoms within 3-4 h of last use and failure to fulfil his roles at work and at home. He finally sought medical assistance in our addictions clinic. We have gradually, over the course of 9 weeks, substituted phenibut with baclofen, which has similar pharmacological properties, and then successfully tapered the patient off baclofen. This required approximately 10 mg of baclofen for each gram of phenibut.

  14. Phenibut dependence

    PubMed Central

    Samokhvalov, Andriy V; Paton-Gay, C Lindsay; Balchand, Kam; Rehm, Jürgen

    2013-01-01

    Phenibut is a γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA) agonist designed and used as an anxiolytic in Russia. In Western countries, phenibut is not a registered medication but is available through online stores as a supplement. We present a case of a patient who used phenibut to self-medicate anxiety, insomnia and cravings for alcohol. While phenibut was helpful initially, the patient developed dependence including tolerance, significant withdrawal symptoms within 3–4 h of last use and failure to fulfil his roles at work and at home. He finally sought medical assistance in our addictions clinic. We have gradually, over the course of 9 weeks, substituted phenibut with baclofen, which has similar pharmacological properties, and then successfully tapered the patient off baclofen. This required approximately 10 mg of baclofen for each gram of phenibut. PMID:23391959

  15. Dependency, Empathy, and Altruism.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Miller, Shirley Matile

    This study examined the relationship of dependency, empathy, and altruism. It was hypothesized that: (1) dependency would be related in a curvilinear manner to empathy, with children who are moderate in dependency scoring highest in empathy; (2) dependency would be positively related to visible altruism when such prosocial behavior results in…

  16. [Evaluating tobacco dependance].

    PubMed

    Etter, Jean-François

    2006-11-29

    Good science needs good measurement instruments, and this is also true for the study of tobacco dependence. In this paper, we present and criticize the most frequently used instrument, the Fagerström Test for Nicotine Dependence. This test, published 28 years ago, does not reflect current definitions of dependence. Several alternative approaches to the measurement of tobacco dependence are discussed, and more recent instruments are presented.

  17. Effects of Statistical Dependence.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1985-01-01

    Some research being carried on deals with concepts of dependence for multicomponent systems. Such dependence arises naturally in reliability work...because of common environmental factors and common sources of material. This article mainly explores modes of positive dependence for bivariate and

  18. Dependency Tree Annotation Software

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-11-01

    Features 5 Distribution List 12 iv List of Figures Fig. 1 Manually created dependency tree for the sentence, “The little cat ate the pie...with a dependency relation label. Fig. 1 Manually created dependency tree for the sentence, “The little cat ate the pie” The user can easily

  19. [Dependence disorders in psychopathology].

    PubMed

    Fernandez, L; Sztulman, H

    1999-01-01

    Research concerning the psychopathological aspects of dependence implicates a wide range of behaviors reassembled under the term of "dependence behaviors": sexual, medical, alcoholic and tobacco dependencies. Speech samples of dependent subjects show that encountering the object of dependence (product, element, ...) introduces a particular form of organized psychological processes. According to several authors, psychopathological dependence can be attributed to: early personality development; failures in the separation-individuation processes; disorders in mother-infant interactions; and a deficit in the psychological functioning of the subjects. For psychopathology, the dependence cannot be reduced to physiological dependence on the product but is understood rather in terms of a complex process indicative of either specific or non-specific suffering which is addressed by abused substance that represents a solution--the effects of which constitute the addictive process. Understanding this process requires an analysis of the psychopathological dependence from a triple meta-psychological viewpoint (topographical, dynamic, economic). Such analysis allows for a psychoanalytical theoretical interpretation of dependence based on three models: pleasure, narcissism and stress reduction. At the same time, the analysis extends the examination of psychopathological dependence towards issues concerning the body. Such body issues are critically placed between the biological and the psychological processes.

  20. Dependent Probability Spaces

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Edwards, William F.; Shiflett, Ray C.; Shultz, Harris

    2008-01-01

    The mathematical model used to describe independence between two events in probability has a non-intuitive consequence called dependent spaces. The paper begins with a very brief history of the development of probability, then defines dependent spaces, and reviews what is known about finite spaces with uniform probability. The study of finite…

  1. Interactive Visualization of Dependencies

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moreno, Camilo Arango; Bischof, Walter F.; Hoover, H. James

    2012-01-01

    We present an interactive tool for browsing course requisites as a case study of dependency visualization. This tool uses multiple interactive visualizations to allow the user to explore the dependencies between courses. A usability study revealed that the proposed browser provides significant advantages over traditional methods, in terms of…

  2. Decisions Concerning Directional Dependence

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    von Eye, Alexander; DeShon, Richard P.

    2012-01-01

    In this rejoinder, von Eye and DeShon discuss the decision strategies proposed in their original article ("Directional Dependence in Developmental Research," this issue), as well as the ones proposed by the authors of the commentary (Pornprasertmanit and Little, "Determining Directional Dependency in Causal Associations," this issue). In addition,…

  3. Adam Smith and dependency.

    PubMed

    Ozler, Sule

    2012-06-01

    The focus of this paper is the works and life of Adam Smith, who is widely recognized as the father and founder of contemporary economics. Latent content analysis is applied to his seminal text in economics, An Inquiry into the Nature and Causes of the Wealth of Nations (1776). The results reveal that Smith considers dependence on others a problem and sees the solution to this problem in impersonalized interdependence. In addition, his views on social dependency and personal dependency, reflected in his Lectures on Jurisprudence (1963) and The Theory of Moral Sentiments (1759), are analyzed. This analysis suggests a central tension between dependence and independence in Smith's writings. The personal dependency patterns he exhibited in his life, which also suggest a tension between dependence and independence, are identified through a reading of his biographies. Based on insights from psychoanalytic literature, this paper proposes that developing the ideas in the Wealth of Nations was part of Smith's creative solution to this tension. In particular, his solution to one individual's dependence on another was through a system of impersonalized interdependence. In other words, Smith defended against his personal dependence through his economic theorizing.

  4. High Performance, Dependable Multiprocessor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ramos, Jeremy; Samson, John R.; Troxel, Ian; Subramaniyan, Rajagopal; Jacobs, Adam; Greco, James; Cieslewski, Grzegorz; Curreri, John; Fischer, Michael; Grobelny, Eric; George, Alan; Aggarwal, Vikas; Patel, Minesh; Some, Raphael

    2006-01-01

    With the ever increasing demand for higher bandwidth and processing capacity of today's space exploration, space science, and defense missions, the ability to efficiently apply commercial-off-the-shelf (COTS) processors for on-board computing is now a critical need. In response to this need, NASA's New Millennium Program office has commissioned the development of Dependable Multiprocessor (DM) technology for use in payload and robotic missions. The Dependable Multiprocessor technology is a COTS-based, power efficient, high performance, highly dependable, fault tolerant cluster computer. To date, Honeywell has successfully demonstrated a TRL4 prototype of the Dependable Multiprocessor [I], and is now working on the development of a TRLS prototype. For the present effort Honeywell has teamed up with the University of Florida's High-performance Computing and Simulation (HCS) Lab, and together the team has demonstrated major elements of the Dependable Multiprocessor TRLS system.

  5. Visual dependence and BPPV.

    PubMed

    Agarwal, K; Bronstein, A M; Faldon, M E; Mandalà, M; Murray, K; Silove, Y

    2012-06-01

    The increased visual dependence noted in some vestibular patients may be secondary to their vertigo. We examine whether a single, brief vertigo attack, such as in benign paroxysmal positional vertigo (BPPV), modifies visual dependency. Visual dependency was measured before and after the Hallpike manoeuvre with (a) the Rod and Frame and the Rod and Disc techniques whilst seated and (b) the postural sway induced by visual roll-motion stimulation. Three subject groups were studied: 20 patients with BPPV (history and positive Hallpike manoeuvre; PosH group), 20 control patients (history of BPPV but negative Hallpike manoeuvre; NegH group) and 20 normal controls. Our findings show that while both patient groups showed enhanced visual dependency, the PosH and the normal control group decreased visual dependency on repetition of the visual tasks after the Hallpike manoeuvre. NegH patients differed from PosH patients in that their high visual dependency did not diminish on repetition of the visual stimuli; they scored higher on the situational characteristic questionnaire ('visual vertigo' symptoms) and showed higher incidence of migraine. We conclude that long term vestibular symptoms increase visual dependence but a single BPPV attack does not increase it further. Repetitive visual motion stimulation induces adaptation in visual dependence in peripheral vestibular disorders such as BPPV. A positional form of vestibular migraine may underlie the symptoms of some patients with a history of BPPV but negative Hallpike manoeuvre. The finding that they have non adaptable increased visual dependency may explain visuo-vestibular symptoms in this group and, perhaps more widely, in patients with migraine.

  6. Chemical dependence - resources

    MedlinePlus

    Substance use - resources, Drug abuse - resources; Resources - chemical dependence ... National Institute on Drug Abuse -- www.drugabuse.gov Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration -- www.samhsa.gov

  7. Dependent personality disorder

    MedlinePlus

    American Psychiatric Association. Dependent personality disorder. Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders: DSM-5 . 5th ed. Arlington, VA: American Psychiatric Publishing. 2013;675-678. Blais MA, Smallwood ...

  8. Tilidine abuse and dependence.

    PubMed

    Trojan, A; Beil, H W

    1978-11-01

    Tilidine (Valoron) is a new strong analgesic which was introduced into the market in West Germany in 1970. In February 1978 tilidine was placed under the regulations of the German Narcotics Act because it had rapidly become an easily acquired substitute for opiates on the drug scene. Cases have become known where tilidine dependence developed during the treatment of pain in patients without any preceding addiction to other drugs. The relevant literature on tilidine is reviewed in regard to pharmacological, epidemiological and clinical aspects of tilidine dependence and abuse.

  9. Dependability and performability analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Trivedi, Kishor S.; Ciardo, Gianfranco; Malhotra, Manish; Sahner, Robin A.

    1993-01-01

    Several practical issues regarding specifications and solution of dependability and performability models are discussed. Model types with and without rewards are compared. Continuous-time Markov chains (CTMC's) are compared with (continuous-time) Markov reward models (MRM's) and generalized stochastic Petri nets (GSPN's) are compared with stochastic reward nets (SRN's). It is shown that reward-based models could lead to more concise model specifications and solution of a variety of new measures. With respect to the solution of dependability and performability models, three practical issues were identified: largeness, stiffness, and non-exponentiality, and a variety of approaches are discussed to deal with them, including some of the latest research efforts.

  10. Reference-Dependent Sympathy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Small, Deborah A.

    2010-01-01

    Natural disasters and other traumatic events often draw a greater charitable response than do ongoing misfortunes, even those that may cause even more widespread misery, such as famine or malaria. Why is the response disproportionate to need? The notion of reference dependence critical to Prospect Theory (Kahneman & Tversky, 1979) maintains that…

  11. ARL Arabic Dependency Treebank

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2016-02-10

    facilitate additional Arabic language processing research by the greater community. 15. SUBJECT TERMS Arabic, treebank, parsing 16. SECURITY...linguistics, and, by releasing this dependency treebank back to them for redistribution, we hope to facilitate Arabic natural language processing...format with one or more blank lines between sentences. All files are UTF-8 encoded. An example is presented below. Approved for public release

  12. Evolution of Metabolic Dependency

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shou, Wenying

    Microbes are often found to have lost their ability to make essential metabolites (auxotrophs) and instead rely on other individuals for these metabolites. How might metabolic dependency evolve to be so common? When microbes live inside a host (endosymbionts), amply host metabolites support auxotrophic endosymbionts. If the host transmits only a small number of endosymbionts to its offspring, then auxotrophic endosymbionts can rise to high frequency simply by chance. On the other hand, auxotrophs have also been observed in abundant free-living bacteria found in ocean water where nutrient supply is low. How might auxotrophs rise to an appreciable frequency in a large population when nutrient supply is low? We have found commonly-encountered conditions that facilitate the evolution of metabolic dependency. Metabolic interactions can in turn shape spatial organization of microbial communities (Momeni et al. (2013) eLife 2, 00230; Momeni et al. (2013) eLife 2, 00960; Estrela and Brown (2013) PLoS Comput Biol 9, e1003398; Muller et al. (2014) PNAS 111, 1037-1042). Rapid evolution of metabolic dependency can contribute to the complexity of microbial communities. Evolution of metabolic dependency.

  13. Time Dependent Fluids

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Collyer, A. A.

    1974-01-01

    Discusses the flow characteristics of thixotropic and negative thixotropic fluids; various theories underlying the thixotropic behavior; and thixotropic phenomena exhibited in drilling muds, commercial paints, pastes, and greases. Inconsistencies in the terminology used to label time dependent effects are revealed. (CC)

  14. [Prevention of alcohol dependence].

    PubMed

    Trova, A C; Paparrigopoulos, Th; Liappas, I; Ginieri-Coccossis, M

    2015-01-01

    With the exception of cardiovascular diseases, no other medical condition causes more serious dysfunction or premature deaths than alcohol-related problems. Research results indicate that alcohol dependent individuals present an exceptionally poor level of quality of life. This is an outcome that highlights the necessity of planning and implementing preventive interventions on biological, psychological or social level, to be provided to individuals who make alcohol abuse, as well as to their families. Preventive interventions can be considered on three levels of prevention: (a) primary prevention, which is focused on the protection of healthy individuals from alcohol abuse and dependence, and may be provided on a universal, selective or indicated level, (b) secondary prevention, which aims at the prevention of deterioration regarding alcoholic dependence and relapse, in the cases of individuals already diagnosed with the condition and (c) tertiary prevention, which is focused at minimizing deterioration of functioning in chronically sufferers from alcoholic dependence. The term "quaternary prevention" can be used for the prevention of relapse. As for primary prevention, interventions focus on assessing the risk of falling into problematic use, enhancing protective factors and providing information and health education in general. These interventions can be delivered in schools or in places of work and recreation for young people. In this context, various programs have been applied in different countries, including Greece with positive results (Preventure, Alcolocks, LST, SFP, Alcohol Ignition Interlock Device). Secondary prevention includes counseling and structured help with the delivery of programs in schools and in high risk groups for alcohol dependence (SAP, LST). These programs aim at the development of alcohol refusal skills and behaviors, the adoption of models of behaviors resisting alcohol use, as well as reinforcement of general social skills. In the

  15. Myofilament length dependent activation.

    PubMed

    de Tombe, Pieter P; Mateja, Ryan D; Tachampa, Kittipong; Ait Mou, Younss; Farman, Gerrie P; Irving, Thomas C

    2010-05-01

    The Frank-Starling law of the heart describes the interrelationship between end-diastolic volume and cardiac ejection volume, a regulatory system that operates on a beat-to-beat basis. The main cellular mechanism that underlies this phenomenon is an increase in the responsiveness of cardiac myofilaments to activating Ca(2+) ions at a longer sarcomere length, commonly referred to as myofilament length-dependent activation. This review focuses on what molecular mechanisms may underlie myofilament length dependency. Specifically, the roles of inter-filament spacing, thick and thin filament based regulation, as well as sarcomeric regulatory proteins are discussed. Although the "Frank-Starling law of the heart" constitutes a fundamental cardiac property that has been appreciated for well over a century, it is still not known in muscle how the contractile apparatus transduces the information concerning sarcomere length to modulate ventricular pressure development.

  16. Comparing dependent robust correlations.

    PubMed

    Wilcox, Rand R

    2016-11-01

    Let r1 and r2 be two dependent estimates of Pearson's correlation. There is a substantial literature on testing H0  : ρ1  = ρ2 , the hypothesis that the population correlation coefficients are equal. However, it is well known that Pearson's correlation is not robust. Even a single outlier can have a substantial impact on Pearson's correlation, resulting in a misleading understanding about the strength of the association among the bulk of the points. A way of mitigating this concern is to use a correlation coefficient that guards against outliers, many of which have been proposed. But apparently there are no results on how to compare dependent robust correlation coefficients when there is heteroscedasicity. Extant results suggest that a basic percentile bootstrap will perform reasonably well. This paper reports simulation results indicating the extent to which this is true when using Spearman's rho, a Winsorized correlation or a skipped correlation.

  17. Myofilament length dependent activation

    SciTech Connect

    de Tombe, Pieter P.; Mateja, Ryan D.; Tachampa, Kittipong; Mou, Younss Ait; Farman, Gerrie P.; Irving, Thomas C.

    2010-05-25

    The Frank-Starling law of the heart describes the interrelationship between end-diastolic volume and cardiac ejection volume, a regulatory system that operates on a beat-to-beat basis. The main cellular mechanism that underlies this phenomenon is an increase in the responsiveness of cardiac myofilaments to activating Ca{sup 2+} ions at a longer sarcomere length, commonly referred to as myofilament length-dependent activation. This review focuses on what molecular mechanisms may underlie myofilament length dependency. Specifically, the roles of inter-filament spacing, thick and thin filament based regulation, as well as sarcomeric regulatory proteins are discussed. Although the 'Frank-Starling law of the heart' constitutes a fundamental cardiac property that has been appreciated for well over a century, it is still not known in muscle how the contractile apparatus transduces the information concerning sarcomere length to modulate ventricular pressure development.

  18. Dependence, Risk, and Vulnerability.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1981-06-01

    B2 has a great deal. The measurement strategy outlined here will gauge A’s import depen- dence on B2 as greater than A’s import dependence on B1 . One...pp 25 Doctrines: One More Time." 43 pp., Jan 1960. Glee. Devid V.; Hsoi. Ih-Chses: Nu,n, Welter A. AD AOIl 192 PP 283 mnd Penn, David A.. "A Clas of

  19. Why Density Dependent Propulsion?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Robertson, Glen A.

    2011-01-01

    In 2004 Khoury and Weltman produced a density dependent cosmology theory they call the Chameleon, as at its nature, it is hidden within known physics. The Chameleon theory has implications to dark matter/energy with universe acceleration properties, which implies a new force mechanism with ties to the far and local density environment. In this paper, the Chameleon Density Model is discussed in terms of propulsion toward new propellant-less engineering methods.

  20. Is extinction age dependent?

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Doran, N.A.; Arnold, A.J.; Parker, W.C.; Huffer, F.W.

    2006-01-01

    Age-dependent extinction is an observation with important biological implications. Van Valen's Red Queen hypothesis triggered three decades of research testing its primary implication: that age is independent of extinction. In contrast to this, later studies with species-level data have indicated the possible presence of age dependence. Since the formulation of the Red Queen hypothesis, more powerful tests of survivorship models have been developed. This is the first report of the application of the Cox Proportional Hazards model to paleontological data. Planktonic foraminiferal morphospecies allow the taxonomic and precise stratigraphic resolution necessary for the Cox model. As a whole, planktonic foraminiferal morphospecies clearly show age-dependent extinction. In particular, the effect is attributable to the presence of shorter-ranged species (range < 4 myr) following extinction events. These shorter-ranged species also possess tests with unique morphological architecture. The morphological differences are probably epiphenomena of underlying developmental and heterochronic processes of shorter-ranged species that survived various extinction events. Extinction survivors carry developmental and morphological characteristics into postextinction recovery times, and this sets them apart from species populations established independently of extinction events. Copyright ?? 2006, SEPM (Society for Sedimentary Geology).

  1. Time dependent holography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Das, Diptarka

    One of the most important results emerging from string theory is the gauge gravity duality (AdS/CFT correspondence) which tells us that certain problems in particular gravitational backgrounds can be exactly mapped to a particular dual gauge theory a quantum theory very similar to the one explaining the interactions between fundamental subatomic particles. The chief merit of the duality is that a difficult problem in one theory can be mapped to a simpler and solvable problem in the other theory. The duality can be used both ways. Most of the current theoretical framework is suited to study equilibrium systems, or systems where time dependence is at most adiabatic. However in the real world, systems are almost always out of equilibrium. Generically these scenarios are described by quenches, where a parameter of the theory is made time dependent. In this dissertation I describe some of the work done in the context of studying quantum quench using the AdS/CFT correspondence. We recover certain universal scaling type of behavior as the quenching is done through a quantum critical point. Another question that has been explored in the dissertation is time dependence of the gravity theory. Present cosmological observations indicate that our universe is accelerating and is described by a spacetime called de-Sitter(dS). In 2011 there had been a speculation over a possible duality between de-Sitter gravity and a particular field theory (Euclidean SP(N) CFT). However a concrete realization of this proposition was still lacking. Here we explicitly derive the dS/CFT duality using well known methods in field theory. We discovered that the time dimension emerges naturally in the derivation. We also describe further applications and extensions of dS/CFT. KEYWORDS: Holography, AdS/CFT correspondence, Quantum Quench, dS/CFT correspondence, Chaos.

  2. Treatment of nicotine dependence.

    PubMed

    Haxby, D G

    1995-02-01

    Drug and nondrug interventions used in treating nicotine dependence are reviewed. Tobacco use is the leading preventable cause of death in the United States. Risks of smoking-related disease and death decline sharply when smokers quit, but 26% of Americans continue to smoke. Most smokers find it extremely difficult to quit smoking because of their nicotine addiction. Nonpharmacologic interventions used to promote smoking cessation include behavioral therapy, setting a specific date for quitting, receiving advice to quit from a health care professional, follow-up visits to review progress, self-help approaches, group counseling, filtration devices, hypnosis, and acupuncture. The efficacy of these approaches ranges from substantial to almost nil. The only pharmacologic agent with FDA-approved labeling for use in smoking-cessation therapy is nicotine. When used in conjunction with appropriate nonpharmacologic interventions, nicotine-replacement therapy roughly doubles the rate of quitting obtained with placebo. Nicotine-replacement therapies consist of nicotine transdermal (patch) systems and nicotine chewing gum. The nicotine patch is the first-line replacement therapy because it is effective when accompanied by only minimal (as opposed to more intensive) nonpharmacologic interventions and because it is easier to use and comply with than gum. Clonidine, antidepressants, and buspirone require further study to determine what role, if any, they should play in the treatment of nicotine dependence. The stages of smoking cessation are precontemplation, contemplation, action, and maintenance; interventions are selected on the basis of the stage the smoker is in. Nicotine dependence is difficult to treat, but there are aids that boost a smoker's chances of quitting. Nicotine patches and chewing gum offer the most effective pharmacologic options, especially when combined with behavioral interventions and counseling.

  3. Dependent rational providers.

    PubMed

    Brothers, Kyle B

    2011-04-01

    Provider claims to conscientious objection have generated a great deal of heated debate in recent years. However, the conflicts that arise when providers make claims to the "conscience" are only a subset of the more fundamental challenges that arise in health care practice when patients and providers come into conflict. In this piece, the author provides an account of patient-provider conflict from within the moral tradition of St. Thomas Aquinas. He argues that the practice of health care providers should be understood as a form of practical reasoning and that this practical reasoning must necessarily incorporate both "moral" and "professional" commitments. In order to understand how the practical reasoning of provider should account for the needs and commitments of the patient and vice versa, he explores the account of dependence provided by Alasdair MacIntyre in his book Dependent Rational Animals. MacIntyre argues that St. Thomas' account of practical reasoning should be extended and adapted to account for the embodied vulnerability of all humans. In light of this insight, providers must view patients not only as the subjects of their moral reflection but also as fellow humans upon whom the provider depends for feedback on the effectiveness and relevance of her practical reasoning. The author argues that this account precludes responsive providers from adopting either moral or professional conclusions on the appropriateness of interventions outside the individual circumstances that arise in particular situations. The adoption of this orientation toward patients will neither eradicate provider-patient conflict nor compel providers to perform interventions to which they object. But this account does require that providers attend meaningfully to the suffering of patients and seek feedback on whether their intervention has effectively addressed that suffering.

  4. Portage and Path Dependence*

    PubMed Central

    Bleakley, Hoyt; Lin, Jeffrey

    2012-01-01

    We examine portage sites in the U.S. South, Mid-Atlantic, and Midwest, including those on the fall line, a geomorphological feature in the southeastern U.S. marking the final rapids on rivers before the ocean. Historically, waterborne transport of goods required portage around the falls at these points, while some falls provided water power during early industrialization. These factors attracted commerce and manufacturing. Although these original advantages have long since been made obsolete, we document the continuing importance of these portage sites over time. We interpret these results as path dependence and contrast explanations based on sunk costs interacting with decreasing versus increasing returns to scale. PMID:23935217

  5. Excitability dependent pattern formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prabhakara, Kaumudi; Gholami, Azam; Bodenschatz, Eberhard

    2014-03-01

    On starvation, the amoebae Dictyostelium discoideum emit the chemo-attractant cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP) at specific frequencies. The neighboring amoebae sense cAMP through membrane receptors and produce their own cAMP. Soon the cells synchronize and move via chemotaxis along the gradient of cAMP. The response of the amoebae to the emission of cAMP is seen as spiral waves or target patterns under a dark field microscope. The causal reasons for the selection of one or the other patterns are still unclear. Here we present a possible explanation based on excitability. The excitability of the amoebae depends on the starvation time because the gene expression changes with starvation. Cells starved for longer times are more excitable. In this work, we mix cells of different excitabilities to study the dependence of the emergent patterns on the excitability. Preliminary results show a transition from spirals to target patterns for specific excitabilities. A phase map of the patterns for different combinations of excitability and number densities is obtained. We compare our findings with numerical simulations of existing theoretical models.

  6. Velocity dependant splash behaviour

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hamlett, C. A. E.; Shirtcliffe, N. J.; McHale, G.; Ahn, S.; Doerr, S. H.; Bryant, R.; Newton, M. I.

    2012-04-01

    Extreme soil water repellency can occur in nature via condensation of volatile organic compounds released during wildfires and can lead to increased erosion rate. Such extreme water repellent soil can be classified as superhydrophobic and shares similar chemical and topographical features to specifically designed superhydrophobic surfaces. Previous studies using high speed videography to investigate single droplet impact behaviour on artificial superhydrophobic have revealed three distinct modes of splash behaviour (rebound, pinned and fragmentation) which are dependent on the impact velocity of the droplet. In our studies, using high-speed videography, we show that such splash behaviour can be replicated on fixed 'model' water repellent soils (hydrophobic glass beads/particles). We show that the type of splash behaviour is dependent on both the size and chemical nature of the fixed particles. The particle shape also influences the splash behaviour as shown by drop impact experiments on fixed sand samples. We have also studied soil samples, as collected from the field, which shows that the type of droplet splash behaviour can lead to enhanced soil particle transport.

  7. Spatial dependence of thrombolysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lakshmanan, Hari Hara Sudhan; Zilberman-Rudenko, Jevgenia; McCarty, Owen; Maddala, Jeevan

    2016-11-01

    Thrombolysis under hemodynamic conditions is affected by both transport processes and reactions, thus profoundly dependent on the geometry of blood vessels or vasculature. Although thrombosis has long been observed clinically, a systematic and quantitative understanding has not been established in complex geometries such as vasculature, where various factors would affect thrombogenesis and its stability. A thrombus's location determines the effect of hydrodynamic forces on it and rate of tPA diffusion, that would result in either embolization or formation of micro-aggregates. Preliminary experiments have shown that thrombolysis is not uniform across an entire network with different locations lysing at different rates. Numerical simulations of thrombolysis under hemodynamics in a microfluidic geometry such as a ladder network with a focus on parameters such as reaction rate, shear gradient, velocity and diffusion established the lysis's dependence on geometry. Finite element simulations of blood flow coupled with reactions have been performed in COMSOL and the results were used to develop quantifiable metrics for thrombolysis in a complex geometry.

  8. [Frequency dependance of compliance].

    PubMed

    Gayrard, P

    1975-01-01

    Resistance of peripheral or "small" airways is only a small part of the total pulmonary resistance (Raw). Even considerable obstruction in these airways will have little effect on total resistance. Conversely this will lead to inequality in the time constants of units in parallel, and dynamic lung compliance (C dyn) shall fall as respiratory frequence increases. C dyn is measured from simultaneous recordings of transpulmonary pressure (esophageal balloon) and volume obtained from a volume displacement plethysmograph. If Raw and static compliance are found to be normal, the frequency dependance of compliance will result from peripheral airway obstruction only. Early stages of chronic airway obstruction can be established by this method. However this appear not suitable for wide-scale studies.

  9. Solar Diameter Latitude Dependence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Emilio, M.; Leister, N. V.; Laclare, F.

    The observing programs of the Sun for determining the fundamental system of reference enable, as a by-product, to measure the apparent solar diameter (Poppe, P.C.R. et al. 1996; Leister et al. 1996; Laclare et al. 1991). The diameter obtained at the Calern Observatory (φ = 43-circ 44' 55''.9; λ = -0h 27m 42s.44) and at Abrahao de Moraes Observatory (OAM) (φ = -23-circ 00'6''.0; λ = 3h 07m 52s.22) was analyzed searching for periodicity evidences. For this we utilized the temporal methods CLEAN and CLEANEST. The analysis in function of heliographic latitude shows a dependence that may be correlated to mode of pulsation non-radial gravity. A discussion is made in terms of physical parameters like temperature luminosity and magnetic field involving the solar radius (Emilio M. 1997; Laclare et al. 1996).

  10. Comparison of the biological effects of {sup 18}F at different intracellular levels

    SciTech Connect

    Kashino, Genro; Hayashi, Kazutaka; Douhara, Kazumasa; Kobashigawa, Shinko; Mori, Hiromu

    2014-11-07

    Highlights: • We estimated the inductions of DNA DSB in cell treated with {sup 18}F-FDG. • We found that inductions of DNA DSB are dependent on accumulation of {sup 18}F in cell. • Accumulation of {sup 18}F in cell may be indispensable for risk estimation of PET. - Abstract: We herein examined the biological effects of cells treated with {sup 18}F labeled drugs for positron emission tomography (PET). The relationship between the intracellular distribution of {sup 18}F and levels of damaged DNA has yet to be clarified in detail. We used culture cells (Chinese Hamster Ovary cells) treated with two types of {sup 18}F labeled drugs, fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) and fluorine ion (HF). FDG efficiently accumulated in cells, whereas HF did not. To examine the induction of DNA double strand breaks (DSB), we measured the number of foci for 53BP1 that formed at the site of DNA DSB. The results revealed that although radioactivity levels were the same, the induction of 53BP1 foci was stronger in cells treated with {sup 18}F-FDG than in those treated with {sup 18}F-HF. The clonogenic survival of cells was significantly lower with {sup 18}F-FDG than with {sup 18}F-HF. We concluded that the efficient accumulation of {sup 18}F in cells led to stronger biological effects due to more severe cellular lethality via the induction of DNA DSB.

  11. Density dependent neurodynamics.

    PubMed

    Halnes, Geir; Liljenström, Hans; Arhem, Peter

    2007-01-01

    The dynamics of a neural network depends on density parameters at (at least) two different levels: the subcellular density of ion channels in single neurons, and the density of cells and synapses at a network level. For the Frankenhaeuser-Huxley (FH) neural model, the density of sodium (Na) and potassium (K) channels determines the behaviour of a single neuron when exposed to an external stimulus. The features of the onset of single neuron oscillations vary qualitatively among different regions in the channel density plane. At a network level, the density of neurons is reflected in the global connectivity. We study the relation between the two density levels in a network of oscillatory FH neurons, by qualitatively distinguishing between three regions, where the mean network activity is (1) spiking, (2) oscillating with enveloped frequencies, and (3) bursting, respectively. We demonstrate that the global activity can be shifted between regions by changing either the density of ion channels at the subcellular level, or the connectivity at the network level, suggesting that different underlying mechanisms can explain similar global phenomena. Finally, we model a possible effect of anaesthesia by blocking specific inhibitory ion channels.

  12. Cyclin-dependent kinases

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Summary Cyclin-dependent kinases (CDKs) are protein kinases characterized by needing a separate subunit - a cyclin - that provides domains essential for enzymatic activity. CDKs play important roles in the control of cell division and modulate transcription in response to several extra- and intracellular cues. The evolutionary expansion of the CDK family in mammals led to the division of CDKs into three cell-cycle-related subfamilies (Cdk1, Cdk4 and Cdk5) and five transcriptional subfamilies (Cdk7, Cdk8, Cdk9, Cdk11 and Cdk20). Unlike the prototypical Cdc28 kinase of budding yeast, most of these CDKs bind one or a few cyclins, consistent with functional specialization during evolution. This review summarizes how, although CDKs are traditionally separated into cell-cycle or transcriptional CDKs, these activities are frequently combined in many family members. Not surprisingly, deregulation of this family of proteins is a hallmark of several diseases, including cancer, and drug-targeted inhibition of specific members has generated very encouraging results in clinical trials. PMID:25180339

  13. Pharmacotherapies for cannabis dependence

    PubMed Central

    Marshall, Kushani; Gowing, Linda; Ali, Robert; Le Foll, Bernard

    2015-01-01

    Background Cannabis is the most prevalent illicit drug in the world. Demand for treatment of cannabis use disorders is increasing. There are currently no pharmacotherapies approved for treatment of cannabis use disorders. Objectives To assess the effectiveness and safety of pharmacotherapies as compared with each other, placebo or supportive care for reducing symptoms of cannabis withdrawal and promoting cessation or reduction of cannabis use. Search methods We searched the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL) (to 4 March 2014), MEDLINE (to week 3 February 2014), EMBASE (to 3 March 2014) and PsycINFO (to week 4 February 2014). We also searched reference lists of articles, electronic sources of ongoing trials and conference proceedings, and contacted selected researchers active in the area. Selection criteria Randomised and quasi-randomised controlled trials involving the use of medications to reduce the symptoms and signs of cannabis withdrawal or to promote cessation or reduction of cannabis use, or both, in comparison with other medications, placebo or no medication (supportive care) in participants diagnosed as cannabis dependent or who were likely to be dependent. Data collection and analysis We used standard methodological procedures expected by The Cochrane Collaboration. Two review authors assessed studies for inclusion and extracted data. All review authors confirmed the inclusion decisions and the overall process. Main results We included 14 randomised controlled trials involving 958 participants. For 10 studies the average age was 33 years; two studies targeted young people; and age data were not available for two studies. Approximately 80% of study participants were male. The studies were at low risk of selection, performance, detection and selective outcome reporting bias. Three studies were at risk of attrition bias. All studies involved comparison of active medication and placebo. The medications included preparations containing

  14. Field dependence and distraction revisited.

    PubMed

    Blowers, G H

    1976-02-01

    An attempt is made to replicate a former study of the relationship of field dependence as measured by rod-and-frame errors to distraction in an RT paradigm. For two groups of Ss (n = 14) who differed specifically in their dependence upon the tilted frame and were classified as frame-dependent and frame-independent, no relationship of frame (or field) dependence to susceptibility to distraction was found.

  15. Texting Dependence, iPod Dependence, and Delay Discounting.

    PubMed

    Ferraro, F Richard; Weatherly, Jeffrey N

    2016-01-01

    We gave 127 undergraduates questionnaires about their iPod and texting dependence and 2 hypothetical delay discounting scenarios related to free downloaded songs and free texting for life. Using regression analyses we found that when iPod dependence was the dependent variable, Text2-excessive use, Text4-psychological and behavioral symptoms, iPod2-excessive use, and iPod3-relationship disruption were significant predictors of discounting. When texting dependence was the dependent variable, Text4-psychological and behavioral symptoms and iPod3-relationship disruption were significant predictors of discounting. These are the first data to show that delay discounting relates to certain aspects of social media, namely iPod and texting dependence. These data also show that across these 2 dependencies, both psychological and behavioral symptoms and relationship disruptions are affected.

  16. Dextropropoxyphene dependence: a cautionary note.

    PubMed

    Edwin, T; Nammalvar, N; Ramanujam, V

    2001-05-01

    Drug abuse and dependence is common in patients with chronic pain. Of concern are the opioid analgesics prescribed commonly, and its availability over the counter. Often the cause of dependence is iatrogenic. We report a case of a patient with chronic back pain and dextropropoxyphene dependence. With chronic pain being a significant risk factor for drug dependence, increased caution by the prescribing physicians is advisable while treating such patients using opioid analgesics. The dangers of opioid dependence, associated risk factors, and issues regarding the prescription of such medication are discussed to aid prevention of prescription drug abuse seen in general practice.

  17. Dependency Grammar: Classification and Exploration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Debusmann, Ralph; Kuhlmann, Marco

    Syntactic representations based on word-to-word dependencies have a long tradition in descriptive linguistics [29]. In recent years, they have also become increasingly used in computational tasks, such as information extraction [5], machine translation [43], and parsing [42]. Among the purported advantages of dependency over phrase structure representations are conciseness, intuitive appeal, and closeness to semantic representations such as predicate-argument structures. On the more practical side, dependency representations are attractive due to the increasing availability of large corpora of dependency analyses, such as the Prague Dependency Treebank [19].

  18. Agitated Depression in Substance Dependence

    PubMed Central

    Leventhal, Adam M.; Gelernter, Joel; Oslin, David; Anton, Raymond F.; Farrer, Lindsay A.

    2011-01-01

    Background Depression with psychomotor agitation (PMA; “agitated depression”) is a putative psychiatric phenotype that appears to associate with some forms of substance dependence. However, it is unclear whether such relationships extend across different substances and independent (I-MDE) versus substance-induced (SI-MDE) subtypes of major depressive episodes. Method We examined whether lifetime depression with (vs. without) PMA was associated with lifetime substance dependence across individuals with lifetime: (1) I-MDE only (n = 575); and (2) SI-MDE only (n = 1683). Data were pooled from several family and genetic studies of substance dependence in which participants received identical structured interviews to diagnose DSM-IV mental disorders. Results In I-MDE, PMA was significantly associated with alcohol, cocaine, opioid, other drug (hallucinogen, inhalant, speed-ball), and sedative dependence. After controlling for demographic and clinical co-factors, PMA's relationship to dependence on opioids, other drugs, and sedatives remained significant, but not its relationship to alcohol or cocaine. In SI-MDE, PMA was significantly associated with alcohol, cocaine, opioid, and other drug dependence. After adjusting for co-factors, associations remained significant for dependence on cocaine and opioids, but not alcohol or other drugs. Relationships between PMA and opioid dependence were stronger in I-MDE than SI-MDE. Depression subtype (I-MDE vs. SI-MDE) did not moderate relations between PMA and non-opioid forms of substance dependence. Conclusions Agitated depression associates with certain forms of substance dependence, particularly opioid dependence. MDE subtype did not alter most PMA-dependence associations, which suggests that the mechanisms underlying this comorbidity are complex and potentially bidirectional. PMID:21277711

  19. A rare case modafinil dependence.

    PubMed

    Krishnan, Raman; Chary, Krishnan Vengadaragava

    2015-01-01

    Modafinil, a non-amphetamine psychostimulant, is indicated for narcolepsy, shift work sleep disorder and severe obstructive sleep apnea syndrome. Modafinil is prescribed at the dose of 100 mg once in a day or as two doses, 12 h apart in a day. It has also been found that it reduces cocaine dependence and withdrawal phenomenon. Modafinil is claimed to have very low liability for abuse and dependence. Here we report a rare case of modafinil dependence.

  20. Spike-timing-dependent synaptic plasticity depends on dendritic location

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Froemke, Robert C.; Poo, Mu-ming; Dan, Yang

    2005-03-01

    In the neocortex, each neuron receives thousands of synaptic inputs distributed across an extensive dendritic tree. Although postsynaptic processing of each input is known to depend on its dendritic location, it is unclear whether activity-dependent synaptic modification is also location-dependent. Here we report that both the magnitude and the temporal specificity of spike-timing-dependent synaptic modification vary along the apical dendrite of rat cortical layer 2/3 pyramidal neurons. At the distal dendrite, the magnitude of long-term potentiation is smaller, and the window of pre-/postsynaptic spike interval for long-term depression (LTD) is broader. The spike-timing window for LTD correlates with the window of action potential-induced suppression of NMDA (N-methyl-D-aspartate) receptors; this correlation applies to both their dendritic location-dependence and pharmacological properties. Presynaptic stimulation with partial blockade of NMDA receptors induced LTD and occluded further induction of spike-timing-dependent LTD, suggesting that NMDA receptor suppression underlies LTD induction. Computer simulation studies showed that the dendritic inhomogeneity of spike-timing-dependent synaptic modification leads to differential input selection at distal and proximal dendrites according to the temporal characteristics of presynaptic spike trains. Such location-dependent tuning of inputs, together with the dendritic heterogeneity of postsynaptic processing, could enhance the computational capacity of cortical pyramidal neurons.

  1. The dependency paradox in close relationships: accepting dependence promotes independence.

    PubMed

    Feeney, Brooke C

    2007-02-01

    Using multiple methods, this investigation tested the hypothesis that a close relationship partner's acceptance of dependence when needed (e.g., sensitive responsiveness to distress cues) is associated with less dependence, more autonomous functioning, and more self-sufficiency (as opposed to more dependence) on the part of the supported individual. In two studies, measures of acceptance of dependency needs and independent functioning were obtained through couple member reports, by observing couple members' behaviors during laboratory interactions, by observing responses to experimentally manipulated partner assistance provided during an individual laboratory task, and by following couples over a period of 6 months to examine independent goal striving as a function of prior assessments of dependency acceptance. Results provided converging evidence in support of the proposed hypothesis. Implications of the importance of close relationships for optimal individual functioning are discussed.

  2. Measuring Dependence on Imported Oil

    EIA Publications

    1995-01-01

    U.S. dependence on imported oil can be measured in at least two ways. The differences hinge largely on whether oil imports are defined as net imports (total imports minus exports) or as total imports. EIA introduces a revised table that expresses dependence on imports in terms of both measures.

  3. Some Concepts of Negative Dependence.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1980-03-01

    The theory of positive dependence notions cannot yield useful results for some widely used distributions such as the multinomial, Dirichlet and the...multivariate hypergeometric. Some conditions of negative dependence that are satisfied by these distributions and which have practical meaning are

  4. [Alcohol dependence, temper and personality].

    PubMed

    Lejoyeux, Michel

    2004-12-01

    This review focuses on classical and recent research work in the field of alcohol dependence. Data from psychopathological studies trying to determine a "pre-addictive" personality are exposed. More recent studies assess personality disorders and dimensions of temperament associated to alcohol dependence. Sensation seeking, antisocial personality and novelty seeking appear as the main psychological parameters involved in dependence. Sensation seeking is a dimension of personality often associated to behavioral dependence. Sensation seeking is assessed with a five-component scale including general factor, thrill and adventure seeking, experience-seeking, disinhibition, and boredom susceptibility. Patients presenting alcohol dependence have a higher level of sensation seeking. Neurophysiological and genetic studies try to correlate these personality features to biological parameters. Preliminary results of these works are presented and discussed.

  5. Coexistence under positive frequency dependence.

    PubMed Central

    Molofsky, J.; Bever, J. D.; Antonovics, J.

    2001-01-01

    Negative frequency dependence resulting from interspecific interactions is considered a driving force in allowing the coexistence of competitors. While interactions between species and genotypes can also result in positive frequency dependence, positive frequency dependence has usually been credited with hastening the extinction of rare types and is not thought to contribute to coexistence. In the present paper, we develop a stochastic cellular automata model that allows us to vary the scale of frequency dependence and the scale of dispersal. The results of this model indicate that positive frequency dependence will allow the coexistence of two species at a greater rate than would be expected from chance. This coexistence arises from the generation of banding patterns that will be stable over long time-periods. As a result, we found that positive frequency-dependent interactions over local spatial scales promote coexistence over neutral interactions. This result was robust to variation in boundary conditions within the simulation and to variation in levels of disturbance. Under all conditions, coexistence is enhanced as the strength of positive frequency-dependent interactions is increased. PMID:11217898

  6. Time-dependent drift Hamiltonian

    SciTech Connect

    Boozer, A.H.

    1983-03-01

    The lowest-order drift equations are given in a canonical magnetic coordinate form for time-dependent magnetic and electric fields. The advantages of the canonical Hamiltonian form are also discussed.

  7. Drug dependence: some research issues*

    PubMed Central

    Cameron, D. C.

    1970-01-01

    This paper examines some problems of drug dependence, stressing the importance of a balanced approach. Consideration must be given to the demand for, as well as the supply of, drugs. Without a demand, there would be no continuing supply of man-made agents and no need to control the availability of naturally occurring agents. To achieve a balanced approach, increased research is needed into the effects on man of taking various dependence-producing drugs (particularly when these are used for long periods of time), the natural history of drug taking, the relative effectiveness of various preventive, therapeutic and restorative approaches and techniques, and means of identifying substances that, because of their dependence-producing properties, are apt to induce individual or public health problems. Attention is also called to some problems that may inhibit, but do not preclude, the initiation of studies in the field of drug dependence. PMID:5313071

  8. Scale-dependent halo bias from scale-dependent growth

    SciTech Connect

    Parfrey, Kyle; Hui, Lam; Sheth, Ravi K.

    2011-03-15

    We derive a general expression for the large-scale halo bias, in theories with a scale-dependent linear growth, using the excursion set formalism. Such theories include modified-gravity models, and models in which the dark energy clustering is non-negligible. A scale dependence is imprinted in both the formation and evolved biases by the scale-dependent growth. Mergers are accounted for in our derivation, which thus extends earlier work which focused on passive evolution. There is a simple analytic form for the bias for those theories in which the nonlinear collapse of perturbations is approximately the same as in general relativity. As an illustration, we apply our results to a simple Yukawa modification of gravity, and use Sloan Digital Sky Survey measurements of the clustering of luminous red galaxies to constrain the theory's parameters.

  9. Frequency-Dependent Changes in NMDAR-Dependent Synaptic Plasticity

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Arvind; Mehta, Mayank R.

    2011-01-01

    The NMDAR-dependent synaptic plasticity is thought to mediate several forms of learning, and can be induced by spike trains containing a small number of spikes occurring with varying rates and timing, as well as with oscillations. We computed the influence of these variables on the plasticity induced at a single NMDAR containing synapse using a reduced model that was analytically tractable, and these findings were confirmed using detailed, multi-compartment model. In addition to explaining diverse experimental results about the rate and timing dependence of synaptic plasticity, the model made several novel and testable predictions. We found that there was a preferred frequency for inducing long-term potentiation (LTP) such that higher frequency stimuli induced lesser LTP, decreasing as 1/f when the number of spikes in the stimulus was kept fixed. Among other things, the preferred frequency for inducing LTP varied as a function of the distance of the synapse from the soma. In fact, same stimulation frequencies could induce LTP or long-term depression depending on the dendritic location of the synapse. Next, we found that rhythmic stimuli induced greater plasticity then irregular stimuli. Furthermore, brief bursts of spikes significantly expanded the timing dependence of plasticity. Finally, we found that in the ∼5–15-Hz frequency range both rate- and timing-dependent plasticity mechanisms work synergistically to render the synaptic plasticity most sensitive to spike timing. These findings provide computational evidence that oscillations can have a profound influence on the plasticity of an NMDAR-dependent synapse, and show a novel role for the dendritic morphology in this process. PMID:21994493

  10. Dependency Structures for Statistical Machine Translation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bach, Nguyen

    2012-01-01

    Dependency structures represent a sentence as a set of dependency relations. Normally the dependency structures from a tree connect all the words in a sentence. One of the most defining characters of dependency structures is the ability to bring long distance dependency between words to local dependency structures. Another the main attraction of…

  11. Anabolic steroid abuse and dependence.

    PubMed

    Brower, Kirk J

    2002-10-01

    Anabolic-androgenic steroids (AAS) are mainly used to treat androgen deficiency syndromes and, more recently, catabolic states such as AIDS-associated wasting. There is no evidence in the reviewed literature that AAS abuse or dependence develops from the therapeutic use of AAS. Conversely, 165 instances of AAS dependence have been reported among weightlifters and bodybuilders who, as part of their weight training regimens, chronically administered supraphysiologic doses, often including combinations of injected and oral AAS as well as other drugs of abuse. A new model is proposed in which both the "myoactive" and psychoactive effects of AAS contribute to the development of AAS dependence. The adverse consequences of AAS are reviewed, as well as their assessment by means of a history and physical, mental status examination, and laboratory testing. When patients with AAS use disorders are compared with patients with other substance use disorders, both similarities and differences become apparent and have implications for treatment.

  12. Developing Tests of Visual Dependency

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kindrat, Alexandra N.

    2011-01-01

    Astronauts develop neural adaptive responses to microgravity during space flight. Consequently these adaptive responses cause maladaptive disturbances in balance and gait function when astronauts return to Earth and are re-exposed to gravity. Current research in the Neuroscience Laboratories at NASA-JSC is focused on understanding how exposure to space flight produces post-flight disturbances in balance and gait control and developing training programs designed to facilitate the rapid recovery of functional mobility after space flight. In concert with these disturbances, astronauts also often report an increase in their visual dependency during space flight. To better understand this phenomenon, studies were conducted with specially designed training programs focusing on visual dependency with the aim to understand and enhance subjects ability to rapidly adapt to novel sensory situations. The Rod and Frame test (RFT) was used first to assess an individual s visual dependency, using a variety of testing techniques. Once assessed, subjects were asked to perform two novel tasks under transformation (both the Pegboard and Cube Construction tasks). Results indicate that head position cues and initial visual test conditions had no effect on an individual s visual dependency scores. Subjects were also able to adapt to the manual tasks after several trials. Individual visual dependency correlated with ability to adapt manual to a novel visual distortion only for the cube task. Subjects with higher visual dependency showed decreased ability to adapt to this task. Ultimately, it was revealed that the RFT may serve as an effective prediction tool to produce individualized adaptability training prescriptions that target the specific sensory profile of each crewmember.

  13. Fault trees and sequence dependencies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dugan, Joanne Bechta; Boyd, Mark A.; Bavuso, Salvatore J.

    1990-01-01

    One of the frequently cited shortcomings of fault-tree models, their inability to model so-called sequence dependencies, is discussed. Several sources of such sequence dependencies are discussed, and new fault-tree gates to capture this behavior are defined. These complex behaviors can be included in present fault-tree models because they utilize a Markov solution. The utility of the new gates is demonstrated by presenting several models of the fault-tolerant parallel processor, which include both hot and cold spares.

  14. [Dependent seniors: families and caregivers].

    PubMed

    Karsch, Ursula M

    2003-01-01

    This article focuses on health care for dependent seniors in relation to chronic illnesses. Expectations about family support for the dependent elderly are related to the role of family caregivers, but care requires support from the public and private sectors. Governments throughout the developed countries are examining their role in the provision of social welfare programs, especially in the public health sector. To recommend home care and family assistance, the context of changing family structures, the type of care needed, and professional follow-up must be taken into account.

  15. The Study of Curricular Dependency

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Anastasiu, Dragos

    2006-01-01

    In the educational process, the disciplines D1, D2,...,Dn have a succession which is generated by the content and the final objective--the student formation. In this work, the disciplines are presented as structured text entities. The graph associated to the disciplines is established. A method for dependencies evaluation is proposed. The testing…

  16. We Depend on Illinois' Environment.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Illinois Environmental Protection Agency, Springfield.

    This teachers guide contains information and activities to provide 5th-grade students with a hands-on experience with air, land, and water pollution in Illinois. This booklet incorporates previous documents entitled: "Water the Liquid of Life,""The Land We Depend On," and "The Air We Breathe." The materials are…

  17. Dependency Structures and Transformational Rules.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Robinson, Jane J.

    In this paper the author shows that dependency grammars are not only equivalent to structure-free phrase-structure grammars (i.e., equally adequate), but are even more informative: they express both the "is a" relation which phrase-structure grammars express and the "governs" relation which phrase-structure grammars obscure. It…

  18. [Preventing dependency: the longevity challenge].

    PubMed

    Forette, Françoise

    2009-02-01

    Longevity can only be considered a privilege if the majority of the elderly population is active and in good health. In contrast to certain statistical interpretations, the HID study gives cause for optimism. It showed that only 7% of subjects aged 60 years and over suffer from dependency and, therefore, that 93% of the population remains independent. Of course, the rate of dependency increases with age, particularly in women and after 90 years of age. Dependency is mostly due to age-related diseases. The second cause is "frailty" and the third is inactivity, or more generally, lifestyle. All age-related diseases have modifiable risk factors and are thus accessible to prevention. Prevention must be started as soon as possible. It has been demonstrated that a mother's educational level influences her children's health in adulthood. It is never too late. The Hyvet study recently showed that the treatment of hypertension after 80 years of age is still able to significantly reduce the risk of death, stroke, heart failure and other cardiovascular complications. Inadequate disease management may also lead to avoidable dependency. This is the case of congestive heart failure and osteoporosis, which are not always treated in very old patients according to evidence-based principles. Another means of prevention is the detection and management of the frailty syndrome, which carries a measurable risk of loss of independence. In addition to these medical approaches, occupational activity involving strong cognitive stimulation has been shown to postpone the onset of cognitive impairment.

  19. Network-timing-dependent plasticity.

    PubMed

    Delattre, Vincent; Keller, Daniel; Perich, Matthew; Markram, Henry; Muller, Eilif B

    2015-01-01

    Bursts of activity in networks of neurons are thought to convey salient information and drive synaptic plasticity. Here we report that network bursts also exert a profound effect on Spike-Timing-Dependent Plasticity (STDP). In acute slices of juvenile rat somatosensory cortex we paired a network burst, which alone induced long-term depression (LTD), with STDP-induced long-term potentiation (LTP) and LTD. We observed that STDP-induced LTP was either unaffected, blocked or flipped into LTD by the network burst, and that STDP-induced LTD was either saturated or flipped into LTP, depending on the relative timing of the network burst with respect to spike coincidences of the STDP event. We hypothesized that network bursts flip STDP-induced LTP to LTD by depleting resources needed for LTP and therefore developed a resource-dependent STDP learning rule. In a model neural network under the influence of the proposed resource-dependent STDP rule, we found that excitatory synaptic coupling was homeostatically regulated to produce power law distributed burst amplitudes reflecting self-organized criticality, a state that ensures optimal information coding.

  20. Network-timing-dependent plasticity

    PubMed Central

    Delattre, Vincent; Keller, Daniel; Perich, Matthew; Markram, Henry; Muller, Eilif B.

    2015-01-01

    Bursts of activity in networks of neurons are thought to convey salient information and drive synaptic plasticity. Here we report that network bursts also exert a profound effect on Spike-Timing-Dependent Plasticity (STDP). In acute slices of juvenile rat somatosensory cortex we paired a network burst, which alone induced long-term depression (LTD), with STDP-induced long-term potentiation (LTP) and LTD. We observed that STDP-induced LTP was either unaffected, blocked or flipped into LTD by the network burst, and that STDP-induced LTD was either saturated or flipped into LTP, depending on the relative timing of the network burst with respect to spike coincidences of the STDP event. We hypothesized that network bursts flip STDP-induced LTP to LTD by depleting resources needed for LTP and therefore developed a resource-dependent STDP learning rule. In a model neural network under the influence of the proposed resource-dependent STDP rule, we found that excitatory synaptic coupling was homeostatically regulated to produce power law distributed burst amplitudes reflecting self-organized criticality, a state that ensures optimal information coding. PMID:26106298

  1. Time dependent view factor methods

    SciTech Connect

    Kirkpatrick, R.C.

    1998-03-01

    View factors have been used for treating radiation transport between opaque surfaces bounding a transparent medium for several decades. However, in recent years they have been applied to problems involving intense bursts of radiation in enclosed volumes such as in the laser fusion hohlraums. In these problems, several aspects require treatment of time dependence.

  2. A User- Dependent SDI System

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Burton, Hilary D.

    1973-01-01

    A large-scale selective dissemination of information (SDI) system which is in operation at the Agricultural Research Service is described. The unique characteristic of this system is that the users develop and modify their own profiles. The implications of this user-dependent approach for information system planners are discussed. (2 references)…

  3. Directional Dependence in Developmental Research

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    von Eye, Alexander; DeShon, Richard P.

    2012-01-01

    In this article, we discuss and propose methods that may be of use to determine direction of dependence in non-normally distributed variables. First, it is shown that standard regression analysis is unable to distinguish between explanatory and response variables. Then, skewness and kurtosis are discussed as tools to assess deviation from…

  4. Dependency Ordering of Atomic Observables

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cīrulis, Jānis

    2015-12-01

    The notion of atomic observable was introduced by S.Gudder for effect test spaces in 1997. In this paper an observable is a σ-homomorphism from the Borel algebra on a line to some logic. Roughly, an observable on a logic is atomic, if it is completely determined by its restriction to one-element subsets of its point spectrum. In particular, every discrete observable is atomic. We study some elementary properties of such observables, and discuss a possible notion of functional dependency between them. Algebraically, a dependency is a certain preorder relation on the set of all atomic observables, which induces an order relation on the set of all maximal orthogonal subsets of the logic. Several properties, as well as characteristics in terms of the underlying logic, of these relations are stated.

  5. Link Dependent Adaptive Radio Simulation

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-06-01

    14. ABSTRACT This paper shows the optimized Link Dependent Adaptive Radio (LDAR) using the variable QAM OFDM modulation size which adapts to channel...bit error rate (BER), Orthogonal Frequency Division Multiplexing ( OFDM ) 16. SECURITY CLASSIFICATION OF: Unclassified 17. LIMITATION OF ABSTRACT...using the variable QAM OFDM modulation size which adapts to channel conditions. The LDAR enhanced performance is illustrated by use of a flight path

  6. Genus dependence of superstring amplitudes

    SciTech Connect

    Davis, Simon

    2006-11-15

    The problem of the consistency of the finiteness of the supermoduli space integral in the limit of vanishing super-fixed point distance and the genus-dependence of the integral over the super-Schottky coordinates in the fundamental region containing a neighborhood of |K{sub n}|=0 is resolved. Given a choice of the categories of isometric circles representing the integration region, the exponential form of bounds for superstring amplitudes is derived.

  7. Nicotine dependence and smoking cessation.

    PubMed

    Tan, Linxiang; Tang, Quansheng; Hao, Wei

    2009-11-01

    Tobacco use is the single most preventable cause of death, disability and disease in the world and is projected to be the leading cause of death and disability across all developed and developing countries by 2020. Nicotine, the primary active ingredient of cigarettes that contributes to physical dependence, acts on nicotine receptors in the central nervous system and leads to the release of neurotransmitters (such as dopamine). Like other drugs of abuse, nicotine is thought to produce reinforcing effect by activating the mesocorticolimbic dopamine system. A wide variety of cessation treatments of nicotine dependence is commercially available, yet only 2 general approaches have received empirical validation: behavioral intervention (including 5 As brief intervention) and pharmacotherapy. The evidences show that 5 As brief intervention is one of the most cost-effective treatments in clinical work for busy physicians. Three types of medications have been available in market for smoking cessation treatment: nicotine replacement treatment (NRT, i.e., transdermal patch, gum, inhaler, nasal spray, and lozenge), sustained release bupropion and varenicline. Varenicline, a novel alpha4beta2 nicotinic receptor partial agonist, is effective for tobacco dependence. Phase III trials suggest that it is more effective than NRT and bupropion SR. The safety profile of varenicline is excellent, with the most commonly occurring adverse events, nausea, typically mild and well tolerated. However, new safety warnings are added to the varenicline label because of post-marketing report including agitation, depression and suicidality. A causal connection between varenicline use and these symptoms has not been established.

  8. Non-transfusion-dependent thalassemias

    PubMed Central

    Musallam, Khaled M.; Rivella, Stefano; Vichinsky, Elliott; Rachmilewitz, Eliezer A.

    2013-01-01

    Non-transfusion-dependent thalassemias include a variety of phenotypes that, unlike patients with beta (β)-thalassemia major, do not require regular transfusion therapy for survival. The most commonly investigated forms are β-thalassemia intermedia, hemoglobin E/β-thalassemia, and α-thalassemia intermedia (hemoglobin H disease). However, transfusion-independence in such patients is not without side effects. Ineffective erythropoiesis and peripheral hemolysis, the hallmarks of disease process, lead to a variety of subsequent pathophysiologies including iron overload and hypercoagulability that ultimately lead to a number of serious clinical morbidities. Thus, prompt and accurate diagnosis of non-transfusion-dependent thalassemia is essential to ensure early intervention. Although several management options are currently available, the need to develop more novel therapeutics is justified by recent advances in our understanding of the mechanisms of disease. Such efforts require wide international collaboration, especially since non-transfusion-dependent thalassemias are no longer bound to low- and middle-income countries but have spread to large multiethnic cities in Europe and the Americas due to continued migration. PMID:23729725

  9. Experimental Studies of Boronophenylalanine ({sup 10}BPA) Biodistribution for the Individual Application of Boron Neutron Capture Therapy (BNCT) for Malignant Melanoma Treatment

    SciTech Connect

    Carpano, Marina; Perona, Marina; Rodriguez, Carla; Nievas, Susana; Olivera, Maria; Santa Cruz, Gustavo A.; Brandizzi, Daniel; Cabrini, Romulo; Pisarev, Mario; Juvenal, Guillermo Juan; Dagrosa, Maria Alejandra

    2015-10-01

    Purpose: Patients with the same histopathologic diagnosis of cutaneous melanoma treated with identical protocols of boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) have shown different clinical outcomes. The objective of the present studies was to evaluate the biodistribution of boronophenilalanina ({sup 10}BPA) for the potential application of BNCT for the treatment of melanoma on an individual basis. Methods and Materials: The boronophenilalanine (BPA) uptake was evaluated in 3 human melanoma cell lines: MEL-J, A375, and M8. NIH nude mice were implanted with 4 10{sup 6} MEL-J cells, and biodistribution studies of BPA (350 mg/kg intraperitoneally) were performed. Static infrared imaging using a specially modified infrared camera adapted to measure the body infrared radiance of small animals was used. Proliferation marker, Ki-67, and endothelial marker, CD31, were analyzed in tumor samples. Results: The in vitro studies demonstrated different patterns of BPA uptake for each analyzed cell line (P<.001 for MEL-J and A375 vs M8 cells). The in vivo studies showed a maximum average boron concentration of 25.9 ± 2.6 μg/g in tumor, with individual values ranging between 11.7 and 52.0 μg/g of {sup 10}B 2 hours after the injection of BPA. Tumor temperature always decreased as the tumors increased in size, with values ranging between 37°C and 23°C. A significant correlation between tumor temperature and tumor-to-blood boron concentration ratio was found (R{sup 2} = 0.7, rational function fit). The immunohistochemical studies revealed, in tumors with extensive areas of viability, a high number of positive cells for Ki-67, blood vessels of large diameter evidenced by the marker CD31, and a direct logistic correlation between proliferative status and boron concentration difference between tumor and blood (R{sup 2} = 0.81, logistic function fit). Conclusion: We propose that these methods could be suitable for designing new screening protocols applied before melanoma BNCT treatment for each individual patient and lesion.

  10. Biodistribution of the boron carriers boronophenylalanine (BPA) and/or decahydrodecaborate (GB-10) for Boron Neutron Capture Therapy (BNCT) in an experimental model of lung metastases

    SciTech Connect

    D.W. Nigg; Various Others

    2014-06-01

    BNCT was proposed for the treatment of diffuse, non-resectable tumors in the lung. We performed boron biodistribution studies with 5 administration protocols employing the boron carriers BPA and/or GB-10 in an experimental model of disseminated lung metastases in rats. All 5 protocols were non-toxic and showed preferential tumor boron uptake versus lung. Absolute tumor boron concentration values were therapeutically useful (25–76 ppm) for 3 protocols. Dosimetric calculations indicate that BNCT at RA-3 would be potentially therapeutic without exceeding radiotolerance in the lung.

  11. PET imaging of leptin biodistribution and metabolism in rodents and primates.

    PubMed

    Ceccarini, Giovanni; Flavell, Robert R; Butelman, Eduardo R; Synan, Michael; Willnow, Thomas E; Bar-Dagan, Maya; Goldsmith, Stanley J; Kreek, Mary J; Kothari, Paresh; Vallabhajosula, Shankar; Muir, Tom W; Friedman, Jeffrey M

    2009-08-01

    We have determined the systemic biodistribution of the hormone leptin by PET imaging. PET imaging using (18)F- and (68)Ga-labeled leptin revealed that, in mouse, the hormone was rapidly taken up by megalin (gp330/LRP2), a multiligand endocytic receptor localized in renal tubules. In addition, in rhesus monkeys, 15% of labeled leptin localized to red bone marrow, which was consistent with hormone uptake in rodent tissues. These data confirm a megalin-dependent mechanism for renal uptake in vivo. The significant binding to immune cells and blood cell precursors in bone marrow is also consistent with prior evidence showing that leptin modulates immune function. These experiments set the stage for similar studies in humans to assess the extent to which alterations of leptin's biodistribution might contribute to obesity; they also provide a general chemical strategy for (18)F labeling of proteins for PET imaging of other polypeptide hormones.

  12. Time dependence of PEB effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yanagishita, Yuichiro; Shigematsu, Kazumasa; Yanagida, Kimio

    1990-06-01

    Though simulations of PEB (Post Exposure Bake) on the basis of PAC diffusion mode! have been carried out by a number of researchers '' (2) , it has never been confirmed that those could predict experimental data caused by PEB' s effects accurately . Because no details of chemical reactions thernlly induced by PEB are known, fundamental parameters which determine PEB' s effects must be obtained experimentally. We have acquired the volume of changes of development rate function, RATE(M) by PEB with DRM monitoring for some types of photoresist . The values of diffusion length have been obtained by means of compareing experimental B (exposure ener) vs T (development time to clear) curves with simulated ones which is based on RATEOA) data. Their dependence on the baking time has been investigated with fixed FEB temperature and it has been proved that a progress of the diffusion saturates only in less than a few seconds when the diffusion length is about lO'-l5ncn, which is much shorter than the standing wave length(= 66nm, for G-line). Profiles of low contrast resist patterns can be improved by the decrease in development rate of slightly exposed areas by PEB. The effects on these resists depend on the baking time because the volume of the decrease grows with increasing FEB time. On the other hands, for high contrast resists PEB' s diffusion enhances their resolution while the decreases in development rate have little effect on them. Time dependence cannot be observed for these resists because the diffusion length remains constant with increasing FEB time.

  13. Time-Dependent Photodissociation Regions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hollenbach, David; Natta, Antonella

    1995-01-01

    We present theoretical models of the time-dependent thermal and chemical structure of molecular gas suddenly exposed to far-ultraviolet (FUV) (6 eV less than hv less than 13.6 eV) radiation fields and the consequent time- dependent infrared emission of the gas. We focus on the response of molecular hydrogen for cloud densities ranging from n = 10(exp 3) to 10(exp 6)/cu cm and FUV fluxes G(sub 0) = 10(exp 3)-10(exp 6) times the local FUV interstellar flux. For G(sub 0)/n greater than 10(exp -2) cu cm, the emergent H(sub 2) vibrational line intensities are initially larger than the final equilibrium values. The H(sub 2) lines are excited by FUV fluorescence and by collisional excitation in warm gas. Most of the H(sub 2) intensity is generated at a characteristic hydrogen column density of N approximately 10(exp 21)/sq cm, which corresponds to an FUV optical depth of unity caused by dust opacity. The time dependence of the H(sub 2) intensities arises because the initial abundances of H(sub 2) at these depths is much higher than the equilibrium values, so that H(sub 2) initially competes more effectively with dust in absorbing FUV photons. Considerable column densities of warm (T approximately 1000) K H(sub 2) gas can be produced by the FUV pumping of H(sub 2) vibrational levels followed by collisional de-excitation, which transfers the energy to heat. In dense (n greater than or approximately 10(exp 5)/cu cm) gas exposed to high (G(sub 0) greater than or approximately 10(exp 4)) fluxes, this warm gas produces a 2-1 S(1)/1-0 S(l) H(sub 2) line ratio of approximately 0.1, which mimics the ratio found in shocked gas. In lower density regions, the FUV pumping produces a pure-fluorescent ratio of approximately 0.5. We also present calculations of the time dependence of the atomic hydrogen column densities and of the intensities of 0 I 6300 A, S II 6730 A, Fe II 1.64 microns, and rotational OH and H20 emission. Potential applications include star-forming regions, clouds

  14. Frequency dependence of organic magnetoresistance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wagemans, W.; Janssen, P.; van der Heijden, E. H. M.; Kemerink, M.; Koopmans, B.

    2010-09-01

    To identify the microscopic mechanisms of organic magnetoresistance (OMAR), the dependency on the frequency of the applied magnetic field is explored, which consists of a dc and ac component. The measured magnetoconductance decreases when the frequency is increased. The decrease is stronger for lower voltages, which is shown to be linked to the presence of a negative capacitance, as measured with admittance spectroscopy. The negative capacitance disappears when the frequency becomes comparable to the inverse transit time of the minority carriers. These results are in agreement with recent interpretations that magnetic field effects on minority carrier mobility dominate OMAR.

  15. Dependent video coding using a tree representation of pixel dependencies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amati, Luca; Valenzise, Giuseppe; Ortega, Antonio; Tubaro, Stefano

    2011-09-01

    Motion-compensated prediction induces a chain of coding dependencies between pixels in video. In principle, an optimal selection of encoding parameters (motion vectors, quantization parameters, coding modes) should take into account the whole temporal horizon of a GOP. However, in practical coding schemes, these choices are made on a frame-by-frame basis, thus with a possible loss of performance. In this paper we describe a tree-based model for pixelwise coding dependencies: each pixel in a frame is the child of a pixel in a previous reference frame. We show that some tree structures are more favorable than others from a rate-distortion perspective, e.g., because they entail a large descendance of pixels which are well predicted from a common ancestor. In those cases, a higher quality has to be assigned to pixels at the top of such trees. We promote the creation of these structures by adding a special discount term to the conventional Lagrangian cost adopted at the encoder. The proposed model can be implemented through a double-pass encoding procedure. Specifically, we devise heuristic cost functions to drive the selection of quantization parameters and of motion vectors, which can be readily implemented into a state-of-the-art H.264/AVC encoder. Our experiments demonstrate that coding efficiency is improved for video sequences with low motion, while there are no apparent gains for more complex motion. We argue that this is due to both the presence of complex encoder features not captured by the model, and to the complexity of the source to be encoded.

  16. Time Dependent Nuclear Scattering Calculations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weeks, David

    2005-04-01

    A new time dependent method for calculating scattering matrix elements of two and three body nuclear collisions below 50 Mev is being developed. The procedure closely follows the channel packet method (CPM) used to compute scattering matrix elements for non-adiabatic molecular reactions.ootnotetextT.A.Niday and D.E.Weeks, Chem. Phys. Letters 308 (1999) 106 Currently, one degree of freedom calculations using a simple square well have been completed and a two body scattering calculation using the Yukawa potential is anticipated. To perform nuclear scattering calculations with the CPM that will incorporate the nucleon-nucleon tensor force, we plan to position initial reactant and product channel packets in the asymptotic limit on single coupled potential energy surfaces labeled by the spin, isospin, and total angular momentum of the reactant nucleons. The wave packets will propagated numerically using the split operator method augmented by a coordinate dependant unitary transformation used to diagonalize the potential. Scattering matrix elements will be determined by the Fourier transform of the correlation function between the evolving reactant and product wave packets. A brief outline of the Argonne v18 nucleon-nucleon potentialootnotetextR.B.Wiringa, V.G.J.Stoks, and R.Schiavilla, Physical Review C 51(1995) 38 and the proposed wave packet calculations will be presented.

  17. State-Dependent Visual Processing

    PubMed Central

    Britz, Juliane; Michel, Christoph M.

    2011-01-01

    The temporal dynamics and anatomical correlates underlying human visual cognition are traditionally assessed as a function of stimulus properties and task demands. Any non-stimulus related activity is commonly dismissed as noise and eliminated to extract an evoked signal that is only a small fraction of the magnitude of the measured signal. We review studies that challenge this view by showing that non-stimulus related activity is not mere noise but that it has a well-structured organization which can largely determine the processing of upcoming stimuli. We review recent evidence from human electrophysiology that shows how different aspects of pre-stimulus activity such as pre-stimulus EEG frequency power and phase and pre-stimulus EEG microstates can determine qualitative and quantitative properties of both lower and higher-level visual processing. These studies show that low-level sensory processes depend on the momentary excitability of sensory cortices whereas perceptual processes leading to stimulus awareness depend on momentary pre-stimulus activity in higher-level non-visual brain areas. Also speed and accuracy of stimulus identification have likewise been shown to be modulated by pre-stimulus brain states. PMID:22203809

  18. Temperature dependency of quantitative ultrasound.

    PubMed

    Pocock, N A; Babichev, A; Culton, N; Graney, K; Rooney, J; Bell, D; Chu, J

    2000-01-01

    Quantitative ultrasound (QUS) parameters are temperature dependent. We examined the effect of temperature on QUS using Lunar Achilles+ and Hologic Sahara units. In vivo studies were performed in a cadaveric foot and in 5 volunteers. QUS scans were performed in the cadaveric foot, using both machines, at temperatures ranging from 15 to 40 degrees C. To assess the effect of change in water bath temperature in the Achilles+, independently of foot temperature, 5 volunteers were studied at water temperatures ranging from 10 to 42 degrees C. In the cadaveric foot there were strong negative correlations between temperature and speed of sound (SOS) but a moderately positive correlation between temperature and broadband ultrasound attenuation (BUA). Stiffness and the Quantitative Ultrasound Index (QUI) in the cadaveric foot showed strong negative correlations with temperature, reflecting their high dependence on SOS. In the 5 volunteers, in whom foot temperature was assumed to be constant, there was a small change in Stiffness in the Achilles+, with variation in water temperature. In conclusion, while there are opposite effects of temperature on SOS and BUA in vivo, there is still a significant effect of temperature variation on Stiffness and the QUI. This may have clinical significance in particular subjects. The precision of QUS may be affected by temperature variation of the environment or of the patient's limb. Instruments utilizing a water bath may be able partly to compensate for changes in environmental temperature, but standardization of water bath temperature is crucial to maximize precision.

  19. Viscosity-dependent protein dynamics.

    PubMed

    Finkelstein, Ilya J; Massari, Aaron M; Fayer, M D

    2007-05-15

    Spectrally resolved stimulated vibrational echo spectroscopy is used to investigate the dependence of fast protein dynamics on bulk solution viscosity at room temperature in four heme proteins: hemoglobin, myoglobin, a myoglobin mutant with the distal histidine replaced by a valine (H64V), and a cytochrome c552 mutant with the distal methionine replaced by an alanine (M61A). Fructose is added to increase the viscosity of the aqueous protein solutions over many orders of magnitude. The fast dynamics of the four globular proteins were found to be sensitive to solution viscosity and asymptotically approached the dynamical behavior that was previously observed in room temperature sugar glasses. The viscosity-dependent protein dynamics are analyzed in the context of a viscoelastic relaxation model that treats the protein as a deformable breathing sphere. The viscoelastic model is in qualitative agreement with the experimental data but does not capture sufficient system detail to offer a quantitative description of the underlying fluctuation amplitudes and relaxation rates. A calibration method based on the near-infrared spectrum of water overtones was constructed to accurately determine the viscosity of small volumes of protein solutions.

  20. Issues and Conflicts in Male Dependence.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ferguson, Roberta C.

    Dependence is a salient quality in both sexes, although it has been culturally more acceptable for women than for men to acknowledge and accept dependency. The conflict men experience with regard to dependency and the manifestations of such conflict in dependent adult behaviors were examined. Subjects were divided into a "most…

  1. Suicidal Behavior in Chemically Dependent Adolescents.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cavaiola, Alan A.; Lavender, Neil

    1999-01-01

    Study explores distinctions between chemically dependent suicide attempters, chemically dependent nonsuicidal adolescents, and high school students with no history of chemical dependency (N=250). Results reveal that there were significant differences between the chemically dependent groups. It was also found that the majority of suicidal gestures…

  2. [Abuse, dependence and intoxication of substances].

    PubMed

    Wada, Kiyoshi

    2015-09-01

    As for substance-related disorders, there were several differences between ICD-10 and DSM-IV, however, the concept of "dependence" had been essential for both criteria. DSM-5 published in 2013 had erased dependence. This confuses us. It is important to recognize dependence again. "Abuse" is the self-intake behavior of drug against the social norms. Repeated abuse results in dependence. Dependence is a state of loss of control against drug use due to craving. Abuse can produce "acute intoxication", and repeated abuse under dependence can produce "chronic intoxication". It is important to understand abuse, dependence and "intoxication" based on their relationship from the point of time course.

  3. Analysis of Critical Infrastructure Dependencies and Interdependencies

    SciTech Connect

    Petit, Frederic; Verner, Duane; Brannegan, David; Buehring, William; Dickinson, David; Guziel, Karen; Haffenden, Rebecca; Phillips, Julia; Peerenboom, James

    2015-06-01

    The report begins by defining dependencies and interdependencies and exploring basic concepts of dependencies in order to facilitate a common understanding and consistent analytical approaches. Key concepts covered include; Characteristics of dependencies: upstream dependencies, internal dependencies, and downstream dependencies; Classes of dependencies: physical, cyber, geographic, and logical; and Dimensions of dependencies: operating environment, coupling and response behavior, type of failure, infrastructure characteristics, and state of operations From there, the report proposes a multi-phase roadmap to support dependency and interdependency assessment activities nationwide, identifying a range of data inputs, analysis activities, and potential products for each phase, as well as key steps needed to progress from one phase to the next. The report concludes by outlining a comprehensive, iterative, and scalable framework for analyzing dependencies and interdependencies that stakeholders can integrate into existing risk and resilience assessment efforts.

  4. Geometry dependence of stellarator turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mynick, H. E.; Xanthopoulos, P.; Boozer, A. H.

    2009-11-01

    Using the nonlinear gyrokinetic code package GENE/GIST [F. Jenko, W. Dorland, M. Kotschenreuther, and B. N. Rogers, Phys. Plasmas 7, 1904 (2000); P. Xanthopoulos, W. A. Cooper, F. Jenko, Yu. Turkin, A. Runov, and J. Geiger, Phys. Plasmas 16, 082303 (2009)], we study the turbulent transport in a broad family of stellarator designs, to understand the geometry dependence of the microturbulence. By using a set of flux tubes on a given flux surface, we construct a picture of the two-dimensional structure of the microturbulence over that surface and relate this to relevant geometric quantities, such as the curvature, local shear, and effective potential in the Schrödinger-like equation governing linear drift modes.

  5. Your Morals Depend on Language

    PubMed Central

    Costa, Albert; Foucart, Alice; Hayakawa, Sayuri; Aparici, Melina; Apesteguia, Jose; Heafner, Joy; Keysar, Boaz

    2014-01-01

    Should you sacrifice one man to save five? Whatever your answer, it should not depend on whether you were asked the question in your native language or a foreign tongue so long as you understood the problem. And yet here we report evidence that people using a foreign language make substantially more utilitarian decisions when faced with such moral dilemmas. We argue that this stems from the reduced emotional response elicited by the foreign language, consequently reducing the impact of intuitive emotional concerns. In general, we suggest that the increased psychological distance of using a foreign language induces utilitarianism. This shows that moral judgments can be heavily affected by an orthogonal property to moral principles, and importantly, one that is relevant to hundreds of millions of individuals on a daily basis. PMID:24760073

  6. Mass dependence of nitride sputtering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elovikov, S. S.; Khrustachev, I. K.; Mosunov, A. S.; Yurasova, V. E.

    2003-08-01

    A molecular dynamics simulation was performed to study the sputtering yield Y for BN, AlN and GaN polycrystals of wurtzite structure as a function of the masses m 1 of bombarding ions with energies from 200 to 2000 eV. A nonmonotonic behavior of the Y ( m 1 ) curve was obtained for the irradiation by low-energy ions, the curve having a maximum with a position being dependent on m 2 / m 1 ( m 2 is the average mass of atoms in a compound). For AlN and GaN the maximum was observed at m 2 / m 1 = 2, and for BN at m 2 / m 1 = 1. The effect of the mass of bombarding ions on the mean energies and energy spectra of sputtered particles, the depth of sputtering origin, and the generation of emitted atoms for nitrides was also investigated and discussed.

  7. Your morals depend on language.

    PubMed

    Costa, Albert; Foucart, Alice; Hayakawa, Sayuri; Aparici, Melina; Apesteguia, Jose; Heafner, Joy; Keysar, Boaz

    2014-01-01

    Should you sacrifice one man to save five? Whatever your answer, it should not depend on whether you were asked the question in your native language or a foreign tongue so long as you understood the problem. And yet here we report evidence that people using a foreign language make substantially more utilitarian decisions when faced with such moral dilemmas. We argue that this stems from the reduced emotional response elicited by the foreign language, consequently reducing the impact of intuitive emotional concerns. In general, we suggest that the increased psychological distance of using a foreign language induces utilitarianism. This shows that moral judgments can be heavily affected by an orthogonal property to moral principles, and importantly, one that is relevant to hundreds of millions of individuals on a daily basis.

  8. Irradiance-dependent UVB Photocarcinogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Lan, Cheng-Che E.; Wu, Ching-Shuang; Huang, Shu-Mei; Wu, Chin-Han; Lai, Hsiao-Chi; Peng, Yu-Ting; Hou, Pao-Sheng; Yang, Hui-Jun; Chen, Gwo-Shing

    2016-01-01

    Ultraviolet B (UVB) radiation from the sun may lead to photocarcinogenesis of the skin. Sunscreens were used to protect the skin by reducing UVB irradiance, but sunscreen use did not reduce sunburn episodes. It was shown that UVB-induced erythema depends on surface exposure but not irradiance of UVB. We previously showed that irradiance plays a critical role in UVB-induced cell differentiation. This study investigated the impact of irradiance on UVB-induced photocarcinogenesis. For hairless mice receiving equivalent exposure of UVB radiation, the low irradiance (LI) UVB treated mice showed more rapid tumor development, larger tumor burden, and more keratinocytes harboring mutant p53 in the epidermis as compared to their high irradiance (HI) UVB treated counterpart. Mechanistically, using cell models, we demonstrated that LI UVB radiation allowed more keratinocytes harboring DNA damages to enter cell cycle via ERK-related signaling as compared to its HI UVB counterpart. These results indicated that at equivalent exposure, UVB radiation at LI has higher photocarcinogenic potential as compared to its HI counterpart. Since erythema is the observed sunburn at moderate doses and use of sunscreen was not found to associate with reduced sunburn episodes, the biological significance of sunburn with or without sunscreen use warrants further investigation. PMID:27869214

  9. Temperature dependence of basalt weathering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Gaojun; Hartmann, Jens; Derry, Louis A.; West, A. Joshua; You, Chen-Feng; Long, Xiaoyong; Zhan, Tao; Li, Laifeng; Li, Gen; Qiu, Wenhong; Li, Tao; Liu, Lianwen; Chen, Yang; Ji, Junfeng; Zhao, Liang; Chen, Jun

    2016-06-01

    The homeostatic balance of Earth's long-term carbon cycle and the equable state of Earth's climate are maintained by negative feedbacks between the levels of atmospheric CO2 and the chemical weathering rate of silicate rocks. Though clearly demonstrated by well-controlled laboratory dissolution experiments, the temperature dependence of silicate weathering rates, hypothesized to play a central role in these weathering feedbacks, has been difficult to quantify clearly in natural settings at landscape scale. By compiling data from basaltic catchments worldwide and considering only inactive volcanic fields (IVFs), here we show that the rate of CO2 consumption associated with the weathering of basaltic rocks is strongly correlated with mean annual temperature (MAT) as predicted by chemical kinetics. Relations between temperature and CO2 consumption rate for active volcanic fields (AVFs) are complicated by other factors such as eruption age, hydrothermal activity, and hydrological complexities. On the basis of this updated data compilation we are not able to distinguish whether or not there is a significant runoff control on basalt weathering rates. Nonetheless, the simple temperature control as observed in this global dataset implies that basalt weathering could be an effective mechanism for Earth to modulate long-term carbon cycle perturbations.

  10. Density Gradient Dependent Helicon Modes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Panevsky, Martin; Bengtson, Roger

    2002-11-01

    Radially localized helicon modes have been proposed to provide a fuller description of helicon discharges over a wide span of operating conditions and gas types [1]. These plasma modes could be of vital importance to the VASIMR engine. They depend on a radial density gradient and appear to operate over a range of frequencies inaccessible to traditional helicon discharges. Our work focuses on confirming experimentally the existence and properties of these helicon modes in Argon, Helium, and Hydrogen. We investigate the density profile, power deposition, wavefields, and dispersion relation of the new helicon modes which differ substantially from the properties of the traditional helicon plasma. We are using a set of dual half-turn helical antennas driven at 13.56 MHz. Our diagnostics includes a system for monitoring the plasma impedance, a set of Langmuir probes, a set of magnetic probes, as well as sensors for monitoring the pressure and DC magnetic field. *Work supported in part by Advanced Space Propulsion Lab, Johnson Space Center, NASA [1] B. N. Breizman and A. V. Arefiev, Phys. Rev. 84, 3863 (2000)

  11. Nuclear Dependence of Charm Production

    SciTech Connect

    Blanco-Covarrubias, A.; Engelfried, J.; Akgun, U.; Alkhazov, G.; Amaro-Reyes, J.; Atamantchouk, A.G.; Ayan, A.S.; Balatz, M.Y.; Bondar, N.F.; Cooper, P.S.; Dauwe, Loretta J.; /Michigan U., Flint /Moscow, ITEP

    2009-02-01

    With data taken by SELEX, which accumulated data during the 1996-1997 fixed target run at Fermilab, we study the production of charmed hadrons on copper and carbon targets with {Sigma}{sup -}, p, {pi}{sup -}, and {pi}{sup +} beams. Parameterizing the production cross section {infinity} A{sup {alpha}}, A being the atomic number, we determine {alpha} for D{sup +}, D{sup 0}, D{sub s}{sup +}, D{sup +}(2010), {Lambda}{sub c}{sup +}, and their respective anti-particles, as a function of their transverse momentum p{sub t} and scaled longitudinal momentum x{sub F}. Within our statistics there is no dependence of {alpha} on x{sub F} for any charm species for the interval 0.1 < x{sub F} < 1.0. The average value of {alpha} for charm production by pion beams is {alpha}{sub meson} = 0.850 {+-} 0.028. This is somewhat larger than the corresponding average {alpha}{sub baryon} = 0.755 {+-} 0.016 for charm production by baryon beams ({Sigma}{sup -}, p).

  12. Energy dependence of hadronic activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gabriel, T. A.; Groom, D. E.; Job, P. K.; Mokhov, N. V.; Stevenson, G. R.

    1994-01-01

    Two features of high-energy hadronic cascades have long been known to shielding specialists: a) in a high-energy hadronic cascade in a given material (incident E ≳ 10 GeV), the relative abundance and spectrum of each hadronic species responsible for most of the energy deposition is independent of the energy or species of the incident hadron, and b) because π0 production bleeds off more and more energy into the electromagnetic sector as the energy of the incident hadron increases, the absolute level of this low-energy hadronic activity ( E ≲ 1 GeV) rises less rapidly than the incident energy, and in fact rises very nearly as a power of the incident energy. Both features are of great importance in hadron calorimetry, where it is the "universal spectrum" which makes possible the definition of an intrinsic {e}/{h}, and the increasing fraction of the energy going into π0's which leads to the energy dependence of {e}/{π}. We present evidence for the "universal spectrum," and use an induction argument and simulation results to demonstrate that the low-energy activity ss Em, with 0.80 ≲ m ≲ 0.85. The hadronic activity produced by incident pions is 15-20% less than that initiated by protons.

  13. Frequency dependence of organic magnetoresistance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Fujian; Rybicki, James; Lin, Ran; Hutchinson, Kent; Hou, Jia; Wohlgenannt, Markus

    2011-03-01

    Organic magnetoresistive (OMAR) devices show a large enough magnetoresistive response (typically 10%) for potential applications as magnetic field sensors. However, applications often require sensing high frequency magnetic fields, and the examination of the frequency-dependent magnetoresistive response is therefore required. Analysis of time constants that limit the frequency response may also shed light on the mechanism behind the OMAR effect, because different OMAR mechanisms occur at different time scales In our experiments, the AC magnetic field is supplied by a coil with a ferrite core which is driven by a function generator The AC magnet shows a frequency response that is almost flat up to 1MHz. We found that the OMAR frequency limit is about 10 kHz for a typical organic semiconductor device and at least 100 kHz for devices made from a doped polymer film. We also performed capacitance and conductance vs. frequency measurements to understand the origin of the observed limit frequencies. This work was supported by Army MURI under GrantNo. W911NF-08-1-0317 and NSF under Grant No. ECS 0725280.

  14. Sequence-dependent nucleosome positioning.

    PubMed

    Chung, Ho-Ryun; Vingron, Martin

    2009-03-13

    Eukaryotic DNA is organized into a macromolecular structure called chromatin. The basic repeating unit of chromatin is the nucleosome, which consists of two copies of each of the four core histones and DNA. The nucleosomal organization and the positions of nucleosomes have profound effects on all DNA-dependent processes. Understanding the factors that influence nucleosome positioning is therefore of general interest. Among the many determinants of nucleosome positioning, the DNA sequence has been proposed to have a major role. Here, we analyzed more than 860,000 nucleosomal DNA sequences to identify sequence features that guide the formation of nucleosomes in vivo. We found that both a periodic enrichment of AT base pairs and an out-of-phase oscillating enrichment of GC base pairs as well as the overall preference for GC base pairs are determinants of nucleosome positioning. The preference for GC pairs can be related to a lower energetic cost required for deformation of the DNA to wrap around the histones. In line with this idea, we found that only incorporation of both signal components into a sequence model for nucleosome formation results in maximal predictive performance on a genome-wide scale. In this manner, one achieves greater predictive power than published approaches. Our results confirm the hypothesis that the DNA sequence has a major role in nucleosome positioning in vivo.

  15. Nicotine Dependence Measures for Perinatal Women.

    PubMed

    Yang, Irene; Hall, Lynne A

    2016-03-02

    This integrative review provides an overview of nicotine dependence measures used with perinatal women and an evaluation of their psychometric properties. Fifty-five articles that met inclusion and exclusion criteria were identified from five different databases. Most of the studies used the Fagerström Test for Nicotine Dependence (FTND). Other approaches included diagnostic tests, the Wisconsin Inventory of Smoking Dependence Motives (WISDM), the Tobacco Dependence Screener, and single-item measures. This review indicated that the FTND may not be the best option for measuring nicotine dependence in this population. The WISDM is a newer instrument that has excellent psychometric properties and captures nonnicotinic dimensions of nicotine dependence relevant to women. Future research is needed to assess its reliability in the perinatal population. Other recommendations from this review include the use of biomarker validation, thorough psychometric reporting on nicotine dependence instruments, and the use of multiple instruments to maximize comparability between nicotine dependence instruments.

  16. Temperature Dependence of Optical Phonon Lifetimes,

    DTIC Science & Technology

    This reprint reports an application of a picosecond laser system to the measurement of the temperature dependence of the relaxation time of LO...Raman linewidths, and to the theoretically predicted temperature dependence of the relaxation time. (Author).

  17. Generalized Categorial Grammar for Unbounded Dependencies Recovery

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nguyen, Luan Viet

    2014-01-01

    Accurate recovery of predicate-argument dependencies is vital for interpretation tasks like information extraction and question answering, and unbounded dependencies may account for a significant portion of the dependencies in any given text. This thesis describes a Generalized Categorial Grammar (GCG) which, like other categorial grammars,…

  18. Jealousy, Gender, Sex Roles, and Dependency.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Madden, Margaret E.; And Others

    One hundred adults ages 18 to 42 completed measures of jealousy and dependency in romantic relationships and of sex role traditionalism. Traditionalism and jealousy were correlated, as predicted, but dependency and jealousy were not. For men, but not for women, traditionalism and jealousy were positively correlated. Dependency and traditionalism…

  19. Indicators of Dependency in Participatory Extension Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Grudens-Schuck, Nancy; Hargrove, Tasha M.

    Participatory adult education programs assist individuals to substitute interdependent, mutually beneficial relationships for unrewarding, dependent relationships. Indicators of changes in dependency, however, are absent or imprecise in evaluations of participatory projects. A study explored facets of dependency by relating practitioners'…

  20. Temperature Dependence of Laser Induced Breakdown

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1994-01-01

    consistent dependence on the temperature of the medium. The theory of the temperature dependence of LIB and experimental observations for all pulse...durations and their implications for retinal damage are discussed. Laser Induced Breakdown, Temperature dependence , Threshold valve, Nanosecond, Picosecond, Femtosecond, laser pulses.

  1. Minimization of Dependency Length in Written English

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Temperley, David

    2007-01-01

    Gibson's Dependency Locality Theory (DLT) [Gibson, E. 1998. "Linguistic complexity: locality of syntactic dependencies." "Cognition," 68, 1-76; Gibson, E. 2000. "The dependency locality theory: A distance-based theory of linguistic complexity." In A. Marantz, Y. Miyashita, & W. O'Neil (Eds.), "Image,…

  2. Genetics of Nicotine Dependence and Pharmacotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Lessov-Schlaggar, Christina N.; Pergadia, Michele L.; Khroyan, Taline V.; Swan, Gary E.

    2008-01-01

    Nicotine dependence is substantially heritable. Several regions across the genome have been implicated in containing genes that confer liability to nicotine dependence and variation in individual genes has been associated with nicotine dependence. Smoking cessation measures are also heritable, and measured genetic variation is associated with nicotine dependence treatment efficacy. Despite significant strides in the understanding of the relative contribution of genetic and environmental factors to nicotine dependence and treatment, emergent challenges necessitate interdisciplinary coordinated effort for effective problem solving. These challenges include refinement of the nicotine dependence phenotype, better understanding of the dynamic interplay between genes and environment in nicotine dependence etiology, application and development of molecular and statistical methodology that can adequately address vast amounts of data, and continuous translational cross-talk. PMID:17888884

  3. Supporting elderly dependent people at home.

    PubMed Central

    Vetter, N. J.; Lewis, P. A.; Llewellyn, L.

    1992-01-01

    OBJECTIVE--To clarify the relation between the dependency of elderly people and the assistance they receive from others by using a detailed but simple measure of dependency. DESIGN--Secondary analysis of data from a survey of people aged 70 and over. SETTING--Two general practices in south Wales. SUBJECTS--1280 people aged 70 and over. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES--Dependency on others to perform essential functions; detailed data on who assists with those functions. RESULTS--Increasing dependency was associated with increased use of more than one member of the family or friends and an increase in the provision of statutory services. CONCLUSION--The complexity of the relation between dependency and those who care for dependent people has previously been underestimated. The presence of providers of statutory services at the household of elderly dependent people suggests that these services can be developed further to help those caring for elderly people at home. Images FIG 1 FIG 3 PMID:1606435

  4. Spatially explicit analyses unveil density dependence.

    PubMed Central

    Veldtman, Ruan; McGeoch, Melodie A.

    2004-01-01

    Density-dependent processes are fundamental in the understanding of species population dynamics. Whereas the benefits of considering the spatial dimension in population biology are widely acknowledged, the implications of doing so for the statistical detection of spatial density dependence have not been examined. The outcome of traditional tests may therefore differ from those that include ecologically relevant locational information on both the prey species and natural enemy. Here, we explicitly incorporate spatial information on individual counts when testing for density dependence between an insect herbivore and its parasitoids. The spatially explicit approach used identified significant density dependence more frequently and in different instances than traditional methods. The form of density dependence detected also differed between methods. These results demonstrate that the explicit consideration of patch location in density-dependence analyses is likely to significantly alter current understanding of the prevalence and form of spatial density dependence in natural populations. PMID:15590593

  5. A Multiple Motives Approach to Tobacco Dependence: The Wisconsin Inventory of Smoking Dependence Motives (WISDM-68)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Piper, Megan E.; Piasecki, Thomas M.; Federman, E. Belle; Bolt, Daniel M.; Smith, Stevens S.; Fiore, Michael C.; Baker, Timothy C.

    2004-01-01

    The dependence construct fills an important explanatory role in motivational accounts of smoking and relapse. Frequently used measures of dependence are either atheoretical or grounded in a unidimensional model of physical dependence. This research creates a multidimensional measure of dependence that is based on theoretically grounded motives for…

  6. Assessment of dependency, agreeableness, and their relationship.

    PubMed

    Lowe, Jennifer Ruth; Edmundson, Maryanne; Widiger, Thomas A

    2009-12-01

    Agreeableness is central to the 5-factor model conceptualization of dependency. However, 4 meta-analyses of the relationship of agreeableness with dependency have failed to identify a consistent relationship. It was the hypothesis of the current study that these findings might be due in part to an emphasis on the assessment of adaptive, rather than maladaptive, variants of agreeableness. This hypothesis was tested by using experimentally altered NEO Personality Inventory-Revised (Costa & McCrae, 1992) items that were reversed with respect to their implications for maladaptiveness. The predicted correlations were confirmed with the experimentally altered version with measures of dependent personality disorder, measures of trait dependency (including 2 measures of adaptive dependency), and measures of dependency from alternative dimensional models of personality disorder. The theoretical implications of the findings and suggestions for future research are discussed.

  7. Co-dependency in the workplace.

    PubMed

    Davidhizar, R; Eshleman, J

    1992-01-01

    Co-dependency has become a familiar term in recent years. No only do mental health professionals encounter the phenomenon, but with the bestseller status of Co-Dependent No More (Beattie 1987), more and more laypersons have begun to identify co-dependent individuals among family members and friends. Community health nurse managers may encounter this problem in clients as well as in other nurses. Of particular concern to the community health nurse manager is co-dependency among nurses on the staff. Co-dependency exhibited by nurses can have a negative effect on group morale and team spirit in a community health setting. This article defines co-dependency and presents guidelines for responding to it in community health nurses.

  8. NON-PARAMETRIC ESTIMATION UNDER STRONG DEPENDENCE

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Zhibiao; Zhang, Yiyun; Li, Runze

    2014-01-01

    We study non-parametric regression function estimation for models with strong dependence. Compared with short-range dependent models, long-range dependent models often result in slower convergence rates. We propose a simple differencing-sequence based non-parametric estimator that achieves the same convergence rate as if the data were independent. Simulation studies show that the proposed method has good finite sample performance. PMID:25018572

  9. Temperature-dependent susceptibility in ALON

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    West, Bruce J.

    2001-02-01

    Herein, we propose a stochastic model of the complex susceptibility in aluminum nitride (ALON), a polycrystalline transparent ceramic. The proposed model yields an inverse power-law dependence of the dielectric loss tangent on frequency, in remarkably close agreement with data. In addition, the phenomenological parameters are found to be strongly temperature-dependent. This temperature dependence is determined, in the theoretical model, to be a consequence of the thermodynamic properties of the molecular dipoles in the material.

  10. Development Factors and Field Dependence-Independence.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1984-11-01

    The use of field dependence -field independence measures has been suggested for both the selection and classification of naval aviators. If measures...of field dependence -field independence are predictive of pilot proficiency, the utility of the construct for selection and classification could be...moderated by the influence of intraindividual changes in field dependence -field independence (FD-FI) over time. This report reviews (1) particulars of the

  11. Temperature Dependence of Large Polaron Superconductivity.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1995-07-18

    to explain the variation of critical temperature Tc with chemical composition and the temperature dependence of high-Tc superconductor properties is...One result of this refinement is a clearer picture of the dependence of electron hopping activation energy on crystal-field parameters. A... dependence is more typically exponential. With these improvements, precise fits to penetration depth versus temperature measurements for high-purity YBCO

  12. Dependence Graphs for Information Assurance of Systems

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2003-06-01

    in sequential programs using dependence analysis, which provides a sound basis for understanding such information flows. The goal was to develop...the design of extensions to the dependence analysis to support concurrency and asynchronous transfer of control. To improve accuracy, it was necessary...achieving results in the area of dependence -graph representations, and queries for software assurance. The results of the research are described in the appendices.

  13. NON-PARAMETRIC ESTIMATION UNDER STRONG DEPENDENCE.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Zhibiao; Zhang, Yiyun; Li, Runze

    2014-01-01

    We study non-parametric regression function estimation for models with strong dependence. Compared with short-range dependent models, long-range dependent models often result in slower convergence rates. We propose a simple differencing-sequence based non-parametric estimator that achieves the same convergence rate as if the data were independent. Simulation studies show that the proposed method has good finite sample performance.

  14. Passion and dependency in online shopping activities.

    PubMed

    Wang, Chih-Chien; Yang, Hui-Wen

    2007-04-01

    This study examines the influence of harmonious passion (HP) and obsessive passion (OP) to online shopping dependency. The results show that both HP and OP might lead to online shopping dependency and online shoppers with OP are more dependent on online shopping activities. In addition, this study also found out that HP and OP could be denoted as a sequence of different intensities of passion, where HP might be a necessity of OP.

  15. Spectral methods for time dependent problems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tadmor, Eitan

    1990-01-01

    Spectral approximations are reviewed for time dependent problems. Some basic ingredients from the spectral Fourier and Chebyshev approximations theory are discussed. A brief survey was made of hyperbolic and parabolic time dependent problems which are dealt with by both the energy method and the related Fourier analysis. The ideas presented above are combined in the study of accuracy stability and convergence of the spectral Fourier approximation to time dependent problems.

  16. Warming: mechanism and latitude dependence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barkin, Yury

    2010-05-01

    flows distribution with respect the Earth's hemispheres in first caused by eccentric position of the Earth core with respect to the mantle (displaced in present geological epoch in direction to Brasil). Of course the asymmetric distribution of heat loss is a long-term phenomenon in the geological history. But in present epoch due to drift of the core to the North we must observe some increasing of the heat flow of the Northern hemisphere and decreasing of the heat flow of the Southern hemisphere. In reality mentioned changes of heat flows are contrast (asymmetrical) and can have general tendency of increasing heat flows in both hemispheres (due to activization of relative oscillations of the core and mantle relatively polar axis). Contrast secular warming of Northern and Southern hemispheres of the Earth in present epoch. Dependence of warming from latitude. And warm flows are asymmetrically, more intensively warm is redistributed in northern hemisphere of the Earth and less intensively in a southern hemisphere. From here it follows, that the phenomenon of more intensive warming up of northern hemisphere, rather than southern in present period should be observed. Data of climatic observations (in first temperature trends for various latitude belts). More detailed analysis shows, that the phenomenon of warming in different form is shown in various latitudinal belts of the Earth. This phenomenon is more clearly shown in latitudinal belts further situated on latitude from South Pole, i.e. in high northern latitudes. Really, the trend of increase of temperature in northern hemisphere is characterized by greater rate, than a trend of temperature in a southern hemisphere. And not only trend components of temperatures increase with increasing of latitudes from southern pole to northern pole, but also amplitudes of decade fluctuations of temperature in high northern breadthes are more bigger than in southern hemisphere. Thus again it is necessary to expect a contrast and

  17. Diagnostic criteria for exercise dependence in women

    PubMed Central

    Bamber, D; Cockerill, I; Rodgers, S; Carroll, D

    2003-01-01

    Objective: To formulate diagnostic criteria for exercise dependence. Method: Fifty six adult female exercisers were interviewed about their exercise behaviour and attitudes. The eating disorders examination, a semistructured clinical interview, was used to diagnose eating disorders. Interviews were taped, transcribed verbatim, and analysed from a social constructionist perspective using QSR NUD*IST. Participants also completed the exercise dependence questionnaire. Results: Two diagnostic criteria emerged from analysis of the interview data: impaired functioning and withdrawal. Impaired functioning was manifest in four areas: psychological, social and occupational, physical, and behavioural. Impairment in at least two areas was considered necessary for diagnosis. Withdrawal was evident as either an adverse reaction to the interruption of exercise or unsuccessful attempts at exercise control. Either sufficed for diagnosis. The absence or presence of an eating disorder was used to distinguish between primary and secondary exercise dependence. Ten women met these criteria for exercise dependence. All 10 also exhibited eating disorders and, accordingly, should be regarded as showing secondary, rather than primary, exercise dependence. Exercise dependent women had significantly higher scores on the exercise dependence questionnaire than non-dependent women. Conclusion: These new diagnostic criteria should now be adopted and explored further, particularly among men and individuals with possible primary exercise dependence. PMID:14514528

  18. Assessment of Dependency, Agreeableness, and Their Relationship

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lowe, Jennifer Ruth; Edmundson, Maryanne; Widiger, Thomas A.

    2009-01-01

    Agreeableness is central to the 5-factor model conceptualization of dependency. However, 4 meta-analyses of the relationship of agreeableness with dependency have failed to identify a consistent relationship. It was the hypothesis of the current study that these findings might be due in part to an emphasis on the assessment of adaptive, rather…

  19. The Restorative Recovery School: Countering Chemical Dependency

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Riestenberg, Nancy

    2007-01-01

    In a recovery school, the students commit to working on recovery from chemical dependency and addiction while becoming successful students. Since all of the students attending the school have been in chemical dependency treatment, the safety of the environment is the first concern of students, their families and staff. Applying restorative…

  20. Chemical Dependency Regional Needs Assessment: Northeastern Minnesota.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stone, Marylee

    The Minnesota Model of Chemical Dependency Treatment, which evolved from a combination of the grassroots Alcoholics Anonymous movement and the State Mental Health Services in the 1960s has made Minnesota an international leader in chemical dependency treatment efforts. Northeastern Minnesota has shared this reputation with the state. In spite of…

  1. Escherichia coli survival in waters: Temperature dependence

    EPA Science Inventory

    Knowing the survival rates of water-borne Escherichia coli is important in evaluating microbial contamination and making appropriate management decisions. E. coli survival rates are dependent on temperature, a dependency that is routinely expressed using an analogue of the Q10 mo...

  2. E. coli survival in waters: temperature dependence

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Knowing the survival rates of water-borne Escherichia coli is important for evaluating microbial contamination and in making appropriate management decisions. E. coli survival rates are dependent on temperature; this dependency is routinely expressed using an analog of the Q10 model. This suggestion...

  3. PRESSURE DEPENDENCE OF PHONON ASSISTED INTERBAND TUNNELING,

    DTIC Science & Technology

    Since very much is known about the band structure of germanium and of its dependence on stress, one can expect to obtain detailed information about... dependence of the relative change of tunneling current with hydrostatic pressure, in Sb-doped germanium tunnel junctions at 4.2 K. This effect is re

  4. The Viscosity-Temperature-Dependence of Liquids,

    DTIC Science & Technology

    The viscosity-temperature- dependence of liquids of different types can be represented by the formula lg kinematic viscosity = A/T to the x power + B...if A has a constant value, only one viscosity measurement at one temperature is necessary for the characterization of the viscosity-temperature- dependence . Examples for each different case are given. (Author)

  5. Empirical Evaluation of Directional-Dependence Tests

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thoemmes, Felix

    2015-01-01

    Testing of directional dependence is a method to infer causal direction that recently has attracted some attention. Previous examples by e.g. von Eye and DeShon (2012a) and extensive simulation studies by Pornprasertmanit and Little (2012) have demonstrated that under specific assumptions, directional-dependence tests can recover the true causal…

  6. 5 CFR 843.405 - Dependency.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... EMPLOYEES RETIREMENT SYSTEM-DEATH BENEFITS AND EMPLOYEE REFUNDS Child Annuities § 843.405 Dependency. To be eligible for survivor annuity benefits, a child must have been dependent on the employee or retiree at the time of the employee's or retiree's death....

  7. 5 CFR 843.405 - Dependency.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... EMPLOYEES RETIREMENT SYSTEM-DEATH BENEFITS AND EMPLOYEE REFUNDS Child Annuities § 843.405 Dependency. To be eligible for survivor annuity benefits, a child must have been dependent on the employee or retiree at the time of the employee's or retiree's death....

  8. 5 CFR 843.405 - Dependency.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... EMPLOYEES RETIREMENT SYSTEM-DEATH BENEFITS AND EMPLOYEE REFUNDS Child Annuities § 843.405 Dependency. To be eligible for survivor annuity benefits, a child must have been dependent on the employee or retiree at the time of the employee's or retiree's death....

  9. 5 CFR 843.405 - Dependency.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... EMPLOYEES RETIREMENT SYSTEM-DEATH BENEFITS AND EMPLOYEE REFUNDS Child Annuities § 843.405 Dependency. To be eligible for survivor annuity benefits, a child must have been dependent on the employee or retiree at the time of the employee's or retiree's death....

  10. 5 CFR 843.405 - Dependency.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... EMPLOYEES RETIREMENT SYSTEM-DEATH BENEFITS AND EMPLOYEE REFUNDS Child Annuities § 843.405 Dependency. To be eligible for survivor annuity benefits, a child must have been dependent on the employee or retiree at the time of the employee's or retiree's death....

  11. Quantifying Item Dependency by Fisher's Z.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shen, Linjun

    Three aspects of the usual approach to assessing local item dependency, Yen's "Q" (H. Huynh, H. Michaels, and S. Ferrara, 1995), deserve further investigation. Pearson correlation coefficients do not distribute normally when the coefficients are large, and thus cannot quantify the dependency well. In the second place, the accuracy of…

  12. Risk Management using Dependency Stucture Matrix

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petković, Ivan

    2011-09-01

    An efficient method based on dependency structure matrix (DSM) analysis is given for ranking risks in a complex system or process whose entities are mutually dependent. This rank is determined according to the element's values of the unique positive eigenvector which corresponds to the matrix spectral radius modeling the considered engineering system. For demonstration, the risk problem of NASA's robotic spacecraft is analyzed.

  13. Dependence effects in unique signal transmission

    SciTech Connect

    Cooper, J.A.

    1988-04-01

    ''Unique Signals'' are communicated from a source to a ''strong link'' safety device in a weapon by means of one or more digital communication channels. The probability that the expected unique signal pattern could be generated accidentally (e.g., due to an abnormal environment) would be an important measure. A probabilistic assessment of this likelihood is deceptive, because it depends on characteristics of the other traffic on the communication channel. One such characteristic that is frequently neglected in analysis is dependence. This report gives a mathematical model for dependence; cites some of the ways in which dependence can increase the likelihood of inadvertent unique signal pattern generation; and suggests that communicating each unique signal ''event'' at the highest level of protocol in the communication system minimizes dependence effects. 3 refs., 4 figs.

  14. Applying supersymmetry to energy dependent potentials

    SciTech Connect

    Yekken, R.; Lassaut, M.; Lombard, R.J.

    2013-11-15

    We investigate the supersymmetry properties of energy dependent potentials in the D=1 dimensional space. We show the main aspects of supersymmetry to be preserved, namely the factorization of the Hamiltonian, the connections between eigenvalues and wave functions of the partner Hamiltonians. Two methods are proposed. The first one requires the extension of the usual rules via the concept of local equivalent potential. In this case, the superpotential becomes depending on the state. The second method, applicable when the potential depends linearly on the energy, is similar to what has been already achieved by means of the Darboux transform. -- Highlights: •Supersymmetry extended to energy dependent potentials. •Generalization of the concept of superpotential. •An alternative method used for linear E-dependence leads to the same results as Darboux transform.

  15. Management of benzodiazepine misuse and dependence

    PubMed Central

    Brett, Jonathan; Murnion, Bridin

    2015-01-01

    Summary There are well-recognised harms from long-term use of benzodiazepines. These include dependency, cognitive decline and falls. It is important to prevent and recognise benzodiazepine dependence. A thorough risk assessment guides optimal management and the necessity for referral. The management of dependence involves either gradual benzodiazepine withdrawal or maintenance treatment. Prescribing interventions, substitution, psychotherapies and pharmacotherapies can all contribute. Unless the patient is elderly, it is helpful to switch to a long-acting benzodiazepine in both withdrawal and maintenance therapy. The dose should be gradually reduced over weeks to lower the risk of seizures. Harms from drugs such as zopiclone and zolpidem are less well characterised. Dependence is managed in the same manner as benzodiazepine dependence. PMID:26648651

  16. Stability on Time-Dependent Domains

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Knobloch, E.; Krechetnikov, R.

    2014-06-01

    We explore the key differences in the stability picture between extended systems on time-fixed and time-dependent spatial domains. As a paradigm, we take the complex Swift-Hohenberg equation, which is the simplest nonlinear model with a finite critical wavenumber, and use it to study dynamic pattern formation and evolution on time-dependent spatial domains in translationally invariant systems, i.e., when dilution effects are absent. In particular, we discuss the effects of a time-dependent domain on the stability of spatially homogeneous and spatially periodic base states, and explore its effects on the Eckhaus instability of periodic states. New equations describing the nonlinear evolution of the pattern wavenumber on time-dependent domains are derived, and the results compared with those on fixed domains. Pattern coarsening on time-dependent domains is contrasted with that on fixed domains with the help of the Cahn-Hilliard equation extended here to time-dependent domains. Parallel results for the evolution of the Benjamin-Feir instability on time-dependent domains are also given.

  17. Invariants for time-dependent Hamiltonian systems.

    PubMed

    Struckmeier, J; Riedel, C

    2001-08-01

    An exact invariant is derived for n-degree-of-freedom Hamiltonian systems with general time-dependent potentials. The invariant is worked out in two equivalent ways. In the first approach, we define a special Ansatz for the invariant and determine its time-dependent coefficients. In the second approach, we perform a two-step canonical transformation of the initially time-dependent Hamiltonian to a time-independent one. The invariant is found to contain a function of time f(2)(t), defined as a solution of a linear third-order differential equation whose coefficients depend in general on the explicitly known configuration space trajectory that follows from the system's time evolution. It is shown that the invariant can be interpreted as the time integral of an energy balance equation. Our result is applied to a one-dimensional, time-dependent, damped non-linear oscillator, and to a three-dimensional system of Coulomb-interacting particles that are confined in a time-dependent quadratic external potential. We finally show that our results can be used to assess the accuracy of numerical simulations of time-dependent Hamiltonian systems.

  18. Time-dependent photoelectron angular distributions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Xiangyang

    1999-09-01

    I show that the angular distribution of electrons photoionized from gas phase targets by short light pulses is time-dependent, when the orbital momentum composition of the photocurrent changes with excitation energy so evolves with the time of detection. A theory of time- dependent photoionization is outlined and general formulas of time-dependent photoelectron flux and angular distribution are given. Two general propagator methods suitable to describe the time-dependent photoionization and scattering processes are developed. The photoionization process is viewed as a local excitation followed by a half scattering. The local excitation process is solved theoretically in a small region around the target core. This approach has been generalized to describe the evolution of a wavepacket in an unbound system. An asymptotic propagator theorem is discovered and used to derive analytic expressions for asymptotic propagators. The origin of the time dependence is explored by parameterizing the time delay and orbital momentum coupling in a two channel model. K-shell photoionization of N2 and CO are calculated with this time- dependent photoionization theory, implemented using a multiple scattering model. Numerical results demonstrate that the time dependence of photoelectron angular distributions is a realistic effect.

  19. Bimodal lipid substrate dependence of phosphatidylinositol kinase.

    PubMed

    Ganong, B R

    1990-07-24

    Phosphatidylinositol (PI) kinase activity was solubilized from rat liver microsomes and partially purified by chromatography on hydroxyapatite and Reactive Green 19-Superose. Examination of the ATP dependence using a mixed micellar assay gave a Km of 120 microM. The dependence of reaction rate on PI was more complicated. PI kinase bound a large amount of Triton X-100, and as expected for a micelle-associated enzyme utilizing a micelle-associated lipid substrate, the reaction rate was dependent on the micellar mole fraction, PI/(PI + Triton X-100), with a Km of 0.02 (unitless). Activity showed an additional dependence on bulk PI concentration at high micelle dilution. These results demonstrated two kinetically distinguishable steps leading to formation of a productive PI/enzyme(/ATP) complex. The rate of the first step, which probably represents exchange of PI from the bulk micellar pool into enzyme-containing micelles, depends on bulk PI concentration. The rate of the second step, association of PI with enzyme within a single micelle, depends on the micellar mole fraction of PI. Depression of the apparent Vmax at low ionic strength suggested that electrostatic repulsion between negatively charged PI/Triton X-100 mixed micelles inhibits PI exchange, consistent with a model in which intermicellar PI exchange depends on micellar collisions.

  20. Implicit and self-attributed dependency needs in dependent and histrionic personality disorders.

    PubMed

    Bornstein, R F

    1998-08-01

    Theorists speculate that dependent personality disorder (DPD) and histrionic personality disorder (HPD) are both associated with high levels of implicit (i.e., unconscious) dependency needs but speculate that only DPD is associated with high levels of self-attributed (i.e., conscious) dependency needs. To test this hypothesis, 444 undergraduates (236 women and 208 men) completed the Personality Diagnostic Questionnaire-Revised (PDQ-R), along with widely used measures of implicit dependency needs (the Rorschach Oral Dependency Scale; ROD), and self-attributed dependency needs (the Interpersonal Dependency Inventory; IDI). Correlational analyses and comparisons of IDI and ROD scores in participants scoring above and below the PDQ-R DPD and HPD thresholds supported theorists' speculations regarding implicit and self-attributed dependency needs in DPD and HPD. Implications of these results are discussed, and suggestions for future studies are offered.

  1. Birefringence in time-dependent moving media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Shirong; Zhang, Ruoyang; Zhai, Yanwang; Wei, Jianye; Zhao, Qing

    2016-08-01

    Electromagnetic wave propagation in one- and two-dimensional time-dependent moving media is investigated in this paper. We identify another origin of linear birefringence caused by the component of the flow perpendicular to the wave vector. Previously, birefringence is induced by applying external electric and magnetic fields to non-crystalline material. Here it is shown that the time-varying velocity field also contributes to such a phenomenon. Our results indicate that the parallel component, time-dependent or not, will not yield birefringence. Furthermore, the time-dependent flow also results in a frequency shift. One-dimensional simulation is conducted to demonstrate these effects.

  2. Field dependency, brain asymmetry and psychophysiological differences.

    PubMed

    Silverman, A J

    1979-01-01

    Field dependent individuals differ psychologically from field independent subjects. They use more primitive defense mechanisms, and are more responsive to social forces around them than field independent subjects. Psychophysiological differences exist between these groups which will be reviewed. Obesity and alcoholism are also related to field dependency, as well as other psychosomatic disorders. Our series of experiments show that field dependent subjects are less left cerebrally dominant, and show most elements (in subclinical form) of a left cerebral lobe (Gerstmann's) syndrome. Implications for psychosomatic medicine are noted in the psychophysiological differences seen.

  3. Mechanisms of ATP Dependent Chromatin Remodeling

    PubMed Central

    Gangaraju, Vamsi K.; Bartholomew, Blaine

    2007-01-01

    The inter-relationship between DNA repair and ATP dependent chromatin remodeling has begun to become very apparent with recent discoveries. ATP dependent remodeling complexes mobilize nucleosomes along DNA, promote the exchange of histones, or completely displace nucleosomes from DNA. These remodeling complexes are often categorized based on the domain organization of their catalytic subunit. The biochemical properties and structural information of several of these remodeling complexes are reviewed. The different models for how these complexes are able to mobilize nucleosomes and alter nucleosome structure are presented incorporating several recent findings. Finally the role of histone tails and their respective modifications in ATP-dependent remodeling are discussed. PMID:17306844

  4. Frequency Dependence of APATS Antenna Gain

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1982-03-01

    ESD-TR-82-120 HTR-8354 3FREQUENCY DEPENDENCE OF APATS ANTENNA GAIN 0 By G. A. ROBERTSHAW MARCH 1982 Prepared for DEPUTY FOR SURVEILLANCE AND CONTROL...FREQUENCY DEPENDENCE OF APATS ANTENNA GAIN 6. PERFORMING ORG. REPORT NUMBER MTR-8354 7. AUTHOR(*) S. CONTRACT OR GRANT NUMBER(s) G. A. ROBERTSHAW F19628-81-C...employed, each channel will lose 1.76 dB of gain. * E.g., if "a" is aperture length in array azimuth plane, frequency dependence begins for 0 > srFl

  5. Buprenorphine Sublingual and Buccal (opioid dependence)

    MedlinePlus

    ... dependence (addiction to opioid drugs, including heroin and narcotic painkillers). Buprenorphine is in a class of medications ... in Treximet), and zolmitriptan (Zomig); mirtazapine (Remeron); opiate (narcotic) medications for pain control; phenothiazines (medications used for ...

  6. EDTA-dependent pseudothrombocytopenia in a child.

    PubMed

    Akbayram, Sinan; Dogan, Murat; Akgun, Cihangir; Caksen, Hüseyin; Oner, Ahmet Faik

    2011-10-01

    Ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid (EDTA)-dependent pseudothrombocytopenia (PTCP) is the phenomenon of a spurious low platelet count due to antiplatelet antibodies that cause platelet clumping in blood anticoagulated with EDTA. The aggregation of platelets in EDTA-dependent PTCP is usually prevented by other anticoagulants, such as sodium citrate or heparin. EDTA-dependent PTCP has never been associated with hemorrhagic diathesis or platelet dysfunction. In this article, a 10-year-old boy with EDTA- and heparin-dependent PTCP is presented because of rare presentation. We report that EDTA and heparin can induce platelet clumping, and thus spuriously low platelet counts. However, aggregation of platelets was not detected in blood samples with sodium citrate, and platelet count was normal.

  7. POME-copula for hydrological dependence analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, D.; Wang, D.; Wang, L.; Chen, Y.; Chen, X.; Gu, S.

    2015-05-01

    Hydrological multivariate analysis has been widely studied using copula-based modelling, in which marginal distribution inference is one of the key issues. The main object of this study is to discuss the applicability of the principle of maximum entropy (POME) in marginal distribution inference, thus to develop a POME-copula framework to analyse the dependence of hydrological variables. Marginal distributions are derived with the POME approach before bivariate copulas constructed with corresponding parameters estimated by the dependence of the derived margins. The proposed POME-copula has been employed in hydrological dependence analyses, with the annual maximum streamflow and water level collected from the Yangtze River, and the monthly streamflow from the Yellow River. Results show that the POME-copula method performs well in capturing dependence patterns of various hydrological variables.

  8. Temperature dependence of nucleation in Yukawa fluids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, J.-S.; Wilemski, G.

    2002-03-01

    We have studied the temperature dependence of gas-liquid nucleation in Yukawa fluids with gradient theory (GT) and density functional theory (DFT). Each of these nonclassical theories exhibits a weaker (i.e. better) temperature dependence than classical nucleation theory. At a given temperature, the difference between GT and DFT for the reversible work to form a critical nucleus gets smaller with increasing superaturation. For the temperature dependence, the reversible work for GT is very close to that for DFT at high temperatures. The difference between the two theories increases with decreasing temperature and supersaturation. Thus, in contrast to the behavior of a Peng-Robinson fluid, we find that GT can improve the temperature dependence over that of classical nucleation theory, although not always to the same degree as DFT.

  9. Work Disability Benefits? Depends on the Doc

    MedlinePlus

    ... page: https://medlineplus.gov/news/fullstory_163275.html Work Disability Benefits? Depends on the Doc International study ... give widely varying opinions about whether claimants for work disability benefits should get those benefits, researchers report. ...

  10. Topic 5: Time-Dependent Behavior

    SciTech Connect

    Pfeiffer, P.A.; Tanabe, Tada-aki

    1991-12-31

    This chapter is a report of the material presented at the International Workshop on Finite Element Analysis of Reinforced Concrete, Session 4 -- Time Dependent Behavior, held at Columbia University, New York on June 3--6, 1991. Dr. P.A. Pfeiffer presented recent developments in time-dependent behavior of concrete and Professor T. Tanabe presented a review of research in Japan on time-dependent behavior of concrete. The chapter discusses the recent research of time-dependent behavior of concrete in the past few years in both the USA-European and Japanese communities. The author appreciates the valuable information provided by Zdenek P. Bazant in preparing the USA-European Research section.

  11. Codependency: a disorder separate from chemical dependency.

    PubMed

    O'Brien, P E; Gaborit, M

    1992-01-01

    This study examined the relationship between codependency (an excessive preoccupation with the lives, feelings, and problems of others), chemical dependency of a significant other, and depression. The Significant Others' Drug Use Survey (SODS) determined whether the subject was in a relationship with a significant other at risk of being chemically dependent. Beck's Depression Inventory (BDI) was used to assess depression. Two hypotheses were tested: first, that codependency exists independently of chemical dependency and, second, that codependent people tend to be more depressed than non-codependents. Results supported the first hypothesis, but not the second. A significant correlation between depression and having a significant other likely to be chemically dependent was observed. The usefulness of the concept of codependency is discussed with proposals for subsequent research.

  12. Free Beauty, Dependent Beauty, and Art.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stecker, Robert

    1987-01-01

    Explains the difference between free and dependent beauty. States that these distinctions, formed by Immanuel Kant, have important implications for aesthetic education. Concludes with a defense of Kant's aesthetics. (JDH)

  13. ALGEBRAIC DEPENDENCE THEOREMS ON COMPLEX PSEUDOCONCAVE SPACES

    DTIC Science & Technology

    The notion of pseudoconcave space is introduced and classical theorems on algebraic dependence of meromorphic functions are extended for this new class of spaces and for sections in a coherent sheaf. (Author)

  14. Mephentermine dependence with psychosis. A case report.

    PubMed

    Uday, G J; Josh, U G; Bhat, S M

    1988-01-01

    Dependence on mephentermine, a widely used sympathomimetic pressor agent, is so far unreported, although misuse of inhalers is recognised. A case of mephentermine dependence associated with chronic psychosis is reported here. Psychosis initially surfaced with chronic dexamphetamine abuse, but was sustained for 3 years by mephentermine. After a period of remission lasting for 4 years, the patient again developed psychosis on restarting abuse of mephentermine, which lasted for 5 years.

  15. Theoretical temperature dependence of solar cell parameters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fan, John C. C.

    1986-01-01

    A simple formulation has been derived for the temperature dependence of cell parameters for any solar cell material. Detailed calculations have been performed for high-quality monocrystalline GaAs, Si and Ge cells. Preliminary experimental data for GaAs and Si cells are close to the calculated values. In general, the higher the energy gap of a material, the small is the temperature dependence of its solar cell parameters.

  16. Density dependence of nuclear symmetry energy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Behera, B.; Routray, T. R.; Tripathy, S. K.

    2016-10-01

    High density behavior of nuclear symmetry energy is studied on the basis of the stiffest density dependence of asymmetric contribution to energy per nucleon in charge neutral n + p + e + μ matter under beta equilibrium. The density dependence of nuclear symmetry energy obtained in this way is neither very stiff nor soft at high densities and is found to be in conformity with recent observations of neutron stars.

  17. Activity dependent CAM cleavage and neurotransmission

    PubMed Central

    Conant, Katherine; Allen, Megan; Lim, Seung T.

    2015-01-01

    Spatially localized proteolysis represents an elegant means by which neuronal activity dependent changes in synaptic structure, and thus experience dependent learning and memory, can be achieved. In vitro and in vivo studies suggest that matrix metalloproteinase and adamalysin activity is concentrated at the cell surface, and emerging evidence suggests that increased peri-synaptic expression, release and/or activation of these proteinases occurs with enhanced excitatory neurotransmission. Synaptically expressed cell adhesion molecules (CAMs) could therefore represent important targets for neuronal activity-dependent proteolysis. Several CAM subtypes are expressed at the synapse, and their cleavage can influence the efficacy of synaptic transmission through a variety of non-mutually exclusive mechanisms. In the following review, we discuss mechanisms that regulate neuronal activity-dependent synaptic CAM shedding, including those that may be calcium dependent. We also highlight CAM targets of activity-dependent proteolysis including neuroligin and intercellular adhesion molecule-5 (ICAM-5). We include discussion focused on potential consequences of synaptic CAM shedding, with an emphasis on interactions between soluble CAM cleavage products and specific pre- and post-synaptic receptors. PMID:26321910

  18. Affective Dependence and Aggression: An Exploratory Study

    PubMed Central

    Petruccelli, Filippo; Diotaiuti, Pierluigi; Verrastro, Valeria; Petruccelli, Irene; Federico, Roberta; Martinotti, Giovanni; Fossati, Andrea; Di Giannantonio, Massimo; Janiri, Luigi

    2014-01-01

    Introduction. Emotionally dependent subjects may engage in controlling, restrictive, and aggressive behaviours, which limit their partner's autonomy. The underlying causes of such behaviours are not solely based on levels of aggression, but act as a mean of maintaining the subject's own sense of self-worth, identity, and general functioning. Objective. The aim of the paper is to explore the correlation between affective dependency and reactive/proactive aggression and to evaluate individual differences as predisposing factors for aggressive behaviour and emotional dependency. Methods. The Spouse-Specific Dependency Scale (SSDS) and the Reactive Proactive Questionnaire (RPQ) were administered to a sample of 3375 subjects. Results. In the whole sample, a positive correlation between emotional dependency and proactive aggression was identified. Differences with regard to sex, age group, and geographical distribution were evidenced for the scores of the different scales. Conclusion. A fundamental distinction between reactive and proactive aggression was observed, anchoring proactive aggression more strictly to emotional dependency. Sociocultural and demographical variables, together with the previous structuring of attachment styles, help to determine the scope, frequency, and intensity of the demands made to the partner, as well as to feed the fears of loss, abandonment, or betrayal. PMID:25054147

  19. Liquid-filled ionization chamber temperature dependence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Franco, L.; Gómez, F.; Iglesias, A.; Pardo, J.; Pazos, A.; Pena, J.; Zapata, M.

    2006-05-01

    Temperature and pressure corrections of the read-out signal of ionization chambers have a crucial importance in order to perform high-precision absolute dose measurements. In the present work the temperature and pressure dependences of a sealed liquid isooctane filled ionization chamber (previously developed by the authors) for radiotherapy applications have been studied. We have analyzed the thermal response of the liquid ionization chamber in a ˜20C interval around room temperature. The temperature dependence of the signal can be considered linear, with a slope that depends on the chamber collection electric field. For example, a relative signal slope of 0.27×10-2 K-1 for an operation electric field of 1.67×106 V m-1 has been measured in our detector. On the other hand, ambient pressure dependence has been found negligible, as expected for liquid-filled chambers. The thermal dependence of the liquid ionization chamber signal can be parametrized within the Onsager theory on initial recombination. Considering that changes with temperature of the detector response are due to variations in the free ion yield, a parametrization of this dependence has been obtained. There is a good agreement between the experimental data and the theoretical model from the Onsager framework.

  20. [Health Technology Dependency: A Concept Analysis].

    PubMed

    Chen, Miao-Yi; Chen, Ting-Yu; Kao, Chi-Wen

    2016-02-01

    Health technology dependence is a widely recognized concept that refers to the utilization of technology, including drugs, equipment, instruments, and related devices, to compensate for a physical disability or to prevent the progression of a disability. Although technology may significantly prolong the life of a patient, technology may also increase the psychological pressure of these patients and the burdens of their caregivers. There is a current dearth of related research and discussions related to the concept of "health technology dependency". Therefore, the present paper uses the strategies of concept analysis described by Walker & Avant (2010) to analyze this concept. The characteristic definition of health technology dependence addresses individuals who: (1) currently live with health technology, (2) may perceive physical or psychological burdens due to health technology, and (3) feel physical and psychological well-being when coping positively with their health technology dependency and, further, regard health technology as a part of their body. Further, the present paper uses case examples to help analyze the general concept. It is hoped that nurses may better understand the concept of "health technology dependency", consider the concerns of health-technology-dependent patients and their families, and develop relevant interventions to promote the well-being of these patients and their families.

  1. Neonatal behavior after drug dependent pregnancy.

    PubMed Central

    van Baar, A L; Fleury, P; Soepatmi, S; Ultee, C A; Wesselman, P J

    1989-01-01

    Neurobehavioural development of 35 infants of drug dependent mothers was compared with the development of 37 reference infants as part of a prospective longitudinal research project. Infants of drug dependent mothers had more poor responses than the other children on neurological examination. This difference is significant only when data of infants of drug dependent mothers born at full term are analysed. Two tailed testing indicated that significantly more infants of drug dependent mothers than reference children had electro-encephalograms rated as suspect or abnormal. By the end of the first month the infants of drug dependent mothers tended to be more active, and they had worse scores than the reference children on the neonatal behavioural assessment scale. Analysing data only of infants born at full term, the groups differ significantly on the interactive items. The results of this study show that even after treatment for the neonatal abstinence syndrome, infants of drug dependent mothers seem to differ from comparison children, which could indicate later developmental problems. PMID:2467626

  2. Experimental analysis of computer system dependability

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Iyer, Ravishankar, K.; Tang, Dong

    1993-01-01

    This paper reviews an area which has evolved over the past 15 years: experimental analysis of computer system dependability. Methodologies and advances are discussed for three basic approaches used in the area: simulated fault injection, physical fault injection, and measurement-based analysis. The three approaches are suited, respectively, to dependability evaluation in the three phases of a system's life: design phase, prototype phase, and operational phase. Before the discussion of these phases, several statistical techniques used in the area are introduced. For each phase, a classification of research methods or study topics is outlined, followed by discussion of these methods or topics as well as representative studies. The statistical techniques introduced include the estimation of parameters and confidence intervals, probability distribution characterization, and several multivariate analysis methods. Importance sampling, a statistical technique used to accelerate Monte Carlo simulation, is also introduced. The discussion of simulated fault injection covers electrical-level, logic-level, and function-level fault injection methods as well as representative simulation environments such as FOCUS and DEPEND. The discussion of physical fault injection covers hardware, software, and radiation fault injection methods as well as several software and hybrid tools including FIAT, FERARI, HYBRID, and FINE. The discussion of measurement-based analysis covers measurement and data processing techniques, basic error characterization, dependency analysis, Markov reward modeling, software-dependability, and fault diagnosis. The discussion involves several important issues studies in the area, including fault models, fast simulation techniques, workload/failure dependency, correlated failures, and software fault tolerance.

  3. Sex differences amongst dependent heroin users: histories, clinical characteristics and predictors of other substance dependence

    PubMed Central

    Shand, Fiona L; Degenhardt, Louisa; Slade, Tim; Nelson, Elliot C

    2010-01-01

    Introduction and aims To examine differences in the characteristics and histories of male and female dependent heroin users, and in the clinical characteristics associated with multiple substance dependence diagnoses. Design and methods 1513 heroin dependent participants underwent an interview covering substance use and dependence, psychiatric history, child maltreatment, family background, adult violence and criminal history. Family background, demographic and clinical characteristics were analysed by sex. Ordinal regression was used to test for a relationship between number of substance dependence diagnoses and other clinical variables. Results Women were more likely to experience most forms of child maltreatment, to first use heroin with a boyfriend or partner, to experience ongoing adult violence at the hands of a partner, and to have a poorer psychiatric history than men. Males had more prevalent lifetime substance dependence diagnoses and criminal histories and were more likely to meet criteria for ASPD. Predictors of multiple substance dependence diagnoses for both sexes were mental health variables, antisocial behaviour, childhood sexual abuse, victim of adult violence, younger age at first cannabis use and overdose. As the number of dependence diagnoses increased, clinical and behavioural problems increased. Childhood emotional neglect was related to increasing dependence diagnoses for females but not males, whereas PTSD was a significant predictor for males but not females. Discussion and conclusions Mental health problems, other substance dependence, childhood and adult trauma were common in this sample, with sex differences indicating different treatment needs and possible different pathways to heroin dependence for men and women. PMID:20833480

  4. Mapping Groundwater Dependent Ecosystems in California

    PubMed Central

    Howard, Jeanette; Merrifield, Matt

    2010-01-01

    Background Most groundwater conservation and management efforts focus on protecting groundwater for drinking water and for other human uses with little understanding or focus on the ecosystems that depend on groundwater. However, groundwater plays an integral role in sustaining certain types of aquatic, terrestrial and coastal ecosystems, and their associated landscapes. Our aim was to illuminate the connection between groundwater and surface ecosystems by identifying and mapping the distribution of groundwater dependent ecosystems (GDEs) in California. Methodology/Principal Findings To locate where groundwater flow sustains ecosystems we identified and mapped groundwater dependent ecosystems using a GIS. We developed an index of groundwater dependency by analyzing geospatial data for three ecosystem types that depend on groundwater: (1) springs and seeps; (2) wetlands and associated vegetation alliances; and (3) stream discharge from groundwater sources (baseflow index). Each variable was summarized at the scale of a small watershed (Hydrologic Unit Code-12; mean size = 9,570 ha; n = 4,621), and then stratified and summarized to 10 regions of relative homogeneity in terms of hydrologic, ecologic and climatic conditions. We found that groundwater dependent ecosystems are widely, although unevenly, distributed across California. Although different types of GDEs are clustered more densely in certain areas of the state, watersheds with multiple types of GDEs are found in both humid (e.g. coastal) and more arid regions. Springs are most densely concentrated in the North Coast and North Lahontan, whereas groundwater dependent wetlands and associated vegetation alliances are concentrated in the North and South Lahontan and Sacramento River hydrologic regions. The percentage of land area where stream discharge is most dependent on groundwater is found in the North Coast, Sacramento River and Tulare Lake regions. GDE clusters are located at the highest percentage

  5. Microdomain organization and frequency-dependence of CREB-dependent transcriptional signaling in heart cells

    PubMed Central

    Kobrinsky, Evgeny; Duong, Son Q.; Sheydina, Anna; Soldatov, Nikolai M.

    2011-01-01

    Voltage-gated Cav1.2 calcium channels couple membrane depolarization to cAMP response-element-binding protein (CREB)-dependent transcriptional activation. To investigate the spatial and temporal organization of CREB-dependent transcriptional nuclear microdomains, we combined perforated patch-clamp technique and FRET microscopy for monitoring CREB and CREB-binding protein interaction in the nuclei of live cells. The experimental approach to the quantitative assessment of CREB-dependent transcriptional signaling evoked by cAMP- and Cav1.2-dependent mechanisms was devised in COS1 cells expressing recombinant Cav1.2 calcium channels. Using continuous 2-dimensional wavelet transform and time series analyses, we found that nuclear CREB-dependent transcriptional signaling is organized differentially in spatially and temporally separated microdomains of 4 distinct types. In rat neonatal cardiomyocytes, CREB-dependent transcription is mediated by the cAMP-initiated CaMKII-sensitive and Cav1.2-initiated CaMKII-insensitive mechanisms. The latter microdomains show a tendency to exhibit periodic behavior correlated with spontaneous contraction of myocytes suggestive of frequency-dependent CREB-dependent transcriptional regulation in the heart.—Kobrinsky, E., Duong, S.Q., Sheydina, A., Soldatov, N. M. Microdomain organization and frequency-dependence of CREB-dependent transcriptional signaling in heart cells. PMID:21248242

  6. How context dependent are species interactions?

    PubMed

    Chamberlain, Scott A; Bronstein, Judith L; Rudgers, Jennifer A

    2014-07-01

    The net effects of interspecific species interactions on individuals and populations vary in both sign (-, 0, +) and magnitude (strong to weak). Interaction outcomes are context-dependent when the sign and/or magnitude change as a function of the biotic or abiotic context. While context dependency appears to be common, its distribution in nature is poorly described. Here, we used meta-analysis to quantify variation in species interaction outcomes (competition, mutualism, or predation) for 247 published articles. Contrary to our expectations, variation in the magnitude of effect sizes did not differ among species interactions, and while mutualism was most likely to change sign across contexts (and predation least likely), mutualism did not strongly differ from competition. Both the magnitude and sign of species interactions varied the most along spatial and abiotic gradients, and least as a function of the presence/absence of a third species. However, the degree of context dependency across these context types was not consistent among mutualism, competition and predation studies. Surprisingly, study location and ecosystem type varied in the degree of context dependency, with laboratory studies showing the highest variation in outcomes. We urge that studying context dependency per se, rather than focusing only on mean outcomes, can provide a general method for describing patterns of variation in nature.

  7. Visual dependency and dizziness after vestibular neuritis.

    PubMed

    Cousins, Sian; Cutfield, Nicholas J; Kaski, Diego; Palla, Antonella; Seemungal, Barry M; Golding, John F; Staab, Jeffrey P; Bronstein, Adolfo M

    2014-01-01

    Symptomatic recovery after acute vestibular neuritis (VN) is variable, with around 50% of patients reporting long term vestibular symptoms; hence, it is essential to identify factors related to poor clinical outcome. Here we investigated whether excessive reliance on visual input for spatial orientation (visual dependence) was associated with long term vestibular symptoms following acute VN. Twenty-eight patients with VN and 25 normal control subjects were included. Patients were enrolled at least 6 months after acute illness. Recovery status was not a criterion for study entry, allowing recruitment of patients with a full range of persistent symptoms. We measured visual dependence with a laptop-based Rod-and-Disk Test and severity of symptoms with the Dizziness Handicap Inventory (DHI). The third of patients showing the worst clinical outcomes (mean DHI score 36-80) had significantly greater visual dependence than normal subjects (6.35° error vs. 3.39° respectively, p = 0.03). Asymptomatic patients and those with minor residual symptoms did not differ from controls. Visual dependence was associated with high levels of persistent vestibular symptoms after acute VN. Over-reliance on visual information for spatial orientation is one characteristic of poorly recovered vestibular neuritis patients. The finding may be clinically useful given that visual dependence may be modified through rehabilitation desensitization techniques.

  8. Visual Dependency and Dizziness after Vestibular Neuritis

    PubMed Central

    Cousins, Sian; Cutfield, Nicholas J.; Kaski, Diego; Palla, Antonella; Seemungal, Barry M.; Golding, John F.; Staab, Jeffrey P.; Bronstein, Adolfo M.

    2014-01-01

    Symptomatic recovery after acute vestibular neuritis (VN) is variable, with around 50% of patients reporting long term vestibular symptoms; hence, it is essential to identify factors related to poor clinical outcome. Here we investigated whether excessive reliance on visual input for spatial orientation (visual dependence) was associated with long term vestibular symptoms following acute VN. Twenty-eight patients with VN and 25 normal control subjects were included. Patients were enrolled at least 6 months after acute illness. Recovery status was not a criterion for study entry, allowing recruitment of patients with a full range of persistent symptoms. We measured visual dependence with a laptop-based Rod-and-Disk Test and severity of symptoms with the Dizziness Handicap Inventory (DHI). The third of patients showing the worst clinical outcomes (mean DHI score 36–80) had significantly greater visual dependence than normal subjects (6.35° error vs. 3.39° respectively, p = 0.03). Asymptomatic patients and those with minor residual symptoms did not differ from controls. Visual dependence was associated with high levels of persistent vestibular symptoms after acute VN. Over-reliance on visual information for spatial orientation is one characteristic of poorly recovered vestibular neuritis patients. The finding may be clinically useful given that visual dependence may be modified through rehabilitation desensitization techniques. PMID:25233234

  9. Representing higher-order dependencies in networks

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Jian; Wickramarathne, Thanuka L.; Chawla, Nitesh V.

    2016-01-01

    To ensure the correctness of network analysis methods, the network (as the input) has to be a sufficiently accurate representation of the underlying data. However, when representing sequential data from complex systems, such as global shipping traffic or Web clickstream traffic as networks, conventional network representations that implicitly assume the Markov property (first-order dependency) can quickly become limiting. This assumption holds that, when movements are simulated on the network, the next movement depends only on the current node, discounting the fact that the movement may depend on several previous steps. However, we show that data derived from many complex systems can show up to fifth-order dependencies. In these cases, the oversimplifying assumption of the first-order network representation can lead to inaccurate network analysis results. To address this problem, we propose the higher-order network (HON) representation that can discover and embed variable orders of dependencies in a network representation. Through a comprehensive empirical evaluation and analysis, we establish several desirable characteristics of HON, including accuracy, scalability, and direct compatibility with the existing suite of network analysis methods. We illustrate how HON can be applied to a broad variety of tasks, such as random walking, clustering, and ranking, and we demonstrate that, by using it as input, HON yields more accurate results without any modification to these tasks. PMID:27386539

  10. [Dependency policies. Consequences for affected families].

    PubMed

    Escuredo Rodríguez, Bibiana

    2008-05-01

    Dependency creates a social problem whose burden falls upon the affected family and which causes problems in the lives and health of caretakers. A solution to these problems depends on the policies enacted. Nurses should know these policies and their consequences and act accordingly. For nurses to do so, the author has carried out a qualitative documented research project which analyzes the main Spanish dependency policies including the Geriatrics Plan and the following laws: regarding situations requiring living together and mutual aid, conciliation of working and personal lives, family caretaking for elderly and dependent relatives. This project's results indicate the aid provided consists in monetary loans and social services. The coverage provided by these aid programs is minimal or scarce. These programs promote keeping patients in need of dependency care in their homes under the care of relatives. There is little aid directed at caretakers and frequently such aid implies high personal costs. Nurses can and should contribute to bring awareness of these situations, to alleviate them and to modify some of these problems.

  11. Percolation on networks with conditional dependence group.

    PubMed

    Wang, Hui; Li, Ming; Deng, Lin; Wang, Bing-Hong

    2015-01-01

    Recently, the dependence group has been proposed to study the robustness of networks with interdependent nodes. A dependence group means that a failed node in the group can lead to the failures of the whole group. Considering the situation of real networks that one failed node may not always break the functionality of a dependence group, we study a cascading failure model that a dependence group fails only when more than a fraction β of nodes of the group fail. We find that the network becomes more robust with the increasing of the parameter β. However, the type of percolation transition is always first order unless the model reduces to the classical network percolation model, which is independent of the degree distribution of the network. Furthermore, we find that a larger dependence group size does not always make the networks more fragile. We also present exact solutions to the size of the giant component and the critical point, which are in agreement with the simulations well.

  12. Percolation on Networks with Conditional Dependence Group

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Hui; Li, Ming; Deng, Lin; Wang, Bing-Hong

    2015-01-01

    Recently, the dependence group has been proposed to study the robustness of networks with interdependent nodes. A dependence group means that a failed node in the group can lead to the failures of the whole group. Considering the situation of real networks that one failed node may not always break the functionality of a dependence group, we study a cascading failure model that a dependence group fails only when more than a fraction β of nodes of the group fail. We find that the network becomes more robust with the increasing of the parameter β. However, the type of percolation transition is always first order unless the model reduces to the classical network percolation model, which is independent of the degree distribution of the network. Furthermore, we find that a larger dependence group size does not always make the networks more fragile. We also present exact solutions to the size of the giant component and the critical point, which are in agreement with the simulations well. PMID:25978634

  13. Emotion recognition (sometimes) depends on horizontal orientations

    PubMed Central

    Huynh, Carol M; Balas, Benjamin

    2014-01-01

    Face recognition depends critically on horizontal orientations (Goffaux & Dakin, 2010). Face images that lack horizontal features are harder to recognize than those that have that information preserved. Presently, we asked if facial emotional recognition also exhibits this dependency by asking observers to categorize orientation-filtered happy and sad expressions. Furthermore, we aimed to dissociate image-based orientation energy from object-based orientation by rotating images 90-degrees in the picture-plane. In our first experiment, we showed that the perception of emotional expression does depend on horizontal orientations and that object-based orientation constrained performance more than image-based orientation. In Experiment 2 we showed that mouth openness (i.e. open versus closed-mouths) also influenced the emotion-dependent reliance on horizontal information. Lastly, we describe a simple computational analysis that demonstrates that the impact of mouth openness was not predicted by variation in the distribution of orientation energy across horizontal and vertical orientation bands. Overall, our results suggest that emotion recognition does largely depend on horizontal information defined relative to the face, but that this bias is modulated by multiple factors that introduce variation in appearance across and within distinct emotions. PMID:24664854

  14. Skeletal muscle tensile strain dependence: hyperviscoelastic nonlinearity

    PubMed Central

    Wheatley, Benjamin B; Morrow, Duane A; Odegard, Gregory M; Kaufman, Kenton R; Donahue, Tammy L Haut

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Computational modeling of skeletal muscle requires characterization at the tissue level. While most skeletal muscle studies focus on hyperelasticity, the goal of this study was to examine and model the nonlinear behavior of both time-independent and time-dependent properties of skeletal muscle as a function of strain. Materials and Methods Nine tibialis anterior muscles from New Zealand White rabbits were subject to five consecutive stress relaxation cycles of roughly 3% strain. Individual relaxation steps were fit with a three-term linear Prony series. Prony series coefficients and relaxation ratio were assessed for strain dependence using a general linear statistical model. A fully nonlinear constitutive model was employed to capture the strain dependence of both the viscoelastic and instantaneous components. Results Instantaneous modulus (p<0.0005) and mid-range relaxation (p<0.0005) increased significantly with strain level, while relaxation at longer time periods decreased with strain (p<0.0005). Time constants and overall relaxation ratio did not change with strain level (p>0.1). Additionally, the fully nonlinear hyperviscoelastic constitutive model provided an excellent fit to experimental data, while other models which included linear components failed to capture muscle function as accurately. Conclusions Material properties of skeletal muscle are strain-dependent at the tissue level. This strain dependence can be included in computational models of skeletal muscle performance with a fully nonlinear hyperviscoelastic model. PMID:26409235

  15. Linear dependencies in Weyl-Heisenberg orbits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dang, Hoan Bui; Blanchfield, Kate; Bengtsson, Ingemar; Appleby, D. M.

    2013-11-01

    Five years ago, Lane Hughston showed that some of the symmetric informationally complete positive operator valued measures (SICs) in dimension 3 coincide with the Hesse configuration (a structure well known to algebraic geometers, which arises from the torsion points of a certain elliptic curve). This connection with elliptic curves is signalled by the presence of linear dependencies among the SIC vectors. Here we look for analogous connections between SICs and algebraic geometry by performing computer searches for linear dependencies in higher dimensional SICs. We prove that linear dependencies will always emerge in Weyl-Heisenberg orbits when the fiducial vector lies in a certain subspace of an order 3 unitary matrix. This includes SICs when the dimension is divisible by 3 or equal to 8 mod 9. We examine the linear dependencies in dimension 6 in detail and show that smaller dimensional SICs are contained within this structure, potentially impacting the SIC existence problem. We extend our results to look for linear dependencies in orbits when the fiducial vector lies in an eigenspace of other elements of the Clifford group that are not order 3. Finally, we align our work with recent studies on representations of the Clifford group.

  16. Temperature Dependence of Factors Controlling Isoprene Emissions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Duncan, Bryan N.; Yoshida, Yasuko; Damon, Megan R.; Douglass, Anne R.; Witte, Jacquelyn C.

    2009-01-01

    We investigated the relationship of variability in the formaldehyde (HCHO) columns measured by the Aura Ozone Monitoring Instrument (OMI) to isoprene emissions in the southeastern United States for 2005-2007. The data show that the inferred, regional-average isoprene emissions varied by about 22% during summer and are well correlated with temperature, which is known to influence emissions. Part of the correlation with temperature is likely associated with other causal factors that are temperature-dependent. We show that the variations in HCHO are convolved with the temperature dependence of surface ozone, which influences isoprene emissions, and the dependence of the HCHO column to mixed layer height as OMI's sensitivity to HCHO increases with altitude. Furthermore, we show that while there is an association of drought with the variation in HCHO, drought in the southeastern U.S. is convolved with temperature.

  17. Dependence of fusion on isospin dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Godbey, K.; Umar, A. S.; Simenel, C.

    2017-01-01

    We introduce a new microscopic approach to calculate the dependence of fusion barriers and cross sections on isospin dynamics. The method is based on the time-dependent Hartree-Fock theory and the isoscalar and isovector properties of the energy density functional (EDF). The contribution to the fusion barriers originating from the isoscalar and isovector parts of the EDF is calculated. It is shown that, for nonsymmetric systems, the isovector dynamics influence the subbarrier fusion cross sections. For most systems this results in an enhancement of the subbarrier cross sections, while for others we observe differing degrees of hindrance. We use this approach to provide an explanation of recently measured fusion cross sections which show a enhancement at low Ec .m . energies for the system 40Ca+132Sn as compared with the more neutron-rich system 48Ca+132Sn and discuss the dependence of subbarrier fusion cross sections on transfer.

  18. Endothelium-dependent relaxation of blood vessels

    SciTech Connect

    Hynes, M.R.

    1987-01-01

    Dilation of blood vessels in response to a large number of agents has been shown to be dependent on an intact vascular endothelium. The present studies examine some aspects of endothelium-dependent vasodilation in blood vessels of the rabbit and rat. Using the rabbit ear artery and the subtype-selective muscarinic antagonist pirenzepine, muscarinic receptors of the endothelium and smooth muscle cells were shown to be of the low affinity M/sub 2/ subtype. Inhibition of (/sup 3/H)(-)quinuclidinyl benzilate was used to determine affinity for the smooth muscle receptors while antagonism of methacholine induced vasodilation yielded the endothelial cell receptor affinity. The effect of increasing age (1-27 months) on endothelium-dependent relaxation was studied in aortic rings, perfused tail artery and perfused mesenteric bed of the Fisher 344 rat. The influence of endothelium on contractile responses was examined using the perfused caudal artery.

  19. Flavour-dependent leptogenesis with reheating

    SciTech Connect

    Antusch, Stefan

    2007-11-20

    Upper bounds on the reheat temperature of the early universe, as they appear for example in classes of supergravity models, impose severe constraints on the thermal leptogenesis mechanism. To analyse these constraints, we extend the flavour-dependent treatment of leptogenesis to include reheating. We solve the flavour-dependent Boltzmann equations to obtain the leptogenesis efficiency as a function of the flavour dependent washout parameter m-tilde{sub 1,{alpha}} and of m{sub N{sub 1}}/T{sub RH}, the ratio of the mass of the lightest right-handed neutrino over the reheat temperature, and calculate the minimal values of the reheat temperature compatible with thermal leptogenesis in type I and type II seesaw scenarios.

  20. Brain pathways to recovery from alcohol dependence.

    PubMed

    Cui, Changhai; Noronha, Antonio; Warren, Kenneth R; Koob, George F; Sinha, Rajita; Thakkar, Mahesh; Matochik, John; Crews, Fulton T; Chandler, L Judson; Pfefferbaum, Adolf; Becker, Howard C; Lovinger, David; Everitt, Barry J; Egli, Mark; Mandyam, Chitra D; Fein, George; Potenza, Marc N; Harris, R Adron; Grant, Kathleen A; Roberto, Marisa; Meyerhoff, Dieter J; Sullivan, Edith V

    2015-08-01

    This article highlights the research presentations at the satellite symposium on "Brain Pathways to Recovery from Alcohol Dependence" held at the 2013 Society for Neuroscience Annual Meeting. The purpose of this symposium was to provide an up to date overview of research efforts focusing on understanding brain mechanisms that contribute to recovery from alcohol dependence. A panel of scientists from the alcohol and addiction research field presented their insights and perspectives on brain mechanisms that may underlie both recovery and lack of recovery from alcohol dependence. The four sessions of the symposium encompassed multilevel studies exploring mechanisms underlying relapse and craving associated with sustained alcohol abstinence, cognitive function deficit and recovery, and translational studies on preventing relapse and promoting recovery. Gaps in our knowledge and research opportunities were also discussed.

  1. Canopy bidirectional reflectance dependence on leaf orientation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brakke, Thomas W.; Otterman, Joseph

    1990-01-01

    The dependence of the bidirectional reflectance (BR) on the inclination and azimuthal orientation of a leaf is analyzed, with the primary assumption that, in terms of both obscuration and shadowing, the entire canopy consists of the same leaves. The BR patterns of a dense canopy are examined as a function of canopy architecture. It is assumed that the leaves are opaque Lambertian reflectors, having identical orientation and relfecting properties throughout the canopy, and distributed randomly with respect to the the irradiation field and the viewing direction. Analytical expressions are presented and analyzed for the BR factor. It is noted that maximal BR occurs at large viewing zenith angles. A complex and often steep dependence of the BR on azimuthal location is reported, noting that the BR thus depends on the leaf azimuth as well as the zenith angle. It is concluded that the question of azimuthal distribution has to be addressed when conducting model inversions to infer canopy characteristics and architecture.

  2. Management of methamphetamine abuse and dependence.

    PubMed

    Ling, Walter; Rawson, Richard; Shoptaw, Steve; Ling, Walter

    2006-10-01

    Preliminary implications for evidence-based treatments and future practice may be drawn from new research findings that inspire a fresh view of methamphetamine dependence and associated medical consequences. Current user populations include increasingly impacted subgroups (ie, youths, women, men who have sex with men, and rural residents); complex consequences of methamphetamine abuse among these subgroups require additional efforts involving contextual understanding of characteristics and needs to develop effective treatments. The neurobiological data on cellular activity of methamphetamine taken with findings from neuroimaging studies indicate potential targets for pharmacologic interventions. In early trials, several candidate medications--bupropion, modafinil, and, to a lesser extent, baclofen--have shown promise in treating aspects of methamphetamine dependence, including aiding memory function necessary to more effectively participate in and benefit from behavioral therapies. Clinicians and researchers must interact to efficiently address the problems of methamphetamine dependence, a major drug problem in the United States and the world.

  3. Predictive a priori pressure-dependent kinetics.

    PubMed

    Jasper, Ahren W; Pelzer, Kenley M; Miller, James A; Kamarchik, Eugene; Harding, Lawrence B; Klippenstein, Stephen J

    2014-12-05

    The ability to predict the pressure dependence of chemical reaction rates would be a great boon to kinetic modeling of processes such as combustion and atmospheric chemistry. This pressure dependence is intimately related to the rate of collision-induced transitions in energy E and angular momentum J. We present a scheme for predicting this pressure dependence based on coupling trajectory-based determinations of moments of the E,J-resolved collisional transfer rates with the two-dimensional master equation. This completely a priori procedure provides a means for proceeding beyond the empiricism of prior work. The requisite microcanonical dissociation rates are obtained from ab initio transition state theory. Predictions for the CH4 = CH3 + H and C2H3 = C2H2 + H reaction systems are in excellent agreement with experiment.

  4. Treating Tobacco Dependence in a Medical Setting

    PubMed Central

    Hurt, Richard D.; Ebbert, Jon O.; Hays, J. Taylor; McFadden, David D.

    2014-01-01

    The US Public Health Service Guideline for Treating Tobacco Use and Dependence 2008 Update emphasizes tobacco use as a chronic medical disorder; highlights both behavioral counseling and the use of 1 or more of the 7 approved medications; and points out the utility, efficacy, and reach of telephone quitlines. The treatment of users of smokeless tobacco continues to be less than optimal. Although providing evidence-based treatment for tobacco-dependent patients is a challenge for busy physicians, a team approach including trained and certified tobacco treatment specialists (TTS) provides an efficient treatment model. TTS represent a new and growing part of the health care team and hold great potential for expanding the collective tobacco treatment expertise in the medical setting. The effective treatment of tobacco dependence frequently requires tailoring, and often intensifying, interventions (both counseling and pharmacotherapy) to meet the needs of the individual patient. PMID:19706827

  5. Drug dependence: its significance and characteristics

    PubMed Central

    Eddy, Nathan B.; Halbach, H.; Isbell, Harris; Seevers, Maurice H.

    1965-01-01

    It has become impossible in practice, and is scientifically unsound, to maintain a single definition for all forms of drug addiction and/or habituation. A feature common to these conditions as well as to drug abuse in general is dependence, psychic or physical or both, of the individual on a chemical agent. Therefore, better understanding should be attained by substitution of the term drug dependence of this or that type, according to the agent or class of agents involved, in discussions of these conditions, especially inter-disciplinary. Short descriptions, followed by concise listings of their characteristics, are formulated for the various types of dependence on at present widely abused major groups of substances. PMID:5294186

  6. Treating tobacco dependence in a medical setting.

    PubMed

    Hurt, Richard D; Ebbert, Jon O; Hays, J Taylor; McFadden, David D

    2009-01-01

    The US Public Health Service Guideline for Treating Tobacco Use and Dependence 2008 Update emphasizes tobacco use as a chronic medical disorder; highlights both behavioral counseling and the use of 1 or more of the 7 approved medications; and points out the utility, efficacy, and reach of telephone quitlines. The treatment of users of smokeless tobacco continues to be less than optimal. Although providing evidence-based treatment for tobacco- dependent patients is a challenge for busy physicians, a team approach including trained and certified tobacco treatment specialists (TTS) provides an efficient treatment model. TTS represent a new and growing part of the health care team and hold great potential for expanding the collective tobacco treatment expertise in the medical setting. The effective treatment of tobacco dependence frequently requires tailoring, and often intensifying, interventions (both counseling and pharmacotherapy) to meet the needs of the individual patient.

  7. Neurocognitive Characteristics of Individuals with Schizophrenia and Cocaine Dependence: Comparison of Currently Dependent and Remitted Groups

    PubMed Central

    Peer, Jason; Bennett, Melanie E.; Bellack, Alan S.

    2009-01-01

    Several investigations of cognitive functioning in indivduals with schizophrenia and co-occurring cocaine use have yielded mixed results when compared to samples with schizophrenia only. However, no studies have specifically compared remitted and current cocaine dependence in schizophrenia. Such an analyis could help clarify the degree and type of cognitive impairment associated with cocaine dependence in schizophrenia. Two samples of individuals with schizophrenia – those with current cocaine dependence (SZ-D; n = 72) and those with cocaine dependence in remission (SZ-R; n = 48) were compared on a brief neuropsychological test battery. Parallel current dependent and remitted samples with affective disorder (AD-D; n = 65 and AD-R; n = 55) were also included in the analyses. Results yielded few neuropsychological differences between remitted and current dependent states across the SZ and AD groups. These findings suggest that cognitive impairment may be relatively static in these populations. PMID:19684503

  8. Time-dependent Flare Models with MALI

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kašparová, J.; Heinzel, P.; Varady, M.; Karlický, M.

    2003-01-01

    Temporal variations of Hα line profile intensities related to electron beams are presented. We show first results of time dependent simulations of a chromospheric response to a 1 sec monoenergetic electron beam. 1-D hydrodynamic code together with particle representation of the beam have been used to calculate atmospheric evolution. Time dependent radiative transfer problem has been solved for the resulting atmosphere in the MALI approach, using the Crank-Nicholson implicit scheme. Non-thermal collisional rates were included in linearised equations of statistical equilibrium.

  9. Dependence in Classification of Aluminium Waste

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Resti, Y.

    2015-06-01

    Based on the dependence between edge and colour intensity of aluminium waste image, the aim of this paper is to classify the aluminium waste into three types; pure aluminium, not pure aluminium type-1 (mixed iron/lead) and not pure aluminium type 2 (unrecycle). Principal Component Analysis (PCA) was employed to reduction the dimension of image data, while Bayes’ theorem with the Gaussian copula was applied to classification. The copula was employed to handle dependence between edge and colour intensity of aluminium waste image. The results showed that the classifier has been correctly classifiable by 88.33%.

  10. Investigations of Low Temperature Time Dependent Cracking

    SciTech Connect

    Van der Sluys, W A; Robitz, E S; Young, B A; Bloom, J

    2002-09-30

    The objective of this project was to investigate metallurgical and mechanical phenomena associated with time dependent cracking of cold bent carbon steel piping at temperatures between 327 C and 360 C. Boiler piping failures have demonstrated that understanding the fundamental metallurgical and mechanical parameters controlling these failures is insufficient to eliminate it from the field. The results of the project consisted of the development of a testing methodology to reproduce low temperature time dependent cracking in laboratory specimens. This methodology was used to evaluate the cracking resistance of candidate heats in order to identify the factors that enhance cracking sensitivity. The resultant data was integrated into current available life prediction tools.

  11. Size-Dependent Accuracy of Nanoscale Thermometers.

    PubMed

    Alicki, Robert; Leitner, David M

    2015-07-23

    The accuracy of two classes of nanoscale thermometers is estimated in terms of size and system-dependent properties using the spin-boson model. We consider solid state thermometers, where the energy splitting is tuned by thermal properties of the material, and fluorescent organic thermometers, in which the fluorescence intensity depends on the thermal population of conformational states of the thermometer. The results of the theoretical model compare well with the accuracy reported for several nanothermometers that have been used to measure local temperature inside living cells.

  12. Does Melissa Officinalis Cause Withdrawal or Dependence?

    PubMed Central

    Demirci, Kadir; Akgönül, Mehmet; Demirdaş, Arif; Akpınar, Abdullah

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: Melissa officinalis is a medical and aromatic plant that is used for its hypnotic, sedative, and spasmolytic effects. This report presents a case study of30-year-old patient who was admitted to an emergency department with restlessness, tremor, distractibility, and sweating following a discontinuation of Melissa officinalis consumption. Case report: In this case, withdrawal symptoms may be related to the dependence effect caused by long-term use of Melissa officinalis. Although Melissa officinalis, a plant, is preferred by many patients as an alternative to pharmaceutical drugs, patients should be made aware that it may have a risk of dependency and can lead to withdrawal symptoms. PMID:25870482

  13. Pharmacotherapy of dual substance abuse and dependence.

    PubMed

    Kenna, George A; Nielsen, Darci M; Mello, Patricia; Schiesl, Alison; Swift, Robert M

    2007-01-01

    The US FDA has approved a limited number of treatments for alcohol, nicotine and opioid dependence; however, no treatments for other abused drugs such as marijuana, cocaine or methamphetamine are approved. This review focuses on research into drug pharmacotherapies, particularly single-drug therapies, for substance abuse and dependence contributing to the most important dual substance use disorders (SUDs). Given the implications of poly-substance abuse, it is essential that clinicians and researchers be aware of potential pharmacotherapies for the treatment of dual SUDs.A substantial number of patients abuse more than one drug concurrently, complicating the treatment of SUD and leaving clinicians with few FDA-approved drug options for their patients. In this era of evidence-based medicine, such patients are typically treated with therapeutically proven medications, but in ways that are outside the scope of a drug's original indication by the FDA. Such 'off-label' prescribing has become an important therapeutic strategy for practitioners seeking treatments for other diseases in subpopulations such as paediatrics and gerontology or for medical conditions such as oncology or mental illness. Similarly, the information that most clinicians use to make their decisions for treating patients abusing multiple drugs stems from trials treating a single SUD, anecdotal experiences from their own practice or that of their colleagues, or single-case studies reported in the literature. The existing evidence suggests there are few treatments for SUDs that confer significant reductions in substance use across a broad patient population. Moreover, even fewer clinical efficacy trials have been conducted that provide evidence of therapeutic benefit for these drugs. Recognising the difficulty in making the proper drug choice for facilitating maximum treatment success, this review highlights the single drugs or drug combinations that show some potential for treating dual SUDs. This

  14. Gate dependent electronic Raman scattering in graphene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Riccardi, E.; Méasson, M.-A.; Kazayous, M.; Sacuto, A.; Gallais, Y.; Spectroscopy Of Quasi-Particles (Squap) Team

    We report the direct observation of polarization resolved electronic Raman scattering in a gated monolayer graphene device. The evolution of the electronic Raman scattering spectra with gate voltage and its polarization dependence are in full agreement with theoretical expectations for non-resonant Raman processes involving interband electron-hole excitations across the Dirac cone. We further show that the spectral dependence of the electronic Raman scattering signal can be simply described by the dynamical polarizability of graphene in the long wavelength limit. The possibility to directly observe Dirac fermion excitations in graphene opens the way to promising Raman investigations of electronic properties of graphene and other 2D materials.

  15. Gate dependent electronic Raman scattering in graphene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Riccardi, E.; Méasson, M.-A.; Kazayous, M.; Sacuto, A.; Gallais, Y.; Spectroscopy Of Quasi-Particles (Squap) Team

    We report the direct observation of polarization resolved electronic Raman scattering in a gated monolayer graphene device. The evolution of the electronic Raman scattering spectra with gate voltage and its polarization dependence are in full agreement with theoretical expectations for non-resonant Raman processes involving interband electron-hole excitations across the Dirac cone [1]. We further show that the spectral dependence of the electronic Raman scattering signal can be simply described by the dynamical polarizability of graphene in the long wavelength limit [2]. The possibility to directly observe Dirac fermion excitations in graphene opens the way to promising Raman investigations of electronic properties of graphene and other 2D materials.

  16. [Substitution therapy tested against amphetamine dependence].

    PubMed

    Bloniecki Kallio, Victor; Guterstam, Joar; Franck, Johan

    2016-01-06

    Amphetamine dependence is relatively common in Sweden and it is the most frequently used substance among patients with intravenous drug abuse. Current treatment options are limited but recently substitution therapy with psychostimulant medication has been evaluated in several clinical trials. Such treatment is controversial in Sweden, perhaps due to the failure of experimental prescription of psychostimulants in the 1960s. Recent clinical trials however indicate that structured treatment programs with psychostimulants might have positive effects, although the results are inconsistent and the evidence base is still limited. Future research is needed in order to determine the potential role of substitution therapy for amphetamine dependence in clinical practice.

  17. Benzodiazepines consumption: does dependence vary with age?

    PubMed

    Gérardin, Marie; Victorri-Vigneau, Caroline; Guerlais, Marylène; Guillou-Landreat, Morgane; Grall-Bronnec, Marie; Jolliet, Pascale

    2014-09-01

    We have compared two groups of chronic benzodiazepines (or zolpidem/zopiclone) users: "Seniors," aged 65 years or more, and "Adults," aged less than 65 years. The study took place in the Pays de Loire region. The questionnaire assesses dependence based on items from the DSM-IV. The analysis was based on 176 Senior questionnaires and 212 Adult questionnaires. Whereas Senior patients take benzodiazepines routinely with little negative consequences, Adults suffer from underlying psychological trouble, mention a higher consumption than planned, which causes negative consequences. 35.2% of Seniors are dependent on benzodiazepines versus 49.8% of Adults.

  18. On spectral dependence of polarization of asteroids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lupishko, D. F.; Shkuratov, Yu. G.

    2016-09-01

    From the analysis of all of the data available on the spectral dependence of polarization of light reflected by asteroids, it has been shown that the slope of the spectral dependence of polarization of asteroids changes its sign, when moving from the negative branch of the phase curve of polarization to the positive one. This effect also manifests itself in the spectral behavior of polarization of the Moon and, probably, in the polarization of the other atmosphereless bodies. From the analysis of a population of asteroids of different types, a weak correlation between the spectral slopes of the polarization degree and the albedo has been found.

  19. Dynamic Dependence Analysis : Modeling and Inference of Changing Dependence Among Multiple Time-Series

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-06-01

    In this dissertation we investigate the problem of reasoning over evolving structures which describe the dependence among multiple, possibly vector... dependence structures. In the absence of training data, such reasoning is challenging for several reasons. If one is solely interested in the structure of... dependence as described by a graphical model, there is the question of how to account for unknown parameters. Additionally the set of possible

  20. What can dependence theories tell us about assessing the emergence of tobacco dependence?

    PubMed

    Tiffany, Stephen T; Conklin, Cynthia A; Shiffman, Saul; Clayton, Richard R

    2004-06-01

    Little is known about the processes that underlie changes in smoking that occur between the first use of a cigarette, subsequent regular use and eventual addictive use. At present, assessments of those critical processes are poorly developed and not strongly informed by contemporary models of drug dependence. The preceding three papers in this special issue address explicitly how modern drug-dependence theories describe the emergence of drug dependence and the implications of those theories for assessment. The papers covered three domains of theories: negative reinforcement, positive reinforcement, and cognitive and social learning. In this paper, we summarize these reviews and extract general themes and issues that emerge across all the articles. These include: (1) the importance of learning processes; (2) limitations of self-report measures; (3) the view of dependence as a process and not a state; (4) the conception of dependence on a continuum in contrast to the conventional perspective of tobacco dependence as a natural category; (5) the ontological status of the dependence concept; (6) limitations of backward extrapolations from adult assessments; (7) the possibility of multiple dimensions or forms of dependence; and (8) the value of a transdisciplinary approach when studying the emergence of tobacco dependence.

  1. Assessment of seismic loss dependence using copula.

    PubMed

    Goda, Katsuichiro; Ren, Jiandong

    2010-07-01

    The catastrophic nature of seismic risk is attributed to spatiotemporal correlation of seismic losses of buildings and infrastructure. For seismic risk management, such correlated seismic effects must be adequately taken into account, since they affect the probability distribution of aggregate seismic losses of spatially distributed structures significantly, and its upper tail behavior can be of particular importance. To investigate seismic loss dependence for two closely located portfolios of buildings, simulated seismic loss samples, which are obtained from a seismic risk model of spatially distributed buildings by taking spatiotemporally correlated ground motions into account, are employed. The characterization considers a loss frequency model that incorporates one dependent random component acting as a common shock to all buildings, and a copula-based loss severity model, which facilitates the separate construction of marginal loss distribution functions and nonlinear copula function with upper tail dependence. The proposed method is applied to groups of wood-frame buildings located in southwestern British Columbia. Analysis results indicate that the dependence structure of aggregate seismic losses can be adequately modeled by the right heavy tail copula or Gumbel copula, and that for the considered example, overall accuracy of the proposed method is satisfactory at probability levels of practical interest (at most 10% estimation error of fractiles of aggregate seismic loss). The developed statistical seismic loss model may be adopted in dynamic financial analysis for achieving faster evaluation with reasonable accuracy.

  2. Field Dependency and Performance in Mathematics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Onwumere, Onyebuchi; Reid, Norman

    2014-01-01

    Mathematics is an important school subject but one which often poses problems for learners. It has been found that learners do not possess the cognitive capacity to handle understanding procedures, representations, concepts, and applications at the same time. while the extent of field dependency may hold the key to one way by which the working…

  3. Ion-dependent gating of kainate receptors.

    PubMed

    Bowie, Derek

    2010-01-01

    Ligand-gated ion channels are an important class of signalling protein that depend on small chemical neurotransmitters such as acetylcholine, l-glutamate, glycine and gamma-aminobutyrate for activation. Although numerous in number, neurotransmitter substances have always been thought to drive the receptor complex into the open state in much the same way and not rely substantially on other factors. However, recent work on kainate-type (KAR) ionotropic glutamate receptors (iGluRs) has identified an exception to this rule. Here, the activation process fails to occur unless external monovalent anions and cations are present. This absolute requirement of ions singles out KARs from all other ligand-gated ion channels, including closely related AMPA- and NMDA-type iGluR family members. The uniqueness of ion-dependent gating has earmarked this feature of KARs as a putative target for the development of selective ligands; a prospect all the more compelling with the recent elucidation of distinct anion and cation binding pockets. Despite these advances, much remains to be resolved. For example, it is still not clear how ion effects on KARs impacts glutamatergic transmission. I conclude by speculating that further analysis of ion-dependent gating may provide clues into how functionally diverse iGluRs families emerged by evolution. Consequently, ion-dependent gating of KARs looks set to continue to be a subject of topical inquiry well into the future.

  4. Evaluation Framework for Dependable Mobile Learning Scenarios

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bensassi, Manel; Laroussi, Mona

    2014-01-01

    The goal of the dependability analysis is to predict inconsistencies and to reveal ambiguities and incompleteness in the designed learning scenario. Evaluation, in traditional learning design, is generally planned after the execution of the scenario. In mobile learning, this stage becomes too difficult and expensive to apply due to the complexity…

  5. Dependency Traits Among Parents of Drug Abusers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tennant, Forest S., Jr.

    1976-01-01

    Studies question whether there is a significant association between parents' dependency traits and drug habits in their offspring. Reported here is a survey of 1,091 young males. The reported occurrence of parents' alcohol consumption, smoking, use of stimulants and sedatives, and overeating were compared among abusers and non-users of hashish,…

  6. Gravity-dependent transport in industrial processes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ostrach, Simon; Kamotani, Yasuhiro

    1994-01-01

    Gravity-dependent transport phenomena in various industrial processes are investigated in order to address a broader range of microgravity phenomena and to develop new applications of microgravity. A number of important topics are identified and analyzed in detail. The present article describes results on coating flow, zeolite growth, and rotating electrochemical system.

  7. Serial dependence in the perception of attractiveness

    PubMed Central

    Xia, Ye; Leib, Allison Yamanashi; Whitney, David

    2016-01-01

    The perception of attractiveness is essential for choices of food, object, and mate preference. Like perception of other visual features, perception of attractiveness is stable despite constant changes of image properties due to factors like occlusion, visual noise, and eye movements. Recent results demonstrate that perception of low-level stimulus features and even more complex attributes like human identity are biased towards recent percepts. This effect is often called serial dependence. Some recent studies have suggested that serial dependence also exists for perceived facial attractiveness, though there is also concern that the reported effects are due to response bias. Here we used an attractiveness-rating task to test the existence of serial dependence in perceived facial attractiveness. Our results demonstrate that perceived face attractiveness was pulled by the attractiveness level of facial images encountered up to 6 s prior. This effect was not due to response bias and did not rely on the previous motor response. This perceptual pull increased as the difference in attractiveness between previous and current stimuli increased. Our results reconcile previously conflicting findings and extend previous work, demonstrating that sequential dependence in perception operates across different levels of visual analysis, even at the highest levels of perceptual interpretation. PMID:28006077

  8. Term Dependence: Truncating the Bahadur Lazarsfeld Expansion.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Losee, Robert M., Jr.

    1994-01-01

    Studies the performance of probabilistic information retrieval systems using differing statistical dependence assumptions when estimating the probabilities inherent in the retrieval model. Experimental results using the Bahadur Lazarsfeld expansion on the Cystic Fibrosis database are discussed that suggest that incorporating term dependence…

  9. Time-dependent freezing rate parcel model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vali, G.; Snider, J. R.

    2015-02-01

    The time-dependent freezing rate (TDFR) model here described represents the formation of ice particles by immersion freezing within an air parcel. The air parcel trajectory follows an adiabatic ascent and includes a period in time when the parcel remains stationary at the top of its ascent. The description of the ice nucleating particles (INPs) in the air parcel is taken from laboratory experiments with cloud and precipitation samples and is assumed to represent the INP content of the cloud droplets in the parcel. Time dependence is included to account for variations in updraft velocity and for the continued formation of ice particles under isothermal conditions. The magnitudes of these factors are assessed on the basis of laboratory measurements. Results show that both factors give rise to three-fold variations in ice concentration for a realistic range of the input parameters. Refinements of the parameters specifying time dependence and INP concentrations are needed to make the results more specific to different atmospheric aerosol types. The simple model framework described in this paper can be adapted to more elaborate cloud models. The results here presented can help guide decisions on whether to include a time-dependent ice nucleation scheme or a simpler singular description in models.

  10. Time-dependent freezing rate parcel model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vali, G.; Snider, J. R.

    2014-11-01

    The Time-Dependent Freezing Rate (TDFR) model here described represents the formation of ice particles by immersion freezing within an air parcel. The air parcel trajectory follows an adiabatic ascent and includes a period at time with the parcel remaining stationary at the top of its ascent. The description of the ice nucleating particles (INPs) in the air parcel is taken from laboratory experiments with cloud and precipitation samples and is assumed to represent the INP content of the cloud droplets in the parcel. Time-dependence is included to account for variations in updraft velocity and for the continued formation of ice particles at isothermal conditions. The magnitudes of these factors are assessed on the basis of laboratory measurements. Results show that both factors give rise to factors of about 3 variations in ice concentration for a realistic range of the input parameters. Refinements of the parameters specifying time-dependence and INP concentrations are needed to make the results more specific to different atmospheric aerosol types. The simple model framework described in this paper can be adapted to more elaborate cloud models. The results here presented can help guide decisions on whether to include a time-dependent ice nucleation scheme or a simpler singular description in models.

  11. Socioeconomic Heterogeneity of Mining-Dependent Counties.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nord, Mark; Luloff, A. E.

    1993-01-01

    Although the socioeconomic well-being of all U.S. mining-dependent counties was slightly above the national average in 1990, disaggregation reveals substantial effects of region and mining subsector. In particular, southern and Great Lakes coal-mining counties had significantly lower high school graduation rates and higher poverty and unemployment…

  12. Organizational Change, Absenteeism, and Welfare Dependency

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Roed, Knut; Fevang, Elisabeth

    2007-01-01

    Based on Norwegian register data, we set up a multivariate mixed proportional hazard model (MMPH) to analyze nurses' pattern of work, sickness absence, nonemployment, and social insurance dependency from 1992 to 2000, and how that pattern was affected by workplace characteristics. The model is estimated by means of the nonparametric…

  13. Costs of Oil Dependence: A 2000 Update

    SciTech Connect

    Greene, D.L.

    2000-05-17

    Oil dependence remains a potentially serious economic and strategic problem for the United States. This report updates previous estimates of the costs of oil dependence to the U.S. economy and introduces several methodological enhancements. Estimates of the costs to the U.S. economy of the oil market upheavals of the last 30 years are in the vicinity of $7 trillion, present value 1998 dollars, about as large as the sum total of payments on the national debt over the same period. Simply adding up historical costs in 1998 dollars without converting to present value results in a Base Case cost estimate of $3.4 trillion. Sensitivity analysis indicates that cost estimates are sensitive to key parameters. A lower bound estimate of $1.7 trillion and an upper bound of $7.1 trillion (not present value) indicate that the costs of oil dependence have been large under almost any plausible set of assumptions. These cost estimates do not include military, strategic or political costs associated with U.S. and world dependence on oil imports.

  14. Cost of Oil Dependence: A 2000 Update

    SciTech Connect

    Greene, D.L.; Tishchishyna, N.I.

    2000-05-01

    Oil dependence remains a potentially serious economic and strategic problem for the United States. This report updates previous estimates of the costs of oil dependence to the U.S. economy and introduces several methodological enhancements. Estimates of the costs to the U.S. economy of the oil market upheavals of the last 30 years are in the vicinity of $7 trillion, present value 1998 dollars, about as large as the sum total of payments on the national debt over the same period. Simply adding up historical costs in 1998 dollars without converting to present value results in a Base Case cost estimate of $3.4 trillion. Sensitivity analysis indicates that cost estimates are sensitive to key parameters. A lower bound estimate of $1.7 trillion and an upper bound of $7.1 trillion (not present value) indicate that the costs of oil dependence have been large under almost any plausible set of assumptions. These cost estimates do not include military, strategic or political costs associated with U.S. and world dependence on oil imports.

  15. Instructional Media, Attitude Change and Field Dependence.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kloock, Terryl R.; And Others

    The effectiveness of two media types (sound film and still slides with audiotape) in changing student attitudes, and their impact on students varying in field dependency levels was examined. Subjects, 82 college students scoring at the high and low extremes of the Group Embedded Figures Test (GEFT), were randomly assigned to either a (1) multi-cue…

  16. Pharmacotherapeutic Treatment of Alcohol Dependence: An Overview

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Graves, Erin; Goodwin, Lloyd R., Jr.

    2008-01-01

    Pharmacotherapy medications can reduce the likelihood of relapse, decrease craving intensity and severity of withdrawal symptoms, and bolster the likelihood of achieving and maintaining recovery goals for many individuals seeking recovery from alcohol dependence. An overview of the benefits and concerns of integrating pharmacotherapeutic…

  17. Vertebral osteomyelitis in insulin-dependent diabetics.

    PubMed

    Cooppan, R; Schoenbaum, S; Younger, M D; Freidberg, S; D'elia, J

    1976-11-20

    Vertebral osteomyelitis continues to be a diagnostically and therapeutically challenging disease with a relatively high incidence in diabetics. The clinical features, investigations and treatment of 7 insulin-dependent diabetics with vertebral osteomyelitis are presented and possible aetiological factors in this group are discussed.

  18. Stress Disrupts Context-Dependent Memory

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schwabe, Lars; Bohringer, Andreas; Wolf, Oliver T.

    2009-01-01

    Memory is facilitated when the retrieval context resembles the learning context. The brain structures underlying contextual influences on memory are susceptible to stress. Whether stress interferes with context-dependent memory is still unknown. We exposed healthy adults to stress or a control procedure before they learned an object-location task…

  19. Texas Employer 1996 Dependent Care Survey.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ruggiere, Paul; Glass, James

    Many employers have enacted "family-friendly benefits" in response to demands placed on their employees by the stress of caring for children or aging parents. The Employer Dependent Care Survey measured the prevalence of flexible work arrangements and child care and elder care benefits in Texas. Participating were 1,331 out of 6,500…

  20. The path dependence of deformation texture development

    SciTech Connect

    Takeshita, T.; Kocks, U.F.; Wenk, H.R.

    1987-01-01

    It is demonstrated for the case of three different strain paths, all of which end up with the same, elongated specimen shape, that the texture developed during straining is path dependent. This is true both for experiments on aluminum polycrystals and for simulations using the LApp code.

  1. Colloidal solitary waves with temperature dependent compressibility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Azmi, A.; Marchant, T. R.

    2014-05-01

    Spatial solitary waves which form in colloidal suspensions of dielectric nanoparticles are considered. The interactions, or compressibility, of the colloidal particles, is modelled using a series in the particle density, or packing fraction, where the virial, or series, coefficients depend on the type of particle interaction model. Both the theoretical hard disk and sphere repulsive models, and a model with temperature dependent compressibility, are considered. Experimental results show that particle interactions can be temperature dependent and either repulsive or attractive in nature, so we model the second virial coefficient using a physically realistic temperature power law. One- and two-dimensional semi-analytical colloidal solitary wave solutions are found. Trial functions, based on the form of the nonlinear Schrödinger equation soliton, are used, together with averaging, to develop the semi-analytical solutions. When the background packing fraction is low, the one-dimensional solitary waves have three solutions branches (with a bistable regime) while the two-dimensional solitary waves have two solution branches, with a single stable branch. The temperature dependent second virial coefficient results in changes to the solitary wave properties and the parameter space, in which multiple solutions branches occur. An excellent comparison is found between the semi-analytical and numerical solutions.

  2. Correlates of Baclofen Effectiveness in Alcohol Dependence

    PubMed Central

    Shukla, Lekhansh; Shukla, Tulika; Bokka, Spandana; Kandasamy, Arun; Benegal, Vivek; Murthy, Pratima; Chand, Prabhat

    2015-01-01

    Alcohol dependence is a global concern. Baclofen has shown promise as an anti-craving agent but its efficiency remains to be settled. We reviewed 549 male cases diagnosed with alcohol dependence who received Acamprosate (201) or Baclofen (348). ‘Time to first drink’ was compared between two groups and multiple regression analysis was done in baclofen group to identify correlates of effectiveness. There was a significant difference in outcome measure between Baclofen (M = 4.44, SD = 3.75) and Acamprosate group (M = 3.73, SD = 2.19); t (547) = 2.45, P = 0.01. Initial regression analysis with six predictor variables (average daily alcohol units, current age, age at onset of dependence, family history, duration of dependence and dose of baclofen in mg/day) showed significant correlation of outcome variable with only two predictor variables — dose of baclofen and average daily intake. Using the hierarchical method it was found that ‘dose of baclofen’ and ‘average alcohol intake’ explain a significant amount of variance in ‘time to first drink’. [F (1, 345) = 182.8, P < 0.001, R2 = 0.52, R2adjusted = 0.51]. This information can be used to select patients in long term longitudinal studies and may explain variable results seen in clinical trials of baclofen done earlier. PMID:26664095

  3. Some pharmacological aspects of drug dependence.

    PubMed

    Chesher, G B

    1975-12-06

    The self-administration of drugs to achieve altered states of consciousness is recognized as normal human behaviour. Community attitudes towards drug use vary according to the drug and often bear little relationship to the known pharmacological and toxicological effects of the drug. For an objective assessment of the potential dangers associated with drug use, a distinction is made between drug use and drug abuse. It is stressed that the progression from drug use to drug abuse involves social and psychological factors in addition to the pharmacological factors which are outlined in this paper. The sequential development of drug dependency is described under the headings: Induction; continued consumption; compulsive consumption; withdrawal; abstinence; reinduction. Man uses psychotropic drugs because he finds the effects rewarding. Some experimental models to explore the neurophysiological basis of the reward are described. Experiments employing inhibitors of protein synthesis suggest that the phenomena of tolerance and physical dependence involve the synthesis of new protein. It has been suggested that the new protein might be new receptor molecules for the drug or neurotransmitter substances. These new receptors might constitute a "drug memory" and provide a possible explanation for high relapse rate of drug dependent subjects. A pharmacological basis for the methadone maintenance programme of management of narcotic dependent subjects is briefly outlined.

  4. Dependency and Marginality in Kingston, Jamaica.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Clarke, Colin G.

    1983-01-01

    Kingston, capital of Jamaica, has been molded by three institutions: colonialism, the sugar plantation, and slavery. It has an enormous marginal population living in permanent poverty and not absorbable into the labor force. This marginality, fundamentally related to dependent capitalism, sustains itself by keeping wages low. (CS)

  5. Spin multiplicity dependence of nonlinear optical properties.

    PubMed

    Jha, Prakash Chandra; Rinkevicius, Zilvinas; Agren, Hans

    2009-03-23

    Open-shell spin-restricted time-dependent density functional theory is applied to explore the spin multiplicity dependence of linear and nonlinear optical properties. An open-shell neutral conjugated system, the C(4)H(4)N radical in the doublet X(2)A(2), quartet X(4)A(2), and sextet X(6)A(1) states, is chosen as a model system to illustrate various aspects of the theory. It is found that irrespective of the exchange-correlation functional employed, the components of the polarizability alpha(-omega,omega) and first hyperpolarizability beta(-2 omega,omega,omega) show very different dependency with respect to the multiplicity, with an increasing trend for higher spin states. This is rationalized by the decrease in conjugation and stability of the system with increasing multiplicity, and by the way the interaction between unpaired electrons and the external field is shielded by remaining electrons of the molecule. The study suggests the applicability of open-shell systems for frequency-dependent nonlinear optical properties and for the possibility of spin control for such properties.

  6. Temperature-dependent Study of Isobutanol Decomposition

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-11-01

    conventional petrol becomes increasingly more fervent. New legislations and pressure is being forced on the fuel industry to reduce America’s dependence on...A. R.; Sakai, S.; Devasher, R. B. Time Resolved FTIR Analysis of Combustion of Ethanol, E85, and Gasoline in an Internal Combustion Engine . Rose

  7. Curvature Dependent Reactivity of Fullerenes and Nanotubes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Park, Seongjun; Cho, Kyeongjae; Srivastava, Deepak

    2000-01-01

    Dependence of pyramidalization angle, examples of nanotube surfaces, internal and external reactivity, and binding energies are some of the topics discussed in this conference presentation preprint. Final conclusions include the relationship between the pyramidal angle of the surface and its associated external reaction energy.

  8. It All Depends on Your Attitude.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kastner, Bernice

    1992-01-01

    Presents six learning exercises that introduce students to the mathematics used to control and track spacecraft attitude. Describes the geocentric system used for Earthbound location and navigation, the celestial sphere, the spacecraft-based celestial system, time-dependent angles, observer-fixed coordinate axes, and spacecraft rotational axes.…

  9. Linear dependencies between composite fermion states

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meyer, M. L.; Liabøtrø, O.; Viefers, S.

    2016-09-01

    The formalism of composite fermions (CFs) has been one of the most prominent and successful approaches to describing the fractional quantum Hall effect, in terms of trial many-body wave functions. Testing the accuracy of the latter typically involves rather heavy numerical comparison to exact diagonalization results. Thus, optimizing computational efficiency has been an important technical issue in this field. One generic (and not yet fully understood) property of the CF approach is that it tends to overcount the number of linearly independent candidate states for fixed sets of quantum numbers. Technically speaking, CF Slater determinants that are orthogonal before projection to the lowest Landau level, may lead to wave functions that are identical, or possess linear dependencies, after projection. This leads to unnecessary computations, and has been pointed out in the literature both for fermionic and bosonic systems. We here present a systematic approach that enables us to reveal all linear dependencies between bosonic compact states in the lowest CF ‘cyclotron energy’ sub-band, and almost all dependencies in higher sub-bands, at the level of the CF Slater determinants, i.e. before projection, which implies a major computational simplification. Our approach is introduced for so-called simple states of two-species rotating bosons, and then generalized to generic compact bosonic states, both one- and two-species. Some perspectives also apply to fermionic systems. The identities and linear dependencies we find, are analytically exact for ‘brute force’ projection in the disk geometry.

  10. Youth At-Risk of Welfare Dependency.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kaplan, April

    1999-01-01

    This issue of WIN (Welfare Information Network) Issue Notes focuses on the tendency of children from low-income families to drop out of high school, become teen parents, become involved in drug-related activities, and become involved in other activities that place them at high risk of long-term welfare dependency. Section 1 offers the background.…

  11. Transverse impedance localization using intensity dependent optics

    SciTech Connect

    Calaga,R.; Arduini, G.; Metral, E.; Papotti, G.; Quatraro, D.; Rumolo, G.; Salvant, B.; Tomas, R.

    2009-05-04

    Measurements of transverse impedance in the SPS to track the evolution over the last few years show discrepancies compared to the analytical estimates of the major contributors. Recent measurements to localize the major sources of the transverse impedance using intensity dependent optics are presented. Some simulations using HEADTAIL to understand the limitations of the reconstruction and related numerical aspects are also discussed.

  12. Engineering Design for a Technological Dependent Society

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Parden, Robert J.

    1974-01-01

    Discusses a Sloan Foundation undergraduate project conducted at the University of California at Santa Clara, with emphases upon interdisciplinary design. Indicates that engineering should be seen as a broad education for a technology dependent society, rather than education leading to a specialized, dead-end career. (CC)

  13. Context-Dependent Control over Attentional Capture

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cosman, Joshua D.; Vecera, Shaun P.

    2013-01-01

    A number of studies have demonstrated that the likelihood of a salient item capturing attention is dependent on the "attentional set" an individual employs in a given situation. The instantiation of an attentional set is often viewed as a strategic, voluntary process, relying on working memory systems that represent immediate task…

  14. Chewing Maintains Hippocampus-Dependent Cognitive Function

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Huayue; Iinuma, Mitsuo; Onozuka, Minoru; Kubo, Kin-Ya

    2015-01-01

    Mastication (chewing) is important not only for food intake, but also for preserving and promoting the general health. Recent studies have showed that mastication helps to maintain cognitive functions in the hippocampus, a central nervous system region vital for spatial memory and learning. The purpose of this paper is to review the recent progress of the association between mastication and the hippocampus-dependent cognitive function. There are multiple neural circuits connecting the masticatory organs and the hippocampus. Both animal and human studies indicated that cognitive functioning is influenced by mastication. Masticatory dysfunction is associated with the hippocampal morphological impairments and the hippocampus-dependent spatial memory deficits, especially in elderly. Mastication is an effective behavior for maintaining the hippocampus-dependent cognitive performance, which deteriorates with aging. Therefore, chewing may represent a useful approach in preserving and promoting the hippocampus-dependent cognitive function in older people. We also discussed several possible mechanisms involved in the interaction between mastication and the hippocampal neurogenesis and the future directions for this unique fascinating research. PMID:26078711

  15. Problems Identifying Independent and Dependent Variables

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Leatham, Keith R.

    2012-01-01

    This paper discusses one step from the scientific method--that of identifying independent and dependent variables--from both scientific and mathematical perspectives. It begins by analyzing an episode from a middle school mathematics classroom that illustrates the need for students and teachers alike to develop a robust understanding of…

  16. Pearson and Pedagogy: Countering Co-Dependency

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fielder, John

    2008-01-01

    Noel Pearson and Marcia Langton have both used the terms "co-dependency" and "rescuing" as part of their challenge to the rights-based focus informing Indigenous policies in Australia since the 1960s. Their premise is that the liberal/Left welfare-based agenda, for decades, has largely overlooked Indigenous responsibility. At…

  17. "Atypical" regulation of Hedgehog-dependent cancers.

    PubMed

    Atwood, Scott X; Oro, Anthony E

    2014-02-10

    Growing evidence indicates targeting PKCι may be effective in treating Hedgehog-dependent cancers. In this issue of Cancer Cell, Justilien and colleagues present the surprising finding that PKCι promotes Hedgehog ligand production and lung squamous cell carcinoma growth through SOX2, rather than the canonical transcription factor GLI.

  18. Non-classical Phase-dependent Fluorescence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bali, Samir

    2000-06-01

    A simple two-level atom, radiating in free space, is a canonical system in quantum optics. Historically, resonance fluorescence provided the first experimental evidence for photon antibunching, sub-Poisson statistics, and quantum jumps. However, it is well known that observation of phase-dependent nonclassical effects in resonance fluorescence presents severe experimental challenges. In particular, the phenomenon of squeezing in resonance fluorescence, first predicted in 1981footnote D. F. Walls and P. Zoller, Phys. Rev. Lett. 47, 709 (1981), long eluded observation despite receiving considerable attention. In this talk I will describe how we recently overcame these challenges to make the first measurements of single-atom squeezing spectra in the phase-dependent fluorescence of a beam of driven two-level atoms in free space(Z. H. Lu, S. Bali, and J. E. Thomas, Phys. Rev. Lett. 81), 3635 (1998). The experimental scheme permits a valid comparison of these measurements with our predictions, thus yielding a new and simple physical picture of phase-dependent resonance fluorescence. Results of a direct measurement of the two-time field correlation function will also be presented. Our measurements enable important insights into the basic atomic processes underlying squeezing, and help elucidate the role of quantum jumps in phase-dependent resonance fluorescence.

  19. Eigenfunction expansions for time dependent hamiltonians

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jauslin, H. R.; Guerin, S.; Deroussiaux, A.

    We describe a generalization of Floquet theory for non periodic time dependent Hamiltonians. It allows to express the time evolution in terms of an expansion in eigenfunctions of a generalized quasienergy operator. We discuss a conjecture on the extension of the adiabatic theorem to this type of systems, which gives a procedure for the physical preparation of Floquet states. *** DIRECT SUPPORT *** A3418380 00004

  20. The load dependence of rate constants.

    PubMed

    Walcott, Sam

    2008-06-07

    As experimental techniques in biophysics have progressed at the single molecule level, there has been considerable interest in understanding how external mechanical influences (such as load) affect chemical reactions. The majority of biophysical studies investigating load-dependent kinetics use an equation where the rate constant exponentially depends on force, which is sometimes called Bell's equation. This equation requires the determination of two parameters that describe the potential energy-strain function: k(0), which is the reaction rate in the absence of load, and x(c), which is the difference in strain between the reactant and transition states. However, there have been theoretical studies based on Kramers' theory suggesting that the rate constant should have load-dependent pre-exponential terms and nonlinear load-dependent terms in the exponential. Kramers' theory requires an exact knowledge of the potential energy-strain function, which is in general not known for an experimental system. Here, we derive a general approximation of Kramers' theory where the potential energy-strain function is described by five parameters, which can, for small loads, be reduced to four-, three-, and finally to two parameters (Bell's equation). We then use an idealized physical system to validate our approximations to Kramers' theory and show how they can predict parameters of interest (such as k(0) and x(c)) better than Bell's equation. Finally, we show previously published experimental data that are not well fitted by Bell's equation but are adequately fitted by these more exact equations.

  1. Temperature dependence of polymer photovoltaic devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakazawa, Yuko

    One of many steps to develop a sustainable society is to reduce the use of fossil fuels by replacing them with renewable energy sources, such as solar energy. This dissertation concerns one of the most contemporary methods to harvest solar radiation and covert it to electricity, using thin polymer films. The photovoltaic devices in this study consisted of a thin layer of p-phenylenevinylene (PPV) based semiconducting polymer sandwiched between two metals (semi-transparent ITO and evaporated metal electrode). Two modified device structures were studied, an interfacial heterojunction device, which includes an additional layer of inorganic n-type semiconductor (Ti-oxides) and a bulk heterojunction device, which is formed by blending electron-attracting materials. Both modifications resulted in higher device performances under ambient conditions due to an increased number of dissociation sites. From studies of inorganic solar cells, it is well known that temperature has a large effect on device performance. However, there are only a few studies on organic Solar cells, concerning the temperature dependence. This thesis focuses on understanding the temperature dependent behaviors of polymer photovoltaic devices. Temperature dependence study allows us to examine how the device parameters such as short circuit current (Isc) and open circuit voltage (Voc) are affected by the material properties and the device architectures. The current-voltage relationships were measured in a temperature controlled OXFORD cryostat operating between 150K and 404K. From the dark current-voltage measurements, the field-independent hole mobility (mu0) was extracted, using a space charge limited current analysis. From the photocurrent-voltage measurements, the temperature dependence on Isc, Voc, and fill factor were studied. The temperature characteristics of Isc (T) were compared to that of mu0(T), and two different dependencies were obtained for different device architectures. The temperature

  2. Evolution in population parameters: density-dependent selection or density-dependent fitness?

    PubMed

    Travis, Joseph; Leips, Jeff; Rodd, F Helen

    2013-05-01

    Density-dependent selection is one of earliest topics of joint interest to both ecologists and evolutionary biologists and thus occupies an important position in the histories of these disciplines. This joint interest is driven by the fact that density-dependent selection is the simplest form of feedback between an ecological effect of an organism's own making (crowding due to sustained population growth) and the selective response to the resulting conditions. This makes density-dependent selection perhaps the simplest process through which we see the full reciprocity between ecology and evolution. In this article, we begin by tracing the history of studying the reciprocity between ecology and evolution, which we see as combining the questions of evolutionary ecology with the assumptions and approaches of ecological genetics. In particular, density-dependent fitness and density-dependent selection were critical concepts underlying ideas about adaptation to biotic selection pressures and the coadaptation of interacting species. However, theory points to a critical distinction between density-dependent fitness and density-dependent selection in their influences on complex evolutionary and ecological interactions among coexisting species. Although density-dependent fitness is manifestly evident in empirical studies, evidence of density-dependent selection is much less common. This leads to the larger question of how prevalent and important density-dependent selection might really be. Life-history variation in the least killifish Heterandria formosa appears to reflect the action of density-dependent selection, and yet compelling evidence is elusive, even in this well-studied system, which suggests some important challenges for understanding density-driven feedbacks between ecology and evolution.

  3. Exploring the Severity of Dependence Scale (SDS) as a Possible Measure of Nicotine Dependence

    PubMed Central

    Mercincavage, Melissa; Smyth, Joshua M.; Branstetter, Steven A.; Catley, Delwyn

    2015-01-01

    Background The time to first cigarette (TTFC) of the day is an emerging single-item indicator of nicotine dependence due to its robust associations with indices of physical dependence. However, it is unclear if this measure adequately captures other dimensions of dependence. The Severity of Dependence Scale (SDS) is a brief questionnaire used to assess psychological aspects of dependence that has not yet been extensively applied to smoking research. Methods We examined associations between the SDS and TTFC among 255 smokers during the baseline session of a cessation trial. We also examined associations of the SDS and TTFC with biobehavioral dependence indices, quitting behaviors, and cognitive-affective variables, and compared the relative contributions of both measures in predicting these variables. Results TTFC was unrelated to SDS total score, but was related to individual SDS items. TTFC, but not SDS, was correlated with indices of physical dependence (e.g., CPD, CO). Both TTFC and SDS were associated with quitting behaviors, with opposite directionality of associations. TTFC and SDS were both associated with cognitive-affective variables, but SDS outperformed TTFC in strength and number of these relationships. Including both the SDS and TTFC as regression model predictors often increased the amount of variance explained. Conclusions Findings suggest that SDS and TTFC assess different constructs of nicotine dependence; among smokers, the SDS appears to tap into non-physical components of dependence (e.g., loss of control) that relate to quitting motivation and affect. Assessing nicotine dependence using only the SDS may fail to capture physical dependence and, further, may not reflect the same domains of addiction the SDS assesses in other drugs of abuse. Nonetheless, using three SDS items in addition to TTFC may offer utility over using TTFC alone. PMID:26566575

  4. Dissociative disorders among alcohol-dependent inpatients.

    PubMed

    Evren, Cuneyt; Sar, Vedat; Karadag, Figen; Tamar Gurol, Defne; Karagoz, Mustafa

    2007-08-30

    The aim of this study was to determine the prevalence of dissociative disorders among inpatients with alcohol dependency. The Dissociative Experiences Scale was used to screen 111 alcohol-dependent patients consecutively admitted to the inpatient unit of a dependency treatment center. Subgroups of 29 patients who scored 30.0 or above and 25 patients who scored below 10.0 were then evaluated with the Dissociative Disorders Interview Schedule and the Structured Interview for DSM-IV Dissociative Disorders. The interviewers were blind to the Dissociative Experiences Scale scores. Of the 54 patients evaluated, 10 (9.0% of the original 111) patients had a dissociative disorder. A considerable number of the remaining patients reported a high level of dissociative experiences. Among the dissociative disorder group, nine patients had dissociative disorder not otherwise specified and one patient had depersonalization disorder. Female gender, younger age, history of suicide attempt, childhood emotional and sexual abuse, and neglect were more frequent in the dissociative disorder group than among non-dissociative patients. The dissociative disorder group also had somatization disorder, borderline personality disorder, and lifetime major depression more frequently. For 9 of the 10 dissociative patients, dissociative symptoms started before the onset of alcohol use. Although the probability of having a comorbid dissociative disorder was not higher among alcohol-dependent inpatients than among the general psychiatric inpatients, the dissociative subgroup had distinct features. Many patients without a dissociative disorder diagnosis (predominantly men) provided hints of subtle dissociative psychopathology. Implications of comorbid dissociative disorders and dissociative experiences on prevention and treatment of alcohol dependency and the importance of gender-specific characteristics in this relationship require further study.

  5. Association mining of dependency between time series

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hafez, Alaaeldin

    2001-03-01

    Time series analysis is considered as a crucial component of strategic control over a broad variety of disciplines in business, science and engineering. Time series data is a sequence of observations collected over intervals of time. Each time series describes a phenomenon as a function of time. Analysis on time series data includes discovering trends (or patterns) in a time series sequence. In the last few years, data mining has emerged and been recognized as a new technology for data analysis. Data Mining is the process of discovering potentially valuable patterns, associations, trends, sequences and dependencies in data. Data mining techniques can discover information that many traditional business analysis and statistical techniques fail to deliver. In this paper, we adapt and innovate data mining techniques to analyze time series data. By using data mining techniques, maximal frequent patterns are discovered and used in predicting future sequences or trends, where trends describe the behavior of a sequence. In order to include different types of time series (e.g. irregular and non- systematic), we consider past frequent patterns of the same time sequences (local patterns) and of other dependent time sequences (global patterns). We use the word 'dependent' instead of the word 'similar' for emphasis on real life time series where two time series sequences could be completely different (in values, shapes, etc.), but they still react to the same conditions in a dependent way. In this paper, we propose the Dependence Mining Technique that could be used in predicting time series sequences. The proposed technique consists of three phases: (a) for all time series sequences, generate their trend sequences, (b) discover maximal frequent trend patterns, generate pattern vectors (to keep information of frequent trend patterns), use trend pattern vectors to predict future time series sequences.

  6. Cascading failures in coupled networks with both inner-dependency and inter-dependency links

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Run-Ran; Li, Ming; Jia, Chun-Xiao; Wang, Bing-Hong

    2016-05-01

    We study the percolation in coupled networks with both inner-dependency and inter-dependency links, where the inner- and inter-dependency links represent the dependencies between nodes in the same or different networks, respectively. We find that when most of dependency links are inner- or inter-ones, the coupled networks system is fragile and makes a discontinuous percolation transition. However, when the numbers of two types of dependency links are close to each other, the system is robust and makes a continuous percolation transition. This indicates that the high density of dependency links could not always lead to a discontinuous percolation transition as the previous studies. More interestingly, although the robustness of the system can be optimized by adjusting the ratio of the two types of dependency links, there exists a critical average degree of the networks for coupled random networks, below which the crossover of the two types of percolation transitions disappears, and the system will always demonstrate a discontinuous percolation transition. We also develop an approach to analyze this model, which is agreement with the simulation results well.

  7. Cascading failures in coupled networks with both inner-dependency and inter-dependency links

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Run-Ran; Li, Ming; Jia, Chun-Xiao; Wang, Bing-Hong

    2016-01-01

    We study the percolation in coupled networks with both inner-dependency and inter-dependency links, where the inner- and inter-dependency links represent the dependencies between nodes in the same or different networks, respectively. We find that when most of dependency links are inner- or inter-ones, the coupled networks system is fragile and makes a discontinuous percolation transition. However, when the numbers of two types of dependency links are close to each other, the system is robust and makes a continuous percolation transition. This indicates that the high density of dependency links could not always lead to a discontinuous percolation transition as the previous studies. More interestingly, although the robustness of the system can be optimized by adjusting the ratio of the two types of dependency links, there exists a critical average degree of the networks for coupled random networks, below which the crossover of the two types of percolation transitions disappears, and the system will always demonstrate a discontinuous percolation transition. We also develop an approach to analyze this model, which is agreement with the simulation results well. PMID:27142883

  8. 32 CFR 48.302 - Substantiating evidence regarding dependency and age of dependents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Substantiating evidence regarding dependency and age of dependents. 48.302 Section 48.302 National Defense Department of Defense OFFICE OF THE SECRETARY OF DEFENSE PERSONNEL, MILITARY AND CIVILIAN RETIRED SERVICEMAN'S FAMILY PROTECTION...

  9. 32 CFR 48.302 - Substantiating evidence regarding dependency and age of dependents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Substantiating evidence regarding dependency and age of dependents. 48.302 Section 48.302 National Defense Department of Defense OFFICE OF THE SECRETARY OF DEFENSE PERSONNEL, MILITARY AND CIVILIAN RETIRED SERVICEMAN'S FAMILY PROTECTION...

  10. 32 CFR 48.302 - Substantiating evidence regarding dependency and age of dependents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Substantiating evidence regarding dependency and age of dependents. 48.302 Section 48.302 National Defense Department of Defense OFFICE OF THE SECRETARY OF DEFENSE PERSONNEL, MILITARY AND CIVILIAN RETIRED SERVICEMAN'S FAMILY PROTECTION...

  11. 32 CFR 48.302 - Substantiating evidence regarding dependency and age of dependents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Substantiating evidence regarding dependency and age of dependents. 48.302 Section 48.302 National Defense Department of Defense OFFICE OF THE SECRETARY OF DEFENSE PERSONNEL, MILITARY AND CIVILIAN RETIRED SERVICEMAN'S FAMILY PROTECTION...

  12. 32 CFR 48.302 - Substantiating evidence regarding dependency and age of dependents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Substantiating evidence regarding dependency and age of dependents. 48.302 Section 48.302 National Defense Department of Defense OFFICE OF THE SECRETARY OF DEFENSE PERSONNEL, MILITARY AND CIVILIAN RETIRED SERVICEMAN'S FAMILY PROTECTION...

  13. Cascading failures in coupled networks with both inner-dependency and inter-dependency links.

    PubMed

    Liu, Run-Ran; Li, Ming; Jia, Chun-Xiao; Wang, Bing-Hong

    2016-05-04

    We study the percolation in coupled networks with both inner-dependency and inter-dependency links, where the inner- and inter-dependency links represent the dependencies between nodes in the same or different networks, respectively. We find that when most of dependency links are inner- or inter-ones, the coupled networks system is fragile and makes a discontinuous percolation transition. However, when the numbers of two types of dependency links are close to each other, the system is robust and makes a continuous percolation transition. This indicates that the high density of dependency links could not always lead to a discontinuous percolation transition as the previous studies. More interestingly, although the robustness of the system can be optimized by adjusting the ratio of the two types of dependency links, there exists a critical average degree of the networks for coupled random networks, below which the crossover of the two types of percolation transitions disappears, and the system will always demonstrate a discontinuous percolation transition. We also develop an approach to analyze this model, which is agreement with the simulation results well.

  14. Identifying and Managing Local Item Dependence in Context-Dependent Item Sets.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Allen, Sally; Sudweeks, Richard R.

    A study was conducted to identify local item dependence (LID) in the context-dependent item sets used in an examination prepared for use in an introductory university physics class and to assess the effects of LID on estimates of the reliability and standard error of measurement. Test scores were obtained for 487 students in the physics class. The…

  15. Pupil responses to intravenous heroin (diamorphine) in dependent and non-dependent humans.

    PubMed

    Tress, K H; El-Sobky, A A

    1979-02-01

    1. Intravenous heroin was administered to volunteers, in doses of 2.5 and 5 mg to non-dependent subjects and does of 1/6, 1/3 and 1/2 of their prescribed daily does of opiates to dependent subjects, and pupillary responses measured before and three times during the 2 h after injection. 2. Tolerance to the miotic effects of heroin in the dependent subjects was demonstrated--larger doses of heroin were needed to produce the same pupil response in dependent subjects than in non-dependent subjects and the duration of action was shorter in the former group. 3. The effect of concurrent oral methadone medication on pupil response to heroin was demonstrated. Subjects prescribed both methadone and heroin showed smaller control pupil diameters and a reduced dose effect to heroin than did subjects prescribed heroin alone.

  16. Sleep-dependent motor memory consolidation in older adults depends on task demands.

    PubMed

    Gudberg, Christel; Wulff, Katharina; Johansen-Berg, Heidi

    2015-03-01

    It is often suggested that sleep-dependent consolidation of motor learning is impaired in older adults. The current study challenges this view and suggests that the degree of motor consolidation seen with sleep in older age groups depends on the kinematic demands of the task. We show that, when tested with a classic sequence learning task, requiring individuated finger movements, older adults did not show sleep-dependent consolidation. By contrast, when tested with an adapted sequence learning task, in which movements were performed with the whole hand, sleep-dependent motor improvement was observed in older adults. We suggest that age-related decline in fine motor dexterity may in part be responsible for the previously described deficit in sleep-dependent motor consolidation with aging.

  17. Genetics of Opioid Dependence: A Review of the Genetic Contribution to Opioid Dependence

    PubMed Central

    Mistry, Chetna J; Bawor, Monica; Desai, Dipika; Marsh, David C; Samaan, Zainab

    2014-01-01

    This narrative review aims to provide an overview of the impact of opioid dependence and the contribution of genetics to opioid dependence. Epidemiological data demonstrate that opioid dependence is a global trend with far-reaching effects on the social, economic, and health care systems. A review of classical genetic studies of opioid use suggests significant heritability of drug use behavior, however the evidence from molecular genetic studies is inconclusive. Nonetheless, certain genetic variants are important to consider given their role in the pathophysiology of addictive behavior. We undertook a literature review to identify the current state of knowledge regarding the role of genes in opioid dependence. Determining the association of genetic markers could change the current understanding of the various factors contributing to opioid dependence and therefore may improve recognition of individuals at risk for the disorder and prevention and treatment strategies. PMID:25242908

  18. Sleep-dependent motor memory consolidation in older adults depends on task demands

    PubMed Central

    Gudberg, Christel; Wulff, Katharina; Johansen-Berg, Heidi

    2015-01-01

    It is often suggested that sleep-dependent consolidation of motor learning is impaired in older adults. The current study challenges this view and suggests that the degree of motor consolidation seen with sleep in older age groups depends on the kinematic demands of the task. We show that, when tested with a classic sequence learning task, requiring individuated finger movements, older adults did not show sleep-dependent consolidation. By contrast, when tested with an adapted sequence learning task, in which movements were performed with the whole hand, sleep-dependent motor improvement was observed in older adults. We suggest that age-related decline in fine motor dexterity may in part be responsible for the previously described deficit in sleep-dependent motor consolidation with aging. PMID:25618616

  19. Region-dependent changes in endocannabinoid transmission in the brain of morphine-dependent rats.

    PubMed

    González, Sara; Schmid, Patricia C; Fernández-Ruiz, Javier; Krebsbach, Randy; Schmid, Harald H O; Ramos, José A

    2003-06-01

    It has been suggested recently that the endocannabinoid system might be a component of the brain reward circuitry and thus play a role not only in cannabinoid tolerance/dependence, but also in dependence/withdrawal to other drugs of abuse. Here we have examined the changes in endocannabinoid ligands and their receptors in different brain regions, with particular attention to those areas related to reinforcement processes, during dependence on the powerful addictive drug, morphine. Thus, we analysed the brain contents of N-arachidonoylethanolamine (anandamide, AEA), the first discovered endocannabinoid, in rats subjected to daily injections of increasing doses of morphine, according to a schedule designed to render the animals opiate-dependent. Although evidence of physical dependence was assured by the appearance of somatic and neurovegetative responses in these animals after an acute challenge with naloxone, there were no changes in the contents of this endocannabinoid in any of the brain regions analysed. By contrast, we observed a significant decrease in the specific binding for CB(1) receptors in the midbrain and the cerebral cortex of morphine-dependent rats, with no changes in the other regions. The decrease in the cerebral cortex was, however, accompanied by a rise in the activation of signalling mechanisms by CB(1) receptor agonists, as revealed by WIN-55,212-2-stimulated [(35)S]GTPgammaS binding, whereas a reduction in this parameter was measured in the brainstem of morphine-dependent rats. In summary, the present data are indicative of the existence of an alteration of the endocannabinoid transmission during morphine dependence in rats, although the changes observed were region-dependent and affected exclusively CB(1) receptors with no changes in endocannabinoid levels. Because the changes occurred in regions of the midbrain, the cerebral cortex and the brainstem, which have been implicated in drug dependence, our data suggest that pharmacological

  20. HMGB1-dependent and -independent autophagy.

    PubMed

    Sun, Xiaofang; Tang, Daolin

    2014-10-01

    HMGB1 (high mobility group box 1) is a multifunctional, ubiquitous protein located inside and outside cells that plays a critical role in various physiological and pathological processes including cell development, differentiation, inflammation, immunity, metastasis, metabolism, and death. Increasing evidence demonstrates that HMGB1-dependent autophagy promotes chemotherapy resistance, sustains tumor metabolism requirements and T cell survival, prevents polyglutamine aggregates and excitotoxicity, and protects against endotoxemia, bacterial infection, and ischemia-reperfusion injury in vitro or in vivo. In contrast, HMGB1 may not be required for autophagy in some organs such as the liver and heart. Understanding HMGB1-dependent and -independent autophagy in more detail will provide insight into the integrated stress response and guide HMGB1-based therapeutic intervention.

  1. Spin-dependent optics with metasurfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiao, Shiyi; Wang, Jiarong; Liu, Fu; Zhang, Shuang; Yin, Xiaobo; Li, Jensen

    2017-01-01

    Optical spin-Hall effect (OSHE) is a spin-dependent transportation phenomenon of light as an analogy to its counterpart in condensed matter physics. Although being predicted and observed for decades, this effect has recently attracted enormous interests due to the development of metamaterials and metasurfaces, which can provide us tailor-made control of the light-matter interaction and spin-orbit interaction. In parallel to the developments of OSHE, metasurface gives us opportunities to manipulate OSHE in achieving a stronger response, a higher efficiency, a higher resolution, or more degrees of freedom in controlling the wave front. Here, we give an overview of the OSHE based on metasurface-enabled geometric phases in different kinds of configurational spaces and their applications on spin-dependent beam steering, focusing, holograms, structured light generation, and detection. These developments mark the beginning of a new era of spin-enabled optics for future optical components.

  2. Convexity, gauge-dependence and tunneling rates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Plascencia, Alexis D.; Tamarit, Carlos

    2016-10-01

    We clarify issues of convexity, gauge-dependence and radiative corrections in relation to tunneling rates. Despite the gauge dependence of the effective action at zero and finite temperature, it is shown that tunneling and nucleation rates remain independent of the choice of gauge-fixing. Taking as a starting point the functional that defines the transition amplitude from a false vacuum onto itself, it is shown that decay rates are exactly determined by a non-convex, false vacuum effective action evaluated at an extremum. The latter can be viewed as a generalized bounce configuration, and gauge-independence follows from the appropriate Nielsen identities. This holds for any election of gauge-fixing that leads to an invertible Faddeev-Popov matrix.

  3. On time-dependent radiative transfer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Streater, A.; Cooper, J.; Sandle, W.

    1987-01-01

    An integral equation is developed for application to time-dependent laboratory experiments in which partial redistribution effects are important. The equation of transport with the Heasly-Kneer (1976) emission coefficient and the equation of statistical equilibrium lead to a time-dependent redistribution function containing an absorption - reemission term which decays exponentially in time and a scattering term which is instantaneous. This integral equation does not agree with an equation written by Payne et al. (1974) that has been used to compare theory with experiments. The difference between the Payne equation and the equation developed here needs to be examined in detail, since it might under some circumstances be on the same order as the difference between partial and complete redistribution.

  4. On time-dependent radiative transfer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Streater, A.; Cooper, J.; Sandle, W.

    1987-02-01

    An integral equation is developed for application to time-dependent laboratory experiments in which partial redistribution effects are important. The equation of transport with the Heasly-Kneer (1976) emission coefficient and the equation of statistical equilibrium lead to a time-dependent redistribution function containing an absorption - reemission term which decays exponentially in time and a scattering term which is instantaneous. This integral equation does not agree with an equation written by Payne et al. (1974) that has been used to compare theory with experiments. The difference between the Payne equation and the equation developed here needs to be examined in detail, since it might under some circumstances be on the same order as the difference between partial and complete redistribution.

  5. Size-Dependent Raman Shifts for nanocrystals

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Yukun; Zhao, Xinmei; Yin, Penggang; Gao, Faming

    2016-01-01

    Raman spectroscopy is a very sensitive tool for probing semiconductor nanocrystals. The underlying mechanism behind the size-dependent Raman shifts is still quite controversial. Here we offer a new theoretical method for the quantum confinement effects on the Raman spectra of semiconductor nanocrystals. We propose that the shift of Raman spectra in nanocrystals can result from two overlapping effects: the quantum effect shift and surface effect shift. The quantum effect shift is extracted from an extended Kubo formula, the surface effect shift is determined via the first principles calculations. Fairly good prediction of Raman shifts can be obtained without the use of any adjustable parameter. Closer analysis shows that the size-dependent Raman shifts in Si nanocrystals mainly result from the quantum effect shifts. For nanodiamond, the proportion of surface effect shift in Raman shift is up to about 40%. Such model can also provide a good baseline for using Raman spectroscopy as a tool to measure size. PMID:27102066

  6. Integral dependent spin couplings in CI calculations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Iberle, K.; Davidson, E. R.

    1982-01-01

    Although the number of ways to combine Slater determinants to form spin eigenfunctions increases rapidly with the number of open shells, most of these spin couplings will make only a small contribution to a given state, provided the spin coupling is chosen judiciously. The technique of limiting calculations to the interacting subspace pioneered by Bunge (1970) was employed by Munch and Davidson (1975) to the vanadium atom. The use of an interacting space looses its advantage in more complex cases. However, the problem can always be reduced to only one interacting spin coupling by making the coefficients integral dependent. The present investigation is concerned with the performance of integral dependent interacting couplings, taking into account the results of three test calculations.

  7. Spatially dependent Kondo effect in Quantum Corrals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rossi, Enrico; Morr, Dirk K.

    2007-03-01

    We study the Kondo screening of a single magnetic impurity placed inside a quantum corral consisting of non-magnetic impurities on the surface of a metallic host system. We show that the spatial structure of the corral's eigenmodes leads to a spatially dependent Kondo effect whose signatures are experimentally measurable spatial variations of the Kondo temperature, TK, and of the critical Kondo coupling, Jcr. Moreover we find that the screening of the magnetic impurity is accompanied by the formation of multiple Kondo resonances with characteristic spatial patterns that provide further experimental signatures of the spatially dependent Kondo effect. Our results demonstrate that quantum corrals provide new possibilities to manipulate and explore the Kondo effect.

  8. [Future medications for tobacco and cannabis dependence].

    PubMed

    Le Foll, Bernard; Justinova, Zuzana; Tanda, Gianlugi; Goldberg, Steven R

    2008-01-01

    Worldwide more than 3 million deaths a year are attributable to smoking, and tobacco use is on the rise in developing countries. Consequently, smoking is one of the few causes of mortality that is increasing, with deaths projected to reach 10 million annually in 30-40 years. Cannabinoids, which are usually used in the form of marijuana, have become the most frequently used illicit drugs, but there is no pharmacological treatment for marijuana dependence. Although the dopaminergic system plays a critical role in reinforcing the effects of drugs of abuse, other neurotransmitter systems are also involved. Here we review recent results obtained with antagonists targeting cannabinoid CB1 receptors, dopamine D3 receptors and opioid receptors, that directly or indirectly modulate dopaminergic transmission. These promising approaches warrant clinical trials in the treatment of tobacco and marijuana dependence.

  9. Studies on thiamine diphosphate-dependent enzymes.

    PubMed

    Leeper, F J; Hawksley, D; Mann, S; Perez Melero, C; Wood, M D H

    2005-08-01

    The 3-deaza analogue of TPP (thiamine diphosphate), a close mimic of the ylid intermediate, has been synthesized and is an extremely potent inhibitor of a variety of TPP-dependent enzymes, binding much more tightly than TPP itself. Results using deazaTPP complexed with the E1 subunit of PDH (pyruvate dehydrogenase) have led to a novel proposal about the mechanism of this enzyme. The 2-substituted forms of deazaTPP, which mimic other intermediates in the catalytic mechanism, can also be synthesized and 2-(1-hydroxyethyl)deazaTPP is also an extremely potent inhibitor of PDC (pyruvate decarboxylase). Attachment of such 2-substituents is expected to be a way to introduce selectivity in the inhibition of various TPP-dependent enzymes.

  10. Time-Dependent Erosion of Ion Optics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wirz, Richard E.; Anderson, John R.; Katz, Ira; Goebel, Dan M.

    2008-01-01

    The accurate prediction of thruster life requires time-dependent erosion estimates for the ion optics assembly. Such information is critical to end-of-life mechanisms such as electron backstreaming. CEX2D was recently modified to handle time-dependent erosion, double ions, and multiple throttle conditions in a single run. The modified code is called "CEX2D-t". Comparisons of CEX2D-t results with LDT and ELT post-tests results show good agreement for both screen and accel grid erosion including important erosion features such as chamfering of the downstream end of the accel grid and reduced rate of accel grid aperture enlargement with time.

  11. Time-dependent species sensitivity distributions.

    PubMed

    Fox, David R; Billoir, Elise

    2013-02-01

    Time is a central component of toxicity assessments. However, current ecotoxicological practice marginalizes time in concentration-response (C-R) modeling and species sensitivity distribution (SSD) analyses. For C-R models, time is invariably fixed, and toxicity measures are estimated from a function fitted to the data at that time. The estimated toxicity measures are used as inputs to the SSD modeling phase, which similarly avoids explicit recognition of the temporal component. The present study extends some commonly employed probability models for SSDs to derive theoretical results that characterize the time-dependent nature of hazardous concentration (HCx) values. The authors' results show that even from very simple assumptions, more complex patterns in the SSD time dependency can be revealed.

  12. Opioid Dependence Treatment: Options In Pharmacotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Stotts, Angela L.; Dodrill, Carrie L.; Kosten, Thomas R.

    2010-01-01

    The development of effective treatments for opioid dependence is of great importance given the devastating consequences of the disease. Pharmacotherapies for opioid addiction include opioid agonists, partial agonists, opioid antagonists, and alpha-2-adrenergic agonists, which are targeted toward either detoxification or long-term agonist maintenance. Agonist maintenance therapy is currently the recommended treatment for opioid dependence due to its superior outcomes relative to detoxification. Detoxification protocols have limited long term efficacy and patient discomfort remains a significant therapy challenge. Buprenorphine’s effectiveness relative to methadone remains a controversy and may be most appropriate for patients in need of low doses of agonist treatment. Buprenorphine appears superior to alpha-2 agonists, however, and office-based treatment with buprenorphine in the US is gaining support. Studies of sustained-release formulations of naltrexone suggest improved effectiveness for retention and sustained abstinence, however, randomized clinical trials are needed. PMID:19538000

  13. Scale Dependence of Spatiotemporal Intermittence of Rain

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kundu, Prasun K.; Siddani, Ravi K.

    2011-01-01

    It is a common experience that rainfall is intermittent in space and time. This is reflected by the fact that the statistics of area- and/or time-averaged rain rate is described by a mixed distribution with a nonzero probability of having a sharp value zero. In this paper we have explored the dependence of the probability of zero rain on the averaging space and time scales in large multiyear data sets based on radar and rain gauge observations. A stretched exponential fannula fits the observed scale dependence of the zero-rain probability. The proposed formula makes it apparent that the space-time support of the rain field is not quite a set of measure zero as is sometimes supposed. We also give an ex.planation of the observed behavior in tenus of a simple probabilistic model based on the premise that rainfall process has an intrinsic memory.

  14. Thymoma masquerading as transfusion dependent anemia

    PubMed Central

    Muzamil, Javvid; Shiekh, Aejaz Aziz; Bhat, Gull Mohammad; Lone, Abdul Rashid; Bhat, Shuaeb; Nabi, Firdousa

    2016-01-01

    Pure red cell aplasia (PRCA) is a known entity in clinical medicine. Patients are often transfusion dependent for their whole life. Ascertaining its etiology is always a herculean task. We received a similar transfusion-dependent patient, who on evaluation was found to have thymoma as an etiological factor. Thymoma presenting as PRCA is seen in 2%–5% patients and evaluating PRCA for thymoma is seen in 5%–13% patient. As per the WHO histopathological classification, thymoma has six types and Type A is associated with PRCA and Type B is associated with myasthenia gravis. This correlation was not seen in our patient, who had Type B thymoma. Surgical resection of thymus improves 30% of PRCA and rest needs immunosuppression. Our patient was not the surgical candidate, and hence he was put on chemotherapy. PMID:28144099

  15. Reducing US Oil Dependence Using Simulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ayoub, Fadi; Arnaout, Georges M.

    2011-01-01

    People across the world are addicted to oil; as a result, the instability of oil prices and the shortage of oil reserves have influenced human behaviors and global businesses. Today, the United States makes up only 5% of the global population but consumes 25% of the. world total energy. Most of this energy is generated from fossil fuels in the form of electricity. The contribution of this paper is to examine the possibilities of replacing fossil fuel with renewable energies to generate electricity as well as to examine other methods to reduce oil and gas consumption. We propose a system dynamics model in an attempt to predict the future US dependence on fossil fuels by using renewable energy resources such as, nuclear, wind, solar, and hydro powers. Based on the findings of our model, the study expects to provide insights towards promising solutions of the oil dependency problem.

  16. Kinship as a frequency dependent strategy.

    PubMed

    Ji, Ting; Zheng, Xiu-Deng; He, Qiao-Qiao; Wu, Jia-Jia; Mace, Ruth; Tao, Yi

    2016-02-01

    Humans divide themselves up into separate cultures, which is a unique and ubiquitous characteristic of our species. Kinship norms are one of the defining features of such societies. Here we show how norms of marital residence can evolve as a frequency-dependent strategy, using real-world cases from southwestern China and an evolutionary game model. The process of kinship change has occurred in the past and is also occurring now in southwestern China. Our data and models show how transitions between residence types can occur both as response to changing costs and benefits of co-residence with kin, and also due to the initial frequency of the strategies adopted by others in the population: patrilocal societies can become matrilocal, and neolocal societies can become duolocal. This illustrates how frequency-dependent selection plays a role both in the maintenance of group-level cultural diversity and in cultural extinction.

  17. Photochemotherapy: Light Dependent Therapies in Medicine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zovinka, Edward P.; Sunseri, Danielle R.

    2002-11-01

    Light-dependent therapies, such as photodynamic therapy and extracorporeal photopheresis, are not new, but have remained of interest to chemists and health care professionals since the middle of the twentieth century. While most people link light-dependent therapies only to the treatment of cancer, these therapies may be of use for a diverse set of medical conditions, from acne to AIDS. The techniques arise directly from the application of chemical concepts, such as spectroscopy, MO theory, and organic chemical reactions. Because of its application to health care, the field of photochemistry provides a tool to demonstrate the significance of chemistry to a socially important issue.

    See Featured Molecules.

  18. Density dependence: an ecological Tower of Babel.

    PubMed

    Herrando-Pérez, Salvador; Delean, Steven; Brook, Barry W; Bradshaw, Corey J A

    2012-11-01

    The concept of density dependence represents the effect of changing population size on demographic rates and captures the demographic role of social and trophic mechanisms (e.g. competition, cooperation, parasitism or predation). Ecologists have coined more than 60 terms to denote different statistical and semantic properties of this concept, resulting in a formidable lexicon of synonymies and polysemies. We have examined the vocabulary of density dependence used in the modern ecological literature from the foundational lexicon developed by Smith, Allee, Haldane, Neave and Varley. A few simple rules suffice to abate terminological inconsistency and to enhance the biological meaning of this important concept. Correct citation of original references by ecologists and research journals could ameliorate terminological standards in our discipline and avoid linguistic confusion of mathematically and theoretically complex patterns.

  19. Pulling angle-dependent force microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grebíková, L.; Gojzewski, H.; Kieviet, B. D.; Klein Gunnewiek, M.; Vancso, G. J.

    2017-03-01

    In this paper, we describe a method allowing one to perform three-dimensional displacement control in force spectroscopy by atomic force microscopy (AFM). Traditionally, AFM force curves are measured in the normal direction of the contacted surface. The method described can be employed to address not only the magnitude of the measured force but also its direction. We demonstrate the technique using a case study of angle-dependent desorption of a single poly(2-hydroxyethyl methacrylate) (PHEMA) chain from a planar silica surface in an aqueous solution. The chains were end-grafted from the AFM tip in high dilution, enabling single macromolecule pull experiments. Our experiments give evidence of angular dependence of the desorption force of single polymer chains and illustrate the added value of introducing force direction control in AFM.

  20. Analysis of frequency dependent pump light absorption

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wohlmuth, Matthias; Pflaum, Christoph

    2011-03-01

    Simulations have to accurately model thermal lensing in order to help improving resonator design of diode pumped solid state lasers. To this end, a precise description of the pump light absorption is an important prerequisite. In this paper, we discuss the frequency dependency of the pump light absorption in the laser crystal and its influence on the simulated laser performance. The results show that the pump light absorption has to include the spectral overlap of the emitting pump source and the absorbing laser material. This information can either be used for a fully frequency dependent absorption model or, at least in the shown examples, to compute an effective value for an exponential Beer-Lambert law of absorption. This is particularly significant at pump wavelengths coinciding with a peak of absorption. Consequences for laser stability and performance are analyzed for different pump wavelengths in a Nd:YAG laser.

  1. Temperature dependence of standard model CP violation.

    PubMed

    Brauner, Tomáš; Taanila, Olli; Tranberg, Anders; Vuorinen, Aleksi

    2012-01-27

    We analyze the temperature dependence of CP violation effects in the standard model by determining the effective action of its bosonic fields, obtained after integrating out the fermions from the theory and performing a covariant gradient expansion. We find nonvanishing CP violating terms starting at the sixth order of the expansion, albeit only in the C-odd-P-even sector, with coefficients that depend on quark masses, Cabibbo-Kobayashi-Maskawa matrix elements, temperature and the magnitude of the Higgs field. The CP violating effects are observed to decrease rapidly with temperature, which has important implications for the generation of a matter-antimatter asymmetry in the early Universe. Our results suggest that the cold electroweak baryogenesis scenario may be viable within the standard model, provided the electroweak transition temperature is at most of order 1 GeV.

  2. Kinship as a frequency dependent strategy

    PubMed Central

    Ji, Ting; Zheng, Xiu-Deng; He, Qiao-Qiao; Wu, Jia-Jia; Tao, Yi

    2016-01-01

    Humans divide themselves up into separate cultures, which is a unique and ubiquitous characteristic of our species. Kinship norms are one of the defining features of such societies. Here we show how norms of marital residence can evolve as a frequency-dependent strategy, using real-world cases from southwestern China and an evolutionary game model. The process of kinship change has occurred in the past and is also occurring now in southwestern China. Our data and models show how transitions between residence types can occur both as response to changing costs and benefits of co-residence with kin, and also due to the initial frequency of the strategies adopted by others in the population: patrilocal societies can become matrilocal, and neolocal societies can become duolocal. This illustrates how frequency-dependent selection plays a role both in the maintenance of group-level cultural diversity and in cultural extinction. PMID:26998333

  3. Brain Pathways to Recovery from Alcohol Dependence

    PubMed Central

    Cui, Changhai; Noronha, Antonio; Warren, Kenneth; Koob, George F.; Sinha, Rajita; Thakkar, Mahesh; Matochik, John; Crews, Fulton T.; Chandler, L. Judson; Pfefferbaum, Adolf; Becker, Howard C.; Lovinger, David; Everitt, Barry; Egli, Mark; Mandyam, Chitra; Fein, George; Potenza, Marc N.; Harris, R. Adron; Grant, Kathleen A.; Roberto, Marisa; Meyerhoff, Dieter J.; Sullivan, Edith V.

    2015-01-01

    This article highlights the research presentations at the satellite symposium on “Brain Pathways to Recovery from Alcohol Dependence” held at the 2013 Society for Neuroscience Annual Meeting. The purpose of this symposium was to provide an up to date overview of research efforts focusing on understanding brain mechanisms that contribute to recovery from alcohol dependence. A panel of scientists from the alcohol and addiction research field presented their insights and perspectives on brain mechanisms that may underlie both recovery and lack of recovery from alcohol dependence. The four sessions of the symposium encompassed multilevel studies exploring mechanisms underlying relapse and craving associated with sustained alcohol abstinence, cognitive function deficit and recovery, and translational studies on preventing relapse and promoting recovery. Gaps in our knowledge and research opportunities were also discussed. PMID:26074423

  4. Anchorage Dependent Cells Attached to a Polymer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    Biomedical research offers hope for a variety of medical problems, from diabetes to the replacement of damaged bone and tissues. Bioreactors, which are used to grow cells and tissue cultures, play a major role in such research and production efforts. Anchorage dependent cells on STS-95 will be grown on beads similar to these cells produced during previous investigations. Recombinant proteins may offer the possibility of reducing or eliminating transplant rejections. Research by Synthecon, Inc. using the BioDyn Bioreactor will focus on the preliminary process for growing a proprietary recombinant protein that can decrease rejection of transplanted tissue. The cells producing this protein are anchorage dependent, meaning that they must attach to something to grow. These cells will be cultured in the bioreactor in a medium containing polymer microbeads. Synthecon hopes that the data from this mission will lead to the development of a commercial protein that will aid in prevention of transplant rejection.

  5. Anchorage Dependent Cells Attached to a Polymer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    Biomedical research offers hope for a variety of medical problems, from diabetes to the replacement of damaged bone and tissues. Bioreactors, which are used to grow cells and tissue cultures, play a major role in such research and production efforts. Anchorage dependent cells on STS-95 will be grown on beads, similar to these cells produced during previous investigations. Recombinant proteins may offer the possibility of reducing or eliminating transplant rejections. Research by Synthecon, Inc. using the BioDyn Bioreactor will focus on the preliminary process for growing a proprietary recombinant protein that can decrease rejection of transplanted tissue. The cells producing this protein are anchorage dependent, meaning that they must attach to something to grow. These cells will be cultured in the bioreactor in a medium containing polymer microbeads. Synthecon hopes that the data from this mission will lead to the development of a commercial protein that will aid in prevention of transplant rejection.

  6. Asymmetry dependence of the nuclear caloric curve

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McIntosh, A. B.; Bonasera, A.; Cammarata, P.; Hagel, K.; Heilborn, L.; Kohley, Z.; Mabiala, J.; May, L. W.; Marini, P.; Raphelt, A.; Souliotis, G. A.; Wuenschel, S.; Zarrella, A.; Yennello, S. J.

    2013-02-01

    A basic feature of the nuclear equation of state is not yet understood: the dependence of the nuclear caloric curve on the neutron-proton asymmetry. Predictions of theoretical models differ on the magnitude and even the sign of this dependence. In this work, the nuclear caloric curve is examined for fully reconstructed quasi-projectiles around mass A = 50. The caloric curve extracted with the momentum quadrupole fluctuation thermometer shows that the temperature varies linearly with quasi-projectile asymmetry N-Z/A. An increase in asymmetry of 0.15 units corresponds to a decrease in temperature on the order of 1 MeV. These results also highlight the importance of a full quasi-projectile reconstruction in the study of thermodynamic properties of hot nuclei.

  7. Asymmetry Dependence of the Nuclear Caloric Curve

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McIntosh, A. B.; Bonasera, A.; Cammarata, P.; Hagel, K.; Heilborn, L.; Kohley, Z.; Mabiala, J.; May, L. W.; Marini, P.; Raphelt, A.; Souliotis, G. A.; Wuenschel, S.; Zarrella, A.; Yennello, S. J.

    2013-03-01

    A basic feature of the nuclear equation of state is not yet understood: the dependence of the nuclear caloric curve on the neutron-proton asymmetry. Predictions of theoretical models differ on the magnitude and even the sign of this dependence. In this work, the nuclear caloric curve is examined for fully reconstructed quasi-projectiles around mass A = 50. Two independent thermometers, the momentum quadrupole fluctuation thermometer and the Albergo yield ratio thermometer, are used to extract the caloric curve. For both methods, the caloric curve extracted shows that the temperature varies linearly with quasi-projectile asymmetry For the momentum quadrupole fluctuation thermometer, an increase in asymmetry of 0.15 units corresponds to a decrease in temperature on the order of 1 MeV. These results also highlight the importance of a full quasi-projectile reconstruction in the study of thermodynamic properties of hot nuclei.

  8. Dependent personality disorder: a critical review.

    PubMed

    Disney, Krystle L

    2013-12-01

    Dependent personality disorder (DPD) has evolved from an abstract idea rooted in a historic and psychoanalytic context to a codified diagnosis in the DSM-IV-TR. This comprehensive review paper chronicles the evolution of DPD through each version of the DSM. Major topics relevant to the disorder are also investigated, including gender and cultural considerations, stability and manifestations of DPD across different developmental stages, comorbidity issues, and others. The purpose of this review is to provide a broad yet comprehensive examination of the complex angles of maladaptive dependency and to identify essential next steps in furthering our knowledge of this disorder. The paper concludes with a discussion of shortcomings in the body of research relevant to DPD, along with specific suggestions for improvement in this field of study.

  9. Time-dependent oral absorption models

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Higaki, K.; Yamashita, S.; Amidon, G. L.

    2001-01-01

    The plasma concentration-time profiles following oral administration of drugs are often irregular and cannot be interpreted easily with conventional models based on first- or zero-order absorption kinetics and lag time. Six new models were developed using a time-dependent absorption rate coefficient, ka(t), wherein the time dependency was varied to account for the dynamic processes such as changes in fluid absorption or secretion, in absorption surface area, and in motility with time, in the gastrointestinal tract. In the present study, the plasma concentration profiles of propranolol obtained in human subjects following oral dosing were analyzed using the newly derived models based on mass balance and compared with the conventional models. Nonlinear regression analysis indicated that the conventional compartment model including lag time (CLAG model) could not predict the rapid initial increase in plasma concentration after dosing and the predicted Cmax values were much lower than that observed. On the other hand, all models with the time-dependent absorption rate coefficient, ka(t), were superior to the CLAG model in predicting plasma concentration profiles. Based on Akaike's Information Criterion (AIC), the fluid absorption model without lag time (FA model) exhibited the best overall fit to the data. The two-phase model including lag time, TPLAG model was also found to be a good model judging from the values of sum of squares. This model also described the irregular profiles of plasma concentration with time and frequently predicted Cmax values satisfactorily. A comparison of the absorption rate profiles also suggested that the TPLAG model is better at prediction of irregular absorption kinetics than the FA model. In conclusion, the incorporation of a time-dependent absorption rate coefficient ka(t) allows the prediction of nonlinear absorption characteristics in a more reliable manner.

  10. Biperiden dependence: case report and literature review.

    PubMed

    Espi Martinez, Fernando; Espi Forcen, Fernando; Shapov, Arlenne; Martinez Moya, Amparo

    2012-01-01

    Anticholinergic drugs are frequently used in psychiatry for the prophylaxis and treatment of extrapiramidal symptoms caused by neuroleptics. Abuse of anticholinergic agents has been reported in patients with psychotic disorders, on treatment with neuroleptics, and polysubstance use disorders. We are reporting the case of a patient who presented with hypoactive delirium as a consequence of biperiden dependence. The clinician must pay special attention to detect anticholinergic misuse in patients presenting with delirium of unknown cause.

  11. Methyl rotor dependent vibrational interactions in toluene.

    PubMed

    Gascooke, Jason R; Lawrance, Warren D

    2013-04-07

    The methyl rotor dependence of a three state Fermi resonance in S1 toluene at ∼460 cm(-1) has been investigated using two-dimensional laser induced fluorescence. An earlier time-resolved study has shown the Fermi resonance levels to have different energy spacings at the two lowest methyl rotor states, m = 0 and 1 [J. A. Davies, A. M. Green, and K. L. Reid, Phys. Chem. Chem. Phys. 12, 9872 (2010)]. The overlapped m = 0 and 1 spectral features have been separated to provide direct spectral evidence for the m dependence of the resonance. The resonance has been probed at m = 3a(") 1 for the first time and found to be absent, providing further evidence for a large change in the interaction with m. Deperturbing the resonance at m = 0 and 1 reveals that the m dependence arises through differences in the separations of the "zero-order," locally coupled states. It is shown that this is the result of the local "zero-order" states being perturbed by long-range torsion-vibration coupling that shifts their energy by small amounts. The m dependence of the shifts arises from the Δm = ±3n (n = 1, 2, ...) coupling selection rule associated with torsion-rotation coupling in combination with the m(2) scaling of the rotor energies, which changes the ΔE for the interaction for each m. There is also an increase in the number of states that can couple to m = 1 compared with m = 0. Consideration of the magnitude of reported torsion-rotation coupling constants suggests that this effect is likely to be pervasive in molecules with methyl rotors.

  12. Winning combinations of history-dependent games

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kay, Roland J.; Johnson, Neil F.

    2003-05-01

    The Parrondo effect describes the seemingly paradoxical situation in which two losing games can, when combined, become a winning game [Parrondo, Harmer, and Abbott, Phys. Rev. Lett. 85, 24 (2000)]. Here, we generalize this analysis to the case where both games are history dependent, i.e., there is an intrinsic memory in the dynamics of each game. Results are presented for the cases of both random and periodic switching between the two games.

  13. Biperiden Dependence: Case Report and Literature Review

    PubMed Central

    Espi Martinez, Fernando; Espi Forcen, Fernando; Shapov, Arlenne; Martinez Moya, Amparo

    2012-01-01

    Anticholinergic drugs are frequently used in psychiatry for the prophylaxis and treatment of extrapiramidal symptoms caused by neuroleptics. Abuse of anticholinergic agents has been reported in patients with psychotic disorders, on treatment with neuroleptics, and polysubstance use disorders. We are reporting the case of a patient who presented with hypoactive delirium as a consequence of biperiden dependence. The clinician must pay special attention to detect anticholinergic misuse in patients presenting with delirium of unknown cause. PMID:22937420

  14. Environment-Dependent Payoffs in Finite Populations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Wei-Hong; Zhang, Yan-Ling; Xie, Guang-Ming; Feng, Xue

    2015-02-01

    In finite population games with weak selection and large population size, when the payoff matrix is constant, the one-third law serves as the condition of a strategy to be advantageous. We generalize the result to the cases of environment-dependent payoff matrices which exhibit the feedback from the environment to the population. Finally, a more general law about cooperation-dominance is obtained.

  15. Renewable Energy Can Help Reduce Oil Dependency

    ScienceCinema

    Arvizu, Dan

    2016-07-12

    In a speech to the Economic Club of Kansas City on June 23, 2010, NREL Director Dan Arvizu takes a realistic look at how renewable energy can help reduce America's dependence on oil, pointing out that the country gets as much energy from renewable sources now as it does from offshore oil production. For a transcript, visit http://www.nrel.gov/director/pdfs/energy_overview_06_10.pdf

  16. Optimal Preventive Maintenance Under Decision Dependent Uncertainty

    SciTech Connect

    Galenko, Alexander; Popova, Elmira; Kee, Ernie; Grantom, Rick

    2006-07-01

    We analyze a system of N components with dependent failure times. The goal is to obtain the optimal block replacement interval (different for each component) over a finite horizon that minimizes the expected total maintenance cost. In addition, we allow each preventive maintenance action to change the future joint failure time distribution. We illustrate our methodology with an example from South Texas Project Nuclear Operating Company. (authors)

  17. Transverse-momentum-dependent parton distributions (TMDs)

    SciTech Connect

    Bacchetta, Alessandro

    2011-10-24

    Transverse-momentum-dependent parton distributions (TMDs) provide three-dimensional images of the partonic structure of the nucleon in momentum space. We made impressive progress in understanding TMDs, both from the theoretical and experimental point of view. This brief overview on TMDs is divided in two parts: in the first, an essential list of achievements is presented. In the second, a selection of open questions is discussed.

  18. Composition Dependence of Bulk Alloy Properties

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bozzolo, Guillermo; Ferrante, John

    1994-01-01

    We introduce an approximate expression for the direct calculation of properties of alloys in terms of the pure components. This rule can be obtained as a particular case from the Bozzolo-Ferrante-Smith (BFS) method, a recently developed semiempirical method for alloys. In particular, we examine the application of this rule to several examples of the concentration dependence of the lattice parameter of binary and ternary alloys.

  19. Systems of reinforcement and drug dependence.

    PubMed

    Valdman, A V; Zvartau, E E

    1982-12-01

    Experimental data are presented in support of the hypothesis on the role of positive and negative reinforcing systems in the mechanism of drug dependence. Drugs with abuse potential (DAP) may change the manner of response to negative emotional stimuli, activate positive emotional reactions in animals, and possess primary reinforcing properties. Reward and punishment systems respond sensitively to withdrawal from DAP or antagonist administration. Catecholaminergic and peptidergic processes are of importance in the mechanisms of the emotionally positive action of DAP.

  20. Spatial dependence of pairing in deformed nuclei

    SciTech Connect

    Balbutsev, E. B.; Malov, L. A.; Schuck, P.

    2011-11-15

    The solution of time-dependent Hartree-Fock-Bogoliubov equations by the Wignerfunction-moments method leads to the appearance of refined low-lying modes whose description requires the accurate knowledge of the anomalous density matrix. It is shown that calculations with Woods-Saxon potential satisfy this requirement, producing an anomalous density matrix of the same quality as more complicated calculations with realistic forces.

  1. Time Delay Systems with Distribution Dependent Dynamics

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-05-10

    sensitivity function for general nonlinear ordinary differential equations (ODEs) in a Banach space. Here we only show the construction of the abstract...shear: A nonlinear stick-slip formulation. CRSC-TR06-07, February, 2006; Differential Equations and Nonlinear Mechanics. Banks, H.T. and H.K. Nguyen (to...dependent dynamical system (in this case a 6 complicated system of partial differential equations ) for which the distribution PL must be estimated in some

  2. Recombination-dependent concatemeric viral DNA replication.

    PubMed

    Lo Piano, Ambra; Martínez-Jiménez, María I; Zecchi, Lisa; Ayora, Silvia

    2011-09-01

    The initiation of viral double stranded (ds) DNA replication involves proteins that recruit and load the replisome at the replication origin (ori). Any block in replication fork progression or a programmed barrier may act as a factor for ori-independent remodelling and assembly of a new replisome at the stalled fork. Then replication initiation becomes dependent on recombination proteins, a process called recombination-dependent replication (RDR). RDR, which is recognized as being important for replication restart and stability in all living organisms, plays an essential role in the replication cycle of many dsDNA viruses. The SPP1 virus, which infects Bacillus subtilis cells, serves as a paradigm to understand the links between replication and recombination in circular dsDNA viruses. SPP1-encoded initiator and replisome assembly proteins control the onset of viral replication and direct the recruitment of host-encoded replisomal components at viral oriL. SPP1 uses replication fork reactivation to switch from ori-dependent θ-type (circle-to-circle) replication to σ-type RDR. Replication fork arrest leads to a double strand break that is processed by viral-encoded factors to generate a D-loop into which a new replisome is assembled, leading to σ-type viral replication. SPP1 RDR proteins are compared with similar proteins encoded by other viruses and their possible in vivo roles are discussed.

  3. Dissipative time-dependent quantum transport theory.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yu; Yam, Chi Yung; Chen, GuanHua

    2013-04-28

    A dissipative time-dependent quantum transport theory is developed to treat the transient current through molecular or nanoscopic devices in presence of electron-phonon interaction. The dissipation via phonon is taken into account by introducing a self-energy for the electron-phonon coupling in addition to the self-energy caused by the electrodes. Based on this, a numerical method is proposed. For practical implementation, the lowest order expansion is employed for the weak electron-phonon coupling case and the wide-band limit approximation is adopted for device and electrodes coupling. The corresponding hierarchical equation of motion is derived, which leads to an efficient and accurate time-dependent treatment of inelastic effect on transport for the weak electron-phonon interaction. The resulting method is applied to a one-level model system and a gold wire described by tight-binding model to demonstrate its validity and the importance of electron-phonon interaction for the quantum transport. As it is based on the effective single-electron model, the method can be readily extended to time-dependent density functional theory.

  4. Preclinical and clinical pharmacology of alcohol dependence.

    PubMed

    Tambour, Sophie; Quertemont, Etienne

    2007-02-01

    In recent years, advances in neuroscience led to the development of new medications to treat alcohol dependence and especially to prevent alcohol relapse after detoxification. Whereas the earliest medications against alcohol dependence were fortuitously discovered, recently developed drugs are increasingly based on alcohol's neurobiological mechanisms of action. This review discusses the most recent developments in alcohol pharmacotherapy and emphasizes the neurobiological basis of anti-alcohol medications. There are currently three approved drugs for the treatment of alcohol dependence with quite different mechanisms of action. Disulfiram is an inhibitor of the enzyme aldehyde dehydrogenase and acts as an alcohol-deterrent drug. Naltrexone, an opiate antagonist, reduces alcohol craving and relapse in heavy drinking, probably via a modulation of the mesolimbic dopamine activity. Finally, acamprosate helps maintaining alcohol abstinence, probably through a normalization of the chronic alcohol-induced hyperglutamatergic state. In addition to these approved medications, many other drugs have been suggested for preventing alcohol consumption on the basis of preclinical studies. Some of these drugs remain promising, whereas others have produced disappointing results in preliminary clinical studies. These new drugs in the field of alcohol pharmacotherapy are also discussed, together with their mechanisms of action.

  5. Influence of Sensory Dependence on Postural Control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Santana, Patricia A.; Mulavara, Ajitkumar P.; Fiedler, Matthew J.

    2011-01-01

    The current project is part of an NSBRI funded project, "Development of Countermeasures to Aid Functional Egress from the Crew Exploration Vehicle Following Long-Duration Spaceflight." The development of this countermeasure is based on the use of imperceptible levels of electrical stimulation to the balance organs of the inner ear to assist and enhance the response of a person s sensorimotor function. These countermeasures could be used to increase an astronaut s re-adaptation rate to Earth s gravity following long-duration space flight. The focus of my project is to evaluate and examine the correlation of sensory preferences for vision and vestibular systems. Disruption of the sensorimotor functions following space flight affects posture, locomotion and spatial orientation tasks in astronauts. The Group Embedded Figures Test (GEFT), the Rod and Frame Test (RFT) and the Computerized Dynamic Posturography Test (CDP) are measurements used to examine subjects visual and vestibular sensory preferences. The analysis of data from these tasks will assist in relating the visual dependence measures recognized in the GEFT and RFT with vestibular dependence measures recognized in the stability measures obtained during CDP. Studying the impact of sensory dependence on the performance in varied tasks will help in the development of targeted countermeasures to help astronauts readapt to gravitational changes after long duration space flight.

  6. Communication imperialism and dependency: a conceptual clarification.

    PubMed

    Lee, P S

    1988-01-01

    Communications imperialism has to do with the domination of a country's media activities by another. The ownership, structure, distribution or content of the media in 1 country are affected by pressures from media interests of another country or group out of proportion with those of that country. To determine if this is happening we should consider the country's policies, the private sector;s efforts to export communications elements, and actions of the dominant country against the dominated. The 4 aspects of international media in this situation are television program exportation, foreign ownership and control of media distribution, the infringement of capital opinions on other societies, and the transfer of commercialism and broadcasting norms. In addition to the software and hardware and the other forms of communication such as satellites, computers, and transportation of the mass media, there are the cultural effects on the developing countries. In the case of involuntary of voluntary dependency of the recipient country, the effect of the unbalanced international communication can be harmful or beneficial. Communication dependency may not be harmful to the culture of the recipient country. In determining the theory of unbalanced international communications 3 factors should be considered. There are: the role of the interacting countries, the nature of the dependency of the recipient country, and the beneficial or harmful effect of unbalanced communication pattern on that country.

  7. Software dependability in the Tandem GUARDIAN system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, Inhwan; Iyer, Ravishankar K.

    1995-01-01

    Based on extensive field failure data for Tandem's GUARDIAN operating system this paper discusses evaluation of the dependability of operational software. Software faults considered are major defects that result in processor failures and invoke backup processes to take over. The paper categorizes the underlying causes of software failures and evaluates the effectiveness of the process pair technique in tolerating software faults. A model to describe the impact of software faults on the reliability of an overall system is proposed. The model is used to evaluate the significance of key factors that determine software dependability and to identify areas for improvement. An analysis of the data shows that about 77% of processor failures that are initially considered due to software are confirmed as software problems. The analysis shows that the use of process pairs to provide checkpointing and restart (originally intended for tolerating hardware faults) allows the system to tolerate about 75% of reported software faults that result in processor failures. The loose coupling between processors, which results in the backup execution (the processor state and the sequence of events) being different from the original execution, is a major reason for the measured software fault tolerance. Over two-thirds (72%) of measured software failures are recurrences of previously reported faults. Modeling, based on the data, shows that, in addition to reducing the number of software faults, software dependability can be enhanced by reducing the recurrence rate.

  8. Time-dependent diffusion in stellar atmospheres

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alecian, G.; Stift, M. J.; Dorfi, E. A.

    2011-12-01

    The chemical peculiarities of Ap stars are due to abundance stratifications produced by atomic diffusion in their outer layers. Theoretical models can predict such stratifications, but so far only provide equilibrium solutions which correspond to the maximum depth-dependent abundances for each element that can be supported by the radiation field. However, these stratifications are actually built up through a non-linear, time-dependent process which has never been modelled for realistic stellar atmospheres. Here, we present the first numerical simulations of time-dependent diffusion. We solve the continuity equation after having computed, as accurately as possible, atomic diffusion velocities (with and without a magnetic field) for a simplified fictitious - but still realistic - chemical element: cloudium. The direct comparison with existing observations is not the immediate aim of this work but rather a general understanding of how the stratification build-up proceeds in time and space. Our results raise serious questions as to the relevance of equilibrium solutions and reinforce the suspicion that certain accumulations of chemical elements might prove unstable.

  9. Energy dependence corrections to MOSFET dosimetric sensitivity.

    PubMed

    Cheung, T; Butson, M J; Yu, P K N

    2009-03-01

    Metal Oxide Semiconductor Field Effect Transistors (MOSFET's) are dosimeters which are now frequently utilized in radiotherapy treatment applications. An improved MOSFET, clinical semiconductor dosimetry system (CSDS) which utilizes improved packaging for the MOSFET device has been studied for energy dependence of sensitivity to x-ray radiation measurement. Energy dependence from 50 kVp to 10 MV x-rays has been studied and found to vary by up to a factor of 3.2 with 75 kVp producing the highest sensitivity response. The detectors average life span in high sensitivity mode is energy related and ranges from approximately 100 Gy for 75 kVp x-rays to approximately 300 Gy at 6 MV x-ray energy. The MOSFET detector has also been studied for sensitivity variations with integrated dose history. It was found to become less sensitive to radiation with age and the magnitude of this effect is dependant on radiation energy with lower energies producing a larger sensitivity reduction with integrated dose. The reduction in sensitivity is however approximated reproducibly by a slightly non linear, second order polynomial function allowing corrections to be made to readings to account for this effect to provide more accurate dose assessments both in phantom and in-vivo.

  10. Quintessential scale dependence from separate universe simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chiang, Chi-Ting; Li, Yin; Hu, Wayne; LoVerde, Marilena

    2016-12-01

    By absorbing fluctuations into a local background, separate universe simulations provide a powerful technique to characterize the response of small-scale observables to the long-wavelength density fluctuations, for example those of the power spectrum and halo mass function which lead to the squeezed-limit n -point function and halo bias, respectively. Using quintessence dark energy as the paradigmatic example, we extend these simulation techniques to cases where non-gravitational forces in other sectors establish a Jeans scale across which the growth of density fluctuations becomes scale dependent. By characterizing the separate universes with matching background expansion histories, we show that the power spectrum and mass function responses depend on whether the long-wavelength mode is above or below the Jeans scale. Correspondingly, the squeezed bispectrum and halo bias also become scale dependent. Models of bias that are effectively local in the density field at a single epoch, initial or observed, cannot describe this effect which highlights the importance of temporal nonlocality in structure formation. Validated by these quintessence tests, our techniques are applicable to a wide range of models where the complex dynamics of additional fields affect the clustering of matter in the linear regime and it would otherwise be difficult to simulate their impact in the nonlinear regime.

  11. Road rage among drug dependent patients.

    PubMed

    Benavidez, Daniela C; Flores, Antonio Marcos; Fierro, Inmaculada; Alvarez, F Javier

    2013-01-01

    The consumption of alcohol, cocaine and cannabis is associated with aggressive behaviour, being a victim of injuries from various causes, and suffering traffic accidents. On the other hand, there is a significant association between road rage and traffic accidents, yet this has not been studied in persons suffering a substance dependence disorder. This study analyses the prevalence of road rage in substance dependent patients undergoing treatment. 100 patients randomly selected at an outpatient treatment centre were included in the study. 63% of the patients had experienced road rage in the year prior to the interview, and 18% were serious perpetrators. There was a higher frequency among drivers and those who were starting treatment for cocaine and cocaine+heroin. The study shows that road rage is very frequent among patients with disorders due to substance dependence who are undergoing treatment, in particular the most severe form ("serious perpetrators"). Special attention should be addressed to the issue of driving and road rage during the treatment of these patients.

  12. The biodiversity-dependent ecosystem service debt.

    PubMed

    Isbell, Forest; Tilman, David; Polasky, Stephen; Loreau, Michel

    2015-02-01

    Habitat destruction is driving biodiversity loss in remaining ecosystems, and ecosystem functioning and services often directly depend on biodiversity. Thus, biodiversity loss is likely creating an ecosystem service debt: a gradual loss of biodiversity-dependent benefits that people obtain from remaining fragments of natural ecosystems. Here, we develop an approach for quantifying ecosystem service debts, and illustrate its use to estimate how one anthropogenic driver, habitat destruction, could indirectly diminish one ecosystem service, carbon storage, by creating an extinction debt. We estimate that c. 2-21 Pg C could be gradually emitted globally in remaining ecosystem fragments because of plant species loss caused by nearby habitat destruction. The wide range for this estimate reflects substantial uncertainties in how many plant species will be lost, how much species loss will impact ecosystem functioning and whether plant species loss will decrease soil carbon. Our exploratory analysis suggests that biodiversity-dependent ecosystem service debts can be globally substantial, even when locally small, if they occur diffusely across vast areas of remaining ecosystems. There is substantial value in conserving not only the quantity (area), but also the quality (biodiversity) of natural ecosystems for the sustainable provision of ecosystem services.

  13. Socio-Emotional Factors in Alcohol Dependence

    PubMed Central

    Tikka, Deyashini Lahiri; Ram, Daya; Dubey, Indu; Tikka, Sai Krishna

    2014-01-01

    Background: Alcohol-dependent patients are traditionally believed to have insecure attachment styles, higher anger expression, and lower self-esteem. There is a need to study them together. Aim: To understand the relationships amongst various of the socio-emotional factors. Materials and Methods: Forty male patients with Alcohol dependence syndrome and 40 matched healthy controls (General Health Questionnaire-12 score <3) were compared on attachment styles (on Relationship Scale Questionnaire), anger domains (on State Trait Anger Expression Inventory), and self-esteem (on Rosenberg Self-esteem Scale). Statistics and Analysis: Comparison using independent samples t test and chi square test; correlation using Pearson's correlation coefficient. Results: Patients had significantly higher anger expression, ‘anger in’ and ‘anger out,’ and lower self-esteem than healthy controls. Severity of alcohol dependence had significant correlation with ‘anger out,’ and self-esteem had significant negative correlation with anger expression. Conclusion: The present study suggests that the socio-emotional factors studied are developmentally linked to each other. PMID:24860216

  14. Phase dependencies of the human baroreceptor reflex

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Seidel, H.; Herzel, H.; Eckberg, D. L.

    1997-01-01

    We studied the influence of respiratory and cardiac phase on responses of the cardiac pacemaker to brief (0.35-s) increases of carotid baroreceptor afferent traffic provoked by neck suction in seven healthy young adult subjects. Cardiac responses to neck suction were measured indirectly from electrocardiographic changes of heart period. Our results show that it is possible to separate the influences of respiratory and cardiac phases at the onset of a neck suction impulse by a product of two factors: one depending only on the respiratory phase and one depending only on the cardiac phase. This result is consistent with the hypothesis that efferent vagal activity is a function of afferent baroreceptor activity, whereas respiratory neurons modulate that medullary throughput independent of the cardiac phase. Furthermore, we have shown that stimulus broadening and stimulus cropping influence the outcome of neck suction experiments in a way that makes it virtually impossible to obtain information on the phase dependency of the cardiac pacemaker's sensitivity to vagal stimulation without accurate knowledge of the functional shape of stimulus broadening.

  15. Time Dependent Behavior in the Weissenberg Effect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Degen, Michael M.; Andereck, C. David

    1997-03-01

    The Weissenberg effect is the climb of a non-Newtonian fluid up a rotating rod. We have found novel transitional effects in the behavior of a particular climbing fluid, STP(STP Oil Treatment distributed by First Brands Corporation.). The first state is a time-independent axisymmetric concave climb. As the rotation rate of the rod is increased, the first transition is to an axisymmetric climb with an ``onion dome'' shape. At higher rotation rates, the flow undergoes a symmetry breaking bifurcation to a time-dependent state. This time-dependent state exhibits an oscillation with a single frequency. Upon further increase of the rod rotation rate, the oscillation becomes modulated by a second frequency. The nature of each transition will be characterized, including the measurement of oscillation amplitudes and the frequency (or frequencies) of the time dependent states. These results will be compared with previous work.(G.S. Beavers, D.D. Joseph, J. Fluid Mech. 69), 475 (1975).(D.D. Joseph, R.L. Fosdick, Arch. Rational Mech. 49), 321 (1973).

  16. Interpersonal dependency and online gaming addiction

    PubMed Central

    Škařupová, Kateřina; Blinka, Lukas

    2016-01-01

    Background and aims The present study explores the relationship between social motivations and addiction to online gaming and if that possible connection can be explained by the personality traits responsible for social functioning. Methods We employ Bernstein’s concept of interpersonal dependency to distinguish healthy dependency, dysfunctional detachment, and destructive overdependence, and Charlton and Danforth’s conceptualisation of online gaming addiction and high engagement. An online questionnaire was administered to a self-nominated sample of 4,074 online gamers. Two regression models were constructed to separately explain gaming addiction and high engagement using social motivations to play, while controlling for age, gender, and time spent online. Results High scores on subscales measuring dysfunctional detachment and destructive overdependence were positively associated with online gaming addiction, while healthy dependency was negatively correlated with addiction scores. In contrast, the overall role of social motivation was negligible. Discussion People with healthy relationship profiles are less likely to develop problematic patterns of online gaming. High in-game engagement, although sharing some factors with addiction, was only poorly explained by the study variables, suggesting the mutual exclusiveness of addiction and engagement. PMID:26690326

  17. Structure of weakly 2-dependent siphons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chao, Daniel Yuh; Chen, Jiun-Ting

    2013-09-01

    Deadlocks arising from insufficiently marked siphons in flexible manufacturing systems can be controlled by adding monitors to each siphon - too many for large systems. Li and Zhou add monitors to elementary siphons only while controlling the rest of (called dependent) siphons by adjusting control depth variables of elementary siphons. Only a linear number of monitors are required. The control of weakly dependent siphons (WDSs) is rather conservative since only positive terms were considered. The structure for strongly dependent siphons (SDSs) has been studied earlier. Based on this structure, the optimal sequence of adding monitors has been discovered earlier. Better controllability has been discovered to achieve faster and more permissive control. The results have been extended earlier to S3PGR2 (systems of simple sequential processes with general resource requirements). This paper explores the structures for WDSs, which, as found in this paper, involve elementary resource circuits interconnecting at more than (for SDSs, exactly) one resource place. This saves the time to compute compound siphons, their complementary sets and T-characteristic vectors. Also it allows us (1) to improve the controllability of WDSs and control siphons and (2) to avoid the time to find independent vectors for elementary siphons. We propose a sufficient and necessary test for adjusting control depth variables in S3PR (systems of simple sequential processes with resources) to avoid the sufficient-only time-consuming linear integer programming test (LIP) (Nondeterministic Polynomial (NP) time complete problem) required previously for some cases.

  18. Interpersonal dependency and online gaming addiction.

    PubMed

    Škařupová, Kateřina; Blinka, Lukas

    2016-03-01

    Background and aims The present study explores the relationship between social motivations and addiction to online gaming and if that possible connection can be explained by the personality traits responsible for social functioning. Methods We employ Bernstein's concept of interpersonal dependency to distinguish healthy dependency, dysfunctional detachment, and destructive overdependence, and Charlton and Danforth's conceptualisation of online gaming addiction and high engagement. An online questionnaire was administered to a self-nominated sample of 4,074 online gamers. Two regression models were constructed to separately explain gaming addiction and high engagement using social motivations to play, while controlling for age, gender, and time spent online. Results High scores on subscales measuring dysfunctional detachment and destructive overdependence were positively associated with online gaming addiction, while healthy dependency was negatively correlated with addiction scores. In contrast, the overall role of social motivation was negligible. Discussion People with healthy relationship profiles are less likely to develop problematic patterns of online gaming. High in-game engagement, although sharing some factors with addiction, was only poorly explained by the study variables, suggesting the mutual exclusiveness of addiction and engagement.

  19. Addiction and dependence in DSM-V.

    PubMed

    O'Brien, Charles

    2011-05-01

    As preparations for the fifth revision of the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (DSM) are under way, this paper focuses upon changes proposed for the substance use disorders section. It briefly outlines the history behind the current nomenclature, and the selection of the term 'dependence' over 'addiction' in earlier versions of the DSM. The term 'dependence', while used in past decades to refer to uncontrolled drug-seeking behavior, has an alternative meaning--the physiological adaptation that occurs when medications acting on the central nervous system are ingested with rebound when the medication is abruptly discontinued. These dual meanings have led to confusion and may have propagated current clinical practices related to under-treatment of pain, as physicians fear creating an 'addiction' by prescribing opioids. In part to address this problem, a change proposed for DSM-V is to alter the chapter name to 'Addiction and Related Disorders', which will include disordered gambling. The specific substance use disorders may be referred to as 'alcohol use' or 'opioid use' disorders. The criteria for the disorders are likely to remain similar, with the exception of removal of the 'committing illegal acts' criterion and addition of a 'craving' criterion. The other major change relates to the elimination of the abuse/dependence dichotomy, given the lack of data supporting an intermediate stage. These changes are anticipated to improve clarification and diagnosis and treatment of substance use and related disorders.

  20. Field dependence, laterality and the EEG.

    PubMed

    O'Connor, K P; Shaw, J C

    1978-03-01

    There is evidence that an individual's 'cognitive style' is related to lateralization of function in the brain, and that this in turn is associated with characteristic EEG coherence spectra. We tested the hypothesis that field dependence (a measure of cognitive organization) and hand preference (a measure of functional organisation) relate to EEG coherence measures in a specific way. The predicted associations were based on the proposal that right preferent individuals have a more specific, and left preferents a more diffuse, system of functional units in the cortex. The association between alpha band resting EEG coherence (sampled on two occasions for both hemispheres from 12 right and 12 left preferent individuals), field dependence (Nyborg's criterion of frame dependence on a rod and frame test), and laterality scores (questionnaire and manual performance), was measured by Kendall's coefficient of concordance (W). Significant associations support the proposed model except for coherence within the left preferents' right hemisphere. It is argued that the right hemisphere is more specifically organised in strong sinistrals than the general model would predict. These and other results support the use of EEC coherence measures in the study of cerebral functional organisation.

  1. Interactive dependency curves for resilience management.

    PubMed

    Petit, Frédéric; Wallace, Kelly; Phillip, Julia

    Physical dependencies are a fundamental consideration when assessing the resilience of an organisation and, ultimately, the resilience of a region. Every organisation needs specific resources for supporting its operations. A disruption in the supply of these resources can severely impact business continuity. It is important to characterise dependencies thoroughly when seeking to reduce the extent an organisation is directly affected by the missions, functions and operations of other organisations. The general protocol when addressing each critical resource is to determine the use for the resource, whether there are redundant services providing the resource, and what protections, backup equipment and arrangements are in place to maintain service. Finally, the criticality of the resource is determined by estimating the time it will take for the facility to experience a severe impact once primary service is lost and what percentage of facility operations can be maintained without backup service in place, as well as identifying whether any external regulations/policies are in place that require shutdown of the facility because of service disruption owing to lack of a critical resource. All of this information can be presented in the form of interactive dependency curves that help anticipate and manage the effect(s) of a disruption on critical resources supply.

  2. GABA receptors, alcohol dependence and criminal behavior.

    PubMed

    Terranova, Claudio; Tucci, Marianna; Sartore, Daniela; Cavarzeran, Fabiano; Di Pietra, Laura; Barzon, Luisa; Palù, Giorgio; Ferrara, Santo D

    2013-09-01

    The aim of this study was to analyze the connection between alcohol dependence and criminal behavior by an integrated genetic-environmental approach. The research, structured as a case-control study, examined 186 alcohol-dependent males; group 1 (N = 47 convicted subjects) was compared with group 2 (N = 139 no previous criminal records). Genetic results were innovative, highlighting differences in genotype distribution (p = 0.0067) in group 1 for single-nucleotide polymorphism rs 3780428, located in the intronic region of subunit 2 of the GABA B receptor gene (GABBR2). Some environmental factors (e.g., grade repetition) were associated with criminal behavior; others (e.g., attendance at Alcoholics Anonymous) were inversely related to convictions. The concomitant presence of the genetic and environmental factors found to be associated with the condition of alcohol-dependent inmate showed a 4-fold increase in the risk of antisocial behavior. The results need to be replicated on a larger population to develop new preventive and therapeutic proposals.

  3. DEPEND: A simulation-based environment for system level dependability analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goswami, Kumar; Iyer, Ravishankar K.

    1992-01-01

    The design and evaluation of highly reliable computer systems is a complex issue. Designers mostly develop such systems based on prior knowledge and experience and occasionally from analytical evaluations of simplified designs. A simulation-based environment called DEPEND which is especially geared for the design and evaluation of fault-tolerant architectures is presented. DEPEND is unique in that it exploits the properties of object-oriented programming to provide a flexible framework with which a user can rapidly model and evaluate various fault-tolerant systems. The key features of the DEPEND environment are described, and its capabilities are illustrated with a detailed analysis of a real design. In particular, DEPEND is used to simulate the Unix based Tandem Integrity fault-tolerance and evaluate how well it handles near-coincident errors caused by correlated and latent faults. Issues such as memory scrubbing, re-integration policies, and workload dependent repair times which affect how the system handles near-coincident errors are also evaluated. Issues such as the method used by DEPEND to simulate error latency and the time acceleration technique that provides enormous simulation speed up are also discussed. Unlike any other simulation-based dependability studies, the use of these approaches and the accuracy of the simulation model are validated by comparing the results of the simulations, with measurements obtained from fault injection experiments conducted on a production Tandem Integrity machine.

  4. Environmental enrichment modifies the PKA-dependence of hippocampal LTP and improves hippocampus-dependent memory.

    PubMed

    Duffy, S N; Craddock, K J; Abel, T; Nguyen, P V

    2001-01-01

    cAMP-dependent protein kinase (PKA) is critical for the expression of some forms of long-term potentiation (LTP) in area CA1 of the mouse hippocampus and for hippocampus-dependent memory. Exposure to spatially enriched environments can modify LTP and improve behavioral memory in rodents, but the molecular bases for the enhanced memory performance seen in enriched animals are undefined. We tested the hypothesis that exposure to a spatially enriched environment may alter the PKA dependence of hippocampal LTP. Hippocampal slices from enriched mice showed enhanced LTP following a single burst of 100-Hz stimulation in the Schaffer collateral pathway of area CA1. In slices from nonenriched mice, this single-burst form of LTP was less robust and was unaffected by Rp-cAMPS, an inhibitor of PKA. In contrast, the enhanced LTP in enriched mice was attenuated by Rp-cAMPS. Enriched slices expressed greater forskolin-induced, cAMP-dependent synaptic facilitation than did slices from nonenriched mice. Enriched mice showed improved memory for contextual fear conditioning, whereas memory for cued fear conditioning was unaffected following enrichment. Our data indicate that exposure of mice to spatial enrichment alters the PKA dependence of LTP and enhances one type of hippocampus-dependent memory. Environmental enrichment can transform the pharmacological profile of hippocampal LTP, possibly by altering the threshold for activity-dependent recruitment of the cAMP-PKA signaling pathway following electrical and chemical stimulation. We suggest that experience-dependent plasticity of the PKA dependence of hippocampal LTP may be important for regulating the efficacy of hippocampus-based memory.

  5. Heart Rate Dependency of Large Artery Stiffness.

    PubMed

    Tan, Isabella; Spronck, Bart; Kiat, Hosen; Barin, Edward; Reesink, Koen D; Delhaas, Tammo; Avolio, Alberto P; Butlin, Mark

    2016-07-01

    Carotid-femoral pulse wave velocity (cfPWV) quantifies large artery stiffness, it is used in hemodynamic research and is considered a useful cardiovascular clinical marker. cfPWV is blood pressure (BP) dependent. Intrinsic heart rate (HR) dependency of cfPWV is unknown because increasing HR is commonly accompanied by increasing BP. This study aims to quantify cfPWV dependency on acute, sympathovagal-independent changes in HR, independent of BP. Individuals (n=52, age 40-93 years, 11 female) with in situ cardiac pacemakers or cardioverter defibrillators were paced at 60, 70, 80, 90, and 100 bpm. BP and cfPWV were measured at each HR. Both cfPWV (mean [95% CI], 0.31 [0.26-0.37] m/s per 10 bpm; P<0.001) and central aortic diastolic pressure (3.78 [3.40-4.17] mm Hg/10 bpm; P<0.001) increased with HR. The HR effect on cfPWV was isolated by correcting the BP effects by 3 different methods: (1) statistically, by a linear mixed model; (2) mathematically, using an exponential relationship between BP and cross-sectional lumen area; and (3) using measured BP dependency of cfPWV derived from changes in BP induced by orthostatic changes (seated and supine) in a subset of subjects (n=17). The BP-independent effects of HR on cfPWV were quantified as 0.20 [0.11-0.28] m/s per 10 bpm (P<0.001, method 1), 0.16 [0.11-0.22] m/s per 10 bpm (P<0.001, method 2), and 0.16 [0.11-0.21] m/s per 10 bpm (P<0.001, method 3). With a mean HR dependency in the range of 0.16 to 0.20 m/s per 10 bpm, cfPWV may be considered to have minimal physiologically relevant changes for small changes in HR, but larger differences in HR must be considered as contributing to significant differences in cfPWV.

  6. Path Dependence of Regional Climate Change

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Herrington, Tyler; Zickfeld, Kirsten

    2013-04-01

    Path dependence of the climate response to CO2 forcing has been investigated from a global mean perspective, with evidence suggesting that long-term global mean temperature and precipitation changes are proportional to cumulative CO2 emissions, and independent of emissions pathway. Little research, however, has been done on path dependence of regional climate changes, particularly in areas that could be affected by tipping points. Here, we utilize the UVic Earth System Climate Model version 2.9, an Earth System Model of Intermediate Complexity. It consists of a 3-dimensional ocean general circulation model, coupled with a dynamic-thermodynamic sea ice model, and a thermodynamic energy-moisture balance model of the atmosphere. This is then coupled with a terrestrial carbon cycle model and an ocean carbon-cycle model containing an inorganic carbon and marine ecosystem component. Model coverage is global with a zonal resolution of 3.6 degrees and meridional resolution of 1.8 degrees. The model is forced with idealized emissions scenarios across five cumulative emission groups (1300 GtC, 2300 GtC, 3300 GtC, 4300 GtC, and 5300 GtC) to explore the path dependence of (and the possibility of hysteresis in) regional climate changes. Emission curves include both fossil carbon emissions and emissions from land use changes, and span a variety of peak and decline scenarios with varying emission rates, as well as overshoot and instantaneous pulse scenarios. Tipping points being explored include those responsible for the disappearance of summer Arctic sea-ice, the irreversible melt of the Greenland Ice Sheet, the collapse of the Atlantic Thermohaline Circulation, and the dieback of the Amazonian Rainforest. Preliminary results suggest that global mean climate change after cessation of CO2 emissions is independent of the emissions pathway, only varying with total cumulative emissions, in accordance with results from earlier studies. Forthcoming analysis will investigate path

  7. [Dependence on benzodiazepines. Clinical and biological aspects].

    PubMed

    Pelissolo, A; Bisserbe, J C

    1994-01-01

    The high rate of benzodiazepines (BZD) consumption has been repeatedly confirmed by epidemiological surveys in most major western world countries. In a recent french survey 7% of chronic users of BZD (use in 5/7 days for the last 12 months) were found the general population (17% in the population aged above 65). It has been suggested that the high BZD consumption rate could be related to dependence. The existence of BZD dependence was described in the early sixties with very high dose of chlordiazepoxide but it has become a real concern for the medical community since the late seventies with increasing number of reports of withdrawal symptoms. The extend of the actual rate of withdrawal symptoms at BZD tapering is still very controversial and according to the different studies it varies from 39 to 90%. The between studies difference in parameters such as: the patient populations (psychopathology, treatment duration), the type of tapering employed (duration, nature of the medical and psychological support) and the used operational criteria for withdrawal definition most likely explain this wide variation in the rate of occurrence of withdrawal manifestations. According to the American Psychiatric Association Task Force on Benzodiazepine Dependence, Toxicity and Abuse three type of pathological events can happen after treatment discontinuation: rebound, withdrawal syndrome and recurrence. The rebound consists in the early and transitory reappearance of the anxiety symptoms pre-existing to the treatment but in an exacerbated from; the withdrawal syndrome associates the resurgence of the pre-existing anxiety symptoms and new symptoms as sensory disturbances (metallic taste, hyperosmia, cutaneous exacerbated sensitivity, photophobia...) nausea, headache, motor disturbance in some rare cases depersonalization, paranoid reaction, confusion, convulsion. Rebound or withdrawal syndrome appearance delay varies from hours to few days according mostly to compounds elimination

  8. Frequency-Dependent Fracture Specific Stiffness

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pyrak-Nolte, L. J.; Folz, M. A.; Acosta-Colon, A.

    2003-12-01

    Monitoring the hydraulic properties of fractures remotely through their seismic signatures is an important goal for field hydrology. Empirical studies have shown that the hydraulic properties of a fracture are implicitly related to the fracture specific stiffness through the amount and distribution of contact area and apertures that arise from two rough surfaces in contact. Complicating this simple picture are seismic measurements that indicate frequency-dependent stiffness, i.e., a scale-dependent fracture stiffness where the scale is set by the wavelength. Thus relating the hydraulic properties of fractures to seismic measurements becomes a scale dependent problem. We have performed laboratory experiments to examine the phenomenon of frequency dependent fracture specific stiffness to aid in the assessment of the hydraulic properties of a fracture using seismic techniques. To this end, we have developed a photolithographic technique with which we can construct synthetic fractures of known fracture geometry with feature sizes controlled over several orders of magnitude. The synthetic fracture (and the control non-fractured samples) are made from acrylic cylinders that measure 15.0 cm in diameter by 7.7 cm in height. The diameter of the samples enables us to sample the acoustic properties of the fracture using acoustic lens over regions that range in scale from 10 mm to 60 mm. A confinement cell controls the normal stress on the fracture. Seismic measurements were made with broadband compressional-mode piezoelectric transducers enabling one-order of magnitude in frequency. We found that when the wavelength is smaller than the asperity size, a linear dependence of fracture specific stiffness on frequency occurs. In this geometric ray regime the asymptotic value of the transmission function provides a direct measure of the contact area of the fracture. On the other hand, when the asperity spacing is less than an eighth of a wavelength, the fracture behaves as a

  9. Time-dependent Hartree approximation and time-dependent harmonic oscillator model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blaizot, J. P.; Schulz, H.

    1982-03-01

    We present an analytically soluble model for studying nuclear collective motion within the framework of the time-dependent Hartree (TDH) approximation. The model reduces the TDH equations to the Schrödinger equation of a time-dependent harmonic oscillator. Using canonical transformations and coherent states we derive a few properties of the time-dependent harmonic oscillator which are relevant for applications. We analyse the role of the normal modes in the time evolution of a system governed by TDH equations. We show how these modes couple together due to the anharmonic terms generated by the non-linearity of the theory.

  10. Genetics Home Reference: pyridoxal 5'-phosphate-dependent epilepsy

    MedlinePlus

    ... 5'-phosphate-dependent epilepsy pyridoxal 5'-phosphate-dependent epilepsy Enable Javascript to view the expand/collapse boxes. ... All Close All Description Pyridoxal 5'-phosphate-dependent epilepsy is a condition that involves seizures beginning soon ...

  11. Genetics Home Reference: vitamin D-dependent rickets

    MedlinePlus

    ... Genetics Home Health Conditions vitamin D-dependent rickets vitamin D-dependent rickets Enable Javascript to view the ... boxes. Download PDF Open All Close All Description Vitamin D-dependent rickets is a disorder of bone ...

  12. 20 CFR 725.207 - Determination of dependency; divorced spouse.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... Duration of Entitlement Conditions and Duration of Entitlement: Miner's Dependents (augmented Benefits) § 725.207 Determination of dependency; divorced spouse. For the purpose of augmenting benefits,...

  13. 20 CFR 725.207 - Determination of dependency; divorced spouse.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ..., and Duration of Entitlement Conditions and Duration of Entitlement: Miner's Dependents (augmented Benefits) § 725.207 Determination of dependency; divorced spouse. For the purpose of augmenting...

  14. 20 CFR 725.207 - Determination of dependency; divorced spouse.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ..., and Duration of Entitlement Conditions and Duration of Entitlement: Miner's Dependents (augmented Benefits) § 725.207 Determination of dependency; divorced spouse. For the purpose of augmenting...

  15. 20 CFR 725.207 - Determination of dependency; divorced spouse.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ..., and Duration of Entitlement Conditions and Duration of Entitlement: Miner's Dependents (augmented Benefits) § 725.207 Determination of dependency; divorced spouse. For the purpose of augmenting...

  16. 20 CFR 725.207 - Determination of dependency; divorced spouse.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ..., and Duration of Entitlement Conditions and Duration of Entitlement: Miner's Dependents (augmented Benefits) § 725.207 Determination of dependency; divorced spouse. For the purpose of augmenting...

  17. Exact time dependence of solutions to the time-dependent Schrödinger equation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lohe, M. A.

    2009-01-01

    Solutions of the Schrödinger equation with an exact time dependence are derived as eigenfunctions of dynamical invariants which are constructed from time-independent operators using time-dependent unitary transformations. Exact solutions and a closed form expression for the corresponding time evolution operator are found for a wide range of time-dependent Hamiltonians in d dimensions, including non-Hermitean {\\cal PT} -symmetric Hamiltonians. Hamiltonians are constructed using time-dependent unitary spatial transformations comprising dilatations, translations and rotations and solutions are found in several forms: as eigenfunctions of a quadratic invariant, as coherent state eigenfunctions of boson operators, as plane wave solutions from which the general solution is obtained as an integral transform by means of the Fourier transform, and as distributional solutions for which the initial wavefunction is the Dirac δ-function. For the isotropic harmonic oscillator in d dimensions radial solutions are found which extend known results for d = 1, including Barut-Girardello and Perelomov coherent states (i.e., vector coherent states), which are shown to be related to eigenfunctions of the quadratic invariant by the ζ-transformation. This transformation, which leaves the Ermakov equation invariant, implements SU(1, 1) transformations on linear dynamical invariants. \\mathfrak{su}(1, 1) coherent states are derived also for the time-dependent linear potential. Exact solutions are found for Hamiltonians with electromagnetic interactions in which the time-dependent magnetic and electric fields are not necessarily spatially uniform. As an example, it is shown how to find exact solutions of the time-dependent Schrödinger equation for the Dirac magnetic monopole in the presence of time-dependent magnetic and electric fields of a specified form.

  18. Cardiac Fas-dependent and mitochondria-dependent apoptosis after chronic cocaine abuse.

    PubMed

    Liou, Cher-Ming; Tsai, Shiow-Chwen; Kuo, Chia-Hua; Ting, Hua; Lee, Shin-Da

    2014-04-09

    To evaluate whether chronic cocaine abuse will increase cardiac Fas-dependent and mitochondria-dependent apoptotic pathways, thirty-two male Wistar rats at 3-4 months of age were randomly divided into a vehicle-treated group (phosphate-buffered saline, PBS, 0.5 mL, SQ per day) and a cocaine-treated group (Cocaine, 10 mg/kg, SQ per day). After 3 months of treatment, the excised left ventricles were measured by H&E staining, Western blotting, DAPI staining and TUNEL assays. More cardiac TUNEL-positive apoptotic cells were observed in the Cocaine group than the PBS group. Protein levels of TNF-alpha, Fas ligand, Fas death receptor, FADD, activated caspase-8, and activated caspase-3 (Fas-dependent apoptosis) extracted from excised hearts in the Cocaine group were significantly increased, compared to the PBS group. Protein levels of cardiac Bax, cytosolic cytochrome c, t-Bid-to-Bid, Bak-to-Bcl-xL, Bax-to-Bcl-2 ratio, activated caspase-9, and activated caspase-3 (mitochondria-dependent apoptosis) were significantly increased in the Cocaine group, compared to the PBS group. Chronic cocaine exposure appeared to activate the cardiac Fas-dependent and mitochondria-dependent apoptosis, which may indicate a possible mechanism for the development of cardiac abnormalities in humans with chronic cocaine abuse.

  19. Chronic methamphetamine exposure induces cardiac fas-dependent and mitochondria-dependent apoptosis.

    PubMed

    Liou, Cher-Ming; Tsai, Shiow-Chwen; Kuo, Chia-Hua; Williams, Timothy; Ting, Hua; Lee, Shin-Da

    2014-06-01

    Very limited information regarding the influence of chronic methamphetamine exposure on cardiac apoptosis is available. In this study, we evaluate whether chronic methamphetamine exposure will increase cardiac Fas-dependent (type I) and mitochondria-dependent (type II) apoptotic pathways. Thirty-two male Wistar rats at 3-4 months of age were randomly divided into a vehicle-treated group [phosphate-buffered saline (PBS) 0.5 ml SQ per day] and a methamphetamine-treated group (MA 10 mg/kg SQ per day) for 3 months. We report that after 3 months of exposure, abnormal myocardial architecture, more minor cardiac fibrosis and cardiac TUNEL-positive apoptotic cells were observed at greater frequency in the MA group than in the PBS group. Protein levels of TNF-α, Fas ligand, Fas receptor, Fas-associated death domain, activated caspase-8, and activated caspase-3 (Fas-dependent apoptosis) extracted from excised hearts were significantly increased in the MA group, compared to the PBS group. Protein levels of cardiac Bak, t-Bid, Bak to Bcl-xL ratio, activated caspase-9, and activated caspase-3 (mitochondria-dependent apoptosis) were significantly increased in the MA group, compared with the PBS group. The results from this study reveal that chronic methamphetamine exposure will activate cardiac Fas-dependent and mitochondria-dependent apoptotic pathways, which may indicate a possible mechanism for developing cardiac abnormalities in humans with chronic methamphetamine abuse.

  20. Comparison of striatal dopamine transporter levels in chronic heroin-dependent and methamphetamine-dependent subjects.

    PubMed

    Yuan, Jie; Liu, Xing Dang; Han, Mei; Lv, Rong Bin; Wang, Yuan Kai; Zhang, Guang Ming; Li, Yu

    2017-01-01

    To compare the effects of heroin and methamphetamine (METH) addiction on dopamine transporters (DATs) in the same dose and duration, we assessed DAT levels in the striatum by (99m) Tc-TRODAT-1 single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) brain images in people with heroin and METH dependence. We recruited 21 healthy human controls, 23 heroin-dependent subjects and 25 METH abusers. The heroin- and METH-dependent subjects exhibited negative urine toxicology after undergoing physiological detoxification. All subjects underwent SPECT brain imaging, and specific tracer uptake ratios (SURs) were assessed bilaterally in the regions of interest. A significant SUR reduction in heroin-dependent subjects and METH-dependent subjects compared with healthy controls was found in the left striatum, right striatum, left caudate nucleus, right caudate nucleus, left putamen and right putamen. There were no significant differences in the heroin group and METH group for the left striatum, right striatum, left caudate nucleus, right caudate nucleus, left putamen and right putamen. The scores of craving, HAMA (Hamilton Anxiety Rating Scale), in heroin abusers were lower than in the METH abusers. Our results show that people with heroin and METH dependence who are currently abstinent had lower DAT levels in the striatum than healthy controls. There were no differences in striatal DAT in heroin and METH users. These results suggest that chronic heroin and METH abuse appears to produce similar effects in striatal DAT in humans. METH users may have more serious craving and anxiety symptoms than heroin users with prolonged abstinence.

  1. Ionic dependence of sulphur mustard cytotoxicity

    SciTech Connect

    Sawyer, Thomas W. Nelson, Peggy; Bjarnason, Stephen; Vair, Cory; Shei Yimin; Tenn, Catherine; Lecavalier, Pierre; Burczyk, Andrew

    2010-09-15

    The effect of ionic environment on sulphur mustard (bis 2-chloroethyl sulphide; HD) toxicity was examined in CHO-K1 cells. Cultures were treated with HD in different ionic environments at constant osmolar conditions (320 mOsM, pH 7.4). The cultures were refed with fresh culture medium 1 h after HD exposure, and viability was assessed. Little toxicity was apparent when HD exposures were carried out in ion-free sucrose buffer compared to LC{sub 50} values of {approx} 100-150 {mu}M when the cultures were treated with HD in culture medium. Addition of NaCl to the buffer increased HD toxicity in a salt concentration-dependent manner to values similar to those obtained in culture medium. HD toxicity was dependent on both cationic and anionic species with anionic environment playing a much larger role in determining toxicity. Substitution of NaI for NaCl in the treatment buffers increased HD toxicity by over 1000%. The activity of the sodium hydrogen exchanger (NHE) in recovering from cytosolic acidification in salt-free and in different chloride salts did not correlate with the HD-induced toxicity in these buffers. However, the inhibition by HD of intracellular pH regulation correlated with its toxicity in NaCl, NaI and sucrose buffers. Analytical chemical studies and the toxicity of the iodine mustard derivative ruled out the role of chemical reactions yielding differentially toxic species as being responsible for the differences in HD toxicity observed. This work demonstrates that the early events that HD sets into motion to cause toxicity are dependent on ionic environment, possibly due to intracellular pH deregulation.

  2. Pressure dependence of electrical conductivity in forsterite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoshino, Takashi; Zhang, Baohua; Rhymer, Brandon; Zhao, Chengcheng; Fei, Hongzhan

    2017-01-01

    Electrical conductivity of dry forsterite has been measured in muli-anvil apparatus to investigate the pressure dependence of ionic conduction in forsterite. The starting materials for the conductivity experiments were a synthetic forsterite single crystal and a sintered forsterite aggregate synthesized from oxide mixture. Electrical conductivities were measured at 3.5, 6.7, 9.6, 12.1, and 14.9 GPa between 1300 and 2100 K. In the measured temperature range, the conductivity of single crystal forsterite decreases in the order of [001], [010], and [100]. In all cases, the conductivity decreases with increasing pressure and then becomes nearly constant for [100] and [001] and slightly increases above 7 GPa for [010] orientations and a polycrystalline forsterite sample. Pressure dependence of forsterite conductivity was considered as a change of the dominant conduction mechanism composed of migration of both magnesium and oxygen vacancies in forsterite. The activation energy (ΔE) and activation volume (ΔV) for ionic conduction due to migration of Mg vacancy were 1.8-2.7 eV and 5-19 cm3/mol, respectively, and for that due to O vacancy were 2.2-3.1 eV and -1.1 to 0.3 cm3/mol, respectively. The olivine conductivity model combined with small polaron conduction suggests that the most part of the upper mantle is controlled by ionic conduction rather than small polaron conduction. The previously observed negative pressure dependence of the conductivity of olivine with low iron content (Fo90) can be explained by ionic conduction due to migration of Mg vacancies, which has a large positive activation volume.

  3. Time-dependent Dyson orbital theory.

    PubMed

    Gritsenko, O V; Baerends, E J

    2016-08-21

    Although time-dependent density functional theory (TDDFT) has become the tool of choice for real-time propagation of the electron density ρ(N)(t) of N-electron systems, it also encounters problems in this application. The first problem is the neglect of memory effects stemming from the, in TDDFT virtually unavoidable, adiabatic approximation, the second problem is the reliable evaluation of the probabilities P(n)(t) of multiple photoinduced ionization, while the third problem (which TDDFT shares with other approaches) is the reliable description of continuum states of the electrons ejected in the process of ionization. In this paper time-dependent Dyson orbital theory (TDDOT) is proposed. Exact TDDOT equations of motion (EOMs) for time-dependent Dyson orbitals are derived, which are linear differential equations with just static, feasible potentials of the electron-electron interaction. No adiabatic approximation is used, which formally resolves the first TDDFT problem. TDDOT offers formally exact expressions for the complete evolution in time of the wavefunction of the outgoing electron. This leads to the correlated probability of single ionization P(1)(t) as well as the probabilities of no ionization (P(0)(t)) and multiple ionization of n electrons, P(n)(t), which formally solves the second problem of TDDFT. For two-electron systems a proper description of the required continuum states appears to be rather straightforward, and both P(1)(t) and P(2)(t) can be calculated. Because of the exact formulation, TDDOT is expected to reproduce a notorious memory effect, the "knee structure" of the non-sequential double ionization of the He atom.

  4. Dextromethorphan psychosis, dependence and physical withdrawal.

    PubMed

    Miller, Shannon C

    2005-12-01

    As part of a synthesis of evidence regarding the abuse and addiction liability of dextromethorphan (DM), an over-the-counter cough medicine available in over 140 preparations, an uncommonly published case of dextromethorphan dependence (addiction) is described, with specific, rarely published complications. The individual was interviewed and several medical databases were also reviewed (Medline, 1966-present; PubMed) for all content relating to the Keywords: dextromethorphan, abuse, dependence, cough medicine, addiction, withdrawal, psychosis. The patient evidenced history suggesting substance dependence, substance-induced psychosis and substance withdrawal in relation to DM. A literature review revealed that DM has specific serotonergic and sigma-1 opioidergic properties. Dextrorphan (DOR), the active metabolite of DM, has similar properties; however, DOR is a weaker sigma opioid receptor agonist, and a stronger NMDA receptor antagonist. DM and DOR display specific biological features of addiction, and are capable of inducing specific psychiatric sequelae. A specific, reproducible toxidrome with significant psychiatric effects occurred, when DM was abused at greater than indicated doses, with more profound and potentially life-threatening effects at even higher doses. DM withdrawal appears evident. DM's active metabolite, DOR, has pharmacodynamic properties and intoxication effects similar to dissociatives, and may be more responsible for the dissociative effect that this DM abuser sought. However, it is this same metabolite that may be fraught with the potentially life-threatening psychoses and dissociative-induced accidents, as well as addiction. While DM has been hypothesized as the most commonly abused dissociative, health-care providers seem largely unaware of its toxidrome and addiction liability.

  5. Facilitation of calcium-dependent potassium current.

    PubMed

    Thompson, S H

    1994-12-01

    The activation of Ca-dependent K+ current, Ic, was studied in macropatches on the cell bodies of molluscan neurons. When a depolarizing voltage-clamp pulse was applied repeatedly, Ic facilitated in a manner that resembled the facilitation of synaptic transmitter release. Facilitation was characterized by an increase in Ic amplitude, a progressive increase in instantaneous outward current, and a decrease in utilization time. Experiments were done to investigate the mechanism responsible for Ic facilitation. Facilitation was reduced by microinjection of an exogenous Ca2+ buffer into the cytoplasm, indicating that facilitation is a Ca(2+)-dependent process. It was also reduced at elevated temperatures. Conversely, facilitation was greatly potentiated by blocking the Na/Ca exchange mechanism. It is concluded that the facilitation of Ca-dependent K+ current results from the accumulation of Ca2+ at the inner face of the membrane during the repeated activation of Ca2+ channels by depolarization. The Ca2+ indicator fluo-3 was used in fluorescence imaging experiments to measure changes in [Ca]i near the cell membrane during repeated depolarizing pulses and the interpretation of these results was aided by numerical simulations of Ca2+ accumulation, diffusion, and buffering in the peripheral cytoplasm. These experiments showed that the time course of Ic facilitation matches the time course of Ca2+ accumulation at the membrane. It was found that the strength of Ic facilitation varies among patches on the same neuron, suggesting that the accumulation of Ca2+ is not uniform along the inner surface of the membrane and that gradients in [Ca]i develop and are maintained during trains of depolarizing pulses. Potential mechanisms that may lead to local differences in Ca2+ accumulation and Ic facilitation are discussed.

  6. Outboard Motor Maximizes Power and Dependability

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2008-01-01

    Developed by Jonathan Lee, a structural materials engineer at Marshall Space Flight Center, and PoShou Chen, a scientist with Huntsville, Alabama-based Morgan Research Corporation, MSFC-398 is a high-strength aluminum alloy able to operate at high temperatures. MSFC-398 was licensed for marine applications by Bombardier Recreational Products Inc., and is now found in the complete line of Evinrude E-TEC outboard motors, a line of two-stroke motors that maintain the power and dependability of a two-stroke with the refinement of a four-stroke.

  7. Motor Learning Enhances Use-Dependent Plasticity.

    PubMed

    Mawase, Firas; Uehara, Shintaro; Bastian, Amy J; Celnik, Pablo

    2017-03-08

    Motor behaviors are shaped not only by current sensory signals but also by the history of recent experiences. For instance, repeated movements toward a particular target bias the subsequent movements toward that target direction. This process, called use-dependent plasticity (UDP), is considered a basic and goal-independent way of forming motor memories. Most studies consider movement history as the critical component that leads to UDP (Classen et al., 1998; Verstynen and Sabes, 2011). However, the effects of learning (i.e., improved performance) on UDP during movement repetition have not been investigated. Here, we used transcranial magnetic stimulation in two experiments to assess plasticity changes occurring in the primary motor cortex after individuals repeated reinforced and nonreinforced actions. The first experiment assessed whether learning a skill task modulates UDP. We found that a group that successfully learned the skill task showed greater UDP than a group that did not accumulate learning, but made comparable repeated actions. The second experiment aimed to understand the role of reinforcement learning in UDP while controlling for reward magnitude and action kinematics. We found that providing subjects with a binary reward without visual feedback of the cursor led to increased UDP effects. Subjects in the group that received comparable reward not associated with their actions maintained the previously induced UDP. Our findings illustrate how reinforcing consistent actions strengthens use-dependent memories and provide insight into operant mechanisms that modulate plastic changes in the motor cortex.SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT Performing consistent motor actions induces use-dependent plastic changes in the motor cortex. This plasticity reflects one of the basic forms of human motor learning. Past studies assumed that this form of learning is exclusively affected by repetition of actions. However, here we showed that success-based reinforcement signals could

  8. Size-dependent thermopower of nickel nanoparticles

    SciTech Connect

    Singh, Jaiveer; Kaurav, N.; Okram, Gunadhor S.

    2014-04-24

    Nickel nanoparticles (Ni-NPs) were prepared by thermal decomposition method using Trioctylphosphine (TOP) and Oleylamine (OA). The average particle size (D) estimated from X-ray diffraction (XRD) using Scherrer equation, to be 1-10nm, systematically decreases with increasing concentration of TOP at constant OA concentration. The observed thermopower strongly depends on particle size particularly at low temperatures reaching a very high value of ∼ 10{sup 5} μV/K (at 20 K), and is attributed to the enhanced grain-boundary scattering combined with quantum confinement.

  9. Gravity-Dependent Transport in Industrial Processes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ostrach, Simon; Kamotani, Yasuhiro

    1996-01-01

    Gravity dependent transport phenomena in various industrial processes are investigated in order to indicate new directions for micro-gravity research that enhance the commercial success of the space program. The present article describes the commercialization possibilities of such topics associated with physicochemical transport phenomena. The topics are: coating flow, rotating electrochemical system, and convection in low Plandtl number fluids. The present study is directed to understand these phenomena, and to develop a knowledge base for their applications with emphasis to a micro-gravity environment.

  10. Alcohol use dependence in fragile X syndrome.

    PubMed

    Salcedo-Arellano, María J; Lozano, Reymundo; Tassone, Flora; Hagerman, Randi J; Saldarriaga, Wilmar

    2016-08-01

    Alcohol use disorders (AUDs) have been reported in a limited number of individuals with cognitive impairment but rarely in those with fragile X syndrome (FXS). However, in Colombia, culturally, alcohol consumption is very common. Here, we report eight cases of patients with FXS who have frequent alcohol consumption in Ricaurte, Colombia. Some of these patients have also used tobacco and illegal substances, including cocaine, which use has not been previously reported in those with FXS. Alcohol and substance use dependence is associated with exacerbation of their behavioral problems, such as increased impulsivity and aggression, as well as of medical problems such as an increased frequency of seizures.

  11. Sequence dependent hole evolution in DNA.

    PubMed

    Lakhno, V D

    2004-06-01

    The paper examines thedynamical behavior of a radical cation(G(+*)) generated in adouble stranded DNA for differentoligonucleotide sequences. The resonancehole tunneling through an oligonucleotidesequence is studied by the method ofnumerical integration of self-consistentquantum-mechanical equations. The holemotion is considered quantum mechanicallyand nucleotide base oscillations aretreated classically. The results obtaineddemonstrate a strong dependence of chargetransfer on the type of nucleotidesequence. The rates of the hole transferare calculated for different nucleotidesequences and compared with experimentaldata on the transfer from (G(+*))to a GGG unit.

  12. Isotopic Dependence of the Nuclear Caloric Curve

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sfienti, C.; Adrich, P.; Aumann, T.; Bacri, C. O.; Barczyk, T.; Bassini, R.; Bianchin, S.; Boiano, C.; Botvina, A. S.; Boudard, A.; Brzychczyk, J.; Chbihi, A.; Cibor, J.; Czech, B.; de Napoli, M.; Ducret, J.-É.; Emling, H.; Frankland, J. D.; Hellström, M.; Henzlova, D.; Immè, G.; Iori, I.; Johansson, H.; Kezzar, K.; Lafriakh, A.; Le Fèvre, A.; Le Gentil, E.; Leifels, Y.; Lühning, J.; Łukasik, J.; Lynch, W. G.; Lynen, U.; Majka, Z.; Mocko, M.; Müller, W. F. J.; Mykulyak, A.; Orth, H.; Otte, A. N.; Palit, R.; Pawłowski, P.; Pullia, A.; Raciti, G.; Rapisarda, E.; Sann, H.; Schwarz, C.; Simon, H.; Sümmerer, K.; Trautmann, W.; Tsang, M. B.; Verde, G.; Volant, C.; Wallace, M.; Weick, H.; Wiechula, J.; Wieloch, A.; Zwiegliński, B.

    2009-04-01

    The A/Z dependence of projectile fragmentation at relativistic energies has been studied with the ALADIN forward spectrometer at SIS. A stable beam of Sn124 and radioactive beams of La124 and Sn107 at 600 MeV per nucleon have been used in order to explore a wide range of isotopic compositions. Chemical freeze-out temperatures are found to be nearly invariant with respect to the A/Z of the produced spectator sources, consistent with predictions for expanded systems. Small Coulomb effects (ΔT≈0.6MeV) appear for residue production near the onset of multifragmentation.

  13. Frequency dependence of pulsar integrated profiles

    SciTech Connect

    Thorsett, S.E. )

    1991-08-01

    The dependence of component separation on observing frequency has been studied for seven pulsars that exhibit double- or multiple-component average profiles. In each case, a review of all available data shows a smooth variation of given form. No evidence is found for a 'break frequency' at which the separation behavior discretely changes. It is argued that previous reports of such a discontinuity are due to insufficiently sampled data together with a prejudice toward pure power-law functional behaviors. The absence of such a break has implications for theories of the pulsar emission mechanism and of the propagation of radio waves in the pulsar magnetosphere. 44 refs.

  14. Geokinematics in GGOS - Different Relations and Dependences

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pachelski, Wojciech; Paśnicka, Małgorzata; Szafranek, Karolina; Zwirowicz-Rutkowska, Agnieszka

    2011-01-01

    The paper presents the preliminary results of the analysis of fundamental dependencies between different geodetic concepts related to the one of the GGOS (Global Geodetic Observation System) pillars called Geometry and Kinematics. These relationships are described using UML (Unified Modelling Language) - one of the graphical notations that can be used for information modelling. Concepts are represented as classes with their names, attributes, and different kinds of links between them. The main purpose of this paper is to introduce the full description of connections between all GGOS components.

  15. Escherichia coli survival in waters: temperature dependence.

    PubMed

    Blaustein, R A; Pachepsky, Y; Hill, R L; Shelton, D R; Whelan, G

    2013-02-01

    Knowing the survival rates of water-borne Escherichia coli is important in evaluating microbial contamination and making appropriate management decisions. E. coli survival rates are dependent on temperature, a dependency that is routinely expressed using an analogue of the Q₁₀ model. This suggestion was made 34 years ago based on 20 survival curves taken from published literature, but has not been revisited since then. The objective of this study was to re-evaluate the accuracy of the Q₁₀ equation, utilizing data accumulated since 1978. We assembled a database of 450 E. coli survival datasets from 70 peer-reviewed papers. We then focused on the 170 curves taken from experiments that were performed in the laboratory under dark conditions to exclude the effects of sunlight and other field factors that could cause additional variability in results. All datasets were tabulated dependencies "log concentration vs. time." There were three major patterns of inactivation: about half of the datasets had a section of fast log-linear inactivation followed by a section of slow log-linear inactivation; about a quarter of the datasets had a lag period followed by log-linear inactivation; and the remaining quarter were approximately linear throughout. First-order inactivation rate constants were calculated from the linear sections of all survival curves and the data grouped by water sources, including waters of agricultural origin, pristine water sources, groundwater and wells, lakes and reservoirs, rivers and streams, estuaries and seawater, and wastewater. Dependency of E. coli inactivation rates on temperature varied among the water sources. There was a significant difference in inactivation rate values at the reference temperature between rivers and agricultural waters, wastewaters and agricultural waters, rivers and lakes, and wastewater and lakes. At specific sites, the Q₁₀ equation was more accurate in rivers and coastal waters than in lakes making the value of

  16. Mercury - Wavelength and longitude dependence of polarization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gehrels, T.; Landau, R.; Coyne, G. V.

    1987-01-01

    The polarization-time variations noted in the present linear polarization observations of the integrated Mercury disk, with filters covering the 0.3-1.0 micron bandpass and between 53-130 deg of phase angle, may be accounted for in terms of longitude dependence through the variation of brightness or other properties over the surface. Kepler's equation for the eccentric anomaly was solved for each observation, and the true anomaly was used to find the subsolar longitude. The difference found in the polarization-albedo relations of Mercury and the moon indicates a difference in surface texture and/or composition.

  17. Phenomenological extraction of Transverse Momentum Dependent distributions

    SciTech Connect

    Prokudin, Alexei

    2011-10-24

    We discuss phenomenological extraction of Transverse Momentum Dependent Distributions (TMDs) from experimental data. At leading twist spin structure of spin-1/2 hadron can be described by 8 TMDs. TMDs reveal three-dimensional distribution of partons inside polarised nucleon. Experimentally these functions can be studied in polarised experiments using Spin Asymmetries in particular Single Spin Asymmetries (SSAs). We discuss transversity that measures distribution of transversely polarised quarks in a transversely polarised nucleon and Sivers distribution function that describes distribution of unpolarised quarks in a transversely polarised nucleon.

  18. Environmental dependence of masses and coupling constants

    SciTech Connect

    Olive, Keith A.; Pospelov, Maxim

    2008-02-15

    We construct a class of scalar field models coupled to matter that lead to the dependence of masses and coupling constants on the ambient matter density. Such models predict a deviation of couplings measured on the Earth from values determined in low-density astrophysical environments, but do not necessarily require the evolution of coupling constants with the redshift in the recent cosmological past. Additional laboratory and astrophysical tests of {delta}{alpha} and {delta}(m{sub p}/m{sub e}) as functions of the ambient matter density are warranted.

  19. Temperature dependent phonon properties of thermoelectric materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hellman, Olle; Broido, David; Fultz, Brent

    2015-03-01

    We present recent developments using the temperature dependent effective potential technique (TDEP) to model thermoelectric materials. We use ab initio molecular dynamics to generate an effective Hamiltonian that reproduce neutron scattering spectra, thermal conductivity, phonon self energies, and heat capacities. Results are presented for (among others) SnSe, Bi2Te3, and Cu2Se proving the necessity of careful modelling of finite temperature properties for strongly anharmonic materials. Supported by the Swedish Research Council (VR) Project Number 637-2013-7296.

  20. Bacterial contact-dependent growth inhibition (CDI)

    PubMed Central

    Ruhe, Zachary C.; Low, David A.; Hayes, Christopher S.

    2013-01-01

    Bacteria cooperate to form multicellular communities and compete against one another for environmental resources. Here, we review recent advances in our understanding of bacterial competition mediated by contact-dependent growth inhibition (CDI) systems. Different CDI+ bacteria deploy a variety of toxins to inhibit neighboring cells and protect themselves from autoinhibition by producing specific immunity proteins. The genes encoding CDI toxin–immunity pairs appear to be exchanged between cdi loci and are often associated with other toxin-delivery systems in diverse bacteria. CDI also appears to facilitate cooperative behavior between kin, suggesting that these systems may have other roles beyond competition. PMID:23473845

  1. Rickets–vitamin D deficiency and dependency

    PubMed Central

    Sahay, Manisha; Sahay, Rakesh

    2012-01-01

    Rickets is an important problem even in countries with adequate sun exposure. The causes of rickets/osteomalacia are varied and include nutritional deficiency, especially poor dietary intake of vitamin D and calcium. Non-nutritional causes include hypophosphatemic rickets primarily due to renal phosphate losses and rickets due to renal tubular acidosis. In addition, some varieties are due to inherited defects in vitamin D metabolism and are called vitamin D dependent rickets. This chapter highlights rickets/osteomalacia related to vitamin D deficiency or to inherited defects in vitamin D metabolism. Hypophosphatemic rickets and rickets due to renal tubular acidosis are discussed in other sections of the journal. PMID:22470851

  2. Time-Dependent Protein Thermostability Assay.

    PubMed

    Vandecaetsbeek, Ilse; Vangheluwe, Peter

    2016-01-01

    Membrane protein purification often yields rather unstable proteins impeding functional and structural protein characterization. Low protein stability also leads to low purification yields as a result of protein degradation, aggregation, precipitation, and folding instability. It is often required to optimize buffer conditions through numerous iterations of trial and error to improve the homogeneity, stability, and solubility of the protein sample demanding high amounts of purified protein. Therefore we have set up a fast, simple, and high-throughput time-dependent thermostability-based assay at low protein cost to identify protein stabilizing factors to facilitate the handling and characterization of membrane proteins by subsequent structural and functional studies.

  3. A Time Dependent Transport Equation Solver

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1991-05-01

    Using TWIGL Mesh Spacing ............. 63 11 Initial FEMP2D Flux Using 2X TWIGL Mesh Spacing ........ .. 64 12 Time Dependent Thermal Absorption...energy group, and g = G is the lowest ( thermal ) energy group. ?oo(r, E, t) the coefficient in the P approximation that phys- ically r’iDresents the total...than these MrPs. This suggest that the thermal flux calculations could be suspect. Indeed, both the FEMP2D and FMP2DT calculations showed that the

  4. Temperature dependent spin structures in Hexaferrite crystal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chao, Y. C.; Lin, J. G.; Chun, S. H.; Kim, K. H.

    2016-01-01

    In this work, the Hexaferrite Ba0.5Sr1.5Zn2Fe12O22 (BSZFO) is studied due to its interesting characteristics of long-wavelength spin structure. Ferromagnetic resonance (FMR) is used to probe the magnetic states of BSZFO single crystal and its temperature dependence behavior is analyzed by decomposing the multiple lines of FMR spectra into various phases. Distinguished phase transition is observed at 110 K for one line, which is assigned to the ferro(ferri)-magnetic transition from non-collinear to collinear spin state.

  5. Temperature dependence of sapphire fiber Raman scattering

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Bo; Yu, Zhihao; Tian, Zhipeng; Homa, Daniel; Hill, Cary; Wang, Anbo; Pickrell, Gary

    2015-04-27

    Anti-Stokes Raman scattering in sapphire fiber has been observed for the first time. Temperature dependence of Raman peaks’ intensity, frequency shift, and linewidth were also measured. Three anti-Stokes Raman peaks were observed at temperatures higher than 300°C in a 0.72-m-long sapphire fiber excited by a second-harmonic Nd YAG laser. The intensity of anti-Stokes peaks are comparable to that of Stokes peaks when the temperature increases to 1033°C. We foresee the combination of sapphire fiber Stokes and anti-Stokes measurement in use as a mechanism for ultrahigh temperature sensing.

  6. Spectrally dependent fluctuations of thermal photon sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Olson, K.; Talghader, J.

    2016-07-01

    Many current quantum optical systems, such as microcavities, interact with thermal light through a small number of widely separated modes. Previous theories for photon number fluctuations of thermal light have been primarily limited to special cases that are appropriate for large volumes or distances, such as single modes, many modes, or modes of uniform spectral distribution. Herein, a theory for the general case of spectrally dependent photon number fluctuations is developed for thermal light. The error in variance of prior art is quantitatively derived for an example cavity in the case where photon counting noise dominates. A method to reduce the spectral impact of this variance is described.

  7. Dependable control systems with Internet of Things.

    PubMed

    Tran, Tri; Ha, Q P

    2015-11-01

    This paper presents an Internet of Things (IoT)-enabled dependable control system (DepCS) for continuous processes. In a DepCS, an actuator and a transmitter form a regulatory control loop. Each processor inside such actuator and transmitter is designed as a computational platform implementing the feedback control algorithm. The connections between actuators and transmitters via IoT create a reliable backbone for a DepCS. The centralized input-output marshaling system is not required in DepCSs. A state feedback control synthesis method for DepCS applying the self-recovery constraint is presented in the second part of the paper.

  8. DSSC anchoring groups: a surface dependent decision.

    PubMed

    O'Rourke, C; Bowler, D R

    2014-05-14

    Electrodes in dye sensitised solar cells are typically nanocrystalline anatase TiO2 with a majority (1 0 1) surface exposed. Generally the sensitising dye employs a carboxylic anchoring moiety through which it adheres to the TiO₂ surface. Recent interest in exploiting the properties of differing TiO₂ electrode morphologies, such as rutile nanorods exposing the (1 1 0) surface and anatase electrodes with high percentages of the (0 0 1) surface exposed, begs the question of whether this anchoring strategy is best, irrespective of the majority surface exposed. Here we address this question by presenting density functional theory calculations contrasting the binding properties of two promising anchoring groups, phosphonic acid and boronic acid, to that of carboxylic acid. Anchor-electrode interactions are studied for the prototypical anatase (1 0 1) surface, along with the anatase (0 0 1) and rutile (1 1 0) surfaces. Finally the effect of using these alternative anchoring groups to bind a typical coumarin dye (NKX-2311) to these TiO₂ substrates is examined. Significant differences in the binding properties are found depending on both the anchor and surface, illustrating that the choice of anchor is necessarily dependent upon the surface exposed in the electrode. In particular the boronic acid is found to show the potential to be an excellent anchor choice for electrodes exposing the anatase (0 0 1) surface.

  9. The body size dependence of trophic cascades.

    PubMed

    DeLong, John P; Gilbert, Benjamin; Shurin, Jonathan B; Savage, Van M; Barton, Brandon T; Clements, Christopher F; Dell, Anthony I; Greig, Hamish S; Harley, Christopher D G; Kratina, Pavel; McCann, Kevin S; Tunney, Tyler D; Vasseur, David A; O'Connor, Mary I

    2015-03-01

    Trophic cascades are indirect positive effects of predators on resources via control of intermediate consumers. Larger-bodied predators appear to induce stronger trophic cascades (a greater rebound of resource density toward carrying capacity), but how this happens is unknown because we lack a clear depiction of how the strength of trophic cascades is determined. Using consumer resource models, we first show that the strength of a trophic cascade has an upper limit set by the interaction strength between the basal trophic group and its consumer and that this limit is approached as the interaction strength between the consumer and its predator increases. We then express the strength of a trophic cascade explicitly in terms of predator body size and use two independent parameter sets to calculate how the strength of a trophic cascade depends on predator size. Both parameter sets predict a positive effect of predator size on the strength of a trophic cascade, driven mostly by the body size dependence of the interaction strength between the first two trophic levels. Our results support previous empirical findings and suggest that the loss of larger predators will have greater consequences on trophic control and biomass structure in food webs than the loss of smaller predators.

  10. Rate-dependent incompleteness of earthquake catalogs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hainzl, Sebastian

    2016-04-01

    Important information about the earthquake generation process can be gained from instrumental earthquake catalogs, but this requires complete recordings to avoid biased results. The local completeness magnitude Mc is known to depend on general conditions such as the seismographic network and the environmental noise, which generally limit the possibility to detect small events. The detectability can be additionally reduced by an earthquake-induced increase of the noise-level leading to short-term variations of Mc, which cannot be resolved by traditional methods relying on the analysis of the frequency-magnitude distribution. Based on simple assumptions, I propose a new method to estimate such temporal excursions of Mc solely based on the estimation of the earthquake rate resulting in a high temporal resolution of Mc. The approach is shown to be in agreement with the apparent decrease of the estimated Gutenberg-Richter b-value in high-activity phases of recorded data sets and the observed incompleteness periods after mainshocks. Furthermore, an algorithm to estimate temporal changes of Mc is introduced and applied to empirical aftershock and swarm sequences from California and central Europe, indicating that observed b-value fluctuations are often related to rate-dependent incompleteness of the earthquake catalogs.

  11. Diameter-dependent hydrophobicity in carbon nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kyakuno, Haruka; Fukasawa, Mamoru; Ichimura, Ryota; Matsuda, Kazuyuki; Nakai, Yusuke; Miyata, Yasumitsu; Saito, Takeshi; Maniwa, Yutaka

    2016-08-01

    Single-wall carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) are a good model system that provides atomically smooth nanocavities. It has been reported that water-SWCNTs exhibit hydrophobicity depending on the temperature T and the SWCNT diameter D. SWCNTs adsorb water molecules spontaneously in their cylindrical pores around room temperature, whereas they exhibit a hydrophilic-hydrophobic transition or wet-dry transition (WDT) at a critical temperature Twd ≈ 220-230 K and above a critical diameter Dc ≈ 1.4-1.6 nm. However, details of the WDT phenomenon and its mechanism remain unknown. Here, we report a systematic experimental study involving X-ray diffraction, optical microscopy, and differential scanning calorimetry. It is found that water molecules inside thick SWCNTs (D > Dc) evaporate and condense into ice Ih outside the SWCNTs at Twd upon cooling, and the ice Ih evaporates and condenses inside the SWCNTs upon heating. On the other hand, residual water trapped inside the SWCNTs below Twd freezes. Molecular dynamics simulations indicate that upon lowering T, the hydrophobicity of thick SWCNTs increases without any structural transition, while the water inside thin SWCNTs (D < Dc) exhibits a structural transition, forming an ordered ice. This ice has a well-developed hydrogen bonding network adapting to the cylindrical pores of the SWCNTs. Thus, the unusual diameter dependence of the WDT is attributed to the adaptability of the structure of water to the pore dimension and shape.

  12. Rippled-spectrum resolution dependence on level.

    PubMed

    Supin, Alexander Ya; Popov, Vladimir V; Milekhina, Olga N; Tarakanov, Mikhail B

    2003-11-01

    Rippled-density resolution of a rippled sound spectrum (probe band) in both the presence and absence of another band (masker) was studied as a function of sound level in normal listeners. The resolvable ripple density in the probe band was measured by finding the highest ripple density at which an interchange of ripple peak and valley positions was detectable (the phase-reversal test). Probe bands were 0.5 oct wide with center frequencies of 1, 2, and 4 kHz. In the control condition (no masker), the ripple-density resolution was almost independent of sound level within a range of 40-90 dB SPL. When an on-frequency masker coincided with the probe band (that resulted in reduced ripple depth), resolution decreased slightly relative to the control condition but remained little dependent on level. With an off-frequency low-side masker, the ripple-density resolution was a little less than in the control but almost independent of level within a range of 40-60 dB SPL and progressively decreased with level increase from 70 to 90 dB SPL. The dependence on level was qualitatively similar at all probe frequencies and at various widths and positions of the low-side off-frequency masker band.

  13. Heating liquid dielectrics by time dependent fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khalife, A.; Pathak, U.; Richert, R.

    2011-10-01

    Steady state and time-resolved dielectric relaxation experiments are performed at high fields on viscous glycerol and the effects of energy absorption from the electric field are studied. Time resolution is obtained by a sinusoidal field whose amplitude is switched from a low to a high level and by recording voltage and current traces with an oscilloscope during this transition. Based on their distinct time and frequency dependences, three sources of modifying the dynamics and dielectric loss via an increase in the effective temperature can be distinguished: electrode temperature, real sample temperature, and configurational temperatures of the modes that absorbed the energy. Isothermal conditions that are desired for focusing on the configurational temperature changes (as in dielectric hole burning and related techniques) are maintained only for very thin samples and for moderate power levels. For high frequencies, say ν > 1 MHz, changes of the real temperature will exceed the effects of configurational temperatures in the case of macroscopic samples. Regarding microwave chemistry, heating via cell phone use, and related situations in which materials are subject to fields involving frequencies beyond the MHz regime, we conclude that changes in the configurational (or fictive) temperatures remain negligible compared with the increase of the real temperature. This simplifies the assessment of how time dependent electric fields modify the properties of materials.

  14. Evidence for bicarbonate-dependent magnesium reabsorption.

    PubMed

    Hartmann, A; Langberg, H; Dibona, G; Kiil, F

    1983-01-01

    During ethacrynic acid administration about 50% of the filtered load of magnesium is reabsorbed. To examine whether the remaining component of magnesium reabsorption is bicarbonate-dependent, i.e. varies with factors known to alter passive reabsorption, experiments were performed in anesthetized dogs. During ethacrynic acid administration MgCl2 infusion raised the plasma concentration of magnesium (PMg) from 0.64 +/- 0.05 to 3.06 +/- 0.27 mM and doubled magnesium reabsorption. The infusion of acetazolamide at high PMg reduced bicarbonate reabsorption by 41 +/- 3% and magnesium reabsorption by 31 +/- 16%. When plasma pH was reduced to 7.04 +/- 0.02 and increased to 7.83 +/- 0.02 by altering PCO2 at a constant plasma bicarbonate concentration of 31.2 +/- 0.8 mM, magnesium and bicarbonate reabsorption were correlated (r = 0.82). The infusion of mannitol, which acts by reducing passive solute transport without affecting bicarbonate reabsorption, halved magnesium reabsorption. By combining mannitol and acetazolamide infusions, only 6 +/- 4% of the filtered magnesium was still reabsorbed. These results indicate that the reabsorption of magnesium remaining after the infusion of ethacrynic acid and after raising PMg varies with changes in PCO2 and is inhibited by the infusion of acetazolamide and mannitol as expected for bicarbonate-dependent passive reabsorption.

  15. Solvent dependent photophysical properties of dimethoxy curcumin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barik, Atanu; Indira Priyadarsini, K.

    2013-03-01

    Dimethoxy curcumin (DMC) is a methylated derivative of curcumin. In order to know the effect of ring substitution on photophysical properties of curcumin, steady state absorption and fluorescence spectra of DMC were recorded in organic solvents with different polarity and compared with those of curcumin. The absorption and fluorescence spectra of DMC, like curcumin, are strongly dependent on solvent polarity and the maxima of DMC showed red shift with increase in solvent polarity function (Δf), but the above effect is prominently observed in case of fluorescence maxima. From the dependence of Stokes' shift on solvent polarity function the difference between the excited state and ground state dipole moment was estimated as 4.9 D. Fluorescence quantum yield (ϕf) and fluorescence lifetime (τf) of DMC were also measured in different solvents at room temperature. The results indicated that with increasing solvent polarity, ϕf increased linearly, which has been accounted for the decrease in non-radiative rate by intersystem crossing (ISC) processes.

  16. Surrogate oracles, generalized dependency and simpler models

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilson, Larry

    1990-01-01

    Software reliability models require the sequence of interfailure times from the debugging process as input. It was previously illustrated that using data from replicated debugging could greatly improve reliability predictions. However, inexpensive replication of the debugging process requires the existence of a cheap, fast error detector. Laboratory experiments can be designed around a gold version which is used as an oracle or around an n-version error detector. Unfortunately, software developers can not be expected to have an oracle or to bear the expense of n-versions. A generic technique is being investigated for approximating replicated data by using the partially debugged software as a difference detector. It is believed that the failure rate of each fault has significant dependence on the presence or absence of other faults. Thus, in order to discuss a failure rate for a known fault, the presence or absence of each of the other known faults needs to be specified. Also, in simpler models which use shorter input sequences without sacrificing accuracy are of interest. In fact, a possible gain in performance is conjectured. To investigate these propositions, NASA computers running LIC (RTI) versions are used to generate data. This data will be used to label the debugging graph associated with each version. These labeled graphs will be used to test the utility of a surrogate oracle, to analyze the dependent nature of fault failure rates and to explore the feasibility of reliability models which use the data of only the most recent failures.

  17. Cognitive dissonance resolution depends on episodic memory.

    PubMed

    Chammat, Mariam; Karoui, Imen El; Allali, Sébastien; Hagège, Joshua; Lehongre, Katia; Hasboun, Dominique; Baulac, Michel; Epelbaum, Stéphane; Michon, Agnès; Dubois, Bruno; Navarro, Vincent; Salti, Moti; Naccache, Lionel

    2017-01-23

    The notion that past choices affect preferences is one of the most influential concepts of social psychology since its first report in the 50 s, and its theorization within the cognitive dissonance framework. In the free-choice paradigm (FCP) after choosing between two similarly rated items, subjects reevaluate chosen items as more attractive and rejected items as less attractive. However the relations prevailing between episodic memory and choice-induced preference change (CIPC) remain highly debated: is this phenomenon dependent or independent from memory of past choices? We solve this theoretical debate by demonstrating that CIPC occurs exclusively for items which were correctly remembered as chosen or rejected during the choice stage. We used a combination of fMRI and intra-cranial electrophysiological recordings to reveal a modulation of left hippocampus activity, a hub of episodic memory retrieval, immediately before the occurrence of CIPC during item reevaluation. Finally, we show that contrarily to a previous influential report flawed by a statistical artifact, this phenomenon is absent in amnesic patients for forgotten items. These results demonstrate the dependence of cognitive dissonance on conscious episodic memory. This link between current preferences and previous choices suggests a homeostatic function of this regulative process, aiming at preserving subjective coherence.

  18. A Case of Insulin-dependent Diabetes.

    PubMed

    Gonzalez, Nicholas

    2016-07-01

    Background • There is a paucity of information on alternative, nutrition-based treatments for insulin-dependent diabetes. Primary Study Objective • This case report provides detailed information on the nutrition-based treatment of a man with insulin-dependent diabetes. Methods/Design • This is a single case report taken from the author's private practice. Setting • The treatment was provided at a private office in New York, NY, USA. Participants • A single patient in the author's practice is reported. Intervention • The patient was treated with a combination of pancreatic enzymes, supplements and nutrients, and cleansing and detoxification procedures, plus amber lenses for severe insomnia. Primary Outcome Measures • The outcome measures were patient self-report of symptoms, overall well-being, and function at work and in leisure time; observation of the patient by the physician; and blood work. Results • The patient described dramatic, sustained improvement in terms of symptoms, function, well-being, and life satisfaction. Improvement in blood sugar control was documented by blood work. Conclusion • The complex, tailored nutritional protocol combined with detoxification procedures, resulted in marked improvement in a patient who had been treated by numerous different physicians without benefit prior to his consulting with the author.

  19. Dependence and addiction during chronic opioid therapy.

    PubMed

    Juurlink, David N; Dhalla, Irfan A

    2012-12-01

    The use of opioids for chronic noncancer pain has increased dramatically over the past 25 years in North America and has been accompanied by a major increase in opioid addiction and overdose deaths. The increase in opioid prescribing is multifactorial and partly reflects concerns about the effectiveness and safety of alternative medications, particularly the nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs. However, much of the rise in opioid prescribing reflects the assertion, widely communicated to physicians in the 1990s, that the risks of dependence and addiction during chronic opioid therapy were low, predictable, and could be minimized by the use of controlled-release opioid formulations. In this narrative review, we offer a critical appraisal of the publications most frequently cited as evidence that the risk of addiction during chronic opioid therapy is low. We conclude that very few well-designed studies support the notion that opioid addiction is rare during chronic opioid therapy and that none can be readily generalized to present-day practice. Despite serious methodological limitations, these studies have been repeatedly mischaracterized as showing that the risk of addiction during chronic opioid therapy is rare. These studies are countered by a larger, more rigorous and contemporary body of evidence demonstrating that dependence and addiction are relatively common consequences of chronic opioid therapy, occurring in up to one-third of patients in some series.

  20. Perturbative Critical Behavior from Spacetime Dependent Couplings

    SciTech Connect

    Dong, Xi; Horn, Bart; Silverstein, Eva; Torroba, Gonzalo

    2012-08-03

    We find novel perturbative fixed points by introducing mildly spacetime-dependent couplings into otherwise marginal terms. In four-dimensional QFT, these are physical analogues of the small-{epsilon} Wilson-Fisher fixed point. Rather than considering 4-{epsilon} dimensions, we stay in four dimensions but introduce couplings whose leading spacetime dependence is of the form {lambda}x{sup {kappa}}{mu}{sup {kappa}}, with a small parameter {kappa} playing a role analogous to {epsilon}. We show, in {phi}{sup 4} theory and in QED and QCD with massless flavors, that this leads to a critical theory under perturbative control over an exponentially wide window of spacetime positions x. The exact fixed point coupling {lambda}{sub *}(x) in our theory is identical to the running coupling of the translationally invariant theory, with the scale replaced by 1/x. Similar statements hold for three-dimensional {phi}{sup 6} theories and two-dimensional sigma models with curved target spaces. We also describe strongly coupled examples using conformal perturbation theory.

  1. Copper Regulates Cyclic AMP-Dependent Lipolysis

    PubMed Central

    Krishnamoorthy, Lakshmi; Cotruvo, Joseph A.; Chan, Jefferson; Kaluarachchi, Harini; Muchenditsi, Abigael; Pendyala, Venkata S.; Jia, Shang; Aron, Allegra T.; Ackerman, Cheri M.; Vander Wal, Mark N.; Guan, Timothy; Smaga, Lukas P.; Farhi, Samouil L.; New, Elizabeth J.; Lutsenko, Svetlana; Chang, Christopher J.

    2016-01-01

    Cell signaling relies extensively on dynamic pools of redox-inactive metal ions such as sodium, potassium, calcium, and zinc, but their redox-active transition metal counterparts such as copper and iron have been studied primarily as static enzyme cofactors. Here we report that copper is an endogenous regulator of lipolysis, the breakdown of fat, which is an essential process in maintaining the body's weight and energy stores. Utilizing a murine model of genetic copper misregulation, in combination with pharmacological alterations in copper status and imaging studies in a 3T3-L1 white adipocyte model, we demonstrate that copper regulates lipolysis at the level of the second messenger, cyclic AMP (cAMP), by altering the activity of the cAMP-degrading phosphodiesterase PDE3B. Biochemical studies of the copper-PDE3B interaction establish copper-dependent inhibition of enzyme activity and identify a key conserved cysteine residue within a PDE3-specific loop that is essential for the observed copper-dependent lipolytic phenotype. PMID:27272565

  2. KK molecules with momentum-dependent interactions

    SciTech Connect

    Lemmer, R. H.

    2009-10-15

    It is shown that the momentum-dependent kaon-antikaon interactions generated via vector-meson exchange from the standard SU{sub V}(3)xSU{sub A}(3) interaction Lagrangian lead to a nonlocal potential in coordinate space that can be incorporated without approximation into a nonrelativistic version of the Bethe-Salpeter wave equation containing a radial-dependent effective kaon mass appearing in a fully symmetrized kinetic energy operator, in addition to a local potential. Estimates of the mass and decay widths of f{sub 0}(980) and a{sub 0}(980), considered as KK molecules of isospin 0 and 1, as well as for K{sup +}K{sup -} atomic bound states (kaonium) are presented and compared with previous studies of a similar nature. It is argued that without a better knowledge of hadronic form factors it is not possible to distinguish between the molecular versus elementary particle models for the structure of the light scalar mesons.

  3. Temperature dependence of the Casimir force

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brevik, Iver; Høye, Johan S.

    2014-01-01

    The Casimir force—at first, a rather unexpected consequence of quantum electrodynamics—was discovered by Hendrik Casimir in Eindhoven in 1948. It predicts that two uncharged metal plates experience an attractive force because of the zero-point fluctuations of the electromagnetic field. The idea was tested experimentally in the 1950s and 1960s, but the results were not so accurate that one could make a definite conclusion regarding the existence of the effect. Evgeny Lifshitz expanded the theory in 1955 so as to deal with general dielectric media. Much experimental work was later done to test the theory’s predictions, especially with regards to the temperature dependence of the effect. The existence of the effect itself was verified beyond doubt by Sabisky and Anderson in 1973. Another quarter century had to pass before Lamoreaux and collaborators were able to confirm—or at least make plausible—the temperature dependence predicted by Lifshitz formula in combination with reasonable input data for the material’s dispersive properties. The situation is not yet clear-cut, however, there are recent experiments indicating results in disagreement with those of Lamoreaux. In this paper, a brief review is given of the status of this research field.

  4. Interval coding. II. Dendrite-dependent mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Doiron, Brent; Oswald, Anne-Marie M; Maler, Leonard

    2007-04-01

    The rich temporal structure of neural spike trains provides multiple dimensions to code dynamic stimuli. Popular examples are spike trains from sensory cells where bursts and isolated spikes can serve distinct coding roles. In contrast to analyses of neural coding, the cellular mechanics of burst mechanisms are typically elucidated from the neural response to static input. Bridging the mechanics of bursting with coding of dynamic stimuli is an important step in establishing theories of neural coding. Electrosensory lateral line lobe (ELL) pyramidal neurons respond to static inputs with a complex dendrite-dependent burst mechanism. Here we show that in response to dynamic broadband stimuli, these bursts lack some of the electrophysiological characteristics observed in response to static inputs. A simple leaky integrate-and-fire (LIF)-style model with a dendrite-dependent depolarizing afterpotential (DAP) is sufficient to match both the output statistics and coding performance of experimental spike trains. We use this model to investigate a simplification of interval coding where the burst interspike interval (ISI) codes for the scale of a canonical upstroke rather than a multidimensional stimulus feature. Using this stimulus reduction, we compute a quantization of the burst ISIs and the upstroke scale to show that the mutual information rate of the interval code is maximized at a moderate DAP amplitude. The combination of a reduced description of ELL pyramidal cell bursting and a simplification of the interval code increases the generality of ELL burst codes to other sensory modalities.

  5. Pressure dependence of the contact angle.

    PubMed

    Wu, Jiyu; Farouk, T; Ward, C A

    2007-06-07

    When a liquid and its vapor contact a smooth, homogeneous surface, Gibbsian thermodynamics indicates that the contact angle depends on the pressure at the three-phase line of an isothermal system. When a recently proposed adsorption isotherm for a solid-vapor interface is combined with the equilibrium conditions and the system is assumed to be in a cylinder where the liquid-vapor interface can be approximated as spherical, the contact-angle-pressure relation can be made explicit. It indicates that a range of contact angles can be observed on a smooth homogeneous surface by changing the pressure at the three-phase line, but it also indicates that the adsorption at the solid-liquid interface is negative, and leads to the prediction that the contact angle increases with pressure. The predicted dependence of the contact angle on pressure is investigated experimentally in a system that has an independent mechanism for determining when thermodynamic equilibrium is reached. The predictions are in agreement with the measurements. The results provide a possible explanation for contact angle hysteresis.

  6. Gabapentin-induced delirium and dependence.

    PubMed

    Kruszewski, Stefan P; Paczynski, Richard P; Kahn, David A

    2009-07-01

    Gabapentin (Neurontin) is approved by the US Food and Drug Administration for treatment of epilepsy and post-herpetic neuralgia. Despite lack of strong evidence, gabapentin is also often prescribed off-label for psychiatric conditions. The case described here involved a 38-year-old male physician with substance intoxication delirium and psychoactive substance dependence due to high self-administered doses of gabapentin, which had been prescribed at lower doses in combination with buspirone and bupropion for depression and anxiety. This unusual case of gabapentin dependence and abuse involved toxic delirium, intense cravings, and a prolonged post-withdrawal confusional state reminiscent of benzodiazepine withdrawal. Gabapentin is a central nervous system inhibitory agent with likely gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA)-ergic and non-GABAergic mechanisms of action. The similarity between benzodiazepine withdrawal and what this patient experienced with gabapentin suggests a common role for GABA-related effects. The case reported here suggests the need for heightened concern regarding the off-label prescription of this drug to vulnerable individuals with psychiatric conditions.

  7. Epigenetic regulation of estrogen-dependent memory

    PubMed Central

    Fortress, Ashley M.; Frick, Karyn M.

    2014-01-01

    Hippocampal memory formation is highly regulated by post-translational histone modifications and DNA methylation. Accordingly, these epigenetic processes play a major role in the effects of modulatory factors, such as sex steroid hormones, on hippocampal memory. Our laboratory recently demonstrated that the ability of the potent estrogen 17β-estradiol (E2) to enhance hippocampal-dependent novel object recognition memory in ovariectomized female mice requires ERK-dependent histone H3 acetylation and DNA methylation in the dorsal hippocampus. Although these data provide valuable insight into the chromatin modifications that mediate the memory-enhancing effects of E2, epigenetic regulation of gene expression is enormously complex. Therefore, more research is needed to fully understand how E2 and other hormones employ epigenetic alterations to shape behavior. This review discusses the epigenetic alterations shown thus far to regulate hippocampal memory, briefly reviews the effects of E2 on hippocampal function, and describes in detail our work on epigenetic regulation of estrogenic memory enhancement. PMID:24878494

  8. The discovery of ubiquitin-dependent proteolysis

    PubMed Central

    Wilkinson, Keith D.

    2005-01-01

    In early 1980, Irwin A. Rose, Avram Hershko, and Aaron Ciechanover published two papers in PNAS that reported the astounding observation that energy-dependent intracellular proteolysis was far more complicated than the previously accepted models of lysosomal proteolysis or the action of ATP-dependent proteases such as bacterial lon. In fact, it has turned out to be even more complicated than they could have suspected. The general model of covalently attaching a small protein as a targeting signal has proved to be every bit as important to eukaryotic cells as the better understood modifications such as phosphorylation or acetylation. The key player in this modification, a small protein called ubiquitin (APF-1 in these papers), is the founding member of a large family of proteins containing the β-grasp fold and is used as a posttranslational targeting signal to modify the structure, function, and/or localization of other proteins. The story of this discovery is a textbook example of the confluence of intellectual curiosity, unselfish collaboration, chance, luck, and preparation. PMID:16230621

  9. Sphingolipids inhibit vimentin-dependent cell migration.

    PubMed

    Hyder, Claire L; Kemppainen, Kati; Isoniemi, Kimmo O; Imanishi, Susumu Y; Goto, Hidemasa; Inagaki, Masaki; Fazeli, Elnaz; Eriksson, John E; Törnquist, Kid

    2015-06-01

    The sphingolipids, sphingosine 1-phosphate (S1P) and sphingosylphosphorylcholine (SPC), can induce or inhibit cellular migration. The intermediate filament protein vimentin is an inducer of migration and a marker for epithelial-mesenchymal transition. Given that keratin intermediate filaments are regulated by SPC, with consequences for cell motility, we wanted to determine whether vimentin is also regulated by sphingolipid signalling and whether it is a determinant for sphingolipid-mediated functions. In cancer cells where S1P and SPC inhibited migration, we observed that S1P and SPC induced phosphorylation of vimentin on S71, leading to a corresponding reorganization of vimentin filaments. These effects were sphingolipid-signalling-dependent, because inhibition of either the S1P2 receptor (also known as S1PR2) or its downstream effector Rho-associated kinase (ROCK, for which there are two isoforms ROCK1 and ROCK2) nullified the sphingolipid-induced effects on vimentin organization and S71 phosphorylation. Furthermore, the anti-migratory effect of S1P and SPC could be prevented by expressing S71-phosphorylation-deficient vimentin. In addition, we demonstrated, by using wild-type and vimentin-knockout mouse embryonic fibroblasts, that the sphingolipid-mediated inhibition of migration is dependent on vimentin. These results imply that this newly discovered sphingolipid-vimentin signalling axis exerts brake-and-throttle functions in the regulation of cell migration.

  10. [Cereal-dependent exercise-induced anaphylaxis].

    PubMed

    Seoane-Rodríguez, Marta; Caralli, María Elisa; Morales-Cabeza, Cristina; Micozzi, Sarah; De Barrio-Fernández, Manuel; Rojas Pérez-Ezquerra, Patricia

    2016-01-01

    Wheat-dependent exercise-induced anaphylaxis (WDEIA) is increasing. In vitro test such as omega-5-gliadin levels are useful in the diagnosis, while oral single blind challenge tests (OCT) with wheat plus exercise continuous being the gold standard diagnostic method. This paper reports the case of a 38-year-old woman, with several episodes of anaphylaxis after eating different foods and doing exercise after ingestion. An allergy study was performed with positive skin prick tests for wheat, barley and rye. Total IgE 238.0KU/L, positive specific IgE (>100KU/L) to wheat, barley and rye, and negative to rTri-a-19 omega-5 gliadin. OCT with bread and exercise was positive. In this case of wheat-dependent exerciseinduced anaphylaxis (WDEIA) with negative serum specific IgE to omega-5-gliadin, negative results with gamma, alpha, bheta y omega-gliadin doesn't exclude the diagnosis of WDEIA.

  11. Epigenetic regulation of estrogen-dependent memory.

    PubMed

    Fortress, Ashley M; Frick, Karyn M

    2014-10-01

    Hippocampal memory formation is highly regulated by post-translational histone modifications and DNA methylation. Accordingly, these epigenetic processes play a major role in the effects of modulatory factors, such as sex steroid hormones, on hippocampal memory. Our laboratory recently demonstrated that the ability of the potent estrogen 17β-estradiol (E2) to enhance hippocampal-dependent novel object recognition memory in ovariectomized female mice requires ERK-dependent histone H3 acetylation and DNA methylation in the dorsal hippocampus. Although these data provide valuable insight into the chromatin modifications that mediate the memory-enhancing effects of E2, epigenetic regulation of gene expression is enormously complex. Therefore, more research is needed to fully understand how E2 and other hormones employ epigenetic alterations to shape behavior. This review discusses the epigenetic alterations shown thus far to regulate hippocampal memory, briefly reviews the effects of E2 on hippocampal function, and describes in detail our work on epigenetic regulation of estrogenic memory enhancement.

  12. Sequence-dependent internalization of aggregating peptides.

    PubMed

    Couceiro, José R; Gallardo, Rodrigo; De Smet, Frederik; De Baets, Greet; Baatsen, Pieter; Annaert, Wim; Roose, Kenny; Saelens, Xavier; Schymkowitz, Joost; Rousseau, Frederic

    2015-01-02

    Recently, a number of aggregation disease polypeptides have been shown to spread from cell to cell, thereby displaying prionoid behavior. Studying aggregate internalization, however, is often hampered by the complex kinetics of the aggregation process, resulting in the concomitant uptake of aggregates of different sizes by competing mechanisms, which makes it difficult to isolate pathway-specific responses to aggregates. We designed synthetic aggregating peptides bearing different aggregation propensities with the aim of producing modes of uptake that are sufficiently distinct to differentially analyze the cellular response to internalization. We found that small acidic aggregates (≤500 nm in diameter) were taken up by nonspecific endocytosis as part of the fluid phase and traveled through the endosomal compartment to lysosomes. By contrast, bigger basic aggregates (>1 μm) were taken up through a mechanism dependent on cytoskeletal reorganization and membrane remodeling with the morphological hallmarks of phagocytosis. Importantly, the properties of these aggregates determined not only the mechanism of internalization but also the involvement of the proteostatic machinery (the assembly of interconnected networks that control the biogenesis, folding, trafficking, and degradation of proteins) in the process; whereas the internalization of small acidic aggregates is HSF1-independent, the uptake of larger basic aggregates was HSF1-dependent, requiring Hsp70. Our results show that the biophysical properties of aggregates determine both their mechanism of internalization and proteostatic response. It remains to be seen whether these differences in cellular response contribute to the particular role of specific aggregated proteins in disease.

  13. Sound source localization identification accuracy: bandwidth dependencies.

    PubMed

    Yost, William A; Zhong, Xuan

    2014-11-01

    Sound source localization accuracy using a sound source identification task was measured in the front, right quarter of the azimuth plane as rms (root-mean-square) error (degrees) for stimulus conditions in which the bandwidth (1/20 to 2 octaves wide) and center frequency (250, 2000, 4000 Hz) of 200-ms noise bursts were varied. Tones of different frequencies (250, 2000, 4000 Hz) were also used. As stimulus bandwidth increases, there is an increase in sound source localization identification accuracy (i.e., rms error decreases). Wideband stimuli (>1 octave wide) produce best sound source localization accuracy (~6°-7° rms error), and localization accuracy for these wideband noise stimuli does not depend on center frequency. For narrow bandwidths (<1 octave) and tonal stimuli, accuracy does depend on center frequency such that highest accuracy is obtained for low-frequency stimuli (centered on 250 Hz), worse accuracy for mid-frequency stimuli (centered on 2000 Hz), and intermediate accuracy for high-frequency stimuli (centered on 4000 Hz).

  14. Frequency dependent thermal expansion in binary viscoelasticcomposites

    SciTech Connect

    Berryman, James G.

    2007-12-01

    The effective thermal expansion coefficient beta* of abinary viscoelastic composite is shown to be frequency dependent even ifthe thermal expansion coefficients beta A and beta B of both constituentsare themselves frequency independent. Exact calculations for binaryviscoelastic systems show that beta* is related to constituent valuesbeta A, beta B, volume fractions, and bulk moduli KA, KB, as well as tothe overall bulk modulus K* of the composite system. Then, beta* isdetermined for isotropic systems by first bounding (or measuring) K* andtherefore beta*. For anisotropic systems with hexagonal symmetry, theprincipal values of the thermal expansion beta*perp and beta*para can bedetermined exactly when the constituents form a layered system. In allthe examples studied, it is shown explicitly that the eigenvectors of thethermoviscoelastic system possess non-negative dissipation -- despite thecomplicated analytical behavior of the frequency dependent thermalexpansivities themselves. Methods presented have a variety ofapplications from fluid-fluid mixtures to fluid-solid suspensions, andfrom fluid-saturated porous media to viscoelastic solid-solidcomposites.

  15. Unconscious relational encoding depends on hippocampus

    PubMed Central

    Duss, Simone B.; Reber, Thomas P.; Hänggi, Jürgen; Schwab, Simon; Wiest, Roland; Müri, René M.; Brugger, Peter; Gutbrod, Klemens

    2014-01-01

    Textbooks divide between human memory systems based on consciousness. Hippocampus is thought to support only conscious encoding, while neocortex supports both conscious and unconscious encoding. We tested whether processing modes, not consciousness, divide between memory systems in three neuroimaging experiments with 11 amnesic patients (mean age = 45.55 years, standard deviation = 8.74, range = 23–60) and 11 matched healthy control subjects. Examined processing modes were single item versus relational encoding with only relational encoding hypothesized to depend on hippocampus. Participants encoded and later retrieved either single words or new relations between words. Consciousness of encoding was excluded by subliminal (invisible) word presentation. Amnesic patients and controls performed equally well on the single item task activating prefrontal cortex. But only the controls succeeded on the relational task activating the hippocampus, while amnesic patients failed as a group. Hence, unconscious relational encoding, but not unconscious single item encoding, depended on hippocampus. Yet, three patients performed normally on unconscious relational encoding in spite of amnesia capitalizing on spared hippocampal tissue and connections to language cortex. This pattern of results suggests that processing modes divide between memory systems, while consciousness divides between levels of function within a memory system. PMID:25273998

  16. Averaged controllability of parameter dependent conservative semigroups

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lohéac, Jérôme; Zuazua, Enrique

    2017-02-01

    We consider the problem of averaged controllability for parameter depending (either in a discrete or continuous fashion) control systems, the aim being to find a control, independent of the unknown parameters, so that the average of the states is controlled. We do it in the context of conservative models, both in an abstract setting and also analysing the specific examples of the wave and Schrödinger equations. Our first result is of perturbative nature. Assuming the averaging probability measure to be a small parameter-dependent perturbation (in a sense that we make precise) of an atomic measure given by a Dirac mass corresponding to a specific realisation of the system, we show that the averaged controllability property is achieved whenever the system corresponding to the support of the Dirac is controllable. Similar tools can be employed to obtain averaged versions of the so-called Ingham inequalities. Particular attention is devoted to the 1d wave equation in which the time-periodicity of solutions can be exploited to obtain more precise results, provided the parameters involved satisfy Diophantine conditions ensuring the lack of resonances.

  17. Cognitive dissonance resolution depends on episodic memory

    PubMed Central

    Chammat, Mariam; Karoui, Imen El; Allali, Sébastien; Hagège, Joshua; Lehongre, Katia; Hasboun, Dominique; Baulac, Michel; Epelbaum, Stéphane; Michon, Agnès; Dubois, Bruno; Navarro, Vincent; Salti, Moti; Naccache, Lionel

    2017-01-01

    The notion that past choices affect preferences is one of the most influential concepts of social psychology since its first report in the 50 s, and its theorization within the cognitive dissonance framework. In the free-choice paradigm (FCP) after choosing between two similarly rated items, subjects reevaluate chosen items as more attractive and rejected items as less attractive. However the relations prevailing between episodic memory and choice-induced preference change (CIPC) remain highly debated: is this phenomenon dependent or independent from memory of past choices? We solve this theoretical debate by demonstrating that CIPC occurs exclusively for items which were correctly remembered as chosen or rejected during the choice stage. We used a combination of fMRI and intra-cranial electrophysiological recordings to reveal a modulation of left hippocampus activity, a hub of episodic memory retrieval, immediately before the occurrence of CIPC during item reevaluation. Finally, we show that contrarily to a previous influential report flawed by a statistical artifact, this phenomenon is absent in amnesic patients for forgotten items. These results demonstrate the dependence of cognitive dissonance on conscious episodic memory. This link between current preferences and previous choices suggests a homeostatic function of this regulative process, aiming at preserving subjective coherence. PMID:28112261

  18. Dependability: a challenge for electrical medical implants.

    PubMed

    Cathébras, Guy; Le Floch, Fanny; Bernard, Serge; Soulier, Fabien

    2010-01-01

    Functional Electrical Stimulation (FES) is an attractive solution to restore some lost or failing physiological functions. Obviously, the FES system may be hazardous for patient and the reliability and dependability of the system must be maximal. Unfortunately, the present context, where the associated systems are more and more complex and their development needs very cross-disciplinary experts, is not favorable to safety. Moreover, the direct adaptation of the existing dependability techniques from domains such as space or automotive is not suitable. Firstly, this paper proposes a strategy for risk management at system level for FES medical implant. The idea is to give a uniform framework where all possible hazards are highlighted and associated consequences are minimized. Then, the paper focuses on critical parts of the FES system: analog micro-circuit which generates the electrical signal to electrode. As this micro-circuit is the closest to the human tissue, any failure might involve very critical consequences for the patient. We propose a concurrent top-down and bottom-up approach where the critical elements are highlighted and an extended risk analysis is performed.

  19. Local frequency dependence in transcranial ultrasound transmission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    White, P. J.; Clement, G. T.; Hynynen, K.

    2006-05-01

    The development of large-aperture multiple-source transducer arrays for ultrasound transmission through the human skull has demonstrated the possibility of controlled and substantial acoustic energy delivery into the brain parenchyma without the necessitation of a craniotomy. The individual control of acoustic parameters from each ultrasound source allows for the correction of distortions arising from transmission through the skull bone and also opens up the possibility for electronic steering of the acoustic focus within the brain. In addition, the capability to adjust the frequency of insonation at different locations on the skull can have an effect on ultrasound transmission. To determine the efficacy and applicability of a multiple-frequency approach with such a device, this study examined the frequency dependence of ultrasound transmission in the range of 0.6-1.4 MHz through a series of 17 points on four ex vivo human skulls. Effects beyond those that are characteristic of frequency-dependent attenuation were examined. Using broadband pulses, it was shown that the reflected spectra from the skull revealed information regarding ultrasound transmission at specific frequencies. A multiple-frequency insonation with optimized frequencies over the entirety of five skull specimens was found to yield on average a temporally brief 230% increase in the transmitted intensity with an 88% decrease in time-averaged intensity transmission within the focal volume. This finding demonstrates a potential applicability of a multiple-frequency approach in transcranial ultrasound transmission.

  20. Local Frequency Dependence in Transcranial Ultrasound Transmission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    White, P. J.; Clement, G. T.; Hynynen, K.

    2006-05-01

    The development of large-aperture multiple-source transducer arrays for ultrasound transmission through the human skull has demonstrated the possibility of controlled and substantial acoustic energy delivery into the brain parenchyma without the necessitation of a craniotomy. The individual control of acoustic parameters from each ultrasound source allows for the correction of distortions arising from transmission through the skull bone and also opens up the possibility for electronic steering of the acoustic focus within the brain. In addition, the capability to adjust the frequency of sonication at different locations on the skull can have an effect on ultrasound transmission. To determine the efficacy and applicability of a multiple-frequency approach with such a device, this study examined the frequency dependence of ultrasound transmission in the range of 0.6-1.4 MHz through a series of seventeen points on four ex vivo human skulls. Effects beyond those that are characteristic of frequency-dependent attenuation were examined. Using broadband pulses, it was shown that the reflected spectra from the skull revealed information regarding ultrasound transmission at specific frequencies. This finding demonstrates a potential applicability of a multiple-frequency approach in transcranial ultrasound transmission.

  1. Energy dependence and angular dependence of an optically stimulated luminescence dosimeter in the mammography energy range.

    PubMed

    Kawaguchi, Ai; Matsunaga, Yuta; Suzuki, Shoichi; Chida, Koichi

    2017-03-01

    This study aimed to investigate the energy dependence and the angular dependence of commercially available optically stimulated luminescence (OSL) point dosimeters in the mammography energy range. The energy dependence was evaluated to calculate calibration factors (CFs). The half-value layer range was 0.31-0.60 mmAl (Mo/Mo 22-28 kV, Mo/Rh 28-32 kV, and W/Rh 30-34 kV at 2-kV intervals). Mo/Rh 28 kV was the reference condition. Angular dependence was tested by rotating the X-ray tube from -90° to 90° in 30° increments, and signal counts from angled nanoDots were normalized to the 0° signal counts. Angular dependence was compared with three tube voltage and target/filter combinations (Mo/Mo 26 kV, Mo/Rh 28 kV and W/Rh 32 kV). The CFs of energy dependence were 0.94-1.06. In Mo/Mo 26-28 kV and Mo/Rh 28-32 kV, the range of CF was 0.99-1.01, which was very similar. For angular dependence, the most deteriorated normalized values (Mo/Mo, 0.37; Mo/Rh, 0.43; and W/Rh, 0.58) were observed when the X-ray tube was rotated at a 90° angle, compared to 0°. The most angular dependences of ± 30°, 60°, and 90° decreased by approximately 4%, 14%, and 63% respectively. The mean deteriorated measurement 30° intervals from 0° to ± 30° was 2%, from ± 30° to ± 60° was 8%, and from ± 60° to ± 90° was 40%. The range of energy dependence in typical mammography energy range was not as much as that in general radiography and computed tomography. For accurate measurement using nanoDot, the tilt needs to be under 30°.

  2. Neonatal Narcotic Dependence. Report Series 29, No. 1.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Inst. on Drug Abuse (DHEW/PHS), Rockville, MD. National Clearinghouse for Drug Abuse Information.

    This brief report suggests that it is evident that many uncertainties still remain with regard to neonatal narcotic dependence. Discussion centers on the precise causes and symptoms of neonatal narcotic dependence, the most efficacious treatment procedures, the relative severity of heroin dependence as compared with methadone dependence in the…

  3. Bayesian Network Models for Local Dependence among Observable Outcome Variables

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Almond, Russell G.; Mulder, Joris; Hemat, Lisa A.; Yan, Duanli

    2009-01-01

    Bayesian network models offer a large degree of flexibility for modeling dependence among observables (item outcome variables) from the same task, which may be dependent. This article explores four design patterns for modeling locally dependent observations: (a) no context--ignores dependence among observables; (b) compensatory context--introduces…

  4. 38 CFR 13.70 - Apportionment of benefits to dependents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... veteran's spouse, child or dependent parent as may be necessary to provide for their needs. (b) Dependent... apportionment to the veteran's spouse, child or dependent parent of any benefit not paid under an institutional... dependents. (a) Incompetent veterans being furnished hospital treatment, institutional or domiciliary care...

  5. 38 CFR 3.250 - Dependency of parents; compensation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 38 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Dependency of parents....250 Dependency of parents; compensation. (a) Income—(1) Conclusive dependency. Dependency of a parent... remarried parent and spouse, living together: (iii) $185 for each additional “member of the family”...

  6. 38 CFR 3.250 - Dependency of parents; compensation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 38 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Dependency of parents....250 Dependency of parents; compensation. (a) Income—(1) Conclusive dependency. Dependency of a parent... remarried parent and spouse, living together: (iii) $185 for each additional “member of the family”...

  7. 38 CFR 3.250 - Dependency of parents; compensation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 38 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Dependency of parents....250 Dependency of parents; compensation. (a) Income—(1) Conclusive dependency. Dependency of a parent... remarried parent and spouse, living together: (iii) $185 for each additional “member of the family”...

  8. 38 CFR 13.70 - Apportionment of benefits to dependents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... veteran's spouse, child or dependent parent as may be necessary to provide for their needs. (b) Dependent... a dependent parent or parents and the fiduciary neglects or refuses to make an equivalent... apportionment to the veteran's spouse, child or dependent parent of any benefit not paid under an...

  9. 38 CFR 13.70 - Apportionment of benefits to dependents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... veteran's spouse, child or dependent parent as may be necessary to provide for their needs. (b) Dependent... a dependent parent or parents and the fiduciary neglects or refuses to make an equivalent... apportionment to the veteran's spouse, child or dependent parent of any benefit not paid under an...

  10. 38 CFR 13.70 - Apportionment of benefits to dependents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... veteran's spouse, child or dependent parent as may be necessary to provide for their needs. (b) Dependent... a dependent parent or parents and the fiduciary neglects or refuses to make an equivalent... apportionment to the veteran's spouse, child or dependent parent of any benefit not paid under an...

  11. 38 CFR 13.70 - Apportionment of benefits to dependents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... veteran's spouse, child or dependent parent as may be necessary to provide for their needs. (b) Dependent... a dependent parent or parents and the fiduciary neglects or refuses to make an equivalent... apportionment to the veteran's spouse, child or dependent parent of any benefit not paid under an...

  12. Local Dependence in an Operational CAT: Diagnosis and Implications

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pommerich, Mary; Segall, Daniel O.

    2008-01-01

    The accuracy of CAT scores can be negatively affected by local dependence if the CAT utilizes parameters that are misspecified due to the presence of local dependence and/or fails to control for local dependence in responses during the administration stage. This article evaluates the existence and effect of local dependence in a test of…

  13. Renormalization scheme dependence with renormalization group summation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McKeon, D. G. C.

    2015-08-01

    We consider all perturbative radiative corrections to the total e+e- annihilation cross section Re+e- showing how the renormalization group (RG) equation associated with the radiatively induced mass scale μ can be used to sum the logarithmic contributions in two ways. First of all, one can sum leading-log, next-to-leading-log, etc., contributions to Re+e- using in turn the one-loop, two-loop, etc., contributions to the RG function β . A second summation shows how all logarithmic corrections to Re+e- can be expressed entirely in terms of the log-independent contributions when one employs the full β -function. Next, using Stevenson's characterization of any choice of renormalization scheme by the use of the contributions to the β -function arising beyond two-loop order, we examine the RG scheme dependence in Re+e- when using the second way of summing logarithms. The renormalization scheme invariants that arise are then related to the renormalization scheme invariants found by Stevenson. We next consider two choices of the renormalization scheme, one which can be used to express Re+e- solely in terms of two powers of a running coupling, and the second which can be used to express Re+e- as an infinite series in the two-loop running coupling (i.e., a Lambert W -function). In both cases, Re+e- is expressed solely in terms of renormalization scheme invariant parameters that are to be computed by a perturbative evaluation of Re+e-. We then establish how in general the coupling constant arising in one renormalization scheme can be expressed as a power series of the coupling arising in any other scheme. We then establish how, by using a different renormalization mass scale at each order of perturbation theory, all renormalization scheme dependence can be absorbed into these mass scales when one uses the second way of summing logarithmic corrections to Re+e-. We then employ the approach to renormalization scheme dependency that we have applied to Re+e- to a RG summed

  14. Grizzly bear habitat selection is scale dependent.

    PubMed

    Ciarniello, Lana M; Boyce, Mark S; Seip, Dale R; Heard, Douglas C

    2007-07-01

    The purpose of our study is to show how ecologists' interpretation of habitat selection by grizzly bears (Ursus arctos) is altered by the scale of observation and also how management questions would be best addressed using predetermined scales of analysis. Using resource selection functions (RSF) we examined how variation in the spatial extent of availability affected our interpretation of habitat selection by grizzly bears inhabiting mountain and plateau landscapes. We estimated separate models for females and males using three spatial extents: within the study area, within the home range, and within predetermined movement buffers. We employed two methods for evaluating the effects of scale on our RSF designs. First, we chose a priori six candidate models, estimated at each scale, and ranked them using Akaike Information Criteria. Using this method, results changed among scales for males but not for females. For female bears, models that included the full suite of covariates predicted habitat use best at each scale. For male bears that resided in the mountains, models based on forest successional stages ranked highest at the study-wide and home range extents, whereas models containing covariates based on terrain features ranked highest at the buffer extent. For male bears on the plateau, each scale estimated a different highest-ranked model. Second, we examined differences among model coefficients across the three scales for one candidate model. We found that both the magnitude and direction of coefficients were dependent upon the scale examined; results varied between landscapes, scales, and sexes. Greenness, reflecting lush green vegetation, was a strong predictor of the presence of female bears in both landscapes and males that resided in the mountains. Male bears on the plateau were the only animals to select areas that exposed them to a high risk of mortality by humans. Our results show that grizzly bear habitat selection is scale dependent. Further, the

  15. Perceptions of Benzodiazepine Dependence Among Women Age 65 and Older

    PubMed Central

    Canham, Sarah L.; Gallo, Joseph; Simoni-Wastila, Linda

    2014-01-01

    A phenomenological study explored whether older women who are chronic benzodiazepine users identified themselves as dependent, how dependence was perceived, and how meanings and understandings shaped experiences of benzodiazepine use. Self-reported benzodiazepine dependence was associated with being unable to reduce use or a desire to discontinue use and reliance on benzodiazepines to remain comfortable and able to handle daily life. Themes included: 1) benzodiazepine dependence is similar to dependence to diabetes or blood pressure medications; 2) dependence is distinctive from addiction/abuse; 3) addiction/abuse is perceived as worse than dependence; and 4) concerns of addiction/abuse result in low-dose benzodiazepine use. PMID:24918963

  16. Intensity dependence of multiphoton dissociation in formaldehyde

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koren, G.

    1980-01-01

    The paper reports a new intensity-dependent measurement of multiple-photon dissociation (MPD) in H2CO, HDCO, and D2CO gases using an intense pulsed CO2 TEA laser. In this measurement the energy and duration of the laser pulses are constant, and the intensity is varied by irradiating the sample with concave mirrors of different focal lengths. A model calculation is used to analyze and fit the MPD data of HDCO and D2CO which assumes that dissociation is obtained by a repeated mechanism in which coherent multiphoton excitation (CME) of the molecule to high vibration-rotation states is followed by intramolecular transfer of the excitation energy (ITEE) to the other molecule modes. It is concluded that the results are consistent with the absorption of 14 plus or minus 4 and 17 plus or minus 5 photons per molecule of HDCO and D2CO, respectively.

  17. Breaking America's dependence on imported molybdenum.

    PubMed

    Einstein, Andrew J

    2009-03-01

    Approximately 9 million nuclear cardiology studies performed each year in the U.S. use technetium-99m, which is produced from the decay of molybdenum-99. The fragility of the worldwide technetium-99m supply chain has been underscored by current shortages caused by an unplanned shutdown of Europe's largest reactor. The majority of the U.S. supply derives from a reactor in Canada that is nearing the end of its lifespan and whose planned replacements have been cancelled recently. In this article, the clinical importance of technetium-99m and our tenuous dependence on the foreign supply of molybdenum are addressed, along with potential measures that may be taken to ensure that America's supply chain remains unbroken.

  18. Syntactic processing depends on dorsal language tracts.

    PubMed

    Wilson, Stephen M; Galantucci, Sebastiano; Tartaglia, Maria Carmela; Rising, Kindle; Patterson, Dianne K; Henry, Maya L; Ogar, Jennifer M; DeLeon, Jessica; Miller, Bruce L; Gorno-Tempini, Maria Luisa

    2011-10-20

    Frontal and temporal language areas involved in syntactic processing are connected by several dorsal and ventral tracts, but the functional roles of the different tracts are not well understood. To identify which white matter tract(s) are important for syntactic processing, we examined the relationship between white matter damage and syntactic deficits in patients with primary progressive aphasia, using multimodal neuroimaging and neurolinguistic assessment. Diffusion tensor imaging showed that microstructural damage to left hemisphere dorsal tracts--the superior longitudinal fasciculus including its arcuate component--was strongly associated with deficits in comprehension and production of syntax. Damage to these dorsal tracts predicted syntactic deficits after gray matter atrophy was taken into account, and fMRI confirmed that these tracts connect regions modulated by syntactic processing. In contrast, damage to ventral tracts--the extreme capsule fiber system or the uncinate fasciculus--was not associated with syntactic deficits. Our findings show that syntactic processing depends primarily on dorsal language tracts.

  19. View-Dependent Streamline Deformation and Exploration

    SciTech Connect

    Tong, Xin; Edwards, John; Chen, Chun-Ming; Shen, Han-Wei; Johnson, Chris R.; Wong, Pak Chung

    2016-07-01

    Occlusion presents a major challenge in visualizing 3D flow and tensor fields using streamlines. Displaying too many streamlines creates a dense visualization filled with occluded structures, but displaying too few streams risks losing important features. We propose a new streamline exploration approach by visually manipulating the cluttered streamlines by pulling visible layers apart and revealing the hidden structures underneath. This paper presents a customized view-dependent deformation algorithm and an interactive visualization tool to minimize visual cluttering for visualizing 3D vector and tensor fields. The algorithm is able to maintain the overall integrity of the fields and expose previously hidden structures. Our system supports both mouse and direct-touch interactions to manipulate the viewing perspectives and visualize the streamlines in depth. By using a lens metaphor of different shapes to select the transition zone of the targeted area interactively, the users can move their focus and examine the vector or tensor field freely.

  20. Substance dependency among homeless American Indians.

    PubMed

    Lobo, Susan; Vaughan, Margaret Mortensen

    2003-01-01

    Extensive qualitative research in the San Francisco Bay Area in California and in Tucson, Arizona, indicates strong associations between substance abuse and homelessness among American Indians. This article takes a comparative approach to describe and analyze precipitating factors and survival patterns of those who are both homeless and who suffer from substance dependency. Possible precipitating factors presented through case studies consider the complex interaction of childhood fostering or adoption into non-Native families, different types of involuntary institutionalization during youth, and the personal impact of accident, trauma and loss. Coping strategies and keys to survival are examined, including the role of the extended family and close friendships, American Indian and mainstream organizations that offer formal and informal services, the existence of anchor or key households, the helping relationships and sobriety groups among homeless individuals, spirituality, and cultural resiliency.