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Sample records for 18p deletion syndrome

  1. A case of 18p deletion syndrome after blepharoplasty

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Li-juan; Wu, Lv-xian; Yuan, Qing; Lv, Zhi-gang; Jiang, Xue-yan

    2017-01-01

    Objective The deletion of the short arm of chromosome 18 is thought to be one of the rare chromosomal aberrations. Here, we report a case to review this disease. Case report The proband is a five-and-a-half-year-old girl who has had phenotypes manifested mainly by ptosis, broad face, broad neck with low posterior hairline, mental retardation, short stature, and other malformations. Chromosomal analysis for her mother showed a normal karyotype. Her father and younger brother were phenotypically normal. Result Phenotypical features were quite similar throughout other cases and in accordance with the usual phenotype of del(18p) suggested within the same cases and among the del(18p) cases described. She underwent blepharoplasty, which improved her appearance. Conclusion 18p deletion syndrome is diagnosed by gene analysis. Plastic surgeries for improving the appearance might be an option for these patients. PMID:28138267

  2. Dental caries history in nine children with chromosome 18p deletion syndrome.

    PubMed

    Hermesch, C B; Cody, J T; Cody, J D

    2000-01-01

    Chromosome 18p deletion syndrome is caused by the deletion of a portion of genetic material on the short (p) arm of chromosome 18. Many of 100 prior case reports in the medical literature describing the dental health of subjects with this syndrome reported multiple caries associated with the syndrome. At the third annual international conference of The Chromosome 18 Registry & Research Society, dental examinations were carried out on nine children with chromosome 18p deletion syndrome and five of their unaffected siblings. The dental examination included an intra-oral evaluation of coronal decay and filled permanent teeth surfaces (DFS) and decayed and filled primary tooth surfaces (dfs) using a mouth mirror, explorer, and a high-intensity fiber optic light. An evaluation of the data revealed that five of nine children with 18p deletion syndrome (56%) were free of tooth decay or a history of tooth decay. Four of the nine (44%) had tooth decay or a history of tooth decay. The prevalence of decay was quite similar in the genetically unaffected siblings. Three of the five (60%) unaffected siblings of the children with 18p were free of tooth decay, whereas two of the five (40%) had tooth decay. One of the affected children had a missing mandibular left central incisor. None of the children had abnormally shaped teeth. The caries pattern seems to be similar to that reported in the NHANES III data collected in the United States from 1988-1991. Analysis of these preliminary data suggests that the risk for caries in chromosome 18p deletion syndrome may be lower than previously reported.

  3. Hemizygosity for SMCHD1 in facioscapulohumeral muscular dystrophy type 2: Consequences for 18p deletion syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Lemmers, Richard J.L.F.; van den Boogaard, Marlinde L.; van der Vliet, Patrick J.; Donlin-Smith, Colleen M.; Nations, Sharon P.; Ruivenkamp, Claudia A.L.; Heard, Patricia; Bakker, Bert; Tapscott, Stephen; Cody, Jannine D.; Tawil, Rabi; van der Maarel, Silvère M.

    2015-01-01

    Facioscapulohumeral muscular dystrophy (FSHD) is most often associated with variegated expression in somatic cells of the normally repressed DUX4 gene within the D4Z4 repeat array. The most common form, FSHD1, is caused by a D4Z4 repeat array contraction to a size of 1-10 units (normal range 10–100 units). The less common form, FSHD2, is characterized by D4Z4 CpG hypomethylation and is most often caused by loss of function mutations in the structural maintenance of chromosomes hinge domain 1 (SMCHD1) gene on chromosome 18p. The chromatin modifier SMCHD1 is necessary to maintain a repressed D4Z4 chromatin state. Here we describe two FSHD2 families with a 1.2 Mb deletion encompassing the SMCHD1 gene. Numerical aberrations of chromosome 18 are relatively common and the majority of 18p deletion syndrome (18p-) cases have, like these FSHD2 families, only one copy of SMCHD1. Our finding therefore raises the possibility that 18p- cases are at risk of developing FSHD. To address this possibility, we combined genome wide array analysis data with D4Z4 CpG methylation and repeat array sizes in individuals with 18p- and conclude that approximately 1:8 18p- cases might be at risk of developing FSHD. PMID:25820463

  4. Neuropsychological Function in a Child with 18p Deletion Syndrome: A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Willoughby, Brian L.; Favero, Marcus; Mochida, Ganeshwaran H.; Braaten, Ellen B.

    2014-01-01

    We report the neuropsychological profile of a 4-year-old boy with the rare 18p deletion syndrome. We used a battery of standardized tests to assess his development in intellect, language, visuomotor integration, academic readiness, socialization, and emotional and behavioral health. The results showed borderline intellectual function except for low average nonverbal reasoning skills. He had stronger receptive than expressive language skills, although both were well below his age group. He had impaired visuomotor integration and pre-academic skills such as letter identification. Emotional and behavioral findings indicated mild aggressiveness, anxiety, low frustration tolerance, and executive function weaknesses, especially at home. Interestingly, he showed social strengths, responding to attention and sharing enjoyment with his examiner. With its assessment of development in many domains, this case report is among the first to characterize the neuropsychological and psychiatric function of a young child with 18p deletion syndrome. We discuss the implications of our findings for clinical practice. PMID:25237747

  5. Deletion of short arm of chromosome 18, Del(18p) syndrome.

    PubMed

    Babaji, Prashant; Singh, Anurag; Lau, Himani; Lamba, G; Somasundaram, P

    2014-01-01

    Deletion of the short arm of chromosome 18 is a rare syndrome clinically presenting with variable mental retardation, growth retardation, low height, pectus excavatum, craniofacial malformations including long ear, ptosis, microcephaly and short neck. This case report presents with characteristic features along with rare feature of single nostril.

  6. Chromosome 18p deletion syndrome presenting holoprosencephaly and premaxillary agenesis: prenatal diagnosis and aCGH characterization using uncultured amniocytes.

    PubMed

    Chen, Chih-Ping; Huang, Jian-Pei; Chen, Yi-Yung; Chern, Schu-Rern; Wu, Peih-Shan; Su, Jun-Wei; Pan, Chen-Wen; Wang, Wayseen

    2013-09-25

    We present prenatal diagnosis of a de novo distal 18p deletion involving 14.06Mb at 18p11.32-p11.21 by aCGH using uncultured amniocytes in a pregnancy with fetal holoprosencephaly and premaxillary agenesis. QF-PCR analysis showed that distal 18p deletion was from maternal origin. Metaphase FISH analysis confirmed haploinsufficiency of TGIF. We discuss the functions of the genes that are deleted within this region. The present case shows the usefulness of applying aCGH on uncultured amniocytes for rapid aneuploidy diagnosis in cases with prenatally detected fetal structural abnormalities.

  7. Gonadal dysgenesis in del (18p) syndrome

    SciTech Connect

    Telvi, L.; Ion, A.; Fouquet, F.

    1995-07-17

    We report on a girl with syndromal gonadal dysgenesis and a de novo del (18p). Genetic factors controlling gonadal development are located not only on the X chromosome, but also on autosomes. The present case suggests that one of these genes is situated on 18p. We conclude that patients with del (18p) syndrome should be evaluated for gonadal dysgenesis. 16 refs., 3 figs.

  8. Anterior Pituitary Aplasia in an Infant with Ring Chromosome 18p Deletion

    PubMed Central

    Durrin, Sarah; Lindgren, Valerie; Shad, Zohra; Boucher-Berry, Claudia

    2016-01-01

    We present the first reported case of an infant with 18p deletion syndrome with anterior pituitary aplasia secondary to a ring chromosome. Endocrine workup soon after birth was reassuring; however, repeat testing months later confirmed central hypopituitarism. While MRI reading initially indicated no midline defects, subsequent review of the images confirmed anterior pituitary aplasia with ectopic posterior pituitary. This case demonstrates how deletion of genetic material, even if resulting in a chromosomal ring, still results in a severe syndromic phenotype. Furthermore, it demonstrates the necessity of close follow-up in the first year of life for children with 18p deletion syndrome and emphasizes the need to verify radiology impressions if there is any doubt as to the radiologic findings. PMID:27843654

  9. The 18 p-syndrome. Report of four cases.

    PubMed

    Faust, J; Habedank, M; Nieuwenhuijsen, C

    1976-08-16

    Four children, two girls and two boys, were found to have a short arm deletion of chromosome No. 18. Three of them exhibit a typical dysmorphy of the face showing retraction of the midface, broad-based, flat nose, hypertelorism, epicanthus, "carp mouth", big, protruding, and low set ears, as well as a variable number of Turner-like features, failure of growth, mental retardation, and muscular hypotonia. A newly born child, who died at 2 days of age exhibited severe brain defects of holoprosencephalic series. The clinical and cytogenetic findings are compared with the reviewed data of the 18 p deletion. The hypothesis of "gene-dosis compensation" is discussed in order to explain the variable phenotypical expression of 18 p-syndrome as there is obviously to correlation between the extent of the deficiency and the expression of malformations.

  10. Familial deletion of 18p associated with Turner like clinical features

    SciTech Connect

    Say, B.; Gopal Rao, V.V.N.; Harris, S.

    1994-09-01

    The authors report the first occurrence to our knowledge of a familial deletion of the short arm of chromosome 18 in a mother and daughter. The proband is an 18-year-old female referred for chromosomal analysis because of mental retardation and short stature. She is the only offspring. Her birth weight was 3 pounds 10 ounces (below 5th percentile). As a child, she had delayed milestones. Her IQ is 69 and she is in classes for the educable mentally handicapped. Her height is 145.6 cm and weight 38.7 kg (both below 5th percentile). Physical examination revealed a low nuchal hairline. She has myopia. Chromosome analysis from peripheral blood lymphocytes revealed a 46,XX,del(18)(p11.21) karyotype. Since some of the same clinical features are also seen in the mother including short stature (157 cm), mental retardation, ocular problems like cataracts, exotropia and refractive error, chromosome analysis was performed which showed the same 46,XX,del(18)(p11.21) karyotype. A familial case like this has great implications in genetic counseling. Since the syndrome is not associated with sterility, the recurrence risk for the offspring is 50%. Patients with deletion (18p) syndrome are reported to have findings suggestive of Turner syndrome with varying degrees of mental retardation. We recommend that in patients with such clinical features associated with mental retardation, normal menstrual history and/or fertility, the possibility of deletion (18p) syndrome be considered.

  11. A case of duplication of 13q32-->qter and deletion of 18p11.32-->pter with mild phenotype: Patau syndrome and duplications of 13q revisited.

    PubMed

    Helali, N; Iafolla, A K; Kahler, S G; Qumsiyeh, M B

    1996-07-01

    A mild clinical phenotype is described in a patient with duplication of 13q32-->qter and a small deletion of 18p11.32-->pter. The 8 year old white male presented with psychomotor retardation, tethered cord, soft, fleshy ears, and normal facial features except for thin lips. The karyotype was found to be 46, XY, der(18)t(13;18) (q32;p11.32) pat confirmed by fluorescence in situ hybridisation (FISH). A review of earlier studies showed that features of trisomy 13 are found in cases of duplication of bands 13q14 to qter. None of the cardinal features of trisomy 13 was seen in this patient. The absence of polydactyly, hernias, urogenital abnormalities, and haemangiomas contrast this condition with both trisomy 13 and duplication of 13q14-22-->qter. Possible explanations for lack of Patau syndrome in this patient could include restriction of the critical region for Patau syndrome to duplication 13q14-->13q32 with variable expression, gene interactions, or interchromosomal effects.

  12. A case of duplication of 13q32-->qter and deletion of 18p11.32-->pter with mild phenotype: Patau syndrome and duplications of 13q revisited.

    PubMed Central

    Helali, N; Iafolla, A K; Kahler, S G; Qumsiyeh, M B

    1996-01-01

    A mild clinical phenotype is described in a patient with duplication of 13q32-->qter and a small deletion of 18p11.32-->pter. The 8 year old white male presented with psychomotor retardation, tethered cord, soft, fleshy ears, and normal facial features except for thin lips. The karyotype was found to be 46, XY, der(18)t(13;18) (q32;p11.32) pat confirmed by fluorescence in situ hybridisation (FISH). A review of earlier studies showed that features of trisomy 13 are found in cases of duplication of bands 13q14 to qter. None of the cardinal features of trisomy 13 was seen in this patient. The absence of polydactyly, hernias, urogenital abnormalities, and haemangiomas contrast this condition with both trisomy 13 and duplication of 13q14-22-->qter. Possible explanations for lack of Patau syndrome in this patient could include restriction of the critical region for Patau syndrome to duplication 13q14-->13q32 with variable expression, gene interactions, or interchromosomal effects. Images PMID:8818949

  13. Follow-up of adult males with chromosome 18p deletion.

    PubMed

    de Ravel, Thomy J L; Thiry, Paul; Fryns, Jean-Pierre

    2005-01-01

    The 18p- syndrome has been known for over 40 years, the first report being by de Grouchy et al. [Comptes Rendus Hebdomadaires Séances l'Acad Sci 256 (1963) 1028]. Mental retardation of varying severity is the most constant feature. Over 100 cases have been reported. The eldest patients have been 50 years [Hum Genet 63 (1983) 139; Clin Genet 2 (1971) 338]. Follow-up of two adult patients, then 22 and 42 years [Ann Génét 29 (1986) 107], now 42 and 62 years of age, is reported. Further case reports are required in order to better define the evolution of adult patients with the 18p- syndrome.

  14. Gonadal dysgenesis, Turner syndrome with 46,XX,del(18p)3

    SciTech Connect

    Telvi, L.; Ion, R.; Bernheim, A.

    1994-09-01

    The authors report a case of a female infant with gonadal dysgenesis, clinical features of Turner syndrome and a de novo del(18p). The factors controlling gonadal dysgenesis and Turner syndrome are unknown to date. The genes involved could be located not only on X chromosome but also on autosomes. The present case suggests that one of these genes is situated on the short arm of chromosome 18. We conclude that patients with del(18p) syndrome should be evaluated for gonadal dysgenesis.

  15. Co-occurrence of mosaic supernumerary isochromosome 18p and intermittent 2q13 deletions in a child with multiple congenital anomalies.

    PubMed

    Jaiswal, Sushil Kumar; Kumar, Ashok; Ali, Akhtar; Rai, Amit Kumar

    2015-03-15

    The present study deals with karyotpye-phenotype correlations in a six month old child with multiple congenital abnormalities. Cytogenetic analysis revealed mosaicism of a small metacentric supernumerary marker chromosome with a karyotype mos 47,XY+mar[34]/46,XY[31]. Cytogenetic microarray result showed three copies of chromosome 18p (15,400 kb in size). Moreover, 255 kbp intermittent deletion of chromosome 2q13 involving RGPD5, RGPD6, LIMS3, and LIMS3-LOC440895 was also observed. Correlating microarray data with the mosaic karyotype, the marker chromosome was identified as mosaic isochromosome 18p and was found to be 32,600 kbp in size. Baby resembled clinical characteristics of trisomy chromosome 18p, isochromosome 18p and trisomy chromosome 18. The present study suggested that deletion of evolutionarily conserved developmental genes (RGPD5, RGPD and LIMS3) in the 2q13 region might have contributed to more severity in phenotype as compared to so far such reported cases of 18p trisomy's, as these are involved in nuclear-cytoplasm trafficking, signaling for tissue patterning and differentiation. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Deletion 22q13.3 syndrome.

    PubMed

    Phelan, Mary C

    2008-05-27

    The deletion 22q13.3 syndrome (deletion 22q13 syndrome or Phelan-McDermid syndrome) is a chromosome microdeletion syndrome characterized by neonatal hypotonia, global developmental delay, normal to accelerated growth, absent to severely delayed speech, and minor dysmorphic features. The deletion occurs with equal frequency in males and females and has been reported in mosaic and non-mosaic forms. Due to lack of clinical recognition and often insufficient laboratory testing, the syndrome is under-diagnosed and its true incidence remains unknown. Common physical traits include long eye lashes, large or unusual ears, relatively large hands, dysplastic toenails, full brow, dolicocephaly, full cheeks, bulbous nose, and pointed chin. Behavior is autistic-like with decreased perception of pain and habitual chewing or mouthing. The loss of 22q13.3 can result from simple deletion, translocation, ring chromosome formation and less common structural changes affecting the long arm of chromosome 22, specifically the region containing the SHANK3 gene. The diagnosis of deletion 22q13 syndrome should be considered in all cases of hypotonia of unknown etiology and in individuals with absent speech. Although the deletion can sometimes be detected by high resolution chromosome analysis, fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) or array comparative genomic hybridization (CGH) is recommended for confirmation. Differential diagnosis includes syndromes associated with hypotonia, developmental delay, speech delay and/or autistic-like affect (Prader-Willi, Angelman, Williams, Smith-Magenis, Fragile X, Sotos, FG, trichorhinophalangeal and velocardiofacial syndromes, autism spectrum disorders, cerebral palsy). Genetic counseling is recommended and parental laboratory studies should be considered to identify cryptic rearrangements and detect parental mosaicism. Prenatal diagnosis should be offered for future pregnancies in those families with inherited rearrangements. Individuals with

  17. Chromosome 11q13 deletion syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Yu-Seon; Kim, Gun-Ha; Byeon, Jung Hye; Eun, So-Hee

    2016-01-01

    Chromosome 11q13 deletion syndrome has been previously reported as either otodental syndrome or oculo-oto-dental syndrome. The otodental syndrome is characterized by dental abnormalities and high-frequency sensorineural hearing loss, and by ocular coloboma in some cases. The underlying genetic defect causing otodental syndrome is a hemizygous microdeletion involving the FGF3 gene on chromosome 11q13.3. Recently, a new form of severe deafness, microtia (small ear) and small teeth, without the appearance of eye abnormalities, was also reported. In this report, we describe a 1-year-old girl presenting with ptosis of the left upper eyelid, right auricular deformity, high-arched palate, delayed dentition, simian line on the right hand, microcephaly, and developmental delay. In this patient, we identified a deletion in the chromosome 11q13.2-q13.3 (2.75 Mb) region by using an array-comparative genomic hybridization analysis. The deletion in chromosome 11q13 results in a syndrome characterized by variable clinical manifestations. Some of these manifestations involve craniofacial dysmorphology and require a functional workup for hearing, ophthalmic examinations, and long-term dental care. PMID:28018436

  18. 1p36 deletion syndrome: an update

    PubMed Central

    Jordan, Valerie K; Zaveri, Hitisha P; Scott, Daryl A

    2015-01-01

    Deletions of chromosome 1p36 affect approximately 1 in 5,000 newborns and are the most common terminal deletions in humans. Medical problems commonly caused by terminal deletions of 1p36 include developmental delay, intellectual disability, seizures, vision problems, hearing loss, short stature, distinctive facial features, brain anomalies, orofacial clefting, congenital heart defects, cardiomyopathy, and renal anomalies. Although 1p36 deletion syndrome is considered clinically recognizable, there is significant phenotypic variation among affected individuals. This variation is due, at least in part, to the genetic heterogeneity seen in 1p36 deletions which include terminal and interstitial deletions of varying lengths located throughout the 30 Mb of DNA that comprise chromosome 1p36. Array-based copy number variant analysis can easily identify genomic regions of 1p36 that are deleted in an affected individual. However, predicting the phenotype of an individual based solely on the location and extent of their 1p36 deletion remains a challenge since most of the genes that contribute to 1p36-related phenotypes have yet to be identified. In addition, haploinsufficiency of more than one gene may contribute to some phenotypes. In this article, we review recent successes in the effort to map and identify the genes and genomic regions that contribute to specific 1p36-related phenotypes. In particular, we highlight evidence implicating MMP23B, GABRD, SKI, PRDM16, KCNAB2, RERE, UBE4B, CASZ1, PDPN, SPEN, ECE1, HSPG2, and LUZP1 in various 1p36 deletion phenotypes. PMID:26345236

  19. 1p36 deletion syndrome: an update.

    PubMed

    Jordan, Valerie K; Zaveri, Hitisha P; Scott, Daryl A

    2015-01-01

    Deletions of chromosome 1p36 affect approximately 1 in 5,000 newborns and are the most common terminal deletions in humans. Medical problems commonly caused by terminal deletions of 1p36 include developmental delay, intellectual disability, seizures, vision problems, hearing loss, short stature, distinctive facial features, brain anomalies, orofacial clefting, congenital heart defects, cardiomyopathy, and renal anomalies. Although 1p36 deletion syndrome is considered clinically recognizable, there is significant phenotypic variation among affected individuals. This variation is due, at least in part, to the genetic heterogeneity seen in 1p36 deletions which include terminal and interstitial deletions of varying lengths located throughout the 30 Mb of DNA that comprise chromosome 1p36. Array-based copy number variant analysis can easily identify genomic regions of 1p36 that are deleted in an affected individual. However, predicting the phenotype of an individual based solely on the location and extent of their 1p36 deletion remains a challenge since most of the genes that contribute to 1p36-related phenotypes have yet to be identified. In addition, haploinsufficiency of more than one gene may contribute to some phenotypes. In this article, we review recent successes in the effort to map and identify the genes and genomic regions that contribute to specific 1p36-related phenotypes. In particular, we highlight evidence implicating MMP23B, GABRD, SKI, PRDM16, KCNAB2, RERE, UBE4B, CASZ1, PDPN, SPEN, ECE1, HSPG2, and LUZP1 in various 1p36 deletion phenotypes.

  20. 22q11 deletion syndrome: current perspective

    PubMed Central

    Hacıhamdioğlu, Bülent; Hacıhamdioğlu, Duygu; Delil, Kenan

    2015-01-01

    Chromosome 22q11 is characterized by the presence of chromosome-specific low-copy repeats or segmental duplications. This region of the chromosome is very unstable and susceptible to mutations. The misalignment of low-copy repeats during nonallelic homologous recombination leads to the deletion of the 22q11.2 region, which results in 22q11 deletion syndrome (22q11DS). The 22q11.2 deletion is associated with a wide variety of phenotypes. The term 22q11DS is an umbrella term that is used to encompass all 22q11.2 deletion-associated phenotypes. The haploinsufficiency of genes located at 22q11.2 affects the early morphogenesis of the pharyngeal arches, heart, skeleton, and brain. TBX1 is the most important gene for 22q11DS. This syndrome can ultimately affect many organs or systems; therefore, it has a very wide phenotypic spectrum. An increasing amount of information is available related to the pathogenesis, clinical phenotypes, and management of this syndrome in recent years. This review summarizes the current clinical and genetic status related to 22q11DS. PMID:26056486

  1. Monosomy 1p36 deletion syndrome.

    PubMed

    Gajecka, Marzena; Mackay, Katherine L; Shaffer, Lisa G

    2007-11-15

    Monosomy 1p36 results from a heterozygous deletion of the most distal chromosomal band on the short arm of chromosome 1. Occurring in approximately 1 in 5,000 live births, monosomy 1p36 is the most common terminal deletion observed in humans. Monosomy 1p36 is associated with mental retardation, developmental delay, hearing impairment, seizures, growth impairment, hypotonia, and heart defects. The syndrome is also characterized by several distinct dysmorphic features, including large anterior fontanels, microcephaly, brachycephaly, deep-set eyes, flat nose and nasal bridge, and pointed chin. Several genes have been proposed as causative for individual features of the phenotype. In addition, based upon molecular characterization of subjects with monosomy 1p36, several mechanisms for the generation and stabilization of terminal deletions have been proposed.

  2. Chromosomal deletions in the myelodysplastic syndrome.

    PubMed

    Mufti, G J

    1992-01-01

    Karyotypic abnormalities in primary myelodysplastic syndrome (P-MDS) are less frequent than in secondary myelodysplasia. A review of the literature involving over 3000 reported cases, shows the incidence of karyotypically abnormal clones at presentation in nearly 48% of cases. Approximately 50% of the abnormalities comprise of deletions of chromosomes 5, 7, 11, 12, 13 and 20. Localisation of a number of haemopoietic growth factors and their receptors to the deleted segments of the chromosomes, has invoked considerable interest in the molecular pathology of the interstitial deletions and their consequent role in the multistep pathogenesis of MDS. Present evidence suggests chromosome abnormalities are a later event in the multistep painogenesis, and it is suggested their occurrence may be restricted to a restricted myeloid progenitor cell, although the initial event(s) occur at the common lymphoid-myeloid progenitor. Much has been gleaned from the dominant modes of leukaemogenesis, such as the occurrence of missense mutations at specific positions of RAS and FMS mutations. It is suggested that a similar enquiry into the mechanisms of chromosomal deletions in P-MDS is required in order to delineate the role of these abnormalities in the clonal evolution of this group of diseases.

  3. Deletions and candidate genes in Williams syndrome

    SciTech Connect

    Perez Jurado, L.A.; Peoples, R.; Francke, U.

    1994-09-01

    Hemizygosity at the elastin locus (ELN) on chromosome 7q11.23 has recently been reported in several familial and sporadic cases of the developmental disorder, Williams syndrome (WS). Because the deletion is greater than the span of the ELN gene, a contiguous gene deletion syndrome has been suggested as the probable molecular basis for this condition. Thus far, neither the size of the deletion(s), nor other genes within it are known. We have analyzed samples from 27 sporadic WS patients by genotyping two multiallelic ELN intragenic polymorphisms, detectable by PCR amplification, and by Southern blotting for ELN gene dosage. Twenty four patients were hemizygous at the ELN locus while 3 showed no deletion or detectable rearrangement. Genotype studies on parental DNA were informative in 12 of the deletions. All 12 were due to de novo events, 8 in the maternal and 4 in the paternal chromosome. In an attempt to identify genes involved in WS we are also using a candidate gene approach. Delayed clearance of an exogenous calcium load with normal or slightly increased calcitonin levels in serum has been documented in WS patients suggesting a defective calcitonin action or calcium sensing function. The calcitonin receptor (CTR) gene is, therefore, a good candidate since CTR has a dual role as a hormonal receptor for calcitonin and an extracellular calcium sensor. We have mapped the CTR gene to chromosome 7q21.1 by PCR-SSCA of somatic cell hybrids and FISH analysis. Using two color FISH with probes for ELN and CTR, both loci are located on 7q at a distance of {approximately}10 Mb, CTR being telomeric. Our CTR probe does not detect any genomic abnormality by FISH or Southern blot in the patients` samples analyzed. We have identified a diallelic polymorphism in the CTR cDNA and are currently testing the hypothesis of an impaired CTR expression as responsible for some of the clinical features of WS by analysing the CTR transcripts by RT-PCR.

  4. Velocardiofacial syndrome, DiGeorge syndrome: the chromosome 22q11.2 deletion syndromes.

    PubMed

    Kobrynski, Lisa J; Sullivan, Kathleen E

    2007-10-20

    Velocardiofacial syndrome, DiGeorge syndrome, and some other clinical syndromes have in common a high frequency of hemizygous deletions of chromosome 22q11.2. This deletion syndrome is very common, affecting nearly one in 3000 children. Here, we focus on recent advances in cardiac assessment, speech, immunology, and pathophysiology of velocardiofacial syndrome. The complex medical care of patients needs a multidisciplinary approach, and every patient has his own unique clinical features that need a tailored approach. Patients with chromosome 22q11.2 deletion syndrome might have high level of functioning, but most often need interventions to improve the function of many organ systems.

  5. Growth patterns of patients with 1p36 deletion syndrome.

    PubMed

    Sangu, Noriko; Shimojima, Keiko; Shimada, Shino; Ando, Tomohiro; Yamamoto, Toshiyuki

    2014-05-01

    1p36 deletion syndrome is one of the most common subtelomeric deletion syndromes. Obesity is frequently observed in patients with this syndrome. Thus, it is important to evaluate the growth status of an individual patient. For this purpose, we accumulated recorded growth data from 44 patients with this syndrome and investigated the growth patterns of patients. Most of the patients showed weight parameters within normal limits, whereas a few of these patients showed intrauterine growth delay and microcephaly. The length of the patients after birth was under the 50th centile in most patients. Many patients showed poor weight gain after birth, and only two female patients were overweight. These findings indicate two different phenotypes of the 1p36 deletion syndrome. The overweight patients with 1p36 deletion started excessive weight gain after two years of life. This characteristic of the patients with 1p36 deletion syndrome is similar to Prader-Willi syndrome.

  6. 47,XX,+der(18),t(9;18)(p24;q21) mat: a distinct partial trisomy 18q--syndrome?

    PubMed Central

    Bass, H N; Weber-Parisi, F; Sparkes, R S

    1978-01-01

    A moderately retarded girl had a 47,XX,+der(18),t(9;18)(p24;q21)mat abnormality that was inherited from her mother, who had a 46,XX,t(9;18)(p24;q21) karyotype in most cells, and a minor cell line of 47,XX,+der(18),-t(9;18)(p24;q21). Her dysmorphic features--bilateral epicanthic folds, low-set, abnormal ears, low posterior hairline, clinodactyly of the 5th fingers, and broad great toes--were similar to those of other patients with an additional number 18 chromosome in which all or most of the long arm was missing, thus raising the possibility of a distinct syndrome. Images PMID:739531

  7. 47,XY,+der(X)t(X;18)(p11.4;p11.22): A Unique Aneuploidy Associated with Klinefelter Syndrome due to an Extra Derivative X Chromosome Inherited Maternally.

    PubMed

    Liang, Ji; Zhang, Yongsheng; Wang, Ruixue; Liang, Zuowen; Yue, Jiaming; Liu, Ruizhi

    2015-01-01

    A derivative X chromosome formed by translocation involving an X chromosome and a chromosome 18 in a Klinefelter syndrome (KS) patient with a 47,XXY karyotype has not been reported before. In this study, we present the clinical and molecular cytogenetic characteristics. The patient presented with small testes and azoospermia. G-banding analysis identified the karyotype as 47,XY,del(X)(p?11.4). Array CGH detected a 10.36-Mb duplication of chromosome region 18p11.22p11.32 (14,316-10,377,516) and a 111.18-Mb duplication of chromosome region Xp11.4q28 (61,931, 689-155,111,583), in addition to the normal chromosome 18 and an X chromosome. FISH results further revealed the extra 18p located at the end of the short arm of a deleted X chromosome, forming a derivative X chromosome. Finally, we identified the karyotype of the patient as 47,XY,+der(X)t(X;18)(p11.4;p11.22). The derivative X chromosome was maternally inherited. To our knowledge, this rare karyotype has not yet been reported in the literature. The present study may suggest a novel karyotype associated with KS.

  8. 22q11.2 deletion syndrome

    PubMed Central

    McDonald-McGinn, Donna M.; Sullivan, Kathleen E.; Marino, Bruno; Philip, Nicole; Swillen, Ann; Vorstman, Jacob A. S.; Zackai, Elaine H.; Emanuel, Beverly S.; Vermeesch, Joris R.; Morrow, Bernice E.; Scambler, Peter J.; Bassett, Anne S.

    2016-01-01

    22q11.2 deletion syndrome (22q11.2DS) is the most common chromosomal microdeletion disorder, estimated to result mainly from de novo non-homologous meiotic recombination events occurring in approximately 1 in every 1,000 fetuses. The first description in the English language of the constellation of findings now known to be due to this chromosomal difference was made in the 1960s in children with DiGeorge syndrome, who presented with the clinical triad of immunodeficiency, hypoparathyroidism and congenital heart disease. The syndrome is now known to have a heterogeneous presentation that includes multiple additional congenital anomalies and later-onset conditions, such as palatal, gastrointestinal and renal abnormalities, autoimmune disease, variable cognitive delays, behavioural phenotypes and psychiatric illness — all far extending the original description of DiGeorge syndrome. Management requires a multidisciplinary approach involving paediatrics, general medicine, surgery, psychiatry, psychology, interventional therapies (physical, occupational, speech, language and behavioural) and genetic counselling. Although common, lack of recognition of the condition and/or lack of familiarity with genetic testing methods, together with the wide variability of clinical presentation, delays diagnosis. Early diagnosis, preferably prenatally or neonatally, could improve outcomes, thus stressing the importance of universal screening. Equally important, 22q11.2DS has become a model for understanding rare and frequent congenital anomalies, medical conditions, psychiatric and developmental disorders, and may provide a platform to better understand these disorders while affording opportunities for translational strategies across the lifespan for both patients with 22q11.2DS and those with these associated features in the general population. PMID:27189754

  9. DiGeorge syndrome/velocardiofacial syndrome: the chromosome 22q11.2 deletion syndrome.

    PubMed

    Sullivan, Kathleen E

    2007-01-01

    Chromosome 22q11.2 deletion (CH22qD) syndrome is also known as DiGeorge syndrome or velocardiofacial syndrome. This deletion syndrome is extremely common with nearly one in 4000 children being affected. Recent advances and a holistic approach to patients have improved the care and well-being of these patients. This review will summarize advances in understanding the health needs and immune system of patients with CH22qD syndrome. Patients will most often need interventions directed at maximizing function for many organ systems but can ultimately have a high level of functioning.

  10. Mental retardation/shortness of stature/multiple minor anomalies syndrome associated with insertion of 3q material into 18p

    SciTech Connect

    Al-Attia, H.M.; Sedaghatian, M.R.

    1995-03-13

    This is a case report of a 16-year-old Arab girl with mental subnormality, shortness of stature and multiple minor phenotypic anomalies. She is obese with normal secondary sexual characteristics, and has a speech deficit. Cytogenetic studies showed a 46,XX,dir ins (18;3)(p11.1;q13.2{yields}q25). The chromosome arrangement appeared balanced. Her condition is not a recognizable specific syndrome; thus, it remained unclear as to whether her condition is attributable to disruption of 3q or 18p or both. Further cytogenetic analysis by molecular biologists is required to solve this problem. 9 refs., 3 figs.

  11. Delineation of 14q32.3 deletion syndrome.

    PubMed

    Ortigas, A P; Stein, C K; Thomson, L L; Hoo, J J

    1997-06-01

    A patient with a 14q32.3 terminal band deletion and cat cry is reported. Review of four other 14q32.3 deletion cases suggests the possible presence of a recognisable 14q32.3 terminal deletion syndrome, which is characterised by (1) apparently postnatal onset of small head size in comparison to body size, (2) high forehead with lateral hypertrichosis, (3) epicanthic folds, (4) broad nasal bridge, (5) high arched palate, (6) single palmar crease, and (7) mild to moderate developmental delay. Although none of the above seven features in unique to this syndrome, and indeed are quite common in other chromosomal disorders or genetic syndromes, patients with a terminal 14q32.3 deletion do show a recognisable facial gestalt. Interestingly, unlike ring chromosome 14, the 14q32.3 terminal deletion has rarely been reported, possibly because it is harder to detect, and an optimal chromosome preparation is required for its identification.

  12. Genetics Home Reference: 22q13.3 deletion syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    ... and symptoms include developmental delay, moderate to profound intellectual disability, decreased muscle tone (hypotonia), and absent or delayed ... the syndrome's characteristic signs (such as developmental delay, intellectual disability, and impaired speech). Additional genes in the deleted ...

  13. Genetics Home Reference: 19p13.13 deletion syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    ... Resources (1 link) National Human Genome Research Institute: Chromosome Abnormalities Educational Resources (5 links) MalaCards: chromosome 19p13.13 deletion syndrome March of Dimes: Chromosomal ...

  14. Genetics Home Reference: 1p36 deletion syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    ... shaped. People with 1p36 deletion syndrome may have vision or hearing problems. Some have abnormalities ... to affect between 1 in 5,000 and 1 in 10,000 newborns. However, this may be an underestimate because some ...

  15. Coexistence of 9p Deletion Syndrome and Autism Spectrum Disorder

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Günes, Serkan; Ekinci, Özalp; Ekinci, Nuran; Toros, Fevziye

    2017-01-01

    Deletion or duplication of the short arm of chromosome 9 may lead to a variety of clinical conditions including craniofacial and limb abnormalities, skeletal malformations, mental retardation, and autism spectrum disorder. Here, we present a case report of 5-year-old boy with 9p deletion syndrome and autism spectrum disorder.

  16. Coexistence of 9p Deletion Syndrome and Autism Spectrum Disorder

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Günes, Serkan; Ekinci, Özalp; Ekinci, Nuran; Toros, Fevziye

    2017-01-01

    Deletion or duplication of the short arm of chromosome 9 may lead to a variety of clinical conditions including craniofacial and limb abnormalities, skeletal malformations, mental retardation, and autism spectrum disorder. Here, we present a case report of 5-year-old boy with 9p deletion syndrome and autism spectrum disorder.

  17. B group short-arm deletion syndrome.

    PubMed

    Sedano, H O; Look, R A; Carter, C; Cohen, M M

    1971-06-01

    Three cases of the cat-cry syndrome are reported and the literature on Bp- syndromes is reviewed. Although the 4p- and 5p- syndromes have many overlapping features, the cleft lip-palate, seizures, iris coloboma, and other features of the 4p- syndrome, as well as absent cat-cry, are frequently sufficient to distinguish between the 4p- and 5p- syndromes.

  18. The 22q13.3 Deletion Syndrome (Phelan-McDermid Syndrome)

    PubMed Central

    Phelan, K.; McDermid, H.E.

    2012-01-01

    The 22q13.3 deletion syndrome, also known as Phelan-McDermid syndrome, is a contiguous gene disorder resulting from deletion of the distal long arm of chromosome 22. In addition to normal growth and a constellation of minor dysmorphic features, this syndrome is characterized by neurological deficits which include global developmental delay, moderate to severe intellectual impairment, absent or severely delayed speech, and neonatal hypotonia. In addition, more than 50% of patients show autism or autistic-like behavior, and therefore it can be classified as a syndromic form of autism spectrum disorders (ASD). The differential diagnosis includes Angelman syndrome, velocardiofacial syndrome, fragile X syndrome, and FG syndrome. Over 600 cases of 22q13.3 deletion syndrome have been documented. Most are terminal deletions of ∼100 kb to >9 Mb, resulting from simple deletions, ring chromosomes, and unbalanced translocations. Almost all of these deletions include the gene SHANK3 which encodes a scaffold protein in the postsynaptic densities of excitatory synapses, connecting membrane-bound receptors to the actin cytoskeleton. Two mouse knockout models and cell culture experiments show that SHANK3 is involved in the structure and function of synapses and support the hypothesis that the majority of 22q13.3 deletion syndrome neurological defects are due to haploinsufficiency of SHANK3, although other genes in the region may also play a role in the syndrome. The molecular connection to ASD suggests that potential future treatments may involve modulation of metabotropic glutamate receptors. PMID:22670140

  19. Chromosome 13q deletion with Cornelia de Lange syndrome phenotype.

    PubMed

    Ngo, C T; Alhady, M; Tan, A K; Norlasiah, I Siti; Ong, G B; Chua, C N

    2007-03-01

    A 3-year-old girl with facial dysmorphic features suggestive of Cornelia de Lange syndrome was seen in the ophthalmology unit for a right leukocoria. The leukocoria was found to be caused by a large retinoblastoma and the right eye was enucleated. Chromosomal analysis revealed partial chromosome 13q deletion involving band 14 which is associated with a high risk of retinoblastoma. This case shows that patient with chromosome 13q deletion syndrome cannot be diagnosed based on dysmorphic features only. Chromosomal analysis is warranted in all infants with facial dysmorphism suggestive of Cornelia de Lange syndrome so that those with chromosome 13q deletion can be referred early for early detection of retinoblastoma.

  20. Deletions of the elastin gene in Williams Syndrome

    SciTech Connect

    Greenberg, F.; Nickerson, E.; McCaskill, C.

    1994-09-01

    To investigate deletions in the elastin gene in patients with Williams Syndrome (WS), we screened 37 patients and their parents for deletions in the elastin gene by both fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) using cosmid cELN272 containing the 5{prime} end of the elastin gene and by polymerase chain reaction (PCR) using a primer pair which amplifies intron 17 in the elastin gene, producing a polymorphic amplification product. Thirty-two patients have been investigated by both the FISH and PCR techniques, one patient was studied only by PCR, and 4 patients were studied only by FISH. Overall, 34 of 37 patients (92%) were deleted for the elastin gene. Using the PCR marker, 14 patients were informative and 12 were shown to be deleted [maternal (n=5) and paternal (n=7)]. Using cosmid cELN272, 33 of 36 patients demonstrated a deletion of chromosome 7q11.23. In one family, both the mother and daughter were deleted due to an apparently de novo deletion arising in the mother. Three patients were not deleted using the elastin cosmid; 2 of these patients have classic WS. Another non-deleted patient has the typical facial features and hypercalcemia but normal intelligence. These three patients will be important in delineating the critical region(s) responsible for the facial features, hypercalcemia, mental retardation and supravalvular aortic stenosis (SVAS). There was not an absolute correlation between deletions in elastin and SVAS, although these individuals may be at risk for other cardiovascular complications such as hypertention. Since the majority of WS patients are deleted for a portion of the elastin gene, most likely this marker will be an important diagnostic tool, although more patients will need to be studied. Those patients who are not deleted but clinically have WS will be missed using only this one marker. Expansion of the critical region to other loci and identification of additional markers will be essential for identifying all patients with WS.

  1. Mouse models for the Wolf-Hirschhorn deletion syndrome.

    PubMed

    Näf, D; Wilson, L A; Bergstrom, R A; Smith, R S; Goodwin, N C; Verkerk, A; van Ommen, G J; Ackerman, S L; Frankel, W N; Schimenti, J C

    2001-01-15

    Wolf-Hirschhorn syndrome (WHS) is a deletion syndrome caused by segmental haploidy of chromosome 4p16.3. Its hallmark features include a 'Greek warrior helmet' facial appearance, mental retardation, various midline defects and seizures. The WHS critical region (WHSCR) lies between the Huntington's disease gene, HD, and FGFR3. In mice, the homologs of these genes map to chromosome 5 in a region of conserved synteny with human 4p16.3. To derive mouse models of WHS and map genes responsible for subphenotypes of the syndrome, five mouse lines bearing radiation-induced deletions spanning the WHSCR syntenic region were generated and characterized. Similar to WHS patients, these animals were growth-retarded, were susceptible to seizures and showed midline (palate closure, tail kinks), craniofacial and ocular anomalies (colobomas, corneal opacities). Other phenotypes included cerebellar hypoplasia and a shortened cerebral cortex. Expression of WHS-like traits was variable and influenced by strain background and deletion size. These mice represent the first animal models for WHS. This collection of nested chromosomal deletions will be useful for mapping and identifying loci responsible for the various subphenotypes of WHS, and provides a paradigm for the dissection of other deletion syndromes using the mouse.

  2. [An updated review of 1p36 deletion (monosomy) syndrome].

    PubMed

    Bello, Sabina; Rodríguez-Moreno, Antonio

    The Monosomy 1p36 deletion syndrome is part of the group of diseases known as Rare Diseases. The objective of the present work is to review the characteristics of Monosomy 1p36 deletion syndrome. The monosomy 1p36 deletion syndrome phenotype includes: dysmorphic craniofacial features; large anterior fontanelle, unibrow, deep-set eyes, epicanthus, wide nasal root/bridge, mandible hypoplasia, abnormal location of the pinna, philtrum and pointed chin; neurological alterations: seizures and hydrocephalus (in some cases). Cerebral malformations: ventricular hypertrophy, increased subarachnoid space, morphological alterations of corpus callosum, cortical atrophy, delays in myelinisation, periventricular leukomalacia and periventricular heterotopia. These alterations produce intellectual disability and delays in motor growth, communication skills, language, social and adaptive behaviour. It is Hearing and vision impairments are also observed in subjects with this syndrome, as well as alterations of cardiac, endocrine and urinary systems and alterations at skin and skeletal level. Approximately 100 cases have been documented since 1981. This rare disease is the most common subtelomeric-micro-deletion syndrome. In situ hybridization with fluorescence (FISH) and array-comparative genomic hybridization (CGH-array) are at present the two best diagnostic techniques. There is currently no effective medical treatment for this disease. Copyright © 2016 Sociedad Chilena de Pediatría. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  3. Phenotypic variability in Angelman syndrome: comparison among different deletion classes and between deletion and UPD subjects.

    PubMed

    Varela, Monica Castro; Kok, Fernando; Otto, Paulo Alberto; Koiffmann, Celia Priszkulnik

    2004-12-01

    Angelman syndrome (AS) can result from either a 15q11-q13 deletion (del), paternal uniparental disomy (UPD), imprinting, or UBE3A mutations. Here, we describe the phenotypic and behavioral variability detected in 49 patients with different classes of deletions and nine patients with UPD. Diagnosis was made by methylation pattern analysis of exon 1 of the SNRPN-SNURF gene and by microsatellite profiling of loci within and outside the 15q11-q13 region. There were no major phenotypic differences between the two main classes (BP1-BP3; BP2-BP3) of AS deletion patients, except for the absence of vocalization, more prevalent in patients with BP1-BP3 deletions, and for the age of sitting without support, which was lower in patients with BP2-BP3 deletions. Our data suggest that gene deletions (NIPA1, NIPA2, CYF1P1, GCP5) mapped to the region between breakpoints BP1 and BP2 may be involved in the severity of speech impairment, since all BP1-BP3 deletion patients showed complete absence of vocalization, while 38.1% of the BP2-BP3 deletion patients were able to pronounce syllabic sounds, with doubtful meaning. Compared to UPD patients, deletion patients presented a higher incidence of swallowing disorders (73.9% del x 22.2% UPD) and hypotonia (73.3% del x 28.57% UPD). In addition, children with UPD showed better physical growth, fewer or no seizures, a lower incidence of microcephaly, less ataxia and higher cognitive skills. As a consequence of their milder or less typical phenotype, AS may remain undiagnosed, leading to an overall underdiagnosis of the disease.

  4. Co-occurrence of 22q11 deletion syndrome and HDR syndrome.

    PubMed

    Fukai, Ryoko; Ochi, Nobuhiko; Murakami, Akira; Nakashima, Mitsuko; Tsurusaki, Yoshinori; Saitsu, Hirotomo; Matsumoto, Naomichi; Miyake, Noriko

    2013-10-01

    22q11 deletion syndrome is one of the most common chromosomal deletion syndromes and is usually caused by a 1.5-3.0 Mb deletion at chromosome 22q11.2. It is characterized by hypocalcemia resulting from hypoplasia of the parathyroid glands, hypoplasia of the thymus, and defects of the cardiac outflow tract. We encountered a Japanese boy presenting with an unusually severe phenotype of 22q11 deletion syndrome, including progressive renal failure and severe intellectual disabilities. Diagnostic testing using fluorescent in situ hybridization revealed deletion of the 22q11 region, but this did not explain the additional complications. Copy number analysis was therefore performed using whole genome single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) assay, which identified an additional de novo deletion at 10p14. This region is the locus for hypoparathyroidism, deafness, and renal dysplasia (HDR) syndrome caused by haploinsufficiency of GATA3. Together, these two syndromes sufficiently explain the patient's phenotype. This is the first known case report of the co-occurrence of 22q11 deletion syndrome and HDR syndrome. As the two syndromes overlap clinically, this study indicates the importance of carrying out careful clinical and genetic assessment of patients with atypical clinical phenotypes or unique complications. Unbiased genetic analysis using whole genome copy number SNP arrays is especially useful for detecting such rare double mutations. Copyright © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  5. Genetics Home Reference: 22q11.2 deletion syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    ... Weissman A, Gerdes M, Pinto-Martin J, Zackai EH, McDonald-McGinn DM, Emanuel BS. Autism spectrum disorders ... PubMed Central McDonald-McGinn DM, Emanuel BS, Zackai EH. 22q11.2 Deletion Syndrome. 1999 Sep 23 [updated ...

  6. Xp22. 3 deletions in isolated familial Kallmann's syndrome

    SciTech Connect

    Hardelin, J.P.; Levilliers, J.; Legouis, R.; Petit, C. ); Young, J.; Pholsena, M.; Schaison, G. ); Kirk, J.; Bouloux, P. )

    1993-04-01

    Several familial cases of Kallmann's syndrome (KS) have been reported, among which the X-chromosome-linked mode of inheritance is the most frequent. The gene responsible for the X-linked KS has been localized to the terminal part of the X-chromosome short arm (Xp22.3 region), immediately proximal to the steroid sulfatase gene responsible for X-linked ichthyosis. Large deletions of this region have been previously shown in patients affected with both X-linked ichthyosis and KS. The authors report here the search for Xp22.3 deletions in 20 unrelated males affected with isolated X-linked KS. Only 2 deletions were found using Southern blot analysis, indicating that large deletions are uncommon in patients affected with KS alone. Both deletions were shown to include the entire KAL gene responsible for X-linked KS. The patients carrying these deletions exhibit additional clinical anomalies, which are discussed: unilateral renal aplasia, unilateral absence of vas deferens, mirror movements, and sensory neural hearing loss. 47 refs., 2 figs., 1 tab.

  7. Chromosome 22q11.2 deletion syndrome (DiGeorge syndrome/velocardiofacial syndrome).

    PubMed

    McDonald-McGinn, Donna M; Sullivan, Kathleen E

    2011-01-01

    Chromosome 22q11.2 deletion syndrome is a common syndrome also known as DiGeorge syndrome and velocardiofacial syndrome. It occurs in approximately 1:4000 births, and the incidence is increasing due to affected parents bearing their own affected children. The manifestations of this syndrome cross all medical specialties, and care of the children and adults can be complex. Many patients have a mild to moderate immune deficiency, and the majority of patients have a cardiac anomaly. Additional features include renal anomalies, eye anomalies, hypoparathyroidism, skeletal defects, and developmental delay. Each child's needs must be tailored to his or her specific medical problems, and as the child transitions to adulthood, additional issues will arise. A holistic approach, addressing medical and behavioral needs, can be very helpful.

  8. Molecular refinement of the 1p36 deletion syndrome reveals size diversity and a preponderance of maternally derived deletions.

    PubMed

    Wu, Y Q; Heilstedt, H A; Bedell, J A; May, K M; Starkey, D E; McPherson, J D; Shapira, S K; Shaffer, L G

    1999-02-01

    The deletion of chromosome 1p36 is a newly recognized, relatively common contiguous gene deletion syndrome with a variable phenotype. The clinical features have recently been delineated and molecular analysis indicates that the prevalence of certain phenotypic features appears to correlate with deletion size. Phenotype/genotype comparisons have allowed the assignment of certain clinical features to specific deletion intervals, significantly narrowing the regions within which to search for candidate genes. We have extensively characterized the deletion regions in 30 cases using microsatellite markers and fluorescence in situ hybridization analyses. The map order of 28 microsatellite markers spanning the deletion region was obtained by a combination of genotypic analysis and physical mapping. The deletion region was divided into six intervals and breakpoints were found to cluster in mainly two regions. Molecular analysis of the deletions showed that two patients had complex re-arrangements; these cases shared their distal and proximal breakpoints in the two common breakpoint regions. Of the de novo deletions ( n = 28) in whichparental samples were available and the analysis was informative ( n = 27), there were significantly morematernally derived deletions ( n = 21) than paternally derived deletions ( n = 6) (chi1(2) = 8.35, P < 0.0001). Phenotype/genotype correlations and refinements of critical regions in our naturally occurring deletion panel have delineated specific areas in which to focus the search for the causative genes for the features of this syndrome.

  9. [Turner syndrome and monosomy 1p36 deletion syndrome misdiagnosed as thyropenia: report of one case].

    PubMed

    Meng, Xubiao; Li, Zhiming; Liu, Tingting; Wen, Zhiming

    2013-12-01

    A 21-year-old woman with a short stature presented with primary amenorrhoea and a 45X karyotype, and comparative genomic hybridization revealed 1p36 deletion and abnormal genes in multiple chromosomes to support the diagnosis of Turner syndrome and monosomy 1p36 deletion syndrome. The main clinical features of this condition include microsomia, poor sexual development, menoschesis, gigantorectum, absence of internal genitalia, sometimes with thyropenia and low intelligence. This disease can be easily diagnosed for its heterogeneous clinical manifestations.

  10. Camptodactyly and the 22q11.2 deletion syndrome.

    PubMed

    Couser, Natario L; Pande, Chetna K; Walsh, Jonathan M; Tepperberg, James; Aylsworth, Arthur S

    2017-02-01

    We describe a 5-day-old male with minor facial anomalies, a congenital laryngeal web, severe laryngomalacia, and prominent fixed flexion of the proximal interphalangeal joints of digits 2 through 5 bilaterally. A whole genome SNP microarray analysis identified a 2.55 Mb interstitial deletion of 22q11.21, typical of that seen in the DiGeorge and Velocardiofacial syndromes. A review of the literature identifies 10 other cases with camptodactyly. Camptodactyly appears to be an associated but rarely reported anomaly in patients with the 22q11.2 microdeletion syndrome. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  11. Chromosome 22q11.2 deletion syndrome: DiGeorge syndrome/velocardiofacial Syndrome.

    PubMed

    Sullivan, Kathleen E

    2008-05-01

    DiGeorge syndrome, or chromosome 22q11.2 deletion syndrome, is a disorder affecting multiple organ systems. The immunologist may be called on to coordinate complex medical care tailored to the specific needs and unique clinical features of each patient. This article focuses on the immune system, but patients require a holistic approach. Attention to cardiac, nutritional, and developmental needs in early infancy is important, and it is critical to identify the rare infants who require either a lymphocyte or thymus transplant. Later, speech and school issues dominate the picture. Allergies and autoimmune disorders also may be troubling for some school-age children.

  12. Deletion involving D15S113 in a mother and son without Angelman syndrome: Refinement of the Angelman syndrome critical deletion region

    SciTech Connect

    Michaelis, R.C.; Skinner, S.A.; Lethco, B.A.

    1995-01-02

    Deletions of 15q11-q13 typically result in Angelman syndrome when inherited from the mother and Prader-Willi syndrome when inherited from the father. The critical deletion region for Angelman syndrome has recently been restricted by a report of an Angelman syndrome patient with a deletion spanning less than 200 kb around the D15S113 locus. We report here on a mother and son with a deletion of chromosome 15 that includes the D15S113 locus. The son has mild to moderate mental retardation and minor anomalies, while the mother has a borderline intellectual deficit and slightly downslanting palpebral fissures. Neither patient has the seizures, excessive laughter and hand clapping, ataxia or the facial anomalies which are characteristic of Angelman syndrome. The proximal boundary of the deletion in our patients lies between the D15S10 and The D15S113 loci. Our patients do not have Angelman syndrome, despite the deletion of the D15S113 marker. This suggests that the Angelman syndrome critical deletion region is now defined as the overlap between the deletion found in the previously reported Angelman syndrome patient and the region that is intact in our patients. 28 refs., 6 figs.

  13. Supporting Children with Genetic Syndromes in the Classroom: The Example of 22q Deletion Syndrome

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Reilly, Colin; Stedman, Lindsey

    2013-01-01

    An increasing number of children are likely to have a known genetic cause for their special educational needs. One such genetic condition is 22q11.2 deletion syndrome (22qDS), a genetic syndrome associated with early speech and language difficulties, global and specific cognitive impairments, difficulties with attention and difficulties with…

  14. Supporting Children with Genetic Syndromes in the Classroom: The Example of 22q Deletion Syndrome

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Reilly, Colin; Stedman, Lindsey

    2013-01-01

    An increasing number of children are likely to have a known genetic cause for their special educational needs. One such genetic condition is 22q11.2 deletion syndrome (22qDS), a genetic syndrome associated with early speech and language difficulties, global and specific cognitive impairments, difficulties with attention and difficulties with…

  15. Bridging the Gene-Behavior Divide through Neuroimaging Deletion Syndromes: Velocardiofacial (22q11.2 Deletion) and Williams (7q11.23 Deletion) Syndromes

    PubMed Central

    Eisenberg, Daniel Paul; Jabbi, Mbemba; Berman, Karen Faith

    2010-01-01

    Investigating the relationship between genes and the neural substrates of complex human behavior promises to provide essential insight into the pathophysiology of mental disorders. One approach to this inquiry is through neuroimaging of individuals with microdeletion syndromes that manifest in specific neuropsychiatric phenotypes. Both Velocardiofacial Syndrome (VCFS) and Williams Syndrome (WS) involve haploinsufficiency of a relatively small set of identified genes on the one hand and association with distinct, clinically-relevant behavioral and cognitive profiles on the other hand. In VCFS, there is a deletion in chromosomal region 22q11.2 and a resultant predilection toward psychosis, poor arithmetic proficiency, and low performance intelligence quotients. In WS, there is a deletion in chromosomal region 7q11.23 and a resultant predilection toward hypersociability, non-social anxiety, impaired visuospatial construction, and often intellectual impairment. Structural and functional neuroimaging studies have begun not only to map these well-defined genetic alterations to systems-level brain abnormalities, but also to identify relationships between neural phenotypes and particular genes within the critical deletion regions. Though neuroimaging of both VCFS and WS presents specific, formidable methodological challenges, including comparison subject selection and accounting for neuroanatomical and vascular anomalies in patients, and many questions remain, the literature to date on these syndromes, reviewed herein, constitutes a fruitful “bottom-up” approach to defining gene-brain relationships. PMID:20206275

  16. 22q11 Deletion Syndrome: A Genetic Subtype of Schizophrenia

    PubMed Central

    Bassett, Anne S.; Chow, Eva W.C.

    2012-01-01

    Schizophrenia is likely to be caused by several susceptibility genes and may have environmental factors that interact with susceptibility genes and/or nongenetic causes. Recent evidence supports the likelihood that 22q11 Deletion Syndrome (22qDS) represents an identifiable genetic subtype of schizophrenia. 22qDS is an under-recognized genetic syndrome associated with microdeletions on chromosome 22 and a variable expression that often includes mild congenital dysmorphic features, hypernasal speech, and learning difficulties. Initial evidence indicates that a minority of patients with schizophrenia (~2%) may have 22qDS and that prevalence may be somewhat higher in subpopulations with developmental delay. This paper proposes clinical criteria (including facial features, learning disabilities, hypernasal speech, congenital heart defects and other congenital anomalies) to aid in identifying patients with schizophrenia who may have this subtype and outlines features that may increase the index of suspicion for this syndrome. Although no specific causal gene or genes have yet been identified in the deletion region, 22qDS may represent a more homogeneous subtype of schizophrenia. This subtype may serve as a model for neurodevelopmental origins of schizophrenia that could aid in delineating etiologic and pathogenetic mechanisms. PMID:10509171

  17. Cardiac Defects and Results of Cardiac Surgery in 22q11.2 Deletion Syndrome

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carotti, Adriano; Digilio, Maria Cristina; Piacentini, Gerardo; Saffirio, Claudia; Di Donato, Roberto M.; Marino, Bruno

    2008-01-01

    Specific types and subtypes of cardiac defects have been described in children with 22q11.2 deletion syndrome as well as in other genetic syndromes. The conotruncal heart defects occurring in patients with 22q11.2 deletion syndrome include tetralogy of Fallot, pulmonary atresia with ventricular septal defect, truncus arteriosus, interrupted aortic…

  18. Cardiac Defects and Results of Cardiac Surgery in 22q11.2 Deletion Syndrome

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carotti, Adriano; Digilio, Maria Cristina; Piacentini, Gerardo; Saffirio, Claudia; Di Donato, Roberto M.; Marino, Bruno

    2008-01-01

    Specific types and subtypes of cardiac defects have been described in children with 22q11.2 deletion syndrome as well as in other genetic syndromes. The conotruncal heart defects occurring in patients with 22q11.2 deletion syndrome include tetralogy of Fallot, pulmonary atresia with ventricular septal defect, truncus arteriosus, interrupted aortic…

  19. [Deletion on the short arm of chromosome 18 syndrome diagnosed by array comparative genomic hybridization. Presentation of one case with a mild phenotype].

    PubMed

    Pachajoa, Harry

    2016-12-01

    Deletion on the short arm of chromosome 18 is an infrequent syndrome and it is characterized by the following features: mental retardation, growth retardation, craniofacial malformations such as large ears, microcephaly, and short neck. The phenotypical spectrum is a wide range of abnormalities including minor congenital abnormalities to holoprosencephaly. We present a case of a 10 year old girl who is found to have a deletion on the short arm of chromosome 18 (18p11.32-p11.21), by conventional cytogenetic analysis and comparative genomic hybridization. Sociedad Argentina de Pediatría.

  20. Atypical 18p- syndrome associated with partial trisomy 16p in a chromosomally unbalanced child of consanguineous parents with an identical balanced translocation.

    PubMed

    Kupchik, Gabriel S; Barrett, Shannon K; Babu, Arvind; Charria-Ortiz, Gustavo; Velinov, Milen; Macera, Michael J

    2005-01-01

    A 2 month old male infant was found to have mild growth retardation, prominent forehead, low set ears, low nasal bridge, rounded facies, cleft palate, webbed neck, shawl scrotum, and absent right kidney. The propositus, a product of a consanguineous marriage, had extremely rare abnormal cytogenetic findings. His karyotype contained three derivative chromosomes that originated from a familial translocation, t(16;18)(p13.3;p11.2) carried by both parents. Based on parental studies, the infant's unbalanced karyotype was defined as: [46,XY,t(16;18)(p13.3;p11.2), der(18)t(16;18).ish t(16;18)(16ptel-,16qtel+,18ptel+,wcp16+,wcp18+;16ptel+,18ptel-,wcp16+,wcp18+), der(18)t(16;18)(16ptel+,18ptel-,wcp16+,wcp18+)]. We describe this child at 2 months of age with a follow up at 4 1/2 years, exhibiting a mixed clinical picture with features of both 18p- and partial trisomy 16p13.3.

  1. Mathematical Learning Disabilities in Children with 22q11.2 Deletion Syndrome: A Review

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    De Smedt, Bert; Swillen, Ann; Verschaffel, Lieven; Ghesquiere, Pol

    2009-01-01

    Mathematical learning disabilities (MLD) occur frequently in children with specific genetic disorders, like Turner syndrome, fragile X syndrome and neurofibromatosis. This review focuses on MLD in children with chromosome 22q11.2 deletion syndrome (22q11DS). This syndrome is the most common known microdeletion syndrome with a prevalence of at…

  2. Mathematical Learning Disabilities in Children with 22q11.2 Deletion Syndrome: A Review

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    De Smedt, Bert; Swillen, Ann; Verschaffel, Lieven; Ghesquiere, Pol

    2009-01-01

    Mathematical learning disabilities (MLD) occur frequently in children with specific genetic disorders, like Turner syndrome, fragile X syndrome and neurofibromatosis. This review focuses on MLD in children with chromosome 22q11.2 deletion syndrome (22q11DS). This syndrome is the most common known microdeletion syndrome with a prevalence of at…

  3. 'Deletion rescue' by mitotic 11q uniparental disomy in a family with recurrence of 11q deletion Jacobsen syndrome.

    PubMed

    Johnson, J P; Haag, M; Beischel, L; McCann, C; Phillips, S; Tunby, M; Hansen, J; Schwanke, C; Reynolds, J F

    2014-04-01

    We describe a family with recurrent 11q23-qter deletion Jacobsen syndrome in two affected brothers, with unique mosaic deletion 'rescue' through development of uniparental disomy (UPD) in the mother and one of the brothers. Inheritance studies show that the deleted chromosome is of maternal origin in both boys, and microarray shows a break near the ASAM gene. Parental lymphocyte chromosomes were normal. However, the mother is homozygous in lymphocytes for all loci within the deleted region in her sons, and presumably has UPD for this region. In addition, she is mosaic for the 11q deletion seen in her sons at a level of 20-30% in skin fibroblasts. We hypothesize that one of her #11 chromosomes shows fragility, that breakage at 11q23 occurred with telomeric loss in some cells, but 'rescue' from the deletion occurred in most cells by the development of mitotic UPD. She apparently carries the 11q deletion in her germ line resulting in recurrence of the syndrome. The older son is mosaic for the 11q cell line (70-88%, remainder 46,XY), and segmental UPD11 'rescue' apparently also occurred in his cytogenetically normal cells. This is a novel phenomenon restoring disomy to an individual with a chromosomal deletion.

  4. Spectrum of epilepsy in terminal 1p36 deletion syndrome.

    PubMed

    Bahi-Buisson, Nadia; Guttierrez-Delicado, Eva; Soufflet, Christine; Rio, Marlène; Daire, Valérie Cormier; Lacombe, Didier; Héron, Delphine; Verloes, Alain; Zuberi, Sameer; Burglen, Lydie; Afenjar, Alexandra; Moutard, Marie Laure; Edery, Patrick; Novelli, Antonio; Bernardini, Laura; Dulac, Olivier; Nabbout, Rima; Plouin, Perrine; Battaglia, Agatino

    2008-03-01

    Previous reports have summarized the seizures types occurring in 1p36 deletion syndrome. To better define the spectrum of epilepsy, we studied 91 patients (median age 7.8 years) with confirmed 1p36 deletion. Based on clinical charts, we retrospectively analyzed the evolution of both the EEG findings and seizures. Epilepsy occurred in 53 patients (58.2%), with onset at a median 2.75 months. First seizures were generalized tonic (8 cases), tonic and clonic (6) or myoclonic (12), simple partial (6), or complex partial (14). Thereafter, 20 patients (21.9%) developed infantile spasms with hypsarrhythmia, at a median age of 5 months. High doses of oral steroids were tried in nine cases, with a prompt remission of seizures in six. Among them, five were seizure-free at the time of evaluation. Conversely, two of three nonresponders to steroids developed severe and refractory epilepsy. At the time of evaluation, 32 patients were seizure-free, from a median age of 1.8 years. Nineteen patients (20.9%) had developed refractory epilepsy with polymorphic seizures, including generalized tonic and tonic-clonic seizures (13) combined with myoclonic seizures (11) and atypical absences (3), atonic seizures (2), or complex partial seizures (3). The EEG showed focal, multifocal or generalized spikes, polyspike, and waves, with poverty of the usual background rhythmic activities. Early epilepsy is a frequent finding in 1p36 deletion syndrome with infantile spasms as of the most common features that can contribute to a poor clinical outcome. Early diagnosis and management of infantile spasm in this condition is mandatory.

  5. Impact of 22q deletion syndrome on speech outcomes following primary surgery for submucous cleft palate.

    PubMed

    Bezuhly, Michael; Fischbach, Simone; Klaiman, Paula; Fisher, David M

    2012-03-01

    Patients with 22q deletion syndrome are at increased risk of submucous cleft palate and velopharyngeal insufficiency. The authors' aim is to evaluate speech outcomes following primary Furlow palatoplasty or pharyngeal flap for correction of velopharyngeal insufficiency in submucous cleft palate patients with and without 22q deletion syndrome. Records of submucous cleft palate patients who underwent primary surgery between 2001 and 2010 were reviewed. Data included 22q deletion syndrome diagnosis, age at surgery, procedure, preoperative nasopharyngoscopy and nasometry, speech outcomes, complications, and secondary surgery rates. Seventy-eight submucous cleft palate patients were identified. Twenty-three patients had 22q deletion syndrome. Fewer 22q deletion syndrome patients obtained normal resonance on perceptual assessment compared with nonsyndromic patients (74 percent versus 88 percent). A similar difference existed based on postoperative nasometric scores. Among 22q deletion syndrome patients, similar success rates were achieved with Furlow palatoplasty and pharyngeal flap. No difference in the proportion improved postoperatively was noted between 22q deletion syndrome and nonsyndromic groups. One complication was experienced per group. More revision operations were indicated in the 22q deletion syndrome group (17 percent) compared with the nonsyndromic group (4 percent). Median times to normal resonance for 22q deletion syndrome and nonsyndromic patients were 150 weeks and 34 weeks, respectively. Adjusting for multiple variables, 22q deletion syndrome patients were 3.6 times less likely to develop normal resonance. Careful selection of Furlow palatoplasty or pharyngeal flap for primary repair of submucous cleft palate is highly effective in 22q deletion syndrome patients and yields results approaching those of nonsyndromic patients. Therapeutic, III.

  6. Classical Noonan syndrome is not associated with deletions of 22q11

    SciTech Connect

    Robin, N.H.; Sellinger, B.; McDonald-McGinn, D.

    1995-03-13

    Deletions of 22q11 cause DiGeorge sequence (DGS), velo-cardio-facial syndrome (VCFS), conotruncal anomaly face syndrome, and some isolated conotruncal heart anomalies. Demonstration of a 22q11 deletion in a patient with manifestations of DGS and Noonan syndrome (NS) has raised the question of whether NS is another of the chromosome 22 microdeletion syndromes. This prompted us to evaluate a cohort of patients with NS for evidence of 22q11 deletions. Five of 6 NS propositi studied in our laboratory with marker N25 (D22S75) did not have a 22q11 deletion. A 2-month-old infant with several findings suggestive of NS did have a 22q11 deletion, suggesting that a small number of 22q11 deletion propositi may present with a NS-like picture. However, most cases of NS must have another cause. 10 refs., 1 fig.

  7. Autism, ADHD, Mental Retardation and Behavior Problems in 100 Individuals with 22q11 Deletion Syndrome

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Niklasson, Lena; Rasmussen, Peder; Oskarsdottir, Solveig; Gillberg, Christopher

    2009-01-01

    This study assessed the prevalence and type of associated neuropsychiatric problems in children and adults with 22q11 deletion syndrome. One-hundred consecutively referred individuals with 22q11 deletion syndrome were given in-depth neuropsychiatric assessments and questionnaires screens. Autism spectrum disorders (ASDs) and/or attention…

  8. Immunologic reconstitution in 22q deletion (DiGeorge) syndrome.

    PubMed

    McGhee, Sean A; Lloret, Maria Garcia; Stiehm, E Richard

    2009-01-01

    Adoptive transfer of mature T cells (ATMTC) through bone marrow (BM) transplantation, first attempted over 20 years ago, has recently emerged as a successful therapy for complete 22q deletion syndrome (22qDS). This provides a potential option to thymic transplantation (TT) for immune reconstitution in 22qDS. Compared to thymic transplant, ATMTC is an easier procedure to accomplish and is available at more centers. However, there are differences in the nature of the T-cell reconstitution that results. Predictably, more naïve T cells and recent thymic emigrants are present in patients treated with thymus transplant. There are no significant differences in mortality between the two procedures, but the number of patients is too limited to conclude that the procedures are equally effective. Adoptive transfer should be pursued as a reasonable treatment for 22qDS patients requiring immune reconstitution when thymus transplant is not available.

  9. Syndrome of proximal interstitial deletion 4p15

    SciTech Connect

    Fryns, J.P.

    1995-09-11

    In this journal, Chitayat et al. reported on 2 boys and a girl with interstitial deletion in the short arm of chromosome 4, including p15.2p15.33. All 3 patients had a characteristic face distinct from that of Wolf-Hirschhorn syndrome and multiple minor congenital anomalies. One patient had a congenitally enlarged penis. The authors noted that all had normal growth, and all had moderate psychomotor retardation (patient 1, developmental age of 4-6 years at age 9 years; patient 2, mental age 6 years at age 25 years; and patient 3, global delay with hypotonia, difficulties in both gross and fine motor development, and persistent delay in language skills). 5 refs., 1 fig.

  10. A girl with 1p36 deletion syndrome and congenital fiber type disproportion myopathy.

    PubMed

    Okamoto, Nobuhiko; Toribe, Yasuhisa; Nakajima, Tohru; Okinaga, Takeshi; Kurosawa, Kenji; Nonaka, Ikuya; Shimokawa, Osamu; Matsumoto, Noamichi

    2002-01-01

    Chromosome 1p36 deletion syndrome is characterized by hypotonia, moderate to severe developmental and growth retardation, and characteristic craniofacial dysmorphism. Muscle hypotonia and delayed motor development are almost constant features of the syndrome. We report a 4-year-old Japanese girl with 1p36 deletion syndrome whose muscle pathology showed congenital fiber type disproportion (CFTD) myopathy. This is the first case report of 1p36 deletion associated with CFTD. This association may indicate that one of the CFTD loci is located at 1p36. Ski proto-oncogene -/- mice have phenotypes that resemble some of the features observed in patients with 1p36 deletion syndrome. Because fluorescent in situ hybridization analysis revealed that the human SKI gene is deleted in our patient, some genes in 1p36, including SKI proto-oncogene, may be involved in muscle hypotonia and delayed motor development in this syndrome.

  11. Keratoconus in an adult with 22q11.2 deletion syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Saffra, Norman; Reinherz, Benjamin

    2015-01-01

    22q11.2 Deletion syndrome is one of the most common microdeletional syndromes, with an incidence of 1:4000 live-births, and potentially affects every organ in the body. More than 180 associated clinical features have been reported and not one phenotypic feature is present in 100% of cases. Ocular manifestations reported based on early childhood examinations include eyelid hooding, strabismus, posterior embryotoxon, retinal vessel tortuosity and refractive errors. Keratoconus has been reported once before in association with 22q11.2 deletion syndrome in a young adult. We report the second case of keratoconus in association with 22q11.2 deletion syndrome. PMID:25596286

  12. Thrombocytopenia and Postpartum Hemorrhage in a Woman with Chromosome 22q11.2 Deletion Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Deng, Kathy; Nanda, Deepak

    2016-01-01

    Chromosome 22q11.2 deletion syndrome, also known as DiGeorge or velocardiofacial syndrome, is associated with a wide spectrum of phenotypic features. It is known to be associated with severe macrothrombocytopenia. Postpartum hemorrhage is a leading cause of maternal morbidity and mortality globally. Chromosome 22q11.2 deletion syndrome is rare cause of thrombocytopenia that can be a significant risk factor for life-threatening postpartum hemorrhage. We report a case of postpartum hemorrhage in a woman with 22q11.2 deletion syndrome causing severe macrothrombocytopenia. PMID:27366335

  13. Novel airway findings in a patient with 1p36 deletion syndrome.

    PubMed

    Ferril, Geoffrey R; Barham, Henry P; Prager, Jeremy D

    2014-01-01

    1p36 deletion syndrome comprises a phenotypic presentation that includes central nervous system, cardiac, and craniofacial anomalies. There has been no report of associated airway anomalies with this syndrome. We present here a case report and literature review. Prenatally, amniocentesis for chromosomal analysis was performed on our patient, with results consistent with 1p36 deletion syndrome. Respiratory distress and unsuccessful attempts at intubation prompted transfer to Children's Hospital of Colorado. Microlaryngoscopy was subsequently performed, revealing a persistent buccopharyngeal membrane and unidentifiable larynx. Emergent tracheostomy was then performed to secure the airway. Airway anomalies may be associated with 1p36 deletion syndrome.

  14. Abdominal paraganglioma in a young woman with 1p36 deletion syndrome.

    PubMed

    Murakoshi, Miki; Takasawa, Kei; Nishioka, Masato; Asakawa, Masahiro; Kashimada, Kenichi; Yoshimoto, Takanobu; Yamamoto, Toshiyuki; Takekoshi, Kazuhiro; Ogawa, Yoshihiro; Shimohira, Masayuki

    2017-02-01

    1p36 deletion syndrome is the most common terminal deletion syndrome, and the genomic regions that contribute to specific 1p36 deletion syndrome-related phenotypes were recently identified. Deletions in the 1p36 region have been documented in various tumor tissues, which indicates correlation between loss of heterozygosity of 1p36 and tumor development, and the existence of tumor suppressors in this region. Therefore, it was suspected that patients with 1p36 deletion syndrome have a higher risk of tumor development; however, only a few child cases of neuroblastoma with 1p36 deletion syndrome have been reported. We report the first case of 1p36 deletion syndrome with paraganglioma (PGL) and include genetic investigation. The 24-year-old woman with 1p36 deletion syndrome had severe intellectual disability, dilated cardiomyopathy, and distinct dysmorphic features, and presented with persistent vomiting accompanied by hypertension (178/115 mmHg). Abdominal CT revealed a 40 × 50 mm retroperitoneal mass and substantial elevations of plasma and urine norepinephrine (15.4 nmol/L and 1022 µmol/mol creatinine, respectively); abnormal uptake of (123) I-MIBG in the tumor led to PGL diagnosis. The patient was not able to have surgery because of substantial surgical risks; however, a combination of α- and β-blockade was effective for blood pressure control. Array CGH revealed a deletion over 4.5 Mb, from the 1p telomere but excluding the SDHB region. Comprehensive mutational analysis of PGL-associated genes (RET, VHL, TMEM127, MAX, and SDHA/B/C/D) was negative. These results indicate that the germline 1p36 deletion might be "1st hit" of tumor development, and PGL might be a novel complication of 1p36 deletion syndrome. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  15. Sequence Homology at the Breakpoint and Clinical Phenotype of Mitochondrial DNA Deletion Syndromes

    PubMed Central

    Sadikovic, Bekim; Wang, Jing; El-Hattab, Ayman; Landsverk, Megan; Douglas, Ganka; Brundage, Ellen K.; Craigen, William J.; Schmitt, Eric S.; Wong, Lee-Jun C.

    2010-01-01

    Mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) deletions are a common cause of mitochondrial disorders. Large mtDNA deletions can lead to a broad spectrum of clinical features with different age of onset, ranging from mild mitochondrial myopathies (MM), progressive external ophthalmoplegia (PEO), and Kearns-Sayre syndrome (KSS), to severe Pearson syndrome. The aim of this study is to investigate the molecular signatures surrounding the deletion breakpoints and their association with the clinical phenotype and age at onset. MtDNA deletions in 67 patients were characterized using array comparative genomic hybridization (aCGH) followed by PCR-sequencing of the deletion junctions. Sequence homology including both perfect and imperfect short repeats flanking the deletion regions were analyzed and correlated with clinical features and patients' age group. In all age groups, there was a significant increase in sequence homology flanking the deletion compared to mtDNA background. The youngest patient group (<6 years old) showed a diffused pattern of deletion distribution in size and locations, with a significantly lower sequence homology flanking the deletion, and the highest percentage of deletion mutant heteroplasmy. The older age groups showed rather discrete pattern of deletions with 44% of all patients over 6 years old carrying the most common 5 kb mtDNA deletion, which was found mostly in muscle specimens (22/41). Only 15% (3/20) of the young patients (<6 years old) carry the 5 kb common deletion, which is usually present in blood rather than muscle. This group of patients predominantly (16 out of 17) exhibit multisystem disorder and/or Pearson syndrome, while older patients had predominantly neuromuscular manifestations including KSS, PEO, and MM. In conclusion, sequence homology at the deletion flanking regions is a consistent feature of mtDNA deletions. Decreased levels of sequence homology and increased levels of deletion mutant heteroplasmy appear to correlate with earlier onset and

  16. Association between deletion size and important phenotypes expands the genomic region of interest in Phelan-McDermid syndrome (22q13 deletion syndrome).

    PubMed

    Sarasua, Sara M; Dwivedi, Alka; Boccuto, Luigi; Rollins, Jonathan D; Chen, Chin-Fu; Rogers, R Curtis; Phelan, Katy; DuPont, Barbara R; Collins, Julianne S

    2011-11-01

    The clinical features of Phelan-McDermid syndrome (also known as 22q13 deletion syndrome) are highly variable and include hypotonia, speech and other developmental delays, autistic traits and mildly dysmorphic features. Patient deletion sizes are also highly variable, prompting this genotype-phenotype association study. Terminal deletion breakpoints were identified for 71 individuals in a patient cohort using a custom-designed high-resolution oligonucleotide array comparative genomic hybridisation platform with a resolution of 100 bp. Patient deletion sizes were highly variable, ranging from 0.22 to 9.22 Mb, and no common breakpoint was observed. SHANK3, the major candidate gene for the neurologic features of the syndrome, was deleted in all cases. Sixteen features (neonatal hypotonia, neonatal hyporeflexia, neonatal feeding problems, speech/language delay, delayed age at crawling, delayed age at walking, severity of developmental delay, male genital anomalies, dysplastic toenails, large or fleshy hands, macrocephaly, tall stature, facial asymmetry, full brow, atypical reflexes and dolichocephaly) were found to be significantly associated with larger deletion sizes, suggesting the role of additional genes or regulatory regions proximal to SHANK3. Individuals with autism spectrum disorders (ASDs) were found to have smaller deletion sizes (median deletion size of 3.39 Mb) than those without ASDs (median deletion size 6.03 Mb, p=0.0144). This may reflect the difficulty in diagnosing ASDs in individuals with severe developmental delay. This genotype-phenotype analysis explains some of the phenotypic variability in the syndrome and identifies new genomic regions with a high likelihood for causing important developmental phenotypes such as speech delay.

  17. Early onset intellectual disability in chromosome 22q11.2 deletion syndrome.

    PubMed

    Cascella, Marco; Muzio, Maria Rosaria

    2015-01-01

    Chromosome 22q11.2 deletion syndrome, or DiGeorge syndrome, or velocardiofacial syndrome, is one of the most common multiple anomaly syndromes in humans. This syndrome is commonly caused by a microdelection from chromosome 22 at band q11.2. Although this genetic disorder may reflect several clinical abnormalities and different degrees of organ commitment, the clinical features that have driven the greatest amount of attention are behavioral and developmental features, because individuals with 22q11.2 deletion syndrome have a 30-fold risk of developing schizophrenia. There are differing opinions about the cognitive development, and commonly a cognitive decline rather than an early onset intellectual disability has been observed. We report a case of 22q11.2 deletion syndrome with both early assessment of mild intellectual disabilities and tetralogy of Fallot as the only physic manifestation.

  18. A non-syndromic intellectual disability associated with a de novo microdeletion at 7q and 18p, microduplication at Xp, and 18q partial trisomy detected using chromosomal microarray analysis approach

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Chromosome abnormalities that segregate with a disease phenotype can facilitate the identification of disease loci and genes. The relationship between chromosome 18 anomalies with severe intellectual disability has attracted the attention of cytogeneticists worldwide. Duplications of the X chromosome can cause intellectual disability in females with variable phenotypic effects, due in part to variations in X-inactivation patterns. Additionally, deletions of the 7qter region are associated with a range of phenotypes. Results We report the first case of de novo microdeletion at 7q and 18p, 18q partial trisomy, microduplication at Xp associated to intellectual disability in a Brazilian child, presenting a normal karyotype. Karyotyping showed any chromosome alteration. Chromosomal microarray analysis detected a de novo microdeletion at 18p11.32 and 18q partial trisomy, an inherited microdeletion at 7q31.1 and a de novo microduplication at Xp22.33p21.3. Conclusions Our report illustrates a case that presents complex genomic imbalances which may contribute to a severe clinical phenotypes. The rare and complex phenotypes have to be investigated to define the subsets and allow the phenotypes classification. PMID:25028595

  19. A non-syndromic intellectual disability associated with a de novo microdeletion at 7q and 18p, microduplication at Xp, and 18q partial trisomy detected using chromosomal microarray analysis approach.

    PubMed

    Pinto, Irene Plaza; Minasi, Lysa Bernardes; da Cruz, Alex Silva; de Melo, Aldaires Vieira; da Cruz E Cunha, Damiana Míriam; Pereira, Rodrigo Roncato; Ribeiro, Cristiano Luiz; da Silva, Claudio Carlos; de Melo E Silva, Daniela; da Cruz, Aparecido Divino

    2014-01-01

    Chromosome abnormalities that segregate with a disease phenotype can facilitate the identification of disease loci and genes. The relationship between chromosome 18 anomalies with severe intellectual disability has attracted the attention of cytogeneticists worldwide. Duplications of the X chromosome can cause intellectual disability in females with variable phenotypic effects, due in part to variations in X-inactivation patterns. Additionally, deletions of the 7qter region are associated with a range of phenotypes. We report the first case of de novo microdeletion at 7q and 18p, 18q partial trisomy, microduplication at Xp associated to intellectual disability in a Brazilian child, presenting a normal karyotype. Karyotyping showed any chromosome alteration. Chromosomal microarray analysis detected a de novo microdeletion at 18p11.32 and 18q partial trisomy, an inherited microdeletion at 7q31.1 and a de novo microduplication at Xp22.33p21.3. Our report illustrates a case that presents complex genomic imbalances which may contribute to a severe clinical phenotypes. The rare and complex phenotypes have to be investigated to define the subsets and allow the phenotypes classification.

  20. Velo-cardio-facial syndrome: Frequency and textent of 22q11 deletions

    SciTech Connect

    Lindsay, E.A.; Goldberg, R.; Jurecic, V.

    1995-07-03

    Velo-cardio-facial (VCFS) or Shprintzen syndrome is associated with deletions in a region of chromosome 22q11.2 also deleted in DiGeorge anomaly and some forms of congenital heart disease. Due to the variability of phenotype, the evaluation of the incidence of deletions has been hampered by uncertainty of diagnosis. In this study, 54 patients were diagnosed with VCFS by a single group of clinicians using homogeneous clinical criteria independent of the deletion status. Cell lines of these patients were established and the deletion status evaluated for three loci within the commonly deleted region at 22q11.2 using fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH). In 81% of the patients all three loci were hemizygous. In one patient we observed a smaller interstitial deletion than that defined by the three loci. The phenotype of this patient was not different from that observed in patients with larger deletions. 22 refs., 2 figs., 1 tab.

  1. Genetics Home Reference: distal 18q deletion syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    ... B, O'Donnell L, Gelfond J, Lancaster J, Fox PT, Hale DE. Consequences of chromsome18q deletions. Am ... Cody JD, Andrews T, Hardies LJ, Hale DE, Fox PT. Myelination in children with partial deletions of ...

  2. Epilepsy and neurological findings in 11 individuals with 1p36 deletion syndrome.

    PubMed

    Kurosawa, Kenji; Kawame, Hiroshi; Okamoto, Nobuhiko; Ochiai, Yukikatsu; Akatsuka, Akira; Kobayashi, Masahisa; Shimohira, Masayuki; Mizuno, Seiji; Wada, Kazuko; Fukushima, Yoshimitsu; Kawawaki, Hisashi; Yamamoto, Toshiyuki; Masuno, Mitsuo; Imaizumi, Kiyoshi; Kuroki, Yoshikazu

    2005-08-01

    The 1p36 deletion syndrome is a newly delineated multiple congenital anomalies/mental retardation syndrome characterized by mental retardation, growth delay, epilepsy, congenital heart defects, characteristic facial appearance, and precocious puberty. We analyzed 11 patients by fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) using commercially available bacterial artificial chromosome and P1-derived artificial chromosome genomic clones to define the chromosomal deletion responsible for the 1p36 deletion syndrome. Cytogenetic investigation revealed two cases with a terminal deletion of 1p36. Nine patients had an apparently normal karyotype with standard G-bands by trypsin using Giemsa (GTG), but FISH screening with the highly polymorphic genetic marker D1Z2, which is mapped to 1p36.3 and contains an unusual reiterated 40-bp variable number tandem repeat, revealed a submicroscopic deletion. All patients had severe to profound mental retardation. Based on the University of California Santa Cruz Genome Browser, we constructed a deletion map and analyzed the relationship between neurological findings and chromosomal deletions for the 11 cases. Six cases had intractable epilepsy and three had no seizures. The common deletion interval was about 1 million base pairs (Mbp) located between RP11-82D16 and RP4-785P20 (Rho guanine exchange factor (GEF) 16). The severity of clinical symptoms correlates with the size of the deletion. This is demonstrated by the 3 patients with at least 8Mbp deletions that display profound mental retardation and congenital heart defects. Although haploinsufficiency of the potassium channel beta-subunit (KCNAB2) is thought to be responsible for intractable seizures in the 1p36 deletion syndrome, this was not the case for 3 of the 11 patients in this study. Further investigation of the 1p36 region is necessary to allow identification of genes responsible for the 1p36 deletion syndrome.

  3. Deletion mapping of 22q11 in CATCH22 syndrome: Identification of a second critical region

    SciTech Connect

    Kurahashi, Hiroki; Nakayama, Takahiro; Nishisho, Isamu

    1996-06-01

    The deletion at 22q11.2 implicates a variety of congenital anomaly syndromes, for which the acronym CATCH22 has been proposed . Most patients with these syndromes share the common large deletion spanning 1-2 Mb, while the phenotypic variability of the patients does not seem to correlate with the extent of the deletions. On the basis of the deletions of rare cases with unbalanced translocation, the shortest region of overlap (SRO) had been identified in the most-centromeric region of the common large deletion. One patient (ADU) has been reported to carry a balanced translocation with the breakpoint located in the SRO. Recently, three transcripts were identified at or very close to the ADU breakpoint (ADUBP), making them strong candidates for CATCH22 syndrome. Here, we describe one patient with a unique deletion at 22q11.2 revealed by quantitative hybridization and/or FISH with six DNA markers in the common large deletion. The patient was dizygous at loci within the SRO and hemizygous only at the most-telomeric locus in the common large deletion. This finding suggests that there must be another critical region in the common large deletion besides the breakpoint of the ADU and that haploinsufficiency of genes in this deletion may also play a major role in CATCH22 pathogenesis. 15 refs., 3 figs.

  4. A complex microcephaly syndrome in a Pakistani family associated with a novel missense mutation in RBBP8 and a heterozygous deletion in NRXN1.

    PubMed

    Agha, Zehra; Iqbal, Zafar; Azam, Maleeha; Siddique, Maimoona; Willemsen, Marjolein H; Kleefstra, Tjitske; Zweier, Christiane; de Leeuw, Nicole; Qamar, Raheel; van Bokhoven, Hans

    2014-03-15

    We report on a consanguineous Pakistani family with a severe congenital microcephaly syndrome resembling the Seckel syndrome and Jawad syndrome. The affected individuals in this family were born to consanguineous parents of whom the mother presented with mild intellectual disability (ID), epilepsy and diabetes mellitus. The two living affected brothers presented with microcephaly, white matter disease of the brain, hyponychia, dysmorphic facial features with synophrys, epilepsy, diabetes mellitus and ID. Genotyping with a 250K SNP array in both affected brothers revealed an 18 MB homozygous region on chromosome 18 p11.21-q12.1 encompassing the SCKL2 locus of the Seckel and Jawad syndromes. Sequencing of the RBBP8 gene, underlying the Seckel and Jawad syndromes, identified the novel mutation c.919A>G, p.Arg307Gly, segregating in a recessive manner in the family. In addition, in the two affected brothers and their mother we have also found a heterozygous 607kb deletion, encompassing exons 13-19 of NRXN1. Bidirectional sequencing of the coding exons of NRXN1 did not reveal any other mutation on the other allele. It thus appears that the phenotype of the mildly affected mother can be explained by the NRXN1 deletion, whereas the more severe and complex microcephalic phenotype of the two affected brothers is due to the simultaneous deletion in NRXN1 and the homozygous missense mutation affecting RBBP8. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Choanal atresia in a patient with the deletion (9p) syndrome

    SciTech Connect

    Shashi, V.; Golden, W.L.; Fryburg, J.S.

    1994-01-01

    The authors report on a child with choanal atresia and deletion 9p. A review of the literature documented one previous instance of choanal atresia in a patient with del(9p). Choanal atresia may be part of the spectrum of malformations in the deletion (9p) syndrome and its presence should prompt a search for this particular deletion as part of the differential diagnosis. 9 refs., 3 figs.

  6. Deletion of 150 kb in the minimal DiGeorge/velocardiofacial syndrome critical region in mouse.

    PubMed

    Kimber, W L; Hsieh, P; Hirotsune, S; Yuva-Paylor, L; Sutherland, H F; Chen, A; Ruiz-Lozano, P; Hoogstraten-Miller, S L; Chien, K R; Paylor, R; Scambler, P J; Wynshaw-Boris, A

    1999-11-01

    Deletions or rearrangements of human chromosome 22q11 lead to a variety of related clinical syndromes such as DiGeorge syndrome (DGS) and velo--cardiofacial syndrome (VCFS). In addition, patients with 22q11 deletions have an increased incidence of schizophrenia and several studies have mapped susceptibility loci for schizophrenia to this region. Human molecular genetic studies have so far failed to identify the crucial genes or disruption mechanisms that result in these disorders. We have used gene targeting in the mouse to delete a defined region within the conserved DGS critical region (DGCR) on mouse chromosome 16 to prospectively investigate the role of the mouse DGCR in 22q11 syndromes. The deletion spans a conserved portion ( approximately 150 kb) of the proximal region of the DGCR, containing at least seven genes ( Znf74l, Idd, Tsk1, Tsk2, Es2, Gscl and Ctp ). Mice heterozygous for this deletion display no findings of DGS/VCFS in either inbred or mixed backgrounds. However, heterozygous mice display an increase in prepulse inhibition of the startle response, a manifestation of sensorimotor gating that is reduced in humans with schizophrenia. Homozygous deleted mice die soon after implantation, demonstrating that the deleted region contains genes essential for early post-implantation embryonic development. These results suggest that heterozygous deletion of this portion of the DGCR is sufficient for sensorimotor gating abnormalities, but not sufficient to produce the common features of DGS/VCFS in the mouse.

  7. Maladaptive Behavior Differences in Prader-Willi Syndrome Due to Paternal Deletion versus Maternal Uniparental Disomy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dykens, Elisabeth M.; King, Bryan H.; Cassidy, Suzanne B.

    1999-01-01

    This study compared maladaptive behavior in 23 people with Prader-Willi syndrome due to paternal deletion and in 23 age- and gender-matched subjects with maternal uniparental disomy. Controlling for IQs, the deletion cases showed significantly higher maladaptive ratings, more symptom-related distress, and more behavior problems. Findings suggest a…

  8. A deletion and a duplication in distal 22q11.2 deletion syndrome region. Clinical implications and review

    PubMed Central

    Fernández, Luis; Nevado, Julián; Santos, Fernando; Heine-Suñer, Damià; Martinez-Glez, Victor; García-Miñaur, Sixto; Palomo, Rebeca; Delicado, Alicia; Pajares, Isidora López; Palomares, María; García-Guereta, Luis; Valverde, Eva; Hawkins, Federico; Lapunzina, Pablo

    2009-01-01

    Background Individuals affected with DiGeorge and Velocardiofacial syndromes present with both phenotypic diversity and variable expressivity. The most frequent clinical features include conotruncal congenital heart defects, velopharyngeal insufficiency, hypocalcemia and a characteristic craniofacial dysmorphism. The etiology in most patients is a 3 Mb recurrent deletion in region 22q11.2. However, cases of infrequent deletions and duplications with different sizes and locations have also been reported, generally with a milder, slightly different phenotype for duplications but with no clear genotype-phenotype correlation to date. Methods We present a 7 month-old male patient with surgically corrected ASD and multiple VSDs, and dysmorphic facial features not clearly suggestive of 22q11.2 deletion syndrome, and a newborn male infant with cleft lip and palate and upslanting palpebral fissures. Karyotype, FISH, MLPA, microsatellite markers segregation studies and SNP genotyping by array-CGH were performed in both patients and parents. Results Karyotype and FISH with probe N25 were normal for both patients. MLPA analysis detected a partial de novo 1.1 Mb deletion in one patient and a novel partial familial 0.4 Mb duplication in the other. Both of these alterations were located at a distal position within the commonly deleted region in 22q11.2. These rearrangements were confirmed and accurately characterized by microsatellite marker segregation studies and SNP array genotyping. Conclusion The phenotypic diversity found for deletions and duplications supports a lack of genotype-phenotype correlation in the vicinity of the LCRC-LCRD interval of the 22q11.2 chromosomal region, whereas the high presence of duplications in normal individuals supports their role as polymorphisms. We suggest that any hypothetical correlation between the clinical phenotype and the size and location of these alterations may be masked by other genetic and/or epigenetic modifying factors. PMID

  9. A deletion and a duplication in distal 22q11.2 deletion syndrome region. Clinical implications and review.

    PubMed

    Fernández, Luis; Nevado, Julián; Santos, Fernando; Heine-Suñer, Damià; Martinez-Glez, Victor; García-Miñaur, Sixto; Palomo, Rebeca; Delicado, Alicia; Pajares, Isidora López; Palomares, María; García-Guereta, Luis; Valverde, Eva; Hawkins, Federico; Lapunzina, Pablo

    2009-06-02

    Individuals affected with DiGeorge and Velocardiofacial syndromes present with both phenotypic diversity and variable expressivity. The most frequent clinical features include conotruncal congenital heart defects, velopharyngeal insufficiency, hypocalcemia and a characteristic craniofacial dysmorphism. The etiology in most patients is a 3 Mb recurrent deletion in region 22q11.2. However, cases of infrequent deletions and duplications with different sizes and locations have also been reported, generally with a milder, slightly different phenotype for duplications but with no clear genotype-phenotype correlation to date. We present a 7 month-old male patient with surgically corrected ASD and multiple VSDs, and dysmorphic facial features not clearly suggestive of 22q11.2 deletion syndrome, and a newborn male infant with cleft lip and palate and upslanting palpebral fissures. Karyotype, FISH, MLPA, microsatellite markers segregation studies and SNP genotyping by array-CGH were performed in both patients and parents. Karyotype and FISH with probe N25 were normal for both patients. MLPA analysis detected a partial de novo 1.1 Mb deletion in one patient and a novel partial familial 0.4 Mb duplication in the other. Both of these alterations were located at a distal position within the commonly deleted region in 22q11.2. These rearrangements were confirmed and accurately characterized by microsatellite marker segregation studies and SNP array genotyping. The phenotypic diversity found for deletions and duplications supports a lack of genotype-phenotype correlation in the vicinity of the LCRC-LCRD interval of the 22q11.2 chromosomal region, whereas the high presence of duplications in normal individuals supports their role as polymorphisms. We suggest that any hypothetical correlation between the clinical phenotype and the size and location of these alterations may be masked by other genetic and/or epigenetic modifying factors.

  10. Nasal dimple as part of the 22q11.2 deletion syndrome

    SciTech Connect

    Gripp, K.W.; Reed, L.A.; Emanuel, B.S. |

    1997-03-31

    The phenotype of the 22q11.2 microdeletion syndrome is quite variable. We describe 2 patients with a 22q11.2 deletion and a dimpled nasal tip, which, we suggest can be the extreme of the broad or bulbous nose commonly found in the 22q11.2 deletion syndrome, and should not be confused with the more severe nasal abnormalities seen in frontonasal dysplasia. 11 refs., 2 figs.

  11. Acute Dystonia in a Patient with 22q11.2 Deletion Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Kontoangelos, Konstantinos; Maillis, Antonis; Maltezou, Maria; Tsiori, Sofia; Papageorgiou, Charalambos C.

    2015-01-01

    The 22q11.2 deletion syndrome (di George syndrome) is one of the most prevalent genetic disorders. The clinical features of the syndrome are distinct facial appearance, velopharyngeal insufficiency, conotruncal heart disease, parathyroid and immune dysfunction; however, little is known about possible neurodegenerative diseases. We describe the case of an 18-year old patient suffering from 22q11.2 deletion syndrome. Since adolescence, he presented with behavioral disorders, recommended treatment with 2 mg aloperidin and he presented cervical dystonia and emergence of torticollis and trunk dystonia. Antipsychotic medications either accelerate or reveal dystonic symptoms. PMID:26605035

  12. Chromosome 22q11.2 deletion in a boy with Opitz (G/BBB) syndrome

    SciTech Connect

    Fryburg, J.S.; Lin, K.Y.; Golden, W.L.

    1996-03-29

    This report is on a 14-month-old boy with manifestations of Opitz (G/BBB) syndrome in whom a 22q11.2 deletion was found. Deletion analysis was requested because of some findings in this patient reminiscent of velocardiofacial (VCF) syndrome. The extent of aspiration and of respiratory symptoms in this child is not usually seen in VCF syndrome. Opitz syndrome maps to at least two loci, one on Xp, the other on 22q11.2. 12 refs., 2 figs.

  13. Molecular cytogenetic detection of chromosome 15 deletions in patients with Prader-Willi and Angelman syndromes

    SciTech Connect

    Chadwick, D.E.; Weksberg, R.; Shuman, C.

    1994-09-01

    Prader-Willi syndrome (PWS) and Angelman syndrome (AS) are clinically distinct genetic disorders involving alterations of chromosome 15q11-q13. Approximately 75% of individuals with PWS and AS have deletions within 15q11-q13 by molecular analysis. We have evaluated fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) for the clinical laboratory detection of del(15)(q11q13) using the cosmid probes D15S11 and GABRB3 (ONCOR, Gaithersburg, NY). 4/4 PWS and 1/1 AS patients previously identified as having cytogenetic deletions were deleted for both probes. In a prospectively ascertained series of 54 patient samples referred to rule out either PWS or AS, 8 were deleted for D15S11 and GABRB3. In addition, an atypical deletion patient with PWS was also identified who was found to be deleted for GABRB3 but not D15S11. The SNRPN locus was also deleted in this patient. Only 4 of the 9 patient samples having molecular cytogenetic deletions were clearly deleted by high resolution banding (HRB) analysis. The microscopic and submicroscopic deletions have been confirmed by dinucleotide (CA) repeat analysis. Microsatellite polymorphism analysis was also used to demonstrate that five non-deletion patients in this series had biparental inheritance of chromosome 15, including region q11-q13. Deletions were not detected by either HRB, FISH or microsatellite polymorphism analysis in samples obtained from parents of the deletion patients. Methylation studies of chromosome 15q11-q13 are in progress for this series of PWS and AS families. FISH analysis of chromosome 15q11-q13 in patients with PWS and AS is a rapid, sensitive and reliable method for deletion detection.

  14. Goldenhar and cri-du-chat syndromes: a contiguous gene deletion syndrome?

    PubMed

    Choong, Yee Fong; Watts, Patrick; Little, Elizabeth; Beck, Lyn

    2003-06-01

    We report a full-term male infant born to nonconsanguinous parents who had clinical features of Goldenhar syndrome and cri du chat syndrome. At birth, the infant was noted to have dysmorphic features with bilateral preauricular tags, rotated ears, bilateral epicanthic folds, a left epibulbar lipodermoid, and an accessory left nipple. After he was assessed for feeding difficulty and tachypnea, he was found to have esophageal atresia with tracheoesophageal fistula. In addition, he had a high-pitched, cat-like cry, characteristic of cri-du-chat syndrome. He also failed a hearing test. Chromosomal analysis and fluorescence in situ hybridisation studies showed an unbalanced karyotype with a terminal deletion of the segment p14 on the short arm of chromosome 5, which is consistent with the cri-du-chat locus. The association of Goldenhar syndrome and cri-du-chat syndrome in this patient suggests that the chromosome 5p14 locus may harbor a gene implicated with Goldenhar syndrome.

  15. Genomic findings in patients with clinical suspicion of 22q11.2 deletion syndrome.

    PubMed

    Koczkowska, Magdalena; Wierzba, Jolanta; Śmigiel, Robert; Sąsiadek, Maria; Cabała, Magdalena; Ślężak, Ryszard; Iliszko, Mariola; Kardaś, Iwona; Limon, Janusz; Lipska-Ziętkiewicz, Beata S

    2017-02-01

    Chromosome 22q11.2 deletion syndrome, one of the most common human genomic syndromes, has highly heterogeneous clinical presentation. Patients usually harbor a 1.5 to 3 Mb hemizygous deletion at chromosome 22q11.2, resulting in pathognomic TBX1, CRKL and/or MAPK1 haploinsufficiency. However, there are some individuals with clinical features resembling the syndrome who are eventually diagnosed with genomic disorders affecting other chromosomal regions. The objective of this study was to evaluate the additive value of high-resolution array-CGH testing in the cohort of 41 patients with clinical features of 22q11.2 deletion syndrome and negative results of standard cytogenetic diagnostic testing (karyotype and FISH for 22q11.2 locus). Array-CGH analysis revealed no aberrations at chromosomes 22 or 10 allegedly related to the syndrome. Five (12.2 %) patients were found to have other genomic imbalances, namely 17q21.31 microdeletion syndrome (MIM#610443), 1p36 deletion syndrome (MIM#607872), NF1 microduplication syndrome (MIM#613675), chromosome 6pter-p24 deletion syndrome (MIM#612582) and a novel interstitial deletion at 3q26.31 of 0.65 Mb encompassing a dosage-dependent gene NAALADL2. Our study demonstrates that the implementation of array-CGH into the panel of classic diagnostic procedures adds significantly to their efficacy. It allows for detection of constitutional genomic imbalances in 12 % of subjects with negative result of karyotype and FISH targeted for 22q11.2 region. Moreover, if used as first-tier genetic test, the method would provide immediate diagnosis in ∼40 % phenotypic 22q11.2 deletion subjects.

  16. Craniosynostosis and radial ray defect: a rare presentation of 22q11.2 deletion syndrome.

    PubMed

    Rojnueangnit, Kitiwan; Robin, Nathaniel H

    2013-08-01

    A newborn with bilateral coronal craniosynostosis, hypoplastic thumbs, imperforate anus, and prenatal growth restriction was evaluated and given the clinical diagnosis of Baller-Gerold syndrome (BGS). While confirmatory testing of RECQL4 was pending, the infant developed unexplained hypocalcemia, prompting testing for a 22q11.2 deletion. Subsequently, the infant was found to have a 22q11.2 deletion, and was negative for an RECQL4 mutation. We therefore conclude that 22q11.2 deletion syndrome can present with findings resembling the BGS phenotype.

  17. A syndrome of short stature, microcephaly and speech delay is associated with duplications reciprocal to the common Sotos syndrome deletion.

    PubMed

    Franco, Luis M; de Ravel, Thomy; Graham, Brett H; Frenkel, Stephanie M; Van Driessche, Jozef; Stankiewicz, Pawel; Lupski, James R; Vermeesch, Joris R; Cheung, Sau Wai

    2010-02-01

    Genomic rearrangements are an increasingly recognized mechanism of human phenotypic variation and susceptibility to disease. Sotos syndrome is characterized by overgrowth, macrocephaly, developmental delay and advanced osseous maturation. Haploinsufficiency of NSD1, caused by inactivating point mutations or deletion copy number variants, is the only known cause of Sotos syndrome. A recurrent 2 Mb deletion has been described with variable frequency in different populations. In this study, we report two individuals of different ethnic and geographical backgrounds, with duplications reciprocal to the common Sotos syndrome deletion. Our findings provide evidence for the existence of a novel syndrome of short stature, microcephaly, delayed bone development, speech delay and mild or absent facial dysmorphism. The phenotype is remarkably opposite to that of Sotos syndrome, suggesting a role for NSD1 in the regulation of somatic growth in humans.

  18. Identification of proximal 1p36 deletions using array-CGH: a possible new syndrome.

    PubMed

    Kang, S-H L; Scheffer, A; Ou, Z; Li, J; Scaglia, F; Belmont, J; Lalani, S R; Roeder, E; Enciso, V; Braddock, S; Buchholz, J; Vacha, S; Chinault, A C; Cheung, S W; Bacino, C A

    2007-10-01

    Monosomy 1p36 is the most common terminal deletion syndrome with an estimated occurrence of 1:5000 live births. Typically, the deletions span <10 Mb of 1pter-1p36.23 and result in mental retardation, developmental delay, sensorineural hearing loss, seizures, cardiomyopathy and cardiovascular malformations, and distinct facies including large anterior fontanel, deep-set eyes, straight eyebrows, flat nasal bridge, asymmetric ears, and pointed chin. We report five patients with 'atypical' proximal interstitial deletions from 1p36.23-1p36.11 using array-comparative genomic hybridization. Four patients carry large overlapping deletions of approximately 9.38-14.69 Mb in size, and one patient carries a small 2.97 Mb deletion. Interestingly, these patients manifest many clinical characteristics that are different from those seen in 'classical' monosomy 1p36 syndrome. The clinical presentation in our patients included: pre- and post-natal growth deficiency (mostly post-natal), feeding difficulties, seizures, developmental delay, cardiovascular malformations, microcephaly, limb anomalies, and dysmorphic features including frontal and parietal bossing, abnormally shaped and posteriorly rotated ears, hypertelorism, arched eyebrows, and prominent and broad nose. Most children also displayed hirsutism. Based on the analysis of the clinical and molecular data from our patients and those reported in the literature, we suggest that this chromosomal abnormality may constitute yet another deletion syndrome distinct from the classical distal 1p36 deletion syndrome.

  19. Prenatal diagnosis of pure partial monosomy 18p associated with holoprosencephaly and congenital heart defects.

    PubMed

    Yi, Zhou; Yingjun, Xie; Yongzhen, Chen; Liangying, Zhong; Meijiao, Shang; Baojiang, Chen

    2014-01-10

    We applied CMA to detect chromosomal variations during a prenatal diagnosis and detected a 4.5Mb pure microdeletion at 18p11.3 that was not detected by conventional karyotyping. Fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH) analysis was performed to confirm the deletion. Accurate breakpoints of the deletion in this patient were used to build correlations between monosomy 18p and the concomitant phenotypes, particularly holoprosencephaly (HPE), which is rarely reported in monosomy 18p11.3.

  20. Mapping Cortical Morphology in Youth with Velocardiofacial (22q11.2 Deletion) Syndrome

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kates, Wendy R.; Bansal, Ravi; Fremont, Wanda; Antshel, Kevin M.; Hao, Xuejun; Higgins, Anne Marie; Liu, Jun; Shprintzen, Robert J.; Peterson, Bradley S.

    2011-01-01

    Objective: Velocardiofacial syndrome (VCFS; 22q11.2 deletion syndrome) represents one of the highest known risk factors for schizophrenia. Insofar as up to 30% of individuals with this genetic disorder develop schizophrenia, VCFS constitutes a unique, etiologically homogeneous model for understanding the pathogenesis of schizophrenia. Method:…

  1. Mapping Cortical Morphology in Youth with Velocardiofacial (22q11.2 Deletion) Syndrome

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kates, Wendy R.; Bansal, Ravi; Fremont, Wanda; Antshel, Kevin M.; Hao, Xuejun; Higgins, Anne Marie; Liu, Jun; Shprintzen, Robert J.; Peterson, Bradley S.

    2011-01-01

    Objective: Velocardiofacial syndrome (VCFS; 22q11.2 deletion syndrome) represents one of the highest known risk factors for schizophrenia. Insofar as up to 30% of individuals with this genetic disorder develop schizophrenia, VCFS constitutes a unique, etiologically homogeneous model for understanding the pathogenesis of schizophrenia. Method:…

  2. A new deletion of 18q23 with few typical features of the 18q- syndrome.

    PubMed Central

    Kohonen-Corish, M; Strathdee, G; Overhauser, J; McDonald, T; Jammu, V

    1996-01-01

    We report on a patient with a deletion of 18q23. At both 2 and 4 years of age, she displayed few of the facial features or other clinical features associated with the 18q- syndrome. Fluorescent in situ hybridisation and microsatellite marker and RFLP analysis were performed to characterise the extent of the deletion, and a terminal deletion of 18q23 was confirmed. The deleted region includes the gene for myelin basic protein, suggesting that hemizygosity of this gene does not invariably lead to mental and developmental delay. The clinical presentation of this patient suggests that either she is not deleted for the genes involved in the 18q- clinical phenotype or this patient represents one end of the spectrum of the clinical variability seen with 18q terminal deletions. Images PMID:8728701

  3. Opitz GBBB syndrome and the 22q11.2 deletion

    SciTech Connect

    Lacassie, Y.; Arriaza, M.I.

    1996-03-29

    Recently, McDonald-McGinn et al. reported the presence of a deletion 22q11.2 in a family with autosomal dominant inheritance and in a sporadic case with the Opitz GBBB syndrome. The presence of a vascular ring in these patients prompted them to look for this deletion, since this anomaly may be associated with the 22q11.2 deletion. They reviewed the Opitz GBBB syndrome and the 22q11.2 microdeletion syndrome, finding considerable overlap of manifestations. They proposed that, in some patients, the Opitz GBBB syndrome may be due to a 22q11.2 deletion. We recently examined a newborn boy referred because of MCA. The cardinal findings in this patient (hypertelorism, hypospadias with descended testicles, characteristic nose and truncus arteriosus type I) were suggestive of the Opitz GBBB syndrome and of the velocardiofacial syndrome. The chromosomes were apparently normal (46,XY), but the FISH study showed a 22q11.2 deletion. The patient developed hypocalcemia with very low level of PTH and heart failure requiring surgery. His immunological status was normal except that CD4 cells were mildly low and natural killer cells were increased in number. The family history was noncontributory, but the full evaluation of the family is pending. The mother at first glance presents apparent hypertelorism. 3 refs.

  4. A case report of 22q11 deletion syndrome confirmed by array-CGH method

    PubMed Central

    Sedghi, Maryam; Nouri, Narges; Abdali, Hossein; Memarzadeh, Mehrdad; Nouri, Nayereh

    2012-01-01

    Velo-cardio-facial syndrome (VCFS) is caused by a submicroscopic deletion on the long arm of chromosome 22 and affects approximately 1 in 4000 persons, making it the second most prevalent genetic syndrome after Down syndrome and the most common genetic syndrome associated with cleft palate. Most of the 22q11.2 deletion cases are new occurrences or sporadic; however, in about 10 % of families, the deletion is inherited and other family members are affected or at risk for passing this deletion to their children. This report describes a 1.5 years-old male child with clinical signs of velo-cardio-facial syndrome (VCFS) presented with heart defect, soft cleft palate, developmental delay, acrocephaly, seizure, MRI abnormalities and descriptive facial feature, such as hypertelorism. Array-CGH test was done to confirm the diagnosis; the result revealed a 2.6 Mbp deletion in 22q11.2 chromosome that containing TBX1 and COMT genes. Our data suggest that haploinsufficiency of TBX1 gene is probably a major contributor to some of the syndrome characteristic signs, such as heart defect. Because of developmental delay and dysmorphic facial feature were observed in the index's mother and relatives, inherited autosomal dominant form of VCF is probable, and MLPA (multiplex ligation-dependent probe amplification) test should be performed for parents to estimate the recurrent risk in next pregnancy. PMID:23267387

  5. The Neural Correlates of Non-Spatial Working Memory in Velocardiofacial Syndrome (22q11.2 Deletion Syndrome)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kates, Wendy R.; Krauss, Beth R.; AbdulSabur, Nuria; Colgan, Deirdre; Antshel, Kevin M.; Higgins, Anne Marie; Shprintzen, Robert J.

    2007-01-01

    Velocardiofacial syndrome (VCFS), also known as 22q11.2 deletion syndrome, is a neurogenetic disorder that is associated with both learning disabilities and a consistent neuropsychological phenotype, including deficits in executive function, visuospatial perception, and working memory. Anatomic imaging studies have identified significant…

  6. The Neural Correlates of Non-Spatial Working Memory in Velocardiofacial Syndrome (22q11.2 Deletion Syndrome)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kates, Wendy R.; Krauss, Beth R.; AbdulSabur, Nuria; Colgan, Deirdre; Antshel, Kevin M.; Higgins, Anne Marie; Shprintzen, Robert J.

    2007-01-01

    Velocardiofacial syndrome (VCFS), also known as 22q11.2 deletion syndrome, is a neurogenetic disorder that is associated with both learning disabilities and a consistent neuropsychological phenotype, including deficits in executive function, visuospatial perception, and working memory. Anatomic imaging studies have identified significant…

  7. Genetics Home Reference: 17q12 deletion syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    ... spectrum disorder (which affects social interaction and communication), schizophrenia , anxiety, and bipolar disorder . Less commonly, 17q12 deletion ... Encyclopedia: Autism Spectrum Disorder Encyclopedia: Bipolar Disorder Encyclopedia: ... Topic: Developmental Disabilities Health Topic: Diabetes Health ...

  8. Genetics Home Reference: proximal 18q deletion syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    ... B, O'Donnell L, Gelfond J, Lancaster J, Fox PT, Hale DE. Consequences of chromsome18q deletions. Am ... Cody CM, Hardies LJ, Li J, Lancaster J, Fox PT, Stratton RF, Perry B, Hale DE. Recurrent ...

  9. 22q11.2 distal deletion: a recurrent genomic disorder distinct from DiGeorge syndrome and velocardiofacial syndrome.

    PubMed

    Ben-Shachar, Shay; Ou, Zhishuo; Shaw, Chad A; Belmont, John W; Patel, Millan S; Hummel, Marybeth; Amato, Stephen; Tartaglia, Nicole; Berg, Jonathan; Sutton, V Reid; Lalani, Seema R; Chinault, A Craig; Cheung, Sau W; Lupski, James R; Patel, Ankita

    2008-01-01

    Microdeletions within chromosome 22q11.2 cause a variable phenotype, including DiGeorge syndrome (DGS) and velocardiofacial syndrome (VCFS). About 97% of patients with DGS/VCFS have either a common recurrent approximately 3 Mb deletion or a smaller, less common, approximately 1.5 Mb nested deletion. Both deletions apparently occur as a result of homologous recombination between nonallelic flanking low-copy repeat (LCR) sequences located in 22q11.2. Interestingly, although eight different LCRs are located in proximal 22q, only a few cases of atypical deletions utilizing alternative LCRs have been described. Using array-based comparative genomic hybridization (CGH) analysis, we have detected six unrelated cases of deletions that are within 22q11.2 and are located distal to the approximately 3 Mb common deletion region. Further analyses revealed that the rearrangements had clustered breakpoints and either a approximately 1.4 Mb or approximately 2.1 Mb recurrent deletion flanked proximally by LCR22-4 and distally by either LCR22-5 or LCR22-6, respectively. Parental fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) analyses revealed that none of the available parents (11 out of 12 were available) had the deletion, indicating de novo events. All patients presented with characteristic facial dysmorphic features. A history of prematurity, prenatal and postnatal growth delay, developmental delay, and mild skeletal abnormalities was prevalent among the patients. Two patients were found to have a cardiovascular malformation, one had truncus arteriosus, and another had a bicuspid aortic valve. A single patient had a cleft palate. We conclude that distal deletions of chromosome 22q11.2 between LCR22-4 and LCR22-6, although they share some characteristic features with DGS/VCFS, represent a novel genomic disorder distinct genomically and clinically from the well-known DGS/VCF deletion syndromes.

  10. Expanding the mutation spectrum for Fraser syndrome: identification of a novel heterozygous deletion in FRAS1.

    PubMed

    Hoefele, Julia; Wilhelm, Christian; Schiesser, Monika; Mack, Reinhold; Heinrich, Uwe; Weber, Lutz T; Biskup, Saskia; Daumer-Haas, Cornelia; Klein, Hanns-Georg; Rost, Imma

    2013-05-15

    Fraser syndrome (FS) is a rare autosomal recessive inherited disorder characterized by cryptophthalmos, laryngeal defects and oral clefting, mental retardation, syndactyly, and urogenital defects. To date, 250 patients have been described in the literature. Mutations in the FRAS1 gene on chromosome 4 have been identified in patients with Fraser syndrome. So far, 26 mutations have been identified, most of them are truncating mutations. The mutational spectrum includes nucleotide substitutions, splicing defects, a large insertion, and small deletions/insertions. Moreover, single heterozygous missense mutations in FRAS1 seem to be responsible for non-syndromic unilateral renal agenesis. Here we report the first case of a family with two patients affected by Fraser syndrome due to a deletion of 64 kb (deletion 4q21.21) and an additional novel frameshift mutation in exon 66 of the FRAS1 gene. To date, large deletions of the FRAS1 gene have not yet been described. Large deletions seem to be a rare cause for Fraser syndrome, but should be considered in patients with a single heterozygous mutation.

  11. RBPJ is disrupted in a case of proximal 4p deletion syndrome with epilepsy.

    PubMed

    Nakayama, Tojo; Saitsu, Hirotomo; Endo, Wakaba; Kikuchi, Atsuo; Uematsu, Mitsugu; Haginoya, Kazuhiro; Hino-fukuyo, Naomi; Kobayashi, Tomoko; Iwasaki, Masaki; Tominaga, Teiji; Kure, Shigeo; Matsumoto, Naomichi

    2014-06-01

    Proximal 4p deletion syndrome is characterized clinically by mental retardation, minor dysmorphic facial features, and is occasionally complicated with epilepsy. More than 20 cases of proximal 4p deletion syndrome have been reported, but the causative gene(s) remain elusive. We describe here a 2-year-old female patient with a common manifestation of proximal 4p deletion syndrome and infantile epileptic encephalopathy possessing a de novo balanced translocation t(4;13)(p15.2;q12.13). The patient was diagnosed as infantile spasms at 9 months of age. She presented with dysmorphic facial features and global developmental delay, compatible with proximal 4p deletion syndrome. Using fluorescence in situ hybridization, we determined the translocation breakpoint at 4p15.2 to be within RBPJ. RBPJ is a transcription factor in the Notch/RBPJ signaling pathway, playing a crucial role in the developing human brain, and particularly telencephalon development. Our findings, combined with those of previous studies, strongly suggest that RBPJ is causative for proximal 4p deletion syndrome and epilepsy in this case. Copyright © 2013 The Japanese Society of Child Neurology. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Cat eye syndrome chromosome breakpoint clustering: identification of two intervals also associated with 22q11 deletion syndrome breakpoints.

    PubMed

    McTaggart, K E; Budarf, M L; Driscoll, D A; Emanuel, B S; Ferreira, P; McDermid, H E

    1998-01-01

    The supernumerary cat eye syndrome (CES) chromosome is dicentric, containing two copies of 22pter-->q11.2. We have found that the duplication breakpoints are clustered in two intervals. The more proximal, most common interval is the 450-650 kb region between D22S427 and D22S36, which corresponds to the proximal deletion breakpoint interval found in the 22q11 deletion syndrome (DiGeorge/velocardiofacial syndrome). The more distal duplication breakpoint interval falls between CRKL and D22S112, which overlaps with the common distal deletion interval of the 22q11 deletion syndrome. We have therefore classified CES chromosomes into two types based on the location of the two breakpoints required to generate them. The smaller type I CES chromosomes are symmetrical, with both breakpoints located within the proximal interval. The larger type II CES chromosomes are either asymmetrical, with one breakpoint located in each of the two intervals, or symmetrical, with both breakpoints located in the distal interval. The co-localization of the breakpoints of these different syndromes, plus the presence of low-copy repeats adjacent to each interval, suggests the existence of several specific regions of chromosomal instability in 22q11.2 which are involved in the production of both deletions and duplications. Since the phenotype associated with the larger duplication does not appear to be more severe than that of the smaller duplication, determination of the type of CES chromosome does not currently have prognostic value.

  13. Paternally inherited deletion of CSH1 in a patient with Silver-Russell syndrome.

    PubMed Central

    Eggermann, T; Eggermann, K; Mergenthaler, S; Kuner, R; Kaiser, P; Ranke, M B; Wollmann, H A

    1998-01-01

    In a continuing study on the aetiology of Silver-Russell syndrome (SRS), we detected a patient with a heterozygous deletion in the growth hormone gene cluster (17q22-q24). The deletion of the chorionic somatomammotrophin hormone 1 (CSH1) gene was inherited from the patient's father. The patient shows typical symptoms of SRS. Though deletions of CSH1 have been reported without any phenotypic consequences, the heterozygous deletion might be involved in the aetiology of SRS in the case presented here. Apart from other observations in SRS, like maternal uniparental disomy 7, changes in the genomic region 17q22-qter might be responsible for the expression of this syndrome for at least some of the patients, leading to the heterogeneity of SRS. Images PMID:9733042

  14. Marfan syndrome with a complex chromosomal rearrangement including deletion of the FBN1 gene

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background The majority of Marfan syndrome (MFS) cases is caused by mutations in the fibrillin-1 gene (FBN1), mapped to chromosome 15q21.1. Only few reports on deletions including the whole FBN1 gene, detected by molecular cytogenetic techniques, were found in literature. Results We report here on a female patient with clinical symptoms of the MFS spectrum plus craniostenosis, hypothyroidism and intellectual deficiency who presents a 1.9 Mb deletion, including the FBN1 gene and a complex rearrangement with eight breakpoints involving chromosomes 6, 12 and 15. Discussion This is the first report of MFS with a complex chromosome rearrangement involving a deletion of FBN1 and contiguous genes. In addition to the typical clinical findings of the Marfan syndrome due to FBN1 gene haploinsufficiency, the patient presents features which may be due to the other gene deletions and possibly to the complex chromosome rearrangement. PMID:22260333

  15. Angelman syndrome: Validation of molecular cytogenetic analysis of chromosome 15q11-q13 for deletion detection

    SciTech Connect

    White, L.; Knoll, J.H.M.

    1995-03-13

    In a series of 18 individuals comprising parents of Angelman syndrome (AS) patients and AS patients with large deletions, microdeletions, and no deletions, we utilized fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) with genomic phage clones for loci D15S63 and GABRB3 for deletion detection of chromosome 15q11-q13. Utilization of probes at these loci allows detection of common large deletions and permits discrimination of less common small deletions. In all individuals the molecular cytogenetic data were concordant with the DNA deletion analyses. FISH provides an accurate method of deletion detection for chromosome 15q11-q13. 23 refs., 2 figs., 1 tab.

  16. Molecular definition of the smallest region of deletion overlap in the Wolf-Hirschhorn syndrome

    SciTech Connect

    Gandelman, K.Y.; Gibson, L.; Meyn, M.S.; Yang-Feng, T.L. )

    1992-09-01

    Wolf-Hirschhorn syndrome (WHS), associated with a deletion of chromosome 4p, is characterized by mental and growth retardation and typical dysmorphism. A girl with clinical features of WHS was found to carry a subtle deletion of chromosome 4p. Initially suggested by high-resolution chromosome analysis, her deletion was confirmed by fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) with cosmid probes, E13, and Y2, of D4S113. To delineate this 4p deletion, the authors performed a series of FISH and pulsed-field gel electrophoresis analysis by using probes from 4p16.3. A deletion of [approximately]2.5 Mb with the breakpoint at [approximately]80 kb distal to D4S43 was defined in this patient and appears to be the smallest WHS deletion so far identified. To further refine the WHS critical region, they have studied three unrelated patients with presumptive 4p deletions, two resulting from unbalanced segregations of parental chromosomal translocations and one resulting from an apparently de novo unbalanced translocation. Larger deletions were identified in two patients with WHS. One patient who did not clinically present with WHS had a smaller deletion that thus eliminates the distal 100-300 kb from the telomere as being part of the WHS region. This study has localized the WHS region to [approximately]2 MB between D4S43 and D4S142. 37 refs., 4 figs., 1 tab.

  17. Neuroblastoma in a boy with MCA/MR syndrome, deletion 11q, and duplication 12q

    SciTech Connect

    Koiffmann, C.P.; Vianna-Morgante, A.M.; Wajntal, A.

    1995-07-31

    Deletion 11q23{r_arrow}qter and duplication 12q23{r_arrow}qter are described in a boy with neuroblastoma, multiple congenital anomalies, and mental retardation. The patient has clinical manifestations of 11q deletion and 12q duplication syndromes. The possible involvement of the segment 11q23{r_arrow}24 in the cause of the neuroblastoma is discussed. 18 refs., 2 figs., 1 tab.

  18. Candidate Genes and the Behavioral Phenotype in 22q11.2 Deletion Syndrome

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Prasad, Sarah E.; Howley, Sarah; Murphy, Kieran C.

    2008-01-01

    There is an overwhelming evidence that children and adults with 22q11.2 deletion syndrome (22q11.2DS) have a characteristic behavioral phenotype. In particular, there is a growing body of evidence that indicates an unequivocal association between 22q11.2DS and schizophrenia, especially in adulthood. Deletion of 22q11.2 is the third highest risk…

  19. Candidate Genes and the Behavioral Phenotype in 22q11.2 Deletion Syndrome

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Prasad, Sarah E.; Howley, Sarah; Murphy, Kieran C.

    2008-01-01

    There is an overwhelming evidence that children and adults with 22q11.2 deletion syndrome (22q11.2DS) have a characteristic behavioral phenotype. In particular, there is a growing body of evidence that indicates an unequivocal association between 22q11.2DS and schizophrenia, especially in adulthood. Deletion of 22q11.2 is the third highest risk…

  20. Prevalence and Nature of Hearing Loss in 22q11.2 Deletion Syndrome

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Van Eynde, Charlotte; Swillen, Ann; Lambeens, Elien; Verhaert, Nicolas; Desloovere, Christian; Luts, Heleen; Vander Poorten, Vincent; Devriendt, Koenraad; Hens, Greet

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this study was to clarify the prevalence, type, severity, and age-dependency of hearing loss in 22q11.2 deletion syndrome. Method: Extensive audiological measurements were conducted in 40 persons with proven 22q11.2 deletion (aged 6-36 years). Besides air and bone conduction thresholds in the frequency range between 0.125…

  1. Prevalence and Nature of Hearing Loss in 22q11.2 Deletion Syndrome

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Van Eynde, Charlotte; Swillen, Ann; Lambeens, Elien; Verhaert, Nicolas; Desloovere, Christian; Luts, Heleen; Vander Poorten, Vincent; Devriendt, Koenraad; Hens, Greet

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this study was to clarify the prevalence, type, severity, and age-dependency of hearing loss in 22q11.2 deletion syndrome. Method: Extensive audiological measurements were conducted in 40 persons with proven 22q11.2 deletion (aged 6-36 years). Besides air and bone conduction thresholds in the frequency range between 0.125…

  2. [Scoliosis in children with chromosome 22q11.2 deletion syndrome].

    PubMed

    Colo, Dino; Kruyt, Mayo C; Timmers-Raaijmaakers, Brigitte C M S; Castelein, René M

    2012-01-01

    Chromosome 22q11.2 deletion syndrome (22q11DS) is a term used to describe a syndrome that consists of several clinical phenotypes, for example the DiGeorge syndrome, velocardiofacial syndrome and conotruncal anomaly face syndrome. These phenotypes share a common cause, i.e. deletion of a part of chromosome 22. An important clinical manifestation of this condition is scoliosis, which is estimated to occur in 15-50% of patients. We present three cases of children with scoliosis detected in early childhood. Two children were treated surgically because of progression of the deformity; in the third child surgery is being postponed as long as possible to allow further growth. We advise that every patient with 22q11DS should be screened for scoliosis. Furthermore, genetic counselling is required in all cases of scoliosis combined with distinct phenotypical characteristics.

  3. Copy number variations and risk for schizophrenia in 22q11.2 deletion syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Bassett, Anne S.; Marshall, Christian R.; Lionel, Anath C.; Chow, Eva W.C.; Scherer, Stephen W.

    2008-01-01

    22q11.2 Deletion Syndrome (22q11.2DS) is a common microdeletion syndrome with congenital and late-onset features. Testing for the genomic content of copy number variations (CNVs) may help elucidate the 22q11.2 deletion mechanism and the variable clinical expression of the syndrome including the high (25%) risk for schizophrenia. We used genome-wide microarrays to assess CNV content and the parental origin of 22q11.2 deletions in a cohort of 100 adults with 22q11.2DS (44 with schizophrenia) and controls. 22q11.2DS subjects with schizophrenia failed to exhibit de novo CNVs or any excess of novel inherited CNVs outside the 22q11.2 region. There were no significant effects of parental origin of the 22q11.2 deletion, deletion length, parental age or family history on expression of schizophrenia. There was no evidence for a general increase of de novo CNVs in 22q11.2DS. A novel finding was the relative paucity of males with de novo 22q11.2 deletions of paternal origin (P = 0.019). The Y chromosome may play a mediating role in the mechanism of 22q11.2 deletion events during spermatogenesis, resulting in the previously observed excess of maternal de novo 22q11.2 deletions. Hemizygosity of the 22q11.2 region appears to be the major CNV-related risk factor for schizophrenia in 22q11.2DS. The results reinforce the need for further efforts to identify specific molecular mechanisms underlying this expression and to identify the 1% of patients with schizophrenia who carry 22q11.2 deletions. PMID:18806272

  4. Two distinctive classic genetic syndromes, 22q11.2 deletion syndrome and Angelman syndrome, occurring within the same family.

    PubMed

    Kosaki, Rika; Migita, Ohsuke; Takahashi, Takao; Kosaki, Kenjiro

    2009-02-15

    We document a sib pair born to a mother with a reciprocal translocation, t(15;22)(q13;q11.2): the daughter had the Angelman syndrome phenotype associated with a maternally derived 15q deletion, and the son had a phenotype associated with a 22q deletion. Adjacent two-type segregation during gametogenesis in the mother can account for the unbalanced karyotypes of the siblings. From a tetravalent chromatid formed by normal chromosome 15, derivative chromosome 15, normal chromosome 22, and derivative chromosome 22, the daughter inherited chromosome 22 and derivative chromosome 22 and the son inherited chromosome 15 and derivative chromosome 15. The family is unique in that two distinctive genetic syndromes, 22q11.2 deletion syndrome and Angelman syndrome, occurred within the same family. The family is also elucidative from an educational standpoint in that major concepts of non-Mendelian inheritance (microdeletion, genomic imprinting, and reciprocal translocation) need to be considered to appreciate the inheritance pattern. Furthermore, the family illustrates the importance of cryptic rearrangements at the most proximal end of acrocentric chromosomes in the evaluation of siblings with multiple congenital anomaly-mental retardation phenotypes that are dissimilar among affected siblings. The situation is analogous to parental balanced translocation between the most "distal" segments of a chromosome, that is, the subtelomere region, a recently appreciated cause of familial recurrence of multiple congenital anomaly-mental retardation phenotype with a normal G-banding karyotype. We suggest that cryptic rearrangements at the most proximal end, analogous to those at the most distal end, should be considered as an appreciable cause of recurrent multiple congenital anomaly-mental retardation phenotype.

  5. A patient with 22q11.2 deletion syndrome: case report.

    PubMed

    Eryılmaz, Sema Kabataş; Baş, Firdevs; Satan, Ali; Darendeliler, Feyza; Bundak, Rüveyde; Günöz, Hülya; Saka, Nurçin

    2009-01-01

    22q11 deletion is one of the most frequently encountered genetic syndromes. The phenotypic spectrum shows a wide variability. We report a boy who presented at age 11.9 years with seizures due to hypocalcemia as a result of hypoparathyroidism. FISH analysis revealed a heterozygote deletion at 22q11.2. Positive findings for the syndrome were delayed speech development due to velofacial dysfunction, recurrent croup attacks in early childhood due to latent hypocalcemia and mild dysmorphic features. The findings of this patient indicate that 22q11 deletion syndrome may present with a wide spectrum of clinical findings and that this diagnosis needs to be considered even in patients of older ages presenting with hypocalcemia.

  6. A Patient with 22q11.2 Deletion Syndrome: Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Baş, Firdevs; Satan, Ali; Darendeliler, Feyza; Bundak, Rüveyde; Günöz, Hülya; Saka, Nurçin

    2009-01-01

    22q11 deletion is one of the most frequently encountered genetic syndromes. The phenotypic spectrum shows a wide variability. We report a boy who presented at age 11.9 years with seizures due to hypocalcemia as a result of hypoparathyroidism. FISH analysis revealed a heterozygote deletion at 22q11.2. Positive findings for the syndrome were delayed speech development due to velofacial dysfunction, recurrent croup attacks in early childhood due to latent hypocalcemia and mild dysmorphic features. The findings of this patient indicate that 22q11 deletion syndrome may present with a wide spectrum of clinical findings and that this diagnosis needs to be considered even in patients of older ages presenting with hypocalcemia. Conflict of interest:None declared. PMID:21274400

  7. Severe craniosynostosis in an infant with deletion 22q11.2 syndrome.

    PubMed

    Al-Hertani, W; Hastings, V A; McGowan-Jordan, J; Hurteau, J; Graham, Gail E

    2013-01-01

    We report a male infant with 22q11.2 deletion syndrome and very severe multi-sutural craniosynostosis associated with increased intracranial pressure, marked displacement of brain structures, and extensive erosion of the skull. While uni- or bi-sultural craniosynostosis is a recognized (though relatively uncommon) feature of 22q11 deletion syndrome, a severe multi-sutural presentation of this nature has never been reported. SNP Microarray was otherwise normal and the patient did not have common mutations in FGFR2, FGFR3, or TWIST associated with craniosynostosis. While markedly variable expressivity is an acknowledged feature of deletion 22q11 syndrome, herein we also consider and discuss the possibility that this infant may have been additionally affected with an undiagnosed single gene disorder.

  8. Male patient with non-mosaic deleted Y-chromosome and clinical features of Turner syndrome.

    PubMed

    Graham, B H; Bacino, C A

    2003-06-01

    Turner syndrome is hypothesized to result from haplo-insufficiency of a gene or perhaps multiple genes present on the sex chromosomes; however, the frequent association of mosaicism with deletions of the sex chromosomes prevents establishing useful genotype/phenotype correlations. In this clinical report, we present a male with a de novo, non-mosaic deletion of the Y-chromosome. The phenotype of this patient is unlike any similar cases previously reported in the literature. This patient exhibits many classical clinical features of Turner syndrome including short stature, characteristic facial anomalies, and webbed neck with low posterior hairline, aortic valve abnormality, and hearing impairment. Detailed molecular characterization of this deleted Y-chromosome could provide important information towards establishing genotype/phenotype correlations in Turner syndrome.

  9. Hypocalcemic seizure mistaken for idiopathic epilepsy in two cases of DiGeorge syndrome (chromosome 22q11 deletion syndrome).

    PubMed

    Tsai, Pei-Lin; Lian, Li-Ming; Chen, Wei-Hung

    2009-12-01

    The chromosome 22q11 deletion syndrome, which is synonymous with DiGeorge syndrome, is a congenital anomaly characterized by abnormal facies, congenital heart defects, hypoparathyroidism with hypocalcemia, and immunodeficiency. Neurological manifestations of the chromosome 22q11 deletion syndrome are variable, and include mental deficiency, speech disturbances, learning difficulties, attention deficit hyperactivity disorder, and epilepsy. Hypoparathyroidism and hypocalcemia cause recurrent seizures if patients are not properly treated. We present two patients with poorly controlled epileptic seizures that turned out to be caused by DiGeorge syndrome with hypocalcemia. For such patients, the definitive treatment of seizures depends on recognition of this syndrome and correction of the hypocalcemic state, rather than the use of anticonvulsants.

  10. Mini-Review: Monosomy 1p36 syndrome: reviewing the correlation between deletion sizes and phenotypes.

    PubMed

    Rocha, C F; Vasques, R B; Santos, S R; Paiva, C L A

    2016-02-22

    The major clinical features of monosomy 1p36 deletion are developmental delay and hypotonia associated with short stature and craniofacial dysmorphisms. The objective of this study was to review the cases of 1p36 deletion that was reported between 1999 and 2014, in order to identify a possible correlation between the size of the 1p36-deleted segment and the clinical phenotype of the disease. Scientific articles published in the (National Center for Biotechnology Information; NCBI http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed) and Scientific Electronic Library Online (www.scielo.com.br) databases were searched using key word combinations, such as "1p36 deletion", "monosomy 1p36 deletion", and "1p36 deletion syndrome". Articles in English or Spanish reporting the correlation between deletion sizes and the respective clinical phenotypes were retrieved, while letters, reviews, guidelines, and studies with mouse models were excluded. Among the 746 retrieved articles, only 17 (12 case reports and 5 series of cases), comprising 29 patients (9 males and 20 females, aged 0 months (neonate) to 22 years) bearing the 1p36 deletions and whose clinical phenotypes were described, met the inclusion criteria. The genotype-phenotype correlation in monosomy 1p36 is a challenge because of the variability in the size of the deleted segment, as well as in the clinical manifestations of similar size deletions. Therefore, the severity of the clinical features was not always associated with the deletion size, possibly because of the other influences, such as stochastic factors, epigenetic events, or reduced penetration of the deleted genes.

  11. FISH detection of chromosome 15 deletions in Prader-Willi and Angelman syndromes

    SciTech Connect

    Teshima, I.; Chadwick, D.; Chitayat, D.

    1996-03-29

    We have evaluated fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) analysis for the clinical laboratory detection of the 15q11-q13 deletion seen in Prader-Willi syndrome (PWS) and Angelman syndrome (AS) using probes for loci D15S11, SNRPN, D15S10, and GABRB3. In a series of 118 samples from patients referred for PWS or AS, 29 had deletions by FISH analysis. These included two brothers with a paternally transmitted deletion detectable with the probe for SNRPN only. G-banding analysis was less sensitive for deletion detection but useful in demonstrating other cytogenetic alterations in four cases. Methylation and CA-repeat analyses of 15q11-q13 were used to validate the FISH results. Clinical findings of patients with deletions were variable, ranging from newborns with hypotonia as the only presenting feature to children who were classically affected. We conclude that FISH analysis is a rapid and reliable method for detection of deletions within 15q11-q13 and whenever a deletion is found, FISH analysis of parental chromosomes should also be considered. 41 refs., 4 figs., 2 tabs.

  12. SANDO syndrome in a cohort of 107 patients with CPEO and mitochondrial DNA deletions.

    PubMed

    Hanisch, Frank; Kornhuber, Malte; Alston, Charlotte L; Taylor, Robert W; Deschauer, Marcus; Zierz, Stephan

    2015-06-01

    The sensory ataxic neuropathy with dysarthria and ophthalmoparesis (SANDO) syndrome is a subgroup of mitochondrial chronic progressive external ophthalmoplegia (CPEO)-plus disorders associated with multiple mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) deletions. There is no systematic survey on SANDO in patients with CPEO with either single or multiple large-scale mtDNA deletions. In this retrospective analysis, we characterised the frequency, the genetic and clinical phenotype of 107 index patients with mitochondrial CPEO (n=66 patients with single and n=41 patients with multiple mtDNA deletions) and assessed these for clinical evidence of a SANDO phenotype. Patients with multiple mtDNA deletions were additionally screened for mutations in the nuclear-encoded POLG, SLC25A4, PEO1 and RRM2B genes. The clinical, histological and genetic data of 11 patients with SANDO were further analysed. None of the 66 patients with single, large-scale mtDNA deletions fulfilled the clinical criteria of SANDO syndrome. In contrast, 9 of 41 patients (22%) with multiple mtDNA deletions and two additional family members fulfilled the clinical criteria for SANDO. Within this subgroup, multiple mtDNA deletions were associated with the following nuclear mutations: POLG (n=6), PEO1 (n=2), unidentified (n=2). The combination of sensory ataxic neuropathy with ophthalmoparesis (SANO) was observed in 70% of patients with multiple mtDNA deletions but only in 4% with single deletions. The combination of CPEO and sensory ataxic neuropathy (SANO, incomplete SANDO) was found in 43% of patients with multiple mtDNA deletions but not in patients with single deletions. The SANDO syndrome seems to indicate a cluster of symptoms within the wide range of multisystemic symptoms associated with mitochondrial CPEO. SANO seems to be the most frequent phenotype associated with multiple mtDNA deletions in our cohort but not or is rarely associated with single, large-scale mtDNA deletions. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group

  13. Molecular characterization of an 11q interstitial deletion in a patient with the clinical features of Jacobsen syndrome.

    PubMed

    Wenger, Sharon L; Grossfeld, Paul D; Siu, Benjamin L; Coad, James E; Keller, Frank G; Hummel, Marybeth

    2006-04-01

    The 11q terminal deletion disorder or Jacobsen syndrome is a contiguous gene disorder. It is characterized by psychomotor retardation, cardiac defects, blood dyscrasias (Paris-Trousseau syndrome) and craniofacial anomalies. We report on a female patient with an approximately 10 Mb interstitial deletion with many of the features of Jacobsen syndrome: A congenital heart defect, dysmorphic features, developmental delay, and Paris-Trousseau syndrome. The karyotype of the patient is 46,XX,del(11)(q24.1q24.3). The interstitial deletion was confirmed using FISH probes for distal 11q, and the breakpoints were characterized by microarray analysis. This is the first molecularly characterized interstitial deletion in a patient with the clinical features of Jacobsen syndrome. The deletion includes FLI-1, but not JAM-3, which will help to determine the critical genes involved in this syndrome.

  14. Autosomal dominant {open_quotes}Opitz{close_quotes} GBBB syndrome due to a 22q11.2 deletion

    SciTech Connect

    McDonald-McGinn, D.M.; Emanuel, B.S.; Zackai, E.H.

    1996-08-23

    The classification of Opitz GBBB syndrome has been associated with the deletion of the DiGeorge chromosome region on human chromosome 22q11.2. The broad phenotype involved in this deletion syndrome has been referred to as the DiGeorge/velocardiofacial syndrome. The clinical description of the patient will influence the diagnosis of the syndrome. More cooperation between the clinicians and the molecular researchers is necessary in order to locate the gene(s) for these disorders. 11 refs.

  15. Evans syndrome and antibody deficiency: an atypical presentation of chromosome 22q11.2 deletion syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Colarusso, Gloria; Gambineri, Eleonora; Lapi, Elisabetta; Casini, Tommaso; Tucci, Fabio; Lippi, Francesca; Azzari, Chiara

    2010-01-01

    We report a case of an 8-year-old male patient with Evans syndrome and severe hypogammaglobulinemia, subsequently in whom the 22q11.2 deletion syndrome (22q11.2 DS) was diagnosed. No other clinical sign of 22q11.2 DS was present with the exception of slight facial dysmorphism. The case is of particular interest because it suggests the need to research chromosome 22q11.2 deletion in patients who present with autoimmune cytopenia and peculiar facial abnormalities, which could be an atypical presentation of an incomplete form of 22q11.2 DS. PMID:21589826

  16. Evans syndrome and antibody deficiency: an atypical presentation of chromosome 22q11.2 deletion syndrome.

    PubMed

    Colarusso, Gloria; Gambineri, Eleonora; Lapi, Elisabetta; Casini, Tommaso; Tucci, Fabio; Lippi, Francesca; Azzari, Chiara

    2010-09-06

    We report a case of an 8-year-old male patient with Evans syndrome and severe hypogammaglobulinemia, subsequently in whom the 22q11.2 deletion syndrome (22q11.2 DS) was diagnosed. No other clinical sign of 22q11.2 DS was present with the exception of slight facial dysmorphism. The case is of particular interest because it suggests the need to research chromosome 22q11.2 deletion in patients who present with autoimmune cytopenia and peculiar facial abnormalities, which could be an atypical presentation of an incomplete form of 22q11.2 DS.

  17. Identification of 1p36 deletion syndrome in patients with facial dysmorphism and developmental delay

    PubMed Central

    Seo, Go Hun; Kim, Ja Hye; Cho, Ja Hyang; Kim, Gu-Hwan; Seo, Eul-Ju; Lee, Beom Hee; Choi, Jin-Ho

    2016-01-01

    Purpose The 1p36 deletion syndrome is a microdeletion syndrome characterized by developmental delays/intellectual disability, craniofacial dysmorphism, and other congenital anomalies. To date, many cases of this syndrome have been reported worldwide. However, cases with this syndrome have not been reported in Korean populations anywhere. This study was performed to report the clinical and molecular characteristics of five Korean patients with the 1p36 deletion syndrome. Methods The clinical characteristics of the 5 patients were reviewed. Karyotyping and multiplex ligation-dependent probe amplification (MLPA) analyses were performed for genetic diagnoses. Results All 5 patients had typical dysmorphic features including frontal bossing, flat right parietal bone, low-set ears, straight eyebrows, down-slanting palpebral fissure, hypotelorism, flat nasal roots, midface hypoplasia, pointed chins, small lips, and variable degrees of developmental delay. Each patient had multiple and variable anomalies such as a congenital heart defect including ventricular septal defect, atrial septal defect, and patent duct arteriosus, ventriculomegaly, cryptorchism, or hearing loss. Karyotyping revealed the 1p36 deletion in only 1 patient, although it was confirmed in all 5 patients by MLPA analyses. Conclusion All the patients had the typical features of 1p36 deletion. These hallmarks can be used to identify other patients with this condition in their early years in order to provide more appropriate care. PMID:26893599

  18. Germinal mosaicism for a deletion of the FMR1 gene leading to fragile X syndrome.

    PubMed

    Jiraanont, P; Hagerman, R J; Neri, G; Zollino, M; Murdolo, M; Tassone, F

    2016-09-01

    Aberrant CGG trinucleotide amplification within the FMR1 gene, which spans approximately 38 Kb of genomic DNA is almost always what leads to fragile X syndrome (FXS). However, deletions of part or the entire FMR1 gene can also cause FXS. Both CGG amplification-induced silencing and deletions result in the absence of the FMR1 gene product, FMRP. Here, we report a rare case of germinal mosaicism of a deletion encompassing approximately 300 Kb of DNA, which by removing the entire FMR1 gene led to FXS. The male proband, carrying the deletion, presented in clinic with the typical features of FXS. His mother was analyzed by FISH on metaphase chromosomes with cosmid probe c22.3 spanning the FMR1 locus, and she was found not to carry the deletion on 30 analyzed cells from peripheral blood lymphocytes. Prenatal examination of the mother's third pregnancy showed that the male fetus also had the same deletion as the proband. Following this prenatal diagnosis, FISH analysis in the mother was expanded to 400 metaphases from peripheral lymphocytes, and a heterozygous FMR1 deletion was found in three. Although this result could be considered questionable from a diagnostic point of view, it indicates that the deletion is in the ovary's germinal cells.

  19. Investigation of TBX1 gene deletion in Iranian children with 22q11.2 deletion syndrome: correlation with conotruncal heart defects

    PubMed Central

    Ganji, Hamid; Salehi, Mansoor; Sedghi, Maryam; Abdali, Hossein; Nouri, Nayereh; Sadri, Leyli; Hosseinzadeh, Majid; Vakili, Bahareh; Lotfi, Mahdi

    2013-01-01

    Background DiGeorge syndrome (DGS) is the result of a microdeletion in chromosome 22q11.2 in over 90% of cases. DGS is the second most frequent syndrome after Down syndrome and has an incidence of 1/4000 births. Unequal crossover between low-copy repeats, on the proximal part of the long arm of chromosome 22, usually results in a 3 Mb deletion in one of the chromosome 22 and a reciprocal and similarly sized duplication on the other one. Several studies have indicated that TBX1 (T-box 1) haploinsufficiency is responsible for many of the phenotypic traits of 22q11.2 deletion syndrome. Conotruncal heart defects (CTDs) are present in 75–85% of patients with 22q11.2 deletion syndrome in Western countries. Methods Among 78 patients fulfilling the criteria for DGS diagnosed by the fluorescence in situ hybridisation test, 24 had 22q11.2 deletion. Screening for TBX1 gene deletion was performed by multiplex ligation-dependent probe amplification (MLPA). Results Our results revealed that of 24 patients with TBX1 gene deletion, 12 had CTDs while 12 did not show any heart defects. Conclusions Our findings indicate that other genes or gene interactions may play a role in penetrance or the severity of heart disease among patients with DGS. PMID:27326128

  20. Molecular analyses of 17p11.2 deletions in 62 Smith-Magenis syndrome patients

    SciTech Connect

    Juyal, R.C.; Figuera, L.E.; Hauge, X.

    1996-05-01

    Smith-Magenis syndrome (SMS) is a clinically recognizable, multiple congenital anomalies/mental retardation syndrome caused by an interstitial deletion involving band p11.2 of chromosome 17. Toward the molecular definition of the interval defining this microdeletion syndrome, 62 unrelated SMS patients in conjunction with 70 available unaffected parents were molecularly analyzed with respect to the presence or absence of 14 loci in the proximal region of the short arm of chromosome 17. A multifaceted approach was used to determine deletion status at the various loci that combined (1) FISH analysis, (2) PCR and Southern analysis of somatic cell hybrids retaining the deleted chromosome 17 from selected patients, and (3) genotype determination of patients for whom a parent(s) was available at four microsatellite marker loci and at four loci with associated RFLPs. The relative order of two novel anonymous markers and a new microsatellite marker was determined in 17p11.2. The results confirmed that the proximal deletion breakpoint in the majority of SMS patients is located between markers D17S58 (EW301) and D17S446 (FG1) within the 17p11.1-17p11.2 region. The common distal breakpoint was mapped between markers cCI17-638, which lies distal to D17S71, and cCI17-498, which lies proximal to the Charcot Marie-Tooth disease type 1A locus. The locus D17S258 was found to be deleted in all 62 patients, and probes from this region can be used for diagnosis of the SMS deletion by FISH. Ten patients demonstrated molecularly distinct deletions; of these, two patients had smaller deletions and will enable the definition of the critical interval for SMS. 49 refs.

  1. An atypical case of fragile X syndrome caused by a deletion that includes FMRI gene

    SciTech Connect

    Quan, F.; Zonana, J.; Gunter, K.; Peterson, K.L.; Magenis, R.E., Popovich, B.W.

    1995-05-01

    Fragile X syndrome is the most common form of inherited mental retardation and results from the transcriptional inactivation of the FMR1 gene. In the vast majority of cases, this is caused by the expansion of an unstable CGG repeat in the first exon of the FMR1 gene. We describe here a phenotypically atypical case of fragile X syndrome, caused by a deletion that includes the entire FMR1 gene and {ge}9.0 Mb of flanking DNA. The proband, RK, was a 6-year-old mentally retarded male with obesity and anal atresia. A diagnosis of fragile X syndrome was established by the failure of RK`s DNA to hybridize to a 558-bp PstI-XhoI fragment (pfxa3) specific for the 5{prime}-end of the FMR1 gene. The analysis of flanking markers in the interval from Xq26.3-q28 indicated a deletion extending from between 160-500 kb distal and 9.0 Mb proximal to the FMR1 gene. High-resolution chromosome banding confirmed a deletion with breakpoints in Xq26.3 and Xq27.3. This deletion was maternally transmitted and arose as a new mutation on the grandpaternal X chromosome. The maternal transmission of the deletion was confirmed by FISH using a 34-kb cosmid (c31.4) containing most of the FMR1 gene. These results indicated that RK carried a deletion of the FMR1 region with the most proximal breakpoint described to date. This patient`s unusual clinical presentation may indicate the presence of genes located in the deleted interval proximal to the FMR1 locus that are able to modify the fragile X syndrome phenotype. 36 refs., 7 figs.

  2. Genotype-phenotype correlation in 22q11.2 deletion syndrome

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background The 22q11.2 deletion syndrome (22q11.2DS) is caused by hemizygous microdeletions on chromosome 22q11.2 with highly variable physical and neuropsychiatric manifestations. We explored the genotype-phenotype relationship in a relatively large 22q11.2DS cohort treated and monitored in our clinic using comprehensive clinical evaluation and detailed molecular characterization of the deletion. Methods Molecular analyses in 142 subjects with 22q11.2DS features were performed by FISH and MLPA methods. Participants underwent clinical assessment of physical symptoms and structured psychiatric and cognitive evaluation. Results Deletions were found in 110 individuals including one with an atypical nested distal deletion which was missed by the FISH test. Most subjects (88.2%) carried the 3Mb typically deleted region and 11.8% carried 4 types of deletions differing in size and location. No statistically significant genotype-phenotype correlations were found between deletion type and clinical data although some differences in hypocalcemia and cardiovascular anomalies were noted. Analysis of the patient with the distal nested deletion suggested a redundancy of genes causing the physical and neuropsychiatric phenotype in 22q11.2DS and indicating that the psychiatric and cognitive trajectories may be governed by different genes. Conclusions MLPA is a useful and affordable molecular method combining accurate diagnosis and detailed deletion characterization. Variations in deletion type and clinical manifestations impede the detection of significant differences in samples of moderate size, but analysis of individuals with unique deletions may provide insight into the underlying biological mechanisms. Future genotype-phenotype studies should involve large multicenter collaborations employing uniform clinical standards and high-resolution molecular methods. PMID:23245648

  3. 22q11 deletion syndrome and forensic research: can we go there?

    PubMed

    Harris, Victoria

    2005-01-01

    Chromosome 22q11 deletion syndrome (22q11DS) encompasses velocardiofacial syndrome (VCFS), DiGeorge syndrome (DGS), and conotruncal anomaly face syndrome (CTAFS). The disorder may represent the interface between genetics and brain-behavior relationships. As there is a strong relationship between the genetic syndrome and schizophrenia, individuals with the disorder are likely to be disproportionately represented in the criminal justice system. The purpose of this article is to review the 22q11DS in the context of forensic research. The existing literature regarding the syndrome and its relationship to schizophrenia is reviewed. A study design is presented to determine the prevalence of the syndrome in correctional facilities compared with expected community prevalence rates. Finally, a brief history of genetic research in correctional facilities is reviewed as a potential model to determine the feasibility of research involving 22q11DS.

  4. Chromosome 22-specific low copy repeats and the 22q11.2 deletion syndrome: genomic organization and deletion endpoint analysis.

    PubMed

    Shaikh, T H; Kurahashi, H; Saitta, S C; O'Hare, A M; Hu, P; Roe, B A; Driscoll, D A; McDonald-McGinn, D M; Zackai, E H; Budarf, M L; Emanuel, B S

    2000-03-01

    The 22q11.2 deletion syndrome, which includes DiGeorge and velocardiofacial syndromes (DGS/VCFS), is the most common microdeletion syndrome. The majority of deleted patients share a common 3 Mb hemizygous deletion of 22q11.2. The remaining patients include those who have smaller deletions that are nested within the 3 Mb typically deleted region (TDR) and a few with rare deletions that have no overlap with the TDR. The identification of chromosome 22-specific duplicated sequences or low copy repeats (LCRs) near the end-points of the 3 Mb TDR has led to the hypothesis that they mediate deletions of 22q11.2. The entire 3 Mb TDR has been sequenced, permitting detailed investigation of the LCRs and their involvement in the 22q11.2 deletions. Sequence analysis has identified four LCRs within the 3 Mb TDR. Although the LCRs differ in content and organization of shared modules, those modules that are common between them share 97-98% sequence identity with one another. By fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) analysis, the end-points of four variant 22q11.2 deletions appear to localize to the LCRs. Pulsed-field gel electrophoresis and Southern hybridization have been used to identify rearranged junction fragments from three variant deletions. Analysis of junction fragments by PCR and sequencing of the PCR products implicate the LCRs directly in the formation of 22q11.2 deletions. The evolutionary origin of the duplications on chromosome 22 has been assessed by FISH analysis of non-human primates. Multiple signals in Old World monkeys suggest that the duplication events may have occurred at least 20-25 million years ago.

  5. Novel features of 3q29 deletion syndrome: Results from the 3q29 registry

    PubMed Central

    Glassford, Megan R.; Rosenfeld, Jill A.; Freedman, Alexa A.; Zwick, Michael E.

    2016-01-01

    3q29 deletion syndrome is caused by a recurrent, typically de novo heterozygous 1.6 Mb deletion, but because incidence of the deletion is rare (1 in 30,000 births) the phenotype is not well described. To characterize the range of phenotypic manifestations associated with 3q29 deletion syndrome, we have developed an online registry (3q29deletion.org) for ascertainment of study subjects and phenotypic data collection via Internet‐based survey instruments. We report here on data collected during the first 18 months of registry operation, from 44 patients. This is the largest cohort of 3q29 deletion carriers ever assembled and surveyed in a systematic way. Our data reveal that 28% of registry participants report neuropsychiatric phenotypes, including anxiety disorder, panic attacks, depression, bipolar disorder, and schizophrenia. Other novel findings include a high prevalence (64%) of feeding problems in infancy and reduced weight at birth for 3q29 deletion carriers (average reduction 13.9 oz (394 g), adjusted for gestational age and sex, P = 6.5e‐07). We further report on the frequency of heart defects, autism, recurrent ear infections, gastrointestinal phenotypes, and dental phenotypes, among others. We also report on the expected timing of delayed developmental milestones. This is the most comprehensive description of the 3q29 deletion phenotype to date. These results are clinically actionable toward improving patient care for 3q29 deletion carriers, and can guide the expectations of physicians and parents. These data also demonstrate the value of patient‐reported outcomes to reveal the full phenotypic spectrum of rare genomic disorders. © 2016 The Authors. American Journal of Medical Genetics Part A Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:26738761

  6. Strong correlation of elastin deletions, detected by FISH, with Williams syndrome: Evaluation of 235 patients

    SciTech Connect

    Lowery, M.C.; Brothman, L.J.; Leonard, C.O.

    1995-07-01

    Williams syndrome (WS) is generally characterized by mental deficiency, gregarious personality, dysmorphic facies, supravalvular aortic stenosis, and idiopathic infantile hypercalcemia. Patients with WS show allelic loss of elastin (ELN), exhibiting a submicroscopic deletion, at 7q11.23, detectable by FISH. Hemizygosity is likely the cause of vascular abnormalities in WS patients. A series of 235 patients was studied, and molecular cytogenetic deletions were seen in 96% of patients with classic WS. Patients included 195 solicited through the Williams Syndrome Association (WSA), plus 40 clinical cytogenetics cases referred by primary-care physicians. Photographs and medical records of most WSA subjects were reviewed, and patients were identified as {open_quotes}classic{open_quotes} (n = 114) or{open_quotes}uncertain{close_quotes} (n = 39). An additional 42 WSA patients were evaluated without clinical information. FISH was performed with biotinylated ELN cosmids on metaphase cells from immortalized lymphoblastoid lines from WSA patients and after high-resolution banding analysis on clinical referral patients. An alpha-satellite probe for chromosome 7 was included in hybridizations, as an internal control. Ninety-six percent of the patients with classic WS showed a deletion in one ELN allele; four of these did not show a deletion. Of the uncertain WS patients, only 3 of 39 showed a deletion. Of the 42 who were not classified phenotypically, because of lack of clinical information, 25 patients (60%) showed a deletion. Thirty-eight percent (15/40) of clinical cytogenetics cases showed an ELN deletion and no cytogenetic deletion by banded analysis. These results support the usefulness of FISH for the detection of elastin deletions as an initial diagnostic assay for WS. 14 refs., 2 figs., 4 tabs.

  7. Novel features of 3q29 deletion syndrome: Results from the 3q29 registry.

    PubMed

    Glassford, Megan R; Rosenfeld, Jill A; Freedman, Alexa A; Zwick, Michael E; Mulle, Jennifer G

    2016-04-01

    3q29 deletion syndrome is caused by a recurrent, typically de novo heterozygous 1.6 Mb deletion, but because incidence of the deletion is rare (1 in 30,000 births) the phenotype is not well described. To characterize the range of phenotypic manifestations associated with 3q29 deletion syndrome, we have developed an online registry (3q29deletion.org) for ascertainment of study subjects and phenotypic data collection via Internet-based survey instruments. We report here on data collected during the first 18 months of registry operation, from 44 patients. This is the largest cohort of 3q29 deletion carriers ever assembled and surveyed in a systematic way. Our data reveal that 28% of registry participants report neuropsychiatric phenotypes, including anxiety disorder, panic attacks, depression, bipolar disorder, and schizophrenia. Other novel findings include a high prevalence (64%) of feeding problems in infancy and reduced weight at birth for 3q29 deletion carriers (average reduction 13.9 oz (394 g), adjusted for gestational age and sex, P = 6.5e-07). We further report on the frequency of heart defects, autism, recurrent ear infections, gastrointestinal phenotypes, and dental phenotypes, among others. We also report on the expected timing of delayed developmental milestones. This is the most comprehensive description of the 3q29 deletion phenotype to date. These results are clinically actionable toward improving patient care for 3q29 deletion carriers, and can guide the expectations of physicians and parents. These data also demonstrate the value of patient-reported outcomes to reveal the full phenotypic spectrum of rare genomic disorders. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  8. Prenatal diagnosis of interstitial deletion of 17(p11.2p11.2) (Smith-Magenis Syndrome)

    SciTech Connect

    1994-01-15

    Interstitial deletion of 17p11.2 is associated with Smith-Magenis syndrome. This is a recognizable chromosomal deletion syndrome, characterized by brachycephaly, midface hypoplasia, growth and mental retardation, behavioral problems, and ocular abnormalities. Molecular analysis indicates it is a contiguous gene syndrome. Over 50 patients have been reported since the deletion was first described by Smith et al. [1982]. Cases include one with mosaicism and a familial example. None were prenatally diagnosed. The authors report on the prenatal detection of interstitial deletion of 17p11.2. 11 refs., 1 fig.

  9. Molecular characterization of a deletion in the HPRT1 gene in a patient with Lesch-Nyhan syndrome.

    PubMed

    Taniguchi, A; Yamada, Y; Hakoda, M; Sekita, C; Kawamoto, M; Kaneko, H; Yamanaka, H

    2011-12-01

    Lesch-Nyhan syndrome is caused by a deficiency of hypoxanthine phosphoribosyltransferase (HPRT) encoded by HPRT1. About 20% of patients have a deletion of HPRT1 and large deletions of HPRT1 are not always fully characterized at the molecular level. Here, we report on a case of Lesch-Nyhan syndrome with a 33-kb deletion involving exon 1 of HPRT1. This novel mutation is caused by a nonhomologous recombination between different classes of interspersed repetitive DNA.

  10. TSHZ3 deletion causes an autism syndrome and defects in cortical projection neurons

    PubMed Central

    Andrieux, Joris; Roubertoux, Pierre L.; Metwaly, Mehdi; Jacq, Bernard; Fatmi, Ahmed; Had-Aissouni, Laurence; Kwan, Kenneth Y.; Salin, Pascal; Carlier, Michèle; Liedén, Agne; Rudd, Eva; Shinawi, Marwan; Vincent-Delorme, Catherine; Cuisset, Jean-Marie; Lemaitre, Marie-Pierre; Abderrehamane, Fatimetou; Duban, Bénédicte; Lemaitre, Jean-François; Woolf, Adrian S.; Bockenhauer, Detlef; Severac, Dany; Dubois, Emeric; Zhu, Ying; Sestan, Nenad; Garratt, Alistair N.; Kerkerian-Le Goff, Lydia; Fasano, Laurent

    2016-01-01

    TSHZ3, which encodes a zinc-finger transcription factor, was recently positioned as a hub gene in a module of genes with the highest expression in the developing human neocortex, but its functions remained unknown. Here, we identify TSHZ3 as the critical region for a syndrome associated with heterozygous deletions at 19q12q13.11, which includes autism spectrum disorder (ASD). In Tshz3 null mice, differentially expressed genes include layer-specific markers of cerebral cortical projection neurons (CPNs) and their human orthologues are strongly associated with ASD. Furthermore, mice heterozygous for Tshz3 deletion show functional changes at synapses established by CPNs and exhibit core ASD-like behavioral abnormalities. These findings reveal essential roles for Tshz3 in CPN development and function, whose alterations can account for ASD in the newly-defined TSHZ3 deletion syndrome. PMID:27668656

  11. Children with Chromosome 22q11.2 Deletion Syndrome Exhibit Impaired Spatial Working Memory

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wong, Ling M.; Riggins, Tracy; Harvey, Danielle; Cabaral, Margarita; Simon, Tony J.

    2014-01-01

    Individuals with chromosome 22q11.2 deletion syndrome (22q11.2DS) have been shown to have impairments in processing spatiotemporal information. The authors examined whether children with 22q11.2DS exhibit impairments in spatial working memory performance due to these weaknesses, even when controlling for maintenance of attention. Children with…

  12. Children with Chromosome 22q11.2 Deletion Syndrome Exhibit Impaired Spatial Working Memory

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wong, Ling M.; Riggins, Tracy; Harvey, Danielle; Cabaral, Margarita; Simon, Tony J.

    2014-01-01

    Individuals with chromosome 22q11.2 deletion syndrome (22q11.2DS) have been shown to have impairments in processing spatiotemporal information. The authors examined whether children with 22q11.2DS exhibit impairments in spatial working memory performance due to these weaknesses, even when controlling for maintenance of attention. Children with…

  13. Subtypes in 22q11.2 Deletion Syndrome Associated with Behaviour and Neurofacial Morphology

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sinderberry, Brooke; Brown, Scott; Hammond, Peter; Stevens, Angela F.; Schall, Ulrich; Murphy, Declan G. M.; Murphy, Kieran C.; Campbell, Linda E.

    2013-01-01

    22q11.2 deletion syndrome (22q11DS) has a complex phenotype with more than 180 characteristics, including cardiac anomalies, cleft palate, intellectual disabilities, a typical facial morphology, and mental health problems. However, the variable phenotype makes it difficult to predict clinical outcome, such as the high prevalence of psychosis among…

  14. Subtypes in 22q11.2 Deletion Syndrome Associated with Behaviour and Neurofacial Morphology

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sinderberry, Brooke; Brown, Scott; Hammond, Peter; Stevens, Angela F.; Schall, Ulrich; Murphy, Declan G. M.; Murphy, Kieran C.; Campbell, Linda E.

    2013-01-01

    22q11.2 deletion syndrome (22q11DS) has a complex phenotype with more than 180 characteristics, including cardiac anomalies, cleft palate, intellectual disabilities, a typical facial morphology, and mental health problems. However, the variable phenotype makes it difficult to predict clinical outcome, such as the high prevalence of psychosis among…

  15. Domain Specific Attentional Impairments in Children with Chromosome 22Q11.2 Deletion Syndrome

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bish, Joel P.; Chiodo, Renee; Mattei, Victoria; Simon, Tony J.

    2007-01-01

    One of the defining cognitive characteristics of the chromosome 22q deletion syndrome (DS22q11.2) is visuospatial processing impairments. The purpose of this study was to investigate and extend the specific attentional profile of children with this disorder using both an object-based attention task and an inhibition of return task. A group of…

  16. Functional outcomes of adults with 22q11.2 deletion syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Butcher, Nancy J.; Chow, Eva W.C.; Costain, Gregory; Karas, Dominique; Ho, Andrew; Bassett, Anne S.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose The 22q11.2 deletion syndrome is a common multisystem genomic disorder with congenital and later-onset manifestations, including congenital heart disease, intellectual disability, and psychiatric illness, that may affect long-term functioning. There are limited data on adult functioning in 22q11.2 deletion syndrome. Methods We used the Vineland Adaptive Behavior Scales to assess functioning in 100 adults with 22q11.2 deletion syndrome (n = 46 male; mean age = 28.8 (standard deviation = 9.7) years) where intellect ranged from average to borderline (n = 57) to mild intellectual disability (n = 43). Results More than 75% of the subjects scored in the functional deficit range. Although personal, vocational, and financial demographics confirmed widespread functional impairment, daily living skills and employment were relative strengths. Intelligence quotient was a significant predictor (P < 0.001) of overall and domain-specific adaptive functioning skills. A diagnosis of schizophrenia was a significant predictor (P < 0.05) of overall adaptive functioning, daily living skills, and socialization scores. Notably, congenital heart disease, history of mood/anxiety disorders, sex, and age were not significant predictors of functioning. Conclusion Despite functional impairment in adulthood that is primarily mediated by cognitive and psychiatric phenotypes, relative strengths in activities of daily living and employment have important implications for services and long-term planning. These results may help to inform expectations about outcomes for patients with 22q11.2 deletion syndrome. PMID:22744446

  17. Contiguous gene deletion syndrome in a female with ornithine transcarbamylase deficiency.

    PubMed

    Balasubramaniam, S; Rudduck, C; Bennetts, B; Peters, G; Wilcken, B; Ellaway, C

    2010-01-01

    OTC deficiency, a partially dominant X-linked trait, is the most frequent inborn error of the urea cycle. We describe a female patient with a contiguous gene deletion syndrome encompassing the OTC, DMD, RPGR, CYBB and XK genes, amongst others, only manifesting features of OTC deficiency. Molecular characterization was ascertained by MLPA and confirmed by CGH microarray, which revealed an 8.7 Mb deletion of the X-chromosome. Complete de novo deletion of the OTC gene led to a severe clinical phenotype in the proband. The application of high resolution molecular genetic techniques such as MLPA and array CGH, in mutation negative OTC cases allows the identification of chromosomal rearrangements, such as large deletions and provides information for accurate genetic counseling and prenatal diagnosis.

  18. VISUOSPATIAL AND NUMERICAL COGNITIVE DEFICITS IN CHILDREN WITH CHROMOSOME 22Q11.2 DELETION SYNDROME

    PubMed Central

    Simon, Tony J.; Bearden, Carrie E.; Mc-Ginn, Donna McDonald; Zackai, Elaine

    2015-01-01

    This article presents some of the earliest evidence of visuospatial and numerical cognitive deficits in children with the chromosome 22q11.2 deletion syndrome; a common but ill-understood genetic disorder resulting in medical complications, cognitive impairment, and brain morphologic changes. Relative to a group of typically developing controls, deleted children performed more poorly on tests of visual attentional orienting, visual enumeration and relative numerical magnitude judgment. Results showed that performance deficits in children with the deletion could not be explained by a global deficit in psychomotor speed. Instead, our findings are supportive of the hypothesis that visuospatial and numerical deficits in children with the chromosome 22q11.2 deletion are due, at least in part, to posterior parietal dysfunction. PMID:15714897

  19. Detection of deleted mitochondrial DNA in Kearns-Sayre syndrome using laser capture microdissection.

    PubMed

    Pistilli, Daniela; di Gioia, Cira R T; D'Amati, Giulia; Sciacchitano, Salvatore; Quaglione, Raffaele; Quitadamo, Raffaella; Casali, Carlo; Gallo, Pietro; Santorelli, Filippo M

    2003-10-01

    A novel 4949-base pair mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) deletion was detected in various tissues in a postmortem study of a patient with Kearns-Sayre syndrome (KSS). Deleted mtDNA levels were higher in skeletal muscle and brain and lower in kidney, working myocardium, and endocrine tissues (thyroid, parathyroids, pancreas, and adrenal glands). The distribution of the deletion in skeletal muscle and conducting myocardium was analyzed by means of laser capture microdissection (LCM). In skeletal muscle, the abundance of deleted mtDNA was slightly higher in cytochrome c oxidase (COX)-negative fibers (70%) than in COX-positive fibers (64%), whereas in the conducting myocardium it was lower in the atrioventricular node (9%) than in the sinus node and bundle of His (30% and 32%, respectively). In this study, LCM proved to be a reliable technique for a more accurate assessment of genotype/phenotype correlation when investigating mtDNA-related disorders.

  20. Is the autosomal dominant Opitz GBBB syndrome part of the DiGeorge/velocardiofacial syndrome with deletions of chromosome area 22q11.2?

    SciTech Connect

    Wulfsberg, E.A.

    1996-08-23

    The classification of Opitz GBBB syndrome has been associated with the deletion of the DiGeorge chromosome region on human chromosome 22q11.2. The broad phenotype involved in this deletion syndrome is usually referred to as the DiGeorge/velocardiofacial syndrome. The clinical description of the patient will influence the diagnosis of the syndrome. More exact descriptions are necessary in order to locate the gene(s) for these disorders. 13 refs.

  1. 22q11.2 Deletion syndrome is associated with perioperative outcome in tetralogy of Fallot.

    PubMed

    Mercer-Rosa, Laura; Pinto, Nelangi; Yang, Wei; Tanel, Ronn; Goldmuntz, Elizabeth

    2013-10-01

    We sought to investigate the impact of 22q11.2 deletion on perioperative outcome in tetralogy of Fallot. We conducted a retrospective review of patients with tetralogy of Fallot who underwent complete surgical reconstruction at The Children's Hospital of Philadelphia between 1995 and 2006. Inclusion criteria included diagnosis of tetralogy of Fallot and known genotype. Fisher exact and Mann-Whitney tests were used for categoric and continuous variables, respectively. Regression analysis was used to determine whether deletion status predicts outcome. We studied 208 subjects with tetralogy of Fallot, 164 (79%) without and 44 (20%) with 22q11.2 deletion syndrome. There were no differences in sex, race, gestational age, age at diagnosis, admission weight, and duration of mechanical ventilation. Presenting anatomy, survival, complications and reoperations were also comparable between patients with and without 22q11.2 deletion syndrome. Those with 22q11.2 deletion syndrome had more aortopulmonary shunts preceding complete surgical repair (21% vs 7%, P = .02). This association was present after adjustment for presenting anatomy (stenosis, atresia, or absence of pulmonary valve and common atrioventricular canal) and surgical era. In addition, those with 22q11.2 deletion syndrome had longer cardiopulmonary bypass time (84 vs 72 minutes, P = .02) and duration of intensive care (6 vs 4 days, P = .007). Genotype affects early operative outcomes in tetralogy of Fallot resulting, in particular, in longer duration of intensive care. Future studies are required to determine factors contributing to such differences in this susceptible population. Copyright © 2013 The American Association for Thoracic Surgery. Published by Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Induced chromosome deletions cause hypersociability and other features of Williams-Beuren syndrome in mice.

    PubMed

    Li, Hong Hua; Roy, Madhuri; Kuscuoglu, Unsal; Spencer, Corinne M; Halm, Birgit; Harrison, Katharine C; Bayle, Joseph H; Splendore, Alessandra; Ding, Feng; Meltzer, Leslie A; Wright, Elena; Paylor, Richard; Deisseroth, Karl; Francke, Uta

    2009-04-01

    The neurodevelopmental disorder Williams-Beuren syndrome is caused by spontaneous approximately 1.5 Mb deletions comprising 25 genes on human chromosome 7q11.23. To functionally dissect the deletion and identify dosage-sensitive genes, we created two half-deletions of the conserved syntenic region on mouse chromosome 5G2. Proximal deletion (PD) mice lack Gtf2i to Limk1, distal deletion (DD) mice lack Limk1 to Fkbp6, and the double heterozygotes (D/P) model the complete human deletion. Gene transcript levels in brain are generally consistent with gene dosage. Increased sociability and acoustic startle response are associated with PD, and cognitive defects with DD. Both PD and D/P males are growth-retarded, while skulls are shortened and brains are smaller in DD and D/P. Lateral ventricle (LV) volumes are reduced, and neuronal cell density in the somatosensory cortex is increased, in PD and D/P. Motor skills are most impaired in D/P. Together, these partial deletion mice replicate crucial aspects of the human disorder and serve to identify genes and gene networks contributing to the neural substrates of complex behaviours and behavioural disorders.

  3. Terminal chromosome 4q deletion syndrome in an infant with hearing impairment and moderate syndromic features: review of literature

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Terminal deletions of chromosome 4q are associated with a broad spectrum of phenotypes including cardiac, craniofacial, digital, and cognitive impairment. The rarity of this syndrome renders genotype-phenotype correlation difficult, which is further complicated by the widely different phenotypes observed in patients sharing similar deletion intervals. Case presentation Herein, we describe a boy with congenital hearing impairment and a variety of moderate syndromic features that prompted SNP array analysis disclosing a heterozygous 6.9 Mb deletion in the 4q35.1q35.2 region, which emerged de novo in the maternal germ line. Conclusion In addition to the index patient, we review 35 cases from the literature and DECIPHER database to attempt genotype-phenotype correlations for a syndrome with great phenotypic variability. We delineate intervals with recurrent phenotypic overlap, particularly for cleft palate, congenital heart defect, intellectual disability, and autism spectrum disorder. Broad phenotypic presentation of the terminal 4q deletion syndrome is consistent with incomplete penetrance of the individual symptoms. PMID:24962056

  4. Physical mapping of the holoprosencephaly critical region in 18p11.3.

    PubMed Central

    Overhauser, J; Mitchell, H F; Zackai, E H; Tick, D B; Rojas, K; Muenke, M

    1995-01-01

    Holoprosencephaly (HPE) is a common developmental defect that results in a spectrum of craniofacial malformations. HPE is genetically heterogeneous, some cases being associated with deletions of the short arm of chromosome 18. In order to map the putative HPE gene located on 18p (HPE4) more precisely, six patients with various cytogenetic 18p deletions and clinical features of HPE have been characterized by using a combination of somatic cell hybrid analysis and FISH. By using a set of 27 chromosome 18p-specific markers, the deletion in each patient was characterized. The HPE minimal critical region on 18p was defined on a molecular level, localizing the HPE4 gene to 18p11.3. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 PMID:7485158

  5. Otologic and audiologic findings in 22q11.2 deletion syndrome.

    PubMed

    Verheij, E; Kist, A L; Mink van der Molen, A B; Stegeman, I; van Zanten, G A; Grolman, W; Thomeer, H G X M

    2017-02-01

    Hearing loss is frequently present in the 22q11.2 deletion syndrome. Our aim was to describe the audiologic and otologic features of patients with 22q11.2 deletion syndrome. We conducted a retrospective cohort study in a single tertiary referral center. We reviewed medical files of all patients with 22q11.2 deletion syndrome who visited an otolaryngologist, plastic surgeon or speech therapist, for audiologic or otologic features. Hearing loss was defined as a pure tone average (of 0.5, 1, 2, and 4 kHz) of >20 decibel hearing level. Audiograms were available for 102 of 199 included patients, out of which 163 ears were measured in the required frquencies (0.5-4 kHz). Median age at time of most recent audiogram was 7 years (range 3-29 years). In 62 out of 163 ears (38%), hearing loss was present. Most ears had conductive hearing loss (n = 58) and 4 ears had mixed hearing loss. The severity of hearing loss was most frequently mild (pure tone average of ≤40 decibel hearing level). In 22.5% of ears, otitis media with effusion was observed at time of most recent audiogram. Age was not related to mean air conduction hearing thresholds or to otitis media with effusion (p = 0.43 and p = 0.11, respectively). In conclusion, hearing loss and otitis media are frequently present in patients with 22q11.2 deletion syndrome. Moreover, our results suggest that children with 22q11.2 deletion syndrome remain susceptible for otitis media as they age.

  6. A de novo deletion at 16q24.3 involving ANKRD11 in a Japanese patient with KBG syndrome.

    PubMed

    Miyatake, Satoko; Murakami, Akira; Okamoto, Nobuhiko; Sakamoto, Michiko; Miyake, Noriko; Saitsu, Hirotomo; Matsumoto, Naomichi

    2013-05-01

    KBG syndrome is a rare autosomal dominant congenital syndrome comprising developmental delay with various neurological involvements, macrodontia of the upper central incisors, characteristic facial dysmorphism, and skeletal anomalies. ANKRD11 was recently identified as the gene responsible for this syndrome. To date, there have been only five KBG syndrome families described, each carrying a single base substitution or a 1- to 14-bp deletion of this gene. Here, we present a patient with clinically confirmed KBG syndrome carrying a de novo 690-kb deletion at 16q24.3 involving part of ANKRD11. He had characteristic facial appearance, macrodontia of the upper central incisors, hand anomalies, delayed bone age and intellectual impairment without autistic features. Interestingly, the deleted region overlaps with the critical region for 16q24.3 microdeletion syndrome. We discuss the clinical entities of KBG syndrome and 16q24.3 microdeletion syndrome from a clinical and genetic point of view.

  7. The diverse clinical features of chromosome 22q11.2 deletion syndrome (DiGeorge syndrome).

    PubMed

    Maggadottir, Solrun Melkorka; Sullivan, Kathleen E

    2013-01-01

    A 2-year-old boy with chromosome 22q11.2 deletion syndrome was referred for recurrent sinopulmonary infections. He was diagnosed shortly after birth by a fluorescence in situ hybridization test that was performed due to interrupted aortic arch type B. He had no hypocalcemia, and his recovery from cardiac repair was uneventful. He had difficulty feeding and gained weight slowly, but, otherwise, there were no concerns during his first year of life. At 15 months of age, he began to develop significant otitis media and bronchitis. He was hospitalized once for pneumonia at 18 months of age and has never been off antibiotics for more than 1 week since then. He has not had any previous immunologic evaluation. Recurrent sinopulmonary infections in a child with chromosome 22q11.2 deletion syndrome can have the same etiologies as in any other child. Atopy, anatomic issues, cystic fibrosis, and new environmental exposures could be considered in this setting. Early childhood can be problematic for patients with chromosome 22q11.2 deletion syndrome due to unfavorable drainage of the middle ear and sinuses. Atopy occurs at a higher frequency in 22q11.2 deletion syndrome, and these children also have a higher rate of gastroesophageal reflux and aspiration than the general population. As would be appropriate for any child who presents with recurrent infections at 2 years of age, an immunologic evaluation should be performed. In this review, we will highlight recent findings and new data on the management of children and adults with chromosome 22q11.2 deletion syndrome.

  8. [Effect of carbamazepine on epilepsy with 1p36 deletion syndrome].

    PubMed

    Nabatame, Shin; Okinaga, Takeshi; Imai, Katsumi; Kamio, Noriko; Kagitani-Shimono, Kuriko; Nagai, Toshisaburo; Kurosawa, Kenji; Ozono, Keiichi

    2007-07-01

    The 1p36 deletion syndrome is caused by submicroscopic deletion in the subtelomeric region of chromosome 1. Epilepsy is one of the most important features of the syndrome, in addition to the characteristic facial appearance, cardiac anomaly, dysphagia, deafness, mental retardation and growth delay. We identified three patients with this syndrome and assessed the features of complicated epilepsy. In all cases, epilepsy developed during infancy. The seizure types were mainly focal seizure and multiple seizure types including tonic seizure and tonic-clonic seizure. Interictal electroencephalogram showed focal abnormalities. Noticeably, two developed epileptic spasms and hypsarrhythmia in electroencephalogram, just after the administration of carbamazepine (CBZ). Including cases showing epileptic spasms, their epilepsy was easily tractable with anti-epileptic drugs, which could be withdrawn as they aged. All had deleted potassium channel beta subunit (KCNAB2) and gamma-aminobutyric acid A receptor delta (GABRD). CBZ may aggravate various epileptic syndromes, especially, those caused by GABA-A receptor gene mutation. Our cases may suggest the novel correspondence of GABA-A receptor-related epilepsy syndrome and exacerbation of epilepsy triggered by CBZ.

  9. Deletion of 7q33-q35 in a Patient with Intellectual Disability and Dysmorphic Features: Further Characterization of 7q Interstitial Deletion Syndrome.

    PubMed

    Dilzell, Kristen; Darcy, Diana; Sum, John; Wallerstein, Robert

    2015-01-01

    This case report concerns a 16-year-old girl with a 9.92 Mb, heterozygous interstitial chromosome deletion at 7q33-q35, identified using array comparative genomic hybridization. The patient has dysmorphic facial features, intellectual disability, recurrent infections, self-injurious behavior, obesity, and recent onset of hemihypertrophy. This patient has overlapping features with previously reported individuals who have similar deletions spanning the 7q32-q36 region. It has been difficult to describe an interstitial 7q deletion syndrome due to variations in the sizes and regions in the few patients reported in the literature. This case contributes to the further characterization of an interstitial distal 7q deletion syndrome.

  10. Deletion of 7q33-q35 in a Patient with Intellectual Disability and Dysmorphic Features: Further Characterization of 7q Interstitial Deletion Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Dilzell, Kristen; Darcy, Diana; Sum, John; Wallerstein, Robert

    2015-01-01

    This case report concerns a 16-year-old girl with a 9.92 Mb, heterozygous interstitial chromosome deletion at 7q33-q35, identified using array comparative genomic hybridization. The patient has dysmorphic facial features, intellectual disability, recurrent infections, self-injurious behavior, obesity, and recent onset of hemihypertrophy. This patient has overlapping features with previously reported individuals who have similar deletions spanning the 7q32-q36 region. It has been difficult to describe an interstitial 7q deletion syndrome due to variations in the sizes and regions in the few patients reported in the literature. This case contributes to the further characterization of an interstitial distal 7q deletion syndrome. PMID:26064708

  11. Two novel gross deletions of TSC2 in Malaysian patients with tuberous sclerosis complex and TSC2/PKD1 contiguous deletion syndrome.

    PubMed

    Ismail, Nur Farrah Dila; Nik Abdul Malik, Nik Mohd Ariff; Mohseni, Jafar; Rani, Abdulqawee Mahyoob; Hayati, Fatemeh; Salmi, Abdul Razak; Narazah, Mohd Yusof; Zabidi-Hussin, Z A M H; Silawati, Abdul Rashid; Keng, Wee Teik; Ngu, Lock Hock; Sasongko, Teguh Haryo

    2014-05-01

    Tuberous sclerosis complex is an autosomal dominant neurocutaneous disorder affecting multiple organs. Tuberous sclerosis complex is caused by mutation in either one of the two disease-causing genes, TSC1 or TSC2, encoding for hamartin and tuberin, respectively. TSC2/PKD1 contiguous gene deletion syndrome is a very rare condition due to deletion involving both TSC2 and PKD1 genes. Tuberous sclerosis complex cannot be easily diagnosed since there is no pathognomonic feature, although there are consensus diagnostic criteria for that. Mutation analysis is useful and plays important roles. We report here two novel gross deletions of TSC2 gene in Malay patients with tuberous sclerosis complex and TSC2/PKD1 contiguous gene deletion syndrome, respectively.

  12. Mild developmental delay and obesity in two patients with mosaic 1p36 deletion syndrome.

    PubMed

    Shimada, Shino; Maegaki, Yoshihiro; Osawa, Makiko; Yamamoto, Toshiyuki

    2014-02-01

    We identified mosaic 1p36 deletions in two patients with developmental delay, distinctive features, and obesity, who can walk alone and communicate with others. Thus, their neurological defects are milder than those in typical patients with 1p36 deletion syndrome because most patients with 1p36 deletion cannot acquire expressive language. Chromosomal microarray testing revealed 3.0 and 4.5 Mb aberrations in the subtelomeric region of the short arm of chromosome 1. Mean signal ratios of the identified aberrations were -0.4 and -0.5, indicating mosaicism, which was confirmed by fluorescence in situ hybridization analysis with a mosaic ratio of 70% and 77%, respectively. Previous studies demonstrated that deletion of the distal 2-3 Mb region would be responsible for hyperphagia and obesity seen in patients. On the other hand, the severity of the neurological defect often correlates with the size of the terminal deletion of 1p36, and patients with larger deletions of 1p36 would usually show severely impaired developmental milestones and be immobile and aphasic. In such cases, hyperphagia and obesity could be clinically masked. In this study, two patients with mosaic deletions of 1p36 showed obesity as a consequence of hyperphagia. This study suggests that patients with 1p36 deletion would be at risk for hyperphagia and obesity when they have both risk factors, that is, (1) deletions including the 2-3 Mb critical region and (2) milder phenotypes that allow them to reach food on their own and to overeat.

  13. Mitochondrial DNA deletion in a patient with combined features of Leigh and Pearson syndromes

    SciTech Connect

    Blok, R.B.; Thorburn, D.R.; Danks, D.M.

    1994-09-01

    We describe a heteroplasmic 4237 bp mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) deletion in an 11 year old girl who has suffered from progressive illness since birth. She has some features of Leigh syndrome (global developmental delay with regression, brainstem dysfunction and lactic acidosis), together with other features suggestive of Pearson syndrome (history of pancytopenia and failure to thrive). The deletion was present at a level greater than 50% in skeletal muscle, but barely detectable in skin fibroblasts following Southern blot analysis, and only observed in blood following PCR analysis. The deletion spanned nt 9498 to nt 13734, and was flanked by a 12 bp direct repeat. Genes for cytochrome c oxidase subunit III, NADH dehydrogenase subunits 3, 4L, 4 and 5, and tRNAs for glycine, arginine, histidine, serine({sup AGY}) and leucine({sup CUN}) were deleted. Southern blotting also revealed an altered Apa I restriction site which was shown by sequence analysis to be caused by G{r_arrow}A nucleotide substitution at nt 1462 in the 12S rRNA gene. This was presumed to be a polymorphism. No abnormalities of mitochondrial ultrastructure, distribution or of respiratory chain enzyme complexes I-IV in skeletal muscle were observed. Mitochondrial disorders with clinical features overlapping more than one syndrome have been reported previously. This case further demonstrates the difficulty in correlating observed clinical features with a specific mitochondrial DNA mutation.

  14. Expanding the phenotype of 22q11 deletion syndrome: the MURCS association.

    PubMed

    Uliana, Vera; Giordano, Nicola; Caselli, Rossella; Papa, Filomena Tiziana; Ariani, Francesca; Marcocci, Claudio; Gianetti, Elena; Martini, Giuseppe; Papakostas, Panagiotis; Rollo, Fabio; Meloni, Ilaria; Mari, Francesca; Priolo, Manuela; Renieri, Alessandra; Nuti, Ranuccio

    2008-01-01

    The MURCS association [Müllerian Duct aplasia or hypoplasia (M), unilateral renal agenesis (UR) and cervicothoracic somite dysplasia (CS)] manifests itself as Müllerian Duct aplasia or hypoplasia, unilateral renal agenesis and cervicothoracic somite dysplasia. We report on a 22-year-old woman with bicornuate uterus, right renal agenesis, C2-C3 vertebral fusion (MURCS association) and 22q11.2 deletion. Angio-MRI revealed the aberrant origin of arch arteries. Hashimoto thyroiditis, micropolycystic ovaries with a dermoid cyst in the right ovary and mild osteoporosis were also diagnosed. Accurate revision of radiographs enabled us also to identify thoracolumbar and lumbosacral vertebral-differentiation defects. Audiometry and echocardiogram were normal. Bone densitometry showed osteoporosis. As per our evaluation, the patient had short stature, obesity (BMI 30.7) and facial features suggestive of the 22q11 deletion syndrome. Multiplex ligation-dependent probe amplification analysis showed a de-novo 22q11.2 deletion confirmed by array-comparative genomic hybridization analysis. We discuss whether this is a casual association or whether it is an additional syndrome owing to the well known phenotype extensive variability of the 22q11 deletion syndrome.

  15. Genotype/phenotype correlation in women with nonmosaic X chromosome deletions and Turner syndrome

    SciTech Connect

    Zinn, A.R.

    1994-09-01

    Turner syndrome is a complex human developmental disorder associated with the absence of the second sex chromosome (monosomy X). Cardinal features of the Turner phenotype include high intrauterine lethality, growth retardation, gonadal failure, and the variable presence of specific somatic abnormalities such as webbed neck, lymphedema, and skeletal abnormalities. Recent observations support the hypothesis that the phenotype associated with monosomy X results from haploid dosage of genes common the X and Y chromosomes that escape X-inactivation ({open_quotes}Turner genes{close_quotes}). Apart from a locus causing short stature that maps to the pseudoautosomal region on the distal short arm, the location of X-linked Turner genes is not known. Karyotype/phenotype correlations in women with partial X deletions have been inconsistent. However, previous studies have focused on sporadic sex chromosome aberrations and may have been confounded by occult mosaicism. In addition, mapping of deletions was limited by the resolution of cytogenetic techniques. I am reexamining genotype/phenotype correlations in partial X monosomy, focusing on a subset of cases in which mosaicism is highly unlikely (e.g., unbalanced X-autosome translocations, familial X deletions), and using molecular techniques to map deletions. I have collected eight cases of nonmosaic X deletions in women with varied manifestations of Turner syndrome. Cytogenetic data suggests that genes responsible for Turner anatomic abnormalities may lie within a critical region of the very proximal portion of the short arm (Xp11). Molecular characterization of the deletions is in progress. Methods include (1) fluorescence in situ hybridization of metaphase spreads from patient-derived cell lines, using cosmid probes that map to known locations on Xp, and (2) sequence tagged site (STS) content mapping of somatic cell hybrids retaining the deleted X chromosomes derived from these cell lines.

  16. A 8.26Mb deletion in 6q16 and a 4.95Mb deletion in 20p12 including JAG1 and BMP2 in a patient with Alagille syndrome and Wolff-Parkinson-White syndrome.

    PubMed

    Le Gloan, Laurianne; Pichon, Olivier; Isidor, Bertrand; Boceno, Michelle; Rival, Jean-Marie; David, Albert; Le Caignec, Cédric

    2008-01-01

    We report a child presenting with Alagille and Wolff-Parkinson-White (WPW) syndromes. Standard karyotyping showed a de novo 46,XY,t(1;6)(p31;q16) translocation. Fluorescent in situ hybridization analysis identified a de novo deletion in the 20p12 chromosomal region encompassing JAG1, the major gene responsible for Alagille syndrome. The aberration was further characterized using an Agilent 44K oligonucleotide array, which confirmed the 4.95Mb 20p12 deletion. An additional 8.26Mb deletion was identified at the 6q16 translocation breakpoint. To our knowledge, WPW has never been associated with Alagille syndrome. The patient we describe presented with a 6q16 deletion containing 21 genes but no good candidate genes for WPW. The 20p12 deletion included 19 genes among them JAG1 and BMP2. Recently, two unrelated patients with WPW and BMP2 deletions have been reported. Despite a relationship between WPW and JAG1 deletion cannot be excluded, the JAG1 deletion is unlikely responsible for the ventricular preexcitation since WPW has never been associated with Alagille syndrome. Among the other deleted genes in 20p12, BMP2 appears to be a good candidate responsible for the WPW.

  17. Toward a genetic etiology of CHARGE syndrome: I. A systematic scan for submicroscopic deletions.

    PubMed

    Lalani, Seema R; Stockton, David W; Bacino, Carlos; Molinari, Laura M; Glass, Nancy L; Fernbach, Susan D; Towbin, Jeffrey A; Craigen, William J; Graham, John M; Hefner, Margaret A; Lin, Angela E; McBride, Kim L; Davenport, Sandra L; Belmont, John W

    2003-04-30

    CHARGE syndrome is a distinctive subgroup within the more heterogeneous group of patients with CHARGE association. While significant progress has been made in the clinical delineation of this syndrome, the molecular basis of the disorder remains unknown. Based on the complex phenotype, some overlap with DiGeorge/velocardiofacial syndrome (DGS/VCFS), and its estimated population incidence, we hypothesized that CHARGE syndrome could be caused by an unidentified genomic microdeletion. In order to address this hypothesis, we carried out a genome-wide screen for loss of expected heterozygosity using 811 microsatellite markers in ten CHARGE syndrome subjects and their unaffected parents. Eight markers gave results suggestive of failure to inherit one parental allele. These loci were tested with fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH), but none showed evidence of deletion. This screen sets upper limits on the length of a CHARGE-related microdeletion, should that be the genetic mechanism underlying the phenotype.

  18. [Genotype and phenotype study of two patients with 22q11.2 deletion syndrome].

    PubMed

    Zhu, Haiyan; Wang, Aiming; Zhang, Hairong; Ji, Chunyan; Zhan, Xiaohua

    2014-10-01

    To carry out genetic analysis for two patients affected with congenital heart disease, developmental delay with or without cleft palate. Cytogenetic and molecular genetic methods including karyotyping, fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH), multiplex ligation-dependent probe amplification (MLPA) and single nucleotide polymorphisms array (SNP-array) were employed to detect potential mutations. For parents of both patients, MLPA was used to analyze whether they were carrier of the deletion. For neither patient, no abnormality was detected upon karyotype analysis. However, FISH analysis has indicated the presence of 22q11.2 deletion. SNP-array analysis has confirmed that both patients have carried a 2.5 Mb deletion in the 22q11.2 region. MLPA analysis suggested none of the parents has carried the same deletion. Although the phenotypes of our patients were not identical, they were both diagnosed as 22q11.2 deletion syndrome by multiple methods. The deletions in both cases were de novo in nature. Precise delineation of the genotype can facilitate better understanding of the patients' phenotype.

  19. Characterization of two novel genes, WBSCR20 and WBSCR22, deleted in Williams-Beuren syndrome.

    PubMed

    Doll, A; Grzeschik, K H

    2001-01-01

    Williams-Beuren syndrome (WBS), due to a contiguous gene deletion of approximately 1.5 Mb at 7q11.23, is a complex developmental disorder with multisystemic manifestations including supravalvular aortic stenosis (SVAS) and a specific cognitive phenotype. Large repeats containing genes and pseudogenes flank the deletion breakpoints, and the mutation mechanism commonly appears to be unequal meiotic crossover. Except for elastin, hemizygosity of which is associated with supravalvular aortic stenosis, it is unknown which of the 18 genes in the deletion area contributes to the phenotype. Here, we report the identification and characterization of two novel genes, WBSCR20 and WBSCR22, which map to the common WBS deletion region. WBSCR22 encodes a putative methyltransferase protein strongly expressed in heart, skeletal muscle and kidney. WBSCR20 encodes a novel protein expressed in skeletal muscle with similarity to p120 (NOL1), a 120-kDa proliferation-associated nucleolar antigen, a member of an evolutionarily conserved protein family. A highly similar putative gene, WBSCR20B, flanks the WBS deletion at the telomeric side. Hemizygous deletion of either of the novel genes might contribute to the growth retardation, the myopathy or the premature aging effects in the pathogenesis of WBS. Copyright 2002 S. Karger AG, Basel

  20. Large genomic fibrillin-1 (FBN1) gene deletions provide evidence for true haploinsufficiency in Marfan syndrome.

    PubMed

    Mátyás, Gábor; Alonso, Sira; Patrignani, Andrea; Marti, Myriam; Arnold, Eliane; Magyar, István; Henggeler, Caroline; Carrel, Thierry; Steinmann, Beat; Berger, Wolfgang

    2007-08-01

    Mutations in the FBN1 gene are the major cause of Marfan syndrome (MFS), an autosomal dominant connective tissue disorder, which displays variable manifestations in the cardiovascular, ocular, and skeletal systems. Current molecular genetic testing of FBN1 may miss mutations in the promoter region or in other noncoding sequences as well as partial or complete gene deletions and duplications. In this study, we tested for copy number variations by successively applying multiplex ligation-dependent probe amplification (MLPA) and the Affymetrix Human Mapping 500 K Array Set, which contains probes for approximately 500,000 single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) across the genome. By analyzing genomic DNA of 101 unrelated individuals with MFS or related phenotypes in whom standard genetic testing detected no mutation, we identified FBN1 deletions in two patients with MFS. Our high-resolution approach narrowed down the deletion breakpoints. Subsequent sequencing of the junctional fragments revealed the deletion sizes of 26,887 and 302,580 bp, respectively. Surprisingly, both deletions affect the putative regulatory and promoter region of the FBN1 gene, strongly indicating that they abolish transcription of the deleted allele. This expectation of complete loss of function of one allele, i.e. true haploinsufficiency, was confirmed by transcript analyses. Our findings not only emphasize the importance of screening for large genomic rearrangements in comprehensive genetic testing of FBN1 but, importantly, also extend the molecular etiology of MFS by providing hitherto unreported evidence that true haploinsufficiency is sufficient to cause MFS.

  1. Comparison of phenotype in uniparental disomy and deletion Prader-Willi syndrome: Sex specific differences

    SciTech Connect

    Mitchell, J.; Langlois, S.; Robinson, W.P.

    1996-10-16

    Prader-Willi syndrome (PWS) results primarily from either a paternal deletion of 15q11-q13 or maternal uniparental disomy (UPD) 15. Birth parameters and clinical presentation of 79 confirmed UPD cases and 43 deletion patients were compared in order to test whether any manifestations differ between the two groups. There were no major clinical differences between the two classes analyzed as a whole, other than the presence of hypopigmentation predominantly in the deletion group. However, there was a significant bias in sex-ratio (P<.001) limited to the UPD group with a predominance (68%) of males. An equal number of males and females was observed in the deletion group. When analyzed by sex, several significant differences between the UPD and deletion groups were observed. Female UPD patients were found to be less severely affected than female deletion patients in terms of length of gavage feeding and a later onset of hyperphagia. Although these traits are likely to be influenced by external factors, they may reflect a milder presentation of female UPD patients which could explain the observed sex bias by causing under-ascertainment of female UPD. Alternatively, there may be an effect of sex on either early trisomy 15 survival or the probability of somatic loss of a chromosome from a trisomic conceptus. 26 refs., 1 tab.

  2. Angelman syndrome caused by deletion: a genotype-phenotype correlation determined by breakpoint.

    PubMed

    Valente, Kette D; Varela, Monica Castro; Koiffmann, Celia Priszkulnik; Andrade, Joaquina Queiroz; Grossmann, Rosi; Kok, Fernando; Marques-Dias, Maria Joaquina

    2013-07-01

    Deletion of the chromosome 15q11-q13, the most common genetic mechanism associated with Angelman syndrome (AS), is highly associated with a severe phenotype. However, deletion is not a genetically homogeneous group as it is composed by two main groups: Class I with breakpoints at BP1 (proximal) and BP3 (distal) and Class II present breakpoints at BP2 (proximal) and BP3 (distal). In this study, we aimed to evaluate the impact of the breakpoint on the electroclinical profile. We evaluated 16 patients with AS caused by 15q11-13 deletion (6 were Class I; 10 were Class II). We characterized epilepsy features by clinical history obtained from parents and caretakers with a pre-standard questionnaire. These data were corroborated by medical records, contact with previous physicians, and video-EEG monitoring. Suggestive EEG patterns for AS were classified according to the classical description of Boyd et al. (1988). AS patients with BP1-BP3 deletion had significantly more daily and disabling seizures than AS patients with BP1-BP2 deletion. They also presented a significant higher frequency of status epilepticus and epilepsy aggravated by fever. Need for polytherapy was significantly more frequent in BP1-BP3 patients. EEG features were similar in both groups. This study shows a significant correlation between the two deletion classes and AS clinical, but not the electrographic phenotype. Epilepsy is more severe and refractory to treatment in patients with larger deletions. Deletion is not a homogeneous group and knowledge on the breakpoint may have a clinical implication and represent an important factor in parental counseling. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Severe laryngeal stenosis in newly born twins with 22q11.2 deletion syndrome: A case report.

    PubMed

    Clive, B; Corsten, G; Penney, L S; Van den Hof, M; El-Naggar, W

    2016-05-18

    Chromosome 22q11.2 deletion syndrome is common and presents with a range of clinical features from cardiac malformations to hypocalcemia. Laryngeal anomalies are not a common feature of this syndrome. We describe newly born twins who presented with unexpected severe birth depression secondary to severe type IV glottic webs requiring extensive resuscitation and emergency tracheostomy. They were diagnosed postnatally to have deletion of 22q11.2. The successful resuscitation of these infants at birth was only possible because they were born in a tertiary care hospital. This report shows the critical nature of prenatal diagnosis of 22q11.2 deletion syndrome.

  4. WAGR syndrome and congenital hypothyroidism in a child with a Mosaic 11p13 deletion.

    PubMed

    Huynh, Minh Tuan; Boudry-Labis, Elise; Duban, Bénédicte; Andrieux, Joris; Tran, Cong Toai; Tampere, Heidi; Ceraso, Delphine; Manouvrier, Sylvie; Tachdjian, Gérard; Roche-Lestienne, Catherine; Vincent-Delorme, Catherine

    2017-04-11

    Wilm's tumor, aniridia, genitourinary anomalies, and mental retardation (WAGR) syndrome, a rare genetic disorder, is caused by the loss of 11p13 region including PAX6 and WT1. We report novel findings in a 28-month-old boy with aniridia, Wilm's tumor, congenital hypothyroidism, and sublingual thyroid ectopia. He was found to have a mosaic 5.28 Mb interstitial deletion of chromosome 11p13 deleting PAX6 and WT1. In order to clarify the mechanism underlying his thyroid dysgenesis, sequence analysis of candidate thyroid developmental genes was performed. We identified a FOXE1: c.532_537delGCCGCC p.(Ala178_Ala179del) variant that predisposes to thyroid ectopia. Taken together, this is the first report of mosaic 11p13 deletion in association with thyroid dysgenesis. We also propose a model of complex interactions of different genetic variants for this particular phenotype in the present patient.

  5. An Amino Acid Deletion in SZT2 in a Family with Non-Syndromic Intellectual Disability

    PubMed Central

    Falcone, Michelle; Yariz, Kemal O.; Ross, David B.; Foster, Joseph; Menendez, Ibis; Tekin, Mustafa

    2013-01-01

    Autosomal recessive intellectual disability (ID) is characterized by extensive genetic heterogeneity. Recently, three mutations in SZT2 were reported in two unrelated children with unexplained infantile epileptic encephalopathy with severe ID. Here we report a European American family with three children having non-syndromic mild or moderate ID without seizures. Whole-exome sequencing of three affected siblings revealed a three base pair deletion (c.4202_4204delTTC) located in a 19 mb autozygous region on chromosome 1, leading to an amino acid deletion (p.Phe1401del) in SZT2. All three children were homozygous for the deletion and their parents were heterozygous as expected in autosomal recessive inheritance. SZT2 is highly expressed in neuronal tissues and regulates seizure threshold and neuronal excitation in mice. We conclude that the disruption of SZT2 with some residual function might lead to mild or moderate ID without seizures. PMID:24324832

  6. Polymicrogyria and infantile spasms in a patient with 1p36 deletion syndrome.

    PubMed

    Saito, Yoshiaki; Kubota, Masaya; Kurosawa, Kenji; Ichihashi, Izumi; Kaneko, Yuu; Hattori, Ayako; Komaki, Hirofumi; Nakagawa, Eiji; Sugai, Kenji; Sasaki, Masayuki

    2011-05-01

    A 3-months-old boy presented with partial seizures that soon evolved into infantile spasms. Magnetic resonance imaging revealed bilateral perisylvian polymicrogyria with right-sided predominance. ACTH therapy successfully controlled epilepsy and electroencephalograms were normalized. Conventional G-banded chromosomal analysis was performed due to his distinctive features and a derivative chromosome 1 derived from parental balanced translocation with a karyoptype of 46,XY,der(1)t(1;4)(p36.23;q35) was detected. Fluorescent in situ hybridization analysis confirmed the deleted region of 1p36 as large as 8.6Mb. This is the first delineation of concurrent complications of infantile spasms and polymicrogyria in patient with 1p36 deletion. 1p36 deletion syndrome should be broadly recognized as a differential diagnosis of regional polymicrogyria and/or infantile spasms.

  7. Velopharyngeal Anatomy in 22q11.2 Deletion Syndrome: A Three-Dimensional Cephalometric Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Ruotolo, Rachel A.; Veitia, Nestor A.; Corbin, Aaron; McDonough, Joseph; Solot, Cynthia B.; McDonald-McGinn, Donna; Zackai, Elaine H.; Emanuel, Beverly S.; Cnaan, Avital; LaRossa, Don; Arens, Raanan; Kirschner, Richard E.

    2010-01-01

    Objective 22q11.2 deletion syndrome is the most common genetic cause of velopharyngeal dysfunction (VPD). Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is a promising method for noninvasive, three-dimensional (3D) assessment of velopharyngeal (VP) anatomy. The purpose of this study was to assess VP structure in patients with 22q11.2 deletion syndrome by using 3D MRI analysis. Design This was a retrospective analysis of magnetic resonance images obtained in patients with VPD associated with a 22q11.2 deletion compared with a normal control group. Setting This study was conducted at The Children’s Hospital of Philadelphia, a pediatric tertiary care center. Patients, Participants The study group consisted of 5 children between the ages of 2.9 and 7.9 years, with 22q11.2 deletion syndrome confirmed by fluorescence in situ hybridization analysis. All had VPD confirmed by nasendoscopy or videofluoroscopy. The control population consisted of 123 unaffected patients who underwent MRI for reasons other than VP assessment. Interventions Axial and sagittal T1- and T2-weighted magnetic resonance images with 3-mm slice thickness were obtained from the orbit to the larynx in all patients by using a 1.5T Siemens Visions system. Outcome Measures Linear, angular, and volumetric measurements of VP structures were obtained from the magnetic resonance images with VIDA image- processing software. Results The study group demonstrated greater anterior and posterior cranial base and atlanto-dental angles. They also demonstrated greater pharyngeal cavity volume and width and lesser tonsillar and adenoid volumes. Conclusion Patients with a 22q11.2 deletion demonstrate significant alterations in VP anatomy that may contribute to VPD. PMID:16854203

  8. Isolation of a zinc finger gene consistently deleted in DiGeorge syndrome.

    PubMed

    Aubry, M; Demczuk, S; Desmaze, C; Aikem, M; Aurias, A; Julien, J P; Rouleau, G A

    1993-10-01

    DiGeorge syndrome is a human developmental disorder resulting in hypoplasia of the thymus and parathyroids, and conotruncal heart defects. We recently isolated four genes with zinc finger DNA binding motifs mapping to chromosome 22q11.2 DiGeorge critical region. We now report that one of them, ZNF74 gene, is hemizygously deleted in 23 out of 24 DiGeorge syndrome patients tested. ZNF74 mRNA transcripts are detected in human and mouse embryos but not in adult tissues. Sequence analysis of a corresponding cDNA reveals an an open reading frame encoding 12 zinc finger motifs of the Kruppel/TFIIIA type as well as N-terminal and C-terminal non-zinc finger domains. These results suggest that changes in the dosage of a putative transcription factor through ZNF74 hemizygous deletion may be critical for DiGeorge developmental anomalies.

  9. Communication issues in 22q11.2 deletion syndrome: children at risk.

    PubMed

    Solot, C B; Gerdes, M; Kirschner, R E; McDonald-McGinn, D M; Moss, E; Woodin, M; Aleman, D; Zackai, E H; Wang, P P

    2001-01-01

    The purpose of this investigation is to describe the communication profile of children with the 22q11.2 deletion syndrome from infancy through school age and to examine the influence of other medical aspects, such as palate anomalies, learning disorders, and cardiac defects of the syndrome to communication. Seventy-nine children were examined using standardized tests of speech and language and perceptual measures of resonance and voice. Results show significant delay in emergence of speech and language milestones with delay/disorder in speech-language processes persisting into the school aged years, including those children diagnosed with nonverbal learning disabilities. Persistent articulation and resonance disorders were also present, presumed to be related in part to palatal anomalies. No correlation was found between cardiac status, learning disorders, palate anomalies and communication disorders. The need for early identification and management of communication skills is crucial in the care of children with the 22q11.2 deletion.

  10. Xp21 contiguous gene syndromes: Deletion quantitation with bivariate flow karyotyping allows mapping of patient breakpoints

    SciTech Connect

    McCabe, E.R.B.; Towbin, J.A. ); Engh, G. van den; Trask, B.J. )

    1992-12-01

    Bivariate flow karyotyping was used to estimate the deletion sizes for a series of patients with Xp21 contiguous gene syndromes. The deletion estimates were used to develop an approximate scale for the genomic map in Xp21. The bivariate flow karyotype results were compared with clinical and molecular genetic information on the extent of the patients' deletions, and these various types of data were consistent. The resulting map spans >15 Mb, from the telomeric interval between DXS41 (99-6) and DXS68 (1-4) to a position centromeric to the ornithine transcarbamylase locus. The deletion sizing was considered to be accurate to [plus minus]1 Mb. The map provides information on the relative localization of genes and markers within this region. For example, the map suggests that the adrenal hypoplasia congenita and glycerol kinase genes are physically close to each other, are within 1-2 Mb of the telomeric end of the Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) gene, and are nearer to the DMD locus than to the more distal marker DXS28 (C7). Information of this type is useful in developing genomic strategies for positional cloning in Xp21. These investigations demonstrate that the DNA from patients with Xp21 contiguous gene syndromes can be valuable reagents, not only for ordering loci and markers but also for providing an approximate scale to the map of the Xp21 region surrounding DMD. 44 refs., 3 figs.

  11. SNORD116 deletions cause Prader-Willi syndrome with a mild phenotype and macrocephaly.

    PubMed

    Fontana, P; Grasso, M; Acquaviva, F; Gennaro, E; Galli, M L; Falco, M; Scarano, F; Scarano, G; Lonardo, F

    2017-10-01

    Prader-Willi syndrome is a complex condition caused by lack of expression of imprinted genes in the paternally derived region of chromosome 15 (15q11q13). A small number of patients with Prader-Willi phenotype have been discovered to have narrow deletions, not encompassing the whole critical region, but only the SNORD116 cluster, which includes genes codifying for small nucleolar RNAs. This kind of deletion usually is not detected by the classic DNA methylation analysis test. We present the case of a male patient with a mild Prader-Willi phenotype and a small deletion including SNORD116, diagnosed by methylation-sensitive multiplex ligation-dependent probe amplification (MLPA. The patient showed neonatal hypotonia, hyperphagia, obesity, central hypogonadism, hypothyroidism, strabismus. Stature and intellectual development are within the normal range. The presence of macrocephaly, observed in other cases of SNORD116 deletions as well, is uncommon for the classic phenotype of the syndrome. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  12. [Contiguous gene deletion syndrome in Xp21: an unusual form of presentation].

    PubMed

    Sanz-Ruiz, I; Bretón-Martínez, J R; Del Castillo-Villaescusa, C; Cásanovas-Martínez, A; Martínez-Castellano, F; Millán-Salvador, J M; Hernández-Marco, R; Codoñer-Franch, P

    We report a case of an infant where the association of Duchenne's muscular dystrophy (DMD) and pseudohypertriglyceridaemia led to the diagnosis of contiguous gene deletion syndrome in Xp21. A 7-month-old male infant who was referred due to psychomotor retardation. The examination revealed pronounced axial hypotonia. Lab findings showed high levels of muscular enzymes with creatine phosphokinase levels of 12,829 IU/L, together with high blood levels of triglycerides. Electromyogram findings were consistent with myopathic compromise. The genetic study for dystrophinopathies revealed the existence of a deletion in the dystrophin gene. Further lab findings identified high glycerol concentrations both in blood and in urine that were compatible with a glycerol kinase deficiency. The genetic study confirmed the existence of a deletion in Xp21 of the genes responsible for DMD, the glycerol kinase deficiency, the congenital adrenal hypoplasia (gene DAX1) and mental retardation (gene IL1RAPL1). In infants and small children with myopathic compromise, increased levels of creatine phosphokinase and pseudohypertriglyceridaemia it is essential to take into account contiguous gene deletion syndrome in Xp21 to be able to prevent and treat the metabolic complications arising from adrenal hypoplasia.

  13. Interstitial deletion of 11(p11.2p12): A newly described contiguous gene deletion syndrome involving the gene for hereditary multiple exostoses

    SciTech Connect

    Potocki, L.; Shaffer, L.G.

    1996-03-29

    Individuals with deletions of the proximal portion of the short arm of chromosome 11 share many manifestations including mental retardation, biparietal foramina, minor facial anomalies, and multiple cartilaginous exostoses. The finding of multiple exostoses in these patients is remarkable as the disorder hereditary multiple exostoses, which is inherited in an autosomal dominant manner, has recently been mapped by linkage to three regions, including proximal 11p. We report the clinical and molecular findings in an additional patient with an 11(p11.2p12) deletion. Cytogenetic and molecular analysis demonstrated a de novo, paternally derived deletion for markers which have been shown to be tightly linked to the 11p locus (EXT2). These data support the location of EXT2 within this region and also provide information regarding the ordering of polymorphic markers on 11p. Deletion 11(p11.2p12) is a rare, yet specific, deletion syndrome involving the EXT2 locus, a gene for parietal foramina, and a mental retardation locus, and therefore can be classified as a contiguous gene deletion syndrome. 24 refs., 4 figs., 1 tab.

  14. [Deletion 11q23 --> qter (Jacobsen Syndrome) associated with duodenal atresia and annular pancreas].

    PubMed

    Fernández González, N; Prieto Espuñes, S; Ibáñez Fernández, A; Fernández Colomer, B; López Sastre, J; Fernández Toral, J

    2002-09-01

    Jacobsen syndrome is a rare chromosomal disorder due to terminal 11q deletion. Prominent features are growth and psychomotor retardation, trigonocephaly and a characteristic facial dysmorphism, but many different abnormalities have been reported. We present the case of a preterm male. Prenatal ultrasonography was suspicious for duodenal atresia. At birth, the boy presented the craniofacial features typical of Jacobsen syndrome, together with diffusely spread petechiae and talipes equinovarus. Hemogram revealed pancytopenia. Ultrasound examination showed left renal agenesis and confirmed the duodenal atresia. Cerebral computed tomography scan, electroencephalogram and cardiac studies showed no abnormalities. Annular pancreas was found during surgery to correct the duodenal atresia. The karyotype was 46,XY,del(11)(q23.2 --> qter), which confirmed Jacobsen syndrome.A wide spectrum of clinical features is described in Jacobsen syndrome, with phenotype-karyotype correlation. This is the first report of duodenal atresia and annular pancreas.

  15. Evaluation of parathyroid gland function using sodium bicarbonate infusion test for 22q11.2 deletion syndrome.

    PubMed

    Nagasaki, Keisuke; Iwasaki, Yasumasa; Ogawa, Yohei; Kikuchi, Toru; Uchiyama, Makoto

    2011-01-01

    22q11.2 Deletion syndrome is a congenital malformation syndrome with hypoparathyroidism. The spectrum of parathyroid gland dysfunction ranges from severe neonatal hypocalcemia to subclinical hypoparathyroidism. The parathyroid hormone (PTH) secretory reserve is reduced in a significant number of 22q11.2 deletion syndrome patients with normocalcemia. The aim of this study was to investigate hypoparathyroid function using the bicarbonate infusion test for 22q11.2 deletion syndrome with normocalcemia. sodium bicarbonate solution [7% (w/v); 40 ml/m(2) body surface area] was infused for 2 min, and blood samples for the determination of plasma ionized calcium and plasma intact PTH were serially obtained. The test was conducted on five 22q11.2 deletion syndrome patients with normocalcemia. two patients presented increments of intact PTH levels (peak value - basal value) of 70 pg/ml or higher during the test, whereas the remaining 3 showed PTH level increments of <30 pg/ml. The former 2 patients were diagnosed as having normal parathyroid gland function, and the latter 3 patients as having subclinical hypoparathyroidism. the bicarbonate infusion test may be a valuable method for the evaluation of residual parathyroid gland function in patients with 22q11.2 deletion syndrome. Screening of subclinical hypoparathyroidism should be considered in the regular follow-up of patients with 22q11.2 deletion syndrome, even in cases with normocalcemia. 2010 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  16. The Neuropsychology of 22q11 Deletion Syndrome. A Neuropsychiatric Study of 100 Individuals

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Niklasson, Lena; Gillberg, Christopher

    2010-01-01

    The primary objective of this study was to study the impact of ASD/ADHD on general intellectual ability and profile, executive functions and visuo-motor skills in children and adults with 22q11 deletion syndrome (22q11DS). A secondary aim was to study if gender, age, heart disease, ASD, ADHD or ASD in combination with ADHD had an impact on general…

  17. Atypical Angelman syndrome with macrocephaly due to a familial imprinting center deletion.

    PubMed

    Ronan, Anne; Buiting, Karin; Dudding, Tracy

    2008-01-01

    Two elderly brothers with severe intellectual disability were diagnosed with Angelman syndrome after a once-removed, 15-year-old cousin was found to have the syndrome due to a deletion of the imprinting center. For many years it was believed the brothers, who both have macrocephaly, were affected by nonsyndromic X-linked mental retardation. This was because, apart from absent speech and intellectual disability, the phenotype of the two men was not characteristic of Angelman syndrome. Conversely, the cousin, in addition to severe intellectual disability, language impairment, and ataxic gait, has microcephaly. None of the three have seizures, and so in the presence of the brothers' macrocephaly, Angelman syndrome was not considered until a diagnosis was made in the younger distant cousin. We report on a familial imprinting center deletion and the importance of considering the mild and atypical Angelman syndrome phenotypes within the differential diagnosis of intellectual handicap, particularly in clarifying the genetic risk to other family members. (c) 2007 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  18. Distal Deletion of Chromosome 11q Encompassing Jacobsen Syndrome without Platelet Abnormality.

    PubMed

    Sheth, Frenny J; Datar, Chaitanya; Andrieux, Joris; Pandit, Anand; Nayak, Darshana; Rahman, Mizanur; Sheth, Jayesh J

    2014-01-01

    Terminal 11q deletion, known as Jacobsen syndrome (JBS), is a rare genetic disorder associated with numerous dysmorphic features. We studied two cases with multiple congenital anomalies that were cytogenetically detected with deletions on 11q encompassing JBS region: 46,XX,der(11) del(11)(q24). Array comparative genomic hybridization (aCGH) analysis confirmed partial deletion of 11.8-11.9 Mb at 11q24.1q25 (case 1) and 13.9-14 Mb deletion at 11q23.3q25 together with 7.3-7.6 Mb duplication at 12q24.32q24.33 (case 2). Dysmorphism because of the partial duplication of 12q was not overtly decipherable over the Jacobsen phenotype except for a triangular facial profile. Aberrant chromosome 11 was inherited from phenotypically normal father, carrier of balanced translocation 46,XY,t(11;12)(q23.3; q24.32). In the present study, both cases had phenotypes that were milder than the ones described in literature despite having large deletion size. Most prominent features in classical JBS is thrombocytopenia, which was absent in both these cases. Therefore, detailed functional analysis of terminal 11q region is warranted to elucidate etiology of JBS and their clinical presentation.

  19. First Report of a Single Exon Deletion in TCOF1 Causing Treacher Collins Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Beygo, J.; Buiting, K.; Seland, S.; Lüdecke, H.-J.; Hehr, U.; Lich, C.; Prager, B.; Lohmann, D.R.; Wieczorek, D.

    2012-01-01

    Treacher Collins syndrome (TCS) is a rare craniofacial disorder characterized by facial anomalies and ear defects. TCS is caused by mutations in the TCOF1 gene and follows autosomal dominant inheritance. Recently, mutations in the POLR1D and POLR1C genes have also been identified to cause TCS. However, in a subset of patients no causative mutation could be found yet. Inter- and intrafamilial phenotypic variability is high as is the variety of mainly family-specific mutations identified throughout TCOF1. No obvious correlation between pheno- and genotype could be observed. The majority of described point mutations, small insertions and deletions comprising only a few nucleotides within TCOF1 lead to a premature termination codon. We investigated a cohort of 112 patients with a tentative clinical diagnosis of TCS by multiplex ligation-dependent probe amplification (MLPA) to search for larger deletions not detectable with other methods used. All patients were selected after negative screening for mutations in TCOF1, POLR1D and POLR1C. In 1 patient with an unequivocal clinical diagnosis of TCS, we identified a 3.367 kb deletion. This deletion abolishes exon 3 and is the first described single exon deletion within TCOF1. On RNA level we observed loss of this exon which supposedly leads to haploinsufficiency of TREACLE, the nucleolar phosphoprotein encoded by TCOF1. PMID:22712005

  20. Molecular definition of 22q11 deletions in 151 velo-cardio-facial syndrome patients.

    PubMed Central

    Carlson, C; Sirotkin, H; Pandita, R; Goldberg, R; McKie, J; Wadey, R; Patanjali, S R; Weissman, S M; Anyane-Yeboa, K; Warburton, D; Scambler, P; Shprintzen, R; Kucherlapati, R; Morrow, B E

    1997-01-01

    Velo-cardio-facial syndrome (VCFS) is a relatively common developmental disorder characterized by craniofacial anomalies and conotruncal heart defects. Many VCFS patients have hemizygous deletions for a part of 22q11, suggesting that haploinsufficiency in this region is responsible for its etiology. Because most cases of VCFS are sporadic, portions of 22q11 may be prone to rearrangement. To understand the molecular basis for chromosomal deletions, we defined the extent of the deletion, by genotyping 151 VCFS patients and performing haplotype analysis on 105, using 15 consecutive polymorphic markers in 22q11. We found that 83% had a deletion and >90% of these had a similar approximately 3 Mb deletion, suggesting that sequences flanking the common breakpoints are susceptible to rearrangement. We found no correlation between the presence or size of the deletion and the phenotype. To further define the chromosomal breakpoints among the VCFS patients, we developed somatic hybrid cell lines from a set of VCFS patients. An 11-kb resolution physical map of a 1,080-kb region that includes deletion breakpoints was constructed, incorporating genes and expressed sequence tags (ESTs) isolated by the hybridization selection method. The ordered markers were used to examine the two separated copies of chromosome 22 in the somatic hybrid cell lines. In some cases, we were able to map the chromosome breakpoints within a single cosmid. A 480-kb critical region for VCFS has been delineated, including the genes for GSCL, CTP, CLTD, HIRA, and TMVCF, as well as a number of novel ordered ESTs. PMID:9326327

  1. Genetic contributions to visuospatial cognition in Williams syndrome: insights from two contrasting partial deletion patients

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Williams syndrome (WS) is a rare neurodevelopmental disorder arising from a hemizygotic deletion of approximately 27 genes on chromosome 7, at locus 7q11.23. WS is characterised by an uneven cognitive profile, with serious deficits in visuospatial tasks in comparison to relatively proficient performance in some other cognitive domains such as language and face processing. Individuals with partial genetic deletions within the WS critical region (WSCR) have provided insights into the contribution of specific genes to this complex phenotype. However, the combinatorial effects of different genes remain elusive. Methods We report on visuospatial cognition in two individuals with contrasting partial deletions in the WSCR: one female (HR), aged 11 years 9 months, with haploinsufficiency for 24 of the WS genes (up to GTF2IRD1), and one male (JB), aged 14 years 2 months, with the three most telomeric genes within the WSCR deleted, or partially deleted. Results Our in-depth phenotyping of the visuospatial domain from table-top psychometric, and small- and large-scale experimental tasks reveal a profile in HR in line with typically developing controls, albeit with some atypical features. These data are contrasted with patient JB’s atypical profile of strengths and weaknesses across the visuospatial domain, as well as with more substantial visuospatial deficits in individuals with the full WS deletion. Conclusions Our findings point to the contribution of specific genes to spatial processing difficulties associated with WS, highlighting the multifaceted nature of spatial cognition and the divergent effects of genetic deletions within the WSCR on different components of visuospatial ability. The importance of general transcription factors at the telomeric end of the WSCR, and their combinatorial effects on the WS visuospatial phenotype are also discussed. PMID:25057328

  2. Secondary Immunologic Consequences in Chromosome 22q11.2 Deletion Syndrome (DiGeorge Syndrome/Velocardiofacial Syndrome)

    PubMed Central

    Zemble, R.; Prak, E. Luning; McDonald, K.; McDonald-McGinn, D.; Zackai, E.; Sullivan, K.

    2010-01-01

    Clinical evidence suggests that patients with Chromosome 22q11.2 deletion (Ch22q11.2D) have an increased prevalence of atopic and autoimmune disease and this has been without explanation. We hypothesized that the increase in atopy was due to homeostatic proliferation of T cells leading to a Th2 skew. We performed intracellular cytokine staining to define Th1/Th2 phenotypes in toddlers (early homeostatic proliferation) and adults (post homeostatic proliferation) with this syndrome. To attempt to understand the predisposition to autoimmunity we performed immunophenotyping analyses to define Th17 cells and B cell subsets. Adult Ch22q11.2D patients had a higher percentage of IL-4+CD4+ T cells than controls. Th17 cells were no different in patients and controls. In addition, adult Ch22q11.2D syndrome patients had significantly lower switched memory B cells, suggesting a dysregulated B cell compartment. These studies demonstrate that the decrement in T cell production has secondary consequences in the immune system, which could mold the patients’ clinical picture. PMID:20472505

  3. Secondary immunologic consequences in chromosome 22q11.2 deletion syndrome (DiGeorge syndrome/velocardiofacial syndrome).

    PubMed

    Zemble, R; Luning Prak, E; McDonald, K; McDonald-McGinn, D; Zackai, E; Sullivan, K

    2010-09-01

    Clinical evidence suggests that patients with Chromosome 22q11.2 deletion (Ch22q11.2D) have an increased prevalence of atopic and autoimmune disease and this has been without explanation. We hypothesized that the increase in atopy was due to homeostatic proliferation of T cells leading to a Th2 skew. We performed intracellular cytokine staining to define Th1/Th2 phenotypes in toddlers (early homeostatic proliferation) and adults (post homeostatic proliferation) with this syndrome. To attempt to understand the predisposition to autoimmunity we performed immunophenotyping analyses to define Th17 cells and B cell subsets. Adult Ch22q11.2D patients had a higher percentage of IL-4+CD4+ T cells than controls. Th17 cells were no different in patients and controls. In addition, adult Ch22q11.2D syndrome patients had significantly lower switched memory B cells, suggesting a dysregulated B cell compartment. These studies demonstrate that the decrement in T cell production has secondary consequences in the immune system, which could mold the patients' clinical picture.

  4. Cognitive, Behavioural and Psychiatric Phenotype in 22q11.2 Deletion Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Philip, Nicole

    2011-01-01

    22q11.2 Deletion syndrome has become an important model for understanding the pathophysiology of neurodevelopmental conditions, particularly schizophrenia which develops in about 20–25% of individuals with a chromosome 22q11.2 microdeletion. From the initial discovery of the syndrome, associated developmental delays made it clear that changes in brain development were a key part of the expression. Once patients were followed through childhood into adult years, further neurobehavioural phenotypes became apparent, including a changing cognitive profile, anxiety disorders and seizure diathesis. The variability of expression is as wide as for the myriad physical features associated with the syndrome, with the addition of evolving phenotype over the developmental trajectory. Notably, variability appears unrelated to length of the associated deletion. Several mouse models of the deletion have been engineered and are beginning to reveal potential molecular mechanisms for the cognitive and behavioural phenotypes observable in animals. Both animal and human studies hold great promise for further discoveries relevant to neurodevelopment and associated cognitive, behavioural and psychiatric disorders. PMID:21573985

  5. Greig cephalopolysyndactyly syndrome: Altered phenotype of a contiguous gene syndrome by the presence of a chromosomal deletion

    SciTech Connect

    Hersh, J.H.; Williams, P.G.; Yen, F.F.

    1994-09-01

    Greig cephalopolysyndactyly syndrome (GCPS) is characterized by craniofacial anomalies, broad thumbs and halluces, polydactyly of the hands and feet, and variable syndactyly. Intellectual abilities are usually normal. Inheritance is in an autosomal dominant fashion. The disorder has been mapped to chromosome 7p13, suggesting that the condition represents a contiguous gene syndrome (CGS). A male infant presented with multiple congenital anomalies, including omphalocele, dysgenesis of the corpus callosum, hydrocephalus, esotropia, broad thumbs and halluces, syndactyly, polydactyly of one foot, hypotonia and developmental delay. A de novo interstitial deletion of chromosome 7p was detected, 46,XY,del(7)(p13p15). Although clinical findings in this case were reminiscent of GCPS, and the chromosomal abnormality included the region assigned to the candidate gene for this syndrome, additional physical abnormalities were present, as well as cognitive deficits. Some of these features have been previously described in patients with chromosomal deletions of 7p. The chromosomal abnormality in our case provides supportive evidence of the gene locus in GCPS, and that GCPS represents a new CGS. However, a larger deletion, extending beyond the limits of the gene, significantly altered the phenotype. Isolation of the gene responsible for GCPS, and identification of additional patients with chromosomal abnormalities in this region of chromosome 7, should help to provide more accurate genotype-phenotype correlations.

  6. Deletion of C2orf34, PREPL and SLC3A1 causes atypical hypotonia–cystinuria syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Chabrol, B; Martens, K; Meulemans, S; Cano, A; Jaeken, J; Matthijs, G; Creemers, J W M

    2009-01-01

    Hypotonia–cystinuria syndrome (HCS) and 2p21 deletion syndrome are two recessive contiguous gene deletion syndromes associated with cystinuria type I. In HCS patients, only SLC3A1 and PREPL are disrupted. In the 2p21 deletion syndrome, two additional genes (C2orf34 and PPM1B) are lost. Molecular analysis of the SLC3A1/PREPL locus was performed in the patients using quantitative polymerase chain reaction (PCR) methods. HCS in both siblings was confirmed with the deletion screen of the SLC3A1/PREPL locus. Fine mapping of the breakpoint revealed a deletion of 77.4 kb, including three genes: SLC3A1, PREPL and C2orf34. Features not present in classical HCS were a mild/moderate mental retardation and a respiratory chain complex IV deficiency. We report the first patients with a deletion of SLC3A1, PREPL and C2orf34. They present with a phenotype intermediate between HCS and 2p21 deletion syndrome. PMID:21686663

  7. Diagnosis of distal 22q11.2 deletion syndrome in a patient with a teratoid/rhabdoid tumour.

    PubMed

    Beddow, R A; Smith, M; Kidd, A; Corbett, R; Hunter, A G

    2011-01-01

    We report an 18 year old patient with mild intellectual disability who was diagnosed with a late onset teratoid/rhabdoid tumour by histological and immunohistochemical studies. Array-CGH studies, performed on a peripheral blood sample, showed a 3.4Mb deletion of chromosome 22q11.2, distal to the common DiGeorge syndrome (DGS) or Velocardiofacial syndrome (VCFs) region. This deletion is consistent with a diagnosis of distal 22q11.2 deletion syndrome. The deletion encompasses the INI1/SMARCB1 tumour suppressor gene. Biallelic inactivation of this gene is characteristic of atypical teratoid/rhabdoid tumours. Although several constitutional chromosome conditions are known to have increased susceptibility to various forms of cancer, very little is known regarding the magnitude of risk for malignancy associated with distal 22q11.2 deletion syndrome. In view of this finding we suggest that patients diagnosed with distal 22q11.2 deletion syndrome undergo careful prolonged monitoring for this type of tumour. This case demonstrates the need to carefully assess regions found to be deleted in individuals, referred for dysmorphia and/or developments delay, by array-CGH for the presence of genes known to be implicated in malignancy. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  8. 22q11 deletion syndrome: a review of the neuropsychiatric features and their neurobiological basis

    PubMed Central

    Squarcione, Chiara; Torti, Maria Chiara; Di Fabio, Fabio; Biondi, Massimo

    2013-01-01

    The 22q11.2 deletion syndrome (22q11DS) is caused by an autosomal dominant microdeletion of chromosome 22 at the long arm (q) 11.2 band. The 22q11DS is among the most clinically variable syndromes, with more than 180 features related with the deletion, and is associated with an increased risk of psychiatric disorders, accounting for up to 1%–2% of schizophrenia cases. In recent years, several genes located on chromosome 22q11 have been linked to schizophrenia, including those encoding catechol-O-methyltransferase and proline dehydrogenase, and the interaction between these and other candidate genes in the deleted region is an important area of research. It has been suggested that haploinsufficiency of some genes within the 22q11.2 region may contribute to the characteristic psychiatric phenotype and cognitive functioning of schizophrenia. Moreover, an extensive literature on neuroimaging shows reductions of the volumes of both gray and white matter, and these findings suggest that this reduction may be predictive of increased risk of prodromal psychotic symptoms in 22q11DS patients. Experimental and standardized cognitive assessments alongside neuroimaging may be important to identify one or more endophenotypes of schizophrenia, as well as a predictive prodrome that can be preventively treated during childhood and adolescence. In this review, we summarize recent data about the 22q11DS, in particular those addressing the neuropsychiatric and cognitive phenotypes associated with the deletion, underlining the recent advances in the studies about the genetic architecture of the syndrome. PMID:24353423

  9. Alagille syndrome with interstitial 20p deletion derived from maternal ins(7;20)

    SciTech Connect

    Pi-Hsien Li; San-Ging Shu; Ching-Shiang Chi

    1996-06-28

    We present a 6-year-old Chinese boy with Alagille syndrome and an interstitial 20p deletion, with a karyotype of 46,XY,der(20)dir ins(7;20)(q11.23;p11.23p12.2 or p12.2p13)mat. He had a peculiar face and suffered from congenital heart disease, growth retardation, severe cholestasis, hepatosplenomegaly, and impaired renal function. The karyotype of his mother showed a balanced translocation, 46,XX,dir ins(7;20)(q11.23; p11.23p12.2 or p12.2p13), and her phenotype was normal. His dead elder brother was highly suspected as another victim of Alagille syndrome. The findings in the present family suggested that if Alagille syndrome is a single gene defect, the putative gene responsible for the syndrome would not be located at the insertion breakpoints but located within the deletion extent. 18 refs., 5 figs.

  10. Ring chromosome 20 syndrome without deletions of the subtelomeric and CHRNA4--KCNQ2 genes loci.

    PubMed

    Elghezal, Hatem; Hannachi, Hanene; Mougou, Soumaya; Kammoun, Hassene; Triki, Chahnez; Saad, Ali

    2007-01-01

    Ring chromosome 20 (r(20)) syndrome is a rare disease characterized by refractory epilepsy, moderate mental retardation and particular electroencephalographic disorder with non-convulsive status epilepticus. Here, we report a new case of r(20) syndrome in a 12 year old female who presented minimal dysmorphism, generalised tonic-clonic and absence seizures refractory to medical therapy and behavioural troubles. Among 20 cytogenetically analysed cells, 14 (70%) exhibited a 46,XX,r(20)(p13q13.3) karyotype and 6 (30%) showed a normal 46,XX caryotype. Interphasic FISH using centromeric probe of chromosome 20 detects the presence of a chromosome 20 monosomy in 7% and a duplicated ring chromosome 20 in 8% of studied cells. Metaphase FISH using chromosome 20 telomeric probes and specific probes of CHRNA4 and KCNQ2 genes detects the absence of any deletion in the ring chromosome 20. Clinical symptoms of r(20) syndrome are attributed to telomeric partial monosomy generated by ring chromosome and causing an haploinsufficiency of two epilepsy genes CHRNA4 and KCNQ2. However, our patient presents the typical epilepsy disorder but no detectable deletion in the ring chromosome 20. We speculate that clinical features of ring chromosome 20 syndrome are caused by low mosaicism of chromosome 20 monosomy caused by the loss of the ring chromosome 20.

  11. [Langer-Giedion syndrome with 8q23.1-q24.12 deletion diagnosed by comparative genomic hybridization].

    PubMed

    Ruiz-Botero, Felipe; Pachajoa, Harry

    2016-08-01

    The Langer-Giedion syndrome, also known as trichorhinophalangeal syndrome type II, is a hereditary multisystemic disease part of the group of contiguous gene deletion syndromes. The cause of this syndrome is a heterozygous deletion that involves the chromosomal region 8q23.3-q24.11 and mainly affects genes TRPS1, RAD21, and EXT1. This syndrome is characterized by the presence of multiple osteochondromas in limbs, hypertrichosis, and facial phenotype that includes sparse scalp hair, large laterally protruding ears, a long nose with a bulbous tip. We report the case of a Colombian patient with finding of an 8q23.1-q24.12 deletion by comparative genomic hybridization array technique and classical clinical findings, being the first case reported in Colombia.

  12. Obstructive Sleep Apnea Syndrome in Children with 22q11.2 Deletion Syndrome after Operative Intervention for Velopharyngeal Insufficiency

    PubMed Central

    Crockett, David Jeffrey; Goudy, Steven L.; Chinnadurai, Sivakumar; Wootten, Christopher Todd

    2014-01-01

    Introduction: Surgical treatment of velopharyngeal insufficiency (VPI) in 22q11.2 deletion syndrome is often warranted. In this patient population, VPI is characterized by poor palatal elevation and muscular hypotonia with an intact palate. We hypothesize that 22q11.2 deletion patients are at greater risk of obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) after surgical correction of VPI, due, in part, to their functional hypotonia, large velopharyngeal gap size, and the need to surgically obstruct the velopharynx. Methods: We performed a retrospective analysis of patients with 22q11.2 deletion syndrome treated at a tertiary pediatric hospital between the years of 2002 and 2012. The incidence of VPI, need for surgery, post-operative polysomnogram, post-operative VPI assessment, and OSA treatments were evaluated. Results: Forty-three patients (18 males, 25 females, ages 1–14 years) fitting the inclusion criteria were identified. Twenty-eight patients were evaluated by speech pathology due to hypernasality. Twenty-one patients had insufficient velopharyngeal function and required surgery. Fifteen underwent pharyngeal flap surgery, three underwent sphincter pharyngoplasty, two underwent Furlow palatoplasty, and one underwent combined sphincter pharyngoplasty with Furlow palatoplasty. Of these, eight had post-operative snoring. Six of these underwent polysomnography (five underwent pharyngeal flap surgeries and one underwent sphincter pharyngoplasty). Four patients were found to have OSA based on the results of the polysomnography (average apnea/hypopnea index of 4.9 events/h, median = 5.1, SD = 2.1). Two required continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) due to moderate OSA. Conclusion: Surgery is often necessary to correct VPI in patients with 22q11.2 deletion syndrome. Monitoring for OSA should be considered after surgical correction of VPI due to a high occurrence in this population. Furthermore, families should be counseled of the risk of OSA after surgery and the

  13. Molecular Definition of the 22q11 Deletions in Velo-Cardio-Facial Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Morrow, Bernice; Goldberg, Rosalie; Carlson, Christine; Gupta, Ruchira Das; Sirotkin, Howard; Collins, John; Dunham, Ian; O'Donnell, Hilary; Scambler, Peter; Shprintzen, Robert; Kucherlapati, Raju

    1995-01-01

    Velo-cardio-facial syndrome (VCFS) is a common genetic disorder among individuals with cleft palate and is associated with hemizygous deletions in human chromosome 22q11. Toward the molecular definition of the deletions, we constructed a physical map of 22q11 in the form of overlapping YACs. The physical map covers >9 cM of genetic distance, estimated to span 5 Mb of DNA, and contains a total of 64 markers. Eleven highly polymorphic short tandem-repeat polymorphic (STRP) markers were placed on the physical map, and 10 of these were unambiguously ordered. The 11 polymorphic markers were used to type the DNA from a total of 61 VCFS patients and 49 unaffected relatives. Comparison of levels of heterozygosity of these markers in VCFS patients and their unaffected relatives revealed that four of these markers are commonly hemizygous among VCFS patients. To confirm these results and to define further the breakpoints in VCFS patients, 15 VCFS individuals and their unaffected parents were genotyped for the 11 STRP markers. Haplotypes generated from this study revealed that 82% of the patients have deletions that can be defined by the STRP markers. The results revealed that all patients who have a deletion share a common proximal breakpoint, while there are two distinct distal breakpoints. Markers D22S941 and D22S944 appear to be consistently hemizygous in patients with deletions. Both of these markers are located on a single nonchimeric YAC that is 400 kb long. The results also show that the parental origin of the deleted chromosome does not have any effect on the phenotypic manifestation ImagesFigure 2Figure 3 PMID:7762562

  14. Prenatal diagnosis of inverted duplication deletion 8p syndrome mimicking trisomy 18.

    PubMed

    Akkurt, Mehmet Ozgur; Higgs, Amanda; Turan, Ozerk T; Turan, Ozhan M; Turan, Sifa

    2017-03-01

    Inverted duplication deletion of 8p (invdupdel[8p]) is a well-described and uncommon chromosomal rearrangement. The majority of the reported cases have revealed no life-threatening malformations. Although the invdupdel[8p] syndrome in children with central nervous system abnormalities has been reported before, we present the first prenatal microarray diagnosis of invdupdel[8p] syndrome mimicking trisomy 18 due to similar sonographic features. Contrary to reported cases with invdupdel[8p] syndrome, the present case had severe polyvalvular dysplasia and the infant deceased at day 12 of life. In this case, we also emphasize the diagnostic power of microarray analysis in detecting the underlying genetic causes for fetuses with multiple congenital anomalies. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  15. A de novo deletion in X 27-28 spans at least 3 megabases and results in fragile X syndrome

    SciTech Connect

    Lachiewicz, A.; Rao, K.; Aylsworth, A.; Richie, R.; Schwartz, C.; Tarleton, J. ||

    1994-07-15

    A 2-year-old boy with Martin-Bell syndrome was referred for molecular testing and found to have a large deletion of FMRI. His mother was found to have two FMR-1 alleles in the normal range for CGG repeats. DNA probes located both proximal and distal to FRAXA were used to delineate the approximation location of the deletion endpoints. Proximal to the fragile site, DXS312 (pX135) was absent but DXS98 (4D8) was present. Distal to the fragile site, DXS296 (VK21) was absent but DXS304 (U6.2) was present. Our patient does not appear to have clinical findings other than those typically associated with fragile X syndrome suggesting that the deletion does not remove other contiguous genes, e.g., IDS. The deletion in this patient is larger than the patient reported by Gedeon et al., in whom approximately 2.5 megabases were estimated to be deleted. Using the physical map of Schlessinger et al., the physical extent of the deletion can be estimated to be at least 3 megabases. This patient may be useful in physical mapping of the chromosomal region near FMR-1. Continued long-term evaluation of this patient may uncover clinical findings suggestive that the deletion removes other genes near to FMR-1 or, alternatively, no findings atypical of the fragile X syndrome suggesting that no other genes lie in the deletion interval.

  16. Comparison of facial features of DiGeorge syndrome (DGS) due to deletion 10p13-10pter with DGS due to 22q11 deletion

    SciTech Connect

    Goodship, J.; Lynch, S.; Brown, J.

    1994-09-01

    DiGeorge syndrome (DGS) is a congenital anomaly consisting of cardiac defects, aplasia or hypoplasia of the thymus and parathroid glands, and dysmorphic facial features. The majority of DGS cases have a submicroscopic deletion within chromosome 22q11. However there have been a number of reports of DGS in association with other chromosomal abnormalities including four cases with chromosome 10p deletions. We describe a further 10p deletion case and suggest that the facial features in children with DGS due to deletions of 10p are different from those associated with chromosome 22 deletions. The propositus was born at 39 weeks gestation to unrelated caucasian parents, birth weight 2580g (10th centile) and was noted to be dysmorphic and cyanosed shortly after birth. The main dysmorphic facial features were a broad nasal bridge with very short palpebral fissures. Echocardiography revealed a large subsortic VSD and overriding aorta. She had a low ionised calcium and low parathroid hormone level. T cell subsets and PHA response were normal. Abdominal ultrasound showed duplex kidneys and on further investigation she was found to have reflux and raised plasma creatinine. She had an anteriorly placed anus. Her karyotype was 46,XX,-10,+der(10)t(3;10)(p23;p13)mat. The dysmorphic facial features in this baby are strikingly similar to those noted by Bridgeman and Butler in child with DGS as the result of a 10p deletion and distinct from the face seen in children with DiGeorge syndrome resulting from interstitial chromosome 22 deletions.

  17. Fifty microdeletions among 112 cases of sotos syndrome: Low copy repeats possibly mediate the common deletion

    SciTech Connect

    Kurotaki, Naohiro; Harada, Naoki; Shimokawa, Osamu; Miyake, Noriko; Kawame, Hiroshi; Uetake, Kimiaki; Makita, Yoshio; Kondoh, Tatsuro; Ogata, Tsutomu; Hasegawa, Tomoko; Nagai, Toshiro; Ozaki, Takao; Touyama, Mayumi; Shenhav, Ruthie; Ohashi, Hirofumi; Medne, Livija; Shiihara, Takashi; Ohtsu, Shigeyuki; Kato, Zen-ichiro; Okamoto, Nobuhiko; Nishimoto, Junji; Lev, Dorit; Miyoshi, Yoko; Ishikiriyama, Satoshi; Sonoda, Tohru; Sakazume, Satoru; Fukushima, Yoshimitsu; Kurosawa, Kenji; Cheng, Jan-Fang; Yoshiura, Koh-ichiro; Ohta, Tohru; Kishino, Tatsuya; Niikawa, Norio; Matsumoto, Naomichi

    2003-04-15

    Sotos syndrome (SoS) is an autosomal dominant overgrowth syndrome with characteristic craniofacial dysmorphic features and various degrees of mental retardation. We previously showed that haploin sufficiency of the NSD1 gene is the major cause of SoS, and submicroscopic deletions at 5q35, including NSD1, were found in about a half (20/42) of our patients examined. Since the first report, an additional 70 SoS cases consisting of 53 Japanese and 17 non-Japanese have been analyzed. We found 50 microdeletions (45 percent) and 16 point mutations (14 percent) among all the 112 cases. A large difference in the frequency of microdeletions between Japanese and non-Japanese patients was noted: 49 (52 percent) of the 95 Japanese patients and only one (6 percent) of the 17 non-Japanese had microdeletions. A sequence-based physical map was constructed to characterize the microdeletions. Most of the microdeletions were confirmed to be identical by FISH analysis. We identified highly homologous sequences, i.e., possible low copy repeats (LCRs), in regions flanking proximal and distal breakpoints of the common deletion. This suggests that LCRs may mediate the deletion. Such LCRs seem to be present in different populations. Thus the different frequency of microdeletions between Japanese and non-Japanese cases in our study may have been caused by patient-selection bias.

  18. Deletion of locus D15S113 in a mother and son without features of Angelman syndrome

    SciTech Connect

    Michaelis, R.C.; Tarleton, J.C.; Donlon, T.A.; Simensen, R.J.

    1994-09-01

    Deletions of the proximal long arm of chromosome 15 result in Angelman syndrome when inherited from the mother and Prader-Willi syndrome when inherited from the father. The minimal critical deletion region for Angelman syndrome has been reported to include D15S74 (B1.5), D15S10 (TD3-21), and D15S113 (LS6-1). We report a mother and son who have deletions that include D15S113 but who do not have features of Angelman syndrome. D.H. is a 10-year-old white male referred for genetic evaluation due to mental retardation. He has mild to moderate mental retardation and minor dysmorphic features, including downslanting palpebral fissures, prominent nose, broad forehead, small chin, midface hypoplasia, and large ears. His mother (B.S.) has slightly downslanting palpebral fissures and a borderline intellectual deficit. Neither individual has the seizures, excessive laughter, hand clapping, ataxia or facial dysmorphism which are characteristic of Angelman syndrome. The linear order of probes mapping to 15q11-q13 is 15cen-D15S11-D15S13-D15S10-D15S113-GABRB3-D15S12-tel. The proximal border of the deletion in our patients lies between D15S10 and D15S113. The fact that these two individuals do not have Angelman syndrome, despite deletion of D15S113, suggests that the Angelman syndrome critical deletion region should be further refined to exclude the D15S113 locus. In addition, the findings of a more severe intellectual impairment in the son than in the mother suggests that the region immediately telomeric to the critical deletion region for Angelman syndrome may contain imprintable genes that influence intellectual function.

  19. MECP2 deletions and genotype-phenotype correlation in Rett syndrome.

    PubMed

    Scala, Elisa; Longo, Ilaria; Ottimo, Federica; Speciale, Caterina; Sampieri, Katia; Katzaki, Eleni; Artuso, Rosangela; Mencarelli, Maria Antonietta; D'Ambrogio, Tatiana; Vonella, Giuseppina; Zappella, Michele; Hayek, Giuseppe; Battaglia, Agatino; Mari, Francesca; Renieri, Alessandra; Ariani, Francesca

    2007-12-01

    Rett syndrome is a neurodevelopmental disorder that represents one of the most common genetic causes of mental retardation in girls. MECP2 point mutations in exons 2-4 account for about 80% of classic Rett cases and for a lower percentage of variant patients. We investigated the genetic cause in 77 mutation-negative Rett patients (33 classic, 31 variant, and 13 Rett-like cases) by searching missed MECP2 defects. DHPLC analysis of exon 1 and MLPA analysis allowed us to identify the defect in 17 Rett patients: one exon 1 point mutation (c.47_57del) in a classic case and 16 MECP2 large deletions (15/33 classic and 1/31 variant cases). One identical intragenic MECP2 deletion, probably due to gonadal mosaicism, was found in two sisters with discordant phenotype: one classic and one "highly functioning" preserved speech variant. This result indicates that other epigenetic or genetic factors, beside MECP2, may contribute to phenotype modulation. Three out of 16 MECP2 deletions extend to the adjacent centromeric IRAK1 gene. A putative involvement of the hemizygosity of this gene in the ossification process is discussed. Finally, results reported here clearly indicate that MECP2 large deletions are a common cause of classic Rett, and MLPA analysis is mandatory in MECP2-negative patients, especially in those more severely affected (P = 0.044).

  20. Molecular definition of the shortest region of deletion overlap in the Langer-Giedion syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Lüdecke, Hermann-Josef; Johnson, Carey; Wagner, Michael J.; Wells, Dan E.; Turleau, Catherine; Tommerup, Niels; Latos-Bielenska, Anna; Sandig, Klaus-Rainer; Meinecke, Peter; Zabel, Bernhard; Horsthemke, Bernhard

    1991-01-01

    The Langer-Giedion syndrome (LGS), which is characterized by craniofacial dysmorphism and skeletal abnormalities, is caused by a genetic defect in 8q24.1. We have used 13 anonymous DNA markers from an 8q24.1-specific microdissection library, as well as c-myc and thyroglobulin gene probes, to map the deletion breakpoints in 16 patients with LGS. Twelve patients had a cytogenetically visible deletion, two patients had an apparently balanced translocation, and two patients had an apparently normal karyotype. In all cases except one translocation patient, loss of genetic material was detected. The DNA markers fall into 10 deletion intervals. Clone L48 (D8S51) defines the shortest region of deletion overlap (SRO), which is estimated to be less than 2 Mbp. Three clones–pl7-2.3EE (D8S43), L24 (D8S45), and L40 (D8S49)–which flank the SRO recognize evolutionarily conserved sequences. ImagesFigure 1Figure 3Figure 4 PMID:1836105

  1. miRNA-mediated risk for schizophrenia in 22q11.2 deletion syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Brzustowicz, Linda M.; Bassett, Anne S.

    2012-01-01

    In humans, the most common genomic disorder is a hemizygous deletion of a 1.5–3 Mb region of chromosome 22q11.2. The resultant 22q11.2 deletion syndrome (22q11.2DS) can affect multiple organ systems, and most notably includes cardiac, craniofacial, and neurodevelopmental defects. Individuals with 22q11.2DS have a 20–25-fold risk of developing schizophrenia compared to individuals from the general population, making 22q11.2DS the strongest known molecular genetic risk factor for schizophrenia. Although the deleted region includes DGCR8, a gene coding for a miRNA processing protein, the exact mechanism by which this deletion increases risk is unknown. Importantly, several lines of evidence suggest that miRNAs may modulate risk for schizophrenia in other, non-22q11.2DS populations. Here we present a theory which mechanistically explains the link between 22q11.2DS, miRNAs, and schizophrenia risk. We outline the testable predictions generated by this theory and present preliminary data in support of our model. Further experimental validation of this model could provide important insights into the etiology of both 22q11.2DS and more common forms of schizophrenia. PMID:23248646

  2. 22q11.2 Distal Deletion Syndrome: Description of a New Case with Truncus Arteriosus Type 2 and Review

    PubMed Central

    Garavelli, L.; Rosato, S.; Wischmeijer, A.; Gelmini, C.; Esposito, A.; Mazzanti, L.; Franchi, F.; De Crescenzo, A.; Palumbo, O.; Carella, M.; Riccio, A.

    2011-01-01

    22q11.2 deletion syndrome is mainly characterized by conotruncal congenital heart defects, velopharyngeal insufficiency, hypocalcemia and a characteristic craniofacial appearance. The etiology in the majority of patients is a 3-Mb recurrent deletion in region 22q11.2. Nevertheless, recently some cases of infrequent deletions with various sizes have been reported with a different phenotype. We report on a patient with congenital heart disease (truncus arteriosus type 2) in whom a de novo 1.3-Mb 22q11.2 deletion was detected by array comparative genomic hybridization. The deletion described corresponds to an atypical and distal deletion which spans low copy repeat (LCR) 4 and is associated with breakpoint sites that do not correspond to known LCRs of 22q11.2. We examine the clinical phenotype of our case and compare our findings with those published in the literature. The most prevalent clinical features in this type of deletion are a history of prematurity, pre-natal and post-natal growth retardation, slight facial dysmorphic features, microcephaly and developmental delay, with a speech defect in particular. These are clearly different from those found in the classic 22q11.2 deletion syndrome, and we believe that the main differential diagnosis should be with Silver-Russel syndrome. In our case we observe the cardiac phenotype with truncus arteriosus communis usually seen in the classic 22q11.2 deletion syndrome, and so far associated with the TBX1 gene. Significantly, however, TBX1 is not included in our patient's deletion. The possible roles of a position effect or other genes are discussed. PMID:22582037

  3. Array-based comparative genomic hybridization facilitates identification of breakpoints of a novel der(1)t(1;18)(p36.3;q23)dn in a child presenting with mental retardation.

    PubMed

    Lennon, P A; Cooper, M L; Curtis, M A; Lim, C; Ou, Z; Patel, A; Cheung, S W; Bacino, C A

    2006-06-01

    Monosomy of distal 1p36 represents the most common terminal deletion in humans and results in one of the most frequently diagnosed mental retardation syndromes. This deletion is considered a contiguous gene deletion syndrome, and has been shown to vary in deletion sizes that contribute to the spectrum of phenotypic anomalies seen in patients with monosomy 1p36. We report on an 8-year-old female with characteristics of the monosomy 1p36 syndrome who demonstrated a novel der(1)t(1;18)(p36.3;q23). Initial G-banded karyotype analysis revealed a deleted chromosome 1, with a breakpoint within 1p36.3. Subsequent FISH and array-based comparative genomic hybridization not only confirmed and partially characterized the deletion of chromosome 1p36.3, but also uncovered distal trisomy for 18q23. In this patient, the duplicated 18q23 is translocated onto the deleted 1p36.3 region, suggesting telomere capture. Molecular characterization of this novel der(1)t(1;18)(p36.3;q23), guided by our clinical array-comparative genomic hybridization, demonstrated a 3.2 Mb terminal deletion of chromosome 1p36.3 and a 200 kb duplication of 18q23 onto the deleted 1p36.3, presumably stabilizing the deleted chromosome 1. DNA sequence analysis around the breakpoints demonstrated no homology, and therefore this telomere capture of distal 18q is apparently the result of a non-homologous recombination. Partial trisomy for 18q23 has not been previously reported. The importance of mapping the breakpoints of all balanced and unbalanced translocations found in the clinical laboratory, when phenotypic abnormalities are found, is discussed.

  4. Critical region in 2q31.2q32.3 deletion syndrome: Report of two phenotypically distinct patients, one with an additional deletion in Alagille syndrome region

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Standard cytogenetic analysis has revealed to date more than 30 reported cases presenting interstitial deletions involving region 2q31-q32, but with poorly defined breakpoints. After the postulation of 2q31.2q32.3 deletion as a clinically recognizable disorder, more patients were reported with a critical region proposed and candidate genes pointed out. Results We report two female patients with de novo chromosome 2 cytogenetically visible deletions, one of them with an additional de novo deletion in chromosome 20p12.2p12.3. Patient I presents a 16.8 Mb deletion in 2q31.2q32.3 while patient II presents a smaller deletion of 7 Mb in 2q32.1q32.3, entirely contained within patient I deleted region, and a second 4 Mb deletion in Alagille syndrome region. Patient I clearly manifests symptoms associated with the 2q31.2q32.3 deletion syndrome, like the muscular phenotype and behavioral problems, while patient II phenotype is compatible with the 20p12 deletion since she manifests problems at the cardiac level, without significant dysmorphisms and an apparently normal psychomotor development. Conclusions Whereas Alagille syndrome is a well characterized condition mainly caused by haploinsufficiency of JAG1 gene, with manifestations that can range from slight clinical findings to major symptoms in different domains, the 2q31.2q32.3 deletion syndrome is still being delineated. The occurrence of both imbalances in reported patient II would be expected to cause a more severe phenotype compared to the individual phenotype associated with each imbalance, which is not the case, since there are no manifestations due to the 2q32 deletion. This, together with the fact that patient I deleted region overlaps previously reported cases and patient II deletion is outside this common region, reinforces the existence of a critical region in 2q31.3q32.1, between 181 to 185 Mb, responsible for the clinical phenotype. PMID:22550961

  5. Early-onset Parkinson's Disease Associated with Chromosome 22q11.2 Deletion Syndrome.

    PubMed

    Oki, Mitsuaki; Hori, Shin-ichiro; Asayama, Shinya; Wate, Reika; Kaneko, Satoshi; Kusaka, Hirofumi

    2016-01-01

    We herein report the case of a 43-year-old man with a 4-year history of resting tremor and akinesia. His resting tremor and rigidity were more prominent on the left side. He also presented retropulsion. His symptoms responded to the administration of levodopa. The patient also had a cleft lip and palate, cavum vergae, and hypoparathyroidism. A chromosome analysis disclosed a hemizygous deletion in 22q11.2, and he was diagnosed with early-onset Parkinson's disease associated with 22q11.2 deletion syndrome. However, the patient lacked autonomic nerve dysfunction, and his cardiac uptake of (123)I-metaiodobenzylguanidine was normal, indicating an underlying pathological mechanism that differed to that of sporadic Parkinson's disease.

  6. Chromosome 18q deletion syndrome with autoimmune diabetes mellitus: putative genomic loci for autoimmunity and immunodeficiency.

    PubMed

    Hogendorf, Anna; Lipska-Zietkiewicz, Beata S; Szadkowska, Agnieszka; Borowiec, Maciej; Koczkowska, Magdalena; Trzonkowski, Piotr; Drozdz, Izabela; Wyka, Krystyna; Limon, Janusz; Mlynarski, Wojciech

    2016-03-01

    A girl with 18q deletion syndrome was diagnosed with autoimmune diabetes mellitus and Hashimoto's thyroiditis at the age of 3 yr. In addition, the girl suffered from recurrent infections due to immunoglobulin A and IgG4 deficiency. She was also found to have CD3+CD4+FoxP3+, CD3+CD4+FoxP3+CD25+, and CD3+CD4+CD25+CD127 regulatory T cells deficiency. The exceptional coincidence of the two autoimmune disorders occurring at an early age, and associated with immune deficiency, implies that genes located on deleted 19.4 Mbp region at 18q21.32-q23 (chr18:58,660,699-78,012,870) might play a role in the pathogenesis of autoimmunity leading to β cell destruction and diabetes.

  7. Mitochondrial DNA deletion with Kearns Sayre syndrome in a child with Addison disease.

    PubMed

    Boles, R G; Roe, T; Senadheera, D; Mahnovski, V; Wong, L J

    1998-08-01

    Kearns Sayre syndrome (KSS) is a multisystem disorder with a confounding variety of clinical manifestations, including ocular myopathy, pigmentary retinopathy, heart block and ataxia. Endocrinopathies are common in KSS, including growth hormone deficiency, hypogonadism, diabetes mellitus and hypoparathyroidism. A variety of deletions of mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) are found in most cases. We report on a 5-year-old boy with Addison disease in whom further investigation revealed a 4.9 kilobase mtDNA deletion and KSS. Later he developed severe lactic acidosis and expired. The degree of mutant mtDNA heteroplasmy in various tissues on autopsy did not correlate well with the clinical manifestations, although this may be due at least in part to replacement with other tissue types. Our report is the first of non-autoimmune Addison disease in KSS and patients with KSS should be evaluated for adrenal insufficiency. Early recognition of adrenal insufficiency is crucial to prevent mortality from this cause.

  8. Rett syndrome in females with CTS hot spot deletions: a disorder profile.

    PubMed

    Smeets, E; Terhal, P; Casaer, P; Peters, A; Midro, A; Schollen, E; van Roozendaal, K; Moog, U; Matthijs, G; Herbergs, J; Smeets, H; Curfs, L; Schrander-Stumpel, C; Fryns, J P

    2005-01-15

    From a series of 107 females with Rett syndrome (RTT), we describe the long-term history of ten females with a deletion in the C-terminus of the MECP2 gene. We observed that their disorder profile is clinically recognizable with time and different from other atypical and milder RTT phenotypes. In females with hot spot deletions in the C-terminus, dystonia is present from childhood and results in a serious spine deformation in spite of preventive measures. Their adaptive behavior is surprisingly better preserved and in contrast with the typical decline in motor functioning. The delineation of disorder profiles by long-term clinical observation can teach us about genotype/phenotype relationships and eventually about the effect of epigenetic phenomena on the final phenotype.

  9. A Turkish patient with large 17p11.2 deletion presenting with Smith Magenis syndrome.

    PubMed

    Tug, E; Cine, N; Aydin, H

    2011-01-01

    Smith-Magenis syndrome (SMS), which occurs as a result of an interstitial deletion within chromosome 17p11.2-p12, is a disorder that presents itself with minor dysmorphic features, brachydactyly, short stature, hypotonia, delayed speech, cognitive deficits and neurobehavioral problems including sleep disturbances and maladaptive repetitive and self-injurious behavior. We present a girl with full SMS phenotype. G-banding cytogenetic analysis showed normal 46,XX karyotype. Whole-genome array comparative genomic hybridization (CGH) was performed due to the severity of the phenotype and the unusual features present in the patient. An interstitial deletion in 17p11.2-p12, approximately 4.73 Mb in size was determined. Characteristic physical and behavioral phenotype strongly suggested SMS. This, to the best of our knowledge is the first patient with SMS reported in Turkey. We emphasize the need for whole genome analysis in multiple congenital abnormalities/mental retardation disorders with unusual and severe phenotypes.

  10. Eye Gaze During Face Processing in Children and Adolescents with 22q11.2 Deletion Syndrome

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Glaser, Bronwyn; Debbane, Martin; Ottet, Marie-Christine; Vuilleumier, Patrik; Zesiger, Pascal; Antonarakis, Stylianos E.; Eliez, Stephan

    2010-01-01

    Objective: The 22q11.2 deletion syndrome (22q11DS) is a neurogenetic syndrome with high risk for the development of psychiatric disorder. There is interest in identifying reliable markers for measuring and monitoring socio-emotional impairments in 22q11DS during development. The current study investigated eye gaze as a potential marker during a…

  11. Overlapping Numerical Cognition Impairments in Children with Chromosome 22q11.2 Deletion or Turner Syndromes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Simon, T. J.; Takarae, Y.; DeBoer, T.; McDonald-McGinn, D. M.; Zackai, E. H.; Ross, J. L.

    2008-01-01

    Children with one of two genetic disorders (chromosome 22q11.2 deletion syndrome and Turner syndrome) as well typically developing controls, participated in three cognitive processing experiments. Two experiments were designed to test cognitive processes involved in basic aspects numerical cognition. The third was a test of simple manual motor…

  12. Memory in Intellectually Matched Groups of Young Participants with 22q11.2 Deletion Syndrome and Those with Schizophrenia

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kravariti, Eugenia; Jacobson, Clare; Morris, Robin; Frangou, Sophia; Murray, Robin M.; Tsakanikos, Elias; Habel, Alex; Shearer, Jo

    2010-01-01

    The 22q11.2 deletion syndrome (22qDS) and schizophrenia have genetic and neuropsychological similarities, but are likely to differ in memory profile. Confirming differences in memory function between the two disorders, and identifying their genetic determinants, can help to define genetic subtypes in both syndromes, identify genetic risk factors…

  13. Memory in Intellectually Matched Groups of Young Participants with 22q11.2 Deletion Syndrome and Those with Schizophrenia

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kravariti, Eugenia; Jacobson, Clare; Morris, Robin; Frangou, Sophia; Murray, Robin M.; Tsakanikos, Elias; Habel, Alex; Shearer, Jo

    2010-01-01

    The 22q11.2 deletion syndrome (22qDS) and schizophrenia have genetic and neuropsychological similarities, but are likely to differ in memory profile. Confirming differences in memory function between the two disorders, and identifying their genetic determinants, can help to define genetic subtypes in both syndromes, identify genetic risk factors…

  14. Childhood Predictors of Written Expression in Late Adolescents with 22q11.2 Deletion Syndrome: A Longitudinal Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hamsho, N.; Antshel, K. M.; Eckert, T. L.; Kates, W. R.

    2017-01-01

    Background: 22q11.2 deletion syndrome (22q11DS) is the second most prevalent genetic syndrome and has a characteristic academic and behavioural phenotype. The primary objective of the current study was to examine the childhood predictors of written expression achievement in adolescents with 22q11DS. Written expression is an important skill that…

  15. Eye Gaze During Face Processing in Children and Adolescents with 22q11.2 Deletion Syndrome

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Glaser, Bronwyn; Debbane, Martin; Ottet, Marie-Christine; Vuilleumier, Patrik; Zesiger, Pascal; Antonarakis, Stylianos E.; Eliez, Stephan

    2010-01-01

    Objective: The 22q11.2 deletion syndrome (22q11DS) is a neurogenetic syndrome with high risk for the development of psychiatric disorder. There is interest in identifying reliable markers for measuring and monitoring socio-emotional impairments in 22q11DS during development. The current study investigated eye gaze as a potential marker during a…

  16. Overlapping Numerical Cognition Impairments in Children with Chromosome 22q11.2 Deletion or Turner Syndromes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Simon, T. J.; Takarae, Y.; DeBoer, T.; McDonald-McGinn, D. M.; Zackai, E. H.; Ross, J. L.

    2008-01-01

    Children with one of two genetic disorders (chromosome 22q11.2 deletion syndrome and Turner syndrome) as well typically developing controls, participated in three cognitive processing experiments. Two experiments were designed to test cognitive processes involved in basic aspects numerical cognition. The third was a test of simple manual motor…

  17. Interstitial deletion of 11q-implicating the KIRREL3 gene in the neurocognitive delay associated with Jacobsen syndrome.

    PubMed

    Guerin, Andrea; Stavropoulos, Dimitri J; Diab, Yaser; Chénier, Sébastien; Christensen, Hilary; Kahr, Walter H A; Babul-Hirji, Riyana; Chitayat, David

    2012-10-01

    Jacobsen syndrome (JS) is a rare contiguous gene disorder characterized by a deletion within the distal part of the long arm of chromosome 11 ranging in size from 7 to 20 Mb. The clinical findings include characteristic dysmorphic features, growth and psychomotor delays and developmental anomalies involving the brain, eyes, heart, kidneys, immune, hematologic, endocrine, and gastrointestinal systems. The majority of cases are due to a terminal deletion of 11q; however interstitial deletions have also been reported. We report on a child with clinical manifestations consistent with JS who had a 2.899 Mb interstitial deletion at 11q24.2-q24.3 which is the smallest interstitial deletion reported so far to our knowledge. This deletion includes the KIRREL3 gene, and given our patient's history of neurocognitive delay and autism spectrum disorder, it raises the possibility that this gene is a candidate for the social and expressive language delay observed in our patient.

  18. Rare deletions at 16p13.11 predispose to a diverse spectrum of sporadic epilepsy syndromes.

    PubMed

    Heinzen, Erin L; Radtke, Rodney A; Urban, Thomas J; Cavalleri, Gianpiero L; Depondt, Chantal; Need, Anna C; Walley, Nicole M; Nicoletti, Paola; Ge, Dongliang; Catarino, Claudia B; Duncan, John S; Kasperaviciūte, Dalia; Tate, Sarah K; Caboclo, Luis O; Sander, Josemir W; Clayton, Lisa; Linney, Kristen N; Shianna, Kevin V; Gumbs, Curtis E; Smith, Jason; Cronin, Kenneth D; Maia, Jessica M; Doherty, Colin P; Pandolfo, Massimo; Leppert, David; Middleton, Lefkos T; Gibson, Rachel A; Johnson, Michael R; Matthews, Paul M; Hosford, David; Kälviäinen, Reetta; Eriksson, Kai; Kantanen, Anne-Mari; Dorn, Thomas; Hansen, Jörg; Krämer, Günter; Steinhoff, Bernhard J; Wieser, Heinz-Gregor; Zumsteg, Dominik; Ortega, Marcos; Wood, Nicholas W; Huxley-Jones, Julie; Mikati, Mohamad; Gallentine, William B; Husain, Aatif M; Buckley, Patrick G; Stallings, Ray L; Podgoreanu, Mihai V; Delanty, Norman; Sisodiya, Sanjay M; Goldstein, David B

    2010-05-14

    Deletions at 16p13.11 are associated with schizophrenia, mental retardation, and most recently idiopathic generalized epilepsy. To evaluate the role of 16p13.11 deletions, as well as other structural variation, in epilepsy disorders, we used genome-wide screens to identify copy number variation in 3812 patients with a diverse spectrum of epilepsy syndromes and in 1299 neurologically-normal controls. Large deletions (> 100 kb) at 16p13.11 were observed in 23 patients, whereas no control had a deletion greater than 16 kb. Patients, even those with identically sized 16p13.11 deletions, presented with highly variable epilepsy phenotypes. For a subset of patients with a 16p13.11 deletion, we show a consistent reduction of expression for included genes, suggesting that haploinsufficiency might contribute to pathogenicity. We also investigated another possible mechanism of pathogenicity by using hybridization-based capture and next-generation sequencing of the homologous chromosome for ten 16p13.11-deletion patients to look for unmasked recessive mutations. Follow-up genotyping of suggestive polymorphisms failed to identify any convincing recessive-acting mutations in the homologous interval corresponding to the deletion. The observation that two of the 16p13.11 deletions were larger than 2 Mb in size led us to screen for other large deletions. We found 12 additional genomic regions harboring deletions > 2 Mb in epilepsy patients, and none in controls. Additional evaluation is needed to characterize the role of these exceedingly large, non-locus-specific deletions in epilepsy. Collectively, these data implicate 16p13.11 and possibly other large deletions as risk factors for a wide range of epilepsy disorders, and they appear to point toward haploinsufficiency as a contributor to the pathogenicity of deletions. Copyright (c) 2010 The American Society of Human Genetics. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Association Between Early-Onset Parkinson Disease and 22q11.2 Deletion Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Butcher, Nancy J.; Kiehl, Tim-Rasmus; Hazrati, Lili-Naz; Chow, Eva W. C.; Rogaeva, Ekaterina; Lang, Anthony E.; Bassett, Anne S.

    2015-01-01

    IMPORTANCE Clinical case reports of parkinsonism co-occurring with hemizygous 22q11.2 deletions and the associated multisystem syndrome, 22q11.2 deletion syndrome (22q11.2DS), suggest that 22q11.2 deletions may lead to increased risk of early-onset Parkinson disease (PD). The frequency of PD and its neuropathological presentation remain unknown in this common genetic condition. OBJECTIVE To evaluate a possible association between 22q11.2 deletions and PD. DESIGN, SETTING, AND PARTICIPANTS An observational study of the occurrence of PD in the world’s largest cohort of well-characterized adults with a molecularly confirmed diagnosis of 22q11.2DS (n = 159 [6 with postmortem tissue]; age range, 18.1–68.6 years) was conducted in Toronto, Ontario, Canada. Rare postmortem brain tissue from individuals with 22q11.2DS and a clinical history of PD was investigated for neurodegenerative changes and compared with that from individuals with no history of a movement disorder. MAIN OUTCOMES AND MEASURES A clinical diagnosis of PD made by a neurologist and neuropathological features of PD. RESULTS Adults with 22q11.2DS had a significantly elevated occurrence of PD compared with standard population estimates (standardized morbidity ratio = 69.7; 95% CI, 19.0–178.5). All cases showed early onset and typical PD symptom pattern, treatment response, and course. All were negative for family history of PD and known pathogenic PD-related mutations. The common use of antipsychotics in patients with 22q11.2DS to manage associated psychiatric symptoms delayed diagnosis of PD by up to 10 years. Postmortem brain tissue revealed classic loss of midbrain dopaminergic neurons in all 3 postmortem 22q11.2DS-PD cases. Typical α-synuclein–positive Lewy bodies were present in the expected distribution in 2 cases but absent in another. CONCLUSIONS AND RELEVANCE These findings suggest that 22q11.2 deletions represent a novel genetic risk factor for early-onset PD with variable neuropathological

  20. Large deletions encompassing the TCOF1 and CAMK2A genes are responsible for Treacher Collins syndrome with intellectual disability.

    PubMed

    Vincent, Marie; Collet, Corinne; Verloes, Alain; Lambert, Laetitia; Herlin, Christian; Blanchet, Catherine; Sanchez, Elodie; Drunat, Séverine; Vigneron, Jacqueline; Laplanche, Jean-Louis; Puechberty, Jacques; Sarda, Pierre; Geneviève, David

    2014-01-01

    Mandibulofacial dysostosis is part of a clinically and genetically heterogeneous group of disorders of craniofacial development, which lead to malar and mandibular hypoplasia. Treacher Collins syndrome is the major cause of mandibulofacial dysostosis and is due to mutations in the TCOF1 gene. Usually patients with Treacher Collins syndrome do not present with intellectual disability. Recently, the EFTUD2 gene was identified in patients with mandibulofacial dysostosis associated with microcephaly, intellectual disability and esophageal atresia. We report on two patients presenting with mandibulofacial dysostosis characteristic of Treacher Collins syndrome, but associated with unexpected intellectual disability, due to a large deletion encompassing several genes including the TCOF1 gene. We discuss the involvement of the other deleted genes such as CAMK2A or SLC6A7 in the cognitive development delay of the patients reported, and we propose the systematic investigation for 5q32 deletion when intellectual disability is associated with Treacher Collins syndrome.

  1. Large deletions encompassing the TCOF1 and CAMK2A genes are responsible for Treacher Collins syndrome with intellectual disability

    PubMed Central

    Vincent, Marie; Collet, Corinne; Verloes, Alain; Lambert, Laetitia; Herlin, Christian; Blanchet, Catherine; Sanchez, Elodie; Drunat, Séverine; Vigneron, Jacqueline; Laplanche, Jean-Louis; Puechberty, Jacques; Sarda, Pierre; Geneviève, David

    2014-01-01

    Mandibulofacial dysostosis is part of a clinically and genetically heterogeneous group of disorders of craniofacial development, which lead to malar and mandibular hypoplasia. Treacher Collins syndrome is the major cause of mandibulofacial dysostosis and is due to mutations in the TCOF1 gene. Usually patients with Treacher Collins syndrome do not present with intellectual disability. Recently, the EFTUD2 gene was identified in patients with mandibulofacial dysostosis associated with microcephaly, intellectual disability and esophageal atresia. We report on two patients presenting with mandibulofacial dysostosis characteristic of Treacher Collins syndrome, but associated with unexpected intellectual disability, due to a large deletion encompassing several genes including the TCOF1 gene. We discuss the involvement of the other deleted genes such as CAMK2A or SLC6A7 in the cognitive development delay of the patients reported, and we propose the systematic investigation for 5q32 deletion when intellectual disability is associated with Treacher Collins syndrome. PMID:23695276

  2. Cognitive and behavioral characterization of 16p11.2 deletion syndrome.

    PubMed

    Hanson, Ellen; Nasir, Ramzi H; Fong, Alexa; Lian, Alyss; Hundley, Rachel; Shen, Yiping; Wu, Bai-Lin; Holm, Ingrid A; Miller, David T

    2010-10-01

    To describe cognitive and behavioral features of patients with chromosome 16p11.2 deletion syndrome, a recently identified and common genetic cause of neurodevelopmental disability, especially autism spectrum disorder (ASD). Twenty-one patients with 16p11.2 deletion were evaluated by medical record review. A subset of 11 patients consented to detailed cognitive, behavioral, and autism diagnostic assessment. Patients with 16p11.2 deletion had varying levels of intellectual disability, variable adaptive skills, and a high incidence of language delay. Attention issues were not as frequent as had been reported in previous clinical reports. Atypical language, reduced social skills, and maladaptive behaviors were common, as was diagnosis of ASD. Based on medical record review, 7 of 21 patients (33%) had an ASD diagnosis. Among patients receiving detailed phenotyping, 3 of 11 (27%) met full criteria (met cutoff scores on both Autism Diagnostic Observation Schedule and Autism Diagnostic Interview) for an ASD diagnosis, whereas 6 other patients (55%) met criteria for ASD on either the Autism Diagnostic Observation Schedule or the Autism Diagnostic Interview, but not both measures. Rates of ASD were similar to previous reports that are based on medical record reviews, but formal assessment revealed that a majority of patients with 16p11.2 deletion demonstrate features of ASD beyond simple language impairment. All patients with 16p11.2 deletion should receive formal neurodevelopmental evaluation including measures to specifically assess cognitive, adaptive, language, and psychiatric/behavioral issues. Clinical evaluation of this patient population should always include assessment by Autism Diagnostic Interview and Autism Diagnostic Observation Schedule to detect behaviors related to ASD and possible ASD diagnosis.

  3. Behavior of mice with mutations in the conserved region deleted in velocardiofacial/DiGeorge syndrome.

    PubMed

    Long, Jeffrey M; LaPorte, Patricia; Merscher, Sandra; Funke, Birgit; Saint-Jore, Bruno; Puech, Anne; Kucherlapati, Raju; Morrow, Bernice E; Skoultchi, Arthur I; Wynshaw-Boris, Anthony

    2006-11-01

    Velocardiofacial/DiGeorge syndrome (VCFS/DGS) is a developmental disorder caused by a 1.5 to 3-Mb hemizygous 22q11.2 deletion. VCFS/DGS patients display malformations in multiple systems, as well as an increased frequency of neuropsychiatric defects including schizophrenia. Haploinsufficiency of TBX1 appears to be responsible for these physical malformations in humans and mice, but the genes responsible for the neuropsychiatric defects are unknown. In this study, two mouse models of VCFS/DGS, a deletion mouse model (Lgdel/+) and a single gene model (Tbx1 +/-), as well as a third mouse mutant (Gscl -/-) for a gene within the Lgdel deletion, were tested in a large behavioral battery designed to assess gross physical features, sensorimotor reflexes, motor activity nociception, acoustic startle, sensorimotor gating, and learning and memory. Lgdel/+ mice contain a 1.5-Mb hemizygous deletion of 27 genes in the orthologous region on MMU 16 and present with impairment in sensorimotor gating, grip strength, and nociception. Tbx1 +/- mice were impaired in grip strength similar to Lgdel/+ mice and movement initiation. Gscl -/- mice were not impaired in any of the administered tests, suggesting that redundant function of other Gsc family members may compensate for the loss of Gscl. Thus, although deletion of the genes in the Lgdel region in mice may recapitulate some of the behavioral phenotypes seen in humans with VCFS/DGS, these phenotypes are not found in mice with complete loss of Gscl or in mice with heterozygous loss of Tbx1, suggesting that the neuropsychiatric and physical malformations of VCFS/DGS may act by different genetic mechanisms.

  4. Contiguous ABCD1 DXS1357E deletion syndrome: report of an autopsy case.

    PubMed

    Iwasa, Mitsuaki; Yamagata, Takanori; Mizuguchi, Masashi; Itoh, Masayuki; Matsumoto, Ayumi; Hironaka, Mitsugu; Honda, Ayako; Momoi, Mariko Y; Shimozawa, Nobuyuki

    2013-06-01

    Contiguous ABCD1 DXS1357E deletion syndrome (CADDS) is a contiguous deletion syndrome involving the ABCD1 and DXS1357E/BAP31 genes on Xq28. Although ABCD1 is responsible for X-linked adrenoleukodystrophy (X-ALD), its phenotype differs from that of CADDS, which manifests with many features of Zellweger syndrome (ZS), including severe growth and developmental retardation, liver dysfunction, cholestasis and early infantile death. We report here the fourth case of CADDS, in which a boy had dysmorphic features, including a flat orbital edge, hypoplastic nose, micrognathia, inguinal hernia, micropenis, cryptorchidism and club feet, all of which are shared by ZS. The patient achieved no developmental milestones and died of pneumonia at 8 months. Biochemical studies demonstrated abnormal metabolism of very long chain fatty acids, which was higher than that seen in X-ALD. Immunocytochemistry and Western blot showed the absence of ALD protein (ALDP) despite the presence of other peroxisomal proteins. Pathological studies disclosed a small brain with hypomyelination and secondary hypoxic-ischemic changes. Neuronal heterotopia in the white matter and leptomeningeal glioneuronal heterotopia indicated a neuronal migration disorder. The liver showed fibrosis and cholestasis. The thymus and adrenal glands were hypoplastic. Array comparative genomic hybridization (CGH) analysis suggested that the deletion was a genomic rearrangement in the 90-kb span starting in DXS1357E/BACP31 exon 4 and included ABCD1, PLXNB3, SRPK3, IDH3G and SSR4, ending in PDZD4 exon 8. Thus, the absence of ALDP, when combined with defects in the B-cell antigen receptor associated protein 31 (BAP31) and other factors, severely affects VLCFA metabolism on peroxisomal functions and produces ZS-like pathology.

  5. Williams-Beuren syndrome: phenotypic variability and deletions of chromosomes 7, 11, and 22 in a series of 52 patients.

    PubMed Central

    Joyce, C A; Zorich, B; Pike, S J; Barber, J C; Dennis, N R

    1996-01-01

    Fluorescence in situ hybridisation (FISH) and conventional chromosome analysis were performed on a series of 52 patients with classical Williams-Beuren syndrome (WBS), suspected WBS, or supravalvular aortic stenosis (SVAS). In the classical WBS group, 22/23 (96%) had a submicroscopic deletion of the elastin locus on chromosome 7, but the remaining patient had a unique interstitial deletion of chromosome 11 (del(11)(q13.5q14.2)). In the suspected WBS group 2/22 (9%) patients had elastin deletions but a third patient had a complex karyotype including a ring chromosome 22 with a deletion of the long arm (r(22)(p11-->q13)). In the SVAS group, 1/7 (14%) had an elastin gene deletion, despite having normal development and minimal signs of WBS. Overall, some patients with submicroscopic elastin deletions have fewer features of Williams-Beuren syndrome than those with other cytogenetic abnormalities. These results, therefore, emphasise the importance of a combined conventional and molecular cytogenetic approach to diagnosis and suggest that the degree to which submicroscopic deletions of chromosome 7 extend beyond the elastin locus may explain some of the phenotypic variability found in Williams-Beuren syndrome. Images PMID:9004128

  6. Williams-Beuren syndrome: phenotypic variability and deletions of chromosomes 7, 11, and 22 in a series of 52 patients.

    PubMed

    Joyce, C A; Zorich, B; Pike, S J; Barber, J C; Dennis, N R

    1996-12-01

    Fluorescence in situ hybridisation (FISH) and conventional chromosome analysis were performed on a series of 52 patients with classical Williams-Beuren syndrome (WBS), suspected WBS, or supravalvular aortic stenosis (SVAS). In the classical WBS group, 22/23 (96%) had a submicroscopic deletion of the elastin locus on chromosome 7, but the remaining patient had a unique interstitial deletion of chromosome 11 (del(11)(q13.5q14.2)). In the suspected WBS group 2/22 (9%) patients had elastin deletions but a third patient had a complex karyotype including a ring chromosome 22 with a deletion of the long arm (r(22)(p11-->q13)). In the SVAS group, 1/7 (14%) had an elastin gene deletion, despite having normal development and minimal signs of WBS. Overall, some patients with submicroscopic elastin deletions have fewer features of Williams-Beuren syndrome than those with other cytogenetic abnormalities. These results, therefore, emphasise the importance of a combined conventional and molecular cytogenetic approach to diagnosis and suggest that the degree to which submicroscopic deletions of chromosome 7 extend beyond the elastin locus may explain some of the phenotypic variability found in Williams-Beuren syndrome.

  7. High-Resolution genomic arrays identify CNVs that phenocopy the chromosome 22q11.2 deletion syndrome.

    PubMed

    Busse, Tracy; Graham, John M; Feldman, Gerald; Perin, Juan; Catherwood, Anne; Knowlton, Robert; Rappaport, Eric F; Emanuel, Beverly; Driscoll, Deborah A; Saitta, Sulagna C

    2011-01-01

    The 22q11 Deletion Syndrome includes the overlapping phenotypes of DiGeorge/Velocardiofacial Syndromes, characterized by conotruncal heart defects, cleft palate, thymus, and parathyroid gland dysplasia. The majority (90%) of patients harbor detectable chr22q11.2 deletions, but a genetic etiology for the remainder of patients without a deletion can remain undefined despite major birth defects. We analyzed DNA from eight patients with normal 22q11 FISH studies by high-density single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) arrays and identified potentially pathogenic copy number variants (CNVs) in four of eight patients. Two patients showed large CNVs in regions of known genomic disorders: one a deletion of distal chr22q11.2 and the other a duplication of chr5q35. A 3-Mb deletion of chr19p13.3 that includes a gene associated with conotruncal heart defects was found in a third patient. Two potentially pathogenic CNVs were found in a fourth patient: a large heterozygous deletion of chr6p24 and a smaller duplication of chr9p24. Our findings support a recent consensus statement advocating chromosomal microarray analysis as a first-line diagnostic approach for patients with multiple congenital anomalies. In patients with phenotypes suggestive of the 22q11.2 syndrome spectrum and normal FISH, microarray analysis can uncover the molecular basis of other genomic disorders whose features overlap those of 22q11.2 deletions. © 2010 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  8. Exome-first approach identified a novel gloss deletion associated with Lowe syndrome.

    PubMed

    Watanabe, Miki; Nakagawa, Ryuji; Kohmoto, Tomohiro; Naruto, Takuya; Suga, Ken-Ichi; Goji, Aya; Horikawa, Hideaki; Masuda, Kiyoshi; Kagami, Shoji; Imoto, Issei

    2016-01-01

    Lowe syndrome (LS) is an X-linked disorder affecting the eyes, nervous system and kidneys, typically caused by missense or nonsense/frameshift OCRL mutations. We report a 6-month-old male clinically suspected to have LS, but without the Fanconi-type renal dysfunction. Using a targeted-exome sequencing-first approach, LS was diagnosed by the identification of a deletion involving 1.7 Mb at Xq25-q26.1, encompassing the entire OCRL gene and neighboring loci.

  9. Exome-first approach identified a novel gloss deletion associated with Lowe syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Watanabe, Miki; Nakagawa, Ryuji; Kohmoto, Tomohiro; Naruto, Takuya; Suga, Ken-ichi; Goji, Aya; Horikawa, Hideaki; Masuda, Kiyoshi; Kagami, Shoji; Imoto, Issei

    2016-01-01

    Lowe syndrome (LS) is an X-linked disorder affecting the eyes, nervous system and kidneys, typically caused by missense or nonsense/frameshift OCRL mutations. We report a 6-month-old male clinically suspected to have LS, but without the Fanconi-type renal dysfunction. Using a targeted-exome sequencing-first approach, LS was diagnosed by the identification of a deletion involving 1.7 Mb at Xq25-q26.1, encompassing the entire OCRL gene and neighboring loci. PMID:27867521

  10. Dying at 23 with 1p36 deletion syndrome: Laura's family story.

    PubMed

    Tandy, P A

    2012-09-01

    Laura was unusual. She had always been different and at times difficult. She was born with a genetic disorder, diagnosed as 1p36 deletion syndrome when she was 21 years old. At 23 she suffered her first cardiac arrest at home and entered the hospital system for the first time apart from infancy. After initially appearing to do well, she suffered a second cardiac arrest 10 weeks after admission. This was followed by an irreversible deterioration and she died 14 weeks after admission. We her family had been with her throughout her traumatic experience. This is our story.

  11. Williams syndrome deletions and duplications: Genetic windows to understanding anxiety, sociality, autism, and schizophrenia.

    PubMed

    Crespi, Bernard J; Procyshyn, Tanya L

    2017-08-01

    We describe and evaluate an integrative hypothesis for helping to explain the major neurocognitive features of individuals with Williams syndrome region deletions and duplications. First, we demonstrate how the cognitive differences between Williams syndrome individuals, individuals with duplications of this region, and healthy individuals parallel the differences between individuals subject to effects of increased or decreased oxytocin. Second, we synthesize evidence showing that variation in expression of the gene GTF2I (General Transcription Factor II-I) underlies the primary social phenotypes of Williams syndrome and that common genetic variation in GTF2I mediates oxytocin reactivity, and its correlates, in healthy populations. Third, we describe findings relevant to the hypothesis that the GTF2I gene is subject to parent of origin effects whose behavioral expression fits with predictions from the kinship theory of genomic imprinting. Fourth, we describe how Williams syndrome can be considered, in part, as an autistic syndrome of Lorna Wing's 'active-but-odd' autism subtype, in contrast to associations of duplications with both schizophrenia and autism. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Numerical magnitude processing impairments in genetic syndromes: a cross-syndrome comparison of Turner and 22q11.2 deletion syndromes.

    PubMed

    Brankaer, Carmen; Ghesquière, Pol; De Wel, Anke; Swillen, Ann; De Smedt, Bert

    2016-10-17

    Cross-syndrome comparisons offer an important window onto understanding heterogeneity in mathematical learning disabilities or dyscalculia. The present study therefore investigated symbolic numerical magnitude processing in two genetic syndromes that are both characterized by mathematical learning disabilities: Turner syndrome and 22q11.2 deletion syndrome (22q11DS). We further verified whether the phenotypic outcomes of these syndromes emerged from the same or different cognitive processes and therefore examined whether numerical impairments were related to working memory deficits, often observed in these syndromes. Participants were 24 girls with Turner syndrome, 25 children with 22q11DS and 48 well-matched typically developing control children. All children completed a symbolic numerical magnitude comparison task and four additional working memory tasks. Both groups of children with genetic syndromes showed similar impairments in symbolic numerical magnitude processing compared to typically developing controls. Importantly, in Turner syndrome, group differences in symbolic numerical magnitude processing disappeared when their difficulties in visual-spatial working memory were taken into account. In contrast, the difficulties in 22q11DS were not explained by poor visual-spatial working memory. These data suggest that different factors underlie the symbolic numerical magnitude processing impairments in both patient groups with mathematical learning disabilities and highlight the value of cross-syndrome comparisons for understanding different pathways to mathematical learning disabilities or dyscalculia.

  13. Detection of classical 17p11.2 deletions, an atypical deletion and RAI1 alterations in patients with features suggestive of Smith-Magenis syndrome.

    PubMed

    Vieira, Gustavo H; Rodriguez, Jayson D; Carmona-Mora, Paulina; Cao, Lei; Gamba, Bruno F; Carvalho, Daniel R; de Rezende Duarte, Andréa; Santos, Suely R; de Souza, Deise H; DuPont, Barbara R; Walz, Katherina; Moretti-Ferreira, Danilo; Srivastava, Anand K

    2012-02-01

    Smith-Magenis syndrome (SMS) is a complex disorder whose clinical features include mild to severe intellectual disability with speech delay, growth failure, brachycephaly, flat midface, short broad hands, and behavioral problems. SMS is typically caused by a large deletion on 17p11.2 that encompasses multiple genes including the retinoic acid induced 1, RAI1, gene or a mutation in the RAI1 gene. Here we have evaluated 30 patients with suspected SMS and identified SMS-associated classical 17p11.2 deletions in six patients, an atypical deletion of ~139 kb that partially deletes the RAI1 gene in one patient, and RAI1 gene nonsynonymous alterations of unknown significance in two unrelated patients. The RAI1 mutant proteins showed no significant alterations in molecular weight, subcellular localization and transcriptional activity. Clinical features of patients with or without 17p11.2 deletions and mutations involving the RAI1 gene were compared to identify phenotypes that may be useful in diagnosing patients with SMS.

  14. Pitt-Rogers-Danks syndrome and Wolf-Hirschhorn syndrome are caused by a deletion in the same region on chromosome 4p 16.3.

    PubMed Central

    Kant, S G; Van Haeringen, A; Bakker, E; Stec, I; Donnai, D; Mollevanger, P; Beverstock, G C; Lindeman-Kusse, M C; Van Ommen, G J

    1997-01-01

    Recently, a deletion of chromosome 4pter was found in three patients with Pitt-Rogers-Danks syndrome. We investigated two of these patients, by means of DNA and FISH studies, together with two additional patients with Pitt-Rogers-Danks syndrome, to determine the critical region of the deletion in these patients and to compare this with the critical region in Wolf-Hirschhorn syndrome. All four patients showed terminal deletions of chromosome 4p of different sizes. One of them appeared to have an unbalanced karyotype caused by a cryptic translocation t(4;8) in the mother, resulting in a deletion of chromosome 4pter and a duplication of chromosome 8pter. The localisation of the Wolf-Hirschhorn critical region has been confined to approximately 1 Mb between D4S43 and D4S115. Our study shows that the deletions in four patients with the Pitt-Rogers-Danks syndrome overlap the Wolf-Hirschhorn critical region and extend beyond this in both directions. This study, combined with the fact that our third patient, who was previously described as a Pitt-Rogers-Danks patient, but who now more closely resembles a Wolf-Hirschhorn patient, makes it likely that Pitt-Rogers-Danks and Wolf-Hirschhorn syndromes are different clinical phenotypes resulting from a deletion in the same microscopic region on chromosome 4p16. Images PMID:9222965

  15. Cognitive-behavioral characteristics and developmental trajectories in children with deletion 11qter (Jacobsen syndrome), and their relation to deletion size.

    PubMed

    Fisch, Gene S

    2015-01-01

    Subtelomeric deletions represent an important class of abnormalities to be considered when investigating genetic links to intellectual disability (ID). One subtelomeric deletion found on the long arm of chromosome 11q produces a characteristic phenotype that includes ID and is often referred to as Jacobsen syndrome (JBS). Previously, researchers found an inverse relationship between IQ and deletion size. While useful, IQ does not provide a comprehensive picture of the cognitive-behavioral strengths and weaknesses in JBS, nor does it reveal how the profiles evolve as these individuals age. One purpose of this study was to confirm the relationship between IQ or adaptive behavior (DQ) and deletion size. We also examined cognitive-behavioral profiles of children with JBS and the extent to which they changed over time. Initially, at T1, we examined 10 children, ages 5-20 years, diagnosed with JBS. Cognitive ability was assessed with the Stanford-Binet (4th Edition). Adaptive behavoir was evaluated with the Vineland Adaptive Behavior Scales (VABS). Eight children were reassessed 2 years later (T2). Results show a negative but non-significant correlation between IQ and deletion size. There was no statistically significant relationship between DQ and deletion size. As for our second aim, IQ and DQ scores were stable from T1 to T2. Cognitive profiles were not significantly different from T1 to T2. However, there were significant changes in adaptive behavior domain scores from T1 to T2. Lack of a significant relationship between cognitive-behavioral measures and deletion size, as well as changes in cognitive-behavioral profiles are discussed.

  16. Signature MicroRNA expression patterns identified in humans with 22q11.2 deletion/DiGeorge syndrome

    PubMed Central

    de la Morena, M. Teresa; Eitson, Jennifer L.; Dozmorov, Igor M.; Belkaya, Serkan; Hoover, Ashley R.; Anguiano, Esperanza; Pascual, M. Virginia; van Oers, Nicolai S.C.

    2013-01-01

    Patients with 22q11.2 deletion syndrome have heterogeneous clinical presentations including immunodeficiency, cardiac anomalies, and hypocalcemia. The syndrome arises from hemizygous deletions of up to 3 Mb on chromosome 22q11.2, a region that contains 60 genes and 4 microRNAs. MicroRNAs are important post-transcriptional regulators of gene expression, with mutations in several microRNAs causal to specific human diseases. We characterized the microRNA expression patterns in the peripheral blood of patients with 22q11.2 deletion syndrome (n=31) compared to normal controls (n=22). Eighteen microRNAs had a statistically significant differential expression (p<0.05), with miR-185 expressed at 0.4× normal levels. The 22q11.2 deletion syndrome cohort exhibited microRNA expression hyper-variability and group dysregulation. Selected microRNAs distinguished patients with cardiac anomalies, hypocalcemia, and/or low circulating T cell counts. In summary, microRNA profiling of chromosome 22q11.2 deletion syndrome/DiGeorge patients revealed a signature microRNA expression pattern distinct from normal controls with clinical relevance. PMID:23454892

  17. Signature MicroRNA expression patterns identified in humans with 22q11.2 deletion/DiGeorge syndrome.

    PubMed

    de la Morena, M Teresa; Eitson, Jennifer L; Dozmorov, Igor M; Belkaya, Serkan; Hoover, Ashley R; Anguiano, Esperanza; Pascual, M Virginia; van Oers, Nicolai S C

    2013-04-01

    Patients with 22q11.2 deletion syndrome have heterogeneous clinical presentations including immunodeficiency, cardiac anomalies, and hypocalcemia. The syndrome arises from hemizygous deletions of up to 3Mb on chromosome 22q11.2, a region that contains 60 genes and 4 microRNAs. MicroRNAs are important post-transcriptional regulators of gene expression, with mutations in several microRNAs causal to specific human diseases. We characterized the microRNA expression patterns in the peripheral blood of patients with 22q11.2 deletion syndrome (n=31) compared to normal controls (n=22). Eighteen microRNAs had a statistically significant differential expression (p<0.05), with miR-185 expressed at 0.4× normal levels. The 22q11.2 deletion syndrome cohort exhibited microRNA expression hyper-variability and group dysregulation. Selected microRNAs distinguished patients with cardiac anomalies, hypocalcemia, and/or low circulating T cell counts. In summary, microRNA profiling of chromosome 22q11.2 deletion syndrome/DiGeorge patients revealed a signature microRNA expression pattern distinct from normal controls with clinical relevance.

  18. Exclusion of 22q11 deletion in Noonan syndrome with Tetralogy of Fallot

    SciTech Connect

    Digilio, M.C.; Marino, B.; Giannotti, A.; Dallapiccola, B. |

    1996-04-24

    We read with interest the report of Robin et al. [1995] published in recent issue of the Journal. The authors described 6 patients with Noonan syndrome (NS) who underwent molecular evaluation for submicroscopic deletion of chromosome band 22q11. None of those patients presented with conotruncal heart defects. Evidence for 22q11 hemizygosity was demonstrated in only one patient. This patient had NS-like manifestations without clinical manifestations of DiGeorge (DG) or velo-cardio-facial (VCF) syndromes. The molecular results obtained in the other 5 patients led the authors to conclude that classical NS is not due to del(22)(q11), even if some patients with del(22)(q11) may present NS-like manifestations. 12 refs., 1 tab.

  19. Practical guidelines for managing adults with 22q11.2 deletion syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Fung, Wai Lun Alan; Butcher, Nancy J.; Costain, Gregory; Andrade, Danielle M.; Boot, Erik; Chow, Eva W.C.; Chung, Brian; Cytrynbaum, Cheryl; Faghfoury, Hanna; Fishman, Leona; García-Miñaúr, Sixto; George, Susan; Lang, Anthony E.; Repetto, Gabriela; Shugar, Andrea; Silversides, Candice; Swillen, Ann; van Amelsvoort, Therese; McDonald-McGinn, Donna M.; Bassett, Anne S.

    2015-01-01

    22q11.2 Deletion syndrome (22q11.2DS) is the most common microdeletion syndrome in humans, estimated to affect up to 1 in 2,000 live births. Major features of this multisystem condition include congenital anomalies, developmental delay, and an array of early- and later-onset medical and psychiatric disorders. Advances in pediatric care ensure a growing population of adults with 22q11.2DS. Informed by an international panel of multidisciplinary experts and a comprehensive review of the existing literature concerning adults, we present the first set of guidelines focused on managing the neuropsychiatric, endocrine, cardiovascular, reproductive, psychosocial, genetic counseling, and other issues that are the focus of attention in adults with 22q11.2DS. We propose practical strategies for the recognition, evaluation, surveillance, and management of the associated morbidities. PMID:25569435

  20. A de novo 15q13.2q13.3 deletion in a boy with an Angelman syndrome like phenotype.

    PubMed

    Barøy, Tuva; Misceo, Doriana; Braaten, Oivind; Helle, Johan R; Fannemel, Madeleine; Strømme, Petter; Frengen, Eirik

    2010-01-01

    We report on a 11-year-old boy investigated for a clinical suspicion of Angelman syndrome (AS) (OMIM 105830) who was found to carry a de novo interstitial deletion of chromosome 15q13.2q13.3. The deletion overlaps the critical region for the newly recognized recurrent 15q13.3 deletion syndrome. This is the first report of a patient with 15q13.3 deletion syndrome with clinical features similar to that of AS, thus broadening the phenotypic spectrum associated with the 15q13.3 microdeletion syndrome. Copyright 2010 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  1. [Neurocognitive and psychiatric management of the 22q11.2 deletion syndrome].

    PubMed

    Demily, C; Rossi, M; Schneider, M; Edery, P; Leleu, A; d'Amato, T; Franck, N; Eliez, S

    2015-06-01

    The 22q11.2 deletion syndrome (22q11.2DS) is caused by hemizygous microdeletions on chromosome 22. 22q11.2DS has several presentations including Di George's syndrome, velo-cardio-facial syndrome or Shprintzen's syndrome and it is the most frequent microdeletion syndrome in the general population (prevalence estimated at 1/4000 births, de novo: 90%). The inheritance of the syndrome (10%) is autosomal dominant. Most people with 22q11.2DS are missing a sequence of about 3 million DNA building blocks (base pairs) on one copy of chromosome 22 in each cell. A small percentage of affected individuals have shorter deletions in the same region (contiguous gene deletion syndrome). The general features of 22q11.2DS vary widely (more than 180 phenotypic presentations) and the syndrome is under diagnosed. Characteristic symptoms may include congenital heart disease, defects in the palate, neuromuscular problems, velo-pharyngeal insufficiency, hypoparathyroidism, craniofacial features and problems with the immune system T-cell mediated response (caused by hypoplasia of the thymus). The neurocognitive phenotype of the 22q11.2DS is complex. Cognitive deficits are seen in the majority (80-100%) of individuals with 22q11DS with impairments in sustained attention, executive function, memory and visual-spatial perception. Borderline intellectual function (IQ: 70-75) is most common, mild intellectual disability (IQ: 55-75) is slightly less frequent and a small percentage of children fall into the low average intelligence range. Most children with 22q11.2DS achieve higher scores in verbal tasks than in non-verbal tasks, although this pattern of dysfunction being not universal. Brain MRI studies have shown volumetric changes in multiple cortical and subcortical regions in individuals with 22q11DS that could be related to both cognition and psychoses. General psychiatric features included anxiety disorders, attention deficit disorder and poor social skills (40-50%). An elevated risk of

  2. Induced Chromosome Deletion in a Williams-Beuren Syndrome Mouse Model Causes Cardiovascular Abnormalities

    PubMed Central

    Goergen, Craig J.; Li, Hong-Hua; Francke, Uta; Taylor, Charles A.

    2011-01-01

    Aims The Williams-Beuren syndrome (WBS) is a genetic disorder caused by a heterozygous ∼1.5-Mb deletion. The aim of this study was to determine how the genetic changes in a Wbs mouse model alter Eln expression, blood pressure, vessel structure, and abdominal aortic wall dynamics in vivo. Methods Elastin (ELN) transcript levels were quantified by qRT-PCR and blood pressure was measured with a tail cuff system. M-mode ultrasound was used to track pulsatile abdominal aortic wall motion. Aortas were sectioned and stained to determine medial lamellar structure. Results ELN transcript levels were reduced by 38–41% in Wbs mice lacking one copy of the ELN gene. These mice also had a 10–20% increase in mean blood pressure and significantly reduced circumferential cyclic strain (p < 0.001). Finally, histological sections showed disorganized and fragmented elastin sheets in Wbs mice, but not the characteristic increase in lamellar units seen in Eln+/– mice. Conclusions The deletion of Eln in this Wbs mouse model results in lower gene expression, hypertension, reduced cyclic strain, and fragmented elastin sheets. The observation that the number of medial lamellar units is normal in Wbs deletion mice, which is in contrast to Eln+/– mice, suggests other genes may be involved in vascular development. PMID:20926892

  3. Autosomal recessive Wolfram syndrome associated with an 8.5 kb mtDNA single deletion

    SciTech Connect

    Barrientos, A.; Casademont, J.; Cardellach, F.

    1996-05-01

    Wolfram syndrome (MIM 222300) is characterized by optic atrophy, diabetes mellitus, diabetes insipidus, neurosensory hearing loss, urinary tract abnormalities, and neurological dysfunction. The association of clinical manifestations in tissues and organs unrelated functionally or embryologically suggested the possibility of a mitochondrial implication in the disease, which has been demonstrated in two sporadic cases. Nonetheless, familial studies suggested an autosomal recessive mode of transmission, and recent data demonstrated linkage with markers on the short arm of human chromosome 4. The patient reported here, as well as her parents and unaffected sister, carried a heteroplasmic 8.5-kb deletion in mtDNA. The deletion accounted for 23% of mitochondrial genomes in lymphocytes from the patient and {approximately}5% in the tissues studied from members of her family. The presence of the deletion in the patient in a proportion higher than in her unaffected parents suggests a putative defect in a nuclear gene that acts at the mitochondrial level. 39 refs., 6 figs., 3 tabs.

  4. Highly restricted deletion of the SNORD116 region is implicated in Prader–Willi Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Bieth, Eric; Eddiry, Sanaa; Gaston, Véronique; Lorenzini, Françoise; Buffet, Alexandre; Conte Auriol, Françoise; Molinas, Catherine; Cailley, Dorothée; Rooryck, Caroline; Arveiler, Benoit; Cavaillé, Jérome; Salles, Jean Pierre; Tauber, Maïthé

    2015-01-01

    The SNORD116 locus lies in the 15q11-13 region of paternally expressed genes implicated in Prader–Willi Syndrome (PWS), a complex disease accompanied by obesity and severe neurobehavioural disturbances. Cases of PWS patients with a deletion encompassing the SNORD116 gene cluster, but preserving the expression of flanking genes, have been described. We report a 23-year-old woman who presented clinical criteria of PWS, including the behavioural and nutritional features, obesity, developmental delay and endocrine dysfunctions with hyperghrelinemia. We found a paternally transmitted highly restricted deletion of the SNORD116 gene cluster, the shortest described to date (118 kb). This deletion was also present in the father. This finding in a human case strongly supports the current hypothesis that lack of the paternal SNORD116 gene cluster has a determinant role in the pathogenesis of PWS. Moreover, targeted analysis of the SNORD116 gene cluster, complementary to SNRPN methylation analysis, should be carried out in subjects with a phenotype suggestive of PWS. PMID:24916642

  5. Mutation spectra in fragile X syndrome induced by deletions of CGG*CCG repeats.

    PubMed

    Wells, Robert D

    2009-03-20

    The fragile X syndrome results from expansions as well as deletions of the repeating CGG.CCG DNA sequence in the 5'-untranslated region of the FMR1 gene on the X chromosome. The relative frequency of disease cases promoted by these two types of mutations cannot be ascertained at present because the routine clinical assay monitors only expansions. At least 30 articles have been reviewed that document the involvement of deletions of part or all of the CGG.CCG repeats along with varying extents of DNA flanking regions as well as very small mutations including single base pair changes. Studies of deletion mutants of CGG.CCG tracts in Escherichia coli plasmids revealed a similar spectrum of mutagenic products. The triplet repeat tract in a non-B conformation is the mutagen, not the sequence per se in the right-handed B helix. Hence, molecular investigations in a simple model organism may generate useful initial information toward therapeutic strategies for this disease.

  6. Gross deletions in TCOF1 are a cause of Treacher–Collins–Franceschetti syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Bowman, Michael; Oldridge, Michael; Archer, Caroline; O'Rourke, Anthony; McParland, Joanna; Brekelmans, Roel; Seller, Anneke; Lester, Tracy

    2012-01-01

    Treacher–Collins–Franceschetti syndrome (TCS) is an autosomal dominant craniofacial disorder characterised by midface hypoplasia, micrognathia, downslanting palpebral fissures, eyelid colobomata, and ear deformities that often lead to conductive deafness. A total of 182 patients with signs consistent with a diagnosis of TCS were screened by DNA sequence and dosage analysis of the TCOF1 gene. In all, 92 cases were found to have a pathogenic mutation by sequencing and 5 to have a partial gene deletion. A further case had a novel in-frame deletion in the alternatively spliced exon 6A of uncertain pathogenicity. The majority of the pathogenic sequence changes were found to predict premature protein termination, however, four novel missense changes in the LIS1 homology motif at the 5′ end of the gene were identified. The partial gene deletions of different sizes represent ∼5.2% of all the pathogenic TCOF1 mutations identified, indicating that gene rearrangements account for a significant proportion of TCS cases. This is the first report of gene rearrangements resulting in TCS. These findings expand the TCOF1 mutation spectrum indicating that dosage analysis should be performed together with sequence analysis, a strategy that is predicted to have a sensitivity of 71% for patients in whom TCS is strongly suspected. PMID:22317976

  7. Novel deletions involving the USH2A gene in patients with Usher syndrome and retinitis pigmentosa

    PubMed Central

    García-García, Gema; Jaijo, Teresa; Aparisi, Maria J.; Larrieu, Lise; Faugère, Valérie; Blanco-Kelly, Fiona; Ayuso, Carmen; Roux, Anne-Francoise; Millán, José M.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose The aim of the present work was to identify and characterize large rearrangements involving the USH2A gene in patients with Usher syndrome and nonsyndromic retinitis pigmentosa. Methods The multiplex ligation-dependent probe amplification (MLPA) technique combined with a customized array-based comparative genomic hybridization (aCGH) analysis was applied to 40 unrelated patients previously screened for point mutations in the USH2A gene in which none or only one pathologic mutation was identified. Results We detected six large deletions involving USH2A in six out of the 40 cases studied. Three of the patients were homozygous for the deletion, and the remaining three were compound heterozygous with a previously identified USH2A point mutation. In five of these cases, the patients displayed Usher type 2, and the remaining case displayed nonsyndromic retinitis pigmentosa. The exact breakpoint junctions of the deletions found in USH2A in four of these cases were characterized. Conclusions Our study highlights the need to develop improved efficient strategies of mutation screening based upon next generation sequencing (NGS) that reduce cost, time, and complexity and allow simultaneous identification of all types of disease-causing mutations in diagnostic procedures. PMID:25352746

  8. A Comparative Study of Cognition and Brain Anatomy between Two Neurodevelopmental Disorders: 22q11.2 Deletion Syndrome and Williams Syndrome

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Campbell, Linda E.; Stevens, Angela; Daly, Eileen; Toal, Fiona; Azuma, Rayna; Karmiloff-Smith, Annette; Murphy, Declan G. M.; Murphy, Kieran C.

    2009-01-01

    Background: 22q11.2 deletion syndrome (22q11DS) is associated with intellectual disability, poor social interaction and a high prevalence of psychosis. However, to date there have been no studies comparing cognition and neuroanatomical characteristics of 22q11DS with other syndromes to investigate if the cognitive strengths and difficulties and…

  9. A Comparative Study of Cognition and Brain Anatomy between Two Neurodevelopmental Disorders: 22q11.2 Deletion Syndrome and Williams Syndrome

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Campbell, Linda E.; Stevens, Angela; Daly, Eileen; Toal, Fiona; Azuma, Rayna; Karmiloff-Smith, Annette; Murphy, Declan G. M.; Murphy, Kieran C.

    2009-01-01

    Background: 22q11.2 deletion syndrome (22q11DS) is associated with intellectual disability, poor social interaction and a high prevalence of psychosis. However, to date there have been no studies comparing cognition and neuroanatomical characteristics of 22q11DS with other syndromes to investigate if the cognitive strengths and difficulties and…

  10. Mother-Child Interaction as a Window to a Unique Social Phenotype in 22q11.2 Deletion Syndrome and in Williams Syndrome

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Weisman, Omri; Feldman, Ruth; Burg-Malki, Merav; Keren, Miri; Geva, Ronny; Diesendruck, Gil; Gothelf, Doron

    2015-01-01

    Mother-child interactions in 22q11.2 Deletion syndrome (22q11.2DS) and Williams syndrome (WS) were coded for maternal sensitivity/intrusiveness, child's expression of affect, levels of engagement, and dyadic reciprocity. WS children were found to express more positive emotions towards their mothers compared to 22q11.2DS children and those with…

  11. Mother-Child Interaction as a Window to a Unique Social Phenotype in 22q11.2 Deletion Syndrome and in Williams Syndrome

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Weisman, Omri; Feldman, Ruth; Burg-Malki, Merav; Keren, Miri; Geva, Ronny; Diesendruck, Gil; Gothelf, Doron

    2015-01-01

    Mother-child interactions in 22q11.2 Deletion syndrome (22q11.2DS) and Williams syndrome (WS) were coded for maternal sensitivity/intrusiveness, child's expression of affect, levels of engagement, and dyadic reciprocity. WS children were found to express more positive emotions towards their mothers compared to 22q11.2DS children and those with…

  12. Rubinstein-Taybi syndrome caused by submicroscopic deletions within 16p13.3

    PubMed Central

    Breuning, Martijn H.; Dauwerse, Hans G.; Fugazza, Gluseppina; Saris, Jasper J.; Spruit, Lia; Wijnen, Herman; Tommerup, Niels; van der Hagen, C. B.; Imaizumi, Kiyoshi; Kuroki, Yoshikazu; van den Boogaard, Marie-Jose; de Pater, Joke M.; Mariman, Edwin C. M.; Hamel, Ben C. J.; Himmelbauer, Heinz; Frischauf, Anne-Marie; Stallings, Raymond L.; Beverstock, Geoffrey C.; van Ommen, Gert-Jan B.; Hennekam, Raoul C. M.

    1993-01-01

    The Rubinstein-Taybi syndrome (RTS) is a well-defined complex of congenital malformations characterized by facial abnormalities, broad thumbs and big toes, and mental retardation. The breakpoint of two distinct reciprocal translocations occurring in patients with a clinical diagnosis of RTS was located to the same interval on chromosome 16, between the cosmids N2 and RT1, in band 16p13.3. By using two-color fluorescence in situ hybridization, the signal from RT1 was found to be missing from one chromosome 16 in 6 of 24 patients with RTS. The parents of five of these patients did not show a deletion of RT1, indicating a de novo rearrangement. RTS is caused by submicroscopic interstitial deletions within 16pl3.3 in approximately 25% of the patients. The detection of microdeletions will allow the objective confirmation of the clinical diagnosis in new patients and provides an excellent tool for the isolation of the gene causally related to the syndrome. ImagesFigure 2 PMID:8430691

  13. Deletion 2q37 syndrome: Cognitive-behavioral trajectories and autistic features related to breakpoint and deletion size.

    PubMed

    Fisch, Gene S; Falk, Rena E; Carey, John C; Imitola, Jaime; Sederberg, Maria; Caravalho, Karen S; South, Sarah

    2016-09-01

    Subtelomeric deletions have been reported in ∼2.5% of individuals with developmental disabilities. Subtelomeric deletion 2q37 has been detected in many individuals diagnosed with intellectual disabilities (ID) and autism spectrum disorders (ASD). Previously, genotype-phenotype correspondences were examined for their relationship to breakpoints 37.1, 37.2, or 37.3. Our purpose was to ascertain whether there were phenotypic differences at these breakpoints, elucidate the cognitive-behavioral phenotype in del2q37, and examine the genotype-phenotype association in the deletion with respect to cognitive-behavioral profiles and ASD. We administered a comprehensive cognitive-behavioral battery to nine children diagnosed with del 2q37, ages 3.9-17.75 years. ID for five tested with the Stanford-Binet (4th Edition) (SBFE) ranged from severe to mild [IQ Range: 36-59]. Adaptive behavior scores from the Vineland Adaptive Behavior Scale (VABS) were much below adequate levels (DQ Range: floor value ["19"] to 55). Autism scores from the Child Autism Rating Scale (CARS) ranged from 22 [non-autistic] to 56 [extremely autistic]; 5/8 [63%] children received scores on the autism spectrum. Participants with the largest deletions, 10.1 and 9.5 Mb, attained the highest IQ and DQ scores while those with the smallest deletions, 7.9 and 6.6 Mb, made the lowest IQ and DQ scores. No association between deletion breakpoint and phenotype were found. Assessment of the various deleted regions suggested histone deacetylase 4 gene (HDAC4) was a likely candidate gene for ASD in our sample. However, two earlier reports found no association between HDAC4 haploinsufficiency and ASD. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  14. Narrowing and genomic annotation of the commonly deleted region of the 5q- syndrome

    SciTech Connect

    Boultwood, Jacqueline; Fidler, Carrie; Strickson, Amanda J.; Watkins, Fiona; Gama, Susana; Kearney, Lyndal; Tosi, Sabrina; Kasprzyk, Arek; Cheng, Jan-Fang; Jaju, Rina J.; Wainscoat, James S.

    2002-01-15

    The 5q syndrome is the most distinct of the myelodysplastic syndromes, and the molecular basis for this disorder remains unknown. We describe the narrowing of the common deleted region (CDR) of the 5q syndrome to the approximately 1.5-megabases interval at 5q32 flanked by D5S413 and the GLRA1 gene. The Ensemblgene prediction program has been used for the complete genomic annotation of the CDR. The CDR is gene rich and contains 24 known genes and 16 novel (predicted) genes. Of 40 genes in the CDR, 33 are expressed in CD34 cells and, therefore, represent candidate genes since they are expressed within the hematopoietic stem/progenitor cell compartment. A number of the genes assigned to the CDR represent good candidates for the 5q syndrome, including MEGF1, G3BP, and several of the novel gene predictions. These data now afford a comprehensive mutational/expression analysis of all candidate genes assigned to the CDR.

  15. Isolation and characterization of a novel gene deleted in DiGeorge syndrome.

    PubMed

    Kurahashi, H; Akagi, K; Inazawa, J; Ohta, T; Niikawa, N; Kayatani, F; Sano, T; Okada, S; Nishisho, I

    1995-04-01

    The region commonly deleted in DiGeorge syndrome (DGS) has been localized at 22q11.1-q11.2 with the aid of a high resolution banding technique. A 22q11 specific plasmid library was constructed with a microdissection and microcloning method. Dosage analysis proved three of 144 randomly selected microclones to detect hemizygosity in two patients with DGS. Two of the clones were found to contain independent low-copy-number repetitive sequences, all of which were included in the region deleted in the DGS patients. Screening of the cosmid library and subsequent cosmid walking allowed us to obtain two cosmid contigs corresponding to the microclones within the deletion (contig 1 and contig 2), whose order fluorescence in situ hybridization identified as centromere-contig 1-contig 2-telomere on 22q. By direct selection strategy using one of the cosmids of contig 1, a 4.3 kb cDNA was obtained from fetal brain cDNA library. Sequence analysis of the cDNA revealed an open reading frame encoding 552 amino acids which had several characteristics of DNA-binding proteins. The gene, designated LZTR-1, which was transcribed in several essential fetal organs, proved to be hemizygously deleted in seven of eight DGS patients or its variants, but not in one DGS patient and GM00980. Although LZTR-1 does not locate in the shortest region of overlap, several of its structural characteristics identifying it as transcriptional regulator suggest that it plays a crucial role in embryogenesis and that haploinsufficiency of this gene may be partly related to the development of DGS.

  16. Detection of mtDNA deletion in Pearson syndrome by two independent PCR assays from Guthrie card.

    PubMed

    Tóth, T; Bókay, J; Szönyi, L; Nagy, B; Papp, Z

    1998-03-01

    Pearson syndrome is a multisystem juvenile condition associated with deletions in the mitochondrial genome. The most common 4977 bp deletion of mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) can mainly be detected in the patients' peripheral blood. Here we report a child with a clinically unclarified diagnosis where molecular genetic results proved Pearson syndrome from stored dried blood sample 6 months after the patient's death. PCR amplification around the breakpoint of the most common mtDNA deletion could detect the presence of mutated mtDNA. Another polymerase chain reaction (PCR) assay indicated the low level of wild type mtDNA in patients' blood. We believe that this case shows the importance of storing Guthrie card and the availability of detection of Pearson syndrome from dried blood sample.

  17. An unusual clinical severity of 16p11.2 deletion syndrome caused by unmasked recessive mutation of CLN3.

    PubMed

    Pebrel-Richard, Céline; Debost-Legrand, Anne; Eymard-Pierre, Eléonore; Greze, Victoria; Kemeny, Stéphan; Gay-Bellile, Mathilde; Gouas, Laetitia; Tchirkov, Andreï; Vago, Philippe; Goumy, Carole; Francannet, Christine

    2014-03-01

    With the introduction of array comparative genomic hybridization (aCGH) techniques in the diagnostic setting of patients with developmental delay and congenital malformations, many new microdeletion syndromes have been recognized. One of these recently recognized microdeletion syndromes is the 16p11.2 deletion syndrome, associated with variable clinical outcomes including developmental delay, autism spectrum disorder, epilepsy, and obesity, but also apparently normal phenotype. We report on a 16-year-old patient with developmental delay, exhibiting retinis pigmentosa with progressive visual failure from the age of 9 years, ataxia, and peripheral neuropathy. Chromosomal microarray analysis identified a 1.7-Mb 16p11.2 deletion encompassing the 593-kb common deletion (∼29.5 to ∼30.1 Mb; Hg18) and the 220-kb distal deletion (∼28.74 to ∼28.95 Mb; Hg18) that partially included the CLN3 gene. As the patient's clinical findings were different from usual 16p11.2 microdeletion phenotypes and showed some features reminiscent of juvenile neuronal ceroid-lipofuscinosis (JNCL, Batten disease, OMIM 204200), we suspected and confirmed a mutation of the remaining CLN3 allele. This case further illustrates that unmasking of hemizygous recessive mutations by chromosomal deletion represents one explanation for the phenotypic variability observed in chromosomal deletion disorders.

  18. An unusual clinical severity of 16p11.2 deletion syndrome caused by unmasked recessive mutation of CLN3

    PubMed Central

    Pebrel-Richard, Céline; Debost-Legrand, Anne; Eymard-Pierre, Eléonore; Greze, Victoria; Kemeny, Stéphan; Gay-Bellile, Mathilde; Gouas, Laetitia; Tchirkov, Andreï; Vago, Philippe; Goumy, Carole; Francannet, Christine

    2014-01-01

    With the introduction of array comparative genomic hybridization (aCGH) techniques in the diagnostic setting of patients with developmental delay and congenital malformations, many new microdeletion syndromes have been recognized. One of these recently recognized microdeletion syndromes is the 16p11.2 deletion syndrome, associated with variable clinical outcomes including developmental delay, autism spectrum disorder, epilepsy, and obesity, but also apparently normal phenotype. We report on a 16-year-old patient with developmental delay, exhibiting retinis pigmentosa with progressive visual failure from the age of 9 years, ataxia, and peripheral neuropathy. Chromosomal microarray analysis identified a 1.7-Mb 16p11.2 deletion encompassing the 593-kb common deletion (∼29.5 to ∼30.1 Mb; Hg18) and the 220-kb distal deletion (∼28.74 to ∼28.95 Mb; Hg18) that partially included the CLN3 gene. As the patient's clinical findings were different from usual 16p11.2 microdeletion phenotypes and showed some features reminiscent of juvenile neuronal ceroid-lipofuscinosis (JNCL, Batten disease, OMIM 204200), we suspected and confirmed a mutation of the remaining CLN3 allele. This case further illustrates that unmasking of hemizygous recessive mutations by chromosomal deletion represents one explanation for the phenotypic variability observed in chromosomal deletion disorders. PMID:23860047

  19. 7q11.23 deletions in Williams syndrome arise as a consequence of unequal meiotic crossover

    SciTech Connect

    Urban, Z.; Csiszar, K.; Boyd, C.D.

    1996-10-01

    Williams syndrome (WS) is a multisystem disorder characterized by mental retardation, a specific neurobehavioral profile, characteristic facies, infantile hypercalcemia, cardiovascular abnormalities, progressive joint limitation, hermas, and soft skin. Recent studies have shown that hemizygosity at the elastin (ELN) gene locus on chromosome 7q is associated with WS. Furthermore, two FISH studies using cosmid recombinants containing the 5{prime} or the 3{prime} end of the ELN gene revealed deletion of the entire ELN gene in 90%-96% of classical WS cases. However, the size of the 7q11.23 deletions and the mechanism by which these deletions arise are not known. 15 refs., 2 figs., 1 tab.

  20. Haploinsufficiency of BCL11A associated with cerebellar abnormalities in 2p15p16.1 deletion syndrome.

    PubMed

    Shimbo, Hiroko; Yokoi, Takayuki; Aida, Noriko; Mizuno, Seiji; Suzumura, Hiroshi; Nagai, Junichi; Ida, Kazumi; Enomoto, Yumi; Hatano, Chihiro; Kurosawa, Kenji

    2017-07-01

    Chromosome 2p15p16.1 deletion syndrome is a rare genetic disorder characterized by intellectual disability (ID), neurodevelopmental delay, language delay, growth retardation, microcephaly, structural brain abnormalities, and dysmorphic features. More than 30 patients with 2p15p16.1 microdeletion syndrome have been reported in the literature. Molecular analysis was performed using microarray-based comparative genomic hybridization (array CGH). Clinical characteristics and brain magnetic resonance imaging features of these patients were also reviewed. We identified four patients with ID, neurodevelopmental delay, brain malformations, and dysmorphic features; two patients with 2p15p16.1 deletions (3.24 Mb, 5.04 Mb), one patient with 2p16.1 deletion (1.12 Mb), and one patient with 2p14p16.1 deletion (5.12 Mb). Three patients with 2p15p16.1 deletions or 2p16.1 deletions encompassing BCL11A,PAPOLG, and REL showed hypoplasia of the pons and cerebellum. The patient with 2p14p16.1 deletion, which did not include three genes showed normal size and shape of the cerebellar hemispheres and pons. The zinc finger transcription factor BCL11A associated with the BAF chromatin remodeling complex has been identified to be critical for neural development and BCL11A haploinsufficiency is closely related to cerebellar abnormalities.

  1. Syndrome of proximal interstitial deletion 4p15: Report of three cases and review of the literature

    SciTech Connect

    Chitayat, D.; Babul, R.; Teshima, I.E.

    1995-01-16

    We report on two boys and a girl with interstitial deletion in the short arm of chromosome 4 including the segment p15.2p15.33. All had normal growth with psychomotor retardation, multiple minor congenital anomalies, and a characteristic face distinct from that of the Wolf-Hirschhorn syndrome. One of the patients had congenitally enlarged penis. These patients resemble some of the previously reported patients with similar cytogenetic abnormalities and suggests the recognition of a specific clinical chromosome deletion syndrome. 12 refs., 6 figs., 1 tab.

  2. Deletion of small nuclear ribonucleoprotein polypeptide N (SNRPN) in Prader-Willi syndrome detected by fluorescence in situ hybridization: Two sibs with the typical phenotype without a cytogenetic deletion in chromosome 15q

    SciTech Connect

    Ishikawa, Tatsuya; Kibe, Tetsuya; Wada, Yoshiro

    1996-04-24

    The small nuclear ribonucleoprotein polypeptide N (SNRPN) gene is regarded as one of the candidates for Prader-Willi syndrome (PWS). We describe two sibs with typical PWS presenting deletion of SNRPN detected by fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH). Neither a cytogenetically detectable 15q12 deletion nor a deletion for the D15S11, D15S10, and GABRB3 cosmid probes were found in either patient. This implies a smaller deletion limited to the PWS critical region. FISH with a SNRPN probe will permit analysis of PWS patients with limited deletions not detectable with other probes. 22 refs., 1 fig.

  3. Congenital Heart Defects and Measures of Fetal Growth in Newborns with Down Syndrome or 22q11.2 Deletion Syndrome.

    PubMed

    Matthiesen, Niels B; Agergaard, Peter; Henriksen, Tine B; Bach, Cathrine C; Gaynor, J William; Hjortdal, Vibeke; Østergaard, John R

    2016-08-01

    To estimate the association between congenital heart defects (CHD) and indices of fetal growth in Down and 22q11.2 deletion syndromes. We established 2 Danish nationwide cohorts of newborn singletons with either Down syndrome (n = 670) or 22q11.2 deletion syndrome (n = 155), born 1997-2011. In both cohorts, we analyzed the association between CHD, CHD severity, and indices of fetal growth by multivariable linear regression adjusted for potential confounders. We report mean differences in gestational age specific z-scores compared with newborns without CHD. Down syndrome and 22q11.2 deletion syndrome were both associated with lower mean birth weight and head circumference z-scores. We found no association between CHD or CHD severity and indices of fetal growth. In Down syndrome, the association between any CHD and the mean difference in head circumference z-score was 0.03 (95% CI -0.12, 0.18), and the estimate regarding birth weight z-score was 0.09 (95% CI -0.08, 0.25). The corresponding estimates in 22q11.2 deletion syndrome were 0.00 (95% CI -0.33, 0.32) and -0.09 (95% CI -0.45, 0.26). We found no association between CHD and fetal growth measures in newborns with Down syndrome or 22q11.2 deletion syndrome. Thus, in certain subtypes of CHD, the contribution of genetic factors to prenatal growth impairment may be more important than circulatory disturbances. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Microarray analysis of 50 patients reveals the critical chromosomal regions responsible for 1p36 deletion syndrome-related complications.

    PubMed

    Shimada, Shino; Shimojima, Keiko; Okamoto, Nobuhiko; Sangu, Noriko; Hirasawa, Kyoko; Matsuo, Mari; Ikeuchi, Mayo; Shimakawa, Shuichi; Shimizu, Kenji; Mizuno, Seiji; Kubota, Masaya; Adachi, Masao; Saito, Yoshiaki; Tomiwa, Kiyotaka; Haginoya, Kazuhiro; Numabe, Hironao; Kako, Yuko; Hayashi, Ai; Sakamoto, Haruko; Hiraki, Yoko; Minami, Koichi; Takemoto, Kiyoshi; Watanabe, Kyoko; Miura, Kiyokuni; Chiyonobu, Tomohiro; Kumada, Tomohiro; Imai, Katsumi; Maegaki, Yoshihiro; Nagata, Satoru; Kosaki, Kenjiro; Izumi, Tatsuro; Nagai, Toshiro; Yamamoto, Toshiyuki

    2015-05-01

    Monosomy 1p36 syndrome is the most commonly observed subtelomeric deletion syndrome. Patients with this syndrome typically have common clinical features, such as intellectual disability, epilepsy, and characteristic craniofacial features. In cooperation with academic societies, we analyzed the genomic copy number aberrations using chromosomal microarray testing. Finally, the genotype-phenotype correlation among them was examined. We obtained clinical information of 86 patients who had been diagnosed with chromosomal deletions in the 1p36 region. Among them, blood samples were obtained from 50 patients (15 males and 35 females). The precise deletion regions were successfully genotyped. There were variable deletion patterns: pure terminal deletions in 38 patients (76%), including three cases of mosaicism; unbalanced translocations in seven (14%); and interstitial deletions in five (10%). Craniofacial/skeletal features, neurodevelopmental impairments, and cardiac anomalies were commonly observed in patients, with correlation to deletion sizes. The genotype-phenotype correlation analysis narrowed the region responsible for distinctive craniofacial features and intellectual disability into 1.8-2.1 and 1.8-2.2 Mb region, respectively. Patients with deletions larger than 6.2 Mb showed no ambulation, indicating that severe neurodevelopmental prognosis may be modified by haploinsufficiencies of KCNAB2 and CHD5, located at 6.2 Mb away from the telomere. Although the genotype-phenotype correlation for the cardiac abnormalities is unclear, PRDM16, PRKCZ, and RERE may be related to this complication. Our study also revealed that female patients who acquired ambulatory ability were likely to be at risk for obesity. Copyright © 2014 The Japanese Society of Child Neurology. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. A coalescence of two syndromes in a girl with terminal deletion and inverted duplication of chromosome 5.

    PubMed

    Krgovic, Danijela; Blatnik, Ana; Burmas, Ante; Zagorac, Andreja; Kokalj Vokac, Nadja

    2014-02-11

    Rearrangements involving chromosome 5p often result in two syndromes, Cri-du-chat (CdC) and Trisomy 5p, caused by a deletion and duplication, respectively. The 5p15.2 has been defined as a critical region for CdC syndrome; however, genotype-phenotype studies allowed isolation of particular characteristics such as speech delay, cat-like cry and mental retardation, caused by distinct deletions of 5p. A varied clinical outcome was also observed in patients with Trisomy 5p. Duplications of 5p10-5p13.1 manifest themselves in a more severe phenotype, while trisomy of regions distal to 5p13 mainly causes mild and indistinct features. Combinations of a terminal deletion and inverted duplication of 5p are infrequent in literature. Consequences of these chromosomal rearrangements differ, depending on size of deletion and duplication in particular cases, although authors mainly describe the deletion as the cause of the observed clinical picture. Here we present a 5-month-old Slovenian girl, with de novo terminal deletion and inverted duplication of chromosome 5p. Our patient presents features of both CdC and Trisomy 5. The most prominent features observed in our patient are a cat-like cry and severe malformations of the right ear. The cat-like cry, characteristic of CdC syndrome, is noted in our patient despite the fact that the deletion is not fully consistent with previously defined cat-like cry critical region in this syndrome. Features like dolichocephaly, macrocephaly and ear malformations, associated with duplication of the critical region of Trisomy 5p, are also present, although this region has not been rearranged in our case. Therefore, the true meaning of the described chromosomal rearrangements is discussed.

  6. An atypical case of fragile X syndrome caused by a deletion that includes the FMR-1 gene

    SciTech Connect

    Quan, F.; Johnson, D.B.; Anoe, K.S.

    1994-09-01

    Fragile X syndrome results from the transcriptional inactivation of the FMR-1 gene. This is commonly caused by the expansion of an unstable CGG trinucleotide repeat in the first exon of the FMR-1 gene. We describe here an atypical case of fragile X syndrome caused by a deletion that includes the FMR-1 gene. RK is a 6-year-old hyperactive, mentally retarded male. Southern analysis of PstI digested genomic DNA was performed using a 558 bp XhoI-PstI fragment specific for the 5`-end of the FMR-1 gene. This analysis revealed the absence of the normal 1.0 kb PstI fragment, indicating the deletion of at least a portion of the FMR-1 gene. PCR analysis using Xq27.3 microsatellite and STS markers confirmed the presence of a deletion of at least 600 kb encompassing the FMR-1 gene. Southern blot and PCR analysis demonstrated that this deletion was maternally transmitted and arose as a new mutation on the grandpaternal X-chromosome. High resolution chromosome banding revealed an extremely small deletion of a portion of band Xq27 which was confirmed by fluorescent in situ hybridrization (FISH) analysis using a 34 kb cosmid containing the FMR-1 gene. As expected, RK manifests physical features typical of fragile X syndrome, including a high arched palate, prognathism, and large ears. Interestingly, RK also presents with anal atresia, obesity and short stature, features not part of fragile X syndrome. In addition, RK has normal sized testicles and does not exhibit the characteristic gaze avoidance, hand-flapping, and crowd anxiety behaviors. These atypical features may result from the deletion of additional genes in the vicinity of the FMR-1 gene. Further work is underway to determine more precisely the extent of the deletion in RK`s DNA.

  7. A coalescence of two syndromes in a girl with terminal deletion and inverted duplication of chromosome 5

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Rearrangements involving chromosome 5p often result in two syndromes, Cri-du-chat (CdC) and Trisomy 5p, caused by a deletion and duplication, respectively. The 5p15.2 has been defined as a critical region for CdC syndrome; however, genotype-phenotype studies allowed isolation of particular characteristics such as speech delay, cat-like cry and mental retardation, caused by distinct deletions of 5p. A varied clinical outcome was also observed in patients with Trisomy 5p. Duplications of 5p10-5p13.1 manifest themselves in a more severe phenotype, while trisomy of regions distal to 5p13 mainly causes mild and indistinct features. Combinations of a terminal deletion and inverted duplication of 5p are infrequent in literature. Consequences of these chromosomal rearrangements differ, depending on size of deletion and duplication in particular cases, although authors mainly describe the deletion as the cause of the observed clinical picture. Case presentation Here we present a 5-month-old Slovenian girl, with de novo terminal deletion and inverted duplication of chromosome 5p. Our patient presents features of both CdC and Trisomy 5. The most prominent features observed in our patient are a cat-like cry and severe malformations of the right ear. Conclusion The cat-like cry, characteristic of CdC syndrome, is noted in our patient despite the fact that the deletion is not fully consistent with previously defined cat-like cry critical region in this syndrome. Features like dolichocephaly, macrocephaly and ear malformations, associated with duplication of the critical region of Trisomy 5p, are also present, although this region has not been rearranged in our case. Therefore, the true meaning of the described chromosomal rearrangements is discussed. PMID:24517234

  8. Sprengel anomaly in deletion 22q11.2 (DiGeorge/Velo-Cardio-Facial) syndrome.

    PubMed

    Radio, Francesca Clementina; Digilio, Maria Cristina; Capolino, Rossella; Dentici, Maria Lisa; Unolt, Marta; Alesi, Viola; Novelli, Antonio; Marino, Bruno; Dallapiccola, Bruno

    2016-03-01

    Sprengel anomaly (SA) is a rare skeletal defect characterized by uni- or bi-lateral elevation of the scapula. This anomaly is often isolated, although it can occur in association with other defects, including cervical spine malformations, cleft palate, and facial anomalies. Neural crest migration anomalies have been involved in the etiology of SA. Since the same embryological pathway accounts for some of the clinical features of deletion 22q11.2 syndrome (del22q11.2; DiGeorge/Velo-Cardio-Facial syndrome), we investigated the occurrence of SA in a consecutive series of 235 del22q11.2 patients aged more than 2 years, undergoing a complete clinical and orthopedic assessment of the dorsal and thoracic skeleton. In the present series, two patients were diagnosed with true SA. Present results and published reports suggest that scapular involvement including SA occurs in 1-2% of del22q11.2 individuals. Accordingly, this anomaly should be investigated as one of the possible skeletal findings of del22q11.2 syndrome, while this diagnosis should be excluded in patients presenting with SA associated with other defects. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  9. Cognitive phenotype and psychiatric disorder in 22q11.2 deletion syndrome: A review.

    PubMed

    Biswas, Asit B; Furniss, Frederick

    2016-01-01

    The behavioural phenotype of 22q11.2 deletion syndrome syndrome (22q11DS), one of the most common human multiple anomaly syndromes, frequently includes intellectual disability (ID) together with high risk of diagnosis of psychotic disorders including schizophrenia. Candidate cognitive endophenotypes include problems with retrieval of contextual information from memory and in executive control and focussing of attention. 22q11DS may offer a model of the relationship between ID and risk of psychiatric disorder. This paper reviews research on the relationship between the cognitive phenotype and the development of psychiatric disorders in 22q11DS. Aspects of cognitive function including verbal I.Q., visual memory, and executive function, are associated with mental health outcome in people with 22q11DS. This relationship may result from a common neurobiological basis for the cognitive difficulties and psychiatric disorders. Some of the cognitive difficulties experienced by people with 22q11DS, especially in attention, memory retrieval, and face processing, may, however, in themselves constitute risk factors for development of hallucinations and paranoid delusions. Future research into factors leading to psychiatric disorder in people with 22q11DS should include assessment of social and psychological factors including life events, symptoms associated with trauma, attachment, and self-esteem, which together with cognitive risk factors may mediate mental health outcome. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. The non-deletion alpha thalassaemia/mental retardation syndrome: further support for X linkage.

    PubMed Central

    Donnai, D; Clayton-Smith, J; Gibbons, R J; Higgs, D R

    1991-01-01

    It has previously been suggested that the non-deletion form of the alpha thalassaemia/mental retardation syndrome may be an X linked disorder. We describe four brothers with this syndrome in whom the diagnosis was first suspected because of their characteristic clinical features, although these varied somewhat from one sib to another. The diagnosis was confirmed in each case by showing Hb H inclusions in a proportion of their red blood cells. The identification of four similarly affected boys in this pedigree is consistent with an X linked pattern of inheritance. In support of this, very rare Hb H inclusions could be found in the red blood cells of the mother and one sister who both share some facial features with the affected boys and are presumably carriers of this disorder. This pedigree thus provides further evidence that this is an X linked syndrome and indicates the clinical and haematological variability that may exist even within a single affected family. Images PMID:1770530

  11. Independent de novo 22q11.2 deletions in first cousins with DiGeorge/velocardiofacial syndrome.

    PubMed

    Saitta, Sulagna C; Harris, Stacy E; McDonald-McGinn, Donna M; Emanuel, Beverly S; Tonnesen, Melissa K; Zackai, Elaine H; Seitz, Suzanne C; Driscoll, Deborah A

    2004-01-30

    Deletions of chromosome 22q11.2 are found in the vast majority of patients with DiGeorge/velocardiofacial syndrome (DGS/VCFS). This most frequent microdeletion syndrome is estimated to occur in 1 in 4,000 live births. The majority of deletions are de novo, with 10% or less inherited from an affected parent. Here, we report two separate families with recurrence of a 22q11.2 deletion in first cousins. In each family, unaffected siblings (brother and sister) had an affected child. Fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) studies of the parents of each affected child were normal and hence, relatives were not considered at an increased risk for recurrence in another pregnancy. We used highly polymorphic microsatellite repeat markers from within 22q11.2 to determine the parental origin of each cousin's deletion and to assess whether parental germline mosaicism for the 22q11.2 deletion might be a factor in these cases. This analysis confirmed that in each case, the deletion occurred on a chromosome 22 derived from unrelated parents, consistent with independent de novo deletion events. Thus, we concluded that germline mosaicism as the underlying mechanism for affected cousins in these families was unlikely. Our findings underscore the high frequency with which the 22q11.2 deletion occurs in the general population and demonstrate the important role that PCR-based parental origin determination can have in recurrence risk counselling. Furthermore, relatives of affected individuals may benefit from genetic counselling and consider prenatal testing for the 22q11.2 deletion in future pregnancies, despite a low recurrence risk.

  12. Reciprocal deletion and duplication of 17p11.2-11.2: Korean patients with Smith-Magenis syndrome and Potocki-Lupski syndrome.

    PubMed

    Lee, Cha Gon; Park, Sang-Jin; Yun, Jun-No; Yim, Shin-Young; Sohn, Young Bae

    2012-12-01

    Deletion and duplication of the -3.7-Mb region in 17p11.2 result in two reciprocal syndrome, Smith-Magenis syndrome and Potocki-Lupski syndrome. Smith-Magenis syndrome is a well-known developmental disorder. Potocki-Lupski syndrome has recently been recognized as a microduplication syndrome that is a reciprocal disease of Smith-Magenis syndrome. In this paper, we report on the clinical and cytogenetic features of two Korean patients with Smith-Magenis syndrome and Potocki-Lupski syndrome. Patient 1 (Smith-Magenis syndrome) was a 2.9-yr-old boy who showed mild dysmorphic features, aggressive behavioral problems, and developmental delay. Patient 2 (Potocki-Lupski syndrome), a 17-yr-old boy, had only intellectual disabilities and language developmental delay. We used array comparative genomic hybridization (array CGH) and found a 2.6 Mb-sized deletion and a reciprocal 2.1 Mb-sized duplication involving the 17p11.2. These regions overlapped in a 2.1 Mb size containing 11 common genes, including RAI1 and SREBF.

  13. 11q terminal deletion and combined immunodeficiency (Jacobsen syndrome): Case report and literature review on immunodeficiency in Jacobsen syndrome.

    PubMed

    Blazina, Štefan; Ihan, Alojz; Lovrečić, Luca; Hovnik, Tinka

    2016-12-01

    Antibody deficiency is common finding in patients with Jacobsen syndrome (JS). In addition, there have been few reports of T-cell defects in this condition, possibly because most of the reported patients have not been specifically evaluated for T-cell function. In this article, we present a child with an 11q deletion and combined immunodeficiency and we perform a literature overview on immunodeficiency in JS. Our patient presented with recurrent bacterial and prolonged viral infections involving the respiratory system, as well as other classic features of the syndrome. In addition to low IgM, IgG4, and B-cells, also low recent thymic emigrants, helper and naïve T-cells were found. We propose that patients with Jacobsen syndrome need thorough immunological evaluations as T-cell dysfunction might be more prevalent than previously reported. Patients with infections consistent with T-cell defects should be classified as having combined immunodeficiency. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  14. Temporal Lobe Anatomy and Psychiatric Symptoms in Velocardiofacial Syndrome (22Q11.2 Deletion Syndrome)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kates, Wendy R.; Miller, Adam M.; Abdulsabur, Nuria; Antshel, Kevin M.; Conchelos, Jena; Fremont, Wanda; Roizen, Nancy

    2006-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the association between mesial temporal lobe morphology, ratios of prefrontal cortex to amygdala and hippocampus volumes, and psychiatric symptomatology in children and adolescents with velocardiofacial syndrome (VCFS). Method: Scores on behavioral rating scales and volumetric measures of the amygdala, hippocampus, and…

  15. Cytogenetic features of 5q deletion and 5q- syndrome in myelodysplastic syndrome in Korea; marker chromosomes proved to be chromosome 5 with interstitial deletion by fluorescence in situ hybridization.

    PubMed

    Lee, Hye Ryun; Oh, Bora; Hong, Dae Sik; Zang, Dae Young; Yoon, Hwi-Joong; Kim, Hyeoung Joon; Kim, Inho; Ahn, Jae-Sook; Cheong, June-Won; Lee, Kyung-A; Cho, Kyung Sam; Lee, Mark Hong; Bang, Soo-Mee; Kim, Tae Young; Yun, Yeo-Min; Min, Yoo Hong; Lee, You Kyoung; Lee, Dong Soon

    2010-12-01

    We characterized the cytogenetic changes and prognostic characteristics of 133 Korean patients with myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS), focusing on 5q- syndrome and MDS with chromosome abnormalities involving 5q deletion according to World Health Organization 2008 classification. In all patients, G banding and fluorescence in situ hybridization for 5q were performed, and in MDS patients with 5q deletion, the deleted region on chromosome 5 was mapped with fluorescence in situ hybridization for EGR1, CSF1R, and PDGFRB. The frequency of isolated del(5q) syndrome and 5q deletion was 2.2% (3 of 137 patients) and 15.3% (21 of 137 patients), respectively. International Prognostic Scoring System (IPSS) groups were low risk (5.8%), intermediate 1 (51.1%), intermediate 2 (27.8%), and high risk (15.3%). The patients with del(5q) were significantly older (62 years) and showed an unfavorable survival compared to patients without del(5q). Half (53%) of the patients with del(5q) also had complex chromosome abnormalities, including chromosome 7 abnormalities. Of the patients with del(5q), 93.3% were deleted for all three regions on 5q, compared to 66.7% of patients with isolated del(5q). Marker chromosomes proved to be chromosome 5 with interstitial deletion of q arm by fluorescence in situ hybridization in three patients. The biological characteristics of MDS in Korea seem to be markedly different from those of Caucasians, with Koreans having a younger age, lower frequencies of 5q- syndrome, higher frequencies of complex cytogenetic abnormalities including del(5q), and poorer prognosis. We infer that additional chromosome abnormalities contribute to the adverse prognostic impact in patients with del(5q). Copyright © 2010. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  16. Spontaneous deletion in the FMR-1 gene in a patient with fragile X syndrome and cherubism

    SciTech Connect

    Popovich, B.W.; Anoe, K.S.; Johnson, D.B.

    1994-09-01

    Fragile X mental retardation results from the transcriptional inactivation of the FMR-1 gene and is commonly caused by the expansion of an unstable CGG trinucleotide repeat located in the first exon of the FMR-1 gene. We describe here a two generation fragile X family in which expansion of the CGG repeat may have resulted in a deletion of a least portion of the FMR-1 gene. One member of this family, AB, carries an apparent deletion of the FMR-1 gene and presents with mental retardation and also cherubism, a feature not usually associated with fragile X syndrome. Cherubism is a condition characterized by a swelling of the lower face and is caused by giant cell lesions of the mandible and maxilla, and often the anterior ends of the ribs. The size of the CGG repeat region in this family was determined by Southern analysis of BglII, EcoRI, and PstI digested genomic DNA, isolated from peripheral blood lymphocytes, using a 558 bp PstI-Xhol fragment specific for the 5{prime}-end of the FMR-1 gene. SB and TB, the mother and maternal half-brother of AB, respectively, were both found to carry an expanded FMR-1 allele with greater than 200 CGG repeats. Negligible hybridization was observed in the DNA of AB. In addition, no amplification was observed when the polymerase chain reaction (PCR) was performed using primers flanking the CGG repeat region. These results are consistent with a deletion of at least the 5{prime} portion of the FMR-1 gene in the majority of peripheral blood lymphocytes. Further work is underway using FMR-1 cDNA probes and additional PCR primers to determine the nature of the molecular lesion in AB`s DNA and determine the relationship of this lesion to his cherubism.

  17. Prenatal diagnosis of 17q12 duplication and deletion syndrome in two fetuses with congenital anomalies.

    PubMed

    Li, Ru; Fu, Fang; Zhang, Yong-Ling; Li, Dong-Zhi; Liao, Can

    2014-12-01

    The objective of this study was to characterize the genetic abnormalities in two fetuses with congenital anomalies in prenatal screening. The mother of Fetus 1 was 26 years old and had a second trimester serum screening that indicated the fetus was at low risk. The prenatal ultrasound and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) at 28 weeks of gestation showed mild ventriculomegaly, microcephaly, and agenesis of the corpus callosum. The mother of Fetus 2 was 25 years old and also had a second trimester serum screening that indicated the fetus was at low risk. The prenatal ultrasound at 32 weeks of gestation showed the presence of hyperechogenic and enlarged kidneys with multicystic renal dysplasia bilaterally and a persistent left superior vena cava (PLSVC). Both pregnant women underwent cord blood samplings because of the abnormal imaging results. Karyotype analysis revealed normal results in the two fetuses. Chromosome microarray analysis (CMA) was then performed to provide genetic analysis of the cord blood and parental blood samples. Ultimately, the pregnancies were both terminated. CMA detected a 1.56-Mb duplication at 17q12 in Fetus 1 and a 1.93-Mb deletion of 17q12 in Fetus 2. Both the duplicated and deleted regions included the HNF1B and LHX1 genes. Neither the duplication nor deletion was inherited from the parents. This study is the first to report the prenatal diagnosis of a 17q12 duplication syndrome. Our results further confirmed that genes in this region, including HNF1B and LHX1, are essential for normal brain and kidney development, and also indicated some genes that may be associated with the cardiovascular abnormality. Combined with imaging examination, the use of CMA will improve the diagnosis of submicroscopic chromosomal aberrations in fetuses with congenital anomalies. Copyright © 2014. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  18. Mosaicism for the fragile X syndrome full mutation and deletions within the CGG repeat of the FMR1 gene.

    PubMed Central

    Milà, M; Castellví-Bel, S; Sánchez, A; Lázaro, C; Villa, M; Estivill, X

    1996-01-01

    The main mutation responsible for the fragile X syndrome is the expansion of an untranslated CGG repeat in the first exon of the FMR1 gene, associated with the hypermethylation of the proximal CpG island and the CGG repeat region, and repression of transcription of FMR1. Fragile X syndrome mosaicism has been described as the coexistence of the full mutation and the permutation. We present here two cases of mosaicism for the full mutation in the FMR1 gene and deletions involving the CGG repeat region. In one case the deletion removed 113 bp proximal to the CGG repeat and part of the repeat itself, leaving 30 pure repeats, and representing 17% of lymphocytes of the patient. The 5' breakpoint of this deletion falls outside the putative hotspot for deletions in the CGG region of FMR1. In the second case the deleted region only involved the CGG sequence (leaving 15 pure repeats), with normal sequences flanking the repeat; this deleted ("normal") FMR1 was estimated to be in about 31% of blood lymphocytes. This second case can be considered a true regression of the CGG FMR1 expansion to a normal sized allele, although in mosaic form. Images PMID:8730293

  19. Heterozygous deletion at the SOX10 gene locus in two patients from a Chinese family with Waardenburg syndrome type II.

    PubMed

    Wenzhi, He; Ruijin, Wen; Jieliang, Li; Xiaoyan, Ma; Haibo, Liu; Xiaoman, Wang; Jiajia, Xian; Shaoying, Li; Shuanglin, Li; Qing, Li

    2015-10-01

    Waardenburg syndrome (WS) is a rare disease characterized by sensorineural deafness and pigment disturbance. To date, almost 100 mutations have been reported, but few reports on cases with SOX10 gene deletion. The inheritance pattern of SOX10 gene deletion is still unclear. Our objective was to identify the genetic causes of Waardenburg syndrome type II in a two-generation Chinese family. Clinical evaluations were conducted in both of the patients. Microarray analysis and multiplex ligation-dependent probe amplification (MLPA) were performed to identify disease-related copy number variants (CNVs). DNA sequencing of the SOX10, MITF and SNAI2 genes was performed to identify the pathogenic mutation responsible for WS2. A 280kb heterozygous deletion at the 22q13.1 chromosome region (including SOX10) was detected in both of the patients. No mutation was found in the patients, unaffected family members and 30 unrelated healthy controls. This report is the first to describe SOX10 heterozygous deletions in Chinese WS2 patients. Our result conform the thesis that heterozygous deletions at SOX10 is an important pathogenicity for WS, and present as autosomal dominant inheritance. Nevertheless, heterozygous deletion of the SOX10 gene would be worth investigating to understand their functions and contributions to neurologic phenotypes. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. A further case of brain-lung-thyroid syndrome with deletion proximal to NKX2-1.

    PubMed

    Kharbanda, Mira; Hermanns, Pia; Jones, Jeremy; Pohlenz, Joachim; Horrocks, Iain; Donaldson, Malcolm

    2017-03-07

    Brain-lung-thyroid syndrome (OMIM #610978) is associated with mutations in the NK2 homeobox 1 (NKX2-1) gene, a transcription factor important in development. 50% of patients are affected by the full triad, comprising congenital hypothyroidism, benign hereditary chorea and infant respiratory distress syndrome. Four cases have previously been reported where a patient has features consistent with brain-lung-thyroid syndrome and a chromosome 14q13 deletion adjacent to, but not disrupting, NKX2-1. We present a patient who has a phenotype consistent with brain-lung-thyroid syndrome, featuring congenital hypothyroidism and choreoathetoid movements with gross motor delay. Thyroid ultrasound showed a small-normal gland and spontaneous resolution of hypothyroidism. Array CGH revealed a de novo 14q13.2-3 deletion adjacent to but not directly involving NKX2-1. Sequencing of NKX2-1 was normal. This report highlights a further case of chromosomal deletion adjacent to NXK2-1 in a patient with a phenotype consistent with brain-lung-thyroid syndrome, and confirms that array-CGH is a useful test in the investigation of congenital hypothyroidism. Deletion of the adjacent gene MBIP in most reported cases so far may be relevant to the pathogenesis of brain-lung-thyroid syndrome. Deletion of nearby promoter or enhancer elements acting on NKX2-1 could also be an important factor. However, further work is needed to elucidate the pathogenesis of the brain-lung-thyroid phenotype in such cases.

  1. Movement disorders and other motor abnormalities in adults with 22q11.2 deletion syndrome.

    PubMed

    Boot, Erik; Butcher, Nancy J; van Amelsvoort, Thérèse A M J; Lang, Anthony E; Marras, Connie; Pondal, Margarita; Andrade, Danielle M; Fung, Wai Lun Alan; Bassett, Anne S

    2015-03-01

    Movement abnormalities are frequently reported in children with 22q11.2 deletion syndrome (22q11.2DS), but knowledge in this area is scarce in the increasing adult population. We report on five individuals illustrative of movement disorders and other motor abnormalities in adults with 22q11.2DS. In addition to an increased susceptibility to neuropsychiatric disorders, seizures, and early-onset Parkinson disease, the underlying brain dysfunction associated with 22q11.2DS may give rise to an increased vulnerability to multiple movement abnormalities, including those influenced by medications. Movement abnormalities may also be secondary to treatable endocrine diseases and congenital musculoskeletal abnormalities. We propose that movement abnormalities may be common in adults with 22q11.2DS and discuss the implications and challenges important to clinical practice.

  2. Movement Disorders and Other Motor Abnormalities in Adults With 22q11.2 Deletion Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Boot, Erik; Butcher, Nancy J; van Amelsvoort, Thérèse AMJ; Lang, Anthony E; Marras, Connie; Pondal, Margarita; Andrade, Danielle M; Fung, Wai Lun Alan; Bassett, Anne S

    2015-01-01

    Movement abnormalities are frequently reported in children with 22q11.2 deletion syndrome (22q11.2DS), but knowledge in this area is scarce in the increasing adult population. We report on five individuals illustrative of movement disorders and other motor abnormalities in adults with 22q11.2DS. In addition to an increased susceptibility to neuropsychiatric disorders, seizures, and early-onset Parkinson disease, the underlying brain dysfunction associated with 22q11.2DS may give rise to an increased vulnerability to multiple movement abnormalities, including those influenced by medications. Movement abnormalities may also be secondary to treatable endocrine diseases and congenital musculoskeletal abnormalities. We propose that movement abnormalities may be common in adults with 22q11.2DS and discuss the implications and challenges important to clinical practice. PMID:25684639

  3. Sleep problems in individuals with 11q terminal deletion disorder (Jacobsen syndrome).

    PubMed

    Maas, A P H M; Grossfeld, P D; Didden, R; Korzilius, H; Braam, W J; Smits, M G; Curfs, L M G

    2008-01-01

    Characteristics of sleep and sleep problems were investigated in 43 individuals with 11q terminal deletion disorder (Jacobsen syndrome). Data were collected using a sleep questionnaire. Ten individuals (23%) had a sleep problem. Settling problems, frequent night waking and early waking occurred in 2 (4%), 7 (16%) and 2 (6%) individuals, respectively. Twenty-two individuals (54%) had a history of sleep problems. Twenty-five individuals (60%) showed restless sleep and 23 individuals (54%) slept in an unusual position. Apart from frequent coughs, no significant relationships were found between the presence of a sleep problem and other variables, such as age, level of ID, breathing problems, heart defects, constipation, daytime activity and behavioral diagnosis, restless sleep and sleeping in an unusual positions.

  4. Disrupted anatomic networks in the 22q11.2 deletion syndrome.

    PubMed

    Schmitt, J Eric; Yi, James; Calkins, Monica E; Ruparel, Kosha; Roalf, David R; Cassidy, Amy; Souders, Margaret C; Satterthwaite, Theodore D; McDonald-McGinn, Donna M; Zackai, Elaine H; Gur, Ruben C; Emanuel, Beverly S; Gur, Raquel E

    2016-01-01

    The 22q11.2 deletion syndrome (22q11DS) is an uncommon genetic disorder with an increased risk of psychosis. Although the neural substrates of psychosis and schizophrenia are not well understood, aberrations in cortical networks represent intriguing potential mechanisms. Investigations of anatomic networks within 22q11DS are sparse. We investigated group differences in anatomic network structure in 48 individuals with 22q11DS and 370 typically developing controls by analyzing covariance patterns in cortical thickness among 68 regions of interest using graph theoretical models. Subjects with 22q11DS had less robust geographic organization relative to the control group, particularly in the occipital and parietal lobes. Multiple global graph theoretical statistics were decreased in 22q11DS. These results are consistent with prior studies demonstrating decreased connectivity in 22q11DS using other neuroimaging methodologies.

  5. Terminal deletion 2q37.3 in a patient with Klippel-Trenaunay-Weber syndrome.

    PubMed

    Puiu, Ileana; Stoica, Alin; Sosoi, Simona; Puiu, Alexandra; Ioana, Mihai; Burada, Florin

    2013-10-01

    Klippel-Trenaunay-Weber syndrome (KTWS) is a rare congenital disorder, characterized by capillary, venous and lymphatic vascular malformations in association with bone and soft tissue hypertrophy. We report a KTWS patient with extensive hemangiomatosis of the right lower limb, trunk and upper limbs; bone and soft tissue hypertrophy of upper limbs, scapular girdle and right lower limb; and muscle atrophy on left lower limb with marked body asymmetry, scoliosis and toe malformations. These pathological features are associated with moderate mental retardation, mild renal and hepatic abnormalities. We identified by array CGH (Comparative Genomic Hybridization) a submicroscopic deletion 2q37.3 that could be related to impaired cognitive function. To our knowledge this is the first reported 2q37.3 microdeletion in a patient with KTWS.

  6. Complex structural rearrangement features suggesting chromoanagenesis mechanism in a case of 1p36 deletion syndrome.

    PubMed

    Zanardo, Évelin Aline; Piazzon, Flavia Balbo; Dutra, Roberta Lelis; Dias, Alexandre Torchio; Montenegro, Marília Moreira; Novo-Filho, Gil Monteiro; Costa, Thaís Virgínia Moura Machado; Nascimento, Amom Mendes; Kim, Chong Ae; Kulikowski, Leslie Domenici

    2014-12-01

    Genome rearrangements are caused by the erroneous repair of DNA double-strand breaks, leading to several alterations that result in loss or gain of the structural genomic of a dosage-sensitive genes. However, the mechanisms that promote the complexity of rearrangements of congenital or developmental defects in human disease are unclear. The investigation of complex genomic abnormalities could help to elucidate the mechanisms and causes for the formation and facilitate the understanding of congenital or developmental defects in human disease. We here report one case of a patient with atypical clinical features of the 1p36 syndrome and the use of cytogenomic techniques to characterize the genomic alterations. Analysis by multiplex ligation-dependent probe amplification and array revealed a complex rearrangement in the 1p36.3 region with deletions and duplication interspaced by normal sequences. We also suggest that chromoanagenesis could be a possible mechanism involved in the repair and stabilization of this rearrangement.

  7. UFD1L, a developmentally expressed ubiquitination gene, is deleted in CATCH 22 syndrome.

    PubMed

    Pizzuti, A; Novelli, G; Ratti, A; Amati, F; Mari, A; Calabrese, G; Nicolis, S; Silani, V; Marino, B; Scarlato, G; Ottolenghi, S; Dallapiccola, B

    1997-02-01

    The CATCH 22 acronym outlines the main clinical features of 22q11.2 deletions (cardiac defects, abnormal facies, thymic hypoplasia, cleft palate and hypocalcemia), usually found in DiGeorge (DGS) and velo-cardio-facial (VCFS) syndromes. Hemizygosity of this region may also be the cause of over 100 different clinical signs. The CATCH 22 locus maps within a 1.5 Mb region, which encompasses several genes. However, no single defect in 22q11.2 hemizygous patients can be ascribed to any gene so far isolated from the critical region of deletion. We have identified a gene in the CATCH 22 critical region, whose functional features and tissue-specific expression suggest a distinct role in embryogenesis. This gene, UFD1L, encodes the human homolog of the yeast ubiquitin fusion degradation 1 protein (UFD1p), involved in the degradation of ubiquitin fusion proteins. Cloning and characterization of the murine homolog (Ufd1l) showed it to be expressed during embryogenesis in the eyes and in the linear ear primordia. These data suggest that the proteolytic pathway that recognizes ubiquitin fusion proteins for degradation is conserved in vertebrates and that the UFD1L gene hemizygosity is the cause of some of the CATCH 22-associated developmental defects.

  8. Histone Modifier Genes Alter Conotruncal Heart Phenotypes in 22q11.2 Deletion Syndrome.

    PubMed

    Guo, Tingwei; Chung, Jonathan H; Wang, Tao; McDonald-McGinn, Donna M; Kates, Wendy R; Hawuła, Wanda; Coleman, Karlene; Zackai, Elaine; Emanuel, Beverly S; Morrow, Bernice E

    2015-12-03

    We performed whole exome sequence (WES) to identify genetic modifiers on 184 individuals with 22q11.2 deletion syndrome (22q11DS), of whom 89 case subjects had severe congenital heart disease (CHD) and 95 control subjects had normal hearts. Three genes including JMJD1C (jumonji domain containing 1C), RREB1 (Ras responsive element binding protein 1), and SEC24C (SEC24 family member C) had rare (MAF < 0.001) predicted deleterious single-nucleotide variations (rdSNVs) in seven case subjects and no control subjects (p = 0.005; Fisher exact and permutation tests). Because JMJD1C and RREB1 are involved in chromatin modification, we investigated other histone modification genes. Eighteen case subjects (20%) had rdSNVs in four genes (JMJD1C, RREB1, MINA, KDM7A) all involved in demethylation of histones (H3K9, H3K27). Overall, rdSNVs were enriched in histone modifier genes that activate transcription (Fisher exact p = 0.0004, permutations, p = 0.0003, OR = 5.16); however, rdSNVs in control subjects were not enriched. This implicates histone modification genes as influencing risk for CHD in presence of the deletion.

  9. Spontaneous 8bp Deletion in Nbeal2 Recapitulates the Gray Platelet Syndrome in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Tomberg, Kärt; Khoriaty, Rami; Westrick, Randal J.; Fairfield, Heather E.; Reinholdt, Laura G.; Brodsky, Gary L.; Davizon-Castillo, Pavel; Ginsburg, David; Di Paola, Jorge

    2016-01-01

    During the analysis of a whole genome ENU mutagenesis screen for thrombosis modifiers, a spontaneous 8 base pair (bp) deletion causing a frameshift in exon 27 of the Nbeal2 gene was identified. Though initially considered as a plausible thrombosis modifier, this Nbeal2 mutation failed to suppress the synthetic lethal thrombosis on which the original ENU screen was based. Mutations in NBEAL2 cause Gray Platelet Syndrome (GPS), an autosomal recessive bleeding disorder characterized by macrothrombocytopenia and gray-appearing platelets due to lack of platelet alpha granules. Mice homozygous for the Nbeal2 8 bp deletion (Nbeal2gps/gps) exhibit a phenotype similar to human GPS, with significantly reduced platelet counts compared to littermate controls (p = 1.63 x 10−7). Nbeal2gps/gps mice also have markedly reduced numbers of platelet alpha granules and an increased level of emperipolesis, consistent with previously characterized mice carrying targeted Nbeal2 null alleles. These findings confirm previous reports, provide an additional mouse model for GPS, and highlight the potentially confounding effect of background spontaneous mutation events in well-characterized mouse strains. PMID:26950939

  10. Psychopathology and cognition in children with 22q11.2 deletion syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Niarchou, Maria; Zammit, Stanley; van Goozen, Stephanie H. M.; Thapar, Anita; Tierling, Hayley M.; Owen, Michael J.; van den Bree, Marianne B. M.

    2014-01-01

    Background Children with 22q11.2 deletion syndrome (22q11.2DS) have been reported to have high rates of cognitive and psychiatric problems. Aims To establish the nature and prevalence of psychiatric disorder and neurocognitive impairment in children with 22q11.2DS and test whether risk of psychopathology is mediated by the children’s intellectual impairment. Method Neurocognition and psychopathology were assessed in 80 children with 22q11.2DS (mean age 10.2 years, s.d. = 2.1) and 39 sibling controls (mean age 10.9 years, s.d. = 2.0). Results More than half (54%) of children with 22q11.2DS met diagnostic criteria for one or more DSM-IV-TR psychiatric disorder. These children had lower IQ (mean 76.8, s.d. = 13.0) than controls (mean 108.6, s.d. = 15.2) (P<0.001) and showed a range of neurocognitive impairments. Increased risk of psychopathology was not mediated by intellectual impairment. Conclusions 22q11.2DS is not related to a specific psychiatric phenotype in children. Moreover, the deletion has largely independent effects on IQ and risk of psychopathology, indicating that psychopathology in 22q11.2DS is not a non-specific consequence of generalised cognitive impairment. PMID:24115343

  11. Neuromotor deficits in children with the 22q11 deletion syndrome.

    PubMed

    Sobin, Christina; Monk, Samantha H; Kiley-Brabeck, Karen; Khuri, Jananne; Karayiorgou, Maria

    2006-12-01

    The 22q11 chromosomal deletion syndrome (22q11DS) is associated with a heterogeneous physical phenotype, neurocognitive deficits, and increased risk of later psychiatric illness. Sporadic clinical reports suggested motor differences, but quantitative studies of movement in children with 22q11DS are rare. If present in a majority of affected school-age children, characterization of neuromotor deficits may prove to be critical for intervention, neurocognitive test interpretation, and understanding etiology. We administered the Movement Assessment Battery for Children to 72 children ages 4.3 to 16.1, including 49 children confirmed positive for the 22q11 deletion and 23 control siblings. We predicted a higher frequency of global and domain impairment in manual dexterity, eye-hand coordination, and balance among affected children. Ninety-four percent of affected children had marked neuromotor deficits, and group scores differed broadly for both global and subarea measures. Secondary analyses showed no impairment differences between younger and older children with 22q11DS, and longitudinal trajectories for 12 affected children suggested stability of deficits over 3-year intervals. Neuromotor deficits in children with 22q11DS occur early in development, continue throughout the school-age years, should be considered in the interpretation of motor-based achievement and IQ tests, and require targeted and ongoing remediation throughout childhood and adolescence. Further studies examining the specificity of motor impairment to 22q11DS are needed.

  12. Isolation of expressed sequences from the region commonly deleted in Velo-cardio-facial syndrome

    SciTech Connect

    Sirotkin, H.; Morrow, B.; DasGupta, R.

    1994-09-01

    Velo-cardio-facial syndrome (VCFS) is a relatively common autosomal dominant genetic disorder characterized by cleft palate, cardiac abnormalities, learning disabilities and a characteristic facial dysmorphology. Most VCFS patients have interstitial deletions of 22q11 of 1-2 mb. In an effort to isolate the gene(s) responsible for VCFS we have utilized a hybrid selection protocol to recover expressed sequences from three non-overlapping YACs comprising almost 1 mb of the commonly deleted region. Total yeast genomic DNA or isolated YAC DNA was immobilized on Hybond-N filters, blocked with yeast and human ribosomal and human repetitive sequences and hybridized with a mixture of random primed short fragment cDNA libraries. Six human short fragment libraries derived from total fetus, fetal brain, adult brain, testes, thymus and spleen have been used for the selections. Short fragment cDNAs retained on the filter were passed through a second round of selection and cloned into lambda gt10. cDNAs shown to originate from the YACs and from chromosome 22 are being used to isolate full length cDNAs. Three genes known to be present on these YACs, catechol-O-methyltransferase, tuple 1 and clathrin heavy chain have been recovered. Additionally, a gene related to the murine p120 gene and a number of novel short cDNAs have been isolated. The role of these genes in VCFS is being investigated.

  13. Atypical neuropsychological profile in a boy with 22q11.2 Deletion Syndrome.

    PubMed

    Stiers, Peter; Swillen, Ann; De Smedt, Bert; Lagae, Lieven; Devriendt, Koen; D'Agostino, Emiliano; Sunaert, Stefan; Fryns, Andjean-Pierre

    2005-02-01

    In this article the general and specific cognitive impairments of the boy R.H. with a de novo deletion 22q11.2 are described. His full-scale IQ was 73, and he obtained only slightly better verbal than non-verbal subtest scores. Neuropsychological assessment revealed specific impairments in perceptual categorization of objects presented suboptimal, matching of unfamiliar faces, and verbal learning and memory. In contrast, he performed in accordance with his intelligence level on other visual perceptual tasks, on non-verbal learning and memory tasks, and on attention tasks. Voxel-wise statistical comparison of a high-resolution T1-weighted magnetic resonance image of R.H's brain with similar images obtained from 14 normal control children revealed as major abnormalities a reduction of the right inferior parietal and superior occipital lobe, and a bilateral reduction of deep white matter behind the inferior frontal gyrus. These cognitive impairments and MRI abnormalities are not commonly described in 22q11.2 Deletion Syndrome and may indicate a larger heterogeneity in the neurocognitive phenotype than currently evidenced. At least in this boy the microdeletion seems to have interfered with the development and functioning of particular neural subsystems, while the structure and functioning of other subsystems was left intact.

  14. Social Skills and Executive Function Deficits in Children With the 22q11 Deletion Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Kiley-Brabeck, Karen; Sobin, Christina

    2009-01-01

    The 22q11 Deletion Syndrome (22q11DS) is among the most frequent gene deletion disorders, occurring once in every 6,000 live births. Descriptive reports have suggested marked social differences in affected children. Empirical studies are needed to verify possible social skills deficits among children with 22q11DS, and also to examine possible associations between their frequently reported executive function deficits and social anomalies. Fifty-two parents of affected children (n = 52) and participating control siblings (n = 26) completed the Social Skills Rating System (SSRS) and Behavior Inventory of Executive Function (BRIEF). When compared with control siblings, children with 22q11DS had significantly lower SSRS ratings for Cooperation, Assertion, Responsibility, and Self-Control. Affected children had significantly higher BRIEF ratings for Initiation, Planning, Working Memory, and Monitoring. In affected children, global Social Skill was negatively correlated with BRIEF Global Composite scores. Initiation and Monitoring significantly predicted Social Skill. Children with 22q11DS have marked differences in social skill development which are associated with executive dysfunction. PMID:17362146

  15. Molecular characterization of two proximal deletion breakpoint regions in both Prader-Willi and Angelman syndrome patients

    SciTech Connect

    Christian, S.L.; Huang, B.; Ledbetter, D.H.

    1995-07-01

    Prader-Willi syndrome (PWS) and Angelman syndrome (AS) are distinct mental retardation syndromes caused by paternal and maternal deficiencies, respectively, in chromosome 15q11{minus}q13. Approximately 70% of these patients have a large deletion of {approximately}4 Mb extending from D15S9 (ML34) through D15S12 (IR10A). To further characterize the deletion breakpoints proximal to D15S9, three new polymorphic microsatellite markers were developed that showed observed heterozygosities of 60%-87%. D15S541 and D15S542 were isolated for YAC A124A3 containing the D15S18 (IR39) locus. D15S543 was isolated from a cosmid cloned from the proximal right end of YAC 254B5 containing the D15S9 (ML34) locus. Gene-centromere mapping of these markers, using a panel of ovarian teratomas of known meiotic origin, extended the genetic map of chromosome 15 by 2-3 cM toward the centromere. Analysis of the more proximal S541/S542 markers on 53 Prader-Willi and 33 Angelman deletion patients indicated two classes of patients: 44% (35/80) of the informative patients were deleted for these markers (class I), while 56% (45/80) were not deleted (class II), with no difference between PWS and AS. In contrast, D15S543 was deleted in all informative patients (13/48) or showed the presence of a single allele (in 35/48 patients), suggesting that this marker is deleted in the majority of PWS and AS cases. These results confirm the presence of two common proximal deletion breakpoint regions in both Prader-Willi and Angelman syndromes and are consistent with the same deletion mechanism being responsible for paternal and maternal deletions. One breakpoint region lies between D15S541/S542 and D15S543, with an additional breakpoint region being proximal to D15S541/S542. 46 refs., 2 figs., 3 tabs.

  16. Genetics Home Reference: tetrasomy 18p

    MedlinePlus

    ... Donnell L, Hale DE, Cody JD. Adults with Chromosome 18 Abnormalities. J Genet Couns. 2015 Aug;24(4):663- ... J, Escamilla M. Psychiatric syndromes in individuals with chromosome 18 abnormalities. Am J Med Genet B Neuropsychiatr Genet. 2010 ...

  17. Behavioral and Psychiatric Phenotypes in 22q11.2 Deletion Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Tang, Kerri L; Antshel, Kevin M; Fremont, Wanda P.

    2015-01-01

    22q11.2DS is a chromosomal microdeletion that affects approximately 40–50 genes, and impacts various organs and systems throughout the body. Detection is typically achieved by fluorescence in-situ hybridization following diagnosis of one of the major features of the deletion or via chromosomal microarray or non-invasive prenatal testing. The physical phenotype can include congenital heart defects, palatal and pharyngeal anomalies, hypocalcemia/hypoparathyroidism, skeletal abnormalities, and cranial/brain anomalies, although prevalence rates of all of these features are variable. Cognitive function is impaired to some degree in most individuals, with prevalence rates of greater than 90% for motor/speech delays and learning disabilities. Attention, executive function, working memory, visual spatial abilities, motor skills, and social cognition/social skills are affected. The deletion is also associated with an increased risk for behavioral disorders and psychiatric illness. The early onset of psychiatric symptoms common to 22q11.2DS disrupts the development and quality of life of individuals with the syndrome, and is also a potential risk factor for later development of a psychotic disorder. This review discusses prevalence, phenotypic features, and management of psychiatric disorders commonly diagnosed in children and adolescents with 22q11.2DS, including autism spectrum disorders, attention deficit/hyperactivity disorder, anxiety disorders, mood disorders, and schizophrenia/psychotic disorders. Guidelines for the clinical assessment and management of psychiatric disorders in youth with this syndrome are provided, as are treatment guidelines for the use of psychiatric medications. PMID:26372046

  18. Clinical Features of 78 Adults With 22q11 Deletion Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Bassett, Anne S.; Chow, Eva W.C.; Husted, Janice; Weksberg, Rosanna; Caluseriu, Oana; Webb, Gary D.; Gatzoulis, Michael A.

    2011-01-01

    22q11 Deletion Syndrome (22q11DS) is a common microdeletion syndrome with multisystem expression. Phenotypic features vary with age, ascertainment, and assessment. We systematically assessed 78 adults (36 M, 42 F; mean age 31.5, SD 10.5 years) with a 22q11.2 deletion ascertained through an adult congenital cardiac clinic (n = 35), psychiatric-related sources (n = 39), or as affected parents of subjects (n = 4). We recorded the lifetime prevalence of features requiring attention, with 95% confidence intervals (CI) not overlapping zero. Subtle learning difficulties, hypernasality and facial gestalt were not included. We investigated ascertainment effects using non-overlapping subgroups ascertained with tetralogy of Fallot (n = 31) or schizophrenia (n = 31). Forty-three features met inclusion criteria and were present in 5% or more patients, including several of later onset (e.g., hypothyroidism, cholelithiasis). Number of features per patient (median 9, range 3–22) correlated with hospitalizations (P=0.0002) and, when congenital features were excluded, with age (P=0.02). Adjusting for ascertainment, 25.8% (95% CI, 9.5–42.1%) of patients had cardiac anomalies and 22.6% (95% CI, 7.0–38.2%) had schizophrenia. Ascertainment subgroups were otherwise similar in median number and prevalence of features. Non-characteristic features are common in 22q11DS. Adjusting for ascertainment effects is important. Many treatable conditions may be anticipated and features may accumulate over time. The results have implications for clinical assessment and management, genetic counseling and research into pathophysiological mechanisms. PMID:16208694

  19. 22q11.2 deletion syndrome: behaviour problems of children and adolescents and parental stress.

    PubMed

    Briegel, W; Schneider, M; Schwab, K Otfried

    2008-11-01

    22q11.2 deletion syndrome can be associated with a variety of somatic symptoms, developmental delays and psychiatric disorders. At present, there is little information on behaviour problems, parental stress and possible relations between these factors. Therefore, this study investigates behaviour problems of children and adolescents with 22q11.2DS, and their primary caregivers' stress. Parents of 4-17 year old subjects known to the German 22q11.2 deletion syndrome foundation were anonymously asked to fill out several questionnaires, e.g. the Child Behavior Checklist 4-18 (CBCL/4-18). The primary caregivers of 77/126 children [43 males, 34 females, mean age: 8;0 (4;0-16;11) years] sent back filled-out questionnaires. Forty-six of 76 subjects were rated as clinical on at least one of the CBCL-scales. Males had significantly higher scores on the total problems scale and the internalizing problems scale than females. The patients' age correlated with several CBCL-scales. Eleven of 49 subjects were suspicious of an autism spectrum disorder. Compared with the general population, but not with other parents of mentally and/or physically handicapped children, the primary caregivers experienced higher levels of stress, but showed normal life satisfaction. In spite of high rates of clinical behaviour problems among children and adolescents with 22q11.2DS and despite increased parental stress, most primary caregivers seem to have effective coping strategies, e.g. partnership support, to sustain normal levels of life satisfaction.

  20. Psychiatric Disorders From Childhood to Adulthood in 22q11.2 Deletion Syndrome: Results From the International Consortium on Brain and Behavior in 22q11.2 Deletion Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Schneider, Maude; Debbané, Martin; Bassett, Anne S.; Chow, Eva W.C.; Fung, Wai Lun Alan; van den Bree, Marianne B.M.; Owen, Michael; Murphy, Kieran C.; Niarchou, Maria; Kates, Wendy R.; Antshel, Kevin M.; Fremont, Wanda; McDonald-McGinn, Donna M.; Gur, Raquel E.; Zackai, Elaine H.; Vorstman, Jacob; Duijff, Sasja N.; Klaassen, Petra W.J.; Swillen, Ann; Gothelf, Doron; Green, Tamar; Weizman, Abraham; Van Amelsvoort, Therese; Evers, Laurens; Boot, Erik; Shashi, Vandana; Hooper, Stephen R.; Bearden, Carrie E.; Jalbrzikowski, Maria; Armando, Marco; Vicari, Stefano; Murphy, Declan G.; Ousley, Opal; Campbell, Linda E.; Simon, Tony J.; Eliez, Stephan

    2014-01-01

    Objective Chromosome 22q11.2 deletion syndrome is a neurogenetic disorder associated with high rates of schizophrenia and other psychiatric conditions. The authors report what is to their knowledge the first large-scale collaborative study of rates and sex distributions of psychiatric disorders from childhood to adulthood in 22q11.2 deletion syndrome. The associations among psychopathology, intellect, and functioning were examined in a subgroup of participants. Method The 1,402 participants with 22q11.2 deletion syndrome, ages 6–68 years, were assessed for psychiatric disorders with validated diagnostic instruments. Data on intelligence and adaptive functioning were available for 183 participants ages 6 to 24 years. Results Attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) was the most frequent disorder in children (37.10%) and was overrepresented in males. Anxiety disorders were more prevalent than mood disorders at all ages, but especially in children and adolescents. Anxiety and unipolar mood disorders were overrepresented in females. Psychotic disorders were present in 41% of adults over age 25. Males did not predominate in psychotic or autism spectrum disorders. Hierarchical regressions in the subgroup revealed that daily living skills were predicted by the presence of anxiety disorders. Psychopathology was not associated with communication or socialization skills. Conclusions To the authors' knowledge, this is the largest study of psychiatric morbidity in 22q11.2 deletion syndrome. It validates previous findings that this condition is one of the strongest risk factors for psychosis. Anxiety and developmental disorders were also prevalent. These results highlight the need to monitor and reduce the long-term burden of psychopathology in 22q11.2 deletion syndrome. PMID:24577245

  1. Social Skills and Associated Psychopathology in Children with Chromosome 22q11.2 Deletion Syndrome: Implications for Interventions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shashi, V.; Veerapandiyan, A.; Schoch, K.; Kwapil, T.; Keshavan, M.; Ip, E.; Hooper, S.

    2012-01-01

    Background: Although distinctive neuropsychological impairments have been delineated in children with chromosome 22q11 deletion syndrome (22q11DS), social skills and social cognition remain less well-characterised. Objective: To examine social skills and social cognition and their relationship with neuropsychological function/behaviour and…

  2. Maladaptive Conflict Monitoring as Evidence for Executive Dysfunction in Children with Chromosome 22q11.2 Deletion Syndrome

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bish, Joel P.; Ferrante, Samantha M.; McDonald-McGinn, Donna; Zackai, Elaine; Simon, Tony J.

    2005-01-01

    Using an adaptation of the Attentional Networks Test, we investigated aspects of executive control in children with chromosome 22q11.2 deletion syndrome (DS22q11.2), a common but not well understood disorder that produces non-verbal cognitive deficits and a marked incidence of psychopathology. The data revealed that children with DS22q11.2…

  3. A Longitudinal Examination of the Psychoeducational, Neurocognitive, and Psychiatric Functioning in Children with 22q11.2 Deletion Syndrome

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hooper, Stephen R.; Curtiss, Kathleen; Schoch, Kelly; Keshavan, Matcheri S.; Allen, Andrew; Shashi, Vandana

    2013-01-01

    The present study sought to examine the longitudinal psychoeducational, neurocognitive, and psychiatric outcomes of children and adolescents with chromosome 22q11.2 deletion syndrome (22q11DS), a population with a high incidence of major psychiatric illnesses appearing in late adolescence/early adulthood. Little is known of the developmental…

  4. Social Skills and Associated Psychopathology in Children with Chromosome 22q11.2 Deletion Syndrome: Implications for Interventions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shashi, V.; Veerapandiyan, A.; Schoch, K.; Kwapil, T.; Keshavan, M.; Ip, E.; Hooper, S.

    2012-01-01

    Background: Although distinctive neuropsychological impairments have been delineated in children with chromosome 22q11 deletion syndrome (22q11DS), social skills and social cognition remain less well-characterised. Objective: To examine social skills and social cognition and their relationship with neuropsychological function/behaviour and…

  5. Evaluation of Potential Modifiers of the Palatal Phenotype in the 22q11.2 Deletion Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Driscoll, Deborah A.; Boland, Torrey; Emanuel, Beverly S.; Kirschner, Richard E.; LaRossa, Don; Manson, Jeanne; McDonald-McGinn, Donna; Randall, Peter; Solot, Cynthia; Zackai, Elaine; Mitchell, Laura E.

    2010-01-01

    Objective To evaluate potential modifiers of the palatal phenotype in individuals with the 22q11.2 deletion syndrome. Design Data from 356 subjects enrolled in a study of the 22q11.2 deletion syndrome were used to evaluate potential modifiers of the palatal phenotype. Specifically, subjects with and without velopharyngeal inadequacy and/or structural malformations of the palate were compared with respect to gender, race, and genotype for variants of seven genes that may influence palatal development. Methods The chi-square test or Fisher exact test was used to evaluate the association between palatal phenotype and each potential modifier. Odds ratios and their associated 95% confidence intervals were used to measure the magnitude of the association between palatal phenotype, subject gender and race, and each of the bi-allelic variants. Results The palatal phenotype observed in individuals with the 22q11.2 deletion syndrome was significantly associated with both gender and race. In addition, there was tentative evidence that the palatal phenotype may be influenced by variation within the gene that encodes methionine synthase. Conclusions Variation in the palatal phenotype observed between individuals with the 22q11.2 deletion syndrome may be related to personal characteristics such as gender and race as well as variation within genes that reside outside of the 22q11.2 region. PMID:16854201

  6. A Longitudinal Examination of the Psychoeducational, Neurocognitive, and Psychiatric Functioning in Children with 22q11.2 Deletion Syndrome

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hooper, Stephen R.; Curtiss, Kathleen; Schoch, Kelly; Keshavan, Matcheri S.; Allen, Andrew; Shashi, Vandana

    2013-01-01

    The present study sought to examine the longitudinal psychoeducational, neurocognitive, and psychiatric outcomes of children and adolescents with chromosome 22q11.2 deletion syndrome (22q11DS), a population with a high incidence of major psychiatric illnesses appearing in late adolescence/early adulthood. Little is known of the developmental…

  7. Maladaptive Conflict Monitoring as Evidence for Executive Dysfunction in Children with Chromosome 22q11.2 Deletion Syndrome

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bish, Joel P.; Ferrante, Samantha M.; McDonald-McGinn, Donna; Zackai, Elaine; Simon, Tony J.

    2005-01-01

    Using an adaptation of the Attentional Networks Test, we investigated aspects of executive control in children with chromosome 22q11.2 deletion syndrome (DS22q11.2), a common but not well understood disorder that produces non-verbal cognitive deficits and a marked incidence of psychopathology. The data revealed that children with DS22q11.2…

  8. Emotion Regulation and Development in Children with Autism and 22q13 Deletion Syndrome: Evidence for Group Differences

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Glaser, Sarah E.; Shaw, Steven R.

    2011-01-01

    Emotion regulation (ER) abilities and developmental differences were investigated among 19 children with autism and 18 children with 22q13 Deletion Syndrome (a rare chromosomal disorder with certain autistic symptoms). The purpose of this study was to examine the phenotypic similarities between the two disorders. ER was measured by the Temperament…

  9. Working Memory Impairments in Chromosome 22q11.2 Deletion Syndrome: The Roles of Anxiety and Stress Physiology

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sanders, Ashley F.; Hobbs, Diana A.; Stephenson, David D.; Laird, Robert D.; Beaton, Elliott A.

    2017-01-01

    Stress and anxiety have a negative impact on working memory systems by competing for executive resources and attention. Broad memory deficits, anxiety, and elevated stress have been reported in individuals with chromosome 22q11.2 deletion syndrome (22q11.2DS). We investigated anxiety and physiological stress reactivity in relation to visuospatial…

  10. 1p36 deletion syndrome confirmed by fluorescence in situ hybridization and array-comparative genomic hybridization analysis

    PubMed Central

    Kang, Dong Soo; Shin, Eunsim

    2016-01-01

    Pediatric epilepsy can be caused by various conditions, including specific syndromes. 1p36 deletion syndrome is reported in 1 in 5,000–10,000 newborns, and its characteristic clinical features include developmental delay, mental retardation, hypotonia, congenital heart defects, seizure, and facial dysmorphism. However, detection of the terminal deletion in chromosome 1p by conventional G-banded karyotyping is difficult. Here we present a case of epilepsy with profound developmental delay and characteristic phenotypes. A 7-year- and 6-month-old boy experienced afebrile generalized seizure at the age of 5 years and 3 months. He had recurrent febrile seizures since 12 months of age and showed severe global developmental delay, remarkable hypotonia, short stature, and dysmorphic features such as microcephaly; small, low-set ears; dark, straight eyebrows; deep-set eyes; flat nasal bridge; midface hypoplasia; and a small, pointed chin. Previous diagnostic work-up, including conventional chromosomal analysis, revealed no definite causes. However, array-comparative genomic hybridization analysis revealed 1p36 deletion syndrome with a 9.15-Mb copy loss of the 1p36.33-1p36.22 region, and fluorescence in situ hybridization analysis (FISH) confirmed this diagnosis. This case highlights the need to consider detailed chromosomal study for patients with delayed development and epilepsy. Furthermore, 1p36 deletion syndrome should be considered for patients presenting seizure and moderate-to-severe developmental delay, particularly if the patient exhibits dysmorphic features, short stature, and hypotonia. PMID:28018437

  11. Pathologic features of dilated cardiomyopathy with localized noncompaction in a child with deletion 1p36 syndrome.

    PubMed

    Pearce, F Bennett; Litovsky, Silvio H; Dabal, Robert J; Robin, Nathaniel; Dure, Leon J; George, James F; Kirklin, James K

    2012-01-01

    Dilated cardiomyopathy and ventricular noncompaction have been reported in association with deletion 1p36 syndrome. Previous descriptions include echocardiographic and/or gross pathologic descriptions. There are no previous reports of microscopic findings. We report a case with descriptions of echocardiographic, gross pathologic, and microscopic findings.

  12. 1p36 deletion syndrome confirmed by fluorescence in situ hybridization and array-comparative genomic hybridization analysis.

    PubMed

    Kang, Dong Soo; Shin, Eunsim; Yu, Jeesuk

    2016-11-01

    Pediatric epilepsy can be caused by various conditions, including specific syndromes. 1p36 deletion syndrome is reported in 1 in 5,000-10,000 newborns, and its characteristic clinical features include developmental delay, mental retardation, hypotonia, congenital heart defects, seizure, and facial dysmorphism. However, detection of the terminal deletion in chromosome 1p by conventional G-banded karyotyping is difficult. Here we present a case of epilepsy with profound developmental delay and characteristic phenotypes. A 7-year- and 6-month-old boy experienced afebrile generalized seizure at the age of 5 years and 3 months. He had recurrent febrile seizures since 12 months of age and showed severe global developmental delay, remarkable hypotonia, short stature, and dysmorphic features such as microcephaly; small, low-set ears; dark, straight eyebrows; deep-set eyes; flat nasal bridge; midface hypoplasia; and a small, pointed chin. Previous diagnostic work-up, including conventional chromosomal analysis, revealed no definite causes. However, array-comparative genomic hybridization analysis revealed 1p36 deletion syndrome with a 9.15-Mb copy loss of the 1p36.33-1p36.22 region, and fluorescence in situ hybridization analysis (FISH) confirmed this diagnosis. This case highlights the need to consider detailed chromosomal study for patients with delayed development and epilepsy. Furthermore, 1p36 deletion syndrome should be considered for patients presenting seizure and moderate-to-severe developmental delay, particularly if the patient exhibits dysmorphic features, short stature, and hypotonia.

  13. Examining a New Method to Studying Velopharyngeal Structures in a Child with 22q11.2 Deletion Syndrome

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kollara, Lakshmi; Schenck, Graham; Jaskolka, Michael; Perry, Jamie L.

    2017-01-01

    Purpose: To date, no studies have imaged the velopharynx in children with 22q11.2 deletion syndrome (22q11.2 DS) without the use of sedation. Dysmorphology in velopharyngeal structures has been shown to have significant negative implications on speech among these individuals. This single case study was designed to assess the feasibility of a…

  14. Autism and intellectual disability in a patient with two microdeletions in 6q16: a contiguous gene deletion syndrome?

    PubMed

    Strunk, Daniela; Weber, Peter; Röthlisberger, Benno; Filges, Isabel

    2016-01-01

    Copy number variations play a significant role in the aetiology of developmental disabilities including non-syndromic intellectual disability and autism. We describe a 19-year old patient with intellectual disability and autism for whom chromosomal microarray (CMA) analysis showed the unusual finding of two de novo microdeletions in cis position on chromosome 6q16.1q16.2 and 6q16.3. The two deletions span 10 genes, including FBXL4, POU3F2, PRDM13, CCNC, COQ3 and GRIK2. We compared phenotypes of patients with similar deletions and looked at the involvement of the genes in neuronal networks in order to determine the pathogenicity of our patient's deletions. We suggest that both deletions on 6q are causing his disease phenotype since they harbour several genes which are implicated in pathways of neuronal development and function. Further studies regarding the interaction between PRDM13 and GRIK2 specifically may be interesting.

  15. Association of Jacobsen syndrome and bipolar affective disorder in a patient with a de novo 11q terminal deletion.

    PubMed

    Böhm, D; Hoffmann, K; Laccone, F; Wilken, B; Dechent, P; Frahm, J; Bartels, I; Bohlander, S K

    2006-02-15

    We report on a young woman with Jacobsen syndrome (JBS) who was admitted to our psychiatric department because of a bipolar affective disorder (BPAD). Chromosome analysis was performed due to the fact that she had mental retardation, short stature, and subtle facial anomalies. A deletion of the distal long arm of chromosome 11 was found. A detailed mapping of the deletion breakpoint by quantitative real time PCR revealed a true terminal 11q deletion of approximately 8 Mb corresponding to the karyotype 46,XX,del(11)(q24.2). Polymorphic DNA marker analysis showed that the deletion is located on the paternal chromosome. Additionally, laboratory investigations revealed a low platelet count and magnetic resonance imaging of the brain showed white matter T2 hyperintensities in frontotemporal regions, which are unlikely to result from a demyelinating process as indicated by localized proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy. To our knowledge, this is the first report describing a BPAD in a case with JBS.

  16. Inflammatory peeling skin syndrome caused by homozygous genomic deletion in the PSORS1 region encompassing the CDSN gene.

    PubMed

    Ishida-Yamamoto, Akemi; Furio, Laetitia; Igawa, Satomi; Honma, Masaru; Tron, Elodie; Malan, Valerie; Murakami, Masamoto; Hovnanian, Alain

    2014-01-01

    Peeling skin syndrome (PSS) type B is a rare recessive genodermatosis characterized by lifelong widespread, reddish peeling of the skin with pruritus. The disease is caused by small-scale mutations in the Corneodesmosin gene (CDSN) leading to premature termination codons. We report for the first time a Japanese case resulting from complete deletion of CDSN. Corneodesmosin was undetectable in the epidermis, and CDSN was unamplifiable by PCR. QMPSF analysis demonstrated deletion of CDSN exons inherited from each parent. Deletion mapping using microsatellite haplotyping, CGH array and PCR analysis established that the genomic deletion spanned 49-72 kb between HCG22 and TCF19, removing CDSN as well as five other genes within the psoriasis susceptibility region 1 (PSORS1) on 6p21.33. This observation widens the spectrum of molecular defects underlying PSS type B and shows that loss of these five genes from the PSORS1 region does not result in an additional cutaneous phenotype.

  17. Detection of deletions at 7q11.23 in Williams-Beuren syndrome by polymorphic markers

    PubMed Central

    Dutra, Roberta Lelis; de Campos Pieri, Patrícia; Teixeira, Ana Carolina Dias; Honjo, Rachel Sayuri; Bertola, Debora Romeo; Kim, Chong Ae

    2011-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Williams-Beuren syndrome (WBS; OMIM 194050) is caused by a hemizygous contiguous gene microdeletion at 7q11.23. Supravalvular aortic stenosis, mental retardation, overfriendliness, and ocular and renal abnormalities comprise typical symptoms in WBS. Although fluorescence in situ hybridization is widely used for diagnostic confirmation, microsatellite DNA markers are considered highly informative and easily manageable. OBJECTIVES: This study aimed to test the microsatellite markers for the diagnosis of Williams-Beuren syndrome, to determine the size and parental origin of microdeletion, compare the clinical characteristics between patients with different sizes of the deletion and parental origin. METHODS: We studied 97 patients with clinical diagnosis of Williams-Beuren syndrome using five microsatellite markers: D7S1870, D7S489, D7S613, D7S2476 and D7S489_A. RESULTS AND DISCUSSION: Using five markers together, the result was informative in all patients. The most informative marker was D7S1870 (78.4%), followed by D7S613 (75.3%), D7S489 (70.1%) and D7S2476 (62.9%). The microdeletion was present in 84 (86.6%) patients and absent in 13 (13.4%) patients. Maternal deletions were found in 52.4% of patients and paternal deletions in 47.6% of patients. The observed size of deletions was 1.55 Mb in 76/84 patients (90.5%) and 1.84 Mb in 8/84 patients (9.5%). SVAS as well as ocular and urinary abnormalities were more frequent in the patients with a deletion. There were no clinical differences in relation to either the size or parental origin of the deletion. CONCLUSION: Using these five selected microsatellite markers was informative in all patients, thus can be considered an alternative method for molecular diagnosis in Williams-Beuren syndrome. PMID:21808859

  18. An atypical deletion of the Williams–Beuren syndrome interval implicates genes associated with defective visuospatial processing and autism

    PubMed Central

    Edelmann, Lisa; Prosnitz, Aaron; Pardo, Sherly; Bhatt, Jahnavi; Cohen, Ninette; Lauriat, Tara; Ouchanov, Leonid; González, Patricia J; Manghi, Elina R; Bondy, Pamela; Esquivel, Marcela; Monge, Silvia; Delgado, Marietha F; Splendore, Alessandra; Francke, Uta; Burton, Barbara K; McInnes, L Alison

    2007-01-01

    Background During a genetic study of autism, a female child who met diagnostic criteria for autism spectrum disorder, but also exhibited the cognitive–behavioural profile (CBP) associated with Williams–Beuren syndrome (WBS) was examined. The WBS CBP includes impaired visuospatial ability, an overly friendly personality, excessive non‐social anxiety and language delay. Methods Using array‐based comparative genomic hybridisation (aCGH), a deletion corresponding to BAC RP11‐89A20 in the distal end of the WBS deletion interval was detected. Hemizygosity was confirmed using fluorescence in situ hybridisation and fine mapping was performed by measuring the copy number of genomic DNA using quantitative polymerase chain reaction. Results The proximal breakpoint was mapped to intron 1 of GTF2IRD1 and the distal breakpoint lies 2.4–3.1 Mb towards the telomere. The subject was completely hemizygous for GTF2I, commonly deleted in carriers of the classic ∼1.5 Mb WBS deletion, and GTF2IRD2, deleted in carriers of the rare ∼1.84 Mb WBS deletion. Conclusion Hemizygosity of the GTF2 family of transcription factors is sufficient to produce many aspects of the WBS CBP, and particularly implicate the GTF2 transcription factors in the visuospatial construction deficit. Symptoms of autism in this case may be due to deletion of additional genes outside the typical WBS interval or remote effects on gene expression at other loci. PMID:16971481

  19. Partial deletion of ANKRD11 results in the KBG phenotype distinct from the 16q24.3 microdeletion syndrome.

    PubMed

    Khalifa, Mohamed; Stein, Jennifer; Grau, Lance; Nelson, Valery; Meck, Jeanne; Aradhya, Swaroop; Duby, John

    2013-04-01

    KBG syndrome (OMIM 148050) is a very rare genetic disorder characterized by macrodontia, distinctive craniofacial abnormalities, short stature, intellectual disability, skeletal, and neurologic involvement. Approximately 60 patients have been reported since it was first described in 1975. Recently mutations in ANKRD11 have been documented in patients with KBG syndrome, and it has been proposed that haploinsufficiency of ANKRD11 is the cause of this syndrome. In addition, copy number variation in the 16q24.3 region that includes ANKRD11 results in a variable phenotype that overlaps with KBG syndrome and also includes autism spectrum disorders and other dysmorphic facial features. In this report we present a 2½-year-old African American male with features highly suggestive of KBG syndrome. Genomic microarray identified an intragenic 154 kb deletion at 16q24.3 within ANKRD11. This child's mother was mosaic for the same deletion (present in approximately 38% of cells) and exhibited a milder phenotype including macrodontia, short stature and brachydactyly. This family provides additional evidence that ANKRD11 causes KBG syndrome, and the mild phenotype in the mosaic form suggests that KBG phenotypes might be dose dependent, differentiating it from the more variable 16q24.3 microdeletion syndrome. This family has additional features that might expand the phenotype of KBG syndrome.

  20. An interstitial deletion of 8q23.3-q24.22 associated with Langer-Giedion syndrome, Cornelia de Lange syndrome and epilepsy.

    PubMed

    Chen, Chih-Ping; Lin, Shuan-Pei; Liu, Yu-Peng; Chern, Schu-Rern; Wu, Peih-Shan; Su, Jun-Wei; Chen, Yu-Ting; Lee, Chen-Chi; Wang, Wayseen

    2013-10-15

    We present a 19-year-old male with laxity of skin and joints, sparse scalp hair, facial dysmorphism, epilepsy, multiple exostoses, scoliosis, gastroesophageal reflux, cardiovascular defects, and an 8q23.3-q24.22 deletion detected by array comparative genomic hybridization. The patient was previously misdiagnosed as having Ehlers-Danlos syndrome. However, his clinical findings are in fact correlated with trichorhinophalangeal syndrome type II/Langer-Giedion syndrome and Cornelia de Lange syndrome-4. We discuss the genotype-phenotype correlation and the consequence of haploinsufficiency of TRPS1, RAD21, EXT1 and KCNQ3 in this case. © 2013.

  1. Comparing the broad socio-cognitive profile of youth with Williams syndrome and 22q11.2 deletion syndrome.

    PubMed

    Weisman, O; Feldman, R; Burg-Malki, M; Keren, M; Geva, R; Diesendruck, G; Gothelf, D

    2017-10-08

    Numerous studies have assessed the socio-cognitive profile in Williams syndrome (WS) and, independently, in 22q11.2 deletion syndrome (22q11.2DS). Yet, a cross-syndrome comparison of these abilities between individuals with these two syndromes with known social deficits has not been conducted. Eighty-two children participated in four study groups: WS (n = 18), 22q112.DS (n = 24), age-matched individuals with idiopathic developmental disability (IDD; n = 20) and typically developing (TD) controls (n = 20). Participants completed four socio-cognitive tests: facial emotion recognition, mental state attribution, differentiating real from apparent emotions and trait inference based on motives and actions-outcomes. The current findings demonstrate that children with WS were better in labelling happy faces compared with children with 22q11.2DS, partially reflecting their exaggerated social drive. In the false belief task, however, the WS and IDD groups performed poorly compared with the 22q11.2DS group, possibly due to their difficulty to interpret subtle social cues. When asked to identify the gap between real-negative vs. apparent-positive emotions, the 22q11.2DS group performed similarly to TD children but better than the WS group, possibly due to their anxious personality and their innate bias towards negatively valence cues. Finally, individuals with WS were more willing to become friends with a story character even when the character's motives were negative, reflecting their difficulty to avoid potentially harmful real-life situations. Overall, our multi-facet socio-cognitive battery uncovered strengths and weaknesses in social cognition that are syndrome-specific, shared among the genetic syndromes, or common to the three clinical groups compared with healthy controls. Our findings underscore the need to devise age-specific and condition-specific assessment tools and intervention programs towards improving these children's socio-cognitive deficits. © 2017

  2. Multi-disciplinary clinical study of Smith-Magenis syndrome (deletion 17p11.2)

    SciTech Connect

    Greenberg, F.; Lewis, R.A.; Potocki, L.

    1996-03-29

    Smith-Magenis syndrome (SMS) is a multiple congenital anomaly, mental retardation (MCA/MR) syndrome associated with deletion of chromosome 17 band p11.2. As part of a multi-disciplinary clinical, cytogenetic, and molecular approach to SMS, detailed clinical studies including radiographic neurologic, developmental, ophthalmologic, otolaryngologic, and audiologic evaluations were performed on 27 SMS patients. Significant findings include otolaryngologic abnormalities in 94%, eye abnormalities in 85%, sleep abnormalities (especially reduced REM sleep) in 75%, hearing impairment in 68% (approximately 65% conductive and 35% sensorineural), scoliosis in 65% brain abnormalities (predominantly ventriculomegaly) in 52%, cardiac abnormalities in at least 37%, renal anomalies (especially duplication of the collecting system) in 35%, low thyroxine levels in 29%, low immunoglobulin levels in 23%, and forearm abnormalities in 16%. The measured IQ ranged between 20-78, most patients falling in the moderate range of mental retardation at 40-54, although several patients scored in the mild or borderline range. The frequency of these many abnormalities in SMS suggests that patients should be evaluated thoroughly for associated complications both at the time of diagnosis and at least annually thereafter. 42 refs., 2 figs., 3 tabs.

  3. Malformations of the middle and inner ear on CT imaging in 22q11 deletion syndrome.

    PubMed

    Loos, Elke; Verhaert, Nicolas; Willaert, Annelore; Devriendt, Koenraad; Swillen, Ann; Hermans, Robert; Op de Beeck, Katya; Hens, Greet

    2016-11-01

    The 22q11 deletion syndrome (22q11DS), the most frequent microdeletion syndrome in humans, presents with a large variety of abnormalities. A common abnormality is hearing impairment. The exact pathophysiological explanation of the observed hearing loss remains largely unknown. The aim of this study was to analyze the middle and inner ear malformations as seen on computer tomographic imaging in patients with 22q11DS. We retrospectively reviewed the charts of 11 22q11DS patients who had undergone a CT of the temporal bone in the past. Of the 22 examined ears, two showed an abnormal malleus and incus, 10 presented with a dense stapes superstructure, and three ears had an abnormal orientation of the stapes. With regard to the inner ear, 12 ears showed an incomplete partition type II with a normal vestibular aqueduct. In four ears the vestibule and lateral semicircular canal were composed of a single cavity, in 14 ears the vestibule was too wide, and three ears had a broadened lateral semicircular canal. These findings suggest that malformations of the stapes, cochlea, vestibule, and lateral semicircular canal are frequent in 22q11DS. To our knowledge, the current study involves the largest case series describing middle and inner ear malformations in 22q11DS. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  4. Mosaic FMR1 deletion causes fragile X syndrome and can lead to molecular misdiagnosis: a case report and review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Coffee, Bradford; Ikeda, Morna; Budimirovic, Dejan B; Hjelm, Lawrence N; Kaufmann, Walter E; Warren, Stephen T

    2008-05-15

    The most common cause of fragile X syndrome is expansion of a CGG trinucleotide repeat in the 5'UTR of FMR1. This expansion leads to transcriptional silencing of the gene. However, other mutational mechanisms, such as deletions of FMR1, also cause fragile X syndrome. The result is the same for both the expansion mediated silencing and deletion, absence of the gene product, FMRP. We report here on an 11-year-old boy with a cognitive and behavioral profile with features compatible with, but not specific to, fragile X syndrome. A mosaic deletion of 1,013,395 bp was found using high-density X chromosome microarray analysis followed by sequencing of the deletion breakpoints. We review the literature of FMR1 deletions and present this case in the context of other FMR1 deletions having mental retardation that may or may not have the classic fragile X phenotype.

  5. Molecular definition of the chromosome 7 deletion in Williams syndrome and parent-of-origin effects on growth

    SciTech Connect

    Perez Jurado, L.A.; Peoples, R.; Francke, U.

    1996-10-01

    Williams syndrome (WS) is a developmental disorder with variable phenotypic expression associated, in most cases, with a hemizygous deletion of part of chromosomal band 7q11.23 that includes the elastin gene (ELN). We have investigated the frequency and size of the deletions, determined the parental origin, and correlated the molecular results with the clinical findings in 65 WS patients. Hemizygosity at the ELN locus was established by typing of two intragenic polymorphisms, quantitative Southern analysis, and/or FISH. Polymorphic markers covering the deletion and flanking regions were ordered by a combination of genetic and physical mapping. Genotyping of WS patients and available parents for 13 polymorphisms revealed that of 65 clinically defined WS patients, 61 (94%) had a deletion of the ELN locus and were also hemizygous (or non-informative) at loci D7S489B, D7S2476, D7S613, D7S2472, and D7S1870. None of the four patients without ELN deletion was hemizygous at any of the polymorphic loci studied. All patients were heterozygous (or noninformative) for centromeric (D7S1816, D7S1483, and D7S653) and telomeric (D7S489A, D7S675, and D7S669) flanking loci. The genetic distance between the most-centromeric deleted locus, D7S489B, and the most-telomeric one, D7S1870, is 2 cM. The breakpoints cluster at {approximately}1 cM to either side of ELN. In 39 families informative for parental origin, all deletions were de novo, and 18 were paternally and 21 maternally derived. Comparison of clinical data, collected in a standardized quantifiable format, revealed significantly more severe growth retardation and microcephaly in the maternal deletion group. An imprinted locus, silent on the paternal chromosome and contributing to statural growth, may be affected by the deletion. 53 refs., 5 figs., 2 tabs.

  6. Molecular definition of the chromosome 7 deletion in Williams syndrome and parent-of-origin effects on growth.

    PubMed Central

    Pérez Jurado, L. A.; Peoples, R.; Kaplan, P.; Hamel, B. C.; Francke, U.

    1996-01-01

    Williams syndrome (WS) is a developmental disorder with variable phenotypic expression associated, in most cases, with a hemizygous deletion of part of chromosomal band 7q11.23 that includes the elastin gene (ELN). We have investigated the frequency and size of the deletions, determined the parental origin, and correlated the molecular results with the clinical findings in 65 WS patients. Hemizygosity at the ELN locus was established by typing of two intragenic polymorphisms, quantitative Southern analysis, and/or FISH. Polymorphic markers covering the deletion and flanking regions were ordered by a combination of genetic and physical mapping. Genotyping of WS patients and available parents for 13 polymorphisms revealed that of 65 clinically defined WS patients, 61 (94%) had a deletion of the ELN locus and were also hemizygous (or noninformative) at loci D7S489B, D7S2476, D7S613, D7S2472, and D7S1870. None of the four patients without ELN deletion was hemizygous at any of the polymorphic loci studied. All patients were heterozygous (or noninformative) for centromeric (D7S1816, D7S1483, and D7S653) and telomeric (D7S489A, D7S675, and D7S669) flanking loci. The genetic distance between the most-centromeric deleted locus, D7S489B, and the most-telomeric one, D7S1870, is 2 cM. The breakpoints cluster at approximately 1 cM to either side of ELN. In 39 families informative for parental origin, all deletions were de novo, and 18 were paternally and 21 maternally derived. Comparison of clinical data, collected in a standardized quantifiable format, revealed significantly more severe growth retardation and microcephaly in the maternal deletion group. An imprinted locus, silent on the paternal chromosome and contributing to statural growth, may be affected by the deletion. Images Figure 1 Figure 4 PMID:8808592

  7. Molecular characterisation of the 22q13 deletion syndrome supports the role of haploinsufficiency of SHANK3/PROSAP2 in the major neurological symptoms

    PubMed Central

    Wilson, H; Wong, A; Shaw, S; Tse, W; Stapleton, G; Phelan, M; Hu, S; Marshall, J; McDermid, H

    2003-01-01

    Methods: The 22q13 deletion syndrome (MIM 606232) is characterised by moderate to profound mental retardation, delay/absence of expressive speech, hypotonia, normal to accelerated growth, and mild dysmorphic features. We have determined the deletion size and parent of origin in 56 patients with this syndrome. Results: Similar to other terminal deletion syndromes, there was an overabundance of paternal deletions. The deletions vary widely in size, from 130 kb to over 9 Mb; however all 45 cases that could be specifically tested for the terminal region at the site of SHANK3 were deleted for this gene. The molecular structure of SHANK3 was further characterised. Comparison of clinical features to deletion size showed few correlations. Some measures of developmental assessment did correlate to deletion size; however, all patients showed some degree of mental retardation and severe delay or absence of expressive speech, regardless of deletion size. Conclusion: Our analysis therefore supports haploinsufficiency of the gene SHANK3, which codes for a structural protein of the postsynaptic density, as a major causative factor in the neurological symptoms of 22q13 deletion syndrome. PMID:12920066

  8. 2q37.3 Deletion Syndrome: Two Cases with Highly Distinctive Facial Phenotype, Discordant Association with Schizophrenic Psychosis, and Shared Deletion Breakpoint Region on 2q37.3.

    PubMed

    Mehraein, Yasmin; Pfob, Martina; Steinlein, Ortrud; Aichinger, Eric; Eggert, Marlene; Bubendorff, Valerie; Mannhart, Adelina; Müller, Stefan

    2015-01-01

    2q37.3 deletion syndrome belongs to the chromosomal 2q37 deletion spectrum which clinically resembles Albright hereditary osteodystrophy (AHO) syndrome. It is is mainly characterized by short stature, obesity, round face, brachydactyly type E, intellectual disability, behavioral problems, and variable intellectual deficits. Different from classical AHO syndrome, patients with 2q37 deletion syndrome lack renal parathyroid hormone resistance (pseudohypoparathyroidism) and soft tissue ossification. So far, deletion mapping or molecular breakpoint analyses of 2q37 have been performed in only few patients. Here, we report on 2 patients with 2q37.3 deletion syndrome. In both patients the breakpoint of the 5.5-Mb terminal microdeletion could be narrowed down to the same ∼ 200-kb interval on 2q37.3 by BAC-FISH and/or array-CGH. Flanking low-copy repeats may indicate a classical microdeletion syndrome genesis for the 2q37.3 microdeletion subgroup. Clinical evaluation revealed intellectual deficits and type E brachydactyly typical for classical AHO syndrome together with distinctive facial dysmorphisms not present in the former. Furthermore, one patient presented with schizophrenic psychosis, an observation that would be in accordance with previous reports about an association between schizophrenia susceptibility and an unknown gene within the chromosomal region 2q37.

  9. Hippocampal and visuospatial learning defects in mice with a deletion of frizzled 9, a gene in the Williams syndrome deletion interval.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Chunjie; Avilés, Carmen; Abel, Regina A; Almli, C Robert; McQuillen, Patrick; Pleasure, Samuel J

    2005-06-01

    Wnt signaling regulates hippocampal development but little is known about the functions of specific Wnt receptors in this structure. Frizzled 9 is selectively expressed in the hippocampus and is one of about 20 genes typically deleted in Williams syndrome. Since Williams syndrome is associated with severe visuospatial processing defects, we generated a targeted null allele for frizzled 9 to examine its role in hippocampal development. Frizzled 9-null mice had generally normal gross anatomical hippocampal organization but showed large increases in apoptotic cell death in the developing dentate gyrus. This increase in programmed cell death commenced with the onset of dentate gyrus development and persisted into the first postnatal week of life. There was also a perhaps compensatory increase in the number of dividing precursors in the dentate gyrus, which may have been a compensatory response to the increased cell death. These changes in the mutants resulted in a moderate decrease in the number of adult dentate granule cells in null mice and an increase in the number of hilar mossy cells. Heterozygous mice (the same frizzled 9 genotype as Williams syndrome patients) were intermediate between wild type and null mice for all developmental neuronanatomic defects. All mice with a mutant allele had diminished seizure thresholds, and frizzled 9 null mice had severe deficits on tests of visuospatial learning/memory. We conclude that frizzled 9 is a critical determinant of hippocampal development and is very likely to be a contributing factor to the neurodevelopmental and behavioral phenotype of patients with Williams syndrome.

  10. Histology of the Pharyngeal Constrictor Muscle in 22q11.2 Deletion Syndrome and Non-Syndromic Children with Velopharyngeal Insufficiency

    PubMed Central

    Widdershoven, Josine C. C.; Spruijt, Nicole E.; Spliet, Wim G. M.; Breugem, Corstiaan C.; Kon, Moshe; Mink van der Molen, Aebele B.

    2011-01-01

    Plastic surgeons aim to correct velopharyngeal insufficiency manifest by hypernasal speech with a velopharyngoplasty. The functional outcome has been reported to be worse in patients with 22q11.2 deletion syndrome than in patients without the syndrome. A possible explanation is the hypotonia that is often present as part of the syndrome. To confirm a myogenic component of the etiology of velopharyngeal insufficiency in children with 22q11.2 deletion syndrome, specimens of the pharyngeal constrictor muscle were taken from children with and without the syndrome. Histologic properties were compared between the groups. Specimens from the two groups did not differ regarding the presence of increased perimysial or endomysial space, fiber grouping by size or type, internalized nuclei, the percentage type I fibers, or the diameters of type I and type II fibers. In conclusion, a myogenic component of the etiology of velopharyngeal insufficiency in children with 22q11.2 deletion syndrome could not be confirmed. PMID:21738760

  11. 11p15 ICR1 Partial Deletions Associated with IGF2/H19 DMR Hypomethylation and Silver-Russell Syndrome.

    PubMed

    Abi Habib, Walid; Brioude, Frederic; Azzi, Salah; Salem, Jennifer; Das Neves, Cristina; Personnier, Claire; Chantot-Bastaraud, Sandra; Keren, Boris; Le Bouc, Yves; Harbison, Madeleine D; Netchine, Irene

    2017-01-01

    The 11p15 region harbors the IGF2/H19 imprinted domain, implicated in fetal and postnatal growth. Silver-Russell syndrome (SRS) is characterized by fetal and postnatal growth failure, and is caused principally by hypomethylation of the 11p15 imprinting control region 1 (ICR1). However, the mechanisms leading to ICR1 hypomethylation remain unknown. Maternally inherited genetic defects affecting the ICR1 domain have been associated with ICR1 hypermethylation and Beckwith-Wiedemann syndrome (an overgrowth syndrome, the clinical and molecular mirror of SRS), and paternal deletions of IGF2 enhancers have been detected in four SRS patients. However, no paternal deletions of ICR1 have ever been associated with hypomethylation of the IGF2/H19 domain in SRS. We screened for new genetic defects within the ICR1 in a cohort of 234 SRS patients with hypomethylated IGF2/H19 domain. We report deletions close to the boundaries of ICR1 on the paternal allele in one familial and two sporadic cases of SRS with ICR1 hypomethylation. These deletions are associated with hypomethylation of the remaining CBS, and decreased IGF2 expression. These results suggest that these regions are most likely required to maintain methylation after fertilization. We estimate these anomalies to occur in about 1% of SRS cases with ICR1 hypomethylation.

  12. Isolation of a putative transcriptional regulator from the region of 22q11 deleted in DiGeorge syndrome, Shprintzen syndrome and familial congenital heart disease.

    PubMed

    Halford, S; Wadey, R; Roberts, C; Daw, S C; Whiting, J A; O'Donnell, H; Dunham, I; Bentley, D; Lindsay, E; Baldini, A

    1993-12-01

    A wide spectrum of birth defects are caused by deletions of the DiGeorge syndrome critical region (DGCR) at human chromosome 22q11. Over one hundred such deletions have now been examined and a minimally deleted region of 300kb defined. Within these sequences we have identified a gene expressed during human and murine embryogenesis. The gene, named TUPLE1, and its murine homologue, encodes a protein containing repeated motifs similar to the WD40 domains found in the beta-transducin/enhancer of split (TLE) family. The TUPLE1 product has several features typical of transcriptional control proteins and in particular has homology with the yeast Tup1 transcriptional regulator. We propose that haploinsufficiency for TUPLE1 is at least partly responsible for DiGeorge syndrome and related abnormalities.

  13. Social Cognition Dysfunction in Adolescents with 22q11.2 Deletion Syndrome (Velo-Cardio-Facial Syndrome): Relationship with Executive Functioning and Social Competence/Functioning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Campbell, L. E.; McCabe, K. L.; Melville, J. L.; Strutt, P. A.; Schall, U.

    2015-01-01

    Background: Social difficulties are often noted among people with intellectual disabilities. Children and adults with 22q.11.2 deletion syndrome (22q11DS) often have poorer social competence as well as poorer performance on measures of executive and social-cognitive skills compared with typically developing young people. However, the relationship…

  14. Social Cognition Dysfunction in Adolescents with 22q11.2 Deletion Syndrome (Velo-Cardio-Facial Syndrome): Relationship with Executive Functioning and Social Competence/Functioning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Campbell, L. E.; McCabe, K. L.; Melville, J. L.; Strutt, P. A.; Schall, U.

    2015-01-01

    Background: Social difficulties are often noted among people with intellectual disabilities. Children and adults with 22q.11.2 deletion syndrome (22q11DS) often have poorer social competence as well as poorer performance on measures of executive and social-cognitive skills compared with typically developing young people. However, the relationship…

  15. Fine mapping of the 1p36 deletion syndrome identifies mutation of PRDM16 as a cause of cardiomyopathy.

    PubMed

    Arndt, Anne-Karin; Schafer, Sebastian; Drenckhahn, Jorg-Detlef; Sabeh, M Khaled; Plovie, Eva R; Caliebe, Almuth; Klopocki, Eva; Musso, Gabriel; Werdich, Andreas A; Kalwa, Hermann; Heinig, Matthias; Padera, Robert F; Wassilew, Katharina; Bluhm, Julia; Harnack, Christine; Martitz, Janine; Barton, Paul J; Greutmann, Matthias; Berger, Felix; Hubner, Norbert; Siebert, Reiner; Kramer, Hans-Heiner; Cook, Stuart A; MacRae, Calum A; Klaassen, Sabine

    2013-07-11

    Deletion 1p36 syndrome is recognized as the most common terminal deletion syndrome. Here, we describe the loss of a gene within the deletion that is responsible for the cardiomyopathy associated with monosomy 1p36, and we confirm its role in nonsyndromic left ventricular noncompaction cardiomyopathy (LVNC) and dilated cardiomyopathy (DCM). With our own data and publically available data from array comparative genomic hybridization (aCGH), we identified a minimal deletion for the cardiomyopathy associated with 1p36del syndrome that included only the terminal 14 exons of the transcription factor PRDM16 (PR domain containing 16), a gene that had previously been shown to direct brown fat determination and differentiation. Resequencing of PRDM16 in a cohort of 75 nonsyndromic individuals with LVNC detected three mutations, including one truncation mutant, one frameshift null mutation, and a single missense mutant. In addition, in a series of cardiac biopsies from 131 individuals with DCM, we found 5 individuals with 4 previously unreported nonsynonymous variants in the coding region of PRDM16. None of the PRDM16 mutations identified were observed in more than 6,400 controls. PRDM16 has not previously been associated with cardiac disease but is localized in the nuclei of cardiomyocytes throughout murine and human development and in the adult heart. Modeling of PRDM16 haploinsufficiency and a human truncation mutant in zebrafish resulted in both contractile dysfunction and partial uncoupling of cardiomyocytes and also revealed evidence of impaired cardiomyocyte proliferative capacity. In conclusion, mutation of PRDM16 causes the cardiomyopathy in 1p36 deletion syndrome as well as a proportion of nonsyndromic LVNC and DCM.

  16. Decreased DGCR8 Expression and miRNA Dysregulation in Individuals with 22q11.2 Deletion Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Sellier, Chantal; Hwang, Vicki J.; Dandekar, Ravi; Durbin-Johnson, Blythe; Charlet-Berguerand, Nicolas; Ander, Bradley P.; Sharp, Frank R.; Angkustsiri, Kathleen; Simon, Tony J.; Tassone, Flora

    2014-01-01

    Deletion of the 1.5–3 Mb region of chromosome 22 at locus 11.2 gives rise to the chromosome 22q11.2 deletion syndrome (22q11DS), also known as DiGeorge and Velocardiofacial Syndromes. It is the most common micro-deletion disorder in humans and one of the most common multiple malformation syndromes. The syndrome is characterized by a broad phenotype, whose characterization has expanded considerably within the last decade and includes many associated findings such as craniofacial anomalies (40%), conotruncal defects of the heart (CHD; 70–80%), hypocalcemia (20–60%), and a range of neurocognitive anomalies with high risk of schizophrenia, all with a broad phenotypic variability. These phenotypic features are believed to be the result of a change in the copy number or dosage of the genes located in the deleted region. Despite this relatively clear genetic etiology, very little is known about which genes modulate phenotypic variations in humans or if they are due to combinatorial effects of reduced dosage of multiple genes acting in concert. Here, we report on decreased expression levels of genes within the deletion region of chromosome 22, including DGCR8, in peripheral leukocytes derived from individuals with 22q11DS compared to healthy controls. Furthermore, we found dysregulated miRNA expression in individuals with 22q11DS, including miR-150, miR-194 and miR-185. We postulate this to be related to DGCR8 haploinsufficiency as DGCR8 regulates miRNA biogenesis. Importantly we demonstrate that the level of some miRNAs correlates with brain measures, CHD and thyroid abnormalities, suggesting that the dysregulated miRNAs may contribute to these phenotypes and/or represent relevant blood biomarkers of the disease in individuals with 22q11DS. PMID:25084529

  17. Refining the 22q11.2 deletion breakpoints in DiGeorge syndrome by aCGH.

    PubMed

    Bittel, D C; Yu, S; Newkirk, H; Kibiryeva, N; Holt, A; Butler, M G; Cooley, L D

    2009-01-01

    Hemizygous deletions of the chromosome 22q11.2 region result in the 22q11.2 deletion syndrome also referred to as DiGeorge, Velocardiofacial or Shprintzen syndromes. The phenotype is variable but commonly includes conotruncal cardiac defects, palatal abnormalities, learning and behavioral problems, immune deficiency, and facial anomalies. Four distinct highly homologous blocks of low copy number repeat sequences (LCRs) flank the deletion region. Mispairing of LCRs during meiosis with unequal meiotic exchange is assumed to cause the recurrent and consistent deletions. The proximal LCR is reportedly located at 22q11.2 from 17.037 to 17.083 Mb while the distal LCR is located from 19.835 to 19.880 Mb. Although the chromosome breakpoints are thought to localize to the LCRs, the positions of the breakpoints have been investigated in only a few individuals. Therefore, we used high resolution oligonucleotide-based 244K microarray comparative genomic hybridization (aCGH) to resolve the breakpoints in a cohort of 20 subjects with known 22q11.2 deletions. We also investigated copy number variation (CNV) in the rest of the genome. The 22q11.2 breaks occurred on either side of the LCR in our subjects, although more commonly on the distal side of the reported proximal LCR. The proximal breakpoints in our subjects spanned the region from 17.036 to 17.398 Mb. This region includes the genes DGCR6 (DiGeorge syndrome critical region protein 6) and PRODH (proline dehydrogenase 1), along with three open reading frames that may encode proteins of unknown function. The distal breakpoints spanned the region from 19.788 to 20.122 Mb. This region includes the genes GGT2 (gamma-glutamyltransferase-like protein 2), HIC2 (hypermethylated in cancer 2), and multiple transcripts of unknown function. The genes in these two breakpoint regions are variably hemizygous depending on the location of the breakpoints. Our 20 subjects had 254 CNVs throughout the genome, 94 duplications and 160 deletions

  18. Mitochondrial Citrate Transporter-dependent Metabolic Signature in the 22q11.2 Deletion Syndrome*

    PubMed Central

    Napoli, Eleonora; Tassone, Flora; Wong, Sarah; Angkustsiri, Kathleen; Simon, Tony J.; Song, Gyu; Giulivi, Cecilia

    2015-01-01

    The congenital disorder 22q11.2 deletion syndrome (22qDS), characterized by a hemizygous deletion of 1.5–3 Mb on chromosome 22 at locus 11.2, is the most common microdeletion disorder (estimated prevalence of 1 in 4000) and the second risk factor for schizophrenia. Nine of ∼30 genes involved in 22qDS have the potential of disrupting mitochondrial metabolism (COMT, UFD1L, DGCR8, MRPL40, PRODH, SLC25A1, TXNRD2, T10, and ZDHHC8). Deficits in bioenergetics during early postnatal brain development could set the basis for a disrupted neuronal metabolism or synaptic signaling, partly explaining the higher incidence in developmental and behavioral deficits in these individuals. Here, we investigated whether mitochondrial outcomes and metabolites from 22qDS children segregated with the altered dosage of one or several of these mitochondrial genes contributing to 22qDS etiology and/or morbidity. Plasma metabolomics, lymphocytic mitochondrial outcomes, and epigenetics (histone H3 Lys-4 trimethylation and 5-methylcytosine) were evaluated in samples from 11 22qDS children and 13 age- and sex-matched neurotypically developing controls. Metabolite differences between 22qDS children and controls reflected a shift from oxidative phosphorylation to glycolysis (higher lactate/pyruvate ratios) accompanied by an increase in reductive carboxylation of α-ketoglutarate (increased concentrations of 2-hydroxyglutaric acid, cholesterol, and fatty acids). Altered metabolism in 22qDS reflected a critical role for the haploinsufficiency of the mitochondrial citrate transporter SLC25A1, further enhanced by HIF-1α, MYC, and metabolite controls. This comprehensive profiling served to clarify the biochemistry of this disease underlying its broad, complex phenotype. PMID:26221035

  19. Speech and hearing in adults with 22q11.2 deletion syndrome.

    PubMed

    Persson, Christina; Friman, Vanda; Óskarsdóttir, Sólveig; Jönsson, Radi

    2012-12-01

    The purpose of the study was to investigate the prevalence of velopharyngeal impairment, compensatory articulation, reduced intelligibility, and to rate the general impression of speech in adults with 22q11.2 deletion syndrome. The second purpose was to study the prevalence and type of hearing impairment in these adults. A referred, consecutive series of 24 adults with confirmed 22q11.2 deletion, 16 female and 8 males, with a mean age of 25 years (19-38 years) was included in the study. A blind assessment of speech by three experienced speech-language pathologists was performed. Sixteen (66%) patients had a mild to severe velopharyngeal impairment. The most prevalent symptoms of velopharygeal impairment were hypernasality and audible nasal airflow. The mean nasalance score was 33% (6-66%). Only two patients had disordered articulation; one of these had glottal articulation. A mean of 96% (88-100%) of single words were rated to be intelligible. To achieve these results half of the patients previously had velopharyngeal flap surgery. Forty-one percent (9/22) had mild-moderate hearing impairment; three had sensorineural type, four conductive and two had a mixed type. In conclusion the majority of the patients had no articulation errors and good intelligibility; while one-third still had moderate to severe problems with velopharyngeal impairment. Around 40% still had some hearing impairment, in most cases with a mild to moderate conductive component. Thus, a high prevalence of speech and hearing problems seems to be a part of the phenotype in adults with 22q11.2DS. Copyright © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  20. Velo-Cardio-Facial syndrome and DiGeorge sequence with meningomyelocele and deletions of the 22q11 region

    SciTech Connect

    Nickel, R.E.; Pillers, D.M.; Merkens, M.; Magenis, R.E.; Zonana, J.; Driscoll, D.A.; Emanuel, B.S.

    1994-10-01

    Approximately 5% of children with neural tube defects (NTDs) have a congenital heart defect and/or cleft lip and palate. The cause of isolated meningomyelocele, congenital heart defects, or cleft lip and palate has been largely thought to be multifactorial. However, chromosomal, teratogenic, and single gene causes of combinations of NTDs with congenital heart defects and/or cleft lip and palate have been reported. We report on 3 patients with meningomyelocele, congenital heart defects, and 22q11 deletions. Two of the children had the clinical diagnosis of velo-cardio-facial syndrome (VCFS); both have bifid uvula. The third child had DiGeorge sequence (DGS). The association of NTDs with 22q11 deletion has not been reported previously. An accurate diagnosis of the 22q11 deletion is critical as this micro-deletion and its associated clinical problems is transmitted as an autosomal dominant trait due to the inheritance of the deletion-bearing chromosome. We recommend that all children with NTDs and congenital heart defects, with or without cleft palate, have cytogenetic and molecular studies performed to detect 22q11 deletions. 31 refs., 3 figs.

  1. Velo-cardio-facial syndrome and DiGeorge sequence with meningomyelocele and deletions of the 22q11 region.

    PubMed

    Nickel, R E; Pillers, D A; Merkens, M; Magenis, R E; Driscoll, D A; Emanuel, B S; Zonana, J

    1994-10-01

    Approximately 5% of children with neural tube defects (NTDs) have a congenital heart defect and/or cleft lip and palate. The cause of isolated meningomyelocele, congenital heart defects, or cleft lip and palate has been largely thought to be multifactorial. However, chromosomal, teratogenic, and single gene causes of combinations of NTDs with congenital heart defects and/or cleft lip and palate have been reported. We report on 3 patients with meningomyelocele, congenital heart defects, and 22q11 deletions. Two of the children had the clinical diagnosis of velo-cardio-facial syndrome (VCFS); both also have bifid uvula. The third child had DiGeorge sequence (DGS). The association of NTDs with 22q11 deletions has not been reported previously. An accurate diagnosis of the 22q11 deletion is critical as this micro-deletion and its associated clinical problems is transmitted as an autosomal dominant trait due to the inheritance of the deletion-bearing chromosome. We recommend that all children with NTDs and congenital heart defects, with or without cleft palate, have cytogenetic and molecular studies performed to detect 22q11 deletions.

  2. Patients carrying 9q31.1-q32 deletion share common features with Cornelia de Lange Syndrome.

    PubMed

    Cao, Ruixue; Pu, Tian; Fang, Shaohai; Long, Fei; Xie, Jing; Xu, Yuejuan; Chen, Sun; Sun, Kun; Xu, Rang

    2015-01-01

    Cornelia de Lange Syndrome (CdLS) is a rare but severe clinically heterogeneous developmental disorder characterized by facial dysmorphia, growth and cognitive retardation, and abnormalities of limb development. To determine the pathogenesis of a patient with CdLS. We studied a patient with CdLS by whole exome sequencing, karyotyping and Agilent CGH Array. The results were confirmed by quantitative real-time PCR analysis of the patient and her parents. Further comparison of our patient and cases with partially overlapping deletions retrieved from the literature and databases was undertaken. Whole exome sequencing had excluded the mutation of cohesion genes such as NIPBL,SMC1A and SMC3. The result of karyotyping showed a deletion of chromosome 9q31.1-q32 and the result of Agilent CGH Array further displayed a 12.01-Mb region of deletion at chromosome bands 9q31.1-q32. Reported cases with the deletion of 9q31.1-q32 share similar features with our CdLS patient. One of the genes in the deleted region, SMC2, belongs to the Structural Maintenance of Chromosomes (SMC) family and regulates gene expression and DNA repair. Patients carrying the deletion of 9q31.1-q32 showed similar phenotypes with CdLS. © 2015 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  3. Deletions of the elastin gene at 7q11.23 occur in {approximately}90% of patients with Williams syndrome

    SciTech Connect

    Nickerson, E.; Greenberg, F.; McCaskill, C.; Shaffer, L.G.; Keating, M.T.

    1995-05-01

    To investigate the frequency of deletions of the elastin gene in patients with Williams syndrome (WS), we screened 44 patients by both FISH and PCR amplification of a dinucleotide repeat polymorphism. FISH was performed using cosmids containing either the 5{prime} or the 3{prime} end of the elastin gene. PCR analysis was performed on the patients and their parents with a (CA){sub n} repeat polymorphism found in intron 17 of the elastin locus. Of the 44 patients screened, 91% were shown to be deleted by FISH. Using the DNA polymorphism, both maternally (39%) and paternally (61%) derived deletions were found. Four patients were not deleted for elastin but have clinical features of WS. Since deletions of elastin cannot account for several features found in WS, these patients will be valuable in further delineation of the critical region responsible for the WS phenotype. Although PCR can be useful for determining the parental origin of the deletion, our results demonstrate that FISH analysis of the elastin locus provides a more rapid and informative test to confirm a clinical diagnosis of WS. The presence of two copies of the elastin locus in a patient does not, however, rule out WS as a diagnosis. 25 refs., 3 figs., 1 tab.

  4. A 1.1Mb deletion in distal 13q deletion syndrome region with congenital heart defect and postaxial polydactyly: additional support for a CHD locus at distal 13q34 region.

    PubMed

    Yang, Yi-Feng; Ai, Qi; Huang, Can; Chen, Jin-Lan; Wang, Jian; Xie, Li; Zhang, Wei-Zhi; Yang, Jin-Fu; Tan, Zhi-Ping

    2013-10-01

    13q deletion syndrome is a rare genetic disorder, especially for group 3 deletion (13q33-q34 deletion). Previously we described a patient with congenital heart defect and mental retardation and proposed that a distal 6Mb region might contain the causative gene of congenital heart defect. Here we present a new patient with congenital heart defects (CHD), hand and foot anomalies and mild mental retardation. We identified a 1.1Mb deletion at chromosome 13q34 with high resolution SNP-array BeadChips (HumanOmni1-Quad, Illumina, USA). This chromosome region contains ten annotated genes, including GRK1, TFDP1, RASA3 and GAS6. To our knowledge, this represents the smallest 13q34 deletion identified to date. Our study provides additional support that distal 13q34 deletion region might contain key gene(s) responsible for cardiac development.

  5. Central precocious puberty in a boy with 22q13 deletion syndrome and NOTCH-1 gene duplication.

    PubMed

    Giannakopoulos, Aris; Fryssira, Helen; Tzetis, Maria; Xaidara, Athina; Kanaka-Gantenbein, Christina

    2016-11-01

    The 22q13 deletion syndrome or Phelan-McDermid syndrome is a neurodevelopmental disorder associated with developmental delay, hypotonia, delayed or absent speech, autistic-like behavior, normal to accelerated growth and dysmorphic faces. We report the occurrence of central precocious puberty in a boy diagnosed with Phelan-McDermid syndrome. At the age of 1 year, our patient presented with increased testicular volume for his age, bone age advancement and growth acceleration. Stimulated gonadotropin levels demonstrated a premature activation of the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal (HPG) axis. Central precocious puberty was treated with gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH) analog. Molecular diagnosis with array-comparative genomic hybridization (CGH) revealed a major deletion of 5.8 Mb at the 22q13 chromosomal region and a 25 kb duplication at the 9q34.3 region that included the NOTCH-1 gene. On the background of 22q13 deletion syndrome and data from animals on the effect of abnormal NOTCH-1 gene expression on kisspeptin neuron formation, we discuss the probable role of Notch signaling in the premature activation of the HPG axis.

  6. Intragenic deletions affecting two alternative transcripts of the IMMP2L gene in patients with Tourette syndrome.

    PubMed

    Bertelsen, Birgitte; Melchior, Linea; Jensen, Lars R; Groth, Camilla; Glenthøj, Birte; Rizzo, Renata; Debes, Nanette Mol; Skov, Liselotte; Brøndum-Nielsen, Karen; Paschou, Peristera; Silahtaroglu, Asli; Tümer, Zeynep

    2014-11-01

    Tourette syndrome is a neurodevelopmental disorder characterized by multiple motor and vocal tics, and the disorder is often accompanied by comorbidities such as attention-deficit hyperactivity-disorder and obsessive compulsive disorder. Tourette syndrome has a complex etiology, but the underlying environmental and genetic factors are largely unknown. IMMP2L (inner mitochondrial membrane peptidase, subunit 2) located on chromosome 7q31 is one of the genes suggested as a susceptibility factor in disease pathogenesis. Through screening of a Danish cohort comprising 188 unrelated Tourette syndrome patients for copy number variations, we identified seven patients with intragenic IMMP2L deletions (3.7%), and this frequency was significantly higher (P=0.0447) compared with a Danish control cohort (0.9%). Four of the seven deletions identified did not include any known exons of IMMP2L, but were within intron 3. These deletions were found to affect a shorter IMMP2L mRNA species with two alternative 5'-exons (one including the ATG start codon). We showed that both transcripts (long and short) were expressed in several brain regions, with a particularly high expression in cerebellum and hippocampus. The current findings give further evidence for the role of IMMP2L as a susceptibility factor in Tourette syndrome and suggest that intronic changes in disease susceptibility genes should be investigated further for presence of alternatively spliced exons.

  7. Intragenic deletions affecting two alternative transcripts of the IMMP2L gene in patients with Tourette syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Bertelsen, Birgitte; Melchior, Linea; Jensen, Lars R; Groth, Camilla; Glenthøj, Birte; Rizzo, Renata; Debes, Nanette Mol; Skov, Liselotte; Brøndum-Nielsen, Karen; Paschou, Peristera; Silahtaroglu, Asli; Tümer, Zeynep

    2014-01-01

    Tourette syndrome is a neurodevelopmental disorder characterized by multiple motor and vocal tics, and the disorder is often accompanied by comorbidities such as attention-deficit hyperactivity-disorder and obsessive compulsive disorder. Tourette syndrome has a complex etiology, but the underlying environmental and genetic factors are largely unknown. IMMP2L (inner mitochondrial membrane peptidase, subunit 2) located on chromosome 7q31 is one of the genes suggested as a susceptibility factor in disease pathogenesis. Through screening of a Danish cohort comprising 188 unrelated Tourette syndrome patients for copy number variations, we identified seven patients with intragenic IMMP2L deletions (3.7%), and this frequency was significantly higher (P=0.0447) compared with a Danish control cohort (0.9%). Four of the seven deletions identified did not include any known exons of IMMP2L, but were within intron 3. These deletions were found to affect a shorter IMMP2L mRNA species with two alternative 5′-exons (one including the ATG start codon). We showed that both transcripts (long and short) were expressed in several brain regions, with a particularly high expression in cerebellum and hippocampus. The current findings give further evidence for the role of IMMP2L as a susceptibility factor in Tourette syndrome and suggest that intronic changes in disease susceptibility genes should be investigated further for presence of alternatively spliced exons. PMID:24549057

  8. Clinical and molecular findings in 39 patients with KBG syndrome caused by deletion or mutation of ANKRD11.

    PubMed

    Goldenberg, Alice; Riccardi, Florence; Tessier, Aude; Pfundt, Rolph; Busa, Tiffany; Cacciagli, Pierre; Capri, Yline; Coutton, Charles; Delahaye-Duriez, Andree; Frebourg, Thierry; Gatinois, Vincent; Guerrot, Anne-Marie; Genevieve, David; Lecoquierre, Francois; Jacquette, Aurélia; Khau Van Kien, Philippe; Leheup, Bruno; Marlin, Sandrine; Verloes, Alain; Michaud, Vincent; Nadeau, Gwenael; Mignot, Cyril; Parent, Philippe; Rossi, Massimiliano; Toutain, Annick; Schaefer, Elise; Thauvin-Robinet, Christel; Van Maldergem, Lionel; Thevenon, Julien; Satre, Véronique; Perrin, Laurence; Vincent-Delorme, Catherine; Sorlin, Arthur; Missirian, Chantal; Villard, Laurent; Mancini, Julien; Saugier-Veber, Pascale; Philip, Nicole

    2016-11-01

    KBG syndrome, due to ANKRD11 alteration is characterized by developmental delay, short stature, dysmorphic facial features, and skeletal anomalies. We report a clinical and molecular study of 39 patients affected by KBG syndrome. Among them, 19 were diagnosed after the detection of a 16q24.3 deletion encompassing the ANKRD11 gene by array CGH. In the 20 remaining patients, the clinical suspicion was confirmed by the identification of an ANKRD11 mutation by direct sequencing. We present arguments to modulate the previously reported diagnostic criteria. Macrodontia should no longer be considered a mandatory feature. KBG syndrome is compatible with autonomous life in adulthood. Autism is less frequent than previously reported. We also describe new clinical findings with a potential impact on the follow-up of patients, such as precocious puberty and a case of malignancy. Most deletions remove the 5'end or the entire coding region but never extend toward 16q telomere suggesting that distal 16q deletion could be lethal. Although ANKRD11 appears to be a major gene associated with intellectual disability, KBG syndrome remains under-diagnosed. NGS-based approaches for sequencing will improve the detection of point mutations in this gene. Broad knowledge of the clinical phenotype is essential for a correct interpretation of the molecular results. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  9. Microarray based comparative genomic hybridization testing in deletion bearing patients with Angelman syndrome: genotype-phenotype correlations.

    PubMed

    Sahoo, T; Peters, S U; Madduri, N S; Glaze, D G; German, J R; Bird, L M; Barbieri-Welge, R; Bichell, T J; Beaudet, A L; Bacino, C A

    2006-06-01

    Angelman syndrome (AS) is a neurodevelopmental disorder characterised by severe mental retardation, dysmorphic features, ataxia, seizures, and typical behavioural characteristics, including a happy sociable disposition. AS is caused by maternal deficiency of UBE3A (E6 associated protein ubiquitin protein ligase 3A gene), located in an imprinted region on chromosome 15q11-q13. Although there are four different molecular types of AS, deletions of the 15q11-q13 region account for approximately 70% of the AS patients. These deletions are usually detected by fluorescence in situ hybridisation studies. The deletions can also be subclassified based on their size into class I and class II, with the former being larger and encompassing the latter. We studied 22 patients with AS due to microdeletions using a microarray based comparative genomic hybridisation (array CGH) assay to define the deletions and analysed their phenotypic severity, especially expression of the autism phenotype, in order to establish clinical correlations. Overall, children with larger, class I deletions were significantly more likely to meet criteria for autism, had lower cognitive scores, and lower expressive language scores compared with children with smaller, class II deletions. Children with class I deletions also required more medications to control their seizures than did those in the class II group. There are four known genes (NIPA1, NIPA2, CYFIP1, & GCP5) that are affected by class I but not class II deletions, thus raising the possibility of a role for these genes in autism as well as the development of expressive language skills.

  10. Overlap of Juvenile Polyposis Syndrome and Cowden Syndrome Due to De Novo Chromosome 10 Deletion Involving BMPR1A and PTEN: Implications for Treatment and Surveillance

    PubMed Central

    Alimi, Adebisi; Weeth-Feinstein, Lauren A.; Stettner, Amy; Caldera, Freddy; Weiss, Jennifer M.

    2014-01-01

    We describe a patient with a severe juvenile polyposis phenotype, due to a de novo deletion of chromosome 10q22.3-q24.1. He was initially diagnosed with Juvenile polyposis syndrome (JPS) at age 4 after presenting with hematochezia due to multiple colonic juvenile polyps. He then represented at 23 years with recurrent hematochezia from juvenile polyps in his ileoanal pouch. He is one of the earliest reported cases of JPS associated with a large deletion of chromosome 10. Since his initial diagnosis of JPS further studies have confirmed an association between JPS and mutations in BMPR1A in chromosome band 10q23.2, which is in close proximity to PTEN. Mutations in PTEN cause Cowden syndrome (CS) and other PTEN hamartoma tumor syndromes. Due to the chromosome 10 deletion involving contiguous portions of BMPR1A and PTEN in our patient, he may be at risk for CS associated cancers and features, in addition to the polyps associated with JPS. This case presents new challenges in developing appropriate surveillance algorithms to account for the risks associated with each syndrome and highlights the importance of longitudinal follow-up and transitional care between pediatric and adult gastroenterology for patients with hereditary polyposis syndromes. PMID:25846706

  11. Overlap of Juvenile polyposis syndrome and Cowden syndrome due to de novo chromosome 10 deletion involving BMPR1A and PTEN: implications for treatment and surveillance.

    PubMed

    Alimi, Adebisi; Weeth-Feinstein, Lauren A; Stettner, Amy; Caldera, Freddy; Weiss, Jennifer M

    2015-06-01

    We describe a patient with a severe juvenile polyposis phenotype, due to a de novo deletion of chromosome 10q22.3-q24.1. He was initially diagnosed with Juvenile polyposis syndrome (JPS) at age four after presenting with hematochezia due to multiple colonic juvenile polyps. He then re-presented at 23 years with recurrent hematochezia from juvenile polyps in his ileoanal pouch. He is one of the earliest reported cases of JPS associated with a large deletion of chromosome 10. Since his initial diagnosis of JPS further studies have confirmed an association between JPS and mutations in BMPR1A in chromosome band 10q23.2, which is in close proximity to PTEN. Mutations in PTEN cause Cowden syndrome (CS) and other PTEN hamartoma tumor syndromes. Due to the chromosome 10 deletion involving contiguous portions of BMPR1A and PTEN in our patient, he may be at risk for CS associated cancers and features, in addition to the polyps associated with JPS. This case presents new challenges in developing appropriate surveillance algorithms to account for the risks associated with each syndrome and highlights the importance of longitudinal follow-up and transitional care between pediatric and adult gastroenterology for patients with hereditary polyposis syndromes. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  12. Ultra high risk status and transition to psychosis in 22q11.2 deletion syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Schneider, Maude; Armando, Marco; Pontillo, Maria; Vicari, Stefano; Debbané, Martin; Schultze‐Lutter, Frauke; Eliez, Stephan

    2016-01-01

    The 22q11.2 deletion syndrome (22q11DS) is characterized by high rates of psychotic symptoms and schizophrenia, making this condition a promising human model for studying risk factors for psychosis. We explored the predictive value of ultra high risk (UHR) criteria in a sample of patients with 22q11DS. We also examined the additional contribution of socio‐demographic, clinical and cognitive variables to predict transition to psychosis within a mean interval of 32.5 ± 17.6 months after initial assessment. Eighty‐nine participants with 22q11DS (age range: 8‐30 years; mean 16.1 ± 4.7) were assessed using the Structured Interview for Psychosis‐Risk Syndromes. Information on Axis I diagnoses, internalizing and externalizing symptoms, level of functioning and IQ was also collected. At baseline, 22 (24.7%) participants met UHR criteria. Compared to those without a UHR condition, they had a significantly lower functioning, more frequent anxiety disorders, and more severe psychopathology. Transition rate to psychosis was 27.3% in UHR and 4.5% in non‐UHR participants. Cox regression analyses revealed that UHR status significantly predicted conversion to psychosis. Baseline level of functioning was the only other additional predictor. This is the first study investigating the predictive value of UHR criteria in 22q11DS. It indicates that the clinical path leading to psychosis is broadly comparable to that observed in other clinical high‐risk samples. Nevertheless, the relatively high transition rate in non‐UHR individuals suggests that other risk markers should be explored in this population. The role of low functioning as a predictor of transition to psychosis should also be investigated more in depth. PMID:27717277

  13. Generalized Epilepsy and Myoclonic Seizures in 22q11.2 Deletion Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Strehlow, Vincent; Swinkels, Marielle E.M.; Thomas, Rhys H.; Rapps, Nora; Syrbe, Steffen; Dorn, Thomas; Lemke, Johannes R.

    2016-01-01

    Prompted by the observations of juvenile myoclonic epilepsy (JME) in 22q11.2 deletion syndrome (22q11DS) and recurrent copy number variants in genetic generalized epilepsy (GGE), we searched for further evidence supporting a possible correlation of 22q11DS with GGE and with myoclonic seizures. Through routine diagnostics, we identified 3 novel individuals with the seemingly uncommon combination of 22q11DS and JME. We subsequently screened the literature for reports focussing on the epilepsy phenotype in 22q11DS. We additionally screened a database of 173 22q11DS patients and identified a fourth individual with JME as well as 2 additional cases with GGE. We describe 6 novel and 22 published cases with co-occurrence of 22q11DS and GGE. In many patients, GGE was associated with myoclonic seizures allowing for a diagnosis of JME in at least 6 individuals. Seventeen of the 173 22q11DS cases (10%) had a diagnosis of either focal or generalized epilepsy. In these cases, focal epilepsy could often be attributed to syndrome-associated hypocalcaemia, cerebral bleeds, or structural brain anomalies. However, the cause of GGE remained unclear. In this study, we describe and review 28 individuals with 22q11DS and GGE (especially JME), showing that both disorders frequently co-occur. Compared to the reported prevalence of 15-21%, in our case series only 10% of 22q11DS individuals were found to have epilepsy, often GGE. Since 22q11.2 does not contain convincing GGE candidate genes, we discuss the possibility of an aetiological correlation through a possibly disturbed interaction with the GABAB receptor. PMID:27781034

  14. Two cases of deletion 5p syndrome: one with paternal involvement and another with atypical presentation.

    PubMed

    Azman, B Z; Akhir, S M; Zilfalil, B A; Ankathil, R

    2008-04-01

    We report two cases of deletion 5p or cri du chat syndrome (CdCS) with different presentations and risks of transmission: one case with paternal chromosome 5 involvement and another, a de novo case with atypical clinical presentation. Cytogenetic analysis was performed on the two cases and their parents. GTG-banded karyotype analysis of Cases 1 and 2 revealed abnormal 46,XY,del(5)(p13-15) male karyotypes. For Case 1, the mother showed normal female karyotype while the father showed an abnormal karyotype involving a balanced translocation 46,XY,t(5;10)(p13;p15). For Case 2, however, both parents showed a normal karyotype pattern. In Case 1, the clinical features, particularly the distinct facial phenotype in combination with a characteristic cat-like cry and hypotonia, aided in the diagnosis at birth and the karyotype analysis was resolutive. The boy in Case 2 presented with atypical clinical features. Even though this patient had multiple syndromic features, the typical high pitched cat-like cry was not prominent. Instead, the patient manifested persistent stridor (from day three of life), which might have prevented the clinician from suspecting CdCS at birth. However, when this patient was presented at seven months of age for cytogenetic analysis, a confirmatory diagnosis of CdCS was established. For children with congenital abnormalities, an early clinical diagnosis confirmed through cytogenetic and molecular investigations, is important for providing personalised diagnostic and prognostic evaluation, and also for genetic counselling on the reproductive risk, particularly for patients with parental chromosome translocation involvement.

  15. Hearing Loss in a Mouse Model of 22q11.2 Deletion Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Fuchs, Jennifer C.; Zinnamon, Fhatarah A.; Taylor, Ruth R.; Ivins, Sarah; Scambler, Peter J.; Forge, Andrew; Tucker, Abigail S.; Linden, Jennifer F.

    2013-01-01

    22q11.2 Deletion Syndrome (22q11DS) arises from an interstitial chromosomal microdeletion encompassing at least 30 genes. This disorder is one of the most significant known cytogenetic risk factors for schizophrenia, and can also cause heart abnormalities, cognitive deficits, hearing difficulties, and a variety of other medical problems. The Df1/+ hemizygous knockout mouse, a model for human 22q11DS, recapitulates many of the deficits observed in the human syndrome including heart defects, impaired memory, and abnormal auditory sensorimotor gating. Here we show that Df1/+ mice, like human 22q11DS patients, have substantial rates of hearing loss arising from chronic middle ear infection. Auditory brainstem response (ABR) measurements revealed significant elevation of click-response thresholds in 48% of Df1/+ mice, often in only one ear. Anatomical and histological analysis of the middle ear demonstrated no gross structural abnormalities, but frequent signs of otitis media (OM, chronic inflammation of the middle ear), including excessive effusion and thickened mucosa. In mice for which both in vivo ABR thresholds and post mortem middle-ear histology were obtained, the severity of signs of OM correlated directly with the level of hearing impairment. These results suggest that abnormal auditory sensorimotor gating previously reported in mouse models of 22q11DS could arise from abnormalities in auditory processing. Furthermore, the findings indicate that Df1/+ mice are an excellent model for increased risk of OM in human 22q11DS patients. Given the frequently monaural nature of OM in Df1/+ mice, these animals could also be a powerful tool for investigating the interplay between genetic and environmental causes of OM. PMID:24244619

  16. Hearing loss in a mouse model of 22q11.2 Deletion Syndrome.

    PubMed

    Fuchs, Jennifer C; Zinnamon, Fhatarah A; Taylor, Ruth R; Ivins, Sarah; Scambler, Peter J; Forge, Andrew; Tucker, Abigail S; Linden, Jennifer F

    2013-01-01

    22q11.2 Deletion Syndrome (22q11DS) arises from an interstitial chromosomal microdeletion encompassing at least 30 genes. This disorder is one of the most significant known cytogenetic risk factors for schizophrenia, and can also cause heart abnormalities, cognitive deficits, hearing difficulties, and a variety of other medical problems. The Df1/+ hemizygous knockout mouse, a model for human 22q11DS, recapitulates many of the deficits observed in the human syndrome including heart defects, impaired memory, and abnormal auditory sensorimotor gating. Here we show that Df1/+ mice, like human 22q11DS patients, have substantial rates of hearing loss arising from chronic middle ear infection. Auditory brainstem response (ABR) measurements revealed significant elevation of click-response thresholds in 48% of Df1/+ mice, often in only one ear. Anatomical and histological analysis of the middle ear demonstrated no gross structural abnormalities, but frequent signs of otitis media (OM, chronic inflammation of the middle ear), including excessive effusion and thickened mucosa. In mice for which both in vivo ABR thresholds and post mortem middle-ear histology were obtained, the severity of signs of OM correlated directly with the level of hearing impairment. These results suggest that abnormal auditory sensorimotor gating previously reported in mouse models of 22q11DS could arise from abnormalities in auditory processing. Furthermore, the findings indicate that Df1/+ mice are an excellent model for increased risk of OM in human 22q11DS patients. Given the frequently monaural nature of OM in Df1/+ mice, these animals could also be a powerful tool for investigating the interplay between genetic and environmental causes of OM.

  17. Analysis of 22q11.2 deletions by FISH in a series of velocardiofacial syndrome patients

    SciTech Connect

    Ravnan, J.B.; Golabi, M.; Lebo, R.V.

    1994-09-01

    Deletions in chromosome 22 band q11.2 have been associated with velocardiofacial (VCF or Shprintzen) syndrome and the DiGeorge anomaly. A study of VCF patients evaluated at the UCSF Medical Center was undertaken to correlate disease phenotype with presence or absence of a deletion. Patients referred for this study had at least two of the following: dysmorphic facial features, frequent ear infections or hearing loss, palate abnormalities, thymic hypoplasia, hypocalcemia, congenital heart defect, hypotonia, and growth or language delay. Fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) using the DiGeorge critical region probe N25 was used to classify patients according to the presence or absence of a deletion in 22q11.2, and the results were compared to clinical characteristics. We have completed studies on 58 patients with features of VCF. Twenty-one patients (36%) were found to have a deletion in 22q11.2 by FISH. A retrospective study of archived slides from 14 patients originally studied only by prometaphase GTG banding found six patients had a deletion detected by FISH; of these, only two had a microscopically visible chromosome deletion. Our study of 11 sets of parents of children with the deletion found two clinically affected mothers with the deletion, including one with three of three children clinically affected. A few patients who did not fit the classical VCF description had a 22q11.2 deletion detected by FISH. These included one patient with both cleft lip and palate, and another with developmental delay and typical facial features but no cardiac or palate abnormalities. Both patients with the DiGeorge anomaly as part of VCF had the deletion. On the other hand, a number of patients diagnosed clinically with classical VCF did not have a detectable deletion. This raises the question whether they represent a subset of patients with a defect of 22q11.2 not detected by the N25 probe, or whether they represent a phenocopy of VCF.

  18. Expanding the ocular phenotype of 14q terminal deletions: A novel presentation of microphthalmia and coloboma in ring 14 syndrome with associated 14q32.31 deletion and review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Salter, Claire G; Baralle, Diana; Collinson, Morag N; Self, James E

    2016-04-01

    A variety of ocular anomalies have been described in the rare ring 14 and 14q terminal deletion syndromes, yet the character, prevalence, and extent of these anomalies are not well defined. Identification of these ocular anomalies can be central to providing diagnoses and facilitating optimal individual patient management. We report a child with a 14q32.31 terminal deletion and ring chromosome formation, presenting with severe visual impairment secondary to significant bilateral coloboma and microphthalmia. This patient is compared to previously reported patients with similar ocular findings and deletion sizes to further refine a locus for coloboma in the 14q terminal region. Those with ring formation and linear deletions are compared and the possibility of ring formation affecting the proximal 14q region is discussed. This report highlights the severity of ocular anomalies that can be associated with ring 14 and 14q terminal deletion syndromes and reveals the limited documentation of ocular examination in these two related syndromes. This suggests that many children with these genetic changes do not undergo an ophthalmology examination as part of their clinical assessment, yet it is only when this evaluation becomes routine that the true prevalence and extent of ocular involvement can be defined. This report therefore advocates for a thorough ophthalmological exam in children with ring 14 or 14q terminal deletion syndrome.

  19. Deficits in Mental State Attributions in Individuals with 22q11.2 Deletion Syndrome (Velo-Cardio-Facial Syndrome)

    PubMed Central

    Ho, Jennifer S.; Radoeva, Petya D.; Jalbrzikowski, Maria; Chow, Carolyn; Hopkins, Jessica; Tran, Wen-Ching; Mehta, Ami; Enrique, Nicole; Gilbert, Chelsea; Antshel, Kevin M.; Fremont, Wanda; Kates, Wendy R.; Bearden, Carrie E.

    2012-01-01

    Velo-cardio-facial syndrome (VCFS; 22q11.2 deletion syndrome) results from a genetic mutation that increases risk for Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD). We compared Theory of Mind (ToM) skills in 63 individuals with VCFS (25% with an ASD diagnosis) and 43 typically-developing controls, and investigated the relationship of ToM to reciprocal social behavior. We administered a video-based task to assess mentalizing at two sites (UCLA and SUNY Upstate Medical University). The videos depicted interactions representing complex mental states (ToM condition), or simple movements (Random condition). Verbal descriptions of the videos were rated for Intentionality (i.e., mentalizing) and Appropriateness. Using Repeated Measures ANOVA, we assessed the effects of VCFS and ASD on Intentionality and Appropriateness, and the relationship of mentalizing to Social Responsiveness Scale (SRS) scores. Results indicated that individuals with VCFS overall had lower Intentionality and Appropriateness scores than controls for ToM, but not for Random scenes. In the SUNY sample, individuals with VCFS, both with and without ASD, performed more poorly than controls on the ToM condition; however, in the UCLA sample, only individuals with VCFS without ASD performed significantly worse than controls on the ToM condition. Controlling for site and age, performance on the ToM condition was significantly correlated with SRS scores. Individuals with VCFS, regardless of an ASD diagnosis, showed impairments in the spontaneous attribution of mental states to abstract visual stimuli, which may underlie real-life problems with social interactions. A better understanding of the social deficits in VCFS is essential for the development of targeted behavioral interventions. PMID:22962003

  20. A patient with partial trisomy 21 and 7q deletion expresses mild Down syndrome phenotype.

    PubMed

    Papoulidis, I; Papageorgiou, E; Siomou, E; Oikonomidou, E; Thomaidis, L; Vetro, A; Zuffardi, O; Liehr, T; Manolakos, E; Vassilis, Papadopoulos

    2014-02-25

    Down syndrome (DS) is the most common aneuploidy in live-born individuals and it is well recognized with various phenotypic expressions. Although an extra chromosome 21 is the genetic cause for DS, specific phenotypic features may result from the duplication of smaller regions of the chromosome and more studies need to define genotypic and phenotypic correlations. We report on a 26 year old male with partial trisomy 21 presenting mild clinical symptoms relative to DS including borderline intellectual disability. In particular, the face and the presence of hypotonia and keratoconus were suggestive for the DS although the condition remained unnoticed until his adult age array comparative genomic hybridization (aCGH) revealed a 10.1 Mb duplication in 21q22.13q22.3 and a small deletion of 2.2 Mb on chromosomal band 7q36 arising from a paternal translocation t(7;21). The 21q duplication encompasses the gene DYRK1. Our data support the evidence of specific regions on distal 21q whose duplication results in phenotypes recalling the typical DS face. Although the duplication region contains DYRK1, which has previously been implicated in the causation of DS, our patient has a borderline IQ confirming that their duplication is not sufficient to cause the full DS phenotype. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. The BCL7 gene family: deletion of BCL7B in Williams syndrome.

    PubMed

    Jadayel, D M; Osborne, L R; Coignet, L J; Zani, V J; Tsui, L C; Scherer, S W; Dyer, M J

    1998-12-11

    The BCL7A gene, which maps to human chromosome 12q24.13, was cloned through its direct involvement with MYC and IGH in a three-way translocation in a Burkitt lymphoma cell line. Here, we describe the identification of two related human genes, BCL7B and BCL7C, which share 90% identity to the amino-terminal 51 amino acids of human BCL7A, as well as 41% identity in the same region to Drosophila melanogaster, Caenorhabditis elegans, and Brugia malayi EST sequences. This degree of relatedness in the amino-terminal domain suggests we have defined a new gene family of unknown function. There was little sequence conservation between the family members outside this conserved domain and no identified protein motifs could be deduced. Human BCL7B and BCL7C mapped to chromosome 7q11.23, and 16p11, respectively. No chromosomal rearrangements affecting BCL7B or BCL7C were detected in lymphoid malignancies. BCL7B did, however, map within the region of 7q11.23 which is commonly deleted in the congenital disorder, Williams syndrome.

  2. Prodromal and autistic symptoms in schizotypal personality disorder and 22q11.2 deletion syndrome.

    PubMed

    Esterberg, Michelle L; Ousley, Opal Y; Cubells, Joseph F; Walker, Elaine F

    2013-02-01

    Despite clear diagnostic distinctions, schizophrenia and autism share symptoms on several dimensions. Recent research has suggested the two disorders overlap in etiology, particularly with respect to inherited and noninherited genetic factors. Studying the relationship between psychotic-like and autistic-like symptoms in risk groups such as 22q11 deletion syndrome (22q11DS) and schizotypal personality disorder (SPD) has the potential to shed light on such etiologic factors; thus, the current study examined prodromal symptoms and autistic features in samples of 22q11DS and SPD subjects using standardized diagnostic measures, including the Structured Interview for Prodromal Symptoms (SIPS) and the Autism Diagnostic Inventory-Revised (ADI-R). Results showed that SPD subjects manifested significantly more severe childhood and current social as well as stereotypic autistic features, as well as more severe positive prodromal symptoms. The two groups did not differ on negative, disorganized, or general prodromal symptoms, but were distinguishable based on correlations between prodromal and autistic features; the relationships between childhood autistic features and current prodromal symptoms were stronger for the SPD group. The results suggest that childhood autistic features are less continuous with subsequent prodromal signs in 22q11DS patients relative to those with SPD, and the findings highlight the importance of studying the overlap in diagnostic phenomenology in groups at risk for developing psychosis and/or autism.

  3. Psychiatric manifestations of 22q11.2 deletion syndrome: a literature review.

    PubMed

    Bertrán, M; Tagle, F P; Irarrázaval, M

    2015-09-22

    The 22q11.2 deletion syndrome is a genetic disorder with variable clinical manifestations. It affects one out of 5950 neonates and has an autosomal dominant inheritance pattern. The aim of this article is to review its psychiatric manifestations and any underlying genetic alterations. We reviewed the scientific literature available as of October 2014 in the LILACS and Medline databases. Sixty per cent of these patients fulfilled diagnostic criteria for a mental disorder at some point in their lives, referring to psychotic disorders, attention deficit hyperactivity disorder, mood disorders, anxiety disorders, and autism spectrum disorders. Specific genes, such as COMT and PRODH, have been linked to these psychiatric manifestations. It is necessary to raise awareness among all health care professionals so that they understand the relevance of these manifestations, are able to anticipate them, and can provide appropriate information to patients and family members. Copyright © 2015 Sociedad Española de Neurología. Published by Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  4. Deletion 1q43-44 in a patient with clinical diagnosis of Warburg-Micro syndrome.

    PubMed

    Arroyo-Carrera, Ignacio; de Zaldívar Tristancho, María Solo; Bermejo-Sánchez, Eva; Martínez-Fernández, María Luisa; López-Lafuente, Amparo; MacDonald, Alexandra; Zúñiga, Ángel; Luis Gómez-Skarmeta, José; Luisa Martínez-Frías, María

    2015-06-01

    Warburg-Micro syndrome (WARBM) is an autosomal recessive syndrome characterized by microcephaly, microphthalmia, microcornea, congenital cataracts, optic atrophy and central nervous system malformations. This syndrome is caused by mutations in the RAB3GAP1/2 and RAB18 genes, part of the Rab family, and in the TBC1D20 gene, which contributes to lipid droplet formation/metabolism. Here we present a patient with clinical diagnosis of WARBM syndrome, who did not have mutations in either the RAB3GAP1/2 genes, in the main exons of RAB18, nor in the TBC1D20 gene. However, the analysis with CGH-array detected a 9.6 Mb deletion at 1q43-qter. We performed a genotype-phenotype correlation using 20 previously published patients in whom the coordinates of the deleted regions were defined. The comparative analysis revealed that the current patient and three of the other 20 patients share the loss of six genes, four of which are related with the family of G proteins, and are strongly expressed in the brain, retina, heart and kidney. Consequently, their haploinsufficiency may result in different combinations of clinical alterations, including some of those of WARBM syndrome. In addition, the haploinsufficiency of other genes may contribute to other defects and clinical variability. Additionally, for the genotype-phenotype correlation, one must also consider molecular pathways that can result in the observed alterations. To early confirm a genetic diagnosis is essential for the patient and family. The current patient was considered as having a recessive syndrome, but since he had a "de novo" deletion, there was not an increased recurrence risk. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  5. Biased T-cell receptor repertoires in patients with chromosome 22q11.2 deletion syndrome (DiGeorge syndrome/velocardiofacial syndrome).

    PubMed

    Pierdominici, M; Mazzetta, F; Caprini, E; Marziali, M; Digilio, M C; Marino, B; Aiuti, A; Amati, F; Russo, G; Novelli, G; Pandolfi, F; Luzi, G; Giovannetti, A

    2003-05-01

    Chromosome 22q11.2 deletion (del22q11.2) syndrome (DiGeorge syndrome/velocardiofacial syndrome) is a common syndrome typically consisting of congenital heart disease, hypoparathyroidism, developmental delay and immunodeficiency. Although a broad range of immunologic defects have been described in these patients, limited information is currently available on the diversity of the T-cell receptor (TCR) variable beta (BV) chain repertoire. The TCRBV repertoires of nine patients with del22q11.2 syndrome were determined by flow cytometry, fragment size analysis of the third complementarity determining region (CDR3 spectratyping) and sequencing of V(D)J regions. The rate of thymic output and the phenotype and function of peripheral T cells were also studied. Expanded TCRBV families were detected by flow cytometry in both CD4+ and CD8+ T cells. A decreased diversity of TCR repertoires was also demonstrated by CDR3 spectratyping, showing altered CDR3 profiles in the majority of TCRBV families investigated. The oligoclonal nature of abnormal peaks detected by CDR3 spectratyping was confirmed by the sequence analysis of the V(D)J regions. Thymic output, evaluated by measuring TCR rearrangement excision circles (TRECs), was significantly decreased in comparison with age-matched controls. Finally, a significant up-regulation in the percentage, but not in the absolute count, of activated CD4+ T cells (CD95+, CCR5+, HLA-DR+), IFN-gamma - and IL-2-expressing T cells was detected. These findings suggest that the diversity of CD4 and CD8 TCRBV repertoires is decreased in patients with del22q11.2 syndrome, possibly as a result of either impaired thymic function and/or increased T-cell activation.

  6. Intelligence and Visual Motor Integration in 5-Year-Old Children with 22q11-Deletion Syndrome

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Duijff, Sasja; Klaassen, Petra; Beemer, Frits; Swanenburg de Veye, Henriette; Vorstman, Jacob; Sinnema, Gerben

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to explore the relationship between intelligence and visual motor integration skills in 5-year-old children with 22q11-deletion syndrome (22q11DS) (N = 65, 43 females, 22 males; mean age 5.6 years (SD 0.2), range 5.23-5.99 years). Sufficient VMI skills seem a prerequisite for IQ testing. Since problems related to…

  7. Intelligence and Visual Motor Integration in 5-Year-Old Children with 22q11-Deletion Syndrome

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Duijff, Sasja; Klaassen, Petra; Beemer, Frits; Swanenburg de Veye, Henriette; Vorstman, Jacob; Sinnema, Gerben

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to explore the relationship between intelligence and visual motor integration skills in 5-year-old children with 22q11-deletion syndrome (22q11DS) (N = 65, 43 females, 22 males; mean age 5.6 years (SD 0.2), range 5.23-5.99 years). Sufficient VMI skills seem a prerequisite for IQ testing. Since problems related to…

  8. Terminal deletion of chromosome 5p in a patient with phenotypical features of Lujan-Fryns syndrome.

    PubMed

    Stathopulu, E; Ogilvie, C Mackie; Flinter, F A

    2003-06-15

    We report a young man with phenotypical features suggestive of Lujan-Fryns syndrome and behaviour of an autistic spectrum disorder, who has a subtle terminal deletion of the short arm of chromosome 5. Individuals reported previously with a similar chromosomal abnormality have had developmental delay and a 'breathy, raspy' voice. It may be appropriate to consider screening patients with a phenotype suggestive of Lujan-Fryns syndrome by fluorescence in situ hybridisation (FISH) using a probe for the subtelomeric region of the short arm of chromosome 5.

  9. A single amino acid deletion in the matrix protein of porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus confers resistance to a polyclonal swine antibody with broadly neutralizing activity.

    PubMed

    Trible, Benjamin R; Popescu, Luca N; Monday, Nicholas; Calvert, Jay G; Rowland, Raymond R R

    2015-06-01

    Assessment of virus neutralization (VN) activity in 176 pigs infected with porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus (PRRSV) identified one pig with broadly neutralizing activity. A Tyr-10 deletion in the matrix protein provided escape from broad neutralization without affecting homologous neutralizing activity. The role of the Tyr-10 deletion was confirmed through an infectious clone with a Tyr-10 deletion. The results demonstrate differences in the properties and specificities of VN responses elicited during PRRSV infection.

  10. Prader-Willi syndrome and atypical submicroscopic 15q11-q13 deletions with or without imprinting defects.

    PubMed

    Hassan, Maaz; Butler, Merlin G

    2016-11-01

    We report a 20 year follow up on a Caucasian female, now 26 years of age, with Prader-Willi syndrome (PWS) harboring an atypical 15q11-q13 submicroscopic deletion of 100-200 kb in size first detected in 1996 involving the imprinting center, SNRPN gene and surrounding region. PWS is a rare complex disorder caused by the loss of paternally expressed genes in the 15q11-q13 region. With high resolution chromosomal microarray and methylation - specific MLPA analysis, we updated the genetic findings on our patient and found a 209,819bp deletion including the SNURF-SNRPN gene complex which includes the imprinting center and the SNORD116 region. We compared with four other similarly reported individuals in the literature with atypical submicroscopic deletions within this region but without imprinting center involvement to better characterize the specific genetic lesions causing PWS clinical findings. Clinically, our patient met the diagnostic criteria of PWS including infantile hypotonia, a poor suck with feeding difficulties, global developmental delays and later food foraging, childhood obesity, small hands and skin picking. Small atypical deletions of comparable sizes were seen in the 15q11-q13 region in all five cases and similar behavioral/physical characteristics were found despite an imprinting defect in our patient. These results further support an overlapping critical deletion region involving the non-coding snoRNA SNORD116 in common in the five individuals playing a key role in contributing to the PWS phenotype.

  11. Identification of a putative transcription factor gene (WBSCR11) that is commonly deleted in Williams-Beuren syndrome.

    PubMed

    Osborne, L R; Campbell, T; Daradich, A; Scherer, S W; Tsui, L C

    1999-04-15

    Williams-Beuren syndrome (WBS) is a complex developmental disorder involving the hemizygous deletion of genes on chromosome 7q11.23. The cardiovascular aspects of the disorder are known to be caused by haploinsufficiency for ELN, but the genes contributing to the other features of WBS are still undetermined. Fifteen genes have been shown to reside within the WBS deletion, and here we report the identification and cloning of an additional gene that is commonly deleted. WBSCR11, which was identified through genomic DNA sequence analysis and cDNA library screening, was positioned toward the telomeric end of the WBS deletion. The gene is expressed in all adult tissues analyzed, including many regions of the brain. The predicted protein displays homology to another gene from the WBS deletion, GTF2I, which is known to be a transcription factor. We postulate that WBSCR11 is also a transcription factor and may contribute to the spectrum of developmental symptoms found in WBS. Copyright 1999 Academic Press.

  12. Increased frequency of DNA deletions in pink-eyed unstable mice carrying a mutation in the Werner syndrome gene homologue.

    PubMed

    Lebel, Michel

    2002-01-01

    Werner syndrome (WS) is a rare autosomal recessive disorder characterized by genomic instability and the premature onset of a number of age-related diseases, including cancers. Accumulating evidence indicates that the WS gene product is involved in resolving aberrant DNA structures that may arise during the process of DNA replication and/or transcription. To estimate the frequency of DNA deletions directly in the skin of mouse embryos, mice with a deletion of part of the murine WRN helicase domain were created. These mutant mice were then crossed to the pink-eyed unstable animals, which have a 70 kb internal duplication at the pink-eyed dilution (p) gene. This report indicates that the frequency of deletion of the duplicated sequence at the p locus is elevated in mice with a mutation in the WRN allele when compared with wild-type mice. In addition, the inhibitor of topoisomerase I camptothecin also increases the frequency of deletion at the p locus. This frequency is even more elevated in WRN mutant mice treated with camptothecin. In contrast, while the inhibition of poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase (PARP) activity by 3-aminobenzamide increases the frequency of DNA deletion, mutant WRN mice are not significantly more sensitive to the inhibition of PARP activity than wild-type animals.

  13. Detection of submicroscopic deletions in band 17p13 in patients with the Miller-Dieker syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Schwartz, Charles E.; Johnson, John P.; Holycross, Bridget; Mandeville, Tracy M.; Sears, Tena S.; Graul, Elizabeth A.; Carey, John C.; Schroer, Richard J.; Phelan, Mary C.; Szollar, Judith; Flannery, David B.; Stevenson, Roger E.

    1988-01-01

    The Miller-Dieker syndrome (MDS), a syndrome with lissencephaly, distinctive craniofacial features, growth impairment, and profound developmental failure, has been associated with a deletion of the distal part of chromosome band 17p13. A minority of patients with the syndrome do not have a deletion detectable with current cytogenetic techniques. Using three highly polymorphic DNA probes (pYNZ22, pYNH37.3, and p144D6) we have detected microdeletions in three MDS patients, two of whom had no visible abnormalities of chromosome 17. Loci defined by two of the DNA probes, pYNZ22 and pYNH37.3, were deleted in all three patients. The most distal locus, defined by p144D6, was present in one MDS patient, possibly defining the distal limits of the MDS region in band 17pl3.3. None of these loci were absent in one case of lissencephaly without MDS. ImagesFigure 1Figure 2Figure 3Figure 4 PMID:2903661

  14. Identification of a new human catenin gene family member (ARVCF) from the region deleted in velo-cardio-facial syndrome.

    PubMed

    Sirotkin, H; O'Donnell, H; DasGupta, R; Halford, S; St Jore, B; Puech, A; Parimoo, S; Morrow, B; Skoultchi, A; Weissman, S M; Scambler, P; Kucherlapati, R

    1997-04-01

    Velo-cardio-facial syndrome (VCFS) and DiGeorge syndrome (DGS) are characterized by a wide spectrum of phenotypes, including conotruncal heart defects, cleft palate, and facial dysmorphology. Hemizygosity for a portion of chromosome 22q11 has been detected in 80-85% of VCFS/DGS patients. Both syndromes are thought to be the result of a developmental field defect. Using two independent gene-isolation procedures, we isolated a new catenin family member termed ARVCF (armadillo repeat gene deleted in VCFS) from the interval deleted in VCFS. ARVCF encodes a protein of 962 amino acids that contains a coiled coil domain and 10 tandem armadillo repeats. The primary structure of the protein is most closely related to the murine catenin p120CAS, which suggests a role for ARVCF in protein-protein interactions at adherens junctions. ARVCF is expressed ubiquitously in all fetal and adult tissues examined. This gene is hemizygous in all VCFS patients with interstitial deletions. Based on the physical location and potential functions of ARVCF, we suggest that hemizygosity at this locus may play a role in the etiology of some of the phenotypes associated with VCFS.

  15. 3p14 deletion is a rare contiguous gene syndrome: report of 2 new patients and an overview of 14 patients.

    PubMed

    Dimitrov, B I; Ogilvie, C; Wieczorek, D; Wakeling, E; Sikkema-Raddatz, B; van Ravenswaaij-Arts, C M A; Josifova, D

    2015-06-01

    Interstitial deletions of chromosome 3p14p12 are a rare chromosome rearrangement. Twenty-six patients have been reported in the literature to date, however, a specific clinical phenotype has not yet been delineated. We describe three patients (two new) with overlapping chromosome 3p14p12 deletions and review the clinical and molecular data of 11 well-characterized, published cases. These patients had a number of features in common, such as short stature, failure to thrive, facial dysmorphism, congenital heart defects, urogenital abnormalities, neurological problems, hearing loss, and global developmental delay, suggesting that the interstitial chromosome 3p14p12 deletion gives rise to a multiple congenital anomaly syndrome. Some of the patients show clinical overlap with other complex syndromes such as CHARGE syndrome. Genotype-phenotype analysis revealed candidate genes for parts of the clinical features suggesting that the 3p14 deletion is a contiguous gene syndrome.

  16. Epilepsy phenotype associated with a chromosome 2q24.3 deletion involving SCN1A: Migrating partial seizures of infancy or atypical Dravet syndrome?

    PubMed

    Lim, Byung Chan; Hwang, Hee; Kim, Hunmin; Chae, Jong-Hee; Choi, Jieun; Kim, Ki Joong; Hwang, Yong Seung; Yum, Mi-Sun; Ko, Tae-Sung

    2015-01-01

    The deletion of a sodium channel gene cluster located on chromosome 2q24.3 is associated with variable epilepsy phenotypes, including Dravet syndrome and migrating partial seizures of infancy. Although SCN1A is considered as the major contributor to the epilepsy phenotype, the role of other sodium channel genes that map within this cluster has not been delineated. We presented five new cases with a chromosome 2q24.3 deletion involving SCN1A and investigated their epilepsy phenotype in relation to the extent of the deletion. Three cases with deletion of the whole sodium channel gene cluster (SCN3A, SCN2A, SCN1A, SCN9A, and SCN7A) exhibited a complex epilepsy phenotype that was atypical for Dravet syndrome and suggestive of migrating partial seizures of infancy: early seizure onset (before 2 months of age), severe developmental delay from seizure onset, multifocal interictal spikes, polymorphous focal seizures, and acquired microcephaly. Two cases with partial deletion of SCN1A and SCN9A and whole SCN1A deletion had an epilepsy phenotype of Dravet syndrome. A literature review of cases with chromosome 2q24.3 deletion revealed that, in most Dravet syndrome cases, it does not involve SCN2A and SCN3A, whereas a complex epilepsy phenotype that is shared with migrating partial seizures of infancy was associated with cases of deletion of the whole sodium channel gene cluster. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Comparative Mapping of the Region of Human Chromosome 7 Deleted in Williams Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    DeSilva, Udaya; Massa, Hillary; Trask, Barbara J.; Green, Eric D.

    1999-01-01

    Williams syndrome (WS) is a complex developmental disorder resulting from the deletion of a large (∼1.5–2 Mb) segment of human chromosome 7q11.23. Physical mapping studies have revealed that this deleted region, which contains a number of known genes, is flanked by several large, nearly identical blocks of DNA. The presence of such highly related DNA segments in close physical proximity to one another has hampered efforts to elucidate the precise long-range organization of this segment of chromosome 7. To gain insight about the structure and evolutionary origins of this important and complex genomic region, we have constructed a fully contiguous bacterial artificial chromosome (BAC) and P1-derived artificial chromosome (PAC) contig map encompassing the corresponding region on mouse chromosome 5. In contrast to the difficulties encountered in constructing a clone-based physical map of the human WS region, the BAC/PAC-based map of the mouse WS region was straightforward to construct, with no evidence of large duplicated segments, such as those encountered in the human WS region. To confirm this difference, representative human and mouse BACs were used as probes for performing fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) to metaphase and interphase chromosomes. Human BACs derived from the nonunique portion of the WS region hybridized to multiple, closely spaced regions on human chromosome 7q11.23. In contrast, corresponding mouse BACs hybridized to a single site on mouse chromosome 5. Furthermore, FISH analysis revealed the presence of duplicated segments within the WS region of various nonhuman primates (chimpanzee, gorilla, orangutan, and gibbon). Hybridization was also noted at the genomic locations corresponding to human chromosome 7p22 and 7q22 in human, chimpanzee, and gorilla, but not in the other animal species examined. Together, these results indicate that the WS region is associated with large, duplicated blocks of DNA on human chromosome 7q11.23 as well

  18. Endocrine phenotype of 6q16.1-q21 deletion involving SIM1 and Prader-Willi syndrome-like features.

    PubMed

    Izumi, Kosuke; Housam, Ryan; Kapadia, Chirag; Stallings, Virginia A; Medne, Livija; Shaikh, Tamim H; Kublaoui, Bassil M; Zackai, Elaine H; Grimberg, Adda

    2013-12-01

    Proximal interstitial 6q deletion involving Single-minded 1 (SIM1) gene causes a syndromic form of obesity mimicking Prader-Willi syndrome. In addition to obesity, Prader-Willi syndrome includes several other endocrinopathies, such as hypothyroidism, growth hormone deficiency, and hypogonadotropic hypogonadism. The endocrine phenotype of interstitial 6q deletion remains largely unknown, although clinical similarities between Prader-Willi syndrome and interstitial 6q deletion suggest endocrine abnormalities also may contribute to the interstitial 6q deletion phenotype. This report describes the endocrine phenotype in a propositus with the Prader-Willi-like syndrome associated with an interstitial 6q deletion including the SIM1 gene. Detailed endocrine evaluation of the propositus during childhood and adolescence revealed hypopituitarism, though initial endocrine evaluations during infancy were unremarkable. Our patient raises the possibility that hypopituitarism may be part of the phenotype, especially short stature, caused by interstitial 6q deletion. SIM1 plays an important role in the development of neuroendocrine lineage cells, implicating SIM1 haploinsufficiency in the pathophysiology of hypopituitarism seen in our propositus. Early identification of endocrine abnormalities can improve clinical outcome by allowing timely introduction of hormone replacement therapy. Hence, we suggest that detailed endocrine evaluation and longitudinal endocrine follow up be performed in individuals with proximal interstitial 6q deletion involving SIM1.

  19. Brain and Behavior in Children with 22Q11.2 Deletion Syndrome: A Volumetric and Voxel-Based Morphometry MRI Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Campbell, Linda E.; Daly, Eileen; Toal, Fiona; Stevens, Angela; Azuma, Rayna; Catani, Marco; Ng, Virginia; Van Amelsvoort, Therese; Chitnis, Xavier; Cutter, William; Murphy, Declan G. M.; Murphy, Kieran C.

    2006-01-01

    In people with velo-cardio-facial syndrome [or 22q11.2 deletion syndrome (22qDS)], a single interstitial deletion of chromosome 22q11.2 causes a wide spectrum of cognitive deficits ranging from global learning difficulties to specific cognitive deficits. People with 22qDS are also at high risk of developing attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder…

  20. Brain and Behavior in Children with 22Q11.2 Deletion Syndrome: A Volumetric and Voxel-Based Morphometry MRI Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Campbell, Linda E.; Daly, Eileen; Toal, Fiona; Stevens, Angela; Azuma, Rayna; Catani, Marco; Ng, Virginia; Van Amelsvoort, Therese; Chitnis, Xavier; Cutter, William; Murphy, Declan G. M.; Murphy, Kieran C.

    2006-01-01

    In people with velo-cardio-facial syndrome [or 22q11.2 deletion syndrome (22qDS)], a single interstitial deletion of chromosome 22q11.2 causes a wide spectrum of cognitive deficits ranging from global learning difficulties to specific cognitive deficits. People with 22qDS are also at high risk of developing attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder…

  1. Modeling a model: Mouse genetics, 22q11.2 Deletion Syndrome, and disorders of cortical circuit development

    PubMed Central

    Meechan, Daniel W.; Maynard, Thomas M.; Fernandez, Alejandra; Karpinski, Beverly A.; Rothblat, Lawrence A.; LaMantia, Anthony S.

    2015-01-01

    Understanding the developmental etiology of autistic spectrum disorders, attention deficit/hyperactivity disorder and schizophrenia remains a major challenge for establishing new diagnostic and therapeutic approaches to these common, difficult-to-treat diseases that compromise neural circuits in the cerebral cortex. One aspect of this challenge is the breadth and overlap of ASD, ADHD, and SCZ deficits; another is the complexity of mutations associated with each, and a third is the difficulty of analyzing disrupted development in at-risk or affected human fetuses. The identification of distinct genetic syndromes that include behavioral deficits similar to those in ASD, ADHC and SCZ provides a critical starting point for meeting this challenge. We summarize clinical and behavioral impairments in children and adults with one such genetic syndrome, the 22q11.2 Deletion Syndrome, routinely called 22q11DS, caused by micro-deletions of between 1.5 and 3.0 MB on human chromosome 22. Among many syndromic features, including cardiovascular and craniofacial anomalies, 22q11DS patients have a high incidence of brain structural, functional, and behavioral deficits that reflect cerebral cortical dysfunction and fall within the spectrum that defines ASD, ADHD, and SCZ. We show that developmental pathogenesis underlying this apparent genetic “model” syndrome in patients can be defined and analyzed mechanistically using genomically accurate mouse models of the deletion that causes 22q11DS. We conclude that “modeling a model”, in this case 22q11DS as a model for idiopathic ASD, ADHD and SCZ, as well as other behavioral disorders like anxiety frequently seen in 22q11DS patients, in genetically engineered mice provides a foundation for understanding the causes and improving diagnosis and therapy for these disorders of cortical circuit development. PMID:25866365

  2. Williams syndrome: a genetic deletion disorder presenting clues to the biology of sociability and clinical challenges of hypersociability.

    PubMed

    Deutsch, Stephen I; Rosse, Richard B; Schwartz, Barbara L

    2007-12-01

    Williams syndrome is a neurodevelopmental disorder that results from the deletion of approximately 25-30 genes spanning about 1.5 megabases in the q11.23 region of chromosome 7. Patients with this syndrome present with a combination of a distinctive elfin-like facial appearance; growth retardation; mild mental retardation; an inconsistent cognitive profile that includes visuospatial impairments with good facial discrimination and relatively preserved expressive language skills; and cardiovascular abnormalities. In addition, a striking behavioral feature of the syndrome is the high sociability and empathy that these patients show for others. The study of patients with "partial" deletions of the chromosome band 7q11.23, mutated genes in this region and knockout mice with deletions of specific genes in the homologous G1-G2 region of mouse chromosome 5 are clarifying some genotype/phenotype relationships. Furthermore, genes located in this region that are prominently expressed have been implicated in brain development and function. The neuropsychological profile of patients with Williams syndrome is heterogeneous, highlights important dissociations between cognitive functions and suggests that the behavioral dimensions of sociability, empathy, engageability, and talkativeness may be independent of, or not easily explained by, the cognitive deficits. Williams syndrome has enormous heuristic value because its pathological feature of heightened "sociability" can be a "deficit" symptom of major complex neuropsychiatric disorders, such as schizophrenia and autism. Data consistent with a core inability of patients with Williams syndrome to inhibit social approach suggest that this disorder may afford an opportunity to study the biological basis of the "drive" toward socialization. From a research perspective, the syndrome lends itself to neurobiological studies of sociability as a dimension that varies independently of cognition (or at least many separable cognitive

  3. The 22q11.2 Deletion Syndrome as a Window into Complex Neuropsychiatric Disorders Over the Lifespan

    PubMed Central

    Jonas, Rachel K.; Montojo, Caroline A.; Bearden, Carrie E.

    2013-01-01

    Evidence is rapidly accumulating that rare, recurrent copy number variants (CNVs) represent large effect risk factors for neuropsychiatric disorders. 22q11.2 Deletion Syndrome (22q11DS; Velo-Cardio-Facial Syndrome (VCFS) or DiGeorge Syndrome) is the most common known contiguous gene deletion syndrome, and is associated with diverse neuropsychiatric disorders across the lifespan. One of the most intriguing aspects of the syndrome is the variability in clinical and cognitive presentation: children with 22q11DS have high prevalence of autism spectrum (ASD), attention deficit, and anxiety disorders, as well as psychotic-like features, and up to 30% of adolescents and adults develop schizophrenia-like psychosis. Recently, cases of early-onset Parkinson’s Disease in adults have been reported, collectively suggesting a role for disrupted dopaminergic neurotransmission in the observed neuropsychiatric phenotypes. There is also some evidence that 22q11DS-associated ASD and schizophrenia represent two unrelated phenotypic manifestations, consistent with a neuropsychiatric pleiotropy model. This genetic lesion thus provides a unique model for the discovery of specific genomic risk and (potentially) protective factors for neuropsychiatric disease. Here we provide an overview of neuropsychiatric findings to date, which highlight the value of this syndrome in mapping the developmental trajectory of dimensional phenotypes that traverse multiple diagnostic categories. Potential sources of genetic variability that may contribute to the disorder’s heterogeneous presentation are reviewed. Because of its known genetic etiology, animal models can readily be developed that recapitulate specific aspects of the syndrome. Future research directions involve translational models and potential for drug screenable targets in the context of this human model system. PMID:23992925

  4. Enhanced Maternal Origin of the 22q11.2 Deletion in Velocardiofacial and DiGeorge Syndromes

    PubMed Central

    Delio, Maria; Guo, Tingwei; McDonald-McGinn, Donna M.; Zackai, Elaine; Herman, Sean; Kaminetzky, Mark; Higgins, Anne Marie; Coleman, Karlene; Chow, Carolyn; Jarlbrzkowski, Maria; Bearden, Carrie E.; Bailey, Alice; Vangkilde, Anders; Olsen, Line; Olesen, Charlotte; Skovby, Flemming; Werge, Thomas M.; Templin, Ludivine; Busa, Tiffany; Philip, Nicole; Swillen, Ann; Vermeesch, Joris R.; Devriendt, Koen; Schneider, Maude; Dahoun, Sophie; Eliez, Stephan; Schoch, Kelly; Hooper, Stephen R.; Shashi, Vandana; Samanich, Joy; Marion, Robert; van Amelsvoort, Therese; Boot, Erik; Klaassen, Petra; Duijff, Sasja N.; Vorstman, Jacob; Yuen, Tracy; Silversides, Candice; Chow, Eva; Bassett, Anne; Frisch, Amos; Weizman, Abraham; Gothelf, Doron; Niarchou, Maria; van den Bree, Marianne; Owen, Michael J.; Suñer, Damian Heine; Andreo, Jordi Rosell; Armando, Marco; Vicari, Stefano; Digilio, Maria Cristina; Auton, Adam; Kates, Wendy R.; Wang, Tao; Shprintzen, Robert J.; Emanuel, Beverly S.; Morrow, Bernice E.

    2013-01-01

    Velocardiofacial and DiGeorge syndromes, also known as 22q11.2 deletion syndrome (22q11DS), are congenital-anomaly disorders caused by a de novo hemizygous 22q11.2 deletion mediated by meiotic nonallelic homologous recombination events between low-copy repeats, also known as segmental duplications. Although previous studies exist, each was of small size, and it remains to be determined whether there are parent-of-origin biases for the de novo 22q11.2 deletion. To address this question, we genotyped a total of 389 DNA samples from 22q11DS-affected families. A total of 219 (56%) individuals with 22q11DS had maternal origin and 170 (44%) had paternal origin of the de novo deletion, which represents a statistically significant bias for maternal origin (p = 0.0151). Combined with many smaller, previous studies, 465 (57%) individuals had maternal origin and 345 (43%) had paternal origin, amounting to a ratio of 1.35 or a 35% increase in maternal compared to paternal origin (p = 0.000028). Among 1,892 probands with the de novo 22q11.2 deletion, the average maternal age at time of conception was 29.5, and this is similar to data for the general population in individual countries. Of interest, the female recombination rate in the 22q11.2 region was about 1.6–1.7 times greater than that for males, suggesting that for this region in the genome, enhanced meiotic recombination rates, as well as other as-of-yet undefined 22q11.2-specific features, could be responsible for the observed excess in maternal origin. PMID:23453669

  5. 22q11.2 deletion syndrome lowers seizure threshold in adult patients without epilepsy.

    PubMed

    Wither, Robert G; Borlot, Felippe; MacDonald, Alex; Butcher, Nancy J; Chow, Eva W C; Bassett, Anne S; Andrade, Danielle M

    2017-06-01

    Previous studies examining seizures in patients with 22q11.2 deletion syndrome (22q11.2DS) have focused primarily on children and adolescents. In this study we investigated the prevalence and characteristics of seizures and epilepsy in an adult 22q11.2DS population. The medical records of 202 adult patients with 22q11.2DS were retrospectively reviewed for documentation of seizures, electroencephalography (EEG) reports, and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) findings. Epilepsy status was assigned in accordance with 2010 International League Against Epilepsy Classification. Of 202 patients, 32 (15.8%) had a documented history of seizure. Of these 32, 23 (71.8%) had acute symptomatic seizures, usually associated with hypocalcemia and/or antipsychotic or antidepressant use. Nine patients (9/32, 28%; 9/202, 4%) met diagnostic criteria for epilepsy. Two patients had genetic generalized epilepsy; two patients had focal seizures of unknown etiology; two had epilepsy due to malformations of cortical development; in two the epilepsy was due to acquired structural changes; and in one patient the epilepsy could not be further classified. Similarly to children, the prevalence of epilepsy and acute symptomatic seizures in adults with 22q11.2DS is higher than in the general population. Hypocalcemia continues to be a risk factor for adults, but differently from kids, the main cause of seizures in adults with 22q11.2DS is exposure to antipsychotics and antidepressants. Further prospective studies are warranted to investigate how 22q11.2 microdeletion leads to an overall decreased seizure threshold. Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2017 International League Against Epilepsy.

  6. Association of airway abnormalities with 22q11.2 deletion syndrome.

    PubMed

    Sacca, Rosalba; Zur, Karen B; Crowley, T Blaine; Zackai, Elaine H; Valverde, Kathleen D; McDonald-McGinn, Donna M

    2017-05-01

    22q11.2 deletion syndrome (22q11.2DS) presents with complex but variable symptoms, including cardiac, immune, palatal, endocrine, cognitive, and psychiatric issues. However, an association of 22q11.2DS with structural airway abnormalities has not been formally described. The aim of this study was to document the frequency of this association. We retrospectively reviewed medical records of patients with 22q11.2DS evaluated in the 22q and You Center at the Children's Hospital of Philadelphia between 1999 and 2015 referred to otolaryngology for an airway assessment. Type of airway abnormality and presence of comorbidities, such as congenital heart disease, tracheostomy, and association with prenatal symptomatology such as polyhydramnios, were noted. Of the 104 patients who underwent an otolaryngology procedure (microlaryngoscopy or bronchoscopy), 71% (n = 74) had airway abnormalities. Patients with airway abnormalities ranged in age from 5 months to 37 years, with similar prevalence among males and females. Observed airway abnormalities included tracheomalacia (36%), subglottic stenosis (28%), laryngomalacia (26%), glottic web (21%), and bronchomalacia (16%). Most patients with airway abnormalities (91%) had an associated congenital heart defect, with ventricular septal defect and Tetralogy of Fallot being the most prevalent. Importantly, 30% of patients required a tracheostomy, and overall polyhydramnios was noted in 16% of pregnancies. Airway abnormalities are a common feature of 22q11.2DS, leading to substantial morbidity, particularly when combined with complex cardiac disease. Polyhydramnios may be an important prenatal clue to both the diagnosis of 22q11.2DS and airway anomalies. Postnatal assessment of airway structure and function among patients with 22q11.2DS is an important component of overall evaluation and will help guide long-term management. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Paradoxical leanness in the imprinting-centre deletion mouse model for Prader–Willi syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Golding, David M; Rees, Daniel J; Davies, Jennifer R; Relkovic, Dinko; Furby, Hannah V; Guschina, Irina A; Hopkins, Anna L; Davies, Jeffrey S; Resnick, James L; Isles, Anthony R

    2016-01-01

    Prader–Willi syndrome (PWS), a neurodevelopmental disorder caused by loss of paternal gene expression from 15q11–q13, is characterised by growth retardation, hyperphagia and obesity. However, as single gene mutation mouse models for this condition display an incomplete spectrum of the PWS phenotype, we have characterised the metabolic impairment in a mouse model for ‘full’ PWS, in which deletion of the imprinting centre (IC) abolishes paternal gene expression from the entire PWS cluster. We show that PWS-ICdel mice displayed postnatal growth retardation, with reduced body weight, hyperghrelinaemia and marked abdominal leanness; proportionate retroperitoneal, epididymal/omental and inguinal white adipose tissue (WAT) weights being reduced by 82%, 84% and 67%, respectively. PWS-ICdel mice also displayed a 48% reduction in proportionate interscapular brown adipose tissue (isBAT) weight with significant ‘beiging’ of abdominal WAT, and a 2°C increase in interscapular surface body temperature. Maintenance of PWS-ICdel mice under thermoneutral conditions (30°C) suppressed the thermogenic activity in PWS-ICdel males, but failed to elevate the abdominal WAT weight, possibly due to a normalisation of caloric intake. Interestingly, PWS-ICdel mice also showed exaggerated food hoarding behaviour with standard and high-fat diets, but despite becoming hyperphagic when switched to a high-fat diet, PWS-ICdel mice failed to gain weight. This evidence indicates that, unlike humans with PWS, loss of paternal gene expression from the PWS cluster in mice results in abdominal leanness. Although reduced subcutaneous insulation may lead to exaggerated heat loss and thermogenesis, abdominal leanness is likely to arise from a reduced lipid storage capacity rather than increased energy utilisation in BAT. PMID:27799465

  8. Platybasia in 22q11.2 Deletion Syndrome Is Not Correlated with Speech Resonance

    PubMed Central

    Kon, Moshe; Mink van der Molen, Aebele B

    2014-01-01

    Background An abnormally obtuse cranial base angle, also known as platybasia, is a common finding in patients with 22q11.2 deletion syndrome (22q11DS). Platybasia increases the depth of the velopharynx and is therefore postulated to contribute to velopharyngeal dysfunction. Our objective was to determine the clinical significance of platybasia in 22q11DS by exploring the relationship between cranial base angles and speech resonance. Methods In this retrospective chart review at a tertiary hospital, 24 children (age, 4.0-13.1 years) with 22q11.2DS underwent speech assessments and lateral cephalograms, which allowed for the measurement of the cranial base angles. Results One patient (4%) had hyponasal resonance, 8 (33%) had normal resonance, 10 (42%) had hypernasal resonance on vowels only, and 5 (21%) had hypernasal resonance on both vowels and consonants. The mean cranial base angle was 136.5° (standard deviation, 5.3°; range, 122.3-144.8°). The Kruskal-Wallis test showed no significant relationship between the resonance ratings and cranial base angles (P=0.242). Cranial base angles and speech ratings were not correlated (Spearman correlation=0.321, P=0.126). The group with hypernasal resonance had a significantly more obtuse mean cranial base angle (138° vs. 134°, P=0.049) but did not have a greater prevalence of platybasia (73% vs. 56%, P=0.412). Conclusions In this retrospective chart review of patients with 22q11DS, cranial base angles were not correlated with speech resonance. The clinical significance of platybasia remains unknown. PMID:25075355

  9. Paradoxical leanness in the imprinting-centre deletion mouse model for Prader-Willi syndrome.

    PubMed

    Golding, David M; Rees, Daniel J; Davies, Jennifer R; Relkovic, Dinko; Furby, Hannah V; Guschina, Irina A; Hopkins, Anna L; Davies, Jeffrey S; Resnick, James L; Isles, Anthony R; Wells, Timothy

    2017-01-01

    Prader-Willi syndrome (PWS), a neurodevelopmental disorder caused by loss of paternal gene expression from 15q11-q13, is characterised by growth retardation, hyperphagia and obesity. However, as single gene mutation mouse models for this condition display an incomplete spectrum of the PWS phenotype, we have characterised the metabolic impairment in a mouse model for 'full' PWS, in which deletion of the imprinting centre (IC) abolishes paternal gene expression from the entire PWS cluster. We show that PWS-IC(del) mice displayed postnatal growth retardation, with reduced body weight, hyperghrelinaemia and marked abdominal leanness; proportionate retroperitoneal, epididymal/omental and inguinal white adipose tissue (WAT) weights being reduced by 82%, 84% and 67%, respectively. PWS-IC(del) mice also displayed a 48% reduction in proportionate interscapular brown adipose tissue (isBAT) weight with significant 'beiging' of abdominal WAT, and a 2°C increase in interscapular surface body temperature. Maintenance of PWS-IC(del) mice under thermoneutral conditions (30°C) suppressed the thermogenic activity in PWS-IC(del) males, but failed to elevate the abdominal WAT weight, possibly due to a normalisation of caloric intake. Interestingly, PWS-IC(del) mice also showed exaggerated food hoarding behaviour with standard and high-fat diets, but despite becoming hyperphagic when switched to a high-fat diet, PWS-IC(del) mice failed to gain weight. This evidence indicates that, unlike humans with PWS, loss of paternal gene expression from the PWS cluster in mice results in abdominal leanness. Although reduced subcutaneous insulation may lead to exaggerated heat loss and thermogenesis, abdominal leanness is likely to arise from a reduced lipid storage capacity rather than increased energy utilisation in BAT. © 2017 The authors.

  10. Monitoring of self-generated speech in adolescents with 22q11.2 deletion syndrome.

    PubMed

    Debbané, Martin; Van der Linden, Martial; Glaser, Bronwyn; Eliez, Stephan

    2010-09-01

    The present report examines the monitoring of self-generated speech in adolescents with 22q11.2 deletion syndrome (22q11DS), a neurogenetic disorder associated with very high risk for psychosis. Between-participant group design. In this study, 20 adolescents with 22q11DS, 19 age- and IQ-matched controls, and 19 typically developing adolescents were enrolled. Participants completed a speech-monitoring task, in which they were asked to silently or overtly read a series of word and non-word items. Subjects then filled out a recognition sheet containing studied and novel items. They were asked to identify the previously studied item, and to attribute the reading condition (silent vs. overt) under which each recognized item was encoded. Adolescents with 22q11DS commit more external attribution errors compared to both control groups, by exhibiting an increased tendency to report silently read items as though they had been read overtly. Further, results suggest that increased cognitive effort exacerbates the external attribution tendency in adolescents with 22q11DS. Increased internal attributions were also observed in the IQcontrol and 22q11DS groups in comparison to typically developing adolescents. Similarly to adult individuals exhibiting positive symptoms of psychosis, adolescents with 22q11DS exhibit an external attribution bias for inner speech. This bias seems to be exacerbated by increased cognitive effort, suggesting a failure to recollect information pertaining to cognitive operations during self-monitoring. Cognitive biases associated to schizophrenia may be detected in adolescents at very high risk for psychosis. These observations provide further evidence for the presence of an external attribution bias along the clinical continuum of psychosis vulnerability.

  11. Behavioural and cognitive abnormalities in an imprinting centre deletion mouse model for Prader-Willi syndrome.

    PubMed

    Relkovic, Dinko; Doe, Christine M; Humby, Trevor; Johnstone, Karen A; Resnick, James L; Holland, Anthony J; Hagan, Jim J; Wilkinson, Lawrence S; Isles, Anthony R

    2010-01-01

    The genes in the imprinted cluster on human chromosome 15q11-q13 are known to contribute to psychiatric conditions such as schizophrenia and autism. Major disruptions of this interval leading to a lack of paternal allele expression give rise to Prader-Willi syndrome (PWS), a neurodevelopmental disorder with core symptoms of a failure to thrive in infancy and, on emergence from infancy, learning disabilities and over-eating. Individuals with PWS also display a number of behavioural problems and an increased incidence of neuropsychiatric abnormalities, which recent work indicates involve aspects of frontal dysfunction. To begin to examine the contribution of genes in this interval to relevant psychological and behavioural phenotypes, we exploited the imprinting centre (IC) deletion mouse model for PWS (PWS-IC(+/-)) and the five-choice serial reaction time task (5-CSRTT), which is primarily an assay of visuospatial attention and response control that is highly sensitive to frontal manipulations. Locomotor activity, open-field behaviour and sensorimotor gating were also assessed. PWS-IC(+/-) mice displayed reduced locomotor activity, increased acoustic startle responses and decreased prepulse inhibition of startle responses. In the 5-CSRTT, the PWS-IC(+/-) mice showed deficits in discriminative response accuracy, increased correct reaction times and increased omissions. Task manipulations confirmed that these differences were likely to be due to impaired attention. Our data recapitulate several aspects of the PWS clinical condition, including findings consistent with frontal abnormalities, and may indicate novel contributions of the imprinted genes found in 15q11-q13 to behavioural and cognitive function generally.

  12. Platybasia in 22q11.2 deletion syndrome is not correlated with speech resonance.

    PubMed

    Spruijt, Nicole E; Kon, Moshe; Mink van der Molen, Aebele B

    2014-07-01

    An abnormally obtuse cranial base angle, also known as platybasia, is a common finding in patients with 22q11.2 deletion syndrome (22q11DS). Platybasia increases the depth of the velopharynx and is therefore postulated to contribute to velopharyngeal dysfunction. Our objective was to determine the clinical significance of platybasia in 22q11DS by exploring the relationship between cranial base angles and speech resonance. In this retrospective chart review at a tertiary hospital, 24 children (age, 4.0-13.1 years) with 22q11.2DS underwent speech assessments and lateral cephalograms, which allowed for the measurement of the cranial base angles. One patient (4%) had hyponasal resonance, 8 (33%) had normal resonance, 10 (42%) had hypernasal resonance on vowels only, and 5 (21%) had hypernasal resonance on both vowels and consonants. The mean cranial base angle was 136.5° (standard deviation, 5.3°; range, 122.3-144.8°). The Kruskal-Wallis test showed no significant relationship between the resonance ratings and cranial base angles (P=0.242). Cranial base angles and speech ratings were not correlated (Spearman correlation=0.321, P=0.126). The group with hypernasal resonance had a significantly more obtuse mean cranial base angle (138° vs. 134°, P=0.049) but did not have a greater prevalence of platybasia (73% vs. 56%, P=0.412). In this retrospective chart review of patients with 22q11DS, cranial base angles were not correlated with speech resonance. The clinical significance of platybasia remains unknown.

  13. DiGeorge anomaly in a patient with isochromosome 18p born to a diabetic mother.

    PubMed

    DeBerardinis, Ralph J; Medne, Livija; Spinner, Nancy B; Zackai, Elaine H

    2005-10-01

    The DiGeorge anomaly (DGA) is an etiologically heterogeneous developmental field defect in which cardiovascular malformations, hypocalcemia, thymic hypoplasia, and characteristic dysmorphisms are major clinical features. The 22q11.2 deletion is the most common single etiology of DGA, although a number of other chromosomal abnormalities and teratogens, including maternal diabetes, have been implicated as well. We present a patient, born to a diabetic mother, with interrupted aortic arch type B (IAA-B), neonatal hypocalcemia, thymic hypoplasia, and dysmorphic features including microcephaly, thick, overfolded helices, and anteriorly-placed anus. Cytogenetic studies showed the presence of a marker chromosome, identified by fluorescence in-situ hybridization (FISH) as an isochromosome 18p [i(18p)]. We did not detect a 22q11.2 deletion by FISH using a cosmid probe corresponding to locus D22S75. The patient is the first example of either DGA or IAA-B in a patient with i(18p). We review the genetic abnormalities associated with DGA, and discuss the potential contributions of maternal diabetes and i(18p) in our patient.

  14. Association of schizophrenia in 22q11.2 deletion syndrome and gray matter volumetric deficits in the superior temporal gyrus.

    PubMed

    Chow, Eva W C; Ho, Andrew; Wei, Corie; Voormolen, Eduard H J; Crawley, Adrian P; Bassett, Anne S

    2011-05-01

    Individuals with 22q11.2 deletion syndrome are known to be at high risk of developing schizophrenia. Previous imaging studies have provided limited data on the relation of schizophrenia expression in 22q11.2 deletion syndrome to specific regional brain volumetric changes. The authors hypothesized that the main structural brain finding associated with schizophrenia expression in 22q11.2 deletion syndrome, as for schizophrenia in the general population, would be gray matter volumetric deficits, especially in the temporal lobes. MR brain images from 29 patients with 22q11.2 deletion syndrome and schizophrenia and 34 comparison subjects with 22q11.2 deletion syndrome and no history of psychosis were analyzed using a voxel-based morphometry method that also yielded volumes for related region-of-interest analyses. The authors compared data from the two groups using an analysis of covariance model correcting for total intracranial volume, age, sex, IQ, and history of congenital cardiac defects. The false discovery rate threshold was set at 0.05 to account for multiple comparisons. Voxel-based morphometry analyses identified significant gray matter reductions in the left superior temporal gyrus (Brodmann's area 22) in the schizophrenia group. There were no significant between-group differences in white matter or CSF volumes. Region-of-interest analyses showed significant bilateral gray matter volume reductions in the temporal lobes and superior temporal gyri in the schizophrenia group. The structural brain expression of schizophrenia associated with the highly penetrant 22q11.2 deletion involves lower gray matter volumes in temporal lobe regions. These structural MRI findings in a 22q11.2 deletion syndrome form of schizophrenia are consistent with those from studies involving schizophrenia samples from the general population. The results provide further support for 22q11.2 deletion syndrome as a genetic subtype and as a useful neurodevelopmental model of schizophrenia.

  15. A case of 22q11.2 deletion syndrome with Peters anomaly, congenital glaucoma, and heterozygous mutation in CYP1B1.

    PubMed

    Reis, Linda M; Tyler, Rebecca C; Zori, Roberto; Burgess, Jennifer; Mueller, Jennifer; Semina, Elena V

    2015-03-01

    We read with interest the recent publication by Tarlan and colleagues 1 describing a patient with 22q11.2 deletion syndrome and ocular features of right microphthalmia and left anterior segment dysgenesis. While anterior segment dysgenesis disorders are occasionally reported with 22q11.2 deletions, 2-5 this remains a rare association. We report here an 8-year-old patient with 22q11.2 deletion syndrome and bilateral Peters anomaly with congenital glaucoma; in addition, our patient was found to have a single heterozygous mutation in CYP1B1, c.83C > T, p.(Ser28Trp).

  16. Toriello-Carey syndrome with a 6Mb interstitial deletion at 22q12 detected by array CGH.

    PubMed

    Said, Edith; Cuschieri, Alfred; Vermeesch, Joris; Fryns, Jean Pierre

    2011-06-01

    Toriello-Carey syndrome is a rare multiple congenital anomaly syndrome comprising agenesis of the corpus callosum, telecanthus, short palpebral fissures, abnormal ears, Pierre Robin sequence, and cardiac anomaly. Autosomal recessive inheritance has been hypothesized and chromosome abnormalities have been reported. The present case is a girl with agenesis of the corpus callosum, a large cleft palate, telecanthus, hypertelorism, atrial septal defect, ventricular septal defect, and patent ductus arteriosus. A routine karyotype and fluorescence in situ hybridization subtelomeric analysis were normal. Array comparative genomic hybridization (CGH) identified a de novo 6 Mb interstitial deletion at 22q12.1→22q12.2. These findings support recent findings of chromosomal abnormalities in patients with the Toriello-Carey phenotype. We suggest that the clinical features described in some cases with Toriello-Carey syndrome might be due to cryptic chromosomal rearrangements and that array CGH should be considered in any case presenting with clinical features of Toriello-Carey.

  17. A novel and de novo deletion in the OCRL1 gene associated with a severe form of Lowe syndrome.

    PubMed

    Peces, Ramón; Peces, Carlos; de Sousa, Erika; Vega, Cristina; Selgas, Rafael; Nevado, Julián

    2013-12-01

    The oculocerebrorenal syndrome of Lowe (OCRL) is an X-linked disorder. The mutation of the gene OCRL1 localized at Xq26.1, coding for the enzyme phosphatidylinositol (4,5) bisphosphate (PIP2P) 5-phosphatase, is responsible for the phenotypic characteristics of the disease. We report a 22-year-old male with a severe form of OCRL syndrome, diagnosed on the basis of congenital cataracts, severe psychomotor and cognitive deficits, and renal tubular dysfunction without Fanconi syndrome. The patient presented low molecular weight proteinuria, nephrocalcinosis, nephrolithiasis, rickets, and growth retardation and developed progressive renal failure. Genetic analysis showed a novel and de novo deletion of exons 10-13 in the OCRL1 gene.

  18. Deletion 17p11.2 (Smith-Magenis syndrome) is relatively common among patients having mental retardation and myopia

    SciTech Connect

    Finucane, B.; Jaeger, E.R.; Freitag, S.K.

    1994-09-01

    We recently reported the finding of moderate to severe myopia in 6 of 10 patients with Smith-Magenis syndrome (SMS). To investigate the prevalence of SMS among mentally retarded people having myopia, we surveyed a cohort of patients residing at a facility for individuals with mental retardation (MR). Of 547 institutionalized individuals with MR, 72 (13.2%) had moderate to high myopia defined as a visual acuity of minus 3 diopters or more. It should be noted that our institution does not specifically select for people with visual impairment; rather, the facility serves people with a primary diagnosis of MR. Sixty-five of 72 (90.3%) myopic individuals identified were available for cytogenetic analysis. Seventeen (26.2%) of these patients had trisomy 21. Down syndrome (DS) is well known to be associated with eye abnormalities, including myopia. Of 48 individuals with moderate to high myopia not having DS, 5 (10.4%) were shown to have deletions of 17p11.2. This is a high prevalence considering the relative rarity of SMS. By contrast, in a randomized sample of 48 patients without significant myopia at the same facility, we found no individuals with deletion 17p11.2. We conclude that the diagnosis of SMS should be considered in any non-Down syndrome individual having MR and myopia, and that ophthalmologists serving people with MR should be made aware of this deletion syndrome. Furthermore, our results suggest that significant numbers of people having SMS could be identified through selective institutional screening of patients having a combination of MR and moderate to severe myopia.

  19. Submicroscopic deletions at 16p13.3 in Rubinstein-Taybi syndrome: frequency and clinical manifestations in a North American population.

    PubMed Central

    Wallerstein, R; Anderson, C E; Hay, B; Gupta, P; Gibas, L; Ansari, K; Cowchock, F S; Weinblatt, V; Reid, C; Levitas, A; Jackson, L

    1997-01-01

    Rubinstein-Taybi syndrome (RTS) is a well delineated multiple congenital anomaly syndrome characterised by mental retardation, broad thumbs and toes, short stature, and specific facial features. The recent localisation of the disorder to 16p13.3 and subsequent identification of a submicroscopic deletion of this region in RTS patients led us to screen a large cohort of affected subjects using the RT1 probe. Among 64 patients with clinical evidence of RTS, seven (11%) had a deletion. Another patient had a translocation of the region without evidence of a deletion. The features of coloboma, growth retardation, naevus flammeus, and hypotonia have a positive predictive value for the presence of an RT1 deletion. Because of the relatively low frequency of deletions in RTS, the RT1 probe is useful in diagnostic confirmation, but has limited use as a screening tool. PMID:9132490

  20. Patient with a 22q11.2 deletion with no overlap of the minimal DiGeorge syndrome critical region (MDGCR).

    PubMed

    McQuade, L; Christodoulou, J; Budarf, M; Sachdev, R; Wilson, M; Emanuel, B; Colley, A

    1999-09-03

    The apparent lack of genotype/phenotype correlation in patients with the DiGeorge anomaly and velocardiofacial syndrome (DGA/VCFS; the "22q11 deletion syndrome") indicates a complex genetic condition. Most cases, whatever the phenotype, have a 1.5-3 Mb chromosomal deletion that includes the minimal DiGeorge critical region (MDGCR). Another potential critical region on 22q11 has been suggested based on two patients with distal deletions outside the MDGCR. We report on a patient with a VCFS phenotype who has a deletion, mapped by short tandem repeat polymorphic loci and fluorescence in situ hybridization analysis, distal to and not overlapping the MDGCR. This patient is deleted for several genes, including the T-box 1 gene (TBX1; a transcription regulator expressed early in embryogenesis) and catechol-O-methyltransferase (COMT; involved in neurotransmitter metabolism). We discuss the role these two genes may play in the clinical phenotype of the patient.

  1. [Catch-22? Wide variety of phenotypes associated with the chromosome 22q11 deletion syndrome in two patients].

    PubMed

    Till, Ágnes; Hadzsiev, Kinga; Lőcsei-Fekete, Anett; Czakó, Márta; Duga, Balázs; Melegh, Béla

    2015-11-08

    The chromosome 22q11 deletion syndrome may present with a variety of phenotypes. Its symptoms generally include a characteristic facial dysmorphisms and multiplex developmental disorders. Fluorescence in situ hybridization is the current method of choice for the diagnosis if typical multiple defects and/or symptoms are present. The authors present the history of two patients who were followed-up for minor anomalies and various developmental disorders for several years in the genetic counseling office of the authors, but definitive diagnosis was not established. However, when DNA samples of the two patients were recently tested with array comparative genome hybridization, a diagnostic method which has already been used in their institute for several years, the results indicated deletion of the 11.2 region on the long arm of chromosome 22 in both patients. The authors draw attention to the incidence and wide phenotypic spectrum of the chromosome 22q11 deletion syndrome, and show that its identification can be aided with the novel molecular cytogenetic method available in their laboratory.

  2. De novo deletion of chromosome 11q12.3 in monozygotic twins affected by Poland Syndrome.

    PubMed

    Vaccari, Carlotta Maria; Romanini, Maria Victoria; Musante, Ilaria; Tassano, Elisa; Gimelli, Stefania; Divizia, Maria Teresa; Torre, Michele; Morovic, Carmen Gloria; Lerone, Margherita; Ravazzolo, Roberto; Puliti, Aldamaria

    2014-05-30

    Poland Syndrome (PS) is a rare disorder characterized by hypoplasia/aplasia of the pectoralis major muscle, variably associated with thoracic and upper limb anomalies. Familial recurrence has been reported indicating that PS could have a genetic basis, though the genetic mechanisms underlying PS development are still unknown. Here we describe a couple of monozygotic (MZ) twin girls, both presenting with Poland Syndrome. They carry a de novo heterozygous 126 Kbp deletion at chromosome 11q12.3 involving 5 genes, four of which, namely HRASLS5, RARRES3, HRASLS2, and PLA2G16, encode proteins that regulate cellular growth, differentiation, and apoptosis, mainly through Ras-mediated signaling pathways. Phenotype concordance between the monozygotic twin probands provides evidence supporting the genetic control of PS. As genes controlling cell growth and differentiation may be related to morphological defects originating during development, we postulate that the observed chromosome deletion could be causative of the phenotype observed in the twin girls and the deleted genes could play a role in PS development.

  3. Cri du chat syndrome determined by the 5p15.3-->pter deletion--diagnostic problems.

    PubMed

    Laczmanska, Izabela; Stembalska, Agnieszka; Gil, Justyna; Czemarmazowicz, Halina; Sasiadek, Maria

    2006-01-01

    A cytogenetic analysis was performed on an 8-day-old girl, who was suspected of Cri du chat syndrome (CdCS) on the basis of a cat-like cry, despite her dysmorphic features not being characteristic of this syndrome. The cytogenetic analysis revealed a partial deletion of the short arm of chromosome 5, but did not allow precise specification of the break points. Fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) analysis, using the specific probe for CdCS, revealed two signals in all the cells analyzed. However, one of two signals was less intense than the other. Thus, telomere probes were applied for all chromosomes. Two signals from 5q and one signal from 5p were observed. The results allowed us to establish the location of the deleted fragment as 5p15.3-->5pter [46,XX,del(5)(p15.3)]. The analysis of a genotype-phenotype correlation confirmed that the cat-like cry, but not the characteristic dysmorphic features of CdCS are correlated with the deletion of 5p15.3.

  4. Associations between neurodevelopmental genes, neuroanatomy, and ultra high risk symptoms of psychosis in 22q11.2 deletion syndrome.

    PubMed

    Thompson, Carlie A; Karelis, Jason; Middleton, Frank A; Gentile, Karen; Coman, Ioana L; Radoeva, Petya D; Mehta, Rashi; Fremont, Wanda P; Antshel, Kevin M; Faraone, Stephen V; Kates, Wendy R

    2017-04-01

    22q11.2 deletion syndrome is a neurogenetic disorder resulting in the deletion of over 40 genes. Up to 40% of individuals with 22q11.2DS develop schizophrenia, though little is known about the underlying mechanisms. We hypothesized that allelic variation in functional polymorphisms in seven genes unique to the deleted region would affect lobar brain volumes, which would predict risk for psychosis in youth with 22q11.2DS. Participants included 56 individuals (30 males) with 22q11.2DS. Anatomic MR images were collected and processed using Freesurfer. Participants were genotyped for 10 SNPs in the COMT, DGCR8, GNB1L, PIK4CA, PRODH, RTN4R, and ZDHHC8 genes. All subjects were assessed for ultra high risk symptoms of psychosis. Allelic variation of the rs701428 SNP of RTN4R was significantly associated with volumetric differences in gray matter of the lingual gyrus and cuneus of the occipital lobe. Moreover, occipital gray matter volumes were robustly associated with ultra high risk symptoms of psychosis in the presence of the G allele of rs701428. Our results suggest that RTN4R, a relatively under-studied gene at the 22q11 locus, constitutes a susceptibility gene for psychosis in individuals with this syndrome through its alteration of the architecture of the brain. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  5. A Case of 9.7 Mb Terminal Xp Deletion Including OA1 Locus Associated with Contiguous Gene Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Cho, Eun-Hae; Kim, Sook-Young

    2012-01-01

    Terminal or interstitial deletions of Xp (Xp22.2→Xpter) in males have been recognized as a cause of contiguous gene syndromes showing variable association of apparently unrelated clinical manifestations such as Leri-Weill dyschondrosteosis (SHOX), chondrodysplasia punctata (CDPX1), mental retardation (NLGN4), ichthyosis (STS), Kallmann syndrome (KAL1), and ocular albinism (GPR143). Here we present a case of a 13.5 yr old boy and sister with a same terminal deletion of Xp22.2 resulting in the absence of genes from the telomere of Xp to GPR143 of Xp22. The boy manifested the findings of all of the disorders mentioned above. We began a testosterone enanthate monthly replacement therapy. His sister, 11 yr old, manifested only Leri-Weill dyschondrosteosis, and had engaged in growth hormone therapy for 3 yr. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report of a male with a 9.7 Mb terminal Xp deletion including the OA1 locus in Korea. PMID:23091330

  6. New patients with Temple syndrome caused by 14q32 deletion: Genotype-phenotype correlations and risk of thyroid cancer.

    PubMed

    Severi, Giulia; Bernardini, Laura; Briuglia, Silvana; Bigoni, Stefania; Buldrini, Barbara; Magini, Pamela; Dentici, Maria L; Cordelli, Duccio M; Arrigo, Teresa; Franzoni, Emilio; Fini, Sergio; Italyankina, Eleonora; Loddo, Italia; Novelli, Antonio; Graziano, Claudio

    2016-01-01

    Temple syndrome (TS) is caused by abnormal expression of genes at the imprinted locus 14q32. A subset of TS patients carry 14q32 deletions of paternal origin. We aimed to define possible genotype-phenotype correlations and to highlight the prevalence of thyroid dysfunction, which is a previously unreported feature of TS. We described four new patients who carry deletions of paternal origin at 14q32 detected by array-CGH and reviewed nine patients reported in the medical literature. We compared clinical features with respect to deletion size and position. Expression of DLK1 is altered in all the patients with TS, but intellectual disability (ID) is present only in patients with larger deletions extending proximally to the imprinted locus. This study led to the identification of an ID "critical region" containing four annotated genes including YY1 as the strongest candidate. Furthermore, we described three patients with thyroid dysfunction, which progressed to papillary carcinoma at a very young age in two of them. We conclude that DLK1 loss of function is likely to be responsible for the core features of TS, while haploinsufficiency of a gene outside the imprinted region causes ID. Thyroid cancer may be an unrecognized feature and monitoring for thyroid dysfunction should thus be considered in TS patients. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  7. Prader-Willi syndrome with an unusually large 15q deletion due to an unbalanced translocation t(4;15).

    PubMed

    Varela, Monica C; Lopes, Graziela M P; Koiffmann, Celia P

    2004-01-01

    Prader-Willi syndrome (PWS) is a neurobehavioral disorder caused by deletions in the 15q11-q13 region, by maternal uniparental disomy of chromosome 15 or by imprinting defects. Structural rearrangements of chromosome 15 have been described in about 5% of the patients with typical or atypical PWS phenotype. An 8-year-old boy with a clinical diagnosis of PWS, severe neurodevelopmental delay, absence of speech and mental retardation was studied by cytogenetic and molecular techniques, and an unbalanced de novo karyotype 45,XY,der(4)t(4;15)(q35;q14),-15 was detected after GTG-banding. The patient was diagnosed by SNURF-SNRPN exon 1 methylation assay, and the extent of the deletions on chromosomes 4 and 15 was investigated by microsatellite analysis of markers located in 4qter and 15q13-q14 regions. The deletion of chromosome 4q was distal to D4S1652, and that of chromosome 15 was located between D15S1043 and D15S1010. Our patient's severely affected phenotype could be due to the extent of the deletion, larger than usually seen in PWS patients, although the unbalance of the derivative chromosome 4 cannot be ruled out as another possible cause. The breakpoint was located in the subtelomeric region, very close to the telomere, a region that has been described as having the lowest gene concentrations in the human genome.

  8. Occupational hydrocarbon exposure among fathers of Prader-Willi syndrome patients with and without deletions of 15q

    SciTech Connect

    Cassidy, S.B.; Gainey, A.J.; Butler, M.G.

    1989-06-01

    Prader-Willi syndrome (PWS) is a multiple-anomaly disorder in which 50%-70% of cases are associated with a de novo interstitial deletion (del 15(q11-13)) on prometaphase cytogenetic analysis, the remainder having apparently normal chromosomes. In most instances, the paternally derived chromosome has become deleted in the affected child, suggesting the possibility of a predisposing environmental factor. Strakowski and Butler found an increased incidence of paternal periconceptional employment in hydrocarbon-exposing occupations in this population. This observation may suggest a causal relationship to PWS. To determine whether this association may distinguish the cytogenetically different groups, we identified 81 patients with the disorder who were physically and cytogenetically examined in three centers, and we compared the frequency of possible periconceptional occupational hydrocarbon exposure between fathers of patients who demonstrate a 15q deletion and those who do not. There was no statistically significant difference between the cytogenetically different groups. In both groups, approximately half of the fathers had been employed in hydrocarbon-exposing jobs. These findings suggest lack of etiologic heterogeneity between the cytogenetically different groups for PWS and affirm the need to seek submicroscopic deletions through molecular genetic studies. These data also provide additional evidence that hydrocarbon exposure among fathers of children with PWS may be causally related to the disorder, and they also suggest the need for more accurate assessment of exposure via a large, controlled study.

  9. Smith-Magenis syndrome deletion: A case with equivocal cytogenetic findings resolved by fluorescence in situ hybridization

    SciTech Connect

    Juyal, R.C.; Patel, P.I.; Greenberg, F.

    1995-09-11

    The availability of markers for the 17p11.2 region has enabled the diagnosis of Smith-Magenis syndrome (SMS) by fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH). SMS is typically associated with a discernible deletion of band 17p11.2 upon cytogenetic analysis at a resolution of 400-550 bands. We present a case that illustrates the importance of using FISH to confirm a cytogenetic diagnosis of del(17)(p11.2). Four independent cytogenetic analyses were performed with different conclusions. Results of low resolution analyses of amniocytes and peripheral blood lymphocytes were apparently normal, while high resolution analyses of peripheral blood samples in two laboratories indicated mosaicism for del(17)(p11.2). FISH clearly demonstrated a 17p deletion on one chromosome of all peripheral blood cells analyzed and ruled out mosaicism unambiguously. The deletion was undetectable by flow cytometric quantitation of chromosomal DNA content, suggesting that it is less than 2 Mb. We conclude that FISH should be used to detect the SMS deletion when routine chromosome analysis fails to detect it and to verify mosaicism. 23 refs., 3 figs., 1 tab.

  10. Cornelia de Lange syndrome caused by heterozygous deletions of chromosome 8q24: comments on the article by Pereza et al. [2012].

    PubMed

    Pereza, Nina; Severinski, Srećko; Ostojić, Saša; Volk, Marija; Maver, Aleš; Dekanić, Kristina Baraba; Kapović, Miljenko; Peterlin, Borut

    2015-06-01

    In the March issue of the Journal in 2012, we reported on a girl with Langer-Giedion syndrome (LGS) phenotype and a 7.5 Mb interstitial deletion at 8q23.3q24.13, encompassing the EXT1, but not the TRPS1 gene. Recent discoveries have shown that heterozygous intragenic mutations or contiguous gene deletions including the RAD21 gene, which is located downstream of the TRPS1 gene, are the cause of Cornelia de Lange syndrome-4. Considering that the interstitial deletion in our patient included the RAD21 and 30 other RefSeq genes, we would like to suggest a revision of the diagnosis reported in our previous paper and compare our patient to other reported patients with Cornelia de Lange syndrome-4 caused by heterozygous deletions of chromosome 8q24. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  11. Prospective investigation of autism and genotype-phenotype correlations in 22q13 deletion syndrome and SHANK3 deficiency

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background 22q13 deletion syndrome, also known as Phelan-McDermid syndrome, is a neurodevelopmental disorder characterized by intellectual disability, hypotonia, delayed or absent speech, and autistic features. SHANK3 has been identified as the critical gene in the neurological and behavioral aspects of this syndrome. The phenotype of SHANK3 deficiency has been described primarily from case studies, with limited evaluation of behavioral and cognitive deficits. The present study used a prospective design and inter-disciplinary clinical evaluations to assess patients with SHANK3 deficiency, with the goal of providing a comprehensive picture of the medical and behavioral profile of the syndrome. Methods A serially ascertained sample of patients with SHANK3 deficiency (n = 32) was evaluated by a team of child psychiatrists, neurologists, clinical geneticists, molecular geneticists and psychologists. Patients were evaluated for autism spectrum disorder using the Autism Diagnostic Interview-Revised and the Autism Diagnostic Observation Schedule-G. Results Thirty participants with 22q13.3 deletions ranging in size from 101 kb to 8.45 Mb and two participants with de novo SHANK3 mutations were included. The sample was characterized by high rates of autism spectrum disorder: 27 (84%) met criteria for autism spectrum disorder and 24 (75%) for autistic disorder. Most patients (77%) exhibited severe to profound intellectual disability and only five (19%) used some words spontaneously to communicate. Dysmorphic features, hypotonia, gait disturbance, recurring upper respiratory tract infections, gastroesophageal reflux and seizures were also common. Analysis of genotype-phenotype correlations indicated that larger deletions were associated with increased levels of dysmorphic features, medical comorbidities and social communication impairments related to autism. Analyses of individuals with small deletions or point mutations identified features related to SHANK3 haploinsufficiency

  12. Identification of novel deletions of 15q11q13 in Angelman syndrome by array-CGH: molecular characterization and genotype-phenotype correlations.

    PubMed

    Sahoo, Trilochan; Bacino, Carlos A; German, Jennifer R; Shaw, Chad A; Bird, Lynne M; Kimonis, Virginia; Anselm, Irinia; Waisbren, Susan; Beaudet, Arthur L; Peters, Sarika U

    2007-09-01

    Angelman syndrome (AS) is a neurodevelopmental disorder characterized by mental retardation, absent speech, ataxia, and a happy disposition. Deletions of the 15q11q13 region are found in approximately 70% of AS patients. The deletions are sub-classified into class I and class II based on their sizes of approximately 6.8 and approximately 6.0, respectively, with two different proximal breakpoints and a common distal breakpoint. Utilizing a chromosome 15-specific comparative genomic hybridization genomic microarray (array-CGH), we have identified, determined the deletion sizes, and mapped the breakpoints in a cohort of 44 cases, to relate those breakpoints to the genomic architecture and derive more precise genotype-phenotype correlations. Interestingly four patients of the 44 studied (9.1%) had novel and unusually large deletions, and are reported here. This is the first report of very large deletions of 15q11q13 resulting in AS; the largest deletion being >10.6 Mb. These novel deletions involve three different distal breakpoints, two of which have been earlier shown to be involved in the generation of isodicentric 15q chromosomes (idic15). Additionally, precise determination of the deletion breakpoints reveals the presence of directly oriented low-copy repeats (LCRs) flanking the recurrent and novel breakpoints. The LCRs are adequate in size, orientation, and homology to enable abnormal recombination events leading to deletions and duplications. This genomic organization provides evidence for a common mechanism for the generation of both common and rare deletion types. Larger deletions result in a loss of several genes outside the common Angelman syndrome-Prader-Willi syndrome (AS-PWS) critical interval, and a more severe phenotype.

  13. Genetic Dosage Compensation in a Family with Velo-cardio-facial/DiGeorge/22q11.2 Deletion Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Alkalay, Avishai A.; Guo, Tingwei; Montagna, Cristina; Digilio, M. Cristina; Marino, Bruno; Dallapiccola, Bruno; Morrow, Bernice

    2014-01-01

    Cytogenetic studies of a male child carrying the 22q11.2 deletion common in patients with velo-cardio-facial/DiGeorge syndrome revealed an unexpected rearrangement of the 22q11.2 region in his normal appearing mother. The mother carries a 3 Mb deletion on one copy and a reciprocal, similar sized duplication on the other copy of chromosome 22q11.2 as revealed by fluorescence in situ hybridization and array comparative genome hybridization analysis. The most parsimonious mechanism for the rearrangement is a mitotic non-allelic homologous recombination event in a cell in the early embryo soon after fertilization. The normal phenotype of the mother can be explained by the theory of genetic dosage compensation. This is the second documented case of such an event for this or any genomic disorder. This finding helps to reinforce this phenomenon in a human model, and has significant implications for genetic counseling of future children. PMID:21337693

  14. A review of neurocognitive and behavioral profiles associated with 22q11 deletion syndrome: implications for clinical evaluation and treatment.

    PubMed

    Ousley, Opal; Rockers, Kimberly; Dell, Mary Lynn; Coleman, Karlene; Cubells, Joseph F

    2007-04-01

    22q11 deletion syndrome (22q11DS) is a chromosomal disorder that results in variable multisystem abnormalities, including conotruncal cardiac malformations, aplasia or hypoplasia of the thymus and/or parathyroid glands, immunodeficiency, dysmorphic facial features, and cleft palate and other nasopharyngeal and dental anomalies. Individuals with 22q11DS also exhibit cognitive and behavioral difficulties, including delayed motor and speech-language development, mental retardation, low academic achievement, impaired spatial reasoning, poor attentional and executive functioning, attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder, autism spectrum disorders, mood disorders, and/or schizophrenia spectrum disorders. Interventions should be designed based on the results of periodic developmental and neuropsychological assessments and psychiatric screening. Future research should focus on understanding deletion-related gene-environment interactions and their effects on developmental and behavioral outcomes, identifying neurodegenerative processes in 22q11DS, and developing preventive models of behavioral and psychopharmacologic treatment.

  15. A grandpaternally derived de novo deletion within Xp21 initially presenting in carrier females diagnosed as Kugelberg-Welander syndrome.

    PubMed

    Wood, S; Shukin, R J; McGillivray, B C; Ray, P N; Worton, R G

    1988-02-01

    We report on two sisters with a history of muscle weakness and an electromyogram (EMG) diagnosis of Kugelberg-Welander syndrome (KWS) or juvenile spinal muscular atrophy. A half-brother to these women was diagnosed to have Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD). Using molecular probes, we identified a deletion within Xp21 in this isolated case of DMD. Sequences detected by pXJ1.1 are deleted, while fragments detected by pERT87 are intact. Both of these probes are derived from the DMD locus. We have shown that the affected sisters share with their half-brother DNA markers that are linked to the DMD gene and inherited from their maternal grandfather. Dosage analysis of Southern blots show monosomy for pXJ1.1, which has allowed us to determine carrier status within this family and to show that the half-sisters are manifesting DMD carriers.

  16. Understanding the Role of Tbx1 as a Candidate Gene for 22q11.2 Deletion Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Shan; Li, Xiao; Amendt, Brad A.

    2013-01-01

    22q11.2 deletion syndrome (22q11.2DS) is caused by a commonly occurring microdeletion on chromosome 22. Clinical findings include cardiac malformations, thymic and parathyroid hypoplasia, craniofacial dysmorphisms, and dental defects. These phenotypes are due mainly to abnormal development of the pharyngeal apparatus. Targeted deletion studies in mice and analysis of naturally occurring mutations in humans have implicated Tbx1 as a candidate gene for 22q11.2DS. Tbx1 belongs to an evolutionarily conserved T-box family of transcription factors, whose expression is precisely regulated during embryogenesis, and it appears to regulate the proliferation and differentiation of various progenitor cells during organogenesis. In this review, we discuss the mechanisms of Tbx1 during development of the heart, thymus and parathyroid glands, as well as during formation of the palate, teeth, and other craniofacial features. PMID:23996541

  17. Individuals with 22q11.2 Deletion Syndrome Are Impaired at Explicit, but Not Implicit, Discrimination of Local Forms Embedded in Global Structures

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Giersch, Anne; Glaser, Bronwyn; Pasca, Catherine; Chabloz, Mélanie; Debbané, Martin; Eliez, Stephan

    2014-01-01

    Individuals with 22q11.2 deletion syndrome (22q11.2DS) are impaired at exploring visual information in space; however, not much is known about visual form discrimination in the syndrome. Thirty-five individuals with 22q11.2DS and 41 controls completed a form discrimination task with global forms made up of local elements. Affected individuals…

  18. Intellectual Functioning in Relation to Autism and ADHD Symptomatology in Children and Adolescents with 22q11.2 Deletion Syndrome

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hidding, E.; Swaab, H.; Sonneville, L. M. J.; Engeland, H.; Sijmens-Morcus, M. E. J.; Klaassen, P. W. J.; Duijff, S. N.; Vorstman, J. A. S.

    2015-01-01

    Background: The 22q11.2 deletion syndrome (22q11DS; velo-cardio-facial syndrome) is associated with an increased risk of various disorders, including autism spectrum disorder (ASD) and attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD). With this study, we aimed to investigate the relation between intellectual functioning and severity of ASD and ADHD…

  19. Individuals with 22q11.2 Deletion Syndrome Are Impaired at Explicit, but Not Implicit, Discrimination of Local Forms Embedded in Global Structures

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Giersch, Anne; Glaser, Bronwyn; Pasca, Catherine; Chabloz, Mélanie; Debbané, Martin; Eliez, Stephan

    2014-01-01

    Individuals with 22q11.2 deletion syndrome (22q11.2DS) are impaired at exploring visual information in space; however, not much is known about visual form discrimination in the syndrome. Thirty-five individuals with 22q11.2DS and 41 controls completed a form discrimination task with global forms made up of local elements. Affected individuals…

  20. Intellectual Functioning in Relation to Autism and ADHD Symptomatology in Children and Adolescents with 22q11.2 Deletion Syndrome

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hidding, E.; Swaab, H.; Sonneville, L. M. J.; Engeland, H.; Sijmens-Morcus, M. E. J.; Klaassen, P. W. J.; Duijff, S. N.; Vorstman, J. A. S.

    2015-01-01

    Background: The 22q11.2 deletion syndrome (22q11DS; velo-cardio-facial syndrome) is associated with an increased risk of various disorders, including autism spectrum disorder (ASD) and attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD). With this study, we aimed to investigate the relation between intellectual functioning and severity of ASD and ADHD…

  1. Investigation of deletions at 7q11.23 in 44 patients referred for Williams-Beuren syndrome, using FISH and four DNA polymorphisms.

    PubMed

    Brøndum-Nielsen, K; Beck, B; Gyftodimou, J; Hørlyk, H; Liljenberg, U; Petersen, M B; Pedersen, W; Petersen, M B; Sand, A; Skovby, F; Stafanger, G; Zetterqvist, P; Tommerup, N

    1997-01-01

    Williams syndrome (WS) is associated with a submicroscopic deletion of the elastin gene (ELN) at 7q11.23. The deletion encompasses closely linked DNA markers. We have investigated 44 patients referred for possible WS using fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) analysis with a P1 clone containing an insert from the ELN, as well as performing genotype analysis of patients and parents with four DNA polymorphisms. Twenty-four patients were found to have deletions, 19 of whom were found clinically to have typical WS. The facial features were especially characteristic. None of the patients without detectable deletions was reported to have typical WS features, although one had supravalvular aortic stenosis, hypercalcemia, and mental retardation. No evidence was found in this material for variability of the size of the deletion. Our study supports the usefulness of analysis of ELN deletion in WS patients, both for confirmation of diagnosis and for genetic counselling.

  2. Human homologue sequences to the Drosophila dishevelled segment-polarity gene are deleted in the DiGeorge syndrome.

    PubMed Central

    Pizzuti, A.; Novelli, G.; Mari, A.; Ratti, A.; Colosimo, A.; Amati, F.; Penso, D.; Sangiuolo, F.; Calabrese, G.; Palka, G.; Silani, V.; Gennarelli, M.; Mingarelli, R.; Scarlato, G.; Scambler, P.; Dallapiccola, B.

    1996-01-01

    DiGeorge syndrome (DGS) is a developmental defect of some of the neural crest derivatives. Most DGS patients show haploinsufficiency due to interstitial deletions of the proximal long arm of chromosome 22. Deletions of 22q11 have also been reported with patients with the velocardio-facial syndrome and familial conotruncal heart defects. It has been suggested that the wide phenotype spectrum associated with 22q11 monosomy is a consequence of contiguous-gene deletions. We report the isolation of human cDNAs homologous to the Drosophila dishevelled (dsh) segment-polarity gene. Sequences homologous to the 3' UTR of these transcripts (DVL-22) were positioned within the DGS critical region and were found to be deleted in DGS patients. Human DVL mRNAs are expressed in several fetal and adult tissues, including the thymus and, at high levels, the heart. Two transcripts, 3.2 and 5kb, were detected, in northern blot analysis, with different expression patterns in the surveyed tissues when different cDNAs were used. The isolated cDNAs exhibit high amino acid homology with the mouse and Xenopus Dvl-1 gene, the only other vertebrate dsh homologues so far isolated. The pivotal role of dsh in fly development suggests an analogous key function in vertebrate embryogenesis of its homologue genes. Since DGS may be due to perturbation of differentiation mechanisms at decisive embryological stages, a Dsh-like gene in the small-region overlap (SRO) might be a candidate for the pathogenesis of this disorder. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 PMID:8644734

  3. Dysregulation of DGCR6 and DGCR6L: psychopathological outcomes in chromosome 22q11.2 deletion syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Chakraborty, D; Bernal, A J; Schoch, K; Howard, T D; Ip, E H; Hooper, S R; Keshavan, M S; Jirtle, R L; Shashi, V

    2012-01-01

    Chromosome 22q11.2 deletion syndrome (22q11DS) is the most common microdeletion syndrome in humans. It is typified by highly variable symptoms, which might be explained by epigenetic regulation of genes in the interval. Using computational algorithms, our laboratory previously predicted that DiGeorge critical region 6 (DGCR6), which lies within the deletion interval, is imprinted in humans. Expression and epigenetic regulation of this gene have not, however, been examined in 22q11DS subjects. The purpose of this study was to determine if the expression levels of DGCR6 and its duplicate copy DGCR6L in 22q11DS subjects are associated with the parent-of-origin of the deletion and childhood psychopathologies. Our investigation showed no evidence of parent-of-origin-related differences in expression of both DGCR6 and DGCR6L. However, we found that the variability in DGCR6 expression was significantly greater in 22q11DS children than in age and gender-matched control individuals. Children with 22q11DS who had anxiety disorders had significantly lower DGCR6 expression, especially in subjects with the deletion on the maternal chromosome, despite the lack of imprinting. Our findings indicate that epigenetic mechanisms other than imprinting contribute to the dysregulation of these genes and the associated childhood psychopathologies observed in individuals with 22q11DS. Further studies are now needed to test the usefulness of DGCR6 and DGCR6L expression and alterations in the epigenome at these loci in predicting childhood anxiety and associated adult-onset pathologies in 22q11DS subjects. PMID:22832905

  4. Human homologue sequences to the Drosophila dishevelled segment-polarity gene are deleted in the DiGeorge syndrome

    SciTech Connect

    Pizzuti, A.; Ratti, A.; Penso, D.; Silani, V.; Scarlato, G.

    1996-04-01

    DiGeorge syndrome (DGS) is a developmental defect of some of the neural crest derivatives. Most DGS patients show haploinsufficiency due to interstitial deletions of the proximal long arm of chromosome 22. Deletions of 22q11 have also been reported in patients with the velo-cardio-facial syndrome and familial conotruncal heart defects. It has been suggested that the wide phenotype spectrum associated with 22q11 monosomy is a consequence of contiguous-gene deletions. We report the isolation of human cDNAs homologous to the Drosophila dishevelled (dsh) segment-polarity gene. Sequences homologous to the 3{prime} UTR of these transcripts (DVL-22) were positioned within the DGS critical region and were found to be deleted in DGS patients. Human DVL mRNAs are expressed in several fetal and adult tissues, including the thymus and, at high levels, the heart. Two transcripts, 3.2 and 5 kb, were detected, in Northern blot analysis, with different expression patterns in the surveyed tissues when different cDNAs were used. The isolated cDNAs exhibit high amino acid homology with the mouse and Xenopus Dvl-1 gene, the only other vertebrate dsh homologues so far isolated. The pivotal role of dsh in fly development suggests an analogous key function in vertebrate embryogenesis of its homologue genes. Since DGS may be due to perturbation of differentiation mechanisms at decisive embryological stages, a Dsh-like gene in the small-region overlap (SRO) might be a candidate for the pathogenesis of this disorder. 52 refs., 3 figs.

  5. Human homologue sequences to the Drosophila dishevelled segment-polarity gene are deleted in the DiGeorge syndrome.

    PubMed

    Pizzuti, A; Novelli, G; Mari, A; Ratti, A; Colosimo, A; Amati, F; Penso, D; Sangiuolo, F; Calabrese, G; Palka, G; Silani, V; Gennarelli, M; Mingarelli, R; Scarlato, G; Scambler, P; Dallapiccola, B

    1996-04-01

    DiGeorge syndrome (DGS) is a developmental defect of some of the neural crest derivatives. Most DGS patients show haploinsufficiency due to interstitial deletions of the proximal long arm of chromosome 22. Deletions of 22q11 have also been reported with patients with the velocardio-facial syndrome and familial conotruncal heart defects. It has been suggested that the wide phenotype spectrum associated with 22q11 monosomy is a consequence of contiguous-gene deletions. We report the isolation of human cDNAs homologous to the Drosophila dishevelled (dsh) segment-polarity gene. Sequences homologous to the 3' UTR of these transcripts (DVL-22) were positioned within the DGS critical region and were found to be deleted in DGS patients. Human DVL mRNAs are expressed in several fetal and adult tissues, including the thymus and, at high levels, the heart. Two transcripts, 3.2 and 5kb, were detected, in northern blot analysis, with different expression patterns in the surveyed tissues when different cDNAs were used. The isolated cDNAs exhibit high amino acid homology with the mouse and Xenopus Dvl-1 gene, the only other vertebrate dsh homologues so far isolated. The pivotal role of dsh in fly development suggests an analogous key function in vertebrate embryogenesis of its homologue genes. Since DGS may be due to perturbation of differentiation mechanisms at decisive embryological stages, a Dsh-like gene in the small-region overlap (SRO) might be a candidate for the pathogenesis of this disorder.

  6. Confirmation that the conotruncal anomaly face syndrome is associated with a deletion within 22q11.2

    SciTech Connect

    Matsuoka, Rumiko; Takao, Atsuyoshi; Kimura, Misa; Kondo, Chisato; Ando, Masahiko; Momma, Kazuo; Imamura, Shin-ichiro; Joh-o, Kunitaka; Ikeda, Kazuo; Nishibatake, Makoto

    1994-11-15

    The so-called {open_quotes}conotruncal anomaly face syndrome{close_quotes} (CTAFS) is characterized by a peculiar facial appearance associated with congenital heart disease (CHD), especially cardiac outflow tract defects such as tetralogy of Fallot (TOF), double outlet ring ventricle (DORV), and truncus arteriosus (TAC). CTAFS and the DiGeorge anomaly (DGA) have many similar phenotypic characteristics, suggesting that they share a common cause. In many cases DGA is known to be associated with monosomy for a region of chromosome 22q11.2. Fifty CTAFS patients and 10 DGA patients, 11 parents couples and 10 mothers of CTAFS patients, and 3 parents couples and 2 mothers of DGA patients were examined by fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH) using the N25 (D22S75) DGCR probe (Oncor). Monosomy for a region of 22q11.2 was found in 42 CTAFS, 9 DGA, 4 mothers, and 1 father who had CTAF without CHD. The remaining 8 CTAFS patients, 1 DGA patient and 1 mother who had questionable CTAF without CHD, showed no such chromosome abnormality. For the control, 60 patients who had CHD without CTAF or other know malformation syndromes were examined and had no deletion of 22q11.2. Therefore, we conclude that CTAFS is a part of the CATCH 22 syndrome; cardiac defects, abnormal faces, thymic hypoplasia, cleft palate, and hypocalcemia (CATCH) resulting from 22q11.2 deletions. 20 refs., 3 figs., 2 tabs.

  7. Absence of 12q21.2q22 deletions and subtelomeric rearrangements in cardiofaciocutaneous (CFC) syndrome patients.

    PubMed

    Kavamura, M I; Zollino, M; Lecce, R; Murdolo, M; Brunoni, D; Alchorne, M M A; Opitz, J M; Neri, G

    2003-06-01

    Recent publications described two patients with a CFC-like phenotype and the same deletion of chromosome region 12q21.2q22 [Rauen et al., 2000, 2002]. The patients did not have the classical CFC phenotype and presented other signs not usually seen in CFC patients: the first patient had hydrocephalus, and the second, a history of olygohydramnios, normal stature, pyloric stenosis, cutaneous syndactyly of toes and bilateral transverse palmar creases. In order to verify if classic CFC patients with normal chromosomes in conventional preparations have microdeletions within the 12q21.2q22 chromosome region, we performed FISH analysis using 12 BAC probes to screen this area. The average interval between the probes was of approximately 1 Mb. No deletions were found in any of the 17 classical CFC patients we examined. We conclude that the region 12q21.2q22 is not a candidate region for CFC syndrome and that the patients described by Rauen et al. [2000, 2002] probably have a different condition, i.e., an aneuploidy syndrome, with some phenotypic resemblance to the CFC syndrome. To further evaluate the possibility of other chromosome imbalances, we performed a subtelomeric analysis, by FISH technique, of all chromosomes, and did not find any subtelomeric rearrangements. Copyright 2003 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  8. Prader Willi/Angelman and DiGeorge/velocardiofacial syndrome deletions: diagnosis by primed in situ labeling (PRINS).

    PubMed

    Tharapel, Avirachan T; Kadandale, Jayarama S; Martens, Paula R; Wachtel, Stephen S; Wilroy, R Sid

    2002-01-15

    A recently developed methodology-primed in situ labeling (PRINS)-can be used in place of fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) to diagnose microdeletions. To demonstrate the efficiency, sensitivity, and specificity of PRINS in the diagnosis of microdeletions, we studied groups of patients with Prader Willi/Angelman (PWS/AS) syndrome and DiGeorge/velocardiofacial syndrome (DGS/VCFS). Results obtained by PRINS were then confirmed with the results obtained with FISH. Oligonucleotide primers specific for SNRPN and GABRB3 were used for PWS/AS syndromes. For DGS/VCFS, the primers used were DGCR2/TUPLE1 loci. Labeling patterns obtained by PRINS and FISH were analyzed and scored under a fluorescence microscope. Five normal subjects served as controls and were used for standardization of the PRINS protocol. In all, 20 study patients were involved: 10 PWS/AS and 10 DGS/VCFS. Five of the 10 patients referred with the clinical diagnosis of PWS/AS showed absence of labeling for SNRPN and GABRB3 on one chromosome 15, confirming deletion of the two loci. Similarly, 6 of the 10 patients referred for DGS/VCFS showed deletion for the DGCR2/TUPLE1 loci on one chromosome 22. The remaining patients and controls had normal patterns for all the loci as indicated by FISH and PRINS. Concordant FISH and PRINS results were obtained in all patients and controls studied.

  9. Rare copy number variants and congenital heart defects in the 22q11.2 deletion syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Mlynarski, Elisabeth E.; Xie, Michael; Taylor, Deanne; Sheridan, Molly B.; Guo, Tingwei; Racedo, Silvia E.; McDonald-McGinn, Donna M.; Chow, Eva W. C.; Vorstman, Jacob; Swillen, Ann; Devriendt, Koen; Breckpot, Jeroen; Digilio, Maria Cristina; Marino, Bruno; Dallapiccola, Bruno; Philip, Nicole; Simon, Tony J.; Roberts, Amy E.; Piotrowicz, Małgorzata; Bearden, Carrie E.; Eliez, Stephan; Gothelf, Doron; Coleman, Karlene; Kates, Wendy R.; Devoto, Marcella; Zackai, Elaine; Heine-Suñer, Damian; Goldmuntz, Elizabeth; Bassett, Anne S.; Morrow, Bernice E.

    2016-01-01

    The 22q11.2 deletion syndrome (22q11DS; velocardiofacial/DiGeorge syndrome; VCFS/DGS; MIM #192430; 188400) is the most common microdeletion syndrome. The phenotypic presentation of 22q11DS is highly variable; approximately 60–75 % of 22q11DS patients have been reported to have a congenital heart defect (CHD), mostly of the conotruncal type, and/or aortic arch defect. The etiology of the cardiac phenotypic variability is not currently known for the majority of patients. We hypothesized that rare copy number variants (CNVs) outside the 22q11.2 deleted region may modify the risk of being born with a CHD in this sensitized population. Rare CNV analysis was performed using Affymetrix SNP Array 6.0 data from 946 22q11DS subjects with CHDs (n = 607) or with normal cardiac anatomy (n = 339). Although there was no significant difference in the overall burden of rare CNVs, an overabundance of CNVs affecting cardiac-related genes was detected in 22q11DS individuals with CHDs. When the rare CNVs were examined with regard to gene interactions, specific cardiac networks, such as Wnt signaling, appear to be overrepresented in 22q11DS CHD cases but not 22q11DS controls with a normal heart. Collectively, these data suggest that CNVs outside the 22q11.2 region may contain genes that modify risk for CHDs in some 22q11DS patients. PMID:26742502

  10. Rare copy number variants and congenital heart defects in the 22q11.2 deletion syndrome.

    PubMed

    Mlynarski, Elisabeth E; Xie, Michael; Taylor, Deanne; Sheridan, Molly B; Guo, Tingwei; Racedo, Silvia E; McDonald-McGinn, Donna M; Chow, Eva W C; Vorstman, Jacob; Swillen, Ann; Devriendt, Koen; Breckpot, Jeroen; Digilio, Maria Cristina; Marino, Bruno; Dallapiccola, Bruno; Philip, Nicole; Simon, Tony J; Roberts, Amy E; Piotrowicz, Małgorzata; Bearden, Carrie E; Eliez, Stephan; Gothelf, Doron; Coleman, Karlene; Kates, Wendy R; Devoto, Marcella; Zackai, Elaine; Heine-Suñer, Damian; Goldmuntz, Elizabeth; Bassett, Anne S; Morrow, Bernice E; Emanuel, Beverly S

    2016-03-01

    The 22q11.2 deletion syndrome (22q11DS; velocardiofacial/DiGeorge syndrome; VCFS/DGS; MIM #192430; 188400) is the most common microdeletion syndrome. The phenotypic presentation of 22q11DS is highly variable; approximately 60-75 % of 22q11DS patients have been reported to have a congenital heart defect (CHD), mostly of the conotruncal type, and/or aortic arch defect. The etiology of the cardiac phenotypic variability is not currently known for the majority of patients. We hypothesized that rare copy number variants (CNVs) outside the 22q11.2 deleted region may modify the risk of being born with a CHD in this sensitized population. Rare CNV analysis was performed using Affymetrix SNP Array 6.0 data from 946 22q11DS subjects with CHDs (n = 607) or with normal cardiac anatomy (n = 339). Although there was no significant difference in the overall burden of rare CNVs, an overabundance of CNVs affecting cardiac-related genes was detected in 22q11DS individuals with CHDs. When the rare CNVs were examined with regard to gene interactions, specific cardiac networks, such as Wnt signaling, appear to be overrepresented in 22q11DS CHD cases but not 22q11DS controls with a normal heart. Collectively, these data suggest that CNVs outside the 22q11.2 region may contain genes that modify risk for CHDs in some 22q11DS patients.

  11. Ictus emeticus presenting as an unusual seizure type in chromosome 22q11.2 deletion syndrome.

    PubMed

    Hung, Pi-Lien; Huang, Li-Tung; Kwan, Shang-Yeong; Chang, Kai-Ping; Chen, Hsin-Hung; Lee, Yi-Yen; Fan, Hueng-Chuen; Chen, Chien

    2017-03-08

    We present a case study of a patient with chromosome 22q11.2 deletion syndrome presenting with ictus emeticus, together with a review of the relevant literature. The patient developed generalized tonic-clonic seizures at 3 months old, and seizures eventually remitted after calcium therapy. He then experienced vigorous vomiting that occurred during sleep, with glassy eyes and legs flexion. Video-EEG recordings exhibited a switch in background activity from organized reactivity during normal sleep to left lateralized temporal delta activity, which was bilaterally synchronized during an emetic attack. The ictal vomiting ceased following management with oxcarbazepine, high-dose phenobarbital, and a ketogenic diet. The unique seizure type and rare ictal EEG findings are the first reported in a child with chromosome 22q11.2 deletion syndrome. This case highlights that ictus emeticus without detectable epileptic discharge on EEG is one potential epileptic presentation in this genetic syndrome. [Published with video sequences on www.epilepticdisorders.com].

  12. Single nucleotide polymorphism discovery in TBX1 in individuals with and without 22q11.2 deletion syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Heike, Carrie L.; Starr, Jacqueline R.; Rieder, Mark J.; Cunningham, Michael L.; Edwards, Karen L.; Stanaway, Ian; Crawford, Dana C.

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND Children with 22q11.2 deletion syndrome (22q11.2DS) have a wide range of clinical features. TBX1 has been proposed as a candidate gene for some of the features in this condition. Polymorphisms in the non-deleted TBX1, which may affect the function of the sole TBX1 gene in individuals with the 22q11.2DS, may be a key to understanding the phenotypic variability among individuals with a shared deletion. Comprehensive single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) discovery by resequencing candidate genes can identify genetic variants that influence a given phenotype. The purpose of this study was to further characterize the sequence variability in TBX1 by identifying all common SNPs in this gene. METHODS We resequenced TBX1 in 29 children with a documented 22q11.2 deletion and 95 non-deleted, healthy individuals. We estimated allele frequencies, performed tagSNP selection, and inferred haplotypes. We also compared SNP frequencies between 22q11.2DS and control samples. RESULTS We identified 355 biallelic markers among the 190 chromosomes resequenced in the control panel. The vast majority of the markers identified were SNPs (n=331), and the remainder indels (n=24). We did not identify SNPs or indels in the cis- regulatory element (FOX–binding site) upstream of TBX1. In children with 22q11.2DS we detected 187 biallelic markers, six of which were indels. Four of the seven coding SNPs identified in the controls were identified in children with 22q11.2DS. CONCLUSIONS This comprehensive SNP discovery data can be used to select SNPs to genotype for future association studies assessing the role of TBX1 and phenotypic variability in individuals with 22q11.2DS. PMID:19645056

  13. Evaluation of Potential Modifiers of the Cardiac Phenotype in the 22q11.2 Deletion Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Goldmuntz, Elizabeth; Driscoll, Deborah A.; Emanuel, Beverly S.; McDonald-McGinn, Donna; Mei, Minghua; Zackai, Elaine; Mitchell, Laura E.

    2010-01-01

    BACKGROUND The phenotype associated with deletion of the 22q11.2 chromosomal region is highly variable, yet little is known about the source of this variability. Cardiovascular anomalies, including tetralogy of Fallot, truncus arteriosus, interrupted aortic arch type B, perimembranous ventricular septal defects, and aortic arch anomalies, occur in approximately 75% of individuals with a 22q11.2 deletion. METHODS Data from 343 subjects enrolled in a study of the 22q11.2 deletion syndrome were used to evaluate potential modifiers of the cardiac phenotype in this disorder. Subjects with and without cardiac malformations, and subjects with and without aortic arch anomalies were compared with respect to sex and race. In addition, in the subset of subjects from whom a DNA sample was available, genotypes for variants of four genes that are involved in the folate-homocysteine metabolic pathway and that have been implicated as risk factors for other birth defects were compared. Five variants in four genes were genotyped by heteroduplex or restriction digest assays. The chi-square or Fisher’s exact test was used to evaluate the association between the cardiac phenotype and each potential modifier. RESULTS The cardiac phenotype observed in individuals with a 22q11.2 deletion was not significantly associated with either sex or race. The genetic variants that were evaluated also did not appear to be associated with the cardiovascular phenotype. CONCLUSIONS Variation in the cardiac phenotype observed between individuals with a 22q11.2 deletion does not appear to be related to sex, race, or five sequence variants in four folate-related genes that are located outside of the 22q11.2 region. PMID:18770859

  14. The 22q11 deletion: DiGeorge and velocardiofacial syndromes and the role of TBX1.

    PubMed

    Papangeli, Irinna; Scambler, Peter

    2013-01-01

    Hemizygous deletion of 22q11 affects approximately 1:4000 live births and may give rise to many different malformations but classically results in a constellation of phenotypes that receive a diagnosis of DiGeorge syndrome or velocardiofacial syndrome. Particularly affected are the heart and great vessels, the endocrine glands of the neck, the face, the soft palate, and cognitive development. Although up to 50 genes may be deleted, it is haploinsufficiency of the transcription factor TBX1 that is thought to make the greatest contribution to the disorder. Mouse embryos are exquisitely sensitive to varying levels of Tbx1 mRNA, and Tbx1 is required in all three germ layers of the embryonic pharyngeal region for normal development. TBX1 controls cell proliferation and affects cellular differentiation in a cell autonomous fashion, but it also directs non-cell autonomous effects, most notably in the signaling between pharyngeal surface ectoderm and the rostral neural crest. TBX1 interacts with several signaling pathways, including fibroblast growth factor, retinoic acid, CTNNB1 (formerly known as β-catenin), and bone morphogenetic protein (BMP), and may regulate pathways by both DNA-binding and non-binding activity. In addition to the structural abnormalities seen in 22q11 deletion syndrome (DS) and Tbx1 mutant mouse models, patients reaching adolescence and adulthood have a predisposition to psychiatric illness. Whether this has a developmental basis and, if so, which genes are involved is an ongoing strand of research. Thus, knowledge of the genetic and developmental mechanisms underlying 22q11DS has the potential to inform about common disease as well as developmental defect.

  15. Haploinsufficiency of Gtf2i, a gene deleted in Williams Syndrome, leads to increases in social interactions.

    PubMed

    Sakurai, Takeshi; Dorr, Nathan P; Takahashi, Nagahide; McInnes, L Alison; Elder, Gregory A; Buxbaum, Joseph D

    2011-02-01

    Identifying genes involved in social behavior is important for autism research. Williams-Beuren syndrome (WBS) is a developmental syndrome with unique neurocognitive features, including low IQ, deficits in visuospatial and visual-motor abilities, hypersensitivity to sounds, hypersociability, and increased general anxiety. The syndrome is caused by a recurrent hemizygous deletion of the 7q11.23 region, containing about 28 genes. One of genes in the region, GTF2I, has been implicated in the hypersociability and visuospatial deficits of WBS based on genotype-phenotype correlation studies of patients with atypical deletions. In order to clarify the involvement of GTF2I in neurocognitive function, especially social behavior, we have developed and characterized Gtf2i-deficient mice. We found that homozygous deletion of Gtf2i causes lethality during embryonic development with neural tube closure defects and exencephaly, consistent with other reports. Gtf2i heterozygous animals show no gross changes in brain structure or development. Furthermore, heterozygous animals show no alterations in learning and memory, including spatial memory as assessed by the Morris water maze, but show alterations in the recognition of novel objects. Interestingly, they show increased social interaction with unfamiliar mice and do not show typical social habituation processes, reminiscent of the hypersociability observed in WBS patients. The mice do not appear to show increased anxiety, supporting a specific effect of Gtf2i on defined domains of the WBS phenotype. These data indicate that Gtf2i is involved in several aspects of embryonic development and the development of social neurocircuitry and that GTF2I haploinsufficiency could be a contributor to the hypersociability in WBS patients. Copyright © 2010, International Society for Autism Research, Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  16. Molecular analysis of chromosome 11 deletions in aniridia-Wilms tumor syndrome.

    PubMed Central

    van Heyningen, V; Boyd, P A; Seawright, A; Fletcher, J M; Fantes, J A; Buckton, K E; Spowart, G; Porteous, D J; Hill, R E; Newton, M S

    1985-01-01

    We describe five individuals who have constitutional deletions of the short arm of one chromosome 11, including all or part of the band p13. All of these individuals suffer from aniridia; two have had a Wilms tumor removed. We have established lymphoblastoid cell lines from these and in three cases constructed somatic cell hybrids containing the deleted chromosome 11. Analysis of DNA from the cell lines and hybrids with a cloned cDNA probe has shown that the catalase gene is deleted in four of five patients. The catalase locus must be proximal to the Wilms and aniridia-related loci. We have not detected a deletion of the beta-globin or calcitonin genes in any of these individuals; we conclude these genes are likely to be outside the region 11p12-11p15.4. In addition, we have used monoclonal antibodies in fluorescence-activated cell sorting analysis to measure expression in the hybrids of two cell surface markers encoded by genes that map to the short arm of chromosome 11. The genes for both of these are deleted in two individuals but are present in the individual with the smallest deletion. Images PMID:3001710

  17. Dandy-Walker malformation and Wisconsin syndrome: novel cases add further insight into the genotype-phenotype correlations of 3q23q25 deletions

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background The Dandy-Walker malformation (DWM) is one of the commonest congenital cerebellar defects, and can be associated with multiple congenital anomalies and chromosomal syndromes. The occurrence of overlapping 3q deletions including the ZIC1 and ZIC4 genes in few patients, along with data from mouse models, have implicated both genes in the pathogenesis of DWM. Methods and results Using a SNP-array approach, we recently identified three novel patients carrying heterozygous 3q deletions encompassing ZIC1 and ZIC4. Magnetic resonance imaging showed that only two had a typical DWM, while the third did not present any defect of the DWM spectrum. SNP-array analysis in further eleven children diagnosed with DWM failed to identify deletions of ZIC1-ZIC4. The clinical phenotype of the three 3q deleted patients included multiple congenital anomalies and peculiar facial appearance, related to the localization and extension of each deletion. In particular, phenotypes resulted from the variable combination of three recognizable patterns: DWM (with incomplete penetrance); blepharophimosis, ptosis, and epicanthus inversus syndrome; and Wisconsin syndrome (WS), recently mapped to 3q. Conclusions Our data indicate that the 3q deletion is a rare defect associated with DWM, and suggest that the hemizygosity of ZIC1-ZIC4 genes is neither necessary nor sufficient per se to cause this condition. Furthermore, based on a detailed comparison of clinical features and molecular data from 3q deleted patients, we propose clinical diagnostic criteria and refine the critical region for WS. PMID:23679990

  18. Dandy-Walker malformation and Wisconsin syndrome: novel cases add further insight into the genotype-phenotype correlations of 3q23q25 deletions.

    PubMed

    Ferraris, Alessandro; Bernardini, Laura; Sabolic Avramovska, Vesna; Zanni, Ginevra; Loddo, Sara; Sukarova-Angelovska, Elena; Parisi, Valentina; Capalbo, Anna; Tumini, Stefano; Travaglini, Lorena; Mancini, Francesca; Duma, Filip; Barresi, Sabina; Novelli, Antonio; Mercuri, Eugenio; Tarani, Luigi; Bertini, Enrico; Dallapiccola, Bruno; Valente, Enza Maria

    2013-05-16

    The Dandy-Walker malformation (DWM) is one of the commonest congenital cerebellar defects, and can be associated with multiple congenital anomalies and chromosomal syndromes. The occurrence of overlapping 3q deletions including the ZIC1 and ZIC4 genes in few patients, along with data from mouse models, have implicated both genes in the pathogenesis of DWM. Using a SNP-array approach, we recently identified three novel patients carrying heterozygous 3q deletions encompassing ZIC1 and ZIC4. Magnetic resonance imaging showed that only two had a typical DWM, while the third did not present any defect of the DWM spectrum. SNP-array analysis in further eleven children diagnosed with DWM failed to identify deletions of ZIC1-ZIC4. The clinical phenotype of the three 3q deleted patients included multiple congenital anomalies and peculiar facial appearance, related to the localization and extension of each deletion. In particular, phenotypes resulted from the variable combination of three recognizable patterns: DWM (with incomplete penetrance); blepharophimosis, ptosis, and epicanthus inversus syndrome; and Wisconsin syndrome (WS), recently mapped to 3q. Our data indicate that the 3q deletion is a rare defect associated with DWM, and suggest that the hemizygosity of ZIC1-ZIC4 genes is neither necessary nor sufficient per se to cause this condition. Furthermore, based on a detailed comparison of clinical features and molecular data from 3q deleted patients, we propose clinical diagnostic criteria and refine the critical region for WS.

  19. Homozygous deletion of TRMT10A as part of a contiguous gene deletion in a syndrome of failure to thrive, delayed puberty, intellectual disability and diabetes mellitus.

    PubMed

    Zung, Amnon; Kori, Michal; Burundukov, Ella; Ben-Yosef, Tamar; Tatoor, Yasmin; Granot, Esther

    2015-12-01

    Two recent reports describe a new syndrome of intellectual disability, short stature, microcephaly, and young onset diabetes or disturbed glucose metabolism in association with inactivating mutations in the TRMT10A gene. We investigated the clinical spectrum presented by a 17-year-old female with a homozygous contiguous gene deletion involving the TRMT10A gene. From infancy, she presented with failure to thrive and microcephaly. Puberty was characterized by a slow and an inconsistent course of progression. Concomitantly, gonadotropin levels fluctuated between low and high levels which were compatible with gonadal failure. Unlike the previous reports, the patient had ketoacidosis at onset of diabetes and islet cell autoantibodies. Nevertheless, glycemic control was excellent (HbA1C 5.0%-6.2%). RT-PCR and Western blot analysis demonstrated a complete abolishment of TRMT10A mRNA and its translated protein. In order to elucidate the nature of diabetes in this patient, endogenous insulin secretion and glycemic control were evaluated by a glucagon stimulation test and continuous glucose monitoring both during insulin treatment and off therapy. Endogenous insulin secretion still persisted 22 months after onset of diabetes and relatively normal glucose levels were kept over 3 days without insulin treatment. The fluctuating course of puberty and diabetes may reflect intermittent apoptotic damages due to sensitization of the relevant cells to various stress agents in the absence of functional TRMT10A.

  20. Lesch-Nyhan Syndrome in a Family with a Deletion Followed by an Insertion within the HPRT1 Gene.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, Khue Vu; Nyhan, William L

    2015-01-01

    Lesch-Nyhan syndrome (LNS) is a rare X-linked inherited neurogenetic disorder of purine metabolism in which the enzyme, hypoxanthine-guanine phosphoribosyltransferase(HGprt) is defective. The authors report a novel mutation which led to LNS in a family with a deletion followed by an insertion (INDELS) via the serial replication slippage mechanism: c.428_432delTGCAGinsAGCAAA, p.Met143Lysfs*12 in exon 6 of HPRT1 gene. Molecular diagnosis discloses the genetic heterogeneity of HPRT1 gene responsible for HGprt deficiency. It allows fast, accurate carrier detection and genetic counseling.

  1. Neurodevelopmental profile of a new dysmorphic syndrome associated with submicroscopic partial deletion of 1p36.3.

    PubMed

    Knight-Jones, E; Knight, S; Heussler, H; Regan, R; Flint, J; Martin, K

    2000-03-01

    We describe four children with dysmorphic syndrome with severe learning disability (SLD). Their chromosomes had been normal on conventional cytogenetic examination. However, screening using a multiprobe fluorescence in situ hybridisation (FISH) technique for subtelomeric abnormalities revealed a deletion of the p arm of chromosome 1. The physical features include body asymmetry, microcephaly, distinctive facies with deep-set eyes, sharply defined eye sockets, and mid-face hypoplasia; the neurodevelopmental profile was characterised by SLD, motor delay with hypotonia, markedly delayed visual maturation, and postural asymmetry together with epilepsy. This phenotype is consistent with that described for partial monosomy for 1p36.3.

  2. Stroke-Like Presentation Following Febrile Seizure in a Patient with 1q43q44 Deletion Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Robinson, J. Elliott; Wolfe, Stephanie M.; Kaiser-Rogers, Kathleen; Greenwood, Robert S.

    2016-01-01

    Hemiconvulsion–hemiplegia–epilepsy syndrome (HHE) is a rare outcome of prolonged hemiconvulsion that is followed by diffuse unilateral hemispheric edema, hemiplegia, and ultimately hemiatrophy of the affected hemisphere and epilepsy. Here, we describe the case of a 3-year-old male with a 1;3 translocation leading to a terminal 1q43q44 deletion and a terminal 3p26.1p26.3 duplication that developed HHE after a prolonged febrile seizure and discuss the pathogenesis of HHE in the context of the patient’s complex genetic background. PMID:27199890

  3. Mother-Child Interaction as a Window to a Unique Social Phenotype in 22q11.2 Deletion Syndrome and in Williams Syndrome.

    PubMed

    Weisman, Omri; Feldman, Ruth; Burg-Malki, Merav; Keren, Miri; Geva, Ronny; Diesendruck, Gil; Gothelf, Doron

    2015-08-01

    Mother-child interactions in 22q11.2 Deletion syndrome (22q11.2DS) and Williams syndrome (WS) were coded for maternal sensitivity/intrusiveness, child's expression of affect, levels of engagement, and dyadic reciprocity. WS children were found to express more positive emotions towards their mothers compared to 22q11.2DS children and those with developmental delay in a conflict interaction. During the same interaction, dyads of 22q11.2DS children were characterized by higher levels of maternal intrusiveness, lower levels of child's engagement and reduced reciprocity compared to dyads of typically developing children. Finally, 22q11.2DS children with the COMT Met allele showed less adaptive behaviors than children with the Val allele. Dyadic behaviors partially coincided with the distinct social phenotypes in these syndromes and are potential behavioral markers of psychopathological trajectory.

  4. Cardiac anomalies in individuals with the 18q deletion syndrome; report of a child with Ebstein anomaly and review of the literature.

    PubMed

    van Trier, Dorothée C; Feenstra, Ilse; Bot, Petra; de Leeuw, Nicole; Draaisma, Jos M Th

    2013-08-01

    Individuals with the 18q deletion syndrome are presented with various clinical characteristics, including cardiac anomalies in 24-36% of the reported cases. Nonetheless, genotype-phenotype correlations for cardiac anomalies in the 18q deletion syndrome have rarely been reported. We report on two girls with a terminal 18q deletion, one in whom an Ebstein anomaly and Wolff-Parkinson-White syndrome were detected and the other with multiple valve stenosis and a ventricular septal defect. The genotype and cardiac abnormalities of these girls and 17 other individuals with a de novo 18qter deletion reported in the literature are reviewed. All 19 individuals shared a small overlapping deletion region between 18q22.3q23. The most common cardiac defects detected were pulmonary valve anomalies and atrial septal defects. Ebstein anomaly, a rare cardiac malformation, was diagnosed in two individuals. Additional molecularly based genotype-phenotype studies are needed in order to pinpoint candidate genes within this region that contribute to normal cardiac development. A careful cardiac evaluation consisting of physical examination, ECG and ultrasound examination should be performed in all individuals diagnosed with the 18q deletion syndrome. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  5. Schizophrenia Spectrum Disorders in a Danish 22q11.2 Deletion Syndrome Cohort Compared to the Total Danish Population--A Nationwide Register Study.

    PubMed

    Vangkilde, Anders; Olsen, Line; Hoeffding, Louise K; Pedersen, Carsten B; Mortensen, Preben B; Werge, Thomas; Trabjerg, Betina

    2016-05-01

    Cross-sectional studies have shown associations between 22q11.2 deletion syndrome and schizophrenia. However, large-scale prospective studies have been lacking. We, therefore, conducted the first large-scale population based study on the risk of being diagnosed with schizophrenia in persons identified with 22q11.2 deletion syndrome. Danish nationwide registers were linked to establish a cohort consisting of all Danish citizens born during 1955-2004 and the cohort was followed from January 1, 1994 until December 31, 2013. Data were analyzed using survival analyses and adjusted for calendar year, age, sex, and parental mental health history. A total of 156 individuals with 22q11.2 deletion syndrome were identified, out of which 6 individuals were diagnosed with schizophrenia spectrum disorders following identification with 22q11 deletion syndrome. Identified carriers of 22q11.2 deletion had an 8.13(95% CI: 3.65-18.09) fold increased risk of schizophrenia spectrum disorder. Carriers of a 22q11.2 deletion who had been clinically identified had a highly increased risk of schizophrenia spectrum disorders. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Maryland Psychiatric Research Center. All rights reserved. For permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  6. Deletions in the COL4A5 collagen gene in X-linked Alport syndrome. Characterization of the pathological transcripts in nonrenal cells and correlation with disease expression.

    PubMed Central

    Antignac, C; Knebelmann, B; Drouot, L; Gros, F; Deschênes, G; Hors-Cayla, M C; Zhou, J; Tryggvason, K; Grünfeld, J P; Broyer, M

    1994-01-01

    The type IV collagen alpha 5 chain (COL4A5) gene of 88 unrelated male patients with X-linked Alport syndrome was tested for major gene rearrangements by Southern blot analysis, using COL4A5 cDNA probes. 14 different deletions were detected, providing a 16% deletion rate in the COL4A5 gene in the patient population. The deletions are dispersed all over the gene with different sizes, ranging from 1 kb to the complete absence of the gene (> 250 kb) in one patient. In four patients with intragenic deletions, absence of the alpha 3 (IV) chain in the glomerular basement membrane was demonstrated by immunohistochemical studies. This finding supports the hypothesis that abnormalities in the alpha 5 (IV) chain may prevent normal incorporation of the alpha 3 (IV) chain into the glomerular basement membrane. Direct sequencing of cDNA amplified from lymphoblast mRNA of four patients with internal gene deletions, using appropriate combinations of primers amplifying across the predicted boundaries of the deletions, allowed us to determine the effect of the genomic rearrangements on the transcripts and, by inference, on the alpha 5 (IV) chain. Regardless of the extent of deletion and of the putative protein product, the 14 deletions occur in patients with juvenile-type Alport syndrome. Images PMID:8132760

  7. Problem Behaviors Associated with Deletion Prader-Willi, Smith-Magenis, and Cri Du Chat Syndromes.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Clarke, David J.; Boer, Harm

    1998-01-01

    Problem behaviors of 38 individuals with Cri-du-Chat syndrome, 55 individuals with Prader Willi syndrome, and 21 individuals with Smith-Magenis syndrome were investigated. All three disorders were Associated with greater ratings of problem behaviors (besides eating abnormalities and sleep abnormalities) than comparison groups. (Author/CR)

  8. Antenatal diagnosis of deletion chromosome 11(q23-qter) (Jacobsen syndrome).

    PubMed

    Foley, Patricia; McAuliffe, Fionnuala; Mullarkey, Marice; Reardon, William

    2007-07-01

    A case of Jacobsen syndrome, suspected antenatally on the grounds of trigonocephaly and hypoplastic left heart syndrome, is presented. Clinicians are reminded that a hypoplastic left heart should not be assumed to be an isolated malformation and that a careful search for associated malformations can facilitate the recognition of an underlying genetic syndrome.

  9. The zebrafish van gogh mutation disrupts tbx1, which is involved in the DiGeorge deletion syndrome in humans.

    PubMed

    Piotrowski, Tatjana; Ahn, Dae-gwon; Schilling, Thomas F; Nair, Sreelaja; Ruvinsky, Ilya; Geisler, Robert; Rauch, Gerd-Jörg; Haffter, Pascal; Zon, Leonard I; Zhou, Yi; Foott, Helen; Dawid, Igor B; Ho, Robert K

    2003-10-01

    The van gogh (vgo) mutant in zebrafish is characterized by defects in the ear, pharyngeal arches and associated structures such as the thymus. We show that vgo is caused by a mutation in tbx1, a member of the large family of T-box genes. tbx1 has been recently suggested to be a major contributor to the cardiovascular defects in DiGeorge deletion syndrome (DGS) in humans, a syndrome in which several neural crest derivatives are affected in the pharyngeal arches. Using cell transplantation studies, we demonstrate that vgo/tbx1 acts cell autonomously in the pharyngeal mesendoderm and influences the development of neural crest-derived cartilages secondarily. Furthermore, we provide evidence for regulatory interactions between vgo/tbx1 and edn1 and hand2, genes that are implicated in the control of pharyngeal arch development and in the etiology of DGS.

  10. An atypical 7q11.23 deletion in a normal IQ Williams–Beuren syndrome patient

    PubMed Central

    Ferrero, Giovanni Battista; Howald, Cédric; Micale, Lucia; Biamino, Elisa; Augello, Bartolomeo; Fusco, Carmela; Turturo, Maria Giuseppina; Forzano, Serena; Reymond, Alexandre; Merla, Giuseppe

    2010-01-01

    Williams–Beuren syndrome (WBS; OMIM no. 194050) is a multisystemic neurodevelopmental disorder caused by a hemizygous deletion of 1.55 Mb on chromosome 7q11.23 spanning 28 genes. Haploinsufficiency of the ELN gene was shown to be responsible for supravalvular aortic stenosis and generalized arteriopathy, whereas LIMK1, CLIP2, GTF2IRD1 and GTF2I genes were suggested to be linked to the specific cognitive profile and craniofacial features. These insights for genotype–phenotype correlations came from the molecular and clinical analysis of patients with atypical deletions and mice models. Here we report a patient showing mild WBS physical phenotype and normal IQ, who carries a shorter 1 Mb atypical deletion. This rearrangement does not include the GTF2IRD1 and GTF2I genes and only partially the BAZ1B gene. Our results are consistent with the hypothesis that hemizygosity of the GTF2IRD1 and GTF2I genes might be involved in the facial dysmorphisms and in the specific motor and cognitive deficits observed in WBS patients. PMID:19568270

  11. Delineation of 7q11.2 deletions associated with Williams-Beuren syndrome and mapping of a repetitive sequence to within and to either side of the common deletion

    SciTech Connect

    Robinson, W.P.; Waslynka, J.; Wang, M.; Clark, S. |

    1996-05-15

    The majority of Williams-Beuren syndrome (WBS) patients have been shown to have a microdeletion within 7q11.2 including the elastin gene locus. The extent of these deletions has, however, not been well characterized. Thirty-five deletion patients were tested for all polymorphic markers in the 7q11.2 region bounding ELN to define the extent of deletions associated with WBS. With only one exception, ELN, D7S1870, and one copy of the D7S489 locus (D7S489U) were always included in the deletions. One patient showed lack of maternal inheritance at D7S1870 and not at ELN or D7S489U. A product corresponding to D7S489U was amplified form YAC 743G6 and from the P1 clone RMC07P008, thereby localizing both to within the common deletion. The boundary of the deleted region on the proximal (centromeric) side is D7S653 and on the distal side is D7S675, neither of which were ever included in the deletion. One locus, D7S489L, was variably deleted in patients, indicating a minimum of two common breakpoints on the proximal side. At least one additional repeat amplified by D7S489 (D7S489M) was localized to a YAC contig mapping distal to the mologous to several cDNA clones in the GenBank database and contains an Alu sequence. It is possible that this and/or other repetitive sequences in this region could play a role in the mechanism of deletion. 26 refs., 5 figs., 2 tabs.

  12. Identification and characterization of a novel homozygous deletion in the alpha-N-acetylglucosaminidase gene in a patient with Sanfilippo type B syndrome (mucopolysaccharidosis IIIB).

    PubMed

    Champion, Kristen J; Basehore, Monica J; Wood, Tim; Destrée, Anne; Vannuffel, Pascal; Maystadt, Isabelle

    2010-05-01

    Sanfilippo syndrome type B (mucopolysaccharidosis IIIB) is an autosomal recessive disease that is caused by a deficiency of the lysosomal enzyme alpha-N-acetylglucosaminidase (NAGLU). Over 100 different mutations in the NAGLU gene have been identified in Sanfilippo syndrome type B patients; however, no large deletions have been reported. Here we present the first case of a large homozygous intragenic NAGLU gene deletion identified in an affected child of consanguineous parents. Long range and multiplex PCR methods were used to characterize this deletion which encompasses exons 3 and 4 and is 1146 base pairs long. We propose that Alu element-mediated unequal homologous recombination between an Alu-Y in intron 2 and an Alu-Sx in intron 4 is the likely mechanism for this deletion, thereby contributing further insight into the molecular etiology of this disorder and providing additional evidence of its allelic heterogeneity.

  13. Delineation of the phenotype associated with 7q36.1q36.2 deletion: long QT syndrome, renal hypoplasia and mental retardation.

    PubMed

    Caselli, Rossella; Mencarelli, Maria Antonietta; Papa, Filomena Tiziana; Ariani, Francesca; Longo, Ilaria; Meloni, Ilaria; Vonella, Giuseppina; Acampa, Maurizio; Auteri, Alberto; Vicari, Stefano; Orsi, Alessandra; Hayek, Giuseppe; Renieri, Alessandra; Mari, Francesca

    2008-05-01

    Terminal deletions of the long arm of chromosome 7 are well known and are frequently associated with hypotelorism or holoprosencephaly due to the involvement of the SHH gene located in 7q36.3. These deletions are easily detectable with routine subtelomeric MLPA analysis. Deletions affecting a more proximal part of 7q36, namely bands 7q36.1q36.2 are less common, and may be missed by subtelomeric MLPA analysis. We report a 9-year-old girl with a 5.27 Mb deletion in 7q36.1q36.2, and compare her to literature patients proposing a phenotype characterized by mental retardation, unusual facial features, renal hypoplasia and long QT syndrome due to loss of the KCNH2 gene. These characteristics are sufficiently distinct that the syndrome may be diagnosed on clinical grounds.

  14. 1p13.2 deletion displays clinical features overlapping Noonan syndrome, likely related to NRAS gene haploinsufficiency

    PubMed Central

    Linhares, Natália Duarte; Freire, Maíra Cristina Menezes; Cardenas, Raony Guimarães Corrêa do Carmo Lisboa; Pena, Heloisa Barbosa; Lachlan, Katherine; Dallapiccola, Bruno; Bacino, Carlos; Delobel, Bruno; James, Paul; Thuresson, Ann-Charlotte; Annerén, Göran; Pena, Sérgio D. J.

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Deletion-induced hemizygosity may unmask deleterious autosomal recessive variants and be a cause of the phenotypic variability observed in microdeletion syndromes. We performed complete exome sequencing (WES) analysis to examine this possibility in a patient with 1p13.2 microdeletion. Since the patient displayed clinical features suggestive of Noonan Syndrome (NS), we also used WES to rule out the presence of pathogenic variants in any of the genes associated with the different types of NS. We concluded that the clinical findings could be attributed solely to the 1p13.2 haploinsufficiency. Retrospective analysis of other nine reported patients with 1p13.2 microdeletions showed that six of them also presented some characteristics of NS. In all these cases, the deleted segment included the NRAS gene. Gain-of-function mutations of NRAS gene are causally related to NS type 6. Thus, it is conceivable that NRAS haploinsufficiency and gain-of-function mutations may have similar clinical consequences. The same phenomenon has been described for two other genes belonging to the Ras/MAPK pathway: MAP2K2 and SHOC2. In conclusion, we here report genotype-phenotype correlations in patients with chromosome 1p13.2 microdeletions and we propose that NRAS may be a critical gene for the NS characteristics in the patients. PMID:27561113

  15. Lenalidomide Promotes p53 Degradation by Inhibiting MDM2 Auto-ubiquitination in Myelodysplastic Syndrome with Chromosome 5q Deletion

    PubMed Central

    Wei, Sheng; Chen, Xianghong; McGraw, Kathy; Zhang, Ling; Komrokji, Rami; Clark, Justine; Caceres, Gisela; Billingsley, Debbie; Sokol, Lubomir; Lancet, Jeffrey; Fortenbery, Nicole; Zhou, Junmin; Eksioglu, Erika A.; Sallman, David; Wang, Huaquan; Epling-Burnette, Pearlie K.; Djeu, Julie; Maciejewski, Jaroslaw P.; Sekeres, Mikkael; List, Alan

    2013-01-01

    Allelic deletion of the RPS14 gene is a key effector of the hypoplastic anemia in patients with myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS) and chromosome 5q deletion [del(5q)]. Disruption of ribosome integrity liberates free ribosomal proteins to bind to and trigger degradation of MDM2, with consequent p53 transactivation. Herein we show that p53 is overexpressed in erythroid precursors of primary bone marrow del(5q) MDS specimens accompanied by reduced cellular MDM2. More importantly, we show that lenalidomide acts to stabilize MDM2, thereby accelerating p53 degradation. Biochemical and molecular analyses showed that lenalidomide inhibits the haplodeficient PP2Acα phosphatase resulting in hyperphosphorylation of inhibitory serine-166 and serine-186 residues on MDM2, and displaces binding of RPS-14 to suppress MDM2 auto-ubiquitination; whereas PP2Acα over expression promotes drug resistance. Bone marrow specimens from del(5q) MDS patients resistant to lenalidomide over-expressed PP2Acα accompanied by restored accumulation of p53 in erythroid precursors. Our findings indicate that lenalidomide restores MDM2 functionality in the 5q- syndrome to overcome p53 activation in response to nucleolar stress, and therefore may warrant investigation in other disorders of ribosomal biogenesis. PMID:22525275

  16. Different loss of material in recurrent chromosome 20 interstitial deletions in Shwachman-Diamond syndrome and in myeloid neoplasms

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background An interstitial deletion of the long arms of chromosome 20, del(20)(q), is frequent in the bone marrow (BM) of patients with myelodysplastic syndromes (MDS), acute myeloid leukemia (AML), and myeloproliferative neoplasms (MPN), and it is recurrent in the BM of patients with Shwachman-Diamond syndrome (SDS), who have a 30-40% risk of developing MDS and AML. Results We report the results obtained by microarray-based comparative genomic hybridization (a-CGH) in six patients with SDS, and we compare the loss of chromosome 20 material with one patient with MDS, and with data on 92 informative patients with MDS/AML/MPN and del(20)(q) collected from the literature. Conclusions The chromosome material lost in MDS/AML/MPN is highly variable with no identifiable common deleted regions, whereas in SDS the loss is more uniform: in 3/6 patients it was almost identical, and the breakpoints that we defined are probably common to most patients from the literature. In some SDS patients less material may be lost, due to different distal breakpoints, but the proximal breakpoint is in the same region, always leading to the loss of the EIF6 gene, an event which was related to a lower risk of MDS/AML in comparison with other patients. PMID:24330778

  17. A prospective study of influenza vaccination and a comparison of immunologic parameters in children and adults with chromosome 22q11.2 deletion syndrome (digeorge syndrome/velocardiofacial syndrome).

    PubMed

    Jawad, Abbas F; Prak, Eline Luning; Boyer, Jean; McDonald-McGinn, Donna M; Zackai, Elaine; McDonald, Kenyetta; Sullivan, Kathleen E

    2011-12-01

    Prior to the advent of cardiac bypass, most children with congenital cardiac anomalies and chromosome 22q11.2 deletion syndrome died. With improved technology, there is now a wave of young adults with chromosome 22q11.2 deletion syndrome requiring clinical care. Fifteen young children and 20 adults with chromosome 22q11.2 deletion had flow cytometry, functional T cell analyses, and functional B cell analyses to characterize their immune system. Subjects were vaccinated with the annual inactivated influenza vaccine, and responses were evaluated by hemagglutination inhibition titer assessment. The pattern of T cell subset abnormalities was markedly different between pediatric and adult patients. In spite of the cellular deficits observed in adults, titers produced after influenza vaccine administration were largely intact. We conclude that disruption to T cell production appears to have secondary consequences for T cell differentiation and B cell function although the clinical impact remains to be determined.

  18. Extra Yq and partial monosomy 12p due to a Y;12 translocation in a boy with features of the 12p deletion syndrome.

    PubMed

    Orye, E; Craen, M; Laureys, G; van Coster, R; van Mele, B

    1985-06-01

    A Y;12 translocation, resulting in extra Yq material and partial monosomy 12p, was found in a 7 1/2 year old boy. He showed growth and mental retardation and several of the congenital anomalies seen in the 12p deletion syndrome. LDHB activity, the gene for which is located at 12p12, was normal in serum, in accordance with the suspected 12p13 deletion in the patient.

  19. Central precocious puberty in a patient with X-linked adrenal hypoplasia congenita and Xp21 contiguous gene deletion syndrome.

    PubMed

    Koh, Ji Won; Kang, So Young; Kim, Gu Hwan; Yoo, Han Wook; Yu, Jeesuk

    2013-06-01

    X-linked adrenal hypoplasia congenita is caused by the mutation of DAX-1 gene (dosage-sensitive sex reversal, adrenal hypoplasia critical region, on chromosome X, gene 1), and can occur as part of a contiguous gene deletion syndrome in association with glycerol kinase (GK) deficiency, Duchenne muscular dystrophy and X-linked interleukin-1 receptor accessory protein-like 1 (IL1RAPL1) gene deficiency. It is usually associated with hypogonadotropic hypogonadism, although in rare cases, it has been reported to occur in normal puberty or even central precocious puberty. This study addresses a case in which central precocious puberty developed in a boy with X-linked adrenal hypoplasia congenita who had complete deletion of the genes DAX-1, GK and IL1RAPL1 (Xp21 contiguous gene deletion syndrome). Initially he was admitted for the management of adrenal crisis at the age of 2 months, and managed with hydrocortisone and florinef. At 45 months of age, his each testicular volumes of 4 mL and a penile length of 5 cm were noted, with pubic hair of Tanner stage 2. His bone age was advanced and a gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH) stimulation test showed a luteinizing hormone peak of 8.26 IU/L, confirming central precocious puberty. He was then treated with a GnRH agonist, as well as steroid replacement therapy. In Korea, this is the first case of central precocious puberty developed in a male patient with X-linked adrenal hypoplasia congenita.

  20. Clinical and genetic characterization of chanarin-dorfman syndrome patients: first report of large deletions in the ABHD5 gene

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Chanarin-Dorfman syndrome (CDS) is a rare autosomal recessive disorder characterized by nonbullous congenital ichthyosiform erythroderma (NCIE) and an intracellular accumulation of triacylglycerol (TG) droplets in most tissues. The clinical phenotype involves multiple organs and systems, including liver, eyes, ears, skeletal muscle and central nervous system (CNS). Mutations in ABHD5/CGI58 gene are associated with CDS. Methods Eight CDS patients belonging to six different families from Mediterranean countries were enrolled for genetic study. Molecular analysis of the ABHD5 gene included the sequencing of the 7 coding exons and of the putative 5' regulatory regions, as well as reverse transcript-polymerase chain reaction analysis and sequencing of normal and aberrant ABHD5 cDNAs. Results Five different mutations were identified, four of which were novel, including two splice-site mutations (c.47+1G>A and c.960+5G>A) and two large deletions (c.898_*320del and c.662-1330_773+46del). All the reported mutations are predicted to be pathogenic because they lead to an early stop codon or a frameshift producing a premature termination of translation. While nonsense, missense, frameshift and splice-site mutations have been identified in CDS patients, large genomic deletions have not previously been described. Conclusions These results emphasize the need for an efficient approach for genomic deletion screening to ensure an accurate molecular diagnosis of CDS. Moreover, in spite of intensive molecular screening, no mutations were identified in one patient with a confirmed clinical diagnosis of CDS, appointing to genetic heterogeneity of the syndrome. PMID:21122093

  1. 22q11.2 Deletion Syndrome: Laboratory Diagnosis and TBX1 and FGF8 Mutation Screening

    PubMed Central

    Sgardioli, Ilária C.; Vieira, Társis P.; Simioni, Milena; Monteiro, Fabíola P.; Gil-da-Silva-Lopes, Vera L.

    2015-01-01

    Velocardiofacial syndrome is one of the recognized forms of chromosome 22q11.2 deletion syndrome (22q11.2 DS) and has an incidence of 1 of 4,000 to 1 of 6,000 births. Nevertheless, the 22q11 deletion is not found in several patients with a 22q11.2 DS phenotype. In this situation, other chromosomal aberrations and/or mutations in the T-box 1 transcription factor C (TBX1) gene have been detected in some patients. A similar phenotype to that of the 22q11.2 DS has been reported in animal models with mutations in fibroblast growth factor 8 (Fgf8) gene. To date, FGF8 mutations have not been investigated in humans. We tested a strategy to perform laboratory testing to reduce costs in the investigation of patients presenting with the 22q11.2 DS phenotype. A total of 109 individuals with clinical suspicion were investigated using GTG-banding karyotype, fluorescence in situ hybridization, and/or multiplex ligation-dependent probe amplification. A conclusive diagnosis was achieved in 33 of 109 (30.2%) cases. In addition, mutations in the coding regions of TBX1 and FGF8 genes were investigated in selected cases where 22q11.2 deletion had been excluded, and no pathogenic mutations were detected in both genes. This study presents a strategy for molecular genetic characterization of patients presenting with the 22q11.2 DS using different laboratory techniques. This strategy could be useful in different countries, according to local resources. Also, to our knowledge, this is the first investigation of FGF8 gene in humans with this clinical suspicion. PMID:27617111

  2. Deletions in GRID2 lead to a recessive syndrome of cerebellar ataxia and tonic upgaze in humans

    PubMed Central

    Hills, L. Benjamin; Masri, Amira; Konno, Kotaro; Kakegawa, Wataru; Lam, Anh-Thu N.; Lim-Melia, Elizabeth; Chandy, Nandini; Hill, R. Sean; Partlow, Jennifer N.; Al-Saffar, Muna; Nasir, Ramzi; Stoler, Joan M.; Barkovich, A. James; Watanabe, Masahiko; Yuzaki, Michisuke

    2013-01-01

    Objective: To identify the genetic cause of a syndrome causing cerebellar ataxia and eye movement abnormalities. Methods: We identified 2 families with cerebellar ataxia, eye movement abnormalities, and global developmental delay. We performed genetic analyses including single nucleotide polymorphism genotyping, linkage analysis, array comparative genomic hybridization, quantitative PCR, and Sanger sequencing. We obtained eye movement recordings of mutant mice deficient for the ortholog of the identified candidate gene, and performed immunohistochemistry using human and mouse brain specimens. Results: All affected individuals had ataxia, eye movement abnormalities, most notably tonic upgaze, and delayed speech and cognitive development. Homozygosity mapping identified the disease locus on chromosome 4q. Within this region, a homozygous deletion of GRID2 exon 4 in the index family and compound heterozygous deletions involving GRID2 exon 2 in the second family were identified. Grid2-deficient mice showed larger spontaneous and random eye movements compared to wild-type mice. In developing mouse and human cerebella, GRID2 localized to the Purkinje cell dendritic spines. Brain MRI in 2 affected children showed progressive cerebellar atrophy, which was more severe than that of Grid2-deficient mice. Conclusions: Biallelic deletions of GRID2 lead to a syndrome of cerebellar ataxia and tonic upgaze in humans. The phenotypic resemblance and similarity in protein expression pattern between humans and mice suggest a conserved role for GRID2 in the synapse organization between parallel fibers and Purkinje cells. However, the progressive and severe cerebellar atrophy seen in the affected individuals could indicate an evolutionarily unique role for GRID2 in the human cerebellum. PMID:24078737

  3. Epilepsy is a possible feature in Williams-Beuren syndrome patients harboring typical deletions of the 7q11.23 critical region.

    PubMed

    Nicita, Francesco; Garone, Giacomo; Spalice, Alberto; Savasta, Salvatore; Striano, Pasquale; Pantaleoni, Chiara; Spartà, Maria Valentina; Kluger, Gerhard; Capovilla, Giuseppe; Pruna, Dario; Freri, Elena; D'Arrigo, Stefano; Verrotti, Alberto

    2016-01-01

    Seizures are rarely reported in Williams-Beuren syndrome (WBS)--a contiguous-gene-deletion disorder caused by a 7q11.23 heterozygous deletion of 1.5-1.8 Mb--and no previous study evaluated electro-clinical features of epilepsy in this syndrome. Furthermore, it has been hypothesized that atypical deletion (e.g., larger than 1.8 Mb) may be responsible for a more pronounced neurological phenotypes, especially including seizures. Our objectives are to describe the electro-clinical features in WBS and to correlate the epileptic phenotype with deletion of the 7q11.23 critical region. We evaluate the electro-clinical features in one case of distal 7q11.23 deletion syndrome and in eight epileptic WBS (eWBS) patients. Additionally, we compare the deletion size-and deleted genes-of four epileptic WBS (eWBS) with that of four non-epileptic WBS (neWBS) patients. Infantile spasms, focal (e.g., motor and dyscognitive with autonomic features) and generalized (e.g., tonic-clonic, tonic, clonic, myoclonic) seizures were encountered. Drug-resistance was observed in one patient. Neuroimaging discovered one case of focal cortical dysplasia, one case of fronto-temporal cortical atrophy and one case of periventricular nodular heterotopia. Comparison of deletion size between eWBS and neWBS patients did not reveal candidate genes potentially underlying epilepsy. This is the largest series describing electro-clinical features of epilepsy in WBS. In WBS, epilepsy should be considered both in case of typical and atypical deletions, which do not involve HIP1, YWHAG or MAGI2. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  4. Characterization of 11p14-p12 deletion in WAGR syndrome by array CGH for identifying genes contributing to mental retardation and autism.

    PubMed

    Xu, S; Han, J C; Morales, A; Menzie, C M; Williams, K; Fan, Y-S

    2008-01-01

    WAGR (Wilms tumor, Aniridia, Genitourinary malformations and mental Retardation) syndrome is a rare genomic disorder caused by deletion of the 11p14-p12 chromosome region. The majority of WAGR patients have mental retardation and behavioral problems, and more than 20% of the patients also have features of autism. While the Wilms tumor/genitourinary anomalies and aniridia are caused by deletion of WT1 and PAX6 respectively, the genomic cause of mental retardation and autism in WAGR syndrome remains unknown. Using oligonucleotide arrays, we have characterized the 11p14-p12 deletions in 31 patients and identified all the genes involved in each deletion. The deletions had sizes ranging from 4.9 to 23 Mb that encompass 18-62 genes (40 on average). In addition to WT1 and PAX6, all the patients had deletion of PRRG4 (transmembrane gamma-carboxyglutamic acid protein 4). The majority of them had deletion of BDNF (brain-derived neurotrophic factor) and SLC1A2 [solute carrier family 1 (glial high affinity glutamate transporter) member 2].