Science.gov

Sample records for 18s rrna internal

  1. Investigation of molluscan phylogeny on the basis of 18S rRNA sequences.

    PubMed

    Winnepenninckx, B; Backeljau, T; De Wachter, R

    1996-12-01

    The 18S rRNA sequences of 12 molluscs, representing the extant classes Gastropoda, Bivalvia, Polyplacophora, Scaphopoda, and Caudofoveata, were determined and compared with selected known 18S rRNA sequences of Metazoa, including other Mollusca. These data do not provide support for a close relationship between Platyhelminthes (Turbellaria) and Mollusca, but rather suggest that the latter group belongs to a clade of eutrochozoan coelomates. The 18S rRNA data fail to recover molluscan, bivalve, or gastropod monophyly. However, the branching pattern of the eutrochozoan phyla and classes is unstable, probably due to the explosive Cambrian radiation during which these groups arose. Similarly, the 18S rRNA data do not provide a reliable signal for the molluscan interclass relationships. Nevertheless, we obtained strong preliminary support for phylogenetic inferences at more restricted taxonomic levels, such as the monophyly of Polyplacophora, Caenogastropoda, Euthyneura, Heterodonta, and Arcoida.

  2. Detection of Babesia microti parasites by highly sensitive 18S rRNA reverse transcription PCR.

    PubMed

    Hanron, Amelia E; Billman, Zachary P; Seilie, Annette M; Chang, Ming; Murphy, Sean C

    2017-03-01

    Babesia are increasingly appreciated as a cause of transfusion-transmitted infection. Sensitive methods are needed to screen blood products. We report herein that B. microti 18S rRNA is over 1,000-fold more abundant than its coding genes, making reverse transcription PCR (RT-PCR) much more sensitive than PCR. Babesia 18S rRNA may be useful for screening the blood supply.

  3. Taxonomic resolutions based on 18S rRNA genes: a case study of subclass copepoda.

    PubMed

    Wu, Shu; Xiong, Jie; Yu, Yuhe

    2015-01-01

    Biodiversity studies are commonly conducted using 18S rRNA genes. In this study, we compared the inter-species divergence of variable regions (V1-9) within the copepod 18S rRNA gene, and tested their taxonomic resolutions at different taxonomic levels. Our results indicate that the 18S rRNA gene is a good molecular marker for the study of copepod biodiversity, and our conclusions are as follows: 1) 18S rRNA genes are highly conserved intra-species (intra-species similarities are close to 100%); and could aid in species-level analyses, but with some limitations; 2) nearly-whole-length sequences and some partial regions (around V2, V4, and V9) of the 18S rRNA gene can be used to discriminate between samples at both the family and order levels (with a success rate of about 80%); 3) compared with other regions, V9 has a higher resolution at the genus level (with an identification success rate of about 80%); and 4) V7 is most divergent in length, and would be a good candidate marker for the phylogenetic study of Acartia species. This study also evaluated the correlation between similarity thresholds and the accuracy of using nuclear 18S rRNA genes for the classification of organisms in the subclass Copepoda. We suggest that sample identification accuracy should be considered when a molecular sequence divergence threshold is used for taxonomic identification, and that the lowest similarity threshold should be determined based on a pre-designated level of acceptable accuracy.

  4. Molecular systematics of Volvocales (Chlorophyceae, Chlorophyta) based on exhaustive 18S rRNA phylogenetic analyses.

    PubMed

    Nakada, Takashi; Misawa, Kazuharu; Nozaki, Hisayoshi

    2008-07-01

    The taxonomy of Volvocales (Chlorophyceae, Chlorophyta) was traditionally based solely on morphological characteristics. However, because recent molecular phylogeny largely contradicts the traditional subordinal and familial classifications, no classification system has yet been established that describes the subdivision of Volvocales in a manner consistent with the phylogenetic relationships. Towards development of a natural classification system at and above the generic level, identification and sorting of hundreds of sequences based on subjective phylogenetic definitions is a significant step. We constructed an 18S rRNA gene phylogeny based on 449 volvocalean sequences collected using exhaustive BLAST searches of the GenBank database. Many chimeric sequences, which can cause fallacious phylogenetic trees, were detected and excluded during data collection. The results revealed 21 strongly supported primary clades within phylogenetically redefined Volvocales. Phylogenetic classification following PhyloCode was proposed based on the presented 18S rRNA gene phylogeny along with the results of previous combined 18S and 26S rRNA and chloroplast multigene analyses.

  5. Ribosomal 18S rRNA base pairs with mRNA during eukaryotic translation initiation

    PubMed Central

    Martin, Franck; Ménétret, Jean-François; Simonetti, Angelita; Myasnikov, Alexander G.; Vicens, Quentin; Prongidi-Fix, Lydia; Natchiar, S. Kundhavai; Klaholz, Bruno P.; Eriani, Gilbert

    2016-01-01

    Eukaryotic mRNAs often contain a Kozak sequence that helps tether the ribosome to the AUG start codon. The mRNA of histone H4 (h4) does not undergo classical ribosome scanning but has evolved a specific tethering mechanism. The cryo-EM structure of the rabbit ribosome complex with mouse h4 shows that the mRNA forms a folded, repressive structure at the mRNA entry site on the 40S subunit next to the tip of helix 16 of 18S ribosomal RNA (rRNA). Toe-printing and mutational assays reveal that an interaction exists between a purine-rich sequence in h4 mRNA and a complementary UUUC sequence of helix h16. Together the present data establish that the h4 mRNA harbours a sequence complementary to an 18S rRNA sequence which tethers the mRNA to the ribosome to promote proper start codon positioning, complementing the interactions of the 40S subunit with the Kozak sequence that flanks the AUG start codon. PMID:27554013

  6. 18S rRNA suggests that Entoprocta are protostomes, unrelated to Ectoprocta.

    PubMed

    Mackey, L Y; Winnepenninckx, B; De Wachter, R; Backeljau, T; Emschermann, P; Garey, J R

    1996-05-01

    The Ento- and Ectoprocta are sometimes placed together in the Bryozoa, which have variously been regarded as proto- or deuterostomes. However, Entoprocta have also been allied to the pseudocoelomates, while Ectoprocta are often united with the Brachiopoda and Phoronida in the (super)phylum Lophophorata. Hence, the phylogenetic relationships of these taxa are still much debated. We determined complete 18S rRNA sequences of two entoprocts, an ectoproct, an inarticulate brachiopod, a phoronid, two annelids, and a platyhelminth. Phylogenetic analyses of these data show that (1) entoprocts and lophophorates have spiralian, protostomous affinities, (2) Ento- and Ectoprocta are not sister taxa, (3) phoronids and brachiopods form a monophyletic clade, and (4) neither Ectoprocta or Annelida appear to be monophyletic. Both deuterostomous and pseudocoelomate features may have arisen at least two times in evolutionary history. These results advocate a Spiralia-Radialia-based classification rather than one based on the Protostomia-Deuterostomia concept.

  7. Novelty in phylogeny of gastrotricha: evidence from 18S rRNA gene.

    PubMed

    Wirz, A; Pucciarelli, S; Miceli, C; Tongiorgi, P; Balsamo, M

    1999-11-01

    Gastrotricha form a phylum which is crucial for defining the origin of pseudocoelomates, in that they share a number of characters with Rotifera and Nematoda but also with acoelomates, and even the evolutionary relationships within the phylum are anything but defined. For this reason the first extensive molecular data on Gastrotricha from the 18S rRNA sequences of both orders have been obtained and analyzed. Sequence analyses show that the phylum Gastrotricha is strictly monophyletic along an evolutionary line quite distinct from that of both Rotifera and Nematoda. A new view of the evolutionary history of the phylum Gastrotricha is put forward, in which Chaetonotida, and not Macrodasyida, are the most primitive forms of the group, contrary to the commonly held view. A polyphyletic origin of aschelminthes is supported, and the misleading term pseudocoelomates should be discarded.

  8. The phylogenetic status of arthropods, as inferred from 18S rRNA sequences.

    PubMed

    Turbeville, J M; Pfeifer, D M; Field, K G; Raff, R A

    1991-09-01

    Partial 18S rRNA sequences of five chelicerate arthropods plus a crustacean, myriapod, insect, chordate, echinoderm, annelid, and platyhelminth were compared. The sequence data were used to infer phylogeny by using a maximum-parsimony method, an evolutionary-distance method, and the evolutionary-parsimony method. The phylogenetic inferences generated by maximum-parsimony and distance methods support both monophyly of the Arthropoda and monophyly of the Chelicerata within the Arthropoda. These results are congruent with phylogenies based on rigorous cladistic analyses of morphological characters. Results support the inclusion of the Arthropoda within a spiralian or protostome coelomate clade that is the sister group of a deuterostome clade, refuting the hypothesis that the arthropods represent the "primitive" sister group of a protostome coelomate clade. Bootstrap analyses and consideration of all trees within 1% of the length of the most parsimonious tree suggest that relationships between the nonchelicerate arthropods and relationships within the chelicerate clade cannot be reliably inferred with the partial 18S rRNA sequence data. With the evolutionary-parsimony method, support for monophyly of the Arthropoda is found in the majority of the combinations analyzed if the coelomates are used as "outgroups." Monophyly of the Chelicerata is supported in most combinations assessed. Our analyses also indicate that the evolutionary-parsimony method, like distance and parsimony, may be biased by taxa with long branches. We suggest that a previous study's inference of the Arthropoda as paraphyletic may be the result of (a) having two few arthropod taxa available for analysis and (b) including long-branched taxa.

  9. Sequencing and characterization of full-length sequence of 18S rRNA gene from the reniform nematode

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The 18S rRNA gene is fundamental to cellular and organismal protein synthesis and because of its stable persistence through generations it is also used in phylogenetic analysis among taxa. Variation within this gene is rare but it has been observed in few metazoan species. For the first time, we h...

  10. Conservation of the primary structure at the 3' end of 18S rRNA from eucaryotic cells.

    PubMed

    Hagenbüchle, O; Santer, M; Steitz, J A; Mans, R J

    1978-03-01

    DNA sequencing methods have been used to determine a sequence of about 20 nucleotides at the 3' termini of various 18S (small ribosomal subunit) RNA molecules. Polyadenylated rRNA was first synthesized using the enzyme ATP:polynucleotidyl transferase from mainze. Then in the presence of an oligonucleotide primer uniquely complementary to the end of each adenylated rRNA, a cDNA copy was produced using AMV reverse transcriptase. In every case, the cDNA transcript was of finite size, which we ascribe to the appearance of an oligonucleotide containing m62A near the 3' end of the 18S rRNAs. Sequences at the 3' termini of 18S rRNA molecules from the four eucaryotic species examined here (mouse, silk worm, wheat embryo and slime mold) are highly conserved. They also exhibit strong homology to the 3' end of E. coli 16S rRNA. Two important differences, however, are apparent. First, the 16S sequence CCUCC, implicated in mRNA binding by E. coli ribosomes, is absent from each eucaryotic rRNA sequence. Second, a purine-rich region which exhibits extensive complementarity to the 5' noncoding regions of many eucaryotic mRNAs appears consistently.

  11. Metabolism of 18S rRNA in rat liver cells in different functional states of protein-synthesizing apparatus

    SciTech Connect

    Chirkov, G.P.; Druzhinina, M.K.; Todorov, I.N.

    1986-04-10

    The ratio of the absolute radioactivities of 28S and 18S RNAs in the fractions of membrane-bound and free polysomes and the fraction of free rat liver ribosomes was studied under conditions of inhibition of translation by cycloheximide, insulin, and cAMP. It was found that insulin and cAMP, in contrast to cycloheximide, do not induce selective degradation of 18S rRNA. The results are discussed from the standpoint of the possible role of the phosphorylation of protein S6 in the degradation of the 40S ribosomal subunit.

  12. An updated 18S rRNA phylogeny of tunicates based on mixture and secondary structure models

    PubMed Central

    Tsagkogeorga, Georgia; Turon, Xavier; Hopcroft, Russell R; Tilak, Marie-Ka; Feldstein, Tamar; Shenkar, Noa; Loya, Yossi; Huchon, Dorothée; Douzery, Emmanuel JP; Delsuc, Frédéric

    2009-01-01

    Background Tunicates have been recently revealed to be the closest living relatives of vertebrates. Yet, with more than 2500 described species, details of their evolutionary history are still obscure. From a molecular point of view, tunicate phylogenetic relationships have been mostly studied based on analyses of 18S rRNA sequences, which indicate several major clades at odds with the traditional class-level arrangements. Nonetheless, substantial uncertainty remains about the phylogenetic relationships and taxonomic status of key groups such as the Aplousobranchia, Appendicularia, and Thaliacea. Results Thirty new complete 18S rRNA sequences were acquired from previously unsampled tunicate species, with special focus on groups presenting high evolutionary rate. The updated 18S rRNA dataset has been aligned with respect to the constraint on homology imposed by the rRNA secondary structure. A probabilistic framework of phylogenetic reconstruction was adopted to accommodate the particular evolutionary dynamics of this ribosomal marker. Detailed Bayesian analyses were conducted under the non-parametric CAT mixture model accounting for site-specific heterogeneity of the evolutionary process, and under RNA-specific doublet models accommodating the occurrence of compensatory substitutions in stem regions. Our results support the division of tunicates into three major clades: 1) Phlebobranchia + Thaliacea + Aplousobranchia, 2) Appendicularia, and 3) Stolidobranchia, but the position of Appendicularia could not be firmly resolved. Our study additionally reveals that most Aplousobranchia evolve at extremely high rates involving changes in secondary structure of their 18S rRNA, with the exception of the family Clavelinidae, which appears to be slowly evolving. This extreme rate heterogeneity precluded resolving with certainty the exact phylogenetic placement of Aplousobranchia. Finally, the best fitting secondary-structure and CAT-mixture models suggest a sister

  13. Typification of virulent and low virulence Babesia bigemina clones by 18S rRNA and rap-1c.

    PubMed

    Thompson, C; Baravalle, M E; Valentini, B; Mangold, A; Torioni de Echaide, S; Ruybal, P; Farber, M; Echaide, I

    2014-06-01

    The population structure of original Babesia bigemina isolates and reference strains with a defined phenotypic profile was assessed using 18S rRNA and rap-1c genes. Two reference strains, BbiS2P-c (virulent) and BbiS1A-c (low virulence), were biologically cloned in vitro. The virulence profile of the strains and clones was assessed in vivo. One fully virulent and one low-virulence clone were mixed in identical proportions to evaluate their growth efficiency in vitro. Each clone was differentiated by two microsatellites and the gene gp45. The 18S rRNA and rap-1c genes sequences from B. bigemina biological clones and their parental strains, multiplied exclusively in vivo or in vitro, were compared with strain JG-29. The virulence of clones derived from the BbiS2P-c strain was variable. Virulent clone Bbi9P1 grew more efficiently in vitro than did the low-virulence clone Bbi2A1. The haplotypes generated by the nucleotide polymorphism, localized in the V4 region of the 18S rRNA, allowed the identification of three genotypes. The rap-1c haplotypes allowed defining four genotypes. Parental and original strains were defined by multiple haplotypes identified in both genes. The rap-1c gene, analyzed by high-resolution melting (HRM), allowed discrimination between two genotypes according to their phenotype, and both were different from JG-29. B. bigemina biological clones made it possible to define the population structure of isolates and strains. The polymorphic regions of the 18S rRNA and rap-1c genes allowed the identification of different subpopulations within original B. bigemina isolates by the definition of several haplotypes and the differentiation of fully virulent from low virulence clones.

  14. Gradual processing of the ITS1 from the nucleolus to the cytoplasm during synthesis of the human 18S rRNA.

    PubMed

    Preti, Milena; O'Donohue, Marie-Françoise; Montel-Lehry, Nathalie; Bortolin-Cavaillé, Marie-Line; Choesmel, Valérie; Gleizes, Pierre-Emmanuel

    2013-04-01

    Defects in ribosome biogenesis trigger stress response pathways, which perturb cell proliferation and differentiation in several genetic diseases. In Diamond-Blackfan anemia (DBA), a congenital erythroblastopenia, mutations in ribosomal protein genes often interfere with the processing of the internal transcribed spacer 1 (ITS1), the mechanism of which remains elusive in human cells. Using loss-of-function experiments and extensive RNA analysis, we have defined the precise position of the endonucleolytic cleavage E in the ITS1, which generates the 18S-E intermediate, the last precursor to the 18S rRNA. Unexpectedly, this cleavage is followed by 3'-5' exonucleolytic trimming of the 18S-E precursor during nuclear export of the pre-40S particle, which sets a new mechanism for 18S rRNA formation clearly different from that established in yeast. In addition, cleavage at site E is also followed by 5'-3' exonucleolytic trimming of the ITS1 by exonuclease XRN2. Perturbation of this step on knockdown of the large subunit ribosomal protein RPL26, which was recently associated to DBA, reveals the putative role of a highly conserved cis-acting sequence in ITS1 processing. These data cast new light on the original mechanism of ITS1 elimination in human cells and provide a mechanistic framework to further study the interplay of DBA-linked ribosomal proteins in this process.

  15. Compositional properties and thermal adaptation of 18S rRNA in vertebrates

    PubMed Central

    Varriale, Annalisa; Torelli, Giuseppe; Bernardi, Giorgio

    2008-01-01

    In order to investigate the influence of temperature on the GC level of the paired sequences of ribosomal 18S RNAs in vertebrates, we have studied their base composition in cold- and warm-blooded vertebrates using a stem-by-stem comparison. We observed that a number of stems of 18S ribosomal RNAs (rRNAs) are variable among species and that the majority of such stems are GC richer in warm-blooded than in cold-blooded vertebrates. We also constructed the secondary structures of the 18S rRNAs of a polar fish, a marsupial, and a monotreme to compare them with those of temperate/tropical fishes and of eutherians, respectively. In these cases, differences similar to those already mentioned were found. We conclude that there is a correlation between stem stability and body temperature even within the relatively limited temperature range of vertebrates. PMID:18567811

  16. Highly divergent 18S rRNA gene paralogs in a Cryptosporidium genotype from eastern chipmunks (Tamias striatus)1

    PubMed Central

    Stenger, Brianna L.S.; Clark, Mark E.; Kváč, Martin; Khan, Eakalak; Giddings, Catherine W.; Dyer, Neil W.; Schultz, Jessie L.; McEvoy, John M.

    2015-01-01

    Cryptosporidium is an apicomplexan parasite that causes the disease cryptosporidiosis in humans, livestock, and other vertebrates. Much of the knowledge on Cryptosporidium diversity is derived from 18S rRNA gene (18S rDNA) phylogenies. Eukaryote genomes generally have multiple 18S rDNA copies that evolve in concert, which is necessary for the accurate inference of phylogenetic relationships. However, 18S rDNA copies in some genomes evolve by a birth-and-death process that can result in sequence divergence among copies. Most notably, divergent 18S rDNA paralogs in the apicomplexan Plasmodium share only 89–95% sequence similarity, encode structurally distinct rRNA molecules, and are expressed at different life cycle stages. In the present study, Cryptosporidium 18S rDNA was amplified from 28/72 (38.9%) eastern chipmunks (Tamias striatus). Phylogenetic analyses showed the co-occurrence of two 18S rDNA types, Type A and Type B, in 26 chipmunks, and Type B clustered with a sequence previously identified as Cryptosporidium chipmunk genotype II. Types A and B had a sister group relationship but shared less than 93% sequence similarity. In contrast, actin and heat shock protein 70 gene sequences were homogeneous in samples with both Types A and B present. It was therefore concluded that Types A and B are divergent 18S rDNA paralogs in Cryptosporidium chipmunk genotype II. Substitution patterns in Types A and B were consistent with functionally constrained evolution; however, Type B evolved more rapidly than Type A and had a higher G+C content (46.3% versus 41.0%). Oocysts of Cryptosporidium chipmunk genotype II measured 4.17 μm (3.73–5.04 μm) × 3.94 μm (3.50–4.98 μm) with a length-to-width ratio of 1.06 ± 0.06 μm, and infection occurred naturally in the jejunum, cecum, and colon of eastern chipmunks. The findings of this study have implications for the use of 18S rDNA sequences to infer phylogenetic relationships. PMID:25772204

  17. Applied genomics: data mining reveals species-specific malaria diagnostic targets more sensitive than 18S rRNA.

    PubMed

    Demas, Allison; Oberstaller, Jenna; DeBarry, Jeremy; Lucchi, Naomi W; Srinivasamoorthy, Ganesh; Sumari, Deborah; Kabanywanyi, Abdunoor M; Villegas, Leopoldo; Escalante, Ananias A; Kachur, S Patrick; Barnwell, John W; Peterson, David S; Udhayakumar, Venkatachalam; Kissinger, Jessica C

    2011-07-01

    Accurate and rapid diagnosis of malaria infections is crucial for implementing species-appropriate treatment and saving lives. Molecular diagnostic tools are the most accurate and sensitive method of detecting Plasmodium, differentiating between Plasmodium species, and detecting subclinical infections. Despite available whole-genome sequence data for Plasmodium falciparum and P. vivax, the majority of PCR-based methods still rely on the 18S rRNA gene targets. Historically, this gene has served as the best target for diagnostic assays. However, it is limited in its ability to detect mixed infections in multiplex assay platforms without the use of nested PCR. New diagnostic targets are needed. Ideal targets will be species specific, highly sensitive, and amenable to both single-step and multiplex PCRs. We have mined the genomes of P. falciparum and P. vivax to identify species-specific, repetitive sequences that serve as new PCR targets for the detection of malaria. We show that these targets (Pvr47 and Pfr364) exist in 14 to 41 copies and are more sensitive than 18S rRNA when utilized in a single-step PCR. Parasites are routinely detected at levels of 1 to 10 parasites/μl. The reaction can be multiplexed to detect both species in a single reaction. We have examined 7 P. falciparum strains and 91 P. falciparum clinical isolates from Tanzania and 10 P. vivax strains and 96 P. vivax clinical isolates from Venezuela, and we have verified a sensitivity and specificity of ∼100% for both targets compared with a nested 18S rRNA approach. We show that bioinformatics approaches can be successfully applied to identify novel diagnostic targets and improve molecular methods for pathogen detection. These novel targets provide a powerful alternative molecular diagnostic method for the detection of P. falciparum and P. vivax in conventional or multiplex PCR platforms.

  18. Molecular phylogenetics of subclass Peritrichia (Ciliophora: Oligohymenophorea) based on expanded analyses of 18S rRNA sequences.

    PubMed

    Utz, Laura R P; Eizirik, Eduardo

    2007-01-01

    Phylogenetic relationships among peritrich ciliates remain unclear in spite of recent progress. To expand the analyses performed in previous studies, and to statistically test hypotheses of monophyly, we analyzed a broad sample of 18s rRNA sequences (including 15 peritrich genera), applying a conservative alignment strategy and several phylogenetic approaches. The main results are that: (i) the monophyly of Peritrichia cannot be rejected; (ii) the two main clades of Sessilida do not correspond to formally recognized taxa; (iii) the monophyly of genera Vorticella and Epistylis is significantly rejected; and (iv) morphological structures commonly used in peritrich taxonomy may be evolutionarily labile.

  19. Detecting morphological convergence in true fungi, using 18S rRNA gene sequence data.

    PubMed

    Berbee, M L; Taylor, J W

    1992-01-01

    For the true fungi, phylogenetic relationships inferred from 18S ribosomal DNA sequence data agree with morphology when (1) the fungi exhibit diagnostic morphological characters, (2) the sequence-based phylogenetic groups are statistically supported, and (3) the ribosomal DNA evolves at roughly the same rate in the lineages being compared. 18S ribosomal RNA gene sequence data and biochemical data provide a congruent definition of true fungi. Sequence data support the traditional fungal subdivisions Ascomycotina and Basidiomycotina. In conflict with morphology, some zygomycetes group with chytrid water molds rather than with other terrestrial fungi, possibly owing to unequal rates of nucleotide substitutions among zygomycete lineages. Within the ascomycetes, the taxonomic consequence of simple or reduced morphology has been a proliferation of mutually incongruent classification systems. Sequence data provide plausible resolution of relationships for some cases where reduced morphology has created confusion. For example, phylogenetic trees from rDNA indicate that those morphologically simple ascomycetes classified as yeasts are polyphyletic and that forcible spore discharge was lost convergently from three lineages of ascomycetes producing flask-like fruiting bodies.

  20. PCR-based diversity estimates of artificial and environmental 18S rRNA gene libraries.

    PubMed

    Potvin, Marianne; Lovejoy, Connie

    2009-01-01

    Environmental clone libraries constructed using small subunit ribosomal RNA (rRNA) or other gene-specific primers have become the standard molecular approach for identifying microorganisms directly from their environment. This technique includes an initial polymerase chain reaction (PCR) amplification step of a phylogenetically useful marker gene using universal primers. Although it is acknowledged that such primers introduce biases, there have been few studies if any to date systematically examining such bias in eukaryotic microbes. We investigated some implications of such bias by constructing clone libraries using several universal primer pairs targeting rRNA genes. Firstly, we constructed artificial libraries using a known mix of small cultured pelagic arctic algae with representatives from five major lineages and secondly we investigated environmental samples using several primer pairs. No primer pair retrieved all of the original algae in the artificial clone libraries and all showed a favorable bias toward the dinoflagellate Polarella glacialis and a bias against the prasinophyte Micromonas and a pennate diatom. Several other species were retrieved by only one primer pair tested. Despite this, sequences from nine environmental libraries were diverse and contained representatives from all major eukaryotic clades expected in marine samples. Further, libraries from the same sample grouped together using Bray-Curtis clustering, irrespective of primer pairs. We conclude that environmental PCR-based techniques are sufficient to compare samples, but the total diversity will probably always be underestimated and relative abundance estimates should be treated with caution.

  1. The ATPase hCINAP regulates 18S rRNA processing and is essential for embryogenesis and tumour growth

    PubMed Central

    Bai, Dongmei; Zhang, Jinfang; Li, Tingting; Hang, Runlai; Liu, Yong; Tian, Yonglu; Huang, Dadu; Qu, Linglong; Cao, Xiaofeng; Ji, Jiafu; Zheng, Xiaofeng

    2016-01-01

    Dysfunctions in ribosome biogenesis cause developmental defects and increased cancer susceptibility; however, the connection between ribosome assembly and tumorigenesis remains unestablished. Here we show that hCINAP (also named AK6) is required for human 18S rRNA processing and 40S subunit assembly. Homozygous CINAP−/− mice show embryonic lethality. The heterozygotes are viable and show defects in 18S rRNA processing, whereas no delayed cell growth is observed. However, during rapid growth, CINAP haploinsufficiency impairs protein synthesis. Consistently, hCINAP depletion in fast-growing cancer cells inhibits ribosome assembly and abolishes tumorigenesis. These data demonstrate that hCINAP reduction is a specific rate-limiting controller during rapid growth. Notably, hCINAP is highly expressed in cancers and correlated with a worse prognosis. Genome-wide polysome profiling shows that hCINAP selectively modulates cancer-associated translatome to promote malignancy. Our results connect the role of hCINAP in ribosome assembly with tumorigenesis. Modulation of hCINAP expression may be a promising target for cancer therapy. PMID:27477389

  2. Phylogeny of Intestinal Ciliates, Including Charonina ventriculi, and Comparison of Microscopy and 18S rRNA Gene Pyrosequencing for Rumen Ciliate Community Structure Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Devente, Savannah R.; Kirk, Michelle R.; Seedorf, Henning; Dehority, Burk A.

    2015-01-01

    The development of high-throughput methods, such as the construction of 18S rRNA gene clone or pyrosequencing libraries, has allowed evaluation of ciliate community composition in hundreds of samples from the rumen and other intestinal habitats. However, several genera of mammalian intestinal ciliates have been described based only on morphological features and, to date, have not been identified using molecular methods. Here, we isolated single cells of one of the smallest but widely distributed intestinal ciliates, Charonina ventriculi, and sequenced its 18S rRNA gene. We verified the sequence in a full-cycle rRNA approach using fluorescence in situ hybridization and thereby assigned an 18S rRNA gene sequence to this species previously known only by its morphology. Based on its full-length 18S rRNA gene sequence, Charonina ventriculi was positioned within the phylogeny of intestinal ciliates in the subclass Trichostomatia. The taxonomic framework derived from this phylogeny was used for taxonomic assignment of trichostome ciliate 18S rRNA gene sequence data stemming from high-throughput amplicon pyrosequencing of rumen-derived DNA samples. The 18S rRNA gene-based ciliate community structure was compared to that obtained from microscopic counts using the same samples. Both methods allowed identification of dominant members of the ciliate communities and classification of the rumen ciliate community into one of the types first described by Eadie in 1962. Notably, each method is associated with advantages and disadvantages. Microscopy is a highly accurate method for evaluation of total numbers or relative abundances of different ciliate genera in a sample, while 18S rRNA gene pyrosequencing represents a valuable alternative for comparison of ciliate community structure in a large number of samples from different animals or treatment groups. PMID:25616800

  3. Nematode 18S rRNA gene is a reliable tool for environmental biosafety assessment of transgenic banana in confined field trials.

    PubMed

    Nakacwa, R; Kiggundu, A; Talwana, H; Namaganda, J; Lilley, C; Tushemereirwe, W; Atkinson, H

    2013-10-01

    Information on relatedness in nematodes is commonly obtained by DNA sequencing of the ribosomal internal transcribed spacer region. However, the level of diversity at this locus is often insufficient for reliable species differentiation. Recent findings suggest that the sequences of a fragment of the small subunit nuclear ribosomal DNA (18S rRNA or SSU), identify genera of soil nematodes and can also distinguish between species in some cases. A database of soil nematode genera in a Ugandan soil was developed using 18S rRNA sequences of individual nematodes from a GM banana confined field trial site at the National Agricultural Research Laboratories, Kawanda in Uganda. The trial was planted to evaluate transgenic bananas for resistance to black Sigatoka disease. Search for relatedness of the sequences gained with entries in a public genomic database identified a range of 20 different genera and sometimes distinguished species. Molecular markers were designed from the sequence information to underpin nematode faunal analysis. This approach provides bio-indicators for disturbance of the soil environment and the condition of the soil food web. It is being developed to support environmental biosafety analysis by detecting any perturbance by transgenic banana or other GM crops on the soil environment.

  4. Molecular Diversity of Eukaryotes in Municipal Wastewater Treatment Processes as Revealed by 18S rRNA Gene Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Matsunaga, Kengo; Kubota, Kengo; Harada, Hideki

    2014-01-01

    Eukaryotic communities involved in sewage treatment processes have been investigated by morphological identification, but have not yet been well-characterized using molecular approaches. In the present study, eukaryotic communities were characterized by constructing 18S rRNA gene clone libraries. The phylogenetic affiliations of a total of 843 clones were Alveolata, Fungi, Rhizaria, Euglenozoa, Stramenopiles, Amoebozoa, and Viridiplantae as protozoans and Rotifera, Gastrotricha, and Nematoda as metazoans. Sixty percent of the clones had <97% sequence identity to described eukaryotes, indicating the greater diversity of eukaryotes than previously recognized. A core OTU closely related to Epistylis chrysemydis was identified, and several OTUs were shared by 4–8 libraries. Members of the uncultured lineage LKM11 in Cryptomycota were predominant fungi in sewage treatment processes. This comparative study represents an initial step in furthering understanding of the diversity and role of eukaryotes in sewage treatment processes. PMID:25491751

  5. Analysis of 18S rRNA gene sequences suggests significant molecular differences between Macrodasyida and Chaetonotida (Gastrotricha).

    PubMed

    Manylov, Oleg G; Vladychenskaya, Natalia S; Milyutina, Irina A; Kedrova, Olga S; Korokhov, Nikolai P; Dvoryanchikov, Gennady A; Aleshin, Vladimir V; Petrov, Nikolai B

    2004-03-01

    Partial 18S rRNA gene sequences of four macrodasyid and one chaetonotid gastrotrichs were obtained and compared with the available sequences of other gastrotrich species and representatives of various metazoan phyla. Contrary to the earlier molecular data, the gastrotrich sequences did not comprise a monophyletic group but formed two distinct clades, corresponding to the Macrodasyida and Chaetonotida, with the basal position occupied by the sequences of Tetranchyroderma sp. and Xenotrichula sp., respectively. Depending on the taxon sampling and methods of analysis, the two clades were separated by various combinations of clades Rotifera, Gnathostomulida, and Platyhelminthes, and never formed a clade with Nematoda. Thus, monophyly of the Gastrotricha is not confirmed by analysis of the presently available molecular data.

  6. Molecular diversity of eukaryotes in municipal wastewater treatment processes as revealed by 18S rRNA gene analysis.

    PubMed

    Matsunaga, Kengo; Kubota, Kengo; Harada, Hideki

    2014-01-01

    Eukaryotic communities involved in sewage treatment processes have been investigated by morphological identification, but have not yet been well-characterized using molecular approaches. In the present study, eukaryotic communities were characterized by constructing 18S rRNA gene clone libraries. The phylogenetic affiliations of a total of 843 clones were Alveolata, Fungi, Rhizaria, Euglenozoa, Stramenopiles, Amoebozoa, and Viridiplantae as protozoans and Rotifera, Gastrotricha, and Nematoda as metazoans. Sixty percent of the clones had <97% sequence identity to described eukaryotes, indicating the greater diversity of eukaryotes than previously recognized. A core OTU closely related to Epistylis chrysemydis was identified, and several OTUs were shared by 4-8 libraries. Members of the uncultured lineage LKM11 in Cryptomycota were predominant fungi in sewage treatment processes. This comparative study represents an initial step in furthering understanding of the diversity and role of eukaryotes in sewage treatment processes.

  7. Molecular phylogeny of extant gymnosperms and seed plant evolution: analysis of nuclear 18S rRNA sequences.

    PubMed

    Chaw, S M; Zharkikh, A; Sung, H M; Lau, T C; Li, W H

    1997-01-01

    To study the evolutionary relationships among the four living gymnosperm orders and the interfamilial relationships in each order, a set of 65 nuclear 18S rRNA sequences from ferns, gymnosperms, and angiosperms was analyzed using the neighbor-joining and maximum-parsimony methods. With Selaginella as the outgroup, the analysis strongly indicates that the seed plants form a monophyletic group with the ferns as a sister group. Within the seed plants the angiosperms are clearly a monophyletic group. Although the bootstrap support for the monophyly of the gymnosperm clade is moderate, the monophyly is further supported by its lack of angiosperm-specific indels. Within the gymnosperms there appear to be three monophyletic clades: Cycadales-Ginkgoales, Gnetales, and Coniferales. The cycad-ginkgo clade is the earliest gymnosperm lineage. Given the strong support for the sister group relationship between Gnetales and Coniferales, it is unlikely that Gnetales is a sister group of the angiosperms, contrary to the view of many plant taxonomists. Within Coniferales, Pinaceae is monophyletic and basal to the remaining conifer families, among which there are three monophyletic clades: Phyllocladaceae-Podocarpaceae, Araucariaceae, and Sciadopityaceae-Taxaceae-Cephalotaxaceae-Taxodiacea e-Cupressaceae. Within the latter clade, Sciadopityaceae may be an outgroup to the other four families. Among the angiosperms, no significant cluster at the level of subclass was found, but there was evidence that Nymphaeaceae branched off first. Within the remaining angiosperms, the monocots included in this study are nested and form a monophyletic group. This study attests to the utility of nuclear 18S rRNA sequences in addressing relationships among living gymnosperms. Considerable variation in substitution rates was observed among the ferns and seed plants.

  8. Sequence heterogeneity in the 18S rRNA gene in Theileria equi from horses presented in Switzerland.

    PubMed

    Liu, Qin; Meli, Marina L; Zhang, Yi; Meili, Theres; Stirn, Martina; Riond, Barbara; Weibel, Beatrice; Hofmann-Lehmann, Regina

    2016-05-15

    A reverse line blot (RLB) hybridization assay was adapted and applied for equine blood samples collected at the animal hospital of the University of Zurich to determine the presence of piroplasms in horses in Switzerland. A total of 100 equine blood samples were included in the study. The V4 hypervariable region of the 18S rRNA gene was amplified by polymerase chain reaction and analyzed using the RLB assay. Samples from seven horses hybridized to a Theileria/Babesia genus-specific and a Theileria genus-specific probe. Of these, two hybridized also to the Theileria equi-specific probe. The other five positive samples did not hybridize to any of the species-specific probes, suggesting the presence of unrecognized Theileria variants or genotypes. The 18S rRNA gene of the latter five samples were sequenced and found to be closely related to T. equi isolated from horses in Spain (AY534822) and China (KF559357) (≥98.4% identity). Four of the seven horses that tested positive had a documented travel history (France, Italy, and Spain) or lived abroad (Hungary). The present study adds new insight into the presence and sequence heterogeneity of T. equi in Switzerland. The results prompt that species-specific probes must be designed in regions of the gene unique to T. equi. Of note, none of the seven positive horses were suspected of having Theileria infection at the time of presentation to the clinic. Clinicians should be aware of the possibility of equine piroplasma infections outside of endemic areas and in horses without signs of piroplasmosis.

  9. Limitations of metazoan 18S rRNA sequence data: implications for reconstructing a phylogeny of the animal kingdom and inferring the reality of the Cambrian explosion.

    PubMed

    Abouheif, E; Zardoya, R; Meyer, A

    1998-10-01

    We document the phylogenetic behavior of the 18S rRNA molecule in 67 taxa from 28 metazoan phyla and assess the effects of among-site rate variation on reconstructing phylogenies of the animal kingdom. This empirical assessment was undertaken to clarify further the limits of resolution of the 18S rRNA gene as a phylogenetic marker and to address the question of whether 18S rRNA phylogenies can be used as a source of evidence to infer the reality of a Cambrian explosion. A notable degree of among-site rate variation exists between different regions of the 18S rRNA molecule, as well as within all classes of secondary structure. There is a significant negative correlation between inferred number of nucleotide substitutions and phylogenetic information, as well as with the degree of substitutional saturation within the molecule. Base compositional differences both within and between taxa exist and, in certain lineages, may be associated with long branches and phylogenetic position. Importantly, excluding sites with different degrees of nucleotide substitution significantly influences the topology and degree of resolution of maximum-parsimony phylogenies as well as neighbor-joining phylogenies (corrected and uncorrected for among-site rate variation) reconstructed at the metazoan scale. Together, these data indicate that the 18S rRNA molecule is an unsuitable candidate for reconstructing the evolutionary history of all metazoan phyla, and that the polytomies, i.e., unresolved nodes within 18S rRNA phylogenies, cannot be used as a single or reliable source of evidence to support the hypothesis of a Cambrian explosion.

  10. Monitoring the mycobiota during Greco di Tufo and Aglianico wine fermentation by 18S rRNA gene sequencing.

    PubMed

    De Filippis, Francesca; La Storia, Antonietta; Blaiotta, Giuseppe

    2017-05-01

    Spontaneous alcoholic fermentation of grape must is a complex process, carried out by indigenous yeast populations arising from the vineyard or the winery environment and therefore representing an autochthonous microbial terroir of the production area. Microbial diversity at species and biotype level is extremely important in order to develop the composite and typical flavour profile of DOCG (Appellation of Controlled and Guaranteed Origin) wines. In this study, we monitored fungal populations involved in spontaneous fermentations of Aglianico and Greco di Tufo grape must by high-throughput sequencing (HTS) of 18S rRNA gene amplicons. We firstly proposed an alternative/addition to ITS as target gene in HTS studies and highlighted consistency between the culture-dependent and -independent approaches. A complex mycobiota was found at the beginning of the fermentation, mainly characterized by non-Saccharomyces yeasts and several moulds, with differences between the two types of grapes. Moreover, Interdelta patterns revealed a succession of several Saccharomyces cerevisiae biotypes and a high genetic diversity within this species.

  11. Phylogenetic analysis and the evolution of the 18S rRNA gene typing system of Acanthamoeba.

    PubMed

    Fuerst, Paul A; Booton, Gregory C; Crary, Monica

    2015-01-01

    Species of Acanthamoeba were first described using morphological characters including cyst structure and cytology of nuclear division. More than 20 nominal species were proposed using these methods. Morphology, especially cyst shape and size, has proven to be plastic and dependent upon culture conditions. The DNA sequence of the nuclear small-subunit (18S) rRNA, the Rns gene, has become the most widely accepted method for rapid diagnosis and classification of Acanthamoeba. The Byers-Fuerst lab first proposed an Rns typing system in 1996. Subsequent refinements, with an increasing DNA database and analysis of diagnostic fragments within the gene, have become widely accepted by the Acanthamoeba research community. The development of the typing system, including its current state of implementation is illustrated by three cases: (i) the division between sequence types T13 and T16; (ii) the diversity within sequence supertype T2/T6, and (iii) verification of a new sequence type, designated T20. Molecular studies make clear the disconnection between phylogenetic relatedness and species names, as applied for the genus Acanthamoeba. Future reconciliation of genetic types with species names must become a priority, but the possible shortcomings of the use of a single gene when reconstructing the evolutionary history of the acanthamoebidae must also be resolved.

  12. [Molecular phylogeny of gastrotricha based on 18S rRNA genes comparison: rejection of hypothesis of relatedness with nematodes].

    PubMed

    Petrov, N B; Pegova, A N; Manylov, O G; Vladychenskaia, N S; Miuge, N S; Aleshin, V V

    2007-01-01

    Gastrotrichs are meiobenthic free-living aquatic worms whose phylogenetic and intra-group relationships remain unclear despite some attempts to resolve them on the base of morphology or molecules. In this study we analysed complete sequences of the 18S rRNA gene of 15 taxa (8 new and 7 published) to test numerous hypotheses on gastrotrich phylogeny and to verify whether controversial interrelationships from previous molecular data could be due to the short region available for analysis and the poor taxa sampling. Data were analysed using both maximum likelihood and Bayesian inference. Results obtained suggest that gastrotrichs, together with Gnathostomulida, Plathelminthes, Syndermata (Rotifera + Acanthocephala), Nemertea and Lophotrochozoa, comprise a clade Spiralia. Statistical tests reject phylogenetic hypotheses regarding Gastrotricha as close relatives of Nematoda and other Ecdysozoa or placing them at the base of bilaterian tree close to acoels and nemertodermatides. Within Gastrotricha, Chaetonotida and Macrodasyida comprise two well supported clades. Our analysis confirmed the monophyly of the Chaetonotidae and Xenotrichulidae within Chaetonida as well as Turbanellidae and Thaumastodermatidae within Macrodasyida. Mesodasys is a sister group of the Turbanellidae, and Lepidodasyidae appears to be a polyphyletic group as Cephalodasys forms a separate lineage at the base of macrodasyids, whereas Lepidodasys groups with Neodasys between Thaumastodermatidae and Turbanellidae. To infer a more reliable Gastrotricha phylogeny many species and additional genes should be involved in future analyses.

  13. Direct chemical probing of the conformation of the 3' functional domain of rabbit 18S rRNA in 40S subunits, 80S ribosomes and polyribosomes

    SciTech Connect

    Rubino, H.M.; Rairkar, A.; Lockard, R.E.

    1987-05-01

    Recent evidence suggests that the 3' minor domain of eukaryotic 18S rRNA, as in prokaryotes, is directly involved in protein biosynthesis. To determine regions of possible functional importance, they have probed the higher order structure of rabbit 18S rRNA in both 40S subunits and 80S ribosomes, as well as polyribosomes using the single-strand specific chemical probes dimethyl sulfate (DMS) and diethyl pyrocarbonate (DEPC) which react with unpaired guanosine and adenosine residues, respectively. The modified 18S rRNA was isolated from these particles and the resultant modified nucleotides identified on polyacrylamide sequencing gels upon either aniline-induced strand scission of /sup 32/P-end-labeled intact rRNA or by DNA primer extension using sequence specific deoxyoligomers with reverse transcriptase. Their results indicate a decreased reactivity of residue C-1692 in rabbit 18S rRNA (corresponding to C-1400 E. coli) within the putative tRNA contact site in polyribosomes as compared with 40S subunits and 80S ribosomes. They have also determined varying reactivities of a number of other residues within specific regions of the 3' functional domain when 40S, 80S, and polyribosomes are compared, which may be important for both subunit association as well as mRNA binding.

  14. Primers to block the amplification of symbiotic apostome ciliate 18S rRNA gene in a PCR-based copepod diet study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yi, Xiaoyan; Zhang, Huan; Liu, Guangxing

    2014-05-01

    Pelagic copepods play an important role in the marine food web. However, a full understanding of the ecological status of this zooplankton group depends on the careful study of their natural diets. In previous PCR-based copepod diet studies, we found many apostome ciliates that live symbiotically under the exoskeleton of the copepods, and their sequences were often over-represented in the 18S rRNA gene (18S rDNA) libraries. As a first step to address this issue, we designed three apostome ciliate 18S rDNA blocking primers, and tested their blocking efficiency against apostome ciliate 18s rDNA under various PCR conditions. Using a semi-quantitative PCR method, we optimized the conditions to efficiently amplify the 18S rDNA of the prey while simultaneously excluding the symbiotic apostome ciliates. This technique will facilitate PCR-based diet studies of copepods and other zooplankton in their natural environments.

  15. Characterization of the vaginal fungal flora in pregnant diabetic women by 18S rRNA sequencing.

    PubMed

    Zheng, N-N; Guo, X-C; Lv, W; Chen, X-X; Feng, G-F

    2013-08-01

    Pregnancy and diabetes are regarded as individual risk factors for vaginal candidiasis. The high prevalence of vaginal candidiasis in pregnant diabetic women can be explained by disruption of the balance of the vaginal normal flora. However, little is known about the overall structure and composition of the vaginal fungal flora in pregnant diabetic women. In the present study, the diversity and richness of the vaginal fungal flora in healthy non-pregnant women (group HN), healthy pregnant women (group HP), women with gestational diabetes mellitus (group GDM), and pregnant women with diabetes mellitus type I (group T1DM) were investigated using an 18S rRNA gene clone library method. Our data demonstrated that the composition of the vaginal fungal flora in the four groups could be divided into two phyla (Ascomycetes, 20/26, and Basidiomycetes, 6/26). The most predominant vaginal fungal species belonged to the Candida and Saccharomyces genera, uncultured fungi, and a large number of low-abundance taxa that were unrecorded or underrepresented in previous studies using cultivation-dependent methods. Variation in operational taxonomic units (OTUs) between the study cohorts was generally high in the clone libraries, as 9, 13, 17, and 20 phylotypes were identified in groups HN, HP, GDM, and T1DM, respectively. The Shannon indices of groups GDM and T1DM (with poorer glycemic control) were significantly higher compared to groups HN and HP (p < 0.05). The data presented here revealed an increased diversity and varied composition of the vaginal fungal flora in pregnant diabetic women and demonstrated that poor glycemic control might be associated with disturbances in the vaginal fungal flora.

  16. Genetic characterization and phylogenetic relationships based on 18S rRNA and ITS1 region of small form of canine Babesia spp. from India.

    PubMed

    Mandal, M; Banerjee, P S; Garg, Rajat; Ram, Hira; Kundu, K; Kumar, Saroj; Kumar, G V P P S Ravi

    2014-10-01

    Canine babesiosis is a vector borne disease caused by intra-erythrocytic apicomplexan parasites Babesia canis (large form) and Babesia gibsoni (small form), throughout the globe. Apart from few sporadic reports on the occurrence of B. gibsoni infection in dogs, no attempt has been made to characterize Babesia spp. of dogs in India. Fifteen canine blood samples, positive for small form of Babesia, collected from northern to eastern parts of India, were used for amplification of 18S rRNA gene (∼1665bp) of Babesia sp. and partial ITS1 region (∼254bp) of B. gibsoni Asian genotype. Cloning and sequencing of the amplified products of each sample was performed separately. Based on sequences and phylogenetic analysis of 18S rRNA and ITS1 sequences, 13 were considered to be B. gibsoni. These thirteen isolates shared high sequence identity with each other and with B. gibsoni Asian genotype. The other two isolates could not be assigned to any particular species because of the difference(s) in 18S rRNA sequence with B. gibsoni and closer identity with Babesiaoccultans and Babesiaorientalis. In the phylogenetic tree, all the isolates of B. gibsoni Asian genotype formed a separate major clade named as Babesia spp. sensu stricto clade with high bootstrap support. The two unnamed Babesia sp. (Malbazar and Ludhiana isolates) clustered close together with B. orientalis, Babesia sp. (Kashi 1 isolate) and B. occultans of bovines. It can be inferred from this study that 18S rRNA gene and ITS1 region are highly conserved among 13 B. gibsoni isolates from India. It is the maiden attempt of genetic characterization by sequencing of 18S rRNA gene and ITS1 region of B. gibsoni from India and is also the first record on the occurrence of an unknown Babesia sp. of dogs from south and south-east Asia.

  17. Sequence variation identified in the 18S rRNA gene of Theileria mutans and Theileria velifera from the African buffalo (Syncerus caffer).

    PubMed

    Chaisi, Mamohale E; Collins, Nicola E; Potgieter, Fred T; Oosthuizen, Marinda C

    2013-01-16

    The African buffalo (Syncerus caffer) is a natural reservoir host for both pathogenic and non-pathogenic Theileria species. These often occur naturally as mixed infections in buffalo. Although the benign and mildly pathogenic forms do not have any significant economic importance, their presence could complicate the interpretation of diagnostic test results aimed at the specific diagnosis of the pathogenic Theileria parva in cattle and buffalo in South Africa. The 18S rRNA gene has been used as the target in a quantitative real-time PCR (qPCR) assay for the detection of T. parva infections. However, the extent of sequence variation within this gene in the non-pathogenic Theileria spp. of the Africa buffalo is not well known. The aim of this study was, therefore, to characterise the full-length 18S rRNA genes of Theileria mutans, Theileria sp. (strain MSD) and T. velifera and to determine the possible influence of any sequence variation on the specific detection of T. parva using the 18S rRNA qPCR. The reverse line blot (RLB) hybridization assay was used to select samples which either tested positive for several different Theileria spp., or which hybridised only with the Babesia/Theileria genus-specific probe and not with any of the Babesia or Theileria species-specific probes. The full-length 18S rRNA genes from 14 samples, originating from 13 buffalo and one bovine from different localities in South Africa, were amplified, cloned and the resulting recombinants sequenced. Variations in the 18S rRNA gene sequences were identified in T. mutans, Theileria sp. (strain MSD) and T. velifera, with the greatest diversity observed amongst the T. mutans variants. This variation possibly explained why the RLB hybridization assay failed to detect T. mutans and T. velifera in some of the analysed samples.

  18. Characterization of the Two Intra-Individual Sequence Variants in the 18S rRNA Gene in the Plant Parasitic Nematode, Rotylenchulus reniformis

    PubMed Central

    Nyaku, Seloame T.; Sripathi, Venkateswara R.; Kantety, Ramesh V.; Gu, Yong Q.; Lawrence, Kathy; Sharma, Govind C.

    2013-01-01

    The 18S rRNA gene is fundamental to cellular and organismal protein synthesis and because of its stable persistence through generations it is also used in phylogenetic analysis among taxa. Sequence variation in this gene within a single species is rare, but it has been observed in few metazoan organisms. More frequently it has mostly been reported in the non-transcribed spacer region. Here, we have identified two sequence variants within the near full coding region of 18S rRNA gene from a single reniform nematode (RN) Rotylenchulus reniformis labeled as reniform nematode variant 1 (RN_VAR1) and variant 2 (RN_VAR2). All sequences from three of the four isolates had both RN variants in their sequences; however, isolate 13B had only RN variant 2 sequence. Specific variable base sites (96 or 5.5%) were found within the 18S rRNA gene that can clearly distinguish the two 18S rDNA variants of RN, in 11 (25.0%) and 33 (75.0%) of the 44 RN clones, for RN_VAR1 and RN_VAR2, respectively. Neighbor-joining trees show that the RN_VAR1 is very similar to the previously existing R. reniformis sequence in GenBank, while the RN_VAR2 sequence is more divergent. This is the first report of the identification of two major variants of the 18S rRNA gene in the same single RN, and documents the specific base variation between the two variants, and hypothesizes on simultaneous co-existence of these two variants for this gene. PMID:23593343

  19. Comparison of potential diatom 'barcode' genes (the 18S rRNA gene and ITS, COI, rbcL) and their effectiveness in discriminating and determining species taxonomy in the Bacillariophyta.

    PubMed

    Guo, Liliang; Sui, Zhenghong; Zhang, Shu; Ren, Yuanyuan; Liu, Yuan

    2015-04-01

    Diatoms form an enormous group of photoautotrophic micro-eukaryotes and play a crucial role in marine ecology. In this study, we evaluated typical genes to determine whether they were effective at different levels of diatom clustering analysis to assess the potential of these regions for barcoding taxa. Our test genes included nuclear rRNA genes (the nuclear small-subunit rRNA gene and the 5.8S rRNA gene+ITS-2), a mitochondrial gene (cytochrome c-oxidase subunit 1, COI), a chloroplast gene [ribulose-1,5-biphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase large subunit (rbcL)] and the universal plastid amplicon (UPA). Calculated genetic divergence was highest for the internal transcribed spacer (ITS; 5.8S+ITS-2) (p-distance of 1.569, 85.84% parsimony-informative sites) and COI (6.084, 82.14%), followed by the 18S rRNA gene (0.139, 57.69%), rbcL (0.120, 42.01%) and UPA (0.050, 14.97%), which indicated that ITS and COI were highly divergent compared with the other tested genes, and that their nucleotide compositions were variable within the whole group of diatoms. Bayesian inference (BI) analysis showed that the phylogenetic trees generated from each gene clustered diatoms at different phylogenetic levels. The 18S rRNA gene was better than the other genes in clustering higher diatom taxa, and both the 18S rRNA gene and rbcL performed well in clustering some lower taxa. The COI region was able to barcode species of some genera within the Bacillariophyceae. ITS was a potential marker for DNA based-taxonomy and DNA barcoding of Thalassiosirales, while species of Cyclotella, Skeletonema and Stephanodiscus gathered in separate clades, and were paraphyletic with those of Thalassiosira. Finally, UPA was too conserved to serve as a diatom barcode.

  20. Identification of Theileria parva and Theileria sp. (buffalo) 18S rRNA gene sequence variants in the African Buffalo (Syncerus caffer) in southern Africa.

    PubMed

    Chaisi, Mamohale E; Sibeko, Kgomotso P; Collins, Nicola E; Potgieter, Fred T; Oosthuizen, Marinda C

    2011-12-15

    Theileria parva is the causative agent of Corridor disease in cattle in South Africa. The African buffalo (Syncerus caffer) is the reservoir host, and, as these animals are important for eco-tourism in South Africa, it is compulsory to test and certify them disease free prior to translocation. A T. parva-specific real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR) test based on the small subunit ribosomal RNA (18S rRNA) gene is one of the tests used for the diagnosis of the parasite in buffalo and cattle in South Africa. However, because of the high similarity between the 18S rRNA gene sequences of T. parva and Theileria sp. (buffalo), the latter is also amplified by the real-time PCR primers, although it is not detected by the T. parva-specific hybridization probes. Preliminary sequencing studies have revealed a small number of sequence differences within the 18S rRNA gene in both species but the extent of this sequence variation is unknown. The aim of the current study was to sequence the 18S rRNA genes of T. parva and Theileria sp. (buffalo), and to determine whether all identified genotypes can be correctly detected by the real-time PCR assay. The reverse line blot (RLB) hybridization assay was used to identify T. parva and Theileria sp. (buffalo) positive samples from buffalo blood samples originating from the Kruger National Park, Hluhluwe-iMfolozi Park, the Greater Limpopo Transfrontier Park, and a private game ranch in the Hoedspruit area. T. parva and Theileria sp. (buffalo) were identified in 42% and 28%, respectively, of 252 samples, mainly as mixed infections. The full-length 18S rRNA gene of selected samples was amplified, cloned and sequenced. From a total of 20 sequences obtained, 10 grouped with previously published T. parva sequences from GenBank while 10 sequences grouped with a previously published Theileria sp. (buffalo) sequence. All these formed a monophyletic group with known pathogenic Theileria species. Our phylogenetic analyses confirm the

  1. Molecular characterization of Argulus bengalensis and Argulus siamensis (Crustacea: Argulidae) infecting the cultured carps in West Bengal, India using 18S rRNA gene sequences

    PubMed Central

    Patra, Avijit; Mondal, Anjan; Banerjee, Sayani; Adikesavalu, Harresh; Joardar, Siddhartha Narayan; Abraham, Thangapalam Jawahar

    2016-01-01

    The present study characterized Argulus spp. infecting the cultured carps using 18S rRNA gene sequences, estimated the genetic similarity among Argulus spp. and established their phylogenetic relationship. Of the 320 fish samples screened, 34 fish (10.6%) had Argulus infection. The parasitic frequency index (PFI) was observed to be high (20%) in Hypophthalmichthys molitrix and Labeo bata. The frequency of infection was high in September (PFI: 17%) and October (PFI: 12.9%). The 18S rRNA sequences of five A. bengalensis (KF583878, KF192316, KM016968, KM016969, and KM016970) and one A. siamensis (KF583879) of this study showed genetic heterogeneity and exhibited 77-99% homology among the 18S rRNA gene sequences of Argulus spp. of NCBI GenBank database. Among the Indian Argulus spp. the sequence homology was 87–100%. Evolutionary pair-wise distances between Indian Argulus spp. and other Argulus spp. ranged from 0 to 20.20%. In the phylogenetic tree, all the crustaceans were clustered together as a separate clade with two distinct lineages. The lineage-1 comprised exclusive of Branchiura (Argulus spp.). All Argulus bengalensis clustered together and A. siamensis (KF583879) was closely related to Argulus sp. JN558648. The results of the present study provided baseline data for future work on population structure analysis of Indian Argulus species. PMID:28097169

  2. Gene cloning of the 18S rRNA of an ancient viable moss from the permafrost of northeastern Siberia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marsic, Damien; Hoover, Richard B.; Gilichinsky, David A.; Ng, Joseph D.

    1999-12-01

    A moss plant dating as much as 40,000 years old was collected from the permafrost of the Kolyma Lowlands of Northeastern Siberia. The plant tissue was revived and cultured for the extraction of its genomic DNA. Using the polymerase chain reaction technique, the 18S ribosomal RNA gene was cloned and its sequence studied. Comparative sequence analysis of the cloned ribosomal DNA to other known 18S RNA showed very high sequence identity and was revealed to be closest to the moss specie, Aulacomnium turgidum. The results of this study also show the ability of biological organisms to rest dormant in deep frozen environments where they can be revived and cultured under favorable conditions. This is significant in the notion that celestial icy bodies can be media to preserve biological function and genetic material during long term storage or transport.

  3. [Mg2+ ions affect the structure of the central domain of the 18S rRNA in the vicinity of the ribosomal protein S13 binding site].

    PubMed

    Ivanov, A V; Malygin, A A; Karpova, G G

    2013-01-01

    It is known that Mg2+ ions at high concentrations stabilize the structure of the 16S rRNA in a conformation favorable for binding to the ribosomal proteins in the course of the eubacterial 30S ribosomal subunits assembly in vitro. Effect of Mg2+ on the formation of the 18S rRNA structure at the 40S subunit assembly remains poorly explored. In this paper, we show that the sequentional increase of the Mg2+ concentration from 0.5 mM to 20 mM leads to a significant decrease of the affinity of recombinant human ribosomal protein S13 (rpS13e) to a RNA transcript corresponding to the central domain fragment of the 18S rRNA (18SCD). The regions near the rpS13e binding site in 18SCD (including the nucleotides of helices H20 and H22), whose availabilities to hydroxyl radicals were dependent on the Mg2+ concentration, were determined. It was found that increase of the concentrations of Mg2+ results in the enhanced accessibilities of nucleotides G933-C937 and C1006-A1009 in helix H22 and reduces those of nucleotides A1023, A1024, and A1028-S1026 in the helix H20. Comparison of the results obtained with the crystallographic data on the structure of the central domain of 18S rRNA in the 40S ribosomal subunit led to conclusion that increase of Mg2+ concentrations results in the reorientation of helices H20 and H24 relatively helices H22 and H23 to form a structure, in which these helices are positioned the same way as in 40S subunits. Hence, saturation of the central domain of 18S rRNA with coordinated Mg2+ ions causes the same changes in its structure as rpS13e binding does, and leads to decreasing of this domain affinity to the protein.

  4. 18S rRNA Gene Variation among Common Airborne Fungi, and Development of Specific Oligonucleotide Probes for the Detection of Fungal Isolates

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Zhihong; Tsumura, Yoshihiko; Blomquist, Göran; Wang, Xiao-Ru

    2003-01-01

    In this study, we sequenced 18S rRNA genes (rDNA) from 49 fungal strains representing 31 species from 15 genera. Most of these species are common airborne fungi and pathogens that may cause various public health concerns. Sequence analysis revealed distinct divergence between Zygomycota and Ascomycota. Within Ascomycota, several strongly supported clades were identified that facilitate the taxonomic placement of several little-studied fungi. Wallemia appeared as the group most diverged from all the other Ascomycota species. Based on the 18S rDNA sequence variation, 108 oligonucleotide probes were designed for each genus and species included in this study. After homology searches and DNA hybridization evaluations, 33 probes were verified as genus or species specific. The optimal hybridization temperatures to achieve the best specificity for these 33 probes were determined. These new probes can contribute to the molecular diagnostic research for environmental monitoring. PMID:12957927

  5. gar2 is a nucleolar protein from Schizosaccharomyces pombe required for 18S rRNA and 40S ribosomal subunit accumulation.

    PubMed Central

    Gulli, M P; Girard, J P; Zabetakis, D; Lapeyre, B; Melese, T; Caizergues-Ferrer, M

    1995-01-01

    Several nucleolar proteins, such as nucleolin, NOP1/fibrillarin, SSB1, NSR1 and GAR1 share a common glycine and arginine rich structural motif called the GAR domain. To identify novel nucleolar proteins from fission yeast we screened Schizosaccharomyces pombe genomic DNA libraries with a probe encompassing the GAR structural motif. Here we report the identification and characterization of a S.pombe gene coding for a novel nucleolar protein, designated gar2. The structure of the fission yeast gar2 is reminiscent of that of nucleolin from vertebrates and NSR1 from Saccharomyces cerevisiae. In addition, like these proteins, gar2 has a nucleolar localisation. The disruption of the gar2+ gene affects normal cell growth, leads to an accumulation of 35S pre-rRNA and a decrease of mature 18S rRNA steady state levels. Moreover, ribosomal profiles of the mutant show an increase of free 60S ribosomal subunits and an absence of free 40S ribosomal subunits. gar2 is able to rescue a S.cerevisiae mutant lacking NSR1, thus establishing gar2 as a functional homolog of NSR1. We propose that gar2 helps the assembly of pre-ribosomal particles containing 18S rRNA. Images PMID:7596817

  6. The utility of diversity profiling using Illumina 18S rRNA gene amplicon deep sequencing to detect and discriminate Toxoplasma gondii among the cyst-forming coccidia.

    PubMed

    Cooper, Madalyn K; Phalen, David N; Donahoe, Shannon L; Rose, Karrie; Šlapeta, Jan

    2016-01-30

    Next-generation sequencing (NGS) has the capacity to screen a single DNA sample and detect pathogen DNA from thousands of host DNA sequence reads, making it a versatile and informative tool for investigation of pathogens in diseased animals. The technique is effective and labor saving in the initial identification of pathogens, and will complement conventional diagnostic tests to associate the candidate pathogen with a disease process. In this report, we investigated the utility of the diversity profiling NGS approach using Illumina small subunit ribosomal RNA (18S rRNA) gene amplicon deep sequencing to detect Toxoplasma gondii in previously confirmed cases of toxoplasmosis. We then tested the diagnostic approach with species-specific PCR genotyping, histopathology and immunohistochemistry of toxoplasmosis in a Risso's dolphin (Grampus griseus) to systematically characterise the disease and associate causality. We show that the Euk7A/Euk570R primer set targeting the V1-V3 hypervariable region of the 18S rRNA gene can be used as a species-specific assay for cyst-forming coccidia and discriminate T. gondii. Overall, the approach is cost-effective and improves diagnostic decision support by narrowing the differential diagnosis list with more certainty than was previously possible. Furthermore, it supplements the limitations of cryptic protozoan morphology and surpasses the need for species-specific PCR primer combinations.

  7. Molecular phylogenetic analysis of the coccidian cephalopod parasites Aggregata octopiana and Aggregata eberthi (Apicomplexa: Aggregatidae) from the NE Atlantic coast using 18S rRNA sequences.

    PubMed

    Castellanos-Martínez, Sheila; Pérez-Losada, Marcos; Gestal, Camino

    2013-08-01

    The coccidia genus Aggregata is responsible for intestinal coccidiosis in wild and cultivated cephalopods. Two coccidia species, Aggregata octopiana, (infecting the common octopus Octopus vulgaris), and A. eberthi, (infecting the cuttlefish Sepia officinalis), are identified in European waters. Extensive investigation of their morphology resulted in a redescription of A. octopiana in octopuses from the NE Atlantic Coast (NW Spain) thus clarifying confusing descriptions recorded in the past. The present study sequenced the 18S rRNA gene in A. octopiana and A. eberthi from the NE Atlantic coast in order to assess their taxonomic and phylogenetic status. Phylogenetic analyses revealed conspecific genetic differences (2.5%) in 18S rRNA sequences between A. eberthi from the Ria of Vigo (NW Spain) and the Adriatic Sea. Larger congeneric differences (15.9%) were observed between A. octopiana samples from the same two areas, which suggest the existence of two species. Based on previous morphological evidence, host specificity data, and new molecular phylogenetic analyses, we suggest that A. octopiana from the Ria of Vigo is the valid type species.

  8. Comparison of Sanger and next generation sequencing performance for genotyping Cryptosporidium isolates at the 18S rRNA and actin loci.

    PubMed

    Paparini, Andrea; Gofton, Alexander; Yang, Rongchang; White, Nicole; Bunce, Michael; Ryan, Una M

    2015-01-01

    Cryptosporidium is an important enteric pathogen that infects a wide range of humans and animals. Rapid and reliable detection and characterisation methods are essential for understanding the transmission dynamics of the parasite. Sanger sequencing, and high-throughput sequencing (HTS) on an Ion Torrent platform, were compared with each other for their sensitivity and accuracy in detecting and characterising 25 Cryptosporidium-positive human and animal faecal samples. Ion Torrent reads (n = 123,857) were obtained at both 18S rRNA and actin loci for 21 of the 25 samples. Of these, one isolate at the actin locus (Cattle 05) and three at the 18S rRNA locus (HTS 10, HTS 11 and HTS 12), suffered PCR drop-out (i.e. PCR failures) when using fusion-tagged PCR. Sanger sequences were obtained for both loci for 23 of the 25 samples and showed good agreement with Ion Torrent-based genotyping. Two samples both from pythons (SK 02 and SK 05) produced mixed 18S and actin chromatograms by Sanger sequencing but were clearly identified by Ion Torrent sequencing as C. muris. One isolate (SK 03) was typed as C. muris by Sanger sequencing but was identified as a mixed C. muris and C. tyzzeri infection by HTS. 18S rRNA Type B sequences were identified in 4/6 C. parvum isolates when deep sequenced but were undetected in Sanger sequencing. Sanger was cheaper than Ion Torrent when sequencing a small numbers of samples, but when larger numbers of samples are considered (n = 60), the costs were comparative. Fusion-tagged amplicon based approaches are a powerful way of approaching mixtures, the only draw-back being the loss of PCR efficiency on low-template samples when using primers coupled to MID tags and adaptors. Taken together these data show that HTS has excellent potential for revealing the "true" composition of species/types in a Cryptosporidium infection, but that HTS workflows need to be carefully developed to ensure sensitivity, accuracy and contamination are

  9. Fast evolving 18S rRNA sequences from Solenogastres (Mollusca) resist standard PCR amplification and give new insights into mollusk substitution rate heterogeneity

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background The 18S rRNA gene is one of the most important molecular markers, used in diverse applications such as molecular phylogenetic analyses and biodiversity screening. The Mollusca is the second largest phylum within the animal kingdom and mollusks show an outstanding high diversity in body plans and ecological adaptations. Although an enormous amount of 18S data is available for higher mollusks, data on some early branching lineages are still limited. Despite of some partial success in obtaining these data from Solenogastres, by some regarded to be the most "basal" mollusks, this taxon still remained problematic due to contamination with food organisms and general amplification difficulties. Results We report here the first authentic 18S genes of three Solenogastres species (Mollusca), each possessing a unique sequence composition with regions conspicuously rich in guanine and cytosine. For these GC-rich regions we calculated strong secondary structures. The observed high intra-molecular forces hamper standard amplification and appear to increase formation of chimerical sequences caused by contaminating foreign DNAs from potential prey organisms. In our analyses, contamination was avoided by using RNA as a template. Indication for contamination of previously published Solenogastres sequences is presented. Detailed phylogenetic analyses were conducted using RNA specific models that account for compensatory substitutions in stem regions. Conclusions The extreme morphological diversity of mollusks is mirrored in the molecular 18S data and shows elevated substitution rates mainly in three higher taxa: true limpets (Patellogastropoda), Cephalopoda and Solenogastres. Our phylogenetic tree based on 123 species, including representatives of all mollusk classes, shows limited resolution at the class level but illustrates the pitfalls of artificial groupings formed due to shared biased sequence composition. PMID:20214780

  10. Protist 18S rRNA gene Sequence Analysis Reveals Multiple Sources of Organic Matter Contributing to Turbidity Maxima of the Columbia River Estuary

    SciTech Connect

    Herfort, Lydie; Peterson, Tawnya D.; McCue, Lee Ann; Zuber, Peter A.

    2011-10-05

    The Columbia River estuary is traditionally considered a detritus-based ecosystem fueled in summer by organic matter (OM) from expired freshwater diatoms. Since Estuarine Turbidity Maxima (ETM) are sites of accumulation and transformation of this phytoplankton-derived OM, to further characterize the ETM protist assemblage, we collected in August 2007 bottom waters throughout an ETM event, as well as surface water during the peak of bottom turbidity, and performed biogeochemical, microscopic and molecular (18S rRNA gene clone libraries) analyses. These data confirmed that the majority of the particulate OM in ETMs is derived from chlorophyll a-poor particulate organic carbon tagged by DNA too damaged to be detected by molecular analysis.

  11. Genetic diversity among Babesia rossi detected in naturally infected dogs in Abeokuta, Nigeria, based on 18S rRNA gene sequences.

    PubMed

    Takeet, Michael I; Oyewusi, Adeoye J; Abakpa, Simon A V; Daramola, Olukayode O; Peters, Sunday O

    2017-03-01

    Adequate knowledge of the genetic diversity among Babesia species infecting dogs is necessary for a better understanding of the epidemiology and control of canine babesiosis. Hence, this study determined the genetic diversity among the Babesia rossi detected in dogs presented for routine examination in Veterinary Hospitals in Abeokuta, Nigeria. Blood were randomly collected from 209 dogs. Field-stained thin smears were made and DNA extracted from the blood. Partial region of the 18S small subunit ribosomal RNA (rRNA) gene was amplified, sequenced and analysed. Babesia species was detected in 16 (7.7%) of the dogs by microscopy. Electrophoresed PCR products from 39 (18.66%) dogs revealed band size of 450 bp and 2 (0.95%) dogs had band size of 430 bp. The sequences obtained from 450 bp amplicon displayed homology of 99.74% (387/388) with partial sequences of 18S rRNA gene of Babesia rossi in the GeneBank. Of the two sequences that had 430 bp amplicon, one was identified as T. annulata and second as T. ovis. A significantly (p<0.05) higher prevalence of B. rossi was detected by PCR compared to microscopy. The mean PCV of Babesia infected dogs was significantly (p<0.05) lower than non-infected dogs. Phylogenetic analysis revealed minimal diversity among B. rossi with the exception of one sequence that was greatly divergent from the others. This study suggests that more than one genotype of B. rossi may be in circulation among the dog population in the study area and this may have potential implication on clinical outcome of canine babesiosis.

  12. Development of a cob-18S rRNA gene real-time PCR assay for quantifying Pfiesteria shumwayae in the natural environment.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Huan; Lin, Senjie

    2005-11-01

    Despite the fact that the heterotrophic dinoflagellate Pfiesteria shumwayae is an organism of high interest due to alleged toxicity, its abundance in natural environments is poorly understood. To address this inadequacy, a real-time quantitative PCR assay based on mitochondrial cytochrome b (cob) and 18S rRNA gene was developed and P. shumwayae abundance was investigated in several geographic locations. First, cob and its 5'-end region were isolated from a P. shumwayae culture, revealing three different copies, each consisting of an identical cob coding region and an unidentified region (X) of variable length and sequence. The unique sequences in cob and the X region were then used to develop a P. shumwayae-specific primer set. This primer set was used with reported P. shumwayae-specific 18S primers in parallel real-time PCRs to investigate P. shumwayae abundance from Maine to North Carolina along the U.S. east coast and along coasts in Chile, Hawaii, and China. Both genes generally gave similar results, indicating that this species was present, but at low abundance (mostly <10 cells x ml(-1)), in all the American coast locations investigated (with the exception of Long Island Sound, where which both genes gave negative results). Genetic variation was detected by use of both genes in most of the locations, and while cob consistently detected P. shumwayae or close genetic variants, some of the 18S PCR products were unrelated to P. shumwayae. We conclude that (i) the real-time PCR assay developed is useful for specific quantification of P. shumwayae, and (ii) P. shumwayae is distributed widely at the American coasts, but normally only as a minor component of plankton even in high-risk estuaries (Neuse River and the Chesapeake Bay).

  13. Development of a cob-18S rRNA Gene Real-Time PCR Assay for Quantifying Pfiesteria shumwayae in the Natural Environment†

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Huan; Lin, Senjie

    2005-01-01

    Despite the fact that the heterotrophic dinoflagellate Pfiesteria shumwayae is an organism of high interest due to alleged toxicity, its abundance in natural environments is poorly understood. To address this inadequacy, a real-time quantitative PCR assay based on mitochondrial cytochrome b (cob) and18S rRNA gene was developed and P. shumwayae abundance was investigated in several geographic locations. First, cob and its 5′-end region were isolated from a P. shumwayae culture, revealing three different copies, each consisting of an identical cob coding region and an unidentified region (X) of variable length and sequence. The unique sequences in cob and the X region were then used to develop a P. shumwayae-specific primer set. This primer set was used with reported P. shumwayae-specific 18S primers in parallel real-time PCRs to investigate P. shumwayae abundance from Maine to North Carolina along the U.S. east coast and along coasts in Chile, Hawaii, and China. Both genes generally gave similar results, indicating that this species was present, but at low abundance (mostly <10 cells · ml−1), in all the American coast locations investigated (with the exception of Long Island Sound, where which both genes gave negative results). Genetic variation was detected by use of both genes in most of the locations, and while cob consistently detected P. shumwayae or close genetic variants, some of the 18S PCR products were unrelated to P. shumwayae. We conclude that (i) the real-time PCR assay developed is useful for specific quantification of P. shumwayae, and (ii) P. shumwayae is distributed widely at the American coasts, but normally only as a minor component of plankton even in high-risk estuaries (Neuse River and the Chesapeake Bay). PMID:16269741

  14. Ribosome biogenesis factor Tsr3 is the aminocarboxypropyl transferase responsible for 18S rRNA hypermodification in yeast and humans

    PubMed Central

    Meyer, Britta; Wurm, Jan Philip; Sharma, Sunny; Immer, Carina; Pogoryelov, Denys; Kötter, Peter; Lafontaine, Denis L. J.; Wöhnert, Jens; Entian, Karl-Dieter

    2016-01-01

    The chemically most complex modification in eukaryotic rRNA is the conserved hypermodified nucleotide N1-methyl-N3-aminocarboxypropyl-pseudouridine (m1acp3Ψ) located next to the P-site tRNA on the small subunit 18S rRNA. While S-adenosylmethionine was identified as the source of the aminocarboxypropyl (acp) group more than 40 years ago the enzyme catalyzing the acp transfer remained elusive. Here we identify the cytoplasmic ribosome biogenesis protein Tsr3 as the responsible enzyme in yeast and human cells. In functionally impaired Tsr3-mutants, a reduced level of acp modification directly correlates with increased 20S pre-rRNA accumulation. The crystal structure of archaeal Tsr3 homologs revealed the same fold as in SPOUT-class RNA-methyltransferases but a distinct SAM binding mode. This unique SAM binding mode explains why Tsr3 transfers the acp and not the methyl group of SAM to its substrate. Structurally, Tsr3 therefore represents a novel class of acp transferase enzymes. PMID:27084949

  15. Design and Evaluation of Illumina MiSeq-Compatible, 18S rRNA Gene-Specific Primers for Improved Characterization of Mixed Phototrophic Communities

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT The use of high-throughput sequencing technologies with the 16S rRNA gene for characterization of bacterial and archaeal communities has become routine. However, the adoption of sequencing methods for eukaryotes has been slow, despite their significance to natural and engineered systems. There are large variations among the target genes used for amplicon sequencing, and for the 18S rRNA gene, there is no consensus on which hypervariable region provides the most suitable representation of diversity. Additionally, it is unclear how much PCR/sequencing bias affects the depiction of community structure using current primers. The present study amplified the V4 and V8-V9 regions from seven microalgal mock communities as well as eukaryotic communities from freshwater, coastal, and wastewater samples to examine the effect of PCR/sequencing bias on community structure and membership. We found that degeneracies on the 3′ end of the current V4-specific primers impact read length and mean relative abundance. Furthermore, the PCR/sequencing error is markedly higher for GC-rich members than for communities with balanced GC content. Importantly, the V4 region failed to reliably capture 2 of the 12 mock community members, and the V8-V9 hypervariable region more accurately represents mean relative abundance and alpha and beta diversity. Overall, the V4 and V8-V9 regions show similar community representations over freshwater, coastal, and wastewater environments, but specific samples show markedly different communities. These results indicate that multiple primer sets may be advantageous for gaining a more complete understanding of community structure and highlight the importance of including mock communities composed of species of interest. IMPORTANCE The quantification of error associated with community representation by amplicon sequencing is a critical challenge that is often ignored. When target genes are amplified using currently available primers, differential

  16. Structural and functional studies of Bud23-Trm112 reveal 18S rRNA N7-G1575 methylation occurs on late 40S precursor ribosomes.

    PubMed

    Létoquart, Juliette; Huvelle, Emmeline; Wacheul, Ludivine; Bourgeois, Gabrielle; Zorbas, Christiane; Graille, Marc; Heurgué-Hamard, Valérie; Lafontaine, Denis L J

    2014-12-23

    The eukaryotic small ribosomal subunit carries only four ribosomal (r) RNA methylated bases, all close to important functional sites. N(7)-methylguanosine (m(7)G) introduced at position 1575 on 18S rRNA by Bud23-Trm112 is at a ridge forming a steric block between P- and E-site tRNAs. Here we report atomic resolution structures of Bud23-Trm112 in the apo and S-adenosyl-L-methionine (SAM)-bound forms. Bud23 and Trm112 interact through formation of a β-zipper involving main-chain atoms, burying an important hydrophobic surface and stabilizing the complex. The structures revealed that the coactivator Trm112 undergoes an induced fit to accommodate its methyltransferase (MTase) partner. We report important structural similarity between the active sites of Bud23 and Coffea canephora xanthosine MTase, leading us to propose and validate experimentally a model for G1575 coordination. We identify Bud23 residues important for Bud23-Trm112 complex formation and recruitment to pre-ribosomes. We report that though Bud23-Trm112 binds precursor ribosomes at an early nucleolar stage, m(7)G methylation occurs at a late step of small subunit biogenesis, implying specifically delayed catalytic activation. Finally, we show that Bud23-Trm112 interacts directly with the box C/D snoRNA U3-associated DEAH RNA helicase Dhr1 supposedly involved in central pseudoknot formation; this suggests that Bud23-Trm112 might also contribute to controlling formation of this irreversible and dramatic structural reorganization essential to overall folding of small subunit rRNA. Our study contributes important new elements to our understanding of key molecular aspects of human ribosomopathy syndromes associated with WBSCR22 (human Bud23) malfunction.

  17. Prevalence of infection and 18S rRNA gene sequences of Cytauxzoon species in Iberian lynx (Lynx pardinus) in Spain.

    PubMed

    Millán, J; Naranjo, V; Rodríguez, A; de la Lastra, J M Pérez; Mangold, A J; de la Fuente, J

    2007-07-01

    The Iberian lynx (Lynx pardinus) is the most endangered felid in the world. Only about 160 individuals remain in 2 separate metapopulations in Southern Spain (Sierra Morena and Doñana). We obtained blood samples of 20 lynxes captured from 2004 to 2006, and determined the prevalence of infection and genetic diversity of Cytauxzoon spp. using 18S rRNA PCR and sequence analysis. Prevalence of infection was 15% (3 of 20). Cytauxzoon sp. was only detected in Sierra Morena. For phylogenetic analysis, we used the sequences reported in the present study and those characterized in different domestic and wild felids and ticks from North and South America, Asia and Europe. Three different Cytauxzoon sp. sequences were obtained. They were closely related to that obtained from a Spanish cat, but diverged in up to 1.0% with respect to the only previously reported sequence from an Iberian lynx. Conversely, the latter sequence clustered together with C. manul sequences obtained from Pallas cats (Otocolobus manul) in Mongolia. Our analysis yields a separate cluster of C. felis sequences from cats, wild felids and ticks in the United States and Brazil. These results suggest that at least 2 different Cytauxzoon spp. may be present in Iberian lynx. The apparent absence in one of the areas, together with the possibility of fatal cytauxzoonosis in lynxes makes necessary disease risks to be taken into account in management conservation strategies, such as translocations and re-introductions.

  18. High protists diversity in the plankton of sulfurous lakes and lagoons examined by 18s rRNA gene sequence analyses.

    PubMed

    Triadó-Margarit, Xavier; Casamayor, Emilio O

    2015-12-01

    Diversity of small protists was studied in sulfidic and anoxic (euxinic) stratified karstic lakes and coastal lagoons by 18S rRNA gene analyses. We hypothesized a major sulfide effect, reducing protist diversity and richness with only a few specialized populations adapted to deal with low-redox conditions and high-sulfide concentrations. However, genetic fingerprinting suggested similar ecological diversity in anoxic and sulfurous than in upper oxygen rich water compartments with specific populations inhabiting euxinic waters. Many of them agreed with genera previously identified by microscopic observations, but also new and unexpected groups were detected. Most of the sequences matched a rich assemblage of Ciliophora (i.e., Coleps, Prorodon, Plagiopyla, Strombidium, Metopus, Vorticella and Caenomorpha, among others) and algae (mainly Cryptomonadales). Unidentified Cercozoa, Fungi, Stramenopiles and Discoba were recurrently found. The lack of GenBank counterparts was higher in deep hypolimnetic waters and appeared differentially allocated in the different taxa, being higher within Discoba and lower in Cryptophyceae. A larger number of populations than expected were specifically detected in the deep sulfurous waters, with unknown ecological interactions and metabolic capabilities.

  19. The phylogenetic position of Myxobolus carnaticus (Myxozoa, Myxosporea, Bivalvulida) infecting gill lamellae of Cirrhinus mrigala (Hamilton, 1822) based on 18S rRNA sequence analysis

    PubMed Central

    Banerjee, Sayani; Patra, Avijit; Adikesavalu, Harresh; Mondal, Anjan; Jawahar Abraham, Thangapalam

    2015-01-01

    Myxozoans are an economically important group of microscopic parasites best known for the diseases they cause in commercially important fish hosts. The classification of myxosporeans is generally based on the morphology of their myxospores. Without molecular data, it is very difficult to identify new or existing species. DNA sequence information is therefore, a prerequisite to taxonomic and phylogenic studies of myxosporeans. In the present study, a myxozoan parasite, Myxobolus carnaticus, infecting the gill lamellae of mrigal carp, Cirrhinus mrigala, was characterized by the 18S rRNA gene sequence. The DNA sequence of M. carnaticus clustered phylogenetically with other gill infecting Myxobolus spp. of freshwater clades, forming a dichotomy with closely related M. pavlovskii (HM991164) that infects the gill lamellae epithelium of silver carp, Hypophthalmichthys molitrix with 95% similarity. Evolutionary pair-wise distances among M. carnaticus and other species of myxosporeans indicated high genetic diversity among myxosporeans. The present study demonstrated that tissue tropism, host specificity and habitat play important roles in phylogenetic relationships among myxozoan species. PMID:27844004

  20. Nop9 is a PUF-like protein that prevents premature cleavage to correctly process pre-18S rRNA

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Jun; McCann, Kathleen L.; Qiu, Chen; Gonzalez, Lauren E.; Baserga, Susan J.; Hall, Traci M. Tanaka

    2016-01-01

    Numerous factors direct eukaryotic ribosome biogenesis, and defects in a single ribosome assembly factor may be lethal or produce tissue-specific human ribosomopathies. Pre-ribosomal RNAs (pre-rRNAs) must be processed stepwise and at the correct subcellular locations to produce the mature rRNAs. Nop9 is a conserved small ribosomal subunit biogenesis factor, essential in yeast. Here we report a 2.1-Å crystal structure of Nop9 and a small-angle X-ray-scattering model of a Nop9:RNA complex that reveals a ‘C'-shaped fold formed from 11 Pumilio repeats. We show that Nop9 recognizes sequence and structural features of the 20S pre-rRNA near the cleavage site of the nuclease, Nob1. We further demonstrate that Nop9 inhibits Nob1 cleavage, the final processing step to produce mature small ribosomal subunit 18S rRNA. Together, our results suggest that Nop9 is critical for timely cleavage of the 20S pre-rRNA. Moreover, the Nop9 structure exemplifies a new class of Pumilio repeat proteins. PMID:27725644

  1. Molecular Characterization of Cryptosporidium spp. in Wild Rodents of Southwestern Iran Using 18s rRNA Gene Nested-PCR-RFLP and Sequencing Techniques

    PubMed Central

    Saki, Jasem; Asadpouri, Reza

    2016-01-01

    Background. Rodents could act as reservoir for Cryptosporidium spp. specially C. parvum, a zoonotic agent responsible for human infections. Since there is no information about Cryptosporidium infection in rodents of Ahvaz city, southwest of Iran, hence, this survey was performed to determine the prevalence and molecular characterization of Cryptosporidium spp. in this region. Materials and Methods. One hundred rodents were trapped from different regions of Ahvaz city. Intestine contents and fecal specimens of rodents were studied using both microscopy examination to identify oocyst and nested-polymerase chain reaction (PCR) technique for 18s rRNA gene detection. Eventually restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP) method using SspI and VspI restriction enzymes was carried out to genotype the species and then obtained results were sequenced. Results. Three out of 100 samples were diagnosed as positive and overall prevalence of Cryptosporidium spp. was 3% using both modified Ziehl-Neelsen staining under light microscope and nested-PCR (830 bp) methods. Afterwards, PCR-RFLP was performed on positive samples and C. parvum pattern was identified. Finally PCR-RFLP findings were sequenced and presence of C. parvum was confirmed again. Conclusions. Our study showed rodents could be potential reservoir for C. parvum. So an integrated program for control and combat with them should be adopted and continued. PMID:27956905

  2. Phylogenetic position of phylum Nemertini, inferred from 18S rRNA sequences: molecular data as a test of morphological character homology.

    PubMed

    Turbeville, J M; Field, K G; Raff, R A

    1992-03-01

    Partial 18S rRNA sequence of the nemertine Cerebratulus lacteus was obtained and compared with those of coelomate metazoans and acoelomate platyhelminths to test whether nemertines share a most recent common ancestor with the platyhelminths, as traditionally has been implied, or whether nemertines lie within a protostome coelomate clade, as suggested by more recent morphological analyses. Maximum-parsimony analysis supports the inclusion of the nemertine within a protostome-coelomate clade that falls within a more inclusive coelomate clade. Bootstrap analysis indicates strong support for a monophyletic Coelomata composed of a deuterostome and protostome-coelomate clade. Support for a monophyletic protostome Coelomata is weak. Inference by distance analysis is consistent with that of maximum parsimony. Analysis of down-weighted paired sites by maximum parsimony reveals variation in topology only within the protostome-coelomate clade. The relationships among the protostome coelomates cannot be reliably inferred from the partial sequences, suggesting that coelomate protostomes diversified rapidly. Results with evolutionary parsimony are consistent with the inclusion of the nemertine in a coelomate clade. The molecular inference corroborates recent morphological character analyses that reveal no synapomorphies of nemertines and flatworms but instead suggest that the circulatory system and rhynchocoel of nemertines are homologous to coelomic cavities of protostome coelomates, thus supporting the corresponding hypothesis that nemertines belong within a protostome-coelomate clade. The sequence data provide an independent test of morphological character homology.

  3. Design and validation of four new primers for next-generation sequencing to target the 18S rRNA genes of gastrointestinal ciliate protozoa.

    PubMed

    Ishaq, Suzanne L; Wright, André-Denis G

    2014-09-01

    Four new primers and one published primer were used to PCR amplify hypervariable regions within the protozoal 18S rRNA gene to determine which primer pair provided the best identification and statistical analysis. PCR amplicons of 394 to 498 bases were generated from three primer sets, sequenced using Roche 454 pyrosequencing with Titanium, and analyzed using the BLAST database (NCBI) and MOTHUR version 1.29. The protozoal diversity of rumen contents from moose in Alaska was assessed. In the present study, primer set 1, P-SSU-316F and GIC758R (amplicon of 482 bases), gave the best representation of diversity using BLAST classification, and the set amplified Entodinium simplex and Ostracodinium spp., which were not amplified by the other two primer sets. Primer set 2, GIC1080F and GIC1578R (amplicon of 498 bases), had similar BLAST results and a slightly higher percentage of sequences that were identified with a higher sequence identity. Primer sets 1 and 2 are recommended for use in ruminants. However, primer set 1 may be inadequate to determine protozoal diversity in nonruminants. The amplicons created by primer set 1 were indistinguishable for certain species within the genera Bandia, Blepharocorys, Polycosta, and Tetratoxum and between Hemiprorodon gymnoprosthium and Prorodonopsis coli, none of which are normally found in the rumen.

  4. Structure of a human pre-40S particle points to a role for RACK1 in the final steps of 18S rRNA processing

    PubMed Central

    Larburu, Natacha; Montellese, Christian; O'Donohue, Marie-Françoise; Kutay, Ulrike; Gleizes, Pierre-Emmanuel; Plisson-Chastang, Célia

    2016-01-01

    Synthesis of ribosomal subunits in eukaryotes is a complex and tightly regulated process that has been mostly characterized in yeast. The discovery of a growing number of diseases linked to defects in ribosome biogenesis calls for a deeper understanding of these mechanisms and of the specificities of human ribosome maturation. We present the 19 Å resolution cryo-EM reconstruction of a cytoplasmic precursor to the human small ribosomal subunit, purified by using the tagged ribosome biogenesis factor LTV1 as bait. Compared to yeast pre-40S particles, this first three-dimensional structure of a human 40S subunit precursor shows noticeable differences with respect to the position of ribosome biogenesis factors and uncovers the early deposition of the ribosomal protein RACK1 during subunit maturation. Consistently, RACK1 is required for efficient processing of the 18S rRNA 3′-end, which might be related to its role in translation initiation. This first structural analysis of a human pre-ribosomal particle sets the grounds for high-resolution studies of conformational transitions accompanying ribosomal subunit maturation. PMID:27530427

  5. Nop9 is a PUF-like protein that prevents premature cleavage to correctly process pre-18S rRNA

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Jun; McCann, Kathleen L.; Qiu, Chen; Gonzalez, Lauren E.; Baserga, Susan J.; Hall, Traci M. Tanaka

    2016-10-11

    Numerous factors direct eukaryotic ribosome biogenesis, and defects in a single ribosome assembly factor may be lethal or produce tissue-specific human ribosomopathies. Pre-ribosomal RNAs (pre-rRNAs) must be processed stepwise and at the correct subcellular locations to produce the mature rRNAs. Nop9 is a conserved small ribosomal subunit biogenesis factor, essential in yeast. Here we report a 2.1-Å crystal structure of Nop9 and a small-angle X-ray-scattering model of a Nop9:RNA complex that reveals a ‘C’-shaped fold formed from 11 Pumilio repeats. We show that Nop9 recognizes sequence and structural features of the 20S pre-rRNA near the cleavage site of the nuclease, Nob1. We further demonstrate that Nop9 inhibits Nob1 cleavage, the final processing step to produce mature small ribosomal subunit 18S rRNA. Together, our results suggest that Nop9 is critical for timely cleavage of the 20S pre-rRNA. Moreover, the Nop9 structure exemplifies a new class of Pumilio repeat proteins.

  6. Design and Validation of Four New Primers for Next-Generation Sequencing To Target the 18S rRNA Genes of Gastrointestinal Ciliate Protozoa

    PubMed Central

    Wright, André-Denis G.

    2014-01-01

    Four new primers and one published primer were used to PCR amplify hypervariable regions within the protozoal 18S rRNA gene to determine which primer pair provided the best identification and statistical analysis. PCR amplicons of 394 to 498 bases were generated from three primer sets, sequenced using Roche 454 pyrosequencing with Titanium, and analyzed using the BLAST database (NCBI) and MOTHUR version 1.29. The protozoal diversity of rumen contents from moose in Alaska was assessed. In the present study, primer set 1, P-SSU-316F and GIC758R (amplicon of 482 bases), gave the best representation of diversity using BLAST classification, and the set amplified Entodinium simplex and Ostracodinium spp., which were not amplified by the other two primer sets. Primer set 2, GIC1080F and GIC1578R (amplicon of 498 bases), had similar BLAST results and a slightly higher percentage of sequences that were identified with a higher sequence identity. Primer sets 1 and 2 are recommended for use in ruminants. However, primer set 1 may be inadequate to determine protozoal diversity in nonruminants. The amplicons created by primer set 1 were indistinguishable for certain species within the genera Bandia, Blepharocorys, Polycosta, and Tetratoxum and between Hemiprorodon gymnoprosthium and Prorodonopsis coli, none of which are normally found in the rumen. PMID:24973070

  7. The phylogenetic position of eriophyoid mites (superfamily Eriophyoidea) in Acariformes inferred from the sequences of mitochondrial genomes and nuclear small subunit (18S) rRNA gene.

    PubMed

    Xue, Xiao-Feng; Dong, Yan; Deng, Wei; Hong, Xiao-Yue; Shao, Renfu

    2017-04-01

    Eriophyoid mites (superfamily Eriophyoidea) comprise >4400 species worldwide. Despite over a century of study, the phylogenetic position of these mites within Acariformes is still poorly resolved. Currently, Eriophyoidea is placed in the order Trombidiformes. We inferred the high-level phylogeny of Acari with the mitochondrial (mt) genome sequences of 110 species including four eriophyoid species, and the nuclear small subunit (18S) rRNA gene sequences of 226 species including 25 eriophyoid species. Maximum likelihood (ML), Bayesian inference (BI) and Maximum parsimony (MP) methods were used to analyze the sequence data. Divergence times were estimated for major lineages of Acari using Bayesian approaches. Our analyses consistently recovered the monophyly of Eriophyoidea but rejected the monophyly of Trombidiformes. The eriophyoid mites were grouped with the sarcoptiform mites, or were the sister group of sarcoptiform mites+non-eriophyoid trombidiform mites, depending on data partition strategies. Eriophyoid mites diverged from other mites in the Devonian (384Mya, 95% HPD, 352-410Mya). The origin of eriophyoid mites was dated to the Permian (262Mya, 95% HPD 230-307Mya), mostly prior to the radiation of gymnosperms (Triassic-Jurassic) and angiosperms (early Cretaceous). We propose that the placement of Eriophyoidea in the order Trombidiformes under the current classification system should be reviewed.

  8. Further use of nearly complete 28S and 18S rRNA genes to classify Ecdysozoa: 37 more arthropods and a kinorhynch.

    PubMed

    Mallatt, Jon; Giribet, Gonzalo

    2006-09-01

    This work expands on a study from 2004 by Mallatt, Garey, and Shultz [Mallatt, J.M., Garey, J.R., Shultz, J.W., 2004. Ecdysozoan phylogeny and Bayesian inference: first use of nearly complete 28S and 18S rRNA gene sequences to classify the arthropods and their kin. Mol. Phylogenet. Evol. 31, 178-191] that evaluated the phylogenetic relationships in Ecdysozoa (molting animals), especially arthropods. Here, the number of rRNA gene-sequences was effectively doubled for each major group of arthropods, and sequences from the phylum Kinorhyncha (mud dragons) were also included, bringing the number of ecdysozoan taxa to over 80. The methods emphasized maximum likelihood, Bayesian inference and statistical testing with parametric bootstrapping, but also included parsimony and minimum evolution. Prominent findings from our combined analysis of both genes are as follows. The fundamental subdivisions of Hexapoda (insects and relatives) are Insecta and Entognatha, with the latter consisting of collembolans (springtails) and a clade of proturans plus diplurans. Our rRNA-gene data provide the strongest evidence to date that the sister group of Hexapoda is Branchiopoda (fairy shrimps, tadpole shrimps, etc.), not Malacostraca. The large, Pancrustacea clade (hexapods within a paraphyletic Crustacea) divided into a few basic subclades: hexapods plus branchiopods; cirripedes (barnacles) plus malacostracans (lobsters, crabs, true shrimps, isopods, etc.); and the basally located clades of (a) ostracods (seed shrimps) and (b) branchiurans (fish lice) plus the bizarre pentastomids (tongue worms). These findings about Pancrustacea agree with a recent study by Regier, Shultz, and Kambic that used entirely different genes [Regier, J.C., Shultz, J.W., Kambic, R.E., 2005a. Pancrustacean phylogeny: hexapods are terrestrial crustaceans and maxillopods are not monophyletic. Proc. R. Soc. B 272, 395-401]. In Malacostraca, the stomatopod (mantis shrimp) was not at the base of the eumalacostracans

  9. Time-series of water column alkenones and 18S rRNA confirm that Uk'37 is a viable SST proxy in Narragansett Bay, RI

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salacup, J.; Theroux, S.; Herbert, T.; Prell, W. L.

    2011-12-01

    Alkenones, produced in the sunlit mixed layer by specific Haptophyte algae, are a well-established and widely-applied proxy for sea surface temperature (SST) in the world's open-oceans. However, the proxy's utility in estuarine environments remains largely untested. A reliable SST proxy is needed to identify the estuary's sensitivity and response to past and present global change because SST can exert strong control on stratification and circulation patterns, and thus oxygenation and ecosystem health, in these shallow basins. Knowing the estuaries response should help local managers and policy-makers plan mitigation and adaptation strategies. Additionally, the rapid deposition of both marine and terrestrial organic and inorganic material in estuarine systems makes them potential archives of high-resolution paleo-environmental information. A previous investigation of estuarine alkenones suggested that the Uk'37 proxy may be sensitive to the composition of the alkenone-producing Haptophyte population, which may be affected by local nutrient and fresh water fluxes. In particular, low-salinity coastal Haptophytes such as Isochrysis galbana may have a different relationship to SST than higher-salinity open-ocean Haptophytes and their presence may complicate interpretations of the Uk'37 proxy in estuaries. To better understand how the alkenone-based Uk'37 SST proxy is produced in estuarine systems, we present a two-year time-series (monthly-to-thrice-weekly resolution) of alkenone concentrations in particulate organic matter from Narragansett Bay. Alkenone concentrations are coupled with 18S ribosomal RNA (rRNA) measurements to identify the alkenone-producing population. Highest concentrations of alkenones are detected at different times in the upper and lower Bay such that the highest alkenone concentrations occur in the winter-spring (upper Bay) and summer/fall (lower Bay). This result is consistent with the established seasonal blooms and seasonal changes in nutrient

  10. Free-Living Protozoa in Two Unchlorinated Drinking Water Supplies, Identified by Phylogenic Analysis of 18S rRNA Gene Sequences▿ †

    PubMed Central

    Valster, Rinske M.; Wullings, Bart A.; Bakker, Geo; Smidt, Hauke; van der Kooij, Dick

    2009-01-01

    Free-living protozoan communities in water supplies may include hosts for Legionella pneumophila and other undesired bacteria, as well as pathogens. This study aimed at identifying free-living protozoa in two unchlorinated groundwater supplies, using cultivation-independent molecular approaches. For this purpose, samples (<20°C) of treated water, distributed water, and distribution system biofilms were collected from supply A, with a low concentration of natural organic matter (NOM) (<0.5 ppm of C), and from supply B, with a high NOM concentration (7.9 ppm of C). Eukaryotic communities were studied using terminal restriction fragment length polymorphism and clone library analyses of partial 18S rRNA gene fragments and a Hartmannella vermiformis-specific quantitative PCR (qPCR). In both supplies, highly diverse eukaryotic communities were observed, including free-living protozoa, fungi, and metazoa. Sequences of protozoa clustered with Amoebozoa (10 operational taxonomic units [OTUs]), Cercozoa (39 OTUs), Choanozoa (26 OTUs), Ciliophora (29 OTUs), Euglenozoa (13 OTUs), Myzozoa (5 OTUs), and Stramenopiles (5 OTUs). A large variety of protozoa were present in both supplies, but the estimated values for protozoan richness did not differ significantly. H. vermiformis was observed in both supplies but was not a predominant protozoan. One OTU with the highest similarity to Acanthamoeba polyphaga, an opportunistic human pathogen and a host for undesired bacteria, was observed in supply A. The high level of NOM in supply B corresponded with an elevated level of active biomass and with elevated concentrations of H. vermiformis in distributed water. Hence, the application of qPCR may be promising in elucidating the relationship between drinking water quality and the presence of specific protozoa. PMID:19465529

  11. Identification of Habitat-Specific Biomes of Aquatic Fungal Communities Using a Comprehensive Nearly Full-Length 18S rRNA Dataset Enriched with Contextual Data.

    PubMed

    Panzer, Katrin; Yilmaz, Pelin; Weiß, Michael; Reich, Lothar; Richter, Michael; Wiese, Jutta; Schmaljohann, Rolf; Labes, Antje; Imhoff, Johannes F; Glöckner, Frank Oliver; Reich, Marlis

    2015-01-01

    Molecular diversity surveys have demonstrated that aquatic fungi are highly diverse, and that they play fundamental ecological roles in aquatic systems. Unfortunately, comparative studies of aquatic fungal communities are few and far between, due to the scarcity of adequate datasets. We combined all publicly available fungal 18S ribosomal RNA (rRNA) gene sequences with new sequence data from a marine fungi culture collection. We further enriched this dataset by adding validated contextual data. Specifically, we included data on the habitat type of the samples assigning fungal taxa to ten different habitat categories. This dataset has been created with the intention to serve as a valuable reference dataset for aquatic fungi including a phylogenetic reference tree. The combined data enabled us to infer fungal community patterns in aquatic systems. Pairwise habitat comparisons showed significant phylogenetic differences, indicating that habitat strongly affects fungal community structure. Fungal taxonomic composition differed considerably even on phylum and class level. Freshwater fungal assemblage was most different from all other habitat types and was dominated by basal fungal lineages. For most communities, phylogenetic signals indicated clustering of sequences suggesting that environmental factors were the main drivers of fungal community structure, rather than species competition. Thus, the diversification process of aquatic fungi must be highly clade specific in some cases.The combined data enabled us to infer fungal community patterns in aquatic systems. Pairwise habitat comparisons showed significant phylogenetic differences, indicating that habitat strongly affects fungal community structure. Fungal taxonomic composition differed considerably even on phylum and class level. Freshwater fungal assemblage was most different from all other habitat types and was dominated by basal fungal lineages. For most communities, phylogenetic signals indicated clustering of

  12. Use of 18S rRNA gene-based PCR assay for diagnosis of acanthamoeba keratitis in non-contact lens wearers in India.

    PubMed

    Pasricha, Gunisha; Sharma, Savitri; Garg, Prashant; Aggarwal, Ramesh K

    2003-07-01

    Identification of Acanthamoeba cysts and trophozoites in ocular tissues requires considerable expertise and is often time-consuming. An 18S rRNA gene-based PCR test, highly specific for the genus Acanthamoeba, has recently been reported in the molecular diagnosis of Acanthamoeba keratitis. This PCR assay was compared with conventional microbiological tests for the diagnosis of Acanthamoeba keratitis. In a pilot study, the PCR conditions with modifications were first tested on corneal scrapings from patients with culture-proven non-contact lens-related Acanthamoeba, bacterial, and fungal keratitis. This was followed by testing of corneal scrapings from 53 consecutive cases of microbial keratitis to determine sensitivity, specificity, and predictive values of the assay. All corneal scrapings from patients with proven Acanthamoeba keratitis showed a 463-bp amplicon, while no amplicon was obtained from patients with bacterial or fungal keratitis. Some of these amplified products were sequenced and compared with EMBL database reference sequences to validate these to be of Acanthamoeba origin. Out of 53 consecutive cases of microbial keratitis included for evaluating the PCR, 10 (18.9%) cases were diagnosed as Acanthamoeba keratitis on the basis of combined results of culture, smear, and PCR of corneal scrapings. Based on culture results as the "gold standard," the sensitivity of PCR was the same as that of the smear (87.5%); however, the specificity and the positive and negative predictive values of PCR were marginally higher than the smear examination (97.8 versus 95.6%, 87.5 versus 77.8%, and 97.8 versus 97.7%) although the difference was not significant. This study confirms the efficacy of the PCR assay and is the first study to evaluate a PCR-based assay against conventional methods of diagnosis in a clinical setting.

  13. Use of 18S rRNA Gene-Based PCR Assay for Diagnosis of Acanthamoeba Keratitis in Non-Contact Lens Wearers in India

    PubMed Central

    Pasricha, Gunisha; Sharma, Savitri; Garg, Prashant; Aggarwal, Ramesh K.

    2003-01-01

    Identification of Acanthamoeba cysts and trophozoites in ocular tissues requires considerable expertise and is often time-consuming. An 18S rRNA gene-based PCR test, highly specific for the genus Acanthamoeba, has recently been reported in the molecular diagnosis of Acanthamoeba keratitis. This PCR assay was compared with conventional microbiological tests for the diagnosis of Acanthamoeba keratitis. In a pilot study, the PCR conditions with modifications were first tested on corneal scrapings from patients with culture-proven non-contact lens-related Acanthamoeba, bacterial, and fungal keratitis. This was followed by testing of corneal scrapings from 53 consecutive cases of microbial keratitis to determine sensitivity, specificity, and predictive values of the assay. All corneal scrapings from patients with proven Acanthamoeba keratitis showed a 463-bp amplicon, while no amplicon was obtained from patients with bacterial or fungal keratitis. Some of these amplified products were sequenced and compared with EMBL database reference sequences to validate these to be of Acanthamoeba origin. Out of 53 consecutive cases of microbial keratitis included for evaluating the PCR, 10 (18.9%) cases were diagnosed as Acanthamoeba keratitis on the basis of combined results of culture, smear, and PCR of corneal scrapings. Based on culture results as the “gold standard,” the sensitivity of PCR was the same as that of the smear (87.5%); however, the specificity and the positive and negative predictive values of PCR were marginally higher than the smear examination (97.8 versus 95.6%, 87.5 versus 77.8%, and 97.8 versus 97.7%) although the difference was not significant. This study confirms the efficacy of the PCR assay and is the first study to evaluate a PCR-based assay against conventional methods of diagnosis in a clinical setting. PMID:12843065

  14. Identification of Habitat-Specific Biomes of Aquatic Fungal Communities Using a Comprehensive Nearly Full-Length 18S rRNA Dataset Enriched with Contextual Data

    PubMed Central

    Panzer, Katrin; Yilmaz, Pelin; Weiß, Michael; Reich, Lothar; Richter, Michael; Wiese, Jutta; Schmaljohann, Rolf; Labes, Antje; Imhoff, Johannes F.; Glöckner, Frank Oliver; Reich, Marlis

    2015-01-01

    Molecular diversity surveys have demonstrated that aquatic fungi are highly diverse, and that they play fundamental ecological roles in aquatic systems. Unfortunately, comparative studies of aquatic fungal communities are few and far between, due to the scarcity of adequate datasets. We combined all publicly available fungal 18S ribosomal RNA (rRNA) gene sequences with new sequence data from a marine fungi culture collection. We further enriched this dataset by adding validated contextual data. Specifically, we included data on the habitat type of the samples assigning fungal taxa to ten different habitat categories. This dataset has been created with the intention to serve as a valuable reference dataset for aquatic fungi including a phylogenetic reference tree. The combined data enabled us to infer fungal community patterns in aquatic systems. Pairwise habitat comparisons showed significant phylogenetic differences, indicating that habitat strongly affects fungal community structure. Fungal taxonomic composition differed considerably even on phylum and class level. Freshwater fungal assemblage was most different from all other habitat types and was dominated by basal fungal lineages. For most communities, phylogenetic signals indicated clustering of sequences suggesting that environmental factors were the main drivers of fungal community structure, rather than species competition. Thus, the diversification process of aquatic fungi must be highly clade specific in some cases.The combined data enabled us to infer fungal community patterns in aquatic systems. Pairwise habitat comparisons showed significant phylogenetic differences, indicating that habitat strongly affects fungal community structure. Fungal taxonomic composition differed considerably even on phylum and class level. Freshwater fungal assemblage was most different from all other habitat types and was dominated by basal fungal lineages. For most communities, phylogenetic signals indicated clustering of

  15. Phylogenetic position of the enigmatic clawless eutardigrade genus Apodibius Dastych, 1983 (Tardigrada), based on 18S and 28S rRNA sequence data from its type species A. confusus.

    PubMed

    Dabert, Miroslawa; Dastych, Hieronymus; Hohberg, Karin; Dabert, Jacek

    2014-01-01

    The systematics of Eutardigrada, the largest lineage among the three classes of the phylum Tardigrada, is based mainly on the morphology of the leg claws and of the buccal apparatus. However, three members of the rarely recorded and poorly known limno-terrestrial eutardigrade genus Apodibius have no claws on their strongly reduced legs, a unique character among all tardigrades. This absence of all claws makes the systematic position of Apodibius one of the most enigmatic among the whole class. Until now all known associates of the genus Apodibius have been located in the incertae sedis species group or, quite recently, included into the Necopinatidae family. In the present study, phylogenetic analyses of 18S and 28S rRNA sequence data from 31 tardigrade species representing four parachelan superfamilies (Isohypsibioidea, Hypsibioidea, Macrobiotoidea, Eohypsibioidea), the apochelan Milnesium tardigradum, and the type species of the genus Apodibius, A. confusus, indicated close relationship of the Apodibius with tardigrade species recently included in the superfamily Isohypsibioidea. This result was well-supported and consistent across all markers (separate 18S rRNA, 28S rRNA, and combined 18S rRNA+28S rRNA datasets) and methods (MP, ML) applied.

  16. Characteristics of the nuclear (18S, 5.8S, 28S and 5S) and mitochondrial (12S and 16S) rRNA genes of Apis mellifera (Insecta: Hymenoptera): structure, organization, and retrotransposable elements

    PubMed Central

    Gillespie, J J; Johnston, J S; Cannone, J J; Gutell, R R

    2006-01-01

    As an accompanying manuscript to the release of the honey bee genome, we report the entire sequence of the nuclear (18S, 5.8S, 28S and 5S) and mitochondrial (12S and 16S) ribosomal RNA (rRNA)-encoding gene sequences (rDNA) and related internally and externally transcribed spacer regions of Apis mellifera (Insecta: Hymenoptera: Apocrita). Additionally, we predict secondary structures for the mature rRNA molecules based on comparative sequence analyses with other arthropod taxa and reference to recently published crystal structures of the ribosome. In general, the structures of honey bee rRNAs are in agreement with previously predicted rRNA models from other arthropods in core regions of the rRNA, with little additional expansion in non-conserved regions. Our multiple sequence alignments are made available on several public databases and provide a preliminary establishment of a global structural model of all rRNAs from the insects. Additionally, we provide conserved stretches of sequences flanking the rDNA cistrons that comprise the externally transcribed spacer regions (ETS) and part of the intergenic spacer region (IGS), including several repetitive motifs. Finally, we report the occurrence of retrotransposition in the nuclear large subunit rDNA, as R2 elements are present in the usual insertion points found in other arthropods. Interestingly, functional R1 elements usually present in the genomes of insects were not detected in the honey bee rRNA genes. The reverse transcriptase products of the R2 elements are deduced from their putative open reading frames and structurally aligned with those from another hymenopteran insect, the jewel wasp Nasonia (Pteromalidae). Stretches of conserved amino acids shared between Apis and Nasonia are illustrated and serve as potential sites for primer design, as target amplicons within these R2 elements may serve as novel phylogenetic markers for Hymenoptera. Given the impending completion of the sequencing of the Nasonia genome

  17. Seasonal Diversity of Planktonic Protists in Southwestern Alberta Rivers over a 1-Year Period as Revealed by Terminal Restriction Fragment Length Polymorphism and 18S rRNA Gene Library Analyses

    PubMed Central

    Thomas, Matthew C.; Selinger, L. Brent

    2012-01-01

    The temporal dynamics of planktonic protists in river water have received limited attention despite their ecological significance and recent studies linking phagotrophic protists to the persistence of human-pathogenic bacteria. Using molecular-based techniques targeting the 18S rRNA gene, we studied the seasonal diversity of planktonic protists in Southwestern Alberta rivers (Oldman River Basin) over a 1-year period. Nonmetric multidimensional scaling analysis of terminal restriction fragment length polymorphism (T-RFLP) data revealed distinct shifts in protistan community profiles that corresponded to season rather than geographical location. Community structures were examined by using clone library analysis; HaeIII restriction profiles of 18S rRNA gene amplicons were used to remove prevalent solanaceous plant clones prior to sequencing. Sanger sequencing of the V1-to-V3 region of the 18S rRNA gene libraries from spring, summer, fall, and winter supported the T-RFLP results and showed marked seasonal differences in the protistan community structure. The spring library was dominated by Chloroplastidae (29.8%), Centrohelida (28.1%), and Alveolata (25.5%), while the summer and fall libraries contained primarily fungal clones (83.0% and 88.0%, respectively). Alveolata (35.6%), Euglenozoa (24.4%), Chloroplastida (15.6%), and Fungi (15.6%) dominated the winter library. These data demonstrate that planktonic protists, including protozoa, are abundant in river water in Southwestern Alberta and that conspicuous seasonal shifts occur in the community structure. PMID:22685143

  18. TcBat a bat-exclusive lineage of Trypanosoma cruzi in the Panama Canal Zone, with comments on its classification and the use of the 18S rRNA gene for lineage identification.

    PubMed

    Pinto, C Miguel; Kalko, Elisabeth K V; Cottontail, Iain; Wellinghausen, Nele; Cottontail, Veronika M

    2012-08-01

    We report TcBat, a recently described genetic lineage of Trypanosoma cruzi, in fruit-eating bats Artibeus from Panama. Infections were common (11.6% prevalence), but no other T. cruzi cruzi genotypes were detected. Phylogenetic analyses show an unambiguous association with Brazilian TcBat, but raise questions about the phylogenetic placement of this genotype using the 18S rRNA gene alone. However, analyses with three concatenated genes (18S rRNA, cytb, and H2B) moderately support TcBat as sister to the discrete typing unit (DTU) TcI. We demonstrate that short fragments (>500 bp) of the 18S rRNA gene are useful for identification of DTUs of T. cruzi, and provide reliable phylogenetic signal as long as they are analyzed within a matrix with reference taxa containing additional informative genes. TcBat forms a very distinctive monophyletic group that may be recognized as an additional DTU within T. cruzi cruzi.

  19. 18S rRNA gene sequencing identifies a novel species of Henneguya parasitizing the gills of the channel catfish (Ictaluridae)

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    In the southeastern United States, the channel catfish Ictalurus punctatus is a host to at least eight different species of myxozoan parasites belonging to the genus Henneguya, four of which have been characterized molecularly using sequencing of the small subunit ribosomal RNA gene (SSU rRNA). Howe...

  20. Analysis of Fungal Diversity in the Wheat Rhizosphere by Sequencing of Cloned PCR-Amplified Genes Encoding 18S rRNA and Temperature Gradient Gel Electrophoresis

    PubMed Central

    Smit, Eric; Leeflang, Paula; Glandorf, Boet; Dirk van Elsas, Jan; Wernars, Karel

    1999-01-01

    Like bacteria, fungi play an important role in the soil ecosystem. As only a small fraction of the fungi present in soil can be cultured, conventional microbiological techniques yield only limited information on the composition and dynamics of fungal communities in soil. DNA-based methods do not depend on the culturability of microorganisms, and therefore they offer an attractive alternative for the study of complex fungal community structures. For this purpose, we designed various PCR primers that allow the specific amplification of fungal 18S-ribosomal-DNA (rDNA) sequences, even in the presence of nonfungal 18S rDNA. DNA was extracted from the wheat rhizosphere, and 18S rDNA gene banks were constructed in Escherichia coli by cloning PCR products generated with primer pairs EF4-EF3 (1.4 kb) and EF4-fung5 (0.5 kb). Fragments of 0.5 kb from the cloned inserts were sequenced and compared to known rDNA sequences. Sequences from all major fungal taxa were amplified by using both primer pairs. As predicted by computer analysis, primer pair EF4-EF3 appeared slightly biased to amplify Basidiomycota and Zygomycota, whereas EF4-fung5 amplified mainly Ascomycota. The 61 clones that were sequenced matched the sequences of 24 different species in the Ribosomal Database Project (RDP) database. Similarity values ranged from 0.676 to 1. Temperature gradient gel electrophoresis (TGGE) analysis of the fungal community in the wheat rhizosphere of a microcosm experiment was carried out after amplification of total DNA with both primer pairs. This resulted in reproducible, distinctive fingerprints, confirming the difference in amplification specificity. Clear banding patterns were obtained with soil and rhizosphere samples by using both primer sets in combination. By comparing the electrophoretic mobility of community fingerprint bands to that of the bands obtained with separate clones, some could be tentatively identified. While 18S-rDNA sequences do not always provide the taxonomic

  1. Phylogenetic Analysis of the Spider Mite Sub-Family Tetranychinae (Acari: Tetranychidae) Based on the Mitochondrial COI Gene and the 18S and the 5′ End of the 28S rRNA Genes Indicates That Several Genera Are Polyphyletic

    PubMed Central

    Matsuda, Tomoko; Morishita, Maiko; Hinomoto, Norihide; Gotoh, Tetsuo

    2014-01-01

    The spider mite sub-family Tetranychinae includes many agricultural pests. The internal transcribed spacer (ITS) region of nuclear ribosomal RNA genes and the cytochrome c oxidase subunit I (COI) gene of mitochondrial DNA have been used for species identification and phylogenetic reconstruction within the sub-family Tetranychinae, although they have not always been successful. The 18S and 28S rRNA genes should be more suitable for resolving higher levels of phylogeny, such as tribes or genera of Tetranychinae because these genes evolve more slowly and are made up of conserved regions and divergent domains. Therefore, we used both the 18S (1,825–1,901 bp) and 28S (the 5′ end of 646–743 bp) rRNA genes to infer phylogenetic relationships within the sub-family Tetranychinae with a focus on the tribe Tetranychini. Then, we compared the phylogenetic tree of the 18S and 28S genes with that of the mitochondrial COI gene (618 bp). As observed in previous studies, our phylogeny based on the COI gene was not resolved because of the low bootstrap values for most nodes of the tree. On the other hand, our phylogenetic tree of the 18S and 28S genes revealed several well-supported clades within the sub-family Tetranychinae. The 18S and 28S phylogenetic trees suggest that the tribes Bryobiini, Petrobiini and Eurytetranychini are monophyletic and that the tribe Tetranychini is polyphyletic. At the genus level, six genera for which more than two species were sampled appear to be monophyletic, while four genera (Oligonychus, Tetranychus, Schizotetranychus and Eotetranychus) appear to be polyphyletic. The topology presented here does not fully agree with the current morphology-based taxonomy, so that the diagnostic morphological characters of Tetranychinae need to be reconsidered. PMID:25289639

  2. New record of Apoholosticha sinica (Ciliophora, Urostylida) from the UK: morphology, 18S rRNA gene phylogeny and notes on morphogenesis.

    PubMed

    Hu, Xiaozhong; Fan, Yangbo; Warren, Alan

    2015-08-01

    The benthic urostylid ciliate Apoholosticha sinicaFan et al., 2014 was isolated from a salt marsh at Blakeney, UK, and reinvestigated using light microscopy and small-subunit rRNA gene sequencing. Morphologically, it corresponds well with the original description. Several stages of divisional morphogenesis and physiological reorganization were also observed from which the following could be deduced: (i) the oral apparatus is completely newly built in the proter; (ii) frontal-ventral-transverse cirral anlage II does not produce a buccal cirrus; (iii) each of the posteriormost three or four anlagen contributes one transverse cirrus at its posterior end; (iv) a row of frontoterminal cirri originates from the rearmost frontal-ventral-transverse cirral anlage; (v) the last midventral row is formed from the penultimate frontal-ventral-transverse cirral anlage. Based on new data, two diagnostic features were added to the genus definition: (i) the midventral complex is composed of midventral pairs and midventral row and (ii) pretransverse ventral cirri are absent. Based on a combination of morphological and morphogenetic data, the genus Apoholosticha is assigned to the recently erected subfamily Nothoholostichinae Paiva et al., 2014, which is consistent with sequence comparison and phylogenetic analyses based on SSU rRNA gene data. It is also concluded that this benthic species, previously reported only from China, is not an endemic form.

  3. Chloroplast development at low temperatures requires a homolog of DIM1, a yeast gene encoding the 18S rRNA dimethylase.

    PubMed Central

    Tokuhisa, J G; Vijayan, P; Feldmann, K A; Browse, J A

    1998-01-01

    Poikilothermic organisms require mechanisms that allow survival at chilling temperatures (2 to 15 degreesC). We have isolated chilling-sensitive mutants of Arabidopsis, a plant that is very chilling resistant, and are characterizing them to understand the genes involved in chilling resistance. The T-DNA-tagged mutant paleface1 (pfc1) grows normally at 22 degrees C but at 5 degrees C exhibits a pattern of chilling-induced chlorosis consistent with a disruption of chloroplast development. Genomic DNA flanking the T-DNA was cloned and used to isolate wild-type genomic and cDNA clones. The PFC1 transcript is present at a low level in wild-type plants and was not detected in pfc1 plants. Wild-type Arabidopsis expressing antisense constructs of PFC1 grew normally at 22 degrees C but showed chilling-induced chlorosis, confirming that the gene is essential for low-temperature development of chloroplasts. The deduced amino acid sequence of PFC1 has identity with rRNA methylases found in bacteria and yeast that modify specific adenosines of pre-rRNA transcripts. The pfc1 mutant does not have these modifications in the small subunit rRNA of the plastid. PMID:9596631

  4. Conformation of yeast 18S rRNA. Direct chemical probing of the 5' domain in ribosomal subunits and in deproteinized RNA by reverse transcriptase mapping of dimethyl sulfate-accessible.

    PubMed Central

    Lempereur, L; Nicoloso, M; Riehl, N; Ehresmann, C; Ehresmann, B; Bachellerie, J P

    1985-01-01

    The structure of the 5' domain of yeast 18S rRNA has been probed by dimethyl sulfate (DMS), either in "native" deproteinized molecules or in the 40S ribosomal subunits. DMS-reacted RNA has been used as a template for reverse transcription and a large number of reactive sites, corresponding to all types of bases have been mapped by a primer extension procedure, taking advantage of blocks in cDNA elongation immediately upstream from bases methylated at atom positions involved in the base-pair recognition of the template. Since the same atom positions are protected from DMS in base-paired nucleotides, the secondary structure status of each nucleotide can be directly assessed in this procedure, thus allowing to evaluate the potential contribution of proteins in modulating subunit rRNA conformation. While the DMS probing of deproteinized rRNA confirms a number of helical stems predicted by phylogenetic comparisons, it is remarkable that a few additional base-pairings, while proven by the comparative analysis, appear to require the presence of the bound ribosomal subunit proteins to be stabilized. Images PMID:2417197

  5. Targeting single-nucleotide polymorphisms in the 18S rRNA gene to differentiate Cyclospora species from Eimeria species by multiplex PCR.

    PubMed

    Orlandi, Palmer A; Carter, Laurenda; Brinker, Anna Marie; da Silva, Alexandre J; Chu, Dan-My; Lampel, Keith A; Monday, Steven R

    2003-08-01

    Cyclospora cayetanensis is a coccidian parasite that causes protracted diarrheal illness in humans. C. cayetanensis is the only species of this genus thus far associated with human illness, although Cyclospora species from other primates have been named. The current method to detect the parasite uses a nested PCR assay to amplify a 294-bp region of the small subunit rRNA gene, followed by restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP) or DNA sequence analysis. Since the amplicons generated from C. cayetanensis and Eimeria species are the same size, the latter step is required to distinguish between these different species. The current PCR-RFLP protocol, however, cannot distinguish between C. cayetanensis and these new isolates. The differential identification of such pathogenic and nonpathogenic parasites is essential in assessing the risks to human health from microorganisms that may be potential contaminants in food and water sources. Therefore, to expand the utility of PCR to detect and identify these parasites in a multiplex assay, a series of genus- and species-specific forward primers were designed that are able to distinguish sites of limited sequence heterogeneity in the target gene. The most effective of these unique primers were those that identified single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) at the 3' end of the primer. Under more stringent annealing and elongation conditions, these SNP primers were able to differentiate between C. cayetanensis, nonhuman primate species of Cyclospora, and Eimeria species. As a diagnostic tool, the SNP PCR protocol described here presents a more rapid and sensitive alternative to the currently available PCR-RFLP detection method. In addition, the specificity of these diagnostic primers removes the uncertainty that can be associated with analyses of foods or environmental sources suspected of harboring potential human parasitic pathogens.

  6. Quantitative detection of Cryptosporidium oocyst in water source based on 18S rRNA by alternately binding probe competitive reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (ABC-RT-PCR).

    PubMed

    Kishida, Naohiro; Miyata, Ryo; Furuta, Atsushi; Izumiyama, Shinji; Tsuneda, Satoshi; Sekiguchi, Yuji; Noda, Naohiro; Akiba, Michihiro

    2012-01-01

    We describe an assay for simple and cost-effective quantification of Cryptosporidium oocysts in water samples using a recently developed quantification method named alternately binding probe competitive PCR (ABC-PCR). The assay is based on the detection of 18S rRNA specific for Cryptosporidium oocysts. The standard curve of the ABC-PCR assay had a good fitting to a rectangular hyperbola with a correlation coefficient (R) of 0.9997. Concentrations of Cryptosporidium oocysts in real river water samples were successfully quantified by the ABC-reverse transcription (RT)-PCR assay. The quantified values by the ABC-RT-PCR assay very closely resemble those by the real-time RT-PCR assay. In addition, the quantified concentration in most water samples by the ABC-RT-PCR assay was comparable to that by conventional microscopic observation. Thus, Cryptosporidium oocysts in water samples can be accurately and specifically determined by the ABC-RT-PCR assay. As the only equipment that is needed for this end-point fluorescence assay is a simple fluorometer and a relatively inexpensive thermal cycler, this method can markedly reduce time and cost to quantify Cryptosporidium oocysts and other health-related water microorganisms.

  7. Microbial diversities (16S and 18S rRNA gene pyrosequencing) and environmental pathogens within drinking water biofilms grown on the common premise plumbing materials unplasticized polyvinylchloride and copper.

    PubMed

    Buse, Helen Y; Lu, Jingrang; Lu, Xinxin; Mou, Xiaozhen; Ashbolt, Nicholas J

    2014-05-01

    Drinking water (DW) biofilm communities influence the survival of opportunistic pathogens, yet knowledge about the microbial composition of DW biofilms developed on common in-premise plumbing material is limited. Utilizing 16S and 18S rRNA gene pyrosequencing, this study characterized the microbial community structure within DW biofilms established on unplasticized polyvinyl chloride (uPVC) and copper (Cu) surfaces and the impact of introducing Legionella pneumophila (Lp) and Acanthamoeba polyphaga. Mature (> 1 year old) biofilms were developed before inoculation with sterilized DW (control, Con), Lp, or Lp and A. polyphaga (LpAp). Comparison of uPVC and Cu biofilms indicated significant differences between bacterial (P = 0.001) and eukaryotic (P < 0.01) members attributable to the unique presence of several family taxa: Burkholderiaceae, Characeae, Epistylidae, Goniomonadaceae, Paramoebidae, Plasmodiophoridae, Plectidae, Sphenomonadidae, and Toxariaceae within uPVC biofilms; and Enterobacteriaceae, Erythrobacteraceae, Methylophilaceae, Acanthamoebidae, and Chlamydomonadaceae within Cu biofilms. Introduction of Lp alone or with A. polyphaga had no effect on bacterial community profiles (P > 0.05) but did affect eukaryotic members (uPVC, P < 0.01; Cu, P = 0.001). Thus, established DW biofilms host complex communities that may vary based on substratum matrix and maintain consistent bacterial communities despite introduction of Lp, an environmental pathogen.

  8. Nuclear rRNA transcript processing versus internal transcribed spacer secondary structure.

    PubMed

    Coleman, Annette W

    2015-03-01

    rRNA is one of the few universal features of life, making it uniquely suited to assess phylogenetic relationships. The processing of the initial polycistronic rRNA transcript is also a conserved process, involving numerous cleavage events and the generation of secondary structures. The secondary structure of the internal transcribed spacer (ITS) regions of nuclear rRNA transcripts are well known for a wide variety of eukaryotes and have been used to aid in the alignment of these sequences for phylogenetic comparisons. By contrast, study of the processing of the initial rRNA transcripts has been largely limited to yeast, mice, rats, and humans. Here I examine the known cleavage sites in the two ITS regions and their positions relative to the secondary structure. A better understanding of the conservation of secondary structures and cleavage sites within the ITS regions will improve evolutionary inferences based on these sequences.

  9. Internal phylogeny of the Chilopoda (Myriapoda, Arthropoda) using complete 18S rDNA and partial 28S rDNA sequences.

    PubMed Central

    Giribet, G; Carranza, S; Riutort, M; Baguñà, J; Ribera, C

    1999-01-01

    The internal phylogeny of the 'myriapod' class Chilopoda is evaluated for 12 species belonging to the five extant centipede orders, using 18S rDNA complete gene sequence and 28S rDNA partial gene sequence data. Equally and differentially weighted parsimony, neighbour-joining and maximum-likelihood were used for phylogenetic reconstruction, and bootstrapping and branch support analyses were performed to evaluate tree topology stability. The results show that the Chilopoda constitute a monophyletic group that is divided into two lines, Notostigmophora (= Scutigeromorpha) and Pleurostigmophora, as found in previous morphological analyses. The Notostigmophora are markedly modified for their epigenic mode of life. The first offshoot of the Pleurostigmophora are the Lithobiomorpha, followed by the Craterostigmomorpha and by the Epimorpha s. str. (= Scolopendromorpha + Geophilomorpha), although strong support for the monophyly of the Epimorpha s. lat. (= Craterostigmomorpha + Epimorpha s. str.) is only found in the differentially weighted parsimony analysis. PMID:10087567

  10. 18S Ribosomal RNA Evaluation as Preanalytical Quality Control for Animal DNA

    PubMed Central

    Meli, Marina L.; Novacco, Marilisa; Borel, Nicole

    2016-01-01

    The 18S ribosomal RNA (rRNA) gene is present in all eukaryotic cells. In this study, we evaluated the use of this gene to verify the presence of PCR-amplifiable host (animal) DNA as an indicator of sufficient sample quality for quantitative real-time PCR (qPCR) analysis. We compared (i) samples from various animal species, tissues, and sample types, including swabs; (ii) multiple DNA extraction methods; and (iii) both fresh and formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded (FFPE) samples. Results showed that 18S ribosomal RNA gene amplification was possible from all tissue samples evaluated, including avian, reptile, and FFPE samples and most swab samples. A single swine rectal swab, which showed sufficient DNA quantity and the demonstrated lack of PCR inhibitors, nonetheless was negative by 18S qPCR. Such a sample specifically illustrates the improvement of determination of sample integrity afforded by inclusion of 18S rRNA gene qPCR analysis in addition to spectrophotometric analysis and the use of internal controls for PCR inhibition. Other possible applications for the described 18S rRNA qPCR are preselection of optimal tissue specimens for studies or preliminary screening of archived samples prior to acceptance for biobanking projects. PMID:27672657

  11. Crude Extracts, Flavokawain B and Alpinetin Compounds from the Rhizome of Alpinia mutica Induce Cell Death via UCK2 Enzyme Inhibition and in Turn Reduce 18S rRNA Biosynthesis in HT-29 Cells

    PubMed Central

    Abdullah, Rasedee; Kassim, Nur Kartinee Bt; Rosli, Rozita; Yeap, Swee Keong; Waziri, Peter; Etti, Imaobong Christopher; Bello, Muhammad Bashir

    2017-01-01

    Uridine-cytidine kinase 2 is an enzyme that is overexpressed in abnormal cell growth and its implication is considered a hallmark of cancer. Due to the selective expression of UCK2 in cancer cells, a selective inhibition of this key enzyme necessitates the discovery of its potential inhibitors for cancer chemotherapy. The present study was carried out to demonstrate the potentials of natural phytochemicals from the rhizome of Alpinia mutica to inhibit UCK2 useful for colorectal cancer. Here, we employed the used of in vitro to investigate the effectiveness of natural UCK2 inhibitors to cause HT-29 cell death. Extracts, flavokawain B, and alpinetin compound from the rhizome of Alpinia mutica was used in the study. The study demonstrated that the expression of UCK2 mRNA were substantially reduced in treated HT-29 cells. In addition, downregulation in expression of 18S ribosomal RNA was also observed in all treated HT-29 cells. This was confirmed by fluorescence imaging to measure the level of expression of 18S ribosomal RNA in live cell images. The study suggests the possibility of MDM2 protein was downregulated and its suppression subsequently activates the expression of p53 during inhibition of UCK2 enzyme. The expression of p53 is directly linked to a blockage of cell cycle progression at G0/G1 phase and upregulates Bax, cytochrome c, and caspase 3 while Bcl2 was deregulated. In this respect, apoptosis induction and DNA fragmentation were observed in treated HT-29 cells. Initial results from in vitro studies have shown the ability of the bioactive compounds of flavokawain B and alpinetin to target UCK2 enzyme specifically, inducing cell cycle arrest and subsequently leading to cancer cell death, possibly through interfering the MDM2-p53 signalling pathway. These phenomena have proven that the bioactive compounds could be useful for future therapeutic use in colon cancer. PMID:28103302

  12. Crude Extracts, Flavokawain B and Alpinetin Compounds from the Rhizome of Alpinia mutica Induce Cell Death via UCK2 Enzyme Inhibition and in Turn Reduce 18S rRNA Biosynthesis in HT-29 Cells.

    PubMed

    Malami, Ibrahim; Abdul, Ahmad Bustamam; Abdullah, Rasedee; Kassim, Nur Kartinee Bt; Rosli, Rozita; Yeap, Swee Keong; Waziri, Peter; Etti, Imaobong Christopher; Bello, Muhammad Bashir

    2017-01-01

    Uridine-cytidine kinase 2 is an enzyme that is overexpressed in abnormal cell growth and its implication is considered a hallmark of cancer. Due to the selective expression of UCK2 in cancer cells, a selective inhibition of this key enzyme necessitates the discovery of its potential inhibitors for cancer chemotherapy. The present study was carried out to demonstrate the potentials of natural phytochemicals from the rhizome of Alpinia mutica to inhibit UCK2 useful for colorectal cancer. Here, we employed the used of in vitro to investigate the effectiveness of natural UCK2 inhibitors to cause HT-29 cell death. Extracts, flavokawain B, and alpinetin compound from the rhizome of Alpinia mutica was used in the study. The study demonstrated that the expression of UCK2 mRNA were substantially reduced in treated HT-29 cells. In addition, downregulation in expression of 18S ribosomal RNA was also observed in all treated HT-29 cells. This was confirmed by fluorescence imaging to measure the level of expression of 18S ribosomal RNA in live cell images. The study suggests the possibility of MDM2 protein was downregulated and its suppression subsequently activates the expression of p53 during inhibition of UCK2 enzyme. The expression of p53 is directly linked to a blockage of cell cycle progression at G0/G1 phase and upregulates Bax, cytochrome c, and caspase 3 while Bcl2 was deregulated. In this respect, apoptosis induction and DNA fragmentation were observed in treated HT-29 cells. Initial results from in vitro studies have shown the ability of the bioactive compounds of flavokawain B and alpinetin to target UCK2 enzyme specifically, inducing cell cycle arrest and subsequently leading to cancer cell death, possibly through interfering the MDM2-p53 signalling pathway. These phenomena have proven that the bioactive compounds could be useful for future therapeutic use in colon cancer.

  13. Composition of the summer photosynthetic pico and nanoplankton communities in the Beaufort Sea assessed by T-RFLP and sequences of the 18S rRNA gene from flow cytometry sorted samples

    PubMed Central

    Balzano, Sergio; Marie, Dominique; Gourvil, Priscillia; Vaulot, Daniel

    2012-01-01

    The composition of photosynthetic pico and nanoeukaryotes was investigated in the North East Pacific and the Arctic Ocean with special emphasis on the Beaufort Sea during the MALINA cruise in summer 2009. Photosynthetic populations were sorted using flow cytometry based on their size and pigment fluorescence. Diversity of the sorted photosynthetic eukaryotes was determined using terminal-restriction fragment length polymorphism analysis and cloning/sequencing of the 18S ribosomal RNA gene. Picoplankton was dominated by Mamiellophyceae, a class of small green algae previously included in the prasinophytes: in the North East Pacific, the contribution of an Arctic Micromonas ecotype increased steadily northward becoming the only taxon occurring at most stations throughout the Beaufort Sea. In contrast, nanoplankton was more diverse: North Pacific stations were dominated by Pseudo-nitzschia sp. whereas those in the Beaufort Sea were dominated by two distinct Chaetoceros species as well as by Chrysophyceae, Pelagophyceae and Chrysochromulina spp.. This study confirms the importance of Arctic Micromonas within picoplankton throughout the Beaufort Sea and demonstrates that the photosynthetic picoeukaryote community in the Arctic is much less diverse than at lower latitudes. Moreover, in contrast to what occurs in warmer waters, most of the key pico- and nanoplankton species found in the Beaufort Sea could be successfully established in culture. PMID:22278671

  14. Cytogenetic analysis of the tamaraw (Bubalus mindorensis): a comparison of R-banded karyotype and chromosomal distribution of centromeric satellite DNAs, telomeric sequence, and 18S-28S rRNA genes with domestic water buffaloes.

    PubMed

    Tanaka, K; Matsuda, Y; Masangkay, J S; Solis, C D; Anunciado, R V; Kuro-o, M; Namikawa, T

    2000-01-01

    The karyotype of the tamaraw (Bubalus mindorensis, 2n = 46) was investigated by RBG-banding technique and compared with those of the river and the swamp cytotypes of domestic water buffalo (B. bubalis). The tamaraw karyotype consisted of 6 submetacentric and 16 acrocentric autosome pairs (NAA = 56), and X and Y chromosomes. The RBG-banded karyotype of the three taxa had a high degree of homology, and the tamaraw karyotype could be explained by a Robertsonian translocation between chromosomes 7 and 15 and by a telomere-centromere tandem fusion between chromosomes 4p and 12 of the standardized river buffalo cytotype (2n = 50, NAA = 58). The buffalo satellite I and II DNAs were localized to the centromeric regions of all the tamaraw chromosomes. The biarmed chromosome 2 of the tamaraw resulting from the fusion between chromosomes 7 and 15 of the standard contained much larger amounts of the satellite I DNA than the other biarmed chromosomes, suggesting that this chromosome was formed by a relatively recent Robertsonian fusion. The (TTAGGG)n telomeric sequence was specifically localized to the telomeric region of all the buffalo chromosomes. The 18S + 28S rDNA was localized to the telomeric regions of the chromosomes 5p, 7, 19, 21, and 22 of the tamaraw and of their homologous chromosomes in the river and swamp buffalo cytotypes.

  15. Requirement of rRNA Methylation for 80S Ribosome Assembly on a Cohort of Cellular Internal Ribosome Entry Sites▿

    PubMed Central

    Basu, Abhijit; Das, Priyanka; Chaudhuri, Sujan; Bevilacqua, Elena; Andrews, Joel; Barik, Sailen; Hatzoglou, Maria; Komar, Anton A.; Mazumder, Barsanjit

    2011-01-01

    Protein syntheses mediated by cellular and viral internal ribosome entry sites (IRESs) are believed to have many features in common. Distinct mechanisms for ribosome recruitment and preinitiation complex assembly between the two processes have not been identified thus far. Here we show that the methylation status of rRNA differentially influenced the mechanism of 80S complex formation on IRES elements from the cellular sodium-coupled neutral amino acid transporter 2 (SNAT2) versus the hepatitis C virus mRNA. Translation initiation involves the assembly of the 48S preinitiation complex, followed by joining of the 60S ribosomal subunit and formation of the 80S complex. Abrogation of rRNA methylation did not affect the 48S complex but resulted in impairment of 80S complex assembly on the cellular, but not the viral, IRESs tested. Impairment of 80S complex assembly on the amino acid transporter SNAT2 IRES was rescued by purified 60S subunits containing fully methylated rRNA. We found that rRNA methylation did not affect the activity of any of the viral IRESs tested but affected the activity of numerous cellular IRESs. This work reveals a novel mechanism operating on a cohort of cellular IRESs that involves rRNA methylation for proper 80S complex assembly and efficient translation initiation. PMID:21930789

  16. Improved resolution of bacteria by high throughput sequence analysis of the rRNA internal transcribed spacer

    PubMed Central

    Ruegger, Paul M.; Clark, Robin T.; Weger, John R.; Braun, Jonathan; Borneman, James

    2014-01-01

    Current high throughput sequencing (HTS) methods are limited in their ability to resolve bacteria at or below the genus level. While the impact of this limitation may be relatively minor in whole-community analyses, it constrains the use of HTS as a tool for identifying and examining individual bacteria of interest. The limited resolution is a consequence of both short read lengths and insufficient sequence variation within the commonly targeted variable regions of the small-subunit rRNA (SSU) gene. The goal of this work was to improve the resolving power of bacterial HTS. We developed an assay targeting the hypervariable rRNA internal transcribed spacer (ITS) region residing between the SSU and large-subunit (LSU) rRNA genes. Comparisons of the ITS region and two SSU regions using annotated bacterial genomes in GenBank showed much greater resolving power is possible with the ITS region. This report presents a new HTS method for analyzing bacterial composition with improved capabilities. The greater resolving power enabled by the ITS region arises from its high sequence variation across a wide range of bacterial taxa and an associated decrease in taxonomic heterogeneity within its OTUs. Although the method should be adaptable to any HTS platform, this report presents PCR primers, amplification parameters, and protocols for Illumina-based analyses. PMID:25034229

  17. Improved resolution of bacteria by high throughput sequence analysis of the rRNA internal transcribed spacer.

    PubMed

    Ruegger, Paul M; Clark, Robin T; Weger, John R; Braun, Jonathan; Borneman, James

    2014-10-01

    Current high throughput sequencing (HTS) methods are limited in their ability to resolve bacteria at or below the genus level. While the impact of this limitation may be relatively minor in whole-community analyses, it constrains the use of HTS as a tool for identifying and examining individual bacteria of interest. The limited resolution is a consequence of both short read lengths and insufficient sequence variation within the commonly targeted variable regions of the small-subunit rRNA (SSU) gene. The goal of this work was to improve the resolving power of bacterial HTS. We developed an assay targeting the hypervariable rRNA internal transcribed spacer (ITS) region residing between the SSU and large-subunit (LSU) rRNA genes. Comparisons of the ITS region and two SSU regions using annotated bacterial genomes in GenBank showed much greater resolving power is possible with the ITS region. This report presents a new HTS method for analyzing bacterial composition with improved capabilities. The greater resolving power enabled by the ITS region arises from its high sequence variation across a wide range of bacterial taxa and an associated decrease in taxonomic heterogeneity within its OTUs. Although the method should be adaptable to any HTS platform, this report presents PCR primers, amplification parameters, and protocols for Illumina-based analyses.

  18. In vivo analyses of the internal control region in the 5S rRNA gene from Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Lee, Y; Erkine, A M; Van Ryk, D I; Nazar, R N

    1995-02-25

    The internal control region of the Saccharomyces cerevisiae 5S rRNA gene has been characterized in vivo by genomic DNase I footprinting and by mutational analyses using base substitutions, deletions or insertions. A high copy shuttle vector was used to efficiently express mutant 5S rRNA genes in vivo and isotope labelling kinetics were used to distinguish impeded gene expression from nascent RNA degradation. In contrast to mutational studies in reconstituted systems, the analyses describe promoter elements which closely resemble the three distinct sequence elements that have been observed in Xenopus laevis 5S rRNA. The results indicate a more highly conserved structure than previously reported with reconstituted systems and suggest that the saturated conditions which are used in reconstitution studies mask sequence dependence which may be physiologically significant. Footprint analyses support the extended region of protein interaction which has recently been observed in some reconstituted systems, but mutational analyses indicate that these interactions are not sequence specific. Periodicity in the footprint provides further detail regarding the in vivo topology of the interacting protein.

  19. ITS1 sequence variabilities correlate with 18S rDNA sequence types in the genus Acanthamoeba (Protozoa: Amoebozoa).

    PubMed

    Köhsler, Martina; Leitner, Brigitte; Blaschitz, Marion; Michel, Rolf; Aspöck, Horst; Walochnik, Julia

    2006-01-01

    The subgenus classification of the ubiquitously spread and potentially pathogenic acanthamoebae still poses a great challenge. Fifteen 18S rDNA sequence types (T1-T15) have been established, but the vast majority of isolates fall into sequence type T4, and so far, there is no means to reliably differentiate within T4. In this study, the first internal transcribed spacer (ITS1), a more variable region than the 18S rRNA gene, was sequenced, and the sequences of 15 different Acanthamoeba isolates were compared to reveal if ITS1 sequence variability correlates with 18S rDNA sequence typing and if the ITS1 sequencing allows a differentiation within T4. It was shown that the variability in ITS1 is tenfold higher than in the 18S rDNA, and that ITS1 clusters correlate with the 18S rDNA clusters and thus corroborate the Acanthamoeba sequence type system. Moreover, high sequence dissimilarities and distinctive microsatellite patterns could enable a more detailed differentiation within T4.

  20. Chemical probing of adenine residues within the secondary structure of rabbit /sup 18/S ribosomal RNA

    SciTech Connect

    Rairkar, A.; Rubino, H.M.; Lockard, R.E.

    1988-01-26

    The location of unpaired adenine residues within the secondary structure of rabbit /sup 18/S ribosomal RNA was determined by chemical probing. Naked /sup 18/S rRNA was first prepared by digestion of purified 40S subunits with matrix-bound proteinase K in sodium dodecyl sulfate, thereby omitting the use of nucleic acid denaturants. Adenines within naked /sup 18/S rRNA were chemically probed by using either diethyl pyrocarbonate or dimethyl sulfate, which specifically react with unpaired nucleotides. Adenine modification sites were identified by polyacrylamide sequencing gel electrophoresis either upon aniline-induced strand scission of /sup 32/P-end-labeled intact and fragmented rRNA or by primer extension using sequence-specific DNA oligomers with reverse transcriptase. The data indicate good agreement between the general pattern of adenine reactivity and the location of unpaired regions in /sup 18/S rRNA determined by comparative sequence analysis. The overall reactivity of adenine residues toward single-strand-specific chemical probes was, also, similar for both rabbit and Escherichia coli small rRNA. The number of strongly reactive adenines appearing within phylogenetically determined helical segments, however, was greater in rabbit /sup 18/S rRNA than for E. coli /sup 16/S rRNA. Some of these adenines were found clustered in specific helices. Such differences suggest a greater irregularity of many of the helical elements within mammalian /sup 18/S rRNA, as compared with prokaryotic /sup 16/S rRNA. These helical irregularities could be important for protein association and also may represent biologically relevant flexible regions of the molecule.

  1. DNA polymorphism in morels: complete sequences of the internal transcribed spacer of genes coding for rRNA in Morchella esculenta (yellow morel) and Morchella conica (black morel).

    PubMed

    Wipf, D; Munch, J C; Botton, B; Buscot, F

    1996-09-01

    The internal transcribed spacer (ITS) of the gene coding for rRNA was sequenced in both directions with the gene walking technique in a black morel (Morchella conica) and a yellow morel (M. esculenta) to elucidate the ITS length discrepancy between the two species groups (750-bp ITS in black morels and 1,150-bp ITS in yellow morels.

  2. Two-dimensional combinatorial screening of a bacterial rRNA A-site-like motif library: defining privileged asymmetric internal loops that bind aminoglycosides.

    PubMed

    Tran, Tuan; Disney, Matthew D

    2010-03-09

    RNAs have diverse structures that are important for biological function. These structures include bulges and internal loops that can form tertiary contacts or serve as ligand binding sites. The most commonly exploited RNA drug target for small molecule intervention is the bacterial ribosome, more specifically the rRNA aminoacyl-tRNA site (rRNA A-site) which is a major target for the aminoglycoside class of antibiotics. The bacterial A-site is composed of a 1 x 1 nucleotide all-U internal loop and a 2 x 1 nucleotide all-A internal loop separated by a single GC base pair. Therefore, we probed the molecular recognition of a small library of four aminoglycosides for binding a 16384-member bacterial rRNA A-site-like internal loop library using two-dimensional combinatorial screening (2DCS). 2DCS is a microarray-based method that probes RNA and chemical spaces simultaneously. These studies sought to determine if aminoglycosides select their therapeutic target if given a choice of binding all possible internal loops derived from an A-site-like library. Results show that the bacterial rRNA A-site was not selected by any aminoglycoside. Analyses of selected sequences using the RNA Privileged Space Predictor (RNA-PSP) program show that each aminoglycoside preferentially binds different types of internal loops. For three of the aminoglycosides, 6''-azido-kanamycin A, 5-O-(2-azidoethyl)-neamine, and 6''-azido-tobramycin, the selected internal loops bind with approximately 10-fold higher affinity than the bacterial rRNA A-site. The internal loops selected to bind 5''-azido-neomycin B bind with an affinity similar to that of the therapeutic target. Selected internal loops that are unique for each aminoglycoside have dissociation constants ranging from 25 to 270 nM and are specific for the aminoglycoside they was selected to bind compared to the other arrayed aminoglycosides. These studies further establish a database of RNA motifs that are recognized by small molecules that

  3. Intrageneric structure of the genus Gluconobacter analyzed by the 16S rRNA gene and 16S-23S rRNA gene internal transcribed spacer sequences.

    PubMed

    Takahashi, Mai; Yukphan, Pattaraporn; Yamada, Yuzo; Suzuki, Ken-ichiro; Sakane, Takeshi; Nakagawa, Yasuyoshi

    2006-06-01

    Forty-nine strains belonging to the genus Gluconobacter were re-examined with respect to their species identification based on the sequences of the 16S rDNA and 16S-23S rDNA internal transcribed spacer regions (ITS). A phylogenetic tree constructed from the 16S rDNA sequences indicated the presence of five clusters corresponding, respectively, to the major five species of the genus Gluconobacter, namely G. albidus, G. cerinus, G. frateurii, G. oxydans (type species), and G. thailandicus. The type strain of G. asaii, NBRC 3276T (T=type strain) was included in the G. cerinus cluster, which is consistent with the report that G. asaii is a junior subjective synonym of G. cerinus. Existence of the G. albidus, G. cerinus, G. frateurii, G. oxydans, and G. thailandicus clusters was also recognized by the ITS sequence analysis. Both sequence analyses revealed that the G. cerinus and G. frateurii clusters were heterogeneous. The G. cerinus cluster comprised three strains of G. cerinus and one strain of G. frateurii, while the G. frateurii cluster included ten strains of G. frateurii, three of G. cerinus, and eleven of G. oxydans. These results suggest that phenotypic differences among Gluconobacter species are ambiguous and the species definition must be re-evaluated. The 16S rDNA and ITS sequences determined in this study are valuable for the identification and phylogenetic analysis of Gluconobacter species.

  4. International interlaboratory study comparing single organism 16S rRNA gene sequencing data: Beyond consensus sequence comparisons

    PubMed Central

    Olson, Nathan D.; Lund, Steven P.; Zook, Justin M.; Rojas-Cornejo, Fabiola; Beck, Brian; Foy, Carole; Huggett, Jim; Whale, Alexandra S.; Sui, Zhiwei; Baoutina, Anna; Dobeson, Michael; Partis, Lina; Morrow, Jayne B.

    2015-01-01

    This study presents the results from an interlaboratory sequencing study for which we developed a novel high-resolution method for comparing data from different sequencing platforms for a multi-copy, paralogous gene. The combination of PCR amplification and 16S ribosomal RNA gene (16S rRNA) sequencing has revolutionized bacteriology by enabling rapid identification, frequently without the need for culture. To assess variability between laboratories in sequencing 16S rRNA, six laboratories sequenced the gene encoding the 16S rRNA from Escherichia coli O157:H7 strain EDL933 and Listeria monocytogenes serovar 4b strain NCTC11994. Participants performed sequencing methods and protocols available in their laboratories: Sanger sequencing, Roche 454 pyrosequencing®, or Ion Torrent PGM®. The sequencing data were evaluated on three levels: (1) identity of biologically conserved position, (2) ratio of 16S rRNA gene copies featuring identified variants, and (3) the collection of variant combinations in a set of 16S rRNA gene copies. The same set of biologically conserved positions was identified for each sequencing method. Analytical methods using Bayesian and maximum likelihood statistics were developed to estimate variant copy ratios, which describe the ratio of nucleotides at each identified biologically variable position, as well as the likely set of variant combinations present in 16S rRNA gene copies. Our results indicate that estimated variant copy ratios at biologically variable positions were only reproducible for high throughput sequencing methods. Furthermore, the likely variant combination set was only reproducible with increased sequencing depth and longer read lengths. We also demonstrate novel methods for evaluating variable positions when comparing multi-copy gene sequence data from multiple laboratories generated using multiple sequencing technologies. PMID:27077030

  5. Differentiation of acetic acid bacteria based on sequence analysis of 16S-23S rRNA gene internal transcribed spacer sequences.

    PubMed

    González, Angel; Mas, Albert

    2011-06-30

    The 16S-23S gene internal transcribed spacer sequence of sixty-four strains belonging to different acetic acid bacteria genera were analyzed, and phylogenetic trees were generated for each genera. The topologies of the different trees were in accordance with the 16S rRNA gene trees, although the similarity percentages obtained between the species was shown to be much lower. These values suggest the usefulness of including the 16S-23S gene internal transcribed spacer region as a part of the polyphasic approach required for the further classification of acetic acid bacteria. Furthermore, the region could be a good target for primer and probe design. It has also been validated for use in the identification of unknown samples of this bacterial group from wine vinegar and fruit condiments.

  6. Chicken rRNA Gene Cluster Structure

    PubMed Central

    Dyomin, Alexander G.; Koshel, Elena I.; Kiselev, Artem M.; Saifitdinova, Alsu F.; Galkina, Svetlana A.; Fukagawa, Tatsuo; Kostareva, Anna A.

    2016-01-01

    Ribosomal RNA (rRNA) genes, whose activity results in nucleolus formation, constitute an extremely important part of genome. Despite the extensive exploration into avian genomes, no complete description of avian rRNA gene primary structure has been offered so far. We publish a complete chicken rRNA gene cluster sequence here, including 5’ETS (1836 bp), 18S rRNA gene (1823 bp), ITS1 (2530 bp), 5.8S rRNA gene (157 bp), ITS2 (733 bp), 28S rRNA gene (4441 bp) and 3’ETS (343 bp). The rRNA gene cluster sequence of 11863 bp was assembled from raw reads and deposited to GenBank under KT445934 accession number. The assembly was validated through in situ fluorescent hybridization analysis on chicken metaphase chromosomes using computed and synthesized specific probes, as well as through the reference assembly against de novo assembled rRNA gene cluster sequence using sequenced fragments of BAC-clone containing chicken NOR (nucleolus organizer region). The results have confirmed the chicken rRNA gene cluster validity. PMID:27299357

  7. A new PCR primer for the identification of Paracoccidioides brasiliensis based on rRNA sequences coding the internal transcribed spacers (ITS) and 5 x 8S regions.

    PubMed

    Imai, T; Sano, A; Mikami, Y; Watanabe, K; Aoki, F H; Branchini, M L; Negroni, R; Nishimura, K; Miyaji, M

    2000-08-01

    Internal transcribed spacer (ITS) genes including the 5.8S ribosomal (r)RNA of Paracoccidioides brasiliensis were amplified and the DNA sequences were determined. Based on a comparison of the sequence information, a new polymerase chain reaction (PCR) primer pair was designed for specific amplification of DNA for P. brasiliensis. This primer pair amplified a 418-bp DNA sequence and was 100% successful in identifying 29 strains of P. brasiliensis (including the reference strains) isolated from the regions of Brazil, Costa Rica, Japan, Argentina or from different sources. The results of specificity tests of these primers to compare the fungus with those of Aspergillus fumigatus, Blastomyces dermatitidis, Candida albicans, Cryptococcus neoformans, Histoplasma capsulatum and Penicillium marneffei are also reported.

  8. Technical considerations in the use of 18s rRNA in gene expression studies

    EPA Science Inventory

    Gene expression analysis is now commonly used in ecotoxicological studies to indicate exposure of an organism to xenobiotics. For example, the vitellogenin gene is used to diagnose exposure of fish to environmental estrogens. Reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PC...

  9. Improved Bacterial 16S rRNA Gene (V4 and V4-5) and Fungal Internal Transcribed Spacer Marker Gene Primers for Microbial Community Surveys.

    PubMed

    Walters, William; Hyde, Embriette R; Berg-Lyons, Donna; Ackermann, Gail; Humphrey, Greg; Parada, Alma; Gilbert, Jack A; Jansson, Janet K; Caporaso, J Gregory; Fuhrman, Jed A; Apprill, Amy; Knight, Rob

    2016-01-01

    Designing primers for PCR-based taxonomic surveys that amplify a broad range of phylotypes in varied community samples is a difficult challenge, and the comparability of data sets amplified with varied primers requires attention. Here, we examined the performance of modified 16S rRNA gene and internal transcribed spacer (ITS) primers for archaea/bacteria and fungi, respectively, with nonaquatic samples. We moved primer bar codes to the 5' end, allowing for a range of different 3' primer pairings, such as the 515f/926r primer pair, which amplifies variable regions 4 and 5 of the 16S rRNA gene. We additionally demonstrated that modifications to the 515f/806r (variable region 4) 16S primer pair, which improves detection of Thaumarchaeota and clade SAR11 in marine samples, do not degrade performance on taxa already amplified effectively by the original primer set. Alterations to the fungal ITS primers did result in differential but overall improved performance compared to the original primers. In both cases, the improved primers should be widely adopted for amplicon studies. IMPORTANCE We continue to uncover a wealth of information connecting microbes in important ways to human and environmental ecology. As our scientific knowledge and technical abilities improve, the tools used for microbiome surveys can be modified to improve the accuracy of our techniques, ensuring that we can continue to identify groundbreaking connections between microbes and the ecosystems they populate, from ice caps to the human body. It is important to confirm that modifications to these tools do not cause new, detrimental biases that would inhibit the field rather than continue to move it forward. We therefore demonstrated that two recently modified primer pairs that target taxonomically discriminatory regions of bacterial and fungal genomic DNA do not introduce new biases when used on a variety of sample types, from soil to human skin. This confirms the utility of these primers for

  10. Secondary structure of rabbit 18S ribosomal RNA determined from biochemical and phylogenetic data

    SciTech Connect

    Rairkar, A.; Rubino, H.; Lockard, R.E.

    1986-05-01

    To understand the functional role of 18S rRNA in the eukaryotic 40S subunit, its higher order structure must first be determined. Native deproteinized 18S rRNA was isolated from purified rabbit 40S subunits, fractionated on SDS-sucrose density gradients and concentrated using centricon-30 microconcentrators. The structure of native 18S rRNA was probed chemically with both diethylpyrocarbonate (DEPC) and dimethyl sulfate (DMS) which react with unpaired adenosine and guanosine residues, respectively. After /sup 32/P-end-labeling of intact and fragmented RNA, the modified nucleotides were identified by polyacrylamide sequencing gel electrophoresis upon aniline induced strand scission. On the basis of both the biochemical and phylogenetic data, a secondary structure model is proposed which includes the two major G + C rich insertion elements. A comparison of the structure data with previously published phylogenetic models suggests an instability of certain predicted helices. These unstable helices may normally be stabilized by ribosomal proteins and could represent the flexible elements involved in biologically significant conformational switches within 40S subunit.

  11. Eukaryotic diversity in premise drinking water using 18S rDNA sequencing: implications for health risks

    EPA Science Inventory

    The goal of this study was to characterize microbial eukaryotes over a 12 month period, so as to provide insight into the occurrence of potentially important predators and bacterial hosts in hot and cold premise plumbing. Nearly 6,300 partial (600 bp) 18S rRNA gene sequences from...

  12. Genotyping of Pneumocystis jirovecii isolates from Chinese HIV-infected patients based on nucleotide sequence variations in the internal transcribed spacer regions of rRNA genes.

    PubMed

    Li, Kai; He, Ai; Cai, Wei Ping; Tang, Xiao Ping; Zheng, Xiao Ying; Li, Zhuo Ya; Zhan, Xi Mei

    2013-01-01

    Genetic diversity of Pneumocystis jirovecii isolates based on internal transcribed spacer (ITS) of the nuclear rRNA locus has previously been reported. The information about ITS genotype and epidemiology of this organism in Chinese human immunodeficiency virus-infected patients has not been available. In this study, 12 bronchoalveolar lavage fluid specimens obtained from HIV-infected patients were analyzed by PCR followed by cloning, sequencing and typing. Three ITS1 genotypes (E, B and 'H') and four ITS2 genotypes (b, g, i and r) as previously reported were identified, the most common of which were E, b and i. Five ITS haplotypes (Eg, Eb, Bi, Er and 'H'r) and 19 new combination types were also identified with the most common types being Eg (four of 12 patients, 10 of 60 clones), Eb (three of 12 patients, 11 of 60 clones) and Bi (three of 12 patients, 10 of 60 clones). Nine patients were found to be co-infected with more than one ITS genotype of P. jirovecii. The prevalence of ITS genotypes in HIV patients from one Chinese hospital did not seem to be significantly different when compared to reports from other countries.

  13. Improved Bacterial 16S rRNA Gene (V4 and V4-5) and Fungal Internal Transcribed Spacer Marker Gene Primers for Microbial Community Surveys

    SciTech Connect

    Walters, William; Hyde, Embriette R.; Berg-Lyons, Donna; Ackermann, Gail; Humphrey, Greg; Parada, Alma; Gilbert, Jack A.; Jansson, Janet K.; Caporaso, J. Gregory; Fuhrman, Jed A.; Apprill, Amy; Knight, Rob; Bik, Holly

    2015-12-22

    ABSTRACT

    Designing primers for PCR-based taxonomic surveys that amplify a broad range of phylotypes in varied community samples is a difficult challenge, and the comparability of data sets amplified with varied primers requires attention. Here, we examined the performance of modified 16S rRNA gene and internal transcribed spacer (ITS) primers for archaea/bacteria and fungi, respectively, with nonaquatic samples. We moved primer bar codes to the 5′ end, allowing for a range of different 3′ primer pairings, such as the 515f/926r primer pair, which amplifies variable regions 4 and 5 of the 16S rRNA gene. We additionally demonstrated that modifications to the 515f/806r (variable region 4) 16S primer pair, which improves detection ofThaumarchaeotaand clade SAR11 in marine samples, do not degrade performance on taxa already amplified effectively by the original primer set. Alterations to the fungal ITS primers did result in differential but overall improved performance compared to the original primers. In both cases, the improved primers should be widely adopted for amplicon studies.

    ImportanceWe continue to uncover a wealth of information connecting microbes in important ways to human and environmental ecology. As our scientific knowledge and technical abilities improve, the tools used for microbiome surveys can be modified to improve the accuracy of our techniques, ensuring that we can continue to identify groundbreaking connections between microbes and the ecosystems they populate, from ice caps to the human body. It is important to confirm that modifications to these tools do not cause new, detrimental biases that would inhibit the field rather than continue to move it forward. We therefore demonstrated that two recently modified primer pairs that target taxonomically discriminatory regions of bacterial and fungal genomic DNA do not introduce new biases when used on a variety of sample types, from soil to

  14. Improved Bacterial 16S rRNA Gene (V4 and V4-5) and Fungal Internal Transcribed Spacer Marker Gene Primers for Microbial Community Surveys

    PubMed Central

    Walters, William; Hyde, Embriette R.; Berg-Lyons, Donna; Ackermann, Gail; Humphrey, Greg; Parada, Alma; Gilbert, Jack A.; Jansson, Janet K.; Caporaso, J. Gregory; Fuhrman, Jed A.; Apprill, Amy

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Designing primers for PCR-based taxonomic surveys that amplify a broad range of phylotypes in varied community samples is a difficult challenge, and the comparability of data sets amplified with varied primers requires attention. Here, we examined the performance of modified 16S rRNA gene and internal transcribed spacer (ITS) primers for archaea/bacteria and fungi, respectively, with nonaquatic samples. We moved primer bar codes to the 5′ end, allowing for a range of different 3′ primer pairings, such as the 515f/926r primer pair, which amplifies variable regions 4 and 5 of the 16S rRNA gene. We additionally demonstrated that modifications to the 515f/806r (variable region 4) 16S primer pair, which improves detection of Thaumarchaeota and clade SAR11 in marine samples, do not degrade performance on taxa already amplified effectively by the original primer set. Alterations to the fungal ITS primers did result in differential but overall improved performance compared to the original primers. In both cases, the improved primers should be widely adopted for amplicon studies. IMPORTANCE We continue to uncover a wealth of information connecting microbes in important ways to human and environmental ecology. As our scientific knowledge and technical abilities improve, the tools used for microbiome surveys can be modified to improve the accuracy of our techniques, ensuring that we can continue to identify groundbreaking connections between microbes and the ecosystems they populate, from ice caps to the human body. It is important to confirm that modifications to these tools do not cause new, detrimental biases that would inhibit the field rather than continue to move it forward. We therefore demonstrated that two recently modified primer pairs that target taxonomically discriminatory regions of bacterial and fungal genomic DNA do not introduce new biases when used on a variety of sample types, from soil to human skin. This confirms the utility of these primers

  15. RNase MRP is required for entry of 35S precursor rRNA into the canonical processing pathway.

    PubMed

    Lindahl, Lasse; Bommankanti, Ananth; Li, Xing; Hayden, Lauren; Jones, Adrienne; Khan, Miriam; Oni, Tolulope; Zengel, Janice M

    2009-07-01

    RNase MRP is a nucleolar RNA-protein enzyme that participates in the processing of rRNA during ribosome biogenesis. Previous experiments suggested that RNase MRP makes a nonessential cleavage in the first internal transcribed spacer. Here we report experiments with new temperature-sensitive RNase MRP mutants in Saccharomyces cerevisiae that show that the abundance of all early intermediates in the processing pathway is severely reduced upon inactivation of RNase MRP. Transcription of rRNA continues unabated as determined by RNA polymerase run-on transcription, but the precursor rRNA transcript does not accumulate, and appears to be unstable. Taken together, these observations suggest that inactivation of RNase MRP blocks cleavage at sites A0, A1, A2, and A3, which in turn, prevents precursor rRNA from entering the canonical processing pathway (35S > 20S + 27S > 18S + 25S + 5.8S rRNA). Nevertheless, at least some cleavage at the processing site in the second internal transcribed spacer takes place to form an unusual 24S intermediate, suggesting that cleavage at C2 is not blocked. Furthermore, the long form of 5.8S rRNA is made in the absence of RNase MRP activity, but only in the presence of Xrn1p (exonuclease 1), an enzyme not required for the canonical pathway. We conclude that RNase MRP is a key enzyme for initiating the canonical processing of precursor rRNA transcripts, but alternative pathway(s) might provide a backup for production of small amounts of rRNA.

  16. Relationships between 16S-23S rRNA gene internal transcribed spacer DNA and genomic DNA similarities in the taxonomy of phototrophic bacteria

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Okamura, K.; Hisada, T.; Takata, K.; Hiraishi, A.

    2013-04-01

    Rapid and accurate identification of microbial species is essential task in microbiology and biotechnology. In prokaryotic systematics, genomic DNA-DNA hybridization is the ultimate tool to determine genetic relationships among bacterial strains at the species level. However, a practical problem in this assay is that the experimental procedure is laborious and time-consuming. In recent years, information on the 16S-23S rRNA gene internal transcribed spacer (ITS) region has been used to classify bacterial strains at the species and intraspecies levels. It is unclear how much information on the ITS region can reflect the genome that contain it. In this study, therefore, we evaluate the quantitative relationship between ITS DNA and entire genomic DNA similarities. For this, we determined ITS sequences of several species of anoxygenic phototrophic bacteria belonging to the order Rhizobiales, and compared with DNA-DNA relatedness among these species. There was a high correlation between the two genetic markers. Based on the regression analysis of this relationship, 70% DNA-DNA relatedness corresponded to 92% ITS sequence similarity. This suggests the usefulness of the ITS sequence similarity as a criterion for determining the genospecies of the phototrophic bacteria. To avoid the effects of polymorphism bias of ITS on similarities, PCR products from all loci of ITS were used directly as genetic probes for comparison. The results of ITS DNA-DNA hybridization coincided well with those of genomic DNA-DNA relatedness. These collective data indicate that the whole ITS DNA-DNA similarity can be used as an alternative to genomic DNA-DNA similarity.

  17. Sequencing for complete rDNA sequences (18S, ITS1, 5.8S, ITS2, and 28S rDNA) of Demodex and phylogenetic analysis of Acari based on 18S and 28S rDNA.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Ya-E; Wu, Li-Ping; Hu, Li; Xu, Yang; Wang, Zheng-Hang; Liu, Wen-Yan

    2012-11-01

    Due to the difficulty of DNA extraction for Demodex, few studies dealt with the identification and the phyletic evolution of Demodex at molecular level. In this study, we amplified, sequenced, and analyzed a complete (Demodex folliculorum) and an almost complete (D12 missing) (Demodex brevis) ribosomal DNA (rDNA) sequence and also analyzed the primary sequences of divergent domains in small-subunit ribosomal RNA (rRNA) of 51 species and in large-subunit rRNA of 43 species from four superfamilies in Acari (Cheyletoidea, Tetranychoidea, Analgoidea, and Ixodoidea). The results revealed that 18S rDNA sequence was relatively conserved in rDNA-coding regions and was not evolving as rapidly as 28S rDNA sequence. The evolutionary rates of transcribed spacer regions were much higher than those of the coding regions. The maximum parsimony trees of 18S and 28S rDNA appeared to be almost identical, consistent with their morphological classification. Based on the fact that the resolution capability of sequence length and the divergence of the 13 segments (D1-D6, D7a, D7b, and D8-D12) of 28S rDNA were stronger than that of the nine variable regions (V1-V9) of 18S rDNA, we were able to identify Demodex (Cheyletoidea) by the indels occurring in D2, D6, and D8.

  18. Use of PCR primers and probes based on the 23S rRNA and internal transcription spacer (ITS) gene sequence for the detection and enumerization of Lactobacillus acidophilus and Lactobacillus plantarum in feed supplements.

    PubMed

    Tsai, Cheng-Chih; Lai, Chieh-Hsien; Yu, Bi; Tsen, Hau-Yang

    2010-06-01

    Novel polymerase chain reaction (PCR) primers designed from the 16S-23S internal transcription spacer (ITS) rRNA and 23S rRNA genes, respectively, were used for the specific detection of Lactobacillus acidophilus and Lactobacillus plantarum. Molecular weights of the PCR products were 221 and 599 bp, respectively. Strains of L. acidophilus and L. plantarum obtained from the culture center, dairy products, infant stool and other samples, could be identified with these PCR primers. DNAs from other lactic acid bacteria (LAB) species including strains of Lactobacillus pentosus which was closely related to L. plantarum, and bacteria species other than LAB, would not generate the false positive results. When this PCR primer set was used for the detection of L. acidophilus and L. plantarum in feed supplement or feed starter samples, reliable results were obtained. Furthermore, when these L. acidophilus or L. plantarum specific primers were used as DNA probes for the colony hybridization of L. acidophilus and L. plantarum, the viable cells of these LAB species in culture and feed supplements or starter products could be identified and enumerized. The method described here thus offers a rapid and economic way to inspect and assure the quality of the feed supplements or fermentation starters.

  19. Rate accelerations in nuclear 18S rDNA of mycoheterotrophic and parasitic angiosperms.

    PubMed

    Lemaire, Benny; Huysmans, Suzy; Smets, Erik; Merckx, Vincent

    2011-09-01

    Rate variation in genes from all three genomes has been observed frequently in plant lineages with a parasitic and mycoheterotrophic mode of life. While the loss of photosynthetic ability leads to a relaxation of evolutionary constraints in genes involved in the photosynthetic apparatus, it remains to be determined how prevalent increased substitution rates are in nuclear DNA of non-photosynthetic angiosperms. In this study we infer rates of molecular evolution of 18S rDNA of all parasitic and mycoheterotorphic plant families (except Lauraceae and Polygalaceae) using relative rate tests. In several holoparasitic and mycoheterotrophic plant lineages extremely high substitution rates are observed compared to other photosynthetic angiosperms. The position and frequency of these substitutions have been identified to understand the mutation dynamics of 18S rRNA in achlorophyllous plants. Despite the presence of significantly elevated substitution rates, very few mutations occur in major functional and structural regions of the small ribosomal molecule, providing evidence that the efficiency of the translational apparatus in non-photosynthetic plants has not been affected.

  20. Two F-18s in Autonomous Formation Flight

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2001-01-01

    This 32 second video clip shows two F-18s in NASA's Autonomous Formation Flight (AFF) program. The aircraft use smoke contrails to gather data on wingtip vortices. Flight research attempts to utilize the energy in the vortices for more efficient flight.

  1. Primers ITS1, ITS2 and ITS4 detect the intraspecies variability in the internal transcribed spacers and 5.8S rRNA gene region in clinical isolates of fungi.

    PubMed

    Korabecná, M; Liska, V; Fajfrlík, K

    2003-01-01

    Restriction fragment length polymorphism analysis of the 5.8S rRNA gene and the internal transcribed spacers (ITS1 and ITS2) was used for examination of 66 isolates belonging to 19 species. Intraspecies variability was found in the examined region of 11 species (Candida albicans, C. catenulata, C. colliculosa, C. glabrata, C. kefyr, C. melinii, C. parapsilosis, C. guillermondii, C. solanii, C. tropicalis, Saccharomyces cerevisiae). Region of ITS-5.8S rDNA was amplified using the primers ITS1 and ITS4. The amplicons were digested by HaeIII, HinfI and CfoI. The recognized intraspecies variability was confirmed in the second step, in which the shorter fragments of this region were amplified using primers ITS1 and ITS2 and analyzed by capillary electrophoresis. Considerable intraspecific variability renders this method unsuitable for species identification, whereas it can be useful for epidemiological tracing of isolates.

  2. The nuclear 18S ribosomal RNA gene as a source of phylogenetic information in the genus Taenia.

    PubMed

    Yan, Hongbin; Lou, Zhongzi; Li, Li; Ni, Xingwei; Guo, Aijiang; Li, Hongmin; Zheng, Yadong; Dyachenko, Viktor; Jia, Wanzhong

    2013-03-01

    Most species of the genus Taenia are of considerable medical and veterinary significance. In this study, complete nuclear 18S rRNA gene sequences were obtained from seven members of genus Taenia [Taenia multiceps, Taenia saginata, Taenia asiatica, Taenia solium, Taenia pisiformis, Taenia hydatigena, and Taenia taeniaeformis] and a phylogeny inferred using these sequences. Most of the variable sites fall within the variable regions, V1-V5. We show that sequences from the nuclear 18S ribosomal RNA gene have considerable promise as sources of phylogenetic information within the genus Taenia. Furthermore, given that almost all the variable sites lie within defined variable portions of that gene, it will be appropriate and economical to sequence only those regions for additional species of Taenia.

  3. Cystoisospora spp. from dogs in China and phylogenetic analysis of its 18S and ITS1 gene.

    PubMed

    He, Pengfei; Li, Jianhua; Gong, Pengtao; Huang, Jingui; Zhang, Xichen

    2012-11-23

    Cystoisospora spp. oocysts isolated from dog feces in Changchun, China were morphologically similar to those of Cystoisospora ohioensis and Cystoisospora sp. 1-MM recently isolated from dogs in Japanese. Sequencing results of the 18S subunit RNA gene from isolates in the present study were compared to other Cystoisospora spp. and the results suggested that Cystoisospora spp. from dogs in Changchun was homologous to C. ohioensis and Cystoisospora sp. 1-MM. Phylogenetic analysis of the 18S rRNA sequences showed that the Cystoisospora sp. ChangChun 1 and Cystoisospora sp. ChangChun 2 were nested in a clade with other Cystoisospora spp., including C. ohioensis, Cystoisospora belli, Cystoisospora suis, Isospora sp. Harbin/01/08 and C. orlovi,. Cystoisospora sp. ChangChun 2 was confirmed as C. ohioensis, and the other isolate was in a separate clade but the genetic relationship was relatively close to C. suis after analysis of the ITS-1gene.

  4. Detection and characterization of fungal infections of Ammophila arenaria (marram grass) roots by denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis of specifically amplified 18s rDNA.

    PubMed Central

    Kowalchuk, G A; Gerards, S; Woldendorp, J W

    1997-01-01

    Marram grass (Ammophila arenaria L.), a sand-stabilizing plant species in coastal dune areas, is affected by a specific pathosystem thought to include both plant-pathogenic fungi and nematodes. To study the fungal component of this pathosystem, we developed a method for the cultivation-independent detection and characterization of fungi infecting plant roots based on denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE) of specifically amplified DNA fragments coding for 18S rRNA (rDNA). A nested PCR strategy was employed to amplify a 569-bp region of the 18S rRNA gene, with the addition of a 36-bp GC clamp, from fungal isolates, from roots of test plants infected in the laboratory, and from field samples of marram grass roots from both healthy and degenerating stands from coastal dunes in The Netherlands. PCR products from fungal isolates were subjected to DGGE to examine the variation seen both between different fungal taxa and within a single species. DGGE of the 18S rDNA fragments could resolve species differences from fungi used in this study yet was unable to discriminate between strains of a single species. The 18S rRNA genes from 20 isolates of fungal species previously recovered from A. arenaria roots were cloned and partially sequenced to aid in the interpretation of DGGE data. DGGE patterns recovered from laboratory plants showed that this technique could reliably identify known plant-infecting fungi. Amplification products from field A. arenaria roots also were analyzed by DGGE, and the major bands were excised, reamplified, sequenced, and subjected to phylogenetic analysis. Some recovered 18S rDNA sequences allowed for phylogenetic placement to the genus level, whereas other sequences were not closely related to known fungal 18S rDNA sequences. The molecular data presented here reveal fungal diversity not detected in previous culture-based surveys. PMID:9327549

  5. Secondary structure analyses of the nuclear rRNA internal transcribed spacers and assessment of its phylogenetic utility across the Brassicaceae (mustards).

    PubMed

    Edger, Patrick P; Tang, Michelle; Bird, Kevin A; Mayfield, Dustin R; Conant, Gavin; Mummenhoff, Klaus; Koch, Marcus A; Pires, J Chris

    2014-01-01

    The internal transcribed spacers of the nuclear ribosomal RNA gene cluster, termed ITS1 and ITS2, are the most frequently used nuclear markers for phylogenetic analyses across many eukaryotic groups including most plant families. The reasons for the popularity of these markers include: 1.) Ease of amplification due to high copy number of the gene clusters, 2.) Available cost-effective methods and highly conserved primers, 3.) Rapidly evolving markers (i.e. variable between closely related species), and 4.) The assumption (and/or treatment) that these sequences are non-functional, neutrally evolving phylogenetic markers. Here, our analyses of ITS1 and ITS2 for 50 species suggest that both sequences are instead under selective constraints to preserve proper secondary structure, likely to maintain complete self-splicing functions, and thus are not neutrally-evolving phylogenetic markers. Our results indicate the majority of sequence sites are co-evolving with other positions to form proper secondary structure, which has implications for phylogenetic inference. We also found that the lowest energy state and total number of possible alternate secondary structures are highly significantly different between ITS regions and random sequences with an identical overall length and Guanine-Cytosine (GC) content. Lastly, we review recent evidence highlighting some additional problematic issues with using these regions as the sole markers for phylogenetic studies, and thus strongly recommend additional markers and cost-effective approaches for future studies to estimate phylogenetic relationships.

  6. Internal Transcribed Spacer 2 (nu ITS2 rRNA) Sequence-Structure Phylogenetics: Towards an Automated Reconstruction of the Green Algal Tree of Life

    PubMed Central

    Buchheim, Mark A.; Keller, Alexander; Koetschan, Christian; Förster, Frank; Merget, Benjamin; Wolf, Matthias

    2011-01-01

    Background Chloroplast-encoded genes (matK and rbcL) have been formally proposed for use in DNA barcoding efforts targeting embryophytes. Extending such a protocol to chlorophytan green algae, though, is fraught with problems including non homology (matK) and heterogeneity that prevents the creation of a universal PCR toolkit (rbcL). Some have advocated the use of the nuclear-encoded, internal transcribed spacer two (ITS2) as an alternative to the traditional chloroplast markers. However, the ITS2 is broadly perceived to be insufficiently conserved or to be confounded by introgression or biparental inheritance patterns, precluding its broad use in phylogenetic reconstruction or as a DNA barcode. A growing body of evidence has shown that simultaneous analysis of nucleotide data with secondary structure information can overcome at least some of the limitations of ITS2. The goal of this investigation was to assess the feasibility of an automated, sequence-structure approach for analysis of IT2 data from a large sampling of phylum Chlorophyta. Methodology/Principal Findings Sequences and secondary structures from 591 chlorophycean, 741 trebouxiophycean and 938 ulvophycean algae, all obtained from the ITS2 Database, were aligned using a sequence structure-specific scoring matrix. Phylogenetic relationships were reconstructed by Profile Neighbor-Joining coupled with a sequence structure-specific, general time reversible substitution model. Results from analyses of the ITS2 data were robust at multiple nodes and showed considerable congruence with results from published phylogenetic analyses. Conclusions/Significance Our observations on the power of automated, sequence-structure analyses of ITS2 to reconstruct phylum-level phylogenies of the green algae validate this approach to assessing diversity for large sets of chlorophytan taxa. Moreover, our results indicate that objections to the use of ITS2 for DNA barcoding should be weighed against the utility of an automated

  7. Early diagnosis of Exophiala CAPD peritonitis by 18S ribosomal RNA gene sequencing and its clinical significance.

    PubMed

    Lau, Susanna K P; Woo, Patrick C Y; Chiu, Siu-kau; Leung, Kit-wah; Yung, Raymond W H; Yuen, Kwok-yung

    2003-06-01

    Phenotypic identification of fungi in clinical microbiology laboratories is often difficult and late, especially for slow growing and rarely encountered fungi. We describe the application of 18S ribosomal RNA (rRNA) gene sequencing in the early diagnosis of a case of Exophiala peritonitis. A yeast-like fungus was isolated from the dialysate fluid of a 66-year-old man undergoing continuous ambulatory peritoneal dialysis. It grew slowly after 12 days of incubation to yield mature cultures to permit recognition of microscopic features resembling those of Exophiala, a dematiacerous mold. 18S rRNA gene sequencing provided results 12 days earlier than phenotypic identification and revealed 15 base difference (0.9%) between the isolate and Exophiala sp. strain GHP 1205 (GenBank Accession no. AJ232954), indicating that the isolate most closely resembles a strain of Exophiala species. The patient responded to 4 weeks of intravenous amphotericin B therapy. Early identification of the fungus was important for the choice of anti-fungal regimen. As opportunistic fungal infections in immunocompromised patients are globally emerging problems, the development of molecular techniques for fungal identification is crucial for early diagnosis and appropriate treatment.

  8. 18S ribosomal RNA gene sequences of Cochliopodium (Himatismenida) and the phylogeny of Amoebozoa.

    PubMed

    Kudryavtsev, Alexander; Bernhard, Detlef; Schlegel, Martin; Chao, Ema E Y; Cavalier-Smith, Thomas

    2005-08-01

    Cochliopodium is a very distinctive genus of discoid amoebae covered by a dorsal tectum of carbohydrate microscales. Its phylogenetic position is unclear, since although sharing many features with naked "gymnamoebae", the tectum sets it apart. We sequenced 18S ribosomal RNA genes from three Cochliopodium species (minus, spiniferum and Cochliopodium sp., a new species resembling C. minutum). Phylogenetic analysis shows Cochliopodium as robustly holophyletic and within Amoebozoa, in full accord with morphological data. Cochliopodium is always one of the basal branches within Amoebozoa but its precise position is unstable. In Bayesian analysis it is sister to holophyletic Glycostylida, but distance trees mostly place it between Dermamoeba and a possibly artifactual long-branch cluster including Thecamoeba. These positions are poorly supported and basal amoebozoan branching ill-resolved, making it unclear whether Discosea (Glycostylida, Himatismenida, Dermamoebida) is holophyletic; however, Thecamoeba seems not specifically related to Dermamoeba. We also sequenced the small-subunit rRNA gene of Vannella persistens, which constantly grouped with other Vannella species, and two Hartmannella strains. Our trees suggest that Vexilliferidae, Variosea and Hartmannella are polyphyletic, confirming the existence of two very distinct Hartmannella clades: that comprising H. cantabrigiensis and another divergent species is sister to Glaeseria, whilst Hartmannella vermiformis branches more deeply.

  9. Secondary structure prediction for complete rDNA sequences (18S, 5.8S, and 28S rDNA) of Demodex folliculorum, and comparison of divergent domains structures across Acari.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Ya-E; Wang, Zheng-Hang; Xu, Yang; Wu, Li-Ping; Hu, Li

    2013-10-01

    According to base pairing, the rRNA folds into corresponding secondary structures, which contain additional phylogenetic information. On the basis of sequencing for complete rDNA sequences (18S, ITS1, 5.8S, ITS2 and 28S rDNA) of Demodex, we predicted the secondary structure of the complete rDNA sequence (18S, 5.8S, and 28S rDNA) of Demodex folliculorum, which was in concordance with that of the main arthropod lineages in past studies. And together with the sequence data from GenBank, we also predicted the secondary structures of divergent domains in SSU rRNA of 51 species and in LSU rRNA of 43 species from four superfamilies in Acari (Cheyletoidea, Tetranychoidea, Analgoidea and Ixodoidea). The multiple alignment among the four superfamilies in Acari showed that, insertions from Tetranychoidea SSU rRNA formed two newly proposed helixes, and helix c3-2b of LSU rRNA was absent in Demodex (Cheyletoidea) taxa. Generally speaking, LSU rRNA presented more remarkable differences than SSU rRNA did, mainly in D2, D3, D5, D7a, D7b, D8 and D10.

  10. Evolutionary dynamics of rRNA gene clusters in cichlid fish

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Among multigene families, ribosomal RNA (rRNA) genes are the most frequently studied and have been explored as cytogenetic markers to study the evolutionary history of karyotypes among animals and plants. In this report, we applied cytogenetic and genomic methods to investigate the organization of rRNA genes among cichlid fishes. Cichlids are a group of fishes that are of increasing scientific interest due to their rapid and convergent adaptive radiation, which has led to extensive ecological diversity. Results The present paper reports the cytogenetic mapping of the 5S rRNA genes from 18 South American, 22 African and one Asian species and the 18S rRNA genes from 3 African species. The data obtained were comparatively analyzed with previously published information related to the mapping of rRNA genes in cichlids. The number of 5S rRNA clusters per diploid genome ranged from 2 to 15, with the most common pattern being the presence of 2 chromosomes bearing a 5S rDNA cluster. Regarding 18S rDNA mapping, the number of sites ranged from 2 to 6, with the most common pattern being the presence of 2 sites per diploid genome. Furthermore, searching the Oreochromis niloticus genome database led to the identification of a total of 59 copies of 5S rRNA and 38 copies of 18S rRNA genes that were distributed in several genomic scaffolds. The rRNA genes were frequently flanked by transposable elements (TEs) and spread throughout the genome, complementing the FISH analysis that detect only clustered copies of rRNA genes. Conclusions The organization of rRNA gene clusters seems to reflect their intense and particular evolutionary pathway and not the evolutionary history of the associated taxa. The possible role of TEs as one source of rRNA gene movement, that could generates the spreading of ribosomal clusters/copies, is discussed. The present paper reinforces the notion that the integration of cytogenetic data and genomic analysis provides a more complete picture for

  11. Three Group-I introns in 18S rDNA of Endosymbiotic Algae of Paramecium bursaria from Japan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoshina, Ryo; Kamako, Shin-ichiro; Imamura, Nobutaka

    2004-08-01

    In the nuclear encoded small subunit ribosomal DNA (18S rDNA) of symbiotic alga of Paramecium bursaria (F36 collected in Japan) possesses three intron-like insertions (Hoshina et al., unpubl. data, 2003). The present study confirmed these exact lengths and insertion sites by reverse transcription-PCR. Two of them were inserted at Escherichia coli 16S rRNA genic position 943 and 1512 that are frequent intron insertion positions, but another insertion position (nearly 1370) was the first finding. Their secondary structures suggested they belong to Group-I intron; one belongs to subgroup IE, others belong to subgroup IC1. Similarity search indicated these introns are ancestral ones.

  12. Chromosomal localization of 5S and 18S-5.8S-25S ribosomal DNA sites in five Asian pines using fluorescence in situ hybridization.

    PubMed

    Liu, Z-L; Zhang, D; Hong, D-Y; Wang, X-R

    2003-01-01

    Fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) was employed on mitotic metaphase chromosome preparations of five Asian Pinus species: Pinus tabuliformis, Pinus yunnanensis, Pinus densata, Pinus massoniana and Pinus merkusii, using simultaneously DNA probes of the 18S rRNA gene and the 5S rRNA gene including the non-transcribed spacer sequences. The number and location of 18S rDNA sites varied markedly (5-10 pairs of strong signals) among the five pines. A maximum of 20 major 18S rDNA sites was observed in the diploid genome (2n = 24) of P. massoniana. The 5S rDNA FISH pattern was less variable, with one major site and one minor site commonly observed in each species. The differentiation of rDNA sites on chromosomes among the five pines correlates well with their phylogenic positions in Pinus as reconstructed from other molecular data. P. densata, a species of hybrid origin, resembles its parents ( P. tabuliformis and P. yunnanensis), including some components characteristic of each parent in its pattern. However, the species is unique, showing new features resulting possibly from recombination and genome reorganization.

  13. Gene arrangement and sequence of the 5S rRNA in Filobasidiella neoformans (Cryptococcus neoformans) as a phylogenetic indicator.

    PubMed

    Kwon-Chung, K J; Chang, Y C

    1994-04-01

    We cloned the 5S rRNA gene and determined its organization in the four genes encoding rRNAs in a ribosomal DNA repeat unit of Filobasidiella neoformans, the teleomorph of Cryptococcus neoformans. The 5S rRNA gene contained 118 nucleotides and was located 1 kb upstream from the 18S rRNA gene within the 8.6-kb fragment of the ribosomal DNA repeat unit. The sequence of the 5S rRNA gene from F. neoformans was more similar to the sequence of the 5S rRNA gene from Tremella mesenterica than to the sequences of the 5S rRNA genes from Filobasidium species. The arrangement of the rRNA genes in F. neoformans closely resembles the arrangement of the rRNA genes in mushrooms such as Schizophyllum commune, Agaricus bisporus, and Coprinus cinereus in that the 5S rRNA-coding region not only is located within the repeat unit that encodes the other rRNAs but also is transcribed in the same direction as the other rRNA genes. This is the first description of the arrangement of rRNA genes in a species belonging to the Heterobasidiomycetes.

  14. Physical mapping of 5S and 18S-5.8S-26S RNA gene families in polyploid series of Cenchrus ciliaris Linnaeus, 1771 (Poaceae)

    PubMed Central

    Kharrat-Souissi, Amina; Siljak-Yakovlev, Sonja; Pustahija, Fatima; Chaieb, Mohamed

    2012-01-01

    Abstract The Buffelgrass (Cenchrus ciliaris L., Poaceae) is one of the most important pasturage grasses due to its high productivity and good forage qualities. This species possess a high adaptability to bioclimatic constraints of arid zones and may be used for the restoration of degraded arid ecosystems. Tunisian populations present three ploidy levels (4x, 5x and 6x) with a basic chromosome number x=9. This study reported for the first time the distribution of the ribosomal genes (rRNA) for pentaploid and hexaploid cytotypes of Cenchrus ciliaris. Molecular cytogenetic study using double fluorescence in situ hybridization has shown that the two rDNA families, 5S and 18S-5.8S-26S (18S), displayed intraspecific variation in number of loci among different ploidy levels. Each ploidy level was characterized by specific number of both 5S and 18S rDNA loci (two loci in tetraploid, five in pentaploid and six in hexaploid level). For three studied cytotypes (4x, 5x and 6x) all 5S rDNA loci were localized on the subcentromeric region of chromosomes, while 18S loci were situated on the telomeric region of short chromosome arms. Data of the FISH experiments show proportional increase of ribosomal loci number during polyploidization processes. PMID:24260668

  15. High-resolution microscopy of active ribosomal genes and key members of the rRNA processing machinery inside nucleolus-like bodies of fully-grown mouse oocytes.

    PubMed

    Shishova, Kseniya V; Khodarovich, Yuriy M; Lavrentyeva, Elena A; Zatsepina, Olga V

    2015-10-01

    Nucleolus-like bodies (NLBs) of fully-grown (germinal vesicle, GV) mammalian oocytes are traditionally considered as morphologically distinct entities, which, unlike normal nucleoli, contain transcribed ribosomal genes (rDNA) solely at their surface. In the current study, we for the first time showed that active ribosomal genes are present not only on the surface but also inside NLBs of the NSN-type oocytes. The "internal" rRNA synthesis was evidenced by cytoplasmic microinjections of BrUTP as precursor and by fluorescence in situ hybridization with a probe to the short-lived 5'ETS segment of the 47S pre-rRNA. We further showed that in the NLB mass of NSN-oocytes, distribution of active rDNA, RNA polymerase I (UBF) and rRNA processing (fibrillarin) protein factors, U3 snoRNA, pre-rRNAs and 18S/28S rRNAs is remarkably similar to that in somatic nucleoli capable to make pre-ribosomes. Overall, these observations support the occurrence of rDNA transcription, rRNA processing and pre-ribosome assembly in the NSN-type NLBs and so that their functional similarity to normal nucleoli. Unlike the NSN-type NLBs, the NLBs of more mature SN-oocytes do not contain transcribed rRNA genes, U3 snoRNA, pre-rRNAs, 18S and 28S rRNAs. These results favor the idea that in a process of transformation of NSN-oocytes to SN-oocytes, NLBs cease to produce pre-ribosomes and, moreover, lose their rRNAs. We also concluded that a denaturing fixative 70% ethanol used in the study to fix oocytes could be more appropriate for light microscopy analysis of nucleolar RNAs and proteins in mammalian fully-grown oocytes than a commonly used cross-linking aldehyde fixative, formalin.

  16. Molecular Identification of Ptychodera flava (Hemichordata: Enteropneusta): Reconsideration in Light of Nucleotide Polymorphism in the 18S Ribosomal RNA Gene.

    PubMed

    Urata, Makoto

    2015-06-01

    Seven nuclear and mitochondrial DNA markers were examined in 12 specimens of Ptychodera flava, a model acorn worm used in molecular biology, collected in Japan from three local populations with different modes of living. A comparison of intraspecific results did not show genetically isolated populations despite the species' enclave habitats and asexual reproduction. Moreover, both the nuclear 18S ribosomal RNA gene and mitochondrial 16S ribosomal RNA gene sequences were identical to those from Moorea in French Polynesia, nearly 10,000 kilometers away from Japan. I also provide the first definitive information regarding polymorphisms in 18S ribosomal RNA gene, the external transcribed spacer (ETS), internal transcribed spacers (ITS), and mitochondrial cytochrome c oxidase subunit 1 (mtCO1) sequence in hemichordates using newly designed primer sets, and I show both high larval vagility and certain criteria for the molecular identification of this species.

  17. Nucleolus-like bodies of fully-grown mouse oocytes contain key nucleolar proteins but are impoverished for rRNA.

    PubMed

    Shishova, Kseniya V; Lavrentyeva, Elena A; Dobrucki, Jurek W; Zatsepina, Olga V

    2015-01-15

    It is well known that fully-grown mammalian oocytes, rather than typical nucleoli, contain prominent but structurally homogenous bodies called "nucleolus-like bodies" (NLBs). NLBs accumulate a vast amount of material, but their biochemical composition and functions remain uncertain. To clarify the composition of the NLB material in mouse GV oocytes, we devised an assay to detect internal oocyte proteins with fluorescein-5-isothiocyanate (FITC) and applied the fluorescent RNA-binding dye acridine orange to examine whether NLBs contain RNA. Our results unequivocally show that, similarly to typical nucleoli, proteins and RNA are major constituents of transcriptionally active (or non-surrounded) NLBs as well as of transcriptionally silent (or surrounded) NLBs. We also show, by exposing fixed oocytes to a mild proteinase K treatment, that the NLB mass in oocytes of both types contains nucleolar proteins that are involved in all major steps of ribosome biogenesis, including rDNA transcription (UBF), early rRNA processing (fibrillarin), and late rRNA processing (NPM1/nucleophosmin/B23, nucleolin/C23), but none of the nuclear proteins tested, including SC35, NOBOX, topoisomerase II beta, HP1α, and H3. The ribosomal RPL26 protein was detected within the NLBs of NSN-type oocytes but is virtually absent from NLBs of SN-type oocytes. Taking into account that the major class of nucleolar RNA is ribosomal RNA (rRNA), we applied fluorescence in situ hybridization with oligonucleotide probes targeting 18S and 28S rRNAs. The results show that, in contrast to active nucleoli, NLBs of fully-grown oocytes are impoverished for the rRNAs, which is consistent with the absence of transcribed ribosomal genes in the NLB mass. Overall, the results of this study suggest that NLBs of fully-grown mammalian oocytes serve for storing major nucleolar proteins but not rRNA.

  18. Karyotypes, male meiosis and comparative FISH mapping of 18S ribosomal DNA and telomeric (TTAGG) n repeat in eight species of true bugs (Hemiptera, Heteroptera)

    PubMed Central

    Grozeva, S.; Kuznetsova, V.G.; Anokhin, B.A.

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Eight species belonging to five true bug families were analyzed using DAPI/CMA3-staining and fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) with telomeric (TTAGG)n and 18S rDNA probes. Standard chromosomal complements are reported for the first time for Deraeocoris rutilus (Herrich-Schäffer, 1838) (2n=30+2m+XY) and Deraeocoris ruber(Linnaeus, 1758) (2n=30+2m+XY) from the family Miridae. Using FISH, the location of a 18S rDNA cluster was detected in these species and in five more species: Megaloceroea recticornis (Geoffroy, 1785) (2n=30+XY) from the Miridae; Oxycarenus lavaterae (Fabricius, 1787) (2n=14+2m+XY) from the Lygaeidae s.l.; Pyrrhocoris apterus (Linnaeus, 1758) (2n=22+X) from the Pyrrhocoridae; Eurydema oleracea (Linnaeus, 1758) (2n=12+XY) and Graphosoma lineatum (Linnaeus, 1758) (2n=12+XY) from the Pentatomidae. The species were found to differ with respect to location of a 18S rRNA gene cluster which resides on autosomes in Oxycarenus lavaterae and Pyrrhocoris apterus, whereas it locates on sex chromosomes in other five species. The 18S rDNA location provides the first physical landmark of the genomes of the species studied. The insect consensus telomeric pentanucleotide (TTAGG)n was demonstrated to be absent in all the species studied in this respect, Deraeocoris rutilus, Megaloceroea recticornis, Cimex lectularius Linnaeus, 1758 (Cimicidae), Eurydema oleracea, and Graphosoma lineatum, supporting the hypothesis that this motif was lost in early evolution of the Heteroptera and secondarily replaced with another motif (yet unknown) or the alternative telomerase-independent mechanisms of telomere maintenance. Dot-blot hybridization analysis of the genomic DNA from Cimex lectularius, Nabis sp. and Oxycarenus lavaterae with (TTAGG)n and six other telomeric probes likewise provided a negative result. PMID:24260641

  19. A molecular phylogenetic study of the Palmae (Arecaceae) based on atpB, rbcL, and 18S nrDNA sequences.

    PubMed

    Hahn, William J

    2002-02-01

    Notoriously slow rates of molecular evolution and convergent evolution among some morphological characters have limited phylogenetic resolution for the palm family (Arecaceae). This study adds nuclear DNA (18S SSU rRNA) and chloroplast DNA (cpDNA; atpB and rbcL) sequence data for 65 genera of palms and characterizes molecular variation for each molecule. Phylogenetic relationships were estimated with maximum likelihood and maximum parsimony techniques for the new data and for previously published molecular data for 45 palm genera. Maximum parsimony analysis was also used to compare molecular and morphological data for 33 palm genera. Incongruence among datasets was detected between cpDNA and 18S data and between molecular and morphological data. Most conflict between nuclear and cpDNA data was associated with the genus Nypa. Several taxa showed relatively long branches with 18S data, but phylogenetic resolution of these taxa was essentially the same for 18S and cpDNA data. Base composition bias for 18S that contributed to erroneous phylogenetic resolution in other taxa did not seem to be present in Palmae. Morphological data were incongruent with all molecular data due to apparent morphological homoplasy for Caryoteae, Ceroxyloideae, Iriarteae, and Thrinacinae. Both cpDNA and nuclear 18S data firmly resolved Caryoteae with Borasseae of Coryphoideae, suggesting that at least some morphological characters used to place Caryoteae in Arecoideae are homoplastic. In this study, increased character sampling seems to be more important than increased taxon sampling; a comparison of the full (65-taxon) and reduced (45- and 33-taxon) datasets suggests little difference in core topology but considerably more nodal support with the increased character sample sizes. These results indicate a general trend toward a stable estimate of phylogenetic relationships for the Palmae. Although the 33-taxon topologies are even better resolved, they lack several critical taxa and are

  20. Deep Sequencing of Subseafloor Eukaryotic rRNA Reveals Active Fungi across Marine Subsurface Provinces

    PubMed Central

    Orsi, William; Biddle, Jennifer F.; Edgcomb, Virginia

    2013-01-01

    The deep marine subsurface is a vast habitat for microbial life where cells may live on geologic timescales. Because DNA in sediments may be preserved on long timescales, ribosomal RNA (rRNA) is suggested to be a proxy for the active fraction of a microbial community in the subsurface. During an investigation of eukaryotic 18S rRNA by amplicon pyrosequencing, unique profiles of Fungi were found across a range of marine subsurface provinces including ridge flanks, continental margins, and abyssal plains. Subseafloor fungal populations exhibit statistically significant correlations with total organic carbon (TOC), nitrate, sulfide, and dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC). These correlations are supported by terminal restriction length polymorphism (TRFLP) analyses of fungal rRNA. Geochemical correlations with fungal pyrosequencing and TRFLP data from this geographically broad sample set suggests environmental selection of active Fungi in the marine subsurface. Within the same dataset, ancient rRNA signatures were recovered from plants and diatoms in marine sediments ranging from 0.03 to 2.7 million years old, suggesting that rRNA from some eukaryotic taxa may be much more stable than previously considered in the marine subsurface. PMID:23418556

  1. Deep sequencing of subseafloor eukaryotic rRNA reveals active Fungi across marine subsurface provinces.

    PubMed

    Orsi, William; Biddle, Jennifer F; Edgcomb, Virginia

    2013-01-01

    The deep marine subsurface is a vast habitat for microbial life where cells may live on geologic timescales. Because DNA in sediments may be preserved on long timescales, ribosomal RNA (rRNA) is suggested to be a proxy for the active fraction of a microbial community in the subsurface. During an investigation of eukaryotic 18S rRNA by amplicon pyrosequencing, unique profiles of Fungi were found across a range of marine subsurface provinces including ridge flanks, continental margins, and abyssal plains. Subseafloor fungal populations exhibit statistically significant correlations with total organic carbon (TOC), nitrate, sulfide, and dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC). These correlations are supported by terminal restriction length polymorphism (TRFLP) analyses of fungal rRNA. Geochemical correlations with fungal pyrosequencing and TRFLP data from this geographically broad sample set suggests environmental selection of active Fungi in the marine subsurface. Within the same dataset, ancient rRNA signatures were recovered from plants and diatoms in marine sediments ranging from 0.03 to 2.7 million years old, suggesting that rRNA from some eukaryotic taxa may be much more stable than previously considered in the marine subsurface.

  2. Updates on quick identification of acetic acid bacteria with a focus on the 16S-23S rRNA gene internal transcribed spacer and the analysis of cell proteins by MALDI-TOF mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Trček, Janja; Barja, François

    2015-03-02

    Acetic acid bacteria have attracted much attention over the past few years, due mainly to their metabolic traits that are of interest to the biotechnology industry. In addition, it turns out that their ecological habitats are almost unlimited since they have been found as symbionts in different insects and also as emerging opportunistic human pathogens. Very surprising is the finding that they colonize niches considered anaerobic, disproving the generalized statement that they are strict aerobes. Since they have taken on different biological roles in our environment, more and more people are charged with the task of identifying them. However, this turns out to be not always easy, especially if we are using phenotypic approaches for identification. A substantial step forward in making the identification of acetic acid bacteria easier was made possible using molecular biological methods, which have been extensively tested since 2000. However, some molecular methods require expensive machines and experienced staff, and moreover the level of their discrimination varies. All these factors must be considered when selecting the most appropriate approach for identifying acetic acid bacteria. With this objective in mind, this review article discusses the benefits and drawbacks of molecular biological methods for identification of acetic acid bacteria, with a focus on the 16S-23S rRNA gene ITS regions and the recently described alternative method for identification of acetic acid bacteria, MALDI-TOF MS.

  3. Phylogenetic analyses of four species of Ulva and Monostroma grevillei using ITS, rbc L and 18S rDNA sequence data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Zhongheng; Shen, Songdong; Chen, Weizhou; Li, Huihui

    2013-01-01

    Chlorophyta species are common in the southern and northern coastal areas of China. In recent years, frequent green tide incidents in Chinese coastal waters have raised concerns and attracted the attention of scientists. In this paper, we sequenced the 18S rDNA genes, the internal transcribed spacer (ITS) regions and the rbc L genes in seven organisms and obtained 536-566 bp long ITS sequences, 1 377-1 407 bp long rbc L sequences and 1 718-1 761 bp long partial 18S rDNA sequences. The GC base pair content was highest in the ITS regions and lowest in the rbc L genes. The sequencing results showed that the three Ulva prolifera (or U. pertusa) gene sequences from Qingdao and Nan'ao Island were identical. The ITS, 18S rDNA and rbc L genes in U. prolifera and U. pertusa from different sea areas in China were unchanged by geographic distance. U. flexuosa had the least evolutionary distance from U. californica in both the ITS regions (0.009) and the 18S rDNA (0.002). These data verified that Ulva and Enteromorpha are not separate genera.

  4. Comparative evaluation of the nested ITS PCR against the 18S PCR-RFLP in a survey of bovine trypanosomiasis in Kwale County, Kenya.

    PubMed

    Odongo, Steven; Delespaux, Vincent; Ngotho, Maina; Bekkele, Serkalem Mindaye; Magez, Stefan

    2016-09-01

    We compared the nested internal transcribed spacer (ITS) PCR and the 18S PCR-RFLP (restriction-fragment length polymorphism) pan-trypanosome assays in a cross-sectional survey of bovine trypanosomiasis in 358 cattle in Kwale County, Kenya. The prevalence of trypanosomiasis as determined by the nested ITS PCR was 19.6% (70/358) and by 18S PCR-RFLP was 16.8% (60/358). Of the pathogenic trypanosomes detected, the prevalence of Trypanosoma congolense and Trypanosoma vivax was greater than that of Trypanosoma simiae The nested ITS PCR detected 83 parasite events, whereas the 18S PCR-RFLP detected 64; however, overall frequencies of infections and the parasite events detected did not differ between the assays (χ(2) = 0.8, df = 1, p > 0.05 and χ(2) = 2.5, df = 1, p > 0.05, respectively). The kappa statistic (0.8) showed good agreement between the tests. The nested ITS PCR and the 18S PCR-RFLP had comparable sensitivity, although the nested ITS PCR was better at detecting mixed infections (χ(2) = 5.4, df = 1, p < 0.05).

  5. An RNA molecular switch: Intrinsic flexibility of 23S rRNA Helices 40 and 68 5’-UAA/5’-GAN internal loops studied by molecular dynamics methods

    PubMed Central

    Réblová, Kamila; Střelcová, Zora; Kulhánek, Petr; Beššeová, Ivana; Mathews, David H.; Nostrand, Keith Van; Yildirim, Ilyas; Turner, Douglas H.; Šponer, Jiří

    2010-01-01

    Functional RNA molecules such as ribosomal RNAs frequently contain highly conserved internal loops with a 5’-UAA/5’-GAN (UAA/GAN) consensus sequence. The UAA/GAN internal loops adopt distinctive structure inconsistent with secondary structure predictions. The structure has a narrow major groove and forms a trans Hoogsteen/Sugar edge (tHS) A/G base pair followed by an unpaired stacked adenine, a trans Watson-Crick/Hoogsteen (tWH) U/A base pair and finally by a bulged nucleotide (N). The structure is further stabilized by a three-adenine stack and base-phosphate interaction. In the ribosome, the UAA/GAN internal loops are involved in extensive tertiary contacts, mainly as donors of A-minor interactions. Further, this sequence can adopt an alternative 2D/3D pattern stabilized by a four-adenine stack involved in a smaller number of tertiary interactions. The solution structure of an isolated UAA/GAA internal loop shows substantially rearranged base pairing with three consecutive non-Watson-Crick base pairs. Its A/U base pair adopts an incomplete cis Watson-Crick/Sugar edge (cWS) A/U conformation instead of the expected Watson-Crick arrangement. We performed 3.1 µs of explicit solvent molecular dynamics (MD) simulations of the X-ray and NMR UAA/GAN structures, supplemented by MM-PBSA free energy calculations, locally enhanced sampling (LES) runs, targeted MD (TMD) and nudged elastic band (NEB) analysis. We compared parm99 and parmbsc0 force fields and net-neutralizing Na+ vs. excess salt KCl ion environments. Both force fields provide a similar description of the simulated structures, with the parmbsc0 leading to modest narrowing of the major groove. The excess salt simulations also cause a similar effect. While the NMR structure is entirely stable in simulations, the simulated X-ray structure shows considerable widening of the major groove, loss of base-phosphate interaction and other instabilities. The alternative X-ray geometry even undergoes conformational

  6. Molecular organization of the 25S-18S rDNA IGS of Fagus sylvatica and Quercus suber: a comparative analysis.

    PubMed

    Inácio, Vera; Rocheta, Margarida; Morais-Cecílio, Leonor

    2014-01-01

    The 35S ribosomal DNA (rDNA) units, repeated in tandem at one or more chromosomal loci, are separated by an intergenic spacer (IGS) containing functional elements involved in the regulation of transcription of downstream rRNA genes. In the present work, we have compared the IGS molecular organizations in two divergent species of Fagaceae, Fagus sylvatica and Quercus suber, aiming to comprehend the evolution of the IGS sequences within the family. Self- and cross-hybridization FISH was done on representative species of the Fagaceae. The IGS length variability and the methylation level of 18 and 25S rRNA genes were assessed in representatives of three genera of this family: Fagus, Quercus and Castanea. The intergenic spacers in Beech and Cork Oak showed similar overall organizations comprising putative functional elements needed for rRNA gene activity and containing a non-transcribed spacer (NTS), a promoter region, and a 5'-external transcribed spacer. In the NTS: the sub-repeats structure in Beech is more organized than in Cork Oak, sharing some short motifs which results in the lowest sequence similarity of the entire IGS; the AT-rich region differed in both spacers by a GC-rich block inserted in Cork Oak. The 5'-ETS is the region with the higher similarity, having nonetheless different lengths. FISH with the NTS-5'-ETS revealed fainter signals in cross-hybridization in agreement with the divergence between genera. The diversity of IGS lengths revealed variants from ∼ 2 kb in Fagus, and Quercus up to 5.3 kb in Castanea, and a lack of correlation between the number of variants and the number of rDNA loci in several species. Methylation of 25S Bam HI site was confirmed in all species and detected for the first time in the 18S of Q. suber and Q. faginea. These results provide important clues for the evolutionary trends of the rDNA 25S-18S IGS in the Fagaceae family.

  7. Unusual features of the sequences of copies of the 16S-23S rRNA internal transcribed spacer regions of Acinetobacter bereziniae, Acinetobacter guillouiae and Acinetobacter baylyi arise from horizontal gene transfer events.

    PubMed

    Maslunka, Christopher; Gürtler, Volker; Seviour, Robert

    2015-02-01

    The highly variable nature of the internal transcribed spacer region (ITS) has been claimed to represent an ideal target for designing species-specific probes/primers capable of differentiating between closely related Acinetobacter species. However, several Acinetobacter species contain multiple ITS copies of variable lengths, and these include Acinetobacter bereziniae, Acinetobacter guillouiae and Acinetobacter baylyi. This study shows these length variations result from inter-genomic insertion/deletion events (indels) involving horizontal transfer of ITS fragments of other Acinetobacter species and possibly unrelated bacteria, as shown previously by us. In some instances, indel incorporation results in the loss of probe target sites in the recipient cell ITS. In other cases, some indel sequences contain target sites for probes designed from a single ITS sequence to target other Acinetobacter species. Hence, these can generate false positives. The largest of the indels that remove probe sites is 683 bp (labelled bay/i1-0), and it derives from the horizontal transfer of a complete ITS between A. bereziniae BCRC15423(T) and A. baylyi strain ADP1. As a consequence, ITS sequencing or fingerprinting cannot be used to distinguish between the 683 bp ITS in these two strains.

  8. PCR Primers for Metazoan Nuclear 18S and 28S Ribosomal DNA Sequences

    PubMed Central

    Machida, Ryuji J.; Knowlton, Nancy

    2012-01-01

    Background Metagenetic analyses, which amplify and sequence target marker DNA regions from environmental samples, are increasingly employed to assess the biodiversity of communities of small organisms. Using this approach, our understanding of microbial diversity has expanded greatly. In contrast, only a few studies using this approach to characterize metazoan diversity have been reported, despite the fact that many metazoan species are small and difficult to identify or are undescribed. One of the reasons for this discrepancy is the availability of universal primers for the target taxa. In microbial studies, analysis of the 16S ribosomal DNA is standard. In contrast, the best gene for metazoan metagenetics is less clear. In the present study, we have designed primers that amplify the nuclear 18S and 28S ribosomal DNA sequences of most metazoan species with the goal of providing effective approaches for metagenetic analyses of metazoan diversity in environmental samples, with a particular emphasis on marine biodiversity. Methodology/Principal Findings Conserved regions suitable for designing PCR primers were identified using 14,503 and 1,072 metazoan sequences of the nuclear 18S and 28S rDNA regions, respectively. The sequence similarity of both these newly designed and the previously reported primers to the target regions of these primers were compared for each phylum to determine the expected amplification efficacy. The nucleotide diversity of the flanking regions of the primers was also estimated for genera or higher taxonomic groups of 11 phyla to determine the variable regions within the genes. Conclusions/Significance The identified nuclear ribosomal DNA primers (five primer pairs for 18S and eleven for 28S) and the results of the nucleotide diversity analyses provide options for primer combinations for metazoan metagenetic analyses. Additionally, advantages and disadvantages of not only the 18S and 28S ribosomal DNA, but also other marker regions as targets

  9. Taenia spp.: 18S rDNA microsatellites for molecular systematic diagnosis.

    PubMed

    Foronda, P; Casanova, J C; Martinez, E; Valladares, B; Feliu, C

    2005-06-01

    The 18S rDNA gene of adult worms of Taenia parva found in Genetta genetta in the Iberian Peninsula and larval stages of T. pisiformis from the wild rabbit (Oryctolagus cuniculus) in Tenerife (Canary Islands) were amplified and sequenced. The sequences of the 18S rDNA gene of T. parva (1768 bp) and T. pisiformis (1760 bp) are reported for the first time (GenBank accession nos. AJ555167-AJ555168 and AJ555169-AJ555170, respectively). In 168 alignment positions microsatellites in the 18S rDNA of both taxa were detected for the first time (TGC in T. parva and TGCT in T. pisiformis) and differences in their sequences with different repetition numbers were observed. The use of nucleotide sequences of this gene in the resolution of systematic problems in cestodes is discussed with reference to the systematic status of Taenia spp. and mainly in human taeniids such as T. solium, T. saginata, and Asian human isolates of Taenia.

  10. Plastid 16S rRNA gene diversity among eukaryotic picophytoplankton sorted by flow cytometry from the South Pacific Ocean.

    PubMed

    Shi, Xiao Li; Lepère, Cécile; Scanlan, David J; Vaulot, Daniel

    2011-04-28

    The genetic diversity of photosynthetic picoeukaryotes was investigated in the South East Pacific Ocean. Genetic libraries of the plastid 16S rRNA gene were constructed on picoeukaryote populations sorted by flow cytometry, using two different primer sets, OXY107F/OXY1313R commonly used to amplify oxygenic organisms, and PLA491F/OXY1313R, biased towards plastids of marine algae. Surprisingly, the two sets revealed quite different photosynthetic picoeukaryote diversity patterns, which were moreover different from what we previously reported using the 18S rRNA nuclear gene as a marker. The first 16S primer set revealed many sequences related to Pelagophyceae and Dictyochophyceae, the second 16S primer set was heavily biased toward Prymnesiophyceae, while 18S sequences were dominated by Prasinophyceae, Chrysophyceae and Haptophyta. Primer mismatches with major algal lineages is probably one reason behind this discrepancy. However, other reasons, such as DNA accessibility or gene copy numbers, may be also critical. Based on plastid 16S rRNA gene sequences, the structure of photosynthetic picoeukaryotes varied along the BIOSOPE transect vertically and horizontally. In oligotrophic regions, Pelagophyceae, Chrysophyceae, and Prymnesiophyceae dominated. Pelagophyceae were prevalent at the DCM depth and Chrysophyceae at the surface. In mesotrophic regions Pelagophyceae were still important but Chlorophyta contribution increased. Phylogenetic analysis revealed a new clade of Prasinophyceae (clade 16S-IX), which seems to be restricted to hyper-oligotrophic stations. Our data suggest that a single gene marker, even as widely used as 18S rRNA, provides a biased view of eukaryotic communities and that the use of several markers is necessary to obtain a complete image.

  11. METAXA2: improved identification and taxonomic classification of small and large subunit rRNA in metagenomic data.

    PubMed

    Bengtsson-Palme, Johan; Hartmann, Martin; Eriksson, Karl Martin; Pal, Chandan; Thorell, Kaisa; Larsson, Dan Göran Joakim; Nilsson, Rolf Henrik

    2015-11-01

    The ribosomal rRNA genes are widely used as genetic markers for taxonomic identification of microbes. Particularly the small subunit (SSU; 16S/18S) rRNA gene is frequently used for species- or genus-level identification, but also the large subunit (LSU; 23S/28S) rRNA gene is employed in taxonomic assignment. The METAXA software tool is a popular utility for extracting partial rRNA sequences from large sequencing data sets and assigning them to an archaeal, bacterial, nuclear eukaryote, mitochondrial or chloroplast origin. This study describes a comprehensive update to METAXA - METAXA2 - that extends the capabilities of the tool, introducing support for the LSU rRNA gene, a greatly improved classifier allowing classification down to genus or species level, as well as enhanced support for short-read (100 bp) and paired-end sequences, among other changes. The performance of METAXA2 was compared to other commonly used taxonomic classifiers, showing that METAXA2 often outperforms previous methods in terms of making correct predictions while maintaining a low misclassification rate. METAXA2 is freely available from http://microbiology.se/software/metaxa2/.

  12. Karyotypes, heterochromatin, and physical mapping of 18S-26S rDNA in Cactaceae.

    PubMed

    Las Peñas, M L; Urdampilleta, J D; Bernardello, G; Forni-Martins, E R

    2009-01-01

    Karyotype analyses in members of the four Cactaceae subfamilies were performed. Numbers and karyotype formula obtained were: Pereskioideae = Pereskiaaculeata(2n = 22; 10 m + 1 sm), Maihuenioideae = Maihuenia patagonica (2n = 22, 9 m + 2 sm; 2n = 44, 18 m + 4 sm), Opuntioideae = Cumulopuntia recurvata(2n = 44; 20 m + 2 sm), Cactoideae = Acanthocalycium spiniflorum (2n = 22; 10 m + 1 sm),Echinopsis tubiflora (2n = 22; 10 m + 1 sm), Trichocereus candicans (2n = 22, 22 m). Chromosomes were small, the average chromosome length was 2.3 mum. Diploid species and the tetraploid C. recurvata had one terminal satellite, whereas the remaining tetraploid species showed four satellited chromosomes. Karyotypes were symmetrical. No CMA(-)/DAPI(+) bands were detected, but CMA(+)/DAPI(-) bands associated with NOR were always found. Pericentromeric heterochromatin was found in C. recurvata, A. spiniflorum, and the tetraploid cytotype of M. patagonica. The locations of the 18S-26S rDNA sites in all species coincided with CMA(+)/DAPI(-) bands; the same occurred with the sizes and numbers of signals for each species. This technique was applied for the first time in metaphase chromosomes in cacti. NOR-bearing pair no.1 may be homeologous in all species examined. In Cactaceae, the 18S-26S loci seem to be highly conserved.

  13. Optical and electrical stability of viral-templated copper sulfide (Cu1.8S) films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shahriar Zaman, Mohammed; Bernard Grajeda, Gabriel; Haberer, Elaine D.

    2014-04-01

    The optical and electrical stabilities of viral-templated non-stoichiometric copper sulfide, digenite (Cu1.8S) films were investigated. The films were composed of large agglomerates of randomly aligned Cu1.8S-coated M13 filamentous phage. Free carrier optical absorption associated with localized surface plasmon resonance (LSPR) was observed in the near infrared spectral region, and the films were electrically active, displaying a linear current-voltage relationship. Under ambient conditions, the magnitude of the LSPR absorption increased, following a power law relationship with time, and the electrical resistance of viral-templated films decreased significantly. In contrast, the resistance of films stored under low oxygen, low humidity conditions experienced a smaller reduction in electrical resistance. Changes in optical and electrical film properties under ambient conditions were associated with an increase in free carrier concentration within the copper chalcogenide material due to oxygen exposure. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy was used to relate this increase in free carrier concentration to compositional changes on the viral-templated material surface.

  14. Loop-mediated isothermal amplification targeting 18S ribosomal DNA for rapid detection of Acanthamoeba.

    PubMed

    Yang, Hye-Won; Lee, Yu-Ran; Inoue, Noboru; Jha, Bijay Kumar; Danne, Dinzouna-Boutamba Sylvatrie; Kim, Hong-Kyun; Lee, Junhun; Goo, Youn-Kyoung; Kong, Hyun-Hee; Chung, Dong-Il; Hong, Yeonchul

    2013-06-01

    Amoebic keratitis (AK) caused by Acanthamoeba is one of the most serious corneal infections. AK is frequently misdiagnosed initially as viral, bacterial, or fungal keratitis, thus ensuring treatment delays. Accordingly, the early detection of Acanthamoeba would contribute significantly to disease management and selection of an appropriate anti-amoebic therapy. Recently, the loop-mediated isothermal amplification (LAMP) method has been applied to the clinical diagnosis of a range of infectious diseases. Here, we describe a rapid and efficient LAMP-based method targeting Acanthamoeba 18S rDNA gene for the detection of Acanthamoeba using clinical ocular specimens in the diagnosis of AK. Acanthamoeba LAMP assays detected 11 different strains including all AK-associated species. The copy number detection limit for a positive signal was 10 DNA copies of 18S rDNA per reaction. No cross-reactivity with the DNA of fungi or other protozoa was observed. The sensitivity of LAMP assay was higher than those of Nelson primer PCR and JDP primer PCR. In the present study, LAMP assay based on directly heat-treated samples was found to be as efficient at detecting Acanthamoeba as DNA extracted using a commercial kit, whereas PCR was only effective when commercial kit-extracted DNA was used. This study showed that the devised Acanthamoeba LAMP assay could be used to diagnose AK in a simple, sensitive, and specific manner.

  15. Loop-Mediated Isothermal Amplification Targeting 18S Ribosomal DNA for Rapid Detection of Acanthamoeba

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Hye-Won; Lee, Yu-Ran; Inoue, Noboru; Jha, Bijay Kumar; Danne, Dinzouna-Boutamba Sylvatrie; Kim, Hong-Kyun; Lee, Junhun; Goo, Youn-Kyoung; Kong, Hyun-Hee; Chung, Dong-Il

    2013-01-01

    Amoebic keratitis (AK) caused by Acanthamoeba is one of the most serious corneal infections. AK is frequently misdiagnosed initially as viral, bacterial, or fungal keratitis, thus ensuring treatment delays. Accordingly, the early detection of Acanthamoeba would contribute significantly to disease management and selection of an appropriate anti-amoebic therapy. Recently, the loop-mediated isothermal amplification (LAMP) method has been applied to the clinical diagnosis of a range of infectious diseases. Here, we describe a rapid and efficient LAMP-based method targeting Acanthamoeba 18S rDNA gene for the detection of Acanthamoeba using clinical ocular specimens in the diagnosis of AK. Acanthamoeba LAMP assays detected 11 different strains including all AK-associated species. The copy number detection limit for a positive signal was 10 DNA copies of 18S rDNA per reaction. No cross-reactivity with the DNA of fungi or other protozoa was observed. The sensitivity of LAMP assay was higher than those of Nelson primer PCR and JDP primer PCR. In the present study, LAMP assay based on directly heat-treated samples was found to be as efficient at detecting Acanthamoeba as DNA extracted using a commercial kit, whereas PCR was only effective when commercial kit-extracted DNA was used. This study showed that the devised Acanthamoeba LAMP assay could be used to diagnose AK in a simple, sensitive, and specific manner. PMID:23864737

  16. Phylogenetic relationships of Spiruromorpha from birds of prey based on 18S rDNA.

    PubMed

    Honisch, M; Krone, O

    2008-06-01

    A total of 153 free-ranging birds from Germany belonging to 15 species were examined for nematodes in their digestive and respiratory tracts. In 51.7% of the birds 14 different nematode species were found: the intestinal ascarids Porrocaecum depressum and P. angusticolle, the strongylid Hovorkonema variegatum, which inhabits the trachea and bronchi, the hairworms Eucoleus dispar and Capillaria tenuissima isolated from the digestive system, the spirurid nematodes Cyrnea leptoptera, C. mansioni, C. seurati, Microtetrameres cloacitectus, Physaloptera alata, P. apivori, Synhimantus hamatus and S. laticeps, which inhabit the proventriculus and gizzard of the raptors, and the spirurid nematode Serratospiculum tendo, which lives in the air sacs. To revise their systematic positions the ribosomal 18S gene regions of the nematode species were analysed and a phylogenetic tree was constructed. The molecular data confirmed the morphological systematics, except the spirurid family Physalopteridae, which grouped together with the Acuariidae.

  17. 18S ribosomal DNA genotypes of Acanthamoeba species isolated from contact lens cases in the Philippines.

    PubMed

    Rivera, Windell L; Adao, Davin Edric V

    2009-10-01

    This study was carried out to document the genotypes of Acanthamoeba present in contact lens cases from 50 randomly selected contact lens wearers living in Quezon City, Metro Manila, Philippines. Acanthamoeba species were isolated from eight (16%) in 50 contact lens cases examined. We analyzed partial 18S ribosomal DNA (Rns) sequences of the eight isolates and found that the sequence differences were sufficient to distinguish the genotypes. After the isolates were genotyped, using the Basic Local Alignment Search Tool program, their phylogenetic positions relative to known Acanthamoeba isolates were determined. The model-based (GTR+Gamma+Iota) neighbor-joining, maximum likelihood, and Bayesian inference analyses, as well as the non-model-based maximum parsimony analysis were used. Results showed that of the eight isolates, six were Rns genotype T5 while two were Rns genotype T4. This present study indicates that genotype T5 is also a common contaminant in contact lens storage cases.

  18. Determination of internal controls for quantitative gene expression of Isochrysis zhangjiangensis at nitrogen stress condition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Shuang; Zhou, Jiannan; Cao, Xupeng; Xue, Song

    2016-02-01

    Isochrysis zhangjiangensis is a potential marine microalga for biodiesel production, which accumulates lipid under nitrogen limitation conditions, but the mechanism on molecular level is veiled. Quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction (qPCR) provides the possibility to investigate the gene expression levels, and a valid reference for data normalization is an essential prerequisite for firing up the analysis. In this study, five housekeeping genes, actin (ACT), α-tubulin (TUA), ß-tubulin (TUB), ubiquitin (UBI), 18S rRNA (18S) and one target gene, diacylglycerol acyltransferase (DGAT), were used for determining the reference. By analyzing the stabilities based on calculation of the stability index and on operating the two types of software, geNorm and bestkeeper, it showed that the reference genes widely used in higher plant and microalgae, such as UBI, TUA and 18S, were not the most stable ones in nitrogen-stressed I. zhangjiangensis, and thus are not suitable for exploring the mRNA expression levels under these experimental conditions. Our results show that ACT together with TUB is the most feasible internal control for investigating gene expression under nitrogen-stressed conditions. Our findings will contribute not only to future qPCR studies of I. zhangjiangensis, but also to verification of comparative transcriptomics studies of the microalgae under similar conditions.

  19. Chromosome Mapping of 18S Ribosomal RNA Genes in Eleven Hypostomus Species (Siluriformes, Loricariidae): Diversity Analysis of the Sites.

    PubMed

    Rubert, Marceléia; da Rosa, Renata; Zawadzki, Claudio H; Mariotto, Sandra; Moreira-Filho, Orlando; Giuliano-Caetano, Lucia

    2016-08-01

    We investigated the chromosomal distribution of 18S ribosomal DNA (rDNA) in different populations of 11 species of Hypostomus collected in important Brazilian basins, namely South Atlantic, Upper Paraná, and Paraguay applying the fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH). Hypostomus cochliodon, Hypostomus commersoni, Hypostomus hermanni, Hypostomus regani, Hypostomus albopunctatus, Hypostomus paulinus, Hypostomus aff. paulinus, Hypostomus iheringii, and Hypostomus mutucae presented multiple 18S rDNA sites while Hypostomus strigaticeps and Hypostomus nigromaculatus exhibited a single pair of chromosomes with 18S rDNA sites. The studied species presented variations in the number and position of these sites. The results accomplished were similar to those obtained by the analysis of AgNORs, revealing the same interspecific variability. Each species exhibited distinctive patterns of AgNOR and 18S rDNA distribution, which can be considered cytogenetic markers in each species of the genus and help improve the discussions on the phylogeny of the group.

  20. Divergent nuclear 18S rDNA paralogs in a turkey coccidium, Eimeria meleagrimitis, complicate molecular systematics and identification.

    PubMed

    El-Sherry, Shiem; Ogedengbe, Mosun E; Hafeez, Mian A; Barta, John R

    2013-07-01

    Multiple 18S rDNA sequences were obtained from two single-oocyst-derived lines of each of Eimeria meleagrimitis and Eimeria adenoeides. After analysing the 15 new 18S rDNA sequences from two lines of E. meleagrimitis and 17 new sequences from two lines of E. adenoeides, there were clear indications that divergent, paralogous 18S rDNA copies existed within the nuclear genome of E. meleagrimitis. In contrast, mitochondrial cytochrome c oxidase subunit I (COI) partial sequences from all lines of a particular Eimeria sp. were identical and, in phylogenetic analyses, COI sequences clustered unambiguously in monophyletic and highly-supported clades specific to individual Eimeria sp. Phylogenetic analysis of the new 18S rDNA sequences from E. meleagrimitis showed that they formed two distinct clades: Type A with four new sequences; and Type B with nine new sequences; both Types A and B sequences were obtained from each of the single-oocyst-derived lines of E. meleagrimitis. Together these rDNA types formed a well-supported E. meleagrimitis clade. Types A and B 18S rDNA sequences from E. meleagrimitis had a mean sequence identity of only 97.4% whereas mean sequence identity within types was 99.1-99.3%. The observed intraspecific sequence divergence among E. meleagrimitis 18S rDNA sequence types was even higher (approximately 2.6%) than the interspecific sequence divergence present between some well-recognized species such as Eimeria tenella and Eimeria necatrix (1.1%). Our observations suggest that, unlike COI sequences, 18S rDNA sequences are not reliable molecular markers to be used alone for species identification with coccidia, although 18S rDNA sequences have clear utility for phylogenetic reconstruction of apicomplexan parasites at the genus and higher taxonomic ranks.

  1. Characterization of Streptomyces venezuelae ATCC 10595 rRNA gene clusters and cloning of rrnA.

    PubMed Central

    La Farina, M; Stira, S; Mancuso, R; Grisanti, C

    1996-01-01

    Streptomyces venezuelae ATCC 10595 harbors seven rRNA gene clusters which can be distinguished by BglII digestion. The three rRNA genes present in each set are closely linked with the general structure 16S-23S-5S. We cloned rrnA and sequenced the 16S-23S spacer region and the region downstream of the 5S rRNA gene. No tRNA gene was found in these regions. PMID:8631730

  2. The Final Step in 5.8S rRNA Processing Is Cytoplasmic in Saccharomyces cerevisiae▿ †

    PubMed Central

    Thomson, Emma; Tollervey, David

    2010-01-01

    The 18S rRNA component of yeast (Saccharomyces cerevisiae) 40S ribosomes undergoes cytoplasmic 3′ cleavage following nuclear export, whereas exported pre-60S subunits were believed to contain only mature 5.8S and 25S rRNAs. However, in situ hybridization detected 3′-extended forms of 5.8S rRNA in the cytoplasm, which were lost when Crm1-dependent preribosome export was blocked by treatment with leptomycin B (LMB). LMB treatment rapidly blocked processing of 6S pre-rRNA to 5.8S rRNA, leading to TRAMP-dependent pre-rRNA degradation. The 6S pre-rRNA was coprecipitated with the 60S export adapter Nmd3 and cytoplasmic 60S synthesis factor Lsg1. The longer 5.8S+30 pre-rRNA (a form of 5.8S rRNA 3′ extended by ∼30 nucleotides) is processed to 6S by the nuclear exonuclease Rrp6, and nuclear pre-rRNA accumulated in the absence of Rrp6. In contrast, 6S to 5.8S processing requires the cytoplasmic exonuclease Ngl2, and cytoplasmic pre-rRNA accumulated in strains lacking Ngl2. We conclude that nuclear pre-60S particles containing the 6S pre-rRNA bind Nmd3 and Crm1 and are exported to the cytoplasm prior to final maturation by Ngl2. PMID:20008552

  3. The identification of rRNA maturation sites in the microsporidian Encephalitozoon cuniculi argues against the full excision of presumed ITS1 sequence.

    PubMed

    Peyretaillade, E; Peyret, P; Metenier, G; Vivares, C P; Prensier, G

    2001-01-01

    In Encephalitozoon cuniculi like in other microsporidia, the primary transcript for SSU and LSU rRNAs includes only one internal transcribed spacer (ITS1) which separates SSU rRNA from the 5.8S region associated with LSU rRNA. The extraction of total RNA from E. cuniculi-infected MRC5 cells using a hot phenol/chloroform procedure enabled us to perform primer extension and S1 nuclease protection experiments in the aim of identifying rRNA maturation sites. Our data support a simple processing (four cleavage sites) with elimination of only nine nucleotides between SSU and LSU rRNA regions. Most of the presumed ITS1 sequence characterized by strain-dependent polymorphism therefore remains linked to SSU rRNA 3' end. A new secondary structure for the sixth domain of E. cuniculi LSU rRNA is proposed following the identification of its 3' terminus.

  4. Testing three pipelines for 18S rDNA-based metabarcoding of soil faunal diversity.

    PubMed

    Yang, ChenXue; Ji, YingQiu; Wang, XiaoYang; Yang, ChunYang; Yu, Douglas W

    2013-01-01

    A number of basic and applied questions in ecology and environmental management require the characterization of soil and leaf litter faunal diversity. Recent advances in high-throughput sequencing of barcode-gene amplicons ('metabarcoding') have made it possible to survey biodiversity in a robust and efficient way. However, one obstacle to the widespread adoption of this technique is the need to choose amongst many candidates for bioinformatic processing of the raw sequencing data. We compare three candidate pipelines for the processing of 18S small subunit rDNA metabarcode data from solid substrates: (i) USEARCH/CROP, (ii) Denoiser/UCLUST, and (iii) OCTUPUS. The three pipelines produced reassuringly similar and highly correlated assessments of community composition that are dominated by taxa known to characterize the sampled environments. However, OCTUPUS appears to inflate phylogenetic diversity, because of higher sequence noise. We therefore recommend either the USEARCH/CROP or Denoiser/UCLUST pipelines, both of which can be run within the QIIME (Quantitative Insights Into Microbial Ecology) environment.

  5. 18S rDNA phylogeny of lamproderma and allied genera (Stemonitales, Myxomycetes, Amoebozoa).

    PubMed

    Fiore-Donno, Anna Maria; Kamono, Akiko; Meyer, Marianne; Schnittler, Martin; Fukui, Manabu; Cavalier-Smith, Thomas

    2012-01-01

    The phylogenetic position of the slime-mould genus Lamproderma (Myxomycetes, Amoebozoa) challenges traditional taxonomy: although it displays the typical characters of the order Stemonitales, it appears to be sister to Physarales. This study provides a small subunit (18S or SSU) ribosomal RNA gene-based phylogeny of Lamproderma and its allies, with new sequences from 49 specimens in 12 genera. We found that the order Stemonitales and Lamproderma were both ancestral to Physarales and that Lamproderma constitutes several clades intermingled with species of Diacheopsis, Colloderma and Elaeomyxa. We suggest that these genera may have evolved from Lamproderma by multiple losses of fruiting body stalks and that many taxonomic revisions are needed. We found such high genetic diversity within three Lamproderma species that they probably consist of clusters of sibling species. We discuss the contrasts between genetic and morphological divergence and implications for the morphospecies concept, highlighting the phylogenetically most reliable morphological characters and pointing to others that have been overestimated. In addition, we showed that the first part (~600 bases) of the SSU rDNA gene is a valuable tool for phylogeny in Myxomycetes, since it displayed sufficient variability to distinguish closely related taxa and never failed to cluster together specimens considered of the same species.

  6. 18S rDNA Phylogeny of Lamproderma and Allied Genera (Stemonitales, Myxomycetes, Amoebozoa)

    PubMed Central

    Fiore-Donno, Anna Maria; Kamono, Akiko; Meyer, Marianne; Schnittler, Martin; Fukui, Manabu; Cavalier-Smith, Thomas

    2012-01-01

    The phylogenetic position of the slime-mould genus Lamproderma (Myxomycetes, Amoebozoa) challenges traditional taxonomy: although it displays the typical characters of the order Stemonitales, it appears to be sister to Physarales. This study provides a small subunit (18S or SSU) ribosomal RNA gene-based phylogeny of Lamproderma and its allies, with new sequences from 49 specimens in 12 genera. We found that the order Stemonitales and Lamproderma were both ancestral to Physarales and that Lamproderma constitutes several clades intermingled with species of Diacheopsis, Colloderma and Elaeomyxa. We suggest that these genera may have evolved from Lamproderma by multiple losses of fruiting body stalks and that many taxonomic revisions are needed. We found such high genetic diversity within three Lamproderma species that they probably consist of clusters of sibling species. We discuss the contrasts between genetic and morphological divergence and implications for the morphospecies concept, highlighting the phylogenetically most reliable morphological characters and pointing to others that have been overestimated. In addition, we showed that the first part (∼600 bases) of the SSU rDNA gene is a valuable tool for phylogeny in Myxomycetes, since it displayed sufficient variability to distinguish closely related taxa and never failed to cluster together specimens considered of the same species. PMID:22530009

  7. Radiolaria Divided into Polycystina and Spasmaria in Combined 18S and 28S rDNA Phylogeny

    PubMed Central

    Dolven, Jane K.; Ose, Randi F.; Klaveness, Dag; Kristensen, Tom; Bjørklund, Kjell R.; Shalchian-Tabrizi, Kamran

    2011-01-01

    Radiolarians are marine planktonic protists that belong to the eukaryote supergroup Rhizaria together with Foraminifera and Cercozoa. Radiolaria has traditionally been divided into four main groups based on morphological characters; i.e. Polycystina, Acantharia, Nassellaria and Phaeodaria. But recent 18S rDNA phylogenies have shown that Phaeodaria belongs within Cerocozoa, and that the previously heliozoan group Taxopodida should be included in Radiolaria. 18S rDNA phylogenies have not yet resolved the sister relationship between the main Radiolaria groups, but nevertheless suggests that Spumellaria, and thereby also Polycystina, are polyphyletic. Very few sequences other than 18S rDNA have so far been generated from radiolarian cells, mostly due to the fact that Radiolaria has been impossible to cultivate and single cell PCR has been hampered by low success rate. Here we have therefore investigated the mutual evolutionary relationship of the main radiolarian groups by using the novel approach of combining single cell whole genome amplification with targeted PCR amplification of the 18S and 28S rDNA genes. Combined 18S and 28S phylogeny of sequences obtained from single cells shows that Radiolaria is divided into two main lineages: Polycystina (Spumellaria+Nassellaria) and Spasmaria (Acantharia+Taxopodida). Further we show with high support that Foraminifera groups within Radiolaria supporting the Retaria hypothesis. PMID:21853146

  8. Phylogenetic relationships of conifers inferred from partial 28S rRNA gene sequences.

    PubMed

    Stefanoviac, S; Jager, M; Deutsch, J; Broutin, J; Masselot, M

    1998-05-01

    The conifers, which traditionally comprise seven families, are the largest and most diverse group of living gymnosperms. Efforts to systematize this diversity without a cladistic phylogenetic framework have often resulted in the segregation of certain genera and/or families from the conifers. In order to understand better the relationships between the families, we performed cladistic analyses using a new data set obtained from 28S rRNA gene sequences. These analyses strongly support the monophyly of conifers including Taxaceae. Within the conifers, the Pinaceae are the first to diverge, being the sister group of the rest of conifers. A recently discovered Australian genus Wollemia is confirmed to be a natural member of the Araucariaceae. The Taxaceae are nested within the conifer clade, being the most closely related to the Cephalotaxaceae. The Taxodiaceae and Cupressaceae together form a monophyletic group. Sciadopitys should be considered as constituting a separate family. These relationships are consistent with previous cladistic analyses of morphological and molecular (18S rRNA, rbcL) data. Furthermore, the well-supported clade linking the Araucariaceae and Podocarpaceae, which has not been previously reported, suggests that the common ancestor of these families, both having the greatest diversity in the Southern Hemisphere, inhabited Gondwanaland.

  9. Fungal community analysis in the deep-sea sediments of the Pacific Ocean assessed by comparison of ITS, 18S and 28S ribosomal DNA regions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Wei; Luo, Zhu-Hua; Guo, Shuangshuang; Pang, Ka-Lai

    2016-03-01

    We investigated the diversity of fungal communities in 6 different deep-sea sediment samples of the Pacific Ocean based on three different types of clone libraries, including internal transcribed spacer (ITS), 18S rDNA, and 28S rDNA regions. A total of 1978 clones were generated from 18 environmental clone libraries, resulting in 140 fungal operational taxonomic units (OTUs), including 18 OTUs from ITS, 44 OTUs from 18S rDNA, and 78 OTUs from 28S rDNA gene primer sets. The majority of the recovered sequences belonged to diverse phylotypes of the Ascomycota and Basidiomycota. Additionally, our study revealed a total of 46 novel fungal phylotypes, which showed low similarities (<97%) with available fungal sequences in the GenBank, including a novel Zygomycete lineage, suggesting possible new fungal taxa occurring in the deep-sea sediments. The results suggested that 28S rDNA is an efficient target gene to describe fungal community in deep-sea environment.

  10. Pharmacological inhibition of PAR2 with the pepducin P2pal-18S protects mice against acute experimental biliary pancreatitis

    PubMed Central

    Michael, E. S.; Kuliopulos, A.; Covic, L.; Steer, M. L.

    2013-01-01

    Pancreatic acinar cells express proteinase-activated receptor-2 (PAR2) that is activated by trypsin-like serine proteases and has been shown to exert model-specific effects on the severity of experimental pancreatitis, i.e., PAR2−/− mice are protected from experimental acute biliary pancreatitis but develop more severe secretagogue-induced pancreatitis. P2pal-18S is a novel pepducin lipopeptide that targets and inhibits PAR2. In studies monitoring PAR2-stimulated intracellular Ca2+ concentration changes, we show that P2pal-18S is a full PAR2 inhibitor in acinar cells. Our in vivo studies show that P2pal-18S significantly reduces the severity of experimental biliary pancreatitis induced by retrograde intraductal bile acid infusion, which mimics injury induced by endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography (ERCP). This reduction in pancreatitis severity is observed when the pepducin is given before or 2 h after bile acid infusion but not when it is given 5 h after bile acid infusion. Conversely, P2pal-18S increases the severity of secretagogue-induced pancreatitis. In vitro studies indicate that P2pal-18S protects acinar cells against bile acid-induced injury/death, but it does not alter bile acid-induced intracellular zymogen activation. These studies are the first to report the effects of an effective PAR2 pharmacological inhibitor on pancreatic acinar cells and on the severity of experimental pancreatitis. They raise the possibility that a pepducin such as P2pal-18S might prove useful in the clinical management of patients at risk for developing severe biliary pancreatitis such as occurs following ERCP. PMID:23275617

  11. Pharmacological inhibition of PAR2 with the pepducin P2pal-18S protects mice against acute experimental biliary pancreatitis.

    PubMed

    Michael, E S; Kuliopulos, A; Covic, L; Steer, M L; Perides, G

    2013-03-01

    Pancreatic acinar cells express proteinase-activated receptor-2 (PAR2) that is activated by trypsin-like serine proteases and has been shown to exert model-specific effects on the severity of experimental pancreatitis, i.e., PAR2(-/-) mice are protected from experimental acute biliary pancreatitis but develop more severe secretagogue-induced pancreatitis. P2pal-18S is a novel pepducin lipopeptide that targets and inhibits PAR2. In studies monitoring PAR2-stimulated intracellular Ca(2+) concentration changes, we show that P2pal-18S is a full PAR2 inhibitor in acinar cells. Our in vivo studies show that P2pal-18S significantly reduces the severity of experimental biliary pancreatitis induced by retrograde intraductal bile acid infusion, which mimics injury induced by endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography (ERCP). This reduction in pancreatitis severity is observed when the pepducin is given before or 2 h after bile acid infusion but not when it is given 5 h after bile acid infusion. Conversely, P2pal-18S increases the severity of secretagogue-induced pancreatitis. In vitro studies indicate that P2pal-18S protects acinar cells against bile acid-induced injury/death, but it does not alter bile acid-induced intracellular zymogen activation. These studies are the first to report the effects of an effective PAR2 pharmacological inhibitor on pancreatic acinar cells and on the severity of experimental pancreatitis. They raise the possibility that a pepducin such as P2pal-18S might prove useful in the clinical management of patients at risk for developing severe biliary pancreatitis such as occurs following ERCP.

  12. Succession of Microbial Communities during Hot Composting as Detected by PCR–Single-Strand-Conformation Polymorphism-Based Genetic Profiles of Small-Subunit rRNA Genes

    PubMed Central

    Peters, Sabine; Koschinsky, Stefanie; Schwieger, Frank; Tebbe, Christoph C.

    2000-01-01

    A cultivation-independent technique for genetic profiling of PCR-amplified small-subunit rRNA genes (SSU rDNA) was chosen to characterize the diversity and succession of microbial communities during composting of an organic agricultural substrate. PCR amplifications were performed with DNA directly extracted from compost samples and with primers targeting either (i) the V4–V5 region of eubacterial 16S rRNA genes, (ii) the V3 region in the 16S rRNA genes of actinomycetes, or (iii) the V8–V9 region of fungal 18S rRNA genes. Homologous PCR products were converted to single-stranded DNA molecules by exonuclease digestion and were subsequently electrophoretically separated by their single-strand-conformation polymorphism (SSCP). Genetic profiles obtained by this technique showed a succession and increasing diversity of microbial populations with all primers. A total of 19 single products were isolated from the profiles by PCR reamplification and cloning. DNA sequencing of these molecular isolates showed similarities in the range of 92.3 to 100% to known gram-positive bacteria with a low or high G+C DNA content and to the SSU rDNA of γ-Proteobacteria. The amplified 18S rRNA gene sequences were related to the respective gene regions of Candida krusei and Candida tropicalis. Specific molecular isolates could be attributed to different composting stages. The diversity of cultivated bacteria isolated from samples taken at the end of the composting process was low. A total of 290 isolates were related to only 6 different species. Two or three of these species were also detectable in the SSCP community profiles. Our study indicates that community SSCP profiles can be highly useful for the monitoring of bacterial diversity and community successions in a biotechnologically relevant process. PMID:10698754

  13. Xenopus U3 snoRNA GAC-Box A′ and Box A Sequences Play Distinct Functional Roles in rRNA Processing

    PubMed Central

    Borovjagin, Anton V.; Gerbi, Susan A.

    2001-01-01

    Mutations in the 5′ portion of Xenopus U3 snoRNA were tested for function in oocytes. The results revealed a new cleavage site (A0) in the 3′ region of vertebrate external transcribed spacer sequences. In addition, U3 mutagenesis uncoupled cleavage at sites 1 and 2, flanking the 5′ and 3′ ends of 18S rRNA, and generated novel intermediates: 19S and 18.5S pre-rRNAs. Furthermore, specific nucleotides in Xenopus U3 snoRNA that are required for cleavages in pre-rRNA were identified: box A is essential for site A0 cleavage, the GAC-box A′ region is necessary for site 1 cleavage, and the 3′ end of box A′ and flanking nucleotides are required for site 2 cleavage. Differences between metazoan and yeast U3 snoRNA-mediated rRNA processing are enumerated. The data support a model where metazoan U3 snoRNA acts as a bridge to draw together the 5′ and 3′ ends of the 18S rRNA coding region within pre-rRNA to coordinate their cleavage. PMID:11509664

  14. rRNA transcription rate in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed Central

    Gotta, S L; Miller, O L; French, S L

    1991-01-01

    The rate of in vivo transcription elongation for Escherichia coli rRNA operons was determined by electron microscopy following addition of rifampin to log-phase cultures. Direct observation of RNA polymerase positions along rRNA operons 30, 40, and 70 s after inhibition of transcription initiation yielded a transcription elongation rate of 42 nucleotides per s. Images FIG. 1 PMID:1717439

  15. Complete sequence analysis of 18S rDNA based on genomic DNA extraction from individual Demodex mites (Acari: Demodicidae).

    PubMed

    Zhao, Ya-E; Xu, Ji-Ru; Hu, Li; Wu, Li-Ping; Wang, Zheng-Hang

    2012-05-01

    The study for the first time attempted to accomplish 18S ribosomal DNA (rDNA) complete sequence amplification and analysis for three Demodex species (Demodex folliculorum, Demodex brevis and Demodex canis) based on gDNA extraction from individual mites. The mites were treated by DNA Release Additive and Hot Start II DNA Polymerase so as to promote mite disruption and increase PCR specificity. Determination of D. folliculorum gDNA showed that the gDNA yield reached the highest at 1 mite, tending to descend with the increase of mite number. The individual mite gDNA was successfully used for 18S rDNA fragment (about 900 bp) amplification examination. The alignments of 18S rDNA complete sequences of individual mite samples and those of pooled mite samples ( ≥ 1000mites/sample) showed over 97% identities for each species, indicating that the gDNA extracted from a single individual mite was as satisfactory as that from pooled mites for PCR amplification. Further pairwise sequence analyses showed that average divergence, genetic distance, transition/transversion or phylogenetic tree could not effectively identify the three Demodex species, largely due to the differentiation in the D. canis isolates. It can be concluded that the individual Demodex mite gDNA can satisfy the molecular study of Demodex. 18S rDNA complete sequence is suitable for interfamily identification in Cheyletoidea, but whether it is suitable for intrafamily identification cannot be confirmed until the ascertainment of the types of Demodex mites parasitizing in dogs.

  16. Molecular hybridization of iodinated 4S, 5S, and 18S + 28S RNA to salamander chromosomes

    PubMed Central

    1976-01-01

    4S, 5S, AND 18S + 28S RNA from the newt Taricha granulosa granulosa were iodinated in vitro with carrier-free 125I and hybridized to the denatured chromosomes of Taricha granulosa and Batrachoseps weighti. Iodinated 18S + 28S RNA hybridizes to the telomeric region on the shorter arm of chromosome 2 and close to the centromere on the shorter arm of chromosome 9 from T. granulosa. On this same salamander the label produced by the 5S RNA is located close to or on the centromere of chromosome 7 and the iodinated 4S RNA labels the distal end of the longer arm of chromosome 5. On the chromosomes of B. wrighti, 18S + 28S RNA hybridizes close to the centromeric region on the longer arm of the largest chromosome. Two centromeric sites are hybridized by the iodinated 5S RNA. After hybridization with iodinated 4S RNA, label is found near the end of the shorter arm of chromosome 3. It is concluded that both ribosomal and transfer RNA genes are clustered in the genome of these two salamanders. PMID:944187

  17. Immunological inter-strain crossreactivity correlated to 18S rDNA sequence types in Acanthamoeba spp.

    PubMed

    Walochnik, J; Obwaller, A; Aspöck, H

    2001-02-01

    Various species of the genus Acanthamoeba have been described as potential pathogens; however, differentiation of acanthamoebae remains problematic. The genus has been divided into 12 18S rDNA sequence types, most keratitis causing strains exhibiting sequence type T4. We recently isolated a keratitis causing Acanthamoeba strain showing sequence type T6, but being morphologically identical to a T4 strain. The aim of our study was to find out, whether the 18S rDNA sequence based identification correlates to immunological differentiation. The protein and antigen profiles of the T6 isolate and three reference Acanthamoeba strains were investigated using two sera from Acanthamoeba keratitis patients and one serum from an asymptomatic individual. It was shown, that the T6 strain produces a distinctly different immunological pattern, while patterns within T4 were identical. Affinity purified antibodies were used to further explore immunological cross-reactivity between sequence types. Altogether, the results of our study support the Acanthamoeba 18S rDNA sequence type classification in the investigated strains.

  18. Dancing together and separate again: gymnosperms exhibit frequent changes of fundamental 5S and 35S rRNA gene (rDNA) organisation.

    PubMed

    Garcia, S; Kovařík, A

    2013-07-01

    In higher eukaryotes, the 5S rRNA genes occur in tandem units and are arranged either separately (S-type arrangement) or linked to other repeated genes, in most cases to rDNA locus encoding 18S-5.8S-26S genes (L-type arrangement). Here we used Southern blot hybridisation, PCR and sequencing approaches to analyse genomic organisation of rRNA genes in all large gymnosperm groups, including Coniferales, Ginkgoales, Gnetales and Cycadales. The data are provided for 27 species (21 genera). The 5S units linked to the 35S rDNA units occur in some but not all Gnetales, Coniferales and in Ginkgo (∼30% of the species analysed), while the remaining exhibit separate organisation. The linked 5S rRNA genes may occur as single-copy insertions or as short tandems embedded in the 26S-18S rDNA intergenic spacer (IGS). The 5S transcript may be encoded by the same (Ginkgo, Ephedra) or opposite (Podocarpus) DNA strand as the 18S-5.8S-26S genes. In addition, pseudogenised 5S copies were also found in some IGS types. Both L- and S-type units have been largely homogenised across the genomes. Phylogenetic relationships based on the comparison of 5S coding sequences suggest that the 5S genes independently inserted IGS at least three times in the course of gymnosperm evolution. Frequent transpositions and rearrangements of basic units indicate relatively relaxed selection pressures imposed on genomic organisation of 5S genes in plants.

  19. Validation of internal reference genes for relative quantitation studies of gene expression in human laryngeal cancer

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Xiaofeng; He, Jinting; Wang, Wei; Ren, Ming; Gao, Sujie; Zhao, Guanjie

    2016-01-01

    Background The aim of this study was to determine the expression stabilities of 12 common internal reference genes for the relative quantitation analysis of target gene expression performed by reverse transcription real-time quantitative polymerase chain reaction (RT-qPCR) in human laryngeal cancer. Methods Hep-2 cells and 14 laryngeal cancer tissue samples were investigated. The expression characteristics of 12 internal reference gene candidates (18S rRNA, GAPDH, ACTB, HPRT1, RPL29, HMBS, PPIA, ALAS1, TBP, PUM1, GUSB, and B2M) were assessed by RT-qPCR. The data were analyzed by three commonly used software programs: geNorm, NormFinder, and BestKeeper. Results The use of the combination of four internal reference genes was more appropriate than the use of a single internal reference gene. The optimal combination was PPIA + GUSB + RPL29 + HPRT1 for both the cell line and tissues; while the most appropriate combination was GUSB + RPL29 + HPRT1 + HMBS for the tissues. Conclusions Our recommended internal reference genes may improve the accuracy of relative quantitation analysis of target gene expression performed by the RT-qPCR method in further gene expression research on laryngeal tumors. PMID:27957397

  20. Silenced rRNA genes are activated and substitute for partially eliminated active homeologs in the recently formed allotetraploid, Tragopogon mirus (Asteraceae)

    PubMed Central

    Dobešová, E; Malinská, H; Matyášek, R; Leitch, A R; Soltis, D E; Soltis, P S; Kovařík, A

    2015-01-01

    To study the relationship between uniparental rDNA (encoding 18S, 5.8S and 26S ribosomal RNA) silencing (nucleolar dominance) and rRNA gene dosage, we studied a recently emerged (within the last 80 years) allotetraploid Tragopogon mirus (2n=24), formed from the diploid progenitors T. dubius (2n=12, D-genome donor) and T. porrifolius (2n=12, P-genome donor). Here, we used molecular, cytogenetic and genomic approaches to analyse rRNA gene activity in two sibling T. mirus plants (33A and 33B) with widely different rRNA gene dosages. Plant 33B had ~400 rRNA genes at the D-genome locus, which is typical for T. mirus, accounting for ~25% of total rDNA. We observed characteristic expression dominance of T. dubius-origin genes in all organs. Its sister plant 33A harboured a homozygous macrodeletion that reduced the number of T. dubius-origin genes to about 70 copies (~4% of total rDNA). It showed biparental rDNA expression in root, flower and callus, but not in leaf where D-genome rDNA dominance was maintained. There was upregulation of minor rDNA variants in some tissues. The RNA polymerase I promoters of reactivated T. porrifolius-origin rRNA genes showed reduced DNA methylation, mainly at symmetrical CG and CHG nucleotide motifs. We hypothesise that active, decondensed rDNA units are most likely to be deleted via recombination. The silenced homeologs could be used as a ‘first reserve' to ameliorate mutational damage and contribute to evolutionary success of polyploids. Deletion and reactivation cycles may lead to bidirectional homogenisation of rRNA arrays in the long term. PMID:25537492

  1. Nuclear Ribosome Biogenesis Mediated by the DIM1A rRNA Dimethylase Is Required for Organized Root Growth and Epidermal Patterning in Arabidopsis[C][W

    PubMed Central

    Wieckowski, Yana; Schiefelbein, John

    2012-01-01

    Position-dependent patterning of hair and non-hair cells in the Arabidopsis thaliana root epidermis is a powerful system to study the molecular basis of cell fate specification. Here, we report an epidermal patterning mutant affecting the ADENOSINE DIMETHYL TRANSFERASE 1A (DIM1A) rRNA dimethylase gene, predicted to participate in rRNA posttranscriptional processing and base modification. Consistent with a role in ribosome biogenesis, DIM1A is preferentially expressed in regions of rapid growth, and its product is nuclear localized with nucleolus enrichment. Furthermore, DIM1A preferentially accumulates in the developing hair cells, and the dim1A point mutant alters the cell-specific expression of the transcriptional regulators GLABRA2, CAPRICE, and WEREWOLF. Together, these findings suggest that establishment of cell-specific gene expression during root epidermis development is dependent upon proper ribosome biogenesis, possibly due to the sensitivity of the cell fate decision to relatively small differences in gene regulatory activities. Consistent with its effect on the predicted S-adenosyl-l-Met binding site, dim1A plants lack the two 18S rRNA base modifications but exhibit normal pre-rRNA processing. In addition to root epidermal defects, the dim1A mutant exhibits abnormal root meristem division, leaf development, and trichome branching. Together, these findings provide new insights into the importance of rRNA base modifications and translation regulation for plant growth and development. PMID:22829145

  2. Nuclear ribosome biogenesis mediated by the DIM1A rRNA dimethylase is required for organized root growth and epidermal patterning in Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Wieckowski, Yana; Schiefelbein, John

    2012-07-01

    Position-dependent patterning of hair and non-hair cells in the Arabidopsis thaliana root epidermis is a powerful system to study the molecular basis of cell fate specification. Here, we report an epidermal patterning mutant affecting the ADENOSINE DIMETHYL TRANSFERASE 1A (DIM1A) rRNA dimethylase gene, predicted to participate in rRNA posttranscriptional processing and base modification. Consistent with a role in ribosome biogenesis, DIM1A is preferentially expressed in regions of rapid growth, and its product is nuclear localized with nucleolus enrichment. Furthermore, DIM1A preferentially accumulates in the developing hair cells, and the dim1A point mutant alters the cell-specific expression of the transcriptional regulators GLABRA2, CAPRICE, and WEREWOLF. Together, these findings suggest that establishment of cell-specific gene expression during root epidermis development is dependent upon proper ribosome biogenesis, possibly due to the sensitivity of the cell fate decision to relatively small differences in gene regulatory activities. Consistent with its effect on the predicted S-adenosyl-l-Met binding site, dim1A plants lack the two 18S rRNA base modifications but exhibit normal pre-rRNA processing. In addition to root epidermal defects, the dim1A mutant exhibits abnormal root meristem division, leaf development, and trichome branching. Together, these findings provide new insights into the importance of rRNA base modifications and translation regulation for plant growth and development.

  3. Degradation of a polyadenylated rRNA maturation by-product involves one of the three RRP6-like proteins in Arabidopsis thaliana.

    PubMed

    Lange, Heike; Holec, Sarah; Cognat, Valérie; Pieuchot, Laurent; Le Ret, Monique; Canaday, Jean; Gagliardi, Dominique

    2008-05-01

    Yeast Rrp6p and its human counterpart, PM/Scl100, are exosome-associated proteins involved in the degradation of aberrant transcripts and processing of precursors to stable RNAs, such as the 5.8S rRNA, snRNAs, and snoRNAs. The activity of yeast Rrp6p is stimulated by the polyadenylation of its RNA substrates. We identified three RRP6-like proteins in Arabidopsis thaliana: AtRRP6L3 is restricted to the cytoplasm, whereas AtRRP6L1 and -2 have different intranuclear localizations. Both nuclear RRP6L proteins are functional, since AtRRP6L1 complements the temperature-sensitive phenotype of a yeast rrp6Delta strain and mutation of AtRRP6L2 leads to accumulation of an rRNA maturation by-product. This by-product corresponds to the excised 5' part of the 18S-5.8S-25S rRNA precursor and accumulates as a polyadenylated transcript, suggesting that RRP6L2 is involved in poly(A)-mediated RNA degradation in plant nuclei. Interestingly, the rRNA maturation by-product is a substrate of AtRRP6L2 but not of AtRRP6L1. This result and the distinctive subcellular distribution of AtRRP6L1 to -3 indicate a specialization of RRP6-like proteins in Arabidopsis.

  4. The rRNA methyltransferase Bud23 shows functional interaction with components of the SSU processome and RNase MRP.

    PubMed

    Sardana, Richa; White, Joshua P; Johnson, Arlen W

    2013-06-01

    Bud23 is responsible for the conserved methylation of G1575 of 18S rRNA, in the P-site of the small subunit of the ribosome. bud23Δ mutants have severely reduced small subunit levels and show a general failure in cleavage at site A2 during rRNA processing. Site A2 is the primary cleavage site for separating the precursors of 18S and 25S rRNAs. Here, we have taken a genetic approach to identify the functional environment of BUD23. We found mutations in UTP2 and UTP14, encoding components of the SSU processome, as spontaneous suppressors of a bud23Δ mutant. The suppressors improved growth and subunit balance and restored cleavage at site A2. In a directed screen of 50 ribosomal trans-acting factors, we identified strong positive and negative genetic interactions with components of the SSU processome and strong negative interactions with components of RNase MRP. RNase MRP is responsible for cleavage at site A3 in pre-rRNA, an alternative cleavage site for separating the precursor rRNAs. The strong negative genetic interaction between RNase MRP mutants and bud23Δ is likely due to the combined defects in cleavage at A2 and A3. Our results suggest that Bud23 plays a role at the time of A2 cleavage, earlier than previously thought. The genetic interaction with the SSU processome suggests that Bud23 could be involved in triggering disassembly of the SSU processome, or of particular subcomplexes of the processome.

  5. Identification of cephalopod species from the North and Baltic Seas using morphology, COI and 18S rDNA sequences

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gebhardt, Katharina; Knebelsberger, Thomas

    2015-09-01

    We morphologically analyzed 79 cephalopod specimens from the North and Baltic Seas belonging to 13 separate species. Another 29 specimens showed morphological features of either Alloteuthis mediaor Alloteuthis subulata or were found to be in between. Reliable identification features to distinguish between A. media and A. subulata are currently not available. The analysis of the DNA barcoding region of the COI gene revealed intraspecific distances (uncorrected p) ranging from 0 to 2.13 % (average 0.1 %) and interspecific distances between 3.31 and 22 % (average 15.52 %). All species formed monophyletic clusters in a neighbor-joining analysis and were supported by bootstrap values of ≥99 %. All COI haplotypes belonging to the 29 Alloteuthis specimens were grouped in one cluster. Neither COI nor 18S rDNA sequences helped to distinguish between the different Alloteuthis morphotypes. For species identification purposes, we recommend the use of COI, as it showed higher bootstrap support of species clusters and less amplification and sequencing failure compared to 18S. Our data strongly support the assumption that the genus Alloteuthis is only represented by a single species, at least in the North Sea. It remained unclear whether this species is A. subulata or A. media. All COI sequences including important metadata were uploaded to the Barcode of Life Data Systems and can be used as reference library for the molecular identification of more than 50 % of the cephalopod fauna known from the North and Baltic Seas.

  6. Phylogenetic Relationships Among Xiphinema and Xiphidorus Nematode Species from Brazil Inferred from 18S rDNA Sequences

    PubMed Central

    Oliveira, Claudio M. G.; Hübschen, Judith; Brown, Derek J. F.; Ferraz, Luiz C. C. B.; Wright, Frank; Neilson, Roy

    2004-01-01

    Maximum likelihood trees produced from 18S rDNA sequences separated 14 Xiphinema and five Xiphidorus nematode species from Brazil into distinct groups that concurred with their current morphological taxonomic status. Species belonging to the X. americanum group (X. brevicolle, X. diffusum, X. oxycaudatum, and X. peruvianum) formed a single group that was clearly separated from the other Xiphinema species. As with previous taxonomic studies that noted only minor morphological differences between putative X. americanum group species, separation of these species based upon 18S rDNA sequences was inconclusive. Thus it is probable that instead of comprising distinct species, the X. americanum group may in fact represent numerous morphotypes with large inter- and intra- population morphological variability that may be environmentally driven. Within the cluster representing non X. americanum group species, there was little statistical support to clearly separate species. However, three subgroups, comprising (i) the X. setariae/vulgare complex, (ii) X. ifacolum and X. paritaliae, and (iii) X. brasiliense and X. ensiculiferum were well resolved. PMID:19262801

  7. Optical and electrical stability of viral-templated copper sulfide (Cu{sub 1.8}S) films

    SciTech Connect

    Shahriar Zaman, Mohammed; Bernard Grajeda, Gabriel; Haberer, Elaine D.

    2014-04-14

    The optical and electrical stabilities of viral-templated non-stoichiometric copper sulfide, digenite (Cu{sub 1.8}S) films were investigated. The films were composed of large agglomerates of randomly aligned Cu{sub 1.8}S-coated M13 filamentous phage. Free carrier optical absorption associated with localized surface plasmon resonance (LSPR) was observed in the near infrared spectral region, and the films were electrically active, displaying a linear current-voltage relationship. Under ambient conditions, the magnitude of the LSPR absorption increased, following a power law relationship with time, and the electrical resistance of viral-templated films decreased significantly. In contrast, the resistance of films stored under low oxygen, low humidity conditions experienced a smaller reduction in electrical resistance. Changes in optical and electrical film properties under ambient conditions were associated with an increase in free carrier concentration within the copper chalcogenide material due to oxygen exposure. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy was used to relate this increase in free carrier concentration to compositional changes on the viral-templated material surface.

  8. Physical mapping of 5S and 18S ribosomal DNA in three species of Agave (Asparagales, Asparagaceae)

    PubMed Central

    Gomez-Rodriguez, Victor Manuel; Rodriguez-Garay, Benjamin; Palomino, Guadalupe; Martínez, Javier; Barba-Gonzalez, Rodrigo

    2013-01-01

    Abstract Agave Linnaeus, 1753 is endemic of America and is considered one of the most important crops in Mexico due to its key role in the country’s economy. Cytogenetic analysis was carried out in Agave tequilana Weber, 1902 ‘Azul’, Agave cupreata Trelease et Berger, 1915 and Agave angustifolia Haworth, 1812. The analysis showed that in all species the diploid chromosome number was 2n = 60, with bimodal karyotypes composed of five pairs of large chromosomes and 25 pairs of small chromosomes. Furthermore, different karyotypical formulae as well as a secondary constriction in a large chromosome pair were found in all species. Fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH) was used for physical mapping of 5S and 18S ribosomal DNA (rDNA). All species analyzed showed that 5S rDNA was located in both arms of a small chromosome pair, while 18S rDNA was associated with the secondary constriction of a large chromosome pair. Data of FISH analysis provides new information about the position and number of rDNA loci and helps for detection of hybrids in breeding programs as well as evolutionary studies. PMID:24260700

  9. Distribution of 18S rDNA sites and absence of the canonical TTAGG insect telomeric repeat in parasitoid Hymenoptera.

    PubMed

    Gokhman, Vladimir E; Anokhin, Boris A; Kuznetsova, Valentina G

    2014-08-01

    Karyotypes of six species belonging to three main clades of parasitoid Hymenoptera, the superfamilies Ichneumonoidea (Ichneumonidae: Ichneumon amphibolus), Cynipoidea (Cynipidae: Diplolepis rosae) and Chalcidoidea (Eurytomidae: Eurytoma robusta, Eu. serratulae and Eu. compressa, and Torymidae: Torymus bedeguaris) were studied using FISH with 18S rDNA and telomeric (TTAGG)n probes. Haploid karyotypes of D. rosae, Eu. robusta and Eu. serratulae carried the only 18S rDNA hybridization signal, whereas those of I. amphibolus and Eu. compressa carried three and two rDNA clusters respectively. In addition, three rDNA sites were visualized in the aneuploid female of T. bedeguaris. The number of rDNA clusters in parasitoid Hymenoptera generally correlates to the chromosome number. Apart from the overwhelming majority of the studied species of aculeate Hymenoptera, no hybridization signals were obtained from FISH with the telomeric (TTAGG)n probe in the examined parasitoid species. These data suggest absence of the canonical (TTAGG)n insect telomeric motif in the Ichneumonoidea, Cynipoidea and Chalcidoidea, and perhaps in parasitoid Hymenoptera in general.

  10. Genetic diversity of Cryptosporidium in fish at the 18S and actin loci and high levels of mixed infections.

    PubMed

    Yang, Rongchang; Palermo, Cindy; Chen, Linda; Edwards, Amanda; Paparini, Andrea; Tong, Kaising; Gibson-Kueh, Susan; Lymbery, Alan; Ryan, Una

    2015-12-15

    Cryptosporidium is an enteric parasite that infects humans and a wide range of animals. Relatively little is known about the epidemiology and taxonomy of Cryptosporidium in fish. In the present study, a total of 775 fish, belonging to 46 species and comprising ornamental fish, marine fish and freshwater fish were screened for the prevalence of Cryptosporidium by PCR. The overall prevalence of Cryptosporidium in fish was 5.3% (41/775), with prevalences ranging from 1.5 to 100% within individual host species. Phylogenetic analysis of these Cryptosporidium isolates as well as 14 isolates from previous studies indicated extensive genetic diversity as well as evidence for mixed infections. At the 18S locus the following species were identified; Cryptosporidium molnari-like genotype (n=14), Cryptosporidium huwi (n=8), piscine genotype 2 (n=4), piscine genotype 3-like (n=1), piscine genotype 4 (n=2), piscine genotype 5 (n=13), piscine genotype 5-like (n=1) and five novel genotypes (n=5). At the actin locus, species identification agreed with the 18S locus for only 52.3% of isolates sequenced, indicating high levels of mixed infections. Future studies will need to employ both morphological characterization and deep sequencing amplicon-based technologies to better understand the epidemiological and phylogenetic relationships of piscine-derived Cryptosporidium species and genotypes, particularly when mixed infections are detected.

  11. DNA sequencing analysis of ITS and 28S rRNA of Poria cocos.

    PubMed

    Atsumi, Toshiyuki; Kakiuchi, Nobuko; Mikage, Masayuki

    2007-08-01

    We determined the DNA sequences of the internal transcribed spacer 1 and 2 (ITS 1 and 2), the 5.8S rRNA gene and most of the 28S rRNA gene of Poria cocos for the first time, and conducted analysis of 20 samples including cultured mycelias and crude drug materials obtained from various localities and markets. Direct sequencing of the ITS 1 and 2 regions of the samples, except for four wild samples, showed that they had identical DNA sequences for ITS 1 and 2 with nucleotide lengths of 997 bps and 460 bps, respectively. By cloning, the four wild samples were found to have combined sequences of common ITS sequences with 1 or 2-base-pair insertions. Altogether both ITS 1 and 2 sequences were substantially longer than those of other fungal crude drugs such as Ganoderma lucidum and Polyporus umbellatus. Thus, Poria cocos could be distinguished from these crude drugs and fakes by comparing the nucleotide length of PCR products of ITS 1 and 2. Contrary to the basic homogeneity in ITS 1 and 2, three types (Group 1, 2, 3) of the 28S rRNA gene with distinctive differences in length and sequence were found. Furthermore, Group 1 could be divided into three subgroups depending on differences at nucleotide position 690. Products with different types of 28S rRNA gene were found in crude drugs from Yunnan and Anhui Provinces as well as the Korean Peninsula, suggesting that the locality of the crude drugs does not guarantee genetic uniformity. The result of DNA typing of Poria cocos may help discrimination of the quality of the crude drug by genotype.

  12. Differential Regulation of rRNA and tRNA Transcription from the rRNA-tRNA Composite Operon in Escherichia coli

    PubMed Central

    Takada, Hiraku; Shimada, Tomohiro; Dey, Debashish; Quyyum, M. Zuhaib; Nakano, Masahiro; Ishiguro, Akira; Yoshida, Hideji; Yamamoto, Kaneyoshi; Sen, Ranjan

    2016-01-01

    Escherichia coli contains seven rRNA operons, each consisting of the genes for three rRNAs (16S, 23S and 5S rRNA in this order) and one or two tRNA genes in the spacer between 16S and 23S rRNA genes and one or two tRNA genes in the 3’ proximal region. All of these rRNA and tRNA genes are transcribed from two promoters, P1 and P2, into single large precursors that are afterward processed to individual rRNAs and tRNAs by a set of RNases. In the course of Genomic SELEX screening of promoters recognized by RNA polymerase (RNAP) holoenzyme containing RpoD sigma, a strong binding site was identified within 16S rRNA gene in each of all seven rRNA operons. The binding in vitro of RNAP RpoD holoenzyme to an internal promoter, referred to the promoter of riRNA (an internal RNA of the rRNA operon), within each 16S rRNA gene was confirmed by gel shift assay and AFM observation. Using this riRNA promoter within the rrnD operon as a representative, transcription in vitro was detected with use of the purified RpoD holoenzyme, confirming the presence of a constitutive promoter in this region. LacZ reporter assay indicated that this riRNA promoter is functional in vivo. The location of riRNA promoter in vivo as identified using a set of reporter plasmids agrees well with that identified in vitro. Based on transcription profile in vitro and Northern blot analysis in vivo, the majority of transcript initiated from this riRNA promoter was estimated to terminate near the beginning of 23S rRNA gene, indicating that riRNA leads to produce the spacer-coded tRNA. Under starved conditions, transcription of the rRNA operon is markedly repressed to reduce the intracellular level of ribosomes, but the levels of both riRNA and its processed tRNAGlu stayed unaffected, implying that riRNA plays a role in the continued steady-state synthesis of tRNAs from the spacers of rRNA operons. We then propose that the tRNA genes organized within the spacers of rRNA-tRNA composite operons are expressed

  13. Confirmation and identification of parasitic stages of obligate endobionts (Harpellales) in blackflies (Simuliidae) by means of rRNA sequence data.

    PubMed

    White, Merlin M; Lichtwardt, Robert W; Colbo, Murray H

    2006-09-01

    Over the last 35y, the life cycle of endosymbiotic gut fungi (Harpellales) has been expanded to include cyst stages associated with the developing ovaries. Ovarian cysts (chlamydospore stages) have been identified after germination and production of asexual trichospores in vitro, but germination is not always successful, and spores exhibit morphological variation. Sequence data (for partial 18S and 28S rRNA genes) were generated for these putative stages of Harpellales using ungerminated cysts from adult blackflies and germinated cysts associated with field-collected blackfly egg masses. Cladistic analyses of the 18S and 28S rRNA sequences confirmed that ovarian cysts are stages in the life cycle of Harpellales. Ungerminated cysts, from a blackfly collected from New York state were identified as Pennella simulii and two samples from Newfoundland Prosimulium mixtum adults were identified as Harpella melusinae. Cysts with bipolar germ tubes, associated with field-collected Simulium egg masses from Newfoundland, were also identified as H. melusinae. Two other samples of cysts could not be matched with available sequences of gut fungi from larval hosts. The potential use of this approach to identify pathogenic stages associated with adult ovaries or field-collected egg masses among other host groups is highlighted and promoted as a tool to test the hypothesis that ovarian cysts are a dispersal stage common to all genera of Harpellales.

  14. Control of rRNA transcription in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed Central

    Condon, C; Squires, C; Squires, C L

    1995-01-01

    The control of rRNA synthesis in response to both extra- and intracellular signals has been a subject of interest to microbial physiologists for nearly four decades, beginning with the observations that Salmonella typhimurium cells grown on rich medium are larger and contain more RNA than those grown on poor medium. This was followed shortly by the discovery of the stringent response in Escherichia coli, which has continued to be the organism of choice for the study of rRNA synthesis. In this review, we summarize four general areas of E. coli rRNA transcription control: stringent control, growth rate regulation, upstream activation, and anti-termination. We also cite similar mechanisms in other bacteria and eukaryotes. The separation of growth rate-dependent control of rRNA synthesis from stringent control continues to be a subject of controversy. One model holds that the nucleotide ppGpp is the key effector for both mechanisms, while another school holds that it is unlikely that ppGpp or any other single effector is solely responsible for growth rate-dependent control. Recent studies on activation of rRNA synthesis by cis-acting upstream sequences has led to the discovery of a new class of promoters that make contact with RNA polymerase at a third position, called the UP element, in addition to the well-known -10 and -35 regions. Lastly, clues as to the role of antitermination in rRNA operons have begun to appear. Transcription complexes modified at the antiterminator site appear to elongate faster and are resistant to the inhibitory effects of ppGpp during the stringent response. PMID:8531889

  15. Further evidence for the variability of the 18S rDNA loci in the family Tingidae (Hemiptera, Heteroptera)

    PubMed Central

    Golub, Natalia V.; Golub, Viktor B.; Kuznetsova, Valentina G.

    2016-01-01

    Abstract As of now, within the lace bug family Tingidae (Cimicomorpha), only 1.5% of the species described have been cytogenetically studied. In this paper, male karyotypes of Stephanitis caucasica, Stephanitis pyri, Physatocheila confinis, Lasiacantha capucina, Dictyla rotundata and Dictyla echii were studied using FISH mapping with an 18S rDNA marker. The results show variability: the major rDNA sites are predominantly located on a pair of autosomes but occasionally on the X and Y chromosomes. All currently available data on the distribution of the major rDNA in the Tingidae karyotypes are summarized and shortly discussed. Our main concern is to clarify whether the chromosomal position of rDNA loci can contribute to resolving the phylogenetic relationships among the Tingidae taxa. PMID:28123675

  16. Granulomatous prostatitis due to Cryptococcus neoformans: diagnostic usefulness of special stains and molecular analysis of 18S rDNA.

    PubMed

    Wada, R; Nakano, N; Yajima, N; Yoneyama, T; Wakasaya, Y; Murakami, C; Yamato, K; Yagihashi, S

    2008-01-01

    A 57-year-old Japanese man complained of pain on micturition. The prostate was of normal size but hard. Transrectal needle biopsy demonstrated granulomatous prostatitis with small focal abscesses. Staining with periodic acid-Schiff, Grocott's methenamine silver and Fontana-Masson revealed yeast-form fungus in the granulomas. The mucoid capsule of the fungus stained with mucicarmine. PCR specific for cryptococcal 18S rDNA using DNA extracted from the pathological specimen was positive, and the sequence was homologous to Cryptococcus neoformans. A diagnosis of cryptococcal granulomatous prostatitis was made. The patient was then found to suffer from meningitis and lung abscess, and was treated with amphotericin B and flucytosine. Careful histological and molecular studies are beneficial to reach the correct diagnosis and to prevent an unfavorable outcome of disseminated cryptococcosis.

  17. Phylogenetic relationships of the Culicomorpha inferred from 18S and 5.8S ribosomal DNA sequences. (Diptera:Nematocera).

    PubMed

    Miller, B R; Crabtree, M B; Savage, H M

    1997-05-01

    We investigated the evolutionary origins of the mosquito family Culicidae by examination of 18S and 5.8S ribosomal gene sequence divergence. Phylogenetic analyses demonstrated that within the infraorder Culicomorpha, taxa in the families Corethrellidae, Chaoboridae and Culicidae formed a monophyletic group; there was support for a sister relationship between this lineage and a representative of the Chironomidae. A chaoborid midge was the closest relative of the mosquitoes. Taxa from four genera of mosquitoes formed a monophyletic group; lack of a spacer in the 5.8S gene was unique to members of the Culicidae. A member of the genus Anopheles formed the most basal lineage among the mosquitoes analysed. Phylogenetic relationships were unresolved for representatives in the families Dixidae, Simuliidae and Ceratopogonidae.

  18. Lessons from an evolving rRNA: 16S and 23S rRNA structures from a comparative perspective.

    PubMed Central

    Gutell, R R; Larsen, N; Woese, C R

    1994-01-01

    The 16S and 23S rRNA higher-order structures inferred from comparative analysis are now quite refined. The models presented here differ from their immediate predecessors only in minor detail. Thus, it is safe to assert that all of the standard secondary-structure elements in (prokaryotic) rRNAs have been identified, with approximately 90% of the individual base pairs in each molecule having independent comparative support, and that at least some of the tertiary interactions have been revealed. It is interesting to compare the rRNAs in this respect with tRNA, whose higher-order structure is known in detail from its crystal structure (36) (Table 2). It can be seen that rRNAs have as great a fraction of their sequence in established secondary-structure elements as does tRNA. However, the fact that the former show a much lower fraction of identified tertiary interactions and a greater fraction of unpaired nucleotides than the latter implies that many of the rRNA tertiary interactions remain to be located. (Alternatively, the ribosome might involve protein-rRNA rather than intramolecular rRNA interactions to stabilize three-dimensional structure.) Experimental studies on rRNA are consistent to a first approximation with the structures proposed here, confirming the basic assumption of comparative analysis, i.e., that bases whose compositions strictly covary are physically interacting. In the exhaustive study of Moazed et al. (45) on protection of the bases in the small-subunit rRNA against chemical modification, the vast majority of bases inferred to pair by covariation are found to be protected from chemical modification, both in isolated small-subunit rRNA and in the 30S subunit. The majority of the tertiary interactions are reflected in the chemical protection data as well (45). On the other hand, many of the bases not shown as paired in Fig. 1 are accessible to chemical attack (45). However, in this case a sizeable fraction of them are also protected against chemical

  19. Lessons from an evolving rRNA: 16S and 23S rRNA structures from a comparative perspective

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gutell, R. R.; Larsen, N.; Woese, C. R.

    1994-01-01

    The 16S and 23S rRNA higher-order structures inferred from comparative analysis are now quite refined. The models presented here differ from their immediate predecessors only in minor detail. Thus, it is safe to assert that all of the standard secondary-structure elements in (prokaryotic) rRNAs have been identified, with approximately 90% of the individual base pairs in each molecule having independent comparative support, and that at least some of the tertiary interactions have been revealed. It is interesting to compare the rRNAs in this respect with tRNA, whose higher-order structure is known in detail from its crystal structure (36) (Table 2). It can be seen that rRNAs have as great a fraction of their sequence in established secondary-structure elements as does tRNA. However, the fact that the former show a much lower fraction of identified tertiary interactions and a greater fraction of unpaired nucleotides than the latter implies that many of the rRNA tertiary interactions remain to be located. (Alternatively, the ribosome might involve protein-rRNA rather than intramolecular rRNA interactions to stabilize three-dimensional structure.) Experimental studies on rRNA are consistent to a first approximation with the structures proposed here, confirming the basic assumption of comparative analysis, i.e., that bases whose compositions strictly covary are physically interacting. In the exhaustive study of Moazed et al. (45) on protection of the bases in the small-subunit rRNA against chemical modification, the vast majority of bases inferred to pair by covariation are found to be protected from chemical modification, both in isolated small-subunit rRNA and in the 30S subunit. The majority of the tertiary interactions are reflected in the chemical protection data as well (45). On the other hand, many of the bases not shown as paired in Fig. 1 are accessible to chemical attack (45). However, in this case a sizeable fraction of them are also protected against chemical

  20. Mapping of Complete Set of Ribose and Base Modifications of Yeast rRNA by RP-HPLC and Mung Bean Nuclease Assay

    PubMed Central

    Watzinger, Peter; Hartmann, Johannes David; Kötter, Peter; Entian, Karl-Dieter

    2016-01-01

    Ribosomes are large ribonucleoprotein complexes that are fundamental for protein synthesis. Ribosomes are ribozymes because their catalytic functions such as peptidyl transferase and peptidyl-tRNA hydrolysis depend on the rRNA. rRNA is a heterogeneous biopolymer comprising of at least 112 chemically modified residues that are believed to expand its topological potential. In the present study, we established a comprehensive modification profile of Saccharomyces cerevisiae’s 18S and 25S rRNA using a high resolution Reversed-Phase High Performance Liquid Chromatography (RP-HPLC). A combination of mung bean nuclease assay, rDNA point mutants and snoRNA deletions allowed us to systematically map all ribose and base modifications on both rRNAs to a single nucleotide resolution. We also calculated approximate molar levels for each modification using their UV (254nm) molar response factors, showing sub-stoichiometric amount of modifications at certain residues. The chemical nature, their precise location and identification of partial modification will facilitate understanding the precise role of these chemical modifications, and provide further evidence for ribosome heterogeneity in eukaryotes. PMID:28033325

  1. An Escherichia coli strain with all chromosomal rRNA operons inactivated: complete exchange of rRNA genes between bacteria.

    PubMed

    Asai, T; Zaporojets, D; Squires, C; Squires, C L

    1999-03-02

    Current global phylogenies are built predominantly on rRNA sequences. However, an experimental system for studying the evolution of rRNA is not readily available, mainly because the rRNA genes are highly repeated in most experimental organisms. We have constructed an Escherichia coli strain in which all seven chromosomal rRNA operons are inactivated by deletions spanning the 16S and 23S coding regions. A single E. coli rRNA operon carried by a multicopy plasmid supplies 16S and 23S rRNA to the cell. By using this strain we have succeeded in creating microorganisms that contain only a foreign rRNA operon derived from either Salmonella typhimurium or Proteus vulgaris, microorganisms that have diverged from E. coli about 120-350 million years ago. We also were able to replace the E. coli rRNA operon with an E. coli/yeast hybrid one in which the GTPase center of E. coli 23S rRNA had been substituted by the corresponding domain from Saccharomyces cerevisiae. These results suggest that, contrary to common belief, coevolution of rRNA with many other components in the translational machinery may not completely preclude the horizontal transfer of rRNA genes.

  2. The 5S rRNA and the rRNA intergenic spacer of the two varieties of Cryptococcus neoformans.

    PubMed

    Fan, M; Chen, L C; Ragan, M A; Gutell, R R; Warner, J R; Currie, B P; Casadevall, A

    1995-01-01

    The intergenic spacers (IGS) separating the 23S-like and 16S-like rDNAs of the two varieties of the human pathogenic fungus Cryptococcus neoformans were amplified, cloned and sequenced. The C. neoformans var. neoformans IGS was 2421 nt with 5S rRNA at positions 1228-1345 3' of the 23S-like rRNA. The C. neoformans var. gattii IGS was 2480 nt with 5S rRNA at positions 1268-1385 3' of the 23S-like rRNA. For both varieties the 5S rDNA genes were in the same orientation as the 16S-5.8-23S genes and encode a 118 nt molecule of identical sequence. Phylogenetic comparison of C. neoformans 5S rDNA with that of other fungi placed this fungus in close relationship with other basidiomycetes including Tremella mesenterica, Bullera alba, and Cryptococcus laurentii. A secondary structure model for the deduced 5S rRNA was constructed by comparative sequence analysis. Polymerase chain reaction-amplified IGS of 12 C. neoformans var. neoformans strains revealed extensive size variation ranging from 100 to 300 nt. Size variation between strains in the length of the IGS may be useful for distinguishing strains. Structurally, the IGS were characterized by the presence of occasional short direct GC-rich 19-nt repeats. Overall IGS sequence identity between the C. neoformans varieties was only 78.5%, in sharp contrast to the identical or nearly identical sequences for the rDNA genes, and suggests rapid evolution for IGS sequences.

  3. Phylogeny of the sundews, Drosera (Droseraceae), based on chloroplast rbcL and nuclear 18S ribosomal DNA Sequences.

    PubMed

    Rivadavia, Fernando; Kondo, Katsuhiko; Kato, Masahiro; Hasebe, Mitsuyasu

    2003-01-01

    The sundew genus Drosera consists of carnivorous plants with active flypaper traps and includes nearly 150 species distributed mainly in Australia, Africa, and South America, with some Northern Hemisphere species. In addition to confused intrageneric classification of Drosera, the intergeneric relationships among the Drosera and two other genera in the Droseraceae with snap traps, Dionaea and Aldrovanda, are problematic. We conducted phylogenetic analyses of DNA sequences of the chloroplast rbcL gene for 59 species of Drosera, covering all sections except one. These analyses revealed that five of 11 sections, including three monotypic sections, are polyphyletic. Combined rbcL and 18S rDNA sequence data were used to infer phylogenetic relationships among Drosera, Dionaea, and Aldrovanda. This analysis revealed that all Drosera species form a clade sister to a clade including Dionaea and Aldrovanda, suggesting that the snap traps of Aldrovanda and Dionaea are homologous despite their morphological differences. MacClade reconstructions indicated that multiple episodes of aneuploidy occurred in a clade that includes mainly Australian species, while the chromosome numbers in the other clades are not as variable. Drosera regia, which is native to South Africa, and most species native to Australia, were clustered basally, suggesting that Drosera originated in Africa or Australia. The rbcL tree indicates that Australian species expanded their distribution to South America and then to Africa. Expansion of distribution to the Northern Hemisphere from the Southern Hemispere occurred in a few different lineages.

  4. Cyanobacterial endobionts within a major marine planktonic calcifier (Globigerina bulloides, Foraminifera) revealed by 16S rRNA metabarcoding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bird, Clare; Darling, Kate F.; Russell, Ann D.; Davis, Catherine V.; Fehrenbacher, Jennifer; Free, Andrew; Wyman, Michael; Ngwenya, Bryne T.

    2017-02-01

    We investigated the possibility of bacterial symbiosis in Globigerina bulloides, a palaeoceanographically important, planktonic foraminifer. This marine protist is commonly used in micropalaeontological investigations of climatically sensitive subpolar and temperate water masses as well as wind-driven upwelling regions of the world's oceans. G. bulloides is unusual because it lacks the protist algal symbionts that are often found in other spinose species. In addition, it has a large offset in its stable carbon and oxygen isotopic compositions compared to other planktonic foraminifer species, and also that predicted from seawater equilibrium. This is suggestive of novel differences in ecology and life history of G. bulloides, making it a good candidate for investigating the potential for bacterial symbiosis as a contributory factor influencing shell calcification. Such information is essential to evaluate fully the potential response of G. bulloides to ocean acidification and climate change. To investigate possible ecological interactions between G. bulloides and marine bacteria, 18S rRNA gene sequencing, fluorescence microscopy, 16S rRNA gene metabarcoding and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) were performed on individual specimens of G. bulloides (type IId) collected from two locations in the California Current. Intracellular DNA extracted from five G. bulloides specimens was subjected to 16S rRNA gene metabarcoding and, remarkably, 37-87 % of all 16S rRNA gene sequences recovered were assigned to operational taxonomic units (OTUs) from the picocyanobacterium Synechococcus. This finding was supported by TEM observations of intact Synechococcus cells in both the cytoplasm and vacuoles of G. bulloides. Their concentrations were up to 4 orders of magnitude greater inside the foraminifera than those reported for the California Current water column and approximately 5 % of the intracellular Synechococcus cells observed were undergoing cell division. This suggests

  5. Validation of housekeeping genes as internal controls for studying gene expression during Pacific oyster (Crassostrea gigas) development by quantitative real-time PCR.

    PubMed

    Du, Yishuai; Zhang, Linlin; Xu, Fei; Huang, Baoyu; Zhang, Guofan; Li, Li

    2013-03-01

    Hatchery-reared larvae of the Pacific oyster (Crassostrea gigas) often suffer from massive mortality induced by Ostreid herpesvirus 1 (OsHV-1) infection, indicating the importance of better understanding of oyster immune defense systems. The accuracy of measurements of gene expression levels based on quantitative real-time PCR assays relies on the use of housekeeping genes as internal controls; however, few studies have focused on the selection of such internal controls. In this study, we conducted a comprehensive investigation of internal control genes during oyster development in virus-infected and uninfected samples. Transcriptome data for 38 developmental stages were downloaded and the gene expression patterns were classified into 30 clusters. A total of 317 orthologs of classical housekeeping genes in the oyster genome were annotated. After combining the expression profiles and oyster housekeeping gene dataset, 14 candidate internal controls were selected for further investigation: Elongation factor-1α (EF-1α), 18S rRNA (18S), 28S rRNA (28S), Glyceraldehyde 3-phosphate dehydrogenase (GAPDH), β-actin (ACT), Ribosomal protein L7 (RL7), Ribosomal protein L27 (RL27), Ribosomal protein L36 (RL36), Ribosomal protein S18 (RS18), Heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoprotein A2/B1 (RO21), Eukaryotic translation elongation factor 2 (EF2), Ubiquitin-conjugating enzyme E2D2 (UBCD1), S-phase kinase-associated protein 1 (SKP1) and Heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoprotein Q (HNRPQ). RNA was extracted from oyster larvae infected with OsHV-1 (group A; GA), and OsHV-1 free larvae (group B; GB). The expression levels of the 14 candidate internal controls were studied in GA and GB larvae by real-time PCR. Their expression stabilities were further analyzed using the GeNorm program. RL7 and RS18 were the most stable genes in both OsHV-1 infected (GA) and uninfected (GB) larvae. These results suggest that RL7 and RS18 could be used as internal controls for studying gene expression in

  6. Selective phylogenetic analysis targeting 16S rRNA genes of hyperthermophilic archaea in the deep-subsurface hot biosphere.

    PubMed

    Kimura, Hiroyuki; Ishibashi, Jun-Ichiro; Masuda, Harue; Kato, Kenji; Hanada, Satoshi

    2007-04-01

    International drilling projects for the study of microbial communities in the deep-subsurface hot biosphere have been expanded. Core samples obtained by deep drilling are commonly contaminated with mesophilic microorganisms in the drilling fluid, making it difficult to examine the microbial community by 16S rRNA gene clone library analysis. To eliminate mesophilic organism contamination, we previously developed a new method (selective phylogenetic analysis [SePA]) based on the strong correlation between the guanine-plus-cytosine (G+C) contents of the 16S rRNA genes and the optimal growth temperatures of prokaryotes, and we verified the method's effectiveness (H. Kimura, M. Sugihara, K. Kato, and S. Hanada, Appl. Environ. Microbiol. 72:21-27, 2006). In the present study we ascertained SePA's ability to eliminate contamination by archaeal rRNA genes, using deep-sea hydrothermal fluid (117 degrees C) and surface seawater (29.9 degrees C) as substitutes for deep-subsurface geothermal samples and drilling fluid, respectively. Archaeal 16S rRNA gene fragments, PCR amplified from the surface seawater, were denatured at 82 degrees C and completely digested with exonuclease I (Exo I), while gene fragments from the deep-sea hydrothermal fluid remained intact after denaturation at 84 degrees C because of their high G+C contents. An examination using mixtures of DNAs from the two environmental samples showed that denaturation at 84 degrees C and digestion with Exo I completely eliminated archaeal 16S rRNA genes from the surface seawater. Our method was quite useful for culture-independent community analysis of hyperthermophilic archaea in core samples recovered from deep-subsurface geothermal environments.

  7. Morphology and 18S rDNA of Henneguya gurlei (Myxosporea) from Ameiurus nebulosus (Siluriformes) in North Carolina

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Iwanowicz, L.R.; Iwanowicz, D.D.; Pote, L.M.; Blazer, V.S.; Schill, W.B.

    2008-01-01

    Henneguya gurlei was isolated from Ameiurus nebulosus captured in North Carolina and redescribed using critical morphological features and 18S small-subunit ribosomal RNA (SSU rDNA) gene sequence. Plasmodia are white, spherical, or subspherical, occur in clusters, measure up to 1.8 mm in length, and are located on the dorsal, pectoral, and anal fins. Histologically, plasmodia are located in the dermis and subdermally, and the larger cysts disrupt the melanocyte pigment layer. The spore body is lanceolate, 18.2 ?? 0.3 ??m (range 15.7-20.3) in length, and 5.4 ?? 0.1 ??m (range 3.8-6.1) in width in valvular view. The caudal appendages are 41.1 ?? 1.1 ??m (range 34.0-49.7) in length. Polar capsules are pyriform and of unequal size. The longer polar capsule measures 6.2 ?? 0.1 ??m (range 5.48-7.06), while the shorter is 5.7 ?? 0.1 ??m (range 4.8-6.4) in length. Polar capsule width is 1.2 ?? 0.03 ??m (range 1.0-1.54). The total length of the spore is 60.9 ?? 1.2 ??m (range 48.7-68.5). Morphologically, this species is similar to other species of Henneguya that are known to infect ictalurids. Based on SSU rDNA sequences, this species is most closely related to H. exilis and H. ictaluri, which infect Ictalurus punctatus. ?? American Society of Parasitologists 2008.

  8. 17(R),18(S)-Epoxyeicosatetraenoic Acid, A Potent Eicosapentaenoic Acid (EPA)-Derived Regulator of Cardiomyocyte Contraction: Structure-Activity Relationships and Stable Analogs

    PubMed Central

    Falck, John R.; Wallukat, Gerd; Puli, Narender; Goli, Mohan; Arnold, Cosima; Konkel, Anne; Rothe, Michael; Fischer, Robert; Müller, Dominik N.; Schunck, Wolf-Hagen

    2011-01-01

    17(R),18(S)-Epoxyeicosatetraenoic acid [17(R),18(S)-EETeTr], a cytochrome P450 epoxygenase metabolite of eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA), exerts negative chronotropic effects and protects neonatal rat cardiomyocytes against Ca2+-overload with an EC50 ~1–2 nM. Structure-activity studies revealed a cis-Δ11,12- or Δ14,15-olefin and a 17(R),18(S)-epoxide are minimal structural elements for anti-arrhythmic activity whereas antagonist activity was often associated with the combination of a Δ14,15-olefin and a 17(S),18(R)-epoxide. Compared with natural material, the agonist and antagonist analogs are chemically and metabolically more robust and several show promise as templates for future development of clinical candidates. PMID:21591683

  9. Outside-in recrystallization of ZnS-Cu1.8 S hollow spheres with interdispersed lattices for enhanced visible light solar hydrogen generation.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Ting; Nuo Peh, Connor Kang; Hong, Minghui; Ho, Ghim Wei

    2014-09-01

    For the first time an earth-abundant and nontoxic ZnS-Cu(1.8) S hybrid photocatalyst has been engineered with well-defined nanosheet hollow structures by a template-engaged method. In contrast to conventional surface coupling and loading, the unique outside-in recrystallization promotes co-precipitation of ZnS and Cu(1.8) S into homogeneous interdispersed lattices, hence forming a hybrid semiconductor with visible responsive photocatalytic activity. The as-derived ZnS-Cu(1.8) S semiconductor alloy is tailored into a hierarchical hollow structure to provide readily accessible porous shells and interior spaces for effective ion transfer/exchange. Notably, this synergistic morphology, interface and crystal lattice engineering, aim towards the design of novel nanocatalysts for various sustainable environmental and energy applications.

  10. The widely used small subunit 18S rDNA molecule greatly underestimates true diversity in biodiversity surveys of the meiofauna.

    PubMed

    Tang, Cuong Q; Leasi, Francesca; Obertegger, Ulrike; Kieneke, Alexander; Barraclough, Timothy G; Fontaneto, Diego

    2012-10-02

    Molecular tools have revolutionized the exploration of biodiversity, especially in organisms for which traditional taxonomy is difficult, such as for microscopic animals (meiofauna). Environmental (eDNA) metabarcode surveys of DNA extracted from sediment samples are increasingly popular for surveying biodiversity. Most eDNA surveys use the nuclear gene-encoding small-subunit rDNA gene (18S) as a marker; however, different markers and metrics used for delimiting species have not yet been evaluated against each other or against morphologically defined species (morphospecies). We assessed more than 12,000 meiofaunal sequences of 18S and of the main alternatively used marker [Cytochrome c oxidase subunit I (COI) mtDNA] belonging to 55 datasets covering three taxonomic ranks. Our results show that 18S reduced diversity estimates by a factor of 0.4 relative to morphospecies, whereas COI increased diversity estimates by a factor of 7.6. Moreover, estimates of species richness using COI were robust among three of four commonly used delimitation metrics, whereas estimates using 18S varied widely with the different metrics. We show that meiofaunal diversity has been greatly underestimated by 18S eDNA surveys and that the use of COI provides a better estimate of diversity. The suitability of COI is supported by cross-mating experiments in the literature and evolutionary analyses of discreteness in patterns of genetic variation. Furthermore its splitting of morphospecies is expected from documented levels of cryptic taxa in exemplar meiofauna. We recommend against using 18S as a marker for biodiversity surveys and suggest that use of COI for eDNA surveys could provide more accurate estimates of species richness in the future.

  11. Physical mapping of 18S-25S rDNA and 5S rDNA in Lupinus via fluorescent in situ hybridization.

    PubMed

    Naganowska, Barbara; Zielińska, Anna

    2002-01-01

    Double-target fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH) was used to determine the genomic distribution of ribosomal RNA genes in five Lupinus species: L. cosentinii (2n=32), L. pilosus (2n=42), L. angustifolius (2n=40), L. luteus (2n=52) and L. mutabilis (2n=48). 18S-25S rDNA and 5S rDNA were used as probes. Some interspecific variation was observed in the number and size of the 18S-25S rDNA loci. All the studied species had one chromosome pair carrying 5S rDNA.

  12. Leuconostoc pseudomesenteroides WCFur3 partial 16S rRNA gene

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    This study used a partial 535 base pair 16S rRNA gene sequence to identify a bacterial isolate. Fatty acid profiles are consistent with the 16S rRNA gene sequence identification of this bacterium. The isolate was obtained from a compost bin in Fort Collins, Colorado, USA. The 16S rRNA gene sequen...

  13. Quantitative analysis of dinoflagellates and diatoms community via Miseq sequencing of actin gene and v9 region of 18S rDNA

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Liliang; Sui, Zhenghong; Liu, Yuan

    2016-01-01

    Miseq sequencing and data analysis for the actin gene and v9 region of 18S rDNA of 7 simulated samples consisting of different mixture of dinoflagellates and diatoms were carried out. Not all the species were detectable in all the 18S v9 samples, and sequence percent in all the v9 samples were not consistent with the corresponding cell percent which may suggest that 18S rDNA copy number in different cells of these species differed greatly which result in the large deviation of the amplification. And 18S rDNA amplification of the microalgae was prone to be contaminated by fungus. The amplification of actin gene all was from the dinoflagellates because of its targeted degenerate primers. All the actin sequences of dinoflagellates were detected in the act samples except act4, and sequence percentage of the dinoflagellates in the act samples was not completely consistent with the dinoflagellates percentage of cell samples, but with certain amplification deviations. Indexes of alpha diversity of actin gene sequencing may be better reflection of community structure, and beta diversity analysis could cluster the dinoflagellates samples with identical or similar composition together and was distinguishable with blooming simulating samples at the generic level. Hence, actin gene was more proper than rDNA as the molecular marker for the community analysis of the dinoflagellates. PMID:27721499

  14. Molecular and phylogenetic characterizations of an Eimeria krijgsmanni Yakimoff & Gouseff, 1938 (Apicomplexa: Eimeriidae) mouse intestinal protozoan parasite by partial 18S ribosomal RNA gene sequence analysis.

    PubMed

    Takeo, Toshinori; Tanaka, Tetsuya; Matsubayashi, Makoto; Maeda, Hiroki; Kusakisako, Kodai; Matsui, Toshihiro; Mochizuki, Masami; Matsuo, Tomohide

    2014-08-01

    Previously, we characterized an undocumented strain of Eimeria krijgsmanni by morphological and biological features. Here, we present a detailed molecular phylogenetic analysis of this organism. Namely, 18S ribosomal RNA gene (rDNA) sequences of E. krijgsmanni were analyzed to incorporate this species into a comprehensive Eimeria phylogeny. As a result, partial 18S rDNA sequence from E. krijgsmanni was successfully determined, and two different types, Type A and Type B, that differed by 1 base pair were identified. E. krijgsmanni was originally isolated from a single oocyst, and thus the result show that the two types might have allelic sequence heterogeneity in the 18S rDNA. Based on phylogenetic analyses, the two types of E. krijgsmanni 18S rDNA formed one of two clades among murine Eimeria spp.; these Eimeria clades reflected morphological similarity among the Eimeria spp. This is the third molecular phylogenetic characterization of a murine Eimeria spp. in addition to E. falciformis and E. papillata.

  15. Phylogenetic analysis of oryx species using partial sequences of mitochondrial rRNA genes.

    PubMed

    Khan, H A; Arif, I A; Al Farhan, A H; Al Homaidan, A A

    2008-10-28

    We conducted a comparative evaluation of 12S rRNA and 16S rRNA genes of the mitochondrial genome for molecular differentiation among three oryx species (Oryx leucoryx, Oryx dammah and Oryx gazella) with respect to two closely related outgroups, addax and roan. Our findings showed the failure of 12S rRNA gene to differentiate between the genus Oryx and addax, whereas a 342-bp partial sequence of 16S rRNA accurately grouped all five taxa studied, suggesting the utility of 16S rRNA segment for molecular phylogeny of oryx at the genus and possibly species levels.

  16. Electrolyte level and blood pH in dogs infected by various 18S RNA strains of Babaesia canis canis on the early stage of babesiosis.

    PubMed

    Adaszek, Łukasz; Górna, Marta; Winiarczyk, Stanisław

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of the studies was to determine electrolyte disturbances and blood pH changes in dogs with babesiosis and possibly show a connection between the Babesia (B.) canis strain causing the infection and the intensity of these irregularities. 40 animals (group 1) with early babesiosis and 40 healthy dogs (group 2) were studied and their blood pH and blood levels of potassium, chlorides; calcium and sodium were determined. At the same time, molecular typing of parasites was carried out to detect which B.canis strain (18S RNA-A or 185 RNA-B) had caused the disease in dogs of group 1. In group 1, four dogs were acidaemic, twelve had normal blood pH, and 24 were alkalaemic. Potassium concentration was below normal in 16 out of 40 dogs (40%) and normal in 24 dogs. Hypochloremia was present in 36 out of 40 dogs; chloride was normal in the remaining four animals. Serum sodium concentration was low in 16 of 40 dogs, normal in 20 of 40 dogs and high in four dogs. Calcium concentration was normal in all 40 dogs. In dogs of group 2 no abnormalities of haematological or blood biochemical parameters were observed. 29 out of the 40 dogs of group 1 were infected with the 18S RNA-A strain and eleven with the 18S RNA-B strain of Babesia canis canis. We did not observe any correlation between the type of strain causing the infection and the electrolyte disturbances in the serum of sick dogs. Hypocalaemia was observed in ten specimen infected with 18S RNA-A and six infected with 18S RNA-B. Additionally, in dogs infected with 18S RNA-A, hypochloraemia (28), hyponatraemia (10), hypernatraemia (2) were observed, as well as blood pH drop (4) or increase (14). The 18S RNA-B-infected dogs suffered from hypochloraemia (8), hyponatraemia (6), hypernatraemia (2) and increase in blood pH (10).The studies conducted did not answer the question of whether the type of electrolyte disturbances in dogs with babesiosis can be connected with the strain of the parasite that induced the disease, as

  17. Introduction of a novel 18S rDNA gene arrangement along with distinct ITS region in the saline water microalga Dunaliella.

    PubMed

    Hejazi, Mohammad A; Barzegari, Abolfazl; Gharajeh, Nahid Hosseinzadeh; Hejazi, Mohammad S

    2010-04-08

    Comparison of 18S rDNA gene sequences is a very promising method for identification and classification of living organisms. Molecular identification and discrimination of different Dunaliella species were carried out based on the size of 18S rDNA gene and, number and position of introns in the gene. Three types of 18S rDNA structure have already been reported: the gene with a size of ~1770 bp lacking any intron, with a size of ~2170 bp consisting one intron near 5' terminus, and with a size of ~2570 bp harbouring two introns near 5' and 3' termini. Hereby, we report a new 18S rDNA gene arrangement in terms of intron localization and nucleotide sequence in a Dunaliella isolated from Iranian salt lakes (ABRIINW-M1/2). PCR amplification with genus-specific primers resulted in production of a ~2170 bp DNA band, which is similar to that of D. salina 18S rDNA gene containing only one intron near 5' terminus. Whilst, sequence composition of the gene revealed the lack of any intron near 5' terminus in our isolate. Furthermore, another alteration was observed due to the presence of a 440 bp DNA fragment near 3' terminus. Accordingly, 18S rDNA gene of the isolate is clearly different from those of D. salina and any other Dunaliella species reported so far. Moreover, analysis of ITS region sequence showed the diversity of this region compared to the previously reported species. 18S rDNA and ITS sequences of our isolate were submitted with accesion numbers of EU678868 and EU927373 in NCBI database, respectively. The optimum growth rate of this isolate occured at the salinity level of 1 M NaCl. The maximum carotenoid content under stress condition of intense light (400 mumol photon m-2 s-1), high salinity (4 M NaCl) and deficiency of nitrate and phosphate nutritions reached to 240 ng/cell after 15 days.

  18. Characterising the Canine Oral Microbiome by Direct Sequencing of Reverse-Transcribed rRNA Molecules

    PubMed Central

    McDonald, James E.; Larsen, Niels; Pennington, Andrea; Connolly, John; Wallis, Corrin; Rooks, David J.; Hall, Neil; McCarthy, Alan J.; Allison, Heather E.

    2016-01-01

    PCR amplification and sequencing of phylogenetic markers, primarily Small Sub-Unit ribosomal RNA (SSU rRNA) genes, has been the paradigm for defining the taxonomic composition of microbiomes. However, ‘universal’ SSU rRNA gene PCR primer sets are likely to miss much of the diversity therein. We sequenced a library comprising purified and reverse-transcribed SSU rRNA (RT-SSU rRNA) molecules from the canine oral microbiome and compared it to a general bacterial 16S rRNA gene PCR amplicon library generated from the same biological sample. In addition, we have developed BIONmeta, a novel, open-source, computer package for the processing and taxonomic classification of the randomly fragmented RT-SSU rRNA reads produced. Direct RT-SSU rRNA sequencing revealed that 16S rRNA molecules belonging to the bacterial phyla Actinobacteria, Bacteroidetes, Firmicutes, Proteobacteria and Spirochaetes, were most abundant in the canine oral microbiome (92.5% of total bacterial SSU rRNA). The direct rRNA sequencing approach detected greater taxonomic diversity (1 additional phylum, 2 classes, 1 order, 10 families and 61 genera) when compared with general bacterial 16S rRNA amplicons from the same sample, simultaneously provided SSU rRNA gene inventories of Bacteria, Archaea and Eukarya, and detected significant numbers of sequences not recognised by ‘universal’ primer sets. Proteobacteria and Spirochaetes were found to be under-represented by PCR-based analysis of the microbiome, and this was due to primer mismatches and taxon-specific variations in amplification efficiency, validated by qPCR analysis of 16S rRNA amplicons from a mock community. This demonstrated the veracity of direct RT-SSU rRNA sequencing for molecular microbial ecology. PMID:27276347

  19. The rRNA evolution and procaryotic phylogeny

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fox, G. E.

    1986-01-01

    Studies of ribosomal RNA primary structure allow reconstruction of phylogenetic trees for prokaryotic organisms. Such studies reveal major dichotomy among the bacteria that separates them into eubacteria and archaebacteria. Both groupings are further segmented into several major divisions. The results obtained from 5S rRNA sequences are essentially the same as those obtained with the 16S rRNA data. In the case of Gram negative bacteria the ribosomal RNA sequencing results can also be directly compared with hybridization studies and cytochrome c sequencing studies. There is again excellent agreement among the several methods. It seems likely then that the overall picture of microbial phylogeny that is emerging from the RNA sequence studies is a good approximation of the true history of these organisms. The RNA data allow examination of the evolutionary process in a semi-quantitative way. The secondary structures of these RNAs are largely established. As a result it is possible to recognize examples of local structural evolution. Evolutionary pathways accounting for these events can be proposed and their probability can be assessed.

  20. Higher-order structure of rRNA

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gutell, R. R.; Woese, C. R.

    1986-01-01

    A comparative search for phylogenetically covarying basepair replacements within potential helices has been the only reliable method to determine the correct secondary structure of the 3 rRNAs, 5S, 16S, and 23S. The analysis of 16S from a wide phylogenetic spectrum, that includes various branches of the eubacteria, archaebacteria, eucaryotes, in addition to the mitochondria and chloroplast, is beginning to reveal the constraints on the secondary structures of these rRNAs. Based on the success of this analysis, and the assumption that higher order structure will also be phylogenetically conserved, a comparative search was initiated for positions that show co-variation not involved in secondary structure helices. From a list of potential higher order interactions within 16S rRNA, two higher-order interactions are presented. The first of these interactions involves positions 570 and 866. Based on the extent of phylogenetic covariation between these positions while maintaining Watson-Crick pairing, this higher-order interaction is considered proven. The other interaction involves a minimum of six positions between the 1400 and 1500 regions of the 16S rRNA. Although these patterns of covariation are not as striking as the 570/866 interaction, the fact that they all exist in an anti-parallel fashion and that experimental methods previously implicated these two regions of the molecule in tRNA function suggests that these interactions be given serious consideration.

  1. RRP1, a Saccharomyces cerevisiae gene affecting rRNA processing and production of mature ribosomal subunits.

    PubMed Central

    Fabian, G R; Hopper, A K

    1987-01-01

    The Saccharomyces cerevisiae mutant ts351 had been shown to affect processing of 27S pre-rRNA to mature 25S and 5.8S rRNAs (C. Andrew, A. K. Hopper, and B. D. Hall, Mol. Gen. Genet. 144:29-37, 1976). We showed that this strain contains two mutations leading to temperature-sensitive lethality. The rRNA-processing defect, however, is a result of only one of the two mutations. We designated the lesion responsible for the rRNA-processing defect rrp1 and showed that it is located on the right arm of chromosome IV either allelic to or tightly linked to mak21. This rrp1 lesion also results in hypersensitivity to aminoglycoside antibiotics and a reduced 25S/18S rRNA ratio at semipermissive temperatures. We cloned the RRP1 gene and provide evidence that it encodes a moderately abundant mRNA which is in lower abundance and larger than most mRNAs encoding ribosomal proteins. Images PMID:3549696

  2. Sequence variation of the 16S to 23S rRNA spacer region in Salmonella enterica.

    PubMed

    Christensen, H; Møller, P L; Vogensen, F K; Olsen, J E

    2000-01-01

    The possibility for identification of Salmonella enterica serotypes by sequence analysis of the 16S to 23S rRNA internal transcribed spacer was investigated by direct sequencing of polymerase chain reaction-amplified DNA from all operons simultaneously in a collection of 25 strains of 18 different serotypes of S. enterica, and by sequencing individual cloned operons from a single strain. It was only possible to determine the first 117 bases upstream from the 23S rRNA gene by direct sequencing because of variation between the rrn operons. Comparison of sequences from this region allowed separation of only 15 out of the 18 serotypes investigated and was not specific even at the subspecies level of S. enterica. To determine the differences between internal transcribed spacers in more detail, the individual rrn operons of strain JEO 197, serotype IV 43:z4,z23:-, were cloned and sequenced. The strain contained four short internal transcribed spacer fragments of 382-384 bases in length, which were 98.4-99.7% similar to each other and three long fragments of 505 bases with 98.0-99.8% similarity. The study demonstrated a higher degree of interbacterial variation than intrabacterial variation between operons for serotypes of S. enterica.

  3. The Regulation of rRNA Gene Transcription during Directed Differentiation of Human Embryonic Stem Cells

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Zhong; Zhao, Rui; Giles, Keith E.

    2016-01-01

    It has become increasingly clear that proper cellular control of pluripotency and differentiation is related to the regulation of rRNA synthesis. To further our understanding of the role that the regulation of rRNA synthesis has in pluripotency we monitored rRNA synthesis during the directed differentiation of human embryonic stem cells (hESCs). We discovered that the rRNA synthesis rate is reduced ~50% within 6 hours of ACTIVIN A treatment. This precedes reductions in expression of specific stem cell markers and increases in expression of specific germ layer markers. The reduction in rRNA synthesis is concomitant with dissociation of the Pol I transcription factor, UBTF, from the rRNA gene promoter and precedes any increase to heterochromatin throughout the rRNA gene. To directly investigate the role of rRNA synthesis in pluripotency, hESCs were treated with the Pol I inhibitor, CX-5461. The direct reduction of rRNA synthesis by CX-5461 induces the expression of markers for all three germ layers, reduces the expression of pluripotency markers, and is overall similar to the ACTIVIN A induced changes. This work indicates that the dissociation of UBTF from the rRNA gene, and corresponding reduction in transcription, represent early regulatory events during the directed differentiation of pluripotent stem cells. PMID:27299313

  4. FISH and AgNor mapping of the 45S and 5S rRNA genes in wild and cultivated species of Capsicum (Solananceae).

    PubMed

    Scaldaferro, Marisel A; da Cruz, M Victoria Romero; Cecchini, Nicolás M; Moscone, Eduardo A

    2016-02-01

    Chromosome number and position of rDNA were studied in 12 wild and cultivated species of the genus Capsicum with chromosome numbers x = 12 and x = 13 (22 samples). For the first time in these species, the 5S and 45S rRNA loci were localized and physically mapped using two-color fluorescence in situ hybridization and AgNOR banding. We focused on the comparison of the results obtained with both methods with the aim of accurately revealing the real functional rRNA genes. The analyzes were based on a previous work that reported that the 18S-5.8S-25S loci mostly coincide with GC-rich heterochromatic regions and likely have given rise to satellite DNAs, which are not active genes. These data show the variability of rDNA within karyotypes of the genus Capsicum, providing anchor points for (comparative) genetic maps. In addition, the obtained information might be useful for studies on evolution of repetitive DNA.

  5. Multiple origins of the ascidian-Prochloron symbiosis: molecular phylogeny of photosymbiotic and non-symbiotic colonial ascidians inferred from 18S rDNA sequences.

    PubMed

    Yokobori, Shin-Ichi; Kurabayashi, Atsushi; Neilan, Brett A; Maruyama, Tadashi; Hirose, Euichi

    2006-07-01

    In the tropics, certain didemnid ascidians harbor the prokaryotic photosymbiont Prochloron. To date, this photosymbiosis has been found in four didemnid genera that include non-symbiotic species. Here, we report the molecular phylogeny of symbiotic and non-symbiotic didemnids based on their 18S rDNA sequences. The data cover all four genera containing symbiotic species and one other genus comprised of only non-symbiotic species. Near-complete nucleotide sequences of 18S rDNAs were determined for four non-didemnid species and 52 didemnid samples (five genera), including 48 photosymbiotic samples collected from the Ryukyu Archipelago, the Great Barrier Reef, Hawaii, and Bali. Our phylogenetic trees indicated a monophyletic origin of the family Didemnidae, as well as each of the didemnid genera. The results strongly support the hypothesis that establishment of the ascidian-Prochloron symbiosis occurred independently in the Didemnidae lineage at least once in each of the genera that possess symbiotic species.

  6. Localization of 18S ribosomal genes in suckermouth armoured catfishes Loricariidae (Teleostei, Siluriformes) with discussion on the Ag-NOR evolution

    PubMed Central

    Alves, Anderson Luis; de Borba, Rafael Splendore; Pozzobon, Allan Pierre Bonetti; Oliveira, Claudio; Nirchio, Mauro; Granado, Angel; Foresti, Fausto

    2012-01-01

    Abstract The family Loricariidae with about 690 species divided into six subfamilies, is one of the world’s largest fish families. Cytogenetic studies conducted in the family showed that among 90 species analyzed the diploid number ranges from 2n=38 in Ancistrus sp. to 2n=96 in Hemipsilichthys gobio Luetken, 1874. In the present study, fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) was employed to determine the chromosomal localization of the 18S rDNA gene in four suckermouth armoured catfishes: Kronichthys lacerta (Nichols, 1919), Pareiorhaphis splendens (Bizerril, 1995), Liposarcus multiradiatus (Hancock, 1828) and Hypostomus prope plecostomus (Linnaeus, 1758). All species analyzed showed one chromosome pair with 18S rDNA sequences, as observed in the previous Ag-NORs analyses. The presence of size and numerical polymorphism was observed and discussed, with proposing a hypothesis of the Ag-NOR evolution in Loricariidae. PMID:24260671

  7. Distribution of Mosquitoes in the South East of Argentina and First Report on the Analysis Based on 18S rDNA and COI Sequences

    PubMed Central

    Díaz-Nieto, Leonardo M.; Maciá, Arnaldo; Parisi, Gustavo; Farina, Juan L.; Vidal-Domínguez, María E.; Perotti, M. Alejandra; Berón, Corina M.

    2013-01-01

    Although Mar del Plata is the most important city on the Atlantic coast of Argentina, mosquitoes inhabiting such area are almost uncharacterized. To increase our knowledge in their distribution, we sampled specimens of natural populations. After the morphological identification based on taxonomic keys, sequences of DNA from small ribosomal subunit (18S rDNA) and cytochrome c oxidase I (COI) genes were obtained from native species and the phylogenetic analysis of these sequences were done. Fourteen species from the genera Uranotaenia, Culex, Ochlerotatus and Psorophora were found and identified. Our 18S rDNA and COI-based analysis indicates the relationships among groups at the supra-species level in concordance with mosquito taxonomy. The introduction and spread of vectors and diseases carried by them are not known in Mar del Plata, but some of the species found in this study were reported as pathogen vectors. PMID:24098700

  8. Species identification through mitochondrial rRNA genetic analysis

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Li; Tan, Zongqing; Wang, Daren; Xue, Ling; Guan, Min-xin; Huang, Taosheng; Li, Ronghua

    2014-01-01

    Inter-species and intraspecific variations in mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) were observed in a bioinformatics analysis of the mitochondrial genomic sequences of 11 animal species. Some highly conserved regions were identified in the mitochondrial 12S and 16S ribosomal RNA (rRNA) genes of these species. To test whether these sequences are universally conserved, primers were designed to target the conserved regions of these two genes and were used to amplify DNA from 21 animal tissues, including two of unknown origin. By sequencing these PCR amplicons and aligning the sequences to a database of non-redundant nucleotide sequences, it was confirmed that these amplicons aligned specifically to mtDNA sequences from the expected species of origin. This molecular technique, when combined with bioinformatics, provides a reliable method for the taxonomic classification of animal tissues. PMID:24522485

  9. Dancing together and separate again: gymnosperms exhibit frequent changes of fundamental 5S and 35S rRNA gene (rDNA) organisation

    PubMed Central

    Garcia, S; Kovařík, A

    2013-01-01

    In higher eukaryotes, the 5S rRNA genes occur in tandem units and are arranged either separately (S-type arrangement) or linked to other repeated genes, in most cases to rDNA locus encoding 18S–5.8S–26S genes (L-type arrangement). Here we used Southern blot hybridisation, PCR and sequencing approaches to analyse genomic organisation of rRNA genes in all large gymnosperm groups, including Coniferales, Ginkgoales, Gnetales and Cycadales. The data are provided for 27 species (21 genera). The 5S units linked to the 35S rDNA units occur in some but not all Gnetales, Coniferales and in Ginkgo (∼30% of the species analysed), while the remaining exhibit separate organisation. The linked 5S rRNA genes may occur as single-copy insertions or as short tandems embedded in the 26S–18S rDNA intergenic spacer (IGS). The 5S transcript may be encoded by the same (Ginkgo, Ephedra) or opposite (Podocarpus) DNA strand as the 18S–5.8S–26S genes. In addition, pseudogenised 5S copies were also found in some IGS types. Both L- and S-type units have been largely homogenised across the genomes. Phylogenetic relationships based on the comparison of 5S coding sequences suggest that the 5S genes independently inserted IGS at least three times in the course of gymnosperm evolution. Frequent transpositions and rearrangements of basic units indicate relatively relaxed selection pressures imposed on genomic organisation of 5S genes in plants. PMID:23512008

  10. Reconstructing the Phylogeny of Capsosiphon fulvescens (Ulotrichales, Chlorophyta) from Korea Based on rbcL and 18S rDNA Sequences.

    PubMed

    Sun, Sang-Mi; Yang, Seung Hwan; Golokhvast, Kirill S; Le, Bao; Chung, Gyuhwa

    2016-01-01

    Capsosiphon fulvescens is a filamentous green algae in the class Ulvophyceae. It has been consumed as food with unique flavor and soft texture to treat stomach disorders and hangovers, and its economic value justifies studying its nutritional and potential therapeutic effects. In contrast to these applications, only a few taxonomic studies have been conducted on C. fulvescens. In particular, classification and phylogenetic relationships of the C. fulvescens below the order level are controversial. To determine its phylogenetic position in the class, we used rbcL and 18S rDNA sequences as molecular markers to construct phylogenetic trees. The amplified rbcL and 18S rDNA sequences from 4 C. fulvescens isolates (Jindo, Jangheung, Wando, and Koheung, Korea) were used for phylogenetic analysis by employing three different phylogenetic methods: neighbor joining (NJ), maximum parsimony (MP), and maximum likelihood (ML). The rbcL phylogenetic tree showed that all taxa in the order Ulvales were clustered as a monophyletic group and resolved the phylogenetic position of C. fulvescens in the order Ulotrichales. The significance of our study is that the 18S rDNA phylogenetic tree shows the detailed taxonomic position of C. fulvescens. In our result, C. fulvescens is inferred as a member of Ulotrichaceae, along with Urospora and Acrosiphonia.

  11. Co-located 18S/5S rDNA arrays: an ancient and unusual chromosomal trait in Julidini species (Labridae, Perciformes)

    PubMed Central

    Amorim, Karlla Danielle Jorge; Cioffi, Marcelo de Bello; Bertollo, Luiz Antonio Carlos; Soares, Rodrigo Xavier; de Souza, Allyson Santos; da Costa, Gideão Wagner Werneck Felix; Molina, Wagner Franco

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Wrasses (Labridae) are extremely diversified marine fishes, whose species exhibit complex interactions with the reef environment. They are widely distributed in the Indian, Pacific and Atlantic oceans. Their species have displayed a number of karyotypic divergent processes, including chromosomal regions with complex structural organization. Current cytogenetic information for this family is phylogenetically and geographically limited and mainly based on conventional cytogenetic techniques. Here, the distribution patterns of heterochromatin, GC-specific chromosome regions and Ag-NORs, and the organization of 18S and 5S rDNA sites of the Atlantic species Thalassoma noronhanum (Boulenger, 1890), Halichoeres poeyi (Steindachner, 1867), Halichoeres radiatus (Linnaeus, 1758), Halichoeres brasiliensis (Bloch, 1791) and Halichoeres penrosei Starks, 1913, belonging to the tribe Julidini were analyzed. All the species exhibited 2n=48 chromosomes with variation in the number of chromosome arms among genera. Thalassoma noronhanum has 2m+46a, while species of the genus Halichoeres Rüppell, 1835 share karyotypes with 48 acrocentric chromosomes. The Halichoeres species exhibit differences in the heterochromatin distribution patterns and in the number and distribution of 18S and 5S rDNA sites. The occurrence of 18S/5S rDNA syntenic arrangements in all the species indicates a functionally stable and adaptive genomic organization. The phylogenetic sharing of this rDNA organization highlights a marked and unusual chromosomal singularity inside the family Labridae. PMID:28123678

  12. Characterization of Dermanyssus gallinae (Acarina: Dermanissydae) by sequence analysis of the ribosomal internal transcribed spacer regions.

    PubMed

    Potenza, L; Cafiero, M A; Camarda, A; La Salandra, G; Cucchiarini, L; Dachà, M

    2009-10-01

    In the present work mites previously identified as Dermanyssus gallinae De Geer (Acari, Mesostigmata) using morphological keys were investigated by molecular tools. The complete internal transcribed spacer 1 (ITS1), 5.8S ribosomal DNA, and ITS2 region of the ribosomal DNA from mites were amplified and sequenced to examine the level of sequence variations and to explore the feasibility of using this region in the identification of this mite. Conserved primers located at the 3'end of 18S and at the 5'start of 28S rRNA genes were used first, and amplified fragments were sequenced. Sequence analyses showed no variation in 5.8S and ITS2 region while slight intraspecific variations involving substitutions as well as deletions concentrated in the ITS1 region. Based on the sequence analyses a nested PCR of the ITS2 region followed by RFLP analyses has been set up in the attempt to provide a rapid molecular diagnostic tool of D. gallinae.

  13. Imp3p and Imp4p mediate formation of essential U3–precursor rRNA (pre-rRNA) duplexes, possibly to recruit the small subunit processome to the pre-rRNA

    PubMed Central

    Gérczei, Tímea; Correll, Carl C.

    2004-01-01

    In eukaryotes, formation of short duplexes between the U3 small nucleolar RNA (snoRNA) and the precursor rRNA (pre-rRNA) at multiple sites is a prerequisite for three endonucleolytic cleavages that initiate small subunit biogenesis by releasing the 18S rRNA precursor from the pre-rRNA. The most likely role of these RNA duplexes is to guide the U3 snoRNA and its associated proteins, designated the small subunit processome, to the target cleavage sites on the pre-rRNA. Studies by others in Saccharomyces cerevisiae have identified the proteins Mpp10p, Imp3p, and Imp4p as candidates to mediate U3–pre-rRNA interactions. We report here that Imp3p and Imp4p appear to stabilize an otherwise unstable duplex between the U3 snoRNA hinge region and complementary bases in the external transcribed spacer of the pre-rRNA. In addition, Imp4p, but not Imp3p, seems to rearrange the U3 box A stem structure to expose the site that base-pairs with the 5′ end of the 18S rRNA, thereby mediating duplex formation at a second site. By mediating formation of both essential U3–pre-rRNA duplexes, Imp3p and Imp4p may help the small subunit processome to dock onto the pre-rRNA, an event indispensable for ribosome biogenesis and hence for cell growth. PMID:15489263

  14. Insights into the phylogenetic positions of photosynthetic bacteria obtained from 5S rRNA and 16S rRNA sequence data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fox, G. E.

    1985-01-01

    Comparisons of complete 16S ribosomal ribonucleic acid (rRNA) sequences established that the secondary structure of these molecules is highly conserved. Earlier work with 5S rRNA secondary structure revealed that when structural conservation exists the alignment of sequences is straightforward. The constancy of structure implies minimal functional change. Under these conditions a uniform evolutionary rate can be expected so that conditions are favorable for phylogenetic tree construction.

  15. Sequencing and analysis of the internal transcribed spacers (ITSs) and coding regions in the EcoR I fragment of the ribosomal DNA of the Japanese pond frog Rana nigromaculata.

    PubMed

    Sumida, Masayuki; Kato, Yoji; Kurabayashi, Atsushi

    2004-04-01

    The rDNA of eukaryotic organisms is transcribed as the 40S-45S rRNA precursor, and this precursor contains the following segments: 5' - ETS - 18S rRNA - ITS 1 - 5.8S rRNA - ITS 2 - 28S rRNA - 3'. In amphibians, the nucleotide sequences of the rRNA precursor have been completely determined in only two species of Xenopus. In the other amphibian species investigated so far, only the short nucleotide sequences of some rDNA fragments have been reported. We obtained a genomic clone containing the rDNA precursor from the Japanese pond frog Rana nigromaculata and analyzed its nucleotide sequence. The cloned genomic fragment was 4,806 bp long and included the 3'-terminus of 18S rRNA, ITS 1, 5.8S rRNA, ITS 2, and a long portion of 28S rRNA. A comparison of nucleotide sequences among Rana, the two species of Xenopus, and human revealed the following: (1) The 3'-terminus of 18S rRNA and the complete 5.8S rRNA were highly conserved among these four taxa. (2) The regions corresponding to the stem and loop of the secondary structure in 28S rRNA were conserved between Xenopus and Rana, but the rate of substitutions in the loop was higher than that in the stem. Many of the human loop regions had large insertions not seen in amphibians. (3) Two ITS regions had highly diverged sequences that made it difficult to compare the sequences not only between human and frogs, but also between Xenopus and Rana. (4) The short tracts in the ITS regions were strictly conserved between the two Xenopus species, and there was a corresponding sequence for Rana. Our data on the nucleotide sequence of the rRNA precursor from the Japanese pond frog Rana nigromaculata were used to examine the potential usefulness of the rRNA genes and ITS regions for evolutionary studies on frogs, because the rRNA precursor contains both highly conserved regions and rapidly evolving regions.

  16. Genetic diversity of Ephedra plants in mongolia inferred from internal transcribed spacer sequence of nuclear ribosomal DNA.

    PubMed

    Kitani, Yuki; Zhu, Shu; Batkhuu, Javzan; Sanchir, Chinbat; Komatsu, Katsuko

    2011-01-01

    Ephedrae herba has been used for treating colds, relieving coughs and asthma from ancient times. We previously reported the distribution of Ephedra sinica, E. equisetina, E. przewalskii, E. regeliana, E. monosperma and Ephedra sp. in Mongolia, and among them E. sinica and E. equisetina were potential new resources of Ephedrae herba of Japanese pharmacopoeia grade, based on our field survey and subsequent molecular and chemical assessments. However, the Ephedra population in southwestern areas showed a high possibility of having hybrid origins. Further field surveys in southwestern areas, and sequence analysis of the partial nuclear internal transcribed spacer 1 (ITS1) region, besides trnK and 18S ribosomal RNA (rRNA) gene regions, were conducted in order to obtain detailed evidence of hybridization status. As a result, the distribution of E. glauca in western area and E. lomatolepis in western-most area was confirmed. The ITS sequences from all 8 Ephedra species collected in Mongolia were roughly divided into 5 types (types I-V). Type II sequence, having several additive nucleotides, was found in Ephedra sp., E. glauca, E. regeliana and E. sinica, which provided useful information for tracing hybrid origins. Morphological, genetic and distribution evidence suggested that the hybridization of Ephedra species occurred widely in southwestern Mongolia, and several Ephedra species including E. przewalkskii and E. intermedia were involved in these events. Integrated with our previous report, trnK-, 18S- and ITS-types from pure lines of each species are proposed. In addition, we propose a practicable method for detecting additive peaks on a direct sequencing electropherogram.

  17. Molecular phylogeny and barcoding of Caulerpa (Bryopsidales) based on the tufA, rbcL, 18S rDNA and ITS rDNA genes.

    PubMed

    Kazi, Mudassar Anisoddin; Reddy, C R K; Jha, Bhavanath

    2013-01-01

    The biodiversity assessment of different taxa of the genus Caulerpa is of interest from the context of morphological plasticity, invasive potential of some species and biotechnological and pharmacological applications. The present study investigated the identification and molecular phylogeny of different species of Caulerpa occurring along the Indian coast inferred from tufA, rbcL, 18S rDNA and ITS rDNA nucleotide sequences. Molecular data confirmed the identification of 10 distinct Caulerpa species: C. veravalensis, C. verticillata, C. racemosa, C. microphysa, C. taxifolia, C. sertularioides, C. scalpelliformis, C. serrulata, C. peltata and C. mexicana. All datasets significantly supported the sister relationship between C. veravalensis and C. racemosa var. cylindracea. It was also concluded from the results that the specimen identified previously as C. microphysa and C. lentillifera could not be considered as separate species. The molecular data revealed the presence of multiple lineages for C. racemosa which can be resolved into separate species. All four markers were used to ascertain their utility for DNA barcoding. The tufA gene proved a better marker with monophyletic association as the main criteria for identification at the species level. The results also support the use of 18S rDNA insertion sequences to delineate the Caulerpa species through character-based barcoding. The ITS rDNA (5.8S-ITS2) phylogenetic analysis also served as another supporting tool. Further, more sequences from additional Caulerpa specimens will need to be analysed in order to support the role of these two markers (ITS rDNA and 18S insertion sequence) in identification of Caulerpa species. The present study revealed the phylogeny of Caulerpa as complete as possible using the currently available data, which is the first comprehensive report illustrating the molecular phylogeny and barcoding of the genus Caulerpa from Indian waters.

  18. Molecular Phylogeny and Barcoding of Caulerpa (Bryopsidales) Based on the tufA, rbcL, 18S rDNA and ITS rDNA Genes

    PubMed Central

    Kazi, Mudassar Anisoddin; Reddy, C. R. K.; Jha, Bhavanath

    2013-01-01

    The biodiversity assessment of different taxa of the genus Caulerpa is of interest from the context of morphological plasticity, invasive potential of some species and biotechnological and pharmacological applications. The present study investigated the identification and molecular phylogeny of different species of Caulerpa occurring along the Indian coast inferred from tufA, rbcL, 18S rDNA and ITS rDNA nucleotide sequences. Molecular data confirmed the identification of 10 distinct Caulerpa species: C. veravalensis, C. verticillata, C. racemosa, C. microphysa, C. taxifolia, C. sertularioides, C. scalpelliformis, C. serrulata, C. peltata and C. mexicana. All datasets significantly supported the sister relationship between C. veravalensis and C. racemosa var. cylindracea. It was also concluded from the results that the specimen identified previously as C. microphysa and C. lentillifera could not be considered as separate species. The molecular data revealed the presence of multiple lineages for C. racemosa which can be resolved into separate species. All four markers were used to ascertain their utility for DNA barcoding. The tufA gene proved a better marker with monophyletic association as the main criteria for identification at the species level. The results also support the use of 18S rDNA insertion sequences to delineate the Caulerpa species through character-based barcoding. The ITS rDNA (5.8S-ITS2) phylogenetic analysis also served as another supporting tool. Further, more sequences from additional Caulerpa specimens will need to be analysed in order to support the role of these two markers (ITS rDNA and 18S insertion sequence) in identification of Caulerpa species. The present study revealed the phylogeny of Caulerpa as complete as possible using the currently available data, which is the first comprehensive report illustrating the molecular phylogeny and barcoding of the genus Caulerpa from Indian waters. PMID:24340028

  19. Use of Subgenic 18S Ribosomal DNA PCR and Sequencing for Genus and Genotype Identification of Acanthamoebae from Humans with Keratitis and from Sewage Sludge

    PubMed Central

    Schroeder, Jill M.; Booton, Gregory C.; Hay, John; Niszl, Ingrid A.; Seal, David V.; Markus, Miles B.; Fuerst, Paul A.; Byers, Thomas J.

    2001-01-01

    This study identified subgenic PCR amplimers from 18S rDNA that were (i) highly specific for the genus Acanthamoeba, (ii) obtainable from all known genotypes, and (iii) useful for identification of individual genotypes. A 423- to 551-bp Acanthamoeba-specific amplimer ASA.S1 obtained with primers JDP1 and JDP2 was the most reliable for purposes i and ii. A variable region within this amplimer also identified genotype clusters, but purpose iii was best achieved with sequencing of the genotype-specific amplimer GTSA.B1. Because this amplimer could be obtained from any eukaryote, axenic Acanthamoeba cultures were required for its study. GTSA.B1, produced with primers CRN5 and 1137, extended between reference bp 1 and 1475. Genotypic identification relied on three segments: bp 178 to 355, 705 to 926, and 1175 to 1379. ASA.S1 was obtained from single amoeba, from cultures of all known 18S rDNA genotypes, and from corneal scrapings of Scottish patients with suspected Acanthamoeba keratitis (AK). The AK PCR findings were consistent with culture results for 11 of 15 culture-positive specimens and detected Acanthamoeba in one of nine culture-negative specimens. ASA.S1 sequences were examined for 6 of the 11 culture-positive isolates and were most closely associated with genotypic cluster T3-T4-T11. A similar distance analysis using GTSA.B1 sequences identified nine South African AK-associated isolates as genotype T4 and three isolates from sewage sludge as genotype T5. Our results demonstrate the usefulness of 18S ribosomal DNA PCR amplimers ASA.S1 and GTSA.B1 for Acanthamoeba-specific detection and reliable genotyping, respectively, and provide further evidence that T4 is the predominant genotype in AK. PMID:11326011

  20. Use of subgenic 18S ribosomal DNA PCR and sequencing for genus and genotype identification of acanthamoebae from humans with keratitis and from sewage sludge.

    PubMed

    Schroeder, J M; Booton, G C; Hay, J; Niszl, I A; Seal, D V; Markus, M B; Fuerst, P A; Byers, T J

    2001-05-01

    This study identified subgenic PCR amplimers from 18S rDNA that were (i) highly specific for the genus Acanthamoeba, (ii) obtainable from all known genotypes, and (iii) useful for identification of individual genotypes. A 423- to 551-bp Acanthamoeba-specific amplimer ASA.S1 obtained with primers JDP1 and JDP2 was the most reliable for purposes i and ii. A variable region within this amplimer also identified genotype clusters, but purpose iii was best achieved with sequencing of the genotype-specific amplimer GTSA.B1. Because this amplimer could be obtained from any eukaryote, axenic Acanthamoeba cultures were required for its study. GTSA.B1, produced with primers CRN5 and 1137, extended between reference bp 1 and 1475. Genotypic identification relied on three segments: bp 178 to 355, 705 to 926, and 1175 to 1379. ASA.S1 was obtained from single amoeba, from cultures of all known 18S rDNA genotypes, and from corneal scrapings of Scottish patients with suspected Acanthamoeba keratitis (AK). The AK PCR findings were consistent with culture results for 11 of 15 culture-positive specimens and detected Acanthamoeba in one of nine culture-negative specimens. ASA.S1 sequences were examined for 6 of the 11 culture-positive isolates and were most closely associated with genotypic cluster T3-T4-T11. A similar distance analysis using GTSA.B1 sequences identified nine South African AK-associated isolates as genotype T4 and three isolates from sewage sludge as genotype T5. Our results demonstrate the usefulness of 18S ribosomal DNA PCR amplimers ASA.S1 and GTSA.B1 for Acanthamoeba-specific detection and reliable genotyping, respectively, and provide further evidence that T4 is the predominant genotype in AK.

  1. Isolation and 18S ribosomal DNA gene sequences of Marteilioides chungmuensis (Paramyxea), an ovarian parasite of the Pacific oyster Crassostrea gigas.

    PubMed

    Itoh, Naoki; Oda, Tadashi; Yoshinaga, Tomoyoshi; Ogawa, Kazuo

    2003-03-31

    To develop sensitive detection techniques with the aim of elucidating the life cycle of Marteilioides chungmuensis, an intracellular paramyxean infecting the ovary of the Pacific oyster Crassostrea gigas, we isolated the parasite at the sporont stage from infected oysters using a freeze-thaw procedure at -20 degrees C and differential centrifugations in discontinuous sucrose and Percoll gradients. DNA was extracted from the isolated sporonts, and a PCR amplicon of 18S small subunit ribosomal RNA gene DNA was partially sequenced. In situ hybridization using 3 parasite-specific probes designed from the obtained sequence successfully detected parasite cells in infected oysters, and confirmed that the sequenced DNA was derived from M. chungmuensis.

  2. Determination of phylogenetic relationships among Eimeria species, which parasitize cattle, on the basis of nuclear 18S rDNA sequence.

    PubMed

    Kokuzawa, Takuya; Ichikawa-Seki, Madoka; Itagaki, Tadashi

    2013-11-01

    We analyzed almost complete 18S rDNA sequences of 10 bovine Eimeria species, namely Eimeria alabamensis, E. auburnensis, E. bovis, E. bukidnonensis, E. canadensis, E. cylindrica, E. ellipsoidalis, E. subspherica, E. wyomingensis and E. zuernii. Although these sequences showed intraspecific variation in 8 species, the sequences of each species were clustered in monophyletic groups in all species, except E. auburnensis. The sequences constituted 3 distinct clusters in a phylogenetic tree with relatively high bootstrap values; however, the members including each cluster shared no similarities in oocyst morphology.

  3. rRNA maturation as a "quality" control step in ribosomal subunit assembly in Dictyostelium discoideum.

    PubMed

    Mangiarotti, G; Chiaberge, S; Bulfone, S

    1997-10-31

    In Dictyostelium discoideum, newly assembled ribosomal subunits enter polyribosomes while they still contain immature rRNA. rRNA maturation requires the engagement of the subunits in protein synthesis and leads to stabilization of their structure. Maturation of pre-17 S rRNA occurs only after the newly formed 40 S ribosomal particle has entered an 80 S ribosome and participated at least in the formation of one peptide bond or in one translocation event; maturation of pre-26 S rRNA requires the presence on the 80 S particle of a peptidyl-tRNA containing at least 6 amino acids. Newly assembled particles that cannot fulfill these requirements for structural reasons are disassembled into free immature rRNA and ribosomal proteins.

  4. Rapid identification of Penicillium marneffei by PCR-based detection of specific sequences on the rRNA gene.

    PubMed

    Vanittanakom, Nongnuch; Vanittanakom, Pramote; Hay, Roderick J

    2002-05-01

    An emerging pathogenic dimorphic fungus, Penicillium marneffei, is one of the major causes of morbidity in patients with human immunodeficiency virus infection in Southeast Asia. A PCR-hybridization assay has been developed to identify this pathogen. This study describes the use of single and nested PCR methods for the rapid identification of P. marneffei. Two sets of oligonucleotide primers were derived from the sequence of 18S rRNA genes of P. marneffei. The outer primers (RRF1 and RRH1) were fungus specific. The inner primers (Pm1 and Pm2) were specific for P. marneffei and were used in nested or single PCR. The specific fragment of approximately 400-bp was amplified from both mold and yeast forms of 13 P. marneffei human isolates, 12 bamboo rat isolates, and 1 soil isolate, but not from other fungi, bacteria, and human DNA. The amplified products were analyzed by agarose gel electrophoresis followed by ethidium bromide staining. The sensitivities of the single PCR and nested PCR were 1.0 pg/microl and 1.8 fg/microl, respectively. The assay is useful for rapid identification of P. marneffei cultures. Very young culture of P. marneffei (2-day-old filamentous colony, 2 mm in diameter) could be performed by this assay. The species was identified within 7 h (single PCR) or 10 h (nested PCR), compared to 4 to 7 days for confirmation of dimorphism. The application of these PCR methods for early diagnosis of the disease needs to be studied further.

  5. Direct Detection of 16S rRNA in Soil Extracts by Using Oligonucleotide Microarrays

    PubMed Central

    Small, Jack; Call, Douglas R.; Brockman, Fred J.; Straub, Timothy M.; Chandler, Darrell P.

    2001-01-01

    We report on the development and validation of a simple microarray method for the direct detection of intact 16S rRNA from unpurified soil extracts. Total RNAs from Geobacter chapellei and Desulfovibrio desulfuricans were hybridized to an oligonucleotide array consisting of universal and species-specific 16S rRNA probes. PCR-amplified products from Geobacter and Desulfovibrio were easily and specifically detected under a range of hybridization times, temperatures, and buffers. However, reproducible, specific hybridization and detection of intact rRNA could be accomplished only by using a chaperone-detector probe strategy. With this knowledge, assay conditions were developed for rRNA detection using a 2-h hybridization time at room temperature. Hybridization specificity and signal intensity were enhanced using fragmented RNA. Formamide was required in the hybridization buffer in order to achieve species-specific detection of intact rRNA. With the chaperone detection strategy, we were able to specifically hybridize and detect G. chapellei 16S rRNA directly from a total-RNA soil extract, without further purification or removal of soluble soil constituents. The detection sensitivity for G. chapellei 16S rRNA in soil extracts was at least 0.5 μg of total RNA, representing approximately 7.5 × 106 Geobacter cell equivalents of RNA. These results suggest that it is now possible to apply microarray technology to the direct detection of microorganisms in environmental samples, without using PCR. PMID:11571176

  6. Trans-splicing and RNA editing of LSU rRNA in Diplonema mitochondria

    PubMed Central

    Valach, Matus; Moreira, Sandrine; Kiethega, Georgette N.; Burger, Gertraud

    2014-01-01

    Mitochondrial ribosomal RNAs (rRNAs) often display reduced size and deviant secondary structure, and sometimes are fragmented, as are their corresponding genes. Here we report a mitochondrial large subunit rRNA (mt-LSU rRNA) with unprecedented features. In the protist Diplonema, the rnl gene is split into two pieces (modules 1 and 2, 534- and 352-nt long) that are encoded by distinct mitochondrial chromosomes, yet the rRNA is continuous. To reconstruct the post-transcriptional maturation pathway of this rRNA, we have catalogued transcript intermediates by deep RNA sequencing and RT-PCR. Gene modules are transcribed separately. Subsequently, transcripts are end-processed, the module-1 transcript is polyuridylated and the module-2 transcript is polyadenylated. The two modules are joined via trans-splicing that retains at the junction ∼26 uridines, resulting in an extent of insertion RNA editing not observed before in any system. The A-tail of trans-spliced molecules is shorter than that of mono-module 2, and completely absent from mitoribosome-associated mt-LSU rRNA. We also characterize putative antisense transcripts. Antisense-mono-modules corroborate bi-directional transcription of chromosomes. Antisense-mt-LSU rRNA, if functional, has the potential of guiding concomitantly trans-splicing and editing of this rRNA. Together, these findings open a window on the investigation of complex regulatory networks that orchestrate multiple and biochemically diverse post-transcriptional events. PMID:24259427

  7. rRNA promoter activity in the fast-growing bacterium Vibrio natriegens.

    PubMed

    Aiyar, Sarah E; Gaal, Tamas; Gourse, Richard L

    2002-03-01

    The bacterium Vibrio natriegens can double with a generation time of less than 10 min (R. G. Eagon, J. Bacteriol. 83:736-737, 1962), a growth rate that requires an extremely high rate of protein synthesis. We show here that V. natriegens' high potential for protein synthesis results from an increase in ribosome numbers with increasing growth rate, as has been found for other bacteria. We show that V. natriegens contains a large number of rRNA operons, and its rRNA promoters are extremely strong. The V. natriegens rRNA core promoters are at least as active in vitro as Escherichia coli rRNA core promoters with either E. coli RNA polymerase (RNAP) or V. natriegens RNAP, and they are activated by UP elements, as in E. coli. In addition, the E. coli transcription factor Fis activated V. natriegens rrn P1 promoters in vitro. We conclude that the high capacity for ribosome synthesis in V. natriegens results from a high capacity for rRNA transcription, and the high capacity for rRNA transcription results, at least in part, from the same factors that contribute most to high rates of rRNA transcription in E. coli, i.e., high gene dose and strong activation by UP elements and Fis.

  8. The RNA recognition motif of NIFK is required for rRNA maturation during cell cycle progression.

    PubMed

    Pan, Wen-An; Tsai, Hsin-Yue; Wang, Shun-Chang; Hsiao, Michael; Wu, Pei-Yu; Tsai, Ming-Daw

    2015-01-01

    Ribosome biogenesis governs protein synthesis. NIFK is transactivated by c-Myc, the key regulator of ribosome biogenesis. The biological function of human NIFK is not well established, except that it has been shown to interact with Ki67 and NPM1. Here we report that NIFK is required for cell cycle progression and participates in the ribosome biogenesis via its RNA recognition motif (RRM). We show that silencing of NIFK inhibits cell proliferation through a reversible p53-dependent G1 arrest, possibly by induction of the RPL5/RPL11-mediated nucleolar stress. Mechanistically it is the consequence of impaired maturation of 28S and 5.8S rRNA resulting from inefficient cleavage of internal transcribed spacer (ITS) 1, a critical step in the separation of pre-ribosome to small and large subunits. Complementation of NIFK silencing by mutants shows that RNA-binding ability of RRM is essential for the pre-rRNA processing and G1 progression. More specifically, we validate that the RRM of NIFK preferentially binds to the 5'-region of ITS2 rRNA likely in both sequence specific and secondary structure dependent manners. Our results show how NIFK is involved in cell cycle progression through RRM-dependent pre-rRNA maturation, which could enhance our understanding of the function of NIFK in cell proliferation, and potentially also cancer and ribosomopathies.

  9. Chromatin endogenous cleavage and psoralen crosslinking assays to analyze rRNA gene chromatin in vivo.

    PubMed

    Griesenbeck, Joachim; Wittner, Manuel; Charton, Romain; Conconi, Antonio

    2012-01-01

    In eukaryotes, multiple copies of ribosomal RNA (rRNA) genes co-exist in two different chromatin states: actively transcribed (nucleosome depleted) chromatin, and nontranscribed (nucleosomal) chromatin. The presence of two rRNA gene populations compromises the interpretation of analyses obtained by the standard biochemical methods that are used to study chromatin structure (e.g., nuclease digestion and chromatin immunoprecipitation). Here, we provide a protocol to investigate the specific association of proteins with the two rRNA gene chromatin populations in vivo, using Saccharomyces cerevisiae as a model eukaryote.

  10. 18S rDNA analysis of alkenone-producing haptophyte(s) preserved in surface sediments of Lake Toyoni, Japan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McColl, J. L.; Couto, J.; Bendle, J. A.; Henderson, A. C.; Seki, O.; Phoenix, V. R.; Toney, J. L.

    2013-12-01

    Alkenones (long chain ketones) are readily preserved in sedimentary archives and have the potential to provide quantitative reconstructions of past water temperature. Alkenones are produced by a limited number of haptophyte algae in the marine and also some lacustrine systems. However, lakes are heterogeneous: an individual lake will have a unique combination of ecological conditions, haptophyte species and seasonal alkenone production that contributes to the sedimentary record. Haptophyte algae species have different sensitivities to temperature; therefore identifying the alkenone producer(s) prior to down-core temperature reconstructions is critical before selecting the most appropriate temperature calibration. We present a study from Lake Toyoni, a freshwater lake in Hokkaido, Japan that has alkenones preserved in surface sediments. The aim of this study is to identify the alkenone producer(s) within the lake using 18S rDNA analyses. Preserved rDNA of planktonic phototrophic algae was extracted from surface sediments of Lake Toyoni and phylogenetic analyses of the rDNA sequences suggest alkenones are produced by a single haptophyte within the class Prymnesiophyceae (order Isochrysidales). The Lake Toyoni alkenone-producer shares a distinct phylotype with a haptophyte reported from water filter samples collected in Lake BrayaSø, Greenland (D'Andrea et al., 2006). Similarity between the 18S rDNA sequences from Lake Toyoni and Lake BrayaSø provides a basis for applying (and updating) the Greenland lake temperature calibration. Applying this temperature calibration (T°C = 40.8 [UK37] + 31.8, R2=0.96; n=34) to the surface sediment alkenone unsaturation index from Lake Toyoni gives an estimated lake surface temperature (LST) of 8°C. This is in line with observed LST at Lake Toyoni, which ranges between 7 - 22°C (Apr 2011 to Nov 2011). The occurrence and identification of a single alkenone producer in Lake Toyoni means problems posed by a mixture of haptophytes in

  11. Use of 16S rRNA, 23S rRNA, and gyrB Gene Sequence Analysis To Determine Phylogenetic Relationships of Bacillus cereus Group Microorganisms

    PubMed Central

    Bavykin, Sergei G.; Lysov, Yuri P.; Zakhariev, Vladimir; Kelly, John J.; Jackman, Joany; Stahl, David A.; Cherni, Alexey

    2004-01-01

    In order to determine if variations in rRNA sequence could be used for discrimination of the members of the Bacillus cereus group, we analyzed 183 16S rRNA and 74 23S rRNA sequences for all species in the B. cereus group. We also analyzed 30 gyrB sequences for B. cereus group strains with published 16S rRNA sequences. Our findings indicated that the three most common species of the B. cereus group, B. cereus, Bacillus thuringiensis, and Bacillus mycoides, were each heterogeneous in all three gene sequences, while all analyzed strains of Bacillus anthracis were found to be homogeneous. Based on analysis of 16S and 23S rRNA sequence variations, the microorganisms within the B. cereus group were divided into seven subgroups, Anthracis, Cereus A and B, Thuringiensis A and B, and Mycoides A and B, and these seven subgroups were further organized into two distinct clusters. This classification of the B. cereus group conflicts with current taxonomic groupings, which are based on phenotypic traits. The presence of B. cereus strains in six of the seven subgroups and the presence of B. thuringiensis strains in three of the subgroups do not support the proposed unification of B. cereus and B. thuringiensis into one species. Analysis of the available phenotypic data for the strains included in this study revealed phenotypic traits that may be characteristic of several of the subgroups. Finally, our results demonstrated that rRNA and gyrB sequences may be used for discriminating B. anthracis from other microorganisms in the B. cereus group. PMID:15297521

  12. Use of 16S rRNA, 23S rRNA, and gyrB gene sequence analysis to determine phylogenetic relationships of Bacillus cereus group.

    SciTech Connect

    Bayvkin, S. G.; Lysov, Y. P.; Zakhariev, V.; Kelly, J. J.; Jackman, J.; Stahl, D. A.; Cherni, A.; Engelhardt Inst. of Molecular Biology; Loyola Univ.; Johns Hopkins Univ.; Univ. of Washington

    2004-08-01

    In order to determine if variations in rRNA sequence could be used for discrimination of the members of the Bacillus cereus group, we analyzed 183 16S rRNA and 74 23S rRNA sequences for all species in the B. cereus group. We also analyzed 30 gyrB sequences for B. cereus group strains with published 16S rRNA sequences. Our findings indicated that the three most common species of the B. cereus group, B. cereus, Bacillus thuringiensis, and Bacillus mycoides, were each heterogeneous in all three gene sequences, while all analyzed strains of Bacillus anthracis were found to be homogeneous. Based on analysis of 16S and 23S rRNA sequence variations, the microorganisms within the B. cereus group were divided into seven subgroups, Anthracis, Cereus A and B, Thuringiensis A and B, and Mycoides A and B, and these seven subgroups were further organized into two distinct clusters. This classification of the B. cereus group conflicts with current taxonomic groupings, which are based on phenotypic traits. The presence of B. cereus strains in six of the seven subgroups and the presence of B. thuringiensis strains in three of the subgroups do not support the proposed unification of B. cereus and B. thuringiensis into one species. Analysis of the available phenotypic data for the strains included in this study revealed phenotypic traits that may be characteristic of several of the subgroups. Finally, our results demonstrated that rRNA and gyrB sequences may be used for discriminating B. anthracis from other microorganisms in the B. cereus group.

  13. Phylogeny of freshwater parasitic copepods in the Ergasilidae (Copepoda: Poecilostomatoida) based on 18S and 28S rDNA sequences.

    PubMed

    Song, Y; Wang, G T; Yao, W J; Gao, Q; Nie, P

    2008-01-01

    The phylogenetic relationships among the Ergasilidae genera are poorly understood. In this study, 14 species from four genera in the Ergasilidae including Sinergasilus, Ergasilus, Pseudergasilus, and Paraergasilus were collected in China, and their phylogenetic relationships were examined using neighbor-joining, maximum parsimony, maximum likelihood, and Bayesian inference methods based on partial sequences of 18S and 28S ribosomal deoxyribonucleic acid, respectively. All the analyses suggest that the Sinergasilus and Paraergasilus are both monophyletic, but the Ergasilus is polyphyletic rather than monophyletic. Considering the relationships among the four genera, the phylogenetic analyses and subsequent hypothesis tests all suggest that Pseudergasilus clustered with some Ergasilus species may have a closer relationship with Sinergasilus rather than with Paraergasilus. It is proposed that the Sinergasilus and the Pseudergasilus species might have evolved from Ergasilus species.

  14. Slow molecular evolution in 18S rDNA, rbcL and nad5 genes of mosses compared with higher plants.

    PubMed

    Stenøien, H K

    2008-03-01

    The evolutionary potential of bryophytes (mosses, liverworts and hornworts) has been debated for decades. Fossil record and biogeographical distribution patterns suggest very slow morphological evolution and the retainment of several ancient traits since the split with vascular plants some 450 million years ago. Many have argued that bryophytes may evolve as rapidly as higher plants on the molecular level, but this hypothesis has not been tested so far. Here, it is shown that mosses have experienced significantly lower rates of molecular evolution than higher plants within 18S rDNA (nuclear), rbcL (chloroplast) and nad5 (mitochondrial) genes. Mosses are on an average evolving 2-3 times slower than ferns, gymnosperms and angiosperms; and also green algae seem to be evolving faster than nonvascular plants. These results support the observation of a general correlation between morphological and molecular evolutionary rates in plants and also show that mosses are 'evolutionary sphinxes' regarding both morphological and molecular evolutionary potential.

  15. Molecular characterization and phylogeny of Linguatula serrata (Pentastomida: Linguatulidae) based on the nuclear 18S rDNA and mitochondrial cytochrome c oxidase I gene

    PubMed Central

    MOHANTA, Uday Kumar; ITAGAKI, Tadashi

    2016-01-01

    Linguatula serrata, a cosmopolitan parasite, is commonly known as tongue worm belonging to the subclass Pentastomida.We collected the nymphal stage of the worm from mesenteric lymph nodes of cattle and identified these as L. serrata based on morphology and morphometry. The 18S rDNA sequences showed no intraspecific variation, although cox1 sequences showed 99.7–99.9% homology. In the phylogenies inferred from both gene loci, members of the genus Linguatula (order Porocephalida) were closer to those of the order Cephalobaenida than to those of Porocephalida, reflecting a mismatch with the corresponding morphology-based taxonomy. Accordingly, analyses of additional gene loci using a larger number of taxa across the Pentastomida should be undertaken to determine an accurate phylogenetic position within the Arthropoda. PMID:27941305

  16. Triploblastic relationships with emphasis on the acoelomates and the position of Gnathostomulida, Cycliophora, Plathelminthes, and Chaetognatha: a combined approach of 18S rDNA sequences and morphology.

    PubMed

    Giribet, G; Distel, D L; Polz, M; Sterrer, W; Wheeler, W C

    2000-09-01

    Triploblastic relationships were examined in the light of molecular and morphological evidence. Representatives for all triploblastic "phyla" (except Loricifera) were represented by both sources of phylogenetic data. The 18S ribosomal (rDNA) sequence data for 145 terminal taxa and 276 morphological characters coded for 36 supraspecific taxa were combined in a total evidence regime to determine the most consistent picture of triploblastic relationships for these data. Only triploblastic taxa are used to avoid rooting with distant outgroups, which seems to happen because of the extreme distance that separates diploblastic from triploblastic taxa according to the 18S rDNA data. Multiple phylogenetic analyses performed with variable analysis parameters yield largely inconsistent results for certain groups such as Chaetognatha, Acoela, and Nemertodermatida. A normalized incongruence length metric is used to assay the relative merit of the multiple analyses. The combined analysis having the least character incongruence yields the following scheme of relationships of four main clades: (1) Deuterostomia [((Echinodermata + Enteropneusta) (Cephalochordata (Urochordata + Vertebrata)))]; (2) Ecdysozoa [(((Priapulida + Kinorhyncha) (Nematoda + Nematomorpha)) ((Onychophora + Tardigrada) Arthropoda))]; (3) Trochozoa [((Phoronida + Brachiopoda) (Entoprocta (Nemertea (Sipuncula (Mollusca (Pogonophora (Echiura + Annelida)))))))]; and (4) Platyzoa [((Gnathostomulida (Cycliophora + Syndermata)) (Gastrotricha + Plathelminthes))]. Chaetognatha, Nemertodermatida, and Bryozoa cannot be assigned to any one of these four groups. For the first time, a data analysis recognizes a clade of acoelomates, the Platyzoa (sensu Cavalier-Smith, Biol. Rev. 73:203-266, 1998). Other relationships that corroborate some morphological analyses are the existence of a clade that groups Gnathostomulida + Syndermata (= Gnathifera), which is expanded to include the enigmatic phylum Cycliophora, as sister group

  17. Dinoflagellate 17S rRNA sequence inferred from the gene sequence: Evolutionary implications

    PubMed Central

    Herzog, Michel; Maroteaux, Luc

    1986-01-01

    We present the complete sequence of the nuclear-encoded small-ribosomal-subunit RNA inferred from the cloned gene sequence of the dinoflagellate Prorocentrum micans. The dinoflagellate 17S rRNA sequence of 1798 nucleotides is contained in a family of 200 tandemly repeated genes per haploid genome. A tentative model of the secondary structure of P. micans 17S rRNA is presented. This sequence is compared with the small-ribosomal-subunit rRNA of Xenopus laevis (Animalia), Saccharomyces cerevisiae (Fungi), Zea mays (Planta), Dictyostelium discoideum (Protoctista), and Halobacterium volcanii (Monera). Although the secondary structure of the dinoflagellate 17S rRNA presents most of the eukaryotic characteristics, it contains sufficient archaeobacterial-like structural features to reinforce the view that dinoflagellates branch off very early from the eukaryotic lineage. PMID:16578795

  18. Dinoflagellate 17S rRNA sequence inferred from the gene sequence: Evolutionary implications.

    PubMed

    Herzog, M; Maroteaux, L

    1986-11-01

    We present the complete sequence of the nuclear-encoded small-ribosomal-subunit RNA inferred from the cloned gene sequence of the dinoflagellate Prorocentrum micans. The dinoflagellate 17S rRNA sequence of 1798 nucleotides is contained in a family of 200 tandemly repeated genes per haploid genome. A tentative model of the secondary structure of P. micans 17S rRNA is presented. This sequence is compared with the small-ribosomal-subunit rRNA of Xenopus laevis (Animalia), Saccharomyces cerevisiae (Fungi), Zea mays (Planta), Dictyostelium discoideum (Protoctista), and Halobacterium volcanii (Monera). Although the secondary structure of the dinoflagellate 17S rRNA presents most of the eukaryotic characteristics, it contains sufficient archaeobacterial-like structural features to reinforce the view that dinoflagellates branch off very early from the eukaryotic lineage.

  19. An Archaea 5S rRNA analog is stably expressed in Escherichia coli

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yang, Y.; Fox, G. E.

    1996-01-01

    Mini-genes for 5S-like rRNA were constructed. These genes had a sequence which largely resembles that of the naturally occurring 5S rRNA of a bacterium, Halococcus morrhuae, which phylogenetically belongs to the Archaea. Plasmids carrying the mini-genes were transformed into Escherichia coli (Ec). Ribosomal incorporation was not a prerequisite for stable accumulation of the RNA product. However, only those constructs with a well-base-paired helix I accumulated RNA product. This result strongly implies that this aspect of the structure is likely to be an important condition for stabilizing 5S rRNA-like products. The results are consistent with our current understanding of 5S rRNA processing in Ec. When used in conjunction with rRNA probe technology, the resulting chimeric RNA may be useful as a monitoring tool for genetically engineered microorganisms or naturally occurring organisms that are released into the environment.

  20. Processing pathway of Escherichia coli 16S precursor rRNA.

    PubMed Central

    Srivastava, A K; Schlessinger, D

    1989-01-01

    Immediate precursors of 16S rRNA are processed by endonucleolytic cleavage at both 5' and 3' mature termini, with the concomitant release of precursor fragments which are further metabolized by both exo- and endonucleases. In wild-type cells rapid cleavages by RNase III in precursor-specific sequences precede the subsequent formation of the mature ends; mature termini can, however, be formed directly from pre-16S rRNA with no intermediate species. The direct maturation is most evident in a strain deficient in RNase III, and the results in whole cells are consistent with results from maturation reactions in vitro. Thus, maturation does not require cleavages within the double-stranded stems that enclose mature rRNA sequences in the pre-16S rRNA. Images PMID:2646597

  1. The binding site for ribosomal protein S8 in 16S rRNA and spc mRNA from Escherichia coli: minimum structural requirements and the effects of single bulged bases on S8-RNA interaction.

    PubMed Central

    Wu, H; Jiang, L; Zimmermann, R A

    1994-01-01

    Through specific interactions with rRNA and mRNA, ribosomal protein S8 of Escherichia coli plays a central role in both assembly of the 30S ribosomal subunit and translational regulation of spc operon expression. To better understand S8-RNA association, we have measured the affinity of S8 for a number of variants of its rRNA and mRNA binding sites prepared by in vitro transcription or chemical synthesis. With the aid of site-directed deletions, we demonstrate that an imperfect, 33-nucleotide helical stem encompassing nucleotides 588-603 and 635-651 possesses all of the structural information necessary for specific binding of S8 to the 16S rRNA. This segment consists of two short duplexes that enclose a conserved, asymmetric internal loop which contains features crucial for protein recognition. The S8 binding site in spc operon mRNA is very similar in both primary and secondary structure to that in 16S rRNA except for the presence of two single bulged bases in one of the duplex segments. In addition, the apparent association constant for the S8-mRNA interaction is approximately fivefold less than that for the S8-rRNA interaction. We show that the difference in affinity can be attributed to the effects of the bulged bases. Deletion of the bulged bases from the mRNA site increases its affinity for S8 to a level similar to that of the rRNA, whereas insertion of single-base bulges at equivalent positions within the rRNA site reduces its affinity for S8 to a value typical of the mRNA. Single-base bulges in the proximity of essential recognition features are therefore capable of modulating the strength of protein-RNA interactions. PMID:7515489

  2. Arabidopsis Chloroplast Mini-Ribonuclease III Participates in rRNA Maturation and Intron Recycling

    PubMed Central

    Hotto, Amber M.; Castandet, Benoît; Gilet, Laetitia; Higdon, Andrea; Condon, Ciarán; Stern, David B.

    2015-01-01

    RNase III proteins recognize double-stranded RNA structures and catalyze endoribonucleolytic cleavages that often regulate gene expression. Here, we characterize the functions of RNC3 and RNC4, two Arabidopsis thaliana chloroplast Mini-RNase III-like enzymes sharing 75% amino acid sequence identity. Whereas rnc3 and rnc4 null mutants have no visible phenotype, rnc3/rnc4 (rnc3/4) double mutants are slightly smaller and chlorotic compared with the wild type. In Bacillus subtilis, the RNase Mini-III is integral to 23S rRNA maturation. In Arabidopsis, we observed imprecise maturation of 23S rRNA in the rnc3/4 double mutant, suggesting that exoribonucleases generated staggered ends in the absence of specific Mini-III-catalyzed cleavages. A similar phenotype was found at the 3′ end of the 16S rRNA, and the primary 4.5S rRNA transcript contained 3′ extensions, suggesting that Mini-III catalyzes several processing events of the polycistronic rRNA precursor. The rnc3/4 mutant showed overaccumulation of a noncoding RNA complementary to the 4.5S-5S rRNA intergenic region, and its presence correlated with that of the extended 4.5S rRNA precursor. Finally, we found rnc3/4-specific intron degradation intermediates that are probable substrates for Mini-III and show that B. subtilis Mini-III is also involved in intron regulation. Overall, this study extends our knowledge of the key role of Mini-III in intron and noncoding RNA regulation and provides important insight into plastid rRNA maturation. PMID:25724636

  3. Complete nucleotide sequence of the 23S rRNA gene of the Cyanobacterium, Anacystis nidulans.

    PubMed Central

    Douglas, S E; Doolittle, W F

    1984-01-01

    The nucleotide sequence of the Anacystis nidulans 23S rRNA gene, including the 5'- and 3'-flanking regions has been determined. The gene is 2876 nucleotides long and shows higher primary sequence homology to the 23S rRNAs of plastids (84.5%) than to that of E. coli (79%). The predicted rRNA transcript also shares many secondary structural features with those of plastids, reinforcing the endosymbiont hypothesis for the origin of these organelles. PMID:6326060

  4. Arabidopsis chloroplast mini-ribonuclease III participates in rRNA maturation and intron recycling.

    PubMed

    Hotto, Amber M; Castandet, Benoît; Gilet, Laetitia; Higdon, Andrea; Condon, Ciarán; Stern, David B

    2015-03-01

    RNase III proteins recognize double-stranded RNA structures and catalyze endoribonucleolytic cleavages that often regulate gene expression. Here, we characterize the functions of RNC3 and RNC4, two Arabidopsis thaliana chloroplast Mini-RNase III-like enzymes sharing 75% amino acid sequence identity. Whereas rnc3 and rnc4 null mutants have no visible phenotype, rnc3/rnc4 (rnc3/4) double mutants are slightly smaller and chlorotic compared with the wild type. In Bacillus subtilis, the RNase Mini-III is integral to 23S rRNA maturation. In Arabidopsis, we observed imprecise maturation of 23S rRNA in the rnc3/4 double mutant, suggesting that exoribonucleases generated staggered ends in the absence of specific Mini-III-catalyzed cleavages. A similar phenotype was found at the 3' end of the 16S rRNA, and the primary 4.5S rRNA transcript contained 3' extensions, suggesting that Mini-III catalyzes several processing events of the polycistronic rRNA precursor. The rnc3/4 mutant showed overaccumulation of a noncoding RNA complementary to the 4.5S-5S rRNA intergenic region, and its presence correlated with that of the extended 4.5S rRNA precursor. Finally, we found rnc3/4-specific intron degradation intermediates that are probable substrates for Mini-III and show that B. subtilis Mini-III is also involved in intron regulation. Overall, this study extends our knowledge of the key role of Mini-III in intron and noncoding RNA regulation and provides important insight into plastid rRNA maturation.

  5. Prevalence of Mitochondrial 12S rRNA Mutations Associated with Aminoglycoside Ototoxicity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Guan, Min-Xin

    2005-01-01

    The mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) 12S rRNA is a hot spot for mutations associated with both aminoglycoside-induced and nonsyndromic hearing loss. Of those, the homoplasmic A1555G and C1494T mutations at a highly conserved decoding region of the 12S rRNA have been associated with hearing loss. These two mutations account for a significant number of…

  6. Sequence homologies between eukaryotic 5.8S rRNA and the 5' end of prokaryotic 23S rRNa: evidences for a common evolutionary origin.

    PubMed Central

    Jacq, B

    1981-01-01

    The question of the evolutionary origin of eukaryotic 5.8S rRNA was re-examined after the recent publication of the E. coli 23S rRNA sequence (26,40). A region of the 23S RNA located at its 5' end was found to be approximately 50% homologous to four different eukaryotic 5.8S rRNAs. A computer comparison analysis indicates that no other region of the E. coli ribosomal transcription unit (greater than 5 000 nucleotides in length) shares a comparable homology with 5.8S rRNA. Homology between the 5' end of e. coli 23S and four different eukaryotic 5.8S rRNAs falls within the same range as that between E. coli 5S RNA from the same four eukaryotic species. All these data strongly suggest that the 5' end of prokaryotic 23S rRNA and eukaryotic 5.8S RNA have a common evolutionary origin. Secondary structure models are proposed for the 5' region of E. coli 23S RNA. Images PMID:7024907

  7. Accurate taxonomy assignments from 16S rRNA sequences produced by highly parallel pyrosequencers

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Zongzhi; DeSantis, Todd Z.; Andersen, Gary L.; Knight, Rob

    2008-01-01

    The recent introduction of massively parallel pyrosequencers allows rapid, inexpensive analysis of microbial community composition using 16S ribosomal RNA (rRNA) sequences. However, a major challenge is to design a workflow so that taxonomic information can be accurately and rapidly assigned to each read, so that the composition of each community can be linked back to likely ecological roles played by members of each species, genus, family or phylum. Here, we use three large 16S rRNA datasets to test whether taxonomic information based on the full-length sequences can be recaptured by short reads that simulate the pyrosequencer outputs. We find that different taxonomic assignment methods vary radically in their ability to recapture the taxonomic information in full-length 16S rRNA sequences: most methods are sensitive to the region of the 16S rRNA gene that is targeted for sequencing, but many combinations of methods and rRNA regions produce consistent and accurate results. To process large datasets of partial 16S rRNA sequences obtained from surveys of various microbial communities, including those from human body habitats, we recommend the use of Greengenes or RDP classifier with fragments of at least 250 bases, starting from one of the primers R357, R534, R798, F343 or F517. PMID:18723574

  8. A Census of rRNA Genes and Linked Genomic Sequences within a Soil Metagenomic Library

    PubMed Central

    Liles, Mark R.; Manske, Brian F.; Bintrim, Scott B.; Handelsman, Jo; Goodman, Robert M.

    2003-01-01

    We have analyzed the diversity of microbial genomes represented in a library of metagenomic DNA from soil. A total of 24,400 bacterial artificial chromosome (BAC) clones were screened for 16S rRNA genes. The sequences obtained from BAC clones were compared with a collection generated by direct PCR amplification and cloning of 16S rRNA genes from the same soil. The results indicated that the BAC library had substantially lower representation of bacteria among the Bacillus, α-Proteobacteria, and CFB groups; greater representation among the β- and γ-Proteobacteria, and OP10 divisions; and no rRNA genes from the domains Eukaryota and Archaea. In addition to rRNA genes recovered from the bacterial divisions Proteobacteria, Verrucomicrobia, Firmicutes, Cytophagales, and OP11, we identified many rRNA genes from the BAC library affiliated with the bacterial division Acidobacterium; all of these sequences were affiliated with subdivisions that lack cultured representatives. The complete sequence of one BAC clone derived from a member of the Acidobacterium division revealed a complete rRNA operon and 20 other open reading frames, including predicted gene products involved in cell division, cell cycling, folic acid biosynthesis, substrate metabolism, amino acid uptake, DNA repair, and transcriptional regulation. This study is the first step in using genomics to reveal the physiology of as-yet-uncultured members of the Acidobacterium division. PMID:12732537

  9. Ecological significance of microdiversity: identical 16S rRNA gene sequences can be found in bacteria with highly divergent genomes and ecophysiologies.

    PubMed

    Jaspers, Elke; Overmann, Jörg

    2004-08-01

    A combination of cultivation-based methods with a molecular biological approach was used to investigate whether planktonic bacteria with identical 16S rRNA gene sequences can represent distinct eco- and genotypes. A set of 11 strains of Brevundimonas alba were isolated from a bacterial freshwater community by conventional plating or by using a liquid most-probable-number (MPN) dilution series. These strains had identical 16S rRNA gene sequences and represented the dominant phylotype in the plateable fraction, as well as in the highest positive dilutions of the MPN series. However, internally transcribed spacer and enterobacterial repetitive intergenic consensus PCR fingerprinting analyses, as well as DNA-DNA hybridization analyses, revealed great genetic diversity among the 11 strains. Each strain utilized a specific combination of 59 carbon substrates, and the niche overlap indices were low, suggesting that each strain occupied a different ecological niche. In dialysis cultures incubated in situ, each strain had a different growth rate and cell yield. We thus demonstrated that the B. alba strains represent distinct populations with genetically determined adaptations and probably occupy different ecological niches. Our results have implications for assessment of the diversity and biogeography of bacteria and increase the perception of natural diversity beyond the level of 16S rRNA gene sequences.

  10. Morphology, morphogenesis and small subunit rRNA gene sequence of a soil hypotrichous ciliate, Perisincirra paucicirrata (Ciliophora, Kahliellidae), from the shoreline of the Yellow River, North China.

    PubMed

    Li, Fengchao; Xing, Yi; Li, Jiamei; Al-Rasheid, Khaled A S; He, Songke; Shao, Chen

    2013-01-01

    The morphology, morphogenesis, and 18S rRNA gene sequence of a soil hypotrichous ciliate Perisincirra paucicirrata, isolated from north China, were investigated. Perisincirra paucicirrata differs from its congeners in: (1) having a body length to width ratio in vivo of 4:1, (2) its adoral zone occupying between 15% and 25% of the total body length, and (3) the presence of two parabuccal cirri, three left (with 10-16 cirri each) and two right marginal rows (with 14-24 cirri each), and three dorsal kineties. Our study offers a first attempt to begin to map the morphogenetic processes of the genus, which are mainly characterised by the following: the formation of four frontal ventral transverse anlagens for each daughter cell, with the proter's anlage I originating from the reorganised anterior part of the parental paroral; the paroral and endoral anlage developed from the reorganised old endoral and do not contribute the first frontal cirrus; the frontoventral transverse anlage I contributing the left frontal cirrus; anlage II generating the middle frontal and the buccal cirri; anlage III developing the right frontal cirrus and the anterior parabuccal cirrus; and anlage IV contributing the posterior parabuccal cirrus. As an additional contribution, we judge that the inner one or the two right rows of P. kahli and P. longicirrata are marginal rows. Phylogenetic analysis based on SSU rDNA sequences suggests that Perisincirra is related to sporadotrichids, but provides no credible evidence for its taxonomic position.

  11. Phylogenetic placement of the spider genus Nephila (Araneae: Araneoidea) inferred from rRNA and MaSp1 gene sequences.

    PubMed

    Pan, Hong-Chun; Zhou, Kai-Ya; Song, Da-Xiang; Qiu, Yang

    2004-03-01

    The family status of the genus Nephila, which belongs to Tetragnathidae currently but Araneidae formerly, was reexamined based on molecular phylogenetic analyses. In the present study, 12S and 18S rRNA gene fragments of eight species of spiders were amplified and sequenced. In addition, 3'-end partial cDNA of major ampullate spidroin-1 (MaSp1) gene of Argiope amoena was cloned and sequenced, and the 3'-end non-repetitive region's cDNA sequence of MaSp1 gene and the predicted amino acid sequence of C-terminal non-repetitive region of MaSp1 were aligned with some previously known sequences. The resulting phylogeny showed that Araneidae and Tetragnathidae are not a sister group in the superfamily Araneoidea, and the genus Nephila is closer to the genera of the family Araneidae rather than to those of Tetragnathidae. We suggest that the genus Nephila should be transferred back to Araneidae. Or the subfamily Nephilinae might be elevated to family level after it was redefined and redelimited. Furthermore, the study showed that 3'-end non-repetitive region's cDNA sequence of MaSp1 gene and C-terminal non-repetitive region's amino acid sequence of MaSp1 are useful molecular markers for phylogenetic analysis of spiders.

  12. Uncultivated microbial eukaryotic diversity: a method to link ssu rRNA gene sequences with morphology.

    PubMed

    Hirst, Marissa B; Kita, Kelley N; Dawson, Scott C

    2011-01-01

    Protists have traditionally been identified by cultivation and classified taxonomically based on their cellular morphologies and behavior. In the past decade, however, many novel protist taxa have been identified using cultivation independent ssu rRNA sequence surveys. New rRNA "phylotypes" from uncultivated eukaryotes have no connection to the wealth of prior morphological descriptions of protists. To link phylogenetically informative sequences with taxonomically informative morphological descriptions, we demonstrate several methods for combining whole cell rRNA-targeted fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH) with cytoskeletal or organellar immunostaining. Either eukaryote or ciliate-specific ssu rRNA probes were combined with an anti-α-tubulin antibody or phalloidin, a common actin stain, to define cytoskeletal features of uncultivated protists in several environmental samples. The eukaryote ssu rRNA probe was also combined with Mitotracker® or a hydrogenosomal-specific anti-Hsp70 antibody to localize mitochondria and hydrogenosomes, respectively, in uncultivated protists from different environments. Using rRNA probes in combination with immunostaining, we linked ssu rRNA phylotypes with microtubule structure to describe flagellate and ciliate morphology in three diverse environments, and linked Naegleria spp. to their amoeboid morphology using actin staining in hay infusion samples. We also linked uncultivated ciliates to morphologically similar Colpoda-like ciliates using tubulin immunostaining with a ciliate-specific rRNA probe. Combining rRNA-targeted FISH with cytoskeletal immunostaining or stains targeting specific organelles provides a fast, efficient, high throughput method for linking genetic sequences with morphological features in uncultivated protists. When linked to phylotype, morphological descriptions of protists can both complement and vet the increasing number of sequences from uncultivated protists, including those of novel lineages

  13. Yersinia spp. Identification Using Copy Diversity in the Chromosomal 16S rRNA Gene Sequence.

    PubMed

    Hao, Huijing; Liang, Junrong; Duan, Ran; Chen, Yuhuang; Liu, Chang; Xiao, Yuchun; Li, Xu; Su, Mingming; Jing, Huaiqi; Wang, Xin

    2016-01-01

    API 20E strip test, the standard for Enterobacteriaceae identification, is not sufficient to discriminate some Yersinia species for some unstable biochemical reactions and the same biochemical profile presented in some species, e.g. Yersinia ferderiksenii and Yersinia intermedia, which need a variety of molecular biology methods as auxiliaries for identification. The 16S rRNA gene is considered a valuable tool for assigning bacterial strains to species. However, the resolution of the 16S rRNA gene may be insufficient for discrimination because of the high similarity of sequences between some species and heterogeneity within copies at the intra-genomic level. In this study, for each strain we randomly selected five 16S rRNA gene clones from 768 Yersinia strains, and collected 3,840 sequences of the 16S rRNA gene from 10 species, which were divided into 439 patterns. The similarity among the five clones of 16S rRNA gene is over 99% for most strains. Identical sequences were found in strains of different species. A phylogenetic tree was constructed using the five 16S rRNA gene sequences for each strain where the phylogenetic classifications are consistent with biochemical tests; and species that are difficult to identify by biochemical phenotype can be differentiated. Most Yersinia strains form distinct groups within each species. However Yersinia kristensenii, a heterogeneous species, clusters with some Yersinia enterocolitica and Yersinia ferderiksenii/intermedia strains, while not affecting the overall efficiency of this species classification. In conclusion, through analysis derived from integrated information from multiple 16S rRNA gene sequences, the discrimination ability of Yersinia species is improved using our method.

  14. Use of Universal 16S rRNA Gene PCR as a Diagnostic Tool for Venous Access Port-Related Bloodstream Infections

    PubMed Central

    Marín, M.; Martín-Rabadán, P.; Echenagusia, A.; Camúñez, F.; Rodríguez-Rosales, G.; Simó, G.; Echenagusia, M.; Bouza, E.

    2013-01-01

    Amplification of the universal 16S rRNA gene using PCR has improved the diagnostic yield of microbiological samples. However, no data have been reported on the reliability of this technique with venous access ports (VAPs). We assessed the utility of 16S rRNA PCR for the prediction of VAP-related bloodstream infection (VAP-RBSI). During a 2-year period, we prospectively received all VAPs removed by interventional radiologists. PCR and conventional cultures were performed using samples from the different VAP sites. We compared the results of PCR with those of conventional culture for patients with confirmed VAP-RBSI. We collected 219 VAPs from 219 patients. Conventional VAP culture revealed 15 episodes of VAP-RBSI. PCR revealed a further 4 episodes in patients undergoing antibiotic therapy which would have gone undetected using conventional culture. Moreover, it had a negative predictive value of 97.8% for the prediction of VAP-RBSI when it was performed using biofilm from the internal surface of the port. In conclusion, universal 16S rRNA PCR performed with samples from the inside of VAPs proved to be a useful tool for the diagnosis of VAP-RBSI. It increased detection of VAP-RBSI episodes by 21.1% in patients undergoing antibiotic therapy whose episodes would have gone undetected using conventional culture. Therefore, we propose a new application of 16S rRNA PCR as a useful tool for the diagnosis of VAP-RBSI in patients receiving antibiotic therapy. PMID:23254136

  15. Phylogeny of coral-inhabiting barnacles (Cirripedia; Thoracica; Pyrgomatidae) based on 12S, 16S and 18S rDNA analysis.

    PubMed

    Simon-Blecher, N; Huchon, D; Achituv, Y

    2007-09-01

    The traditional phylogeny of the coral-inhabiting barnacles, the Pyrgomatidae, is based on morphological characteristics, mainly of the hard parts. It has been difficult to establish the phylogenetic relationships among Pyrgomatidae because of the apparent convergence of morphological characteristics, and due to the use of non-cladistic systematics, which emphasize ancestor-descendant relationships rather than sister-clade relationships. We used partial sequences of two mithochondrial genes, 12S rDNA and 16S rDNA, and a nuclear gene, 18S rDNA, to infer the molecular phylogeny of the pyrgomatids. Our phylogenetic results allowed us to reject previous classifications of Pyrgomatidae based on morphological characteristics. Our results also suggested the possibility of paraphyly of the Pyrgomatidae. The hydrocoral barnacle Wanella is not found on the same clade as the other pyrgomatids, but rather, with the free-living balanids. The basal position of Megatrema and Ceratoconcha is supported. The archeaobalanid Armatobalanus is grouped with Cantellius at the base of the Indo-Pacific pyrgomatines. Fusion of the shell plate and modification of the opercular valves are homoplasious features that occurred more than three times on different clades. The monophyly of the "Savignium" group, comprising four nominal genera, is also not supported, and the different taxa are placed on different clades.

  16. Morphology and 18S rDNA sequencing identifies Henneguya visibilis n. sp., a parasite of Leporinus obtusidens from Mogi Guaçu River, Brazil.

    PubMed

    Moreira, Gabriel S A; Adriano, Edson A; Silva, Marcia R M; Ceccarelli, Paulo S; Maia, Antônio A M

    2014-01-01

    During a survey of myxozoan parasites of freshwater fish from the Mogi Guaçu River in São Paulo State, Brazil, plasmodia of Henneguya visibilis n. sp. were found on the fins of Leporinus obtusidens (Characiformes: Anostomidae). The plasmodia, which were observed on five out of eight (62.5%) L. obtusidens examined, were 400-1,000 μm long. Mature spores were elongated with a spore body 10.8 ± 0.6 μm long and 3.9 ± 0.2 μm wide, a caudal process 18 ± 1.2 μm long, and a total spore length of 26.8 ± 1.1 μm. Polar capsules were elongated 4.9 ± 0.3 μm long and 1.4 ± 0.1 μm wide. Histological examination indicated that the plasmodia developed in the connective tissue, and no inflammatory infiltrate was observed at the infection site. Ultrastructural analysis showed a plasmodium wall with a single membrane and several pinocytotic canals. Sporogenesis occurred from the periphery to the center of the plasmodia. Phylogenetic analysis of the 18S rDNA sequence using maximum likelihood and maximum parsimony methods showed H. visibilis n. sp. positioned in a sub-clade composed of Henneguya/Myxobolus parasites of several freshwater fish families.

  17. Gregarine site-heterogeneous 18S rDNA trees, revision of gregarine higher classification, and the evolutionary diversification of Sporozoa.

    PubMed

    Cavalier-Smith, Thomas

    2014-10-01

    Gregarine 18S ribosomal DNA trees are hard to resolve because they exhibit the most disparate rates of rDNA evolution of any eukaryote group. As site-heterogeneous tree-reconstruction algorithms can give more accurate trees, especially for technically unusually challenging groups, I present the first site-heterogeneous rDNA trees for 122 gregarines and an extensive set of 452 appropriate outgroups. While some features remain poorly resolved, these trees fit morphological diversity better than most previous, evolutionarily less realistic, maximum likelihood trees. Gregarines are probably polyphyletic, with some 'eugregarines' and all 'neogregarines' (both abandoned as taxa) being more closely related to Cryptosporidium and Rhytidocystidae than to archigregarines. I establish a new subclass Orthogregarinia (new orders Vermigregarida, Arthrogregarida) for gregarines most closely related to Cryptosporidium and group Orthogregarinia, Cryptosporidiidae, and Rhytidocystidae as revised class Gregarinomorphea. Archigregarines are excluded from Gregarinomorphea and grouped with new orders Velocida (Urosporoidea superfam. n. and Veloxidium) and Stenophorida as a new sporozoan class Paragregarea. Platyproteum and Filipodium never group with Orthogregarinia or Paragregarea and are sufficiently different morphologically to merit a new order Squirmida. I revise gregarine higher-level classification generally in the light of site-heterogeneous-model trees, discuss their evolution, and also sporozoan cell structure and life-history evolution, correcting widespread misinterpretations.

  18. Nanoscale copper sulfide hollow spheres with phase-engineered composition: covellite (CuS), digenite (Cu1.8S), chalcocite (Cu2S).

    PubMed

    Leidinger, Peter; Popescu, Radian; Gerthsen, Dagmar; Lünsdorf, Heinrich; Feldmann, Claus

    2011-06-01

    Covellite (CuS), digenite (Cu(1.8)S) and chalcocite (Cu(2)S) are prepared as nanoscaled hollow spheres by reaction at the liquid-to-liquid phase boundary of a w/o-microemulsion. According to electron microscopy (SEM, STEM, TEM, HRTEM) the hollow spheres exhibit an outer diameter of 32-36 nm, a wall thickness of 8-12 nm and an inner cavity of 8-16 nm in diameter. The phase composition is determined based on HRTEM, electron-energy loss spectroscopy, X-ray powder diffraction and thermal analysis. In face of the advanced morphology of the hollow spheres, precise control of its phase composition is nevertheless possible by adjusting the experimental conditions (i.e. type and concentration of the copper precursor, concentration of ammonia inside of the micelle). Such phase-engineering of nanoscale hollow spheres is firstly observed and might allow adjusting even further compositions/structures as well as tailoring of phase-specific properties in the future.

  19. Detection of Kudoa septempunctata 18S ribosomal DNA in patient fecal samples from novel food-borne outbreaks caused by consumption of raw olive flounder (Paralichthys olivaceus).

    PubMed

    Harada, Tetsuya; Kawai, Takao; Jinnai, Michio; Ohnishi, Takahiro; Sugita-Konishi, Yoshiko; Kumeda, Yuko

    2012-09-01

    Kudoa septempunctata is a newly identified myxosporean parasite of olive flounder (Paralichthys olivaceus) and a suspected causative agent of several food-borne gastroenteritis outbreaks in Japan. Here, we report the detection of K. septempunctata 18S ribosomal DNA in fecal samples of outbreak patients using an efficient method based on real-time PCR. We first performed a spiking experiment to assess whether our previously developed real-time PCR assay was applicable to detect K. septempunctata in feces. Simultaneously, we compared the relative extraction efficacy of K. septempunctata DNA using three commercial kits. Finally, our detection method was validated by testing 45 clinical samples obtained from 13 food-borne outbreaks associated with the consumption of raw flounder and 41 fecal samples from diarrhea patients epidemiologically unrelated to the ingestion of raw fish. We found that the FastDNA Spin Kit for Soil (MP Biomedicals) was the most efficient method for extracting K. septempunctata DNA from fecal samples. Using this kit, the detection limit of our real-time PCR assay was 1.6 × 10(1) spores per g of feces, and positive results were obtained for 21 fecal and 2 vomitus samples obtained from the food-borne outbreaks. To our knowledge, this is the first report to describe the detection of K. septempunctata DNA in patient fecal samples. We anticipate that our detection method will be useful for confirming food-borne diseases caused by K. septempunctata in laboratory investigations.

  20. Seasonal and geographical distribution of near-surface small photosynthetic eukaryotes in the western North Pacific determined by pyrosequencing of 18S rDNA.

    PubMed

    Kataoka, Takafumi; Yamaguchi, Haruyo; Sato, Mayumi; Watanabe, Tsuyoshi; Taniuchi, Yukiko; Kuwata, Akira; Kawachi, Masanobu

    2017-02-01

    In this study, we investigated the distribution of small photosynthetic eukaryotes in the near-surface layer of the western North Pacific at four stations, including two oceanic stations where the subarctic Oyashio and subtropical Kuroshio currents influence a transition region and the bay mouth and head of the Sendai Bay, from April 2012 to May 2013. Flow cytometry was applied to sort small photosynthetic eukaryotes (<5 μm), and high-throughput sequencing of 18S rDNA was performed. Our taxonomic analysis showed that 19/195 operational taxonomic units (OTUs) were frequently distributed among all sites. Composition analysis showed that the OTUs had characteristic patterns and were divided into four main groups. Two groups reflected the low-saline water and winter season, with the characteristic OTUs belonging to diatoms; Chaetoceros and Leptocylindrus were characteristic of low saline water, and two diatom genera (Minidiscus and Minutocellus) and Cryptomonadales-related OTUs were prevalent in the winter. Our results indicate that the community composition of small photosynthetic eukaryotes seasonally changes in a dynamic manner according to variations in water properties.

  1. Dynamic changes in the distribution of a satellite homologous to intergenic 26-18S rDNA spacer in the evolution of Nicotiana.

    PubMed Central

    Lim, K Y; Skalicka, K; Koukalova, B; Volkov, R A; Matyasek, R; Hemleben, V; Leitch, A R; Kovarik, A

    2004-01-01

    An approximately 135-bp sequence called the A1/A2 repeat was isolated from the transcribed region of the 26-18S rDNA intergenic spacer (IGS) of Nicotiana tomentosiformis. Fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) and Southern blot analysis revealed its occurrence as an independent satellite (termed an A1/A2 satellite) outside of rDNA loci in species of Nicotiana section Tomentosae. The chromosomal location, patterns of genomic dispersion, and copy numbers of its tandemly arranged units varied between the species. In more distantly related Nicotiana species the A1/A2 repeats were found only at the nucleolar organizer regions (NOR). There was a trend toward the elimination of the A1/A2 satellite in N. tabacum (tobacco), an allotetraploid with parents closely related to the diploids N. sylvestris and N. tomentosiformis. This process may have already commenced in an S(3) generation of synthetic tobacco. Cytosine residues in the IGS were significantly hypomethylated compared with the A1/A2 satellite. There was no clear separation between the IGS and satellite fractions in sequence analysis of individual clones and we found no evidence for CG suppression. Taken together the data indicate a dynamic nature of the A1/A2 repeats in Nicotiana genomes, with evidence for recurrent integration, copy number expansions, and contractions. PMID:15126410

  2. When molecules support morphology: Phylogenetic reconstruction of the family Onuphidae (Eunicida, Annelida) based on 16S rDNA and 18S rDNA.

    PubMed

    Budaeva, Nataliya; Schepetov, Dmitry; Zanol, Joana; Neretina, Tatiana; Willassen, Endre

    2016-01-01

    Onuphid polychaetes are tubicolous marine worms commonly reported worldwide from intertidal areas to hadal depths. They often dominate in benthic communities and have economic importance in aquaculture and recreational fishing. Here we report the phylogeny of the family Onuphidae based on the combined analyses of nuclear (18S rDNA) and mitochondrial (16S rDNA) genes. Results of Bayesian and Maximum Likelihood analyses supported the monophyly of Onuphidae and its traditional subdivision into two monophyletic subfamilies: Onuphinae and Hyalinoeciinae. Ten of 22 recognized genera were monophyletic with strong node support; four more genera included in this study were either monotypic or represented by a single species. None of the genera appeared para- or polyphyletic and this indicates a strong congruence between the traditional morphology-based systematics of the family and the newly obtained molecular-based phylogenetic reconstructions. Intergeneric relationships within Hyalinoeciinae were not resolved. Two strongly supported monophyletic groups of genera were recovered within Onuphinae: ((Onuphis, Aponuphis), Diopatra, Paradiopatra) and (Hirsutonuphis, (Paxtonia, (Kinbergonuphis, Mooreonuphis))). A previously accepted hypothesis on the subdivision of Onuphinae into the Onuphis group of genera and the Diopatra group of genera was largely rejected.

  3. Decreases in average bacterial community rRNA operon copy number during succession.

    PubMed

    Nemergut, Diana R; Knelman, Joseph E; Ferrenberg, Scott; Bilinski, Teresa; Melbourne, Brett; Jiang, Lin; Violle, Cyrille; Darcy, John L; Prest, Tiffany; Schmidt, Steven K; Townsend, Alan R

    2016-05-01

    Trait-based studies can help clarify the mechanisms driving patterns of microbial community assembly and coexistence. Here, we use a trait-based approach to explore the importance of rRNA operon copy number in microbial succession, building on prior evidence that organisms with higher copy numbers respond more rapidly to nutrient inputs. We set flasks of heterotrophic media into the environment and examined bacterial community assembly at seven time points. Communities were arrayed along a geographic gradient to introduce stochasticity via dispersal processes and were analyzed using 16 S rRNA gene pyrosequencing, and rRNA operon copy number was modeled using ancestral trait reconstruction. We found that taxonomic composition was similar between communities at the beginning of the experiment and then diverged through time; as well, phylogenetic clustering within communities decreased over time. The average rRNA operon copy number decreased over the experiment, and variance in rRNA operon copy number was lowest both early and late in succession. We then analyzed bacterial community data from other soil and sediment primary and secondary successional sequences from three markedly different ecosystem types. Our results demonstrate that decreases in average copy number are a consistent feature of communities across various drivers of ecological succession. Importantly, our work supports the scaling of the copy number trait over multiple levels of biological organization, ranging from cells to populations and communities, with implications for both microbial ecology and evolution.

  4. Unstable Inheritance of 45S rRNA Genes in Arabidopsis thaliana

    PubMed Central

    Rabanal, Fernando A.; Nizhynska, Viktoria; Mandáková, Terezie; Novikova, Polina Yu.; Lysak, Martin A.; Mott, Richard; Nordborg, Magnus

    2017-01-01

    The considerable genome size variation in Arabidopsis thaliana has been shown largely to be due to copy number variation (CNV) in 45S ribosomal RNA (rRNA) genes. Surprisingly, attempts to map this variation by means of genome-wide association studies (GWAS) failed to identify either of the two likely sources, namely the nucleolus organizer regions (NORs). Instead, GWAS implicated a trans-acting locus, as if rRNA gene CNV was a phenotype rather than a genotype. To explain these results, we investigated the inheritance and stability of rRNA gene copy number using the variety of genetic resources available in A. thaliana — F2 crosses, recombinant inbred lines, the multiparent advanced-generation inter-cross population, and mutation accumulation lines. Our results clearly show that rRNA gene CNV can be mapped to the NORs themselves, with both loci contributing equally to the variation. However, NOR size is unstably inherited, and dramatic copy number changes are visible already within tens of generations, which explains why it is not possible to map the NORs using GWAS. We did not find any evidence of trans-acting loci in crosses, which is also expected since changes due to such loci would take very many generations to manifest themselves. rRNA gene copy number is thus an interesting example of “missing heritability”—a trait that is heritable in pedigrees, but not in the general population. PMID:28188182

  5. Histones are required for transcription of yeast rRNA genes by RNA polymerase I.

    PubMed

    Tongaonkar, Prasad; French, Sarah L; Oakes, Melanie L; Vu, Loan; Schneider, David A; Beyer, Ann L; Nomura, Masayasu

    2005-07-19

    Nucleosomes and their histone components have generally been recognized to act negatively on transcription. However, purified upstream activating factor (UAF), a transcription initiation factor required for RNA polymerase (Pol) I transcription in Saccharomyces cerevisiae, contains histones H3 and H4 and four nonhistone protein subunits. Other studies have shown that histones H3 and H4 are associated with actively transcribed rRNA genes. To examine their functional role in Pol I transcription, we constructed yeast strains in which synthesis of H3 is achieved from the glucose-repressible GAL10 promoter. We found that partial depletion of H3 (approximately 50% depletion) resulted in a strong inhibition (>80%) of Pol I transcription. A combination of biochemical analysis and electron microscopic (EM) analysis of Miller chromatin spreads indicated that initiation and elongation steps and rRNA processing were compromised upon histone depletion. A clear decrease in relative amounts of UAF, presumably caused by reduced stability, was also observed under the conditions of H3 depletion. Therefore, the observed inhibition of initiation can be explained, in part, by the decrease in UAF concentration. In addition, the EM results suggested that the defects in rRNA transcript elongation and processing may be a result of loss of histones from rRNA genes rather than (or in addition to) an indirect consequence of effects of histone depletion on expression of other genes. Thus, these results show functional importance of histones associated with actively transcribed rRNA genes.

  6. Decreases in average bacterial community rRNA operon copy number during succession

    PubMed Central

    Nemergut, Diana R; Knelman, Joseph E; Ferrenberg, Scott; Bilinski, Teresa; Melbourne, Brett; Jiang, Lin; Violle, Cyrille; Darcy, John L; Prest, Tiffany; Schmidt, Steven K; Townsend, Alan R

    2016-01-01

    Trait-based studies can help clarify the mechanisms driving patterns of microbial community assembly and coexistence. Here, we use a trait-based approach to explore the importance of rRNA operon copy number in microbial succession, building on prior evidence that organisms with higher copy numbers respond more rapidly to nutrient inputs. We set flasks of heterotrophic media into the environment and examined bacterial community assembly at seven time points. Communities were arrayed along a geographic gradient to introduce stochasticity via dispersal processes and were analyzed using 16 S rRNA gene pyrosequencing, and rRNA operon copy number was modeled using ancestral trait reconstruction. We found that taxonomic composition was similar between communities at the beginning of the experiment and then diverged through time; as well, phylogenetic clustering within communities decreased over time. The average rRNA operon copy number decreased over the experiment, and variance in rRNA operon copy number was lowest both early and late in succession. We then analyzed bacterial community data from other soil and sediment primary and secondary successional sequences from three markedly different ecosystem types. Our results demonstrate that decreases in average copy number are a consistent feature of communities across various drivers of ecological succession. Importantly, our work supports the scaling of the copy number trait over multiple levels of biological organization, ranging from cells to populations and communities, with implications for both microbial ecology and evolution. PMID:26565722

  7. Processing of Escherichia coli 16S rRNA with bacteriophage lambda leader sequences.

    PubMed Central

    Krych, M; Sirdeshmukh, R; Gourse, R; Schlessinger, D

    1987-01-01

    To test whether any specific 5' precursor sequences are required for the processing of pre-16S rRNA, constructs were studied in which large parts of the 5' leader sequence were replaced by the coliphage lambda pL promoter and adjacent sequences. Unexpectedly, few full-length transcripts of the rRNA were detected after the pL promoter was induced, implying that either transcription was poor or most of the rRNA chains with lambda leader sequences were unstable. Nevertheless, sufficient transcription occurred to permit the detection of processing by S1 nuclease analysis. RNA transcripts in which 2/3 of the normal rRNA leader was deleted (from the promoter up to the normal RNase III cleavage site) were processed to form the normal 5' terminus. Thus, most of the double-stranded stem that forms from sequences bracketing wild-type 16S pre-rRNA is apparently not required for proper processing; the expression of such modified transcripts, however, must be increased before the efficiency of processing of the 16S rRNA formed can be assessed. Images PMID:2445728

  8. Structure and organization of rRNA operons in the region of the replication origin of the Bacillus subtilis chromosome.

    PubMed Central

    Ogasawara, N; Moriya, S; Yoshikawa, H

    1983-01-01

    Structure and organization of two complete ribosomal RNA (rRNA) gene sets, rrnO and rrnA, were determined for the first time in Bacillus subtilis. They are located at the region of the replication origin of the chromosome. Each set constitutes a single operon of: two tandem promoters - leader sequence - 16S rRNA gene - Ile-tRNA gene - Ala-tRNA gene - 23S rRNA gene - 5S rRNA gene - termination signal. The first promoter (P1) of rrnO differs from that of rrnA in sequence and function. P1 of rrnO was used very little for transcription either in vivo or in vitro while P1 was predominantly used in rrnA. A putative transcript of the entire operon was determined and constructed into a secondary structure. Analysis of in vivo transcripts by S1 mapping revealed primary processing sites at the loop and stem structure of 16S rRNA in rrnO and rrnA. A unique sequence in the leader region of rrnO can be formed into a highly complexed secondary structure and affects processing of mature 16S rRNA. The sequences of the two spacer tRNA genes are highly conserved between B. subtilis and Escherichia coli. Images PMID:6312418

  9. rRNA suppressor of a eukaryotic translation initiation factor 5B/initiation factor 2 mutant reveals a binding site for translational GTPases on the small ribosomal subunit.

    PubMed

    Shin, Byung-Sik; Kim, Joo-Ran; Acker, Michael G; Maher, Kathryn N; Lorsch, Jon R; Dever, Thomas E

    2009-02-01

    The translational GTPases promote initiation, elongation, and termination of protein synthesis by interacting with the ribosome. Mutations that impair GTP hydrolysis by eukaryotic translation initiation factor 5B/initiation factor 2 (eIF5B/IF2) impair yeast cell growth due to failure to dissociate from the ribosome following subunit joining. A mutation in helix h5 of the 18S rRNA in the 40S ribosomal subunit and intragenic mutations in domain II of eIF5B suppress the toxic effects associated with expression of the eIF5B-H480I GTPase-deficient mutant in yeast by lowering the ribosome binding affinity of eIF5B. Hydroxyl radical mapping experiments reveal that the domain II suppressors interface with the body of the 40S subunit in the vicinity of helix h5. As the helix h5 mutation also impairs elongation factor function, the rRNA and eIF5B suppressor mutations provide in vivo evidence supporting a functionally important docking of domain II of the translational GTPases on the body of the small ribosomal subunit.

  10. Infective Arthritis: Bacterial 23S rRNA Gene Sequencing as a Supplementary Diagnostic Method

    PubMed Central

    Moser, Claus; Andresen, Keld; Kjerulf, Anne; Salamon, Suheil; Kemp, Michael; Christensen, Jens Jørgen

    2008-01-01

    Consecutively collected synovial fluids were examined for presence of bacterial DNA (a 700-bp fragment of the bacterial 23S rRNA gene) followed by DNA sequencing of amplicons, and by conventional bacteriological methods. One or more microorganisms were identified in 22 of the 227 synovial fluids (9,7%) originating from 17 patients. Sixteen of the patients had clinical signs of arthritis. For 11 patients molecular and conventional bacterial examinations were in agreement. Staphylococcus aureus, Streptococcus dysgalactiae subspecies equisimilis and Streptococcus pneumoniae, were detected in synovial fluids from 6, 2 and 2 patients, respectively. In 3 patients only 23S rRNA analysis was positive; 2 synovial fluids contained S. dysgalactiae subspecies equisimilis and 1 S. pneumoniae). The present study indicates a significant contribution by PCR with subsequent DNA sequencing of the 23S rRNA gene analysis in recognizing and identification of microorganisms from synovial fluids. PMID:19088916

  11. Changes in rRNA transcription influence proliferation and cell fate within a stem cell lineage.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Qiao; Shalaby, Nevine A; Buszczak, Michael

    2014-01-17

    Ribosome biogenesis drives cell growth and proliferation, but mechanisms that modulate this process within specific lineages remain poorly understood. Here, we identify a Drosophila RNA polymerase I (Pol I) regulatory complex composed of Under-developed (Udd), TAF1B, and a TAF1C-like factor. Disruption of udd or TAF1B results in reduced ovarian germline stem cell (GSC) proliferation. Female GSCs display high levels of ribosomal RNA (rRNA) transcription, and Udd becomes enriched in GSCs relative to their differentiating daughters. Increasing Pol I transcription delays differentiation, whereas reducing rRNA production induces both morphological changes that accompany multicellular cyst formation and specific decreased expression of the bone morphogenetic protein (BMP) pathway component Mad. These findings demonstrate that modulating rRNA synthesis fosters changes in the cell fate, growth, and proliferation of female Drosophila GSCs and their daughters.

  12. Sequence organization of the Acanthamoeba rRNA intergenic spacer: identification of transcriptional enhancers.

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Q; Zwick, M G; Paule, M R

    1994-01-01

    The primary sequence of the entire 2330 bp intergenic spacer of the A.castellanii ribosomal RNA gene was determined. Repeated sequence elements averaging 140 bp were identified and found to bind a protein required for optimum initiation at the core promoter. These repeated elements were shown to stimulate rRNA transcription by RNA polymerase I in vitro. The repeats inhibited transcription when placed in trans, and stimulated transcription when in cis, in either orientation, but only when upstream of the core promoter. Thus, these repeated elements have characteristics similar to polymerase I enhancers found in higher eukaryotes. The number of rRNA repeats in Acanthamoeba cells was determined to be 24 per haploid genome, the lowest number so far identified in any eukaryote. However, because Acanthamoeba is polyploid, each cell contains approximately 600 rRNA genes. Images PMID:7984432

  13. Specific binding of tRNAMet to 23S rRNA of Escherichia coli.

    PubMed Central

    Dahlberg, J E; Kintner, C; Lund, E

    1978-01-01

    tRNAMetf binds to 23S rRNA of Escherichia coli, forming a complex with a melting temperature of 75 degrees (in 0.6 M NaCl). The regions within the RNAs that bind to each other have been isolated and their nucleotide sequences have been determined. The interacting region in tRNAMetf is 17 nucleotides long, extending from G5 in the acceptor stem to D21 (D = 5.6-dihydrouridine) in the D loop. The sequence in 23S rRNA is complementary to that sequence except for an extra Up in the middle and allowing a Gp.D base pair. We propose that association of these two sequences may play a role in initiation of protein synthesis by tRNAMetf. In addition, part of this sequence in 23S rRNA may also stabilize tRNA binding to the ribosome during elongation of nascent polypeptides. Images PMID:349554

  14. Sequence alignment of 18S ribosomal RNA and the basal relationships of Adephagan beetles: evidence for monophyly of aquatic families and the placement of Trachypachidae.

    PubMed

    Shull, V L; Vogler, A P; Baker, M D; Maddison, D R; Hammond, P M

    2001-01-01

    Current hypotheses regarding family relationships in the suborder Adephaga (Coleoptera) are conflicting. Here we report full-length 18S ribosomal RNA sequences of 39 adephagans and 13 outgroup taxa. Data analysis focused on the impact of sequence alignment on tree topology, using two principally different approaches. Tree alignments, which seek to minimize indels and substitutions on the tree in a single step, as implemented in an approximate procedure by the computer program POY, were contrasted with a more traditional procedure based on alignments followed by phylogenetic inference based on parsimony, likelihood, and distance analyses. Despite substantial differences between the procedures, phylogenetic conclusions regarding basal relationships within Adephaga and relationships between the four suborders of Coleoptera were broadly similar. The analysis weakly supports monophyly of Adephaga, with Polyphaga usually as its sister, and the two small suborders Myxophaga and Archostemata basal to them. In some analyses, however, Polyphaga was reconstructed as having arisen from within Hydradephaga. Adephaga generally split into two monophyletic groups, corresponding to the terrestrial Geadephaga and the aquatic Hydradephaga, as initially proposed by Crowson in 1955, consistent with a single colonization of the aquatic environment by adephagan ancestors and contradicting the recent proposition of three independent invasions. A monophyletic Hydradephaga is consistently, though not strongly, supported under most analyses, and a parametric bootstrapping test significantly rejects an hypothesis of nonmonophyly. The enigmatic Trachypachidae, which exhibit many similarities to aquatic forms but whose species are entirely terrestrial, were usually recovered as a basal lineage within Geadephaga. Strong evidence opposes the view that terrestrial trachypachids are related to the dytiscoid water beetles.

  15. Crystallization of engineered Thermus flavus 5S rRNA under earth and microgravity conditions.

    PubMed

    Lorenz, S; Perbandt, M; Lippmann, C; Moore, K; DeLucas, L J; Betzel, C; Erdmann, V A

    2000-04-01

    Thermus flavus 5S rRNA with a molecular weight of about 40 kDa was modified at the 5' and 3' ends. Crystals were obtained under earth and microgravity conditions. The best crystals were obtained during NASA space mission STS 94. For the first time, it was possible to collect a complete data set from 5S rRNA crystals to 7.8 A resolution and to assign the space group as R32, with unit-cell parameters a = b = 110.3, c = 387.6 A, alpha = beta = 90, gamma = 120 degrees.

  16. 16S rRNA Phylogenetic Investigation of the Candidate Division “Korarchaeota”

    PubMed Central

    Auchtung, Thomas A.; Takacs-Vesbach, Cristina D.; Cavanaugh, Colleen M.

    2006-01-01

    The environmental distribution and phylogeny of “Korarchaeota,” a proposed ancient archaeal division, was investigated by using the 16S rRNA gene framework. Korarchaeota-specific primers were designed based on previously published sequences and used to screen a variety of environments. Korarchaeota 16S rRNA genes were amplified exclusively from high temperature Yellowstone National Park hot springs and a 9°N East Pacific Rise deep-sea hydrothermal vent. Phylogenetic analyses of these and all available sequences suggest that Korarchaeota exhibit a high level of endemicity. PMID:16820509

  17. A yeast transcription system for the 5S rRNA gene.

    PubMed Central

    van Keulen, H; Thomas, D Y

    1982-01-01

    A cell-free extract of yeast nuclei that can specifically transcribe cloned yeast 5S rRNA genes has been developed. Optima for transcription of 5S rDNA were determined and conditions of extract preparation leading to reproducible activities and specificities established. The major in vitro product has the same size and oligonucleotide composition as in vivo 5S rRNA. The in vitro transcription extract does not transcribe yeast tRNA genes. The extract does increase the transcription of tRNA genes packaged in chromatin. Images PMID:7145700

  18. Identification of Aspergillus Species Using Internal Transcribed Spacer Regions 1 and 2

    PubMed Central

    Henry, Travis; Iwen, Peter C.; Hinrichs, Steven H.

    2000-01-01

    Aspergillus species are the most frequent cause of invasive mold infections in immunocompromised patients. Although over 180 species are found within the genus, 3 species, Aspergillus flavus, A. fumigatus, and A. terreus, account for most cases of invasive aspergillosis (IA), with A. nidulans, A. niger, and A. ustus being rare causes of IA. The ability to distinguish between the various clinically relevant Aspergillus species may have diagnostic value, as certain species are associated with higher mortality and increased virulence and vary in their resistance to antifungal therapy. A method to identify Aspergillus at the species level and differentiate it from other true pathogenic and opportunistic molds was developed using the 18S and 28S rRNA genes for primer binding sites. The contiguous internal transcribed spacer (ITS) region, ITS 1–5.8S–ITS 2, from referenced strains and clinical isolates of aspergilli and other fungi were amplified, sequenced, and compared with non-reference strain sequences in GenBank. ITS amplicons from Aspergillus species ranged in size from 565 to 613 bp. Comparison of reference strains and GenBank sequences demonstrated that both ITS 1 and ITS 2 regions were needed for accurate identification of Aspergillus at the species level. Intraspecies variation among clinical isolates and reference strains was minimal. Sixteen other pathogenic molds demonstrated less than 89% similarity with Aspergillus ITS 1 and 2 sequences. A blind study of 11 clinical isolates was performed, and each was correctly identified. Clinical application of this approach may allow for earlier diagnosis and selection of effective antifungal agents for patients with IA. PMID:10747135

  19. [16S rRNA gene sequence analysis for bacterial identification in the clinical laboratory].

    PubMed

    Matsumoto, Takehisa; Sugano, Mitsutoshi

    2013-12-01

    The traditional identification of bacteria on the basis of phenotypic characteristics is generally not as accurate as identification based on genotypic methods. For many years, sequencing of the 16S ribosomal RNA (rRNA) gene has served as an important tool for determining phylogenetic relationships between bacteria. The features of this molecular target that make it a useful phylogenetic tool also make it useful for bacterial detection and identification in the clinical laboratory. 16S rRNA gene sequence analysis can better identify poorly described, rarely isolated, or phenotypically aberrant strains, and can lead to the recognition of novel pathogens and noncultured bacteria. In clinical microbiology, molecular identification based on 16S rDNA sequencing is applied fundamentally to bacteria whose identification by means of other types of techniques is impossible or difficult. However, there are some cases in which 16S rRNA gene sequence analysis can not differentiate closely related bacteria such as Shigella spp. and Escherichia coli at the species level. Thus, it is important to understand the advantages and disadvantages of 16S rRNA gene sequence analysis.

  20. Exceptionally high and diverse mutation rates in insects small rRNA.

    PubMed

    Feng, Y X; Krupp, G; Gross, J H

    1985-10-01

    The nucleotide sequence of 5S rRNA from the posterior silk gland of the silk worm Philosamia cynthia ricini has been determined. The comparison with other insect 5S rRNAs revealed an exceptionally conserved secondary structure, in spite of an extremely high mutation rate: Thirteen nucleotides are different in Philosamia and Drosophila 5S rRNA, but all substitutions are either compensatory or occur in loops or introduce G:U base pairs. The rates of base substitution per site per year of several insect species (diptera and lepidoptera) 5S and 5.8S rRNAs are compared with those occurring in vertebrate rRNAs. In the latter cases the rates are remarkably constant, whereas their value is not only about twofold higher in insect rRNAs, but is found to be extremely large in the 5S rRNA of the silkworm Bombyx mori. These data demonstrate that phylogenetic conclusions derived from small rRNA sequence comparisons are only of limited value.

  1. 16S rRNA Phylogeny of Sponge-Associated Cyanobacteria

    PubMed Central

    Steindler, Laura; Huchon, Dorothée; Avni, Adi; Ilan, Micha

    2005-01-01

    Phylogenetic analyses of 16S rRNA sequences of sponge-associated cyanobacteria showed them to be polyphyletic, implying that they derived from multiple independent symbiotic events. Most of the symbiont sequences were affiliated to a group of Synechococcus and Prochlorococcus species. However, other symbionts were related to different groups, such as the Oscillatoriales. PMID:16000832

  2. Molecular Diagnosis of Actinomadura madurae Infection by 16S rRNA Deep Sequencing

    PubMed Central

    SenGupta, Dhruba J.; Hoogestraat, Daniel R.; Cummings, Lisa A.; Bryant, Bronwyn H.; Natividad, Catherine; Thielges, Stephanie; Monsaas, Peter W.; Chau, Mimosa; Barbee, Lindley A.; Rosenthal, Christopher; Cookson, Brad T.; Hoffman, Noah G.

    2013-01-01

    Next-generation DNA sequencing can be used to catalog individual organisms within complex, polymicrobial specimens. Here, we utilized deep sequencing of 16S rRNA to implicate Actinomadura madurae as the cause of mycetoma in a diabetic patient when culture and conventional molecular methods were overwhelmed by overgrowth of other organisms. PMID:24108607

  3. Molecular diagnosis of Actinomadura madurae infection by 16S rRNA deep sequencing.

    PubMed

    Salipante, Stephen J; Sengupta, Dhruba J; Hoogestraat, Daniel R; Cummings, Lisa A; Bryant, Bronwyn H; Natividad, Catherine; Thielges, Stephanie; Monsaas, Peter W; Chau, Mimosa; Barbee, Lindley A; Rosenthal, Christopher; Cookson, Brad T; Hoffman, Noah G

    2013-12-01

    Next-generation DNA sequencing can be used to catalog individual organisms within complex, polymicrobial specimens. Here, we utilized deep sequencing of 16S rRNA to implicate Actinomadura madurae as the cause of mycetoma in a diabetic patient when culture and conventional molecular methods were overwhelmed by overgrowth of other organisms.

  4. 16S rRNA region based PCR protocol for identification and subtyping of Parvimonas micra.

    PubMed

    Ota-Tsuzuki, C; Brunheira, A T P; Mayer, M P A

    2008-10-01

    The present study established a PCR protocol in order to identify Parvimonas micra and to evaluate the intra-species diversity by PCR-RFLP of 16S rRNA partial sequence. The data indicated that the protocol was able to identify this species which could be clustered in five genotypes.

  5. Methyltransferase Erm(37) slips on rRNA to confer atypical resistance in Mycobacterium tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Madsen, Christian Toft; Jakobsen, Lene; Buriánková, Karolina; Doucet-Populaire, Florence; Pernodet, Jean-Luc; Douthwaite, Stephen

    2005-11-25

    Members of the Mycobacterium tuberculosis complex possess a resistance determinant, erm(37) (also termed ermMT), which is a truncated homologue of the erm genes found in a diverse range of drug-producing and pathogenic bacteria. All erm genes examined thus far encode N(6)-monomethyltransferases or N(6),N(6)-dimethyltransferases that show absolute specificity for nucleotide A2058 in 23 S rRNA. Monomethylation at A2058 confers resistance to a subset of the macrolide, lincosamide, and streptogramin B (MLS(B)) group of antibiotics and no resistance to the latest macrolide derivatives, the ketolides. Dimethylation at A2058 confers high resistance to all MLS(B) and ketolide drugs. The erm(37) phenotype fits into neither category. We show here by tandem mass spectrometry that Erm(37) initially adds a single methyl group to its primary target at A2058 but then proceeds to attach additional methyl groups to the neighboring nucleotides A2057 and A2059. Other methyltransferases, Erm(E) and Erm(O), maintain their specificity for A2058 on mycobacterial rRNA. Erm(E) and Erm(O) have a full-length C-terminal domain, which appears to be important for stabilizing the methyltransferases at their rRNA target, and this domain is truncated in Erm(37). The lax interaction of the M. tuberculosis Erm(37) with its rRNA produces a unique methylation pattern and confers resistance to the ketolide telithromycin.

  6. 16S rRNA region based PCR protocol for identification and subtyping of Parvimonas micra

    PubMed Central

    Ota-Tsuzuki, C.; Brunheira, A.T.P.; Mayer, M.P.A.

    2008-01-01

    The present study established a PCR protocol in order to identify Parvimonas micra and to evaluate the intra-species diversity by PCR-RFLP of 16S rRNA partial sequence. The data indicated that the protocol was able to identify this species which could be clustered in five genotypes. PMID:24031274

  7. Role of Escherichia coli YbeY, a highly conserved protein, in rRNA processing

    PubMed Central

    Davies, Bryan W.; Köhrer, Caroline; Jacob, Asha I.; Simmons, Lyle A.; Zhu, Jianyu; Aleman, Lourdes M.; RajBhandary, Uttam L.; Walker, Graham C.

    2010-01-01

    The UPF0054 protein family is highly conserved with homologs present in nearly every sequenced bacterium. In some bacteria, the respective gene is essential, while in others its loss results in a highly pleiotropic phenotype. Despite detailed structural studies, a cellular role for this protein family has remained unknown. We report here that deletion of the Escherichia coli homolog, YbeY, causes striking defects that affect ribosome activity, translational fidelity and ribosome assembly. Mapping of 16S, 23S and 5S rRNA termini reveals that YbeY influences the maturation of all three rRNAs, with a particularly strong effect on maturation at both the 5′- and 3′-ends of 16S rRNA as well as maturation of the 5′-termini of 23S and 5S rRNAs. Furthermore, we demonstrate strong genetic interactions between ybeY and rnc (encoding RNase III), ybeY and rnr (encoding RNase R), and ybeY and pnp (encoding PNPase), further suggesting a role for YbeY in rRNA maturation. Mutation of highly conserved amino acids in YbeY, allowed the identification of two residues (H114, R59) that were found to have a significant effect in vivo. We discuss the implications of these findings for rRNA maturation and ribosome assembly in bacteria. PMID:20807199

  8. Detecting 16S rRNA Methyltransferases in Enterobacteriaceae by Use of Arbekacin

    PubMed Central

    Chahine, Sarah; Okafor, Darius; Ong, Ana C.; Maybank, Rosslyn; Kwak, Yoon I.; Wilson, Kerry; Zapor, Michael; Lesho, Emil; Hinkle, Mary

    2015-01-01

    16S rRNA methyltransferases confer resistance to most aminoglycosides, but discriminating their activity from that of aminoglycoside-modifying enzymes (AMEs) is challenging using phenotypic methods. We demonstrate that arbekacin, an aminoglycoside refractory to most AMEs, can rapidly detect 16S methyltransferase activity in Enterobacteriaceae with high specificity using the standard disk susceptibility test. PMID:26537447

  9. Common 5S rRNA variants are likely to be accepted in many sequence contexts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zhang, Zhengdong; D'Souza, Lisa M.; Lee, Youn-Hyung; Fox, George E.

    2003-01-01

    Over evolutionary time RNA sequences which are successfully fixed in a population are selected from among those that satisfy the structural and chemical requirements imposed by the function of the RNA. These sequences together comprise the structure space of the RNA. In principle, a comprehensive understanding of RNA structure and function would make it possible to enumerate which specific RNA sequences belong to a particular structure space and which do not. We are using bacterial 5S rRNA as a model system to attempt to identify principles that can be used to predict which sequences do or do not belong to the 5S rRNA structure space. One promising idea is the very intuitive notion that frequently seen sequence changes in an aligned data set of naturally occurring 5S rRNAs would be widely accepted in many other 5S rRNA sequence contexts. To test this hypothesis, we first developed well-defined operational definitions for a Vibrio region of the 5S rRNA structure space and what is meant by a highly variable position. Fourteen sequence variants (10 point changes and 4 base-pair changes) were identified in this way, which, by the hypothesis, would be expected to incorporate successfully in any of the known sequences in the Vibrio region. All 14 of these changes were constructed and separately introduced into the Vibrio proteolyticus 5S rRNA sequence where they are not normally found. Each variant was evaluated for its ability to function as a valid 5S rRNA in an E. coli cellular context. It was found that 93% (13/14) of the variants tested are likely valid 5S rRNAs in this context. In addition, seven variants were constructed that, although present in the Vibrio region, did not meet the stringent criteria for a highly variable position. In this case, 86% (6/7) are likely valid. As a control we also examined seven variants that are seldom or never seen in the Vibrio region of 5S rRNA sequence space. In this case only two of seven were found to be potentially valid. The

  10. Evidence for autophagy-dependent pathways of rRNA turnover in Arabidopsis

    PubMed Central

    Floyd, Brice E; Morriss, Stephanie C; MacIntosh, Gustavo C; Bassham, Diane C

    2015-01-01

    Ribosomes account for a majority of the cell's RNA and much of its protein and represent a significant investment of cellular resources. The turnover and degradation of ribosomes has been proposed to play a role in homeostasis and during stress conditions. Mechanisms for the turnover of rRNA and ribosomal proteins have not been fully elucidated. We show here that the RNS2 ribonuclease and autophagy participate in RNA turnover in Arabidopsis thaliana under normal growth conditions. An increase in autophagosome formation was seen in an rns2–2 mutant, and this increase was dependent on the core autophagy genes ATG9 and ATG5. Autophagosomes and autophagic bodies in rns2–2 mutants contain RNA and ribosomes, suggesting that autophagy is activated as an attempt to compensate for loss of rRNA degradation. Total RNA accumulates in rns2–2, atg9–4, atg5–1, rns2–2 atg9–4, and rns2–2 atg5–1 mutants, suggesting a parallel role for autophagy and RNS2 in RNA turnover. rRNA accumulates in the vacuole in rns2–2 mutants. Vacuolar accumulation of rRNA was blocked by disrupting autophagy via an rns2–2 atg5–1 double mutant but not by an rns2–2 atg9–4 double mutant, indicating that ATG5 and ATG9 function differently in this process. Our results suggest that autophagy and RNS2 are both involved in homeostatic degradation of rRNA in the vacuole. PMID:26735434

  11. Evidence for autophagy-dependent pathways of rRNA turnover in Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Floyd, Brice E; Morriss, Stephanie C; MacIntosh, Gustavo C; Bassham, Diane C

    2015-01-01

    Ribosomes account for a majority of the cell's RNA and much of its protein and represent a significant investment of cellular resources. The turnover and degradation of ribosomes has been proposed to play a role in homeostasis and during stress conditions. Mechanisms for the turnover of rRNA and ribosomal proteins have not been fully elucidated. We show here that the RNS2 ribonuclease and autophagy participate in RNA turnover in Arabidopsis thaliana under normal growth conditions. An increase in autophagosome formation was seen in an rns2-2 mutant, and this increase was dependent on the core autophagy genes ATG9 and ATG5. Autophagosomes and autophagic bodies in rns2-2 mutants contain RNA and ribosomes, suggesting that autophagy is activated as an attempt to compensate for loss of rRNA degradation. Total RNA accumulates in rns2-2, atg9-4, atg5-1, rns2-2 atg9-4, and rns2-2 atg5-1 mutants, suggesting a parallel role for autophagy and RNS2 in RNA turnover. rRNA accumulates in the vacuole in rns2-2 mutants. Vacuolar accumulation of rRNA was blocked by disrupting autophagy via an rns2-2 atg5-1 double mutant but not by an rns2-2 atg9-4 double mutant, indicating that ATG5 and ATG9 function differently in this process. Our results suggest that autophagy and RNS2 are both involved in homeostatic degradation of rRNA in the vacuole.

  12. Analysis of a marine picoplankton community by 16S rRNA gene cloning and sequencing.

    PubMed Central

    Schmidt, T M; DeLong, E F; Pace, N R

    1991-01-01

    The phylogenetic diversity of an oligotrophic marine picoplankton community was examined by analyzing the sequences of cloned ribosomal genes. This strategy does not rely on cultivation of the resident microorganisms. Bulk genomic DNA was isolated from picoplankton collected in the north central Pacific Ocean by tangential flow filtration. The mixed-population DNA was fragmented, size fractionated, and cloned into bacteriophage lambda. Thirty-eight clones containing 16S rRNA genes were identified in a screen of 3.2 x 10(4) recombinant phage, and portions of the rRNA gene were amplified by polymerase chain reaction and sequenced. The resulting sequences were used to establish the identities of the picoplankton by comparison with an established data base of rRNA sequences. Fifteen unique eubacterial sequences were obtained, including four from cyanobacteria and eleven from proteobacteria. A single eucaryote related to dinoflagellates was identified; no archaebacterial sequences were detected. The cyanobacterial sequences are all closely related to sequences from cultivated marine Synechococcus strains and with cyanobacterial sequences obtained from the Atlantic Ocean (Sargasso Sea). Several sequences were related to common marine isolates of the gamma subdivision of proteobacteria. In addition to sequences closely related to those of described bacteria, sequences were obtained from two phylogenetic groups of organisms that are not closely related to any known rRNA sequences from cultivated organisms. Both of these novel phylogenetic clusters are proteobacteria, one group within the alpha subdivision and the other distinct from known proteobacterial subdivisions. The rRNA sequences of the alpha-related group are nearly identical to those of some Sargasso Sea picoplankton, suggesting a global distribution of these organisms. Images PMID:2066334

  13. Physical Mapping of the 5S and 18S rDNA in Ten Species of Hypostomus Lacépède 1803 (Siluriformes: Loricariidae): Evolutionary Tendencies in the Genus

    PubMed Central

    César Venere, Paulo; Thums Konerat, Jocicléia; Henrique Zawadzki, Cláudio; Ricardo Vicari, Marcelo; Margarido, Vladimir Pavan

    2014-01-01

    Hypostomus is a diverse group with unclear aspects regarding its biology, including the mechanisms that led to chromosome diversification within the group. Fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) with 5S and 18S rDNA probes was performed on ten Hypostomini species. Hypostomus faveolus, H. cochliodon, H. albopunctatus, H. aff. paulinus, and H. topavae had only one chromosome pair with 18S rDNA sites, while H. ancistroides, H. commersoni, H. hermanni, H. regani, and H. strigaticeps had multiple 18S rDNA sites. Regarding the 5S rDNA genes, H. ancistroides, H. regani, H. albopunctatus, H. aff. paulinus, and H. topavae had 5S rDNA sites on only one chromosome pair and H. faveolus, H. cochliodon, H. commersoni, H. hermanni, and H. strigaticeps had multiple 5S rDNA sites. Most species had 18S rDNA sites in the telomeric region of the chromosomes. All species but H. cochliodon had 5S rDNA in the centromeric/pericentromeric region of one metacentric pair. Obtained results are discussed based on existent phylogenies for the genus, with comments on possible dispersion mechanisms to justify the variability of the rDNA sites in Hypostomus. PMID:25405240

  14. Physical mapping of the 5S and 18S rDNA in ten species of Hypostomus Lacépède 1803 (Siluriformes: Loricariidae): evolutionary tendencies in the genus.

    PubMed

    Bueno, Vanessa; Venere, Paulo César; Thums Konerat, Jocicléia; Zawadzki, Cláudio Henrique; Vicari, Marcelo Ricardo; Margarido, Vladimir Pavan

    2014-01-01

    Hypostomus is a diverse group with unclear aspects regarding its biology, including the mechanisms that led to chromosome diversification within the group. Fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) with 5S and 18S rDNA probes was performed on ten Hypostomini species. Hypostomus faveolus, H. cochliodon, H. albopunctatus, H. aff. paulinus, and H. topavae had only one chromosome pair with 18S rDNA sites, while H. ancistroides, H. commersoni, H. hermanni, H. regani, and H. strigaticeps had multiple 18S rDNA sites. Regarding the 5S rDNA genes, H. ancistroides, H. regani, H. albopunctatus, H. aff. paulinus, and H. topavae had 5S rDNA sites on only one chromosome pair and H. faveolus, H. cochliodon, H. commersoni, H. hermanni, and H. strigaticeps had multiple 5S rDNA sites. Most species had 18S rDNA sites in the telomeric region of the chromosomes. All species but H. cochliodon had 5S rDNA in the centromeric/pericentromeric region of one metacentric pair. Obtained results are discussed based on existent phylogenies for the genus, with comments on possible dispersion mechanisms to justify the variability of the rDNA sites in Hypostomus.

  15. Comparative evaluation of rRNA depletion procedures for the improved analysis of bacterial biofilm and mixed pathogen culture transcriptomes.

    PubMed

    Petrova, Olga E; Garcia-Alcalde, Fernando; Zampaloni, Claudia; Sauer, Karin

    2017-01-24

    Global transcriptomic analysis via RNA-seq is often hampered by the high abundance of ribosomal (r)RNA in bacterial cells. To remove rRNA and enrich coding sequences, subtractive hybridization procedures have become the approach of choice prior to RNA-seq, with their efficiency varying in a manner dependent on sample type and composition. Yet, despite an increasing number of RNA-seq studies, comparative evaluation of bacterial rRNA depletion methods has remained limited. Moreover, no such study has utilized RNA derived from bacterial biofilms, which have potentially higher rRNA:mRNA ratios and higher rRNA carryover during RNA-seq analysis. Presently, we evaluated the efficiency of three subtractive hybridization-based kits in depleting rRNA from samples derived from biofilm, as well as planktonic cells of the opportunistic human pathogen Pseudomonas aeruginosa. Our results indicated different rRNA removal efficiency for the three procedures, with the Ribo-Zero kit yielding the highest degree of rRNA depletion, which translated into enhanced enrichment of non-rRNA transcripts and increased depth of RNA-seq coverage. The results indicated that, in addition to improving RNA-seq sensitivity, efficient rRNA removal enhanced detection of low abundance transcripts via qPCR. Finally, we demonstrate that the Ribo-Zero kit also exhibited the highest efficiency when P. aeruginosa/Staphylococcus aureus co-culture RNA samples were tested.

  16. Comparative evaluation of rRNA depletion procedures for the improved analysis of bacterial biofilm and mixed pathogen culture transcriptomes

    PubMed Central

    Petrova, Olga E.; Garcia-Alcalde, Fernando; Zampaloni, Claudia; Sauer, Karin

    2017-01-01

    Global transcriptomic analysis via RNA-seq is often hampered by the high abundance of ribosomal (r)RNA in bacterial cells. To remove rRNA and enrich coding sequences, subtractive hybridization procedures have become the approach of choice prior to RNA-seq, with their efficiency varying in a manner dependent on sample type and composition. Yet, despite an increasing number of RNA-seq studies, comparative evaluation of bacterial rRNA depletion methods has remained limited. Moreover, no such study has utilized RNA derived from bacterial biofilms, which have potentially higher rRNA:mRNA ratios and higher rRNA carryover during RNA-seq analysis. Presently, we evaluated the efficiency of three subtractive hybridization-based kits in depleting rRNA from samples derived from biofilm, as well as planktonic cells of the opportunistic human pathogen Pseudomonas aeruginosa. Our results indicated different rRNA removal efficiency for the three procedures, with the Ribo-Zero kit yielding the highest degree of rRNA depletion, which translated into enhanced enrichment of non-rRNA transcripts and increased depth of RNA-seq coverage. The results indicated that, in addition to improving RNA-seq sensitivity, efficient rRNA removal enhanced detection of low abundance transcripts via qPCR. Finally, we demonstrate that the Ribo-Zero kit also exhibited the highest efficiency when P. aeruginosa/Staphylococcus aureus co-culture RNA samples were tested. PMID:28117413

  17. Phylogenetic Sequence Variations in Bacterial rRNA Affect Species-Specific Susceptibility to Drugs Targeting Protein Synthesis▿‡

    PubMed Central

    Akshay, Subramanian; Bertea, Mihai; Hobbie, Sven N.; Oettinghaus, Björn; Shcherbakov, Dimitri; Böttger, Erik C.; Akbergenov, Rashid

    2011-01-01

    Antibiotics targeting the bacterial ribosome typically bind to highly conserved rRNA regions with only minor phylogenetic sequence variations. It is unclear whether these sequence variations affect antibiotic susceptibility or resistance development. To address this question, we have investigated the drug binding pockets of aminoglycosides and macrolides/ketolides. The binding site of aminoglycosides is located within helix 44 of the 16S rRNA (A site); macrolides/ketolides bind to domain V of the 23S rRNA (peptidyltransferase center). We have used mutagenesis of rRNA sequences in Mycobacterium smegmatis ribosomes to reconstruct the different bacterial drug binding sites and to study the effects of rRNA sequence variations on drug activity. Our results provide a rationale for differences in species-specific drug susceptibility patterns and species-specific resistance phenotypes associated with mutational alterations in the drug binding pocket. PMID:21730122

  18. 16S rRNA beacons for bacterial monitoring during human space missions.

    PubMed

    Larios-Sanz, Maia; Kourentzi, Katerina D; Warmflash, David; Jones, Jeffrey; Pierson, Duane L; Willson, Richard C; Fox, George E

    2007-04-01

    Microorganisms are unavoidable in space environments and their presence has, at times, been a source of problems. Concerns about disease during human space missions are particularly important considering the significant changes the immune system incurs during spaceflight and the history of microbial contamination aboard the Mir space station. Additionally, these contaminants may have adverse effects on instrumentation and life-support systems. A sensitive, highly specific system to detect, characterize, and monitor these microbial populations is essential. Herein we describe a monitoring approach that uses 16S rRNA targeted molecular beacons to successfully detect several specific bacterial groupings. This methodology will greatly simplify in-flight monitoring by minimizing sample handling and processing. We also address and provide solutions to target accessibility problems encountered in hybridizations that target 16S rRNA.

  19. Phylogeny of Metschnikowia species estimated from partial rRNA sequences.

    PubMed

    Mendonça-Hagler, L C; Hagler, A N; Kurtzman, C P

    1993-04-01

    Phylogenetic relationships of species assigned to the genus Metschnikowia were estimated from the extents of divergence among partial sequences of rRNA. The data suggest that the aquatic species (Metschnikowia australis, Metschnikowia bicuspidata, Metschnikowia krissii, and Metschnikowia zobellii) and the terrestrial species (Metschnikowia hawaiiensis, Metschnikowia lunata, Metschnikowia pulcherrima, and Metschnikowia reukaufii) form two groups within the genus. M. lunata and M. hawaiiensis are well separated from other members of the genus, and M. hawaiiensis may be sufficiently divergent that it could be placed in a new genus. Species of the genus Metschnikowia are unique compared with other ascomycetous yeasts because they have a deletion in the large-subunit rRNA sequence that includes nucleotides 434 to 483.

  20. Improving oligonucleotide fingerprinting of rRNA genes by implementation of polony microarray technology

    PubMed Central

    Ruegger, Paul M.; Bent, Elizabeth; Li, Wei; Jeske, Daniel R.; Cui, Xinping; Braun, Jonathan; Jiang, Tao; Borneman, James

    2012-01-01

    Improvements to oligonucleotide fingerprinting of rRNA genes (OFRG) were obtained by implementing polony microarray technology. OFRG is an array-based method for analyzing microbial community composition. Polonies are discrete clusters of DNA, produced by solid-phase PCR in hydrogels, and derived from individual, spatially isolated DNA molecules. The advantages of a polony-based OFRG method include higher throughput and reductions in the PCR-induced errors and compositional skew inherent in all other PCR-based community composition methods, including high throughput sequencing of rRNA genes. Given the similarities between polony microarrays and certain aspects of sequencing methods such as the Illumina platform, we suggest that if concepts presented in this study were implemented in high throughput sequencing protocols, a reduction of PCR-induced errors and compositional skew may be realized. PMID:22640891

  1. A renaissance for the pioneering 16S rRNA gene

    SciTech Connect

    Tringe, Susannah; Hugenholtz, Philip

    2008-09-07

    Culture-independent molecular surveys using the 16S rRNA gene have become a mainstay for characterizing microbial community structure over the last quarter century. More recently this approach has been overshadowed by metagenomics, which provides a global overview of a community's functional potential rather than just an inventory of its inhabitants. However, the pioneering 16S rRNA gene is making a comeback in its own right thanks to a number of methodological advancements including higher resolution (more sequences), analysis of multiple related samples (e.g. spatial and temporal series) and improved metadata and use of metadata. The standard conclusion that microbial ecosystems are remarkably complex and diverse is now being replaced by detailed insights into microbial ecology and evolution based only on this one historically important marker gene.

  2. Transcriptional Activity of rRNA Genes in Barley Cells after Mutagenic Treatment

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    In the present study, the combination of the micronucleus test with analysis of the activity of the rRNA genes in mutagen-treated Hordeum vulgare (barley) by maleic hydrazide (MH) cells was performed. Simultaneously fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) with 25S rDNA as probes and an analysis of the transcriptional activity of 35S rRNA genes with silver staining were performed. The results showed that transcriptional activity is always maintained in the micronuclei although they are eliminated during the next cell cycle. The analysis of the transcriptional activity was extended to barley nuclei. MH influenced the fusion of the nucleoli in barley nuclei. The silver staining enabled detection of the nuclear bodies which arose after MH treatment. The results confirmed the usefulness of cytogenetic techniques in the characterization of micronuclei. Similar analyses can be now extended to other abiotic stresses to study the response of plant cells to the environment. PMID:27257817

  3. PCR-based bioprospecting for homing endonucleases in fungal mitochondrial rRNA genes.

    PubMed

    Hafez, Mohamed; Guha, Tuhin Kumar; Shen, Chen; Sethuraman, Jyothi; Hausner, Georg

    2014-01-01

    Fungal mitochondrial genomes act as "reservoirs" for homing endonucleases. These enzymes with their DNA site-specific cleavage activities are attractive tools for genome editing and gene therapy applications. Bioprospecting and characterization of naturally occurring homing endonucleases offers an alternative to synthesizing artificial endonucleases. Here, we describe methods for PCR-based screening of fungal mitochondrial rRNA genes for homing endonuclease encoding sequences, and we also provide protocols for the purification and biochemical characterization of putative native homing endonucleases.

  4. Greengenes: Chimera-checked 16S rRNA gene database and workbenchcompatible in ARB

    SciTech Connect

    DeSantis, T.Z.; Hugenholtz, P.; Larsen, N.; Rojas, M.; Brodie,E.L; Keller, K.; Huber, T.; Dalevi, D.; Hu, P.; Andersen, G.L.

    2006-02-01

    A 16S rRNA gene database (http://greengenes.lbl.gov) addresses limitations of public repositories by providing chimera-screening, standard alignments and taxonomic classification using multiple published taxonomies. It was revealed that incongruent taxonomic nomenclature exists among curators even at the phylum-level. Putative chimeras were identified in 3% of environmental sequences and 0.2% of records derived from isolates. Environmental sequences were classified into 100 phylum-level lineages within the Archaea and Bacteria.

  5. Application of 12S rRNA gene for the identification of animal-derived drugs.

    PubMed

    Luo, Jiaoyang; Yan, Dan; Zhang, Da; Han, Yumei; Dong, Xiaoping; Yang, Yong; Deng, Kejun; Xiao, Xiaohe

    2011-01-01

    PURPOSE. Animal-derived drugs are the major source of biological products and traditional medicine, but they are often difficult to identify, causing confusion in the clinical application. Among these medicinal animals, a number of animal species are endangered, leading to the destruction of biodiversity. The identification of animal-derived drugs and their alternatives would be a first step toward biodiversity conservation and safe medication. Until now, no effective method for identifying animal-derived drugs has been demonstrated; DNA-based species identification presents a brand-new technique. METHODS. We designed primers to amplify a 523-bp fragment of 12S rRNA and generated sequences for 13 individuals within six medicinal animal species. We examined the efficiency of species recognition based on this sequence, and we also tested the taxonomic affiliations against the GenBank database. RESULTS. All the tested drugs were identified successfully, and a visible gap was found between the inter-specific and intra-specific variation. We further demonstrated the importance of data exploration in DNA-based species identification practice by examining the sequence characteristics of relative genera in GenBank. This region of the 12S rRNA gene had a 100% success rate of species recognition within the six medicinal animal species. CONCLUSIONS. We propose that the 12S rRNA locus might be universal for identifying animal-derived drugs and their adulterants. The development of 12S rRNA for indentifying animal-derived drugs that share a common gene target would contribute significantly to the clinical application of animal-derived drugs and the conservation of medicinal animal species. This article is open to POST-PUBLICATION REVIEW. Registered readers (see "For Readers") may comment by clicking on ABSTRACT on the issue's contents page.

  6. Phenotypic characterisation and 16S rRNA sequence analysis of veterinary isolates of Streptococcus pluranimalium.

    PubMed

    Twomey, D F; Carson, T; Foster, G; Koylass, M S; Whatmore, A M

    2012-05-01

    Forty-two isolates of Streptococcus pluranimalium were identified from cattle (n=38), sheep (n=2), an alpaca (n=1) and a pheasant (n=1) in the United Kingdom. The isolates were confirmed as S. pluranimalium by 16S rRNA sequence analysis but could not be differentiated reliably from Streptococcus acidominimus by phenotypic characterisation using commercial kits routinely used in veterinary laboratories. The alanyl-phenylalanyl-proline arylamidase reaction could be used to differentiate S. pluranimalium (positive) from Aerococcus urinae (negative).

  7. GJB2 and mitochondrial 12S rRNA susceptibility mutations in sudden deafness.

    PubMed

    Chen, Kaitian; Sun, Liang; Zong, Ling; Wu, Xuan; Zhan, Yuan; Dong, Chang; Cao, Hui; Tang, Haocheng; Jiang, Hongyan

    2016-06-01

    Genetic susceptibility may play an important role in the pathogenesis of sudden deafness. However, the specific genes involved are largely unknown. We sought to explore the frequency of GJB2 and mitochondrial 12S rRNA susceptibility mutations in patients with sudden deafness. Between September 2011 and May 2012, 62 consecutive patients with sudden deafness were seen. In 50 of these, no etiological factors for sudden deafness were found. We detected GJB2 and mitochondrial 12S rRNA variants by direct sequencing in these 50 patients and in 53-aged matched controls with normal hearing. In addition, we undertook functional analyses of the mitochondrial mutations which we detected, applying structural and phylogenetic analysis. GJB2 sequencing identified six mutations, including three pathogenic mutations (c.235delC, c.299-300delAT, c.109G>A) and three polymorphisms, in the study participants, giving an allele frequency of 15.0 %. A homozygous c.109G>A mutation was detected in two participants. A total of 16 variants in mitochondrial 12S rRNA gene were identified in the participants. No significant differences were found in GJB2 heterozygosity or in mitochondrial 12S rRNA variants between patients with sudden deafness and in controls. Our results suggest that the homozygous GJB2 c.109G>A mutation may be a cause of sudden deafness involving both ears. This finding should increase awareness of the likely role of genetic factors in the etiology of sudden deafness in general.

  8. The Role of 16S rRNA Gene Sequencing in Confirmation of Suspected Neonatal Sepsis

    PubMed Central

    El Gawhary, Somaia; El-Anany, Mervat; Ali, Doaa; El Gameel, El Qassem

    2016-01-01

    Different molecular assays for the detection of bacterial DNA in the peripheral blood represented a diagnostic tool for neonatal sepsis. We targeted to evaluate the role of 16S rRNA gene sequencing to screen for bacteremia to confirm suspected neonatal sepsis (NS) and compare with risk factors and septic screen testing. Sixty-two neonates with suspected NS were enrolled. White blood cells count, I/T ratio, C-reactive protein, blood culture and 16S rRNA sequencing were performed. Blood culture was positive in 26% of cases, and PCR was positive in 26% of cases. Evaluation of PCR for the diagnosis of NS showed sensitivity 62.5%, specificity 86.9%, PPV 62.5%, NPV 86.9% and accuracy of 79.7%. 16S rRNA PCR increased the sensitivity of detecting bacterial DNA in newborns with signs of sepsis from 26 to 35.4%, and its use can be limited to cases with the most significant risk factors and positive septic screen. PMID:26494728

  9. Characterization of Xanthomonas campestris Pathovars by rRNA Gene Restriction Patterns

    PubMed Central

    Berthier, Yvette; Verdier, Valérie; Guesdon, Jean-Luc; Chevrier, Danièle; Denis, Jean-Baptiste; Decoux, Guy; Lemattre, Monique

    1993-01-01

    Genomic DNA of 191 strains of the family Pseudomonadaceae, including 187 strains of the genus Xanthomonas, was cleaved by EcoRI endonuclease. After hybridization of Southern transfer blots with 2-acetylamino-fluorene-labelled Escherichia coli 16+23S rRNA probe, 27 different patterns were obtained. The strains are clearly distinguishable at the genus, species, and pathovar levels. The variability of the rRNA gene restriction patterns was determined for four pathovars of Xanthomonas campestris species. The 16 strains of X. campestris pv. begoniae analyzed gave only one pattern. The variability of rRNA gene restriction patterns of X. campestris pv. manihotis strains could be related to ecotypes. In contrast, the variability of patterns observed for X. campestris pv. malvacearum was not correlated with pathogenicity or with the geographical origins of the strains. The highest degree of variability of DNA fingerprints was observed within X. campestris pv. dieffenbachiae, which is pathogenic to several hosts of the Araceae family. In this case, variability was related to both host plant and pathogenicity. Images PMID:16348894

  10. rRNA Binding Sites and the Molecular Mechanism of Action of the Tetracyclines

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    The tetracycline antibiotics are known to be effective in the treatment of both infectious and noninfectious disease conditions. The 16S rRNA binding mechanism currently held for the antibacterial action of the tetracyclines does not explain their activity against viruses, protozoa that lack mitochondria, and noninfectious conditions. Also, the mechanism by which the tetracyclines selectively inhibit microbial protein synthesis against host eukaryotic protein synthesis despite conservation of ribosome structure and functions is still questionable. Many studies have investigated the binding of the tetracyclines to the 16S rRNA using the small ribosomal subunit of different bacterial species, but there seems to be no agreement between various reports on the exact binding site on the 16S rRNA. The wide range of activity of the tetracyclines against a broad spectrum of bacterial pathogens, viruses, protozoa, and helminths, as well as noninfectious conditions, indicates a more generalized effect on RNA. In the light of recent evidence that the tetracyclines bind to various synthetic double-stranded RNAs (dsRNAs) of random base sequences, suggesting that the double-stranded structures may play a more important role in the binding of the tetracyclines to RNA than the specific base pairs, as earlier speculated, it is imperative to consider possible alternative binding modes or sites that could help explain the mechanisms of action of the tetracyclines against various pathogens and disease conditions. PMID:27246781

  11. Two Distinct Mechanisms Cause Heterogeneity of 16S rRNA

    PubMed Central

    Ueda, Kumiko; Seki, Tatsuji; Kudo, Takuji; Yoshida, Toshiomi; Kataoka, Masakazu

    1999-01-01

    To investigate the frequency of heterogeneity among the multiple 16S rRNA genes within a single microorganism, we determined directly the 120-bp nucleotide sequences containing the hypervariable α region of the 16S rRNA gene from 475 Streptomyces strains. Display of the direct sequencing patterns revealed the existence of 136 heterogeneous loci among a total of 33 strains. The heterogeneous loci were detected only in the stem region designated helix 10. All of the substitutions conserved the relevant secondary structure. The 33 strains were divided into two groups: one group, including 22 strains, had less than two heterogeneous bases; the other group, including 11 strains, had five or more heterogeneous bases. The two groups were different in their combinations of heterogeneous bases. The former mainly contained transitional substitutions, and the latter was mainly composed of transversional substitutions, suggesting that at least two mechanisms, possibly misincorporation during DNA replication and horizontal gene transfer, cause rRNA heterogeneity. PMID:9864315

  12. The Role of 16S rRNA Gene Sequencing in Confirmation of Suspected Neonatal Sepsis.

    PubMed

    El Gawhary, Somaia; El-Anany, Mervat; Hassan, Reem; Ali, Doaa; El Gameel, El Qassem

    2016-02-01

    Different molecular assays for the detection of bacterial DNA in the peripheral blood represented a diagnostic tool for neonatal sepsis. We targeted to evaluate the role of 16S rRNA gene sequencing to screen for bacteremia to confirm suspected neonatal sepsis (NS) and compare with risk factors and septic screen testing. Sixty-two neonates with suspected NS were enrolled. White blood cells count, I/T ratio, C-reactive protein, blood culture and 16S rRNA sequencing were performed. Blood culture was positive in 26% of cases, and PCR was positive in 26% of cases. Evaluation of PCR for the diagnosis of NS showed sensitivity 62.5%, specificity 86.9%, PPV 62.5%, NPV 86.9% and accuracy of 79.7%. 16S rRNA PCR increased the sensitivity of detecting bacterial DNA in newborns with signs of sepsis from 26 to 35.4%, and its use can be limited to cases with the most significant risk factors and positive septic screen.

  13. Intrinsic challenges in ancient microbiome reconstruction using 16S rRNA gene amplification.

    PubMed

    Ziesemer, Kirsten A; Mann, Allison E; Sankaranarayanan, Krithivasan; Schroeder, Hannes; Ozga, Andrew T; Brandt, Bernd W; Zaura, Egija; Waters-Rist, Andrea; Hoogland, Menno; Salazar-García, Domingo C; Aldenderfer, Mark; Speller, Camilla; Hendy, Jessica; Weston, Darlene A; MacDonald, Sandy J; Thomas, Gavin H; Collins, Matthew J; Lewis, Cecil M; Hofman, Corinne; Warinner, Christina

    2015-11-13

    To date, characterization of ancient oral (dental calculus) and gut (coprolite) microbiota has been primarily accomplished through a metataxonomic approach involving targeted amplification of one or more variable regions in the 16S rRNA gene. Specifically, the V3 region (E. coli 341-534) of this gene has been suggested as an excellent candidate for ancient DNA amplification and microbial community reconstruction. However, in practice this metataxonomic approach often produces highly skewed taxonomic frequency data. In this study, we use non-targeted (shotgun metagenomics) sequencing methods to better understand skewed microbial profiles observed in four ancient dental calculus specimens previously analyzed by amplicon sequencing. Through comparisons of microbial taxonomic counts from paired amplicon (V3 U341F/534R) and shotgun sequencing datasets, we demonstrate that extensive length polymorphisms in the V3 region are a consistent and major cause of differential amplification leading to taxonomic bias in ancient microbiome reconstructions based on amplicon sequencing. We conclude that systematic amplification bias confounds attempts to accurately reconstruct microbiome taxonomic profiles from 16S rRNA V3 amplicon data generated using universal primers. Because in silico analysis indicates that alternative 16S rRNA hypervariable regions will present similar challenges, we advocate for the use of a shotgun metagenomics approach in ancient microbiome reconstructions.

  14. Intrinsic challenges in ancient microbiome reconstruction using 16S rRNA gene amplification

    PubMed Central

    Ziesemer, Kirsten A.; Mann, Allison E.; Sankaranarayanan, Krithivasan; Schroeder, Hannes; Ozga, Andrew T.; Brandt, Bernd W.; Zaura, Egija; Waters-Rist, Andrea; Hoogland, Menno; Salazar-García, Domingo C.; Aldenderfer, Mark; Speller, Camilla; Hendy, Jessica; Weston, Darlene A.; MacDonald, Sandy J.; Thomas, Gavin H.; Collins, Matthew J.; Lewis, Cecil M.; Hofman, Corinne; Warinner, Christina

    2015-01-01

    To date, characterization of ancient oral (dental calculus) and gut (coprolite) microbiota has been primarily accomplished through a metataxonomic approach involving targeted amplification of one or more variable regions in the 16S rRNA gene. Specifically, the V3 region (E. coli 341–534) of this gene has been suggested as an excellent candidate for ancient DNA amplification and microbial community reconstruction. However, in practice this metataxonomic approach often produces highly skewed taxonomic frequency data. In this study, we use non-targeted (shotgun metagenomics) sequencing methods to better understand skewed microbial profiles observed in four ancient dental calculus specimens previously analyzed by amplicon sequencing. Through comparisons of microbial taxonomic counts from paired amplicon (V3 U341F/534R) and shotgun sequencing datasets, we demonstrate that extensive length polymorphisms in the V3 region are a consistent and major cause of differential amplification leading to taxonomic bias in ancient microbiome reconstructions based on amplicon sequencing. We conclude that systematic amplification bias confounds attempts to accurately reconstruct microbiome taxonomic profiles from 16S rRNA V3 amplicon data generated using universal primers. Because in silico analysis indicates that alternative 16S rRNA hypervariable regions will present similar challenges, we advocate for the use of a shotgun metagenomics approach in ancient microbiome reconstructions. PMID:26563586

  15. A Mutation in the 16S rRNA Decoding Region Attenuates the Virulence of Mycobacterium tuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    Watanabe, Shinya; Matsumura, Kazunori; Iwai, Hiroki; Funatogawa, Keiji; Haishima, Yuji; Fukui, Chie; Okumura, Kayo; Kato-Miyazawa, Masako; Hashimoto, Masahito; Teramoto, Kanae; Kirikae, Fumiko; Miyoshi-Akiyama, Tohru

    2016-01-01

    Mycobacterium tuberculosis contains a single rRNA operon that encodes targets for antituberculosis agents, including kanamycin. To date, only four mutations in the kanamycin binding sites of 16S rRNA have been reported in kanamycin-resistant clinical isolates. We hypothesized that another mutation(s) in the region may dramatically decrease M. tuberculosis viability and virulence. Here, we describe an rRNA mutation, U1406A, which was generated in vitro and confers resistance to kanamycin while highly attenuating M. tuberculosis virulence. The mutant showed decreased expression of 20% (n = 361) of mycobacterial proteins, including central metabolic enzymes, mycolic acid biosynthesis enzymes, and virulence factors such as antigen 85 complexes and ESAT-6. The mutation also induced three proteins, including KsgA (Rv1010; 16S rRNA adenine dimethyltransferase), which closely bind to the U1406A mutation site on the ribosome; these proteins were associated with ribosome maturation and translation initiation processes. The mutant showed an increase in 17S rRNA (precursor 16S rRNA) and a decrease in the ratio of 30S subunits to the 70S ribosomes, suggesting that the U1406A mutation in 16S rRNA attenuated M. tuberculosis virulence by affecting these processes. PMID:27245411

  16. A Mutation in the 16S rRNA Decoding Region Attenuates the Virulence of Mycobacterium tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Watanabe, Shinya; Matsumura, Kazunori; Iwai, Hiroki; Funatogawa, Keiji; Haishima, Yuji; Fukui, Chie; Okumura, Kayo; Kato-Miyazawa, Masako; Hashimoto, Masahito; Teramoto, Kanae; Kirikae, Fumiko; Miyoshi-Akiyama, Tohru; Kirikae, Teruo

    2016-08-01

    Mycobacterium tuberculosis contains a single rRNA operon that encodes targets for antituberculosis agents, including kanamycin. To date, only four mutations in the kanamycin binding sites of 16S rRNA have been reported in kanamycin-resistant clinical isolates. We hypothesized that another mutation(s) in the region may dramatically decrease M. tuberculosis viability and virulence. Here, we describe an rRNA mutation, U1406A, which was generated in vitro and confers resistance to kanamycin while highly attenuating M. tuberculosis virulence. The mutant showed decreased expression of 20% (n = 361) of mycobacterial proteins, including central metabolic enzymes, mycolic acid biosynthesis enzymes, and virulence factors such as antigen 85 complexes and ESAT-6. The mutation also induced three proteins, including KsgA (Rv1010; 16S rRNA adenine dimethyltransferase), which closely bind to the U1406A mutation site on the ribosome; these proteins were associated with ribosome maturation and translation initiation processes. The mutant showed an increase in 17S rRNA (precursor 16S rRNA) and a decrease in the ratio of 30S subunits to the 70S ribosomes, suggesting that the U1406A mutation in 16S rRNA attenuated M. tuberculosis virulence by affecting these processes.

  17. Organization, Structure, and Variability of the rRNA Operon of the Whipple's Disease Bacterium (Tropheryma whippelii)

    PubMed Central

    Maiwald, Matthias; von Herbay, Axel; Lepp, Paul W.; Relman, David A.

    2000-01-01

    Whipple's disease is a systemic disorder associated with a cultivation-resistant, poorly characterized actinomycete, Tropheryma whippelii. We determined a nearly complete rRNA operon sequence of T. whippelii from specimens from 3 patients with Whipple's disease, as well as partial operon sequences from 43 patients. Variability was observed in the 16S-23S rRNA spacer sequences, leading to the description of five distinct sequence types. One specimen contained two spacer sequence types, raising the possibility of a double infection. Secondary structure models for the primary rRNA transcript and mature rRNAs revealed rare or unique features. PMID:10809715

  18. Cloning and sequence analysis of two copies of a 23S rRNA gene from Helicobacter pylori and association of clarithromycin resistance with 23S rRNA mutations.

    PubMed Central

    Taylor, D E; Ge, Z; Purych, D; Lo, T; Hiratsuka, K

    1997-01-01

    In this study, two identical copies of a 23S-5S gene cluster, which are separately situated within the Helicobacter pylori UA802 chromosome, were cloned and sequenced. Comparison of the DNA sequence of the H. pylori 23S rRNA gene with known sequences of other bacterial 23S rRNA genes indicated that the H. pylori UA802 23S rRNA genes are closely related to those of Campylobacter spp. and therefore belong in the proposed Proteobacteria subdivision. The 5'-terminal nucleotide T or A of the 23S rRNA is close to a Pribnow box which could be a -10 region of the transcription promoter for the 23S rRNA gene, suggesting that a posttranscriptional process is likely not involved in the maturation of the H. pylori 23S rRNA. Clinical isolates of H. pylori resistant to clarithromycin were examined by using natural transformation and pulsed-field gel electrophoresis. Cross-resistance to clarithromycin and erythromycin, which was transferred by natural transformation from the Cla(r) Ery(r) donor strain H. pylori E to the Cla(s) Ery(s) recipient strain H. pylori UA802, was associated with an single A-to-G transition mutation at position 2142 of both copies of the 23S rRNA in UA802 Cla(r) Ery(r) mutants. The transformation frequency for Cla(r) and Ery(r) was found to be approximately 2 x 10(-6) transformants per viable cell, and the MICs of both clarithromycin and erythromycin for the Cla(r) Ery(r) mutants were equal to those for the donor isolate. Our results confirmed the previous findings that mutations at positions 2142 and 2143 of the H. pylori 23S rRNA gene are responsible for clarithromycin resistance and suggest that acquisition of clarithromycin resistance in H. pylori could also result from horizontal transfer. PMID:9420030

  19. Design and experimental application of a novel non-degenerate universal primer set that amplifies prokaryotic 16S rRNA genes with a low possibility to amplify eukaryotic rRNA genes.

    PubMed

    Mori, Hiroshi; Maruyama, Fumito; Kato, Hiromi; Toyoda, Atsushi; Dozono, Ayumi; Ohtsubo, Yoshiyuki; Nagata, Yuji; Fujiyama, Asao; Tsuda, Masataka; Kurokawa, Ken

    2014-01-01

    The deep sequencing of 16S rRNA genes amplified by universal primers has revolutionized our understanding of microbial communities by allowing the characterization of the diversity of the uncultured majority. However, some universal primers also amplify eukaryotic rRNA genes, leading to a decrease in the efficiency of sequencing of prokaryotic 16S rRNA genes with possible mischaracterization of the diversity in the microbial community. In this study, we compared 16S rRNA gene sequences from genome-sequenced strains and identified candidates for non-degenerate universal primers that could be used for the amplification of prokaryotic 16S rRNA genes. The 50 identified candidates were investigated to calculate their coverage for prokaryotic and eukaryotic rRNA genes, including those from uncultured taxa and eukaryotic organelles, and a novel universal primer set, 342F-806R, covering many prokaryotic, but not eukaryotic, rRNA genes was identified. This primer set was validated by the amplification of 16S rRNA genes from a soil metagenomic sample and subsequent pyrosequencing using the Roche 454 platform. The same sample was also used for pyrosequencing of the amplicons by employing a commonly used primer set, 338F-533R, and for shotgun metagenomic sequencing using the Illumina platform. Our comparison of the taxonomic compositions inferred by the three sequencing experiments indicated that the non-degenerate 342F-806R primer set can characterize the taxonomic composition of the microbial community without substantial bias, and is highly expected to be applicable to the analysis of a wide variety of microbial communities.

  20. Uniting the classification of cultured and uncultured bacteria and archaea using 16S rRNA gene sequences.

    PubMed

    Yarza, Pablo; Yilmaz, Pelin; Pruesse, Elmar; Glöckner, Frank Oliver; Ludwig, Wolfgang; Schleifer, Karl-Heinz; Whitman, William B; Euzéby, Jean; Amann, Rudolf; Rosselló-Móra, Ramon

    2014-09-01

    Publicly available sequence databases of the small subunit ribosomal RNA gene, also known as 16S rRNA in bacteria and archaea, are growing rapidly, and the number of entries currently exceeds 4 million. However, a unified classification and nomenclature framework for all bacteria and archaea does not yet exist. In this Analysis article, we propose rational taxonomic boundaries for high taxa of bacteria and archaea on the basis of 16S rRNA gene sequence identities and suggest a rationale for the circumscription of uncultured taxa that is compatible with the taxonomy of cultured bacteria and archaea. Our analyses show that only nearly complete 16S rRNA sequences give accurate measures of taxonomic diversity. In addition, our analyses suggest that most of the 16S rRNA sequences of the high taxa will be discovered in environmental surveys by the end of the current decade.

  1. How close is close: 16S rRNA sequence identity may not be sufficient to guarantee species identity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fox, G. E.; Wisotzkey, J. D.; Jurtshuk, P. Jr

    1992-01-01

    16S rRNA (genes coding for rRNA) sequence comparisons were conducted with the following three psychrophilic strains: Bacillus globisporus W25T (T = type strain) and Bacillus psychrophilus W16AT, and W5. These strains exhibited more than 99.5% sequence identity and within experimental uncertainty could be regarded as identical. Their close taxonomic relationship was further documented by phenotypic similarities. In contrast, previously published DNA-DNA hybridization results have convincingly established that these strains do not belong to the same species if current standards are used. These results emphasize the important point that effective identity of 16S rRNA sequences is not necessarily a sufficient criterion to guarantee species identity. Thus, although 16S rRNA sequences can be used routinely to distinguish and establish relationships between genera and well-resolved species, very recently diverged species may not be recognizable.

  2. A report of cat scratch disease in Korea confirmed by PCR amplification of the 16S-23S rRNA intergenic region of Bartonella henselae.

    PubMed

    Suh, Borum; Chun, Jin-Kyoung; Yong, Dongeun; Lee, Yang Soon; Jeong, Seok Hoon; Yang, Woo Ick; Kim, Dong Soo

    2010-02-01

    We report a case of cat scratch disease in an 8-yr-old girl who presented with fever and enlargement of both axillary lymph nodes. Both aerobic and anaerobic cultures of the lymph node aspirate were negative for microbial growth. Gram staining and Warthin-Starry silver staining did not reveal any organism. Purified DNA from the PCR-amplicon of the 16S-23S rRNA intergenic region was sequenced and showed 99.7% identity with the corresponding sequence of Bartonella henselae strain Houston-1. Our findings suggest that the internal transcribed spacer is a reliable region for PCR identification of Bartonella species. In patients with lymphadenitis, a history of contact with cats or dogs necessitates the use of diagnostic approaches that employ not only the conventional staining and culture but also molecular methods to detect B. henselae.

  3. The pre-existing population of 5S rRNA effects p53 stabilization during ribosome biogenesis inhibition.

    PubMed

    Onofrillo, Carmine; Galbiati, Alice; Montanaro, Lorenzo; Derenzini, Massimo

    2017-01-17

    Pre-ribosomal complex RPL5/RPL11/5S rRNA (5S RNP) is considered the central MDM2 inhibitory complex that control p53 stabilization during ribosome biogenesis inhibition. Despite its role is well defined, the dynamic of 5S RNP assembly still requires further characterization. In the present work, we report that MDM2 inhibition is dependent by a pre-existing population of 5S rRNA.

  4. Abiotrophia defectiva infection of a total hip arthroplasty diagnosed by 16S rRNA gene sequencing.

    PubMed

    Rozemeijer, Wouter; Jiya, Timothy U; Rijnsburger, Martine; Heddema, Edou; Savelkoul, Paul; Ang, Wim

    2011-05-01

    We describe a case of a total hip arthroplasty infection caused by Abiotrophia defectiva, identified by 16S rRNA gene sequencing. Removal of the prosthesis followed by antibiotic treatment resulted in a good clinical outcome. 16S rRNA gene sequencing can be a useful tool in diagnosing infection with this fastidious microorganism that can easily be misidentified using phenotypic identification methods.

  5. Site-directed photo-cross-linking of rRNA transcription initiation complexes.

    PubMed Central

    Gong, X; Radebaugh, C A; Geiss, G K; Simon, M N; Paule, M R

    1995-01-01

    Site-specific photo-cross-linking of the rRNA committed transcription complex was carried out by using 5-[N-(p-azidobenzoyl)-3-aminoallyl]-dUMP-derivatized promoter DNA. Putative TAFIs of 145, 99, 96, and 91 kDa, as well as TATA-binding protein (TBP), were found to specifically photo-cross-link to different positions along the promoter. These had been identified as potential subunits of the fundamental transcription initiation factor TIF-IB (also known as SL1, factor D, and TFID) from Acanthamoeba castellanii by purification to apparent homogeneity. No other polypeptides attributable to the rRNA architectural transcription factor UBF were identified, suggesting that this protein is not part of the committed complex. Scanning transmission electron microscopy of the complexes was used to estimate the mass of the complex and the contour length of the DNA in the complex. This showed that a single molecule of TIF-IB is in each committed complex and that the DNA is not looped around the protein, as would be expected if UBF were in the complex. A circular permutation analysis of DNA bending resulting from TIF-IB binding revealed a 45 +/- 3.1 degrees (n = 14) bend centered 23 bp upstream of the transcription initiation site. This degree of bending and the position of the bend relative to the site of TBP photo-cross-linking are consistent with earlier data showing that the TBP TATA box-binding domain is not utilized in the assembly of the rRNA committed complex (C. A. Radebaugh, J. L. Mathews, G. K. Geiss, F. Liu, J. Wong, E. Bateman, S. Camier, A. Sentenac, and M. R. Paule, Mol. Cell. Biol. 14:597-605, 1994). PMID:7651413

  6. Site-directed photo-cross-linking of rRNA transcription initiation complexes.

    PubMed

    Gong, X; Radebaugh, C A; Geiss, G K; Simon, M N; Paule, M R

    1995-09-01

    Site-specific photo-cross-linking of the rRNA committed transcription complex was carried out by using 5-[N-(p-azidobenzoyl)-3-aminoallyl]-dUMP-derivatized promoter DNA. Putative TAFIs of 145, 99, 96, and 91 kDa, as well as TATA-binding protein (TBP), were found to specifically photo-cross-link to different positions along the promoter. These had been identified as potential subunits of the fundamental transcription initiation factor TIF-IB (also known as SL1, factor D, and TFID) from Acanthamoeba castellanii by purification to apparent homogeneity. No other polypeptides attributable to the rRNA architectural transcription factor UBF were identified, suggesting that this protein is not part of the committed complex. Scanning transmission electron microscopy of the complexes was used to estimate the mass of the complex and the contour length of the DNA in the complex. This showed that a single molecule of TIF-IB is in each committed complex and that the DNA is not looped around the protein, as would be expected if UBF were in the complex. A circular permutation analysis of DNA bending resulting from TIF-IB binding revealed a 45 +/- 3.1 degrees (n = 14) bend centered 23 bp upstream of the transcription initiation site. This degree of bending and the position of the bend relative to the site of TBP photo-cross-linking are consistent with earlier data showing that the TBP TATA box-binding domain is not utilized in the assembly of the rRNA committed complex (C. A. Radebaugh, J. L. Mathews, G. K. Geiss, F. Liu, J. Wong, E. Bateman, S. Camier, A. Sentenac, and M. R. Paule, Mol. Cell. Biol. 14:597-605, 1994).

  7. Bacillus nanhaiisediminis sp. nov., an alkalitolerant member of Bacillus rRNA group 6.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jianli; Wang, Jiewei; Song, Fei; Fang, Caiyuan; Xin, Yuhua; Zhang, Yabo

    2011-05-01

    A Gram-stain-positive, rod-shaped bacterium, designated strain NH3(T), was isolated from a sediment sample from the South China Sea and was subjected to a polyphasic taxonomic study. The isolate grew optimally at 37 °C and pH 9. Strain NH3(T) had cell-wall peptidoglycan based on meso-diaminopimelic acid and MK-7 as the predominant menaquinone. The cellular fatty acid profile included significant amounts of iso-C(15 : 0) and iso-C(14 : 0). The major polar lipids were phosphatidylethanolamine, phosphatidylglycerol and diphosphatidylglycerol. The DNA G+C content of strain NH3(T) was 40.3 mol%. Phylogenetic analysis of the 16S rRNA gene sequence revealed that strain NH3(T) was a member of rRNA group 6 of the genus Bacillus, which includes alkalitolerant, alkaliphilic and halotolerant species. The closest phylogenetic relatives were Bacillus akibai 1139(T) (96.82 % 16S rRNA gene sequence similarity), B. pseudofirmus DSM 8715(T) (96.76 %), B. okhensis Kh10-101(T) (96.76 %) and B. alkalidiazotrophicus MS 6(T) (96.47 %). Strain NH3(T) could be distinguished from these phylogenetically close neighbours based on a number of phenotypic properties. On the basis of phenotypic and chemotaxonomic characteristics and phylogenetic data, we conclude that strain NH3(T) ( = CGMCC 1.10116(T)  = JCM 16507(T)) merits classification as the type strain of a novel species, for which the name Bacillus nanhaiisediminis sp. nov. is proposed.

  8. Analysis, Optimization and Verification of Illumina-Generated 16S rRNA Gene Amplicon Surveys

    PubMed Central

    Nelson, Michael C.; Morrison, Hilary G.; Benjamino, Jacquelynn; Grim, Sharon L.; Graf, Joerg

    2014-01-01

    The exploration of microbial communities by sequencing 16S rRNA genes has expanded with low-cost, high-throughput sequencing instruments. Illumina-based 16S rRNA gene sequencing has recently gained popularity over 454 pyrosequencing due to its lower costs, higher accuracy and greater throughput. Although recent reports suggest that Illumina and 454 pyrosequencing provide similar beta diversity measures, it remains to be demonstrated that pre-existing 454 pyrosequencing workflows can transfer directly from 454 to Illumina MiSeq sequencing by simply changing the sequencing adapters of the primers. In this study, we modified 454 pyrosequencing primers targeting the V4-V5 hyper-variable regions of the 16S rRNA gene to be compatible with Illumina sequencers. Microbial communities from cows, humans, leeches, mice, sewage, and termites and a mock community were analyzed by 454 and MiSeq sequencing of the V4-V5 region and MiSeq sequencing of the V4 region. Our analysis revealed that reference-based OTU clustering alone introduced biases compared to de novo clustering, preventing certain taxa from being observed in some samples. Based on this we devised and recommend an analysis pipeline that includes read merging, contaminant filtering, and reference-based clustering followed by de novo OTU clustering, which produces diversity measures consistent with de novo OTU clustering analysis. Low levels of dataset contamination with Illumina sequencing were discovered that could affect analyses that require highly sensitive approaches. While moving to Illumina-based sequencing platforms promises to provide deeper insights into the breadth and function of microbial diversity, our results show that care must be taken to ensure that sequencing and processing artifacts do not obscure true microbial diversity. PMID:24722003

  9. Multi-site-specific 16S rRNA Methyltransferase RsmF from Thermus thermophilus

    SciTech Connect

    Demirci, H.; Larsen, L; Hansen, T; Rasmussen, A; Cadambi, A; Gregory, S; Kirpekar, F; Jogl, G

    2010-01-01

    Cells devote a significant effort toward the production of multiple modified nucleotides in rRNAs, which fine tune the ribosome function. Here, we report that two methyltransferases, RsmB and RsmF, are responsible for all four 5-methylcytidine (m{sup 5}C) modifications in 16S rRNA of Thermus thermophilus. Like Escherichia coli RsmB, T. thermophilus RsmB produces m{sup 5}C967. In contrast to E. coli RsmF, which introduces a single m{sup 5}C1407 modification, T. thermophilus RsmF modifies three positions, generating m{sup 5}C1400 and m{sup 5}C1404 in addition to m{sup 5}C1407. These three residues are clustered near the decoding site of the ribosome, but are situated in distinct structural contexts, suggesting a requirement for flexibility in the RsmF active site that is absent from the E. coli enzyme. Two of these residues, C1400 and C1404, are sufficiently buried in the mature ribosome structure so as to require extensive unfolding of the rRNA to be accessible to RsmF. In vitro, T. thermophilus RsmF methylates C1400, C1404, and C1407 in a 30S subunit substrate, but only C1400 and C1404 when naked 16S rRNA is the substrate. The multispecificity of T. thermophilus RsmF is potentially explained by three crystal structures of the enzyme in a complex with cofactor S-adenosyl-methionine at up to 1.3 {angstrom} resolution. In addition to confirming the overall structural similarity to E. coli RsmF, these structures also reveal that key segments in the active site are likely to be dynamic in solution, thereby expanding substrate recognition by T. thermophilus RsmF.

  10. Phylogenetic diversity in the genus Bacillus as seen by 16S rRNA sequencing studies.

    PubMed

    Rössler, D; Ludwig, W; Schleifer, K H; Lin, C; McGill, T J; Wisotzkey, J D; Jurtshuk, P; Fox, G E

    1991-01-01

    Comparative sequence analysis of 16S ribosomal (r)RNAs or DNAs of Bacillus alvei, B. laterosporus, B. macerans, B. macquariensis, B. polymyxa and B. stearothermophilus revealed the phylogenetic diversity of the genus Bacillus. Based on the presently available data set of 16S rRNA sequences from bacilli and relatives at least four major "Bacillus clusters" can be defined: a "Bacillus subtilis cluster" including B. stearothermophilus, a "B. brevis cluster" including B. laterosporus, a "B. alvei cluster" including B. macerans, B. maquariensis and B. polymyxa and a "B. cycloheptanicus branch".

  11. Phylogenetic diversity in the genus Bacillus as seen by 16S rRNA sequencing studies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rossler, D.; Ludwig, W.; Schleifer, K. H.; Lin, C.; McGill, T. J.; Wisotzkey, J. D.; Jurtshuk, P. Jr; Fox, G. E.

    1991-01-01

    Comparative sequence analysis of 16S ribosomal (r)RNAs or DNAs of Bacillus alvei, B. laterosporus, B. macerans, B. macquariensis, B. polymyxa and B. stearothermophilus revealed the phylogenetic diversity of the genus Bacillus. Based on the presently available data set of 16S rRNA sequences from bacilli and relatives at least four major "Bacillus clusters" can be defined: a "Bacillus subtilis cluster" including B. stearothermophilus, a "B. brevis cluster" including B. laterosporus, a "B. alvei cluster" including B. macerans, B. maquariensis and B. polymyxa and a "B. cycloheptanicus branch".

  12. Campylobacter species identification based on polymorphism of DNA encoding rRNA.

    PubMed Central

    Moureau, P; Derclaye, I; Gregoire, D; Janssen, M; Cornelis, G R

    1989-01-01

    Total DNA from five Campylobacter species was digested with a mixture of XhoI and BglII restriction endonucleases and analyzed by Southern hybridization by using a probe complementary to the DNA coding for the 16S rRNA. Each of the Campylobacter species, including C. jejuni, C. coli, C. laridis, C. fetus, and C. upsaliensis, displayed a characteristic pattern. Although some bands may be common to different species, the simplicity of the hybridization pattern enabled us to discriminate among the different species of Campylobacter. Images PMID:2570080

  13. Greengenes, a Chimera-checked 16S rRNA gene database and workbenchcompatible with ARB

    SciTech Connect

    DeSantis, Todd Z.; Hugenholtz, Philip; Larsen, Neils; Rojas,Mark; Brodie, Eoin L.; Keller, Keith; Huber, Thomas; Dalevi, Daniel; Hu,Ping; Andersen, Gary L.

    2006-04-10

    A 16S rRNA gene database (http://greengenes.lbl.gov) addresses limitations of public repositories by providing chimera-screening, standard alignments and taxonomic classification using multiple published taxonomies. It was revealed that in congruent taxonomic nomenclature exists among curators even at the phylum-level. Putative chimeras were identified in 3 percent of environmental sequences and 0.2 percent of records derived from isolates. Environmental sequences were classified into 100 phylum-level lineages within the Archaea and Bacteria.

  14. Novel haloarchaeal 16S rRNA gene sequences from Alpine Permo-Triassic rock salt.

    PubMed

    Radax, C; Gruber, C; Stan-Lotter, H

    2001-08-01

    Prokaryotic diversity in Alpine salt sediments was investigated by polymerase chain reaction (PCR) amplification of 16S rRNA genes, sequencing of cloned products, and comparisons with culturable strains. DNA was extracted from the residue following filtration of dissolved Permo-Triassic rock salt. Fifty-four haloarchaeal sequences were obtained, which could be grouped into at least five distinct clusters. Similarity values of three clusters to known 16S rRNA genes were less than 90%-95%, suggesting the presence of uncultured novel taxa; two clusters were 98% and 99% similar to isolates from Permo-Triassic or Miocene salt from England and Poland, and to Halobacterium salinarum, respectively. Some rock salt samples, including drilling cores, yielded no amplifiable DNA and no cells or only a few culturable cells. This result suggested a variable distribution of haloarchaea within different strata, probably consistent with the known geologic heterogeneity of Alpine salt deposits. We recently reported identical culturable Halococcus salifodinae strains in Permo-Triassic salt sediments from England, Germany, and Austria; together with the data presented here, those results suggest one plausible scenario to be an ancient continuous hypersaline ocean (Zechstein sea) populated by haloarchaea, whose descendants are found today in the salt sediments. The novelty of the sequences also suggested avoidance of haloarchaeal contaminants during our isolation of strains, preparation of DNA, and PCR reactions.

  15. Functional Specialization of Domains Tandemly Duplicated Witin 16S rRNA Methyltransferase RsmC

    SciTech Connect

    Sunita,S.; Purta, E.; Durawa, M.; Tkaczuk, K.; Swaathi, J.; Bujnicki, J.; Sivaraman, J.

    2007-01-01

    RNA methyltransferases (MTases) are important players in the biogenesis and regulation of the ribosome, the cellular machine for protein synthesis. RsmC is a MTase that catalyzes the transfer of a methyl group from S-adenosyl-L-methionine (SAM) to G1207 of 16S rRNA. Mutations of G1207 have dominant lethal phenotypes in Escherichia coli, underscoring the significance of this modified nucleotide for ribosome function. Here we report the crystal structure of E. coli RsmC refined to 2.1 Angstroms resolution, which reveals two homologous domains tandemly duplicated within a single polypeptide. We characterized the function of the individual domains and identified key residues involved in binding of rRNA and SAM, and in catalysis. We also discovered that one of the domains is important for the folding of the other. Domain duplication and subfunctionalization by complementary degeneration of redundant functions (in particular substrate binding versus catalysis) has been reported for many enzymes, including those involved in RNA metabolism. Thus, RsmC can be regarded as a model system for functional streamlining of domains accompanied by the development of dependencies concerning folding and stability.

  16. Anticancer activity of CX-3543: a direct inhibitor of rRNA biogenesis.

    PubMed

    Drygin, Denis; Siddiqui-Jain, Adam; O'Brien, Sean; Schwaebe, Michael; Lin, Amy; Bliesath, Josh; Ho, Caroline B; Proffitt, Chris; Trent, Katy; Whitten, Jeffrey P; Lim, John K C; Von Hoff, Daniel; Anderes, Kenna; Rice, William G

    2009-10-01

    Hallmark deregulated signaling in cancer cells drives excessive ribosome biogenesis within the nucleolus, which elicits unbridled cell growth and proliferation. The rate-limiting step of ribosome biogenesis is synthesis of rRNA (building blocks of ribosomes) by RNA Polymerase I (Pol I). Numerous kinase pathways and products of proto-oncogenes can up-regulate Pol I, whereas tumor suppressor proteins can inhibit rRNA synthesis. In tumorigenesis, activating mutations in certain cancer-associated kinases and loss-of-function mutations in tumor suppressors lead to deregulated signaling that stimulates Pol I transcription with resultant increases in ribosome biogenesis, protein synthesis, cell growth, and proliferation. Certain anticancer therapeutics, such as cisplatin and 5-fluorouracil, reportedly exert, at least partially, their activity through disruption of ribosome biogenesis, yet many prime targets for anticancer drugs within the ribosome synthetic machinery of the nucleolus remain largely unexploited. Herein, we describe CX-3543, a small molecule nucleolus-targeting agent that selectively disrupts nucleolin/rDNA G-quadruplex complexes in the nucleolus, thereby inhibiting Pol I transcription and inducing apoptosis in cancer cells. CX-3543 is the first G-quadruplex interactive agent to enter human clinical trials, and it is currently under evaluation against carcinoid/neuroendocrine tumors in a phase II clinical trial.

  17. DbpA: a DEAD box protein specifically activated by 23s rRNA.

    PubMed Central

    Fuller-Pace, F V; Nicol, S M; Reid, A D; Lane, D P

    1993-01-01

    The Escherichia coli protein DbpA is a member of the 'DEAD box' family of putative RNA-dependent ATPases and RNA helicases, so called because they share the highly conserved motif Asp-Glu-Ala-Asp, together with several other conserved elements. We have investigated DbpA expression under conditions where an endogenous promoter is used. In this context, translation initiation does not occur at the previously identified AUG, but at an upstream, in-frame GUG. Mutation of the GUG initiation codon to AUG virtually abolishes DbpA expression, suggesting an unusual translation initiation mechanism. Using an inducible overexpression plasmid, we have purified milligram quantities of DbpA to homogeneity and shown that the purified protein hydrolyses ATP in an RNA-dependent manner. This ATPase activity is interesting in that, unlike that of other DEAD box proteins investigated to date, it absolutely requires a specific bacterial RNA, which we have identified as 23S rRNA. This observation is particularly significant since DbpA will bind other RNAs and DNA, but will only hydrolyse ATP in the presence of 23S rRNA. Images PMID:8253085

  18. The cytoplasmic mRNA degradation factor Pat1 is required for rRNA processing

    PubMed Central

    Muppavarapu, Mridula; Huch, Susanne; Nissan, Tracy

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Pat1 is a key cytoplasmic mRNA degradation factor, the loss of which severely increases mRNA half-lives. Several recent studies have shown that Pat1 can enter the nucleus and can shuttle between the nucleus and the cytoplasm. As a result, many nuclear roles have been proposed for Pat1. In this study, we analyzed four previously suggested nuclear roles of Pat1 and show that Pat1 is not required for efficient pre-mRNA splicing or pre-mRNA decay in yeast. However, lack of Pat1 results in accumulation of pre-rRNA processing intermediates. Intriguingly, we identified a novel genetic relationship between Pat1 and the rRNA decay machinery, specifically the exosome and the TRAMP complex. While the pre-rRNA processing intermediates that accumulate in the pat1 deletion mutant are, at least to some extent, recognized as aberrant by the rRNA degradation machinery, it is unlikely that these accumulations are the cause of their synthetic sick relationship. Here, we show that the dysregulation of the levels of mRNAs related to ribosome biogenesis could be the cause of the accumulation of the pre-rRNA processing intermediates. Although our results support a role for Pat1 in transcription, they nevertheless suggest that the primary cause of the dysregulated mRNA levels is most likely due to Pat1's role in mRNA decapping and mRNA degradation. PMID:26918764

  19. Greengenes: 16S rRNA Database and Workbench Compatible with ARB

    DOE Data Explorer

    DeSantis, T. Z.; Hugenholtz, P.; Larsen, N.; Rojas, M.; Brodie, E. L.; Keller, K.; Huber, T.; Dalevi, D. Hu, P. Andersen, G. L.

    Greengenes was developed, as the abstract of an AEM reprint states, to "addresse limitations of public repositories by providing chimera screening, standard alignment, and taxonomic classification using multiple published taxonomies. It was found that there is incongruent taxonomic nomenclature among curators even at the phylum level. Putative chimeras were identified in 3% of environmental sequences and in 0.2% of records derived from isolates. Environmental sequences were classified into 100 phylum-level lineages in the Archaea and Bacteria....Greengenes is also a functional workbench to assist in analysis of user-generated 16S rRNA gene sequences. Batches of sequencing reads can be uploaded for quality-based trimming and creation of multiple-sequence alignments (9). Three types of non-MSA similarity searches are also available, seed extension by BLAST (1), similarity based on shared 7-mers by a tool called Simrank, and a direct degenerative pattern match for probe/primer evaluation. Results are displayed using user-preferred taxonomic nomenclature and can be saved between sessions. [Taken from DeSantis, T. Z., P. Hugenholtz, N. Larsen, M. Rojas, E. L. Brodie, K. Keller, T. Huber, D. Dalevi, P. Hu, and G. L. Andersen. 2006. Greengenes, a Chimera-Checked 16S rRNA Gene Database and Workbench Compatible with ARB. Appl Environ Microbiol 72:5069-72, pages 1 and 3] (Specialized Interface)

  20. Control of rRNA Synthesis in Escherichia coli: a Systems Biology Approach†

    PubMed Central

    Dennis, Patrick P.; Ehrenberg, Mans; Bremer, Hans

    2004-01-01

    The first part of this review contains an overview of the various contributions and models relating to the control of rRNA synthesis reported over the last 45 years. The second part describes a systems biology approach to identify the factors and effectors that control the interactions between RNA polymerase and rRNA (rrn) promoters of Escherichia coli bacteria during exponential growth in different media. This analysis is based on measurements of absolute rrn promoter activities as transcripts per minute per promoter in bacterial strains either deficient or proficient in the synthesis of the factor Fis and/or the effector ppGpp. These absolute promoter activities are evaluated in terms of rrn promoter strength (Vmax/Km) and free RNA polymerase concentrations. Three major conclusions emerge from this evaluation. First, the rrn promoters are not saturated with RNA polymerase. As a consequence, changes in the concentration of free RNA polymerase contribute to changes in rrn promoter activities. Second, rrn P2 promoter strength is not specifically regulated during exponential growth at different rates; its activity changes only when the concentration of free RNA polymerase changes. Third, the effector ppGpp reduces the strength of the rrn P1 promoter both directly and indirectly by reducing synthesis of the stimulating factor Fis. This control of rrn P1 promoter strength forms part of a larger feedback loop that adjusts the synthesis of ribosomes to the availability of amino acids via amino acid-dependent control of ppGpp accumulation. PMID:15590778

  1. Correct identification of species makes the amoebozoan rRNA tree congruent with morphology for the order Leptomyxida Page 1987; with description of Acramoeba dendroida n. g., n. sp., originally misidentified as 'Gephyramoeba sp.'.

    PubMed

    Smirnov, Alexey V; Nassonova, Elena S; Cavalier-Smith, Thomas

    2008-02-01

    Morphological identification of protists remains an expert task, especially for little known and poorly described species. Culture collections normally accept organisms under the name provided by depositors and are not responsible for identification. Uncritical acceptance of these names by molecular phylogeneticists may result in serious errors of interpretation of phylogenetic trees based on DNA sequences, making them appear more incongruent with morphology than they really are. Several cases of misidentification in a major culture collection have recently been reported. Here we provide evidence for misidentifications of two more gymnamoebae. The first concerns "Gephyramoeba sp." ATCC 50654; it is not Gephyramoeba, a leptomyxid with lobose pseudopods, but a hitherto undescribed branching amoeba with fine, filamentous subpseudopods named here Acramoeba dendroida gen. et sp. nov. We also sequenced 18S rRNA of Page's strain of Rhizamoeba saxonica (CCAP 1570/2) and show that it is the most deeply branching leptomyxid and is not phylogenetically close to 'Rhizamoeba saxonica' ATCC 50742, which was misidentified. Correcting these misidentifications improves the congruence between morphological diversity of Amoebozoa and their rRNA-based phylogenies, both for Leptomyxida and for the Acramoeba part of the tree. On morphological grounds we transfer Gephyramoebidae from Varipodida back to Leptomyxida and remove Flamella from Leptomyxida; sequences are needed to confirm these two revisions.

  2. Identification of oral bacteria by 16S rRNA gene analysis in elderly persons requiring nursing care.

    PubMed

    Kurabayashi, Hirotaka; Kaneko, Akihiro; Sekiya, Ryo; Karakida, Kazunari; Sasaki, Masashi; Nakatogawa, Noriko; Aoki, Takayuki; Ota, Yoshihide; Sakamoto, Haruo

    2011-02-01

    After incubation of saliva from 58 semi-bedridden elderly persons, the cultures were identified based on the 16S rRNA gene base sequence to compare the identification by the conventional culture method. As a result, the 16S rRNA gene base sequence of 198 strains identified by the culture method showed 98.5% or more homology in some of the Human Oral Microbiome database, and the identification of bacterial species and genus was possible. When an organism identified by the 16S rRNA gene sequencing method was compared with that by the culture method, the concordance rates were 54.5% at the genus level and 35.9% at the species level. Streptococcus mitis strains most frequently isolated from saliva that were identified by the culture method were identified as the same species by the 16S rRNA gene sequencing method (32/35), and all the 11 Streptococcus salivarius strains identified by the culture method were identified as the same species by the 16S rRNA gene sequencing method. All the strains identified as Streptococcus anginosus group by the culture method and 8 of the 9 strains identified as Prevotella species by the culture method were identified as the same group and genus by the 16S rRNA gene sequencing method. When an oral microbial flora test with saliva samples from elderly persons is performed, the 16S rRNA gene sequence identification enables us to identify major indigenous bacteria and pathogenic bacteria and is considered useful as a means of supplementing the conventional culture method.

  3. Group I introns are inherited through common ancestry in the nuclear-encoded rRNA of Zygnematales (Charophyceae).

    PubMed Central

    Bhattacharya, D; Surek, B; Rüsing, M; Damberger, S; Melkonian, M

    1994-01-01

    Group I introns are found in organellar genomes, in the genomes of eubacteria and phages, and in nuclear-encoded rRNAs. The origin and distribution of nuclear-encoded rRNA group I introns are not understood. To elucidate their evolutionary relationships, we analyzed diverse nuclear-encoded small-subunit rRNA group I introns including nine sequences from the green-algal order Zygnematales (Charophyceae). Phylogenetic analyses of group I introns and rRNA coding regions suggest that lateral transfers have occurred in the evolutionary history of group I introns and that, after transfer, some of these elements may form stable components of the host-cell nuclear genomes. The Zygnematales introns, which share a common insertion site (position 1506 relative to the Escherichia coli small-subunit rRNA), form one subfamily of group I introns that has, after its origin, been inherited through common ancestry. Since the first Zygnematales appear in the middle Devonian within the fossil record, the "1506" group I intron presumably has been a stable component of the Zygnematales small-subunit rRNA coding region for 350-400 million years. PMID:7937917

  4. 16S rRNA methyltransferase KsgA contributes to oxidative stress resistance and virulence in Staphylococcus aureus.

    PubMed

    Kyuma, Tatsuhiko; Kizaki, Hayato; Ryuno, Hiroki; Sekimizu, Kazuhisa; Kaito, Chikara

    2015-12-01

    We previously reported that the rRNA methyltransferases RsmI and RsmH, which are responsible for cytidine dimethylation at position 1402 of 16S rRNA in the decoding center of the ribosome, contribute to Staphylococcus aureus virulence. Here we evaluated other 16S rRNA methyltransferases, including KsgA (RsmA), RsmB/F, RsmC, RsmD, RsmE, and RsmG. Knockout of KsgA, which methylates two adjacent adenosines at positions 1518 and 1519 of 16S rRNA in the intersubunit bridge of the ribosome, attenuated the S. aureus killing ability against silkworms. The ksgA knockout strain was sensitive to oxidative stress and had a lower survival rate in murine macrophages than the parent strain. The ksgA knockout strain exhibited decreased translational fidelity in oxidative stress conditions. Administration of N-acetyl-l-cysteine, a free-radical scavenger, restored the killing ability of the ksgA knockout strain against silkworms. These findings suggest that the methyl-modifications of 16S rRNA by KsgA contribute to maintain ribosome function under oxidative conditions and thus to S. aureus virulence.

  5. RiboFR-Seq: a novel approach to linking 16S rRNA amplicon profiles to metagenomes

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Yanming; Ji, Peifeng; Wang, Jinfeng; Zhao, Fangqing

    2016-01-01

    16S rRNA amplicon analysis and shotgun metagenome sequencing are two main culture-independent strategies to explore the genetic landscape of various microbial communities. Recently, numerous studies have employed these two approaches together, but downstream data analyses were performed separately, which always generated incongruent or conflict signals on both taxonomic and functional classifications. Here we propose a novel approach, RiboFR-Seq (Ribosomal RNA gene flanking region sequencing), for capturing both ribosomal RNA variable regions and their flanking protein-coding genes simultaneously. Through extensive testing on clonal bacterial strain, salivary microbiome and bacterial epibionts of marine kelp, we demonstrated that RiboFR-Seq could detect the vast majority of bacteria not only in well-studied microbiomes but also in novel communities with limited reference genomes. Combined with classical amplicon sequencing and shotgun metagenome sequencing, RiboFR-Seq can link the annotations of 16S rRNA and metagenomic contigs to make a consensus classification. By recognizing almost all 16S rRNA copies, the RiboFR-seq approach can effectively reduce the taxonomic abundance bias resulted from 16S rRNA copy number variation. We believe that RiboFR-Seq, which provides an integrated view of 16S rRNA profiles and metagenomes, will help us better understand diverse microbial communities. PMID:26984526

  6. Group I introns are inherited through common ancestry in the nuclear-encoded rRNA of Zygnematales (Charophyceae).

    PubMed

    Bhattacharya, D; Surek, B; Rüsing, M; Damberger, S; Melkonian, M

    1994-10-11

    Group I introns are found in organellar genomes, in the genomes of eubacteria and phages, and in nuclear-encoded rRNAs. The origin and distribution of nuclear-encoded rRNA group I introns are not understood. To elucidate their evolutionary relationships, we analyzed diverse nuclear-encoded small-subunit rRNA group I introns including nine sequences from the green-algal order Zygnematales (Charophyceae). Phylogenetic analyses of group I introns and rRNA coding regions suggest that lateral transfers have occurred in the evolutionary history of group I introns and that, after transfer, some of these elements may form stable components of the host-cell nuclear genomes. The Zygnematales introns, which share a common insertion site (position 1506 relative to the Escherichia coli small-subunit rRNA), form one subfamily of group I introns that has, after its origin, been inherited through common ancestry. Since the first Zygnematales appear in the middle Devonian within the fossil record, the "1506" group I intron presumably has been a stable component of the Zygnematales small-subunit rRNA coding region for 350-400 million years.

  7. Characterization of three different clusters of 18S-26S ribosomal DNA genes in the sea urchin P. lividus: Genetic and epigenetic regulation synchronous to 5S rDNA.

    PubMed

    Bellavia, Daniele; Dimarco, Eufrosina; Caradonna, Fabio

    2016-04-15

    We previously reported the characterization 5S ribosomal DNA (rDNA) clusters in the common sea urchin Paracentrotus lividus and demonstrated the presence of DNA methylation-dependent silencing of embryo specific 5S rDNA cluster in adult tissue. In this work, we show genetic and epigenetic characterization of 18S-26S rDNA clusters in this specie. The results indicate the presence of three different 18S-26S rDNA clusters with different Non-Transcribed Spacer (NTS) regions that have different chromosomal localizations. Moreover, we show that the two largest clusters are hyper-methylated in the promoter-containing NTS regions in adult tissues, as in the 5S rDNA. These findings demonstrate an analogous epigenetic regulation in small and large rDNA clusters and support the logical synchronism in building ribosomes. In fact, all the ribosomal RNA genes must be synchronously and equally transcribed to perform their unique final product.

  8. Basic cytogenetics and physical mapping of 5S and 18S ribosomal genes in Hoplias malabaricus (Osteichthyes, Characiformes, Erythrinidae) from isolated natural lagoons: a conserved karyomorph along the Iguaçu river basin

    PubMed Central

    Gemi, Gisele; Lui, Roberto Laridondo; Treco, Fernando Rodrigo; Paiz, Leonardo Marcel; Moresco, Rafaela Maria; Margarido, Vladimir Pavan

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Erythrinidae include Neotropical teleost fish that are widely distributed in South America. Hoplias Gill, 1903 include two large groups: H. malabaricus Bloch, 1794 and H. lacerdae Miranda Ribeiro, 1908. Hoplias malabaricus is characterized by remarkable karyotype diversity, with some karyomorphs widely distributed geographically while others are more restricted to certain river basins. Cytogenetic analyzes were performed in a population of Hoplias malabaricus from the Wildlife Refuge of Campos de Palmas, the Iguaçu River basin. The specimens showed diploid number of 42 chromosomes (24m+18sm) without differentiated sex chromosomes system. The impregnation by silver nitrate showed multiple AgNORs. Seven pairs (4, 7, 10, 13, 16, 20 and 21) carrying 18S rDNA were detected by FISH. Heterochromatin was verified in the centromeric and pericentromeric region of most chromosomes and the terminal region of some pairs. FISH with 5S rDNA probes showed two chromosome pairs carrying these sites in the interstitial region (8 and 14). The data obtained in this study are similar to those found for two other populations of H. malabaricus already studied in the basin of the Iguaçu River, confirming the hypothesis that this species is natural, not having been introduced, as well as having an intrinsic characteristic, such as the largest number of sites of 18S rDNA. PMID:25349672

  9. Heteroduplex mobility assay-guided sequence discovery: elucidation of the small subunit (18S) rDNA sequences of Pfiesteria piscicida and related dinoflagellates from complex algal culture and environmental sample DNA pools.

    PubMed

    Oldach, D W; Delwiche, C F; Jakobsen, K S; Tengs, T; Brown, E G; Kempton, J W; Schaefer, E F; Bowers, H A; Glasgow, H B; Burkholder, J M; Steidinger, K A; Rublee, P A

    2000-04-11

    The newly described heterotrophic estuarine dinoflagellate Pfiesteria piscicida has been linked with fish kills in field and laboratory settings, and with a novel clinical syndrome of impaired cognition and memory disturbance among humans after presumptive toxin exposure. As a result, there is a pressing need to better characterize the organism and these associations. Advances in Pfiesteria research have been hampered, however, by the absence of genomic sequence data. We employed a sequencing strategy directed by heteroduplex mobility assay to detect Pfiesteria piscicida 18S rDNA "signature" sequences in complex pools of DNA and used those data as the basis for determination of the complete P. piscicida 18S rDNA sequence. Specific PCR assays for P. piscicida and other estuarine heterotrophic dinoflagellates were developed, permitting their detection in algal cultures and in estuarine water samples collected during fish kill and fish lesion events. These tools should enhance efforts to characterize these organisms and their ecological relationships. Heteroduplex mobility assay-directed sequence discovery is broadly applicable, and may be adapted for the detection of genomic sequence data of other novel or nonculturable organisms in complex assemblages.

  10. Phylogenetic analysis of the genus Microbacterium based on 16S rRNA gene sequences.

    PubMed

    Takeuchi, M; Yokota, A

    1994-11-15

    16S rRNA gene (rDNA) studies of the six species of the genus Microbacterium, M. lacticum, M. laevaniformans, M. dextranolyticum, M. imperiale, M. arborescens and M. aurum, were performed and the primary structures were compared with those of 29 representative actinobacteria and related organisms. Phylogenetic analysis indicated that six species of the genus Microbacterium and representative four species of the genus Aureobacterium appear to be phylogenetically coherent as was suggested by Rainey et al., although the peptidoglycan types of these two genera are different (peptidoglycan type B1 or B2). Thus, the phylogenetical analyses revealed that members of actinobacteria with group B-peptidoglycan do not cluster according to their peptidoglycan types, but form compact cluster different from actinobacteria or actinomycetes with group A-peptidoglycan.

  11. Identification of Scopulariopsis species by partial 28S rRNA gene sequence analysis.

    PubMed

    Jagielski, Tomasz; Kosim, Kinga; Skóra, Magdalena; Macura, Anna Barbara; Bielecki, Jacek

    2013-01-01

    The genus Scopulariopsis contains over 30 species of mitosporic moulds, which although usually saprophytic may also act as opportunistic pathogens in humans. They have mainly been associated with onychomycosis, and only sporadically reported as a cause of deep tissue infections or systemic disease. Identification of Scopulariopsis species still largely relies on phenotype-based methods. There is a need for a molecular diagnostic approach, that would allow to reliably discriminate between different Scopulariopsis species. The aim of this study was to apply sequence analysis of partial 28S rRNA gene for species identification of Scopulariopsis clinical isolates. Although the method employed did reveal some genetic polymorphism among Scopulariopsis isolates tested, it was not enough for species delineation. For this to be achieved, other genetic loci, within and beyond the rDNA operon, need to be investigated.

  12. Towards a phylogeny of the genus Vibrio based on 16S rRNA sequences.

    PubMed

    Dorsch, M; Lane, D; Stackebrandt, E

    1992-01-01

    The inter- and intrageneric relationships of the genus Vibrio were investigated by performing a comparative analysis of the 16S rRNAs of 10 species, including four pathogenic representatives. The results of immunological and 5S rRNA studies were confirmed in that the genus is a neighboring taxon of the family Enterobacteriaceae. With regard to the intrageneric structure, Vibrio alginolyticus, Vibrio campbellii, Vibrio natriegens, Vibrio harveyi, Vibrio proteolyticus, Vibrio parahaemolyticus, and Vibrio vulnificus form the core of the genus, while Vibrio (Listonella) anguillarum, Vibrio diazotrophicus, and Vibrio hollisae are placed on the outskirts of the genus. Variable regions around positions 80, 180, and 450 could be used as target sites for genus- and species-specific oligonucleotide probes and polymerase chain reaction primers to be used in molecular identification.

  13. Molecular characterization of nocardioform actinomycetes in activated sludge by 16S rRNA analysis.

    PubMed

    Schuppler, M; Mertens, F; Schön, G; Göbel, U B

    1995-02-01

    The analysis of complex microbiota present in activated sludge is important for the understanding and possible control of severe separation problems in sewage treatment such as sludge bulking or sludge foaming. Previous studies have shown that nocardioform actinomycetes are responsible for these conditions, which not only affect the efficiency of sewage treatment but also represent a threat to public health due to spread of pathogens. However, isolation and identification of these filamentous, nocardioform actinomycetes is hampered by their fastidious nature. Most species are still uncultivable and their taxonomy is unresolved. To study the ecology of these micro-organisms at the molecular level, we have established a clone library of 16S rRNA gene fragments amplified from bulk sludge DNA. A rough indication of the predominant flora in the sludge was given by sequencing randomly chosen clones, which revealed a great diversity of bacteria from different taxa. Colony hybridization with oligonucleotide probe MNP1 detected 27 clones with 16S rDNA inserts from nocardioform actinomycetes and mycobacteria. The sequence data from these clones together with those from randomly chosen clones were used for comparative 16S rRNA analysis and construction of dendrograms. All sequences differed from those of previously sequenced species in the databases. Phenotypic characterization of isolates of nocardioform actinomycetes and mycobacteria cultivated in parallel from the same activated-sludge sample revealed a large discrepancy between the two approaches. Only one 16S rDNA sequence of a cultured isolate was represented in the clone library, indicating that culture conditions could select species which represent only a small fraction of the organisms in the activated sludge.

  14. The feline oral microbiome: a provisional 16S rRNA gene based taxonomy with full-length reference sequences.

    PubMed

    Dewhirst, Floyd E; Klein, Erin A; Bennett, Marie-Louise; Croft, Julie M; Harris, Stephen J; Marshall-Jones, Zoe V

    2015-02-25

    The human oral microbiome is known to play a significant role in human health and disease. While less well studied, the feline oral microbiome is thought to play a similarly important role. To determine roles oral bacteria play in health and disease, one first has to be able to accurately identify bacterial species present. 16S rRNA gene sequence information is widely used for molecular identification of bacteria and is also useful for establishing the taxonomy of novel species. The objective of this research was to obtain full 16S rRNA gene reference sequences for feline oral bacteria, place the sequences in species-level phylotypes, and create a curated 16S rRNA based taxonomy for common feline oral bacteria. Clone libraries were produced using "universal" and phylum-selective PCR primers and DNA from pooled subgingival plaque from healthy and periodontally diseased cats. Bacteria in subgingival samples were also cultivated to obtain isolates. Full-length 16S rDNA sequences were determined for clones and isolates that represent 171 feline oral taxa. A provisional curated taxonomy was developed based on the position of each taxon in 16S rRNA phylogenetic trees. The feline oral microbiome curated taxonomy and 16S rRNA gene reference set will allow investigators to refer to precisely defined bacterial taxa. A provisional name such as "Propionibacterium sp. feline oral taxon FOT-327" is an anchor to which clone, strain or GenBank names or accession numbers can point. Future next-generation-sequencing studies of feline oral bacteria will be able to map reads to taxonomically curated full-length 16S rRNA gene sequences.

  15. Measurement of rRNA Variations in Natural Communities of Microorganisms on the Southeastern U.S. Continental Shelf †

    PubMed Central

    Kramer, Jonathan G.; Singleton, Fred L.

    1993-01-01

    The development of a clear understanding of the physiology of marine prokaryotes is complicated by the difficulties inherent in resolving the activity of various components of natural microbial communities. Application of appropriate molecular biological techniques offers a means of overcoming some of these problems. In this regard, we have used direct probing of bulk RNA purified from selective size fractions to examine variations in the rRNA content of heterotrophic communities and Synechococcus populations on the southeastern U.S. continental shelf. Heterotrophic communities in natural seawater cultures amended with selected substrates were examined. Synechococcus populations were isolated from the water column by differential filtration. The total cellular rRNA content of the target populations was assayed by probing RNA purified from these samples with an oligonucleotide complementing a universally conserved region in the eubacterial 16S rRNA (heterotrophs) or with a 1.5-kbp fragment encoding the Synechococcus sp. strain WH 7803 16S rRNA (cyanobacteria). The analyses revealed that heterotrophic bacteria responded to the addition of glucose and trace nutrients after a 6-h lag period. However, no response was detected after amino acids were added. The cellular rRNA content increased 48-fold before dropping to a value 20 times that detected before nutrients were added. Variations in the rRNA content from Synechococcus spp. followed a distinct diel pattern imposed by the phasing of cell division within the irradiance cycle. The results indicate that careful application of these appropriate molecular biological techniques can be of great use in discerning basic physiological characteristics of selected natural populations and the mechanisms which regulate growth at the subcellular level. Images PMID:16349009

  16. rRNA (rrn) Operon-Engineered Bacillus subtilis as a Feasible Test Organism for Antibiotic Discovery

    PubMed Central

    Tanaka, Yukinori; Nanamiya, Hideaki; Yano, Koichi; Kakugawa, Koji; Kawamura, Fujio

    2013-01-01

    Bacillus subtilis contains 10 rRNA (rrn) operons. We found that rRNA operon-engineered B. subtilis strain RIK543, with only the rrnO operon, is specifically hypersensitive to RNA polymerase inhibitors such as rifamycin SV and rifampin (80-fold and 20-fold, respectively). In pilot screening experiments, we found actinomycete isolates successfully at an incidence of 1.9% (18/945) that produced antibacterials that were detectable only with RIK543 as the test organism. Strain RIK543 may be a feasible test organism for the discovery of novel RNA polymerase inhibitors. PMID:23335737

  17. Primary Structure of 28S rRNA Gene Confirms Monophyly of Free-Living Heterotrophic and Phototrophic Apicomplexans (Alveolata).

    PubMed

    Mikhailov, K V; Tikhonenkov, D V; Janouškovec, J; Diakin, A Y; Ofitserov, M V; Mylnikov, A P; Aleshin, V V

    2015-11-01

    Phylogenetic analysis of large subunit ribosomal RNA (LSU rRNA or 28S rRNA) gene sequences from free-living predatory flagellates Colpodella angusta, Voromonas pontica, and Alphamonas edax (Apicomplexa) confirms their close relationship with chromerids Chromera velia and Vitrella brassicaformis, which possess a functional photosynthetic plastid. Together these organisms form a sister group to parasitic apicomplexans (coccidians and gregarines, or sporozoans sensu lato). This result agrees with the previous conclusion on monophyly of colpodellids and chromerids (chrompodellids) based on phylogenomic data. The revealed relationships demonstrate a complex pattern of acquisition, loss, or modification of plastids and transition to parasitism during alveolate evolution.

  18. Intragenomic heterogeneity of the 16S rRNA gene in strain UFO1 caused by a 100-bp insertion in helix 6

    SciTech Connect

    Allison E. Ray; Stephanie A. Connon; Peter P. Sheridan; Jeremy Gilbreath; Malcolm S. Shields; Deborah T. Newby; Yoshiko Fujita; Timothy S. Magnuson

    2010-06-01

    The determination of variation in 16S rRNA gene sequences is perhaps the most common method for assessing microbial community diversity. However, the occurrence of multiple copies of 16S rRNA genes within some organisms can bias estimates of microbial diversity. During phylogenetic characterization of a metal-transforming, fermentative bacterium (strain UFO1) isolated from the Field Research Center (FRC) in Oak Ridge, TN, we detected an apparent 16S rRNA pseudogene. The putative 16S rRNA pseudogene was first detected in clone libraries constructed with 16S rRNA genes amplified from UFO1 genomic DNA. Sequencing revealed two distinct 16S rRNA genes, with one differing from the other by a 100 bp insert near the 5’ end. Ribosomal RNA was extracted from strain UFO1 and analyzed by RT-qPCR with insert and non-insert specific primers; however, only the non-insert 16S rRNA sequence was expressed. Reverse-transcribed rRNA from strain UFO1 was also used to construct a cDNA library. Of 190 clones screened by PCR, none contained the 16S rRNA gene with the 100 bp insert. Examination of GenBank 16S rRNA gene sequences revealed that the same insert sequence was present in other clones, including those from an environmental library constructed from FRC enrichments. These findings demonstrate the existence of widely disparate copies of the 16S rRNA gene in the same species and a putative 16S rRNA pseudogene, which may confound 16S rRNA-based methods for assessments of microbial diversity in environmental samples.

  19. Folate deficiency facilitates recruitment of upstream binding factor to hot spots of DNA double-strand breaks of rRNA genes and promotes its transcription.

    PubMed

    Xie, Qiu; Li, Caihua; Song, Xiaozhen; Wu, Lihua; Jiang, Qian; Qiu, Zhiyong; Cao, Haiyan; Yu, Kaihui; Wan, Chunlei; Li, Jianting; Yang, Feng; Huang, Zebing; Niu, Bo; Jiang, Zhengwen; Zhang, Ting

    2016-12-06

    The biogenesis of ribosomes in vivo is an essential process for cellular functions. Transcription of ribosomal RNA (rRNA) genes is the rate-limiting step in ribosome biogenesis controlled by environmental conditions. Here, we investigated the role of folate antagonist on changes of DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) landscape in mouse embryonic stem cells. A significant DSB enhancement was detected in the genome of these cells and a large majority of these DSBs were found in rRNA genes. Furthermore, spontaneous DSBs in cells under folate deficiency conditions were located exclusively within the rRNA gene units, representing a H3K4me1 hallmark. Enrichment H3K4me1 at the hot spots of DSB regions enhanced the recruitment of upstream binding factor (UBF) to rRNA genes, resulting in the increment of rRNA genes transcription. Supplement of folate resulted in a restored UBF binding across DNA breakage sites of rRNA genes, and normal rRNA gene transcription. In samples from neural tube defects (NTDs) with low folate level, up-regulation of rRNA gene transcription was observed, along with aberrant UBF level. Our results present a new view by which alterations in folate levels affects DNA breakage through epigenetic control leading to the regulation of rRNA gene transcription during the early stage of development.

  20. Replication of the rRNA and legumin genes in synchronized root cells of pea (Pisum sativum): evidence for transient EcoR I sites in replicating rRNA genes.

    PubMed

    Hof, J V; Hernandez, P; Bjerknes, C A; Kraszewska, E K; Lamm, S S

    1987-03-01

    The temporal pattern of replication of the rRNA and legumin genes differs in synchronized pea root cells. The relative number of rRNA genes replicated hourly during the first five hours of S phase ranges between 5 and 10 percent. In late S phase, during hours six through nine, the number of rRNA genes replicated increases reaching a maximum of about 25 percent at the ninth hour. Unlike the rRNA genes, the legumin genes have a wave-like pattern of replication peaking in early S phase at the third hour and again in late S phase at the eighth hour.Replicating rDNA, isolated by benzoylated naphthoylated DEAE-column chromatography, has EcoR I restriction sites that are absent in non-replicating rDNA sequences. The cleavage of these sites is independent of the time of rDNA replication. The transient nature of the EcoR I sites suggests that they exist in a hemimethylated state in parental DNA.The two Hind III repeat-size classes of rDNA of var. Alaska peas are replicated simultaneously as cells progress through S phase. Thus, even if the 9.0 kb and 8.6 kb repeat classes are located on different chromosomes, their temporal order of replication is the same.

  1. RlmCD-mediated U747 methylation promotes efficient G748 methylation by methyltransferase RlmAII in 23S rRNA in Streptococcus pneumoniae; interplay between two rRNA methylations responsible for telithromycin susceptibility

    PubMed Central

    Shoji, Tatsuma; Takaya, Akiko; Sato, Yoshiharu; Kimura, Satoshi; Suzuki, Tsutomu; Yamamoto, Tomoko

    2015-01-01

    Adenine at position 752 in a loop of helix 35 from positions 745 to 752 in domain II of 23S rRNA is involved in binding to the ribosome of telithromycin (TEL), a member of ketolides. Methylation of guanine at position 748 by the intrinsic methyltransferase RlmAII enhances binding of telithromycin (TEL) to A752 in Streptococcus pneumoniae. We have found that another intrinsic methylation of the adjacent uridine at position 747 enhances G748 methylation by RlmAII, rendering TEL susceptibility. U747 and another nucleotide, U1939, were methylated by the dual-specific methyltransferase RlmCD encoded by SP_1029 in S. pneumoniae. Inactivation of RlmCD reduced N1-methylated level of G748 by RlmAII in vivo, leading to TEL resistance when the nucleotide A2058, located in domain V of 23S rRNA, was dimethylated by the dimethyltransferase Erm(B). In vitro methylation of rRNA showed that RlmAII activity was significantly enhanced by RlmCD-mediated pre-methylation of 23S rRNA. These results suggest that RlmCD-mediated U747 methylation promotes efficient G748 methylation by RlmAII, thereby facilitating TEL binding to the ribosome. PMID:26365244

  2. Verification of false-positive blood culture results generated by the BACTEC 9000 series by eubacterial 16S rDNA and panfungal 18S rDNA directed polymerase chain reaction (PCR).

    PubMed

    Daxboeck, Florian; Dornbusch, Hans Jürgen; Krause, Robert; Assadian, Ojan; Wenisch, Christoph

    2004-01-01

    A small but significant proportion of blood cultures processed by the BACTEC 9000 series systems is signaled positive, while subsequent Gram's stain and culture on solid media yield no pathogens. In this study, 15 "false-positive" vials (7 aerobes, 8 anaerobes) from 15 patients were investigated for the presence of bacteria and fungi by eubacterial 16S rDNA and panfungal 18S rDNA amplification, respectively. All samples turned out negative by both methods. Most patients (7) had neutropenia, which does not support the theory that high leukocyte counts enhance the generation of false-positive results. In conclusion, the results of this study indicate that false-negative results generated by the BACTEC 9000 series are inherent to the automated detection and not due to the growth of fastidious organisms.

  3. Population studies for STR loci (D3S1358, D5S818, D7S820, D18S51 and FGA) in NWFP and Sindhi populations of Pakistan for forensic use.

    PubMed

    Saqib Shahzad, M; Abbas Bokhari, S Yassir; Rao, Abdul Qayyum; Raza, M Hashim; Ullah, Obaid; Zia-Ur-rahman; Shahid, A Ali; Ahmad, Zahoor; Riazuddin, S

    2004-01-01

    CEMB's Forensic DNA typing project is directed towards the introduction of DNA typing technique in Pakistan's criminal justice system so as to exonerate an innocent and wrongly accused person and incriminates the culprit. The present study is a part of the project of CEMB to analyze Sindhi and NWFP (North West Frontier Province) populations for five STR (Short Tandem Repeat) loci out of 13 CODIS (Combined DNA Index System) loci. Allelic frequencies and heterozygosity for STR markers D3S1358, D5S818, D7S820, D18S51 and FGA (FIBRA) were determined. Samples from unrelated individuals were amplified by multiplex PCR using the unlabelled primers for these markers followed by denaturing Polyacrylamide Gel Electrophoresis (PAGE). Statistical analysis was performed to determine the allelic frequencies and was evaluated using the Chi Square Test.

  4. Cytogenetic comparison between two allopatric populations of Astyanax altiparanae Garutti et Britski, 2000 (Teleostei, Characidae), with emphasis on the localization of 18S and 5S rDNA.

    PubMed

    Pacheco, Rosiley Berton; da Rosa, Renata; Giuliano-Caetano, Lucia; Júlio, Horácio Ferreira; Dias, Ana Lúcia

    2011-01-01

    Two populations of Astyanax altiparanae (Garutti & Britski, 2000) of the Água dos Patos stream/SP and lake Igapó/PR were analyzed. All individuals showed 2n = 50, however, different karyotypic formulae were observed. The population of the Água dos Patos stream showed 8m +24sm+6st+12a (NF=88) and the population of lake Igapó, 8m+28sm+4st+10a (NF=90). Nucleolus organizing regions (AgNORs) were observed in the terminal position on the short and long arm of different chromosomes of both populations, showing a variation from 3 to 4 chromosomes. Fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH) using 18S rDNA probes revealed only one pair of chromosomes with fluorescent signals in the terminal site on the short arm in the Igapó lake population, while the population of Água dos Patos stream showed 4 fluorescence terminal signals, characterizing a system of simple and multiple NORs, respectively. 5S rDNA fluorescent signals were detected in the interstitial position of a pair of chromosomes in the two studied populations. Some AgNOR sites revealed to be GC-rich when stained with Chromomycin A3 (CMA3), however, AT positive regions were not observed. The data obtained show that, despite the conservation of the diploid number and location of 5S DNAr, differences in both the distribution of 18S rDNA and karyotypic formula among the populations were found, thus corroborating the existing data on chromosome variability in Astyanax altiparanae that can be significant for cytotaxonomy in this group.

  5. Intragenomic sequence variation at the ITS1 - ITS2 region and at the 18S and 28S nuclear ribosomal DNA genes of the New Zealand mud snail, Potamopyrgus antipodarum (Hydrobiidae: mollusca)

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hoy, Marshal S.; Rodriguez, Rusty J.

    2013-01-01

    Molecular genetic analysis was conducted on two populations of the invasive non-native New Zealand mud snail (Potamopyrgus antipodarum), one from a freshwater ecosystem in Devil's Lake (Oregon, USA) and the other from an ecosystem of higher salinity in the Columbia River estuary (Hammond Harbor, Oregon, USA). To elucidate potential genetic differences between the two populations, three segments of nuclear ribosomal DNA (rDNA), the ITS1-ITS2 regions and the 18S and 28S rDNA genes were cloned and sequenced. Variant sequences within each individual were found in all three rDNA segments. Folding models were utilized for secondary structure analysis and results indicated that there were many sequences which contained structure-altering polymorphisms, which suggests they could be nonfunctional pseudogenes. In addition, analysis of molecular variance (AMOVA) was used for hierarchical analysis of genetic variance to estimate variation within and among populations and within individuals. AMOVA revealed significant variation in the ITS region between the populations and among clones within individuals, while in the 5.8S rDNA significant variation was revealed among individuals within the two populations. High levels of intragenomic variation were found in the ITS regions, which are known to be highly variable in many organisms. More interestingly, intragenomic variation was also found in the 18S and 28S rDNA, which has rarely been observed in animals and is so far unreported in Mollusca. We postulate that in these P. antipodarum populations the effects of concerted evolution are diminished due to the fact that not all of the rDNA genes in their polyploid genome should be essential for sustaining cellular function. This could lead to a lessening of selection pressures, allowing mutations to accumulate in some copies, changing them into variant sequences.                   

  6. Changes in rRNA levels during stress invalidates results from mRNA blotting: fluorescence in situ rRNA hybridization permits renormalization for estimation of cellular mRNA levels.

    PubMed

    Hansen, M C; Nielsen, A K; Molin, S; Hammer, K; Kilstrup, M

    2001-08-01

    Regulation of gene expression can be analyzed by a number of different techniques. Some techniques monitor the level of specific mRNA directly, and others monitor indirectly by determining the level of enzymes encoded by the mRNA. Each method has its own inherent way of normalization. When results obtained by these techniques are compared between experiments in which differences in growth rates, strains, or stress treatments occur, the normalization procedure may have a significant impact on the results. In this report we present a solution to the normalization problem in RNA slot blotting experiments, in which mRNA levels routinely are normalized to a fixed amount of extracted total RNA. The cellular levels of specific mRNA species were estimated using a renormalization with the total RNA content per cell. By a combination of fluorescence in situ rRNA hybridization, which estimates the relative level of rRNA per cell, and slot blotting to rRNA probes, which estimates the level of rRNA per extracted total RNA, the amount of RNA per cell was calculated in a series of heat shock experiments with the gram-positive bacterium Lactococcus lactis. It was found that the level of rRNA per cell decreased to 30% in the course of the heat shock. This lowered ribosome level led to a decrease in the total RNA content, resulting in a gradually increasing overestimation of the mRNA levels throughout the experiment. Using renormalized cellular mRNA levels, the HrcA-mediated regulation of the genes in the hrcA-grpE-dnaK operon was analyzed. The hybridization data suggested a complex heat shock regulation indicating that the mRNA levels continued to rise after 30 min, but after renormalization the calculated average cellular levels exhibited a much simpler induction pattern, eventually attaining a moderately increased value.

  7. 16S rRNA Amplicon Sequencing for Epidemiological Surveys of Bacteria in Wildlife

    PubMed Central

    Razzauti, Maria; Bard, Emilie; Bernard, Maria; Brouat, Carine; Charbonnel, Nathalie; Dehne-Garcia, Alexandre; Loiseau, Anne; Tatard, Caroline; Tamisier, Lucie; Vayssier-Taussat, Muriel; Vignes, Helene

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT The human impact on natural habitats is increasing the complexity of human-wildlife interactions and leading to the emergence of infectious diseases worldwide. Highly successful synanthropic wildlife species, such as rodents, will undoubtedly play an increasingly important role in transmitting zoonotic diseases. We investigated the potential for recent developments in 16S rRNA amplicon sequencing to facilitate the multiplexing of the large numbers of samples needed to improve our understanding of the risk of zoonotic disease transmission posed by urban rodents in West Africa. In addition to listing pathogenic bacteria in wild populations, as in other high-throughput sequencing (HTS) studies, our approach can estimate essential parameters for studies of zoonotic risk, such as prevalence and patterns of coinfection within individual hosts. However, the estimation of these parameters requires cleaning of the raw data to mitigate the biases generated by HTS methods. We present here an extensive review of these biases and of their consequences, and we propose a comprehensive trimming strategy for managing these biases. We demonstrated the application of this strategy using 711 commensal rodents, including 208 Mus musculus domesticus, 189 Rattus rattus, 93 Mastomys natalensis, and 221 Mastomys erythroleucus, collected from 24 villages in Senegal. Seven major genera of pathogenic bacteria were detected in their spleens: Borrelia, Bartonella, Mycoplasma, Ehrlichia, Rickettsia, Streptobacillus, and Orientia. Mycoplasma, Ehrlichia, Rickettsia, Streptobacillus, and Orientia have never before been detected in West African rodents. Bacterial prevalence ranged from 0% to 90% of individuals per site, depending on the bacterial taxon, rodent species, and site considered, and 26% of rodents displayed coinfection. The 16S rRNA amplicon sequencing strategy presented here has the advantage over other molecular surveillance tools of dealing with a large spectrum of bacterial

  8. Evaluation of nearest-neighbor methods for detection of chimeric small-subunit rRNA sequences.

    PubMed Central

    Robison-Cox, J F; Bateson, M M; Ward, D M

    1995-01-01

    Detection of chimeric artifacts formed when PCR is used to retrieve naturally occurring small-subunit (SSU) rRNA sequences may rely on demonstrating that different sequence domains have different phylogenetic affiliations. We evaluated the CHECK_CHIMERA method of the Ribosomal Database Project and another method which we developed, both based on determining nearest neighbors of different sequence domains, for their ability to discern artificially generated SSU rRNA chimeras from authentic Ribosomal Database Project sequences. The reliability of both methods decreases when the parental sequences which contribute to chimera formation are more than 82 to 84% similar. Detection is also complicated by the occurrence of authentic SSU rRNA sequences that behave like chimeras. We developed a naive statistical test based on CHECK_CHIMERA output and used it to evaluate previously reported SSU rRNA chimeras. Application of this test also suggests that chimeras might be formed by retrieving SSU rRNAs as cDNA. The amount of uncertainty associated with nearest-neighbor analyses indicates that such tests alone are insufficient and that better methods are needed. PMID:7538272

  9. 23S rRNA gene mutations contributing to macrolide resistance in Campylobacter jejuni and Campylobacter coli

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Operon specific 23S rRNA mutations affecting minimum inhibitory concentrations (MICs) of macrolides (erythromycin [ERY], azithromycin [AZM], tylosin [TYL]) and a lincosamide (clindamycin [CLI]) were examined in a collection of Campylobacter jejuni and C. coli isolates. The three copies of the Campy...

  10. Molecular Diagnosis of Kingella kingae Pericarditis by Amplification and Sequencing of the 16S rRNA Gene▿

    PubMed Central

    Matta, Matta; Wermert, Delphine; Podglajen, Isabelle; Sanchez, Olivier; Buu-Hoï, Annie; Gutmann, Laurent; Meyer, Guy; Mainardi, Jean-Luc

    2007-01-01

    Kingella kingae is a fastidious gram-negative bacillus that is considered an emerging pathogen in pediatric settings but remains less common in adults. Here we describe a case of pericarditis in an immunocompetent adult host. The microorganism was identified directly from the clinical sample by molecular techniques, i.e., 16S rRNA gene amplification and sequencing. PMID:17634294

  11. Molecular diagnosis of Kingella kingae pericarditis by amplification and sequencing of the 16S rRNA gene.

    PubMed

    Matta, Matta; Wermert, Delphine; Podglajen, Isabelle; Sanchez, Olivier; Buu-Hoï, Annie; Gutmann, Laurent; Meyer, Guy; Mainardi, Jean-Luc

    2007-09-01

    Kingella kingae is a fastidious gram-negative bacillus that is considered an emerging pathogen in pediatric settings but remains less common in adults. Here we describe a case of pericarditis in an immunocompetent adult host. The microorganism was identified directly from the clinical sample by molecular techniques, i.e., 16S rRNA gene amplification and sequencing.

  12. Pathway of ATP utilization and duplex rRNA unwinding by the DEAD-box helicase, DbpA.

    PubMed

    Henn, Arnon; Cao, Wenxiang; Licciardello, Nicholas; Heitkamp, Sara E; Hackney, David D; De La Cruz, Enrique M

    2010-03-02

    DEAD-box RNA helicase proteins use the energy of ATP hydrolysis to drive the unwinding of duplex RNA. However, the mechanism that couples ATP utilization to duplex RNA unwinding is unknown. We measured ATP utilization and duplex RNA unwinding by DbpA, a non-processive bacterial DEAD-box RNA helicase specifically activated by the peptidyl transferase center (PTC) of 23S rRNA. Consumption of a single ATP molecule is sufficient to unwind and displace an 8 base pair rRNA strand annealed to a 32 base pair PTC-RNA "mother strand" fragment. Strand displacement occurs after ATP binding and hydrolysis but before P(i) product release. P(i) release weakens binding to rRNA, thereby facilitating the release of the unwound rRNA mother strand and the recycling of DbpA for additional rounds of unwinding. This work explains how ATPase activity of DEAD-box helicases is linked to RNA unwinding.

  13. Mitochondrial 16S rRNA Is Methylated by tRNA Methyltransferase TRMT61B in All Vertebrates

    PubMed Central

    Bar-Yaacov, Dan; Frumkin, Idan; Yashiro, Yuka; Schlesinger, Orr; Bieri, Philipp; Greber, Basil; Ban, Nenad; Zarivach, Raz; Alfonta, Lital; Pilpel, Yitzhak; Suzuki, Tsutomu; Mishmar, Dan

    2016-01-01

    The mitochondrial ribosome, which translates all mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA)-encoded proteins, should be tightly regulated pre- and post-transcriptionally. Recently, we found RNA-DNA differences (RDDs) at human mitochondrial 16S (large) rRNA position 947 that were indicative of post-transcriptional modification. Here, we show that these 16S rRNA RDDs result from a 1-methyladenosine (m1A) modification introduced by TRMT61B, thus being the first vertebrate methyltransferase that modifies both tRNA and rRNAs. m1A947 is conserved in humans and all vertebrates having adenine at the corresponding mtDNA position (90% of vertebrates). However, this mtDNA base is a thymine in 10% of the vertebrates and a guanine in the 23S rRNA of 95% of bacteria, suggesting alternative evolutionary solutions. m1A, uridine, or guanine may stabilize the local structure of mitochondrial and bacterial ribosomes. Experimental assessment of genome-edited Escherichia coli showed that unmodified adenine caused impaired protein synthesis and growth. Our findings revealed a conserved mechanism of rRNA modification that has been selected instead of DNA mutations to enable proper mitochondrial ribosome function. PMID:27631568

  14. Phylogenetic Analysis of Bacteroidales 16S rRNA Genes Unveils Sequences Specific to Diverse Swine Fecal Sources

    EPA Science Inventory

    Two of the currently available methods to assess swine fecal pollution (Bac1 and PF163) target Bacteroidales 16S rRNA genes. However, these assays have been shown to exhibit poor host-specificity and low detection limits in environmental waters, in part due to the limited number...

  15. Species identification and profiling of complex microbial communities using shotgun Illumina sequencing of 16S rRNA amplicon sequences.

    PubMed

    Ong, Swee Hoe; Kukkillaya, Vinutha Uppoor; Wilm, Andreas; Lay, Christophe; Ho, Eliza Xin Pei; Low, Louie; Hibberd, Martin Lloyd; Nagarajan, Niranjan

    2013-01-01

    The high throughput and cost-effectiveness afforded by short-read sequencing technologies, in principle, enable researchers to perform 16S rRNA profiling of complex microbial communities at unprecedented depth and resolution. Existing Illumina sequencing protocols are, however, limited by the fraction of the 16S rRNA gene that is interrogated and therefore limit the resolution and quality of the profiling. To address this, we present the design of a novel protocol for shotgun Illumina sequencing of the bacterial 16S rRNA gene, optimized to amplify more than 90% of sequences in the Greengenes database and with the ability to distinguish nearly twice as many species-level OTUs compared to existing protocols. Using several in silico and experimental datasets, we demonstrate that despite the presence of multiple variable and conserved regions, the resulting shotgun sequences can be used to accurately quantify the constituents of complex microbial communities. The reconstruction of a significant fraction of the 16S rRNA gene also enabled high precision (>90%) in species-level identification thereby opening up potential application of this approach for clinical microbial characterization.

  16. Dynamics and persistence of Dead Sea microbial populations as shown by high-throughput sequencing of rRNA.

    PubMed

    Rhodes, Matthew E; Oren, Aharon; House, Christopher H

    2012-04-01

    16S rRNA amplicon libraries from a haloarchaeal bloom in the hypersaline Dead Sea in 1992 were analyzed together with the 2007 residual population and simulated blooms in experimental mesocosms. Significant population shifts were observed during the bloom, and surprisingly a signature from the bloom was retained 15 years later.

  17. Evolutionary and Diagnostic Implications of Intragenomic Heterogeneity in the 16S rRNA Gene in Aeromonas Strains

    PubMed Central

    Morandi, Alessia; Zhaxybayeva, Olga; Gogarten, J. Peter; Graf, Joerg

    2005-01-01

    Sequencing 16S rRNA genes (SSU) cloned from Aeromonas strains revealed that strains contained up to six copies differing by ≤1.5%. The SSU copies from Aeromonas veronii LMG13695 clustered with sequences from four Aeromonas species. These results demonstrate intragenomic heterogeneity of SSU and suggest caution when using SSU to identify aeromonads. PMID:16159790

  18. Development of a 16S rRNA gene-based prototype microarray for the detection of selected actinomycetes genera.

    PubMed

    Kyselková, Martina; Kopecký, Jan; Felföldi, Tamás; Cermák, Ladislav; Omelka, Marek; Grundmann, Geneviève L; Moënne-Loccoz, Yvan; Ságová-Marecková, Markéta

    2008-10-01

    Actinomycetes are known for their secondary metabolites, which have been successfully used as drugs in human and veterinary medicines. However, information on the distribution of this group of Gram-positive bacteria in diverse ecosystems and a comprehension of their activities in ecosystem processes are still scarce. We have developed a 16S rRNA-based taxonomic microarray that targets key actinomycetes at the genus level. In total, 113 actinomycete 16S rRNA probes, corresponding to 55 of the 202 described genera, were designed. The microarray accuracy was evaluated by comparing signal intensities with probe/target-weighted mismatch values and the Gibbs energy of the probe/target duplex formation by hybridizing 17 non-actinomycete and 29 actinomycete strains/clones with the probe set. The validation proved that the probe set was specific, with only 1.3% of false results. The incomplete coverage of actinomycetes by a genus-specific probe was caused by the limited number of 16S rRNA gene sequences in databases or insufficient 16S rRNA gene polymorphism. The microarray enabled discrimination between actinomycete communities from three forest soil samples collected at one site. Cloning and sequencing of 16S rRNA genes from one of the soil samples confirmed the microarray results. We propose that this newly constructed microarray will be a valuable tool for genus-level comparisons of actinomycete communities in various ecological conditions.

  19. Comparison of gull-specific assays targeting 16S rRNA gene of Catellicoccus marimammalium and Streptococcus spp.

    EPA Science Inventory

    Gulls have been implicated as a source of fecal contamination in inland and coastal waters. Only one gull-specific assay is currently available (i.e., gull2 qPCR assay). This assay is based on the 16S rRNA gene of Catellicocclls marimammalium and has showed a high level of host-s...

  20. Quantitative Analysis of Small-Subunit rRNA Genes in Mixed Microbial Populations via 5′-Nuclease Assays

    PubMed Central

    Suzuki, Marcelino T.; Taylor, Lance T.; DeLong, Edward F.

    2000-01-01

    Few techniques are currently available for quantifying specific prokaryotic taxa in environmental samples. Quantification of specific genotypes has relied mainly on oligonucleotide hybridization to extracted rRNA or intact rRNA in whole cells. However, low abundance and cellular rRNA content limit the application of these techniques in aquatic environments. In this study, we applied a newly developed quantitative PCR assay (5′-nuclease assay, also known as TaqMan) to quantify specific small-subunit (SSU) rRNA genes (rDNAs) from uncultivated planktonic prokaryotes in Monterey Bay. Primer and probe combinations for quantification of SSU rDNAs at the domain and group levels were developed and tested for specificity and quantitative reliability. We examined the spatial and temporal variations of SSU rDNAs from Synechococcus plus Prochlorococcus and marine Archaea and compared the results of the quantitative PCR assays to those obtained by alternative methods. The 5′-nuclease assays reliably quantified rDNAs over at least 4 orders of magnitude and accurately measured the proportions of genes in artificial mixtures. The spatial and temporal distributions of planktonic microbial groups measured by the 5′-nuclease assays were similar to the distributions estimated by quantitative oligonucleotide probe hybridization, whole-cell hybridization assays, and flow cytometry. PMID:11055900

  1. Comprehensive Analysis of Bacterial Flora in Postoperative Maxillary Cyst Fluid by 16S rRNA Gene and Culture Methods

    PubMed Central

    Sano, Naoto; Yamashita, Yoshio; Fukuda, Kazumasa; Taniguchi, Hatsumi; Goto, Masaaki; Miyamoto, Hiroshi

    2012-01-01

    Intracystic fluid was aseptically collected from 11 patients with postoperative maxillary cyst (POMC), and DNA was extracted from the POMC fluid. Bacterial species were identified by sequencing after cloning of approximately 580 bp of the 16S rRNA gene. Identification of pathogenic bacteria was also performed by culture methods. The phylogenetic identity was determined by sequencing 517–596 bp in each of the 1139 16S rRNA gene clones. A total of 1114 clones were classified while the remaining 25 clones were unclassified. A total of 103 bacterial species belonging to 42 genera were identified in POMC fluid samples by 16S rRNA gene analysis. Species of Prevotella (91%), Neisseria (73%), Fusobacterium (73%), Porphyromonas (73%), and Propionibacterium (73%) were found to be highly prevalent in all patients. Streptococcus mitis (64%), Fusobacterium nucleatum (55%), Propionibacterium acnes (55%), Staphylococcus capitis (55%), and Streptococcus salivarius (55%) were detected in more than 6 of the 11 patients. The results obtained by the culture method were different from those obtained by 16S rRNA gene analysis, but both approaches may be necessary for the identification of pathogens, especially of bacteria that are difficult to detect by culture methods, and the development of rational treatments for patients with POMC. PMID:22685668

  2. Karyotypic diversification in Mytilus mussels (Bivalvia: Mytilidae) inferred from chromosomal mapping of rRNA and histone gene clusters

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Mussels of the genus Mytilus present morphologically similar karyotypes that are presumably conserved. The absence of chromosome painting probes in bivalves makes difficult verifying this hypothesis. In this context, we comparatively mapped ribosomal RNA and histone gene families on the chromosomes of Mytilus edulis, M. galloprovincialis, M. trossulus and M. californianus by fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH). Results Major rRNA, core and linker histone gene clusters mapped to different chromosome pairs in the four taxa. In contrast, minor rRNA gene clusters showed a different behavior. In all Mytilus two of the 5S rDNA clusters mapped to the same chromosome pair and one of them showed overlapping signals with those corresponding to one of the histone H1 gene clusters. The overlapping signals on mitotic chromosomes became a pattern of alternate 5S rRNA and linker histone gene signals on extended chromatin fibers. Additionally, M. trossulus showed minor and major rDNA clusters on the same chromosome pair. Conclusion The results obtained suggest that at least some of the chromosomes bearing these sequences are orthologous and that chromosomal mapping of rRNA and histone gene clusters could be a good tool to help deciphering some of the many unsolved questions in the systematic classification of Mytilidae. PMID:25023072

  3. R4, a non-LTR retrotransposon specific to the large subunit rRNA genes of nematodes.

    PubMed Central

    Burke, W D; Müller, F; Eickbush, T H

    1995-01-01

    A 4.7 kb sequence-specific insertion in the 26S ribosomal RNA gene of Ascaris lumbricoides, named R4, is shown to be a non-long terminal repeat (non-LTR) retrotransposable element. The R4 element inserts at a site in the large subunit rRNA gene which is midway between two other sequence-specific non-LTR retrotransposable elements, R1 and R2, found in most insect species. Based on the structure of its open reading frame and the sequence of its reverse transcriptase domain, R4 elements do not appear to be a family of R1 or R2 elements that have changed their insertion site. R4 is most similar in structure and in sequence to the element Dong, which is not specialized for insertion into rRNA units. Thus R4 represents a separate non-LTR retrotransposable element that has become specialized for insertion in the rRNA genes of its host. Using oligonucleotide primers directed to a conserved region of the reverse transcriptase encoding domain, insertions in the R4 site were also amplified from Parascaris equorum and Haemonchus contortus. Why several non-LTR retrotransposable elements have become specialized for insertion into a short (87 bp) region of the large subunit rRNA gene is discussed. PMID:8524653

  4. rRNA operons and genome size of 'Candidatus Liberibacter americanus', a bacterium associated with citrus huanglongbing in Brazil.

    PubMed

    Wulff, N A; Eveillard, S; Foissac, X; Ayres, A J; Bové, J-M

    2009-08-01

    Huanglongbing is one of the most severe diseases of citrus worldwide and is associated with 'Candidatus (Ca.) Liberibacter africanus' in Africa, 'Ca. Liberibacter asiaticus' in Asia and the Americas (Brazil, USA and Cuba) and 'Ca. Liberibacter americanus' (Lam) in Brazil. In the absence of axenic cultures, genetic information on liberibacters is scarce. The sequences of the entire 23S rRNA and 5S rRNA genes from Lam have now been obtained, using a consensus primer designed on known tRNAMet sequences of rhizobia. The size of the Lam genome was determined by PFGE, using Lam-infected periwinkle plants for bacterial enrichment, and was found to be close to 1.31 Mbp. In order to determine the number of ribosomal operons on the Lam genome, probes designed to detect the 16S rRNA gene and the 3' end of the 23S rRNA gene were developed and used for Southern hybridization with I-CeuI-treated genomic DNA. Our results suggest that there are three ribosomal operons in a circular genome. Lam is the first liberibacter species for which such data are available.

  5. Evaluation of nearest-neighbor methods for detection of chimeric small-subunit rRNA sequences

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Robison-Cox, J. F.; Bateson, M. M.; Ward, D. M.

    1995-01-01

    Detection of chimeric artifacts formed when PCR is used to retrieve naturally occurring small-subunit (SSU) rRNA sequences may rely on demonstrating that different sequence domains have different phylogenetic affiliations. We evaluated the CHECK_CHIMERA method of the Ribosomal Database Project and another method which we developed, both based on determining nearest neighbors of different sequence domains, for their ability to discern artificially generated SSU rRNA chimeras from authentic Ribosomal Database Project sequences. The reliability of both methods decreases when the parental sequences which contribute to chimera formation are more than 82 to 84% similar. Detection is also complicated by the occurrence of authentic SSU rRNA sequences that behave like chimeras. We developed a naive statistical test based on CHECK_CHIMERA output and used it to evaluate previously reported SSU rRNA chimeras. Application of this test also suggests that chimeras might be formed by retrieving SSU rRNAs as cDNA. The amount of uncertainty associated with nearest-neighbor analyses indicates that such tests alone are insufficient and that better methods are needed.

  6. Tomato (Solanum lycopersicum) variety discrimination and hybridization analysis based on the 5S rRNA region.

    PubMed

    Sun, Yan-Lin; Kang, Ho-Min; Kim, Young-Sik; Baek, Jun-Pill; Zheng, Shi-Lin; Xiang, Jin-Jun; Hong, Soon-Kwan

    2014-05-04

    The tomato (Solanum lycopersicum) is a major vegetable crop worldwide. To satisfy popular demand, more than 500 tomato varieties have been bred. However, a clear variety identification has not been found. Thorough understanding of the phylogenetic relationship and hybridization information of tomato varieties is very important for further variety breeding. Thus, in this study, we collected 26 tomato varieties and attempted to distinguish them based on the 5S rRNA region, which is widely used in the determination of phylogenetic relations. Sequence analysis of the 5S rRNA region suggested that a large number of nucleotide variations exist among tomato varieties. These variable nucleotide sites were also informative regarding hybridization. Chromas sequencing of Yellow Mountain View and Seuwiteuking varieties indicated three and one variable nucleotide sites in the non-transcribed spacer (NTS) of the 5S rRNA region showing hybridization, respectively. Based on a phylogenetic tree constructed using the 5S rRNA sequences, we observed that 16 tomato varieties were divided into three groups at 95% similarity. Rubiking and Sseommeoking, Lang Selection Procedure and Seuwiteuking, and Acorn Gold and Yellow Mountain View exhibited very high identity with their partners. This work will aid variety authentication and provides a basis for further tomato variety breeding.

  7. Microbial rRNA: rDNA gene ratios may be unexpectedly low due to extracellular DNA preservation in soils

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    We tested a method of estimating the activity of detectable individual bacterial and archaeal OTUs within a community by calculating ratios of absolute 16S rRNA to rDNA copy numbers. We investigated phylogenetically coherent patterns of activity among soil prokaryotes in non-growing soil communitie...

  8. Species Identification and Profiling of Complex Microbial Communities Using Shotgun Illumina Sequencing of 16S rRNA Amplicon Sequences

    PubMed Central

    Lay, Christophe; Ho, Eliza Xin Pei; Low, Louie; Hibberd, Martin Lloyd; Nagarajan, Niranjan

    2013-01-01

    The high throughput and cost-effectiveness afforded by short-read sequencing technologies, in principle, enable researchers to perform 16S rRNA profiling of complex microbial communities at unprecedented depth and resolution. Existing Illumina sequencing protocols are, however, limited by the fraction of the 16S rRNA gene that is interrogated and therefore limit the resolution and quality of the profiling. To address this, we present the design of a novel protocol for shotgun Illumina sequencing of the bacterial 16S rRNA gene, optimized to amplify more than 90% of sequences in the Greengenes database and with the ability to distinguish nearly twice as many species-level OTUs compared to existing protocols. Using several in silico and experimental datasets, we demonstrate that despite the presence of multiple variable and conserved regions, the resulting shotgun sequences can be used to accurately quantify the constituents of complex microbial communities. The reconstruction of a significant fraction of the 16S rRNA gene also enabled high precision (>90%) in species-level identification thereby opening up potential application of this approach for clinical microbial characterization. PMID:23579286

  9. Ribosomal protein L3 bound to 23S precursor rRNA stimulates its maturation by Mini-III ribonuclease.

    PubMed

    Redko, Yulia; Condon, Ciarán

    2009-03-01

    Ribosomal RNAs (rRNAs) are processed from larger primary transcripts in every living system known. The maturation of 23S rRNA in Bacillus subtilis is catalysed by Mini-III, a member of the RNase III family of enzymes that lacks the characteristic double-stranded RNA binding domain of its relatives. We have previously shown that Mini-III processing of 23S precursor rRNA in assembled 50S ribosomal subunits is much more efficient than a substrate with no ribosomal proteins bound, suggesting that one or more large subunit proteins act as a cofactor for Mini-III cleavage. Here we show that this cofactor is ribosomal protein L3. Stimulation of the Mini-III cleavage reaction is through L3 binding to its normal site at the 3' end of 23S rRNA. We present indirect evidence that suggests that L3 acts at the level of substrate, rather than enzyme conformation. We also discuss the potential implication of using ribosomal protein cofactors in rRNA processing for ribosome quality control.

  10. 16S rRNA partial gene sequencing for the differentiation and molecular subtyping of Listeria species.

    PubMed

    Hellberg, Rosalee S; Martin, Keely G; Keys, Ashley L; Haney, Christopher J; Shen, Yuelian; Smiley, R Derike

    2013-12-01

    Use of 16S rRNA partial gene sequencing within the regulatory workflow could greatly reduce the time and labor needed for confirmation and subtyping of Listeria monocytogenes. The goal of this study was to build a 16S rRNA partial gene reference library for Listeria spp. and investigate the potential for 16S rRNA molecular subtyping. A total of 86 isolates of Listeria representing L. innocua, L. seeligeri, L. welshimeri, and L. monocytogenes were obtained for use in building the custom library. Seven non-Listeria species and three additional strains of Listeria were obtained for use in exclusivity and food spiking tests. Isolates were sequenced for the partial 16S rRNA gene using the MicroSeq ID 500 Bacterial Identification Kit (Applied Biosystems). High-quality sequences were obtained for 84 of the custom library isolates and 23 unique 16S sequence types were discovered for use in molecular subtyping. All of the exclusivity strains were negative for Listeria and the three Listeria strains used in food spiking were consistently recovered and correctly identified at the species level. The spiking results also allowed for differentiation beyond the species level, as 87% of replicates for one strain and 100% of replicates for the other two strains consistently matched the same 16S type.

  11. A group IIC-type intron interrupts the rRNA methylase gene of Geobacillus stearothermophilus strain 10.

    PubMed

    Moretz, Samuel E; Lampson, Bert C

    2010-10-01

    Group IIC introns insert next to the stem-loop structure of rho-independent transcription terminators, thus avoiding intact genes. The insertion sites of 17 copies of the G.st.I1 intron from Geobacillus stearothermophilus were compared. One copy of the intron was found to interrupt an open reading frame (ORF) encoding an rRNA methylase.

  12. Campylobacter jejuni, an uncommon cause of splenic abscess diagnosed by 16S rRNA gene sequencing.

    PubMed

    Seng, Piseth; Quenard, Fanny; Menard, Amélie; Heyries, Laurent; Stein, Andreas

    2014-12-01

    Splenic abscess is a rare disease that primarily occurs in patients with splenic trauma, endocarditis, sickle cell anemia, or other diseases that compromise the immune system. This report describes a culture-negative splenic abscess in an immunocompetent patient caused by Campylobacter jejuni, as determined by 16S rRNA gene sequencing.

  13. Small Ubiquitin-like Modifier (SUMO)-mediated Repression of the Xenopus Oocyte 5 S rRNA Genes*

    PubMed Central

    Malik, Mariam Q.; Bertke, Michelle M.; Huber, Paul W.

    2014-01-01

    The 5 S rRNA gene-specific transcription factor IIIA (TFIIIA) interacts with the small ubiquitin-like modifier (SUMO) E3 ligase PIAS2b and with one of its targets, the transcriptional corepressor, XCtBP. PIAS2b is restricted to the cytoplasm of Xenopus oocytes but relocates to the nucleus immediately after fertilization. Following the midblastula transition, PIAS2b and XCtBP are present on oocyte-type, but not somatic-type, 5 S rRNA genes up through the neurula stage, as is a limiting amount of TFIIIA. Histone H3 methylation, coincident with the binding of XCtBP, also occurs exclusively on the oocyte-type genes. Immunohistochemical staining of embryos confirms the occupancy of a subset of the oocyte-type genes by TFIIIA that become positioned at the nuclear periphery shortly after the midblastula transition. Inhibition of SUMOylation activity relieves repression of oocyte-type 5 S rRNA genes and is correlated with a decrease in methylation of H3K9 and H3K27 and disruption of subnuclear localization. These results reveal a novel function for TFIIIA as a negative regulator that recruits histone modification activity through the CtBP repressor complex exclusively to the oocyte-type 5 S rRNA genes, leading to their terminal repression. PMID:25368327

  14. Analysis of transduction in wastewater bacterial populations by targeting the phage-derived 16S rRNA gene sequences.

    PubMed

    Del Casale, Antonio; Flanagan, Paul V; Larkin, Michael J; Allen, Christopher C R; Kulakov, Leonid A

    2011-04-01

    Bacterial 16S rRNA genes transduced by bacteriophages were identified and analyzed in order to estimate the extent of the bacteriophage-mediated horizontal gene transfer in the wastewater environment. For this purpose, phage and bacterial DNA was isolated from the oxidation tank of a municipal wastewater treatment plant. Phylogenetic analysis of the 16S rRNA gene sequences cloned from a phage metagenome revealed that bacteriophages transduce genetic material in several major groups of bacteria. The groups identified were as follows: Betaproteobacteria, Gammaproteobacteria, Alphaproteobacteria, Actinomycetales and Firmicutes. Analysis of the 16S rRNA gene sequences in the total bacterial DNA from the same sample revealed that several bacterial groups found in the oxidation tank were not present in the phage metagenome (e.g. Deltaproteobacteria, Nitrospira, Planctomycetes and many Actinobacteria genera). These results suggest that transduction in a wastewater environment occurs in several bacterial groups; however, not all species are equally involved into this process. The data also showed that a number of distinctive bacterial strains participate in transduction-mediated gene transfer within identified bacterial groupings. Denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis analysis confirmed that profiles of the transduced 16S rRNA gene sequences and those present in the whole microbial community show significant differences.

  15. High or low correlation between co-occuring gene clusters and 16S rRNA gene phylogeny.

    PubMed

    Rudi, Knut; Sekelja, Monika

    2013-02-01

    Ribosomal RNA (rRNA) genes are universal for all living organisms. Yet, the correspondence between genome composition and rRNA phylogeny remains poorly known. The aim of this study was to use the information from genome sequence databases to address the correlation between rRNA gene phylogeny and total gene composition in bacteria. This was done by analysing 327 genomes with TIGRFAM functional gene annotations. Our approach consisted of two steps. First, we searched for discriminatory clusters of co-occurring genes. Using a multivariate statistical approach, we identified 11 such clusters which contain genes that were co-occurring only in a subset of genomes and contributed to explain the gene content differences between genome subsets. Second, we mapped the discovered clusters to 16S rRNA-based phylogeny and calculated the correlation between co-occuring genes and phylogeny. Six of the 11 clusters exhibited significant correlation with 16S rRNA gene phylogeny. The most distinct phylogenetic finding was a high correlation between iron-sulfur oxidoreductases in combination with carbon nitrogen ligases and Chlorobium. The other correlations identified covered relatively large phylogroups: Actinobacteria were positively associated with kinases, while Gammaproteobacteria were positively associated with methylases and acyltransferases. The suggested functional differences between higher phylogroups, however, need experimental verification.

  16. Intragenomic heterogeneity in the 16S rRNA genes of Flavobacterium columnare and standard protocol for genomovar assignment.

    PubMed

    LaFrentz, B R; Waldbieser, G C; Welch, T J; Shoemaker, C A

    2014-07-01

    Genetic variability in 16S rRNA gene sequences has been demonstrated among isolates of Flavobacterium columnare, and a restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP) assay is available for genetic typing of this important fish pathogen. Interpretation of restriction patterns can be difficult due to the lack of a formal description of the expected number and sizes of DNA fragments generated for each of the described genomovars. In this study, partial 16S rRNA gene sequences (ca. 1250-bp fragment) from isolates representing each described genomovar and isolates generating unique restriction patterns were cloned and sequenced. The results demonstrated that some isolates contained up to three different 16S rRNA genes whose sequences generate different RFLP patterns due to intragenomic heterogeneity within HaeIII restriction sites. The occurrence of HaeIII restriction sites within the portion of the 16S rRNA gene used for typing the F. columnare isolates and intragenomic heterogeneity within these sites explained the restriction patterns observed following RFLP analyses. This research provides a standard protocol for typing isolates of F. columnare by RFLP and a formal description of the expected restriction patterns for the previously described genomovars I, II, II-B and III. Additionally, we describe a new genomovar, I/II.

  17. A pseudouridylation switch in rRNA is implicated in ribosome function during the life cycle of Trypanosoma brucei

    PubMed Central

    Chikne, Vaibhav; Doniger, Tirza; Rajan, K. Shanmugha; Bartok, Osnat; Eliaz, Dror; Cohen-Chalamish, Smadar; Tschudi, Christian; Unger, Ron; Hashem, Yaser; Kadener, Sebastian; Michaeli, Shulamit

    2016-01-01

    The protozoan parasite Trypanosoma brucei, which causes devastating diseases in humans and animals in sub-Saharan Africa, undergoes a complex life cycle between the mammalian host and the blood-feeding tsetse fly vector. However, little is known about how the parasite performs most molecular functions in such different environments. Here, we provide evidence for the intriguing possibility that pseudouridylation of rRNA plays an important role in the capacity of the parasite to transit between the insect midgut and the mammalian bloodstream. Briefly, we mapped pseudouridines (Ψ) on rRNA by Ψ-seq in procyclic form (PCF) and bloodstream form (BSF) trypanosomes. We detected 68 Ψs on rRNA, which are guided by H/ACA small nucleolar RNAs (snoRNA). The small RNome of both life cycle stages was determined by HiSeq and 83 H/ACAs were identified. We observed an elevation of 21 Ψs modifications in BSF as a result of increased levels of the guiding snoRNAs. Overexpression of snoRNAs guiding modification on H69 provided a slight growth advantage to PCF parasites at 30 °C. Interestingly, these modifications are predicted to significantly alter the secondary structure of the large subunit (LSU) rRNA suggesting that hypermodified positions may contribute to the adaption of ribosome function during cycling between the two hosts. PMID:27142987

  18. Intragenomic heterogeneity in the 16S rRNA genes of Flavobacterium columnare and standard protocol for genomovar assignment

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Genetic variability in 16S rRNA gene sequences has been demonstrated among isolates of Flavobacterium columnare and a restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP) assay is available for genetic typing this important fish pathogen. Interpretation of restriction patterns can be difficult due to th...

  19. Differential rRNA genes expression in bread wheat and its inheritance.

    PubMed

    Carvalho, Ana; Polanco, Carlos; Guedes-Pinto, Henrique; Lima-Brito, José

    2013-09-01

    The expression of the ribosomal RNA (rRNA) genes from rye, located within the nucleolus organizer regions (NORs), is repressed by cytosine methylation in wheat x rye hybrids and in triticale, as consequence of nucleolar dominance. Our previous study revealed that bread wheat cultivars with a maximum number of four Ag-NORs presented high level of rDNA cytosine methylation when compared to others with a maximum of six Ag-NORs. In order to evaluate the inheritance of the Ag-NORs number and NOR methylation patterns, we produced F1 hybrids between bread wheat cultivars with four Ag-NORs and bread wheat cultivars with six Ag-NORs (in the direct and reciprocal senses). The F2 progenies of these F1 hybrids were also evaluated for the NOR number and methylation patterns. Parent bread wheat cultivars with a maximum of four Ag-NORs after treated with 5-azacytidine evidenced a maximum of six Ag-NORs per metaphase cell and a maximum of six nucleoli per interphase nucleus, confirming that the expression of the rRNA genes in bread wheat is related to cytosine methylation. Most of the F1 hybrids showed a maximum number of four or six Ag-NORs, similarly to that of the female parent suggesting a non-mendelian inheritance, while other hybrids presented four or six Ag-NORs in both senses of the cross. The F1 NOR methylation patterns showed some fragments common to their parents but also novel fragments suggesting genomic and/or chromosome rearrangements after hybridization. Despite the different NOR patterns among the parents, an invariable NOR pattern was found among the F1 plants suggesting a tendency to stability, which was also transmitted to the F2. The F2 progenies showed plants with a maximum of four, five and/or six Ag-NORs. The ratio of plants with four, five and/or six Ag-NORs per F2 progeny was variable and did not follow any specific mendelian proportion. These results allowed us to suggest that the inheritance of the number of Ag-NORs by the F1 and F2 plants did not

  20. International Health

    MedlinePlus

    ... create refugee populations with immediate and long-term health problems. Some of the major diseases currently affecting ... also an international problem which can affect people's health. Many countries and health organizations are working together ...

  1. International Geology

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hoover, Linn

    1977-01-01

    Briefly discusses recent international programs in various areas of geology, including land-use problems, coping with geological hazards, and conserving the environment while searching for energy and mineral resources. (MLH)

  2. Linking maternal and somatic 5S rRNA types with different sequence-specific non-LTR retrotransposons

    PubMed Central

    Pagano, Johanna F.B.; Ensink, Wim A.; van Olst, Marina; van Leeuwen, Selina; Nehrdich, Ulrike; Zhu, Kongju; Spaink, Herman P.; Girard, Geneviève; Rauwerda, Han; Jonker, Martijs J.; Dekker, Rob J.

    2017-01-01

    5S rRNA is a ribosomal core component, transcribed from many gene copies organized in genomic repeats. Some eukaryotic species have two 5S rRNA types defined by their predominant expression in oogenesis or adult tissue. Our next-generation sequencing study on zebrafish egg, embryo, and adult tissue identified maternal-type 5S rRNA that is exclusively accumulated during oogenesis, replaced throughout the embryogenesis by a somatic-type, and thus virtually absent in adult somatic tissue. The maternal-type 5S rDNA contains several thousands of gene copies on chromosome 4 in tandem repeats with small intergenic regions, whereas the somatic-type is present in only 12 gene copies on chromosome 18 with large intergenic regions. The nine-nucleotide variation between the two 5S rRNA types likely affects TFIII binding and riboprotein L5 binding, probably leading to storage of maternal-type rRNA. Remarkably, these sequence differences are located exactly at the sequence-specific target site for genome integration by the 5S rRNA-specific Mutsu retrotransposon family. Thus, we could define maternal- and somatic-type MutsuDr subfamilies. Furthermore, we identified four additional maternal-type and two new somatic-type MutsuDr subfamilies, each with their own target sequence. This target-site specificity, frequently intact maternal-type retrotransposon elements, plus specific presence of Mutsu retrotransposon RNA and piRNA in egg and adult tissue, suggest an involvement of retrotransposons in achieving the differential copy number of the two types of 5S rDNA loci. PMID:28003516

  3. Mutational Evidence for a Functional Connection between Two Domains of 23S rRNA in Translation Termination

    PubMed Central

    Arkov, Alexey L.; Hedenstierna, Klas O. F.; Murgola, Emanuel J.

    2002-01-01

    Nucleotide 1093 in domain II of Escherichia coli 23S rRNA is part of a highly conserved structure historically referred to as the GTPase center. The mutation G1093A was previously shown to cause readthrough of nonsense codons and high temperature-conditional lethality. Defects in translation termination caused by this mutation have also been demonstrated in vitro. To identify sites in 23S rRNA that may be functionally associated with the G1093 region during termination, we selected for secondary mutations in 23S rRNA that would compensate for the temperature-conditional lethality caused by G1093A. Here we report the isolation and characterization of such a secondary mutation. The mutation is a deletion of two consecutive nucleotides from helix 73 in domain V, close to the peptidyltransferase center. The deletion results in a shortening of the CGCG sequence between positions 2045 and 2048 by two nucleotides to CG. In addition to restoring viability in the presence of G1093A, this deletion dramatically decreased readthrough of UGA nonsense mutations caused by G1093A. An analysis of the amount of mutant rRNA in polysomes revealed that this decrease cannot be explained by an inability of G1093A-containing rRNA to be incorporated into polysomes. Furthermore, the deletion was found to cause UGA readthrough on its own, thereby implicating helix 73 in termination for the first time. These results also indicate the existence of a functional connection between the G1093 region and helix 73 during translation termination. PMID:12193621

  4. A framework for establishing predictive relationships between specific bacterial 16S rRNA sequence abundances and biotransformation rates.

    PubMed

    Helbling, Damian E; Johnson, David R; Lee, Tae Kwon; Scheidegger, Andreas; Fenner, Kathrin

    2015-03-01

    The rates at which wastewater treatment plant (WWTP) microbial communities biotransform specific substrates can differ by orders of magnitude among WWTP communities. Differences in taxonomic compositions among WWTP communities may predict differences in the rates of some types of biotransformations. In this work, we present a novel framework for establishing predictive relationships between specific bacterial 16S rRNA sequence abundances and biotransformation rates. We selected ten WWTPs with substantial variation in their environmental and operational metrics and measured the in situ ammonia biotransformation rate constants in nine of them. We isolated total RNA from samples from each WWTP and analyzed 16S rRNA sequence reads. We then developed multivariate models between the measured abundances of specific bacterial 16S rRNA sequence reads and the ammonia biotransformation rate constants. We constructed model scenarios that systematically explored the effects of model regularization, model linearity and non-linearity, and aggregation of 16S rRNA sequences into operational taxonomic units (OTUs) as a function of sequence dissimilarity threshold (SDT). A large percentage (greater than 80%) of model scenarios resulted in well-performing and significant models at intermediate SDTs of 0.13-0.14 and 0.26. The 16S rRNA sequences consistently selected into the well-performing and significant models at those SDTs were classified as Nitrosomonas and Nitrospira groups. We then extend the framework by applying it to the biotransformation rate constants of ten micropollutants measured in batch reactors seeded with the ten WWTP communities. We identified phylogenetic groups that were robustly selected into all well-performing and significant models constructed with biotransformation rates of isoproturon, propachlor, ranitidine, and venlafaxine. These phylogenetic groups can be used as predictive biomarkers of WWTP microbial community activity towards these specific

  5. Analysis of a 5S rRNA gene cloned from Euplotes eurstomus

    SciTech Connect

    Roberson, A.E.; Wolffe, A.; Olins, D.E.

    1987-05-01

    The macronucleus of the hypotrichous ciliated protozoan Euplotes eurystomus lends itself to the study of eukaryotic gene and chromatin structure because native macronuclear DNA exists as linear, gene-sized fragments between 400 and 20,000 bp in length. The macronuclear chromatin, while arranged in a typical nucleosomal structure, is freely soluble in low ionic strength buffers without treatment by nucleases. Thus, specific genes may be enriched as native, intact chromatin molecules. The 5S rRNA gene from Euplotes has been cloned to facilitate investigation of 5S gene-chromatin following characterization of the gene at the DNA level. It has been demonstrated that the gene, while in circular or linear form, can be transcribed in vitro by a Xenopus oocyte nuclear extract. The transcript generated in vitro is 120 nucleotides in length and is synthesized by RNA polymerase III. Anti-Xenopus TFIIIA antibodies recognize a Euplotes macronuclear chromatin-associated protein which is approx. 80 KD in size. It has been established that the sequence of the telomere flanking the 5S gene in Euplotes eurystomus is the same telomeric sequence published for Euplotes aediculatus.

  6. Molecular identification of adulteration in mutton based on mitochondrial 16S rRNA gene.

    PubMed

    Xu, Jia; Zhao, Wei; Zhu, Mengru; Wen, Yuanju; Xie, Tao; He, Xiaoqian; Zhang, Yongfeng; Cao, Suizhong; Niu, Lili; Zhang, Hongping; Zhong, Tao

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study is to set up a protocol for identification of the adulteration in mutton based on mitochondrial 16S rRNA gene. The multiplex polymerase chain reaction (multi-PCR) assay was carried out to trace the impure DNA in mutton. A universal primer pair yielded an approximate 610 bp fragment in mutton, pork, duck, chicken, horse and cat meats. The amplicons of multi-PCR assay represented the species-specific products, which could be discriminated by the size ranging from 106 bp to 532 bp. Subsequently, the authentication of each fragment was also confirmed by sequencing. Random analyses of adulterants with various meats yielded the identical results to their components, showing the suitability of the multi-PCR assay for tracing of adulterant meats with high-accuracy and precision. This assay was sensitive to detect the species-specific DNA in different proportional mixtures of mutton and duck/pork (9.1%-90.9%). In conclusion, this multi-PCR assay successfully discriminated the double-, triple-, quadruple-, and quintuple-mixtures containing variant counterparts. This method will be particularly useful in the detection of mutton adulteration in processed foods further.

  7. Retrotransposable elements R1 and R2 interrupt the rRNA genes of most insects.

    PubMed Central

    Jakubczak, J L; Burke, W D; Eickbush, T H

    1991-01-01

    A large number of insect species have been screened for the presence of the retrotransposable elements R1 and R2. These elements integrate independently at specific sites in the 28S rRNA genes. Genomic blots indicated that 43 of 47 insect species from nine orders contained insertions, ranging in frequency from a few percent to greater than 50% of the 28S genes. Sequence analysis of these insertions from 8 species revealed 22 elements, 21 of which corresponded to R1 or R2 elements. Surprisingly, many species appeared to contain highly divergent copies of R1 and R2 elements. For example, a parasitic wasp contained at least four families of R1 elements; the Japanese beetle contained at least five families of R2 elements. The presence of these retrotransposable elements throughout Insecta and the observation that single species can harbor divergent families within its rRNA-encoding DNA loci present interesting questions concerning the age of these elements and the possibility of cross-species transfer. Images PMID:1849649

  8. Predictive functional profiling of microbial communities using 16S rRNA marker gene sequences

    PubMed Central

    Langille, Morgan G. I.; Zaneveld, Jesse; Caporaso, J. Gregory; McDonald, Daniel; Knights, Dan; Reyes, Joshua A.; Clemente, Jose C.; Burkepile, Deron E.; Vega Thurber, Rebecca L.; Knight, Rob; Beiko, Robert G.; Huttenhower, Curtis

    2013-01-01

    Profiling phylogenetic marker genes, such as the 16S rRNA gene, is a key tool for studies of microbial communities but does not provide direct evidence of a community’s functional capabilities. Here we describe PICRUSt (Phylogenetic Investigation of Communities by Reconstruction of Unobserved States), a computational approach to predict the functional composition of a metagenome using marker gene data and a database of reference genomes. PICRUSt uses an extended ancestral-state reconstruction algorithm to predict which gene families are present and then combines gene families to estimate the composite metagenome. Using 16S information, PICRUSt recaptures key findings from the Human Microbiome Project and accurately predicts the abundance of gene families in host-associated and environmental communities, with quantifiable uncertainty. Our results demonstrate that phylogeny and function are sufficiently linked that this ‘predictive metagenomic’ approach should provide useful insights into the thousands of uncultivated microbial communities for which only marker gene surveys are currently available. PMID:23975157

  9. Phylogeny of the malarial genus Plasmodium, derived from rRNA gene sequences.

    PubMed Central

    Escalante, A A; Ayala, F J

    1994-01-01

    Malaria is among mankind's worst scourges, affecting many millions of people, particularly in the tropics. Human malaria is caused by several species of Plasmodium, a parasitic protozoan. We analyze the small subunit rRNA gene sequences of 11 Plasmodium species, including three parasitic to humans, to infer their evolutionary relationships. Plasmodium falciparum, the most virulent of the human species, is closely related to Plasmodium reichenowi, which is parasitic to chimpanzee. The estimated time of divergence of these two Plasmodium species is consistent with the time of divergence (6-10 million years ago) between the human and chimpanzee lineages. The falciparum-reichenowi clade is only remotely related to two other human parasites, Plasmodium malariae and Plasmodium vivax, which are also only remotely related to each other. Thus, the parasitic associations of the Plasmodium species with their human hosts are phylogenetically independent. The remote phylogenetic relationship between the two bird parasites, Plasmodium gallinaceum and Plasmodium lophurae, and any of the human parasites provides no support for the hypothesis that infection by Plasmodium falciparum is a recent acquisition of humans, possibly coincident with the onset of agriculture. PMID:7972067

  10. Dinoflagellate nuclear SSU rRNA phylogeny suggests multiple plastid losses and replacements.

    PubMed

    Saldarriaga, J F; Taylor, F J; Keeling, P J; Cavalier-Smith, T

    2001-09-01

    Dinoflagellates are a trophically diverse group of protists with photosynthetic and non-photosynthetic members that appears to incorporate and lose endosymbionts relatively easily. To trace the gain and loss of plastids in dinoflagellates, we have sequenced the nuclear small subunit rRNA gene of 28 photosynthetic and four non-photosynthetic species, and produced phylogenetic trees with a total of 81 dinoflagellate sequences. Patterns of plastid gain, loss, and replacement were plotted onto this phylogeny. With the exception of the apparently early-diverging Syndiniales and Noctilucales, all non-photosynthetic dinoflagellates are very likely to have had photosynthetic ancestors with peridinin-containing plastids. The same is true for all dinoflagellates with plastids other than the peridinin-containing plastid: their ancestors have replaced one type of plastid for another, in some cases most likely through a non-photosynthetic intermediate. Eight independent instances of plastid loss and three of replacement can be inferred from existing data, but as more non-photosynthetic lineages are characterized these numbers will surely grow.

  11. Primer and platform effects on 16S rRNA tag sequencing

    DOE PAGES

    Tremblay, Julien; Singh, Kanwar; Fern, Alison; ...

    2015-08-04

    Sequencing of 16S rRNA gene tags is a popular method for profiling and comparing microbial communities. The protocols and methods used, however, vary considerably with regard to amplification primers, sequencing primers, sequencing technologies; as well as quality filtering and clustering. How results are affected by these choices, and whether data produced with different protocols can be meaningfully compared, is often unknown. Here we compare results obtained using three different amplification primer sets (targeting V4, V6–V8, and V7–V8) and two sequencing technologies (454 pyrosequencing and Illumina MiSeq) using DNA from a mock community containing a known number of species as wellmore » as complex environmental samples whose PCR-independent profiles were estimated using shotgun sequencing. We find that paired-end MiSeq reads produce higher quality data and enabled the use of more aggressive quality control parameters over 454, resulting in a higher retention rate of high quality reads for downstream data analysis. While primer choice considerably influences quantitative abundance estimations, sequencing platform has relatively minor effects when matched primers are used. In conclusion, beta diversity metrics are surprisingly robust to both primer and sequencing platform biases.« less

  12. Phylogenetic Analysis of Cryptosporidium Parasites Based on the Small-Subunit rRNA Gene Locus

    PubMed Central

    Xiao, Lihua; Escalante, Lillian; Yang, Chunfu; Sulaiman, Irshad; Escalante, Anannias A.; Montali, Richard J.; Fayer, Ronald; Lal, Altaf A.

    1999-01-01

    Biological data support the hypothesis that there are multiple species in the genus Cryptosporidium, but a recent analysis of the available genetic data suggested that there is insufficient evidence for species differentiation. In order to resolve the controversy in the taxonomy of this parasite genus, we characterized the small-subunit rRNA genes of Cryptosporidium parvum, Cryptosporidium baileyi, Cryptosporidium muris, and Cryptosporidium serpentis and performed a phylogenetic analysis of the genus Cryptosporidium. Our study revealed that the genus Cryptosporidium contains the phylogenetically distinct species C. parvum, C. muris, C. baileyi, and C. serpentis, which is consistent with the biological characteristics and host specificity data. The Cryptosporidium species formed two clades, with C. parvum and C. baileyi belonging to one clade and C. muris and C. serpentis belonging to the other clade. Within C. parvum, human genotype isolates and guinea pig isolates (known as Cryptosporidium wrairi) each differed from bovine genotype isolates by the nucleotide sequence in four regions. A C. muris isolate from cattle was also different from parasites isolated from a rock hyrax and a Bactrian camel. Minor differences were also detected between C. serpentis isolates from snakes and lizards. Based on the genetic information, a species- and strain-specific PCR-restriction fragment length polymorphism diagnostic tool was developed. PMID:10103253

  13. The nuclear phenotypic plasticity observed in fish during rRNA regulation entails Cajal bodies dynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Alvarez, Marco; Nardocci, Gino; Thiry, Marc; Alvarez, Rodrigo; Reyes, Mauricio; Molina, Alfredo; Vera, M. Ines . E-mail: mvera@unab.cl

    2007-08-17

    Cajal bodies (CBs) are small mobile organelles found throughout the nucleoplasm of animal and plant cells. The dynamics of these organelles involves interactions with the nucleolus. The later has been found to play a substantial role in the compensatory response that evolved in eurythermal fish to adapt to the cyclic seasonal habitat changes, i.e., temperature and photoperiod. Contrary to being constitutive, rRNA synthesis is dramatically regulated between summer and winter, thus affecting ribosomal biogenesis which plays a central role in the acclimatization process. To examine whether CBs, up to now, never described in fish, were also sustaining the phenotypic plasticity observed in nuclei of fish undergoing seasonal acclimatization, we identified these organelles both, by transmission electronic microscopy and immunodetection with the marker protein p80-coilin. We found transcripts in all tissues analyzed. Furthermore we assessed that p80-coilin gene expression was always higher in summer-acclimatized fish when compared to that adapted to the cold season, indicating that p80-coilin expression is modulated upon seasonal acclimatization. Concurrently, CBs were more frequently found in summer-acclimatized carp which suggests that the organization of CBs is involved in adaptive processes and contribute to the phenotypic plasticity of fish cell nuclei observed concomitantly with profound reprogramming of nucleolar components and regulation of ribosomal rRNAs.

  14. Different chromatin structures along the spacers flanking active and inactive Xenopus rRNA genes.

    PubMed Central

    Lucchini, R; Sogo, J M

    1992-01-01

    The accessibility of DNA in chromatin to psoralen was assayed to compare the chromatin structure of the rRNA coding and spacer regions of the two related frog species Xenopus laevis and Xenopus borealis. Isolated nuclei from tissue culture cells were photoreacted with psoralen, and the extent of cross-linking in the different rDNA regions was analyzed by using a gel retardation assay. In both species, restriction fragments from the coding regions showed two distinct extents of cross-linking, indicating the presence of two types of chromatin, one that contains nucleosomes and represents the inactive gene copies, and the other one which is more cross-linked and corresponds to the transcribed genes. A similar cross-linking pattern was obtained with restriction fragments from the enhancer region. Analysis of fragments including these sequences and the upstream portions of the genes suggests that active genes are preceded by nonnucleosomal enhancer regions. The spacer regions flanking the 3' end of the genes gave different results in the two frog species. In X. borealis, all these sequences are packaged in nucleosomes, whereas in X. laevis a distinct fraction, presumably those flanking the active genes, show a heterogeneous chromatin structure. This disturbed nucleosomal organization correlates with the presence of a weaker terminator at the 3' end of the X. laevis genes compared with those of X. borealis, which allows polymerases to transcribe into the downstream spacer. Images PMID:1406621

  15. Mutations in the 23S rRNA gene of Helicobacter pylori associated with clarithromycin resistance.

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Kyung Suk; Kang, Jung Oak; Eun, Chang Soo; Han, Dong Soo; Choi, Tae Yeal

    2002-01-01

    Among 12 clarithromycin-resistant Helicobacter pylori strains isolated in Guri, Korea, 8 showed an adenine to guanine mutation at position 2143 (formerly A2144G or E. coli 2059) in the 23S rRNA gene by the PCR-restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP) method. The remaining 4 strains, digested by neither BsaI nor BbsI, showed a thymine to cytosine mutation at position 2182 (T2182C) by direct sequencing of the PCR products. The T2182C mutants showed a tendency of higher levels of minimum inhibitory concentration to clarithromycin than the A2143G mutants. In conclusion, either the A2143G or the T2182C mutation was present in 100% of clarithromycin-resistant H. pylori isolates examined. The PCR-RFLP technique with restriction enzymes BbsI and BsaI was a rapid and relatively simple method to detect the clarithromycin resistance. But undigested isolates were quite frequent among our isolates (33.3%), the PCR-RFLP method with restriction enzymes BbsI and BsaI should not be used alone, and development of other rapid detection method for clarithromycin resistance is mandatory. PMID:12378008

  16. Comparative metagenomic and rRNA microbial diversity characterization using Archaeal and Bacterial synthetic communities

    PubMed Central

    Shakya, Migun; Quince, Christopher; Campbell, James H.; Yang, Zamin K.; Schadt, Christopher W.; Podar, Mircea

    2013-01-01

    Summary Next generation sequencing has dramatically changed the landscape of microbial ecology, large-scale and in-depth diversity studies being now widely accessible. However, determining the accuracy of taxonomic and quantitative inferences and comparing results obtained with different approaches are complicated by incongruence of experimental and computational data types and also by lack of knowledge of the true ecological diversity. Here we used highly diverse bacterial and archaeal synthetic communities assembled from pure genomic DNAs to compare inferences from metagenomic and SSU rRNA amplicon sequencing. Both Illumina and 454 metagenomic data outperformed amplicon sequencing in quantifying the community composition, but the outcome was dependent on analysis parameters and platform. New approaches in processing and classifying amplicons can reconstruct the taxonomic composition of the community with high reproducibility within primer sets, but all tested primers sets lead to significant taxon-specific biases. Controlled synthetic communities assembled to broadly mimic the phylogenetic richness in target environments can provide important validation for fine-tuning experimental and computational parameters used to characterize natural communities. PMID:23387867

  17. rRNA gene restriction patterns and biotypes of Shigella sonnei.

    PubMed Central

    Nastasi, A.; Pignato, S.; Mammina, C.; Giammanco, G.

    1993-01-01

    Shigella sonnei is a major agent of diarrhoeal disease in developed as well as in developing countries. Several phenotypic methods to define strain differences have been applied to this species of Shigella including, more recently, analysis of extrachromosomal and chromosomal DNA. In this study, 432 endemic and epidemic strains isolated between 1975 and 1991 in Italy, France and Switzerland were submitted to rRNA gene restriction pattern analysis, after digestion of whole-cell DNA by Hinc II, and to concomitant biotyping. Thirteen ribotypes, H1 to H13, and five biotypes, a, d, e, f, g, were detected. Ninety-five percent of the sporadic strains were assigned to ribotypes H1 to H4, which could be subtyped, except for H4, in different biotypes. Strains from each of seven different outbreaks had indistinguishable ribotype-biotype patterns. In contrast, 65 strains, isolated in Sicily in 1980 over an extended period of apparently epidemic increase of isolations and which had previously been considered to be a single bacterial clone on the basis of resistance pattern and phage type, were found to belong to two different and scarcely related ribotypes. Ribotyping and biochemical subtyping appear to be a useful epidemiological tool in studies on the circulation and distribution of strains of S. sonnei. Images Fig. 1 PMID:7679353

  18. Two distinct promoter elements in the human rRNA gene identified by linker scanning mutagenesis.

    PubMed Central

    Haltiner, M M; Smale, S T; Tjian, R

    1986-01-01

    A cell-free RNA polymerase I transcription system was used to evaluate the transcription efficiency of 21 linker scanning mutations that span the human rRNA gene promoter. Our analysis revealed the presence of two major control elements, designated the core and upstream elements, that affect the level of transcription initiation. The core element extends from -45 to +18 relative to the RNA start site, and transcription is severely affected (up to 100-fold) by linker scanning mutations in this region. Linker scanning and deletion mutations in the upstream element, located between nucleotides -156 and -107, cause a three- to fivefold reduction in transcription. Under certain reaction conditions, such as the presence of a high ratio of protein to template or supplementation of the reaction with partially purified protein fractions, sequences upstream of the core element can have an even greater effect (20- to 50-fold) on RNA polymerase I transcription. Primer extension analysis showed that RNA synthesized from all of these mutant templates is initiated at the correct in vivo start site. To examine the functional relationship between the core and the upstream region, mutant promoters were constructed that alter the orientation, distance, or multiplicity of these control elements relative to each other. The upstream control element appears to function in only one orientation, and its position relative to the core is constrained within a fairly narrow region. Moreover, multiple core elements in close proximity to each other have an inhibitory effect on transcription. Images PMID:3785147

  19. Primer and platform effects on 16S rRNA tag sequencing

    SciTech Connect

    Tremblay, Julien; Singh, Kanwar; Fern, Alison; Kirton, Edward S.; He, Shaomei; Woyke, Tanja; Lee, Janey; Chen, Feng; Dangl, Jeffery L.; Tringe, Susannah G.

    2015-08-04

    Sequencing of 16S rRNA gene tags is a popular method for profiling and comparing microbial communities. The protocols and methods used, however, vary considerably with regard to amplification primers, sequencing primers, sequencing technologies; as well as quality filtering and clustering. How results are affected by these choices, and whether data produced with different protocols can be meaningfully compared, is often unknown. Here we compare results obtained using three different amplification primer sets (targeting V4, V6–V8, and V7–V8) and two sequencing technologies (454 pyrosequencing and Illumina MiSeq) using DNA from a mock community containing a known number of species as well as complex environmental samples whose PCR-independent profiles were estimated using shotgun sequencing. We find that paired-end MiSeq reads produce higher quality data and enabled the use of more aggressive quality control parameters over 454, resulting in a higher retention rate of high quality reads for downstream data analysis. While primer choice considerably influences quantitative abundance estimations, sequencing platform has relatively minor effects when matched primers are used. In conclusion, beta diversity metrics are surprisingly robust to both primer and sequencing platform biases.

  20. Evolution of green plants as deduced from 5S rRNA sequences.

    PubMed

    Hori, H; Lim, B L; Osawa, S

    1985-02-01

    We have constructed a phylogenic tree for green plants by comparing 5S rRNA sequences. The tree suggests that the emergence of most of the uni- and multicellular green algae such as Chlamydomonas, Spirogyra, Ulva, and Chlorella occurred in the early stage of green plant evolution. The branching point of Nitella is a little earlier than that of land plants and much later than that of the above green algae, supporting the view that Nitella-like green algae may be the direct precursor to land plants. The Bryophyta and the Pteridophyta separated from each other after emergence of the Spermatophyta. The result is consistent with the view that the Bryophyta evolved from ferns by degeneration. In the Pteridophyta, Psilotum (whisk fern) separated first, and a little later Lycopodium (club moss) separated from the ancestor common to Equisetum (horsetail) and Dryopteris (fern). This order is in accordance with the classical view. During the Spermatophyta evolution, the gymnosperms (Cycas, Ginkgo, and Metasequoia have been studied here) and the angiosperms (flowering plants) separated, and this was followed by the separation of Metasequoia and Cycas (cycad)/Ginkgo (maidenhair tree) on one branch and various flowering plants on the other.

  1. Evolution of green plants as deduced from 5S rRNA sequences

    PubMed Central

    Hori, Hiroshi; Lim, Byung-Lak; Osawa, Syozo

    1985-01-01

    We have constructed a phylogenic tree for green plants by comparing 5S rRNA sequences. The tree suggests that the emergence of most of the uni- and multicellular green algae such as Chlamydomonas, Spirogyra, Ulva, and Chlorella occurred in the early stage of green plant evolution. The branching point of Nitella is a little earlier than that of land plants and much later than that of the above green algae, supporting the view that Nitella-like green algae may be the direct precursor to land plants. The Bryophyta and the Pteridophyta separated from each other after emergence of the Spermatophyta. The result is consistent with the view that the Bryophyta evolved from ferns by degeneration. In the Pteridophyta, Psilotum (whisk fern) separated first, and a little later Lycopodium (club moss) separated from the ancestor common to Equisetum (horsetail) and Dryopteris (fern). This order is in accordance with the classical view. During the Spermatophyta evolution, the gymnosperms (Cycas, Ginkgo, and Metasequoia have been studied here) and the angiosperms (flowering plants) separated, and this was followed by the separation of Metasequoia and Cycas (cycad)/Ginkgo (maidenhair tree) on one branch and various flowering plants on the other. PMID:16593540

  2. Kanamycin-resistant alfalfa has a point mutation in the 16S plastid rRNA.

    PubMed

    Rosellini, D; LaFayette, P R; Barone, P; Veronesi, F; Parrott, W A

    2004-05-01

    Genes conferring resistance to kanamycin are frequently used to obtain transgenic plants as spontaneous resistance to kanamycin is not known to exist in higher plants. Nevertheless, mutations conferring kanamycin resistance have been identified in Chlamydomonas reinhardtii, raising the question as to why kanamycin-resistant mutants have not been found in higher plants. While attempting plastid transformation of alfalfa, we obtained non-transgenic but kanamycin-resistant somatic embryos following 2 months of culture in the presence of 50 mg l(-1) kanamycin. Sequencing of the plastid DNA region corresponding to the decoding site of the 16S rRNA in ten independent resistant events revealed an A to C transversion at position 1357 of the 16S plastid rDNA, the same site at which an A to G conversion confers kanamycin resistance to C. reinhardtii by reducing the ability of the antibiotic to bind to its target site. All plants derived from the resistant embryos through additional cycles of somatic embryogenesis in the absence of kanamycin retained the mutant phenotype, suggesting that the mutation was homoplastomic. Resistant plants produced 85% less biomass than controls; their leaves were chlorotic during early development and over time slowly turned green. The absence of kanamycin- resistant mutants in higher plants might be explained by the requirement for a regeneration system capable of resulting in homoplastomic individuals, or it may be the result of the detrimental effect of the mutation on the phenotype.

  3. Changes in the Composition of Drinking Water Bacterial Clone Libraries Introduced by Using Two Different 16S rRna Gene PCR Primers

    EPA Science Inventory

    Sequence analysis of 16S rRNA gene clone libraries is a popular tool used to describe the composition of natural microbial communities. Commonly, clone libraries are developed by direct cloning of 16S rRNA gene PCR products. Different primers are often employed in the initial amp...

  4. Changes in the Composition of Drinking Water Bacterial Clone Libraries Introduced by Using Two Different 16S rRNA Gene PCR Primers

    EPA Science Inventory

    Sequence analysis of 16S rRNA gene clone libraries is a popular tool used to describe the composition of natural microbial communities. Commonly, clone libraries are developed by direct cloning of 16S rRNA gene PCR products. Different primers are often employed in the initial amp...

  5. RmtC introduces G1405 methylation in 16S rRNA and confers high-level aminoglycoside resistance on Gram-positive microorganisms.

    PubMed

    Wachino, Jun-Ichi; Shibayama, Keigo; Kimura, Kouji; Yamane, Kunikazu; Suzuki, Satowa; Arakawa, Yoshichika

    2010-10-01

    Seven plasmid-mediated 16S rRNA methyltransferases (MTases), RmtA, RmtB, RmtC, RmtD, RmtE, ArmA, and NpmA, conferring aminoglycoside resistance have so far been found in Gram-negative pathogenic microorganisms. In the present study, by performing an RNase protection assay, primer extension, and HPLC, we confirmed that RmtC indeed methylates at the N7 position of nucleotide G1405 in 16S rRNA as found in ArmA and RmtB. RmtC has an MTase activity specific for the bacterial 30S ribosomal subunit consisting of 16S rRNA and several ribosomal proteins, but not for the naked 16S rRNA, as seen in ArmA, RmtB, and NpmA. All seven 16S rRNA MTases have been found exclusively in Gram-negative bacilli to date, and no plasmid-mediated 16S rRNA MTase has been reported in Gram-positive pathogenic microorganisms. Thus, we checked whether or not the RmtC could function in Gram-positive bacilli, and found that RmtC could indeed confer high-level resistance to gentamicin and kanamycin in Bacillus subtilis and Staphylococcus aureus. 16S rRNA MTases seemed to be functional to some extent in any bacterial species, regardless of the provenance of the 16S rRNA MTase gene responsible for aminoglycoside resistance.

  6. Development of a Multiplex PCR Method for Detection of the Genes Encoding 16S rRNA, Coagulase, Methicillin Resistance and Enterotoxins in Staphylococcus aureus

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A multiplex PCR method was developed for simultaneous detection of the genes encoding methicillin resistance (mecA), staphylococcal enterotoxins A, B and C (sea, seb and sec), coagulase (coa) and 16S rRNA. The primers for amplification of the 16S rRNA gene were specific for Staphylococcus spp., and ...

  7. Nearly complete rRNA genes from 371 Animalia: updated structure-based alignment and detailed phylogenetic analysis.

    PubMed

    Mallatt, Jon; Craig, Catherine Waggoner; Yoder, Matthew J

    2012-09-01

    This study presents a manually constructed alignment of nearly complete rRNA genes from most animal clades (371 taxa from ~33 of the ~36 metazoan phyla), expanded from the 197 sequences in a previous study. This thorough, taxon-rich alignment, available at http://www.wsu.edu/~jmallatt/research/rRNAalignment.html and in the Dryad Repository (doi: http://dx.doi.org/10.5061/dryad.1v62kr3q), is based rigidly on the secondary structure of the SSU and LSU rRNA molecules, and is annotated in detail, including labeling of the erroneous sequences (contaminants). The alignment can be used for future studies of the molecular evolution of rRNA. Here, we use it to explore if the larger number of sequences produces an improved phylogenetic tree of animal relationships. Disappointingly, the resolution did not improve, neither when the standard maximum-likelihood method was used, nor with more sophisticated methods that partitioned the rRNA into paired and unpaired sites (stem, loop, bulge, junction), or accounted for the evolution of the paired sites. For example, no doublet model of paired-site substitutions (16-state, 16A and 16B, 7A-F, or 6A-C models) corrected the placement of any rogue taxa or increased resolution. The following findings are from the simplest, standard, ML analysis. The 371-taxon tree only imperfectly supported the bilaterian clades of Lophotrochozoa and Ecdysozoa, and this problem remained after 17 taxa with unstably positioned sequences were omitted from the analysis. The problem seems to stem from base-compositional heterogeneity across taxa and from an overrepresentation of highly divergent sequences among the newly added taxa (e.g., sequences from Cephalopoda, Rotifera, Acoela, and Myxozoa). The rogue taxa continue to concentrate in two locations in the rRNA tree: near the base of Arthropoda and of Bilateria. The approximately uncertain (AU) test refuted the monophyly of Mollusca and of Chordata, probably due to long-branch attraction of the highly

  8. Natural-abundance stable carbon isotopes of small-subunit ribosomal RNA (SSU rRNA) from Guaymas Basin (Mexico)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    MacGregor, B. J.; Mendlovitz, H.; Albert, D.; Teske, A. P.

    2012-12-01

    Small-subunit ribosomal RNA (SSU rRNA) is a phylogenetically informative molecule found in all species. Because it is poorly preserved in most environments, it is a useful marker for active microbial populations. We are using the natural-abundance stable carbon isotopic composition of specific microbial groups to help identify the carbon substrates contributing to microbial biomass in a variety of marine environments. At Guaymas Basin, hydrothermal fluids interact with abundant sedimentary organic carbon to produce natural gas and petroleum. Where this reaches the sediment surface, it can support dense patches of seafloor life, including Beggiatoa mats. We report here on the stable carbon isotopic composition of SSU rRNA from a Beggiatoa mat transect, a cold background site, a warm site with high oil concentration, and a second Beggiatoa mat. The central part of the transect mat overlay the steepest temperature gradient, and was visually dominated by orange Beggiatoa. This was fringed by white Beggiatoa mat and bare, but still warm, sediment. Methane concentrations were saturating beneath the orange and white mats and at the oily site, lower beneath bare sediment, and below detection at the background site. Our initial hypotheses were that rRNA isotopic composition would be strongly influenced by methane supply, and that archaeal rRNA might be lighter than bacterial due to contributions from methanogens and anaerobic methane oxidizers. We used biotin-labeled oligonucleotides to capture Bacterial and Archaeal SSU rRNA for isotopic determination. Background-site rRNA was isotopically heaviest, and bacterial RNA from below 2 cm at the oily site was lightest, consistent with control by methane. Within the transect mat, however, the pattern was more complicated; at some sediment depths, rRNA from the mat periphery was isotopically lightest. Part of this may be due to the spatially and temporally variable paths followed by hydrothermal fluid, which can include horizontal

  9. A 9-nt segment of a cellular mRNA can function as an internal ribosome entry site (IRES) and when present in linked multiple copies greatly enhances IRES activity

    PubMed Central

    Chappell, Stephen A.; Edelman, Gerald M.; Mauro, Vincent P.

    2000-01-01

    This study addresses the properties of a newly identified internal ribosome entry site (IRES) contained within the mRNA of the homeodomain protein Gtx. Sequential deletions of the 5′ untranslated region (UTR) from either end did not define distinct IRES boundaries; when five nonoverlapping UTR fragments were tested, four had IRES activity. These observations are consistent with other cellular IRES analyses suggesting that some cellular IRESes are composed of segments (IRES modules) that independently and combinatorially contribute to overall IRES activity. We characterize a 9-nt IRES module from the Gtx 5′ UTR that is 100% complementary to the 18S rRNA at nucleotides 1132–1124. In previous work, we demonstrated that this mRNA segment could be crosslinked to its complement within intact 40S subunits. Here we show that increasing the number of copies of this IRES module in the intercistronic region of a dicistronic mRNA strongly enhances IRES activity in various cell lines. Ten linked copies increased IRES activity up to 570-fold in Neuro 2a cells. This level of IRES activity is up to 63-fold greater than that obtained by using the well characterized encephalomyocarditis virus IRES when tested in the same assay system. When the number of nucleotides between two of the 9-nt Gtx IRES modules was increased, the synergy between them decreased. In light of these findings, we discuss possible mechanisms of ribosome recruitment by cellular mRNAs, address the proposed role of higher order RNA structures on cellular IRES activity, and suggest parallels between IRES modules and transcriptional enhancer elements. PMID:10677496

  10. Microbial diversity and activity in the Nematostella vectensis holobiont: insights from 16S rRNA gene sequencing, isolate genomes, and a pilot-scale survey of gene expression

    PubMed Central

    Har, Jia Y.; Helbig, Tim; Lim, Ju H.; Fernando, Samodha C.; Reitzel, Adam M.; Penn, Kevin; Thompson, Janelle R.

    2015-01-01

    We have characterized the molecular and genomic diversity of the microbiota of the starlet sea anemone Nematostella vectensis, a cnidarian model for comparative developmental and functional biology and a year-round inhabitant of temperate salt marshes. Molecular phylogenetic analysis of 16S rRNA gene clone libraries revealed four ribotypes associated with N. vectensis at multiple locations and times. These associates include two novel ribotypes within the ε-Proteobacterial order Campylobacterales and the Spirochetes, respectively, each sharing <85% identity with cultivated strains, and two γ-Proteobacterial ribotypes sharing >99% 16S rRNA identity with Endozoicomonas elysicola and Pseudomonas oleovorans, respectively. Species-specific PCR revealed that these populations persisted in N. vectensis asexually propagated under laboratory conditions. cDNA indicated expression of the Campylobacterales and Endozoicomonas 16S rRNA in anemones from Sippewissett Marsh, MA. A collection of bacteria from laboratory raised N. vectensis was dominated by isolates from P. oleovorans and Rhizobium radiobacter. Isolates from field-collected anemones revealed an association with Limnobacter and Stappia isolates. Genomic DNA sequencing was carried out on 10 cultured bacterial isolates representing field- and laboratory-associates, i.e., Limnobacter spp., Stappia spp., P. oleovorans and R. radiobacter. Genomes contained multiple genes identified as virulence (host-association) factors while S. stellulata and L. thiooxidans genomes revealed pathways for mixotrophic sulfur oxidation. A pilot metatranscriptome of laboratory-raised N. vectensis was compared to the isolate genomes and indicated expression of ORFs from L. thiooxidans with predicted functions of motility, nutrient scavenging (Fe and P), polyhydroxyalkanoate synthesis for carbon storage, and selective permeability (porins). We hypothesize that such activities may mediate acclimation and persistence of bacteria in a N

  11. Internal shim

    DOEpatents

    Barth, Clyde H.; Blizinski, Theodore W.

    2003-05-13

    An internal shim used to accurately measure spaces in conjunction with a standard small probe has a shim top and a chassis. The internal shim is adjustably fixed within the space to be measured using grippers that emerge from the chassis and which are controlled by an arm pivotably attached to the shim top. A standard small probe passes through the shim along guides on the chassis and measures the distance between the exterior of the chassis and the boundary. By summing the measurements on each side of the chassis and the width of the chassis, the dimension of the space can be determined to within 0.001 inches.

  12. Differential gene expression in neurospora crassa cell types: amplification of rRNA genes. Progress report, July 1979-30 June 1980

    SciTech Connect

    Dutta, S.K.

    1980-01-01

    The significant results obtained during 1979 to 1980 of the current research program are as follows: (1) the differential rRNA gene amplification in germinated conidia of N.crassa was confirmed. N.crassa rDNAs showed differences in degrees of homology with isolated DNAs from other Neurospora species which could be due to heterogeneity in internal spacers. Studies with N.crassa rDNA clones were initiated to study their heterogeneities. The organization of the Institutional Biohazard Committee (IBC) for Recombinant DNA research was completed and necessary certifications for the laboratory and the workers were obtained in accordance with the P/sub 2/EK/sub 1/ containment regulation of N.I.H. Known 17S and 26S N.crassa rDNA probes are being used to detect differences, if any, in restriction cleavage sites in rDNAs of different cell types and developmental mutants of N.crassa. DNAs from these N.crassa cells are restricted with EcoR/sub 1/ and Hind III and cleaved fragments separated by gel electrophoresis are transferred into nitrocellulose papers. Experiments are underway now to see if there are any changes in cleavage sites by annealing with /sup 32/P or /sup 3/H-17S or 26S rDNA probes followed by autoradiography.

  13. Two different 16S rRNA genes in a mycobacterial strain.

    PubMed Central

    Ninet, B; Monod, M; Emler, S; Pawlowski, J; Metral, C; Rohner, P; Auckenthaler, R; Hirschel, B

    1996-01-01

    Sequencing of the gene coding for 16S rRNA (16S rDNA) is a well-established method used to identify bacteria, particularly mycobacteria. Unique sequences allow identification of a particular genus and species. If more than one 16S rDNA is present on one mycobacterial genome, their sequences are assumed to be strictly or almost identical. We have isolated a slowly growing Mycobacterium strain, "X", identified by conventional biochemical tests as Mycobacterium terrae. Identification by amplification and direct sequencing of 16S rDNA yielded ambiguous results in two variable regions, suggesting the presence of different copies of the sequenced gene. Total DNA was digested by restriction enzymes and hybridized after Southern blotting to a probe representing about two-thirds of the 16S rDNA. Two copies of 16S rDNA were identified and cloned. By sequencing, the clones were of two different types, A and B, differing in 18 positions. Oligonucleotides specific to each copy of the 16S rDNA were used to distinguish the positions of the two genes observed in the Southern blot. We conclude that Mycobacterium strain "X" has two different copies of 16S rDNA. Variations in the sequence between two copies of 16S rDNA gene have been described in archaeobacteria, but not in mycobacteria. When placed in a phylogenetic tree together with other slowly growing mycobacteria gene A shows a common root with M. terrae, whereas gene B is placed separately. PMID:8880515

  14. 16S rRNA Gene Survey of Microbial Communities in Winogradsky Columns

    PubMed Central

    Rundell, Ethan A.; Banta, Lois M.; Ward, Doyle V.; Watts, Corey D.; Birren, Bruce; Esteban, David J.

    2014-01-01

    A Winogradsky column is a clear glass or plastic column filled with enriched sediment. Over time, microbial communities in the sediment grow in a stratified ecosystem with an oxic top layer and anoxic sub-surface layers. Winogradsky columns have been used extensively to demonstrate microbial nutrient cycling and metabolic diversity in undergraduate microbiology labs. In this study, we used high-throughput 16s rRNA gene sequencing to investigate the microbial diversity of Winogradsky columns. Specifically, we tested the impact of sediment source, supplemental cellulose source, and depth within the column, on microbial community structure. We found that the Winogradsky columns were highly diverse communities but are dominated by three phyla: Proteobacteria, Bacteroidetes, and Firmicutes. The community is structured by a founding population dependent on the source of sediment used to prepare the columns and is differentiated by depth within the column. Numerous biomarkers were identified distinguishing sample depth, including Cyanobacteria, Alphaproteobacteria, and Betaproteobacteria as biomarkers of the soil-water interface, and Clostridia as a biomarker of the deepest depth. Supplemental cellulose source impacted community structure but less strongly than depth and sediment source. In columns dominated by Firmicutes, the family Peptococcaceae was the most abundant sulfate reducer, while in columns abundant in Proteobacteria, several Deltaproteobacteria families, including Desulfobacteraceae, were found, showing that different taxonomic groups carry out sulfur cycling in different columns. This study brings this historical method for enrichment culture of chemolithotrophs and other soil bacteria into the modern era of microbiology and demonstrates the potential of the Winogradsky column as a model system for investigating the effect of environmental variables on soil microbial communities. PMID:25101630

  15. Beyond 16S rRNA Community Profiling: Intra-Species Diversity in the Gut Microbiota.

    PubMed

    Ellegaard, Kirsten M; Engel, Philipp

    2016-01-01

    Interactions with microbes affect many aspects of animal biology, including immune system development, nutrition and health. In vertebrates, the gut microbiota is dominated by a small subset of phyla, but the species composition within these phyla is typically not conserved. Moreover, several recent studies have shown that bacterial species in the gut are composed of a multitude of strains, which frequently co-exist in their host, and may be host-specific. However, since the study of intra-species diversity is challenging, particularly in the setting of complex, host-associated microbial communities, our current understanding of the distribution, evolution and functional relevance of intra-species diversity in the gut is scarce. In order to unravel how genomic diversity translates into phenotypic diversity, community analyses going beyond 16S rRNA profiling, in combination with experimental approaches, are needed. Recently, the honeybee has emerged as a promising model for studying gut bacterial communities, particularly in terms of strain-level diversity. Unlike most other invertebrates, the honeybee gut is colonized by a remarkably consistent and specific core microbiota, which is dominated by only eight bacterial species. As for the vertebrate gut microbiota, these species are composed of highly diverse strains suggesting that similar evolutionary forces shape gut community structures in vertebrates and social insects. In this review, we outline current knowledge on the evolution and functional relevance of strain diversity within the gut microbiota, including recent insights gained from mammals and other animals such as the honeybee. We discuss methodological approaches and propose possible future avenues for studying strain diversity in complex bacterial communities.

  16. Beyond 16S rRNA Community Profiling: Intra-Species Diversity in the Gut Microbiota

    PubMed Central

    Ellegaard, Kirsten M.; Engel, Philipp

    2016-01-01

    Interactions with microbes affect many aspects of animal biology, including immune system development, nutrition and health. In vertebrates, the gut microbiota is dominated by a small subset of phyla, but the species composition within these phyla is typically not conserved. Moreover, several recent studies have shown that bacterial species in the gut are composed of a multitude of strains, which frequently co-exist in their host, and may be host-specific. However, since the study of intra-species diversity is challenging, particularly in the setting of complex, host-associated microbial communities, our current understanding of the distribution, evolution and functional relevance of intra-species diversity in the gut is scarce. In order to unravel how genomic diversity translates into phenotypic diversity, community analyses going beyond 16S rRNA profiling, in combination with experimental approaches, are needed. Recently, the honeybee has emerged as a promising model for studying gut bacterial communities, particularly in terms of strain-level diversity. Unlike most other invertebrates, the honeybee gut is colonized by a remarkably consistent and specific core microbiota, which is dominated by only eight bacterial species. As for the vertebrate gut microbiota, these species are composed of highly diverse strains suggesting that similar evolutionary forces shape gut community structures in vertebrates and social insects. In this review, we outline current knowledge on the evolution and functional relevance of strain diversity within the gut microbiota, including recent insights gained from mammals and other animals such as the honeybee. We discuss methodological approaches and propose possible future avenues for studying strain diversity in complex bacterial communities. PMID:27708630

  17. Cysteine Methylation Controls Radical Generation in the Cfr Radical AdoMet rRNA Methyltransferase

    PubMed Central

    Challand, Martin R.; Salvadori, Enrico; Driesener, Rebecca C.; Kay, Christopher W. M.; Roach, Peter L.; Spencer, James

    2013-01-01

    The ‘radical S-adenosyl-L-methionine (AdoMet)’ enzyme Cfr methylates adenosine 2503 of the 23S rRNA in the peptidyltransferase centre (P-site) of the bacterial ribosome. This modification protects host bacteria, notably methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA), from numerous antibiotics, including agents (e.g. linezolid, retapamulin) that were developed to treat such organisms. Cfr contains a single [4Fe-4S] cluster that binds two separate molecules of AdoMet during the reaction cycle. These are used sequentially to first methylate a cysteine residue, Cys338; and subsequently generate an oxidative radical intermediate that facilitates methyl transfer to the unreactive C8 (and/or C2) carbon centres of adenosine 2503. How the Cfr active site, with its single [4Fe-4S] cluster, catalyses these two distinct activities that each utilise AdoMet as a substrate remains to be established. Here, we use absorbance and electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectroscopy to investigate the interactions of AdoMet with the [4Fe-4S] clusters of wild-type Cfr and a Cys338 Ala mutant, which is unable to accept a methyl group. Cfr binds AdoMet with high (∼ 10 µM) affinity notwithstanding the absence of the RNA cosubstrate. In wild-type Cfr, where Cys338 is methylated, AdoMet binding leads to rapid oxidation of the [4Fe-4S] cluster and production of 5'-deoxyadenosine (DOA). In contrast, while Cys338 Ala Cfr binds AdoMet with equivalent affinity, oxidation of the [4Fe-4S] cluster is not observed. Our results indicate that the presence of a methyl group on Cfr Cys338 is a key determinant of the activity of the enzyme towards AdoMet, thus enabling a single active site to support two distinct modes of AdoMet cleavage. PMID:23861844

  18. Emergence of Multidrug-Resistant Campylobacter Species Isolates with a Horizontally Acquired rRNA Methylase

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yang; Zhang, Maojun; Deng, Fengru; Shen, Zhangqi; Wu, Congming; Zhang, Jianzhong

    2014-01-01

    Antibiotic-resistant Campylobacter constitutes a serious threat to public health, and resistance to macrolides is of particular concern, as this class of antibiotics is the drug of choice for clinical therapy of campylobacteriosis. Very recently, a horizontally transferrable macrolide resistance mediated by the rRNA methylase gene erm(B) was reported in a Campylobacter coli isolate, but little is known about the dissemination of erm(B) among Campylobacter isolates and the association of erm(B)-carrying isolates with clinical disease. To address this question and facilitate the control of antibiotic-resistant Campylobacter, we determined the distribution of erm(B) in 1,554 C. coli and Campylobacter jejuni isolates derived from food-producing animals and clinically confirmed human diarrheal cases. The results revealed that 58 of the examined isolates harbored erm(B) and exhibited high-level resistance to macrolides, and most were recent isolates, derived in 2011-2012. In addition, the erm(B)-positive isolates were all resistant to fluoroquinolones, another clinically important antibiotic used for treating campylobacteriosis. The erm(B) gene is found to be associated with chromosomal multidrug resistance genomic islands (MDRGIs) of Gram-positive origin or with plasmids of various sizes. All MDRGIs were transferrable to macrolide-susceptible C. jejuni by natural transformation under laboratory conditions. Molecular typing of the erm(B)-carrying isolates by pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) and multilocus sequence typing (MLST) identified diverse genotypes and outbreak-associated diarrheal isolates. Molecular typing also suggested zoonotic transmission of erm(B)-positive Campylobacter. These findings reveal an emerging and alarming trend of dissemination of erm(B) and MDRGIs in Campylobacter and underscore the need for heightened efforts to control their further spread. PMID:24982085

  19. DECIPHER, a search-based approach to chimera identification for 16S rRNA sequences.

    PubMed

    Wright, Erik S; Yilmaz, L Safak; Noguera, Daniel R

    2012-02-01

    DECIPHER is a new method for finding 16S rRNA chimeric sequences by the use of a search-based approach. The method is based upon detecting short fragments that are uncommon in the phylogenetic group where a query sequence is classified but frequently found in another phylogenetic group. The algorithm was calibrated for full sequences (fs_DECIPHER) and short sequences (ss_DECIPHER) and benchmarked against WigeoN (Pintail), ChimeraSlayer, and Uchime using artificially generated chimeras. Overall, ss_DECIPHER and Uchime provided the highest chimera detection for sequences 100 to 600 nucleotides long (79% and 81%, respectively), but Uchime's performance deteriorated for longer sequences, while ss_DECIPHER maintained a high detection rate (89%). Both methods had low false-positive rates (1.3% and 1.6%). The more conservative fs_DECIPHER, benchmarked only for sequences longer than 600 nucleotides, had an overall detection rate lower than that of ss_DECIPHER (75%) but higher than those of the other programs. In addition, fs_DECIPHER had the lowest false-positive rate among all the benchmarked programs (<0.20%). DECIPHER was outperformed only by ChimeraSlayer and Uchime when chimeras were formed from closely related parents (less than 10% divergence). Given the differences in the programs, it was possible to detect over 89% of all chimeras with just the combination of ss_DECIPHER and Uchime. Using fs_DECIPHER, we detected between 1% and 2% additional chimeras in the RDP, SILVA, and Greengenes databases from which chimeras had already been removed with Pintail or Bellerophon. DECIPHER was implemented in the R programming language and is directly accessible through a webpage or by downloading the program as an R package (http://DECIPHER.cee.wisc.edu).

  20. International Reports.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Anderson, Nancy D.; And Others

    1994-01-01

    Three reports discuss the International Federation of Library Associations and Institutions; the Frankfurt Book Fair, focusing on electronics; and Canadian library trends, including resource sharing, technology projects, information policy, censorship, services for persons with disabilities, construction projects, and library education and…

  1. Internet International.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Woodard, Colin

    1995-01-01

    The unexpectedly rapid expansion of the Internet in Eastern and Central Europe is having a significant effect on institutions of higher education, still suffering from decades of isolation. The benefits include global access to information and cost-effective communications. A number of international efforts are under way to expand Internet access,…

  2. International Systems.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Saba, Farhad, Ed.

    1999-01-01

    Completes a discussion of a systems model of distance education (in articles since May 1999) focusing on the most complex level, international. Discussion includes transfer of technology from United States universities to developing nations, the free market, and the age of the global economy. Presents a list of "early indicators" of changes in…

  3. International Entomology

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Pests and diseases of plants in agriculture are a shared international problem. Yet some of the very places that pest invaders come from often lack the institutional structure and organization necessary to help in understanding the biology of the pest or disease. Strengthening entomology by stimulat...

  4. International Reports.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tabb, Winston; Bender, David R.; Haycock, Ken; Horodyski, John

    2001-01-01

    Includes three annual reports: one from the International Federation of Library Associations and Institutions, the Special Libraries Association, and a report on innovations in Canadian libraries that discusses electronic initiatives, partnerships, books and publishing, school libraries, national issues, local challenges, and funding. (LRW)

  5. Identification of goat cashmere and sheep wool by PCR-RFLP analysis of mitochondrial 12S rRNA gene.

    PubMed

    Geng, Rong-Qing; Yuan, Chao; Chen, Yu-Lin

    2012-12-01

    The efficacy of polymerase chain reaction-restriction fragment length polymorphism (PCR-RFLP) analysis of mitochondrial 12S rRNA gene in identification of goat cashmere and sheep wool samples was evaluated. The specific fragments of the mitochondrial 12S rRNA gene, which were about 440 bp, were obtained using the PCR. Restriction enzyme digestion of the PCR products with endonucleases BspT I and Hinf I revealed species-specific RFLP patterns. Application of this technique on mixed samples could identify goat cashmere and sheep wool from each other within the proportion of 8:1. The technique, however, could detect only one species when the proportion of mixture was more than 9:1. The PCR-RFLP technique was demonstrated to possess potential value in precise identification of goat cashmere and sheep wool.

  6. Comparative analysis of mt LSU rRNA secondary structures of Odonates: structural variability and phylogenetic signal.

    PubMed

    Misof, B; Fleck, G

    2003-12-01

    Secondary structures of the most conserved part of the mt 16S rRNA gene, domains IV and V, have been recently analysed in a comparative study. However, full secondary structures of the mt LSU rRNA molecule are published for only a few insect species. The present study presents full secondary structures of domains I, II, IV and V of Odonates and one representative of mayflies, Ephemera sp. The reconstructions are based on a comparative approach and minimal consensus structures derived from sequence alignments. The inferred structures exhibit remarkable similarities to the published Drosophila melanogaster model, which increases confidence in these structures. Structural variance within Odonates is homoplastic, and neighbour-joining trees based on tree edit distances do not correspond to any of the phylogenetically expected patterns. However, despite homoplastic quantitative structural variation, many similarities between Odonates and Ephemera sp. suggest promising character sets for higher order insect systematics that merit further investigations.

  7. Functional variants of 5S rRNA in the ribosomes of common sea urchin Paracentrotus lividus.

    PubMed

    Dimarco, Eufrosina; Cascone, Eleonora; Bellavia, Daniele; Caradonna, Fabio

    2012-10-15

    We have previously reported a molecular and cytogenetic characterization of three different 5S rDNA clusters in the sea urchin Paracentrotus lividus; this study, performed at DNA level only, lends itself as starting point to verify that these clusters could contain transcribed genes, then, to demonstrate the presence of heterogeneity at functional RNA level, also. In the present work we report in P. lividus ribosomes the existence of several transcribed variants of the 5S rRNA and we associate all transcribed variants to the cluster to which belong. Our finding is the first demonstration of the presence of high heterogeneity in functional 5S rRNA molecules in animal ribosomes, a feature that had been considered a peculiarity of some plants.

  8. The Deinococcus-Thermus phylum and the effect of rRNA composition on phylogenetic tree construction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weisburg, W. G.; Giovannoni, S. J.; Woese, C. R.

    1989-01-01

    Through comparative analysis of 16S ribosomal RNA sequences, it can be shown that two seemingly dissimilar types of eubacteria Deinococcus and the ubiquitous hot spring organism Thermus are distantly but specifically related to one another. This confirms an earlier report based upon 16S rRNA oligonucleotide cataloging studies (Hensel et al., 1986). Their two lineages form a distinctive grouping within the eubacteria that deserved the taxonomic status of a phylum. The (partial) sequence of T. aquaticus rRNA appears relatively close to those of other thermophilic eubacteria. e.g. Thermotoga maritima and Thermomicrobium roseum. However, this closeness does not reflect a true evolutionary closeness; rather it is due to a "thermophilic convergence", the result of unusually high G+C composition in the rRNAs of thermophilic bacteria. Unless such compositional biases are taken into account, the branching order and root of phylogenetic trees can be incorrectly inferred.

  9. Evolution of multicellular animals as deduced from 5S rRNA sequences: a possible early emergence of the Mesozoa.

    PubMed

    Ohama, T; Kumazaki, T; Hori, H; Osawa, S

    1984-06-25

    The nucleotide sequences of 5S rRNA from a mesozoan Dicyema misakiense and three metazoan species, i.e., an acorn-worm Saccoglossus kowalevskii, a moss-animal Bugula neritina, and an octopus Octopus vulgaris have been determined. A phylogenic tree of multicellular animals has been constructed from 73 5S rRNA sequences available at present including those from the above four sequences. The tree suggests that the mesozoan is the most ancient multicellular animal identified so far, its emergence time being almost the same as that of flagellated or ciliated protozoans. The branching points of planarians and nematodes are a little later than that of the mesozoan but are clearly earlier than other metazoan groups including sponges and jellyfishes. Many metazoan groups seem to have diverged within a relatively short period.

  10. EzEditor: a versatile sequence alignment editor for both rRNA- and protein-coding genes.

    PubMed

    Jeon, Yoon-Seong; Lee, Kihyun; Park, Sang-Cheol; Kim, Bong-Soo; Cho, Yong-Joon; Ha, Sung-Min; Chun, Jongsik

    2014-02-01

    EzEditor is a Java-based molecular sequence editor allowing manipulation of both DNA and protein sequence alignments for phylogenetic analysis. It has multiple features optimized to connect initial computer-generated multiple alignment and subsequent phylogenetic analysis by providing manual editing with reference to biological information specific to the genes under consideration. It provides various functionalities for editing rRNA alignments using secondary structure information. In addition, it supports simultaneous editing of both DNA sequences and their translated protein sequences for protein-coding genes. EzEditor is, to our knowledge, the first sequence editing software designed for both rRNA- and protein-coding genes with the visualization of biologically relevant information and should be useful in molecular phylogenetic studies. EzEditor is based on Java, can be run on all major computer operating systems and is freely available from http://sw.ezbiocloud.net/ezeditor/.

  11. Analysis of rRNA gene methylation in Arabidopsis thaliana by CHEF-Conventional 2D gel electrophoresis

    PubMed Central

    Mohannath, Gireesha; Pikaard, Craig S.

    2017-01-01

    Summary Contour-clamped homogenous electric field (CHEF) gel electrophoresis, a variant of Pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE), is a powerful technique for resolving large fragments of DNA (10 kb to 9 Mb). CHEF has many applications including the physical mapping of chromosomes, artificial chromosomes and sub-chromosomal DNA fragments, etc. Here we describe the use of CHEF and two-dimensional gel electrophoresis to analyze rRNA gene methylation patterns within the two ~ 4 million base pair nucleolus organizer regions (NORs) of Arabidopsis thaliana. The method involves CHEF gel electrophoresis of agarose-embedded DNA following restriction endonuclease digestion to cut the NORs into large but resolvable segments, followed by digestion with methylation-sensitive restriction endonucleases and conventional (or CHEF) gel electrophoresis, in a second dimension. Resulting products are then detected by Southern blotting or PCR analyses capable of discriminating rRNA gene subtypes. PMID:27576719

  12. [Phylogeny of protostome moulting animals (Ecdysozoa) inferred from 18 and 28S rRNA gene sequences].

    PubMed

    Petrov, N B; Vladychenskaia, N S

    2005-01-01

    Reliability of reconstruction of phylogenetic relationships within a group of protostome moulting animals was evaluated by means of comparison of 18 and 28S rRNA gene sequences sets both taken separately and combined. Reliability of reconstructions was evaluated by values of the bootstrap support of major phylogenetic tree nodes and by degree of congruence of phylogenetic trees inferred by various methods. By both criteria, phylogenetic trees reconstructed from the combined 18 and 28S rRNA gene sequences were better than those inferred from 18 and 28S sequences taken separately. Results obtained are consistent with phylogenetic hypothesis separating protostome animals into two major clades, moulting Ecdysozoa (Priapulida + Kinorhyncha, Nematoda + Nematomorpha, Onychophora + Tardigrada, Myriapoda + Chelicerata, Crustacea + Hexapoda) and unmoulting Lophotrochozoa (Plathelminthes, Nemertini, Annelida, Mollusca, Echiura, Sipuncula). Clade Cephalorhyncha does not include nematomorphs (Nematomorpha). Conclusion was taken that it is necessary to use combined 18 and 28S data in phylogenetic studies.