Science.gov

Sample records for 18s small-subunit ribosomal

  1. Prevalence, Genetic Characterization, and 18S Small Subunit Ribosomal RNA Diversity of Trypanosoma rangeli in Triatomine and Mammal Hosts in Endemic Areas for Chagas Disease in Ecuador

    PubMed Central

    Ocaña-Mayorga, Sofia; Aguirre-Villacis, Fernanda; Pinto, C. Miguel; Vallejo, Gustavo A.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Trypanosoma rangeli is a nonpathogenic parasite for humans; however, its medical importance relies in its similarity and overlapping distribution with Trypanosoma cruzi, causal agent of Chagas disease in the Americas. The genetic diversity of T. rangeli and its association with host species (triatomines and mammals) has been identified along Central and the South America; however, it has not included data of isolates from Ecuador. This study reports infection with T. rangeli in 18 genera of mammal hosts and five species of triatomines in three environments (domestic, peridomestic, and sylvatic). Higher infection rates were found in the sylvatic environment, in close association with Rhodnius ecuadoriensis. The results of this study extend the range of hosts infected with this parasite and the geographic range of the T. rangeli genotype KP1(−)/lineage C in South America. It was not possible to detect variation on T. rangeli from the central coastal region and southern Ecuador with the analysis of the small subunit ribosomal RNA (SSU-rRNA) gene, even though these areas are ecologically different and a phenotypic subdivision of R. ecuadoriensis has been found. R. ecuadoriensis is considered one of the most important vectors for Chagas disease transmission in Ecuador due to its wide distribution and adaptability to diverse environments. An extensive knowledge of the trypanosomes circulating in this species of triatomine, and associated mammal hosts, is important for delineating transmission dynamics and preventive measures in the endemic areas of Ecuador and Northern Peru. PMID:26645579

  2. Prevalence, Genetic Characterization, and 18S Small Subunit Ribosomal RNA Diversity of Trypanosoma rangeli in Triatomine and Mammal Hosts in Endemic Areas for Chagas Disease in Ecuador.

    PubMed

    Ocaña-Mayorga, Sofia; Aguirre-Villacis, Fernanda; Pinto, C Miguel; Vallejo, Gustavo A; Grijalva, Mario J

    2015-12-01

    Trypanosoma rangeli is a nonpathogenic parasite for humans; however, its medical importance relies in its similarity and overlapping distribution with Trypanosoma cruzi, causal agent of Chagas disease in the Americas. The genetic diversity of T. rangeli and its association with host species (triatomines and mammals) has been identified along Central and the South America; however, it has not included data of isolates from Ecuador. This study reports infection with T. rangeli in 18 genera of mammal hosts and five species of triatomines in three environments (domestic, peridomestic, and sylvatic). Higher infection rates were found in the sylvatic environment, in close association with Rhodnius ecuadoriensis. The results of this study extend the range of hosts infected with this parasite and the geographic range of the T. rangeli genotype KP1(-)/lineage C in South America. It was not possible to detect variation on T. rangeli from the central coastal region and southern Ecuador with the analysis of the small subunit ribosomal RNA (SSU-rRNA) gene, even though these areas are ecologically different and a phenotypic subdivision of R. ecuadoriensis has been found. R. ecuadoriensis is considered one of the most important vectors for Chagas disease transmission in Ecuador due to its wide distribution and adaptability to diverse environments. An extensive knowledge of the trypanosomes circulating in this species of triatomine, and associated mammal hosts, is important for delineating transmission dynamics and preventive measures in the endemic areas of Ecuador and Northern Peru.

  3. Morphology and Small-Subunit Ribosomal DNA Sequence of Henneguya Adiposa (Myxosporea) From Ictalurus punctatus (Siluriformes)

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    The original description of Henneguya adiposa, a myxozoan parasitizing channel catfish Ictalurus punctatus, is supplemented with new data on spore morphology, including photomicrographs and line drawings, as well as 18S small-subunit (SSU) ribosomal DNA (rDNA) sequence. Elongate, translucent, linear...

  4. Metaxa: a software tool for automated detection and discrimination among ribosomal small subunit (12S/16S/18S) sequences of archaea, bacteria, eukaryotes, mitochondria, and chloroplasts in metagenomes and environmental sequencing datasets.

    PubMed

    Bengtsson, Johan; Eriksson, K Martin; Hartmann, Martin; Wang, Zheng; Shenoy, Belle Damodara; Grelet, Gwen-Aëlle; Abarenkov, Kessy; Petri, Anna; Rosenblad, Magnus Alm; Nilsson, R Henrik

    2011-10-01

    The ribosomal small subunit (SSU) rRNA gene has emerged as an important genetic marker for taxonomic identification in environmental sequencing datasets. In addition to being present in the nucleus of eukaryotes and the core genome of prokaryotes, the gene is also found in the mitochondria of eukaryotes and in the chloroplasts of photosynthetic eukaryotes. These three sets of genes are conceptually paralogous and should in most situations not be aligned and analyzed jointly. To identify the origin of SSU sequences in complex sequence datasets has hitherto been a time-consuming and largely manual undertaking. However, the present study introduces Metaxa ( http://microbiology.se/software/metaxa/ ), an automated software tool to extract full-length and partial SSU sequences from larger sequence datasets and assign them to an archaeal, bacterial, nuclear eukaryote, mitochondrial, or chloroplast origin. Using data from reference databases and from full-length organelle and organism genomes, we show that Metaxa detects and scores SSU sequences for origin with very low proportions of false positives and negatives. We believe that this tool will be useful in microbial and evolutionary ecology as well as in metagenomics.

  5. Ribosomal small subunit domains radiate from a central core

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gulen, Burak; Petrov, Anton S.; Okafor, C. Denise; Vander Wood, Drew; O'Neill, Eric B.; Hud, Nicholas V.; Williams, Loren Dean

    2016-02-01

    The domain architecture of a large RNA can help explain and/or predict folding, function, biogenesis and evolution. We offer a formal and general definition of an RNA domain and use that definition to experimentally characterize the rRNA of the ribosomal small subunit. Here the rRNA comprising a domain is compact, with a self-contained system of molecular interactions. A given rRNA helix or stem-loop must be allocated uniquely to a single domain. Local changes such as mutations can give domain-wide effects. Helices within a domain have interdependent orientations, stabilities and interactions. With these criteria we identify a core domain (domain A) of small subunit rRNA. Domain A acts as a hub, linking the four peripheral domains and imposing orientational and positional restraints on the other domains. Experimental characterization of isolated domain A, and mutations and truncations of it, by methods including selective 2‧OH acylation analyzed by primer extension and circular dichroism spectroscopy are consistent with our architectural model. The results support the utility of the concept of an RNA domain. Domain A, which exhibits structural similarity to tRNA, appears to be an essential core of the small ribosomal subunit.

  6. Ribosomal small subunit domains radiate from a central core

    PubMed Central

    Gulen, Burak; Petrov, Anton S.; Okafor, C. Denise; Vander Wood, Drew; O’Neill, Eric B.; Hud, Nicholas V.; Williams, Loren Dean

    2016-01-01

    The domain architecture of a large RNA can help explain and/or predict folding, function, biogenesis and evolution. We offer a formal and general definition of an RNA domain and use that definition to experimentally characterize the rRNA of the ribosomal small subunit. Here the rRNA comprising a domain is compact, with a self-contained system of molecular interactions. A given rRNA helix or stem-loop must be allocated uniquely to a single domain. Local changes such as mutations can give domain-wide effects. Helices within a domain have interdependent orientations, stabilities and interactions. With these criteria we identify a core domain (domain A) of small subunit rRNA. Domain A acts as a hub, linking the four peripheral domains and imposing orientational and positional restraints on the other domains. Experimental characterization of isolated domain A, and mutations and truncations of it, by methods including selective 2′OH acylation analyzed by primer extension and circular dichroism spectroscopy are consistent with our architectural model. The results support the utility of the concept of an RNA domain. Domain A, which exhibits structural similarity to tRNA, appears to be an essential core of the small ribosomal subunit. PMID:26876483

  7. Megraft: A software package to graft ribosomal small subunit (16S/18S) fragments onto full-length sequences for accurate species richness and sequencing depth analysis in pyrosequencing-length metagenomes

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Metagenomic libraries represent subsamples of the total DNA found at a study site and offer unprecedented opportunities to study ecological and functional aspects of microbial communities. To examine the depth of the sequencing effort, rarefaction analysis of the ribosomal small sub-unit (SSU/16S/18...

  8. Mitochondrial DNA Restriction Fragment Length Polymorphism (RFLP) and 18S Small-Subunit Ribosomal DNA PCR-RFLP Analyses of Acanthamoeba Isolated from Contact Lens Storage Cases of Residents in Southwestern Korea

    PubMed Central

    Kong, Hyun-Hee; Shin, Ji-Yeol; Yu, Hak-Sun; Kim, Jin; Hahn, Tae-Won; Hahn, Young-Ho; Chung, Dong-Il

    2002-01-01

    We applied ribosomal DNA PCR-restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP) and mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) RFLP analyses to 43 Acanthamoeba environmental isolates (KA/LH1 to KA/LH43) from contact lens storage cases in southwestern Korea. These isolates were compared to American Type Culture Collection strains and clinical isolates (KA/E1 to KA/E12) from patients with keratitis. Seven riboprint patterns were seen. To identify the species of the isolates, a phylogenetic tree was constructed based on the comparison of riboprint patterns with reference strains. Four types accounted for 39 of the isolates belonging to the A. castellanii complex. The most predominant (48.8%) type was A. castellanii KA/LH2 type, which had identical riboprint and mtDNA RFLP patterns to those of A. castellanii Castellani, KA/E3 and KA/E8. The riboprint and mtDNA RFLP patterns of the KA/LH7 (20.9%) type were identical to those of A. castellanii Ma, a corneal isolate from the United States. The riboprint and mtDNA RFLP patterns of the KA/LH1 (18.6%) type were the same as those of A. lugdunensis L3a, KA/E2, and KA/E12. The prevalent pattern for each type of Acanthamoeba in southwestern Korea was very different from that from southeastern Korea and Seoul, Korea. It is noteworthy that 38 (88.4%) out of 43 isolates from contact lens storage cases of the residents in southwestern Korea revealed mtDNA RFLP and riboprint patterns identical to those found for clinical isolates in our area. This indicates that most isolates from contact lens storage cases in the surveyed area are potential keratopathogens. More attention should be paid to the disinfection of contact lens storage cases to prevent possible amoebic keratitis. PMID:11923331

  9. Mitochondrial DNA restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP) and 18S small-subunit ribosomal DNA PCR-RFLP analyses of Acanthamoeba isolated from contact lens storage cases of residents in southwestern Korea.

    PubMed

    Kong, Hyun-Hee; Shin, Ji-Yeol; Yu, Hak-Sun; Kim, Jin; Hahn, Tae-Won; Hahn, Young-Ho; Chung, Dong-Il

    2002-04-01

    We applied ribosomal DNA PCR-restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP) and mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) RFLP analyses to 43 Acanthamoeba environmental isolates (KA/LH1 to KA/LH43) from contact lens storage cases in southwestern Korea. These isolates were compared to American Type Culture Collection strains and clinical isolates (KA/E1 to KA/E12) from patients with keratitis. Seven riboprint patterns were seen. To identify the species of the isolates, a phylogenetic tree was constructed based on the comparison of riboprint patterns with reference strains. Four types accounted for 39 of the isolates belonging to the A. castellanii complex. The most predominant (48.8%) type was A. castellanii KA/LH2 type, which had identical riboprint and mtDNA RFLP patterns to those of A. castellanii Castellani, KA/E3 and KA/E8. The riboprint and mtDNA RFLP patterns of the KA/LH7 (20.9%) type were identical to those of A. castellanii Ma, a corneal isolate from the United States. The riboprint and mtDNA RFLP patterns of the KA/LH1 (18.6%) type were the same as those of A. lugdunensis L3a, KA/E2, and KA/E12. The prevalent pattern for each type of Acanthamoeba in southwestern Korea was very different from that from southeastern Korea and Seoul, Korea. It is noteworthy that 38 (88.4%) out of 43 isolates from contact lens storage cases of the residents in southwestern Korea revealed mtDNA RFLP and riboprint patterns identical to those found for clinical isolates in our area. This indicates that most isolates from contact lens storage cases in the surveyed area are potential keratopathogens. More attention should be paid to the disinfection of contact lens storage cases to prevent possible amoebic keratitis.

  10. Identification of Egyptian Fasciola species by PCR and restriction endonucleases digestion of the nuclear small subunit ribosomal RNA gene.

    PubMed

    El-Gozamy, Bothina R; Shoukry, Nahla M

    2009-08-01

    Fascioliasis is one of the familiar zoonotic health problems of worldwide distribution including Egypt. In this study, a simple and rapid polymerase chain reaction/restriction fragment length polymorphisms (PCR/RFLPs) assay, using the common restriction endonucleases Aval, EcoRI, Eael, Sac11 and Avail was applied to differentiate between both Fasciola gigantica and F. hepatica. The five restriction endonucleases were used to differentiate between the two species of Fasciola based on -1950 bp long sequence of the 18S nuclear small subunit ribosomal RNA gene. Aval and EcoRI restriction endonucleases failed to differentiate between the two Fasciola species when each restriction enzyme gave the same restriction patterns in both of them. However, F. gigantica and F. hepatica were well-differentiated when their small subunit ribosomal DNA were digested with Eael and Sac 11 restriction endonucleases.

  11. Genetic characterization of clinical acanthamoeba isolates from Japan using nuclear and mitochondrial small subunit ribosomal RNA.

    PubMed

    Rahman, Md Moshiur; Yagita, Kenji; Kobayashi, Akira; Oikawa, Yosaburo; Hussein, Amjad I A; Matsumura, Takahiro; Tokoro, Masaharu

    2013-08-01

    Because of an increased number of Acanthamoeba keratitis (AK) along with associated disease burdens, medical professionals have become more aware of this pathogen in recent years. In this study, by analyzing both the nuclear 18S small subunit ribosomal RNA (18S rRNA) and mitochondrial 16S rRNA gene loci, 27 clinical Acanthamoeba strains that caused AK in Japan were classified into 3 genotypes, T3 (3 strains), T4 (23 strains), and T5 (one strain). Most haplotypes were identical to the reference haplotypes reported from all over the world, and thus no specificity of the haplotype distribution in Japan was found. The T4 sub-genotype analysis using the 16S rRNA gene locus also revealed a clear sub-conformation within the T4 cluster, and lead to the recognition of a new sub-genotype T4i, in addition to the previously reported sub-genotypes T4a-T4h. Furthermore, 9 out of 23 strains in the T4 genotype were identified to a specific haplotype (AF479533), which seems to be a causal haplotype of AK. While heterozygous nuclear haplotypes were observed from 2 strains, the mitochondrial haplotypes were homozygous as T4 genotype in the both strains, and suggested a possibility of nuclear hybridization (mating reproduction) between different strains in Acanthamoeba. The nuclear 18S rRNA gene and mitochondrial 16S rRNA gene loci of Acanthamoeba spp. possess different unique characteristics usable for the genotyping analyses, and those specific features could contribute to the establishment of molecular taxonomy for the species complex of Acanthamoeba.

  12. Group I introns in small subunit ribosomal DNA of several Phaeosphaeria species

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    In a study of small subunit ribosomal RNA (SSU-rRNA) gene sequences in Phaeosphaeria species, group I introns were found in 9 of 10 P. avenaria f.sp. avenaria (Paa) isolates, 1 of 2 Phaeosphaeria sp. (P-rye) isolates from Polish rye (Sn48-1), 1 Phaeosphaeria sp. from dallis grass (P-dg) (S-93-48) an...

  13. Substitution rate calibration of small subunit ribosomal RNA identifies chlorarachniophyte endosymbionts as remnants of green algae.

    PubMed Central

    Van de Peer, Y; Rensing, S A; Maier, U G; De Wachter, R

    1996-01-01

    Chlorarachniophytes are amoeboid algae with chlorophyll a and b containing plastids that are surrounded by four membranes instead of two as in plants and green algae. These extra membranes form important support for the hypothesis that chlorarachniophytes have acquired their plastids by the ingestion of another eukaryotic plastid-containing alga. Chlorarachniophytes also contain a small nucleus-like structure called the nucleomorph situated between the two inner and the two outer membranes surrounding the plastid. This nucleomorph is a remnant of the endosymbiont's nucleus and encodes, among other molecules, small subunit ribosomal RNA. Previous phylogenetic analyses on the basis of this molecule provided unexpected and contradictory evidence for the origin of the chlorarachniophyte endosymbiont. We developed a new method for measuring the substitution rates of the individual nucleotides of small subunit ribosomal RNA. From the resulting substitution rate distribution, we derived an equation that gives a more realistic relationship between sequence dissimilarity and evolutionary distance than equations previously available. Phylogenetic trees constructed on the basis of evolutionary distances computed by this new method clearly situate the chlorarachniophyte nucleomorphs among the green algae. Moreover, this relationship is confirmed by transversion analysis of the Chlorarachnion plastid small subunit ribosomal RNA. PMID:8755544

  14. Mammalian mitochondrial ribosomal small subunit (MRPS) genes: A putative role in human disease.

    PubMed

    Gopisetty, Gopal; Thangarajan, Rajkumar

    2016-09-01

    Mitochondria are prominently understood as power houses producing ATP the primary energy currency of the cell. However, mitochondria are also known to play an important role in apoptosis and autophagy, and mitochondrial dysregulation can lead to pathological outcomes. Mitochondria are known to contain 1500 proteins of which only 13 are coded by mitochondrial DNA and the rest are coded by nuclear genes. Protein synthesis in mitochondria involves mitochondrial ribosomes which are 55-60S particles and are composed of small 28S and large 39S subunits. A feature of mammalian mitoribosome which differentiate it from bacterial ribosomes is the increased protein content. The human mitochondrial ribosomal protein (MRP) gene family comprises of 30 genes which code for mitochondrial ribosomal small subunit and 50 genes for the large subunit. The present review focuses on the mitochondrial ribosomal small subunit genes (MRPS), presents an overview of the literature and data gleaned from publicly available gene and protein expression databases. The survey revealed aberrations in MRPS gene expression patterns in varied human diseases indicating a putative role in their etiology.

  15. Molecular architecture of the 90S small subunit pre-ribosome

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Qi; Zhu, Xing; Qi, Jia; An, Weidong; Lan, Pengfei; Tan, Dan; Chen, Rongchang; Wang, Bing; Zheng, Sanduo; Zhang, Cheng; Chen, Xining; Zhang, Wei; Chen, Jing; Dong, Meng-Qiu; Ye, Keqiong

    2017-01-01

    Eukaryotic small ribosomal subunits are first assembled into 90S pre-ribosomes. The complete 90S is a gigantic complex with a molecular mass of approximately five megadaltons. Here, we report the nearly complete architecture of Saccharomyces cerevisiae 90S determined from three cryo-electron microscopy single particle reconstructions at 4.5 to 8.7 angstrom resolution. The majority of the density maps were modeled and assigned to specific RNA and protein components. The nascent ribosome is assembled into isolated native-like substructures that are stabilized by abundant assembly factors. The 5' external transcribed spacer and U3 snoRNA nucleate a large subcomplex that scaffolds the nascent ribosome. U3 binds four sites of pre-rRNA, including a novel site on helix 27 but not the 3' side of the central pseudoknot, and crucially organizes the 90S structure. The 90S model provides significant insight into the principle of small subunit assembly and the function of assembly factors. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.22086.001 PMID:28244370

  16. Molecular architecture of the 90S small subunit pre-ribosome.

    PubMed

    Sun, Qi; Zhu, Xing; Qi, Jia; An, Weidong; Lan, Pengfei; Tan, Dan; Chen, Rongchang; Wang, Bing; Zheng, Sanduo; Zhang, Cheng; Chen, Xining; Zhang, Wei; Chen, Jing; Dong, Meng-Qiu; Ye, Keqiong

    2017-02-28

    Eukaryotic small ribosomal subunits are first assembled into 90S pre-ribosomes. The complete 90S is a gigantic complex with a molecular mass of approximately five megadaltons. Here, we report the nearly complete architecture of Saccharomyces cerevisiae 90S determined from three cryo-electron microscopy single particle reconstructions at 4.5 to 8.7 angstrom resolution. The majority of the density maps were modeled and assigned to specific RNA and protein components. The nascent ribosome is assembled into isolated native-like substructures that are stabilized by abundant assembly factors. The 5' external transcribed spacer and U3 snoRNA nucleate a large subcomplex that scaffolds the nascent ribosome. U3 binds four sites of pre-rRNA, including a novel site on helix 27 but not the 3' side of the central pseudoknot, and crucially organizes the 90S structure. The 90S model provides significant insight into the principle of small subunit assembly and the function of assembly factors.

  17. An overview of the secondary structure of the V4 region of eukaryotic small-subunit ribosomal RNA.

    PubMed Central

    Nickrent, D L; Sargent, M L

    1991-01-01

    The V4 region of the small subunit (18S) ribosomal RNA was examined in 72 different sequences representing a broad sample eukaryotic diversity. This domain is the most variable region of the 18S rRNA molecule and ranges in length from ca. 230 to over 500 bases. Based upon comparative analysis, secondary structural models were constructed for all sequences and the resulting generalized model shows that most organisms possess seven helices for this region. The protists and two insects show from one to as many as four helices in addition to the above seven. In this report, we summarize secondary structure information presented elsewhere for the V4 region, describe the general features for helical and apical regions, and identify signature sequences useful in helix identification. Our model generally agrees with other current concepts; however, we propose modifications or alternative structures for the start of the V4 region, the large protist inserts, and the sector that may possibly contain a pseudoknot. PMID:2014163

  18. Prevalent ciliate symbiosis on copepods: high genetic diversity and wide distribution detected using small subunit ribosomal RNA gene.

    PubMed

    Guo, Zhiling; Liu, Sheng; Hu, Simin; Li, Tao; Huang, Yousong; Liu, Guangxing; Zhang, Huan; Lin, Senjie

    2012-01-01

    Toward understanding the genetic diversity and distribution of copepod-associated symbiotic ciliates and the evolutionary relationships with their hosts in the marine environment, we developed a small subunit ribosomal RNA gene (18S rDNA)-based molecular method and investigated the genetic diversity and genotype distribution of the symbiotic ciliates on copepods. Of the 10 copepod species representing six families collected from six locations of Pacific and Atlantic Oceans, 9 were found to harbor ciliate symbionts. Phylogenetic analysis of the 391 ciliate 18S rDNA sequences obtained revealed seven groups (ribogroups), six (containing 99% of all the sequences) belonging to subclass Apostomatida, the other clustered with peritrich ciliate Vorticella gracilis. Among the Apostomatida groups, Group III were essentially identical to Vampyrophrya pelagica, and the other five groups represented the undocumented ciliates that were close to Vampyrophrya/Gymnodinioides/Hyalophysa. Group VI ciliates were found in all copepod species but one (Calanus sinicus), and were most abundant among all ciliate sequences obtained, indicating that they are the dominant symbiotic ciliates universally associated with copepods. In contrast, some ciliate sequences were found only in some of the copepods examined, suggesting the host selectivity and geographic differentiation of ciliates, which requires further verification by more extensive sampling. Our results reveal the wide occurrence and high genetic diversity of symbiotic ciliates on marine copepods and highlight the need to systematically investigate the host- and geography-based genetic differentiation and ecological roles of these ciliates globally.

  19. Prevalent Ciliate Symbiosis on Copepods: High Genetic Diversity and Wide Distribution Detected Using Small Subunit Ribosomal RNA Gene

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Zhiling; Liu, Sheng; Hu, Simin; Li, Tao; Huang, Yousong; Liu, Guangxing; Zhang, Huan; Lin, Senjie

    2012-01-01

    Toward understanding the genetic diversity and distribution of copepod-associated symbiotic ciliates and the evolutionary relationships with their hosts in the marine environment, we developed a small subunit ribosomal RNA gene (18S rDNA)-based molecular method and investigated the genetic diversity and genotype distribution of the symbiotic ciliates on copepods. Of the 10 copepod species representing six families collected from six locations of Pacific and Atlantic Oceans, 9 were found to harbor ciliate symbionts. Phylogenetic analysis of the 391 ciliate 18S rDNA sequences obtained revealed seven groups (ribogroups), six (containing 99% of all the sequences) belonging to subclass Apostomatida, the other clustered with peritrich ciliate Vorticella gracilis. Among the Apostomatida groups, Group III were essentially identical to Vampyrophrya pelagica, and the other five groups represented the undocumented ciliates that were close to Vampyrophrya/Gymnodinioides/Hyalophysa. Group VI ciliates were found in all copepod species but one (Calanus sinicus), and were most abundant among all ciliate sequences obtained, indicating that they are the dominant symbiotic ciliates universally associated with copepods. In contrast, some ciliate sequences were found only in some of the copepods examined, suggesting the host selectivity and geographic differentiation of ciliates, which requires further verification by more extensive sampling. Our results reveal the wide occurrence and high genetic diversity of symbiotic ciliates on marine copepods and highlight the need to systematically investigate the host- and geography-based genetic differentiation and ecological roles of these ciliates globally. PMID:23024768

  20. Small-subunit ribosomal RNA gene sequences of Phaeodarea challenge the monophyly of Haeckel's Radiolaria.

    PubMed

    Polet, Stephane; Berney, Cédric; Fahrni, José; Pawlowski, Jan

    2004-03-01

    In his grand monograph of Radiolaria, Ernst Haeckel originally included Phaeodarea together with Acantharea and Polycystinea, all three taxa characterized by the presence of a central capsule and the possession of axopodia. Cytological and ultrastructural studies, however, questioned the monophyly of Radiolaria, suggesting an independent evolutionary origin of the three taxa, and the first molecular data on Acantharea and Polycystinea brought controversial results. To test further the monophyly of Radiolaria, we sequenced the complete small subunit ribosomal RNA gene of three phaeodarians and three polycystines. Our analyses reveal that phaeodarians clearly branch among the recently described phylum Cercozoa, separately from Acantharea and Polycystinea. This result enhances the morphological variability within the phylum Cercozoa, which already contains very heterogeneous groups of protists. Our study also confirms the common origin of Acantharea and Polycystinea, which form a sister-group to the Cercozoa, and allows a phylogenetic reinterpretation of the morphological features of the three radiolarian groups.

  1. Roles of eukaryotic ribosomal proteins in maturation and transport of pre-18S rRNA and ribosome function.

    PubMed

    Ferreira-Cerca, Sébastien; Pöll, Gisela; Gleizes, Pierre-Emmanuel; Tschochner, Herbert; Milkereit, Philipp

    2005-10-28

    Despite the rising knowledge about ribosome function and structure and how ribosomal subunits assemble in vitro in bacteria, the in vivo role of many ribosomal proteins remains obscure both in pro- and eukaryotes. Our systematic analysis of yeast ribosomal proteins (r-proteins) of the small subunit revealed that most eukaryotic r-proteins fulfill different roles in ribosome biogenesis, making them indispensable for growth. Different r-proteins control distinct steps of nuclear and cytoplasmic pre-18S rRNA processing and, thus, ensure that only properly assembled ribosomes become engaged in translation. Comparative analysis of dynamic and steady-state maturation assays revealed that several r-proteins are required for efficient nuclear export of pre-18S rRNA, suggesting that they form an interaction platform with the export machinery. In contrast, the presence of other r-proteins is mainly required before nuclear export is initiated. Our studies draw a correlation between the in vitro assembly, structural localization, and in vivo function of r-proteins.

  2. A group I intron in the nuclear small subunit ribosomal DNA of Gaeumannomyces graminis.

    PubMed

    Fouly, H M; Wilkinson, H T

    2000-05-01

    The length of the small subunit ribosomal DNA (SSU rDNA) differs among isolates of species and varieties of Gaeumannomyces. The sequence of the 3' region of the SSU rDNA revealed 340-, 365-, and 520-bp insertions for G. graminis varieties avenae, tritici, and graminis, respectively. The intron sequences from varities tritici and avenae were similar, except there was an insert of 23 nucleotides at base 328 from the 5' end of the G. g. var. tritici intron. The G. g. var. graminis intron sequences had 92.4% homology compared with the intron sequences of varieties tritici and avenae. In addition, the intron sequence of variety graminis is larger, having an insert of 155 nucleotides at base 365 of the 5' end of the intron. Little variation in the DNA sequences flanking the introns has been detected among the isolates of Gaeumannomyces that either have or lack an intron. Reverse transcriptase PCR (RT-PCR) indicated the absence of the intron in the mature rRNA. The intron sequence had both a conserved sequence and secondary structural elements classifying it as a group I intron.

  3. Phylogenetic position of Gromia oviformis Dujardin inferred from nuclear-encoded small subunit ribosomal DNA.

    PubMed

    Burki, Fabien; Berney, Cédric; Pawlowski, Jan

    2002-09-01

    Gromia oviformis Dujardin is a common marine protist characterised by a large, globular test and filose pseudopodia. First considered a foraminifer, Gromia was later placed within the Filosea and recently included among amoebae of uncertain affinities. In order to clarify the phylogenetic position of this genus, we sequenced the complete small-subunit ribosomal DNA gene of G. oviformis collected at five different geographic localities. The high divergence of obtained sequences suggests that G. oviformis is a species complex composed of several genetically distinct sibling species. Sequence analyses show Gromia to be a member of the Cercozoa, a heterogeneous assemblage which includes filose amoebae, the amoeboflagellate cercomonads, the chlorarachniophytes and the plasmodiophorid plant pathogens. Contrary to traditional classification, Gromia is not closely related to other testate filose amoebae (the Euglyphida), but seems to branch early among the Cercozoa. Our analyses also show a close relationship between the Cercozoa and the Acantharea. Because the Cercozoa are related to the Foraminifera based on other molecular data, we propose that most protists possessing filopodia, reticulopodia and axopodia have a common origin.

  4. Small subunit ribosomal metabarcoding reveals extraordinary trypanosomatid diversity in Brazilian bats

    PubMed Central

    Dario, Maria Augusta; Moratelli, Ricardo; Schwabl, Philipp; Jansen, Ana Maria; Llewellyn, Martin S.

    2017-01-01

    Background Bats are a highly successful, globally dispersed order of mammals that occupy a wide array of ecological niches. They are also intensely parasitized and implicated in multiple viral, bacterial and parasitic zoonoses. Trypanosomes are thought to be especially abundant and diverse in bats. In this study, we used 18S ribosomal RNA metabarcoding to probe bat trypanosome diversity in unprecedented detail. Methodology/Principal Findings Total DNA was extracted from the blood of 90 bat individuals (17 species) captured along Atlantic Forest fragments of Espírito Santo state, southeast Brazil. 18S ribosomal RNA was amplified by standard and/or nested PCR, then deep sequenced to recover and identify Operational Taxonomic Units (OTUs) for phylogenetic analysis. Blood samples from 34 bat individuals (13 species) tested positive for infection by 18S rRNA amplification. Amplicon sequences clustered to 14 OTUs, of which five were identified as Trypanosoma cruzi I, T. cruzi III/V, Trypanosoma cruzi marinkellei, Trypanosoma rangeli, and Trypanosoma dionisii, and seven were identified as novel genotypes monophyletic to basal T. cruzi clade types of the New World. Another OTU was identified as a trypanosome like those found in reptiles. Surprisingly, the remaining OTU was identified as Bodo saltans–closest non-parasitic relative of the trypanosomatid order. While three blood samples featured just one OTU (T. dionisii), all others resolved as mixed infections of up to eight OTUs. Conclusions/Significance This study demonstrates the utility of next-generation barcoding methods to screen parasite diversity in mammalian reservoir hosts. We exposed high rates of local bat parasitism by multiple trypanosome species, some known to cause fatal human disease, others non-pathogenic, novel or yet little understood. Our results highlight bats as a long-standing nexus among host-parasite interactions of multiple niches, sustained in part by opportunistic and incidental infections

  5. The widely used small subunit 18S rDNA molecule greatly underestimates true diversity in biodiversity surveys of the meiofauna.

    PubMed

    Tang, Cuong Q; Leasi, Francesca; Obertegger, Ulrike; Kieneke, Alexander; Barraclough, Timothy G; Fontaneto, Diego

    2012-10-02

    Molecular tools have revolutionized the exploration of biodiversity, especially in organisms for which traditional taxonomy is difficult, such as for microscopic animals (meiofauna). Environmental (eDNA) metabarcode surveys of DNA extracted from sediment samples are increasingly popular for surveying biodiversity. Most eDNA surveys use the nuclear gene-encoding small-subunit rDNA gene (18S) as a marker; however, different markers and metrics used for delimiting species have not yet been evaluated against each other or against morphologically defined species (morphospecies). We assessed more than 12,000 meiofaunal sequences of 18S and of the main alternatively used marker [Cytochrome c oxidase subunit I (COI) mtDNA] belonging to 55 datasets covering three taxonomic ranks. Our results show that 18S reduced diversity estimates by a factor of 0.4 relative to morphospecies, whereas COI increased diversity estimates by a factor of 7.6. Moreover, estimates of species richness using COI were robust among three of four commonly used delimitation metrics, whereas estimates using 18S varied widely with the different metrics. We show that meiofaunal diversity has been greatly underestimated by 18S eDNA surveys and that the use of COI provides a better estimate of diversity. The suitability of COI is supported by cross-mating experiments in the literature and evolutionary analyses of discreteness in patterns of genetic variation. Furthermore its splitting of morphospecies is expected from documented levels of cryptic taxa in exemplar meiofauna. We recommend against using 18S as a marker for biodiversity surveys and suggest that use of COI for eDNA surveys could provide more accurate estimates of species richness in the future.

  6. Recognition of chimeric small-subunit ribosomal DNAs composed of genes from uncultivated microorganisms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kopczynski, E. D.; Bateson, M. M.; Ward, D. M.

    1994-01-01

    When PCR was used to recover small-subunit (SSU) rRNA genes from a hot spring cyanobacterial mat community, chimeric SSU rRNA sequences which exhibited little or no secondary structural abnormality were recovered. They were revealed as chimeras of SSU rRNA genes of uncultivated species through separate phylogenetic analysis of short sequence domains.

  7. Recognition of chimeric small-subunit ribosomal DNAs composed of genes from uncultivated microorganisms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kopczynski, E. D.; Bateson, M. M.; Ward, D. M.

    1994-01-01

    When PCR was used to recover small-subunit (SSU) rRNA genes from a hot spring cyanobacterial mat community, chimeric SSU rRNA sequences which exhibited little or no secondary structural abnormality were recovered. They were revealed as chimeras of SSU rRNA genes of uncultivated species through separate phylogenetic analysis of short sequence domains.

  8. Negamycin induces translational stalling and miscoding by binding to the small subunit head domain of the Escherichia coli ribosome.

    PubMed

    Olivier, Nelson B; Altman, Roger B; Noeske, Jonas; Basarab, Gregory S; Code, Erin; Ferguson, Andrew D; Gao, Ning; Huang, Jian; Juette, Manuel F; Livchak, Stephania; Miller, Matthew D; Prince, D Bryan; Cate, Jamie H D; Buurman, Ed T; Blanchard, Scott C

    2014-11-18

    Negamycin is a natural product with broad-spectrum antibacterial activity and efficacy in animal models of infection. Although its precise mechanism of action has yet to be delineated, negamycin inhibits cellular protein synthesis and causes cell death. Here, we show that single point mutations within 16S rRNA that confer resistance to negamycin are in close proximity of the tetracycline binding site within helix 34 of the small subunit head domain. As expected from its direct interaction with this region of the ribosome, negamycin was shown to displace tetracycline. However, in contrast to tetracycline-class antibiotics, which serve to prevent cognate tRNA from entering the translating ribosome, single-molecule fluorescence resonance energy transfer investigations revealed that negamycin specifically stabilizes near-cognate ternary complexes within the A site during the normally transient initial selection process to promote miscoding. The crystal structure of the 70S ribosome in complex with negamycin, determined at 3.1 Å resolution, sheds light on this finding by showing that negamycin occupies a site that partially overlaps that of tetracycline-class antibiotics. Collectively, these data suggest that the small subunit head domain contributes to the decoding mechanism and that small-molecule binding to this domain may either prevent or promote tRNA entry by altering the initial selection mechanism after codon recognition and before GTPase activation.

  9. Late-assembly of human ribosomal protein S20 in the cytoplasm is essential for the functioning of the small subunit ribosome

    SciTech Connect

    Tai, Lin-Ru; Chou, Chang-Wei; Wu, Jing-Ying; Kirby, Ralph; Lin, Alan

    2013-11-15

    Using immuno-fluorescent probing and Western blotting analysis, we reveal the exclusive cytoplasm nature of the small subunit ribosomal protein S20. To illustrate the importance of the cellular compartmentation of S20 to the function of small subunit 40S, we created a nuclear resident S20{sub NLS} mutant gene and examined polysome profile of cells that had been transfected with the S20{sub NLS} gene. As a result, we observed the formation of recombinant 40S carried S20{sub NLS} but this recombinant 40S was never found in the polysome, suggesting such a recombinant 40S was translation incompetent. Moreover, by the tactic of the energy depletion and restoration, we were able to restrain the nuclear-resided S20{sub NLS} in the cytoplasm. Yet, along a progressive energy restoration, we observed the presence of recombinant 40S subunits carrying the S20{sub NLS} in the polysome. This proves that S20 needs to be cytoplasmic in order to make a functional 40S subunit. Furthermore, it also implies that the assembly order of ribosomal protein in eukaryote is orderly regulated. - Highlights: • The step of S20 assembled on 40S is happened in the cytoplasm. • A small subunit assembled with a nuclear S20{sub NLS} is translational incompetence. • Using energy depletion and recovery to manipulate the cellular compartment of S20{sub NLS}. • Cytoplasm-retained S20{sub NLS} is crucial for creating a functional small subunit.

  10. Phylogenetic position of the genus Perkinsus (Protista, Apicomplexa) based on small subunit ribosomal RNA.

    PubMed

    Goggin, C L; Barker, S C

    1993-07-01

    Parasites of the genus Perkinsus destroy marine molluscs worldwide. Their phylogenetic position within the kingdom Protista is controversial. Nucleotide sequence data (1792 bp) from the small subunit rRNA gene of Perkinsus sp. from Anadara trapezia (Mollusca: Bivalvia) from Moreton Bay, Queensland, was used to examine the phylogenetic affinities of this enigmatic genus. These data were aligned with nucleotide sequences from 6 apicomplexans, 3 ciliates, 3 flagellates, a dinoflagellate, 3 fungi, maize and human. Phylogenetic trees were constructed after analysis with maximum parsimony and distance matrix methods. Our analyses indicate that Perkinsus is phylogenetically closer to dinoflagellates and to coccidean and piroplasm apicomplexans than to fungi or flagellates.

  11. Small subunit ribosomal DNA suggests that the xenophyophorean Syringammina corbicula is a foraminiferan.

    PubMed

    Pawlowski, Jan; Holzmann, Maria; Fahrni, Jose; Richardson, Susan L

    2003-01-01

    Xenophyophorea are giant deep-sea rhizopodial protists of enigmatic origins. Although species were described as Foraminifera or sponges in the early literature, the xenophyophoreans are currently classified either as a class of Rhizopoda or an independent phylum. To establish the phylogenetic position of Xenophyophorea, we analysed the small subunit (SSU) rRNA gene sequence of Syringammina corbicula Richardson, a newly described xenophyophorean species from the Cape Verde Plateau. The SSUrDNA analyses showed that S. corbicula is closely related to Rhizammina algaeformis, a tubular deep-sea foraminiferan. Both species branch within a group of monothalamous (single-chambered) Foraminifera, which include also such agglutinated genera as Toxisarcon, Rhabdammina, and Saccammina, and the organic-walled genera Gloiogullmia and Cylindrogullmia. Our results are congruent with observations of similar cytoplasmic organisation in Rhizammina and Syringammina. Thus, the Xenophyophorea appear to be a highly specialised group of deep-sea Foraminifera.

  12. Eukaryote-specific extensions in ribosomal proteins of the small subunit: Structure and function

    PubMed Central

    Ghosh, Arnab; Komar, Anton A

    2015-01-01

    High-resolution structures of yeast ribosomes have improved our understanding of the architecture and organization of eukaryotic rRNA and proteins, as well as eukaryote-specific extensions present in some conserved ribosomal proteins. Despite this progress, assignment of specific functions to individual proteins and/or eukaryote-specific protein extensions remains challenging. It has been suggested that eukaryote-specific extensions of conserved proteins from the small ribosomal subunit may facilitate eukaryote-specific reactions in the initiation phase of protein synthesis. This review summarizes emerging data describing the structural and functional significance of eukaryote-specific extensions of conserved small ribosomal subunit proteins, particularly their possible roles in recruitment and spatial organization of eukaryote-specific initiation factors. PMID:26779416

  13. The phylogenetic position of eriophyoid mites (superfamily Eriophyoidea) in Acariformes inferred from the sequences of mitochondrial genomes and nuclear small subunit (18S) rRNA gene.

    PubMed

    Xue, Xiao-Feng; Dong, Yan; Deng, Wei; Hong, Xiao-Yue; Shao, Renfu

    2017-04-01

    Eriophyoid mites (superfamily Eriophyoidea) comprise >4400 species worldwide. Despite over a century of study, the phylogenetic position of these mites within Acariformes is still poorly resolved. Currently, Eriophyoidea is placed in the order Trombidiformes. We inferred the high-level phylogeny of Acari with the mitochondrial (mt) genome sequences of 110 species including four eriophyoid species, and the nuclear small subunit (18S) rRNA gene sequences of 226 species including 25 eriophyoid species. Maximum likelihood (ML), Bayesian inference (BI) and Maximum parsimony (MP) methods were used to analyze the sequence data. Divergence times were estimated for major lineages of Acari using Bayesian approaches. Our analyses consistently recovered the monophyly of Eriophyoidea but rejected the monophyly of Trombidiformes. The eriophyoid mites were grouped with the sarcoptiform mites, or were the sister group of sarcoptiform mites+non-eriophyoid trombidiform mites, depending on data partition strategies. Eriophyoid mites diverged from other mites in the Devonian (384Mya, 95% HPD, 352-410Mya). The origin of eriophyoid mites was dated to the Permian (262Mya, 95% HPD 230-307Mya), mostly prior to the radiation of gymnosperms (Triassic-Jurassic) and angiosperms (early Cretaceous). We propose that the placement of Eriophyoidea in the order Trombidiformes under the current classification system should be reviewed.

  14. A preliminary phylogeny of the scale insects (Hemiptera: Sternorrhyncha: Coccoidea) based on nuclear small-subunit ribosomal DNA.

    PubMed

    Cook, Lyn G; Gullan, Penny J; Trueman, Holly E

    2002-10-01

    Scale insects (Hemiptera: Sternorrhyncha: Coccoidea) are a speciose and morphologically specialized group of plant-feeding bugs in which evolutionary relationships and thus higher classification are controversial. Sequences derived from nuclear small-subunit ribosomal DNA were used to generate a preliminary molecular phylogeny for the Coccoidea based on 39 species representing 14 putative families. Monophyly of the archaeococcoids (comprising Ortheziidae, Margarodidae sensu lato, and Phenacoleachia) was equivocal, whereas monophyly of the neococcoids was supported. Putoidae, represented by Puto yuccae, was found to be outside the remainder of the neococcoid clade. These data are consistent with a single origin (in the ancestor of the neococcoid clade) of a chromosome system involving paternal genome elimination in males. Pseudococcidae (mealybugs) appear to be sister to the rest of the neococcoids and there are indications that Coccidae (soft scales) and Kerriidae (lac scales) are sister taxa. The Eriococcidae (felt scales) was not recovered as a monophyletic group and the eriococcid genus Eriococcus sensu lato was polyphyletic.

  15. Molecular analysis of lungworms from European bison (Bison bonasus) on the basis of small subunit ribosomal RNA gene (SSU).

    PubMed

    Pyziel, Anna M

    2014-03-01

    Dictyocaulosis (Nematoda: Trichostrongyloidea) is a widespread parasitosis of the European bison (Bison bonasus) inhabiting Bialowieza Primeval Forest. Bearing in mind the current coexistence of bison with wild cervids, and with domestic ruminants in the 19th and 20th century, the need arose for molecular identification of lungworm species. Molecular analysis was done on adult lungworms that were obtained from the respiratory track of four free-roaming bison euthanized as a part of the population health control program. As the result of the study four identical small subunit-ribosomal RNA gene sequences from the lungworms were obtained and deposited in GenBank as sequence, 1708 bp long (GenBank KC771250). Comparative analysis of the SSU rRNA sequences revealed the European bison to be a host for the bovine lungworm Dictyocaulus viviparus.

  16. [Binding of human ribosomal protein S13 to the central domain of 18S rRNA].

    PubMed

    Ivanov, A V; Malygin, A A; Karpova, G G

    2011-01-01

    Human ribosomal protein S13 is a structural element of the small subunit of ribosome. It is a homologue of eubacterial ribosomal protein S15, and, besides, it possesses an extended N-terminal region, characteristic of the S15p family in eukaryotes and archaea. In the present study, we investigated binding of recombinant ribosomal protein S13 and its mutants containing deletions or substitutions of amino acid residues in different regions with an RNA transcript corresponding to a fragment of the central domain of 18S rRNA. We found that replacement of ultra-conservative residues H101 and D108 as well as deletions of either 29 C-terminal or 27 N-terminal residues substantially reduced affinity of the protein to the RNA transcript. Deletion of 54 C-terminal or 80 N-terminal residues completely deprived the protein of binding capacity. Using a footprinting assay, we identified sites in the RNA transcript changing their accessibilities to action of hydroxyl radicals under binding of either full-length protein S13 or its mutant lacking 27 N-terminal residues. It is shown that these sites are located mainly in helix H22 of the 18S rRNA and in the region of its junction with helix H20 and are consistent predominantly with contacts of the rRNA with the conserved part of the protein. We concluded that binding of ribosomal protein S13 to 18S rRNA is provided mainly by conserved motifs of the protein corresponding to those motifs in its eubacterial homologue that are involved in the interaction with 16S rRNA in the 30S subunit. Role of the N-terminal region of the protein in its binding to the central domain of 18S rRNA is discussed.

  17. 18S ribosomal RNA gene sequences of Cochliopodium (Himatismenida) and the phylogeny of Amoebozoa.

    PubMed

    Kudryavtsev, Alexander; Bernhard, Detlef; Schlegel, Martin; Chao, Ema E Y; Cavalier-Smith, Thomas

    2005-08-01

    Cochliopodium is a very distinctive genus of discoid amoebae covered by a dorsal tectum of carbohydrate microscales. Its phylogenetic position is unclear, since although sharing many features with naked "gymnamoebae", the tectum sets it apart. We sequenced 18S ribosomal RNA genes from three Cochliopodium species (minus, spiniferum and Cochliopodium sp., a new species resembling C. minutum). Phylogenetic analysis shows Cochliopodium as robustly holophyletic and within Amoebozoa, in full accord with morphological data. Cochliopodium is always one of the basal branches within Amoebozoa but its precise position is unstable. In Bayesian analysis it is sister to holophyletic Glycostylida, but distance trees mostly place it between Dermamoeba and a possibly artifactual long-branch cluster including Thecamoeba. These positions are poorly supported and basal amoebozoan branching ill-resolved, making it unclear whether Discosea (Glycostylida, Himatismenida, Dermamoebida) is holophyletic; however, Thecamoeba seems not specifically related to Dermamoeba. We also sequenced the small-subunit rRNA gene of Vannella persistens, which constantly grouped with other Vannella species, and two Hartmannella strains. Our trees suggest that Vexilliferidae, Variosea and Hartmannella are polyphyletic, confirming the existence of two very distinct Hartmannella clades: that comprising H. cantabrigiensis and another divergent species is sister to Glaeseria, whilst Hartmannella vermiformis branches more deeply.

  18. One step engineering of the small-subunit ribosomal RNA using CRISPR/Cas9.

    PubMed

    Kannan, Krishna; Tsvetanova, Billyana; Chuang, Ray-Yuan; Noskov, Vladimir N; Assad-Garcia, Nacyra; Ma, Li; Hutchison Iii, Clyde A; Smith, Hamilton O; Glass, John I; Merryman, Chuck; Venter, J Craig; Gibson, Daniel G

    2016-08-04

    Bacteria are indispensable for the study of fundamental molecular biology processes due to their relatively simple gene and genome architecture. The ability to engineer bacterial chromosomes is quintessential for understanding gene functions. Here we demonstrate the engineering of the small-ribosomal subunit (16S) RNA of Mycoplasma mycoides, by combining the CRISPR/Cas9 system and the yeast recombination machinery. We cloned the entire genome of M. mycoides in yeast and used constitutively expressed Cas9 together with in vitro transcribed guide-RNAs to introduce engineered 16S rRNA genes. By testing the function of the engineered 16S rRNA genes through genome transplantation, we observed surprising resilience of this gene to addition of genetic elements or helix substitutions with phylogenetically-distant bacteria. While this system could be further used to study the function of the 16S rRNA, one could envision the "simple" M. mycoides genome being used in this setting to study other genetic structures and functions to answer fundamental questions of life.

  19. One step engineering of the small-subunit ribosomal RNA using CRISPR/Cas9

    PubMed Central

    Kannan, Krishna; Tsvetanova, Billyana; Chuang, Ray-Yuan; Noskov, Vladimir N.; Assad-Garcia, Nacyra; Ma, Li; Hutchison III, Clyde A.; Smith, Hamilton O.; Glass, John I.; Merryman, Chuck; Venter, J. Craig; Gibson, Daniel G.

    2016-01-01

    Bacteria are indispensable for the study of fundamental molecular biology processes due to their relatively simple gene and genome architecture. The ability to engineer bacterial chromosomes is quintessential for understanding gene functions. Here we demonstrate the engineering of the small-ribosomal subunit (16S) RNA of Mycoplasma mycoides, by combining the CRISPR/Cas9 system and the yeast recombination machinery. We cloned the entire genome of M. mycoides in yeast and used constitutively expressed Cas9 together with in vitro transcribed guide-RNAs to introduce engineered 16S rRNA genes. By testing the function of the engineered 16S rRNA genes through genome transplantation, we observed surprising resilience of this gene to addition of genetic elements or helix substitutions with phylogenetically-distant bacteria. While this system could be further used to study the function of the 16S rRNA, one could envision the “simple” M. mycoides genome being used in this setting to study other genetic structures and functions to answer fundamental questions of life. PMID:27489041

  20. Combined large and small subunit ribosomal RNA phylogenies support a basal position of the acoelomorph flatworms.

    PubMed Central

    Telford, Maximilian J; Lockyer, Anne E; Cartwright-Finch, Chloë; Littlewood, D Timothy J

    2003-01-01

    The phylogenetic position of the phylum Platyhelminthes has been re-evaluated in the past decade by analysis of diverse molecular datasets. The consensus is that the Rhabditophora + Catenulida, which includes most of the flatworm taxa, are not primitively simple basal bilaterians but are related to coelomate phyla such as molluscs. The status of two other groups of acoelomate worms, Acoela and Nemertodermatida, is less clear. Although many characteristics unite these two groups, initial molecular phylogenetic studies placed the Nemertodermatida within the Rhabditophora, but placed the Acoela at the base of the Bilateria, distant from other flatworms. This contradiction resulted in scepticism about the basal position of acoels and led to calls for further data. We have sequenced large subunit ribosomal RNA genes from 13 rhabditophorans + catenulids, three acoels and one nemertodermatid, tripling the available data. Our analyses strongly support a basal position of both acoels and nemertodermatids. Alternative hypotheses are significantly less well supported by the data. We conclude that the Nemertodermatida and Acoela are basal bilaterians and, owing to their unique body plan and embryogenesis, should be recognized as a separate phylum, the Acoelomorpha. PMID:12803898

  1. Combined large and small subunit ribosomal RNA phylogenies support a basal position of the acoelomorph flatworms.

    PubMed

    Telford, Maximilian J; Lockyer, Anne E; Cartwright-Finch, Chloë; Littlewood, D Timothy J

    2003-05-22

    The phylogenetic position of the phylum Platyhelminthes has been re-evaluated in the past decade by analysis of diverse molecular datasets. The consensus is that the Rhabditophora + Catenulida, which includes most of the flatworm taxa, are not primitively simple basal bilaterians but are related to coelomate phyla such as molluscs. The status of two other groups of acoelomate worms, Acoela and Nemertodermatida, is less clear. Although many characteristics unite these two groups, initial molecular phylogenetic studies placed the Nemertodermatida within the Rhabditophora, but placed the Acoela at the base of the Bilateria, distant from other flatworms. This contradiction resulted in scepticism about the basal position of acoels and led to calls for further data. We have sequenced large subunit ribosomal RNA genes from 13 rhabditophorans + catenulids, three acoels and one nemertodermatid, tripling the available data. Our analyses strongly support a basal position of both acoels and nemertodermatids. Alternative hypotheses are significantly less well supported by the data. We conclude that the Nemertodermatida and Acoela are basal bilaterians and, owing to their unique body plan and embryogenesis, should be recognized as a separate phylum, the Acoelomorpha.

  2. Phylogenetics of Bonamia parasites based on small subunit and internal transcribed spacer region ribosomal DNA sequence data.

    PubMed

    Hill, Kristina M; Stokes, Nancy A; Webb, Stephen C; Hine, P Mike; Kroeck, Marina A; Moore, James D; Morley, Margaret S; Reece, Kimberly S; Burreson, Eugene M; Carnegie, Ryan B

    2014-07-24

    The genus Bonamia (Haplosporidia) includes economically significant oyster parasites. Described species were thought to have fairly circumscribed host and geographic ranges: B. ostreae infecting Ostrea edulis in Europe and North America, B. exitiosa infecting O. chilensis in New Zealand, and B. roughleyi infecting Saccostrea glomerata in Australia. The discovery of B. exitiosa-like parasites in new locations and the observation of a novel species, B. perspora, in non-commercial O. stentina altered this perception and prompted our wider evaluation of the global diversity of Bonamia parasites. Samples of 13 oyster species from 21 locations were screened for Bonamia spp. by PCR, and small subunit and internal transcribed spacer regions of Bonamia sp. ribosomal DNA were sequenced from PCR-positive individuals. Infections were confirmed histologically. Phylogenetic analyses using parsimony and Bayesian methods revealed one species, B. exitiosa, to be widely distributed, infecting 7 oyster species from Australia, New Zealand, Argentina, eastern and western USA, and Tunisia. More limited host and geographic distributions of B. ostreae and B. perspora were confirmed, but nothing genetically identifiable as B. roughleyi was found in Australia or elsewhere. Newly discovered diversity included a Bonamia sp. in Dendostrea sandvicensis from Hawaii, USA, that is basal to the other Bonamia species and a Bonamia sp. in O. edulis from Tomales Bay, California, USA, that is closely related to both B. exitiosa and the previously observed Bonamia sp. from O. chilensis in Chile.

  3. Secondary structure and molecular evolution of the mitochondrial small subunit ribosomal RNA in Agaricales (Euagarics clade, Homobasidiomycota).

    PubMed

    Barroso, Gérard; Sirand-Pugnet, Pascal; Mouhamadou, Bello; Labarère, Jacques

    2003-10-01

    The complete sequences and secondary structures of the mitochondrial small subunit (SSU) ribosomal RNAs of both mostly cultivated mushrooms Agaricus bisporus (1930 nt) and Lentinula edodes (2164 nt) were achieved. These secondary structures and that of Schizophyllum commune (1872 nt) were compared to that previously established for Agrocybe aegerita. The four structures are near the model established for Archae, Bacteria, plastids, and mitochondria; particularly the helices 23 and 37, described as specific to bacteria, are present. Within the four Agaricales (Homobasidiomycota), the SSU-rRNA "core" is conserved in size (966 to 1009 nt) with the exception of an unusual extension of 40 nt in the H17 helix of S. commune. The four core sequences possess 76% of conserved positions and a cluster of C in their 3' end, which could constitute a signal involved in the RNA maturation process. Among the nine putative variable domains, three (V3, V5, V7) do not show significant length variations and possess similar percentages of conserved positions (69%) than the core. The other six variable domains show important length variations, due to independent large size inserted/deleted sequences, and higher rates of nucleotide substitutions than the core (only 31% of conserved positions between the four species). Interestingly, the inserted/deleted sequences are located in few preferential sites (hot spots for insertion/deletion) where they seem to arise or disappear haphazardly during evolution. These sites are located on the surface of the tertiary structure of the 30S ribosomal subunit, at the beginning of hairpin loops; the insertions lead to a lengthening of existing hairpins or to branching loops bearing up to five additional helices.

  4. A definition of the domains Archaea, Bacteria and Eucarya in terms of small subunit ribosomal RNA characteristics

    SciTech Connect

    Winker, S.; Woese, C.R.

    1994-11-01

    The number of small subunit rRNA sequences is not great enough that the three domains Archaea, Bacteria, and Eucarya (Woese, et al., 1990) can be reliably defined in terms of their sequence ``signatures.`` Approximately 50 homologous positions (or nucleotide pairs) in the small subunit rRNA characterized and distinguish among the three. In addition, the three can be recognized by a variety of nonhomologous rRNA characters, either individual positions and/or higher-order structural features. The Crenarchaeota and the Euryarchaeota, the two archaeal kingdoms, can also be defined and distinguished by their characteristic composition at approximately fifteen positions in the small subunit rRNA molecule.

  5. A definition of the domains Archaea, Bacteria and Eucarya in terms of small subunit ribosomal RNA characteristics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Winker, S.; Woese, C. R.

    1991-01-01

    The number of small subunit rRNA sequences is now great enough that the three domains Archaea, Bacteria and Eucarya (Woese et al., 1990) can be reliably defined in terms of their sequence "signatures". Approximately 50 homologous positions (or nucleotide pairs) in the small subunit rRNA characterize and distinguish among the three. In addition, the three can be recognized by a variety of nonhomologous rRNA characters, either individual positions and/or higher-order structural features. The Crenarchaeota and the Euryarchaeota, the two archaeal kingdoms, can also be defined and distinguished by their characteristic compositions at approximately fifteen positions in the small subunit rRNA molecule.

  6. A definition of the domains Archaea, Bacteria and Eucarya in terms of small subunit ribosomal RNA characteristics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Winker, S.; Woese, C. R.

    1991-01-01

    The number of small subunit rRNA sequences is now great enough that the three domains Archaea, Bacteria and Eucarya (Woese et al., 1990) can be reliably defined in terms of their sequence "signatures". Approximately 50 homologous positions (or nucleotide pairs) in the small subunit rRNA characterize and distinguish among the three. In addition, the three can be recognized by a variety of nonhomologous rRNA characters, either individual positions and/or higher-order structural features. The Crenarchaeota and the Euryarchaeota, the two archaeal kingdoms, can also be defined and distinguished by their characteristic compositions at approximately fifteen positions in the small subunit rRNA molecule.

  7. A definition of the domains Archaea, Bacteria and Eucarya in terms of small subunit ribosomal RNA characteristics.

    PubMed

    Winker, S; Woese, C R

    1991-01-01

    The number of small subunit rRNA sequences is now great enough that the three domains Archaea, Bacteria and Eucarya (Woese et al., 1990) can be reliably defined in terms of their sequence "signatures". Approximately 50 homologous positions (or nucleotide pairs) in the small subunit rRNA characterize and distinguish among the three. In addition, the three can be recognized by a variety of nonhomologous rRNA characters, either individual positions and/or higher-order structural features. The Crenarchaeota and the Euryarchaeota, the two archaeal kingdoms, can also be defined and distinguished by their characteristic compositions at approximately fifteen positions in the small subunit rRNA molecule.

  8. Isolation and 18S ribosomal DNA gene sequences of Marteilioides chungmuensis (Paramyxea), an ovarian parasite of the Pacific oyster Crassostrea gigas.

    PubMed

    Itoh, Naoki; Oda, Tadashi; Yoshinaga, Tomoyoshi; Ogawa, Kazuo

    2003-03-31

    To develop sensitive detection techniques with the aim of elucidating the life cycle of Marteilioides chungmuensis, an intracellular paramyxean infecting the ovary of the Pacific oyster Crassostrea gigas, we isolated the parasite at the sporont stage from infected oysters using a freeze-thaw procedure at -20 degrees C and differential centrifugations in discontinuous sucrose and Percoll gradients. DNA was extracted from the isolated sporonts, and a PCR amplicon of 18S small subunit ribosomal RNA gene DNA was partially sequenced. In situ hybridization using 3 parasite-specific probes designed from the obtained sequence successfully detected parasite cells in infected oysters, and confirmed that the sequenced DNA was derived from M. chungmuensis.

  9. Molecular systematics of several cyclophyllid families (Cestoda) based on the analysis of 18S ribosomal DNA gene sequences.

    PubMed

    Foronda, P; Casanova, J C; Valladares, B; Martinez, E; Feliu, C

    2004-07-01

    The sequences of the 18S small subunit ribosomal DNA of five species of cyclophyllidean cestodes from the families Davaineidae, Anoplocephalidae and Dilepididae were determined. A species of tetrabothridid was also sequenced. These 18S sequences were combined with other available eucestode sequences in GenBank. From the 1,838 sites in the alignment, 375 bp (20%) were excluded from the analysis due to alignment issues inferred by manual inspection. Phylogenetic trees were obtained by maximum parsimony, neighbour-joining distance and maximum likelihood methods. Analyses showed that Cyclophyllidea is monophyletic and separate from Tetrabothrius spp. Lyruterina nigropunctata, which is now included in the family Paruterinidae, is more closely related to davaineids of the genus Raillietina than Pseudidiogenes nana (Davaineidae). P. nana and Choanotaenia infundibulum (Dilepididae) derive from the Davaineidae (or Raillietininae). The two species of Taenia (T. parva and T. pisiformis) formed a monophyletic sister group to the Davaineidae and Anoplocephalidae. The systematics of the Paruterinidae have been problematic and our results suggest a review of this family including other species with paruterine organ located in other families. The position of the Idiogeninae as a subfamily in the Davaineidae is also reviewed. Copyright 2004 Springer-Verlag

  10. Natural-abundance stable carbon isotopes of small-subunit ribosomal RNA (SSU rRNA) from Guaymas Basin (Mexico)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    MacGregor, B. J.; Mendlovitz, H.; Albert, D.; Teske, A. P.

    2012-12-01

    Small-subunit ribosomal RNA (SSU rRNA) is a phylogenetically informative molecule found in all species. Because it is poorly preserved in most environments, it is a useful marker for active microbial populations. We are using the natural-abundance stable carbon isotopic composition of specific microbial groups to help identify the carbon substrates contributing to microbial biomass in a variety of marine environments. At Guaymas Basin, hydrothermal fluids interact with abundant sedimentary organic carbon to produce natural gas and petroleum. Where this reaches the sediment surface, it can support dense patches of seafloor life, including Beggiatoa mats. We report here on the stable carbon isotopic composition of SSU rRNA from a Beggiatoa mat transect, a cold background site, a warm site with high oil concentration, and a second Beggiatoa mat. The central part of the transect mat overlay the steepest temperature gradient, and was visually dominated by orange Beggiatoa. This was fringed by white Beggiatoa mat and bare, but still warm, sediment. Methane concentrations were saturating beneath the orange and white mats and at the oily site, lower beneath bare sediment, and below detection at the background site. Our initial hypotheses were that rRNA isotopic composition would be strongly influenced by methane supply, and that archaeal rRNA might be lighter than bacterial due to contributions from methanogens and anaerobic methane oxidizers. We used biotin-labeled oligonucleotides to capture Bacterial and Archaeal SSU rRNA for isotopic determination. Background-site rRNA was isotopically heaviest, and bacterial RNA from below 2 cm at the oily site was lightest, consistent with control by methane. Within the transect mat, however, the pattern was more complicated; at some sediment depths, rRNA from the mat periphery was isotopically lightest. Part of this may be due to the spatially and temporally variable paths followed by hydrothermal fluid, which can include horizontal

  11. Posttranscriptional down-regulation of small ribosomal subunit proteins correlates with reduction of 18S rRNA in RPS19 deficiency.

    PubMed

    Badhai, Jitendra; Fröjmark, Anne-Sophie; Razzaghian, Hamid Reza; Davey, Edward; Schuster, Jens; Dahl, Niklas

    2009-06-18

    Ribosomal protein S19 (RPS19) is mutated in patients with Diamond-Blackfan anemia (DBA). We hypothesized that decreased levels of RPS19 lead to a coordinated down-regulation of other ribosomal (r-)proteins at the subunit level. We show that small interfering RNA (siRNA) knock-down of RPS19 results in a relative decrease of small subunit (SSU) r-proteins (S20, S21 and S24) when compared to large subunit (LSU) r-proteins (L3, L9, L30 and L38). This correlates with a relative decrease in 18S rRNA with respect to 28S rRNA. The r-protein mRNA levels remain relatively unchanged indicating a post transcriptional regulation of r-proteins at the level of subunit formation.

  12. The Putative GTPase Encoded by MTG3 Functions in a Novel Pathway for Regulating Assembly of the Small Subunit of Yeast Mitochondrial Ribosomes*

    PubMed Central

    Paul, Marie-Françoise; Alushin, Gregory M.; Barros, Mario H.; Rak, Malgorzata; Tzagoloff, Alexander

    2012-01-01

    Very little is known about biogenesis of mitochondrial ribosomes. The GTPases encoded by the nuclear MTG1 and MTG2 genes of Saccharomyces cerevisiae have been reported to play a role in assembly of the ribosomal 54 S subunit. In the present study biochemical screens of a collection of respiratory deficient yeast mutants have enabled us to identify a third gene essential for expression of mitochondrial ribosomes. This gene codes for a member of the YqeH family of GTPases, which we have named MTG3 in keeping with the earlier convention. Mutations in MTG3 cause the accumulation of the 15 S rRNA precursor, previously shown to have an 80-nucleotide 5′ extension. Sucrose gradient sedimentation of mitochondrial ribosomes from temperature-sensitive mtg3 mutants grown at the permissive and restrictive temperatures, combined with immunobloting with subunit-specific antibodies, indicate that Mtg3p is required for assembly of the 30 S but not 54 S ribosomal subunit. The respiratory deficient growth phenotype of an mtg3 null mutant is partially rescued by overexpression of the Mrpl4p constituent located at the peptide exit site of the 54 S subunit. The rescue is accompanied by an increase in processed 15 S rRNA. This suggests that Mtg3p and Mrpl4p jointly regulate assembly of the small subunit by modulating processing of the 15 S rRNA precursor. PMID:22621929

  13. The putative GTPase encoded by MTG3 functions in a novel pathway for regulating assembly of the small subunit of yeast mitochondrial ribosomes.

    PubMed

    Paul, Marie-Françoise; Alushin, Gregory M; Barros, Mario H; Rak, Malgorzata; Tzagoloff, Alexander

    2012-07-13

    Very little is known about biogenesis of mitochondrial ribosomes. The GTPases encoded by the nuclear MTG1 and MTG2 genes of Saccharomyces cerevisiae have been reported to play a role in assembly of the ribosomal 54 S subunit. In the present study biochemical screens of a collection of respiratory deficient yeast mutants have enabled us to identify a third gene essential for expression of mitochondrial ribosomes. This gene codes for a member of the YqeH family of GTPases, which we have named MTG3 in keeping with the earlier convention. Mutations in MTG3 cause the accumulation of the 15 S rRNA precursor, previously shown to have an 80-nucleotide 5' extension. Sucrose gradient sedimentation of mitochondrial ribosomes from temperature-sensitive mtg3 mutants grown at the permissive and restrictive temperatures, combined with immunobloting with subunit-specific antibodies, indicate that Mtg3p is required for assembly of the 30 S but not 54 S ribosomal subunit. The respiratory deficient growth phenotype of an mtg3 null mutant is partially rescued by overexpression of the Mrpl4p constituent located at the peptide exit site of the 54 S subunit. The rescue is accompanied by an increase in processed 15 S rRNA. This suggests that Mtg3p and Mrpl4p jointly regulate assembly of the small subunit by modulating processing of the 15 S rRNA precursor.

  14. Alteration of a novel dispensable mitochondrial ribosomal small-subunit protein, Rsm28p, allows translation of defective COX2 mRNAs.

    PubMed

    Williams, Elizabeth H; Bsat, Nada; Bonnefoy, Nathalie; Butler, Christine A; Fox, Thomas D

    2005-02-01

    Mutations affecting the RNA sequence of the first 10 codons of the Saccharomyces cerevisiae mitochondrial gene COX2 strongly reduce translation of the mRNA, which encodes the precursor of cytochrome c oxidase subunit II. A dominant chromosomal mutation that suppresses these defects is an internal in-frame deletion of 67 codons from the gene YDR494w. Wild-type YDR494w encodes a 361-residue polypeptide with no similarity to proteins of known function. The epitope-tagged product of this gene, now named RSM28, is both peripherally associated with the inner surface of the inner mitochondrial membrane and soluble in the matrix. Epitope-tagged Rsm28p from Triton X-100-solubilized mitochondria sedimented with the small subunit of mitochondrial ribosomes in a sucrose gradient containing 500 mM NH4Cl. Complete deletion of RSM28 caused only a modest decrease in growth on nonfermentable carbon sources in otherwise wild-type strains and enhanced the respiratory defect of the suppressible cox2 mutations. The rsm28 null mutation also reduced translation of an ARG8m reporter sequence inserted at the COX1, COX2, and COX3 mitochondrial loci. We tested the ability of RSM28-1 to suppress a variety of cox2 and cox3 mutations and found that initiation codon mutations in both genes were suppressed. We conclude that Rsm28p is a dispensable small-subunit mitochondrial ribosomal protein previously undetected in systematic investigations of these ribosomes, with a positive role in translation of several mitochondrial mRNAs.

  15. The use of large and small subunits of ribosomal DNA in evaluating phylogenetic relationships between species of Cornudiscoides Kulkarni, 1969 (Monogenoidea: Dactylogyridae) from India.

    PubMed

    Verma, J; Agrawal, N; Verma, A K

    2017-03-01

    Two partial regions of ribosomal DNA (28S and 18S) were used to evaluate genetic variations among the species of Cornudiscoides, viz. C. proximus, C. geminus and C. agarwali, all parasites of Mystus vittatus (Bagridae) from River Gomati, Ganges River basin, India. Our findings demonstrated that both the large and small ribosomal subunits are useful for species identification and genetic characterization of parasites, leading to resolution of inter/intra-relationships at generic and specific levels. The secondary structures of all three species for 28S and 18S rRNA genes contained exact pattern matches (EMPs) displaying the high degree of similarity among them. The phylogenetic analyses within the members of Dactylogyridae demonstrated that species of Cornudiscoides cluster together for 28S rRNA and 18S rRNA genes.

  16. Using the small subunit of nuclear ribosomal DNA to reveal the phylogenetic position of the plerocercoid larvae of Spirometra tapeworms.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xi; Duan, Jiang Yang; Wang, Zhong Quan; Jiang, Peng; Liu, Ruo Dan; Cui, Jing

    2017-04-01

    Although medically important, the systematics of Spirometra and the taxonomic position of S. erinaceieuropaei remain unclear. In this study, the 18S rDNA gene of S. erinaceieuropaei sparganum from naturally infected frogs caught in 14 geographical locations of China was sequenced. In addition, all available 18S sequences of the family Diphyllobothriidae in the Genbank database were included to reconstruct the phylogeny of diphyllobothriid tapeworms. The secondary structure model of the 18S rDNA was also predicated to further explore the sequence variation. Phylogenetic analyses were performed using maximum parsimony (MP), maximum likelihood (ML) and Bayesian inference (BI) methods. The intraspecific divergences of 18S rDNA in Chinese sparganum isolates ranged from 0.0 to 0.4%. Regions of V2, V4 and V7 were the most variable regions in the secondary structure of 18S rDNA. With the exception of genera Duthiersia and Probothriocephalus, other genera (i.e., Adenocephalus, Diphyllobothrium, Diplogonoporus, Duthiersia, Schistocephalus and Spirometra) selected in the Diphyllobothriidae shared similar topologies of V2, V4 and V7 structures. The topology of generated phylogenetic trees revealed close relationships among Adenocephalus, Digramma, Diphyllobothrium, Diplogonoporus, Ligula, Sparganum and Spirometra. The exact phylogenetic position of Spirometra species should be further analyzed with more sampling and more useful molecular markers.

  17. Discrimination between Gyrodactylus salaris, G. derjavini and G. truttae (Platyhelminthes: Monogenea) using restriction fragment length polymorphisms and an oligonucleotide probe within the small subunit ribosomal RNA gene.

    PubMed

    Cunningham, C O; McGillivray, D M; MacKenzie, K; Melvin, W T

    1995-07-01

    The small subunit ribosomal RNA (srRNA) gene was amplified from Gyrodactylus salaris using the polymerase chain reaction (PCR), cloned, and the complete gene sequence of 1966 bp determined. The V4 region of the srRNA gene was identified and amplified from single specimens of G. salaris, G. derjavini and G. truttae. Comparison of the V4 sequences from these three species revealed sequence differences from which restriction fragment length polymorphisms (RFLPs) were predicted and an oligonucleotide probe (GsV4) specific to G. salaris designed. Digestion of the amplified V4 region of the srRNA gene with Hae III and either Alw I, BstY I, Dde I or Mbo I provided a means of discriminating between G. salaris, G. derjavini and G. truttae. The GsV4 probe was used to detect the srRNA gene from G. salaris in Southern and dot blots of the amplified V4 region.

  18. Cryptosporidium is more closely related to the gregarines than to coccidia as shown by phylogenetic analysis of apicomplexan parasites inferred using small-subunit ribosomal RNA gene sequences.

    PubMed

    Carreno, R A; Martin, D S; Barta, J R

    1999-11-01

    The phylogenetic placement of gregarine parasites (Apicomplexa: Gregarinasina) within the Apicomplexa was derived by comparison of small-subunit ribosomal RNA gene sequences. Gregarine sequences were obtained from Gregarina niphandrodes Clopton, Percival, and Janovy, 1991, and Monocystis agilis Stein, 1848 (Eugregarinorida Léger 1900), as well as from Ophriocystis elektroscirrha McLaughlin and Myers, 1970 (Neogregarinorida Grassé 1953). The sequences were aligned with several other gregarine and apicomplexan sequences from GenBank and the resulting data matrix analyzed by parsimony and maximum-likelihood methods. The gregarines form a monophyletic clade that is a sister group to Cryptosporidium spp. The gregarine/ Cryptosporidium clade is separate from the other major apicomplexan clade containing the coccidia, adeleids, piroplasms, and haemosporinids. The trees indicate that the genus Cryptosporidium has a closer phylogenetic affinity with the gregarines than with the coccidia. These results do not support the present classification of the Cryptosporidiidae in the suborder Eimerioirina Léger, 1911.

  19. Ribosomal 18S rRNA base pairs with mRNA during eukaryotic translation initiation

    PubMed Central

    Martin, Franck; Ménétret, Jean-François; Simonetti, Angelita; Myasnikov, Alexander G.; Vicens, Quentin; Prongidi-Fix, Lydia; Natchiar, S. Kundhavai; Klaholz, Bruno P.; Eriani, Gilbert

    2016-01-01

    Eukaryotic mRNAs often contain a Kozak sequence that helps tether the ribosome to the AUG start codon. The mRNA of histone H4 (h4) does not undergo classical ribosome scanning but has evolved a specific tethering mechanism. The cryo-EM structure of the rabbit ribosome complex with mouse h4 shows that the mRNA forms a folded, repressive structure at the mRNA entry site on the 40S subunit next to the tip of helix 16 of 18S ribosomal RNA (rRNA). Toe-printing and mutational assays reveal that an interaction exists between a purine-rich sequence in h4 mRNA and a complementary UUUC sequence of helix h16. Together the present data establish that the h4 mRNA harbours a sequence complementary to an 18S rRNA sequence which tethers the mRNA to the ribosome to promote proper start codon positioning, complementing the interactions of the 40S subunit with the Kozak sequence that flanks the AUG start codon. PMID:27554013

  20. 18S Ribosomal RNA Evaluation as Preanalytical Quality Control for Animal DNA

    PubMed Central

    Meli, Marina L.; Novacco, Marilisa; Borel, Nicole

    2016-01-01

    The 18S ribosomal RNA (rRNA) gene is present in all eukaryotic cells. In this study, we evaluated the use of this gene to verify the presence of PCR-amplifiable host (animal) DNA as an indicator of sufficient sample quality for quantitative real-time PCR (qPCR) analysis. We compared (i) samples from various animal species, tissues, and sample types, including swabs; (ii) multiple DNA extraction methods; and (iii) both fresh and formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded (FFPE) samples. Results showed that 18S ribosomal RNA gene amplification was possible from all tissue samples evaluated, including avian, reptile, and FFPE samples and most swab samples. A single swine rectal swab, which showed sufficient DNA quantity and the demonstrated lack of PCR inhibitors, nonetheless was negative by 18S qPCR. Such a sample specifically illustrates the improvement of determination of sample integrity afforded by inclusion of 18S rRNA gene qPCR analysis in addition to spectrophotometric analysis and the use of internal controls for PCR inhibition. Other possible applications for the described 18S rRNA qPCR are preselection of optimal tissue specimens for studies or preliminary screening of archived samples prior to acceptance for biobanking projects. PMID:27672657

  1. Structural and functional studies of Bud23-Trm112 reveal 18S rRNA N7-G1575 methylation occurs on late 40S precursor ribosomes.

    PubMed

    Létoquart, Juliette; Huvelle, Emmeline; Wacheul, Ludivine; Bourgeois, Gabrielle; Zorbas, Christiane; Graille, Marc; Heurgué-Hamard, Valérie; Lafontaine, Denis L J

    2014-12-23

    The eukaryotic small ribosomal subunit carries only four ribosomal (r) RNA methylated bases, all close to important functional sites. N(7)-methylguanosine (m(7)G) introduced at position 1575 on 18S rRNA by Bud23-Trm112 is at a ridge forming a steric block between P- and E-site tRNAs. Here we report atomic resolution structures of Bud23-Trm112 in the apo and S-adenosyl-L-methionine (SAM)-bound forms. Bud23 and Trm112 interact through formation of a β-zipper involving main-chain atoms, burying an important hydrophobic surface and stabilizing the complex. The structures revealed that the coactivator Trm112 undergoes an induced fit to accommodate its methyltransferase (MTase) partner. We report important structural similarity between the active sites of Bud23 and Coffea canephora xanthosine MTase, leading us to propose and validate experimentally a model for G1575 coordination. We identify Bud23 residues important for Bud23-Trm112 complex formation and recruitment to pre-ribosomes. We report that though Bud23-Trm112 binds precursor ribosomes at an early nucleolar stage, m(7)G methylation occurs at a late step of small subunit biogenesis, implying specifically delayed catalytic activation. Finally, we show that Bud23-Trm112 interacts directly with the box C/D snoRNA U3-associated DEAH RNA helicase Dhr1 supposedly involved in central pseudoknot formation; this suggests that Bud23-Trm112 might also contribute to controlling formation of this irreversible and dramatic structural reorganization essential to overall folding of small subunit rRNA. Our study contributes important new elements to our understanding of key molecular aspects of human ribosomopathy syndromes associated with WBSCR22 (human Bud23) malfunction.

  2. The discovery of the two types of small subunit ribosomal RNA gene in Eimeria mitis contests the existence of E. mivati as an independent species.

    PubMed

    Vrba, Vladimir; Poplstein, Martin; Pakandl, Michal

    2011-12-29

    Although the validity of the coccidian species, Eimeria mivati, has been questioned by many researchers for a long time there has not been any molecular analysis that would help resolve this issue. Here we report on the discovery of the two types of small ribosomal subunit (18S) gene within the Eimeria mitis genome that correspond to the known 18S sequences of E. mitis and E. mivati, and this is in conflict with the existence of E. mivati as an independent species. We have carried out five single oocyst isolations to obtain five single-oocyst-derived strains of E. mitis and these were analyzed by the sequencing of 18S and mitochondrial cytochrome c oxidase subunit I genes. The two types of 18S gene were found to be present in each strain in roughly equal ratios. This indicates that if the strains carrying only one or the other 18S type exist, they will likely cross-breed and still represent a single species. However, the more probable explanation is that all strains of E. mitis contain two types of 18S gene and that the occasional detection of only one or the other type by sequencing might be caused by insufficient sampling. This is also the first report of the two types of 18S gene in Eimeria, which has already been described in some other apicomplexan species, most notably Plasmodium. We also found that these two types of ribosomal RNA differ significantly in their secondary structure. The biological significance of the two 18S gene variants in E. mitis is not known, however, we hypothesize that these variants might be used in different stages of the parasite's life-cycle as it is in other apicomplexan species investigated so far.

  3. PCR Primers for Metazoan Nuclear 18S and 28S Ribosomal DNA Sequences

    PubMed Central

    Machida, Ryuji J.; Knowlton, Nancy

    2012-01-01

    Background Metagenetic analyses, which amplify and sequence target marker DNA regions from environmental samples, are increasingly employed to assess the biodiversity of communities of small organisms. Using this approach, our understanding of microbial diversity has expanded greatly. In contrast, only a few studies using this approach to characterize metazoan diversity have been reported, despite the fact that many metazoan species are small and difficult to identify or are undescribed. One of the reasons for this discrepancy is the availability of universal primers for the target taxa. In microbial studies, analysis of the 16S ribosomal DNA is standard. In contrast, the best gene for metazoan metagenetics is less clear. In the present study, we have designed primers that amplify the nuclear 18S and 28S ribosomal DNA sequences of most metazoan species with the goal of providing effective approaches for metagenetic analyses of metazoan diversity in environmental samples, with a particular emphasis on marine biodiversity. Methodology/Principal Findings Conserved regions suitable for designing PCR primers were identified using 14,503 and 1,072 metazoan sequences of the nuclear 18S and 28S rDNA regions, respectively. The sequence similarity of both these newly designed and the previously reported primers to the target regions of these primers were compared for each phylum to determine the expected amplification efficacy. The nucleotide diversity of the flanking regions of the primers was also estimated for genera or higher taxonomic groups of 11 phyla to determine the variable regions within the genes. Conclusions/Significance The identified nuclear ribosomal DNA primers (five primer pairs for 18S and eleven for 28S) and the results of the nucleotide diversity analyses provide options for primer combinations for metazoan metagenetic analyses. Additionally, advantages and disadvantages of not only the 18S and 28S ribosomal DNA, but also other marker regions as targets

  4. Lack of WDR36 leads to preimplantation embryonic lethality in mice and delays the formation of small subunit ribosomal RNA in human cells in vitro.

    PubMed

    Gallenberger, Martin; Meinel, Dominik M; Kroeber, Markus; Wegner, Michael; Milkereit, Philipp; Bösl, Michael R; Tamm, Ernst R

    2011-02-01

    Mutations in WD repeat domain 36 gene (WDR36) play a causative role in some forms of primary open-angle glaucoma, a leading cause of blindness worldwide. WDR36 is characterized by the presence of multiple WD40 repeats and shows homology to Utp21, an essential protein component of the yeast small subunit (SSU) processome required for maturation of 18S rRNA. To clarify the functional role of WDR36 in the mammalian organism, we generated and investigated mutant mice with a targeted deletion of Wdr36. In parallel experiments, we used RNA interference to deplete WDR36 mRNA in mouse embryos and cultured human trabecular meshwork (HTM-N) cells. Deletion of Wdr36 in the mouse caused preimplantation embryonic lethality, and essentially similar effects were observed when WDR36 mRNA was depleted in mouse embryos by RNA interference. Depletion of WDR36 mRNA in HTM-N cells caused apoptotic cell death and upregulation of mRNA for BAX, TP53 and CDKN1A. By immunocytochemistry, staining for WDR36 was observed in the nucleolus of cells, which co-localized with that of nucleolar proteins such as nucleophosmin and PWP2. In addition, recombinant and epitope-tagged WDR36 localized to the nucleolus of HTM-N cells. By northern blot analysis, a substantial decrease in 21S rRNA, the precursor of 18S rRNA, was observed following knockdown of WDR36. In addition, metabolic-labeling experiments consistently showed a delay of 18S rRNA maturation in WDR36-depleted cells. Our results provide evidence that WDR36 is an essential protein in mammalian cells which is involved in the nucleolar processing of SSU 18S rRNA.

  5. Phylogenetic Analysis of Myobia musculi (Schranck, 1781) by Using the 18S Small Ribosomal Subunit Sequence

    PubMed Central

    Feldman, Sanford H; Ntenda, Abraham M

    2011-01-01

    We used high-fidelity PCR to amplify 2 overlapping regions of the ribosomal gene complex from the rodent fur mite Myobia musculi. The amplicons encompassed a large portion of the mite's ribosomal gene complex spanning 3128 nucleotides containing the entire 18S rRNA, internal transcribed spacer (ITS) 1, 5.8S rRNA, ITS2, and a portion of the 5′-end of the 28S rRNA. M. musculi’s 179-nucleotide 5.8S rRNA nucleotide sequence was not conserved, so this region was identified by conservation of rRNA secondary structure. Maximum likelihood and Bayesian inference phylogenetic analyses were performed by using multiple sequence alignment consisting of 1524 nucleotides of M. musculi 18S rRNA and homologous sequences from 42 prostigmatid mites and the tick Dermacentor andersoni. The phylograms produced by both methods were in agreement regarding terminal, secondary, and some tertiary phylogenetic relationships among mites. Bayesian inference discriminated most infraordinal relationships between Eleutherengona and Parasitengona mites in the suborder Anystina. Basal relationships between suborders Anystina and Eupodina historically determined by comparing differences in anatomic characteristics were less well-supported by our molecular analysis. Our results recapitulated similar 18S rRNA sequence analyses recently reported. Our study supports M. musculi as belonging to the suborder Anystina, infraorder Eleutherenona, and superfamily Cheyletoidea. PMID:22330574

  6. Phylogenetic analysis of Myobia musculi (Schranck, 1781) by using the 18S small ribosomal subunit sequence.

    PubMed

    Feldman, Sanford H; Ntenda, Abraham M

    2011-12-01

    We used high-fidelity PCR to amplify 2 overlapping regions of the ribosomal gene complex from the rodent fur mite Myobia musculi. The amplicons encompassed a large portion of the mite's ribosomal gene complex spanning 3128 nucleotides containing the entire 18S rRNA, internal transcribed spacer (ITS) 1,5.8S rRNA, ITS2, and a portion of the 5'-end of the 28S rRNA. M. musculi's 179-nucleotide 5.8S rRNA nucleotide sequence was not conserved, so this region was identified by conservation of rRNA secondary structure. Maximum likelihood and Bayesian inference phylogenetic analyses were performed by using multiple sequence alignment consisting of 1524 nucleotides of M. musculi 18S rRNA and homologous sequences from 42 prostigmatid mites and the tick Dermacentor andersoni. The phylograms produced by both methods were in agreement regarding terminal, secondary, and some tertiary phylogenetic relationships among mites. Bayesian inference discriminated most infraordinal relationships between Eleutherengona and Parasitengona mites in the suborder Anystina. Basal relationships between suborders Anystina and Eupodina historically determined by comparing differences in anatomic characteristics were less well-supported by our molecular analysis. Our results recapitulated similar 18S rRNA sequence analyses recently reported. Our study supports M. musculi as belonging to the suborder Anystina, infraorder Eleutherenona, and superfamily Cheyletoidea.

  7. Detection of Histomonas meleagridis in turkeys cecal droppings by PCR amplification of the small subunit ribosomal DNA sequence.

    PubMed

    Huber, Karine; Chauve, C; Zenner, L

    2005-08-10

    Histomonas meleagridis is a protozoan parasite that may cause histomoniasis, a disease of gallinaceous fowl characterized by necrotic typhlitis, hepatitis and high mortality. Diagnosis of this disease is based on direct identification or on cultivation of the parasite. With the aim of developing more sensitive, rapid and useful tools for parasite detection, PCR that amplified a DNA target of 209 pb of the 18S rRNA gene was designed to detect the genome of H. meleagridis and to differentiate it from the genome of Tetratrichomonas gallinarum, another common protozoan parasite of fowl. The sensitivity of the test was evaluated using serial diluted samples of cultured H. meleagridis and showed positive amplification for concentrations comprised between 10 and 10(-1)parasites/ml of culture. The sensitivity for cecal droppings samples was assessed using spiked material and was comprised between 3 x 10(3) and 3 x 10(5)parasites/ml of stool. The reliability of the PCR for the detection of Histomonas infection was also evaluated by experimental infection of turkeys. Results of the PCR appeared to be in agreement with the development of the clinical signs and of the cecal lesions. The PCR developed in this study may be a useful tool in the detection and identification of H. meleagridis for rapid, routine screening as a supplement to direct identification or cultivation of the parasite.

  8. Multiple RNA interactions position Mrd1 at the site of the small subunit pseudoknot within the 90S pre-ribosome.

    PubMed

    Segerstolpe, Åsa; Granneman, Sander; Björk, Petra; de Lima Alves, Flavia; Rappsilber, Juri; Andersson, Charlotta; Högbom, Martin; Tollervey, David; Wieslander, Lars

    2013-01-01

    Ribosomal subunit biogenesis in eukaryotes is a complex multistep process. Mrd1 is an essential and conserved small (40S) ribosomal subunit synthesis factor that is required for early cleavages in the 35S pre-ribosomal RNA (rRNA). Yeast Mrd1 contains five RNA-binding domains (RBDs), all of which are necessary for optimal function of the protein. Proteomic data showed that Mrd1 is part of the early pre-ribosomal complexes, and deletion of individual RBDs perturbs the pre-ribosomal structure. In vivo ultraviolet cross-linking showed that Mrd1 binds to the pre-rRNA at two sites within the 18S region, in helix 27 (h27) and helix 28. The major binding site lies in h27, and mutational analyses shows that this interaction requires the RBD1-3 region of Mrd1. RBD2 plays the dominant role in h27 binding, but other RBDs also contribute directly. h27 and helix 28 are located close to the sequences that form the central pseudoknot, a key structural feature of the mature 40S subunit. We speculate that the modular structure of Mrd1 coordinates pseudoknot formation with pre-rRNA processing and subunit assembly.

  9. Multiple RNA interactions position Mrd1 at the site of the small subunit pseudoknot within the 90S pre-ribosome

    PubMed Central

    Segerstolpe, Åsa; Granneman, Sander; Björk, Petra; de Lima Alves, Flavia; Rappsilber, Juri; Andersson, Charlotta; Högbom, Martin; Tollervey, David; Wieslander, Lars

    2013-01-01

    Ribosomal subunit biogenesis in eukaryotes is a complex multistep process. Mrd1 is an essential and conserved small (40S) ribosomal subunit synthesis factor that is required for early cleavages in the 35S pre-ribosomal RNA (rRNA). Yeast Mrd1 contains five RNA-binding domains (RBDs), all of which are necessary for optimal function of the protein. Proteomic data showed that Mrd1 is part of the early pre-ribosomal complexes, and deletion of individual RBDs perturbs the pre-ribosomal structure. In vivo ultraviolet cross-linking showed that Mrd1 binds to the pre-rRNA at two sites within the 18S region, in helix 27 (h27) and helix 28. The major binding site lies in h27, and mutational analyses shows that this interaction requires the RBD1-3 region of Mrd1. RBD2 plays the dominant role in h27 binding, but other RBDs also contribute directly. h27 and helix 28 are located close to the sequences that form the central pseudoknot, a key structural feature of the mature 40S subunit. We speculate that the modular structure of Mrd1 coordinates pseudoknot formation with pre-rRNA processing and subunit assembly. PMID:23193268

  10. Identification of the 18S-ribosomal-DNA genotypes of Acanthamoeba isolates from the Philippines.

    PubMed

    Rivera, W L; Adao, D E V

    2008-12-01

    Cyst morphology has been commonly used to identify the free-living amoeba Acanthamoeba to subgenus level. A more accurate and consistent method, based on the sequence analysis of the gene coding for the amoeba's small-subunit ribosomal RNA (Rns), has, however, been developed. There have been no attempts to identify the Acanthamoeba genotypes circulating in the Philippines. In this study, therefore, the ASA.S1 region of the Rns gene from 17 Acanthamoeba isolates, collected from soil, water and contact-lens storage cases in different regions of the Philippines, was sequenced. After the isolates were genotyped, using the BLAST program, their phylogenetic positions relative to known Acanthamoeba isolates were determined. For this, the model-based (GTR + Gamma) neighbour-joining, maximum-likelihood and Bayesian-inference analyses and the non-model-based maximum-parsimony analysis were used. All but two of the isolates were identified as the T5 or T4 genotypes, which are probably common in soil, water and contact-lens cases across the Philippines. The only other genotypes identified were T15 (as a single isolate from a contact-lens case) and T3 (as a single soil isolate).

  11. Phylogeny of chloromonas (chlorophyceae): A study of 18S ribosomal RNA gene sequences

    SciTech Connect

    Buchheim, M.A.; Buchheim, J.A.; Chapman, R.L.

    1997-04-01

    The unicellular, biflagellate genus Chloromonas differs from its ally, Chlamydomonas, primarily by the absence of pyrenoids in the vegetative stage of the former. As with most green flagellate genera, little is known about phylogenetic affinities within and among Chloromonas species. Phylogenetic analyses of nuclear-encoded small-subunit ribosomal RNA gene sequences demonstrate that a sampling of five Chloromonas taxa, obtained from major culture collections, do not form a monophyletic group. However, only three of these isolates, Chloromonas clathrata, Chloromonas serbinowi, and Chloromonas rosae, are diagnosable morphologically as Chloromonas species by the absence of a pyrenoid in the vegetative stage. The three diagnosable Chloromonas taxa form an alliance with two pyrenoid-bearing chlamydomonads, Chlamydomonas augustae and Chlamydomonas macrostellata. With the exception of Chloromonas serbinowi, which represents the basal lineage within the clade, each of the diagnosable Chloromonas taxa and their pyrenoid-bearing Chlamydomonas allies were isolated originally from mountain soils, snow, or cold peat. These observations suggest that hibitat, independent of pyrenoid status, may be most closely linked to the natural history of this clade of chlamydomonad flagellates. 51 refs., 3 figs., 3 tabs.

  12. Probing the secondary structure of expansion segment ES6 in 18S ribosomal RNA.

    PubMed

    Alkemar, Gunnar; Nygård, Odd

    2006-07-04

    Expansion segment ES6 in 18S ribosomal RNA is, unlike many other expansion segments, present in all eukaryotes. The available data suggest that ES6 is located on the surface of the small ribosomal subunit. Here we have analyzed the secondary structure of the complete ES6 sequence in intact ribosomes from three eukaryotes, wheat, yeast, and mouse, representing different eukaryotic kingdoms. The availability of the ES6 sequence for modification and cleavage by structure sensitive chemicals and enzymatic reagents was analyzed by primer extension and gel electrophoresis on an ABI 377 automated DNA sequencer. The experimental results were used to restrict the number of possible secondary structure models of ES6 generated by the folding software MFOLD. The modification data obtained from the three experimental organisms were very similar despite the sequence variation. Consequently, similar secondary structure models were obtained for the ES6 sequence in wheat, yeast, and mouse ribosomes. A comparison of sequence data from more than 6000 eukaryotes showed that similar structural elements could also be formed in other organisms. The comparative analysis also showed that the extent of compensatory base changes in the suggested helices was low. The in situ structure analysis was complemented by a secondary structure analysis of wheat ES6 transcribed and folded in vitro. The obtained modification data indicate that the secondary structure of the in vitro transcribed sequence differs from that observed in the intact ribosome. These results suggest that chaperones, ribosomal proteins, and/or tertiary rRNA interactions could be involved in the in vivo folding of ES6.

  13. Chemical probing of adenine residues within the secondary structure of rabbit /sup 18/S ribosomal RNA

    SciTech Connect

    Rairkar, A.; Rubino, H.M.; Lockard, R.E.

    1988-01-26

    The location of unpaired adenine residues within the secondary structure of rabbit /sup 18/S ribosomal RNA was determined by chemical probing. Naked /sup 18/S rRNA was first prepared by digestion of purified 40S subunits with matrix-bound proteinase K in sodium dodecyl sulfate, thereby omitting the use of nucleic acid denaturants. Adenines within naked /sup 18/S rRNA were chemically probed by using either diethyl pyrocarbonate or dimethyl sulfate, which specifically react with unpaired nucleotides. Adenine modification sites were identified by polyacrylamide sequencing gel electrophoresis either upon aniline-induced strand scission of /sup 32/P-end-labeled intact and fragmented rRNA or by primer extension using sequence-specific DNA oligomers with reverse transcriptase. The data indicate good agreement between the general pattern of adenine reactivity and the location of unpaired regions in /sup 18/S rRNA determined by comparative sequence analysis. The overall reactivity of adenine residues toward single-strand-specific chemical probes was, also, similar for both rabbit and Escherichia coli small rRNA. The number of strongly reactive adenines appearing within phylogenetically determined helical segments, however, was greater in rabbit /sup 18/S rRNA than for E. coli /sup 16/S rRNA. Some of these adenines were found clustered in specific helices. Such differences suggest a greater irregularity of many of the helical elements within mammalian /sup 18/S rRNA, as compared with prokaryotic /sup 16/S rRNA. These helical irregularities could be important for protein association and also may represent biologically relevant flexible regions of the molecule.

  14. Babesia canis canis, Babesia canis vogeli, Babesia canis rossi: differentiation of the three subspecies by a restriction fragment length polymorphism analysis on amplified small subunit ribosomal RNA genes.

    PubMed

    Carret, C; Walas, F; Carcy, B; Grande, N; Précigout, E; Moubri, K; Schetters, T P; Gorenflot, A

    1999-01-01

    The parasites Babesia canis and Babesia gibsoni (phylum Apicomplexa) are responsible for canine babesiosis throughout the world. Babesia canis was previously described as a group of three biologically different subspecies, namely B. canis canis, B. canis vogeli, and B. canis rossi. We report partial sequences of small subunit ribosomal RNA gene (ssu-rDNA) of each subspecies amplified in vitro with primers derived from a semi-conserved region of the ssu-rDNA genes in other Babesia species. The polymerase chain reaction combined with a restriction fragment length polymorphism analysis, using HinfI and TaqI restriction enzymes, confirmed the separation of B. canis into three subspecies. These sequences were compared with previously published sequences of other Babesia species. A phylogenetic approach showed that the three subspecies of B. canis belong to the clade of Babesia species sensu stricto where B. canis canis clusters with B. canis rossi whereas B. canis vogeli might form a monophyletic group with the cluster B. divergens and B. odocoilei. Our results show that the three subspecies of B. canis can readily be differentiated at the molecular level and suggest that they might be considered as true species.

  15. Small subunit ribosomal DNA-based phylogenetic analysis of foliar nematodes (Aphelenchoides spp.) and their quantitative detection in complex DNA backgrounds.

    PubMed

    Rybarczyk-Mydłowska, Katarzyna; Mooyman, Paul; van Megen, Hanny; van den Elsen, Sven; Vervoort, Mariëtte; Veenhuizen, Peter; van Doorn, Joop; Dees, Robert; Karssen, Gerrit; Bakker, Jaap; Helder, Johannes

    2012-12-01

    Foliar nematodes, plant-parasitic representatives of the genus Aphelenchoides, constitute a minority in a group dominated by fungivorous species. Distinction between (mostly harmless) fungal feeding Aphelenchoides species and high impact plant parasites such as A. besseyi, A. fragariae, A. ritzemabosi, and A. subtenuis is severely hampered by the scarcity of informative morphological characters, some of which are only observable in specific developmental stages. Poor description of a number of non-plant-parasitic Aphelenchoides species further complicates identification. Based on (nearly) full-length small subunit ribosomal DNA (SSU rDNA) sequences (≈1,700 bp), a phylogenetic tree was generated, and the four target species appeared as distinct, well-supported groups. Notably, this genus does not constitute a monophyletic group: A. besseyi and A. ritzemabosi cluster together and they are phylogenetically isolated from A. fragariae, A. subtenuis, and most other fungivorous species. A phylum-wide SSU rDNA framework was used to identify species-specific DNA motifs. For the molecular detection of four plant-parasitic Aphelenchoides species, polymerase chain reaction primers were developed with high, identical annealing temperatures (63°C). Within the molecular framework presented here, these primers can be used for the rapid screening of plant material and soil for the presence of one or multiple foliar nematode species.

  16. Optimal eukaryotic 18S and universal 16S/18S ribosomal RNA primers and their application in a study of symbiosis.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yong; Tian, Ren Mao; Gao, Zhao Ming; Bougouffa, Salim; Qian, Pei-Yuan

    2014-01-01

    Eukaryotic 18S ribosomal RNA (rRNA) gene primers that feature a wide coverage are critical in detecting the composition of eukaryotic microscopic organisms in ecosystems. Here, we predicted 18S rRNA primers based on consecutive conserved sites and evaluated their coverage efficiency and scope of application to different eukaryotic groups. After evaluation, eight of them were considered as qualified 18S primers based on coverage rate. Next, we examined common conserved regions in prokaryotic 16S and eukaryotic 18S rRNA sequences to design 16S/18S universal primers. Three 16S/18S candidate primers, U515, U1390 and U1492, were then considered to be suitable for simultaneous amplification of the rRNA sequences in three domains. Eukaryotic 18S and prokaryotic 16S rRNA genes in a sponge were amplified simultaneously using universal primers U515 and U1390, and the subsequent sorting of pyrosequenced reads revealed some distinctive communities in different parts of the sample. The real difference in biodiversity between prokaryotic and eukaryotic symbionts could be discerned as the dissimilarity between OTUs was increased from 0.005 to 0.1. A network of the communities in external and internal parts of the sponge illustrated the co-variation of some unique microbes in certain parts of the sponge, suggesting that the universal primers are useful in simultaneous detection of prokaryotic and eukaryotic microbial communities.

  17. Optimal Eukaryotic 18S and Universal 16S/18S Ribosomal RNA Primers and Their Application in a Study of Symbiosis

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yong; Tian, Ren Mao; Gao, Zhao Ming; Bougouffa, Salim; Qian, Pei-Yuan

    2014-01-01

    Eukaryotic 18S ribosomal RNA (rRNA) gene primers that feature a wide coverage are critical in detecting the composition of eukaryotic microscopic organisms in ecosystems. Here, we predicted 18S rRNA primers based on consecutive conserved sites and evaluated their coverage efficiency and scope of application to different eukaryotic groups. After evaluation, eight of them were considered as qualified 18S primers based on coverage rate. Next, we examined common conserved regions in prokaryotic 16S and eukaryotic 18S rRNA sequences to design 16S/18S universal primers. Three 16S/18S candidate primers, U515, U1390 and U1492, were then considered to be suitable for simultaneous amplification of the rRNA sequences in three domains. Eukaryotic 18S and prokaryotic 16S rRNA genes in a sponge were amplified simultaneously using universal primers U515 and U1390, and the subsequent sorting of pyrosequenced reads revealed some distinctive communities in different parts of the sample. The real difference in biodiversity between prokaryotic and eukaryotic symbionts could be discerned as the dissimilarity between OTUs was increased from 0.005 to 0.1. A network of the communities in external and internal parts of the sponge illustrated the co-variation of some unique microbes in certain parts of the sponge, suggesting that the universal primers are useful in simultaneous detection of prokaryotic and eukaryotic microbial communities. PMID:24594623

  18. Secondary structure of rabbit 18S ribosomal RNA determined from biochemical and phylogenetic data

    SciTech Connect

    Rairkar, A.; Rubino, H.; Lockard, R.E.

    1986-05-01

    To understand the functional role of 18S rRNA in the eukaryotic 40S subunit, its higher order structure must first be determined. Native deproteinized 18S rRNA was isolated from purified rabbit 40S subunits, fractionated on SDS-sucrose density gradients and concentrated using centricon-30 microconcentrators. The structure of native 18S rRNA was probed chemically with both diethylpyrocarbonate (DEPC) and dimethyl sulfate (DMS) which react with unpaired adenosine and guanosine residues, respectively. After /sup 32/P-end-labeling of intact and fragmented RNA, the modified nucleotides were identified by polyacrylamide sequencing gel electrophoresis upon aniline induced strand scission. On the basis of both the biochemical and phylogenetic data, a secondary structure model is proposed which includes the two major G + C rich insertion elements. A comparison of the structure data with previously published phylogenetic models suggests an instability of certain predicted helices. These unstable helices may normally be stabilized by ribosomal proteins and could represent the flexible elements involved in biologically significant conformational switches within 40S subunit.

  19. The origin and evolution of variable-region helices in V4 and V7 of the small-subunit ribosomal RNA of branchiopod crustaceans.

    PubMed

    Crease, T J; Taylor, D J

    1998-11-01

    We sequenced the V4 and V7 regions of the small-subunit ribosomal RNA (SSU rRNA) from 38 species of branchiopod crustaceans (e.g., Artemia, Daphnia, Triops) representing all eight extant orders. Ancestral large-bodied taxa in the orders Anostraca, Notostraca, Laevicaudata, and Spinicaudata (limnadiids and cyzicids) possess the typical secondary structure in these regions, whereas the spinicaudatan Cyclestheria and all of the cladocerans (Anomopoda, Ctenopoda, Onychopoda, and Haplopoda) possess three unique helices. Although the lengths and primary sequences of the distal ends of these helices are extremely variable, their locations, secondary structures, and primary sequences at the proximal end are conserved, indicating that they are homologous. This evidence supports the classical view that Cladocera is a monophyletic group and that the cyclestheriids are transitional between spinicaudatans and cladocerans. The single origin and persistence since the Permian of the unique cladoceran helices suggests that births and deaths of variable region helices have been rare. The broad range of sequence divergences observed among the cladoceran helices permitted us to make inferences about their evolution. Although their proximal ends are very GC-biased, there is a significant negative correlation between length and GC content due to an increasing proportion of U at their distal ends. Slippage-like processes occurring at unpaired nucleotides or bulges, which are very U-biased, are associated with both helix origin and runaway length expansion. The overall GC contents and lengths of V4 and V7 are highly correlated. More surprisingly, the lengths of these SSU rRNA variable regions are also highly correlated with the length of the large-subunit rRNA expansion segment, D2, indicating that mechanisms affecting length variation do so both across single genes and across genes in the rRNA gene family.

  20. Using Small Subunit Ribosomal RNA to Follow Dark Incorporation of 14C-bicarbonate by Bacteria and Archaea in Sandy Sediment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    MacGregor, B. J.; Musat, N.; Kuypers, M. M.

    2007-12-01

    Small subunit ribosomal RNA (SSU rRNA) and the genes encoding it have become the basis of modern microbial phylogeny, and of numerous methods for characterizing the composition of bacterial, archaeal, and even eukaryotic communities as they occur in nature. A limitation of this approach has been that phylogeny alone is not a reliable guide to physiology, particularly for groups with no close relatives in culture. We have been developing ways of using the SSU rRNA molecule itself to identify and (eventually) quantify the carbon sources incorporated by particular phylogenetic groups. This can be done by taking advantage of natural variations in carbon isotopic composition among growth substrates, or by following incorporation of 13C- or 14C-labeled compounds. 14C has the advantage that natural background levels are negligible. In the present study, our goal is to identify species responsible for non-photosynthetic CO2 incorporation in sandy sediments of the German Wadden Sea. Sediment cores collected from the Janssand sand flats were percolated with 14C-bicarbonate at in situ temperature for 36-38h in the dark, total RNA isolated, and domain-specific oligonucleotide probes used to capture bacterial and archaeal SSU rRNA. Total and/or captured RNA was separated by denaturing polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis, and 14C detected by phosphor imager, autoradiography, or beta imager. Detection was fastest and most sensitive with the beta imager. Both Bacteria and Archaea had incorporated label, suggesting both groups may harbor non-photosynthetic autotrophs. The next step will be to use more specific capture probes. We are currently working to separate the captured domain-specific SSU rRNA on non-denaturing gels, with detection by the high-resolution mode of the beta imager, so that individual species incorporating label can be identified by RT-PCR and sequencing of labeled bands.

  1. 18S ribosomal DNA genotypes of Acanthamoeba species isolated from contact lens cases in the Philippines.

    PubMed

    Rivera, Windell L; Adao, Davin Edric V

    2009-10-01

    This study was carried out to document the genotypes of Acanthamoeba present in contact lens cases from 50 randomly selected contact lens wearers living in Quezon City, Metro Manila, Philippines. Acanthamoeba species were isolated from eight (16%) in 50 contact lens cases examined. We analyzed partial 18S ribosomal DNA (Rns) sequences of the eight isolates and found that the sequence differences were sufficient to distinguish the genotypes. After the isolates were genotyped, using the Basic Local Alignment Search Tool program, their phylogenetic positions relative to known Acanthamoeba isolates were determined. The model-based (GTR+Gamma+Iota) neighbor-joining, maximum likelihood, and Bayesian inference analyses, as well as the non-model-based maximum parsimony analysis were used. Results showed that of the eight isolates, six were Rns genotype T5 while two were Rns genotype T4. This present study indicates that genotype T5 is also a common contaminant in contact lens storage cases.

  2. Differential stability of 28s and 18s rat liver ribosomal ribonucleic acids.

    PubMed

    Venkov, P V; Hadjiolov, A A

    1969-10-01

    Rat liver ribosomal RNA (rRNA) free from nuclease contaminants was isolated by a modification of the phenol technique. The 28s and 18s rRNA species were separated by preparative agar-gel electrophoresis. The two rRNA species were heated at different temperatures under various conditions and the amount of undegraded rRNA was determined by analytical agar-gel electrophoresis. The 18s rRNA remained unaltered after heating for up to 10min. at 90 degrees in water, acetate buffer, pH5.0, or phosphate buffer, pH7.0. Under similar or milder conditions 28s rRNA was partially degraded, giving rise to a well-delimited 6s peak and a heterogeneous material located in the zone between 28s and 6s. The dependence of degradation of 28s rRNA on the temperature and the ionic strength of the medium was studied. The greatest extent of degradation of 28s rRNA was observed on heating at 90 degrees in water. It is suggested that the instability of rat liver 28s rRNA is due to two factors: the presence of hidden breaks in the polymer chain and a higher susceptibility of some phosphodiester bonds to thermal hydrolysis.

  3. [Study of the binding of the S7 protein with 16S rRNA fragment 926-986/1219-1393 as a key step in the assembly of the small subunit of prokaryotic ribosomes].

    PubMed

    Rassokhin, T I; Golovin, A V; Petrova, E B; Spiridonova, V A; Karginova, O A; Rozhdestvenskiĭ, T S; Brosius, J; Kopylov, A M

    2001-01-01

    Both structural and thermodynamic studies are necessary to understand the ribosome assembly. An initial step was made in studying the interaction between a 16S rRNA fragment and S7, a key protein in assembling the prokaryotic ribosome small subunit. The apparent dissociation constant was obtained for complexes of recombinant Escherichia coli and Thermus thermophilus S7 with a fragment of the 3' domain of the E. coli 16S rRNA. Both proteins showed a high rRNA-binding activity, which was not observed earlier. Since RNA and proteins are conformationally labile, their folding must be considered to correctly describe the RNA-protein interactions.

  4. Exploring human 40S ribosomal proteins binding to the 18S rRNA fragment containing major 3'-terminal domain.

    PubMed

    Gopanenko, Alexander V; Malygin, Alexey A; Karpova, Galina G

    2015-02-01

    Association of ribosomal proteins with rRNA during assembly of ribosomal subunits is an intricate process, which is strictly regulated in vivo. As for the assembly in vitro, it was reported so far only for prokaryotic subunits. Bacterial ribosomal proteins are capable of selective binding to 16S rRNA as well as to its separate morphological domains. In this work, we explored binding of total protein of human 40S ribosomal subunit to the RNA transcript corresponding to the major 3'-domain of 18S rRNA. We showed that the resulting ribonucleoprotein particles contained almost all of the expected ribosomal proteins, whose binding sites are located in this 18S rRNA domain in the 40S subunit, together with several nonspecific proteins. The binding in solution was accompanied with aggregation of the RNA-protein complexes. Ribosomal proteins bound to the RNA transcript protected from chemical modification mostly those 18S rRNA nucleotides that are known to be involved in binding with the proteins in the 40S subunit and thereby demonstrated their ability to selectively bind to the rRNA in vitro. The possible implication of unstructured extensions of eukaryotic ribosomal proteins in their nonspecific binding with rRNA and in subsequent aggregation of the resulting complexes is discussed. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Poly(A)-specific ribonuclease is a nuclear ribosome biogenesis factor involved in human 18S rRNA maturation.

    PubMed

    Montellese, Christian; Montel-Lehry, Nathalie; Henras, Anthony K; Kutay, Ulrike; Gleizes, Pierre-Emmanuel; O'Donohue, Marie-Françoise

    2017-04-10

    The poly-A specific ribonuclease (PARN), initially characterized for its role in mRNA catabolism, supports the processing of different types of non-coding RNAs including telomerase RNA. Mutations in PARN are linked to dyskeratosis congenita and pulmonary fibrosis. Here, we show that PARN is part of the enzymatic machinery that matures the human 18S ribosomal RNA (rRNA). Consistent with its nucleolar steady-state localization, PARN is required for 40S ribosomal subunit production and co-purifies with 40S subunit precursors. Depletion of PARN or expression of a catalytically-compromised PARN mutant results in accumulation of 3΄ extended 18S rRNA precursors. Analysis of these processing intermediates reveals a defect in 3΄ to 5΄ trimming of the internal transcribed spacer 1 (ITS1) region, subsequent to endonucleolytic cleavage at site E. Consistent with a function of PARN in exonucleolytic trimming of 18S-E pre-rRNA, recombinant PARN can process the corresponding ITS1 RNA fragment in vitro. Trimming of 18S-E pre-rRNA by PARN occurs in the nucleus, upstream of the final endonucleolytic cleavage by the endonuclease NOB1 in the cytoplasm. These results identify PARN as a new component of the ribosome biogenesis machinery in human cells. Defects in ribosome biogenesis could therefore underlie the pathologies linked to mutations in PARN. © The Author(s) 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Nucleic Acids Research.

  6. Poly(A)-specific ribonuclease is a nuclear ribosome biogenesis factor involved in human 18S rRNA maturation

    PubMed Central

    Montellese, Christian; Montel-Lehry, Nathalie; Henras, Anthony K.; Kutay, Ulrike

    2017-01-01

    Abstract The poly-A specific ribonuclease (PARN), initially characterized for its role in mRNA catabolism, supports the processing of different types of non-coding RNAs including telomerase RNA. Mutations in PARN are linked to dyskeratosis congenita and pulmonary fibrosis. Here, we show that PARN is part of the enzymatic machinery that matures the human 18S ribosomal RNA (rRNA). Consistent with its nucleolar steady-state localization, PARN is required for 40S ribosomal subunit production and co-purifies with 40S subunit precursors. Depletion of PARN or expression of a catalytically-compromised PARN mutant results in accumulation of 3΄ extended 18S rRNA precursors. Analysis of these processing intermediates reveals a defect in 3΄ to 5΄ trimming of the internal transcribed spacer 1 (ITS1) region, subsequent to endonucleolytic cleavage at site E. Consistent with a function of PARN in exonucleolytic trimming of 18S-E pre-rRNA, recombinant PARN can process the corresponding ITS1 RNA fragment in vitro. Trimming of 18S-E pre-rRNA by PARN occurs in the nucleus, upstream of the final endonucleolytic cleavage by the endonuclease NOB1 in the cytoplasm. These results identify PARN as a new component of the ribosome biogenesis machinery in human cells. Defects in ribosome biogenesis could therefore underlie the pathologies linked to mutations in PARN. PMID:28402503

  7. Ribosome biogenesis factor Tsr3 is the aminocarboxypropyl transferase responsible for 18S rRNA hypermodification in yeast and humans.

    PubMed

    Meyer, Britta; Wurm, Jan Philip; Sharma, Sunny; Immer, Carina; Pogoryelov, Denys; Kötter, Peter; Lafontaine, Denis L J; Wöhnert, Jens; Entian, Karl-Dieter

    2016-05-19

    The chemically most complex modification in eukaryotic rRNA is the conserved hypermodified nucleotide N1-methyl-N3-aminocarboxypropyl-pseudouridine (m(1)acp(3)Ψ) located next to the P-site tRNA on the small subunit 18S rRNA. While S-adenosylmethionine was identified as the source of the aminocarboxypropyl (acp) group more than 40 years ago the enzyme catalyzing the acp transfer remained elusive. Here we identify the cytoplasmic ribosome biogenesis protein Tsr3 as the responsible enzyme in yeast and human cells. In functionally impaired Tsr3-mutants, a reduced level of acp modification directly correlates with increased 20S pre-rRNA accumulation. The crystal structure of archaeal Tsr3 homologs revealed the same fold as in SPOUT-class RNA-methyltransferases but a distinct SAM binding mode. This unique SAM binding mode explains why Tsr3 transfers the acp and not the methyl group of SAM to its substrate. Structurally, Tsr3 therefore represents a novel class of acp transferase enzymes. © The Author(s) 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Nucleic Acids Research.

  8. Ribosome biogenesis factor Tsr3 is the aminocarboxypropyl transferase responsible for 18S rRNA hypermodification in yeast and humans

    PubMed Central

    Meyer, Britta; Wurm, Jan Philip; Sharma, Sunny; Immer, Carina; Pogoryelov, Denys; Kötter, Peter; Lafontaine, Denis L. J.; Wöhnert, Jens; Entian, Karl-Dieter

    2016-01-01

    The chemically most complex modification in eukaryotic rRNA is the conserved hypermodified nucleotide N1-methyl-N3-aminocarboxypropyl-pseudouridine (m1acp3Ψ) located next to the P-site tRNA on the small subunit 18S rRNA. While S-adenosylmethionine was identified as the source of the aminocarboxypropyl (acp) group more than 40 years ago the enzyme catalyzing the acp transfer remained elusive. Here we identify the cytoplasmic ribosome biogenesis protein Tsr3 as the responsible enzyme in yeast and human cells. In functionally impaired Tsr3-mutants, a reduced level of acp modification directly correlates with increased 20S pre-rRNA accumulation. The crystal structure of archaeal Tsr3 homologs revealed the same fold as in SPOUT-class RNA-methyltransferases but a distinct SAM binding mode. This unique SAM binding mode explains why Tsr3 transfers the acp and not the methyl group of SAM to its substrate. Structurally, Tsr3 therefore represents a novel class of acp transferase enzymes. PMID:27084949

  9. Molecular Identification of Ptychodera flava (Hemichordata: Enteropneusta): Reconsideration in Light of Nucleotide Polymorphism in the 18S Ribosomal RNA Gene.

    PubMed

    Urata, Makoto

    2015-06-01

    Seven nuclear and mitochondrial DNA markers were examined in 12 specimens of Ptychodera flava, a model acorn worm used in molecular biology, collected in Japan from three local populations with different modes of living. A comparison of intraspecific results did not show genetically isolated populations despite the species' enclave habitats and asexual reproduction. Moreover, both the nuclear 18S ribosomal RNA gene and mitochondrial 16S ribosomal RNA gene sequences were identical to those from Moorea in French Polynesia, nearly 10,000 kilometers away from Japan. I also provide the first definitive information regarding polymorphisms in 18S ribosomal RNA gene, the external transcribed spacer (ETS), internal transcribed spacers (ITS), and mitochondrial cytochrome c oxidase subunit 1 (mtCO1) sequence in hemichordates using newly designed primer sets, and I show both high larval vagility and certain criteria for the molecular identification of this species.

  10. Chromosome Mapping of 18S Ribosomal RNA Genes in Eleven Hypostomus Species (Siluriformes, Loricariidae): Diversity Analysis of the Sites.

    PubMed

    Rubert, Marceléia; da Rosa, Renata; Zawadzki, Claudio H; Mariotto, Sandra; Moreira-Filho, Orlando; Giuliano-Caetano, Lucia

    2016-08-01

    We investigated the chromosomal distribution of 18S ribosomal DNA (rDNA) in different populations of 11 species of Hypostomus collected in important Brazilian basins, namely South Atlantic, Upper Paraná, and Paraguay applying the fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH). Hypostomus cochliodon, Hypostomus commersoni, Hypostomus hermanni, Hypostomus regani, Hypostomus albopunctatus, Hypostomus paulinus, Hypostomus aff. paulinus, Hypostomus iheringii, and Hypostomus mutucae presented multiple 18S rDNA sites while Hypostomus strigaticeps and Hypostomus nigromaculatus exhibited a single pair of chromosomes with 18S rDNA sites. The studied species presented variations in the number and position of these sites. The results accomplished were similar to those obtained by the analysis of AgNORs, revealing the same interspecific variability. Each species exhibited distinctive patterns of AgNOR and 18S rDNA distribution, which can be considered cytogenetic markers in each species of the genus and help improve the discussions on the phylogeny of the group.

  11. Chromosomal localization and partial sequencing of the 18S and 28S ribosomal genes from Bradysia hygida (Diptera: Sciaridae).

    PubMed

    Gaspar, V P; Shimauti, E L T; Fernandez, M A

    2014-03-26

    In insects, ribosomal genes are usually detected in sex chromosomes, but have also or only been detected in autosomal chromosomes in some cases. Previous results from our research group indicated that in Bradysia hygida, nucleolus organizer regions were associated with heterochromatic regions of the autosomal C chromosome, using the silver impregnation technique. The present study confirmed this location of the ribosomal genes using fluorescence in situ hybridization analysis. This analysis also revealed the partial sequences of the 18S and 28S genes for this sciarid. The sequence alignment showed that the 18S gene has 98% identity to Corydalus armatus and 91% identity to Drosophila persimilis and Drosophila melanogaster. The partial sequence analysis of the 28S gene showed 95% identity with Bradysia amoena and 93% identity with Schwenckfeldina sp. These results confirmed the location of ribosomal genes of B. hygida in an autosomal chromosome, and the partial sequence analysis of the 18S and 28S genes demonstrated a high percentage of identity among several insect ribosomal genes.

  12. Oxidative damage of 18S and 5S ribosomal RNA in digestive gland of mussels exposed to trace metals.

    PubMed

    Kournoutou, Georgia G; Giannopoulou, Panagiota C; Sazakli, Eleni; Leotsinidis, Michel; Kalpaxis, Dimitrios L

    2017-09-06

    Numerous studies have shown the ability of trace metals to accumulate in marine organisms and cause oxidative stress that leads to perturbations in many important intracellular processes, including protein synthesis. This study is mainly focused on the exploration of structural changes, like base modifications, scissions, and conformational changes, caused in 18S and 5S ribosomal RNA (rRNA) isolated from the mussel Mytilus galloprovincialis exposed to 40μg/L Cu, 30μg/L Hg, or 100μg/L Cd, for 5 or 15days. 18S rRNA and 5S rRNA are components of the small and large ribosomal subunit, respectively, found in complex with ribosomal proteins, translation factors and other auxiliary components (metal ions, toxins etc). 18S rRNA plays crucial roles in all stages of protein synthesis, while 5S rRNA serves as a master signal transducer between several functional regions of 28S rRNA. Therefore, structural changes in these ribosomal constituents could affect the basic functions of ribosomes and hence the normal metabolism of cells. Especially, 18S rRNA along with ribosomal proteins forms the decoding centre that ensures the correct codon-anticodon pairing. As exemplified by ELISA, primer extension analysis and DMS footprinting analysis, each metal caused oxidative damage to rRNA, depending on the nature of metal ion and the duration of exposure. Interestingly, exposure of mussels to Cu or Hg caused structural alterations in 5S rRNA, localized in paired regions and within loops A, B, C, and E, leading to a continuous progressive loss of the 5S RNA structural integrity. In contrast, structural impairments of 5S rRNA in mussels exposed to Cd were accumulating for the initial 5days, and then progressively decreased to almost the normal level by day 15, probably due to the parallel elevation of metallothionein content that depletes the pools of free Cd. Regions of interest in 18S rRNA, such as the decoding centre, sites implicated in the binding of tRNAs (A- and P-sites) or

  13. Structural and functional studies of Bud23–Trm112 reveal 18S rRNA N7-G1575 methylation occurs on late 40S precursor ribosomes

    PubMed Central

    Létoquart, Juliette; Huvelle, Emmeline; Wacheul, Ludivine; Bourgeois, Gabrielle; Zorbas, Christiane; Graille, Marc; Heurgué-Hamard, Valérie; Lafontaine, Denis L. J.

    2014-01-01

    The eukaryotic small ribosomal subunit carries only four ribosomal (r) RNA methylated bases, all close to important functional sites. N7-methylguanosine (m7G) introduced at position 1575 on 18S rRNA by Bud23–Trm112 is at a ridge forming a steric block between P- and E-site tRNAs. Here we report atomic resolution structures of Bud23–Trm112 in the apo and S-adenosyl-l-methionine (SAM)-bound forms. Bud23 and Trm112 interact through formation of a β-zipper involving main-chain atoms, burying an important hydrophobic surface and stabilizing the complex. The structures revealed that the coactivator Trm112 undergoes an induced fit to accommodate its methyltransferase (MTase) partner. We report important structural similarity between the active sites of Bud23 and Coffea canephora xanthosine MTase, leading us to propose and validate experimentally a model for G1575 coordination. We identify Bud23 residues important for Bud23–Trm112 complex formation and recruitment to pre-ribosomes. We report that though Bud23–Trm112 binds precursor ribosomes at an early nucleolar stage, m7G methylation occurs at a late step of small subunit biogenesis, implying specifically delayed catalytic activation. Finally, we show that Bud23–Trm112 interacts directly with the box C/D snoRNA U3-associated DEAH RNA helicase Dhr1 supposedly involved in central pseudoknot formation; this suggests that Bud23–Trm112 might also contribute to controlling formation of this irreversible and dramatic structural reorganization essential to overall folding of small subunit rRNA. Our study contributes important new elements to our understanding of key molecular aspects of human ribosomopathy syndromes associated with WBSCR22 (human Bud23) malfunction. PMID:25489090

  14. The differential expression of ribosomal 18S RNA paralog genes from the chaetognath Spadella cephaloptera.

    PubMed

    Barthélémy, Roxane-Marie; Grino, Michel; Pontarotti, Pierre; Casanova, Jean-Paul; Faure, Eric

    2007-01-01

    Chaetognaths constitute a small marine phylum of approximately 120 species. Two classes of both 18S and 28S rRNA gene sequences have been evidenced in this phylum, even though significant intraindividual variation in the sequences of rRNA genes is unusual in animal genomes. These observations led to the hypothesis that this unusual genetic characteristic could play one or more physiological role(s). Using in situ hybridization on the frontal sections of the chaetognath Spadella cephaloptera, we found that the 18S Class I genes are expressed in the whole body, with a strong expression throughout the gut epithelium, whereas the expression of the 18S Class II genes is restricted to the oocytes. Our results could suggest that the paralog products of the 18S Class I genes are probably the "housekeeping" 18S rRNAs, whereas those of class II would only be essential in specific tissues. These results provide support for the idea that each type of 18S paralog is important for specific cellular functions and is under the control of selective factors.

  15. Yeast 18 S rRNA Is Directly Involved in the Ribosomal Response to Stringent AUG Selection during Translation Initiation*

    PubMed Central

    Nemoto, Naoki; Singh, Chingakham Ranjit; Udagawa, Tsuyoshi; Wang, Suzhi; Thorson, Elizabeth; Winter, Zachery; Ohira, Takahiro; Ii, Miki; Valášek, Leoš; Brown, Susan J.; Asano, Katsura

    2010-01-01

    In eukaryotes, the 40 S ribosomal subunit serves as the platform of initiation factor assembly, to place itself precisely on the AUG start codon. Structural arrangement of the 18 S rRNA determines the overall shape of the 40 S subunit. Here, we present genetic evaluation of yeast 18 S rRNA function using 10 point mutations altering the polysome profile. All the mutants reduce the abundance of the mutant 40 S, making it limiting for translation initiation. Two of the isolated mutations, G875A, altering the core of the platform domain that binds eIF1 and eIF2, and A1193U, changing the h31 loop located below the P-site tRNAiMet, show phenotypes indicating defective regulation of AUG selection. Evidence is provided that these mutations reduce the interaction with the components of the preinitiation complex, thereby inhibiting its function at different steps. These results indicate that the 18 S rRNA mutations impair the integrity of scanning-competent preinitiation complex, thereby altering the 40 S subunit response to stringent AUG selection. Interestingly, nine of the mutations alter the body/platform domains of 18 S rRNA, potentially affecting the bridges to the 60 S subunit, but they do not change the level of 18 S rRNA intermediates. Based on these results, we also discuss the mechanism of the selective degradation of the mutant 40 S subunits. PMID:20699223

  16. A small subunit processome protein promotes cancer by altering translation.

    PubMed

    Yang, H W; Kim, T-M; Song, S S; Menon, L; Jiang, X; Huang, W; Black, P M; Park, P J; Carroll, R S; Johnson, M D

    2015-08-20

    Dysregulation of ribosome biogenesis or translation can promote cancer, but the underlying mechanisms remain unclear. UTP18 is a component of the small subunit processome, a nucleolar multi-protein complex whose only known function is to cleave pre-ribosomal RNA to yield the 18S ribosomal RNA component of 40S ribosomal subunits. Here, we show that UTP18 also alters translation to promote stress resistance and growth, and that UTP18 is frequently gained and overexpressed in cancer. We observed that UTP18 localizes to the cytoplasm in a subset of cells, and that serum withdrawal increases cytoplasmic UTP18 localization. Cytoplasmic UTP18 associates with the translation complex and Hsp90 to upregulate the translation of IRES-containing transcripts such as HIF1a, Myc and VEGF, thereby inducing stress resistance. Hsp90 inhibition decreases cytoplasmic UTP18 and UTP18-induced increases in translation. Importantly, elevated UTP18 expression correlates with increased aggressiveness and decreased survival in numerous cancers. Enforced UTP18 overexpression promotes transformation and tumorigenesis, whereas UTP18 knockdown inhibits these processes. This stress adaptation mechanism is thus co-opted for growth by cancers, and its inhibition may represent a promising new therapeutic target.

  17. The nuclear 18S ribosomal RNA gene as a source of phylogenetic information in the genus Taenia.

    PubMed

    Yan, Hongbin; Lou, Zhongzi; Li, Li; Ni, Xingwei; Guo, Aijiang; Li, Hongmin; Zheng, Yadong; Dyachenko, Viktor; Jia, Wanzhong

    2013-03-01

    Most species of the genus Taenia are of considerable medical and veterinary significance. In this study, complete nuclear 18S rRNA gene sequences were obtained from seven members of genus Taenia [Taenia multiceps, Taenia saginata, Taenia asiatica, Taenia solium, Taenia pisiformis, Taenia hydatigena, and Taenia taeniaeformis] and a phylogeny inferred using these sequences. Most of the variable sites fall within the variable regions, V1-V5. We show that sequences from the nuclear 18S ribosomal RNA gene have considerable promise as sources of phylogenetic information within the genus Taenia. Furthermore, given that almost all the variable sites lie within defined variable portions of that gene, it will be appropriate and economical to sequence only those regions for additional species of Taenia.

  18. Hypermethylation of 18S and 28S ribosomal DNAs predicts progression-free survival in patients with ovarian cancer.

    PubMed

    Chan, Michael W Y; Wei, Susan H; Wen, Ping; Wang, Zailong; Matei, Daniela E; Liu, Joseph C; Liyanarachchi, Sandya; Brown, Robert; Nephew, Kenneth P; Yan, Pearlly S; Huang, Tim H-M

    2005-10-15

    Repetitive ribosomal DNA (rDNA) genes are GC-rich clusters in the human genome. The aim of the study was to determine the methylation status of two rDNA subunits, the 18S and 28S genes, in ovarian tumors and to correlate methylation levels with clinicopathologic features in a cohort of ovarian cancer patients. 18S and 28S rDNA methylation was examined by quantitative methylation-specific PCR in 74 late-stage ovarian cancers, 9 histologically uninvolved, and 11 normal ovarian surface epithelial samples. In addition, methylation and gene expression levels of 18S and 28S rDNAs in two ovarian cancer cell lines were examined by reverse transcription-PCR before and after treatment with the demethylating drug 5'-aza-2'-deoxycytidine. The methylation level (amount of methylated rDNA/beta-actin) of 18S and 28S rDNAs was significantly higher (P < 0.05) in tumors than in normal ovarian surface epithelial samples. Methylation of 18S and 28S rDNA was highly correlated (R2= 0.842). Multivariate analysis by Cox regression found that rDNA hypermethylation [hazard ratio (HR), 0.25; P < 0.01], but not age (HR, 1.29; P = 0.291) and stage (HR, 1.09; P = 0.709), was independently associated with longer progression-free survival. In ovarian cancer cell lines, methylation levels of rDNA correlated with gene down-regulation and 5'-aza-2'-deoxycytidine treatment resulted in a moderate increase in 18S and 28S rDNA gene expressions. This is the first report of rDNA hypermethylation in ovarian tumors. Furthermore, rDNA methylation levels were higher in patients with long progression-free survival versus patients with short survival. Thus, rDNA methylation as a prognostic marker in ovarian cancer warrants further investigation.

  19. Genetic differentiation of strongyloides stercoralis from two different climate zones revealed by 18S ribosomal DNA sequence comparison.

    PubMed

    Pakdee, Wallop; Thaenkham, Urusa; Dekumyoy, Paron; Sa-Nguankiat, Surapol; Maipanich, Wanna; Pubampen, Somchit

    2012-11-01

    Over 70 countries in tropical and subtropical zones are endemic areas for Strongyloides stercoralis, with a higher prevalence of the parasite often occurring in tropical regions compared to subtropical ones. In order to explore genetic variations of S. stercoralis form different climate zones, 18S ribosomal DNA of parasite specimens obtained from Thailand were sequenced and compared with those from Japan. The maximum likelihood indicates that S. stercoralis populations from these two different climate zones have genetically diverged. The genetic relationship between S. stercoralis populations is not related to the host species, but rather to moisture and temperature. These factors may directly drive genetic differentiation among isolated populations of S. stercoralis.

  20. Amebic colitis in an antigenically and serologically negative patient: usefulness of a small-subunit ribosomal RNA gene-based polymerase chain reaction in diagnosis.

    PubMed

    Solaymani-Mohammadi, Shahram; Coyle, Christina M; Factor, Stephen M; Petri, William A

    2008-11-01

    Specific identification of Entamoeba histolytica in clinical specimens is an essential confirmatory diagnostic step in the management of amebiasis. Here, we report an unusual case of amebic colitis in a 20-year-old female immigrant from South China. The patient had experienced diarrhea, crampy abdominal pain, and fever for approximately 3 weeks prior to admission to hospital and had treated herself at home with metronidazole. On admission, stool microscopy and serology for E. histolytica were negative. Because the clinical findings raised the suspicion of Clostridium difficile fulminant colitis, she underwent a subtotal colectomy. Histopathology revealed flask-shaped ulcers characteristic of amebic colitis. Consequently, E. histolytica DNA was detected by a sensitive small-subunit rRNA polymerase chain reaction (PCR) from feces, and the patient was successfully treated for amebiasis with metronidazole. This case exemplifies the relative insensitivity of serologic tests for the diagnosis of intestinal amebiasis and the difficulties encountered in detecting the parasite antigen in a patient partially treated with metronidazole. We conclude that when the possibility of invasive intestinal amebiasis is suspected, detecting the parasite DNA directly in the stool sample by PCR using E. histolytica-specific primers may be an alternative, noninvasive, and reliable tool for the specific diagnosis of the disease.

  1. Heteroduplex mobility assay-guided sequence discovery: elucidation of the small subunit (18S) rDNA sequences of Pfiesteria piscicida and related dinoflagellates from complex algal culture and environmental sample DNA pools.

    PubMed

    Oldach, D W; Delwiche, C F; Jakobsen, K S; Tengs, T; Brown, E G; Kempton, J W; Schaefer, E F; Bowers, H A; Glasgow, H B; Burkholder, J M; Steidinger, K A; Rublee, P A

    2000-04-11

    The newly described heterotrophic estuarine dinoflagellate Pfiesteria piscicida has been linked with fish kills in field and laboratory settings, and with a novel clinical syndrome of impaired cognition and memory disturbance among humans after presumptive toxin exposure. As a result, there is a pressing need to better characterize the organism and these associations. Advances in Pfiesteria research have been hampered, however, by the absence of genomic sequence data. We employed a sequencing strategy directed by heteroduplex mobility assay to detect Pfiesteria piscicida 18S rDNA "signature" sequences in complex pools of DNA and used those data as the basis for determination of the complete P. piscicida 18S rDNA sequence. Specific PCR assays for P. piscicida and other estuarine heterotrophic dinoflagellates were developed, permitting their detection in algal cultures and in estuarine water samples collected during fish kill and fish lesion events. These tools should enhance efforts to characterize these organisms and their ecological relationships. Heteroduplex mobility assay-directed sequence discovery is broadly applicable, and may be adapted for the detection of genomic sequence data of other novel or nonculturable organisms in complex assemblages.

  2. Loop-Mediated Isothermal Amplification Targeting 18S Ribosomal DNA for Rapid Detection of Acanthamoeba

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Hye-Won; Lee, Yu-Ran; Inoue, Noboru; Jha, Bijay Kumar; Danne, Dinzouna-Boutamba Sylvatrie; Kim, Hong-Kyun; Lee, Junhun; Goo, Youn-Kyoung; Kong, Hyun-Hee; Chung, Dong-Il

    2013-01-01

    Amoebic keratitis (AK) caused by Acanthamoeba is one of the most serious corneal infections. AK is frequently misdiagnosed initially as viral, bacterial, or fungal keratitis, thus ensuring treatment delays. Accordingly, the early detection of Acanthamoeba would contribute significantly to disease management and selection of an appropriate anti-amoebic therapy. Recently, the loop-mediated isothermal amplification (LAMP) method has been applied to the clinical diagnosis of a range of infectious diseases. Here, we describe a rapid and efficient LAMP-based method targeting Acanthamoeba 18S rDNA gene for the detection of Acanthamoeba using clinical ocular specimens in the diagnosis of AK. Acanthamoeba LAMP assays detected 11 different strains including all AK-associated species. The copy number detection limit for a positive signal was 10 DNA copies of 18S rDNA per reaction. No cross-reactivity with the DNA of fungi or other protozoa was observed. The sensitivity of LAMP assay was higher than those of Nelson primer PCR and JDP primer PCR. In the present study, LAMP assay based on directly heat-treated samples was found to be as efficient at detecting Acanthamoeba as DNA extracted using a commercial kit, whereas PCR was only effective when commercial kit-extracted DNA was used. This study showed that the devised Acanthamoeba LAMP assay could be used to diagnose AK in a simple, sensitive, and specific manner. PMID:23864737

  3. Loop-mediated isothermal amplification targeting 18S ribosomal DNA for rapid detection of Acanthamoeba.

    PubMed

    Yang, Hye-Won; Lee, Yu-Ran; Inoue, Noboru; Jha, Bijay Kumar; Danne, Dinzouna-Boutamba Sylvatrie; Kim, Hong-Kyun; Lee, Junhun; Goo, Youn-Kyoung; Kong, Hyun-Hee; Chung, Dong-Il; Hong, Yeonchul

    2013-06-01

    Amoebic keratitis (AK) caused by Acanthamoeba is one of the most serious corneal infections. AK is frequently misdiagnosed initially as viral, bacterial, or fungal keratitis, thus ensuring treatment delays. Accordingly, the early detection of Acanthamoeba would contribute significantly to disease management and selection of an appropriate anti-amoebic therapy. Recently, the loop-mediated isothermal amplification (LAMP) method has been applied to the clinical diagnosis of a range of infectious diseases. Here, we describe a rapid and efficient LAMP-based method targeting Acanthamoeba 18S rDNA gene for the detection of Acanthamoeba using clinical ocular specimens in the diagnosis of AK. Acanthamoeba LAMP assays detected 11 different strains including all AK-associated species. The copy number detection limit for a positive signal was 10 DNA copies of 18S rDNA per reaction. No cross-reactivity with the DNA of fungi or other protozoa was observed. The sensitivity of LAMP assay was higher than those of Nelson primer PCR and JDP primer PCR. In the present study, LAMP assay based on directly heat-treated samples was found to be as efficient at detecting Acanthamoeba as DNA extracted using a commercial kit, whereas PCR was only effective when commercial kit-extracted DNA was used. This study showed that the devised Acanthamoeba LAMP assay could be used to diagnose AK in a simple, sensitive, and specific manner.

  4. 18S ribosomal DNA-based PCR for diagnosis of Trichomonas vaginalis.

    PubMed

    Mayta, H; Gilman, R H; Calderon, M M; Gottlieb, A; Soto, G; Tuero, I; Sanchez, S; Vivar, A

    2000-07-01

    Trichomonas vaginalis remains the most common sexually transmitted parasite in the world and is considered a major risk factor in the transmission of the human immunodeficiency virus. A PCR technique using primers targeting a specific region of the 18S rRNA gene of T. vaginalis was developed. The PCR test was standardized using 15 reference strains, giving a single product of 312 bp in all strains. No amplification was observed when DNA from related organisms or human DNA was used as a target. The test was evaluated on 372 vaginal swab specimens and 361 urine samples from women attending infertility and obstetric clinics at two separate hospitals in Lima, Peru. Compared to T. vaginalis culture, the overall sensitivity and specificity of PCR of vaginal swab samples was 100% and 98%, respectively. The PCR of urine samples was 100% sensitive and 99.7% specific compared to culture of vaginal swab, but the sensitivity drops to 83.3% when compared to PCR of vaginal swabs. All culture-positive samples were found to be positive by PCR in either urine or vaginal secretion. None of the PCR-negative samples were positive by culture. The origin of the amplification was confirmed by digestion of PCR products with HaeIII. This PCR assay, which is easy to perform and has a high sensitivity and specificity, should be useful for routine diagnosis of T. vaginalis infection.

  5. Phylogenetic relationships of the Culicomorpha inferred from 18S and 5.8S ribosomal DNA sequences. (Diptera:Nematocera).

    PubMed

    Miller, B R; Crabtree, M B; Savage, H M

    1997-05-01

    We investigated the evolutionary origins of the mosquito family Culicidae by examination of 18S and 5.8S ribosomal gene sequence divergence. Phylogenetic analyses demonstrated that within the infraorder Culicomorpha, taxa in the families Corethrellidae, Chaoboridae and Culicidae formed a monophyletic group; there was support for a sister relationship between this lineage and a representative of the Chironomidae. A chaoborid midge was the closest relative of the mosquitoes. Taxa from four genera of mosquitoes formed a monophyletic group; lack of a spacer in the 5.8S gene was unique to members of the Culicidae. A member of the genus Anopheles formed the most basal lineage among the mosquitoes analysed. Phylogenetic relationships were unresolved for representatives in the families Dixidae, Simuliidae and Ceratopogonidae.

  6. HCV IRES interacts with the 18S rRNA to activate the 40S ribosome for subsequent steps of translation initiation.

    PubMed

    Malygin, Alexey A; Kossinova, Olga A; Shatsky, Ivan N; Karpova, Galina G

    2013-10-01

    Previous analyses of complexes of 40S ribosomal subunits with the hepatitis C virus (HCV) internal ribosome entry site (IRES) have revealed contacts made by the IRES with ribosomal proteins. Here, using chemical probing, we show that the HCV IRES also contacts the backbone and bases of the CCC triplet in the 18S ribosomal RNA (rRNA) expansion segment 7. These contacts presumably provide interplay between IRES domain II and the AUG codon close to ribosomal protein S5, which causes a rearrangement of 18S rRNA structure in the vicinity of the universally conserved nucleotide G1639. As a result, G1639 becomes exposed and the corresponding site of the 40S subunit implicated in transfer RNA discrimination can select . These data are the first demonstration at nucleotide resolution of direct IRES-rRNA interactions and how they induce conformational transition in the 40S subunit allowing the HCV IRES to function without AUG recognition initiation factors.

  7. Early diagnosis of Exophiala CAPD peritonitis by 18S ribosomal RNA gene sequencing and its clinical significance.

    PubMed

    Lau, Susanna K P; Woo, Patrick C Y; Chiu, Siu-kau; Leung, Kit-wah; Yung, Raymond W H; Yuen, Kwok-yung

    2003-06-01

    Phenotypic identification of fungi in clinical microbiology laboratories is often difficult and late, especially for slow growing and rarely encountered fungi. We describe the application of 18S ribosomal RNA (rRNA) gene sequencing in the early diagnosis of a case of Exophiala peritonitis. A yeast-like fungus was isolated from the dialysate fluid of a 66-year-old man undergoing continuous ambulatory peritoneal dialysis. It grew slowly after 12 days of incubation to yield mature cultures to permit recognition of microscopic features resembling those of Exophiala, a dematiacerous mold. 18S rRNA gene sequencing provided results 12 days earlier than phenotypic identification and revealed 15 base difference (0.9%) between the isolate and Exophiala sp. strain GHP 1205 (GenBank Accession no. AJ232954), indicating that the isolate most closely resembles a strain of Exophiala species. The patient responded to 4 weeks of intravenous amphotericin B therapy. Early identification of the fungus was important for the choice of anti-fungal regimen. As opportunistic fungal infections in immunocompromised patients are globally emerging problems, the development of molecular techniques for fungal identification is crucial for early diagnosis and appropriate treatment.

  8. Physical mapping of 5S and 18S ribosomal DNA in three species of Agave (Asparagales, Asparagaceae)

    PubMed Central

    Gomez-Rodriguez, Victor Manuel; Rodriguez-Garay, Benjamin; Palomino, Guadalupe; Martínez, Javier; Barba-Gonzalez, Rodrigo

    2013-01-01

    Abstract Agave Linnaeus, 1753 is endemic of America and is considered one of the most important crops in Mexico due to its key role in the country’s economy. Cytogenetic analysis was carried out in Agave tequilana Weber, 1902 ‘Azul’, Agave cupreata Trelease et Berger, 1915 and Agave angustifolia Haworth, 1812. The analysis showed that in all species the diploid chromosome number was 2n = 60, with bimodal karyotypes composed of five pairs of large chromosomes and 25 pairs of small chromosomes. Furthermore, different karyotypical formulae as well as a secondary constriction in a large chromosome pair were found in all species. Fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH) was used for physical mapping of 5S and 18S ribosomal DNA (rDNA). All species analyzed showed that 5S rDNA was located in both arms of a small chromosome pair, while 18S rDNA was associated with the secondary constriction of a large chromosome pair. Data of FISH analysis provides new information about the position and number of rDNA loci and helps for detection of hybrids in breeding programs as well as evolutionary studies. PMID:24260700

  9. The phylogenetic position of Allocreadiidae (Trematoda: Digenea) from partial sequences of the 18S and 28S ribosomal RNA genes.

    PubMed

    Choudhury, Anindo; Rosas Valdez, Rogelio; Johnson, Ryan C; Hoffmann, Brian; Pérez-Ponce de León, Gerardo

    2007-02-01

    Species of Allocreadiidae are an important component of the parasite fauna of freshwater vertebrates, particularly fishes, and yet their systematic relationships with other trematodes have not been clarified. Partial sequences of the 18S and 28S ribosomal RNA genes from 3 representative species of Allocreadiidae, i.e., Crepidostomum cooperi, Bunodera mediovitellata, and Polylekithum ictaluri, and from 79 other taxa representing 78 families of trematodes obtained from GenBank, were used in a phylogenetic analysis to address the relationships of Allocreadiidae with other plagiorchiiforms/plagiorchiidans. Maximum parsimony and Bayesian analyses of combined 18S and 28S rRNA gene sequence data place 2 of the allocreadiids, Crepidostomum cooperi and Bunodera mediovitellata, in a clade with species of Callodistomidae and Gorgoderidae, which, in turn is sister to a clade containing Polylekithum ictaluri and representatives of Encyclometridae, Dicrocoelidae, and Orchipedidae, a grouping supported by high bootstrap values. These results suggest that Polylekithum ictaluri is not an allocreadiid, a conclusion that is supported by reported differences between its cercaria and that of other allocreadiids. Although details of the life cycle of callodistomids, the sister taxon to Allocreadiidae, remain unknown, the relationship of Allocreadiidae and Gorgoderidae is consistent with their larval development in bivalve, rather than gastropod, molluscs, and with their host relationships (predominantly freshwater vertebrates). The results also indicate that, whereas Allocreadiidae is not a basal taxon, it is not included within the suborder Plagiorchiata. No support was found for a direct relationship between allocreadiids and opecoelids either.

  10. Partial methylation at Am100 in 18S rRNA of baker's yeast reveals ribosome heterogeneity on the level of eukaryotic rRNA modification.

    PubMed

    Buchhaupt, Markus; Sharma, Sunny; Kellner, Stefanie; Oswald, Stefanie; Paetzold, Melanie; Peifer, Christian; Watzinger, Peter; Schrader, Jens; Helm, Mark; Entian, Karl-Dieter

    2014-01-01

    Ribosome heterogeneity is of increasing biological significance and several examples have been described for multicellular and single cells organisms. In here we show for the first time a variation in ribose methylation within the 18S rRNA of Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Using RNA-cleaving DNAzymes, we could specifically demonstrate that a significant amount of S. cerevisiae ribosomes are not methylated at 2'-O-ribose of A100 residue in the 18S rRNA. Furthermore, using LC-UV-MS/MS of a respective 18S rRNA fragment, we could not only corroborate the partial methylation at A100, but could also quantify the methylated versus non-methylated A100 residue. Here, we exhibit that only 68% of A100 in the 18S rRNA of S.cerevisiae are methylated at 2'-O ribose sugar. Polysomes also contain a similar heterogeneity for methylated Am100, which shows that 40S ribosome subunits with and without Am100 participate in translation. Introduction of a multicopy plasmid containing the corresponding methylation guide snoRNA gene SNR51 led to an increased A100 methylation, suggesting the cellular snR51 level to limit the extent of this modification. Partial rRNA modification demonstrates a new level of ribosome heterogeneity in eukaryotic cells that might have substantial impact on regulation and fine-tuning of the translation process.

  11. Partial Methylation at Am100 in 18S rRNA of Baker's Yeast Reveals Ribosome Heterogeneity on the Level of Eukaryotic rRNA Modification

    PubMed Central

    Kellner, Stefanie; Oswald, Stefanie; Paetzold, Melanie; Peifer, Christian; Watzinger, Peter; Schrader, Jens; Helm, Mark; Entian, Karl-Dieter

    2014-01-01

    Ribosome heterogeneity is of increasing biological significance and several examples have been described for multicellular and single cells organisms. In here we show for the first time a variation in ribose methylation within the 18S rRNA of Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Using RNA-cleaving DNAzymes, we could specifically demonstrate that a significant amount of S. cerevisiae ribosomes are not methylated at 2′-O-ribose of A100 residue in the 18S rRNA. Furthermore, using LC-UV-MS/MS of a respective 18S rRNA fragment, we could not only corroborate the partial methylation at A100, but could also quantify the methylated versus non-methylated A100 residue. Here, we exhibit that only 68% of A100 in the 18S rRNA of S.cerevisiae are methylated at 2′-O ribose sugar. Polysomes also contain a similar heterogeneity for methylated Am100, which shows that 40S ribosome subunits with and without Am100 participate in translation. Introduction of a multicopy plasmid containing the corresponding methylation guide snoRNA gene SNR51 led to an increased A100 methylation, suggesting the cellular snR51 level to limit the extent of this modification. Partial rRNA modification demonstrates a new level of ribosome heterogeneity in eukaryotic cells that might have substantial impact on regulation and fine-tuning of the translation process. PMID:24586927

  12. Fatal brain infection caused by Aspergillus glaucus in an immunocompetent patient identified by sequencing of the ribosomal 18S-28S internal transcribed spacer.

    PubMed

    Traboulsi, R S; Kattar, M M; Dbouni, O; Araj, G F; Kanj, S S

    2007-10-01

    Cerebral aspergillosis has rarely been reported in immunocompetent patients. We herein describe a unique case of cerebral aspergillosis in a healthy adult that led to his death despite aggressive antifungal therapy. Sequencing of ribosomal 18S-28S internal transcribed spacer identified the organism as Eurotium herbariorum, the teleomorph of Aspergillus glaucus.

  13. Characterization of the Dominant and Rare Members of a Young Hawaiian Soil Bacterial Community with Small-Subunit Ribosomal DNA Amplified from DNA Fractionated on the Basis of Its Guanine and Cytosine Composition

    PubMed Central

    Nüsslein, Klaus; Tiedje, James M.

    1998-01-01

    The small-subunit ribosomal DNA (rDNA) diversity was found to be very high in a Hawaiian soil community that might be expected to have lower diversity than the communities in continental soils because the Hawaiian soil is geographically isolated and only 200 years old, is subjected to a constant climate, and harbors low plant diversity. Since an underlying community structure could not be revealed by analyzing the total eubacterial rDNA, we first fractionated the DNA on the basis of guanine-plus-cytosine (G+C) content by using bis-benzimidazole and equilibrium centrifugation and then analyzed the bacterial rDNA amplified from a fraction with a high biomass (63% G+C fraction) and a fraction with a low biomass (35% G+C fraction). The rDNA clone libraries were screened by amplified rDNA restriction analysis to determine phylotype distribution. The dominant biomass reflected by the 63% G+C fraction contained several dominant phylotypes, while the community members that were less successful (35% G+C fraction) did not show dominance but there was a very high diversity of phylotypes. Nucleotide sequence analysis revealed taxa belonging to the groups expected for the G+C contents used. The dominant phylotypes in the 63% G+C fraction were members of the Pseudomonas, Rhizobium-Agrobacterium, and Rhodospirillum assemblages, while all of the clones sequenced from the 35% G+C fraction were affiliated with several Clostridium assemblages. The two-step rDNA analysis used here uncovered more diversity than can be detected by direct rDNA analysis of total community DNA. The G+C separation step is also a way to detect some of the less dominant organisms in a community. PMID:9546163

  14. A Single Acetylation of 18 S rRNA Is Essential for Biogenesis of the Small Ribosomal Subunit in Saccharomyces cerevisiae*

    PubMed Central

    Ito, Satoshi; Akamatsu, Yu; Noma, Akiko; Kimura, Satoshi; Miyauchi, Kenjyo; Ikeuchi, Yoshiho; Suzuki, Takeo; Suzuki, Tsutomu

    2014-01-01

    Biogenesis of eukaryotic ribosome is a complex event involving a number of non-ribosomal factors. During assembly of the ribosome, rRNAs are post-transcriptionally modified by 2′-O-methylation, pseudouridylation, and several base-specific modifications, which are collectively involved in fine-tuning translational fidelity and/or modulating ribosome assembly. By mass-spectrometric analysis, we demonstrated that N4-acetylcytidine (ac4C) is present at position 1773 in the 18 S rRNA of Saccharomyces cerevisiae. In addition, we found an essential gene, KRE33 (human homolog, NAT10), that we renamed RRA1 (ribosomal RNA cytidine acetyltransferase 1) encoding an RNA acetyltransferase responsible for ac4C1773 formation. Using recombinant Rra1p, we could successfully reconstitute ac4C1773 in a model rRNA fragment in the presence of both acetyl-CoA and ATP as substrates. Upon depletion of Rra1p, the 23 S precursor of 18 S rRNA was accumulated significantly, which resulted in complete loss of 18 S rRNA and small ribosomal subunit (40 S), suggesting that ac4C1773 formation catalyzed by Rra1p plays a critical role in processing of the 23 S precursor to yield 18 S rRNA. When nuclear acetyl-CoA was depleted by inactivation of acetyl-CoA synthetase 2 (ACS2), we observed temporal accumulation of the 23 S precursor, indicating that Rra1p modulates biogenesis of 40 S subunit by sensing nuclear acetyl-CoA concentration. PMID:25086048

  15. The human 18S rRNA base methyltransferases DIMT1L and WBSCR22-TRMT112 but not rRNA modification are required for ribosome biogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Zorbas, Christiane; Nicolas, Emilien; Wacheul, Ludivine; Huvelle, Emmeline; Heurgué-Hamard, Valérie; Lafontaine, Denis L. J.

    2015-01-01

    At the heart of the ribosome lie rRNAs, whose catalytic function in translation is subtly modulated by posttranscriptional modifications. In the small ribosomal subunit of budding yeast, on the 18S rRNA, two adjacent adenosines (A1781/A1782) are N6-dimethylated by Dim1 near the decoding site, and one guanosine (G1575) is N7-methylated by Bud23-Trm112 at a ridge between the P- and E-site tRNAs. Here we establish human DIMT1L and WBSCR22-TRMT112 as the functional homologues of yeast Dim1 and Bud23-Trm112. We report that these enzymes are required for distinct pre-rRNA processing reactions leading to synthesis of 18S rRNA, and we demonstrate that in human cells, as in budding yeast, ribosome biogenesis requires the presence of the modification enzyme rather than its RNA-modifying catalytic activity. We conclude that a quality control mechanism has been conserved from yeast to human by which binding of a methyltransferase to nascent pre-rRNAs is a prerequisite to processing, so that all cleaved RNAs are committed to faithful modification. We further report that 18S rRNA dimethylation is nuclear in human cells, in contrast to yeast, where it is cytoplasmic. Yeast and human ribosome biogenesis thus have both conserved and distinctive features. PMID:25851604

  16. Ribosomal protein S18e as a putative molecular staple for the 18S rRNA 3'-major domain core.

    PubMed

    Ilin, Aleksey A; Malygin, Alexey A; Karpova, Galina G

    2011-04-01

    Ribosomal protein S18e is a structural constituent of the 40S ribosomal subunit. We obtained recombinant human ribosomal protein S18e and studied its structural and functional properties. With the use of CD spectroscopy we showed that the protein secondary structure is mainly helical and stable in the neutral pH range and at low urea concentrations. Applying multiple sequence alignment, we revealed that the protein structure has characteristics of the eukaryotic members of the ribosomal protein S13p family with additional extensions in the N-terminal and central parts that contain α-helices according to our prediction. S18e binds specifically and independently to an RNA transcript corresponding to the evolutionary core of the 3'-major domain of 18S rRNA. Hydroxyl radical footprinting showed that the binding site of S18e on the 18S rRNA is similar in general to the binding site of S13p on the 16S rRNA in the 30S ribosomal subunit, albeit the rRNA regions attributed to binding of the eukaryote-specific extensions of S18e were also detected. With magnesium ion concentration close to cellular conditions (2mM), protein binding caused substantial rearrangements in the rRNA transcript making it compact in such a manner that helices H29/H30 and H41-H43 form a bundle resembling their arrangement in the ribosome. Thus, S18e seems to act as a molecular staple fixing the 18S rRNA 3'-major domain core. 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. HCV IRES interacts with the 18S rRNA to activate the 40S ribosome for subsequent steps of translation initiation

    PubMed Central

    Malygin, Alexey A.; Kossinova, Olga A.; Shatsky, Ivan N.; Karpova, Galina G.

    2013-01-01

    Previous analyses of complexes of 40S ribosomal subunits with the hepatitis C virus (HCV) internal ribosome entry site (IRES) have revealed contacts made by the IRES with ribosomal proteins. Here, using chemical probing, we show that the HCV IRES also contacts the backbone and bases of the CCC triplet in the 18S ribosomal RNA (rRNA) expansion segment 7. These contacts presumably provide interplay between IRES domain II and the AUG codon close to ribosomal protein S5, which causes a rearrangement of 18S rRNA structure in the vicinity of the universally conserved nucleotide G1639. As a result, G1639 becomes exposed and the corresponding site of the 40S subunit implicated in transfer RNA discrimination can select . These data are the first demonstration at nucleotide resolution of direct IRES–rRNA interactions and how they induce conformational transition in the 40S subunit allowing the HCV IRES to function without AUG recognition initiation factors. PMID:23873958

  18. Highly purified spermatozoal RNA obtained by a novel method indicates an unusual 28S/18S rRNA ratio and suggests impaired ribosome assembly.

    PubMed

    Cappallo-Obermann, Heike; Schulze, Wolfgang; Jastrow, Holger; Baukloh, Vera; Spiess, Andrej-Nikolai

    2011-11-01

    Human spermatozoal RNA features special characteristics such as a significantly reduced quantity within spermatozoa compared with somatic cells is described as being devoid of ribosomal RNAs and is difficult to isolate due to a massive excess of genomic DNA in the lysates. Using a novel two-round column-based protocol for human ejaculates delivering highly purified spermatozoal RNA, we uncovered a heterogeneous, but specific banding pattern in microelectrophoresis with 28S ribosomal RNA being indicative for the amount of round cell contamination. Ejaculates with different round cell quantities and density-purified spermatozoa revealed that 18S rRNA but not 28S rRNA is inherent to a pure spermatozoal fraction. Transmission electron microscopy showed monoribosomes and polyribosomes in spermatozoal cytoplasm, while immunohistochemical results suggest the presence of proteins from small and large ribosomal subunits in retained spermatozoal cytoplasm irrespective of 28S rRNA absence.

  19. gar2 is a nucleolar protein from Schizosaccharomyces pombe required for 18S rRNA and 40S ribosomal subunit accumulation.

    PubMed Central

    Gulli, M P; Girard, J P; Zabetakis, D; Lapeyre, B; Melese, T; Caizergues-Ferrer, M

    1995-01-01

    Several nucleolar proteins, such as nucleolin, NOP1/fibrillarin, SSB1, NSR1 and GAR1 share a common glycine and arginine rich structural motif called the GAR domain. To identify novel nucleolar proteins from fission yeast we screened Schizosaccharomyces pombe genomic DNA libraries with a probe encompassing the GAR structural motif. Here we report the identification and characterization of a S.pombe gene coding for a novel nucleolar protein, designated gar2. The structure of the fission yeast gar2 is reminiscent of that of nucleolin from vertebrates and NSR1 from Saccharomyces cerevisiae. In addition, like these proteins, gar2 has a nucleolar localisation. The disruption of the gar2+ gene affects normal cell growth, leads to an accumulation of 35S pre-rRNA and a decrease of mature 18S rRNA steady state levels. Moreover, ribosomal profiles of the mutant show an increase of free 60S ribosomal subunits and an absence of free 40S ribosomal subunits. gar2 is able to rescue a S.cerevisiae mutant lacking NSR1, thus establishing gar2 as a functional homolog of NSR1. We propose that gar2 helps the assembly of pre-ribosomal particles containing 18S rRNA. Images PMID:7596817

  20. Direct chemical probing of the conformation of the 3' functional domain of rabbit 18S rRNA in 40S subunits, 80S ribosomes and polyribosomes

    SciTech Connect

    Rubino, H.M.; Rairkar, A.; Lockard, R.E.

    1987-05-01

    Recent evidence suggests that the 3' minor domain of eukaryotic 18S rRNA, as in prokaryotes, is directly involved in protein biosynthesis. To determine regions of possible functional importance, they have probed the higher order structure of rabbit 18S rRNA in both 40S subunits and 80S ribosomes, as well as polyribosomes using the single-strand specific chemical probes dimethyl sulfate (DMS) and diethyl pyrocarbonate (DEPC) which react with unpaired guanosine and adenosine residues, respectively. The modified 18S rRNA was isolated from these particles and the resultant modified nucleotides identified on polyacrylamide sequencing gels upon either aniline-induced strand scission of /sup 32/P-end-labeled intact rRNA or by DNA primer extension using sequence specific deoxyoligomers with reverse transcriptase. Their results indicate a decreased reactivity of residue C-1692 in rabbit 18S rRNA (corresponding to C-1400 E. coli) within the putative tRNA contact site in polyribosomes as compared with 40S subunits and 80S ribosomes. They have also determined varying reactivities of a number of other residues within specific regions of the 3' functional domain when 40S, 80S, and polyribosomes are compared, which may be important for both subunit association as well as mRNA binding.

  1. Ribosomal RNA sequence suggest microsporidia are extremely ancient eukaryotes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vossbrinck, C. R.; Maddox, J. V.; Friedman, S.; Debrunner-Vossbrinck, B. A.; Woese, C. R.

    1987-01-01

    A comparative sequence analysis of the 18S small subunit ribosomal RNA (rRNA) of the microsporidium Vairimorpha necatrix is presented. The results show that this rRNA sequence is more unlike those of other eukaryotes than any known eukaryote rRNA sequence. It is concluded that the lineage leading to microsporidia branched very early from that leading to other eukaryotes.

  2. Ribosomal RNA sequence suggest microsporidia are extremely ancient eukaryotes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vossbrinck, C. R.; Maddox, J. V.; Friedman, S.; Debrunner-Vossbrinck, B. A.; Woese, C. R.

    1987-01-01

    A comparative sequence analysis of the 18S small subunit ribosomal RNA (rRNA) of the microsporidium Vairimorpha necatrix is presented. The results show that this rRNA sequence is more unlike those of other eukaryotes than any known eukaryote rRNA sequence. It is concluded that the lineage leading to microsporidia branched very early from that leading to other eukaryotes.

  3. The human 18S rRNA base methyltransferases DIMT1L and WBSCR22-TRMT112 but not rRNA modification are required for ribosome biogenesis.

    PubMed

    Zorbas, Christiane; Nicolas, Emilien; Wacheul, Ludivine; Huvelle, Emmeline; Heurgué-Hamard, Valérie; Lafontaine, Denis L J

    2015-06-01

    At the heart of the ribosome lie rRNAs, whose catalytic function in translation is subtly modulated by posttranscriptional modifications. In the small ribosomal subunit of budding yeast, on the 18S rRNA, two adjacent adenosines (A1781/A1782) are N(6)-dimethylated by Dim1 near the decoding site, and one guanosine (G1575) is N(7)-methylated by Bud23-Trm112 at a ridge between the P- and E-site tRNAs. Here we establish human DIMT1L and WBSCR22-TRMT112 as the functional homologues of yeast Dim1 and Bud23-Trm112. We report that these enzymes are required for distinct pre-rRNA processing reactions leading to synthesis of 18S rRNA, and we demonstrate that in human cells, as in budding yeast, ribosome biogenesis requires the presence of the modification enzyme rather than its RNA-modifying catalytic activity. We conclude that a quality control mechanism has been conserved from yeast to human by which binding of a methyltransferase to nascent pre-rRNAs is a prerequisite to processing, so that all cleaved RNAs are committed to faithful modification. We further report that 18S rRNA dimethylation is nuclear in human cells, in contrast to yeast, where it is cytoplasmic. Yeast and human ribosome biogenesis thus have both conserved and distinctive features. © 2015 Zorbas, Nicolas et al. This article is distributed by The American Society for Cell Biology under license from the author(s). Two months after publication it is available to the public under an Attribution–Noncommercial–Share Alike 3.0 Unported Creative Commons License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/3.0).

  4. Localization of 18S + 28S and 5S ribosomal RNA genes in the dog by fluorescence in situ hybridization.

    PubMed

    Mäkinen, A; Zijlstra, C; de Haan, N A; Mellink, C H; Bosma, A A

    1997-01-01

    The gene clusters encoding 18S + 28S and 5S rRNA in the dog (Canis familiaris) have been localized by using GTG-banding and fluorescence in situ hybridization. The 18S + 28S rDNA maps to chromosome regions 7q2.5-->q2.7, 17q1.7, qter of a medium-sized, not yet numbered autosome, and Yq1.2-->q1.3. Our data show that there is one cluster of 5S rDNA in the dog, which maps to chromosome region 4q1.4.

  5. A Local Role for the Small Ribosomal Subunit Primary Binder rpS5 in Final 18S rRNA Processing in Yeast

    PubMed Central

    Neueder, Andreas; Jakob, Steffen; Pöll, Gisela; Linnemann, Jan; Deutzmann, Rainer; Tschochner, Herbert; Milkereit, Philipp

    2010-01-01

    In vivo depletion of the yeast small ribosomal subunit (SSU) protein S5 (rpS5) leads to nuclear degradation of nascent SSUs and to a perturbed global assembly state of the SSU head domain. Here, we report that rpS5 plays an additional local role at the head/platform interface in efficient SSU maturation. We find that yeast small ribosomal subunits which incorporated an rpS5 variant lacking the seven C-terminal amino acids have a largely assembled head domain and are exported to the cytoplasm. On the other hand, 3′ processing of 18S rRNA precursors is inhibited in these ribosomal particles, although they associate with the putative endonuclease Nob1p and other late acting 40S biogenesis factors. We suggest that the SSU head component rpS5 and platform components as rpS14 are crucial constituents of a highly defined spatial arrangement in the head – platform interface of nascent SSUs, which is required for efficient processing of the therein predicted SSU rRNA 3′ end. Positioning of rpS5 in nascent SSUs, including its relative orientation towards platform components in the head-platform cleft, will depend on the general assembly and folding state of the head domain. Therefore, the suggested model can explain 18S precursor rRNA 3′ processing phenotypes observed in many eukaryotic SSU head assembly mutants. PMID:20419091

  6. Molecular phylogenetic analysis of Enterobius vermicularis and development of an 18S ribosomal DNA-targeted diagnostic PCR.

    PubMed

    Zelck, Ulrike E; Bialek, Ralf; Weiss, Michael

    2011-04-01

    We genetically characterized pinworms obtained from 37 children from different regions of Germany and established new species-specific molecular diagnostic tools. No ribosomal DNA diversity was found; the phylogenetic position of Enterobius vermicularis within the Oxyurida order and its close relationship to the Ascaridida and Spirurida orders was confirmed.

  7. Molecular Phylogenetic Analysis of Enterobius vermicularis and Development of an 18S Ribosomal DNA-Targeted Diagnostic PCR▿

    PubMed Central

    Zelck, Ulrike E.; Bialek, Ralf; Weiß, Michael

    2011-01-01

    We genetically characterized pinworms obtained from 37 children from different regions of Germany and established new species-specific molecular diagnostic tools. No ribosomal DNA diversity was found; the phylogenetic position of Enterobius vermicularis within the Oxyurida order and its close relationship to the Ascaridida and Spirurida orders was confirmed. PMID:21248085

  8. PHYLOGENETIC RELATIONSHIP OF ALEXANDRIUM MONILATUM (DINOPHYCEAE) TO OTHER ALEXANDRIUM SPECIES BASED ON 18S RIBOSOMAL RNA GENE SEQUENCES

    EPA Science Inventory

    The phylogenetic relationship of Alexandrium monilatum to other Alexandrium spp. was explored using 18S rDNA sequences. Maximum likelilhood phylogenetic analysis of the combined rDNA sequences established that A. monilatum paired with Alexandrium taylori and that the pair was the...

  9. Haptophyte Diversity and Vertical Distribution Explored by 18S and 28S Ribosomal RNA Gene Metabarcoding and Scanning Electron Microscopy.

    PubMed

    Gran-Stadniczeñko, Sandra; Šupraha, Luka; Egge, Elianne D; Edvardsen, Bente

    2017-07-01

    Haptophyta encompasses more than 300 species of mostly marine pico- and nanoplanktonic flagellates. Our aims were to investigate the Oslofjorden haptophyte diversity and vertical distribution by metabarcoding, and to improve the approach to study haptophyte community composition, richness and proportional abundance by comparing two rRNA markers and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Samples were collected in August 2013 at the Outer Oslofjorden, Norway. Total RNA/cDNA was amplified by haptophyte-specific primers targeting the V4 region of the 18S, and the D1-D2 region of the 28S rRNA. Taxonomy was assigned using curated haptophyte reference databases and phylogenetic analyses. Both marker genes showed Chrysochromulinaceae and Prymnesiaceae to be the families with highest number of Operational Taxonomic Units (OTUs), as well as proportional abundance. The 18S rRNA data set also contained OTUs assigned to eight supported and defined clades consisting of environmental sequences only, possibly representing novel lineages from family to class. We also recorded new species for the area. Comparing coccolithophores by SEM with metabarcoding shows a good correspondence with the 18S rRNA gene proportional abundances. Our results contribute to link morphological and molecular data and 28S to 18S rRNA gene sequences of haptophytes without cultured representatives, and to improve metabarcoding methodology. © 2016 The Authors Journal of Eukaryotic Microbiology published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. on behalf of International Society of Protistologists.

  10. Nop9 is an RNA binding protein present in pre-40S ribosomes and required for 18S rRNA synthesis in yeast

    PubMed Central

    Thomson, Emma; Rappsilber, Juri; Tollervey, David

    2007-01-01

    Proteomic analyses in yeast have identified a large number of proteins that are associated with preribosomal particles. However, the product of the yeast ORF YJL010C, herein designated as Nop9, failed to be identified in any previous physical or genetic analysis of preribosomes. Here we report that Nop9 is a nucleolar protein, which is associated with 90S and 40S preribosomes. In cells depleted of Nop9p, early cleavages of the 35S pre-rRNA are inhibited, resulting in the nucleolar retention of accumulated precursors and a failure to synthesize 18S rRNA. Nop9 contains multiple pumilio-like putative RNA binding repeats and displays robust in vitro RNA binding activity. The identification of Nop9p as a novel, essential factor in the nuclear maturation of 90S and pre-40S ribosomal subunits shows that the complement of ribosome synthesis factors remains incomplete. PMID:17956976

  11. [Mg2+ ions affect the structure of the central domain of the 18S rRNA in the vicinity of the ribosomal protein S13 binding site].

    PubMed

    Ivanov, A V; Malygin, A A; Karpova, G G

    2013-01-01

    It is known that Mg2+ ions at high concentrations stabilize the structure of the 16S rRNA in a conformation favorable for binding to the ribosomal proteins in the course of the eubacterial 30S ribosomal subunits assembly in vitro. Effect of Mg2+ on the formation of the 18S rRNA structure at the 40S subunit assembly remains poorly explored. In this paper, we show that the sequentional increase of the Mg2+ concentration from 0.5 mM to 20 mM leads to a significant decrease of the affinity of recombinant human ribosomal protein S13 (rpS13e) to a RNA transcript corresponding to the central domain fragment of the 18S rRNA (18SCD). The regions near the rpS13e binding site in 18SCD (including the nucleotides of helices H20 and H22), whose availabilities to hydroxyl radicals were dependent on the Mg2+ concentration, were determined. It was found that increase of the concentrations of Mg2+ results in the enhanced accessibilities of nucleotides G933-C937 and C1006-A1009 in helix H22 and reduces those of nucleotides A1023, A1024, and A1028-S1026 in the helix H20. Comparison of the results obtained with the crystallographic data on the structure of the central domain of 18S rRNA in the 40S ribosomal subunit led to conclusion that increase of Mg2+ concentrations results in the reorientation of helices H20 and H24 relatively helices H22 and H23 to form a structure, in which these helices are positioned the same way as in 40S subunits. Hence, saturation of the central domain of 18S rRNA with coordinated Mg2+ ions causes the same changes in its structure as rpS13e binding does, and leads to decreasing of this domain affinity to the protein.

  12. Molecular and phylogenetic characterizations of an Eimeria krijgsmanni Yakimoff & Gouseff, 1938 (Apicomplexa: Eimeriidae) mouse intestinal protozoan parasite by partial 18S ribosomal RNA gene sequence analysis.

    PubMed

    Takeo, Toshinori; Tanaka, Tetsuya; Matsubayashi, Makoto; Maeda, Hiroki; Kusakisako, Kodai; Matsui, Toshihiro; Mochizuki, Masami; Matsuo, Tomohide

    2014-08-01

    Previously, we characterized an undocumented strain of Eimeria krijgsmanni by morphological and biological features. Here, we present a detailed molecular phylogenetic analysis of this organism. Namely, 18S ribosomal RNA gene (rDNA) sequences of E. krijgsmanni were analyzed to incorporate this species into a comprehensive Eimeria phylogeny. As a result, partial 18S rDNA sequence from E. krijgsmanni was successfully determined, and two different types, Type A and Type B, that differed by 1 base pair were identified. E. krijgsmanni was originally isolated from a single oocyst, and thus the result show that the two types might have allelic sequence heterogeneity in the 18S rDNA. Based on phylogenetic analyses, the two types of E. krijgsmanni 18S rDNA formed one of two clades among murine Eimeria spp.; these Eimeria clades reflected morphological similarity among the Eimeria spp. This is the third molecular phylogenetic characterization of a murine Eimeria spp. in addition to E. falciformis and E. papillata.

  13. The 18S ribosomal RNA sequence of the sea anemone Anemonia sulcata and its evolutionary position among other eukaryotes.

    PubMed

    Hendriks, L; Van de Peer, Y; Van Herck, M; Neefs, J M; De Wachter, R

    1990-09-03

    Evolutionary trees based on partial small ribosomal subunit RNA sequences of 22 metazoa species have been published [(1988) Science 239, 748-753]. In these trees, cnidarians (Radiata) seemed to have evolved independently from the Bilateria, which is in contradiction with the general evolutionary view. In order to further investigate this problem, the complete srRNA sequence of the sea anemone Anemonia sulcata was determined and evolutionary trees were constructed using a matrix optimization method. In the tree thus obtained the sea anemone and Bilateria together form a monophyletic cluster, with the sea anemone forming the first line of the metazoan group.

  14. Variation in the number of nucleoli and incomplete homogenization of 18S ribosomal DNA sequences in leaf cells of the cultivated Oriental ginseng (Panax ginseng Meyer)

    PubMed Central

    Chelomina, Galina N.; Rozhkovan, Konstantin V.; Voronova, Anastasia N.; Burundukova, Olga L.; Muzarok, Tamara I.; Zhuravlev, Yuri N.

    2015-01-01

    Background Wild ginseng, Panax ginseng Meyer, is an endangered species of medicinal plants. In the present study, we analyzed variations within the ribosomal DNA (rDNA) cluster to gain insight into the genetic diversity of the Oriental ginseng, P. ginseng, at artificial plant cultivation. Methods The roots of wild P. ginseng plants were sampled from a nonprotected natural population of the Russian Far East. The slides were prepared from leaf tissues using the squash technique for cytogenetic analysis. The 18S rDNA sequences were cloned and sequenced. The distribution of nucleotide diversity, recombination events, and interspecific phylogenies for the total 18S rDNA sequence data set was also examined. Results In mesophyll cells, mononucleolar nuclei were estimated to be dominant (75.7%), while the remaining nuclei contained two to four nucleoli. Among the analyzed 18S rDNA clones, 20% were identical to the 18S rDNA sequence of P. ginseng from Japan, and other clones differed in one to six substitutions. The nucleotide polymorphism was more expressed at the positions 440–640 bp, and distributed in variable regions, expansion segments, and conservative elements of core structure. The phylogenetic analysis confirmed conspecificity of ginseng plants cultivated in different regions, with two fixed mutations between P. ginseng and other species. Conclusion This study identified the evidences of the intragenomic nucleotide polymorphism in the 18S rDNA sequences of P. ginseng. These data suggest that, in cultivated plants, the observed genome instability may influence the synthesis of biologically active compounds, which are widely used in traditional medicine. PMID:27158239

  15. The HIV-1 Nef protein interacts with two components of the 40S small ribosomal subunit, the RPS10 protein and the 18S rRNA.

    PubMed

    Abbas, Wasim; Dichamp, Isabelle; Herbein, Georges

    2012-07-10

    Human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) Nef-encoded protein plays key functions at almost all stages of the viral life cycle, but its role in translation is largely unknown. To determine the effect of Nef on translation we used an in vitro translation assay. The detection of Nef/RPS10 complexes and the presence of 18S rRNA and tRNAs in the complexes were performed by coimmunoprecipitation and RT-PCR assay. We observed that the HIV-1 Nef protein specifically impaired translation in vitro. We observed the interaction of Nef with RPS10 by coimmunoprecipitation assay. In addition 18S rRNA and tRNAs were present in the Nef/RPS10 complexes. Our results are consistent with a model in which the Nef protein by binding to two components of the 40S small ribosomal subunit, RPS10 and 18S rRNA, and to a lesser extent to tRNAs, could lead to decreased protein synthesis.

  16. Phylogeny of the sundews, Drosera (Droseraceae), based on chloroplast rbcL and nuclear 18S ribosomal DNA Sequences.

    PubMed

    Rivadavia, Fernando; Kondo, Katsuhiko; Kato, Masahiro; Hasebe, Mitsuyasu

    2003-01-01

    The sundew genus Drosera consists of carnivorous plants with active flypaper traps and includes nearly 150 species distributed mainly in Australia, Africa, and South America, with some Northern Hemisphere species. In addition to confused intrageneric classification of Drosera, the intergeneric relationships among the Drosera and two other genera in the Droseraceae with snap traps, Dionaea and Aldrovanda, are problematic. We conducted phylogenetic analyses of DNA sequences of the chloroplast rbcL gene for 59 species of Drosera, covering all sections except one. These analyses revealed that five of 11 sections, including three monotypic sections, are polyphyletic. Combined rbcL and 18S rDNA sequence data were used to infer phylogenetic relationships among Drosera, Dionaea, and Aldrovanda. This analysis revealed that all Drosera species form a clade sister to a clade including Dionaea and Aldrovanda, suggesting that the snap traps of Aldrovanda and Dionaea are homologous despite their morphological differences. MacClade reconstructions indicated that multiple episodes of aneuploidy occurred in a clade that includes mainly Australian species, while the chromosome numbers in the other clades are not as variable. Drosera regia, which is native to South Africa, and most species native to Australia, were clustered basally, suggesting that Drosera originated in Africa or Australia. The rbcL tree indicates that Australian species expanded their distribution to South America and then to Africa. Expansion of distribution to the Northern Hemisphere from the Southern Hemispere occurred in a few different lineages.

  17. A paraphyly of the genus Bothriocephalus Rudolphi, 1808 (Cestoda: Pseudophyllidea) inferred from internal transcribed spacer-2 and 18S ribosomal DNA sequences.

    PubMed

    Skeríková, Andrea; Hypsa, Václav; Scholz, Tomás

    2004-06-01

    Phylogenetic relationships between Bothriocephalus species from freshwater and marine teleosts from different geographical regions were studied using internal transcribed spacer-2 and partial 18S ribosomal DNA. The analyses revealed a paraphyly of Bothriocephalus with respect to the genera Polyonchobothrium, Anantrum, and Clestobothrium. The freshwater species Bothriocephalus claviceps, B. acheilognathi, and Bothriocephalus sp. from Dorosoma petenense formed a well-supported monophyletic cluster, with Polyonchobothrium at its base. In contrast, the type species, B. scorpii, clustered within a distinct lineage formed by a heterogeneous assemblage of marine species, Clestobothrium crassiceps and Anantrum tortum, and the freshwater species B. cf. japonicus. This shows that the current morphology-based classification is unlikely to reflect the phylogenetic relationships within this group and will require a thorough revision.

  18. The Strepsiptera problem: phylogeny of the holometabolous insect orders inferred from 18S and 28S ribosomal DNA sequences and morphology.

    PubMed

    Whiting, M F; Carpenter, J C; Wheeler, Q D; Wheeler, W C

    1997-03-01

    Phylogenetic relationships among the holometabolous insect orders were inferred from cladistic analysis of nucleotide sequences of 18S ribosomal DNA (rDNA) (85 exemplars) and 28S rDNA (52 exemplars) and morphological characters. Exemplar outgroup taxa were Collembola (1 sequence), Archaeognatha (1), Ephemerida (1), Odonata (2), Plecoptera (2), Blattodea (1), Mantodea (1), Dermaptera (1), Orthoptera (1), Phasmatodea (1), Embioptera (1), Psocoptera (1), Phthiraptera (1), Hemiptera (4), and Thysanoptera (1). Exemplar ingroup taxa were Coleoptera: Archostemata (1), Adephaga (2), and Polyphaga (7); Megaloptera (1); Raphidioptera (1); Neuroptera (sensu stricto = Planipennia): Mantispoidea (2), Hemerobioidea (2), and Myrmeleontoidea (2); Hymenoptera: Symphyta (4) and Apocrita (19); Trichoptera: Hydropsychoidea (1) and Limnephiloidea (2); Lepidoptera: Ditrysia (3); Siphonaptera: Pulicoidea (1) and Ceratophylloidea (2); Mecoptera: Meropeidae (1), Boreidae (1), Panorpidae (1), and Bittacidae (2); Diptera: Nematocera (1), Brachycera (2), and Cyclorrhapha (1); and Strepsiptera: Corioxenidae (1), Myrmecolacidae (1), Elenchidae (1), and Stylopidae (3). We analyzed approximately 1 kilobase of 18S rDNA, starting 398 nucleotides downstream of the 5' end, and approximately 400 bp of 28S rDNA in expansion segment D3. Multiple alignment of the 18S and 28S sequences resulted in 1,116 nucleotide positions with 24 insert regions and 398 positions with 14 insert regions, respectively. All Strepsiptera and Neuroptera have large insert regions in 18S and 28S. The secondary structure of 18S insert 23 is composed of long stems that are GC rich in the basal Strepsiptera and AT rich in the more derived Strepsiptera. A matrix of 176 morphological characters was analyzed for holometabolous orders. Incongruence length difference tests indicate that the 28S + morphological data sets are incongruent but that 28S + 18S, 18S + morphology, and 28S + 18S + morphology fail to reject the hypothesis of

  19. Use of Subgenic 18S Ribosomal DNA PCR and Sequencing for Genus and Genotype Identification of Acanthamoebae from Humans with Keratitis and from Sewage Sludge

    PubMed Central

    Schroeder, Jill M.; Booton, Gregory C.; Hay, John; Niszl, Ingrid A.; Seal, David V.; Markus, Miles B.; Fuerst, Paul A.; Byers, Thomas J.

    2001-01-01

    This study identified subgenic PCR amplimers from 18S rDNA that were (i) highly specific for the genus Acanthamoeba, (ii) obtainable from all known genotypes, and (iii) useful for identification of individual genotypes. A 423- to 551-bp Acanthamoeba-specific amplimer ASA.S1 obtained with primers JDP1 and JDP2 was the most reliable for purposes i and ii. A variable region within this amplimer also identified genotype clusters, but purpose iii was best achieved with sequencing of the genotype-specific amplimer GTSA.B1. Because this amplimer could be obtained from any eukaryote, axenic Acanthamoeba cultures were required for its study. GTSA.B1, produced with primers CRN5 and 1137, extended between reference bp 1 and 1475. Genotypic identification relied on three segments: bp 178 to 355, 705 to 926, and 1175 to 1379. ASA.S1 was obtained from single amoeba, from cultures of all known 18S rDNA genotypes, and from corneal scrapings of Scottish patients with suspected Acanthamoeba keratitis (AK). The AK PCR findings were consistent with culture results for 11 of 15 culture-positive specimens and detected Acanthamoeba in one of nine culture-negative specimens. ASA.S1 sequences were examined for 6 of the 11 culture-positive isolates and were most closely associated with genotypic cluster T3-T4-T11. A similar distance analysis using GTSA.B1 sequences identified nine South African AK-associated isolates as genotype T4 and three isolates from sewage sludge as genotype T5. Our results demonstrate the usefulness of 18S ribosomal DNA PCR amplimers ASA.S1 and GTSA.B1 for Acanthamoeba-specific detection and reliable genotyping, respectively, and provide further evidence that T4 is the predominant genotype in AK. PMID:11326011

  20. Use of subgenic 18S ribosomal DNA PCR and sequencing for genus and genotype identification of acanthamoebae from humans with keratitis and from sewage sludge.

    PubMed

    Schroeder, J M; Booton, G C; Hay, J; Niszl, I A; Seal, D V; Markus, M B; Fuerst, P A; Byers, T J

    2001-05-01

    This study identified subgenic PCR amplimers from 18S rDNA that were (i) highly specific for the genus Acanthamoeba, (ii) obtainable from all known genotypes, and (iii) useful for identification of individual genotypes. A 423- to 551-bp Acanthamoeba-specific amplimer ASA.S1 obtained with primers JDP1 and JDP2 was the most reliable for purposes i and ii. A variable region within this amplimer also identified genotype clusters, but purpose iii was best achieved with sequencing of the genotype-specific amplimer GTSA.B1. Because this amplimer could be obtained from any eukaryote, axenic Acanthamoeba cultures were required for its study. GTSA.B1, produced with primers CRN5 and 1137, extended between reference bp 1 and 1475. Genotypic identification relied on three segments: bp 178 to 355, 705 to 926, and 1175 to 1379. ASA.S1 was obtained from single amoeba, from cultures of all known 18S rDNA genotypes, and from corneal scrapings of Scottish patients with suspected Acanthamoeba keratitis (AK). The AK PCR findings were consistent with culture results for 11 of 15 culture-positive specimens and detected Acanthamoeba in one of nine culture-negative specimens. ASA.S1 sequences were examined for 6 of the 11 culture-positive isolates and were most closely associated with genotypic cluster T3-T4-T11. A similar distance analysis using GTSA.B1 sequences identified nine South African AK-associated isolates as genotype T4 and three isolates from sewage sludge as genotype T5. Our results demonstrate the usefulness of 18S ribosomal DNA PCR amplimers ASA.S1 and GTSA.B1 for Acanthamoeba-specific detection and reliable genotyping, respectively, and provide further evidence that T4 is the predominant genotype in AK.

  1. Vorticella Linnaeus, 1767 (Ciliophora, Oligohymenophora, Peritrichia) is a grade not a clade: redefinition of Vorticella and the families Vorticellidae and Astylozoidae using molecular characters derived from the gene coding for small subunit ribosomal RNA.

    PubMed

    Sun, Ping; Clamp, John; Xu, Dapeng; Kusuoka, Yasushi; Miao, Wei

    2012-01-01

    Recent phylogenetic analyses of the peritrich genus Vorticella have suggested that it might be paraphyletic, with one Vorticella species - Vorticella microstoma grouping with the swimming peritrichs Astylozoon and Opisthonecta in a distant clade. These results were based on very limited taxon sampling and thus could not be accepted as conclusive evidence for revising the generic classification. We tested paraphyly of the genus Vorticella by making a new analysis with a broad range of samples from three continents that yielded 52 new sequences of the gene coding for small subunit rRNA. Our results, together with the available sequences in Genbank, form a comprehensive set of data for the genus Vorticella. Analyses of these data showed that Vorticella microstoma morphotypes, Astylozoon, and Opisthonecta form a well-supported, monophyletic clade, that is distinct from and basal to the family Vorticellidae containing other species of Vorticella. Paraphyly of the genus Vorticella and family Vorticellidae was strongly confirmed by these results. Furthermore, the two clades of Vorticella identified by the SSU rRNA gene are so genetically diverse whereas the genetic distances within the one containing Vorticella microstoma morphotypes, Astylozoon, and Opisthonecta were so slight, which marked it as a separate family that must be defined by molecular characters in the absence of unifying morphological and morphogenetic characters. An emended characterization and status of the genus Vorticella, the families Vorticellidae and Astylozoidae are presented and discussed.

  2. Chemical footprinting reveals conformational changes of 18S and 28S rRNAs at different steps of translation termination on the human ribosome

    PubMed Central

    Bulygin, Konstantin N.; Bartuli, Yulia S.; Malygin, Alexey A.; Graifer, Dmitri M.; Frolova, Ludmila Yu.; Karpova, Galina G.

    2016-01-01

    Translation termination in eukaryotes is mediated by release factors: eRF1, which is responsible for stop codon recognition and peptidyl-tRNA hydrolysis, and GTPase eRF3, which stimulates peptide release. Here, we have utilized ribose-specific probes to investigate accessibility of rRNA backbone in complexes formed by association of mRNA- and tRNA-bound human ribosomes with eRF1•eRF3•GMPPNP, eRF1•eRF3•GTP, or eRF1 alone as compared with complexes where the A site is vacant or occupied by tRNA. Our data show which rRNA ribose moieties are protected from attack by the probes in the complexes with release factors and reveal the rRNA regions increasing their accessibility to the probes after the factors bind. These regions in 28S rRNA are helices 43 and 44 in the GTPase associated center, the apical loop of helix 71, and helices 89, 92, and 94 as well as 18S rRNA helices 18 and 34. Additionally, the obtained data suggest that eRF3 neither interacts with the rRNA ribose-phosphate backbone nor dissociates from the complex after GTP hydrolysis. Taken together, our findings provide new information on architecture of the eRF1 binding site on mammalian ribosome at various translation termination steps and on conformational rearrangements induced by binding of the release factors. PMID:26655225

  3. Chemical footprinting reveals conformational changes of 18S and 28S rRNAs at different steps of translation termination on the human ribosome.

    PubMed

    Bulygin, Konstantin N; Bartuli, Yulia S; Malygin, Alexey A; Graifer, Dmitri M; Frolova, Ludmila Yu; Karpova, Galina G

    2016-02-01

    Translation termination in eukaryotes is mediated by release factors: eRF1, which is responsible for stop codon recognition and peptidyl-tRNA hydrolysis, and GTPase eRF3, which stimulates peptide release. Here, we have utilized ribose-specific probes to investigate accessibility of rRNA backbone in complexes formed by association of mRNA- and tRNA-bound human ribosomes with eRF1•eRF3•GMPPNP, eRF1•eRF3•GTP, or eRF1 alone as compared with complexes where the A site is vacant or occupied by tRNA. Our data show which rRNA ribose moieties are protected from attack by the probes in the complexes with release factors and reveal the rRNA regions increasing their accessibility to the probes after the factors bind. These regions in 28S rRNA are helices 43 and 44 in the GTPase associated center, the apical loop of helix 71, and helices 89, 92, and 94 as well as 18S rRNA helices 18 and 34. Additionally, the obtained data suggest that eRF3 neither interacts with the rRNA ribose-phosphate backbone nor dissociates from the complex after GTP hydrolysis. Taken together, our findings provide new information on architecture of the eRF1 binding site on mammalian ribosome at various translation termination steps and on conformational rearrangements induced by binding of the release factors. © 2016 Bulygin et al.; Published by Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory Press for the RNA Society.

  4. Role of the Rubisco Small Subunit

    SciTech Connect

    Spreitzer, Robert Joseph

    2016-11-05

    Ribulose-1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase (Rubisco) catalyzes the rate-limiting step of CO2 fixation in photosynthesis. However, it is a slow enzyme, and O2 competes with CO2 at the active site. Oxygenation initiates the photorespiratory pathway, which also results in the loss of CO2. If carboxylation could be increased or oxygenation decreased, an increase in net CO2 fixation would be realized. Because Rubisco provides the primary means by which carbon enters all life on earth, there is much interest in engineering Rubisco to increase the production of food and renewable energy. Rubisco is located in the chloroplasts of plants, and it is comprised of two subunits. Much is known about the chloroplast-gene-encoded large subunit (rbcL gene), which contains the active site, but much less is known about the role of the nuclear-gene-encoded small subunit in Rubisco function (rbcS gene). Both subunits are coded by multiple genes in plants, which makes genetic engineering difficult. In the eukaryotic, green alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii, it has been possible to eliminate all the Rubisco genes. These Rubisco-less mutants can be maintained by providing acetate as an alternative carbon source. In this project, focus has been placed on determining whether the small subunit might be a better genetic-engineering target for improving Rubisco. Analysis of a variable-loop structure (βA-βB loop) of the small subunit by genetic selection, directed mutagenesis, and construction of chimeras has shown that the small subunit can influence CO2/O2 specificity. X-ray crystal structures of engineered chimeric-loop enzymes have indicated that additional residues and regions of the small subunit may also contribute to Rubisco function. Structural dynamics of the small-subunit carboxyl terminus was also investigated. Alanine-scanning mutagenesis of the most-conserved small-subunit residues has identified a

  5. Detection of Kudoa septempunctata 18S ribosomal DNA in patient fecal samples from novel food-borne outbreaks caused by consumption of raw olive flounder (Paralichthys olivaceus).

    PubMed

    Harada, Tetsuya; Kawai, Takao; Jinnai, Michio; Ohnishi, Takahiro; Sugita-Konishi, Yoshiko; Kumeda, Yuko

    2012-09-01

    Kudoa septempunctata is a newly identified myxosporean parasite of olive flounder (Paralichthys olivaceus) and a suspected causative agent of several food-borne gastroenteritis outbreaks in Japan. Here, we report the detection of K. septempunctata 18S ribosomal DNA in fecal samples of outbreak patients using an efficient method based on real-time PCR. We first performed a spiking experiment to assess whether our previously developed real-time PCR assay was applicable to detect K. septempunctata in feces. Simultaneously, we compared the relative extraction efficacy of K. septempunctata DNA using three commercial kits. Finally, our detection method was validated by testing 45 clinical samples obtained from 13 food-borne outbreaks associated with the consumption of raw flounder and 41 fecal samples from diarrhea patients epidemiologically unrelated to the ingestion of raw fish. We found that the FastDNA Spin Kit for Soil (MP Biomedicals) was the most efficient method for extracting K. septempunctata DNA from fecal samples. Using this kit, the detection limit of our real-time PCR assay was 1.6 × 10(1) spores per g of feces, and positive results were obtained for 21 fecal and 2 vomitus samples obtained from the food-borne outbreaks. To our knowledge, this is the first report to describe the detection of K. septempunctata DNA in patient fecal samples. We anticipate that our detection method will be useful for confirming food-borne diseases caused by K. septempunctata in laboratory investigations.

  6. An 18S ribosomal DNA barcode for the study of Isomermis lairdi, a parasite of the blackfly Simulium damnosum s.l.

    PubMed

    Crainey, J L; Wilson, M D; Post, R J

    2009-09-01

    The mermithid parasite, Isomermis lairdi Mondet, Poinar & Bernadou (Nematoda: Mermithidae), is known to have a major impact on populations of Simulium damnosum s.l. Theobald (Diptera: Simuliidae) and on their efficiency as vectors of Onchocerca volvulus (Leuckart) (Nematoda: Filarioidea). However, the value of I. lairdi and other mermithid parasites as potential means of integrated vector control has not been fully realized. This is partly because traditional taxonomic approaches have been insufficient for describing and analysing important aspects of their biology and host range. In total, rDNA barcode sequences have been obtained from over 70 I. lairdi mermithids found parasitizing S. damnosum s.l. larvae in three different rivers. No two sequences were found to vary by more than 0.5%, and cytospecies identification of mermithid hosts revealed that I. lairdi with identical rDNA barcodes can parasitize multiple cytoforms of the S. damnosum complex, including S. squamosum (Enderlein). Phylogenetic analysis using a partial sequence from the 18S ribosomal DNA barcode, grouped I. lairdi in a monophyletic group with Gastromermis viridis Welch (Nematoda: Mermithidae) and Isomermis wisconsinensis Welch (Nematoda: Mermithidae).

  7. Completion of the sequence of the nuclear ribosomal DNA subunit of Simulium sanctipauli, with descriptions of the 18S, 28S genes and the IGS.

    PubMed

    Morales-Hojas, R; Post, R J; Wilson, M D; Cheke, R A

    2002-12-01

    We describe the IGS-ETS, 18S and 28S ribosomal gene sequences of Simulium sanctipauli Vajime & Dunbar, a member of the S. damnosum Theobald (Diptera: Simuliidae) complex of blackflies (Diptera: Simuliidae). These regions, together with the ITS-1, ITS-2 and 5.8S rDNA presented elsewhere (accession number U36206), constitute the composite sequence of the entire rDNA unit, making S. sanctipauli the second dipteran species of medical importance for which the entire rDNA has been sequenced. Despite the lack of sequence identity, the IGS of S. sanctipauli showed some structural similarities to other Diptera, i.e. the mosquito Aedes albopictus Skuse (Culicidae), the fruitfly Drosophila melanogaster Meigen (Drosophilidae) and the tsetse Glossina (Glossinidae). Two blocks of tandemly repeated subunits were present in the IGS of S. sanctipauli and, unlike other species of Diptera, they contained no duplications of promoter-like sequences. However, two promoter-like sequences were identified in the unique DNA stretches of the IGS by their sequence similarity to the promoter of Aedes aegypti L. (Diptera: Culicidae). The observed sequence variation can be explained, as in the case of Drosophila spp., by the occurrence of slippage-like and point mutation processes, with unequal crossing-over homogenizing (to a certain extent) the region throughout the gene family and blackfly population. The 18S and 28S rDNA genes show more intraspecific variability within the expansion segments than in the core regions. This is also the case in the interspecific comparison of these genes from S. sanctipauli with those of Simulium vittatum, Ae. albopictus and D. melanogaster. This pattern is typical of many eukaryotes and likely to be the result of a more relaxed functional selection in the expansion segments than on the core regions. The A + T content of the S. sanctipauli genes is high and similar to those of other Diptera. This could be the result of a change in the mutation pressure towards

  8. Imp3 unfolds stem structures in pre-rRNA and U3 snoRNA to form a duplex essential for small subunit processing

    PubMed Central

    Shah, Binal N.; Liu, Xin; Correll, Carl C.

    2013-01-01

    Eukaryotic ribosome biogenesis requires rapid hybridization between the U3 snoRNA and the pre-rRNA to direct cleavages at the A0, A1, and A2 sites in pre-rRNA that liberate the small subunit precursor. The bases involved in hybridization of one of the three duplexes that U3 makes with pre-rRNA, designated the U3-18S duplex, are buried in conserved structures: box A/A′ stem–loop in U3 snoRNA and helix 1 (H1) in the 18S region of the pre-rRNA. These conserved structures must be unfolded to permit the necessary hybridization. Previously, we reported that Imp3 and Imp4 promote U3-18S hybridization in vitro, but the mechanism by which these proteins facilitate U3-18S duplex formation remained unclear. Here, we directly addressed this question by probing base accessibility with chemical modification and backbone accessibility with ribonuclease activity of U3 and pre-rRNA fragments that mimic the secondary structure observed in vivo. Our results demonstrate that U3-18S hybridization requires only Imp3. Binding to each RNA by Imp3 provides sufficient energy to unfold both the 18S H1 and the U3 box A/A′ stem structures. The Imp3 unfolding activity also increases accessibility at the U3-dependent A0 and A1 sites, perhaps signaling cleavage at these sites to generate the 5′ mature end of 18S. Imp4 destabilizes the U3-18S duplex to aid U3 release, thus differentiating the roles of these proteins. Protein-dependent unfolding of these structures may serve as a switch to block U3-pre-rRNA interactions until recruitment of Imp3, thereby preventing premature and inaccurate U3-dependent pre-rRNA cleavage and folding events in eukaryotic ribosome biogenesis. PMID:23980203

  9. [Common features in arrangements of ribosomal protein S26e binding sites on its own pre-mRNA and the 18S rRNA].

    PubMed

    Ivanov, A V; Malygin, A A; Karpova, G G

    2014-01-01

    It is known that human ribosomal protein (rp) S26e can bind to the first intron of its own pre-mRNA and thereby inhibit its splicing. In this work, hydroxyl radical footprinting was applied for detailed mapping of the rpS26e binding site on an RNA transcript corresponding to the rpS26e pre-mRNA fragment containing the first intron flanked by the first exon and a part of the second exon sequences. Nucleotides of this RNA protected from hydroxyl radical attack in the presence of rpS26e were identified. Most of them are found in the region of the 3'-splice site of the first intron within a purine-rich sequence, which forms a loop connecting two helices in the predicted secondary structure of the rpS26e pre-mRNA fragment, and the remaining nucleotides are located near the 5'-splice site. Comparison of arrangements of rpS26e binding sites on the pre-mRNA and 18S rRNA secondary structures reveals similar elements in the organization of these sites. It was found that both sites contain a structural motif, represented by an extended purine-rich loop between two helices, which could be recognized by rpS26e upon binding to these RNAs. The data obtained shed light on the structural aspects of RNA-protein interactions underlying autoregulation of human RPS26e gene expression at the splicing step.

  10. Interactions of human ribosomal proteins S16 and S5 with an 18S rRNA fragment containing their binding sites.

    PubMed

    Malygin, Alexey A; Yanshina, Darya D; Karpova, Galina G

    2009-09-01

    Human ribosomal proteins S5e and S16e are the homologues of prokaryotic S7p and S9p, respectively. It was shown that S5e and S16e are capable of the specific binding with a rRNA transcript corresponding to the region of human 18S rRNA containing helices H28-30 and H41-43 (3Dm), which is homologous to the region in 16S rRNA containing the entire binding site for S7p and the major part of the site for S9p. We have studied binding of S5e and S16e to 3Dm and demonstrated that while each of them is able to bind to the rRNA transcript independently, their simultaneous binding has a noticeable synergetic effect. Using enzymatic footprinting, we showed that these proteins protect 3Dm against hydrolysis with RNases mainly in the regions homologous to the sites of S7p and S9p binding on the 16S rRNA. At the same time, we found regions that correspond to 16S rRNA fragments distant from the binding sites of the respective homologous prokaryotic proteins. Comparison of these results with the data on 3Dm footprinting in binary complexes with S5e or S16e revealed that each of these proteins affects binding of another one to 3Dm, which is displayed in significant expansion of 3Dm sites protected by the proteins against hydrolysis in the ternary complex.

  11. Sequence alignment of 18S ribosomal RNA and the basal relationships of Adephagan beetles: evidence for monophyly of aquatic families and the placement of Trachypachidae.

    PubMed

    Shull, V L; Vogler, A P; Baker, M D; Maddison, D R; Hammond, P M

    2001-01-01

    Current hypotheses regarding family relationships in the suborder Adephaga (Coleoptera) are conflicting. Here we report full-length 18S ribosomal RNA sequences of 39 adephagans and 13 outgroup taxa. Data analysis focused on the impact of sequence alignment on tree topology, using two principally different approaches. Tree alignments, which seek to minimize indels and substitutions on the tree in a single step, as implemented in an approximate procedure by the computer program POY, were contrasted with a more traditional procedure based on alignments followed by phylogenetic inference based on parsimony, likelihood, and distance analyses. Despite substantial differences between the procedures, phylogenetic conclusions regarding basal relationships within Adephaga and relationships between the four suborders of Coleoptera were broadly similar. The analysis weakly supports monophyly of Adephaga, with Polyphaga usually as its sister, and the two small suborders Myxophaga and Archostemata basal to them. In some analyses, however, Polyphaga was reconstructed as having arisen from within Hydradephaga. Adephaga generally split into two monophyletic groups, corresponding to the terrestrial Geadephaga and the aquatic Hydradephaga, as initially proposed by Crowson in 1955, consistent with a single colonization of the aquatic environment by adephagan ancestors and contradicting the recent proposition of three independent invasions. A monophyletic Hydradephaga is consistently, though not strongly, supported under most analyses, and a parametric bootstrapping test significantly rejects an hypothesis of nonmonophyly. The enigmatic Trachypachidae, which exhibit many similarities to aquatic forms but whose species are entirely terrestrial, were usually recovered as a basal lineage within Geadephaga. Strong evidence opposes the view that terrestrial trachypachids are related to the dytiscoid water beetles.

  12. WBSCR22/Merm1 is required for late nuclear pre-ribosomal RNA processing and mediates N7-methylation of G1639 in human 18S rRNA.

    PubMed

    Haag, Sara; Kretschmer, Jens; Bohnsack, Markus T

    2015-02-01

    Ribosomal (r)RNAs are extensively modified during ribosome synthesis and their modification is required for the fidelity and efficiency of translation. Besides numerous small nucleolar RNA-guided 2'-O methylations and pseudouridinylations, a number of individual RNA methyltransferases are involved in rRNA modification. WBSCR22/Merm1, which is affected in Williams-Beuren syndrome and has been implicated in tumorigenesis and metastasis formation, was recently shown to be involved in ribosome synthesis, but its molecular functions have remained elusive. Here we show that depletion of WBSCR22 leads to nuclear accumulation of 3'-extended 18SE pre-rRNA intermediates resulting in impaired 18S rRNA maturation. We map the 3' ends of the 18SE pre-rRNA intermediates accumulating after depletion of WBSCR22 and in control cells using 3'-RACE and deep sequencing. Furthermore, we demonstrate that WBSCR22 is required for N(7)-methylation of G1639 in human 18S rRNA in vivo. Interestingly, the catalytic activity of WBSCR22 is not required for 18S pre-rRNA processing, suggesting that the key role of WBSCR22 in 40S subunit biogenesis is independent of its function as an RNA methyltransferase. © 2015 Haag et al.; Published by Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory Press for the RNA Society.

  13. WBSCR22/Merm1 is required for late nuclear pre-ribosomal RNA processing and mediates N7-methylation of G1639 in human 18S rRNA

    PubMed Central

    Haag, Sara; Kretschmer, Jens

    2015-01-01

    Ribosomal (r)RNAs are extensively modified during ribosome synthesis and their modification is required for the fidelity and efficiency of translation. Besides numerous small nucleolar RNA-guided 2′-O methylations and pseudouridinylations, a number of individual RNA methyltransferases are involved in rRNA modification. WBSCR22/Merm1, which is affected in Williams–Beuren syndrome and has been implicated in tumorigenesis and metastasis formation, was recently shown to be involved in ribosome synthesis, but its molecular functions have remained elusive. Here we show that depletion of WBSCR22 leads to nuclear accumulation of 3′-extended 18SE pre-rRNA intermediates resulting in impaired 18S rRNA maturation. We map the 3′ ends of the 18SE pre-rRNA intermediates accumulating after depletion of WBSCR22 and in control cells using 3′-RACE and deep sequencing. Furthermore, we demonstrate that WBSCR22 is required for N7-methylation of G1639 in human 18S rRNA in vivo. Interestingly, the catalytic activity of WBSCR22 is not required for 18S pre-rRNA processing, suggesting that the key role of WBSCR22 in 40S subunit biogenesis is independent of its function as an RNA methyltransferase. PMID:25525153

  14. Characterization of three different clusters of 18S-26S ribosomal DNA genes in the sea urchin P. lividus: Genetic and epigenetic regulation synchronous to 5S rDNA.

    PubMed

    Bellavia, Daniele; Dimarco, Eufrosina; Caradonna, Fabio

    2016-04-15

    We previously reported the characterization 5S ribosomal DNA (rDNA) clusters in the common sea urchin Paracentrotus lividus and demonstrated the presence of DNA methylation-dependent silencing of embryo specific 5S rDNA cluster in adult tissue. In this work, we show genetic and epigenetic characterization of 18S-26S rDNA clusters in this specie. The results indicate the presence of three different 18S-26S rDNA clusters with different Non-Transcribed Spacer (NTS) regions that have different chromosomal localizations. Moreover, we show that the two largest clusters are hyper-methylated in the promoter-containing NTS regions in adult tissues, as in the 5S rDNA. These findings demonstrate an analogous epigenetic regulation in small and large rDNA clusters and support the logical synchronism in building ribosomes. In fact, all the ribosomal RNA genes must be synchronously and equally transcribed to perform their unique final product. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Localization of 18S ribosomal genes in suckermouth armoured catfishes Loricariidae (Teleostei, Siluriformes) with discussion on the Ag-NOR evolution

    PubMed Central

    Alves, Anderson Luis; de Borba, Rafael Splendore; Pozzobon, Allan Pierre Bonetti; Oliveira, Claudio; Nirchio, Mauro; Granado, Angel; Foresti, Fausto

    2012-01-01

    Abstract The family Loricariidae with about 690 species divided into six subfamilies, is one of the world’s largest fish families. Cytogenetic studies conducted in the family showed that among 90 species analyzed the diploid number ranges from 2n=38 in Ancistrus sp. to 2n=96 in Hemipsilichthys gobio Luetken, 1874. In the present study, fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) was employed to determine the chromosomal localization of the 18S rDNA gene in four suckermouth armoured catfishes: Kronichthys lacerta (Nichols, 1919), Pareiorhaphis splendens (Bizerril, 1995), Liposarcus multiradiatus (Hancock, 1828) and Hypostomus prope plecostomus (Linnaeus, 1758). All species analyzed showed one chromosome pair with 18S rDNA sequences, as observed in the previous Ag-NORs analyses. The presence of size and numerical polymorphism was observed and discussed, with proposing a hypothesis of the Ag-NOR evolution in Loricariidae. PMID:24260671

  16. Rubisco small subunit gene family in cassava.

    PubMed

    Yeo, T W; Mak, Y M; Ho, K K

    1999-01-01

    Cassava leaves of two different cultivars, Brazil and Buloh, were used to isolate mRNA. The mRNA isolated was successfully used in the construction of cDNA libraries for each of the cultivars. The cDNA libraries were screened for members of ribulose-1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase small subunit gene family and positive clones were sequenced. A total of seven different SSU genes, of which five were from cultivar Brazil and two were from cultivar Buloh, were isolated. Comparison results show that even though all the sequences are highly similar, they can be classified into three subfamilies. Homology between members of the same subfamily is higher than homology between members from the same cultivar.

  17. Karyotypes, male meiosis and comparative FISH mapping of 18S ribosomal DNA and telomeric (TTAGG) n repeat in eight species of true bugs (Hemiptera, Heteroptera)

    PubMed Central

    Grozeva, S.; Kuznetsova, V.G.; Anokhin, B.A.

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Eight species belonging to five true bug families were analyzed using DAPI/CMA3-staining and fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) with telomeric (TTAGG)n and 18S rDNA probes. Standard chromosomal complements are reported for the first time for Deraeocoris rutilus (Herrich-Schäffer, 1838) (2n=30+2m+XY) and Deraeocoris ruber(Linnaeus, 1758) (2n=30+2m+XY) from the family Miridae. Using FISH, the location of a 18S rDNA cluster was detected in these species and in five more species: Megaloceroea recticornis (Geoffroy, 1785) (2n=30+XY) from the Miridae; Oxycarenus lavaterae (Fabricius, 1787) (2n=14+2m+XY) from the Lygaeidae s.l.; Pyrrhocoris apterus (Linnaeus, 1758) (2n=22+X) from the Pyrrhocoridae; Eurydema oleracea (Linnaeus, 1758) (2n=12+XY) and Graphosoma lineatum (Linnaeus, 1758) (2n=12+XY) from the Pentatomidae. The species were found to differ with respect to location of a 18S rRNA gene cluster which resides on autosomes in Oxycarenus lavaterae and Pyrrhocoris apterus, whereas it locates on sex chromosomes in other five species. The 18S rDNA location provides the first physical landmark of the genomes of the species studied. The insect consensus telomeric pentanucleotide (TTAGG)n was demonstrated to be absent in all the species studied in this respect, Deraeocoris rutilus, Megaloceroea recticornis, Cimex lectularius Linnaeus, 1758 (Cimicidae), Eurydema oleracea, and Graphosoma lineatum, supporting the hypothesis that this motif was lost in early evolution of the Heteroptera and secondarily replaced with another motif (yet unknown) or the alternative telomerase-independent mechanisms of telomere maintenance. Dot-blot hybridization analysis of the genomic DNA from Cimex lectularius, Nabis sp. and Oxycarenus lavaterae with (TTAGG)n and six other telomeric probes likewise provided a negative result. PMID:24260641

  18. Chromosomal localization of 5S and 18S-5.8S-25S ribosomal DNA sites in five Asian pines using fluorescence in situ hybridization.

    PubMed

    Liu, Z-L; Zhang, D; Hong, D-Y; Wang, X-R

    2003-01-01

    Fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) was employed on mitotic metaphase chromosome preparations of five Asian Pinus species: Pinus tabuliformis, Pinus yunnanensis, Pinus densata, Pinus massoniana and Pinus merkusii, using simultaneously DNA probes of the 18S rRNA gene and the 5S rRNA gene including the non-transcribed spacer sequences. The number and location of 18S rDNA sites varied markedly (5-10 pairs of strong signals) among the five pines. A maximum of 20 major 18S rDNA sites was observed in the diploid genome (2n = 24) of P. massoniana. The 5S rDNA FISH pattern was less variable, with one major site and one minor site commonly observed in each species. The differentiation of rDNA sites on chromosomes among the five pines correlates well with their phylogenic positions in Pinus as reconstructed from other molecular data. P. densata, a species of hybrid origin, resembles its parents ( P. tabuliformis and P. yunnanensis), including some components characteristic of each parent in its pattern. However, the species is unique, showing new features resulting possibly from recombination and genome reorganization.

  19. Both the Exact Target Site Sequence and a Long Poly(A) Tail Are Required for Precise Insertion of the 18S Ribosomal DNA-Specific Non-Long Terminal Repeat Retrotransposon R7Ag.

    PubMed

    Nichuguti, Narisu; Hayase, Mayumi; Fujiwara, Haruhiko

    2016-05-15

    Ribosomal elements (R elements) are site-specific non-long terminal repeat (LTR) retrotransposons that target ribosomal DNA (rDNA). To elucidate how R elements specifically access their target sites, we isolated and characterized the 18S rDNA-specific R element R7Ag from Anopheles gambiae Using an in vivo and ex vivo recombinant baculovirus retrotransposition system, we found that the exact host 18S rDNA sequence at the target site is essential for the precise insertion of R7Ag. In addition, a long poly(A) tail is necessary for the accurate initiation of R7Ag reverse transcription, a novel mechanism found in non-LTR elements. We further compared the subcellular localizations of proteins in R7Ag as well as R1Bm, another R element that targets 28S rDNA. Although the open reading frame 1 proteins (ORF1ps) of both R7Ag and R1Bm localized predominantly in the cytoplasm, ORF2 proteins (ORF2ps) colocalized in the nucleus with the nucleolar marker fibrillarin. The ORF1ps and ORF2ps of both R elements colocalized largely in the nuclear periphery and to a lesser extent within the nucleus. These results suggest that R7Ag and R1Bm proteins may access nucleolar rDNA targets in an ORF2p-dependent manner. Copyright © 2016, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

  20. Fungal community analysis in the deep-sea sediments of the Pacific Ocean assessed by comparison of ITS, 18S and 28S ribosomal DNA regions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Wei; Luo, Zhu-Hua; Guo, Shuangshuang; Pang, Ka-Lai

    2016-03-01

    We investigated the diversity of fungal communities in 6 different deep-sea sediment samples of the Pacific Ocean based on three different types of clone libraries, including internal transcribed spacer (ITS), 18S rDNA, and 28S rDNA regions. A total of 1978 clones were generated from 18 environmental clone libraries, resulting in 140 fungal operational taxonomic units (OTUs), including 18 OTUs from ITS, 44 OTUs from 18S rDNA, and 78 OTUs from 28S rDNA gene primer sets. The majority of the recovered sequences belonged to diverse phylotypes of the Ascomycota and Basidiomycota. Additionally, our study revealed a total of 46 novel fungal phylotypes, which showed low similarities (<97%) with available fungal sequences in the GenBank, including a novel Zygomycete lineage, suggesting possible new fungal taxa occurring in the deep-sea sediments. The results suggested that 28S rDNA is an efficient target gene to describe fungal community in deep-sea environment.

  1. Repetitive DNAs in the slug Milax nigricans: association of ribosomal (18S-28S and 5S rDNA) and (TTAGGG)n telomeric sequences in the slug M. nigricans (Mollusca: Gastropoda: Pulmonata).

    PubMed

    Vitturi, R; Sineo, L; Volpe, N; Lannino, A; Colomba, M

    2004-01-01

    Spermatocyte chromosomes of the slug Milax nigricans (Mollusca: Gastropoda: Pulmonata) were studied using silver staining (Ag-NOR) and fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH) with four repetitive DNA probes [18S rDNA, 5S rDNA, (TTAGGG)n and (GATA)n]. Silver impregnation was inadequate to localize the chromosome sites of nucleolus organizer regions (NORs) since no silver dots occurred on the chromosomes at spermatogonial metaphase and a diffuse silver stainability could be observed on the bivalents at metaphase-I. Unlike silver staining, single-colour rDNA FISH consistently mapped major ribosomal sites (18S-28S rDNA) on two small-sized chromosomes in spermatogonial cells and on the correspondent metaphase-I bivalent in spermatocytes. While telomeric (TTAGGG)n sequence hybridized to all chromosomes, (GATA)n probe localized abundant hybridization sites, dispersed throughout the genome. Simultaneous double-colour FISH demonstrated a close chromosomal association of 18S-28S rDNA, 5S rDNA and (TTAGGG)n.

  2. Phylogenetic Analyses of Meloidogyne Small Subunit rDNA

    PubMed Central

    De Ley, Irma Tandingan; De Ley, Paul; Vierstraete, Andy; Karssen, Gerrit; Moens, Maurice; Vanfleteren, Jacques

    2002-01-01

    Phylogenies were inferred from nearly complete small subunit (SSU) 18S rDNA sequences of 12 species of Meloidogyne and 4 outgroup taxa (Globodera pallida, Nacobbus abberans, Subanguina radicicola, and Zygotylenchus guevarai). Alignments were generated manually from a secondary structure model, and computationally using ClustalX and Treealign. Trees were constructed using distance, parsimony, and likelihood algorithms in PAUP* 4.0b4a. Obtained tree topologies were stable across algorithms and alignments, supporting 3 clades: clade I = [M. incognita (M. javanica, M. arenaria)]; clade II = M. duytsi and M. maritima in an unresolved trichotomy with (M. hapla, M. microtyla); and clade III = (M. exigua (M. graminicola, M. chitwoodi)). Monophyly of [(clade I, clade II) clade III] was given maximal bootstrap support (mbs). M. artiellia was always a sister taxon to this joint clade, while M. ichinohei was consistently placed with mbs as a basal taxon within the genus. Affinities with the outgroup taxa remain unclear, although G. pallida and S. radicicola were never placed as closest relatives of Meloidogyne. Our results show that SSU sequence data are useful in addressing deeper phylogeny within Meloidogyne, and that both M. ichinohei and M. artiellia are credible outgroups for phylogenetic analysis of speciations among the major species. PMID:19265950

  3. The Bowen-Conradi syndrome protein Nep1 (Emg1) has a dual role in eukaryotic ribosome biogenesis, as an essential assembly factor and in the methylation of Ψ1191 in yeast 18S rRNA.

    PubMed

    Meyer, Britta; Wurm, Jan Philip; Kötter, Peter; Leisegang, Matthias S; Schilling, Valeska; Buchhaupt, Markus; Held, Martin; Bahr, Ute; Karas, Michael; Heckel, Alexander; Bohnsack, Markus T; Wöhnert, Jens; Entian, Karl-Dieter

    2011-03-01

    The Nep1 (Emg1) SPOUT-class methyltransferase is an essential ribosome assembly factor and the human Bowen-Conradi syndrome (BCS) is caused by a specific Nep1(D86G) mutation. We recently showed in vitro that Methanocaldococcus jannaschii Nep1 is a sequence-specific pseudouridine-N1-methyltransferase. Here, we show that in yeast the in vivo target site for Nep1-catalyzed methylation is located within loop 35 of the 18S rRNA that contains the unique hypermodification of U1191 to 1-methyl-3-(3-amino-3-carboxypropyl)-pseudouri-dine (m1acp3Ψ). Specific (14)C-methionine labelling of 18S rRNA in yeast mutants showed that Nep1 is not required for acp-modification but suggested a function in Ψ1191 methylation. ESI MS analysis of acp-modified Ψ-nucleosides in a Δnep1-mutant showed that Nep1 catalyzes the Ψ1191 methylation in vivo. Remarkably, the restored growth of a nep1-1(ts) mutant upon addition of S-adenosylmethionine was even observed after preventing U1191 methylation in a Δsnr35 mutant. This strongly suggests a dual Nep1 function, as Ψ1191-methyltransferase and ribosome assembly factor. Interestingly, the Nep1 methyltransferase activity is not affected upon introduction of the BCS mutation. Instead, the mutated protein shows enhanced dimerization propensity and increased affinity for its RNA-target in vitro. Furthermore, the BCS mutation prevents nucleolar accumulation of Nep1, which could be the reason for reduced growth in yeast and the Bowen-Conradi syndrome.

  4. Imp3p and Imp4p mediate formation of essential U3–precursor rRNA (pre-rRNA) duplexes, possibly to recruit the small subunit processome to the pre-rRNA

    PubMed Central

    Gérczei, Tímea; Correll, Carl C.

    2004-01-01

    In eukaryotes, formation of short duplexes between the U3 small nucleolar RNA (snoRNA) and the precursor rRNA (pre-rRNA) at multiple sites is a prerequisite for three endonucleolytic cleavages that initiate small subunit biogenesis by releasing the 18S rRNA precursor from the pre-rRNA. The most likely role of these RNA duplexes is to guide the U3 snoRNA and its associated proteins, designated the small subunit processome, to the target cleavage sites on the pre-rRNA. Studies by others in Saccharomyces cerevisiae have identified the proteins Mpp10p, Imp3p, and Imp4p as candidates to mediate U3–pre-rRNA interactions. We report here that Imp3p and Imp4p appear to stabilize an otherwise unstable duplex between the U3 snoRNA hinge region and complementary bases in the external transcribed spacer of the pre-rRNA. In addition, Imp4p, but not Imp3p, seems to rearrange the U3 box A stem structure to expose the site that base-pairs with the 5′ end of the 18S rRNA, thereby mediating duplex formation at a second site. By mediating formation of both essential U3–pre-rRNA duplexes, Imp3p and Imp4p may help the small subunit processome to dock onto the pre-rRNA, an event indispensable for ribosome biogenesis and hence for cell growth. PMID:15489263

  5. Conformation of yeast 18S rRNA. Direct chemical probing of the 5' domain in ribosomal subunits and in deproteinized RNA by reverse transcriptase mapping of dimethyl sulfate-accessible.

    PubMed Central

    Lempereur, L; Nicoloso, M; Riehl, N; Ehresmann, C; Ehresmann, B; Bachellerie, J P

    1985-01-01

    The structure of the 5' domain of yeast 18S rRNA has been probed by dimethyl sulfate (DMS), either in "native" deproteinized molecules or in the 40S ribosomal subunits. DMS-reacted RNA has been used as a template for reverse transcription and a large number of reactive sites, corresponding to all types of bases have been mapped by a primer extension procedure, taking advantage of blocks in cDNA elongation immediately upstream from bases methylated at atom positions involved in the base-pair recognition of the template. Since the same atom positions are protected from DMS in base-paired nucleotides, the secondary structure status of each nucleotide can be directly assessed in this procedure, thus allowing to evaluate the potential contribution of proteins in modulating subunit rRNA conformation. While the DMS probing of deproteinized rRNA confirms a number of helical stems predicted by phylogenetic comparisons, it is remarkable that a few additional base-pairings, while proven by the comparative analysis, appear to require the presence of the bound ribosomal subunit proteins to be stabilized. Images PMID:2417197

  6. The initial U3 snoRNA:pre-rRNA base pairing interaction required for pre-18S rRNA folding revealed by in vivo chemical probing.

    PubMed

    Dutca, Laura M; Gallagher, Jennifer E G; Baserga, Susan J

    2011-07-01

    The synthesis of ribosomal subunits in the nucleolus is a conserved, essential process that results in cytoplasmic ribosomes with precisely processed and folded rRNAs assembled with ribosomal proteins. It has been proposed, but never directly demonstrated, that the U3 small nucleolar RNA (snoRNA), a nucleolar component required for ribosome biogenesis, is a chaperone for pre-18S rRNA folding. To test this, we used in vivo chemical probing with dimethyl sulfate to detect changes in pre-rRNA structure upon genetic manipulation of the yeast, Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Based on changes in nucleotide reactivity, we found that the U3 snoRNA is indeed required for folding of the pre-18S rRNA. Furthermore, we detected a new essential base pairing interaction that is likely the initial anchor that recruits the U3 snoRNA to the pre-rRNA, is a prerequisite for the subsequent interactions, and is required for the small subunit processome formation. Substitution of the 5'-ETS nucleotides of the pre-rRNA involved in this initial base pairing interaction is lethal, but growth is restored when a complementary U3 snoRNA is expressed. The U3 snoRNP, via base pairing, and its associated proteins, are part of the required machinery that orchestrates the folding of pre-rRNA that results in the assembly of the small ribosomal subunit.

  7. The initial U3 snoRNA:pre-rRNA base pairing interaction required for pre-18S rRNA folding revealed by in vivo chemical probing

    PubMed Central

    Dutca, Laura M.; Gallagher, Jennifer E. G.; Baserga, Susan J.

    2011-01-01

    The synthesis of ribosomal subunits in the nucleolus is a conserved, essential process that results in cytoplasmic ribosomes with precisely processed and folded rRNAs assembled with ribosomal proteins. It has been proposed, but never directly demonstrated, that the U3 small nucleolar RNA (snoRNA), a nucleolar component required for ribosome biogenesis, is a chaperone for pre-18S rRNA folding. To test this, we used in vivo chemical probing with dimethyl sulfate to detect changes in pre-rRNA structure upon genetic manipulation of the yeast, Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Based on changes in nucleotide reactivity, we found that the U3 snoRNA is indeed required for folding of the pre-18S rRNA. Furthermore, we detected a new essential base pairing interaction that is likely the initial anchor that recruits the U3 snoRNA to the pre-rRNA, is a prerequisite for the subsequent interactions, and is required for the small subunit processome formation. Substitution of the 5′-ETS nucleotides of the pre-rRNA involved in this initial base pairing interaction is lethal, but growth is restored when a complementary U3 snoRNA is expressed. The U3 snoRNP, via base pairing, and its associated proteins, are part of the required machinery that orchestrates the folding of pre-rRNA that results in the assembly of the small ribosomal subunit. PMID:21349877

  8. Intragenomic sequence variation at the ITS1 - ITS2 region and at the 18S and 28S nuclear ribosomal DNA genes of the New Zealand mud snail, Potamopyrgus antipodarum (Hydrobiidae: mollusca)

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hoy, Marshal S.; Rodriguez, Rusty J.

    2013-01-01

    Molecular genetic analysis was conducted on two populations of the invasive non-native New Zealand mud snail (Potamopyrgus antipodarum), one from a freshwater ecosystem in Devil's Lake (Oregon, USA) and the other from an ecosystem of higher salinity in the Columbia River estuary (Hammond Harbor, Oregon, USA). To elucidate potential genetic differences between the two populations, three segments of nuclear ribosomal DNA (rDNA), the ITS1-ITS2 regions and the 18S and 28S rDNA genes were cloned and sequenced. Variant sequences within each individual were found in all three rDNA segments. Folding models were utilized for secondary structure analysis and results indicated that there were many sequences which contained structure-altering polymorphisms, which suggests they could be nonfunctional pseudogenes. In addition, analysis of molecular variance (AMOVA) was used for hierarchical analysis of genetic variance to estimate variation within and among populations and within individuals. AMOVA revealed significant variation in the ITS region between the populations and among clones within individuals, while in the 5.8S rDNA significant variation was revealed among individuals within the two populations. High levels of intragenomic variation were found in the ITS regions, which are known to be highly variable in many organisms. More interestingly, intragenomic variation was also found in the 18S and 28S rDNA, which has rarely been observed in animals and is so far unreported in Mollusca. We postulate that in these P. antipodarum populations the effects of concerted evolution are diminished due to the fact that not all of the rDNA genes in their polyploid genome should be essential for sustaining cellular function. This could lead to a lessening of selection pressures, allowing mutations to accumulate in some copies, changing them into variant sequences.                   

  9. Sequencing for complete rDNA sequences (18S, ITS1, 5.8S, ITS2, and 28S rDNA) of Demodex and phylogenetic analysis of Acari based on 18S and 28S rDNA.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Ya-E; Wu, Li-Ping; Hu, Li; Xu, Yang; Wang, Zheng-Hang; Liu, Wen-Yan

    2012-11-01

    Due to the difficulty of DNA extraction for Demodex, few studies dealt with the identification and the phyletic evolution of Demodex at molecular level. In this study, we amplified, sequenced, and analyzed a complete (Demodex folliculorum) and an almost complete (D12 missing) (Demodex brevis) ribosomal DNA (rDNA) sequence and also analyzed the primary sequences of divergent domains in small-subunit ribosomal RNA (rRNA) of 51 species and in large-subunit rRNA of 43 species from four superfamilies in Acari (Cheyletoidea, Tetranychoidea, Analgoidea, and Ixodoidea). The results revealed that 18S rDNA sequence was relatively conserved in rDNA-coding regions and was not evolving as rapidly as 28S rDNA sequence. The evolutionary rates of transcribed spacer regions were much higher than those of the coding regions. The maximum parsimony trees of 18S and 28S rDNA appeared to be almost identical, consistent with their morphological classification. Based on the fact that the resolution capability of sequence length and the divergence of the 13 segments (D1-D6, D7a, D7b, and D8-D12) of 28S rDNA were stronger than that of the nine variable regions (V1-V9) of 18S rDNA, we were able to identify Demodex (Cheyletoidea) by the indels occurring in D2, D6, and D8.

  10. Detection of Cryptosporidium species in feces or gastric contents from snakes and lizards as determined by polymerase chain reaction analysis and partial sequencing of the 18S ribosomal RNA gene.

    PubMed

    Richter, Barbara; Nedorost, Nora; Maderner, Anton; Weissenböck, Herbert

    2011-05-01

    Cryptosporidiosis is a well-known gastrointestinal disease of snakes and lizards. In the current study, 672 samples (feces and/or gastric contents or regurgitated food items) of various snakes and lizards were examined for the presence of cryptosporidia by polymerase chain reaction (PCR) assay targeting a part of the 18S ribosomal RNA gene. A consecutive sequencing reaction was used to identify the cryptosporidian species present in PCR-positive samples. Cryptosporidium varanii (saurophilum) was detected in 17 out of 106 (16%) samples from corn snakes (Pantherophis guttatus) and in 32 out of 462 (7%) samples from leopard geckos (Eublepharis macularius). Cryptosporidium serpentis was found in 8 out of 462 (2%) leopard gecko samples, but in no other reptile. The Cryptosporidium sp. "lizard genotype" was present in 1 leopard gecko sample, and 1 sample from a corn snake showed a single nucleotide mismatch to this genotype. Pseudoparasitic cryptosporidian species were identified in 5 out of 174 (3%) ophidian samples, but not in lizards. Other sequences did not show complete similarity to previously published Cryptosporidium sequences. The results stress the importance for diagnostic methods to be specific for Cryptosporidium species especially in snakes and show a relatively high prevalence of C. varanii in leopard geckos and corn snakes. © 2011 The Author(s)

  11. Highly conserved small subunit residues influence rubisco large subunit catalysis.

    PubMed

    Genkov, Todor; Spreitzer, Robert J

    2009-10-30

    The chloroplast enzyme ribulose 1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase (Rubisco) catalyzes the rate-limiting step of photosynthetic CO(2) fixation. With a deeper understanding of its structure-function relationships and competitive inhibition by O(2), it may be possible to engineer an increase in agricultural productivity and renewable energy. The chloroplast-encoded large subunits form the active site, but the nuclear-encoded small subunits can also influence catalytic efficiency and CO(2)/O(2) specificity. To further define the role of the small subunit in Rubisco function, the 10 most conserved residues in all small subunits were substituted with alanine by transformation of a Chlamydomonas reinhardtii mutant that lacks the small subunit gene family. All the mutant strains were able to grow photosynthetically, indicating that none of the residues is essential for function. Three of the substitutions have little or no effect (S16A, P19A, and E92A), one primarily affects holoenzyme stability (L18A), and the remainder affect catalysis with or without some level of associated structural instability (Y32A, E43A, W73A, L78A, P79A, and F81A). Y32A and E43A cause decreases in CO(2)/O(2) specificity. Based on the x-ray crystal structure of Chlamydomonas Rubisco, all but one (Glu-92) of the conserved residues are in contact with large subunits and cluster near the amino- or carboxyl-terminal ends of large subunit alpha-helix 8, which is a structural element of the alpha/beta-barrel active site. Small subunit residues Glu-43 and Trp-73 identify a possible structural connection between active site alpha-helix 8 and the highly variable small subunit loop between beta-strands A and B, which can also influence Rubisco CO(2)/O(2) specificity.

  12. Three Group-I introns in 18S rDNA of Endosymbiotic Algae of Paramecium bursaria from Japan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoshina, Ryo; Kamako, Shin-ichiro; Imamura, Nobutaka

    2004-08-01

    In the nuclear encoded small subunit ribosomal DNA (18S rDNA) of symbiotic alga of Paramecium bursaria (F36 collected in Japan) possesses three intron-like insertions (Hoshina et al., unpubl. data, 2003). The present study confirmed these exact lengths and insertion sites by reverse transcription-PCR. Two of them were inserted at Escherichia coli 16S rRNA genic position 943 and 1512 that are frequent intron insertion positions, but another insertion position (nearly 1370) was the first finding. Their secondary structures suggested they belong to Group-I intron; one belongs to subgroup IE, others belong to subgroup IC1. Similarity search indicated these introns are ancestral ones.

  13. 18S Ribosomal DNA Typing and Tracking of Acanthamoeba Species Isolates from Corneal Scrape Specimens, Contact Lenses, Lens Cases, and Home Water Supplies of Acanthamoeba Keratitis Patients in Hong Kong

    PubMed Central

    Booton, G. C.; Kelly, D. J.; Chu, Y.-W.; Seal, D. V.; Houang, E.; Lam, D. S. C.; Byers, T. J.; Fuerst, P. A.

    2002-01-01

    We examined partial 18S ribosomal DNA (Rns) sequences of Acanthamoeba isolates cultured in a study of microbial keratitis in Hong Kong. Sequence differences were sufficient to distinguish closely related strains and were used to examine links between strains obtained from corneal scrape specimens, contact lenses, lens cases, lens case solutions, and home water-supply faucets of patients with Acanthamoeba. We also looked for evidence of mixed infections. Identification of Acanthamoeba Rns genotypes was based on sequences of ∼113 bp within the genus-specific amplicon ASA.S1. This permitted genotype identification by using nonaxenic cultures. Of 13 specimens obtained from corneal scrapes, contact lenses, lens cases, or lens case solutions, 12 were Rns genotype T4 and the remaining one was Rns genotype T3. The sequences of corneal scrape specimens of two patients also were the same as those obtained from their contact lenses or lens case specimens. A possible triple-strain infection was indicated by three different T4 sequences in cultures from one patient's lenses. Although faucet water used by patients to clean their lenses is a possible source of infections, specimens isolated from the faucets at two Acanthamoeba keratitis patients' homes differed from their corneal scrape or lens specimens. The overall results demonstrate the potential of this Rns region for tracking Acanthamoeba keratitis strains in infections and for distinguishing single-strain and closely related multiple-strain infections even when other microorganisms might be present with the cultured specimens. They also confirm the predominance of Rns genotype T4 strains in Acanthamoeba keratitis infections. PMID:11980931

  14. 18S ribosomal DNA typing and tracking of Acanthamoeba species isolates from corneal scrape specimens, contact lenses, lens cases, and home water supplies of Acanthamoeba keratitis patients in Hong Kong.

    PubMed

    Booton, G C; Kelly, D J; Chu, Y-W; Seal, D V; Houang, E; Lam, D S C; Byers, T J; Fuerst, P A

    2002-05-01

    We examined partial 18S ribosomal DNA (Rns) sequences of Acanthamoeba isolates cultured in a study of microbial keratitis in Hong Kong. Sequence differences were sufficient to distinguish closely related strains and were used to examine links between strains obtained from corneal scrape specimens, contact lenses, lens cases, lens case solutions, and home water-supply faucets of patients with Acanthamoeba. We also looked for evidence of mixed infections. Identification of Acanthamoeba Rns genotypes was based on sequences of approximately 113 bp within the genus-specific amplicon ASA.S1. This permitted genotype identification by using nonaxenic cultures. Of 13 specimens obtained from corneal scrapes, contact lenses, lens cases, or lens case solutions, 12 were Rns genotype T4 and the remaining one was Rns genotype T3. The sequences of corneal scrape specimens of two patients also were the same as those obtained from their contact lenses or lens case specimens. A possible triple-strain infection was indicated by three different T4 sequences in cultures from one patient's lenses. Although faucet water used by patients to clean their lenses is a possible source of infections, specimens isolated from the faucets at two Acanthamoeba keratitis patients' homes differed from their corneal scrape or lens specimens. The overall results demonstrate the potential of this Rns region for tracking Acanthamoeba keratitis strains in infections and for distinguishing single-strain and closely related multiple-strain infections even when other microorganisms might be present with the cultured specimens. They also confirm the predominance of Rns genotype T4 strains in Acanthamoeba keratitis infections.

  15. Revised small subunit rRNA analysis provides further evidence that Foraminifera are related to Cercozoa.

    PubMed

    Berney, Cédric; Pawlowski, Jan

    2003-01-01

    There is accumulating evidence that the general shape of the ribosomal DNA-based phylogeny of Eukaryotes is strongly biased by the long-branch attraction phenomenon, leading to an artifactual basal clustering of groups that are probably highly derived. Among these groups, Foraminifera are of particular interest, because their deep phylogenetic position in ribosomal trees contrasts with their Cambrian appearance in the fossil record. A recent actin-based phylogeny of Eukaryotes has proposed that Foraminifera might be closely related to Cercozoa and, thus, branch among the so-called crown of Eukaryotes. Here, we reanalyze the small-subunit ribosomal RNA gene (SSU rDNA) phylogeny by removing all long-branching lineages that could artifactually attract foraminiferan sequences to the base of the tree. Our analyses reveal that Foraminifera branch together with the marine testate filosean Gromia oviformis as a sister group to Cercozoa, in agreement with actin phylogeny. Our study confirms the utility of SSU rDNA as a phylogenetic marker of megaevolutionary history, provided that the artifacts due to the heterogeneity of substitution rates in ribosomal genes are circumvented.

  16. Functional dichotomy of ribosomal proteins during the synthesis of mammalian 40S ribosomal subunits.

    PubMed

    O'Donohue, Marie-Françoise; Choesmel, Valérie; Faubladier, Marlène; Fichant, Gwennaële; Gleizes, Pierre-Emmanuel

    2010-09-06

    Our knowledge of the functions of metazoan ribosomal proteins in ribosome synthesis remains fragmentary. Using siRNAs, we show that knockdown of 31 of the 32 ribosomal proteins of the human 40S subunit (ribosomal protein of the small subunit [RPS]) strongly affects pre-ribosomal RNA (rRNA) processing, which often correlates with nucleolar chromatin disorganization. 16 RPSs are strictly required for initiating processing of the sequences flanking the 18S rRNA in the pre-rRNA except at the metazoan-specific early cleavage site. The remaining 16 proteins are necessary for progression of the nuclear and cytoplasmic maturation steps and for nuclear export. Distribution of these two subsets of RPSs in the 40S subunit structure argues for a tight dependence of pre-rRNA processing initiation on the folding of both the body and the head of the forming subunit. Interestingly, the functional dichotomy of RPS proteins reported in this study is correlated with the mutation frequency of RPS genes in Diamond-Blackfan anemia.

  17. FISH mapping of 18S-28S and 5S ribosomal DNA, (GATA)n and (TTAGGG)n telomeric repeats in the periwinkle Melarhaphe neritoides (Prosobranchia, Gastropoda, Caenogastropoda).

    PubMed

    Colomba, M S; Vitturi, R; Castriota, L; Bertoni, R; Libertini, A

    2002-05-01

    Spermatocyte chromosomes of Melarhaphe neritoides (Mollusca, Prosobranchia, Caenogastropoda) were studied using fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH) with four repetitive DNA probes (18S rDNA, 5S rDNA, (TTAGGG)n and (GATA)n). Single-colour FISH consistently mapped one chromosome pair per spread using either 18S or 5S rDNA as probes. The telomeric sequence (TTAGGG)n hybridized with termini of all chromosomes whereas the (GATA)n probe did not label any areas. Simultaneous 18S-5S rDNA and 18S-(TTAGGG)n FISH demonstrated that repeated units of the three multicopy families are closely associated on the same chromosome pair.

  18. RRP20, a component of the 90S preribosome, is required for pre-18S rRNA processing in Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    PubMed Central

    Senapin, Saengchan; Desmond Clark-Walker, G.; Jie Chen, Xin; Séraphin, Bertrand; Daugeron, Marie-Claire

    2003-01-01

    A strain of Saccharomyces cerevisiae, defective in small subunit ribosomal RNA processing, has a mutation in YOR145c ORF that converts Gly235 to Asp. Yor145c is a nucleolar protein required for cell viability and has been reported recently to be present in 90S pre-ribosomal particles. The Gly235Asp mutation in YOR145c is found in a KH-type RNA-binding domain and causes a marked deficiency in 18S rRNA production. Detailed studies by northern blotting and primer extension analyses show that the mutant strain impairs the early pre-rRNA processing cleavage essentially at sites A1 and A2, leading to accumulation of a 22S dead-end processing product that is found in only a few rRNA processing mutants. Furthermore, U3, U14, snR10 and snR30 snoRNAs, involved in early pre-rRNA cleavages, are not destabilized by the YOR145c mutation. As the protein encoded by YOR145c is found in pre-ribosomal particles and the mutant strain is defective in ribosomal RNA processing, we have renamed it as RRP20. PMID:12736301

  19. RRP20, a component of the 90S preribosome, is required for pre-18S rRNA processing in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Senapin, Saengchan; Clark-Walker, G Desmond; Chen, Xin Jie; Séraphin, Bertrand; Daugeron, Marie-Claire

    2003-05-15

    A strain of Saccharomyces cerevisiae, defective in small subunit ribosomal RNA processing, has a mutation in YOR145c ORF that converts Gly235 to Asp. Yor145c is a nucleolar protein required for cell viability and has been reported recently to be present in 90S pre-ribosomal particles. The Gly235Asp mutation in YOR145c is found in a KH-type RNA-binding domain and causes a marked deficiency in 18S rRNA production. Detailed studies by northern blotting and primer extension analyses show that the mutant strain impairs the early pre-rRNA processing cleavage essentially at sites A1 and A2, leading to accumulation of a 22S dead-end processing product that is found in only a few rRNA processing mutants. Furthermore, U3, U14, snR10 and snR30 snoRNAs, involved in early pre-rRNA cleavages, are not destabilized by the YOR145c mutation. As the protein encoded by YOR145c is found in pre-ribosomal particles and the mutant strain is defective in ribosomal RNA processing, we have renamed it as RRP20.

  20. Paradigms of ribosome synthesis: Lessons learned from ribosomal proteins

    PubMed Central

    Gamalinda, Michael; Woolford, John L

    2015-01-01

    The proteome in all cells is manufactured via the intricate process of translation by multimolecular factories called ribosomes. Nevertheless, these ribonucleoprotein particles, the largest of their kind, also have an elaborate assembly line of their own. Groundbreaking discoveries that bacterial ribosomal subunits can be self-assembled in vitro jumpstarted studies on how ribosomes are constructed. Until recently, ribosome assembly has been investigated almost entirely in vitro with bacterial small subunits under equilibrium conditions. In light of high-resolution ribosome structures and a more sophisticated toolkit, the past decade has been defined by a burst of kinetic studies in vitro and, importantly, also a shift to examining ribosome maturation in living cells, especially in eukaryotes. In this review, we summarize the principles governing ribosome assembly that emerged from studies focusing on ribosomal proteins and their interactions with rRNA. Understanding these paradigms has taken center stage, given the linkage between anomalous ribosome biogenesis and proliferative disorders. PMID:26779413

  1. 18S rDNA Phylogeny of Lamproderma and Allied Genera (Stemonitales, Myxomycetes, Amoebozoa)

    PubMed Central

    Fiore-Donno, Anna Maria; Kamono, Akiko; Meyer, Marianne; Schnittler, Martin; Fukui, Manabu; Cavalier-Smith, Thomas

    2012-01-01

    The phylogenetic position of the slime-mould genus Lamproderma (Myxomycetes, Amoebozoa) challenges traditional taxonomy: although it displays the typical characters of the order Stemonitales, it appears to be sister to Physarales. This study provides a small subunit (18S or SSU) ribosomal RNA gene-based phylogeny of Lamproderma and its allies, with new sequences from 49 specimens in 12 genera. We found that the order Stemonitales and Lamproderma were both ancestral to Physarales and that Lamproderma constitutes several clades intermingled with species of Diacheopsis, Colloderma and Elaeomyxa. We suggest that these genera may have evolved from Lamproderma by multiple losses of fruiting body stalks and that many taxonomic revisions are needed. We found such high genetic diversity within three Lamproderma species that they probably consist of clusters of sibling species. We discuss the contrasts between genetic and morphological divergence and implications for the morphospecies concept, highlighting the phylogenetically most reliable morphological characters and pointing to others that have been overestimated. In addition, we showed that the first part (∼600 bases) of the SSU rDNA gene is a valuable tool for phylogeny in Myxomycetes, since it displayed sufficient variability to distinguish closely related taxa and never failed to cluster together specimens considered of the same species. PMID:22530009

  2. 18S rDNA phylogeny of lamproderma and allied genera (Stemonitales, Myxomycetes, Amoebozoa).

    PubMed

    Fiore-Donno, Anna Maria; Kamono, Akiko; Meyer, Marianne; Schnittler, Martin; Fukui, Manabu; Cavalier-Smith, Thomas

    2012-01-01

    The phylogenetic position of the slime-mould genus Lamproderma (Myxomycetes, Amoebozoa) challenges traditional taxonomy: although it displays the typical characters of the order Stemonitales, it appears to be sister to Physarales. This study provides a small subunit (18S or SSU) ribosomal RNA gene-based phylogeny of Lamproderma and its allies, with new sequences from 49 specimens in 12 genera. We found that the order Stemonitales and Lamproderma were both ancestral to Physarales and that Lamproderma constitutes several clades intermingled with species of Diacheopsis, Colloderma and Elaeomyxa. We suggest that these genera may have evolved from Lamproderma by multiple losses of fruiting body stalks and that many taxonomic revisions are needed. We found such high genetic diversity within three Lamproderma species that they probably consist of clusters of sibling species. We discuss the contrasts between genetic and morphological divergence and implications for the morphospecies concept, highlighting the phylogenetically most reliable morphological characters and pointing to others that have been overestimated. In addition, we showed that the first part (~600 bases) of the SSU rDNA gene is a valuable tool for phylogeny in Myxomycetes, since it displayed sufficient variability to distinguish closely related taxa and never failed to cluster together specimens considered of the same species.

  3. UtpA and UtpB chaperone nascent pre-ribosomal RNA and U3 snoRNA to initiate eukaryotic ribosome assembly

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hunziker, Mirjam; Barandun, Jonas; Petfalski, Elisabeth; Tan, Dongyan; Delan-Forino, Clémentine; Molloy, Kelly R.; Kim, Kelly H.; Dunn-Davies, Hywel; Shi, Yi; Chaker-Margot, Malik; Chait, Brian T.; Walz, Thomas; Tollervey, David; Klinge, Sebastian

    2016-06-01

    Early eukaryotic ribosome biogenesis involves large multi-protein complexes, which co-transcriptionally associate with pre-ribosomal RNA to form the small subunit processome. The precise mechanisms by which two of the largest multi-protein complexes--UtpA and UtpB--interact with nascent pre-ribosomal RNA are poorly understood. Here, we combined biochemical and structural biology approaches with ensembles of RNA-protein cross-linking data to elucidate the essential functions of both complexes. We show that UtpA contains a large composite RNA-binding site and captures the 5' end of pre-ribosomal RNA. UtpB forms an extended structure that binds early pre-ribosomal intermediates in close proximity to architectural sites such as an RNA duplex formed by the 5' ETS and U3 snoRNA as well as the 3' boundary of the 18S rRNA. Both complexes therefore act as vital RNA chaperones to initiate eukaryotic ribosome assembly.

  4. Nematode 18S rRNA gene is a reliable tool for environmental biosafety assessment of transgenic banana in confined field trials.

    PubMed

    Nakacwa, R; Kiggundu, A; Talwana, H; Namaganda, J; Lilley, C; Tushemereirwe, W; Atkinson, H

    2013-10-01

    Information on relatedness in nematodes is commonly obtained by DNA sequencing of the ribosomal internal transcribed spacer region. However, the level of diversity at this locus is often insufficient for reliable species differentiation. Recent findings suggest that the sequences of a fragment of the small subunit nuclear ribosomal DNA (18S rRNA or SSU), identify genera of soil nematodes and can also distinguish between species in some cases. A database of soil nematode genera in a Ugandan soil was developed using 18S rRNA sequences of individual nematodes from a GM banana confined field trial site at the National Agricultural Research Laboratories, Kawanda in Uganda. The trial was planted to evaluate transgenic bananas for resistance to black Sigatoka disease. Search for relatedness of the sequences gained with entries in a public genomic database identified a range of 20 different genera and sometimes distinguished species. Molecular markers were designed from the sequence information to underpin nematode faunal analysis. This approach provides bio-indicators for disturbance of the soil environment and the condition of the soil food web. It is being developed to support environmental biosafety analysis by detecting any perturbance by transgenic banana or other GM crops on the soil environment.

  5. Sequence analysis of ribosomal and mitochondrial genes of the giant liver fluke Fascioloides magna (Trematoda: Fasciolidae): intraspecific variation and differentiation from Fasciola hepatica.

    PubMed

    Králová-Hromadová, Ivica; Spakulová, Marta; Horácková, Eva; Turceková, Ludmila; Novobilský, Adam; Beck, Relja; Koudela, Bretislav; Marinculić, Albert; Rajský, Dusan; Pybus, Margo

    2008-02-01

    Complete sequences of ribosomal and mitochondrial genes of the giant liver fluke Fascioloides magna are presented. In particular, small subunit (18S) and internal transcribed spacers (ITS1 and ITS2) of the ribosomal gene (rDNA), as well as cytochrome c oxidase subunit I (cox1) and nicotinamide dehydrogenase subunit I (nad1) of the mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA), were analyzed. The 18S and ITS sequences were compared with previously published sequences of the liver fluke Fasciola hepatica. Fixed interspecific genetic differences were determined that allow molecular differentiation of F. magna and F. hepatica using either the PCR-RFLP method or PCR amplification of species-specific DNA regions. Additionally, intraspecific sequence polymorphism of the complete cox1 and nad1 mitochondrial genes in geographically distinct F. magna populations was determined. Based on the sequence divergences, short (< 500 bp) variable regions suitable for broader biogeographical studies of giant liver fluke were designed.

  6. Yeast Kre33 and human NAT10 are conserved 18S rRNA cytosine acetyltransferases that modify tRNAs assisted by the adaptor Tan1/THUMPD1

    PubMed Central

    Sharma, Sunny; Langhendries, Jean-Louis; Watzinger, Peter; Kötter, Peter; Entian, Karl-Dieter; Lafontaine, Denis L.J.

    2015-01-01

    The function of RNA is subtly modulated by post-transcriptional modifications. Here, we report an important crosstalk in the covalent modification of two classes of RNAs. We demonstrate that yeast Kre33 and human NAT10 are RNA cytosine acetyltransferases with, surprisingly, specificity toward both 18S rRNA and tRNAs. tRNA acetylation requires the intervention of a specific and conserved adaptor: yeast Tan1/human THUMPD1. In budding and fission yeasts, and in human cells, we found two acetylated cytosines on 18S rRNA, one in helix 34 important for translation accuracy and another in helix 45 near the decoding site. Efficient 18S rRNA acetylation in helix 45 involves, in human cells, the vertebrate-specific box C/D snoRNA U13, which, we suggest, exposes the substrate cytosine to modification through Watson–Crick base pairing with 18S rRNA precursors during small subunit biogenesis. Finally, while Kre33 and NAT10 are essential for pre-rRNA processing reactions leading to 18S rRNA synthesis, we demonstrate that rRNA acetylation is dispensable to yeast cells growth. The inactivation of NAT10 was suggested to suppress nuclear morphological defects observed in laminopathic patient cells through loss of microtubules modification and cytoskeleton reorganization. We rather propose the effects of NAT10 on laminopathic cells are due to reduced ribosome biogenesis or function. PMID:25653167

  7. Basic cytogenetics and physical mapping of 5S and 18S ribosomal genes in Hoplias malabaricus (Osteichthyes, Characiformes, Erythrinidae) from isolated natural lagoons: a conserved karyomorph along the Iguaçu river basin

    PubMed Central

    Gemi, Gisele; Lui, Roberto Laridondo; Treco, Fernando Rodrigo; Paiz, Leonardo Marcel; Moresco, Rafaela Maria; Margarido, Vladimir Pavan

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Erythrinidae include Neotropical teleost fish that are widely distributed in South America. Hoplias Gill, 1903 include two large groups: H. malabaricus Bloch, 1794 and H. lacerdae Miranda Ribeiro, 1908. Hoplias malabaricus is characterized by remarkable karyotype diversity, with some karyomorphs widely distributed geographically while others are more restricted to certain river basins. Cytogenetic analyzes were performed in a population of Hoplias malabaricus from the Wildlife Refuge of Campos de Palmas, the Iguaçu River basin. The specimens showed diploid number of 42 chromosomes (24m+18sm) without differentiated sex chromosomes system. The impregnation by silver nitrate showed multiple AgNORs. Seven pairs (4, 7, 10, 13, 16, 20 and 21) carrying 18S rDNA were detected by FISH. Heterochromatin was verified in the centromeric and pericentromeric region of most chromosomes and the terminal region of some pairs. FISH with 5S rDNA probes showed two chromosome pairs carrying these sites in the interstitial region (8 and 14). The data obtained in this study are similar to those found for two other populations of H. malabaricus already studied in the basin of the Iguaçu River, confirming the hypothesis that this species is natural, not having been introduced, as well as having an intrinsic characteristic, such as the largest number of sites of 18S rDNA. PMID:25349672

  8. A phylogenetic framework for root lesion nematodes of the genus Pratylenchus (Nematoda): Evidence from 18S and D2-D3 expansion segments of 28S ribosomal RNA genes and morphological characters.

    PubMed

    Subbotin, Sergei A; Ragsdale, Erik J; Mullens, Teresa; Roberts, Philip A; Mundo-Ocampo, Manuel; Baldwin, James G

    2008-08-01

    The root lesion nematodes of the genus Pratylenchus Filipjev, 1936 are migratory endoparasites of plant roots, considered among the most widespread and important nematode parasites in a variety of crops. We obtained gene sequences from the D2 and D3 expansion segments of 28S rRNA partial and 18S rRNA from 31 populations belonging to 11 valid and two unidentified species of root lesion nematodes and five outgroup taxa. These datasets were analyzed using maximum parsimony and Bayesian inference. The alignments were generated using the secondary structure models for these molecules and analyzed with Bayesian inference under the standard models and the complex model, considering helices under the doublet model and loops and bulges under the general time reversible model. The phylogenetic informativeness of morphological characters is tested by reconstruction of their histories on rRNA based trees using parallel parsimony and Bayesian approaches. Phylogenetic and sequence analyses of the 28S D2-D3 dataset with 145 accessions for 28 species and 18S dataset with 68 accessions for 15 species confirmed among large numbers of geographical diverse isolates that most classical morphospecies are monophyletic. Phylogenetic analyses revealed at least six distinct major clades of examined Pratylenchus species and these clades are generally congruent with those defined by characters derived from lip patterns, numbers of lip annules, and spermatheca shape. Morphological results suggest the need for sophisticated character discovery and analysis for morphology based phylogenetics in nematodes.

  9. PHYLOGENETIC ANALYSIS OF CRYPTOSPORIDIUM PARASITES BASED ON THE SMALL SUBUNIT RIBOSOMAL RNA GENE LOCUS

    EPA Science Inventory

    ABSTRACT
    Biologic data support the presence of multiple species in the genus Cryptosporidium, but
    a recent analysis of the available genetic data has suggested that there is insufficient evidence for species differentiation. In order to resolve the controversy in the taxono...

  10. PHYLOGENETIC ANALYSIS OF CRYPTOSPORIDIUM PARASITES BASED ON THE SMALL SUBUNIT RIBOSOMAL RNA GENE LOCUS

    EPA Science Inventory

    ABSTRACT
    Biologic data support the presence of multiple species in the genus Cryptosporidium, but
    a recent analysis of the available genetic data has suggested that there is insufficient evidence for species differentiation. In order to resolve the controversy in the taxono...

  11. Collection of small subunit (16S- and 16S-like) ribosomal RNA structures: 1994.

    PubMed Central

    Gutell, R R

    1994-01-01

    A collection of diverse 16S and 16S-like rRNA secondary structure diagrams are available. This set of rRNAs contains representative structures from all of the major phylogenetic groupings--Archaea, (eu)Bacteria, and the nucleus, mitochondrion, and chloroplast of Eucarya. Within this broad phylogenetic sampling are examples of the major forms of structural diversity currently known for this class of rRNAs. These structure diagrams are available online through our computer-network WWW server and anonymous ftp, as well as from the author in hardcopy format. PMID:7524024

  12. Plasmids containing small subunit ribosomal RNA gene fragments from Babesia bovis and Babesia bigemina

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    BEI Resources was developed by NIAID as a centralized biological resource center for research reagents to the scientific community (http://www.beiresources.org/). They have a considerable amount of reagents and isolates for parasitologists working with Entamoeba histolytica, Giardia, Toxoplasma, and...

  13. The 28S-18S rDNA intergenic spacer from Crithidia fasciculata: repeated sequences, length heterogeneity, putative processing sites and potential interactions between U3 small nucleolar RNA and the ribosomal RNA precursor.

    PubMed

    Schnare, M N; Collings, J C; Spencer, D F; Gray, M W

    2000-09-15

    In Crithidia fasciculata, the ribosomal RNA (rRNA) gene repeats range in size from approximately 11 to 12 kb. This length heterogeneity is localized to a region of the intergenic spacer (IGS) that contains tandemly repeated copies of a 19mer sequence. The IGS also contains four copies of an approximately 55 nt repeat that has an internal inverted repeat and is also present in the IGS of Leishmania species. We have mapped the C.fasciculata transcription initiation site as well as two other reverse transcriptase stop sites that may be analogous to the A0 and A' pre-rRNA processing sites within the 5' external transcribed spacer (ETS) of other eukaryotes. Features that could influence processing at these sites include two stretches of conserved primary sequence and three secondary structure elements present in the 5' ETS. We also characterized the C.fasciculata U3 snoRNA, which has the potential for base-pairing with pre-rRNA sequences. Finally, we demonstrate that biosynthesis of large subunit rRNA in both C. fasciculata and Trypanosoma brucei involves 3'-terminal addition of three A residues that are not present in the corresponding DNA sequences.

  14. Proteins on ribosome surface: Measurements of protein exposure by hot tritium bombardment technique

    PubMed Central

    Agafonov, Dmitry E.; Kolb, Vyacheslav A.; Spirin, Alexander S.

    1997-01-01

    The hot tritium bombardment technique [Goldanskii, V. I., Kashirin, I. A., Shishkov, A. V., Baratova, L. A. & Grebenshchikov, N. I. (1988) J. Mol. Biol. 201, 567–574] has been applied to measure the exposure of proteins on the ribosomal surface. The technique is based on replacement of hydrogen by high energy tritium atoms in thin surface layer of macromolecules. Quantitation of tritium radioactivity of each protein has revealed that proteins S1, S4, S5, S7, S18, S20, and S21 of the small subunit, and proteins L7/L12, L9, L10, L11, L16, L17, L24, and L27 of the large subunit are well exposed on the surface of the Escherichia coli 70 S ribosome. Proteins S8, S10, S12, S16, S17, L14, L20, L29, L30, L31, L32, L33, and L34 have virtually no groups exposed on the ribosomal surface. The remaining proteins are found to be exposed to lesser degree than the well exposed ones. No additional ribosomal proteins was exposed upon dissociation of ribosomes into subunits, thus indicating the absence of proteins on intersubunit contacting surfaces. PMID:9371771

  15. Small-Subunit rRNA Genotyping of Rhizobia Nodulating Australian Acacia spp.

    PubMed Central

    Lafay, Bénédicte; Burdon, Jeremy J.

    2001-01-01

    The structure of rhizobial communities nodulating Acacia in southeastern Australia from south Queensland to Tasmania was investigated by a molecular approach. A total of 118 isolates from nodule samples from 13 different Acacia species collected at 44 sites were characterized by small-subunit (SSU) ribosomal DNA (rDNA) PCR-restriction fragment length polymorphism analysis. Nine rhizobial genomospecies were identified, and these taxa corresponded to previously described genomospecies (B. Lafay and J. J. Burdon, Appl. Environ. Microbiol. 64:3989–3997, 1998). Eight of these genomospecies belonged to the Bradyrhizobium lineage and accounted for 96.6% of the isolates. The remaining genomospecies corresponded to Rhizobium tropici. For analysis of geographic patterns, results were grouped into five latitudinal regions regardless of host origin. In each region, as observed previously for rhizobial isolates taken from non-Acacia legumes (Lafay and Burdon, Appl. Environ. Microbiol. 64:3989–3997, 1998), rhizobial communities were dominated by one or two genomospecies, the identities of which varied from place to place. Despite this similarity in patterns, the most abundant genomospecies for Acacia isolates differed from the genomospecies found in the non-Acacia-derived rhizobial collection, suggesting that there is a difference in nodulation patterns of the Mimosoideae and the Papilionoideae. Only two genomospecies were both widespread and relatively abundant across the range of sites sampled. Genomospecies A was found in all regions except the most northern sites located in Queensland, whereas genomospecies B was not detected in Tasmania. This suggests that genomospecies A might be restricted to the more temperate regions of Australia, whereas in contrast, genomospecies B occurs in different climatic and edaphic conditions across the whole continent. The latter hypothesis is supported by the presence of genomospecies B in southwestern Australia, based on partial SSU r

  16. Seasonal and Spatial Variability in Lake Michigan Sediment Small-Subunit rRNA Concentrations

    PubMed Central

    MacGregor, Barbara J.; Moser, Duane P.; Baker, Brett J.; Alm, Elizabeth W.; Maurer, Max; Nealson, Kenneth H.; Stahl, David A.

    2001-01-01

    We have used molecular biological methods to study the distribution of microbial small-subunit rRNAs (SSU rRNAs), in relation to chemical profiles, in offshore Lake Michigan sediments. The sampling site is at a depth of 100 m, with temperatures of 2 to 4°C year-round. RNA extracted from sediment was probed with radiolabeled oligonucleotides targeting bacterial, archaeal, and eukaryotic SSU rRNAs, as well as with a universal probe. The coverage of these probes in relation to the present sequence database is discussed. Because ribosome production is growth rate regulated, rRNA concentrations are an indicator of the microbial populations active in situ. Over a 1-year period, changes in sedimentary SSU rRNA concentrations followed seasonal changes in surface water temperature and SSU rRNA concentration. Sedimentary depth profiles of oxygen, reduced manganese and iron, and sulfate changed relatively little from season to season, but the nitrate concentration was approximately fivefold higher in April and June 1997 than at the other times sampling was done. We propose that sediment microbial SSU rRNA concentrations at our sampling site are influenced by seasonal inputs from the water column, particularly the settling of the spring diatom bloom, and that the timing of this input may be modulated by grazers, such that ammonia becomes available to sediment microbes sooner than fresh organic carbon. Nitrate production from ammonia by autotrophic nitrifying bacteria, combined with low activity of heterotrophic denitrifying bacteria in the absence of readily degradable organic carbon, could account for the cooccurrence of high nitrate and low SSU rRNA concentrations. PMID:11525985

  17. The utility of diversity profiling using Illumina 18S rRNA gene amplicon deep sequencing to detect and discriminate Toxoplasma gondii among the cyst-forming coccidia.

    PubMed

    Cooper, Madalyn K; Phalen, David N; Donahoe, Shannon L; Rose, Karrie; Šlapeta, Jan

    2016-01-30

    Next-generation sequencing (NGS) has the capacity to screen a single DNA sample and detect pathogen DNA from thousands of host DNA sequence reads, making it a versatile and informative tool for investigation of pathogens in diseased animals. The technique is effective and labor saving in the initial identification of pathogens, and will complement conventional diagnostic tests to associate the candidate pathogen with a disease process. In this report, we investigated the utility of the diversity profiling NGS approach using Illumina small subunit ribosomal RNA (18S rRNA) gene amplicon deep sequencing to detect Toxoplasma gondii in previously confirmed cases of toxoplasmosis. We then tested the diagnostic approach with species-specific PCR genotyping, histopathology and immunohistochemistry of toxoplasmosis in a Risso's dolphin (Grampus griseus) to systematically characterise the disease and associate causality. We show that the Euk7A/Euk570R primer set targeting the V1-V3 hypervariable region of the 18S rRNA gene can be used as a species-specific assay for cyst-forming coccidia and discriminate T. gondii. Overall, the approach is cost-effective and improves diagnostic decision support by narrowing the differential diagnosis list with more certainty than was previously possible. Furthermore, it supplements the limitations of cryptic protozoan morphology and surpasses the need for species-specific PCR primer combinations. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. A pre-ribosomal RNA interaction network involving snoRNAs and the Rok1 helicase.

    PubMed

    Martin, Roman; Hackert, Philipp; Ruprecht, Maike; Simm, Stefan; Brüning, Lukas; Mirus, Oliver; Sloan, Katherine E; Kudla, Grzegorz; Schleiff, Enrico; Bohnsack, Markus T

    2014-08-01

    Ribosome biogenesis in yeast requires 75 small nucleolar RNAs (snoRNAs) and a myriad of cofactors for processing, modification, and folding of the ribosomal RNAs (rRNAs). For the 19 RNA helicases implicated in ribosome synthesis, their sites of action and molecular functions have largely remained unknown. Here, we have used UV cross-linking and analysis of cDNA (CRAC) to reveal the pre-rRNA binding sites of the RNA helicase Rok1, which is involved in early small subunit biogenesis. Several contact sites were identified in the 18S rRNA sequence, which interestingly all cluster in the "foot" region of the small ribosomal subunit. These include a major binding site in the eukaryotic expansion segment ES6, where Rok1 is required for release of the snR30 snoRNA. Rok1 directly contacts snR30 and other snoRNAs required for pre-rRNA processing. Using cross-linking, ligation and sequencing of hybrids (CLASH) we identified several novel pre-rRNA base-pairing sites for the snoRNAs snR30, snR10, U3, and U14, which cluster in the expansion segments of the 18S rRNA. Our data suggest that these snoRNAs bridge interactions between the expansion segments, thereby forming an extensive interaction network that likely promotes pre-rRNA maturation and folding in early pre-ribosomal complexes and establishes long-range rRNA interactions during ribosome synthesis. © 2014 Martin et al.; Published by Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory Press for the RNA Society.

  19. A pre-ribosomal RNA interaction network involving snoRNAs and the Rok1 helicase

    PubMed Central

    Martin, Roman; Hackert, Philipp; Ruprecht, Maike; Simm, Stefan; Brüning, Lukas; Mirus, Oliver; Sloan, Katherine E.; Kudla, Grzegorz; Schleiff, Enrico; Bohnsack, Markus T.

    2014-01-01

    Ribosome biogenesis in yeast requires 75 small nucleolar RNAs (snoRNAs) and a myriad of cofactors for processing, modification, and folding of the ribosomal RNAs (rRNAs). For the 19 RNA helicases implicated in ribosome synthesis, their sites of action and molecular functions have largely remained unknown. Here, we have used UV cross-linking and analysis of cDNA (CRAC) to reveal the pre-rRNA binding sites of the RNA helicase Rok1, which is involved in early small subunit biogenesis. Several contact sites were identified in the 18S rRNA sequence, which interestingly all cluster in the “foot” region of the small ribosomal subunit. These include a major binding site in the eukaryotic expansion segment ES6, where Rok1 is required for release of the snR30 snoRNA. Rok1 directly contacts snR30 and other snoRNAs required for pre-rRNA processing. Using cross-linking, ligation and sequencing of hybrids (CLASH) we identified several novel pre-rRNA base-pairing sites for the snoRNAs snR30, snR10, U3, and U14, which cluster in the expansion segments of the 18S rRNA. Our data suggest that these snoRNAs bridge interactions between the expansion segments, thereby forming an extensive interaction network that likely promotes pre-rRNA maturation and folding in early pre-ribosomal complexes and establishes long-range rRNA interactions during ribosome synthesis. PMID:24947498

  20. Ribosomal RNA processing in Candida albicans

    PubMed Central

    Pendrak, Michael L.; Roberts, David D.

    2011-01-01

    Ribosome assembly begins with conversion of a polycistronic precursor into 18S, 5.8S, and 25S rRNAs. In the ascomycete fungus Candida albicans, rRNA transcription starts 604 nt upstream of the 18S rRNA junction (site A1). One major internal processing site in the 5′ external transcribed spacer (A0) occurs 108 nt from site A1. The A0–A1 fragment persists as a stable species during log phase growth and can be used to assess proliferation rates. Separation of the small and large subunit pre-rRNAs occurs at sites A2 and A3 in internal transcribed spacer-1 Saccharomyces cerevisiae pre-rRNA. However, the 5′ end of the 5.8S rRNA is represented by only a 5.8S (S) form, and a 7S rRNA precursor of the 5.8S rRNA extends into internal transcribed spacer 1 to site A2, which differs from S. cerevisiae. External transcribed spacer 1 and internal transcribed spacers 1 and 2 show remarkable structural similarity with S. cerevisiae despite low sequence identity. Maturation of C. albicans rRNA resembles other eukaryotes in that processing can occur cotranscriptionally or post-transcriptionally. During rapid proliferation, U3 snoRNA-dependent processing occurs before large and small subunit rRNA separation, consistent with cotranscriptional processing. As cells pass the diauxic transition, the 18S pre-rRNA accumulates into stationary phase as a 23S species, possessing an intact 5′ external transcribed spacer extending to site A3. Nutrient addition to starved cells results in the disappearance of the 23S rRNA, indicating a potential role in normal physiology. Therefore, C. albicans reveals new mechanisms that regulate post- versus cotranscriptional rRNA processing. PMID:22028364

  1. Ribosome Biogenesis in African Trypanosomes Requires Conserved and Trypanosome-Specific Factors

    PubMed Central

    Umaer, Khan; Ciganda, Martin

    2014-01-01

    Large ribosomal subunit protein L5 is responsible for the stability and trafficking of 5S rRNA to the site of eukaryotic ribosomal assembly. In Trypanosoma brucei, in addition to L5, trypanosome-specific proteins P34 and P37 also participate in this process. These two essential proteins form a novel preribosomal particle through interactions with both the ribosomal protein L5 and 5S rRNA. We have generated a procyclic L5 RNA interference cell line and found that L5 itself is a protein essential for trypanosome growth, despite the presence of other 5S rRNA binding proteins. Loss of L5 decreases the levels of all large-subunit rRNAs, 25/28S, 5.8S, and 5S rRNAs, but does not alter small-subunit 18S rRNA. Depletion of L5 specifically reduced the levels of the other large ribosomal proteins, L3 and L11, whereas the steady-state levels of the mRNA for these proteins were increased. L5-knockdown cells showed an increase in the 40S ribosomal subunit and a loss of the 60S ribosomal subunits, 80S monosomes, and polysomes. In addition, L5 was involved in the processing and maturation of precursor rRNAs. Analysis of polysomal fractions revealed that unprocessed rRNA intermediates accumulate in the ribosome when L5 is depleted. Although we previously found that the loss of P34 and P37 does not result in a change in the levels of L5, the loss of L5 resulted in an increase of P34 and P37 proteins, suggesting the presence of a compensatory feedback loop. This study demonstrates that ribosomal protein L5 has conserved functions, in addition to nonconserved trypanosome-specific features, which could be targeted for drug intervention. PMID:24706018

  2. The gene coding for small ribosomal subunit RNA in the basidiomycete Ustilago maydis contains a group I intron.

    PubMed Central

    De Wachter, R; Neefs, J M; Goris, A; Van de Peer, Y

    1992-01-01

    The nucleotide sequence of the gene coding for small ribosomal subunit RNA in the basidiomycete Ustilago maydis was determined. It revealed the presence of a group I intron with a length of 411 nucleotides. This is the third occurrence of such an intron discovered in a small subunit rRNA gene encoded by a eukaryotic nuclear genome. The other two occurrences are in Pneumocystis carinii, a fungus of uncertain taxonomic status, and Ankistrodesmus stipitatus, a green alga. The nucleotides of the conserved core structure of 101 group I intron sequences present in different genes and genome types were aligned and their evolutionary relatedness was examined. This revealed a cluster including all group I introns hitherto found in eukaryotic nuclear genes coding for small and large subunit rRNAs. A secondary structure model was designed for the area of the Ustilago maydis small ribosomal subunit RNA precursor where the intron is situated. It shows that the internal guide sequence pairing with the intron boundaries fits between two helices of the small subunit rRNA, and that minimal rearrangement of base pairs suffices to achieve the definitive secondary structure of the 18S rRNA upon splicing. PMID:1561081

  3. Evaluation of nearest-neighbor methods for detection of chimeric small-subunit rRNA sequences

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Robison-Cox, J. F.; Bateson, M. M.; Ward, D. M.

    1995-01-01

    Detection of chimeric artifacts formed when PCR is used to retrieve naturally occurring small-subunit (SSU) rRNA sequences may rely on demonstrating that different sequence domains have different phylogenetic affiliations. We evaluated the CHECK_CHIMERA method of the Ribosomal Database Project and another method which we developed, both based on determining nearest neighbors of different sequence domains, for their ability to discern artificially generated SSU rRNA chimeras from authentic Ribosomal Database Project sequences. The reliability of both methods decreases when the parental sequences which contribute to chimera formation are more than 82 to 84% similar. Detection is also complicated by the occurrence of authentic SSU rRNA sequences that behave like chimeras. We developed a naive statistical test based on CHECK_CHIMERA output and used it to evaluate previously reported SSU rRNA chimeras. Application of this test also suggests that chimeras might be formed by retrieving SSU rRNAs as cDNA. The amount of uncertainty associated with nearest-neighbor analyses indicates that such tests alone are insufficient and that better methods are needed.

  4. Evaluation of nearest-neighbor methods for detection of chimeric small-subunit rRNA sequences

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Robison-Cox, J. F.; Bateson, M. M.; Ward, D. M.

    1995-01-01

    Detection of chimeric artifacts formed when PCR is used to retrieve naturally occurring small-subunit (SSU) rRNA sequences may rely on demonstrating that different sequence domains have different phylogenetic affiliations. We evaluated the CHECK_CHIMERA method of the Ribosomal Database Project and another method which we developed, both based on determining nearest neighbors of different sequence domains, for their ability to discern artificially generated SSU rRNA chimeras from authentic Ribosomal Database Project sequences. The reliability of both methods decreases when the parental sequences which contribute to chimera formation are more than 82 to 84% similar. Detection is also complicated by the occurrence of authentic SSU rRNA sequences that behave like chimeras. We developed a naive statistical test based on CHECK_CHIMERA output and used it to evaluate previously reported SSU rRNA chimeras. Application of this test also suggests that chimeras might be formed by retrieving SSU rRNAs as cDNA. The amount of uncertainty associated with nearest-neighbor analyses indicates that such tests alone are insufficient and that better methods are needed.

  5. Evaluation of nearest-neighbor methods for detection of chimeric small-subunit rRNA sequences.

    PubMed Central

    Robison-Cox, J F; Bateson, M M; Ward, D M

    1995-01-01

    Detection of chimeric artifacts formed when PCR is used to retrieve naturally occurring small-subunit (SSU) rRNA sequences may rely on demonstrating that different sequence domains have different phylogenetic affiliations. We evaluated the CHECK_CHIMERA method of the Ribosomal Database Project and another method which we developed, both based on determining nearest neighbors of different sequence domains, for their ability to discern artificially generated SSU rRNA chimeras from authentic Ribosomal Database Project sequences. The reliability of both methods decreases when the parental sequences which contribute to chimera formation are more than 82 to 84% similar. Detection is also complicated by the occurrence of authentic SSU rRNA sequences that behave like chimeras. We developed a naive statistical test based on CHECK_CHIMERA output and used it to evaluate previously reported SSU rRNA chimeras. Application of this test also suggests that chimeras might be formed by retrieving SSU rRNAs as cDNA. The amount of uncertainty associated with nearest-neighbor analyses indicates that such tests alone are insufficient and that better methods are needed. PMID:7538272

  6. Autophagy induction is a Tor- and Tp53-independent cell survival response in a zebrafish model of disrupted ribosome biogenesis.

    PubMed

    Boglev, Yeliz; Badrock, Andrew P; Trotter, Andrew J; Du, Qian; Richardson, Elsbeth J; Parslow, Adam C; Markmiller, Sebastian J; Hall, Nathan E; de Jong-Curtain, Tanya A; Ng, Annie Y; Verkade, Heather; Ober, Elke A; Field, Holly A; Shin, Donghun; Shin, Chong H; Hannan, Katherine M; Hannan, Ross D; Pearson, Richard B; Kim, Seok-Hyung; Ess, Kevin C; Lieschke, Graham J; Stainier, Didier Y R; Heath, Joan K

    2013-01-01

    Ribosome biogenesis underpins cell growth and division. Disruptions in ribosome biogenesis and translation initiation are deleterious to development and underlie a spectrum of diseases known collectively as ribosomopathies. Here, we describe a novel zebrafish mutant, titania (tti(s450)), which harbours a recessive lethal mutation in pwp2h, a gene encoding a protein component of the small subunit processome. The biochemical impacts of this lesion are decreased production of mature 18S rRNA molecules, activation of Tp53, and impaired ribosome biogenesis. In tti(s450), the growth of the endodermal organs, eyes, brain, and craniofacial structures is severely arrested and autophagy is up-regulated, allowing intestinal epithelial cells to evade cell death. Inhibiting autophagy in tti(s450) larvae markedly reduces their lifespan. Somewhat surprisingly, autophagy induction in tti(s450) larvae is independent of the state of the Tor pathway and proceeds unabated in Tp53-mutant larvae. These data demonstrate that autophagy is a survival mechanism invoked in response to ribosomal stress. This response may be of relevance to therapeutic strategies aimed at killing cancer cells by targeting ribosome biogenesis. In certain contexts, these treatments may promote autophagy and contribute to cancer cells evading cell death.

  7. Autophagy Induction Is a Tor- and Tp53-Independent Cell Survival Response in a Zebrafish Model of Disrupted Ribosome Biogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Boglev, Yeliz; Badrock, Andrew P.; Trotter, Andrew J.; Du, Qian; Richardson, Elsbeth J.; Parslow, Adam C.; Markmiller, Sebastian J.; Hall, Nathan E.; de Jong-Curtain, Tanya A.; Ng, Annie Y.; Verkade, Heather; Ober, Elke A.; Field, Holly A.; Shin, Donghun; Shin, Chong H.; Hannan, Katherine M.; Hannan, Ross D.; Pearson, Richard B.; Kim, Seok-Hyung; Ess, Kevin C.; Lieschke, Graham J.; Stainier, Didier Y. R.; Heath, Joan K.

    2013-01-01

    Ribosome biogenesis underpins cell growth and division. Disruptions in ribosome biogenesis and translation initiation are deleterious to development and underlie a spectrum of diseases known collectively as ribosomopathies. Here, we describe a novel zebrafish mutant, titania (ttis450), which harbours a recessive lethal mutation in pwp2h, a gene encoding a protein component of the small subunit processome. The biochemical impacts of this lesion are decreased production of mature 18S rRNA molecules, activation of Tp53, and impaired ribosome biogenesis. In ttis450, the growth of the endodermal organs, eyes, brain, and craniofacial structures is severely arrested and autophagy is up-regulated, allowing intestinal epithelial cells to evade cell death. Inhibiting autophagy in ttis450 larvae markedly reduces their lifespan. Somewhat surprisingly, autophagy induction in ttis450 larvae is independent of the state of the Tor pathway and proceeds unabated in Tp53-mutant larvae. These data demonstrate that autophagy is a survival mechanism invoked in response to ribosomal stress. This response may be of relevance to therapeutic strategies aimed at killing cancer cells by targeting ribosome biogenesis. In certain contexts, these treatments may promote autophagy and contribute to cancer cells evading cell death. PMID:23408911

  8. Visualization of the eEF2-80S Ribosome Transition State Complex by Cryo-electron Microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Sengupta, Jayati; Nilsson, Jakob; Gursky, Richard; Kjeldgaard, Morten; Nissen, Poul; Frank, Joachim

    2010-01-01

    Summary In an attempt to understand ribosome-induced GTP hydrolysis on eEF2, we have determined a 12.6-Å cryo-EM reconstruction of the eEF2-bound 80S ribosome in the presence of aluminum fluoride (AlF4−) and GDP, with AlF4− mimicking the γ-phosphate during hydrolysis. This is the first visualization of a structure representing a transition state complex on the ribosome. Tight interactions are observed between the factor’s G-domain and the large ribosomal subunit, as well as between domain IV and an intersubunit bridge. In contrast, some of the domains of eEF2 implicated in small subunit binding display a large degree of flexibility. Furthermore, we find support for a transition state model conformation of the switch I region in this complex where the reoriented switch I interacts with a conserved rRNA region of the 40S subunit formed by loops of the 18S RNA helices 8 and 14. This complex is structurally distinct from the eEF2-bound 80S ribosome complexes previously published, and analysis of this map sheds light on the GTPase-coupled translocation mechanism. PMID:18644383

  9. Conservation of RNA sequence and cross-linking ability in ribosomes from a higher eukaryote: photochemical cross-linking of the anticodon of P site bound tRNA to the penultimate cytidine of the UACACACG sequence in Artemia salina 18S rRNA.

    PubMed

    Ciesiolka, J; Nurse, K; Klein, J; Ofengand, J

    1985-06-18

    The complex of Artemia salina ribosomes and Escherichia coli acetylvalyl-tRNA could be cross-linked by irradiation with near-UV light. Cross-linking required the presence of the codon GUU, GUA being ineffective. The acetylvalyl group could be released from the cross-linked tRNA by treatment with puromycin, demonstrating that cross-linking had occurred at the P site. This was true both for pGUU- and also for poly(U2,G)-dependent cross-linking. All of the cross-linking was to the 18S rRNA of the small ribosomal subunit. Photolysis of the cross-link at 254 nm occurred with the same kinetics as that for the known cyclobutane dimer between this tRNA and Escherichia coli 16S rRNA. T1 RNase digestion of the cross-linked tRNA yielded an oligonucleotide larger in molecular weight than any from un-cross-linked rRNA or tRNA or from a prephotolyzed complex. Extended electrophoresis showed this material to consist of two oligomers of similar mobility, a faster one-third component and a slower two-thirds component. Each oligomer yielded two components on 254-nm photolysis. The slower band from each was the tRNA T1 oligomer CACCUCCCUVACAAGp, which includes the anticodon. The faster band was the rRNA 9-mer UACACACCGp and its derivative UACACACUG. Unexpectedly, the dephosphorylated and slower moving 9-mer was derived from the faster moving dimer. Deamination of the penultimate C to U is probably due to cyclobutane dimer formation and was evidence for that nucleotide being the site of cross-linking. Direct confirmation of the cross-linking site was obtained by "Z"-gel analysis [Ehresmann, C., & Ofengand, J. (1984) Biochemistry 23, 438-445].(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  10. Yeast Kre33 and human NAT10 are conserved 18S rRNA cytosine acetyltransferases that modify tRNAs assisted by the adaptor Tan1/THUMPD1.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Sunny; Langhendries, Jean-Louis; Watzinger, Peter; Kötter, Peter; Entian, Karl-Dieter; Lafontaine, Denis L J

    2015-02-27

    The function of RNA is subtly modulated by post-transcriptional modifications. Here, we report an important crosstalk in the covalent modification of two classes of RNAs. We demonstrate that yeast Kre33 and human NAT10 are RNA cytosine acetyltransferases with, surprisingly, specificity toward both 18S rRNA and tRNAs. tRNA acetylation requires the intervention of a specific and conserved adaptor: yeast Tan1/human THUMPD1. In budding and fission yeasts, and in human cells, we found two acetylated cytosines on 18S rRNA, one in helix 34 important for translation accuracy and another in helix 45 near the decoding site. Efficient 18S rRNA acetylation in helix 45 involves, in human cells, the vertebrate-specific box C/D snoRNA U13, which, we suggest, exposes the substrate cytosine to modification through Watson-Crick base pairing with 18S rRNA precursors during small subunit biogenesis. Finally, while Kre33 and NAT10 are essential for pre-rRNA processing reactions leading to 18S rRNA synthesis, we demonstrate that rRNA acetylation is dispensable to yeast cells growth. The inactivation of NAT10 was suggested to suppress nuclear morphological defects observed in laminopathic patient cells through loss of microtubules modification and cytoskeleton reorganization. We rather propose the effects of NAT10 on laminopathic cells are due to reduced ribosome biogenesis or function. © The Author(s) 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Nucleic Acids Research.

  11. Stepwise and dynamic assembly of the earliest precursors of small ribosomal subunits in yeast.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Liman; Wu, Chen; Cai, Gaihong; Chen, She; Ye, Keqiong

    2016-03-15

    The eukaryotic ribosomal RNA (rRNA) is associated cotranscriptionally with numerous factors into an enormous 90S preribosomal particle that conducts early processing of small ribosomal subunits. The assembly pathway and structure of the 90S particle is poorly understood. Here, we affinity-purified and analyzed the constituents of yeast 90S particles that were assembled on a series of plasmid-encoded 3'-truncated pre-18S RNAs. We determined the assembly point of 65 proteins and the U3, U14, and snR30 small nucleolar RNAs (snoRNAs), revealing a stepwise and dynamic assembly map. The 5' external transcribed spacer (ETS) alone can nucleate a large complex. When the 18S rRNA is nearly complete, the 90S structure undergoes a dramatic reorganization, releasing U14, snR30, and 14 protein factors that bind earlier. We also identified a reference state of 90S that is fully assembled yet has not undergone 5'ETS processing. The assembly map present here provides a new framework to understand small subunit biogenesis. © 2016 Zhang et al.; Published by Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory Press.

  12. Stepwise and dynamic assembly of the earliest precursors of small ribosomal subunits in yeast

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Liman; Wu, Chen; Cai, Gaihong; Chen, She

    2016-01-01

    The eukaryotic ribosomal RNA (rRNA) is associated cotranscriptionally with numerous factors into an enormous 90S preribosomal particle that conducts early processing of small ribosomal subunits. The assembly pathway and structure of the 90S particle is poorly understood. Here, we affinity-purified and analyzed the constituents of yeast 90S particles that were assembled on a series of plasmid-encoded 3′-truncated pre-18S RNAs. We determined the assembly point of 65 proteins and the U3, U14, and snR30 small nucleolar RNAs (snoRNAs), revealing a stepwise and dynamic assembly map. The 5′ external transcribed spacer (ETS) alone can nucleate a large complex. When the 18S rRNA is nearly complete, the 90S structure undergoes a dramatic reorganization, releasing U14, snR30, and 14 protein factors that bind earlier. We also identified a reference state of 90S that is fully assembled yet has not undergone 5′ETS processing. The assembly map present here provides a new framework to understand small subunit biogenesis. PMID:26980190

  13. Ribosomal Database Project II

    DOE Data Explorer

    The Ribosomal Database Project (RDP) provides ribosome related data and services to the scientific community, including online data analysis and aligned and annotated Bacterial small-subunit 16S rRNA sequences. As of March 2008, RDP Release 10 is available and currently (August 2009) contains 1,074,075 aligned 16S rRNA sequences. Data that can be downloaded include zipped GenBank and FASTA alignment files, a histogram (in Excel) of the number of RDP sequences spanning each base position, data in the Functional Gene Pipeline Repository, and various user submitted data. The RDP-II website also provides numerous analysis tools.[From the RDP-II home page at http://rdp.cme.msu.edu/index.jsp

  14. 18S rRNA gene sequencing identifies a novel species of Henneguya parasitizing the gills of the channel catfish (Ictaluridae)

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    In the southeastern United States, the channel catfish Ictalurus punctatus is a host to at least eight different species of myxozoan parasites belonging to the genus Henneguya, four of which have been characterized molecularly using sequencing of the small subunit ribosomal RNA gene (SSU rRNA). Howe...

  15. Expression of a foreign Rubisco small subunit in tobacco with reduced levels of the native protein

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    The cDNA, ArRbcS3, for the small subunit of Rubisco from Amaranthus retroflexus (pigweed) was expressed in tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum) under the control of a strong leaf-specific Lhcb promoter. The coding region of the ArRbcS3 was fused to the plastid targeting sequence of the native tobacco rbcS to...

  16. Evaluating hypotheses of basal animal phylogeny using complete sequences of large and small subunit rRNA

    SciTech Connect

    Medina, Monica; Collins, Allen G.; Silberman, Jeffrey; Sogin, Mitchell L.

    2001-06-21

    We studied the evolutionary relationships among basal metazoan lineages by using complete large subunit (LSU) and small subunit (SSU) ribosomal RNA sequences for 23 taxa. After identifying competing hypotheses, we performed maximum likelihood searches for trees conforming to each hypothesis. Kishino-Hasegawa tests were used to determine whether the data (LSU, SSU, and combined) reject any of the competing hypotheses. We also conducted unconstrained tree searches, compared the resulting topologies, and calculated bootstrap indices. Shimodaira-Hasegawa tests were applied to determine whether the data reject any of the topologies resulting from the constrained and unconstrained tree searches. LSU, SSU, and the combined data strongly contradict two assertions pertaining to sponge phylogeny. Hexactinellid sponges are not likely to be the basal lineage of amonophyletic Porifera or the sister group to all other animals. Instead, Hexactinellida and Demospongia form a well-supported clade of siliceous sponges, Silicea. It remains unclear, on the basis of these data alone, whether the calcarean sponges are more closely related to Silicea or to nonsponge animals. The SSU and combined data reject the hypothesis that Bilateria is more closely related to Ctenophora than it is to Cnidaria, whereas LSU data alone do not refute either hypothesis. LSU and SSU data agree in supporting the monophyly of Bilateria, Cnidaria, Ctenophora, and Metazoa. LSU sequence data reveal phylogenetic structure in a data set with limited taxon sampling. Continued accumulation of LSU sequences should increase our understanding of animal phylogeny.

  17. Evaluating hypotheses of basal animal phylogeny using complete sequences of large and small subunit rRNA.

    PubMed

    Medina, M; Collins, A G; Silberman, J D; Sogin, M L

    2001-08-14

    We studied the evolutionary relationships among basal metazoan lineages by using complete large subunit (LSU) and small subunit (SSU) ribosomal RNA sequences for 23 taxa. After identifying competing hypotheses, we performed maximum likelihood searches for trees conforming to each hypothesis. Kishino-Hasegawa tests were used to determine whether the data (LSU, SSU, and combined) reject any of the competing hypotheses. We also conducted unconstrained tree searches, compared the resulting topologies, and calculated bootstrap indices. Shimodaira-Hasegawa tests were applied to determine whether the data reject any of the topologies resulting from the constrained and unconstrained tree searches. LSU, SSU, and the combined data strongly contradict two assertions pertaining to sponge phylogeny. Hexactinellid sponges are not likely to be the basal lineage of a monophyletic Porifera or the sister group to all other animals. Instead, Hexactinellida and Demospongia form a well-supported clade of siliceous sponges, Silicea. It remains unclear, on the basis of these data alone, whether the calcarean sponges are more closely related to Silicea or to nonsponge animals. The SSU and combined data reject the hypothesis that Bilateria is more closely related to Ctenophora than it is to Cnidaria, whereas LSU data alone do not refute either hypothesis. LSU and SSU data agree in supporting the monophyly of Bilateria, Cnidaria, Ctenophora, and Metazoa. LSU sequence data reveal phylogenetic structure in a data set with limited taxon sampling. Continued accumulation of LSU sequences should increase our understanding of animal phylogeny.

  18. Evaluating hypotheses of basal animal phylogeny using complete sequences of large and small subunit rRNA

    PubMed Central

    Medina, Mónica; Collins, Allen G.; Silberman, Jeffrey D.; Sogin, Mitchell L.

    2001-01-01

    We studied the evolutionary relationships among basal metazoan lineages by using complete large subunit (LSU) and small subunit (SSU) ribosomal RNA sequences for 23 taxa. After identifying competing hypotheses, we performed maximum likelihood searches for trees conforming to each hypothesis. Kishino–Hasegawa tests were used to determine whether the data (LSU, SSU, and combined) reject any of the competing hypotheses. We also conducted unconstrained tree searches, compared the resulting topologies, and calculated bootstrap indices. Shimodaira–Hasegawa tests were applied to determine whether the data reject any of the topologies resulting from the constrained and unconstrained tree searches. LSU, SSU, and the combined data strongly contradict two assertions pertaining to sponge phylogeny. Hexactinellid sponges are not likely to be the basal lineage of a monophyletic Porifera or the sister group to all other animals. Instead, Hexactinellida and Demospongia form a well-supported clade of siliceous sponges, Silicea. It remains unclear, on the basis of these data alone, whether the calcarean sponges are more closely related to Silicea or to nonsponge animals. The SSU and combined data reject the hypothesis that Bilateria is more closely related to Ctenophora than it is to Cnidaria, whereas LSU data alone do not refute either hypothesis. LSU and SSU data agree in supporting the monophyly of Bilateria, Cnidaria, Ctenophora, and Metazoa. LSU sequence data reveal phylogenetic structure in a data set with limited taxon sampling. Continued accumulation of LSU sequences should increase our understanding of animal phylogeny. PMID:11504944

  19. DEAD-box RNA helicase Dbp4 is required for small-subunit processome formation and function.

    PubMed

    Soltanieh, Sahar; Osheim, Yvonne N; Spasov, Krasimir; Trahan, Christian; Beyer, Ann L; Dragon, François

    2015-03-01

    DEAD-box RNA helicase Dbp4 is required for 18S rRNA synthesis: cellular depletion of Dbp4 impairs the early cleavage reactions of the pre-rRNA and causes U14 small nucleolar RNA (snoRNA) to remain associated with pre-rRNA. Immunoprecipitation experiments (IPs) carried out with whole-cell extracts (WCEs) revealed that hemagglutinin (HA)-tagged Dbp4 is associated with U3 snoRNA but not with U14 snoRNA. IPs with WCEs also showed association with the U3-specific protein Mpp10, which suggests that Dbp4 interacts with the functionally active U3 RNP; this particle, called the small-subunit (SSU) processome, can be observed at the 5' end of nascent pre-rRNA. Electron microscopy analyses indicated that depletion of Dbp4 compromised SSU processome formation and cotranscriptional cleavage of the pre-rRNA. Sucrose density gradient analyses revealed that depletion of U3 snoRNA or the Mpp10 protein inhibited the release of U14 snoRNA from pre-rRNA, just as was seen with Dbp4-depleted cells, indicating that alteration of SSU processome components has significant consequences for U14 snoRNA dynamics. We also found that the C-terminal extension flanking the catalytic core of Dbp4 plays an important role in the release of U14 snoRNA from pre-rRNA.

  20. DEAD-Box RNA Helicase Dbp4 Is Required for Small-Subunit Processome Formation and Function

    PubMed Central

    Soltanieh, Sahar; Osheim, Yvonne N.; Spasov, Krasimir; Trahan, Christian; Beyer, Ann L.

    2014-01-01

    DEAD-box RNA helicase Dbp4 is required for 18S rRNA synthesis: cellular depletion of Dbp4 impairs the early cleavage reactions of the pre-rRNA and causes U14 small nucleolar RNA (snoRNA) to remain associated with pre-rRNA. Immunoprecipitation experiments (IPs) carried out with whole-cell extracts (WCEs) revealed that hemagglutinin (HA)-tagged Dbp4 is associated with U3 snoRNA but not with U14 snoRNA. IPs with WCEs also showed association with the U3-specific protein Mpp10, which suggests that Dbp4 interacts with the functionally active U3 RNP; this particle, called the small-subunit (SSU) processome, can be observed at the 5′ end of nascent pre-rRNA. Electron microscopy analyses indicated that depletion of Dbp4 compromised SSU processome formation and cotranscriptional cleavage of the pre-rRNA. Sucrose density gradient analyses revealed that depletion of U3 snoRNA or the Mpp10 protein inhibited the release of U14 snoRNA from pre-rRNA, just as was seen with Dbp4-depleted cells, indicating that alteration of SSU processome components has significant consequences for U14 snoRNA dynamics. We also found that the C-terminal extension flanking the catalytic core of Dbp4 plays an important role in the release of U14 snoRNA from pre-rRNA. PMID:25535329

  1. Trypanosoma brucei mitochondrial ribosomes: affinity purification and component identification by mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Zíková, Alena; Panigrahi, Aswini K; Dalley, Rachel A; Acestor, Nathalie; Anupama, Atashi; Ogata, Yuko; Myler, Peter J; Stuart, Kenneth

    2008-07-01

    Although eukaryotic mitochondrial (mt) ribosomes evolved from a putative prokaryotic ancestor their compositions vary considerably among organisms. We determined the protein composition of tandem affinity-purified Trypanosoma brucei mt ribosomes by mass spectrometry and identified 133 proteins of which 77 were associated with the large subunit and 56 were associated with the small subunit. Comparisons with bacterial and mammalian mt ribosomal proteins identified T. brucei mt homologs of L2-4, L7/12, L9, L11, L13-17, L20-24, L27-30, L33, L38, L43, L46, L47, L49, L52, S5, S6, S8, S9, S11, S15-18, S29, and S34, although the degree of conservation varied widely. Sequence characteristics of some of the component proteins indicated apparent functions in rRNA modification and processing, protein assembly, and mitochondrial metabolism implying possible additional roles for these proteins. Nevertheless most of the identified proteins have no homology outside Kinetoplastida implying very low conservation and/or a divergent function in kinetoplastid mitochondria.

  2. The gene for the ribulose-1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase (Rubisco) small subunit relocated to the plastid genome of tobacco directs the synthesis of small subunits that assemble into Rubisco.

    PubMed

    Whitney, S M; Andrews, T J

    2001-01-01

    To assess the extent to which a nuclear gene for a chloroplast protein retained the ability to be expressed in its presumed preendosymbiotic location, we relocated the RbcS gene for the small subunit of ribulose-1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase (Rubisco) to the tobacco plastid genome. Plastid RbcS transgenes, both with and without the transit presequence, were equipped with 3' hepta-histidine-encoding sequences and psbA promoter and terminator elements. Both transgenes were transcribed abundantly, and their products were translated into small subunit polypeptides that folded correctly and assembled into the Rubisco hexadecamer. When present, either the transit presequence was not translated or the transit peptide was cleaved completely. After assembly into Rubisco, transplastomic small subunits were relatively stable. The hepta-histidine sequence fused to the C terminus of a single small subunit was sufficient for isolation of the whole Rubisco hexadecamer by Ni(2)+ chelation. Small subunits produced by the plastid transgenes were not abundant, never exceeding approximately 1% of the total small subunits, and they differed from cytoplasmically synthesized small subunits in their N-terminal modifications. The scarcity of transplastomic small subunits might be caused by inefficient translation or assembly.

  3. Morphology and 18S rDNA of Henneguya gurlei (Myxosporea) from Ameiurus nebulosus (Siluriformes) in North Carolina

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Iwanowicz, L.R.; Iwanowicz, D.D.; Pote, L.M.; Blazer, V.S.; Schill, W.B.

    2008-01-01

    Henneguya gurlei was isolated from Ameiurus nebulosus captured in North Carolina and redescribed using critical morphological features and 18S small-subunit ribosomal RNA (SSU rDNA) gene sequence. Plasmodia are white, spherical, or subspherical, occur in clusters, measure up to 1.8 mm in length, and are located on the dorsal, pectoral, and anal fins. Histologically, plasmodia are located in the dermis and subdermally, and the larger cysts disrupt the melanocyte pigment layer. The spore body is lanceolate, 18.2 ?? 0.3 ??m (range 15.7-20.3) in length, and 5.4 ?? 0.1 ??m (range 3.8-6.1) in width in valvular view. The caudal appendages are 41.1 ?? 1.1 ??m (range 34.0-49.7) in length. Polar capsules are pyriform and of unequal size. The longer polar capsule measures 6.2 ?? 0.1 ??m (range 5.48-7.06), while the shorter is 5.7 ?? 0.1 ??m (range 4.8-6.4) in length. Polar capsule width is 1.2 ?? 0.03 ??m (range 1.0-1.54). The total length of the spore is 60.9 ?? 1.2 ??m (range 48.7-68.5). Morphologically, this species is similar to other species of Henneguya that are known to infect ictalurids. Based on SSU rDNA sequences, this species is most closely related to H. exilis and H. ictaluri, which infect Ictalurus punctatus. ?? American Society of Parasitologists 2008.

  4. Genetic diversity among Babesia rossi detected in naturally infected dogs in Abeokuta, Nigeria, based on 18S rRNA gene sequences.

    PubMed

    Takeet, Michael I; Oyewusi, Adeoye J; Abakpa, Simon A V; Daramola, Olukayode O; Peters, Sunday O

    2017-03-01

    Adequate knowledge of the genetic diversity among Babesia species infecting dogs is necessary for a better understanding of the epidemiology and control of canine babesiosis. Hence, this study determined the genetic diversity among the Babesia rossi detected in dogs presented for routine examination in Veterinary Hospitals in Abeokuta, Nigeria. Blood were randomly collected from 209 dogs. Field-stained thin smears were made and DNA extracted from the blood. Partial region of the 18S small subunit ribosomal RNA (rRNA) gene was amplified, sequenced and analysed. Babesia species was detected in 16 (7.7%) of the dogs by microscopy. Electrophoresed PCR products from 39 (18.66%) dogs revealed band size of 450 bp and 2 (0.95%) dogs had band size of 430 bp. The sequences obtained from 450 bp amplicon displayed homology of 99.74% (387/388) with partial sequences of 18S rRNA gene of Babesia rossi in the GeneBank. Of the two sequences that had 430 bp amplicon, one was identified as T. annulata and second as T. ovis. A significantly (p<0.05) higher prevalence of B. rossi was detected by PCR compared to microscopy. The mean PCV of Babesia infected dogs was significantly (p<0.05) lower than non-infected dogs. Phylogenetic analysis revealed minimal diversity among B. rossi with the exception of one sequence that was greatly divergent from the others. This study suggests that more than one genotype of B. rossi may be in circulation among the dog population in the study area and this may have potential implication on clinical outcome of canine babesiosis.

  5. Structural and functional analysis of Utp23, a yeast ribosome synthesis factor with degenerate PIN domain

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Jing; Sun, Mengyi; Ye, Keqiong

    2013-01-01

    During synthesis of yeast ribosome, a large complex, called the 90S pre-ribosome or the small subunit processome, is assembled on the nascent precursor rRNA and mediates early processing of 18S rRNA. The Utp23 protein and snR30 H/ACA snoRNA are two conserved components of 90S pre-ribosomes. Utp23 contains a degenerate PIN nuclease domain followed by a long C-terminal tail and associates specifically with snR30. Here, we report the crystal structure of the Utp23 PIN domain at 2.5-Å resolution. The structure reveals a conserved core fold of PIN domain with degenerate active site residues, a unique CCHC Zn-finger motif, and two terminal extension elements. Functional sites of Utp23 have been examined with conservation analysis, mutagenesis, and in vivo and in vitro assays. Mutations in each of three cysteine ligands of zinc, although not the histidine ligand, were lethal or strongly inhibitory to yeast growth, indicating that the Zn-finger motif is required for Utp23 structure or function. The N-terminal helix extension harbors many highly conserved basic residues that mostly are critical for growth and in vitro RNA-binding activity of Utp23. Deletion of the C-terminal tail, which contains a short functionally important sequence motif, disrupted the interaction of Utp23 with snR30 and perturbed the pre-ribosomal association of Utp23. Our data establish a structural framework for dissecting Utp23 function in the assembly and dynamics of 90S pre-ribosomes. PMID:24152547

  6. Structural and functional analysis of Utp23, a yeast ribosome synthesis factor with degenerate PIN domain.

    PubMed

    Lu, Jing; Sun, Mengyi; Ye, Keqiong

    2013-12-01

    During synthesis of yeast ribosome, a large complex, called the 90S pre-ribosome or the small subunit processome, is assembled on the nascent precursor rRNA and mediates early processing of 18S rRNA. The Utp23 protein and snR30 H/ACA snoRNA are two conserved components of 90S pre-ribosomes. Utp23 contains a degenerate PIN nuclease domain followed by a long C-terminal tail and associates specifically with snR30. Here, we report the crystal structure of the Utp23 PIN domain at 2.5-Å resolution. The structure reveals a conserved core fold of PIN domain with degenerate active site residues, a unique CCHC Zn-finger motif, and two terminal extension elements. Functional sites of Utp23 have been examined with conservation analysis, mutagenesis, and in vivo and in vitro assays. Mutations in each of three cysteine ligands of zinc, although not the histidine ligand, were lethal or strongly inhibitory to yeast growth, indicating that the Zn-finger motif is required for Utp23 structure or function. The N-terminal helix extension harbors many highly conserved basic residues that mostly are critical for growth and in vitro RNA-binding activity of Utp23. Deletion of the C-terminal tail, which contains a short functionally important sequence motif, disrupted the interaction of Utp23 with snR30 and perturbed the pre-ribosomal association of Utp23. Our data establish a structural framework for dissecting Utp23 function in the assembly and dynamics of 90S pre-ribosomes.

  7. Role of the Rubisco small subunit. Final report for period May 1, 1997--April 30,2000

    SciTech Connect

    Spreitzer, Robert J.

    2000-10-04

    CO{sub 2} and O{sub 2} are mutually competitive at the active site of ribulose-1,5-biphosphate (RuBP) carboxylase/oxygenase (Rubisco). Rubisco contains two subunits, each present in eight copies. The 15-kD small subunit is coded by a family of nuclear RbcS genes. Until now, the role of the small subunit in Rubisco structure or catalytic efficiency is not known. Because of other work in eliminating the two RbcS genes in the green algo Chlamydomonas reinhardtii, it is now possible to address questions about the structure-function relationships of the eukaryotic small subunit. There are three specific aims in this project: (1) Alanine scanning mutagenesis is being used to dissect the importance of the {beta}A/{beta}B loop, a feature unique to the eukaryotic small subunit. (2) Random mutagenesis is being used to identify additional residues or regions of the small subunit that are important for holoenzyme assembly and function. (3) Attempts are being made to express foreign small subunits in Chlamydomonas to examine the contribution of small subunits to holoenzyme assembly, catalytic efficiency, and CO{sub 2}/O{sub 2} specificity.

  8. RNA chaperones stimulate formation and yield of the U3 snoRNA-pre-rRNA duplexes needed for eukaryotic ribosome biogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Gérczei, Tímea; Shah, Binal N.; Manzo, Anthony J.; Walter, Nils G.; Correll, Carl C.

    2010-01-01

    To satisfy the high demand for ribosome synthesis in rapidly growing eukaryotic cells, short duplexes between the U3 small nucleolar RNA (snoRNA) and the precursor ribosomal RNA (pre-rRNA) must form quickly and with high yield. These interactions, designated the U3-ETS and U3-18S duplexes, are essential to initiate the processing of small subunit rRNA. Previously, we showed in vitro that duplexes corresponding to those in Saccharomyces cerevisiae are only observed after addition of one of two proteins: Imp3p or Imp4p. Here, we used fluorescence-based and other in vitro assays to determine whether these proteins possess RNA chaperone activities and to assess whether these activities are sufficient to satisfy the duplex yield and rate requirements expected in vivo. Assembly of both proteins with the U3 snoRNA into a chaperone complex destabilizes a U3-stem structure, apparently to expose its 18S base-pairing site. As a result, the chaperone complex accelerates formation of the U3-18S duplex from an undetectable rate to one comparable to the intrinsic rate observed for hybridizing short duplexes. The chaperone complex also stabilizes the U3-ETS duplex by 2.7 kcal/mol. These chaperone activities provide high U3-ETS duplex yield and rapid U3-18S duplex formation over a broad concentration range to help ensure that the U3-pre-rRNA interactions limit neither ribosome biogenesis nor rapid cell growth. The thermodynamic and kinetic framework used is general and thus suitable to investigate the mechanism of action of other RNA chaperones. PMID:19482034

  9. Elucidation of the assembly events required for the recruitment of Utp20, Imp4 and Bms1 onto nascent pre-ribosomes

    PubMed Central

    Pérez-Fernández, Jorge; Martín-Marcos, Pilar; Dosil, Mercedes

    2011-01-01

    The 90S pre-ribosome, also known as the small subunit (SSU) processome, is a large multisubunit particle required for the production of the 18S rRNA from a pre-rRNA precursor. Recently, it has been shown that the formation of this particle entails the initial association of the tUTP subunit with the nascent pre-RNA and, subsequently, the binding of Rrp5/UTP-C and U3 snoRNP/UTP-B subunits in two independent assembly branches. However, the mode of assembly of other 90S pre-ribosome components remains obscure as yet. In this study, we have investigated the assembly of three proteins (Utp20, Imp4 and Bms1) previously regarded as potential nucleating factors of the 90S particle. Here, we demonstrate that the loading of those three proteins onto the pre-rRNA takes place independently of Rrp5/UTP-C and, instead, occurs downstream of the tUTP and U3/UTP-B subcomplexes. We also demonstrate that Bms1 and Utp20 are required for the recruitment of a subset of proteins to nascent pre-ribosomes. Finally, we show that proteins associated through secondary steps condition the stability of the two assembly branches in partially assembled pre-ribosomes. These results provide new information about the functional relationships among 90S particle components and the events that are required for their stepwise incorporation onto the primary pre-rRNA. PMID:21724601

  10. Ribosomal History Reveals Origins of Modern Protein Synthesis

    PubMed Central

    Harish, Ajith; Caetano-Anollés, Gustavo

    2012-01-01

    The origin and evolution of the ribosome is central to our understanding of the cellular world. Most hypotheses posit that the ribosome originated in the peptidyl transferase center of the large ribosomal subunit. However, these proposals do not link protein synthesis to RNA recognition and do not use a phylogenetic comparative framework to study ribosomal evolution. Here we infer evolution of the structural components of the ribosome. Phylogenetic methods widely used in morphometrics are applied directly to RNA structures of thousands of molecules and to a census of protein structures in hundreds of genomes. We find that components of the small subunit involved in ribosomal processivity evolved earlier than the catalytic peptidyl transferase center responsible for protein synthesis. Remarkably, subunit RNA and proteins coevolved, starting with interactions between the oldest proteins (S12 and S17) and the oldest substructure (the ribosomal ratchet) in the small subunit and ending with the rise of a modern multi-subunit ribosome. Ancestral ribonucleoprotein components show similarities to in vitro evolved RNA replicase ribozymes and protein structures in extant replication machinery. Our study therefore provides important clues about the chicken-or-egg dilemma associated with the central dogma of molecular biology by showing that ribosomal history is driven by the gradual structural accretion of protein and RNA structures. Most importantly, results suggest that functionally important and conserved regions of the ribosome were recruited and could be relics of an ancient ribonucleoprotein world. PMID:22427882

  11. Ribosomal history reveals origins of modern protein synthesis.

    PubMed

    Harish, Ajith; Caetano-Anollés, Gustavo

    2012-01-01

    The origin and evolution of the ribosome is central to our understanding of the cellular world. Most hypotheses posit that the ribosome originated in the peptidyl transferase center of the large ribosomal subunit. However, these proposals do not link protein synthesis to RNA recognition and do not use a phylogenetic comparative framework to study ribosomal evolution. Here we infer evolution of the structural components of the ribosome. Phylogenetic methods widely used in morphometrics are applied directly to RNA structures of thousands of molecules and to a census of protein structures in hundreds of genomes. We find that components of the small subunit involved in ribosomal processivity evolved earlier than the catalytic peptidyl transferase center responsible for protein synthesis. Remarkably, subunit RNA and proteins coevolved, starting with interactions between the oldest proteins (S12 and S17) and the oldest substructure (the ribosomal ratchet) in the small subunit and ending with the rise of a modern multi-subunit ribosome. Ancestral ribonucleoprotein components show similarities to in vitro evolved RNA replicase ribozymes and protein structures in extant replication machinery. Our study therefore provides important clues about the chicken-or-egg dilemma associated with the central dogma of molecular biology by showing that ribosomal history is driven by the gradual structural accretion of protein and RNA structures. Most importantly, results suggest that functionally important and conserved regions of the ribosome were recruited and could be relics of an ancient ribonucleoprotein world.

  12. Multiple Group I Introns in the Small-Subunit rDNA of Botryosphaeria dothidea: Implication for Intraspecific Genetic Diversity

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Chao; Wang, Chunsheng; Sun, Xinyao; Zhang, Rong; Gleason, Mark L.; Eiji, Tanaka; Sun, Guangyu

    2013-01-01

    Botryosphaeria dothidea is a widespread and economically important pathogen on various fruit trees, and it often causes die-back and canker on limbs and fruit rot. In characterizing intraspecies genetic variation within this fungus, group I introns, rich in rDNA of fungi, may provide a productive region for exploration. In this research, we analysed complete small subunit (SSU) ribosomal DNA (rDNA) sequences of 37 B. dothidea strains, and found four insertions, designated Bdo.S943, Bdo.S1199-A, Bdo.S1199-B and Bdo.S1506, at three positions. Sequence analysis and structure prediction revealed that both Bdo.S943 and Bdo.S1506 belonged to subgroup IC1 of group I introns, whereas Bdo.S1199-A and Bdo.S1199-B corresponded to group IE introns. Moreover, Bdo.S1199-A was found to host an open reading frame (ORF) for encoding the homing endonuclease (HE), whereas Bdo.S1199-B, an evolutionary descendant of Bdo.S1199-A, included a degenerate HE. The above four introns were novel, and were the first group I introns observed and characterized in this species. Differential distribution of these introns revealed that all strains could be separated into four genotypes. Genotype III (no intron) and genotype IV (Bdo.S1199-B) were each found in only one strain, whereas genotype I (Bdo.S1199-A) and genotype II (Bdo.S943 and Bdo.S1506) occurred in 95% of the strains. There is a correlation between B. dothidea genotypes and hosts or geographic locations. Thus, these newly discovered group I introns can help to advance understanding of genetic differentiation within B. dothidea. PMID:23844098

  13. Multiple group I introns in the small-subunit rDNA of Botryosphaeria dothidea: implication for intraspecific genetic diversity.

    PubMed

    Xu, Chao; Wang, Chunsheng; Sun, Xinyao; Zhang, Rong; Gleason, Mark L; Eiji, Tanaka; Sun, Guangyu

    2013-01-01

    Botryosphaeria dothidea is a widespread and economically important pathogen on various fruit trees, and it often causes die-back and canker on limbs and fruit rot. In characterizing intraspecies genetic variation within this fungus, group I introns, rich in rDNA of fungi, may provide a productive region for exploration. In this research, we analysed complete small subunit (SSU) ribosomal DNA (rDNA) sequences of 37 B. dothidea strains, and found four insertions, designated Bdo.S943, Bdo.S1199-A, Bdo.S1199-B and Bdo.S1506, at three positions. Sequence analysis and structure prediction revealed that both Bdo.S943 and Bdo.S1506 belonged to subgroup IC1 of group I introns, whereas Bdo.S1199-A and Bdo.S1199-B corresponded to group IE introns. Moreover, Bdo.S1199-A was found to host an open reading frame (ORF) for encoding the homing endonuclease (HE), whereas Bdo.S1199-B, an evolutionary descendant of Bdo.S1199-A, included a degenerate HE. The above four introns were novel, and were the first group I introns observed and characterized in this species. Differential distribution of these introns revealed that all strains could be separated into four genotypes. Genotype III (no intron) and genotype IV (Bdo.S1199-B) were each found in only one strain, whereas genotype I (Bdo.S1199-A) and genotype II (Bdo.S943 and Bdo.S1506) occurred in 95% of the strains. There is a correlation between B. dothidea genotypes and hosts or geographic locations. Thus, these newly discovered group I introns can help to advance understanding of genetic differentiation within B. dothidea.

  14. Esf2p, a U3-Associated Factor Required for Small-Subunit Processome Assembly and Compaction

    PubMed Central

    Hoang, Tran; Peng, Wen-Tao; Vanrobays, Emmanuel; Krogan, Nevan; Hiley, Shawna; Beyer, Ann L.; Osheim, Yvonne N.; Greenblatt, Jack; Hughes, Timothy R.; Lafontaine, Denis L. J.

    2005-01-01

    Esf2p is the Saccharomyces cerevisiae homolog of mouse ABT1, a protein previously identified as a putative partner of the TATA-element binding protein. However, large-scale studies have indicated that Esf2p is primarily localized to the nucleolus and that it physically associates with pre-rRNA processing factors. Here, we show that Esf2p-depleted cells are defective for pre-rRNA processing at the early nucleolar cleavage sites A0 through A2 and consequently are inhibited for 18S rRNA synthesis. Esf2p was stably associated with the 5′ external transcribed spacer (ETS) and the box C+D snoRNA U3, as well as additional box C+D snoRNAs and proteins enriched within the small-subunit (SSU) processome/90S preribosomes. Esf2p colocalized on glycerol gradients with 90S preribosomes and slower migrating particles containing 5′ ETS fragments. Strikingly, upon Esf2p depletion, chromatin spreads revealed that SSU processome assembly and compaction are inhibited and glycerol gradient analysis showed that U3 remains associated within 90S preribosomes. This suggests that in the absence of proper SSU processome assembly, early pre-rRNA processing is inhibited and U3 is not properly released from the 35S pre-rRNAs. The identification of ABT1 in a large-scale analysis of the human nucleolar proteome indicates that its role may also be conserved in mammals. PMID:15964808

  15. Structures of the ribosome in intermediate states of ratcheting

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Wen; Dunkle, Jack; Cate, Jamie H. D.

    2010-01-01

    Summary Structures of the E. coli 70S ribosome show how the large and small subunits rotate to facilitate protein synthesis. Protein biosynthesis on the ribosome requires repeated cycles of ratcheting, which couples rotation of the two ribosomal subunits with respect to each other and swiveling of the head domain of the small subunit. However, the molecular basis for how the two ribosomal subunits rearrange contacts with each other during ratcheting while remaining stably associated is not known. Here we describe x-ray crystal structures of the intact Escherichia coli ribosome, either in the apo form (3.5 Å resolution) or with one (4.0 Å res) or two (4.0 Å res) anticodon stem-loop tRNA mimics bound, that reveal intermediate states of intersubunit rotation. In the structures, the interface between the small and large ribosomal subunits rearranges in discrete steps along the ratcheting pathway. Positioning of the head domain of the small subunit is controlled by interactions with the large subunit and with the tRNA bound in the peptidyl-tRNA site. The intermediates observed here provide insight into how tRNAs move into the hybrid state of binding that precedes the final steps of mRNA and tRNA translocation. PMID:19696352

  16. Molecular phylogeny of brachiopods and phoronids based on nuclear-encoded small subunit ribosomal RNA gene sequences

    PubMed Central

    L.Cohen, B.

    1998-01-01

    Brachiopod and phoronid phylogeny is inferred from SSU rDNA sequences of 28 articulate and nine inarticulate brachiopods, three phoronids, two ectoprocts and various outgroups, using gene trees reconstructed by weighted parsimony, distance and maximum likelihood methods. Of these sequences, 33 from brachiopods, two from phoronids and one each from an ectoproct and a priapulan are newly determined. The brachiopod sequences belong to 31 different genera and thus survey about 10% of extant genus-level diversity. Sequences determined in different laboratories and those from closely related taxa agree well, but evidence is presented suggesting that one published phoronid sequence (GenBank accession UO12648) is a brachiopod-phoronid chimaera, and this sequence is excluded from the analyses. The chiton, Acanthopleura, is identified as the phenetically proximal outgroup; other selected outgroups were chosen to allow comparison with recent, non-molecular analyses of brachiopod phylogeny. The different outgroups and methods of phylogenetic reconstruction lead to similar results, with differences mainly in the resolution of weakly supported ancient and recent nodes, including the divergence of inarticulate brachiopod sub-phyla, the position of the rhynchonellids in relation to long- and short-looped articulate brachiopod clades and the relationships of some articulate brachiopod genera and species. Attention is drawn to the problem presented by nodes that are strongly supported by non-molecular evidence but receive only low bootstrap resampling support. Overall, the gene trees agree with morphology-based brachiopod taxonomy, but novel relationships are tentatively suggested for thecideidine and megathyrid brachiopods. Articulate brachiopods are found to be monophyletic in all reconstructions, but monophyly of inarticulate brachiopods and the possible inclusion of phoronids in the inarticulate brachiopod clade are less strongly established. Phoronids are clearly excluded from a sister-group relationship with articulate brachiopods, this proposed relationship being due to the rejected, chimaeric sequence (GenBank UO12648). Lineage relative rate tests show no heterogeneity of evolutionary rate among articulate brachiopod sequences, but indicate that inarticulate brachiopod plus phoronid sequences evolve somewhat more slowly. Both brachiopods and phoronids evolve slowly by comparison with other invertebrates. A number of palaeontologically dated times of earliest appearance are used to make upper and lower estimates of the global rate of brachiopod SSU rDNA evolution, and these estimates are used to infer the likely divergence times of other nodes in the gene tree. There is reasonable agreement between most inferred molecular and palaeontological ages. The estimated rates of SSU rDNA sequence evolution suggest that the last common ancestor of brachiopods, chitons and other protostome invertebrates (Lophotrochozoa and Ecdysozoa) lived deep in Precambrian time. Results of this first DNA-based, taxonomically representative analysis of brachiopod phylogeny are in broad agreement with current morphology-based classification and systematics and are largely consistent with the hypothesis that brachiopod shell ontogeny and morphology are a good guide to phylogeny.

  17. Ribosome engineering to promote new crystal forms

    SciTech Connect

    Selmer, Maria; Gao, Yong-Gui; Weixlbaumer, Albert; Ramakrishnan, V.

    2012-05-01

    Truncation of ribosomal protein L9 in T. thermophilus allows the generation of new crystal forms and the crystallization of ribosome–GTPase complexes. Crystallographic studies of the ribosome have provided molecular details of protein synthesis. However, the crystallization of functional complexes of ribosomes with GTPase translation factors proved to be elusive for a decade after the first ribosome structures were determined. Analysis of the packing in different 70S ribosome crystal forms revealed that regardless of the species or space group, a contact between ribosomal protein L9 from the large subunit and 16S rRNA in the shoulder of a neighbouring small subunit in the crystal lattice competes with the binding of GTPase elongation factors to this region of 16S rRNA. To prevent the formation of this preferred crystal contact, a mutant strain of Thermus thermophilus, HB8-MRCMSAW1, in which the ribosomal protein L9 gene has been truncated was constructed by homologous recombination. Mutant 70S ribosomes were used to crystallize and solve the structure of the ribosome with EF-G, GDP and fusidic acid in a previously unobserved crystal form. Subsequent work has shown the usefulness of this strain for crystallization of the ribosome with other GTPase factors.

  18. Structure of the archaeal Cascade subunit Csa5: relating the small subunits of CRISPR effector complexes.

    PubMed

    Reeks, Judith; Graham, Shirley; Anderson, Linzi; Liu, Huanting; White, Malcolm F; Naismith, James H

    2013-05-01

    The Cascade complex for CRISPR-mediated antiviral immunity uses CRISPR RNA (crRNA) to target invading DNA species from mobile elements such as viruses, leading to their destruction. The core of the Cascade effector complex consists of the Cas5 and Cas7 subunits, which are widely conserved in prokaryotes. Cas7 binds crRNA and forms the helical backbone of Cascade. Many archaea encode a version of the Cascade complex (denoted Type I-A) that includes a Csa5 (or small) subunit, which interacts weakly with the core proteins. Here, we report the crystal structure of the Csa5 protein from Sulfolobus solfataricus. Csa5 comprises a conserved α-helical domain with a small insertion consisting of a weakly conserved β-strand domain. In the crystal, the Csa5 monomers have multimerized into infinite helical threads. At each interface is a strictly conserved intersubunit salt bridge, deletion of which disrupts multimerization. Structural analysis indicates a shared evolutionary history among the small subunits of the CRISPR effector complexes. The same α-helical domain is found in the C-terminal domain of Cse2 (from Type I-E Cascade), while the N-terminal domain of Cse2 is found in Cmr5 of the CMR (Type III-B) effector complex. As Cmr5 shares no match with Csa5, two possibilities present themselves: selective domain loss from an ancestral Cse2 to create two new subfamilies or domain fusion of two separate families to create a new Cse2 family. A definitive answer awaits structural studies of further small subunits from other CRISPR effector complexes.

  19. Triatomine vectors of Trypanosoma cruzi: a molecular perspective based on nuclear ribosomal DNA markers.

    PubMed

    Bargues, María Dolores; Marcilla, Antonio; Dujardin, Jean Pierre; Mas-Coma, Santiago

    2002-04-01

    Chagas disease (American trypanosomiasis) is mainly transmitted by blood-sucking bugs of the reduviid subfamily Triatominae (Hemiptera: Prosorrhyncha). Control strategies are directed mainly against these insect vectors, as no vaccine is available and, except in the very early stage of infection, there is no effective chemótherapy. Studies of deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) will lead to major advances in our knowledge of Triatominae and their relationships to Chagas disease transmission, epidemiology and control. Analyses of complete sequences of nuclear genes coding for ribosomal ribonucleic acid (rRNA) (rRNA genes) and spacers furnish significant information at the levels of higher taxons, genera, species, subspecies, hybrids, varieties and populations of Triatominae. This paper briefly reviews the contributions of studies on the slowly-evolving 18S or small subunit (SSU) rRNA gene and the quickly-evolving second internal transcribed spacer (ITS-2). The whole 18S rRNA gene is a useful marker for supraspecific relationships in Triatominae. ITS-2 is complementary to it, enabling resolution at specific and infraspecific levels. All the evidence suggests that ITS-2 will become the DNA marker of excellence for studies of Triatominae at specific and subspecific levels, as it is in other groups of organisms. Possible applications of data obtained from the study of rRNA and ITS-2 sequences of Triatominae are discussed.

  20. Amino-terminal truncations of the ribulose-bisphosphate carboxylase small subunit influence catalysis and subunit interactions.

    PubMed Central

    Paul, K; Morell, M K; Andrews, T J

    1993-01-01

    The first 20 residues at the amino terminus of the small subunit of spinach ribulose-1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase form an irregular arm that makes extensive contacts with the large subunit and also with another small subunit (S. Knight, I. Andersson, and C.-I. Brändén [1990] J Mol Biol 215: 113-160). The influence of these contacts on subunit binding and, indirectly, on catalysis was investigated by constructing truncations from the amino terminus of the small subunit of the highly homologous enzyme from Synechococcus PCC 6301 expressed in Escherichia coli. Removal of the first six residues (and thus the region of contact with a neighboring small subunit) affected neither the affinity with which the small subunits bound to the large subunits nor the catalytic properties of the assembled holoenzyme. Extending the truncation to include the first 12 residues (which encroaches into a highly conserved region that interacts with the large subunit) also did not weaken intersubunit binding appreciably, but it reduced the catalytic activity of the holoenzyme nearly 5-fold. Removal of an additional single residue (i.e. removal of a total of 13 residues) weakened intersubunit binding approximately 80-fold. Paradoxically, this partially restored catalytic activity to approximately 40% of that of the wild-type holoenzyme. None of these truncations materially affected the Km values for ribulose-1,5-bisphosphate or CO2. Removal of all 20 residues of the irregular arm (thereby deleting the conserved region of contact with large subunits) totally abolished the small subunit's ability to bind to large subunits to form a stable holoenzyme. However, this truncated small subunit was still synthesized by the E. coli cells. These data are interpreted in terms of the role of the amino-terminal arm of the small subunit in maintaining the structure of the holoenzyme. PMID:8278544

  1. Starchless Mutants of Chlamydomonas reinhardtii Lack the Small Subunit of a Heterotetrameric ADP-Glucose Pyrophosphorylase

    PubMed Central

    Zabawinski, Christophe; Van Den Koornhuyse, Nathalie; D'Hulst, Christophe; Schlichting, Ralf; Giersch, Christoph; Delrue, Brigitte; Lacroix, Jean-Marie; Preiss, Jack; Ball, Steven

    2001-01-01

    ADP-glucose synthesis through ADP-glucose pyrophosphorylase defines the major rate-controlling step of storage polysaccharide synthesis in both bacteria and plants. We have isolated mutant strains defective in the STA6 locus of the monocellular green alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii that fail to accumulate starch and lack ADP-glucose pyrophosphorylase activity. We show that this locus encodes a 514-amino-acid polypeptide corresponding to a mature 50-kDa protein with homology to vascular plant ADP-glucose pyrophosphorylase small-subunit sequences. This gene segregates independently from the previously characterized STA1 locus that encodes the large 53-kDa subunit of the same heterotetramer enzyme. Because STA1 locus mutants have retained an AGPase but exhibit lower sensitivity to 3-phosphoglyceric acid activation, we suggest that the small and large subunits of the enzyme define, respectively, the catalytic and regulatory subunits of AGPase in unicellular green algae. We provide preliminary evidence that both the small-subunit mRNA abundance and enzyme activity, and therefore also starch metabolism, may be controlled by the circadian clock. PMID:11208806

  2. Identification of Theileria parva and Theileria sp. (buffalo) 18S rRNA gene sequence variants in the African Buffalo (Syncerus caffer) in southern Africa.

    PubMed

    Chaisi, Mamohale E; Sibeko, Kgomotso P; Collins, Nicola E; Potgieter, Fred T; Oosthuizen, Marinda C

    2011-12-15

    Theileria parva is the causative agent of Corridor disease in cattle in South Africa. The African buffalo (Syncerus caffer) is the reservoir host, and, as these animals are important for eco-tourism in South Africa, it is compulsory to test and certify them disease free prior to translocation. A T. parva-specific real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR) test based on the small subunit ribosomal RNA (18S rRNA) gene is one of the tests used for the diagnosis of the parasite in buffalo and cattle in South Africa. However, because of the high similarity between the 18S rRNA gene sequences of T. parva and Theileria sp. (buffalo), the latter is also amplified by the real-time PCR primers, although it is not detected by the T. parva-specific hybridization probes. Preliminary sequencing studies have revealed a small number of sequence differences within the 18S rRNA gene in both species but the extent of this sequence variation is unknown. The aim of the current study was to sequence the 18S rRNA genes of T. parva and Theileria sp. (buffalo), and to determine whether all identified genotypes can be correctly detected by the real-time PCR assay. The reverse line blot (RLB) hybridization assay was used to identify T. parva and Theileria sp. (buffalo) positive samples from buffalo blood samples originating from the Kruger National Park, Hluhluwe-iMfolozi Park, the Greater Limpopo Transfrontier Park, and a private game ranch in the Hoedspruit area. T. parva and Theileria sp. (buffalo) were identified in 42% and 28%, respectively, of 252 samples, mainly as mixed infections. The full-length 18S rRNA gene of selected samples was amplified, cloned and sequenced. From a total of 20 sequences obtained, 10 grouped with previously published T. parva sequences from GenBank while 10 sequences grouped with a previously published Theileria sp. (buffalo) sequence. All these formed a monophyletic group with known pathogenic Theileria species. Our phylogenetic analyses confirm the

  3. Isolation and characterization of rubisco small subunit gene promoter from common wheat (Triticum aestivum L.).

    PubMed

    Mukherjee, Shalini; Stasolla, Claudio; Brûlé-Babel, Anita; Ayele, Belay T

    2015-01-01

    Choice of an appropriate promoter is critical to express target genes in intended tissues and developmental stages. However, promoters capable of directing gene expression in specific tissues and stages are not well characterized in monocot species. To identify such a promoter in wheat, this study isolated a partial sequence of the wheat small subunit of RuBisCO (TarbcS) promoter. In silico analysis revealed the presence of elements that are characteristic to rbcS promoters of other, mainly dicot, species. Transient expression of the TarbcS:GUS in immature wheat embryos and tobacco leaves but not in the wheat roots indicate the functionality of the TarbcS promoter fragment in directing the expression of target genes in green plant tissues.

  4. AtPAP2 modulates the import of the small subunit of Rubisco into chloroplasts

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Renshan; Guan, Xiaoqian; Law, Yee-Song; Sun, Feng; Chen, Shuai; Wong, Kam Bo

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Arabidopsis thaliana purple acid phosphatase 2 (AtPAP2) is the only phosphatase that is dual-targeted to both chloroplasts and mitochondria. Like Toc33/34 of the TOC and Tom 20 of the TOM, AtPAP2 is anchored to the outer membranes of chloroplasts and mitochondria via a hydrophobic C-terminal motif. AtPAP2 on the mitochondria was previously shown to recognize the presequences of several nuclear-encoded mitochondrial proteins and modulate the import of pMORF3 into the mitochondria. Here we show that AtPAP2 binds to the small subunit of Rubisco (pSSU) and that chloroplast import experiments demonstrated that pSSU was imported less efficiently into pap2 chloroplasts than into wild-type chloroplasts. We propose that AtPAP2 is an outer membrane-bound phosphatase receptor that facilitates the import of selected proteins into chloroplasts. PMID:27700374

  5. Postimport methylation of the small subunit of ribulose-1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase in chloroplasts.

    PubMed

    Grimm, R; Grimm, M; Eckerskorn, C; Pohlmeyer, K; Röhl, T; Soll, J

    1997-05-26

    Electron impact mass spectronomy analysis of the amino-terminal amino acid of the small subunit (SSU) of ribulose-1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase (Rubisco) showed that the amino-terminal methionine residue is post-translationally modified to N-methyl-methionine. Modification of the amino-terminal methionine residue was found in mature SSU proteins from the dicotyledonous plants pea and spinach as well as the monocotyledonous plants barley and corn. SSU methyltransferase is a soluble protein in the chloroplast stroma and accepts heterologously expressed non-methylated SSU as a substrate using S-adenosylmethionine as methyl-group donor. We show that this modification occurs after post-translational uptake of the precursor form of SSU into chloroplasts and processing to its mature size. This reaction represents a new step in the import and assembly pathway of Rubisco holoenzyme.

  6. Substrate specificity determinants of the methanogen homoaconitase enzyme: structure and function of the small subunit.

    PubMed

    Jeyakanthan, Jeyaraman; Drevland, Randy M; Gayathri, Dasara Raju; Velmurugan, Devadasan; Shinkai, Akeo; Kuramitsu, Seiki; Yokoyama, Shigeyuki; Graham, David E

    2010-03-30

    The aconitase family of hydro-lyase enzymes includes three classes of proteins that catalyze the isomerization of alpha-hydroxy acids to beta-hydroxy acids. Besides aconitase, isopropylmalate isomerase (IPMI) proteins specifically catalyze the isomerization of alpha,beta-dicarboxylates with hydrophobic gamma-chain groups, and homoaconitase (HACN) proteins catalyze the isomerization of tricarboxylates with variable chain length gamma-carboxylate groups. These enzymes' stereospecific hydro-lyase activities make them attractive catalysts to produce diastereomers from unsaturated precursors. However, sequence similarity and convergent evolution among these proteins lead to widespread misannotation and uncertainty about gene function. To find the substrate specificity determinants of homologous IPMI and HACN proteins from Methanocaldococcus jannaschii, the small-subunit HACN protein (MJ1271) was crystallized for X-ray diffraction. The structural model showed characteristic residues in a flexible loop region between alpha2 and alpha3 that distinguish HACN from IPMI and aconitase proteins. Site-directed mutagenesis of MJ1271 produced loop-region variant proteins that were reconstituted with wild-type MJ1003 large-subunit protein. The heteromers formed promiscuous hydro-lyases with reduced activity but broader substrate specificity. Both R26K and R26V variants formed relatively efficient IPMI enzymes, while the T27A variant had uniformly lower specificity constants for both IPMI and HACN substrates. The R26V T27Y variant resembles the MJ1277 IPMI small subunit in its flexible loop sequence but demonstrated the broad substrate specificity of the R26V variant. These mutations may reverse the evolution of HACN activity from an ancestral IPMI gene, demonstrating the evolutionary potential for promiscuity in hydro-lyase enzymes. Understanding these specificity determinants enables the functional reannotation of paralogous HACN and IPMI genes in numerous genome sequences. These

  7. Substrate specificity determinants of the methanogen homoaconitase enzyme: structure and function of small subunit residues

    SciTech Connect

    Jeyakanthan, Jeyaraman; Drevland, Randy; Gayathri, Dasara; Velmurugan, Devadasan; Shinkai, Akeo; Graham, David E

    2010-01-01

    The aconitase family of hydro-lyase enzymes includes three classes of proteins that catalyze the isomerization of -hydroxyacids to -hydroxyacids. Besides aconitase, isopropylmalate isomerase (IPMI) proteins specifically catalyze the isomerization of , -dicarboxylates with hydrophobic -chain groups, and homoaconitase (HACN) proteins catalyze the isomerization of tricarboxylates with variable chain length -carboxylate groups. These enzymes stereospecific hydro-lyase activities make them attractive catalysts to produce diastereomers from unsaturated precursors. However, sequence similarity and convergent evolution among these proteins leads to widespread misannotation and uncertainty about gene function. To find the substrate specificity determinants of homologous IPMI and HACN proteins from Methanocaldococcus jannaschii, the small-subunit HACN protein (MJ1271) was crystallized for X-ray diffraction. The structural model showed characteristic residues in a flexible loop region between 2 and 3 that distinguish HACN from IPMI and aconitase proteins. Site-directed mutagenesis of MJ1271 produced loop-region variant proteins that were reconstituted with wild-type MJ1003 large-subunit protein. The heteromers formed promiscuous hydro-lyases with reduced activity but broader substrate specificity. Both R26K and R26V variants formed relatively efficient IPMI enzymes, while the T27A variant had uniformly lower specificity constants for both IPMI and HACN substrates. The R26V T27Y variant resembles the MJ1277 IPMI small subunit in its flexible loop sequence, but demonstrated the broad substrate specificity of the R26V variant. These mutations may reverse the evolution of HACN activity from an ancestral IPMI gene, demonstrating the evolutionary potential for promiscuity in hydro-lyase enzymes. Understanding these specificity determinants enables the functional reannotation of paralogous HACN and IPMI genes in numerous genome sequences. These structural and kinetic results will

  8. Structural insights on the small subunit of DNA topoisomerase I from the unicellular parasite Leishmania donovani.

    PubMed

    Díaz González, Rosario; Pérez Pertejo, Yolanda; Redondo, Carmen M; Pommier, Yves; Balaña-Fouce, Rafael; Reguera, Rosa M

    2007-12-01

    Leishmania donovani, the causative organism of visceral leishmaniasis, contains a unique heterodimeric DNA topoisomerase IB (LdTop1). The catalytically active enzyme consists of a large subunit (LdTop1L), which contains the non-conserved N-terminal end and a phylogenetically conserved core domain, and of a small subunit (LdTop1S) which harbours the C-terminal region with a characteristic tyrosine residue in the active site. Heterologous co-expression of LdTop1L and LdTop1S in a topoisomerase I deficient yeast strain, reconstitutes a fully functional enzyme which can be used for structural studies. The role played by the non-conserved N-terminal extension of LdTop1S in both relaxation activity and CPT sensitivity of LdTop1 has been examined co-expressing the full-length LdTop1L with several deletions of LdTop1S lacking growing sequences of the N-terminal end. The sequential deletion study shows that the first 174 amino acids of LdTop1S are dispensable in terms of relaxation activity and DNA cleavage. It is also described that the trapping of the covalent complex between LdTop1 and DNA by CPT requires a pentapeptide between amino acid residues 175 and 179 of LdTop1S. Our results suggest the crucial role played by the N-terminal extension of the small subunit of DNA topoisomerase I.

  9. Ribosome dynamics and the evolutionary history of ribosomes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fox, George E.; Paci, Maxim; Tran, Quyen; Petrov, Anton S.; Williams, Loren D.

    2015-09-01

    The ribosome is a dynamic nanomachine responsible for coded protein synthesis. Its major subsystems were essentially in place at the time of the last universal common ancestor (LUCA). Ribosome evolutionary history thus potentially provides a window into the pre- LUCA world. This history begins with the origins of the peptidyl transferase center where the actual peptide is synthesized and then continues over an extended timeframe as additional functional centers including the GTPase center are added. The large ribosomal RNAs (rRNAs) have grown over time by an accretion process and a model exists that proposes a relative age of each accreted element. We have compared atomic resolution ribosome structures before and after EF-G bound GTP hydrolysis and thereby identified the location of 23 pivot points in the large rRNAs that facilitate ribosome dynamics. Pivots in small subunit helices h28 and h44 appear to be especially central to the process and according to the accretion model significantly older than the other helices containing pivots. Overall, the results suggest that ribosomal dynamics occurred in two phases. In the first phase, an inherently mobile h28/h44 combination provided the flexibility needed to create a dynamic ribosome that was essentially a Brownian machine. This addition likely made coded peptide synthesis possible by facilitating movement of a primitive mRNA. During the second phase, addition of pivoting elements and the creation of a factor binding site allowed the regulation of the inherent motion created by h28/h44. All of these events likely occurred before LUCA.

  10. Compositional properties and thermal adaptation of 18S rRNA in vertebrates

    PubMed Central

    Varriale, Annalisa; Torelli, Giuseppe; Bernardi, Giorgio

    2008-01-01

    In order to investigate the influence of temperature on the GC level of the paired sequences of ribosomal 18S RNAs in vertebrates, we have studied their base composition in cold- and warm-blooded vertebrates using a stem-by-stem comparison. We observed that a number of stems of 18S ribosomal RNAs (rRNAs) are variable among species and that the majority of such stems are GC richer in warm-blooded than in cold-blooded vertebrates. We also constructed the secondary structures of the 18S rRNAs of a polar fish, a marsupial, and a monotreme to compare them with those of temperate/tropical fishes and of eutherians, respectively. In these cases, differences similar to those already mentioned were found. We conclude that there is a correlation between stem stability and body temperature even within the relatively limited temperature range of vertebrates. PMID:18567811

  11. Photoinduced reduction of the medial FeS center in the hydrogenase small subunit HupS from Nostoc punctiforme.

    PubMed

    Raleiras, Patrícia; Hammarström, Leif; Lindblad, Peter; Styring, Stenbjörn; Magnuson, Ann

    2015-07-01

    The small subunit from the NiFe uptake hydrogenase, HupSL, in the cyanobacterium Nostoc punctiforme ATCC 29133, has been isolated in the absence of the large subunit (P. Raleiras, P. Kellers, P. Lindblad, S. Styring, A. Magnuson, J. Biol. Chem. 288 (2013) 18,345-18,352). Here, we have used flash photolysis to reduce the iron-sulfur clusters in the isolated small subunit, HupS. We used ascorbate as electron donor to the photogenerated excited state of Ru(II)-trisbipyridine (Ru(bpy)3), to generate Ru(I)(bpy)3 as reducing agent. Our results show that the isolated small subunit can be reduced by the Ru(I)(bpy)3 generated through flash photolysis. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. An RNA conformational switch regulates pre-18S rRNA cleavage.

    PubMed

    Lamanna, Allison C; Karbstein, Katrin

    2011-01-07

    To produce mature ribosomal RNAs (rRNAs), polycistronic rRNA transcripts are cleaved in an ordered series of events. We have uncovered the molecular basis for the ordering of two essential cleavage steps at the 3'-end of 18S rRNA. Using in vitro and in vivo structure probing, RNA binding and cleavage experiments, and yeast genetics, we demonstrate that a conserved RNA sequence in the spacer region between the 18S and 5.8S rRNAs base-pairs with the decoding site of 18S rRNA in early assembly intermediates. Nucleolar cleavage at site A(2) excises this sequence element, leading to a conformational switch in pre-18S rRNA, by which the ribosomal decoding site is formed. This conformational switch positions the nuclease Nob1 for cytoplasmic cleavage at the 3'-end of 18S rRNA and is required for the final maturation step of 18S rRNA in vivo and in vitro. More generally, our data show that the intrinsic ability of RNA to form stable structural switches is exploited to order and regulate RNA-dependent biological processes. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. An RNA Conformational Switch Regulates Pre-18S rRNA Cleavage

    PubMed Central

    Lamanna, Allison C.; Karbstein, Katrin

    2010-01-01

    To produce mature ribosomal RNAs (rRNAs), polycistronic rRNA transcripts are cleaved in an ordered series of events. We have uncovered the molecular basis for the ordering of two essential cleavage steps at the 3′-end of 18S rRNA. Using in vitro and in vivo structure probing, RNA binding and cleavage experiments, and yeast genetics, we demonstrate that a conserved RNA sequence in the spacer region between the 18S and 5.8S rRNAs base pairs with the decoding site of 18S rRNA in early assembly intermediates. Nucleolar cleavage at site A2 excises this sequence element, leading to a conformational switch in pre-18S rRNA by which the ribosomal decoding site is formed. This conformational switch positions the nuclease Nob1 for cytoplasmic cleavage at the 3′-end of 18S rRNA and is required for the final maturation step of 18S rRNA in vivo and in vitro. More generally, our data show that the intrinsic ability of RNA to form stable structural switches is exploited to order and regulate RNA-dependent biological processes. PMID:20934433

  14. Evolution of RNA editing sites in the mitochondrial small subunit rRNA of the Myxomycota.

    PubMed

    Krishnan, Uma; Barsamian, Arpi; Miller, Dennis L

    2007-01-01

    Because of their unique and unprecedented character, it is often difficult to imagine how and why the different, diverse types of RNA editing have evolved. Information about the evolution of a particular RNA editing system can be obtained by comparing RNA editing characteristics in contemporary organisms whose phylogenetic relationships are known so that editing patterns in ancestral organisms can be inferred. This information can then be used to build models of the origins, constraints, variability, and mechanisms of RNA editing. As an example of the types of information that can be obtained from these analyses, we describe how we have used cDNA, covariation, and phylogenetic analyses to study the evolution of the variation in RNA editing site location in the core region of the small subunit rRNA gene in the mtDNA of seven myxomycetes, including Physarum polycephalum. We find that the unique type of insertional RNA editing present in mitochondria of P. polycephalum is also present in the mitochondrial small subunit (SSU) rRNA of the other six myxomycetes. As in Physarum, this editing predominantly consists of cytidine insertions, but also includes uridine insertions and certain dinucleotide insertions such that any of the four canonical ribonucleotides can be inserted. Although the characteristics of RNA editing in these organisms are the same as in Physarum, the location of the insertion sites varies among the seven organisms relative to the conserved primary sequence and secondary structure of the rRNA. Nucleotide insertions have been identified at 29 different sites within this core region of the rRNA, but no one organism has more than 10 of these insertion sites, suggesting that editing sites have been created and/or eliminated since the divergence of these organisms. To determine the order in which editing sites have been created or eliminated, the sequences of the mitochondrial SSU rRNA have been aligned and this alignment has been used to produce

  15. Further consideration of the phylogeny of some "traditional" heterotrichs (Protista, Ciliophora) of uncertain affinities, based on new sequences of the small subunit rRNA gene.

    PubMed

    Miao, Miao; Song, Weibo; Clamp, John C; Al-Rasheid, Khaled A S; Al-Khedhairy, Abdulaziz A; Al-Arifi, Saud

    2009-01-01

    The systematic relationships and taxonomic positions of the traditional heterotrich genera Condylostentor, Climacostomum, Fabrea, Folliculina, Peritromus, and Condylostoma, as well as the licnophorid genus Licnophora, were re-examined using new data from sequences of the gene coding for small subunit ribosomal RNA. Trees constructed using distance-matrix, Bayesian inference, and maximum-parsimony methods all showed the following relationships: (1) the "traditional" heterotrichs consist of several paraphyletic groups, including the current classes Heterotrichea, Armophorea and part of the Spirotrichea; (2) the class Heterotrichea was confirmed as a monophyletic assemblage based on our analyses of 31 taxa, and the genus Peritromus was demonstrated to be a peripheral group; (3) the genus Licnophora occupied an isolated branch on one side of the deepest divergence in the subphylum Intramacronucleata and was closely affiliated with spirotrichs, armophoreans, and clevelandellids; (4) Condylostentor, a recently defined genus with several truly unique morphological features, is more closely related to Condylostoma than to Stentor; (5) Folliculina, Eufolliculina, and Maristentor always clustered together with high bootstrap support; and (6) Climacostomum occupied a paraphyletic position distant from Fabrea, showing a close relationship with Condylostomatidae and Chattonidiidae despite of modest support.

  16. Development and Application of Small-Subunit rRNA Probes for Assessment of Selected Thiobacillus Species and Members of the Genus Acidiphilium

    PubMed Central

    Peccia, Jordan; Marchand, Eric A.; Silverstein, Joann; Hernandez, Mark

    2000-01-01

    Culture-dependent studies have implicated sulfur-oxidizing bacteria as the causative agents of acid mine drainage and concrete corrosion in sewers. Thiobacillus species are considered the major representatives of the acid-producing bacteria in these environments. Small-subunit rRNA genes from all of the Thiobacillus and Acidiphilium species catalogued by the Ribosomal Database Project were identified and used to design oligonucleotide DNA probes. Two oligonucleotide probes were synthesized to complement variable regions of 16S rRNA in the following acidophilic bacteria: Thiobacillus ferrooxidans and T. thiooxidans (probe Thio820) and members of the genus Acidiphilium (probe Acdp821). Using 32P radiolabels, probe specificity was characterized by hybridization dissociation temperature (Td) with membrane-immobilized RNA extracted from a suite of 21 strains representing three groups of bacteria. Fluorochrome-conjugated probes were evaluated for use with fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH) at the experimentally determined Tds. FISH was used to identify and enumerate bacteria in laboratory reactors and environmental samples. Probing of laboratory reactors inoculated with a mixed culture of acidophilic bacteria validated the ability of the oligonucleotide probes to track specific cell numbers with time. Additionally, probing of sediments from an active acid mine drainage site in Colorado demonstrated the ability to identify numbers of active bacteria in natural environments that contain high concentrations of metals, associated precipitates, and other mineral debris. PMID:10877807

  17. Development and application of small-subunit rRNA probes for assessment of selected Thiobacillus species and members of the genus Acidiphilium.

    PubMed

    Peccia, J; Marchand, E A; Silverstein, J; Hernandez, M

    2000-07-01

    Culture-dependent studies have implicated sulfur-oxidizing bacteria as the causative agents of acid mine drainage and concrete corrosion in sewers. Thiobacillus species are considered the major representatives of the acid-producing bacteria in these environments. Small-subunit rRNA genes from all of the Thiobacillus and Acidiphilium species catalogued by the Ribosomal Database Project were identified and used to design oligonucleotide DNA probes. Two oligonucleotide probes were synthesized to complement variable regions of 16S rRNA in the following acidophilic bacteria: Thiobacillus ferrooxidans and T. thiooxidans (probe Thio820) and members of the genus Acidiphilium (probe Acdp821). Using (32)P radiolabels, probe specificity was characterized by hybridization dissociation temperature (T(d)) with membrane-immobilized RNA extracted from a suite of 21 strains representing three groups of bacteria. Fluorochrome-conjugated probes were evaluated for use with fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH) at the experimentally determined T(d)s. FISH was used to identify and enumerate bacteria in laboratory reactors and environmental samples. Probing of laboratory reactors inoculated with a mixed culture of acidophilic bacteria validated the ability of the oligonucleotide probes to track specific cell numbers with time. Additionally, probing of sediments from an active acid mine drainage site in Colorado demonstrated the ability to identify numbers of active bacteria in natural environments that contain high concentrations of metals, associated precipitates, and other mineral debris.

  18. Soybean ribulose bisphosphate carboxylase small subunit: Mechanisms and determinants of RNA turnover. Annual progress report

    SciTech Connect

    Meagher, R.B.

    1993-12-31

    An in vitro degradation system has been developed from petunia and soybean polysomes in order to investigate the mechanisms and determinants controlling RNA turnover in higher plants. This system faithfully degrades soybean ribulose-1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase small subunit (rbcS) mRNA into the same products observed in total RNA preparations. In previous years it was shown that the most stable products represent a nested constellation of fragments, which are shortened from their 3{prime} ends, and have intact 5{prime} ends. Exogenous rbcS RNA tagged with novel 5{prime} sequence 15 or 56 bp long were synthesized in vitro as Sp6 and T7 runoff transcripts, respectively. When added to the system they were degraded faithfully into constellation of products which were 15 or 56 bp longer than the endogenous products, respectively. Detailed kinetics on the appearance of these exogenous products confirmed degradation proceeds in an overall 3{prime} to 5{prime} direction but suggested that there are multiple pathways through which the RNA may be degraded. To further demonstrate a precursor product relationships, in vitro synthesized transcripts truncated at their 3{prime} ends were shown to degrade into the expected smaller fragments previously mapped in the 5{prime} portion of the rbcS RNA.

  19. Rubisco small subunits from the unicellular green alga Chlamydomonas complement Rubisco-deficient mutants of Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Atkinson, Nicky; Leitão, Nuno; Orr, Douglas J; Meyer, Moritz T; Carmo-Silva, Elizabete; Griffiths, Howard; Smith, Alison M; McCormick, Alistair J

    2017-04-01

    Introducing components of algal carbon concentrating mechanisms (CCMs) into higher plant chloroplasts could increase photosynthetic productivity. A key component is the Rubisco-containing pyrenoid that is needed to minimise CO2 retro-diffusion for CCM operating efficiency. Rubisco in Arabidopsis was re-engineered to incorporate sequence elements that are thought to be essential for recruitment of Rubisco to the pyrenoid, namely the algal Rubisco small subunit (SSU, encoded by rbcS) or only the surface-exposed algal SSU α-helices. Leaves of Arabidopsis rbcs mutants expressing 'pyrenoid-competent' chimeric Arabidopsis SSUs containing the SSU α-helices from Chlamydomonas reinhardtii can form hybrid Rubisco complexes with catalytic properties similar to those of native Rubisco, suggesting that the α-helices are catalytically neutral. The growth and photosynthetic performance of complemented Arabidopsis rbcs mutants producing near wild-type levels of the hybrid Rubisco were similar to those of wild-type controls. Arabidopsis rbcs mutants expressing a Chlamydomonas SSU differed from wild-type plants with respect to Rubisco catalysis, photosynthesis and growth. This confirms a role for the SSU in influencing Rubisco catalytic properties.

  20. Phylogenetic Analysis of Cryptosporidium Parasites Based on the Small-Subunit rRNA Gene Locus

    PubMed Central

    Xiao, Lihua; Escalante, Lillian; Yang, Chunfu; Sulaiman, Irshad; Escalante, Anannias A.; Montali, Richard J.; Fayer, Ronald; Lal, Altaf A.

    1999-01-01

    Biological data support the hypothesis that there are multiple species in the genus Cryptosporidium, but a recent analysis of the available genetic data suggested that there is insufficient evidence for species differentiation. In order to resolve the controversy in the taxonomy of this parasite genus, we characterized the small-subunit rRNA genes of Cryptosporidium parvum, Cryptosporidium baileyi, Cryptosporidium muris, and Cryptosporidium serpentis and performed a phylogenetic analysis of the genus Cryptosporidium. Our study revealed that the genus Cryptosporidium contains the phylogenetically distinct species C. parvum, C. muris, C. baileyi, and C. serpentis, which is consistent with the biological characteristics and host specificity data. The Cryptosporidium species formed two clades, with C. parvum and C. baileyi belonging to one clade and C. muris and C. serpentis belonging to the other clade. Within C. parvum, human genotype isolates and guinea pig isolates (known as Cryptosporidium wrairi) each differed from bovine genotype isolates by the nucleotide sequence in four regions. A C. muris isolate from cattle was also different from parasites isolated from a rock hyrax and a Bactrian camel. Minor differences were also detected between C. serpentis isolates from snakes and lizards. Based on the genetic information, a species- and strain-specific PCR-restriction fragment length polymorphism diagnostic tool was developed. PMID:10103253

  1. Rubisco small-subunit α-helices control pyrenoid formation in Chlamydomonas

    PubMed Central

    Meyer, Moritz T.; Genkov, Todor; Skepper, Jeremy N.; Jouhet, Juliette; Mitchell, Madeline C.; Spreitzer, Robert J.; Griffiths, Howard

    2012-01-01

    The pyrenoid is a subcellular microcompartment in which algae sequester the primary carboxylase, ribulose-1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase (Rubisco). The pyrenoid is associated with a CO2-concentrating mechanism (CCM), which improves the operating efficiency of carbon assimilation and overcomes diffusive limitations in aquatic photosynthesis. Using the model alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii, we show that pyrenoid formation, Rubisco aggregation, and CCM activity relate to discrete regions of the Rubisco small subunit (SSU). Specifically, pyrenoid occurrence was shown to be conditioned by the amino acid composition of two surface-exposed α-helices of the SSU: higher plant-like helices knock out the pyrenoid, whereas native algal helices establish a pyrenoid. We have also established that pyrenoid integrity was essential for the operation of an active CCM. With the algal CCM being functionally analogous to the terrestrial C4 pathway in higher plants, such insights may offer a route toward transforming algal and higher plant productivity for the future. PMID:23112177

  2. The bacteriophage T4 gene for the small subunit of ribonucleotide reductase contains an intron.

    PubMed Central

    Sjöberg, B M; Hahne, S; Mathews, C Z; Mathews, C K; Rand, K N; Gait, M J

    1986-01-01

    The bacteriophage T4 gene nrdB codes for the small subunit of the enzyme ribonucleotide reductase. The T4 nrdB gene was localized between 136.1 kb and 137.8 kb in the T4 genetic map according to the deduced structural homology of the protein to the amino acid sequence of its bacterial counterpart, the B2 subunit of Escherichia coli. This positions the C-terminal end of the T4 nrdB gene approximately 2 kb closer to the T4 gene 63 than earlier anticipated from genetic recombinational analyses. The most surprising feature of the T4 nrdB gene is the presence of an approximately 625 bp intron which divides the structural gene into two parts. This is the second example of a prokaryotic structural gene with an intron. The first prokaryotic intron was reported in the nearby td gene, coding for the bacteriophage T4-specific thymidylate synthase enzyme. The nucleotide sequence at the exon-intron junctions of the T4 nrdB gene is similar to that of the junctions of the T4 td gene: the anticipated exon-intron boundary at the donor site ends with a TAA stop codon and there is an ATG start codon at the putative downstream intron-exon boundary of the acceptor site. In the course of this work the denA gene of T4 (endonuclease II) was also located. PMID:3530746

  3. A genetic link between epigenetic repressor AS1-AS2 and a putative small subunit processome in leaf polarity establishment of Arabidopsis

    PubMed Central

    Matsumura, Yoko; Ohbayashi, Iwai; Takahashi, Hiro; Kojima, Shoko; Ishibashi, Nanako; Keta, Sumie; Nakagawa, Ayami; Hayashi, Rika; Saéz-Vásquez, Julio; Echeverria, Manuel; Sugiyama, Munetaka; Nakamura, Kenzo; Machida, Chiyoko

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Although the DEAD-box RNA helicase family is ubiquitous in eukaryotes, its developmental role remains unelucidated. Here, we report that cooperative action between the Arabidopsis nucleolar protein RH10, an ortholog of human DEAD-box RNA helicase DDX47, and the epigenetic repressor complex of ASYMMETRIC-LEAVES1 (AS1) and AS2 (AS1-AS2) is critical to repress abaxial (ventral) genes ETT/ARF3 and ARF4, which leads to adaxial (dorsal) development in leaf primordia at shoot apices. Double mutations of rh10-1 and as2 (or as1) synergistically up-regulated the abaxial genes, which generated abaxialized filamentous leaves with loss of the adaxial domain. DDX47 is part of the small subunit processome (SSUP) that mediates rRNA biogenesis. In rh10-1 we found various defects in SSUP-related events, such as: accumulation of 35S/33S rRNA precursors; reduction in the 18S/25S ratio; and nucleolar hypertrophy. Double mutants of as2 with mutations of genes that encode other candidate SSUP-related components such as nucleolin and putative rRNA methyltransferase exhibited similar synergistic defects caused by up-regulation of ETT/ARF3 and ARF4. These results suggest a tight link between putative SSUP and AS1-AS2 in repression of the abaxial-determining genes for cell fate decisions for adaxial development. PMID:27334696

  4. Succession of Microbial Communities during Hot Composting as Detected by PCR–Single-Strand-Conformation Polymorphism-Based Genetic Profiles of Small-Subunit rRNA Genes

    PubMed Central

    Peters, Sabine; Koschinsky, Stefanie; Schwieger, Frank; Tebbe, Christoph C.

    2000-01-01

    A cultivation-independent technique for genetic profiling of PCR-amplified small-subunit rRNA genes (SSU rDNA) was chosen to characterize the diversity and succession of microbial communities during composting of an organic agricultural substrate. PCR amplifications were performed with DNA directly extracted from compost samples and with primers targeting either (i) the V4–V5 region of eubacterial 16S rRNA genes, (ii) the V3 region in the 16S rRNA genes of actinomycetes, or (iii) the V8–V9 region of fungal 18S rRNA genes. Homologous PCR products were converted to single-stranded DNA molecules by exonuclease digestion and were subsequently electrophoretically separated by their single-strand-conformation polymorphism (SSCP). Genetic profiles obtained by this technique showed a succession and increasing diversity of microbial populations with all primers. A total of 19 single products were isolated from the profiles by PCR reamplification and cloning. DNA sequencing of these molecular isolates showed similarities in the range of 92.3 to 100% to known gram-positive bacteria with a low or high G+C DNA content and to the SSU rDNA of γ-Proteobacteria. The amplified 18S rRNA gene sequences were related to the respective gene regions of Candida krusei and Candida tropicalis. Specific molecular isolates could be attributed to different composting stages. The diversity of cultivated bacteria isolated from samples taken at the end of the composting process was low. A total of 290 isolates were related to only 6 different species. Two or three of these species were also detectable in the SSCP community profiles. Our study indicates that community SSCP profiles can be highly useful for the monitoring of bacterial diversity and community successions in a biotechnologically relevant process. PMID:10698754

  5. Postmortem interval determination using 18S-rRNA and microRNA.

    PubMed

    Li, Wen-Can; Ma, Kai-Jun; Lv, Ye-Hui; Zhang, Ping; Pan, Hui; Zhang, Heng; Wang, Hui-Jun; Ma, Duan; Chen, Long

    2014-07-01

    The importance of determining postmortem interval (PMI) is crucial to criminal, civil and forensic cases. The precise estimation of PMI is a critical step in many death investigations. A technique exploiting the level of RNA, 18S rRNA and microRNA to estimate PMI was investigated. 18S-rRNA is a main ribosomal RNA presented as part of the ribosomal protein complex, while microRNA is a class of small non-coding single-stranded RNA, only 21-25 nucleotides, which has a strong conservation between different species. In this study, heart tissues were removed from adult rats at various postmortem intervals. An efficient extraction and detection protocol to analyze the level of 18S-rRNA and microRNA in postmortem tissue was carried out. The process consists of total RNA extraction, transcription and visualization by quantitative real time PCR. The result indicates a characteristic parabola relationship between postmortem period and Ct values for 18S-rRNA in dead rat hearts. The result indicates that the degradation pattern of tissue 18S-rRNA and microRNA is useful in the determination of the postmortem interval within seven days. Copyright © 2014 Forensic Science Society. Published by Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Toward a Whole-Cell Model of Ribosome Biogenesis: Kinetic Modeling of SSU Assembly

    PubMed Central

    Earnest, Tyler M.; Lai, Jonathan; Chen, Ke; Hallock, Michael J.; Williamson, James R.; Luthey-Schulten, Zaida

    2015-01-01

    Central to all life is the assembly of the ribosome: a coordinated process involving the hierarchical association of ribosomal proteins to the RNAs forming the small and large ribosomal subunits. The process is further complicated by effects arising from the intracellular heterogeneous environment and the location of ribosomal operons within the cell. We provide a simplified model of ribosome biogenesis in slow-growing Escherichia coli. Kinetic models of in vitro small-subunit reconstitution at the level of individual protein/ribosomal RNA interactions are developed for two temperature regimes. The model at low temperatures predicts the existence of a novel 5′→3′→central assembly pathway, which we investigate further using molecular dynamics. The high-temperature assembly network is incorporated into a model of in vivo ribosome biogenesis in slow-growing E. coli. The model, described in terms of reaction-diffusion master equations, contains 1336 reactions and 251 species that dynamically couple transcription and translation to ribosome assembly. We use the Lattice Microbes software package to simulate the stochastic production of mRNA, proteins, and ribosome intermediates over a full cell cycle of 120 min. The whole-cell model captures the correct growth rate of ribosomes, predicts the localization of early assembly intermediates to the nucleoid region, and reproduces the known assembly timescales for the small subunit with no modifications made to the embedded in vitro assembly network. PMID:26333594

  7. Structure of Ribosomal Silencing Factor Bound to Mycobacterium tuberculosis Ribosome.

    PubMed

    Li, Xiaojun; Sun, Qingan; Jiang, Cai; Yang, Kailu; Hung, Li-Wei; Zhang, Junjie; Sacchettini, James C

    2015-10-06

    The ribosomal silencing factor RsfS slows cell growth by inhibiting protein synthesis during periods of diminished nutrient availability. The crystal structure of Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb) RsfS, together with the cryo-electron microscopy (EM) structure of the large subunit 50S of Mtb ribosome, reveals how inhibition of protein synthesis by RsfS occurs. RsfS binds to the 50S at L14, which, when occupied, blocks the association of the small subunit 30S. Although Mtb RsfS is a dimer in solution, only a single subunit binds to 50S. The overlap between the dimer interface and the L14 binding interface confirms that the RsfS dimer must first dissociate to a monomer in order to bind to L14. RsfS interacts primarily through electrostatic and hydrogen bonding to L14. The EM structure shows extended rRNA density that it is not found in the Escherichia coli ribosome, the most striking of these being the extended RNA helix of H54a.

  8. Hybrid Rubisco of tomato large subunits and tobacco small subunits is functional in tobacco plants.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xing-Hai; Webb, James; Huang, Yi-Hong; Lin, Li; Tang, Ri-Sheng; Liu, Aimin

    2011-03-01

    Biogenesis of functional ribulose-1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase (Rubisco) in plants requires specific assembly in the chloroplast of the imported, cytosol-synthesized small subunits (SS) with the chloroplast-made large subunits (LS). Accumulating evidence indicates that chloroplasts (plastids) generally have a low tolerance for assembling foreign or modified Rubisco. To explore Rubisco engineering, we created two lines of transplastomic tobacco plants whose rbcL gene was replaced by tomato-derived rbcL: plant LLS2 with Rubisco composed of tobacco SS and Q437R LS and plant LLS4 with a hybrid Rubisco of tobacco SS and tomato LS (representing four substitutions of Y226F, A230T, S279T and Q437R from tobacco LS). Plant LLS2 exhibited similar phenotypes as the wild type. Plant LLS4 showed lower chlorophyll and Rubisco levels particularly in young emerging leaves, lower photosynthesis rates and biomass during early stages of development, but was able to reach reproductive maturity and somewhat wild type-like phenotype under ambient CO₂ condition. In vitro assays detected similar carboxylase activity and RuBP affinity in LLS2 and LLS4 plants as in wild type. Our studies demonstrated that tomato LS was sufficiently assembled with tobacco SS into functional Rubisco. The hybrid Rubisco of tomato LS and tobacco SS can drive photosynthesis that supports photoautotrophic growth and reproduction of tobacco plants under ambient CO₂ and light conditions. We discuss the effect of these residue substitutions on Rubisco activity and the possible attribution of chlorophyll deficiency to the in planta photosynthesis performance in the hybrid Rubisco plants.

  9. Isolation and Characterization of the Small Subunit of the Uptake Hydrogenase from the Cyanobacterium Nostoc punctiforme*

    PubMed Central

    Raleiras, Patrícia; Kellers, Petra; Lindblad, Peter; Styring, Stenbjörn; Magnuson, Ann

    2013-01-01

    In nitrogen-fixing cyanobacteria, hydrogen evolution is associated with hydrogenases and nitrogenase, making these enzymes interesting targets for genetic engineering aimed at increased hydrogen production. Nostoc punctiforme ATCC 29133 is a filamentous cyanobacterium that expresses the uptake hydrogenase HupSL in heterocysts under nitrogen-fixing conditions. Little is known about the structural and biophysical properties of HupSL. The small subunit, HupS, has been postulated to contain three iron-sulfur clusters, but the details regarding their nature have been unclear due to unusual cluster binding motifs in the amino acid sequence. We now report the cloning and heterologous expression of Nostoc punctiforme HupS as a fusion protein, f-HupS. We have characterized the anaerobically purified protein by UV-visible and EPR spectroscopies. Our results show that f-HupS contains three iron-sulfur clusters. UV-visible absorption of f-HupS has bands ∼340 and 420 nm, typical for iron-sulfur clusters. The EPR spectrum of the oxidized f-HupS shows a narrow g = 2.023 resonance, characteristic of a low-spin (S = ½) [3Fe-4S] cluster. The reduced f-HupS presents complex EPR spectra with overlapping resonances centered on g = 1.94, g = 1.91, and g = 1.88, typical of low-spin (S = ½) [4Fe-4S] clusters. Analysis of the spectroscopic data allowed us to distinguish between two species attributable to two distinct [4Fe-4S] clusters, in addition to the [3Fe-4S] cluster. This indicates that f-HupS binds [4Fe-4S] clusters despite the presence of unusual coordinating amino acids. Furthermore, our expression and purification of what seems to be an intact HupS protein allows future studies on the significance of ligand nature on redox properties of the iron-sulfur clusters of HupS. PMID:23649626

  10. Isolation and characterization of the small subunit of the uptake hydrogenase from the cyanobacterium Nostoc punctiforme.

    PubMed

    Raleiras, Patrícia; Kellers, Petra; Lindblad, Peter; Styring, Stenbjörn; Magnuson, Ann

    2013-06-21

    In nitrogen-fixing cyanobacteria, hydrogen evolution is associated with hydrogenases and nitrogenase, making these enzymes interesting targets for genetic engineering aimed at increased hydrogen production. Nostoc punctiforme ATCC 29133 is a filamentous cyanobacterium that expresses the uptake hydrogenase HupSL in heterocysts under nitrogen-fixing conditions. Little is known about the structural and biophysical properties of HupSL. The small subunit, HupS, has been postulated to contain three iron-sulfur clusters, but the details regarding their nature have been unclear due to unusual cluster binding motifs in the amino acid sequence. We now report the cloning and heterologous expression of Nostoc punctiforme HupS as a fusion protein, f-HupS. We have characterized the anaerobically purified protein by UV-visible and EPR spectroscopies. Our results show that f-HupS contains three iron-sulfur clusters. UV-visible absorption of f-HupS has bands ∼340 and 420 nm, typical for iron-sulfur clusters. The EPR spectrum of the oxidized f-HupS shows a narrow g = 2.023 resonance, characteristic of a low-spin (S = ½) [3Fe-4S] cluster. The reduced f-HupS presents complex EPR spectra with overlapping resonances centered on g = 1.94, g = 1.91, and g = 1.88, typical of low-spin (S = ½) [4Fe-4S] clusters. Analysis of the spectroscopic data allowed us to distinguish between two species attributable to two distinct [4Fe-4S] clusters, in addition to the [3Fe-4S] cluster. This indicates that f-HupS binds [4Fe-4S] clusters despite the presence of unusual coordinating amino acids. Furthermore, our expression and purification of what seems to be an intact HupS protein allows future studies on the significance of ligand nature on redox properties of the iron-sulfur clusters of HupS.

  11. Role of Small Subunit in Mediating Assembly of Red-type Form I Rubisco

    PubMed Central

    Joshi, Jidnyasa; Mueller-Cajar, Oliver; Tsai, Yi-Chin C.; Hartl, F. Ulrich; Hayer-Hartl, Manajit

    2015-01-01

    Ribulose-1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase (Rubisco) is the key enzyme involved in photosynthetic carbon fixation, converting atmospheric CO2 to organic compounds. Form I Rubisco is a cylindrical complex composed of eight large (RbcL) subunits that are capped by four small subunits (RbcS) at the top and four at the bottom. Form I Rubiscos are phylogenetically divided into green- and red-type. Some red-type enzymes have catalytically superior properties. Thus, understanding their folding and assembly is of considerable biotechnological interest. Folding of the green-type RbcL subunits in cyanobacteria is mediated by the GroEL/ES chaperonin system, and assembly to holoenzyme requires specialized chaperones such as RbcX and RAF1. Here, we show that the red-type RbcL subunits in the proteobacterium Rhodobacter sphaeroides also fold with GroEL/ES. However, assembly proceeds in a chaperone-independent manner. We find that the C-terminal β-hairpin extension of red-type RbcS, which is absent in green-type RbcS, is critical for efficient assembly. The β-hairpins of four RbcS subunits form an eight-stranded β-barrel that protrudes into the central solvent channel of the RbcL core complex. The two β-barrels stabilize the complex through multiple interactions with the RbcL subunits. A chimeric green-type RbcS carrying the C-terminal β-hairpin renders the assembly of a cyanobacterial Rubisco independent of RbcX. Our results may facilitate the engineering of crop plants with improved growth properties expressing red-type Rubisco. PMID:25371207

  12. Molecular Evolution of the Small Subunit of Ribulose Bisphosphate Carboxylase: Nucleotide Substitution and Gene Conversion

    PubMed Central

    Meagher, R. B.; Berry-Lowe, S.; Rice, K.

    1989-01-01

    The nucleotide sequences encoding the mature portion of 31 ribulose 1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase small subunit (SSU) genes from 17 genera of plants, green algae and cyanobacteria were examined. Among the 465 pairwise sequence comparisons, SSU multigene family members within the same species were more similar to each other in nonsynonymous or replacement nucleotide substitutions (RNS) than they were to SSU sequences in any other organism. The concerted evolution of independent SSU gene lineages within closely related plant species suggests that homogenization of RNS positions has occurred at least once in the life of each genus. The rate of expected RNS among mature SSU sequences was calculated to be 1.25 X 10(-9)/site/yr for the first 70 million years (MY) of divergence with a significant slowing to 0.13 X 10(-9)/site/yr for the next 1,400 MY. The data suggest that mature SSU sequences do not accumulate more than 20% differences in the RNS positions without compensatory changes in other components of this enzyme system. During the first 70 MY of divergence between species, the rate of expected synonymous or silent nucleotide substitutions (SNS) is ~6.6 X 10(-9)/site/yr. This is five times the RNS rate and is similar to the silent rate observed in animals. In striking contrast, SNS and RNS do not show this correlation among SSU gene family members within a species. A mechanism involving gene conversion within the exons followed by selection for biased gene conversion products with conservation of RNS positions and divergence of SNS positions is discussed. A SSU gene tree based on corrected RNS for 31 SSU sequences is presented and agrees well with a species tree based on morphological and cytogenetic traits for the 17 genera examined. SSU gene comparisons may be useful in predicting phylogenetic relationships and in some cases divergence times of various plant, algal and cyanobacterial species. PMID:2515110

  13. Metabolism of 18S rRNA in rat liver cells in different functional states of protein-synthesizing apparatus

    SciTech Connect

    Chirkov, G.P.; Druzhinina, M.K.; Todorov, I.N.

    1986-04-10

    The ratio of the absolute radioactivities of 28S and 18S RNAs in the fractions of membrane-bound and free polysomes and the fraction of free rat liver ribosomes was studied under conditions of inhibition of translation by cycloheximide, insulin, and cAMP. It was found that insulin and cAMP, in contrast to cycloheximide, do not induce selective degradation of 18S rRNA. The results are discussed from the standpoint of the possible role of the phosphorylation of protein S6 in the degradation of the 40S ribosomal subunit.

  14. Functional determinants in transit sequences: import and partial maturation by vascular plant chloroplasts of the ribulose-1,5- bisphosphate carboxylase small subunit of Chlamydomonas

    PubMed Central

    1985-01-01

    The precursor of the ribulose-1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase small subunit and other proteins from Chlamydomonas reinhardtii are efficiently transported into chloroplasts isolated from spinach and pea. Thus, similar determinants specify precursor-chloroplast interactions in the alga and vascular plants. Removal of all or part of its transit sequence was found to block import of the algal small subunit into isolated chloroplasts. Comparison of available sequences revealed a nine amino acid segment conserved in the transit sequences of all small subunit precursors. A protease in the vascular plant chloroplasts recognized this region in the Chlamydomonas precursor and produced an intermediate form of the small subunit. We propose that processing of the small subunit precursor involves at least two proteolytic events; only one of these has been evolutionarily conserved. PMID:3965471

  15. Phylogenetic position of the trichomonad parasite of turkeys, Histomonas meleagridis (Smith) Tyzzer, inferred from small subunit rRNA sequence.

    PubMed

    Gerbod, D; Edgcomb, V P; Noël, C; Zenner, L; Wintjens, R; Delgado-Viscogliosi, P; Holder, M E; Sogin, M L; Viscogliosi, E

    2001-01-01

    The phylogenetic position of the trichomonad, Histomonas meleagridis was determined by analysis of small subunit rRNAs. Molecular trees including all identified parabasalid sequences available in data bases were inferred by distance, parsimony, and likelihood methods. All reveal a close relationship between H. meleagridis, and Dientamoeba fragilis. Moreover, small subunit rRNAs of both amoeboid species have a reduced G + C content and increased chain length relative to other parabasalids. Finally, the rRNA genes from H. meleagridis and D. fragilis share a recent common ancestor with Tritrichomonasfoetus, which exhibits a more developed cytoskeleton. This indicates that Histomonas and Dientamoeba secondarily lost most of the typical trichomonad cytoskeletal structures and hence, do not represent primitive morphologies. A global phylogeny of parabasalids revealed significant discrepancies with morphology-based classifications, such as the polyphyly of most of the parabasalid families and classes included in our study.

  16. Functional characterization of sequence motifs in the transit peptide of Arabidopsis small subunit of rubisco.

    PubMed

    Lee, Dong Wook; Lee, Sookjin; Lee, Gil-Je; Lee, Kwang Hee; Kim, Sanguk; Cheong, Gang-Won; Hwang, Inhwan

    2006-02-01

    The transit peptides of nuclear-encoded chloroplast proteins are necessary and sufficient for targeting and import of proteins into chloroplasts. However, the sequence information encoded by transit peptides is not fully understood. In this study, we investigated sequence motifs in the transit peptide of the small subunit of the Rubisco complex by examining the ability of various mutant transit peptides to target green fluorescent protein reporter proteins to chloroplasts in Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) leaf protoplasts. We divided the transit peptide into eight blocks (T1 through T8), each consisting of eight or 10 amino acids, and generated mutants that had alanine (Ala) substitutions or deletions, of one or two T blocks in the transit peptide. In addition, we generated mutants that had the original sequence partially restored in single- or double-T-block Ala (A) substitution mutants. Analysis of chloroplast import of these mutants revealed several interesting observations. Single-T-block mutations did not noticeably affect targeting efficiency, except in T1 and T4 mutations. However, double-T mutants, T2A/T4A, T3A/T6A, T3A/T7A, T4A/T6A, and T4A/T7A, caused a 50% to 100% loss in targeting ability. T3A/T6A and T4A/T6A mutants produced only precursor proteins, whereas T2A/T4A and T4A/T7A mutants produced only a 37-kD protein. Detailed analyses revealed that sequence motifs ML in T1, LKSSA in T3, FP and RK in T4, CMQVW in T6, and KKFET in T7 play important roles in chloroplast targeting. In T1, the hydrophobicity of ML is important for targeting. LKSSA in T3 is functionally equivalent to CMQVW in T6 and KKFET in T7. Furthermore, subcellular fractionation revealed that Ala substitution in T1, T3, and T6 produced soluble precursors, whereas Ala substitution in T4 and T7 produced intermediates that were tightly associated with membranes. These results demonstrate that the transit peptide contains multiple motifs and that some of them act in concert or

  17. Functional analysis of the small subunit of the putative homoaconitase from Pyrococcus horikoshii in the Thermus lysine biosynthetic pathway.

    PubMed

    Lombo, Tania; Takaya, Naoki; Miyazaki, Junichi; Gotoh, Kazumi; Nishiyama, Makoto; Kosuge, Takehide; Nakamura, Akira; Hoshino, Takayuki

    2004-04-15

    An in vivo disruption-integration vector system for Thermus thermophilus was developed and used for the functional analysis of an evolutionary-related archaeal protein for lysine biosynthesis. In contrast to fungal one, the putative homoaconitase of T. thermophilus consists of two subunits and catalyzes the second and third steps of lysine biosynthesis. ORFs from hyperthermophilic archaeon Pyrococcus horikoshii, PH1726 and PH1724, share a high degree of amino acid identity with the T. thermophilus subunits LysT and LysU, respectively. In the present report, gene encoding the putative small subunit of archaeal homoaconitase, PH1724, was integrated into the lysU locus of T. thermophilus. The archaeal gene was expressed under the control of PslpA promoter and functional analyses were performed. Transformants were able to grow on minimal medium without lysine when PH1724 ORF was integrated, whereas the lysU disruption led to lysine auxotrophy. Chromosomal integration was verified by PCR analysis, and homoaconitase assay showed that the archaeal gene product functions as a small subunit of homoaconitase, possibly by forming a heterodimer with the LysT subunit of T. thermophilus. These results strongly suggest the functional relation of P. horikoshii PH1724 with LysU in the Thermus lysine biosynthetic pathway, together with functional assignment of LysU as small subunit of homoaconitase. In addition, the provided results indicate that archaeal genes products from hyperthermophiles can be studied in a thermophilic eubacterium such as T. thermophilus.

  18. Structures of the Ribosome in Intermediate States of Ratcheting

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Wen; Dunkle, Jack A.; Cate, Jamie H.D.

    2009-10-21

    Protein biosynthesis on the ribosome requires repeated cycles of ratcheting, which couples rotation of the two ribosomal subunits with respect to each other, and swiveling of the head domain of the small subunit. However, the molecular basis for how the two ribosomal subunits rearrange contacts with each other during ratcheting while remaining stably associated is not known. Here, we describe x-ray crystal structures of the intact Escherichia coli ribosome, either in the apo-form (3.5 angstrom resolution) or with one (4.0 angstrom resolution) or two (4.0 angstrom resolution) anticodon stem-loop tRNA mimics bound, that reveal intermediate states of intersubunit rotation. In the structures, the interface between the small and large ribosomal subunits rearranges in discrete steps along the ratcheting pathway. Positioning of the head domain of the small subunit is controlled by interactions with the large subunit and with the tRNA bound in the peptidyl-tRNA site. The intermediates observed here provide insight into how tRNAs move into the hybrid state of binding that precedes the final steps of mRNA and tRNA translocation.

  19. Erythromycin- and chloramphenicol-induced ribosomal assembly defects are secondary effects of protein synthesis inhibition.

    PubMed

    Siibak, Triinu; Peil, Lauri; Xiong, Liqun; Mankin, Alexander; Remme, Jaanus; Tenson, Tanel

    2009-02-01

    Several protein synthesis inhibitors are known to inhibit ribosome assembly. This may be a consequence of direct binding of the antibiotic to ribosome precursor particles, or it could result indirectly from loss of coordination in the production of ribosomal components due to the inhibition of protein synthesis. Here we demonstrate that erythromycin and chloramphenicol, inhibitors of the large ribosomal subunit, affect the assembly of both the large and small subunits. Expression of a small erythromycin resistance peptide acting in cis on mature ribosomes relieves the erythromycin-mediated assembly defect for both subunits. Erythromycin treatment of bacteria expressing a mixture of erythromycin-sensitive and -resistant ribosomes produced comparable effects on subunit assembly. These results argue in favor of the view that erythromycin and chloramphenicol affect the assembly of the large ribosomal subunit indirectly.

  20. The SSU Processome in Ribosome Biogenesis – Progress and Prospects

    PubMed Central

    Phipps, Kathleen R.; Charette, J. Michael; Baserga, Susan J.

    2010-01-01

    The small subunit (SSU) processome is a 2.2 MDa ribonucleoprotein complex involved in the processing, assembly and maturation of the SSU of eukaryotic ribosomes. The identities of many of the factors involved in SSU biogenesis have been elucidated over the past 40 years. However, as our understanding increases, so do the number of questions about the nature of this complicated process. Cataloguing the components is the first step towards understanding the molecular workings of a system. This review will focus on how identifying components of ribosome biogenesis has led to the knowledge of how these factors, protein and RNA alike, associate with one another into sub-complexes, with a concentration on the small ribosomal subunit. We will also explore how this knowledge of sub-complex assembly has informed our understanding of the workings of the ribosome synthesis system as a whole. PMID:21318072

  1. A mechanism for intergenomic integration: abundance of ribulose bisphosphate carboxylase small-subunit protein influences the translation of the large-subunit mRNA.

    PubMed

    Rodermel, S; Haley, J; Jiang, C Z; Tsai, C H; Bogorad, L

    1996-04-30

    Multimeric protein complexes in chloroplasts and mitochondria are generally composed of products of both nuclear and organelle genes of the cell. A central problem of eukaryotic cell biology is to identify and understand the molecular mechanisms for integrating the production and accumulation of the products of the two separate genomes. Ribulose bisphosphate carboxylase (Rubisco) is localized in the chloroplasts of photosynthetic eukaryotic cells and is composed of small subunits (SS) and large subunits (LS) coded for by nuclear rbcS and chloroplast rbcL genes, respectively. Transgenic tobacco plants containing antisense rbcS DNA have reduced levels of rbcS mRNA, normal levels of rbcL mRNA, and coordinately reduced LS and SS proteins. Our previous experiments indicated that the rate of translation of rbcL mRNA might be reduced in some antisense plants; direct evidence is presented here. After a short-term pulse there is less labeled LS protein in the transgenic plants than in wild-type plants, indicating that LS accumulation is controlled in the mutants at the translational and/or posttranslational levels. Consistent with a primary restriction at translation, fewer rbcL mRNAs are associated with polysomes of normal size and more are free or are associated with only a few ribosomes in the antisense plants. Effects of the rbcS antisense mutation on mRNA and protein accumulation, as well as on the distribution of mRNAs on polysomes, appear to be minimal for other chloroplast and nuclear photosynthetic genes. Our results suggest that SS protein abundance specifically contributes to the regulation of LS protein accumulation at the level of rbcL translation initiation.

  2. Cloning and sequencing of the genes encoding the large and small subunits of the periplasmic (NiFeSe) hydrogenase of Desulfovibrio baculatus

    SciTech Connect

    Menon, N.K.; Peck, H.D. Jr.; Le Gall, J.; Przybyla, A.E.

    1987-12-01

    The genes coding for the large and small subunits of the periplasmic hydrogenase from Desulfovibrio baculatus have been cloned and sequenced. The genes are arranged in an operon with the small subunit gene preceding the large subunit gene. The small subunit gene codes for a 32 amino acid leader sequence supporting the periplasmic localization of the protein, however no ferredoxin-like or other characteristic iron-sulfur coordination sites were observed. The periplasmic hydrogenases from D. baculatus (an NiFeSe protein) and D. vulgaris (an Fe protein) exhibit no homology suggesting that they are structurally different, unrelated entities.

  3. Cloning and sequencing of the genes encoding the large and small subunits of the periplasmic (NiFeSe) hydrogenase of Desulfovibrio baculatus.

    PubMed Central

    Menon, N K; Peck, H D; Gall, J L; Przybyla, A E

    1987-01-01

    The genes coding for the large and small subunits of the periplasmic hydrogenase from Desulfovibrio baculatus have been cloned and sequenced. The genes are arranged in an operon with the small subunit gene preceding the large subunit gene. The small subunit gene codes for a 32 amino acid leader sequence supporting the periplasmic localization of the protein, however no ferredoxin-like or other characteristic iron-sulfur coordination sites were observed. The periplasmic hydrogenases from D. baculatus (an NiFeSe protein) and D. vulgaris (an Fe protein) exhibit no homology suggesting that they are structurally different, unrelated entities. Images PMID:3316183

  4. [Fragment of mRNA coding part that is complementary to region 1638-1650 of wheat 18S rRNA functions as a translational enhancer].

    PubMed

    Zhigaĭlov, A V; Babaĭlova, E S; Polimbetova, N S; Graĭfer, D M; Karpova, G G; Iskakov, B K

    2012-01-01

    Possible involvement of 18S rRNA fragment 1638-1650 including basements of the helices h44 and h28 and nucleotides of the ribosomal decoding site in the cap-independent translation initiation on plant ribosomes is studied. This rRNA fragment is shown to be accessible for complementary interactions within the 40S ribosomal subunit. It is found that the sequence complementary to the 18S rRNA fragment 1638-1650 is able to enhance efficiency of a reporter mRNA translation when placed just after the initiation codon. The results obtained indicate that in the course of the cap-independent translation initiation, complementary interactions can occur between mRNA coding sequence and 18S rRNA fragment in the region of the ribosomal decoding site.

  5. Identical ribosomal DNA sequence data from Pfiesteria piscicida (Dinophyceae) isolates with different toxicity phenotypes.

    PubMed

    Tengs, Torstein; Bowers, Holly A; Glasgow, Howard B; Burkholder, JoAnn M; Oldach, David W

    2003-09-01

    Complete small subunit ribosomal RNA, internal transcribed spacer 1 and 2, 5.8S, and partial large subunit ribosomal RNA gene sequences were generated from multiple isolates of Pfiesteria piscicida. Sequences were derived from isolates that have been shown to be ichthyotoxic as well as isolates that have no history of toxic behavior. All of the sequences generated were identical for the different cultures, and we therefore conclude that differences in toxicity seen between isolates of P. piscicida are linked to factors other than genetic strain variation detectable by ribosomal gene sequence analyses.

  6. A single gene encodes two different transcripts for the ADP-glucose pyrophosphorylase small subunit from barley (Hordeum vulgare).

    PubMed Central

    Thorbjørnsen, T; Villand, P; Kleczkowski, L A; Olsen, O A

    1996-01-01

    ADP-glucose pyrophosphorylase (AGPase), a heterotetrameric enzyme composed of two small and two large subunits, catalyses the first committed step of starch synthesis in plant tissues. In an attempt to learn more about the organization and expression of the small-subunit gene of AGPase, we have studied the small-subunit transcripts as well as the structure of the gene encoding these transcripts in barley (Hordeum vulgare L. cv. Bomi). Two different transcripts (bepsF1 and blps14) were identified: bepF1 was abundantly expressed in the starchy endosperm but not in leaves, whereas blps14 was isolated from leaves but was also found to be present at a moderate level in the starchy endosperm. The sequences for the two transcripts are identical over approx. 90% of the length, with differences being confined solely to their 5' ends. In blps14, the unique 5' end is 259 nt long and encodes a putative plastid transit peptide sequence. For the 178-nt 5' end of bepsF1, on the other hand, no transit peptide sequence could be recognized. A lambda clone that hybridized to the AGPase transcripts was isolated from a barley genomic library and characterized. The restriction map has suggested a complex organization of the gene, with alternative exons encoding the different 5' ends of the two transcripts followed by nine exons coding for the common part of the transcripts. The sequence of a portion of the genomic clone, covering the alternative 5'-end exons as well as upstream regions, has verified that both transcripts are encoded by the gene. The results suggest that the small-subunit gene of barley AGPase transcribes two different mRNAs by a mechanism classified as alternative splicing. PMID:8546676

  7. Mutations in the small subunit of the Drosophila U2AF splicing factor cause lethality and developmental defects.

    PubMed

    Rudner, D Z; Kanaar, R; Breger, K S; Rio, D C

    1996-09-17

    The essential eukaryotic pre-mRNA splicing factor U2AF (U2 small nuclear ribonucleoprotein auxiliary factor) is required to specify the 3' splice at an early step in spliceosome assembly. U2AF binds site-specifically to the intron polypyrimidine tract and recruits U2 small nuclear ribonucleoprotein to the branch site. Human U2AF (hU2AF) is a heterodimer composed of a large (hU2AF65) and small (hU2AF35) subunit. Although these proteins associate in a tight complex, the biochemical requirement for U2AF activity can be satisfied solely by the large subunit. The requirement for the small subunit in splicing has remained enigmatic. No biochemical activity has been found for hU2AF35 and it has been implicated in splicing only indirectly by its interaction with known splicing factors. In the absence of a biochemical assay, we have taken a genetic approach to investigate the function of the small subunit in the fruit fly Drosophila melanogaster. A cDNA clone encoding the small subunit of Drosophila U2AF (dU2AF38) has been isolated and sequenced. The dU2AF38 protein is highly homologous to hU2AF35 containing a conserved central arginine- and serine-rich (RS) domain. A recessive P-element insertion mutation affecting dU2AF38 causes a reduction in viability and fertility and morphological bristle defects. Consistent with a general role in splicing, a null allele of dU2AF38 is fully penetrant recessive lethal, like null alleles of the Drosophila U2AF large subunit.

  8. Cryo-EM structure of the large subunit of the spinach chloroplast ribosome

    PubMed Central

    Ahmed, Tofayel; Yin, Zhan; Bhushan, Shashi

    2016-01-01

    Protein synthesis in the chloroplast is mediated by the chloroplast ribosome (chloro-ribosome). Overall architecture of the chloro-ribosome is considerably similar to the Escherichia coli (E. coli) ribosome but certain differences are evident. The chloro-ribosome proteins are generally larger because of the presence of chloroplast-specific extensions in their N- and C-termini. The chloro-ribosome harbours six plastid-specific ribosomal proteins (PSRPs); four in the small subunit and two in the large subunit. Deletions and insertions occur throughout the rRNA sequence of the chloro-ribosome (except for the conserved peptidyl transferase center region) but the overall length of the rRNAs do not change significantly, compared to the E. coli. Although, recent advancements in cryo-electron microscopy (cryo-EM) have provided detailed high-resolution structures of ribosomes from many different sources, a high-resolution structure of the chloro-ribosome is still lacking. Here, we present a cryo-EM structure of the large subunit of the chloro-ribosome from spinach (Spinacia oleracea) at an average resolution of 3.5 Å. High-resolution map enabled us to localize and model chloro-ribosome proteins, chloroplast-specific protein extensions, two PSRPs (PSRP5 and 6) and three rRNA molecules present in the chloro-ribosome. Although comparable to E. coli, the polypeptide tunnel and the tunnel exit site show chloroplast-specific features. PMID:27762343

  9. An RNA-Binding Complex Involved in Ribosome Biogenesis Contains a Protein with Homology to tRNA CCA-Adding Enzyme

    PubMed Central

    Feng, Yingang; Sun, Mengyi; Ye, Keqiong

    2013-01-01

    A multitude of proteins and small nucleolar RNAs transiently associate with eukaryotic ribosomal RNAs to direct their modification and processing and the assembly of ribosomal proteins. Utp22 and Rrp7, two interacting proteins with no recognizable domain, are components of the 90S preribosome or the small subunit processome that conducts early processing of 18S rRNA. Here, we determine the cocrystal structure of Utp22 and Rrp7 complex at 1.97 Å resolution and the NMR structure of a C-terminal fragment of Rrp7, which is not visible in the crystal structure. The structure reveals that Utp22 surprisingly resembles a dimeric class I tRNA CCA-adding enzyme yet with degenerate active sites, raising an interesting evolutionary connection between tRNA and rRNA processing machineries. Rrp7 binds extensively to Utp22 using a deviant RNA recognition motif and an extended linker. Functional sites on the two proteins were identified by structure-based mutagenesis in yeast. We show that Rrp7 contains a flexible RNA-binding C-terminal tail that is essential for association with preribosomes. RNA–protein crosslinking shows that Rrp7 binds at the central domain of 18S rRNA and shares a neighborhood with two processing H/ACA snoRNAs snR30 and snR10. Depletion of snR30 prevents the stable assembly of Rrp7 into preribosomes. Our results provide insight into the evolutionary origin and functional context of Utp22 and Rrp7. PMID:24130456

  10. Characterisation of Lymnaea cubensis, L. viatrix and L. neotropica n. sp., the main vectors of Fasciola hepatica in Latin America, by analysis of their ribosomal and mitochondrial DNA.

    PubMed

    Bargues, M D; Artigas, P; Mera Y Sierra, R L; Pointier, J P; Mas-Coma, S

    2007-10-01

    Although, in the endemic areas throughout the world, human fascioliasis presents varying patterns in its epidemiology, the species of lymnaeid snail that act as intermediate hosts and vectors are always crucial in the transmission of the causative parasites. Species in the Galba/Fossaria group of snails, such as Lymnaea cubensis, L. viatrix var. A ventricosa, L. viatrix var. B elongata and Galba truncatula, appear to be frequently involved in the transmission of Fasciola hepatica in Central and South America, although specific classification within this morphologically and anatomically confusing group is often very difficult. To explore the potential use of molecular analyses in the identification of vector snails, regions of the ribosomal DNA - the small subunit (18S) gene and internal transcribed spacers (ITS-2 and ITS-1) - and of the mitochondrial DNA - the cytochrome c oxidase subunit I (COI) - of wild-caught lymnaeid snails of L. cubensis, L. viatrix var. A ventricosa, L. viatrix var. B elongata and G. truncatula have been sequenced. The samples of the Latin American species included specimens from the respective type localities. The genetic distances observed and the results of phylogenetic analyses demonstrate that two different species exist within L. viatrix. Lymnaea neotropica n. sp. (=L. viatrix var. B elongata) is here proposed for specimens from Lima, Peru, and is differentiated from L. viatrix (=L. viatrix var. A ventricosa), L. cubensis and G. truncatula. The data collected on the 18S ribosomal-RNA gene indicate that the snails investigated may cover more than one supraspecific taxon. The ITS-2, ITS-1 and COI nucleotide sequences are clearly useful markers for the differentiation of these morpho-anatomically similar lymnaeid species. The numerous microsatellite repeats found within ITS-2 are potential tools for differentiation at population level.

  11. Structural and functional analyses of a yeast mitochondrial ribosomal protein homologous to ribosomal protein S15 of Escherichia coli.

    PubMed Central

    Dang, H; Ellis, S R

    1990-01-01

    We have purified a small subunit mitochondrial ribosomal protein, MRPS28p, from the yeast, Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Sequence from the amino terminus of MRPS28p was used to design a degenerate oligonucleotide that was complementary to the MRPS28 gene. The MRPS28 gene was isolated and its sequence determined. The MRPS28 sequence encodes a 28 kDa protein that has a region of homology with ribosomal protein S15 of E. coli. This region spans the entire length of the E. coli protein, but as MRPS28p is larger, includes only the portion of the MRPS28p sequence from amino acids 150 to 238. Based on this homology, we predict that MRPS28p, like E. coli S15, interacts directly with small subunit rRNA and functions as an early protein in ribosome assembly. Cells carrying a disrupted chromosomal copy of MRPS28 are unable to respire and spontaneously lose portions of their mitochondrial genomes at a high frequency. These phenotypes are consistent with an essential role for MRPS28p in the assembly and/or function of the mitochondrial ribosome. Images PMID:2263452

  12. Nop9 binds the central pseudoknot region of 18S rRNA

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Bing

    2017-01-01

    Abstract The assembly of eukaryotic ribosomes requires numerous factors that transiently associate with evolving pre-ribosomal particles. The Pumilio repeat-containing protein Nop9 briefly associates with the 90S pre-ribosome during its co-transcriptional assembly. Here, we show that Nop9 specifically binds an 11-nucleotide sequence of 18S rRNA that forms the 3΄ side of the central pseudoknot and helix 28 in the mature subunit. Crystal structures of Nop9 in the free and RNA-bound states reveal a new type of Pumilio repeat protein with a distinct structure, target sequence and RNA-binding mode. Nop9 contains 10 Pumilio repeats arranged into a U-shaped scaffold. The target RNA is recognized by two stretches of repeats in a bipartite manner, and three central bases are unrecognized as a result of the degeneracy of repeats 6 and 7. Our data suggest that Nop9 regulates the folding of 18S rRNA at early assembly stages of 90S. PMID:28053123

  13. Nop9 binds the central pseudoknot region of 18S rRNA.

    PubMed

    Wang, Bing; Ye, Keqiong

    2017-04-07

    The assembly of eukaryotic ribosomes requires numerous factors that transiently associate with evolving pre-ribosomal particles. The Pumilio repeat-containing protein Nop9 briefly associates with the 90S pre-ribosome during its co-transcriptional assembly. Here, we show that Nop9 specifically binds an 11-nucleotide sequence of 18S rRNA that forms the 3΄ side of the central pseudoknot and helix 28 in the mature subunit. Crystal structures of Nop9 in the free and RNA-bound states reveal a new type of Pumilio repeat protein with a distinct structure, target sequence and RNA-binding mode. Nop9 contains 10 Pumilio repeats arranged into a U-shaped scaffold. The target RNA is recognized by two stretches of repeats in a bipartite manner, and three central bases are unrecognized as a result of the degeneracy of repeats 6 and 7. Our data suggest that Nop9 regulates the folding of 18S rRNA at early assembly stages of 90S. © The Author(s) 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Nucleic Acids Research.

  14. Detecting morphological convergence in true fungi, using 18S rRNA gene sequence data.

    PubMed

    Berbee, M L; Taylor, J W

    1992-01-01

    For the true fungi, phylogenetic relationships inferred from 18S ribosomal DNA sequence data agree with morphology when (1) the fungi exhibit diagnostic morphological characters, (2) the sequence-based phylogenetic groups are statistically supported, and (3) the ribosomal DNA evolves at roughly the same rate in the lineages being compared. 18S ribosomal RNA gene sequence data and biochemical data provide a congruent definition of true fungi. Sequence data support the traditional fungal subdivisions Ascomycotina and Basidiomycotina. In conflict with morphology, some zygomycetes group with chytrid water molds rather than with other terrestrial fungi, possibly owing to unequal rates of nucleotide substitutions among zygomycete lineages. Within the ascomycetes, the taxonomic consequence of simple or reduced morphology has been a proliferation of mutually incongruent classification systems. Sequence data provide plausible resolution of relationships for some cases where reduced morphology has created confusion. For example, phylogenetic trees from rDNA indicate that those morphologically simple ascomycetes classified as yeasts are polyphyletic and that forcible spore discharge was lost convergently from three lineages of ascomycetes producing flask-like fruiting bodies.

  15. Structural Comparison, Substrate Specificity, and Inhibitor Binding of AGPase Small Subunit from Monocot and Dicot: Present Insight and Future Potential

    PubMed Central

    Choudhury, Manabendra D.; Modi, Mahendra K.

    2014-01-01

    ADP-glucose pyrophosphorylase (AGPase) is the first rate limiting enzyme of starch biosynthesis pathway and has been exploited as the target for greater starch yield in several plants. The structure-function analysis and substrate binding specificity of AGPase have provided enormous potential for understanding the role of specific amino acid or motifs responsible for allosteric regulation and catalytic mechanisms, which facilitate the engineering of AGPases. We report the three-dimensional structure, substrate, and inhibitor binding specificity of AGPase small subunit from different monocot and dicot crop plants. Both monocot and dicot subunits were found to exploit similar interactions with the substrate and inhibitor molecule as in the case of their closest homologue potato tuber AGPase small subunit. Comparative sequence and structural analysis followed by molecular docking and electrostatic surface potential analysis reveal that rearrangements of secondary structure elements, substrate, and inhibitor binding residues are strongly conserved and follow common folding pattern and orientation within monocot and dicot displaying a similar mode of allosteric regulation and catalytic mechanism. The results from this study along with site-directed mutagenesis complemented by molecular dynamics simulation will shed more light on increasing the starch content of crop plants to ensure the food security worldwide. PMID:25276800

  16. Structural comparison, substrate specificity, and inhibitor binding of AGPase small subunit from monocot and dicot: present insight and future potential.

    PubMed

    Sarma, Kishore; Sen, Priyabrata; Barooah, Madhumita; Choudhury, Manabendra D; Roychoudhury, Shubhadeep; Modi, Mahendra K

    2014-01-01

    ADP-glucose pyrophosphorylase (AGPase) is the first rate limiting enzyme of starch biosynthesis pathway and has been exploited as the target for greater starch yield in several plants. The structure-function analysis and substrate binding specificity of AGPase have provided enormous potential for understanding the role of specific amino acid or motifs responsible for allosteric regulation and catalytic mechanisms, which facilitate the engineering of AGPases. We report the three-dimensional structure, substrate, and inhibitor binding specificity of AGPase small subunit from different monocot and dicot crop plants. Both monocot and dicot subunits were found to exploit similar interactions with the substrate and inhibitor molecule as in the case of their closest homologue potato tuber AGPase small subunit. Comparative sequence and structural analysis followed by molecular docking and electrostatic surface potential analysis reveal that rearrangements of secondary structure elements, substrate, and inhibitor binding residues are strongly conserved and follow common folding pattern and orientation within monocot and dicot displaying a similar mode of allosteric regulation and catalytic mechanism. The results from this study along with site-directed mutagenesis complemented by molecular dynamics simulation will shed more light on increasing the starch content of crop plants to ensure the food security worldwide.

  17. Ribosome biogenesis; the KsgA protein throws a methyl-mediated switch in ribosome assembly.

    PubMed

    Mangat, Chand S; Brown, Eric D

    2008-12-01

    Many trans-acting factors that aid in ribosome biogenesis have been identified in higher organisms but relatively few such factors are known in prokaryotes. In bacteria, the list of such factors includes ATP-energized helicases and chaperones as well as an emerging cadre of switch GTPases. The KsgA protein is a universally conserved methyltransferase that dimethylates both A1518 and A1519 of the 16S rRNA of the small ribosomal subunit. Methylation has long been thought to be solely for fine-tuning of protein translation. In this issue of Molecular Microbiology, Connolly et al. present data suggesting KsgA might function in the assembly of the small subunit of the ribosome. Indeed, the work indicates that KsgA might have a checkpoint role in ribosome biogenesis where methylation by this protein marks the completion of its assembly role. These findings open our thinking to new candidate assembly factors and provide a new direction for understanding ribosome assembly.

  18. PCR-based diversity estimates of artificial and environmental 18S rRNA gene libraries.

    PubMed

    Potvin, Marianne; Lovejoy, Connie

    2009-01-01

    Environmental clone libraries constructed using small subunit ribosomal RNA (rRNA) or other gene-specific primers have become the standard molecular approach for identifying microorganisms directly from their environment. This technique includes an initial polymerase chain reaction (PCR) amplification step of a phylogenetically useful marker gene using universal primers. Although it is acknowledged that such primers introduce biases, there have been few studies if any to date systematically examining such bias in eukaryotic microbes. We investigated some implications of such bias by constructing clone libraries using several universal primer pairs targeting rRNA genes. Firstly, we constructed artificial libraries using a known mix of small cultured pelagic arctic algae with representatives from five major lineages and secondly we investigated environmental samples using several primer pairs. No primer pair retrieved all of the original algae in the artificial clone libraries and all showed a favorable bias toward the dinoflagellate Polarella glacialis and a bias against the prasinophyte Micromonas and a pennate diatom. Several other species were retrieved by only one primer pair tested. Despite this, sequences from nine environmental libraries were diverse and contained representatives from all major eukaryotic clades expected in marine samples. Further, libraries from the same sample grouped together using Bray-Curtis clustering, irrespective of primer pairs. We conclude that environmental PCR-based techniques are sufficient to compare samples, but the total diversity will probably always be underestimated and relative abundance estimates should be treated with caution.

  19. Identification of new 18S rRNA strains of Babesia canis isolated from dogs with subclinical babesiosis.

    PubMed

    Łyp, P; Adaszek, Ł; Furmaga, B; Winiarczyk, S

    2015-01-01

    In this study, we used PCR to detect and characterize B. canis from naturally infected dogs in Poland with subclinical babesiosis by amplifying and sequencing a portion of the 18S ribosomal RNA (rRNA) gene. Venous blood samples were collected from ten dogs with subclinical babesiosis. A 559-bp fragment of the B. canis 18S rRNA gene was amplified by PCR. Sequencing of the PCR products led to the identification of a new variant of Babesia canis, differing from the previously detected protozoa genotypes (18S rRNA-A and 18S rRNA-B) with nucleotide substitutions in positions 150 and 151 of the tested gene fragment. The results indicate the emergence within the Polish territory of a new, previously unencountered Babesia canis genotype responsible for the development of subclinical babesiosis.

  20. Testing three pipelines for 18S rDNA-based metabarcoding of soil faunal diversity.

    PubMed

    Yang, ChenXue; Ji, YingQiu; Wang, XiaoYang; Yang, ChunYang; Yu, Douglas W

    2013-01-01

    A number of basic and applied questions in ecology and environmental management require the characterization of soil and leaf litter faunal diversity. Recent advances in high-throughput sequencing of barcode-gene amplicons ('metabarcoding') have made it possible to survey biodiversity in a robust and efficient way. However, one obstacle to the widespread adoption of this technique is the need to choose amongst many candidates for bioinformatic processing of the raw sequencing data. We compare three candidate pipelines for the processing of 18S small subunit rDNA metabarcode data from solid substrates: (i) USEARCH/CROP, (ii) Denoiser/UCLUST, and (iii) OCTUPUS. The three pipelines produced reassuringly similar and highly correlated assessments of community composition that are dominated by taxa known to characterize the sampled environments. However, OCTUPUS appears to inflate phylogenetic diversity, because of higher sequence noise. We therefore recommend either the USEARCH/CROP or Denoiser/UCLUST pipelines, both of which can be run within the QIIME (Quantitative Insights Into Microbial Ecology) environment.

  1. An Extensive Network of Information Flow through the B1b/c Intersubunit Bridge of the Yeast Ribosome

    PubMed Central

    Rhodin, Michael H. J.; Dinman, Jonathan D.

    2011-01-01

    Yeast ribosomal proteins L11 and S18 form a dynamic intersubunit interaction called the B1b/c bridge. Recent high resolution images of the ribosome have enabled targeting of specific residues in this bridge to address how distantly separated regions within the large and small subunits of the ribosome communicate with each other. Mutations were generated in the L11 side of the B1b/c bridge with a particular focus on disrupting the opposing charge motifs that have previously been proposed to be involved in subunit ratcheting. Mutants had wide-ranging effects on cellular viability and translational fidelity, with the most pronounced phenotypes corresponding to amino acid changes resulting in alterations of local charge properties. Chemical protection studies of selected mutants revealed rRNA structural changes in both the large and small subunits. In the large subunit rRNA, structural changes mapped to Helices 39, 80, 82, 83, 84, and the peptidyltransferase center. In the small subunit rRNA, structural changes were identified in helices 30 and 42, located between S18 and the decoding center. The rRNA structural changes correlated with charge-specific alterations to the L11 side of the B1b/c bridge. These analyses underscore the importance of the opposing charge mechanism in mediating B1b/c bridge interactions and suggest an extensive network of information exchange between distinct regions of the large and small subunits. PMID:21625514

  2. An extensive network of information flow through the B1b/c intersubunit bridge of the yeast ribosome.

    PubMed

    Rhodin, Michael H J; Dinman, Jonathan D

    2011-01-01

    Yeast ribosomal proteins L11 and S18 form a dynamic intersubunit interaction called the B1b/c bridge. Recent high resolution images of the ribosome have enabled targeting of specific residues in this bridge to address how distantly separated regions within the large and small subunits of the ribosome communicate with each other. Mutations were generated in the L11 side of the B1b/c bridge with a particular focus on disrupting the opposing charge motifs that have previously been proposed to be involved in subunit ratcheting. Mutants had wide-ranging effects on cellular viability and translational fidelity, with the most pronounced phenotypes corresponding to amino acid changes resulting in alterations of local charge properties. Chemical protection studies of selected mutants revealed rRNA structural changes in both the large and small subunits. In the large subunit rRNA, structural changes mapped to Helices 39, 80, 82, 83, 84, and the peptidyltransferase center. In the small subunit rRNA, structural changes were identified in helices 30 and 42, located between S18 and the decoding center. The rRNA structural changes correlated with charge-specific alterations to the L11 side of the B1b/c bridge. These analyses underscore the importance of the opposing charge mechanism in mediating B1b/c bridge interactions and suggest an extensive network of information exchange between distinct regions of the large and small subunits.

  3. Splicing factor 2-associated protein p32 participates in ribosome biogenesis by regulating the binding of Nop52 and fibrillarin to preribosome particles.

    PubMed

    Yoshikawa, Harunori; Komatsu, Wataru; Hayano, Toshiya; Miura, Yutaka; Homma, Keiichi; Izumikawa, Keiichi; Ishikawa, Hideaki; Miyazawa, Naoki; Tachikawa, Hiroyuki; Yamauchi, Yoshio; Isobe, Toshiaki; Takahashi, Nobuhiro

    2011-08-01

    Ribosome biogenesis starts with transcription of the large ribosomal RNA precursor (47S pre-rRNA), which soon combines with numerous factors to form the 90S pre-ribosome in the nucleolus. Although the subsequent separation of the pre-90S particle into pre-40S and pre-60S particles is critical for the production process of mature small and large ribosomal subunits, its molecular mechanisms remain undetermined. Here, we present evidence that p32, fibrillarin (FBL), and Nop52 play key roles in this separation step. Mass-based analyses combined with immunoblotting showed that p32 associated with 155 proteins including 31 rRNA-processing factors (of which nine were components of small subunit processome, and six were those of RIX1 complex), 13 chromatin remodeling components, and six general transcription factors required for RNA polymerase III-mediated transcription. Of these, a late rRNA-processing factor Nop52 interacted directly with p32. Immunocytochemical analyses demonstrated that p32 colocalized with an early rRNA-processing factor FBL or Nop52 in the nucleolus and Cajal bodies, but was excluded from the nucleolus after actinomycin D treatment. p32 was present in the pre-ribosomal fractions prepared by cell fractionation or separated by ultracentrifugation of the nuclear extract. p32 also associated with pre-rRNAs including 47S/45S and 32S pre-rRNAs. Furthermore, knockdown of p32 with a small interfering RNA slowed the early processing from 47S/45S pre-rRNAs to 18S rRNA and 32S pre-rRNA. Finally, Nop52 was found to compete with FBL for binding to p32 probably in the nucleolus. Given the fact that FBL and Nop52 are associated with pre-ribosome particles distinctly different from each other, we suggest that p32 is a new rRNA maturation factor involved in the remodeling from pre-90S particles to pre-40S and pre-60S particles that requires the exchange of FBL for Nop52.

  4. Splicing Factor 2-Associated Protein p32 Participates in Ribosome Biogenesis by Regulating the Binding of Nop52 and Fibrillarin to Preribosome Particles*

    PubMed Central

    Yoshikawa, Harunori; Komatsu, Wataru; Hayano, Toshiya; Miura, Yutaka; Homma, Keiichi; Izumikawa, Keiichi; Ishikawa, Hideaki; Miyazawa, Naoki; Tachikawa, Hiroyuki; Yamauchi, Yoshio; Isobe, Toshiaki; Takahashi, Nobuhiro

    2011-01-01

    Ribosome biogenesis starts with transcription of the large ribosomal RNA precursor (47S pre-rRNA), which soon combines with numerous factors to form the 90S pre-ribosome in the nucleolus. Although the subsequent separation of the pre-90S particle into pre-40S and pre-60S particles is critical for the production process of mature small and large ribosomal subunits, its molecular mechanisms remain undetermined. Here, we present evidence that p32, fibrillarin (FBL), and Nop52 play key roles in this separation step. Mass-based analyses combined with immunoblotting showed that p32 associated with 155 proteins including 31 rRNA-processing factors (of which nine were components of small subunit processome, and six were those of RIX1 complex), 13 chromatin remodeling components, and six general transcription factors required for RNA polymerase III-mediated transcription. Of these, a late rRNA-processing factor Nop52 interacted directly with p32. Immunocytochemical analyses demonstrated that p32 colocalized with an early rRNA-processing factor FBL or Nop52 in the nucleolus and Cajal bodies, but was excluded from the nucleolus after actinomycin D treatment. p32 was present in the pre-ribosomal fractions prepared by cell fractionation or separated by ultracentrifugation of the nuclear extract. p32 also associated with pre-rRNAs including 47S/45S and 32S pre-rRNAs. Furthermore, knockdown of p32 with a small interfering RNA slowed the early processing from 47S/45S pre-rRNAs to 18S rRNA and 32S pre-rRNA. Finally, Nop52 was found to compete with FBL for binding to p32 probably in the nucleolus. Given the fact that FBL and Nop52 are associated with pre-ribosome particles distinctly different from each other, we suggest that p32 is a new rRNA maturation factor involved in the remodeling from pre-90S particles to pre-40S and pre-60S particles that requires the exchange of FBL for Nop52. PMID:21536856

  5. Isolation of the catalytically competent small subunit of ribulose bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase from spinach under an extremely alkaline condition.

    PubMed

    Incharoensakdi, A; Takabe, T; Takabe, T; Akazawa, T

    1986-07-16

    A method for isolating the small subunit (B) of ribulose-1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase (RuBisCO) from spinach leaf using an alkaline buffer (pH 11.2) in combination with sucrose gradient centrifugation is described. Although the yield of isolated subunit B (ca. 20%) was comparable to that previously described (ca. 25%) using the acid precipitation method [Andrews, T.J. and Lorimer, G.H. (1985) J. Biol. Chem. 260: 4632-4636], the isolated subunit B in this report suffered less denaturation (ca. 30%) as estimated from kinetic analysis of its reassembly with large subunit (A) derived from Aphanothece halophytica. Studies on the kinetic properties of the reassembled enzyme molecules suggested that spinach subunit B does not influence the affinity of the enzyme for substrate CO2. The catalytic core (A8) of spinach RuBisCO could not be isolated in the native form.

  6. Phosphorylation of chloroplast ribulose bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase small subunit by an envelope-bound protein kinase in situ.

    PubMed

    Soll, J; Buchanan, B B

    1983-06-10

    A new protein kinase of the cAMP independent type was found to be bound to the outer envelope membrane of spinach chloroplasts. While stimulated by Mg2+ and inhibited by ADP, the enzyme showed no response to conventional protein substrates and was essentially independent of pH in the physiological (pH 7 to 8) range. The new protein kinase phosphorylated the mature form of the small subunit of ribulose 1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase and, to a lesser extent, an unidentified 24-kDa polypeptide, both of which were bound to the outer envelope membrane. The results suggest that phosphorylation of cytoplasmically synthesized protein constituents of chloroplasts is involved in their transport through the chloroplast envelope membrane barrier.

  7. The small subunit 1 of the Arabidopsis isopropylmalate isomerase is required for normal growth and development and the early stages of glucosinolate formation.

    PubMed

    Imhof, Janet; Huber, Florian; Reichelt, Michael; Gershenzon, Jonathan; Wiegreffe, Christoph; Lächler, Kurt; Binder, Stefan

    2014-01-01

    In Arabidopsis thaliana the evolutionary and functional relationship between Leu biosynthesis and the Met chain elongation pathway, the first part of glucosinolate formation, is well documented. Nevertheless the exact functions of some pathway components are still unclear. Isopropylmalate isomerase (IPMI), an enzyme usually involved in Leu biosynthesis, is a heterodimer consisting of a large and a small subunit. While the large protein is encoded by a single gene (isopropylmalate isomerase large subunit1), three genes encode small subunits (isopropylmalate isomerase small subunit1 to 3). We have now analyzed small subunit 1 (isopropylmalate isomerase small subunit1) employing artificial microRNA for a targeted knockdown of the encoding gene. Strong reduction of corresponding mRNA levels to less than 5% of wild-type levels resulted in a severe phenotype with stunted growth, narrow pale leaf blades with green vasculature and abnormal adaxial-abaxial patterning as well as anomalous flower morphology. Supplementation of the knockdown plants with leucine could only partially compensate for the morphological and developmental abnormalities. Detailed metabolite profiling of the knockdown plants revealed changes in the steady state levels of isopropylmalate and glucosinolates as well as their intermediates demonstrating a function of IPMI SSU1 in both leucine biosynthesis and the first cycle of Met chain elongation. Surprisingly the levels of free leucine slightly increased suggesting an imbalanced distribution of leucine within cells and/or within plant tissues.

  8. The Small Subunit 1 of the Arabidopsis Isopropylmalate Isomerase Is Required for Normal Growth and Development and the Early Stages of Glucosinolate Formation

    PubMed Central

    Imhof, Janet; Huber, Florian; Reichelt, Michael; Gershenzon, Jonathan; Wiegreffe, Christoph; Lächler, Kurt; Binder, Stefan

    2014-01-01

    In Arabidopsis thaliana the evolutionary and functional relationship between Leu biosynthesis and the Met chain elongation pathway, the first part of glucosinolate formation, is well documented. Nevertheless the exact functions of some pathway components are still unclear. Isopropylmalate isomerase (IPMI), an enzyme usually involved in Leu biosynthesis, is a heterodimer consisting of a large and a small subunit. While the large protein is encoded by a single gene (ISOPROPYLMALATE ISOMERASE LARGE SUBUNIT1), three genes encode small subunits (ISOPROPYLMALATE ISOMERASE SMALL SUBUNIT1 to 3). We have now analyzed small subunit 1 (ISOPROPYLMALATE ISOMERASE SMALL SUBUNIT1) employing artificial microRNA for a targeted knockdown of the encoding gene. Strong reduction of corresponding mRNA levels to less than 5% of wild-type levels resulted in a severe phenotype with stunted growth, narrow pale leaf blades with green vasculature and abnormal adaxial-abaxial patterning as well as anomalous flower morphology. Supplementation of the knockdown plants with leucine could only partially compensate for the morphological and developmental abnormalities. Detailed metabolite profiling of the knockdown plants revealed changes in the steady state levels of isopropylmalate and glucosinolates as well as their intermediates demonstrating a function of IPMI SSU1 in both leucine biosynthesis and the first cycle of Met chain elongation. Surprisingly the levels of free leucine slightly increased suggesting an imbalanced distribution of leucine within cells and/or within plant tissues. PMID:24608865

  9. Cloning of the cDNAs for the small subunits of bovine and human DNA polymerase {delta} and chromosomal location of the human gene (POLD2)

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Jian; Tan, Cheng-Keat; Downey, K.M.

    1995-09-01

    cDNAs encoding the small subunit of bovine and human DNA polymerase {delta} have been cloned and sequenced. The predicted polypeptides, 50,885 and 51,289 Daltons, respectively, are 94% identical, similar to the catalytic subunits. The high degree of conservation of the polypeptides suggests an essential function for the small subunit in the heterodimeric core enzyme. Although the catalytic subunit of DNA polymerase 5 shares significant homology with those of the herpes virus family of DNA polymerases, the small subunit of mammalian DNA polymerase 6 is not homologous to the small subunit of either herpes simplex virus type 1 DNA polymerase (UL42 protein) or the Epstein-Barr virus DNA polymerase (BMRF1 protein). Searches of the protein databases failed to detect significant homology with any protein sequenced thus far. PCR analysis of DNA from a panel of human-hamster hybrid cell lines localized the gene (POLD2) for the small subunit of DNA polymerase 5 to human chromosome 7. 45 refs., 2 figs., 2 tabs.

  10. Update on Acanthamoeba jacobsi genotype T15, including full-length 18S rDNA molecular phylogeny.

    PubMed

    Corsaro, Daniele; Köhsler, Martina; Montalbano Di Filippo, Margherita; Venditti, Danielle; Monno, Rosa; Di Cave, David; Berrilli, Federica; Walochnik, Julia

    2017-04-01

    Free-living amoebae of the genus Acanthamoeba are worldwide present in natural and artificial environments, and are also clinically important, as causative agents of diseases in humans and other animals. Acanthamoeba comprises several species, historically assigned to one of the three groups based on their cyst morphology, but presently recognized as at least 20 genotypes (T1-T20) on the basis of their nuclear 18S ribosomal RNA (rRNA) gene (18S rDNA) sequences. While strain identification may usually be achieved targeting short (<500 bp) 18S ribosomal DNA (rDNA) fragments, the use of full-length gene sequences (>2200 bp) is necessary for correct genotype description and reliable molecular phylogenetic inference. The genotype T15, corresponding to Acanthamoeba jacobsi, is the only genotype described on the basis of partial sequences (~1500 bp). While this feature does not prevent the correct identification of the strains, having only partial sequences renders the genotype T15 not completely defined and may furthermore affect its position in the Acanthamoeba molecular tree. Here, we complete this gap, by obtaining full-length 18S rDNA sequences from eight A. jacobsi strains, genotype T15. Morphologies and physiological features of isolated strains are reported. Molecular phylogeny based on full 18S rDNA confirms some previous suggestions for a genetic link between T15 and T13, T16, and T19, with T19 as sister-group to T15.

  11. Purification and characterization of large and small subunits of ribulose 1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase expressed separately in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Smrcka, A V; Ramage, R T; Bohnert, H J; Jensen, R G

    1991-04-01

    Procedures were developed for 95 and 80% purification to homogeneity of the large subunit (L) and small subunit (S) of ribulose 1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase (L8S8) from Synechococcus PCC 6301, each expressed separately in Escherichia coli. Purified L had a low specific activity in the absence of S (0.075 mumol CO2 fixed/mg holoenzyme/min). Following elution on a Pharmacia Superose 6 or 12 gel filtration column, 50% of the purified L appeared as the octamer, L8. The rest was in equilibrium with lower polymeric species and/or was retained on the column. Large and small subunits assembled rapidly into the L8S8 holoenzyme that had high specific activities, 6.2 and 3.1 mumol CO2 fixed/mg holoenzyme/min for the homologous Synechococcus L8S8 and the hybrid Synechococcus L-pea S L8S8, respectively. The CO2 dependence for carbamylation of L8 was compared to that of L8S8 as a function of pH and CO2 concentration. The pH dependence indicated an apparent pKa for L8 of 8.28 and for L8S8 of 8.15, suggesting that S may influence the pKa of the lysine involved in carbamylation. The Kact for CO2 at pH 8.4 were similar for L8 (13.5 microM) and L8S8 (15.5 microM). L8 bound 2-[14C]carboxy-D-arabinitol 1,5-bisphosphate (CABP) tightly so that most of the bound [14C]CABP survived gel filtration. A major amount of the L8-[14C]CABP complex appeared as larger polymeric aggregates when eluted in the presence of E. coli protein.

  12. Group-specific small-subunit rRNA hybridization probes to characterize filamentous foaming in activated sludge systems.

    PubMed Central

    de los Reyes, F L; Ritter, W; Raskin, L

    1997-01-01

    Foaming in activated sludge systems is characterized by the formation of a thick, chocolate brown-colored scum that floats on the surface of aeration basins and secondary clarifiers. These viscous foams have been associated with the presence of filamentous mycolic acid-containing actinomycetes. To aid in evaluating the microbial representation in foam, we developed and characterized group-, genus-, and species-specific oligonucleotide probes targeting the small subunit rRNA of the Mycobacterium complex, Gordona spp., and Gordona (Nocardia) amarae, respectively. The use of a universal base analog, 5-nitroindole, in oligonucleotide probe design was evaluated by comparing the characteristics of two different versions of the Mycobacterium complex probe. The temperature of dissociation of each probe was determined. Probe specificity studies with a diverse collection of 67 target and nontarget rRNAs demonstrated the specificity of the probes to the target groups. Whole-cell hybridizations with fluorescein- and rhodamine-labeled probes were performed with pure cultures of various members of the Mycobacterium complex as well as with environmental samples from a full-scale activated sludge plant which experienced foaming. Quantitative membrane hybridizations with activated sludge and anaerobic digester foam showed that 15.0 to 18.3% of the total small-subunit rRNAs could be attributed to members of the Mycobacterium complex, of which a vast majority consisted of Gordona rRNA. Several G. amarae strains made up only a very small percentage of the Gordona strains present. We demonstrated that group-specific rRNA probes are useful tools for the in situ monitoring and identification of filamentous bacteria in activated sludge systems. PMID:9055425

  13. Group-specific small-subunit rRNA hybridization probes to characterize filamentous foaming in activated sludge systems.

    PubMed

    de los Reyes, F L; Ritter, W; Raskin, L

    1997-03-01

    Foaming in activated sludge systems is characterized by the formation of a thick, chocolate brown-colored scum that floats on the surface of aeration basins and secondary clarifiers. These viscous foams have been associated with the presence of filamentous mycolic acid-containing actinomycetes. To aid in evaluating the microbial representation in foam, we developed and characterized group-, genus-, and species-specific oligonucleotide probes targeting the small subunit rRNA of the Mycobacterium complex, Gordona spp., and Gordona (Nocardia) amarae, respectively. The use of a universal base analog, 5-nitroindole, in oligonucleotide probe design was evaluated by comparing the characteristics of two different versions of the Mycobacterium complex probe. The temperature of dissociation of each probe was determined. Probe specificity studies with a diverse collection of 67 target and nontarget rRNAs demonstrated the specificity of the probes to the target groups. Whole-cell hybridizations with fluorescein- and rhodamine-labeled probes were performed with pure cultures of various members of the Mycobacterium complex as well as with environmental samples from a full-scale activated sludge plant which experienced foaming. Quantitative membrane hybridizations with activated sludge and anaerobic digester foam showed that 15.0 to 18.3% of the total small-subunit rRNAs could be attributed to members of the Mycobacterium complex, of which a vast majority consisted of Gordona rRNA. Several G. amarae strains made up only a very small percentage of the Gordona strains present. We demonstrated that group-specific rRNA probes are useful tools for the in situ monitoring and identification of filamentous bacteria in activated sludge systems.

  14. Structural diversity of eukaryotic 18S rRNA and its impact on alignment and phylogenetic reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Xie, Qiang; Lin, Jinzhong; Qin, Yan; Zhou, Jianfu; Bu, Wenjun

    2011-02-01

    Ribosomal RNAs are important because they catalyze the synthesis of peptides and proteins. Comparative studies of the secondary structure of 18S rRNA have revealed the basic locations of its many length-conserved and length-variable regions. In recent years, many more sequences of 18S rDNA with unusual lengths have been documented in GenBank. These data make it possible to recognize the diversity of the secondary and tertiary structures of 18S rRNAs and to identify the length-conserved parts of 18S rDNAs. The longest 18S rDNA sequences of almost every known eukaryotic phylum were included in this study. We illustrated the bioinformatics-based structure to show that, the regions that are more length-variable, regions that are less length-variable, the splicing sites for introns, and the sites of A-minor interactions are mostly distributed in different parts of the 18S rRNA. Additionally, this study revealed that some length-variable regions or insertion positions could be quite close to the functional part of the 18S rRNA of Foraminifera organisms. The tertiary structure as well as the secondary structure of 18S rRNA can be more diverse than what was previously supposed. Besides revealing how this interesting gene evolves, it can help to remove ambiguity from the alignment of eukaryotic 18S rDNAs and to improve the performance of 18S rDNA in phylogenetic reconstruction. Six nucleotides shared by Archaea and Eukaryota but rarely by Bacteria are also reported here for the first time, which might further support the supposed origin of eukaryote from archaeans.

  15. MPV17L2 is required for ribosome assembly in mitochondria

    PubMed Central

    Dalla Rosa, Ilaria; Durigon, Romina; Pearce, Sarah F.; Rorbach, Joanna; Hirst, Elizabeth M.A.; Vidoni, Sara; Reyes, Aurelio; Brea-Calvo, Gloria; Minczuk, Michal; Woellhaf, Michael W.; Herrmann, Johannes M.; Huynen, Martijn A.; Holt, Ian J.; Spinazzola, Antonella

    2014-01-01

    MPV17 is a mitochondrial protein of unknown function, and mutations in MPV17 are associated with mitochondrial deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) maintenance disorders. Here we investigated its most similar relative, MPV17L2, which is also annotated as a mitochondrial protein. Mitochondrial fractionation analyses demonstrate MPV17L2 is an integral inner membrane protein, like MPV17. However, unlike MPV17, MPV17L2 is dependent on mitochondrial DNA, as it is absent from ρ0 cells, and co-sediments on sucrose gradients with the large subunit of the mitochondrial ribosome and the monosome. Gene silencing of MPV17L2 results in marked decreases in the monosome and both subunits of the mitochondrial ribosome, leading to impaired protein synthesis in the mitochondria. Depletion of MPV17L2 also induces mitochondrial DNA aggregation. The DNA and ribosome phenotypes are linked, as in the absence of MPV17L2 proteins of the small subunit of the mitochondrial ribosome are trapped in the enlarged nucleoids, in contrast to a component of the large subunit. These findings suggest MPV17L2 contributes to the biogenesis of the mitochondrial ribosome, uniting the two subunits to create the translationally competent monosome, and provide evidence that assembly of the small subunit of the mitochondrial ribosome occurs at the nucleoid. PMID:24948607

  16. Phylogenetic relationships of Cryptosporidium determined by ribosomal RNA sequence comparison.

    PubMed

    Johnson, A M; Fielke, R; Lumb, R; Baverstock, P R

    1990-04-01

    Reverse transcription of total cellular RNA was used to obtain a partial sequence of the small subunit ribosomal RNA of Cryptosporidium, a protist currently placed in the phylum Apicomplexa. The semi-conserved regions were aligned with homologous sequences in a range of other eukaryotes, and the evolutionary relationships of Cryptosporidium were determined by two different methods of phylogenetic analysis. The prokaryotes Escherichia coli and Halobacterium cuti were included as outgroups. The results do not show an especially close relationship of Cryptosporidium to other members of the phylum Apicomplexa.

  17. Expanding the Entamoeba Universe: New Hosts Yield Novel Ribosomal Lineages.

    PubMed

    Jacob, Alison S; Busby, Eloise J; Levy, Abigail D; Komm, Natasha; Clark, C Graham

    2016-01-01

    Removing the requirement for cell culture has led to a substantial increase in the number of lineages of Entamoeba recognized as distinct. Surveying the range of potential host species for this parasite genus has barely been started and it is clear that additional sampling of the same host in different locations often identifies additional diversity. In this study, using small subunit ribosomal RNA gene sequencing, we identify four new lineages of Entamoeba, including the first report of Entamoeba from an elephant, and extend the host range of some previously described lineages. In addition, examination of microbiome data from a number of host animals suggests that substantial Entamoeba diversity remains to be uncovered.

  18. Gene cloning of the 18S rRNA of an ancient viable moss from the permafrost of northeastern Siberia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marsic, Damien; Hoover, Richard B.; Gilichinsky, David A.; Ng, Joseph D.

    1999-12-01

    A moss plant dating as much as 40,000 years old was collected from the permafrost of the Kolyma Lowlands of Northeastern Siberia. The plant tissue was revived and cultured for the extraction of its genomic DNA. Using the polymerase chain reaction technique, the 18S ribosomal RNA gene was cloned and its sequence studied. Comparative sequence analysis of the cloned ribosomal DNA to other known 18S RNA showed very high sequence identity and was revealed to be closest to the moss specie, Aulacomnium turgidum. The results of this study also show the ability of biological organisms to rest dormant in deep frozen environments where they can be revived and cultured under favorable conditions. This is significant in the notion that celestial icy bodies can be media to preserve biological function and genetic material during long term storage or transport.

  19. Genetic evidence for 18S rRNA binding and an Rps19p assembly function of yeast nucleolar protein Nep1p.

    PubMed

    Buchhaupt, Markus; Meyer, Britta; Kötter, Peter; Entian, Karl-Dieter

    2006-09-01

    The nucleolar protein Nep1 and its human homologue were previously shown to be involved in the maturation of 18S rRNA and to interfere directly or indirectly with a methylation reaction. Here, we report that the loss-of-function mutation Deltasnr57 and multicopy expression of the ribosomal 40S subunit protein 19 (Rps19p) can partially suppress the Saccharomyces cerevisiae Deltanep1 growth defect. SnR57 mediates 2'-O-ribose-methylation of G(1570) in the 18S rRNA. By performing a three-hybrid screen, we isolated several short RNA sequences with strong binding affinity to Nep1p. All isolated RNAs shared a six-nucleotide consensus motif C/UUCAAC. Furthermore, one of the isolated RNAs exactly corresponded to nucleotides 1553-1577 of the 18S rRNA, which includes G(1570), the site of snR57-dependent 18S rRNA methylation. From protein-protein crosslink data and the cryo-EM map of the S. cerevisiae small ribosomal subunit, we suggest that Rps19p is localized in close vicinity to the Nep1p 18S rRNA binding site. Our results suggest that Nep1p binds adjacent to helix 47 of the 18S rRNA and possibly supports the association of Rps19p to pre-ribosomal particles.

  20. Comprehensive Analysis of Phosphorylated Proteins of E. coli Ribosomes

    PubMed Central

    Soung, George Y.; Miller, Jennifer L.; Koc, Hasan; Koc, Emine C.

    2009-01-01

    Phosphorylation of bacterial ribosomal proteins has been known for decades; however, there is still very limited information available on specific locations of the phosphorylation sites in ribosomal proteins and the role they might play in protein synthesis. In this study, we have mapped the specific phosphorylation sites in twenty-four E. coli ribosomal proteins by tandem mass spectrometry. Specific detection of phosphorylation was achieved by either phosphorylation specific visualization techniques, ProQ staining and antibodies for phospho-Ser, Thr, and Tyr, or by mass spectrometry equipped with a capability to detect addition and the loss of the phosphate moiety. Enrichment by immobilized metal affinity and/or strong cation exchange chromatography was used to improve the success of detection of the low abundance phosphopeptides. We found the small subunit (30S) proteins S3, S4, S5, S7, S11, S12, S13, S18, and S21 and the large subunit (50S) proteins L1, L2, L3, L5, L6, L7/L12, L13, L14, L16, L18, L19, L21, L22, L28, L31 to be phosphorylated at one or more residues. Potential roles for each specific site in ribosome function were deduced through careful evaluation of the given site of the phosphorylation in 3D-crystal structure models of ribosomes and the previous mutational studies of E. coli ribosomal proteins. PMID:19469554

  1. Comprehensive analysis of phosphorylated proteins of Escherichia coli ribosomes.

    PubMed

    Soung, George Y; Miller, Jennifer L; Koc, Hasan; Koc, Emine C

    2009-07-01

    Phosphorylation of bacterial ribosomal proteins has been known for decades; however, there is still very limited information available on specific locations of the phosphorylation sites in ribosomal proteins and the role they might play in protein synthesis. In this study, we have mapped the specific phosphorylation sites in 24 Escherichia coli ribosomal proteins by tandem mass spectrometry. Detection of phosphorylation was achieved by either phosphorylation specific visualization techniques, ProQ staining, and antibodies for phospho-Ser, Thr, and Tyr; or by mass spectrometry equipped with a capability to detect addition and loss of the phosphate moiety. Enrichment by immobilized metal affinity and/or strong cation exchange chromatography was used to improve the success of detection of the low abundance phosphopeptides. We found the small subunit (30S) proteins S3, S4, S5, S7, S11, S12, S13, S18, and S21 and the large subunit (50S) proteins L1, L2, L3, L5, L6, L7/L12, L13, L14, L16, L18, L19, L21, L22, L28, and L31 to be phosphorylated at one or more residues. Potential roles for each specific site in ribosome function were deduced through careful evaluation of the given phosphorylation sites in 3D-crystal structure models of ribosomes and the previous mutational studies of E. coli ribosomal proteins.

  2. Reduced ribosomes of the apicoplast and mitochondrion of Plasmodium spp. and predicted interactions with antibiotics.

    PubMed

    Gupta, Ankit; Shah, Priyanka; Haider, Afreen; Gupta, Kirti; Siddiqi, Mohammad Imran; Ralph, Stuart A; Habib, Saman

    2014-05-01

    Apicomplexan protists such as Plasmodium and Toxoplasma contain a mitochondrion and a relic plastid (apicoplast) that are sites of protein translation. Although there is emerging interest in the partitioning and function of translation factors that participate in apicoplast and mitochondrial peptide synthesis, the composition of organellar ribosomes remains to be elucidated. We carried out an analysis of the complement of core ribosomal protein subunits that are encoded by either the parasite organellar or nuclear genomes, accompanied by a survey of ribosome assembly factors for the apicoplast and mitochondrion. A cross-species comparison with other apicomplexan, algal and diatom species revealed compositional differences in apicomplexan organelle ribosomes and identified considerable reduction and divergence with ribosomes of bacteria or characterized organelle ribosomes from other organisms. We assembled structural models of sections of Plasmodium falciparum organellar ribosomes and predicted interactions with translation inhibitory antibiotics. Differences in predicted drug-ribosome interactions with some of the modelled structures suggested specificity of inhibition between the apicoplast and mitochondrion. Our results indicate that Plasmodium and Toxoplasma organellar ribosomes have a unique composition, resulting from the loss of several large and small subunit proteins accompanied by significant sequence and size divergences in parasite orthologues of ribosomal proteins.

  3. Reduced ribosomes of the apicoplast and mitochondrion of Plasmodium spp. and predicted interactions with antibiotics

    PubMed Central

    Gupta, Ankit; Shah, Priyanka; Haider, Afreen; Gupta, Kirti; Siddiqi, Mohammad Imran; Ralph, Stuart A.; Habib, Saman

    2014-01-01

    Apicomplexan protists such as Plasmodium and Toxoplasma contain a mitochondrion and a relic plastid (apicoplast) that are sites of protein translation. Although there is emerging interest in the partitioning and function of translation factors that participate in apicoplast and mitochondrial peptide synthesis, the composition of organellar ribosomes remains to be elucidated. We carried out an analysis of the complement of core ribosomal protein subunits that are encoded by either the parasite organellar or nuclear genomes, accompanied by a survey of ribosome assembly factors for the apicoplast and mitochondrion. A cross-species comparison with other apicomplexan, algal and diatom species revealed compositional differences in apicomplexan organelle ribosomes and identified considerable reduction and divergence with ribosomes of bacteria or characterized organelle ribosomes from other organisms. We assembled structural models of sections of Plasmodium falciparum organellar ribosomes and predicted interactions with translation inhibitory antibiotics. Differences in predicted drug–ribosome interactions with some of the modelled structures suggested specificity of inhibition between the apicoplast and mitochondrion. Our results indicate that Plasmodium and Toxoplasma organellar ribosomes have a unique composition, resulting from the loss of several large and small subunit proteins accompanied by significant sequence and size divergences in parasite orthologues of ribosomal proteins. PMID:24850912

  4. E2F1 promote the aggressiveness of human colorectal cancer by activating the ribonucleotide reductase small subunit M2

    SciTech Connect

    Fang, Zejun; Gong, Chaoju; Liu, Hong; Zhang, Xiaomin; Mei, Lingming; Song, Mintao; Qiu, Lanlan; Luo, Shuchai; Zhu, Zhihua; Zhang, Ronghui; Gu, Hongqian; Chen, Xiang

    2015-08-21

    As the ribonucleotide reductase small subunit, the high expression of ribonucleotide reductase small subunit M2 (RRM2) induces cancer and contributes to tumor growth and invasion. In several colorectal cancer (CRC) cell lines, we found that the expression levels of RRM2 were closely related to the transcription factor E2F1. Mechanistic studies were conducted to determine the molecular basis. Ectopic overexpression of E2F1 promoted RRM2 transactivation while knockdown of E2F1 reduced the levels of RRM2 mRNA and protein. To further investigate the roles of RRM2 which was activated by E2F1 in CRC, CCK-8 assay and EdU incorporation assay were performed. Overexpression of E2F1 promoted cell proliferation in CRC cells, which was blocked by RRM2 knockdown attenuation. In the migration and invasion tests, overexpression of E2F1 enhanced the migration and invasion of CRC cells which was abrogated by silencing RRM2. Besides, overexpression of RRM2 reversed the effects of E2F1 knockdown partially in CRC cells. Examination of clinical CRC specimens demonstrated that both RRM2 and E2F1 were elevated in most cancer tissues compared to the paired normal tissues. Further analysis showed that the protein expression levels of E2F1 and RRM2 were parallel with each other and positively correlated with lymph node metastasis (LNM), TNM stage and distant metastasis. Consistently, the patients with low E2F1 and RRM2 levels have a better prognosis than those with high levels. Therefore, we suggest that E2F1 can promote CRC proliferation, migration, invasion and metastasis by regulating RRM2 transactivation. Understanding the role of E2F1 in activating RRM2 transcription will help to explain the relationship between E2F1 and RRM2 in CRC and provide a novel predictive marker for diagnosis and prognosis of the disease. - Highlights: • E2F1 promotes RRM2 transactivation in CRC cells. • E2F1 promotes the proliferation of CRC cells by activating RRM2. • E2F1 promotes the migration and

  5. Sequence heterogeneity in the 18S rRNA gene within Theileria equi and Babesia caballi from horses in South Africa.

    PubMed

    Bhoora, Raksha; Franssen, Linda; Oosthuizen, Marinda C; Guthrie, Alan J; Zweygarth, Erich; Penzhorn, Barend L; Jongejan, Frans; Collins, Nicola E

    2009-02-05

    A molecular epidemiological survey of the protozoal parasites that cause equine piroplasmosis was conducted using samples collected from horses and zebra from different geographical locations in South Africa. A total of 488 samples were tested for the presence of Theileria equi and/or Babesia caballi using the reverse line blot hybridization assay. Ten percent of the samples hybridized to the Theileria/Babesia genus-specific probe and not to the B. caballi or T. equi species-specific probes, suggesting the presence of a novel species or genotype. The small subunit of rRNA gene (18S; approximately 1600bp) was amplified and sequenced from 33 of these 488 samples. Sequences were compared with published sequences from the public sequence databases. Twelve distinct T. equi and six B. caballi 18S rRNA sequences were identified. Alignments demonstrated extensive sequence variation in the V4 hypervariable region of the 18S rRNA gene within T. equi. Sequence variation was also found in B. caballi 18S rRNA genes, although there was less variation than observed for T. equi. Phylogenetic analysis based on 18S rRNA gene sequences revealed three T. equi clades and two B. caballi clades in South Africa. The extent of sequence heterogeneity detected within T. equi and B. caballi 18S rRNA genes was unexpected since concerted evolution is thought to maintain homogeneity within repeated gene families, including rRNA genes, in eukaryotes. The findings reported here show that careful examination of variants of the 18S rRNA gene of T. equi and B. caballi is required prior to the development of molecular diagnostic tests to detect these parasites in horses. Species-specific probes must be in designed in regions of the gene that are both conserved within and unique to each species.

  6. The ATPase hCINAP regulates 18S rRNA processing and is essential for embryogenesis and tumour growth

    PubMed Central

    Bai, Dongmei; Zhang, Jinfang; Li, Tingting; Hang, Runlai; Liu, Yong; Tian, Yonglu; Huang, Dadu; Qu, Linglong; Cao, Xiaofeng; Ji, Jiafu; Zheng, Xiaofeng

    2016-01-01

    Dysfunctions in ribosome biogenesis cause developmental defects and increased cancer susceptibility; however, the connection between ribosome assembly and tumorigenesis remains unestablished. Here we show that hCINAP (also named AK6) is required for human 18S rRNA processing and 40S subunit assembly. Homozygous CINAP−/− mice show embryonic lethality. The heterozygotes are viable and show defects in 18S rRNA processing, whereas no delayed cell growth is observed. However, during rapid growth, CINAP haploinsufficiency impairs protein synthesis. Consistently, hCINAP depletion in fast-growing cancer cells inhibits ribosome assembly and abolishes tumorigenesis. These data demonstrate that hCINAP reduction is a specific rate-limiting controller during rapid growth. Notably, hCINAP is highly expressed in cancers and correlated with a worse prognosis. Genome-wide polysome profiling shows that hCINAP selectively modulates cancer-associated translatome to promote malignancy. Our results connect the role of hCINAP in ribosome assembly with tumorigenesis. Modulation of hCINAP expression may be a promising target for cancer therapy. PMID:27477389

  7. Trm112 is required for Bud23-mediated methylation of the 18S rRNA at position G1575.

    PubMed

    Figaro, Sabine; Wacheul, Ludivine; Schillewaert, Stéphanie; Graille, Marc; Huvelle, Emmeline; Mongeard, Rémi; Zorbas, Christiane; Lafontaine, Denis L J; Heurgué-Hamard, Valérie

    2012-06-01

    Posttranscriptional and posttranslational modification of macromolecules is known to fine-tune their functions. Trm112 is unique, acting as an activator of both tRNA and protein methyltransferases. Here we report that in Saccharomyces cerevisiae, Trm112 is required for efficient ribosome synthesis and progression through mitosis. Trm112 copurifies with pre-rRNAs and with multiple ribosome synthesis trans-acting factors, including the 18S rRNA methyltransferase Bud23. Consistent with the known mechanisms of activation of methyltransferases by Trm112, we found that Trm112 interacts directly with Bud23 in vitro and that it is required for its stability in vivo. Consequently, trm112Δ cells are deficient for Bud23-mediated 18S rRNA methylation at position G1575 and for small ribosome subunit formation. Bud23 failure to bind nascent preribosomes activates a nucleolar surveillance pathway involving the TRAMP complexes, leading to preribosome degradation. Trm112 is thus active in rRNA, tRNA, and translation factor modification, ideally placing it at the interface between ribosome synthesis and function.

  8. Trm112 Is Required for Bud23-Mediated Methylation of the 18S rRNA at Position G1575

    PubMed Central

    Figaro, Sabine; Wacheul, Ludivine; Schillewaert, Stéphanie; Graille, Marc; Huvelle, Emmeline; Mongeard, Rémi; Zorbas, Christiane

    2012-01-01

    Posttranscriptional and posttranslational modification of macromolecules is known to fine-tune their functions. Trm112 is unique, acting as an activator of both tRNA and protein methyltransferases. Here we report that in Saccharomyces cerevisiae, Trm112 is required for efficient ribosome synthesis and progression through mitosis. Trm112 copurifies with pre-rRNAs and with multiple ribosome synthesis trans-acting factors, including the 18S rRNA methyltransferase Bud23. Consistent with the known mechanisms of activation of methyltransferases by Trm112, we found that Trm112 interacts directly with Bud23 in vitro and that it is required for its stability in vivo. Consequently, trm112Δ cells are deficient for Bud23-mediated 18S rRNA methylation at position G1575 and for small ribosome subunit formation. Bud23 failure to bind nascent preribosomes activates a nucleolar surveillance pathway involving the TRAMP complexes, leading to preribosome degradation. Trm112 is thus active in rRNA, tRNA, and translation factor modification, ideally placing it at the interface between ribosome synthesis and function. PMID:22493060

  9. Spurious Amplification of a Plasmodium vivax Small-Subunit RNA Gene by Use of Primers Currently Used To Detect P. knowlesi▿

    PubMed Central

    Imwong, Mallika; Tanomsing, Naowarat; Pukrittayakamee, Sasithon; Day, Nicholas P. J.; White, Nicholas J.; Snounou, Georges

    2009-01-01

    The PCR primers commonly used to detect Plasmodium knowlesi infections in humans were found to cross-react stochastically with P. vivax genomic DNA. A nested primer set that targets one of the P. knowlesi small-subunit rRNA genes was validated for specificity and for sensitivity of detection of <10 parasite genomes. PMID:19812279

  10. Differential accumulation of ribonucleotide reductase subunits in clam oocytes: the large subunit is stored as a polypeptide, the small subunit as untranslated mRNA

    PubMed Central

    1986-01-01

    Within minutes of fertilization of clam oocytes, translation of a set of maternal mRNAs is activated. One of the most abundant of these stored mRNAs encodes the small subunit of ribonucleotide reductase (Standart, N. M., S. J. Bray, E. L. George, T. Hunt, and J. V. Ruderman, 1985, J. Cell Biol., 100:1968-1976). Unfertilized oocytes do not contain any ribonucleotide reductase activity; such activity begins to appear shortly after fertilization. In virtually all organisms, this enzyme is composed of two dissimilar subunits with molecular masses of approximately 44 and 88 kD, both of which are required for activity. This paper reports the identification of the large subunit of clam ribonucleotide reductase isolated by dATP-Sepharose chromatography as a relatively abundant 86-kD polypeptide which is already present in oocytes, and whose level remains constant during early development. The enzyme activity of this large subunit was established in reconstitution assays using the small subunit isolated from embryos by virtue of its binding to the anti-tubulin antibody YL 1/2. Thus the two components of clam ribonucleotide reductase are differentially stored in the oocyte: the small subunit in the form of untranslated mRNA and the large subunit as protein. When fertilization triggers the activation of translation of the maternal mRNA, the newly synthesized small subunit combines with the preformed large subunit to generate active ribonucleotide reductase. PMID:3536960

  11. Crystal structure of the Pyrococcus horikoshii isopropylmalate isomerase small subunit provides insight into the dual substrate specificity of the enzyme.

    PubMed

    Yasutake, Yoshiaki; Yao, Min; Sakai, Naoki; Kirita, Tomomi; Tanaka, Isao

    2004-11-19

    Recent studies have implied that the isopropylmalate isomerase small subunit of the hyperthermophilic archaea Pyrococcus horikoshii (PhIPMI-s) functions as isopropylmalate isomerase in the leucine biosynthesis pathway, and as homoaconitase (HACN) in the lysine biosynthesis pathway via alpha-aminoadipic acid. PhIPMI is thus considered a key to understanding the fundamental metabolism of the earliest organisms. We describe for the first time the crystal structure of PhIPMI-s, which displays dual substrate specificity. The crystal structure unexpectedly shows that four molecules create an interlocked assembly with intermolecular disulfide linkages having a skewed 222 point-group symmetry. Although the overall fold of the PhIPMI-s monomer is related closely to domain 4 of the aconitase (ACN), one alpha-helix in the ACN structure is replaced by a short loop with relatively high temperature factor values. Because this region is essential for discriminating the structurally similar substrate based on interactions with its diversified gamma-moiety, the loop structure in the PhIPMI-s must be dependent on the presence of a substrate. The flexibility of the loop region might be a structural basis for recognizing both hydrophobic and hydrophilic gamma-moieties of two distinct substrates, isopropylmalate and homocitrate.

  12. A molecular phylogeny of the marine red algae (Rhodophyta) based on the nuclear small-subunit rRNA gene.

    PubMed Central

    Ragan, M A; Bird, C J; Rice, E L; Gutell, R R; Murphy, C A; Singh, R K

    1994-01-01

    A phylogeny of marine Rhodophyta has been inferred by a number of methods from nucleotide sequences of nuclear genes encoding small subunit rRNA from 39 species in 15 orders. Sequence divergences are relatively large, especially among bangiophytes and even among congeners in this group. Subclass Bangiophycidae appears polyphyletic, encompassing at least three lineages, with Porphyridiales distributed between two of these. Subclass Florideophycidae is monophyletic, with Hildenbrandiales, Corallinales, Ahnfeltiales, and a close association of Nemaliales, Acrochaetiales, and Palmariales forming the four deepest branches. Cermiales may represent a convergence of vegetative and reproductive morphologies, as family Ceramiaceae is at best weakly related to the rest of the order, and one of its members appears to be allied to Gelidiales. Except for Gigartinales, for which more data are required, the other florideophyte orders appear distinct and taxonomically justified. A good correlation was observed with taxonomy based on pit-plug ultrastructure. Tests under maximum-likelihood and parsimony of alternative phylogenies based on structure and chemistry refuted suggestions that Acrochaetiales is the most primitive florideophyte order and that Gelidiales and Hildenbrandiales are sister groups. PMID:8041780

  13. Establishment of a continuous culture system for Entamoeba muris and analysis of the small subunit rRNA gene.

    PubMed

    Kobayashi, S; Suzuki, J; Takeuchi, T

    2009-06-01

    We established a culture system for Entamoeba muris (MG-EM-01 strain isolated from a Mongolian gerbil) using a modified Balamuth's egg yolk infusion medium supplemented with 4% adult bovine serum and Bacteroides fragilis cocultured with Escherichia coli. Further, encystation was observed in the culture medium. The morphological characteristics of E. muris are similar to those of Entamoeba coli (E. coli); moreover, the malic isoenzyme electrophoretic band, which shows species-specific electrophoretic mobility, of E. muris had almost the same mobility as that observed with the malic isoenzyme electrophorectic band of E. coli (UZG-EC-01 strain isolated from a gorilla). We determined the small subunit rRNA (SSU-rRNA) gene sequence of the MG-EM-01 strain, and this sequence was observed to show 82.7% homology with that of the UZG-EC-01 strain. Further, the resultant phylogenetic tree for molecular taxonomy based on the SSU-rRNA genes of the 21 strains of the intestinal parasitic amoeba species indicated that the MG-EM-01 strain was most closely related to E. coli.

  14. Sequence of a genomic DNA clone for the small subunit of ribulose bis-phosphate carboxylase-oxygenase from tobacco.

    PubMed Central

    Mazur, B J; Chui, C F

    1985-01-01

    We have cloned and sequenced a gene for the small subunit (SS) of ribulose bis-phosphate carboxylase-oxygenase from Nicotiana tabacum. The tobacco gene is most closely related to the SS genes from the dicots soybean and pea, and less so to the monocots wheat and Lemna; the deduced amino acid sequence of the mature protein is in all cases more closely conserved than is its chloroplast transit sequence. Unlike the genomic sequences of the two monocots, which have one intron, and the two other dicots, which have two introns, the tobacco gene has three introns. The third tobacco intron lies within a highly conserved region of the protein. Its position coincides with the boundary of a 12 amino acid insertion in the SS genes of higher plants, relative to those of blue green algae. The 5' flanking end of the gene carries 67 bp inverted repeats, which flank a series of eight direct repeats; the direct repeats themselves each carry inverted repeats. The 3' untranslated end of this gene differs by only 2 bp from that of an N. sylvestris SS gene. PMID:4000958

  15. Phylogenetic relationships between Vorticella convallaria and other species inferred from small subunit rRNA gene sequences.

    PubMed

    Itabashi, Takeshi; Mikami, Kazuyuki; Fang, Jie; Asai, Hiroshi

    2002-08-01

    Vorticellid ciliates generally dwell in freshwater. In nature, the species have up until now been identified by comparison with previous descriptions. It is difficult to identify between species of the genus Vorticella, because the morphological markers of vorticellid ciliates described in reports are limited and variable. Unfortunately, culturing them has only succeeded with certain species such as Vorticella convallaria, but many others have been impossible to culture. To find out whether the sequence of a small subunit rRNA gene was an appropriate marker to identify vorticellid ciliates, the gene was aligned and compared. Finding a new convenient method will contribute to research on vorticellid ciliates. In strains of V. convallaria, classified morphologically, some varieties of the SSrRNA gene sequences were recognized, but there were large variations within the same species. According to the phylogenetic tree, these strains are closely related. However, the difference was not as big as between Vorticella and Carchesium. In addition, Carchesium constructed a distinct clade from the genus Vorticella and Epistylis. These results show the possibility that the SSrRNA gene is one of the important markers to identify species of Vorticella. This study is first to approach and clarify the complicated taxa in the genus Vorticella.

  16. Quantitative Analysis of Small-Subunit rRNA Genes in Mixed Microbial Populations via 5′-Nuclease Assays

    PubMed Central

    Suzuki, Marcelino T.; Taylor, Lance T.; DeLong, Edward F.

    2000-01-01

    Few techniques are currently available for quantifying specific prokaryotic taxa in environmental samples. Quantification of specific genotypes has relied mainly on oligonucleotide hybridization to extracted rRNA or intact rRNA in whole cells. However, low abundance and cellular rRNA content limit the application of these techniques in aquatic environments. In this study, we applied a newly developed quantitative PCR assay (5′-nuclease assay, also known as TaqMan) to quantify specific small-subunit (SSU) rRNA genes (rDNAs) from uncultivated planktonic prokaryotes in Monterey Bay. Primer and probe combinations for quantification of SSU rDNAs at the domain and group levels were developed and tested for specificity and quantitative reliability. We examined the spatial and temporal variations of SSU rDNAs from Synechococcus plus Prochlorococcus and marine Archaea and compared the results of the quantitative PCR assays to those obtained by alternative methods. The 5′-nuclease assays reliably quantified rDNAs over at least 4 orders of magnitude and accurately measured the proportions of genes in artificial mixtures. The spatial and temporal distributions of planktonic microbial groups measured by the 5′-nuclease assays were similar to the distributions estimated by quantitative oligonucleotide probe hybridization, whole-cell hybridization assays, and flow cytometry. PMID:11055900

  17. The rubisco small subunit is involved in tobamovirus movement and Tm-2²-mediated extreme resistance.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Jinping; Liu, Qi; Zhang, Haili; Jia, Qi; Hong, Yiguo; Liu, Yule

    2013-01-01

    The multifunctional movement protein (MP) of Tomato mosaic tobamovirus (ToMV) is involved in viral cell-to-cell movement, symptom development, and resistance gene recognition. However, it remains to be elucidated how ToMV MP plays such diverse roles in plants. Here, we show that ToMV MP interacts with the Rubisco small subunit (RbCS) of Nicotiana benthamiana in vitro and in vivo. In susceptible N. benthamiana plants, silencing of NbRbCS enabled ToMV to induce necrosis in inoculated leaves, thus enhancing virus local infectivity. However, the development of systemic viral symptoms was delayed. In transgenic N. benthamiana plants harboring Tobacco mosaic virus resistance-2² (Tm-2²), which mediates extreme resistance to ToMV, silencing of NbRbCS compromised Tm-2²-dependent resistance. ToMV was able to establish efficient local infection but was not able to move systemically. These findings suggest that NbRbCS plays a vital role in tobamovirus movement and plant antiviral defenses.

  18. Rfc5, a small subunit of replication factor C complex, couples DNA replication and mitosis in budding yeast.

    PubMed Central

    Sugimoto, K; Shimomura, T; Hashimoto, K; Araki, H; Sugino, A; Matsumoto, K

    1996-01-01

    The inhibition of DNA synthesis prevents mitotic entry through the action of the S phase checkpoint. In the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae, an essential protein kinase, Spk1/Mec2/Rad53/Sad1, controls the coupling of S phase to mitosis. In an attempt to identify genes that genetically interact with Spk1, we have isolated a temperature-sensitive mutation, rfc5-1, that can be suppressed by overexpression of SPK1. The RFC5 gene encodes a small subunit of replication factor C complex. At the restrictive temperature, rfc5-1 mutant cells entered mitosis with unevenly separated or fragmented chromosomes, resulting in loss of viability. Thus, the rfc5 mutation defective for DNA replication is also impaired in the S phase checkpoint. Overexpression of POL30, which encodes the proliferating cell nuclear antigen, suppressed the replication defect of the rfc5 mutant but not its checkpoint defect. Taken together, these results suggested that replication factor C has a direct role in sensing the state of DNA replication and transmitting the signal to the checkpoint machinery. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 Fig. 3 Fig. 4 Fig. 5 PMID:8692942

  19. Ribonucleotide reductase small subunit p53R2 facilitates p21 induction of G1 arrest under UV irradiation.

    PubMed

    Xue, Lijun; Zhou, Bingsen; Liu, Xiyong; Heung, Yvonne; Chau, Jennifer; Chu, Emilie; Li, Shan; Jiang, Chunglin; Un, Frank; Yen, Yun

    2007-01-01

    p53R2, which is one of the two known ribonucleotide reductase small subunits (the other being M2), is suggested to play an important role in supplying deoxynucleotide triphosphates (dNTP) for DNA repair during the G(1) or G(2) phase of the cell cycle. The ability of p53R2 to supply dNTPs for repairing DNA damages requires the presence of a functional p53 tumor suppressor. Here, we report in vivo physical interaction and colocalization of p53R2 and p21 before DNA damage. Mammalian two-hybrid assay further indicates that the amino acids 1 to 113 of p53R2 are critical for interacting with the NH(2)-terminal region (amino acids 1-93) of p21. The binding between p21 and p53R2 decreases inside the nucleus in response to UV, the time point of which corresponds to the increased binding of p21 with cyclin-dependent kinase-2 (Cdk2), and the decreased Cdk2 activity in the nucleus at G(1). Interestingly, p53R2 dissociates from p21 but facilitates the accumulation of p21 in the nucleus in response to UV. On the other hand, the ribonucleotide reductase activity increases at the corresponding time in response to UV. These data suggest a new function of p53R2 of cooperating with p21 during DNA repair at G(1) arrest.

  20. Functional hybrid rubisco enzymes with plant small subunits and algal large subunits: engineered rbcS cDNA for expression in chlamydomonas.

    PubMed

    Genkov, Todor; Meyer, Moritz; Griffiths, Howard; Spreitzer, Robert J

    2010-06-25

    There has been much interest in the chloroplast-encoded large subunit of ribulose-1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase (Rubisco) as a target for engineering an increase in net CO(2) fixation in photosynthesis. Improvements in the enzyme would lead to an increase in the production of food, fiber, and renewable energy. Although the large subunit contains the active site, a family of rbcS nuclear genes encodes the Rubisco small subunits, which can also influence the carboxylation catalytic efficiency and CO(2)/O(2) specificity of the enzyme. To further define the role of the small subunit in Rubisco function, small subunits from spinach, Arabidopsis, and sunflower were assembled with algal large subunits by transformation of a Chlamydomonas reinhardtii mutant that lacks the rbcS gene family. Foreign rbcS cDNAs were successfully expressed in Chlamydomonas by fusing them to a Chlamydomonas rbcS transit peptide sequence engineered to contain rbcS introns. Although plant Rubisco generally has greater CO(2)/O(2) specificity but a lower carboxylation V(max) than Chlamydomonas Rubisco, the hybrid enzymes have 3-11% increases in CO(2)/O(2) specificity and retain near normal V(max) values. Thus, small subunits may make a significant contribution to the overall catalytic performance of Rubisco. Despite having normal amounts of catalytically proficient Rubisco, the hybrid mutant strains display reduced levels of photosynthetic growth and lack chloroplast pyrenoids. It appears that small subunits contain the structural elements responsible for targeting Rubisco to the algal pyrenoid, which is the site where CO(2) is concentrated for optimal photosynthesis.

  1. Structure of a human pre-40S particle points to a role for RACK1 in the final steps of 18S rRNA processing

    PubMed Central

    Larburu, Natacha; Montellese, Christian; O'Donohue, Marie-Françoise; Kutay, Ulrike; Gleizes, Pierre-Emmanuel; Plisson-Chastang, Célia

    2016-01-01

    Synthesis of ribosomal subunits in eukaryotes is a complex and tightly regulated process that has been mostly characterized in yeast. The discovery of a growing number of diseases linked to defects in ribosome biogenesis calls for a deeper understanding of these mechanisms and of the specificities of human ribosome maturation. We present the 19 Å resolution cryo-EM reconstruction of a cytoplasmic precursor to the human small ribosomal subunit, purified by using the tagged ribosome biogenesis factor LTV1 as bait. Compared to yeast pre-40S particles, this first three-dimensional structure of a human 40S subunit precursor shows noticeable differences with respect to the position of ribosome biogenesis factors and uncovers the early deposition of the ribosomal protein RACK1 during subunit maturation. Consistently, RACK1 is required for efficient processing of the 18S rRNA 3′-end, which might be related to its role in translation initiation. This first structural analysis of a human pre-ribosomal particle sets the grounds for high-resolution studies of conformational transitions accompanying ribosomal subunit maturation. PMID:27530427

  2. Structure of a human pre-40S particle points to a role for RACK1 in the final steps of 18S rRNA processing.

    PubMed

    Larburu, Natacha; Montellese, Christian; O'Donohue, Marie-Françoise; Kutay, Ulrike; Gleizes, Pierre-Emmanuel; Plisson-Chastang, Célia

    2016-09-30

    Synthesis of ribosomal subunits in eukaryotes is a complex and tightly regulated process that has been mostly characterized in yeast. The discovery of a growing number of diseases linked to defects in ribosome biogenesis calls for a deeper understanding of these mechanisms and of the specificities of human ribosome maturation. We present the 19 Å resolution cryo-EM reconstruction of a cytoplasmic precursor to the human small ribosomal subunit, purified by using the tagged ribosome biogenesis factor LTV1 as bait. Compared to yeast pre-40S particles, this first three-dimensional structure of a human 40S subunit precursor shows noticeable differences with respect to the position of ribosome biogenesis factors and uncovers the early deposition of the ribosomal protein RACK1 during subunit maturation. Consistently, RACK1 is required for efficient processing of the 18S rRNA 3'-end, which might be related to its role in translation initiation. This first structural analysis of a human pre-ribosomal particle sets the grounds for high-resolution studies of conformational transitions accompanying ribosomal subunit maturation. © The Author(s) 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Nucleic Acids Research.

  3. Gradual processing of the ITS1 from the nucleolus to the cytoplasm during synthesis of the human 18S rRNA.

    PubMed

    Preti, Milena; O'Donohue, Marie-Françoise; Montel-Lehry, Nathalie; Bortolin-Cavaillé, Marie-Line; Choesmel, Valérie; Gleizes, Pierre-Emmanuel

    2013-04-01

    Defects in ribosome biogenesis trigger stress response pathways, which perturb cell proliferation and differentiation in several genetic diseases. In Diamond-Blackfan anemia (DBA), a congenital erythroblastopenia, mutations in ribosomal protein genes often interfere with the processing of the internal transcribed spacer 1 (ITS1), the mechanism of which remains elusive in human cells. Using loss-of-function experiments and extensive RNA analysis, we have defined the precise position of the endonucleolytic cleavage E in the ITS1, which generates the 18S-E intermediate, the last precursor to the 18S rRNA. Unexpectedly, this cleavage is followed by 3'-5' exonucleolytic trimming of the 18S-E precursor during nuclear export of the pre-40S particle, which sets a new mechanism for 18S rRNA formation clearly different from that established in yeast. In addition, cleavage at site E is also followed by 5'-3' exonucleolytic trimming of the ITS1 by exonuclease XRN2. Perturbation of this step on knockdown of the large subunit ribosomal protein RPL26, which was recently associated to DBA, reveals the putative role of a highly conserved cis-acting sequence in ITS1 processing. These data cast new light on the original mechanism of ITS1 elimination in human cells and provide a mechanistic framework to further study the interplay of DBA-linked ribosomal proteins in this process.

  4. Gradual processing of the ITS1 from the nucleolus to the cytoplasm during synthesis of the human 18S rRNA

    PubMed Central

    Preti, Milena; O'Donohue, Marie-Françoise; Montel-Lehry, Nathalie; Bortolin-Cavaillé, Marie-Line; Choesmel, Valérie; Gleizes, Pierre-Emmanuel

    2013-01-01

    Defects in ribosome biogenesis trigger stress response pathways, which perturb cell proliferation and differentiation in several genetic diseases. In Diamond–Blackfan anemia (DBA), a congenital erythroblastopenia, mutations in ribosomal protein genes often interfere with the processing of the internal transcribed spacer 1 (ITS1), the mechanism of which remains elusive in human cells. Using loss-of-function experiments and extensive RNA analysis, we have defined the precise position of the endonucleolytic cleavage E in the ITS1, which generates the 18S-E intermediate, the last precursor to the 18S rRNA. Unexpectedly, this cleavage is followed by 3′–5′ exonucleolytic trimming of the 18S-E precursor during nuclear export of the pre-40S particle, which sets a new mechanism for 18S rRNA formation clearly different from that established in yeast. In addition, cleavage at site E is also followed by 5′–3′ exonucleolytic trimming of the ITS1 by exonuclease XRN2. Perturbation of this step on knockdown of the large subunit ribosomal protein RPL26, which was recently associated to DBA, reveals the putative role of a highly conserved cis-acting sequence in ITS1 processing. These data cast new light on the original mechanism of ITS1 elimination in human cells and provide a mechanistic framework to further study the interplay of DBA-linked ribosomal proteins in this process. PMID:23482395

  5. Choreography of molecular movements during ribosome progression along mRNA.

    PubMed

    Belardinelli, Riccardo; Sharma, Heena; Caliskan, Neva; Cunha, Carlos E; Peske, Frank; Wintermeyer, Wolfgang; Rodnina, Marina V

    2016-04-01

    During translation elongation, ribosome translocation along an mRNA entails rotations of the ribosomal subunits, swiveling motions of the small subunit (SSU) head and stepwise movements of the tRNAs together with the mRNA. Here, we reconstructed the choreography of the collective motions of the Escherichia coli ribosome during translocation promoted by elongation factor EF-G, by recording the fluorescence signatures of nine different reporters placed on both ribosomal subunits, tRNA and mRNA. We captured an early forward swiveling of the SSU head taking place while the SSU body rotates in the opposite, clockwise direction. Backward swiveling of the SSU head starts upon tRNA translocation and continues until the post-translocation state is reached. This work places structures of translocation intermediates along a time axis and unravels principles of the motions of macromolecular machines.

  6. Histone deacetylase 6 associates with ribosomes and regulates de novo protein translation during arsenite stress.

    PubMed

    Kappeler, Kyle V; Zhang, Jack; Dinh, Thai Nho; Strom, Joshua G; Chen, Qin M

    2012-05-01

    Histone deacetylase 6 (HDAC6) is known as a cytoplasmic enzyme that regulates cell migration, cell adhesion, and degradation of misfolded proteins by deacetylating substrates such as α-tubulin and Hsp90. When HaCaT keratinocytes were exposed to 1-200μM sodium arsenite, we observed perinuclear localization of HDAC6 within 30 min. Although the overall level of HDAC6 protein did not change, sodium arsenite caused an increase of HDAC6 in ribosomal fractions. Separation of ribosomal subunits versus intact ribosomes or polysomes indicated that HDAC6 was mainly detected in 40/43S fractions containing the small ribosomal subunit in untreated cells but was associated with 40/43S and 60/80S ribosomal fractions in arsenite-treated cells. Immunocytochemistry studies revealed that arsenite caused colocalization of HDAC6 with the ribosomal large and small subunit protein L36a and S6. Both L36a and S6 were detected in the immunocomplex of HDAC6 isolated from arsenite-treated cells. The observed physical interaction of HDAC6 with ribosomes pointed to a role of HDAC6 in stress-induced protein translation. Among arsenite stress-induced proteins, de novo Nrf2 protein translation was inhibited by Tubastatin A. These data demonstrate that HDAC6 was recruited to ribosomes, physically interacted with ribosomal proteins, and regulated de novo protein translation in keratinocytes responding to arsenite stress.

  7. Analysis of rRNA processing and translation in mammalian cells using a synthetic 18S rRNA expression system.

    PubMed

    Burman, Luke G; Mauro, Vincent P

    2012-09-01

    Analysis of processing, assembly, and function of higher eukaryotic ribosomal RNA (rRNA) has been hindered by the lack of an expression system that enables rRNA to be modified and then examined functionally. Given the potential usefulness of such a system, we have developed one for mammalian 18S rRNA. We inserted a sequence tag into expansion segment 3 of mouse 18S rRNA to monitor expression and cleavage by hybridization. Mutations were identified that confer resistance to pactamycin, allowing functional analysis of 40S ribosomal subunits containing synthetic 18S rRNAs by selectively blocking translation from endogenous (pactamycin-sensitive) subunits. rRNA constructs were suitably expressed in transfected cells, shown to process correctly, incorporate into ≈ 15% of 40S subunits, and function normally based on various criteria. After rigorous analysis, the system was used to investigate the importance of sequences that flank 18S rRNA in precursor transcripts. Although deletion analysis supported the requirement of binding sites for the U3 snoRNA, it showed that a large segment of the 5' external transcribed spacer and the entire first internal transcribed spacer, both of which flank 18S rRNA, are not required. The success of this approach opens the possibility of functional analyses of ribosomes, with applications in basic research and synthetic biology.

  8. Analysis of rRNA processing and translation in mammalian cells using a synthetic 18S rRNA expression system

    PubMed Central

    Burman, Luke G.; Mauro, Vincent P.

    2012-01-01

    Analysis of processing, assembly, and function of higher eukaryotic ribosomal RNA (rRNA) has been hindered by the lack of an expression system that enables rRNA to be modified and then examined functionally. Given the potential usefulness of such a system, we have developed one for mammalian 18S rRNA. We inserted a sequence tag into expansion segment 3 of mouse 18S rRNA to monitor expression and cleavage by hybridization. Mutations were identified that confer resistance to pactamycin, allowing functional analysis of 40S ribosomal subunits containing synthetic 18S rRNAs by selectively blocking translation from endogenous (pactamycin-sensitive) subunits. rRNA constructs were suitably expressed in transfected cells, shown to process correctly, incorporate into ≈15% of 40S subunits, and function normally based on various criteria. After rigorous analysis, the system was used to investigate the importance of sequences that flank 18S rRNA in precursor transcripts. Although deletion analysis supported the requirement of binding sites for the U3 snoRNA, it showed that a large segment of the 5′ external transcribed spacer and the entire first internal transcribed spacer, both of which flank 18S rRNA, are not required. The success of this approach opens the possibility of functional analyses of ribosomes, with applications in basic research and synthetic biology. PMID:22718970

  9. Molecular microbial diversity of an anaerobic digestor as determined by small-subunit rDNA sequence analysis.

    PubMed Central

    Godon, J J; Zumstein, E; Dabert, P; Habouzit, F; Moletta, R

    1997-01-01

    The bacterial community structure of a fluidized-bed reactor fed by vinasses (wine distillation waste) was analyzed. After PCR amplification, four small-subunit (SSU) rDNA clone libraries of Bacteria, Archaea, Procarya, and Eucarya populations were established. The community structure was determined by operational taxonomic unit (OTU) phylogenetic analyses of 579 partial rDNA sequences (about 500 bp long). A total of 146 OTUs were found, comprising 133, 6, and 7 from the Bacteria, Archaea, and Eucarya domains, respectively. A total of 117 bacterial OTU were affiliated with major phyla: low-G+C gram-positive bacteria, Cytophaga-Flexibacter-Bacteroides, Proteobacteria, high-G+C gram-positive bacteria, and Spirochaetes, where the clone distribution was 34, 26, 17, 6, and 4%, respectively. The other 16 bacterial OTUs represent 13% of the clones. They were either affiliated with narrow phyla such as Planctomyces-Chlamydia, green nonsulfur bacteria, or Synergistes, or deeply branched on the phylogenetic tree. A large number of bacterial OTUs are not closely related to any other hitherto determined sequences. The most frequent bacterial OTUs represents less than 5% of the total bacterial SSU rDNA sequences. However, the 20 more frequent bacterial OTUs describe at least 50% of these sequences. Three of the six Archaea OTUs correspond to 95% of the Archaea population and are very similar to already known methanogenic species: Methanosarcina barkeri, Methanosarcina frisius, and Methanobacterium formicicum. In contrast, the three other Archaea OTUs are unusual and are related to thermophilic microorganisms such as Crenarchaea or Thermoplasma spp. Five percent of the sequences analyzed were chimeras and were removed from the analysis. PMID:9212428

  10. Regulation of Plasmodium yoelii Oocyst Development by Strain- and Stage-Specific Small-Subunit rRNA

    PubMed Central

    Qi, Yanwei; Zhu, Feng; Eastman, Richard T.; Fu, Young; Zilversmit, Martine; Pattaradilokrat, Sittiporn; Hong, Lingxian; Liu, Shengfa; McCutchan, Thomas F.; Pan, Weiqing; Xu, Wenyue

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT One unique feature of malaria parasites is the differential transcription of structurally distinct rRNA (rRNA) genes at different developmental stages: the A-type genes are transcribed mainly in asexual stages, whereas the S-type genes are expressed mostly in sexual or mosquito stages. Conclusive functional evidence of different rRNAs in regulating stage-specific parasite development, however, is still absent. Here we performed genetic crosses of Plasmodium yoelii parasites with one parent having an oocyst development defect (ODD) phenotype and another producing normal oocysts to identify the gene(s) contributing to the ODD. The parent with ODD—characterized as having small oocysts and lacking infective sporozoites—was obtained after introduction of a plasmid with a green fluorescent protein gene into the parasite genome and subsequent passages in mice. Quantitative trait locus analysis of genome-wide microsatellite genotypes of 48 progeny from the crosses linked an ~200-kb segment on chromosome 6 containing one of the S-type genes (D-type small subunit rRNA gene [D-ssu]) to the ODD. Fine mapping of the plasmid integration site, gene expression pattern, and gene knockout experiments demonstrated that disruption of the D-ssu gene caused the ODD phenotype. Interestingly, introduction of the D-ssu gene into the same parasite strain (self), but not into a different subspecies, significantly affected or completely ablated oocyst development, suggesting a stage- and subspecies (strain)-specific regulation of oocyst development by D-ssu. This study demonstrates that P. yoelii D-ssu is essential for normal oocyst and sporozoite development and that variation in the D-ssu sequence can have dramatic effects on parasite development. PMID:25759501

  11. Molecular microbial diversity of an anaerobic digestor as determined by small-subunit rDNA sequence analysis.

    PubMed

    Godon, J J; Zumstein, E; Dabert, P; Habouzit, F; Moletta, R

    1997-07-01

    The bacterial community structure of a fluidized-bed reactor fed by vinasses (wine distillation waste) was analyzed. After PCR amplification, four small-subunit (SSU) rDNA clone libraries of Bacteria, Archaea, Procarya, and Eucarya populations were established. The community structure was determined by operational taxonomic unit (OTU) phylogenetic analyses of 579 partial rDNA sequences (about 500 bp long). A total of 146 OTUs were found, comprising 133, 6, and 7 from the Bacteria, Archaea, and Eucarya domains, respectively. A total of 117 bacterial OTU were affiliated with major phyla: low-G+C gram-positive bacteria, Cytophaga-Flexibacter-Bacteroides, Proteobacteria, high-G+C gram-positive bacteria, and Spirochaetes, where the clone distribution was 34, 26, 17, 6, and 4%, respectively. The other 16 bacterial OTUs represent 13% of the clones. They were either affiliated with narrow phyla such as Planctomyces-Chlamydia, green nonsulfur bacteria, or Synergistes, or deeply branched on the phylogenetic tree. A large number of bacterial OTUs are not closely related to any other hitherto determined sequences. The most frequent bacterial OTUs represents less than 5% of the total bacterial SSU rDNA sequences. However, the 20 more frequent bacterial OTUs describe at least 50% of these sequences. Three of the six Archaea OTUs correspond to 95% of the Archaea population and are very similar to already known methanogenic species: Methanosarcina barkeri, Methanosarcina frisius, and Methanobacterium formicicum. In contrast, the three other Archaea OTUs are unusual and are related to thermophilic microorganisms such as Crenarchaea or Thermoplasma spp. Five percent of the sequences analyzed were chimeras and were removed from the analysis.

  12. Phylogeny of gregarines (Apicomplexa) as inferred from small-subunit rDNA and beta-tubulin.

    PubMed

    Leander, Brian S; Clopton, Richard E; Keeling, Patrick J

    2003-01-01

    Gregarines are thought to be deep-branching apicomplexans. Accordingly, a robust inference of gregarine phylogeny is crucial to any interpretation of apicomplexan evolution, but molecular sequences from gregarines are restricted to a small number of small-subunit (SSU) rDNA sequences from derived taxa. This work examines the usefulness of SSU rDNA and beta-tubulin sequences for inferring gregarine phylogeny. SSU rRNA genes from Lecudina (Mingazzini) sp., Monocystis agilis Stein, Leidyana migrator Clopton and Gregarina polymorpha Dufour, as well as the beta-tubulin gene from Leidyana migrator, were sequenced. The results of phylogenetic analyses of alveolate taxa using both genes were consistent with an early origin of gregarines and the putative 'sister' relationship between gregarines and Cryptosporidium, but neither phylogeny was strongly supported. In addition, two SSU rDNA sequences from unidentified marine eukaryotes were found to branch among the gregarines: one was a sequence derived from the haemolymph parasite of the giant clam, Tridacna crocea, and the other was a sequence misattributed to the foraminiferan Ammonium beccarii. In all of our analyses, the SSU rDNA sequence from Colpodella sp. clustered weakly with the apicomplexans, which is consistent with ultrastructural data. Altogether, the exact position of gregarines with respect to Cryptosporidium and other apicomplexans remains to be confirmed, but the congruence of SSU rDNA and beta-tubulin trees with one another and with morphological data does suggest that further sampling of molecular data will eventually put gregarine diversity into a phylogenetic context.

  13. Caspase-dependent Proteolysis of Human Ribonucleotide Reductase Small Subunits R2 and p53R2 during Apoptosis*

    PubMed Central

    Tebbi, Ali; Guittet, Olivier; Tuphile, Karine; Cabrié, Aimeric; Lepoivre, Michel

    2015-01-01

    Ribonucleotide reductase (RnR) is a key enzyme synthesizing deoxyribonucleotides for DNA replication and repair. In mammals, the R1 catalytic subunit forms an active complex with either one of the two small subunits R2 and p53R2. Expression of R2 is S phase-specific and required for DNA replication. The p53R2 protein is expressed throughout the cell cycle and in quiescent cells where it provides dNTPs for mitochondrial DNA synthesis. Participation of R2 and p53R2 in DNA repair has also been suggested. In this study, we investigated the fate of the RnR subunits during apoptosis. The p53R2 protein was cleaved in a caspase-dependent manner in K-562 cells treated with inhibitors of the Bcr-Abl oncogenic kinase and in HeLa 229 cells incubated with TNF-α and cycloheximide. The cleavage site was mapped between Asp342 and Asn343. Caspase attack released a C-terminal p53R2 peptide of nine residues containing the conserved heptapeptide essential for R1 binding. As a consequence, the cleaved p53R2 protein was inactive. In vitro, purified caspase-3 and -8 could release the C-terminal tail of p53R2. Knocking down these caspases, but not caspase-2, -7, and -10, also inhibited p53R2 cleavage in cells committed to die via the extrinsic death receptor pathway. The R2 subunit was subjected to caspase- and proteasome-dependent proteolysis, which was prevented by siRNA targeting caspase-8. Knocking down caspase-3 was ineffective. Protein R1 was not subjected to degradation. Adding deoxyribonucleosides to restore dNTP pools transiently protected cells from apoptosis. These data identify RnR activity as a prosurvival function inactivated by proteolysis during apoptosis. PMID:25878246

  14. Phylogenetic relationships of Spiruromorpha from birds of prey based on 18S rDNA.

    PubMed

    Honisch, M; Krone, O

    2008-06-01

    A total of 153 free-ranging birds from Germany belonging to 15 species were examined for nematodes in their digestive and respiratory tracts. In 51.7% of the birds 14 different nematode species were found: the intestinal ascarids Porrocaecum depressum and P. angusticolle, the strongylid Hovorkonema variegatum, which inhabits the trachea and bronchi, the hairworms Eucoleus dispar and Capillaria tenuissima isolated from the digestive system, the spirurid nematodes Cyrnea leptoptera, C. mansioni, C. seurati, Microtetrameres cloacitectus, Physaloptera alata, P. apivori, Synhimantus hamatus and S. laticeps, which inhabit the proventriculus and gizzard of the raptors, and the spirurid nematode Serratospiculum tendo, which lives in the air sacs. To revise their systematic positions the ribosomal 18S gene regions of the nematode species were analysed and a phylogenetic tree was constructed. The molecular data confirmed the morphological systematics, except the spirurid family Physalopteridae, which grouped together with the Acuariidae.

  15. Conservation of the primary structure at the 3' end of 18S rRNA from eucaryotic cells.

    PubMed

    Hagenbüchle, O; Santer, M; Steitz, J A; Mans, R J

    1978-03-01

    DNA sequencing methods have been used to determine a sequence of about 20 nucleotides at the 3' termini of various 18S (small ribosomal subunit) RNA molecules. Polyadenylated rRNA was first synthesized using the enzyme ATP:polynucleotidyl transferase from mainze. Then in the presence of an oligonucleotide primer uniquely complementary to the end of each adenylated rRNA, a cDNA copy was produced using AMV reverse transcriptase. In every case, the cDNA transcript was of finite size, which we ascribe to the appearance of an oligonucleotide containing m62A near the 3' end of the 18S rRNAs. Sequences at the 3' termini of 18S rRNA molecules from the four eucaryotic species examined here (mouse, silk worm, wheat embryo and slime mold) are highly conserved. They also exhibit strong homology to the 3' end of E. coli 16S rRNA. Two important differences, however, are apparent. First, the 16S sequence CCUCC, implicated in mRNA binding by E. coli ribosomes, is absent from each eucaryotic rRNA sequence. Second, a purine-rich region which exhibits extensive complementarity to the 5' noncoding regions of many eucaryotic mRNAs appears consistently.

  16. Crystallization and preliminary X-ray crystallographic analysis of the small subunit of the heterodimeric laccase POXA3b from Pleurotus ostreatus.

    PubMed

    Ferraroni, Marta; Scozzafava, Andrea; Ullah, Sana; Tron, Thierry; Piscitelli, Alessandra; Sannia, Giovanni

    2014-01-01

    Laccases are multicopper oxidases of great biotechnological potential. While laccases are generally monomeric glycoproteins, the white-rot fungus Pleurotus ostreatus produces two closely related heterodimeric isoenzymes composed of a large subunit, homologous to the other fungal laccases, and a small subunit. The sequence of the small subunit does not show significant homology to any other protein or domain of known function and consequently its function is unknown. The highest similarity to proteins of known structure is to a putative enoyl-CoA hydratase/isomerase from Acinetobacter baumannii, which shows an identity of 27.8%. Diffraction-quality crystals of the small subunit of the heterodimeric laccase POXA3b (sPOXA3b) from P. ostreatus were obtained using the sitting-drop vapour-diffusion method at 294 K from a solution consisting of 1.8 M sodium formate, 0.1 M Tris-HCl pH 8.5. The crystals belonged to the tetragonal space group P4(1)2(1)2 or P4(3)2(1)2, with unit-cell parameters a = 126.6, c = 53.9 Å. The asymmetric unit contains two molecules related by a noncrystallographic twofold axis. A complete data set extending to a maximum resolution of 2.5 Å was collected at 100 K using a wavelength of 1.140 Å.

  17. Higher order structural elements in ribosomal RNAs: pseudo-knots and the use of noncanonical pairs.

    PubMed

    Gutell, R R; Woese, C R

    1990-01-01

    The data base of prokaryotic small subunit ribosomal RNAs alone now numbers more than 400 sequences, while that for the large subunit rRNAs numbers more than 70 when eukaryotic, mitochondrial, and plastid sequences are also included. Comparisons among these rRNA sequences reveal a number of positions that covary in composition, suggestive of higher order structural elements; 5 such structures are reported for the small subunit rRNA and 15 for the large subunit rRNA. While some of these are properly (small) secondary structural elements, the majority would have to be classified as more complex "tertiary" interactions, which in some cases bring together diverse areas in the secondary structural diagram. A number of the covariances are not of the canonical type, indicating non-Watson-Crick interactions.

  18. [Study of the surface of Escherichia coli ribosomes and ribosomal particles by the tritium bombardment method].

    PubMed

    Iusupov, M M; Spirin, A S

    1986-11-01

    A new technique of atomic tritium bombardment has been used to study the surface topography of Escherichia coli ribosomes and ribosomal subunits. The technique provides for the labeling of proteins exposed on the surface of ribosomal particles, the extent of protein labeling being proportional to the degree of exposure. The following proteins were considerably tritiated in the 70S ribosomes: S1, S4, S7, S9 and/or S11, S12 and/or L20, S13, S18, S20, S21, L1, L5, L6, L7/L12, L10, L11, L16, L17, L24, L26 and L27. A conclusion is drawn that these proteins are exposed on the ribosome surface to an essentially greater extent than the others. Dissociation of 70S ribosomes into the ribosomal subunits by decreasing Mg2+ concentration does not lead to the exposure of additional ribosomal proteins. This implies that there are no proteins on the contacting surfaces of the subunits. However, if a mixture of subunits has been subjected to centrifugation in a low Mg2+ concentration at high concentrations of a monovalent cation, proteins S3, S5, S7, S14, S18 and L16 are more exposed on the surface of the isolated 30S and 50S subunits than in the subunit mixture or in the 70S ribosomes. The exposure of additional proteins is explained by distortion of the native quaternary structure of ribosomal subunits as a result of the separation procedure. Reassociation of isolated subunits at high Mg2+ concentration results in shielding of proteins S3, S5, S7 and S18 and can be explained by reconstitution of the intact 30S subunit structure.

  19. Rate accelerations in nuclear 18S rDNA of mycoheterotrophic and parasitic angiosperms.

    PubMed

    Lemaire, Benny; Huysmans, Suzy; Smets, Erik; Merckx, Vincent

    2011-09-01

    Rate variation in genes from all three genomes has been observed frequently in plant lineages with a parasitic and mycoheterotrophic mode of life. While the loss of photosynthetic ability leads to a relaxation of evolutionary constraints in genes involved in the photosynthetic apparatus, it remains to be determined how prevalent increased substitution rates are in nuclear DNA of non-photosynthetic angiosperms. In this study we infer rates of molecular evolution of 18S rDNA of all parasitic and mycoheterotorphic plant families (except Lauraceae and Polygalaceae) using relative rate tests. In several holoparasitic and mycoheterotrophic plant lineages extremely high substitution rates are observed compared to other photosynthetic angiosperms. The position and frequency of these substitutions have been identified to understand the mutation dynamics of 18S rRNA in achlorophyllous plants. Despite the presence of significantly elevated substitution rates, very few mutations occur in major functional and structural regions of the small ribosomal molecule, providing evidence that the efficiency of the translational apparatus in non-photosynthetic plants has not been affected.

  20. Phylogenetic analysis and the evolution of the 18S rRNA gene typing system of Acanthamoeba.

    PubMed

    Fuerst, Paul A; Booton, Gregory C; Crary, Monica

    2015-01-01

    Species of Acanthamoeba were first described using morphological characters including cyst structure and cytology of nuclear division. More than 20 nominal species were proposed using these methods. Morphology, especially cyst shape and size, has proven to be plastic and dependent upon culture conditions. The DNA sequence of the nuclear small-subunit (18S) rRNA, the Rns gene, has become the most widely accepted method for rapid diagnosis and classification of Acanthamoeba. The Byers-Fuerst lab first proposed an Rns typing system in 1996. Subsequent refinements, with an increasing DNA database and analysis of diagnostic fragments within the gene, have become widely accepted by the Acanthamoeba research community. The development of the typing system, including its current state of implementation is illustrated by three cases: (i) the division between sequence types T13 and T16; (ii) the diversity within sequence supertype T2/T6, and (iii) verification of a new sequence type, designated T20. Molecular studies make clear the disconnection between phylogenetic relatedness and species names, as applied for the genus Acanthamoeba. Future reconciliation of genetic types with species names must become a priority, but the possible shortcomings of the use of a single gene when reconstructing the evolutionary history of the acanthamoebidae must also be resolved. © 2014 The Author(s) Journal of Eukaryotic Microbiology © 2014 International Society of Protistologists.

  1. Genotypic heterogeneity based on 18S-rRNA gene sequences among Acanthamoeba isolates from clinical samples in Italy.

    PubMed

    Di Cave, David; D' Alfonso, Rossella; Dussey Comlavi, Kodjo A; D' Orazi, Carlo; Monno, Rosa; Berrilli, Federica

    2014-11-01

    Acanthamoeba keratitis (AK) is an ocular disease caused by members of a genus of free-living amoebae and it is associated predominantly with contact lens (CL) use. This study reports 55 cases of AK diagnosed in Italy. Genotype identification was carried out by PCR assay followed by sequence analysis of the 18S rRNA gene using the genus specific primers JDP1 and JDP2. Genotype assignment was based on phenetic analysis of the ASA.S1 subset of the small-subunit rRNA gene sequences. The material has been collected at the Polyclinic Tor Vergata of Rome for a total of 19 isolates and at the Polyclinic Hospital of Bari (36 isolates). Thirty-three out of the 55 genetically characterized isolates were assigned to the genotype T4. Ten isolates were identified as belonging to the genotype T15 thus confirming the first association between the genotype T15 and human amoebic keratitis previously described from the same area. We underline the occurrence of the genotype T3 and T11 identified for the first time in the country. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Affinity labeling of the ribosomal P site in Drosophila melanogaster

    SciTech Connect

    North, D.

    1987-01-01

    Several recent studies have probed the peptidyl transferase region of the Drosophila ribosome via the use of reactive site specific analogues (affinity labels). P site proteins adjacent to the 3' end of the amino acid bearing tRNA strand were labeled with modified tRNA fragments. Drugs affecting the binding of these agents were used to further clarify the nature of the region. The nascent peptide region of the P site was not labeled in previous experiments. To label that region radioactive Bromoacetylphenylalanyl-tRNA (BrAcphe-tRNA) was synthesized. The alpha-bromoacetyl group of this analogue is potentially reactive with nucleophiles present in either proteins or RNAs. Charged tRNAs and tRNA analogues bearing a peptide bond on the N-terminus of their amino acid are recognized as having affinity for the ribosomal P site. Specific labeling of the P site by BrAcphe-tRNA was confirmed by its ability to radioactively label proteins indirectly. As many as 8 ribosomal proteins may be labeled under these conditions, however, the majority of the bound label is associated with 3 large subunit proteins and 2 small subunit proteins. Overlaps between the proteins labeled by BrAcphe-tRNA and those labeled by other affinity labels are examined and a model of the peptidyl transferase region of Drosophila ribosomes is presented.

  3. Two F-18s in Autonomous Formation Flight

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2001-01-01

    This 32 second video clip shows two F-18s in NASA's Autonomous Formation Flight (AFF) program. The aircraft use smoke contrails to gather data on wingtip vortices. Flight research attempts to utilize the energy in the vortices for more efficient flight.

  4. Base pairing between hepatitis C virus RNA and 18S rRNA is required for IRES-dependent translation initiation in vivo

    PubMed Central

    Matsuda, Daiki; Mauro, Vincent P.

    2014-01-01

    Degeneracy in eukaryotic translation initiation is evident in the initiation strategies of various viruses. Hepatitis C virus (HCV) provides an exceptional example—translation of the HCV RNA is facilitated by an internal ribosome entry site (IRES) that can autonomously bind a 40S ribosomal subunit and accurately position it at the initiation codon. This binding involves both ribosomal protein and 18S ribosomal RNA (rRNA) interactions. In this study, we evaluate the functional significance of the rRNA interaction and show that HCV IRES activity requires a 3-nt Watson–Crick base-pairing interaction between the apical loop of subdomain IIId in the IRES and helix 26 in 18S rRNA. Mutations of these nucleotides in either RNA dramatically disrupted IRES activity. The activities of the mutated HCV IRESs could be restored by compensatory mutations in the 18S rRNA. The effects of the 18S rRNA mutations appeared to be specific inasmuch as ribosomes containing these mutations did not support translation mediated by the wild-type HCV IRES, but did not block translation mediated by the cap structure or other viral IRESs. The present study provides, to our knowledge, the first functional demonstration of mRNA–rRNA base pairing in mammalian cells. By contrast with other rRNA-binding sites in mRNAs that can enhance translation as independent elements, e.g., the Shine–Dalgarno sequence in prokaryotes, the rRNA-binding site in the HCV IRES functions as an essential component of a more complex interaction. PMID:25313046

  5. Base pairing between hepatitis C virus RNA and 18S rRNA is required for IRES-dependent translation initiation in vivo.

    PubMed

    Matsuda, Daiki; Mauro, Vincent P

    2014-10-28

    Degeneracy in eukaryotic translation initiation is evident in the initiation strategies of various viruses. Hepatitis C virus (HCV) provides an exceptional example--translation of the HCV RNA is facilitated by an internal ribosome entry site (IRES) that can autonomously bind a 40S ribosomal subunit and accurately position it at the initiation codon. This binding involves both ribosomal protein and 18S ribosomal RNA (rRNA) interactions. In this study, we evaluate the functional significance of the rRNA interaction and show that HCV IRES activity requires a 3-nt Watson-Crick base-pairing interaction between the apical loop of subdomain IIId in the IRES and helix 26 in 18S rRNA. Mutations of these nucleotides in either RNA dramatically disrupted IRES activity. The activities of the mutated HCV IRESs could be restored by compensatory mutations in the 18S rRNA. The effects of the 18S rRNA mutations appeared to be specific inasmuch as ribosomes containing these mutations did not support translation mediated by the wild-type HCV IRES, but did not block translation mediated by the cap structure or other viral IRESs. The present study provides, to our knowledge, the first functional demonstration of mRNA-rRNA base pairing in mammalian cells. By contrast with other rRNA-binding sites in mRNAs that can enhance translation as independent elements, e.g., the Shine-Dalgarno sequence in prokaryotes, the rRNA-binding site in the HCV IRES functions as an essential component of a more complex interaction.

  6. Ribosomal protein uS19 mutants reveal its role in coordinating ribosome structure and function

    PubMed Central

    Bowen, Alicia M; Musalgaonkar, Sharmishtha; Moomau, Christine A; Gulay, Suna P; Mirvis, Mary; Dinman, Jonathan D

    2015-01-01

    Prior studies identified allosteric information pathways connecting functional centers in the large ribosomal subunit to the decoding center in the small subunit through the B1a and B1b/c intersubunit bridges in yeast. In prokaryotes a single SSU protein, uS13, partners with H38 (the A-site finger) and uL5 to form the B1a and B1b/c bridges respectively. In eukaryotes, the SSU component was split into 2 separate proteins during the course of evolution. One, also known as uS13, participates in B1b/c bridge with uL5 in eukaryotes. The other, called uS19 is the SSU partner in the B1a bridge with H38. Here, polyalanine mutants of uS19 involved in the uS19/uS13 and the uS19/H38 interfaces were used to elucidate the important amino acid residues involved in these intersubunit communication pathways. Two key clusters of amino acids were identified: one located at the junction between uS19 and uS13, and a second that appears to interact with the distal tip of H38. Biochemical analyses reveal that these mutations shift the ribosomal rotational equilibrium toward the unrotated state, increasing ribosomal affinity for tRNAs in the P-site and for ternary complex in the A-site, and inhibit binding of the translocase, eEF2. These defects in turn affect specific aspects of translational fidelity. These findings suggest that uS19 plays a critical role as a conduit of information exchange between the large and small ribosomal subunits directly through the B1a, and indirectly through the B1b/c bridges. PMID:26824029

  7. Evaluation of PCR amplification bias by terminal restriction fragment length polymorphism analysis of small-subunit rRNA and mcrA genes by using defined template mixtures of methanogenic pure cultures and soil DNA extracts.

    PubMed

    Lueders, Tillmann; Friedrich, Michael W

    2003-01-01

    Terminal restriction fragment length polymorphism (T-RFLP) analysis is a widely used method for profiling microbial community structure in different habitats by targeting small-subunit (SSU) rRNA and also functional marker genes. It is not known, however, whether relative gene frequencies of individual community members are adequately represented in post-PCR amplicon frequencies as shown by T-RFLP. In this study, precisely defined artificial template mixtures containing genomic DNA of four different methanogens in various ratios were prepared for subsequent T-RFLP analysis. PCR amplicons were generated from defined mixtures targeting not only the SSU rRNA but also the methyl-coenzyme M reductase (mcrA/mrtA) genes of methanogens. Relative amplicon frequencies of microorganisms were quantified by comparing fluorescence intensities of characteristic terminal restriction fragments. SSU ribosomal DNA (rDNA) template ratios in defined template mixtures of the four-membered community were recovered absolutely by PCR-T-RFLP analysis, which demonstrates that the T-RFLP analysis evaluated can give a quantitative view of the template pool. SSU rDNA-targeted T-RFLP analysis of a natural community was found to be highly reproducible, independent of PCR annealing temperature, and unaffected by increasing PCR cycle numbers. Ratios of mcrA-targeted T-RFLP analysis were biased, most likely by PCR selection due to the degeneracy of the primers used. Consequently, for microbial community analyses, each primer system used should be evaluated carefully for possible PCR bias. In fact, such bias can be detected by using T-RFLP analysis as a tool for the precise quantification of the PCR product pool.

  8. RIBOSOME-MEMBRANE INTERACTION

    PubMed Central

    Adelman, M. R.; Sabatini, David D.; Blobel, Günter

    1973-01-01

    In a medium of high ionic strength, rat liver rough microsomes can be nondestructively disassembled into ribosomes and stripped membranes if nascent polypeptides are discharged from the bound ribosomes by reaction with puromycin. At 750 mM KCl, 5 mM MgCl2, 50 mM Tris·HCl, pH 7 5, up to 85% of all bound ribosomes are released from the membranes after incubation at room temperature with 1 mM puromycin. The ribosomes are released as subunits which are active in peptide synthesis if programmed with polyuridylic acid. The ribosome-denuded, or stripped, rough microsomes (RM) can be recovered as intact, essentially unaltered membranous vesicles Judging from the incorporation of [3H]puromycin into hot acid-insoluble material and from the release of [3H]leucine-labeled nascent polypeptide chains from bound ribosomes, puromycin coupling occurs almost as well at low (25–100 mM) as at high (500–1000 mM) KCl concentrations. Since puromycin-dependent ribosome release only occurs at high ionic strength, it appears that ribosomes are bound to membranes via two types of interactions: a direct one between the membrane and the large ribosomal subunit (labile at high KCl concentration) and an indirect one in which the nascent chain anchors the ribosome to the membrane (puromycin labile). The nascent chains of ribosomes specifically released by puromycin remain tightly associated with the stripped membranes. Some membrane-bound ribosomes (up to 40%) can be nondestructively released in high ionic strength media without puromycin; these appear to consist of a mixture of inactive ribosomes and ribosomes containing relatively short nascent chains. A fraction (∼15%) of the bound ribosomes can only be released from membranes by exposure of RM to ionic conditions which cause extensive unfolding of ribosomal subunits, the nature and significance of these ribosomes is not clear. PMID:4682341

  9. The structure of the 80S ribosome from Trypanosoma cruzi reveals unique rRNA components

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Haixiao; Ayub, Maximiliano Juri; Levin, Mariano J.; Frank, Joachim

    2005-01-01

    We present analysis, by cryo-electron microscopy and single-particle reconstruction, of the structure of the 80S ribosome from Trypanosoma cruzi, the kinetoplastid protozoan pathogen that causes Chagas disease. The density map of the T. cruzi 80S ribosome shows the phylogenetically conserved eukaryotic rRNA core structure, together with distinctive structural features in both the small and large subunits. Remarkably, a previously undescribed helical structure appears in the small subunit in the vicinity of the mRNA exit channel. We propose that this rRNA structure likely participates in the recruitment of ribosome onto the 5′ end of mRNA, in facilitating and modulating the initiation of translation that is unique to the trypanosomes. PMID:16014419

  10. Driving ribosome assembly.

    PubMed

    Kressler, Dieter; Hurt, Ed; Bassler, Jochen

    2010-06-01

    Ribosome biogenesis is a fundamental process that provides cells with the molecular factories for cellular protein production. Accordingly, its misregulation lies at the heart of several hereditary diseases (e.g., Diamond-Blackfan anemia). The process of ribosome assembly comprises the processing and folding of the pre-rRNA and its concomitant assembly with the ribosomal proteins. Eukaryotic ribosome biogenesis relies on a large number (>200) of non-ribosomal factors, which confer directionality and accuracy to this process. Many of these non-ribosomal factors fall into different families of energy-consuming enzymes, notably including ATP-dependent RNA helicases, AAA-ATPases, GTPases, and kinases. Ribosome biogenesis is highly conserved within eukaryotic organisms; however, due to the combination of powerful genetic and biochemical methods, it is best studied in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. This review summarizes our current knowledge on eukaryotic ribosome assembly, with particular focus on the molecular role of the involved energy-consuming enzymes.

  11. Isolation of Mitochondrial Ribosomes.

    PubMed

    Carroll, Adam J

    2017-01-01

    Translation of mitochondrial encoded mRNAs by mitochondrial ribosomes is thought to play a major role in regulating the expression of mitochondrial proteins. However, the structure and function of plant mitochondrial ribosomes remains poorly understood. To study mitochondrial ribosomes, it is necessary to separate them from plastidic and cytosolic ribosomes that are generally present at much higher concentrations. Here, a straight forward protocol for the preparation of fractions highly enriched in mitochondrial ribosomes from plant cells is described. The method begins with purification of mitochondria followed by mitochondrial lysis and ultracentrifugation of released ribosomes through sucrose cushions and gradients. Dark-grown Arabidopsis cells were used in this example because of the ease with which good yields of pure mitochondria can be obtained from them. However, the steps for isolation of ribosomes from mitochondria could be applied to mitochondria obtained from other sources. Proteomic analyses of resulting fractions have confirmed strong enrichment of mitochondrial ribosomal proteins.

  12. Inferring the Ancient History of the Translation Machinery and Genetic Code via Recapitulation of Ribosomal Subunit Assembly Orders

    PubMed Central

    Fournier, Gregory P.; Neumann, Justin E.; Gogarten, J. Peter

    2010-01-01

    Universally conserved positions in ribosomal proteins have significant biases in amino acid usage, likely indicating the expansion of the genetic code at the time leading up to the most recent common ancestor(s) (MRCA). Here, we apply this principle to the evolutionary history of the ribosome before the MRCA. It has been proposed that the experimentally determined order of assembly for ribosomal subunits recapitulates their evolutionary chronology. Given this model, we produce a probabilistic evolutionary ordering of the universally conserved small subunit (SSU) and large subunit (LSU) ribosomal proteins. Optimizing the relative ordering of SSU and LSU evolutionary chronologies with respect to minimizing differences in amino acid usage bias, we find strong compositional evidence for a more ancient origin for early LSU proteins. Furthermore, we find that this ordering produces several trends in specific amino acid usages compatible with models of genetic code evolution. PMID:20208990

  13. Inferring the ancient history of the translation machinery and genetic code via recapitulation of ribosomal subunit assembly orders.

    PubMed

    Fournier, Gregory P; Neumann, Justin E; Gogarten, J Peter

    2010-03-01

    Universally conserved positions in ribosomal proteins have significant biases in amino acid usage, likely indicating the expansion of the genetic code at the time leading up to the most recent common ancestor(s) (MRCA). Here, we apply this principle to the evolutionary history of the ribosome before the MRCA. It has been proposed that the experimentally determined order of assembly for ribosomal subunits recapitulates their evolutionary chronology. Given this model, we produce a probabilistic evolutionary ordering of the universally conserved small subunit (SSU) and large subunit (LSU) ribosomal proteins. Optimizing the relative ordering of SSU and LSU evolutionary chronologies with respect to minimizing differences in amino acid usage bias, we find strong compositional evidence for a more ancient origin for early LSU proteins. Furthermore, we find that this ordering produces several trends in specific amino acid usages compatible with models of genetic code evolution.

  14. Physical mapping of 18S-25S rDNA and 5S rDNA in Lupinus via fluorescent in situ hybridization.

    PubMed

    Naganowska, Barbara; Zielińska, Anna

    2002-01-01

    Double-target fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH) was used to determine the genomic distribution of ribosomal RNA genes in five Lupinus species: L. cosentinii (2n=32), L. pilosus (2n=42), L. angustifolius (2n=40), L. luteus (2n=52) and L. mutabilis (2n=48). 18S-25S rDNA and 5S rDNA were used as probes. Some interspecific variation was observed in the number and size of the 18S-25S rDNA loci. All the studied species had one chromosome pair carrying 5S rDNA.

  15. The Ribosome Filter Redux

    PubMed Central

    Mauro, Vincent P.; Edelman, Gerald M.

    2010-01-01

    The ribosome filter hypothesis postulates that ribosomes are not simply translation machines but also function as regulatory elements that differentially affect or filter the translation of particular mRNAs. On the basis of new information, we take the opportunity here to review the ribosome filter hypothesis, suggest specific mechanisms of action, and discuss recent examples from the literature that support it. PMID:17890902

  16. E. coli metabolic protein aldehyde-alcohol dehydrogenase-E binds to the ribosome: a unique moonlighting action revealed

    PubMed Central

    Shasmal, Manidip; Dey, Sandip; Shaikh, Tanvir R.; Bhakta, Sayan; Sengupta, Jayati

    2016-01-01

    It is becoming increasingly evident that a high degree of regulation is involved in the protein synthesis machinery entailing more interacting regulatory factors. A multitude of proteins have been identified recently which show regulatory function upon binding to the ribosome. Here, we identify tight association of a metabolic protein aldehyde-alcohol dehydrogenase E (AdhE) with the E. coli 70S ribosome isolated from cell extract under low salt wash conditions. Cryo-EM reconstruction of the ribosome sample allows us to localize its position on the head of the small subunit, near the mRNA entrance. Our study demonstrates substantial RNA unwinding activity of AdhE which can account for the ability of ribosome to translate through downstream of at least certain mRNA helices. Thus far, in E. coli, no ribosome-associated factor has been identified that shows downstream mRNA helicase activity. Additionally, the cryo-EM map reveals interaction of another extracellular protein, outer membrane protein C (OmpC), with the ribosome at the peripheral solvent side of the 50S subunit. Our result also provides important insight into plausible functional role of OmpC upon ribosome binding. Visualization of the ribosome purified directly from the cell lysate unveils for the first time interactions of additional regulatory proteins with the ribosome. PMID:26822933

  17. Identification of Species and Sources of Cryptosporidium Oocysts in Storm Waters with a Small-Subunit rRNA-Based Diagnostic and Genotyping Tool

    PubMed Central

    Xiao, Lihua; Alderisio, Kerri; Limor, Josef; Royer, Michael; Lal, Altaf A.

    2000-01-01

    The identification of Cryptosporidium oocysts in environmental samples is largely made by the use of an immunofluorescent assay. In this study, we have used a small-subunit rRNA-based PCR-restriction fragment length polymorphism technique to identify species and sources of Cryptosporidium oocysts present in 29 storm water samples collected from a stream in New York. A total of 12 genotypes were found in 27 positive samples; for 4 the species and probable origins were identified by sequence analysis, whereas the rest represent new genotypes from wildlife. Thus, this technique provides an alternative method for the detection and differentiation of Cryptosporidium parasites in environmental samples. PMID:11097935

  18. Chromosomal mapping of 18S-28S rRNA genes and 10 cDNA clones of human chromosome 1 in the musk shrew (Suncus murinus).

    PubMed

    Kuroiwa, A; Matsubara, K; Nagase, T; Nomura, N; Seong, J K; Ishikawa, A; Anunciado, R V; Tanaka, K; Yamagata, T; Masangkay, J S; Dang, V B; Namikawa, T; Matsuda, Y

    2001-01-01

    The direct R-banding fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) method was used to map 18S-28S ribosomal RNA genes and 10 human cDNA clones on the chromosomes of the musk shrew (Suncus murinus). The chromosomal locations of 18S-28S ribosomal RNA genes were examined in the five laboratory lines and wild animals captured in the Philippines and Vietnam, and the genes were found on chromosomes 5, 6, 9, and 13 with geographic variation. The comparative mapping of 10 cDNA clones of human chromosome 1 demonstrated that human chromosome 1 consisted of at least three segments homologous to Suncus chromosomes (chromosomes 7, 10, and 14). This approach with the direct R-banding FISH method is useful for constructing comparative maps between human and insectivore species and for explicating the process of chromosomal rearrangements during the evolution of mammals.

  19. VISUALIZATION OF THE HYBRID STATE OF tRNA BINDING PROMOTED BY SPONTANEOUS RATCHETING OF THE RIBOSOME

    PubMed Central

    Agirrezabala, Xabier; Lei, Jianlin; Brunelle, Julie L.; Ortiz-Meoz, Rodrigo F.; Green, Rachel; Frank, Joachim

    2008-01-01

    SUMMARY A crucial step in protein translation is the translocation of tRNAs through the ribosome. In the transition from one canonical site to the other, the tRNAs acquire intermediate configurations, so-called hybrid states. At this stage, the small subunits is rotated with respect to the large subunit, and the anticodon stem loops reside in the A and P sites of the small subunit, while the acceptor ends interact with the P and E sites of the large subunit. In this work, by means of cryo-EM and particle classification procedures, we visualize for the first time the hybrid state of both A/P and P/E tRNAs in an authentic factor-free ribosome complex during translocation. In addition, we show how the repositioning of the tRNAs goes hand in hand with the change in the interplay between S13, L1 stalk, L5, H68, H69 and H38 that is caused by the ratcheting of the small subunit. PMID:18951087

  20. Expression of distinct maternal and somatic 5.8S, 18S, and 28S rRNA types during zebrafish development.

    PubMed

    Locati, Mauro D; Pagano, Johanna F B; Girard, Geneviève; Ensink, Wim A; van Olst, Marina; van Leeuwen, Selina; Nehrdich, Ulrike; Spaink, Herman P; Rauwerda, Han; Jonker, Martijs J; Dekker, Rob J; Breit, Timo M

    2017-08-01

    There is mounting evidence that the ribosome is not a static translation machinery, but a cell-specific, adaptive system. Ribosomal variations have mostly been studied at the protein level, even though the essential transcriptional functions are primarily performed by rRNAs. At the RNA level, oocyte-specific 5S rRNAs are long known for Xenopus. Recently, we described for zebrafish a similar system in which the sole maternal-type 5S rRNA present in eggs is replaced completely during embryonic development by a somatic-type. Here, we report the discovery of an analogous system for the 45S rDNA elements: 5.8S, 18S, and 28S. The maternal-type 5.8S, 18S, and 28S rRNA sequences differ substantially from those of the somatic-type, plus the maternal-type rRNAs are also replaced by the somatic-type rRNAs during embryogenesis. We discuss the structural and functional implications of the observed sequence differences with respect to the translational functions of the 5.8S, 18S, and 28S rRNA elements. Finally, in silico evidence suggests that expansion segments (ES) in 18S rRNA, previously implicated in ribosome-mRNA interaction, may have a preference for interacting with specific mRNA genes. Taken together, our findings indicate that two distinct types of ribosomes exist in zebrafish during development, each likely conducting the translation machinery in a unique way. © 2017 Locati et al.; Published by Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory Press for the RNA Society.

  1. Mapping of a conformational epitope on the cashew allergen Ana o 2: a discontinuous large subunit epitope dependent upon homologous or heterologous small subunit association.

    PubMed

    Xia, Lixin; Willison, LeAnna N; Porter, Lauren; Robotham, Jason M; Teuber, Suzanne S; Sathe, Shridhar K; Roux, Kenneth H

    2010-05-01

    The 11S globulins are members of the cupin protein superfamily and represent an important class of tree nut allergens for which a number of linear epitopes have been mapped. However, specific conformational epitopes for these allergens have yet to be described. We have recently reported a cashew Ana o 2 conformational epitope defined by murine mAb 2B5 and competitively inhibited by a subset of patient IgE antibodies. The 2B5 epitope appears to reside on the large (acidic) subunit, is dependent upon small (basic) subunit association for expression, and is highly susceptible to denaturation. Here we fine map the epitope using a combination of recombinant chimeric cashew Ana o 2-soybean Gly m 6 chimeras, deletion and point mutations, molecular modeling, and electron microscopy of 2B5-Ana o 2 immune complexes. Key residues appear confined to a 24 amino acid segment near the N-terminus of the large subunit peptide, a portion of which makes direct contact with the small subunit. These data provide an explanation for both the small subunit dependence and the structurally labile nature of the epitope.

  2. Cloning of a yeast gene coding for the glutamate synthase small subunit (GUS2) by complementation of Saccharomyces cerevisiae and Escherichia coli glutamate auxotrophs.

    PubMed

    González, A; Membrillo-Hernández, J; Olivera, H; Aranda, C; Macino, G; Ballario, P

    1992-02-01

    A Saccharomyces cerevisiae glutamate auxotroph, lacking NADP-glutamate dehydrogenase (NADP-GDH) and glutamate synthase (GOGAT) activities, was complemented with a yeast genomic library. Clones were obtained which still lacked NADP-GDH but showed GOGAT activity. Northern analysis revealed that the DNA fragment present in the complementing plasmids coded for a 1.5kb mRNA. Since the only GOGAT enzyme so far purified from S. cerevisiae is made up of a small and a large subunit, the size of the mRNA suggested that the cloned DNA fragment could code for the GOGAT small subunit. Plasmids were purified and used to transform Escherichia coli glutamate auxotrophs. Transformants were only recovered when the recipient strain was an E. coli GDH-less mutant lacking the small GOGAT subunit. These data show that we have cloned the structural gene coding for the yeast small subunit (GUS2). Evidence is also presented indicating that the GOGAT enzyme which is synthesized in the E. coli transformants is a hybrid comprising the large E. coli subunit and the small S. cerevisiae subunit.

  3. The fission yeast Cdc1 protein, a homologue of the small subunit of DNA polymerase delta, binds to Pol3 and Cdc27.

    PubMed Central

    MacNeill, S A; Moreno, S; Reynolds, N; Nurse, P; Fantes, P A

    1996-01-01

    cdc1+ is required for cell cycle progression in Schizosaccharomyces pombe. Cells carrying temperature-sensitive cdc1 mutants undergo cell cycle arrest when shifted to the restrictive temperature, becoming highly elongated. Here we describe the cloning and sequencing of cdc1+, which is shown to encode a 462 residue protein that displays significant sequence similarity to the small subunit of mammalian DNA polymerase delta. cdc1+ interacts genetically with pol3+, which encodes the large subunit of DNA polymerase delta in fission yeast, and the Cdc1 protein binds to Pol3 in vitro, strongly suggesting that Cdc1 is likely to be the small subunit of Pol delta. In addition, we show that cdc1+ overexpression is sufficient to rescue cells carrying temperature-sensitive cdc27 alleles and that the Cdc1 and Cdc27 proteins interact in vivo and in vitro. Deletion of either cdc1+ or cdc27+ results in cell cycle arrest with the arrested cells having a single nucleus with 2C DNA content. No evidence was obtained for a cut phenotype, indicating that neither cdc1+ nor cdc27+ is required for checkpoint function. cdc1 mutant cells are supersensitive to the DNA synthesis inhibitor hydroxyurea and to the DNA damaging agent MMS, display increased frequency of mini-chromosome loss and have an extended S phase. Images PMID:8887553

  4. Phytoplankton distribution patterns in the northwestern Sargasso Sea revealed by small subunit rRNA genes from plastids.

    PubMed

    Treusch, Alexander H; Demir-Hilton, Elif; Vergin, Kevin L; Worden, Alexandra Z; Carlson, Craig A; Donatz, Michael G; Burton, Robert M; Giovannoni, Stephen J

    2012-03-01

    Phytoplankton species vary in their physiological properties, and are expected to respond differently to seasonal changes in water column conditions. To assess these varying distribution patterns, we used 412 samples collected monthly over 12 years (1991-2004) at the Bermuda Atlantic Time-Series Study site, located in the northwestern Sargasso Sea. We measured plastid 16S ribosomal RNA gene abundances with a terminal restriction fragment length polymorphism approach and identified distribution patterns for members of the Prymnesiophyceae, Pelagophyceae, Chrysophyceae, Cryptophyceae, Bacillariophyceae and Prasinophyceae. The analysis revealed dynamic bloom patterns by these phytoplankton taxa that begin early in the year, when the mixed layer is deep. Previously, unreported open-ocean prasinophyte blooms dominated the plastid gene signal during convective mixing events. Quantitative PCR confirmed the blooms and transitions of Bathycoccus, Micromonas and Ostreococcus populations. In contrast, taxa belonging to the pelagophytes and chrysophytes, as well as cryptophytes, reached annual peaks during mixed layer shoaling, while Bacillariophyceae (diatoms) were observed only episodically in the 12-year record. Prymnesiophytes dominated the integrated plastid gene signal. They were abundant throughout the water column before mixing events, but persisted in the deep chlorophyll maximum during stratified conditions. Various models have been used to describe mechanisms that drive vernal phytoplankton blooms in temperate seas. The range of taxon-specific bloom patterns observed here indicates that different 'spring bloom' models can aptly describe the behavior of different phytoplankton taxa at a single geographical location. These findings provide insight into the subdivision of niche space by phytoplankton and may lead to improved predictions of phytoplankton responses to changes in ocean conditions.

  5. Phytoplankton distribution patterns in the northwestern Sargasso Sea revealed by small subunit rRNA genes from plastids

    PubMed Central

    Treusch, Alexander H; Demir-Hilton, Elif; Vergin, Kevin L; Worden, Alexandra Z; Carlson, Craig A; Donatz, Michael G; Burton, Robert M; Giovannoni, Stephen J

    2012-01-01

    Phytoplankton species vary in their physiological properties, and are expected to respond differently to seasonal changes in water column conditions. To assess these varying distribution patterns, we used 412 samples collected monthly over 12 years (1991–2004) at the Bermuda Atlantic Time-Series Study site, located in the northwestern Sargasso Sea. We measured plastid 16S ribosomal RNA gene abundances with a terminal restriction fragment length polymorphism approach and identified distribution patterns for members of the Prymnesiophyceae, Pelagophyceae, Chrysophyceae, Cryptophyceae, Bacillariophyceae and Prasinophyceae. The analysis revealed dynamic bloom patterns by these phytoplankton taxa that begin early in the year, when the mixed layer is deep. Previously, unreported open-ocean prasinophyte blooms dominated the plastid gene signal during convective mixing events. Quantitative PCR confirmed the blooms and transitions of Bathycoccus, Micromonas and Ostreococcus populations. In contrast, taxa belonging to the pelagophytes and chrysophytes, as well as cryptophytes, reached annual peaks during mixed layer shoaling, while Bacillariophyceae (diatoms) were observed only episodically in the 12-year record. Prymnesiophytes dominated the integrated plastid gene signal. They were abundant throughout the water column before mixing events, but persisted in the deep chlorophyll maximum during stratified conditions. Various models have been used to describe mechanisms that drive vernal phytoplankton blooms in temperate seas. The range of taxon-specific bloom patterns observed here indicates that different ‘spring bloom' models can aptly describe the behavior of different phytoplankton taxa at a single geographical location. These findings provide insight into the subdivision of niche space by phytoplankton and may lead to improved predictions of phytoplankton responses to changes in ocean conditions. PMID:21955994

  6. Evidence for several higher order structural elements in ribosomal RNA.

    PubMed

    Woese, C R; Gutell, R R

    1989-05-01

    Comparative analysis of small subunit ribosomal RNA sequences suggests the existence of two new higher order interactions: (i) a double-helical structure involving positions 505-507 and 524-526 (Escherichia coli numbering) and (ii) an interaction between the region of position 130 and the helix located approximately between positions 180 and 195. In the first of these, one of the strands of the helix exists in the bulge loop, and the other strand exists in the terminal loop of a previously recognized compound helix involving positions 500-545. Therefore, the new structure formally represents a pseudoknot. In the second, the insertion/deletion of a nucleotide in the vicinity of position 130 correlates with the length of the helix in the 180-195 region, the latter having a 3-base-pair stalk when the base in question is deleted and a stalk of approximately 10 pairs when it is inserted.

  7. Evidence for several higher order structural elements in ribosomal RNA.

    PubMed Central

    Woese, C R; Gutell, R R

    1989-01-01

    Comparative analysis of small subunit ribosomal RNA sequences suggests the existence of two new higher order interactions: (i) a double-helical structure involving positions 505-507 and 524-526 (Escherichia coli numbering) and (ii) an interaction between the region of position 130 and the helix located approximately between positions 180 and 195. In the first of these, one of the strands of the helix exists in the bulge loop, and the other strand exists in the terminal loop of a previously recognized compound helix involving positions 500-545. Therefore, the new structure formally represents a pseudoknot. In the second, the insertion/deletion of a nucleotide in the vicinity of position 130 correlates with the length of the helix in the 180-195 region, the latter having a 3-base-pair stalk when the base in question is deleted and a stalk of approximately 10 pairs when it is inserted. PMID:2654936

  8. Analysis of U3 snoRNA and small subunit processome components in the parasitic protist Entamoeba histolytica.

    PubMed

    Srivastava, Ankita; Ahamad, Jamaluddin; Ray, Ashwini Kumar; Kaur, Devinder; Bhattacharya, Alok; Bhattacharya, Sudha

    2014-02-01

    In the early branching parasitic protist Entamoeba histolytica, pre-rRNA synthesis continues when cells are subjected to growth stress, but processing slows down and unprocessed pre-rRNA accumulates. To gain insight into the regulatory mechanisms leading to accumulation, it is necessary to define the pre-rRNA processing machinery in E. histolytica. We searched the E. histolytica genome sequence for homologs of the SSU processome, which contains the U3snoRNA, and 72 proteins in yeast. We could identify 57 of the proteins with high confidence. Of the rest, 6 were absent in human, and 4 were non-essential in yeast. The remaining 5 were absent in other parasite genomes as well. Analysis of U3snoRNA showed that the E. histolytica U3snoRNA adopted the same conserved secondary structure as seen in yeast and human. The predicted structure was verified by chemical modification followed by primer extension (SHAPE). Further we showed that the predicted interactions of Eh_U3snoRNA boxes A and A' with pre-18S rRNA were highly conserved both in position and sequence. The predicted interactions of 5'-hinge and 3'-hinge sequences of Eh_U3 snoRNA with the 5'-ETS sequences were conserved in position but not in sequence. Transcription of selected genes of SSU processome was tested by northern analysis, and transcripts of predicted sizes were obtained. During serum starvation, when unprocessed pre-RNA accumulated, the transcript levels of some of these genes declined. This is the first report on pre-rRNA processing machinery in E. histolytica, and shows that the components are well conserved with respect to yeast and human.

  9. 28S and 18S rDNA sequences support the monophyly of lampreys and hagfishes.

    PubMed

    Mallatt, J; Sullivan, J

    1998-12-01

    Resolving the interrelationships of three major extant lineages of vertebrates (hagfishes, lampreys, and gnathostomes) is a particularly important issue in evolution, because the basal resolution critically influences our understanding of primitive vertebrate characters. A consensus has emerged over the last 20 years that lampreys are the sister group to the gnathostomes and the hagfishes represent an ancient, basal lineage. This hypothesis has essentially displaced the classical hypothesis of monophyly of the cyclostomes (lampreys plus hagfishes). To test these hypotheses, we compared nearly complete ribosomal DNA sequences from each of these major lineages, as well as those from a cephalochordate and a urochordate, which represent a paraphyletic outgroup for assessing the basal vertebrate relationships. For this comparison, 92%-99% complete 28S rDNA sequences were obtained from the lancelet Branchiostoma floridae, the hagfish Eptatretus stouti, the lamprey Petromyzon marinus, and cartilaginous fishes Hydrolagus colliei and Squalus acanthias and were then analyzed with previously reported 28S and 18S rDNA sequences from other chordates. We conducted conventional (nonparametric) bootstrap analyses, under maximum-likelihood, parsimony, and minimum-evolution (using LogDet distances) criteria, of both 28S and 18S rDNA sequences considered separately and combined. All these analyses provide moderate to very strong support for the monophyly of the cyclostomes. Furthermore, the currently accepted hypothesis of a lamprey-gnathostome clade is moderately rejected by the Kishino-Hasegawa test (P = 0.099) and resoundingly rejected by parametric bootstrap tests (P < 0.01) in favor of monophyly of living cyclostomes. Another significant finding is that the hagfish E. stouti has the longest 28S rDNA gene known in any organism (> 5,200 nt).

  10. The Modular Adaptive Ribosome.

    PubMed

    Yadav, Anupama; Radhakrishnan, Aparna; Panda, Anshuman; Singh, Amartya; Sinha, Himanshu; Bhanot, Gyan

    2016-01-01

    The ribosome is an ancient machine, performing the same function across organisms. Although functionally unitary, recent experiments suggest specialized roles for some ribosomal proteins. Our central thesis is that ribosomal proteins function in a modular fashion to decode genetic information in a context dependent manner. We show through large data analyses that although many ribosomal proteins are essential with consistent effect on growth in different conditions in yeast and similar expression across cell and tissue types in mice and humans, some ribosomal proteins are used in an environment specific manner. The latter set of variable ribosomal proteins further function in a coordinated manner forming modules, which are adapted to different environmental cues in different organisms. We show that these environment specific modules of ribosomal proteins in yeast have differential genetic interactions with other pathways and their 5'UTRs show differential signatures of selection in yeast strains, presumably to facilitate adaptation. Similarly, we show that in higher metazoans such as mice and humans, different modules of ribosomal proteins are expressed in different cell types and tissues. A clear example is nervous tissue that uses a ribosomal protein module distinct from the rest of the tissues in both mice and humans. Our results suggest a novel stratification of ribosomal proteins that could have played a role in adaptation, presumably to optimize translation for adaptation to diverse ecological niches and tissue microenvironments.

  11. The Modular Adaptive Ribosome

    PubMed Central

    Yadav, Anupama; Radhakrishnan, Aparna; Panda, Anshuman; Singh, Amartya; Sinha, Himanshu; Bhanot, Gyan

    2016-01-01

    The ribosome is an ancient machine, performing the same function across organisms. Although functionally unitary, recent experiments suggest specialized roles for some ribosomal proteins. Our central thesis is that ribosomal proteins function in a modular fashion to decode genetic information in a context dependent manner. We show through large data analyses that although many ribosomal proteins are essential with consistent effect on growth in different conditions in yeast and similar expression across cell and tissue types in mice and humans, some ribosomal proteins are used in an environment specific manner. The latter set of variable ribosomal proteins further function in a coordinated manner forming modules, which are adapted to different environmental cues in different organisms. We show that these environment specific modules of ribosomal proteins in yeast have differential genetic interactions with other pathways and their 5’UTRs show differential signatures of selection in yeast strains, presumably to facilitate adaptation. Similarly, we show that in higher metazoans such as mice and humans, different modules of ribosomal proteins are expressed in different cell types and tissues. A clear example is nervous tissue that uses a ribosomal protein module distinct from the rest of the tissues in both mice and humans. Our results suggest a novel stratification of ribosomal proteins that could have played a role in adaptation, presumably to optimize translation for adaptation to diverse ecological niches and tissue microenvironments. PMID:27812193

  12. How Ribosomes Translate Cancer.

    PubMed

    Sulima, Sergey O; Hofman, Isabel J F; De Keersmaecker, Kim; Dinman, Jonathan D

    2017-09-18

    A wealth of novel findings, including congenital ribosomal mutations in ribosomopathies and somatic ribosomal mutations in various cancers, have significantly increased our understanding of the relevance of ribosomes in oncogenesis. Here, we explore the growing list of mechanisms by which the ribosome is involved in carcinogenesis-from the hijacking of ribosomes by oncogenic factors and dysregulated translational control, to the effects of mutations in ribosomal components on cellular metabolism. Of clinical importance, the recent success of RNA polymerase inhibitors highlights the dependence on "onco-ribosomes" as an Achilles' heel of cancer cells and a promising target for further therapeutic intervention.Significance: The recent discovery of somatic mutations in ribosomal proteins in several cancers has strengthened the link between ribosome defects and cancer progression, while also raising the question of which cellular mechanisms such defects exploit. Here, we discuss the emerging molecular mechanisms by which ribosomes support oncogenesis, and how this understanding is driving the design of novel therapeutic strategies. Cancer Discov; 7(10); 1-19. ©2017 AACR. ©2017 American Association for Cancer Research.

  13. Distinct 18S rRNA precursors are targets of the exosome complex, the exoribonuclease RRP6L2 and the terminal nucleotidyltransferase TRL in Arabidopsis thaliana.

    PubMed

    Sikorski, Pawel J; Zuber, Hélène; Philippe, Lucas; Sement, François M; Canaday, Jean; Kufel, Joanna; Gagliardi, Dominique; Lange, Heike

    2015-09-01

    The biosynthesis of ribosomal RNA and its incorporation into functional ribosomes is an essential and intricate process that includes production of mature ribosomal RNA from large precursors. Here, we analyse the contribution of the plant exosome and its co-factors to processing and degradation of 18S pre-RNAs in Arabidopsis thaliana. Our data show that, unlike in yeast and humans, an RRP6 homologue, the nucleolar exoribonuclease RRP6L2, and the exosome complex, together with RRP44, function in two distinct steps of pre-18S rRNA processing or degradation in Arabidopsis. In addition, we identify TRL (TRF4/5-like) as the terminal nucleotidyltransferase that is mainly responsible for oligoadenylation of rRNA precursors in Arabidopsis. We show that TRL is required for efficient elimination of the excised 5' external transcribed spacer and of 18S maturation intermediates that escaped 5' processing. Our data also suggest involvement of additional nucleotidyltransferases, including terminal uridylyltransferase(s), in modifying rRNA processing intermediates in plants. © 2015 The Authors The Plant Journal © 2015 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  14. The RDP (Ribosomal Database Project) continues

    PubMed Central

    Maidak, Bonnie L.; Cole, James R.; Lilburn, Timothy G.; Parker Jr, Charles T.; Saxman, Paul R.; Stredwick, Jason M.; Garrity, George M.; Li, Bing; Olsen, Gary J.; Pramanik, Sakti; Schmidt, Thomas M.; Tiedje, James M.

    2000-01-01

    The Ribosomal Database Project (RDP-II), previously described by Maidak et al., continued during the past year to add new rRNA sequences to the aligned data and to improve the analysis commands. Release 7.1 (September 17, 1999) included more than 10 700 small subunit rRNA sequences. More than 850 type strain sequences were identified and added to the prokaryotic alignment, bringing the total number of type sequences to 3324 representing 2460 different species. Availability of an RDP-II mirror site in Japan is also near completion. RDP-II provides aligned and annotated rRNA sequences, derived phylogenetic trees and taxonomic hierarchies, and analysis services through its WWW server (http://rdp.cme.msu.edu/ ). Analysis services include rRNA probe checking, approximate phylogenetic placement of user sequences, screening user sequences for possible chimeric rRNA sequences, automated alignment, production of similarity matrices and services to plan and analyze terminal restriction fragment length polymorphism (T-RFLP) experiments. PMID:10592216

  15. A new version of the RDP (Ribosomal Database Project)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Maidak, B. L.; Cole, J. R.; Parker, C. T. Jr; Garrity, G. M.; Larsen, N.; Li, B.; Lilburn, T. G.; McCaughey, M. J.; Olsen, G. J.; Overbeek, R.; hide

    1999-01-01

    The Ribosomal Database Project (RDP-II), previously described by Maidak et al. [ Nucleic Acids Res. (1997), 25, 109-111], is now hosted by the Center for Microbial Ecology at Michigan State University. RDP-II is a curated database that offers ribosomal RNA (rRNA) nucleotide sequence data in aligned and unaligned forms, analysis services, and associated computer programs. During the past two years, data alignments have been updated and now include >9700 small subunit rRNA sequences. The recent development of an ObjectStore database will provide more rapid updating of data, better data accuracy and increased user access. RDP-II includes phylogenetically ordered alignments of rRNA sequences, derived phylogenetic trees, rRNA secondary structure diagrams, and various software programs for handling, analyzing and displaying alignments and trees. The data are available via anonymous ftp (ftp.cme.msu. edu) and WWW (http://www.cme.msu.edu/RDP). The WWW server provides ribosomal probe checking, approximate phylogenetic placement of user-submitted sequences, screening for possible chimeric rRNA sequences, automated alignment, and a suggested placement of an unknown sequence on an existing phylogenetic tree. Additional utilities also exist at RDP-II, including distance matrix, T-RFLP, and a Java-based viewer of the phylogenetic trees that can be used to create subtrees.

  16. A new version of the RDP (Ribosomal Database Project).

    PubMed

    Maidak, B L; Cole, J R; Parker, C T; Garrity, G M; Larsen, N; Li, B; Lilburn, T G; McCaughey, M J; Olsen, G J; Overbeek, R; Pramanik, S; Schmidt, T M; Tiedje, J M; Woese, C R

    1999-01-01

    The Ribosomal Database Project (RDP-II), previously described by Maidak et al. [ Nucleic Acids Res. (1997), 25, 109-111], is now hosted by the Center for Microbial Ecology at Michigan State University. RDP-II is a curated database that offers ribosomal RNA (rRNA) nucleotide sequence data in aligned and unaligned forms, analysis services, and associated computer programs. During the past two years, data alignments have been updated and now include >9700 small subunit rRNA sequences. The recent development of an ObjectStore database will provide more rapid updating of data, better data accuracy and increased user access. RDP-II includes phylogenetically ordered alignments of rRNA sequences, derived phylogenetic trees, rRNA secondary structure diagrams, and various software programs for handling, analyzing and displaying alignments and trees. The data are available via anonymous ftp (ftp.cme.msu. edu) and WWW (http://www.cme.msu.edu/RDP). The WWW server provides ribosomal probe checking, approximate phylogenetic placement of user-submitted sequences, screening for possible chimeric rRNA sequences, automated alignment, and a suggested placement of an unknown sequence on an existing phylogenetic tree. Additional utilities also exist at RDP-II, including distance matrix, T-RFLP, and a Java-based viewer of the phylogenetic trees that can be used to create subtrees.

  17. A new version of the RDP (Ribosomal Database Project)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Maidak, B. L.; Cole, J. R.; Parker, C. T. Jr; Garrity, G. M.; Larsen, N.; Li, B.; Lilburn, T. G.; McCaughey, M. J.; Olsen, G. J.; Overbeek, R.; Pramanik, S.; Schmidt, T. M.; Tiedje, J. M.; Woese, C. R.

    1999-01-01

    The Ribosomal Database Project (RDP-II), previously described by Maidak et al. [ Nucleic Acids Res. (1997), 25, 109-111], is now hosted by the Center for Microbial Ecology at Michigan State University. RDP-II is a curated database that offers ribosomal RNA (rRNA) nucleotide sequence data in aligned and unaligned forms, analysis services, and associated computer programs. During the past two years, data alignments have been updated and now include >9700 small subunit rRNA sequences. The recent development of an ObjectStore database will provide more rapid updating of data, better data accuracy and increased user access. RDP-II includes phylogenetically ordered alignments of rRNA sequences, derived phylogenetic trees, rRNA secondary structure diagrams, and various software programs for handling, analyzing and displaying alignments and trees. The data are available via anonymous ftp (ftp.cme.msu. edu) and WWW (http://www.cme.msu.edu/RDP). The WWW server provides ribosomal probe checking, approximate phylogenetic placement of user-submitted sequences, screening for possible chimeric rRNA sequences, automated alignment, and a suggested placement of an unknown sequence on an existing phylogenetic tree. Additional utilities also exist at RDP-II, including distance matrix, T-RFLP, and a Java-based viewer of the phylogenetic trees that can be used to create subtrees.

  18. Organization of proteins in mammalian mitochondrial ribosomes: accessibility to lactoperoxidase-catalyzed radioiodination

    SciTech Connect

    Denslow, N.D.; O'Brien, T.W.

    1984-08-10

    To assess the relative exposure of individual ribosomal proteins (r-proteins) in the large and small subunits of the bovine mitochondrial ribosome, double label iodination technique was used. Regions of r-proteins exposed in purified ribosomal subunits were labeled with /sup 131/I using the lactoperoxidase-catalyzed iodination system, and additional reactive groups available upon denaturing the r-proteins in urea were labeled with /sup 125/I using the chloramine-T mediated reaction. The ratio of /sup 131/I to /sup 125/I incorporated into individual proteins under these conditions is representative of the degree of exposure for each of the proteins in the subunits. In this manner, the r-proteins have been grouped into 3 classes depending on their degree of exposure: high exposure, intermediate exposure, and essentially buried. While both subunits have a few proteins in the highly exposed group, and a large number of proteins in the intermediate exposure group, only the large ribosomal subunit has an appreciable number of proteins which appear essentially buried. The more buried proteins may serve mainly structural roles, perhaps acting as assembly proteins, since many from this group bind to ribosomal RNA. The more superficially disposed proteins may comprise binding sites for macromolecules that interact with ribosomes during protein synthesis, as well as stabilizing the association of the large and small subribosomal particles.

  19. An evolutionary conserved pattern of 18S rRNA sequence complementarity to mRNA 5′ UTRs and its implications for eukaryotic gene translation regulation

    PubMed Central

    Pánek, Josef; Kolář, Michal; Vohradský, Jiří; Shivaya Valášek, Leoš

    2013-01-01

    There are several key mechanisms regulating eukaryotic gene expression at the level of protein synthesis. Interestingly, the least explored mechanisms of translational control are those that involve the translating ribosome per se, mediated for example via predicted interactions between the ribosomal RNAs (rRNAs) and mRNAs. Here, we took advantage of robustly growing large-scale data sets of mRNA sequences for numerous organisms, solved ribosomal structures and computational power to computationally explore the mRNA–rRNA complementarity that is statistically significant across the species. Our predictions reveal highly specific sequence complementarity of 18S rRNA sequences with mRNA 5′ untranslated regions (UTRs) forming a well-defined 3D pattern on the rRNA sequence of the 40S subunit. Broader evolutionary conservation of this pattern may imply that 5′ UTRs of eukaryotic mRNAs, which have already emerged from the mRNA-binding channel, may contact several complementary spots on 18S rRNA situated near the exit of the mRNA binding channel and on the middle-to-lower body of the solvent-exposed 40S ribosome including its left foot. We discuss physiological significance of this structurally conserved pattern and, in the context of previously published experimental results, propose that it modulates scanning of the 40S subunit through 5′ UTRs of mRNAs. PMID:23804757

  20. An evolutionary conserved pattern of 18S rRNA sequence complementarity to mRNA 5' UTRs and its implications for eukaryotic gene translation regulation.

    PubMed

    Pánek, Josef; Kolár, Michal; Vohradský, Jirí; Shivaya Valásek, Leos

    2013-09-01

    There are several key mechanisms regulating eukaryotic gene expression at the level of protein synthesis. Interestingly, the least explored mechanisms of translational control are those that involve the translating ribosome per se, mediated for example via predicted interactions between the ribosomal RNAs (rRNAs) and mRNAs. Here, we took advantage of robustly growing large-scale data sets of mRNA sequences for numerous organisms, solved ribosomal structures and computational power to computationally explore the mRNA-rRNA complementarity that is statistically significant across the species. Our predictions reveal highly specific sequence complementarity of 18S rRNA sequences with mRNA 5' untranslated regions (UTRs) forming a well-defined 3D pattern on the rRNA sequence of the 40S subunit. Broader evolutionary conservation of this pattern may imply that 5' UTRs of eukaryotic mRNAs, which have already emerged from the mRNA-binding channel, may contact several complementary spots on 18S rRNA situated near the exit of the mRNA binding channel and on the middle-to-lower body of the solvent-exposed 40S ribosome including its left foot. We discuss physiological significance of this structurally conserved pattern and, in the context of previously published experimental results, propose that it modulates scanning of the 40S subunit through 5' UTRs of mRNAs.

  1. An updated 18S rRNA phylogeny of tunicates based on mixture and secondary structure models.

    PubMed

    Tsagkogeorga, Georgia; Turon, Xavier; Hopcroft, Russell R; Tilak, Marie-Ka; Feldstein, Tamar; Shenkar, Noa; Loya, Yossi; Huchon, Dorothée; Douzery, Emmanuel J P; Delsuc, Frédéric

    2009-08-05

    Tunicates have been recently revealed to be the closest living relatives of vertebrates. Yet, with more than 2500 described species, details of their evolutionary history are still obscure. From a molecular point of view, tunicate phylogenetic relationships have been mostly studied based on analyses of 18S rRNA sequences, which indicate several major clades at odds with the traditional class-level arrangements. Nonetheless, substantial uncertainty remains about the phylogenetic relationships and taxonomic status of key groups such as the Aplousobranchia, Appendicularia, and Thaliacea. Thirty new complete 18S rRNA sequences were acquired from previously unsampled tunicate species, with special focus on groups presenting high evolutionary rate. The updated 18S rRNA dataset has been aligned with respect to the constraint on homology imposed by the rRNA secondary structure. A probabilistic framework of phylogenetic reconstruction was adopted to accommodate the particular evolutionary dynamics of this ribosomal marker. Detailed Bayesian analyses were conducted under the non-parametric CAT mixture model accounting for site-specific heterogeneity of the evolutionary process, and under RNA-specific doublet models accommodating the occurrence of compensatory substitutions in stem regions. Our results support the division of tunicates into three major clades: 1) Phlebobranchia + Thaliacea + Aplousobranchia, 2) Appendicularia, and 3) Stolidobranchia, but the position of Appendicularia could not be firmly resolved. Our study additionally reveals that most Aplousobranchia evolve at extremely high rates involving changes in secondary structure of their 18S rRNA, with the exception of the family Clavelinidae, which appears to be slowly evolving. This extreme rate heterogeneity precluded resolving with certainty the exact phylogenetic placement of Aplousobranchia. Finally, the best fitting secondary-structure and CAT-mixture models suggest a sister-group relationship between

  2. An updated 18S rRNA phylogeny of tunicates based on mixture and secondary structure models

    PubMed Central

    Tsagkogeorga, Georgia; Turon, Xavier; Hopcroft, Russell R; Tilak, Marie-Ka; Feldstein, Tamar; Shenkar, Noa; Loya, Yossi; Huchon, Dorothée; Douzery, Emmanuel JP; Delsuc, Frédéric

    2009-01-01

    Background Tunicates have been recently revealed to be the closest living relatives of vertebrates. Yet, with more than 2500 described species, details of their evolutionary history are still obscure. From a molecular point of view, tunicate phylogenetic relationships have been mostly studied based on analyses of 18S rRNA sequences, which indicate several major clades at odds with the traditional class-level arrangements. Nonetheless, substantial uncertainty remains about the phylogenetic relationships and taxonomic status of key groups such as the Aplousobranchia, Appendicularia, and Thaliacea. Results Thirty new complete 18S rRNA sequences were acquired from previously unsampled tunicate species, with special focus on groups presenting high evolutionary rate. The updated 18S rRNA dataset has been aligned with respect to the constraint on homology imposed by the rRNA secondary structure. A probabilistic framework of phylogenetic reconstruction was adopted to accommodate the particular evolutionary dynamics of this ribosomal marker. Detailed Bayesian analyses were conducted under the non-parametric CAT mixture model accounting for site-specific heterogeneity of the evolutionary process, and under RNA-specific doublet models accommodating the occurrence of compensatory substitutions in stem regions. Our results support the division of tunicates into three major clades: 1) Phlebobranchia + Thaliacea + Aplousobranchia, 2) Appendicularia, and 3) Stolidobranchia, but the position of Appendicularia could not be firmly resolved. Our study additionally reveals that most Aplousobranchia evolve at extremely high rates involving changes in secondary structure of their 18S rRNA, with the exception of the family Clavelinidae, which appears to be slowly evolving. This extreme rate heterogeneity precluded resolving with certainty the exact phylogenetic placement of Aplousobranchia. Finally, the best fitting secondary-structure and CAT-mixture models suggest a sister

  3. [Probable involvement of 3'-terminal segment of 18S rRNA in translation initiation of uncapped mRNAs in plants].

    PubMed

    Zhigaĭlov, A V; Babaĭlova, E S; Polimbetov, N S; Graĭfer, D M; Karpova, G G; Iskakov, B K

    2011-01-01

    A possibility of involvement of 3'-terminal 18S rRNA segment in the cap-independent initiation of translation on plant ribosomes was studied. It was shown that 3-terminal segment (nucleotides 1777-1811) of 18S rRNA including the last hairpin 45 is accessible for complementary interactions in 40S ribosomal subunits. Oligonucleotides complementary to this segment of rRNA when added to wheat germ cell-free protein synthesizing system were found to specifically inhibit translation of uncapped reporter mRNA coding for beta-glucuronidase, which bears in the 5'-untranslated region (UTR) a leader sequence of potato virus Y (PVY) genomic RNA possessing fragments complementary to the region 1777-1811. It was shown that a sequence corresponding to nucleotides 291-316 of PVY, which is complementary to a major portion of the 3-terminal 18S rRNA segment 1777-1808, when placed into 5'-UTR, is able to enhance translational efficiency of the reporter mRNAs. The results obtained suggest that complementary interactions between mRNA 5'-UTR and 18S rRNA 3'-terminal segment can take place in the course of cap-independent translation initiation.

  4. Physical mapping of 5S and 18S-5.8S-26S RNA gene families in polyploid series of Cenchrus ciliaris Linnaeus, 1771 (Poaceae)

    PubMed Central

    Kharrat-Souissi, Amina; Siljak-Yakovlev, Sonja; Pustahija, Fatima; Chaieb, Mohamed

    2012-01-01

    Abstract The Buffelgrass (Cenchrus ciliaris L., Poaceae) is one of the most important pasturage grasses due to its high productivity and good forage qualities. This species possess a high adaptability to bioclimatic constraints of arid zones and may be used for the restoration of degraded arid ecosystems. Tunisian populations present three ploidy levels (4x, 5x and 6x) with a basic chromosome number x=9. This study reported for the first time the distribution of the ribosomal genes (rRNA) for pentaploid and hexaploid cytotypes of Cenchrus ciliaris. Molecular cytogenetic study using double fluorescence in situ hybridization has shown that the two rDNA families, 5S and 18S-5.8S-26S (18S), displayed intraspecific variation in number of loci among different ploidy levels. Each ploidy level was characterized by specific number of both 5S and 18S rDNA loci (two loci in tetraploid, five in pentaploid and six in hexaploid level). For three studied cytotypes (4x, 5x and 6x) all 5S rDNA loci were localized on the subcentromeric region of chromosomes, while 18S loci were situated on the telomeric region of short chromosome arms. Data of the FISH experiments show proportional increase of ribosomal loci number during polyploidization processes. PMID:24260668

  5. Molecular hybridization of iodinated 4S, 5S, and 18S + 28S RNA to salamander chromosomes

    PubMed Central

    1976-01-01

    4S, 5S, AND 18S + 28S RNA from the newt Taricha granulosa granulosa were iodinated in vitro with carrier-free 125I and hybridized to the denatured chromosomes of Taricha granulosa and Batrachoseps weighti. Iodinated 18S + 28S RNA hybridizes to the telomeric region on the shorter arm of chromosome 2 and close to the centromere on the shorter arm of chromosome 9 from T. granulosa. On this same salamander the label produced by the 5S RNA is located close to or on the centromere of chromosome 7 and the iodinated 4S RNA labels the distal end of the longer arm of chromosome 5. On the chromosomes of B. wrighti, 18S + 28S RNA hybridizes close to the centromeric region on the longer arm of the largest chromosome. Two centromeric sites are hybridized by the iodinated 5S RNA. After hybridization with iodinated 4S RNA, label is found near the end of the shorter arm of chromosome 3. It is concluded that both ribosomal and transfer RNA genes are clustered in the genome of these two salamanders. PMID:944187

  6. Systematic design of 18S rRNA gene primers for determining eukaryotic diversity in microbial consortia.

    PubMed

    Hugerth, Luisa W; Muller, Emilie E L; Hu, Yue O O; Lebrun, Laura A M; Roume, Hugo; Lundin, Daniel; Wilmes, Paul; Andersson, Anders F

    2014-01-01

    High-throughput sequencing of ribosomal RNA gene (rDNA) amplicons has opened up the door to large-scale comparative studies of microbial community structures. The short reads currently produced by massively parallel sequencing technologies make the choice of sequencing region crucial for accurate phylogenetic assignments. While for 16S rDNA, relevant regions have been well described, no truly systematic design of 18S rDNA primers aimed at resolving eukaryotic diversity has yet been reported. Here we used 31,862 18S rDNA sequences to design a set of broad-taxonomic range degenerate PCR primers. We simulated the phylogenetic information that each candidate primer pair would retrieve using paired- or single-end reads of various lengths, representing different sequencing technologies. Primer pairs targeting the V4 region performed best, allowing discrimination with paired-end reads as short as 150 bp (with 75% accuracy at genus level). The conditions for PCR amplification were optimised for one of these primer pairs and this was used to amplify 18S rDNA sequences from isolates as well as from a range of environmental samples which were then Illumina sequenced and analysed, revealing good concordance between expected and observed results. In summary, the reported primer sets will allow minimally biased assessment of eukaryotic diversity in different microbial ecosystems.

  7. The ribosomal database project.

    PubMed

    Larsen, N; Olsen, G J; Maidak, B L; McCaughey, M J; Overbeek, R; Macke, T J; Marsh, T L; Woese, C R

    1993-07-01

    The Ribosomal Database Project (RDP) is a curated database that offers ribosome data along with related programs and services. The offerings include phylogenetically ordered alignments of ribosomal RNA (rRNA) sequences, derived phylogenetic trees, rRNA secondary structure diagrams and various software packages for handling, analyzing and displaying alignments and trees. The data are available via ftp and electronic mail. Certain analytic services are also provided by the electronic mail server.

  8. The ribosomal database project.

    PubMed Central

    Larsen, N; Olsen, G J; Maidak, B L; McCaughey, M J; Overbeek, R; Macke, T J; Marsh, T L; Woese, C R

    1993-01-01

    The Ribosomal Database Project (RDP) is a curated database that offers ribosome data along with related programs and services. The offerings include phylogenetically ordered alignments of ribosomal RNA (rRNA) sequences, derived phylogenetic trees, rRNA secondary structure diagrams and various software packages for handling, analyzing and displaying alignments and trees. The data are available via ftp and electronic mail. Certain analytic services are also provided by the electronic mail server. PMID:8332524

  9. The Ribosomal Database Project.

    PubMed

    Maidak, B L; Larsen, N; McCaughey, M J; Overbeek, R; Olsen, G J; Fogel, K; Blandy, J; Woese, C R

    1994-09-01

    The Ribosomal Database Project (RDP) is a curated database that offers ribosome-related data, analysis services, and associated computer programs. The offerings include phylogenetically ordered alignments of ribosomal RNA (rRNA) sequences, derived phylogenetic trees, rRNA secondary structure diagrams, and various software for handling, analyzing and displaying alignments and trees. The data are available via anonymous ftp (rdp.life.uiuc.edu), electronic mail (server/rdp.life.uiuc.edu) and gopher (rdpgopher.life.uiuc.edu). The electronic mail server also provides ribosomal probe checking, approximate phylogenetic placement of user-submitted sequences, screening for chimeric nature of newly sequenced rRNAs, and automated alignment.

  10. Redescriptions of three trachelocercid ciliates (Protista, Ciliophora, Karyorelictea), with notes on their phylogeny based on small subunit rRNA gene sequences.

    PubMed

    Yan, Ying; Xu, Yuan; Yi, Zhenzhen; Warren, Alan

    2013-09-01

    Three trachelocercid ciliates, Kovalevaia sulcata (Kovaleva, 1966) Foissner, 1997, Trachelocerca sagitta (Müller, 1786) Ehrenberg, 1840 and Trachelocerca ditis (Wright, 1982) Foissner, 1996, isolated from two coastal habitats at Qingdao, China, were investigated using live observation and silver impregnation methods. Data on their infraciliature and morphology are supplied. The small subunit rRNA (SSU rRNA) genes of K. sulcata and Trachelocerca sagitta were sequenced for the first time. Phylogenetic analyses based on SSU rRNA gene sequence data indicate that both organisms, and the previously sequenced Trachelocerca ditis, are located within the trachelocercid assemblage and that K. sulcata is sister to an unidentified taxon forming a clade that is basal to the core trachelocercids.

  11. ATR-CHK1-E2F3 signaling transactivates human ribonucleotide reductase small subunit M2 for DNA repair induced by the chemical carcinogen MNNG.

    PubMed

    Gong, Chaoju; Liu, Hong; Song, Rui; Zhong, Tingting; Lou, Meng; Wang, Tingyang; Qi, Hongyan; Shen, Jing; Zhu, Lijun; Shao, Jimin

    2016-04-01

    N-methyl-N'-nitro-N-nitrosoguanidine (MNNG), an alkylating agent and an environmental carcinogen, causes DNA lesions and even carcinomas. DNA damage responses induced by MNNG activate various DNA repair genes and related signaling pathways. The present study aimed to investigate the regulatory mechanisms of human RR small subunit M2 (hRRM2) in response to MNNG. In this study, we demonstrated that the RRM2 gene was transactivated by MNNG exposure more strongly than the other small subunit, p53R2. The upregulated RRM2 translocated to the nucleus for DNA repair. Further study showed that E2F3 transactivated RRM2 expression by directly binding to its promoter after MNNG exposure. The transactivation was enhanced by the upregulation of NFY, which bound to the RRM2 promoter adjacent to the E2F3 binding site and interacted with E2F3. In response to MNNG treatment, E2F3 accumulated mainly through its phosphorylation at S124 and was dependent on ATR-CHK1 signaling. In comparison, p53R2 played a relatively weaker role in the MNNG-induced DNA damage response, and its transcription was regulated by the ATR-CHK2-E2F1/p53 pathway. We suggest that MNNG-stimulated ATR/CHK1 signaling stabilizes E2F3 by S124 phosphorylation, and then E2F3 together with NFY co-transactivate RRM2 expression for DNA repair. We propose a new mechanism for RRM2 regulation to maintain genome stability in response to environmental chemical carcinogens. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Cloning and characterization of ribulose-1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase small subunit (RbcS) cDNA from green microalga Ankistrodesmus convolutus.

    PubMed

    Thanh, Tran; Chi, Vu Thi Quynh; Abdullah, Mohd Puad; Omar, Hishamuddin; Noroozi, Mostafa; Napis, Suhaimi

    2011-11-01

    An initial study on gene cloning and characterization of unicellular green microalga Ankistrodesmus convolutus was carried out to isolate and characterize the full-length cDNA of ribulose-1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase small subunit (RbcS) as a first step towards elucidating the structure of A. convolutus RbcS gene. The full-length of A. convolutus RbcS cDNA (AcRbcS) contained 28 bp of 5' untranslated region (UTR), 225 bp of 3' non-coding region, and an open reading frame of 165 amino acids consisting of a chloroplast transit peptide with 24 amino acids and a mature protein of 141 amino acids. The amino acid sequence has high identity to those of other green algae RbcS genes. The AcRbcS contained a few conserved domains including protein kinase C phosphorylation site, tyrosine kinase phosphorylation site and N-myristoylation sites. The AcRbcS was successfully expressed in Escherichia coli and a ~21 kDa of anticipated protein band was observed on SDS-PAGE. From the phylogenetic analysis of RbcS protein sequences, it was found that the RbcS of A. convolutus has closer genetic relationship with green microalgae species compared to those of green seaweed and green macroalgae species. Southern hybridization analysis revealed that the AcRbcS is a member of a small multigene family comprising of two to six members in A. convolutus genome. Under different illumination conditions, RT-PCR analysis showed that AcRbcS transcription was reduced in the dark, and drastically recovered in the light condition. Results presented in this paper established a good foundation for further study on the photosynthetic process of A. convolutus and other green algae species where little information is known on Rubisco small subunit.

  13. Chromosomal location of 18S and 5S rDNA sites in Triportheus fish species (Characiformes, Characidae)

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    The location of 18S and 5S rDNA sites was determined in eight species and populations of the fish genus Triportheus by using fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH). The males and females of all species had 2n = 52 chromosomes and a ZZ/ZW sex chromosome system. A single 18S rDNA site that was roughly equivalent to an Ag-NOR was detected on the short arms of a submetacentric pair in nearly all species, and up to two additional sites were also observed in some species. In addition, another 18S rDNA cluster was identified in a distal region on the long arms of the W chromosome; this finding corroborated previous evidence that this cluster would be a shared feature amongst Triportheus species. In T. angulatus, a heterozygotic paracentric inversion involving the short arms of one homolog of a metacentric pair was associated with NORs. The 5S rDNA sites were located on the short arms of a single submetacentric chromosomal pair, close to the centromeres, except in T. auritus, which had up to ten 5S rDNA sites. The 18S and 5S rDNA sites were co-localized and adjacent on the short arms of a chromosomal pair in two populations of T. nematurus. Although all Triportheus species have a similar karyotypic macrostructure, the results of this work show that in some species ribosomal genes may serve as species-specific markers when used in conjunction with other putatively synapomorphic features. PMID:21637644

  14. 18S rRNA is a reliable normalisation gene for real time PCR based on influenza virus infected cells.

    PubMed

    Kuchipudi, Suresh V; Tellabati, Meenu; Nelli, Rahul K; White, Gavin A; Perez, Belinda Baquero; Sebastian, Sujith; Slomka, Marek J; Brookes, Sharon M; Brown, Ian H; Dunham, Stephen P; Chang, Kin-Chow

    2012-10-08

    One requisite of quantitative reverse transcription PCR (qRT-PCR) is to normalise the data with an internal reference gene that is invariant regardless of treatment, such as virus infection. Several studies have found variability in the expression of commonly used housekeeping genes, such as beta-actin (ACTB) and glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase (GAPDH), under different experimental settings. However, ACTB and GAPDH remain widely used in the studies of host gene response to virus infections, including influenza viruses. To date no detailed study has been described that compares the suitability of commonly used housekeeping genes in influenza virus infections. The present study evaluated several commonly used housekeeping genes [ACTB, GAPDH, 18S ribosomal RNA (18S rRNA), ATP synthase, H+ transporting, mitochondrial F1 complex, beta polypeptide (ATP5B) and ATP synthase, H+ transporting, mitochondrial Fo complex, subunit C1 (subunit 9) (ATP5G1)] to identify the most stably expressed gene in human, pig, chicken and duck cells infected with a range of influenza A virus subtypes. The relative expression stability of commonly used housekeeping genes were determined in primary human bronchial epithelial cells (HBECs), pig tracheal epithelial cells (PTECs), and chicken and duck primary lung-derived cells infected with five influenza A virus subtypes. Analysis of qRT-PCR data from virus and mock infected cells using NormFinder and BestKeeper software programmes found that 18S rRNA was the most stable gene in HBECs, PTECs and avian lung cells. Based on the presented data from cell culture models (HBECs, PTECs, chicken and duck lung cells) infected with a range of influenza viruses, we found that 18S rRNA is the most stable reference gene for normalising qRT-PCR data. Expression levels of the other housekeeping genes evaluated in this study (including ACTB and GPADH) were highly affected by influenza virus infection and hence are not reliable as reference genes for RNA

  15. Authentication of Curcuma species (Zingiberaceae) based on nuclear 18S rDNA and plastid trnK sequences.

    PubMed

    Cao, Hui; Sasaki, Yohei; Fushimi, Hirotoshi; Komatsu, Katsuko

    2010-07-01

    Curcuma drugs have been used discriminatingly for invigorating blood circulation, promoting digestion, and as a cholagogic in China. However, there is confusion about the drug's botanical origins and clinical uses because of morphological similarity of Curcuma plants and drugs. Comparative sequencing of the 18S rRNA gene in nuclear ribosomal DNA (rDNA) and trnK gene in chloroplast DNA (cpDNA) was carried out in order to examine interspecies phylogeny and to identify ultimately Curcuma species. A total of a hundred of accessions of eighteen species were analyzed. This resulted in an aligned matrix of 1810 bp for 18S rDNA and 2 800 bp for trnK. 18S rDNA sequence divergence within the ingroup ranged from 0-0.05%, trnK ranged from 0-0.19%. One base transversion-substituted site (from cytosine to thymine) was observed from the upstream of 18S rDNA at nucleotide position 234 in C. kwangsiensis and Japanese population of C. zedoaria which have separated genetic distance to other Curcuma taxa. Two noncoding regions embedded in trnK intron showed higher variability, including nucleotide substitutions, repeat insertion and deletions. Based on consensus of relationship, eighteen major lineages within Curcuma are recognized at the species level. The results suggest that Curcuma is monophyletic with 100% bootstrap support and sister to the genera Hedychium and Zingiber. The trnK sequences showed considerable variations between Curcuma species and thus were revealed as a promising candidate for barcoding of Curcuma species, which provide valuable characters for inferring relationship within species but are insufficient to resolve relationships among closely related taxa.

  16. Complete sequence analysis of 18S rDNA based on genomic DNA extraction from individual Demodex mites (Acari: Demodicidae).

    PubMed

    Zhao, Ya-E; Xu, Ji-Ru; Hu, Li; Wu, Li-Ping; Wang, Zheng-Hang

    2012-05-01

    The study for the first time attempted to accomplish 18S ribosomal DNA (rDNA) complete sequence amplification and analysis for three Demodex species (Demodex folliculorum, Demodex brevis and Demodex canis) based on gDNA extraction from individual mites. The mites were treated by DNA Release Additive and Hot Start II DNA Polymerase so as to promote mite disruption and increase PCR specificity. Determination of D. folliculorum gDNA showed that the gDNA yield reached the highest at 1 mite, tending to descend with the increase of mite number. The individual mite gDNA was successfully used for 18S rDNA fragment (about 900 bp) amplification examination. The alignments of 18S rDNA complete sequences of individual mite samples and those of pooled mite samples ( ≥ 1000mites/sample) showed over 97% identities for each species, indicating that the gDNA extracted from a single individual mite was as satisfactory as that from pooled mites for PCR amplification. Further pairwise sequence analyses showed that average divergence, genetic distance, transition/transversion or phylogenetic tree could not effectively identify the three Demodex species, largely due to the differentiation in the D. canis isolates. It can be concluded that the individual Demodex mite gDNA can satisfy the molecular study of Demodex. 18S rDNA complete sequence is suitable for interfamily identification in Cheyletoidea, but whether it is suitable for intrafamily identification cannot be confirmed until the ascertainment of the types of Demodex mites parasitizing in dogs.

  17. The Ribosomal Database Project

    PubMed Central

    Olsen, Gary J.; Overbeek, Ross; Larsen, Niels; Marsh, Terry L.; McCaughey, Michael J.; Maciukenas, Michael A.; Kuan, Wen-Min; Macke, Thomas J.; Xing, Yuqing; Woese, Carl R.

    1992-01-01

    The Ribosomal Database Project (RDP) compiles ribosomal sequences and related data, and redistributes them in aligned and phylogenetically ordered form to its user community. It also offers various software packages for handling, analyzing and displaying sequences. In addition, the RDP offers (or will offer) certain analytic services. At present the project is in an intermediate stage of development. PMID:1598241

  18. The Ribosomal Database Project

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Olsen, G. J.; Overbeek, R.; Larsen, N.; Marsh, T. L.; McCaughey, M. J.; Maciukenas, M. A.; Kuan, W. M.; Macke, T. J.; Xing, Y.; Woese, C. R.

    1992-01-01

    The Ribosomal Database Project (RDP) complies ribosomal sequences and related data, and redistributes them in aligned and phylogenetically ordered form to its user community. It also offers various software packages for handling, analyzing and displaying sequences. In addition, the RDP offers (or will offer) certain analytic services. At present the project is in an intermediate stage of development.

  19. The Ribosomal Database Project.

    PubMed

    Olsen, G J; Overbeek, R; Larsen, N; Marsh, T L; McCaughey, M J; Maciukenas, M A; Kuan, W M; Macke, T J; Xing, Y; Woese, C R

    1992-05-11

    The Ribosomal Database Project (RDP) complies ribosomal sequences and related data, and redistributes them in aligned and phylogenetically ordered form to its user community. It also offers various software packages for handling, analyzing and displaying sequences. In addition, the RDP offers (or will offer) certain analytic services. At present the project is in an intermediate stage of development.

  20. Identification of 18S ribosomal DNA genotype of Acanthamoeba from hot spring recreation areas in the central range, Taiwan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hsu, Bing-Mu; Ma, Po-Hua; Liou, Tai-Sheng; Chen, Jung-Sheng; Shih, Feng-Cheng

    2009-04-01

    SummaryAcanthamoeba is a free-living amoebae ubiquitous to aquatic environments. Within the genus a few species are recognized as opportunistic potential human pathogens, which cause granulomatous amoebic encephalitis (GAE) and keratitis. Infections of keratitis are frequently reported through wearing lens while swimming in the non-disinfected aquatic environment. Contaminations in hot tubs, spas and public baths are also possible. As a result, in this study, we identified Acanthamoeba based on the PCR amplification with a genus-specific primer pair and investigated the distribution of Acanthamoeba at five hot spring recreation areas in central range, Taiwan. We gathered data on factors potentially associated with the pathogen's distribution, including various sampling sites, aquatic environment, physical and microbiological water quality parameters. Spring water was collected from 55 sites and Acanthamoeba was detected in 9 (16.4%). The most frequently detected was Acanthamoeba griffini, followed by Acanthamoeba jacobsi. Legionella were detected in 18 (32.7%) of the sites sampled in this study. The species of Legionella identified included Legionella pneumophila serotype 6, serotype 1, and Legionella erythra. Overall, 9.1% of the samples contained both Acanthamoeba and Legionella. The prevalence of Acanthamoeba was contrary to the levels of microbiological indicators recommended by Taiwan CDC, and no significant differences (Mann-Whitney U test, P < 0.05) were observed between the presence/absence of Acanthamoeba and water quality parameters. Results of this survey confirm the existence of Acanthamoeba in Taiwan spring recreation areas. Acanthamoeba, the organism responsible for the majority of Acanthamoeba keratitis and can serve as vehicles for facultative pathogens, should be considered a potential threat for health associated with human activities in spring recreation areas of Taiwan.

  1. Variability in secondary structure of 18S ribosomal RNA as topological marker for identification of Paramecium species.

    PubMed

    Shakoori, Farah R; Tasneem, Fareeda; Al-Ghanim, K; Mahboob, S; Al-Misned, F; Jahan, Nusrat; Shakoori, Abdul Rauf

    2014-12-01

    Besides cytological and molecular applications, Paramecium is being used in water quality assessment and for determination of saprobic levels. An unambiguous identification of these unicellular eukaryotes is not only essential, but its ecological diversity must also be explored in the local environment. 18SrRNA genes of all the strains of Paramecium species isolated from waste water were amplified, cloned and sequenced. Phylogenetic comparison of the nucleotide sequences of these strains with 23 closely related Paramecium species from GenBank Database enabled identification of Paramecium multimicronucleatum and Paramecium jenningsi. Some isolates did not show significant close association with other Paramecium species, and because of their unique position in the phylogenetic tree, they were considered new to the field. In the present report, these isolates are being designated as Paramecium caudatum pakistanicus. In this article, secondary structure of 18SrRNA has also been analyzed as an additional and perhaps more reliable topological marker for species discrimination and for determining possible phylogenetic relationship between the ciliate species. On the basis of comparison of secondary structure of 18SrRNA of various isolated Paramacium strains, and among Paramecium caudatum pakistanicus, Tetrahymena thermophila, Drosophila melanogaster, and Homo sapiens, it can be deduced that variable regions are more helpful in differentiating the species at interspecific level rather than at intraspecific level. It was concluded that V3 was the least variable region in all the organisms, V2 and V7 were the longest expansion segments of D. melanogaster and there was continuous mutational bias towards G.C base pairing in H. sapiens. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  2. Functional Specialization of Ribosomes?

    PubMed Central

    Gilbert, Wendy V.

    2011-01-01

    Ribosomes are highly conserved macromolecular machines responsible for protein synthesis in all living organisms. Work published in the past year shows that changes to the ribosome core can affect the mechanism of translation initiation that is favored in the cell, potentially leading to specific changes in the relative efficiencies with which different proteins are made. Here I examine recent data from expression and proteomic studies suggesting that cells make slightly different ribosomes under different growth conditions and discuss genetic evidence that such differences are functional. In particular, I will argue that eukaryotic cells likely produce ribosomes that lack one or more ‘core’ ribosomal proteins (RPs) under some conditions, and that ‘core’ RPs contribute differentially to translation of distinct subpopulations of mRNAs. PMID:21242088

  3. Assembly of bacterial ribosomes.

    PubMed

    Shajani, Zahra; Sykes, Michael T; Williamson, James R

    2011-01-01

    The assembly of ribosomes from a discrete set of components is a key aspect of the highly coordinated process of ribosome biogenesis. In this review, we present a brief history of the early work on ribosome assembly in Escherichia coli, including a description of in vivo and in vitro intermediates. The assembly process is believed to progress through an alternating series of RNA conformational changes and protein-binding events; we explore the effects of ribosomal proteins in driving these events. Ribosome assembly in vivo proceeds much faster than in vitro, and we outline the contributions of several of the assembly cofactors involved, including Era, RbfA, RimJ, RimM, RimP, and RsgA, which associate with the 30S subunit, and CsdA, DbpA, Der, and SrmB, which associate with the 50S subunit.

  4. Nob1 binds the single-stranded cleavage site D at the 3'-end of 18S rRNA with its PIN domain.

    PubMed

    Lamanna, Allison C; Karbstein, Katrin

    2009-08-25

    Ribosome assembly is a hierarchical process that involves pre-rRNA folding, modification, and cleavage and assembly of ribosomal proteins. In eukaryotes, this process requires a macromolecular complex comprising over 200 proteins and RNAs. Whereas the rRNA modification machinery is well-characterized, rRNA cleavage to release mature rRNAs is poorly understood, and in yeast, only 2 of 8 endonucleases have been identified. The essential and conserved ribosome assembly factor Nob1 has been suggested to be the endonuclease responsible for generating the mature 3'-end of 18S rRNA by cleaving at site D. Here we provide evidence that recombinant Nob1 forms a tetramer that binds directly to pre-rRNA analogs containing cleavage site D. Analysis of Nob1's affinity to a series of RNA truncations, as well as Nob1-dependent protections of pre-rRNA in vitro and in vivo demonstrate that Nob1's binding site centers around the 3'-end of 18S rRNA, where our data also locate Nob1's suggested active site. Thus, Nob1 is poised for cleavage at the 3'-end of 18S rRNA. Together with prior data, these results strongly implicate Nob1 in cleavage at site D. In addition, our data provide evidence that the cleavage site at the 3'-end of 18S rRNA is single-stranded and not part of a duplex as commonly depicted. Using these results, we have built a model for Nob1's interaction with preribosomes.

  5. Expression of distinct maternal and somatic 5.8S, 18S, and 28S rRNA types during zebrafish development

    PubMed Central

    Pagano, Johanna F.B.; Girard, Geneviève; Ensink, Wim A.; van Olst, Marina; van Leeuwen, Selina; Nehrdich, Ulrike; Spaink, Herman P.; Rauwerda, Han; Jonker, Martijs J.; Dekker, Rob J.; Breit, Timo M.

    2017-01-01

    There is mounting evidence that the ribosome is not a static translation machinery, but a cell-specific, adaptive system. Ribosomal variations have mostly been studied at the protein level, even though the essential transcriptional functions are primarily performed by rRNAs. At the RNA level, oocyte-specific 5S rRNAs are long known for Xenopus. Recently, we described for zebrafish a similar system in which the sole maternal-type 5S rRNA present in eggs is replaced completely during embryonic development by a somatic-type. Here, we report the discovery of an analogous system for the 45S rDNA elements: 5.8S, 18S, and 28S. The maternal-type 5.8S, 18S, and 28S rRNA sequences differ substantially from those of the somatic-type, plus the maternal-type rRNAs are also replaced by the somatic-type rRNAs during embryogenesis. We discuss the structural and functional implications of the observed sequence differences with respect to the translational functions of the 5.8S, 18S, and 28S rRNA elements. Finally, in silico evidence suggests that expansion segments (ES) in 18S rRNA, previously implicated in ribosome–mRNA interaction, may have a preference for interacting with specific mRNA genes. Taken together, our findings indicate that two distinct types of ribosomes exist in zebrafish during development, each likely conducting the translation machinery in a unique way. PMID:28500251

  6. Comparison of Artemia salina and Escherichia coli ribosome structure by electron microscopy.

    PubMed Central

    Boulik, M; Hellmann, W

    1978-01-01

    The structure of eukaryotic Artemia salina and prokaryotic Escherichia coli ribosomes has been compared by electron microscopy. Despite the established differences in size and in the amount and proportion of the protein and RNA moieties, both types of ribosomes appear to have substantial similarity in the overall shape and in the mutual orientation of the subunits on the monosome. The small subunit is located in the "crown" region of the large subunit lengthwise between the two side crests. However, high-resolution electron microscopy reveals distinct differences in the fine structure of both small and large subunits. The 40S A. salina subunit with three structural domains is more complex than the corresponding E. coli subunit. The 60S A. salina subunit has a less expressed "crown" region and shows a knob-like protrusion in the base. Structural asymmetry is a characteristic feature common to subunits and monosomes from both A. salina and E. coli. Images PMID:351617

  7. Nop9 is a PUF-like protein that prevents premature cleavage to correctly process pre-18S rRNA

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Jun; McCann, Kathleen L.; Qiu, Chen; Gonzalez, Lauren E.; Baserga, Susan J.; Hall, Traci M. Tanaka

    2016-01-01

    Numerous factors direct eukaryotic ribosome biogenesis, and defects in a single ribosome assembly factor may be lethal or produce tissue-specific human ribosomopathies. Pre-ribosomal RNAs (pre-rRNAs) must be processed stepwise and at the correct subcellular locations to produce the mature rRNAs. Nop9 is a conserved small ribosomal subunit biogenesis factor, essential in yeast. Here we report a 2.1-Å crystal structure of Nop9 and a small-angle X-ray-scattering model of a Nop9:RNA complex that reveals a ‘C'-shaped fold formed from 11 Pumilio repeats. We show that Nop9 recognizes sequence and structural features of the 20S pre-rRNA near the cleavage site of the nuclease, Nob1. We further demonstrate that Nop9 inhibits Nob1 cleavage, the final processing step to produce mature small ribosomal subunit 18S rRNA. Together, our results suggest that Nop9 is critical for timely cleavage of the 20S pre-rRNA. Moreover, the Nop9 structure exemplifies a new class of Pumilio repeat proteins. PMID:27725644

  8. Nop9 is a PUF-like protein that prevents premature cleavage to correctly process pre-18S rRNA

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Jun; McCann, Kathleen L.; Qiu, Chen; Gonzalez, Lauren E.; Baserga, Susan J.; Hall, Traci M. Tanaka

    2016-10-11

    Numerous factors direct eukaryotic ribosome biogenesis, and defects in a single ribosome assembly factor may be lethal or produce tissue-specific human ribosomopathies. Pre-ribosomal RNAs (pre-rRNAs) must be processed stepwise and at the correct subcellular locations to produce the mature rRNAs. Nop9 is a conserved small ribosomal subunit biogenesis factor, essential in yeast. Here we report a 2.1-Å crystal structure of Nop9 and a small-angle X-ray-scattering model of a Nop9:RNA complex that reveals a ‘C’-shaped fold formed from 11 Pumilio repeats. We show that Nop9 recognizes sequence and structural features of the 20S pre-rRNA near the cleavage site of the nuclease, Nob1. We further demonstrate that Nop9 inhibits Nob1 cleavage, the final processing step to produce mature small ribosomal subunit 18S rRNA. Together, our results suggest that Nop9 is critical for timely cleavage of the 20S pre-rRNA. Moreover, the Nop9 structure exemplifies a new class of Pumilio repeat proteins.

  9. High-pressure scattering study of Artemia salina ribosomes and polysomes.

    PubMed

    Nieuwenhuysen, P; Heremans, K; Clauwaert, J

    1980-02-29

    The intensity has been measured of the light scattered by solutions of brine shrimp (Artemia salina) ribosomes and polysomes under hydrostatic pressures up to 2000 atm. This has given information about pressure-induced decreases in the means weight of the particles in solutions containing different concentrations of K+ and Mg2+ ions. The dissociation-association equilibrium reaction ribosome formed from large subunit + small subunit is accompanied by a volume change, --200 less than delta V less than --300 ml/mol; this delta V is discussed with relation to different models for the interaction between the ribosome subunits. The application of high pressures on polysome solutions caused also decreases of the light scattering; these were slower than in the case of ribosomes, and nonexponential. Only small decreases were found for ribosomes attached to messenger-RNA, which were obtained by incubation of polysomes with pancreatic RNAase. After fixation of the ribsomes and polysomes with formaldehyde, the light scattering remained constant with increasing pressures.

  10. Powering through ribosome assembly

    PubMed Central

    Strunk, Bethany S.; Karbstein, Katrin

    2009-01-01

    Ribosome assembly is required for cell growth in all organisms. Classic in vitro work in bacteria has led to a detailed understanding of the biophysical, thermodynamic, and structural basis for the ordered and correct assembly of ribosomal proteins on ribosomal RNA. Furthermore, it has enabled reconstitution of active subunits from ribosomal RNA and proteins in vitro. Nevertheless, recent work has shown that eukaryotic ribosome assembly requires a large macromolecular machinery in vivo. Many of these assembly factors such as ATPases, GTPases, and kinases hydrolyze nucleotide triphosphates. Because these enzymes are likely regulatory proteins, much work to date has focused on understanding their role in the assembly process. Here, we review these factors, as well as other sources of energy, and their roles in the ribosome assembly process. In addition, we propose roles of energy-releasing enzymes in the assembly process, to explain why energy is used for a process that occurs largely spontaneously in bacteria. Finally, we use literature data to suggest testable models for how these enzymes could be used as targets for regulation of ribosome assembly. PMID:19850913

  11. Nonbridging phosphate oxygens in 16S rRNA important for 30S subunit assembly and association with the 50S ribosomal subunit.

    PubMed

    Ghosh, Srikanta; Joseph, Simpson

    2005-05-01

    Ribosomes are composed of RNA and protein molecules that associate together to form a supramolecular machine responsible for protein biosynthesis. Detailed information about the structure of the ribosome has come from the recent X-ray crystal structures of the ribosome and the ribosomal subunits. However, the molecular interactions between the rRNAs and the r-proteins that occur during the intermediate steps of ribosome assembly are poorly understood. Here we describe a modification-interference approach to identify nonbridging phosphate oxygens within 16S rRNA that are important for the in vitro assembly of the Escherichia coli 30S small ribosomal subunit and for its association with the 50S large ribosomal subunit. The 30S small subunit was reconstituted from phosphorothioate-substituted 16S rRNA and small subunit proteins. Active 30S subunits were selected by their ability to bind to the 50S large subunit and form 70S ribosomes. Analysis of the selected population shows that phosphate oxygens at specific positions in the 16S rRNA are important for either subunit assembly or for binding to the 50S subunit. The X-ray crystallographic structures of the 30S subunit suggest that some of these phosphate oxygens participate in r-protein binding, coordination of metal ions, or for the formation of intersubunit bridges in the mature 30S subunit. Interestingly, however, several of the phosphate oxygens identified in this study do not participate in any interaction in the mature 30S subunit, suggesting that they play a role in the early steps of the 30S subunit assembly.

  12. Mutation of EMG1 causing Bowen–Conradi syndrome results in reduced cell proliferation rates concomitant with G2/M arrest and 18S rRNA processing delay

    PubMed Central

    Armistead, Joy; Hemming, Richard; Patel, Nehal; Triggs-Raine, Barbara

    2014-01-01

    Bowen–Conradi syndrome (BCS) is a lethal autosomal recessive disorder caused by a D86G substitution in the protein, Essential for Mitotic Growth 1 (EMG1). EMG1 is essential for 18S rRNA maturation and 40S ribosome biogenesis in yeast, but no studies of its role in ribosome biogenesis have been done in mammals. To assess the effect of the EMG1 mutation on cell growth and ribosomal biogenesis in humans, we employed BCS patient cells. The D86G substitution did not interfere with EMG1 nucleolar localization. In BCS patient lymphoblasts, cells accumulated in G2/M, resulting in reduced proliferation rates; however, patient fibroblasts showed normal proliferation. The rate of 18S rRNA processing was consistently delayed in patient cells, although this did not lead to a difference in the levels of 40S ribosomes, or a change in protein synthesis rates. These results demonstrate that as in yeast, EMG1 in mammals has a role in ribosome biogenesis. The obvious phenotype in lymphoblasts compared to fibroblasts suggests a greater need for EMG1 in rapidly dividing cells. Tissue-specific effects have been seen in other ribosomal biogenesis disorders, and it seems likely that the impact of EMG1 deficiency would be larger in the rapidly proliferating cells of the developing embryo. PMID:26676230

  13. Comparative physical mapping of 18S rDNA in the karyotypes of six leafcutter ant species of the genera Atta and Acromyrmex (Formicidae: Myrmicinae).

    PubMed

    Teixeira, Gisele Amaro; Barros, Luísa Antônia Campos; de Aguiar, Hilton Jeferson Alves Cardoso; das Graças Pompolo, Silvia

    2017-06-16

    Leafcutter ants of the Atta and Acromyrmex genera are important plagues in different cultures. Cytogenetic data on chromosome number, morphology, and chromosomal banding pattern are only available for 17 species of leafcutter ants. Molecular cytogenetic data for the detection of ribosomal genes by the FISH technique are scarce, and only 15 Neotropical ant species have been studied. This study aimed to physically map the 18S ribosomal RNA genes (rDNA) of six leafcutter ants belonging to the genera Atta and Acromyrmex using FISH. The results were compared with data on the fluorochrome CMA3 currently available for these species. All analyzed species presented the 18S rDNA on one pair of chromosomes. In Acromyrmex subterraneus molestans and Ac. aspersus, FISH signals were observed in the terminal region of the short arm of the largest subtelocentric pair, while in Atta bisphaerica, A. laevigata, and A. sexdens, FISH signals were observed in the interstitial region of the long arm of the fourth metacentric pair. In Acromyrmex striatus, 18S rDNA was located in the interstitial region of the second metacentric pair. The karyotypic formula for Ac. aspersus was 2n = 38 (8m + 10sm + 16st + 4a), representing the first report in this species. The observed 18S rDNA regions in A. laevigata, A. sexdens, A. bisphaerica, Ac. aspersus, and Ac. subterraneus molestans corresponded to the CMA3(+) bands, while in Ac. striatus, several GC-rich bands and one pair of 18S rDNA bands were observed. No differential bands were visible using the DAPI fluorochrome. Karyotype uniformity with previously studied Atta spp. was also observed at the level of molecular cytogenetics using 18S rDNA FISH. A difference in the size of the chromosomal pair carrying the 18S rDNA gene was observed in Ac. striatus (2n = 22) and Atta spp. (2n = 22) highlighting the dissimilarity between these species. The results from the present study contribute to the description of 18S rDNA clusters in

  14. The ribosomal subunit assembly line

    PubMed Central

    Dlakić, Mensur

    2005-01-01

    Recent proteomic studies in Saccharomyces cerevisiae have identified nearly 200 proteins, other than the structural ribosomal proteins, that participate in the assembly of ribosomal subunits and their transport from the nucleus. In a separate line of research, proteomic studies of mature plant ribosomes have revealed considerable variability in the protein composition of individual ribosomes. PMID:16207363

  15. Clinostomum complanatum and Clinostomum marginatum (Rudolphi, 1819) (Digenea: Clinostomidae) are separate species based on differences in ribosomal DNA.

    PubMed

    Dzikowski, R; Levy, M G; Poore, M F; Flowers, J R; Paperna, I

    2004-04-01

    Infections by metacercariae of Clinostomum (Leidy, 1856) species adversely affect aquacultured fish and are potentially transmissible to humans. Molecular methodologies are efficient tools, which enable diagnosis of all life-history stages of trematodes in their diverse hosts. The small subunit of ribosomal DNA genes of adults of the Old World Clinostomum complanatum (Rudolphi, 1819) and the New World Clinostomum marginatum (Rudolphi, 1819), obtained from a little egret Egretta garzetta (Linnaeus, 1766) and the great blue heron Ardea herodias (Linnaeus, 1758), respectively, were amplified, sequenced, and aligned. The resulting alignment was used to develop a genetic assay to differentiate between these species.

  16. Polymorphisms in the 18S rDNA gene of Cystoisospora belli and clinical features of cystoisosporosis in HIV-infected patients.

    PubMed

    Resende, Deisy V; Pedrosa, André L; Correia, Dalmo; Cabrine-Santos, Marlene; Lages-Silva, Eliane; Meira, Wendell S F; Oliveira-Silva, Márcia B

    2011-03-01

    Intraspecific variability among Cystoisospora belli isolates and its clinical implications in human cystoisosporosis have not been established. In this study, the restriction fragment length polymorphisms in a 1.8-kb amplicon of the small subunit ribosomal DNA (SSU rDNA) of the parasite was investigated in 20 C. belli-positive stool samples obtained from 15 HIV-infected patients. Diarrheic syndrome was observed in all patients with cystoisosporosis and the number of diarrheic episodes per patient during hospitalization ranged from 1 to 26 (mean of 9.64 ± 9.30), with a mean duration of 2 to 12 days (mean of 5.90 ± 3 days). Three restriction profiles (RF) were generated with MboII digestion, which were named RFI, RFII, and RFIII. Two isolates obtained from a patient with extraintestinal cystoisosporosis showed distinct restriction profiles with MboII. This study demonstrates that patients can be infected with different C. belli genotypes, and this information may be useful for identifying new C. belli genotypes infecting humans.

  17. First description of heterogeneity in 18S rRNA genes in the haploid genome of Cryptosporidium andersoni Kawatabi type.

    PubMed

    Ikarashi, Makoto; Fukuda, Yasuhiro; Honma, Hajime; Kasai, Kenji; Kaneta, Yoshiyasu; Nakai, Yutaka

    2013-09-01

    The Apicomplexan Cryptosporidium andersoni, is a species of gastric Cryptosporidium, is frequently detected in older calves and adult cattle. Genotyping analyses based on 18S ribosomal RNA gene sequences have been performed on a novel C. andersoni genotype, namely the Kawatabi type, and the oocysts were classified into two distinct groups genotypically: Type A (the sequence in GenBank) and Type B (with a thymine nucleotide insertion not in Type A). This study analyzed 3775 cattle at a slaughterhouse and 310 cattle at a farm using microscopy and found 175 Cryptosporidium-positive animals: 171 from the slaughterhouse and four from the farm, and all infecting parasites were determined to be C. andersoni from 18S rRNA gene sequences determined from fecal DNA. In genotyping analyses with single isolated oocysts, about a half of analyzed ones were clearly classified into well known two genotypes (Type A and B). In addition to these two known genotypes, we have detected some oocysts showing mixed signals of Types A and B in the electropherogram from the automated sequencer (the Type C genotype). To determine the genotypic composition of sporozoites carried by the Type C oocysts, we analyzed their 18S rRNA gene sequences using a single sporozoite isolation procedure. Some sporozoites were classified as either Type A or Type B. However, more than half of the analyzed isolated sporozoites showed a mixed signal identical to that of Type C oocysts, and both the Type A and B signals were surely detectable from such sporozoites after a cloning procedure. In conclusion, C. andersoni carries two different genotypes heterogeneously in its haploid genome. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Potential Roles for Ubiquitin and the Proteasome during Ribosome Biogenesis‡

    PubMed Central

    Stavreva, Diana A.; Kawasaki, Miyuki; Dundr, Miroslav; Koberna, Karel; Müller, Waltraud G.; Tsujimura-Takahashi, Teruko; Komatsu, Wataru; Hayano, Toshiya; Isobe, Toshiaki; Raska, Ivan; Misteli, Tom; Takahashi, Nobuhiro; McNally, James G.

    2006-01-01

    We have investigated the possible involvement of the ubiquitin-proteasome system (UPS) in ribosome biogenesis. We find by immunofluorescence that ubiquitin is present within nucleoli and also demonstrate by immunoprecipitation that complexes associated with pre-rRNA processing factors are ubiquitinated. Using short proteasome inhibition treatments, we show by fluorescence microscopy that nucleolar morphology is disrupted for some but not all factors involved in ribosome biogenesis. Interference with proteasome degradation also induces the accumulation of 90S preribosomes, alters the dynamic properties of a number of processing factors, slows the release of mature rRNA from the nucleolus, and leads to the depletion of 18S and 28S rRNAs. Together, these results suggest that the UPS is probably involved at many steps during ribosome biogenesis, including the maturation of the 90S preribosome. PMID:16782897

  19. A comparison of the yeast and rabbit 80 S ribosome reveals the topology of the nascent chain exit tunnel, inter-subunit bridges and mammalian rRNA expansion segments.

    PubMed

    Morgan, D G; Ménétret, J F; Radermacher, M; Neuhof, A; Akey, I V; Rapoport, T A; Akey, C W

    2000-08-11

    Protein synthesis in eukaryotes is mediated by both cytoplasmic and membrane-bound ribosomes. During the co-translational translocation of secretory and membrane proteins, eukaryotic ribosomes dock with the protein conducting channel of the endoplasmic reticulum. An understanding of these processes will require the detailed structure of a eukaryotic ribosome. To this end, we have compared the three-dimensional structures of yeast and rabbit ribosomes at 24 A resolution. In general, we find that the active sites for protein synthesis and translocation have been highly conserved. It is interesting that a channel was visualized in the neck of the small subunit whose entrance is formed by a deep groove. By analogy with the prokaryotic small subunit, this channel may provide a conserved portal through which mRNA is threaded into the decoding center. In addition, both the small and large subunits are built around a dense tubular network. Our analysis further suggests that the nascent chain exit tunnel and the docking surface for the endoplasmic reticulum channel are formed by this network. We surmise that many of these features correspond to rRNA, based on biochemical and structural data. Ribosomal function is critically dependent on the specific association of small and large subunits. Our analysis of eukaryotic ribosomes reveals four conserved inter-subunit bridges with a geometry similar to that found in prokaryotes. In particular, a double-bridge connects the small subunit platform with the interface canyon on the large subunit. Moreover, a novel bridge is formed between the platform and the base of the L1 domain. Finally, size differences between mammalian and yeast large subunit rRNAs have been correlated with five expansion segments that form two large spines and three extended fingers. Overall, we find that expansion segments within the large subunit rRNA have been incorporated at positions distinct from the active sites for protein synthesis and translocation.

  20. Nonessential Plastid-Encoded Ribosomal Proteins in Tobacco: A Developmental Role for Plastid Translation and Implications for Reductive Genome Evolution[W][OA

    PubMed Central

    Fleischmann, Tobias T.; Scharff, Lars B.; Alkatib, Sibah; Hasdorf, Sebastian; Schöttler, Mark A.; Bock, Ralph

    2011-01-01

    Plastid genomes of higher plants contain a conserved set of ribosomal protein genes. Although plastid translational activity is essential for cell survival in tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum), individual plastid ribosomal proteins can be nonessential. Candidates for nonessential plastid ribosomal proteins are ribosomal proteins identified as nonessential in bacteria and those whose genes were lost from the highly reduced plastid genomes of nonphotosynthetic plastid-bearing lineages (parasitic plants, apicomplexan protozoa). Here we report the reverse genetic analysis of seven plastid-encoded ribosomal proteins that meet these criteria. We have introduced knockout alleles for the corresponding genes into the tobacco plastid genome. Five of the targeted genes (ribosomal protein of the large subunit22 [rpl22], rpl23, rpl32, ribosomal protein of the small subunit3 [rps3], and rps16) were shown to be essential even under heterotrophic conditions, despite their loss in at least some parasitic plastid-bearing lineages. This suggests that nonphotosynthetic plastids show elevated rates of gene transfer to the nuclear genome. Knockout of two ribosomal protein genes, rps15 and rpl36, yielded homoplasmic transplastomic mutants, thus indicating nonessentiality. Whereas Δrps15 plants showed only a mild phenotype, Δrpl36 plants were severely impaired in photosynthesis and growth and, moreover, displayed greatly altered leaf morphology. This finding provides strong genetic evidence that chloroplast translational activity influences leaf development, presumably via a retrograde signaling pathway. PMID:21934145

  1. CREB1 directly activates the transcription of ribonucleotide reductase small subunit M2 and promotes the aggressiveness of human colorectal cancer

    PubMed Central

    Fang, Zejun; Lin, Aifen; Chen, Jiaoe; Zhang, Xiaomin; Liu, Hong; Li, Hongzhang; Hu, Yanyan; Zhang, Xia; Zhang, Jiangang; Qiu, Lanlan; Mei, Lingming; Shao, Jimin; Chen, Xiang

    2016-01-01

    As the small subunit of Ribonucleotide reductase (RR), RRM2 displays a very important role in various critical cellular processes such as cell proliferation, DNA repair, and senescence, etc. Importantly, RRM2 functions like a tumor driver in most types of cancer but little is known about the regulatory mechanism of RRM2 in cancer development. In this study, we found that the cAMP responsive element binding protein 1 (CREB1) acted as a transcription factor of RRM2 gene in human colorectal cancer (CRC). CREB1 directly bound to the promoter of RRM2 gene and induced its transcriptional activation. Knockdown of CREB1 decreased the expression of RRM2 at both mRNA and protein levels. Moreover, knockdown of RRM2 attenuated CREB1-induced aggressive phenotypes of CRC cells in vitro and in vivo. Analysis of the data from TCGA database and clinical CRC specimens with immunohistochemical staining also demonstrated a strong correlation between the co-expression of CREB1 and RRM2. Decreased disease survivals were observed in CRC patients with high expression levels of CREB1 or RRM2. Our results indicate CREB1 as a critical transcription factor of RRM2 which promotes tumor aggressiveness, and imply a significant correlation between CREB1 and RRM2 in CRC specimens. These may provide the possibility that CREB1 and RRM2 could be used as biomarkers or targets for CRC diagnosis and treatment. PMID:27801665

  2. The molecular evolution and structural organization of group I introns at position 1389 in nuclear small subunit rDNA of myxomycetes.

    PubMed

    Wikmark, Odd-Gunnar; Haugen, Peik; Lundblad, Eirik W; Haugli, Kari; Johansen, Steinar D

    2007-01-01

    The number of nuclear group I introns from myxomycetes is rapidly increasing in GenBank as more rDNA sequences from these organisms are being sequenced. They represent an interesting and complex group of intervening sequences because several introns are mobile (or inferred to be mobile) and many contain large and unusual insertions in peripheral loops. Here we describe related group I introns at position 1389 in the small subunit rDNA of representatives from the myxomycete family Didymiaceae. Phylogenetic analyses support a common origin and mainly vertical inheritance of the intron. All S1389 introns from the Didymiaceae belong to the IC1 subclass of nuclear group I introns. The central catalytic core region of about 100 nt appears divergent in sequence composition even though the introns reside in closely related species. Furthermore, unlike the majority of group I introns from myxomycetes the S1389 introns do not self-splice as naked RNA in vitro under standard conditions, consistent with a dependence on host factors for folding or activity. Finally, the myxomycete S1389 introns are exclusively found within the family Didymiaceae, which suggests that this group I intron was acquired after the split between the families Didymiaceae and Physaraceae.

  3. Isolation and characterization of cDNAs and genomic DNAs encoding ADP-glucose pyrophosphorylase large and small subunits from sweet potato.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Yu-Xi; Chen, Yu-Xiang; Tao, Xiang; Cheng, Xiao-Jie; Wang, Hai-Yan

    2016-04-01

    Sweet potato [Ipomoea batatas (L.) Lam.], the world's seventh most important food crop, is also a major industrial raw material for starch and ethanol production. In the plant starch biosynthesis pathway, ADP-glucose pyrophosphorylase (AGPase) catalyzes the first, rate-limiting step and plays a pivotal role in regulating this process. In spite of the importance of sweet potato as a starch source, only a few studies have focused on the molecular aspects of starch biosynthesis in sweet potato and almost no intensive research has been carried out on the AGPase gene family in this species. In this study, cDNAs encoding two small subunits (SSs) and four large subunits (LSs) of AGPase isoforms were cloned from sweet potato and the genomic organizations of the corresponding AGPase genes were elucidated. Expression pattern analysis revealed that the two SSs were constitutively expressed, whereas the four LSs displayed differential expression patterns in various tissues and at different developmental stages. Co-expression of SSs with different LSs in Escherichia coli yielded eight heterotetramers showing different catalytic activities. Interactions between different SSs and LSs were confirmed by a yeast two-hybrid experiment. Our findings provide comprehensive information about AGPase gene sequences, structures, expression profiles, and subunit interactions in sweet potato. The results can serve as a foundation for elucidation of molecular mechanisms of starch synthesis in tuberous roots, and should contribute to future regulation of starch biosynthesis to improve sweet potato starch yield.

  4. Reconsideration of the phylogenetic positions of five peritrich genera, Vorticella, Pseudovorticella, Zoothamnopsis, Zoothamnium, and Epicarchesium (Ciliophora, Peritrichia, Sessilida), based on small subunit rRNA gene sequences.

    PubMed

    Li, Lifang; Song, Weibo; Warren, Alan; Shin, Mann Kyoon; Chen, Zigui; Ji, Daode; Sun, Ping

    2008-01-01

    In order to re-evaluate the systematics of sessilid peritrich ciliates, small subunit (SSU) rRNA gene sequences were determined for 12 species belonging to five genera: Vorticella, Pseudovorticella, Epicarchesium, Zoothamnium, and Zoothamnopsis. Phylogenetic trees were deduced using Bayesian inference, maximum parsimony, and maximum likelihood methods. The phylogenetic analyses suggest that (1) sessilids which have stalks with continuous myonemes that contract in a zig-zag fashion form a separate clade from those which have stalks that contract independently and in a spiral fashion, supporting the separation of the family Zoothamniidae from the family Vorticellidae and (2) Epicarchesium and Pseudovorticella, both of which have reticulate silverline systems, are more closely related to each other than to other vorticellids, suggesting that differences in the silverline system (i.e. transverse vs. reticulate) may be the result of genuine evolutionary divergence among sessilid peritrichs. However, the newly sequenced Zoothamnopsis sinica, which has a reticulate silverline pattern, nests within the unresolved Zoothamnium species that have transverse silverline patterns. Thus, there were at least two evolutions of the reticulate silverline pattern character state from a plesiomorphic transverse state in the peritrichid ciliates. The molecular work demonstrates the genus Zoothamnium to be paraphyletic in relation to morphological studies, and suggests that Astylozoon, Opisthonecta, and Vorticella microstoma possibly share a SSU rRNA secondary structure in the helix E10-1 region.

  5. Cryptic diversity of free-living parabasalids, Pseudotrichomonas keilini and Lacusteria cypriaca n. g., n. sp., as inferred from small subunit rDNA sequences.

    PubMed

    Yubuki, Naoji; Céza, Vít; Cepicka, Ivan; Yabuki, Akinori; Inagaki, Yuji; Nakayama, Takeshi; Inouye, Isao; Leander, Brian S

    2010-01-01

    Ultrastructural and molecular phylogenetic evidence indicate that the Parabasalia consists of seven main subgroups: the Trichomonadida, Honigbergiellida, Hypotrichomonadida, Tritrichomonadida, Cristamonadida, Spirotrichonymphida, and Trichonymphida. Only five species of free-living parabasalids are known: Monotrichomonas carabina, Ditrichomonas honigbergii, Honigbergiella sp., Tetratrichomonas undula, and Pseudotrichomonas keilini. Phylogenetic analyses show that free-living species do not form a clade and instead branch in several different positions within the context of their parasitic relatives. Because the diversity of free-living parabasalids is poorly understood, the systematics of these lineages is in a significant state of disarray. In order to better understand the phylogenetic distribution of free-living parabasalids, we sequenced the small subunit rDNA from three different strains reminiscent of P. keilini; the strains were isolated from different geographical locations: (1) mangrove sediments in Japan and (2) sediments in Cyprus. These data demonstrated that the free-living parabasalids P. keilini and Lacusteria cypriaca n. g., n. sp., form a paraphyletic assemblage near the origin of a clade consisting mostly of parasitic trichomonadids (e.g. Trichomonas vaginalis). This paraphyletic distribution of similar morphotypes indicates that free-living trichomonadids represent a compelling example of morphostasis that provides insight into the suite of features present in the most recent free-living ancestor of their parasitic relatives. © 2010 The Author(s). Journal of Eukaryotic Microbiology © 2010 International Society of Protistologists.

  6. Determination of the relative expression levels of rubisco small subunit genes in Arabidopsis by rapid amplification of cDNA ends.

    PubMed

    Yoon, M; Putterill, J J; Ross, G S; Laing, W A

    2001-04-15

    Multigene families are common in higher organisms. However, due to the close similarities between members, it is often difficult to assess the individual contribution of each gene to the overall expression of the family. In Arabidopsis thaliana, there are four genes encoding the small subunits (SSU) of ribulose-1.5-bisphosphate carboxylase oxygenase (rubisco) whose nucleotide sequences are up to 98.4% identical. In order to overcome the technical limitations associated with gene-specific probes (or primers) commonly used in existing methods, we developed a new gene expression assay based on the RACE (rapid amplification of cDNA ends) technique with a single pair of primers. With this RACE gene expression assay, we were able to determine the relative transcript levels between four Arabidopsis SSU genes. We found that the relative SSU gene expression differed significantly between plants grown at different temperatures. Our observation raises the possibility that an adaptation of rubisco to the environment may be achieved through the specific synthesis of the SSU proteins, which is determined by the relative expression levels between the SSU genes.

  7. Molecular evolution inferred from small subunit rRNA sequences: what does it tell us about phylogenetic relationships and taxonomy of the parabasalids?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Viscogliosi, E.; Edgcomb, V. P.; Gerbod, D.; Noel, C.; Delgado-Viscogliosi, P.; Sogin, M. L. (Principal Investigator)

    1999-01-01

    The Parabasala are a primitive group of protists divided into two classes: the trichomonads and the hypermastigids. Until recently, phylogeny and taxonomy of parabasalids were mainly based on the comparative analysis of morphological characters primarily linked to the development of their cytoskeleton. Recent use of molecular markers, such as small subunit (SSU) rRNA has led to now insights into the systematics of the Parabasala and other groups of prolists. An updated phylogeny based on SSU rRNA is provided and compared to that inferred from ultrastructural data. The SSU rRNA phylogeny contradicts the dogma equating simple characters with pumitive characters. Hypermastigids, possessing a hyperdeveloped cytoskeleton, exhibit the most basal emergence in the parabasalid lineage. Other observations emerge from the SSU rRNA analysis, such as the secondary loss of some cytoskeleton structures in all representatives of the Monocercomonadidae, the existence of secondarily free living taxa (reversibility of parasitism) and the evidence against the co-evolution of the endobiotic parabasalids and their animal hosts. According to phylogenies based on SSU rRNA, all the trichomonad families are not monophyletic groups, putting into question the validity of current taxonomic assignments. The precise branching order of some taxa remains unclear, but this issue can possibly be addressed by the molecular analysis of additional parabasalids. The goal of such additional analyses would be to propose, in a near future, a revision of the taxonomy of this group of protists that takes into account both molecular and morphological data.

  8. Genetic diversity of microbial eukaryotes in anoxic sediment around fumaroles on a submarine caldera floor based on the small-subunit rDNA phylogeny.

    PubMed

    Takishita, Kiyotaka; Miyake, Hiroshi; Kawato, Masaru; Maruyama, Tadashi

    2005-06-01

    Recent culture-independent molecular analyses have shown the diversity and ecological importance of microbial eukaryotes (protists) in various marine environments. In the present study we directly extracted DNA from anoxic sediment near active fumaroles on a submarine caldera floor at a depth of 200 m and constructed genetic libraries of PCR-amplified eukaryotic small-subunit (SSU) rDNA. By sequencing cloned SSU rDNA of the libraries and their phylogenetic analyses, it was shown that most sequences have affiliations with known major lineages of eukaryotes (Cercozoa, Alveolata, stramenopiles and Opisthokonta). In particular, some sequences were closely related to those of representatives of eukaryotic parasites, such as Phagomyxa and Cryothecomonas of Cercozoa, Pirsonia of stramenopiles and Ichthyosporea of Opisthokonta, although it is not clear whether the organisms occur in free-living or parasitic forms. In addition, other sequences did not seem to be related to any described eukaryotic lineages suggesting the existence of novel eukaryotes at a high-taxonomic level in the sediment. The community composition of microbial eukaryotes in the sediment we surveyed was different overall from those of other anoxic marine environments previously investigated.

  9. Molecular evolution inferred from small subunit rRNA sequences: what does it tell us about phylogenetic relationships and taxonomy of the parabasalids?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Viscogliosi, E.; Edgcomb, V. P.; Gerbod, D.; Noel, C.; Delgado-Viscogliosi, P.; Sogin, M. L. (Principal Investigator)

    1999-01-01

    The Parabasala are a primitive group of protists divided into two classes: the trichomonads and the hypermastigids. Until recently, phylogeny and taxonomy of parabasalids were mainly based on the comparative analysis of morphological characters primarily linked to the development of their cytoskeleton. Recent use of molecular markers, such as small subunit (SSU) rRNA has led to now insights into the systematics of the Parabasala and other groups of prolists. An updated phylogeny based on SSU rRNA is provided and compared to that inferred from ultrastructural data. The SSU rRNA phylogeny contradicts the dogma equating simple characters with pumitive characters. Hypermastigids, possessing a hyperdeveloped cytoskeleton, exhibit the most basal emergence in the parabasalid lineage. Other observations emerge from the SSU rRNA analysis, such as the secondary loss of some cytoskeleton structures in all representatives of the Monocercomonadidae, the existence of secondarily free living taxa (reversibility of parasitism) and the evidence against the co-evolution of the endobiotic parabasalids and their animal hosts. According to phylogenies based on SSU rRNA, all the trichomonad families are not monophyletic groups, putting into question the validity of current taxonomic assignments. The precise branching order of some taxa remains unclear, but this issue can possibly be addressed by the molecular analysis of additional parabasalids. The goal of such additional analyses would be to propose, in a near future, a revision of the taxonomy of this group of protists that takes into account both molecular and morphological data.

  10. A potential role for RNA turnover in the light regulation of plant gene expression: ribulose-1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase small subunit in soybean.

    PubMed Central

    Shirley, B W; Meagher, R B

    1990-01-01

    Post-transcriptional regulation of the genes encoding the small subunit (rbcS) of ribulose-1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase was examined in soybean seedlings. Substantial discrepancies were detected between relative in vitro transcription rates and steady-state RNA levels in light- and dark-grown seedling leaves, indicating that rbcS RNA may be degraded more rapidly in light than in darkness. Additional data imply that the turnover mechanism is rapidly induced by light, maintained for some time in darkness, and that it may be negatively controlled by far-red light. The proposed RNA turnover system does not affect all RNAs equally since a soybean actin gene showed equivalent in vitro transcription rates and RNA levels in light and darkness. Soybean rbcS genes may be subject to a novel mode of control in which light-induced expression is accompanied by an increased rate of RNA degradation. Models for the specific regulation of rbcS RNA stability in response to light are presented. Images PMID:2356127

  11. Orosomucoid Proteins Interact with the Small Subunit of Serine Palmitoyltransferase and Contribute to Sphingolipid Homeostasis and Stress Responses in Arabidopsis[OPEN

    PubMed Central

    Li, Jian; Yin, Jian; Rong, Chan; Li, Kai-En; Wu, Jian-Xin; Huang, Li-Qun; Zeng, Hong-Yun; Sahu, Sunil Kumar; Yao, Nan

    2016-01-01

    Serine palmitoyltransferase (SPT), a pyridoxyl-5′-phosphate-dependent enzyme, catalyzes the first and rate-limiting step in sphingolipid biosynthesis. In humans and yeast, orosomucoid proteins (ORMs) negatively regulate SPT and thus play an important role in maintaining sphingolipid levels. Despite the importance of sphingoid intermediates as bioactive molecules, the regulation of sphingolipid biosynthesis through SPT is not well understood in plants. Here, we identified and characterized the Arabidopsis thaliana ORMs, ORM1 and ORM2. Loss of function of both ORM1 and ORM2 (orm1 amiR-ORM2) stimulated de novo sphingolipid biosynthesis, leading to strong sphingolipid accumulation, especially of long-chain bases and ceramides. Yeast two-hybrid, bimolecular fluorescence complementation, and coimmunoprecipitation assays confirmed that ORM1 and ORM2 physically interact with the small subunit of SPT (ssSPT), indicating that ORMs inhibit ssSPT function. We found that orm1 amiR-ORM2 plants exhibited an early-senescence phenotype accompanied by H2O2 production at the cell wall and in mitochondria, active vesicular trafficking, and formation of cell wall appositions. Strikingly, the orm1 amiR-ORM2 plants showed increased expression of genes related to endoplasmic reticulum stress and defenses and also had enhanced resistance to oxidative stress and pathogen infection. Taken together, our findings indicate that ORMs interact with SPT to regulate sphingolipid homeostasis and play a pivotal role in environmental stress tolerance in plants. PMID:27923879

  12. Ribosome dynamics during decoding.

    PubMed

    Rodnina, Marina V; Fischer, Niels; Maracci, Cristina; Stark, Holger

    2017-03-19

    Elongation factors Tu (EF-Tu) and SelB are translational GTPases that deliver aminoacyl-tRNAs (aa-tRNAs) to the ribosome. In each canonical round of translation elongation, aa-tRNAs, assisted by EF-Tu, decode mRNA codons and insert the respective amino acid into the growing peptide chain. Stop codons usually lead to translation termination; however, in special cases UGA codons are recoded to selenocysteine (Sec) with the help of SelB. Recruitment of EF-Tu and SelB together with their respective aa-tRNAs to the ribosome is a multistep process. In this review, we summarize recent progress in understanding the role of ribosome dynamics in aa-tRNA selection. We describe the path to correct codon recognition by canonical elongator aa-tRNA and Sec-tRNA(Sec) and discuss the local and global rearrangements of the ribosome in response to correct and incorrect aa-tRNAs. We present the mechanisms of GTPase activation and GTP hydrolysis of EF-Tu and SelB and summarize what is known about the accommodation of aa-tRNA on the ribosome after its release from the elongation factor. We show how ribosome dynamics ensures high selectivity for the cognate aa-tRNA and suggest that conformational fluctuations, induced fit and kinetic discrimination play major roles in maintaining the speed and fidelity of translation.This article is part of the themed issue 'Perspectives on the ribosome'.

  13. Distribution of Mosquitoes in the South East of Argentina and First Report on the Analysis Based on 18S rDNA and COI Sequences

    PubMed Central

    Díaz-Nieto, Leonardo M.; Maciá, Arnaldo; Parisi, Gustavo; Farina, Juan L.; Vidal-Domínguez, María E.; Perotti, M. Alejandra; Berón, Corina M.

    2013-01-01

    Although Mar del Plata is the most important city on the Atlantic coast of Argentina, mosquitoes inhabiting such area are almost uncharacterized. To increase our knowledge in their distribution, we sampled specimens of natural populations. After the morphological identification based on taxonomic keys, sequences of DNA from small ribosomal subunit (18S rDNA) and cytochrome c oxidase I (COI) genes were obtained from native species and the phylogenetic analysis of these sequences were done. Fourteen species from the genera Uranotaenia, Culex, Ochlerotatus and Psorophora were found and identified. Our 18S rDNA an