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Sample records for 19-9 ca 19-9

  1. CA 19-9 (Cancer Antigen 19-9)

    MedlinePlus

    ... as a tumor marker : To help differentiate between cancer of the pancreas and other conditions, such as pancreatitis To monitor ... levels of CA 19-9 are seen in cancer of the exocrine pancreas. This cancer arises in the tissues that produce ...

  2. Gastric Cancer with a Very High Serum CA 19-9 Level.

    PubMed

    Kato, Kazuya; Taniguchi, Masahiko; Kawakami, Takako; Nagase, Atsushi; Matsuda, Minoru; Onodea, Kazuhiko; Yamaguchi, Hidenori; Higuchi, Mineko; Furukawa, Hiroyuki

    2011-01-01

    Carbohydrate antigen 19-9 (CA 19-9) is a sensitive marker for pancreatic and hepatobiliary malignancies. The highest frequency of elevated serum CA 19-9 levels is found among patients with pancreatic cancer. CA 19-9 has recently been demonstrated to be a marker of digestive tract malignancies. We report the case of a patient with a gastric cancer and a very high serum CA 19-9 level. During laparotomy, a large mass was found in the antrum. A distal gastrectomy with D2 dissection of the lymph nodes was performed. Histological examination, including immunohistochemistry, revealed an adenocarcinoma of the stomach producing CA 19-9. To the best of our knowledge, no patient with an extremely high serum CA 19-9 level resulting from a gastric adenocarcinoma has been reported previously. PMID:21577374

  3. Relationship between serum CA19-9 and CEA levels and prognosis of pancreatic cancer

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Lei; Huang, Peijun; Wang, Fang; Li, Daqian; Xie, Erfu; Zhang, Yan

    2015-01-01

    Background To explore the relationship between preoperative serum CA19-9 and CEA levels and prognosis of pancreatic cancer (PC). Methods The clinicopathological data of 128 patients with pancreatic adenocarcinoma who were treated in our center between January 2012 and December 2013 were retrospectively analyzed. The relationships between serum CA19-9 and CEA levels and survival were analyzed using Kaplan-Meier method, log-rank test, and Cox regression analysis. The cut-off values for serum CA19-9 and CEA levels were 39 U/mL and 4.7 ng/mL, respectively. Results Among these 128 patients, the mean age was 62 years, and median survival was 12.2 days. The positive rate of CA19-9 and CEA was 78.1% and 37.5%, respectively. Patients with increased CA19-9 or CEA level suffered a poorer prognosis than those with normal CA19-9 or CEA level (CA19-9: P=0.027; CEA: P=0.036). Cox logistic analysis revealed that lymphatic metastasis, CA19-9 >39 U/mL, and CEA >4.7 ng/mL were independent prognostic factors in patients with pancreatic carcinoma. Conclusions Preoperative serum CA19-9 and CEA level are closely related with survival time in PC patients and therefore may be used for evaluating the prognosis for PC. PMID:26734638

  4. CA19-9 serum levels predict micrometastases in patients with gastric cancer

    PubMed Central

    Potrc, Stojan; Mis, Katarina; Plankl, Mojca; Mars, Tomaz

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Background We explored the prognostic value of the up-regulated carbohydrate antigen (CA19-9) in node-negative patients with gastric cancer as a surrogate marker for micrometastases. Patients and methods Micrometastases were determined using reverse transcription quantitative polymerase chain reaction (RT-qPCR) for a subgroup of 30 node-negative patients. This group was used to determine the cut-off for preoperative CA19-9 serum levels as a surrogate marker for micrometastases. Then 187 node-negative T1 to T4 patients were selected to validate the predictive value of this CA19-9 threshold. Results Patients with micrometastases had significantly higher preoperative CA19-9 serum levels compared to patients without micrometastases (p = 0.046). CA19-9 serum levels were significantly correlated with tumour site, tumour diameter, and perineural invasion. Although not reaching significance, subgroup analysis showed better five-year survival rates for patients with CA19-9 serum levels below the threshold, compared to patients with CA19-9 serum levels above the cut-off. The cumulative survival for T2 to T4 node-negative patients was significantly better with CA19-9 serum levels below the cut-off (p = 0.04). Conclusions Preoperative CA19-9 serum levels can be used to predict higher risk for haematogenous spread and micrometastases in node-negative patients. However, CA19-9 serum levels lack the necessary sensitivity and specificity to reliably predict micrometastases. PMID:27247553

  5. The Role of CA19-9 in Predicting Tumour Resectability in Carcinoma Head of Pancreas

    PubMed Central

    Viswanathan, Subramanian; Antomy, Thomas Babu; Thirumuruganand, Sathyamoorthy; Kumaresan, Dhandapani Subramanian

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Carbohydrate antigen 19-9 (CA 19-9) is a tumour associated antigen. Blood levels may be elevated in benign as well as malignant conditions. Its sensitivity (70-90%) and specificity (68-91%) are inadequate for accurate diagnosis. It can be used to predict the extent of disease and outcome after resection. Aim The aim of the present study was to assess the role of CA 19-9 in predicting the resectability of the tumour in the head of pancreas. Materials and Methods This was a prospective study which included 30 patients and study period was from May 2012 to October 2014. Data collected from all patients with carcinoma of the head of pancreas on the basis of contrast enhanced computed tomography/Magnetic resonance cholangiopancreaticography. CA 19-9 levels were measured and recorded. Patients who were medically unfit for surgery or those who didn’t warrant palliative surgery were excluded from the study. During surgery the operative findings on operability were documented and tabulated against corresponding CA 19-9 levels. Results Of the 30 patients who were operated, 13(43.3%) patients had operable tumours and underwent Whipple’s procedure and 17(56.7%) underwent palliative bypass procedure. Of the 30, CA 19-9 levels were elevated in 9(30.0%) and were normal in 21(70.0%). Among 13(43.3%) who had operable tumours, CA 19-9 was elevated in 4(13.3) and was normal in 9(30.0%). Of the 17(56.7%) who had inoperable tumours CA 19-9 was elevated in 5(16.7%) and was normal in 12(40.0%). Among the 17 who had inoperable tumours, 8(47.1%) were diagnosed preoperatively and of them CA 19-9 levels were raised in 2(11.8%) and normal in 6(35.3%). In the group of 9(52.9%) who had inoperable tumours diagnosed intraoperatively, CA 19-9 was raised in 3(17.6%) of them and was normal in the remaining 6(35.3%) of them. Conclusion Based on the study findings, it can be stated that there is no significant correlation with resectability of pancreatic adenocarcinoma and CA 19-9 and

  6. Serum CA 242 in pancreatic cancer. Comparison with CA 19-9 and CEA.

    PubMed

    Pezzilli, R; Billi, P; Plate, L; Laudadio, M A; Sprovieri, G

    1995-01-01

    Serum CA 242, CA 19-9 and CEA concentrations were determined in 94 subjects divided into 5 groups: Group 1 consisted of 22 healthy subjects; Group 2 consisted of 40 patients with pancreatic adenocarcinoma; according to Cubilla and Fitzgerald's classification, 11 tumours were Stage I, 4 were Stage II, and 25 were Stage III. Group 3 consisted of 10 chronic pancreatitis patients, group 4 of 10 acute pancreatitis patients, group 5 of 12 patients with nonpancreatic digestive carcinomas. Ten of these 12 patients had distant metastases. The sensitivity of CA 19-9 in the diagnosis of pancreatic cancer was higher than that of CEA and CA 242 (p < 0.05 and p < 0.005, respectively). In Stage I cancer patients the sensitivity of the markers studied was less than 50% (45% for CA 19-9, 18% for CEA, and 9% for CA 242) whereas most of the 25 patients with metastatic tumours of the pancreas had elevated serum levels of all 3 markers. The various combinations of the three markers did not significantly improve the sensitivity in diagnosing pancreatic cancer. No relationship was found between the localization of the tumour and the serum levels of the 3 markers studied. Similarly, no differences were found between patients with cholestasis and those without. The specificity of the 3 markers, evaluated in patients with benign pancreatic diseases, was 100% for CA 242, 90% for CA 199 and 70% for CEA.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:8562994

  7. Elevated Preoperative Serum CA19-9 Levels in Patients with Hepatocellular Carcinoma Is Associated with Poor Prognosis after Resection

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Chien-Hung; Hu, Rey-Heng; Ho, Ming-Chih

    2013-01-01

    Serum levels of the tumor marker CA19-9 have been reported to be elevated in patients with hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC), but its clinicopathologic significance is still unknown. A cohort of 304 patients undergoing surgical resection for HCC and having preoperative CA19-9 data was enrolled in this study. Serum CA19-9 levels were correlated with clinicopathologic factors. Univariate and multivariate analyses were performed to determine the predictors of patient survival. On receiver operating characteristic curve analysis, the cut off value of CA19-9 was determined to be 27 U/mL. One hundred and six patients had preoperative CA19-9 values >27 U/mL. High serum CA19-9 levels did not correlate with patient age, sex, viral status, α-fetoprotein level, tumor size, tumor grade, tumor stage, multiplicity, and vascular invasion. Patients with elevated preoperative CA19-9 levels had lower 10-year survival than those without CA19-9 elevation. Multivariate analysis revealed that CA19-9 level, tumor grade, and tumor size are independent prognostic factors for long-term survival. In conclusion, a preoperative CA19-9 value >27 U/mL is associated with poor prognosis after resection for HCC. PMID:23843733

  8. Expression of CEA, CA19-9, CA125, and EpCAM in pseudomyxoma peritonei.

    PubMed

    Nummela, Pirjo; Leinonen, Hannele; Järvinen, Petrus; Thiel, Alexandra; Järvinen, Heikki; Lepistö, Anna; Ristimäki, Ari

    2016-08-01

    Pseudomyxoma peritonei is a fatal clinical syndrome with mucinous tumor cells disseminated into peritoneal cavity and secreting abundant mucinous ascites. The serum tumor markers CEA, CA19-9, and CA125 are used to monitor pseudomyxoma peritonei remission, but their expression at tissue level has not been well characterized. Herein, we analyzed expression of these proteins and the adenocarcinoma marker EpCAM in 92 appendix-derived pseudomyxoma peritonei tumors by immunohistochemistry. All tumors were found to ubiquitously express CEA and EpCAM. In the majority of the tumors (94.6%), CEA showed polarized immunostaining, but in 5 aggressive high-grade tumors containing numerous signet ring cells, a nonpolarized staining was detected. We found preoperative CEA serum values to correlate with peritoneal cancer index. However, the serum values of the advanced cases with nonpolarized staining pattern were normal, and the patients died within 5 years after diagnosis. Thus, serum CEA measurements did not reflect aggressiveness of these tumors. CA19-9 showed strong immunopositivity in most of the tumors (91.3%), and mutated enzyme FUT3 was demonstrated from the cases showing negative or weak staining. CA125 was infrequently expressed by tumor cells (focal staining in 6.5% of the cases), but in most of the cases (79.3%), adjacent nonneoplastic mesothelial cells showed immunopositivity. As a conclusion, CEA and EpCAM are invariably expressed by pseudomyxoma peritonei tumor cells and could be exploited to targeted therapies against this malignancy. PMID:27038681

  9. Postoperative CA19-9 Change Is a Useful Predictor of Intrahepatic Cholangiocarcinoma Survival following Liver Resection

    PubMed Central

    Yoo, Tae; Park, Sang-Jae; Han, Sung-Sik; Kim, Seong Hoon; Lee, Seung Duk; Kim, Young-Kyu; Kim, Tae Hyun; Woo, Sang Myung; Lee, Woo Jin; Hong, Eun Kyung

    2015-01-01

    Background. To investigate the clinical significance of the perioperative CA19-9 change for predicting survival in intrahepatic cholangiocarcinoma (ICC) patients treated with surgical resection. Methods. We retrospectively reviewed the data from 74 ICC patients treated with surgical resection between April 2001 and July 2010. Perioperative CA19-9 (preoperative level, postoperative lowest level, and level at recurrence) levels were analyzed for patient distribution and survival. Results. Before surgery, there were 45 patients who had high preoperative CA19-9 levels (>37 U/mL) and 29 who had normal levels (≤37 U/mL). Of 45 patients with high CA19-9 levels, 34 had normalized CA19-9 levels after resection and 11 had persistently high levels. Of 34 patients with normalized CA19-9 levels, 18 showed recurrence. Of 29 patients with normal preoperative levels, 15 showed recurrence. Multivariate analysis presented that old age (hazard ratio [HR] = 3.881, p < 0.01), persistently high postoperative CA19-9 level (HR = 4.41, p < 0.001), perineural invasion (HR = 3.073, p = 0.01), narrow resection margin (HR = 3.152, p = 0.05), and lymph node metastasis (HR = 3.427, p = 0.02) were significant independent risk factors for survival. Conclusions. Patients who have normalized CA19-9 levels postoperatively have longer survival outcomes. Therefore, normalized postoperative CA19-9 may be a useful clinical marker for ICC survival. PMID:26839445

  10. Elevated CA19-9 Is Associated With Increased Mortality In A Prospective Cohort Of Hepatocellular Carcinoma Patients

    PubMed Central

    Hsu, Christine C; Goyal, Abhishek; Iuga, Alina; Krishnamoorthy, Saravanan; Lee, Valerie; Verna, Elizabeth C; Wang, Shuang; Chen, Fei-Na; Rodriguez, Rosa; Emond, Jean; Berk, Paul; Lefkowitch, Jay; Dove, Lorna; Brown, Robert S; Siegel, Abby B

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is the third leading cause of cancer-related deaths worldwide. CA19-9 is a glycoprotein that predicts poor prognosis in pancreatic and biliary malignancies. We evaluated it as a prognostic biomarker for patients with HCC. Methods: We prospectively enrolled 145 patients with HCC, diagnosed using American Association for Study of Liver Diseases criteria, between October 2008 and November 2012. We examined whether baseline serum CA19-9 levels predicted overall survival. We also examined immunostains of hepatic resections and explants of patients with elevated and normal serum CA19-9. Results: In a cohort of predominantly hepatitis C and B patients, CA19-9 ≥100 U/ml was associated with a 2.7-fold increased mortality (hazard ratio (HR): 2.72; 95% confidence interval (CI): 1.52–4.88, P<0.001). It remained a significant predictor (HR: 2.58; 95% CI: 1.41–4.72, P=0.002) in a multivariable model adjusted for Child–Pugh score, alpha-fetoprotein, Barcelona Clinic Liver Cancer stage, and Model for End-Stage Liver Disease. CA19-9 immunohistochemistry performed on a subset of liver resection and explant specimens showed increased CA19-9 immunostaining of non-tumor liver parenchyma in patients with elevated serum CA19-9. It also showed staining of native and reactive bile ducts, and of progenitor-like cells at the periphery of cirrhotic nodules. Conclusions: Elevated serum CA19-9 ≥100 U/ml is an independent predictor of poor overall survival in this hypothesis-generating study. The unfavorable prognosis seen with elevated serum levels may be related to progenitor-like cells in the non-tumor liver. PMID:25651978

  11. Benign Hydronephrosis and Elevated of Serum Levels of Carbohydrate Antigen CA 19-9: A Case Report.

    PubMed

    Filipovic, Branka; Milinić, Nikola; Gacic, Jasna; Markovic, Olivera; Djokovic, Aleksandra; Filipovic, Branislav

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND Carbohydrate tumor-associated antigen (CA 19-9) has been shown to be upregulated in other malignant tumors including gastric, ovarian, hepatocellular, and colorectal carcinoma as well as benign diseases of the biliary track such as pancreatitis, cholangitis, and choledocholithiasis. According to the available literature, in several cases of benign hydronephrosis and in a few cases of benign renal diseases, elevated CA 19-9 has been noted. CASE REPORT A 58-year-old Caucasian male patient was admitted in our clinic with complaints about blunt abdominal pain in the past two-month period localized in the right lumbar region and irradiating into the right inguinal area, constipation, abdominal bloating, and intermittent hematuria. The concentration of serum CA 19-9 was 3500 U/mL. Urine cytology provided no signs of abnormality. Intravenous urography visualized right-sided pyelon and ureter duplex with the defect in contrast shade of the pyelon, caused by a stag horn calculus. Contrast added computerized axial tomography of the abdomen and pelvis visualized the pyelon casted concretion spreading throughout the right pyelon, with ureterohydronephrosis with the distal block for passage of the contrast to the distal part of the ureter. CONCLUSIONS There is no doubt that CA 19-9 level is occasionally elevated in patients with obstructive urolithiasis as it was in our case. In the routine medical praxis, urolithiasis should not be neglected in the differential diagnosis of elevated concentrations of CA 19-9 marker. PMID:27287959

  12. PAM4 Immunoassay Alone and in Combination with CA19-9 for the Detection of Pancreatic Adenocarcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Gold, David V.; Gaedcke, Jochen; Ghadimi, B. Michael; Goggins, Michael; Hruban, Ralph H.; Liu, Mengling; Newsome, Guy; Goldenberg, David M.

    2012-01-01

    Background Monoclonal antibody PAM4 has high specificity for pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC), as well as its precursor lesions, but is not reactive with normal and benign pancreatic tissues. Our purpose was to evaluate a PAM4-based serum-immunoassay alone, and in combination with the CA19-9 assay, for the detection of PDAC with particular attention to early-stage disease. Methods Sera from patients with confirmed PDAC (N=298), other cancers (N=99), benign disease of the pancreas (N=120), and healthy adults (N=79) were evaluated by specific enzyme-immunoassay for concentration of PAM4 and CA19-9 antigen levels by blinded analyses. All tests for statistical significance were two-sided. Results Overall sensitivity for PAM4 detection of PDAC was 76%, with 64% of stage-1 patients also identified. The detection rate was considerably higher (85%) for advanced disease. The assay showed high specificity compared to benign pancreatic disease (85%), with a positive likelihood ratio (+LR) of 4.93. CA19-9 provided an overall sensitivity of 77%, and was positive in 58% of patients with stage-1 disease; however, specificity was significantly lower for CA19-9 (68%) with a +LR=2.85 (P=0.026 compared to PAM4). Importantly, a combined PAM4/CA19-9 assay demonstrated an improved sensitivity (84%) for overall detection of PDAC without significant loss of specificity (82%), as compared to either arm alone. Conclusions The PAM4-immunoassay identified approximately two-thirds of stage-1 PDAC patients with high discriminatory power with respect to benign, non-neoplastic pancreatic disease. These results provide a rationale for testing patient groups considered at high-risk for PDAC with a combined PAM4/CA19-9 biomarker assay for detection of early-stage PDAC. PMID:22898932

  13. Diagnostic Accuracy of Serum CA19-9 in Patients with Cholangiocarcinoma: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Liang, Bin; Zhong, Liansheng; He, Qun; Wang, Shaocheng; Pan, Zhongcheng; Wang, Tianjiao; Zhao, Yujie

    2015-01-01

    Background Cholangiocarcinoma (CCA) is a relatively rare cancer worldwide; however, its incidence is extremely high in Asia. Numerous studies reported that serum carbohydrate antigen 19-9 (CA19-9) plays a role in the diagnosis of CCA patients. However, published data are inconclusive. The aim of this meta-analysis was to provide a systematic review of the diagnostic performance of CA19-9 for CCA. Material/Methods We searched the public databases including PubMed, Web of Science, Embase, Chinese National Knowledge Infrastructure (CNKI), and WANFANG databases for articles evaluating the diagnostic accuracy of serum CA19-9 to predict CCA. The diagnostic sensitivity (SEN), specificity (SPE), positive likelihood ratio (PLR), negative likelihood ratio (NLR), diagnostic odds ratio (DOR), and summary receiver operating characteristic curve (SROC) were pooled by Meta-DiSc 1.4 software. Results A total of 31 articles met the inclusion criteria, including 1,264 patients and 2,039 controls. The pooled SEN, SPE, PLR, NLR, and DOR were 0.72 (95% CI: 0.70–0.75), 0.84 (95% CI: 0.82–0.85), 4.93 (95% CI, 3.67–6.64), 0.35 (95%CI, 0.30–0.41), and 15.10 (95% CI, 10.70–21.32), respectively. The area under SROC curve was 0.8300. The subgroup analyses based on different control type, geographical location, and sample size revealed that the diagnostic accuracy of CA19-9 tends to be same in different control type, but showed low sensitivity in European patients and small size group. Conclusions Serum CA19-9 is a useful non-invasive biomarker for CCA detection and may become a clinically useful tool to identify high-risk patients. PMID:26576628

  14. CA 19-9 Level as Indicator of Early Distant Metastasis and Therapeutic Selection in Resected Pancreatic Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Tae Hyun; Han, Sung-Sik; Park, Sang-Jae; Lee, Woo Jin; Woo, Sang Myung; Yoo, Tae; Moon, Sung Ho; Kim, Seong Hoon; Hong, Eun Kyung; Kim, Dae Yong; Park, Joong-Won

    2011-12-01

    Purpose: In patients with pancreatic cancer treated with curative resection, we evaluated the effect of clinicopathologic parameters on early distant metastasis within 6 months (DM{sup 6m}) to identify patients who might benefit from surgery. Methods and Materials: The study involved 84 patients with pancreatic cancer who had undergone curative resection between August 2001 and April 2009. The parameters of gender, age, tumor size, histologic differentiation, T classification, N classification, pre- and postoperative carbohydrate antigen (CA) 19-9 level, resection margin, and adjuvant chemoradiotherapy were analyzed to identify the risk factors associated with DM{sup 6m}. Results: Of the 84 patients, locoregional recurrence developed in 35 (41.7%) and distant metastasis in 58 (69%). Of the 58 patients with distant metastasis, DM{sup 6m} had developed in 27 (46.6%). Multivariate analysis showed that preoperative CA 19-9 level was significantly associated with DM{sup 6m} (p < .05). Of all 84 patients, DM{sup 6m} was observed in 9.1%, 50%, and 80% of those with a preoperative CA 19-9 level of {<=}100 U/mL, 101-400 U/mL, and >400 U/mL, respectively (p < .001). Conclusions: The preoperative CA 19-9 level might be a useful predictor of DM{sup 6m} and to identify those who would benefit from surgical resection.

  15. [A Patient with CA19-9-Producing Pulmonary Adenocarcinoma Who Responded to Multidisciplinary Therapy and Achieved Complete Response].

    PubMed

    Katayama, Kazuhisa; Tanaka, Takashi; Takahashi, Yuji; Endo, Hideko

    2016-07-01

    The patient, a man in his 60s, visited his physician with hemosputum. The shadow of a large mass, measuring approximately 6 cm in diameter, was observed in the left upper lung field, and the patient was referred to our hospital. After thorough examination, the mass was diagnosed as a pulmonary adenocarcinoma. In addition, serum CA19-9 levels were elevated(608.9 U/mL). Based on the PET-CT scan, the cancer was diagnosed as cT2bN1M0, stage II B disease and surgery was performed. The thorax was opened via a posterolateral incision; left upper lobectomy and lymph node dissection(ND2a-2)were performed. The lesion, measuring 56×59×44 mm, was excised from S1+2. The histopathological diagnosis was poorly-differentiated adenocarcinoma(mucin-producing adenocarcinoma). On immunostaining, the lesion was CA19-9-positive and was confirmed as pT2bN1M0, stage II B disease. The serum CA19-9 level was still elevated after surgery(83.2 U/mL). Therefore, 6 courses of adjuvant chemotherapy(carboplatin plus weekly paclitaxel)were administered. Grade 2 adverse events included hair loss and neutropenia. Thus, the drug withdrawal period was extended. After completion of 2 courses of the therapy, the serum CA19-9 level normalized. Two years after surgery, there has been no sign of recurrence. PMID:27431634

  16. 30 CFR 19.9 - Performance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Performance. 19.9 Section 19.9 Mineral Resources MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR TESTING, EVALUATION, AND APPROVAL OF MINING PRODUCTS ELECTRIC CAP LAMPS § 19.9 Performance. In addition to the general design and the safety features, MSHA considers that a lamp...

  17. Benign Hydronephrosis and Elevated of Serum Levels of Carbohydrate Antigen CA 19-9: A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Filipovic, Branka; Milinić, Nikola; Gacic, Jasna; Markovic, Olivera; Djokovic, Aleksandra; Filipovic, Branislav

    2016-01-01

    Patient: Male, 58 Final Diagnosis: Hydronephrosis Symptoms: Blunt abdominal pain • constipation • constipation Medication: — Clinical Procedure: Extracorporeal shock wave lithotripsy and percutaneous nephrostolithotomy Specialty: Gastroenterology and Hepatology Objective: Rare co-existance of disease or pathology Background: Carbohydrate tumor-associated antigen (CA 19-9) has been shown to be upregulated in other malignant tumors including gastric, ovarian, hepatocellular, and colorectal carcinoma as well as benign diseases of the biliary track such as pancreatitis, cholangitis, and choledocholithiasis. According to the available literature, in several cases of benign hydronephrosis and in a few cases of benign renal diseases, elevated CA 19-9 has been noted. Case Report: A 58-year-old Caucasian male patient was admitted in our clinic with complaints about blunt abdominal pain in the past two-month period localized in the right lumbar region and irradiating into the right inguinal area, constipation, abdominal bloating, and intermittent hematuria. The concentration of serum CA 19-9 was 3500 U/mL. Urine cytology provided no signs of abnormality. Intravenous urography visualized right-sided pyelon and ureter duplex with the defect in contrast shade of the pyelon, caused by a stag horn calculus. Contrast added computerized axial tomography of the abdomen and pelvis visualized the pyelon casted concretion spreading throughout the right pyelon, with ureterohydronephrosis with the distal block for passage of the contrast to the distal part of the ureter. Conclusions: There is no doubt that CA 19-9 level is occasionally elevated in patients with obstructive urolithiasis as it was in our case. In the routine medical praxis, urolithiasis should not be neglected in the differential diagnosis of elevated concentrations of CA 19-9 marker. PMID:27287959

  18. Applying PET to Broaden the Diagnostic Utility of the Clinically Validated CA19.9 Serum Biomarker for Oncology

    PubMed Central

    Viola-Villegas, Nerissa Therese; Rice, Samuel L.; Carlin, Sean; Wu, Xiaohong; Evans, Michael J.; Sevak, Kuntal K.; Drobjnak, Marija; Ragupathi, Govind; Sawada, Ritsuko; Scholz, Wolfgang W.; Livingston, Philip O.; Lewis, Jason S.

    2014-01-01

    Despite their considerable advantages, many circulating biomarkers have well-documented limitations. One prominent shortcoming in oncology is a high frequency of false-positive indications for malignant disease in upfront diagnosis. Because one common cause of false positivism is biomarker production from benign disorders in unrelated host tissues, we hypothesized that probing the sites of biomarker secretion with an imaging tool could be a broadly useful strategy to deconvolute the meaning of foreboding but inconclusive circulating biomarker levels. Methods In preparation to address this hypothesis clinically, we developed 89Zr-5B1, a fully human, antibody-based radiotracer targeting tumor-associated CA19.9 in the preclinical setting. Results 89Zr-5B1 localized to multiple tumor models representing diseases with undetectable and supraphysiologic serum CA19.9 levels. Among these, 89Zr-5B1 detected orthotopic models of pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma, an elusive cancer for which the serum assay is measured in humans but with limited specificity in part because of the frequency of CA19.9 secretion from benign hepatic pathologies. Conclusion In this report, a general strategy to supplement some of the shortcomings of otherwise highly useful circulating biomarkers with immunoPET is described. To expedite the clinical validation of this model, a human monoclonal antibody to CA19.9 (a highly visible but partially flawed serum biomarker for several cancers) was radiolabeled and evaluated, and the compelling preclinical evidence suggests that the radiotracer may enhance the fidelity of diagnosis and staging of pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma, a notoriously occult cancer. PMID:24029655

  19. Widespread osteoblastic metastases and marked elevation of CA19-9 as a presentation of signet ring cell gastric carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Romano, Asaf; Bejar, Jacob; Schiff, Elad; Dotan, Yaniv

    2016-01-01

    Widespread osteoblastic metastases, as well as marked elevations of CA19-9 and carcino-embryonic antigen (CEA), are the initial manifestations of gastric signet ring cell carcinoma. CT Imaging revealed diffuse sclerotic metastases in the axial skeleton. It was only following gastric biopsy that the primary site of metastatic bone tumor was identified. Recent studies suggest that early diagnosis of cancer origin, including tumor molecular profiling, may dictate specific therapy, improve prognosis and increase patient survival rates. PMID:27034800

  20. Carbohydrate 19.9 Antigen Serum Levels in Liver Disease

    PubMed Central

    Bertino, Gaetano; Ardiri, Annalisa Maria; Calvagno, Giuseppe Stefano; Malaguarnera, Giulia; Interlandi, Donatella; Vacante, Marco; Bertino, Nicoletta; Lucca, Francesco; Madeddu, Roberto; Motta, Massimo

    2013-01-01

    Background. Carbohydrate 19.9 antigen (CA19.9) has been used in the diagnosis and followup of gastrointestinal tumours. The aim of this prospective longitudinal study was the evaluation of CA19.9 levels in patients with chronic hepatitis and hepatic cirrhosis hepatitis C virus and B virus correlated. Materials and Methods. 180 patients were enrolled, 116 with HCV-related chronic liver disease (48% chronic hepatitis, 52% cirrhosis) and 64 with HBV-related chronic liver disease (86% chronic hepatitis, 14% cirrhosis). Patients with high levels of CA19.9 underwent abdominal ecography, gastroendoscopy, colonoscopy, and abdominal CT scan. Results. 51.7% of patients with HCV-related chronic liver disease and 48.4% of those with HBV-related chronic liver disease presented high levels of CA19.9. None was affected by pancreatic or intestinal neoplasia, cholestatic jaundice, or other diseases potentially able to induce Ca19.9 elevations. CA19.9 levels were elevated in 43.3% of HCV chronic hepatitis, in 56.3% of HCV cirrhosis, in 45.1% of HBV chronic hepatitis, and in 58% of HBV cirrhosis. Conclusions. CA19.9 commonly increases in the serum of patients with chronic viral hepatitis. Elevation of CA 19.9 is not specific for neoplastic disease and is related to the severity of fibrosis and to the viral aetiology of hepatitis. PMID:24282817

  1. Combined detection of preoperative serum CEA, CA19-9 and CA242 improve prognostic prediction of surgically treated colorectal cancer patients

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Jingtao; Wang, Xiao; Yu, Fudong; Chen, Jian; Zhao, Senlin; Zhang, Dongyuan; Yu, Yang; Liu, Xisheng; Tang, Huamei; Peng, Zhihai

    2015-01-01

    We assessed the prognostic significance of preoperative serum carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA), carbohydrate antigen 19-9 (CA19-9) and carbohydrate antigen 242 (CA242) levels in surgically treated colorectal cancer patients. The relationship of preoperative serum CEA, CA19-9 and CA242 levels with disease characteristics was investigated in 310 patients. Correlation between tumor markers was investigated using Pearson correlation test. Univariate and multivariate survival analyses were used to study the relationship between preoperative tumor markers and prognosis [disease free survival (DFS) and overall survival (OS)]. Kaplan-Meier analysis with log rank test was used to assess the impact of tumor marker levels on survival. Positive rate of preoperative serum CEA, CA19-9 and CA242 were 54.84%, 47.42% and 37.10%, respectively. High preoperative CEA level was associated with tumor size (P = 0.038), T stage (P < 0.001) and AJCC stage (P = 0.002). High preoperative CA19-9 level was associated with tumor AJCC stage (P = 0.023). Preoperative CA242 positively correlated with CEA (P < 0.001) and CA19-9 (P < 0.001). Combining the three markers was of independent prognostic value in CRC (HR = 2.532, 95% CI: 1.400-4.579, P = 0.002 for OS; and HR = 2.366, 95% CI: 1.334-4.196, P = 0.003 for DFS). Combined detection of preoperative serum CEA, CA19-9 and CA242 is of independent prognostic value for management of CRC patients treated surgically. PMID:26823815

  2. The clinical utility of serum CA 19-9 in the diagnosis, prognosis and management of pancreatic adenocarcinoma: An evidence based appraisal

    PubMed Central

    Ballehaninna, Umashankar K

    2012-01-01

    Background Serum carbohydrate antigen (CA 19-9) is the most common tumor marker assessed in pancreatic cancer patients; nevertheless few articles have comprehensively evaluated the evidence for its utility in pancreatic cancer management. Methods Literature search was performed using Medline with keywords "pancreatic cancer", "tumor markers", "CA 19-9", "diagnosis", "screening", "prognosis", "resectability" and "recurrence". All English language articles pertaining to the role of CA 19-9 in pancreatic cancer were critically analyzed to determine its utility as a biomarker for pancreatic cancer. Results Serum CA 19-9 is the most extensively validated pancreatic cancer biomarker with multiple clinical applications. CA 19-9 serum levels have a sensitivity and specificity of 79-81% and 82-90% respectively for the diagnosis of pancreatic cancer in symptomatic patients; but are not useful as a screening marker because of low positive predictive value (0.5-0.9%). Pre-operative CA 19-9 serum levels provide useful prognostic information as patients with normal levels (<37 U/mL) have a prolonged median survival (32-36 months) compared to patients with elevated levels (>37 U/mL) (12-15 months). A CA 19-9 serum level of <100 U/mL implies likely resectable disease whereas levels >100 U/mL suggest unresectablity or metastatic disease. Normalization or a decrease in post-operative CA 19-9 serum levels by ≥20-50% from baseline following surgical resection or chemotherapy is associated with prolonged survival compared to failure of CA 19-9 serum levels to normalize or an increase. Important limitations to CA 19-9 serum level evaluation in pancreatic cancer include poor sensitivity, false negative results in Lewis negative phenotype (5-10%) and increased false positivity in the presence of obstructive jaundice (10-60%). Conclusions CA 19-9 is the most extensively studied and validated serum biomarker for the diagnosis of pancreatic cancer in symptomatic patients. CA 19-9 serum

  3. [Clinical evaluation of the tumor marker CA 19-9 in comparison with carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA) in surgical pre- and postoperative diagnosis].

    PubMed

    Lorenz, M; Happ, J; Hottenrott, C; Maul, F D; Baum, R P; Hör, G; Encke, A

    1986-02-01

    A new tumor marker (CA 19-9) was investigated. CA 19-9 is a tumor-associated antigen which is detected by a monoclonal antibody. CA 19-9 (CIS-Centocor) was compared simultaneously with CEA (carcinoembryonic antigen) in 347 patients. 123 patients with gastrointestinal tumors showed a sensitivity of 31% for CA 19-9 (CEA 49%), combination increased sensitivity to 58%. The highest sensitivity was found in pancreas carcinoma (CA 19-9 75%, CEA 66%, combination 92%); it was lower in gastric, colon, and oesophagus carcinomas. In relapsed colorectal carcinomas sensitivity was 53% (CEA 78%, combination 85%). In cases of relapse, tumor markers may become positive even if they were not detectable before resection of the primary tumor. Specificity for CA 19-9 was 100% (CEA 84%) compared to a group of non-malignant diseases including patients with inflammations and patients with nicotin abuse (n = 102). Because of its high specificity and superior sensitivity to CEA in pancreas carcinomas CA 19-9 should be determined in primary and relapse diagnosis in combination with CEA. PMID:3459133

  4. CA19-9-related tumor kinetics after first-line chemotherapy of patients with advanced pancreatic cancer: a monoinstitutional experience.

    PubMed

    Colloca, Giuseppe; Venturino, Antonella; Guarneri, Domenico

    2016-09-01

    The absolute value of carbohydrate antigen 19-9 (CA19-9) pretreatment and its reduction after chemotherapy are established prognostic variables for patients with advanced pancreatic cancer. The present study is a retrospective monoinstitutional evaluation of the prognostic role of the CA19-9 reduction and some CA19-9-related tumor kinetics parameters, such as tumor growth rate constant (G), kinetic tumor response and log ratio. Forty-one cases met the selection criteria. After 8 weeks only G reported an inverse relationship with OS (r = -0.494) that was confirmed by regression analysis (R (2) = 0.192). G after 8 weeks of chemotherapy appears as a possible surrogate end point of overall survival. PMID:27522503

  5. Primary epithelial splenic cyst with micro-rupture and raised carbohydrate antigen CA 19-9: a paradigm of management

    PubMed Central

    Papadopoulos, Iordanis N; Davatzikos, Anastasios; Kasabalis, Georgios; Manti, Christina; Konstantoudakis, Georgios

    2010-01-01

    Epithelial splenic cysts are rare entities that surgeons might not have previously encountered and their management is based on historical studies. A 21-year-old female presented with a cyst of the spleen that produced a high serum concentration of carbohydrate antigen CA 19-9. A partial splenectomy with the removal of the entire cyst and preservation of splenic parenchyma by laparotomy was performed and the patient made an uneventful recovery. A microscopic rupture of the wall of the cyst and degradation of blood in the fluid of the cyst were confirmed. Eighteen months following surgery a functional splenic parenchyma was documented. There was no episode of infection during this follow-up time. Partial surgical splenectomy with resection of the entire cyst prevents recurrence and preserves splenic function. PMID:22767471

  6. Primary epithelial splenic cyst with micro-rupture and raised carbohydrate antigen CA 19-9: a proposal for management

    PubMed Central

    Papadopoulos, Iordanis N; Davatzikos, Anastasios; Kasabalis, Georgios; Manti, Christina; Konstantoudakis, Georgios

    2010-01-01

    Background Epithelial splenic cysts are rare entities which surgeons may not have previously encountered. Their management is based on historical studies. Case presentation A 21-year-old woman presented with a cyst of the spleen that produced a high serum concentration of carbohydrate antigen CA 19-9. A partial splenectomy with removal of the entire cyst and preservation of the splenic parenchyma by laparotomy was performed and the patient made an uneventful recovery. A microscopic rupture of the wall of the cyst and blood degradation products in the fluid of the cyst were confirmed. A functional splenic parenchyma was documented 18 months after surgery. There was no infection during follow-up. Conclusion Partial surgical splenectomy with resection of the entire cyst prevents recurrence and preserves splenic function. PMID:22791783

  7. Five Year Results of US Intergroup/RTOG 9704 With Postoperative CA 19-9 {<=}90 U/mL and Comparison to the CONKO-001 Trial

    SciTech Connect

    Berger, Adam C.; Winter, Kathryn; Hoffman, John P.; Regine, William F.; Abrams, Ross A.; Safran, Howard; Benson, Alan B.; MacDonald, John; Willett, Christopher G.

    2012-11-01

    Purpose: Radiation Therapy Oncology Group (RTOG) trial 9704 was the largest randomized trial to use adjuvant chemoradiation therapy for patients with pancreatic cancer. This report analyzes 5-year survival by serum level of tumor marker CA 19-9 of {<=}90 vs >90 U/mL and compares results to the those of the CONKO-001 trial. Methods and Materials: CA 19-9 expression was analyzed as a dichotomized variable ({<=}90 vs >90 U/mL). Cox proportional hazard models were used to identify the impact of the CA 19-9 value on overall survival (OS). Actuarial estimates of OS were calculated using the Kaplan-Meier method. Results: Both univariate (hazard ratio [HR] = 3.2; 95% confidence interval [CI], 2.3-4.3, P<.0001) and multivariate (HR = 3.1; 95% CI, 2.2-4.2, P<.0001) analyses demonstrated a statistically significant decrease in OS for CA 19-9 serum level of {>=}90 U/mL. For patients in the gemcitabine (Gem) treatment arm with CA 19-9 <90 U/mL, median survival was 21 months. For patients with CA 19-9 {>=}90 U/mL, this number dropped to 10 months. In patients with pancreatic head tumors in the Gem treatment arm with RT quality assurance per protocol and CA 19-9 of <90 U/mL, median survival and 5-year rate were 24 months and 34%. In comparison, the median survival and 5-year OS rate for patients in the Gem arm of the CONKO trial were 22 months and 21%. Conclusions: This analysis demonstrates that patients with postresection CA 19-9 values {>=}90 U/mL had a significantly worse survival. Patients with pancreatic head tumors treated with Gem with CA 19-9 serum level of <90 U/mL and per protocol RT had favorable survival compared to that seen in the CONKO trial. CA 19-9 is a stratification factor for the current RTOG adjuvant pancreas trial (0848).

  8. ITRAQ-based quantitative proteomics reveals apolipoprotein A-I and transferrin as potential serum markers in CA19-9 negative pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma.

    PubMed

    Lin, Chao; Wu, Wen-Chuan; Zhao, Guo-Chao; Wang, Dan-Song; Lou, Wen-Hui; Jin, Da-Yong

    2016-08-01

    Currently the diagnosis of pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC) relies on CA19-9 and radiological means, whereas some patients do not have elevated levels of CA19-9 secondary to pancreatic cancer. The purpose of this study was to identify potential serum biomarkers for CA19-9 negative PDAC.A total of 114 serum samples were collected from 3 groups: CA19-9 negative PDAC patients (n = 34), CA19-9 positive PDAC patients (n = 44), and healthy volunteers (n = 36), whereas the first 12 samples from each group were used for isobaric tags for relative and absolute quantitation (iTRAQ) analysis. Thereafter, candidate biomarkers were selected for validation by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) with the rest specimens.Using the iTRAQ approach, a total of 5 proteins were identified as significantly different between CA19-9 negative PDAC patients and healthy subjects according to our defined criteria. Apolipoprotein A-I (APOA-I) and transferrin (TF) were selected to validate the proteomic results by ELISA in a further 78 serum specimens. It revealed that TF significantly correlated with the degree of histological differentiation (P = 0.042), and univariate and multivariate analyses indicated that TF is an independent prognostic factor for survival (hazard ratio, 0.302; 95% confidence interval, 0.118-0.774; P = 0.013) of patients with PDAC after curative surgery.ITRAQ-based quantitative proteomics revealed that APOA-I and TF may be potential CA19-9 negative PDAC serum markers. PMID:27495108

  9. ITRAQ-based quantitative proteomics reveals apolipoprotein A-I and transferrin as potential serum markers in CA19-9 negative pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Chao; Wu, Wen-Chuan; Zhao, Guo-Chao; Wang, Dan-Song; Lou, Wen-Hui; Jin, Da-Yong

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Currently the diagnosis of pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC) relies on CA19-9 and radiological means, whereas some patients do not have elevated levels of CA19-9 secondary to pancreatic cancer. The purpose of this study was to identify potential serum biomarkers for CA19-9 negative PDAC. A total of 114 serum samples were collected from 3 groups: CA19-9 negative PDAC patients (n = 34), CA19-9 positive PDAC patients (n = 44), and healthy volunteers (n = 36), whereas the first 12 samples from each group were used for isobaric tags for relative and absolute quantitation (iTRAQ) analysis. Thereafter, candidate biomarkers were selected for validation by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) with the rest specimens. Using the iTRAQ approach, a total of 5 proteins were identified as significantly different between CA19-9 negative PDAC patients and healthy subjects according to our defined criteria. Apolipoprotein A-I (APOA-I) and transferrin (TF) were selected to validate the proteomic results by ELISA in a further 78 serum specimens. It revealed that TF significantly correlated with the degree of histological differentiation (P = 0.042), and univariate and multivariate analyses indicated that TF is an independent prognostic factor for survival (hazard ratio, 0.302; 95% confidence interval, 0.118–0.774; P = 0.013) of patients with PDAC after curative surgery. ITRAQ-based quantitative proteomics revealed that APOA-I and TF may be potential CA19-9 negative PDAC serum markers. PMID:27495108

  10. Diagnostic performance of CD66c in lung adenocarcinoma-associated malignant pleural effusion: comparison with CEA, CA 19-9, and CYFRA 21-1.

    PubMed

    Son, Seung-Myoung; Han, Hye-Suk; An, Jin Young; Choe, Kang Hyeon; Lee, Ki Man; Lee, Ki Hyeong; Kim, So-Seul; Lee, Yong-Moon; Lee, Ho-Chang; Song, Hyung Geun; Lee, Ok-Jun

    2015-02-01

    Various tumour markers have been evaluated in malignant pleural effusions, but not CD66c. This study evaluated the diagnostic ability of CD66c in lung adenocarcinoma-associated malignant pleural effusions (LA-MPEs) and compared it with other known tumour markers. Forty-seven cases of LA-MPE and 52 cases of benign pleural effusions were collected. The levels of CD66c, CEA, CA 19-9, and CYFRA 21-1 were measured by enzyme immunoassay. The expression of CD66c, CEA, and CA 19-9 in cell blocks was measured by immunocytochemistry. CEA had the best diagnostic values, with a sensitivity of 87.2% and specificity of 92.3%. Both CD66c and CA 19-9 showed the highest specificity of 98.1%, with sensitivities of 63.8% and 55.3%, respectively. CYFRA 21-1 had a sensitivity of 83.0% and specificity of 76.9%. CEA combined with CA 19-9 reached a sensitivity of 91.5% and a specificity of 98.1%. The sensitivities of immunocytochemical staining for CD66c, CEA, and CA 19-9 were 72.5%, 75%, and 40%, respectively. CD66c showed a diagnostic performance comparable to CYFRA 21-1 and CA 19-9 by enzyme immunoassay. Immunocytochemical study showed that CD66c and CEA were more sensitive than CA19-9. Both studies support CD66c as a potential tumour marker to differentiate LA-MPE from benign effusions. PMID:25551300

  11. Herlyn-Werner-Wunderlich Syndrome: A Rare Cause of Pelvic Pain and High CA 19-9 Levels in an Adolescent Girl.

    PubMed

    Unal, Emel; Tanyildiz, Hikmet Gulsah; Sonmezer, Murat; Erkol, Hatice Gul; Fitoz, Suat

    2016-01-01

    Herlyn-Werner-Wunderlich (HWW) syndrome is a rare developmental anomaly that includes uterus didelphys with obstructed hemivagina and ipsilateral renal agenesis. A 13-year-old girl presented with chronic abdominal pain. Magnetic resonance imaging revealed uterus didelphys, hematometrocolpos and renal agenesis on the right side with imperforate hymen. Subsequently the patient was found to have Mullerian duct anomalies. CA 19-9 level was high. At laparoscopy combined with vaginoscopy hematocolpos was drained following which she improved clinically and CA 19-9 level returned to normal. PMID:26816677

  12. Herlyn-Werner-Wunderlich Syndrome: A Rare Cause of Pelvic Pain and High CA 19-9 Levels in an Adolescent Girl

    PubMed Central

    Unal, Emel; Sonmezer, Murat; Erkol, Hatice Gul; Fitoz, Suat

    2016-01-01

    Herlyn-Werner-Wunderlich (HWW) syndrome is a rare developmental anomaly that includes uterus didelphys with obstructed hemivagina and ipsilateral renal agenesis. A 13-year-old girl presented with chronic abdominal pain. Magnetic resonance imaging revealed uterus didelphys, hematometrocolpos and renal agenesis on the right side with imperforate hymen. Subsequently the patient was found to have Mullerian duct anomalies. CA 19-9 level was high. At laparoscopy combined with vaginoscopy hematocolpos was drained following which she improved clinically and CA 19-9 level returned to normal. PMID:26816677

  13. Ultrasound-Mediated Microbubble Destruction (UMMD) Facilitates the Delivery of CA19-9 Targeted and Paclitaxel Loaded mPEG-PLGA-PLL Nanoparticles in Pancreatic Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Xing, Lingxi; Shi, Qiusheng; Zheng, Kailiang; Shen, Ming; Ma, Jing; Li, Fan; Liu, Yang; Lin, Lizhou; Tu, Wenzhi; Duan, Yourong; Du, Lianfang

    2016-01-01

    Pancreatic cancer, one of the most lethal human malignancies with dismal prognosis, is refractory to existing radio-chemotherapeutic treatment modalities. There is a critical unmet need to develop effective approaches, especially for targeted pancreatic cancer drug delivery. Targeted and drug-loaded nanoparticles (NPs) combined with ultrasound-mediated microbubble destruction (UMMD) have been shown to significantly increase the cellular uptake in vitro and drug retention in vivo, suggesting a promising strategy for cancer therapy. In this study, we synthesized pancreatic cancer-targeting organic NPs that were modified with anti CA19-9 antibody and encapsulated paclitaxol (PTX). The three-block copolymer methoxy polyethylene glycol-polylacticco-glycolic acid-polylysine (mPEG-PLGA-PLL) constituted the skeleton of the NPs. We speculated that the PTX-NPs-anti CA19-9 would circulate long-term in vivo, "actively target" pancreatic cancer cells, and sustainably release the loaded PTX while UMMD would "passively target" the irradiated tumor and effectively increase the permeability of cell membrane and capillary gaps. Our results demonstrated that the combination of PTX-NPs-anti CA19-9 with UMMD achieved a low IC50, significant cell cycle arrest, and cell apoptosis in vitro. In mouse pancreatic tumor xenografts, the combined application of PTX-NP-anti CA19-9 NPs with UMMD attained the highest tumor inhibition rate, promoted the pharmacokinetic profile by increasing AUC, t1/2, and mean residence time (MRT), and decreased clearance. Consequently, the survival of the tumor-bearing nude mice was prolonged without obvious toxicity. The dynamic change in cellular uptake, targeted real-time imaging, and the concentration of PTX in the plasma and tumor were all closely associated with the treatment efficacy both in vitro and in vivo. Our study suggests that PTX-NP-anti CA19-9 NPs combined with UMMD is a promising strategy for the treatment of pancreatic cancer. PMID:27446491

  14. Ultrasound-Mediated Microbubble Destruction (UMMD) Facilitates the Delivery of CA19-9 Targeted and Paclitaxel Loaded mPEG-PLGA-PLL Nanoparticles in Pancreatic Cancer.

    PubMed

    Xing, Lingxi; Shi, Qiusheng; Zheng, Kailiang; Shen, Ming; Ma, Jing; Li, Fan; Liu, Yang; Lin, Lizhou; Tu, Wenzhi; Duan, Yourong; Du, Lianfang

    2016-01-01

    Pancreatic cancer, one of the most lethal human malignancies with dismal prognosis, is refractory to existing radio-chemotherapeutic treatment modalities. There is a critical unmet need to develop effective approaches, especially for targeted pancreatic cancer drug delivery. Targeted and drug-loaded nanoparticles (NPs) combined with ultrasound-mediated microbubble destruction (UMMD) have been shown to significantly increase the cellular uptake in vitro and drug retention in vivo, suggesting a promising strategy for cancer therapy. In this study, we synthesized pancreatic cancer-targeting organic NPs that were modified with anti CA19-9 antibody and encapsulated paclitaxol (PTX). The three-block copolymer methoxy polyethylene glycol-polylacticco-glycolic acid-polylysine (mPEG-PLGA-PLL) constituted the skeleton of the NPs. We speculated that the PTX-NPs-anti CA19-9 would circulate long-term in vivo, "actively target" pancreatic cancer cells, and sustainably release the loaded PTX while UMMD would "passively target" the irradiated tumor and effectively increase the permeability of cell membrane and capillary gaps. Our results demonstrated that the combination of PTX-NPs-anti CA19-9 with UMMD achieved a low IC50, significant cell cycle arrest, and cell apoptosis in vitro. In mouse pancreatic tumor xenografts, the combined application of PTX-NP-anti CA19-9 NPs with UMMD attained the highest tumor inhibition rate, promoted the pharmacokinetic profile by increasing AUC, t1/2, and mean residence time (MRT), and decreased clearance. Consequently, the survival of the tumor-bearing nude mice was prolonged without obvious toxicity. The dynamic change in cellular uptake, targeted real-time imaging, and the concentration of PTX in the plasma and tumor were all closely associated with the treatment efficacy both in vitro and in vivo. Our study suggests that PTX-NP-anti CA19-9 NPs combined with UMMD is a promising strategy for the treatment of pancreatic cancer. PMID:27446491

  15. Application of biochemical markers CA 19-9, CEA and C-reactive protein in diagnosis of malicious and benign pancreatic tumors

    PubMed Central

    Piskorz, Łukasz; Wawrzycki, Marcin; Dobielski, Przemysław; Pikala, Małgorzata; Jabłoński, Sławomir; Brocki, Marian

    2013-01-01

    Introduction We would save many lives and spare a lot of suffering if we could only detect and accurately determine the character and TMN staging of pancreatic tumors (PTs). With improved diagnosis, we could offer specific treatment that would result in better treatment outcome. The aim of study was to determine the significance of neoplastic markers CA 19-9 and CEA for prognosis in inflammatory and carcinomatous PTs. Material and methods We based our research upon a group of 170 patients. The patients were treated in our Oncologic Surgery Department from January 2007 to December 2010 for PTs. The patients were divided into four groups depending on the character of the tumor and underwent the following treatments: group 1 – 34 patients with carcinoma of the ampulla of Vater, group 2 – 64 patients with PTs at different stages (1, 2, 3) according to TMN classification, group 3 – 62 patients with PTs at stage 4 on the TMN scale (unresectable tumors), group 4 – 28 patients with inflammatory PTs. Results The results of Ca 19-9 in group 2 were 736.00 (25–75% 220.40–4285.00) ng/ml before surgery, 53.00 (25–75% 12.60–84.00) ng/ml in the 7 days after surgery, 29.4 (25–75% 7.90–113.00) ng/ml at day 30, and 119.00 (25–75% 96.30–621.00) ng/ml 3 months after the operation. These results were significantly higher than the control group but were significantly lower than the results for group 3 (unresectable tumors). The highest average concentration and median for CA 19-9 and CEA were noted in patients with unresectable PTs (the 3rd group). The average concentration for CEA was lowest in group 4, but much higher than the lab limits. Conclusions The sensitivity of the CA 19-9 marker may be as high as 88%. Values of CA 19-9 above 852 U/ml may indicate TNM stage 4, consistent with an unresectable PT. In the cases where CA 19-9 is within normal limits but C-reactive protein is above normal limits (often thirty times the upper limit), in comparison to the

  16. 22 CFR 19.9 - Pension benefits for former spouses.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 22 Foreign Relations 1 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Pension benefits for former spouses. 19.9 Section 19.9 Foreign Relations DEPARTMENT OF STATE PERSONNEL BENEFITS FOR SPOUSES AND FORMER SPOUSES OF PARTICIPANTS IN THE FOREIGN SERVICE RETIREMENT AND DISABILITY SYSTEM § 19.9 Pension benefits for former spouses....

  17. 22 CFR 19.9 - Pension benefits for former spouses.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 22 Foreign Relations 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Pension benefits for former spouses. 19.9 Section 19.9 Foreign Relations DEPARTMENT OF STATE PERSONNEL BENEFITS FOR SPOUSES AND FORMER SPOUSES OF PARTICIPANTS IN THE FOREIGN SERVICE RETIREMENT AND DISABILITY SYSTEM § 19.9 Pension benefits for former spouses....

  18. Diagnostic values of serum tumor markers Cyfra21-1, SCCAg, ferritin, CEA, CA19-9, and AFP in oral/oropharyngeal squamous cell carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Yuan, Chuanshu; Yang, Kai; Tang, Hong; Chen, Dan

    2016-01-01

    Background At present, the research on serum tumor markers in the early diagnosis of malignant tumors has aroused widespread concern. The aim of this study was to investigate the diagnostic values of serum tumor markers cytokeratin 19 fragment (Cyfra21-1), squamous cell carcinoma antigen (SCCAg), ferritin, carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA), carbohydrate antigen 19-9 (CA19-9), and α-fetoprotein (AFP) for patients with oral/oropharyngeal squamous carcinoma (OSCC/OPSCC). Methods One hundred and sixty-nine cases of patients with OSCC/OPSCC as the experimental group, 86 cases of oral benign tumor patients as the control group, and 30 cases of healthy people as the normal control group were studied. The levels of serum Cyfra21-1, SCCAg, ferritin, CEA, CA19-9, and AFP were measured using electrochemiluminescence immunoassay. Results The levels of serum Cyfra21-1, SCCAg, ferritin, and CEA in patients with OSCC/OPSCC were significantly higher than those of benign tumor and healthy control group (P<0.05). The levels of CA19-9 and AFP showed no significant difference between patients with OSCC/OPSCC, benign tumor, and healthy group (P>0.05). The level of serum Cyfra21-1 in patients with early OSCC/OPSCC (stage I + II) was significantly higher than that of benign tumor and healthy control group (P<0.05). However, the levels of serum SCCAg, ferritin, CEA, CA19-9, and AFP showed no significant difference between patients with early OSCC/OPSCC, benign tumor, and healthy control group (P>0.05). The levels of serum Cyfra21-1, SCCAg, ferritin, and CEA in the middle-late stage of patients with OSCC/OPSCC (stage III + IV) were significantly higher than those of patients with the early OSCC/OPSCC, benign tumor, and healthy control group (P<0.05). The diagnostic cutoff levels of Cyfra21-1, SCCAg, ferritin, and CEA were 2.17, 0.72, 109.95, and 1.99 ng/mL, respectively. The sensitivities were 60.36%, 73.37%, 81.66%, and 66.27%, respectively. The specificities were 81.03%, 68.10%, 40

  19. Comparative study of CEA and CA19-9 in esophageal, gastric and colon cancers individually and in combination (ROC curve analysis)

    PubMed Central

    Bagaria, Bhawna; Sood, Sadhna; Sharma, Rameshwaram; Lalwani, Soniya

    2013-01-01

    Objective To determine the clinical serum levels of carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA) and carbohydrate antigen 19-9 (CA19-9), individually and in combination, for the diagnosis of 50 healthy subjects and 150 cases of esophageal, gastric, and colon cancers. Methods The sensitivities of the two markers were compared individually and in combination, with specificity set at 100%. Receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curves were plotted. Results Serum CEA levels were significantly higher in cancer patients than in the control group. The sensitivity of CEA was determined: in esophageal cancer, sensitivity=28%, negative predictive value (NPV)=61.72%, and AUC=0.742 
(SE=0.05), with a significance level of P<0.0001; in gastric cancer, sensitivity=30%, NPV=58.82%, and AUC=0.734 (SE=0.05), with a significance level of P<0.0001; in colon cancer, sensitivity=74%, NPV=79.36%, and AUC=0.856 
(SE=0.04), with a significance level of P<0.0001. The sensitivity of CA19-9 was also evaluated: in esophageal cancer, sensitivity=18%, NPV=54.94%, and AUC=0.573 (SE =0.05), with a significance level of P=0.2054. In gastric cancer, sensitivity=42%, NPV=63.29%, and AUC=0.679 (SE =0.05), with a significance level of P<0.0011. In colon cancer, sensitivity=26%, NPV=57.47%, and AUC=0.580 (SE =0.05), with a significance level of P=0.1670. The following were the sensitivities of CEA/CA19-9 combined: in esophageal cancer, sensitivity=42%, NPV=63.29%, SE=0.078 (95% CI: 0.0159-0.322); gastric cancer, sensitivity=58%, NPV=70.42%, SE=0.072 (95% CI: -0.0866-0.198); and colon cancer, sensitivity=72%, NPV=78.12%, SE=0.070 (95% CI: 0.137-0.415). Conclusion CEA exhibited the highest sensitivity for colon cancer, and CA19-9 exhibited the highest sensitivity for gastric cancer. Combined analysis indicated an increase in diagnostic sensitivity in esophageal and gastric cancer compared with that in colon cancer. PMID:24379990

  20. Comparison of tumor M2-pyruvate kinase (tumor M2-PK), carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA), carbohydrate antigens CA 19-9 and CA 72-4 in the diagnosis of gastrointestinal cancer.

    PubMed

    Schneider, Joachim; Schulze, Guntram

    2003-01-01

    The study presents data comparing the relatively new tumor metabolic marker Tumor-M2-PK with the established markers CEA, CA 19-9 and CA 72-4 in the diagnosis of gastrointestinal cancers. In this prospective study histologically confirmed n = 250 colorectal, n = 122 gastric, n = 86 oesophageal and n = 24 pancreatic cancer patients were investigated and compared with n = 76 control persons without any malignant disease. Tumor M2-PK was measured in plasma by an ELISA. CEA, CA 19-9 and CA 72-4 were determined in sera by an autoanalyser. Significantly elevated tumor marker concentrations were detected in the tumor patients suffering from colorectal, gastric, oesophageal and pancreatic cancers. In patients with colorectal cancer Tumor M2-PK was significantly frequently elevated (47.8%), followed by CEA (33.6%) or CA19-9 (30.4%). In gastric cancers, the sensitivity of Tumor M2-PK (57.0%) and CA 72-4 (60.7%) were comparable and higher than CA19-9 (45.5%) or CEA (23.8%). In oesophageal cancers, Tumor M2-PK was most frequently elevated (55.8%) followed by CA 72-4 (53.5%), CA 19-9 (27.9%) and CEA (14.5%). In pancreatic cancer patients, the sensitivities were CA 19-9 (87.5%), Tumor M2-PK (72.9%) and CEA (33.3%). The discrimination power (demonstrated by the AUC) of Tumor M2-PK was superior in colorectal, gastric and oesophageal cancers without distant metastasis. Also CA 72-4 was superior to CA 19-9 or CEA in detection of gastric or oesophageal cancer patients. CEA bore no relevant information for the detection of localised cancers. The present data indicate that Tumor M2-PK could be a valuable tumor marker for the detection of gastrointestinal cancers. PMID:14981971

  1. Poussée de maladie de Kaposi et élévation du CA 19-9: penser à la tuberculose!

    PubMed Central

    Ajili, Faida; Hariz, Héla; Souissi, Asmahen; Abid, Rim; Boussetta, Najeh; Laabidi, Besma; Battikh, Riadh; Louzir, Bassem; Othmani, Salah

    2013-01-01

    La maladie de Kaposi (MK) est une entité pathologique qui peut survenir chez les patients VIH positifs et dans le cadre d'une immunodépression, d'origine tuberculeuse très rarement. On décrit le cas d'une MK chez un patient VIH négatif au décours d'une tuberculose. Nous rapportons le cas d'un patient âgé de 81 ans, VIH négatif, ayant présenté deux nodules angiomateux de l'avant bras gauche dont la biopsie cutanée était en faveur d'une MK. L’évolution était marquée 2 mois plus tard, par l'apparition de placards angiomateux extensifs des deux membres supérieurs et d'adénopathies cervicales jugulo-carotidiennes bilatérales. La biopsie ganglionnaire était en faveur d'une tuberculose ganglionnaire. Par ailleurs, il avait un taux sérique élevé des CA 19-9. La régression de l’étendue des lésions au niveau des membres supérieurs et la normalisation du taux sérique des CA 19-9 ont été obtenues sous traitement anti-tuberculeux. Chez les patients atteints d'une MK avec une élévation des CA 19-9, il faut penser à la tuberculose. PMID:24711871

  2. 38 CFR 19.9 - Remand for further development.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 38 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Remand for further development. 19.9 Section 19.9 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief DEPARTMENT OF VETERANS AFFAIRS....9 Remand for further development. (a) General. If further evidence, clarification of the...

  3. Site-specifically labeled CA19.9-targeted immunoconjugates for the PET, NIRF, and multimodal PET/NIRF imaging of pancreatic cancer

    PubMed Central

    Houghton, Jacob L.; Zeglis, Brian M.; Abdel-Atti, Dalya; Aggeler, Robert; Sawada, Ritsuko; Agnew, Brian J.; Scholz, Wolfgang W.; Lewis, Jason S.

    2015-01-01

    Molecular imaging agents for preoperative positron emission tomography (PET) and near-infrared fluorescent (NIRF)-guided delineation of surgical margins could greatly enhance the diagnosis, staging, and resection of pancreatic cancer. PET and NIRF optical imaging offer complementary clinical applications, enabling the noninvasive whole-body imaging to localize disease and identification of tumor margins during surgery, respectively. We report the development of PET, NIRF, and dual-modal (PET/NIRF) imaging agents, using 5B1, a fully human monoclonal antibody that targets CA19.9, a well-established pancreatic cancer biomarker. Desferrioxamine (DFO) and/or a NIRF dye (FL) were conjugated to the heavy-chain glycans of 5B1, using a robust and reproducible site-specific (ss) labeling methodology to generate three constructs (ssDFO-5B1, ssFL-5B1, and ssdual-5B1) in which the immunoreactivity was not affected by the conjugation of either label. Each construct was evaluated in a s.c. xenograft model, using CA19.9-positive (BxPC3) and -negative (MIAPaCa-2) human pancreatic cancer cell lines. Each construct showed exceptional uptake and contrast in antigen-positive tumors with negligible nonspecific uptake in antigen-negative tumors. Additionally, the dual-modal construct was evaluated in an orthotopic murine pancreatic cancer model, using the human pancreatic cancer cell line, Suit-2. The ssdual-5B1 demonstrated a remarkable capacity to delineate metastases and to map the sentinel lymph nodes via tandem PET-computed tomography (PET/CT) and NIRF imaging. Fluorescence microscopy, histopathology, and autoradiography were performed on representative sections of excised tumors to visualize the distribution of the constructs within the tumors. These imaging tools have tremendous potential for further preclinical research and for clinical translation. PMID:26668398

  4. Increased B7H4 tissue expression correlates with high CA19.9 serum levels and a worse prognosis of pancreatic adenocarcinoma.

    PubMed

    Tsiaousidou, Anastasia; Tsaroucha, A K; Lambropoulou, M; Pitiakoudis, M; Polychronidis, A; Chatzitheoklitos, E; Romanidis, K; Simopoulos, C

    2016-08-01

    Pancreatic cancer (PC) is a leading cause of cancer death worldwide, especially in Western societies. Its aggressive nature and poor prognosis increase the need for identifying new and more accurate diagnostic and prognostic tools. We studied 41 patients who had undergone radical surgical resection for PC, investigated B7H4 protein expression in the PC tissue specimens of these patients by immunohistochemistry and analyzed several clinical and pathological features. The positive expression of the B7H4 antigen was associated with a negative impact of chemotherapy with gemcitabine on patient survival and also correlated with high CA19.9 serum levels and poorly differentiated tumors. Moreover, patients that overexpressed B7H4 antigen had worse prognosis compared to the ones that did not overexpress B7H4. B7H4 antigen is a negative prognostic marker for PC patients and also seems to express resistance of PC patients to chemotherapy with gemcitabine. PMID:25924930

  5. CA19-9 decrease at 8 weeks as a predictor of overall survival in a randomized phase III trial (MPACT) of weekly nab-paclitaxel plus gemcitabine versus gemcitabine alone in patients with metastatic pancreatic cancer

    PubMed Central

    Chiorean, E. G.; Von Hoff, D. D.; Reni, M.; Arena, F. P.; Infante, J. R.; Bathini, V. G.; Wood, T. E.; Mainwaring, P. N.; Muldoon, R. T.; Clingan, P. R.; Kunzmann, V.; Ramanathan, R. K.; Tabernero, J.; Goldstein, D.; McGovern, D.; Lu, B.; Ko, A.

    2016-01-01

    Background A phase I/II study and subsequent phase III study (MPACT) reported significant correlations between CA19-9 decreases and prolonged overall survival (OS) with nab-paclitaxel plus gemcitabine (nab-P + Gem) treatment for metastatic pancreatic cancer (MPC). CA19-9 changes at week 8 and potential associations with efficacy were investigated as part of an exploratory analysis in the MPACT trial. Patients and methods Untreated patients with MPC (N = 861) received nab-P + Gem or Gem alone. CA19-9 was evaluated at baseline and every 8 weeks. Results Patients with baseline and week-8 CA19-9 measurements were analyzed (nab-P + Gem: 252; Gem: 202). In an analysis pooling the treatments, patients with any CA19-9 decline (80%) versus those without (20%) had improved OS (median 11.1 versus 8.0 months; P = 0.005). In the nab-P + Gem arm, patients with (n = 206) versus without (n = 46) any CA19-9 decrease at week 8 had a confirmed overall response rate (ORR) of 40% versus 13%, and a median OS of 13.2 versus 8.3 months (P = 0.001), respectively. In the Gem-alone arm, patients with (n = 159) versus without (n = 43) CA19-9 decrease at week 8 had a confirmed ORR of 15% versus 5%, and a median OS of 9.4 versus 7.1 months (P = 0.404), respectively. In the nab-P + Gem and Gem-alone arms, by week 8, 16% (40/252) and 6% (13/202) of patients, respectively, had an unconfirmed radiologic response (median OS 13.7 and 14.7 months, respectively), and 79% and 84% of patients, respectively, had stable disease (SD) (median OS 11.1 and 9 months, respectively). Patients with SD and any CA19-9 decrease (158/199 and 133/170) had a median OS of 13.2 and 9.4 months, respectively. Conclusion This analysis demonstrated that, in patients with MPC, any CA19-9 decrease at week 8 can be an early marker for chemotherapy efficacy, including in those patients with SD. CA19-9 decrease identified more patients with survival benefit than radiologic response by week 8. PMID:26802160

  6. Carbohydrate antigen 19-9 for differential diagnosis of pancreatic carcinoma and chronic pancreatitis

    PubMed Central

    Su, Si-Biao; Qin, Shan-Yu; Chen, Wen; Luo, Wei; Jiang, Hai-Xing

    2015-01-01

    AIM: To evaluate the utility of carbohydrate antigen 19-9 (CA19-9) for differential diagnosis of pancreatic carcinoma and chronic pancreatitis. METHODS: We searched the literature for studies reporting the sensitivity, specificity, and other accuracy measures of serum CA19-9 levels for differentiating pancreatic carcinoma and chronic pancreatitis. Pooled analysis was performed using random-effects models, and receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curves were generated. Study quality was assessed using Standards for Reporting Diagnostic Accuracy and Quality Assessment for Studies of Diagnostic Accuracy tools. RESULTS: A total of 34 studies involving 3125 patients with pancreatic carcinoma and 2061 patients with chronic pancreatitis were included. Pooled analysis of the ability of CA19-9 level to differentiate pancreatic carcinoma and chronic pancreatitis showed the following effect estimates: sensitivity, 0.81 (95%CI: 0.80-0.83); specificity, 0.81 (95%CI: 0.79-0.82); positive likelihood ratio, 4.08 (95%CI: 3.39-4.91); negative likelihood ratio, 0.24 (95%CI: 0.21-0.28); and diagnostic odds ratio, 19.31 (95%CI: 14.40-25.90). The area under the ROC curve was 0.88. No significant publication bias was detected. CONCLUSION: Elevated CA19-9 by itself is insufficient for differentiating pancreatic carcinoma and chronic pancreatitis, however, it increases suspicion of pancreatic carcinoma and may complement other clinical findings to improve diagnostic accuracy. PMID:25892884

  7. Metastatic Recurrence in a Pancreatic Cancer Patient Derived Orthotopic Xenograft (PDOX) Nude Mouse Model Is Inhibited by Neoadjuvant Chemotherapy in Combination with Fluorescence-Guided Surgery with an Anti-CA 19-9-Conjugated Fluorophore

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Yong; Murakami, Takashi; Momiyama, Masashi; Mori, Ryutaro; Matsuyama, Ryusei; Katz, Matthew H. G.; Fleming, Jason B.; Chishima, Takashi; Tanaka, Kuniya; Ichikawa, Yasushi; Endo, Itaru; Hoffman, Robert M.; Bouvet, Michael

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study is to determine the efficacy of neoadjuvant chemotherapy (NAC) with gemcitabine (GEM) in combination with fluorescence-guided surgery (FGS) on a pancreatic cancer patient derived orthotopic xenograft (PDOX) model. A PDOX model was established from a CA19-9-positive, CEA-negative tumor from a patient who had undergone a pancreaticoduodenectomy for pancreatic adenocarcinoma. Mice were randomized to 4 groups: bright light surgery (BLS) only; BLS+NAC; FGS only; and FGS+NAC. An anti-CA19-9 or anti-CEA antibody conjugated to DyLight 650 was administered intravenously via the tail vein of mice with the pancreatic cancer PDOX 24 hours before surgery. The PDOX was brightly labeled with fluorophore-conjugated anti-CA19-9, but not with a fluorophore-conjugated anti-CEA antibody. FGS was performed using the fluorophore-conjugated anti-CA19-9 antibody. FGS had no benefit over BLS to prevent metastatic recurrence. NAC in combination with BLS did not convey an advantage over BLS to prevent metastatic recurrence. However, FGS+NAC significantly reduced the metastatic recurrence frequency to one of 8 mice, compared to FGS only after which metastasis recurred in 6 out of 8 mice, and BLS+NAC with metastatic recurrence in 7 out of 8 mice (p = 0.041). Thus NAC in combination with FGS can reduce or even eliminate metastatic recurrence of pancreatic cancer sensitive to NAC. The present study further emphasizes the power of the PDOX model which enables metastasis to occur and thereby identify the efficacy of NAC in combination with FGS on metastatic recurrence. PMID:25463150

  8. Identification of IGFBP2 and IGFBP3 As Compensatory Biomarkers for CA19-9 in Early-Stage Pancreatic Cancer Using a Combination of Antibody-Based and LC-MS/MS-Based Proteomics.

    PubMed

    Yoneyama, Toshihiro; Ohtsuki, Sumio; Honda, Kazufumi; Kobayashi, Makoto; Iwasaki, Motoki; Uchida, Yasuo; Okusaka, Takuji; Nakamori, Shoji; Shimahara, Masashi; Ueno, Takaaki; Tsuchida, Akihiko; Sata, Naohiro; Ioka, Tatsuya; Yasunami, Yohichi; Kosuge, Tomoo; Kaneda, Takashi; Kato, Takao; Yagihara, Kazuhiro; Fujita, Shigeyuki; Huang, Wilber; Yamada, Tesshi; Tachikawa, Masanori; Terasaki, Tetsuya

    2016-01-01

    Pancreatic cancer is one of the most lethal tumors, and reliable detection of early-stage pancreatic cancer and risk diseases for pancreatic cancer is essential to improve the prognosis. As 260 genes were previously reported to be upregulated in invasive ductal adenocarcinoma of pancreas (IDACP) cells, quantification of the corresponding proteins in plasma might be useful for IDACP diagnosis. Therefore, the purpose of the present study was to identify plasma biomarkers for early detection of IDACP by using two proteomics strategies: antibody-based proteomics and liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS)-based proteomics. Among the 260 genes, we focused on 130 encoded proteins with known function for which antibodies were available. Twenty-three proteins showed values of the area under the curve (AUC) of more than 0.8 in receiver operating characteristic (ROC) analysis of reverse-phase protein array (RPPA) data of IDACP patients compared with healthy controls, and these proteins were selected as biomarker candidates. We then used our high-throughput selected reaction monitoring or multiple reaction monitoring (SRM/MRM) methodology, together with an automated sample preparation system, micro LC and auto analysis system, to quantify these candidate proteins in plasma from healthy controls and IDACP patients on a large scale. The results revealed that insulin-like growth factor-binding protein (IGFBP)2 and IGFBP3 have the ability to discriminate IDACP patients at an early stage from healthy controls, and IGFBP2 appeared to be increased in risk diseases of pancreatic malignancy, such as intraductal papillary mucinous neoplasms (IPMNs). Furthermore, diagnosis of IDACP using the combination of carbohydrate antigen 19-9 (CA19-9), IGFBP2 and IGFBP3 is significantly more effective than CA19-9 alone. This suggests that IGFBP2 and IGFBP3 may serve as compensatory biomarkers for CA19-9. Early diagnosis with this marker combination may improve the prognosis of

  9. Ciliated hepatic foregut cyst with high intra-cystic carbohydrate antigen 19-9 level.

    PubMed

    Ben Ari, Ziv; Cohen-Ezra, Oranit; Weidenfeld, Jonathan; Bradichevsky, Tania; Weitzman, Ella; Rimon, Uri; Inbar, Yael; Amitai, Michal; Bar-Zachai, Barak; Eshkenazy, Roni; Ariche, Arie; Azoulay, Daniel

    2014-11-21

    A ciliated hepatic foregut cyst (CHFC) is a rare foregut developmental malformation usually diagnosed in adulthood. Five percent of reported cases of CHFC transform into squamous cell carcinoma. We report the presentation, evaluation, and surgical management of a symptomatic 45-year-old male found to have a 6.2 cm CHFC. Contrast tomography-guided fine-needle aspiration demonstrated columnar, ciliated epithelium consistent with the histologic diagnosis of CHFC. The intracystic levels of carbohydrate antigen (CA) 19-9 and carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA) were extremely high (978118 U/mL and 973 μg/L, respectively). Histologically, the wall of the cyst showed characteristic pseudopapillae lined with a ciliated stratified columnar epithelium, underlying smooth muscle, an outer fibrous layer and no atypia. Immunohistochemistry for CA19-9 and CEA was positive. This is the first case report of a CHFC in which levels of CA 19-9 and CEA were measured. Our findings suggest that a large sized multilocular cyst and elevated cyst CA19-9 and CEA levels do not exclude a CHFC from consideration in the diagnosis. CHFCs should be included in the differential diagnosis of hepatic lesions. Accurate diagnosis of a CHFC is necessary given its potential for malignant transformation, and surgical excision is recommended. PMID:25473195

  10. Chronic bronchitis with fungal infection presenting with marked elevation of serum carbohydrate antigen 19-9: a case report

    PubMed Central

    Han, Ping; Yan, Wei; Luo, Yi; Tu, Wei; He, Jia-Yi; Liu, Jing-Mei; Gong, Jin; Wang, Yun-Wu; Li, Meng-Ke; Tian, De-An; Huang, Huan-Jun

    2014-01-01

    Carbohydrate antigen 19-9 (CA19-9) is the most frequently applied serum tumor marker for diagnosis of cancers in the digestive organs. However, some patients with benign diseases can have elevated serum levels of CA19-9 as well. The current study presents a 55-year-old female who was admitted to our hospital for further evaluation of a nodular cavity shadow in the right lower lobe and clarification of the cause of the marked elevation of serum CA19-9 levels. Abdominal MRI and gastrointestinal endoscopy did not find any malignancy. As lung cancer cannot be excluded in this patient, a video-assisted thoracoscopic surgery was carried, intraoperative and postoperative biopsy analysis both suggested chronic bronchitis with fungal infection (due to Histoplasma capsulatum or Penicillium marneffei) and organization. Immunohistochemistry showed marked positive staining for CA19-9 in the damaged lung tissue. The CA19-9 levels quickly returned to the normal range following lobe resection. Therefore, the marked elevation of serum CA19-9 levels, in this case, may have resulted from the chronic bronchitis with fungal infection. PMID:25337284

  11. Mutant p53 determines pancreatic cancer poor prognosis to pancreatectomy through upregulation of cavin-1 in patients with preoperative serum CA19-9 ≥ 1,000 U/mL

    PubMed Central

    Xiang, Jin-Feng; Wang, Wen-Quan; Liu, Liang; Xu, Hua-Xiang; Wu, Chun-Tao; Yang, Jing-Xuan; Qi, Zi-Hao; Wang, Ya-Qi; Xu, Jin; Liu, Chen; Long, Jiang; Ni, Quan-Xing; Li, Min; Yu, Xian-Jun

    2016-01-01

    Patients with pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC) and preoperative CA19-9 ≥ 1,000 U/mL that does not decrease postresection have the worst prognosis, but the mechanism is unclear. Here, we elucidated the relationship between this signature and driver-gene mutations, and the cavins/caveolin-1 axis. Four major driver-genes (KRAS, TP53, CDKN2A/p16, and SMAD4/DPC4) that are associated with PDAC and five critical molecules (cavin-1/-2/-3/-4 and caveolin-1) in the cavins/caveolin-1 axis were screened by immunohistochemistry in tumor tissue microarrays. Additionally, six pancreatic cancer cell lines and a spleen subcapsular inoculation nude mouse model were also used. Overexpression of mutant p53 was the major mutational event in patients with the CA19-9 signature. Cavin-1 was also overexpressed, and mutant p53 correlated directly with high cavin-1 expression in pancreatic cancer cell lines and tumor specimens (P < 0.01). Furthermore, mutant p53R172H upregulated cavin-1 and promoted invasiveness and metastasis of pancreatic cancer cells in vitro and in vivo. Finally, combination of mutant p53 and high cavin-1 density indicated the shortest survival for patients with PDAC after resection (P < 0.001). Mutant p53-driven upregulation of cavin-1 represents the major mechanism of poor outcome for PDAC patients with the CA19-9 signature after resection, indicating that inhibition of cavin-1 may improve the long-term efficacy of pancreatectomy. PMID:26753987

  12. CEA, TPS, CA 19-9 and CA 72-4 and the fecal occult blood test in the preoperative diagnosis and follow-up after resective surgery of colorectal cancer.

    PubMed

    Griesenberg, D; Nürnberg, R; Bahlo, M; Klapdor, R

    1999-01-01

    In a prospective clinical study we examined the diagnostic procedures used in the preoperative diagnosis of colorectal cancer patients (n = 176) and the value of supplementation of standard diagnostic methods (clinical investigation, colonoscopy, barium enema, ultrasound, computer tomography) with a test for occult fecal blood (FOBT) and an expanded tumor marker panel (CA 19-9, TPS and CA 72-4 in addition to CEA) in the postoperative follow-up (n = 116, mean follow-up 21 months). Preoperative diagnosis based on colonoscopy/barium enema, followed by histology and the imaging methods, in most cases US and/or CT. Patients with postoperative stage Dukes D and after palliative surgery were excluded from the follow-up study (n = 43). The patients were seen every three months (clinical investigation, US, CT, tumor markers, FOBT) within the first two postoperative years and every half a year thereafter. 83 of the 116 patients (16%) developed a recurrent disease and 5 of them could be reoperated with curative intention. In addition to the 19 patients 14 simultaneously admitted patients with recurrence of colorectal cancer (total n = 33) were studied. The results of our study analyzing the sensitivity and specificity of colonoscopy, tumor, markers and the FOBT in the preoperative and postoperative phases as well as in the diagnosis of recurrent disease of colorectal cancer confirms the view that FOBT and tumor markers cannot replace endoscopic and imaging methods. However they support the concept, that diagnosis and follow-up of colorectal cancer should be based on a combination of clinical investigation and imaging methods (US, CT etc. and endoscopic and/or x-ray examination) with supplementation by FOBT and determination of tumor markers, mainly CEA. In the case a patient is asking for prognostic and recurrence information as early and as valid as possible we currently recommend the following procedure for the first two years after surgery: every three months the

  13. Dual frequency (20.0-19.9 kHz) VLF data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Looney, C. H.

    1968-01-01

    Data are presented from 24 months of operation of radio station WWVL. Daily measurements of the 20.0 kHz and 20.0/19.9 kHz signal phase angles corrected in accordance with the NBS measurements are presented in tabular form. The 20.0/19.9 kHz data is a function of the phase angle of the 100 Hz information inherent in the 20.0/19.9 transmissions. This data can be used to resolve the 50 microsecond ambiguity inherent in 20.0 kHz single frequency transmissions.

  14. Clinicopathologic and Prognostic Value of Serum Carbohydrate Antigen 19-9 in Gastric Cancer: A Meta-Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Song, Yong-xi; Huang, Xuan-zhang; Gao, Peng; Sun, Jing-xu; Chen, Xiao-wan; Yang, Yu-chong; Zhang, Cong; Liu, Hong-peng; Wang, Hong-chi; Wang, Zhen-ning

    2015-01-01

    Background. The clinical value of carbohydrate antigen (CA) 19-9 in gastric cancer is controversial. We evaluated the clinicopathologic and prognostic value of CA 19-9 in gastric cancer. Methods. A literature search was conducted in PubMed and Embase databases. Odds ratios (ORs), risk ratios (RR), hazard ratios (HRs), and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) were used as effect measures. Results. Thirty-eight studies were included. Results showed that there were significant differences in the incidence of high CA 19-9 levels between stages III/IV and I/II groups (OR = 3.36; 95% CI = 2.34–4.84), the pT3/T4 and pT1/T2 groups (OR = 2.40; 95% CI = 1.60–3.59), the lymph node-positive and node-negative groups (OR = 2.91; 95% CI = 2.21–3.84), the metastasis-positive and metastasis-negative groups (OR = 2.76; 95% CI = 1.12–6.82), and vessel invasion-positive and invasion-negative groups (OR = 1.66; 95% CI = 1.11–2.48). Moreover, CA 19-9 was significantly associated with poor overall survival (HR = 1.83; 95% CI = 1.56–2.15), disease-free survival (HR = 1.85; 95% CI = 1.16–2.95), and disease-specific survival (HR = 1.33; 95% CI = 1.10–1.60) in gastric cancer. Conclusions. Our meta-analysis showed that CA 19-9 indicates clinicopathologic characteristics of gastric cancer and is associated with a poor prognosis. PMID:26576068

  15. Delayed radiation-induced inflammation accompanying a marked carbohydrate antigen 19-9 elevation in a patient with resected pancreatic cancer

    PubMed Central

    Mattes, Malcolm D.; Cardinal, Jon S.; Jacobson, Geraldine M.

    2016-01-01

    Although carbohydrate antigen (CA) 19-9 is a useful tumor marker for pancreatic cancer, it can also become elevated from a variety of benign and malignant conditions. Herein we describe an unusual presentation of elevated CA 19-9 in an asymptomatic patient who had previously undergone adjuvant chemotherapy and radiation therapy for resected early stage pancreatic cancer. The rise in CA 19-9 might be due to delayed radiation-induced inflammation related to previous intra-abdominal radiation therapy with or without radiation recall induced by gemcitabine. After treatment with corticosteroids the CA 19-9 level decreased to normal, and the patient has not developed any evidence of recurrent cancer to date. PMID:27306770

  16. 19 CFR 19.9 - General order, abandoned, and seized merchandise.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 19 Customs Duties 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false General order, abandoned, and seized merchandise... Provisions § 19.9 General order, abandoned, and seized merchandise. (a) Acceptance of merchandise. The... Customs-authorized permit to transfer or in-bond entry) is responsible for preparing a Customs Form...

  17. 15 CFR 19.9 - When will Commerce entities transfer a Commerce debt to the Treasury Department's Financial...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... accordance with the procedures described in 31 CFR 285.12. The Financial Management Service takes appropriate... Commerce debt to the Treasury Department's Financial Management Service for collection? 19.9 Section 19.9... Department's Financial Management Service for collection? (a) Commerce entities will transfer any...

  18. 15 CFR 19.9 - When will Commerce entities transfer a Commerce debt to the Treasury Department's Financial...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... accordance with the procedures described in 31 CFR 285.12. The Financial Management Service takes appropriate... Commerce debt to the Treasury Department's Financial Management Service for collection? 19.9 Section 19.9... Department's Financial Management Service for collection? (a) Commerce entities will transfer any...

  19. 15 CFR 19.9 - When will Commerce entities transfer a Commerce debt to the Treasury Department's Financial...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... accordance with the procedures described in 31 CFR 285.12. The Financial Management Service takes appropriate... Commerce debt to the Treasury Department's Financial Management Service for collection? 19.9 Section 19.9... Department's Financial Management Service for collection? (a) Commerce entities will transfer any...

  20. 15 CFR 19.9 - When will Commerce entities transfer a Commerce debt to the Treasury Department's Financial...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... accordance with the procedures described in 31 CFR 285.12. The Financial Management Service takes appropriate... Commerce debt to the Treasury Department's Financial Management Service for collection? 19.9 Section 19.9... Department's Financial Management Service for collection? (a) Commerce entities will transfer any...

  1. Elevated serum level of carbohydrate antigen 19-9 in benign biliary stricture diseases can reduce its value as a tumor marker.

    PubMed

    Lin, Mao-Song; Huang, Jun-Xing; Yu, Hong

    2014-01-01

    Although carbohydrate antigen (CA19-9) level is frequently upregulated in pancreatobiliary cancer, it is also elevated in some benign diseases. This study aimed to determine whether CA19-9 levels could be used to distinguish between benign obstructive jaundice and pancreatobiliary cancer. Fifty-seven patients with obstructive jaundice were studied retrospectively. Endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography (ERCP), sphincterotomy, stone extraction, or stent placement were used to treat patients with benign bile duct stricture or inoperable malignant biliopancreatic diseases, whilst surgery was performed in suitable cases. Serum CA19-9 levels and some additional biochemical parameters were evaluated before and after treatment. CA19-9 levels were elevated in most patients, along with levels of total bilirubin, alkaline phosphatase (ALP), and gamma glutamyl transpeptidase (GGT), and 10 patients with benign disorders had extraordinarily high levels of these markers (> 1000 U/mL). The mean CA19-9 level in the malignant group was greater than that in the benign group (826.83 ± 557.34 vs. 401.92 ± 483.92 U/mL, P = 0.005), and the sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value (PPV), and negative predictive value (NPV) for CA19-9 were 100%, 7.69%, 33.33% and 47.47%, respectively. CA19-9 levels in the whole cohort were correlated with ALP (r = 0.77, P < 0.001), GGT (r = 0.83, P < 0.001), bilirubin (r = 0.69, P < 0.001), and CRP (r = 0.37, P = 0.004). The reduction in serum level of CA19-9 after treatment in the malignant group was remarkably less than that observed in the benign group (97.26 ± 123.24 U/mL vs. 352.71 ± 397.29 U/mL, P < 0.001). CA19-9 levels may not be sufficient to distinguish between malignant and benign obstructive jaundice diseases. PMID:24753772

  2. Prognostic Significance of Carbohydrate Antigen 19-9 in Unresectable Locally Advanced Pancreatic Cancer Treated With Dose-Escalated Intensity Modulated Radiation Therapy and Concurrent Full-Dose Gemcitabine: Analysis of a Prospective Phase 1/2 Dose Escalation Study

    SciTech Connect

    Vainshtein, Jeffrey M.; Schipper, Matthew; Zalupski, Mark M.; Lawrence, Theodore S.; Abrams, Ross; Francis, Isaac R.; Khan, Gazala; Leslie, William; Ben-Josef, Edgar

    2013-05-01

    Purpose: Although established in the postresection setting, the prognostic value of carbohydrate antigen 19-9 (CA19-9) in unresectable locally advanced pancreatic cancer (LAPC) is less clear. We examined the prognostic utility of CA19-9 in patients with unresectable LAPC treated on a prospective trial of intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) dose escalation with concurrent gemcitabine. Methods and Materials: Forty-six patients with unresectable LAPC were treated at the University of Michigan on a phase 1/2 trial of IMRT dose escalation with concurrent gemcitabine. CA19-9 was obtained at baseline and during routine follow-up. Cox models were used to assess the effect of baseline factors on freedom from local progression (FFLP), distant progression (FFDP), progression-free survival (PFS), and overall survival (OS). Stepwise forward regression was used to build multivariate predictive models for each endpoint. Results: Thirty-eight patients were eligible for the present analysis. On univariate analysis, baseline CA19-9 and age predicted OS, CA19-9 at baseline and 3 months predicted PFS, gross tumor volume (GTV) and black race predicted FFLP, and CA19-9 at 3 months predicted FFDP. On stepwise multivariate regression modeling, baseline CA19-9, age, and female sex predicted OS; baseline CA19-9 and female sex predicted both PFS and FFDP; and GTV predicted FFLP. Patients with baseline CA19-9 ≤90 U/mL had improved OS (median 23.0 vs 11.1 months, HR 2.88, P<.01) and PFS (14.4 vs 7.0 months, HR 3.61, P=.001). CA19-9 progression over 90 U/mL was prognostic for both OS (HR 3.65, P=.001) and PFS (HR 3.04, P=.001), and it was a stronger predictor of death than either local progression (HR 1.46, P=.42) or distant progression (HR 3.31, P=.004). Conclusions: In patients with unresectable LAPC undergoing definitive chemoradiation therapy, baseline CA19-9 was independently prognostic even after established prognostic factors were controlled for, whereas CA19-9 progression

  3. Extremely increased serum carbohydrate antigen 19-9 levels caused by new or resistant infections to previous antibiotics in chronic lung diseases.

    PubMed

    Shin, Ji Young; Yoo, Su Jin; Park, Bo Mi; Jung, Sung Su; Kim, Ju Ock; Lee, Jeong Eun

    2013-09-01

    In this paper, we describe 72-year-old female patient without evidence of malignant disease presented with significantly elevated serum carbohydrate antigen (CA) 19-9 levels by respiratory infections. She was diagnosed with respiratory infections due to Mycobacterium avium complex and Pseudomonas aeruginosa. The serum CA 19-9 levels remarkably increased (1,453-5,300 U/mL; reference range, <37 U/mL) by respiratory infection and abruptly decreased (357-534 U/mL) whenever infection was controlled by specific treatments. This case suggests that serum CA 19-9 levels may be used as a diagnostic marker to indicate new or resistant infections to previous antibiotics in chronic lung diseases without significant changes in chest X-ray findings. PMID:24101938

  4. The clinical utility of normal range carbohydrate antigen 19-9 level as a surrogate marker in evaluating response to treatment in pancreatic cancer—a report of two cases

    PubMed Central

    Alzahrani, Mohammed; Wolff, Robert A.

    2016-01-01

    Carbohydrate antigen 19-9 (CA 19-9) is a tumor marker that is has been has been intensely studied and investigated as a surrogate marker in pancreatic cancer (PC). It is also commonly utilized in the clinical management of PC. We report two cases where normal range CA 19-9 level has been shown to be useful as a surrogate marker for following PC progression and response to treatment. Initially in our cases, both patients had a resectable tumor and their tumor markers were within normal range. In both cases the normal range CA 19-9 increase from the baseline was associated with corresponding progressive disease on imaging studies and CA 19-9 decline was in keeping with response to systemic and local therapy despite being within the normal range. To our knowledge, this is the first case report where we report the utility of serial normal values of CA 19-9 as a useful tool in following PC disease activity and in response to treatment. Clinicians should consider measuring serial normal values of CA 19-9 in patients with PC and normal range CA 19-9 which may help in assessing response to treatment in subset of this population. PMID:27284488

  5. A novel sandwich electrochemiluminescence immunosensor for ultrasensitive detection of carbohydrate antigen 19-9 based on immobilizing luminol on Ag@BSA core/shell microspheres.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Amin; Xiang, Hongkun; Zhang, Xin; Guo, Weiwei; Yuan, Enhui; Huang, Chusen; Jia, Nengqin

    2016-01-15

    A novel sandwich-type electrochemiluminescence immunosensor based on immobilizing luminol on Ag@BSA core/shell microspheres (Ag@BSA-luminol) for ultrasensitive detection of tumor marker carbohydrate antigen 19-9 (CA19-9) has been developed. Herein, magnetic carbon nanotubes (MAGCNTs) decorated with polyethylenimine (PEI) was used to construct the base of the immunosensor. MAGCNTs with prominent electrical conductivity and high surface area could be beneficial for promoting the electron transfer and loading plenty of primary antibodies (Ab1) via glutaraldehyde (GA). Meanwhile, the magnetic property of MAGCNTs makes it easy to be attached to the surface of magnetic glass carbon electrode (MGCE) through magnetism interaction, which provides an outstanding platform for this immunosensor. Moreover, Ag@BSA microspheres with large surface area, good stability, and excellent biocompatibility were desirable candidates for effective cross-link of CA19-9 detection antibodies (Ab2). A more interesting thing was that ELISA color reaction was used as an ultrasensitive strategy for identifying Ab2 was successfully coated on Ag@BSA with the naked eye. Additionally, we immobilized the luminol on the surface of Ag@BSA to prepare the target immunosensor. Immobilization of luminol on the surface of Ag@BSA could decrease the distance between luminophores and the electrode surface, leading to great enhancement of the ECL intensity of luminol in the present of hydrogen peroxide (H2O2). Under the optimal conditions, the intensity of the ECL immunosensor increased linearly with the logarithm of CA19-9 concentration in a wide linear range from 0.0005 to 150UmL(-1) with a detection limit of 0.0002UmL(-1) (S/N=3). All the results suggested the prepared CA19-9 immunosensor displayed high sensitivity, excellent stability and good specificity. The developed method opened a new avenue to clinical bioassay. PMID:26319163

  6. Pretreatment Carbohydrate Antigen 19-9 Level Indicates Tumor Response, Early Distant Metastasis, Overall Survival, and Therapeutic Selection in Localized and Unresectable Pancreatic Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Yoo, Tae; Lee, Woo Jin; Woo, Sang Myung; Kim, Tae Hyun; Han, Sung-Sik; Park, Sang-Jae; Moon, Sung Ho; Shin, Kyung Hwan; Kim, Sang Soo; Hong, Eun Kyung; Kim, Dae Yong; Park, Joong-Won

    2011-11-15

    Purpose: The use of chemoradiotherapy (CRT) for localized and unresectable pancreatic cancer has been disputed because of high probability of distant metastasis. Thus, we analyzed the effect of clinical parameters on tumor response, early distant metastasis within 3 months (DM{sup 3m}), and overall survival to identify an indicator for selecting patients who would benefit from CRT. Methods and Materials: This study retrospectively analyzed the data from 84 patients with localized and unresectable pancreatic cancer who underwent CRT between August 2002 and October 2009. Sex, age, tumor size, histological differentiation, N classification, pre- and post-treatment carbohydrate antigen (CA) 19-9 level, and CA 19-9 percent decrease were analyzed to identify risk factors associated with tumor response, DM{sup 3m}, and overall survival. Results: For all 84 patients, the median survival time was 12.5 months (range, 2-31.9 months), objective response (complete response or partial response) to CRT was observed in 28 patients (33.3%), and DM{sup 3m} occurred in 24 patients (28.6%). Multivariate analysis showed that pretreatment CA 19-9 level ({<=}400 vs. >400 U/ml) was significantly associated with tumor response (45.1% vs. 15.2%), DM{sup 3m} (19.6% vs. 42.4%), and median overall survival time (15.1 vs. 9.7 months) (p < 0.05 for all three parameters). Conclusion: For patients with localized and unresectable pancreatic cancer, pretreatment CA 19-9 level could be helpful in predicting tumor response, DM{sup 3m}, and overall survival and identifying patients who will benefit from CRT.

  7. Silver-functionalized g-C3N4 nanohybrids as signal-transduction tags for electrochemical immunoassay of human carbohydrate antigen 19-9.

    PubMed

    Sun, Ai-Li; Qi, Qing-An

    2016-07-21

    A simple and feasible electrochemical immunosensing platform was developed for highly efficient screening of a disease-related protein (human carbohydrate antigen 19-9, CA 19-9 used in this case) using silver-functionalized g-C3N4 nanosheets (Ag/g-C3N4) as signal-transduction tags. Initially, Ag/g-C3N4 nanohybrids were synthesized by combining thermal polymerization of the melamine precursor with the photo-assisted reduction method. Thereafter, the as-synthesized Ag/g-C3N4 nanohybrids were utilized for the labeling of the anti-CA 19-9 detection antibody by using a typical carbodiimide coupling method. The assay was carried out on a capture antibody-modified glassy carbon electrode in a sandwich-type detection mode. The detectable signal mainly derived from the voltammetric characteristics of the immobilized nanosilver particles on the g-C3N4 nanosheets within the applied potentials. Under the optimal conditions, the voltammetric peak currents increased with the increasing amount of target CA 19-9, and exhibited a wide linear range from 5.0 mU mL(-1) to 50 U mL(-1) with a detection limit of 1.2 mU mL(-1). Our strategy also displayed good reproducibility, precision and specificity. The results of the analysis of clinical serum specimens were in good accordance with the results obtained by an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) method. The newly developed immunosensing system is promising for enzyme-free and cost-effective analysis of low-abundance proteins. PMID:27183220

  8. Measurement of serum carcinoembryonic antigen, carbohydrate antigen 19-9, cytokeratin-19 fragment and matrix metalloproteinase-7 for detecting cholangiocarcinoma: a preliminary case-control study.

    PubMed

    Lumachi, Franco; Lo Re, Giovanni; Tozzoli, Renato; D'Aurizio, Federica; Facomer, Flavio; Chiara, Giordano B; Basso, Stefano M M

    2014-11-01

    Cholangiocarcinoma is a malignant tumor of the liver arising from the bile duct epithelium, accounting for 10-25% of all primary hepatic cancers. The clinical presentation of this tumor is not specific and the diagnosis of early cholangiocarcinoma is difficult, especially in patients with other biliary diseases. Measurement of serum carbohydrate antigen (CA) 19-9 and carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA) are commonly used to monitor response to therapy, but are also useful for confirming the presence of a cholangiocarcinoma. In this setting, other biomarkers have been previously tested, including cytokeratin-19 fragment (CYFRA 21-1) and the matrix metalloproteinase-7 (MMP7). The purpose of this retrospective study was to determine the clinical usefulness of the assay of serum CEA, CA 19-9, CYFRA 21-1 and MMP7, individually and together, as tumor markers for the diagnosis of cholangiocarcinoma. Twenty-four patients (14 men, 10 women, 62.6±8.2 years of age) with histologically-confirmed cholangiocarcinoma (cases) and 25 age- and sex-matched patients with benign liver disease (controls) underwent measurement of these biomarkers. The mean values of all serum markers of patients with cholangiocarcinoma were significantly higher (p<0.01) than that of the controls. No correlation was found between serum tumor markers and total bilirubin, aspartate aminotransferase (AST) and alkaline phosphatase (ALP). The sensitivity, specificity and accuracy were: CEA: 52%, 55%, and 58%; CA 19-9: 74%, 82% and 78%; CYFRA 21-1: 76%, 79% and 78%; MMP7: 78%, 77% and 80%, respectively. The combination of all serum markers afforded 92.0% sensitivity and 96% specificity in detecting cholangiocarcinoma, showing the highest diagnostic accuracy (94%). In conclusion, our preliminary results suggest that the measurement of all four biomarkers together can help in the early detection of cholangiocarcinoma. PMID:25368272

  9. Amperometric carbohydrate antigen 19-9 immunosensor based on three dimensional ordered macroporous magnetic Au film coupling direct electrochemistry of horseradish peroxidase.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Qi; Chen, Xiaojun; Tang, Yin; Ge, Lingna; Guo, Buhua; Yao, Cheng

    2014-03-01

    A sandwich-type electrochemical immunosensor for the detection of carbohydrate antigen 19-9 (CA 19-9) antigen based on the immobilization of primary antibody (Ab1) on three dimensional ordered macroporous magnetic (3DOMM) electrode, and the direct electrochemistry of horseradish peroxidase (HRP) that was used as both the label of secondary antibody (Ab2) and the blocking reagent. The 3DOMM electrode was fabricated by introducing core-shell Au-SiO2@Fe3O4 nanospheres onto the surface of three dimensional ordered macroporous (3DOM) Au electrode via the application of an external magnet. Au nanoparticles functionalized SBA-15 (Au@SBA-15) was conjugated to the HRP labeled secondary antibody (HRP-Ab2) through the Au-SH or Au-NH3(+) interaction, and HRP was also used as the block reagent. The formation of antigen-antibody complex made the combination of Au@SBA-15 and 3DOMM exhibit remarkable synergistic effects for accelerating direct electron transfer (DET) between HRP and the electrode. Under the optimal conditions, the DET current signal increased proportionally to CA 19-9 concentration in the range of 0.05 to 15.65 U mL(-1) with a detection limit of 0.01 U mL(-1). Moreover, the immunosensor showed high selectivity, good stability, satisfactory reproducibility and regeneration. Importantly, the developed method was used to assay clinical serum specimens, achieving a good relation with those obtained from the commercialized electrochemiluminescent method. PMID:24560371

  10. Three-dimensional structure of Fab R19.9, a monoclonal murine antibody specific for the p-azobenzenearsonate group.

    PubMed Central

    Lascombe, M B; Alzari, P M; Boulot, G; Saludjian, P; Tougard, P; Berek, C; Haba, S; Rosen, E M; Nisonoff, A; Poljak, R J

    1989-01-01

    The crystal structure of Fab R19.9, derived from an anti-p-azobenzenearsonate monoclonal antibody, has been determined and refined to 2.8-A resolution by x-ray crystallographic techniques. Monoclonal antibody R19.9 (IgG2b kappa) shares some idiotopes with a major idiotype (CRIA) associated with A/J anti-p-azobenzenearsonate antibodies. The amino acid sequences of the variable (V) parts of the heavy (VH) and light (VL) polypeptide chains of monoclonal antibody R19.9 were determined through nucleotide sequencing of their mRNAs. The VL region is very similar to that of CRIA-positive anti-p-azobenzenearsonate antibodies as is VH, except for its third complementarity-determining region, which is three amino acids longer; it makes a loop, unique to R19.9, that protrudes into the solvent. A large number of tyrosine residues in the complementarity-determining region of VH and VL, with their side chains pointing towards the solvent, may have an important function in antigen binding. PMID:2911596

  11. 30 CFR 19.9 - Performance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... shall burn for at least 10 consecutive hours on one charge of the battery and shall give during that period a mean candlepower of light beam of not less than 1. (b) Bulb life. The average life of the bulbs shall be not less than 200 hours, and at least 92 percent of the bulbs shall have a life of 150...

  12. 30 CFR 19.9 - Performance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... shall burn for at least 10 consecutive hours on one charge of the battery and shall give during that period a mean candlepower of light beam of not less than 1. (b) Bulb life. The average life of the bulbs shall be not less than 200 hours, and at least 92 percent of the bulbs shall have a life of 150...

  13. 30 CFR 19.9 - Performance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... shall burn for at least 10 consecutive hours on one charge of the battery and shall give during that period a mean candlepower of light beam of not less than 1. (b) Bulb life. The average life of the bulbs shall be not less than 200 hours, and at least 92 percent of the bulbs shall have a life of 150...

  14. 30 CFR 19.9 - Performance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... period a mean candlepower of light beam of not less than 1. (b) Bulb life. The average life of the bulbs.... The life of a bulb is the number of hours its main filament will burn in the cap lamp or its equivalent. The life of a bulb having main filaments in parallel is considered ended when the first...

  15. 12 CFR 19.9 - Ex parte communications.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... parte communication means any material oral or written communication relevant to the merits of an... administrative law judge handling that proceeding, the Comptroller, or a decisional employee. (2) Exception. A request for status of the proceeding does not constitute an ex parte communication. (b) Prohibition of...

  16. Characterization of 19.9% Efficient CIGS Absorbers: Preprint

    SciTech Connect

    Repins, I.; Contreras, M.; Romero, M.; Yan, Y.; Metzger, W.; Li, J.; Johnston, S.; Egass, B.; DeHart, C.; Scharf, J.; McCandless, B. E.; Noufi, R.

    2008-05-01

    This paper documents the properties of the world-record-efficiency CIGS solar cell by a variety of characterization techniques, with an emphasis on identifying near-surface properties associated with the modified processing.

  17. 22 CFR 19.9-2 - Commencement and termination.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... becomes entitled to a Foreign Service annuity or on the first day of the month in which the divorce... service; (2) The date the disability annuity begins; or (3) The first of the month in which the...

  18. 22 CFR 19.9-2 - Commencement and termination.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... becomes entitled to a Foreign Service annuity or on the first day of the month in which the divorce... service; (2) The date the disability annuity begins; or (3) The first of the month in which the...

  19. 22 CFR 19.9-2 - Commencement and termination.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... becomes entitled to a Foreign Service annuity or on the first day of the month in which the divorce... service; (2) The date the disability annuity begins; or (3) The first of the month in which the...

  20. 22 CFR 19.9-2 - Commencement and termination.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... becomes entitled to a Foreign Service annuity or on the first day of the month in which the divorce... service; (2) The date the disability annuity begins; or (3) The first of the month in which the...

  1. 22 CFR 19.9-2 - Commencement and termination.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... becomes entitled to a Foreign Service annuity or on the first day of the month in which the divorce... service; (2) The date the disability annuity begins; or (3) The first of the month in which the...

  2. 22 CFR 19.9-3 - Computation and payment of pension to former spouse.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 22 Foreign Relations 1 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Computation and payment of pension to former... Computation and payment of pension to former spouse. (a) A pension to a former spouse is paid monthly on the... for a pension or any combination of pensions to former spouses of any one principal which exceeds...

  3. 22 CFR 19.9-3 - Computation and payment of pension to former spouse.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 22 Foreign Relations 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Computation and payment of pension to former... Computation and payment of pension to former spouse. (a) A pension to a former spouse is paid monthly on the... for a pension or any combination of pensions to former spouses of any one principal which exceeds...

  4. Association of serum levels of CEA, CA199, CA125, CYFRA21-1 and CA72-4 and disease characteristics in colorectal cancer.

    PubMed

    Zhong, Wa; Yu, Zhong; Zhan, Jun; Yu, Tao; Lin, Ying; Xia, Zhong-Sheng; Yuan, Yu-Hong; Chen, Qi-Kui

    2015-01-01

    Identifying predictive biomarkers for colorectal cancer would facilitate diagnosis and treatment of the disease. This study aimed to investigate the association of the serological biomarkers CEA, CA19-9, CA125, CYFRA21-1 and CA72-4 with patient characteristics and disease outcomes in colorectal cancer. Patients (N = 373) with colorectal cancer were evaluated for the association of CEA, CA19-9, CA125, CYFRA21-1, and CA72-4 pre and post-surgery and at disease recurrence with demographics, disease characteristics including pathological types, degree of differentiation, invasion depth, abdominal lymph node metastasis, TMN stage, Dukes stage, location of cancer and metastasis, and disease outcomes. It was more common for a patient to express these markers prior to surgery and at disease recurrence than following surgery. Overall, the serum levels of CEA, CA19-9, CA125, CYFRA21-1, and CA72-4 were not associated with age, gender, pathological type and location of cancer (all P-values >0.05), but were associated with the poor tumor differentiation, higher tumor invasion, greater degree of abdominal lymph node metastasis, and higher TNM and Duke stage tumors (all P-values < 0.01). CEA expression was associated with older ages (median age 65 years). Multivariate analysis indicated that CEA was correlated with overall survival and none of the markers correlated with disease recurrence. The expression of CEA, CA19-9, CA125, CYFRA21-1, and CA72-4 was associated with specific disease characteristics which tended to indicated more advanced disease and disease recurrence consistent with these biomarkers being useful for detecting colorectal cancer. PMID:24875250

  5. 19.9%-Efficient ZnO/CdS/CuInGaSe2 Solar Cell with 81.2% Fill Factor

    SciTech Connect

    Repins, I.; Contreras, M. A.; Egaas, B.; DeHart, C.; Scharf, J.; Perkins, C. L.; To, B.; Noufi, R.

    2008-05-01

    We report a new record total-area efficiency of 19 {center_dot} 9% for CuInGaSe{sub 2}-based thin-film solar cells. Improved performance is due to higher fill factor. The device was made by three-stage co-evaporation with a modified surface termination. Growth conditions, device analysis, and basic film characterization are presented.

  6. In situ allicin generation using targeted alliinase delivery for inhibition of MIA PaCa-2 cells via epigenetic changes, oxidative stress and cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor (CDKI) expression.

    PubMed

    Chhabria, Sagar V; Akbarsha, Mohammad A; Li, Albert P; Kharkar, Prashant S; Desai, Krutika B

    2015-10-01

    Allicin, an extremely active constituent of freshly crushed garlic, is produced upon reaction of substrate alliin with the enzyme alliinase (EC 4.4.1.4). Allicin has been shown to be toxic to several mammalian cells in vitro in a dose-dependent manner. In the present study this cytotoxicity was taken to advantage to develop a novel approach to cancer treatment, based on site directed generation of allicin. Alliinase was chemically conjugated to a monoclonal antibody (mAb) which was directed against a specific pancreatic cancer marker, CA19-9. After the CA19-9 mAb-alliinase conjugate was bound to targeted pancreatic cancer cells (MIA PaCa-2 cells), on addition of alliin, the cancer cell-localized alliinase produced allicin, which effectively induced apoptosis in MIA PaCa-2 cells. Specificity of anticancer activity of in situ generated allicin was demonstrated using a novel in vitro system-integrated discrete multiple organ co-culture technique. Further, allicin-induced caspase-3 expression, DNA fragmentation, cell cycle arrest, p21(Waf1/Cip1) cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor expression, ROS generation, GSH depletion, and led to various epigenetic modifications which resulted in stimulation of apoptosis. This approach offers a new therapeutic strategy, wherein alliin and alliinase-bound antibody work together to produce allicin at targeted locations which would reverse gene silencing and suppress cancer cell growth, suggesting that combination of these targeted agents may improve pancreatic cancer therapy. PMID:26286853

  7. Serum CA125 is a novel predictive marker for pancreatic cancer metastasis and correlates with the metastasis-associated burden

    PubMed Central

    Xiang, Jin-Feng; Liu, Chen; Long, Jiang; Xu, Jin; Ni, Quan-Xing; Houchen, Courtney W.; Postier, Russell G.; Li, Min; Yu, Xian-Jun

    2016-01-01

    This study evaluated potential of serum tumor markers to predict the incidence and intensity of pancreatic cancer metastasis as well as patient survival. Retrospective records from 905 patients and prospective data from 142 patients were collected from two high-volume institutions. The levels of eight serum tumor markers (CA19-9, CEA, CA242, CA72-4, CA50, CA125, CA153, and AFP) commonly used in gastroenterological cancer were analyzed in all stages of pancreatic cancer. Serum CA125 levels were the most strongly associated with pancreatic cancer metastasis and were higher in patients with metastatic disease than those without. CA125 levels increased with increasing metastasis to lymph nodes and distant organs, especially the liver. High baseline CA125 levels predicted early distant metastasis after pancreatectomy and were associated with the presence of occult metastasis before surgery. An optimal CA125 cut-off value of 18.4 U/mL was identified; patients with baseline CA125 levels of 18.4 U/mL or higher had poor surgical outcomes. In addition, high serum CA125 levels coincided with the expression of a metastasis-associated gene signature and with alterations in “driver” gene expression involved in pancreatic cancer metastasis. CA125 may therefore be a promising, noninvasive, metastasis-associated biomarker for monitoring pancreatic cancer prognosis. PMID:26745601

  8. Pregnancy-associated adaptations in [Ca2+]i-dependent and Ca2+ sensitization mechanisms of venous contraction: implications in pregnancy-related venous disorders.

    PubMed

    Xia, Yin; Khalil, Raouf A

    2016-06-01

    Pregnancy is associated with significant adaptations in the maternal hemodynamics and arterial circulation, but the changes in the venous mechanisms during pregnancy are less clear. We hypothesized that pregnancy is associated with alterations in venous function, intracellular free Ca(2+) concentration ([Ca(2+)]i), and Ca(2+)-dependent mechanisms of venous contraction. Circular segments of inferior vena cava (IVC) from virgin and late pregnant (Preg, day 19) Sprague-Dawley rats were suspended between two hooks, labeled with fura-2, and placed in a cuvet inside a spectrofluorometer for simultaneous measurement of contraction and [Ca(2+)]i (fura-2 340/380 ratio). KCl (96 mM), which stimulates Ca(2+) influx, caused less contraction (35.6 ± 6.3 vs. 92.6 ± 19.9 mg/mg tissue) and smaller increases in [Ca(2+)]i (1.67 ± 0.12 vs. 2.19 ± 0.11) in Preg vs. virgin rat IVC. The α-adrenergic receptor agonist phenylephrine (Phe; 10(-5) M) caused less contraction (23.8 ± 3.4 vs. 70.9 ± 12.9 mg/mg tissue) and comparable increases in [Ca(2+)]i (1.76 ± 0.10 vs. 1.89 ± 0.08) in Preg vs. virgin rat IVC. At increasing extracellular Ca(2+) concentrations ([Ca(2+)]e) (0.1, 0.3, 0.6, 1, and 2.5 mM), KCl and Phe induced [Ca(2+)]e-contraction and [Ca(2+)]e-[Ca(2+)]i curves that were reduced in Preg vs. virgin IVC, supporting reduced Ca(2+) entry mechanisms. The [Ca(2+)]e-contraction and [Ca(2+)]e-[Ca(2+)]i curves were used to construct the [Ca(2+)]i-contraction relationship. Despite reduced contraction and [Ca(2+)]i in Preg IVC, the Phe-induced [Ca(2+)]i-contraction relationship was greater than that of KCl and was enhanced in Preg vs. virgin IVC, suggesting parallel activation of Ca(2+)-sensitization pathways. The Ca(2+) channel blocker diltiazem, protein kinase C (PKC) inhibitor GF-109203X, and Rho-kinase (ROCK) inhibitor Y27632 inhibited KCl- and Phe-induced contraction and abolished the shift in the Phe [Ca(2+)]i-contraction relationship in Preg IVC, suggesting an interplay

  9. Tumor markers in pancreatic cancer: a European Group on Tumor Markers (EGTM) status report.

    PubMed

    Duffy, M J; Sturgeon, C; Lamerz, R; Haglund, C; Holubec, V L; Klapdor, R; Nicolini, A; Topolcan, O; Heinemann, V

    2010-03-01

    Pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma is one of the most difficult malignancies to diagnose and treat. The aim of this article is to review how tumor markers can aid the diagnosis and management of patients with this malignancy. The most widely used and best validated marker for pancreatic cancer is CA 19-9. Inadequate sensitivity and specificity limit the use of CA 19-9 in the early diagnosis of pancreatic cancer. In non-jaundiced patients, however, CA 19-9 may complement other diagnostic procedures. In patients with resectable pancreatic cancer, presurgical and postresection CA 19-9 levels correlate with overall survival. In advanced disease, elevated pretreatment levels of CA 19-9 are associated with adverse patient outcome and thus may be combined with other factors for risk stratification. Most, but not all, reports indicate that serial levels of CA 19-9 correlate with response to systemic therapy. Use of CA 19-9 kinetics in conjunction with imaging is therefore recommended in monitoring therapy. Although several potential serum and tissue markers for pancreatic cancer are currently undergoing evaluation, none are sufficiently validated for routine clinical use. CA 19-9 thus remains the serum pancreatic cancer marker against which new markers for this malignancy should be judged. PMID:19690057

  10. Variation of tumoral marker after radiofrequency ablation of pancreatic adenocarcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Barbi, Emilio; Girelli, Roberto; Tinazzi Martini, Paolo; De Robertis, Riccardo; Ciaravino, Valentina; Salvia, Roberto; Butturini, Giovanni; Frigerio, Isabella; Milazzo, Teresa; Crosara, Stefano; Paiella, Salvatore; Pederzoli, Paolo; Bassi, Claudio

    2016-01-01

    Background To evaluate the correlation between variations of CA 19.9 blood levels and the entity of necrosis at CT after radiofrequency ablation (RFA) of unresectable pancreatic adenocarcinoma. Methods In this study, from June 2010 to February 2014, patients with diagnosis of unresectable and not metastatic pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma, expressing tumor marker CA 19.9, treated with RFA procedure were included. All these patients underwent RFA. CT study was performed 1 week after RFA. The dosage of CA 19.9 levels was performed 1 month after RFA. Features of necrosis at CT, as mean entity, density and necrosis percentages compared to the original lesion, were evaluated and compared by using t-test with CA 19.9 blood levels variations after RFA procedure. Results In this study were included 51 patients with diagnosis of unresectable and not metastatic pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma, expressing tumor marker CA 19.9, treated with RFA procedure and with CT study and CA 19.9 available for analysis. After the procedure, CA 19.9 blood levels reduced in 24/51 (47%), remained stable in 10/51 (20%) and increased in 17/51 (33%). In patients with CA 19.9 levels reduced, the tumor marker were reduced less than 20% in 4/24 (17%) and more than 20% in 20/24 (83%); instead the tumor marker were reduced less than 30% in 8/24 (33%) and more than 30% in 16/24 (67%). At CT scan necrotic area density difference was not statistically significant. Also there was no statistically significant difference among the mean area, the mean volume and the mean ablation volume in percentage related to the treated tumor among the three different groups of patients divided depending on the CA 19.9 blood levels. But a tendency to a statistically significant difference was found in comparing the mean percentage of ablation volume between two subgroups of patients with a decrease of CA 19.9 levels with less or more than 20% reduction of tumor markers and between two subgroups with less or more than

  11. Biomarkers for early detection of pancreatic cancer — EDRN Public Portal

    Cancer.gov

    Background: The clinical management of pancreatic cancer is severely hampered by the absence of effective screening tools. Methods: Sixty-seven biomarkers were evaluated in prediagnostic sera obtained from cases of pancreatic cancer enrolled in the Prostate, Lung, Colorectal, and Ovarian Cancer Screening Trial (PLCO). Results: The panel of CA 19-9, OPN, and OPG, identified in a prior retrospective study, was not effective. CA 19-9, CEA, NSE, bHCG, CEACAM1 and PRL were significantly altered in sera obtained from cases greater than 1 year prior to diagnosis. Levels of CA 19-9, CA 125, CEA, PRL, and IL-8 were negatively correlated with time to diagnosis. A training/validation study using alternate halves of the PLCO set failed to identify a biomarker panel with significantly improved performance over CA 19-9 alone. When the entire PLCO set was used for training at a specificity (SP) of 95%, a panel of CA 19-9, CEA, and Cyfra 21-1 provided significantly elevated sensitivity (SN) levels of 32.4% and 29.7% in samples collected 1 year prior to diagnosis, respectively, compared to SN levels of 25.7% and 17.2% for CA 19-9 alone. Conclusions: Most biomarkers identified in previously conducted case/control studies are ineffective in prediagnostic samples, however several biomarkers were identified as significantly altered up to 35 months prior to diagnosis. Two newly derived biomarker combination offered some advantage of CA 19-9 alone in terms of SN, particularly in samples collected >1 year prior to diagnosis, however further study will be needed to fully define the implications of these findings.

  12. Prediagnostic Serum Biomarkers as Early Detection Tools for Pancreatic Cancer in a Large Prospective Cohort Study

    PubMed Central

    Nolen, Brian M.; Brand, Randall E.; Prosser, Denise; Velikokhatnaya, Liudmila; Allen, Peter J.; Zeh, Herbert J.; Grizzle, William E.; Lomakin, Aleksey; Lokshin, Anna E.

    2014-01-01

    Background The clinical management of pancreatic cancer is severely hampered by the absence of effective screening tools. Methods Sixty-seven biomarkers were evaluated in prediagnostic sera obtained from cases of pancreatic cancer enrolled in the Prostate, Lung, Colorectal, and Ovarian Cancer Screening Trial (PLCO). Results The panel of CA 19-9, OPN, and OPG, identified in a prior retrospective study, was not effective. CA 19-9, CEA, NSE, bHCG, CEACAM1 and PRL were significantly altered in sera obtained from cases greater than 1 year prior to diagnosis. Levels of CA 19-9, CA 125, CEA, PRL, and IL-8 were negatively associated with time to diagnosis. A training/validation study using alternate halves of the PLCO set failed to identify a biomarker panel with significantly improved performance over CA 19-9 alone. When the entire PLCO set was used for training at a specificity (SP) of 95%, a panel of CA 19-9, CEA, and Cyfra 21-1 provided significantly elevated sensitivity (SN) levels of 32.4% and 29.7% in samples collected <1 and >1 year prior to diagnosis, respectively, compared to SN levels of 25.7% and 17.2% for CA 19-9 alone. Conclusions Most biomarkers identified in previously conducted case/control studies are ineffective in prediagnostic samples, however several biomarkers were identified as significantly altered up to 35 months prior to diagnosis. Two newly derived biomarker combinations offered advantage over CA 19-9 alone in terms of SN, particularly in samples collected >1 year prior to diagnosis. However, the efficacy of biomarker-based tools remains limited at present. Several biomarkers demonstrated significant velocity related to time to diagnosis, an observation which may offer considerable potential for enhancements in early detection. PMID:24747429

  13. Cation ordering and flexibility of the BO₄²⁻ tetrahedra in incommensurately modulated CaEu₂(BO₄)₄ (B = Mo, W) scheelites.

    PubMed

    Abakumov, Artem M; Morozov, Vladimir A; Tsirlin, Alexander A; Verbeeck, Johan; Hadermann, Joke

    2014-09-01

    The factors mediating cation ordering in the scheelite-based molybdates and tungstates are discussed on the basis of the incommensurately modulated crystal structures of the CaEu2(BO4)4 (B = Mo, W) red phosphors solved from high-resolution synchrotron powder X-ray diffraction data. Monoclinic CaEu2(WO4)4 adopts a (3 + 1)-dimensionally modulated structure [superspace group I2/b(αβ0)00, a = 5.238 73(1)Å, b = 5.266 35(1) Å, c = 11.463 19(9) Å, γ = 91.1511(2)°, q = 0.56153(6)a* + 0.7708(9)b*, R(F) = 0.050, R(P) = 0.069], whereas tetragonal CaEu2(MoO4)4 is (3 + 2)-dimensionally modulated [superspace group I4₁/a(αβ0)00(-βα0)00, a = 5.238 672(7) Å, c = 11.548 43(2) Å, q1 = 0.55331(8)a* + 0.82068(9)b*, q2 = -0.82068(9)a* + 0.55331(8)b*, R(F) = 0.061, R(P) = 0.082]. In both cases the modulation arises from the ordering of the Ca/Eu cations and the cation vacancies at the A-sublattice of the parent scheelite ABO4 structure. The cation ordering is incomplete and better described with harmonic rather than with steplike occupational modulation functions. The structures respond to the variation of the effective charge and cation size at the A-position through the flexible geometry of the MoO4(2-) and WO4(2-) tetrahedra demonstrating an alternation of stretching the B-O bond lengths and bending the O-B-O bond angles. The tendency towards A-site cation ordering in scheelites is rationalized using the difference in ionic radii and concentration of the A-site vacancies as parameters and presented in the form of a structure map. PMID:25144135

  14. [Possibility of the combined use of tumor markers in endometrial carcinoma].

    PubMed

    Indraccolo, S R; Cecchi, A; Thodos, A; Brandi, S; Carta, G

    1991-10-01

    The Authors have studied the haematic levels of CA 125, CA 19-9, CA 50, CEA, TPA, alfa-feto-proteina e CA 15-3 in 24 women with endometrial carcinoma and in 28 healthy women. The results show that these markers are not useful for the screening of endometrial carcinoma. PMID:1722568

  15. Expression and Diagnostic Value of HE4 in Pancreatic Adenocarcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Tianhe; Jiang, Shi-Wen; Qin, Liangyi; Senkowski, Christopher; Lyle, Christian; Terry, Karen; Brower, Steven; Chen, Haibin; Glasgow, Wayne; Wei, Yongchang; Li, Jinping

    2015-01-01

    Human epididymis protein 4 (HE4) is a recognized biomarker in ovarian and endometrial cancer and over-expressed in pancreatic adenocarcinoma. The diagnostic value of HE4 in pancreatic adenocarcinoma remains unknown. Here we elucidate mRNA, protein and serum level of HE4 in pancreatic adenocarcinoma. HE4 mRNA level in tumor adjacent tissues and pancreatic adenocarcinoma tissues were tested by real time-PCR. Tissue microarray containing normal, adenocarcinoma, and adjacent pancreatic tissue was tested by immunohistochemistry (IHC). Serum level of HE4, carbohydrate antigen 19-9 (CA19-9), carbohydrate antigen 15-3 (CA15-3) and carbohydrate antigen 125 (CA125) were detected by ELISA assay in control and tumor patients. Further we compared the sensitivity and specificity of determining HE4, CA19-9, CA15-3, and CA125 for diagnosis of pancreatic adenocarcinoma and assessed the complementary diagnostic value of HE4, CA19-9, CA15-3 and CA125. Real time PCR showed significantly increased HE4 mRNA level in pancreatic adenocarcinoma compared with control. Result of IHC showed that HE4 significantly higher expressed in the human pancreatic carcinoma tissues than in both normal and adjacent non-tumorous pancreatic tissues, and the staining intensity is inversely correlated with the clinical stage. HE4 was highly expressed in early stage of pancreatic adenocarcinoma. Serum HE4 level is higher in cases with pancreatic adenocarcinoma than in the controls. Serum HE4 levels could research to a sensitivity of 45.83% and specificity of 93.75% when the Cutoff was set at 4.59 ng/mL. The Combined HE4 and CA19-9 increased the sensitivity to 83.33%; and interestingly, the combination of HE4 with CA15-3 led to the most powerful sensitivity of 87.5%. Combined with CA19-9 and CA15-3, HE4 could be a potential biomarker to improve the diagnostic power for pancreatic adenocarcinoma. PMID:25642754

  16. Serum Biomarker Panels for the Detection of Pancreatic Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Brand, Randall E.; Nolen, Brian M.; Zeh, Herbert J.; Allen, Peter J.; Eloubeidi, Mohamad A.; Goldberg, Michael; Elton, Eric; Arnoletti, Juan P.; Christein, John D.; Vickers, Selwyn M.; Langmead, Christopher J.; Landsittel, Douglas P.; Whitcomb, David C.; Grizzle, William E.; Lokshin, Anna E.

    2010-01-01

    Purpose Serum biomarker-based screening for pancreatic cancer could greatly improve survival in appropriately targeted high-risk populations. Experimental Design Eighty-three circulating proteins were analyzed in sera of patients diagnosed with pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC) (n=333), benign pancreatic conditions (n=144), and healthy control individuals (n=227). Samples from each group were split randomly into training and blinded validation sets prior to analysis. A Metropolis algorithm with Monte Carlo simulation (MMC) was used to identify discriminatory biomarker panels in the training set. Identified panels were evaluated in the validation set and in patients diagnosed with colon (n=33), lung (n=62), and breast (n=108) cancers. Results Several robust profiles of protein alterations were present in sera of PDAC patients compared to the Healthy and Benign groups. In a training set (n=160 PDAC, 74 Benign, 107 Healthy), the panel of CA 19-9, ICAM-1, and OPG discriminated PDAC patients from Healthy controls with a sensitivity/specificity (SN/SP) of 88/90%, while the panel of CA 19-9, CEA, and TIMP-1 discriminated PDAC patients from Benign subjects with a SN/SP of 76/90%. In an independent validation set (n=173 PDAC, 70 Benign, 120 Healthy), the panel of CA 19-9, ICAM-1 and OPG demonstrated a SN/SP of 78/94 while the panel of CA19-9, CEA, and TIMP-1 demonstrated a SN/SP of 71/89%. The CA19-9, ICAM-1, OPG panel is selective for PDAC and does not recognize breast (SP=100%), lung (SP=97%), or colon (SP=97%) cancer. Conclusions The PDAC-specific biomarker panels identified in this investigation warrant additional clinical validation to determine their role in screening targeted high-risk populations. PMID:21325298

  17. Vacuolar Ca(2+) uptake.

    PubMed

    Pittman, Jon K

    2011-08-01

    Calcium transporters that mediate the removal of Ca(2+) from the cytosol and into internal stores provide a critical role in regulating Ca(2+) signals following stimulus induction and in preventing calcium toxicity. The vacuole is a major calcium store in many organisms, particularly plants and fungi. Two main pathways facilitate the accumulation of Ca(2+) into vacuoles, Ca(2+)-ATPases and Ca(2+)/H(+) exchangers. Here I review the biochemical and regulatory features of these transporters that have been characterised in yeast and plants. These Ca(2+) transport mechanisms are compared with those being identified from other vacuolated organisms including algae and protozoa. Studies suggest that Ca(2+) uptake into vacuoles and other related acidic Ca(2+) stores occurs by conserved mechanisms which developed early in evolution. PMID:21310481

  18. Preoperative serum markers for individual patient prognosis in stage I-III colon cancer.

    PubMed

    Giessen-Jung, Clemens; Nagel, Dorothea; Glas, Maria; Spelsberg, Fritz; Lau-Werner, Ulla; Modest, Dominik Paul; Schulz, Christoph; Heinemann, Volker; Di Gioia, Dorit; Stieber, Petra

    2015-09-01

    Carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA) remains the only recommended biomarker for follow-up care of colorectal cancer (CRC), but besides CEA, several other serological parameters have been proposed as prognostic markers for CRC. The present retrospective analysis investigates a comprehensive set of serum markers with regard to cancer-specific survival (CSS) and disease-free survival (DFS). A total of 472 patients with colon cancer underwent surgery for curative intent between January 1988 and June 2007. Preoperative serum was analyzed for the following parameters: albumin, alkaline phosphatase (aP), beta-human chorionic gonadotropin (βhCG), bilirubin, cancer antigen 125 (CA 125), cancer antigen 19-9 (CA 19-9), CA 72-4, CEA, C-reactive protein (CRP), cytokeratin-19 soluble fragment (CYFRA 21-1), ferritin, gamma-glutamyltransferase (γGT), glutamate oxaloacetate transaminase (GOT), glutamate pyruvate transaminase (GPT), hemoglobin, haptoglobin, interleukin-6, interleukin-8, creatinine, lactate dehydrogenase (LDH), serum amyloid A (SAA), and 25-hydroxyvitamin D. After a median follow-up period of 5.9 years, the overall 3- and 5-year CSS was 91.7 and 84.9 % and DFS rates were 82.7 % (3 years) and 77.6 % (5 years). Multivariate analyses confirmed preoperative CEA as an independent prognostic factor with regard to CSS and DFS. CA 19-9 and γGT also provided prognostic value for CSS and DFS, respectively. Younger age was negatively associated with DFS. According to UICC stage, CEA provided significant prognostic value with regard to CSS and DFS, while CA 19-9 was only prognostic for CSS. Combined analysis is able to identify patients with favorable prognosis. In addition to tumor baseline parameters, preoperative CEA could be confirmed as prognostic marker in colon cancer. CA 19-9 and γGT also provide additional prognostic value with regard to survival and recurrence in stage III and stage I disease, respectively. The combined use of CEA together with CA 19-9 and γGT improve

  19. Decreased levels of serum cytokeratin 19 fragment CYFRA 21-1 predict objective response to chemotherapy in patients with non-small cell lung cancer.

    PubMed

    Pang, Li; Wang, Jing; Jiang, Yanwen; Chen, Liangan

    2013-08-01

    Diagnostic tools capable of predicting early responses to chemotherapy are required to improve the individual management of cancer patients. The present study aimed to evaluate the prognostic significance of the serum tumor markers CYFRA 21-1, carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA), neuron-specific enolase (NSE), carbohydrate antigen (CA) 125, and CA 19-9 for predicting responses to different chemotherapy regimens in patients with non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). A total of 276 patients with postoperative stage I-IV NSCLC were retrospectively reviewed. The five tumor markers were measured before and after at least two cycles of chemotherapy using an electrochemiluminescent assay. Multivariate analysis revealed that performance status, age, postoperative stage and surgery were significantly associated with the response to chemotherapy. High baseline CYFRA 21-1 and CA 19-9 levels were associated with poor effectiveness of chemotherapy. Significant reductions in CYFRA 21-1 levels were associated with a positive response to various chemotherapy regimens. CEA, CA 125 and CA 19-9 expression was only associated with a positive response in patients receiving paclitaxel, docetaxel, pemetrexed and the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) tyrosine kinase inhibitor (TKI). NSE expression was only associated with a positive response to gemcitabine. Receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve analysis indicated that CYFRA 21-1 is the most sensitive of the tumor markers in predicting the response to chemotherapy. Serum CYFRA 21-1 is a useful surrogate marker for predicting the response to different chemotherapy regimens used to treat NSCLC and is a more sensitive marker than CEA, CA125, CA19-9 and NSE. PMID:24137188

  20. Gemcitabine-Based Regional Intra-Arterial Infusion Chemotherapy in Patients With Advanced Pancreatic Adenocarcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Xiaoyu; Yang, Xuerong; Zhou, Guofeng; Chen, Yi; Li, Changyu; Wang, Xiaolin

    2016-01-01

    Abstract The present study was carried out to investigate the prognostic factors in patients who received intra-arterial infusion for advanced pancreatic cancer. In addition, the detailed procedure of intra-arterial infusion chemotherapy was described. A total of 354 patients with advanced unresectable pancreatic adenocarcinoma were recruited from January 2012, to April 2015, at Zhongshan Hospital Fudan University, Shanghai, China. Demographic and clinic characteristics of the patients were extracted from electronic medical records. Restricted cubic spline was used to assess the nonliner regression between baseline CA19-9 value and overall survival. Kaplan–Meier analysis and Cox proportional hazard models were used to estimate the association between overall survival and clinical characteristics. Of all 354 included patients, 230 (65%) were male (male/female ratio = 1.8), and 72 (20%) patients were diagnosed with detectable distant metastases. Pretreatment CA19-9 value of patients with metastases was significantly higher as compared to those with locally advanced cancer (median: 922.30 vs 357.00 U/mL, P = 0.0090). Totally 274 patients completed 1 cycle of intra-arterial infusion, whereas 80 patients received 2 or more cycles of the chemotherapy. For all the 354 patients, median OS was 7.0 months (95% CI: 6.0, 8.0 months) with a 6-, 12-, and 18-month survival rate of 0.48, 0.28, and 0.18, respectively. The median OS of patients, who received 1 cycle of intra-arterial infusion therapy, was 6.0 months (95% CI: 5.0, 8.0 months), which was similar to 7.0 months (95% CI: 6.0, 9.0 months) in patients who received 2 or more cycles. Restricted cubic spline revealed the nonline association between baseline CA19-9 and prognosis. The Cox proportional hazard model showed that age, CA19-9 baseline, CA19-9 value, and tumor location were significantly associated with the OS. In conclusion, the gemcitabine-based RIAC presented a potential treatment method for advanced

  1. Mitochondrial Ca2+-induced Ca2+ Release Mediated by the Ca2+ Uniporter

    PubMed Central

    Montero, Mayte; Alonso, Maria Teresa; Albillos, Almudena; García-Sancho, Javier; Alvarez, Javier

    2001-01-01

    We have reported that a population of chromaffin cell mitochondria takes up large amounts of Ca2+ during cell stimulation. The present study focuses on the pathways for mitochondrial Ca2+ efflux. Treatment with protonophores before cell stimulation abolished mitochondrial Ca2+ uptake and increased the cytosolic [Ca2+] ([Ca2+]c) peak induced by the stimulus. Instead, when protonophores were added after cell stimulation, they did not modify [Ca2+]c kinetics and inhibited Ca2+ release from Ca2+-loaded mitochondria. This effect was due to inhibition of mitochondrial Na+/Ca2+ exchange, because blocking this system with CGP37157 produced no further effect. Increasing extramitochondrial [Ca2+]c triggered fast Ca2+ release from these depolarized Ca2+-loaded mitochondria, both in intact or permeabilized cells. These effects of protonophores were mimicked by valinomycin, but not by nigericin. The observed mitochondrial Ca2+-induced Ca2+ release response was insensitive to cyclosporin A and CGP37157 but fully blocked by ruthenium red, suggesting that it may be mediated by reversal of the Ca2+ uniporter. This novel kind of mitochondrial Ca2+-induced Ca2+ release might contribute to Ca2+ clearance from mitochondria that become depolarized during Ca2+ overload. PMID:11160823

  2. Routes of Ca2+ Shuttling during Ca2+ Oscillations

    PubMed Central

    Pecze, László; Blum, Walter; Schwaller, Beat

    2015-01-01

    In some cell types, Ca2+ oscillations are strictly dependent on Ca2+ influx across the plasma membrane, whereas in others, oscillations also persist in the absence of Ca2+ influx. We observed that, in primary mesothelial cells, the plasmalemmal Ca2+ influx played a pivotal role. However, when the Ca2+ transport across the plasma membrane by the “lanthanum insulation method” was blocked prior to the induction of the serum-induced Ca2+ oscillations, mitochondrial Ca2+ transport was found to be able to substitute for the plasmalemmal Ca2+ exchange function, thus rendering the oscillations independent of extracellular Ca2+. However, in a physiological situation, the Ca2+-buffering capacity of mitochondria was found not to be essential for Ca2+ oscillations. Moreover, brief spontaneous Ca2+ changes were observed in the mitochondrial Ca2+ concentration without apparent changes in the cytosolic Ca2+ concentration, indicating the presence of a mitochondrial autonomous Ca2+ signaling mechanism. In the presence of calretinin, a Ca2+-buffering protein, the amplitude of cytosolic spikes during oscillations was decreased, and the amount of Ca2+ ions taken up by mitochondria was reduced. Thus, the increased calretinin expression observed in mesothelioma cells and in certain colon cancer might be correlated to the increased resistance of these tumor cells to proapoptotic/pronecrotic signals. We identified and characterized (experimentally and by modeling) three Ca2+ shuttling pathways in primary mesothelial cells during Ca2+ oscillations: Ca2+ shuttled between (i) the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) and mitochondria, (ii) the ER and the extracellular space, and (iii) the ER and cytoplasmic Ca2+ buffers. PMID:26396196

  3. Classic tumor markers in gastric cancer. Current standards and limitations.

    PubMed

    Căinap, Călin; Nagy, Viorica; Gherman, Alexandra; Cetean, Sanziana; Laszlo, Istvan; Constantin, Anne-Marie; Căinap, Simona

    2015-01-01

    The progress made in the last few years made available a large amount of information that needs to be integrated and ordered by oncologists. Tumor markers are one of the pieces that physicians need to fit into the bigger puzzle. This article will detail the most frequent etiologies for the surges in the carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA), cancer-related antigen 72-4 (CA 72-4), cancer-related antigen 19-9 (CA 19-9) serum levels and their indications. Although tumor markers are an invaluable asset to medical practice, their role in screening, diagnosis and oncologic treatment remains poorly standardized. Ongoing or future clinical trials will shed light on pending problems. PMID:26528057

  4. [A Case of Advanced Gastric Cancer with Peritoneal Dissemination Effectively Treated with S-1 and Docetaxel Combination Chemotherapy].

    PubMed

    Saito, Hiroyuki; Suematsu, Yuki; Hiratsuka, Miyuki; Suda, Hiroshi; Takahashi, Miyuki; Omori, Keita; Ishibashi, Yuji; Morita, Akihiko; Wakabayashi, Kazuhiko; Ito, Yutaka

    2015-11-01

    A 72-year-old man underwent surgery for advanced gastric cancer. Systemic chemotherapy was started, using a regimen of S-1/CDDP for 4 courses, followed by 8 courses of S-1. Three years and 8 months after the surgery, abdominal CT demonstrated ascites, and the serum CA19-9 level was abnormally high (1,165.1 U/mL). Adenocarcinoma cells were found in the ascites. Treatment with S-1/docetaxel (DOC) was started. After 10 courses, the ascites disappeared and the serum CA19-9 value returned to normal. Four years and 7 months after the operation, the patient has been in good health, with no signs of recurrence. PMID:26805261

  5. Genetic studies of plasma analytes identify novel potential biomarkers for several complex traits

    PubMed Central

    Deming, Yuetiva; Xia, Jian; Cai, Yefei; Lord, Jenny; Del-Aguila, Jorge L.; Fernandez, Maria Victoria; Carrell, David; Black, Kathleen; Budde, John; Ma, ShengMei; Saef, Benjamin; Howells, Bill; Bertelsen, Sarah; Bailey, Matthew; Ridge, Perry G.; Hefti, Franz; Fillit, Howard; Zimmerman, Earl A.; Celmins, Dzintra; Brown, Alice D.; Carrillo, Maria; Fleisher, Adam; Reeder, Stephanie; Trncic, Nadira; Burke, Anna; Tariot, Pierre; Reiman, Eric M.; Chen, Kewei; Sabbagh, Marwan N.; Beiden, Christine M.; Jacobson, Sandra A.; Sirrel, Sherye A.; Doody, Rachelle S.; Villanueva-Meyer, Javier; Chowdhury, Munir; Rountree, Susan; Dang, Mimi; Kowall, Neil; Killiany, Ronald; Budson, Andrew E.; Norbash, Alexander; Johnson, Patricia Lynn; Green, Robert C.; Marshall, Gad; Johnson, Keith A.; Sperling, Reisa A.; Snyder, Peter; Salloway, Stephen; Malloy, Paul; Correia, Stephen; Bernick, Charles; Munic, Donna; Stern, Yaakov; Honig, Lawrence S.; Bell, Karen L.; Relkin, Norman; Chaing, Gloria; Ravdin, Lisa; Paul, Steven; Flashman, Laura A.; Seltzer, Marc; Hynes, Mary L.; Santulli, Robert B.; Bates, Vernice; Capote, Horacio; Rainka, Michelle; Friedl, Karl; Murali Doraiswamy, P.; Petrella, Jeffrey R.; Borges-Neto, Salvador; James, Olga; Wong, Terence; Coleman, Edward; Schwartz, Adam; Cellar, Janet S.; Levey, Allan L.; Lah, James J.; Behan, Kelly; Scott Turner, Raymond; Johnson, Kathleen; Reynolds, Brigid; Pearlson, Godfrey D.; Blank, Karen; Anderson, Karen; Obisesan, Thomas O.; Wolday, Saba; Allard, Joanne; Lerner, Alan; Ogrocki, Paula; Tatsuoka, Curtis; Fatica, Parianne; Farlow, Martin R.; Saykin, Andrew J.; Foroud, Tatiana M.; Shen, Li; Faber, Kelly; Kim, Sungeun; Nho, Kwangsik; Marie Hake, Ann; Matthews, Brandy R.; Brosch, Jared R.; Herring, Scott; Hunt, Cynthia; Albert, Marilyn; Onyike, Chiadi; D’Agostino, Daniel; Kielb, Stephanie; Graff-Radford, Neill R; Parfitt, Francine; Kendall, Tracy; Johnson, Heather; Petersen, Ronald; Jack, Clifford R.; Bernstein, Matthew; Borowski, Bret; Gunter, Jeff; Senjem, Matt; Vemuri, Prashanthi; Jones, David; Kantarci, Kejal; Ward, Chad; Mason, Sara S.; Albers, Colleen S.; Knopman, David; Johnson, Kris; Chertkow, Howard; Hosein, Chris; Mintzer, Jacob; Spicer, Kenneth; Bachman, David; Grossman, Hillel; Mitsis, Effie; Pomara, Nunzio; Hernando, Raymundo; Sarrael, Antero; Potter, William; Buckholtz, Neil; Hsiao, John; Kittur, Smita; Galvin, James E.; Cerbone, Brittany; Michel, Christina A.; Pogorelec, Dana M.; Rusinek, Henry; de Leon, Mony J; Glodzik, Lidia; De Santi, Susan; Johnson, Nancy; Chuang-Kuo; Kerwin, Diana; Bonakdarpour, Borna; Weintraub, Sandra; Grafman, Jordan; Lipowski, Kristine; Mesulam, Marek-Marsel; Scharre, Douglas W.; Kataki, Maria; Adeli, Anahita; Kaye, Jeffrey; Quinn, Joseph; Silbert, Lisa; Lind, Betty; Carter, Raina; Dolen, Sara; Borrie, Michael; Lee, T-Y; Bartha, Rob; Martinez, Walter; Villena, Teresa; Sadowsky, Carl; Khachaturian, Zaven; Ott, Brian R.; Querfurth, Henry; Tremont, Geoffrey; Frank, Richard; Fleischman, Debra; Arfanakis, Konstantinos; Shah, Raj C.; deToledo-Morrell, Leyla; Sorensen, Greg; Finger, Elizabeth; Pasternack, Stephen; Rachinsky, Irina; Drost, Dick; Rogers, John; Kertesz, Andrew; Furst, Ansgar J.; Chad, Stevan; Yesavage, Jerome; Taylor, Joy L.; Lane, Barton; Rosen, Allyson; Tinklenberg, Jared; Black, Sandra; Stefanovic, Bojana; Caldwell, Curtis; Robin Hsiung, Ging-Yuek; Mudge, Benita; Assaly, Michele; Fox, Nick; Schultz, Susan K.; Boles Ponto, Laura L.; Shim, Hyungsub; Ekstam Smith, Karen; Burns, Jeffrey M.; Swerdlow, Russell H.; Brooks, William M.; Marson, Daniel; Griffith, Randall; Clark, David; Geldmacher, David; Brockington, John; Roberson, Erik; Natelson Love, Marissa; DeCarli, Charles; Carmichael, Owen; Olichney, John; Maillard, Pauline; Fletcher, Evan; Nguyen, Dana; Preda, Andrian; Potkin, Steven; Mulnard, Ruth A.; Thai, Gaby; McAdams-Ortiz, Catherine; Landau, Susan; Jagust, William; Apostolova, Liana; Tingus, Kathleen; Woo, Ellen; Silverman, Daniel H.S.; Lu, Po H.; Bartzokis, George; Thompson, Paul; Donohue, Michael; Thomas, Ronald G.; Walter, Sarah; Gessert, Devon; Brewer, James; Vanderswag, Helen; Sather, Tamie; Jiminez, Gus; Balasubramanian, Archana B.; Mason, Jennifer; Sim, Iris; Aisen, Paul; Davis, Melissa; Morrison, Rosemary; Harvey, Danielle; Thal, Lean; Beckett, Laurel; Neylan, Thomas; Finley, Shannon; Weiner, Michael W.; Hayes, Jacqueline; Rosen, Howard J.; Miller, Bruce L.; Perry, David; Massoglia, Dino; Brawman-Mentzer, Olga; Schuff, Norbert; Smith, Charles D.; Hardy, Peter; Sinha, Partha; Oates, Elizabeth; Conrad, Gary; Koeppe, Robert A.; Lord, Joanne L.; Heidebrink, Judith L.; Arnold, Steven E.; Karlawish, Jason H.; Wolk, David; Clark, Christopher M.; Trojanowki, John Q.; Shaw, Leslie M.; Lee, Virginia; Korecka, Magdalena; Figurski, Michal; Toga, Arthur W.; Crawford, Karen; Neu, Scott; Schneider, Lon S.; Pawluczyk, Sonia; Beccera, Mauricio; Teodoro, Liberty; Spann, Bryan M.; Womack, Kyle; Mathews, Dana; Quiceno, Mary; Foster, Norm; Montine, Tom; Fruehling, J. Jay; Harding, Sandra; Johnson, Sterling; Asthana, Sanjay; Carlsson, Cynthia M.; Petrie, Eric C.; Peskind, Elaine; Li, Gail; Porsteinsson, Anton P.; Goldstein, Bonnie S.; Martin, Kim; Makino, Kelly M.; Ismail, M. Saleem; Brand, Connie; Smith, Amanda; Ashok Raj, Balebail; Fargher, Kristin; Kuller, Lew; Mathis, Chet; Ann Oakley, Mary; Lopez, Oscar L.; Simpson, Donna M.; Sink, Kaycee M.; Gordineer, Leslie; Williamson, Jeff D.; Garg, Pradeep; Watkins, Franklin; Cairns, Nigel J.; Raichle, Marc; Morris, John C.; Householder, Erin; Taylor-Reinwald, Lisa; Holtzman, David; Ances, Beau; Carroll, Maria; Creech, Mary L.; Franklin, Erin; Mintun, Mark A.; Schneider, Stacy; Oliver, Angela; Duara, Ranjan; Varon, Daniel; Greig, Maria T.; Roberts, Peggy; Varma, Pradeep; MacAvoy, Martha G.; Carson, Richard E.; van Dyck, Christopher H.; Davies, Peter; Holtzman, David; Morris, John C.; Bales, Kelly; Pickering, Eve H.; Lee, Jin-Moo; Heitsch, Laura; Kauwe, John; Goate, Alison; Piccio, Laura; Cruchaga, Carlos

    2016-01-01

    Genome-wide association studies of 146 plasma protein levels in 818 individuals revealed 56 genome-wide significant associations (28 novel) with 47 analytes. Loci associated with plasma levels of 39 proteins tested have been previously associated with various complex traits such as heart disease, inflammatory bowel disease, Type 2 diabetes, and multiple sclerosis. These data suggest that these plasma protein levels may constitute informative endophenotypes for these complex traits. We found three potential pleiotropic genes: ABO for plasma SELE and ACE levels, FUT2 for CA19-9 and CEA plasma levels, and APOE for ApoE and CRP levels. We also found multiple independent signals in loci associated with plasma levels of ApoH, CA19-9, FetuinA, IL6r, and LPa. Our study highlights the power of biological traits for genetic studies to identify genetic variants influencing clinically relevant traits, potential pleiotropic effects, and complex disease associations in the same locus.

  6. Topological organization of CA3-to-CA1 excitation.

    PubMed

    Hongo, Yoshie; Ogawa, Koichi; Takahara, Yuji; Takasu, Keiko; Royer, Sebastien; Hasegawa, Minoru; Sakaguchi, Gaku; Ikegaya, Yuji

    2015-09-01

    The CA1-projecting axons of CA3 pyramidal cells, called Schaffer collaterals, constitute one of the major information flow routes in the hippocampal formation. Recent anatomical studies have revealed the non-random structural connectivity between CA3 and CA1, but little is known regarding the functional connectivity (i.e. how CA3 network activity is functionally transmitted downstream to the CA1 network). Using functional multi-neuron calcium imaging of rat hippocampal slices, we monitored the spatiotemporal patterns of spontaneous CA3 and CA1 burst activity under pharmacological GABAergic blockade. We found that spatially clustered CA3 activity patterns were transformed into layered CA1 activity sequences. Specifically, synchronized bursts initiated from multiple hot spots in CA3 ensembles, and CA1 neurons located deeper in the pyramidal cell layer were recruited during earlier phases of the burst events. The order of these sequential activations was maintained across the bursts, but the sequence velocity varied depending on the inter-burst intervals. Thus, CA3 axons innervate CA1 neurons in a highly topographical fashion. PMID:26036915

  7. UV - RIVERSIDE CA

    EPA Science Inventory

    Brewer 112 is located in Riverside CA, measuring ultraviolet solar radiation. Irradiance and column ozone are derived from this data. Ultraviolet solar radiation is measured with a Brewer Mark IV, single-monochrometer, spectrophotometer manufactured by SCI-TEC Instruments, Inc. o...

  8. Long term survivors with metastatic pancreatic adenocarcinoma treated with gemcitabine: a retrospective analysis

    PubMed Central

    Goulart, Bernardo HL; Clark, Jeffrey W; Lauwers, Gregory Y; Ryan, David P; Grenon, Nina; Muzikansky, Alona; Zhu, Andrew X

    2009-01-01

    Background Metastatic pancreatic adenocarcinoma has a short median overall survival (OS) of 5–6 months. However, a subgroup of patients survives more than 1 year. We analyzed the survival outcomes of this subgroup and evaluated clinical and pathological factors that might affect survival durations. Methods We identified 20 patients with metastatic or recurrent pancreatic adenocarcinoma who received single-agent gemcitabine and had an OS longer than 1 year. Baseline data available after the diagnosis of metastatic or recurrent disease was categorized as: 1) clinical/demographic data (age, gender, ECOG PS, number and location of metastatic sites); 2) Laboratory data (Hematocrit, hemoglobin, glucose, LDH, renal and liver function and CA19-9); 3) Pathologic data (margins, nodal status and grade); 4) Outcomes data (OS, Time to Treatment Failure (TTF), and 2 year-OS). The lowest CA19-9 levels during treatment with gemcitabine were also recorded. We performed a univariate analysis with OS as the outcome variable. Results Baseline logarithm of CA19-9 and total bilirubin had a significant impact on OS (HR = 1.32 and 1.31, respectively). Median OS and TTF on gemcitabine were 26.9 (95% CI = 18 to 32) and 11.5 (95% CI = 9.0 to 14.3) months, respectively. Two-year OS was 56.4%, with 7 patients alive at the time of analysis. Conclusion A subgroup of patients with metastatic pancreatic cancer has prolonged survival after treatment with gemcitabine. Only bilirubin and CA 19-9 levels were predictive of longer survival in this population. Further analysis of potential prognostic and predictive markers of response to treatment and survival are needed. PMID:19291303

  9. Role of endoscopic ultrasound-guided fine needle aspiration and ultrasound-guided fine-needle aspiration in diagnosis of cystic pancreatic lesions

    PubMed Central

    Okasha, Hussein Hassan; Ashry, Mahmoud; Imam, Hala M. K.; Ezzat, Reem; Naguib, Mohamed; Farag, Ali H.; Gemeie, Emad H.; Khattab, Hani M.

    2015-01-01

    Background and Objective: The addition of fine-needle aspiration (FNA) to different imaging modalities has raised the accuracy for diagnosis of cystic pancreatic lesions. We aim to differentiate benign from neoplastic pancreatic cysts by evaluating cyst fluid carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA), carbohydrate antigen (CA19-9), and amylase levels and cytopathological examination, including mucin stain. Patients and Methods: This prospective study included 77 patients with pancreatic cystic lesions. Ultrasound-FNA (US-FNA) or endoscopic ultrasound-FNA (EUS-FNA) was done according to the accessibility of the lesion. The aspirated specimens were subjected to cytopathological examination (including mucin staining), tumor markers (CEA, CA19-9), and amylase level. Results: Cyst CEA value of 279 or more showed high statistical significance in differentiating mucinous from nonmucinous lesions with sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value (PPV), negative predictive value (NPV), and accuracy of 73%, 60%, 50%, 80%, and 65%, respectively. Cyst amylase could differentiate between neoplastic and nonneoplastic cysts at a level of 1043 with sensitivity of 58%, specificity of 75%, PPV of 73%, NPV of 60%, and accuracy of 66%. CA19-9 could not differentiate between neoplastic and nonneoplastic cysts. Mucin examination showed a sensitivity of 85%, specificity of 95%, PPV of 92%, NPV of 91%, and accuracy of 91% in differentiating mucinous from non-mucinous lesions. Cytopathological examination showed a sensitivity of 81%, specificity of 94%, PPV of 94%, NPV of 83%, and accuracy of 88%. Conclusion: US or EUS-FNA with analysis of cyst CEA level, CA19-9, amylase, mucin stain, and cytopathological examination increases the diagnostic accuracy of cystic pancreatic lesions. PMID:26020048

  10. Humoral response against sialyl-Le(a) glycosylated protein species in esophageal cancer: Insights for immunoproteomic studies.

    PubMed

    Fernandes, Elisabete; Peixoto, Andreia; Neves, Manuel; Afonso, Luís Pedro; Santos, Lúcio Lara; Ferreira, José Alexandre

    2015-12-01

    Esophageal cancers (ECs) show poor prognosis and decreased overall survival due to late diagnosis and ineffective therapeutics, urging the introduction of novel biomarkers to aid disease management. The levels of sialyl-Lewis(a) antigen (sLe(a) ) are frequently increased in digestive tumours, which has been explored in serological non-invasive prognostication (CA19-9 test); however, with low sensitivity and specificity. Autoantibodies against cancer antigens are considered the next generation biomarkers, as they are present in circulation long before tumour-associated proteins. Based on these observations we have mined the serum of EC patients (n = 7) for antibodies against sLe(a) -glycosylated protein species. All EC were positive for sLe(a) , irrespectively of their histological nature but only two patients showed elevated CA19-9. Moreover, IgG titers, with emphasis on IgG1, were elevated in EC patients in comparison to the control group. SLe(a) -glycoproteins were then extracted from tumours of patients with negative CA19-9, isolated by immunoprecipitation and blotted with patients IgG. Autoantibodies against sLe(a) -glycosylated proteins were detected in all cases. Different SLe(a) -glycoproteins were observed for tumours of distinct histological natures, which now require identification and validation in larger patient sets. This preliminary data suggests that antoantibodies against sLe(a) glycosylated proteins hold potential for non-invasive diagnosis in CA19-9 negative cases and sets the rational for future immunoproteomic studies envisaging highly specific EC biomarkers. PMID:26333169

  11. Glycoprotein biomarker panel for pancreatic cancer discovered by quantitative proteomics analysis.

    PubMed

    Nie, Song; Lo, Andy; Wu, Jing; Zhu, Jianhui; Tan, Zhijing; Simeone, Diane M; Anderson, Michelle A; Shedden, Kerby A; Ruffin, Mack T; Lubman, David M

    2014-04-01

    Pancreatic cancer is a lethal disease where specific early detection biomarkers would be very valuable to improve outcomes in patients. Many previous studies have compared biosamples from pancreatic cancer patients with healthy controls to find potential biomarkers. However, a range of related disease conditions can influence the performance of these putative biomarkers, including pancreatitis and diabetes. In this study, quantitative proteomics methods were applied to discover potential serum glycoprotein biomarkers that distinguish pancreatic cancer from other pancreas related conditions (diabetes, cyst, chronic pancreatitis, obstructive jaundice) and healthy controls. Aleuria aurantia lectin (AAL) was used to extract fucosylated glycoproteins and then both TMT protein-level labeling and label-free quantitative analysis were performed to analyze glycoprotein differences from 179 serum samples across the six different conditions. A total of 243 and 354 serum proteins were identified and quantified by label-free and TMT protein-level quantitative strategies, respectively. Nineteen and 25 proteins were found to show significant differences in samples between the pancreatic cancer and other conditions using the label-free and TMT strategies, respectively, with 7 proteins considered significant in both methods. Significantly different glycoproteins were further validated by lectin-ELISA and ELISA assays. Four candidates were identified as potential markers with profiles found to be highly complementary with CA 19-9 (p < 0.001). Obstructive jaundice (OJ) was found to have a significant impact on the performance of every marker protein, including CA 19-9. The combination of α-1-antichymotrypsin (AACT), thrombospondin-1 (THBS1), and haptoglobin (HPT) outperformed CA 19-9 in distinguishing pancreatic cancer from normal controls (AUC = 0.95), diabetes (AUC = 0.89), cyst (AUC = 0.82), and chronic pancreatitis (AUC = 0.90). A marker panel of AACT, THBS1, HPT, and CA 19-9

  12. Controlled Film Architectures to Detect a Biomarker for Pancreatic Cancer Using Impedance Spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Soares, Andrey C; Soares, Juliana C; Shimizu, Flavio M; Melendez, Matias E; Carvalho, André L; Oliveira, Osvaldo N

    2015-11-25

    The need for analytical devices for detecting cancer at early stages has motivated research into nanomaterials where synergy is sought to achieve high sensitivity and selectivity in low-cost biosensors. In this study, we developed a film architecture combining self-assembled monolayer (SAM) and layer-by-layer (LbL) films of polysaccharide chitosan and the protein concanavalin A, on which a layer of anti-CA19-9 antibody was adsorbed. Using impedance spectroscopy with this biosensor, we were capable of detecting low concentrations of the antigen CA19-9, an important biomarker for pancreatic cancer. The limit of detection of 0.69U/mL reached is sufficient for detecting pancreatic cancer at very early stages. The selectivity of the biosensor was inferred from a series of control experiments with samples of cell lines that were tested positive (HT29) and negative (SW620) for the biomarker CA19-9, in addition to the lack of changes in the capacitance value for other analytes and antigen that are not related to this type of cancer. The high sensitivity and selectivity are ascribed to the very specific antigen-antibody interaction, which was confirmed with PM-IRRAS and atomic force microscopy. Also significant is that used information visualization methods to show that different cell lines and commercial samples containing distinct concentrations of CA19-9 and other analytes can be easily distinguished from each other. These computational methods are generic and may be used in optimization procedures to tailor biosensors for specific purposes, as we demonstrated here by comparing the performance of two film architectures in which the concentration of chitosan was varied. PMID:26539972

  13. Indications for staging laparoscopy in pancreatic cancer

    PubMed Central

    De Rosa, Antonella; Cameron, Iain C.; Gomez, Dhanwant

    2015-01-01

    Background To identify indications for staging laparoscopy (SL) in patients with resectable pancreatic cancer, and suggest a pre-operative algorithm for staging these patients. Methods Relevant articles were reviewed from the published literature using the Medline database. The search was performed using the keywords ‘pancreatic cancer’, ‘resectability’, ‘staging’, ‘laparoscopy’, and ‘Whipple's procedure’. Results Twenty four studies were identified which fulfilled the inclusion criteria. Of the published data, the most reliable surrogate markers for selecting patients for SL to predict unresectability in patients with CT defined resectable pancreatic cancer were CA 19.9 and tumour size. Although there are studies suggesting a role for tumour location, CEA levels, and clinical findings such as weight loss and jaundice, there is currently not enough evidence for these variables to predict resectability. Based on the current data, patients with a CT suggestive of resectable disease and (1) CA 19.9 ≥150 U/mL; or (2) tumour size >3 cm should be considered for SL. Conclusion The role of laparoscopy in the staging of pancreatic cancer patients remains controversial. Potential predictors of unresectability to select patients for SL include CA 19.9 levels and tumour size. PMID:26776846

  14. CAM 17.1--a new diagnostic marker in pancreatic cancer.

    PubMed Central

    Gansauge, F.; Gansauge, S.; Parker, N.; Beger, M. I.; Poch, B.; Link, K. H.; Safi, F.; Beger, H. G.

    1996-01-01

    CAM 17.1-Ab is a recently described monoclonal antibody that detects a mucus glycoprotein with high specificity for intestinal mucus, particularly in the colon, small intestine, biliary tract and pancreas. We investigated the expression and release of CAM 17.1 in pancreatic carcinoma cell lines and tissue specimens of normal pancreas, chronic pancreatitis and pancreatic cancer. CAM 17.1 was weakly expressed on normal ductal cells and chronic pancreatitis, whereas it was overexpressed in pancreatic cancer. Serum analysis using a new enzyme-linked antibody sandwich assay (CAM 17.1/WGA) of patients with chronic pancreatitis, pancreatic cancer or other gastrointestinal cancer and of healthy blood donors revealed a high sensitivity (67%) and excellent specificity (90%) of CAM 17.1/WGA assay in pancreatic cancer. In comparison with the tumour marker CA19-9, the sensitivity of the CAM 17.1/WGA assay was similar to the sensitivity of CA 19-9 (67% and 76%, P = 0.22), whereas the specificity of CAM 17.1/WGA assay was higher than in CA 19-9 (90% compared with 78% in chronic pancreatitis, P > 0.05). Images Figure 2 PMID:8980403

  15. Coincidental Occurrence of Hepatocellular Carcinoma and Cholangiocarcinoma (Collision Tumors) After Liver Transplantation: A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Al Hamoudi, Waleed; Khalaf, Hatem; Allam, Naglaa; Al Sebayel, Mohammed

    2012-01-01

    Coincidental occurrence of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) and cholangiocarcinoma, known as “collision tumors”, within a cirrhotic liver is rare. Herein, we report a case of liver transplantation (LT) in a patient with such collision tumors. Our patient was a 56-year-old woman with hepatitis C virus-related cirrhosis and 2 focal hepatic lesions, measuring 1.5 and 3 cm, in the liver segments 8 and 5, respectively. The lesion on segment 8 showed the typical radiological characteristics of HCC; however, the lesion in segment 5 showed an atypical vascular pattern and was closely associated with the inferior vena cava. Serum alpha-fetoprotein level was normal and serum carbohydrate antigen 19-9 (CA19-9) level was slightly elevated (63 U/mL); the extrahepatic spread of HCC was ruled out. The patient underwent an uneventful deceased-donor LT. Histopathological examination of the explant confirmed that the lesion on segment 8 was an HCC, but surprisingly, the lesion on segment 5 was found to be a cholangiocarcinoma. Six months after LT, the serum CA19-9 level was markedly elevated (255 U/mL), and the patient began experiencing abdominal pain. Magnetic resonance imaging showed enlarged hilar and paraaortic lymph nodes that were suggestive of metastases; histopathological analysis using ultrasound (US)-guided biopsy confirmed recurrent cholangiocarcinoma. Unfortunately, the patient died because of tumor recurrence 9 months after LT. Collision tumor resulting from the co-existence HCC and cholangiocarcinoma in a cirrhotic liver is rare and has a negative impact on the outcome of LT. Atypical vascular pattern and elevated serum CA19-9 levels are suggestive of such tumors; patients with these findings should undergo a targeted biopsy to rule out the coincidental occurrence of HCC and cholangiocarcinoma. PMID:23162598

  16. Serum dickkopf-1 is a novel serological biomarker for the diagnosis and prognosis of pancreatic cancer

    PubMed Central

    He, Chen-chen; Cai, Meng-jiao; Ma, Jin-lu; Zhang, Yuan-yuan; Zhou, Cong-ya; Ma, Chen-xian; Varela-Ramirez, Armando; Zhu, Qing

    2015-01-01

    Purpose To identify whether Dickkopf-1 (DKK1) could be a potential biomarker for early detection and prognosis in patients with pancreatic cancer (PC). Methods Serum was collected from 140 patients with pancreatic adenocarcinoma and 92 control patients without pancreatic adenocarcinoma. Serological levels of DKK1 were examined by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). The sensitivity and specificity was compared with carbohydrate antigen 19-9 (CA19-9). A 2-year follow-up was monitored to evaluate the correlation between DKK1 serum levels and overall survival. The expression of DKK1 in PC tumor tissues was also evaluated using immunohistochemistry staining. Results Serum levels of DKK1 and CA19-9 were elevated in PC patients in the early-stage cases. These levels increased with the advancement of clinical stage. There was significant difference in DKK1 serum levels between early and advanced PC stages. Receiver operating characteristic curve (ROCC) analysis showed that DKK1 was significantly better than CA19-9 in differentiating patients with PC from the controls (area under the curve (AUC) 0.919 versus 0.853, respectively), especially in distinguishing early-stage cancer from chronic pancreatitis (CP). The expression of DKK1 in PC tissues correlated with its expression in serum samples. The overall survival rate was 24.4% in the group with higher DKK1 levels and was found to be significantly different from the group with lower DKK1 levels (33.3%). Conclusion DKK1 may be a novel diagnostic/prognostic biomarker for PC. PMID:26101916

  17. Intracellular BK(Ca) (iBK(Ca)) channels.

    PubMed

    Singh, Harpreet; Stefani, Enrico; Toro, Ligia

    2012-12-01

    The large conductance calcium- and voltage-activated potassium channel (BK(Ca)) is widely expressed at the plasma membrane. This channel is involved in a variety of fundamental cellular functions including excitability, smooth muscle contractility, and Ca(2+) homeostasis, as well as in pathological situations like proinflammatory responses in rheumatoid arthritis, and cancer cell proliferation. Immunochemical, biochemical and pharmacological studies from over a decade have intermittently shown the presence of BK(Ca) in intracellular organelles. To date, intracellular BK(Ca) (iBK(Ca)) has been localized in the mitochondria, endoplasmic reticulum, nucleus and Golgi apparatus but its functional role remains largely unknown except for the mitochondrial BK(Ca) whose opening is thought to play a role in protecting the heart from ischaemic injury. In the nucleus, pharmacology suggests a role in regulating nuclear Ca(2+), membrane potential and eNOS expression. Establishing the molecular correlates of iBK(Ca), the mechanisms defining iBK(Ca) organelle-specific targeting, and their modulation are challenging questions. This review summarizes iBK(Ca) channels, their possible functions, and efforts to identify their molecular correlates. PMID:22930268

  18. Cardiac Ca2+ signaling and Ca2+ sensitizers.

    PubMed

    Endoh, Masao

    2008-12-01

    The role of Ca2+ in cardiac excitation-contraction (E-C) coupling has been established by simultaneous measurements of contractility and Ca2+ transients by means of aequorin in intact myocardium and Ca2+ sensitive fluorescent dyes in single myocytes. The E-C coupling process can be classified into 3 processes: upstream (Ca2+ mobilization), central (Ca2+ binding to troponin C) and downstream mechanism (thin filament regulation and crossbridge cycling). These mechanisms are regulated differentially by various inotropic interventions. Positive force-frequency relationship and effects of beta-adrenoceptor stimulation, phosphodiesterase 3 inhibitors and digitalis are essentially exerted via upstream mechanism. Alpha-adrenoceptor stimulation, endothelin-1, angiotensin II, and clinically available Ca2+ sensitizers, such as levosimendan and pimobendan, act by a combination of the upstream and central/downstream mechanism. The Frank-Starling mechanism and effects of Ca2+ sensitizers such as EMD 57033 and Org 30029 are primarily induced via the central/downstream mechanism. Whereas the upstream and central mechanisms are markedly suppressed in failing myocytes and under acidotic conditions, Ca2+ sensitizers such as EMD 57033 and Org 30029 can induce cardiotonic effects under such conditions. Ca2+ sensitizers have high therapeutic potential for the treatment of contractile dysfunction in congestive heart failure and ischemic heart diseases, because they have energetic advantages and less risk of Ca2+ overload and can maintain effectiveness under pathological conditions. PMID:18981594

  19. Colloid (mucinous non-cystic) carcinoma of the pancreas: A case report

    PubMed Central

    GAO, YANG; ZHU, YA-YUN; YUAN, ZHOU

    2015-01-01

    Colloid carcinoma (CC) of the pancreas, also known as mucinous non-cystic carcinoma, is a rare histological variant of pancreatic cancer. The present study reports the case of a 65-year-old male with a pancreatic head tumor 4.6×3.1 cm in size. The tumor had not invaded the superior mesenteric or celiac arteries. Laboratory data showed elevated alkaline phosphatase, γ-gluytamyl transpeptidase and cancer antigen 19-9 (CA19-9) levels. The patient underwent a pancreaticoduodenectomy (PD), and the pathology revealed CC extending to the submucosa of the duodenum, with mild atypical hyperplasia of the pancreatic duct. The patient was negative for circulating tumor cells, indicating a good prognosis. The CA19-9 concentration decreased to within the normal range following surgery. The present study reports a rare case of CC of the pancreas presenting with obstructive jaundice, in which a PD procedure was performed. Primary surgical treatment with curative intent is the optimal management and this subtype of pancreatic cancer is associated with a better prognosis compared with pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma. PMID:26722311

  20. Coachella Valley, CA

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2001-01-01

    These band composites, acquired on June 4, 2000, cover a 11 by 13.5 km sub-scene in the Coachella Valley, CA. The area is shown by the yellow box on the full scene in the LOWER RIGHT corner, northwest of the Salton Sea. This is a major agricultural region of California, growing fruit and produce throughout the year. Different combinations of ASTER bands help identify the different crop types. UPPER LEFT: bands 3, 2, 1 as red, green, and blue (RGB); UPPER RIGHT: bands 4, 2, 1 as RGB; LOWER LEFT: bands 4, 3, 2 as RGB. The image is centered at 33.6 degrees north latitude, 116.1 degrees west longitude.

    The U.S. science team is located at NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, Calif. The Terra mission is part of NASA's Science Mission Directorate.

  1. Prognostic value of serum leptin in advanced lung adenocarcinoma patients with cisplatin/pemetrexed chemotherapy

    PubMed Central

    MOU, WENJUN; XUE, HUI; TONG, HONGLI; SUN, SHENGJIE; ZHANG, ZHUHONG; ZHANG, CHUNYAN; SUN, QIYU; DONG, JING; WEN, XINYU; YAN, GUANGTAO; TIAN, YAPING

    2014-01-01

    Cisplatin/pemetrexed chemotherapy has been established as a standard treatment in lung adenocarcinoma. However, the response to the cisplatin/pemetrexed combination varies considerably among patients due to individual variations. Thus, novel biomarkers are required to aid the prediction of the response to the cisplatin/pemetrexed combination. We hypothesized that leptin expression may be a determinant for prognosis in lung adenocarcinoma patients with cisplatin/pemetrexed chemotherapy. Serum from consenting patients with lung adenocarcinoma were obtained for the measurement of leptin and associated tumor biomarkers. Leptin expression was measured by radioimmunoassay. Carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA), carbohydrate antigen 19-9 (CA19-9), CA15-3, CA125, CA72-4, cytokeratin 19 fragment (CYFRA21-1) and neuron-specific enolase (NSE) expression were determined by electrochemiluminescence immunoassays. Serum squamous cell carcinoma antigen levels were measured using a microparticle enzyme immunoassay. The associations between serum leptin and tumor biomarker expression were evaluated by Spearman’s correlation analysis. Serum CEA, CA19-9, CA15-3, CA125, CA72-4, CYFRA21-1 and NSE levels showed no obvious difference among patients. However, a trend towards an improved prognosis was observed in patients with lower serum leptin at diagnosis and an increase during cisplatin/pemetrexed chemotherapy. The results indicated that the serum leptin level has prognostic indications in patients with advanced lung adenocarcinoma during cisplatin/pemetrexed chemotherapy, which indicates that it may be a useful marker for the prognosis of cancer patients undergoing chemotherapy treatment. PMID:24932291

  2. Prognostic value of serum leptin in advanced lung adenocarcinoma patients with cisplatin/pemetrexed chemotherapy.

    PubMed

    Mou, Wenjun; Xue, Hui; Tong, Hongli; Sun, Shengjie; Zhang, Zhuhong; Zhang, Chunyan; Sun, Qiyu; Dong, Jing; Wen, Xinyu; Yan, Guangtao; Tian, Yaping

    2014-06-01

    Cisplatin/pemetrexed chemotherapy has been established as a standard treatment in lung adenocarcinoma. However, the response to the cisplatin/pemetrexed combination varies considerably among patients due to individual variations. Thus, novel biomarkers are required to aid the prediction of the response to the cisplatin/pemetrexed combination. We hypothesized that leptin expression may be a determinant for prognosis in lung adenocarcinoma patients with cisplatin/pemetrexed chemotherapy. Serum from consenting patients with lung adenocarcinoma were obtained for the measurement of leptin and associated tumor biomarkers. Leptin expression was measured by radioimmunoassay. Carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA), carbohydrate antigen 19-9 (CA19-9), CA15-3, CA125, CA72-4, cytokeratin 19 fragment (CYFRA21-1) and neuron-specific enolase (NSE) expression were determined by electrochemiluminescence immunoassays. Serum squamous cell carcinoma antigen levels were measured using a microparticle enzyme immunoassay. The associations between serum leptin and tumor biomarker expression were evaluated by Spearman's correlation analysis. Serum CEA, CA19-9, CA15-3, CA125, CA72-4, CYFRA21-1 and NSE levels showed no obvious difference among patients. However, a trend towards an improved prognosis was observed in patients with lower serum leptin at diagnosis and an increase during cisplatin/pemetrexed chemotherapy. The results indicated that the serum leptin level has prognostic indications in patients with advanced lung adenocarcinoma during cisplatin/pemetrexed chemotherapy, which indicates that it may be a useful marker for the prognosis of cancer patients undergoing chemotherapy treatment. PMID:24932291

  3. CA125 in Ovarian Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Urban, Nicole

    2009-01-01

    Summary Twenty five years after its discovery, circulating CA125 antigen is recommended for clinical use in the US for ovarian cancer (OC) screening of high risk women with ovaries despite its limited sensitivity and specificity. Recent findings suggest that CA125 might also serve as a predictive marker for pre-invasive OC. Methods to quantify circulating CA125 evolved towards sensitive and reliable double determinant ELISA assays. The CA125 gene, MUC16, was cloned 20 years after the protein discovery and revealed a very complex and unusual glycoprotein structure suggesting an immunological role. Recent evidence points toward CA125 function in the induction of materno-fetal tolerance through the alteration of NK phenotype. Two receptors for CA125 have been described: mesothelin and galectin-1. The specific location and functional proprieties of CA125 make it a therapeutic target of choice; clinical trials have demonstrated that anti-CA125 injections are well tolerated and suggest a potential survival benefit. PMID:20477371

  4. Dynamic buffering of mitochondrial Ca2+ during Ca2+ uptake and Na+-induced Ca2+ release

    PubMed Central

    Blomeyer, Christoph A.; Bazil, Jason N.; Stowe, David F.; Pradhan, Ranjan K.; Dash, Ranjan K.; Camara, Amadou K. S.

    2014-01-01

    In cardiac mitochondria, matrix free Ca2+ ([Ca2+]m) is primarily regulated by Ca2+ uptake and release via the Ca2+ uniporter (CU) and Na+/Ca2+ exchanger (NCE) as well as by Ca2+ buffering. Although experimental and computational studies on the CU and NCE dynamics exist, it is not well understood how matrix Ca2+ buffering affects these dynamics under various Ca2+ uptake and release conditions, and whether this influences the stoichiometry of the NCE. To elucidate the role of matrix Ca2+ buffering on the uptake and release of Ca2+, we monitored Ca2+ dynamics in isolated mitochondria by measuring both the extra-matrix free [Ca2+] ([Ca2+]e) and [Ca2+]m. A detailed protocol was developed and freshly isolated mitochondria from guinea pig hearts were exposed to five different [CaCl2] followed by ruthenium red and six different [NaCl]. By using the fluorescent probe indo-1, [Ca2+] and [Ca2+e]m were spectrofluorometrically quantified, and the stoichiometry of the NCE was determined. In addition, we measured NADH, membrane potential, matrix volume and matrix pH to monitor Ca2+-induced changes in mitochondrial bioenergetics. Our [Ca2+]e and [Ca2+]m measurements demonstrate that Ca2+ uptake and release do not show reciprocal Ca2+ dynamics in the extra-matrix and matrix compartments. This salient finding is likely caused by a dynamic Ca2+ buffering system in the matrix compartment. The Na+ - induced Ca2+ release demonstrates an electrogenic exchange via the NCE by excluding an electroneutral exchange. Mitochondrial bioenergetics were only transiently affected by Ca2+ uptake in the presence of large amounts of CaCl2, but not by Na+- induced Ca2+ release. PMID:23225099

  5. CaPTC Biennial Meetings

    Cancer.gov

    CaPTC hosts the 'Biennial Science of Global Prostate Cancer Disparities in Black Men' conference to address the growing global public health problem of prostate cancer among Black men in industrialized and developing countries.

  6. Evaluation of a CLEIA automated assay system for the detection of a panel of tumor markers.

    PubMed

    Falzarano, Renato; Viggiani, Valentina; Michienzi, Simona; Longo, Flavia; Tudini, Silvestra; Frati, Luigi; Anastasi, Emanuela

    2013-10-01

    Tumor markers are commonly used to detect a relapse of disease in oncologic patients during follow-up. It is important to evaluate new assay systems for a better and more precise assessment, as a standardized method is currently lacking. The aim of this study was to assess the concordance between an automated chemiluminescent enzyme immunoassay system (LUMIPULSE® G1200) and our reference methods using seven tumor markers. Serum samples from 787 subjects representing a variety of diagnoses, including oncologic, were analyzed using LUMIPULSE® G1200 and our reference methods. Serum values were measured for the following analytes: prostate-specific antigen (PSA), alpha-fetoprotein (AFP), carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA), cancer antigen 125 (CA125), carbohydrate antigen 15-3 (CA15-3), carbohydrate antigen 19-9 (CA19-9), and cytokeratin 19 fragment (CYFRA 21-1). For the determination of CEA, AFP, and PSA, an automatic analyzer based on chemiluminescence was applied as reference method. To assess CYFRA 21-1, CA125, CA19-9, and CA15-3, an immunoradiometric manual system was employed. Method comparison by Passing-Bablok analysis resulted in slopes ranging from 0.9728 to 1.9089 and correlation coefficients from 0.9977 to 0.9335. The precision of each assay was assessed by testing six serum samples. Each sample was analyzed for all tumor biomarkers in duplicate and in three different runs. The coefficients of variation were less than 6.3 and 6.2 % for within-run and between-run variation, respectively. Our data suggest an overall good interassay agreement for all markers. The comparison with our reference methods showed good precision and reliability, highlighting its usefulness in clinical laboratory's routine. PMID:23775009

  7. Mitochondrial Ca(2+) Processing by a Unit of Mitochondrial Ca(2+) Uniporter and Na(+)/Ca(2+) Exchanger Supports the Neuronal Ca(2+) Influx via Activated Glutamate Receptors.

    PubMed

    Strokin, Mikhail; Reiser, Georg

    2016-06-01

    The current study demonstrates that in hippocampal neurons mitochondrial Ca(2+) processing supports Ca(2+) influx via ionotropic glutamate (Glu) receptors. We define mitochondrial Ca(2+) processing as Ca(2+) uptake via mitochondrial Ca(2+) uniporter (MCU) combined with subsequent Ca(2+) release via mitochondrial Na(+)/Ca(2+) exchanger (NCX). Our tool is to measure the Ca(2+) influx rate in primary hippocampal co-cultures, i.e. neurons and astrocytes, by fluorescent digital microscopy, using a Fura-2-quenching method where we add small amounts of Mn(2+) in the superfusion medium. Thus, Ca(2+) influx is measured with Mn(2+) in the bath. Ru360 as inhibitor of mitochondrial Ca(2+) uptake through MCU strongly reduces the rate of Ca(2+) influx in Glu-stimulated primary hippocampal neurons. Similarly, the Ca(2+) influx rate in Glu-stimulated neurons declines after suppression of potential-dependent MCU, when we depolarize mitochondria with rotenone. With inhibition of Ca(2+) release from mitochondria via NCX using CGP-37157 the Ca(2+) influx via N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA)- and kainate-sensitive receptors is slowed down. Working jointly as mitochondrial Ca(2+) processing unit, MCU and NCX, apparently sustain the Ca(2+) throughput of activated Glu-sensitive receptors. Our results revise the role frequently attributed to mitochondria in neuronal Ca(2+) homeostasis, where mitochondria function mainly as Ca(2+) buffer, and prevent excessively high cytosolic Ca(2+) concentration increase during neuronal activity. The mechanism to control Ca(2+) influx in neurons, as discovered in this study, highlights mitochondrial Ca(2+) processing as a promising pharmacological target. We discuss this pathway in relation to the endoplasmic reticulum-related mechanisms of Ca(2+) processing. PMID:26842930

  8. The Influence of Ca2+ Buffers on Free [Ca2+] Fluctuations and the Effective Volume of Ca2+ Microdomains

    PubMed Central

    Weinberg, Seth H.; Smith, Gregory D.

    2014-01-01

    Intracellular calcium (Ca2+) plays a significant role in many cell signaling pathways, some of which are localized to spatially restricted microdomains. Ca2+ binding proteins (Ca2+ buffers) play an important role in regulating Ca2+ concentration ([Ca2+]). Buffers typically slow [Ca2+] temporal dynamics and increase the effective volume of Ca2+ domains. Because fluctuations in [Ca2+] decrease in proportion to the square-root of a domain’s physical volume, one might conjecture that buffers decrease [Ca2+] fluctuations and, consequently, mitigate the significance of small domain volume concerning Ca2+ signaling. We test this hypothesis through mathematical and computational analysis of idealized buffer-containing domains and their stochastic dynamics during free Ca2+ influx with passive exchange of both Ca2+ and buffer with bulk concentrations. We derive Langevin equations for the fluctuating dynamics of Ca2+ and buffer and use these stochastic differential equations to determine the magnitude of [Ca2+] fluctuations for different buffer parameters (e.g., dissociation constant and concentration). In marked contrast to expectations based on a naive application of the principle of effective volume as employed in deterministic models of Ca2+ signaling, we find that mobile and rapid buffers typically increase the magnitude of domain [Ca2+] fluctuations during periods of Ca2+ influx, whereas stationary (immobile) Ca2+ buffers do not. Also contrary to expectations, we find that in the absence of Ca2+ influx, buffers influence the temporal characteristics, but not the magnitude, of [Ca2+] fluctuations. We derive an analytical formula describing the influence of rapid Ca2+ buffers on [Ca2+] fluctuations and, importantly, identify the stochastic analog of (deterministic) effective domain volume. Our results demonstrate that Ca2+ buffers alter the dynamics of [Ca2+] fluctuations in a nonintuitive manner. The finding that Ca2+ buffers do not suppress intrinsic domain [Ca2

  9. Effect of tumor mass and antigenic nature on the biodistribution of labeled monoclonal antibodies in mice

    SciTech Connect

    Watanabe, Y.; Endo, K.; Koizumi, M.; Kawamura, Y.; Saga, T.; Sakahara, H.; Kuroki, M.; Matsuoka, Y.; Konishi, J.

    1989-06-01

    The effect of tumor mass and antigenic nature on the biodistribution of 111In- and 125I-labeled monoclonal antibodies (MoAbs) was studied using F(ab')2 fragments of three representative anti-tumor MoAbs and SW1116 human colorectal carcinoma grown in nude mice. The 19-9, F33-104 anti-CEA, and 17-1A MoAbs showed specific binding to SW1116 cells. The former two MoAbs recognize circulating CA 19-9 with molecular weights of more than 5,000,000 and CEA of Mr 170,000-180,000, respectively, whereas 17-1A reacts with a nonshedding antigen. Both percentage injected dose per gram tumor and tumor-to-blood ratios were inversely proportional to the tumor mass in nude mice administered 111In- and 125I-labeled 19-9, but liver uptake increased as tumor size increased. Analysis of serum samples and tumor homogenates demonstrated the presence of a high-molecular-weight species, probably due to the antibody binding to CA 19-9. In the case of 111In-labeled anti-CEA MoAb, tumor uptake also decreased and liver uptake increased with tumor size, but this effect was less obvious than that of 19-9. In contrast, tumor and liver uptake of 125I-labeled anti-CEA MoAb, 111In- and 125I-labeled 17-1A and control antibodies were independent of tumor mass. The absolute tumor uptake and tumor-to-blood ratios of all 125I-labeled antibodies were lower than those of the 111In-labeled ones. And the effect of tumor mass was also weaker with 125I-labeled antibodies, probably due to in vivo dehalogenation. These results indicate that the effect of tumor size on the incorporation of labeled MoAb into tumors is dependent on the antigenic nature to be targeted and/or radionuclides used for labeling and that high concentrations of circulating high molecular weight antigens may limit in vivo use of MoAb conjugates.

  10. Effects of Ca antagonists on Ca fluxes in resistance vessels

    SciTech Connect

    Cauvin, C.; Saida, K.; van Breemen, C.

    1982-01-01

    Researchers have examined contractions and /sup 45/Ca fluxes induced by norepinephrine (NE) and 80 mM potassium (high K) depolarization and their inhibition by dilitazem in rabbit mesenteric resistance vessels. Contraction induced by both NE and high K depended almost completely on extracellular Ca. Dose-response curves for diltiazem inhibition of NE (10(-5) M) and high K contractions showed ED50 values of 1 X 10(-8) and 6 X 10(-7) M, respectively, indicating that the receptor-operated channel (ROC) was more sensitive than the potential-operated channel (POC) to the action of diltiazem. Diltiazem (10(-6) M) was shown to inhibit NE- and 80 mM K-stimulated /sup 45/Ca influx effectively by 87 +/- 15 and 85 +/- 10%, respectively. Comparison of these data to those obtained from aorta suggest that although the sensitivity of the POC is approximately the same in aorta and mesenteric resistance vessels, the sensitivity of the ROC is much greater in the latter. This increased sensitivity is paralleled by a greatly decreased role of intracellular Ca release in NE contraction in mesenteric resistance vessels.

  11. Timing in Cellular Ca2+ signaling

    PubMed Central

    Boulware, Michael J.; Marchant, Jonathan S.

    2011-01-01

    Calcium (Ca2+) signals are generated across a broad time range. Kinetic considerations impact how information is processed to encode and decode Ca2+ signals, the choreography of responses that ensure specific and efficient signaling and the overall temporal gearing such that ephemeral Ca2+ signals have lasting physiological value. The reciprocal importance of timing for Ca2+ signaling, and Ca2+ signaling for timing is exemplified by the altered kinetic profiles of Ca2+ signals in certain diseases and the likely role of basal Ca2+ fluctuations in the perception of time itself. PMID:18786382

  12. Ca2+ waves in the heart

    PubMed Central

    Izu, Leighton T.; Xie, Yuanfang; Sato, Daisuke; Bányász, Tamás; Chen-Izu, Ye

    2013-01-01

    Ca2+ waves were probably first observed in the early 1940s. Since then Ca2+ waves have captured the attention of an eclectic mixture of mathematicians, neuroscientists, muscle physiologists, developmental biologists, and clinical cardiologists. This review discusses the current state of mathematical models of Ca2+ waves, the normal physiological functions Ca2+ waves might serve in cardiac cells, as well as how the spatial arrangement of Ca2+ release channels shape Ca2+ waves, and we introduce the idea of Ca2+ phase waves that might provide a useful framework for understanding triggered arrhythmias. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled ‘Calcium Signaling in Heart’. PMID:23220129

  13. Large Ca2+-dependent facilitation of CaV2.1 channels revealed by Ca2+ photo-uncaging

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Shin-Rong; Adams, Paul J; Yue, David T

    2015-01-01

    Key points CaV2.1 channels constitute a dominant Ca2+ entry pathway into brain neurons, triggering downstream Ca2+-dependent processes such as neurotransmitter release. CaV2.1 is itself modulated by Ca2+, resulting in activity-dependent enhancement of channel opening termed Ca2+-dependent facilitation (CDF). Real-time Ca2+ imaging and Ca2+ uncaging here reveal that CDF turns out to be strikingly faster, more Ca2+ sensitive, and larger than anticipated on previous grounds. Robust resolution of the quantitative profile of CDF enables deduction of a realistic biophysical model for this process. These results suggest that CaV2.1 CDF would figure most prominently in short-term synaptic plasticity and cerebellar Purkinje cell rhythmicity. Abstract CaV2.1 (P-type) voltage-gated Ca2+ channels constitute a major source of neuronal Ca2+ current, strongly influencing rhythmicity and triggering neurotransmitter release throughout the central nervous system. Fitting with such stature among Ca2+ entry pathways, CaV2.1 is itself feedback regulated by intracellular Ca2+, acting through calmodulin to facilitate channel opening. The precise neurophysiological role of this calcium-dependent facilitation (CDF) remains uncertain, however, in large measure because the very magnitude, Ca2+ dependence and kinetics of CDF have resisted quantification by conventional means. Here, we utilize the photo-uncaging of Ca2+ with CaV2.1 channels fluxing Li+ currents, so that voltage-dependent activation of channel gating is no longer conflated with Ca2+ entry, and CDF is then driven solely by light-induced increases in Ca2+. By using this strategy, we now find that CDF can be unexpectedly large, enhancing currents by as much as twofold at physiological voltages. CDF is steeply Ca2+ dependent, with a Hill coefficient of approximately two, a half-maximal effect reached by nearly 500 nm Ca2+, and Ca2+ on/off kinetics in the order of milliseconds to tens of milliseconds. These properties were

  14. Angular dependence in proton-proton correlation functions in central 40Ca + 40Ca and 48Ca + 48Ca reactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Henzl, V.; Kilburn, M. A.; Chajęcki, Z.; Henzlova, D.; Lynch, W. G.; Brown, D.; Chbihi, A.; Coupland, D. D. S.; Danielewicz, P.; Desouza, R. T.; Famiano, M.; Herlitzius, C.; Hudan, S.; Lee, Jenny; Lukyanov, S.; Rogers, A. M.; Sanetullaev, A.; Sobotka, L. G.; Sun, Z. Y.; Tsang, M. B.; Vander Molen, A.; Verde, G.; Wallace, M. S.; Youngs, M.

    2012-01-01

    The angular dependence of proton-proton correlation functions is studied in central 40Ca+40Ca and 48Ca+48Ca nuclear reactions at E/A=80 MeV. Measurements were performed with the High Resolution Array (HiRA) complemented by the 4π Array at the National Superconducting Cyclotron Laboratory. A striking angular dependence in the laboratory frame is found within proton-proton correlation functions for both systems that greatly exceeds the measured and expected isospin dependent difference between the neutron-rich and neutron-deficient systems. Sources measured at backward angles reflect the participant zone of the reaction, while much larger sources observed at forward angles reflect the expanding, fragmenting, and evaporating projectile remnants. The decrease of the size of the source with increasing momentum is observed at backward angles while a weaker trend in the opposite direction is observed at forward angles. The results are compared to the theoretical calculations using the Boltzmann-Uehling-Uhlenbeck (BUU) transport model.

  15. STIM Is a Ca2+ Sensor Essential for Ca2+-Store-Depletion-Triggered Ca2+ Influx

    PubMed Central

    Liou, Jen; Kim, Man Lyang; Heo, Won Do; Jones, Joshua T.; Myers, Jason W.; Ferrell, James E.; Meyer, Tobias

    2011-01-01

    Summary Ca2+ signaling in nonexcitable cells is typically initiated by receptor-triggered production of inositol-1,4,5-trisphosphate and the release of Ca2+ from intracellular stores [1]. An elusive signaling process senses the Ca2+ store depletion and triggers the opening of plasma membrane Ca2+ channels [2–5]. The resulting sustained Ca2+ signals are required for many physiological responses, such as T cell activation and differentiation [6]. Here, we monitored receptor-triggered Ca2+ signals in cells transfected with siRNAs against 2,304 human signaling proteins, and we identified two proteins required for Ca2+-store-depletion-mediated Ca2+ influx, STIM1 and STIM2 [7–9]. These proteins have a single transmembrane region with a putative Ca2+ binding domain in the lumen of the endoplasmic reticulum. Ca2+ store depletion led to a rapid translocation of STIM1 into puncta that accumulated near the plasma membrane. Introducing a point mutation in the STIM1 Ca2+ binding domain resulted in prelocalization of the protein in puncta, and this mutant failed to respond to store depletion. Our study suggests that STIM proteins function as Ca2+ store sensors in the signaling pathway connecting Ca2+ store depletion to Ca2+ influx. PMID:16005298

  16. Decoding Ca2+ signals in plants

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sathyanarayanan, P. V.; Poovaiah, B. W.

    2004-01-01

    Different input signals create their own characteristic Ca2+ fingerprints. These fingerprints are distinguished by frequency, amplitude, duration, and number of Ca2+ oscillations. Ca(2+)-binding proteins and protein kinases decode these complex Ca2+ fingerprints through conformational coupling and covalent modifications of proteins. This decoding of signals can lead to a physiological response with or without changes in gene expression. In plants, Ca(2+)-dependent protein kinases and Ca2+/calmodulin-dependent protein kinases are involved in decoding Ca2+ signals into phosphorylation signals. This review summarizes the elements of conformational coupling and molecular mechanisms of regulation of the two groups of protein kinases by Ca2+ and Ca2+/calmodulin in plants.

  17. Decoding Ca2+ signals in plants.

    PubMed

    Sathyanarayanan, P V; Poovaiah, B W

    2004-01-01

    Different input signals create their own characteristic Ca2+ fingerprints. These fingerprints are distinguished by frequency, amplitude, duration, and number of Ca2+ oscillations. Ca(2+)-binding proteins and protein kinases decode these complex Ca2+ fingerprints through conformational coupling and covalent modifications of proteins. This decoding of signals can lead to a physiological response with or without changes in gene expression. In plants, Ca(2+)-dependent protein kinases and Ca2+/calmodulin-dependent protein kinases are involved in decoding Ca2+ signals into phosphorylation signals. This review summarizes the elements of conformational coupling and molecular mechanisms of regulation of the two groups of protein kinases by Ca2+ and Ca2+/calmodulin in plants. PMID:16044584

  18. A Devil in the Details: Matrix-Dependent 40Ca42Ca++/42Ca+ and Its Effects on Estimates of the Initial 41Ca/40Ca in the Solar System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McKeegan, K. D.; Liu, M.-C.

    2015-07-01

    Ian Hutcheon established that the molecular ion interference 40Ca42Ca++/42Ca+ on 41K+ is strongly dependent on the mineral analyzed. Correction for this "matrix effect" led to a downward revision of the initial 41Ca/40Ca of the solar system.

  19. Voltage-activated ion channels and Ca2+-induced Ca2+ release shape Ca2+ signaling in Merkel cells

    PubMed Central

    Piskorowski, Rebecca; Haeberle, Henry; Panditrao, Mayuri V.; Lumpkin, Ellen A.

    2008-01-01

    Ca2+ signaling and neurotransmission modulate touch-evoked responses in Merkel cell–neurite complexes. To identify mechanisms governing these processes, we analyzed voltage-activated ion channels and Ca2+ signaling in purified Merkel cells. Merkel cells in the intact skin were specifically labeled by antibodies against voltage-activated Ca2+ channels (CaV2.1) and voltage- and Ca2+-activated K+ (BKCa) channels. Voltage-clamp recordings revealed small Ca2+ currents, which produced Ca2+ transients that were amplified sevenfold by Ca2+-induced Ca2+ release. Merkel cells' voltage-activated K+ currents were carried predominantly by BKCa channels with inactivating and noninactivating components. Thus, Merkel cells, like hair cells, have functionally diverse BKCa channels. Finally, blocking K+ channels increased response magnitude and dramatically shortened Ca2+ transients evoked by mechanical stimulation. Together, these results demonstrate that Ca2+ signaling in Merkel cells is governed by the interplay of plasma membrane Ca2+ channels, store release and K+ channels, and they identify specific signaling mechanisms that may control touch sensitivity. PMID:18415122

  20. Fine tuning of cytosolic Ca 2+ oscillations

    PubMed Central

    Dupont, Geneviève; Combettes, Laurent

    2016-01-01

    Ca 2+ oscillations, a widespread mode of cell signaling, were reported in non-excitable cells for the first time more than 25 years ago. Their fundamental mechanism, based on the periodic Ca 2+ exchange between the endoplasmic reticulum and the cytoplasm, has been well characterized. However, how the kinetics of cytosolic Ca 2+ changes are related to the extent of a physiological response remains poorly understood. Here, we review data suggesting that the downstream targets of Ca 2+ are controlled not only by the frequency of Ca 2+ oscillations but also by the detailed characteristics of the oscillations, such as their duration, shape, or baseline level. Involvement of non-endoplasmic reticulum Ca 2+ stores, mainly mitochondria and the extracellular medium, participates in this fine tuning of Ca 2+ oscillations. The main characteristics of the Ca 2+ exchange fluxes with these compartments are also reviewed.

  1. CaMKII regulates intracellular Ca²⁺ dynamics in native endothelial cells.

    PubMed

    Toussaint, Fanny; Charbel, Chimène; Blanchette, Alexandre; Ledoux, Jonathan

    2015-09-01

    Localized endothelial Ca(2+) signalling, such as Ca(2+) pulsars, can modulate the contractile state of the underlying vascular smooth muscle cell through specific endothelial targets. In addition to K(Ca)3.1 as a target, Ca(2+) pulsars, an IP3R-dependent pulsatile Ca(2+) release from the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) could activate a frequency-sensitive Ca(2+)-dependent kinase such as CaMKII. In the absence of extracellular Ca(2+), acetylcholine increased endothelial CaMKII phosphorylation and activation, thereby suggesting CaMKII activation independently of Ca(2+) influx. Herein, a reciprocal relation where CaMKII controls endothelial Ca(2+) dynamics has been investigated in mesenteric arteries. Both CaMKIIα and β isoforms have been identified in endothelial cells and close proximity (<40 nm) suggests their association in heteromultimers. Intracellular Ca(2+) monitoring with high speed confocal microscopy then showed that inhibition of CaMKII with KN-93 significantly increased the population of Ca(2+) pulsars active sites (+89%), suggesting CaMKII as a major regulator of Ca(2+) pulsars in native endothelium. Mechanistic insights were then sought through the elucidation of the impact of CaMKII on ER Ca(2+) store. ER Ca(2+) emptying was accelerated by CaMKII inhibition and ER Ca(2+) content was assessed using ionomycin. Exposure to KN-93 strongly diminished ER Ca(2+) content (-61%) by relieving CaMKII-dependent inhibition of IP3 receptors (IP3R). Moreover, in situ proximity ligation assay suggested CaMKII-IP3R promiscuity, essential condition for a protein-protein interaction. Interestingly, segregation of IP3R within myoendothelial projection (MEP) appears to be isoform-specific. Hence, only IP3R type 1 and type 2 are detected within fenestrations of the internal elastic lamina, sites of MEP, whilst type 3 is absent from these structures. In summary, CaMKII seems to act as a Ca(2+)-sensitive switch of a negative feedback loop regulating endothelial Ca(2

  2. Potentiation of inositol trisphosphate-induced Ca2+ mobilization in Xenopus oocytes by cytosolic Ca2+.

    PubMed

    Yao, Y; Parker, I

    1992-12-01

    1. The ability of cytosolic Ca2+ ions to modulate inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate (Insp3)-induced Ca2+ liberation from intracellular stores was studied in Xenopus oocytes using light flash photolysis of caged InsP3. Changes in cytosolic free Ca2+ level were effected by inducing Ca2+ entry through ionophore and voltage-gated plasma membrane channels and by injection of Ca2+ through a micropipette. Their effects on Ca2+ liberation were monitored by video imaging of Fluo-3 fluorescence and by voltage clamp recording of Ca(2+)-activated membrane Cl- currents. 2. Treatment of oocytes with the Ca2+ ionophores A23187 and ionomycin caused a transient elevation of cytosolic Ca2+ level when cells were bathed in Ca(2+)-free solution, which probably arose because of release of Ca2+ from intracellular stores. 3. Membrane current and Fluo-3 Ca2+ signals evoked by photoreleased InsP3 in ionophore-treated oocytes were potentiated when the intracellular Ca2+ level was elevated by raising the Ca2+ level in the bathing solution. 4. Responses to photoreleased InsP3 were similarly potentiated following activation of Ca2+ entry through voltage-gated Ca2+ channels expressed in the plasma membrane. 5. Ca(2+)-activated membrane currents evoked by depolarization developed a delayed 'hump' component during sustained photorelease of InsP3, probably because Ca2+ ions entering through the membrane channels triggered liberation of Ca2+ from intracellular stores. 6. Ba2+ and Sr2+ ions were able to substitute for Ca2+ in potentiating InsP3-mediated Ca2+ liberation. 7. Gradual photorelease of InsP3 by weak photolysis light evoked Ca2+ liberation that began at particular foci and then propagated throughout, but not beyond that area of the oocyte exposed to the light. Local elevations of intracellular Ca2+ produced by microinjection of Ca2+ acted as new foci for the initiation of Ca2+ liberation by InsP3. 8. In resting oocytes, intracellular injections of Ca2+ resulted only in localized elevation of

  3. Autonomous CaMKII requires further stimulation by Ca2+/calmodulin for enhancing synaptic strength

    PubMed Central

    Barcomb, Kelsey; Buard, Isabelle; Coultrap, Steven J.; Kulbe, Jacqueline R.; O'Leary, Heather; Benke, Timothy A.; Bayer, K. Ulrich

    2014-01-01

    A hallmark feature of Ca2+/calmodulin (CaM)-dependent protein kinase II (CaMKII) is generation of autonomous (Ca2+-independent) activity by T286 autophosphorylation. Biochemical studies have shown that “autonomous” CaMKII is ∼5-fold further stimulated by Ca2+/CaM, but demonstration of a physiological function for such regulation within cells has remained elusive. In this study, CaMKII-induced enhancement of synaptic strength in rat hippocampal neurons required both autonomous activity and further stimulation. Synaptic strength was decreased by CaMKIIα knockdown and rescued by reexpression, but not by mutants impaired for autonomy (T286A) or binding to NMDA-type glutamate receptor subunit 2B (GluN2B; formerly NR2B; I205K). Full rescue was seen with constitutively autonomous mutants (T286D), but only if they could be further stimulated (additional T305/306A mutation), and not with two other mutations that additionally impair Ca2+/CaM binding. Compared to rescue with wild-type CaMKII, the CaM-binding-impaired mutants even had reduced synaptic strength. One of these mutants (T305/306D) mimicked an inhibitory autophosphorylation of CaMKII, whereas the other one (Δstim) abolished CaM binding without introducing charged residues. Inhibitory T305/306 autophosphorylation also reduced GluN2B binding, but this effect was independent of reduced Ca2+/CaM binding and was not mimicked by T305/306D mutation. Thus, even autonomous CaMKII activity must be further stimulated by Ca2+/CaM for enhancement of synaptic strength.—Barcomb, K., Buard, I., Coultrap, S. J., Kulbe, J. R., O'Leary, H., Benke, T. A., Bayer, K. U. Autonomous CaMKII requires further stimulation by Ca2+/calmodulin for enhancing synaptic strength. PMID:24843070

  4. Extensive Metastatic Cholangiocarcinoma Associated With IgG4-Related Sclerosing Cholangitis Misdiagnosed as Isolated IgG4-Related Sclerosing Cholangitis

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Yi-An; Shen, Xi-Zhong; Zhu, Ji-Min; Liu, Tao-Tao

    2015-01-01

    Abstract As cholangiographic features of IgG4-related sclerosing cholangitis (IgG4-SC) resemble those of cholangiocarcinoma, it is highly confusing between the 2 conditions on the basis of cholangiographic findings. This study presents a case of extensive metastatic cholangiocarcinoma with IgG4-SC misdiagnosed as isolated IgG4-SC, and reviews recent studies of the 2 diseases. A 56-year-old man with no family history of malignant tumors or liver diseases presented with recurrent mild abdominal pain and distention for 3 months. Magnetic resonance cholangiopancreatography showed a 3.7 cm nodular lesion with unclear boundary in segment VI of the liver. Serum IgG4 and CA19-9 were slightly elevated. Histopathological examination was consistent with the consensus statement on the pathology of IgG4-SC. IgG4-SC was thus considered. Due to his mild symptoms, glucocorticoid was not given at first. However, 3 months after his first admission, he had more severe abdominal pain and further elevated serum CA19-9. Actually he was found suffering from extensive metastatic cholangiocarcinoma with IgG4-SC by exploratory laparotomy. The present case serves as a reminder that extensive metastatic cholangiocarcinoma with or without IgG4-SC may be misdiagnosed as an isolated IgG4-SC case if one relies solely on elevated serum and tissue IgG4 levels. We emphasize on the importance of repeated core needle biopsy or exploratory laparoscopy/laparotomy before immunosuppressive drugs are given, and on follow-up of imaging findings and serum CA19-9 once immunosuppressive therapy is started. PMID:26559312

  5. Bifunctional 4MBA mediated recyclable SERS-based immunoassay induced by photocatalytic activity of TiO2 nanotube arrays.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xiaolong; Zhou, Lu; Lai, Wei; Jiang, Tao; Zhou, Jun

    2016-09-14

    We first report here a novel recyclable surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS)-based immunoassay via the photocatalytic ability of anatase titania nanotube (TiO2-NT) arrays. In this immunoassay, an immune probe was realized by immobilizing anti-CA19-9 onto Ag@SiO2@Ag three core-shell nanoparticles (TCSNPs), which showed a much higher SERS activity than bare Ag NPs with an enhancement ratio of 1.75. Then, the vertically oriented TiO2-NT immune substrate was synthesized by ultra-fast anodic oxidation of flexible titanium foils and functionalised with 4-mercaptobenzoic acid (4MBA) molecules to link them with anti-CA19-9. The immunoassay using the above immune probe and the substrate exhibited a wide linear range from 1000 to 0.5 U mL(-1) and a low detection limit of 0.5 U mL(-1) for CA19-9 due to the excellent SERS performance of Ag@SiO2@Ag TCSNPs. More importantly, the linkage between TiO2-NTs and 4MBA was destroyed by catalyzing 4MBA into 4-sulfobenzoate upon UV irradiation in O2-saturated water. The target antigen and the immune probe were simultaneously removed leading to a recyclable immunoassay and a detection limit of 5 U mL(-1) was achieved after six cycles. The simplicity and versatility of this strategy may bridge the technology gap between academia and practical detection, which makes it promising for clinical SERS-based immunoassay. PMID:27523026

  6. Predictors of long term survival after hepatic resection for hilar cholangiocarcinoma: A retrospective study of 5-year survivors

    PubMed Central

    Abd ElWahab, Mohamed; El Nakeeb, Ayman; El Hanafy, Ehab; Sultan, Ahmad M; Elghawalby, Ahmed; Askr, Waleed; Ali, Mahmoud; Abd El Gawad, Mohamed; Salah, Tarek

    2016-01-01

    AIM: To determine predictors of long term survival after resection of hilar cholangiocarcinoma (HC) by comparing patients surviving > 5 years with those who survived < 5 years. METHODS: This is a retrospective study of patients with pathologically proven HC who underwent surgical resection at the Gastroenterology Surgical Center, Mansoura University, Egypt between January 2002 and April 2013. All data of the patients were collected from the medical records. Patients were divided into two groups according to their survival: Patients surviving less than 5 years and those who survived > 5 years. RESULTS: There were 34 (14%) long term survivors (5 year survivors) among the 243 patients. Five-year survivors were younger at diagnosis than those surviving less than 5 years (mean age, 50.47 ± 4.45 vs 54.59 ± 4.98, P = 0.001). Gender, clinical presentation, preoperative drainage, preoperative serum bilirubin, albumin and serum glutamic-pyruvic transaminase were similar between the two groups. The level of CA 19-9 was significantly higher in patients surviving < 5 years (395.71 ± 31.43 vs 254.06 ± 42.19, P = 0.0001). Univariate analysis demonstrated nine variables to be significantly associated with survival > 5 year, including young age (P = 0.001), serum CA19-9 (P = 0.0001), non-cirrhotic liver (P = 0.02), major hepatic resection (P = 0.001), caudate lobe resection (P = 0.006), well differentiated tumour (P = 0.03), lymph node status (0.008), R0 resection margin (P = 0.0001) and early postoperative liver cell failure (P = 0.02). CONCLUSION: Liver status, resection of caudate lobe, lymph node status, R0 resection and CA19-9 were demonstrated to be independent risk factors for long term survival. PMID:27358676

  7. Differentiation of Pancreatic Ductal Adenocarcinoma From Chronic Pancreatitis by PAM4 Immunohistochemistry

    PubMed Central

    Shi, Chanjuan; Merchant, Nipun; Newsome, Guy; Goldenberg, David M.; Gold, David V.

    2014-01-01

    Context PAM4 is a monoclonal antibody that shows high specificity for pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC) and its neoplastic precursor lesions. A PAM4-based serum immunoassay is able to detect 71% of early-stage patients and 91% with advanced disease. However, approximately 20% of patients diagnosed with chronic pancreatitis (CP) are also positive for circulating PAM4 antigen. The specificity of the PAM4 antibody is critical to the interpretation of the serum-based and immunohistochemical assays for detection of PDAC. Objective To determine whether PAM4 can differentiate PDAC from nonneoplastic lesions of the pancreas. Design Tissue microarrays of PDAC (N = 43) and surgical specimens from CP (N = 32) and benign cystic lesions (N=19) were evaluated for expression of the PAM4 biomarker, MUC1, MUC4, CEACAM5/6, and CA19-9. Results PAM4 and monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) to MUC1, MUC4, CEACAM5/6, and CA19-9 were each reactive with the majority of PDAC cases; however, PAM4 was the only monoclonal antibody not to react with adjacent, nonneoplastic parenchyma. Although PAM4 labeled 19% (6 of 32) of CP specimens, reactivity was restricted to pancreatic intraepithelial neoplasia associated with CP; inflamed tissues were negative in all cases. In contrast, MUC1, MUC4, CEACAM5/6, and CA19-9 were detected in 90%, 78%, 97%, and 100% of CP, respectively, with reactivity also present in nonneoplastic inflamed tissue. Conclusions PAM4 was the only monoclonal antibody able to differentiate PDAC (and pancreatic intraepithelial neoplasia precursor lesions) from benign, nonneoplastic tissues of the pancreas. These results suggest the use of PAM4 for evaluation of tissue specimens, and support its role as an immunoassay for detection of PDAC. PMID:24476519

  8. 46 CFR 7.125 - Point Vincente, CA to Point Conception, CA.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 1 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Point Vincente, CA to Point Conception, CA. 7.125 Section 7.125 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY PROCEDURES APPLICABLE TO THE PUBLIC BOUNDARY LINES Pacific Coast § 7.125 Point Vincente, CA to Point Conception, CA. (a) A line drawn...

  9. Distinct Roles for Dorsal CA3 and CA1 in Memory for Sequential Nonspatial Events

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Farovik, Anja; Dupont, Laura M.; Eichenbaum, Howard

    2010-01-01

    Previous studies have suggested that dorsal hippocampal areas CA3 and CA1 are both involved in representing sequences of events that compose unique episodes. However, it is uncertain whether the contribution of CA3 is restricted to spatial information, and it is unclear whether CA1 encodes order per se or contributes by an active maintenance of…

  10. 46 CFR 7.130 - Point Conception, CA to Point Sur, CA.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 1 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Point Conception, CA to Point Sur, CA. 7.130 Section 7... LINES Pacific Coast § 7.130 Point Conception, CA to Point Sur, CA. (a) A line drawn from the southernmost extremity of Fossil Point at longitude 120°43.5′ W. to the seaward extremity of Whaler...

  11. 46 CFR 7.130 - Point Conception, CA to Point Sur, CA.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Point Conception, CA to Point Sur, CA. 7.130 Section 7... LINES Pacific Coast § 7.130 Point Conception, CA to Point Sur, CA. (a) A line drawn from the southernmost extremity of Fossil Point at longitude 120°43.5′ W. to the seaward extremity of Whaler...

  12. Expression and Localization of CaBP Ca2+ Binding Proteins in the Mouse Cochlea.

    PubMed

    Yang, Tian; Scholl, Elizabeth S; Pan, Ning; Fritzsch, Bernd; Haeseleer, Françoise; Lee, Amy

    2016-01-01

    CaBPs are a family of EF-hand Ca2+ binding proteins that are structurally similar to calmodulin. CaBPs can interact with, and yet differentially modulate, effectors that are regulated by calmodulin, such as Cav1 voltage-gated Ca2+ channels. Immunolabeling studies suggest that multiple CaBP family members (CaBP1, 2, 4, and 5) are expressed in the cochlea. To gain insights into the respective auditory functions of these CaBPs, we characterized the expression and cellular localization of CaBPs in the mouse cochlea. By quantitative reverse transcription PCR, we show that CaBP1 and CaBP2 are the major CaBPs expressed in mouse cochlea both before and after hearing onset. Of the three alternatively spliced variants of CaBP1 (caldendrin, CaBP1-L, and CaBP1-S) and CaBP2 (CaBP2-alt, CaBP2-L, CaBP2-S), caldendrin and CaBP2-alt are the most abundant. By in situ hybridization, probes recognizing caldendrin strongly label the spiral ganglion, while probes designed to recognize all three isoforms of CaBP1 weakly label both the inner and outer hair cells as well as the spiral ganglion. Within the spiral ganglion, caldendrin/CaBP1 labeling is associated with cells resembling satellite glial cells. CaBP2-alt is strongly expressed in inner hair cells both before and after hearing onset. Probes designed to recognize all three variants of CaBP2 strongly label inner hair cells before hearing onset and outer hair cells after the onset of hearing. Thus, CaBP1 and CaBP2 may have overlapping roles in regulating Ca2+ signaling in the hair cells, and CaBP1 may have an additional function in the spiral ganglion. Our findings provide a framework for understanding the role of CaBP family members in the auditory periphery. PMID:26809054

  13. Expression and Localization of CaBP Ca2+ Binding Proteins in the Mouse Cochlea

    PubMed Central

    Pan, Ning; Fritzsch, Bernd; Haeseleer, Françoise; Lee, Amy

    2016-01-01

    CaBPs are a family of EF-hand Ca2+ binding proteins that are structurally similar to calmodulin. CaBPs can interact with, and yet differentially modulate, effectors that are regulated by calmodulin, such as Cav1 voltage-gated Ca2+ channels. Immunolabeling studies suggest that multiple CaBP family members (CaBP1, 2, 4, and 5) are expressed in the cochlea. To gain insights into the respective auditory functions of these CaBPs, we characterized the expression and cellular localization of CaBPs in the mouse cochlea. By quantitative reverse transcription PCR, we show that CaBP1 and CaBP2 are the major CaBPs expressed in mouse cochlea both before and after hearing onset. Of the three alternatively spliced variants of CaBP1 (caldendrin, CaBP1-L, and CaBP1-S) and CaBP2 (CaBP2-alt, CaBP2-L, CaBP2-S), caldendrin and CaBP2-alt are the most abundant. By in situ hybridization, probes recognizing caldendrin strongly label the spiral ganglion, while probes designed to recognize all three isoforms of CaBP1 weakly label both the inner and outer hair cells as well as the spiral ganglion. Within the spiral ganglion, caldendrin/CaBP1 labeling is associated with cells resembling satellite glial cells. CaBP2-alt is strongly expressed in inner hair cells both before and after hearing onset. Probes designed to recognize all three variants of CaBP2 strongly label inner hair cells before hearing onset and outer hair cells after the onset of hearing. Thus, CaBP1 and CaBP2 may have overlapping roles in regulating Ca2+ signaling in the hair cells, and CaBP1 may have an additional function in the spiral ganglion. Our findings provide a framework for understanding the role of CaBP family members in the auditory periphery. PMID:26809054

  14. Hand-Held High-Resolution Fluorescence Imaging System for Fluorescence-Guided Surgery of Patient and Cell-Line Pancreatic Tumors Growing Orthotopically in Nude Mice

    PubMed Central

    Hiroshima, Yukihiko; Maawy, Ali; Sato, Sho; Murakami, Takashi; Uehara, Fuminari; Miwa, Shinji; Yano, Shuya; Momiyama, Masashi; Chishima, Takashi; Tanaka, Kuniya; Bouvet, Michael; Endo, Itaru; Hoffman, Robert M.

    2014-01-01

    Background In this study, we investigated the advantages for fluorescence-guided surgery (FGS) in mice of a portable hand-sized imaging system compared to a large chamber fluorescing imaging system or a long-working-distance fluorescence microscope. Methods Mouse models of human pancreatic cancer for FGS included (1) MiaPaCa-2-expressing green fluorescent protein (GFP), (2) BxPC3 labeled with anti-CEA antibody conjugated with Alexa 488, (3) patient-derived orhotopic xenograft (PDOX)™ labeled with anti-CA19-9 antibody conjugated with Alexa 488. Results Each device could clearly detect the primary MiaPaCa-2-GFP. tumor and any residual tumor after FGS. In the BxPC3 model labeled with Alexa 488-conjugated anti-CEA, each device could detect the primary tumor, but the MVX10 could not clearly detect the residual tumor remaining after FGS while the other devices could. In the PDOX™ model labeled with Alexa 488 conjugated with anti CA19-9, only the portable hand-held device could distinguish the residual tumor from the background, and complete resection of the residual tumor was achieved under fluorescence navigation. Conclusions The results described in the present report suggest the hand-held mobile imaging system can be able to be applied to the clinic for FGS due to its convenient size and high sensitivity and help make FGS widely-used. PMID:24373959

  15. Levels of CEA, CA153, CA199, CA724 and AFP in nipple discharge of breast cancer patients

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Song; Mei, Yu; Wang, Yongmei; Zhu, Jiang; Zheng, Guixi; Ma, Rong

    2015-01-01

    The distinction between breast cancer and benign breast diseases with nipple discharge remains an important diagnostic challenge. The purpose of this study was to predict the potential usefulness of tumor markers in nipple discharge and to investigate the relationship of tumor markers and clinical characteristics with breast cancer.One hundred and eleven patients with nipple discharge received breast surgery from November 2013 to December 2014 were included in the study. We evaluated levels of five tumor markers (CEA, CA153, CA199, CA724 and AFP) prior to treatment. Patients were divided into two groups according to postoperative pathological results: 30 cases in breast cancer group and 81 cases in benign group. The relationships of clinical characteristics with breast cancer were investigated by multivariate analysis with a logistic regression model.It showed significant differences in levels of nipple discharge CEA (P < 0.001) and CA153 (P = 0.014), but not CA199 (P = 0.856), CA724 (P = 0.171), AFP (P = 0.834) among two groups. Logistic regression analysis demonstrated complaint, age, menopause, abnormal palpable mass, CEA and CA153 were associated with breast cancer. In summary, measurements of CA199, CA724 and AFP in nipple discharge are not of great clinical value. Detecting CEA and CA153 in nipple dischargecould potentially be used for the early detection of breast cancer with in high-risk populations. PMID:26885008

  16. Voltage-gated Ca2+ entry and ryanodine receptor Ca2+-induced Ca2+ release in preglomerular arterioles.

    PubMed

    Fellner, Susan K; Arendshorst, William J

    2007-05-01

    We have previously shown that in afferent arterioles, angiotensin II (ANG II) involves activation of the inositol trisphosphate receptor (IP(3)R), activation of adenine diphosphoribose (ADPR) cyclase, and amplification of the initial IP(3)R-stimulated release of cytosolic Ca(2+) ([Ca(2+)](i)) from the sarcoplasmic reticulum (SR) (Fellner SK, Arendshorst WJ. Am J Physiol Renal Physiol 288: F785-F791, 2004). The response of the ryanodine receptor (RyR) to local increases in [Ca(2+)](i) is defined as calcium-induced calcium release (CICR). To investigate whether Ca(2+) entry via voltage-gated channels (VGCC) can stimulate CICR, we treated fura 2-loaded, freshly isolated afferent arterioles with KCl (40 mM; high KCl). In control arterioles, peak [Ca(2+)](i) increased by 165 +/- 10 nM. Locking the RyR in the closed position with ryanodine (100 microM) inhibited the [Ca(2+)](i) response by 59% (P < 0.01). 8-Br cADPR, a specific blocker of the ability of cyclic ADPR (cADPR) to sensitize the RyR to Ca(2+), caused a 43% inhibition. We suggest that the lower inhibition by 8-Br cADPR (P = 0.02, ryanodine vs. 8-Br cADPR) represents endogenously active ADPR cyclase. Depletion of SR Ca(2+) stores by inhibiting the SR Ca(2+)-ATPase with cyclopiazonic acid or thapsigargin blocked the [Ca(2+)](i) responses to KCl by 51% (P not significant vs. ryanodine or 8-Br cADPR). These data suggest that about half of the increase in [Ca(2+)](i) induced by high KCl is accomplished by activation of CICR through the ability of entered Ca(2+) to expose the RyR to high local concentrations of Ca(2+) and that endogenous cADPR contributes to the process. PMID:17190906

  17. Pancreatic Reference Set Application: Ivan Blasutig-University of Toronto (2014) — EDRN Public Portal

    Cancer.gov

    The primary objective of this study is to independently validate a panel of serum biomarkers for the early detection of pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC). The biomarkers were identified in various discovery studies performed in our laboratory1-6. We hypothesize that our candidate biomarkers can be used as a panel that will perform better than CA19.9 alone for the early detection of PDAC. Such a panel has the potential to lead to improved patient outcomes by enabling patients to receive treatment as early as possible.

  18. Acute brucellosis with typical hemophagocytic lymphohistiocytosis accompanying elevated tumor markers.

    PubMed

    Yin, Xiuyun; Li, Yuhang; Zeng, Lijun; Yu, Nong; Song, Shiping; Zhang, Wei; Chen, Jiankui; Wang, Jun; Hu, Liangding; Chen, Shuiping

    2014-10-01

    We reported a typical brucellosis, which was diagnosed as hemophagocytic lymphohistiocytosis (HLH). Although some tumor markers (CEA, CYFRA21-1, NSE, CA19-9) in the patient's serum were elevated, carcinomas were excluded by a variety of inspections including bone marrow aspirations, ultrasound examinations, and whole-body PET-CT scans. It was concluded that serum tumor markers are considered medically necessary as a screening test for brucellosis with HLH, however, detailed inspections were needed to make a final diagnosis. Moreover, combination of epidemiology investigations and laboratory inspections were helpful to determine the etiology of HLH and initiate the corresponding treatments. PMID:25305773

  19. Kinetic Study on Desulfurization of Hot Metal Using CaO and CaC2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lindström, David; Sichen, Du

    2015-02-01

    The kinetics and reaction mechanisms of hot metal desulfurization using CaO and CaC2 were studied in a well-controlled atmosphere with a lab scale high temperature furnace. The growths of CaS around CaO and CaC2 were measured and compared at 1773 K (1500 °C). The parabolic rate constant was evaluated to be 5 × 10-7 (cm s-1) on CaO particles, and 2.4 × 10-7 (cm s-1) on CaC2. The bigger parabolic constant of CaO resulted in more efficient desulfurization. Agglomerates and big CaO particles led to 2CaO·SiO2 formation which hindered further utilization of CaO for desulfurization. The 2CaO·SiO2 formation was favoured by a high oxygen potential. Since the desulfurization reaction of CaO not only produced CaS but also oxygen, the local oxygen concentration around big CaO particles was higher than around small particles.

  20. Kinetic Study on Desulfurization of Hot Metal Using CaO and CaC2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lindström, David; Sichen, Du

    2014-09-01

    The kinetics and reaction mechanisms of hot metal desulfurization using CaO and CaC2 were studied in a well-controlled atmosphere with a lab scale high temperature furnace. The growths of CaS around CaO and CaC2 were measured and compared at 1773 K (1500 °C). The parabolic rate constant was evaluated to be 5 × 10-7 (cm s-1) on CaO particles, and 2.4 × 10-7 (cm s-1) on CaC2. The bigger parabolic constant of CaO resulted in more efficient desulfurization. Agglomerates and big CaO particles led to 2CaO·SiO2 formation which hindered further utilization of CaO for desulfurization. The 2CaO·SiO2 formation was favoured by a high oxygen potential. Since the desulfurization reaction of CaO not only produced CaS but also oxygen, the local oxygen concentration around big CaO particles was higher than around small particles.

  1. Interplay Between Intracellular Ca(2+) Oscillations and Ca(2+)-stimulated Mitochondrial Metabolism.

    PubMed

    Wacquier, Benjamin; Combettes, Laurent; Van Nhieu, Guy Tran; Dupont, Geneviève

    2016-01-01

    Oscillations of cytosolic Ca(2+) concentration are a widespread mode of signalling. Oscillatory spikes rely on repetitive exchanges of Ca(2+) between the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) and the cytosol, due to the regulation of inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate receptors. Mitochondria also sequester and release Ca(2+), thus affecting Ca(2+) signalling. Mitochondrial Ca(2+) activates key enzymes involved in ATP synthesis. We propose a new integrative model for Ca(2+) signalling and mitochondrial metabolism in electrically non-excitable cells. The model accounts for (1) the phase relationship of the Ca(2+) changes in the cytosol, the ER and mitochondria, (2) the dynamics of mitochondrial metabolites in response to cytosolic Ca(2+) changes, and (3) the impacts of cytosol/mitochondria Ca(2+) exchanges and of mitochondrial metabolism on Ca(2+) oscillations. Simulations predict that as expected, oscillations are slowed down by decreasing the rate of Ca(2+) efflux from mitochondria, but also by decreasing the rate of Ca(2+) influx through the mitochondrial Ca(2+) uniporter (MCU). These predictions were experimentally validated by inhibiting MCU expression. Despite the highly non-linear character of Ca(2+) dynamics and mitochondrial metabolism, bioenergetics were found to be robust with respect to changes in frequency and amplitude of Ca(2+) oscillations. PMID:26776859

  2. Interplay Between Intracellular Ca2+ Oscillations and Ca2+-stimulated Mitochondrial Metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Wacquier, Benjamin; Combettes, Laurent; Van Nhieu, Guy Tran; Dupont, Geneviève

    2016-01-01

    Oscillations of cytosolic Ca2+ concentration are a widespread mode of signalling. Oscillatory spikes rely on repetitive exchanges of Ca2+ between the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) and the cytosol, due to the regulation of inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate receptors. Mitochondria also sequester and release Ca2+, thus affecting Ca2+ signalling. Mitochondrial Ca2+ activates key enzymes involved in ATP synthesis. We propose a new integrative model for Ca2+ signalling and mitochondrial metabolism in electrically non-excitable cells. The model accounts for (1) the phase relationship of the Ca2+ changes in the cytosol, the ER and mitochondria, (2) the dynamics of mitochondrial metabolites in response to cytosolic Ca2+ changes, and (3) the impacts of cytosol/mitochondria Ca2+ exchanges and of mitochondrial metabolism on Ca2+ oscillations. Simulations predict that as expected, oscillations are slowed down by decreasing the rate of Ca2+ efflux from mitochondria, but also by decreasing the rate of Ca2+ influx through the mitochondrial Ca2+ uniporter (MCU). These predictions were experimentally validated by inhibiting MCU expression. Despite the highly non-linear character of Ca2+ dynamics and mitochondrial metabolism, bioenergetics were found to be robust with respect to changes in frequency and amplitude of Ca2+ oscillations. PMID:26776859

  3. Ca isotope cycling in a forested ecosystem

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holmden, Chris; Bélanger, Nicolas

    2010-02-01

    Reports of large Ca isotope fractionations between trees and soils prompted this study of a Boreal forest ecosystem near La Ronge, Saskatchewan, to improve understanding of this phenomenon. The results on five tree species (black spruce, trembling aspen, white spruce, jack pine, balsam poplar) confirm that nutrient Ca uptake by plants favors the light isotopes, thus driving residual Ca in plant available soil pools towards enrichment in the heavy isotopes. Substantial within-tree fraction occurs in tissues formed along the transpiration stream, with low δ 44Ca values in fine roots (2 mm), intermediate values in stemwood, and high values in foliage. Separation factors between different plant tissues are similar between species, but the initial fractionation step in the tips of the fine roots is species specific, and/or sensitive to the local soil environment. Soil water δ 44Ca values appear to increase with depth to at least 35 cm below the top of the forest floor, which is close to the deepest level of fine roots. The heavy plant fractionated signature of Ca in the finely rooted upper soils filters downward where it is retained on ion exchange sites, leached into groundwater, and discharged into surface waters. The relationship between Ca uptake by tree fine roots and the pattern of δ 44Ca enrichment with soil depth was modeled for two Ca pools: the forest floor (litter) and the underlying (upper B) mineral soil. Six study plots were investigated along two hillside toposequences trending upwards from a first order stream. We used allometric equations describing the Ca distribution in boreal tree species to calculate weighted average δ 44Ca values for the stands in each plot and estimate Ca uptake rates. The δ 44Ca value of precipitation was measured, and soil weathering signatures deduced, by acid leaching of lower B mineral soils. Steady state equations were used to derive a set of model Ca fluxes and fractionation factors for each plot. The model reproduces

  4. Drugs preventing Na+ and Ca2+ overload.

    PubMed

    Ravens, U; Himmel, H M

    1999-03-01

    Cardiac intracellular Na+and Ca2+homeostasis is regulated by the concerted action of ion channels, pumps and exchangers. The Na+, K+-ATPase produces the electrochemical concentration gradient for Na+, which is the driving force for Ca2+removal from the cytosol via the Na+/Ca2+exchange. Reduction of this gradient by increased intracellular Na+concentration leads to cellular Ca2+overload resulting in arrhythmias and contractile dysfunction. Na+and Ca2+overload-associated arrhythmias can be produced experimentally by inhibition of Na+efflux (digitalis-induced intoxication) and by abnormal Na+influx via modulated Na+channels (veratridine, DPI 201-106; hypoxia) or via the Na+, H+exchanger. Theoretically, blockers of Na+and Ca2+channels, inhibitors of abnormal oscillatory release of Ca2+from internal stores or modulators of the Na+, Ca2+and Na+, H+exchanger activities could protect against cellular Na+and Ca2+overload. Three exemplary drugs that prevent Na+and Ca2+overload, i.e. the benzothiazolamine R56865, the methylenephenoxydioxy-derivative CP-060S, and the benzoyl-guanidine Hoe 642, a Na+, H+exchange blocker, are briefly reviewed with respect to their efficacy on digitalis-, veratridine- and ischaemia/reperfusion-induced arrhythmias. PMID:10094840

  5. Trace element proxies (Sr/Ca, Ba/Ca and Pb/Ca) in Bivalve shells: environmental signals or not?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gillikin, D. P.; Dehairs, F.; Steenmans, D.; Meng, L.; Haifeng, T.; Navez, J.; Andre, L.; Baeyens, W.; Keppens, E.; Calmars Group,.

    2004-12-01

    Coral and sclerosponge skeletons have both been used as recorders of their environment. Sr/Ca, Ba/Ca and Pb/Ca have all shown to be useful in these substrates, giving insight into the past environment in which the skeleton grew (e.g., Lea et al., 1989, Nature 340, 373-376; Beck et al., 1992, Science 257, 644-647; Lazareth et al., 2000, Geology 28, 515-518; Rosenheim et al., 2004, Geology 32, 145-148). Although bivalves have not been studied as extensively as corals, these proxies are apparently not as reliable in bivalves (e.g., Vander Putten et al., 2000, GCA 64, 997-1011). We therefore investigate Sr/Ca and Pb/Ca in two species of aragonitic clams (Mercenaria mercenaria and Saxidomus giganteus) and Ba/Ca in the calcite layer of the mussel Mytilus edulis. Results indicate that Sr/Ca is primarily controlled by growth rate in S. giganteus whereas there was no relationship between these parameters in M. mercenaria. Pb/Ca is somewhat reproducible between specimens of S. giganteus, however long-term Pb/Ca records (1949-2003) in the shell of M. mercenaria did not show the expected curve of anthropogenically introduced lead, indicating that they are not recording environmental Pb concentrations. Therefore, Sr/Ca and Pb/Ca incorporation seem to be regulated by biological processes and not directly by environmental parameters. Ba/Ca in M. edulis shells on the other hand, does seem to be directly linked to the environment. Shells grown under laboratory and natural conditions both show the same linear relationship between dissolved Ba/Ca and shell Ba/Ca. Experiments involving manipulations of dissolved and particulate (i.e. food) Ba/Ca, suggest that the dominant pathway of barium into the shell is from the dissolved phase via the hemolymph. We were unable to explain the large peaks noted in the Ba/Ca profiles, however, they did not seem linked to phytoplankton blooms as has been previously suggested (Stecher et al., 1996, GCA 60, 3445-3456; Vander Putten et al., 2000

  6. Time course of Ca and Ca-dependent K currents during molluscan nerve cell action potentials.

    PubMed

    Gola, M; Hussy, N; Crest, M; Ducreux, C

    1986-10-20

    The time courses of Ca and Ca-dependent K currents during Ca-dependent action potentials were obtained by recording the membrane currents produced in response to spike-like voltage clamp pulses before and after selective blockade of channels. The Ca current had a biphasic waveform with a first surge and a late, large entry. The Ca-dependent K(Ca) current onset was relatively fast with a peak occurring at half spike repolarization. The fast activation of the K(Ca) current was consecutive to the first Ca entry. It is concluded that K(Ca) currents constitute a powerful spike repolarization mechanism in addition to the voltage-dependent K currents. PMID:2430243

  7. Topographic specificity of functional connections from hippocampal CA3 to CA1

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brivanlou, Iman H.; Dantzker, Jami L. M.; Stevens, Charles F.; Callaway, Edward M.

    2004-02-01

    The hippocampus is a cortical region thought to play an important role in learning and memory. Most of our knowledge about the detailed organization of hippocampal circuitry responsible for these functions is derived from anatomical studies. These studies present an incomplete picture, however, because the functional character and importance of connections are often not revealed by anatomy. Here, we used a physiological method (photostimulation with caged glutamate) to probe the fine pattern of functional connectivity between the CA3 and CA1 subfields in the mouse hippocampal slice preparation. We recorded intracellularly from CA1 and CA3 pyramidal neurons while scanning with photostimulation across the entire CA3 subfield with high spatial resolution. Our results show that, at a given septotemporal level, nearby CA1 neurons receive synaptic inputs from neighboring CA3 neurons. Thus, the CA3 to CA1 mapping preserves neighbor relations.

  8. Impact of seawater [Ca2+] on the calcification and calciteMg / Ca of Amphistegina lessonii

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mewes, A.; Langer, G.; Thoms, S.; Nehrke, G.; Reichart, G.-J.; de Nooijer, L. J.; Bijma, J.

    2015-04-01

    Mg / Ca ratios in foraminiferal tests are routinely used as paleotemperature proxies, but on long timescales, they also hold the potential to reconstruct past seawater Mg / Ca. The impact of both temperature and seawater Mg / Ca on Mg incorporation in Foraminifera has been quantified by a number of studies. The underlying mechanism responsible for Mg incorporation in foraminiferal calcite and its sensitivity to environmental conditions, however, has not been fully identified. A recently published biomineralization model (Nehrke et al., 2013) proposes a combination of transmembrane transport and seawater leakage or vacuolization to link calcite Mg / Ca to seawater Mg / Ca and explains inter-species variability in Mg / Ca ratios. To test the assumptions of this model, we conducted a culture study in which seawater Mg / Ca was manipulated by varying [Ca2+] and keeping [Mg2+] constant. Foraminiferal growth rates, test thickness and calcite Mg / Ca of newly formed chambers were analyzed. Results showed optimum growth rates and test thickness at Mg / Ca closest to that of ambient seawater. Calcite Mg / Ca is positively correlated to seawater Mg / Ca, indicating that it is not absolute seawater [Ca2+] and [Mg2+] but their ratio that controls Mg / Ca in tests. These results demonstrate that the calcification process cannot be based only on seawater vacuolization, supporting the mixing model proposed by Nehrke et al. (2013). Here, however, we suggest transmembrane transport fractionation that is not as strong as suggested by Nehrke et al. (2013).

  9. Dietary calcium deficiency increases Ca2+ uptake and Ca2+ extrusion mechanisms in chick enterocytes.

    PubMed

    Centeno, Viviana A; Díaz de Barboza, Gabriela E; Marchionatti, Ana M; Alisio, Arturo E; Dallorso, Maria E; Nasif, Renée; Tolosa de Talamoni, Nori G

    2004-10-01

    Ca2+ uptake and Ca2+ extrusion mechanisms were studied in enterocytes with different degree of differentiation from chicks adapted to a low Ca2+ diet as compared to animals fed a normal diet. Chicks adapted to a low Ca2+ diet presented hypocalcemia, hypophosphatemia and increased serum 1,25(OH)2D3 and Ca2+ absorption. Low Ca2+ diet increased the alkaline phosphatase (AP) activity, independently of the cellular maturation, but it did not alter gamma-glutamyl-transpeptidase activity. Ca2+ uptake, Ca2+-ATPase and Na(+)/Ca2+ exchanger activities and expressions were increased by the mineral-deficient diet either in mature or immature enterocytes. Western blots analysis shows that vitamin D receptor (VDR) expression was much higher in crypt cells than in mature cells. Low Ca2+ diet decreased the number of vitamin D receptor units in both kinds of cells. In conclusion, changes in Ca2+ uptake and Ca2+ extrusion mechanisms in the enterocytes by a low Ca2+ diet appear to be a result of enhanced serum levels of 1,25(OH)2D3, which would promote cellular differentiation producing cells more efficient to express vitamin D dependent genes required for Ca2+ absorption. PMID:15528161

  10. Impact of seawater Ca2+ on the calcification and calcite Mg/Ca of Amphistegina lessonii

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mewes, A.; Langer, G.; Thoms, S.; Nehrke, G.; Reichart, G.-J.; de Nooijer, L. J.; Bijma, J.

    2014-12-01

    Mg/Ca ratios in foraminiferal tests are routinely used as paleo temperature proxy, but on long timescales, also hold the potential to reconstruct past seawater Mg/Ca. Impact of both temperature and seawater Mg/Ca on Mg incorporation in foraminifera have been quantified by a number of studies. The underlying mechanism responsible for Mg incorporation in foraminiferal calcite and its sensitivity to environmental conditions, however, is not fully identified. A recently published biomineralization model (Nehrke et al., 2013) proposes a combination of transmembrane transport and seawater leakage or vacuolization to link calcite Mg/Ca to seawater Mg/Ca and explains inter-species variability in Mg/Ca ratios. To test the assumptions of this model, we conducted a culture study in which seawater Mg/Ca was manipulated by varying [Ca2+] and keeping [Mg2+] constant. Foraminiferal growth rates, test thickness and calcite Mg/Ca of newly formed chambers were analyzed. Results showed optimum growth rates and test thickness at Mg/Ca closest to that of ambient seawater. Calcite Mg/Ca is positively correlated to seawater Mg/Ca, indicating that not absolute seawater [Ca2+] and [Mg2+], but the telative ratio controls Mg/Ca in tests. These results demonstrate that the calcification process cannot be based only on seawater vacuolization, supporting the mixing model proposed by Nehrke et al. (2013). Here we, however, suggest a transmembrane transport fractionation that is not as strong as suggested by Nehrke et al. (2013).

  11. Ca2+ cycling in heart cells from ground squirrels: adaptive strategies for intracellular Ca2+ homeostasis.

    PubMed

    Li, Xiao-Chen; Wei, Ling; Zhang, Guang-Qin; Bai, Zai-Ling; Hu, Ying-Ying; Zhou, Peng; Bai, Shu-Hua; Chai, Zhen; Lakatta, Edward G; Hao, Xue-Mei; Wang, Shi-Qiang

    2011-01-01

    Heart tissues from hibernating mammals, such as ground squirrels, are able to endure hypothermia, hypoxia and other extreme insulting factors that are fatal for human and nonhibernating mammals. This study was designed to understand adaptive mechanisms involved in intracellular Ca(2+) homeostasis in cardiomyocytes from the mammalian hibernator, ground squirrel, compared to rat. Electrophysiological and confocal imaging experiments showed that the voltage-dependence of L-type Ca(2+) current (I(Ca)) was shifted to higher potentials in ventricular myocytes from ground squirrels vs. rats. The elevated threshold of I(Ca) did not compromise the Ca(2+)-induced Ca(2+) release, because a higher depolarization rate and a longer duration of action potential compensated the voltage shift of I(Ca). Both the caffeine-sensitive and caffeine-resistant components of cytosolic Ca(2+) removal were more rapid in ground squirrels. Ca(2+) sparks in ground squirrels exhibited larger amplitude/size and much lower frequency than in rats. Due to the high I(Ca) threshold, low SR Ca(2+) leak and rapid cytosolic Ca(2+) clearance, heart cells from ground squirrels exhibited better capability in maintaining intracellular Ca(2+) homeostasis than those from rats and other nonhibernating mammals. These findings not only reveal adaptive mechanisms of hibernation, but also provide novel strategies against Ca(2+) overload-related heart diseases. PMID:21935466

  12. TMCO1 Is an ER Ca(2+) Load-Activated Ca(2+) Channel.

    PubMed

    Wang, Qiao-Chu; Zheng, Qiaoxia; Tan, Haiyan; Zhang, Bing; Li, Xiaoling; Yang, Yuxiu; Yu, Jie; Liu, Yang; Chai, Hao; Wang, Xi; Sun, Zhongshuai; Wang, Jiu-Qiang; Zhu, Shu; Wang, Fengli; Yang, Maojun; Guo, Caixia; Wang, Heng; Zheng, Qingyin; Li, Yang; Chen, Quan; Zhou, Aimin; Tang, Tie-Shan

    2016-06-01

    Maintaining homeostasis of Ca(2+) stores in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) is crucial for proper Ca(2+) signaling and key cellular functions. The Ca(2+)-release-activated Ca(2+) (CRAC) channel is responsible for Ca(2+) influx and refilling after store depletion, but how cells cope with excess Ca(2+) when ER stores are overloaded is unclear. We show that TMCO1 is an ER transmembrane protein that actively prevents Ca(2+) stores from overfilling, acting as what we term a "Ca(2+) load-activated Ca(2+) channel" or "CLAC" channel. TMCO1 undergoes reversible homotetramerization in response to ER Ca(2+) overloading and disassembly upon Ca(2+) depletion and forms a Ca(2+)-selective ion channel on giant liposomes. TMCO1 knockout mice reproduce the main clinical features of human cerebrofaciothoracic (CFT) dysplasia spectrum, a developmental disorder linked to TMCO1 dysfunction, and exhibit severe mishandling of ER Ca(2+) in cells. Our findings indicate that TMCO1 provides a protective mechanism to prevent overfilling of ER stores with Ca(2+) ions. PMID:27212239

  13. Pleural fluid tumour markers in malignant pleural effusion with inconclusive cytologic results

    PubMed Central

    Antonangelo, L.; Sales, R.K.; Corá, A.P.; Acencio, M.M.P.; Teixeira, L.R.; Vargas, F.S.

    2015-01-01

    Background The presence of tumour cells in pleural fluid or tissue defines an effusion as malignant. Cytology analysis of the pleural fluid has about 60% diagnostic sensitivity. Several tests have been proposed to improve diagnosis—among them, the concentrations of tumour markers in pleural fluid. We evaluated whether the concentrations of tumour markers in pleural fluid could improve the diagnosis of malignant pleural effusion (mpe) when cytology is doubtful. Methods Lymphocytic pleural fluids secondary to tuberculosis or malignancy from 156 outpatients were submitted for cytology and tumour marker quantification [carcinoembryonic antigen (cea), cancer antigen 15-3 (ca15-3), carbohydrate antigen 19-9 (ca19-9), cancer antigen 72-4 (ca72-4), cancer antigen 125 (ca125), and cyfra 21-1). Oneway analysis of variance, the Student t-test or Mann–Whitney test, and receiver operating characteristic curves were used in the statistical analysis. Results Concentrations of the tumour markers cea, ca15-3, ca125, and cyfra 21-1 were higher in mpes than they were in the benign effusions (p < 0.001), regardless of cytology results. The markers ca19-9 and ca72-4 did not discriminate malignant from benign effusions. When comparing the concentrations of tumour markers in mpes having positive, suspicious, or negative cytology with concentrations in benign effusions, we observed higher levels of cea, ca15-3, cyfra 21-1, and ca125 in malignant effusions with positive cytology (p = 0.003, p = 0.001, p = 0.002, and p = 0.001 respectively). In pleural fluid, only ca125 was higher in mpes with suspicious or negative cytology (p = 0.001) than in benign effusions. Conclusions Given high specificity and a sensitivity of about 60%, the concentrations of tumour markers in pleural effusions could be evaluated in cases of inconclusive cytology in patients with a high pre-test chance of malignancy or a history of cancer. PMID:26628873

  14. Allometric constraints on Sr/Ca and Ba/Ca partitioning in terrestrial mammalian trophic chains.

    PubMed

    Balter, Vincent

    2004-03-01

    In biological systems, strontium (Sr) and barium (Ba) are two non-essential elements, in comparison to calcium (Ca) which is essential. The Sr/Ca and Ba/Ca ratios tend to decrease in biochemical pathways which include Ca as an essential element, and these processes are termed biopurification of Ca. The quantitative pathway of the biopurification of Ca in relation to Sr and Ba between two biological reservoirs ( Rn and R(n -1)) is measured with an observed ratio (OR) expressed by the (Sr/Ca) Rn /(Sr/Ca)( Rn-1) and (Ba/Ca) Rn /(Ba/Ca)( Rn-1) ratios. For a mammalian organism, during the whole biopurification of Ca starting with the diet to the ultimate reservoir of Ca which is the bone, the mean values for ORSr and ORBa are 0.25 and 0.2, respectively. In this study, published Sr/Ca and Ba/Ca ratios are used for three sets of soils, plants, and bones of herbivorous and carnivorous mammals, each comprising a trophic chain, to illustrate the biopurification of Ca at the level of trophic chains. Calculated ORSr and ORBa of herbivore bones in relation to plants and of bones of carnivores in relation to bones of herbivores give ORSr=0.30+/-0.08 and ORBa=0.16+/-0.08, thus suggesting that trophic chains reflect the Sr/Ca and Ba/Ca fluxes that are prevalent at the level of a mammalian organism. The slopes of the three regression equations of log(Sr/Ca) vs. log(Ba/Ca) are similar, indicating that the process of biopurification of Ca with respect to Sr and Ba is due to biological processes and is independent of the geological settings. Modifications of the logarithmic expression of the Sr/Ca and Ba/Ca relationship allow a new formula of the biopurification process to be deduced, leading to the general equation ORBa=ORSr(1.79+/-0.33), where the allometric coefficient is the mean of the slopes of the three regression equations. Some recent examples are used to illustrate this new analysis of predator-prey relations between mammals. This opens up new possibilities for the

  15. Glutamate excitotoxicity and Ca2+-regulation of respiration: Role of the Ca2+ activated mitochondrial transporters (CaMCs).

    PubMed

    Rueda, Carlos B; Llorente-Folch, Irene; Traba, Javier; Amigo, Ignacio; Gonzalez-Sanchez, Paloma; Contreras, Laura; Juaristi, Inés; Martinez-Valero, Paula; Pardo, Beatriz; Del Arco, Araceli; Satrustegui, Jorgina

    2016-08-01

    Glutamate elicits Ca(2+) signals and workloads that regulate neuronal fate both in physiological and pathological circumstances. Oxidative phosphorylation is required in order to respond to the metabolic challenge caused by glutamate. In response to physiological glutamate signals, cytosolic Ca(2+) activates respiration by stimulation of the NADH malate-aspartate shuttle through Ca(2+)-binding to the mitochondrial aspartate/glutamate carrier (Aralar/AGC1/Slc25a12), and by stimulation of adenine nucleotide uptake through Ca(2+) binding to the mitochondrial ATP-Mg/Pi carrier (SCaMC-3/Slc25a23). In addition, after Ca(2+) entry into the matrix through the mitochondrial Ca(2+) uniporter (MCU), it activates mitochondrial dehydrogenases. In response to pathological glutamate stimulation during excitotoxicity, Ca(2+) overload, reactive oxygen species (ROS), mitochondrial dysfunction and delayed Ca(2+) deregulation (DCD) lead to neuronal death. Glutamate-induced respiratory stimulation is rapidly inactivated through a mechanism involving Poly (ADP-ribose) Polymerase-1 (PARP-1) activation, consumption of cytosolic NAD(+), a decrease in matrix ATP and restricted substrate supply. Glutamate-induced Ca(2+)-activation of SCaMC-3 imports adenine nucleotides into mitochondria, counteracting the depletion of matrix ATP and the impaired respiration, while Aralar-dependent lactate metabolism prevents substrate exhaustion. A second mechanism induced by excitotoxic glutamate is permeability transition pore (PTP) opening, which critically depends on ROS production and matrix Ca(2+) entry through the MCU. By increasing matrix content of adenine nucleotides, SCaMC-3 activity protects against glutamate-induced PTP opening and lowers matrix free Ca(2+), resulting in protracted appearance of DCD and protection against excitotoxicity in vitro and in vivo, while the lack of lactate protection during in vivo excitotoxicity explains increased vulnerability to kainite-induced toxicity in Aralar

  16. Exploring the Glycosylation of Serum CA125

    PubMed Central

    Saldova, Radka; Struwe, Weston B.; Wynne, Kieran; Elia, Giuliano; Duffy, Michael J.; Rudd, Pauline M.

    2013-01-01

    Ovarian cancer is the most lethal gynaecologic cancer affecting women. The most widely used biomarker for ovarian cancer, CA125, lacks sensitivity and specificity. Here, we explored differences in glycosylation of CA125 between serum from patients with ovarian cancer and healthy controls. We found differences between CA125 N-glycans from patient sera compared to controls. These include increases in core-fucosylated bi-antennary monosialylated glycans, as well as decreases in mostly bisecting bi-antennary and non-fucosylated glycans in patients compared to controls. Measurement of the glycosylated state of CA125 may therefore provide a more specific biomarker for patients with ovarian cancer. PMID:23896595

  17. Oxidized CaMKII Triggers Atrial Fibrillation

    PubMed Central

    Purohit, Anil; Rokita, Adam G.; Guan, Xiaoqun; Chen, Biyi; Koval, Olha M.; Voigt, Niels; Neef, Stefan; Sowa, Thomas; Gao, Zhan; Luczak, Elizabeth D.; Stefansdottir, Hrafnhildur; Behunin, Andrew C.; Li, Na; El-Accaoui, Ramzi N.; Yang, Baoli; Swaminathan, Paari Dominic; Weiss, Robert M.; Wehrens, Xander H.T.; Song, Long-Sheng; Dobrev, Dobromir; Maier, Lars S.; Anderson, Mark E.

    2013-01-01

    Background Atrial fibrillation is a growing public health problem without adequate therapies. Angiotensin II (Ang II) and reactive oxygen species (ROS) are validated risk factors for atrial fibrillation (AF) in patients, but the molecular pathway(s) connecting ROS and AF is unknown. The Ca2+/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II (CaMKII) has recently emerged as a ROS activated proarrhythmic signal, so we hypothesized that oxidized CaMKIIδ(ox-CaMKII) could contribute to AF. Methods and Results We found ox-CaMKII was increased in atria from AF patients compared to patients in sinus rhythm and from mice infused with Ang II compared with saline. Ang II treated mice had increased susceptibility to AF compared to saline treated WT mice, establishing Ang II as a risk factor for AF in mice. Knock in mice lacking critical oxidation sites in CaMKIIδ (MM-VV) and mice with myocardial-restricted transgenic over-expression of methionine sulfoxide reductase A (MsrA TG), an enzyme that reduces ox-CaMKII, were resistant to AF induction after Ang II infusion. Conclusions Our studies suggest that CaMKII is a molecular signal that couples increased ROS with AF and that therapeutic strategies to decrease ox-CaMKII may prevent or reduce AF. PMID:24030498

  18. The State of the Ca Isotope Proxy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fantle, M. S.; Tipper, E.

    2012-12-01

    At the Earth's surface, Ca is a critical element at a variety of scales. It is both a biological nutrient and water-soluble, and is a major constituent of the dominant mineral sink for carbon in the ocean. Additionally, the 5‰ range in the stable isotope ratios of Ca (44Ca/40Ca) suggests that Ca isotopes may be a promising tracer of the Ca cycle, specifically the oceanic budget over time. Despite ~15 years of concentrated effort on high-precision Ca isotope measurements, the utility of Ca isotopes as a proxy remains far from clear. A variety of basic questions have yet to be resolved, both in the marine and terrestrial realms. To provide perspective, the current work presents a data compilation of over 60 published Ca isotope studies. The compilation includes δ44/40CaSRM-915a measurements of the modern Ca cycle, including rivers and groundwater, dust, soils and soil pore fluids, vegetation, rainwater, silicate minerals/rocks, and marine carbonates. The focus of this work is to quantify the leverage of inputs to change the isotopic composition of the ocean. One of the tenets of the weathering proxy is that there is little isotopic leverage to change seawater. If this assumption is valid, then significant variations in the isotopic composition of seawater can be explained to some extent by mass flux imbalances between Ca inputs and outputs, requiring the Ca cycle to be out of steady state for significant periods of time. Despite evidence that Ca fractionates in the modern system during continental cycling, the δ44Ca range of riverine inputs to the ocean is very narrow (especially when compared to the spread in marine carbonates). Thus, there appears to be minimal isotopic leverage amongst inputs to shift the ocean δ44Ca. In order to develop our understanding of the Ca isotope proxy, we identify two probable mechanisms for shifting ocean δ44Ca and evaluate them using a series of simple box models. In the terrestrial realm, plants exhibit a wide range of

  19. Treatment of hepatic carcinoma by low-frequency ultrasound and microbubbles: A case report

    PubMed Central

    SHEN, ZHI-YONG; WU, MING-FENG; ZHANG, YI-XIN; SHEN, KANG; XIA, GAN-LIN

    2015-01-01

    In vitro and in vivo studies have identified that low-frequency ultrasound (US) and microbubbles (MBs) mediate tumor inhibitory effects. However, the application of US in the clinical setting remains unclear. The aim of the present study was to investigate the clinically therapeutic effect of 20 kHz US in combination with MBs for the treatment of hepatic carcinoma. A 71-year-old male with a hepatic malignant tumor was admitted to Nantong University Affiliated Nantong Tumor Hospital (Nantong, China). The patient was subsequently sonicated with 20 kHz US and MBs over a period of five days. The low-frequency US parameters were set at 20 kHz, 2 W/cm2, duty cycle 40% (on 2 sec, off 3 sec) for a duration of 5 min each day for a total of five days. Computed tomography (CT), contrast-enhanced US (CEUS) and carbohydrate antigen 19-9 (CA19-9) tests were performed to evaluate the therapeutic effects. Although the tumor size increased marginally on CT from 5.4 to 5.6 cm after US treatment, the intensity and enhanced-areas on the CT scans and CEUS decreased. The abdominal lymph node decreased in size, from 2.2 to 1.9 cm, and CA19-9 levels decreased from the pretreatment value of 2,007 to 734 U/ml. Therapy with low-frequency US combined with MBs may exhibit an antivasculature effect and may be used as a palliative treatment for patients with unresectable hepatic malignant tumors. PMID:25663892

  20. Establishment and characterization of unique human gallbladder cancer cell lines.

    PubMed

    Ghosh, Mila; Koike, Naoto; Yanagimoto, Go; Tsunoda, Shin-Ichi; Kaul, Sunil; Hirano, Takashi; Emura, Fabian; Kashiwagi, Hironobu; Kawamoto, Toru; Ohkohchi, Nobuhiro; Saijo, Kaoru; Ohno, Tadao; Miwa, Masanao; Todoroki, Takeshi

    2004-05-01

    Gallbladder cancer has a dismal prognosis. Understanding the disease at the biological, genetic, molecular, cellular, and clinical level is essential for effective diagnostics and therapeutics. However, the currently established gallbladder cell lines are insufficient for better understanding and further research. The aim of our present study was to establish and characterize human gallbladder cancer cell lines. We established 5 cell lines from resected specimens of gallbladder cancers. These cell lines revealed typical tumor histopathological characteristics. We examined growth characteristics and the colony-forming ability of established cell lines in terms of their cell cycle parameters, expression of tumor markers (carcinoembryonic antigen; CEA, carbohydrated antigen 19-9; CA19-9, MUC-1 and c-kit) and the oncogene c-erbB2 by flow cytometer. Comparative genomic hybridization (CGH) analysis with specific gene probes was performed to detect changes in the gene copy numbers. Human origin of cell lines was confirmed by chromosomal analysis. Cells maintained differentiation characteristics of the original tumors. The doubling time of different cell lines varied from 30 to 96 h. All 5 cell lines formed colonies in the colony forming assays and expressed CEA, CA19-9, MUC-1 and the oncogene c-erbB2 and showed chromosomal aneuploidy. CGH analysis demonstrated gain of chromosomal region bearing SRC, RAB1, and PAP in all cell lines and hTERT in 4 cell lines. These newly established cell lines might serve as a useful model for studying the molecular pathogenesis of gallbladder cancer. Furthermore, they may serve as a model for testing new therapeutics against gallbladder cancer. These chromosomal aberrations and imbalances provide a starting point for molecular analyses of genomic regions and genes in gallbladder carcinogenesis. PMID:15067341

  1. Intrahepatic cholangiocarcinoma with increased serum CYFRA 21-1 level.

    PubMed

    Kashihara, T; Ohki, A; Kobayashi, T; Sato, T; Nishizawa, H; Ogawa, K; Tako, H; Kawakami, F; Tsuji, M; Tamaoka, K

    1998-06-01

    CYFRA 21-1 is a fragment of cytokeratin 19 (CK 19). Four patients with large intrahepatic (or peripheral) cholangiocarcinoma (CC) and high serum levels of CYFRA 21-1 (normal, < or = 2 ng/ml) are reported. CYFRA 21-1 levels exceeded 9 ng/ml in all 4 patients. Carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA), was high in 1 (CEA; normal range, < or = 5.0 ng/ml) and carbohydrate antigen 19-9 (CA 19-9) was high in 3 (CA19-9; normal range, < or = 36 U/ml). We also measured serum levels of CYFRA 21-1 in 13 patients with hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) more than 5 cm in diameter. Levels of CYFRA 21-1 exceeded 2 ng/ml in 9 of the HCC patients and were higher than 9 ng/ml in 2 of the HCC patients. Levels of alpha fetoprotein (AFP) and/or protein induced by vitamin K absence or antagonist II (PIVKA II) were elevated in all HCC patients (AFP, PIVKA II, respectively; normal range, < or = 10.0 ng/ml and < or = 0.1 AU/ml) CYFRA 21-1 levels were measured twice or three times during the clinical course in 2 CC patients and in 6 HCC patients, and increased gradually with tumor growth in the 2 CC patients and in 3 of the 6 HCC patients. Marked increases in serum CYFRA 21-1 levels in patients with large liver cancers, particularly in those with normal levels of AFP and PIVKA II, would suggest the existence of intrahepatic CC rather than HCC. PMID:9658330

  2. A Multicenter Phase II Trial of S-1 With Concurrent Radiation Therapy for Locally Advanced Pancreatic Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Ikeda, Masafumi; Ioka, Tatsuya; Ito, Yoshinori; Yonemoto, Naohiro; Nagase, Michitaka; Yamao, Kenji; Miyakawa, Hiroyuki; Ishii, Hiroshi; Furuse, Junji; Sato, Keiko; Sato, Tosiya; Okusaka, Takuji

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: The aim of this trial was to evaluate the efficacy and toxicity of S-1 and concurrent radiation therapy for locally advanced pancreatic cancer (PC). Methods and Materials: Locally advanced PC patients with histologically or cytologically confirmed adenocarcinoma or adenosquamous carcinoma, who had no previous therapy were enrolled. Radiation therapy was delivered through 3 or more fields at a total dose of 50.4 Gy in 28 fractions over 5.5 weeks. S-1 was administered orally at a dose of 80 mg/m{sup 2} twice daily on the day of irradiation during radiation therapy. After a 2- to 8-week break, patients received a maintenance dose of S-1 (80 mg/m{sup 2}/day for 28 consecutive days, followed by a 14-day rest period) was then administered until the appearance of disease progression or unacceptable toxicity. The primary efficacy endpoint was survival, and the secondary efficacy endpoints were progression-free survival, response rate, and serum carbohydrate antigen 19-9 (CA19-9) response; the safety endpoint was toxicity. Results: Of the 60 evaluable patients, 16 patients achieved a partial response (27%; 95% confidence interval [CI], 16%-40%). The median progression-free survival period, overall survival period, and 1-year survival rate of the evaluable patients were 9.7 months (95% CI, 6.9-11.6 months), 16.2 months (95% CI, 13.5-21.3 months), and 72% (95%CI, 59%-82%), respectively. Of the 42 patients with a pretreatment serum CA19-9 level of {>=}100 U/ml, 34 (81%) patients showed a decrease of greater than 50%. Leukopenia (6 patients, 10%) and anorexia (4 patients, 7%) were the major grade 3-4 toxicities with chemoradiation therapy. Conclusions: The effect of S-1 with concurrent radiation therapy in patients with locally advanced PC was found to be very favorable, with only mild toxicity.

  3. A Novel Electrochemical Microfluidic Chip Combined with Multiple Biomarkers for Early Diagnosis of Gastric Cancer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xie, Yao; Zhi, Xiao; Su, Haichuan; Wang, Kan; Yan, Zhen; He, Nongyue; Zhang, Jingpu; Chen, Di; Cui, Daxiang

    2015-12-01

    Early diagnosis is very important to improve the survival rate of patients with gastric cancer and to understand the biology of cancer. In order to meet the clinical demands for early diagnosis of gastric cancer, we developed a disposable easy-to-use electrochemical microfluidic chip combined with multiple antibodies against six kinds of biomarkers (carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA), carbohydrate antigen 19-9 (CA19-9), Helicobacter pylori CagA protein (H.P.), P53oncoprotein (P53), pepsinogen I (PG I), and PG-II). The six kinds of biomarkers related to gastric cancer can be detected sensitively and synchronously in a short time. The specially designed three electrodes system enables cross-contamination to be avoided effectively. The linear ranges of detection of the electrochemical microfluidic chip were as follows: 0.37-90 ng mL-1 for CEA, 10.75-172 U mL-1 for CA19-9, 10-160 U L-1 for H.P., 35-560 ng mL-1 for P53, 37.5-600 ng mL-1 for PG I, and 2.5-80 ng mL-1for PG II. This method owns better sensitivity compared with enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) results of 394 specimens of gastric cancer sera. Furthermore, we established a multi-index prediction model based on the six kinds of biomarkers for predicting risk of gastric cancer. In conclusion, the electrochemical microfluidic chip for detecting multiple biomarkers has great potential in applications such as early screening of gastric cancer patients, and therapeutic evaluation, and real-time dynamic monitoring the progress of gastric cancer in near future.

  4. Phase II Trial of Full-Dose Gemcitabine and Bevacizumab in Combination With Attenuated Three-Dimensional Conformal Radiotherapy in Patients With Localized Pancreatic Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Small, William; Mulcahy, Mary F.; Rademaker, Alfred; Bentrem, David J.; Benson, Al B.; Weitner, Bing Bing; Talamonti, Mark S.

    2011-06-01

    Purpose: To evaluate response rate, survival, and toxicity in patients with nonmetastatic pancreatic cancer treated with gemcitabine, bevacizumab, and radiotherapy. Methods and Materials: Patients received three cycles of therapy over 10 weeks. In total, treatment consisted of intravenous (IV) gemcitabine, 1,000 mg/m{sup 2}, every 1 to 2 weeks (7 doses), IV bevacizumab, 10 mg/kg every 2 weeks (5 doses), and 36 Gy of radiotherapy (2.4-Gy fractions during cycle two). Response was assessed by cross-sectional imaging and carbohydrate antigen 19-9 (CA 19-9) levels. Patients with resectable tumors underwent surgery 6 to 8 weeks after the last dose of bevacizumab. Maintenance gemcitabine and bevacizumab doses were delivered to patients who had unresected tumors and no progression. Results: Twenty-eight of the 32 enrolled patients completed all three cycles. The median follow-up was 11.07 months. Most grade 3 or 4 toxicities occurred in the initial treatment phase; the most frequent toxicities were leukopenia (21%), neutropenia (17%), and nausea (17%). At week 10, 1 patient (4%) had a complete response, 2 patients (7%) had partial responses, 21 patients (75%) had stable disease, and 4 patients (14%) had progressive disease. The median pretreatment and posttreatment CA 19-9 levels (25 patients) were 184.3 and 57.9 U/ml, respectively (p = 0.0006). One of 10 patients proceeding to surgery experienced a major complication. Two of 6 patients undergoing resection had complete pathologic responses. The median progression-free and overall survival durations were 9.9 months and 11.8 months, respectively. Conclusions: The combination of full-dose gemcitabine, bevacizumab, and radiotherapy was active and was not associated with a high rate of major surgical complications.

  5. Ca2+ influx into lily pollen grains through a hyperpolarization-activated Ca2+-permeable channel which can be regulated by extracellular CaM.

    PubMed

    Shang, Zhong-lin; Ma, Li-geng; Zhang, Hai-lin; He, Rui-rong; Wang, Xue-chen; Cui, Su-juan; Sun, Da-ye

    2005-04-01

    Confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM) and whole-cell patch-clamp were used to investigate the role of Ca2+ influx in maintaining the cytosolic Ca2+ concentration ([Ca2+]c) and the features of the Ca2+ influx pathway in germinating pollen grains of Lilium davidii D. [Ca2+]c decreased when Ca2+ influx was inhibited by EGTA or Ca2+ channel blockers. A hyperpolarization-activated Ca2+-permeable channel, which can be suppressed by trivalent cations, verapamil, nifedipine or diltiazem, was identified on the plasma membrane of pollen protoplasts with whole-cell patch-clamp recording. Calmodulin (CaM) antiserum and W7-agarose, both of which are cell-impermeable CaM antagonists, lead to a [Ca2+]c decrease, while exogenous purified CaM triggers a transient increase of [Ca2+]c and also remarkably activated the hyperpolarization-activated Ca2+ conductance on plasma membrane of pollen protoplasts in a dose-dependent manner. Both the increase of [Ca2+]c and the activation of Ca2+ conductance which were induced by exogenous CaM were inhibited by EGTA or Ca2+ channel blockers. This primary evidence showed the presence of a voltage-dependent Ca2+-permeable channel, whose activity may be regulated by extracellular CaM, in pollen cells. PMID:15695439

  6. Extrapolating microdomain Ca2+ dynamics using BK channels as a Ca2+ sensor

    PubMed Central

    Hou, Panpan; Xiao, Feng; Liu, Haowen; Yuchi, Ming; Zhang, Guohui; Wu, Ying; Wang, Wei; Zeng, Wenping; Ding, Mingyue; Cui, Jianming; Wu, Zhengxing; Wang, Lu-Yang; Ding, Jiuping

    2016-01-01

    Ca2+ ions play crucial roles in mediating physiological and pathophysiological processes, yet Ca2+ dynamics local to the Ca2+ source, either from influx via calcium permeable ion channels on plasmic membrane or release from internal Ca2+ stores, is difficult to delineate. Large-conductance calcium-activated K+ (BK-type) channels, abundantly distribute in excitable cells and often localize to the proximity of voltage-gated Ca2+ channels (VGCCs), spatially enabling the coupling of the intracellular Ca2+ signal to the channel gating to regulate membrane excitability and spike firing patterns. Here we utilized the sensitivity and dynamic range of BK to explore non-uniform Ca2+ local transients in the microdomain of VGCCs. Accordingly, we applied flash photolysis of caged Ca2+ to activate BK channels and determine their intrinsic sensitivity to Ca2+. We found that uncaging Ca2+ activated biphasic BK currents with fast and slow components (time constants being τf ≈ 0.2 ms and τs ≈ 10 ms), which can be accounted for by biphasic Ca2+ transients following light photolysis. We estimated the Ca2+-binding rate constant kb (≈1.8 × 108 M−1s−1) for mSlo1 and further developed a model in which BK channels act as a calcium sensor capable of quantitatively predicting local microdomain Ca2+ transients in the vicinity of VGCCs during action potentials. PMID:26776352

  7. EMRE is a Matrix Ca2+ Sensor that Governs Gatekeeping of the Mitochondrial Ca2+ Uniporter

    PubMed Central

    Vais, Horia; Mallilankaraman, Karthik; Mak, Don-On Daniel; Hoff, Henry; Payne, Riley; Tanis, Jessica; Foskett, J. Kevin

    2015-01-01

    SUMMARY The mitochondrial uniporter (MCU) is an ion channel that mediates Ca2+ uptake into the matrix to regulate metabolism, cell death and cytoplasmic Ca2+ signaling. Matrix Ca2+ concentration is similar to that in cytoplasm, despite an enormous driving force for entry, but the mechanisms that prevent mitochondrial Ca2+ overload are unclear. Here, we show that MCU channel activity is governed by matrix Ca2+ concentration through EMRE. Deletion or charge neutralization of its matrix-localized acidic carboxyl terminus abolishes matrix Ca2+ inhibition of MCU Ca2+ currents, resulting in MCU channel activation, enhanced mitochondrial Ca2+ uptake and constitutively elevated matrix Ca2+ concentration. EMRE-dependent regulation of MCU channel activity requires intermembrane space-localized MICU1, MICU2 and cytoplasmic Ca2+. Thus, mitochondria are protected from Ca2+ depletion and Ca2+ overload by a unique molecular complex that involves Ca2+ sensors on both sides of the inner mitochondrial membrane, coupled through EMRE. PMID:26774479

  8. Extrapolating microdomain Ca(2+) dynamics using BK channels as a Ca(2+) sensor.

    PubMed

    Hou, Panpan; Xiao, Feng; Liu, Haowen; Yuchi, Ming; Zhang, Guohui; Wu, Ying; Wang, Wei; Zeng, Wenping; Ding, Mingyue; Cui, Jianming; Wu, Zhengxing; Wang, Lu-Yang; Ding, Jiuping

    2016-01-01

    Ca(2+) ions play crucial roles in mediating physiological and pathophysiological processes, yet Ca(2+) dynamics local to the Ca(2+) source, either from influx via calcium permeable ion channels on plasmic membrane or release from internal Ca(2+) stores, is difficult to delineate. Large-conductance calcium-activated K(+) (BK-type) channels, abundantly distribute in excitable cells and often localize to the proximity of voltage-gated Ca(2+) channels (VGCCs), spatially enabling the coupling of the intracellular Ca(2+) signal to the channel gating to regulate membrane excitability and spike firing patterns. Here we utilized the sensitivity and dynamic range of BK to explore non-uniform Ca(2+) local transients in the microdomain of VGCCs. Accordingly, we applied flash photolysis of caged Ca(2+) to activate BK channels and determine their intrinsic sensitivity to Ca(2+). We found that uncaging Ca(2+) activated biphasic BK currents with fast and slow components (time constants being τf ≈ 0.2 ms and τs ≈ 10 ms), which can be accounted for by biphasic Ca(2+) transients following light photolysis. We estimated the Ca(2+)-binding rate constant kb (≈1.8 × 10(8)  M(-1) s(-1)) for mSlo1 and further developed a model in which BK channels act as a calcium sensor capable of quantitatively predicting local microdomain Ca(2+) transients in the vicinity of VGCCs during action potentials. PMID:26776352

  9. Topography of Place Maps along the CA3-to-CA2 Axis of the Hippocampus.

    PubMed

    Lu, Li; Igarashi, Kei M; Witter, Menno P; Moser, Edvard I; Moser, May-Britt

    2015-09-01

    We asked whether the structural heterogeneity of the hippocampal CA3-CA2 axis is reflected in how space is mapped onto place cells in CA3-CA2. Place fields were smaller and sharper in proximal CA3 than in distal CA3 and CA2. The proximodistal shift was accompanied by a progressive loss in the ability of place cells to distinguish configurations of the same spatial environment, as well as a reduction in the extent to which place cells formed uncorrelated representations for different environments. The transition to similar representations was nonlinear, with the sharpest drop in distal CA3. These functional changes along the CA3-CA2 axis mirror gradients in gene expression and connectivity that partly override cytoarchitectonic boundaries between the subfields of the hippocampus. The results point to the CA3-CA2 axis as a functionally graded system with powerful pattern separation at the proximal end, near the dentate gyrus, and stronger pattern completion at the CA2 end. PMID:26298277

  10. EMRE Is a Matrix Ca(2+) Sensor that Governs Gatekeeping of the Mitochondrial Ca(2+) Uniporter.

    PubMed

    Vais, Horia; Mallilankaraman, Karthik; Mak, Don-On Daniel; Hoff, Henry; Payne, Riley; Tanis, Jessica E; Foskett, J Kevin

    2016-01-26

    The mitochondrial uniporter (MCU) is an ion channel that mediates Ca(2+) uptake into the matrix to regulate metabolism, cell death, and cytoplasmic Ca(2+) signaling. Matrix Ca(2+) concentration is similar to that in cytoplasm, despite an enormous driving force for entry, but the mechanisms that prevent mitochondrial Ca(2+) overload are unclear. Here, we show that MCU channel activity is governed by matrix Ca(2+) concentration through EMRE. Deletion or charge neutralization of its matrix-localized acidic C terminus abolishes matrix Ca(2+) inhibition of MCU Ca(2+) currents, resulting in MCU channel activation, enhanced mitochondrial Ca(2+) uptake, and constitutively elevated matrix Ca(2+) concentration. EMRE-dependent regulation of MCU channel activity requires intermembrane space-localized MICU1, MICU2, and cytoplasmic Ca(2+). Thus, mitochondria are protected from Ca(2+) depletion and Ca(2+) overload by a unique molecular complex that involves Ca(2+) sensors on both sides of the inner mitochondrial membrane, coupled through EMRE. PMID:26774479

  11. Biphasic decay of the Ca transient results from increased sarcoplasmic reticulum Ca leak

    PubMed Central

    Sankaranarayanan, Rajiv; Li, Yatong; Greensmith, David J.; Eisner, David A.

    2016-01-01

    Key points Ca leak from the sarcoplasmic reticulum through the ryanodine receptor (RyR) reduces the amplitude of the Ca transient and slows its rate of decay.In the presence of β‐adrenergic stimulation, RyR‐mediated Ca leak produces a biphasic decay of the Ca transient with a fast early phase and a slow late phase.Two forms of Ca leak have been studied, Ca‐sensitising (induced by caffeine) and non‐sensitising (induced by ryanodine) and both induce biphasic decay of the Ca transient.Only Ca‐sensitising leak can be reversed by traditional RyR inhibitors such as tetracaine.Ca leak can also induce Ca waves. At low levels of leak, waves occur. As leak is increased, first biphasic decay and then slowed monophasic decay is seen. The level of leak has major effects on the shape of the Ca transient. Abstract In heart failure, a reduction in Ca transient amplitude and contractile dysfunction can by caused by Ca leak through the sarcoplasmic reticulum (SR) Ca channel (ryanodine receptor, RyR) and/or decreased activity of the SR Ca ATPase (SERCA). We have characterised the effects of two forms of Ca leak (Ca‐sensitising and non‐sensitising) on calcium cycling and compared with those of SERCA inhibition. We measured [Ca2+]i with fluo‐3 in voltage‐clamped rat ventricular myocytes. Increasing SR leak with either caffeine (to sensitise the RyR to Ca activation) or ryanodine (non‐sensitising) had similar effects to SERCA inhibition: decreased systolic [Ca2+]i, increased diastolic [Ca2+]i and slowed decay. However, in the presence of isoproterenol, leak produced a biphasic decay of the Ca transient in the majority of cells while SERCA inhibition produced monophasic decay. Tetracaine reversed the effects of caffeine but not of ryanodine. When caffeine (1 mmol l−1) was added to a cell which displayed Ca waves, the wave frequency initially increased before waves disappeared and biphasic decay developed. Eventually (at higher caffeine concentrations), the

  12. Effects of Mg2+ on Ca2+ waves and Ca2+ transients of rat ventricular myocytes.

    PubMed

    Terada, H; Hayashi, H; Noda, N; Satoh, H; Katoh, H; Yamazaki, N

    1996-03-01

    It has been shown that the occurrence of the transient inward current, which is responsible for triggered activity, was often associated with propagating regions of increased intracellular Ca2+ concentration ([Ca2+]i), i.e., the "Ca2+ wave." To investigate the mechanism of antiarrhythmic action of Mg2+, we have studied effects of high concentrations of Mg2+ on Ca2+ waves in isolated rat ventricular myocytes. [Ca2+]i was estimated using the Ca(2+)-indicating probe indo 1. Ca2+ waves in myocytes, stimulated at 0.2 Hz, were induced by perfusion of isoproterenol (10(-7) M). High Mg2+ concentration suppressed Ca2+ waves in a concentration-dependent manner (36% at 4 mM, 70% at 8 mM, and 82% at 12 mM). The Ca2+ channel blocker verapamil also suppressed Ca2+ waves in a similar way. In contrast with marked depression of Ca2+ transients by verapamil, Ca2+ transients were not affected by high Mg2+ concentration (8 mM). High Mg2+ concentration also reduced frequencies of Ca2+ waves in the absence of electrical stimulation, whereas verapamil failed to reduce frequencies of Ca2+ waves. Reduction in frequency of Ca2+ waves by high Mg2+ concentration was associated with slowing of propagation velocity of Ca2+ waves. To examine whether suppressive effects of high Mg2+ concentration on Ca2+ waves were related to an increase in intracellular Mg2+ concentration ([Mg2+]i), the effect of high-Mg2+ solution on [Mg2+]i was examined in myocytes loaded with mag-fura 2. An increase in extracellular Mg2+ concentration from 1 to 12 mM increased [Mg2+]i from 1.06 +/- 0.16 to 1.87 +/- 0.22 mM (P < 0.01) in 30 min. To examine the effect of high Mg2+ concentration on amount of releasable Ca2+ in the sarcoplasmic reticulum, the effect of high Mg2+ concentration on the Ca2+ transient induced by a rapid application of caffeine was examined. High-Mg2+ solution increased the peak of the caffeine-induced Ca2+ transient. These results suggest that the inhibitory effect of Mg2+ on Ca2+ waves was not due

  13. Serum haptoglobin as a novel molecular biomarker predicting colorectal cancer hepatic metastasis.

    PubMed

    Sun, Lichao; Hu, Shusheng; Yu, Long; Guo, Chunguang; Sun, Lixin; Yang, Zhihua; Qi, Jun; Ran, Yuliang

    2016-06-01

    Early detection of liver metastasis is important for improving colorectal cancer (CRC) patient survival. Our previous studies showed haptoglobin was highly expressed in primary CRC tissues, especially in heterochronous metastatic cases. Here, we assessed the potential of serum haptoglobin (sHP) as a biomarker for early detection of CRC liver metastasis by evaluating the sHP in 475 CRC patients and 152 healthy volunteers. In the training set (250 cases), sHP level in CRC-M1 (1773.18 ± 690.25 ng/mL) were significantly increased as compared to in CRC-M0 (1544.37 ± 1497.65 ng/mL) or healthy (917.76 ± 571.59 ng/mL). And the high sHP level was correlated with poor survival. Logistic regression analysis revealed that sHP, serum carcinoembryonic antigen (sCEA) and serum carbohydrate antigen 19.9 (sCA19.9) level were the significant parameters for detecting liver metastasis. In leave-one-out-cross-validation, these three markers resulted in 89.1% sensitivity and 85.8% specificity for hepatic metastasis detection. In an independent test set (225 cases), receiver operating characteristic curve analysis of sHP in CRC liver metastasis showed an area under the curve of 0.735, with a sensitivity of 87.2% and a specificity of 59.9%. Combination of sHP, sCEA and sCA19.9 improved diagnostic accuracy to 0.880, with a sensitivity of 88.5% and a specificity of 87.8%. Silencing of HP by specific shRNA significantly inhibited the LOVO and SW620 cell invasion, and suppressed xenograft tumor invasive growth. In summary, these results demonstrate that sHP is associated with poor prognosis of CRC patients and that HP promotes colorectal cancer cell invasion. sHP combining with sCA19.9 and sCEA may be used as accurate predictors of CRC liver metastasis. PMID:26756179

  14. Ca2+-regulated structural changes in troponin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vinogradova, Maia V.; Stone, Deborah B.; Malanina, Galina G.; Karatzaferi, Christina; Cooke, Roger; Mendelson, Robert A.; Fletterick, Robert J.

    2005-04-01

    Troponin senses Ca2+ to regulate contraction in striated muscle. Structures of skeletal muscle troponin composed of TnC (the sensor), TnI (the regulator), and TnT (the link to the muscle thin filament) have been determined. The structure of troponin in the Ca2+-activated state features a nearly twofold symmetrical assembly of TnI and TnT subunits penetrated asymmetrically by the dumbbell-shaped TnC subunit. Ca ions are thought to regulate contraction by controlling the presentation to and withdrawal of the TnI inhibitory segment from the thin filament. Here, we show that the rigid central helix of the sensor binds the inhibitory segment of TnI in the Ca2+-activated state. Comparison of crystal structures of troponin in the Ca2+-activated state at 3.0 Å resolution and in the Ca2+-free state at 7.0 Å resolution shows that the long framework helices of TnI and TnT, presumed to be a Ca2+-independent structural domain of troponin are unchanged. Loss of Ca ions causes the rigid central helix of the sensor to collapse and to release the inhibitory segment of TnI. The inhibitory segment of TnI changes conformation from an extended loop in the presence of Ca2+ to a short -helix in its absence. We also show that Anapoe, a detergent molecule, increases the contractile force of muscle fibers and binds specifically, together with the TnI switch helix, in a hydrophobic pocket of TnC upon activation by Ca ions. Ca | muscle | regulation | structure

  15. Basal Ca2+ and the oscillation of Ca2+ in caffeine-treated bullfrog sympathetic neurones.

    PubMed Central

    Nohmi, M; Hua, S Y; Kuba, K

    1992-01-01

    1. Effects of caffeine on the intracellular free Ca2+ concentration ([Ca2+]i) in single bullfrog sympathetic neurones in excised tissue were studied by recording Fura-2 fluorescence excited at 340, 361 or 380 nm and taking their ratios (R340/380 or R361/380). 2. Caffeine (3-10 mM) produced oscillation of [Ca2+]i and an 'apparent' decrease in the basal level of [Ca2+]i during a period between phasic rises. The mechanism of the latter effect was analysed in relation to the mechanism of the former. 3. Caffeine (3-10 mM) increased Fura-2 fluorescence in a range of excitation wavelength from 330 to 390 nm. The ratios of fluorescences, R340/380 and R361/380, however, were not significantly affected by caffeine. These results suggest that the 'apparent' reduction in the basal [Ca2+]i seen as a decrease in R340/380 or R361/380 results from a true decrease in [Ca2+]i. 4. Caffeine-induced decrease in [Ca2+]i persisted for every period between phasic rises of [Ca2+]i during [Ca2+]i oscillation, and after the blockade of [Ca2+]i oscillation by ryanodine. The decrease in the latter condition lasted for more than 20 min. 5. The decrease in the basal [Ca2+]i depended on the external Ca2+ concentration and was not mimicked by the action of cyclic nucleotides. 6. Possible mechanisms underlying the decrease in the basal [Ca2+]i produced by caffeine (effects on Ca2+ transport at the cell or Ca(2+)-storing organelle membrane) and their significance in relation to the [Ca2+]i oscillation were discussed. PMID:1432716

  16. Coupled Ca2+/H+ transport by cytoplasmic buffers regulates local Ca2+ and H+ ion signaling.

    PubMed

    Swietach, Pawel; Youm, Jae-Boum; Saegusa, Noriko; Leem, Chae-Hun; Spitzer, Kenneth W; Vaughan-Jones, Richard D

    2013-05-28

    Ca(2+) signaling regulates cell function. This is subject to modulation by H(+) ions that are universal end-products of metabolism. Due to slow diffusion and common buffers, changes in cytoplasmic [Ca(2+)] ([Ca(2+)]i) or [H(+)] ([H(+)]i) can become compartmentalized, leading potentially to complex spatial Ca(2+)/H(+) coupling. This was studied by fluorescence imaging of cardiac myocytes. An increase in [H(+)]i, produced by superfusion of acetate (salt of membrane-permeant weak acid), evoked a [Ca(2+)]i rise, independent of sarcolemmal Ca(2+) influx or release from mitochondria, sarcoplasmic reticulum, or acidic stores. Photolytic H(+) uncaging from 2-nitrobenzaldehyde also raised [Ca(2+)]i, and the yield was reduced following inhibition of glycolysis or mitochondrial respiration. H(+) uncaging into buffer mixtures in vitro demonstrated that Ca(2+) unloading from proteins, histidyl dipeptides (HDPs; e.g., carnosine), and ATP can underlie the H(+)-evoked [Ca(2+)]i rise. Raising [H(+)]i tonically at one end of a myocyte evoked a local [Ca(2+)]i rise in the acidic microdomain, which did not dissipate. The result is consistent with uphill Ca(2+) transport into the acidic zone via Ca(2+)/H(+) exchange on diffusible HDPs and ATP molecules, energized by the [H(+)]i gradient. Ca(2+) recruitment to a localized acid microdomain was greatly reduced during intracellular Mg(2+) overload or by ATP depletion, maneuvers that reduce the Ca(2+)-carrying capacity of HDPs. Cytoplasmic HDPs and ATP underlie spatial Ca(2+)/H(+) coupling in the cardiac myocyte by providing ion exchange and transport on common buffer sites. Given the abundance of cellular HDPs and ATP, spatial Ca(2+)/H(+) coupling is likely to be of general importance in cell signaling. PMID:23676270

  17. By Regulating Mitochondrial Ca2+-Uptake UCP2 Modulates Intracellular Ca2+

    PubMed Central

    Gebing, Tina; Reda, Sara; Schwaiger, Astrid; Leitner, Johannes; Wolny, Martin; Eckardt, Lars; Hoppe, Uta C.

    2016-01-01

    Introduction The possible role of UCP2 in modulating mitochondrial Ca2+-uptake (mCa2+-uptake) via the mitochondrial calcium uniporter (MCU) is highly controversial. Methods Thus, we analyzed mCa2+-uptake in isolated cardiac mitochondria, MCU single-channel activity in cardiac mitoplasts, dual Ca2+-transients from mitochondrial ((Ca2+)m) and intracellular compartment ((Ca2+)c) in the whole-cell configuration in cardiomyocytes of wild-type (WT) and UCP2-/- mice. Results Isolated mitochondria showed a Ru360 sensitive mCa2+-uptake, which was significantly decreased in UCP2-/- (229.4±30.8 FU vs. 146.3±23.4 FU, P<0.05). Single-channel registrations confirmed a Ru360 sensitive voltage-gated Ca2+-channel in mitoplasts, i.e. mCa1, showing a reduced single-channel activity in UCP2-/- (Po,total: 0.34±0.05% vs. 0.07±0.01%, P<0.05). In UCP2-/- cardiomyocytes (Ca2+)m was decreased (0.050±0.009 FU vs. 0.021±0.005 FU, P<0.05) while (Ca2+)c was unchanged (0.032±0.002 FU vs. 0.028±0.004 FU, P>0.05) and transsarcolemmal Ca2+-influx was inhibited suggesting a possible compensatory mechanism. Additionally, we observed an inhibitory effect of ATP on mCa2+-uptake in WT mitoplasts and (Ca2+)m of cardiomyocytes leading to an increase of (Ca2+)c while no ATP dependent effect was observed in UCP2-/-. Conclusion Our results indicate regulatory effects of UCP2 on mCa2+-uptake. Furthermore, we propose, that previously described inhibitory effects on MCU by ATP may be mediated via UCP2 resulting in changes of excitation contraction coupling. PMID:26849136

  18. CA-MRSA. The new sports pathogen.

    PubMed

    Kurkowski, Christina

    2007-01-01

    Skin infections in athletes caused by community-associated Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (CA-MRSA) have been observed within many cities throughout the United States and within many countries throughout the world (Centers for Disease Control and Prevention [CDC], 2003). As the incidence rises in the athletic population, clinicians must learn to identify risk factors for CA-MRSA, diagnosis and treat infections with judicious use of antimicrobial agents and facilitate strategies to limit transmission. Recently, a new consensus guideline for handling CA-MRSA outbreaks in sports has been released by the CDC (Gorwitz et al., 2006). This article includes a review of the evolution of MRSA; distinguishes between healthcare associated Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (HA-MRSA) and CA-MRSA; and reviews the diagnosis, management, and prevention strategies to limit transmission of CA-MRSA. PMID:17921891

  19. Ca-Dependent Folding of Human Calumenin

    PubMed Central

    Mazzorana, Marco; Hussain, Rohanah; Sorensen, Thomas

    2016-01-01

    Human calumenin (hCALU) is a six EF-hand protein belonging to the CREC family. As other members of the family, it is localized in the secretory pathway and regulates the activity of SERCA2a and of the ryanodine receptor in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER). We have studied the effects of Ca2+ binding to the protein and found it to attain a more compact structure upon ion binding. Circular Dichroism (CD) measurements suggest a major rearrangement of the protein secondary structure, which reversibly switches from disordered at low Ca2+ concentrations to predominantly alpha-helical when Ca2+ is added. SAXS experiments confirm the transition from an unfolded to a compact structure, which matches the structural prediction of a trilobal fold. Overall our experiments suggest that calumenin is a Ca2+ sensor, which folds into a compact structure, capable of interacting with its molecular partners, when Ca2+ concentration within the ER reaches the millimolar range. PMID:26991433

  20. Ppp2ca knockout in mice spermatogenesis.

    PubMed

    Pan, Xiaoyun; Chen, Xia; Tong, Xin; Tang, Chao; Li, Jianmin

    2015-04-01

    Protein phosphatase 2A (PP2A) is a ubiquitous serine/threonine phosphatase involved in meiosis, mitosis, sperm capacitation, and apoptosis. Abberant activity of PP2A has been associated with a number of diseases. The homolog PPP2CA and PPP2CB can each function as the phosphatase catalytic subunit generally referred to as PP2AC. We generated a Ppp2ca conditional knockout (CKO) in C57BL/6J mice. Exon 2 of Ppp2ca was knocked out in a spatial or temporal-specific manner in primordial germ cells at E12.5. This Ppp2ca-null mutation caused infertility in male C57BL/6J mice. These CKO mice provide a powerful tool to study the mechanisms of Ppp2ca in development and disease. PMID:25628439

  1. The role of luminal Ca2+ in the generation of Ca2+ waves in rat ventricular myocytes

    PubMed Central

    Lukyanenko, Valeriy; Subramanian, Saisunder; Györke, Inna; Wiesner, Theodore F; Györke, Sandor

    1999-01-01

    We used confocal Ca2+ imaging and fluo-3 to investigate the transition of localized Ca2+ releases induced by focal caffeine stimulation into propagating Ca2+ waves in isolated rat ventricular myocytes. Self-sustaining Ca2+ waves could be initiated when the cellular Ca2+ load was increased by elevating the extracellular [Ca2+] ([Ca2+]o) and they could also be initiated at normal Ca2+ loads when the sensitivity of the release sites to cytosolic Ca2+ was enhanced by low doses of caffeine. When we prevented the accumulation of extra Ca2+ in the luminal compartment of the sarcoplasmic reticulum (SR) with thapsigargin, focal caffeine pulses failed to trigger self-sustaining Ca2+ waves on elevation of [Ca2+]o. Inhibition of SR Ca2+ uptake by thapsigargin in cells already preloaded with Ca2+ above normal levels did not prevent local Ca2+ elevations from triggering propagating waves. Moreover, wave velocity increased by 20 %. Tetracaine (0·75 mM) caused transient complete inhibition of both local and propagating Ca2+ signals, followed by full recovery of the responses due to increased SR Ca2+ accumulation. Computer simulations using a numerical model with spatially distinct Ca2+ release sites suggested that increased amounts of releasable Ca2+ might not be sufficient to generate self-sustaining Ca2+ waves under conditions of Ca2+ overload unless the threshold of release site Ca2+ activation was set at relatively low levels (< 1·5 μM). We conclude that the potentiation of SR Ca2+ release channels by luminal Ca2+ is an important factor in Ca2+ wave generation. Wave propagation does not require the translocation of Ca2+ from the spreading wave front into the SR. Instead, it relies on luminal Ca2+ sensitizing Ca2+ release channels to cytosolic Ca2+. PMID:10373699

  2. Main determinants of presynaptic Ca2+ dynamics at individual mossy fiber - CA3 pyramidal cell synapses

    PubMed Central

    Scott, Ricardo; Rusakov, Dmitri A.

    2009-01-01

    Synaptic transmission between hippocampal mossy fibers (MFs) and CA3 pyramidal cells exhibits remarkable use-dependent plasticity. The underlying presynaptic mechanisms, however, remain poorly understood. Here we have used fluorescent Ca2+ indicators Fluo-4, Fluo-5F and Oregon Green BAPTA-1 to investigate Ca2+ dynamics in individual giant MF boutons (MFBs) in area CA3 traced from the somata of granule cells held in whole-cell mode. In an individual MFB, a single action potential induces a brief peak of free Ca2+ (estimated in the range of 8-9 μM) followed by an elevation to ~320 nM which slowly decays to its resting level of ~110 nM. Changes in the somatic membrane potential influence presynaptic Ca2+ entry at proximal MFBs in the hilus. This influence decays with distance along the axon, with a length constant of approximately 200 μm. In giant MFBs in CA3, progressive saturation of endogenous Ca2+ buffers during repetitive spiking amplifies rapid Ca2+ peaks and the residual Ca2+ several-fold, suggesting a causal link to synaptic facilitation. We find that internal Ca2+ stores contribute to maintaining the low resting Ca2+ providing ~22% of the buffering/extrusion capacity of giant MFBs. Rapid Ca2+ release from stores represents up to 20% of the presynaptic Ca2+ transient evoked by a brief train of action potentials. The results identify the main components of presynaptic Ca2+ dynamics at this important cortical synapse. PMID:16807336

  3. Isospin effects in 40,48Ca+40,48Ca collisions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Henzl, V.; Henzlova, D.; Kilburn, M.; Verde, G.; Brown, D.; Chbihi, A.; Coupland, D.; Elson, J.; Famiano, M.; Herlitzius, C.; Hudan, S.; Lee, J.; Lukyanov, S.; Lynch, W.; Rogers, A.; Sanetullaev, A.; Sobotka, L.; de Souza, R. T.; Sun, Z. Y.; Tsang, B.; Wallace, M.; Xu, K.; Youngs, M.

    2010-03-01

    The isospin dependence of two proton correlations is studied in 40Ca+40Ca and 48Ca+48Ca collisions at E/A=80MeV. Measurements were performed with the HiRA detector array complemented by the 4π Ball at NSCL. We observe a strong isospin dependence of the pp-correlation functions; however the emitting source radius extracted using the imaging technique yields no sensitivity to the isospin of the reaction system. We interpret this result as a consequence of smaller fraction of fast proton emission in the neutron rich 48Ca system.

  4. Fusion hindrance for Ca+Ca systems: Influence of neutron excess

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, C. L.; Stefanini, A. M.; Esbensen, H.; Rehm, K. E.; Corradi, L.; Fioretto, E.; Mason, P.; Montagnoli, G.; Scarlassara, F.; Silvestri, R.; Singh, P. P.; Szilner, S.; Tang, X. D.; Ur, C. A.

    2010-10-01

    The measurement of the excitation function for fusion evaporation reactions in the system Ca40+Ca48 (Q= 4.56 MeV) has been extended downward by two orders of magnitude with respect to previous cross section data. A first indication of an S-factor maximum in a system with a positive Q value has been observed. In addition a correlation between fusion hindrance and neutron excess N-Z has been found for the Ca + Ca, Ni + Ni, and Ca + Zr systems.

  5. Na+/Ca2+ exchangers: three mammalian gene families control Ca2+ transport.

    PubMed

    Lytton, Jonathan

    2007-09-15

    Mammalian Na+/Ca2+ exchangers are members of three branches of a much larger family of transport proteins [the CaCA (Ca2+/cation antiporter) superfamily] whose main role is to provide control of Ca2+ flux across the plasma membranes or intracellular compartments. Since cytosolic levels of Ca2+ are much lower than those found extracellularly or in sequestered stores, the major function of Na+/Ca2+ exchangers is to extrude Ca2+ from the cytoplasm. The exchangers are, however, fully reversible and thus, under special conditions of subcellular localization and compartmentalized ion gradients, Na+/Ca2+ exchangers may allow Ca2+ entry and may play more specialized roles in Ca2+ movement between compartments. The NCX (Na+/Ca2+ exchanger) [SLC (solute carrier) 8] branch of Na+/Ca2+ exchangers comprises three members: NCX1 has been most extensively studied, and is broadly expressed with particular abundance in heart, brain and kidney, NCX2 is expressed in brain, and NCX3 is expressed in brain and skeletal muscle. The NCX proteins subserve a variety of roles, depending upon the site of expression. These include cardiac excitation-contraction coupling, neuronal signalling and Ca2+ reabsorption in the kidney. The NCKX (Na2+/Ca2+-K+ exchanger) (SLC24) branch of Na+/Ca2+ exchangers transport K+ and Ca2+ in exchange for Na+, and comprises five members: NCKX1 is expressed in retinal rod photoreceptors, NCKX2 is expressed in cone photoreceptors and in neurons throughout the brain, NCKX3 and NCKX4 are abundant in brain, but have a broader tissue distribution, and NCKX5 is expressed in skin, retinal epithelium and brain. The NCKX proteins probably play a particularly prominent role in regulating Ca2+ flux in environments which experience wide and frequent fluctuations in Na+ concentration. Until recently, the range of functions that NCKX proteins play was generally underappreciated. This situation is now changing rapidly as evidence emerges for roles including photoreceptor

  6. Ca2+ microdomains near plasma membrane Ca2+ channels: impact on cell function.

    PubMed

    Parekh, Anant B

    2008-07-01

    In eukaryotic cells, a rise in cytoplasmic Ca(2+) can activate a plethora of responses that operate on time scales ranging from milliseconds to days. Inherent to the use of a promiscuous signal like Ca(2+) is the problem of specificity: how can Ca(2+) activate some responses but not others? We now know that the spatial profile of the Ca(2+) signal is important Ca(2+) does not simply rise uniformly throughout the cytoplasm upon stimulation but can reach very high levels locally, creating spatial gradients. The most fundamental local Ca(2+) signal is the Ca(2+) microdomain that develops rapidly near open plasmalemmal Ca(2+) channels like voltage-gated L-type (Cav1.2) and store-operated CRAC channels. Recent work has revealed that Ca(2+) microdomains arising from these channels are remarkably versatile in triggering a range of responses that differ enormously in both temporal and spatial profile. Here, I delineate basic features of Ca(2+) microdomains and then describe how these highly local signals are used by Ca(2+)-permeable channels to drive cellular responses. PMID:18467365

  7. Ca Cycle Constraints from the Ca Isotope Composition of Precambrian Sedimentary Carbonates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blättler, C. L.; Higgins, J. A.

    2014-12-01

    The geochemical cycle of Ca in seawater is relatively straightforward - Ca is ultimately sourced from the weathering of silicates and largely removed as carbonates. Most of these carbonates are then recycled through subsequent uplift and weathering, but some are metamorphosed or returned to the mantle via subduction. Ca isotopes in sedimentary marine carbonates can provide new insights into the global Ca (and by corollary, C) cycle by constraining the flux and isotopic composition of the recycled and subducted Ca sinks on billion-year timescales. Precambrian applications of Ca isotopes have so far been limited to relatively small datasets which cover unusual, dynamic intervals of the Proterozoic. In order to address questions about long-timescale Ca cycling, Ca isotopes were measured on an extensive suite of Precambrian carbonates (n > 300) which represent environments, textures, and morphologies that are typical for their age, and whose carbon isotope values have been interpreted as reflecting precipitation from seawater. Because marine carbonates constitute the dominant geological sink for Ca, this representative sample set places specific limits on the evolution of the sedimentary and crustal Ca reservoirs and suggests further applications for Ca isotopes in Precambrian time.

  8. (47)Ca production for (47)Ca/(47)Sc generator system using electron linacs.

    PubMed

    Rane, Shraddha; Harris, Jason T; Starovoitova, Valeriia N

    2015-03-01

    In this work we have studied the feasibility of photonuclear production of (47)Ca from (48)Ca for (47)Ca/(47)Sc generators. Photon flux distribution for electron beams of different energies incident on a tungsten converter was calculated using the MCNPX radiation transport code. The (47)Ca production rate dependence on electron beam energy was found and (47)Ca/(47)Sc yields were estimated for a 40MeV electron beam. It was shown that irradiating enriched targets with a 40MeV, 1mA beam will result in tens of MBq g(-1) (few mCi g(-1)) activity of (47)Sc. The results of the simulations were benchmarked by irradiating 22.5g of CaCl2 powder with a 39MeV electron beam incident on a tungsten converter. Measured (47)Ca/(47)Sc activities were found to be in very good agreement with the predictions. PMID:25600103

  9. Ferromagnetic CaRuO3

    PubMed Central

    Tripathi, Shivendra; Rana, Rakesh; Kumar, Sanjay; Pandey, Parul; Singh, R. S.; Rana, D. S.

    2014-01-01

    The non-magnetic and non-Fermi-liquid CaRuO3 is the iso-structural analog of the ferromagnetic (FM) and Fermi-liquid SrRuO3. We show that an FM order in the orthorhombic CaRuO3 can be established by the means of tensile epitaxial strain. The structural and magnetic property correlations in the CaRuO3 films formed on SrTiO3 (100) substrate establish a scaling relation between the FM moment and the tensile strain. The strain dependent crossover from non-magnetic to FM CaRuO3 was observed to be associated with switching of non-Fermi liquid to Fermi-liquid behavior. The intrinsic nature of this strain-induced FM order manifests in the Hall resistivity too; the anomalous Hall component realizes in FM tensile-strained CaRuO3 films on SrTiO3 (100) whereas the non-magnetic compressive-strained films on LaAlO3 (100) exhibit only the ordinary Hall effect. These observations of an elusive FM order are consistent with the theoretical predictions of scaling of the tensile epitaxial strain and the magnetic order in tensile CaRuO3. We further establish that the tensile strain is more efficient than the chemical route to induce FM order in CaRuO3. PMID:24464302

  10. Predicting Ca(2+)-binding sites in proteins.

    PubMed Central

    Nayal, M; Di Cera, E

    1994-01-01

    The coordination shell of Ca2+ ions in proteins contains almost exclusively oxygen atoms supported by an outer shell of carbon atoms. The bond-strength contribution of each ligating oxygen in the inner shell can be evaluated by using an empirical expression successfully applied in the analysis of crystals of metal oxides. The sum of such contributions closely approximates the valence of the bound cation. When a protein is embedded in a very fine grid of points and an algorithm is used to calculate the valence of each point representing a potential Ca(2+)-binding site, a typical distribution of valence values peaked around 0.4 is obtained. In 32 documented Ca(2+)-binding proteins, containing a total of 62 Ca(2+)-binding sites, a very small fraction of points in the distribution has a valence close to that of Ca2+. Only 0.06% of the points have a valence > or = 1.4. These points share the remarkable tendency to cluster around documented Ca2+ ions. A high enough value of the valence is both necessary (58 out of 62 Ca(2+)-binding sites have a valence > or = 1.4) and sufficient (87% of the grid points with a valence > or = 1.4 are within 1.0 A from a documented Ca2+ ion) to predict the location of bound Ca2+ ions. The algorithm can also be used for the analysis of other cations and predicts the location of Mg(2+)- and Na(+)-binding sites in a number of proteins. The valence is, therefore, a tool of pinpoint accuracy for locating cation-binding sites, which can also be exploited in engineering high-affinity binding sites and characterizing the linkage between structural components and functional energetics for molecular recognition of metal ions by proteins. Images Fig. 4 PMID:8290605

  11. Involvement of the Ca2+/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II pathway in the Ca2+-mediated regulation of the capacitative Ca2+ entry in Xenopus oocytes.

    PubMed Central

    Matifat, F; Fournier, F; Lorca, T; Capony, J P; Brûlé, G; Collin, T

    1997-01-01

    Activation of the phosphoinositide transduction pathway induces capacitative Ca2+ entry in Xenopus oocytes. This can also be evoked by intracellular injection of Ins(1,4.5)P3, external application of thapsigargin and/or incubation in a Ca2+-free medium. Readmission of Ca2+ to voltage-clamped, thapsigargin-treated Xenopus oocytes triggers Ca2+-dependent Cl- current variations that reflect capacitative Ca2+ entry. Inhibition of Ca2+/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II (CaMKII) by specific peptides markedly increased the amplitude of the transients, suggesting an involvement of the CaMKII pathway in the regulation of capacitative Ca2+ entry. Biochemical studies provide evidence for the activation of CaMKII in response to the development of capacitative Ca2+ entry. In effect, a CaMKII assay in vivo allows us to postulate that readmission of Ca2+ to thapsigargin-treated oocytes can induce a burst of CaMKII activity. Finally, analysis of the Cl- transient kinetics at high resolution of time suggests that CaMKII inhibition blocks the onset of the inactivation process without affecting the activation rate. We therefore postulate that CaMKII might participate in a negative feedback regulation of store-depletion-evoked Ca2+ entry in Xenopus oocytes. PMID:9078272

  12. Yeast as a tool for plant Ca(2+) transporter research

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    To maintain optimal cytosolic Ca(2+) concentrations, cells employ three distinct strategies: 1) tightly regulated influx of Ca(2+); 2) efficient efflux of Ca(2+) from the cell; and 3) sequestration of Ca(2+) in organelles. Ca(2+)efflux and influx are mediated by diverse transporter systems, such as ...

  13. Reduced endogenous Ca2+ buffering speeds active zone Ca2+ signaling.

    PubMed

    Delvendahl, Igor; Jablonski, Lukasz; Baade, Carolin; Matveev, Victor; Neher, Erwin; Hallermann, Stefan

    2015-06-01

    Fast synchronous neurotransmitter release at the presynaptic active zone is triggered by local Ca(2+) signals, which are confined in their spatiotemporal extent by endogenous Ca(2+) buffers. However, it remains elusive how rapid and reliable Ca(2+) signaling can be sustained during repetitive release. Here, we established quantitative two-photon Ca(2+) imaging in cerebellar mossy fiber boutons, which fire at exceptionally high rates. We show that endogenous fixed buffers have a surprisingly low Ca(2+)-binding ratio (∼ 15) and low affinity, whereas mobile buffers have high affinity. Experimentally constrained modeling revealed that the low endogenous buffering promotes fast clearance of Ca(2+) from the active zone during repetitive firing. Measuring Ca(2+) signals at different distances from active zones with ultra-high-resolution confirmed our model predictions. Our results lead to the concept that reduced Ca(2+) buffering enables fast active zone Ca(2+) signaling, suggesting that the strength of endogenous Ca(2+) buffering limits the rate of synchronous synaptic transmission. PMID:26015575

  14. Isoflurane inhibits synaptic vesicle exocytosis through reduced Ca2+ influx, not Ca2+-exocytosis coupling

    PubMed Central

    Baumgart, Joel P.; Zhou, Zhen-Yu; Hara, Masato; Cook, Daniel C.; Hoppa, Michael B.; Ryan, Timothy A.; Hemmings, Hugh C.

    2015-01-01

    Identifying presynaptic mechanisms of general anesthetics is critical to understanding their effects on synaptic transmission. We show that the volatile anesthetic isoflurane inhibits synaptic vesicle (SV) exocytosis at nerve terminals in dissociated rat hippocampal neurons through inhibition of presynaptic Ca2+ influx without significantly altering the Ca2+ sensitivity of SV exocytosis. A clinically relevant concentration of isoflurane (0.7 mM) inhibited changes in [Ca2+]i driven by single action potentials (APs) by 25 ± 3%, which in turn led to 62 ± 3% inhibition of single AP-triggered exocytosis at 4 mM extracellular Ca2+ ([Ca2+]e). Lowering external Ca2+ to match the isoflurane-induced reduction in Ca2+ entry led to an equivalent reduction in exocytosis. These data thus indicate that anesthetic inhibition of neurotransmitter release from small SVs occurs primarily through reduced axon terminal Ca2+ entry without significant direct effects on Ca2+-exocytosis coupling or on the SV fusion machinery. Isoflurane inhibition of exocytosis and Ca2+ influx was greater in glutamatergic compared with GABAergic nerve terminals, consistent with selective inhibition of excitatory synaptic transmission. Such alteration in the balance of excitatory to inhibitory transmission could mediate reduced neuronal interactions and network-selective effects observed in the anesthetized central nervous system. PMID:26351670

  15. Isoflurane inhibits synaptic vesicle exocytosis through reduced Ca2+ influx, not Ca2+-exocytosis coupling.

    PubMed

    Baumgart, Joel P; Zhou, Zhen-Yu; Hara, Masato; Cook, Daniel C; Hoppa, Michael B; Ryan, Timothy A; Hemmings, Hugh C

    2015-09-22

    Identifying presynaptic mechanisms of general anesthetics is critical to understanding their effects on synaptic transmission. We show that the volatile anesthetic isoflurane inhibits synaptic vesicle (SV) exocytosis at nerve terminals in dissociated rat hippocampal neurons through inhibition of presynaptic Ca(2+) influx without significantly altering the Ca(2+) sensitivity of SV exocytosis. A clinically relevant concentration of isoflurane (0.7 mM) inhibited changes in [Ca(2+)]i driven by single action potentials (APs) by 25 ± 3%, which in turn led to 62 ± 3% inhibition of single AP-triggered exocytosis at 4 mM extracellular Ca(2+) ([Ca(2+)]e). Lowering external Ca(2+) to match the isoflurane-induced reduction in Ca(2+) entry led to an equivalent reduction in exocytosis. These data thus indicate that anesthetic inhibition of neurotransmitter release from small SVs occurs primarily through reduced axon terminal Ca(2+) entry without significant direct effects on Ca(2+)-exocytosis coupling or on the SV fusion machinery. Isoflurane inhibition of exocytosis and Ca(2+) influx was greater in glutamatergic compared with GABAergic nerve terminals, consistent with selective inhibition of excitatory synaptic transmission. Such alteration in the balance of excitatory to inhibitory transmission could mediate reduced neuronal interactions and network-selective effects observed in the anesthetized central nervous system. PMID:26351670

  16. Tetraspanin-13 modulates voltage-gated CaV2.2 Ca2+ channels

    PubMed Central

    Mallmann, Robert T.; Wilmes, Thomas; Lichvarova, Lucia; Bührer, Anja; Lohmüller, Barbara; Castonguay, Jan; Lacinova, Lubica; Klugbauer, Norbert

    2013-01-01

    Integration of voltage-gated Ca2+ channels in a network of protein-interactions is a crucial requirement for proper regulation of channel activity. In this study, we took advantage of the specific properties of the yeast split-ubiquitin system to search for and characterize so far unknown interaction partners of CaV2 Ca2+ channels. We identified tetraspanin-13 (TSPAN-13) as an interaction partner of the α1 subunit of N-type CaV2.2, but not of P/Q-type CaV2.1 or L- and T-type Ca2+ channels. Interaction could be located between domain IV of CaV2.2 and transmembrane segments S1 and S2 of TSPAN-13. Electrophysiological analysis revealed that TSPAN-13 specifically modulates the efficiency of coupling between voltage sensor activation and pore opening of the channel and accelerates the voltage-dependent activation and inactivation of the Ba2+ current through CaV2.2. These data indicate that TSPAN-13 might regulate CaV2.2 Ca2+ channel activity in defined synaptic membrane compartments and thereby influences transmitter release. PMID:23648579

  17. Aging and CaMKII alter intracellular Ca2+ transients and heart rhythm in Drosophila melanogaster.

    PubMed

    Santalla, Manuela; Valverde, Carlos A; Harnichar, Ezequiel; Lacunza, Ezequiel; Aguilar-Fuentes, Javier; Mattiazzi, Alicia; Ferrero, Paola

    2014-01-01

    Aging is associated to disrupted contractility and rhythmicity, among other cardiovascular alterations. Drosophila melanogaster shows a pattern of aging similar to human beings and recapitulates the arrhythmogenic conditions found in the human heart. Moreover, the kinase CaMKII has been characterized as an important regulator of heart function and an arrhythmogenic molecule that participate in Ca2+ handling. Using a genetically engineered expressed Ca2+ indicator, we report changes in cardiac Ca2+ handling at two different ages. Aging prolonged relaxation, reduced spontaneous heart rate (HR) and increased the occurrence of arrhythmias, ectopic beats and asystoles. Alignment between Drosophila melanogaster and human CaMKII showed a high degree of conservation and indicates that relevant phosphorylation sites in humans are also present in the fruit fly. Inhibition of CaMKII by KN-93 (CaMKII-specific inhibitor), reduced HR without significant changes in other parameters. By contrast, overexpression of CaMKII increased HR and reduced arrhythmias. Moreover, it increased fluorescence amplitude, maximal rate of rise of fluorescence and reduced time to peak fluorescence. These results suggest that CaMKII in Drosophila melanogaster acts directly on heart function and that increasing CaMKII expression levels could be beneficial to improve contractility. PMID:25003749

  18. Aging and CaMKII Alter Intracellular Ca2+ Transients and Heart Rhythm in Drosophila melanogaster

    PubMed Central

    Santalla, Manuela; Valverde, Carlos A.; Harnichar, Ezequiel; Lacunza, Ezequiel; Aguilar-Fuentes, Javier; Mattiazzi, Alicia; Ferrero, Paola

    2014-01-01

    Aging is associated to disrupted contractility and rhythmicity, among other cardiovascular alterations. Drosophila melanogaster shows a pattern of aging similar to human beings and recapitulates the arrhythmogenic conditions found in the human heart. Moreover, the kinase CaMKII has been characterized as an important regulator of heart function and an arrhythmogenic molecule that participate in Ca2+ handling. Using a genetically engineered expressed Ca2+ indicator, we report changes in cardiac Ca2+ handling at two different ages. Aging prolonged relaxation, reduced spontaneous heart rate (HR) and increased the occurrence of arrhythmias, ectopic beats and asystoles. Alignment between Drosophila melanogaster and human CaMKII showed a high degree of conservation and indicates that relevant phosphorylation sites in humans are also present in the fruit fly. Inhibition of CaMKII by KN-93 (CaMKII-specific inhibitor), reduced HR without significant changes in other parameters. By contrast, overexpression of CaMKII increased HR and reduced arrhythmias. Moreover, it increased fluorescence amplitude, maximal rate of rise of fluorescence and reduced time to peak fluorescence. These results suggest that CaMKII in Drosophila melanogaster acts directly on heart function and that increasing CaMKII expression levels could be beneficial to improve contractility. PMID:25003749

  19. Regulated release of Ca2+ from respiring mitochondria by Ca2+/2H+ antiport.

    PubMed

    Fiskum, G; Lehninger, A L

    1979-07-25

    Simultaneous measurements of oxygen consumption and transmembrane transport of Ca2+, H+, and phosphate show that the efflux of Ca2+ from respiring tightly coupled rat liver mitochondria takes place by an electroneutral Ca2+/2H+ antiport process that is ruthenium red-insensitive and that is regulated by the oxidation-reduction state of the mitochondrial pyridine nucleotides. When mitochondrial pyridine nucleotides are kept in a reduced steady state, the efflux of Ca2+ is inhibited; when they are in an oxidized state, Ca2+ efflux is activated. These processes were demonstrated by allowing phosphate-depleted mitochondria respiring on succinate in the presence of rotenone to take up Ca2+ from the medium. Upon subsequent addition of ruthenium red to block Ca2+ transport via the electrophoretic influx pathway, and acetoacetate, to bring mitochondrial pyridine nucleotides into the oxidized state, Ca2+ efflux and H+ influx ensued. The observed H+ influx/Ca2+ efflux ratio was close to the value 2.0 predicted for the operation of an electrically neutral Ca2+/2H+ antiport process. PMID:36390

  20. Reduced endogenous Ca2+ buffering speeds active zone Ca2+ signaling

    PubMed Central

    Delvendahl, Igor; Jablonski, Lukasz; Baade, Carolin; Matveev, Victor; Neher, Erwin; Hallermann, Stefan

    2015-01-01

    Fast synchronous neurotransmitter release at the presynaptic active zone is triggered by local Ca2+ signals, which are confined in their spatiotemporal extent by endogenous Ca2+ buffers. However, it remains elusive how rapid and reliable Ca2+ signaling can be sustained during repetitive release. Here, we established quantitative two-photon Ca2+ imaging in cerebellar mossy fiber boutons, which fire at exceptionally high rates. We show that endogenous fixed buffers have a surprisingly low Ca2+-binding ratio (∼15) and low affinity, whereas mobile buffers have high affinity. Experimentally constrained modeling revealed that the low endogenous buffering promotes fast clearance of Ca2+ from the active zone during repetitive firing. Measuring Ca2+ signals at different distances from active zones with ultra-high-resolution confirmed our model predictions. Our results lead to the concept that reduced Ca2+ buffering enables fast active zone Ca2+ signaling, suggesting that the strength of endogenous Ca2+ buffering limits the rate of synchronous synaptic transmission. PMID:26015575

  1. Genetical and comparative genomics of Brassica under altered Ca supply identifies Arabidopsis Ca-transporter orthologs.

    PubMed

    Graham, Neil S; Hammond, John P; Lysenko, Artem; Mayes, Sean; O Lochlainn, Seosamh; Blasco, Bego; Bowen, Helen C; Rawlings, Chris J; Rios, Juan J; Welham, Susan; Carion, Pierre W C; Dupuy, Lionel X; King, Graham J; White, Philip J; Broadley, Martin R

    2014-07-01

    Although Ca transport in plants is highly complex, the overexpression of vacuolar Ca(2+) transporters in crops is a promising new technology to improve dietary Ca supplies through biofortification. Here, we sought to identify novel targets for increasing plant Ca accumulation using genetical and comparative genomics. Expression quantitative trait locus (eQTL) mapping to 1895 cis- and 8015 trans-loci were identified in shoots of an inbred mapping population of Brassica rapa (IMB211 × R500); 23 cis- and 948 trans-eQTLs responded specifically to altered Ca supply. eQTLs were screened for functional significance using a large database of shoot Ca concentration phenotypes of Arabidopsis thaliana. From 31 Arabidopsis gene identifiers tagged to robust shoot Ca concentration phenotypes, 21 mapped to 27 B. rapa eQTLs, including orthologs of the Ca(2+) transporters At-CAX1 and At-ACA8. Two of three independent missense mutants of BraA.cax1a, isolated previously by targeting induced local lesions in genomes, have allele-specific shoot Ca concentration phenotypes compared with their segregating wild types. BraA.CAX1a is a promising target for altering the Ca composition of Brassica, consistent with prior knowledge from Arabidopsis. We conclude that multiple-environment eQTL analysis of complex crop genomes combined with comparative genomics is a powerful technique for novel gene identification/prioritization. PMID:25082855

  2. Calcium transport in bovine rumen epithelium as affected by luminal Ca concentrations and Ca sources

    PubMed Central

    Schröder, Bernd; Wilkens, Mirja R; Ricken, Gundula E; Leonhard-Marek, Sabine; Fraser, David R; Breves, Gerhard

    2015-01-01

    The quantitative role of different segments of the gastrointestinal tract for Ca absorption, the respective mechanisms, and their regulation are not fully identified for ruminants, that is, cattle. In different in vitro experiments the forestomach wall has been demonstrated to be a major site for active Ca absorption in sheep and goats. In order to further clarify the role of the bovine rumen for Ca transport with special attention to luminal Ca concentrations, its ionic form, and pH, electrophysiological and unidirectional flux rate measurements were performed with isolated bovine rumen epithelial tissues. For Ca flux studies (Jms, Jsm) in vitro Ussing chamber technique was applied. Standard RT-PCR method was used to characterize TRPV6 and PMCA1 as potential contributors to transepithelial active Ca transport. At Ca concentrations of 1.2 mmol L−1 on both sides of the tissues, Jms were higher than Jsm resulting under some conditions in significant Ca net flux rates (Jnet), indicating the presence of active Ca transport. In the absence of an electrical gradient, Jnet could significantly be stimulated in the presence of luminal short-chain fatty acids (SCFAs). Increasing the luminal Ca concentrations up to 11.2 mmol L−1 resulted in significant increases in Jms without influencing Jsm. Providing Ca in its form as respective chloride, formate, or propionate salts there was no significant effect on Jms. No transcripts specific for Ca channel TRPV6 could be demonstrated. Our results indicate different mechanisms for Ca absorption in bovine rumen as compared with those usually described for the small intestines. PMID:26564067

  3. Calcium transport in bovine rumen epithelium as affected by luminal Ca concentrations and Ca sources.

    PubMed

    Schröder, Bernd; Wilkens, Mirja R; Ricken, Gundula E; Leonhard-Marek, Sabine; Fraser, David R; Breves, Gerhard

    2015-11-01

    The quantitative role of different segments of the gastrointestinal tract for Ca absorption, the respective mechanisms, and their regulation are not fully identified for ruminants, that is, cattle. In different in vitro experiments the forestomach wall has been demonstrated to be a major site for active Ca absorption in sheep and goats. In order to further clarify the role of the bovine rumen for Ca transport with special attention to luminal Ca concentrations, its ionic form, and pH, electrophysiological and unidirectional flux rate measurements were performed with isolated bovine rumen epithelial tissues. For Ca flux studies (Jms, Jsm) in vitro Ussing chamber technique was applied. Standard RT-PCR method was used to characterize TRPV6 and PMCA1 as potential contributors to transepithelial active Ca transport. At Ca concentrations of 1.2 mmol L(-1) on both sides of the tissues, Jms were higher than Jsm resulting under some conditions in significant Ca net flux rates (Jnet), indicating the presence of active Ca transport. In the absence of an electrical gradient, Jnet could significantly be stimulated in the presence of luminal short-chain fatty acids (SCFAs). Increasing the luminal Ca concentrations up to 11.2 mmol L(-1) resulted in significant increases in Jms without influencing Jsm. Providing Ca in its form as respective chloride, formate, or propionate salts there was no significant effect on Jms. No transcripts specific for Ca channel TRPV6 could be demonstrated. Our results indicate different mechanisms for Ca absorption in bovine rumen as compared with those usually described for the small intestines. PMID:26564067

  4. Selective Na+/Ca2+ exchanger inhibition prevents Ca2+ overload-induced triggered arrhythmias

    PubMed Central

    Nagy, Norbert; Kormos, Anita; Kohajda, Zsófia; Szebeni, Áron; Szepesi, Judit; Pollesello, Piero; Levijoki, Jouko; Acsai, Károly; Virág, László; Nánási, Péter P; Papp, Julius Gy; Varró, András; Tóth, András

    2014-01-01

    Background and Purpose Augmented Na+/Ca2+ exchanger (NCX) activity may play a crucial role in cardiac arrhythmogenesis; however, data regarding the anti-arrhythmic efficacy of NCX inhibition are debatable. Feasible explanations could be the unsatisfactory selectivity of NCX inhibitors and/or the dependence of the experimental model on the degree of Ca2+i overload. Hence, we used NCX inhibitors SEA0400 and the more selective ORM10103 to evaluate the efficacy of NCX inhibition against arrhythmogenic Ca2+i rise in conditions when [Ca2+]i was augmented via activation of the late sodium current (INaL) or inhibition of the Na+/K+ pump. Experimental Approach Action potentials (APs) were recorded from canine papillary muscles and Purkinje fibres by microelectrodes. NCX current (INCX) was determined in ventricular cardiomyocytes utilizing the whole-cell patch clamp technique. Ca2+i transients (CaTs) were monitored with a Ca2+-sensitive fluorescent dye, Fluo-4. Key Results Enhanced INaL increased the Ca2+ load and AP duration (APD). SEA0400 and ORM10103 suppressed INCX and prevented/reversed the anemone toxin II (ATX-II)-induced [Ca2+]i rise without influencing APD, CaT or cell shortening, or affecting the ATX-II-induced increased APD. ORM10103 significantly decreased the number of strophanthidin-induced spontaneous diastolic Ca2+ release events; however, SEA0400 failed to restrict the veratridine-induced augmentation in Purkinje-ventricle APD dispersion. Conclusions and Implications Selective NCX inhibition – presumably by blocking revINCX (reverse mode NCX current) – is effective against arrhythmogenesis caused by [Na+]i-induced [Ca2+]i elevation, without influencing the AP waveform. Therefore, selective INCX inhibition, by significantly reducing the arrhythmogenic trigger activity caused by the perturbed Ca2+i handling, should be considered as a promising anti-arrhythmic therapeutic strategy. PMID:25073832

  5. The caBIG terminology review process.

    PubMed

    Cimino, James J; Hayamizu, Terry F; Bodenreider, Olivier; Davis, Brian; Stafford, Grace A; Ringwald, Martin

    2009-06-01

    The National Cancer Institute (NCI) is developing an integrated biomedical informatics infrastructure, the cancer Biomedical Informatics Grid (caBIG), to support collaboration within the cancer research community. A key part of the caBIG architecture is the establishment of terminology standards for representing data. In order to evaluate the suitability of existing controlled terminologies, the caBIG Vocabulary and Data Elements Workspace (VCDE WS) working group has developed a set of criteria that serve to assess a terminology's structure, content, documentation, and editorial process. This paper describes the evolution of these criteria and the results of their use in evaluating four standard terminologies: the Gene Ontology (GO), the NCI Thesaurus (NCIt), the Common Terminology for Adverse Events (known as CTCAE), and the laboratory portion of the Logical Objects, Identifiers, Names and Codes (LOINC). The resulting caBIG criteria are presented as a matrix that may be applicable to any terminology standardization effort. PMID:19154797

  6. Role of Ca++ in Shoot Gravitropism. [avena

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rayle, D. L.

    1985-01-01

    A cornerstone in the argument that Ca(2+) levels may regulate growth is the finding the EGTA promotes straight growth. The usual explanation for these results is that Ca(2+) chelation from cell walls results in wall loosening and thus accelerated straight growth. The ability of frozen-thawed Avena coleoptile tissue (subjected to 15g tension) to extend in response to EGTA and Quin II was examined. The EGTA when applied in weakly buffered (i.e., 0.1mM) neutral solutions initiates rapid extension. When the buffer strength is increased, similar concentrations of EGTA produce no growth response. This implies when EGTA liberated protons are released upon Ca(2+) chelation they can either initiate acid growth (low buffer conditions) or if consumed (high buffer conditions) have no effect. Thus Ca(2+) chelation in itself apparently does not result in straight growth.

  7. The caBIG Terminology Review Process

    PubMed Central

    Cimino, James J.; Hayamizu, Terry F.; Bodenreider, Olivier; Davis, Brian; Stafford, Grace A.; Ringwald, Martin

    2009-01-01

    The National Cancer Institute (NCI) is developing an integrated biomedical informatics infrastructure, the cancer Biomedical Informatics Grid (caBIG®), to support collaboration within the cancer research community. A key part of the caBIG architecture is the establishment of terminology standards for representing data. In order to evaluate the suitability of existing controlled terminologies, the caBIG Vocabulary and Data Elements Workspace (VCDE WS) working group has developed a set of criteria that serve to assess a terminology's structure, content, documentation, and editorial process. This paper describes the evolution of these criteria and the results of their use in evaluating four standard terminologies: the Gene Ontology (GO), the NCI Thesaurus (NCIt), the Common Terminology for Adverse Events (known as CTCAE), and the laboratory portion of the Logical Objects, Identifiers, Names and Codes (LOINC). The resulting caBIG criteria are presented as a matrix that may be applicable to any terminology standardization effort. PMID:19154797

  8. Motion of the Ca2+-pump captured.

    PubMed

    Yokokawa, Masatoshi; Takeyasu, Kunio

    2011-09-01

    Studies of ion pumps, such as ATP synthetase and Ca(2+)-ATPase, have a long history. The crystal structures of several kinds of ion pump have been resolved, and provide static pictures of mechanisms of ion transport. In this study, using fast-scanning atomic force microscopy, we have visualized conformational changes in the sarcoplasmic reticulum Ca(2+)-ATPase (SERCA) in real time at the single-molecule level. The analyses of individual SERCA molecules in the presence of both ATP and free Ca(2+) revealed up-down structural changes corresponding to the Albers-Post scheme. This fluctuation was strongly affected by the ATP and Ca(2+) concentrations, and was prevented by an inhibitor, thapsigargin. Interestingly, at a physiological ATP concentrations, the up-down motion disappeared completely. These results indicate that SERCA does not transit through the shortest structure, and has a catalytic pathway different from the ordinary Albers-Post scheme under physiological conditions. PMID:21707923

  9. Ca channel gating during cardiac action potentials.

    PubMed

    Mazzanti, M; DeFelice, L J

    1990-10-01

    How do Ca channels conduct Ca ions during the cardiac action potential? We attempt to answer this question by applying a two-microelectrode technique, previously used for Na and K currents, in which we record the patch current and the action potential at the same time (Mazzanti, M., and L. J. DeFelice. 1987. Biophys. J. 12:95-100, and 1988. Biophys. J. 54:1139-1148; Wellis, D., L. J. DeFelice, and M. Mazzanti. 1990. Biophys. J. 57:41-48). In this paper, we also compare the action currents obtained by the technique with the step-protocol currents obtained during standard voltage-clamp experiments. Individual Ca channels were measured in 10 mM Ca/1 Ba and 10 mM Ba. To describe part of our results, we use the nomenclature introduced by Hess, P., J. B. Lansman, and R. W. Tsien (1984. Nature (Lond.). 311:538-544). With Ba as the charge carrier, Ca channel kinetics convert rapidly from long to short open times as the patch voltage changes from 20 to -20 mV. This voltage-dependent conversion occurs during action potentials and in step-protocol experiments. With Ca as the charge carrier, the currents are brief at all voltages, and it is difficult to define either the number of channels in the patch or the conductance of the individual channels. Occasionally, however, Ca-conducting channels spontaneously convert to long-open-time kinetics (in Hess et al., 1984, notation, mode 2). When this happens, which is about once in every 100beats, there usually appears to be only one channel in the patch. In this rare configuration, the channel is open long enough to measure its conductance in 10 Ca/ 1 Ba. The value is 8-10 pS, which is about half the conductance in Ba. Because the long openings occur so infrequently with Ca as the charge carrier, they contribute negligibly to the average Ca current at any particular time during an action potential. However, the total number of Ca ions entering during these long openings may be significant when compared to the number entering by the

  10. PIK3CA in Colorectal Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Cathomas, Gieri

    2014-01-01

    PIK3CA, the catalytic subunit of PI3K, is mutated in many different tumors, including colorectal cancer (CRC). Mutations of PIK3CA have been reported in 10–20% of CRC, about 80% of mutations found in two hot spots in exon 9 and exon 20. In RAS wild-type CRC, PIK3CA mutations have been associated with a worse clinical outcome and with a negative prediction of a response to targeted therapy by anti-EGFR monoclonal antibodies. However, these findings have not been confirmed in all studies and subsequent more detailed analysis has revealed that these effects may be restricted to mutations in Exon 20. Finally, mutations in PIK3CA may be the long sought biomarker for successful adjuvant therapy with aspirin in patients with CRC. Therefore, PIK3CA mutations appear to be a promising predictive biomarker; however, further data are needed to conclusively define the impact of somatic mutations in the PIK3CA gene for the management of patients with CRC. PMID:24624362

  11. Ca(5)Zr(3)F(22).

    PubMed

    Oudahmane, Abdelghani; El-Ghozzi, Malika; Avignant, Daniel

    2012-04-01

    Single crystals of Ca(5)Zr(3)F(22), penta-calcium trizirconium docosafluoride, were obtained unexpectedly by solid-state reaction between CaF(2) and ZrF(4) in the presence of AgF. The structure of the title compound is isotypic with that of Sr(5)Zr(3)F(22) and can be described as being composed of layers with composition [Zr(3)F(20)](8-) made up from two different [ZrF(8)](4-) square anti-prisms (one with site symmetry 2) by corner-sharing. The layers extending parallel to the (001) plane are further linked by Ca(2+) cations, forming a three-dimensional network. Amongst the four crystallographically different Ca(2+) ions, three are located on twofold rotation axes. The Ca(2+) ions exhibit coordination numbers ranging from 8 to 12, depending on the cut off, with very distorted fluorine environments. Two of the Ca(2+) ions occupy inter-stices between the layers whereas the other two are located in void spaces of the [Zr(3)F(20)](8-) layer and alternate with the two Zr atoms along [010]. The crystal under investigation was an inversion twin. PMID:22589749

  12. Effect of morphine on synaptosomal Ca++ uptake.

    PubMed

    Guerrero-Munoz, F; Cerreta, K V; Guerrero, M L; Way, E L

    1979-04-01

    The effect of morphine on the uptake of 45Ca++ was studied in synaptosomes from mouse brain using two procedures, centrifugation and filtration. The addition of morphine (1.7 x 10(-7) or 3.4 x 10(-7) M) reduced 45CA++ uptake by either technique, although the basal 45Ca++ uptake by the filtration method was approximately 7-fold higher than that by the centrifugation procedure. Similar effects were obtained after acute morphine treatment with 10 mg/kg s.c. Previous naloxone in vitro treatment (1.9 x 10(-8) M) or in vivo administration (2 mg/kg s.c.) reversed the morphine inhibition of the 45Ca++ uptake. On the other hand, after the animal was rendered tolerant and dependent by morphine pellet implantation, an enhancement of the synaptosomal 45Ca++ uptake was observed. It is concluded that changes in Ca++ fluxes in synaptosomes observed after acute and chronic morphine treatment may be involved with morphine pharmacological action related with analgesia, tolerance and physical dependence. PMID:571016

  13. Efficient 41Ca measurements for biomedical applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vockenhuber, C.; Schulze-König, T.; Synal, H.-A.; Aeberli, I.; Zimmermann, M. B.

    2015-10-01

    We present the performance of 41Ca measurements using low-energy Accelerator Mass Spectrometry (AMS) at the 500 kV facility TANDY at ETH Zurich. We optimized the measurement procedure for biomedical applications where reliability and high sample throughput is required. The main challenge for AMS measurements of 41Ca is the interfering stable isobar 41K. We use a simplified sample preparation procedure to produce calcium fluoride (CaF2) and extract calcium tri-fluoride ions (CaF3-) ions to suppress the stable isobar 41K. Although 41K is not completely suppressed we reach 41Ca/40Ca background level in the 10-12 range which is adequate for biomedical studies. With helium as a stripper gas we can use charge state 2+ at high transmission (∼50%). The new measurement procedure with the approximately 10 × improved efficiency and the higher accuracy due to 41K correction allowed us to measure more than 600 samples for a large biomedical study within only a few weeks of measurement time.

  14. Mixed Large Cell Neuroendocrine Carcinoma and Adenocarcinoma with Spindle Cell and Clear Cell Features in the Extrahepatic Bile Duct

    PubMed Central

    Agarwal, Rishi; Nguyen, Jeremy; Weidenhaft, Mandy Crause; Shores, Nathan; Kimbrell, Hillary Z.

    2014-01-01

    Mixed adenoneuroendocrine carcinomas, spindle cell carcinomas, and clear cell carcinomas are all rare tumors in the biliary tract. We present the first case, to our knowledge, of an extrahepatic bile duct carcinoma composed of all three types. A 65-year-old man with prior cholecystectomy presented with painless jaundice, vomiting, and weight loss. CA19-9 and alpha-fetoprotein (AFP) were elevated. Cholangioscopy revealed a friable mass extending from the middle of the common bile duct to the common hepatic duct. A bile duct excision was performed. Gross examination revealed a 3.6 cm intraluminal polypoid tumor. Microscopically, the tumor had foci of conventional adenocarcinoma (CK7-positive and CA19-9-postive) surrounded by malignant-appearing spindle cells that were positive for cytokeratins and vimentin. Additionally, there were separate areas of large cell neuroendocrine carcinoma (LCNEC). Foci of clear cell carcinoma merged into both the LCNEC and the adenocarcinoma. Tumor invaded through the bile duct wall with extensive perineural and vascular invasion. Circumferential margins were positive. The patient's poor performance status precluded adjuvant therapy and he died with recurrent and metastatic disease 5 months after surgery. This is consistent with the reported poor survival rates of biliary mixed adenoneuroendocrine carcinomas. PMID:24804133

  15. Tumor markers used in monitoring the tumor recurrence in patients with colorectal cancer

    PubMed Central

    BURZ, CLAUDIA; AZIZ, BEN YOUSSEF MOHAMED; BĂLĂCESCU, LOREDANA; LELUŢIU, LUMINIŢA; BUIGA, RAREŞ; SAMASCA, GABRIEL; IRIMIE, ALEXANDRU; LISENCU, COSMIN

    2016-01-01

    Background and aims The aim of this study was to investigate the value of serum carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA) and carbohydrate antigen (CA 19-9) correlated with some tissue molecules as predictive markers for recurrence in colon cancer. Methods A total of 30 patients diagnosed with colon cancer stage II or III who underwent optimal surgery were enrolled in study. Tumor markers CEA and CA 19-9 were determined before surgery. Tumor samples were prepared using tissue microarray kit (TMA) then stained for different cellular markers (Ki 67, HER2, BCL2, CD56, CD4, CD8) and analyzed using Inforatio programme for quantitative determination. All patients received standard adjuvant treatment, which consisted of eight cycles chemotherapy type XELOX. The patients were followed up for 3 years. Results Upon 3 years follow-up, 67% of patients developed tumor relapse, the most common site of metastasis being the liver. No correlations were observed between either serum or tissue tumor markers and the risk of tumor relapse. Conclusion Over 50% of patients with colon cancer who had optimal treatment developed metastasis. No statistically significant predictive value for investigated molecules was found. Future studies are needed to confirm the use of molecular markers in monitoring patients with colorectal cancer PMID:27547057

  16. [Tumor markers for colorectal cancer].

    PubMed

    Yamamoto, H; Miyake, Y; Noura, S; Ogawa, M; Yasui, M; Ikenaga, M; Sekimoto, M; Monden, M

    2001-09-01

    CEA and CA19-9 are the two most common tumor markers for colorectal cancer that are currently utilized clinically. The positive rate of CEA is 40-60% and that of CA19-9 is 30-50%. Simultaneous use of the two markers is useful in evaluating the therapeutic effect and monitoring the recurrence of advanced colorectal cancer. Surgical specimens may also provide useful information for the appropriate treatment of patients. Using surgically resected lymph nodes, we examined micrometastasis to assess the spread of the cancer cells and the malignant potential of colorectal cancer. Immunohistochemical analysis using anti-cytokeratin antibody revealed no significant impact of micrometastasis on patient prognosis, while RT-PCR assay using CEA as a genetic marker suggested a positive value in predicting a rapid recurrence. Among various molecular markers, we found that CDC25B phosphatase was a powerful prognostic factor for colorectal cancer. Diagnosis of the existence and malignant potential of cancer cells, together with serum tumor marker levels, may help to construct a more useful system for the better treatment of colorectal cancer. PMID:11579645

  17. β-Cell Differentiation of Human Pancreatic Duct–Derived Cells After In Vitro Expansion

    PubMed Central

    Corritore, Elisa; Dugnani, Erica; Pasquale, Valentina; Misawa, Ryosuke; Witkowski, Piotr; Lei, Ji; Markmann, James; Piemonti, Lorenzo; Sokal, Etienne M.; Bonner-Weir, Susan

    2014-01-01

    Abstract β-Cell replacement therapy is a promising field of research that is currently evaluating new sources of cells for clinical use. Pancreatic epithelial cells are potent candidates for β-cell engineering, but their large-scale expansion has not been evidenced yet. Here we describe the efficient expansion and β-cell differentiation of purified human pancreatic duct cells (DCs). When cultured in endothelial growth-promoting media, purified CA19-9+ cells proliferated extensively and achieved up to 22 population doublings over nine passages. While proliferating, human pancreatic duct-derived cells (HDDCs) downregulated most DC markers, but they retained low CK19 and SOX9 gene expression. HDDCs acquired mesenchymal features but differed from fibroblasts or pancreatic stromal cells. Coexpression of duct and mesenchymal markers suggested that HDDCs were derived from DCs via a partial epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition (EMT). This was supported by the blockade of HDDC appearance in CA19-9+ cell cultures after incubation with the EMT inhibitor A83-01. After a differentiation protocol mimicking pancreatic development, HDDC populations contained about 2% of immature insulin-producing cells and showed glucose-unresponsive insulin secretion. Downregulation of the mesenchymal phenotype improved β-cell gene expression profile of differentiated HDDCs without affecting insulin protein expression and secretion. We show that pancreatic ducts represent a new source for engineering large amounts of β-like-cells with potential for treating diabetes. PMID:25437872

  18. [A Case of Long-Term Survival after Surgeries for Gastric Cancer and Metachronous Ovarian Metastasis].

    PubMed

    Yoshida, Tatsuya; Wajima, Naoki; Akasaka, Harue; Sakuraba, Shingo; Muroya, Takahiro; Kubo, Norihito; Okano, Kensuke; Uchida, Chiaki; Hakamada, Kenichi

    2015-11-01

    The patient was a 57-year-old woman. In October 2011, she underwent distal gastrectomy, D2 lymphadenectomy, and Roux-en-Y reconstruction for gastric cancer (pT4a, pN3b, Stage ⅢC [JCGC 14th Edition]). She then received S-1 plus CDDP combination therapy and S-1 monotherapy as postoperative adjuvant chemotherapies for 1 year, and was followed up as an outpatient. In April 2013, a significant increase in the CA19-9 level was noted, and CT indicated a right ovarian tumor. Ovarian metastasis from the gastric cancer was diagnosed, and the response to 3 courses of weekly PTX was stable disease. No findings indicated metastasis to other organs. In July 2013, a salpingo-oophorectomy was performed, after which her CA19-9 level returned to the normal range. Follow-up was adopted as the postoperative strategy in part due to the desires of the patient. Presently, 3 years and 6 months after the initial surgery and 1 year and 9 months after the last surgery, no recurrence has been detected. Generally, ovarian metastasis from gastric cancer is considered to be associated with a poor prognosis. However, our patient showed long-term survival after surgeries for gastric cancer and asynchronous ovarian metastasis. Here, we report the details of our case and review the relevant literature. PMID:26805246

  19. [Two cases of recurrent colorectal cancer treated successfully with folinate/tegafur/uracil (UFT/LV) chemotherapy on an outpatient basis].

    PubMed

    Hosotaki, Kiyoshi; Tabira, Yoichi; Shimamoto, Masato; Tamori, Yasuhiro

    2008-04-01

    We report two cases of recurrent colorectal cancer in two patients who were treated successfully with a combined oral chemotherapeutic agent folinate/tegafur/uracil (UFT/LV) dosage. The first case was a 74-year-old woman who underwent Hartmann operation for colon cancer perforation. One year and 7 months after surgery, a local recurrence was found on the CT scan and endoscopy. It ended in exploratory laparotomy though we were operated on. Chemotherapy using 5-fluorouracil/Leucovorin (5-FU/LV) was performed six times. Sequentially, UFT/LV internal use was managed at our outpatient clinic. This patient has been living without side effects in the first three postoperative years, and without increase in tumors. The second case was a 65-year-old woman who underwent abdominoperineal resection of the rectum for rectal cancer. The histologic stage of disease aggravation of the patient was stageI. Post operatively, 2 years and 6 months later, we recognized a metastasis node on the lung upper right lobe of the patient and her CA19-9 value climbed dramatically. The patient took UFT/LV during outpatient visits to the hospital, the lung node shadow disappeared two months later, and CA19-9 decreased, too. The patient is living without a cancer recurrence now. UFT/LV treatment is one of the effective modalities against recurrence of colorectal cancer from outpatient treatment while maintaining QOL. PMID:18408440

  20. Regulation of RYR1 activity by Ca(2+) and calmodulin

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rodney, G. G.; Williams, B. Y.; Strasburg, G. M.; Beckingham, K.; Hamilton, S. L.

    2000-01-01

    The skeletal muscle calcium release channel (RYR1) is a Ca(2+)-binding protein that is regulated by another Ca(2+)-binding protein, calmodulin. The functional consequences of calmodulin's interaction with RYR1 are dependent on Ca(2+) concentration. At nanomolar Ca(2+) concentrations, calmodulin is an activator, but at micromolar Ca(2+) concentrations, calmodulin is an inhibitor of RYR1. This raises the question of whether the Ca(2+)-dependent effects of calmodulin on RYR1 function are due to Ca(2+) binding to calmodulin, RYR1, or both. To distinguish the effects of Ca(2+) binding to calmodulin from those of Ca(2+) binding to RYR1, a mutant calmodulin that cannot bind Ca(2+) was used to evaluate the effects of Ca(2+)-free calmodulin on Ca(2+)-bound RYR1. We demonstrate that Ca(2+)-free calmodulin enhances the affinity of RYR1 for Ca(2+) while Ca(2+) binding to calmodulin converts calmodulin from an activator to an inhibitor. Furthermore, Ca(2+) binding to RYR1 enhances its affinity for both Ca(2+)-free and Ca(2+)-bound calmodulin.

  1. Pumping Ca2+ up H+ gradients: a Ca2(+)-H+ exchanger without a membrane.

    PubMed

    Swietach, Pawel; Leem, Chae-Hun; Spitzer, Kenneth W; Vaughan-Jones, Richard D

    2014-08-01

    Cellular processes are exquisitely sensitive to H+ and Ca2+ ions because of powerful ionic interactions with proteins. By regulating the spatial and temporal distribution of intracellular [Ca2+] and [H+], cells such as cardiac myocytes can exercise control over their biological function. A well-established paradigm in cellular physiology is that ion concentrations are regulated by specialized, membrane-embedded transporter proteins. Many of these couple the movement of two or more ionic species per transport cycle, thereby linking ion concentrations among neighbouring compartments. Here, we compare and contrast canonical membrane transport with a novel type of Ca(2+)-H+ coupling within cytoplasm, which produces uphill Ca2+ transport energized by spatial H+ ion gradients, and can result in the cytoplasmic compartmentalization of Ca2+ without requiring a partitioning membrane. The mechanism, demonstrated in mammalian myocytes, relies on diffusible cytoplasmic buffers, such as carnosine, homocarnosine and ATP, to which Ca2+ and H+ ions bind in an apparently competitive manner. These buffer molecules can actively recruit Ca2+ to acidic microdomains, in exchange for the movement of H+ ions. The resulting Ca2+ microdomains thus have the potential to regulate function locally. Spatial cytoplasmic Ca(2+)-H+ exchange (cCHX) acts like a 'pump' without a membrane and may be operational in many cell types. PMID:24514908

  2. Ca2+ homeostasis and regulation of ER Ca2+ in mammalian oocytes/eggs

    PubMed Central

    Wakai, Takuya; Fissore, Rafael A.

    2014-01-01

    The activation of the developmental program in mammalian eggs relies on the initiation at the time of fertilization of repeated rises in the intracellular concentration of free calcium ([Ca2+]i), also known as [Ca2+]i oscillations. The ability to mount the full complement of oscillations is only achieved at the end of oocyte maturation, at the metaphase stage of meiosis II (MII). Over the last decades research has focused on addressing the mechanisms by which the sperm initiates the oscillations and identification of the channels that mediate intracellular Ca2+ release. This review will describe the up-to-date knowledge of other aspects of Ca2+ homeostasis in mouse such as the mechanisms that transport Ca2+ out of the cytosol into the endoplasmic reticulum (ER), the Ca2+ store of the oocyte/egg, into other organelles and also those extrude Ca2+. Evidence pointing to channels in the plasma membrane that mediate Ca2+ entry from the extracellular milieu, which is required for the persistence of the oscillations, is also discussed, along with the modifications that these mechanisms undergo during maturation. Lastly, we highlight areas where additional research is needed to obtain a better understating of the molecules and mechanisms that regulate homeostasis in this unique Ca2+ signaling system. PMID:23260016

  3. Negative feedback from CaSR signaling to aquaporin-2 sensitizes vasopressin to extracellular Ca2.

    PubMed

    Ranieri, Marianna; Tamma, Grazia; Di Mise, Annarita; Russo, Annamaria; Centrone, Mariangela; Svelto, Maria; Calamita, Giuseppe; Valenti, Giovanna

    2015-07-01

    We previously described that high luminal Ca(2+) in the renal collecting duct attenuates short-term vasopressin-induced aquaporin-2 (AQP2) trafficking through activation of the Ca(2+)-sensing receptor (CaSR). Here, we evaluated AQP2 phosphorylation and permeability, in both renal HEK-293 cells and in the dissected inner medullary collecting duct, in response to specific activation of CaSR with NPS-R568. In CaSR-transfected cells, CaSR activation drastically reduced the basal levels of AQP2 phosphorylation at S256 (AQP2-pS256), thus having an opposite effect to vasopressin action. When forskolin stimulation was performed in the presence of NPS-R568, the increase in AQP2-pS256 and in the osmotic water permeability were prevented. In the freshly isolated inner mouse medullar collecting duct, stimulation with forskolin in the presence of NPS-R568 prevented the increase in AQP2-pS256 and osmotic water permeability. Our data demonstrate that the activation of CaSR in the collecting duct prevents the cAMP-dependent increase in AQP2-pS256 and water permeability, counteracting the short-term vasopressin response. By extension, our results suggest the attractive concept that CaSR expressed in distinct nephron segments exerts a negative feedback on hormones acting through cAMP, conferring high sensitivity of hormone to extracellular Ca(2+). PMID:25977473

  4. Sr / Ca and Mg / Ca ratios in polygenetic carbonate allochems from a Michigan marl lake

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Treese, Thomas N.; Owen, Robert M.; Wilkinson, Bruce H.

    1981-03-01

    Rapid accumulation of CaCO 3 is occurring in Littlefield Lake, a marl lake located in central Michigan. The sediment, which is 95% CaCO 3, primarily consists of eight different genetic groups of carbonate allochems. These include calcite muds, sands, algal oncoids and Chara encrustations, as well as the dominant aragonitic gastropods Valvota tricarinota. Gyraulus deflectus and Amnicola integra. and the dominant aragonitic pelecypod Sphaerium partumeium. Samples of each of these groups were analyzed for Ca, Sr and Mg. Molar Mg/Ca ratios are primarily controlled by allochem mineralogy, with calcitic forms having Mg/Ca ratios 5-10 times larger than aragonitic (shelled) forms. The Sr/Ca ratios are primarily controlled by biochemical fractionation, and are significantly lower than Sr/Ca ratios of inorganically precipitated aragonite from other settings. Partition coefficients were determined for both Sr and Mg for each carbonate allochem group and, based on comparisons with results reported by other workers, the partition coefficients determined here are generally considered 'typical' or representative values for biogeneous freshwater carbonates. An analysis of variance of the data indicates that most genera and species of carbonate-secreting organisms in marl lakes have highly characteristic Sr/Ca and Mg/Ca ratios. These ratios can potentially serve as geochemical tracers in future investigations of lacustrine carbonate diagenesis. Both Sr and Mg are influenced by grain size and/or surface area, probably due to the presence of these elements in non-lattice-held (exchangeable) positions.

  5. L-type and Ca2+ release channel-dependent hierarchical Ca2+ signalling in rat portal vein myocytes.

    PubMed

    Arnaudeau, S; Boittin, F X; Macrez, N; Lavie, J L; Mironneau, C; Mironneau, J

    1997-11-01

    Ca2+ signalling events and whole-cell Ca2+ currents were analyzed in single myocytes from rat portal vein by using a laser scanning confocal microscope combined with the patch-clamp technique. In myocytes in which the intracellular Ca2+ store was depleted or Ca2+ release channels were blocked by 10 microM ryanodine, inward Ca2+ currents induced slow and sustained elevations of [Ca2+]i. These Ca2+ responses were suppressed by 1 microM oxodipine and by depolarizations to +120 mV, a potential close to the reversal potential for Ca2+ ions, suggesting that they reflected Ca2+ influx through L-type Ca2+ channels. With functioning intracellular Ca2+ stores, flash photolysis of caged Ca2+ gave rise to a small increase in [Ca2+]i with superimposed Ca2+ sparks, reflecting the opening of clustered Ca2+ release channels. Brief Ca2+ currents in the voltage range from -30 to +10 mV triggered Ca2+ sparks or macrosparks that did not propagate in the entire line-scan image. Increasing the duration of Ca2+ current for 100 ms or more allowed the trigger of propagating Ca2+ waves which originated from the same initiation sites as the caffeine-activated response. Both Ca2+ sparks and initiation sites of Ca2+ waves activated by Ca2+ currents were observed in the vicinity of areas that excluded the Ca2+ probes, reflecting infoldings of the plasma membrane close to the sarcoplasmic reticulum, as revealed by fluorescent markers. The hierarchy of Ca2+ signalling events, from submicroscopic fundamental events to elementary events (sparks) and propagated waves, provides an integrated mechanism to regulate vascular tone. PMID:9448946

  6. A caffeine- and ryanodine-sensitive Ca2+ store in bullfrog sympathetic neurones modulates effects of Ca2+ entry on [Ca2+]i.

    PubMed Central

    Friel, D D; Tsien, R W

    1992-01-01

    1. We studied how in changes in cytosolic free Ca2+ concentration ([Ca2+]i) produced by voltage-dependent Ca2+ entry are influenced by a caffeine-sensitive Ca2+ store in bullfrog sympathetic neurones. Ca2+ influx was elicited by K+ depolarization and the store was manipulated with either caffeine or ryanodine. 2. For a time after discharging the store with caffeine and switching to a caffeine-free medium: (a) [Ca2+]i was depressed by up to 40-50 nM below the resting level, (b) caffeine responsiveness was diminished, and (c) brief K+ applications elicited [Ca2+]i responses with slower onset and faster recovery than controls. These effects were more pronounced as the conditioning caffeine concentration was increased over the range 1-30 mM. 3. [Ca2+]i, caffeine and K+ responsiveness recovered in parallel with a half-time of approximately 2 min. Recovery required external Ca2+ and was speeded by increasing the availability of cytosolic Ca2+, suggesting that it reflected replenishment of the store at the expense of cytosolic Ca2+. 4. During recovery, Ca2+ entry stimulated by depolarization had the least effect on [Ca2+]i when the store was filling most rapidly. This suggests that the effect of Ca2+ entry on [Ca2+]i is modified, at least in part, because some of the Ca2+ which enters the cytosol during stimulation is taken up by the store as it refills. 5. Further experiments were carried out to investigate whether the store can also release Ca2+ in response to stimulated Ca2+ entry. In the continued presence of caffeine at a low concentration (1 mM), high K+ elicited a faster and larger [Ca2+]i response compared to controls; at higher concentrations of caffeine (10 and 30 mM) responses were depressed. 6. Ryanodine (1 microM) reduced the rate at which [Ca2+]i increased with Ca2+ entry, but not to the degree observed after discharging the store. At this concentration, ryanodine completely blocked responses to caffeine but had no detectable effect on Ca2+ channel current

  7. CaMKII regulation in information processing and storage

    PubMed Central

    Coultrap, Steven J.; Bayer, K. Ulrich

    2012-01-01

    The Ca2+/Calmodulin(CaM)-dependent protein kinase II (CaMKII) is activated by Ca2+/CaM, but becomes partially autonomous (Ca2+-independent) upon autophosphorylation at T286. This hallmark feature of CaMKII regulation provides a form of molecular memory and is indeed important in long-term potentiation (LTP) of excitatory synapse strength and memory formation. However, emerging evidence supports a direct role in information processing, while storage of synaptic information may instead be mediated by regulated interaction of CaMKII with the NMDA receptor (NMDAR) complex. These and other CaMKII regulation mechanisms are discussed here in the context of the kinase structure and their impact on post-synaptic functions. Recent findings also implicate CaMKII in long-term depression (LTD), as well as functional roles at inhibitory synapses, lending renewed emphasis on better understanding the spatio-temporal control of CaMKII regulation. PMID:22717267

  8. Ultrastructural and immunohistochemical localization of plasma membrane Ca2+-ATPase 4 in Ca2+-transporting epithelia.

    PubMed

    Alexander, R Todd; Beggs, Megan R; Zamani, Reza; Marcussen, Niels; Frische, Sebastian; Dimke, Henrik

    2015-10-01

    Plasma membrane Ca(2+)-ATPases (PMCAs) participate in epithelial Ca(2+) transport and intracellular Ca(2+) signaling. The Pmca4 isoform is enriched in distal nephron isolates and decreased in mice lacking the epithelial transient receptor potential vanilloid 5 Ca(2+) channel. We therefore hypothesized that Pmca4 plays a significant role in transcellular Ca(2+) flux and investigated the localization and regulation of Pmca4 in Ca(2+)-transporting epithelia. Using antibodies directed specifically against Pmca4, we found it expressed only in the smooth muscle layer of mouse and human intestines, whereas pan-specific Pmca antibodies detected Pmca1 in lateral membranes of enterocytes. In the kidney, Pmca4 showed broad localization to the distal nephron. In the mouse, expression was most abundant in segments coexpressing the epithelial ransient receptor potential vanilloid 5 Ca(2+) channel. Significant, albeit lower, expression was also evident in the region encompassing the cortical thick ascending limbs, macula densa, and early distal tubules as well as smooth muscle layers surrounding renal vessels. In the human kidney, a similar pattern of distribution was observed, with the highest PMCA4 expression in Na(+)-Cl(-) cotransporter-positive tubules. Electron microscopy demonstrated Pmca4 localization in distal nephron cells at both the basolateral membrane and intracellular perinuclear compartments but not submembranous vesicles, suggesting rapid trafficking to the plasma membrane is unlikely to occur in vivo. Pmca4 expression was not altered by perturbations in Ca(2+) balance, pointing to a housekeeping function of the pump in Ca(2+)-transporting epithelia. In conclusion, Pmca4 shows a divergent expression pattern in Ca(2+)-transporting epithelia, inferring diverse roles for this isoform not limited to transepithelial Ca(2+) transport. PMID:26180241

  9. Swelling-Activated Ca2+ Channels Trigger Ca2+ Signals in Merkel Cells

    PubMed Central

    Haeberle, Henry; Bryan, Leigh A.; Vadakkan, Tegy J.; Dickinson, Mary E.; Lumpkin, Ellen A.

    2008-01-01

    Merkel cell-neurite complexes are highly sensitive touch receptors comprising epidermal Merkel cells and sensory afferents. Based on morphological and molecular studies, Merkel cells are proposed to be mechanosensory cells that signal afferents via neurotransmission; however, functional studies testing this hypothesis in intact skin have produced conflicting results. To test this model in a simplified system, we asked whether purified Merkel cells are directly activated by mechanical stimulation. Cell shape was manipulated with anisotonic solution changes and responses were monitored by Ca2+ imaging with fura-2. We found that hypotonic-induced cell swelling, but not hypertonic solutions, triggered cytoplasmic Ca2+ transients. Several lines of evidence indicate that these signals arise from swelling-activated Ca2+-permeable ion channels. First, transients were reversibly abolished by chelating extracellular Ca2+, demonstrating a requirement for Ca2+ influx across the plasma membrane. Second, Ca2+ transients were initially observed near the plasma membrane in cytoplasmic processes. Third, voltage-activated Ca2+ channel (VACC) antagonists reduced transients by half, suggesting that swelling-activated channels depolarize plasma membranes to activate VACCs. Finally, emptying internal Ca2+ stores attenuated transients by 80%, suggesting Ca2+ release from stores augments swelling-activated Ca2+ signals. To identify candidate mechanotransduction channels, we used RT-PCR to amplify ion-channel transcripts whose pharmacological profiles matched those of hypotonic-evoked Ca2+ signals in Merkel cells. We found 11 amplicons, including PKD1, PKD2, and TRPC1, channels previously implicated in mechanotransduction in other cells. Collectively, these results directly demonstrate that Merkel cells are activated by hypotonic-evoked swelling, identify cellular signaling mechanisms that mediate these responses, and support the hypothesis that Merkel cells contribute to touch reception

  10. Acidic Ca(2+) stores come to the fore.

    PubMed

    Patel, Sandip; Muallem, Shmuel

    2011-08-01

    Changes in the concentration of cytosolic Ca(2+) form the basis of a ubiquitous signal transduction pathway. Accumulating evidence implicates acidic organelles in the control of Ca(2+) dynamics in organisms across phyla. In this special issue, we discuss Ca(2+) signalling by these "acidic Ca(2+) stores" which include acidocalcisomes, vacuoles, the endo-lysosomal system, lysosome-related organelles, secretory vesicles and the Golgi complex. Ca(2+) release from these morphologically very different organelles is mediated by members of the TRP channel superfamily and two-pore channels. Inositol trisphosphate and ryanodine receptors which are traditionally viewed as endoplasmic reticulum Ca(2+) release channels can also mobilize acidic Ca(2+) stores. Ca(2+) uptake into acidic Ca(2+) stores is driven by Ca(2+) ATPases and Ca(2+)/H(+) exchangers. In animal cells, the Ca(2+)-mobilizing messenger NAADP plays a central role in mediating Ca(2+) signals from acidic Ca(2+) stores through activation of two-pore channels. These signals are important for several physiological processes including muscle contraction and differentiation. Dysfunctional acidic Ca(2+) stores have been implicated in diseases such as acute pancreatitis and lysosomal storage disorders. Acidic Ca(2+) stores are therefore emerging as essential components of the Ca(2+) signalling network and merit extensive further study. PMID:21497395

  11. Control of ciliary motility by Ca sup 2+ : Integration of Ca sup 2+ -dependent functions and targets for Ca sup 2+ action

    SciTech Connect

    Evans, T.C.

    1988-01-01

    To identify functions that regulate Ca{sup 2+}-induced ciliary reversal in Paramecium, mutants defective in terminating depolarization-induced backward swimming were selected. Six independent recessive mutations (k-shy) comprising two complementation groups, k-shyA and k-shyB, were identified. All mutants exhibited prolonged backward swimming in depolarizing solutions. Voltage clamp studies revealed that mutant Ca{sup 2+} current amplitudes were reduced, but could be restored to wild type levels by EGTA injection. The recovery of the mutant Ca{sup 2+} current from Ca{sup 2+}-dependent inactivation, and the decay of the Ca{sup 2+}-dependent K{sup +} and Ca{sup 2+}-dependent Na{sup +} currents after depolarization were slow in k-shy compared to wild type. To identify protein targets of Ca{sup 2+} action, ciliary proteins that interact with calmodulin (CaM) were characterized. With a {sup 125}I-CaM blot assay, several CaM-binding proteins were identified including axonemal, soluble, and membrane-bound polypeptides. Competitive displacement studies with unlabeled Paramecium CaM, bovine CaM, and troponinC suggested that both protein types bind CaM with high affinity and specificity. To examine the presence of CaM-binding sites in intact axonemes, a filtration binding assay was developed.

  12. Diffusion of Ca and Mg in Calcite

    SciTech Connect

    Cygan, R.T.; Fisler, D.K.

    1999-02-10

    The self-diffusion of Ca and the tracer diffusion of Mg in calcite have been experimentally measured using isotopic tracers of {sup 25}Mg and {sup 44}Ca. Natural single crystals of calcite were coated with a thermally-sputtered oxide thin film and then annealed in a CO{sub 2} gas at one atmosphere total pressure and temperatures from 550 to 800 C. Diffusion coefficient values were derived from the depth profiles obtained by ion microprobe analysis. The resultant activation energies for Mg tracer diffusion and Ca self-diffusion are respectively: E{sub a}(Mg) = 284 {+-} 74 kJ/mol and E{sub a}(Ca) = 271 {+-} 80 kJ/mol. For the temperature ranges in these experiments, the diffusion of Mg is faster than Ca. The results are generally consistent in magnitude with divalent cation diffusion rates obtained in previous studies and provide a means of interpreting the thermal histories of carbonate minerals, the mechanism of dolomitization, and other diffusion-controlled processes. The results indicate that cation diffusion in calcite is relatively slow and cations are the rate-limiting diffusing species for the deformation of calcite and carbonate rocks. Application of the calcite-dolomite geothermometer to metamorphic assemblages will be constrained by cation diffusion and cooling rates. The direct measurement of Mg tracer diffusion in calcite indicates that dolomitization is unlikely to be accomplished by Mg diffusion in the solid state but by a recrystallization process.

  13. Ca2+ signaling during vertebrate somitogenesis.

    PubMed

    Webb, Sarah E; Miller, Andrew L

    2006-07-01

    A variety of Ca2+ signals, in the form of intercellular pulses and waves, have been reported to be associated with the various sequential stages of somitogenesis: from convergent extension and the formation of the paraxial mesoderm; during the patterning of the paraxial mesoderm to establish segmental units; throughout the formation of the morphological boundaries that delineate the segmental units, and finally from within the maturing somites as they undergo subsequent development and differentiation. Due to both the technical challenges presented in imaging intact, developing embryos, and the subtle nature of the Ca2+ transients generated, they have proved to be difficult to visualize. However, a combination of cultured cell preparations and improvements in explant and whole embryo imaging techniques has begun to reveal a new and exciting class of developmental Ca2+ signals. In this chapter, we review the small, but expanding, number of reports in the literature and attempt to identify common characteristics of the somitogenic Ca2+ transients, such as their mode of generation, as well as their spatial and temporal features. This may help to elucidate the significance and function of these intriguing Ca2+ transients and thus integrate them into the complex signaling networks that orchestrate early developmental events. PMID:16787560

  14. CaF2:Yb laser ceramics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akchurin, M. Sh.; Basiev, T. T.; Demidenko, A. A.; Doroshenko, M. E.; Fedorov, P. P.; Garibin, E. A.; Gusev, P. E.; Kuznetsov, S. V.; Krutov, M. A.; Mironov, I. A.; Osiko, V. V.; Popov, P. A.

    2013-01-01

    CaF2:Yb fluoride laser ceramics, prepared by hot-forming, exhibit the same optical properties as starting single crystals. Slope efficiency of the Сa0.95Yb0.05F2.05 is equal to 35% in the pulsed mode of laser operation. Decrease of ytterbium concentration in CaF2:Yb samples down to 3 mol.% resulted in the essential improvement of Сa0.97Yb0.03F2.03 thermal conductivity from 3.5 to 4.5 W/m K, but slightly decreased (down to 30%) slope efficiency of the samples under both pulsed and CW mode of operation. Alternative hot-pressing synthesis of CaF2:Yb fluoride laser ceramics provided materials with superior mechanical properties (microhardness Н = 3.2 GPa and fracture toughness К1С = 0.65 МPа m1/2) in comparison with hot-formed and/or single crystal CaF2:Yb specimens. For the first time, lasing has been observed for the novel aforementioned hot-pressed CaF2:Yb ceramics.

  15. Multifaceted plasma membrane Ca(2+) pumps: From structure to intracellular Ca(2+) handling and cancer.

    PubMed

    Padányi, Rita; Pászty, Katalin; Hegedűs, Luca; Varga, Karolina; Papp, Béla; Penniston, John T; Enyedi, Ágnes

    2016-06-01

    Plasma membrane Ca(2+) ATPases (PMCAs) are intimately involved in the control of intracellular Ca(2+) concentration. They reduce Ca(2+) in the cytosol not only by direct ejection, but also by controlling the formation of inositol-1,4,5-trisphosphate and decreasing Ca(2+) release from the endoplasmic reticulum Ca(2+) pool. In mammals four genes (PMCA1-4) are expressed, and alternative RNA splicing generates more than twenty variants. The variants differ in their regulatory characteristics. They localize into highly specialized membrane compartments and respond to the incoming Ca(2+) with distinct temporal resolution. The expression pattern of variants depends on cell type; a change in this pattern can result in perturbed Ca(2+) homeostasis and thus altered cell function. Indeed, PMCAs undergo remarkable changes in their expression pattern during tumorigenesis that might significantly contribute to the unbalanced Ca(2+) homeostasis of cancer cells. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Calcium and Cell Fate. Guest Editors: Jacques Haiech, Claus Heizmann, Joachim Krebs, Thierry Capiod and Olivier Mignen. PMID:26707182

  16. Characterizing CA{sub 2} and CA{sub 6} using ELNES

    SciTech Connect

    Altay, A.; Carter, C.B.; Rulis, P.; Ching, W.-Y.; Arslan, I.; Guelguen, M.A.

    2010-08-15

    Calcium aluminates, compounds in the CaO-Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} phase system, are used in high-temperature cements and refractory oxides and have wide range of potential technological applications due to their interesting optical, electrical, thermal, and mechanical properties. They are used in both crystalline and glassy form; the glass is an isotropic material while the crystalline materials may be highly anisotropic. This paper will consider two particular crystalline materials, CA{sub 2} and CA{sub 6}, but the results should be applicable to all calcium aluminates. Although CA{sub 2} and CA{sub 6} crystals contain the same chemical species, Ca, Al, and O, the coordination and local environments of these species are different in the two structures and hence they show very different energy-loss near-edge structures (ELNES) when examined by electron energy-loss spectroscopy (EELS) in the TEM. The data obtained using ELNES can effectively provide a fingerprint for each compound and a map for their electronic structure. Once such fingerprints are obtained, they can be used to identify nano-sized particles/grains or material at interfaces and grain boundaries. In the present study, the local symmetry fingerprints for CA{sub 2} and CA{sub 6} structures are reported combining experimental spectra with electronic-structure calculations that allow the different features in the spectra to be interpreted. Al-L{sub 2,3} and O-K edge core-loss spectra from CA{sub 2} and CA{sub 6} were measured experimentally using electron energy-loss spectroscopy in a monochromated scanning transmission electron microscope. The near-edge structures were calculated for the different phases using the orthogonalized linear combination of atomic-orbitals method, and took account of core-hole interactions. It is shown that CA{sub 2} and CA{sub 6} structures exhibit distinctive experimental ELNES fingerprints so that these two phases can be separately identified even when present in small volumes

  17. Hg2+ signaling in trout hepatoma (RTH-149) cells: involvement of Ca2+-induced Ca2+ release.

    PubMed

    Burlando, Bruno; Bonomo, Marco; Fabbri, Elena; Dondero, Francesco; Viarengo, Aldo

    2003-09-01

    Mercury is a non-essential heavy metal affecting intracellular Ca2+ dynamics. We studied the effects of Hg2+ on [Ca2+]i in trout hepatoma cells (RTH-149). Confocal imaging of fluo-3-loaded cells showed that Hg2+ induced dose-dependent, sustained [Ca2+]i transient, triggered intracellular Ca2+ waves, stimulated Ca2+-ATPase activity, and promoted InsP3 production. The effect of Hg2+ was reduced by the Ca2+ channel blocker verapamil and totally abolished by extracellular GSH, but was almost unaffected by cell loading with the heavy metal chelator TPEN or esterified GSH. In a Ca2+-free medium, Hg2+ induced a smaller [Ca2+]i transient, that was unaffected by TPEN, but was abolished by U73122, a PLC inhibitor, and by cell loading with GDP-betaS, a G protein inhibitor, or heparin, a blocker of intracellular Ca2+ release. Data indicate that Hg2+ induces Ca2+ entry through verapamil-sensitive channels, and intracellular Ca2+ release via a G protein-PLC-InsP3 mechanism. However, in cells loaded with heparin and exposed to Hg2+ in the presence of external Ca2+, the [Ca2+]i rise was maximally reduced, indicating that the global effect of Hg2+ is not a mere sum of Ca2+ entry plus Ca2+ release, but involves an amplification of Ca2+ release operated by Ca2+ entry through a CICR mechanism. PMID:12887976

  18. Mitochondrial Ca(2+) uptake in skeletal muscle health and disease.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Jingsong; Dhakal, Kamal; Yi, Jianxun

    2016-08-01

    Muscle uses Ca(2+) as a messenger to control contraction and relies on ATP to maintain the intracellular Ca(2+) homeostasis. Mitochondria are the major sub-cellular organelle of ATP production. With a negative inner membrane potential, mitochondria take up Ca(2+) from their surroundings, a process called mitochondrial Ca(2+) uptake. Under physiological conditions, Ca(2+) uptake into mitochondria promotes ATP production. Excessive uptake causes mitochondrial Ca(2+) overload, which activates downstream adverse responses leading to cell dysfunction. Moreover, mitochondrial Ca(2+) uptake could shape spatio-temporal patterns of intracellular Ca(2+) signaling. Malfunction of mitochondrial Ca(2+) uptake is implicated in muscle degeneration. Unlike non-excitable cells, mitochondria in muscle cells experience dramatic changes of intracellular Ca(2+) levels. Besides the sudden elevation of Ca(2+) level induced by action potentials, Ca(2+) transients in muscle cells can be as short as a few milliseconds during a single twitch or as long as minutes during tetanic contraction, which raises the question whether mitochondrial Ca(2+) uptake is fast and big enough to shape intracellular Ca(2+) signaling during excitation-contraction coupling and creates technical challenges for quantification of the dynamic changes of Ca(2+) inside mitochondria. This review focuses on characterization of mitochondrial Ca(2+) uptake in skeletal muscle and its role in muscle physiology and diseases. PMID:27430885

  19. Growth rate effects on Mg/Ca and Sr/Ca ratios constrained by belemnite calcite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vinzenz Ullmann, Clemens

    2016-04-01

    Multiple temperature proxies from single species are important to achieve robust palaeotemperature estimates. Besides the commonly employed oxygen isotope thermometer, also Mg/Ca and Sr/Ca ratios perform well as proxies for calcification temperature in the shells of some species. While salinity changes affect the ratios of earth alkaline elements much less than the δ18O thermometer, metabolic effects may exert a strong control on the expression of element ratios. Such effects are hard to study because biomineralization experiments have to overcome large intraspecific variability and can hardly ever isolate the controls of a single parameter on shell geochemistry. The unique geometry of the belemnite rostrum constitutes an exception to this rule. Its shape, large size, and the visibility of growth increments as bands enable the analysis of multiple, correlatable, high resolution geochemical profiles in a single fossil. The effects of the growth rate variability amongst these profiles on Mg/Ca and Sr/Ca ratios has been tested here. Within a specimen of Passaloteuthis bisulcata (Early Toarcian, Cleveland Basin, UK), Mg/Ca and Sr/Ca data were obtained from four profiles. With respect to growth rate in the first profile, which was taken as a reference, the relative growth rates in the remaining three profiles varied by a factor of 0.9 to 2.7. Results suggest that relative growth rate is linearly correlated with Mg/Ca and Sr/Ca, with a decrease of Mg/Ca by 8 % and increase of Sr/Ca by 6 % per 100 % increase in relative growth rate. The observed trends are consistent with abiogenic precipitation experiments and suggest that crystal precipitation rate exerts a significant, predictable control on the element distribution in biogenic calcite.

  20. Materials compatibility during the chlorination of molten CaCl/sub 2/. CaO salts. [CaCl/sub 2/. CaO salt

    SciTech Connect

    Rense, C.E.C.; Fife, K.W.; Bowersox, D.F.; Ferran, M.D.

    1987-01-01

    As part of our effort to develop a semicontinuous PuO/sub 2/ reduction process, we are investigating promising materials for containing a 900/sup 0/C molten CaCl/sub 2/ . CaO chlorination reaction. We want the material to contain this reaction and to be reusable. We tested candidate materials in a simulated salt (no plutonium) using anhydrous HCl as the chlorinating agent. Data are presented on the performance of 36 metals and alloys, 9 ceramics, and 3 coatings.

  1. Gonadotropin-releasing hormone-induced Ca2+ transients in single identified gonadotropes require both intracellular Ca2+ mobilization and Ca2+ influx.

    PubMed Central

    Shangold, G A; Murphy, S N; Miller, R J

    1988-01-01

    We examined the effects of gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH) on the intracellular free Ca2+ concentration ([Ca2+]i) in single rat anterior pituitary gonadotropes identified by a reverse hemolytic plaque assay. Concentrations of GnRH greater than 10 pM elicited increases in [Ca2+]i in identified cells but not in others. In contrast, depolarization induced by 50 mM K+ increased [Ca2+]i in all cells. Ca2+ transients induced by GnRH exhibited a complex time course. After an initial rapid rise, the [Ca2+]i fell to near basal levels only to be followed by a secondary extended rise and fall. Analysis of the Ca2+ transients on a rapid time base revealed that responses frequently consisted of several rapid oscillations in [Ca2+]i. Removal of extracellular Ca2+ or addition of the dihydropyridine Ca2+-channel blocker nitrendipine completely blocked the secondary rise in [Ca2+]i but had no effect whatsoever on the initial spike. Nitrendipine also blocked 50 mM K+-induced increases in [Ca2+]i in identified gonadotropes. The secondary rise induced by GnRH could be enhanced by a phorbol ester in a nitrendipine-sensitive fashion. Multiple spike responses to GnRH stimulation of the same cell could only be obtained if subsequent Ca2+ influx was permitted either by allowing a secondary rise to occur or by producing a Ca2+ transient by depolarizing the cells with 50 mM K+. It therefore appears that the response to GnRH consists of an initial phase of Ca2+ mobilization, probably mediated by inositol trisphosphate, and a subsequent phase of Ca2+ influx through nitrendipine-sensitive Ca2+ channels that may be activated by protein kinase C. The relative roles of these phases in the control of gonadotropin secretion are discussed. Images PMID:3045819

  2. Inhibitors of the Ca{sup 2+}/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase phosphatase family (CaMKP and CaMKP-N)

    SciTech Connect

    Sueyoshi, Noriyuki; Takao, Toshihiko; Nimura, Takaki; Sugiyama, Yasunori; Numano, Takamasa; Shigeri, Yasushi; Taniguchi, Takanobu; Kameshita, Isamu Ishida, Atsuhiko

    2007-11-23

    Ca{sup 2+}/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase phosphatase (CaMKP) and its nuclear isoform CaMKP-N are unique Ser/Thr protein phosphatases that negatively regulate the Ca{sup 2+}/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase (CaMK) cascade by dephosphorylating multifunctional CaMKI, II, and IV. However, the lack of specific inhibitors of these phosphatases has hampered studies on these enzymes in vivo. In an attempt to obtain specific inhibitors, we searched inhibitory compounds and found that Evans Blue and Chicago Sky Blue 6B served as effective inhibitors for CaMKP. These compounds also inhibited CaMKP-N, but inhibited neither protein phosphatase 2C, another member of PPM family phosphatase, nor calcineurin, a typical PPP family phosphatase. The minimum structure required for the inhibition was 1-amino-8-naphthol-4-sulfonic acid. When Neuro2a cells cotransfected with CaMKIV and CaMKP-N were treated with these compounds, the dephosphorylation of CaMKIV was strongly suppressed, suggesting that these compounds could be used as potent inhibitors of CaMKP and CaMKP-N in vivo as well as in vitro.

  3. Mitochondrial Ryanodine Receptors and Other Mitochondrial Ca2+ Permeable Channels

    PubMed Central

    Ryu, Shin-Young; Beutner, Gisela; Dirksen, Robert T.; Kinnally, Kathleen W.; Sheu, Shey-Shing

    2010-01-01

    Ca2+ channels that underlie mitochondrial Ca2+ transport first reported decades ago have now just recently been precisely characterized electrophysiologically. Numerous data indicate that mitochondrial Ca2+ uptake via these channels regulates multiple intracellular processes by shaping cytosolic and mitochondrial Ca2+ transients, as well as altering the cellular metabolic and redox state. On the other hand, mitochondrial Ca2+ overload also initiates a cascade of events that leads to cell death. Thus, characterization of mitochondrial Ca2+ channels is central to a comprehensive understanding of cell signaling. Here, we discuss recent progresses in the biophysical and electrophysiological characterization of several distinct mitochondrial Ca2+ channels. PMID:20096690

  4. Regulation and roles of Ca2+ stores in human sperm

    PubMed Central

    Correia, Joao; Michelangeli, Francesco; Publicover, Stephen

    2015-01-01

    [Ca2 +]i signalling is a key regulatory mechanism in sperm function. In mammalian sperm the Ca2 +-permeable plasma membrane ion channel CatSper is central to [Ca2 +]i signalling, but there is good evidence that Ca2 + stored in intracellular organelles is also functionally important. Here we briefly review the current understanding of the diversity of Ca2 + stores and the mechanisms for the regulation of their activity. We then consider the evidence for the involvement of these stores in [Ca2 +]i signalling in mammalian (primarily human) sperm, the agonists that may activate these stores and their role in control of sperm function. Finally we consider the evidence that membrane Ca2 + channels and stored Ca2 + may play discrete roles in the regulation of sperm activities and propose a mechanism by which these different components of the sperm Ca2 +-signalling apparatus may interact to generate complex and spatially diverse [Ca2 +]i signals. PMID:25964382

  5. Solution NMR Structure of the Ca2+-bound N-terminal Domain of CaBP7

    PubMed Central

    McCue, Hannah V.; Patel, Pryank; Herbert, Andrew P.; Lian, Lu-Yun; Burgoyne, Robert D.; Haynes, Lee P.

    2012-01-01

    Calcium-binding protein 7 (CaBP7) is a member of the calmodulin (CaM) superfamily that harbors two high affinity EF-hand motifs and a C-terminal transmembrane domain. CaBP7 has been previously shown to interact with and modulate phosphatidylinositol 4-kinase III-β (PI4KIIIβ) activity in in vitro assays and affects vesicle transport in neurons when overexpressed. Here we show that the N-terminal domain (NTD) of CaBP7 is sufficient to mediate the interaction of CaBP7 with PI4KIIIβ. CaBP7 NTD encompasses the two high affinity Ca2+ binding sites, and structural characterization through multiangle light scattering, circular dichroism, and NMR reveals unique properties for this domain. CaBP7 NTD binds specifically to Ca2+ but not Mg2+ and undergoes significant conformational changes in both secondary and tertiary structure upon Ca2+ binding. The Ca2+-bound form of CaBP7 NTD is monomeric and exhibits an open conformation similar to that of CaM. Ca2+-bound CaBP7 NTD has a solvent-exposed hydrophobic surface that is more expansive than observed in CaM or CaBP1. Within this hydrophobic pocket, there is a significant reduction in the number of methionine residues that are conserved in CaM and CaBP1 and shown to be important for target recognition. In CaBP7 NTD, these residues are replaced with isoleucine and leucine residues with branched side chains that are intrinsically more rigid than the flexible methionine side chain. We propose that these differences in surface hydrophobicity, charge, and methionine content may be important in determining highly specific interactions of CaBP7 with target proteins, such as PI4KIIIβ. PMID:22989873

  6. CaV1.2 beta-subunit coordinates CaMKII-triggered cardiomyocyte death and afterdepolarizations.

    PubMed

    Koval, Olha M; Guan, Xiaoquan; Wu, Yuejin; Joiner, Mei-Ling; Gao, Zhan; Chen, Biyi; Grumbach, Isabella M; Luczak, Elizabeth D; Colbran, Roger J; Song, Long-Sheng; Hund, Thomas J; Mohler, Peter J; Anderson, Mark E

    2010-03-16

    Excessive activation of calmodulin kinase II (CaMKII) causes arrhythmias and heart failure, but the cellular mechanisms for CaMKII-targeted proteins causing disordered cell membrane excitability and myocardial dysfunction remain uncertain. Failing human cardiomyocytes exhibit increased CaMKII and voltage-gated Ca(2+) channel (Ca(V)1.2) activity, and enhanced expression of a specific Ca(V)1.2 beta-subunit protein isoform (beta(2a)). We recently identified Ca(V)1.2 beta(2a) residues critical for CaMKII phosphorylation (Thr 498) and binding (Leu 493), suggesting the hypothesis that these amino acids are crucial for cardiomyopathic consequences of CaMKII signaling. Here we show WT beta(2a) expression causes cellular Ca(2+) overload, arrhythmia-triggering cell membrane potential oscillations called early afterdepolarizations (EADs), and premature death in paced adult rabbit ventricular myocytes. Prevention of intracellular Ca(2+) release by ryanodine or global cellular CaMKII inhibition reduced EADs and improved cell survival to control levels in WT beta(2a)-expressing ventricular myocytes. In contrast, expression of beta(2a) T498A or L493A mutants mimicked the protective effects of ryanodine or global cellular CaMKII inhibition by reducing Ca(2+) entry through Ca(V)1.2 and inhibiting EADs. Furthermore, Ca(V)1.2 currents recorded from cells overexpressing CaMKII phosphorylation- or binding-incompetent beta(2a) subunits were incapable of entering a CaMKII-dependent high-activity gating mode (mode 2), indicating that beta(2a) Thr 498 and Leu 493 are required for Ca(V)1.2 activation by CaMKII in native cells. These data show that CaMKII binding and phosphorylation sites on beta(2a) are concise but pivotal components of a molecular and biophysical and mechanism for EADs and impaired survival in adult cardiomyocytes. PMID:20194790

  7. The CAR that drives Ca2+ to Orai1.

    PubMed

    Jha, Archana; Muallem, Shmuel

    2016-03-01

    How Ca(2+) permeates the Orai1 channel and the mechanism by which the channel achieves high Ca(2+) selectivity remain critical questions in understanding store-operated Ca(2+) influx. In research published in Science Signaling, Frischauf et al. identified a Ca(2+)-accumulating region (CAR) in the extracellular opening of Orai1, which explains how concentrating Ca(2+) at the mouth of Orai1 facilitates channel permeation and contributes to selectivity. PMID:26956483

  8. Fine-tuning synaptic plasticity by modulation of Ca(V)2.1 channels with Ca2+ sensor proteins.

    PubMed

    Leal, Karina; Mochida, Sumiko; Scheuer, Todd; Catterall, William A

    2012-10-16

    Modulation of P/Q-type Ca(2+) currents through presynaptic voltage-gated calcium channels (Ca(V)2.1) by binding of Ca(2+)/calmodulin contributes to short-term synaptic plasticity. Ca(2+)-binding protein-1 (CaBP1) and Visinin-like protein-2 (VILIP-2) are neurospecific calmodulin-like Ca(2+) sensor proteins that differentially modulate Ca(V)2.1 channels, but how they contribute to short-term synaptic plasticity is unknown. Here, we show that activity-dependent modulation of presynaptic Ca(V)2.1 channels by CaBP1 and VILIP-2 has opposing effects on short-term synaptic plasticity in superior cervical ganglion neurons. Expression of CaBP1, which blocks Ca(2+)-dependent facilitation of P/Q-type Ca(2+) current, markedly reduced facilitation of synaptic transmission. VILIP-2, which blocks Ca(2+)-dependent inactivation of P/Q-type Ca(2+) current, reduced synaptic depression and increased facilitation under conditions of high release probability. These results demonstrate that activity-dependent regulation of presynaptic Ca(V)2.1 channels by differentially expressed Ca(2+) sensor proteins can fine-tune synaptic responses to trains of action potentials and thereby contribute to the diversity of short-term synaptic plasticity. PMID:23027954

  9. Detection of Ca(2+)-binding proteins by electrophoretic migration in the presence of Ca2+ combined with 45Ca2+ overlay of protein blots

    SciTech Connect

    Garrigos, M.; Deschamps, S.; Viel, A.; Lund, S.; Champeil, P.; Moller, J.V.; le Maire, M. , Gif-sur-Yvette )

    1991-04-01

    When high affinity Ca(2+)-binding proteins like calmodulin, or proteins with a high Ca(2+)-binding capacity like calsequestrin, underwent sodium dodecyl sulfate-gel electrophoresis in Laemmli systems, their electrophoretic migration rates were much higher in gels containing 1 mM Ca2+ than in gels containing ethylene glycol bis(beta-aminoethyl ether) N,N{prime}-tetraacetic acid (EGTA). Replacement of EGTA by Ca2+ in the gel, combined with the blotting of electrophoretically separated proteins on polyvinylidene difluoride membranes and subsequent 45Ca2+ overlay, proved a very effective means of detecting Ca(2+)-binding proteins. This combined approach is important since artifacts occur in both techniques when used separately. We found that the usual procedure of adding Ca2+ to the sample before electrophoresis without including it in the gel itself permitted the detection of only very high affinity Ca(2+)-binding proteins.

  10. Developmental changes in Ca(2+)-uptake, Na+,Ca(2+)-exchange and Ca(2+)-ATPase in freshly isolated embryonic, newborn and adult chicken heart.

    PubMed

    Prakash, P; Meera, P; Tripathi, O

    1996-01-01

    Developmental changes in cellular Ca(2+)-transport mechanisms were studied in chick heart by determining cellular Ca(2+)-uptake and Na+,Ca(2+)-exchange activity in freshly isolated ventricular tissues of embryonic (5-18 days old), newborn (1-2 days old) and young adult (90-100 days old) heart by monitoring 45Ca influx. Ca(2+)-ATPase activity was determined in microsomal fractions at different stages of development. The Ca(2+)-uptake (per g wet tissue weight) increased with the development of embryonic as well as post-hatch chick heart, reaching a maximum in the young adult chicken. The overall increase in Ca(2+)-uptake, from embryonic day 5 to young-adult stage, was more than 3 fold. The Na+,Ca(2+)-exchange activity, determined as Na(+)-gradient-induced Ca(2+)-uptake in presence of either ouabain or zero [Na+]0, showed a 6-fold increase during development of heart from the embryonic day 5 to the young adult stage. Amiloride, an inhibitor of Na+,Ca(2+)-exchange, caused a dose-dependent reduction in a ouabain-induced rise in 45Ca influx at different stages of development. The inhibitory effect of amiloride was, however, greater during later stages of development. A progressive increase in Ca(2+)-ATPase activity was also seen during development. Ca(2+)-ATPase exhibited about a 4-fold increase in activity from embryonic day 7 to the young adult. The concomitant increase in Ca(2+)-uptake, Na+,Ca(2+)-exchange and Ca(2+)-ATPase activities suggests age-dependent changes in Ca(2+)-transport and storage systems of developing heart during embryogenesis and post-embryonic life. During embryogenesis the developmental increase in Na+,Ca(2+)-exchange activity was greater than that during post-hatch development of heart. However, the increase in Ca(2+)-ATPase activity was greater during post-hatch development than during embryogenesis. It is suggested that Na+,Ca(2+)-exchange and Ca(2+)-ATPase play a prominent role in maintaining cellular Ca2+ homeostasis during embryogenesis and

  11. Mitochondrial and sarcolemmal Ca2+ transport reduce [Ca2+]i during caffeine contractures in rabbit cardiac myocytes.

    PubMed Central

    Bassani, R A; Bassani, J W; Bers, D M

    1992-01-01

    1. Contraction and intracellular Ca2+ (Ca2+i) transients were measured in isolated rabbit ventricular myocytes during twitches and contractures induced by rapid application of 10 mM-caffeine. 2. The amplitude of caffeine-induced contractures and the accompanying Ca2+i transients were larger than during normal twitches and also declined more slowly. This may be because only a fraction of sarcoplasmic reticulum (SR) Ca2+ is released during a normal twitch, or because of a temporal overlap of SR Ca2+ release and uptake during the twitch. 3. When a caffeine contracture was initiated in Na(+)-free, Ca(2+)-free medium (to prevent sarcolemmal Na(+)-Ca2+ exchange) the contracture and Ca2+i transient were larger and decreased much more slowly. Thus, Ca2+ extrusion via Na(+)-Ca2+ exchange may limit the amplitude of caffeine-induced contractures. 4. Relaxation half-time (t1/2) for the twitch (0.17 +/- 0.03 s) was increased to 0.54 +/- 0.07 s for caffeine contractures in control solution and 8.8 +/- 1 s for caffeine-induced contractures in Na(+)-free, Ca(2+)-free solution. These results confirm that the SR Ca2+ pump and Na(+)-Ca2+ exchange are the predominant mechanisms for cytoplasmic Ca2+ removal during relaxation. However slower mechanisms can still reduce intracellular [Ca2+]. 5. Relaxation of caffeine contractures in Na(+)-free solution was further slowed when (a) mitochondrial Ca2+ uptake was inhibited with the oxidative phosphorylation uncoupler, FCCP (t1/2 = 19.7 +/- 3.2 s), or (b) the sarcolemmal Ca(2+)-ATPase pumping ability was depressed by a large transmembrane [Ca2+] gradient (t1/2 = 27.5 +/- 6.9 s). 6. When the four Ca2+ transport systems were simultaneously inhibited (i.e. SR Ca2+ pump, Na(+)-Ca2+ exchange, mitochondrial Ca2+ uptake and sarcolemmal Ca2+ pump), relaxation was practically abolished, but the cell could recover quickly when Na+ was reintroduced and caffeine removed. 7. We conclude that, under our experimental conditions, the sarcolemmal Ca2+ pump

  12. Ca2+ signaling in the myocardium by (redox) regulation of PKA/CaMKII

    PubMed Central

    Johnston, Alex S.; Lehnart, Stephan E.; Burgoyne, Joseph R.

    2015-01-01

    Homeostatic cardiac function is maintained by a complex network of interdependent signaling pathways which become compromised during disease progression. Excitation-contraction-coupling, the translation of an electrical signal to a contractile response is critically dependent on a tightly controlled sequence of events culminating in a rise in intracellular Ca2+ and subsequent contraction of the myocardium. Dysregulation of this Ca2+ handling system as well as increases in the production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) are two major contributing factors to myocardial disease progression. ROS, generated by cellular oxidases and by-products of cellular metabolism, are highly reactive oxygen derivatives that function as key secondary messengers within the heart and contribute to normal homeostatic function. However, excessive production of ROS, as in disease, can directly interact with kinases critical for Ca2+ regulation. This post-translational oxidative modification therefore links changes in the redox status of the myocardium to phospho-regulated pathways essential for its function. This review aims to describe the oxidative regulation of the Ca2+/calmodulin-dependent kinase II (CaMKII) and cAMP-dependent protein kinase A (PKA), and the subsequent impact this has on Ca2+ handling within the myocardium. Elucidating the impact of alterations in intracellular ROS production on Ca2+ dynamics through oxidative modification of key ROS sensing kinases, may provide novel therapeutic targets for preventing myocardial disease progression. PMID:26321952

  13. Measuring spatial and temporal Ca2+ signals in Arabidopsis plants.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Xiaohong; Taylor, Aaron; Zhang, Shenyu; Zhang, Dayong; Feng, Ying; Liang, Gaimei; Zhu, Jian-Kang

    2014-01-01

    Developmental and environmental cues induce Ca(2+) fluctuations in plant cells. Stimulus-specific spatial-temporal Ca(2+) patterns are sensed by cellular Ca(2+) binding proteins that initiate Ca(2+) signaling cascades. However, we still know little about how stimulus specific Ca(2+) signals are generated. The specificity of a Ca(2+) signal may be attributed to the sophisticated regulation of the activities of Ca(2+) channels and/or transporters in response to a given stimulus. To identify these cellular components and understand their functions, it is crucial to use systems that allow a sensitive and robust recording of Ca(2+) signals at both the tissue and cellular levels. Genetically encoded Ca(2+) indicators that are targeted to different cellular compartments have provided a platform for live cell confocal imaging of cellular Ca(2+) signals. Here we describe instructions for the use of two Ca(2+) detection systems: aequorin based FAS (film adhesive seedlings) luminescence Ca(2+) imaging and case12 based live cell confocal fluorescence Ca(2+) imaging. Luminescence imaging using the FAS system provides a simple, robust and sensitive detection of spatial and temporal Ca(2+) signals at the tissue level, while live cell confocal imaging using Case12 provides simultaneous detection of cytosolic and nuclear Ca(2+) signals at a high resolution. PMID:25226381

  14. Apocalmodulin Itself Promotes Ion Channel Opening and Ca2+ Regulation

    PubMed Central

    Adams, Paul J.; Ben-Johny, Manu; Dick, Ivy E.; Inoue, Takanari; Yue, David T.

    2014-01-01

    SUMMARY The Ca2+-free form of calmodulin (apoCaM) often appears inert, modulating target molecules only upon conversion to its Ca2+-bound form. This schema has appeared to govern voltage-gated Ca2+ channels, where apoCaM has been considered a dormant Ca2+ sensor, associated with channels, but awaiting the binding of Ca2+ ions before inhibiting channel opening to provide vital feedback inhibition. Using single-molecule measurements of channels and chemical dimerization to elevate apoCaM, we find that apoCaM binding on its own markedly upregulates opening, rivaling the strongest forms of modulation. Upon Ca2+ binding to this CaM, inhibition may simply reverse the initial upregulation. As RNA edited and spliced channel variants show different affinities for apoCaM, the apoCaM-dependent control mechanisms may underlie the functional diversity of these variants and explain an elongation of neuronal action potentials by apoCaM. More broadly, voltage-gated Na channels adopt this same modulatory principle. ApoCaM thus imparts potent and pervasive ion-channel regulation. PMID:25417111

  15. 77 FR 58901 - California Disaster #CA-00190

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-09-24

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office SMALL BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION California Disaster CA-00190 AGENCY: U.S. Small Business Administration. ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY... Application Deadline Date: 06/14/2013. ADDRESSES: Submit completed loan applications to: U.S. Small...

  16. literacy.ca EXPRESS. December 2010

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Canadian Literacy and Learning Network, 2010

    2010-01-01

    This issue of "literacy.ca EXPRESS" features new and exciting developments, updates and exciting new resources. Articles included in this issue are: (1) Introducing CLLN (Canadian Literacy and Learning Network)!; (2) Supporting Learner Leadership; (3) Involving Learners by Patricia Ashie; (4) Catching Confidence; (5) CALL (Committee of Adult…

  17. Hippocampal CA1 Ripples as Inhibitory Transients.

    PubMed

    Malerba, Paola; Krishnan, Giri P; Fellous, Jean-Marc; Bazhenov, Maxim

    2016-04-01

    Memories are stored and consolidated as a result of a dialogue between the hippocampus and cortex during sleep. Neurons active during behavior reactivate in both structures during sleep, in conjunction with characteristic brain oscillations that may form the neural substrate of memory consolidation. In the hippocampus, replay occurs within sharp wave-ripples: short bouts of high-frequency activity in area CA1 caused by excitatory activation from area CA3. In this work, we develop a computational model of ripple generation, motivated by in vivo rat data showing that ripples have a broad frequency distribution, exponential inter-arrival times and yet highly non-variable durations. Our study predicts that ripples are not persistent oscillations but result from a transient network behavior, induced by input from CA3, in which the high frequency synchronous firing of perisomatic interneurons does not depend on the time scale of synaptic inhibition. We found that noise-induced loss of synchrony among CA1 interneurons dynamically constrains individual ripple duration. Our study proposes a novel mechanism of hippocampal ripple generation consistent with a broad range of experimental data, and highlights the role of noise in regulating the duration of input-driven oscillatory spiking in an inhibitory network. PMID:27093059

  18. Exchange stiffness of Ca-doped YIG

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Avgin, I.; Huber, D. L.

    1994-05-01

    An effective medium theory for the zero-temperature exchange stiffness of uncompensated Ca-doped YIG is presented. The theory is based on the assumption that the effect of the Ca impurities is to produce strong, random ferromagnetic interactions between spins on the a and d sublattices. In the simplest version of the theory, a fraction, x, of the ad exchange integrals are large and positive, x being related to the Ca concentration. The stiffness is calculated as function of x for arbitrary perturbed ad exchange integral, Jxad. For Jxad≳(1/5)‖8Jaa+3Jdd‖, with Jaa and Jdd denoting the aa and dd exchange integrals, respectively, there is a critical concentration, Xc, such that when x≳Xc, the stiffness is complex. It is suggested that Xc delineates the region where there are significant departures from colinearity in the ground state of the Fe spins. Extension of the theory to a model where the Ca doping is assumed to generate Fe4+ ions on the tetrahedral sites is discussed. Possible experimental tests of the theory are mentioned.

  19. literacy.ca EXPRESS. October 2009

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Movement for Canadian Literacy, 2009

    2009-01-01

    This issue of "literacy.ca EXPRESS" focuses on the topic of promising practice. Promising or good practice and lessons learned are used to describe useful practices, approaches or ideas. Articles included in this issue: (1) Practitioner Profile: Meet Connie Jones; (2) Highlights from the LAN (Learner Advisory Network); (3) In the Works... Projects…

  20. Interlamellar CA1 network in the hippocampus

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Sunggu; Yang, Sungchil; Moreira, Thais; Hoffman, Gloria; Carlson, Greg C.; Bender, Kevin J.; Alger, Bradley E.; Tang, Cha-Min

    2014-01-01

    To understand the cellular basis of learning and memory, the neurophysiology of the hippocampus has been largely examined in thin transverse slice preparations. However, the synaptic architecture along the longitudinal septo-temporal axis perpendicular to the transverse projections in CA1 is largely unknown, despite its potential significance for understanding the information processing carried out by the hippocampus. Here, using a battery of powerful techniques, including 3D digital holography and focal glutamate uncaging, voltage-sensitive dye, two-photon imaging, electrophysiology, and immunohistochemistry, we show that CA1 pyramidal neurons are connected to one another in an associational and well-organized fashion along the longitudinal axis of the hippocampus. Such CA1 longitudinal connections mediate reliable signal transfer among the pyramidal cells and express significant synaptic plasticity. These results illustrate a need to reconceptualize hippocampal CA1 network function to include not only processing in the transverse plane, but also operations made possible by the longitudinal network. Our data will thus provide an essential basis for future computational modeling studies on information processing operations carried out in the full 3D hippocampal network that underlies its complex cognitive functions. PMID:25139992

  1. literacy.ca EXPRESS. April 2010

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Movement for Canadian Literacy, 2010

    2010-01-01

    This issue of "literacy.ca EXPRESS" focuses on poverty. The articles included in this issue are: (1) Poverty Overview; (2) Tony's Story; (3) LAN (Learner Advisory Network) Member's Story (Dianne Smith); (4) Linking Adult Literacy to Poverty Reduction; (5) MCL (Movement for Canadian Literacy) Update; (6) Highlights from the LAN; (7) Good to Know...…

  2. SNL/CA Cultural Resources Management Plan.

    SciTech Connect

    Larsen, Barbara L.

    2005-11-01

    The SNL/CA Cultural Resources Management Plan satisfies the site's Environmental Management System requirement to promote long-term stewardship of cultural resources. The plan summarizes the cultural and historical setting of the site, identifies existing procedures and processes that support protection and preservation of resources, and outlines actions that would be initiated if cultural resources were discovered onsite in the future.3

  3. 78 FR 39821 - California Disaster #CA-00202

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-07-02

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office SMALL BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION California Disaster CA-00202 AGENCY: U.S. Small Business Administration. ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY... Deadline Date: 03/25/2014. ADDRESSES: Submit completed loan applications to: U.S. Small...

  4. 78 FR 60366 - California Disaster #CA-00212

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-10-01

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office SMALL BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION California Disaster CA-00212 AGENCY: U.S. Small Business Administration. ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY...: 06/24/2014. ADDRESSES: Submit completed loan applications to: U.S. Small Business...

  5. Inositol Trisphosphate Receptor Ca2+ Release Channels

    PubMed Central

    FOSKETT, J. KEVIN; WHITE, CARL; CHEUNG, KING-HO; MAK, DON-ON DANIEL

    2010-01-01

    The inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate (InsP3) receptors (InsP3Rs) are a family of Ca2+ release channels localized predominately in the endoplasmic reticulum of all cell types. They function to release Ca2+ into the cytoplasm in response to InsP3 produced by diverse stimuli, generating complex local and global Ca2+ signals that regulate numerous cell physiological processes ranging from gene transcription to secretion to learning and memory. The InsP3R is a calcium-selective cation channel whose gating is regulated not only by InsP3, but by other ligands as well, in particular cytoplasmic Ca2+. Over the last decade, detailed quantitative studies of InsP3R channel function and its regulation by ligands and interacting proteins have provided new insights into a remarkable richness of channel regulation and of the structural aspects that underlie signal transduction and permeation. Here, we focus on these developments and review and synthesize the literature regarding the structure and single-channel properties of the InsP3R. PMID:17429043

  6. Hippocampal CA1 Ripples as Inhibitory Transients

    PubMed Central

    Krishnan, Giri P; Fellous, Jean-Marc; Bazhenov, Maxim

    2016-01-01

    Memories are stored and consolidated as a result of a dialogue between the hippocampus and cortex during sleep. Neurons active during behavior reactivate in both structures during sleep, in conjunction with characteristic brain oscillations that may form the neural substrate of memory consolidation. In the hippocampus, replay occurs within sharp wave-ripples: short bouts of high-frequency activity in area CA1 caused by excitatory activation from area CA3. In this work, we develop a computational model of ripple generation, motivated by in vivo rat data showing that ripples have a broad frequency distribution, exponential inter-arrival times and yet highly non-variable durations. Our study predicts that ripples are not persistent oscillations but result from a transient network behavior, induced by input from CA3, in which the high frequency synchronous firing of perisomatic interneurons does not depend on the time scale of synaptic inhibition. We found that noise-induced loss of synchrony among CA1 interneurons dynamically constrains individual ripple duration. Our study proposes a novel mechanism of hippocampal ripple generation consistent with a broad range of experimental data, and highlights the role of noise in regulating the duration of input-driven oscillatory spiking in an inhibitory network. PMID:27093059

  7. Interlamellar CA1 network in the hippocampus.

    PubMed

    Yang, Sunggu; Yang, Sungchil; Moreira, Thais; Hoffman, Gloria; Carlson, Greg C; Bender, Kevin J; Alger, Bradley E; Tang, Cha-Min

    2014-09-01

    To understand the cellular basis of learning and memory, the neurophysiology of the hippocampus has been largely examined in thin transverse slice preparations. However, the synaptic architecture along the longitudinal septo-temporal axis perpendicular to the transverse projections in CA1 is largely unknown, despite its potential significance for understanding the information processing carried out by the hippocampus. Here, using a battery of powerful techniques, including 3D digital holography and focal glutamate uncaging, voltage-sensitive dye, two-photon imaging, electrophysiology, and immunohistochemistry, we show that CA1 pyramidal neurons are connected to one another in an associational and well-organized fashion along the longitudinal axis of the hippocampus. Such CA1 longitudinal connections mediate reliable signal transfer among the pyramidal cells and express significant synaptic plasticity. These results illustrate a need to reconceptualize hippocampal CA1 network function to include not only processing in the transverse plane, but also operations made possible by the longitudinal network. Our data will thus provide an essential basis for future computational modeling studies on information processing operations carried out in the full 3D hippocampal network that underlies its complex cognitive functions. PMID:25139992

  8. Ca2+-Dependent Regulation of Ca2+ Currents in Rat Primary Afferent Neurons: Role of CaMKII and the Effect of Injury

    PubMed Central

    Tang, Qingbo; Bangaru, Madhavi Latha Yadav; Kostic, Sandra; Pan, Bin; Wu, Hsiang-En; Koopmeiners, Andrew S.; Yu, Hongwei; Fischer, Gregory J.; McCallum, J. Bruce; Kwok, Wai-Meng; Hudmon, Andy

    2012-01-01

    Currents through voltage-gated Ca2+ channels (ICa) may be regulated by cytoplasmic Ca2+ levels ([Ca2+]c), producing Ca2+-dependent inactivation (CDI) or facilitation (CDF). Since ICa regulates sensory neuron excitability, altered CDI or CDF could contribute to pain generation after peripheral nerve injury. We explored this by manipulating [Ca2+]c while recording ICa in rat sensory neurons. In uninjured neurons, elevating [Ca2+]c with a conditioning prepulse (−15 mV, 2 s) inactivated ICa measured during subsequent test pulses (−15 mV, 5 ms). This inactivation was Ca2+-dependent (CDI), since it was decreased with elimination of Ca2+ influx by depolarization to above the ICa reversal potential, with high intracellular Ca2+ buffering (EGTA 10 mm or BAPTA 20 mm), and with substitution of Ba2+ for extracellular Ca2+, revealing a residual voltage-dependent inactivation. At longer latencies after conditioning (>6 s), ICa recovered beyond baseline. This facilitation also proved to be Ca2+-dependent (CDF) using the protocols limiting cytoplasmic Ca2+ elevation. Ca2+/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II (CaMKII) blockers applied by bath (KN-93, myristoyl-AIP) or expressed selectively in the sensory neurons (AIP) reduced CDF, unlike their inactive analogues. Protein kinase C inhibition (chelerythrine) had no effect. Selective blockade of N-type Ca2+ channels eliminated CDF, whereas L-type channel blockade had no effect. Following nerve injury, CDI was unaffected, but CDF was eliminated in axotomized neurons. Excitability of sensory neurons in intact ganglia from control animals was diminished after a similar conditioning pulse, but this regulation was eliminated by injury. These findings indicate that ICa in sensory neurons is subject to both CDI and CDF, and that hyperexcitability following injury-induced loss of CDF may result from diminished CaMKII activity. PMID:22915116

  9. ASteCA: Automated Stellar Cluster Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perren, G. I.; Vázquez, R. A.; Piatti, A. E.

    2015-04-01

    We present the Automated Stellar Cluster Analysis package (ASteCA), a suit of tools designed to fully automate the standard tests applied on stellar clusters to determine their basic parameters. The set of functions included in the code make use of positional and photometric data to obtain precise and objective values for a given cluster's center coordinates, radius, luminosity function and integrated color magnitude, as well as characterizing through a statistical estimator its probability of being a true physical cluster rather than a random overdensity of field stars. ASteCA incorporates a Bayesian field star decontamination algorithm capable of assigning membership probabilities using photometric data alone. An isochrone fitting process based on the generation of synthetic clusters from theoretical isochrones and selection of the best fit through a genetic algorithm is also present, which allows ASteCA to provide accurate estimates for a cluster's metallicity, age, extinction and distance values along with its uncertainties. To validate the code we applied it on a large set of over 400 synthetic MASSCLEAN clusters with varying degrees of field star contamination as well as a smaller set of 20 observed Milky Way open clusters (Berkeley 7, Bochum 11, Czernik 26, Czernik 30, Haffner 11, Haffner 19, NGC 133, NGC 2236, NGC 2264, NGC 2324, NGC 2421, NGC 2627, NGC 6231, NGC 6383, NGC 6705, Ruprecht 1, Tombaugh 1, Trumpler 1, Trumpler 5 and Trumpler 14) studied in the literature. The results show that ASteCA is able to recover cluster parameters with an acceptable precision even for those clusters affected by substantial field star contamination. ASteCA is written in Python and is made available as an open source code which can be downloaded ready to be used from its official site.

  10. The Electronic Spectra of CaN2(+) and Ca(N2)2(+)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rodriguez-Santiago, Luis; Bauschlicher, Charles W., Jr.; Arnold, James (Technical Monitor)

    1998-01-01

    The ground and low-lying electronic states of CaN2(+) are studied at several levels of theory. The results for the X(sup 2)Sigma(+) state and the excited (2)(sup 2)Pi state, arising from occupying the Ca 4p orbital, are in good agreement with experiment. The analogous states of Ca(N2)2(+) are studied using the same theoretical approaches, and predictions are made as to the changes caused by the addition of the second N2 ligand.

  11. A study of the low-lying states of CaAr + and CaKr +

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heinemann, Christoph; Koch, Wolfram; Partridge, Harry

    1998-04-01

    The spectroscopic constants of the ground 2Σ + states of CaAr + and CaKr + are determined using high quality ab initio methods. The computed binding energies are 789 and 1252 cm -1, respectively, in good agreement with the experimental determination of Pullins, Scurlock, Reddic and Duncan (J. Chem. Phys. 104 (1996) 7518). The much smaller CaKr + binding energy determined by Buthelezi, Bellert, Lewis and Brucat (Chem. Phys. Lett. 246 (1995) 145) is shown to be due to deficiencies in the method used to approximate the binding energy of the excited state.

  12. Exercise training reverses myocardial dysfunction induced by CaMKIIδC overexpression by restoring Ca2+ homeostasis.

    PubMed

    Høydal, Morten A; Stølen, Tomas O; Kettlewell, Sarah; Maier, Lars S; Brown, Joan Heller; Sowa, Tomas; Catalucci, Daniele; Condorelli, Gianluigi; Kemi, Ole J; Smith, Godfrey L; Wisløff, Ulrik

    2016-07-01

    Several conditions of heart disease, including heart failure and diabetic cardiomyopathy, are associated with upregulation of cytosolic Ca(2+)/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II (CaMKIIδC) activity. In the heart, CaMKIIδC isoform targets several proteins involved in intracellular Ca(2+) homeostasis. We hypothesized that high-intensity endurance training activates mechanisms that enable a rescue of dysfunctional cardiomyocyte Ca(2+) handling and thereby ameliorate cardiac dysfunction despite continuous and chronic elevated levels of CaMKIIδC CaMKIIδC transgenic (TG) and wild-type (WT) mice performed aerobic interval exercise training over 6 wk. Cardiac function was measured by echocardiography in vivo, and cardiomyocyte shortening and intracellular Ca(2+) handling were measured in vitro. TG mice had reduced global cardiac function, cardiomyocyte shortening (47% reduced compared with WT, P < 0.01), and impaired Ca(2+) homeostasis. Despite no change in the chronic elevated levels of CaMKIIδC, exercise improved global cardiac function, restored cardiomyocyte shortening, and reestablished Ca(2+) homeostasis to values not different from WT. The key features to explain restored Ca(2+) homeostasis after exercise training were increased L-type Ca(2+) current density and flux by 79 and 85%, respectively (P < 0.01), increased sarcoplasmic reticulum (SR) Ca(2+)-ATPase (SERCA2a) function by 50% (P < 0.01), and reduced diastolic SR Ca(2+) leak by 73% (P < 0.01), compared with sedentary TG mice. In conclusion, exercise training improves global cardiac function as well as cardiomyocyte function in the presence of a maintained high CaMKII activity. The main mechanisms of exercise-induced improvements in TG CaMKIIδC mice are mediated via increased L-type Ca(2+) channel currents and improved SR Ca(2+) handling by restoration of SERCA2a function in addition to reduced diastolic SR Ca(2+) leak. PMID:27231311

  13. Regulation of endoplasmic reticulum Ca2+ oscillations in mammalian eggs

    PubMed Central

    Wakai, Takuya; Zhang, Nan; Vangheluwe, Peter; Fissore, Rafael A.

    2013-01-01

    Summary Changes in the intracellular concentration of free calcium ([Ca2+]i) regulate diverse cellular processes including fertilization. In mammalian eggs, the [Ca2+]i changes induced by the sperm unfold in a pattern of periodical rises, also known as [Ca2+]i oscillations. The source of Ca2+ during oscillations is the endoplasmic reticulum ([Ca2+]ER), but it is presently unknown how [Ca2+]ER is regulated. Here, we show using mouse eggs that [Ca2+]i oscillations induced by a variety of agonists, including PLCζ, SrCl2 and thimerosal, provoke simultaneous but opposite changes in [Ca2+]ER and cause differential effects on the refilling and overall load of [Ca2+]ER. We also found that Ca2+ influx is required to refill [Ca2+]ER, because the loss of [Ca2+]ER was accelerated in medium devoid of Ca2+. Pharmacological inactivation of the function of the mitochondria and of the Ca2+-ATPase pumps PMCA and SERCA altered the pattern of oscillations and abruptly reduced [Ca2+]ER, especially after inactivation of mitochondria and SERCA functions. We also examined the expression of SERCA2b protein and found that it was expressed throughout oocyte maturation and attained a conspicuous cortical cluster organization in mature eggs. We show that its overexpression reduces the duration of inositol-1,4,5-trisphosphate-induced [Ca2+]i rises, promotes initiation of oscillations and enhances refilling of [Ca2+]ER. Collectively, our results provide novel insights on the regulation of [Ca2+]ER oscillations, which underlie the unique Ca2+-signalling system that activates the developmental program in mammalian eggs. PMID:24101727

  14. Ca2+ signals regulate mitochondrial metabolism by stimulating CREB-mediated expression of the mitochondrial Ca2+ uniporter gene mcu

    PubMed Central

    Shanmughapriya, Santhanam; Rajan, Sudarsan; Hoffman, Nicholas E.; Zhang, Xueqian; Guo, Shuchi; Kolesar, Jill E.; Hines, Kevin J.; Ragheb, Jonathan; Jog, Neelakshi R.; Caricchio, Roberto; Baba, Yoshihiro; Zhou, Yandong; Kaufman, Brett; Cheung, Joseph Y.; Kurosaki, Tomohiro; Gill, Donald L.; Madesh, Muniswamy

    2016-01-01

    Cytosolic Ca2+ signals, generated through the coordinated translocation of Ca2+ across the plasma membrane (PM) and endoplasmic reticulum (ER) membrane, mediate diverse cellular responses. Mitochondrial Ca2+ is important for mitochondrial function and, when cytosolic Ca2+ concentrations become too high, mitochondria function as cellular Ca2+ sinks. By measuring mitochondrial Ca2+ currents, we found that mitochondrial Ca2+ uptake was reduced in chicken DT40 B lymphocytes lacking either the ER-localized inositol trisphosphate receptor (IP3R), which releases Ca2+ from the ER, or Orai1 or STIM1, components of the PM-localized Ca2+-permeable channel complex that mediates store-operated calcium entry (SOCE) in response to depletion of ER Ca2+ stores. The abundance of MCU, the pore-forming subunit of the mitochondrial Ca2+ uniporter, was reduced in cells deficient in IP3R, STIM1, or Orai1. Chromatin immunoprecipitation and promoter reporter analyses revealed that the Ca2+-regulated transcription factor CREB directly bound the mcu promoter and stimulated expression. Lymphocytes deficient in IP3R, STIM1, or Orai1 exhibited altered mitochondrial metabolism, indicating that Ca2+ released from the ER and SOCE-mediated signals modulate mitochondrial function. Thus, our results showed that a transcriptional regulatory circuit involving Ca2+-dependent activation of CREB controls the Ca2+-uptake capability of mitochondria and hence regulates mitochondrial metabolism. PMID:25737585

  15. Activation of the Ca2+-sensing receptor increases renal claudin-14 expression and urinary Ca2+ excretion

    PubMed Central

    Dimke, Henrik; Desai, Prajakta; Borovac, Jelena; Lau, Alyssa; Pan, Wanling; Alexander, R. Todd

    2016-01-01

    Kidney stones are a prevalent clinical condition imposing a large economic burden on the health-care system. Hypercalciuria remains the major risk factor for development of a Ca2+-containing stone. The kidney’s ability to alter Ca2+ excretion in response to changes in serum Ca2+ is in part mediated by the Ca2+-sensing receptor (CaSR). Recent studies revealed renal claudin-14 (Cldn14) expression localized to the thick ascending limb (TAL) and its expression to be regulated via the CaSR. We find that Cldn14 expression is increased by high dietary Ca2+ intake and by elevated serum Ca2+ levels induced by prolonged 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D3 administration. Consistent with this, activation of the CaSR in vivo via administration of the calcimimetic cinacalcet hydrochloride led to a 40-fold increase in Cldn14 mRNA. Moreover, overexpression of Cldn14 in two separate cell culture models decreased paracellular Ca2+ flux by preferentially decreasing cation permeability, thereby increasing transepithelial resistance. These data support the existence of a mechanism whereby activation of the CaSR in the TAL increases Cldn14 expression, which in turn blocks the paracellular reabsorption of Ca2+. This molecular mechanism likely facilitates renal Ca2+ losses in response to elevated serum Ca2+. Moreover, dys-regulation of the newly described CaSR-Cldn14 axis likely contributes to the development of hypercalciuria and kidney stones. PMID:23283989

  16. Ca2+ signals regulate mitochondrial metabolism by stimulating CREB-mediated expression of the mitochondrial Ca2+ uniporter gene MCU.

    PubMed

    Shanmughapriya, Santhanam; Rajan, Sudarsan; Hoffman, Nicholas E; Zhang, Xueqian; Guo, Shuchi; Kolesar, Jill E; Hines, Kevin J; Ragheb, Jonathan; Jog, Neelakshi R; Caricchio, Roberto; Baba, Yoshihiro; Zhou, Yandong; Kaufman, Brett A; Cheung, Joseph Y; Kurosaki, Tomohiro; Gill, Donald L; Madesh, Muniswamy

    2015-03-01

    Cytosolic Ca2+ signals, generated through the coordinated translocation of Ca2+ across the plasma membrane (PM) and endoplasmic reticulum (ER) membrane, mediate diverse cellular responses. Mitochondrial Ca2+ is important for mitochondrial function, and when cytosolic Ca2+ concentration becomes too high, mitochondria function as cellular Ca2+ sinks. By measuring mitochondrial Ca2+ currents, we found that mitochondrial Ca2+ uptake was reduced in chicken DT40 B lymphocytes lacking either the ER-localized inositol trisphosphate receptor (IP3R), which releases Ca2+ from the ER, or Orai1 or STIM1, components of the PM-localized Ca2+ -permeable channel complex that mediates store-operated calcium entry (SOCE) in response to depletion of ER Ca2+ stores. The abundance of MCU, the pore-forming subunit of the mitochondrial Ca2+ uniporter, was reduced in cells deficient in IP3R, STIM1, or Orai1. Chromatin immunoprecipitation and promoter reporter analyses revealed that the Ca2+ -regulated transcription factor CREB (cyclic adenosine monophosphate response element-binding protein) directly bound the MCU promoter and stimulated expression. Lymphocytes deficient in IP3R, STIM1, or Orai1 exhibited altered mitochondrial metabolism, indicating that Ca2+ released from the ER and SOCE-mediated signals modulates mitochondrial function. Thus, our results showed that a transcriptional regulatory circuit involving Ca2+ -dependent activation of CREB controls the Ca2+ uptake capability of mitochondria and hence regulates mitochondrial metabolism. PMID:25737585

  17. Imaging intraorganellar Ca2+ at subcellular resolution using CEPIA

    PubMed Central

    Suzuki, Junji; Kanemaru, Kazunori; Ishii, Kuniaki; Ohkura, Masamichi; Okubo, Yohei; Iino, Masamitsu

    2014-01-01

    The endoplasmic reticulum (ER) and mitochondria accumulate Ca2+ within their lumens to regulate numerous cell functions. However, determining the dynamics of intraorganellar Ca2+ has proven to be difficult. Here we describe a family of genetically encoded Ca2+ indicators, named calcium-measuring organelle-entrapped protein indicators (CEPIA), which can be utilized for intraorganellar Ca2+ imaging. CEPIA, which emit green, red or blue/green fluorescence, are engineered to bind Ca2+ at intraorganellar Ca2+ concentrations. They can be targeted to different organelles and may be used alongside other fluorescent molecular markers, expanding the range of cell functions that can be simultaneously analysed. The spatiotemporal resolution of CEPIA makes it possible to resolve Ca2+ import into individual mitochondria while simultaneously measuring ER and cytosolic Ca2+. We have used these imaging capabilities to reveal differential Ca2+ handling in individual mitochondria. CEPIA imaging is a useful new tool to further the understanding of organellar functions. PMID:24923787

  18. Phosphorylation and activation of nuclear Ca{sup 2+}/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase phosphatase (CaMKP-N/PPM1E) by Ca{sup 2+}/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase I (CaMKI)

    SciTech Connect

    Onouchi, Takashi; Sueyoshi, Noriyuki; Ishida, Atsuhiko; Kameshita, Isamu

    2012-06-15

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer CaMKP-N/PPM1E underwent proteolytic processing and translocated to cytosol. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The proteolysis was effectively inhibited by the proteasome inhibitors. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Ser-480 of zebrafish CaMKP-N was phosphorylated by cytosolic CaMKI. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Phosphorylation-mimic mutants of CaMKP-N showed enhanced activity. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer These results suggest that CaMKP-N is regulated by CaMKI. -- Abstract: Nuclear Ca{sup 2+}/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase phosphatase (CaMKP-N/PPM1E) is an enzyme that dephosphorylates and downregulates multifunctional Ca{sup 2+}/calmodulin-dependent protein kinases (CaMKs) as well as AMP-dependent protein kinase. In our previous study, we found that zebrafish CaMKP-N (zCaMKP-N) underwent proteolytic processing and translocated to cytosol in a proteasome inhibitor-sensitive manner. In the present study, we found that zCaMKP-N is regulated by phosphorylation at Ser-480. When zCaMKP-N was incubated with the activated CaMKI, time-dependent phosphorylation of the enzyme was observed. This phosphorylation was significantly reduced when Ser-480 was replaced by Ala, suggesting that CaMKI phosphorylates Ser-480 of zCaMKP-N. Phosphorylation-mimic mutants, S480D and S480E, showed higher phosphatase activities than those of wild type and S480A mutant in solution-based phosphatase assay using various substrates. Furthermore, autophosphorylation of CaMKII after ionomycin treatment was more severely attenuated in Neuro2a cells when CaMKII was cotransfected with the phosphorylation-mimic mutant of zCaMKP-N than with the wild-type or non-phosphorylatable zCaMKP-N. These results strongly suggest that phosphorylation of zCaMKP-N at Ser-480 by CaMKI activates CaMKP-N catalytic activity and thereby downregulates multifunctional CaMKs in the cytosol.

  19. Acidic intracellular Ca(2+) stores and caveolae in Ca(2+) signaling and diabetes.

    PubMed

    Guerrero-Hernandez, Agustin; Gallegos-Gomez, Martin Leonardo; Sanchez-Vazquez, Victor Hugo; Lopez-Mendez, Maria Cristina

    2014-11-01

    Acidic Ca(2+) stores, particularly lysosomes, are newly discovered players in the well-orchestrated arena of Ca(2+) signaling and we are at the verge of understanding how lysosomes accumulate Ca(2+) and how they release it in response to different chemical, such as NAADP, and physical signals. Additionally, it is now clear that lysosomes play a key role in autophagy, a process that allows cells to recycle components or to eliminate damaged structures to ensure cellular well-being. Moreover, lysosomes are being unraveled as hubs that coordinate both anabolism via insulin signaling and catabolism via AMPK. These acidic vesicles have close contact with the ER and there is a bidirectional movement of information between these two organelles that exquisitely regulates cell survival. Lysosomes also connect with plasma membrane where caveolae are located as specialized regions involved in Ca(2+) and insulin signaling. Alterations of all these signaling pathways are at the core of insulin resistance and diabetes. PMID:25182518

  20. Fabrication aspects of PLA-CaP/PLGA-CaP composites for orthopedic applications: a review.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Huan; Lawrence, Joseph G; Bhaduri, Sarit B

    2012-07-01

    For several decades, composites made of polylactic acid-calcium phosphates (PLA-CaP) and polylactic acid-co-glycolic acid-calcium phosphates (PLGA-CaP) have seen widespread uses in orthopedic applications. This paper reviews the fabrication aspects of these composites, following the ubiquitous materials science approach by studying "processing-structure-property" correlations. Various fabrication processes such as microencapsulation, phase separation, electrospinning, supercritical gas foaming, etc., are reviewed, with specific examples of their applications in fabricating these composites. The effect of the incorporation of CaP materials on the mechanical and biological performance of PLA/PLGA is addressed. In addition, this paper describes the state of the art on challenges and innovations concerning CaP dispersion, incorporation of biomolecules/stem cells and long-term degradation of the composites. PMID:22342596

  1. Sarcoplasmic reticulum Ca2+ content, L-type Ca2+ current and the Ca2+ transient in rat myocytes during beta-adrenergic stimulation.

    PubMed Central

    Hussain, M; Orchard, C H

    1997-01-01

    1. The effect of beta-adrenergic stimulation on the relationship between the intracellular Ca2+ transient and the amplitude of the L-type Ca2+ current (ICa) has been investigated in ventricular myocytes isolated from rat hearts. Intracellular [Ca2+] was monitored using fura-2 during field stimulation and while membrane potential was controlled using voltage clamp techniques. 2. The increase in the amplitude, and the rate of decline, of the Ca2+ transient produced by isoprenaline (1.0 mumol l-1) was not significantly different in myocytes generating action potentials and in those voltage clamped with pulses of constant duration and amplitude. 3. Under control conditions, the current-voltage (I-V) relationship for ICa was bell shaped. The amplitude of the Ca2+ transient also showed a bell-shaped voltage dependence. In the presence of isoprenaline, the amplitude of both ICa and the Ca2+ transient was greater at all test potentials and the I-V relationship maintained its bell-shaped voltage dependence. However, the size of the Ca2+ transient was no longer graded with changes in the amplitude of ICa: a small ICa could now elicit a maximal Ca2+ transient. 4. Rapid application of caffeine (10 mmol l-1) was used to elicit Ca2+ release from the sarcoplasmic reticulum (SR). Isoprenaline increased the integral of the subsequent rise in cytoplasmic [Ca2+] to 175 +/- 13% of control. 5. Abbreviation of conditioning pulse duration in the presence of isoprenaline was used to reduce the amplitude of the Ca2+ transient to control levels. Under these conditions, the amplitude of the Ca2+ transient was again graded with the amplitude of ICa in the same way as under control conditions. 6. Nifedipine (2 mumol l-1) was also used to decrease Ca2+ transient amplitude in the presence of isoprenaline. In the presence of isoprenaline and nifedipine, the amplitude of the Ca2+ transient again showed a bell-shaped voltage dependence. 7. The SR Ca(2+)-ATPase inhibitor thapsigargin (2.5 mumol l-1

  2. Role of Ca2+ entry and Ca2+ stores in atypical smooth muscle cell autorhythmicity in the mouse renal pelvis

    PubMed Central

    Lang, R J; Hashitani, H; Tonta, M A; Suzuki, H; Parkington, H C

    2007-01-01

    Background and purpose: Electrically active atypical smooth muscle cells (ASMCs) within the renal pelvis have long been considered to act as pacemaker cells driving pelviureteric peristalsis. We have investigated the role of Ca2+ entry and uptake into and release from internal stores in the generation of Ca2+ transients and spontaneous transient depolarizations (STDs) in ASMCs. Experimental approach: The electrical activity and separately visualized changes in intracellular Ca2+ concentration in typical smooth muscle cells (TSMCs), ASMCs and interstitial cells of Cajal-like cells (ICC-LCs) were recorded using intracellular microelectrodes and a fluorescent Ca2+ indicator, fluo-4. Results: In 1 μM nifedipine, high frequency (10–30 min−1) Ca2+ transients and STDs were recorded in ASMCs, while ICC-LCs displayed low frequency (1–3 min−1) Ca2+ transients. All spontaneous electrical activity and Ca2+ transients were blocked upon removal of Ca2+ from the bathing solution, blockade of Ca2+ store uptake with cyclopiazonic acid (CPA) and with 2-aminoethoxy-diphenylborate (2-APB). STD amplitudes were reduced upon removal of the extracellular Na+ or blockade of IP3 dependent Ca2+ store release with neomycin or U73122. Blockade of ryanodine-sensitive Ca2+ release blocked ICC-LC Ca2+ transients but only reduced Ca2+ transient discharge in ASMCs. STDs in ASMCS were also little affected by DIDS, La3+, Gd3+ or by the replacement of extracellular Cl- with isethionate. Conclusions: ASMCs generated Ca2+ transients and cation-selective STDs via mechanisms involving Ca2+ release from IP3-dependent Ca2+ stores, STD stimulation of TSMCs was supported by Ca2+ entry through L type Ca2+ channels and Ca2+ release from ryanodine-sensitive stores. PMID:17965738

  3. Dual Effect of Phosphate Transport on Mitochondrial Ca2+ Dynamics*

    PubMed Central

    Wei, An-Chi; Liu, Ting; O'Rourke, Brian

    2015-01-01

    The large inner membrane electrochemical driving force and restricted volume of the matrix confer unique constraints on mitochondrial ion transport. Cation uptake along with anion and water movement induces swelling if not compensated by other processes. For mitochondrial Ca2+ uptake, these include activation of countertransporters (Na+/Ca2+ exchanger and Na+/H+ exchanger) coupled to the proton gradient, ultimately maintained by the proton pumps of the respiratory chain, and Ca2+ binding to matrix buffers. Inorganic phosphate (Pi) is known to affect both the Ca2+ uptake rate and the buffering reaction, but the role of anion transport in determining mitochondrial Ca2+ dynamics is poorly understood. Here we simultaneously monitor extra- and intra-mitochondrial Ca2+ and mitochondrial membrane potential (ΔΨm) to examine the effects of anion transport on mitochondrial Ca2+ flux and buffering in Pi-depleted guinea pig cardiac mitochondria. Mitochondrial Ca2+ uptake proceeded slowly in the absence of Pi but matrix free Ca2+ ([Ca2+]mito) still rose to ∼50 μm. Pi (0.001–1 mm) accelerated Ca2+ uptake but decreased [Ca2+]mito by almost 50% while restoring ΔΨm. Pi-dependent effects on Ca2+ were blocked by inhibiting the phosphate carrier. Mitochondrial Ca2+ uptake rate was also increased by vanadate (Vi), acetate, ATP, or a non-hydrolyzable ATP analog (AMP-PNP), with differential effects on matrix Ca2+ buffering and ΔΨm recovery. Interestingly, ATP or AMP-PNP prevented the effects of Pi on Ca2+ uptake. The results show that anion transport imposes an upper limit on mitochondrial Ca2+ uptake and modifies the [Ca2+]mito response in a complex manner. PMID:25963147

  4. Epithelial Ca2+ entry channels: transcellular Ca2+ transport and beyond

    PubMed Central

    Peng, Ji-Bin; Brown, Edward M; Hediger, Matthias A

    2003-01-01

    The recently discovered apical calcium channels CaT1 (TRPV6) and ECaC (TRPV5) belong to a family of six members called the ‘TRPV family’. Unlike the other four members which are nonselective cation channels functioning as heat or osmolarity sensors in the body, CaT1 and ECaC are remarkably calcium-selective channels which serve as apical calcium entry mechanisms in absorptive and secretory tissues. CaT1 is highly expressed in the proximal intestine, placenta and exocrine tissues, whereas ECaC expression is most prominent in the distal convoluted and connecting tubules of the kidney. CaT1 in the intestine is highly responsive to 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D3 and shows both fast and slow calcium-dependent feedback inhibition to prevent calcium overload. In contrast, ECaC only shows slow inactivation kinetics and appears to be mostly regulated by the calcium load in the kidney. Outside the calcium-transporting epithelia, CaT1 is highly expressed in exocrine tissues such as pancreas, prostate and salivary gland. In these tissues it probably mediates re-uptake of calcium following its release by secretory vesicles. CaT1 also contributes to store-operated calcium entry in Jurkat T-lymphocytes and prostate cancer LNCaP cells, possibly in conjunction with other cellular components which link CaT1 activity to the filling state of the calcium stores. Finally, CaT1 expression is upregulated in prostate cancer and other cancers of epithelial origin, highlighting its potential as a target for cancer therapy. PMID:12869611

  5. Ca-α1T, a fly T-type Ca2+ channel, negatively modulates sleep

    PubMed Central

    Jeong, Kyunghwa; Lee, Soyoung; Seo, Haengsoo; Oh, Yangkyun; Jang, Donghoon; Choe, Joonho; Kim, Daesoo; Lee, Jung-Ha; Jones, Walton D.

    2015-01-01

    Mammalian T-type Ca2+ channels are encoded by three separate genes (Cav3.1, 3.2, 3.3). These channels are reported to be sleep stabilizers important in the generation of the delta rhythms of deep sleep, but controversy remains. The identification of precise physiological functions for the T-type channels has been hindered, at least in part, by the potential for compensation between the products of these three genes and a lack of specific pharmacological inhibitors. Invertebrates have only one T-type channel gene, but its functions are even less well-studied. We cloned Ca-α1T, the only Cav3 channel gene in Drosophila melanogaster, expressed it in Xenopus oocytes and HEK-293 cells, and confirmed it passes typical T-type currents. Voltage-clamp analysis revealed the biophysical properties of Ca-α1T show mixed similarity, sometimes falling closer to Cav3.1, sometimes to Cav3.2, and sometimes to Cav3.3. We found Ca-α1T is broadly expressed across the adult fly brain in a pattern vaguely reminiscent of mammalian T-type channels. In addition, flies lacking Ca-α1T show an abnormal increase in sleep duration most pronounced during subjective day under continuous dark conditions despite normal oscillations of the circadian clock. Thus, our study suggests invertebrate T-type Ca2+ channels promote wakefulness rather than stabilizing sleep. PMID:26647714

  6. Isotope ratios measured in symmetric and asymmetric ^40,48Ca+^40,48Ca collisions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Henzlova, D.; Brown, D.; Charity, B.; Chbihi, A.; Coupland, D.; de Souza, R.; Elson, J.; Famiano, M.; Henzl, V.; Hudan, S.; Kilburn, M.; Lee, J.; Lukyanov, S.; Lynch, B.; Rogers, A.; Sanetullaev, A.; Sobotka, L.; Sun, Z.; Tsang, B.; Verde, G.; Wallace, M.; Youngs, M.; Westfall, G.; Vander Molen, A.

    2008-04-01

    In a recent experiment performed at NSCL MSU three reaction systems with very different isospin contents were investigated at incident energy of 80A MeV -- ^40Ca+^40Ca, ^48Ca+^40Ca and ^48Ca+^48Ca. The reactions were studied in a 4pi geometry using an MSU 4pi detector (array of 224 phoswitch scintillators) in combination with HiRA (High Resolution Array, a high granularity Si strip/CsI detector array). The former was used to determine the centrality of the collision, while the latter gave precise energy and angular information of the emitted light fragments. The measured reactions span a wide range of system isospin (N/Z=1 to 1.4) and thus serve as an important source of information on the influence of isospin of the reaction system on some of the basic properties of the dense and highly excited system formed in these collisions. Preliminary results on isotope ratios and isoscaling will be presented. This work is supported by the National Science Foundation under Grant Nos. PHY-0606007 and PHY-9977707.

  7. Ca-α1T, a fly T-type Ca2+ channel, negatively modulates sleep.

    PubMed

    Jeong, Kyunghwa; Lee, Soyoung; Seo, Haengsoo; Oh, Yangkyun; Jang, Donghoon; Choe, Joonho; Kim, Daesoo; Lee, Jung-Ha; Jones, Walton D

    2015-01-01

    Mammalian T-type Ca(2+) channels are encoded by three separate genes (Cav3.1, 3.2, 3.3). These channels are reported to be sleep stabilizers important in the generation of the delta rhythms of deep sleep, but controversy remains. The identification of precise physiological functions for the T-type channels has been hindered, at least in part, by the potential for compensation between the products of these three genes and a lack of specific pharmacological inhibitors. Invertebrates have only one T-type channel gene, but its functions are even less well-studied. We cloned Ca-α1T, the only Cav3 channel gene in Drosophila melanogaster, expressed it in Xenopus oocytes and HEK-293 cells, and confirmed it passes typical T-type currents. Voltage-clamp analysis revealed the biophysical properties of Ca-α1T show mixed similarity, sometimes falling closer to Cav3.1, sometimes to Cav3.2, and sometimes to Cav3.3. We found Ca-α1T is broadly expressed across the adult fly brain in a pattern vaguely reminiscent of mammalian T-type channels. In addition, flies lacking Ca-α1T show an abnormal increase in sleep duration most pronounced during subjective day under continuous dark conditions despite normal oscillations of the circadian clock. Thus, our study suggests invertebrate T-type Ca(2+) channels promote wakefulness rather than stabilizing sleep. PMID:26647714

  8. Effect of sophoridine on Ca(2+) induced Ca(2+) release during heart failure.

    PubMed

    Hu, S-T; Shen, Y-F; Gong, J-M; Yang, Y-J

    2016-03-14

    Sophoridine is a type of alkaloid extract derived from the Chinese herb Sophora flavescens Ait (kushen) and possess a variety of pharmacological effects including anti-inflammation, anti-anaphylaxis, anti-cancer, anti-arrhythmic and so on. However, the effect of sophoridine on heart failure has not been known yet. In this study, the effect of sophoridine on heart failure was investigated using Sprague-Dawley (SD) rat model of chronic heart failure. Morphological results showed that in medium and high dose group, myofilaments were arranged orderly and closely, intermyofibrillar lysis disappeared and mitochondria contained tightly packed cristae compared with heart failure group. We investigated the Ca(2+) induced Ca(2+) transients and assessed the expression of ryanodine receptor (RyR2) and L-type Ca(2+) channel (dihydropyridine receptor, DHPR). We found that the cytosolic Ca(2+) transients were markedly increased in amplitude in medium (deltaF/F(0)=43.33+/-1.92) and high dose groups (deltaF/F(0)=47.21+/-1.25) compared with heart failure group (deltaF/F(0)=16.7+/-1.29, P<0.01), Moreover, we demonstrated that the expression of cardiac DHPR was significantly increased in medium- and high dose-group compared with heart failure rats. Our results suggest that sophoridine could improve heart failure by ameliorating cardiac Ca(2+) induced Ca(2+) transients, and that this amelioration is associated with upregulation of DHPR. PMID:26596316

  9. Rediscovering area CA2: unique properties and functions

    PubMed Central

    Dudek, Serena M.; Alexander, Georgia M.; Farris, Shannon

    2016-01-01

    Hippocampal area CA2 has several features that distinguish it from CA1 and CA3, including a unique gene expression profile, failure to display long-term potentiation and relative resistance to cell death. A recent increase in interest in the CA2 region, combined with the development of new methods to define and manipulate its neurons, has led to some exciting new discoveries on the properties of CA2 neurons and their role in behaviour. Here, we review these findings and call attention to the idea that the definition of area CA2 ought to be revised in light of gene expression data. PMID:26806628

  10. 41Ca in Circumstellar Graphite from Supernovae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amari, S.; Zinner, E.; Lewis, R. S.

    1995-09-01

    We have measured isotopic ratios of C, N, O, Si, K, Ca, and Ti in 13 carbon grains from the low density graphite fraction KE3 (1.65-1.72g/cm3). These grains show the same isotopic signatures as KE3 grains previously measured [1]. Many of them have isotopically heavy C (up to x13 solar) and heavy N (up to x9.7 solar); nine have ^18O excesses (up to x183 solar); 26Al/27Al ratios range up to 0.07. Type II supernovae have previously been proposed as stellar sources of low density graphite grains [1,2,3]. Grain KE3c-551 (14 micrometers in size) has the most extreme C-, N-, and O-isotopic ratios ever measured in a graphite grain (^12C/^13C=7223+/-111, 14N/15N=28+/-2, 16O/18O=2.72+/-0.08). Interestingly, the isotopic ratios of these elements changed during analysis, becoming more anomalous with time. This suggests that isotopically "normal" components had been absorbed onto the grain surface or that partial exchange of the indigenous component had occurred. The above ratios are therefore lower (for C) and upper (for N and O) limits. High ^12C/^13C and ^16O/^17O (4595+/-858) and low ^16O/^18O ratios as well as the Ti isotopic ratios of the grain (delta 46Ti/48Ti=12+/-10 permil, delta ^47Ti/^48Ti=-62+/-9 permil, delta ^49Ti/^48Ti=901+/-16 permil, delta ^50Ti/^48Ti=200+/-12 permil) show the signature of the He/C zone in presupernova stars [4]. Eleven grains were measured for their K, Ca, and Ti isotopic ratios. Four of them, including KE3c-551, have ^41K excesses (218+/-50 permil to 10610+/-326 permil), apparently due to the decay of ^41Ca (T(sub)1/2=1.03 x 10^5a). Inferred ^41Ca/^40Ca ratios range from (1.94+/-0.43) x 10^-3 to (1.65+/-0.38) x 10^-2. In supernovae, ^41Ca is produced by neutron capture in the He/C, the O/C, and the O/Ne zones, as well as by explosive nucleosynthesis in the Si/S zone [4,5]. The expected ^41Ca/^40Ca ratios in the neutron capture zones are 1.6-1.8 x 10^-2 and in the Si/S zone 8 x 10^-4. Two of the 4 grains with ^41K excesses have Ca isotopic

  11. Serum markers of intrahepatic cholangiocarcinoma.

    PubMed

    Malaguarnera, Giulia; Paladina, Isabella; Giordano, Maria; Malaguarnera, Michele; Bertino, Gaetano; Berretta, Massimiliano

    2013-01-01

    Cholangiocarcinoma (CCA) is a relatively rare type of primary liver cancer that originates in the bile duct epithelium. It is an aggressive malignancy typified by unresponsiveness to chemotherapy and radiotherapy. Despite advances in radiologic techniques and laboratory diagnostic test, the diagnosis of CCA remains highly challenging. Development in molecular techniques has led to go into the possible use of serum markers in diagnosing of cholangiocarcinoma. This review summarizes the principal characteristics of serum markers of cholangiocarcinoma. The tumour markers used frequently such as Carbohydrate antigen 19-9 (CA 19-9), Carcinogenic Embryonic antigen (CEA), and Cancer Antigen 125 have shown sufficient sensitivity and specificity to detect and monitor CCA. In particular, the combination of these tumour markers seems to increase their efficiency in diagnosing of cholangiocarcinoma. New markers such as Soluble fragment of cytokeratin 19 (CYFRA 21-1) Mucins, Tumour Markers_{2} pyruvate-Kinase (TuM_{2-} PK) and metalloproteinase-7 (MMP-7) have been recently shown to help in the diagnosis of CCA, with in some cases a prognostic value. PMID:23396291

  12. Non-invasive biomarkers in pancreatic cancer diagnosis: what we need versus what we have

    PubMed Central

    Bujanda, Luis

    2016-01-01

    Pancreatic cancer (PC) is probably the most lethal tumor being forecast as the second most fatal cancer by 2020 in developed countries. Only the earliest forms of the disease are a curable disease but it has to be diagnosed before symptoms starts. Detection at curable phase demands screening intervention for early detection and differential diagnosis. Unfortunately, no successful strategy or image technique has been concluded as effective approach and currently non-invasive biomarkers are the hope. Multiple translational research studies have explored minimally or non-invasive biomarkers in biofluids-blood, urine, stool, saliva or pancreatic juice, but diagnostic performance has not been validated yet. Nowadays no biomarker, alone or in combination, has been superior to carbohydrate antigen 19-9 (CA19-9) in sensitivity and specificity. Although the number of novel biomarkers for early diagnosis of PC has been increasing during the last couple of years, no molecular signature is ready to be implemented in clinical routine. Under the uncertain future, miRNAs profiling and methylation status seem to be the most promising biomarkers. However, good results in larger validations are urgently needed before application. Industry efforts through biotech and pharmaceutical companies are urgently required to demonstrate accuracy and validate promising results from basic and translational results. PMID:27162784

  13. Hepatocellular carcinoma and cholangiocarcinoma: an update.

    PubMed

    Yazici, Cemal; Niemeyer, David J; Iannitti, David A; Russo, Mark W

    2014-01-01

    Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is the third most common cause of cancer worldwide and is rising in incidence. Ultrasound is the preferred modality for screening high-risk patients for HCC because it detects clinically significant nodules, widespread availability and lower cost. HCC does not require a biopsy for diagnosis if specific imaging criteria are fulfilled. Transarterial chemoembolization (TACE) is the most common modality used to treat HCC followed by ablation. Cholangiocarcinoma (CCA) is increasing in incidence and the second most common primary malignancy of the liver. There is no effective screening strategy for CCA although magnetic resonance imaging and carbohydrate antigen 19-9 (CA 19-9) are commonly used without proven benefit. Therapy for CCA is challenging and resection, when possible, is the mainstay of therapy. Gemcitabine in combination with cisplatin or biologics may offer a modest survival benefit. Liver transplantation for CCA is associated with reasonable survival in select cases. Molecular diagnostics offer the potential to develop personalized approaches in the management of HCC and CCA. PMID:24245910

  14. Circulating MicroRNAs as Biomarkers in Biliary Tract Cancers

    PubMed Central

    Letelier, Pablo; Riquelme, Ismael; Hernández, Alfonso H.; Guzmán, Neftalí; Farías, Jorge G.; Roa, Juan Carlos

    2016-01-01

    Biliary tract cancers (BTCs) are a group of highly aggressive malignant tumors with a poor prognosis. The current diagnosis is based mainly on imaging and intraoperative exploration due to brush cytology havinga low sensitivity and the standard markers, such as carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA) and carbohydrate 19-9 (CA19-9), not having enough sensitivity nor specificity to be used in a differential diagnosis and early stage detection. Thus, better non-invasive methods that can distinguish between normal and pathological tissue are needed. MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are small, single-stranded non-coding RNA molecules of ~20–22 nucleotides that regulate relevant physiological mechanisms and can also be involved in carcinogenesis. Recent studies have demonstrated that miRNAs are detectable in multiple body fluids, showing great stability, either free or trapped in circulating microvesicles, such as exosomes. miRNAs are ideal biomarkers that may be used in screening and prognosis in biliary tract cancers, aiding also in the clinical decisions at different stages of cancer treatment. This review highlights the progress in the analysis of circulating miRNAs in serum, plasma and bile as potential diagnostic and prognostic markers of BTCs. PMID:27223281

  15. Non-invasive biomarkers in pancreatic cancer diagnosis: what we need versus what we have.

    PubMed

    Herreros-Villanueva, Marta; Bujanda, Luis

    2016-04-01

    Pancreatic cancer (PC) is probably the most lethal tumor being forecast as the second most fatal cancer by 2020 in developed countries. Only the earliest forms of the disease are a curable disease but it has to be diagnosed before symptoms starts. Detection at curable phase demands screening intervention for early detection and differential diagnosis. Unfortunately, no successful strategy or image technique has been concluded as effective approach and currently non-invasive biomarkers are the hope. Multiple translational research studies have explored minimally or non-invasive biomarkers in biofluids-blood, urine, stool, saliva or pancreatic juice, but diagnostic performance has not been validated yet. Nowadays no biomarker, alone or in combination, has been superior to carbohydrate antigen 19-9 (CA19-9) in sensitivity and specificity. Although the number of novel biomarkers for early diagnosis of PC has been increasing during the last couple of years, no molecular signature is ready to be implemented in clinical routine. Under the uncertain future, miRNAs profiling and methylation status seem to be the most promising biomarkers. However, good results in larger validations are urgently needed before application. Industry efforts through biotech and pharmaceutical companies are urgently required to demonstrate accuracy and validate promising results from basic and translational results. PMID:27162784

  16. Circulating MicroRNAs as Biomarkers in Biliary Tract Cancers.

    PubMed

    Letelier, Pablo; Riquelme, Ismael; Hernández, Alfonso H; Guzmán, Neftalí; Farías, Jorge G; Roa, Juan Carlos

    2016-01-01

    Biliary tract cancers (BTCs) are a group of highly aggressive malignant tumors with a poor prognosis. The current diagnosis is based mainly on imaging and intraoperative exploration due to brush cytology havinga low sensitivity and the standard markers, such as carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA) and carbohydrate 19-9 (CA19-9), not having enough sensitivity nor specificity to be used in a differential diagnosis and early stage detection. Thus, better non-invasive methods that can distinguish between normal and pathological tissue are needed. MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are small, single-stranded non-coding RNA molecules of ~20-22 nucleotides that regulate relevant physiological mechanisms and can also be involved in carcinogenesis. Recent studies have demonstrated that miRNAs are detectable in multiple body fluids, showing great stability, either free or trapped in circulating microvesicles, such as exosomes. miRNAs are ideal biomarkers that may be used in screening and prognosis in biliary tract cancers, aiding also in the clinical decisions at different stages of cancer treatment. This review highlights the progress in the analysis of circulating miRNAs in serum, plasma and bile as potential diagnostic and prognostic markers of BTCs. PMID:27223281

  17. Kinetics and stoichiometry of coupled Na efflux and Ca influx (Na/Ca exchange) in barnacle muscle cells.

    PubMed

    Rasgado-Flores, H; Santiago, E M; Blaustein, M P

    1989-06-01

    Coupled Na+ exit/Ca2+ entry (Na/Ca exchange operating in the Ca2+ influx mode) was studied in giant barnacle muscle cells by measuring 22Na+ efflux and 45Ca2+ influx in internally perfused, ATP-fueled cells in which the Na+ pump was poisoned by 0.1 mM ouabain. Internal free Ca2+, [Ca2+]i, was controlled with a Ca-EGTA buffering system containing 8 mM EGTA and varying amounts of Ca2+. Ca2+ sequestration in internal stores was inhibited with caffeine and a mitochondrial uncoupler (FCCP). To maximize conditions for Ca2+ influx mode Na/Ca exchange, and to eliminate tracer Na/Na exchange, all of the external Na+ in the standard Na+ sea water (NaSW) was replaced by Tris or Li+ (Tris-SW or LiSW, respectively). In both Na-free solutions an external Ca2+ (Cao)-dependent Na+ efflux was observed when [Ca2+]i was increased above 10(-8) M; this efflux was half-maximally activated by [Ca2+]i = 0.3 microM (LiSW) to 0.7 microM (Tris-SW). The Cao-dependent Na+ efflux was half-maximally activated by [Ca2+]o = 2.0 mM in LiSW and 7.2 mM in Tris-SW; at saturating [Ca2+]o, [Ca2+]i, and [Na+]i the maximal (calculated) Cao-dependent Na+ efflux was approximately 75 pmol#cm2.s. This efflux was inhibited by external Na+ and La3+ with IC50's of approximately 125 and 0.4 mM, respectively. A Nai-dependent Ca2+ influx was also observed in Tris-SW. This Ca2+ influx also required [Ca2+]i greater than 10(-8) M. Internal Ca2+ activated a Nai-independent Ca2+ influx from LiSW (tracer Ca/Ca exchange), but in Tris-SW virtually all of the Cai-activated Ca2+ influx was Nai-dependent (Na/Ca exchange). Half-maximal activation was observed with [Na+]i = 30 mM. The fact that internal Ca2+ activates both a Cao-dependent Na+ efflux and a Nai-dependent Ca2+ influx in Tris-SW implies that these two fluxes are coupled; the activating (intracellular) Ca2+ does not appear to be transported by the exchanger. The maximal (calculated) Nai-dependent Ca2+ influx was -25 pmol/cm2.s. At various [Na+]i between 6 and 106 m

  18. Enhanced heavy metal immobilization in soil by grinding with addition of nanometallic Ca/CaO dispersion mixture.

    PubMed

    Mallampati, Srinivasa Reddy; Mitoma, Yoshiharu; Okuda, Tetsuji; Sakita, Shogo; Kakeda, Mitsunori

    2012-10-01

    This study investigated the use of a nanometallic Ca and CaO dispersion mixture for the immobilization of heavy metals (As, Cd, Cr and Pb) in contaminated soil. Simple grinding achieved 85-90% heavy metal immobilization, but it can be enhanced further to 98-100% by addition of a nanometallic Ca/CaO dispersion mixture produced by grinding. Observations using SEM-EDS elemental maps and semi-quantitative analysis showed that the amounts of As, Cd, Cr, and Pb measurable on the soil particle surface decrease after nanometallic Ca/CaO treatment. The leachable heavy metal concentrations were reduced after nanometallic Ca/CaO treatment to concentrations lower than the Japan soil elution standard regulatory threshold: <0.01 mg L(-1) for As, Cd, and Pb; and 0.05 mg L(-1) for Cr. Effects of soil moisture and pH on heavy metal immobilization were not strongly influenced. The most probable mechanisms for the enhancement of heavy metal immobilization capacity with nanometallic Ca/CaO treatment might be due to adsorption and entrapment of heavy metals into newly formed aggregates, thereby prompting aggregation of soil particles and enclosure/binding with Ca/CaO-associated immobile salts. Results suggest that the nanometallic Ca/CaO mixture is suitable for use in immobilization of heavy-metal-contaminated soil under normal moisture conditions. PMID:22818089

  19. Luminal Ca2+ promoting spontaneous Ca2+ release from inositol trisphosphate-sensitive stores in rat hepatocytes.

    PubMed Central

    Missiaen, L; Taylor, C W; Berridge, M J

    1992-01-01

    1. Spontaneous Ca2+ release from the inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate (InsP3)-sensitive stores in permeabilized hepatocytes was monitored using Fluo-3 to measure the free [Ca2+] of the medium bathing the cells. 2. Permeabilized cells rapidly sequestered Ca2+, reducing the [Ca2+] to 103 +/- 5 nM. Under conditions that depended critically upon cell density and the amount of Ca2+ in the medium, this was followed by a slow increase in [Ca2+] culminating in a substantial Ca2+ spike representing synchronous discharge from the InsP3-sensitive stores. 3. During the latency preceding the Ca2+ spike, the stores increased their sensitivity to InsP3. This sensitization seemed to be an all-or-none phenomenon. 4. Oxidized glutathione and thimerosal promoted the spontaneous release by sensitizing the InsP3 receptor. 5. An increase in the [Ca2+] within the stores was required for both the increased sensitivity to InsP3 and the subsequent spike. 6. Caffeine (6 mM) antagonized the effect of very low InsP3 concentrations and abolished the Ca2+ spike, without itself releasing Ca2+. 7. Our results suggesting that luminal Ca2+ may sensitive InsP3-sensitive stores leading to spontaneous Ca2+ mobilization will be discussed in the light of a modified version of the two-pool model for explaining cytosolic Ca2+ oscillations. PMID:1484365

  20. Activations of the Ca dependent K channel by Ca released from the sarcoplasmic reticulum of mammalian smooth muscles.

    PubMed

    Kitamura, K; Sakai, T; Kajioka, S; Kuriyama, H

    1989-01-01

    In mammalian smooth muscles, the outward K current recorded using the whole cell voltage clamp or patch clamp methods can be classified into the Ca-dependent and independent K currents. The former is sub-classified into the extra- and intra-cellular Ca dependent K current. The intra-cellular Ca dependent K current has a close relation to Ca released from the sarcoplasmic reticulum, i.e. Ca released by inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate (InsP3), ryanodine or Ca ionophores (A23187 or ionomycin) modify the appearance of the K current. The transient (Ca dependent) outward current evoked by depolarization pulses, as measured using the whole cell voltage clamp method, is closely related with after-hyperpolarization of the action potential as recorded using the microelectrode method and is postulated to be due to activations of the Ca-induced Ca release mechanism in the sarcoplasmic reticulum. The oscillatory (Ca dependent) outward K current is closely related with the amount of Ca released from the sarcoplasmic reticulum during the long depolarization induced by electrical stimulation (command pulse) or applications of Ca releasers such as InsP3 or ryanodine. In this review, the Ca dependent K current recorded from smooth muscle cells is compared with the influx and release of Ca. PMID:2667516

  1. The Structure of Ca2+ Sensor Case16 Reveals the Mechanism of Reaction to Low Ca2+ Concentrations

    PubMed Central

    Leder, Lukas; Stark, Wilhelm; Freuler, Felix; Marsh, May; Meyerhofer, Marco; Stettler, Thomas; Mayr, Lorenz M.; Britanova, Olga V.; Strukova, Lydia A.; Chudakov, Dmitriy M.; Souslova, Ekaterina A.

    2010-01-01

    Here we report the first crystal structure of a high-contrast genetically encoded circularly permuted green fluorescent protein (cpGFP)-based Ca2+ sensor, Case16, in the presence of a low Ca2+ concentration. The structure reveals the positioning of the chromophore within Case16 at the first stage of the Ca2+-dependent response when only two out of four Ca2+-binding pockets of calmodulin (CaM) are occupied with Ca2+ ions. In such a “half Ca2+-bound state”, Case16 is characterized by an incomplete interaction between its CaM-/M13-domains. We also report the crystal structure of the related Ca2+ sensor Case12 at saturating Ca2+ concentration. Based on this structure, we postulate that cpGFP-based Ca2+ sensors can form non-functional homodimers where the CaM-domain of one sensor molecule binds symmetrically to the M13-peptide of the partner sensor molecule. Case12 and Case16 behavior upon addition of high concentrations of free CaM or M13-peptide reveals that the latter effectively blocks the fluorescent response of the sensor. We speculate that the demonstrated intermolecular interaction with endogenous substrates and homodimerization can impede proper functioning of this type of Ca2+ sensors in living cells. PMID:22163646

  2. Comparison of Ca and Ar Diffusion in Phlogopite: Implications for K-Ca and K-Ar Geochronology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cruz, M. F.; Szilas, K.; Grove, M. J.

    2015-12-01

    Coupled geochronology based upon branched decay of 40K-40Ar and 40K-40Ca decay is rarely exploited because 40Ca is the major common isotope of calcium and 40Ca and 40K are difficult to resolve isotopically without resorting to isotope dilution wet chemistry. Recently developed ion microprobe methods based upon measurement of doubly ionized species partially overcome the latter problem and have been applied to high K/Ca micas. The ability to interpret K-Ar and K-Ca results is limited due to uncertainty in the relative diffusion properties of Ca and Ar. To address this problem, we are performing Ar and Ca diffusion experiments and fluid-crystal Ar partitioning experiments with anhydrous F-phlogopite that is stable to 1390°C. As an additional check, we are comparing K-Ca and K-Ar ages from natural mantle phlogopites from a variety of settings to assess the relative retentivity of Ar and Ca. South African xenoliths tend to yield 40Ar/39Ar ages that are much older than K-Ca ages from the same phologopites. Possible excess 40Ar and high common Ca render the comparisons inconclusive, but this suggests that Ca diffuses more readily than Ar in phlogopite. Our most definitive K-Ca phlogopite results (i.e., least affected by common Ca) come from the Archean Seqi dunite of SW Greenland. The K-Ca ages of Seqi phlogopites is 927 ± 26 Ma (2s). Incremental heating 40Ar/39Ar results from the same sample yields a much older result with a terminal age of 3.5 Ga. However, the first 5-10% of 39Ar release are consistent with transient heating at ca. 900 Ma. Considered together, the K-Ca and 40Ar/39Ar results from the Seqi dunite locality strongly suggest that Ca diffusion is more rapid than Ar diffusion in phlogopite.

  3. Oxidative Stress and Ca2+ Release Events in Mouse Cardiomyocytes

    PubMed Central

    Shirokova, Natalia; Kang, Chifei; Fernandez-Tenorio, Miguel; Wang, Wei; Wang, Qiongling; Wehrens, Xander H.T.; Niggli, Ernst

    2014-01-01

    Cellular oxidative stress, associated with a variety of common cardiac diseases, is well recognized to affect the function of several key proteins involved in Ca2+ signaling and excitation-contraction coupling, which are known to be exquisitely sensitive to reactive oxygen species. These include the Ca2+ release channels of the sarcoplasmic reticulum (ryanodine receptors or RyR2s) and the Ca2+/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II (CaMKII). Oxidation of RyR2s was found to increase the open probability of the channel, whereas CaMKII can be activated independent of Ca2+ through oxidation. Here, we investigated how oxidative stress affects RyR2 function and SR Ca2+ signaling in situ, by analyzing Ca2+ sparks in permeabilized mouse cardiomyocytes under a broad range of oxidative conditions. The results show that with increasing oxidative stress Ca2+ spark duration is prolonged. In addition, long and very long-lasting (up to hundreds of milliseconds) localized Ca2+ release events started to appear, eventually leading to sarcoplasmic reticulum (SR) Ca2+ depletion. These changes of release duration could be prevented by the CaMKII inhibitor KN93 and did not occur in mice lacking the CaMKII-specific S2814 phosphorylation site on RyR2. The appearance of long-lasting Ca2+ release events was paralleled by an increase of RyR2 oxidation, but also by RyR-S2814 phosphorylation, and by CaMKII oxidation. Our results suggest that in a strongly oxidative environment oxidation-dependent activation of CaMKII leads to RyR2 phosphorylation and thereby contributes to the massive prolongation of SR Ca2+ release events. PMID:25517148

  4. Conserved properties of individual Ca2+-binding sites in calmodulin

    PubMed Central

    Halling, D. Brent; Liebeskind, Benjamin J.; Hall, Amelia W.; Aldrich, Richard W.

    2016-01-01

    Calmodulin (CaM) is a Ca2+-sensing protein that is highly conserved and ubiquitous in eukaryotes. In humans it is a locus of life-threatening cardiomyopathies. The primary function of CaM is to transduce Ca2+ concentration into cellular signals by binding to a wide range of target proteins in a Ca2+-dependent manner. We do not fully understand how CaM performs its role as a high-fidelity signal transducer for more than 300 target proteins, but diversity among its four Ca2+-binding sites, called EF-hands, may contribute to CaM’s functional versatility. We therefore looked at the conservation of CaM sequences over deep evolutionary time, focusing primarily on the four EF-hand motifs. Expanding on previous work, we found that CaM evolves slowly but that its evolutionary rate is substantially faster in fungi. We also found that the four EF-hands have distinguishing biophysical and structural properties that span eukaryotes. These results suggest that all eukaryotes require CaM to decode Ca2+ signals using four specialized EF-hands, each with specific, conserved traits. In addition, we provide an extensive map of sites associated with target proteins and with human disease and correlate these with evolutionary sequence diversity. Our comprehensive evolutionary analysis provides a basis for understanding the sequence space associated with CaM function and should help guide future work on the relationship between structure, function, and disease. PMID:26884197

  5. Ca cycling and isotopic fluxes in forested ecosystems in Hawaii

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wiegand, B.A.; Chadwick, O.A.; Vitousek, P.M.; Wooden, J.L.

    2005-01-01

    Biogeochemical processes fractionate Ca isotopes in plants and soils along a 4 million year developmental sequence in the Hawaiian Islands. We observed that plants preferentially take up 40Ca relative to 44Ca, and that biological fractionation and changes in the relative contributions from volcanic and marine sources produce a significant increase in 44Ca in soil exchangeable pools. Our results imply moderate fluxes enriched in 44Ca from strongly nutrient-depleted old soils, in contrast with high 40Ca fluxes in young and little weathered environments. In addition, biological fractionation controls divergent geochemical pathways of Ca and Sr in the plant-soil system. While Ca depletes progressively with increasing soil age, Sr/Ca ratios increase systematically. Sr isotope ratios provide a valuable tracer for provenance studies of alkaline earth elements in forested ecosystems, but its usefulness is limited when deciphering biogeochemical processes involved in the terrestrial Ca cycle. Ca isotopes in combination with Sr/ Ca ratios reveal more complex processes involved in the biogeochemistry of Ca and Sr. Copyright 2005 by the American Geophysical Union.

  6. Ca sup + emission in the sunlit ionosphere

    SciTech Connect

    Torr, M.R. ); Torr, D.G.; Bhatt, P.; Swift, W.; Dougani, H. )

    1990-03-01

    In the course of a program of twilight airglow observations from the McDonald Observatory in southwest Texas, the resonance fluorescence emissions from calcium ions were measured. In particular, twilight sequences were obtained during the period of December 19-22, 1987, which coincided with the Ursids meteorite shower. During this meteorite event the intensities of the Ca{sup +} emission lines at 3,934 {angstrom} increased to the point that the surface brightness profiles could be inverted to volume emission rate profiles. These profiles show evidence for strong spatial redistribution of the Ca{sup +} over the course of three days. Prior to the onset of the meteorite activity, emissions from the Ca{sup +} originate from below 100 km, on the occasions when the emissions are visible. By the evening of December 19 a peak is measurable at 108 km. On the morning of December 22, a high-altitude peak was observed above 250 km, with a larger peak down at approximately 85 km. By the evening of December 22, the emission had substantially intensified, with the peak of the layer being at 80 km or below, but with emission being produced all the way up to at least 160 km. Observations of these emissions during meteor shower periods could provide a valuable tracer for the processes responsible for the transport of ions in the D, E, and F region, allowing the full altitude and latitude extent of the distribution to be determined.

  7. TRP-Na(+)/Ca(2+) Exchanger Coupling.

    PubMed

    Harper, Alan G S; Sage, Stewart O

    2016-01-01

    Na(+)/Ca(2+) exchangers (NCXs) have traditionally been viewed principally as a means of Ca(2+) removal from non-excitable cells. However there has recently been increasing interest in the operation of NCXs in reverse mode acting as a means of eliciting Ca(2+) entry into these cells. Reverse mode exchange requires a significant change in the normal resting transmembrane ion gradients and membrane potential, which has been suggested to occur principally via the coupling of NCXs to localised Na(+) entry through non-selective cation channels such as canonical transient receptor potential (TRPC) channels. Here we review evidence for functional or physical coupling of NCXs to non-selective cation channels, and how this affects NCX activity in non-excitable cells. In particular we focus on the potential role of nanojunctions, where the close apposition of plasma and intracellular membranes may help create the conditions needed for the generation of localised rises in Na(+) concentration that would be required to trigger reverse mode exchange. PMID:27161225

  8. Superconductivity in Ca-doped graphene laminates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chapman, J.; Su, Y.; Howard, C. A.; Kundys, D.; Grigorenko, A. N.; Guinea, F.; Geim, A. K.; Grigorieva, I. V.; Nair, R. R.

    2016-03-01

    Despite graphene’s long list of exceptional electronic properties and many theoretical predictions regarding the possibility of superconductivity in graphene, its direct and unambiguous experimental observation has not been achieved. We searched for superconductivity in weakly interacting, metal decorated graphene crystals assembled into so-called graphene laminates, consisting of well separated and electronically decoupled graphene crystallites. We report robust superconductivity in all Ca-doped graphene laminates. They become superconducting at temperatures (Tc) between ≈4 and ≈6 K, with Tc’s strongly dependent on the confinement of the Ca layer and the induced charge carrier concentration in graphene. We find that Ca is the only dopant that induces superconductivity in graphene laminates above 1.8 K among several dopants used in our experiments, such as potassium, caesium and lithium. By revealing the tunability of the superconducting response through doping and confinement of the metal layer, our work shows that achieving superconductivity in free-standing, metal decorated monolayer graphene is conditional on an optimum confinement of the metal layer and sufficient doping, thereby bringing its experimental realization within grasp.

  9. Superconductivity in CaBi2.

    PubMed

    Winiarski, M J; Wiendlocha, B; Gołąb, S; Kushwaha, S K; Wiśniewski, P; Kaczorowski, D; Thompson, J D; Cava, R J; Klimczuk, T

    2016-08-01

    Superconductivity is observed with critical temperature Tc = 2.0 K in self-flux-grown single crystals of CaBi2. This material adopts the ZrSi2 structure type with lattice parameters a = 4.696(1) Å, b = 17.081(2) Å and c = 4.611(1) Å. The crystals of CaBi2 were studied by means of magnetic susceptibility, specific heat and electrical resistivity measurements. The heat capacity jump at Tc is ΔC/γTc = 1.41, confirming bulk superconductivity; the Sommerfeld coefficient γ = 4.1 mJ mol(-1) K(-2) and the Debye temperature ΘD = 157 K. The electron-phonon coupling strength is λel-ph = 0.59, and the thermodynamic critical field Hc is low, between 111 and 124 Oe CaBi2 is a moderate coupling type-I superconductor. Results of electronic structure calculations are reported and charge densities, electronic bands, densities of states and Fermi surfaces are discussed, focusing on the effects of spin-orbit coupling and electronic property anisotropy. We find a mixed quasi-2D + 3D character in the electronic structure, which reflects the layered crystal structure of the material. PMID:27435423

  10. Superconductivity in Ca-doped graphene laminates.

    PubMed

    Chapman, J; Su, Y; Howard, C A; Kundys, D; Grigorenko, A N; Guinea, F; Geim, A K; Grigorieva, I V; Nair, R R

    2016-01-01

    Despite graphene's long list of exceptional electronic properties and many theoretical predictions regarding the possibility of superconductivity in graphene, its direct and unambiguous experimental observation has not been achieved. We searched for superconductivity in weakly interacting, metal decorated graphene crystals assembled into so-called graphene laminates, consisting of well separated and electronically decoupled graphene crystallites. We report robust superconductivity in all Ca-doped graphene laminates. They become superconducting at temperatures (Tc) between ≈4 and ≈6 K, with Tc's strongly dependent on the confinement of the Ca layer and the induced charge carrier concentration in graphene. We find that Ca is the only dopant that induces superconductivity in graphene laminates above 1.8 K among several dopants used in our experiments, such as potassium, caesium and lithium. By revealing the tunability of the superconducting response through doping and confinement of the metal layer, our work shows that achieving superconductivity in free-standing, metal decorated monolayer graphene is conditional on an optimum confinement of the metal layer and sufficient doping, thereby bringing its experimental realization within grasp. PMID:26979564

  11. Superconductivity in Ca-doped graphene laminates

    PubMed Central

    Chapman, J.; Su, Y.; Howard, C. A.; Kundys, D.; Grigorenko, A. N.; Guinea, F.; Geim, A. K.; Grigorieva, I. V.; Nair, R. R.

    2016-01-01

    Despite graphene’s long list of exceptional electronic properties and many theoretical predictions regarding the possibility of superconductivity in graphene, its direct and unambiguous experimental observation has not been achieved. We searched for superconductivity in weakly interacting, metal decorated graphene crystals assembled into so-called graphene laminates, consisting of well separated and electronically decoupled graphene crystallites. We report robust superconductivity in all Ca-doped graphene laminates. They become superconducting at temperatures (Tc) between ≈4 and ≈6 K, with Tc’s strongly dependent on the confinement of the Ca layer and the induced charge carrier concentration in graphene. We find that Ca is the only dopant that induces superconductivity in graphene laminates above 1.8 K among several dopants used in our experiments, such as potassium, caesium and lithium. By revealing the tunability of the superconducting response through doping and confinement of the metal layer, our work shows that achieving superconductivity in free-standing, metal decorated monolayer graphene is conditional on an optimum confinement of the metal layer and sufficient doping, thereby bringing its experimental realization within grasp. PMID:26979564

  12. Dissociation of Ca-bearing Molecules as a Source of Mercury's Ca Exosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burger, Matthew H.; Killen, Rosemary M.

    2015-11-01

    Observations of Mercury's calcium exosphere by MESSENGER have revealed three key features: (1) The Ca is extremely energetic, with a temperature ~70,000 K if the source is thermal, (2) the source region is located in the dawn hemisphere, and (3) there is a strong annual variation in the Ca source rate (Burger et al. 2014). Killen and Hahn (2015) have shown that the source rate is consistent with impact vaporization by interplanetary dust and the intersection of Mercury with a cometary dust stream (likely associated with Comet Encke, Christou et al., submitted).Killen et al. (2005) suggested that energetic calcium could be produced by the dissociation of Ca-bearing molecules produced in impact vaporization plumes. We test this hypothesis with a Monte Carlo model that follows the evolution of atomic and molecular calcium produced in impact plumes. Ca-bearing molecules such as CaO, CaOH, and Ca(OH)2 are more likely to be are produced in vapor plumes than atomic Ca (Berezhnoy and Klumov 2008); these molecules quickly break apart either through vibrational dissociation or photodissociation. The excess energy associated with dissociation gives the atomic Ca an extra energy boost above the temperature of the impact plumes (~5000 K). We determine impact vaporization rates and excess energies required by the dissociation process to reproduce the scale height and spatial morphology of the Ca exosphere as observed by the MESSENGER Ultraviolet and Visible Spectrometer (UVVS).ReferencesBerezhnoy, A.A. and Klumov, B.A., Impacts as sources of the exosphere on Mercury, Icarus, 195, 511-522, 2008, doi:10.1016/j.icarus.2008.01.005.Burger, M.H., et al., Seasonal variations in Mercury's dayside calcium exosphere, Icarus, 238, 51-58, 2014, doi:10.1016/j.icarus.2014.04.049.Killen, R.M., et al., The calcium exosphere of Mercury, Icarus, 173, 300-311, 2005, doi:10.1016/j.icarus.2004.08.022.Killen, R.M. and Hahn, J.M., Impact vaporization as a possible source ofMercury's calcium exosphere

  13. Nitric oxide inhibits capacitative Ca2+ entry by suppression of mitochondrial Ca2+ handling

    PubMed Central

    Thyagarajan, Baskaran; Malli, Roland; Schmidt, Kurt; Graier, Wolfgang F; Groschner, Klaus

    2002-01-01

    Nitric oxide (NO) is a key modulator of cellular Ca2+ signalling and a determinant of mitochondrial function. Here, we demonstrate that NO governs capacitative Ca2+ entry (CCE) into HEK293 cells by impairment of mitochondrial Ca2+ handling. Authentic NO as well as the NO donors 1-[2-(carboxylato)pyrrolidin-1-yl]diazem-1-ium-1,2-diolate (ProliNO) and 2-(N,N-diethylamino)-diazenolate-2-oxide (DEANO) suppressed CCE activated by thapsigargin (TG)-induced store depletion. Threshold concentrations for inhibition of CCE by ProliNO and DEANO were 0.3 and 1 μM, respectively. NO-induced inhibition of CCE was not mimicked by peroxynitrite (100 μM), the peroxynitrite donor 3-morpholino-sydnonimine (SIN-1, 100 μM) or 8-bromoguanosine 3′,5′-cyclic monophosphate (8-BrcGMP, 1 mM). In addition, the guanylyl cyclase inhibitor 1H-[1,2,4] oxadiazole[4,3-a] quinoxalin-1-one (ODQ, 30 μM) failed to antagonize the inhibitory action of NO on CCE. DEANO (1–10 μM) suppressed mitochondrial respiration as evident from inhibition of cellular oxygen consumption. Experiments using fluorescent dyes to monitor mitochondrial membrane potential and mitochondrial Ca2+ levels, respectively, indicated that DEANO (10 μM) depolarized mitochondria and suppressed mitochondrial Ca2+ sequestration. The inhibitory effect of DEANO on Ca2+ uptake into mitochondria was confirmed by recording mitochondrial Ca2+ during agonist stimulation in HEK293 cells expressing ratiometric-pericam in mitochondria. DEANO (10 μM) failed to inhibit Ba2+ entry into TG-stimulated cells when extracellular Ca2+ was buffered below 1 μM, while clear inhibition of Ba2+ entry into store depleted cells was observed when extracellular Ca2+ levels were above 10 μM. Moreover, buffering of intracellular Ca2+ by use of N,N′-[1,2-ethanediylbis(oxy-2,1-phenylene)] bis [N-[25-[(acetyloxy) methoxy]-2-oxoethyl

  14. Multimodality of Ca2+ signaling in rat atrial myocytes.

    PubMed

    Morad, Martin; Javaheri, Ashkan; Risius, Tim; Belmonte, Steve

    2005-06-01

    It has been suggested that the multiplicity of Ca(2+) signaling pathways in atrial myocytes may contribute to the variability of its function. This article reports on a novel Ca(2+) signaling cascade initiated by mechanical forces induced by "puffing" of solution onto the myocytes. Ca(i) transients were measured in fura-2 acetoxymethyl (AM) loaded cells using alternating 340- and 410-nm excitation waves at 1.2 kHz. Pressurized puffs of bathing solutions, applied by an electronically controlled micro-barrel system, activated slowly (approximately 300 ms) developing Ca(i) transients that lasted 1,693 +/- 68 ms at room temperature. Subsequent second and third puffs, applied at approximately 20 s intervals activated significantly smaller or no Ca(i) transients. Puff-triggered Ca(i) transients could be reactivated once again following caffeine (10 mM)-induced release of Ca(2+) from sarcoplasmic reticulum (SR). Puff-triggered Ca(i) transients were independent of [Ca(2+)](o), and activation of voltage-gated Ca(2+) or cationic stretch channels or influx of Ca(2+) on Na(+)/Ca(2+)exchanger, because puffing solution containing no Ca(2+), 10 microM diltiazem, 1 mM Cd(2+), 5 mM Ni(2+), or 100 microM Gd(3+) failed to suppress them. Puff-triggered Ca(i) transients were enhanced in paced compared to quiescent myocytes. Electrically activated Ca(i) transients triggered during the time course of puff-induced transients were unaltered, suggesting functionally separate Ca(2+) pools. Contribution of inositol 1,4,5-triphosphate (IP(3))-gated or mitochondrial Ca(2+) pools or modulation of SR stores by nitric oxide/nitric oxide synthase (NO/NOS) signaling were evaluated using 0.5 to 500 microM 2-aminoethoxydiphenyl borate (2-APB) and 0.1 to 1 microM carbonylcyanide-p-trifluoromethoxyphenylhydrazone (FCCP), and 1 mM Nomega-Nitro-L-arginine methyl ester (L-NAME) and 7-nitroindizole, respectively. Only FCCP appeared to significantly suppress the puff-triggered Ca(i) transients. It was

  15. Ca Isotopic Ratios in Igneous Rocks: Some Preliminary Results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, S.; Farkas, J.; Jacobsen, S. B.

    2009-12-01

    Calcium (Ca) is the 5th most abundant element on the Earth, and it is an important geochemical and cosmochemical tracer. It has six isotopes and only H and He have a larger percentage mass difference (Δm/m) between the heaviest and the lightest isotopes. Systematic Ca isotopic studies have mostly focused on low-temperature geochemical processes, and most Ca isotopic analyses have been applied on modern and ancient marine carbonates and sulphates, documenting large and systematic isotopic variations, which were used to infer the chemical evolution of seawater. Detailed work on igneous rocks is very limited. Here we show two examples of how stable Ca isotopic ratios can be a useful geochemical tool in understanding igneous processes. Ca isotopic fractionation between coexisting clinopyroxene and orthopyroxene from mantle peridotites: We report Ca isotopic ratios on co-existing clino- and ortho-pyroxenes from Kilbourne Hole and San Carlos mantle peridotites. The 44Ca/40Ca in orthopyroxenes is ~0.5 per mil heavier than that in co-existing clinopyroxenes. Combined with published Ca isotopic data on low-temperature Ca-bearing minerals (calcite, aragonite and barite), we show that the fractionation of Ca isotopes between Ca-bearing minerals (at both low-temperature and high-temperature) is primarily controlled by the strength of Ca-O bond in the minerals. The mineral with shorter (i.e., stronger) Ca-O bond yields heavier Ca isotopic ratio. Using our measured 44Ca/40Ca in mantle pyroxenes and the relative proportions of major Ca-bearing minerals in the upper mantle, the estimated 44Ca/40Ca of the upper mantle is 1.1 per mil heavier relative to the NIST 915a, ~0.1 to 0.2 per mil higher than basalts. Ca isotopic variation in Hawaiian shield lavas: Large geochemical and isotopic variations have been observed in lavas forming the large tholeiitic shields of Hawaiian volcanoes, with lavas from the surface of the Koolau volcano (Makapuu-stage) defining one compositional and

  16. Substantial depletion of the intracellular Ca2+ stores is required for macroscopic activation of the Ca2+ release-activated Ca2+ current in rat basophilic leukaemia cells.

    PubMed

    Fierro, L; Parekh, A B

    2000-01-15

    1. Tight-seal whole-cell patch clamp experiments were performed to examine the ability of different intracellular Ca2+ mobilising agents to activate the Ca2+ release-activated Ca2+ current (ICRAC) in rat basophilic leukaemia (RBL-1) cells under conditions of weak cytoplasmic Ca2+ buffering. 2. Dialysis with a maximal concentration of inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate (IP3) routinely failed to activate macroscopic ICRAC in low buffer (0.mM EGTA, BAPTA or dimethyl BAPTA), whereas it activated the current to its maximal extent in high buffer (10 mM EGTA). Dialysis with a poorly metabolisable analogue of IP3, with ionomycin, or with IP3 and ionomycin all failed to generate macroscopic ICRAC in low Ca2+ buffering conditions. 3. Dialysis with the sarco/endoplasmic reticulum Ca2+-ATPase (SERCA) pump blocker thapsigargin was able to activate ICRAC even in the presence of low cytoplasmic Ca2+ buffering, albeit at a slow rate. Exposure to IP3 together with the SERCA blockers thapsigargin, thapsigargicin or cyclopiazonic acid rapidly activated ICRAC in low buffer. 4. Following activation of ICRAC by intracellular dialysis with IP3 and thapsigargin in low buffer, the current was very selective for Ca2+ (apparent KD of 1 mM) Sr2+ and Ba2+ were less effective charge carriers and Na+ was not conducted to any appreciable extent. The ionic selectivity of ICRAC was very similar in low or high intracellular Ca2+ buffer. 5. Fast Ca2+-dependent inactivation of ICRAC occurred at a similar rate and to a similar extent in low or high Ca2+ buffer. Ca2+-dependent inactivation is not the reason why macroscopic ICRAC cannot be seen under conditions of low cytoplasmic Ca2+ buffering. 6. ICRAC could be activated by combining IP3 with thapsigargin, even in the presence of 100 microM Ca2+ and the absence of any exogenous Ca2+ chelator, where ATP and glutamate represented the only Ca2+ buffers in the pipette solution. 7. Our results suggest that a threshold exists within the IP3-sensitive Ca2+ store

  17. Small event Ca2+ release: a probable precursor of Ca2+ sparks in frog skeletal muscle.

    PubMed Central

    Shirokova, N; Ríos, E

    1997-01-01

    1. Fluo-3 fluorescence associated with Ca2+ release was recorded with confocal microscopy in single muscle fibres. Clamp depolarization to -65 or -60 mV elicited Ca2+ sparks with amplitudes and spatial widths distributed approximately normally, with mean values of 0.79 of resting fluorescence and 0.8 micron (S.D., 0.17 and 0.2 micron; n = 193), respectively. Given these distributions, events of amplitude less than 0.45 or width less than 0.4 micron are unlikely to be sparks. 2. Low voltage depolarization (-72 mV) elicited only one spark per triad every 6 s, but generated a relative increase in fluorescence at triads of 0.05. This increase must therefore have been due to events smaller than sparks. 3. The variance/mean ratio of triadic fluorescence gradients averaged 0.11 at low voltages and increased severalfold at the higher voltages at which sparks appeared, indicating the existence of at least two event amplitudes. 4. Tetracaine (200 microM) reversibly abolished sparks and the early peak of Ca2+ release at all voltages. In its presence, discrete events were smaller than the spark criterion, and triadic gradients had a variance/mean ratio of 0.11. 5. The phenylalkylamine D600 (2 microM) reduced release at all voltages, abolishing sparks and the peak of Ca2+ release at low but not at high voltages. 6. The parallel abolition of all sparks and the peak of Ca2+ release indicates that both phenomena are activated by Ca2+. The restoration of sparks by voltage in D600 suggests that release in small events provides the trigger Ca2+ for activation of sparks. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 PMID:9234193

  18. Pressure-induced structural transformation of CaC2.

    PubMed

    Wang, Lu; Huang, Xiaoli; Li, Da; Huang, Yanping; Bao, Kuo; Li, Fangfei; Wu, Gang; Liu, Bingbing; Cui, Tian

    2016-05-21

    The high pressure structural changes of calcium carbide CaC2 have been investigated with Raman spectroscopy and synchrotron X-ray diffraction (XRD) techniques in a diamond anvil cell at room temperature. At ambient conditions, two forms of CaC2 co-exist. Above 4.9 GPa, monoclinic CaC2-ii diminished indicating the structural phase transition from CaC2-ii to CaC2-i. At about 7.0 GPa, both XRD patterns and Raman spectra confirmed that CaC2-i transforms into a metallic Cmcm structure which contains polymeric carbon chains. Along with the phase transition, the isolated C2 dumbbells are polymerized into zigzag chains resulting in a large volume collapse with 22.4%. Above 30.0 GPa, the XRD patterns of CaC2 become featureless and remain featureless upon decompression, suggesting an irreversible amorphization of CaC2. PMID:27208957

  19. The emerging role of CaMKII in cancer

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yan-yang; Zhao, Ren; Zhe, Hong

    2015-01-01

    Ca2+/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II (CaMKII) is a multifunctional serine/threonine kinases best known for its critical role in learning and memory. Recent studies suggested that high levels of CaMKII also expressed in variety of malignant diseases. In this review, we focus on the structure and biology properties of CaMKII, including the role of CaMKII in the regulation of cancer progression and therapy response. We also describe the role of CaMKII in the diagnosis of different kinds of cancer and recent progress in the development of CaMKII inhibitors. These data establishes CaMKII as a novel target whose modulation presents new opportunities for cancer diagnosis and treatment. PMID:25961153

  20. Pressure-induced structural transformation of CaC2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Lu; Huang, Xiaoli; Li, Da; Huang, Yanping; Bao, Kuo; Li, Fangfei; Wu, Gang; Liu, Bingbing; Cui, Tian

    2016-05-01

    The high pressure structural changes of calcium carbide CaC2 have been investigated with Raman spectroscopy and synchrotron X-ray diffraction (XRD) techniques in a diamond anvil cell at room temperature. At ambient conditions, two forms of CaC2 co-exist. Above 4.9 GPa, monoclinic CaC2-ii diminished indicating the structural phase transition from CaC2-ii to CaC2-i. At about 7.0 GPa, both XRD patterns and Raman spectra confirmed that CaC2-i transforms into a metallic Cmcm structure which contains polymeric carbon chains. Along with the phase transition, the isolated C2 dumbbells are polymerized into zigzag chains resulting in a large volume collapse with 22.4%. Above 30.0 GPa, the XRD patterns of CaC2 become featureless and remain featureless upon decompression, suggesting an irreversible amorphization of CaC2.

  1. MicroRNA-145 suppresses ROS-induced Ca{sup 2+} overload of cardiomyocytes by targeting CaMKIIδ

    SciTech Connect

    Cha, Min-Ji; Jang, Jin-Kyung; Ham, Onju; Song, Byeong-Wook; Lee, Se-Yeon; Lee, Chang Yeon; Park, Jun-Hee; Lee, Jiyun; Seo, Hyang-Hee; Choi, Eunhyun; Jeon, Woo-min; Hwang, Hye Jin; Shin, Hyun-Taek; and others

    2013-06-14

    Highlights: •CaMKIIδ mediates H{sub 2}O{sub 2}-induced Ca{sup 2+} overload in cardiomyocytes. •miR-145 can inhibit Ca{sup 2+} overload. •A luciferase assay confirms that miR-145 functions as a CaMKIIδ-targeting miRNA. •Overexpression of miR-145 regulates CaMKIIδ-related genes and ameliorates apoptosis. -- Abstract: A change in intracellular free calcium (Ca{sup 2+}) is a common signaling mechanism of reperfusion-induced cardiomyocyte death. Calcium/calmodulin dependent protein kinase II (CaMKII) is a critical regulator of Ca{sup 2+} signaling and mediates signaling pathways responsible for functions in the heart including hypertrophy, apoptosis, arrhythmia, and heart disease. MicroRNAs (miRNA) are involved in the regulation of cell response, including survival, proliferation, apoptosis, and development. However, the roles of miRNAs in Ca{sup 2+}-mediated apoptosis of cardiomyocytes are uncertain. Here, we determined the potential role of miRNA in the regulation of CaMKII dependent apoptosis and explored its underlying mechanism. To determine the potential roles of miRNAs in H{sub 2}O{sub 2}-mediated Ca{sup 2+} overload, we selected and tested 6 putative miRNAs that targeted CaMKIIδ, and showed that miR-145 represses CaMKIIδ protein expression and Ca{sup 2+} overload. We confirmed CaMKIIδ as a direct downstream target of miR-145. Furthermore, miR-145 regulates Ca{sup 2+}-related signals and ameliorates apoptosis. This study demonstrates that miR-145 regulates reactive oxygen species (ROS)-induced Ca{sup 2+} overload in cardiomyocytes. Thus, miR-145 affects ROS-mediated gene regulation and cellular injury responses.

  2. Application of Ca stable isotopes to long-term changes in the Ca cycle of a Northern Hardwood forest

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kurtz, A. C.; Takagi, K.; Bailey, S. W.; Bullen, T. D.

    2015-12-01

    The Hubbard Brook Ecosystem Study (New Hampshire, USA) presents an unusual opportunity for the application of innovative isotope methods in forest biogeochemistry. Changes in biogeochemical cycling resulting from decades of acid deposition, subsequent reductions in acid deposition, and a series of experimental treatments (harvesting, Ca amendment) have been studied continuously for 60 years at this site. Importantly, researchers have archived soil, water, and vegetation samples for much of the site's history. Our work seeks to complement earlier mass balance studies of Ca cycling by measuring Ca isotope ratios on archived samples. In the first component of our study, we examined the Ca isotopic response to an experimental clearcut in the early 1980's. Earlier work showed that the clearcut promoted dramatic loss of Ca from the watershed, indicated by a 5-fold increase in streamwater Ca concentrations. The mechanism for this loss was unclear as no resolvable changes in soil Ca pools were observed. Our work shows that streamwater dissolved Ca becomes isotopically lighter as Ca concentrations increase. These data are best accounted for by an increase in Ca loss from the soil cation exchange complex. Soil exchangeable δ44Ca itself evolves towards lighter values in the years following the experimental harvest. We interpret this as replenishment of the soil exchange complex by release of isotopically light Ca from root biomass. In the second component of our study, we examine decadal-scale changes in streamwater and soil Ca in an un-manipulated biogeochemical reference watershed. Historical data from Hubbard Brook show that streamwater Ca concentrations began decreasing sharply in the early 1970's, attributed to decreased deposition of both acidity and Ca with the passage of the Clean Air Act. Preliminary data indicate no resolvable change in the average δ44Ca of streamwater, with variability mostly attributable to discharge (flowpath control). Preliminary data

  3. Sr/Ca and Ba/Ca variations in environmental and biological sources: A survey of marine and terrestrial systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peek, Stephanie; Clementz, Mark T.

    2012-10-01

    The relative concentrations of strontium to calcium (Sr/Ca) and barium to calcium (Ba/Ca) in mammalian bioapatite are common biogeochemical indicators for trophic level and/or dietary preferences in terrestrial foodwebs; however, similar research in marine foodwebs is lacking. This study combined environmental and biological Sr/Ca and Ba/Ca data from both terrestrial and marine settings from 62 published books, reports, and studies along with original data collected from 149 marine mammals (30 species) and 83 prey items (18 species) and found that variations in Sr/Ca and Ba/Ca ratios of biological and environmental samples are appreciably different in terrestrial and marine systems. In terrestrial systems, environmental sources account for most of the variations in Sr/Ca and Ba/Ca ratios. In contrast, environmental sources in marine systems (i.e., seawater) are comparatively invariant, meaning most of the variations in Sr/Ca and Ba/Ca ratios originate from biological processes. Marine consumers, particularly non-mammalian and mammalian vertebrates, show evidence of biopurification of Ca relative to Sr and Ba, similar to what is observed in terrestrial systems; however, unlike terrestrial systems, variations in Sr/Ca and Ba/Ca ratios of environmental sources are overprinted by bioaccumulation of Sr and Ba at the base of marine foodwebs. This demonstrates that in marine systems, spatial or temporal differences may have little to no effect on Sr/Ca and Ba/Ca ratios of marine vertebrates, making Sr/Ca, and to a lesser extent Ba/Ca, potentially useful global proxies for trophic level and dietary preferences of marine vertebrates.

  4. Graded Ca²⁺/calmodulin-dependent coupling of voltage-gated CaV1.2 channels.

    PubMed

    Dixon, Rose E; Moreno, Claudia M; Yuan, Can; Opitz-Araya, Ximena; Binder, Marc D; Navedo, Manuel F; Santana, Luis F

    2015-01-01

    In the heart, reliable activation of Ca(2+) release from the sarcoplasmic reticulum during the plateau of the ventricular action potential requires synchronous opening of multiple CaV1.2 channels. Yet the mechanisms that coordinate this simultaneous opening during every heartbeat are unclear. Here, we demonstrate that CaV1.2 channels form clusters that undergo dynamic, reciprocal, allosteric interactions. This 'functional coupling' facilitates Ca(2+) influx by increasing activation of adjoined channels and occurs through C-terminal-to-C-terminal interactions. These interactions are initiated by binding of incoming Ca(2+) to calmodulin (CaM) and proceed through Ca(2+)/CaM binding to the CaV1.2 pre-IQ domain. Coupling fades as [Ca(2+)]i decreases, but persists longer than the current that evoked it, providing evidence for 'molecular memory'. Our findings suggest a model for CaV1.2 channel gating and Ca(2+)-influx amplification that unifies diverse observations about Ca(2+) signaling in the heart, and challenges the long-held view that voltage-gated channels open and close independently. PMID:25714924

  5. Graded Ca2+/calmodulin-dependent coupling of voltage-gated CaV1.2 channels

    PubMed Central

    Dixon, Rose E; Moreno, Claudia M; Yuan, Can; Opitz-Araya, Ximena; Binder, Marc D; Navedo, Manuel F; Santana, Luis F

    2015-01-01

    In the heart, reliable activation of Ca2+ release from the sarcoplasmic reticulum during the plateau of the ventricular action potential requires synchronous opening of multiple CaV1.2 channels. Yet the mechanisms that coordinate this simultaneous opening during every heartbeat are unclear. Here, we demonstrate that CaV1.2 channels form clusters that undergo dynamic, reciprocal, allosteric interactions. This ‘functional coupling’ facilitates Ca2+ influx by increasing activation of adjoined channels and occurs through C-terminal-to-C-terminal interactions. These interactions are initiated by binding of incoming Ca2+ to calmodulin (CaM) and proceed through Ca2+/CaM binding to the CaV1.2 pre-IQ domain. Coupling fades as [Ca2+]i decreases, but persists longer than the current that evoked it, providing evidence for ‘molecular memory’. Our findings suggest a model for CaV1.2 channel gating and Ca2+-influx amplification that unifies diverse observations about Ca2+ signaling in the heart, and challenges the long-held view that voltage-gated channels open and close independently. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.05608.001 PMID:25714924

  6. The EF-Hand Ca2+ Binding Protein MICU Choreographs Mitochondrial Ca2+ Dynamics in Arabidopsis[OPEN

    PubMed Central

    Carraretto, Luca; Teardo, Enrico; Cendron, Laura; Füßl, Magdalena; Doccula, Fabrizio G.; Szabò, Ildikò

    2015-01-01

    Plant organelle function must constantly adjust to environmental conditions, which requires dynamic coordination. Ca2+ signaling may play a central role in this process. Free Ca2+ dynamics are tightly regulated and differ markedly between the cytosol, plastid stroma, and mitochondrial matrix. The mechanistic basis of compartment-specific Ca2+ dynamics is poorly understood. Here, we studied the function of At-MICU, an EF-hand protein of Arabidopsis thaliana with homology to constituents of the mitochondrial Ca2+ uniporter machinery in mammals. MICU binds Ca2+ and localizes to the mitochondria in Arabidopsis. In vivo imaging of roots expressing a genetically encoded Ca2+ sensor in the mitochondrial matrix revealed that lack of MICU increased resting concentrations of free Ca2+ in the matrix. Furthermore, Ca2+ elevations triggered by auxin and extracellular ATP occurred more rapidly and reached higher maximal concentrations in the mitochondria of micu mutants, whereas cytosolic Ca2+ signatures remained unchanged. These findings support the idea that a conserved uniporter system, with composition and regulation distinct from the mammalian machinery, mediates mitochondrial Ca2+ uptake in plants under in vivo conditions. They further suggest that MICU acts as a throttle that controls Ca2+ uptake by moderating influx, thereby shaping Ca2+ signatures in the matrix and preserving mitochondrial homeostasis. Our results open the door to genetic dissection of mitochondrial Ca2+ signaling in plants. PMID:26530087

  7. Ca2+ transport capacity of sarcolemmal Na+-Ca2+ exchange. Extrapolation of vesicle data to in vivo conditions.

    PubMed

    Philipson, K D; Ward, R

    1986-09-01

    Na+-Ca2+ exchange activity is high in cardiac sarcolemmal vesicles suggesting an important physiologic role. Vesicular Na+-Ca2+ exchange, however, is usually measured under conditions which are far from physiologic. Using sarcolemmal vesicles, we have estimated the possible significance of both Ca2+ influx and efflux mediated by Na+-Ca2+ exchange under approximate in vivo ionic conditions. In this situation, Na+-Ca2+ exchange activity is far from maximal with intracellular Mg2+ causing significant inhibition. The capacity of the Na+-Ca2+ exchange system to extrude intracellular Ca2+ (at [Ca2+] = 6.0 microM) is about 1.2 mumol Ca2+/kg wet weight/s and approximately equals the capacity of the sarcolemmal ATP-dependent Ca2+ pump. The capacity of the sarcoplasmic reticular Ca2+ pump to remove cytoplasmic Ca2+ is much larger. Significant Ca2+ influx through the exchanger is unlikely to occur in normal mammalian myocardium and would require reduced extracellular Na+ or elevated intracellular Na+. PMID:3783729

  8. Role of sarcomere mechanics and Ca2+ overload in Ca2+ waves and arrhythmias in rat cardiac muscle.

    PubMed

    ter Keurs, Henk E D J; Wakayama, Yuji; Sugai, Yoshinao; Price, Guy; Kagaya, Yutaka; Boyden, Penelope A; Miura, Masahito; Stuyvers, Bruno D M

    2006-10-01

    Ca(2+) release from the sarcoplasmic reticulum (SR) depends on the sarcoplasmic reticulum (SR) Ca(2+) load and the cytosolic Ca(2+) level. Arrhythmogenic Ca(2+) waves underlying triggered propagated contractions arise from Ca(2+) overloaded regions near damaged areas in the cardiac muscle. Ca(2+) waves can also be induced in undamaged muscle, in regions with nonuniform excitation-contraction (EC) coupling by the cycle of stretch and release in the border zone between the damaged and intact regions. We hypothesize that rapid shortening of sarcomeres in the border zone during relaxation causes Ca(2+) release from troponin C (TnC) on thin filaments and initiates Ca(2+) waves. Elimination of this shortening will inhibit the initiation of Ca(2+) waves, while SR Ca(2+) overload will enhance the waves. Force, sarcomere length (SL), and [Ca(2+)](i) were measured and muscle length was controlled. A small jet of Hepes solution with an extracellular [Ca(2+)] 10 mM (HC), or HC containing BDM, was used to weaken a 300 mum long muscle segment. Trains of electrical stimuli were used to induce Ca(2+) waves. The effects of small exponential stretches on triggered propagatory contraction (TPC) amplitude and propagation velocity of Ca(2+) waves (V(prop)) were studied. Sarcomere shortening was uniform prior to activation. HC induced spontaneous diastolic sarcomere contractions in the jet region and attenuated twitch sarcomere shortening; HC+ butanedione monoxime (BDM) caused stretch only in the jet region. Stimulus trains induced Ca(2+) waves, which started inside the HC jet region during twitch relaxation. Ca(2+) waves started in the border zone of the BDM jet. The initial local [Ca(2+)](i) rise of the waves by HC was twice that by BDM. The waves propagated at a V(prop) of 2.0 +/- 0.2 mm/sec. Arrhythmias occurred frequently in trabeculae following exposure to the HC jet. Stretch early during relaxation, which reduced sarcomere shortening in the weakened regions, substantially

  9. Control of IP3-mediated Ca2+ puffs in Xenopus laevis oocytes by the Ca2+-binding protein parvalbumin

    PubMed Central

    John, Linu M; Mosquera-Caro, Monica; Camacho, Patricia; Lechleiter, James D

    2001-01-01

    Elementary events of Ca2+ release (Ca2+ puffs) can be elicited from discrete clusters of inositol 1,4,5 trisphosphate receptors (IP3Rs) at low concentrations of IP3. Ca2+ puffs have rarely been observed unless elicited by either hormone treatment or introduction of IP3 into the cell. However, cells appear to have sufficient concentrations of IP3 (0.1-3.0 μM) to induce Ca2+ release under resting conditions. Here, we investigated Ca2+ puff activity in non-stimulated Xenopus oocytes using confocal microscopy. The fluorescent Ca2+ dye indicators Calcium Green 1 and Oregon Green 488 BAPTA-2 were injected into oocytes to monitor basal Ca2+ activity. In this preparation, injection or overexpression of parvalbumin, an EF-hand Ca2+-binding protein (CaBP), induced Ca2+ puffs in resting Xenopus oocytes. This activity was inhibited by heparin, an IP3R channel blocker, and by mutation of the Ca2+-binding sites in parvalbumin. Ca2+ puff activity was also evoked by injection of low concentrations of the Ca2+ chelator EGTA, but not by calbindin D28k, another member of the EF-hand CaBP superfamily. BAPTA and the Ca2+ indicator dye Oregon Green 488 BAPTA-1 evoked Ca2+ puff activity, while the dextran conjugate of Oregon Green 488 BAPTA-1 did not. These data indicate that a Ca2+ buffer must be mobile in order to increase Ca2+ puff activity. Together, the data indicate that some IP3Rs spontaneously release Ca2+ under resting concentrations of IP3. These elementary Ca2+ events appear to be below the level of detection of current imaging techniques. We suggest that parvalbumin evokes Ca2+ puffs by coordinating the activity of elementary IP3R channel openings. We conclude that Ca2+ release can be evoked not only by hormone-induced increases in IP3, but also by expression of mobile cytosolic CaBPs under resting concentrations of IP3. PMID:11507154

  10. Ca++ induced hypothermia in a hibernator /Citellus beechyi/

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hanegan, J. L.; Williams, B. A.

    1975-01-01

    Results of perfusion of excess Ca++ and Na+ into the hypothalamus of the hibernating ground squirrel Citellus beechyi are presented. The significant finding is that perfused excess Ca++ causes a reduction in core temperature when ambient temperature is low (12 C). Ca++ also causes a rise in rectal temperature at high ambient temperature (33 C). Thus hypothalamic Ca++ perfusion apparently causes a nonspecific depression of thermoregulatory control.

  11. T-type Ca2+ channel modulation by otilonium bromide

    PubMed Central

    Strege, Peter R.; Sha, Lei; Beyder, Arthur; Bernard, Cheryl E.; Perez-Reyes, Edward; Evangelista, Stefano; Gibbons, Simon J.; Szurszewski, Joseph H.

    2010-01-01

    Antispasmodics are used clinically to treat a variety of gastrointestinal disorders by inhibition of smooth muscle contraction. The main pathway for smooth muscle Ca2+ entry is through L-type channels; however, there is increasing evidence that T-type Ca2+ channels also play a role in regulating contractility. Otilonium bromide, an antispasmodic, has previously been shown to inhibit L-type Ca2+ channels and colonic contractile activity. The objective of this study was to determine whether otilonium bromide also inhibits T-type Ca2+ channels. Whole cell currents were recorded by patch-clamp technique from HEK293 cells transfected with cDNAs encoding the T-type Ca2+ channels, CaV3.1 (α1G), CaV3.2 (α1H), or CaV3.3 (α1I) alpha subunits. Extracellular solution was exchanged with otilonium bromide (10−8 to 10−5 M). Otilonium bromide reversibly blocked all T-type Ca2+ channels with a significantly greater affinity for CaV3.3 than CaV3.1 or CaV3.2. Additionally, the drug slowed inactivation in CaV3.1 and CaV3.3. Inhibition of T-type Ca2+ channels may contribute to inhibition of contractility by otilonium bromide. This may represent a new mechanism of action for antispasmodics and may contribute to the observed increased clinical effectiveness of antispasmodics compared with selective L-type Ca2+ channel blockers. PMID:20203058

  12. [Spontaneous rupture of mediastinal cystic teratoma (case report)].

    PubMed

    Ege, Gürkan; Akman, Haluk; Kuzucu, Kismet; Kalayci, Göksel

    2004-06-01

    Teratomas are rare tumors in the mediastinum. Benign cystic teratomas of anterior mediastinum are rarely complicated by rupture into an adjacent body cavity. Such rupture, however, is usually associated with life-threatening complications. We present a case with spontaneous rupture of mediastinal cystic teratoma. The patient was evaluated with chest radiograph, computed tomography (CT) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). A complex mass including predominantly cystic components was detected in the left anterior mediastinum. After surgery, pathologic diagnosis was reported as mature cystic teratoma. High levels of amylase and lipase were detected in both the cystic fluid and serum. This finding supported the hypothesis of autolysis for the explanation of rupture. In addition, carbohydrate antigen (CA) 19-9, CA 125 and carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA) levels were high in the cystic fluid. PMID:15236127

  13. Ovarian Cavernous Hemangioma Presenting as a Large Growing Mass in a Postmenopausal Woman: A Case Report and Review of the Literature

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Sun Suk; Han, Si Eun; Lee, Nam Kyung; Choi, Kyung Un; Joo, Jong Kil; Suh, Dong Soo; Kim, Heung Yeol

    2015-01-01

    Ovarian hemangiomas are usually of the cavernous type, and are rarely encountered. A 73-year-old woman presented with lower abdominal discomfort. Subsequent physical examination depicted a palpable mass in the lower abdomen. Abdominopelvic computed tomography (CT) revealed a well-circumscribed mass with thin septa measuring 12.1 × 9.0 cm in the right ovary. Levels of the tumor markers cancer antigen (CA)-125 and CA 19-9 were within the normal range. At laparoscopy, the tumor was found to be confined to the right ovary and to have a smooth surface. The final histopathological result was ovarian cavernous hemangioma. Microscopically, the mass consisted of multiple, dilated, blood-filled vascular channels separated by loose connective tissue, and all were lined by a single layer of flattened endothelium. The authors present a case of ovarian cavernous hemangioma presenting as a large growing mass in a postmenopausal woman and review previously published literature. PMID:26793681

  14. Ovarian Cavernous Hemangioma Presenting as a Large Growing Mass in a Postmenopausal Woman: A Case Report and Review of the Literature.

    PubMed

    Kim, Sun Suk; Han, Si Eun; Lee, Nam Kyung; Choi, Kyung Un; Joo, Jong Kil; Suh, Dong Soo; Kim, Heung Yeol; Kim, Ki Hyung

    2015-12-01

    Ovarian hemangiomas are usually of the cavernous type, and are rarely encountered. A 73-year-old woman presented with lower abdominal discomfort. Subsequent physical examination depicted a palpable mass in the lower abdomen. Abdominopelvic computed tomography (CT) revealed a well-circumscribed mass with thin septa measuring 12.1 × 9.0 cm in the right ovary. Levels of the tumor markers cancer antigen (CA)-125 and CA 19-9 were within the normal range. At laparoscopy, the tumor was found to be confined to the right ovary and to have a smooth surface. The final histopathological result was ovarian cavernous hemangioma. Microscopically, the mass consisted of multiple, dilated, blood-filled vascular channels separated by loose connective tissue, and all were lined by a single layer of flattened endothelium. The authors present a case of ovarian cavernous hemangioma presenting as a large growing mass in a postmenopausal woman and review previously published literature. PMID:26793681

  15. High precision calcium isotope analysis using 42Ca-48Ca double-spike TIMS technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feng, L.; Zhou, L.; Gao, S.; Tong, S. Y.; Zhou, M. L.

    2014-12-01

    Double spike techniques are widely used for determining calcium isotopic compositions of natural samples. The most important factor controlling precision of the double spike technique is the choice of appropriate spike isotope pair, the composition of double spikes and the ratio of spike to sample(CSp/CN). We propose an optimal 42Ca-48Ca double spike protocol which yields the best internal precision for calcium isotopic composition determinations among all kinds of spike pairs and various spike compositions and ratios of spike to sample, as predicted by linear error propagation method. It is suggested to use spike composition of 42Ca/(42Ca+48Ca) = 0.44 mol/mol and CSp/(CN+ CSp)= 0.12mol/mol because it takes both advantages of the largest mass dispersion between 42Ca and 48Ca (14%) and lowest spike cost. Spiked samples were purified by pass through homemade micro-column filled with Ca special resin. K, Ti and other interference elements were completely separated, while 100% calcium was recovered with negligible blank. Data collection includes integration time, idle time, focus and peakcenter frequency, which were all carefully designed for the highest internal precision and lowest analysis time. All beams were automatically measured in a sequence by Triton TIMS so as to eliminate difference of analytical conditions between samples and standards, and also to increase the analytical throughputs. The typical internal precision of 100 duty cycles for one beam is 0.012‒0.015 ‰ (2δSEM), which agrees well with the predicted internal precision of 0.0124 ‰ (2δSEM). Our methods improve internal precisions by a factor of 2‒10 compared to previous methods of determination of calcium isotopic compositions by double spike TIMS. We analyzed NIST SRM 915a, NIST SRM 915b and Pacific Seawater as well as interspersed geological samples during two months. The obtained average δ44/40Ca (all relative to NIST SRM 915a) is 0.02 ± 0.02 ‰ (n=28), 0.72±0.04 ‰ (n=10) and 1

  16. Nature of the individual Ca2+ binding sites in Ca2+-regenerated bacteriorhodopsin

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Y. N.; Sweetman, L. L.; Awad, E. S.; El-Sayed, M. A.

    1992-01-01

    The binding constants, K1 and K2, and the number of Ca2+ ions in each of the two high affinity sites of Ca2+-regenerated bacteriorhodopsin (bR) are determined potentiometrically at different pH values in the range of pH 3.5-4.5 by using the Scatchard plot method. From the pH dependence of K1 and K2, it was found that two hydrogen ions are released for each Ca2+ bound to each of the two high affinity sites. Furthermore, we have measured by a direct spectroscopic method the association constant, Ks, for the binding of Ca2+ to deionized bR, which is responsible for producing the blue to purple color change. Comparing the value of Ks and its pH dependence with those of K1 and K2 showed that the site corresponding to Ks is to be identified with that of K2. This is in agreement with the conclusion reached previously, using a different approach, which showed that it is the second Ca2+ that causes the blue to purple color change. Our studies also show that in addition to the two distinct high affinity sites, there are about four to six sites with lower binding constants. These are attributed to the nonspecific binding in bR. PMID:19431830

  17. Electronic structure of Ca, Sr, and Ba under pressure.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Animalu, A. O. E.; Heine, V.; Vasvari, B.

    1967-01-01

    Electronic band structure calculations phase of Ca, Sr and Ba over wide range of atomic volumes under pressure electronic band structure calculations for fcc phase of Ca, Sr and Ba over wide range of atomic volumes under pressure electronic band structure calculations for fcc phase of Ca, Sr and Ba over wide range of atomic volumes under pressure

  18. Memory retrieval along the proximodistal axis of CA1.

    PubMed

    Nakazawa, Yuki; Pevzner, Aleksandr; Tanaka, Kazumasa Z; Wiltgen, Brian J

    2016-09-01

    The proximal and distal segments of CA1 are thought to perform distinct computations. Neurons in proximal CA1 are reciprocally connected with the medial entorhinal cortex (MEC) and exhibit precise spatial firing. In contrast, cells in distal CA1 communicate with the lateral entorhinal cortex (LEC), exhibit more diffuse spatial firing and are affected by the presence of objects in the environment. To determine if these segments make unique contributions to memory retrieval, we examined cellular activity along the proximodistal axis of CA1 using transgenic reporter mice. Neurons tagged during context learning in proximal CA1 were more likely to be reactivated during testing than those in distal CA1. This was true following context fear conditioning and after exposure to a novel environment. Reactivation was also higher in brain regions connected to proximal CA1 (MEC, distal CA3) than those connected to the distal segment (LEC, proximal CA3). To examine contributions to memory retrieval, we performed neurotoxic lesions of proximal or distal CA1 after training. Lesions of the proximal segment significantly impaired memory retrieval while damage to distal CA1 had no effect. These data suggest that context memories are retrieved by a hippocampal microcircuit that involves the proximal but not distal segment of CA1. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:27068122

  19. 78 FR 36655 - Drawbridge Operation Regulation; Carquinez Strait, Martinez, CA

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-06-19

    ... SECURITY Coast Guard 33 CFR Part 117 Drawbridge Operation Regulation; Carquinez Strait, Martinez, CA AGENCY... Drawbridge across the Carquinez Strait, mile 7.0 at Martinez, CA. The deviation is necessary to perform a..., at Martinez, CA. The drawbridge navigation span provides 135 feet vertical clearance above Mean...

  20. Registration of CA0469C025C chickpea germplasm

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Chickpea (Cicer arientinum L.) germplasm CA0469C025C (Reg. No. XXX; PI XXX), was released by the USDA-ARS in 2010. CA0469C025C was released based on its improved yield and reaction to Ascochyta blight relative to the popular commercial cultivars ‘Dwelley’, ‘Sierra’, and ‘Sawyer’. CA0490C025C is deri...

  1. 77 FR 10371 - Drawbridge Operation Regulation; Sacramento River, Sacramento, CA

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-02-22

    ... SECURITY Coast Guard 33 CFR Part 117 Drawbridge Operation Regulation; Sacramento River, Sacramento, CA... of the Tower Drawbridge across the Sacramento River, mile 59.0, at Sacramento, CA. The deviation is... Drawbridge, mile 59.0, Sacramento River, at Sacramento, CA. The Tower Drawbridge navigation span provides...

  2. 77 FR 22216 - Drawbridge Operation Regulation; Sacramento River, Sacramento, CA

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-04-13

    ... SECURITY Coast Guard 33 CFR Part 117 Drawbridge Operation Regulation; Sacramento River, Sacramento, CA... across the Sacramento River, mile 59.0, at Sacramento, CA. The deviation is necessary to allow the... Tower Drawbridge, mile 59.0, Sacramento River, at Sacramento, CA. The Tower Drawbridge navigation...

  3. 78 FR 42452 - Drawbridge Operation Regulation; Sacramento River, Sacramento, CA

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-07-16

    ... SECURITY Coast Guard 33 CFR Part 117 Drawbridge Operation Regulation; Sacramento River, Sacramento, CA... across the Sacramento River, mile 59.4 at Sacramento, CA. The deviation is necessary to allow the bridge... Sacramento River, at Sacramento, CA. The drawbridge navigation span provides 109 feet vertical...

  4. 76 FR 79067 - Drawbridge Operation Regulation; Sacramento River, Sacramento, CA

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-12-21

    ... SECURITY Coast Guard 33 CFR Part 117 Drawbridge Operation Regulation; Sacramento River, Sacramento, CA... of the Tower Drawbridge across the Sacramento River, mile 59.0, at Sacramento, CA. The deviation is... change to the operation of the Tower Drawbridge, mile 59.0, Sacramento River, at Sacramento, CA....

  5. 78 FR 15878 - Drawbridge Operation Regulations; Sacramento River, Sacramento, CA

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-03-13

    ... SECURITY Coast Guard 33 CFR Part 117 Drawbridge Operation Regulations; Sacramento River, Sacramento, CA... across Sacramento River, mile 59.0, at Sacramento, CA. The deviation is necessary to allow the community... Sacramento River, at Sacramento, CA. The Tower Drawbridge navigation span provides a vertical clearance of...

  6. 77 FR 44139 - Drawbridge Operation Regulation; Sacramento River, Sacramento, CA

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-07-27

    ... SECURITY Coast Guard 33 CFR Part 117 Drawbridge Operation Regulation; Sacramento River, Sacramento, CA... across the Sacramento River, mile 59.0, at Sacramento, CA. The deviation is necessary to allow the... operation of the Tower Drawbridge, mile 59.0, Sacramento River, at Sacramento, CA. The Tower...

  7. 77 FR 419 - Drawbridge Operation Regulation; Sacramento River, Paintersville, CA

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-01-05

    ... CFR Part 117 Drawbridge Operation Regulation; Sacramento River, Paintersville, CA AGENCY: Coast Guard... Paintersville Drawbridge across Sacramento River, mile 33.4, at Paintersville, CA. The deviation is necessary to... Paintersville Drawbridge, mile 33.4, over Sacramento River, at Paintersville, CA. The drawbridge navigation...

  8. Dual effect of spermine on mitochondrial Ca2+ transport.

    PubMed Central

    Lenzen, S; Münster, W; Rustenbeck, I

    1992-01-01

    1. A dual effect of the polyamine spermine on Ca2+ uptake by isolated rat liver, brain and heart mitochondria could be demonstrated by using a high-resolution system for studying mitochondrial Ca2+ transport. Depending on the experimental situation, spermine had an inhibiting or accelerating effects on mitochondrial Ca(2+)-uptake rate, but invariably increased the mitochondrial Ca2+ accumulation. 2. Both effects were concentration-dependent and clearly discernible on the basis of their different kinetic characteristics. For mitochondria from all three tissues the half-maximally effective concentration for inhibition of the initial rate of Ca2+ uptake was approx. 180 microM, whereas that for the subsequent stimulation of Ca2+ accumulation was approx. 50 microM. 3. Acceleration of the initial uptake rate could be seen when the mitochondria were preloaded with spermine during a 2 min preincubation period and thereafter incubated in a medium without spermine. 4. When such spermine-preloaded mitochondria were incubated in a spermine-containing medium, the increase in Ca(2+)-accumulation capacity was maintained in spite of an unchanged rate of Ca2+ uptake. 5. Mg2+ interacted with the effects of spermine in a differential manner, enhancing the initial inhibition of the rate of mitochondrial Ca2+ uptake and diminishing the subsequent stimulation of mitochondrial Ca2+ accumulation. 6. This dual effect of spermine on mitochondrial Ca2+ transport resolves the apparent paradox that a polycationic compound can act as a stimulator of Ca2+ uptake. PMID:1530590

  9. Research on urban sprawl based on GIS and CA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qin, Fen; Yan, Lijie

    2008-10-01

    The complex urban system can't be simulated directly by the traditional and static models. Cellular automata (CA) is a kind of dynamically modeling framework from bottom to top, which possesses the capability of modeling spatialtemporal evolvement process of a complicated geographical system. The peculiarities of CA are apt for simulating urban sprawl, urban expansion and land use evolution, which make the application of CA become very popular. The environment of CA simulation can be improved by using the CA model integrated with GIS to simulate the urban sprawl, and new parameters and transition rules can be found out by establishing classical urban CA. The paper summarizes the status and the application of urban CA in the world, develops a CA model named GIS-CA on the basis of the principle of CA, integrated with GIS and RS, adds urban plan as controlling factor into GIS-CA model, and uses GIS-CA model to simulate and forecast urban sprawl, and takes Luoyang City as the case study. The simulation and forecast results are acceptable for that the precision and Lee-Sallee shape index are rational.

  10. Characteristics (Delta44/40Ca, Mg/Ca and Sr/Ca) of Mytilus edulis and Arctica islandica Shells formed in a Temperature-Salinity Matrix

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hiebenthal, C.; Eisenhauer, A.; Wahl, M.

    2008-12-01

    We investigated the influence of temperature (5°C to 15°C (A. islandica) resp. 25°C (M. edulis)) and salinity (15 to 35 psu) regimes on the calcium (Ca) isotope fractionation (Δ44/40Ca) and on Mg/Ca and Sr/Ca in cultured bivalves (Mytilus edulis and Arctica islandica). In an orthogonal 2-factorial (temperature vs. salinity) experiment, the bivalves were allowed to grow for 15 weeks under tightly controlled conditions and then probed and analysed by thermal ionisation mass spectrometry (TIMS) and optical emission spectrometry (ICP-OES). Several interactions between the factors temperature and salinity with respect to their influence on bivalve shell parameters could be found. However, with the exception of Sr/Ca data, the variation of measured shell characteristics between individual bivalves was high. The Sr/Ca - salinity proxy seems to be the most reliable (linear. regression, M. edulis: Sr/Ca = -0.0283*sal + 1.7967, R2 = 0.81, p < 0.001), even though, in A. islandica shells, it can be blurred by temperature effects at low salinities (lin. regr. at 5°C: p > 0.05, at 10°C: Sr/Ca = - 0.061*sal + 3.13, R2 = 0.93, p < 0.001, at 15°C: Sr/Ca = -0.066*sal + 3.34, R2 = 0.92, p < 0.001). In M. edulis shells Mg/Ca ratios related well with seawater temperature (lin. regr.: Mg/Ca = 0.642*t - 0.107, R2 = 0.81, p < 0.001). Ca isotope ratios only in A. islandica related significantly with temperature (lin. regr.: Δ44/40Ca = 0.016*t - 1.26, R2 = 0.29, p < 0.01) but due to an interacting salinity effect at 10°C (lin. regr.: Δ44/40Ca = -0.0148*sal - 0.738, R2 = 0.62, p = 0.002) the temperature model can only explain a limited part of the variation. Overall, the calcitic shells of M. edulis appear to provide the better element ratio proxies (Mg/Ca for temperature and Sr/Ca for salinity) and the aragonitic shells of A. islandica have the better Ca isotope - temperature proxy.

  11. Intracellular Na+ overload causes oxidation of CaMKII and leads to Ca2+ mishandling in isolated ventricular myocytes.

    PubMed

    Viatchenko-Karpinski, Serge; Kornyeyev, Dmytro; El-Bizri, Nesrine; Budas, Grant; Fan, Peidong; Jiang, Zhan; Yang, Jin; Anderson, Mark E; Shryock, John C; Chang, Ching-Pin; Belardinelli, Luiz; Yao, Lina

    2014-11-01

    An increase of late Na(+) current (INaL) in cardiac myocytes can raise the cytosolic Na(+) concentration and is associated with activation of Ca(2+)/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II (CaMKII) and alterations of mitochondrial metabolism and Ca(2+) handling by sarcoplasmic reticulum (SR). We tested the hypothesis that augmentation of INaL can increase mitochondrial reactive oxygen species (ROS) production and oxidation of CaMKII, resulting in spontaneous SR Ca(2+) release and increased diastolic Ca(2+) in myocytes. Increases of INaL and/or of the cytosolic Na(+) concentration led to mitochondrial ROS production and oxidation of CaMKII to cause dysregulation of Ca(2+) handling in rabbit cardiac myocytes. PMID:25252177

  12. Using Ca isotopes to constrain source of streamwater Ca following clear-cutting of a New England watershed

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takagi, K.; Kurtz, A. C.; Bailey, S. W.

    2011-12-01

    Stable Ca isotopes have been used in applications ranging from use as a paleooceanographic temperature proxy to tracing continental weathering fluxes to the oceans. One of the most important applications has been in understanding Ca cycling in terrestrial ecosystems. Major land use disturbance such as forest harvesting results in increased hydrologic export of cations but the mechanisms that lead to increased Ca export and the sources of streamwater Ca following disturbance remain uncertain. Ca isotope ratios may allow us to determine the internal Ca pools that contribute to increased export. We measured stable Ca isotopes on archived streamwater samples from Hubbard Brook Watershed 5 before and after a 1983 whole-watershed harvest experiment to test the following hypothesis: following harvest, the Ca isotopic value of streamwater will shift towards an isotopically light composition reflecting loss of biologically cycled Ca from soil pools. Ca concentrations measured on archived samples correspond exactly to values measured at the time of collection indicating adequate sample preservation over several decades of storage. Preliminary stable Ca isotopic results on these streamwater samples indicate a robust shift in δ40Ca from a pre-harvest value of -0.95% (vs. seawater) to a post-harvest value of -1.45%. We developed a box model of Ca cycling in forested ecosystems that includes Ca isotopes as tracer in order to model the δ40Ca of the various soil and vegetation pools. Steady-state model results indicate that vegetation is isotopically light relative to the B-horizon and forest floor soil pools and the forest floor soil pool is isotopically light relative to the B-horizon soil pool. We used modeled δ40Ca values of B-horizon and forest floor soil pools in a two end-member mixing analysis to evaluate changes in streamwater δ40Ca following harvesting. Our mixing analysis indicates that the observed decrease in the δ40Ca of streamwater following harvest requires an

  13. Late INa increases diastolic SR-Ca2+-leak in atrial myocardium by activating PKA and CaMKII

    PubMed Central

    Fischer, Thomas H.; Herting, Jonas; Mason, Fleur E.; Hartmann, Nico; Watanabe, Saera; Nikolaev, Viacheslav O.; Sprenger, Julia U.; Fan, Peidong; Yao, Lina; Popov, Aron-Frederik; Danner, Bernhard C.; Schöndube, Friedrich; Belardinelli, Luiz; Hasenfuss, Gerd; Maier, Lars S.; Sossalla, Samuel

    2015-01-01

    Aims Enhanced cardiac late Na current (late INa) and increased sarcoplasmic reticulum (SR)-Ca2+-leak are both highly arrhythmogenic. This study seeks to identify signalling pathways interconnecting late INa and SR-Ca2+-leak in atrial cardiomyocytes (CMs). Methods and results In murine atrial CMs, SR-Ca2+-leak was increased by the late INa enhancer Anemonia sulcata toxin II (ATX-II). An inhibition of Ca2+/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II (Autocamide-2-related inhibitory peptide), protein kinase A (H89), or late INa (Ranolazine or Tetrodotoxin) all prevented ATX-II-dependent SR-Ca2+-leak. The SR-Ca2+-leak induction by ATX-II was not detected when either the Na+/Ca2+ exchanger was inhibited (KBR) or in CaMKIIδc-knockout mice. FRET measurements revealed increased cAMP levels upon ATX-II stimulation, which could be prevented by inhibition of adenylyl cyclases (ACs) 5 and 6 (NKY 80) but not by inhibition of phosphodiesterases (IBMX), suggesting PKA activation via an AC-dependent increase of cAMP levels. Western blots showed late INa-dependent hyperphosphorylation of CaMKII as well as PKA target sites at ryanodine receptor type-2 (-S2814 and -S2808) and phospholamban (-Thr17, -S16). Enhancement of late INa did not alter Ca2+-transient amplitude or SR-Ca2+-load. However, upon late INa activation and simultaneous CaMKII inhibition, Ca2+-transient amplitude and SR-Ca2+-load were increased, whereas PKA inhibition reduced Ca2+-transient amplitude and load and additionally slowed Ca2+ elimination. In atrial CMs from patients with atrial fibrillation, inhibition of late INa, CaMKII, or PKA reduced the SR-Ca2+-leak. Conclusion Late INa exerts distinct effects on Ca2+ homeostasis in atrial myocardium through activation of CaMKII and PKA. Inhibition of late INa represents a potential approach to attenuate CaMKII activation and decreases SR-Ca2+-leak in atrial rhythm disorders. The interconnection with the cAMP/PKA system further increases the antiarrhythmic potential of late

  14. CaV1.2/CaV3.x channels mediate divergent vasomotor responses in human cerebral arteries.

    PubMed

    Harraz, Osama F; Visser, Frank; Brett, Suzanne E; Goldman, Daniel; Zechariah, Anil; Hashad, Ahmed M; Menon, Bijoy K; Watson, Tim; Starreveld, Yves; Welsh, Donald G

    2015-05-01

    The regulation of arterial tone is critical in the spatial and temporal control of cerebral blood flow. Voltage-gated Ca(2+) (CaV) channels are key regulators of excitation-contraction coupling in arterial smooth muscle, and thereby of arterial tone. Although L- and T-type CaV channels have been identified in rodent smooth muscle, little is known about the expression and function of specific CaV subtypes in human arteries. Here, we determined which CaV subtypes are present in human cerebral arteries and defined their roles in determining arterial tone. Quantitative polymerase chain reaction and Western blot analysis, respectively, identified mRNA and protein for L- and T-type channels in smooth muscle of cerebral arteries harvested from patients undergoing resection surgery. Analogous to rodents, CaV1.2 (L-type) and CaV3.2 (T-type) α1 subunits were expressed in human cerebral arterial smooth muscle; intriguingly, the CaV3.1 (T-type) subtype present in rodents was replaced with a different T-type isoform, CaV3.3, in humans. Using established pharmacological and electrophysiological tools, we separated and characterized the unique profiles of Ca(2+) channel subtypes. Pressurized vessel myography identified a key role for CaV1.2 and CaV3.3 channels in mediating cerebral arterial constriction, with the former and latter predominating at higher and lower intraluminal pressures, respectively. In contrast, CaV3.2 antagonized arterial tone through downstream regulation of the large-conductance Ca(2+)-activated K(+) channel. Computational analysis indicated that each Ca(2+) channel subtype will uniquely contribute to the dynamic regulation of cerebral blood flow. In conclusion, this study documents the expression of three distinct Ca(2+) channel subtypes in human cerebral arteries and further shows how they act together to orchestrate arterial tone. PMID:25918359

  15. Reorientable dipolar CuCa antisite and anomalous screening in CaCu3Ti4O12

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Delugas, Pietro; Alippi, Paola; Fiorentini, Vincenzo; Raineri, Vito

    2010-02-01

    Based on first-principles calculations, we show that the abundant CuCa antisite defect contributes sizably to dielectric screening in single-crystal CaCu3Ti4O12 . CuCa has a multi-minimum off-center equilibrium configuration, whereby it possesses a large and easily reorientable dipole moment. The low-temperature and frequency cut-off behavior of CuCa -induced response is consistent with experiment.

  16. Mg/Ca, Sr/Ca and Ca isotope ratios in benthonic foraminifers related to test structure, mineralogy and environmental controls

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gussone, Nikolaus; Filipsson, Helena L.; Kuhnert, Henning

    2016-01-01

    We analysed Mg/Ca, Sr/Ca and Ca isotope ratios of benthonic foraminifers from sediment core tops retrieved during several research cruises in the Atlantic Ocean, in order to improve the understanding of isotope fractionation and element partitioning resulting from biomineralisation processes and changes in ambient conditions. Species include foraminifers secreting tests composed of hyaline low magnesium calcite, porcelaneous high magnesium calcite as well as aragonite. Our results demonstrate systematic isotope fractionation and element partitioning patterns specific for these foraminiferal groups. Calcium isotope fractionation is similar in porcelaneous and hyaline calcite tests and both groups demonstrate the previously described anomaly with enrichment of heavy isotopes around 3-4 °C (Gussone and Filipsson, 2010). Calcium isotope ratios of the aragonitic species Hoeglundina elegans, on the other hand, are about 0.4‰ lighter compared to the calcitic species, which is in general agreement with stronger fractionation in inorganic aragonite compared to calcite. However, the low and strongly variable Sr content suggests additional processes during test formation, and we propose that transmembrane ion transport or a precursor phase to aragonite may be involved. Porcelaneous tests, composed of high Mg calcite, incorporate higher amounts of Sr compared to hyaline low Mg calcite, in agreement with inorganic calcite systematics, but also porcelaneous tests with reduced Mg/Ca show high Sr/Ca. While calcium isotopes, Sr/Ca and Mg/Ca in benthonic foraminifers primarily appear to fractionate and partition with a dominant inorganic control, δ44/40Ca temperature and growth rate dependencies of benthonic foraminifer tests favour a dominant contribution of light Ca by transmembrane transport relative to unfractionated seawater Ca to the calcifying fluid, thus controlling the formation of foraminiferal δ44/40Ca and Sr/Ca proxy signals.

  17. Ca(2+)-mobilizing hormones induce sequentially ordered Ca2+ signals in multicellular systems of rat hepatocytes.

    PubMed Central

    Combettes, L; Tran, D; Tordjmann, T; Laurent, M; Berthon, B; Claret, M

    1994-01-01

    The development of hormone-mediated Ca2+ signals was analysed in polarized doublets, triplets and quadruplets of rat hepatocytes by video imaging of fura2 fluorescence. These multicellular models showed dilated bile canaliculi, and gap junctions were observed by using an anti-connexin-32 antibody. They also showed highly organized Ca2+ signals in response to vasopressin or noradrenaline. Surprisingly, the primary rises in intracellular Ca2+ concentration ([Ca2+]i) did not start randomly from any cell of the multiplet. It originated invariably in the same hepatocyte (first-responding cell), and then was propagated in a sequential manner to the nearest connected cells (cell 2, then 3, in triplets; cell 2, 3, then 4 in quadruplets). The sequential activation of the cells appeared to be an intrinsic property of multiplets of rat hepatocytes. (1) In the continued presence of hormones, the same sequential order was observed up to six times, i.e. at each train of oscillations occurring between the cells. (2) The order of [Ca2+]i responses was modified neither by the repeated addition of hormones nor by the hormonal dose. (3) The mechanical disruption of an intermediate cell slowed down the speed of the propagation, suggesting a role of gap junctions in the rapidity of the sequential activation of cells. (4) The same multiplet could have a different first-responding cell for vasopressin or noradrenaline, suggesting a role of the hormonal receptors in the sequentiality of cell responses. It is postulated that a functional heterogeneity of hormonal receptors, and the presence of functional gap junctions, are involved in the existence of sequentially ordered hormone-mediated [Ca2+]i rises in the multiplets of rat hepatocytes. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 PMID:7998996

  18. Superdeformed and Triaxial States in 42Ca

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hadyńska-KlÈ©k, K.; Napiorkowski, P. J.; Zielińska, M.; Srebrny, J.; Maj, A.; Azaiez, F.; Valiente Dobón, J. J.; Kicińska-Habior, M.; Nowacki, F.; Naïdja, H.; Bounthong, B.; Rodríguez, T. R.; de Angelis, G.; Abraham, T.; Anil Kumar, G.; Bazzacco, D.; Bellato, M.; Bortolato, D.; Bednarczyk, P.; Benzoni, G.; Berti, L.; Birkenbach, B.; Bruyneel, B.; Brambilla, S.; Camera, F.; Chavas, J.; Cederwall, B.; Charles, L.; Ciemała, M.; Cocconi, P.; Coleman-Smith, P.; Colombo, A.; Corsi, A.; Crespi, F. C. L.; Cullen, D. M.; Czermak, A.; Désesquelles, P.; Doherty, D. T.; Dulny, B.; Eberth, J.; Farnea, E.; Fornal, B.; Franchoo, S.; Gadea, A.; Giaz, A.; Gottardo, A.; Grave, X.; GrÈ©bosz, J.; Görgen, A.; Gulmini, M.; Habermann, T.; Hess, H.; Isocrate, R.; Iwanicki, J.; Jaworski, G.; Judson, D. S.; Jungclaus, A.; Karkour, N.; Kmiecik, M.; Karpiński, D.; Kisieliński, M.; Kondratyev, N.; Korichi, A.; Komorowska, M.; Kowalczyk, M.; Korten, W.; Krzysiek, M.; Lehaut, G.; Leoni, S.; Ljungvall, J.; Lopez-Martens, A.; Lunardi, S.; Maron, G.; Mazurek, K.; Menegazzo, R.; Mengoni, D.; Merchán, E.; MÈ©czyński, W.; Michelagnoli, C.; Mierzejewski, J.; Million, B.; Myalski, S.; Napoli, D. R.; Nicolini, R.; Niikura, M.; Obertelli, A.; Özmen, S. F.; Palacz, M.; Próchniak, L.; Pullia, A.; Quintana, B.; Rampazzo, G.; Recchia, F.; Redon, N.; Reiter, P.; Rosso, D.; Rusek, K.; Sahin, E.; Salsac, M.-D.; Söderström, P.-A.; Stefan, I.; Stézowski, O.; Styczeń, J.; Theisen, Ch.; Toniolo, N.; Ur, C. A.; Vandone, V.; Wadsworth, R.; Wasilewska, B.; Wiens, A.; Wood, J. L.; Wrzosek-Lipska, K.; ZiÈ©bliński, M.

    2016-08-01

    Shape parameters of a weakly deformed ground-state band and highly deformed slightly triaxial sideband in 42Ca were determined from E 2 matrix elements measured in the first low-energy Coulomb excitation experiment performed with AGATA. The picture of two coexisting structures is well reproduced by new state-of-the-art large-scale shell model and beyond-mean-field calculations. Experimental evidence for superdeformation of the band built on 02+ has been obtained and the role of triaxiality in the A ˜40 mass region is discussed. Furthermore, the potential of Coulomb excitation as a tool to study superdeformation has been demonstrated for the first time.

  19. Ca2+-Regulated Photoproteins: Effective Immunoassay Reporters

    PubMed Central

    Frank, Ludmila A.

    2010-01-01

    Ca2+-regulated photoproteins of luminous marine coelenterates are of interest and a challenge for researchers as a unique bioluminescent system and as a promising analytical instrument for both in vivo and in vitro applications. The proteins are comprehensively studied as to biochemical properties, tertiary structures, bioluminescence mechanism, etc. This knowledge, along with available recombinant proteins serves the basis for development of unique bioluminescent detection systems that are “self-contained”, triggerable, fast, highly sensitive, and non-hazardous. In the paper, we focus on the use of photoproteins as reporters in binding assays based on immunological recognition element—bioluminescent immunoassay and hybridization immunoassay, their advantages and prospects. PMID:22163526

  20. San Francisco and Bay Area, CA, USA

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1991-01-01

    This cloud free color infrared view of San Francisco and Bay Area, CA (38.0N, 122.5W) is unusual because the city is normally concealed from view by clouds and fog. Gray tones represent urban areas and the red toned areas are vegetated. Within the city, parks easily stand out from the well-developed parts of the city as enclaves of color. The trace of the San Andreas fault shows as a straight valley running across the San Francisco peninsula.

  1. Mechanics of Old Faithful Geyser, Calistoga, CA

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Rudolph, M.L.; Manga, M.; Hurwitz, Shaul; Johnston, Malcolm J.; Karlstrom, L.; Wang, Chun-Yong

    2012-01-01

    In order to probe the subsurface dynamics associated with geyser eruptions, we measured ground deformation at Old Faithful Geyser of Calistoga, CA. We present a physical model in which recharge during the period preceding an eruption is driven by pressure differences relative to the aquifer supplying the geyser. The model predicts that pressure and ground deformation are characterized by an exponential function of time, consistent with our observations. The geyser's conduit is connected to a reservoir at a depth of at least 42 m, and pressure changes in the reservoir can produce the observed ground deformations through either a poroelastic or elastic mechanical model.

  2. Influx of na, k, and ca into roots of salt-stressed cotton seedlings : effects of supplemental ca.

    PubMed

    Cramer, G R; Lynch, J; Läuchli, A; Epstein, E

    1987-03-01

    High Na(+) concentrations may disrupt K(+) and Ca(2+) transport and interfere with growth of many plant species, cotton (Gossypium hirsutum L.) included. Elevated Ca(2+) levels often counteract these consequences of salinity. The effect of supplemental Ca(2+) on influx of Ca(2+), K(+), and Na(+) in roots of intact, salt-stressed cotton seedlings was therefore investigated. Eight-day-old seedlings were exposed to treatments ranging from 0 to 250 millimolar NaCl in the presence of nutrient solutions containing 0.4 or 10 millimolar Ca(2+). Sodium influx increased proportionally to increasing salinity. At high external Ca(2+), Na(+) influx was less than at low Ca(2+). Calcium influx was complex and exhibited two different responses to salinity. At low salt concentrations, influx decreased curvilinearly with increasing salt concentration. At 150 to 250 millimolar NaCl, (45)Ca(2+) influx increased in proportion to salt concentrations, especially with high Ca(2+). Potassium influx declined significantly with increasing salinity, but was unaffected by external Ca(2+). The rate of K(+) uptake was dependent upon root weight, although influx was normalized for root weight. We conclude that the protection of root growth from salt stress by supplemental Ca(2+) is related to improved Ca-status and maintenance of K(+)/Na(+) selectivity. PMID:16665280

  3. Ca2+ entry into neurons is facilitated by cooperative gating of clustered CaV1.3 channels

    PubMed Central

    Moreno, Claudia M; Dixon, Rose E; Tajada, Sendoa; Yuan, Can; Opitz-Araya, Ximena; Binder, Marc D; Santana, Luis F

    2016-01-01

    CaV1.3 channels regulate excitability in many neurons. As is the case for all voltage-gated channels, it is widely assumed that individual CaV1.3 channels behave independently with respect to voltage-activation, open probability, and facilitation. Here, we report the results of super-resolution imaging, optogenetic, and electrophysiological measurements that refute this long-held view. We found that the short channel isoform (CaV1.3S), but not the long (CaV1.3L), associates in functional clusters of two or more channels that open cooperatively, facilitating Ca2+ influx. CaV1.3S channels are coupled via a C-terminus-to-C-terminus interaction that requires binding of the incoming Ca2+ to calmodulin (CaM) and subsequent binding of CaM to the pre-IQ domain of the channels. Physically-coupled channels facilitate Ca2+ currents as a consequence of their higher open probabilities, leading to increased firing rates in rat hippocampal neurons. We propose that cooperative gating of CaV1.3S channels represents a mechanism for the regulation of Ca2+ signaling and electrical activity. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.15744.001 PMID:27187148

  4. Ca2+/calmodulin kinase II increases ryanodine binding and Ca2+-induced sarcoplasmic reticulum Ca2+ release kinetics during β-adrenergic stimulation

    PubMed Central

    Ferrero, Paola; Said, Matilde; Sánchez, Gina; Vittone, Leticia; Valverde, Carlos; Donoso, Paulina; Mattiazzi, Alicia; Mundiña-Weilenmann, Cecilia

    2007-01-01

    We aimed to define the relative contribution of both PKA and Ca2+/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II (CaMKII) cascades to the phosphorylation of RyR2 and the activity of the channel during β-adrenergic receptor (βAR) stimulation. Rat hearts were perfused with increasing concentrations of the β-agonist isoproterenol in the absence and the presence of CaMKII inhibition. CaMKII was inhibited either by preventing the Ca2+ influx to the cell by low [Ca]o plus nifedipine or by the specific inhibitor KN-93. We immunodetected RyR2 phosphorylated at Ser2809 (PKA and putative CaMKII site) and at Ser2815 (CaMKII site) and measured [3H]-ryanodine binding and fast Ca2+ release kinetics in sarcoplasmic reticulum (SR) vesicles. SR vesicles were isolated in conditions that preserved the phosphorylation levels achieved in the intact heart and were actively and equally loaded with Ca2+. Our results demonstrated that Ser2809 and Ser2815 of RyR2 were dose-dependently phosphorylated under βAR stimulation by PKA and CaMKII, respectively. The isoproterenol-induced increase in the phosphorylation of Ser2815 site was prevented by the PKA inhibitor H-89 and mimicked by forskolin. CaMKII-dependent phosphorylation of RyR2 (but not PKA-dependent phosphorylation) was responsible for the β-induced increase in the channel activity as indicated by the enhancement of the [3H]-ryanodine binding and the velocity of fast SR Ca2+ release. The present results show for the first time a dose-dependent increase in the phosphorylation of Ser2815 of RyR2 through the PKA-dependent activation of CaMKII and a predominant role of CaMKII-dependent phosphorylation of RyR2, over that of PKA-dependent phosphorylation, on SR-Ca2+ release during βAR stimulation. PMID:17643448

  5. Ca2+ Sparks and Ca2+ Waves are the subcellular events underlying Ca2+ overload during ischemia and reperfusion in perfused intact hearts

    PubMed Central

    Alicia, Mattiazzi; Mariana, Argenziano; Yuriana, Aguilar-Sanchez; Gabriela, Mazzocchi; Escobar Ariel, L.

    2014-01-01

    Abnormal intracellular Ca2+ cycling plays a key role in cardiac dysfunction, particularly during the setting of ischemia/reperfusion (I/R). During ischemia there is an increase in cytosolic and sarcoplasmic reticulum (SR) Ca2+. At the onset of reperfusion there is a transient and abrupt increase in cytosolic Ca2+ which occurs timely associated with reperfusion arrhythmias. However, little is known about the subcellular dynamics of Ca2+ increase during I/R and a possible role of the SR as a mechanism underlying this increase has been previously overlooked. The aim of the present work is to test two main hypotheses: 1. An increase in the frequency of diastolic Ca2+ sparks (cspf) constitutes a mayor substrate for the ischemia-induced diastolic Ca2+ increase; 2. An increase in cytosolic Ca2+ pro-arrhythmogenic events (Ca2+ waves), mediates the abrupt diastolic Ca2+ rise at the onset of reperfusion. We used confocal microscopy on mouse intact hearts loaded with Fluo-4. Hearts were submitted to global I/R (12/30 min) to assess epicardial Ca2+ sparks in the whole heart. Intact heart sparks were faster than in isolated myocytes whereas cspf was not different. During ischemia, cspf significantly increased relative to preischemia (2.07±0.33 vs. 1.13±0.20 sp/sec/100μm, n=29/34, 7 hearts). Reperfusion significantly changed Ca2+ sparks kinetics, by prolonging Ca2+ sparks rise time and decreased cspf. However it significantly increased Ca2+ wave frequency relative to ischemia (0.71±0.14 vs. 0.38±0.06 w/sec/100μm, n=32/33, 7 hearts). The results show for the first time the assessment of intact perfused heart Ca2+ sparks and provides direct evidence of increased Ca2+ sparks in ischemia that transform into Ca2+ waves during reperfusion. These waves may constitute a main trigger of reperfusion arrhythmias. PMID:25451173

  6. Multiplex determination of serological signatures in the sera of colorectal cancer patients using hydrogel biochips.

    PubMed

    Butvilovskaya, Veronika I; Popletaeva, Sofya B; Chechetkin, Vladimir R; Zubtsova, Zhanna I; Tsybulskaya, Marya V; Samokhina, Larisa O; Vinnitskii, Leonid I; Ragimov, Aligeydar A; Pozharitskaya, Elena I; Grigor Eva, Galina A; Meshalkina, Natalya Y; Golysheva, Svetlana V; Shilova, Nadezhda V; Bovin, Nicolai V; Zasedatelev, Aleksander S; Rubina, Alla Y

    2016-07-01

    Colorectal cancer (CRC) is the third most common malignancy in industrialized countries. Despite the advances in diagnostics and development of new drugs, the 5-year survival remains only 60-65%. Our approach to early diagnostics of CRC is based on the determination of serological signatures with an array of hemispherical hydrogel cells containing immobilized proteins and oligosaccharides (glycochip). The compounds immobilized on the glycochip include tumor-associated glycans (SiaTn, Tn, TF, Le(C) , Le(Y) , SiaLe(A) , and Manβ1-4GlcNAcβ) and antibodies against human immunoglobulins IgG, IgA, and IgM. The glycochip detects antibodies against tumor-associated glycans in patients' sera. The simultaneous measurement of the levels of immunoglobulins enhances the diagnostic impact of the signatures. In this work, we found previously unreported increase in antibodies against oligosaccharide Manβ1-4GlcNAcβ in patients with CRC. In parallel with these experiments, we determined the levels of oncomarkers carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA), cancer antigen (CA) 19-9, CA 125, CA 15-3, human chorionic gonadotropin (HCG), and alpha-fetoprotein (AFP) using another gel-based biochip with immobilized antibodies (oncochip) developed earlier in our laboratory. In total, 69 samples from healthy donors, 33 from patients with colorectal carcinoma, and 27 from patients with inflammatory bowel diseases were studied. The use of combined signatures of antiglycan antibodies and oncomarkers provides much better predictive value than the conventional measurement of oncomarkers CEA and CA 19-9. Positive predictive value of CRC diagnoses using together glycochip and oncochip reached 95% with the sensitivity and specificity 88% and 98%, respectively. Thus, the combination of antibody profiling with detection of conventional oncomarkers proved to be a promising tool in diagnostics of CRC. PMID:26992329

  7. An integrated mechanism of cardiomyocyte nuclear Ca2+ signaling

    PubMed Central

    Ibarra, Cristián; Vicencio, Jose Miguel; Varas-Godoy, Manuel; Jaimovich, Enrique; Rothermel, Beverly A.; Uhlén, Per; Hill, Joseph A.; Lavandero, Sergio

    2015-01-01

    In cardiomyocytes, Ca2+ plays a central role in governing both contraction and signaling events that regulate gene expression. Current evidence indicates that discrimination between these two critical functions is achieved by segregating Ca2+ within subcellular microdomains: transcription is regulated by Ca2+ release within nuclear microdomains, and excitation–contraction coupling is regulated by cytosolic Ca2+. Accordingly, a variety of agonists that control cardiomyocyte gene expression, such as endothelin-1, angiotensin-II or insulin-like growth factor-1, share the feature of triggering nuclear Ca2+ signals. However, signaling pathways coupling surface receptor activation to nuclear Ca2+ release, and the phenotypic responses to such signals, differ between agonists. According to earlier hypotheses, the selective control of nuclear Ca2+ signals by activation of plasma membrane receptors relies on the strategic localization of inositol trisphosphate receptors at the nuclear envelope. There, they mediate Ca2+ release from perinuclear Ca2+ stores upon binding of inositol trisphosphate generated in the cytosol, which diffuses into the nucleus. More recently, identification of such receptors at nuclear membranes or perinuclear sarcolemmal invaginations has uncovered novel mechanisms whereby agonists control nuclear Ca2+ release. In this review, we discuss mechanisms for the selective control of nuclear Ca2+ signals with special focus on emerging models of agonist receptor activation. PMID:24997440

  8. An integrated mechanism of cardiomyocyte nuclear Ca(2+) signaling.

    PubMed

    Ibarra, Cristián; Vicencio, Jose Miguel; Varas-Godoy, Manuel; Jaimovich, Enrique; Rothermel, Beverly A; Uhlén, Per; Hill, Joseph A; Lavandero, Sergio

    2014-10-01

    In cardiomyocytes, Ca(2+) plays a central role in governing both contraction and signaling events that regulate gene expression. Current evidence indicates that discrimination between these two critical functions is achieved by segregating Ca(2+) within subcellular microdomains: transcription is regulated by Ca(2+) release within nuclear microdomains, and excitation-contraction coupling is regulated by cytosolic Ca(2+). Accordingly, a variety of agonists that control cardiomyocyte gene expression, such as endothelin-1, angiotensin-II or insulin-like growth factor-1, share the feature of triggering nuclear Ca(2+) signals. However, signaling pathways coupling surface receptor activation to nuclear Ca(2+) release, and the phenotypic responses to such signals, differ between agonists. According to earlier hypotheses, the selective control of nuclear Ca(2+) signals by activation of plasma membrane receptors relies on the strategic localization of inositol trisphosphate receptors at the nuclear envelope. There, they mediate Ca(2+) release from perinuclear Ca(2+) stores upon binding of inositol trisphosphate generated in the cytosol, which diffuses into the nucleus. More recently, identification of such receptors at nuclear membranes or perinuclear sarcolemmal invaginations has uncovered novel mechanisms whereby agonists control nuclear Ca(2+) release. In this review, we discuss mechanisms for the selective control of nuclear Ca(2+) signals with special focus on emerging models of agonist receptor activation. PMID:24997440

  9. Neurogranin regulates CaM dynamics at dendritic spines

    PubMed Central

    Petersen, Amber; Gerges, Nashaat Z.

    2015-01-01

    Calmodulin (CaM) plays a key role in synaptic function and plasticity due to its ability to mediate Ca2+ signaling. Therefore, it is essential to understand the dynamics of CaM at dendritic spines. In this study we have explored CaM dynamics using live-cell confocal microscopy and fluorescence recovery after photobleaching (FRAP) to study CaM diffusion. We find that only a small fraction of CaM in dendritic spines is immobile. Furthermore, the diffusion rate of CaM was regulated by neurogranin (Ng), a CaM-binding protein enriched at dendritic spines. Interestingly, Ng did not influence the immobile fraction of CaM at recovery plateau. We have previously shown that Ng enhances synaptic strength in a CaM-dependent manner. Taken together, these data indicate that Ng-mediated enhancement of synaptic strength is due to its ability to target, rather than sequester, CaM within dendritic spines. PMID:26084473

  10. Influence of Ca2+ on tetracycline adsorption on montmorillonite.

    PubMed

    Parolo, M Eugenia; Avena, Marcelo J; Pettinari, Gisela R; Baschini, Miria T

    2012-02-15

    The adsorption of tetracycline (TC) on montmorillonite was studied as a function of pH and Ca(2+) concentration using a batch technique complemented with X-ray diffraction and transmission electron microscopy. In the absence of Ca(2+), TC adsorption was high at low pH and decreased as the pH increased. In the presence of Ca(2+), at least two different adsorption processes took place in the studied systems, i.e., cation exchange and Ca-bridging. Cation exchange was the prevailing process at pH<5, and thus, TC adsorption decreased by increasing total Ca(2+) concentration. On the contrary, Ca-bridging was the prevailing process at pH>5, and thus, TC adsorption increased by increasing Ca(2+) concentration. The pH 5 represents an isoadsorption pH where both adsorption processes compensate each other. TC adsorption became independent of Ca(2+) concentration at this pH. For TC adsorption on Ca(2+)-montmorillonite in 0.01 M NaCl experiments, the ratio adsorbed TC/retained Ca(2+) was close to 1 in the pH range of 5-9, indicating an important participation of Ca(2+) in the binding of TC to montmorillonite. X-ray diffraction and transmission electron microscopy showed that TC adsorption induced intercalation between montmorillonite layers forming a multiphase system with stacking of layers with and without intercalated TC. PMID:22189389

  11. The hippocampal CA2 region is essential for social memory

    PubMed Central

    Hitti, Frederick L.; Siegelbaum, Steven A.

    2014-01-01

    Summary The hippocampus is critical for encoding declarative memory, our repository of knowledge of who, what, where, and when1. Mnemonic information is processed in the hippocampus through several parallel routes involving distinct subregions. In the classic trisynaptic pathway, information proceeds from entorhinal cortex (EC) to dentate gyrus (DG) to CA3 and then to CA1, the main hippocampal output2. Genetic lesions of EC3 and hippocampal DG4, CA35, and CA16 regions have revealed their distinct functions in learning and memory. In contrast, little is known about the role of CA2, a relatively small area interposed between CA3 and CA1 that forms the nexus of a powerful disynaptic circuit linking EC input with CA1 output7. Here, we report a novel transgenic mouse line that enabled us to selectively examine the synaptic connections and behavioral role of the CA2 region in adult mice. Genetically targeted inactivation of CA2 pyramidal neurons caused a pronounced loss of social memory, the ability of an animal to remember a conspecific, with no change in sociability or several other hippocampal-dependent behaviors, including spatial and contextual memory. These behavioral and anatomical results thus reveal CA2 as a critical hub of sociocognitive memory processing. PMID:24572357

  12. Nicotinic acid adenine dinucleotide phosphate (NAADP) and Ca2+ mobilization.

    PubMed

    Mándi, Miklós; Bak, Judit

    2008-01-01

    Many physiological processes are controlled by a great diversity of Ca2+ signals that depend on Ca2+ entry into the cell and/or Ca2+ release from internal Ca2+ stores. Ca2+ mobilization from intracellular stores is gated by a family of messengers including inositol-1,4,5-trisphosphate (InsP3), cyclic ADP-ribose (cADPR), and nicotinic acid adenine dinucleotide phosphate (NAADP). There is increasing evidence for a novel intracellular Ca2+ release channel that may be targeted by NAADP and that displays properties distinctly different from the well-characterized InsP3 and ryanodine receptors. These channels appear to localize on a wider range of intracellular organelles, including the acidic Ca2+ stores. Activation of the NAADP-sensitive Ca2+ channels evokes complex changes in cytoplasmic Ca2+ levels by means of channel chatter with other intracellular Ca2+ channels. The recent demonstration of changes in intracellular NAADP levels in response to physiologically relevant extracellular stimuli highlights the significance of NAADP as an important regulator of intracellular Ca2+ signaling. PMID:18569524

  13. Accretion rate of extraterrestrial 41Ca in Antarctic snow samples

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gómez-Guzmán, J. M.; Bishop, S.; Faestermann, T.; Famulok, N.; Fimiani, L.; Hain, K.; Jahn, S.; Korschinek, G.; Ludwig, P.; Rodrigues, D.

    2015-10-01

    Interplanetary Dust Particles (IDPs) are small grains, generally less than a few hundred micrometers in size. Their main source is the Asteroid Belt, located at 3 AU from the Sun, between Mars and Jupiter. During their flight from the Asteroid Belt to the Earth they are irradiated by galactic and solar cosmic rays (GCR and SCR), thus radionuclides are formed, like 41Ca and 53Mn. Therefore, 41Ca (T1/2 = 1.03 × 105 yr) can be used as a key tracer to determine the accretion rate of IDPs onto the Earth because there are no significant terrestrial sources for this radionuclide. The first step of this study consisted to calculate the production rate of 41Ca in IDPs accreted by the Earth during their travel from the Asteroid Belt. This production rate, used in accordance with the 41Ca/40Ca ratios that will be measured in snow samples from the Antarctica will be used to calculate the amount of extraterrestrial material accreted by the Earth per year. There challenges for this project are, at first, the much longer time for the flight needed by the IDPs to travel from the Asteroid Belt to the Earth in comparison with the 41Ca half-life yields an early saturation for the 41Ca/40Ca ratio, and second, the importance of selecting the correct sampling site to avoid a high influx of natural 40Ca, preventing dilution of the 41Ca/40Ca ratio, the quantity measured by AMS.

  14. caB2B hosting update —

    Cancer.gov

    cancer Bench-to-Beside - caB2B - is an open-source query tool that permits translational research scientists to search and combine data from virtually any caGrid data service. The caB2B suite is composed of three core components: the Web application, the Client Application and the Administrative Module. The caB2B Web Application provides query templates that allow easy search and retrieval of microarray data (from caArray), imaging data (from the National Biomedical Imaging Archive (NBIA)), specimen data (from caTissue) and nanoparticle data (from caNanoLab) across the grid. Searches can be performed on selected locations using either form-based or keyword searches and data can be exported in the CSV format.

  15. Influence of isolation media on synaptosomal properties: Intracellular pH, pCa, and Ca sup 2+ uptake

    SciTech Connect

    Bandeira-Duarte, C.; Carvalho, C.A.; Cragoe Junior, E.J.; Carvalho, A.P. )

    1990-03-01

    Preparations of synaptosomes isolated in sucrose or in Na(+)-rich media were compared with respect to internal pH (pHi), internal Ca{sup 2+} concentration ((Ca{sup 2+})i), membrane potential and {sup 45}Ca{sup 2+} uptake due to K+ depolarization and Na{sup +}/Ca{sup 2+} exchange. We found that synaptosomes isolated in sucrose media have a pHi of 6.77 +/- 0.04 and a (Ca{sup 2+})i of about 260 nM, whereas synaptosomes isolated in Na(+)-rich ionic media have a pHi of 6.96 +/- 0.07 and a (Ca{sup 2+})i of 463 nM, but both types of preparations have similar membrane potentials of about -50 mV when placed in choline media. The sucrose preparation takes up Ca{sup 2+} only by voltage sensitive calcium channels (VSCC'S) when K(+)-depolarized, while the Na(+)-rich synaptosomes take up {sup 45}Ca{sup 2+} both by VSCC'S and by Na{sup +}/Ca{sup 2+} exchange. The amiloride derivative 2',4'-dimethylbenzamil (DMB), at 30 microM, inhibits both mechanisms of Ca{sup 2+} influx, but 5-(N-4-chlorobenzyl)-2',4' dimethylbenzamil (CBZ-DMB), at 30 microM, inhibits the Ca{sup 2+} uptake by VSCC'S, but not by Na+/Ca2+ exchange. Thus, DMB and CBZ-DMB permit distinguishing between Ca{sup 2+} flux through channels and through Na{sup +}/Ca{sup 2+} exchange. We point out that the different properties of the two types of synaptosomes studied account for some of the discrepancies in results reported in the literature for studies of Ca{sup 2+} fluxes and neurotransmitter release by different types of preparations of synaptosomes.

  16. Carbon Dioxide "Trapped" in a β-Carbonic Anhydrase.

    PubMed

    Aggarwal, Mayank; Chua, Teck Khiang; Pinard, Melissa A; Szebenyi, Doletha M; McKenna, Robert

    2015-11-01

    Carbonic anhydrases (CAs) are enzymes that catalyze the hydration/dehydration of CO2/HCO3(-) with rates approaching diffusion-controlled limits (kcat/KM ∼ 10(8) M(-1) s(-1)). This family of enzymes has evolved disparate protein folds that all perform the same reaction at near catalytic perfection. Presented here is a structural study of a β-CA (psCA3) expressed in Pseudomonas aeruginosa, in complex with CO2, using pressurized cryo-cooled crystallography. The structure has been refined to 1.6 Å resolution with R(cryst) and R(free) values of 17.3 and 19.9%, respectively, and is compared with the α-CA, human CA isoform II (hCA II), the only other CA to have CO2 captured in its active site. Despite the lack of structural similarity between psCA3 and hCA II, the CO2 binding orientation relative to the zinc-bound solvent is identical. In addition, a second CO2 binding site was located at the dimer interface of psCA3. Interestingly, all β-CAs function as dimers or higher-order oligomeric states, and the CO2 bound at the interface may contribute to the allosteric nature of this family of enzymes or may be a convenient alternative binding site as this pocket has been previously shown to be a promiscuous site for a variety of ligands, including bicarbonate, sulfate, and phosphate ions. PMID:26457866

  17. Magic Angle Spinning NMR Reveals Sequence-Dependent Structural Plasticity, Dynamics, and the Spacer Peptide 1 Conformation in HIV-1 Capsid Protein Assemblies

    SciTech Connect

    Han, Yun; Hou, Guangjin; Suiter, Christopher L.; Ahn, Jinwoo; Byeon, In-Ja L.; Lipton, Andrew S.; Burton, Sarah D.; Hung, Ivan; Gorkov, Peter L.; Gan, Zhehong; Brey, William W.; Rice, David M.; Gronenborn, Angela M.; Polenova, Tatyana E.

    2013-11-27

    Maturation of HIV-1 virus into an infectious virion requires cleavage of the Gag polyprotein into its constituent domains and formation of a conical capsid core that encloses viral RNA and a small complement of proteins for replication. The final step of this process is the cleavage of the SP1 peptide from the CA-SP1 maturation intermediate, which triggers the condensation of the CA protein into a conical capsid. The mechanism of this step, including the conformation of the SP1 peptide in CA-SP1, is under intense debate. In this report, we examine the tubular assemblies of CA and the CA-SP1 maturation intermediate using Magic Angle Spinning NMR spectroscopy. At the magnetic fields of 19.9 T and above, tubular CA and CA-SP1 assemblies yield outstanding-quality 2D and 3D MAS NMR spectra, which are amenable to resonance assignments and detailed structural characterization. Dipolar- and scalar-based correlation experiments unequivocally indicate that SP1 peptide is in a random coil conformation and mobile in the assembled CA-SP1. Analysis of two sequence variants reveals that remarkably, the conformation of SP1 tail, of the functionally important CypA loop, and of the loop preceding helix 8 are sequence dependent and modulated by the residue variations at distal sites. These findings challenge the role of SP1 as a conformational switch in the maturation process and establish sequence-dependent conformational plasticity in CA.

  18. Carbon dioxide "trapped" in a β-carbonic anhydrase

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Aggarwal, Mayank; Chua, Teck Khiang; Pinard, Melissa A.; Szebenyi, Doletha M.; McKenna, Robert

    2015-10-12

    Carbonic anhydrases (CAs) are enzymes that catalyze the hydration/ dehydration of CO2/HCO3- with rates approaching diffusion-controlled limits (kcat/KM ~ 108 M–1s–1). Here, this family of enzymes has evolved disparate protein folds that all perform the same reaction at near catalytic perfection. Presented here is a structural study of a beta-CA (psCA3) expressed in Pseudomonas aeruginosa, in complex with CO2, using pressurized cryocooled crystallography. The structure has been refined to 1.6 angstrom resolution with Rcryst and Rfree values of 17.3 and 19.9%, respectively, and is compared with the α-CA, human CA isoform II (hCA II), the only other CA to havemore » CO2, captured in its active site. Despite the lack of structural similarity between psCA3 and hCA II, the CO2, binding orientation relative to the zinc-bound solvent is identical. In addition, a second CO2, binding site was located at the dimer interface of psCA3. Interestingly, all β-CAs function as dirners or higher-order oligomeric states, and the CO2, bound at the interface may contribute to the allosteric nature of this family of enzymes or may be a convenient alternative binding site as this pocket has been previously shown to be a promiscuous site for a variety of ligands, including bicarbonate, sulfate, and phosphate ions.« less

  19. Mechanisms of enhanced taurine release under Ca2+ depletion.

    PubMed

    Molchanova, Svetlana M; Oja, Simo S; Saransaari, Pirjo

    2005-10-01

    The sulfur-containing amino acid taurine is an inhibitory neuromodulator in the brain of mammals, as well as a key substance in the regulation of cell volumes. The effect of Ca(2+) on extracellular taurine concentrations is of special interest in the context of the regulatory mechanisms of taurine release. The aim of this study was to characterize the basal release of taurine in Ca(2+)-free medium using in vivo microdialysis of the striatum of anesthetized rats. Perfusion of Ca(2+)-free medium via a microdialysis probe evoked a sustained release of taurine (up to 180 % compared to the basal levels). The Ca(2+) chelator EGTA (1mM) potentiated Ca(2+) depletion-evoked taurine release. The substitution of CaCl(2) by choline chloride did not alter the observed effect. Ca(2+)-free solution did not significantly evoke release of taurine from tissue loaded with the competitive inhibitor of taurine transporter guanidinoethanesulfonate (1mM), suggesting that in Ca(2+) depletion taurine is released by the transporter operating in the outward direction. The volume-sensitive chloride channel blocker diisothiocyanostilbene-2,2'-disulfonate (1mM) did not attenuate the taurine release evoked by Ca(2+) depletion. The non-specific blocker of voltage-sensitive Ca(2+) channels NiCl(2) (0.65 mM) enhanced taurine release in the presence of Ca(2+). CdCl(2) (0.25 mM) had no effect under these conditions. However, both CdCl(2) and NiCl(2) attenuated the effect of Ca(2+)-free medium on the release of taurine. The data obtained imply the involvement of both decreased influx of Ca(2+) and increased non-specific influx of Na(+) through voltage-sensitive calcium channels in the regulation of transporter-mediated taurine release in Ca(2+) depletion. PMID:15982785

  20. The Ca2+ release-activated Ca2+ current (I(CRAC)) mediates store-operated Ca2+ entry in rat microglia.

    PubMed

    Ohana, Lily; Newell, Evan W; Stanley, Elise F; Schlichter, Lyanne C

    2009-01-01

    Ca2+ signaling plays a central role in microglial activation, and several studies have demonstrated a store-operated Ca2+ entry (SOCE) pathway to supply this ion. Due to the rapid pace of discovery of novel Ca2+ permeable channels, and limited electrophysiological analyses of Ca2+ currents in microglia, characterization of the SOCE channels remains incomplete. At present, the prime candidates are 'transient receptor potential' (TRP) channels and the recently cloned Orai1, which produces a Ca2+-release-activated Ca2+ (CRAC) current. We used cultured rat microglia and real-time RT-PCR to compare expression levels of Orai1, Orai2, Orai3, TRPM2, TRPM7, TRPC1, TRPC2, TRPC3, TRPC4, TRPC5, TRPC6 and TRPC7 channel genes. Next, we used Fura-2 imaging to identify a store-operated Ca2+ entry pathway that was reduced by depolarization and blocked by Gd3+, SKF-96365, diethylstilbestrol (DES), and a high concentration of 2-aminoethoxydiphenyl borate (50 microM 2-APB). The Fura-2 signal was increased by hyperpolarization, and by a low concentration of 2-APB (5 microM), and exhibited Ca(2+)-dependent potentiation. These properties are entirely consistent with Orai1/CRAC, rather than any known TRP channel and this conclusion was supported by patch-clamp electrophysiological analysis. We identified a store-operated Ca2+ current with the same properties, including high selectivity for Ca2+ over monovalent cations, pronounced inward rectification and a very positive reversal potential, Ca(2+)-dependent current potentiation, and block by SKF-96365, DES and 50 microM 2-APB. Determining the contribution of Orai1/CRAC in different cell types is crucial to future mechanistic and therapeutic studies; this comprehensive multi-strategy analysis demonstrates that Orai1/CRAC channels are responsible for SOCE in primary microglia. PMID:19411837

  1. Effects of Na+ and Ca2+ gradients on intracellular free Ca2+ in voltage-clamped Aplysia neurons.

    PubMed

    Levy, S; Tillotson, D

    1988-12-01

    Selected neurons of the abdominal ganglion of Aplysia californica were voltage-clamped and intracellular free Ca [( Ca2+]i) and Na [( Na+]i) concentrations were monitored with ion selective microelectrodes. Reducing [Na+]o from 500 mM (normal seawater, NSW) to 5 mM resulted in a decrease of the potential measured by the Ca electrode (VCa). Increasing [Ca2+]o from 10 to 50 mM increased [Ca2+]i two-fold, keeping [Ca2+]o at 50 mM and decreasing [Na+]o to 5 mM still led to a decrease in VCa. With 100 mM [Ca2+]o, which also increased [Ca2+]i, decreasing [Na+]o increased VCa in two of the eight cells tested. This indicates that in normal or moderately high resting [Ca2+]i, Ca2+ extrusion by Na/Ca exchange (forward mode) is not essential for [Ca2+]i buffering. [Na+]i was 12.9 +/- 3.6 mM (S.E.M., n = 7) in NSW; reducing [Na+]o to 5 mM decreased [Na+]i to 2.0 +/- 1.1 mM (S.E.M.). Keeping [Na+]o at 5 mM and increasing [Ca2+]o from 10 to 20 mM further decreased [Na+]i to about 1.0 mM, evidence of Na/Ca exchange operating in the reverse mode. Attempts to increase [Ca2+]i by bath application of the Ca ionophores A23187, X537A, ionomycin or ETH 1001 resulted in no measurable change of the resting [Ca2+]i. Application of Ouabain caused an apparent increase in [Ca2+]i in two of the six cells tested. In cells injected with the metallochromic indicator arsenazo III (AIII), the rate of the falling phase of the AIII absorbance increase, following a voltage-clamp pulse, was significantly slower in 5 mM [Na+]o. This indicates that in its forward mode Na-Ca exchange is active in clearing large submembrane increases in [Ca2+]i. PMID:3208137

  2. The influence of the 2-neutron elastic transfer on the fusion of 42Ca + 40Ca

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stefanini, A. M.; Montagnoli, G.; Corradi, L.; Fioretto, E.; Goasduff, A.; Grebosz, J.; Haas, F.; Mazzocco, M.; Scarlassara, F.; Strano, E.

    2016-05-01

    Strong coupling to a single channel with zero Q-value is predicted to produce a characteristic fusion barrier distribution with two peaks, one on each side of the original uncoupled Coulomb barrier. In practical cases, only coupling to an elastic transfer channel may produce such a distribution which, however, has never been observed sofar, probably because low-lying surface vibrations usually have a dominant role, and this may obscure the two-peak structure. The case of the two-neutron (2n) elastic transfer in 42Ca + 40Ca is particularly attractive, because of the relatively rigid nature of the two nuclei. We have measured the fusion excitation function of this system using the 42Ca beam of the XTU Tandem of LNL on a thin 40Ca target enriched to 99.96% in mass 40. Cross sections have been measured down to ≤1 mb. The extracted barrier distribution shows clearly two main peaks. We have performed preliminary CC calculations where the 2+ coupling strengths have been taken from the literature and the schematic 2n pair transfer form factor has been used, with a deformation length σt= 0.39 fm. The excitation function is well reproduced by the calculation including the 2n transfer channel. However, including the octupole excitations destroys the agreement.

  3. Expression of an "Arabidopsis" Ca(2+)/H(+) transporter increases bioavailable Ca(2+) in edible carrot roots

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Our long range goal is to make vegetables a better source of dietary calcium. We demonstrate that carrots expressing the Arabidopsis H(+)/Ca(2+) transporter sCAX1 contain up to 50% more calcium compared to plants transformed with the vector only. These modified carrots were fertile and robust, wit...

  4. Pycnogenol protects CA3-CA1 synaptic function in a rat model of traumatic brain injury.

    PubMed

    Norris, Christopher M; Sompol, Pradoldej; Roberts, Kelly N; Ansari, Mubeen; Scheff, Stephen W

    2016-02-01

    Pycnogenol (PYC) is a patented mix of bioflavonoids with potent anti-oxidant and anti-inflammatory properties. Previously, we showed that PYC administration to rats within hours after a controlled cortical impact (CCI) injury significantly protects against the loss of several synaptic proteins in the hippocampus. Here, we investigated the effects of PYC on CA3-CA1 synaptic function following CCI. Adult Sprague-Dawley rats received an ipsilateral CCI injury followed 15 min later by intravenous injection of saline vehicle or PYC (10 mg/kg). Hippocampal slices from the injured (ipsilateral) and uninjured (contralateral) hemispheres were prepared at seven and fourteen days post-CCI for electrophysiological analyses of CA3-CA1 synaptic function and induction of long-term depression (LTD). Basal synaptic strength was impaired in slices from the ipsilateral, relative to the contralateral, hemisphere at seven days post-CCI and susceptibility to LTD was enhanced in the ipsilateral hemisphere at both post-injury timepoints. No interhemispheric differences in basal synaptic strength or LTD induction were observed in rats treated with PYC. The results show that PYC preserves synaptic function after CCI and provides further rationale for investigating the use of PYC as a therapeutic in humans suffering from neurotrauma. PMID:26607913

  5. EXPRESSION OF AN ARABIDOPSIS CA2+/H+ TRANSPORTER INCREASES BIOAVAILABLE CA2+ IN EDIBLE CARROT ROOTS

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Our long range goal is to make vegetables a better source of dietary calcium. We demonstrate that carrots expressing the Arabidopsis H+/Ca2+ transporter sCAX1 contain up to 50% more calcium compared to plants transformed with the vector only. These modified carrots were fertile and robust, with no d...

  6. Design and application of a class of sensors to monitor Ca2+ dynamics in high Ca2+ concentration cellular compartments

    PubMed Central

    Tang, Shen; Wong, Hing-Cheung; Wang, Zhong-Min; Huang, Yun; Zou, Jin; Zhuo, You; Pennati, Andrea; Gadda, Giovanni; Delbono, Osvaldo; Yang, Jenny J.

    2011-01-01

    Quantitative analysis of Ca2+ fluctuations in the endoplasmic/sarcoplasmic reticulum (ER/SR) is essential to defining the mechanisms of Ca2+-dependent signaling under physiological and pathological conditions. Here, we developed a unique class of genetically encoded indicators by designing a Ca2+ binding site in the EGFP. One of them, calcium sensor for detecting high concentration in the ER, exhibits unprecedented Ca2+ release kinetics with an off-rate estimated at around 700 s−1 and appropriate Ca2+ binding affinity, likely attributable to local Ca2+-induced conformational changes around the designed Ca2+ binding site and reduced chemical exchange between two chromophore states. Calcium sensor for detecting high concentration in the ER reported considerable differences in ER Ca2+ dynamics and concentration among human epithelial carcinoma cells (HeLa), human embryonic kidney 293 cells (HEK-293), and mouse myoblast cells (C2C12), enabling us to monitor SR luminal Ca2+ in flexor digitorum brevis muscle fibers to determine the mechanism of diminished SR Ca2+ release in aging mice. This sensor will be invaluable in examining pathogenesis characterized by alterations in Ca2+ homeostasis. PMID:21914846

  7. Thermodynamics of Reducing Refining of Phosphorus from Si-Mn Alloy Using CaO-CaF2 Slag

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shin, Jae Hong; Park, Joo Hyun

    2012-12-01

    The thermodynamic behavior of phosphide ions in the CaO-CaF2 flux in equilibrium with a SiMn(-Fe) alloy melt was investigated under a strongly reducing atmosphere at 1823 K (1550 °C). The phosphide capacity increased with increasing CaO concentration in the flux before reaching a constant value. The composition for the saturating capacity is in good agreement with the saturation content of CaO in the CaO-CaF2 flux at 1823 K (1550 °C). The relationship between the phosphide capacity and the activity of CaO in the flux exhibited a linear relationship on the logarithmic scale, indicating that phosphorus was removed from the SiMn(-Fe) melt by the reducing refining mechanism.

  8. Aluminian Low-Ca Pyroxene in a Ca-Al-rich Chondrule from the Semarkona Meteorite

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rubin, Alan E.

    2006-01-01

    A Ca-AI-rich chondrule (labeled G7) from the Semarkona LL3.0 ordinary chondrite (OC) consists of 73 vol% glassy mesostasis, 22 vol% skeletal forsterite. 3 vol% fassaite (i.e., Al-Ti diopside), and 2 vol% Al-rich, low-Ca pyroxene. The latter phase, which contains up to 16.3 wt% A1203, is among the most AI-rich, low-Ca pyroxene grains ever reported. It is inferred that 20% of the tetrahedral sites and 13% of the octahedral sites in this grain are occupied by Al. Approximately parallel optical extinction implies that the Al-rich, low-Ca pyroxene grains are probably orthorhombic, consistent with literature data that show that A1203 stabilizes the orthoenstatite structure relative to protoenstatite at low pressure. The order of crystallization in the chondrule was forsterite, AI-rich low-Ca pyroxene, and fassaite; the residual liquid vitrified during chondrule quenching. Phase relationships indicate that, for a G7-composition liquid at equilibrium, spinel and anorthite should crystallize early and orthopyroxene should not crystallize at all. The presence of AI-rich orthopyroxene in G7 is due mainly to the kinetic failure of anorthite to crystallize; this failure was caused by quenching of the G7 precursor droplet. Aluminum preferentially enters the relatively large B tetrahedra of orthopyroxene; because only one tetrahedral size occurs in fassaite, this phase contains higher mean concentrations of Al2O3 than the Al-rich orthopyroxene (17.8 and 14.7 wt%, respectively). Chondrule G7 may have formed by remelting an amoeboid olivine inclusion that entered the OC region of the solar nebula during an episode of chondrule formation.

  9. CHEMILUMINESCENT CHEMI-IONIZATION: Ar* + Ca AND THE CaAr+ EMISSION SPECTRUM

    SciTech Connect

    Hartman, Dennis C.; Winn, John S.

    1980-09-01

    A flowing afterglow chemiluminescence apparatus has been used to analyze visible fluorescence in the Ar* ({sup 3}P{sub 2}{sup o}) + Ca ({sup 1}S{sub 0}) reaction. The rate constants for production of Ca{sup +} ({sup 2}P{sub 3/2}{sup o}) and Ca{sup +} ({sup 2}P{sub 1/2}{sup o}) were measured to be 1.6 x 10{sup -10} cm{sup 3}-molecule{sup -1} sec{sup -1} and 3.2 x 10{sup -11} cm{sup 3} molecule{sup -1} sec{sup -1}, respectively. These results demonstrate a transfer of the total electronic angular momentum polarization in Ar* tothe excited ion levels. The molecular band spectrum of the associative ionization product CaAr{sup +} (A{sup 2}{Pi}) was observed. Molecular fluorescence constituted 14% of the total fluorescence from all ion products. This spectrum was analyzed with a model (exp-Z4) potential, yielding, for the ground state, {Chi}{sup 2}{Sigma}{sup +}, R{sub e} = 2.8 {angstrom}, {omega}''{sub e} = 87 cm{sup -1}, and D''{sub e} = 1000 cm{sup -1}, and, for the A{sup 2}{Pi} state, R{sub e} = 2.6 {angstrom}, {omega}'{sub e} = 200 cm{sup -1}, and D'{sub e} = 4900 cm{sup -1}. The nascent internal state distribution in CaAr{sup +} is found to consist of a fairly narrow range of high vibrational levels. The analysis of spectra from chemiluminescent reaction is a well established technique for elucidating the product state distributions of elementary processes. In this paper, they use the analysis of the chemiluminescent chemi-ionization reactions between metastable argon atoms and calcium atoms to expose the dynamics of associative ionization (AI) and to measure the branching ratios for chemi-ionization into more than one product channel.

  10. PGC-1{alpha} accelerates cytosolic Ca{sup 2+} clearance without disturbing Ca{sup 2+} homeostasis in cardiac myocytes

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Min; Wang, Yanru; Qu, Aijuan

    2010-06-11

    Energy metabolism and Ca{sup 2+} handling serve critical roles in cardiac physiology and pathophysiology. Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma coactivator 1 alpha (PGC-1{alpha}) is a multi-functional coactivator that is involved in the regulation of cardiac mitochondrial functional capacity and cellular energy metabolism. However, the regulation of PGC-1{alpha} in cardiac Ca{sup 2+} signaling has not been fully elucidated. To address this issue, we combined confocal line-scan imaging with off-line imaging processing to characterize calcium signaling in cultured adult rat ventricular myocytes expressing PGC-1{alpha} via adenoviral transduction. Our data shows that overexpressing PGC-1{alpha} improved myocyte contractility without increasing the amplitude of Ca{sup 2+} transients, suggesting that myofilament sensitivity to Ca{sup 2+} increased. Interestingly, the decay kinetics of global Ca{sup 2+} transients and Ca{sup 2+} waves accelerated in PGC-1{alpha}-expressing cells, but the decay rate of caffeine-elicited Ca{sup 2+} transients showed no significant change. This suggests that sarcoplasmic reticulum (SR) Ca{sup 2+}-ATPase (SERCA2a), but not Na{sup +}/Ca{sup 2+} exchange (NCX) contribute to PGC-1{alpha}-induced cytosolic Ca{sup 2+} clearance. Furthermore, PGC-1{alpha} induced the expression of SERCA2a in cultured cardiac myocytes. Importantly, overexpressing PGC-1{alpha} did not disturb cardiac Ca{sup 2+} homeostasis, because SR Ca{sup 2+} load and the propensity for Ca{sup 2+} waves remained unchanged. These data suggest that PGC-1{alpha} can ameliorate cardiac Ca{sup 2+} cycling and improve cardiac work output in response to physiological stress. Unraveling the PGC-1{alpha}-calcium handing pathway sheds new light on the role of PGC-1{alpha} in the therapy of cardiac diseases.

  11. Ca2+ influx via the Na+/Ca2+ exchanger is enhanced in malignant hyperthermia skeletal muscle.

    PubMed

    Altamirano, Francisco; Eltit, José M; Robin, Gaëlle; Linares, Nancy; Ding, Xudong; Pessah, Isaac N; Allen, Paul D; López, José R

    2014-07-01

    Malignant hyperthermia (MH) is potentially fatal pharmacogenetic disorder of skeletal muscle caused by intracellular Ca(2+) dysregulation. NCX is a bidirectional transporter that effluxes (forward mode) or influxes (reverse mode) Ca(2+) depending on cellular activity. Resting intracellular calcium ([Ca(2+)]r) and sodium ([Na(+)]r) concentrations are elevated in MH susceptible (MHS) swine and murine muscles compared with their normal (MHN) counterparts, although the contribution of NCX is unclear. Lowering [Na(+)]e elevates [Ca(2+)]r in both MHN and MHS swine muscle fibers and it is prevented by removal of extracellular Ca(2+) or reduced by t-tubule disruption, in both genotypes. KB-R7943, a nonselective NCX3 blocker, reduced [Ca(2+)]r in both swine and murine MHN and MHS muscle fibers at rest and decreased the magnitude of the elevation of [Ca(2+)]r observed in MHS fibers after exposure to halothane. YM-244769, a high affinity reverse mode NCX3 blocker, reduces [Ca(2+)]r in MHS muscle fibers and decreases the amplitude of [Ca(2+)]r rise triggered by halothane, but had no effect on [Ca(2+)]r in MHN muscle. In addition, YM-244769 reduced the peak and area under the curve of the Ca(2+) transient elicited by high [K(+)]e and increased its rate of decay in MHS muscle fibers. siRNA knockdown of NCX3 in MHS myotubes reduced [Ca(2+)]r and the Ca(2+) transient area induced by high [K(+)]e. These results demonstrate a functional NCX3 in skeletal muscle whose activity is enhanced in MHS. Moreover reverse mode NCX3 contributes to the Ca(2+) transients associated with K(+)-induced depolarization and the halothane-triggered MH episode in MHS muscle fibers. PMID:24847052

  12. Ca2+ Influx via the Na+/Ca2+ Exchanger Is Enhanced in Malignant Hyperthermia Skeletal Muscle*

    PubMed Central

    Altamirano, Francisco; Eltit, José M.; Robin, Gaëlle; Linares, Nancy; Ding, Xudong; Pessah, Isaac N.; Allen, Paul D.; López, José R.

    2014-01-01

    Malignant hyperthermia (MH) is potentially fatal pharmacogenetic disorder of skeletal muscle caused by intracellular Ca2+ dysregulation. NCX is a bidirectional transporter that effluxes (forward mode) or influxes (reverse mode) Ca2+ depending on cellular activity. Resting intracellular calcium ([Ca2+]r) and sodium ([Na+]r) concentrations are elevated in MH susceptible (MHS) swine and murine muscles compared with their normal (MHN) counterparts, although the contribution of NCX is unclear. Lowering [Na+]e elevates [Ca2+]r in both MHN and MHS swine muscle fibers and it is prevented by removal of extracellular Ca2+ or reduced by t-tubule disruption, in both genotypes. KB-R7943, a nonselective NCX3 blocker, reduced [Ca2+]r in both swine and murine MHN and MHS muscle fibers at rest and decreased the magnitude of the elevation of [Ca2+]r observed in MHS fibers after exposure to halothane. YM-244769, a high affinity reverse mode NCX3 blocker, reduces [Ca2+]r in MHS muscle fibers and decreases the amplitude of [Ca2+]r rise triggered by halothane, but had no effect on [Ca2+]r in MHN muscle. In addition, YM-244769 reduced the peak and area under the curve of the Ca2+ transient elicited by high [K+]e and increased its rate of decay in MHS muscle fibers. siRNA knockdown of NCX3 in MHS myotubes reduced [Ca2+]r and the Ca2+ transient area induced by high [K+]e. These results demonstrate a functional NCX3 in skeletal muscle whose activity is enhanced in MHS. Moreover reverse mode NCX3 contributes to the Ca2+ transients associated with K+-induced depolarization and the halothane-triggered MH episode in MHS muscle fibers. PMID:24847052

  13. Plasma Folate and Vitamin B12 Levels in Patients with Hepatocellular Carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Cui, Lian-Hua; Quan, Zhen-Yu; Piao, Jin-Mei; Zhang, Ting-Ting; Jiang, Meng-Hui; Shin, Min-Ho; Choi, Jin-Su

    2016-01-01

    Folate and vitamin B12 involved in the one-carbon metabolism may play a key role in carcinogenesis and progression of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) through influencing DNA integrity. The purpose of this study is to evaluate the association of plasma folate and vitamin B12 levels with HCC in a case-control study on 312 HCC patients and 325 cancer-free controls. Plasma concentrations of folate and vitamin B12 in all the subjects were measured by electrochemiluminescence immunoassay. Meanwhile, the information of HCC patients' clinical characteristics including tumor-node-metastasis (TNM) stage, tumor size and tumor markers were collected. The patients of HCC had significantly lower folate levels than those of controls; there was no significant difference in the mean of plasma vitamin B12 levels. We also observed an inverse association between the levels of plasma folate and HCC: the adjusted odds ratios (OR) (95% confidence intervals (CI)) of HCC from the highest to lowest quartile of folate were 0.30 (0.15-0.60), 0.33 (0.17-0.65), and 0.19 (0.09-0.38). Compared to the subjects in the lowest quartile of plasma vitamin B12, only the subjects in the highest quartile of vitamin B12 exhibited a significant positive relationship with HCC, the adjusted OR was 2.01 (95% CI, 1.02-3.98). HCC patients with Stage III and IV or bigger tumor size had lower folate and higher vitamin B12 levels. There was no significant difference in the mean plasma folate levels of the HCC cases in tumor markers status (AFP, CEA and CA19-9 levels), whereas patients with higher CEA or CA19-9 levels retained significantly more plasma vitamin B12 than those with normal-CEA or CA19-9 level. In conclusion, plasma folate and vitamin B12 levels could be associated with HCC, and might be used as predictors of clinical characteristics of HCC patients. However, further prospective studies are essential to confirm the observed results. PMID:27376276

  14. Plasma Folate and Vitamin B12 Levels in Patients with Hepatocellular Carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Cui, Lian-Hua; Quan, Zhen-Yu; Piao, Jin-Mei; Zhang, Ting-Ting; Jiang, Meng-Hui; Shin, Min-Ho; Choi, Jin-Su

    2016-01-01

    Folate and vitamin B12 involved in the one-carbon metabolism may play a key role in carcinogenesis and progression of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) through influencing DNA integrity. The purpose of this study is to evaluate the association of plasma folate and vitamin B12 levels with HCC in a case-control study on 312 HCC patients and 325 cancer-free controls. Plasma concentrations of folate and vitamin B12 in all the subjects were measured by electrochemiluminescence immunoassay. Meanwhile, the information of HCC patients’ clinical characteristics including tumor-node-metastasis (TNM) stage, tumor size and tumor markers were collected. The patients of HCC had significantly lower folate levels than those of controls; there was no significant difference in the mean of plasma vitamin B12 levels. We also observed an inverse association between the levels of plasma folate and HCC: the adjusted odds ratios (OR) (95% confidence intervals (CI)) of HCC from the highest to lowest quartile of folate were 0.30 (0.15–0.60), 0.33 (0.17–0.65), and 0.19 (0.09–0.38). Compared to the subjects in the lowest quartile of plasma vitamin B12, only the subjects in the highest quartile of vitamin B12 exhibited a significant positive relationship with HCC, the adjusted OR was 2.01 (95% CI, 1.02–3.98). HCC patients with Stage III and IV or bigger tumor size had lower folate and higher vitamin B12 levels. There was no significant difference in the mean plasma folate levels of the HCC cases in tumor markers status (AFP, CEA and CA19-9 levels), whereas patients with higher CEA or CA19-9 levels retained significantly more plasma vitamin B12 than those with normal-CEA or CA19-9 level. In conclusion, plasma folate and vitamin B12 levels could be associated with HCC, and might be used as predictors of clinical characteristics of HCC patients. However, further prospective studies are essential to confirm the observed results. PMID:27376276

  15. Potential predictive role of chemotherapy-induced changes of soluble CD40 ligand in untreated advanced pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Azzariti, Amalia; Brunetti, Oronzo; Porcelli, Letizia; Graziano, Giusi; Iacobazzi, Rosa Maria; Signorile, Michele; Scarpa, Aldo; Lorusso, Vito; Silvestris, Nicola

    2016-01-01

    Pancreas ductal adenocarcinoma lacks predictive biomarkers. CD40 is a member of the tumor necrosis factor superfamily. CD40–sCD40L interaction is considered to contribute to the promotion of tumor cell growth and angiogenesis. The aim of the present study was to investigate the role of serum sCD40L as a predictor in metastatic pancreatic cancer. We evaluated 27 consecutive pancreatic cancer patients treated with FOLFIRINOX (21 patients) or gemcitabine plus nab-paclitaxel combination (six patients). The sCD40L level was measured in serum by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay at baseline, at first evaluation (all patients), and at time to progression (18 patients). The radiological response was evaluated according to the Response Evaluation Criteria in Solid Tumors, Version 1.1. The Wilcoxon signed-rank test was used to compare pre–post treatment sCD40L levels with respect to clinical response, while Pearson’s correlation coefficient was used for the correlation between sCD40L and CA19.9 pre- and post-treatment. The Kruskal–Wallis test was also conducted for further comparisons. We observed a statistically significant reduction in the sCD40L level after 3 months of treatment in patients with partial response (11,718.05±7,097.13 pg/mL vs 4,689.42±5,409.96 pg/mL; P<0.01). Conversely, in patients with progressive disease, the biomarker statistically increased in the same time (9,351.51±7,356.91 pg/mL vs 22,282.92±11,629.35 pg/mL; P<0.01). This trend of sCD40L was confirmed in 18 patients at time to progression after the first evaluation. No differences were recorded within the stable disease group. Moreover, there was a positive correlation between the sCD40L and CA19.9 pre–post treatment variation percentage (Pearson’s correlation coefficient =0.52; P<0.05). Our data suggest a possible predictive role of sCD40L in pancreatic cancer patients, similar to CA19.9. PMID:27555786

  16. Randomized Phase II Trial of Gemcitabine Plus TH-302 Versus Gemcitabine in Patients With Advanced Pancreatic Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Borad, Mitesh J.; Reddy, Shantan G.; Bahary, Nathan; Uronis, Hope E.; Sigal, Darren; Cohn, Allen L.; Schelman, William R.; Stephenson, Joe; Chiorean, E. Gabriela; Rosen, Peter J.; Ulrich, Brian; Dragovich, Tomislav; Del Prete, Salvatore A.; Rarick, Mark; Eng, Clarence; Kroll, Stew; Ryan, David P.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose TH-302 is an investigational hypoxia-activated prodrug that releases the DNA alkylator bromo-isophosphoramide mustard in hypoxic settings. This phase II study (NCT01144455) evaluated gemcitabine plus TH-302 in patients with previously untreated, locally advanced or metastatic pancreatic cancer. Patients and Methods Patients were randomly assigned 1:1:1 to gemcitabine (1,000 mg/m2), gemcitabine plus TH-302 240 mg/m2 (G+T240), or gemcitabine plus TH-302 340 mg/m2 (G+T340). Randomized crossover after progression on gemcitabine was allowed. The primary end point was progression-free survival (PFS). Secondary end points included overall survival (OS), tumor response, CA 19-9 response, and safety. Results Two hundred fourteen patients (77% with metastatic disease) were enrolled between June 2010 and July 2011. PFS was significantly longer with gemcitabine plus TH-302 (pooled combination arms) compared with gemcitabine alone (median PFS, 5.6 v 3.6 months, respectively; hazard ratio, 0.61; 95% CI, 0.43 to 0.87; P = .005; median PFS for metastatic disease, 5.1 v 3.4 months, respectively). Median PFS times for G+T240 and G+T340 were 5.6 and 6.0 months, respectively. Tumor response was 12%, 17%, and 26% in the gemcitabine, G+T240, and G+T340 arms, respectively (G+T340 v gemcitabine, P = .04). CA 19-9 decrease was greater with G+T340 versus gemcitabine (−5,398 v −549 U/mL, respectively; P = .008). Median OS times for gemcitabine, G+T240, and G+T340 were 6.9, 8.7, and 9.2 months, respectively (P = not significant). The most common adverse events (AEs) were fatigue, nausea, and peripheral edema (frequencies similar across arms). Skin and mucosal toxicities (2% grade 3) and myelosuppression (55% grade 3 or 4) were the most common TH-302–related AEs but were not associated with treatment discontinuation. Conclusion PFS, tumor response, and CA 19-9 response were significantly improved with G+TH-302. G+T340 is being investigated further in the phase III MAESTRO study

  17. Potential predictive role of chemotherapy-induced changes of soluble CD40 ligand in untreated advanced pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma.

    PubMed

    Azzariti, Amalia; Brunetti, Oronzo; Porcelli, Letizia; Graziano, Giusi; Iacobazzi, Rosa Maria; Signorile, Michele; Scarpa, Aldo; Lorusso, Vito; Silvestris, Nicola

    2016-01-01

    Pancreas ductal adenocarcinoma lacks predictive biomarkers. CD40 is a member of the tumor necrosis factor superfamily. CD40-sCD40L interaction is considered to contribute to the promotion of tumor cell growth and angiogenesis. The aim of the present study was to investigate the role of serum sCD40L as a predictor in metastatic pancreatic cancer. We evaluated 27 consecutive pancreatic cancer patients treated with FOLFIRINOX (21 patients) or gemcitabine plus nab-paclitaxel combination (six patients). The sCD40L level was measured in serum by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay at baseline, at first evaluation (all patients), and at time to progression (18 patients). The radiological response was evaluated according to the Response Evaluation Criteria in Solid Tumors, Version 1.1. The Wilcoxon signed-rank test was used to compare pre-post treatment sCD40L levels with respect to clinical response, while Pearson's correlation coefficient was used for the correlation between sCD40L and CA19.9 pre- and post-treatment. The Kruskal-Wallis test was also conducted for further comparisons. We observed a statistically significant reduction in the sCD40L level after 3 months of treatment in patients with partial response (11,718.05±7,097.13 pg/mL vs 4,689.42±5,409.96 pg/mL; P<0.01). Conversely, in patients with progressive disease, the biomarker statistically increased in the same time (9,351.51±7,356.91 pg/mL vs 22,282.92±11,629.35 pg/mL; P<0.01). This trend of sCD40L was confirmed in 18 patients at time to progression after the first evaluation. No differences were recorded within the stable disease group. Moreover, there was a positive correlation between the sCD40L and CA19.9 pre-post treatment variation percentage (Pearson's correlation coefficient =0.52; P<0.05). Our data suggest a possible predictive role of sCD40L in pancreatic cancer patients, similar to CA19.9. PMID:27555786

  18. Cytosolic Ca2+ and Ca2+-activated Cl− current dynamics: insights from two functionally distinct mouse exocrine cells

    PubMed Central

    Giovannucci, David R; Bruce, Jason I. E; Straub, Stephen V; Arreola, Jorge; Sneyd, James; Shuttleworth, Trevor J; Yule, David I

    2002-01-01

    The dynamics of Ca2+ release and Ca2+-activated Cl− currents in two related, but functionally distinct exocrine cells, were studied to gain insight into how the molecular specialization of Ca2+ signalling machinery are utilized to produce different physiological endpoints: in this case, fluid or exocytotic secretion. Digital imaging and patch-clamp methods were used to monitor the temporal and spatial properties of changes in cytosolic Ca2+ concentration ([Ca2+]c) and Cl− currents following the controlled photolytic release of caged-InsP3 or caged-Ca2+. In parotid and pancreatic acinar cells, changes in [Ca2+]c and activation of a Ca2+-activated Cl− current occurred with close temporal coincidence. In parotid, a rapid global Ca2+ signal was invariably induced, even with low-level photolytic release of threshold amounts of InsP3. In pancreas, threshold stimulation generated an apically delimited [Ca2+]c signal, while a stronger stimulus induced a global [Ca2+]c signal which exhibited characteristics of a propagating wave. InsP3 was more effective in parotid, where [Ca2+]c signals initiated with shorter latency and exhibited a faster time-to-peak than in pancreas. The increased potency of InsP3 in parotid probably results from a four-fold higher number of InsP3 receptors as measured by radiolabelled InsP3 binding and western blot analysis. The Ca2+ sensitivity of the Cl− channels in parotid and pancreas was determined from the [Ca2+]-current relationship measured during a dynamic ‘Ca2+ ramp’ produced by the continuous, low-level photolysis of caged-Ca2+. In addition to a greater number of InsP3 receptors, the Cl− current density of parotid acinar cells was more than four-fold greater than that of pancreatic cells. Whereas activation of the current was tightly coupled to increases in Ca2+ in both cell types, local Ca2+ clearance was found to contribute substantially to the deactivation of the current in parotid. These data reveal specializations of

  19. Effects of spermine on mitochondrial Ca2+ transport and the ranges of extramitochondrial Ca2+ to which the matrix Ca2+-sensitive dehydrogenases respond.

    PubMed Central

    McCormack, J G

    1989-01-01

    1. Spermine has previously been reported to be an activator of mitochondrial Ca2+ uptake [Nicchitta & Williamson (1984) J. Biol. Chem. 259, 12978-12983]. This is confirmed in the present studies on rat heart, liver and kidney mitochondria by using the activities of the Ca2+-sensitive intramitochondrial dehydrogenases (pyruvate, NAD+-isocitrate and 2-oxoglutarate dehydrogenases) as probes for matrix Ca2+, and also, for the heart mitochondria, by using entrapped fura-2. 2. As also found previously [Damuni, Humphreys & Reed (1984) Biochem. Biophys. Res. Commun. 124, 95-99], spermine activated extracted pyruvate dehydrogenase phosphate phosphatase. However, it was found to have no effects at all on the extracted NAD+-isocitrate or 2-oxoglutarate dehydrogenases. It also had no effects on activities of the enzymes in mitochondria incubated in the absence of Ca2+, or on the Ca2+-sensitivity of the enzymes in uncoupled mitochondria. 3. Spermine clearly activated 45Ca uptake by coupled mitochondria, but had no effect on Ca2+ egress from mitochondria previously loaded with 45Ca. 4. Spermine (with effective Km values of around 0.2-0.4 mM) caused an approx. 2-3-fold decrease in the effective ranges of extramitochondrial Ca2+ in the activation of the Ca2+-sensitive matrix enzymes in coupled mitochondria from all of the tissues. The effects of spermine appeared to be largely independent of the other effectors of mitochondrial Ca2+ transport, such as Mg2+ (inhibitor of uptake) and Na+ (promoter of egrees). 5. In the most physiological circumstance, coupled mitochondria incubated with Na+ and Mg2+, the presence of saturating spermine (2 mM) resulted in an effective extramitochondrial Ca2+ range for matrix enzyme activation of from about 30-50 nM up to about 800-1200 nM, with half-maximal effects around 250-400 nM-Ca2+. The implications of these findings for the regulation of matrix and extramitochondrial Ca2+ are discussed. PMID:2604711

  20. U-Pb Dating of CA/non-CA Treated Zircons Obtained by LA-ICP-MS and CA-TIMS Techniques: Impact for their Geological Interpretation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Von Quadt, A.; Gallhofer, D.; Guillong, M.; Peytcheva, I.

    2014-12-01

    Chemical Abrasion Isotope-Dilution Thermal Ionization Mass Spectrometry (CA-ID-TIMS) is known as a high precision technique for resolving lead loss and improving the interpretation of U-Pb zircon age data. We argue that combining CA with the widely applied Laser Ablation-Inductively Coupled Plasma-Mass Spectrometry (LA-ICP-MS) improves the precision and accuracy of zircon dates, while removing the substantial parts with lead loss, reducing data scatter, and providing meaningful geological interpretations. The samples are magmatic rocks chosen from different geological time periods (Paleozoic, Mesozoic and Cenozoic time). All zircon separates are analysed by LA-ICP-MS before and after CA, and all age data are compared with CA-ID-TIMS 206Pb/238U dates that are considered as the most accurately age. All CA-treated zircon crystals show up to 50% less data scatter compared to the non-CA treated zircon grains and thus a reduction of the calculated uncertainties is apparent. The obtained wt average LA-ICP-MS 206Pb/238U ages of the CA-treated zircon grains are up to 4-6% higher than those of the non-CA treated crystals, exceeding the analytical uncertainties of the LA-ICP-MS dating technique of 1-2%. The damaged crystal parts, caused by U-decay, with lead loss are removed, so that we can exclude younging from the possible geological scenarios. CA-LA-ICP-MS age data are in good agreement with the CA-ID-TIMS dates and suggest advantages of using CA-LA-ICP-MS in order to define accurate ages. The use of the CA technique for very young zircons (~0.2 Ma, Kos rhyolitic tuff, Greece) seems optional; as the obtained mean 206Pb/238U ages of non-CA and CA treated zircons coincide within the uncertainty. The negligible time to produce the lattice damage (based on alpha decay or spontaneous fission) makes lead loss less important for age dating and data interpretation of very young zircons (<1 Ma). Von Quadt, A. et al., 2014, JAAS, doi: 10.1039/c4ja00102h.

  1. Luminal Ca(2+) dynamics during IP3R mediated signals.

    PubMed

    Lopez, Lucia F; Dawson, Silvina Ponce

    2016-01-01

    The role of cytosolic Ca(2+) on the kinetics of Inositol 1,4,5-triphosphate receptors (IP3Rs) and on the dynamics of IP3R-mediated Ca(2+) signals has been studied at large both experimentally and by modeling. The role of luminal Ca(2+) has not been investigated with that much detail although it has been found that it is relevant for signal termination in the case of Ca(2+) release through ryanodine receptors. In this work we present the results of observing the dynamics of luminal and cytosolic Ca(2+) simultaneously in Xenopus laevis oocytes. Combining observations and modeling we conclude that there is a rapid mechanism that guarantees the availability of free Ca(2+) in the lumen even when a relatively large Ca(2+) release is evoked. Comparing the dynamics of cytosolic and luminal Ca(2+) during a release, we estimate that they are consistent with a 80% of luminal Ca(2+) being buffered. The rapid availability of free luminal Ca(2+) correlates with the observation that the lumen occupies a considerable volume in several regions across the images. PMID:27232767

  2. The Effect of OPA1 on Mitochondrial Ca2+ Signaling

    PubMed Central

    Enyedi, Balázs; Várnai, Péter; Spät, András

    2011-01-01

    The dynamin-related GTPase protein OPA1, localized in the intermembrane space and tethered to the inner membrane of mitochondria, participates in the fusion of these organelles. Its mutation is the most prevalent cause of Autosomal Dominant Optic Atrophy. OPA1 controls the diameter of the junctions between the boundary part of the inner membrane and the membrane of cristae and reduces the diffusibility of cytochrome c through these junctions. We postulated that if significant Ca2+ uptake into the matrix occurs from the lumen of the cristae, reduced expression of OPA1 would increase the access of Ca2+ to the transporters in the crista membrane and thus would enhance Ca2+ uptake. In intact H295R adrenocortical and HeLa cells cytosolic Ca2+ signals evoked with K+ and histamine, respectively, were transferred into the mitochondria. The rate and amplitude of mitochondrial [Ca2+] rise (followed with confocal laser scanning microscopy and FRET measurements with fluorescent wide-field microscopy) were increased after knockdown of OPA1, as compared with cells transfected with control RNA or mitofusin1 siRNA. Ca2+ uptake was enhanced despite reduced mitochondrial membrane potential. In permeabilized cells the rate of Ca2+ uptake by depolarized mitochondria was also increased in OPA1-silenced cells. The participation of Na+/Ca2+ and Ca2+/H+ antiporters in this transport process is indicated by pharmacological data. Altogether, our observations reveal the significance of OPA1 in the control of mitochondrial Ca2+ metabolism. PMID:21980395

  3. Ca2+ dynamics in oocytes from naturally-aged mice

    PubMed Central

    Haverfield, Jenna; Nakagawa, Shoma; Love, Daniel; Tsichlaki, Elina; Nomikos, Michail; Lai, F. Anthony; Swann, Karl; FitzHarris, Greg

    2016-01-01

    The ability of human metaphase-II arrested eggs to activate following fertilisation declines with advancing maternal age. Egg activation is triggered by repetitive increases in intracellular Ca2+ concentration ([Ca2+]i) in the ooplasm as a result of sperm-egg fusion. We therefore hypothesised that eggs from older females feature a reduced ability to mount appropriate Ca2+ responses at fertilisation. To test this hypothesis we performed the first examination of Ca2+ dynamics in eggs from young and naturally-aged mice. Strikingly, we find that Ca2+ stores and resting [Ca2+]i are unchanged with age. Although eggs from aged mice feature a reduced ability to replenish intracellular Ca2+ stores following depletion, this difference had no effect on the duration, number, or amplitude of Ca2+ oscillations following intracytoplasmic sperm injection or expression of phospholipase C zeta. In contrast, we describe a substantial reduction in the frequency and duration of oscillations in aged eggs upon parthenogenetic activation with SrCl2. We conclude that the ability to mount and respond to an appropriate Ca2+ signal at fertilisation is largely unchanged by advancing maternal age, but subtle changes in Ca2+ handling occur that may have more substantial impacts upon commonly used means of parthenogenetic activation. PMID:26785810

  4. Ca2+/H+ exchange in acidic vacuoles of Trypanosoma brucei.

    PubMed Central

    Vercesi, A E; Moreno, S N; Docampo, R

    1994-01-01

    The use of digitonin to permeabilize the plasma membrane of Trypanosoma brucei procyclic and bloodstream trypomastigotes allowed the identification of a non-mitochondrial nigericin-sensitive Ca2+ compartment. The proton ionophore carbonyl cyanide p-trifluoromethoxyphenylhydrazone (FCCP) was able to cause Ca2+ release from this compartment, which was also sensitive to sodium orthovanadate. Preincubation of the cells with the vacuolar H(+)-ATPase inhibitor bafilomycin A1 greatly reduced the nigericin-sensitive Ca2+ compartment. Bafilomycin A1 inhibited the initial rate of ATP-dependent non-mitochondrial Ca2+ uptake and stimulated the initial rate of nigericin-induced Ca2+ release by permeabilized procyclic trypomastigotes. ATP-dependent and bafilomycin A1- and 7-chloro-4-nitrobenz-2-oxa-1,3-diazole (NBD-Cl)-sensitive Acridine Orange uptake was demonstrated in permeabilized cells. Under these conditions Acridine Orange was concentrated in abundant cytoplasmic round vacuoles by a process inhibited by bafilomycin A1, NBD-Cl, nigericin, and Ca2+. Vanadate or EGTA significantly increased Acridine Orange uptake, while Ca2+ released Acridine Orange from these preparations, thus suggesting that the dye and Ca2+ were being accumulated in the same acidic vacuole. Acridine Orange uptake was reversed by nigericin, bafilomycin A1 and NH4Cl. The results are consistent with the presence of a Ca2+/H(+)-ATPase system pumping Ca2+ into an acidic vacuole, that we tentatively named the acidocalcisome. Images Figure 5 PMID:7998937

  5. Characteristics and Possible Functions of Mitochondrial Ca2+ Transport Mechanisms

    PubMed Central

    Gunter, Thomas E.; Sheu, Shey-Shing

    2009-01-01

    Mitochondria produce around 92% of the ATP used in the typical animal cell by oxidative phosphorylation using energy from their electrochemical proton gradient. Intramitochondrial free Ca2+ concentration ([Ca2+]m) has been found to be an important component of control of the rate of this ATP production. In addition, [Ca2+]m also controls the opening of a large pore in the inner mitochondrial membrane, the permeability transition pore (PTP), which plays a role in mitochondrial control of programmed cell death or apoptosis. Therefore, [Ca2+]m can control whether the cell has sufficient ATP to fulfill its functions and survive or is condemned to death. Ca2+ is also one of the most important second messengers within the cytosol, signaling changes in cellular response through Ca2+ pulses or transients. Mitochondria can also sequester Ca2+ from these transients so as to modify the shape of Ca2+ signaling transients or control their location within the cell. All of this is controlled by the action of four or five mitochondrial Ca2+ transport mechanisms and the PTP. The characteristics of these mechanisms of Ca2+ transport and a discussion of how they might function are described in this paper. PMID:19161975

  6. Osmotically induced cytosolic free Ca(2+) changes in human neutrophils.

    PubMed

    Morris, M R; Doull, I J; Hallett, M B

    2001-02-01

    Cytosolic free Ca(2+) concentration in neutrophils was measured by ratiometric fluorometry of intracellular fura2. Increasing the extracellular osmolarity, by either NaCl (300-600 mM) or sucrose (600-1200 mM), caused a rise in cytosolic free Ca(2+) (Delta(max) approximately equal to 600 nM). This was not due to cell lysis as the cytosolic free Ca(2+) concentration was reversed by restoration of isotonicity and a second rise in cytosolic free Ca(2+) could be provoked by repeating the change in extracellular osmolarity. Furthermore, the rise in cytosolic free Ca(2+) concentration occurred in the absence of extracellular Ca(2+), demonstrating that release of intracellular fura2 into the external medium did not occur. The osmotically-induced rise in cytosolic free Ca(2+) was not inhibited by either the phospholipase C-inhibitor U73122, or the microfilament inhibitor cytochalasin B, suggesting that neither signalling via inositol tris-phosphate or the cytoskeletal system were involved. However, the rise in cytosolic free Ca(2+) may have resulted from a reduction in neutrophil water volume in hyperosmotic conditions. As these rises in cytosolic Ca(2+) (Delta(max) approximately equal to 600 nM) were large enough to provoke changes in neutrophil activity, we propose that conditions which removes cell water may similarly elevate cytosolic free Ca(2+) to physiologically important levels. PMID:11341979

  7. Ca2+-Dependent Enhancement of Release by Subthreshold Somatic Depolarization

    PubMed Central

    Christie, Jason M.; Chiu, Delia N.; Jahr, Craig E.

    2010-01-01

    Summary In many neurons, subthreshold somatic depolarization can spread electrotonically into the axon and modulate subsequent spike-evoked transmission. Although release probability is regulated by intracellular Ca2+, the Ca2+-dependence of this modulatory mechanism has been debated. Using paired recordings from synaptically connected molecular-layer interneurons (MLIs) of the rat cerebellum, we observed Ca2+-mediated strengthening of release following brief subthreshold depolarization of the soma. Two-photon microscopy revealed that, at the axon, somatic depolarization evoked Ca2+ influx through voltage-sensitive Ca2+ channels (VSCCs) and facilitated spike-evoked Ca2+ entry. Exogenous Ca2+ buffering diminished these Ca2+ transients and eliminated the strengthening of release. Axonal Ca2+ entry elicited by subthreshold somatic depolarization also triggered asynchronous transmission that may deplete vesicle availability and thereby temper release strengthening. In this cerebellar circuit, activity-dependent presynaptic plasticity depends on Ca2+ elevations resulting from both sub- and suprathreshold electrical activity initiated at the soma. PMID:21170054

  8. Luminal Ca2+ dynamics during IP3R mediated signals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lopez, Lucia F.; Ponce Dawson, Silvina

    2016-06-01

    The role of cytosolic Ca2+ on the kinetics of Inositol 1,4,5-triphosphate receptors (IP3Rs) and on the dynamics of IP3R-mediated Ca2+ signals has been studied at large both experimentally and by modeling. The role of luminal Ca2+ has not been investigated with that much detail although it has been found that it is relevant for signal termination in the case of Ca2+ release through ryanodine receptors. In this work we present the results of observing the dynamics of luminal and cytosolic Ca2+ simultaneously in Xenopus laevis oocytes. Combining observations and modeling we conclude that there is a rapid mechanism that guarantees the availability of free Ca2+ in the lumen even when a relatively large Ca2+ release is evoked. Comparing the dynamics of cytosolic and luminal Ca2+ during a release, we estimate that they are consistent with a 80% of luminal Ca2+ being buffered. The rapid availability of free luminal Ca2+ correlates with the observation that the lumen occupies a considerable volume in several regions across the images.

  9. The 3R polymorph of CaSi{sub 2}

    SciTech Connect

    Nedumkandathil, Reji; Benson, Daryn E.; Grins, Jekabs; Spektor, Kristina; Häussermann, Ulrich

    2015-02-15

    The Zintl phase CaSi{sub 2} commonly occurs in the 6R structure where puckered hexagon layers of Si atoms are stacked in an AA′BB′CC′ fashion. In this study we show that sintering of CaSi{sub 2} in a hydrogen atmosphere (30 bar) at temperatures between 200 and 700 °C transforms 6R-CaSi{sub 2} quantitatively into 3R-CaSi{sub 2}. In the 3R polymorph (space group R-3m (no. 166), a=3.8284(1), c=15.8966(4), Z=3) puckered hexagon layers are stacked in an ABC fashion. The volume per formula unit is about 3% larger compared to 6R-CaSi{sub 2}. First principles density functional calculations reveal that 6R and 3R-CaSi{sub 2} are energetically degenerate at zero Kelvin. With increasing temperature 6R-CaSi{sub 2} stabilizes over 3R because of its higher entropy. This suggests that 3R-CaSi{sub 2} should revert to 6R at elevated temperatures, which however is not observed up to 800 °C. 3R-CaSi{sub 2} may be stabilized by small amounts of incorporated hydrogen and/or defects. - Graphical abstract: The common 6R form of CaSi{sub 2} can be transformed quantitatively into 3R-CaSi{sub 2} upon sintering in a hydrogen atmosphere. - Highlights: • Quantitative and reproducible bulk synthesis of the rare 3R polymorph of CaSi{sub 2}. • Clarification of the energetic relation between 3R and conventional 6R form. • 3R-CaSi{sub 2} is presumably stabilized by small amounts of incorporated hydrogen and/or defects.

  10. Fractionation of stable Ca isotopes in a shallow groundwater aquifer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wiegand, B. A.

    2006-12-01

    Calcium has six stable isotopes, which fractionate during biological and inorganic processes, and thus may provide an important tracer in hydrological studies. To evaluate the potential use of Ca isotopes in determining sources and biogeochemical processes, groundwater from a shallow aquifer in NW Germany was investigated. 44Ca/40Ca ratios (expressed as Δ44Ca) of dissolved Ca2+ in water were analyzed by thermal ionization mass spectrometry using a ^{42}Ca-^{48}Ca double spike to correct for fractionation during the analytical procedure. 44Ca/40Ca ratios were normalized to seawater (Δ44Ca = 0), which was used as a standard. Groundwater samples were collected from monitoring wells in depths between 1.5 and 50 meters below surface. The aquifer is composed of Quaternary unconsolidated sediments. pH values increase from 4.5 in shallow wells to 7.6 at deeper levels, indicating low buffering capacities due to long-term decalcification processes in near-surface horizons. Near-surface groundwater is strongly undersaturated with respect to calcite whereas deep groundwater is close to saturation with calcite. Deep groundwater and several shallow wells are characterized by anoxic conditions while in parts of the aquifer oxic conditions prevail. Δ44Ca values of groundwater range between 0.2 and -1.4 ‰, indicating changes in the sources that are contributing to the dissolved Ca2+ loads, and biogeochemical fractionation processes. The main sources of calcium in the groundwater include mineral weathering and atmospheric deposition. Ca isotopes may be fractionated by secondary minerals precipitation, ion-exchange processes, and biological processes. In this presentation, possible scenarios will be discussed. Acknowledgements: Thanks to Dr. P. Groth, Dr. A. Mehling and the personnel of the Harzwasserwerke GmbH, Germany.

  11. Synchrony of Cardiomyocyte Ca2+ Release is Controlled by t-tubule Organization, SR Ca2+ Content, and Ryanodine Receptor Ca2+ Sensitivity

    PubMed Central

    Øyehaug, Leiv; Loose, Kristian Ø.; Jølle, Guro F.; Røe, Åsmund T.; Sjaastad, Ivar; Christensen, Geir; Sejersted, Ole M.; Louch, William E.

    2013-01-01

    Recent work has demonstrated that cardiomyocyte Ca2+release is desynchronized in several pathological conditions. Loss of Ca2+ release synchrony has been attributed to t-tubule disruption, but it is unknown if other factors also contribute. We investigated this issue in normal and failing myocytes by integrating experimental data with a mathematical model describing spatiotemporal dynamics of Ca2+ in the cytosol and sarcoplasmic reticulum (SR). Heart failure development in postinfarction mice was associated with progressive t-tubule disorganization, as quantified by fast-Fourier transforms. Data from fast-Fourier transforms were then incorporated in the model as a dyadic organization index, reflecting the proportion of ryanodine receptors located in dyads. With decreasing dyadic-organization index, the model predicted greater dyssynchrony of Ca2+ release, which exceeded that observed in experimental line-scan images. Model and experiment were reconciled by reducing the threshold for Ca2+ release in the model, suggesting that increased RyR sensitivity partially offsets the desynchronizing effects of t-tubule disruption in heart failure. Reducing the magnitude of SR Ca2+ content and release, whether experimentally by thapsigargin treatment, or in the model, desynchronized the Ca2+ transient. However, in cardiomyocytes isolated from SERCA2 knockout mice, RyR sensitization offset such effects. A similar interplay between RyR sensitivity and SR content was observed during treatment of myocytes with low-dose caffeine. Initial synchronization of Ca2+ release during caffeine was reversed as SR content declined due to enhanced RyR leak. Thus, synchrony of cardiomyocyte Ca2+ release is not only determined by t-tubule organization but also by the interplay between RyR sensitivity and SR Ca2+ content. PMID:23601316

  12. Abnormal alterations in the Ca2+/CaV1.2/calmodulin/caMKII signaling pathway in a tremor rat model and in cultured hippocampal neurons exposed to Mg2+-free solution

    PubMed Central

    LV, XINTONG; GUO, FENG; XU, XIAOXUE; CHEN, ZAIXING; SUN, XUEFEI; MIN, DONGYU; CAO, YONGGANG; SHI, XIANBAO; WANG, LEI; CHEN, TIANBAO; SHAW, CHRIS; GAO, HUILING; HAO, LIYING; CAI, JIQUN

    2015-01-01

    Voltage-dependent calcium channels (VDCCs) are key elements in epileptogenesis. There are several binding-sites linked to calmodulin (CaM) and several potential CaM-dependent protein kinase II (CaMKII)-mediated phosphorylation sites in CaV1.2. The tremor rat model (TRM) exhibits absence-like seizures from 8 weeks of age. The present study was performed to detect changes in the Ca2+/CaV1.2/CaM/CaMKII pathway in TRMs and in cultured hippocampal neurons exposed to Mg2+-free solution. The expression levels of CaV1.2, CaM and phosphorylated CaMKII (p-CaMKII; Thr-286) in these two models were examined using immunofluorescence and western blotting. Compared with Wistar rats, the expression levels of CaV1.2 and CaM were increased, and the expression of p-CaMKII was decreased in the TRM hippocampus. However, the expression of the targeted proteins was reversed in the TRM temporal cortex. A significant increase in the expression of CaM and decrease in the expression of CaV1.2 were observed in the TRM cerebellum. In the cultured neuron model, p-CaMKII and CaV1.2 were markedly decreased. In addition, neurons exhibiting co-localized expression of CaV1.2 and CaM immunoreactivities were detected. Furthermore, intracellular calcium concentrations were increased in these two models. For the first time, o the best of our knowledge, the data of the present study suggested that abnormal alterations in the Ca2+/CaV1.2/CaM/CaMKII pathway may be involved in epileptogenesis and in the phenotypes of TRMs and cultured hippocampal neurons exposed to Mg2+-free solution. PMID:26299765

  13. Superdeformed and Triaxial States in ^{42}Ca.

    PubMed

    Hadyńska-Klȩk, K; Napiorkowski, P J; Zielińska, M; Srebrny, J; Maj, A; Azaiez, F; Valiente Dobón, J J; Kicińska-Habior, M; Nowacki, F; Naïdja, H; Bounthong, B; Rodríguez, T R; de Angelis, G; Abraham, T; Anil Kumar, G; Bazzacco, D; Bellato, M; Bortolato, D; Bednarczyk, P; Benzoni, G; Berti, L; Birkenbach, B; Bruyneel, B; Brambilla, S; Camera, F; Chavas, J; Cederwall, B; Charles, L; Ciemała, M; Cocconi, P; Coleman-Smith, P; Colombo, A; Corsi, A; Crespi, F C L; Cullen, D M; Czermak, A; Désesquelles, P; Doherty, D T; Dulny, B; Eberth, J; Farnea, E; Fornal, B; Franchoo, S; Gadea, A; Giaz, A; Gottardo, A; Grave, X; Grȩbosz, J; Görgen, A; Gulmini, M; Habermann, T; Hess, H; Isocrate, R; Iwanicki, J; Jaworski, G; Judson, D S; Jungclaus, A; Karkour, N; Kmiecik, M; Karpiński, D; Kisieliński, M; Kondratyev, N; Korichi, A; Komorowska, M; Kowalczyk, M; Korten, W; Krzysiek, M; Lehaut, G; Leoni, S; Ljungvall, J; Lopez-Martens, A; Lunardi, S; Maron, G; Mazurek, K; Menegazzo, R; Mengoni, D; Merchán, E; Mȩczyński, W; Michelagnoli, C; Mierzejewski, J; Million, B; Myalski, S; Napoli, D R; Nicolini, R; Niikura, M; Obertelli, A; Özmen, S F; Palacz, M; Próchniak, L; Pullia, A; Quintana, B; Rampazzo, G; Recchia, F; Redon, N; Reiter, P; Rosso, D; Rusek, K; Sahin, E; Salsac, M-D; Söderström, P-A; Stefan, I; Stézowski, O; Styczeń, J; Theisen, Ch; Toniolo, N; Ur, C A; Vandone, V; Wadsworth, R; Wasilewska, B; Wiens, A; Wood, J L; Wrzosek-Lipska, K; Ziȩbliński, M

    2016-08-01

    Shape parameters of a weakly deformed ground-state band and highly deformed slightly triaxial sideband in ^{42}Ca were determined from E2 matrix elements measured in the first low-energy Coulomb excitation experiment performed with AGATA. The picture of two coexisting structures is well reproduced by new state-of-the-art large-scale shell model and beyond-mean-field calculations. Experimental evidence for superdeformation of the band built on 0_{2}^{+} has been obtained and the role of triaxiality in the A∼40 mass region is discussed. Furthermore, the potential of Coulomb excitation as a tool to study superdeformation has been demonstrated for the first time. PMID:27541463

  14. Fast Inversion of Solar Ca II Spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beck, C.; Choudhary, D. P.; Rezaei, R.; Louis, R. E.

    2015-01-01

    We present a fast (Lt1 s per profile) inversion code for solar Ca II lines. The code uses an archive of spectra that are synthesized prior to the inversion under the assumption of local thermodynamic equilibrium (LTE). We show that it can be successfully applied to spectrograph data or more sparsely sampled spectra from two-dimensional spectrometers. From a comparison to a non-LTE inversion of the same set of spectra, we derive a first-order non-LTE correction to the temperature stratifications derived in the LTE approach. The correction factor is close to unity up to log τ ~ -3 and increases to values of 2.5 and 4 at log τ = -6 in the quiet Sun and the umbra, respectively.

  15. FAST INVERSION OF SOLAR Ca II SPECTRA

    SciTech Connect

    Beck, C.; Choudhary, D. P.; Rezaei, R.; Louis, R. E.

    2015-01-10

    We present a fast (<<1 s per profile) inversion code for solar Ca II lines. The code uses an archive of spectra that are synthesized prior to the inversion under the assumption of local thermodynamic equilibrium (LTE). We show that it can be successfully applied to spectrograph data or more sparsely sampled spectra from two-dimensional spectrometers. From a comparison to a non-LTE inversion of the same set of spectra, we derive a first-order non-LTE correction to the temperature stratifications derived in the LTE approach. The correction factor is close to unity up to log τ ∼ –3 and increases to values of 2.5 and 4 at log τ = –6 in the quiet Sun and the umbra, respectively.

  16. The CaV2.3 R-Type Voltage-Gated Ca2+ Channel in Mouse Sleep Architecture

    PubMed Central

    Siwek, Magdalena Elisabeth; Müller, Ralf; Henseler, Christina; Broich, Karl; Papazoglou, Anna; Weiergräber, Marco

    2014-01-01

    Study Objectives: Voltage-gated Ca2+ channels (VGCCs) are key elements in mediating thalamocortical rhythmicity. Low-voltage activated (LVA) CaV 3 T-type Ca2+ channels have been related to thalamic rebound burst firing and to generation of non-rapid eye movement (NREM) sleep. High-voltage activated (HVA) CaV 1 L-type Ca2+ channels, on the opposite, favor the tonic mode of action associated with higher levels of vigilance. However, the role of the HVA Non-L-type CaV2.3 Ca2+ channels, which are predominantly expressed in the reticular thalamic nucleus (RTN), still remains unclear. Recently, CaV2.3−/− mice were reported to exhibit altered spike-wave discharge (SWD)/absence seizure susceptibility supported by the observation that CaV2.3 mediated Ca2+ influx into RTN neurons can trigger small-conductance Ca2+-activated K+-channel type 2 (SK2) currents capable of maintaining thalamic burst activity. Based on these studies we investigated the role of CaV2.3 R-type Ca2+ channels in rodent sleep. Methods: The role of CaV2.3 Ca2+ channels was analyzed in CaV2.3−/− mice and controls in both spontaneous and artificial urethane-induced sleep, using implantable video-EEG radiotelemetry. Data were analyzed for alterations in sleep architecture using sleep staging software and time-frequency analysis. Results: CaV2.3 deficient mice exhibited reduced wake duration and increased slow-wave sleep (SWS). Whereas mean sleep stage durations remained unchanged, the total number of SWS epochs was increased in CaV2.3−/− mice. Additional changes were observed for sleep stage transitions and EEG amplitudes. Furthermore, urethane-induced SWS mimicked spontaneous sleep results obtained from CaV2.3 deficient mice. Quantitative Real-time PCR did not reveal changes in thalamic CaV3 T-type Ca2+ channel expression. The detailed mechanisms of SWS increase in CaV2.3−/− mice remain to be determined. Conclusions: Low-voltage activated CaV2.3 R-type Ca2+ channels in the thalamocortical

  17. Ca(2+)-handling proteins and heart failure: novel molecular targets?

    PubMed

    Prestle, J; Quinn, F R; Smith, G L

    2003-06-01

    Calcium (Ca(2+)) ions are the currency of heart muscle activity. During excitation-contraction coupling Ca(2+) is rapidly cycled between the cytosol (where it activates the myofilaments) and the sarcoplasmic reticulum (SR), the Ca(2+) store. These fluxes occur by the transient activity of Ca(2+)-pumps and -channels. In the failing human heart, changes in activity and expression profile of Ca(2+)-handling proteins, in particular the SR Ca(2+)-ATPase (SERCA2a), are thought to cause an overall reduction in the amount of SR-Ca(2+) available for contraction. In the steady state, the Ca(2+)-content of the SR is essentially a balance between Ca(2+)-uptake via SERCA2a pump and Ca(2+)-release via the cardiac SR Ca(2+)-release channel complex (Ryanodine receptor, RyR2). This review discusses current pharmacological options available to enhance cardiac SR Ca(2+) content and the implications of this approach as an inotropic therapy in heart failure. Two options are considered: (i) activation of the SERCA2a pump to increase SR Ca(2+)-uptake, and (ii) reduction of SR Ca(2+)-leakage through RyR2. RyR2 forms a macromolecular complex with a number of regulatory proteins that either remain permanently bound or that interact in a time- and/or Ca(2+)-dependant manner. These regulatory proteins can dramatically affect RyR2 function, e.g. over-expression of the accessory protein FK 506-binding protein 12.6 (FKBP12.6) has recently been shown to reduce SR Ca(2+)-leak. Recent attempts to design positive inotropes for chronic administrations have focussed on the use of phosphodiesterase III inhibitors (PDE III inhibitors). These compounds, which increase intracellular cAMP-levels, have failed in clinical trials. Therefore medical researchers are seeking new drugs that act through alternative pathways. Novel cardiac inotropes targeting SR Ca(2+)-cycling proteins may have the potential to fill this gap. PMID:12678683

  18. Experimental identification of Ca isotopic fractionations in higher plants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cobert, Florian; Schmitt, Anne-Désirée; Bourgeade, Pascale; Labolle, François; Badot, Pierre-Marie; Chabaux, François; Stille, Peter

    2011-10-01

    Hydroponic experiments have been performed in order to identify the co-occurring geochemical and biological processes affecting the Ca isotopic compositions within plants. To test the influence of the Ca concentration and pH of the nutritive solution on the Ca isotopic composition of the different plant organs, four experimental conditions were chosen combining two different Ca concentrations (5 and 60 ppm) and two pHs (4 and 6). The study was performed on rapid growing bean plants in order to have a complete growth cycle. Several organs (root, stem, leaf, reproductive) were sampled at two different growth stages (10 days and 6 weeks of culture) and prepared for Ca isotopic measurements. The results allow to identify three Ca isotopic fractionation levels. The first one takes place when Ca enters the lateral roots, during Ca adsorption on cation-exchange binding sites in the apoplasm. The second one takes place when Ca is bound to the polygalacturonic acids (pectins) of the middle lamella of the xylem cell wall. Finally, the last fractionation occurs in the reproductive organs, also caused by cation-exchange processes with pectins. However, the cell wall structures of these organs and/or number of available exchange sites seem to be different to those of the xylem wall. These three physico-chemical fractionation mechanisms allow to enrich the organs in the light 40Ca isotope. The amplitude of the Ca isotopic fractionation within plant organs is highly dependent on the composition of the nutritive solution: low pH (4) and Ca concentrations (5 ppm) have no effect on the biomass increase of the plants but induce smaller fractionation amplitudes compared to those obtained from other experimental conditions. Thus, Ca isotopic signatures of bean plants are controlled by the external nutritive medium. This study highlights the potential of Ca isotopes to be applied in plant physiology (to identify Ca uptake, circulation and storage mechanisms within plants) and in

  19. Modelling Changes of the Paleogene Ca Budget Using Benthic Foraminifera

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pabich, S.; Gussone, N. C.; Vollmer, C.; Palike, H.; Rabe, K.; Teichert, B. M.

    2014-12-01

    Understanding the earth's climate as well as the oceanic chemical and isotopic evolution in the past is one of the main aims in earth science. Ca as one of the major elements in the ocean is especially important. Its variation in concentration are controlled by different factors including the CO2 concentration of the atmosphere, continental weathering and Ca carbonate sedimentation. We used samples from IODP Exp. 320/321 to establish a δ44/40Ca paleo-seawater record between 45 and 25 Ma and model changes in the Ca budget through time. Our results show differences in the Eocene and Oligocene Ca isotope record of benthic foraminifers. The δ44/40Ca values during the Eocene are relatively constant with no significant fluctuations during phases of large short term CCD fluctuations[1]. The Oligocene is characterized by sediments with uniformly high carbonate content and increasing δ44/40Ca towards the late Oligocene. Past seawater δ44/40Ca values (Fig. 1) were calculated from the measured benthic foraminifer record applying the calibration for Gyroidinoides spp.[2]. The Ca budget during the Eocene is relatively constant and not affected by short term CCD fluctuations, indicating that they are too small to alter the isotopic Ca budget. The Oligocene, in contrast is characterized by a general increase in δ44/40Ca seawater values and a continuously deep CCD[1]. This is consistent with a massive long term (>1Ma) CaCO3 deposition and decreasing Ca concentration in the ocean water. To examine the preservation (dissolution and recrystallization) of the foraminifer test through time, we studied additionally the changes in the crystallographic orientations trough time by Electron Backscatter Diffraction (EBSD) analysis and Raman spectroscopy. As a final step we use our δ44/40Ca seawater record to run a combined Ca and C model showing the effect of Ca weathering input, carbonate remobilization and dolomitization on the Ca and carbonate system of seawater [1]. [1]Pälike H

  20. The many phases of CaC2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Konar, Sumit; Nylén, Johanna; Svensson, Gunnar; Bernin, Diana; Edén, Mattias; Ruschewitz, Uwe; Häussermann, Ulrich

    2016-07-01

    Polymorphic CaC2 was prepared by reacting mixtures of CaH2 and graphite with molar ratios between 1:1.8 and 1:2.2 at temperatures between 700 and 1400 °C under dynamic vacuum. These conditions provided a well controlled, homogeneous, chemical environment and afforded products with high purity. The products, which were characterized by powder X-ray diffraction, solid state NMR and Raman spectroscopy, represented mixtures of the three known polymorphs, tetragonal CaC2-I and monoclinic CaC2-II and -III. Their proportion is dependent on the nominal C/CaH2 ratio of the reaction mixture and temperature. Reactions with excess carbon produced a mixture virtually free from CaC2-I, whereas high temperatures (above 1100 °C) and C-deficiency favored the formation of CaC2-I. From first principles calculations it is shown that CaC2-I is dynamically unstable within the harmonic approximation. This indicates that existing CaC2-I is structurally/dynamically disordered and may possibly even occur as slightly carbon-deficient phase CaC2-δ. It is proposed that monoclinic II is the ground state of CaC2 and polymorph III is stable at temperatures above 200 °C. Tetragonal I represents a metastable, heterogeneous, phase of CaC2. It is argued that a complete understanding of the occurrence of three room temperature modifications of CaC2 will require a detailed characterization of compositional and structural heterogeneities within the high temperature form CaC2-IV, which is stable above 450 °C. The effect of high pressure on the stability of the monoclinic forms of CaC2 was studied in a diamond anvil cell using Raman spectroscopy. CaC2-II and -III transform into tetragonal CaC2-I at about 4 and 1GPa, respectively.

  1. Effects of Ca2+ on phosphoinositide breakdown in exocrine pancreas.

    PubMed Central

    Taylor, C W; Merritt, J E; Putney, J W; Rubin, R P

    1986-01-01

    Recent studies have established that inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate [I(1,4,5)P3] provides the link between receptor-regulated polyphosphoinositide hydrolysis and mobilization of intracellular Ca2+. Here, we report the effects of Ca2+ on inositol trisphosphate (IP3) formation from phosphatidylinositol bisphosphate (PIP2) catalysed by phospholipase C in intact and electrically permeabilized rat pancreatic acinar cells. In permeabilized cells, the Ca2+-mobilizing agonist caerulein stimulated [3H]IP3 formation when the free [Ca2+] was buffered at 140 nM, the cytosolic free [Ca2+] of unstimulated pancreatic acinar cells. When the free [Ca2+] was reduced to less than 10 nM, caerulein did not stimulate [3H]IP3 formation. Ca2+ in the physiological range stimulated [3H]IP3 formation and reduced the amount of [3H]PIP2 in permeabilized cells. The effects of Ca2+ and the receptor agonist caerulein were additive, but we have not established whether this reflects independent effects on the same or different enzymes. The effect of Ca2+ on [3H]IP3 formation by permeabilized cells was unaffected by inhibitors of the cyclo-oxygenase and lipoxygenase pathways of arachidonic acid metabolism; nor were the effects of Ca2+ mimicked by addition of arachidonic acid. These results suggest that the effects of Ca2+ on phospholipase C activity are not a secondary consequence of Ca2+ activation of phospholipase A2. Changes in free [Ca2+] (less than 10 nM-1.2 mM) did not affect the metabolism of exogenous [3H]I(1,4,5)P3 by permeabilized cells. In permeabilized cells, breakdown of exogenous [3H]IP3 to [3H]IP2 (inositol bisphosphate), and formation of [3H]IP3 in response to receptor agonists were equally inhibited by 2,3-bisphosphoglyceric acid. This suggests that the [3H]IP2 formed in response to receptor agonists is entirely derived from [3H]IP3. In intact cells, [3H]IP3 formation was stimulated when ionomycin was used to increase the cytosolic free [Ca2+]. However, a maximal concentration of

  2. T-type Ca2+ channels mediate propagation of odor-induced Ca2+ transients in rat olfactory receptor neurons.

    PubMed

    Gautam, S H; Otsuguro, K-I; Ito, S; Saito, T; Habara, Y

    2007-01-19

    Propagation of odor-induced Ca(2+) transients from the cilia/knob to the soma in mammalian olfactory receptor neurons (ORNs) is thought to be mediated exclusively by high-voltage-activated Ca(2+) channels. However, using confocal Ca(2+) imaging and immunocytochemistry we identified functional T-type Ca(2+) channels in rat ORNs. Here we show that T-type Ca(2+) channels in ORNs also mediate propagation of odor-induced Ca(2+) transients from the knob to the soma. In the presence of the selective inhibitor of T-type Ca(2+) channels mibefradil (10-15 microM) or Ni(2+) (100 microM), odor- and forskolin/3-isobutyl-1-methyl-xanthine (IBMX)-induced Ca(2+) transients in the soma and dendrite were either strongly inhibited or abolished. The percentage of inhibition of the Ca(2+) transients in the knob, however, was 40-50% less than that in the soma. Ca(2+) transients induced by 30 mM K(+) were partially inhibited by mibefradil, but without a significant difference in the extent of inhibition between the knob and soma. Furthermore, an increase of as little as 2.5 mM in the extracellular K(+) concentration (7.5 mM K(+)) was found to induce Ca(2+) transients in ORNs, and such responses were completely inhibited by mibefradil or Ni(2+). Total replacement of extracellular Na(+) with N-methyl-d-glutamate inhibited none of the odor-, forskolin/IBMX- or 7.5 mM K(+)-induced Ca(2+) transients. Positive immunoreactivity to the Ca(v)3.1, Ca(v)3.2 and Ca(v)3.3 subunits of the T-type Ca(2+) channel was observed throughout the soma, dendrite and knob. These data suggest that involvement of T-type Ca(2+) channels in the propagation of odor-induced Ca(2+) transients in ORNs may contribute to signal transduction and odor sensitivity. PMID:17110049

  3. Apocalmodulin and Ca2+ calmodulin bind to the same region on the skeletal muscle Ca2+ release channel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moore, C. P.; Rodney, G.; Zhang, J. Z.; Santacruz-Toloza, L.; Strasburg, G.; Hamilton, S. L.

    1999-01-01

    The skeletal muscle Ca2+ release channel (RYR1) is regulated by calmodulin in both its Ca2+-free (apocalmodulin) and Ca2+-bound (Ca2+ calmodulin) states. Apocalmodulin is an activator of the channel, and Ca2+ calmodulin is an inhibitor of the channel. Both apocalmodulin and Ca2+ calmodulin binding sites on RYR1 are destroyed by a mild tryptic digestion of the sarcoplasmic reticulum membranes, but calmodulin (either form), bound to RYR1 prior to tryptic digestion, protects both the apocalmodulin and Ca2+ calmodulin sites from tryptic destruction. The protected sites are after arginines 3630 and 3637 on RYR1. These studies suggest that both Ca2+ calmodulin and apocalmodulin bind to the same or overlapping regions on RYR1 and block access of trypsin to sites at amino acids 3630 and 3637. This sequence is part of a predicted Ca2+ CaM binding site of amino acids 3614-3642 [Takeshima, H., et al. (1989) Nature 339, 439-445].

  4. Na+-Ca2+ exchanger contributes to Ca2+ extrusion in ATP-stimulated endothelium of intact rat aorta.

    PubMed

    Berra-Romani, Roberto; Raqeeb, Abdul; Guzman-Silva, Alejandro; Torres-Jácome, Julián; Tanzi, Franco; Moccia, Francesco

    2010-04-23

    The role of Na(+)-Ca(2+) exchanger (NCX) in vascular endothelium is still matter of debate. Depending on both the endothelial cell (EC) type and the extracellular ligand, NCX has been shown to operate in either the forward (Ca(2+) out)- or the reverse (Ca(2+) in)-mode. In particular, acetylcholine (Ach) has been shown to promote Ca(2+) inflow in the intact endothelium of excised rat aorta. Herein, we assessed the involvement of NCX into the Ca(2+) signals elicited by ATP in such preparation. Removal of extracellular Na(+) (0Na(+)) causes the NCX to switch into the reverse-mode and induced an increase in intracellular Ca(2+) concentration ([Ca(2+)](i)), which disappeared in the absence of extracellular Ca(2+), and in the presence of benzamil, which blocks both modes of NCX, and KB-R 7943, a selective inhibitor of the reverse-mode. ATP induced a transient Ca(2+) signal, whose decay was significantly prolonged by 0Na(+), benzamil, DCB, and monensin while it was unaffected by KB-R 7943. Notably, lowering extracellular Na(+) concentration increased the sensibility to lower doses of ATP. These date suggest that, unlike Ach-stimulated ECs, NCX promotes Ca(2+) extrusion when the stimulus is provided by ATP in intact endothelium of rat aorta. These data show that, within the same preparation, NCX operates in both modes, depending on the chemical nature of the extracellular stimulus. PMID:20353753

  5. Cytosolic and mitochondrial [Ca2+] in whole hearts using indo-1 acetoxymethyl ester: effects of high extracellular Ca2+.

    PubMed Central

    Schreur, J H; Figueredo, V M; Miyamae, M; Shames, D M; Baker, A J; Camacho, S A

    1996-01-01

    Assessment of free cytosolic [Ca2+] ([Ca2+]c) using the acetoxymethyl ester (AM) form of indo-1 may be compromised by loading of indo-1 into noncytosolic compartments, primarily mitochondria. To determine the fraction of noncytosolic fluorescence in whole hearts loaded with indo-1 AM, Mn2+ was used to quench cytosolic fluorescence. Residual (i.e., noncytosolic) fluorescence was subtracted from the total fluorescence before calculating [Ca2+]c. Noncytosolic fluorescence was used to estimate mitochondrial [Ca2+]. In hearts paced at 5 Hz (N = 17), noncytosolic fluorescence was 0.61 +/- 0.06 and 0.56 +/- 0.07 of total fluorescence at lambda 385 and lambda 456, respectively. After taking into account noncytosolic fluorescence, systolic and diastolic [Ca2+]c was 673 +/- 72 and 132 +/- 9 nM, respectively, noncytosolic [Ca2+] was 183 +/- 36 nM and increased to 272 +/- 12 when extracellular Ca2+ was increased from 2 to 6 mM. This increase in noncytosolic [Ca2+] was inhibited by ruthenium red, a blocker of Ca2+ uptake by mitochondria. We conclude that cytosolic and mitochondrial [Ca2+] can be determined in whole hearts loaded with indo-1 AM by using Mn2+ to quench cytosolic fluorescence. PMID:8744296

  6. Genetical and Comparative Genomics of Brassica under Altered Ca Supply Identifies Arabidopsis Ca-Transporter Orthologs[W][OPEN

    PubMed Central

    Graham, Neil S.; Hammond, John P.; Lysenko, Artem; Mayes, Sean; Ó Lochlainn, Seosamh; Blasco, Bego; Bowen, Helen C.; Rawlings, Chris J.; Rios, Juan J.; Welham, Susan; Carion, Pierre W.C.; Dupuy, Lionel X.; King, Graham J.; White, Philip J.; Broadley, Martin R.

    2014-01-01

    Although Ca transport in plants is highly complex, the overexpression of vacuolar Ca2+ transporters in crops is a promising new technology to improve dietary Ca supplies through biofortification. Here, we sought to identify novel targets for increasing plant Ca accumulation using genetical and comparative genomics. Expression quantitative trait locus (eQTL) mapping to 1895 cis- and 8015 trans-loci were identified in shoots of an inbred mapping population of Brassica rapa (IMB211 × R500); 23 cis- and 948 trans-eQTLs responded specifically to altered Ca supply. eQTLs were screened for functional significance using a large database of shoot Ca concentration phenotypes of Arabidopsis thaliana. From 31 Arabidopsis gene identifiers tagged to robust shoot Ca concentration phenotypes, 21 mapped to 27 B. rapa eQTLs, including orthologs of the Ca2+ transporters At-CAX1 and At-ACA8. Two of three independent missense mutants of BraA.cax1a, isolated previously by targeting induced local lesions in genomes, have allele-specific shoot Ca concentration phenotypes compared with their segregating wild types. BraA.CAX1a is a promising target for altering the Ca composition of Brassica, consistent with prior knowledge from Arabidopsis. We conclude that multiple-environment eQTL analysis of complex crop genomes combined with comparative genomics is a powerful technique for novel gene identification/prioritization. PMID:25082855

  7. Improving transesterification acitvity of CaO with hydration technique.

    PubMed

    Yoosuk, Boonyawan; Udomsap, Parncheewa; Puttasawat, Buppa; Krasae, Pawnprapa

    2010-05-01

    An efficient technique for increasing the transesterification activity of CaO obtained from calcination of CaCO(3) was proposed in order to make them highly suitable for use as heterogeneous catalysts for biodiesel production. CaO was refluxed in water followed by the synthesis of the oxide from hydroxide species. The characterization results indicate that this procedure substantially increases both the specific surface area and the amount of basic site. Hydration and subsequent calcination also generates a new calcium oxide with less crystalline. Transesterification of palm olein was used to determine the activity of catalysts to show that the decomposed-hydrated CaO exhibits higher catalytic activity than CaO generated from calcination of CaCO(3). The methyl ester content was enhanced 18.4 wt.%. PMID:20089395

  8. Ca(2+) influx through L-type Ca(2+) channels and transient receptor potential channels activates pathological hypertrophy signaling.

    PubMed

    Gao, Hui; Wang, Fang; Wang, Wei; Makarewich, Catherine A; Zhang, Hongyu; Kubo, Hajime; Berretta, Remus M; Barr, Larry A; Molkentin, Jeffery D; Houser, Steven R

    2012-11-01

    Common cardiovascular diseases such as hypertension and myocardial infarction require that myocytes develop greater than normal force to maintain cardiac pump function. This requires increases in [Ca(2+)]. These diseases induce cardiac hypertrophy and increases in [Ca(2+)] are known to be an essential proximal signal for activation of hypertrophic genes. However, the source of "hypertrophic" [Ca(2+)] is not known and is the topic of this study. The role of Ca(2+) influx through L-type Ca(2+) channels (LTCC), T-type Ca(2+) channels (TTCC) and transient receptor potential (TRP) channels on the activation of calcineurin (Cn)-nuclear factor of activated T cells (NFAT) signaling and myocyte hypertrophy was studied. Neonatal rat ventricular myocytes (NRVMs) and adult feline ventricular myocytes (AFVMs) were infected with an adenovirus containing NFAT-GFP, to determine factors that could induce NFAT nuclear translocation. Four millimolar Ca(2+) or pacing induced NFAT nuclear translocation. This effect was blocked by Cn inhibitors. In NRVMs Nifedipine (Nif, LTCC antagonist) blocked high Ca(2+)-induced NFAT nuclear translocation while SKF-96365 (TRP channel antagonist) and Nickel (Ni, TTCC antagonist) were less effective. The relative potency of these antagonists against Ca(2+) induced NFAT nuclear translocation (Nif>SKF-96365>Ni) was similar to their effects on Ca(2+) transients and the LTCC current. Infection of NRVM with viruses containing TRP channels also activated NFAT-GFP nuclear translocation and caused myocyte hypertrophy. TRP effects were reduced by SKF-96365, but were more effectively antagonized by Nif. These experiments suggest that Ca(2+) influx through LTCCs is the primary source of Ca(2+) to activate Cn-NFAT signaling in NRVMs and AFVMs. While TRP channels cause hypertrophy, they appear to do so through a mechanism involving Ca(2+) entry via LTCCs. PMID:22921230

  9. Apparent Ca2+ dissociation constant of Ca2+ chelators incorporated non-disruptively into intact human red cells.

    PubMed Central

    Tiffert, T; Lew, V L

    1997-01-01

    1. A recently developed method of measuring cytoplasmic Ca2+ buffering in intact red cells was applied to re-evaluate the intracellular Ca2+ binding properties of the Ca2+ chelators benz2 and BAPTA. Incorporation of the free chelators was accomplished by incubating the cells with the acetoxymethyl ester forms (benz2 AM or BAPTA AM). The divalent cation ionophore A23187 was used to induce equilibrium distribution of Ca2+ between cells and medium. 45Ca2+ was added stepwise to cell suspensions in the presence and absence of external BAPTA. To induce full Ca2+ equilibration, the plasma membrane Ca2+ pump was inhibited either by depleting the cells of ATP or by adding vanadate to the cell suspension. 2. The properties of the incorporated chelators were assessed from the difference in cytoplasmic Ca2+ buffering between chelator-free and chelator-loaded cells, over a wide range of intracellular ionized calcium concentrations ([Ca2+]i), from nanomolar to millimolar. 3. Under the experimental conditions applied, incorporation of benz2 and BAPTA into the red cells increased their Ca2+ buffering capacity by 300-600 mumol (340 g Hb)-1. The intracellular apparent Ca2+ dissociation constants (KDi) were about 500 nM for benz2 and 800 nM for BAPTA, values much higher than those reported for standard salt solutions (KD) of about 40 and 130 nM, respectively. These results suggest that, contrary to earlier observations, the intracellular red cell environment may cause large shifts in the apparent Ca2+ binding behaviour of incorporated chelators. 4. The possibility that the observed KD shifts are due to reversible binding of the chelators to haemoglobin is considered, and the implications of the present results for early estimates of physiological [Ca2+]i levels is discussed. PMID:9423182

  10. Calcineurin inhibits VCX1-dependent H+/Ca2+ exchange and induces Ca2+ ATPases in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed Central

    Cunningham, K W; Fink, G R

    1996-01-01

    The PMC1 gene in Saccharomyces cerevisiae encodes a vacuolar Ca2+ ATPase required for growth in high-Ca2+ conditions. Previous work showed that Ca2+ tolerance can be restored to pmc1 mutants by inactivation of calcineurin, a Ca2+/calmodulin-dependent protein phosphatase sensitive to the immunosuppressive drug FK506. We now report that calcineurin decreases Ca2+ tolerance of pmc1 mutants by inhibiting the function of VCX1, which encodes a vacuolar H+/Ca2+ exchanger related to vertebrate Na+/Ca2+ exchangers. The contribution of VCX1 in Ca2+ tolerance is low in strains with a functional calcineurin and is high in strains which lack calcineurin activity. In contrast, the contribution of PMC1 to Ca2+ tolerance is augmented by calcineurin activation. Consistent with these positive and negative roles of calcineurin, expression of a vcx1::lacZ reporter was slightly diminished and a pmc1::lacZ reporter was induced up to 500-fold by processes dependent on calcineurin, calmodulin, and Ca2+. It is likely that calcineurin inhibits VCX1 function mainly by posttranslational mechanisms. Activities of VCX1 and PMC1 help to control cytosolic free Ca2+ concentrations because their function can decrease pmc1::lacZ induction by calcineurin. Additional studies with reporter genes and mutants indicate that PMR1 and PMR2A, encoding P-type ion pumps required for Mn2+ and Na+ tolerance, may also be induced physiologically in response to high-Mn2+ and -Na+ conditions through calcineurin-dependent mechanisms. In these situations, inhibition of VCX1 function may be important for the production of Ca2+ signals. We propose that elevated cytosolic free Ca2+ concentrations, calmodulin, and calcineurin regulate at least four ion transporters in S. cerevisiae in response to several environmental conditions. PMID:8628289

  11. Citrus bergamia Risso Elevates Intracellular Ca (2+) in Human Vascular Endothelial Cells due to Release of Ca (2+) from Primary Intracellular Stores.

    PubMed

    Kang, Purum; Han, Seung Ho; Moon, Hea Kyung; Lee, Jeong-Min; Kim, Hyo-Keun; Min, Sun Seek; Seol, Geun Hee

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of the present study is to examine the effects of essential oil of Citrus bergamia Risso (bergamot, BEO) on intracellular Ca(2+) in human umbilical vein endothelial cells. Fura-2 fluorescence was used to examine changes in intracellular Ca(2+) concentration [Ca(2+)]i . In the presence of extracellular Ca(2+), BEO increased [Ca(2+)]i , which was partially inhibited by a nonselective Ca(2+) channel blocker La(3+). In Ca(2+)-free extracellular solutions, BEO increased [Ca(2+)]i in a concentration-dependent manner, suggesting that BEO mobilizes intracellular Ca(2+). BEO-induced [Ca(2+)]i increase was partially inhibited by a Ca(2+)-induced Ca(2+) release inhibitor dantrolene, a phospholipase C inhibitor U73122, and an inositol 1,4,5-triphosphate (IP3)-gated Ca(2+) channel blocker, 2-aminoethoxydiphenyl borane (2-APB). BEO also increased [Ca(2+)]i in the presence of carbonyl cyanide m-chlorophenylhydrazone, an inhibitor of mitochondrial Ca(2+) uptake. In addition, store-operated Ca(2+) entry (SOC) was potentiated by BEO. These results suggest that BEO mobilizes Ca(2+) from primary intracellular stores via Ca(2+)-induced and IP3-mediated Ca(2+) release and affect promotion of Ca(2+) influx, likely via an SOC mechanism. PMID:24348719

  12. Structural basis for the differential effects of CaBP1 and calmodulin on CaV1.2 calcium-dependent inactivation

    PubMed Central

    Findeisen, Felix; Minor, Daniel L.

    2010-01-01

    Calcium-binding protein 1 (CaBP1), a calmodulin (CaM) homolog, endows certain voltage-gated calcium channels (CaVs) with unusual properties. CaBP1 inhibits CaV1.2 calcium-dependent inactivation (CDI) and introduces calcium-dependent facilitation (CDF). Here, we show that the ability of CaBP1 to inhibit CaV1.2 CDI and induce CDF arises from interaction between the CaBP1 N-lobe and interlobe linker residue Glu94. Unlike CaM, where functional EF hands are essential for channel modulation, CDI inhibition does not require functional CaBP1 EF-hands. Furthermore, CaBP1-mediated CDF has different molecular requirements than CaM-mediated CDF. Overall, the data show that CaBP1 comprises two structural modules having separate functions: similar to CaM, the CaBP1 C-lobe serves as a high-affinity anchor that binds the CaV1.2 IQ domain at a site that overlaps with the Ca2+/CaM C-lobe site, whereas the N-lobe/linker module houses the elements required for channel modulation. Discovery of this division provides the framework for understanding how CaBP1 regulates CaVs. PMID:21134641

  13. Evaporated CaS thin films for AC electroluminescence devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kobayashi, H.; Tanaka, S.; Shanker, V.; Shiiki, M.; Deguchi, H.

    1985-08-01

    The growth behavior of evaporated CaS thin films has been investigated to achieve bright electroluminescence. The crystallinity of CaS films is improved with substrate temperature and for temperatures higher than 300°C, the films orient to the (200) plane. Sulfur coevaporation further helps to form a more per