Science.gov

Sample records for 19-dimensional parameter space

  1. Generalized Stokes parameters in phase space.

    PubMed

    Sahin, Serkan

    2010-05-15

    The generalized Stokes parameters (GSP) are studied under the theory of phase space. It is noted that phase-space Stokes parameters can be a useful tool for Wigner distribution function measurements. Electromagnetic Wigner functions are introduced by use of the two-point statistics of GSP. The advantage in the GSP is that they can be measured in terms of the electric correlation matrix (which is a measurable quantity) or they can be measured independently. Hence, the GSP help in finding the polarization and coherence properties of electromagnetic beams. Within this framework, by using the GSP in phase space, the intensity feature of electromagnetic beams in phase space is given, as well.

  2. Surface grid generation in a parameter space

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Samareh-Abolhassani, Jamshid; Stewart, John E.

    1994-07-01

    A robust and efficient technique is discussed for surface-grid generation on a general curvilinear surface. This technique is based on a nonuniform parameter space and allows for the generation of surface grids on highly skewed and nonuniform spaced background surface-grids. This method has been successfully integrated into the GRIDGEN software system.

  3. Surface Grid Generation in a Parameter Space

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Samareh-Abolhassani, Jamshid; Stewart, John E.

    1994-07-01

    A robust and efficient technique is discussed for surface-grid generation on a general curvilinear surface. This technique is based on a non-uniform parameter space and allows for the generation of surface grids on highly skewed and nonuniform spaced background surface-grids. This method has been successfully integrated into the GRIDGEN software system.

  4. Surface grid generation in a parameter space

    SciTech Connect

    Samareh-Abolhassani, J.; Stewart, J.E. )

    1994-07-01

    A robust and efficient technique is discussed for surface-grid generation on a general curvilinear surface. This technique is based on a nonuniform parameter space and allows for the generation of surface grids on highly skewed and nonuniform spaced background surface-grids. This method has been successfully integrated into the GRIDGEN software system. 8 refs., 6 figs.

  5. Surface grid generation in a parameter space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Samareh-Abolhassani, Jamshid; Stewart, John E.

    1994-01-01

    A robust and efficient technique is discussed for surface-grid generation on a general curvilinear surface. This technique is based on a nonuniform parameter space and allows for the generation of surface grids on highly skewed and nonuniform spaced background surface-grids. This method has been successfully integrated into the GRIDGEN software system.

  6. Manifold parameter space and its applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sato, Atsushi

    2004-11-01

    We review the several features of the new parameter space which we presented in the previous paper, and show the differentiable manifold properties of this parameter space coordinate. Using this parameter coordinate we calculate three Feynman amplitudes of the vacuum polarization with a gluon loop, a quark loop and a ghost loop in QCD and show that the results are perfectly equal to those of the usual calculations by the Feynman parametrization technique in the scheme of the dimensional regularization. Then we try to calculate the anomalous magnetic moment of an on-shell quark in QCD by using the dimensional regularization, our new parametrization and integral method.

  7. Visualization of parameter space for image analysis.

    PubMed

    Pretorius, A Johannes; Bray, Mark-Anthony P; Carpenter, Anne E; Ruddle, Roy A

    2011-12-01

    Image analysis algorithms are often highly parameterized and much human input is needed to optimize parameter settings. This incurs a time cost of up to several days. We analyze and characterize the conventional parameter optimization process for image analysis and formulate user requirements. With this as input, we propose a change in paradigm by optimizing parameters based on parameter sampling and interactive visual exploration. To save time and reduce memory load, users are only involved in the first step--initialization of sampling--and the last step--visual analysis of output. This helps users to more thoroughly explore the parameter space and produce higher quality results. We describe a custom sampling plug-in we developed for CellProfiler--a popular biomedical image analysis framework. Our main focus is the development of an interactive visualization technique that enables users to analyze the relationships between sampled input parameters and corresponding output. We implemented this in a prototype called Paramorama. It provides users with a visual overview of parameters and their sampled values. User-defined areas of interest are presented in a structured way that includes image-based output and a novel layout algorithm. To find optimal parameter settings, users can tag high- and low-quality results to refine their search. We include two case studies to illustrate the utility of this approach.

  8. A Tool for Parameter-space Explorations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murase, Yohsuke; Uchitane, Takeshi; Ito, Nobuyasu

    A software for managing simulation jobs and results, named "OACIS", is presented. It controls a large number of simulation jobs executed in various remote servers, keeps these results in an organized way, and manages the analyses on these results. The software has a web browser front end, and users can submit various jobs to appropriate remote hosts from a web browser easily. After these jobs are finished, all the result files are automatically downloaded from the computational hosts and stored in a traceable way together with the logs of the date, host, and elapsed time of the jobs. Some visualization functions are also provided so that users can easily grasp the overview of the results distributed in a high-dimensional parameter space. Thus, OACIS is especially beneficial for the complex simulation models having many parameters for which a lot of parameter searches are required. By using API of OACIS, it is easy to write a code that automates parameter selection depending on the previous simulation results. A few examples of the automated parameter selection are also demonstrated.

  9. Poincaré dodecahedral space parameter estimates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roukema, B. F.; Buliński, Z.; Gaudin, N. E.

    2008-12-01

    Context: Several studies have proposed that the preferred model of the comoving spatial 3-hypersurface of the Universe may be a Poincaré dodecahedral space (PDS) rather than a simply connected, infinite, flat space. Aims: Here, we aim to improve the surface of last scattering (SLS) optimal cross-correlation method and apply this to observational data and simulations. Methods: For a given “generalised” PDS orientation, we analytically derive the formulae required to exclude points on the sky that cannot be members of close SLS-SLS cross-pairs. These enable more efficient pair selection without sacrificing the uniformity of the underlying selection process. For a sufficiently small matched circle size α and a fixed number of randomly placed points selected for a cross-correlation estimate, the calculation time is decreased and the number of pairs per separation bin is increased. Using this faster method, and including the smallest separation bin when testing correlations, (i) we recalculate Monte Carlo Markov Chains (MCMC) on the five-year Wilkinson Microwave Anisotropy Probe (WMAP) data; and (ii) we seek PDS solutions in a small number of Gaussian random fluctuation (GRF) simulations in order to further explore the statistical significance of the PDS hypothesis. Results: For 5° < α < 60^circ, a calculation speed-up of 3-10 is obtained. (i) The best estimates of the PDS parameters for the five-year WMAP data are similar to those for the three-year data; (ii) comparison of the optimal solutions found by the MCMC chains in the observational map to those found in the simulated maps yields a slightly stronger rejection of the simply connected model using α rather than the twist angle φ. The best estimate of α implies that, given a large-scale auto-correlation as weak as that observed, the PDS-like cross-correlation signal in the WMAP data is expected with a probability of less than about 10%. The expected distribution of φ from the GRF simulations is not

  10. Supersymmetric parameter space of family symmetries

    SciTech Connect

    Velasco-Sevilla, L.

    2008-11-23

    In this talk I have emphasized the effects of considering departures from the minimal flavour violation conditions, in the context of CMSSM-like theories, introduced by boundary conditions at GUT scale from Family Symmetries. In [1] we have shown the results of running these conditions down to EW, where constraints from fermion masses and CKM matrix elements have been used. Only when the expansion parameter in the sdown-squark sector is relatively large it is possible to relax the lower limit from b{yields}s{gamma} on the universal gaugino mass. The expansion parameter associated with the slepton sector needs to be smaller than the analogous in the sdown-squark sector in order to satisfy the bound imposed by the decay of {tau}{yields}{mu}{mu}.

  11. The parameter space of windy convection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goluskin, David

    2016-11-01

    In horizontally periodic Rayleigh-Bénard convection at large Rayleigh numbers (Ra), wavenumber-zero horizontal winds can arise spontaneously and dramatically alter the flow. The resulting "windy convection" has been observed in 2D domains and horizontally anisotropic 3D domains. As Ra is raised, the fraction of total kinetic energy contained in the wind approaches 100%. Vertical heat transport is greatly depressed by the wind and grows very slowly (if at all) as Ra is raised. Two different types of windy convection have been observed at different Prandtl numbers (Pr). At smaller Pr, heat is vertically convected almost exclusively during discrete bursts that are separated by long quiescent phases. At larger Pr, convective transport remains significant at all times. Convection can thus be identified as either windy or non-windy, and windy states can be either bursting or non-bursting. The regions of the Ra-Pr parameter plane in which each type of convection can occur remain poorly understood, as do transitions between these regions. This talk will summarize the phenomenon of windy convection in 2D and 3D and present a preliminary exploration of the Ra-Pr plane in the 2D case. Partially supported by NSF award DMS-1515161.

  12. Dynamics in the Parameter Space of a Neuron Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paulo, C. Rech

    2012-06-01

    Some two-dimensional parameter-space diagrams are numerically obtained by considering the largest Lyapunov exponent for a four-dimensional thirteen-parameter Hindmarsh—Rose neuron model. Several different parameter planes are considered, and it is shown that depending on the combination of parameters, a typical scenario can be preserved: for some choice of two parameters, the parameter plane presents a comb-shaped chaotic region embedded in a large periodic region. It is also shown that there exist regions close to these comb-shaped chaotic regions, separated by the comb teeth, organizing themselves in period-adding bifurcation cascades.

  13. Parameter redundancy in discrete state‐space and integrated models

    PubMed Central

    McCrea, Rachel S.

    2016-01-01

    Discrete state‐space models are used in ecology to describe the dynamics of wild animal populations, with parameters, such as the probability of survival, being of ecological interest. For a particular parametrization of a model it is not always clear which parameters can be estimated. This inability to estimate all parameters is known as parameter redundancy or a model is described as nonidentifiable. In this paper we develop methods that can be used to detect parameter redundancy in discrete state‐space models. An exhaustive summary is a combination of parameters that fully specify a model. To use general methods for detecting parameter redundancy a suitable exhaustive summary is required. This paper proposes two methods for the derivation of an exhaustive summary for discrete state‐space models using discrete analogues of methods for continuous state‐space models. We also demonstrate that combining multiple data sets, through the use of an integrated population model, may result in a model in which all parameters are estimable, even though models fitted to the separate data sets may be parameter redundant. PMID:27362826

  14. Mission planning parameters for the Space Shuttle large format camera

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wood, G. A.

    1979-01-01

    The paper discusses the impact of various Space Shuttle mission parameters on the efficient and meaningful utilization of the large format camera (LFC) as a photographic acquisition system. Some of the LFC's vital statistics and its mounting within the Orbiter payload are described. LFC characteristics and mounting dictate certain mission parameters. The controlling parameters are orbit inclinations, launch time of year, launch time of day, orbital altitude, mission duration, overlap selection, film capacity, and climatological prediction. A mission case is evaluated relative to controlling parameters and geographical area(s) of interest.

  15. Determining frequentist confidence limits using a directed parameter space search

    SciTech Connect

    Daniel, Scott F.; Connolly, Andrew J.; Schneider, Jeff

    2014-10-10

    We consider the problem of inferring constraints on a high-dimensional parameter space with a computationally expensive likelihood function. We propose a machine learning algorithm that maps out the Frequentist confidence limit on parameter space by intelligently targeting likelihood evaluations so as to quickly and accurately characterize the likelihood surface in both low- and high-likelihood regions. We compare our algorithm to Bayesian credible limits derived by the well-tested Markov Chain Monte Carlo (MCMC) algorithm using both multi-modal toy likelihood functions and the seven yr Wilkinson Microwave Anisotropy Probe cosmic microwave background likelihood function. We find that our algorithm correctly identifies the location, general size, and general shape of high-likelihood regions in parameter space while being more robust against multi-modality than MCMC.

  16. Estimability of geodetic parameters from space VLBI observables

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Adam, Jozsef

    1990-01-01

    The feasibility of space very long base interferometry (VLBI) observables for geodesy and geodynamics is investigated. A brief review of space VLBI systems from the point of view of potential geodetic application is given. A selected notational convention is used to jointly treat the VLBI observables of different types of baselines within a combined ground/space VLBI network. The basic equations of the space VLBI observables appropriate for convariance analysis are derived and included. The corresponding equations for the ground-to-ground baseline VLBI observables are also given for a comparison. The simplified expression of the mathematical models for both space VLBI observables (time delay and delay rate) include the ground station coordinates, the satellite orbital elements, the earth rotation parameters, the radio source coordinates, and clock parameters. The observation equations with these parameters were examined in order to determine which of them are separable or nonseparable. Singularity problems arising from coordinate system definition and critical configuration are studied. Linear dependencies between partials are analytically derived. The mathematical models for ground-space baseline VLBI observables were tested with simulation data in the frame of some numerical experiments. Singularity due to datum defect is confirmed.

  17. Extreme Meteorological Parameters During Space Shuttle Pad Exposure Periods

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roberts, Barry C.; Overbey, B. Glenn

    2004-01-01

    During the 113 missions of the Space Transportation System (STS), the Space Shuttle fleet has been exposed to the elements on the launch pad for a total of 4195 days. This paper provides a summary of the historical record of the meteorological extremes encountered by the Space Shuttle fleet during the pad exposure period. Parameters included are temperature, dew point, relative humidity, wind speed, sea level pressure and precipitation. All the data presented are archived by the Marshall Space Flight Center Environments Group, and were obtained from a combination of surface observations and meteorological towers at Kennedy Space Center (KSC), Florida. Data are provided from the first launch of the STS in 1981 through the launch of STS-107 in 2003.

  18. Recovering a Probabilistic Knowledge Structure by Constraining Its Parameter Space

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stefanutti, Luca; Robusto, Egidio

    2009-01-01

    In the Basic Local Independence Model (BLIM) of Doignon and Falmagne ("Knowledge Spaces," Springer, Berlin, 1999), the probabilistic relationship between the latent knowledge states and the observable response patterns is established by the introduction of a pair of parameters for each of the problems: a lucky guess probability and a careless…

  19. Valence space techniques and QRPA vibrational mass parameters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deloncle, I.; Lechaftois, F.; Péru, S.

    2016-06-01

    The vibrational mass parameters entering the quadrupolar 5DCH Hamiltonian are commonly obtained neglecting beyond mean-field correlations and the dynamical mean-field rearrangement. The Quasiparticle Random Phase Approximation (QRPA) framework would allow to avoid these disadvantages [1], if the computation time, when using density dependent force, was not prohibitive. Here, a significant time reduction is obtained by applying valence space (VS) techniques (energy cut-off and inert core) in QRPA calculations. The VS techniques allow to probe the physical content of the mass parameter. The QRPA mass parameter exhibit robustness toward VS limitations contrarily to the intrinsic QRPA outputs, that show deceptive appearance when an inert core is used. Excited states energy, and associated transition probabilities, should not be considered for optimizing the valence space limits.

  20. Mutagenesis by outer space parameters other than cosmic rays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Horneck, Gerda; Rabbow, Elke

    We have studied the ability of microorganisms to cope with the complex interplay of the parameters of space in experiments in low Earth orbit and using space simulation facilities on ground. Emphasis was laid on space parameters other than cosmic rays. The studies are directed towards understanding prebiotic chemical evolution and biological evolution processes, and interplanetary transfer of life. Effects of space vacuum: Space experiments have shown that up to 70% of bacterial and fungal spores survived short-term exposure to space vacuum. The chances of survival in space were increased when spores were embedded in chemical protectants such as sugars, or salt crystals, or when they were exposed in multilayer. During the six years lasting LDEF mission up to 80% of bacterial spores survived exposure to space vacuum. A 10-fold increased mutation rate over the spontaneous rate has been observed in spores of Bacillus subtilis after exposure to space vacuum, which is probably based on a unique molecular signature of tandem-double base change at restricted sites in the DNA. In addition, DNA strand breaks have been observed to be induced by vacuum treatment. Effects of extraterrestrial solar UV radiation: Solar UV radiation has been found to be the most deleterious factor of space. The reason for this is the highly energetic UV-C and vacuum UV radiation that is directly absorbed by the DNA and which induces specific photoproducts in the DNA that are highly mutagenic and lethal. The damaging effect of extraterrestrial solar UV radiation was even aggravated, when the spores were simultaneously exposed to both, solar UV radiation and space vacuum. In order to investigate the mutagenic potential of solar UV radiation, DNA of the Escherichia coli plasmid pUC19 was exposed to selected wavebands of UV radiation (from vacuum UV to UV-A) by use of a solar simulator and space simulation facilities. Action spectra revealed that for vacuum UV different kinds of photochemical damage

  1. Exploring the MSSM Neutralino Parameter Space using DarkSUSY

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maleki Sanukesh, Mehdi

    2017-01-01

    Historically, one of the most promising dark matter candidates has been the Neutralino from the Minimal Supersymmetric Standard Model (MSSM). Although Supersymmetry has not been experimentally confirmed, it has been tightly constrained by both accelerator limits and astrophysical bounds. DarkSUSY is a computer code that is based on the MSSM, and which allows for the calculation of Neutralino densities, cross sections, and expected detection rates in both direct and indirect detection experiments. In this work we use DarkSUSY, together with the latest accelerator constraints and astrophysical bounds, to explore parameter space. Beginning with 700,000+ randomly generated models we explore if the MSSM has been experimentally ruled out. Surviving models and interesting regions of surviving parameter space will be presented and discussed.

  2. A new parameter space study of cosmological microlensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vernardos, G.; Fluke, C. J.

    2013-09-01

    Cosmological gravitational microlensing is a useful technique for understanding the structure of the inner parts of a quasar, especially the accretion disc and the central supermassive black hole. So far, most of the cosmological microlensing studies have focused on single objects from ˜90 currently known lensed quasars. However, present and planned all-sky surveys are expected to discover thousands of new lensed systems. Using a graphics processing unit (GPU) accelerated ray-shooting code, we have generated 2550 magnification maps uniformly across the convergence (κ) and shear (γ) parameter space of interest to microlensing. We examine the effect of random realizations of the microlens positions on map properties such as the magnification probability distribution (MPD). It is shown that for most of the parameter space a single map is representative of an average behaviour. All of the simulations have been carried out on the GPU Supercomputer for Theoretical Astrophysics Research.

  3. Competing adiabatic Thouless pumps in enlarged parameter spaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lopes, Pedro L. e. S.; Ghaemi, Pouyan; Ryu, Shinsei; Hughes, Taylor L.

    2016-12-01

    The transfer of conserved charges through insulating matter via smooth deformations of the Hamiltonian is known as quantum adiabatic, or Thouless, pumping. Central to this phenomenon are Hamiltonians whose insulating gap is controlled by a multidimensional (usually two-dimensional) parameter space in which paths can be defined for adiabatic changes in the Hamiltonian, i.e., without closing the gap. Here, we extend the concept of Thouless pumps of band insulators by considering a larger, three-dimensional parameter space. We show that the connectivity of this parameter space is crucial for defining quantum pumps, demonstrating that, as opposed to the conventional two-dimensional case, pumped quantities depend not only on the initial and final points of Hamiltonian evolution but also on the class of the chosen path and preserved symmetries. As such, we distinguish the scenarios of closed/open paths of Hamiltonian evolution, finding that different closed cycles can lead to the pumping of different quantum numbers, and that different open paths may point to distinct scenarios for surface physics. As explicit examples, we consider models similar to simple models used to describe topological insulators, but with doubled degrees of freedom compared to a minimal topological insulator model. The extra fermionic flavors from doubling allow for extra gapping terms/adiabatic parameters—besides the usual topological mass which preserves the topology-protecting discrete symmetries—generating an enlarged adiabatic parameter space. We consider cases in one and three spatial dimensions, and our results in three dimensions may be realized in the context of crystalline topological insulators, as we briefly discuss.

  4. Video painting with space-time-varying style parameters.

    PubMed

    Kagaya, Mizuki; Brendel, William; Deng, Qingqing; Kesterson, Todd; Todorovic, Sinisa; Neill, Patrick J; Zhang, Eugene

    2011-01-01

    Artists use different means of stylization to control the focus on different objects in the scene. This allows them to portray complex meaning and achieve certain artistic effects. Most prior work on painterly rendering of videos, however, uses only a single painting style, with fixed global parameters, irrespective of objects and their layout in the images. This often leads to inadequate artistic control. Moreover, brush stroke orientation is typically assumed to follow an everywhere continuous directional field. In this paper, we propose a video painting system that accounts for the spatial support of objects in the images or videos, and uses this information to specify style parameters and stroke orientation for painterly rendering. Since objects occupy distinct image locations and move relatively smoothly from one video frame to another, our object-based painterly rendering approach is characterized by style parameters that coherently vary in space and time. Space-time-varying style parameters enable more artistic freedom, such as emphasis/de-emphasis, increase or decrease of contrast, exaggeration or abstraction of different objects in the scene in a temporally coherent fashion.

  5. Parameter space visualizer: an interactive parameter selection interface for iterative CT reconstruction algorithms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Wei; Mueller, Klaus

    2010-02-01

    Previous work indicated that using ordered subsets (OS-SIRT) for iterative CT can optimize the reconstruction performance once optimal settings for parameters such as number of subsets and relaxation factor have been identified. However, recent work also indicated that the optimal settings have dependent relations with regards to the quality of the projection data (such as SNR-level), which are hard to obtain a-priori. In addition, users may also have preferences in trading off between the dependent parameters, such as reconstruction speed and quality, which makes these (independent) parameters even more difficult to determine in an automated manner. Therefore, we devise an effective parameter space navigation interface allowing users to interactively assist parameter selection for iterative CT reconstruction algorithms (here for OS-SIRT). It is based on a 2D scatter plot with six display modes to show different features of the reconstruction results based on the user preferences. It also enables a dynamic visualization by gradual parameter alteration for illustrating the rate of impact of a given parameter constellation. Finally, we note the generality of our approach, which could be applied to assist any parameter selection related systems.

  6. Parameter space of experimental chaotic circuits with high-precision control parameters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Sousa, Francisco F. G.; Rubinger, Rero M.; Sartorelli, José C.; Albuquerque, Holokx A.; Baptista, Murilo S.

    2016-08-01

    We report high-resolution measurements that experimentally confirm a spiral cascade structure and a scaling relationship of shrimps in the Chua's circuit. Circuits constructed using this component allow for a comprehensive characterization of the circuit behaviors through high resolution parameter spaces. To illustrate the power of our technological development for the creation and the study of chaotic circuits, we constructed a Chua circuit and study its high resolution parameter space. The reliability and stability of the designed component allowed us to obtain data for long periods of time (˜21 weeks), a data set from which an accurate estimation of Lyapunov exponents for the circuit characterization was possible. Moreover, this data, rigorously characterized by the Lyapunov exponents, allows us to reassure experimentally that the shrimps, stable islands embedded in a domain of chaos in the parameter spaces, can be observed in the laboratory. Finally, we confirm that their sizes decay exponentially with the period of the attractor, a result expected to be found in maps of the quadratic family.

  7. Entropy considerations in constraining the mSUGRA parameter space

    SciTech Connect

    Nunez, Dario; Sussman, Roberto A.; Zavala, Jesus; Nellen, Lukas; Cabral-Rosetti, Luis G.; Mondragon, Myriam

    2006-09-25

    We explore the use of two criteria to constraint the allowed parameter space in mSUGRA models. Both criteria are based in the calculation of the present density of neutralinos as dark matter in the Universe. The first one is the usual ''abundance'' criterion which is used to calculate the relic density after the ''freeze-out'' era. To compute the relic density we used the numerical public code micrOMEGAs. The second criterion applies the microcanonical definition of entropy to a weakly interacting and self-gravitating gas evaluating then the change in the entropy per particle of this gas between the ''freeze-out'' era and present day virialized structures (i.e systems in virial equilibrium). An ''entropy-consistency'' criterion emerges by comparing theoretical and empirical estimates of this entropy. The main objective of our work is to determine for which regions of the parameter space in the mSUGRA model are both criteria consistent with the 2{sigma} bounds according to WMAP for the relic density: 0.0945 < {omega}CDMh2 < 0.1287. As a first result, we found that for A0 = 0, sgn{mu} +, small values of tan{beta} are not favored; only for tan{beta} {approx_equal} 50 are both criteria significantly consistent.

  8. Emergence and spread of antibiotic resistance: setting a parameter space

    PubMed Central

    Baquero, Fernando

    2014-01-01

    The emergence and spread of antibiotic resistance among human pathogens is a relevant problem for human health and one of the few evolution processes amenable to experimental studies. In the present review, we discuss some basic aspects of antibiotic resistance, including mechanisms of resistance, origin of resistance genes, and bottlenecks that modulate the acquisition and spread of antibiotic resistance among human pathogens. In addition, we analyse several parameters that modulate the evolution landscape of antibiotic resistance. Learning why some resistance mechanisms emerge but do not evolve after a first burst, whereas others can spread over the entire world very rapidly, mimicking a chain reaction, is important for predicting the evolution, and relevance for human health, of a given mechanism of resistance. Because of this, we propose that the emergence and spread of antibiotic resistance can only be understood in a multi-parameter space. Measuring the effect on antibiotic resistance of parameters such as contact rates, transfer rates, integration rates, replication rates, diversification rates, and selection rates, for different genes and organisms, growing under different conditions in distinct ecosystems, will allow for a better prediction of antibiotic resistance and possibilities of focused interventions. PMID:24678768

  9. Exploring Parameter Space Coverage of Various LISA Configurations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Katz, Michael L.

    2017-01-01

    With the success of LISA Pathfinder, the measurement of gravitational waves in space has taken an important step forward. We conduct an analysis of the measurement abilities of distinctive LISA detector designs, examining how the low-frequency band-edge behavior of the detector sensitivity curve affects measurement capabilities. We are particularly interested in LISA’s ability to measure massive black holes that are merging near the band-edge, with masses in the range of $\\sim 10^6-10^{10}M_\\odot$. We examine the ringdown and insprial detectability over a wide range of Massive Black Hole (MBH) binaries along with a broad palette of possible LISA design parameters.

  10. Dynamical quantum Hall effect in the parameter space.

    PubMed

    Gritsev, V; Polkovnikov, A

    2012-04-24

    Geometric phases in quantum mechanics play an extraordinary role in broadening our understanding of fundamental significance of geometry in nature. One of the best known examples is the Berry phase [M.V. Berry (1984), Proc. Royal. Soc. London A, 392:45], which naturally emerges in quantum adiabatic evolution. So far the applicability and measurements of the Berry phase were mostly limited to systems of weakly interacting quasi-particles, where interference experiments are feasible. Here we show how one can go beyond this limitation and observe the Berry curvature, and hence the Berry phase, in generic systems as a nonadiabatic response of physical observables to the rate of change of an external parameter. These results can be interpreted as a dynamical quantum Hall effect in a parameter space. The conventional quantum Hall effect is a particular example of the general relation if one views the electric field as a rate of change of the vector potential. We illustrate our findings by analyzing the response of interacting spin chains to a rotating magnetic field. We observe the quantization of this response, which we term the rotational quantum Hall effect.

  11. Parallel axes gear set optimization in two-parameter space

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Theberge, Y.; Cardou, A.; Cloutier, L.

    1991-05-01

    This paper presents a method for optimal spur and helical gear transmission design that may be used in a computer aided design (CAD) approach. The design objective is generally taken as obtaining the most compact set for a given power input and gear ratio. A mixed design procedure is employed which relies both on heuristic considerations and computer capabilities. Strength and kinematic constraints are considered in order to define the domain of feasible designs. Constraints allowed include: pinion tooth bending strength, gear tooth bending strength, surface stress (resistance to pitting), scoring resistance, pinion involute interference, gear involute interference, minimum pinion tooth thickness, minimum gear tooth thickness, and profile or transverse contact ratio. A computer program was developed which allows the user to input the problem parameters, to select the calculation procedure, to see constraint curves in graphic display, to have an objective function level curve drawn through the design space, to point at a feasible design point and to have constraint values calculated at that point. The user can also modify some of the parameters during the design process.

  12. Effect of solar wind plasma parameters on space weather

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rathore, Balveer S.; Gupta, Dinesh C.; Kaushik, Subhash C.

    2015-01-01

    Today's challenge for space weather research is to quantitatively predict the dynamics of the magnetosphere from measured solar wind and interplanetary magnetic field (IMF) conditions. Correlative studies between geomagnetic storms (GMSs) and the various interplanetary (IP) field/plasma parameters have been performed to search for the causes of geomagnetic activity and develop models for predicting the occurrence of GMSs, which are important for space weather predictions. We find a possible relation between GMSs and solar wind and IMF parameters in three different situations and also derived the linear relation for all parameters in three situations. On the basis of the present statistical study, we develop an empirical model. With the help of this model, we can predict all categories of GMSs. This model is based on the following fact: the total IMF Btotal can be used to trigger an alarm for GMSs, when sudden changes in total magnetic field Btotal occur. This is the first alarm condition for a storm's arrival. It is observed in the present study that the southward Bz component of the IMF is an important factor for describing GMSs. A result of the paper is that the magnitude of Bz is maximum neither during the initial phase (at the instant of the IP shock) nor during the main phase (at the instant of Disturbance storm time (Dst) minimum). It is seen in this study that there is a time delay between the maximum value of southward Bz and the Dst minimum, and this time delay can be used in the prediction of the intensity of a magnetic storm two-three hours before the main phase of a GMS. A linear relation has been derived between the maximum value of the southward component of Bz and the Dst, which is Dst = (-0.06) + (7.65) Bz +t. Some auxiliary conditions should be fulfilled with this, for example the speed of the solar wind should, on average, be 350 km s-1 to 750 km s-1, plasma β should be low and, most importantly, plasma temperature should be low for intense

  13. Space-to-Space Based Relative Motion Estimation Using Direct Relative Orbit Parameters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bennett, T.; Schaub, H.

    There has been an increasing interest in space-based space situational awareness around satellite assets and the tracking of orbital debris. Of particular interest is the space-based tracking of objects near critical circular orbit regimes, for example near the Geostationary belt or the International Space Station. Relative orbit descriptions such as the Clohessy-Wiltshire equations describe the motion using time-varying Cartesian or curvilinear coordinates. Orbit element differences describe the unperturbed motion using constant variations of inertial orbit elements. With perturbations these only vary slowly, but can be challenging to estimate. Linearized Relative Orbit Elements (LROEs) employ invariants of the linearized relative motion, are thus constant for the unperturbed linear case, and share the benefit of the CW equations in that they directly related to space-based relative motion measurements. The variational LROE equations enable the relative orbit to be directly propagated including perturbation forces. Utilization of the invariant-inspired relative motion parameters exhibits exciting applications in relative motion sensing and control. Many methods of relative motion estimation involve the direct estimation of time-evolving position and velocity variables. Developed is an angles-only relative orbit Extended Kalman filter (EKF) navigation approach that directly estimates these nominally constant LROEs. The proposed variational equations and filtering scheme enables direct estimation of geometric parameters with clear geometric insight. Preliminary numerical simulation results demonstrate the relative orbit insight gained and speed of convergence. EKF implementations often exhibit significant sensitivity to initial conditions, however, initial results show that the LROE filter converges within fractions of an orbit with initialization errors that exceed 100 percent. The manuscript presents the invariants of motion, develops the variational equations for

  14. Two space scatterer formalism calculation of bulk parameters of thunderclouds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Phanord, Dieudonne D.

    1994-01-01

    In a previous study, we used a modified two-space scatterer formalism of Twersky to establish for a cloud modeled as a statistically homogeneous distribution of spherical water droplets, the dispersion relations that determine its bulk propagation numbers and bulk indexes of refraction in terms of the vector equivalent scattering amplitude and the dyadic scattering amplitude of the single water droplet in isolation. The results were specialized to the forward direction of scattering while demanding that the scatterers preserve the incident polarization. We apply this approach to obtain specific numerical values for the macroscopic parameters of the cloud. We work with a cloud of density rho = 100 cm(exp -3), a wavelength lambda = 0.7774 microns, and with spherical water droplets of common radius alpha = 10 microns. In addition, the scattering medium is divided into three parts, the medium outside the cloud, moist air (the medium inside the cloud but outside the droplets), and the medium inside the spherical water droplets. The results of this report are applicable to a cloud of any geometry since the boundary does not interfere with the calculations. Also, it is important to notice the plane wave nature of the incidence wave in the moist atmosphere.

  15. Derivation of Delaware Bay tidal parameters from space shuttle photography

    SciTech Connect

    Zheng, Quanan; Yan, Xiaohai; Klemas, V. )

    1993-06-01

    The tide-related parameters of the Delaware Bay are derived from space shuttle time-series photographs. The water areas in the bay are measured from interpretation maps of the photographs with a CALCOMP 9100 digitizer and ERDAS Image Processing System. The corresponding tidal levels are calculated using the exposure time annotated on the photographs. From these data, an approximate function relating the water area to the tidal level at a reference point is determined. Based on the function, the water areas of the Delaware Bay at mean high water (MHW) and mean low water (MLW), below 0 m, and for the tidal zone are inferred. With MHW and MLW areas and the mean tidal range, the authors calculate the tidal influx of the Delaware Bay, which is 2.76 x 1O[sup 9] m[sup 3]. Furthermore, the velocity of flood tide at the bay mouth is determined using the tidal flux and an integral of the velocity distribution function at the cross section between Cape Henlopen and Cape May. The result is 132 cm/s, which compares well with the data on tidal current charts.

  16. Temperature characteristics of silicon space solar cells and underlying parameters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anspaugh, B. E.; Kachare, Ram; Garlick, G. F. J.

    1987-01-01

    Silicon space cells, 2 cm x 2 cm, with 10 ohm-cm p-base resistivity, 8-mil base thickness, and no back-surface fields have been investigated over the temperature range from 301 to 223 K by measurements of dark forward and reverse current-voltage characteristics and current-voltage relations under illumination. From dark forward bias data, the first and second diode saturation currents, I01 and I02, are determined and hence the base diffusion length and lifetime of minority carriers as functions of temperature. Lifetime increases exponentially with temperature and is explained by a Shockley-Read-Hall model with deep recombination levels 0.245 eV above the valence band. The I02 variation with temperature follows the Sah-Noyce-Shockley-Choo model except at low temperature where extra transitions raise the value above the predicted level. Reverse bias current at low voltage is a thermally assisted tunneling process via deep levels which are observed in base recombination at higher temperatures. The tunneling effects tend to become independent of temperature in the low-temperature region. These results demonstrate the ability to deduce basic parameters such as lifetime from simple measurements and show that back-surface fields offer no advantage at temperatures below 230 K. The analysis also explains the fall in lifetimes observed as the base conductivity increases, attributing it to native defects (perhaps carbon-oxygen-vacancy complexes) rather than the concentration of base dopant.

  17. Space motion sickness medications - Interference with biomedical parameters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vernikos-Danellis, J.; Winget, C. M.; Leach, C. S.; Rosenblatt, L. S.; Lyman, J.; Beljan, J. R.

    1976-01-01

    The possibility that drugs administered to Skylab 3 and 4 crewmen for space motion sickness may have interfered with their biomedical evaluation in space is investigated. The mixture of scopolamine and dextroamphetamine produced changes which allow a more valid interpretation of the early biomedical changes ocurring in weightlessness. There is no doubt that the dramatic increase in aldosterone excretion is not attributable to the drug, while the drug could have contributed to the in-flight changes observed in cortisol, epinephrine, heart rate and possibly urine volume.

  18. A note on deep space optical communication link parameters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dolinar, S. J.; Yuen, J. H.

    1982-01-01

    Topical communication in the context of a deep space communication link. Communication link analysis at the optical frequencies differs significantly from that at microwave frequencies such as the traditional S and X-bands used in deep space applications, due to the different technology of transmitter, antenna, modulators, and receivers. In addition, the important role of quantum noise in limiting system performance is quite different than that of thermal noise. The optical link design is put in a design control table format similar to a microwave telecom link design. Key considerations unique to the optical link are discussed.

  19. GRID-BASED EXPLORATION OF COSMOLOGICAL PARAMETER SPACE WITH SNAKE

    SciTech Connect

    Mikkelsen, K.; Næss, S. K.; Eriksen, H. K.

    2013-11-10

    We present a fully parallelized grid-based parameter estimation algorithm for investigating multidimensional likelihoods called Snake, and apply it to cosmological parameter estimation. The basic idea is to map out the likelihood grid-cell by grid-cell according to decreasing likelihood, and stop when a certain threshold has been reached. This approach improves vastly on the 'curse of dimensionality' problem plaguing standard grid-based parameter estimation simply by disregarding grid cells with negligible likelihood. The main advantages of this method compared to standard Metropolis-Hastings Markov Chain Monte Carlo methods include (1) trivial extraction of arbitrary conditional distributions; (2) direct access to Bayesian evidences; (3) better sampling of the tails of the distribution; and (4) nearly perfect parallelization scaling. The main disadvantage is, as in the case of brute-force grid-based evaluation, a dependency on the number of parameters, N{sub par}. One of the main goals of the present paper is to determine how large N{sub par} can be, while still maintaining reasonable computational efficiency; we find that N{sub par} = 12 is well within the capabilities of the method. The performance of the code is tested by comparing cosmological parameters estimated using Snake and the WMAP-7 data with those obtained using CosmoMC, the current standard code in the field. We find fully consistent results, with similar computational expenses, but shorter wall time due to the perfect parallelization scheme.

  20. Exploring Neutrino Oscillation Parameter Space with a Monte Carlo Algorithm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Espejel, Hugo; Ernst, David; Cogswell, Bernadette; Latimer, David

    2015-04-01

    The χ2 (or likelihood) function for a global analysis of neutrino oscillation data is first calculated as a function of the neutrino mixing parameters. A computational challenge is to obtain the minima or the allowed regions for the mixing parameters. The conventional approach is to calculate the χ2 (or likelihood) function on a grid for a large number of points, and then marginalize over the likelihood function. As the number of parameters increases with the number of neutrinos, making the calculation numerically efficient becomes necessary. We implement a new Monte Carlo algorithm (D. Foreman-Mackey, D. W. Hogg, D. Lang and J. Goodman, Publications of the Astronomical Society of the Pacific, 125 306 (2013)) to determine its computational efficiency at finding the minima and allowed regions. We examine a realistic example to compare the historical and the new methods.

  1. Geometry on the parameter space of the belief propagation algorithm on Bayesian networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Watanabe, Yodai

    2006-01-01

    This Letter considers a geometrical structure on the parameter space of the belief propagation algorithm on Bayesian networks. The statistical manifold of posterior distributions is introduced, and the expression for the information metric on the manifold is derived. The expression is used to construct a cost function which can be regarded as a measure of the distance in the parameter space.

  2. A six-parameter space to describe galaxy diversification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fraix-Burnet, D.; Chattopadhyay, T.; Chattopadhyay, A. K.; Davoust, E.; Thuillard, M.

    2012-09-01

    Context. The diversification of galaxies is caused by transforming events such as accretion, interaction, or mergers. These explain the formation and evolution of galaxies, which can now be described by many observables. Multivariate analyses are the obvious tools to tackle the available datasets and understand the differences between different kinds of objects. However, depending on the method used, redundancies, incompatibilities, or subjective choices of the parameters can diminish the usefulness of these analyses. The behaviour of the available parameters should be analysed before any objective reduction in the dimensionality and any subsequent clustering analyses can be undertaken, especially in an evolutionary context. Aims: We study a sample of 424 early-type galaxies described by 25 parameters, 10 of which are Lick indices, to identify the most discriminant parameters and construct an evolutionary classification of these objects. Methods: Four independent statistical methods are used to investigate the discriminant properties of the observables and the partitioning of the 424 galaxies: principal component analysis, K-means cluster analysis, minimum contradiction analysis, and Cladistics. Results: The methods agree in terms of six parameters: central velocity dispersion, disc-to-bulge ratio, effective surface brightness, metallicity, and the line indices NaD and OIII. The partitioning found using these six parameters, when projected onto the fundamental plane, looks very similar to the partitioning obtained previously for a totally different sample and based only on the parameters of the fundamental plane. Two additional groups are identified here, and we are able to provide some more constraints on the assembly history of galaxies within each group thanks to the larger number of parameters. We also identify another "fundamental plane" with the absolute K magnitude, the linear diameter, and the Lick index Hβ. We confirm that the Mg b vs. velocity dispersion

  3. Possibility of using space radar GRAVES signals for uninterrupted monitoring of orbital parameters of space objects in low orbits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bushuev, F. I.; Vorsin, G. V.; Grinchenko, A. A.; Kalyuzhny, N. A.; Shulga, A. V.

    2013-12-01

    The paper shows the possibility to monitor the orbital parameters of space objects using an experimental radio hardware and software complex that receives signals of the space radar GRAVES (France) which are reflected by the monitored objects. The results of comparing the calculated and the measured values of Doppler frequency shift are shown for selected objects and the Moon.

  4. Space shuttle propulsion parameter estimation using optional estimation techniques

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1983-01-01

    A regression analyses on tabular aerodynamic data provided. A representative aerodynamic model for coefficient estimation. It also reduced the storage requirements for the "normal' model used to check out the estimation algorithms. The results of the regression analyses are presented. The computer routines for the filter portion of the estimation algorithm and the :"bringing-up' of the SRB predictive program on the computer was developed. For the filter program, approximately 54 routines were developed. The routines were highly subsegmented to facilitate overlaying program segments within the partitioned storage space on the computer.

  5. Space motion sickness medications: interference with biomedical parameters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vernikos-Danellis, J.; Winget, C. M.; Leach, C. S.; Rosenblatt, L. S.; Lyman, J.; Beljan, J. R.

    1977-01-01

    The possibility that drugs administered to Skylab 3 (SL-3) and 4 (SL-4) crewmen for space motion sickness may have interfered with their biomedical evaluation in space was investigated. Healthy volunteers received combinations of Scopolamine/Dexedrine for four days in regimens similar to those used in these missions. Urine samples, heart rate, body temperature, mood and performance were analyzed for drug-related changes. Twenty-four hour urine samples were analyzed by the same procedures as those used to analyze the flight samples. Hormone concentrations determined included cortisol, epinephrine, norepinephrine, aldosterone and antidiuretic hormone (ADH). In addition, volume, specific gravity, osmolarity, sodium (Na), potassium (K), calcium (Ca), magnesium (Mg), chloride (Cl), inorganic phosphate, uric acid and creatinine were measured. Performance was not affected by the Scopolamine/Dexedrine. The drug combination increased daily mean heart rate (HR) significantly in all the subjects and daily mean rectal temperature (RT) in some of the subjects. A 2-4 hr phase shift in the HR circadian rhythm was also observed which indicates that internal circadian synchrony was disturbed by the drugs. Psychological and subjective evaluation indicated that the subjects could usually identify which days they were given the drugs by an increase in tension and anxiety, decreased patience, restlessness, decreased appetite, difficulty in sleeping and feelings of increased heart rate and body temperature. Urinary electrolytes were not changed significantly by the drug, but marked and significant changes occurred in urine volume and hormone excretion patterns. Scopolamine/Dexedrine caused consistent elevations in urinary cortisol and epinephrine and a transient elevation in ADH. Norepinephrine excretion was decreased, but there was no significant change in aldosterone excretion or in 24 hr urine volume. A comparison of these findings with the first four days of inflight data from the

  6. Quantum-classical transition and quantum activation of ratchet currents in the parameter space.

    PubMed

    Beims, M W; Schlesinger, M; Manchein, C; Celestino, A; Pernice, A; Strunz, W T

    2015-05-01

    The quantum ratchet current is studied in the parameter space of the dissipative kicked rotor model coupled to a zero-temperature quantum environment. We show that vacuum fluctuations blur the generic isoperiodic stable structures found in the classical case. Such structures tend to survive when a measure of statistical dependence between the quantum and classical currents are displayed in the parameter space. In addition, we show that quantum fluctuations can be used to overcome transport barriers in the phase space. Related quantum ratchet current activation regions are spotted in the parameter space. Results are discussed based on quantum, semiclassical, and classical calculations. While the semiclassical dynamics involves vacuum fluctuations, the classical map is driven by thermal noise.

  7. Space Shuttle Pad Exposure Period Meteorological Parameters STS-1 Through STS-107

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Overbey, B. G.; Roberts, B. C.

    2005-01-01

    During the 113 missions of the Space Transportation System (STS) to date, the Space Shuttle fleet has been exposed to the elements on the launch pad for approx. 4,195 days. The Natural Environments Branch at Marshall Space Flight Center archives atmospheric environments to which the Space Shuttle vehicles are exposed. This Technical Memorandum (TM) provides a summary of the historical record of the meteorological conditions encountered by the Space Shuttle fleet during the pad exposure period. Parameters included in this TM are temperature, relative humidity, wind speed, wind direction, sea level pressure, and precipitation. Extremes for each of these parameters for each mission are also summarized. Sources for the data include meteorological towers and hourly surface observations. Data are provided from the first launch of the STS in 1981 through the launch of STS-107 in 2003.

  8. Efficient characterization of high-dimensional parameter spaces for systems biology

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background A biological system's robustness to mutations and its evolution are influenced by the structure of its viable space, the region of its space of biochemical parameters where it can exert its function. In systems with a large number of biochemical parameters, viable regions with potentially complex geometries fill a tiny fraction of the whole parameter space. This hampers explorations of the viable space based on "brute force" or Gaussian sampling. Results We here propose a novel algorithm to characterize viable spaces efficiently. The algorithm combines global and local explorations of a parameter space. The global exploration involves an out-of-equilibrium adaptive Metropolis Monte Carlo method aimed at identifying poorly connected viable regions. The local exploration then samples these regions in detail by a method we call multiple ellipsoid-based sampling. Our algorithm explores efficiently nonconvex and poorly connected viable regions of different test-problems. Most importantly, its computational effort scales linearly with the number of dimensions, in contrast to "brute force" sampling that shows an exponential dependence on the number of dimensions. We also apply this algorithm to a simplified model of a biochemical oscillator with positive and negative feedback loops. A detailed characterization of the model's viable space captures well known structural properties of circadian oscillators. Concretely, we find that model topologies with an essential negative feedback loop and a nonessential positive feedback loop provide the most robust fixed period oscillations. Moreover, the connectedness of the model's viable space suggests that biochemical oscillators with varying topologies can evolve from one another. Conclusions Our algorithm permits an efficient analysis of high-dimensional, nonconvex, and poorly connected viable spaces characteristic of complex biological circuitry. It allows a systematic use of robustness as a tool for model

  9. Exploration of DGVM Parameter Solution Space Using Simulated Annealing: Implications for Forecast Uncertainties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wells, J. R.; Kim, J. B.

    2011-12-01

    Parameters in dynamic global vegetation models (DGVMs) are thought to be weakly constrained and can be a significant source of errors and uncertainties. DGVMs use between 5 and 26 plant functional types (PFTs) to represent the average plant life form in each simulated plot, and each PFT typically has a dozen or more parameters that define the way it uses resource and responds to the simulated growing environment. Sensitivity analysis explores how varying parameters affects the output, but does not do a full exploration of the parameter solution space. The solution space for DGVM parameter values are thought to be complex and non-linear; and multiple sets of acceptable parameters may exist. In published studies, PFT parameters are estimated from published literature, and often a parameter value is estimated from a single published value. Further, the parameters are "tuned" using somewhat arbitrary, "trial-and-error" methods. BIOMAP is a new DGVM created by fusing MAPSS biogeography model with Biome-BGC. It represents the vegetation of North America using 26 PFTs. We are using simulated annealing, a global search method, to systematically and objectively explore the solution space for the BIOMAP PFTs and system parameters important for plant water use. We defined the boundaries of the solution space by obtaining maximum and minimum values from published literature, and where those were not available, using +/-20% of current values. We used stratified random sampling to select a set of grid cells representing the vegetation of the conterminous USA. Simulated annealing algorithm is applied to the parameters for spin-up and a transient run during the historical period 1961-1990. A set of parameter values is considered acceptable if the associated simulation run produces a modern potential vegetation distribution map that is as accurate as one produced by trial-and-error calibration. We expect to confirm that the solution space is non-linear and complex, and that

  10. The Application of Parameter Space Design Method for Generator Excitation Control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iki, Hiroyuki; Yoshimura, Shyuta; Uriu, Yosihisa

    Recently, control engineering changes from classical control theory to modern control theory, and analogue to digital. However, as a matter of fact, the sensitivity adjustment of the parameters using Bode diagram require many time and works. In this paper, the tool of Matlab/Simulink that adjusted the AVR control parameter of the PI control type brushless and Thyristor excitation method by using the technique for based on the parameter space planning method by QE was made. Moreover, the adjustment of the sensitivity parameter of the excitation control method intended for the dynamic stability level area in Single Machine Infinite Bus is examined with the tool.

  11. Space-weather Parameters for 1,000 Active Regions Observed by SDO/HMI

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bobra, M.; Liu, Y.; Hoeksema, J. T.; Sun, X.

    2013-12-01

    We present statistical studies of several space-weather parameters, derived from observations of the photospheric vector magnetic field by the Helioseismic and Magnetic Imager (HMI) aboard the Solar Dynamics Observatory, for a thousand active regions. Each active region has been observed every twelve minutes during the entirety of its disk passage. Some of these parameters, such as energy density and shear angle, indicate the deviation of the photospheric magnetic field from that of a potential field. Other parameters include flux, helicity, field gradients, polarity inversion line properties, and measures of complexity. We show that some of these parameters are useful for event prediction.

  12. Stabilization and parameter identification of tumbling space debris with bounded torque in postcapture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Teng; Yue, Xiaokui; Ning, Xin; Yuan, Jianping

    2016-06-01

    This paper presents a new control scheme for the problem of a space robot after capturing an unknown tumbling target, such as space debris. Robotic capturing the target may destabilize the base of spacecraft and control torque is bounded which would affect the performance of attitude control system. To stabilize the base with bounded torque in postcapture scenario, a new control scheme which utilizes the control torque to balance angular momentum and motion of the manipulator to compensate limitation of the torque, is proposed. Considering uncertainties of the target, parameter identification technique for tumbling target with linear momentum is utilized to correct parameters of the controller. To verify validity and feasibility of the proposed concept, a planar space robot capturing small, medium and large target with or without linear momentum is studied. The results show that the whole system is stabilized finally and all the inertial parameters of the target converge to their real values.

  13. Effects of space-dependent cross sections on core physics parameters for compact fast spectrum space power reactors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lell, R. M.; Hanan, N. A.

    Effects of multigroup neutron cross section generation procedures on core physics parameters for compact fast spectrum reactors were examined. Homogeneous and space dependent multigroup cross section set were generated in 11 and 27 groups for a representative fast reactor core. These cross sections were used to compute various reactor physics parameters for the reference core. Coarse group structure and neglect of space dependence in the generation procedure resulted in inaccurate computations of reactor flux and power distributions and in significant errors regarding estimates of core reactivity and control system worth. Delayed neutron fraction was insensitive to cross section treatment, and computed reactivity coefficients were only slightly sensitive. However, neutron lifetime was found to be very sensitive to cross section treatment. Deficiencies in multigroup cross sections are reflected in core nuclear design and, consequently, in system mechanical design.

  14. Reconsidering seismological constraints on the available parameter space of macroscopic dark matter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cyncynates, David; Chiel, Joshua; Sidhu, Jagjit; Starkman, Glenn D.

    2017-03-01

    Using lunar seismological data, constraints are proposed on the available parameter space of macroscopic dark matter (macros). We show that actual limits are considerably weaker by considering in greater detail the mechanism through which macro impacts generate detectable seismic waves, which have wavelengths considerably longer than the diameter of the macro. We show that the portion of the macro parameter space that can be ruled out by current seismological evidence is considerably smaller than previously reported, and specifically that candidates with greater than or equal to nuclear density are not excluded by lunar seismology.

  15. Characterization in bi-parameter space of a non-ideal oscillator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Souza, S. L. T.; Batista, A. M.; Baptista, M. S.; Caldas, I. L.; Balthazar, J. M.

    2017-01-01

    We investigate the dynamical behavior of a non-ideal Duffing oscillator, a system composed of a mass-spring-pendulum driven by a DC motor with limited power supply. To identify new features on Duffing oscillator parameter space due to the limited power supply, we provide an extensive numerical characterization in the bi-parameter space by using Lyapunov exponents. Following this procedure, we identify remarkable new organized distribution of periodic windows, the ones known as Arnold tongues and also shrimp-shaped structures. In addition, we also identify intertwined basins of attraction for coexisting multiple attractors connected with tongues.

  16. Quantum homogeneous spaces and special functions with a dimensional deformation parameter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bonechi, F.; Giachetti, R.; del Olmo, M. A.; Sorace, E.; Tarlini, M.

    1996-12-01

    We study the most elementary aspects of harmonic analysis on a homogeneous space of a deformation of the two-dimensional Euclidean group, admitting generalizations to dimensions three and four, whose quantum parameter has the physical dimensions of length. The homogeneous space is recognized as a new quantum plane and the action of the Euclidean quantum group is used to determine an eigenvalue problem for the Casimir operator, which constitutes the analogue of the Schrödinger equation in the presence of such a deformation. The solutions are given in the plane-wave and angular-momentum bases and are expressed in terms of hypergeometric series with non-commuting parameters.

  17. Acoustic omni meta-atom for decoupled access to all octants of a wave parameter space.

    PubMed

    Koo, Sukmo; Cho, Choonlae; Jeong, Jun-Ho; Park, Namkyoo

    2016-09-30

    The common behaviour of a wave is determined by wave parameters of its medium, which are generally associated with the characteristic oscillations of its corresponding elementary particles. In the context of metamaterials, the decoupled excitation of these fundamental oscillations would provide an ideal platform for top-down and reconfigurable access to the entire constitutive parameter space; however, this has remained as a conceivable problem that must be accomplished, after being pointed out by Pendry. Here by focusing on acoustic metamaterials, we achieve the decoupling of density ρ, modulus B(-1) and bianisotropy ξ, by separating the paths of particle momentum to conform to the characteristic oscillations of each macroscopic wave parameter. Independent access to all octants of wave parameter space (ρ, B(-1), ξ)=(+/-,+/-,+/-) is thus realized using a single platform that we call an omni meta-atom; as a building block that achieves top-down access to the target properties of metamaterials.

  18. Acoustic omni meta-atom for decoupled access to all octants of a wave parameter space

    PubMed Central

    Koo, Sukmo; Cho, Choonlae; Jeong, Jun-ho; Park, Namkyoo

    2016-01-01

    The common behaviour of a wave is determined by wave parameters of its medium, which are generally associated with the characteristic oscillations of its corresponding elementary particles. In the context of metamaterials, the decoupled excitation of these fundamental oscillations would provide an ideal platform for top–down and reconfigurable access to the entire constitutive parameter space; however, this has remained as a conceivable problem that must be accomplished, after being pointed out by Pendry. Here by focusing on acoustic metamaterials, we achieve the decoupling of density ρ, modulus B−1 and bianisotropy ξ, by separating the paths of particle momentum to conform to the characteristic oscillations of each macroscopic wave parameter. Independent access to all octants of wave parameter space (ρ, B−1, ξ)=(+/−,+/−,+/−) is thus realized using a single platform that we call an omni meta-atom; as a building block that achieves top–down access to the target properties of metamaterials. PMID:27687689

  19. Parameter-space metric of semicoherent searches for continuous gravitational waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pletsch, Holger J.

    2010-08-01

    Continuous gravitational-wave (CW) signals such as emitted by spinning neutron stars are an important target class for current detectors. However, the enormous computational demand prohibits fully coherent broadband all-sky searches for prior unknown CW sources over wide ranges of parameter space and for yearlong observation times. More efficient hierarchical “semicoherent” search strategies divide the data into segments much shorter than one year, which are analyzed coherently; then detection statistics from different segments are combined incoherently. To optimally perform the incoherent combination, understanding of the underlying parameter-space structure is requisite. This problem is addressed here by using new coordinates on the parameter space, which yield the first analytical parameter-space metric for the incoherent combination step. This semicoherent metric applies to broadband all-sky surveys (also embedding directed searches at fixed sky position) for isolated CW sources. Furthermore, the additional metric resolution attained through the combination of segments is studied. From the search parameters (sky position, frequency, and frequency derivatives), solely the metric resolution in the frequency derivatives is found to significantly increase with the number of segments.

  20. A new parameter of geomagnetic storms for the severity of space weather

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balan, N.; Batista, I. S.; Tulasi Ram, S.; Rajesh, P. K.

    2016-12-01

    Using the continuous Dst data available since 1957 and H component data for the Carrington space weather event of 1859, the paper shows that the mean value of Dst during the main phase of geomagnetic storms, called mean DstMP, is a unique parameter that can indicate the severity of space weather. All storms having high mean DstMP (≤-250 nT), which corresponds to high amount of energy input in the magnetosphere-ionosphere system in short duration, are found associated with severe space weather events that caused all known electric power outages and telegraph system failures.

  1. A Summary of Meteorological Parameters During Space Shuttle Pad Exposure Periods

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Overbey, Glenn; Roberts, Barry C.

    2005-01-01

    During the 113 missions of the Space Transportation System (STS), the Space Shuffle fleet has been exposed to the elements on the launch pad for a total of 4195 days. The Natural Environments Branch at Marshall Space Flight Center archives atmospheric environments to which the Space Shuttle vehicles are exposed. This paper provides a summary of the historical record of the meteorological conditions encountered by the Space Shuttle fleet during the pad exposure period. Sources of the surface parameters, including temperature, dew point temperature, relative humidity, wind speed, wind direction, sea level pressure and precipitation are presented. Data is provided from the first launch of the STS in 1981 through the launch of STS-107 in 2003.

  2. Variations of cosmic large-scale structure covariance matrices across parameter space

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reischke, Robert; Kiessling, Alina; Schäfer, Björn Malte

    2017-03-01

    The likelihood function for cosmological parameters, given by e.g. weak lensing shear measurements, depends on contributions to the covariance induced by the non-linear evolution of the cosmic web. As highly non-linear clustering to date has only been described by numerical N-body simulations in a reliable and sufficiently precise way, the necessary computational costs for estimating those covariances at different points in parameter space are tremendous. In this work, we describe the change of the matter covariance and the weak lensing covariance matrix as a function of cosmological parameters by constructing a suitable basis, where we model the contribution to the covariance from non-linear structure formation using Eulerian perturbation theory at third order. We show that our formalism is capable of dealing with large matrices and reproduces expected degeneracies and scaling with cosmological parameters in a reliable way. Comparing our analytical results to numerical simulations, we find that the method describes the variation of the covariance matrix found in the SUNGLASS weak lensing simulation pipeline within the errors at one-loop and tree-level for the spectrum and the trispectrum, respectively, for multipoles up to ℓ ≤ 1300. We show that it is possible to optimize the sampling of parameter space where numerical simulations should be carried out by minimizing interpolation errors and propose a corresponding method to distribute points in parameter space in an economical way.

  3. Scale-invariant structure of parameter space for coupled Feigenbaum systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuznetsov, S. P.

    1985-09-01

    Numerical calculations which yield specific information about the structure of parameter spaces for coupled Feigenbaum systems are discussed. A system of two identical symmetrically coupled systems governed by equations of a certain form is analyzed, and the situations with pure B and pure A coupling are considered. Finally, the case of mixed coupling is addressed.

  4. Trap configuration and spacing influences parameter estimates in spatial capture-recapture models

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Sun, Catherine C.; Fuller, Angela K.; Royle, J. Andrew

    2014-01-01

    An increasing number of studies employ spatial capture-recapture models to estimate population size, but there has been limited research on how different spatial sampling designs and trap configurations influence parameter estimators. Spatial capture-recapture models provide an advantage over non-spatial models by explicitly accounting for heterogeneous detection probabilities among individuals that arise due to the spatial organization of individuals relative to sampling devices. We simulated black bear (Ursus americanus) populations and spatial capture-recapture data to evaluate the influence of trap configuration and trap spacing on estimates of population size and a spatial scale parameter, sigma, that relates to home range size. We varied detection probability and home range size, and considered three trap configurations common to large-mammal mark-recapture studies: regular spacing, clustered, and a temporal sequence of different cluster configurations (i.e., trap relocation). We explored trap spacing and number of traps per cluster by varying the number of traps. The clustered arrangement performed well when detection rates were low, and provides for easier field implementation than the sequential trap arrangement. However, performance differences between trap configurations diminished as home range size increased. Our simulations suggest it is important to consider trap spacing relative to home range sizes, with traps ideally spaced no more than twice the spatial scale parameter. While spatial capture-recapture models can accommodate different sampling designs and still estimate parameters with accuracy and precision, our simulations demonstrate that aspects of sampling design, namely trap configuration and spacing, must consider study area size, ranges of individual movement, and home range sizes in the study population.

  5. On-orbit identifying the inertia parameters of space robotic systems using simple equivalent dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Wenfu; Hu, Zhonghua; Zhang, Yu; Liang, Bin

    2017-03-01

    After being launched into space to perform some tasks, the inertia parameters of a space robotic system may change due to fuel consumption, hardware reconfiguration, target capturing, and so on. For precision control and simulation, it is required to identify these parameters on orbit. This paper proposes an effective method for identifying the complete inertia parameters (including the mass, inertia tensor and center of mass position) of a space robotic system. The key to the method is to identify two types of simple dynamics systems: equivalent single-body and two-body systems. For the former, all of the joints are locked into a designed configuration and the thrusters are used for orbital maneuvering. The object function for optimization is defined in terms of acceleration and velocity of the equivalent single body. For the latter, only one joint is unlocked and driven to move along a planned (exiting) trajectory in free-floating mode. The object function is defined based on the linear and angular momentum equations. Then, the parameter identification problems are transformed into non-linear optimization problems. The Particle Swarm Optimization (PSO) algorithm is applied to determine the optimal parameters, i.e. the complete dynamic parameters of the two equivalent systems. By sequentially unlocking the 1st to nth joints (or unlocking the nth to 1st joints), the mass properties of body 0 to n (or n to 0) are completely identified. For the proposed method, only simple dynamics equations are needed for identification. The excitation motion (orbit maneuvering and joint motion) is also easily realized. Moreover, the method does not require prior knowledge of the mass properties of any body. It is general and practical for identifying a space robotic system on-orbit.

  6. Exploring Replica-Exchange Wang-Landau sampling in higher-dimensional parameter space

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Valentim, Alexandra; Rocha, Julio C. S.; Tsai, Shan-Ho; Li, Ying Wai; Eisenbach, Markus; Fiore, Carlos E.; Landau, David P.

    2015-09-01

    We considered a higher-dimensional extension for the replica-exchange Wang- Landau algorithm to perform a random walk in the energy and magnetization space of the two-dimensional Ising model. This hybrid scheme combines the advantages of Wang-Landau and Replica-Exchange algorithms, and the one-dimensional version of this approach has been shown to be very efficient and to scale well, up to several thousands of computing cores. This approach allows us to split the parameter space of the system to be simulated into several pieces and still perform a random walk over the entire parameter range, ensuring the ergodicity of the simulation. Previous work, in which a similar scheme of parallel simulation was implemented without using replica exchange and with a different way to combine the result from the pieces, led to discontinuities in the final density of states over the entire range of parameters. From our simulations, it appears that the replica-exchange Wang-Landau algorithm is able to overcome this difficulty, allowing exploration of higher parameter phase space by keeping track of the joint density of states.

  7. On standard conjugate families for natural exponential families with bounded natural parameter space.

    PubMed

    Hornik, Kurt; Grün, Bettina

    2014-04-01

    Diaconis and Ylvisaker (1979) give necessary conditions for conjugate priors for distributions from the natural exponential family to be proper as well as to have the property of linear posterior expectation of the mean parameter of the family. Their conditions for propriety and linear posterior expectation are also sufficient if the natural parameter space is equal to the set of all [Formula: see text]-dimensional real numbers. In this paper their results are extended to characterize when conjugate priors are proper if the natural parameter space is bounded. For the special case where the natural exponential family is through a spherical probability distribution  [Formula: see text], we show that the proper conjugate priors can be characterized by the behavior of the moment generating function of [Formula: see text] at the boundary of the natural parameter space, or the second-order tail behavior of [Formula: see text]. In addition, we show that if these families are non-regular, then linear posterior expectation never holds. The results for this special case are also extended to natural exponential families through elliptical probability distributions.

  8. Exploring Replica-Exchange Wang-Landau sampling in higher-dimensional parameter space

    SciTech Connect

    Valentim, Alexandra; Rocha, Julio C. S.; Tsai, Shan-Ho; Li, Ying Wai; Eisenbach, Markus; Fiore, Carlos E; Landau, David P

    2015-01-01

    We considered a higher-dimensional extension for the replica-exchange Wang-Landau algorithm to perform a random walk in the energy and magnetization space of the two-dimensional Ising model. This hybrid scheme combines the advantages of Wang-Landau and Replica-Exchange algorithms, and the one-dimensional version of this approach has been shown to be very efficient and to scale well, up to several thousands of computing cores. This approach allows us to split the parameter space of the system to be simulated into several pieces and still perform a random walk over the entire parameter range, ensuring the ergodicity of the simulation. Previous work, in which a similar scheme of parallel simulation was implemented without using replica exchange and with a different way to combine the result from the pieces, led to discontinuities in the final density of states over the entire range of parameters. From our simulations, it appears that the replica-exchange Wang-Landau algorithm is able to overcome this diculty, allowing exploration of higher parameter phase space by keeping track of the joint density of states.

  9. Surrogate models for identifying robust, high yield regions of parameter space for ICF implosion simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Humbird, Kelli; Peterson, J. Luc; Brandon, Scott; Field, John; Nora, Ryan; Spears, Brian

    2016-10-01

    Next-generation supercomputer architecture and in-transit data analysis have been used to create a large collection of 2-D ICF capsule implosion simulations. The database includes metrics for approximately 60,000 implosions, with x-ray images and detailed physics parameters available for over 20,000 simulations. To map and explore this large database, surrogate models for numerous quantities of interest are built using supervised machine learning algorithms. Response surfaces constructed using the predictive capabilities of the surrogates allow for continuous exploration of parameter space without requiring additional simulations. High performing regions of the input space are identified to guide the design of future experiments. In particular, a model for the yield built using a random forest regression algorithm has a cross validation score of 94.3% and is consistently conservative for high yield predictions. The model is used to search for robust volumes of parameter space where high yields are expected, even given variations in other input parameters. Surrogates for additional quantities of interest relevant to ignition are used to further characterize the high yield regions. This work performed under the auspices of the U.S. Department of Energy by Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory under Contract DE-AC52-07NA27344, Lawrence Livermore National Security, LLC. LLNL-ABS-697277.

  10. SP_Ace: a new code to derive stellar parameters and elemental abundances

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boeche, C.; Grebel, E. K.

    2016-03-01

    Context. Ongoing and future massive spectroscopic surveys will collect large numbers (106-107) of stellar spectra that need to be analyzed. Highly automated software is needed to derive stellar parameters and chemical abundances from these spectra. Aims: We developed a new method of estimating the stellar parameters Teff, log g, [M/H], and elemental abundances. This method was implemented in a new code, SP_Ace (Stellar Parameters And Chemical abundances Estimator). This is a highly automated code suitable for analyzing the spectra of large spectroscopic surveys with low or medium spectral resolution (R = 2000-20 000). Methods: After the astrophysical calibration of the oscillator strengths of 4643 absorption lines covering the wavelength ranges 5212-6860 Å and 8400-8924 Å, we constructed a library that contains the equivalent widths (EW) of these lines for a grid of stellar parameters. The EWs of each line are fit by a polynomial function that describes the EW of the line as a function of the stellar parameters. The coefficients of these polynomial functions are stored in a library called the "GCOG library". SP_Ace, a code written in FORTRAN95, uses the GCOG library to compute the EWs of the lines, constructs models of spectra as a function of the stellar parameters and abundances, and searches for the model that minimizes the χ2 deviation when compared to the observed spectrum. The code has been tested on synthetic and real spectra for a wide range of signal-to-noise and spectral resolutions. Results: SP_Ace derives stellar parameters such as Teff, log g, [M/H], and chemical abundances of up to ten elements for low to medium resolution spectra of FGK-type stars with precision comparable to the one usually obtained with spectra of higher resolution. Systematic errors in stellar parameters and chemical abundances are presented and identified with tests on synthetic and real spectra. Stochastic errors are automatically estimated by the code for all the parameters

  11. Effects of Space Weather on Biomedical Parameters during the Solar Activity Cycles 23-24.

    PubMed

    Ragul'skaya, M V; Rudenchik, E A; Chibisov, S M; Gromozova, E N

    2015-06-01

    The results of long-term (1998-2012) biomedical monitoring of the biotropic effects of space weather are discussed. A drastic change in statistical distribution parameters in the middle of 2005 was revealed that did not conform to usual sinusoidal distribution of the biomedical data reflecting changes in the number of solar spots over a solar activity cycle. The dynamics of space weather of 2001-2012 is analyzed. The authors hypothesize that the actual change in statistical distributions corresponds to the adaptation reaction of the biosphere to nonstandard geophysical characteristics of the 24th solar activity cycle and the probable long-term decrease in solar activity up to 2067.

  12. Moving to continuous facial expression space using the MPEG-4 facial definition parameter (FDP) set

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karpouzis, Kostas; Tsapatsoulis, Nicolas; Kollias, Stefanos D.

    2000-06-01

    Research in facial expression has concluded that at least six emotions, conveyed by human faces, are universally associated with distinct expressions. Sadness, anger, joy, fear, disgust and surprise are categories of expressions that are recognizable across cultures. In this work we form a relation between the description of the universal expressions and the MPEG-4 Facial Definition Parameter Set (FDP). We also investigate the relation between the movement of basic FDPs and the parameters that describe emotion-related words according to some classical psychological studies. In particular Whissel suggested that emotions are points in a space, which seem to occupy two dimensions: activation and evaluation. We show that some of the MPEG-4 Facial Animation Parameters (FAPs), approximated by the motion of the corresponding FDPs, can be combined by means of a fuzzy rule system to estimate the activation parameter. In this way variations of the six archetypal emotions can be achieved. Moreover, Plutchik concluded that emotion terms are unevenly distributed through the space defined by dimensions like Whissel's; instead they tend to form an approximately circular pattern, called 'emotion wheel,' modeled using an angular measure. The 'emotion wheel' can be defined as a reference for creating intermediate expressions from the universal ones, by interpolating the movement of dominant FDP points between neighboring basic expressions. By exploiting the relation between the movement of the basic FDP point and the activation and angular parameters we can model more emotions than the primary ones and achieve efficient recognition in video sequences.

  13. Oscillating dark energy model in plane symmetric space-time with time periodic varying deceleration parameter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    She, M.; Jiang, L. P.

    2014-12-01

    In this paper, an oscillating dark energy model is presented in an isotropic but inhomogeneous plane symmetric space-time by considering a time periodic varying deceleration parameter. We find three different types of new solutions which describe different scenarios of oscillating universe. The first two solutions show an oscillating universe with singularities. For the third one, the universe is singularity-free during the whole evolution. Moreover, the Hubble parameter oscillates and keeps positive which explores an interesting possibility to unify the early inflation and late time acceleration of the universe.

  14. Result-driven exploration of simulation parameter spaces for visual effects design.

    PubMed

    Bruckner, Stefan; Möller, Torsten

    2010-01-01

    Graphics artists commonly employ physically-based simulation for the generation of effects such as smoke, explosions, and similar phenomena. The task of finding the correct parameters for a desired result, however, is difficult and time-consuming as current tools provide little to no guidance. In this paper, we present a new approach for the visual exploration of such parameter spaces. Given a three-dimensional scene description, we utilize sampling and spatio-temporal clustering techniques to generate a concise overview of the achievable variations and their temporal evolution. Our visualization system then allows the user to explore the simulation space in a goal-oriented manner. Animation sequences with a set of desired characteristics can be composed using a novel search-by-example approach and interactive direct volume rendering is employed to provide instant visual feedback. A user study was performed to evaluate the applicability of our system in production use.

  15. Autonomous space systems control incorporating automated maneuvers strategies in the presence of parameters uncertainties.

    PubMed

    Mazinan, A H; Shakhesi, S

    2016-05-01

    The research attempts to deal with the autonomous space systems incorporating new automated maneuvers strategies in the presence of parameters uncertainties. The main subject behind the investigation is to realize the high-resolution small amplitude orbital maneuvers via the first control strategy. And subsequently to realize the large amplitude orbital maneuvers via the second control strategy, as well. There is a trajectory optimization to provide the three-axis referenced commends for the aforementioned overactuated autonomous space system to be able to transfer from the initial orbit to its final ones, in finite burn, as long as the uncertainties of key parameters of the system such as the thrust vector, the center of the gravity, the moments of the inertia and so on are taken into real consideration. The strategies performances are finally considered through a series of experiments and a number of benchmarks to be tangibly verified.

  16. An Extension of the Two-Parameter Logistic Model to the Multidimensional Latent Space.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1983-08-01

    COVERED An Extension of the Two-Parameter". ’.’.Technic al Report Logistic Model to the Multidimensional Latent Space. A PERFORMING ORG . REPORT NUMBER...rh’t.f (if 𔃾 avil T’,i i t rriinin;v, 1.1 iara O~ff Lc" 𔃾iit Ni ’iat’rm *1!ip’r’ii (75) * U. tr Feirce ’I’ it R?-inurr- .! ibor ic~ry m ifitton

  17. Simulative Analysis of Various Parameters on Free Space Optical Communication System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, Naresh; Rana, Ashwani Kumar

    2013-09-01

    The Free Space Optical (FSO) communication system provides a high bandwidth, small size, light weight, low power and low cost alternative to present microwave systems. In this paper, we have designed a model of FSO system using OPTISYSTEM™ simulator to establish an FSO link by a range of 5 km with BER ˜ 10-6 achieved and reported analysis of different parameter that play important role in FSO communication system.

  18. A Parameter Space as an Improved Tool for Investigating Extraterrestrial Intelligence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ashworth, S.

    2014-06-01

    For the past half century the Drake Equation and the Fermi Paradox have provided the intellectual foundation for investigating the possible existence of extraterrestrial intelligence. But both the Equation and the Paradox are flawed and of questionable scientific utility. A replacement needs to be found, based on a different principle, and a parameter space for extraterrestrial intelligence is proposed as an improved tool of thought. This generates six distinct scenarios, whose implications for SETI are discussed.

  19. Parametric estimation of R&M parameters during the conceptual design of space vehicles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ebeling, Charles E.

    1992-01-01

    Reliability and maintainability parameters of proposed space vehicles are estimated based on a comparability analysis of similar aircraft subsystems. Using multiple regression techniques, parametric equations are developed for each subsystem to predict mean flying hours between failure as a function of vehicle design and performance specifications. These estimates are then adjusted to account for reliability growth, environmental differences, and new technologies. Overall vehicle mission reliability may then be computed from subsystem reliability estimates.

  20. Inertial parameter identification using contact force information for an unknown object captured by a space manipulator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chu, Zhongyi; Ma, Ye; Hou, Yueyang; Wang, Fengwen

    2017-02-01

    This paper presents a novel identification method for the intact inertial parameters of an unknown object in space captured by a manipulator in a space robotic system. With strong dynamic and kinematic coupling existing in the robotic system, the inertial parameter identification of the unknown object is essential for the ideal control strategy based on changes in the attitude and trajectory of the space robot via capturing operations. Conventional studies merely refer to the principle and theory of identification, and an error analysis process of identification is deficient for a practical scenario. To solve this issue, an analysis of the effect of errors on identification is illustrated first, and the accumulation of measurement or estimation errors causing poor identification precision is demonstrated. Meanwhile, a modified identification equation incorporating the contact force, as well as the force/torque of the end-effector, is proposed to weaken the accumulation of errors and improve the identification accuracy. Furthermore, considering a severe disturbance condition caused by various measured noises, the hybrid immune algorithm, Recursive Least Squares and Affine Projection Sign Algorithm (RLS-APSA), is employed to decode the modified identification equation to ensure a stable identification property. Finally, to verify the validity of the proposed identification method, the co-simulation of ADAMS-MATLAB is implemented by multi-degree of freedom models of a space robotic system, and the numerical results show a precise and stable identification performance, which is able to guarantee the execution of aerospace operations and prevent failed control strategies.

  1. Summary of longitudinal stability and control parameters as determined from Space Shuttle Challenger flight test data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Suit, William T.

    1989-01-01

    Estimates of longitudinal stability and control parameters for the space shuttle were determined by applying a maximum likelihood parameter estimation technique to Challenger flight test data. The parameters for pitching moment coefficient, C(m sub alpha), (at different angles of attack), pitching moment coefficient, C(m sub delta e), (at different elevator deflections) and the normal force coefficient, C(z sub alpha), (at different angles of attack) describe 90 percent of the response to longitudinal inputs during Space Shuttle Challenger flights with C(m sub delta e) being the dominant parameter. The values of C(z sub alpha) were found to be input dependent for these tests. However, when C(z sub alpha) was set at preflight predictions, the values determined for C(m sub delta e) changed less than 10 percent from the values obtained when C(z sub alpha) was estimated as well. The preflight predictions for C(z sub alpha) and C(m sub alpha) are acceptable values, while the values of C(z sub delta e) should be about 30 percent less negative than the preflight predictions near Mach 1, and 10 percent less negative, otherwise.

  2. Parameter identification of unknown object handled by free-flying space robot

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murotsu, Yoshisada; Senda, Kei; Ozaki, Mitsuhiro

    1994-05-01

    This paper is concerned with parameter identification methods for inertial parameters for the unknown object handled by manipulators on a free-flying space robot. The parameter identification is necessary for the precise control because of changes in the kinematics of the system together with the dynamics. Two methods are proposed under the condition that the robot is free to translate and rotate. One method is based on the conservation principle of linear and angular momentum and the other on Newton-Euler equations of motion. Only the linear/angular velocities and accelerations of the satellite base are used in the identification methods with no information about the force and torque utilized. The feasibility of the methods is demonstrated by a hardware experiment on the ground as well as numerical simulation.

  3. Controller design and parameter identifiability studies for a large space antenna

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Joshi, S. M.

    1985-01-01

    The problem of control systems synthesis and parameter identifiability are considered for a large, space-based antenna. Two methods are considered for control system synthesis, the first of which uses torque actuators and collocated attitude and rate sensors, and the second method is based on the linear-quadratic-Gaussian (LQG) control theory. The predicted performance obtained by computing variances of pointing, surface and feed misalignment errors in the presence of sensor noise indicates that the LQG-based controller yields superior results. Since controller design requires the knowledge of the system parameters, the identifiability of the structural parameters is investigated by obtaining Cramer-Rao lower bounds. The modal frequencies are found to have the best identifiability, followed by damping ratios, and mode-slopes.

  4. The dynamics of blood biochemical parameters in cosmonauts during long-term space flights

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Markin, Andrei; Strogonova, Lubov; Balashov, Oleg; Polyakov, Valery; Tigner, Timoty

    Most of the previously obtained data on cosmonauts' metabolic state concerned certain stages of the postflight period. In this connection, all conclusions, as to metabolism peculiarities during the space flight, were to a large extent probabilistic. The purpose of this work was study of metabolism characteristics in cosmonauts directly during long-term space flights. In the capillary blood samples taken from a finger, by "Reflotron IV" biochemical analyzer, "Boehringer Mannheim" GmbH, Germany, adapted to weightlessness environments, the activity of GOT, GPT, CK, gamma-GT, total and pancreatic amylase, as well as concentration of hemoglobin, glucose, total bilirubin, uric acid, urea, creatinine, total, HDL- and LDL cholesterol, triglycerides had been determined. HDL/LDL-cholesterol ratio also was computed. The crewmembers of 6 main missions to the "Mir" orbital station, a total of 17 cosmonauts, were examined. Biochemical tests were carryed out 30-60 days before lounch, and in the flights different stages between the 25-th and the 423-rd days of flights. In cosmonauts during space flight had been found tendency to increase, in compare with basal level, GOT, GPT, total amylase activity, glucose and total cholesterol concentration, and tendency to decrease of CK activity, hemoglobin, HDL-cholesterol concentration, and HDL/LDL — cholesterol ratio. Some definite trends in variations of other determined biochemical parameters had not been found. The same trends of mentioned biochemical parameters alterations observed in majority of tested cosmonauts, allows to suppose existence of connection between noted metabolic alterations with influence of space flight conditions upon cosmonaut's body. Variations of other studied blood biochemical parameters depends on, probably, pure individual causes.

  5. Space radiation parameters for EUI and the Sun Sensor of Solar Orbiter, ESIO, and JUDE instruments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rossi, Laurence; Jacques, Lionel; Halain, Jean-Philippe; Renotte, Etienne; Thibert, Tanguy; Grodent, Denis

    2014-08-01

    This paper presents predictions of space radiation parameters for four space instruments performed by the Centre Spatial de Liège (ULg - Belgium); EUI, the Extreme Ultra-violet Instrument, on-board the Solar Orbiter platform; ESIO, Extreme-UV solar Imager for Operations, and JUDE, the Jupiter system Ultraviolet Dynamics Experiment, which was proposed for the JUICE platform. For Solar Orbiter platform, the radiation environment is defined by ESA environmental specification and the determination of the parameters is done through ray-trace analyses inside the EUI instrument. For ESIO instrument, the radiation environment of the geostationary orbit is defined through simulations of the trapped particles flux, the energetic solar protons flux and the galactic cosmic rays flux, taking the ECSS standard for space environment as a guideline. Then ray-trace analyses inside the instrument are performed to predict the particles fluxes at the level of the most radiation-sensitive elements of the instrument. For JUICE, the spacecraft trajectory is built from ephemeris files provided by ESA and the radiation environment is modeled through simulations by JOSE (Jovian Specification Environment model) then ray-trace analyses inside the instrument are performed to predict the particles fluxes at the level of the most radiation-sensitive elements of the instrument.

  6. A parameter database for large scientific projects: application to the Gaia space astrometry mission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perryman, Michael; de Bruijne, Jos; Lammers, Uwe

    2008-10-01

    The parallel development of many aspects of a complex space science mission like Gaia, which includes numerous participants in ESA, industrial companies, and a large and active scientific collaboration throughout Europe, makes keeping track of the many design changes, instrument and operational parameters, and numerical values for the data analysis and simulations, a challenging but crucially important problem. A comprehensive, easily-accessible, up-to-date, and definitive compilation of a large range of numerical quantities is required, and the Gaia parameter database has been established to satisfy these needs. The database is a centralised repository containing, besides mathematical, physical, and astronomical constants, many satellite and subsystem design parameters. Version control provides both a ‘live’ version with the most recent parameters, as well as previous ‘reference’ versions of the full database contents. Query results are formatted by default in HTML, while an important feature is that data can also be retrieved as Java, ANSI-C, C++, Ruby, or XML structures for direct inclusion into software codes, such that all collaborating scientists can use the retrieved database parameters and values directly linked to computational routines.

  7. Space Shuttle propulsion parameter estimation using optimal estimation techniques, volume 1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1983-01-01

    The mathematical developments and their computer program implementation for the Space Shuttle propulsion parameter estimation project are summarized. The estimation approach chosen is the extended Kalman filtering with a modified Bryson-Frazier smoother. Its use here is motivated by the objective of obtaining better estimates than those available from filtering and to eliminate the lag associated with filtering. The estimation technique uses as the dynamical process the six degree equations-of-motion resulting in twelve state vector elements. In addition to these are mass and solid propellant burn depth as the ""system'' state elements. The ""parameter'' state elements can include aerodynamic coefficient, inertia, center-of-gravity, atmospheric wind, etc. deviations from referenced values. Propulsion parameter state elements have been included not as options just discussed but as the main parameter states to be estimated. The mathematical developments were completed for all these parameters. Since the systems dynamics and measurement processes are non-linear functions of the states, the mathematical developments are taken up almost entirely by the linearization of these equations as required by the estimation algorithms.

  8. Constraining the mSUGRA (minimal supergravity) parameter space using the entropy of dark matter halos

    SciTech Connect

    Nunez, Dario; Zavala, Jesus; Nellen, Lukas; Sussman, Roberto A; Cabral-Rosetti, Luis G; Mondragon, Myriam E-mail: jzavala@nucleares.unam.mx E-mail: lukas@nucleares.unam.mx E-mail: lgcabral@ciidet.edu.mx; Collaboration: For the Instituto Avanzado de Cosmologia, IAC

    2008-05-15

    We derive an expression for the entropy of a dark matter halo described using a Navarro-Frenk-White model with a core. The comparison of this entropy with that of dark matter in the freeze-out era allows us to constrain the parameter space in mSUGRA models. Moreover, combining these constraints with the ones obtained from the usual abundance criterion and demanding that these criteria be consistent with the 2{sigma} bounds for the abundance of dark matter: 0.112{<=}{Omega}{sub DM}h{sup 2}{<=}0.122, we are able to clearly identify validity regions among the values of tan{beta}, which is one of the parameters of the mSUGRA model. We found that for the regions of the parameter space explored, small values of tan{beta} are not favored; only for tan {beta} Asymptotically-Equal-To 50 are the two criteria significantly consistent. In the region where the two criteria are consistent we also found a lower bound for the neutralino mass, m{sub {chi}}{>=}141 GeV.

  9. Forest biophysical parameter estimation using space-borne bistatic PolInSAR measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khati, Unmesh; Singh, Gulab; Mohanty, Shradha

    2016-05-01

    Forest height is an important indicator of the health of the forest ecosystem and can be utilized for accurate estimation of important parameters such as forest above-ground biomass. PolInSAR techniques have been utilized for forest height estimation using airborne and space-borne platforms. However, temporal decorrelation severely limits the ability of space-borne PolInSAR observations for meaningful height inversion. With the launch of the TerraSAR-X/TanDEM-X platforms, acquisition of Polarimetric SAR data in bistatic mode, without the undesired effects of temporal decorrelation, is possible. Full-PolInSAR bistatic data is acquired over Indian tropical forests and the height inversion results are presented in this research article. The inverted height shows a good correlation with field measured height, with r = 0.8. The inversion shows over-estimation over low height forests, while providing an accurate estimation for tall forested areas.

  10. Retrieval of cloud optical parameters from space-based backscatter lidar data.

    PubMed

    Balin, Y S; Samoilova, S V; Krekova, M M; Winker, D M

    1999-10-20

    We present an approach to estimating the multiple-scattering (MS) contribution to lidar return signals from clouds recorded from space that enables us to describe in more detail the return formation at the depth where first orders of scattering dominate. Estimates made have enabled us to propose a method for correcting solutions of single-scattering lidar equations for the MS contribution. We also describe an algorithm for reconstructing the profiles of the cloud scattering coefficient and the optical thickness tau under conditions of a priori uncertainties. The approach proposed is illustrated with results for optical parameters of cirrus and stratiform clouds determined from return signals calculated by the Monte Carlo method as well as from return signals acquired with the American spaceborne lidar during the Lidar In-Space Technology Experiment (LITE).

  11. Laser dimpling process parameters selection and optimization using surrogate-driven process capability space

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ozkat, Erkan Caner; Franciosa, Pasquale; Ceglarek, Dariusz

    2017-08-01

    Remote laser welding technology offers opportunities for high production throughput at a competitive cost. However, the remote laser welding process of zinc-coated sheet metal parts in lap joint configuration poses a challenge due to the difference between the melting temperature of the steel (∼1500 °C) and the vapourizing temperature of the zinc (∼907 °C). In fact, the zinc layer at the faying surface is vapourized and the vapour might be trapped within the melting pool leading to weld defects. Various solutions have been proposed to overcome this problem over the years. Among them, laser dimpling has been adopted by manufacturers because of its flexibility and effectiveness along with its cost advantages. In essence, the dimple works as a spacer between the two sheets in lap joint and allows the zinc vapour escape during welding process, thereby preventing weld defects. However, there is a lack of comprehensive characterization of dimpling process for effective implementation in real manufacturing system taking into consideration inherent changes in variability of process parameters. This paper introduces a methodology to develop (i) surrogate model for dimpling process characterization considering multiple-inputs (i.e. key control characteristics) and multiple-outputs (i.e. key performance indicators) system by conducting physical experimentation and using multivariate adaptive regression splines; (ii) process capability space (Cp-Space) based on the developed surrogate model that allows the estimation of a desired process fallout rate in the case of violation of process requirements in the presence of stochastic variation; and, (iii) selection and optimization of the process parameters based on the process capability space. The proposed methodology provides a unique capability to: (i) simulate the effect of process variation as generated by manufacturing process; (ii) model quality requirements with multiple and coupled quality requirements; and (iii

  12. A metamodeling approach for studying ignition target robustness in a highly dimensional parameter space

    SciTech Connect

    Giorla, Jean; Masson, Annie; Poggi, Francoise; Quach, Robert; Seytor, Patricia; Garnier, Josselin

    2009-03-15

    Inertial confinement fusion targets must be carefully designed to ignite their central hot spots and burn. Changes in the optimal implosion could reduce the fusion energy or even prevent ignition. Since there are unavoidable uncertainties due to technological defects and not perfect reproducibility from shot to shot, the fusion energy will remain uncertain. The degree with which a target can tolerate larger specifications than specified, and the probability with which a particular yield is exceeded, are possible measures of the robustness of that design. This robustness must be assessed in a very high-dimensional parameter space whose variables include every characteristics of the given target and of the associated laser pulse shape, using high-fidelity simulations. Therefore, these studies would remain computationally very intensive. In this paper we propose an approach which consist first of constructing an accurate metamodel of the yield on the whole parameter space with a reasonable data set of simulations. Then the robustness is very quickly assessed for any set of specifications with this surrogate. The yield is approximated by a neural network, and an iterative method adds new points in the data set by means of D-optimal experimental designs. The robustness study of the baseline Laser Megajoule target against one-dimensional defects illustrates this approach. A set of 2000 simulations is sufficient to metamodel the fusion energy on a large 22-dimensional parameter space around the nominal point. Furthermore, a metamodel of the robustness margin against all specifications has been obtained, providing guidance for target fabrication research and development.

  13. Non-Abelian monopole in the parameter space of point-like interactions

    SciTech Connect

    Ohya, Satoshi

    2014-12-15

    We study non-Abelian geometric phase in N=2 supersymmetric quantum mechanics for a free particle on a circle with two point-like interactions at antipodal points. We show that non-Abelian Berry’s connection is that of SU(2) magnetic monopole discovered by Moody, Shapere and Wilczek in the context of adiabatic decoupling limit of diatomic molecule. - Highlights: • Supersymmetric quantum mechanics is an ideal playground for studying geometric phase. • We determine the parameter space of supersymmetric point-like interactions. • Berry’s connection is given by a Wu–Yang-like magnetic monopole in SU(2) Yang–Mills.

  14. Generalized CP symmetries and special regions of parameter space in the two-Higgs-doublet model

    SciTech Connect

    Ferreira, P. M.; Haber, Howard E.; Silva, Joao P.

    2009-06-01

    We consider the impact of imposing generalized CP symmetries on the Higgs sector of the two-Higgs-doublet model, and identify three classes of symmetries. Two of these classes constrain the scalar potential parameters to an exceptional region of parameter space, which respects either a Z{sub 2} discrete flavor symmetry or a U(1) symmetry. We exhibit a basis-invariant quantity that distinguishes between these two possible symmetries. We also show that the consequences of imposing these two classes of CP symmetry can be achieved by combining Higgs family symmetries, and that this is not possible for the usual CP symmetry. We comment on the vacuum structure and on renormalization in the presence of these symmetries. Finally, we demonstrate that the standard CP symmetry can be used to build all the models we identify, including those based on Higgs family symmetries.

  15. Effects of space environment on composites: An analytical study of critical experimental parameters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gupta, A.; Carroll, W. F.; Moacanin, J.

    1979-01-01

    A generalized methodology currently employed at JPL, was used to develop an analytical model for effects of high-energy electrons and interactions between electron and ultraviolet effects. Chemical kinetic concepts were applied in defining quantifiable parameters; the need for determining short-lived transient species and their concentration was demonstrated. The results demonstrates a systematic and cost-effective means of addressing the issues and show qualitative and quantitative, applicable relationships between space radiation and simulation parameters. An equally important result is identification of critical initial experiments necessary to further clarify the relationships. Topics discussed include facility and test design; rastered vs. diffuse continuous e-beam; valid acceleration level; simultaneous vs. sequential exposure to different types of radiation; and interruption of test continuity.

  16. Estimating Shape and Micro-Motion Parameter of Rotationally Symmetric Space Objects from the Infrared Signature

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Yabei; Lu, Huanzhang; Zhao, Fei; Zhang, Zhiyong

    2016-01-01

    Shape serves as an important additional feature for space target classification, which is complementary to those made available. Since different shapes lead to different projection functions, the projection property can be regarded as one kind of shape feature. In this work, the problem of estimating the projection function from the infrared signature of the object is addressed. We show that the projection function of any rotationally symmetric object can be approximately represented as a linear combination of some base functions. Based on this fact, the signal model of the emissivity-area product sequence is constructed, which is a particular mathematical function of the linear coefficients and micro-motion parameters. Then, the least square estimator is proposed to estimate the projection function and micro-motion parameters jointly. Experiments validate the effectiveness of the proposed method. PMID:27763500

  17. A new parameter space study of the fermionic cold dark matter model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bagherian, Z.; Ettefaghi, M. M.; Haghgouyan, Z.; Moazzemi, R.

    2014-10-01

    We consider the standard model (SM) extended by a gauge singlet fermion as cold dark matter (SFCDM) and a gauge singlet scalar (singlet Higgs) as a mediator. The parameter space of the SM is enlarged by seven new ones. We obtain the total annihilation cross section of singlet fermions to the SM particles and singlet Higgs at tree level. Regarding the relic abundance constraint obtained by WMAP observations, we study the dependency on each parameter separately, for dark matter masses up to 1 TeV. In particular, the coupling of SFCDM to singlet Higgs gs, the SFCDM mass mψ, the second Higgs mass mh2, and the Higgs bosons mixing angel θ are investigated accurately. Three other parameters play no significant role. For a maximal mixing of Higgs bosons or at resonances, gs is applicable for the perturbation theory at tree level. We also obtain the scattering cross section of SFCDM off nucleons and compare our results with experiments which have already reported data in this mass range; XENON100, LUX, COUPP and PICASSO collaborations. Our results show that the SFCDM is excluded by these experiments for choosing parameters which are consistent with perturbation theory and relic abundance constraints.

  18. A new parameter space study of the fermionic cold dark matter model

    SciTech Connect

    Bagherian, Z.; Ettefaghi, M.M.; Haghgouyan, Z.; Moazzemi, R. E-mail: mettefaghi@qom.ac.ir E-mail: r.moazzemi@qom.ac.ir

    2014-10-01

    We consider the standard model (SM) extended by a gauge singlet fermion as cold dark matter (SFCDM) and a gauge singlet scalar (singlet Higgs) as a mediator. The parameter space of the SM is enlarged by seven new ones. We obtain the total annihilation cross section of singlet fermions to the SM particles and singlet Higgs at tree level. Regarding the relic abundance constraint obtained by WMAP observations, we study the dependency on each parameter separately, for dark matter masses up to 1 TeV. In particular, the coupling of SFCDM to singlet Higgs g{sub s}, the SFCDM mass m{sub ψ}, the second Higgs mass m{sub h{sub 2}}, and the Higgs bosons mixing angel θ are investigated accurately. Three other parameters play no significant role. For a maximal mixing of Higgs bosons or at resonances, g{sub s} is applicable for the perturbation theory at tree level. We also obtain the scattering cross section of SFCDM off nucleons and compare our results with experiments which have already reported data in this mass range; XENON100, LUX, COUPP and PICASSO collaborations. Our results show that the SFCDM is excluded by these experiments for choosing parameters which are consistent with perturbation theory and relic abundance constraints.

  19. Hough transform relative to a four-dimensional parameter space for the detection of constant velocity target

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Jing; Zhang, Tianxu

    2010-12-01

    We present a novel Hough transform method for moving point target detection by using a 4-D parameter space. A new representation, which uses four parameters (the distance variable ρ, the angle variable θ, the velocity variable v, and the distance variable S), is proposed for constant velocity target in the 3-D observation space X-Y-T. By estimating velocity, a target trajectory can be transformed into a 4-D parameter space with a limited range of projection options. Our simulation and analysis show that the new algorithm can produce positive results in suppressing noise points with less computational cost.

  20. Constraining the mSUGRA parameter space through entropy and abundance criteria

    SciTech Connect

    Cabral-Rosetti, Luis G.; Mondragon, Myriam; Nunez, Dario; Sussman, Roberto A.; Zavala, Jesus; Nellen, Lukas

    2007-06-19

    We explore the use of two criteria to constrain the allowed parameter space in mSUGRA models; both criteria are based in the calculation of the present density of neutralinos {chi}0 as Dark Matter in the Universe. The first one is the usual ''abundance'' criterion that requieres that present neutralino relic density complies with 0.0945 < {omega}CDMh2 < 0.1287, which are the 2{sigma} bounds according to WMAP. To calculate the relic density we use the public numerical code micrOMEGAS. The second criterion is the original idea presented in [3] that basically applies the microcanonical definition of entropy to a weakly interacting and self-gravitating gas, and then evaluate the change in entropy per particle of this gas between the freeze-out era and present day virialized structures. An 'entropy consistency' criterion emerges by comparing theoretical and empirical estimates of this entropy. One of the objetives of the work is to analyze the joint application of both criteria, already done in [3], to see if their results, using approximations for the calculations of the relic density, agree with the results coming from the exact numerical results of micrOMEGAS. The main objetive of the work is to use this method to constrain the parameter space in mSUGRA models that are inputs for the calculations of micrOMEGAS, and thus to get some bounds on the predictions for the SUSY spectra.

  1. Fast estimation of space-robots inertia parameters: A modular mathematical formulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nabavi Chashmi, Seyed Yaser; Malaek, Seyed Mohammad-Bagher

    2016-10-01

    This work aims to propose a new technique that considerably helps enhance time and precision needed to identify "Inertia Parameters (IPs)" of a typical Autonomous Space-Robot (ASR). Operations might include, capturing an unknown Target Space-Object (TSO), "active space-debris removal" or "automated in-orbit assemblies". In these operations generating precise successive commands are essential to the success of the mission. We show how a generalized, repeatable estimation-process could play an effective role to manage the operation. With the help of the well-known Force-Based approach, a new "modular formulation" has been developed to simultaneously identify IPs of an ASR while it captures a TSO. The idea is to reorganize the equations with associated IPs with a "Modular Set" of matrices instead of a single matrix representing the overall system dynamics. The devised Modular Matrix Set will then facilitate the estimation process. It provides a conjugate linear model in mass and inertia terms. The new formulation is, therefore, well-suited for "simultaneous estimation processes" using recursive algorithms like RLS. Further enhancements would be needed for cases the effect of center of mass location becomes important. Extensive case studies reveal that estimation time is drastically reduced which in-turn paves the way to acquire better results.

  2. Active correction of aperture discontinuities (ACAD) for space telescope pupils: a parametic analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mazoyer, Johan; Pueyo, Laurent; Norman, Colin; N'Diaye, Mamadou; Mawet, Dimitri; Soummer, Rémi; Perrin, Marshall; Choquet, Élodie; Carlotti, Alexis

    2015-09-01

    As the performance of coronagraphs improves, the achievable contrast is more and more dependent of the shape of the pupil. The future generation of space and ground based coronagraphic instruments will have to achieve high contrast levels on on-axis and/or segmented telescopes. To correct for the high amplitude aberrations introduced by secondary mirror structures and segmentation of the primary mirror, we explore a two deformable mirror (DM) method. The major difficulty of several DM methods is the non-linear relation linking actuator strokes to the point spread function in the coronagraph focal plane. The Active Compensation of Aperture Discontinuities (ACAD) method is achieving this minimization by solving a non linear differential Monge Ampere equation. Once this open loop method have reached the minimum, a close-loop stroke minimization method can be applied to correct for phase and amplitude aberrations to achieve the ultimate contrast. In this paper, I describe the results of the parametric analysis that that I have undertaken on this method. After recalling the principle of the method, I will described the explored parameter space (deformable mirror set-up, shape of the pupil, bandwidth, coronagraph designs). I will precisely described the way I simulated the Vortex coronagraph for this numerical simulation. Finally I will present the preliminary results of this parametric analysis for space telescope pupils only.

  3. Cellular parameters for track structure modelling of radiation hazard in space

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hollmark, M.; Lind, B.; Gudowska, I.; Waligorski, M.

    Based on irradiation with 45 MeV/u N and B ions and with Co-60 gamma rays, track structure cellular parameters have been fitted for V 79-379A Chinese hamster lung fibroblasts and for human melanoma cells (AA wtp53). These sets of parameters will be used to develop a calculation of radiation hazard in deep space, based on the system for evaluating, summing and reporting occupational exposures proposed in 1967 by subcommittee of the NCRP, but never issued as an NCRP report. The key concepts of this system were: i) expression of the risk from all radiation exposures relative to that from a whole-body exposure to Co-60 radiation; ii) relating the risk from any exposure to that of the standard (Co-60) radiation through an "effectiveness factor" (ef), a product of sub-factors representing radiation quality, body region irradiated, and depth of penetration of radiation; the product of absorbed dose by ef being termed the "exposure record unit" (eru); iii) development of ef values and a cumulative eru record for external and internal emitters. Application of this concept should provide a better description of the Gy -equivalent presently in use by NASA for evaluating risk in deep space than the equivalent dose, following ICRP-60 recommendations. Dose and charged particle fluence levels encountered in space, particularly after Solar Particle Events, require that deterministic rather than stochastic effects be considered. Also, synergistic effects due to simultaneous multiple charged particle transfers, may have to be considered. Thus, models applicable in radiotherapy, where the Gy -equivalent is also applied, in conjunction with transport calculations performed using, e.g. the ADAM and EVA phantoms, along the concepts of the 1967 NCRP system, may be more appropriate for evaluating the radiation hazard from external fields with a large flux and a major high-LET component.

  4. Modelling of subarachnoid space width changes in apnoea resulting as a function of blood flow parameters.

    PubMed

    Kalicka, Renata; Mazur, Kamila; Wolf, Jacek; Frydrychowski, Andrzej F; Narkiewicz, Krzysztof; Winklewski, Pawel J

    2017-03-29

    During apnoea, the pial artery is subjected to two opposite physiological processes: vasoconstriction due to elevated blood pressure and vasorelaxation driven by rising pH in the brain parenchyma. We hypothesized that the pial artery response to apnoea may vary, depending on which process dominate. Apnoea experiments were performed in a group of 19 healthy, non-smoking volunteers (9 men and 10 women). The following parameters were obtained for further analysis: blood pressure, the cardiac (from 0.5 to 5.0Hz) and slow (<0.5Hz) components of subarachnoid space width, heart rate, mean cerebral blood flow velocity in the internal carotid artery, pulsatility and resistivity index, internal carotid artery diameter, blood oxygen saturation and end-tidal carbon dioxide. The experiment consisted of three apnoeas, sequentially: 30s, 60s and maximal apnoea. The breath-hold was separated for 5minute rest. The control process is sophisticated, involving internal cross-couplings and cross-dependences. The aim of work was to find a mathematical dependence between data. Unexpectedly, the modelling revealed two different reactions, on the same experimental procedure. As a consequence, there are two subsets of cardiac subarachnoid space width responses to breath-hold in humans. A positive cardiac subarachnoid space width change to apnoea depends on changes in heart rate and cerebral blood flow velocity. A negative cardiac subarachnoid space width change to apnoea is driven by heart rate, mean arterial pressure and pulsatility index changes. The described above two different reactions to experimental breath-hold provides new insights into our understanding of the complex mechanisms governing the adaptation to apnoea in humans. We proposed a mathematical methodology that can be used in further clinical research.

  5. Calibration of imaging parameters for space-borne airglow photography using city light positions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hozumi, Yuta; Saito, Akinori; Ejiri, Mitsumu K.

    2016-09-01

    A new method for calibrating imaging parameters of photographs taken from the International Space Station (ISS) is presented in this report. Airglow in the mesosphere and the F-region ionosphere was captured on the limb of the Earth with a digital single-lens reflex camera from the ISS by astronauts. To utilize the photographs as scientific data, imaging parameters, such as the angle of view, exact position, and orientation of the camera, should be determined because they are not measured at the time of imaging. A new calibration method using city light positions shown in the photographs was developed to determine these imaging parameters with high accuracy suitable for airglow study. Applying the pinhole camera model, the apparent city light positions on the photograph are matched with the actual city light locations on Earth, which are derived from the global nighttime stable light map data obtained by the Defense Meteorological Satellite Program satellite. The correct imaging parameters are determined in an iterative process by matching the apparent positions on the image with the actual city light locations. We applied this calibration method to photographs taken on August 26, 2014, and confirmed that the result is correct. The precision of the calibration was evaluated by comparing the results from six different photographs with the same imaging parameters. The precisions in determining the camera position and orientation are estimated to be ±2.2 km and ±0.08°, respectively. The 0.08° difference in the orientation yields a 2.9-km difference at a tangential point of 90 km in altitude. The airglow structures in the photographs were mapped to geographical points using the calibrated imaging parameters and compared with a simultaneous observation by the Visible and near-Infrared Spectral Imager of the Ionosphere, Mesosphere, Upper Atmosphere, and Plasmasphere mapping mission installed on the ISS. The comparison shows good agreements and supports the validity

  6. A variational approach for dissipative quantum transport in a wide parameter space.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yu; Yam, ChiYung; Chen, GuanHua

    2015-09-14

    Recent development of theoretical method for dissipative quantum transport has achieved notable progresses in the weak or strong electron-phonon coupling regime. However, a generalized theory for dissipative quantum transport in a wide parameter space had not been established. In this work, a variational polaron theory for dissipative quantum transport in a wide range of electron-phonon coupling is developed. The optimal polaron transformation is determined by the optimization of the Feynman-Bogoliubov upper bound of free energy. The free energy minimization ends up with an optimal mean-field Hamiltonian and a minimal interaction Hamiltonian. Hence, second-order perturbation can be applied to the transformed system, resulting in an accurate and efficient method for the treatment of dissipative quantum transport with different electron-phonon coupling strength. Numerical benchmark calculation on a single site model coupled to one phonon mode is presented.

  7. Proposed parameters of specific rain attenuation prediction for Free Space Optics link operating in tropical region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suriza, A. Z.; Md Rafiqul, Islam; Wajdi, A. K.; Naji, A. W.

    2013-03-01

    As the demand for higher and unlimited bandwidth for communication channel is increased, Free Space Optics (FSO) is a good alternative solution. As it is protocol transparent, easy to install, cost effective and have capabilities like fiber optics, its demand rises very fast. Weather condition, however is the limiting factor for FSO link. In the temperate region the major blockage for FSO link feasibility is fog. In the tropical region high rainfall rate is expected to be the major drawback of FSO link availability. Rain attenuation is the most significant to influence FSO link availability in tropical region. As for now the available k and α values are developed using data from temperate regions. Therefore, the objective of this paper is to propose new parameters for specific rain attenuation prediction model that represents tropical weather condition. The proposed values are derived from data measured in Malaysia and using methods recommended by ITU-R.

  8. A variational approach for dissipative quantum transport in a wide parameter space

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Yu Kwok, YanHo; Chen, GuanHua; Yam, ChiYung

    2015-09-14

    Recent development of theoretical method for dissipative quantum transport has achieved notable progresses in the weak or strong electron-phonon coupling regime. However, a generalized theory for dissipative quantum transport in a wide parameter space had not been established. In this work, a variational polaron theory for dissipative quantum transport in a wide range of electron-phonon coupling is developed. The optimal polaron transformation is determined by the optimization of the Feynman-Bogoliubov upper bound of free energy. The free energy minimization ends up with an optimal mean-field Hamiltonian and a minimal interaction Hamiltonian. Hence, second-order perturbation can be applied to the transformed system, resulting in an accurate and efficient method for the treatment of dissipative quantum transport with different electron-phonon coupling strength. Numerical benchmark calculation on a single site model coupled to one phonon mode is presented.

  9. The relative effects of entry parameters on thermal protection system weight. [space shuttle orbiters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hirasaki, P. N.

    1971-01-01

    Shielding a spacecraft from the severe thermal environment of an atmospheric entry requires a sophisticated thermal protection system (TPS). Thermal computer program models were developed for two such TPS designs proposed for the space shuttle orbiter. The multilayer systems, a reusable surface insulation TPS, and a re-radiative metallic skin TPS, were sized for a cross-section of trajectories in the entry corridor. This analysis indicates the relative influence of the entry parameters on the weight of each TPS concept. The results are summarized graphically. The trajectory variables considered were down-range, cross-range, orbit inclination, entry interface velocity and flight path angle, maximum heating rate level, angle of attack, and ballistic coefficient. Variations in cross-range and flight path angle over the ranges considered had virtually no effect on the required entry TPS weight. The TPS weight was significantly more sensitive to variations in angle of attack than to dispersions in the other trajectory considered.

  10. Planning ahead for asteroid and comet hazard mitigation, phase 1: parameter space exploration and scenario modeling

    SciTech Connect

    Plesko, Catherine S; Clement, R Ryan; Weaver, Robert P; Bradley, Paul A; Huebner, Walter F

    2009-01-01

    The mitigation of impact hazards resulting from Earth-approaching asteroids and comets has received much attention in the popular press. However, many questions remain about the near-term and long-term, feasibility and appropriate application of all proposed methods. Recent and ongoing ground- and space-based observations of small solar-system body composition and dynamics have revolutionized our understanding of these bodies (e.g., Ryan (2000), Fujiwara et al. (2006), and Jedicke et al. (2006)). Ongoing increases in computing power and algorithm sophistication make it possible to calculate the response of these inhomogeneous objects to proposed mitigation techniques. Here we present the first phase of a comprehensive hazard mitigation planning effort undertaken by Southwest Research Institute and Los Alamos National Laboratory. We begin by reviewing the parameter space of the object's physical and chemical composition and trajectory. We then use the radiation hydrocode RAGE (Gittings et al. 2008), Monte Carlo N-Particle (MCNP) radiation transport (see Clement et al., this conference), and N-body dynamics codes to explore the effects these variations in object properties have on the coupling of energy into the object from a variety of mitigation techniques, including deflection and disruption by nuclear and conventional munitions, and a kinetic impactor.

  11. Estimating mutation parameters, population history and genealogy simultaneously from temporally spaced sequence data.

    PubMed

    Drummond, Alexei J; Nicholls, Geoff K; Rodrigo, Allen G; Solomon, Wiremu

    2002-07-01

    Molecular sequences obtained at different sampling times from populations of rapidly evolving pathogens and from ancient subfossil and fossil sources are increasingly available with modern sequencing technology. Here, we present a Bayesian statistical inference approach to the joint estimation of mutation rate and population size that incorporates the uncertainty in the genealogy of such temporally spaced sequences by using Markov chain Monte Carlo (MCMC) integration. The Kingman coalescent model is used to describe the time structure of the ancestral tree. We recover information about the unknown true ancestral coalescent tree, population size, and the overall mutation rate from temporally spaced data, that is, from nucleotide sequences gathered at different times, from different individuals, in an evolving haploid population. We briefly discuss the methodological implications and show what can be inferred, in various practically relevant states of prior knowledge. We develop extensions for exponentially growing population size and joint estimation of substitution model parameters. We illustrate some of the important features of this approach on a genealogy of HIV-1 envelope (env) partial sequences.

  12. Relationships of linear and nonlinear ultrasound parameters with porosity and trabecular spacing in trabecular-bone-mimicking phantoms.

    PubMed

    Lee, Kang Il

    2016-12-01

    The speed of sound (SOS), the normalized broadband ultrasound attenuation (nBUA), and the nonlinear parameter (B/A) were measured in 18 trabecular-bone-mimicking phantoms consisting of water-saturated aluminum foams. The strong slow wave and the very weak fast wave were consistently observed in the signals transmitted through all of the phantoms. It was found that the SOS increased as the porosity and the trabecular spacing increased. In contrast, both the nBUA and the B/A showed opposite dependences on the porosity and the trabecular spacing. All three ultrasound parameters exhibited high correlation coefficients with the porosity and the trabecular spacing.

  13. Reproducible, high-throughput synthesis of colloidal nanocrystals for optimization in multidimensional parameter space.

    PubMed

    Chan, Emory M; Xu, Chenxu; Mao, Alvin W; Han, Gang; Owen, Jonathan S; Cohen, Bruce E; Milliron, Delia J

    2010-05-12

    While colloidal nanocrystals hold tremendous potential for both enhancing fundamental understanding of materials scaling and enabling advanced technologies, progress in both realms can be inhibited by the limited reproducibility of traditional synthetic methods and by the difficulty of optimizing syntheses over a large number of synthetic parameters. Here, we describe an automated platform for the reproducible synthesis of colloidal nanocrystals and for the high-throughput optimization of physical properties relevant to emerging applications of nanomaterials. This robotic platform enables precise control over reaction conditions while performing workflows analogous to those of traditional flask syntheses. We demonstrate control over the size, size distribution, kinetics, and concentration of reactions by synthesizing CdSe nanocrystals with 0.2% coefficient of variation in the mean diameters across an array of batch reactors and over multiple runs. Leveraging this precise control along with high-throughput optical and diffraction characterization, we effectively map multidimensional parameter space to tune the size and polydispersity of CdSe nanocrystals, to maximize the photoluminescence efficiency of CdTe nanocrystals, and to control the crystal phase and maximize the upconverted luminescence of lanthanide-doped NaYF(4) nanocrystals. On the basis of these demonstrative examples, we conclude that this automated synthesis approach will be of great utility for the development of diverse colloidal nanomaterials for electronic assemblies, luminescent biological labels, electroluminescent devices, and other emerging applications.

  14. Linear parameter varying switching attitude control for a near space hypersonic vehicle with parametric uncertainties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Yiqing; Sun, Changyin; Qian, Chengshan; Wang, Li

    2015-12-01

    This paper deals with the problem of linear parameter varying (LPV) switching attitude control for a near space hypersonic vehicle (NSHV) with parametric uncertainties. First, due to the enormous complexity of the NSHV nonlinear attitude dynamics, a slow-fast loop polytopic LPV attitude model is developed by using Jacobian linearisation and the tensor product model transformation approach. Second, for the purpose of less conservative attitude controller design, the flight envelope is divided into four subregions. For each parameter subregion, slow-loop and fast-loop LPV controllers are designed. By the defined switching character function, these slow-fast loop LPV controllers are then switched in order to guarantee the closed-loop NSHV system to be asymptotically stable and satisfy a specified tracking performance criterion. The condition of LPV switching attitude controller synthesis is given in terms of linear matrix inequalities, which can be readily solved via standard numerical software, and the robust stability analysis of the closed-loop NSHV system is verified based on multiple Lypapunov functions. Finally, numerical simulations have demonstrated the effectiveness of the proposed approach.

  15. A modal test of a space-truss for structural parameter identification

    SciTech Connect

    Carne, T.G.; Mayes, R.L. ); Levine-West, M.B. )

    1992-01-01

    The Jet Propulsion Laboratory is developing a large space-truss to support a micro-precision interferometer. A finite element model will be used to design and place passive and active elements in the truss to suppress vibration. To improve the model's predictive capability, it is desirable to identify uncertain structural parameters in the model by utilizing experimental modal data. Testing of both the components and the system was performed to obtain the data necessary to identify the structural parameters. Extracting a modal model, absent of bias errors, from measured data requires great care in test design and implementation. Testing procedures that are discussed include: verification of non-constraining shaker attachment, quantification of the non-linear structural response, and the design and effects of suspension systems used to simulate a free structure. In addition to these procedures, the accuracy of the measured frequency response functions are evaluated by comparing functions measured with random excitation, using various frequency resolutions, and with step sine excitation.

  16. A modal test of a space-truss for structural parameter identification

    SciTech Connect

    Carne, T.G.; Mayes, R.L.; Levine-West, M.B.

    1992-12-01

    The Jet Propulsion Laboratory is developing a large space-truss to support a micro-precision interferometer. A finite element model will be used to design and place passive and active elements in the truss to suppress vibration. To improve the model`s predictive capability, it is desirable to identify uncertain structural parameters in the model by utilizing experimental modal data. Testing of both the components and the system was performed to obtain the data necessary to identify the structural parameters. Extracting a modal model, absent of bias errors, from measured data requires great care in test design and implementation. Testing procedures that are discussed include: verification of non-constraining shaker attachment, quantification of the non-linear structural response, and the design and effects of suspension systems used to simulate a free structure. In addition to these procedures, the accuracy of the measured frequency response functions are evaluated by comparing functions measured with random excitation, using various frequency resolutions, and with step sine excitation.

  17. GMC COLLISIONS AS TRIGGERS OF STAR FORMATION. I. PARAMETER SPACE EXPLORATION WITH 2D SIMULATIONS

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, Benjamin; Loo, Sven Van; Tan, Jonathan C.; Bruderer, Simon

    2015-09-20

    We utilize magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) simulations to develop a numerical model for giant molecular cloud (GMC)–GMC collisions between nearly magnetically critical clouds. The goal is to determine if, and under what circumstances, cloud collisions can cause pre-existing magnetically subcritical clumps to become supercritical and undergo gravitational collapse. We first develop and implement new photodissociation region based heating and cooling functions that span the atomic to molecular transition, creating a multiphase ISM and allowing modeling of non-equilibrium temperature structures. Then in 2D and with ideal MHD, we explore a wide parameter space of magnetic field strength, magnetic field geometry, collision velocity, and impact parameter and compare isolated versus colliding clouds. We find factors of ∼2–3 increase in mean clump density from typical collisions, with strong dependence on collision velocity and magnetic field strength, but ultimately limited by flux-freezing in 2D geometries. For geometries enabling flow along magnetic field lines, greater degrees of collapse are seen. We discuss observational diagnostics of cloud collisions, focussing on {sup 13}CO(J = 2–1), {sup 13}CO(J = 3–2), and {sup 12}CO(J = 8–7) integrated intensity maps and spectra, which we synthesize from our simulation outputs. We find that the ratio of J = 8–7 to lower-J emission is a powerful diagnostic probe of GMC collisions.

  18. Reconciling Planck with the local value of H0 in extended parameter space

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Di Valentino, Eleonora; Melchiorri, Alessandro; Silk, Joseph

    2016-10-01

    The recent determination of the local value of the Hubble constant by Riess et al., 2016 (hereafter R16) is now 3.3 sigma higher than the value derived from the most recent CMB anisotropy data provided by the Planck satellite in a ΛCDM model. Here we perform a combined analysis of the Planck and R16 results in an extended parameter space, varying simultaneously 12 cosmological parameters instead of the usual 6. We find that a phantom-like dark energy component, with effective equation of state w = -1.29-0.12+0.15 at 68% c.l. can solve the current tension between the Planck dataset and the R16 prior in an extended ΛCDM scenario. On the other hand, the neutrino effective number is fully compatible with standard expectations. This result is confirmed when including cosmic shear data from the CFHTLenS survey and CMB lensing constraints from Planck. However, when BAO measurements are included we find that some of the tension with R16 remains, as also is the case when we include the supernova type Ia luminosity distances from the JLA catalog.

  19. A study of double exposure process design with balanced performance parameters for line/space applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Jun; Wu, Peng; Wu, Qiang; Ding, Hua; Li, Xin; Sun, Changjiang

    2007-03-01

    As the semiconductor fabrication groundrule has reached the 32nm node, in general there are several possible approaches for the photolithography solution such as the double exposure with 1.35 NA immersion, the high refractive index immersion, the extremely ultra violet (EUV) lithography, nanoimprint lithography etc. Among the four, the easiest approach seems to be the double exposure method at an effective numerical aperture (NA) of 1.35. However, there are still challenges in the design and optimization of the process, such as, the use of appropriate illumination condition, the choice of a good photoresist, and the design of an optical proximity correction (OPC) strategy. Besides these considerations, there is a question as whether we really need the double etch process. To study the double exposure mechanism, we have used a 248 nm deep-UV exposure tool and several well chosen photoresist (one is for Space application and the other is for Line application) to study the photo performance parameters in the merge of two photo exposures. At a numerical aperture (NA) around 0.7, the minimum groundrule we can achieve is the one for a 75 nm logic process with minimum pitch around 220 nm. One approach will be that the features with pitches wider than 440 nm are completed in a single exposure, which includes various isolated lines and spaces, line and space ends, two-dimensional structures, etc. This strategy essentially puts the single exposure pattern under the 0.18 um logic like pitches where mild conventional illumination can produce a balanced performance. Under typical illumination conditions, the photolithographic process under 0.18 um like ground rule is well understood and the optical proximity correction is not complicated. The remaining issues are in the dense pitches, where the double exposure kicks in. We have demonstrated that the double exposure with single development can achieve a process window large enough for a 75 nm logic like process and the OPC

  20. Planning Ahead for Asteroid Hazard Mitigation, Phase 1: Parameter Space Exploration and Scenario Modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Plesko, C. Weaver, R.; Clement, R.; Bradley, P.; Huebner, W.

    The mitigation of impact hazards resulting from Earth-approaching asteroids and comets has received much attention in the popular press. However, many questions remain about the near-term and long-term feasibility and appropriate application of all proposed methods. Recent and ongoing ground and space-based observations of small solar system body composition and dynamics have revolutionized our understanding of these bodies (e.g., Ryan (2000), Fujiwara et al. (2006), and Jedicke et al. (2006)). Ongoing increases in computing power and algorithm sophistication make it possible to calculate the response of these inhomogeneous objects to proposed mitigation techniques. Here we present the first phase of a comprehensive hazard mitigation planning effort undertaken by Southwest Research Institute and Los Alamos National Laboratory. We begin by reviewing the parameter space of the objects physical and chemical composition and trajectory. We then use the radiation hydrocode RAGE (Gittings et al. 2008), Monte Carlo N-Particle (MCNP) radiation transport (see Clement et al., this conference), and N-body dynamics codes to explore the effects these variations in object properties have on the coupling of energy into the object from a variety of mitigation techniques, including deflection and disruption by nuclear and conventional munitions, and a kinetic impactor. Preliminary results for models of the deflection of a 100 m basalt sphere by a 100 kt nuclear burst (Bradley et al., LPSC 2009) are encouraging. A 40 cm/s velocity away from the burst is imparted to the objects center of mass without disruption. Further results will be presented at the meeting.

  1. The Parameter Space of Magnetized Target Fusion (aka Magneto-Inertial Fusion)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lindemuth, Irvin

    2016-10-01

    Magnetized Target Fusion (MTF), aka Magneto-Inertial Fusion (MIF), is an approach to fusion that compresses a preformed, magnetized (but not necessarily magnetically confined) plasma with an imploding liner or pusher. MTF/MIF operates in a density regime in between the eleven orders of magnitude (1011) in density that separate inertial confinement fusion (ICF) from magnetic confinement fusion MCF. Compared to MCF, the higher density, shorter confinement times, and compressional heating as the dominant heating mechanism potentially reduce the impact of magnetic instabilities. Compared to ICF, the magnetically reduced thermal transport and lower density leads to orders-of-magnitude reduction in the difficult-to-achieve areal-density parameter and a significant reduction in required implosion velocity and radial convergence, potentially reducing the deleterious effects of implosion hydrodynamic instabilities. This tutorial presents fundamental analysis and simple time-dependent modeling to show where significant fusion gain might be achieved in the intermediate-density regime. The analysis shows that the fusion design space is potentially a continuum between ICF and MCF but practical considerations limit the space in which ignition might be obtained. Generic time-dependent modeling addresses the key physics requirements and defines ``ball-park'' values needed for target-plasma initial density, temperature, and magnetic field and implosion system size, energy, and velocity. The modeling shows energy gains greater than 30 can potentially be achieved and that high gain may be obtained at low convergence ratios, e.g., less than 15. A non-exhaustive review of past and present MTF/MIF efforts is presented and the renewed interest in MTF/MIF within the US (e.g., ARPA-E's ALPHA program) and abroad is noted.

  2. Exploring Parameter Space of Rift Induced Delamination Hypothesis with Application to Rwenzori Mountains

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wallner, H.; Schmeling, H.

    2009-04-01

    The extreme elevation of Rwenzori Mountains, a horst situated inside a rift zone, motivates our search for their geodynamic driving mechanism. Testing several hypotheses favours RID due to some first successful numerical models. RID is the hypothesis of rift induced delamination of mantle lithosphere and uplift of crust. It is based on the propagation of the rift tips feeded by upwelling asthenosphere, surrounding stiff old lithosphere, thereby triggering the delamination of cold and dense mantle lithosphere root by reducing viscosity and strength of the undermost lower crust. This unloading induces pop-up of the less dense crustal block along steep inclining faults. Viscous flow of 2D models is approximated by Finite Difference Method in an Eulerian formulation. Equations of conservation of mass, momentum and energy are solved for a multi component and two phase system. Based on laboratory data of appropriate samples a temperature, pressure and stress dependent rheology is assumed. We try to establish RID and learn about the process by exploring the parameter space with model families. Aim is to identify relvant factors controlling the delamination. Investigation candidates are parameters describing the initial pertubation such as excess temperature and geometry and its distance between bounding rifts. Further candidates include rheological properties such as the power laws of mantle, upper and lower crust and the limiting yield stress and its depth dependence. The range of variation and sensitivity of the individual quantities are presented. Because some values are highly sensitive physical and numerical system answers must be distinguished carefully. The actually used model is 2D and simple as possible to test under which conditions the hypothesis is basically working. Earth naturally is more complex as new observations around Rwenzoris suggest. A first step would be an asymmetric model leading to 3D. If RID is true for the very special situation of the

  3. Relevant parameter space and stability of spherical tokamaks with a plasma center column

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lampugnani, L. G.; Garcia-Martinez, P. L.; Farengo, R.

    2017-02-01

    A spherical tokamak (ST) with a plasma center column (PCC) can be formed inside a simply connected chamber via driven magnetic relaxation. From a practical perspective, the ST-PCC could overcome many difficulties associated with the material center column of the standard ST reactor design. Besides, the ST-PCC concept can be regarded as an advanced helicity injected device that would enable novel experiments on the key physics of magnetic relaxation and reconnection. This is because the concept includes not only a PCC but also a coaxial helicity injector (CHI). This combination implies an improved level of flexibility in the helicity injection scheme required for the formation and sustainment phases. In this work, the parameter space determining the magnetic structure of the ST-PCC equilibria is studied under the assumption of fully relaxed plasmas. In particular, it is shown that the effect of the external bias field of the PCC and the CHI essentially depends on a single parameter that measures the relative amount of flux of these two entities. The effect of plasma elongation on the safety factor profile and the stability to the tilt mode are also analyzed. In the first part of this work, the stability of the system is explained in terms of the minimum energy principle, and relevant stability maps are constructed. While this picture provides an adequate insight into the underlying physics of the instability, it does not include the stabilizing effect of line-tying at the electrodes. In the second part, a dynamical stability analysis of the ST-PCC configurations, including the effect of line-tying, is performed by numerically solving the magnetohydrodynamic equations. A significant stability enhancement is observed when the PCC contains more than the 70% of the total external bias flux, and the elongation is not higher than two.

  4. Nonlinear Steepest Descent Asymptotics for Semiclassical Limit of Integrable Systems: Continuation in the Parameter Space

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tovbis, Alexander; Venakides, Stephanos

    2010-04-01

    The initial value problem for an integrable system, such as the Nonlinear Schrödinger equation, is solved by subjecting the linear eigenvalue problem arising from its Lax pair to inverse scattering, and, thus, transforming it to a matrix Riemann-Hilbert problem (RHP) in the spectral variable. In the semiclassical limit, the method of nonlinear steepest descent ([4,5]), supplemented by the g-function mechanism ([3]), is applied to this RHP to produce explicit asymptotic solution formulae for the integrable system. These formule are based on a hyperelliptic Riemann surface {mathcal {R} = mathcal {R}(x,t)} in the spectral variable, where the space-time variables ( x, t) play the role of external parameters. The curves in the x, t plane, separating regions of different genuses of {mathcal {R}(x,t)}, are called breaking curves or nonlinear caustics. The genus of {mathcal {R}(x,t)} is related to the number of oscillatory phases in the asymptotic solution of the integrable system at the point x, t. The evolution theorem ([10]) guarantees continuous evolution of the asymptotic solution in the space-time away from the breaking curves. In the case of the analytic scattering data f( z; x, t) (in the NLS case, f is a normalized logarithm of the reflection coefficient with time evolution included), the primary role in the breaking mechanism is played by a phase function {{Im h(z;x,t)}}, which is closely related to the g function. Namely, a break can be caused ([10]) either through the change of topology of zero level curves of {Im h(z;x,t)} (regular break), or through the interaction of zero level curves of {{Im h(z;x,t)}} with singularities of f (singular break). Every time a breaking curve in the x, t plane is reached, one has to prove the validity of the nonlinear steepest descent asymptotics in the region across the curve. In this paper we prove that in the case of a regular break, the nonlinear steepest descent asymptotics can be “automatically” continued through the

  5. "A space-time ensemble Kalman filter for state and parameter estimation of groundwater transport models"

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Briseño, Jessica; Herrera, Graciela S.

    2010-05-01

    Herrera (1998) proposed a method for the optimal design of groundwater quality monitoring networks that involves space and time in a combined form. The method was applied later by Herrera et al (2001) and by Herrera and Pinder (2005). To get the estimates of the contaminant concentration being analyzed, this method uses a space-time ensemble Kalman filter, based on a stochastic flow and transport model. When the method is applied, it is important that the characteristics of the stochastic model be congruent with field data, but, in general, it is laborious to manually achieve a good match between them. For this reason, the main objective of this work is to extend the space-time ensemble Kalman filter proposed by Herrera, to estimate the hydraulic conductivity, together with hydraulic head and contaminant concentration, and its application in a synthetic example. The method has three steps: 1) Given the mean and the semivariogram of the natural logarithm of hydraulic conductivity (ln K), random realizations of this parameter are obtained through two alternatives: Gaussian simulation (SGSim) and Latin Hypercube Sampling method (LHC). 2) The stochastic model is used to produce hydraulic head (h) and contaminant (C) realizations, for each one of the conductivity realizations. With these realization the mean of ln K, h and C are obtained, for h and C, the mean is calculated in space and time, and also the cross covariance matrix h-ln K-C in space and time. The covariance matrix is obtained averaging products of the ln K, h and C realizations on the estimation points and times, and the positions and times with data of the analyzed variables. The estimation points are the positions at which estimates of ln K, h or C are gathered. In an analogous way, the estimation times are those at which estimates of any of the three variables are gathered. 3) Finally the ln K, h and C estimate are obtained using the space-time ensemble Kalman filter. The realization mean for each one

  6. An Initial Study of the Sensitivity of Aircraft Vortex Spacing System (AVOSS) Spacing Sensitivity to Weather and Configuration Input Parameters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Riddick, Stephen E.; Hinton, David A.

    2000-01-01

    A study has been performed on a computer code modeling an aircraft wake vortex spacing system during final approach. This code represents an initial engineering model of a system to calculate reduced approach separation criteria needed to increase airport productivity. This report evaluates model sensitivity toward various weather conditions (crosswind, crosswind variance, turbulent kinetic energy, and thermal gradient), code configurations (approach corridor option, and wake demise definition), and post-processing techniques (rounding of provided spacing values, and controller time variance).

  7. Parameter Space of Atomic Layer Deposition of Ultrathin Oxides on Graphene

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Atomic layer deposition (ALD) of ultrathin aluminum oxide (AlOx) films was systematically studied on supported chemical vapor deposition (CVD) graphene. We show that by extending the precursor residence time, using either a multiple-pulse sequence or a soaking period, ultrathin continuous AlOx films can be achieved directly on graphene using standard H2O and trimethylaluminum (TMA) precursors even at a high deposition temperature of 200 °C, without the use of surfactants or other additional graphene surface modifications. To obtain conformal nucleation, a precursor residence time of >2s is needed, which is not prohibitively long but sufficient to account for the slow adsorption kinetics of the graphene surface. In contrast, a shorter residence time results in heterogeneous nucleation that is preferential to defect/selective sites on the graphene. These findings demonstrate that careful control of the ALD parameter space is imperative in governing the nucleation behavior of AlOx on CVD graphene. We consider our results to have model system character for rational two-dimensional (2D)/non-2D material process integration, relevant also to the interfacing and device integration of the many other emerging 2D materials. PMID:27723305

  8. Novel constraint on the parameter space of the Georgi-Machacek model with current LHC data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chiang, Cheng-Wei; Kanemura, Shinya; Yagyu, Kei

    2014-12-01

    The same-sign diboson process p p →W±W±j j has been measured at the LHC using leptonic decay channels of W bosons, with production cross sections of two fiducial regions reported to be consistent with the Standard Model expectations within 1 σ . These results constrain new physics models with a modified W+W+W-W- vertex. We consider in particular the Georgi-Machacek model in which the quartic W boson vertex is effectively modified due to mediations of new Higgs bosons in the model. The relevant gauge-gauge-scalar couplings are all proportional to the vacuum expectation value of the isospin triplets, which can be of O (10 ) GeV because of custodial vacuum alignment. Using the current 8-TeV data at the LHC, we exclude parameter space on the plane of the triplet vacuum expectation value and the new Higgs boson mass. The expected discovery reach at the 14-TeV LHC is also studied.

  9. FORECASTING COSMOLOGICAL PARAMETER CONSTRAINTS FROM NEAR-FUTURE SPACE-BASED GALAXY SURVEYS

    SciTech Connect

    Pavlov, Anatoly; Ratra, Bharat; Samushia, Lado E-mail: ratra@phys.ksu.edu

    2012-11-20

    The next generation of space-based galaxy surveys is expected to measure the growth rate of structure to a level of about one percent over a range of redshifts. The rate of growth of structure as a function of redshift depends on the behavior of dark energy and so can be used to constrain parameters of dark energy models. In this work, we investigate how well these future data will be able to constrain the time dependence of the dark energy density. We consider parameterizations of the dark energy equation of state, such as XCDM and {omega}CDM, as well as a consistent physical model of time-evolving scalar field dark energy, {phi}CDM. We show that if the standard, specially flat cosmological model is taken as a fiducial model of the universe, these near-future measurements of structure growth will be able to constrain the time dependence of scalar field dark energy density to a precision of about 10%, which is almost an order of magnitude better than what can be achieved from a compilation of currently available data sets.

  10. The effects of simulated space environmental parameters on six commercially available composite materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Funk, Joan G.; Sykes, George F., Jr.

    1989-01-01

    The effects of simulated space environmental parameters on microdamage induced by the environment in a series of commercially available graphite-fiber-reinforced composite materials were determined. Composites with both thermoset and thermoplastic resin systems were studied. Low-Earth-Orbit (LEO) exposures were simulated by thermal cycling; geosynchronous-orbit (GEO) exposures were simulated by electron irradiation plus thermal cycling. The thermal cycling temperature range was -250 F to either 200 F or 150 F. The upper limits of the thermal cycles were different to ensure that an individual composite material was not cycled above its glass transition temperature. Material response was characterized through assessment of the induced microcracking and its influence on mechanical property changes at both room temperature and -250 F. Microdamage was induced in both thermoset and thermoplastic advanced composite materials exposed to the simulated LEO environment. However, a 350 F cure single-phase toughened epoxy composite was not damaged during exposure to the LEO environment. The simuated GEO environment produced microdamage in all materials tested.

  11. The derivation of constraints on the msugra parameter space from the entropy of dark matter halos

    SciTech Connect

    Cabral-Rosetti, L. G.; Mondragon, M.; Nellen, L.; Nunez, D.; Sussmann, R.; Zavala, J.

    2009-04-20

    We derive an expression for the entropy of a present dark matter halo described by a Navarro-Frenk-White modified model with a central core. We obtain an expression for the relic abundance of neutralinos by comparing this entropy of the halo with the value it had during the freeze-out era. Using WMAP observations, we constrain the parameter space for mSUGRA models. Combining our results with the usual abundance criteria, we are able to discriminate clearly among different validity regions for tan {beta} values. For this, we require both criteria to be consistent within a 2{sigma} bound of the WMAP observations for the relic density: 0.112<{omega}h{sup 2}<0.122. We find that for sgn {mu} = +1, small values of tan {beta} are not favored; only for tan {beta}{approx}50 are both criteria significantly consistent. Both criteria allow us to put a lower bound on the neutralino mass, m{sub {chi}}{>=}141 GeV.

  12. Duality in parameter space and approximation of measures for mixing repellers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abenda, S.; Turchetti, G.

    1990-10-01

    For one-dimensional expanding maps T with an invariant measure μ we consider, in a parameter space, the envelope ℰ n of the real lines associated to any couple of points of the orbit, connected by n iterations of T. If the map has s inverses and is piecewise linear, then the sets ℰ n are just the union of s n points and converge to the invariant Cantor set of T. A correspondence between all the sets and their measures is established and allows one to associate the atomic measure on ℰ1 to the completly continuous measure on the Cantor set. If the map is nonlinear, hyperbolic, and has s inverses, the sets ℰ n are homeomorphic to the Cantor set; they converge to the Cantor set of T and their measures converge to the measure of the Cantor set when n→∞. The correspondence between the sets ℰ n allows one to define converging approximation schemes for the map an its measure: one replaces each of the s n disjoint sets with a point in a convenient neighborhood and a probability equal to its measure and transforms it back to the original set ℰ1. All the approximations with linear Cantor systems previously proposed are recovered, the converging proprties being straightforward in the present scheme. Moreover, extensions to higher dimensionality and to nondisconnected repellers arte possible and are briefly examined.

  13. Mantle Debris in Giant Impacts: Parameter-Space Study and Scaling Laws

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gabriel, Travis; Reufer, Andreas; Jackson, Alan P.; Asphaug, Erik

    2016-10-01

    Collisions between similar-sized planetesimals are prevalent throughout the early stages of the formation of the Solar System. N-body dynamics simulations commonly employed to understand planetary evolution depend on parameterized disruption/accretion criteria in order to consider the diversity of outcomes of these collisions. Additionally, understanding the debris from collisions is essential in tracing the source regions of volatiles, placing constraints on collisional grinding, and explaining the formation of small solar system bodies. We describe the transport of mantle material through debris production in giant impacts using a large database of SPH hydrocode simulations. We then develop new scaling laws that accurately capture the production of diverse debris products found in giant impacts with a range of relative velocities up to a few times the mutual escape velocity and a complete range of impact geometries. At typical impact angles it is found that giant impacts are significantly less erosive than suggested by existing scaling laws. This discrepancy grows with impact velocity and the impactor-to-target mass ratio, and thus it grows with the kinetic energy of the system. Our database spans a wide parameter space of pre-impact initial conditions, and includes chondritic and icy, chondritic material representative of the bulk abundances in the inner and outer solar system respectively. Implications for this new understanding in debris production through giant impacts are discussed.

  14. Space warping order parameters and symmetry: application to multiscale simulation of macromolecular assemblies.

    PubMed

    Singharoy, Abhishek; Joshi, Harshad; Miao, Yinglong; Ortoleva, Peter J

    2012-07-26

    Coarse-grained features of macromolecular assemblies are understood via a set of order parameters (OPs) constructed in terms of their all-atom configuration. OPs are shown to be slowly changing in time and capture the large-scale spatial features of macromolecular assemblies. The relationship of these variables to the classic notion of OPs based on symmetry breaking phase transitions is discussed. OPs based on space warping transformations are analyzed in detail as they naturally provide a connection between overall structure of an assembly and all-atom configuration. These OPs serve as the basis of a multiscale analysis that yields Langevin equations for OP dynamics. In this context, the characteristics of OPs and PCA modes are compared. The OPs enable efficient all-atom multiscale simulations of the dynamics of macromolecular assemblies in response to changes in microenvironmental conditions, as demonstrated on the structural transitions of cowpea chlorotic mottle virus capsid (CCMV) and RNA of the satellite tobacco mosaic virus (STMV).

  15. Optical parameters and space-bandwidth product optimization in digital holographic microscopy.

    PubMed

    Claus, Daniel; Iliescu, Daciana

    2013-01-01

    This paper considers some of the most important optical parameters that characterize a digital holographic microscope (DHM) and presents their mathematical derivation based on geometrical and diffraction-based models. It supports and justifies the use of the out-of-focus recording of holograms by showing that the field of view can be increased when recording the hologram in front of the in-focus image plane. In this manner a better match between the space-bandwidth product (SBP) of the microscope objective and that of the reconstructed hologram can be obtained. Hence, DHM offers a more cost-efficient way to increase the recorded SBP compared to the application of a high-quality microscope objective (large numerical aperture and low magnification) used in conventional microscopy. Furthermore, an expression for the imaging distance (distance between hologram and image plane), while maintaining the optical resolution and sufficient sampling, is obtained. This expression takes into account all kinds of reference-wave curvature and can easily be transferred to lensless digital holography. In this context it could be demonstrated that an object wave matched reference wave offers a significantly smaller imaging distance and hence the largest recoverable SBP. In addition, a new, to our knowledge, approach, based on the influence of defocus on the modulation transfer function, is used to derive the depth of field (DOF) for a circular aperture (lens-based system) and a rectangular aperture (lensless system), respectively. This investigation leads to the finding that a rectangular aperture offers an increased resolution combined with an increased DOF, when compared to a circular aperture of the same size.

  16. A Methodology for Evaluating Technical Performance Parameter Design Margins to Control Earth and Space Science Instrument Cost

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jones-Selden, Felicia L.

    Costs of aerospace missions have increased over the last twenty years, placing the future of the space program in jeopardy. A potential source for such growth can be attributed to the complex multidisciplinary and challenging nature of earth and space science instrument development. Design margins are additional resources carried in technical performance parameters to mitigate uncertainties throughout the product lifecycle. Margins are traditionally derived and allocated based upon historical experience intrinsic to organizations, as opposed to quantitative methods, jeopardizing the development of low-cost space-based instruments. This dissertation utilizes a methodology to evaluate the interrelationships between pre-launch and actual launch margins for the key technical performance parameters of mass, power, and data-rate to identify the extent to which excessive or insufficient margins are used in the design of space-based instruments in an effort to control instrument cost growth. The research examined 62 space-based instruments from the National Aeronautics and Space Administration, Federally Funded Research and Development Centers, and universities. Statistical analysis consisting of paired t-tests and multiple linear regression were utilized to determine the degree to which space-based instruments are over or under designed by the use of excessive or insufficient design margins and to determine the effect of design margins for the technical performance parameters of mass, power, and data-rate on the percentage instrument cost growth from the preliminary design phase to launch. Findings confirm, that in the implementation of space-based instruments, design margins are allocated to technical performance parameters above suggested government/industry standards, impacting the development of low-cost space-based instruments. The findings provide senior leadership, systems engineers, project managers, and resource managers with the ability to determine where

  17. The role of extreme orbits in the global organization of periodic regions in parameter space for one dimensional maps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    da Costa, Diogo Ricardo; Hansen, Matheus; Guarise, Gustavo; Medrano-T, Rene O.; Leonel, Edson D.

    2016-04-01

    We show that extreme orbits, trajectories that connect local maximum and minimum values of one dimensional maps, play a major role in the parameter space of dissipative systems dictating the organization for the windows of periodicity, hence producing sets of shrimp-like structures. Here we solve three fundamental problems regarding the distribution of these sets and give: (i) their precise localization in the parameter space, even for sets of very high periods; (ii) their local and global distributions along cascades; and (iii) the association of these cascades to complicate sets of periodicity. The extreme orbits are proved to be a powerful indicator to investigate the organization of windows of periodicity in parameter planes. As applications of the theory, we obtain some results for the circle map and perturbed logistic map. The formalism presented here can be extended to many other different nonlinear and dissipative systems.

  18. Synergy between ground- and space-based gravitational-wave detectors for estimation of binary coalescence parameters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nair, Remya; Jhingan, Sanjay; Tanaka, Takahiro

    2016-05-01

    We study the advantages of the coexistence of future ground- and space-based gravitational-wave detectors in estimating the parameters of a binary coalescence. Space measurements will act as a precursor to ground measurements. Also, since space measurements will provide much better localization information on the source, they will aid electromagnetic follow-up of the source and hence increase the probability of finding an electromagnetic counterpart of the gravitational-wave event. Using the post-Newtonian waveform for the inspiral of nonspinning neutron star-black hole binaries in circular orbits, we analyze how estimates for the chirp mass, the symmetric mass ratio, and the time and phase at coalescence are improved by combining the data from different space-ground detector pairs. Since the gravitational waves produced by binary coalescence also provide a suitable domain where we can investigate strong field gravity, we also study the deviations from general relativity using the parameterized post-Einsteinian framework. As an example, focusing on the Einstein telescope and DECIGO pair, we demonstrate that there exists a sweet-spot range of sensitivity in the pre-DECIGO period where the best enhancement due to the synergy effect can be obtained for estimates of the post-Newtonian waveform parameters. Similar results are obtained for the parameter that characterizes deviation from general relativity.

  19. Experimental study on modulation of Stokes parameters on propagation of a Gaussian Schell model beam in free space.

    PubMed

    Verma, Manish; Senthilkumaran, P; Joseph, Joby; Kandpal, H C

    2013-07-01

    The effect on the Stokes parameters of a Gaussian Schell model beam on propagation in free space is studied experimentally and results are matched with the theory [X. H. Zhao, et al. Opt. Express 17, 17888 (2009)] that in general the degree of polarization of a Gaussian Schell model beam doesn't change on propagation if the three spectral correlation widths δ xx, δ yy, δ xy are equal and the beam width parameters σ x =σ y. It is experimentally shown that all the four Stokes parameters at the center of the beam decrease on propagation while the magnitudes of the normalized Stokes parameters and the spectral degree of polarization at the center of the beam remain constant for different propagation distances.

  20. First-Principles Calculation of the Real-Space Order Parameter and Condensation Energy Density in Phonon-Mediated Superconductors.

    PubMed

    Linscheid, A; Sanna, A; Floris, A; Gross, E K U

    2015-08-28

    We show that the superconducting order parameter and condensation energy density of phonon-mediated superconductors can be calculated in real space from first principles density functional theory for superconductors. This method highlights the connection between the chemical bonding structure and the superconducting condensation and reveals new and interesting properties of superconducting materials. Understanding this connection is essential to describe nanostructured superconducting systems where the usual reciprocal space analysis hides the basic physical mechanism. In a first application we present results for MgB2, CaC6 and hole-doped graphane.

  1. Experimental design and environmental parameters affect Rhodospirillum rubrum S1H response to space flight.

    PubMed

    Mastroleo, Felice; Van Houdt, Rob; Leroy, Baptiste; Benotmane, M Abderrafi; Janssen, Ann; Mergeay, Max; Vanhavere, Filip; Hendrickx, Larissa; Wattiez, Ruddy; Leys, Natalie

    2009-12-01

    In view of long-haul space exploration missions, the European Space Agency initiated the Micro-Ecological Life Support System Alternative (MELiSSA) project targeting the total recycling of organic waste produced by the astronauts into oxygen, water and food using a loop of bacterial and higher plant bioreactors. In that purpose, the alpha-proteobacterium, Rhodospirillum rubrum S1H, was sent twice to the International Space Station and was analyzed post-flight using a newly developed R. rubrum whole genome oligonucleotide microarray and high throughput gel-free proteomics with Isotope-Coded Protein Label technology. Moreover, in an effort to identify a specific response of R. rubrum S1H to space flight, simulation of microgravity and space-ionizing radiation were performed on Earth under identical culture set-up and growth conditions as encountered during the actual space journeys. Transcriptomic and proteomic data were integrated and permitted to put forward the importance of medium composition and culture set-up on the response of the bacterium to space flight-related environmental conditions. In addition, we showed for the first time that a low dose of ionizing radiation (2 mGy) can induce a significant response at the transcriptomic level, although no change in cell viability and only a few significant differentially expressed proteins were observed. From the MELiSSA perspective, we could argue the effect of microgravity to be minimized, whereas R. rubrum S1H could be more sensitive to ionizing radiation during long-term space exploration mission.

  2. Electrode performance parameters for a radioisotope-powered AMTEC for space power applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Underwood, M. L.; O'Connor, D.; Williams, R. M.; Jeffries-Nakamura, B.; Ryan, M. A.; Bankston, C. P.

    1992-01-01

    The alkali metal thermoelastic converter (AMTEC) is a device for the direct conversion of heat to electricity. Recently a design of an AMTEC using a radioisotope heat source was described, but the optimum condenser temperature was hotter than the temperatures used in the laboratory to develop the electrode performance model. Now laboratory experiments have confirmed the dependence of two model parameters over a broader range of condenser and electrode temperatures for two candidate electrode compositions. One parameter, the electrochemical exchange current density at the reaction interface, is independent of the condenser temperature, and depends only upon the collision rate of sodium at the reaction zone. The second parameter, a morphological parameter, which measures the mass transport resistance through the electrode, is independent of condenser and electrode temperatures for molybdenum electrodes. For rhodium-tungsten electrodes, however, this parameter increases for decreasing electrode temperature, indicating an activated mass transport mechanism such as surface diffusion.

  3. Parameters of optical signals registered with the AZT-33IK telescope in active Radar-Progress space experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eselevich, Maksim; Khakhinov, Vitaliy; Klunko, Evgeniy

    2016-09-01

    Images of Progress cargo spacecraft (PCS) and areas around them were captured by the AZT-33IK optical telescope (Sayan Observatory of ISTP SB RAS) during sessions of the active Radar-Progress space experiment. We took images of exhaust and fuel jets when propulsion systems worked and after they were cut off, during fuel system purging. In different sessions of the experiment, PCS had different orientations relative to the telescope, thus allowing us to find some parameters of the observed phenomena. These parameters make it possible to determine instants of engine ignitions, to estimate velocities of the jets, and, if necessary, to control the geometry of the space experiment. The paper reports common features of optical signals from jets measured in these experiments.

  4. Effect of space flight on cytokine production and other immunologic parameters of rhesus monkeys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sonnenfeld, G.; Davis, S.; Taylor, G. R.; Mandel, A. D.; Konstantinova, I. V.; Lesnyak, A.; Fuchs, B. B.; Peres, C.; Tkackzuk, J.; Schmitt, D. A.

    1996-01-01

    During a recent flight of a Russian satellite (Cosmos #2229), initial experiments examining the effects of space flight on immunologic responses of rhesus monkeys were performed to gain insight into the effect of space flight on resistance to infection. Experiments were performed on tissue samples taken from the monkeys before and immediately after flight. Additional samples were obtained approximately 1 month after flight for a postflight restraint study. Two types of experiments were carried out throughout this study. The first experiment determined the ability of leukocytes to produce interleukin-1 and to express interleukin-2 receptors. The second experiment examined the responsiveness of rhesus bone marrow cells to recombinant human granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF). Human reagents that cross-reacted with monkey tissue were utilized for the bulk of the studies. Results from both studies indicated that there were changes in immunologic function attributable to space flight. Interleukin-1 production and the expression of interleukin-2 receptors was decreased after space flight. Bone marrow cells from flight monkeys showed a significant decrease in their response to GM-CSF compared with the response of bone marrow cells from nonflight control monkeys. These results suggest that the rhesus monkey may be a useful surrogate for humans in future studies that examine the effect of space flight on immune response, particularly when conditions do not readily permit human study.

  5. A preliminary study of environmental parameters associated with the feasibility of a polygeneration plant at Kennedy Space Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barnes, G. D.

    1982-01-01

    The feasibility of a polygeneration plant at Kennedy Space Center was studied. Liquid hydrogen and gaseous nitrogen are the two principal products in consideration. Environmental parameters (air quality, water quality, biological diversity and hazardous waste disposal) necessary for the feasibility study were investigated. A National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) project flow sheet was to be formulated for the environmental impact statement. Water quality criteria for Florida waters were to be established.

  6. High Resolution Parameter-Space from a Two-Level Model on Semi-Insulating GaAs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    da Silva, S. L.; Viana, E. R.; de Oliveira, A. G.; Ribeiro, G. M.; da Silva, R. L.

    Semi-insulating Gallium Arsenide (SI-GaAs) samples experimentally show, under high electric fields and even at room temperature, negative differential conductivity in N-shaped form (NNDC). Since the most consolidated model for n-GaAs, namely, "the model", proposed by E. Schöll was not capable to generate the NNDC curve for SI-GaAs, in this work we have proposed an alternative model. The model proposed, "the two-valley model" is based on the minimal set of generation-recombination equations for two valleys inside of the conduction band, and an equation for the drift velocity as a function of the applied electric field, that covers the physical properties of the nonlinear electrical conduction of the SI-GaAs system. The "two-valley model" was capable to generate theoretically the NNDC region for the first time, and with that, we were able to build a high resolution parameter-space of the periodicity (PSP) using a Periodicity-Detection (PD) routine. In the parameter-space were observed self-organized periodic structures immersed in chaotic regions. The complex regions are presented in a "shrimp" shape rotated around a focal point, which forms in large-scale a "snail shell" shape, with intricate connections between different "shrimps". The knowledge of detailed information on parameter spaces is crucial to localize wide regions of smooth and continuous chaos.

  7. The reduced order model problem in distributed parameter systems adaptive identification and control. [large space structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, C. R., Jr.; Lawrence, D.

    1981-01-01

    The basic assumption that a large space structure can be decoupled preceding the application of reduced order active control was considered and alternative solutions to the control of such structures (in contrast to the strict modal control) were investigated. The transfer function matrix from the actuators to the sensors was deemed to be a reasonable candidate. More refined models from multivariable systems theory were studied and recent results in the multivariable control field were compared with respect to theoretical deficiencies and likely problems in application to large space structures.

  8. Effects of space station conditions on resting egg survivorship and parameters of life cycle in D. magna

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alekseev, V.; Sychev, V.

    Dormancy is a widespread adaptation protected many species of animals and plants in harsh environmental conditions within months or even hundred years This can be perspective for long-term transportation of ecosystem elements in space missions when renewable source of food and an efficient method to recycle oxygen are required Effect of space station conditions such as space radiation strong magnetic electric fields and microgravity on resting stages has not been studies yet We examined life cycle parameters in a cladoceran D magna after one month exposition as resting eggs at the Russian segment of International Space Station ISS The reference group were kept in laboratory at the same temperature 20 o C moister 50 and packed in the same material polyethylene zipped bags The samples from orbit in 10 days after delivering to the Earth were transported to laboratory for detailed analyses of their reactivation patterns life span parameters and productive reproductive potential We found statistically significant differences between D magna from orbit and control in reactivation maturation time and the first clutch size Animals exposed at orbit demonstrated lower level of reactivation and less fitness to high productive conditions they were cultivated than in reference group In offspring of ISS treated female about 50 of males appeared and no one in control Embryos of D magna from orbit showed significantly higher sensitiveness to the fungal parasite Pitium daphniarum than

  9. Fitting state-space integral projection models to size-structured time series data to estimate unknown parameters.

    PubMed

    White, J Wilson; Nickols, Kerry J; Malone, Daniel; Carr, Mark H; Starr, Richard M; Cordoleani, Flora; Baskett, Marissa L; Hastings, Alan; Botsford, Louis W

    2016-12-01

    Integral projection models (IPMs) have a number of advantages over matrix-model approaches for analyzing size-structured population dynamics, because the latter require parameter estimates for each age or stage transition. However, IPMs still require appropriate data. Typically they are parameterized using individual-scale relationships between body size and demographic rates, but these are not always available. We present an alternative approach for estimating demographic parameters from time series of size-structured survey data using a Bayesian state-space IPM (SSIPM). By fitting an IPM in a state-space framework, we estimate unknown parameters and explicitly account for process and measurement error in a dataset to estimate the underlying process model dynamics. We tested our method by fitting SSIPMs to simulated data; the model fit the simulated size distributions well and estimated unknown demographic parameters accurately. We then illustrated our method using nine years of annual surveys of the density and size distribution of two fish species (blue rockfish, Sebastes mystinus, and gopher rockfish, S. carnatus) at seven kelp forest sites in California. The SSIPM produced reasonable fits to the data, and estimated fishing rates for both species that were higher than our Bayesian prior estimates based on coast-wide stock assessment estimates of harvest. That improvement reinforces the value of being able to estimate demographic parameters from local-scale monitoring data. We highlight a number of key decision points in SSIPM development (e.g., open vs. closed demography, number of particles in the state-space filter) so that users can apply the method to their own datasets.

  10. Development of base pressure similarity parameters for application to space shuttle launch vehicle power-on aerodynamic testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sulyma, P. R.; Penny, M. M.

    1978-01-01

    A base pressure data correlation study was conducted to define exhaust plume similarity parameters for use in Space Shuttle power-on launch vehicle aerodynamic test programs. Data correlations were performed for single bodies having, respectively, single and triple nozzle configurations and for a triple body configuration with single nozzles on each of the outside bodies. Base pressure similarity parameters were found to differ for the single nozzle and triple nozzle configurations. However, the correlation parameter for each was found to be a strong function of the nozzle exit momentum. Results of the data base evaluation are presented indicating an assessment of all data points. Analytical/experimental data comparisons were made for nozzle calibrations and correction factors derived, where indicated for use in nozzle exit plane data calculations.

  11. The universe formation by space reduction cascades with random initial parameters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rubin, Sergei; Zinger, Alexey

    2012-09-01

    In this paper we discuss the creation of our universe using the idea of extra dimensions. The initial, multidimensional Lagrangian contains only metric tensor. We have found many sets of the numerical values of the Lagrangian parameters corresponding to the observed low-energy physics of our Universe. Different initial parameters can lead to the same values of fundamental constants by the appropriate choice of a dimensional reduction cascade. This result diminishes the significance of the search for the `unique' initial Lagrangian. We also have obtained a large number of low-energy vacua, which is known as `landscape' in the string theory.

  12. Summary of longitudinal stability and control parameters as determined from space shuttle Columbia flight test data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Suit, W. T.

    1986-01-01

    Extensive wind tunnel tests were conducted to establish the preflight aerodynamics of the Shuttle vehicle. This paper presents the longitudinal, short-period aerodynamics of the space shuttle Columbia as determined from flight test data. These flight-determined results are compared with the preflight predictions, and areas of agreement or disagreement are noted. In addition to the short-period aerodynamics, the pitch RCS effectiveness was determined.

  13. Numerical simulations of thermal instabilities in stratified gases. II - Exploration of the parameter space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reale, F.; Rosner, R.; Malagoli, A.; Peres, G.; Serio, S.

    1991-01-01

    The temporal evolution of density perturbations in an initially hydrostatic isothermal atmosphere consisting of an optically thin radiating compressible plasma is studied. Numerical techniques are used to describe the nonlinear evolution of the perturbations, and the relative equilibrium between dynamic and thermal instabilities as governed by three independent control parameters are examined, namely, the initial density contrast of the perturbation, the ratio of the local buoyancy oscillation period to the local radiative cooling time, and the ratio of the perturbation radius to the local scaleheight. Four orders of magnitude of initial density contrasts and ratios of buoyancy and cooling times, and one order of magnitude of the bubble dimensions are explored. Well-defined oscillations were found to occur in a limited parameter range, and thermal instability to occur even within secondary condensations deriving from the bubble fragmentation.

  14. Measurement of the PPN parameter γ by testing the geometry of near-Earth space

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luo, Jie; Tian, Yuan; Wang, Dian-Hong; Qin, Cheng-Gang; Shao, Cheng-Gang

    2016-06-01

    The Beyond Einstein Advanced Coherent Optical Network (BEACON) mission was designed to achieve an accuracy of 10^{-9} in measuring the Eddington parameter γ , which is perhaps the most fundamental Parameterized Post-Newtonian parameter. However, this ideal accuracy was just estimated as a ratio of the measurement accuracy of the inter-spacecraft distances to the magnitude of the departure from Euclidean geometry. Based on the BEACON concept, we construct a measurement model to estimate the parameter γ with the least squares method. Influences of the measurement noise and the out-of-plane error on the estimation accuracy are evaluated based on the white noise model. Though the BEACON mission does not require expensive drag-free systems and avoids physical dynamical models of spacecraft, the relatively low accuracy of initial inter-spacecraft distances poses a great challenge, which reduces the estimation accuracy in about two orders of magnitude. Thus the noise requirements may need to be more stringent in the design in order to achieve the target accuracy, which is demonstrated in the work. Considering that, we have given the limits on the power spectral density of both noise sources for the accuracy of 10^{-9}.

  15. Generalized parity relations for large space structures with uncertain parameters. M.S. Thesis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dutilloy, J. R.

    1986-01-01

    The generalized parity relations method is a technique that can be used to detect sensor and actuator failures on a large space structure. A model of a grid structure was used to evaluate the performance of these relations. It shows their relative sensitivity to modeling errors. A method using sensor outputs and actuator inputs is required for the design of the generalized parity relations. Three different estimators are studied. The last estimator can generate relations optimized for the detection of a particular failure which are interesting when the level of sensor noise is high.

  16. Exploring parameter space in detailed single neuron models: simulations of the mitral and granule cells of the olfactory bulb.

    PubMed

    Bhalla, U S; Bower, J M

    1993-06-01

    1. Detailed compartmental computer simulations of single mitral and granule cells of the vertebrate olfactory bulb were constructed using previously published geometric data. Electrophysiological properties were determined by comparing model output to previously published experimental data, mainly current-clamp recordings. 2. The passive electrical properties of each model were explored by comparing model output with intracellular potential data from hyperpolarizing current injection experiments. The results suggest that membrane resistivity in both cells is nonuniform, with somatas having a substantially lower resistivity than the dendrites. 3. The active properties of these cells were explored by incorporating active ion channels into modeled compartments. On the basis of evidence from the literature, the mitral cell model included six channel types: fast sodium, fast delayed rectifier (Kfast), slow delayed rectifier (K), transient outward potassium current (KA), voltage- and calcium-dependent potassium current (KCa), and L-type calcium current. The granule cell model included four channel types: rat brain sodium, K, KA, and the non-inactivating muscarinic potassium current (KM). Modeled channels were based on the Hodgkin-Huxley formalism. 4. Representative kinetics for each of the channel classes above were obtained from the literature. The experimentally unknown spatial distributions of each included channel were obtained by systematic parameter searches. These were conducted in two ways: large-scale simulation series, in which each parameter was varied in turn, and an adaptation of a multidimensional conjugate gradient method. In each case, the simulated results were compared wtih experimental data using a curve-matching function evaluating mean squared differences of several aspects of the simulated and experimental voltage waveforms. 5. Systematic parameter variations revealed a single distinct region of parameter space in which the mitral cell model best

  17. Calibrating and deriving physical parameters using plasma contactor data from the International Space Station

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bering, E.

    The International Space Station (ISS) regularly passes through the southern auroral oval south of Australia. The ISS has two plasma contactors that emit the electron currents needed to balance electron collection by surfaces such as the lattice of bare rods on the solar array masts. These electron currents exceed 0.1 A at times. The largest currents are observed in the auroral oval south of Australia. On the space station, the solar array 40 m long masts each have over 400 m of stainless steel tensioning rods. When subject to orbital v×B-l induced potentials, the rods collect substantial currents from the ionosphere. Maximum v×B-l potentials are generated near the magnetic poles. The plasma contactor emission current can be converted to an estimate of plasma density and calibrated using Floating potential Probe (FPP) and other data. These measurements show that the plasma density in the nighttime auroral ionosphere is frequently several times that predicted by the International Reference Ionosphere (IRI)-90 and IRI-2001 models.

  18. Calibrating and deriving physical parameters using plasma contactor data from the international space station

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bering, Edgar A.; Koontz, Steven L.; Evans, David S.; Katz, Ira; Gardner, Barbara M.; Suggs, Robert M.; Minow, Joseph I.; Dalton, Penni J.; Feruson, Dale C.; Hillard, G. Barry; Counts, Jerry L.; Barsamian, Hagop; Kern, John; Mikatarian, Ronald

    2003-12-01

    The International Space Station (ISS) regularly passes through the southern auroral oval south of Australia. The ISS has two plasma contactors that emit the electron currents needed to balance electron collection by surfaces such as the lattice of bare rods on the solar array masts. These electron currents exceed 0.1 A at times. The largest currents are observed in the auroral oval south of Australia. On the space station, the solar array 40 m long masts each have over 400 m of stainless steel tensioning rods. When subject to orbital v × B· l induced potentials, the rods collect substantial currents from the ionosphere. Maximum v × B· l potentials are generated near the magnetic poles. The plasma contactor emission current can be converted to an estimate of plasma density and calibrated using Floating Potential Probe (FPP) and other data. These measurements show that the plasma density in the nighttime auroral ionosphere is frequently several times that predicted by the International Reference Ionosphere (IRI)-90 and IRI2001 models.

  19. Control of parameters of the International Space Station Alpha Russian-segment two-phase thermal control system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grigoriev, Y. I.; Grigorov, E. I.; Cykhotsky, V. M.; Prokhorov, Y. M.; Gorbenko, G. A.; Blinkov, V. N.; Brus, N. A.; Malukhin, C. A.; Ganja, E. P.

    1997-01-01

    International Space Station ALPHA (ISSA) will present the assembly of many modules with total heat load a few tens of kilowatts. Collection, transport and rejection of heat from Russian Segment (RS) will be provided by central ammonia two-phase mechanically-pumped loop (MPL). Two-phase MPL should provide stable thermal regime at any number of attached modules, at variations in heat loads and at various orbit environment conditions. The paper presents principal schematic of MPL RS ISSA and specifications for control of parameters of the system. Recommendations on heat-controlled accumulator and flow control valves design are given.

  20. The method and results of measurement of the optical parameters of the UHECR detector for the TUS space experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grinyuk, A.; Slunecka, M.; Tkachenko, A.; Tkachev, L.; Klimov, P.; Sharakin, S.

    2014-11-01

    The TUS space experiment is aimed to study the energy spectrum and arrival direction of Ultra High Energy Cosmic Rays (UHECR) at E ~1020 eV. The TUS detector will measure the fluorescence and Cherenkov light radiated by Extensive Air Shower of the UHECR using the optical system that comprises a Fresnel mirror-concentrator of seven modules with a total area of ~ 2m2. The production process of the Fresnel mirror and the method and results of measurement of its optical parameters are presented.

  1. Parameter Space of Fixed Points of the Damped Driven Pendulum Susceptible to Control of Chaos Algorithms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dittmore, Andrew; Trail, Collin; Olsen, Thomas; Wiener, Richard J.

    2003-11-01

    We have previously demonstrated the experimental control of chaos in a Modified Taylor-Couette system with hourglass geometry( Richard J. Wiener et al), Phys. Rev. Lett. 83, 2340 (1999).. Identifying fixed points susceptible to algorithms for the control of chaos is key. We seek to learn about this process in the accessible numerical model of the damped, driven pendulum. Following Baker(Gregory L. Baker, Am. J. Phys. 63), 832 (1995)., we seek points susceptible to the OGY(E. Ott, C. Grebogi, and J. A. Yorke, Phys. Rev. Lett. 64), 1196 (1990). algorithm. We automate the search for fixed points that are candidates for control. We present comparisons of the space of candidate fixed points with the bifurcation diagrams and Poincare sections of the system. We demonstrate control at fixed points which do not appear on the attractor. We also show that the control algorithm may be employed to shift the system between non-communicating branches of the attractor.

  2. Parameters of superflares on G-Type stars observed with the Kepler space telescope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Savanov, I. S.; Dmitrienko, E. S.

    2016-01-01

    We continued the analysis of 279 G-type stars with superflares (energies in the range of 1033-1036 erg). We calculated the SFL parameter (part of the stellar surface which emits in the flare). The SFL estimates were derived from the relation connecting this value with the amplitude of the flare and its radiation on the assumption of the blackbody character of the emission at times close to its maximum. Most SFL values are in the range of 0-0.1, with values of 0.2-0.4 for some strong flares. Dependence of SFL on effective temperature for stars with superflares is similar to that found earlier for the spottedness parameter S. The SFL distribution reaches its maximum in the temperature range of about 5100-5250 K and decreases with the effective temperature increase. We suggested an assumption on the presence of bimodal distribution in the "SFL-rotation period" relation with a gap for objects with rotation periods P of about 10 days. For stars with P less than 10 days, the given data can indicate a decrease in flare areas with the P increase. Our analysis showed that significant changes both in flare energy and in flare areas can be achieved with small changes in spottedness S for one and the same star.

  3. Biological basis for space-variant sensor design I: parameters of monkey and human spatial vision

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rojer, Alan S.; Schwartz, Eric L.

    1991-02-01

    Biological sensor design has long provided inspiration for sensor design in machine vision. However relatively little attention has been paid to the actual design parameters provided by biological systems as opposed to the general nature of biological vision architectures. In the present paper we will provide a review of current knowledge of primate spatial vision design parameters and will present recent experimental and modeling work from our lab which demonstrates that a numerical conformal mapping which is a refinement of our previous complex logarithmic model provides the best current summary of this feature of the primate visual system. In this paper we will review recent work from our laboratory which has characterized some of the spatial architectures of the primate visual system. In particular we will review experimental and modeling studies which indicate that: . The global spatial architecture of primate visual cortex is well summarized by a numerical conformal mapping whose simplest analytic approximation is the complex logarithm function . The columnar sub-structure of primate visual cortex can be well summarized by a model based on a band-pass filtered white noise. We will also refer to ongoing work in our lab which demonstrates that: . The joint columnar/map structure of primate visual cortex can be modeled and summarized in terms of a new algorithm the ''''proto-column'''' algorithm. This work provides a reference-point for current engineering approaches to novel architectures for

  4. The internal Shapiro effect in some portions of the parameter space of asymmetric two-junction SQUIDs and its influences

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eatesami, Mohammad

    2013-08-01

    The Shapiro effect is known, with regular steps in the voltage-current characteristic of a Josephson junction in the presence of microwave radiation, and so are its applications. In asymmetric two-junction SQUIDs (superconducting quantum interference devices), in particular the interactions between various current contributions in the two junctions lead to more varied and richer conditions. In this paper, we discuss the possibility and the impacts of a kind of internal Shapiro effect in some portions of the parameter space of the asymmetric high-TC SQUID with overdamped junctions and large loop inductance. In this predicted phenomenon, the required high-frequency radiation is produced spontaneously in the interior of the SQUID. The main message is the importance of achieving a set of nine parameters for the device whose voltage-current characteristics show no indication of spike-step-like structures.

  5. Optical turbulence parameters characterized via optical measurements over a 2.33 km free-space laser path.

    PubMed

    Tunick, Arnold

    2008-09-15

    Optical turbulence research contributes to improved laser communications, adaptive optics, and long-range imaging systems. This paper presents experimental measurements of scintillation and focal spot displacement to obtain optical turbulence information along a near-horizontal 2.33 km free-space laser propagation path. Calculated values for the refractive index structure constant (C(n)(2)) and Fried parameter (r0) are compared to scintillometer-based measurements for several cases in winter and spring. Optical measurements were investigated using two different laser sources for the first and second parts of the experiment. Scintillation index estimates from recorded signal intensities were corrected to account for aperture averaging. As a result, we found that an earlier calculation algorithm based on analysis of log-amplitude intensity variance was the best estimator of optical turbulence parameters over the propagation path considered.

  6. Estimation of Cardiopulmonary Parameters From Ultra Wideband Radar Measurements Using the State Space Method.

    PubMed

    Naishadham, Krishna; Piou, Jean E; Ren, Lingyun; Fathy, Aly E

    2016-12-01

    Ultra wideband (UWB) Doppler radar has many biomedical applications, including remote diagnosis of cardiovascular disease, triage and real-time personnel tracking in rescue missions. It uses narrow pulses to probe the human body and detect tiny cardiopulmonary movements by spectral analysis of the backscattered electromagnetic (EM) field. With the help of super-resolution spectral algorithms, UWB radar is capable of increased accuracy for estimating vital signs such as heart and respiration rates in adverse signal-to-noise conditions. A major challenge for biomedical radar systems is detecting the heartbeat of a subject with high accuracy, because of minute thorax motion (less than 0.5 mm) caused by the heartbeat. The problem becomes compounded by EM clutter and noise in the environment. In this paper, we introduce a new algorithm based on the state space method (SSM) for the extraction of cardiac and respiration rates from UWB radar measurements. SSM produces range-dependent system poles that can be classified parametrically with spectral peaks at the cardiac and respiratory frequencies. It is shown that SSM produces accurate estimates of the vital signs without producing harmonics and inter-modulation products that plague signal resolution in widely used FFT spectrograms.

  7. Macroscopicity of quantum superpositions on a one-parameter unitary path in Hilbert space

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Volkoff, T. J.; Whaley, K. B.

    2014-12-01

    We analyze quantum states formed as superpositions of an initial pure product state and its image under local unitary evolution, using two measurement-based measures of superposition size: one based on the optimal quantum binary distinguishability of the branches of the superposition and another based on the ratio of the maximal quantum Fisher information of the superposition to that of its branches, i.e., the relative metrological usefulness of the superposition. A general formula for the effective sizes of these states according to the branch-distinguishability measure is obtained and applied to superposition states of N quantum harmonic oscillators composed of Gaussian branches. Considering optimal distinguishability of pure states on a time-evolution path leads naturally to a notion of distinguishability time that generalizes the well-known orthogonalization times of Mandelstam and Tamm and Margolus and Levitin. We further show that the distinguishability time provides a compact operational expression for the superposition size measure based on the relative quantum Fisher information. By restricting the maximization procedure in the definition of this measure to an appropriate algebra of observables, we show that the superposition size of, e.g., NOON states and hierarchical cat states, can scale linearly with the number of elementary particles comprising the superposition state, implying precision scaling inversely with the total number of photons when these states are employed as probes in quantum parameter estimation of a 1-local Hamiltonian in this algebra.

  8. Computer code for space-time diagnostics of nuclear safety parameters

    SciTech Connect

    Solovyev, D. A.; Semenov, A. A.; Gruzdov, F. V.; Druzhaev, A. A.; Shchukin, N. V.; Dolgenko, S. G.; Solovyeva, I. V.; Ovchinnikova, E. A.

    2012-07-01

    The computer code ECRAN 3D (Experimental and Calculation Reactor Analysis) is designed for continuous monitoring and diagnostics of reactor cores and databases for RBMK-1000 on the basis of analytical methods for the interrelation parameters of nuclear safety. The code algorithms are based on the analysis of deviations between the physically obtained figures and the results of neutron-physical and thermal-hydraulic calculations. Discrepancies between the measured and calculated signals are equivalent to obtaining inadequacy between performance of the physical device and its simulator. The diagnostics system can solve the following problems: identification of facts and time for inconsistent results, localization of failures, identification and quantification of the causes for inconsistencies. These problems can be effectively solved only when the computer code is working in a real-time mode. This leads to increasing requirements for a higher code performance. As false operations can lead to significant economic losses, the diagnostics system must be based on the certified software tools. POLARIS, version 4.2.1 is used for the neutron-physical calculation in the computer code ECRAN 3D. (authors)

  9. Numeric estimation of the possibilities of ionizing detectors for monitoring SR beam space parameters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Artemiev, A. N.; Artemiev, N. A.; Ioudin, L. I.; Mikhailov, V. G.; Moryakov, V. P.; Odintsov, D. G.; Rezvov, V. A.; Cerenius, Y.; Svensson, A.

    2000-06-01

    An ionizing detector for on-line registration and representation of the geometric SR beam parameters was developed in RRC KI. The detector analyses the products of the residual gas ionization, which was done by the investigated beam. Special electrostatic optics and open image converter tube (ICT) form optical image of the real beam on the screen of ICT. The detector was checked on SR beams of the next storage rings: DCI (LURE, Orsey, France), KSRS (RRC KI, Moscow, Russia) and MAX-2 (MAX-lab, Lund, Sweden). The codes for TV image processing give a possibility for numeric estimation of the beam size, the width of its horizontal and vertical profiles and position of the beam gravity. Statistic processing of the beam gravity center using big amount of TV frames gives uncertainty in the beam position of about 2 μm while the width of the beam is about 2 mm. Summation of big amount of TV frames was used. This method significantly increases signal-to-noise ratio.

  10. Parameter estimation supplement to the Mission Analysis Evaluation and Space Trajectory Operations program (MAESTRO)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bjorkman, W. S.; Uphoff, C. W.

    1973-01-01

    This Parameter Estimation Supplement describes the PEST computer program and gives instructions for its use in determination of lunar gravitation field coefficients. PEST was developed for use in the RAE-B lunar orbiting mission as a means of lunar field recovery. The observations processed by PEST are short-arc osculating orbital elements. These observations are the end product of an orbit determination process obtained with another program. PEST's end product it a set of harmonic coefficients to be used in long-term prediction of the lunar orbit. PEST employs some novel techniques in its estimation process, notably a square batch estimator and linear variational equations in the orbital elements (both osculating and mean) for measurement sensitivities. The program's capabilities are described, and operating instructions and input/output examples are given. PEST utilizes MAESTRO routines for its trajectory propagation. PEST's program structure and subroutines which are not common to MAESTRO are described. Some of the theoretical background information for the estimation process, and a derivation of linear variational equations for the Method 7 elements are included.

  11. Space and water heating in UK multi-residential buildings: comparison of heating systems and heating design parameters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Apostolakis, Konstantinos

    2007-05-01

    Space and water heating comprise a large part of the energy needs of a domestic building. The energy performance of the heating systems depends directly on their operating efficiency and indirectly on the heat losses of the building. This study examines the energy performance of various space and water heating systems in a multi-residential building in the UK. Multi-residential buildings are characterised by diverse use of the spaces and the services by the occupants with consequent varying heating loads and operation schedules that the heating systems have to deal with. The energy performance of the systems is analysed in terms of energy consumption, C02 emissions and running cost. Heating design parameters such as localisation or centralisation of the installation of the systems, ventilation rate and heating set point temperature are also examined and their potential of saving heating energy is estimated. Results showed that a ground source heat pump system produces the lowest C02 emissions (5.92 tnC02 per annum) amongst the systems examined (9.76 tnC02 per annum in average). A localised gas-fired warm air system can save 8% of C02 emissions compared to a centralised version of the same system. Great savings can be achieved by lowering the ventilation rate (23%-26% C02 reduction) and lowering the heating set point temperature (23%-27% CQ2 reduction).

  12. Life-Prediction Parameters of Sapphire Determined for the Design of a Space Station Combustion Facility Window

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Salem, Jonathan A.

    2003-01-01

    To characterize the stress corrosion parameters and predict the life of a sapphire window being considered for use in the International Space Station's Fluids and Combustion Facility, researchers at the NASA Glenn Research Center conducted stress corrosion tests, fracture toughness tests, and reliability analyses, as shown in the figures. Standardized test methods, developed and updated by the author under the auspices of American Society for Testing and Materials, were employed. One interesting finding is that sapphire exhibits a susceptibility to stress corrosion in water similar to that of glass. In addition to generating the stress corrosion parameters and fracture toughness data, closed-form expressions for the variances of the crack growth parameters were derived. The expressions allow confidence bands to be easily placed on life predictions of ceramic components. Brittle materials such as sapphire and quartz are required for windows in a variety of applications such as the Fluids and Combustion Facility. To minimize the launch weight of such facilities, researchers must design the windows to be as lightweight as possible. The safe use of lightweight, brittle windows in structural applications is limited by two factors: low fracture toughness and slow crack growth, or stress corrosion. Stress corrosion of these and other optical materials can occur in relatively common environments, such as humid air. Access to the data has been requested by designers for use in the life prediction of a Northrop Grumman F16 instrument window and a Jet Propulsion Laboratory instrument window. One Space Act Agreement has been formed. Future work includes the measurement of the life of subscale windows.

  13. Geostatistical characteristic of space-time variation in quality parameters in Klodzko water supply system (SW part of Poland)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Namysłowska-Wilczyńska, Barbara

    2015-04-01

    Selected results of research connected with the development of a (3D) geostatistical hydrogeochemical model of the Klodzko city area, dedicated to the spatial and time variation in the quality parameters in the Klodzko water supply system (SW part of Poland) will be presented. The research covers the period 2007 ÷ 2011. Spatial analyses of the variation in three different quality parameters, i.e. Fe iron [g/m3] content, Mn manganese [g/m3] content and NH4+ ammonium ion [g/m3] content, were carried out. Spatial and time variation in the parameters was analyzed on the basis of the data (2007 ÷ 2011). Thematic databases, containing original data on coordinates X, Y (latitude and longitude) and Z (time - years) and on regionalized variables, i.e. the water quality parameters in the Klodzko water supply system, were created. The input for the studies were the chemical determinations of the quality parameters of water samples taken in the Klodzko water supply system area in different periods of time. These data were subjected to spatial analyses using geostatistical methods. The geostatistical parameters of the assumed theoretical models of directional semivariograms functions of the studied water quality parameters, calculated for the time (years) interval, were used in the ordinary (block) kriging estimation. Generally, the behaviour of the quality parameters in the Klodzko water supply system has been found to vary in space and time. Thanks to the multidirectional spatial analyses some regularities in the variation in the water supply system in the Klodzko city area have been identified. In the considered time interval, the shapes of the directional Fe iron content semivariogram show a tendency to vary periodically. The courses of the directional semivariograms of Mn manganese content and NH4+ ammonium ion content show some tendencies towards directional variation over the passing years: distinctly expressed trends of variability for Mn content and stronger for NH4

  14. Effect of 90-day space flight (MDS-ISS) on immunological parameters in mice: lymphocyte distribution and function

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roberts, Arthur; Lhuillier, Andrew; Liu, Yi; Ruggiu, Alessandra; Shi, Yufang

    Elucidation of the effects of space flight on the immune system of astronauts and other animal species is important for the survival and success of manned space flight, especially long-term missions. Space flight exposes astronauts to microgravity, galactic cosmic radiation (GCR), and various psycho-social stressors. Blood samples from astronauts returning from space flight have shown changes in the numbers and types of circulating leukocytes. Similarly, normal lym-phocyte homeostasis has been shown to be severely affected in mice using ground-based models of microgravity and GCR exposure, as demonstrated by profound effects on several immuno-logical parameters examined by other investigators and ourselves. In particular, lymphocyte numbers are significantly reduced and subpopulation distribution is altered in the spleen, thy-mus, and peripheral blood following hindlimb unloading (HU) in mice. Lymphocyte depletion was found to be mediated through corticosteroid-induced apoptosis, although the molecular mechanism of apoptosis induction is still under investigation. The proliferative capacity of TCR-stimulated lymphocytes was also inhibited after HU. We have similarly shown that mice exposed to high-energy 56Fe ion radiation have decreased lymphocyte numbers and perturba-tions in proportions of various subpopulations, including CD4+ and CD8+ T cells, and B cells in the spleen, and maturation stages of immature T cells in the thymus. To compare these ground-based results to the effects of actual space-flight, fresh spleen and thymus samples were recently obtained from normal and transgenic mice immediately after 90 d. space-flight in the MDS, and identically-housed ground control mice. Total leukocyte numbers in each organ were enumerated, and subpopulation distribution was examined by flow cytometric analysis of CD3, CD4, CD8, CD19, CD25, DX-5, and CD11b. Splenic T cells were stimulated with anti-CD3 and assessed for proliferation after 2-4 d., and production of

  15. Simulations of binary galaxy cluster mergers: Modeling real clusters and exploring parameter spaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zuhone, John A.

    . Lastly, we present a fiducial set of galaxy cluster merger simulations, where the initial mass ratio and the impact parameter have been varied. By projecting the simulated quantities along the axes of the computational domain, we produce maps of X-ray surface brightness, temperature, projected mass density, and simulated X-ray observations. From these observations we compute the observed X-ray luminosity and fitted spectral temperature, and fit b-model profiles to compute estimated hydrostatic masses. From this information we determine the effect of mergers viewed along different projections on these observed quantities. We also construct simulated maps of galaxies, and test the power of a commonly employed substructure statistic to probe for the existence of substructure along the different projections during the merger. Finally, we comment on other aspects of our simulations, such as comparisons to existing merging clusters; and the mixing of the intracluster medium due to merging, and resulting cluster entropy and cooling time profiles.

  16. Apollo MEED mycology revisited and reviewed, including the Trichophyton terrestre keratinophilic growth at splashdown and 23 years after exposure to space parameters.

    PubMed

    Volz, P A; Long, J D; Veselenak, J M

    1995-01-01

    Keratinophilic Trichophyton terrestre conidia were exposed to selected parameters of space flight including 254, 280 and 300 nm UV light, full light and total darkness of space. Phenotypic isolates were grown on human hair collected from one source at years 1 and 23 after splashdown. The patterns of fungal growth on the hair, and the hair deterioration rates, were noted according to the space exposure. Growth and deterioration were consistent but slightly reduced at year 23.

  17. Effect of quantum parameter – H on space-charge wave spectra in n-type semiconductor plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Ghosh, S. Muley, Apurva

    2015-07-31

    The present paper deals with the propagation characteristics of very fundamental wave i.e. space – charge wave while propagating through quantum semiconductor plasma. We have used quantum hydrodynamic model to derive the most general dispersion relation in terms of quantum parameter – H. We have found that in presence of an external electrostatic field, the wave spectra (dispersion as well as gain characteristics) not only modified due to presence of quantum effect but also two novel modes of propagation are introduced due to this effect. Hence it may be concluded that to miniaturize the opto-electronic devices, one should use highly doped semiconductor medium at comparatively lower temperature so that the quantum effects predominate.

  18. Parameter space for the collective laser coupling in the laser fusion driver based on the concept of fiber amplification network.

    PubMed

    Huang, Zhihua; Lin, Honghuan; Xu, Dangpeng; Li, Mingzhong; Wang, Jianjun; Deng, Ying; Zhang, Rui; Zhang, Yongliang; Tian, Xiaocheng; Wei, Xiaofeng

    2013-07-15

    Collective laser coupling of the fiber array in the inertial confinement fusion (ICF) laser driver based on the concept of fiber amplification network (FAN) is researched. The feasible parameter space is given for laser coupling of the fundamental, second and third harmonic waves by neglecting the influence of the frequency conversion on the beam quality under the assumption of beam quality factor conservation. Third harmonic laser coupling is preferred due to its lower output energy requirement from a single fiber amplifier. For coplanar fiber array, the energy requirement is around 0.4 J with an effective mode field diameter of around 500 μm while maintaining the fundamental mode operation which is more than one order of magnitude higher than what can be achieved with state-of-the-art technology. Novel waveguide structure needs to be developed to enlarge the fundamental mode size while mitigating the catastrophic self-focusing effect.

  19. Effect of 12-hour road transportation on physiological, immunological and haematological parameters in bulls housed at different space allowances.

    PubMed

    Gupta, S; Earley, B; Crowe, M A

    2007-05-01

    The effects of transporting Holstein Friesian bulls (n=72; bodyweight 403+/-3.5 kg) for 12h by road were examined. Adrenal, haematological and immune responses, body temperature and performance were recorded. The animals had been previously housed for 96 days at three space allowances (1.2, 2.7 or 4.2m(2) per bull). The bulls were allocated to one of two treatments: T (transport for 12h; n=16 per space allowance) and C (control; n=8 per space allowance). Basal cortisol plasma concentrations and interferon (IFN)-gamma production from cultured lymphocytes did not show any statistically significant difference (P>0.05) following the housing period. Removing bulls from their home pens and walking them to the pre-loading crush facility, loading onto the transporter, and unloading following the 12h road journey, significantly (P<0.001) increased plasma cortisol concentration. The bulls housed at 4.2m(2) had greater (P<0.05) plasma cortisol concentrations than bulls housed at 1.2m(2) at loading, unloading, or on return to the crush holding facility; those housed at 1.2m(2) had greater (P<0.05) plasma cortisol concentrations than bulls housed at 2.7 and 4.2m(2) in their home pens after transport. There was an increased (P<0.05) plasma cortisol response in the T than in the C bulls following adrenocorticotrophic hormone administration. Transport significantly reduced (P<0.05) IFN-gamma production, lymphocyte % and body weight and significantly increased (P<0.05) neutrophils, eosinophils, packed cell volume, red blood cell numbers and haemoglobin. In conclusion, housing bulls for 96 days in a range of space allowances did not affect basal cortisol response or immune function parameters. Whereas transport increased plasma cortisol and reduced the immune response in the short-term, the changes were transient and within normal physiological ranges, suggesting that 12h road transport had no adverse effect on welfare status over the longer term. Furthermore, transport of bulls

  20. Optimization of design and operating parameters of a space-based optical-electronic system with a distributed aperture.

    PubMed

    Tcherniavski, Iouri; Kahrizi, Mojtaba

    2008-11-20

    Using a gradient optimization method with objective functions formulated in terms of a signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) calculated at given values of the prescribed spatial ground resolution, optimization problems of geometrical parameters of a distributed optical system and a charge-coupled device of a space-based optical-electronic system are solved for samples of the optical systems consisting of two and three annular subapertures. The modulation transfer function (MTF) of the distributed aperture is expressed in terms of an average MTF taking residual image alignment (IA) and optical path difference (OPD) errors into account. The results show optimal solutions of the optimization problems depending on diverse variable parameters. The information on the magnitudes of the SNR can be used to determine the number of the subapertures and their sizes, while the information on the SNR decrease depending on the IA and OPD errors can be useful in design of a beam combination control system to produce the necessary requirements to its accuracy on the basis of the permissible deterioration in the image quality.

  1. Mapping the Parameter Space of tDCS and Cognitive Control via Manipulation of Current Polarity and Intensity.

    PubMed

    Karuza, Elisabeth A; Balewski, Zuzanna Z; Hamilton, Roy H; Medaglia, John D; Tardiff, Nathan; Thompson-Schill, Sharon L

    2016-01-01

    In the cognitive domain, enormous variation in methodological approach prompts questions about the generalizability of behavioral findings obtained from studies of transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS). To determine the impact of common variations in approach, we systematically manipulated two key stimulation parameters-current polarity and intensity-and assessed their impact on a task of inhibitory control (the Eriksen Flanker). Ninety participants were randomly assigned to one of nine experimental groups: three stimulation conditions (anode, sham, cathode) crossed with three intensity levels (1.0, 1.5, 2.0 mA). As participants performed the Flanker task, stimulation was applied over left dorsolateral prefrontal cortex (DLPFC; electrode montage: F3-RSO). The behavioral impact of these manipulations was examined using mixed effects linear regression. Results indicate a significant effect of stimulation condition (current polarity) on the magnitude of the interference effect during the Flanker; however, this effect was specific to the comparison between anodal and sham stimulation. Inhibitory control was therefore improved by anodal stimulation over the DLPFC. In the present experimental context, no reliable effect of stimulation intensity was observed, and we found no evidence that inhibitory control was impeded by cathodal stimulation. Continued exploration of the stimulation parameter space, particularly with more robustly powered sample sizes, is essential to facilitating cross-study comparison and ultimately working toward a reliable model of tDCS effects.

  2. Dynamics and adaptive control of a dual-arm space robot with closed-loop constraints and uncertain inertial parameters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jia, Ying-Hong; Hu, Quan; Xu, Shi-Jie

    2014-02-01

    A dynamics-based adaptive control approach is proposed for a planar dual-arm space robot in the presence of closed-loop constraints and uncertain inertial parameters of the payload. The controller is capable of controlling the position and attitude of both the satellite base and the payload grasped by the manipulator end effectors. The equations of motion in reduced-order form for the constrained system are derived by incorporating the constraint equations in terms of accelerations into Kane's equations of the unconstrained system. Model analysis shows that the resulting equations perfectly meet the requirement of adaptive controller design. Consequently, by using an indirect approach, an adaptive control scheme is proposed to accomplish position/attitude trajectory tracking control with the uncertain parameters being estimated on-line. The actuator redundancy due to the closed-loop constraints is utilized to minimize a weighted norm of the joint torques. Global asymptotic stability is proven by using Lyapunov's method, and simulation results are also presented to demonstrate the effectiveness of the proposed approach. [Figure not available: see fulltext.

  3. Analyzing dynamic performance of power systems over parameter space using the method of normal forms of vector fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Songzhe

    Today's power systems have become more and more stressed due to the high utilization of available facilities. The complex dynamic behavior of large stressed power systems following disturbances can not be fully explained with present tools, such as linear eigen-analysis tools and nonlinear time-domain simulation methods. This research work applies a nonlinear analytical tool, the method of normal forms of vector fields, to help understand the complex transient oscillations in stressed power systems. The method of normal forms is a well-known mathematical tool to study systems of differential equations. The basic idea is to simplify the dynamical system by a sequence of nonlinear coordinate transformations. If there is no resonance in the system, then the nonlinear vector field can be turned into a linear one by the transformations. Previous work applied the second-order normal form transformation under non-resonance condition to power system dynamical equations. The nonlinear interaction among the fundamental modes was investigated. Based on these efforts, this work extends the application of normal forms to evaluate the dynamic performance of power systems taking into account changing operation conditions. As the resonance and near-resonance could occur in parameter space, a new normal form transformation under second order resonance condition is derived. The analysis shows that the high nonlinearity resulting from the resonance and near-resonance among poorly damped oscillatory modes and control modes is detrimental to the system performance. An approach to determine the resonance and near-resonance regions in parameter space is developed. The modes contributing to the detrimental behavior associated with the near-resonance region are identified by a procedure based on certain modal interaction indices. The state variables showing detrimental behavior are then determined using nonlinear participation factors. The accuracy of the prediction is verified by

  4. Biochemical, photosynthetic and productive parameters of Chinese cabbage grown under blue-red LED assembly designed for space agriculture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Avercheva, Olga; Berkovich, Yuliy A.; Smolyanina, Svetlana; Bassarskaya, Elizaveta; Pogosyan, Sergey; Ptushenko, Vasiliy; Erokhin, Alexei; Zhigalova, Tatiana

    2014-06-01

    Currently light emitting diodes (LEDs) are considered to be most preferable source for space plant growth facilities. We performed a complex study of growth and photosynthesis in Chinese cabbage plants (Brassica chinensis L.) grown with continuous LED lighting based on red (650 nm) and blue (470 nm) LEDs with a red to blue photon ratio of 7:1. Plants grown with high-pressure sodium (HPS) lamps were used as a control. PPF levels used were about 100 μmol/(m2 s) (PPF 100) and nearly 400 μmol/(m2 s) (PPF 400). One group of plants was grown with PPF 100 and transferred to PPF 400 at the age of 12 days. Plants were studied at the age of 15 and 28 days (harvest age); some plants were left to naturally end their life cycle. We studied a number of parameters reflecting different stages of photosynthesis: photosynthetic pigment content; chlorophyll fluorescence parameters (photosystem II quantum yield, photochemical and non-photochemical chlorophyll fluorescence quenching); electron transport rate, proton gradient on thylakoid membranes (ΔpH), and photophosphorylation rate in isolated chloroplasts. We also tested parameters reflecting plant growth and productivity: shoot and root fresh and dry weight, sugar content and ascorbic acid content in shoots. Our results had shown that at PPF 100, plants grown with LEDs did not differ from control plants in shoot fresh weight, but showed substantial differences in photophosphorylation rate and sugar content. Differences observed in plants grown with PPF 100 become more pronounced in plants grown with PPF 400. Most parameters characterizing the plant photosynthetic performance, such as photosynthetic pigment content, electron transport rate, and ΔpH did not react strongly to light spectrum. Photophosphorylation rate differed strongly in plants grown with different spectrum and PPF level, but did not always reflect final plant yield. Results of the present work suggest that narrow-band LED lighting caused changes in Chinese

  5. Regulation of NF-κB oscillation by spatial parameters in true intracellular space (TiCS)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ohshima, Daisuke; Sagara, Hiroshi; Ichikawa, Kazuhisa

    2013-10-01

    Transcription factor NF-κB is activated by cytokine stimulation, viral infection, or hypoxic environment leading to its translocation to the nucleus. The nuclear NF-κB is exported from the nucleus to the cytoplasm again, and by repetitive import and export, NF-κB shows damped oscillation with the period of 1.5-2.0 h. Oscillation pattern of NF-κB is thought to determine the gene expression profile. We published a report on a computational simulation for the oscillation of nuclear NF-κB in a 3D spherical cell, and showed the importance of spatial parameters such as diffusion coefficient and locus of translation for determining the oscillation pattern. Although the value of diffusion coefficient is inherent to protein species, its effective value can be modified by organelle crowding in intracellular space. Here we tested this possibility by computer simulation. The results indicate that the effective value of diffusion coefficient is significantly changed by the organelle crowding, and this alters the oscillation pattern of nuclear NF-κB.

  6. Multiband Gravitational-Wave Astronomy: Parameter Estimation and Tests of General Relativity with Space- and Ground-Based Detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vitale, Salvatore

    2016-07-01

    With the discovery of the binary-black-hole (BBH) coalescence GW150914 the era of gravitational-wave (GW) astronomy has started. It has recently been shown that BBH with masses comparable to or higher than GW150914 would be visible in the Evolved Laser Interferometer Space Antenna (eLISA) band a few years before they finally merge in the band of ground-based detectors. This would allow for premerger electromagnetic alerts, dramatically increasing the chances of a joint detection, if BBHs are indeed luminous in the electromagnetic band. In this Letter we explore a quite different aspect of multiband GW astronomy, and verify if, and to what extent, measurement of masses and sky position with eLISA could improve parameter estimation and tests of general relativity with ground-based detectors. We generate a catalog of 200 BBHs and find that having prior information from eLISA can reduce the uncertainty in the measurement of source distance and primary black hole spin by up to factor of 2 in ground-based GW detectors. The component masses estimate from eLISA will not be refined by the ground based detectors, whereas joint analysis will yield precise characterization of the newly formed black hole and improve consistency tests of general relativity.

  7. Using model-based proposals for fast parameter inference on discrete state space, continuous-time Markov processes

    PubMed Central

    Pooley, C. M.; Bishop, S. C.; Marion, G.

    2015-01-01

    Bayesian statistics provides a framework for the integration of dynamic models with incomplete data to enable inference of model parameters and unobserved aspects of the system under study. An important class of dynamic models is discrete state space, continuous-time Markov processes (DCTMPs). Simulated via the Doob–Gillespie algorithm, these have been used to model systems ranging from chemistry to ecology to epidemiology. A new type of proposal, termed ‘model-based proposal’ (MBP), is developed for the efficient implementation of Bayesian inference in DCTMPs using Markov chain Monte Carlo (MCMC). This new method, which in principle can be applied to any DCTMP, is compared (using simple epidemiological SIS and SIR models as easy to follow exemplars) to a standard MCMC approach and a recently proposed particle MCMC (PMCMC) technique. When measurements are made on a single-state variable (e.g. the number of infected individuals in a population during an epidemic), model-based proposal MCMC (MBP-MCMC) is marginally faster than PMCMC (by a factor of 2–8 for the tests performed), and significantly faster than the standard MCMC scheme (by a factor of 400 at least). However, when model complexity increases and measurements are made on more than one state variable (e.g. simultaneously on the number of infected individuals in spatially separated subpopulations), MBP-MCMC is significantly faster than PMCMC (more than 100-fold for just four subpopulations) and this difference becomes increasingly large. PMID:25994297

  8. Multiband Gravitational-Wave Astronomy: Parameter Estimation and Tests of General Relativity with Space- and Ground-Based Detectors.

    PubMed

    Vitale, Salvatore

    2016-07-29

    With the discovery of the binary-black-hole (BBH) coalescence GW150914 the era of gravitational-wave (GW) astronomy has started. It has recently been shown that BBH with masses comparable to or higher than GW150914 would be visible in the Evolved Laser Interferometer Space Antenna (eLISA) band a few years before they finally merge in the band of ground-based detectors. This would allow for premerger electromagnetic alerts, dramatically increasing the chances of a joint detection, if BBHs are indeed luminous in the electromagnetic band. In this Letter we explore a quite different aspect of multiband GW astronomy, and verify if, and to what extent, measurement of masses and sky position with eLISA could improve parameter estimation and tests of general relativity with ground-based detectors. We generate a catalog of 200 BBHs and find that having prior information from eLISA can reduce the uncertainty in the measurement of source distance and primary black hole spin by up to factor of 2 in ground-based GW detectors. The component masses estimate from eLISA will not be refined by the ground based detectors, whereas joint analysis will yield precise characterization of the newly formed black hole and improve consistency tests of general relativity.

  9. GROWING WHITE DWARFS TO THE CHANDRASEKHAR LIMIT: THE PARAMETER SPACE OF THE SINGLE DEGENERATE SN Ia CHANNEL

    SciTech Connect

    Hillman, Y.; Prialnik, D.; Kovetz, A.; Shara, M. M.

    2016-03-10

    Can a white dwarf (WD), accreting hydrogen-rich matter from a non-degenerate companion star, ever exceed the Chandrasekhar mass and explode as a SN Ia? We explore the range of accretion rates that allow a WD to secularly grow in mass, and derive limits on the accretion rate and on the initial mass that will allow it to reach 1.4M{sub ⊙}—the Chandrasekhar mass. We follow the evolution through a long series of hydrogen flashes, during which a thick helium shell accumulates. This determines the effective helium mass accretion rate for long-term, self-consistent evolutionary runs with helium flashes. We find that net mass accumulation always occurs despite helium flashes. Although the amount of mass lost during the first few helium shell flashes is a significant fraction of that accumulated prior to the flash, that fraction decreases with repeated helium shell flashes. Eventually no mass is ejected at all during subsequent flashes. This unexpected result occurs because of continual heating of the WD interior by the helium shell flashes near its surface. The effect of heating is to lower the electron degeneracy throughout the WD, especially in the outer layers. This key result yields helium burning that is quasi-steady state, instead of explosive. We thus find a remarkably large parameter space within which long-term, self-consistent simulations show that a WD can grow in mass and reach the Chandrasekhar limit, despite its helium flashes.

  10. Mapping the Parameter Space of tDCS and Cognitive Control via Manipulation of Current Polarity and Intensity

    PubMed Central

    Karuza, Elisabeth A.; Balewski, Zuzanna Z.; Hamilton, Roy H.; Medaglia, John D.; Tardiff, Nathan; Thompson-Schill, Sharon L.

    2016-01-01

    In the cognitive domain, enormous variation in methodological approach prompts questions about the generalizability of behavioral findings obtained from studies of transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS). To determine the impact of common variations in approach, we systematically manipulated two key stimulation parameters—current polarity and intensity—and assessed their impact on a task of inhibitory control (the Eriksen Flanker). Ninety participants were randomly assigned to one of nine experimental groups: three stimulation conditions (anode, sham, cathode) crossed with three intensity levels (1.0, 1.5, 2.0 mA). As participants performed the Flanker task, stimulation was applied over left dorsolateral prefrontal cortex (DLPFC; electrode montage: F3-RSO). The behavioral impact of these manipulations was examined using mixed effects linear regression. Results indicate a significant effect of stimulation condition (current polarity) on the magnitude of the interference effect during the Flanker; however, this effect was specific to the comparison between anodal and sham stimulation. Inhibitory control was therefore improved by anodal stimulation over the DLPFC. In the present experimental context, no reliable effect of stimulation intensity was observed, and we found no evidence that inhibitory control was impeded by cathodal stimulation. Continued exploration of the stimulation parameter space, particularly with more robustly powered sample sizes, is essential to facilitating cross-study comparison and ultimately working toward a reliable model of tDCS effects. PMID:28082886

  11. An Investigation of Candidate Sensor-Observable Wake Vortex Strength Parameters for the NASA Aircraft Vortex Spacing System (AVOSS)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tatnall, Chistopher R.

    1998-01-01

    The counter-rotating pair of wake vortices shed by flying aircraft can pose a threat to ensuing aircraft, particularly on landing approach. To allow adequate time for the vortices to disperse/decay, landing aircraft are required to maintain certain fixed separation distances. The Aircraft Vortex Spacing System (AVOSS), under development at NASA, is designed to prescribe safe aircraft landing approach separation distances appropriate to the ambient weather conditions. A key component of the AVOSS is a ground sensor, to ensure, safety by making wake observations to verify predicted behavior. This task requires knowledge of a flowfield strength metric which gauges the severity of disturbance an encountering aircraft could potentially experience. Several proposed strength metric concepts are defined and evaluated for various combinations of metric parameters and sensor line-of-sight elevation angles. Representative populations of generating and following aircraft types are selected, and their associated wake flowfields are modeled using various wake geometry definitions. Strength metric candidates are then rated and compared based on the correspondence of their computed values to associated aircraft response values, using basic statistical analyses.

  12. Modelling non-linear redshift-space distortions in the galaxy clustering pattern: systematic errors on the growth rate parameter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de la Torre, Sylvain; Guzzo, Luigi

    2012-11-01

    We investigate the ability of state-of-the-art redshift-space distortion models for the galaxy anisotropic two-point correlation function, ξ(r⊥, r∥), to recover precise and unbiased estimates of the linear growth rate of structure f, when applied to catalogues of galaxies characterized by a realistic bias relation. To this aim, we make use of a set of simulated catalogues at z = 0.1 and 1 with different luminosity thresholds, obtained by populating dark matter haloes from a large N-body simulation using halo occupation prescriptions. We examine the most recent developments in redshift-space distortion modelling, which account for non-linearities on both small and intermediate scales produced, respectively, by randomized motions in virialized structures and non-linear coupling between the density and velocity fields. We consider the possibility of including the linear component of galaxy bias as a free parameter and directly estimate the growth rate of structure f. Results are compared to those obtained using the standard dispersion model, over different ranges of scales. We find that the model of Taruya et al., the most sophisticated one considered in this analysis, provides in general the most unbiased estimates of the growth rate of structure, with systematic errors within ±4 per cent over a wide range of galaxy populations spanning luminosities between L > L* and L > 3L*. The scale dependence of galaxy bias plays a role on recovering unbiased estimates of f when fitting quasi-non-linear scales. Its effect is particularly severe for most luminous galaxies, for which systematic effects in the modelling might be more difficult to mitigate and have to be further investigated. Finally, we also test the impact of neglecting the presence of non-negligible velocity bias with respect to mass in the galaxy catalogues. This can produce an additional systematic error of the order of 1-3 per cent depending on the redshift, comparable to the statistical errors the we

  13. Physical parameters and morphology of comet 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko - a main target of Rosetta space mission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Churyumov, Klim; Kleshchonok, Valery; Mozgova, Alyona

    Rosetta, a European space vehicle was head to the icy nucleus of the short period comet 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko on 2 March, 2004 from cosmodrome Kouru. On 20 Jan. 2014, Rosetta after 10 years of flight and 31-month sleep has been woke up succesfully and now will approche to the icy nucleus of comet Churyumov-Gerasimenko and pass away into orbit around the cometary nucleus. In November 2014 the Philae probe will be sent from Rosetta on the nucleus of comet 67P to study the relict matter of the Solar system. Comet 67P was discovered by the Kyiv astronomers Klim Churyumov and Svitlana Gerasimenko on 22 October 1969 on the five photographic plates exponed with the help of 50-cm Maksutov’s reflector of the Alma-Ata Astrophysical Institute on 9, 11 and 21 Sept. 1969. First 5 exact positions of comet were sent to Dr Brian Marsden. Dr B.Marsden showed it was new comet. The comet had an apparent magnitude of 13 and a faint tail about 1 arcmin in length at position angle 280 degrees. The astronomer Nikolay Belyaev from Saint-Petersbourg calculated that the comet followed an elliptical orbit. In 1982 it had the close encounter with the Earth at 0.3910 A.U. On the basis of the observations of comet 67P obtained in Nizhny Arkhyz with the help of the 6- BTA reflector of SAO of RAS some physical parameters of its comet plasma tail (coefficients of diffusion Dp(parallel) , Ds(perpendicular) and induction of magnetic field B) were determined. Other results of exploration of comet 67P (its polarisation, spectral observations, the light curve and morphology) in different apparitions are discussed.

  14. A local identification method for linear parameter-varying systems based on interpolation of state-space matrices and least-squares approximation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ferranti, Francesco; Rolain, Yves

    2017-01-01

    This paper proposes a novel state-space matrix interpolation technique to generate linear parameter-varying (LPV) models starting from a set of local linear time-invariant (LTI) models estimated at fixed operating conditions. Since the state-space representation of LTI models is unique up to a similarity transformation, the state-space matrices need to be represented in a common state-space form. This is needed to avoid potentially large variations as a function of the scheduling parameters of the state-space matrices to be interpolated due to underlying similarity transformations, which might degrade the accuracy of the interpolation significantly. Underlying linear state coordinate transformations for a set of local LTI models are extracted by the computation of similarity transformation matrices by means of linear least-squares approximations. These matrices are then used to transform the local LTI state-space matrices into a form suitable to achieve accurate interpolation results. The proposed LPV modeling technique is validated by pertinent numerical results.

  15. Concept design theory and model for multi-use space facilities: Analysis of key system design parameters through variance of mission requirements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reynerson, Charles Martin

    This research has been performed to create concept design and economic feasibility data for space business parks. A space business park is a commercially run multi-use space station facility designed for use by a wide variety of customers. Both space hardware and crew are considered as revenue producing payloads. Examples of commercial markets may include biological and materials research, processing, and production, space tourism habitats, and satellite maintenance and resupply depots. This research develops a design methodology and an analytical tool to create feasible preliminary design information for space business parks. The design tool is validated against a number of real facility designs. Appropriate model variables are adjusted to ensure that statistical approximations are valid for subsequent analyses. The tool is used to analyze the effect of various payload requirements on the size, weight and power of the facility. The approach for the analytical tool was to input potential payloads as simple requirements, such as volume, weight, power, crew size, and endurance. In creating the theory, basic principles are used and combined with parametric estimation of data when necessary. Key system parameters are identified for overall system design. Typical ranges for these key parameters are identified based on real human spaceflight systems. To connect the economics to design, a life-cycle cost model is created based upon facility mass. This rough cost model estimates potential return on investments, initial investment requirements and number of years to return on the initial investment. Example cases are analyzed for both performance and cost driven requirements for space hotels, microgravity processing facilities, and multi-use facilities. In combining both engineering and economic models, a design-to-cost methodology is created for more accurately estimating the commercial viability for multiple space business park markets.

  16. Lidar and Mission Parameter Trade Study of Space-Based Coherent Wind Measurement Centered on NASA's 2006 GWOS Wind Mission Study Parameters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kavaya, Michael J.; Frehlich, Rod G.

    2007-01-01

    The global measurement of vertical profiles of horizontal vector winds has been highly desired for many years by NASA, NOAA and the Integrated Program Office (IPO) implementing the National Polar-orbiting Operational Environmental Satellite Systems (NPOESS). Recently the global wind mission was one of 15 missions recommended to NASA by the first ever NRC Earth Sciences Decadal Survey. Since before 1978, the most promising method to make this space-based measurement has been pulsed Doppler lidar. The favored technology and technique has evolved over the years from obtaining line-of-sight (LOS) wind profiles from a single laser shot using pulsed CO2 gas laser technology to the current plans to use both a coherent-detection and direct-detection pulsed Doppler wind lidar systems with each lidar employing multiple shot accumulation to produce an LOS wind profile. The idea of using two lidars (hybrid concept) entails coherent detection using the NASA LaRC-developed pulsed 2-micron solid state laser technology, and direct detection using pulsed Nd:YAG laser technology tripled in frequency to 355 nm wavelength.

  17. A statistical approach to more than two-parameter families of triple encounters in two-dimensional space

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, Ranjeet; Chandra, Navin; Tomar, Surekha

    2016-02-01

    This paper deals with the role of triple encounters with low initial velocities and equal masses in the framework of statistical escape theory in two-dimensional space. This system is described by allowing for both energy and angular momentum conservation in the phase space. The complete statistical solutions (i.e. the semi-major axis `a', the distributions of eccentricity `e', and energy Eb of the final binary, escape energy Es of escaper and its escape velocity vs) of the system are calculated. These are in good agreement with the numerical results of Chandra and Bhatnagar (1999) in the range of perturbing velocities vi (10^{-1} ≤ vi ≤ 10^{-10}) in two-dimensional space. The double limit process has been applied to the system. It is observed that when vi to 0^{ +}, a vs2 to 2 / 3 for all directions in two-dimensional space.

  18. An ensemble of models of the acute inflammatory response to bacterial lipopolysaccharide in rats: results from parameter space reduction.

    PubMed

    Daun, Silvia; Rubin, Jonathan; Vodovotz, Yoram; Roy, Anirban; Parker, Robert; Clermont, Gilles

    2008-08-21

    In previous work, we developed an 8-state nonlinear dynamic model of the acute inflammatory response, including activated phagocytic cells, pro- and anti-inflammatory cytokines, and tissue damage, and calibrated it to data on cytokines from endotoxemic rats. In the interest of parsimony, the present work employed parametric sensitivity and local identifiability analysis to establish a core set of parameters predominantly responsible for variability in model solutions. Parameter optimization, facilitated by varying only those parameters belonging to this core set, was used to identify an ensemble of parameter vectors, each representing an acceptable local optimum in terms of fit to experimental data. Individual models within this ensemble, characterized by their different parameter values, showed similar cytokine but diverse tissue damage behavior. A cluster analysis of the ensemble of models showed the existence of a continuum of acceptable models, characterized by compensatory mechanisms and parameter changes. We calculated the direct correlations between the core set of model parameters and identified three mechanisms responsible for the conversion of the diverse damage time courses to similar cytokine behavior in these models. Given that tissue damage level could be an indicator of the likelihood of mortality, our findings suggest that similar cytokine dynamics could be associated with very different mortality outcomes, depending on the balance of certain inflammatory elements.

  19. Empirically extending the range of validity of parameter-space metrics for all-sky searches for gravitational-wave pulsars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wette, Karl

    2016-12-01

    All-sky searches for gravitational-wave pulsars are generally limited in sensitivity by the finite availability of computing resources. Semicoherent searches are a common method of maximizing search sensitivity given a fixed computing budget. The work of Wette and Prix [Phys. Rev. D 88, 123005 (2013)] and Wette [Phys. Rev. D 92, 082003 (2015)] developed a semicoherent search method which uses metrics to construct the banks of pulsar signal templates needed to search the parameter space of interest. In this work we extend the range of validity of the parameter-space metrics using an empirically derived relationship between the resolution (or mismatch) of the template banks and the mismatch of the overall search. This work has important consequences for the optimization of metric-based semicoherent searches at fixed computing cost.

  20. Lateral and longitudinal stability and control parameters for the space shuttle discovery as determined from flight test data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Suit, William T.; Schiess, James R.

    1988-01-01

    The Discovery vehicle was found to have longitudinal and lateral aerodynamic characteristics similar to those of the Columbia and Challenger vehicles. The values of the lateral and longitudinal parameters are compared with the preflight data book. The lateral parameters showed the same trends as the data book. With the exception of C sub l sub Beta for Mach numbers greater than 15, C sub n sub delta r for Mach numbers greater than 2 and for Mach numbers less than 1.5, where the variation boundaries were not well defined, ninety percent of the extracted values of the lateral parameters fell within the predicted variations. The longitudinal parameters showed more scatter, but scattered about the preflight predictions. With the exception of the Mach 1.5 to .5 region of the flight envelope, the preflight predictions seem a reasonable representation of the Shuttle aerodynamics. The models determined accounted for ninety percent of the actual flight time histories.

  1. The use of the parameter space to uncover new structures in continuous-time dynamic systems modeled with sets of differential equations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Castro, Victor Hugo

    The parameter space structure is presented as a useful tool, to study dynamic systems represented by differential equations. Different structures are obtained when the values of a system's invariant (Lyapunov exponents, fractal dimension, etc) are associated to colors, and visualized in parameter space by means of a map. This color map technique allows quick access to quantitative information about the dynamics of the system. It also permits navigating through the parameter space while intentionally maintaining the system in a desired state, and avoiding regions where the system's behavior would be undesirable. Under this view, the rich structure of stability clusters the Rossler and Chua flows exhibit, is also reported for the first time. These clusters are composed of affine-similar repetitions of basic elementary cells that in this thesis are called swallows . The existence of swallows in flows is quite surprising since, up until recently, swallows have been only known to be associated with one- and two-dimensional discrete maps. Swallows tend to form dense groups where child swallows depart from a main cell along various directions following simple curves. The main cells are, at the same time, child swallows of other larger main cells. The study of these directions and structures could give valuable information about the system's dynamics.

  2. Stochastic model of the NASA/MSFC ground facility for large space structures with uncertain parameters: The maximum entropy approach

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hsia, Wei-Shen

    1987-01-01

    A stochastic control model of the NASA/MSFC Ground Facility for Large Space Structures (LSS) control verification through Maximum Entropy (ME) principle adopted in Hyland's method was presented. Using ORACLS, a computer program was implemented for this purpose. Four models were then tested and the results presented.

  3. A preliminary human factors planning and design outline of parameters related to space station windows and CCTV monitoring

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Haines, R. F.

    1985-01-01

    The question of the merits of placing windows on proposed future space stations is addressed. The use of windows for human visual capabilities is compared to using closed circuit television. Placement and field of view, as well as the number of windows is discussed.

  4. Subchannel and bundle friction factors and flowsplit parameters for laminar, transition, and turbulent longitudinal flows in wire-wrap spaced hexagonal arrays. [LMFBR

    SciTech Connect

    Hawley, J.T.; Chiu, C.; Rohsenow, W.M.; Todreas, N.E.

    1980-08-01

    Correlations are presented for subchannel and bundle friction factors and flowsplit parameters for laminar, transition and turbulent longitudinal flows in wire wrap spaced hexagonal arrays. These results are obtained from pressure drop models of flow in individual subchannels. For turbulent flow, an existing pressure drop model for flow in edge subchannels is extended, and the resulting edge subchannel friction factor is identified. Using the expressions for flowsplit parameters and the equal pressured drop assumption, the interior subchannel and bundle friction factors are obtained. For laminar flow, models are developed for pressure drops of individual subchannels. From these models, expressions for the subchannel friction factors are identified and expressions for the flowsplit parameters are derived.

  5. Ground Reaction Forces and Gait Parameters during Motorized and Non-Motorized Treadmill Walking and Runing on the International Space Station Treadmill

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hagan, Ronald Donald; Norcross, Jason; DeWitt, John; Lee, Stuart M.; McCleary, Frank; Edwards, W. Brent

    2006-01-01

    Both motorized (T-M) and non-motorized (T-NM) treadmill locomotion are used on the International Space Station (ISS) as countermeasures to the deleterious effects of prolonged weightlessness. However, the ground reaction forces (GRF) and gait parameters of these exercise modes have not been examined. The purpose of this study was to determine if differences in GRF and gait parameters exist while walking (1.34 m/s) and running (3.13 m/s) on T-M and T-NM. Dissimilar GRF and gait parameters suggest that T-M and T-NM locomotion may elicit different physiologic effects. T-NM may result in a reduced stimulus to bone formation due to a lower LR, but an increased energy cost as a result of shorter, more frequent strides. Therefore, the usage of each mode should depend upon the desired training stimulus.

  6. A generalized Lyapunov theory for robust root clustering of linear state space models with real parameter uncertainty

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yedavalli, R. K.

    1992-01-01

    The problem of analyzing and designing controllers for linear systems subject to real parameter uncertainty is considered. An elegant, unified theory for robust eigenvalue placement is presented for a class of D-regions defined by algebraic inequalities by extending the nominal matrix root clustering theory of Gutman and Jury (1981) to linear uncertain time systems. The author presents explicit conditions for matrix root clustering for different D-regions and establishes the relationship between the eigenvalue migration range and the parameter range. The bounds are all obtained by one-shot computation in the matrix domain and do not need any frequency sweeping or parameter gridding. The method uses the generalized Lyapunov theory for getting the bounds.

  7. A Self-Organizing State-Space-Model Approach for Parameter Estimation in Hodgkin-Huxley-Type Models of Single Neurons

    PubMed Central

    Vavoulis, Dimitrios V.; Straub, Volko A.; Aston, John A. D.; Feng, Jianfeng

    2012-01-01

    Traditional approaches to the problem of parameter estimation in biophysical models of neurons and neural networks usually adopt a global search algorithm (for example, an evolutionary algorithm), often in combination with a local search method (such as gradient descent) in order to minimize the value of a cost function, which measures the discrepancy between various features of the available experimental data and model output. In this study, we approach the problem of parameter estimation in conductance-based models of single neurons from a different perspective. By adopting a hidden-dynamical-systems formalism, we expressed parameter estimation as an inference problem in these systems, which can then be tackled using a range of well-established statistical inference methods. The particular method we used was Kitagawa's self-organizing state-space model, which was applied on a number of Hodgkin-Huxley-type models using simulated or actual electrophysiological data. We showed that the algorithm can be used to estimate a large number of parameters, including maximal conductances, reversal potentials, kinetics of ionic currents, measurement and intrinsic noise, based on low-dimensional experimental data and sufficiently informative priors in the form of pre-defined constraints imposed on model parameters. The algorithm remained operational even when very noisy experimental data were used. Importantly, by combining the self-organizing state-space model with an adaptive sampling algorithm akin to the Covariance Matrix Adaptation Evolution Strategy, we achieved a significant reduction in the variance of parameter estimates. The algorithm did not require the explicit formulation of a cost function and it was straightforward to apply on compartmental models and multiple data sets. Overall, the proposed methodology is particularly suitable for resolving high-dimensional inference problems based on noisy electrophysiological data and, therefore, a potentially useful tool in

  8. An integrated approach for the knowledge discovery in computer simulation models with a multi-dimensional parameter space

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khawli, Toufik Al; Gebhardt, Sascha; Eppelt, Urs; Hermanns, Torsten; Kuhlen, Torsten; Schulz, Wolfgang

    2016-06-01

    In production industries, parameter identification, sensitivity analysis and multi-dimensional visualization are vital steps in the planning process for achieving optimal designs and gaining valuable information. Sensitivity analysis and visualization can help in identifying the most-influential parameters and quantify their contribution to the model output, reduce the model complexity, and enhance the understanding of the model behavior. Typically, this requires a large number of simulations, which can be both very expensive and time consuming when the simulation models are numerically complex and the number of parameter inputs increases. There are three main constituent parts in this work. The first part is to substitute the numerical, physical model by an accurate surrogate model, the so-called metamodel. The second part includes a multi-dimensional visualization approach for the visual exploration of metamodels. In the third part, the metamodel is used to provide the two global sensitivity measures: i) the Elementary Effect for screening the parameters, and ii) the variance decomposition method for calculating the Sobol indices that quantify both the main and interaction effects. The application of the proposed approach is illustrated with an industrial application with the goal of optimizing a drilling process using a Gaussian laser beam.

  9. System identification for Space Station Freedom using observer/Kalman filter Markov parameters. M.S. Thesis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Papadopoulos, Michael; Tolson, Robert H.

    1993-01-01

    The Modal Identification Experiment (MIE) is a proposed experiment to define the dynamic characteristics of Space Station Freedom. Previous studies emphasized free-decay modal identification. The feasibility of using a forced response method (Observer/Kalman Filter Identification (OKID)) is addressed. The interest in using OKID is to determine the input mode shape matrix which can be used for controller design or control-structure interaction analysis, and investigate if forced response methods may aid in separating closely spaced modes. A model of the SC-7 configuration of Space Station Freedom was excited using simulated control system thrusters to obtain acceleration output. It is shown that an 'optimum' number of outputs exists for OKID. To recover global mode shapes, a modified method called Global-Local OKID was developed. This study shows that using data from a long forced response followed by free-decay leads to the 'best' modal identification. Twelve out of the thirteen target modes were identified for such an output.

  10. Development and analysis of control methods of the International Space Station ``ALPHA'' Russian Segment Central Two-Phase Thermal Control System parameters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cykhotsky, V. M.; Sementsov, A. N.; Grigoriev, Y. I.; Prokhorov, Y. M.; Gorbenko, G. A.; Malukhin, C. A.; Ganja, E. P.

    1999-01-01

    Central Two-Phase Thermal Control System (TPS) of the International Space Station ``ALPHA'' Russian Segment (ISSA RS) is a complex thermalhydraulic system aimed to collect heat from the station modules and transport it to Central Heat Exchanger-Radiator (RAD). The TPS is based on a two-phase ammonia heat transfer loop. Proper work of the TPS Parameters Control System is an important factor for ISSA reliability to be maintained. The Control System is mainly intended to provide the following characteristics of the Station: rated values of the Station thermal condition parameters, high tolerance of the Station thermal condition to instabilities caused by selfspontained deviations of the parameters, ability of the system to regain its rated operation parameters in case of failures or accidents. In particular, the Control System should provide stable ammonia evaporative temperature and pressure in Evaporative Heat Exchanger (EHEX), stable liquid coolant (antifreeze) temperature, high vapor quality and prevent the TPS elements from low temperatures. Heat Controlled Accumulator (HCA) maintains nearly constant pressure in vapor line. To control the TPS elements functioning some control methods have been suggested. Namely, how to control HCA electric heater operation, FCV operation, RAD panel rotation, turning on/off Electric Heater and bypass valves operation. Results of mathematical modeling of the TPS operation during ISSA orbital flight and experimental investigations carried out in the Center of Technical Physics of Kharkov Aviation Institute (CEP KhAI) (Ukraine) are presented. It is proved the TPS Parameters Control System designed to be reliable.

  11. Hubble Parameter Measurement Constraints on the Redshift of the Deceleration–Acceleration Transition, Dynamical Dark Energy, and Space Curvature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Farooq, Omer; Ranjeet Madiyar, Foram; Crandall, Sara; Ratra, Bharat

    2017-01-01

    We compile an updated list of 38 measurements of the Hubble parameter H(z) between redshifts 0.07 ≤ z ≤ 2.36 and use them to place constraints on model parameters of constant and time-varying dark energy cosmological models, both spatially flat and curved. We use five models to measure the redshift of the cosmological deceleration–acceleration transition, zda, from these H(z) data. Within the error bars, the measured zda are insensitive to the model used, depending only on the value assumed for the Hubble constant H0. The weighted mean of our measurements is zda = 0.72 ± 0.05 (0.84 ± 0.03) for H0 = 68 ± 2.8 (73.24 ± 1.74) km s‑1 Mpc‑1 and should provide a reasonably model-independent estimate of this cosmological parameter. The H(z) data are consistent with the standard spatially flat ΛCDM cosmological model but do not rule out nonflat models or dynamical dark energy models.

  12. A new method to estimate photosynthetic parameters through net assimilation rate-intercellular space CO2 concentration (A-Ci ) curve and chlorophyll fluorescence measurements.

    PubMed

    Moualeu-Ngangue, Dany P; Chen, Tsu-Wei; Stützel, Hartmut

    2017-02-01

    Gas exchange (GE) and chlorophyll fluorescence (CF) measurements are widely used to noninvasively study photosynthetic parameters, for example the rates of maximum Rubisco carboxylation (Vcmax ), electron transport rate (J), daytime respiration (Rd ) and mesophyll conductance (gm ). Existing methods for fitting GE data (net assimilation rate-intercellular space CO2 concentration (A-Ci ) curve) are based on two assumptions: gm is unvaried with CO2 concentration in the intercellular space (Ci ); and light absorption (α) and the proportion of quanta absorbed by photosystem II (β) are constant in the data set. These may result in significant bias in estimating photosynthetic parameters. To avoid the above-mentioned hypotheses, we present a new method for fitting A-Ci curves and CF data simultaneously. This method was applied to a data set obtained from cucumber (Cucumis sativus) leaves of various leaf ages and grown under eight different light conditions. The new method had significantly lower root mean square error and a lower rate of failures compared with previously published methods (6.72% versus 24.1%, respectively) and the effect of light conditions on Vcmax and J was better observed. Furthermore, the new method allows the estimation of a new parameter, the fraction of incoming irradiance harvested by photosystem II, and the dependence of gm on Ci .

  13. Investigation of long period oscillations in the equatorial middle atmospheric parameters derived from ground and space based platforms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Swain, Debadatta; Kishore Kumar, K.; John, Sherine Rachel; Ramkumar, Geetha

    The middle atmospheric dynamics is modulated strongly by long period waves and oscilla-tions apart from short period gravity waves, tides and planetary scale waves. Owing to the importance of these phenomena in the middle atmosphere, several studies have been carried out globally using in situ measurements and models to identify and investigate the waves and oscillations as well as their forcing mechanisms. In the present work we attempt to investigate the long period oscillations in winds, temperature and ozone simultaneously over a low lati-tude station, Trivandrum (8.5o N, 77o E) using a combination of ground and satellite based observations. The long term measurements of various atmospheric parameters like winds from radiosonde/rocket flights, atmospheric radars (under ISRO's MIDAS campaign) along with temperature and ozone from SABER on TIMED satellite has for the first time enabled the simultaneous investigation of the chemistry, dynamics and thermal structure of the middle at-mosphere over this location. The study revealed several interesting features of stratospheric and mesospheric long period oscillations bringing out the salient features of QBO and SAO in particular. It was observed that stratospheric and mesospheric QBO and SAO in temperature and winds are exactly in opposite phases. The peaking altitudes of stratospheric and meso-spheric SAO in case of the three parameters are also different. The comprehensive analysis of the long period oscillations in winds, temperature and ozone simultaneously is one of the first of its kind over this location involving the three parameters contributing to middle atmospheric dynamics.

  14. Relative desirability of leisure activities and work parameters in a simulation of isolated work stations. [long term space flight simulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sullins, W. R., Jr.; Rogers, J. G.

    1974-01-01

    The kinds of activities that are attractive to man in long duration isolation are delineated considering meaningful work as major activity and a choice of leisure/living provisions. The dependent variables are the relative distribution between various work, leisure, and living activities where external constraints on the subject's freedom of choice are minimized. Results indicate that an average of at least five hours per day of significant meaningful work is required for satisfactory enjoyment of the situation; most other parameters of the situation have less effects on overall performance and satisfaction

  15. No Prejudice in Space

    SciTech Connect

    Cotta, R.C.; Gainer, J.S.; Hewett, J.L.; Rizzo, T.G.; /SLAC

    2010-08-26

    We present a summary of recent results obtained from a scan of the 19-dimensional parameter space of the pMSSM and its implications for dark matter searches. We have generated a large set of points in parameter space (which we call 'models') for the 19-parameter CP-conserving pMSSM, where MFV has been assumed. We subjected these models to numerous experimental and theoretical constraints to obtain a set of {approx}68 K models which are consistent with existing data. We attempted to be somewhat conservative in our implementation of these constraints; in particular we only demanded that the relic density of the LSP not be greater than the measured value of {Omega}H{sup 2} for non-baryonic dark matter, rather than assuming that the LSP must account for the entire observed relic density. Examining the properties of the neutralinos in these models, we find that many are relatively pure gauge eigenstates with Higgsinos being the most common, followed by Winos. The relative prevalence of Higgsino and Wino LSPs leads many of our models to have a chargino as nLSP, often with a relatively small mass splitting between this nLSP and the LSP; this has important consequences in both collider and astroparticle phenomenology. We find that, in general, the LSP in our models provides a relatively small ({approx} 4%) contribution to the dark matter, however there is a long tail to this distribution and a substantial number of models for which the LSP makes up all or most of the dark matter. Typically these neutralinos are mostly Binos. Examining the signatures of our models in direct and indirect dark matter detection experiments, we find a wide range of signatures for both cases. In particular, we find a much larger range of WIMP-nucleon cross sections than is found in any particular model of SUSY-breaking. As these cross sections also enter the regions of parameter space suggested by non-SUSY models, it appears that the discovery of WIMPs in direct detection experiments might not

  16. Experiment K305: Quantitative analysis of selected bone parameters. Supplement 3A: Trabecular spacing and orientation in the long bones

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Judy, M. M.

    1981-01-01

    Values of mean trabecular spacing computed from optical diffraction patterns of 1:1 X-ray micrographs of tibial metaphysis and those obtained by standard image digitization techniques show excellent agreement. Upper limits on values of mean trabecular orientation deduced from diffraction patterns and the images are also in excellent agreement. Values of the ratio of mean trabecular spatial density in a region of 300 micrometers distal to the downwardly directed convexity in the cartilage growth plate to the value adjacent to the plate determined for flight animals sacrificed at recovery were significantly smaller than values for vivarium control animals. No significant differences were found in proximal regions. No significant differences in mean trabecular orientation were detected. Decreased values of trabecular spatial density and of both obsteoblastic activity and trabecular cross-sectional area noted in collateral researches suggest decreased modeling activity under weightlessness.

  17. Geostatistical Characteristic of Space -Time Variation in Underground Water Selected Quality Parameters in Klodzko Water Intake Area (SW Part of Poland)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Namysłowska-Wilczyńska, Barbara

    2016-04-01

    . These data were subjected to spatial analyses using statistical and geostatistical methods. The evaluation of basic statistics of the investigated quality parameters, including their histograms of distributions, scatter diagrams between these parameters and also correlation coefficients r were presented in this article. The directional semivariogram function and the ordinary (block) kriging procedure were used to build the 3D geostatistical model. The geostatistical parameters of the theoretical models of directional semivariograms of the studied water quality parameters, calculated along the time interval and along the wells depth (taking into account the terrain elevation), were used in the ordinary (block) kriging estimation. The obtained results of estimation, i.e. block diagrams allowed to determine the levels of increased values Z* of studied underground water quality parameters. Analysis of the variability in the selected quality parameters of underground water for an analyzed area in Klodzko water intake was enriched by referring to the results of geostatistical studies carried out for underground water quality parameters and also for a treated water and in Klodzko water supply system (iron Fe, manganese Mn, ammonium ion NH4+ contents), discussed in earlier works. Spatial and time variation in the latter-mentioned parameters was analysed on the basis of the data (2007÷2011, 2008÷2011). Generally, the behaviour of the underground water quality parameters has been found to vary in space and time. Thanks to the spatial analyses of the variation in the quality parameters in the Kłodzko underground water intake area some regularities (trends) in the variation in water quality have been identified.

  18. THE SPACE INTERFEROMETRY MISSION ASTROMETRIC GRID GIANT STAR SURVEY. III. BASIC STELLAR PARAMETERS FOR AN EXTENDED SAMPLE

    SciTech Connect

    Bizyaev, Dmitry; Smith, Verne V.; Cunha, Katia E-mail: vsmith@noao.ed

    2010-12-15

    We present results of high-resolution ({approx}55000) spectral observations of 830 photometrically pre-selected candidate red giants in the magnitude range of V = 9-12. We develop a pipeline for automated determination of the stellar atmospheric parameters from these spectra and estimate T{sub eff}, log g, [Fe/H], microturbulence velocity, and projected rotational velocities, vsin i, for the stars. The analysis confirms that the candidate selection procedure yielded red giants with very high success rate. We show that most of these stars are G and K giants with slightly subsolar metallicity ([Fe/H] {approx} -0.3 dex). An analysis of Mg abundances in the sample results in consistency of the [Mg/Fe] vs [Fe/H] trend with published results.

  19. Particle System Based Adaptive Sampling on Spherical Parameter Space to Improve the MDL Method for Construction of Statistical Shape Models

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Xiangrong; Hirano, Yasushi; Tachibana, Rie; Hara, Takeshi; Kido, Shoji; Fujita, Hiroshi

    2013-01-01

    Minimum description length (MDL) based group-wise registration was a state-of-the-art method to determine the corresponding points of 3D shapes for the construction of statistical shape models (SSMs). However, it suffered from the problem that determined corresponding points did not uniformly spread on original shapes, since corresponding points were obtained by uniformly sampling the aligned shape on the parameterized space of unit sphere. We proposed a particle-system based method to obtain adaptive sampling positions on the unit sphere to resolve this problem. Here, a set of particles was placed on the unit sphere to construct a particle system whose energy was related to the distortions of parameterized meshes. By minimizing this energy, each particle was moved on the unit sphere. When the system became steady, particles were treated as vertices to build a spherical mesh, which was then relaxed to slightly adjust vertices to obtain optimal sampling-positions. We used 47 cases of (left and right) lungs and 50 cases of livers, (left and right) kidneys, and spleens for evaluations. Experiments showed that the proposed method was able to resolve the problem of the original MDL method, and the proposed method performed better in the generalization and specificity tests. PMID:23861721

  20. Parameter Space for Self-Consistent High βN, High li Discharges in Steady-State

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ferron, J. R.; Luce, T. C.; Holcomb, C. T.; Park, J. M.

    2016-10-01

    A tokamak scenario with a peaked current profile (li>0.9), is a promising candidate for a high βN and Q power plant because of the increased stability limits and confinement. Model equilibria have been used to show that the present DIII-D experiments in this range of li, with βN=5 and evolving current density (J) profile, can be extended to 100% noninductively driven current with stationary, self-consistent J and pressure (P) profiles. βN=4, q95<6.5, bootstrap current fraction fBS<0.46 is predicted stable to ideal low-n modes without requirement for a conducting wall, while βN=5, fBS<0.6 is predicted stable when the effect of the vacuum vessel is included. These results reflect the trade-off between high fBS and high βN that is required because, as βN is increased, bootstrap current in the plasma outer half, from the H-mode pedestal and the broad pressure profile, reduces li and the ideal stability limit. Full simulations using the TGLF transport model and the DIII-D current drive/heating sources yield similar parameters. Supported by US DOE under DE-FC02-04ER54698, DE-AC52-07NA27344, DE-AC05-00OR22725.

  1. Perception of temperature and wind by users of public outdoor spaces: relationships with weather parameters and personal characteristics.

    PubMed

    Andrade, Henrique; Alcoforado, Maria-João; Oliveira, Sandra

    2011-09-01

    We aim to understand the relationship between people's declared bioclimatic comfort, their personal characteristics (age, origin, clothing, activity and motivation, etc.) and the atmospheric conditions. To attain this goal, questionnaire surveys were made concurrently with weather measurements (air temperature, relative humidity, solar and long-wave radiation and wind speed) in two open leisure areas of Lisbon (Portugal), during the years 2006 and 2007. We analysed the desire expressed by the interviewees to decrease, maintain or increase the values of air temperature and wind speed, in order to improve their level of comfort. Multiple logistic regression was used to analyse the quantitative relation between preference votes and environmental and personal parameters. The preference for a different temperature depends on the season and is strongly associated with wind speed. Furthermore, a general decrease of discomfort with increasing age was also found. Most people declared a preference for lower wind speed in all seasons; the perception of wind shows significant differences depending on gender, with women declaring a lower level of comfort with higher wind speed. It was also found that the tolerance of warmer conditions is higher than of cooler conditions, and that adaptive strategies are undertaken by people to improve their level of comfort outdoors.

  2. Perception of temperature and wind by users of public outdoor spaces: relationships with weather parameters and personal characteristics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andrade, Henrique; Alcoforado, Maria-João; Oliveira, Sandra

    2011-09-01

    We aim to understand the relationship between people's declared bioclimatic comfort, their personal characteristics (age, origin, clothing, activity and motivation, etc.) and the atmospheric conditions. To attain this goal, questionnaire surveys were made concurrently with weather measurements (air temperature, relative humidity, solar and long-wave radiation and wind speed) in two open leisure areas of Lisbon (Portugal), during the years 2006 and 2007. We analysed the desire expressed by the interviewees to decrease, maintain or increase the values of air temperature and wind speed, in order to improve their level of comfort. Multiple logistic regression was used to analyse the quantitative relation between preference votes and environmental and personal parameters. The preference for a different temperature depends on the season and is strongly associated with wind speed. Furthermore, a general decrease of discomfort with increasing age was also found. Most people declared a preference for lower wind speed in all seasons; the perception of wind shows significant differences depending on gender, with women declaring a lower level of comfort with higher wind speed. It was also found that the tolerance of warmer conditions is higher than of cooler conditions, and that adaptive strategies are undertaken by people to improve their level of comfort outdoors.

  3. Calculating a parameter space to smoothly transport magnetically-trapped suspended superparamagnetic microbeads with electric-field domain wall control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McLellan, Brenda; Nowakowski, Mark; Bokor, Jeffrey; Liang, Cheng-Yen; Hockel, Joshua; Wetzlar, Kyle; Keller, Scott; Sohn, Hyunmin; Carman, Gregory; Young, Anthony; Doran, Andrew; Marcus, Matthew; Klaui, Mathias; Candler, Robert

    2015-03-01

    We demonstrate the capture and electrically-driven piecewise transport of superparamagnetic microbeads trapped in a magnetostatic potential energy well produced by the magnetic domain walls of Ni microrings on a [Pb(Mg1/3Nb2/3) O3]0.66-[PbTiO3]0.34 (PMN-PT) substrate. Here I present micromagnetic simulations that illustrate the formation of field-initialized domain walls in Ni microrings and calculate the approximate force of attraction experienced by superparamagnetic microbeads near the domain walls. This force is estimated as a function of the ring geometry, bead diameter, and distance from the domain wall, and provides an upper bound for the strain-mediated, electrically-induced domain wall velocity that can be implemented to smoothly transport coupled microbeads within a fluidic environment. These results provide an initial estimate for important technological parameters and set a foundation for the optimization of this microfluidic magnetic control scheme. Supported by E3S and TANMS.

  4. Directed searches for continuous gravitational waves from binary systems: Parameter-space metrics and optimal Scorpius X-1 sensitivity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leaci, Paola; Prix, Reinhard

    2015-05-01

    We derive simple analytic expressions for the (coherent and semicoherent) phase metrics of continuous-wave sources in low-eccentricity binary systems for the two regimes of long and short segments compared to the orbital period. The resulting expressions correct and extend previous results found in the literature. We present results of extensive Monte Carlo studies comparing metric mismatch predictions against the measured loss of detection statistics for binary parameter offsets. The agreement is generally found to be within ˜10 %- 30 % . For an application of the metric template expressions, we estimate the optimal achievable sensitivity of an Einstein@Home directed search for Scorpius X-1, under the assumption of sufficiently small spin wandering. We find that such a search, using data from the upcoming advanced detectors, would be able to beat the torque-balance level [R. V. Wagoner, Astrophys. J. 278, 345 (1984); L. Bildsten, Astrophys. J. 501, L89 (1998).] up to a frequency of ˜500 - 600 Hz , if orbital eccentricity is well constrained, and up to a frequency of ˜160 - 200 Hz for more conservative assumptions about the uncertainty on orbital eccentricity.

  5. State distributions in two-dimensional parameter spaces of a nonlinear optical loop mirror-based, mode-locked, all-normal-dispersion fiber laser.

    PubMed

    Cai, Jun-Hao; Chen, He; Chen, Sheng-Ping; Hou, Jing

    2017-02-20

    We present the results of numerical simulations of dissipative soliton generation using nonlinear Schrödinger equations in an all-normal-dispersion (ANDi) mode-locked fiber laser based on a nonlinear optical loop mirror (NOLM). Firstly, systematic and computationally intensive analysis of the pulse state distributions in two-dimensional parameter spaces of an ANDi fiber laser was conducted. In addition, we determined that unstable non-vanishing regions including pulsation and noise-like pulses are directly related to the saturable absorptions of NOLMs and that two critical filter bandwidths separate those regions from stable ones. Finally, we found that the multi-pulsing power threshold can be maximized by using an optimal optical filter bandwidth.

  6. The effect of structural design parameters on FPGA-based feed-forward space-time trellis coding-orthogonal frequency division multiplexing channel encoders

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Passas, Georgios; Freear, Steven; Fawcett, Darren

    2010-08-01

    Orthogonal frequency division multiplexing (OFDM)-based feed-forward space-time trellis code (FFSTTC) encoders can be synthesised as very high speed integrated circuit hardware description language (VHDL) designs. Evaluation of their FPGA implementation can lead to conclusions that help a designer to decide the optimum implementation, given the encoder structural parameters. VLSI architectures based on 1-bit multipliers and look-up tables (LUTs) are compared in terms of FPGA slices and block RAMs (area), as well as in terms of minimum clock period (speed). Area and speed graphs versus encoder memory order are provided for quadrature phase shift keying (QPSK) and 8 phase shift keying (8-PSK) modulation and two transmit antennas, revealing best implementation under these conditions. The effect of number of modulation bits and transmit antennas on the encoder implementation complexity is also investigated.

  7. DMA Modulus as a Screening Parameter for Compatibility of Polymeric Containment Materials with Various Solutions for use in Space Shuttle Microgravity Protein Crystal Growth (PCG) Experiments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wingard, Charles Doug; Munafo, Paul M. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    Protein crystals are grown in microgravity experiments inside the Space Shuttle during orbit. Such crystals are basically grown in a five-component system containing a salt, buffer, polymer, organic and water. During these experiments, a number of different polymeric containment materials must be compatible with up to hundreds of different PCG solutions in various concentrations for durations up to 180 days. When such compatibility experiments are performed at NASA/MSFC (Marshall Space Flight Center) simultaneously on containment material samples immersed in various solutions in vials, the samples are rather small out of necessity. DMA4 modulus was often used as the primary screening parameter for such small samples as a pass/fail criterion for incompatibility issues. In particular, the TA Instruments DMA 2980 film tension clamp was used to test rubber O-rings as small in I.D. as 0.091 in. by cutting through the cross-section at one place, then clamping the stretched linear cord stock at each end. The film tension clamp was also used to successfully test short length samples of medical/surgical grade tubing with an O.D. of 0.125 in.

  8. Modeling the Hot Tensile Flow Behaviors at Ultra-High-Strength Steel and Construction of Three-Dimensional Continuous Interaction Space for Forming Parameters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Quan, Guo-zheng; Zhan, Zong-yang; Wang, Tong; Xia, Yu-feng

    2017-01-01

    The response of true stress to strain rate, temperature and strain is a complex three-dimensional (3D) issue, and the accurate description of such constitutive relationships significantly contributes to the optimum process design. To obtain the true stress-strain data of ultra-high-strength steel, BR1500HS, a series of isothermal hot tensile tests were conducted in a wide temperature range of 973-1,123 K and a strain rate range of 0.01-10 s-1 on a Gleeble 3800 testing machine. Then the constitutive relationships were modeled by an optimally constructed and well-trained backpropagation artificial neural network (BP-ANN). The evaluation of BP-ANN model revealed that it has admirable performance in characterizing and predicting the flow behaviors of BR1500HS. A comparison on improved Arrhenius-type constitutive equation and BP-ANN model shows that the latter has higher accuracy. Consequently, the developed BP-ANN model was used to predict abundant stress-strain data beyond the limited experimental conditions. Then a 3D continuous interaction space for temperature, strain rate, strain and stress was constructed based on these predicted data. The developed 3D continuous interaction space for hot working parameters contributes to fully revealing the intrinsic relationships of BR1500HS steel.

  9. Transiting exoplanets from the CoRoT space mission. V. CoRoT-Exo-4b: stellar and planetary parameters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moutou, C.; Bruntt, H.; Guillot, T.; Shporer, A.; Guenther, E.; Aigrain, S.; Almenara, J. M.; Alonso, R.; Auvergne, M.; Baglin, A.; Barbieri, M.; Barge, P.; Benz, W.; Bordé, P.; Bouchy, F.; Deeg, H. J.; de La Reza, R.; Deleuil, M.; Dvorak, R.; Erikson, A.; Fridlund, M.; Gillon, M.; Gondoin, P.; Hatzes, A.; Hébrard, G.; Jorda, L.; Kabath, P.; Lammer, H.; Léger, A.; Llebaria, A.; Loeillet, B.; Magain, P.; Mayor, M.; Mazeh, T.; Ollivier, M.; Pätzold, M.; Pepe, F.; Pont, F.; Queloz, D.; Rabus, M.; Rauer, H.; Rouan, D.; Schneider, J.; Udry, S.; Wuchterl, G.

    2008-09-01

    Aims: The CoRoT satellite has announced its fourth transiting planet (Aigrain et al. 2008, A&A, 488, L43) with space photometry. We describe and analyse complementary observations of this system performed to establish the planetary nature of the transiting body and to estimate the fundamental parameters of the planet and its parent star. Methods: We have analysed high precision radial-velocity data, ground-based photometry, and high signal-to-noise ratio spectroscopy. Results: The parent star CoRoT-Exo-4 (2MASS 06484671-0040219) is a late F-type star of mass of 1.16 M⊙ and radius of 1.17 R⊙. The planet has a circular orbit with a period of 9.20205 d. The planet radius is 1.19 R_Jup and the mass is 0.72 M_Jup. It is a gas-giant planet with a “normal” internal structure of mainly H and He. CoRoT-Exo-4b has the second longest period of the known transiting planets. It is an important discovery since it occupies an empty area in the mass-period diagram of transiting exoplanets. Based on observations obtained with CoRoT, a space project operated by the French Space Agency, CNES, with participation of the Science Programme of ESA, ESTEC/RSSD, Austria, Belgium, Brazil, Germany and Spain; and on observations made with the SOPHIE spectrograph at Observatoire de Haute Provence, France (PNP.07B.MOUT), and the HARPS spectrograph at ESO La Silla Observatory (079.C-0127/F). Table 2 and Fig. 5 are only available in electronic form at http://www.aanda.org

  10. A game theoretic controller for a linear time-invariant system with parameter uncertainty and its application to the Space Station

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rhee, Ihnseok; Speyer, Jason L.

    1990-01-01

    A game theoretic controller is developed for a linear time-invariant system with parameter uncertainties in system and input matrices. The input-output decomposition modeling for the plant uncertainty is adopted. The uncertain dynamic system is represented as an internal feedback loop in which the system is assumed forced by fictitious disturbance caused by the parameter uncertainty. By considering the input and the fictitious disturbance as two noncooperative players, a differential game problem is constructed. It is shown that the resulting time invariant controller stabilizes the uncertain system for a prescribed uncertainty bound. This game theoretic controller is applied to the momentum management and attitude control of the Space Station in the presence of uncertainties in the moments of inertia. Inclusion of the external disturbance torque to the design procedure results in a dynamical feedback controller which consists of conventional PID control and cyclic disturbance rejection filter. It is shown that the game theoretic design, comparing to the LQR design or pole placement design, improves the stability robustness with respect to inertia variations.

  11. An Exploratory Exercise in Taguchi Analysis of Design Parameters: Application to a Shuttle-to-space Station Automated Approach Control System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Deal, Don E.

    1991-01-01

    The chief goals of the summer project have been twofold - first, for my host group and myself to learn as much of the working details of Taguchi analysis as possible in the time allotted, and, secondly, to apply the methodology to a design problem with the intention of establishing a preliminary set of near-optimal (in the sense of producing a desired response) design parameter values from among a large number of candidate factor combinations. The selected problem is concerned with determining design factor settings for an automated approach program which is to have the capability of guiding the Shuttle into the docking port of the Space Station under controlled conditions so as to meet and/or optimize certain target criteria. The candidate design parameters under study were glide path (i.e., approach) angle, path intercept and approach gains, and minimum impulse bit mode (a parameter which defines how Shuttle jets shall be fired). Several performance criteria were of concern: terminal relative velocity at the instant the two spacecraft are mated; docking offset; number of Shuttle jet firings in certain specified directions (of interest due to possible plume impingement on the Station's solar arrays), and total RCS (a measure of the energy expended in performing the approach/docking maneuver). In the material discussed here, we have focused on single performance criteria - total RCS. An analysis of the possibility of employing a multiobjective function composed of a weighted sum of the various individual criteria has been undertaken, but is, at this writing, incomplete. Results from the Taguchi statistical analysis indicate that only three of the original four posited factors are significant in affecting RCS response. A comparison of model simulation output (via Monte Carlo) with predictions based on estimated factor effects inferred through the Taguchi experiment array data suggested acceptable or close agreement between the two except at the predicted optimum

  12. Error Analysis and Selection of Optimal Excitation Parameters for the Sensing of CO2 and O2 from Space for ASCENDS Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pliutau, Denis; Prasad, Narasimha S.

    2012-01-01

    Simulation studies to optimize sensing of CO2 and O2 from space are described. Uncertainties in line-by-line calculations unaccounted for in previous studies identified. Multivariate methods are employed for measurement wavelengths selection. The Active Sensing of CO2 Emissions over Nights, Days, and Seasons (ASCENDS) recommended by NRC Decadal Survey has a stringent accuracy requirements of 0.5% or better in XCO2 retrievals. NASA LaRC and its partners are investigating the use of the 1.57 m band of CO2 and the 1.26-1.27 m band of oxygen for XCO2 measurements. As part of these efforts, we are carrying out simulation studies using a lidar modeling framework being developed at NASA LaRC to predict the performance of our proposed ASCENDS mission implementation [1]. Our study is aimed at predicting the sources and magnitudes of errors anticipated in XCO2 retrievals for further error minimization through the selection of optimum excitation parameters and development of better retrieval methods.

  13. The prediction of zenith range refraction from surface measurements of meteorological parameters. [mathematical models of atmospheric refraction used to improve spacecraft tracking space navigation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Berman, A. L.

    1976-01-01

    In the last two decades, increasingly sophisticated deep space missions have placed correspondingly stringent requirements on navigational accuracy. As part of the effort to increase navigational accuracy, and hence the quality of radiometric data, much effort has been expended in an attempt to understand and compute the tropospheric effect on range (and hence range rate) data. The general approach adopted has been that of computing a zenith range refraction, and then mapping this refraction to any arbitrary elevation angle via an empirically derived function of elevation. The prediction of zenith range refraction derived from surface measurements of meteorological parameters is presented. Refractivity is separated into wet (water vapor pressure) and dry (atmospheric pressure) components. The integration of dry refractivity is shown to be exact. Attempts to integrate wet refractivity directly prove ineffective; however, several empirical models developed by the author and other researchers at JPL are discussed. The best current wet refraction model is here considered to be a separate day/night model, which is proportional to surface water vapor pressure and inversely proportional to surface temperature. Methods are suggested that might improve the accuracy of the wet range refraction model.

  14. Campaign 9 of the K2 Mission: Observational Parameters, Scientific Drivers, and Community Involvement for a Simultaneous Space- and Ground-based Microlensing Survey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Henderson, Calen B.; Poleski, Radosław; Penny, Matthew; Street, Rachel A.; Bennett, David P.; Hogg, David W.; Gaudi, B. Scott; K2 Campaign 9 Microlensing Science Team; Zhu, W.; Barclay, T.; Barentsen, G.; Howell, S. B.; Mullally, F.; Udalski, A.; Szymański, M. K.; Skowron, J.; Mróz, P.; Kozłowski, S.; Wyrzykowski, Ł.; Pietrukowicz, P.; Soszyński, I.; Ulaczyk, K.; Pawlak, M.; OGLE Project, The; Sumi, T.; Abe, F.; Asakura, Y.; Barry, R. K.; Bhattacharya, A.; Bond, I. A.; Donachie, M.; Freeman, M.; Fukui, A.; Hirao, Y.; Itow, Y.; Koshimoto, N.; Li, M. C. A.; Ling, C. H.; Masuda, K.; Matsubara, Y.; Muraki, Y.; Nagakane, M.; Ohnishi, K.; Oyokawa, H.; Rattenbury, N.; Saito, To.; Sharan, A.; Sullivan, D. J.; Tristram, P. J.; Yonehara, A.; MOA Collaboration; Bachelet, E.; Bramich, D. M.; Cassan, A.; Dominik, M.; Figuera Jaimes, R.; Horne, K.; Hundertmark, M.; Mao, S.; Ranc, C.; Schmidt, R.; Snodgrass, C.; Steele, I. A.; Tsapras, Y.; Wambsganss, J.; RoboNet Project, The; Bozza, V.; Burgdorf, M. J.; Jørgensen, U. G.; Calchi Novati, S.; Ciceri, S.; D'Ago, G.; Evans, D. F.; Hessman, F. V.; Hinse, T. C.; Husser, T.-O.; Mancini, L.; Popovas, A.; Rabus, M.; Rahvar, S.; Scarpetta, G.; Skottfelt, J.; Southworth, J.; Unda-Sanzana, E.; The MiNDSTEp Team; Bryson, S. T.; Caldwell, D. A.; Haas, M. R.; Larson, K.; McCalmont, K.; Packard, M.; Peterson, C.; Putnam, D.; Reedy, L.; Ross, S.; Van Cleve, J. E.; K2C9 Engineering Team; Akeson, R.; Batista, V.; Beaulieu, J.-P.; Beichman, C. A.; Bryden, G.; Ciardi, D.; Cole, A.; Coutures, C.; Foreman-Mackey, D.; Fouqué, P.; Friedmann, M.; Gelino, C.; Kaspi, S.; Kerins, E.; Korhonen, H.; Lang, D.; Lee, C.-H.; Lineweaver, C. H.; Maoz, D.; Marquette, J.-B.; Mogavero, F.; Morales, J. C.; Nataf, D.; Pogge, R. W.; Santerne, A.; Shvartzvald, Y.; Suzuki, D.; Tamura, M.; Tisserand, P.; Wang, D.

    2016-12-01

    K2's Campaign 9 (K2C9) will conduct a ˜3.7 deg2 survey toward the Galactic bulge from 2016 April 22 through July 2 that will leverage the spatial separation between K2 and the Earth to facilitate measurement of the microlens parallax {π }{{E}} for ≳ 170 microlensing events. These will include several that are planetary in nature as well as many short-timescale microlensing events, which are potentially indicative of free-floating planets (FFPs). These satellite parallax measurements will in turn allow for the direct measurement of the masses of and distances to the lensing systems. In this article we provide an overview of the K2C9 space- and ground-based microlensing survey. Specifically, we detail the demographic questions that can be addressed by this program, including the frequency of FFPs and the Galactic distribution of exoplanets, the observational parameters of K2C9, and the array of resources dedicated to concurrent observations. Finally, we outline the avenues through which the larger community can become involved, and generally encourage participation in K2C9, which constitutes an important pathfinding mission and community exercise in anticipation of WFIRST.

  15. Campaign 9 of the K2 Mission: Observational Parameters, Scientific Drivers, and Community Involvement for a Simultaneous Space- and Ground-based Microlensing Survey

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Henderson, Calen B.; Poleski, Radoslaw; Penny, Matthew; Street, Rachel A.; Bennett, David P.; Hogg, David W.; Gaudi, B. Scott; Zhu, W.; Barclay, T.; Barentsen, G.; Howell, S. B.; Mullally, F.; Barry, R. K.; Bryson, S. T.; Caldwell, D. A.; Haas, M. R.; Beichman, C. A.; Bryden, G.; Van Cleve, J. E.

    2016-01-01

    K2's Campaign 9 (K2C9) will conduct a approximately 3.7 sq. deg survey toward the Galactic bulge from 2016 April 22 through July 2 that will leverage the spatial separation between K2 and the Earth to facilitate measurement of the microlens parallax Pi(sub E) for approximately greater than 170 microlensing events. These will include several that are planetary in nature as well as many short-timescale microlensing events, which are potentially indicative of free-floating planets (FFPs). These satellite parallax measurements will in turn allow for the direct measurement of the masses of and distances to the lensing systems. In this article we provide an overview of the K2C9 space- and ground-based microlensing survey. Specifically, we detail the demographic questions that can be addressed by this program, including the frequency of FFPs and the Galactic distribution of exoplanets, the observational parameters of K2C9, and the array of resources dedicated to concurrent observations. Finally, we outline the avenues through which the larger community can become involved, and generally encourage participation in K2C9, which constitutes an important pathfinding mission and community exercise in anticipation of WFIRST.

  16. Congenitally Missing Maxillary Lateral Incisors: Update on the Functional and Esthetic Parameters of Patients Treated with Implants or Space Closure and Teeth Recontouring

    PubMed Central

    Pini, Núbia Inocencya Pavesi; Marchi, Luciana Manzotti De; Pascotto, Renata Corrêa

    2015-01-01

    Maxillary lateral incisor agenesis (MLIA) is a condition that affects both dental esthetics and function in young patients, and represents an important challenge for clinicians. Although several treatment options are available, the mesial repositioning of the canines followed by teeth recontouring into lateral incisors; or space opening/maintenance followed by implant placement have recently emerged as two important treatment approaches. In this article, the current and latest literature has been reviewed in order to summarize the functional and esthetic outcomes obtained with these two forms of treatment of MLIA patients in recent years. Indications, clinical limitations and the most important parameters to achieve the best possible results with each treatment modality are also discussed. Within the limitations of this review, it is not possible to assert at this point in time that one treatment approach is more advantageous than the other. Long-term followup studies comparing the existing treatment options are still lacking in the literature, and they are necessary to shed some light on the issue. It is possible, however, to state that adequate multidisciplinary diagnosis and planning are imperative to define the treatment option that will provide the best individual results for patients with MLIA. PMID:25646137

  17. Study parameters influencing NOAEL and LOAEL in toxicity feeding studies for pesticides: exposure duration versus dose decrement, dose spacing, group size and chemical class.

    PubMed

    Zarn, Jürg A; Engeli, Barbara E; Schlatter, Josef R

    2011-11-01

    The effect of exposure duration on no observed adverse effect levels (NOAEL) and lowest observed adverse effect levels (LOAEL) in rodent pesticide feeding studies was evaluated. Ratios of NOAEL (and LOAEL), expressed as pesticide concentrations in feed, were calculated from subacute to subchronic, subchronic to chronic and subacute to chronic studies. There was no statistical significant effect of exposure duration on ratio distributions. Whereas geometric means of ratios were in a narrow range of 1.1-2.5, the geometric standard deviations and 95th percentiles increased with dose spacing of the involved studies. With the exception of carbamates, the chemical class of pesticides had no influence on the ratio distributions. However, the number of animals in the shorter-term study of ratio couples being ≤ 1 was statistically significantly higher than in ratio couples being >1. Ratios ≤ 1 may be partly explained by the dose decrement over time observed in feeding studies applying the test substances in constant concentrations. The dose decrement possibly converts initially toxic doses to less toxic doses beyond the subacute phase. Ratios >1 seem to be caused predominantly by differences in study design parameters. In dietary risk assessment, the acceptable daily intake (ADI) is compared to pesticide intake estimates based on mean food consumption (i.e. the so called theoretical maximum daily intake, TMDI) being orders of magnitude lower than actual food consumption on eating occasions for certain food commodities. As subacute, subchronic and chronic NOAEL (and LOAEL), expressed as pesticide concentration in feed did not differ statistically significantly, the TMDI as benchmark for the ADI may underestimate the significance of the toxicity of subacute exposure.

  18. Parameter Selection and Longitudinal Phase Space Simulation for a Single Stage X-Band FEL Driver at 250 MeV

    SciTech Connect

    Sun, Yipeng; Raubenheimer, Tor; Wu, Juhao; /SLAC

    2011-08-19

    Hard x-ray Free electron lasers (FEL) are being built or proposed at many accelerator laboratories as it supports wide range of applications in many aspects. Most of the hard x-ray FEL design is similar with the SLAC Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS), which features a two (or multiple) stage bunch compression. For the first stage of the bunch compression, usually the beam is accelerated in a lower-frequency RF section (such as S-band for LCLS), and then the longitudinal phase space is linearized by a higher-frequency RF section (harmonic RF, such as X-band for LCLS). In this paper, a compact hard x-ray FEL design is proposed, which is based on X-band RF acceleration and eliminating the need of a harmonic RF. The parameter selection and relation is discussed, and the longitudinal phase space simulation is presented. The FEL coherence condition of the electron beam in the undulators requires a large charge density, a small emittance and small energy spread. The RMS electron bunch length from the injector is in the ps scale, with a bunch charge in the range of hundreds pC to several nC, which means that the current is roughly 0.1 kA. According to the requirement from soft x-ray lasing and hard x-ray lasing, a peak current of 1 kA and 3 kA is needed respectively. Thus the bunch has to be compressed. Usually a two stage bunch compression or multipole stage bunch compression is adopted. The z-correlated energy chirp is normally established by letting the beam pass through a section of RF cavities, with a RF phase off crest. As stated above, S-band RF (3 GHz) acceleration could be applied in this section. Due to the nature of RF acceleration wave, the chirp on the bunch is not linear, but has the RF curvature on it. In order to linearize the energy chirp, a harmonic RF section with higher frequency is needed. For LCLS a short X-band RF section (12 GHz) is used which is a fourth order harmonic. The linearized bunch is then passing by a dispersive region, in which the

  19. On the accuracy of the relativistic parameters beta, gamma, and the solar oblateness coefficient J2, as deduced from ranging data of a drag-free space probe

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roth, E. A.

    1971-01-01

    Motion in the general gravity field is described mathematically. A covariance analysis, based on two simple models, is presented. Two drag-free space probes were considered, for which the orbital elements are given.

  20. Space-time dynamics of carbon and environmental parameters related to carbon dioxide emissions in the Buor-Khaya Bay and adjacent part of the Laptev Sea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Semiletov, I. P.; Shakhova, N. E.; Pipko, I. I.; Pugach, S. P.; Charkin, A. N.; Dudarev, O. V.; Kosmach, D. A.; Nishino, S.

    2013-09-01

    This study aims to improve understanding of carbon cycling in the Buor-Khaya Bay (BKB) and adjacent part of the Laptev Sea by studying the inter-annual, seasonal, and meso-scale variability of carbon and related hydrological and biogeochemical parameters in the water, as well as factors controlling carbon dioxide (CO2) emission. Here we present data sets obtained on summer cruises and winter expeditions during 12 yr of investigation. Based on data analysis, we suggest that in the heterotrophic BKB area, input of terrestrially borne organic carbon (OC) varies seasonally and inter-annually and is largely determined by rates of coastal erosion and river discharge. Two different BKB sedimentation regimes were revealed: Type 1 (erosion accumulation) and Type 2 (accumulation). A Type 1 sedimentation regime occurs more often and is believed to be the quantitatively most important mechanism for suspended particular matter (SPM) and particulate organic carbon (POC) delivery to the BKB. The mean SPM concentration observed in the BKB under a Type 1 regime was one order of magnitude greater than the mean concentration of SPM (~ 20 mg L-1) observed along the Lena River stream in summer 2003. Loadings of the BKB water column with particulate material vary by more than a factor of two between the two regimes. Higher partial pressure of CO2 (pCO2), higher concentrations of nutrients, and lower levels of oxygen saturation were observed in the bottom water near the eroded coasts, implying that coastal erosion and subsequent oxidation of eroded organic matter (OM) rather than the Lena River serves as the predominant source of nutrients to the BKB. Atmospheric CO2 fluxes from the sea surface in the BKB vary from 1 to 95 mmol m-2 day-1 and are determined by specific features of hydrology and wind conditions, which change spatially, seasonally, and inter-annually. Mean values of CO2 emission from the shallow Laptev Sea were similar in September 1999 and 2005 (7.2 and 7.8 mmol m-2 day-1

  1. Exploration of the Parameter Space in AN Agent-Based Model of Tuberculosis Spread: Emergence of Drug Resistance in Developing VS Developed Countries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Espindola, Aquino L.; Girardi, Daniel; Penna, Thadeu J. P.; Bauch, Chris T.; Martinez, Alexandre S.; Cabella, Brenno C. T.

    2012-06-01

    In this work we present an agent-based model for the spread of tuberculosis where the individuals can be infected with either drug-susceptible or drug-resistant strains and can also receive a treatment. The dynamics of the model and the role of each one of the parameters are explained. The whole set of parameters is explored to check their importance in the numerical simulation results. The model captures the beneficial impact of the adequate treatment on the prevalence of tuberculosis. Nevertheless, depending on the treatment parameters range, it also captures the emergence of drug resistance. Drug resistance emergence is particularly likely to occur for parameter values corresponding to less efficacious treatment, as usually found in developing countries.

  2. Geostatistical analysis of space variation in underground water various quality parameters in Kłodzko water intake area (SW part of Poland)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Namysłowska-Wilczyńska, Barbara

    2016-09-01

    This paper presents selected results of research connected with the development of a (3D) geostatistical hydrogeochemical model of the Kłodzko Drainage Basin, dedicated to the spatial variation in the different quality parameters of underground water in the water intake area (SW part of Poland). The research covers the period 2011-2012. Spatial analyses of the variation in various quality parameters, i.e., contents of: iron, manganese, ammonium ion, nitrate ion, phosphate ion, total organic carbon, pH redox potential and temperature, were carried out on the basis of the chemical determinations of the quality parameters of underground water samples taken from the wells in the water intake area. Spatial variation in the parameters was analyzed on the basis of data obtained (November 2011) from tests of water taken from 14 existing wells with a depth ranging from 9.5 to 38.0 m b.g.l. The latest data (January 2012) were obtained (gained) from 3 new piezometers, made in other locations in the relevant area. A depth of these piezometers amounts to 9-10 m. Data derived from 14 wells (2011) and 14 wells + 3 piezometers (2012) were subjected to spatial analyses using geostatistical methods. The evaluation of basic statistics of the quality parameters, including their histograms of distributions, scatter diagrams and correlation coefficient values r were presented. The directional semivariogram function γ(h) and the ordinary (block) kriging procedure were used to build the 3D geostatistical model. The geostatistical parameters of the theoretical models of directional semivariograms of the water quality parameters under study, calculated along the wells depth (taking into account the terrain elevation), were used in the ordinary (block) kriging estimation. The obtained results of estimation, i.e., block diagrams allowed us to determine the levels of increased values of estimated averages Z* of underground water quality parameters.

  3. The effect of changes in space shuttle parameters on the NASA/MSFC multilayer diffusion model predictions of surface HCl concentrations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Glasser, M. E.; Rundel, R. D.

    1978-01-01

    A method for formulating these changes into the model input parameters using a preprocessor program run on a programed data processor was implemented. The results indicate that any changes in the input parameters are small enough to be negligible in comparison to meteorological inputs and the limitations of the model and that such changes will not substantially increase the number of meteorological cases for which the model will predict surface hydrogen chloride concentrations exceeding public safety levels.

  4. DOE applied to study the effect of process parameters on silicon spacing in lost foam Al-Si-Cu alloy casting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shayganpour, A.; Idris, M. H.; Izman, S.; Jafari, H.

    2012-09-01

    Lost foam casting as a relatively new manufacturing process is extensively employed to produce sound complicated castings. In this study, an experimental investigation on lost foam casting of an Al-Si-Cu aluminium cast alloy was conducted. The research was aimed in evaluating the effect of different pouring temperatures, slurry viscosities, vibration durations and sand grain sizes on eutectic silicon spacing of thin-wall castings. A stepped-pattern was used in the study and the focus of the investigations was at the thinnest 3 mm section. A full two-level factorial design experimental technique was used to plan the experiments and afterwards identify the significant factors affecting casting silicon spacing. The results showed that pouring temperature and its interaction with vibration time have pronounced effect on eutectic silicon phase size. Increasing pouring temperature coarsened the eutectic silicon spacing while the higher vibration time diminished coarsening effect. Moreover, no significant effects on silicon spacing were found with variation of sand size and slurry viscosity.

  5. An analytical procedure and automated computer code used to design model nozzles which meet MSFC base pressure similarity parameter criteria. [space shuttle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sulyma, P. R.

    1980-01-01

    Fundamental equations and similarity definition and application are described as well as the computational steps of a computer program developed to design model nozzles for wind tunnel tests conducted to define power-on aerodynamic characteristics of the space shuttle over a range of ascent trajectory conditions. The computer code capabilities, a user's guide for the model nozzle design program, and the output format are examined. A program listing is included.

  6. Radars in space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Delnore, Victor E.

    1990-01-01

    The capabilities of active microwave devices operating from space (typically, radar, scatterometers, interferometers, and altimeters) are discussed. General radar parameters and basic radar principles are explained. Applications of these parameters and principles are also explained. Trends in space radar technology, and where space radars and active microwave sensors in orbit are going are discussed.

  7. In search of the best match: probing a multi-dimensional cloud microphysical parameter space to better understand what controls cloud thermodynamic phase

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tan, Ivy; Storelvmo, Trude

    2015-04-01

    Substantial improvements have been made to the cloud microphysical schemes used in the latest generation of global climate models (GCMs), however, an outstanding weakness of these schemes lies in the arbitrariness of their tuning parameters, which are also notoriously fraught with uncertainties. Despite the growing effort in improving the cloud microphysical schemes in GCMs, most of this effort has neglected to focus on improving the ability of GCMs to accurately simulate the present-day global distribution of thermodynamic phase partitioning in mixed-phase clouds. Liquid droplets and ice crystals not only influence the Earth's radiative budget and hence climate sensitivity via their contrasting optical properties, but also through the effects of their lifetimes in the atmosphere. The current study employs NCAR's CAM5.1, and uses observations of cloud phase obtained by NASA's CALIOP lidar over a 79-month period (November 2007 to June 2014) guide the accurate simulation of the global distribution of mixed-phase clouds in 20∘ latitudinal bands at the -10∘ C, -20∘C and -30∘C isotherms, by adjusting six relevant cloud microphysical tuning parameters in the CAM5.1 via Quasi-Monte Carlo sampling. Among the parameters include those that control the Wegener-Bergeron-Findeisen (WBF) timescale for the conversion of supercooled liquid droplets to ice and snow in mixed-phase clouds, the fraction of ice nuclei that nucleate ice in the atmosphere, ice crystal sedimentation speed, and wet scavenging in stratiform and convective clouds. Using a Generalized Linear Model as a variance-based sensitivity analysis, the relative contributions of each of the six parameters are quantified to gain a better understanding of the importance of their individual and two-way interaction effects on the liquid to ice proportion in mixed-phase clouds. Thus, the methodology implemented in the current study aims to search for the combination of cloud microphysical parameters in a GCM that

  8. Fast ray-tracing algorithm for circumstellar structures (FRACS). I. Algorithm description and parameter-space study for mid-IR interferometry of B[e] stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Niccolini, G.; Bendjoya, P.; Domiciano de Souza, A.

    2011-01-01

    Aims: The physical interpretation of spectro-interferometric data is strongly model-dependent. On one hand, models involving elaborate radiative transfer solvers are too time consuming in general to perform an automatic fitting procedure and derive astrophysical quantities and their related errors. On the other hand, using simple geometrical models does not give sufficient insights into the physics of the object. We propose to stand in between these two extreme approaches by using a physical but still simple parameterised model for the object under consideration. Based on this philosophy, we developed a numerical tool optimised for mid-infrared (mid-IR) interferometry, the fast ray-tracing algorithm for circumstellar structures (FRACS), which can be used as a stand-alone model, or as an aid for a more advanced physical description or even for elaborating observation strategies. Methods: FRACS is based on the ray-tracing technique without scattering, but supplemented with the use of quadtree meshes and the full symmetries of the axisymmetrical problem to significantly decrease the necessary computing time to obtain e.g. monochromatic images and visibilities. We applied FRACS in a theoretical study of the dusty circumstellar environments (CSEs) of B[e] supergiants (sgB[e]) in order to determine which information (physical parameters) can be retrieved from present mid-IR interferometry (flux and visibility). Results: From a set of selected dusty CSE models typical of sgB[e] stars we show that together with the geometrical parameters (position angle, inclination, inner radius), the temperature structure (inner dust temperature and gradient) can be well constrained by the mid-IR data alone. Our results also indicate that the determination of the parameters characterising the CSE density structure is more challenging but, in some cases, upper limits as well as correlations on the parameters characterising the mass loss can be obtained. Good constraints for the sg

  9. Variation of TEC and related parameters over the Indian EIA region from ground and space based GPS observations during the low solar activity period of May 2007-April 2008

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chakravarty, S. C.; Nagaraja, Kamsali; Jakowski, N.

    2017-03-01

    The annual variations of ionospheric Total Electron Content (TEC), F-region peak ionisation (NmF2) and the ionospheric slab thickness (τ) over the Indian region during the low solar activity period of May 2007-April 2008 have been studied. For this purpose the ground based TEC data obtained from GAGAN measurements and the space based data from GPS radio occultation technique using CHAMP have been utilised. The results of these independent measurements are combined to derive additional parameters such as the equivalent slab thickness of the total and the bottom-side ionospheric regions (τT and τB). The one year hourly average values of all these parameters over the ionospheric anomaly latitude region (10-26°N) are presented here along with the statistical error estimates. It is expected that these results are potentially suited to be used as base level values during geomagnetically quiet and undisturbed solar conditions.

  10. MULTI-WAVELENGTH OBSERVATIONS OF THE SPATIO-TEMPORAL EVOLUTION OF SOLAR FLARES WITH AIA/SDO. I. UNIVERSAL SCALING LAWS OF SPACE AND TIME PARAMETERS

    SciTech Connect

    Aschwanden, Markus J.; Zhang, Jie; Liu, Kai E-mail: jzhang7@gmu.edu

    2013-09-20

    We extend a previous statistical solar flare study of 155 GOES M- and X-class flares observed with AIA/SDO to all seven coronal wavelengths (94, 131, 171, 193, 211, 304, and 335 Å) to test the wavelength dependence of scaling laws and statistical distributions. Except for the 171 and 193 Å wavelengths, which are affected by EUV dimming caused by coronal mass ejections (CMEs), we find near-identical size distributions of geometric (lengths L, flare areas A, volumes V, and fractal dimension D{sub 2}), temporal (flare durations T), and spatio-temporal parameters (diffusion coefficient κ, spreading exponent β, and maximum expansion velocities v{sub max}) in different wavelengths, which are consistent with the universal predictions of the fractal-diffusive avalanche model of a slowly driven, self-organized criticality (FD-SOC) system, i.e., N(L)∝L {sup –3}, N(A)∝A {sup –2}, N(V)∝V {sup –5/3}, N(T)∝T {sup –2}, and D{sub 2} = 3/2, for a Euclidean dimension d = 3. Empirically, we find also a new strong correlation κ∝L {sup 0.94±0.01} and the three-parameter scaling law L∝κ T {sup 0.1}, which is more consistent with the logistic-growth model than with classical diffusion. The findings suggest long-range correlation lengths in the FD-SOC system that operate in the vicinity of a critical state, which could be used for predictions of individual extreme events. We find also that eruptive flares (with accompanying CMEs) have larger volumes V, longer flare durations T, higher EUV and soft X-ray fluxes, and somewhat larger diffusion coefficients κ than confined flares (without CMEs)

  11. Multi-wavelength Observations of the Spatio-temporal Evolution of Solar Flares with AIA/SDO. I. Universal Scaling Laws of Space and Time Parameters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aschwanden, Markus J.; Zhang, Jie; Liu, Kai

    2013-09-01

    We extend a previous statistical solar flare study of 155 GOES M- and X-class flares observed with AIA/SDO to all seven coronal wavelengths (94, 131, 171, 193, 211, 304, and 335 Å) to test the wavelength dependence of scaling laws and statistical distributions. Except for the 171 and 193 Å wavelengths, which are affected by EUV dimming caused by coronal mass ejections (CMEs), we find near-identical size distributions of geometric (lengths L, flare areas A, volumes V, and fractal dimension D 2), temporal (flare durations T), and spatio-temporal parameters (diffusion coefficient κ, spreading exponent β, and maximum expansion velocities v max) in different wavelengths, which are consistent with the universal predictions of the fractal-diffusive avalanche model of a slowly driven, self-organized criticality (FD-SOC) system, i.e., N(L)vpropL -3, N(A)vpropA -2, N(V)vpropV -5/3, N(T)vpropT -2, and D 2 = 3/2, for a Euclidean dimension d = 3. Empirically, we find also a new strong correlation κvpropL 0.94 ± 0.01 and the three-parameter scaling law Lvpropκ T 0.1, which is more consistent with the logistic-growth model than with classical diffusion. The findings suggest long-range correlation lengths in the FD-SOC system that operate in the vicinity of a critical state, which could be used for predictions of individual extreme events. We find also that eruptive flares (with accompanying CMEs) have larger volumes V, longer flare durations T, higher EUV and soft X-ray fluxes, and somewhat larger diffusion coefficients κ than confined flares (without CMEs).

  12. Stochastic model of the NASA/MSFC ground facility for large space structures with uncertain parameters: The maximum entropy approach, part 2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hsia, Wei Shen

    1989-01-01

    A validated technology data base is being developed in the areas of control/structures interaction, deployment dynamics, and system performance for Large Space Structures (LSS). A Ground Facility (GF), in which the dynamics and control systems being considered for LSS applications can be verified, was designed and built. One of the important aspects of the GF is to verify the analytical model for the control system design. The procedure is to describe the control system mathematically as well as possible, then to perform tests on the control system, and finally to factor those results into the mathematical model. The reduction of the order of a higher order control plant was addressed. The computer program was improved for the maximum entropy principle adopted in Hyland's MEOP method. The program was tested against the testing problem. It resulted in a very close match. Two methods of model reduction were examined: Wilson's model reduction method and Hyland's optimal projection (OP) method. Design of a computer program for Hyland's OP method was attempted. Due to the difficulty encountered at the stage where a special matrix factorization technique is needed in order to obtain the required projection matrix, the program was successful up to the finding of the Linear Quadratic Gaussian solution but not beyond. Numerical results along with computer programs which employed ORACLS are presented.

  13. Investigation of Peak Pressure Index Parameters for People with Spinal Cord Injury Using Wheelchair Tilt-in-Space and Recline: Methodology and Preliminary Report

    PubMed Central

    Lung, Chi-Wen; Yang, Tim D.; Crane, Barbara A.; Elliott, Jeannette; Dicianno, Brad E.; Jan, Yih-Kuen

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the effect of the sensel window's location and size when calculating the peak pressure index (PPI) of pressure mapping with varying degrees of wheelchair tilt-in-space (tilt) and recline in people with spinal cord injury (SCI). Thirteen power wheelchair users were recruited into this study. Six combinations of wheelchair tilt (15°, 25°, and 35°) and recline (10° and 30°) were used by the participants in random order. Displacements of peak pressure and center of pressure were extracted from the left side of the mapping system. Normalized PPI was computed for three sensel window dimensions (3 sensels × 3 sensels, 5 × 5, and 7 × 7). At least 3.33 cm of Euclidean displacement of peak pressures was observed in the tilt and recline. For every tilt angle, peak pressure displacement was not significantly different between 10° and 30° recline, while center of pressure displacement was significantly different (P < .05). For each recline angle, peak pressure displacement was not significantly different between pairs of 15°, 25°, and 35° tilt, while center of pressure displacement was significantly different between 15° versus 35° and 25° versus 35°. Our study showed that peak pressure displacement occurs in response to wheelchair tilt and recline, suggesting that the selected sensel window locations used to calculate PPI should be adjusted during changes in wheelchair configuration. PMID:25057491

  14. Space Microbiology

    PubMed Central

    Horneck, Gerda; Klaus, David M.; Mancinelli, Rocco L.

    2010-01-01

    Summary: The responses of microorganisms (viruses, bacterial cells, bacterial and fungal spores, and lichens) to selected factors of space (microgravity, galactic cosmic radiation, solar UV radiation, and space vacuum) were determined in space and laboratory simulation experiments. In general, microorganisms tend to thrive in the space flight environment in terms of enhanced growth parameters and a demonstrated ability to proliferate in the presence of normally inhibitory levels of antibiotics. The mechanisms responsible for the observed biological responses, however, are not yet fully understood. A hypothesized interaction of microgravity with radiation-induced DNA repair processes was experimentally refuted. The survival of microorganisms in outer space was investigated to tackle questions on the upper boundary of the biosphere and on the likelihood of interplanetary transport of microorganisms. It was found that extraterrestrial solar UV radiation was the most deleterious factor of space. Among all organisms tested, only lichens (Rhizocarpon geographicum and Xanthoria elegans) maintained full viability after 2 weeks in outer space, whereas all other test systems were inactivated by orders of magnitude. Using optical filters and spores of Bacillus subtilis as a biological UV dosimeter, it was found that the current ozone layer reduces the biological effectiveness of solar UV by 3 orders of magnitude. If shielded against solar UV, spores of B. subtilis were capable of surviving in space for up to 6 years, especially if embedded in clay or meteorite powder (artificial meteorites). The data support the likelihood of interplanetary transfer of microorganisms within meteorites, the so-called lithopanspermia hypothesis. PMID:20197502

  15. Study of the electrical parameters degradation of GaAs sub-cells for triple junction space solar cells by computer simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cappelletti, M. A.; Casas, G. A.; Morales, D. M.; Hasperue, W.; Blancá, E. L. Peltzer y.

    2016-11-01

    In this paper, a theoretical study of the electrical parameters degradation of different n-type GaAs sub-cells for InGaP/GaAs/Ge triple junction solar cells irradiated with 1 and 5 MeV electrons has been performed by means of computer simulation. Effects of base carrier concentration upon the maximum power point, short-circuit current, open circuit voltage, diffusion current, recombination current and series resistance of these devices have been researched using the displacement damage dose method, the one-dimensional PC1D device modeling program and a home-made numerical code based on genetic algorithms. The radiative recombination lifetime, damage constant for minority-carrier lifetime and carrier removal rate models for GaAs sub-cells have been used in the simulations. An analytical model has been proposed, which is useful to describe the radiation-induced degradation of diffusion current, recombination current and series resistance. Results obtained in this work can be used to predict the radiation resistance of solar cells over a wide range of energies.

  16. PRECISE ESTIMATES OF THE PHYSICAL PARAMETERS FOR THE EXOPLANET SYSTEM HD 17156 ENABLED BY HUBBLE SPACE TELESCOPE FINE GUIDANCE SENSOR TRANSIT AND ASTEROSEISMIC OBSERVATIONS

    SciTech Connect

    Nutzman, Philip; Charbonneau, David; Holman, Matthew J.; Gilliland, Ronald L.; McCullough, Peter R.; Nelan, Edmund P.; Christensen-Dalsgaard, Joergen; Kjeldsen, Hans; Brown, Timothy M.

    2011-01-01

    We present observations of three distinct transits of HD 17156b obtained with the Fine Guidance Sensors on board the Hubble Space Telescope. We analyzed both the transit photometry and previously published radial velocities to find the planet-star radius ratio R{sub p} /R{sub *} = 0.07454 {+-} 0.00035, inclination i = 86.49{sup +0.24}{sub -0.20} deg, and scaled semimajor axis a/R{sub *} = 23.19{sup +0.32}{sub -0.27}. This last value translates directly to a mean stellar density determination {rho}{sub *} = 0.522{sup +0.021}{sub -0.018} g cm{sup -3}. Analysis of asteroseismology observations by the companion paper of Gilliland et al. provides a consistent but significantly refined measurement of {rho}{sub *} = 0.5308 {+-} 0.0040. We compare stellar isochrones to this density estimate and find M{sub *} = 1.275 {+-} 0.018 M{sub sun} and a stellar age of 3.37{sup +0.20}{sub -0.47} Gyr. Using this estimate of M{sub *} and incorporating the density constraint from asteroseismology, we model both the photometry and published radial velocities to estimate the planet radius R{sub p} = 1.0870 {+-} 0.0066 R{sub J} and the stellar radius R{sub *} = 1.5007 {+-} 0.0076 R{sub sun}. The planet radius is larger than that found in previous studies and consistent with theoretical models of a solar-composition gas giant of the same mass and equilibrium temperature. For the three transits, we determine the times of mid-transit to a precision of 6.2 s, 7.6 s, and 6.9 s, and the transit times for HD 17156 do not show any significant departures from a constant period. The joint analysis of transit photometry and asteroseismology presages similar studies that will be enabled by the NASA Kepler Mission.

  17. Space smarts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Colucci, Frank

    1991-02-01

    A review is presented of design and development work in space data processors at the Honeywell Space Systems Group in Florida. Space computers, some hardened for the first time against radiation from both man-made nuclear events and the natural space environment, are described. A specific illustration of this is the Space Shuttle main engine control which monitors some 120 engine parameters 50 times per second and operates the actuators that control the liquid-fueled engine through its eight minute burn. It is further pointed out that Space Station processors will be tied together by three different data buses, each with its own protocol, while the backbone of the data management system will be an optical fiber distributed data interface handling up to 100 Mbits/sec. Radiation hardening without heavy shielding can be accomplished in several ways, i.e., at the materials level, by insulating substrates which can limit the photo-currents generated by a nuclear event, and at the topological level, by spacing transistors so that photocurrents cannot concentrate at any particular node.

  18. Parameter estimating state reconstruction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    George, E. B.

    1976-01-01

    Parameter estimation is considered for systems whose entire state cannot be measured. Linear observers are designed to recover the unmeasured states to a sufficient accuracy to permit the estimation process. There are three distinct dynamics that must be accommodated in the system design: the dynamics of the plant, the dynamics of the observer, and the system updating of the parameter estimation. The latter two are designed to minimize interaction of the involved systems. These techniques are extended to weakly nonlinear systems. The application to a simulation of a space shuttle POGO system test is of particular interest. A nonlinear simulation of the system is developed, observers designed, and the parameters estimated.

  19. Games with fuzzy parameters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Messaoud, Deghdak

    2010-11-01

    In this paper, we study the existence of equilibrium in non-cooperative game with fuzzy parameters. We generalize te results of Larbani and Kacher(2008, 2009) in infinite dimentional spaces. The proof is based on the Browder-Fan fixed point theorem.

  20. Articulatory Parameters.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ladefoged, Peter

    1980-01-01

    Summarizes the 16 parameters hypothesized to be necessary and sufficient for linguistic phonetic specifications. Suggests seven parameters affecting tongue shapes, three determining the positions of the lips, one controlling the position of the velum, four varying laryngeal actions, and one controlling respiratory activity. (RL)

  1. Extensive experimental mapping of sonoluminescence parameter space

    PubMed

    Ketterling; Apfel

    2000-04-01

    Experimental phase diagrams are compared to theoretical predictions based on the Dissociation Hypothesis (DH) theory of single bubble sonoluminescence (SBSL). Ambient radius (R(o))- acoustic drive pressure (P(a)) phase diagrams are presented for krypton-nitrogen mixtures and for a collection of data with other noble gas-nitrogen mixtures. The data is also presented in terms of expansion ratio (maximum bubble radius R(max)/R(o)) vs P(a) and relative light intensity vs P(a). The results provide further evidence of the validity of DH and also provide a thorough mapping of SBSL at a single frequency.

  2. Classification of Data Bundles via Parameter Spaces

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-12-01

    Ph.D., Summer 2008 • Jen-Mei Chang, Ph.D., Spring 2008 Masters students awarded degrees: • Justin Marks, (currently qualified Ph.D. student, CSU ) • Lori...Ziegelmeier, (currently qualified Ph.D. student, CSU ) • Tim McCoy, (currently Ph.D. student University of Notre Dame) Arta Jamshidi was hired as a...Analysis vs Kernelized Principal Compo- nent Analysis, in proceedings, World Comp Congress 08, Data Mining Symposium, Las Vegas, July 2008. 16. E. Smith

  3. Achieving agility through parameter space qualification

    SciTech Connect

    Diegert, K.V.; Easterling, R.G.; Ashby, M.R.; Benavides, G.L.; Forsythe, C.; Jones, R.E.; Longcope, D.B.; Parratt, S.W.

    1995-02-01

    The A-primed (Agile Product Realization of Innovative electro-Mechanical Devices) project is defining and proving processes for agile product realization for the Department of Energy complex. Like other agile production efforts reported in the literature, A-primed uses concurrent engineering and information automation technologies to enhance information transfer. A unique aspect of our approach to agility is the qualification during development of a family of related product designs and their production processes, rather than a single design and its attendant processes. Applying engineering principles and statistical design of experiments, economies of test and analytic effort are realized for the qualification of the device family as a whole. Thus the need is minimized for test and analysis to qualify future devices from this family, thereby further reducing the design-to-production cycle time. As a measure of the success of the A-primed approach, the first design took 24 days to produce, and operated correctly on the first attempt. A flow diagram for the qualification process is presented. Guidelines are given for implementation, based on the authors experiences as members of the A-primed qualification team.

  4. Control of space stations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, K. Y.

    1983-01-01

    A study is made to develop controllers for the NASA-JSC Triangular Space Station and evaluate their performances to make recommendations for structural design and/or control alternatives. The control system design assumes the rigid body of the Space Station and developes the lumped parameter control system by using the Inverse Optimal Control Theory. In order to evaluate the performance of the control system, a Parameter Estimation algorithm is being developed which will be used in modeling an equivalent but simpler Space Station model. Finally, a scaled version of the Space Station is being built for the purpose of physical experiments to evaluate the control system performance.

  5. Aircraft parameter estimation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Iliff, Kenneth W.

    1987-01-01

    The aircraft parameter estimation problem is used to illustrate the utility of parameter estimation, which applies to many engineering and scientific fields. Maximum likelihood estimation has been used to extract stability and control derivatives from flight data for many years. This paper presents some of the basic concepts of aircraft parameter estimation and briefly surveys the literature in the field. The maximum likelihood estimator is discussed, and the basic concepts of minimization and estimation are examined for a simple simulated aircraft example. The cost functions that are to be minimized during estimation are defined and discussed. Graphic representations of the cost functions are given to illustrate the minimization process. Finally, the basic concepts are generalized, and estimation from flight data is discussed. Some of the major conclusions for the simulated example are also developed for the analysis of flight data from the F-14, highly maneuverable aircraft technology (HiMAT), and space shuttle vehicles.

  6. On Markov parameters in system identification

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Phan, Minh; Juang, Jer-Nan; Longman, Richard W.

    1991-01-01

    A detailed discussion of Markov parameters in system identification is given. Different forms of input-output representation of linear discrete-time systems are reviewed and discussed. Interpretation of sampled response data as Markov parameters is presented. Relations between the state-space model and particular linear difference models via the Markov parameters are formulated. A generalization of Markov parameters to observer and Kalman filter Markov parameters for system identification is explained. These extended Markov parameters play an important role in providing not only a state-space realization, but also an observer/Kalman filter for the system of interest.

  7. Supergranular Parameters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Udayashankar, Paniveni

    2016-07-01

    I study the complexity of supergranular cells using intensity patterns from Kodaikanal solar observatory. The chaotic and turbulent aspect of the solar supergranulation can be studied by examining the interrelationships amongst the parameters characterizing supergranular cells namely size, horizontal flow field, lifetime and physical dimensions of the cells and the fractal dimension deduced from the size data. The findings are supportive of Kolmogorov's theory of turbulence. The Data consists of visually identified supergranular cells, from which a fractal dimension 'D' for supergranulation is obtained according to the relation P α AD/2 where 'A' is the area and 'P' is the perimeter of the supergranular cells. I find a fractal dimension close to about 1.3 which is consistent with that for isobars and suggests a possible turbulent origin. The cell circularity shows a dependence on the perimeter with a peak around (1.1-1.2) x 105 m. The findings are supportive of Kolmogorov's theory of turbulence.

  8. Next generation space robot

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Iwata, Tsutomu; Oda, Mitsushige; Imai, Ryoichi

    1989-01-01

    The recent research effort on the next generation space robots is presented. The goals of this research are to develop the fundamental technologies and to acquire the design parameters of the next generation space robot. Visual sensing and perception, dexterous manipulation, man machine interface and artificial intelligence techniques such as task planning are identified as the key technologies.

  9. Aging and space travel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mohler, S. R.

    1982-01-01

    The matter of aging and its relation to space vehicle crewmembers undertaking prolonged space missions is addressed. The capabilities of the older space traveler to recover from bone demineralization and muscle atrophy are discussed. Certain advantages of the older person are noted, for example, a greater tolerance of monotony and repetitious activities. Additional parameters are delineated including the cardiovascular system, the reproductive system, ionizing radiation, performance, and group dynamics.

  10. Measuring planetary field parameters by scattered cubes from the Husar-5 rover: educational space probe construction for a field work mission with great number of 5 cm sized sensorcube units launched from the rover.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lang, A.; Kocsis, A.; Gats, J.

    2015-10-01

    The Hunveyor-Husar project tries to keep step with the main trends in the space research, in our recent case with the so called MSSM (Micro Sized Space- Mothership) and NPSDR (Nano, Pico Space Devices and Robots). [1]Of course, we do not want to scatter the smaller probe-cubes from a mothership, but from the Husar rover, and to do it on the planetary surface after landing.

  11. Space Domain Awareness

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-09-01

    information required to characterize a space object. Another key parameter to be considered is the frequency of observation. This sampling rate varies...useful to define the values of these parameters that approximate the current and future state of the space domain. The current catalog and network... Parameters used in estimating data needs for SDA Current Threshold Objective βmo , βimg 0.1, 10Kb 0.1, 10Kb 0.1, 10Kb Number of Objects (Na , Np

  12. Space Suit Thermal Dynamics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Campbell, Anthony B.; Nair, Satish S.; Miles, John B.; Iovine, John V.; Lin, Chin H.

    1998-01-01

    The present NASA space suit (the Shuttle EMU) is a self-contained environmental control system, providing life support, environmental protection, earth-like mobility, and communications. This study considers the thermal dynamics of the space suit as they relate to astronaut thermal comfort control. A detailed dynamic lumped capacitance thermal model of the present space suit is used to analyze the thermal dynamics of the suit with observations verified using experimental and flight data. Prior to using the model to define performance characteristics and limitations for the space suit, the model is first evaluated and improved. This evaluation includes determining the effect of various model parameters on model performance and quantifying various temperature prediction errors in terms of heat transfer and heat storage. The observations from this study are being utilized in two future design efforts, automatic thermal comfort control design for the present space suit and design of future space suit systems for Space Station, Lunar, and Martian missions.

  13. Parameter Estimation using Numerical Merger Waveforms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thorpe, J. I.; McWilliams, S.; Kelly, B.; Fahey, R.; Arnaud, K.; Baker, J.

    2008-01-01

    Results: Developed parameter estimation model integrating complete waveforms and improved instrumental models. Initial results for equal-mass non-spinning systems indicate moderate improvement in most parameters, significant improvement in some Near-term improvement: a) Improved statistics; b) T-channel; c) Larger parameter space coverage. Combination with other results: a) Higher harmonics; b) Spin precession; c) Instrumental effects.

  14. Space Service Market (Theoretical Aspect)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prisniakov, V. F.; Prisniakova, L. M.

    The authors propose a mathematical model of the demand and supply in the market economics and in the market of space services, in particular. A theoretical demand formula and a real curve demand are compared. The market equilibrium price is defined. The space market dynamics is studied. The calculations are carried out for the parameters which are close to the market of space services.

  15. Space Discovery.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Blackman, Joan

    1998-01-01

    Describes one teacher's experience taking Space Discovery courses that were sponsored by the United States Space Foundation (USSF). These courses examine the history of space science, theory of orbits and rocketry, the effects of living in outer space on humans, and space weather. (DDR)

  16. Space Station

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anderton, D. A.

    1985-01-01

    The official start of a bold new space program, essential to maintain the United States' leadership in space was signaled by a Presidential directive to move aggressively again into space by proceeding with the development of a space station. Development concepts for a permanently manned space station are discussed. Reasons for establishing an inhabited space station are given. Cost estimates and timetables are also cited.

  17. Reducing the Knowledge Tracing Space

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ritter, Steven; Harris, Thomas K.; Nixon, Tristan; Dickison, Daniel; Murray, R. Charles; Towle, Brendon

    2009-01-01

    In Cognitive Tutors, student skill is represented by estimates of student knowledge on various knowledge components. The estimate for each knowledge component is based on a four-parameter model developed by Corbett and Anderson [Nb]. In this paper, we investigate the nature of the parameter space defined by these four parameters by modeling data…

  18. Space station

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stewart, Donald F.; Hayes, Judith

    1989-01-01

    The history of American space flight indicates that a space station is the next logical step in the scientific pursuit of greater knowledge of the universe. The Space Station and its complement of space vehicles, developed by NASA, will add new dimensions to an already extensive space program in the United States. The Space Station offers extraordinary benefits for a comparatively modest investment (currently estimated at one-ninth the cost of the Apollo Program). The station will provide a permanent multipurpose facility in orbit necessary for the expansion of space science and technology. It will enable significant advancements in life sciences research, satellite communications, astronomy, and materials processing. Eventually, the station will function in support of the commercialization and industrialization of space. Also, as a prerequisite to manned interplanetary exploration, the long-duration space flights typical of Space Station missions will provide the essential life sciences research to allow progressively longer human staytime in space.

  19. Space Power

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1984-01-01

    Appropriate directions for the applied research and technology programs that will develop space power systems for U.S. future space missions beyond 1995 are explored. Spacecraft power supplies; space stations, space power reactors, solar arrays, thermoelectric generators, energy storage, and communication satellites are among the topics discussed.

  20. Themed Space

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lynch, Christopher O.

    2010-01-01

    This article presents a classroom activity that introduces students to the concept of themed space. Students learn to think critically about the spaces they encounter on a regular basis by analyzing existing spaces and by working in groups to create their own themed space. This exercise gives students the chance to see the relevance of critical…

  1. Space colonization.

    PubMed

    2002-12-01

    NASA interest in colonization encompasses space tourism; space exploration; space bases in orbit, at L1, on the Moon, or on Mars; in-situ resource utilization; and planetary terraforming. Activities progressed during 2002 in areas such as Mars colonies, hoppers, and biomass; space elevators and construction; and in-situ consumables.

  2. Earth Rotation Parameters from DSN VLBI: 1994

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Steppe, J. A.; Oliveau, S. H.; Sovers, O. J.

    1994-01-01

    In this report, Earth Rotation Parameter (ERP) estimates ahve been obtained from an analysis of Deep Space Network (DSN) VLBI data that directly aligns its celestial and terrestrial reference frames with those of the International Earth Rotation Service (IERS).

  3. SpaceTech—Postgraduate space education

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Bruijn, Ferdi J.; Ashford, Edward W.; Larson, Wiley J.

    2008-07-01

    , Interpersonal Skills, Telecommunications, Earth Observation and Navigation. A group CCP, a major asset of this unique program, is a focused project, aimed at the formation of a credible virtual commercial space-related business. Participants exercise space systems engineering fundamentals as well as marketing and business engineering tools, with the goal of creating a financially viable business opportunity. They then present the result, in the form of an unsolicited proposal to potential investors, as well as a varied group of engineers, managers and executives from the space community. During the CCP, participants learn the ties between mission and system design and the potential return to investors. They develop an instinct for the technical concepts and which of the parameters to adjust to make their newly conceived business more effective and profitable.

  4. Space Industry

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-01-01

    invest in and support commercial efforts. In testimony before the House Committee on Space and Aeronautics in April of 2005, Elon Musk provided the...Response Launch Vehicle. Space Daily. Retrieved April 9, 2006 from www.spacedaily.com. 81 Musk , Elon (2005, April 20). Commercialization of Space...Space Transportation Policy. (2006, January 5). Retrieved May 30, 2006 from http://www.ostp.gov/html/SpaceTransFactSheetJan2005.pdf. 86 Musk , Elon

  5. Space Station Food System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thurmond, Beverly A.; Gillan, Douglas J.; Perchonok, Michele G.; Marcus, Beth A.; Bourland, Charles T.

    1986-01-01

    A team of engineers and food scientists from NASA, the aerospace industry, food companies, and academia are defining the Space Station Food System. The team identified the system requirements based on an analysis of past and current space food systems, food systems from isolated environment communities that resemble Space Station, and the projected Space Station parameters. The team is resolving conflicts among requirements through the use of trade-off analyses. The requirements will give rise to a set of specifications which, in turn, will be used to produce concepts. Concept verification will include testing of prototypes, both in 1-g and microgravity. The end-item specification provides an overall guide for assembling a functional food system for Space Station.

  6. Space prospects. [european space programs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1980-01-01

    A strategy for keeping the Common Market's space effort independent of and competitive with NASA and the space shuttle is discussed. Limited financing is the chief obstacle to this. Proposals include an outer space materials processing project and further development of the Ariane rocket. A manned space program is excluded for the foreseeable future.

  7. Display Parameters and Requirements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bahadur, Birendra

    The following sections are included: * INTRODUCTION * HUMAN FACTORS * Anthropometry * Sensory * Cognitive * Discussions * THE HUMAN VISUAL SYSTEM - CAPABILITIES AND LIMITATIONS * Cornea * Pupil and Iris * Lens * Vitreous Humor * Retina * RODS - NIGHT VISION * CONES - DAY VISION * RODS AND CONES - TWILIGHT VISION * VISUAL PIGMENTS * MACULA * BLOOD * CHOROID COAT * Visual Signal Processing * Pathways to the Brain * Spatial Vision * Temporal Vision * Colour Vision * Colour Blindness * DICHROMATISM * Protanopia * Deuteranopia * Tritanopia * ANOMALOUS TRICHROMATISM * Protanomaly * Deuteranomaly * Tritanomaly * CONE MONOCHROMATISM * ROD MONOCHROMATISM * Using Colour Effectively * COLOUR MIXTURES AND THE CHROMATICITY DIAGRAM * Colour Matching Functions and Chromaticity Co-ordinates * CIE 1931 Colour Space * CIE PRIMARIES * CIE COLOUR MATCHING FUNCTIONS AND CHROMATICITY CO-ORDINATES * METHODS FOR DETERMINING TRISTIMULUS VALUES AND COLOUR CO-ORDINATES * Spectral Power Distribution Method * Filter Method * CIE 1931 CHROMATICITY DIAGRAM * ADDITIVE COLOUR MIXTURE * CIE 1976 Chromaticity Diagram * CIE Uniform Colour Spaces and Colour Difference Formulae * CIELUV OR L*u*v* * CIELAB OR L*a*b* * CIE COLOUR DIFFERENCE FORMULAE * Colour Temperature and CIE Standard Illuminants and source * RADIOMETRIC AND PHOTOMETRIC QUANTITIES * Photopic (Vλ and Scotopic (Vλ') Luminous Efficiency Function * Photometric and Radiometric Flux * Luminous and Radiant Intensities * Incidence: Illuminance and Irradiance * Exitance or Emittance (M) * Luminance and Radiance * ERGONOMIC REQUIREMENTS OF DISPLAYS * ELECTRO-OPTICAL PARAMETERS AND REQUIREMENTS * Contrast and Contrast Ratio * Luminance and Brightness * Colour Contrast and Chromaticity * Glare * Other Aspects of Legibility * SHAPE AND SIZE OF CHARACTERS * DEFECTS AND BLEMISHES * FLICKER AND DISTORTION * ANGLE OF VIEW * Switching Speed * Threshold and Threshold Characteristic * Measurement Techniques For Electro-optical Parameters * RADIOMETRIC

  8. Space station contamination modeling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gordon, T. D.

    1989-01-01

    Current plans for the operation of Space Station Freedom allow the orbit to decay to approximately an altitude of 200 km before reboosting to approximately 450 km. The Space Station will encounter dramatically increasing ambient and induced environmental effects as the orbit decays. Unfortunately, Shuttle docking, which has been of concern as a high contamination period, will likely occur during the time when the station is in the lowest orbit. The combination of ambient and induced environments along with the presence of the docked Shuttle could cause very severe contamination conditions at the lower orbital altitudes prior to Space Station reboost. The purpose here is to determine the effects on the induced external environment of Space Station Freedom with regard to the proposed changes in altitude. The change in the induced environment will be manifest in several parameters. The ambient density buildup in front of ram facing surfaces will change. The source of such contaminants can be outgassing/offgassing surfaces, leakage from the pressurized modules or experiments, purposeful venting, and thruster firings. The third induced environment parameter with altitude dependence is the glow. In order to determine the altitude dependence of the induced environment parameters, researchers used the integrated Spacecraft Environment Model (ISEM) which was developed for Marshall Space Flight Center. The analysis required numerous ISEM runs. The assumptions and limitations for the ISEM runs are described.

  9. Space Shuttle.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration, Washington, DC.

    The plans for utilizing reusable space shuttles which could replace almost all present expendable launch vehicles are briefly described. Many illustrations are included showing the artists' concepts of various configurations proposed for space shuttles. (PR)

  10. Space Basics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Herbert, Dexter (Editor)

    1991-01-01

    In this education video series, 'Liftoff to Learning', astronauts (Bruce Melnick, Thomas Akers, William Shepherd, Robert Cabana, and Richard Richards) describe the historical beginnings of space exploration from the time of Robert H. Goddard (considered the Father of Rocketry), who, in 1929, invented the first propellant rocket, the prototype of modern liquid propellant rockets, up to the modern Space Shuttles. The questions - where is space, what is space, and how do astronauts get to, stay in, and come back from space are answered through historical footage, computer graphics, and animation. The space environment effects, temperature effects, and gravitational effects on the launching, orbiting, and descent of the Shuttles are discussed. Included is historical still photos and film footage of past space programs and space vehicles.

  11. Space medicine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, P. C., Jr.

    1984-01-01

    The medical aspects of space flight are briefly discussed. The problems of space adaptation syndrome, commonly known as space sickness, are described, and its cause is shown. The adaptation of the cardiovascular system to weightlessness, the problems of radiation in space, atrophy of bones and muscles, and loss of blood volume are addressed. The difficulties associated with the reexperience of gravity on return to earth are briefly considered.

  12. Space Operations

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-05-29

    as the Solar Heliospheric Observatory —a joint European Space Agency-NASA mission) (Ka) was launched in December 1995 and NASA’s Advanced Composition...Command, United States Central Command, United States European Command, and others. The US has missile defense cooperative programs with a number of...Therefore, civilian space agencies have often taken the leadership role for space. Agencies such as the European Space Agency, the United Kingdom

  13. Space Battery

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2008-06-13

    Space Command SPACE AND MISSILE SYSTEMS CENTER STANDARD SPACE BATTERY APPROVED FOR PUBLIC RELEASE ...person shall be subject to a penalty for failing to comply with a collection of information if it does not display a currently valid OMB control ... release , distribution unlimited 13. SUPPLEMENTARY NOTES 14. ABSTRACT 15. SUBJECT TERMS 16. SECURITY CLASSIFICATION OF: 17. LIMITATION OF ABSTRACT

  14. Space Law

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hermida, Julian

    2006-01-01

    This chapter examines the salient characteristics of Space Law. It analyzes the origins and evolution of Space Law, its main international principles, and some current topics of interest to the scientific community: the delimitation of airspace and outer space, intellectual property, and criminal responsibility.

  15. Constructing Space

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Henderson, Austin

    This chapter chronicles the growth of the author's understanding of Media Space through his 20-year experience with coupling spaces, using video. It is a “technology-first” understanding of the construction of space. Key ideas from research studies and practice are presented, and contrasts with other genres of communication are made. The implications for distributed collaboration are explored.

  16. Cognitive Neuroscience in Space

    PubMed Central

    De la Torre, Gabriel G.

    2014-01-01

    Humans are the most adaptable species on this planet, able to live in vastly different environments on Earth. Space represents the ultimate frontier and a true challenge to human adaptive capabilities. As a group, astronauts and cosmonauts are selected for their ability to work in the highly perilous environment of space, giving their best. Terrestrial research has shown that human cognitive and perceptual motor performances deteriorate under stress. We would expect to observe these effects in space, which currently represents an exceptionally stressful environment for humans. Understanding the neurocognitive and neuropsychological parameters influencing space flight is of high relevance to neuroscientists, as well as psychologists. Many of the environmental characteristics specific to space missions, some of which are also present in space flight simulations, may affect neurocognitive performance. Previous work in space has shown that various psychomotor functions degrade during space flight, including central postural functions, the speed and accuracy of aimed movements, internal timekeeping, attentional processes, sensing of limb position and the central management of concurrent tasks. Other factors that might affect neurocognitive performance in space are illness, injury, toxic exposure, decompression accidents, medication side effects and excessive exposure to radiation. Different tools have been developed to assess and counteract these deficits and problems, including computerized tests and physical exercise devices. It is yet unknown how the brain will adapt to long-term space travel to the asteroids, Mars and beyond. This work represents a comprehensive review of the current knowledge and future challenges of cognitive neuroscience in space from simulations and analog missions to low Earth orbit and beyond. PMID:25370373

  17. Cognitive neuroscience in space.

    PubMed

    De la Torre, Gabriel G

    2014-07-03

    Humans are the most adaptable species on this planet, able to live in vastly different environments on Earth. Space represents the ultimate frontier and a true challenge to human adaptive capabilities. As a group, astronauts and cosmonauts are selected for their ability to work in the highly perilous environment of space, giving their best. Terrestrial research has shown that human cognitive and perceptual motor performances deteriorate under stress. We would expect to observe these effects in space, which currently represents an exceptionally stressful environment for humans. Understanding the neurocognitive and neuropsychological parameters influencing space flight is of high relevance to neuroscientists, as well as psychologists. Many of the environmental characteristics specific to space missions, some of which are also present in space flight simulations, may affect neurocognitive performance. Previous work in space has shown that various psychomotor functions degrade during space flight, including central postural functions, the speed and accuracy of aimed movements, internal timekeeping, attentional processes, sensing of limb position and the central management of concurrent tasks. Other factors that might affect neurocognitive performance in space are illness, injury, toxic exposure, decompression accidents, medication side effects and excessive exposure to radiation. Different tools have been developed to assess and counteract these deficits and problems, including computerized tests and physical exercise devices. It is yet unknown how the brain will adapt to long-term space travel to the asteroids, Mars and beyond. This work represents a comprehensive review of the current knowledge and future challenges of cognitive neuroscience in space from simulations and analog missions to low Earth orbit and beyond.

  18. The Development of a Stochastic Model of the Atmosphere Between 30 and 90 Km to Be Used in Determining the Effect of Atmospheric Variability on Space Shuttle Entry Parameters. Ph.D. Thesis - Virginia Polytechnic Inst. and State Univ.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Campbell, J. W.

    1973-01-01

    A stochasitc model of the atmosphere between 30 and 90 km was developed for use in Monte Carlo space shuttle entry studies. The model is actually a family of models, one for each latitude-season category as defined in the 1966 U.S. Standard Atmosphere Supplements. Each latitude-season model generates a pseudo-random temperature profile whose mean is the appropriate temperature profile from the Standard Atmosphere Supplements. The standard deviation of temperature at each altitude for a given latitude-season model was estimated from sounding-rocket data. Departures from the mean temperature at each altitude were produced by assuming a linear regression of temperature on the solar heating rate of ozone. A profile of random ozone concentrations was first generated using an auxiliary stochastic ozone model, also developed as part of this study, and then solar heating rates were computed for the random ozone concentrations.

  19. Parameter estimation uncertainty: Comparing apples and apples?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hart, D.; Yoon, H.; McKenna, S. A.

    2012-12-01

    Given a highly parameterized ground water model in which the conceptual model of the heterogeneity is stochastic, an ensemble of inverse calibrations from multiple starting points (MSP) provides an ensemble of calibrated parameters and follow-on transport predictions. However, the multiple calibrations are computationally expensive. Parameter estimation uncertainty can also be modeled by decomposing the parameterization into a solution space and a null space. From a single calibration (single starting point) a single set of parameters defining the solution space can be extracted. The solution space is held constant while Monte Carlo sampling of the parameter set covering the null space creates an ensemble of the null space parameter set. A recently developed null-space Monte Carlo (NSMC) method combines the calibration solution space parameters with the ensemble of null space parameters, creating sets of calibration-constrained parameters for input to the follow-on transport predictions. Here, we examine the consistency between probabilistic ensembles of parameter estimates and predictions using the MSP calibration and the NSMC approaches. A highly parameterized model of the Culebra dolomite previously developed for the WIPP project in New Mexico is used as the test case. A total of 100 estimated fields are retained from the MSP approach and the ensemble of results defining the model fit to the data, the reproduction of the variogram model and prediction of an advective travel time are compared to the same results obtained using NSMC. We demonstrate that the NSMC fields based on a single calibration model can be significantly constrained by the calibrated solution space and the resulting distribution of advective travel times is biased toward the travel time from the single calibrated field. To overcome this, newly proposed strategies to employ a multiple calibration-constrained NSMC approach (M-NSMC) are evaluated. Comparison of the M-NSMC and MSP methods suggests

  20. Space Commercialization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Martin, Gary L.

    2011-01-01

    A robust and competitive commercial space sector is vital to continued progress in space. The United States is committed to encouraging and facilitating the growth of a U.S. commercial space sector that supports U.S. needs, is globally competitive, and advances U.S. leadership in the generation of new markets and innovation-driven entrepreneurship. Energize competitive domestic industries to participate in global markets and advance the development of: satellite manufacturing; satellite-based services; space launch; terrestrial applications; and increased entrepreneurship. Purchase and use commercial space capabilities and services to the maximum practical extent Actively explore the use of inventive, nontraditional arrangements for acquiring commercial space goods and services to meet United States Government requirements, including measures such as public-private partnerships, . Refrain from conducting United States Government space activities that preclude, discourage, or compete with U.S. commercial space activities. Pursue potential opportunities for transferring routine, operational space functions to the commercial space sector where beneficial and cost-effective.

  1. Space law and space resources

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goldman, Nathan C.

    1992-01-01

    Space industrialization is confronting space law with problems that are changing old and shaping new legal principles. The return to the Moon, the next logical step beyond the space station, will establish a permanent human presence there. Science and engineering, manufacturing and mining will involve the astronauts in the settlement of the solar system. These pioneers, from many nations, will need a legal, political, and social framework to structure their lives and interactions. International and even domestic space law are only the beginning of this framework. Dispute resolution and simple experience will be needed in order to develop, over time, a new social system for the new regime of space.

  2. 76 FR 20070 - Commercial Space Transportation Safety Approval Performance Criteria

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-04-11

    ....19 (a)(4). NASTAR's ] STS-400 suborbital space flight simulator (a multi-axis centrifuge) is capable of replicating the G forces associated with suborbital space flight within the following parameters... Federal Aviation Administration Commercial Space Transportation Safety Approval Performance...

  3. Space Telescopes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Clampin, Mark; Flanagan, Kathryn A.

    2012-01-01

    Space telescopes have been a dominant force in astrophysics and astronomy over the last two decades. As Lyman Spitzer predicted in 1946, space telescopes have opened up much of the electromagnetic spectrum to astronomers, and provided the opportunity to exploit the optical performance of telescopes uncompromised by the turbulent atmosphere. This special section of Optical Engineering is devoted to space telescopes. It focuses on the design and implementation of major space observatories from the gamma-ray to far-infrared, and highlights the scientific and technical breakthroughs enabled by these telescopes. The papers accepted for publication include reviews of major space telescopes spanning the last two decades, in-depth discussions of the design considerations for visible and x-ray telescopes, and papers discussing concepts and technical challenges for future space telescopes.

  4. Space Operations

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-01-06

    adversaries’ perceptions of US space capabilities and makes them less confident of success in interfering with those capabilities. DSC is built on...Responsibilities IV-17 transportation and space-based tourism , are no longer out of reach. Due to the demand for space-based products and services, the USG has...1) A well-organized missile warning system structure allows commanders to maximize detection and warning of inbound ballistic missiles, thereby

  5. Space suit

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shepard, L. F.; Durney, G. P.; Case, M. C.; Kenneway, A. J., III; Wise, R. C.; Rinehart, D.; Bessette, R. J.; Pulling, R. C. (Inventor)

    1973-01-01

    A pressure suit for high altitude flights, particularly space missions is reported. The suit is designed for astronauts in the Apollo space program and may be worn both inside and outside a space vehicle, as well as on the lunar surface. It comprises an integrated assembly of inner comfort liner, intermediate pressure garment, and outer thermal protective garment with removable helmet, and gloves. The pressure garment comprises an inner convoluted sealing bladder and outer fabric restraint to which are attached a plurality of cable restraint assemblies. It provides versitility in combination with improved sealing and increased mobility for internal pressures suitable for life support in the near vacuum of outer space.

  6. Space Medicine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pool, Sam L.

    2000-01-01

    The National Academy of Sciences Committee on Space Biology and Medicine points out that space medicine is unique among space sciences, because in addition to addressing questions of fundamental scientific interest, it must address clinical or human health and safety issues as well. Efforts to identify how microgravity affects human physiology began in earnest by the United States in 1960 with the establishment of the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA's) Life Sciences program. Before the first human space missions, prediction about the physiological effects of microgravity in space ranged from extremely severe to none at all. The understanding that has developed from our experiences in space to date allows us to be guardedly optimistic about the ultimate accommodations of humans to space flight. Only by our travels into the microgravity environment of space have we begun to unravel the mysteries associated with gravity's role in shaping human physiology. Space medicine is still at its very earliest stages. Development of this field has been slow for several reasons, including the limited number of space flights, the small number of research subjects, and the competition within the life sciences community and other disciplines for flight opportunities. The physiological changes incurred during space flight may have a dramatic effect on the course of an injury or illness. These physiological changes present an exciting challenge for the field of space medicine: how to best preserve human health and safety while simultaneously deciphering the effects of microgravity on human performance. As the United States considers the future of humans in long-term space travel, it is essential that the many mysteries as to how microgravity affects human systems be addressed with vigor. Based on the current state of our knowledge, the justification is excellent indeed compelling- for NASA to develop a sophisticated capability in space medicine. Teams of physicians

  7. Space Telescope.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration, Huntsville, AL. George C. Marshall Space Flight Center.

    This pamphlet describes the Space Telescope, an unmanned multi-purpose telescope observatory planned for launch into orbit by the Space Shuttle in the 1980s. The unique capabilities of this telescope are detailed, the major elements of the telescope are described, and its proposed mission operations are outlined. (CS)

  8. Collaborative Spaces

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lippman, Peter C.

    2013-01-01

    When architects discuss the educational facilities of the next century and beyond, the conversation turns to collaborative spaces. They envision flexible and fluid spaces that will encourage creative and critical thinking, and free students to communicate clearly about the task at hand. While these are admirable ideals, there are some fundamental…

  9. Space psychology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parin, V. V.; Gorbov, F. D.; Kosmolinskiy, F. P.

    1974-01-01

    Psychological selection of astronauts considers mental responses and adaptation to the following space flight stress factors: (1) confinement in a small space; (2) changes in three dimensional orientation; (3) effects of altered gravity and weightlessness; (4) decrease in afferent nerve pulses; (5) a sensation of novelty and danger; and (6) a sense of separation from earth.

  10. Space Jurisdiction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    O'Donnell, Declan

    United Societies In Space (USIS) marks its official beginning at Georgetown University Law School in October, 1992. The setting was the Moot Court proceedings of the International Institute of Space Lawyers at the law school. Dr. George S. Robinson, III was presiding over the Court Competition. Dr. Robinson was Associate General Counsel for the Smithsonian Institution at that time…

  11. Quantifying uncertainty in state and parameter estimation.

    PubMed

    Parlitz, Ulrich; Schumann-Bischoff, Jan; Luther, Stefan

    2014-05-01

    Observability of state variables and parameters of a dynamical system from an observed time series is analyzed and quantified by means of the Jacobian matrix of the delay coordinates map. For each state variable and each parameter to be estimated, a measure of uncertainty is introduced depending on the current state and parameter values, which allows us to identify regions in state and parameter space where the specific unknown quantity can(not) be estimated from a given time series. The method is demonstrated using the Ikeda map and the Hindmarsh-Rose model.

  12. Space engineering

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Alexander, Harold L.

    1991-01-01

    Human productivity was studied for extravehicular tasks performed in microgravity, particularly including in-space assembly of truss structures and other large objects. Human factors research probed the anthropometric constraints imposed on microgravity task performance and the associated workstation design requirements. Anthropometric experiments included reach envelope tests conducted using the 3-D Acoustic Positioning System (3DAPS), which permitted measuring the range of reach possible for persons using foot restraints in neutral buoyancy, both with and without space suits. Much neutral buoyancy research was conducted using the support of water to simulate the weightlessness environment of space. It became clear over time that the anticipated EVA requirement associated with the Space Station and with in-space construction of interplanetary probes would heavily burden astronauts, and remotely operated robots (teleoperators) were increasingly considered to absorb the workload. Experience in human EVA productivity led naturally to teleoperation research into the remote performance of tasks through human controlled robots.

  13. Precision cosmological parameter estimation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fendt, William Ashton, Jr.

    2009-09-01

    methods. These techniques will help in the understanding of new physics contained in current and future data sets as well as benefit the research efforts of the cosmology community. Our idea is to shift the computationally intensive pieces of the parameter estimation framework to a parallel training step. We then provide a machine learning code that uses this training set to learn the relationship between the underlying cosmological parameters and the function we wish to compute. This code is very accurate and simple to evaluate. It can provide incredible speed- ups of parameter estimation codes. For some applications this provides the convenience of obtaining results faster, while in other cases this allows the use of codes that would be impossible to apply in the brute force setting. In this thesis we provide several examples where our method allows more accurate computation of functions important for data analysis than is currently possible. As the techniques developed in this work are very general, there are no doubt a wide array of applications both inside and outside of cosmology. We have already seen this interest as other scientists have presented ideas for using our algorithm to improve their computational work, indicating its importance as modern experiments push forward. In fact, our algorithm will play an important role in the parameter analysis of Planck, the next generation CMB space mission.

  14. Space station thermal control surfaces. [space radiators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Maag, C. R.; Millard, J. M.; Jeffery, J. A.; Scott, R. R.

    1979-01-01

    Mission planning documents were used to analyze the radiator design and thermal control surface requirements for both space station and 25-kW power module, to analyze the missions, and to determine the thermal control technology needed to satisfy both sets of requirements. Parameters such as thermal control coating degradation, vehicle attitude, self eclipsing, variation in solar constant, albedo, and Earth emission are considered. Four computer programs were developed which provide a preliminary design and evaluation tool for active radiator systems in LEO and GEO. Two programs were developed as general programs for space station analysis. Both types of programs find the radiator-flow solution and evaluate external heat loads in the same way. Fortran listings are included.

  15. Space disposal of nuclear wastes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Priest, C. C.; Nixon, R. F.; Rice, E. E.

    1980-01-01

    The DOE has been studying several options for nuclear waste disposal, among them space disposal, which NASA has been assessing. Attention is given to space disposal destinations noting that a circular heliocentric orbit about halfway between Earth and Venus is the reference option in space disposal studies. Discussion also covers the waste form, showing that parameters to be considered include high waste loading, high thermal conductivity, thermochemical stability, resistance to leaching, fabrication, resistance to oxidation and to thermal shock. Finally, the Space Shuttle nuclear waste disposal mission profile is presented.

  16. Redefining solubility parameters: the partial solvation parameters.

    PubMed

    Panayiotou, Costas

    2012-03-21

    The present work reconsiders a classical and universally accepted concept of physical chemistry, the solubility parameter. Based on the insight derived from modern quantum chemical calculations, a new definition of solubility parameter is proposed, which overcomes some of the inherent restrictions of the original definition and expands its range of applications. The original single solubility parameter is replaced by four partial solvation parameters reflecting the dispersion, the polar, the acidic and the basic character of the chemical compounds as expressed either in their pure state or in mixtures. Simple rules are adopted for the definition and calculation of these four parameters and their values are tabulated for a variety of common substances. In contrast, however, to the well known Hansen solubility parameters, their design and evaluation does not rely exclusively on the basic rule of "similarity matching" for solubility but it makes also use of the other basic rule of compatibility, namely, the rule of "complementarity matching". This complementarity matching becomes particularly operational with the sound definition of the acidic and basic components of the solvation parameter based on the third σ-moments of the screening charge distributions of the quantum mechanics-based COSMO-RS theory. The new definitions are made in a simple and straightforward manner, thus, preserving the strength and appeal of solubility parameter stemming from its simplicity. The new predictive method has been applied to a variety of solubility data for systems of pharmaceuticals and polymers. The results from quantum mechanics calculations are critically compared with the results from Abraham's acid/base descriptors.

  17. Space polypropulsion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kellett, B. J.; Griffin, D. K.; Bingham, R.; Campbell, R. N.; Forbes, A.; Michaelis, M. M.

    2008-05-01

    Hybrid space propulsion has been a feature of most space missions. Only the very early rocket propulsion experiments like the V2, employed a single form of propulsion. By the late fifties multi-staging was routine and the Space Shuttle employs three different kinds of fuel and rocket engines. During the development of chemical rockets, other forms of propulsion were being slowly tested, both theoretically and, relatively slowly, in practice. Rail and gas guns, ion engines, "slingshot" gravity assist, nuclear and solar power, tethers, solar sails have all seen some real applications. Yet the earliest type of non-chemical space propulsion to be thought of has never been attempted in space: laser and photon propulsion. The ideas of Eugen Saenger, Georgii Marx, Arthur Kantrowitz, Leik Myrabo, Claude Phipps and Robert Forward remain Earth-bound. In this paper we summarize the various forms of nonchemical propulsion and their results. We point out that missions beyond Saturn would benefit from a change of attitude to laser-propulsion as well as consideration of hybrid "polypropulsion" - which is to say using all the rocket "tools" available rather than possibly not the most appropriate. We conclude with three practical examples, two for the next decades and one for the next century; disposal of nuclear waste in space; a grand tour of the Jovian and Saturnian moons - with Huygens or Lunoxod type, landers; and eventually mankind's greatest space dream: robotic exploration of neighbouring planetary systems.

  18. Advances in space robotics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Varsi, Giulio

    1989-01-01

    The problem of the remote control of space operations is addressed by identifying the key technical challenge: the management of contact forces and the principal performance parameters. Three principal classes of devices for remote operation are identified: anthropomorphic exoskeletons, computer aided teleoperators, and supervised telerobots. Their fields of application are described, and areas in which progress has reached the level of system or subsystem laboratory demonstrations are indicated. Key test results, indicating performance at a level useful for design tradeoffs, are reported.

  19. Space medicine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pool, Sam L.

    1988-01-01

    This paper attempts to underscore the importance of continued studies on the effects of space on human physiology. With particular reference to the Space Station, it is pointed out that there are two aspects which are challenging to life scientists: first is the development of a research capability for the life sciences which will be used to conduct investigations necessary to extend the time humans can remain in space; second is the challenge to develop a medical capability to provide prevention, diagnosis, and therapy. A discussion of physiological changes that have been observed in spacecrews follows along the lines of the two aspects mentioned.

  20. Space Resources

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McKay, Mary Fae (Editor); McKay, David S. (Editor); Duke, Michael S. (Editor)

    1992-01-01

    Space resources must be used to support life on the Moon and exploration of Mars. Just as the pioneers applied the tools they brought with them to resources they found along the way rather than trying to haul all their needs over a long supply line, so too must space travelers apply their high technology tools to local resources. The pioneers refilled their water barrels at each river they forded; moonbase inhabitants may use chemical reactors to combine hydrogen brought from Earth with oxygen found in lunar soil to make their water. The pioneers sought temporary shelter under trees or in the lee of a cliff and built sod houses as their first homes on the new land; settlers of the Moon may seek out lava tubes for their shelter or cover space station modules with lunar regolith for radiation protection. The pioneers moved further west from their first settlements, using wagons they had built from local wood and pack animals they had raised; space explorers may use propellant made at a lunar base to take them on to Mars. The concept for this report was developed at a NASA-sponsored summer study in 1984. The program was held on the Scripps campus of the University of California at San Diego (UCSD), under the auspices of the American Society for Engineering Education (ASEE). It was jointly managed under the California Space Inst. and the NASA Johnson Space Center, under the direction of the Office of Aeronautics and Space Technology (OAST) at NASA Headquarters. The study participants (listed in the addendum) included a group of 18 university teachers and researchers (faculty fellows) who were present for the entire 10-week period and a larger group of attendees from universities, Government, and industry who came for a series of four 1-week workshops. The organization of this report follows that of the summer study. Space Resources consists of a brief overview and four detailed technical volumes: (1) Scenarios; (2) Energy, Power, and Transport; (3) Materials; (4

  1. Space Shuttle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1975-01-01

    A general description of the space shuttle program is presented, with emphasis on its application to the use of space for commercial, scientific, and defense needs. The following aspects of the program are discussed: description of the flight system (orbiter, external tank, solid rocket boosters) and mission profile, direct benefits related to life on earth (both present and expected), description of the space shuttle vehicle and its associated supporting systems, economic impacts (including indirect benefits such as lower inflation rates), listing of participating organizations.

  2. Parameter-exploring policy gradients.

    PubMed

    Sehnke, Frank; Osendorfer, Christian; Rückstiess, Thomas; Graves, Alex; Peters, Jan; Schmidhuber, Jürgen

    2010-05-01

    We present a model-free reinforcement learning method for partially observable Markov decision problems. Our method estimates a likelihood gradient by sampling directly in parameter space, which leads to lower variance gradient estimates than obtained by regular policy gradient methods. We show that for several complex control tasks, including robust standing with a humanoid robot, this method outperforms well-known algorithms from the fields of standard policy gradients, finite difference methods and population based heuristics. We also show that the improvement is largest when the parameter samples are drawn symmetrically. Lastly we analyse the importance of the individual components of our method by incrementally incorporating them into the other algorithms, and measuring the gain in performance after each step.

  3. Space Shuttle and Space Station Radio Frequency (RF) Exposure Analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hwu, Shian U.; Loh, Yin-Chung; Sham, Catherine C.; Kroll, Quin D.

    2005-01-01

    This paper outlines the modeling techniques and important parameters to define a rigorous but practical procedure that can verify the compliance of RF exposure to the NASA standards for astronauts and electronic equipment. The electromagnetic modeling techniques are applied to analyze RF exposure in Space Shuttle and Space Station environments with reasonable computing time and resources. The modeling techniques are capable of taking into account the field interactions with Space Shuttle and Space Station structures. The obtained results illustrate the multipath effects due to the presence of the space vehicle structures. It's necessary to include the field interactions with the space vehicle in the analysis for an accurate assessment of the RF exposure. Based on the obtained results, the RF keep out zones are identified for appropriate operational scenarios, flight rules and necessary RF transmitter constraints to ensure a safe operating environment and mission success.

  4. Space Shuttle.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bierly, Ken; Dalheim, Mary

    1981-01-01

    Presents an elementary teaching unit on NASA's space program, including teacher background information, suggested student activities, and a list of resources. Appended is a transcript of an interview conducted by elementary children with astronaut candidate Sherwood (Woody) Spring. (SJL)

  5. Proceedings of the 1998 Space Control Conference,

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-11-02

    Sridharan - MIT Lincoln Laboratory SBV Space Object Photometry : Initial Results 103 R. Lambour, R. Bergemann, C. von Braun and E.M. Gaposchkin...velocity between the space-based sensor network and the RSOs. The sensor design process used these parameters to determine aperture, optical design...design process. From an analysis of these results, the orbital parameters listed in Table 6 were recommended. Table 6. Recommended Space-based Network

  6. Space science

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1975-01-01

    A fact sheet on the NASA space science program is presented. Some of the subjects considered include the following: (1) the Orbiting Astronomical Observatory, (2) the Orbiting Solar Observatory, (3) the Small Astronomy Satellite, (4) lunar programs, (5) planetary programs using the Mariner, Pioneer 10, and Viking space probes, and (6) the Scout, Thor-Delta, and Atlas-Centaur launch vehicles. For each program there is a description of the effort, the schedule, management, program officials, and funding aspects in outline form.

  7. Space Robotics

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1982-08-01

    ACCESSION NO 3. RECIPIENTS CATALOG NUIA3.R CMU-RI-TR-82-10 I4 1 (. 4. ;,;-LL (and Sublitle) S. TYPE OF REPORT & PERIOD CovEREO SPACE ROBOTICS Interim... Robotics Institute Pittsburgh, PA. 15213 It. CONTROLLING OFFICE NAME AND ADDRESS 12. REPORT DATE Office of Naval Research -August 1982 Arlington, VA 22217...SXnet.eE . Space Robotics Richard E. Korf Department of Computer Science and The Robotics Institute Carnegie-Mellon University Pittsburgh, Oetusylvania

  8. Space Resources

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McKay, Mary Fae (Editor); McKay, David S. (Editor); Duke, Michael S. (Editor)

    1992-01-01

    Space resources must be used to support life on the Moon and exploration of Mars. Just as the pioneers applied the tools they brought with them to resources they found along the way rather than trying to haul all their needs over a long supply line, so too must space travelers apply their high technology tools to local resources. The pioneers refilled their water barrels at each river they forded; moonbase inhabitants may use chemical reactors to combine hydrogen brought from Earth with oxygen found in lunar soil to make their water. The pioneers sought temporary shelter under trees or in the lee of a cliff and built sod houses as their first homes on the new land; settlers of the Moon may seek out lava tubes for their shelter or cover space station modules with lunar regolith for radiation protection. The pioneers moved further west from their first settlements, using wagons they had built from local wood and pack animals they had raised; space explorers may use propellant made at a lunar base to take them on to Mars. The concept for this report was developed at a NASA-sponsored summer study in 1984. The program was held on the Scripps campus of the University of California at San Diego (UCSD), under the auspices of the American Society for Engineering Education (ASEE). It was jointly managed under the California Space Inst. and the NASA Johnson Space Center, under the direction of the Office of Aeronautics and Space Technology (OAST) at NASA Headquarters. The study participants (listed in the addendum) included a group of 18 university teachers and researchers (faculty fellows) who were present for the entire 10-week period and a larger group of attendees from universities, Government, and industry who came for a series of four 1-week workshops. The organization of this report follows that of the summer study. Space Resources consists of a brief overview and four detailed technical volumes: (1) Scenarios; (2) Energy, Power, and Transport; (3) Materials; (4

  9. Space Rescue

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Muratore, John F.

    2007-01-01

    Space Rescue has been a topic of speculation for a wide community of people for decades. Astronauts, aerospace engineers, diplomats, medical and rescue professionals, inventors and science fiction writers have all speculated on this problem. Martin Caidin's 1964 novel Marooned dealt with the problems of rescuing a crew stranded in low earth orbit. Legend at the Johnson Space Center says that Caidin's portrayal of a Russian attempt to save the American crew played a pivotal role in convincing the Russians to join the real joint Apollo-Soyuz mission. Space Rescue has been a staple in science fiction television and movies portrayed in programs such as Star Trek, Stargate-SG1 and Space 1999 and movies such as Mission To Mars and Red Planet. As dramatic and as difficult as rescue appears in fictional accounts, in the real world it has even greater drama and greater difficulty. Space rescue is still in its infancy as a discipline and the purpose of this chapter is to describe the issues associated with space rescue and the work done so far in this field. For the purposes of this chapter, the term space rescue will refer to any system which allows for rescue or escape of personnel from situations which endanger human life in a spaceflight operation. This will span the period from crew ingress prior to flight through crew egress postlanding. For the purposes of this chapter, the term primary system will refer to the spacecraft system that a crew is either attempting to escape from or from which an attempt is being made to rescue the crew.

  10. Space Resources and Space Settlements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Billingham, J. (Editor); Gilbreath, W. P. (Editor); Oleary, B. (Editor); Gosset, B. (Editor)

    1979-01-01

    The technical papers from the five tasks groups that took part in the 1977 Ames Summer Study on Space Settlements and Industrialization Using Nonterrestrial Materials are presented. The papers are presented under the following general topics: (1) research needs for regenerative life-support systems; (2) habitat design; (3) dynamics and design of electromagnetic mass drivers; (4) asteroids as resources for space manufacturing; and (5) processing of nonterrestrial materials.

  11. Capabilities and constraints of typical space flight hardware

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Koudelka, John M.

    1993-01-01

    The Space Experiments Division is in the business of performing ground based low gravity testing and designing experiment hardware for space flight on the Space Shuttle and in the future, Space Station Freedom. As witnessed in combustion work, the reduction of gravity brings forward previously negligible processes and parameters. In a similar manner, the design of experiments for microgravity operation aboard the Space Shuttle must consider parameters that are often not factors for laboratory hardware.

  12. 14 CFR 1214.117 - Launch and orbit parameters for a standard launch.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 5 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Launch and orbit parameters for a standard launch. 1214.117 Section 1214.117 Aeronautics and Space NATIONAL AERONAUTICS AND SPACE ADMINISTRATION SPACE FLIGHT General Provisions Regarding Space Shuttle Flights of Payloads for Non-U.S....

  13. 14 CFR 1214.117 - Launch and orbit parameters for a standard launch.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 5 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Launch and orbit parameters for a standard launch. 1214.117 Section 1214.117 Aeronautics and Space NATIONAL AERONAUTICS AND SPACE ADMINISTRATION SPACE FLIGHT General Provisions Regarding Space Shuttle Flights of Payloads for Non-U.S....

  14. 14 CFR 1214.117 - Launch and orbit parameters for a standard launch.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 5 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Launch and orbit parameters for a standard launch. 1214.117 Section 1214.117 Aeronautics and Space NATIONAL AERONAUTICS AND SPACE ADMINISTRATION SPACE FLIGHT General Provisions Regarding Space Shuttle Flights of Payloads for Non-U.S....

  15. 14 CFR 1214.117 - Launch and orbit parameters for a standard launch.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 5 2011-01-01 2010-01-01 true Launch and orbit parameters for a standard launch. 1214.117 Section 1214.117 Aeronautics and Space NATIONAL AERONAUTICS AND SPACE ADMINISTRATION SPACE FLIGHT General Provisions Regarding Space Shuttle Flights of Payloads for Non-U.S....

  16. Space Exploration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Davis, Jeffrey R.

    2006-01-01

    This abstract covers a one hour presentation on Space Exploration. The audience is elementary students; therefore there are few words on the slides, mostly pictures of living and working in space. The presentation opens with a few slides describing a day in the life of a space explorer. It begins with a launch, discussions of day-night cycles, eating, exercising, housekeeping, EVA, relaxation, and sleeping. The next section of the presentation shows photos of astronauts performing experiments on the ISS. Yokomi Elementary School launched this fall with the most advanced educational technology tools available in schools today. The science and technology magnet school is equipped with interactive white boards, digital projectors, integrated sound systems and several computers for use by teachers and students. The only elementary school in Fresno Unified with a science focus also houses dedicated science classrooms equipped specifically for elementary students to experience hands-on science instruction in addition to the regular elementary curriculum.

  17. Metabolic and Regulatory Systems in Space Flight

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    In this session, Session JP2, the discussion focuses on the following topics: The Dynamics of Blood Biochemical Parameters in Cosmonauts During Long-Term Space Flights; Efficiency of Functional Loading Test for Investigations of Metabolic Responses to Weightlessness; Human Cellular Immunity and Space Flight; Cytokine Production and Head-Down Tilt Bed Rest; Plasma and Urine Amino Acids During Human Space Flight; and DNA Fingerprinting, Applications to Space Microbiology.

  18. MSSM Dark Matter Without Prejudice

    SciTech Connect

    Gainer, James S.; /SLAC

    2009-12-11

    Recently we examined a large number of points in a 19-dimensional parameter subspace of the CP-conserving MSSM with Minimal Flavor Violation. We determined whether each of these points satisfied existing theoretical, experimental, and observational constraints. Here we discuss the properties of the parameter space points allowed by existing data that are relevant for dark matter searches.

  19. MSSM Dark Matter Without Prejudice

    SciTech Connect

    Gainer, James S.

    2010-02-10

    Recently we examined a large number of points in a 19-dimensional parameter subspace of the CP-conserving MSSM with Minimal Flavor Violation. We determined whether each of these points satisfied existing theoretical, experimental, and observational constraints. Here we discuss the properties of the parameter space points allowed by existing data that are relevant for dark matter searches.

  20. MSSM Dark Matter Without Prejudice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gainer, James S.

    2010-02-01

    Recently we examined a large number of points in a 19-dimensional parameter subspace of the CP-conserving MSSM with Minimal Flavor Violation. We determined whether each of these points satisfied existing theoretical, experimental, and observational constraints. Here we discuss the properties of the parameter space points allowed by existing data that are relevant for dark matter searches.

  1. GALAPAGOS: from pixels to parameters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barden, Marco; Häußler, Boris; Peng, Chien Y.; McIntosh, Daniel H.; Guo, Yicheng

    2012-05-01

    To automate source detection, two-dimensional light profile Sérsic modelling and catalogue compilation in large survey applications, we introduce a new code Galaxy Analysis over Large Areas: Parameter Assessment by GALFITting Objects from SEXTRACTOR (GALAPAGOS). Based on a single set-up, GALAPAGOS can process a complete set of survey images. It detects sources in the data, estimates a local sky background, cuts postage stamp images for all sources, prepares object masks, performs Sérsic fitting including neighbours and compiles all objects in a final output catalogue. For the initial source detection, GALAPAGOS applies SEXTRACTOR, while GALFIT is incorporated for modelling Sérsic profiles. It measures the background sky involved in the Sérsic fitting by means of a flux growth curve. GALAPAGOS determines postage stamp sizes based on SEXTRACTOR shape parameters. In order to obtain precise model parameters, GALAPAGOS incorporates a complex sorting mechanism and makes use of modern CPU's multiplexing capabilities. It combines SEXTRACTOR and GALFIT data in a single output table. When incorporating information from overlapping tiles, GALAPAGOS automatically removes multiple entries from identical sources. GALAPAGOS is programmed in the Interactive Data Language (IDL). We test the stability and the ability to properly recover structural parameters extensively with artificial image simulations. Moreover, we apply GALAPAGOS successfully to the STAGES data set. For one-orbit Hubble Space Telescope data, a single 2.2-GHz CPU processes about 1000 primary sources per 24 h. Note that GALAPAGOS results depend critically on the user-defined parameter set-up. This paper provides useful guidelines to help the user make sensible choices.

  2. Entering Space

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zubrin, Robert

    The authors is giving a classification of civilisations depending on the degree of colonisation of the Earth, Solar System and Our Galaxy. The problems of: History of geographic discoveries (The great geographical discoveries during the Middle Age, the concurence of Chinnese and Europeans in this Area); The Astrophysics, such as: Asteroids, Water and Atmosphere on outer planets, Planet Mars Planet, Agriculture on outer planets, Minerals on outer planets; Cosmic flights: Fuels, Robotics, Moon (as an intermediary basis for interplanetary flights), Mars colonisation; Interstellar flights, Space research costs, strategy and tactics of the space colonisation; Policy: War and Peace, International Collaboration are discussed.

  3. Space vehicle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vonpragenau, G. L. (Inventor)

    1975-01-01

    A space vehicle having an improved ascent configuration for use in traveling in space is presented. Components of the vehicle are: (1) a winged orbiter having an elongater fuselage and rearwardly directed main engines fixed to the fuselage; (2) an elongated tank assembly of an improved configuration disposed forwardly of the fuselage and connected with the main engines of the vehicle for supplying liquid propellants; and (3) a booster stage comprising a pair of integrated solid rocket boosters connected with the orbiter immediately beneath the fuselage and extended in substantial parallelism.

  4. Satellite stabilization using space leeches

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Walker, Michael W.; Kim, Dong-Min

    1990-01-01

    A control algorithm for satellite stabilization using a space leech is presented. The space leech is assumed to have n reaction wheels with known moments of inertia about their axis of rotation. All mass properties of the satellite are assumed to be unknown. The algorithm brings the satellite to a specified attitude trajectory. Simulations were performed to demonstrate the controller. The model parameters and specific algorithm used and the results obtained are presented.

  5. Exploration and Validation of the Sdhash Parameter Space

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-06-01

    being compared. Roussev addresses this problem by recommend- ing a similarity score threshold of 21 [1], above which the compared object should be...interpreting the score introduces at least two problems . First, the ideal value of this score threshold may depend on the particular data or task at hand...of such granular feedback. An in-depth analysis of the implications of sdhash’s similarity scores has the potential to address these problems by making

  6. Parameter Space Techniques for Robust Control System Design.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1980-07-01

    been further investi- gated by Cruz [2] and Desoer and Wang [3]. In frequency design methods the concept to compensate the loop, such that high gains...of Feedback Systems, McGraw-Hill, New York, 1972. 3. C. A. Desoer and Y. T. Wang, "Foundations of Feedback Theory for Nonlinear Dynamical Systems

  7. Removing Gaps in the Exclusion of Top Squark Parameter Space

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Czakon, Michal; Mitov, Alexander; Papucci, Michele; Ruderman, Joshua T.; Weiler, Andreas

    2014-11-01

    Light stops are a hallmark of the most natural realizations of weak-scale supersymmetry. While stops have been extensively searched for, there remain open gaps around and below the top mass, due to similarities of stop and top signals with current statistics. We propose a new fast-track avenue to improve light stop searches for R -parity-conserving supersymmetry by comparing top cross section measurements to the theoretical prediction. Stop masses below ˜180 GeV can now be ruled out for a light neutralino. The possibility of a stop signal contaminating the top mass measurement is also briefly addressed.

  8. Parameter space exploration within dynamic simulations of signaling networks.

    PubMed

    De Ambrosi, Cristina; Barla, Annalisa; Tortolina, Lorenzo; Castagnino, Nicoletta; Pesenti, Raffaele; Verri, Alessandro; Ballestrero, Alberto; Patrone, Franco; Parodi, Silvio

    2013-02-01

    We started offering an introduction to very basic aspects of molecular biology, for the reader coming from computer sciences, information technology, mathematics. Similarly we offered a minimum of information about pathways and networks in graph theory, for a reader coming from the bio-medical sector. At the crossover about the two different types of expertise, we offered some definition about Systems Biology. The core of the article deals with a Molecular Interaction Map (MIM), a network of biochemical interactions involved in a small signaling-network sub-region relevant in breast cancer. We explored robustness/sensitivity to random perturbations. It turns out that our MIM is a non-isomorphic directed graph. For non physiological directions of propagation of the signal the network is quite resistant to perturbations. The opposite happens for biologically significant directions of signal propagation. In these cases we can have no signal attenuation, and even signal amplification. Signal propagation along a given pathway is highly unidirectional, with the exception of signal-feedbacks, that again have a specific biological role and significance. In conclusion, even a relatively small network like our present MIM reveals the preponderance of specific biological functions over unspecific isomorphic behaviors. This is perhaps the consequence of hundreds of millions of years of biological evolution.

  9. Exploring the parameter space of warm-inflation models

    SciTech Connect

    Bastero-Gil, Mar; Berera, Arjun; Kronberg, Nico E-mail: ab@ph.ed.ac.uk

    2015-12-01

    Warm inflation includes inflaton interactions with other fields throughout the inflationary epoch instead of confining such interactions to a distinct reheating era. Previous investigations have shown that, when certain constraints on the dynamics of these interactions and the resultant radiation bath are satisfied, a low-momentum-dominated dissipation coefficient ∝ T{sup 3}/m{sub χ}{sup 2} can sustain an era of inflation compatible with CMB observations. In this work, we extend these analyses by including the pole-dominated dissipation term ∝ √m{sub χ} T exp(−m{sub χ}/T). We find that, with this enhanced dissipation, certain models, notably the quadratic hilltop potential, perform significantly better. Specifically, we can achieve 50 e-folds of inflation and a spectral index compatible with Planck data while requiring fewer mediator field (O(10{sup 4}) for the quadratic hilltop potential) and smaller coupling constants, opening up interesting model-building possibilities. We also highlight the significance of the specific parametric dependence of the dissipative coefficient which could prove useful in even greater reduction in field content.

  10. Exploring the parameter space of warm-inflation models

    SciTech Connect

    Bastero-Gil, Mar; Berera, Arjun; Kronberg, Nico

    2015-12-22

    Warm inflation includes inflaton interactions with other fields throughout the inflationary epoch instead of confining such interactions to a distinct reheating era. Previous investigations have shown that, when certain constraints on the dynamics of these interactions and the resultant radiation bath are satisfied, a low-momentum-dominated dissipation coefficient ∝T{sup 3}/m{sub χ}{sup 2} can sustain an era of inflation compatible with CMB observations. In this work, we extend these analyses by including the pole-dominated dissipation term ∝√(m{sub χ}T)exp (−m{sub χ}/T). We find that, with this enhanced dissipation, certain models, notably the quadratic hilltop potential, perform significantly better. Specifically, we can achieve 50 e-folds of inflation and a spectral index compatible with Planck data while requiring fewer mediator field (O(10{sup 4}) for the quadratic hilltop potential) and smaller coupling constants, opening up interesting model-building possibilities. We also highlight the significance of the specific parametric dependence of the dissipative coefficient which could prove useful in even greater reduction in field content.

  11. Exploring the parameter space of warm-inflation models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bastero-Gil, Mar; Berera, Arjun; Kronberg, Nico

    2015-12-01

    Warm inflation includes inflaton interactions with other fields throughout the inflationary epoch instead of confining such interactions to a distinct reheating era. Previous investigations have shown that, when certain constraints on the dynamics of these interactions and the resultant radiation bath are satisfied, a low-momentum-dominated dissipation coefficient propto T3/mχ2 can sustain an era of inflation compatible with CMB observations. In this work, we extend these analyses by including the pole-dominated dissipation term propto √mχ T exp(-mχ/T). We find that, with this enhanced dissipation, certain models, notably the quadratic hilltop potential, perform significantly better. Specifically, we can achieve 50 e-folds of inflation and a spectral index compatible with Planck data while requiring fewer mediator field (Script O(104) for the quadratic hilltop potential) and smaller coupling constants, opening up interesting model-building possibilities. We also highlight the significance of the specific parametric dependence of the dissipative coefficient which could prove useful in even greater reduction in field content.

  12. Space Shuttle propulsion parameter estimation using optimal estimation techniques

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1983-01-01

    The fifth monthly progress report includes corrections and additions to the previously submitted reports. The addition of the SRB propellant thickness as a state variable is included with the associated partial derivatives. During this reporting period, preliminary results of the estimation program checkout was presented to NASA technical personnel.

  13. Sensitivity of Dynamical Systems to Banach Space Parameters

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2005-02-13

    nonlinear ordinary differential equation ẇN (t) = AN1 w N (t) + FN (t), t...spline approximation scheme to our HIV system, we establish a 4(N+ 1) dimensional nonlinear ordinary differential equation system. The solution of the...parametric density version of the HIV example treated in [3]. Specifically, we study the sensitivity equation of the ordinary differential equation ẋ(t) =

  14. A Handbook of Sound and Vibration Parameters

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1978-09-18

    fixed in space. (Reference 1.) no motion atay node Static Divergence: (See Divergence.) Statistical Energy Analysis (SEA): Statistical energy analysis is...parameters of the circuits come from statistics of the vibrational characteristics of the structure. Statistical energy analysis is uniquely successful

  15. Space Communications

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1977-03-15

    sponsored Survivability Analysis Group (SAG), (b) Reviewing for the Air Force some spacecraft radioisotope - thermoelectric - generator (RTG) and... Thermoelectric Generator SADA Solar Array Drive Assembly SAG Survivahilily Analysis Group SAMSO Space and Missile Systems Organization SAOS Solar Array Drive...over was accomplished without incident except that the third- generation gyro (TGG) drift-rate compensation was observed to have changed sometime after

  16. Found Space

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Haug, Ted; Ogurek, Douglas J.

    2006-01-01

    When education providers confront obstacles such as shrinking budgets and swelling enrollments, a multi-million-dollar new facility or major additions probably are not feasible. Converting vacant and underused buildings into school facilities enables administrators to acquire additional space quickly and cheaply. In this article, the authors…

  17. Training Spaces

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Weinstein, Margery

    2010-01-01

    Creating a balanced learning space for employees is about more than trying different types of seating. It is a challenge that an affect how well employees absorb the lessons and whether they will be able to product better results for the company. The possible solutions are as diverse as the learners. This article describes how three companies…

  18. Space Gerontology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miquel, J. (Editor); Economos, A. C. (Editor)

    1982-01-01

    Presentations are given which address the effects of space flght on the older person, the parallels between the physiological responses to weightlessness and the aging process, and experimental possibilities afforded by the weightless environment to fundamental research in gerontology and geriatrics.

  19. Friendly Spaces.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    D'Elia, William

    1996-01-01

    The creation of usable space for gatherings and socializing is an important consideration in any campus planning program. The University of California-San Diego has a large outdoor assembly area. An addition at Cal Poly-San Luis Obispo encompasses an existing pedestrian path. A new building at the University of Alaska, Fairbanks, is designed as a…

  20. Space languages

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hays, Dan

    1987-01-01

    Applications of linguistic principles to potential problems of human and machine communication in space settings are discussed. Variations in language among speakers of different backgrounds and change in language forms resulting from new experiences or reduced contact with other groups need to be considered in the design of intelligent machine systems.

  1. Parameter Plane Design Method

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1989-03-01

    Th usr a toente aninteer a thca sms b esta 1 Fp-ocsing 2. Enter P1 values, lwgt, ldig - > 9 Table I give us proper values. Table 1. PARAMETER TABLE...necessary and identify by block number) In this thesis a control systems analysis package is developed using parameter plane methods. It is an interactive...designer is able to choose values of the parameters which provide a good compromise between cost and dynamic behavior. 20 Distribution Availability of

  2. HYDROGEN ATOM THERMAL PARAMETERS.

    PubMed

    JENSEN, L H; SUNDARALINGAM, M

    1964-09-11

    Isotropic hydrogen atom thermal parameters for N,N'- hexamethylenebispropionamide have been determined. They show a definite trend and vary from approximately the same as the mean thermal parameters for atoms other than hydrogen near the center of the molecule to appreciably greater for atoms near the end. The indicated trend for this compound, along with other results, provides the basis for a possible explanation of the anomolous values that have been obtained for hydrogen atom thermal parameters.

  3. Second Symposium on Space Industrialization. [space commercialization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jernigan, C. M. (Editor)

    1984-01-01

    The policy, legal, and economic aspects of space industrialization are considered along with satellite communications, material processing, remote sensing, and the role of space carriers and a space station in space industrialization.

  4. Inherit Space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Giarratano, Joseph C.; Jenks, K. C.

    1997-01-01

    The objective of the proposed research was to begin development of a unique educational tool targeted at educating and inspiring young people 12-16 years old about NASA and the Space Program. Since these young people are the future engineers, scientists and space pioneers, the nurturing of their enthusiasm and interest is of critical importance to the Nation. This summer the basic infrastructure of the tool was developed in the context of an educational game paradigm. The game paradigm has achieved remarkable success in maintaining the interest of young people in a self-paced, student-directed learning environment. This type of environment encourages student exploration and curiosity which are exactly the traits that future space pioneers need to develop to prepare for the unexpected. The Inherit Space Educational Tool is an open-ended learning environment consisting of a finite-state machine classic adventure game paradigm. As the young person explores this world, different obstacles must be overcome. Rewards will be offered such as using the flight simulator to fly around and explore Titan. This simulator was modeled on conventional Earth flight simulators but has been considerably enhanced to add texture mapping of Titan's atmosphere utilizing the latest information from the NASA Galileo Space Probe. Additional scenery was added to provide color VGA graphics of a futuristic research station on Titan as well as an interesting story to keep the youngster's attention. This summer the game infrastructure has been developed as well as the Titan Flight Simulator. A number of other enhancements are planned.

  5. Dimensional regularization in configuration space

    SciTech Connect

    Bollini, C.G. |; Giambiagi, J.J.

    1996-05-01

    Dimensional regularization is introduced in configuration space by Fourier transforming in {nu} dimensions the perturbative momentum space Green functions. For this transformation, the Bochner theorem is used; no extra parameters, such as those of Feynman or Bogoliubov and Shirkov, are needed for convolutions. The regularized causal functions in {ital x} space have {nu}-dependent moderated singularities at the origin. They can be multiplied together and Fourier transformed (Bochner) without divergence problems. The usual ultraviolet divergences appear as poles of the resultant analytic functions of {nu}. Several examples are discussed. {copyright} {ital 1996 The American Physical Society.}

  6. Relations between demographic parameters.

    PubMed

    Demetrius, L

    1979-05-01

    The mean life-expectancy e describes the average prospective life-time of an individual aged zero. This parameter can be explicitly described in terms of the survivorship distribution of the population. The Malthusian parameter r represents the asymptotic growth rate of a population. This parameter can be implicitly expressed in terms of the net-maternity distribution. The parameters e and r incompletely incorporate the age-specific fertility and mortality pattern of a population; distinct populations may have the same growth rate but different net-maternity functions; distinct populations may be characterized by the same mean life expectation but may have different survivorship distributions. This article analyzes a class of parameters called the entropy of a population (Demetrius, 1974a) which distinguishes between net-maternity functions with the same growth rate and also mortality distributions with the same mean life expectation. This class of parameters measures the convexity of the fertility and mortality distributions. This paper analyzes the relations between the entropy parameter and the standard demographic parameters.

  7. Planning Robot-Control Parameters With Qualitative Reasoning

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Peters, Stephen F.

    1993-01-01

    Qualitative-reasoning planning algorithm helps to determine quantitative parameters controlling motion of robot. Algorithm regarded as performing search in multidimensional space of control parameters from starting point to goal region in which desired result of robotic manipulation achieved. Makes use of directed graph representing qualitative physical equations describing task, and interacts, at each sampling period, with history of quantitative control parameters and sensory data, to narrow search for reliable values of quantitative control parameters.

  8. Subsurface fracture spacing

    SciTech Connect

    Lorenz, J.C. ); Hill, R.E. )

    1991-01-01

    This study was undertaken in order to document and analyze the unique set of data on subsurface fracture characteristics, especially spacing, provided by the US Department of Energy's Slant Hole Completion Test well (SHCT-1) in the Piceance Basin, Colorado. Two hundred thirty-six (236) ft (71.9 m) of slant core and 115 ft (35.1 m) of horizontal core show irregular, but remarkably close, spacings for 72 natural fractures cored in sandstone reservoirs of the Mesaverde Group. Over 4200 ft (1280 m) of vertical core (containing 275 fractures) from the vertical Multiwell Experiment wells at the same location provide valuable information on fracture orientation, termination, and height, but only data from the SHCT-1 core allow calculations of relative fracture spacing. Within the 162-ft (49-m) thick zone of overlapping core from the vertical and deviated wellbores, only one fracture is present in vertical core whereas 52 fractures occur in the equivalent SHCT-1 core. The irregular distribution of regional-type fractures in these heterogeneous reservoirs suggests that measurements of average fracture spacing'' are of questionable value as direct input parameters into reservoir engineering models. Rather, deviated core provides data on the relative degree of fracturing, and confirms that cross fractures can be rare in the subsurface. 13 refs., 11 figs.

  9. Space Toxicology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    James, John T.

    2011-01-01

    Safe breathing air for space faring crews is essential whether they are inside an Extravehicular Mobility Suit (EMU), a small capsule such as Soyuz, or the expansive International Space Station (ISS). Sources of air pollution can include entry of propellants, excess offgassing from polymeric materials, leakage of systems compounds, escape of payload compounds, over-use of utility compounds, microbial metabolism, and human metabolism. The toxicological risk posed by a compound is comprised of the probability of escaping to cause air pollution and the magnitude of adverse effects on human health if escape occurs. The risk from highly toxic compounds is controlled by requiring multiple levels of containment to greatly reduce the probability of escape; whereas compounds that are virtually non-toxic may require little or no containment. The potential for toxicity is determined by the inherent toxicity of the compound and the amount that could potentially escape into the breathing air.

  10. Space Shuttle navigation validation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ragsdale, A.

    The validation of the guidance, navigation, and control system of the Space Shuttle is explained. The functions of the ascent, on-board, and entry mission phases software of the navigation system are described. The common facility testing, which evaluates the simulations to be used in the navigation validation, is examined. The standard preflight analysis of the operational modes of the navigation software and the post-flight navigation analysis are explained. The conversion of the data into a useful reference frame and the use of orbit parameters in the analysis of the data are discussed. Upon entry the data received are converted to flags, ratios, and residuals in order to evaluate performance and detect errors. Various programs developed to support navigation validation are explained. A number of events that occurred with the Space Shuttle's navigation system are described.

  11. Space Shuttle navigation validation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ragsdale, A.

    1985-01-01

    The validation of the guidance, navigation, and control system of the Space Shuttle is explained. The functions of the ascent, on-board, and entry mission phases software of the navigation system are described. The common facility testing, which evaluates the simulations to be used in the navigation validation, is examined. The standard preflight analysis of the operational modes of the navigation software and the post-flight navigation analysis are explained. The conversion of the data into a useful reference frame and the use of orbit parameters in the analysis of the data are discussed. Upon entry the data received are converted to flags, ratios, and residuals in order to evaluate performance and detect errors. Various programs developed to support navigation validation are explained. A number of events that occurred with the Space Shuttle's navigation system are described.

  12. Optimal synchronization in space.

    PubMed

    Brede, Markus

    2010-02-01

    In this Rapid Communication we investigate spatially constrained networks that realize optimal synchronization properties. After arguing that spatial constraints can be imposed by limiting the amount of "wire" available to connect nodes distributed in space, we use numerical optimization methods to construct networks that realize different trade offs between optimal synchronization and spatial constraints. Over a large range of parameters such optimal networks are found to have a link length distribution characterized by power-law tails P(l) proportional to l(-alpha), with exponents alpha increasing as the networks become more constrained in space. It is also shown that the optimal networks, which constitute a particular type of small world network, are characterized by the presence of nodes of distinctly larger than average degree around which long-distance links are centered.

  13. Optimal synchronization in space

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brede, Markus

    2010-02-01

    In this Rapid Communication we investigate spatially constrained networks that realize optimal synchronization properties. After arguing that spatial constraints can be imposed by limiting the amount of “wire” available to connect nodes distributed in space, we use numerical optimization methods to construct networks that realize different trade offs between optimal synchronization and spatial constraints. Over a large range of parameters such optimal networks are found to have a link length distribution characterized by power-law tails P(l)∝l-α , with exponents α increasing as the networks become more constrained in space. It is also shown that the optimal networks, which constitute a particular type of small world network, are characterized by the presence of nodes of distinctly larger than average degree around which long-distance links are centered.

  14. Communication spaces

    PubMed Central

    Coiera, Enrico

    2014-01-01

    Background and objective Annotations to physical workspaces such as signs and notes are ubiquitous. When densely annotated, work areas become communication spaces. This study aims to characterize the types and purpose of such annotations. Methods A qualitative observational study was undertaken in two wards and the radiology department of a 440-bed metropolitan teaching hospital. Images were purposefully sampled; 39 were analyzed after excluding inferior images. Results Annotation functions included signaling identity, location, capability, status, availability, and operation. They encoded data, rules or procedural descriptions. Most aggregated into groups that either created a workflow by referencing each other, supported a common workflow without reference to each other, or were heterogeneous, referring to many workflows. Higher-level assemblies of such groupings were also observed. Discussion Annotations make visible the gap between work done and the capability of a space to support work. Annotations are repairs of an environment, improving fitness for purpose, fixing inadequacy in design, or meeting emergent needs. Annotations thus record the missing information needed to undertake tasks, typically added post-implemented. Measuring annotation levels post-implementation could help assess the fit of technology to task. Physical and digital spaces could meet broader user needs by formally supporting user customization, ‘programming through annotation’. Augmented reality systems could also directly support annotation, addressing existing information gaps, and enhancing work with context sensitive annotation. Conclusions Communication spaces offer a model of how work unfolds. Annotations make visible local adaptation that makes technology fit for purpose post-implementation and suggest an important role for annotatable information systems and digital augmentation of the physical environment. PMID:24005797

  15. Spaced Armor

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1950-11-20

    less resistance to the penetration of a projectile than does the midsection of the plate. This is so because the front and rear surfaces of the armor ...Front -7idsectio " Aberdeen Proving Ground Report .AD-943, "Ballistic Test of Spaced Armor Arrangements which can be used for Increasing the Protection of... Ground . The target was to be a 100 • thick cast armor plate which can be quite easily penetrated by this carbide cored projectile at O0 obliquity

  16. Space Telescopes

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-01-01

    the Kirkpatrick–Baez type systems and the focussing colli- mator or ‘ lobster -eye’ systems. 1http://henke.lbl.gov/optical constants/ 176 9. Space...mirror requires a longer telescope. Focussing collimator or ‘ lobster -eye’ telescopes The Wolter and the Kirkpatrick–Baez systems have in common a...9.13: Flat-mirror two-dimensional focussing collimator or detached lobster - eye configuration (Schmidt 1975). within one tube but from adjacent walls a

  17. Space colonization.

    PubMed

    Parrish, Clyde F

    2003-12-01

    A series of workshops were sponsored by the Physical Science Division of NASA's Office of Biological and Physical Research to address operational gravity-compliant in-situ resource utilization and life support techologies. Workshop participants explored a Mars simulation study on Devon Island, Canada; the processing of carbon dioxide in regenerative life support systems; space tourism; rocket technology; plant growth research for closed ecological systems; and propellant extraction of planetary regoliths.

  18. Space Nutrition

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, Scott M.

    2009-01-01

    Optimal nutrition will be critical for crew members who embark on space exploration missions. Nutritional assessment provides an opportunity to ensure that crewmembers begin their missions in optimal nutritional status, to document changes during a mission and, if necessary, to provide intervention to maintain that status throughout the mission, and to assesses changes after landing in order to facilitate the return to their normal status as soon as possible after landing. We report here the findings from our nutritional assessment of astronauts who participated in the International Space Station (ISS) missions, along with flight and ground-based research findings. We also present ongoing and planned nutrition research activities. These studies provide evidence that bone loss, compromised vitamin status, and oxidative damage are the critical nutritional concerns for space travelers. Other nutrient issues exist, including concerns about the stability of nutrients in the food system, which are exposed to longterm storage and radiation during flight. Defining nutrient requirements, and being able to provide and maintain those nutrients on exploration missions, will be critical for maintaining crew member health.

  19. Space-filling percolation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chakraborty, Abhijit; Manna, S. S.

    2014-03-01

    A region of two-dimensional space has been filled randomly with a large number of growing circular disks allowing only a "slight" overlapping among them just before their growth stops. More specifically, each disk grows from a nucleation center that is selected at a random location within the uncovered region. The growth rate δ is a continuously tunable parameter of the problem which assumes a specific value while a particular pattern of disks is generated. When a growing disk overlaps for the first time with at least one other disk, its growth is stopped and is said to be frozen. In this paper we study the percolation properties of the set of frozen disks. Using numerical simulations we present evidence for the following: (i) The order parameter appears to jump discontinuously at a certain critical value of the area coverage; (ii) the width of the window of the area coverage needed to observe a macroscopic jump in the order parameter tends to vanish as δ →0; and on the contrary (iii) the cluster size distribution has a power-law-decaying functional form. While the first two results are the signatures of a discontinuous transition, the third result is indicative of a continuous transition. Therefore we refer to this transition as a sharp but continuous transition similar to what has been observed in the recently introduced Achlioptas process of explosive percolation. It is also observed that in the limit of δ →0, the critical area coverage at the transition point tends to unity, implying that the limiting pattern is space filling. In this limit, the fractal dimension of the pore space at the percolation point has been estimated to be 1.42(10) and the contact network of the disk assembly is found to be a scale-free network.

  20. Precision Parameter Estimation and Machine Learning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wandelt, Benjamin D.

    2008-12-01

    I discuss the strategy of ``Acceleration by Parallel Precomputation and Learning'' (AP-PLe) that can vastly accelerate parameter estimation in high-dimensional parameter spaces and costly likelihood functions, using trivially parallel computing to speed up sequential exploration of parameter space. This strategy combines the power of distributed computing with machine learning and Markov-Chain Monte Carlo techniques efficiently to explore a likelihood function, posterior distribution or χ2-surface. This strategy is particularly successful in cases where computing the likelihood is costly and the number of parameters is moderate or large. We apply this technique to two central problems in cosmology: the solution of the cosmological parameter estimation problem with sufficient accuracy for the Planck data using PICo; and the detailed calculation of cosmological helium and hydrogen recombination with RICO. Since the APPLe approach is designed to be able to use massively parallel resources to speed up problems that are inherently serial, we can bring the power of distributed computing to bear on parameter estimation problems. We have demonstrated this with the CosmologyatHome project.

  1. America plans for space

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1986-01-01

    Contents include: pursuing a balanced space program; the space defense initiative; warfare in space; the lunar laboratory; the role of space in preserving the peace; living off the land - the use of resources in space for future civilian space operations; the military uses of space; C3I(command control communications and intelligence); aspects of space technology; arms control in space: preserving critical strategic space systems without weapons in space; space and arms control: a skeptical view; options for space arms control; space arms control.

  2. Classification of hydrological parameter sensitivity and evaluation of parameter transferability across 431 US MOPEX basins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ren, Huiying; Hou, Zhangshuan; Huang, Maoyi; Bao, Jie; Sun, Yu; Tesfa, Teklu; Ruby Leung, L.

    2016-05-01

    The Community Land Model (CLM) represents physical, chemical, and biological processes of the terrestrial ecosystems that interact with climate across a range of spatial and temporal scales. As CLM includes numerous sub-models and associated parameters, the high-dimensional parameter space presents a formidable challenge for quantifying uncertainty and improving Earth system predictions needed to assess environmental changes and risks. This study aims to evaluate the potential of transferring hydrologic model parameters in CLM through sensitivity analyses and classification across watersheds from the Model Parameter Estimation Experiment (MOPEX) in the United States. The sensitivity of CLM-simulated water and energy fluxes to hydrological parameters across 431 MOPEX basins are first examined using an efficient stochastic sampling-based sensitivity analysis approach. Linear, interaction, and high-order nonlinear impacts are all identified via statistical tests and stepwise backward removal parameter screening. The basins are then classified according to their parameter sensitivity patterns (internal attributes), as well as their hydrologic indices/attributes (external hydrologic factors) separately, using Principal component analysis (PCA) and expectation-maximization (EM) - based clustering approach. Similarities and differences among the parameter sensitivity-based classification system (S-Class), the hydrologic indices-based classification (H-Class), and the Koppen climate classification systems (K-Class) are discussed. Within each parameter sensitivity-based classification system (S-Class) with similar parameter sensitivity characteristics, similar inversion modeling setups can be used for parameter calibration, and the parameters and their contribution or significance to water and energy cycling may also be more transferrable. This classification study provides guidance on identifiable parameters, and on parameterization and inverse model design for CLM but the

  3. Theory of Space Charge Limited Current in Fractional Dimensional Space

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zubair, Muhammad; Ang, L. K.

    The concept of fractional dimensional space has been effectively applied in many areas of physics to describe the fractional effects on the physical systems. We will present some recent developments of space charge limited (SCL) current in free space and solid in the framework of fractional dimensional space which may account for the effect of imperfectness or roughness of the electrode surface. For SCL current in free space, the governing law is known as the Child-Langmuir (CL) law. Its analogy in a trap-free solid (or dielectric) is known as Mott-Gurney (MG) law. This work extends the one-dimensional CL Law and MG Law for the case of a D-dimensional fractional space with 0 < D <= 1 where parameter D defines the degree of roughness of the electrode surface. Such a fractional dimensional space generalization of SCL current theory can be used to characterize the charge injection by the imperfectness or roughness of the surface in applications related to high current cathode (CL law), and organic electronics (MG law). In terms of operating regime, the model has included the quantum effects when the spacing between the electrodes is small.

  4. The Space in Spatial Language

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carlson, Laura A.; Van Deman, Shannon R.

    2004-01-01

    Projective spatial terms such as ''below'' specify the location of one object by indicating its spatial relation with respect to a reference object. These relations are defined via a reference frame that consists of a number of parameters (orientation, direction, origin, and distance) whose settings configure the space surrounding the reference…

  5. Sighting the International Space Station

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Teets, Donald

    2008-01-01

    This article shows how to use six parameters describing the International Space Station's orbit to predict when and in what part of the sky observers can look for the station as it passes over their location. The method requires only a good background in trigonometry and some familiarity with elementary vector and matrix operations. An included…

  6. Hubble Space Telescope prescription retrieval.

    PubMed

    Redding, D; Dumont, P; Yu, J

    1993-04-01

    Prescription retrieval is a technique for directly estimating optical prescription parameters from images. We apply it to estimate the value of the Hubble Space Telescope primary mirror conic constant. Our results agree with other studies that examined primary-mirror test fixtures and results. In addition they show that small aberrations exist on the planetary-camera repeater optics.

  7. CHOICE OF PROTON DRIVER PARAMETERS FOR A NEUTRINO FACTORY.

    SciTech Connect

    KIRK, H.G.; BERG, J.S.; FERNOW, R.C.; GALLARDO, J.C.; SIMOS, N.; WENG, W.

    2006-06-23

    We discuss criteria for designing an optimal ''green field'' proton driver for a neutrino factory. The driver parameters are determined by considerations of space charge, power capabilities of the target, beam loading and available RF peak power.

  8. Space Handbook,

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1985-01-01

    thle early life * of" the system. Figure 4-2 shows the variation in power output for polonium - 210 (Po- 210 ) with a 138-day half-life, curium-242 (Cm...can move large payloads through space. The radioisotope heat cycle engines use high-energy particle sources such as plutonium and polonium . The walls...place inI January 1959, when researchers tested and delive .red to the AEC’ the 2.5 v. att SNAI’-3. aI polonium -2 10-f’ueled’ radioisotope generator

  9. Space Technospheres

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vidmachenko, A. P.; Steklov, A. F.; Primak, N. V.

    2000-01-01

    Two main tendencies of making the Solar System habitable are regarding nowadays: (1) making objects of the Solar System habitable; and (2) making the space of the Solar System habitable. We think that it's better to combine them. We should dezine and build settlements ('technospheres') on such objects as asteroids and comets, using their resources. That is, it is necessary to create 'space technospheres' - a long-termed human settlements in the space. To save energy resources it is necessary to use Near-Earth asteroids enriched with water ice (i. e. extinguished comets) with Near-Earth orbits. To realize listed conceptions it is necessary to decrease (up to 100 times) the cost price of the long-termed settlements. That's why even average UN country will be able to create it's own space house - artificial planet ('technosphere') and maintain life activities there. About 50-100 such artificial planets will represent the future civilization of our Solar System. At the same time Earth will stay basic, maternal planet. There is an interesting problem of correcting orbits of that objects. Orbits can be changed into circular or elongated to make them comfortable for living activities of 5000-10000 settlers, and to maintain connection with maternal planet. Technospheres with the elongated orbits are more advantageous to assimilate the Solar System. While technospheres with circular orbits suit to the industrial cycle with certain specialization. The specialization of the technosphere will depend on mine-workings and/or chosen high-technology industrial process. Because it is profitable to convert raw materials at the technosphere and then to transport finished products to the maternal planet. It worth to be mentioned that because of the low gravitation and changed life cycle technosphere settlers, new 'Columb' of the Solar System will transform into new mankind. It will happen though it is difficult to imaging this. Because long ago, when fish left the ocean, they didn

  10. Space Food

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1994-01-01

    In planning for the long duration Apollo missions, NASA conducted extensive research into space food. One of the techniques developed was freeze drying. Action Products commercialized this technique, concentrating on snack food including the first freeze-dried ice cream. The foods are cooked, quickly frozen and then slowly heated in a vacuum chamber to remove the ice crystals formed by the freezing process. The final product retains 98 percent of its nutrition and weighs only 20 percent of its original weight. Action snacks are sold at museums, NASA facilities and are exported to a number of foreign countries. Sales run to several million dollars annually.

  11. Space Radiation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wu, Honglu

    2006-01-01

    Astronauts receive the highest occupational radiation exposure. Effective protections are needed to ensure the safety of astronauts on long duration space missions. Increased cancer morbidity or mortality risk in astronauts may be caused by occupational radiation exposure. Acute and late radiation damage to the central nervous system (CNS) may lead to changes in motor function and behavior, or neurological disorders. Radiation exposure may result in degenerative tissue diseases (non-cancer or non-CNS) such as cardiac, circulatory, or digestive diseases, as well as cataracts. Acute radiation syndromes may occur due to occupational radiation exposure.

  12. Commercial Space Tourism and Space Weather

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Turner, Ronald

    2007-08-01

    Space tourism, a concept which even a few years ago was perveived as science fantasy, is now a credible industry. Five individuals have paid up to $25 M to spend more than a week on the International Space Station. Several enterprises are working toward viable suborbital and orbital private space operations. while operational space weather support to human space flight has been the domain of government entities the emergence of space tourism now presents a new opportunity for the commercial space weather community. This article examines the space weather impact on crews and passengers of the future space tourism industry.

  13. Concept for an International Standard related to Space Weather Effects on Space Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tobiska, W. Kent; Tomky, Alyssa

    There is great interest in developing an international standard related to space weather in order to specify the tools and parameters needed for space systems operations. In particular, a standard is important for satellite operators who may not be familiar with space weather. In addition, there are others who participate in space systems operations that would also benefit from such a document. For example, the developers of software systems that provide LEO satellite orbit determination, radio communication availability for scintillation events (GEO-to-ground L and UHF bands), GPS uncertainties, and the radiation environment from ground-to-space for commercial space tourism. These groups require recent historical data, current epoch specification, and forecast of space weather events into their automated or manual systems. Other examples are national government agencies that rely on space weather data provided by their organizations such as those represented in the International Space Environment Service (ISES) group of 14 national agencies. Designers, manufacturers, and launchers of space systems require real-time, operational space weather parameters that can be measured, monitored, or built into automated systems. Thus, a broad scope for the document will provide a useful international standard product to a variety of engineering and science domains. The structure of the document should contain a well-defined scope, consensus space weather terms and definitions, and internationally accepted descriptions of the main elements of space weather, its sources, and its effects upon space systems. Appendices will be useful for describing expanded material such as guidelines on how to use the standard, how to obtain specific space weather parameters, and short but detailed descriptions such as when best to use some parameters and not others; appendices provide a path for easily updating the standard since the domain of space weather is rapidly changing with new advances

  14. Solitons in curved space of constant curvature

    SciTech Connect

    Batz, Sascha; Peschel, Ulf

    2010-05-15

    We consider spatial solitons as, for example, self-confined optical beams in spaces of constant curvature, which are a natural generalization of flat space. Due to the symmetries of these spaces we are able to define respective dynamical parameters, for example, velocity and position. For positively curved space we find stable multiple-hump solitons as a continuation from the linear modes. In the case of negatively curved space we show that no localized solution exists and a bright soliton will always decay through a nonlinear tunneling process.

  15. Longitudinal phase space tomography with space charge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hancock, S.; Lindroos, M.; Koscielniak, S.

    2000-12-01

    Tomography is now a very broad topic with a wealth of algorithms for the reconstruction of both qualitative and quantitative images. In an extension in the domain of particle accelerators, one of the simplest algorithms has been modified to take into account the nonlinearity of large-amplitude synchrotron motion. This permits the accurate reconstruction of longitudinal phase space density from one-dimensional bunch profile data. The method is a hybrid one which incorporates particle tracking. Hitherto, a very simple tracking algorithm has been employed because only a brief span of measured profile data is required to build a snapshot of phase space. This is one of the strengths of the method, as tracking for relatively few turns relaxes the precision to which input machine parameters need to be known. The recent addition of longitudinal space charge considerations as an optional refinement of the code is described. Simplicity suggested an approach based on the derivative of bunch shape with the properties of the vacuum chamber parametrized by a single value of distributed reactive impedance and by a geometrical coupling coefficient. This is sufficient to model the dominant collective effects in machines of low to moderate energy. In contrast to simulation codes, binning is not an issue since the profiles to be differentiated are measured ones. The program is written in Fortran 90 with high-performance Fortran extensions for parallel processing. A major effort has been made to identify and remove execution bottlenecks, for example, by reducing floating-point calculations and recoding slow intrinsic functions. A pointerlike mechanism which avoids the problems associated with pointers and parallel processing has been implemented. This is required to handle the large, sparse matrices that the algorithm employs. Results obtained with and without the inclusion of space charge are presented and compared for proton beams in the CERN protron synchrotron booster. Comparisons

  16. MSSM without free parameters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kitano, Ryuichiro; Motono, Ryuji; Nagai, Minoru

    2016-12-01

    It is often argued that the minimal supersymmetric standard model has O (100 ) free parameters, and the generic parameter region is already excluded by the null observation of the flavor and C P -violating processes as well as the constraints from the LHC experiments. This situation naturally leads us to consider the case where all the dangerous soft supersymmetry breaking terms, such as the scalar masses and scalar couplings, are absent, while only the unified gaugino mass term and the μ term are nonvanishing at the grand unification scale. We revisit this simple situation taking into account the observed Higgs boson mass, 125 GeV. Since the gaugino mass and the μ term are fixed in order to explain the Higgs boson and the Z boson masses, there is no free parameter left in this scenario. We find that there are three independent parameter sets that exist including ones which have not been discussed in the literature. We also find that the abundance of the dark matter can be explained by relic gravitinos which are nonthermally produced as decay products of the supersymmetry particles while satisfying constraints from big bang nucleosynthesis. We discuss the effects of the gravity mediation which generically gives a contribution to the soft terms of the order of the gravitino mass. It turns out that a newly found parameter set is preferable to explain the Higgs boson mass as well as the gravitino dark matter while satisfying the constraints from the electric dipole moments of the electron and the nucleon.

  17. 14 CFR 1214.813 - Computation of sharing and pricing parameters.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 5 2011-01-01 2010-01-01 true Computation of sharing and pricing parameters. 1214.813 Section 1214.813 Aeronautics and Space NATIONAL AERONAUTICS AND SPACE ADMINISTRATION SPACE FLIGHT Reimbursement for Spacelab Services § 1214.813 Computation of sharing and...

  18. 14 CFR § 1214.813 - Computation of sharing and pricing parameters.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 5 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Computation of sharing and pricing parameters. § 1214.813 Section § 1214.813 Aeronautics and Space NATIONAL AERONAUTICS AND SPACE ADMINISTRATION SPACE FLIGHT Reimbursement for Spacelab Services § 1214.813 Computation of sharing and...

  19. 14 CFR 1214.813 - Computation of sharing and pricing parameters.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 5 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Computation of sharing and pricing parameters. 1214.813 Section 1214.813 Aeronautics and Space NATIONAL AERONAUTICS AND SPACE ADMINISTRATION SPACE FLIGHT Reimbursement for Spacelab Services § 1214.813 Computation of sharing and...

  20. 14 CFR 1214.813 - Computation of sharing and pricing parameters.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 5 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Computation of sharing and pricing parameters. 1214.813 Section 1214.813 Aeronautics and Space NATIONAL AERONAUTICS AND SPACE ADMINISTRATION SPACE FLIGHT Reimbursement for Spacelab Services § 1214.813 Computation of sharing and...

  1. 14 CFR § 1214.117 - Launch and orbit parameters for a standard launch.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... ADMINISTRATION SPACE FLIGHT General Provisions Regarding Space Shuttle Flights of Payloads for Non-U.S... flights: (1) Launch from Kennedy Space Center (KSC) into the customer's choice of two standard mission... 14 Aeronautics and Space 5 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Launch and orbit parameters for a...

  2. 14 CFR 1214.813 - Computation of sharing and pricing parameters.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 5 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Computation of sharing and pricing parameters. 1214.813 Section 1214.813 Aeronautics and Space NATIONAL AERONAUTICS AND SPACE ADMINISTRATION SPACE FLIGHT Reimbursement for Spacelab Services § 1214.813 Computation of sharing and...

  3. Space sickness on earth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nooij, S. A. E.; Bos, J. E.; Groen, E. L.; Bles, W.; Ockels, W. J.

    2007-09-01

    During the first days in space, i.e., after a transition from 1G to 0G, more than 50% of the astro- (and cosmonauts) suffer from the Space Adaptation Syndrome (SAS).The symptoms of SAS, like nausea and dizziness, are especially provoked by head movements. Astronauts have mentioned close similarities between the symptoms of SAS and the symptoms they experienced after a 1 hour centrifuge run on Earth, i.e., after a transition from 3G to 1G (denoted by Sickness Induced by Centrifugation, SIC). During several space missions, we related susceptibility to SAS and to SIC in 11 astronauts and found 4 of them being susceptible to both SIC and SAS, and 7 being not susceptible to SIC nor to SAS. This correspondence in susceptibility suggests that SIC and SAS share the same underlying mechanism. To further study this mechanism, several vestibular parameters have been investigated (e.g. postural stability, vestibularly driven eye movements, subjective vertical). We found some striking changes in individual cases that are possibly due to the centrifuge run. However, the variability between subjects generally is very large, making physiological links to SIC and SAS still hard to find.

  4. Target parameter estimation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hocking, W. K.

    1989-01-01

    The objective of any radar experiment is to determine as much as possible about the entities which scatter the radiation. This review discusses many of the various parameters which can be deduced in a radar experiment, and also critically examines the procedures used to deduce them. Methods for determining the mean wind velocity, the RMS fluctuating velocities, turbulence parameters, and the shapes of the scatterers are considered. Complications with these determinations are discussed. It is seen throughout that a detailed understanding of the shape and cause of the scatterers is important in order to make better determinations of these various quantities. Finally, some other parameters, which are less easily acquired, are considered. For example, it is noted that momentum fluxes due to buoyancy waves and turbulence can be determined, and on occasions radars can be used to determine stratospheric diffusion coefficients and even temperature profiles in the atmosphere.

  5. Classification of hydrological parameter sensitivity and evaluation of parameter transferability across 431 US MOPEX basins

    SciTech Connect

    Ren, Huiying; Hou, Zhangshuan; Huang, Maoyi; Bao, Jie; Sun, Yu; Tesfa, Teklu K.; Leung, Lai-Yung R.

    2016-02-27

    The Community Land Model (CLM) represents physical, chemical, and biological processes of the terrestrial ecosystems that interact with climate across a range of spatial and temporal scales. As CLM includes numerous sub-models and associated parameters, the high-dimensional parameter space presents a formidable challenge for quantifying uncertainty and improving Earth system predictions needed to assess environmental changes and risks. This study aims to evaluate the potential of transferring hydrologic model parameters in CLM through sensitivity analyses and classification across watersheds from the Model Parameter Estimation Experiment (MOPEX) in the United States. The sensitivity of CLM-simulated water and energy fluxes to hydrological parameters across 431 MOPEX basins are first examined using an efficient stochastic sampling-based sensitivity analysis approach. Linear, interaction, and high-order nonlinear impacts are all identified via statistical tests and stepwise backward removal parameter screening. The basins are then classified accordingly to their parameter sensitivity patterns (internal attributes), as well as their hydrologic indices/attributes (external hydrologic factors) separately, using a Principal component analyses (PCA) and expectation-maximization (EM) –based clustering approach. Similarities and differences among the parameter sensitivity-based classification system (S-Class), the hydrologic indices-based classification (H-Class), and the Koppen climate classification systems (K-Class) are discussed. Within each S-class with similar parameter sensitivity characteristics, similar inversion modeling setups can be used for parameter calibration, and the parameters and their contribution or significance to water and energy cycling may also be more transferrable. This classification study provides guidance on identifiable parameters, and on parameterization and inverse model design for CLM but the methodology is applicable to other models

  6. Exploiting intrinsic fluctuations to identify model parameters.

    PubMed

    Zimmer, Christoph; Sahle, Sven; Pahle, Jürgen

    2015-04-01

    Parameterisation of kinetic models plays a central role in computational systems biology. Besides the lack of experimental data of high enough quality, some of the biggest challenges here are identification issues. Model parameters can be structurally non-identifiable because of functional relationships. Noise in measured data is usually considered to be a nuisance for parameter estimation. However, it turns out that intrinsic fluctuations in particle numbers can make parameters identifiable that were previously non-identifiable. The authors present a method to identify model parameters that are structurally non-identifiable in a deterministic framework. The method takes time course recordings of biochemical systems in steady state or transient state as input. Often a functional relationship between parameters presents itself by a one-dimensional manifold in parameter space containing parameter sets of optimal goodness. Although the system's behaviour cannot be distinguished on this manifold in a deterministic framework it might be distinguishable in a stochastic modelling framework. Their method exploits this by using an objective function that includes a measure for fluctuations in particle numbers. They show on three example models, immigration-death, gene expression and Epo-EpoReceptor interaction, that this resolves the non-identifiability even in the case of measurement noise with known amplitude. The method is applied to partially observed recordings of biochemical systems with measurement noise. It is simple to implement and it is usually very fast to compute. This optimisation can be realised in a classical or Bayesian fashion.

  7. Tweaking Model Parameters: Manual Adjustment and Self Calibration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schulz, B.; Tuffs, R. J.; Laureijs, R. J.; Lu, N.; Peschke, S. B.; Gabriel, C.; Khan, I.

    2002-12-01

    The reduction of P32 data is not always straight forward and the application of the transient model needs tight control by the user. This paper describes how to access the model parameters within the P32Tools software and how to work with the "Inspect signals per pixel" panel, in order to explore the parameter space and improve the model fit.

  8. Phenological Parameters Estimation Tool

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McKellip, Rodney D.; Ross, Kenton W.; Spruce, Joseph P.; Smoot, James C.; Ryan, Robert E.; Gasser, Gerald E.; Prados, Donald L.; Vaughan, Ronald D.

    2010-01-01

    The Phenological Parameters Estimation Tool (PPET) is a set of algorithms implemented in MATLAB that estimates key vegetative phenological parameters. For a given year, the PPET software package takes in temporally processed vegetation index data (3D spatio-temporal arrays) generated by the time series product tool (TSPT) and outputs spatial grids (2D arrays) of vegetation phenological parameters. As a precursor to PPET, the TSPT uses quality information for each pixel of each date to remove bad or suspect data, and then interpolates and digitally fills data voids in the time series to produce a continuous, smoothed vegetation index product. During processing, the TSPT displays NDVI (Normalized Difference Vegetation Index) time series plots and images from the temporally processed pixels. Both the TSPT and PPET currently use moderate resolution imaging spectroradiometer (MODIS) satellite multispectral data as a default, but each software package is modifiable and could be used with any high-temporal-rate remote sensing data collection system that is capable of producing vegetation indices. Raw MODIS data from the Aqua and Terra satellites is processed using the TSPT to generate a filtered time series data product. The PPET then uses the TSPT output to generate phenological parameters for desired locations. PPET output data tiles are mosaicked into a Conterminous United States (CONUS) data layer using ERDAS IMAGINE, or equivalent software package. Mosaics of the vegetation phenology data products are then reprojected to the desired map projection using ERDAS IMAGINE

  9. The Parameters of Postmodernism.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zurbrugg, Nicholas

    Hypothesizing that the tendency to define postmodern culture negatively derives from overliteral and undercritical responses to European theorists, this book of essays identifies the wide parameters of postmodernism. The book demonstrates that the literary and artistic temper of the postmodern condition in Europe and America cannot adequately be…

  10. Systematic parameter inference in stochastic mesoscopic modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lei, Huan; Yang, Xiu; Li, Zhen; Karniadakis, George Em

    2017-02-01

    We propose a method to efficiently determine the optimal coarse-grained force field in mesoscopic stochastic simulations of Newtonian fluid and polymer melt systems modeled by dissipative particle dynamics (DPD) and energy conserving dissipative particle dynamics (eDPD). The response surfaces of various target properties (viscosity, diffusivity, pressure, etc.) with respect to model parameters are constructed based on the generalized polynomial chaos (gPC) expansion using simulation results on sampling points (e.g., individual parameter sets). To alleviate the computational cost to evaluate the target properties, we employ the compressive sensing method to compute the coefficients of the dominant gPC terms given the prior knowledge that the coefficients are "sparse". The proposed method shows comparable accuracy with the standard probabilistic collocation method (PCM) while it imposes a much weaker restriction on the number of the simulation samples especially for systems with high dimensional parametric space. Fully access to the response surfaces within the confidence range enables us to infer the optimal force parameters given the desirable values of target properties at the macroscopic scale. Moreover, it enables us to investigate the intrinsic relationship between the model parameters, identify possible degeneracies in the parameter space, and optimize the model by eliminating model redundancies. The proposed method provides an efficient alternative approach for constructing mesoscopic models by inferring model parameters to recover target properties of the physics systems (e.g., from experimental measurements), where those force field parameters and formulation cannot be derived from the microscopic level in a straight forward way.

  11. Immune responses in space flight

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sonnenfeld, G.

    1998-01-01

    Space flight has been shown to have profound effects on immunological parameters of humans, monkeys and rodents. These studies have been carried out by a number of different laboratories. Among the parameters affected are leukocyte blastogenesis, natural killer cell activity, leukocyte subset distribution, cytokine production - including interferons and interleukins, and macrophage maturation and activity. These changes start to occur only after a few days space flight, and some changes continue throughout long-term space flight. Antibody responses have received only very limited study, and total antibody levels have been shown to be increased after long-term space flight. Several factors could be involved in inducing these changes. These factors could include microgravity, lack of load-bearing, stress, acceleration forces, and radiation. The mechanism(s) for space flight-induced changes in immune responses remain(s) to be established. Certainly, there can be direct effects of microgravity, or other factors, on cells that play a fundamental role in immune responses. However, it is now clear that there are interactions between the immune system and other physiological systems that could play a major role. For example, changes occurring in calcium use in the musculoskeletal system induced by microgravity or lack of use could have great impact on the immune system. Most of the changes in immune responses have been observed using samples taken immediately after return from space flight. However, there have been two recent studies that have used in-flight testing. Delayed-type hypersensitivity responses to common recall antigens of astronauts and cosmonauts have been shown to be decreased when tested during space flights. Additionally, natural killer cell and blastogenic activities are inhibited in samples taken from rats during space flight. Therefore, it is now clear that events occurring during space flight itself can affect immune responses. The biological

  12. Earth orientation parameters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Eanes, Richard J.

    1994-01-01

    Since the beginning of regular space geodetic measurements, Satellite Laser Ranging (SLR) has routinely provided polar motion and length of day solutions. At the present time, Global Positioning Systems (GPS) regularly produces daily polar motion solutions with 0.4 mas accuracy, equivalent to the routine 1-day VLBI experiments and SLR solutions using 3 days of Lageos-1 data. This rapid progress of the GPS technique forces a review of any resource allocations for VLBI and SLR measurements of Earth orientation.

  13. Large size space construction for space exploitation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kondyurin, Alexey

    2016-07-01

    Space exploitation is impossible without large space structures. We need to make sufficient large volume of pressurized protecting frames for crew, passengers, space processing equipment, & etc. We have to be unlimited in space. Now the size and mass of space constructions are limited by possibility of a launch vehicle. It limits our future in exploitation of space by humans and in development of space industry. Large-size space construction can be made with using of the curing technology of the fibers-filled composites and a reactionable matrix applied directly in free space. For curing the fabric impregnated with a liquid matrix (prepreg) is prepared in terrestrial conditions and shipped in a container to orbit. In due time the prepreg is unfolded by inflating. After polymerization reaction, the durable construction can be fitted out with air, apparatus and life support systems. Our experimental studies of the curing processes in the simulated free space environment showed that the curing of composite in free space is possible. The large-size space construction can be developed. A project of space station, Moon base, Mars base, mining station, interplanet space ship, telecommunication station, space observatory, space factory, antenna dish, radiation shield, solar sail is proposed and overviewed. The study was supported by Humboldt Foundation, ESA (contract 17083/03/NL/SFe), NASA program of the stratospheric balloons and RFBR grants (05-08-18277, 12-08-00970 and 14-08-96011).

  14. Space Science in Action: Space Exploration [Videotape].

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    1999

    In this videotape recording, students learn about the human quest to discover what is out in space. Students see the challenges and benefits of space exploration including the development of rocket science, a look back at the space race, and a history of manned space travel. A special section on the Saturn V rocket gives students insight into the…

  15. Hyperbolic tori in Hamiltonian systems with slowly varying parameter

    SciTech Connect

    Medvedev, Anton G

    2013-05-31

    This paper looks at a Hamiltonian system which depends periodically on a parameter. For each value of the parameter the system is assumed to have a hyperbolic periodic solution. Using the methods in KAM-theory it is proved that if the Hamiltonian is perturbed so that the value of the parameter varies with constant small frequency, then the nonautonomous system will have hyperbolic 2-tori in the extended phase space. Bibliography: 12 titles.

  16. Space Station personal hygiene study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Prejean, Stephen E.; Booher, Cletis R.

    1986-01-01

    A personal hygiene system is currently under development for Space Station application that will provide capabilities equivalent to those found on earth. This paper addresses the study approach for specifying both primary and contingency personal hygiene systems and provisions for specified growth. Topics covered are system definition and subsystem descriptions. Subsystem interfaces are explored to determine which concurrent NASA study efforts must be monitored during future design phases to stay up-to-date on critical Space Station parameters. A design concept for a three (3) compartment personal hygiene facility is included as a baseline for planned test and verification activities.

  17. Soft Mappings Space

    PubMed Central

    Ozturk, Taha Yasin; Bayramov, Sadi

    2014-01-01

    Various soft topologies are being introduced on a given function space soft topological spaces. In this paper, soft compact-open topology is defined in functional spaces of soft topological spaces. Further, these functional spaces are studied and interrelations between various functional spaces with soft compact-open topology are established. PMID:25374936

  18. Space physiology and medicine

    SciTech Connect

    Nicogossian, A.E.; Parker J.F. Jr.

    1982-01-01

    The state of knowledge in space physiology and medicine are reviewed. Overviews of manned space flight, the space environment, spaceflight systems and procedures, physiological adaptation to space flight, health maintenance of space crew members, and medical problems of space flight are presented.

  19. Preparing future space leaders - International Space University

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stone, Barbara A.; Van Reeth, George P.

    1992-01-01

    The International Space University (ISU) concept of developing a cadre of space professionals that will lead the universities and industries into space is discussed. ISU is an innovative, permanent worldwide organization for training and academic instruction in all aspects of space studies. ISU's major goal is to provide the young professional academic instruction in technical and nontechnical areas of modern space exploration and research, and a forum to exchange ideas and develop both personal and professional ties at an international level.

  20. Space habitats. [prognosis for space colonization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, R. D.

    1978-01-01

    Differences between space industrialization and space colonization are outlined along with the physiological, psychological, and esthetic needs of the inhabitants of a space habitat. The detrimental effects of zero gravity on human physiology are reviewed, and the necessity of providing artificial gravity, an acceptable atmosphere, and comfortable relative humidity and temperature in a space habitat is discussed. Consideration is also given to social organization and governance, supply of food and water, and design criteria for space colonies.

  1. Physical Parameter Eclipse Mapping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vrielmann, S.

    The tomographic method Physical Parameter Eclipse Mapping is a tool to reconstruct spatial distributions of physical parameters (like temperatures and surface densities) in accretion discs of cataclysmic variables. After summarizing the method, we apply it to multi-colour eclipse light curves of various dwarf novae and nova-likes like VZ Scl, IP Peg in outburst, UU Aqr, V2051 Oph and HT Cas in order to derive the temperatures (and surface densities) in the disc, the white dwarf temperature, the disc size, the effective temperatures and the viscosities. The results allows us to establish or refine a physical model for the accretion disc. Our maps of HT Cas and V 2051Oph, for example, indicate that the (quiescent) disc must be structured into a cool, optically thick inner disc sandwiched by hot, optically thin chromospheres. In addition, the disc of HT Cas must be patchy with a covering factor of about 40% caused by magnetic activity in the disc.

  2. Geoengineering design parameters workshop

    SciTech Connect

    St. John, C.M. and Associates, Grand Junction, CO ); Kim, Kunsoo . Rockwell Hanford Operations)

    1985-12-12

    A one-day workshop on the subject of the geotechnical design parameters, in situ stress and rock mass strength, for a nuclear waste repository in basalt was held in Rapid City, South Dakota, on June 25, 1989. A panel comprised of five widely recognized experts in the field of rock mechanics, met to discuss the state of stress at the Hanford Site and the strength of a basalt rock mass. This report summarizes the discussions that took place and presents a set of final position statements developed collaboratively by the panel and the workshop moderator. The report concludes with a set of specific recommendations for future actions considered necessary to adequately define the in situ stress and the rock mass strength at the Hanford Site and to document the position of the Basalt Waste Isolation Project in respect to these two critical design parameters.

  3. Structural health monitoring using parameter identification methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Pengxiang; Rao, Vittal S.

    2000-06-01

    A structural health monitoring method for determination of damages in structural system is developed using state variable model. A time-domain identification method, the subspace system identification algorithm, is first applied to get a state-space model of the structure. The identified state-space model is then transformed to two special realization forms, for determination of the equation of motion of multiple- degrees-freedom of the structure. The parameters of equation of motion, mass and stiffness matrices or damage indices are used to determine the location and extent of the damage. This method is also extended for the health monitoring of substructural system. Unlike the health monitoring of the whole structure, the health monitoring of substructure uses localized parameter identification which only involves the measurement of substructure parameters. Using this method, the number of unknown parameters and the computational requirement for each identification can be significantly reduced, hence the accuracy of estimation can be improved. Illustrative cases studies using both numerical and experimental structures are presented.

  4. Military display performance parameters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Desjardins, Daniel D.; Meyer, Frederick

    2012-06-01

    The military display market is analyzed in terms of four of its segments: avionics, vetronics, dismounted soldier, and command and control. Requirements are summarized for a number of technology-driving parameters, to include luminance, night vision imaging system compatibility, gray levels, resolution, dimming range, viewing angle, video capability, altitude, temperature, shock and vibration, etc., for direct-view and virtual-view displays in cockpits and crew stations. Technical specifications are discussed for selected programs.

  5. Generalized Lions-Peetre interpolation construction and optimal embedding theorems for Sobolev spaces

    SciTech Connect

    Ovchinnikov, V I

    2014-01-31

    In the paper, a new description of the generalized Lions-Peetre method of means is found, which enables one to evaluate the interpolation orbits of spaces constructed by this method. The list of these spaces includes all Lorentz spaces with functional parameters, Orlicz spaces, and spaces close to them. This leads in turn to new optimal embedding theorems for Sobolev spaces produced using the Lions-Peetre construction in rearrangement invariant spaces. It turns out that the optimal space of the embedding is also a generalized Lions-Peetre space whose parameters are explicitly evaluated. Bibliography: 18 titles.

  6. Space Biosciences, Space-X, and the International Space Station

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wigley, Cecilia

    2014-01-01

    Space Biosciences Research on the International Space Station uses living organisms to study a variety of research questions. To enhance our understanding of fundamental biological processes. To develop the fundations for a safe, productive human exploration of space. To improve the quality of life on earth.

  7. "Space, the Final Frontier"; Books on Space and Space Exploration.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jordan, Anne Devereaux

    1997-01-01

    Advocates play in a child's life. Describes how science fiction seizes the imaginations of young readers with its tales of the future and of outer space. Talks about various nonfiction books about space. Elaborates a workshop on books about space exploration. Gives 10 questions about stimulating student response. (PA)

  8. Space crew productivity: A driving factor in space station design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wolbers, H. L.

    1985-01-01

    The criteria of performance, cost, and mission success probability (program confidence) are the principal factors that program or project managers and system engineers use in selecting the optimum design approach for meeting mission objectives. A frame of reference is discussed in which the interrelationships of these pertinent parameters can be made visible, and from which rational or informed decisions can be derived regarding the potential impact of adjustments in crew productivity on total Space Station System effectiveness.

  9. Orbiting Space Interferometer (OSI): A first generation space interferometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shao, Michael

    1992-01-01

    The technical requirements and performance of a first generation space interferometer is discussed. The performance of an interferometer, sensitivity, field of view, dynamic range, astrometric accuracy, etc, in space is set by what cannot be achieved for a ground-based instrument. For the Orbiting Space Interferometer (OSI), the nominal performance parameters are 20 mag sensitivity, field of view of approximately 500*500 pixels, a 1000:1 dynamic range in the image with one milliarcsec resolution, and an astrometric accuracy of 0.1 milliarcsec for wide angle astrometry and 10 microarcsec accuracy for narrow field astrometry (few degrees). OSI is a fully phased interferometer where all critical optical paths are controlled to 0.05 wavelengths. The instrument uses two guide interferometers locked on bright stars several degrees away to provide the spacecraft attitude information needed to keep the fringes from the faint science object stable on the detector.

  10. CELSS engineering parameters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Drysdale, Alan; Sager, John; Wheeler, Ray; Fortson, Russ; Chetirkin, Peter

    1993-01-01

    The most important Controlled Ecological Life Support System (CELSS) engineering parameters are, in order of decreasing importance, manpower, mass, and energy. The plant component is a significant contributor to the total system equivalent mass. In this report, a generic plant component is described and the relative equivalent mass and productivity are derived for a number of instances taken from the KSC CELSS Breadboard Project data and literature. Typical specific productivities (edible biomass produced over 10 years divided by system equivalent mass) for closed systems are of the order of 0.2.

  11. NICMOS Defocus parameter test

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dashevsky, Ilana

    2007-07-01

    This proposal tests the new NICMOS non-nominal focus positions, which are implemented in the front-end systems and are specified in the Phase II using the CAMERA-FOCUS=DEFOCUS Optional Parameter. The targets from Proposals 9832 and 11063 are used in this Proposal. The GO Proposal 9832 is an example of how GOs may use the new non-nominal focus implementation for detector 3. Proposal 11063 is the NICMOS focus monitor, which will be used to verify the non-nominal focus for all 3 detectors.

  12. Ultrasonics and space instrumentation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1987-01-01

    The design topic selected was an outgrowth of the experimental design work done in the Fluid Behavior in Space experiment, which relies on the measurement of minute changes of the pressure and temperature to obtain reasonably accurate volume determinations. An alternative method of volume determination is the use of ultrasonic imaging. An ultrasonic wave system is generated by wall mounted transducer arrays. The interior liquid configuration causes reflection and refraction of the pattern so that analysis of the received wave system provides a description of the configuration and hence volume. Both continuous and chirp probe beams were used in a laboratory experiment simulating a surface wetting propellant. The hardware included a simulated tank with gaseous voids, transmitting and receiving transducers, transmitters, receivers, computer interface, and computer. Analysis software was developed for image generation and interpretation of results. Space instrumentation was pursued in support of a number of experiments under development for GAS flights. The program included thirty undergraduate students pursuing major qualifying project work under the guidance of eight faculty supported by a teaching assistant. Both mechanical and electrical engineering students designed and built several microprocessor systems to measure parameters such as temperature, acceleration, pressure, velocity, and circulation in order to determine combustion products, vortex formation, gas entrainment, EMR emissions from thunderstorms, and milli-g-accelerations due to crew motions.

  13. Fundamental space radiobiology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nelson, Gregory A.

    2003-01-01

    The unique feature of the space radiation environment is the dominance of high-energy charged particles (HZE or high LET radiation) emitted by the Sun and galactic sources, or trapped in the Van Allen radiation belts. These charged particles present a significant hazard to space flight crews, and accelerator-based experiments are underway to quantify the health risks due to unavoidable radiation exposure. There are three principal properties of charged particles that distinguish them from conventional radiation, i.e. gamma rays and x-rays. First, they have a defined range in matter rather than an exponential absorption profile. Second, they undergo nuclear reactions to produce secondary particles. Third, and most important, they deposit their energy along well-defined linear paths or tracks rather than diffuse fields. The structured energy deposition pattern interacts on multiple scales with the biological structures of DNA, cells and tissues to produce correlated patterns of damage that evade repair systems. Traditional concepts of dose and its associated normalization parameter, RBE (relative biological effectiveness), break down under experimental scrutiny, and probabilistic models of risk based on the number of particle traversals per cell may be more appropriate. Unique patterns of DNA damage, gene expression, mobilization of repair proteins, activation of cytokines and remodeling of cellular microenvironment are observed following exposure to high LET radiation. At low levels of exposure the communication of bioactive substances from irradiated to unirradiated "bystander" cells can amplify the damage and cause a significant deviation from linearity in dose vs. response relations. Under some circumstances, there is even a multigenerational delay in the expression of radiation-induced genetic damage (genomic instability) which is not strictly dose dependent. These issues and the experimental evidence derived from ground based experiments at particle

  14. Fundamental space radiobiology.

    PubMed

    Nelson, Gregory A

    2003-06-01

    The unique feature of the space radiation environment is the dominance of high-energy charged particles (HZE or high LET radiation) emitted by the Sun and galactic sources, or trapped in the Van Allen radiation belts. These charged particles present a significant hazard to space flight crews, and accelerator-based experiments are underway to quantify the health risks due to unavoidable radiation exposure. There are three principal properties of charged particles that distinguish them from conventional radiation, i.e. gamma rays and x-rays. First, they have a defined range in matter rather than an exponential absorption profile. Second, they undergo nuclear reactions to produce secondary particles. Third, and most important, they deposit their energy along well-defined linear paths or tracks rather than diffuse fields. The structured energy deposition pattern interacts on multiple scales with the biological structures of DNA, cells and tissues to produce correlated patterns of damage that evade repair systems. Traditional concepts of dose and its associated normalization parameter, RBE (relative biological effectiveness), break down under experimental scrutiny, and probabilistic models of risk based on the number of particle traversals per cell may be more appropriate. Unique patterns of DNA damage, gene expression, mobilization of repair proteins, activation of cytokines and remodeling of cellular microenvironment are observed following exposure to high LET radiation. At low levels of exposure the communication of bioactive substances from irradiated to unirradiated "bystander" cells can amplify the damage and cause a significant deviation from linearity in dose vs. response relations. Under some circumstances, there is even a multigenerational delay in the expression of radiation-induced genetic damage (genomic instability) which is not strictly dose dependent. These issues and the experimental evidence derived from ground based experiments at particle

  15. Space station power semiconductor package

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Balodis, Vilnis; Berman, Albert; Devance, Darrell; Ludlow, Gerry; Wagner, Lee

    1987-01-01

    A package of high-power switching semiconductors for the space station have been designed and fabricated. The package includes a high-voltage (600 volts) high current (50 amps) NPN Fast Switching Power Transistor and a high-voltage (1200 volts), high-current (50 amps) Fast Recovery Diode. The package features an isolated collector for the transistors and an isolated anode for the diode. Beryllia is used as the isolation material resulting in a thermal resistance for both devices of .2 degrees per watt. Additional features include a hermetical seal for long life -- greater than 10 years in a space environment. Also, the package design resulted in a low electrical energy loss with the reduction of eddy currents, stray inductances, circuit inductance, and capacitance. The required package design and device parameters have been achieved. Test results for the transistor and diode utilizing the space station package is given.

  16. Evaluations of average level spacings

    SciTech Connect

    Liou, H.I.

    1980-01-01

    The average level spacing for highly excited nuclei is a key parameter in cross section formulas based on statistical nuclear models, and also plays an important role in determining many physics quantities. Various methods to evaluate average level spacings are reviewed. Because of the finite experimental resolution, to detect a complete sequence of levels without mixing other parities is extremely difficult, if not totally impossible. Most methods derive the average level spacings by applying a fit, with different degrees of generality, to the truncated Porter-Thomas distribution for reduced neutron widths. A method that tests both distributions of level widths and positions is discussed extensivey with an example of /sup 168/Er data. 19 figures, 2 tables.

  17. Space Weathering of Small Bodies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McFadden, L. A.

    2002-12-01

    Space weathering is defined as any process that wears away and alters surfaces, here confined to small bodies in the Solar System. Mechanisms which possibly alter asteroid and comet surfaces include solar wind bombardment, UV radiation, cosmic ray bombardment, micrometeorite bombardment. These processes are likely to contribute to surface processes differently. For example, solar wind bombardment would be more important on a body closer to the Sun compared to a comet where cosmic ray bombardment might be a more significant weathering mechanism. How can we measure the effects of space weathering? A big problem is that we don't know the nature of the surface before it was weathered. We are in a new era in the study of surface processes on small bodies brought about by the availability of spatially resolved, color and spectral measurements of asteroids from Galileo and NEAR. What processes are active on which bodies? What physics controls surface processes in different regions of the solar system? How do processes differ on different bodies of different physical and chemical properties? What combinations of observable parameters best address the nature of surface processes? Are there alternative explanations for the observed parameters that have been attributed to space weathering? Should we retain the term, space weathering? How can our understanding of space weathering on the Moon help us understand it on asteroids and comets? Finally, we have to leave behind some presuppositions, one being that there is evidence of space weathering based on the fact that the optical properties of S-type asteroids differs from those of ordinary chondrites.

  18. Space on Earth.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Leder, Sandra J.

    1992-01-01

    Describes ideas for applying research from space programs to life science instruction including plants in space, exercise and diet on space flights, environmental advantages from space exploration, and the effects of microgravity on health. Discusses space spinoffs used in medicine including digital imaging processing and the Ingestible Thermal…

  19. Canada in Space.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    de Paz, Shoshana

    1991-01-01

    Discusses the history of the Canadian Space Agency. Explains that Canada's space program grew out of the need to manage resources and communicate over large distances. Reports that the small Canadian space industry is growing rapidly. Describes Canadian cooperation in international space programs. Identifies space careers and examines the future…

  20. Test spaces and characterizations of quadratic spaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dvurečenskij, Anatolij

    1996-10-01

    We show that a test space consisting of nonzero vectors of a quadratic space E and of the set all maximal orthogonal systems in E is algebraic iff E is Dacey or, equivalently, iff E is orthomodular. In addition, we present another orthomodularity criteria of quadratic spaces, and using the result of Solèr, we show that they can imply that E is a real, complex, or quaternionic Hilbert space.

  1. Space Science and Marshall Space Flight Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Spann, James

    2005-01-01

    Space Science a t Marshall Space Flight Center is diverse and very interesting. It ranges from high energy astrophysics to astrobiology, from solar physics to space weather to dusty plasmas. I will present some of the more interesting investigations regarding auroral physics, what it takes to build a space camera, and laboratory investigations of dust. There will be time for questions and answers at the conclusion.

  2. Coordinated Parameter Identification Technique for the Inertial Parameters of Non-Cooperative Target

    PubMed Central

    Ning, Xin; Zhang, Teng; Wu, Yaofa; Zhang, Pihui; Zhang, Jiawei; Li, Shuai; Yue, Xiaokui; Yuan, Jianping

    2016-01-01

    Space operations will be the main space missions in the future. This paper focuses on the precise operations for non-cooperative target, and researches of coordinated parameter identification (CPI) which allows the motion of multi-joints. The contents of this paper are organized: (1) Summarize the inertial parameters identification techniques which have been conducted now, and the technique based on momentum conservation is selected for reliability and realizability; (2) Elaborate the basic principles and primary algorithm of coordinated parameter identification, and analyze some special problems in calculation (3) Numerical simulation of coordinated identification technique by an case study on non-cooperative target of spacecraft mounting dual-arm with six joints is done. The results show that the coordinated parameter identification technique could get all the inertial parameters of the target in 3D by one-time identification, and does not need special configuration or driven joints, moreover the results are highly precise and save much more time than traditional ones. PMID:27116187

  3. Visual exploration of parameter influence on phylogenetic trees.

    PubMed

    Hess, Martin; Bremm, Sebastian; Weissgraeber, Stephanie; Hamacher, Kay; Goesele, Michael; Wiemeyer, Josef; von Landesberger, Tatiana

    2014-01-01

    Evolutionary relationships between organisms are frequently derived as phylogenetic trees inferred from multiple sequence alignments (MSAs). The MSA parameter space is exponentially large, so tens of thousands of potential trees can emerge for each dataset. A proposed visual-analytics approach can reveal the parameters' impact on the trees. Given input trees created with different parameter settings, it hierarchically clusters the trees according to their structural similarity. The most important clusters of similar trees are shown together with their parameters. This view offers interactive parameter exploration and automatic identification of relevant parameters. Biologists applied this approach to real data of 16S ribosomal RNA and protein sequences of ion channels. It revealed which parameters affected the tree structures. This led to a more reliable selection of the best trees.

  4. Space Station - Implications for space manufacturing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tingey, D. L.; Willenberg, H. J.; Atkins, H. L.

    1985-01-01

    Space-based materials processing R&D is examined. It is proposed that the Space Station's Microgravity and Materials Processing Facility will be utilized by academic, government, and commercial customers. Users requirements for materials processing in space are discussed. Consideration is given to the time allocation of the facility, charges to users, and the property rights of the users.

  5. Space history, space policy, and executive leadership

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kraemer, Sylvia K.

    1993-01-01

    A lecture that attempts to establish the role of space historians in formulating space policy is presented. The discussion focusses on two adages and their relevance to space policy. The adages are as follows: 'write about what you know;' and 'good managers do things right; good executives do the right things.'

  6. Loss parameter calculations

    SciTech Connect

    Cook, J.M.

    1995-07-01

    Sands and Rees propose an electronic bench measurement of the impulse energy loss of a stored particle bunch to vacuum-chamber components. The components act as the outer conductor of a coaxial line with a thin wire as center conductor. Short pulses are then transmitted through this coaxial system to simulate relativistic particle bunches. Their proposal has since been implemented by several investigators and has become a well-known technique. They derive a first-order approximation to the loss parameter {kappa} for use in these measurements. The purpose of this note is to point out that exact expression for {kappa} is as simple as its first-order approximation and to recommend its use even when {kappa} is small.

  7. Lyapunov exponents for multi-parameter tent and logistic maps.

    PubMed

    McCartney, Mark

    2011-12-01

    The behaviour of logistic and tent maps is studied in cases where the control parameter is dependent on iteration number. Analytic results for global Lyapunov exponent are presented in the case of the tent map and numerical results are presented in the case of the logistic map. In the case of a tent map with N control parameters, the fraction of parameter space for which the global Lyapunov exponent is positive is calculated. The case of bi-parameter maps of period N are investigated.

  8. How human sleep in space — investigations during space flights

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stoilova, I. M.; Zdravev, T. K.; Yanev, T. K.

    Sleep problems have been observed during many of the space flights. The existence of poor quality of sleep, fatigue, insomnia or different alterations in sleep structure, organization and sleep cyclicity have been established. Nevertheless results obtained from investigations of human sleep on board manned space vehicles show that it is possible to keep sleep patterns related to the restorative and adaptive processes. For the first time in the frame of the "Intercosmos" program a multi-channel system for recording and analysis of sleep in space was constructed by scientists of the Bulgarian Academy of Sciences and was installed on board the manned Mir orbiting station. In 1988 during the joint Bulgarian-Russian space flight continues recording of electro-physiological parameters necessary to estimate the sleep stages and sleep organization was made. These investigations were continued in next space flights of different prolongation. The results were compared with the findings obtained under the conditions during the pre- and post-flight periods.

  9. How human sleep in space--investigations during space flights.

    PubMed

    Stoilova, I M; Zdravev, T K; Yanev, T K

    2003-01-01

    Sleep problems have been observed during many of the space flights. The existence of poor quality of sleep, fatigue, insomnia or different alterations in sleep structure, organization and sleep cyclicity have been established. Nevertheless results obtained from investigations of human sleep on board manned space vehicles show that it is possible to keep sleep patterns related to the restorative and adaptive processes. For the first time in the frame of the "Intercosmos" program a multi-channel system for recording and analysis of sleep in space was constructed by scientists of the Bulgarian Academy of Sciences and was installed on board the manned Mir orbiting station. In 1988 during the joint Bulgarian-Russian space flight continues recording of electro-physiological parameters necessary to estimate the sleep stages and sleep organization was made. These investigations were continued in next space flights of different prolongation. The results were compared with the findings obtained under the conditions during the pre- and post-flight periods.

  10. Software Computes Tape-Casting Parameters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    deGroh, Henry C., III

    2003-01-01

    Tcast2 is a FORTRAN computer program that accelerates the setup of a process in which a slurry containing metal particles and a polymeric binder is cast, to a thickness regulated by a doctor blade, onto fibers wound on a rotating drum to make a green precursor of a metal-matrix/fiber composite tape. Before Tcast2, setup parameters were determined by trial and error in time-consuming multiple iterations of the process. In Tcast2, the fiber architecture in the final composite is expressed in terms of the lateral distance between fibers and the thickness-wise distance between fibers in adjacent plies. The lateral distance is controlled via the manner of winding. The interply spacing is controlled via the characteristics of the slurry and the doctor-blade height. When a new combination of fibers and slurry is first cast and dried to a green tape, the shrinkage from the wet to the green condition and a few other key parameters of the green tape are measured. These parameters are provided as input to Tcast2, which uses them to compute the doctor-blade height and fiber spacings needed to obtain the desired fiber architecture and fiber volume fraction in the final composite.

  11. The partnership: Space shuttle, space science, and space station

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Culbertson, Philip E.; Freitag, Robert F.

    1989-01-01

    An overview of the NASA Space Station Program functions, design, and planned implementation is presented. The discussed functions for the permanently manned space facility include: (1) development of new technologies and related commercial products; (2) observations of the Earth and the universe; (3) provision of service facilities for resupply, maintenance, upgrade and repair of payloads and spacecraft; (4) provision of a transportation node for stationing, processing and dispatching payloads and vehicles; (5) provision of manufacturing and assembly facilities; (6) provision of a storage depot for parts and payloads; and (7) provision of a staging base for future space endeavors. The fundamental concept for the Space Station, as given, is that it be designed, operated, and evolved in response to a broad variety of scientific, technological, and commercial user interests. The Space Shuttle's role as the principal transportation system for the construction and maintenance of the Space Station and the servicing and support of the station crew is also discussed.

  12. Delineating parameter unidentifiabilities in complex models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raman, Dhruva V.; Anderson, James; Papachristodoulou, Antonis

    2017-03-01

    Scientists use mathematical modeling as a tool for understanding and predicting the properties of complex physical systems. In highly parametrized models there often exist relationships between parameters over which model predictions are identical, or nearly identical. These are known as structural or practical unidentifiabilities, respectively. They are hard to diagnose and make reliable parameter estimation from data impossible. They furthermore imply the existence of an underlying model simplification. We describe a scalable method for detecting unidentifiabilities, as well as the functional relations defining them, for generic models. This allows for model simplification, and appreciation of which parameters (or functions thereof) cannot be estimated from data. Our algorithm can identify features such as redundant mechanisms and fast time-scale subsystems, as well as the regimes in parameter space over which such approximations are valid. We base our algorithm on a quantification of regional parametric sensitivity that we call `multiscale sloppiness'. Traditionally, the link between parametric sensitivity and the conditioning of the parameter estimation problem is made locally, through the Fisher information matrix. This is valid in the regime of infinitesimal measurement uncertainty. We demonstrate the duality between multiscale sloppiness and the geometry of confidence regions surrounding parameter estimates made where measurement uncertainty is non-negligible. Further theoretical relationships are provided linking multiscale sloppiness to the likelihood-ratio test. From this, we show that a local sensitivity analysis (as typically done) is insufficient for determining the reliability of parameter estimation, even with simple (non)linear systems. Our algorithm can provide a tractable alternative. We finally apply our methods to a large-scale, benchmark systems biology model of necrosis factor (NF)-κ B , uncovering unidentifiabilities.

  13. International Space Apps Challenge

    NASA Video Gallery

    During the 2013 Space Apps Challenge, space enthusiasts with diverse backgrounds gathered April 20-21 for a collaborative, global problem-solving effort. Held at Kennedy Space Center Visitor Comple...

  14. International Space Station Overview

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bates, William V., Jr.

    1999-01-01

    The overview of the International Space Station (ISS) is comprised of the program vision and mission; Space Station uses; definition of program phases; as well as descriptions and status of several scheduled International Space Station Overview assembly flights.

  15. Angry Birds in Space

    NASA Video Gallery

    Aboard the International Space Station, Flight Engineer Don Pettit of NASA created a video using Angry Birds Space to explain how physics works in space, including demonstrating trajectories in mic...

  16. Space Probe Launch

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1970-01-01

    Managed by Marshall Space Flight Center, the Space Tug was a reusable multipurpose space vehicle designed to transport payloads to different orbital inclinations. Utilizing mission-specific combinations of its three primary modules (crew, propulsion, and cargo) and a variety of supplementary kits, the Space Tug was capable of numerous space applications. This 1970 artist's concept depicts the Tug's propulsion module launching a space probe into lunar orbit.

  17. Nutrition in space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, S. M.; Davis-Street, J.; Rice, B. L.; Lane, H. W.

    1997-01-01

    The authors review studies conducted to define nutritional requirements for astronauts during space flight and to assess nutrition before, during, and after space flight. Topics include space food systems, research and limitations on spacecraft, physiological adaptation to weightlessness, energy requirements, dietary intake during space flight, bone demineralization, gastrointestinal function, blood volume, and nutrition requirements for space flight. Benefits of space-related nutrition research are highlighted.

  18. The International Space Station in Space Exploration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gerstenmaier, William H.; McKay, Meredith M.

    2006-01-01

    The International Space Station (ISS) Program has many lessons to offer for the future of space exploration. Among these lessons of the ISS Program, three stand out as instrumental for the next generation of explorers. These include: 1) resourcefulness and the value of a strong international partnership; 2) flexibility as illustrated by the evolution of the ISS Program and 3) designing with dissimilar redundancy and simplicity of sparing. These lessons graphically demonstrate that the ISS Program can serve as a test bed for future programs. As the ISS Program builds upon the strong foundation of previous space programs, it can provide insight into the prospects for continued growth and cooperation in space exploration. As the capacity for spacefaring increases worldwide and as more nations invest in space exploration and space sector development, the potential for advancement in space exploration is unlimited. By building on its engineering and research achievements and international cooperation, the ISS Program is inspiring tomorrow s explorers today.

  19. Health Issues and Space Weather

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crosby, N.

    2009-04-01

    The possibility that solar activity and variations in the Earth's magnetic field may affect human health has been debated for many decades but is still a "scientific topic" in its infancy. By learning whether and, if so, how much the Earth's space weather can influence the daily health of people will be of practical importance. Knowing whether human genetics, include regulating factors that take into account fluctuations of the Earth's magnetic field and solar disturbances, indeed exist will also benefit future interplanetary space travelers. Because the atmospheres on other planets are different from ours, as well as their interaction with the space environment, one may ask whether we are equipped with the genetics necessary to take this variability into account. The goal of this presentation is to define what is meant by space weather as a health risk and identify the long-term socio-economic effects on society that such health risks would have. Identifying the physical links between space weather sources and different effects on human health, as well as the parameters (direct and indirect) to be monitored, the potential for such a cross-disciplinary study will be invaluable, for scientists and medical doctors, as well as for engineers.

  20. U.S. space surveillance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnson, Nicholas L.

    1993-08-01

    The United States operates a diverse set of more than two dozen radar and optical facilities around the world to monitor near-Earth space. The mission of the Space Surveillance Network (SSN) to detect, track, catalog, and identify all man-made objects in space pertains not only to routine space operations but also to special event processing, e.g., satellite breakups. The SSN provides both the Government and the civilian space communities with a wide variety of services and products, including comprehensive historical records on more than 22,000 objects and current, high fidelity orbital parameters on approximately 7,000 satellites now in Earth orbit. Although upgrades to both sensors and processing techniques continue to increase the sensitivity and capacity of the SSN, modifications to the operational procedures at existing facilities and the employment of special, non-network sensors can provide additional insight concerning the magnitude of the Earth satellite population which lies below the normal network reporting level.

  1. Stochastic control system parameter identifiability

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, C. H.; Herget, C. J.

    1975-01-01

    The parameter identification problem of general discrete time, nonlinear, multiple input/multiple output dynamic systems with Gaussian white distributed measurement errors is considered. The knowledge of the system parameterization was assumed to be known. Concepts of local parameter identifiability and local constrained maximum likelihood parameter identifiability were established. A set of sufficient conditions for the existence of a region of parameter identifiability was derived. A computation procedure employing interval arithmetic was provided for finding the regions of parameter identifiability. If the vector of the true parameters is locally constrained maximum likelihood (CML) identifiable, then with probability one, the vector of true parameters is a unique maximal point of the maximum likelihood function in the region of parameter identifiability and the constrained maximum likelihood estimation sequence will converge to the vector of true parameters.

  2. Spaced Retrieval: Absolute Spacing Enhances Learning Regardless of Relative Spacing

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Karpicke, Jeffrey D.; Bauernschmidt, Althea

    2011-01-01

    Repeated retrieval enhances long-term retention, and spaced repetition also enhances retention. A question with practical and theoretical significance is whether there are particular schedules of spaced retrieval (e.g., gradually expanding the interval between tests) that produce the best learning. In the present experiment, subjects studied and…

  3. A study of parameter identification

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Herget, C. J.; Patterson, R. E., III

    1978-01-01

    A set of definitions for deterministic parameter identification ability were proposed. Deterministic parameter identificability properties are presented based on four system characteristics: direct parameter recoverability, properties of the system transfer function, properties of output distinguishability, and uniqueness properties of a quadratic cost functional. Stochastic parameter identifiability was defined in terms of the existence of an estimation sequence for the unknown parameters which is consistent in probability. Stochastic parameter identifiability properties are presented based on the following characteristics: convergence properties of the maximum likelihood estimate, properties of the joint probability density functions of the observations, and properties of the information matrix.

  4. HEO space debris orbit predictions.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gregorowicz, Dorota; Pospieszynski, Remigiusz; Golembiewska, Justyna; Wnuk, Edwin

    2012-07-01

    HEO (Highly Elliptical Orbit) satellites are objects with an elliptic orbit with a low-altitude perigee and a high-altitude apogee. Perigee mainly cross the LEO orbits and apogee reaches regions above GEO orbits. Number of satellites on the orbits are old racket bodies and other space debris. Most of HEO objects has the eccentricity more than 0.7. Many trackable objects are included in the NORAD TLE Catalogue but much more small debris exist which we could not track. Objects on as highly elliptical orbit are very danger for satellites in LEO region because of increasing velocity near the perigee. In order to calculate the trajectory of space debris we have to take into account force model consisting of geopotential, luni-solar effects, solar radiation pressure and for objects with low-altitude of perigee, atmospheric drag. This last perturbation is very important to calculate orbits with high accuracy but also one of the hardest to predict. Many atmospheric space debris objects parameters should be taken into account in this case, but we do not have sufficient data from observations, in particular S/M (area-to-mass) ratio. Fortunately we have some archival data for some debris included in TLE Catalogue, which are very helpful to estimate the approximate value of the parameter. In this paper we present the results of calculations of orbit predictions for short and medium time span (up to several weeks). We tried to designate the S/M parameter for some HEO objects from archival data from the TLE Catalogue and predict its orbital elements for several weeks. With better knowledge about approximate mean value of the S/M parameter we are able to improve the accuracy of predicted orbits.

  5. Habitable zone dependence on stellar parameter uncertainties

    SciTech Connect

    Kane, Stephen R.

    2014-02-20

    An important property of exoplanetary systems is the extent of the Habitable Zone (HZ), defined as that region where water can exist in a liquid state on the surface of a planet with sufficient atmospheric pressure. Both ground- and space-based observations have revealed a plethora of confirmed exoplanets and exoplanetary candidates, most notably from the Kepler mission using the transit detection technique. Many of these detected planets lie within the predicted HZ of their host star. However, as is the case with the derived properties of the planets themselves, the HZ boundaries depend on how well we understand the host star. Here we quantify the uncertainties of HZ boundaries on the parameter uncertainties of the host star. We examine the distribution of stellar parameter uncertainties from confirmed exoplanet hosts and Kepler candidate hosts and translate these into HZ boundary uncertainties. We apply this to several known systems with an HZ planet to determine the uncertainty in their HZ status.

  6. Space Transportation System (STS): Emergency support

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Janoski, T.; Nicholson, L.

    1991-01-01

    The DSN (Deep Space Network) mission support requirements for emergency support of the Space Transportation System (STS) are summarized. Coverage would be provided by the DSN during emergencies that would prevent communications between the shuttle and the White Sands TDRSS receiving station. The DSN support requirements are defined through the presentation of tables and narratives describing the spacecraft flight profile; DSN support coverage; frequency assignments; support parameters for telemetry, command and support systems; and tracking support responsibility.

  7. Parameter estimation techniques for LTP system identification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nofrarias Serra, Miquel

    LISA Pathfinder (LPF) is the precursor mission of LISA (Laser Interferometer Space Antenna) and the first step towards gravitational waves detection in space. The main instrument onboard the mission is the LTP (LISA Technology Package) whose scientific goal is to test LISA's drag-free control loop by reaching a differential acceleration noise level between two masses in √ geodesic motion of 3 × 10-14 ms-2 / Hz in the milliHertz band. The mission is not only challenging in terms of technology readiness but also in terms of data analysis. As with any gravitational wave detector, attaining the instrument performance goals will require an extensive noise hunting campaign to measure all contributions with high accuracy. But, opposite to on-ground experiments, LTP characterisation will be only possible by setting parameters via telecommands and getting a selected amount of information through the available telemetry downlink. These two conditions, high accuracy and high reliability, are the main restrictions that the LTP data analysis must overcome. A dedicated object oriented Matlab Toolbox (LTPDA) has been set up by the LTP analysis team for this purpose. Among the different toolbox methods, an essential part for the mission are the parameter estimation tools that will be used for system identification during operations: Linear Least Squares, Non-linear Least Squares and Monte Carlo Markov Chain methods have been implemented as LTPDA methods. The data analysis team has been testing those methods with a series of mock data exercises with the following objectives: to cross-check parameter estimation methods and compare the achievable accuracy for each of them, and to develop the best strategies to describe the physics underlying a complex controlled experiment as the LTP. In this contribution we describe how these methods were tested with simulated LTP-like data to recover the parameters of the model and we report on the latest results of these mock data exercises.

  8. Space Communications Emulation Facility

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hill, Chante A.

    2004-01-01

    Establishing space communication between ground facilities and other satellites is a painstaking task that requires many precise calculations dealing with relay time, atmospheric conditions, and satellite positions, to name a few. The Space Communications Emulation Facility (SCEF) team here at NASA is developing a facility that will approximately emulate the conditions in space that impact space communication. The emulation facility is comprised of a 32 node distributed cluster of computers; each node representing a satellite or ground station. The objective of the satellites is to observe the topography of the Earth (water, vegetation, land, and ice) and relay this information back to the ground stations. Software originally designed by the University of Kansas, labeled the Emulation Manager, controls the interaction of the satellites and ground stations, as well as handling the recording of data. The Emulation Manager is installed on a Linux Operating System, employing both Java and C++ programming codes. The emulation scenarios are written in extensible Markup Language, XML. XML documents are designed to store, carry, and exchange data. With XML documents data can be exchanged between incompatible systems, which makes it ideal for this project because Linux, MAC and Windows Operating Systems are all used. Unfortunately, XML documents cannot display data like HTML documents. Therefore, the SCEF team uses XML Schema Definition (XSD) or just schema to describe the structure of an XML document. Schemas are very important because they have the capability to validate the correctness of data, define restrictions on data, define data formats, and convert data between different data types, among other things. At this time, in order for the Emulation Manager to open and run an XML emulation scenario file, the user must first establish a link between the schema file and the directory under which the XML scenario files are saved. This procedure takes place on the command

  9. Order Parameters for Two-Dimensional Networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaatz, Forrest; Bultheel, Adhemar; Egami, Takeshi

    2007-10-01

    We derive methods that explain how to quantify the amount of order in ``ordered'' and ``highly ordered'' porous arrays. Ordered arrays from bee honeycomb and several from the general field of nanoscience are compared. Accurate measures of the order in porous arrays are made using the discrete pair distribution function (PDF) and the Debye-Waller Factor (DWF) from 2-D discrete Fourier transforms calculated from the real-space data using MATLAB routines. An order parameter, OP3, is defined from the PDF to evaluate the total order in a given array such that an ideal network has the value of 1. When we compare PDFs of man-made arrays with that of our honeycomb we find OP3=0.399 for the honeycomb and OP3=0.572 for man's best hexagonal array. The DWF also scales with this order parameter with the least disorder from a computer-generated hexagonal array and the most disorder from a random array. An ideal hexagonal array normalizes a two-dimensional Fourier transform from which a Debye-Waller parameter is derived which describes the disorder in the arrays. An order parameter S, defined by the DWF, takes values from [0, 1] and for the analyzed man-made array is 0.90, while for the honeycomb it is 0.65. This presentation describes methods to quantify the order found in these arrays.

  10. Space weather: European Space Agency perspectives

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Daly, E. J.; Hilgers, A.

    Spacecraft and payloads have become steadily more sophisticated and therefore more susceptible to space weather effects. ESA has long been active in applying models and tools to the problems associated with such effects on its spacecraft. In parallel, ESA and European agencies have built a highly successful solar-terrestrial physics capability. ESA is now investigating the marriage of these technological and scientific capabilities to address perceived user needs for space weather products and services. Two major ESA-sponsored studies are laying the groundwork for a possible operational European space weather service. The wide-ranging activities of ESA in the Space Weather/Space Environment domain are summarized and recent important examples of space weather concerns given.

  11. Space Toxicology: Human Health during Space Operations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Khan-Mayberry, Noreen; James, John T.; Tyl, ROchelle; Lam, Chiu-Wing

    2010-01-01

    Space Toxicology is a unique and targeted discipline for spaceflight, space habitation and occupation of celestial bodies including planets, moons and asteroids. Astronaut explorers face distinctive health challenges and limited resources for rescue and medical care during space operation. A central goal of space toxicology is to protect the health of the astronaut by assessing potential chemical exposures during spaceflight and setting safe limits that will protect the astronaut against chemical exposures, in a physiologically altered state. In order to maintain sustained occupation in space on the International Space Station (ISS), toxicological risks must be assessed and managed within the context of isolation continuous exposures, reuse of air and water, limited rescue options, and the need to use highly toxic compounds for propulsion. As we begin to explore other celestial bodies in situ toxicological risks, such as inhalation of reactive mineral dusts, must also be managed.

  12. A split-optimization approach for obtaining multiple solutions in single-objective process parameter optimization.

    PubMed

    Rajora, Manik; Zou, Pan; Yang, Yao Guang; Fan, Zhi Wen; Chen, Hung Yi; Wu, Wen Chieh; Li, Beizhi; Liang, Steven Y

    2016-01-01

    It can be observed from the experimental data of different processes that different process parameter combinations can lead to the same performance indicators, but during the optimization of process parameters, using current techniques, only one of these combinations can be found when a given objective function is specified. The combination of process parameters obtained after optimization may not always be applicable in actual production or may lead to undesired experimental conditions. In this paper, a split-optimization approach is proposed for obtaining multiple solutions in a single-objective process parameter optimization problem. This is accomplished by splitting the original search space into smaller sub-search spaces and using GA in each sub-search space to optimize the process parameters. Two different methods, i.e., cluster centers and hill and valley splitting strategy, were used to split the original search space, and their efficiency was measured against a method in which the original search space is split into equal smaller sub-search spaces. The proposed approach was used to obtain multiple optimal process parameter combinations for electrochemical micro-machining. The result obtained from the case study showed that the cluster centers and hill and valley splitting strategies were more efficient in splitting the original search space than the method in which the original search space is divided into smaller equal sub-search spaces.

  13. Computer program for parameter optimization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Glatt, C. R.; Hague, D. S.

    1968-01-01

    Flexible, large scale digital computer program was designed for the solution of a wide range of multivariable parameter optimization problems. The program has the ability to solve constrained optimization problems involving up to one hundred parameters.

  14. Using space resources

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sullivan, Thomas A.; Mckay, David S.

    1991-01-01

    The topics covered include the following: reducing the cost of space exploration; the high cost of shipping; lunar raw materials; some useful space products; energy from the moon; ceramic, glass, and concrete construction materials; mars atmosphere resources; relationship to the Space Exploration Initiative (SEI); an evolutionary approach to using space resources; technology development; and oxygen and metal coproduction.

  15. TCLS Arm for Space

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leroy, Benoit; Helfers, Tim; Poupat, Jean-Luc

    2015-09-01

    The TCLS ARM FOR SPACE proposal was an answer to the H2020 topic “COMPET-6-2014: Bottom-up Space Technologies at low TRL”. This paper presents this H2020 TCLS ARM FOR SPACE initiative led by Airbus DS and which aims at fostering the use of European technology such as ARM processing for Space.

  16. Space Flight. Teacher Resources.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    2001

    This teacher's guide contains information, lesson plans, and diverse student learning activities focusing on space flight. The guide is divided into seven sections: (1) "Drawing Activities" (Future Flight; Space Fun; Mission: Draw); (2) "Geography" (Space Places); (3) "History" (Space and Time); (4)…

  17. Space: The New Frontier.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration, Washington, DC.

    This document is designed primarily to describe the U.S. Space Program, its history, its current state of development, and its goals for the future. Chapter headings include: Space and You; The Early History of Space Flight; The Solar System; Space Probes and Satellites; Scientific Satellites and Sounding Rockets; Application Satellites, Unmanned…

  18. Space Guidelines for Libraries.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wisconsin Coordinating Committee for Higher Education, Madison.

    The following guidelines are recommended: stack space--for each 10 volumes, one square foot of space; reading room--25 square feet per station x 20% of the total undergraduate population; carrel space--25% of the graduate enrollment x 45 square feet; office and auxilliary space--135 square feet x full time equivalent staff. (NI)

  19. Budgeting Academic Space

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Harris, Watson

    2011-01-01

    There are many articles about space management, including those that discuss space calculations, metrics, and categories. Fewer articles discuss the space budgeting processes used by administrators to allocate space. The author attempts to fill this void by discussing her administrative experiences with Middle Tennessee State University's (MTSU)…

  20. Organic chemistry in space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, R. D.

    1977-01-01

    Organic cosmochemistry, organic materials in space exploration, and biochemistry of man in space are briefly surveyed. A model of Jupiter's atmosphere is considered, and the search for organic molecules in the solar system and in interstellar space is discussed. Materials and analytical techniques relevant to space exploration are indicated, and the blood and urine analyses performed on Skylab are described.

  1. Conversion from constitutive parameters to dispersive transmission line parameters for multi-band metamaterials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ozturk, Yusuf; Egemen Yilmaz, Asim; Ozbay, Ekmel

    2016-04-01

    In this study, we explain an approach including conversion from constitutive parameters to dispersive transmission line parameters using the double-band DNG (double-negative) properties of the circular type fishnet metamaterials. After designing the metamaterial structure, the numerical calculations and the composite right/left-handed (CRLH) modeling of circular-type metamaterials are realized in free space. Detailed dispersion characteristics give us the opportunity to explain the true behavior of the inclusions during the analysis stage. By combining the results coming from the standard retrieval procedure with the conventional CRLH theory, we calculate the actual values of the transmission line parameters for all frequency regimes. The constitutive parameters of an equivalent CRLH transmission line are derived and shown to be negative values. It is shown that the constitutive parameters present the same behavior for all negative refractive index regimes. The double-negative properties and the phase advance/lag behavior of metamaterials are observed based on the dispersive transmission line parameters.

  2. Design challenges for space bioreactors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Seshan, P. K.; Petersen, G. R.

    1989-01-01

    The design of bioreactors for operation under conditions of microgravity presents problems and challenges. Absence of a significant body force such as gravity can have profound consequences for interfacial phenomena. Marangoni convection can no longer be overlooked. Many speculations on the advantages and benefits of microgravity can be found in the literature. Initial bioreactor research considerations for space applications had little regard for the suitability of the designs for conditions of microgravity. Bioreactors can be classified in terms of their function and type of operation. The complex interaction of parameters leading to optimal design and operation of a bioreactor is illustrated by the JSC mammalian cell culture system. The design of a bioreactor is strongly dependent upon its intended use as a production unit for cell mass and/or biologicals or as a research reactor for the study of cell growth and function. Therefore a variety of bioreactor configurations are presented in rapid summary. Following this, a rationale is presented for not attempting to derive key design parameters such as the oxygen transfer coefficient from ground-based data. A set of themes/objectives for flight experiments to develop the expertise for design of space bioreactors is then proposed for discussion. These experiments, carried out systematically, will provide a database from which engineering tools for space bioreactor design will be derived.

  3. The Space Shuttle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moffitt, William L.

    2003-01-01

    As missions have become increasingly more challenging over the years, the most adaptable and capable element of space shuttle operations has proven time and again to be human beings. Human space flight provides unique aspects of observation. interaction and intervention that can reduce risk and improve mission success. No other launch vehicle - in development or in operation today - can match the space shuttle's human space flight capabilities. Preserving U.S. leadership in human space flight requires a strategy to meet those challenges. The ongoing development of next generation vehicles, along with upgrades to the space shuttle, is the most effective means for assuring our access to space.

  4. Bioprocessing in Space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morrison, D. R. (Compiler)

    1977-01-01

    Proceedings are presented of the 1976 NASA Colloquium on bioprocessing in space. The program included general sessions and formal presentations on the following topics: NASA's Space Shuttle, Spacelab, and space-processing programs; the known unusual behavior of materials in space; space-processing experiment results; cell biology, gravity sensors in cells, space electrophoresis of living cells, new approaches to biosynthesis of biologicals from cell culture in space, and zero-g fermentation concepts; and upcoming flight opportunities and industrial application planning studies already underway.

  5. Space educators' handbook

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Woodfill, Jerry

    1992-01-01

    The Space Educators' Handbook is a collection of space exploration information available on Hypercard as a space education reference book. Ranging from early dreams of space ships to current manned missions, the more than four thousand cards include entries of statistics, historical facts and anecdotes, technical articles, accounts of NASA missions from Mercury through the space shuttle, biographical information on women and men who have contributed to space exploration, scientific facts, and various other space-related data. The means of presenting the data range from cartoons and drawings to lists and narratives, some briefly quoted and some reproduced in full.

  6. Drawing dynamical and parameters planes of iterative families and methods.

    PubMed

    Chicharro, Francisco I; Cordero, Alicia; Torregrosa, Juan R

    2013-01-01

    The complex dynamical analysis of the parametric fourth-order Kim's iterative family is made on quadratic polynomials, showing the MATLAB codes generated to draw the fractal images necessary to complete the study. The parameter spaces associated with the free critical points have been analyzed, showing the stable (and unstable) regions where the selection of the parameter will provide us the excellent schemes (or dreadful ones).

  7. Drawing Dynamical and Parameters Planes of Iterative Families and Methods

    PubMed Central

    Chicharro, Francisco I.

    2013-01-01

    The complex dynamical analysis of the parametric fourth-order Kim's iterative family is made on quadratic polynomials, showing the MATLAB codes generated to draw the fractal images necessary to complete the study. The parameter spaces associated with the free critical points have been analyzed, showing the stable (and unstable) regions where the selection of the parameter will provide us the excellent schemes (or dreadful ones). PMID:24376386

  8. Space Physiology and Operational Space Medicine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Scheuring, Richard A.

    2009-01-01

    The objectives of this slide presentation are to teach a level of familiarity with: the effects of short and long duration space flight on the human body, the major medical concerns regarding future long duration missions, the environmental issues that have potential medical impact on the crew, the role and capabilities of the Space Medicine Flight Surgeon and the environmental impacts experienced by the Apollo crews. The main physiological effects of space flight on the human body reviewed in this presentation are: space motion sickness (SMS), neurovestibular, cardiovascular, musculoskeletal, immune/hematopoietic system and behavioral/psycho-social. Some countermeasures are discussed to these effects.

  9. Subsurface Geotechnical Parameters Report

    SciTech Connect

    D. Rigby; M. Mrugala; G. Shideler; T. Davidsavor; J. Leem; D. Buesch; Y. Sun; D. Potyondy; M. Christianson

    2003-12-17

    The Yucca Mountain Project is entering a the license application (LA) stage in its mission to develop the nation's first underground nuclear waste repository. After a number of years of gathering data related to site characterization, including activities ranging from laboratory and site investigations, to numerical modeling of processes associated with conditions to be encountered in the future repository, the Project is realigning its activities towards the License Application preparation. At the current stage, the major efforts are directed at translating the results of scientific investigations into sets of data needed to support the design, and to fulfill the licensing requirements and the repository design activities. This document addresses the program need to address specific technical questions so that an assessment can be made about the suitability and adequacy of data to license and construct a repository at the Yucca Mountain Site. In July 2002, the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) published an Integrated Issue Resolution Status Report (NRC 2002). Included in this report were the Repository Design and Thermal-Mechanical Effects (RDTME) Key Technical Issues (KTI). Geotechnical agreements were formulated to resolve a number of KTI subissues, in particular, RDTME KTIs 3.04, 3.05, 3.07, and 3.19 relate to the physical, thermal and mechanical properties of the host rock (NRC 2002, pp. 2.1.1-28, 2.1.7-10 to 2.1.7-21, A-17, A-18, and A-20). The purpose of the Subsurface Geotechnical Parameters Report is to present an accounting of current geotechnical information that will help resolve KTI subissues and some other project needs. The report analyzes and summarizes available qualified geotechnical data. It evaluates the sufficiency and quality of existing data to support engineering design and performance assessment. In addition, the corroborative data obtained from tests performed by a number of research organizations is presented to reinforce

  10. Parameter Sensitivity in Multivariate Methods

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Green, Bert F., Jr.

    1977-01-01

    Interpretation of multivariate models requires knowing how much the fit of the model is impaired by changes in the parameters. The relation of parameter change to loss of goodness of fit can be called parameter sensitivity. Formulas are presented for assessing the sensitivity of multiple regression and principal component weights. (Author/JKS)

  11. Bibliography for aircraft parameter estimation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Iliff, Kenneth W.; Maine, Richard E.

    1986-01-01

    An extensive bibliography in the field of aircraft parameter estimation has been compiled. This list contains definitive works related to most aircraft parameter estimation approaches. Theoretical studies as well as practical applications are included. Many of these publications are pertinent to subjects peripherally related to parameter estimation, such as aircraft maneuver design or instrumentation considerations.

  12. Space Science Curricula

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1990-01-01

    Johnson High School, Huntsville, Alabama started an international magnet program in 1987. One of the courses in the curriculum was in space science. They appealed to Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) when they couldn't find a suitable textbook, nor locate other classes in space science to provide a guideline. MSFC agreed to help and placed the school under an official 'Adopt-A-School' program. MSFC's chief scientist and others at the space center helped prepare a very comprehensive space science program. Examples of the subjects covered include problems of space travel, materials processing in space, technology utilization, robotics, space colonization, etc. MSFC followed up by working with Johnson High to determine if the curriculum is generally usable and workable. If it is, MSFC may make it available to other schools. MSFC not only developed the space science curriculum; they continue to support the program by sponsoring hands- on activities and tours of space research facilities.

  13. A Feasibility Study of Space VLBI for Geodesy and Geodynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kulkarni, Madhav Narayan

    1992-01-01

    Space Very Long Baseline Interferometry (VLBI) is an extension of the ground based VLBI to the space. With the launching of two or more Space VLBI satellites in the future, Space VLBI observations will be available for astrometric, geodetic and geodynamic applications. This new technique holds potential for various important applications including monitoring Earth rotation and interconnection of the reference frames used in geodesy and geodynamics. The aim of this feasibility study has been to investigate the possibility of precise estimation of geodetic parameters, with emphasis on the Earth rotation parameters (ERP's), from Space VLBI observations. A brief description of the Space VLBI technique, it's possible applications, and the Space VLBI missions being planned has been given. Estimability analysis to investigate the estimability of geodetic parameters from Space VLBI observations has been carried out and a simplified mathematical model is derived in terms of estimable parameters. Results of sensitivity analysis carried out to study the sensitivity of the Space VLBI observables to the geodetic parameters of interest, including the number of these parameters and random errors in their a priori values, have been presented. Some of the dominant systematic effects including atmospheric refraction, solar radiation pressure and relativistic effects have also been investigated. Simulation studies have been carried out to study the influence of these systematic effects and a priori information on the estimation of the Earth rotation parameters. The results from the simulation studies indicate that it may be possible to use the Space VLBI technique for monitoring Earth rotation and polar motion, only if the orbital systematic effects can be modeled to a high degree of accuracy (or the satellites can be tracked, with high accuracy, independently), and precise a priori information on station coordinates from other sources is used. A brief description of the Space VLBI

  14. Space time neural networks for tether operations in space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lea, Robert N.; Villarreal, James A.; Jani, Yashvant; Copeland, Charles

    1993-01-01

    A space shuttle flight scheduled for 1992 will attempt to prove the feasibility of operating tethered payloads in earth orbit. due to the interaction between the Earth's magnetic field and current pulsing through the tether, the tethered system may exhibit a circular transverse oscillation referred to as the 'skiprope' phenomenon. Effective damping of skiprope motion depends on rapid and accurate detection of skiprope magnitude and phase. Because of non-linear dynamic coupling, the satellite attitude behavior has characteristic oscillations during the skiprope motion. Since the satellite attitude motion has many other perturbations, the relationship between the skiprope parameters and attitude time history is very involved and non-linear. We propose a Space-Time Neural Network implementation for filtering satellite rate gyro data to rapidly detect and predict skiprope magnitude and phase. Training and testing of the skiprope detection system will be performed using a validated Orbital Operations Simulator and Space-Time Neural Network software developed in the Software Technology Branch at NASA's Lyndon B. Johnson Space Center.

  15. Space Shuttle Familiarization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mellett, Kevin

    2006-01-01

    This slide presentation visualizes the NASA space center and research facility sites, as well as the geography, launching sites, launching pads, rocket launching, pre-flight activities, and space shuttle ground operations located at NASA Kennedy Space Center. Additionally, highlights the international involvement behind the International Space Station and the space station mobile servicing system. Extraterrestrial landings, surface habitats and habitation systems, outposts, extravehicular activity, and spacecraft rendezvous with the Earth return vehicle are also covered.

  16. The Austrian Space Plan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pseiner, K.; Balogh, W.

    2002-01-01

    After several years of preparation and discussion among the involved players, the Austrian Space Plan was approved for implementation in November 2001. Based on careful benchmarking and analysis of the capabilities of the Austrian space sector it aims to create excellent conditions for the sector's further development. The new space strategy embraces Austria's participation in the mandatory and optional programmes of the European Space Agency and establishes a National Space Programme supported by separate funding opportunities. A set of clearly-defined indicators ensures that the progress in implementing the Space Plan can be objectively judged through independent, annual reviews. The National Space Programme promotes international cooperation in space research and space activities with the aim to strengthen the role of space science and to better prepare Austrian space industry for the commercial space market. In the framework of the Space Plan the Austrian Space Agency has been tasked with integrating the industry's growing involvement in aeronautics activities to better utilize synergies with the space sector. This paper reviews the various steps leading to the approval of the new space strategy and discusses the hurdles mastered in this process. It reports on the Space Plan's first results, specifically taking into account projects involving international cooperation. For the first the Austria aerospace-sector can rely on an integrated strategy for aeronautics- and space activities which is firmly rooted in the efforts to enhance the country's R&D activities. It may also act as a useful example for other small space- using countries planning to enhance their involvement in space activities.

  17. National Space Agencies vs. Commercial Space: Towards Improved Space Safety

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pelton, J.

    2013-09-01

    Traditional space policies as developed at the national level includes many elements but they are most typically driven by economic and political objectives. Legislatively administered programs apportion limited public funds to achieve "gains" that can involve employment, stimulus to the economy, national defense or other advancements. Yet political advantage is seldom far from the picture.Within the context of traditional space policies, safety issues cannot truly be described as "afterthoughts", but they are usually, at best, a secondary or even tertiary consideration. "Space safety" is often simply assumed to be "in there" somewhere. The current key question is can "safety and risk minimization", within new commercial space programs actually be elevated in importance and effectively be "designed in" at the outset. This has long been the case with commercial aviation and there is at least reasonable hope that this could also be the case for the commercial space industry in coming years. The cooperative role that the insurance industry has now played for centuries in the shipping industry and for decades in aviation can perhaps now play a constructive role in risk minimization in the commercial space domain as well. This paper begins by examining two historical case studies in the context of traditional national space policy development to see how major space policy decisions involving "manned space programs" have given undue primacy to "political considerations" over "safety" and other factors. The specific case histories examined here include first the decision to undertake the Space Shuttle Program (i.e. 1970-1972) and the second is the International Space Station. In both cases the key and overarching decisions were driven by political, schedule and cost considerations, and safety seems absence as a prime consideration. In publicly funded space programs—whether in the United States, Europe, Russia, Japan, China, India or elsewhere—it seems realistic to

  18. Looking at the earth from space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Geller, Marvin A.

    1988-01-01

    Some of the scientific accomplishments attained in observing the earth from space are discussed. A brief overview of findings concerning the atmosphere, the oceans and sea ice, the solid earth, and the terrestrial hydrosphere and biosphere is presented, and six examples are examined in which space data have provided unique information enabling new knowledge concerning the workings of the earth to be derived. These examples concern stratospheric water vapor, hemispheric differences in surface and atmosphere parameters, Seasat altimeter mesoscale variability, variability of Antarctic sea ice, variations in the length of day, and spaceborne radar imaging of ancient rivers. Future space observations of the earth are briefly addressed.

  19. Habitability design elements for a space station

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dalton, M. C.

    1983-01-01

    Habitability in space refers to the components, characteristics, conditions, and design parameters that go beyond but include the basic life sustaining requirements. Elements of habitability covered include internal environment, architecture, mobility and restraint, food, clothing, personal hygiene, housekeeping, communications, and crew activities. All elements are interrelated and need to be treated as an overall discipline. Designing for a space station is similar to designing on earth but with 'space rules' instead of ground rules. It is concluded that some habitability problems require behavioral science solutions.

  20. Effects of model deficiencies on parameter estimation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hasselman, T. K.

    1988-01-01

    Reliable structural dynamic models will be required as a basis for deriving the reduced-order plant models used in control systems for large space structures. Ground vibration testing and model verification will play an important role in the development of these models; however, fundamental differences between the space environment and earth environment, as well as variations in structural properties due to as-built conditions, will make on-orbit identification essential. The efficiency, and perhaps even the success, of on-orbit identification will depend on having a valid model of the structure. It is envisioned that the identification process will primarily involve parametric methods. Given a correct model, a variety of estimation algorithms may be used to estimate parameter values. This paper explores the effects of modeling errors and model deficiencies on parameter estimation by reviewing previous case histories. The effects depend at least to some extent on the estimation algorithm being used. Bayesian estimation was used in the case histories presented here. It is therefore conceivable that the behavior of an estimation algorithm might be useful in detecting and possibly even diagnosing deficiencies. In practice, the task is complicated by the presence of systematic errors in experimental procedures and data processing and in the use of the estimation procedures themselves.