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Sample records for 193nm scanner lithography

  1. New antireflective coatings for 193-nm lithography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Gu; Guerrero, Douglas J.; Dobson, Norman

    1998-06-01

    New bottom antireflective coatings (BARCs) for 193 nm lithography have been recently developed by Brewer Science Inc. Copolymers of benzyl methacrylate (or benzyl acrylate) and hydroxypropyl methacrylate have been synthesized and used as a main component in 193 nm BARCs. The acrylic copolymers have strong absorbance at 193 nm UV light wavelength. The 193 nm BARCs were formulated in safe solvents such as ethyl lactate and formed by spin-on coating process. Thermosetting of the 193 nm BARCs limited their intermixing with photoresists. These 193 nm BARCs had optical density of about 10 micrometers -1, k equals 0.35, and n equals 1.81. Preliminary oxygen plasma etch rates were > 1.5 times DUV resists. Good profiles at small feature sizes (< 0.20 micrometers ) were achieved with tested photoresists.

  2. Synthesis of fluorinated materials for 193-nm immersion lithography and 157-nm lithography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamashita, T.; Ishikawa, T.; Yoshida, T.; Hayamai, T.; Araki, Takayuki; Aoyama, H.; Hagiwara, T.; Itani, Toshiro; Fujii, Kiyoshi

    2005-05-01

    Various fluorinated polymers were synthesized for application in 193-nm immersion lithography with the goal of improving 157-nm photoresist performance. Their fundamental properties were characterized, such as transparency at 193-nm and 157-nm (wavelength) and solubility in water and a standard alkaline developer. High transparency, i.e., absorbance better than 0.3 μm-1 at 193-nm wavelength, was achieved. The dissolution behaviors of them were studied by using the Quartz Crystal Microbalance (QCM) method. We find that the dissolution rate of Poly(norbornene-2-fluoro-2-hexafluoroalchol) (PNB1FVIP) in 0.065N tetramethylammonium hydroxide (TMAH) was >200 times (nm/s) faster than that of the copolymer of tetrafluoroethylene (TFE) and norbornene-2-fluoro-2-hexafluoroalchol (TFE/NB1FVIP). A resist based on TFE/NB1FVIP was able to delineate 75 nm dense lines by exposure at 193-nm (wavelength) with an alternating phase shift mask using a 0.75 NA ArF scanner. The dissolution rates of the fluoropolymers in water and a 0.262N and 0.065 TMAH can be controlled by optimizing counter monomers containing hexafluoroisopropanol (HFA) unit, carboxylic acid unit and so on. In addition, we have collect water contact angle data. This data shows that fluoropolymers can be used as resist cover materials for 193-nm immersion lithography.

  3. Excimer lasers for superhigh NA 193-nm lithography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paetzel, Rainer; Albrecht, Hans S.; Lokai, Peter; Zschocke, Wolfgang; Schmidt, Thomas; Bragin, Igor; Schroeder, Thomas; Reusch, Christian; Spratte, Stefan

    2003-06-01

    Excimer lasers are widely used as the light source for microlithography scanners. The volume shipment of scanner systems using 193nm is projected to begin in year 2003. Such tools will directly start with super high numerical aperture (NA) in order to take full advantage of the 193nm wavelength over the advanced 248nm systems. Reliable high repetition rate laser light sources enabling high illumination power and wafer throughput are one of the fundamental prerequisites. In addition these light sources must support a very high NA imaging lens of more than 0.8 which determines the output spectrum of the laser to be less than 0.30 pm FWHM. In this paper we report on our recent progress in the development of high repetition rate ultra-narrow band lasers for high NA 193nm microlithography scanners. The laser, NovaLine A4003, is based on a Single Oscillator Ultral Line-narrowed (SOUL) design which yields a bandwidth of less than 0.30pm FWHM. The SOUL laser enables superior optical performance without adding complexity or cost up to the 4 kHz maximum repetition rate. The A4003's high precision line-narrowing optics used in combination with the high repetition rate of 4 kHz yields an output power of 20 W at an extremely narrow spectral bandwidth of less than 0.30 pm FWHM and highest spectral purity of less than 0.75 pm for the 95% energy content. We present performance and reliability data and discuss the key laser parameters. Improvements in the laser-internal metrology and faster regulation control result in better energy stability and improved overall operation behavior. The design considerations for line narrowing and stable laser operation at high repetition rates are discussed.

  4. High index fluoride materials for 193nm immersion lithography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nawata, T.; Inui, Y.; Masada, I.; Nishijima, E.; Satoh, H.; Fukuda, T.

    2006-03-01

    We tried to investigate various kinds of metal fluoride materials which have higher gravity than CaF II and cubic crystal system, and we found out barium lithium fluoride (BaLiF 3) and potassium yttrium fluoride (KY 3F 10) as candidates for the last lens material. We have developed unique Czochralski (CZ) machines and techniques for the growth of large calcium fluoride single crystals. And we applied these technologies to the growth of fluoride high index materials. We have succeeded to grow the large BaLiF 3 single crystal with 120mm in diameter and a KY 3F 10 single crystal, and measured their basic properties such as refractive index, VUV transmittance, birefringence, and so on. As a result of our basic research, we found out that BaLiF 3 single crystal is transparent at VUV region, and the refractive index at 193nm is 1.64, and KY 3F 10 single crystal has the index of 1.59 at the wavelength of 193nm which is slightly higher than fused silica. We expect that these fluoride high index materials are useful for the last lens material of the next generation immersion lithography.

  5. Customized illumination shapes for 193nm immersion lithography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ling, Moh Lung; Chua, Gek Soon; Lin, Qunying; Tay, Cho Jui; Quan, Chenggen

    2008-03-01

    In this paper, a study on customized illumination shape configurations as resolution enhancement for 45nm technology node will be presented. Several new source shape configurations will be explored through simulation based on 193nm immersion lithography on 6% Attenuated Phase Shift Mask. Forbidden pitch effect is commonly encountered in the application of off axis illumination (OAI). The illumination settings are often optimized to allow maximum process window for a pitch. This is done by creating symmetrical distribution of diffraction order on the pupil plane. However, at other pitch, the distribution of diffraction order on the pupil plane results in severe degradation in image contrast and results in significant critical dimension (CD) fluctuation. The problematic pitch is often known as forbidden pitch. It has to be avoided in the design and thus limited the pitch range to be imaged for particular illumination. An approach to modify off axis illumination to minimize the effect of forbidden pitch is explored in this study. The new customized shape for one dimensional line and space pattern is modified from current off axis illumination. Simulation study is done to evaluate the performance some customized shapes. The extent of CD fluctuation and CD through pitch uniformity is analyzed to determine the performance enhancement of the new illumination shapes. From simulation result, the proposed modification have significantly improved the through pitch performance and minimized the effect of forbidden pitch.

  6. Development of fluoropolymer for 193nm immersion lithography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shirota, Naoko; Takebe, Yoko; Sasaki, Takashi; Yokokoji, Osamu; Toriumi, Minoru; Masuhara, Hiroshi

    2006-03-01

    We had already developed several series of fluoropolymers, FPRs and FUGUs, having a partially fluorinated monocyclic structure and having acidic hydroxyl group, which acts as dissolution unit into alkaline solution. Then we have optimized these polymers for top-coat as the developer-soluble type in the 193nm immersion lithography. However the hydrophobicity of these polymers were a little poor due to its hydroxyl group. So we thought that the introduction of water repellent moiety into the these polymers structure is effective to improve the their hydrophobicity though the increase of water repellent unit in the polymer leads to lower dissolution rate in developer. To introduce as much as possible of hydrophobicity unit, we selected FUGU as platform, which has larger dissolution rate in developer than that of FPRs, We copolymerized FUGU with higher water-repellent component and obtained three copolymers, FUGU-CoA, FUGU-CoB, and FUGU-CoC. In this paper, we described characteristics and evaluation of these polymers. Most of these polymer showed an improvement of hydrophobicity, in particular FUGU-CoB had excellent hydrophobicity due to introduction bulky containing-fluorine group. In this study, we also investigated the interaction between the water and various polymers by using QCM method. The difference between FUGU and water repellent polymers for swelling behavior to water became clear by analysis of diffusion coefficient. We found that our new co-polymers have excellent diffusion coefficient than FUGU which was confirmed by QCM method used to evaluate water permeability and water diffusion in the materials.

  7. Chemical trimming overcoat: an enhancing composition and process for 193nm lithography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Cong; Rowell, Kevin; Joesten, Lori; Baranowski, Paul; Kaur, Irvinder; Huang, Wanyi; Leonard, JoAnne; Jeong, Hae-Mi; Im, Kwang-Hwyi; Estelle, Tom; Cutler, Charlotte; Pohlers, Gerd; Yin, Wenyan; Fallon, Patricia; Li, Mingqi; Jeon, Hyun; Xu, Cheng Bai; Trefonas, Pete

    2016-03-01

    As the critical dimension of devices is approaching the resolution limit of 193nm photo lithography, multiple patterning processes have been developed to print smaller CD and pitch. Multiple patterning and other advanced lithographic processes often require the formation of isolated features such as lines or posts by direct lithographic printing. The formation of isolated features with an acceptable process window, however, can pose a challenge as a result of poor aerial image contrast at defocus. Herein we report a novel Chemical Trimming Overcoat (CTO) as an extra step after lithography that allows us to achieve smaller feature size and better process window.

  8. Dual-layer dye-filled developer-soluble BARCs for 193-nm lithography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meador, James D.; Beaman, Carol; Stroud, Charlyn; Lowes, Joyce A.; Zhu, Zhimin; Guerrero, Douglas J.; Mercado, Ramil-Marcelo L.; Drain, David

    2008-03-01

    A family of dye-filled developer-soluble bottom anti-reflective coatings (BARCs) has been developed for use in 193-nm microlithography. This new dye-filled chemical platform easily provides products covering a wide range of optical properties. The light-sensitive and positive-working BARCs use a transparent polymeric binder and a polymeric dye in a thermally crosslinking formulation, with the cured products then being photochemically decrosslinked prior to development. The cured BARC films are imaged and removed with developer in the same steps as the covering photoresist. Two dye-filled BARCs with differing optical properties were developed via a series of DOEs and then used as a dual-layer BARC stack. Lithography with this BARC stack, using a 193-nm resist, gave 150-nm L/S (1:1). A 193-nm dual-layer BARC stack (gradient optical properties) from the well-established dye-attached family of light-sensitive BARCs also gave 150-nm L/S (1:1) with the same resist. However, the latter provided much improved line shape with no scumming. The targeted application for light-sensitive dual-layer BARCs is high-numerical aperture (NA) immersion lithography where a single-layer BARC will not afford the requisite reflection control.

  9. Inspection of advanced computational lithography logic reticles using a 193-nm inspection system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Ching-Fang; Lin, Mei-Chun; Lai, Mei-Tsu; Hsu, Luke T. H.; Chin, Angus; Lee, S. C.; Yen, Anthony; Wang, Jim; Chen, Ellison; Wu, David; Broadbent, William H.; Huang, William; Zhu, Zinggang

    2010-09-01

    We report inspection results of early 22-nm logic reticles designed with both conventional and computational lithography methods. Inspection is performed using a state-of-the-art 193-nm reticle inspection system in the reticleplane inspection mode (RPI) where both rule-based sensitivity control (RSC) and a newer modelbased sensitivity control (MSC) method are tested. The evaluation includes defect detection performance using several special test reticles designed with both conventional and computational lithography methods; the reticles contain a variety of programmed critical defects which are measured based on wafer print impact. Also included are inspection results from several full-field product reticles designed with both conventional and computational lithography methods to determine if low nuisance-defect counts can be achieved. These early reticles are largely single-die and all inspections are performed in the die-to-database inspection mode only.

  10. Development of an inorganic nanoparticle photoresist for EUV, e-beam, and 193nm lithography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krysak, Marie; Trikeriotis, Markos; Schwartz, Evan; Lafferty, Neal; Xie, Peng; Smith, Bruce; Zimmerman, Paul; Montgomery, Warren; Giannelis, Emmanuel; Ober, Christopher K.

    2011-04-01

    We have developed a transparent, high refractive index inorganic photoresist with significantly higher etch resistance than even the most robust polymeric resist. As feature sizes continue to decrease, film thickness must be reduced in order to prevent pattern collapse. Normally thinner films prevent sufficient pattern transfer during the etch process, creating the need for a hardmask, thus increasing production cost. Compared to PHOST, we have shown over 10 times better etch resistance. Organic photo-crosslinkable ligands have been attached to a hafnium oxide nanoparticle core to create an imageable photoresist. This resist has shown superior resolution with both E-beam and 193 nm lithography, producing sub-50 nm patterns. In addition to improved etch resistance, the inorganic photoresist exhibits a high refractive index, increasing the depth of focus (DOF). The nanoparticle size of ~ 1-2 nm has the potential to reduce line edge roughness (LER).

  11. CD-SEM measurement line-edge roughness test patterns for 193-nm lithography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bunday, Benjamin D.; Bishop, Michael; Villarrubia, John S.; Vladar, Andras E.

    2003-05-01

    The measurement of line-edge roughness (LER) has recently become a major topic of concern in the litho-metrology community and the semiconductor industry as a whole, as addressed in the 2001 ITRS roadmap. The Advanced Metrology Advisory Group (AMAG, a council composed of the chief CD-metrologists from the International SEMATECH consortium's Member Companies and from the National Institute of Standards and Technology, NIST) has begun a project to investigate this issue and to direct the CD-SEM supplier community towards a semiconductor industry-backed solution for implementation. The AMAG group has designed and built a 193 nm reticle that includes structures implementing a number of schemes to intentionally cause line edge roughness of various spatial frequencies and amplitudes. The lithography of these structures is in itself of interest to the litho-metrology community and will be discussed here. Measurements on different CD-SEMs of major suppliers will be used to comparatively demonstrate the current state of LER measurement. These measurements are compared to roughness determined off-line by analysis of top-down images from these tools. While no official standard measurement algorithm or definition of LER measurement exists, definitions used in this work are presented and compared in use. Repeatability of the measurements and factors affecting their accuracy will be explored, as well as how CD-SEM parameters can effect the measurements.

  12. CD-SEM measurement line edge roughness test patterns for 193 nm lithography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bunday, Benjamin D.; Bishop, Michael; Villarrubia, John S.; Vladar, Andras E.

    2003-07-01

    The measurement of line-edge roughness (LER) has recently become a major topic of concern in the litho-metrology community and the semiconductor industry as a whole, as addressed in the 2001 International Technology Roadmap for Semiconductors (ITRS) roadmap. The Advanced Metrology Advisory Group (AMAG, a council composed of the chief metrologists from the International SEMATECH (ISMT) consortium"s Member Companies and from the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) has begun a project to investigate this issue and to direct the critical dimension scanning electron microscope (CD-SEM) supplier community towards a semiconductor industry-backed solution for implementation. The AMAG group has designed and built a 193 nm reticle that includes structures implementing a number of schemes to intentionally cause line edge roughness of various spatial frequencies and amplitudes. The lithography of these structures is in itself of interest to the litho-metrology community and will be discussed here. These structures, along with several other photolithography process variables, have been used to fabricate a set of features of varying roughness value and structure which span the LER process space of interest. These references are, in turn, useful for evaluation of LER measurement capability. Measurements on different CD-SEMs of major suppliers were used to demonstrate the current state of LER measurement. These measurements were compared to roughness determined off-line by analysis of top-down images from these tools. While no official standard measurement algorithm or definition of LER measurement exists, definitions used in this work are presented and compared in use. Repeatability of the measurements and factors affecting their accuracy were explored, as well as how CD-SEM parameters can affect the measurements.

  13. Extension of 193 nm dry lithography to 45-nm half-pitch node: double exposure and double processing technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Biswas, Abani M.; Li, Jianliang; Hiserote, Jay A.; Melvin, Lawrence S., III

    2006-10-01

    Immersion lithography and multiple exposure techniques are the most promising methods to extend lithography manufacturing to the 45nm node. Although immersion lithography has attracted much attention recently as a promising optical lithography extension, it will not solve all the problems at the 45-nm node. The 'dry' option, (i.e. double exposure/etch) which can be realized with standard processing practice, will extend 193-nm lithography to the end of the current industry roadmap. Double exposure/etch lithography is expensive in terms of cost, throughput time, and overlay registration accuracy. However, it is less challenging compared to other possible alternatives and has the ability to break through the κ I barrier (0.25). This process, in combination with attenuated PSM (att-PSM) mask, is a good imaging solution that can reach, and most likely go beyond, the 45-nm node. Mask making requirements in a double exposure scheme will be reduced significantly. This can be appreciated by the fact that the separation of tightly-pitched mask into two less demanding pitch patterns will reduce the stringent specifications for each mask. In this study, modeling of double exposure lithography (DEL) with att-PSM masks to target 45-nm node is described. In addition, mask separation and implementation issues of optical proximity corrections (OPC) to improve process window are studied. To understand the impact of OPC on the process window, Fourier analysis of the masks has been carried out as well.

  14. Top surface imaging process and materials development for 193 nm and extreme ultraviolet lithography

    SciTech Connect

    Rao, V.; Hutchinson, J.; Holl, S.; Langston, J.; Henderson, C.; Wheeler, D.R.; Cardinale, G.; OConnell, D.; Goldsmith, J.; Bohland, J.; Taylor, G.; Sinta, R.

    1998-11-01

    The maturity and acceptance of top surface imaging (TSI) technology have been hampered by several factors including inadequate resist sensitivity and line edge roughness. We have found that the use of a chemically amplified resist can improve the sensitivity in these systems by 1.5{endash} 2{times} without compromising the line edge roughness. In addition, we have shown improved line edge roughness by increasing the molecular weight of the polymeric resin in the resist. Using these materials approaches, we have been able to show excellent resolution images with the TSI process for both 193 nm and extreme ultraviolet (13.4 nm) patterning. {copyright} {ital 1998 American Vacuum Society.}

  15. Double-exposure materials for pitch division with 193nm lithography: requirements, results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bristol, Robert; Shykind, David; Kim, Sungwon; Borodovsky, Yan; Schwartz, Evan; Turner, Courtney; Masson, Georgeta; Min, Ke; Esswein, Katherine; Blackwell, James M.; Suetin, Nikolay

    2009-03-01

    We present the results of both theoretical and experimental investigations of materials for application either as a reversible Contrast Enhancement Layer (rCEL) or a Two-Stage PAG. The purpose of these materials is to enable Litho- Litho-Etch (LLE) patterning for Pitch Division (PD) at the 16nm logic node (2013 Manufacturing). For the rCEL, we find from modeling using an E-M solver that such a material must posses a bleaching capability equivalent to a Dill A parameter of greater than 100. This is at least a factor of ten greater than that achieved so far at 193nm by any usable organic material we have tested. In the case of the Two-Stage PAG, analytical and lithographic modeling yields a usable material process window, in terms of reversibility and two-photon vs. one-photon acid production rates (branching ratio). One class of materials, based on the cycloadduct of a tethered pair of anthracenes, has shown promise under testing at 193nm in acetonitrile. Sufficient reversibility without acid production, enabled by near-UV exposure, has been achieved. Acid production as a function of dose shows a clear quadratic component, consistent with a branching ratio greater than 1. The experimental data also supports a acid contrast value of approximately 0.05 that could in principle be obtained with this molecule under a pitch division double-exposure scenario.

  16. Research development of thermal aberration in 193nm lithography exposure system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Yueqiang; Liu, Yong

    2014-08-01

    Lithographic exposure is the key process in the manufacture of the integrated circuit, and the performance of exposure system decides the level of microelectronic manufacture technology. Nowadays, the 193nm ArF immersion exposure tool is widely used by the IC manufacturer. With the uniformity of critical dimension (CDU) and overlay become tighter and the requirement for throughput become higher, the thermal aberration caused by lens material and structure absorbing the laser energy cannot be neglected. In this paper, we introduce the efforts and methods that researcher on thermal aberration and its control. Further, these methods were compared to show their own pros and cons. Finally we investigated the challenges of thermal aberration control for state of the art technologies.

  17. A design of beam shaping unit for 193nm lithography illumination system using angular spectrum theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Yang; Gong, Yan; Li, Shun; Zhang, Wei

    2010-08-01

    Off-axis illumination (OAI) technology is widely used to enhance resolution for deep ultraviolet lithography. The realizing methods of OAI include geometrical optics method and physical optics method. However, the former has the disadvantage of weak intensity distribution controlling ability, and the latter introduces simulation errors evidently when dealing with near field diffraction propagation. A diffractive optical element (DOE) designing method using plane wave angular spectrum theory is presented in this paper. Several kinds of OAI modes at near field away from DOE can be realized, and simulation errors and the size of illuminator are also reduced. According to studying the relationships of the sampling point distance of DOE, light beam propagation distance, and the structure of the beam shaping unit, a method of determining the designing parameters is discussed. Using this method, several illumination modes are realized, and simulation results show that all diffraction efficiencies reach up to 84%. The method of DOE manufacturing is analyzed at last, and it is proven to be feasible.

  18. Impact of water and top-coats on lithographic performance in 193-nm immersion lithography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kishimura, Shinji; Gronheid, Roel; Ercken, Monique; Maenhoudt, Mireille; Matsuo, Takahiro; Endo, Masayuki; Sasago, Masaru

    2005-05-01

    We have investigated the impact of water and top-coats on the resist in water immersion lithography by analyzing the dissolution behavior and the film constitution. We used a resist development analyzer (RDA) and a quartz crystal microbalance (QCM) to study the dissolution behavior. The film constitution was studied through the gradient shaving preparation (GSP) method in combination with TOF-SIMS. The GSP/TOF-SIMS method reveals the constitution of a top-coat/resist film. We found that, in a resist, the photo acid generator (PAG) anion at a depth of about 30 nm from the surface leached into water and a surface insoluble layer formed during immersion. The estimated amount of leaching was about 5% of the original content. The formation of an intermixing layer with a low dissolution rate was observed for some top-coat and resist combinations. The thickness of the intermixing layer and the formation behavior were made clear. We believe the intermixing layer was caused by the top-coat solvent eluting resist components. In a top-coat, a PAG existed within the top-coat and the PAG anion leached into the water. Top-coats blocked gaseous decomposed products from the resist film during PEB. These results are useful for estimating patterning characteristics and the defectivity due to materials for actual immersion exposure.

  19. Challenges of 29nm half-pitch NAND Flash STI patterning with 193nm dry lithography and self-aligned double patterning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chiu, M. C.; Lin, Benjamin Szu-Min; Tsai, M. F.; Chang, Y. S.; Yeh, M. H.; Ying, T. H.; Ngai, Chris; Jin, Jaklyn; Yuen, Stephen; Huang, Sem; Chen, Yongmei; Miao, Liyan; Tai, Kevin; Conley, Amiad; Liu, Ian

    2008-11-01

    High NA (1.35) Immersion litho runs into the fundamental limit of printing at 40-45nm half pitch (HP). The next generation EUVL tool is known to be ready not until year 2012. Double patterning (DP) technology has been identified as the extension of optical photolithography technologies to 3xnm and 2xnm half-pitch for the low k1 regime to fill in the gap between Immersion lithography and EUVL. Self Aligned Double Patterning (SADP) Technology utilized mature process technology to reduce risk and faster time to market to support the continuation of Moore's Law of Scaling to reduce the cost/function. SADP uses spacer to do the pitch splitting bypass the conventional double patterning (e.g. Litho-Freeze-Litho-Etch (LFLE), or Litho-Etch-Litho-Etch (LELE)) overlay problem. Having a tight overlay performance is extremely critical for NAND Flash manufacturers to achieve a fast yield ramp in production. This paper describes the challenges and accomplishment of a Line-By-Spacer (LBS) SADP scheme to pattern the 29nm half-pitch NAND Flash STI application. A 193nm Dry lithography was chosen to pattern on top of the amorphous carbon (a-C) film stack. The resist pattern will be transferred on the top a-C core layer follow by spacer deposition and etch to achieve the pitch splitting. Then the spacer will be used to transfer to the bottom a-C universal hardmask. This high selectivity a-C hardmask will be used to transfer the 29nm half-pitch pattern to the STI. Good within wafer CD uniformity (CDU) <2nm and line width roughness (LWR) <2nm for the 29nm half-pitch NAND FLASH STI were demonstrated as the benefits using double amorphous carbon hardmask layers. The relationships among the photoresist CDs, CD trimming , as-deposited spacer film thickness, spacer width and the final STI line/core space/gap space CDs will also be discussed in this paper since patterning is combining both lithography performance with CVD and Etch process performance. Film selection for amorphous carbon and

  20. Advanced patterning approaches based on negative-tone development (NTD) process for further extension of 193nm immersion lithography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shirakawa, Michihiro; Inoue, Naoki; Furutani, Hajime; Yamamoto, Kei; Goto, Akiyoshi; Fujita, Mitsuhiro

    2015-03-01

    Two approaches which achieve the further evolution of NTD (Negative Tone Development) process are shown in this article. One is ACCEL (Advanced Chemical Contrast Enhancement Layer) process that can improve the lithography performance and the other is DTD (Dual Tone Development) process that can shrink patterning pitch below the limit of single exposure process. ACCEL is an additionally provided layer which is coated on a surface of NTD resist film before exposure and removed by NTD developer. ACCEL can enhance the acid distribution and dissolution contrast of the NTD resist. In fact, lithography performances such as exposure latitude (EL) and DOF improved dramatically by applying ACCEL compared to the NTD resist without ACCEL. We consider that suppression of excessive acid diffusion and material transfer between the resist layer and the ACCEL layer are the causes of the contrast enhancement. DTD process is one of the simplest pitch shrink method which is achieved by repeating PTD and NTD process. Feasibility study of DTD patterning has been demonstrated so far. However, Exposure latitude margin and CDU performance were not sufficient for applying DTD to HVM. We developed the novel DTD specific resist under a new concept, and 32 nm half pitch (hp) contact hole (CH) pattern was successfully formed with enough margins. DTD line and space (L/S) patterning are also demonstrated and 24 nm hp L/S pattern can be resolved. k1 factors of DTD CH and L/S patterns reach to 0.20 and 0.15, respectively.

  1. Recent progress in 193-nm antireflective coatings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meador, James D.; Guerrero, Douglas J.; Xu, Gu; Shao, Xie; Dobson, Norman; Claypool, James B.; Nowak, Kelly A.

    1999-06-01

    This paper presents the chemistries and properties of organic, spin-on, bottom antireflective coatings (BARCs) that are designed for 193 nm lithography. All of the BARCs are thermosetting and use dye-attached/incorporated polymers. A first generation product, NEXT, will soon be commercialized. NEXT is built form i-line and deep-UV chemistries with the polymeric constituent being a substitute novolac. This product provide outstanding resolution of 0.16 micrometers L/S with several 193 nm photoresists. Second generation chemical platforms under study include acrylics, polyesters, and polyethers with the 193 nm absorbing chromophore being an aromatic function. The performance of selected BARCs from the four platforms is described, including: optical properties, 193 nm litho, plasma etch rates, Prolith modeling data, spin-bowl and waste line compatibility, and ambient stability.

  2. Binary 193nm photomasks aging phenomenon study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dufaye, Félix; Sartelli, Luca; Pogliani, Carlo; Gough, Stuart; Sundermann, Frank; Miyashita, Hiroyuki; Hidenori, Yoshioka; Charras, Nathalie; Brochard, Christophe; Thivolle, Nicolas

    2011-05-01

    193nm binary photomasks are still used in the semiconductor industry for the lithography of some critical layers for the nodes 90nm and 65nm, with high volumes and over long period. These 193nm binary masks seem to be well-known but recent studies have shown surprising degrading effects, like Electric Field induced chromium Migration (EFM) [1] or chromium migration [2] [3] . Phase shift Masks (PSM) or Opaque MoSi On Glass (OMOG) might not be concerned by these effects [4] [6] under certain conditions. In this paper, we will focus our study on two layers gate and metal lines. We will detail the effects of mask aging, with SEM top view pictures revealing a degraded chromium edge profile and TEM chemical analyses demonstrating the growth of a chromium oxide on the sidewall. SEMCD measurements after volume production indicated a modified CD with respect to initial CD data after manufacture. A regression analysis of these CD measurements shows a radial effect, a die effect and an isolated-dense effect. Mask cleaning effectiveness has also been investigated, with sulphate or ozone cleans, to recover the mask quality in terms of CD. In complement, wafer intrafield CD measurements have been performed on the most sensitive structure to monitor the evolution of the aging effect on mask CD uniformity. Mask CD drift have been correlated with exposure dose drift and isolated-dense bias CD drift on wafers. In the end, we will try to propose a physical explanation of this aging phenomenon and a solution to prevent from it occurring.

  3. Inline detection of Chrome degradation on binary 193nm photomasks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dufaye, Félix; Sippel, Astrid; Wylie, Mark; García-Berríos, Edgardo; Crawford, Charles; Hess, Carl; Sartelli, Luca; Pogliani, Carlo; Miyashita, Hiroyuki; Gough, Stuart; Sundermann, Frank; Brochard, Christophe

    2013-09-01

    193nm binary photomasks are still used in the semiconductor industry for the lithography of some critical layers for the nodes 90nm and 65nm, with high volumes and over long periods. However, these 193nm binary photomasks can be impacted by a phenomenon of chrome oxidation leading to critical dimensions uniformity (CDU) degradation with a pronounced radial signature. If not detected early enough, this CDU degradation may cause defectivity issues and lower yield on wafers. Fortunately, a standard cleaning and repellicle service at the mask shop has been demonstrated as efficient to remove the grown materials and get the photomask CD back on target.Some detection methods have been already described in literature, such as wafer CD intrafield monitoring (ACLV), giving reliable results but also consuming additional SEM time with less precision than direct photomask measurement. In this paper, we propose another approach, by monitoring the CDU directly on the photomask, concurrently with defect inspection for regular requalification to production for wafer fabs. For this study, we focused on a Metal layer in a 90nm technology node. Wafers have been exposed with production conditions and then measured by SEM-CD. Afterwards, this photomask has been measured with a SEM-CD in mask shop and also inspected on a KLA-Tencor X5.2 inspection system, with pixels 125 and 90nm, to evaluate the Intensity based Critical Dimension Uniformity (iCDU) option. iCDU was firstly developed to provide feed-forward CDU maps for scanner intrafield corrections, from arrayed dense structures on memory photomasks. Due to layout complexity and differing feature types, CDU monitoring on logic photomasks used to pose unique challenges.The selection of suitable feature types for CDU monitoring on logic photomasks is no longer an issue, since the transmitted intensity map gives all the needed information, as shown in this paper. In this study, the photomask was heavily degraded after more than 18,000 300

  4. Results from a new 193nm die-to-database reticle inspection platform

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Broadbent, William H.; Alles, David S.; Giusti, Michael T.; Kvamme, Damon F.; Shi, Rui-fang; Sousa, Weston L.; Walsh, Robert; Xiong, Yalin

    2010-05-01

    A new 193nm wavelength high resolution reticle defect inspection platform has been developed for both die-to-database and die-to-die inspection modes. In its initial configuration, this innovative platform has been designed to meet the reticle qualification requirements of the IC industry for the 22nm logic and 3xhp memory generations (and shrinks) with planned extensions to the next generation. The 22nm/3xhp IC generation includes advanced 193nm optical lithography using conventional RET, advanced computational lithography, and double patterning. Further, EUV pilot line lithography is beginning. This advanced 193nm inspection platform has world-class performance and the capability to meet these diverse needs in optical and EUV lithography. The architecture of the new 193nm inspection platform is described. Die-to-database inspection results are shown on a variety of reticles from industry sources; these reticles include standard programmed defect test reticles, as well as advanced optical and EUV product and product-like reticles. Results show high sensitivity and low false and nuisance detections on complex optical reticle designs and small feature size EUV reticles. A direct comparison with the existing industry standard 257nm wavelength inspection system shows measurable sensitivity improvement for small feature sizes

  5. New single-layer positive photoresists for 193-nm photolithography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Okoroanyanwu, Uzodinma; Shimokawa, Tsutomu; Byers, Jeff D.; Medeiros, David R.; Willson, C. Grant; Niu, Qingshang J.; Frechet, Jean M. J.; Allen, Robert D.

    1997-07-01

    New series of chemically amplified, single layer, positive tone photoresists for 193 nm lithography have been developed. These resists were formulated from a series of cycloaliphatic co- and terpolymers of 2-methyl propyl bicyclo(2.2.1)hept-2- ene-5-carboxylate (carbo-tert-butoxynorbornene), bicyclo(2.2.1)hept-2-ene carboxylic acid (norbornene carboxylic acid), 8-methyl-8-carboxy tetracyclo(4,4,0.12,5,17,10)dodec-3-ene (methyltetracyclododecene carboxylic acid), norbornenemethanol, and maleic anhydride, which were synthesized by free radical, vinyl addition and ring opening metathesis polymerization techniques. The polymers derived from ring opening metathesis polymerization have bee successfully hydrogenated to provide yet another member of this group of materials. The cycloaliphatic polymer backbones provide etch resistance, mechanical properties and stability to radiation. The lithographic function is provided by carefully tailored pendant groups, which include an acid functionality that is masked by protecting groups that undergo acid catalyzed thermolysis as well as polar groups that influence the adhesion, wetability and dissolution properties of the polymer. The polymers are soluble in common organic solvents and have glass transition temperatures ranging from less than 60 degrees Celsius to higher than 250 degrees Celsius depending on their specific structure and mode of polymerization. They are at least as transparent at 193 nm as the corresponding acrylics. Their dry etch resistance varies with the formulation, but the base polymers etch more slowly than novolac under conditions typically used to pattern polysilicon. Upon exposure and baking, the resists have demonstrated high sensitivities (9-25 mJ/cm2), and 0.16 micrometer features have bean resolved.

  6. 193-nm radiation durability study of MoSi binary mask and resulting lithographic performance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Servin, Isabelle; Belledent, Jérôme; Pain, Laurent; Connolly, Brid; Sczyrba, Martin; Lamantia, Matt

    2011-05-01

    Dimensions on mask continue to shrink to keep up with the ITRS roadmap. This has implications on the material of choice for the blanks. For example, the new binary OMOG stack (Opaque MOSi on Glass) was successfully introduced to meet the mask specifications at the 32nm technology node. Obviously 193-nm optical lithography will be further used in production at even higher NA and lower k1 emphasizing, for example, the impact on wafer of any electromagnetic field migration effects. Indeed, long term radiation damage inducing CD growth and consequently, device yield loss, has already been reported [1, 2]. This mechanism, known as Electric Field induced Migration of chrome (EMF) often shortens the mask's lifetime. Here, a study was conducted to investigate the impact of intensive ArF scanner exposure both on final wafer and mask performances. The Si printed wafers measured with top-down CD-SEM were characterized with respect to CD uniformity, linearity, Sub Resolution Assist Feature (SRAF) printability through process window, MEEF, DOF, and OPC accuracy. The data was also correlated to advanced mask inspection results (e.g. AIMSTM) taken at the same location. More precisely, this work follows a preliminary study [1] which pointed out that OMOG is less sensitive to radiation than standard COG (Chrome On Glass). And, in this paper, we report on results obtained at higher energy to determine the ultimate lifetime of OMOG masks.

  7. Investigation of electron beam stabilization of 193-nm photoresists

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Myoung-Soo; Park, Jong-Woon; Kim, Hak-Joon; Jun, Bum-Jin; Gil, Myung-Goon; Kim, Bong-Ho; Ross, Matthew F.; Livesay, William R.

    2001-08-01

    193nm lithography is a promising candidate for the fabrication of microelectronic devices at the 130nm design rule and below. With smaller feature sizes, below 130nm, reduced resist thickness is essential because of the pattern collapse issues at high aspect ratios and the limited depth of focus with 193nm lithography tools. However, ArF resists have shown problems with etch selectivity, especially with the thin resist layers necessary. Additionally, pattern slimming during CD-SEM measurement, due to the nature of the resist chemistry, is an issue with feature stability after patterning. At present, many studies have been performed for improving the etch selectivity of resists and addressing line slimming issues. In this study, the electron beam stabilization process has been applied for improving the etch selectivity of resist patterns having an aspect ratio less than 3.0. The electron beam stabilization has been applied to two different ArF resist types; acrylate and cyclic-olefin- maleic-anhydride (COMA), which have been evaluated with respect to materials properties, etch selectivity, and line slimming performance as a function of electron beam dose and etch condition. Film shrinkage and the change in index of refraction were monitored as a function of stabilization condition. The chemical properties were characterized before and after electron beam stabilization using FTIR analysis. Blanket resist etch rate studies were performed as a function of stabilization condition for each resist type. Cross- sectional views of resist patterns after etch processing were also investigated to evaluate the improvement in etch resistance provided by the electron beam process. CD SEM measurements were performed to evaluate the impact of the stabilization process on the patterned features. The issue of line slimming has also been evaluated, with and without electron beam stabilization, for the different ArF resist materials considered. The results were compared with a Kr

  8. An anti-reflection coating for use with PMMA at 193 nm

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yen, Anthony; Smith, Henry I.; Schattenburg, M. L.; Taylor, Gary N.

    1992-01-01

    An antireflection coating (ARC) for use with poly(methyl methacrylate) (PMMA) resist for ArF excimer laser lithography (193 nm) was formulated. It consists of PMMA and a bis-azide, 4.4-prime-diazidodiphenyl sulfone (DDS) which crosslinks the film after deep UV (260 nm) irradiation and subsequent annealing. The reacted DDS then serves as the absorber for the 193 nm radiation and also prevents mixing of the ARC and PMMA during PMMA spin-coating and development. The effectiveness of the ARC was demonstrated by exposing, in PMMA, using achromatic holographic lithography, gratings of 100 nm period (about 50 nm linewidth) that are almost entirely free of an orthogonal standing wave.

  9. EUV reticle inspection with a 193nm reticle inspector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Broadbent, William; Inderhees, Gregg; Yamamoto, Tetsuya; Lee, Isaac; Lim, Phillip

    2013-06-01

    The prevailing industry opinion is that EUV Lithography (EUVL) will enter High Volume Manufacturing (HVM) in the 2015 - 2017 timeframe at the 16nm HP node. Every year the industry assesses the key risk factors for introducing EUVL into HVM - blank and reticle defects are among the top items. To reduce EUV blank and reticle defect levels, high sensitivity inspection is needed. To address this EUV inspection need, KLA-Tencor first developed EUV blank inspection and EUV reticle inspection capability for their 193nm wavelength reticle inspection system - the Teron 610 Series (2010). This system has become the industry standard for 22nm / 3xhp optical reticle HVM along with 14nm / 2xhp optical pilot production; it is further widely used for EUV blank and reticle inspection in R and D. To prepare for the upcoming 10nm / 1xhp generation, KLA-Tencor has developed the Teron 630 Series reticle inspection system which includes many technical advances; these advances can be applied to both EUV and optical reticles. The advanced capabilities are described in this paper with application to EUV die-to-database and die-to-die inspection for currently available 14nm / 2xhp generation EUV reticles. As 10nm / 1xhp generation optical and EUV reticles become available later in 2013, the system will be tested to identify areas for further improvement with the goal to be ready for pilot lines in early 2015.

  10. Refractive index change during exposure for 193-nm chemically amplified resists

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oh, Hye-Keun; Sohn, Young-Soo; Sung, Moon-Gyu; Lee, Young-Mi; Lee, Eun-Mi; Byun, Sung Hwan; An, Ilsin; Lee, Kun-Sang; Park, In-Ho

    1999-06-01

    Some of the important areas to be improved for lithography simulation are getting correct exposure parameters and determining the change of refractive index. It is known that the real and imaginary refractive indices are changed during exposure. We obtained these refractive index changes during exposure for 193 nm chemically amplified resists. The variations of the transmittance as well as the resist thickness were measured during ArF excimer laser exposure. We found that the refractive index change is directly related to the concentration of the photo acid generator and de-protected resin. It is important to know the exact values of acid concentration from the exposure parameters since a small difference in acid concentration magnifies the variation in the amplified de-protection during post exposure bake. We developed and used a method to extract Dill ABC exposure parameters for 193 nm chemically amplified resist from the refractive index change upon exposure.

  11. Thin bilayer resists for 193-nm and future photolithography II

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hishiro, Yoshi; Hyatt, Michael

    2007-03-01

    Bilayer, Si-containing resists are a technique of interest and a strong candidate to replace chemical vapor deposition (CVD) hardmask processes for small critical dimensions (CDs). Previously, we proposed a very thin film approach using bilayer resists for future lithography, defined the requirements for the resists, and demonstrated 55nm transferred patterns with high aspect ratios using 2-beam interferometer exposure. In this paper, we have demonstrated smaller-than- 60nm transferred patterns with a high numerical aperture (NA) scanner, as well as 45nm and 40nm transferred patterns with a 2-beam system using a 20% Si-containing thin bilayer resist. Immersion scanner exposure and a 35nm CD with 2- beam system were also studied.

  12. Faster qualification of 193-nm resists for 100-nm development using photo cell monitoring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jones, Chris M.; Kallingal, Chidam; Zawadzki, Mary T.; Jeewakhan, Nazneen N.; Kaviani, Nazila N.; Krishnan, Prakash; Klaum, Arthur D.; Van Ess, Joel

    2003-05-01

    The development of 100-nm design rule technologies is currently taking place in many R&D facilities across the world. For some critical alyers, the transition to 193-nm resist technology has been required to meet this leading edge design rule. As with previous technology node transitions, the materials and processes available are undergoing changes and improvements as vendors encounter and solve problems. The initial implementation of the 193-nm resits process did not meet the photolithography requirements of some IC manufacturers due to very high Post Exposure Bake temperature sensitivity and consequently high wafer to wafer CD variation. The photoresist vendors have been working to improve the performance of the 193-nm resists to meet their customer's requirements. Characterization of these new resists needs to be carried out prior to implementation in the R&D line. Initial results on the second-generation resists evaluated at Cypress Semicondcutor showed better CD control compared to the aelrier resist with comparable Depth of Focus (DOF), Exposure Latitute, Etch Resistance, etc. In addition to the standard lithography parameters, resist characterization needs to include defect density studies. It was found that the new resists process with the best CD control, resulted in the introduction of orders of magnitude higher yield limiting defects at Gate, Contact adn Local Interconnect. The defect data were shared with the resists vendor and within days of the discovery the resist vendor was able to pinpoint the source of the problem. The fix was confirmed and the new resists were successfully released to production. By including defect monitoring into the resist qualification process, Cypress Semiconductor was able to 1) drive correction actions earlier resulting in faster ramp and 2) eliminate potential yield loss. We will discuss in this paper how to apply the Micro Photo Cell Monitoring methodology for defect monitoring in the photolithogprhay module and the

  13. The Photochemistry of Cyano and Dicyanoacetylene at 193 nm.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1987-07-28

    Halpern, L. Petway , R. Lu, W.M. Jackson, and V.R. McCrary and W. Nottingham Prepared for submission to the Journal of Chemical Physics Department of...CYANO- AND DICYANOACETYLENE AT 193 NM By J. B. Halpern% L. Petway , R. Lu W. M. Jackson , and V. R. McCrary Department of Chemistry Howard University

  14. Carbon Nanotube Scanning Probe for Surface Profiling of DUV and 193 nm Photoresist Pattern

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nguyen, Cattien V.; Stevens, Ramsey M. D.; Barber, Jabulani; Han, Jie; Meyyappan, M.; Sanchez, Martha I.; Larson, Carl; Hinsberg, William D.; Arnold, Jim (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    The continual scaling down of semiconductors to 100 nm and below necessitates a characterization technique to resolve high aspect ratio features in the nanoscale regime. This paper reports the use of atomic force microscope coupled with high aspect ratio multi-walled carbon nanotube scanning probe tip for the purpose of imaging surface profile of photoresists. Multi-walled carbon nanotube tips used in this work are 5-10 nm in diameter and about a micron long. Their exceptional mechanical strength and ability to reversibly buckle enable to resolve steep, deep nanometer-scale features. Images of photoresist patterns generated by 257 nm interference lithography as well as 193 nm lithography are presented to demonstrate multi-walled carbon nanotube scanning probe tip for applications in metrology.

  15. Advances in 193 nm excimer lasers for mass spectrometry applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Delmdahl, Ralph; Esser, Hans-Gerd; Bonati, Guido

    2016-03-01

    Ongoing progress in mass analysis applications such as laser ablation inductively coupled mass spectrometry of solid samples and ultraviolet photoionization mediated sequencing of peptides and proteins is to a large extent driven by ultrashort wavelength excimer lasers at 193 nm. This paper will introduce the latest improvements achieved in the development of compact high repetition rate excimer lasers and elaborate on the impact on mass spectrometry instrumentation. Various performance and lifetime measurements obtained in a long-term endurance test over the course of 18 months will be shown and discussed in view of the laser source requirements of different mass spectrometry tasks. These sampling type applications are served by excimer lasers delivering pulsed 193 nm output of several mJ as well as fast repetition rates which are already approaching one Kilohertz. In order to open up the pathway from the laboratory to broader market industrial use, sufficient component lifetimes and long-term stable performance behavior have to be ensured. The obtained long-term results which will be presented are based on diverse 193 nm excimer laser tube improvements aiming at e.g. optimizing the gas flow dynamics and have extended the operational life the laser tube for the first time over several billion pulses even under high duty-cycle conditions.

  16. Run time scanner data analysis for HVM lithography process monitoring and stability control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chung, Woong Jae; Kim, Young Ki; Tristan, John; Kim, Jeong Soo; Subramany, Lokesh; Li, Chen; Riggs, Brent; Ramanathan, Vidya; Karur-Shanmugam, Ram; Hoo, George; Gao, Jie; Golotsvan, Anna; Huang, Kevin; Pierson, Bill; Robinson, John

    2014-04-01

    There are various data mining and analysis tools in use by high-volume semiconductor manufacturers throughout the industry that seek to provide robust monitoring and analysis capabilities for the purpose of maintaining a stable lithography process. These tools exist in both online and offline formats and draw upon data from various sources for monitoring and analysis. This paper explores several possible use cases of run-time scanner data to provide advanced overlay and imaging analysis for scanner lithography signatures. Here we demonstrate several use-cases for analyzing and stabilizing lithography processes. Applications include high order wafer alignment simulations in which an optimal alignment strategy is determined by dynamic wafer selection, reporting statistics data and analysis of the lot report and the sub-recipe as a sort of non-standard lot report, visualization of key lithography process parameters, and scanner fleet management (SFM)

  17. Development of high coherence high power 193nm laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tanaka, Satoshi; Arakawa, Masaki; Fuchimukai, Atsushi; Sasaki, Yoichi; Onose, Takashi; Kamba, Yasuhiro; Igarashi, Hironori; Qu, Chen; Tamiya, Mitsuru; Oizumi, Hiroaki; Ito, Shinji; Kakizaki, Koji; Xuan, Hongwen; Zhao, Zhigang; Kobayashi, Yohei; Mizoguchi, Hakaru

    2016-03-01

    We have been developing a hybrid 193 nm ArF laser system that consists of a solid state seeding laser and an ArF excimer laser amplifier for power-boosting. The solid state laser consists of an Yb-fiber-solid hybrid laser system and an Er-fiber laser system as fundamentals, and one LBO and three CLBO crystals for frequency conversion. In an ArF power amplifier, the seed laser passes through the ArF gain media three times, and an average power of 110 W is obtained. As a demonstration of the potential applications of the laser, an interference exposure test is performed.

  18. Solid sampling with 193-nm excimer laser ablation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Delmdahl, Ralph

    2007-02-01

    Reproducible and sensitive elemental analysis of solid samples is a crucial task in areas of geology (e.g. microanalysis of fluid inclusions), material sciences, industrial quality control as well as in environmental, forensic and biological studies. To date the most versatile detection method is mass-spectroscopic multi-element analysis. In order to obtain reproducible results, this requires transferring the solid sample into the gas-phase while preserving the sample's stoichiometric composition. Laser ablation in combination with Inductively Coupled Plasma-Mass Spectrometry (LA-ICP-MS) is a proven powerful technique to meet the requirements for reliable solid sample analysis. The sample is laser ablated in an air-tight cell and the aerosol is carried by an inert gas to a micro-wave induced plasma where its constituents are atomized and ionized prior to mass analysis. The 193 nm excimer laser ablation, in particular, provides athermal sample ablation with very precise lateral ablation and controlled depth profiling. The high photon energy and beam homogeneity of the 193 nm excimer laser system avoids elemental fractionation and permits clean ablation of even transmissive solid materials such as carbonates, fluorites and pure quartz.

  19. Tuning and simulating a 193-nm resist for 2D applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Howard, William B.; Wiaux, Vincent; Ercken, Monique; Bui, Bang; Byers, Jeff D.; Pochkowski, Mike

    2002-07-01

    For some applications, the usefulness of lithography simulation results depends strongly on the matching between experimental conditions and the simulation input parameters. If this matching is optimized and other sources of error are minimized, then the lithography model can be used to explain printed wafer experimental results. Further, simulation can be useful in predicting the results or in choosing the correct set of experiments. In this paper, PROLITH and ProDATA AutoTune were used to systematically vary simulation input parameters to match measured results on printed wafers used in a 193 nm process. The validity of the simulation parameters was then checked using 3D simulation compared to 2D top-down SEM images. The quality of matching was evaluated using the 1D metrics of average gate CD and Line End Shortening (LES). To ensure the most accurate simulation, a new approach was taken to create a compound mask from GDSII contextual information surrounding an accurate SEM image of the reticle region of interest. Corrections were made to account for all metrology offsets.

  20. Lactones in 193 nm resists: What do they do?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ito, Hiroshi; Truong, Hoa D.; Brock, Phil J.

    2008-03-01

    Lactones are almost ubiquitously employed in 193 nm resists to increase the polarity of hydrophobic alicyclic polymers. What else do lactones do in 193 nm resists? We studied the behavior of methacrylate (MA) resists consisting of different protecting groups, hexafluoroalcohols, and norbornane lactone methacrylate (NLM, 2-oxo-3-oxatricyclo[4.2.1.04,8]nonan-5-yl methacrylate). When the protecting group is large [ethylcyclooctyl (ECO) and methyladamantyl (MAd)], thinning of the resist film that occurs in highly exposed areas upon postexposure bake (PEB) is significantly smaller than what is expected from the polymer composition. When the concentration of isopropylhexafluoroalcohol methacrylate (iPrHFAMA) is increased in the ECOMA-NLM polymer, the thinning increases and reaches 100% of theory and the ECOMA-norbornenehexafluoroalcohol methacrylate (NBHFAMA) resist loses quantitative thickness in highly-exposed areas upon PEB at 90 °C. This indicates that small lactones which are more basic than esters can trap deprotection fragments especially when the protecting group is large. Such entrapment was detected by IR spectroscopy and also observed at temperatures as high as 200 °C in thermogravimetric analysis (TGA). Incorporation of lactone appears to decrease the bake temperature sensitivity and the sensitivity of the resist perhaps due to trapping of photochemically generated acids by basic lactone. The lactone ring can be hydrolyzed during aqueous base development but does not seem to affect the dissolution rate, indicating that hydrolysis occurs in aqueous base solution after dissolution. Poly(methacrylic acid-NLM) dissolves as fast as poly(methacrylic acid) in 0.26 N tetramethylammonium hydroxide (TMAH) aqueous solution. While exposed P(ECOMA 47-NLM 53) resist dissolves in 0.26 N developer at about the same rate as authentically prepared poly(methacrylic acid 47-NLM 53), the dissolution rate of highly-exposed P(MAdMA 44-NLM 56) resist is much slower, indicating

  1. Development of high coherence, 200mW, 193nm solid-state laser at 6 kHz

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakazato, T.; Tsuboi, M.; Onose, T.; Tanaka, Y.; Sarukura, N.; Ito, S.; Kakizaki, K.; Watanabe, S.

    2015-02-01

    The high coherent, high power 193-nm ArF lasers are useful for interference lithography and microprosessing applications. In order to achieve high coherence ArF lasers, we have been developing a high coherence 193 nm solid state laser for the seeding to a high power ArF laser. We used the sum frequency mixing of the fourth harmonic (FH) of a 904-nm Ti:sapphire laser with a Nd:YVO4 laser (1342 nm) to generate 193-nm light. The laser system consists of a single-mode Ti:sapphire oscillator seeded by a 904-nm external cavity laser diode, a Pockels cell, a 6-pass amplifier, a 4-pass amplifier, a 2-pass amplifier and a wavelength conversion stage. The required repetition rate of 6 kHz corresponding to the ArF laser, along with a low gain at 904 nm induces serious thermal lens effects; extremely short focal lengths of the order of cm and bi-foci in the vertical and horizontal directions. From the analysis of thermal lens depending on pump intensity, we successfully compensated the thermal lens by dividing a 527-nm pump power with 15, 25 and 28 W to 3-stage amplifiers with even passes, resulting in the output power above 10W with a nearly diffraction limited beam. This 904-nm output was converted to 3.8 W in the second harmonic by LBO, 0.5 W in FH by BBO sequentially. Finally the output power of 230 mW was obtained at 193 nm by mixing the FH with a 1342-nm light in CLBO.

  2. Technique for cellular microsurgery using the 193-nm excimer laser.

    PubMed

    Palanker, D; Ohad, S; Lewis, A; Simon, A; Shenkar, J; Penchas, S; Laufer, N

    1991-01-01

    A new cell surgery technique has been developed to produce well-defined alterations in cells and tissue without detectable heating and/or other structural damage in the surroundings. The technique involves the use of an argon fluoride excimer laser, in the deep ultraviolet (UV) region of the spectrum at 193 nm, which is guided through a glass pipette filled with a positive air pressure. To demonstrate the method, holes were drilled in the zona pellucida of mouse oocytes. The diameter of the drilled hole was determined by the pipette tip size, and its depth by an energy emitted per pulse and number of pulses. Scanning electron microscopy of the drilled mouse oocytes showed uniform, round, well-circumscribed holes with sharp edges. Oocytes that had their zona pellucida drilled with this new method fertilized in vitro and developed to the blastocyst stage in a rate similar to that of control group. These results demonstrate the nonperturbing nature of this cold laser microsurgical procedure. In addition to the extension of our results for clinical in vitro fertilization purposes, such as enhancement of fertilization and embryo biopsy, there are wide-ranging possible uses of our method in fundamental and applied investigations that require submicron accuracy in cellular alteration.

  3. Total lithography system based on a new application software platform enabling smart scanner management

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kono, Hirotaka; Masaki, Kazuo; Matsuyama, Tomoyuki; Wakamoto, Shinji; Park, Seemoon; Sugihara, Taro; Shibazaki, Yuichi

    2015-03-01

    Along with device shrinkage, higher accuracy will continuously be required from photo-lithography tools in order to enhance on-product yield. In order to achieve higher yield, the advanced photo-lithography tools must be equipped with sophisticated tuning knobs on the tool and with software that is flexible enough to be applied per layer. This means photo-lithography tools must be capable of handling many types of sub-recipes and parameters simultaneously. To enable managing such a large amount of data easily and to setup lithography tools smoothly, we have developed a total lithography system called Litho Turnkey Solution based on a new software application platform, which we call Plug and Play Manager (PPM). PPM has its own graphical user interface, which enables total management of various data. Here various data means recipes, sub-recipes, tuning-parameters, measurement results, and so on. Through PPM, parameter making by intelligent applications such as CDU/Overlay tuning tools can easily be implemented. In addition, PPM is also linked to metrology tools and the customer's host computer, which enables data flow automation. Based on measurement data received from the metrology tools, PPM calculates correction parameters and sends them to the scanners automatically. This scheme can make calibration feedback loops possible. It should be noted that the abovementioned functions are running on the same platform through a user-friendly interface. This leads to smart scanner management and usability improvement. In this paper, we will demonstrate the latest development status of Nikon's total lithography solution based on PPM; describe details of each application; and provide supporting data for the accuracy and usability of the system. Keywords: exposure

  4. Across scanner platform optimization to enable EUV lithography at the 10-nm logic node

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mulkens, Jan; Karssenberg, Jaap; Wei, Hannah; Beckers, Marcel; Verstappen, Leon; Hsu, Stephen; Chen, Guangqin

    2014-04-01

    EUV lithography is expected to be introduced in volume manufacturing at the 10-nm and 7-nm node. Especially in these first EUV nodes, critical layer patterning will be balanced with the use of ArF immersion. As a consequence a good overlay and placement matching between both lithography methods becomes an enabling factor for EUV. In this paper we present an integral method to optimize critical layer patterning across the EUV and ArF scanner platform, such that good overlay and device pattern placement is achieved. It is discussed that besides classical overlay control methods, also the optimization of the ArF and EUV imaging steps is needed. Best matching is achieved by applying high-order field-to-field overlay corrections for both imaging and overlay. The lithography architecture we build for these higher order corrections connects the dynamic scanner actuators with the angle resolved scatterometer via a separate computational application server. Improvements of CD uniformity are based on source mask optimization for EUV combined with CD optimization using freeform intra-field dose actuator in the immersion scanner.

  5. Understanding dissolution behavior of 193nm photoresists in organic solvent developers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Seung-Hyun; Park, Jong Keun; Cardolaccia, Thomas; Sun, Jibin; Andes, Cecily; O'Connell, Kathleen; Barclay, George G.

    2012-03-01

    Herein, we investigate the dissolution behavior of 193-nm chemically amplified resist in different organic solvents at a mechanistic level. We previously reported the effect of solvent developers on the negative tone development (NTD) process in both dry and immersion lithography, and demonstrated various resist performance parameters such as photospeed, critical dimension uniformity, and dissolution rate contrast are strongly affected by chemical nature of the organic developer. We further pursued the investigation by examining the dependence of resist dissolution behavior on their solubility properties using Hansen Solubility Parameter (HSP). The effects of monomer structure, and resist composition, and the effects of different developer chemistry on dissolution behaviors were evaluated by using laser interferometry and quartz crystal microbalance. We have found that dissolution behaviors of methacrylate based resists are significantly different in different organic solvent developers such as OSDTM-1000 Developer* and n-butyl acetate (nBA), affecting their resist performance. This study reveals that understanding the resist dissolution behavior helps to design robust NTD materials for higher resolution imaging.

  6. Scanner performance predictor and optimizer in further low-k1 lithography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aoyama, Hajime; Nakashima, Toshiharu; Ogata, Taro; Kudo, Shintaro; Kita, Naonori; Ikeda, Junji; Matsui, Ryota; Yamamoto, Hajime; Sukegawa, Ayako; Makino, Katsushi; Murayama, Masayuki; Masaki, Kazuo; Matsuyama, Tomoyuki

    2014-03-01

    Due to the importance of errors in lithography scanners, masks, and computational lithography in low-k1 lithography, application software is used to simultaneously reduce them. We have developed "Masters" application software, which is all-inclusive term of critical dimension uniformity (CDU), optical proximity effect (OPE), overlay (OVL), lens control (LNS), tool maintenance (MNT) and source optimization for wide process window (SO), for compensation of the issues on imaging and overlay. In this paper, we describe the more accurate and comprehensive solution of OPE-Master, LNS-Master and SO-Master with functions of analysis, prediction and optimization. Since OPE-Master employed a rigorous simulation, a root cause of error in OPE matching was found out. From the analysis, we had developed an additional knob and evaluated a proof-of- concept for the improvement. Influence of thermal issues on projection optics is evaluated with a heating prediction, and an optimization with scanner knobs on an optimized source taken into account mask 3D effect for obtaining usable process window. Furthermore, we discuss a possibility of correction for reticle expansion by heating comparing calculation and measurement.

  7. The art of photomask materials for low-k1-193nm lithography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hashimoto, Masahiro; Iwashita, Hiroyuki; Mitsui, Hideaki

    2009-04-01

    The resolution of photomask patterns were improved with a hardmask (HM) system. The system which is thin Sicompounds layer is easily etched by the hyper-thin resist (below 100nm thickness). The HM material has sufficient etching selectivity against the chrome-compounds which is the second layer chrome absorber for the phase-shifter. This hardmask layer has been completely removed during the phase-shifter etching. It means that the conventional phase-shit mask (PSM) has been made with the ultimately high-resolution without configuration changes. Below 50nm resolution of PSM was made with 90nm thickness resist on HM layer in this paper. The CD bias between a resist feature CD and a chrome feature CD was almost zero (below 1nm) in the optimized etching condition. We confirmed that the mask performances were the equal to COMS (Cr-HM on MoSi binary mask) in resolution and CD linearity. The performances of hardmask blanks will be defined by resist performance because of almost zero bias.

  8. Polarization aberrations induced by graded multilayer coatings in EUV lithography scanners

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jota, Thiago S.; Chipman, Russell A.

    2016-03-01

    The functional form of coating-induced polarization aberrations in EUV lithography systems is evaluated through polarization ray tracing of an example 3×EUV scanner with state-of-the-art graded multilayer coatings. In particular, the impact of coating-induced on-axis astigmatism, as well as diattenuation and retardance on image quality are investigated. The point spread function (PSF) consists of four polarization-dependent components: two are nearly diffraction limited and two are highly apodized, and all components can be described by a Mueller matrix Point Spread Matrix (PSM). The highly apodized components are "ghost" images that are larger than the diffraction limit, reducing image contrast and resolution.

  9. Absorption coefficients for water vapor at 193 nm from 300 to 1073 K

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kessler, W. J.; Carleton, K. L.; Marinelli, W. J.

    1993-01-01

    Measurements of the water absorption coefficient at 193 nm from 300 to 1073 K are reported. The measurements were made using broadband VUV radiation and a monochromator-based detection system. The water vapor was generated by a saturator and metered into a flowing, 99 cm absorption cell via a water vapor mass flow meter. The 193 nm absorption coefficient measurements are compared to room temperature and high temperature shock tube measurements with good agreement. The absorption can be parameterized by a nu3 vibrational mode reaction coordinate and the thermal population of the nu3 mode.

  10. Performance of a high-NA dual-stage 193-nm TWINSCAN Step and Scan system for 80-nm applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Klerk, Jos; Jorritsma, Louis; van Setten, Eelco; Droste, Richard; du Croo de Jongh, Richard; Hansen, Steven G.; Smith, Dan; van de Kerkhof, Mark A.; van de Mast, Frank; Graeupner, Paul; Rohe, Thomas; Kornitzer, Klaus

    2003-06-01

    As the semiconductor industry looks into the near future to extend manufacturing beyond 100nm, a new optical lithography system was developed by ASML. To achieve the aggressive industry roadmap and enable high volume manufacturing of sub 100nm resolutions at low k1 requires a number of challenges to be overcome. This paper reviews the design, system performance and measurements of a High NA, Dual stage 193nm TWINSCAN system planned for high volume manufacturing for 80nm applications. The overall system capability to effectively measure and control to a high precision the various attributes upon process control necessary for adequate CD control, in the low k1 regime will be shown. This paper will discuss the needed imaging control and the requirement for an extremely stable and matured platform. The system's dynamic, focus, leveling and dose delivery performance will be shown. Additionally, the automated control features of the optical system will be shown that enable the use of the various resolution enhancement techniques (RET) currently under development. The ability to optimize imaging performance with the control and flexibility in the pupil formation optics will be discussed. Finally, experimental results of an in-situ measurement technique with automated feedback control to optimize projection lens aberrations, which has a direct impact to imaging fidelity, will be shown. In summary, the lithographic system functionality and performance needed to achieve 80nm volume manufacturing will be presented.

  11. High-performance 193-nm photoresist materials based on a new class of polymers containing spaced ester finctionalities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khojasteh, Mahmoud; Chen, K. Rex; Kwong, Ranee W.; Lawson, Margaret C.; Varanasi, Pushkara R.; Patel, Kaushal S.; Kobayashi, Eiichi

    2003-06-01

    ArF lithography has been selected as the imaging method for the 90 nm technology node. Manufacturing related issues will have to be addressed when designing advanced 193 nm resists that are production worthy. Post exposure bake (PEB) sensitivity, dissolution properties and process window are some issues that need continuous improvement. Initially our investigation focused on a cyclic olefin (CO) platform which led us to a better understanding of the relationship between polymer structure and physical properties and how to improve cyclic olefin resist performance. Since then we have developed a new class of acrylate polymers with pendant "spaced ester" functionality. We have investigated the potential use of "spaced ester" functionality on improving the lithographic performance of CO and acrylate resist platforms. We have found that with "spaced ester" as pending group in CO polymer structures, it can lower the Tg and improve the dissolution properties of the CO resists. Resists formulated with acrylate containing "spaced ester" group exhibit excellent PEB temperature sensitivity (1 nm/°C), and are soluble in PGMEA. In addition, we have demonstrated sub-100 nm resolution with excellent process window through formulation optimization for acrylate based resists. This paper will focus on the "spaced ester" based polymer design, material properties; resist characteristics, and the lithographic performance for logic dense line applications.

  12. Studies on a cross-linking type positive 193nm photoresist material

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Liyuan; Guo, Xin; Chu, Zhanxing; Wang, Wenjun

    2006-03-01

    A kind of diacid, acrylpimaric acid, with condensed alicyclic structure and good film-forming property, was prepared by the Diels-Alder reaction of abietic acid and acrylic acid. In their solid film, the diacid can react with divinyl ether, such as 1,3-divinyloxyethoxybenzene when baked above 80 °C and become insoluble in dilute aqueous base. Thus formed compound can be quickly decomposed at the presence of strong acid generated by PAG above 100 °C and become easily soluble in dilute aqueous base. A positive photoresist can be formed by the diacid, divinyl ether and PAG. The measured photosensitivity is less than 50 mj/cm2 when exposed to low pressure Hg lamp (254nm). The diacid mixture displayed lower transparency than estimated at 193 nm and should be further purified to be used in 193 nm photoresist.

  13. Long Coherence Length 193 nm Laser for High-Resolution Nano-Fabrication

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2008-06-27

    ns pulses, considering Kerr self phase modulation and perhaps Kramers- Kronig self phase modulation as well? What conversion efficiency to 193.4 nm is...Kramers- Kronig phase related to Actinix 31 6/27/2008 Long Coherence Length 193-nm Laser for High-Resolution Nano-Fabrication DARPA Phase I STTR Final...by. Usually the n 2 contribution is the larger of the two, and better characterized. I do not include a Kramers- Kronig contribution in the

  14. Comparison of acid-generating efficiencies in 248 and 193-nm photoresists

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cameron, James F.; Chan, Nicholas; Moore, Kathryn; Pohlers, Gerd

    2001-08-01

    Photoacid generation is a critical step in the application of chemically amplified (CA) resist technology. During the key exposure step, a catalytic amount of a strong Bronsted acid is released within these resists. The photoacid is subsequently used in a post-exposure bake step to catalytically react with the resist polymer. In the case of a positive tone resist, an acid sensitive polymer is deprotected to render the exposed areas soluble in dilute aqueous base thereby allowing for pattern development. As the semicondutor industry beings to focus on developing 193 nm photoresists for production, it si important to identify and understand differences between prototype 193nm CA resists and current state of the art 248nm production worth photoresists. The major difference between 193 and 248 nm photoresists is the exposure wavelength, which isr educed to achieve higher resolution based on the Rayleigh equation. However, this change in wavelength has several ramifications: Firstly, the tried, tested and true phenolic polymers used in DUV resists are too absorbent to be used fo 193nm application and had to be replaced by low absorbing, non-aromatic systems. Second, since even these new platforms are still more absorbing at 193 nm than the phenolic matrices are at 248nm, the PAG loading had to be lowered significantly in order to keep the overall absorbance of the resist down. This paper descibes the results of our systematic studies on understanding the reasons for observed differences in photoacid generating efficincy between 193 and 248nm chemically amplified resist systems. First the wavelength effect is studied by comparing the relative acid generating efficiency of onium type PAGs in a prototype 193nm and a DUV photoresist at both 193 nm and 248 nm exposure. Second, the photoacid generating efficiency for these PAGs at 238 nm is compared in both phenolic and non-phenolic based photoresists to probe resist polymer matrix effects. Third, these experiments were

  15. Studies of nitride- and oxide-based materials as absorptive shifters for embedded attenuated phase-shifting mask in 193 nm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Cheng-ming; Chang, Keh-wen; Lee, Ming-der; Loong, Wen-An

    1999-07-01

    Abstract-Five materials which are PdSixOy, CrAlxOy, SiNx, TiSixNy, and TiSixOyNz as absorptive shifters for attenuated phase-shifting mask in 193 nm wavelength lithography are presented. PdSixOy films were deposited by dual e-gun evaporation. CrAlxOy, TiSixNy and TiSixOyNz films were formed by plasma sputtering and SiNx films were formed with LPCVD. All of these materials are shown to be capable of achieving 4 percent - 15 percent transmittance in 193 nm with thickness that produce a 180 degrees phase shift. Under BCl3:Cl2 equals 14:70 sccm; chamber pressure 5 mtorr and RF power 1900W, the dry etching selectivity of TiSixNy over DQN positive resist and fused silica, were found to be 2:1 and 4,8:1 respectively. An embedded layer TiSixNy with 0.5 micrometers line/space was successfully patterned.

  16. Tellurite glass thin films on silica and polymer using UV (193 nm) pulsed laser ablation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Zhanxiang; Jose, Gin; Steenson, Paul; Bamiedakis, Nikos; Penty, Richard V.; White, Ian H.; Jha, Animesh

    2011-03-01

    Erbium-doped tellurite glass thin films were deposited using excimer (193 nm) laser ablation onto two different types of substrates: silica and polymer-coated silica for engineering optical integrated active-passive devices. The deposition conditions were optimized for both substrates in order to produce high-quality rare-earth (Er3+) ion-doped glass thin films with low propagation loss. The optical and spectroscopic properties of the deposited films, namely transmittance, fluorescence, lifetime as well as refractive indices at 633 nm were measured and analysed in detail.

  17. Collateral damage-free debridement using 193nm ArF laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wynne, James J.; Felsenstein, Jerome M.; Trzcinski, Robert; Zupanski-Nielsen, Donna; Connors, Daniel P.

    2011-03-01

    Burn eschar and other necrotic areas of the skin and soft tissue are anhydrous compared to the underlying viable tissue. A 193 nm ArF excimer laser, emitting electromagnetic radiation at 6.4 eV at fluence exceeding the ablation threshold, will debride such necrotic areas. Because such radiation is strongly absorbed by aqueous chloride ions through the nonthermal process of electron photodetachment, debridement will cease when hydrated (with chloride ions) viable tissue is exposed, avoiding collateral damage to this tissue. Such tissue will be sterile and ready for further treatment, such as a wound dressing and/or a skin graft.

  18. 193 nm deep-ultraviolet solar-blind cubic boron nitride based photodetectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soltani, A.; Barkad, H. A.; Mattalah, M.; Benbakhti, B.; De Jaeger, J.-C.; Chong, Y. M.; Zou, Y. S.; Zhang, W. J.; Lee, S. T.; BenMoussa, A.; Giordanengo, B.; Hochedez, J.-F.

    2008-02-01

    Deep-ultraviolet (DUV) solar-blind photodetectors based on high-quality cubic boron nitride (cBN) films with a metal/semiconductor/metal configuration were fabricated. The design of interdigitated circular electrodes enables high homogeneity of electric field between pads. The DUV photodetectors present a peak responsivity at 180nm with a very sharp cutoff wavelength at 193nm and a visible rejection ratio (180 versus 250nm) of more than four orders of magnitude. The characteristics of the photodetectors present extremely low dark current, high breakdown voltage, and high responsivity, suggesting that cBN films are very promising for DUV sensing.

  19. Structural design of new alicyclic acrylate polymers with androstane moiety for 193-nm resist

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aoai, Toshiaki; Sato, Kenichiro; Kodama, Kunihiko; Kawabe, Yasumasa; Nakao, Hajime; Yagihara, Morio

    1999-06-01

    Synthesis of new alicyclic (meth)acrylate polymers containing androstane moieties, especially cholic acid derivatives, and their characteristics were investigated for 193nm single layer resists. Among the derivatives, a work of adhesion, Ohnishi and ring parameters were used as measures for the adhesion and the dry-etching resistance in this study. In the synthesis of the polymers, the use of 3- (beta) -methacryloyoxy-deoxycholic acid, which is the inverse configuration against the original 3-(alpha) -structure, was effective as a monomer, because the steric hindrance at 3- (alpha) -position degraded its polymerization ability. The polymers partially protected by acid labile groups showed a satisfactory adhesion, which was probably due to the hydrophilic hydroxyl group at the 12-position and the carboxyl group linked at the 17-position, and a good dry- etching resistance. On the lithographic imaging with these polymers, the reduction of the side reaction on the acid decomposition and also the control of the flexibility on the polymers largely affected their performance. THe adjustment of the Tg values of the polymers by the co-polymerization and the change of the polymer backbone from the methacrylate to acrylate structure performed well on imaging under 193nm exposure.

  20. Measurement of initial absorption of fused silica at 193nm using laser induced deflection technique (LID)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schönfeld, Dörte; Klett, Ursula; Mühlig, Christian; Thomas, Stephan

    2008-01-01

    The ongoing development in microlithography towards further miniaturization of structures creates a strong demand for lens material with nearly ideal optical properties. Beside the highly demanding requirements on homogeneity and stress induced birefringence (SIB), low absorption is a key factor. Even a small absorption is associated with a temperature increase and results in thermally induced local variations of refractive index and SIB. This could affect the achievable resolution of the lithographic process. The total absorption of the material is composed of initial absorption and of absorption induced during irradiation. Thus, the optimization of both improves the lifetime of the material. In principal, it is possible to measure transmission and scattering with a suitable spectrometer assembly and calculate absorption from them. However, owing to the influence of sample surfaces and errors of measurement, these methods usually do not provide satisfactory results for highly light-transmissive fused silica. Therefore, it is most desirable to find a technique that is capable of directly measuring absorption coefficients in the range of (1...10)•10 -4 cm -1 (base 10) directly. We report our first results for fused silica achieved with the LID technique. Besides a fused silica grade designed for 193 nm applications, grades with higher absorption at 193 nm were measured to test the LID technique. A special focus was set on the possibility of measuring initial absorption without the influence of degradation effects.

  1. 193 nm Excimer laser processing of Si/Ge/Si(100) micropatterns

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gontad, F.; Conde, J. C.; Chiussi, S.; Serra, C.; González, P.

    2016-01-01

    193 nm Excimer laser assisted growth and crystallization of amorphous Si/Ge bilayer patterns with circular structures of 3 μm diameter and around 25 nm total thickness, is presented. Amorphous patterns were grown by Laser induced Chemical Vapor Deposition, using nanostencils as shadow masks and then irradiated with the same laser to induce structural and compositional modifications for producing crystalline SiGe alloys through fast melting/solidification cycles. Compositional and structural analyses demonstrated that pulses of 240 mJ/cm2 lead to graded SiGe alloys with Si rich discs of 2 μm diameter on top, a buried Ge layer, and Ge rich SiGe rings surrounding each feature, as predicted by previous numerical simulation.

  2. Three-dimensional deep sub-wavelength defect detection using λ = 193 nm optical microscopy.

    PubMed

    Barnes, Bryan M; Sohn, Martin Y; Goasmat, Francois; Zhou, Hui; Vladár, András E; Silver, Richard M; Arceo, Abraham

    2013-11-04

    Optical microscopy is sensitive both to arrays of nanoscale features and to their imperfections. Optimizing scattered electromagnetic field intensities from deep sub-wavelength nanometer scale structures represents an important element of optical metrology. Current, well-established optical methods used to identify defects in semiconductor patterning are in jeopardy by upcoming sub-20 nm device dimensions. A novel volumetric analysis for processing focus-resolved images of defects is presented using simulated and experimental examples. This new method allows defects as narrow as (16 ± 2) nm (k = 1) to be revealed using 193 nm light with focus and illumination conditions optimized for three-dimensional data analysis. Quantitative metrics to compare two-dimensional and three-dimensional imaging indicate possible fourfold improvements in sensitivity using these methods.

  3. Depth-of-focus (DoF) analysis of a 193nm superlens imaging structure.

    PubMed

    Shi, Zhong; Kochergin, Vladimir; Wang, Fei

    2009-10-26

    We present a design of a 193 nm superlens imaging structure to enable the printing of 20 nm features. Optical image simulations indicate that the 20 nm resolution is feasible for both the periodic grating feature and the two-slit feature. Nominal depth-of-focus (DoF) position for both features is identified through the image contrast calculations. Simulations show that the two features have a common nominal dose at the nominal DoF to resolve 20 nm critical dimension when a suitable dielectric material is placed between mask and superlens layer. A DoF of micro8 nm is shown to be obtainable for the 20 nm half-pitch grating feature while the respective DoF for the two-slit feature is less than 8 nm which potentially can be enhanced by employing existing lithographic resolution enhancement techniques.

  4. Controlling H atom production in the 193 nm laser photolysis of triethylarsenic

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Xiaodong; Deshmukh, Subhash; Brum, Jeffrey L.; Koplitz, Brent

    1991-05-01

    We report on the production of atomic hydrogen subsequent to the 193 nm photolysis of triethylarsenic (TEAs) using an excimer laser. The H atoms are probed via two-photon (121.6+364.7 nm) ionization, and the resulting H atom Doppler profile at Lyman-α is presented. Photolysis power dependence studies demonstrate that substantial H atom formation occurs at relatively low laser powers. However, the H atom signal actually begins to diminish as the photolysis laser power is increased beyond ˜70 MW/cm2. Correlations with time-of-fight mass spectral data suggest that ion channels are being accessed. The possible mechanisms for TEAs excitation that lead to H atom formation/depletion are presented, and the implications of these observations on controlling carbon incorporation in the laser-enhanced growth of films of GaAs, AlGaAs, etc. are discussed.

  5. Three-body dissociations: The photodissociation of dimethyl sulfoxide at 193 nm

    SciTech Connect

    Blank, D.A.; North, S.W.; Stranges, D.

    1997-04-01

    When a molecule with two equivalent chemical bonds is excited above the threshold for dissociation of both bonds, how the rupture of the two bonds is temporally coupled becomes a salient question. Following absorption at 193 nm dimethyl sulfoxide (CH{sub 3}SOCH{sub 3}) contains enough energy to rupture both C-S bonds. This can happen in a stepwise (reaction 1) or concerted (reaction 2) fashion where the authors use rotation of the SOCH{sub 3} intermediate prior to dissociation to define a stepwise dissociation: (1) CH{sub 3}SOCH{sub 3} {r_arrow} 2CH{sub 3} + SO; (2a) CH{sub 3}SOCH{sub 3} {r_arrow} CH{sub 3} + SOCH{sub 3}; and (2b) SOCH{sub 3} {r_arrow} SO + CH{sub 3}. Recently, the dissociation of dimethyl sulfoxide following absorption at 193 nm was suggested to involve simultaneous cleavage of both C-S bonds on an excited electronic surface. This conclusion was inferred from laser induced fluorescence (LIF) and resonant multiphoton ionization (2+1 REMPI) measurements of the internal energy content in the CH{sub 3} and SO photoproducts and a near unity quantum yield measured for SO. Since this type of concerted three body dissociation is very interesting and a rather rare event in photodissociation dynamics, the authors chose to investigate this system using the technique of photofragment translational spectroscopy at beamline 9.0.2.1. The soft photoionization provided by the VUV undulator radiation allowed the authors to probe the SOCH{sub 3} intermediate which had not been previously observed and provided good evidence that the dissociation of dimethyl sulfoxide primarily proceeds via a two step dissociation, reaction 2.

  6. An AC phase measuring interferometer for measuring dn/dT of fused silica and calcium fluoride at 193 nm

    SciTech Connect

    Shagam, R.N.

    1998-09-01

    A novel method for the measurement of the change in index of refraction vs. temperature (dn/dT) of fused silica and calcium fluoride at the 193 nm wavelength has been developed in support of thermal modeling efforts for the development of 193 nm-based photolithographic exposure tools. The method, based upon grating lateral shear interferometry, uses a transmissive linear grating to divide a 193 nm laser beam into several beam paths by diffraction which propagate through separate identical material samples. One diffracted order passing through one sample overlaps the undiffracted beam from a second sample and forms interference fringes dependent upon the optical path difference between the two samples. Optical phase delay due to an index change from heating one of the samples causes the interference fringes to change sinusoidally with phase. The interferometer also makes use of AC phase measurement techniques through lateral translation of the grating. Results for several samples of fused silica and calcium fluoride are demonstrated.

  7. Silsesquioxane-based 193 nm bilayer resists: characterization and lithographic evaluation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ito, Hiroshi; Truong, Hoa D.; Burns, Sean D.; Pfeiffer, Dirk; Huang, Wu-Song; Khojasteh, Mahmoud M.; Varanasi, P. Rao; Lercel, Mike

    2005-05-01

    Polysilsesquioxane-based 193 nm positive bilayer resists are described. In this design Si for etch resistance is placed in every repeat unit and acid-labile protected and acidic groups (and polar units) are in the side chain, allowing to incorporate each lithographically critical functionality in sufficient quantity. Fluoroalcohol is employed as an acid group instead of carboxylic acid because of its more attractive dissolution properties. Polymers were carefully analyzed by 19F, 13C, and 29Si NMR to determine composition and to quantify residual acetyl, silanol, and Q/T. Hydrogen-bonding between tertiary ester and fluoroalcohol in the polysilsesquioxanes was investigated by FT-IR and the effect of lactone incorporation on the thermal deprotection temperature elucidated. In order to better understand the dissolution behavior of exposed resist films, the silsesquioxane resist polymers were partially (ca. 30%) and fully deprotected in solution with acid and their dissolution kinetics investigated by using a quartz crystal microbalance (QCM). It has been found that the exposed areas of the silsesquioxane resists can have a very fast dissolution rate (Rmax) of >20,000 A/sec (or even >100,000 A/sec). Heating the fully deprotected model polymers to 150°C did not reduce the dissolution rate much, suggesting thermal condensation of silanol end groups is insignificant. Model deprotected polymers containing triphenylsulfonium nonaflate were exposed to 254 nm radiation, baked, and subjected to QCM measurements in order to determine whether or not acid-catalyzed silanol condensation would reduce the dissolution rate. A combination of high dose and high temperature bake resulted in significant reduction of the dissolution rate in the silsesquioxane polymer containing a small trifluoroalcohol. However, the dissolution behavior of the polymer bearing a bulky norbornene hexafluoroalcohol was unaffected by exposure and bake. Chemical and development contrast curves were generated

  8. Mechanisms involved in HBr and Ar cure plasma treatments applied to 193 nm photoresists

    SciTech Connect

    Pargon, E.; Menguelti, K.; Martin, M.; Bazin, A.; Joubert, O.; Lill, T.

    2009-05-01

    In this article, we have performed detailed investigations of the 193 nm photoresist transformations after exposure to the so-called HBr and Ar plasma cure treatments using various characterization techniques (x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, Fourier transformed infrared, Raman analyses, and ellipsometry). By using windows with different cutoff wavelengths patched on the photoresist film, the role of the plasma vacuum ultraviolet (VUV) light on the resist modifications is clearly outlined and distinguished from the role of radicals and ions from the plasma. The analyses reveal that both plasma cure treatments induce severe surface and bulk chemical modifications of the resist films. The synergistic effects of low energetic ion bombardment and VUV plasma light lead to surface graphitization or cross-linking (on the order of 10 nm), while the plasma VUV light (110-210 nm) is clearly identified as being responsible for ester and lactone group removal from the resist bulk. As the resist modification depth depends strongly on the wavelength penetration into the material, it is found that HBr plasma cure that emits near 160-170 nm can chemically modify the photoresist through its entire thickness (240 nm), while the impact of Ar plasmas emitting near 100 nm is more limited. In the case of HBr cure treatment, Raman and ellipsometry analyses reveal the formation of sp{sup 2} carbon atoms in the resist bulk, certainly thanks to hydrogen diffusion through the resist film assisted by the VUV plasma light.

  9. Top-coatless 193nm positive-tone development immersion resist for logic application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Lian Cong; Yeh, Tsung Ju; Lin, Yeh-Sheng; Huang, Yu Chin; Kuo, Chien Wen; Huang, Wen Liang; Lin, Chia Hung; Yu, Chun Chi; Hsu, Ray; Wan, I.-Yuan; Lin, Jeff; Im, Kwang-Hwyi; Lim, Hae Jin; Jeon, Hyun K.; Suzuki, Yasuhiro; Xu, Cheng Bai

    2015-03-01

    In this paper, we summarize our development efforts for a top-coatless 193nm immersion positive tone development (PTD) contact hole (C/H) resist with improved litho and defect performances for logic application specifically with an advance node. The ultimate performance goal was to improve the depth of focus (DoF) margin, mask error enhancement factor (MEEF), critical dimension uniformity (CDU), contact edge roughness (CER), and defect performance. Also, the through pitch CD difference was supposed to be comparable to the previous control resist. Effects of polymer and PAG properties have been evaluated for this purpose. The material properties focused in the evaluation study were polymer activation energy (Ea), polymer solubility differentiated by polymerization process types, and diffusion length (DL) and acidity (pKa) of photoacid generator (PAG). Additionally, the impact of post exposure bake (PEB) temperature was investigated for process condition optimization. As a result of this study, a new resist formulation to satisfy all litho and defect performance was developed and production yield was further improved.

  10. Photodissociation of the Propargyl (C3D3) Radicals at 248 nm and 193 nm

    SciTech Connect

    Neumark., D.M.; Crider, P.E.; Castiglioni, L.; Kautzman, K.K.

    2009-01-21

    The photodissociation of perdeuterated propargyl (D{sub 2}CCCD) and propynyl (D{sub 3}CCC) radicals was investigated using fast beam photofragment translational spectroscopy. Radicals were produced from their respective anions by photodetachment at 540 nm and 450 nm (below and above the electron affinity of propynyl). The radicals were then photodissociated by 248 nm or 193 nm light. The recoiling photofragments were detected in coincidence with a time- and position-sensitive detector. Three channels were observed: D{sub 2} loss, CD + C{sub 2}D{sub 2}, and CD{sub 3} + C{sub 2}. Obervation of the D loss channel was incompatible with this experiment and was not attempted. Our translational energy distributions for D{sub 2} loss peaked at nonzero translational energy, consistent with ground state dissociation over small (< 1 eV) exit barriers with respect to separated products. Translational energy distributions for the two heavy channels peaked near zero kinetic energy, indicating dissociation on the ground state in the absence of exit barriers.

  11. The stability of allyl radicals following the photodissociation of allyl iodide at 193 nm.

    SciTech Connect

    Fan, H.; Pratt, S. T.; Chemistry

    2006-01-01

    The photodissociation of allyl iodide (C{sub 3}H{sub 5}I) at 193 nm was investigated by using a combination of vacuum-ultraviolet photoionization of the allyl radical, resonant multiphoton ionization of the iodine atoms, and velocity map imaging. The data provide insight into the primary C-I bond fission process and into the dissociative ionization of the allyl radical to produce C{sub 3}H{sup 3+}. The experimental results are consistent with the earlier results of Szpunar et al. [J. Chem. Phys. 119, 5078 (2003)], in that some allyl radicals with internal energies higher than the secondary dissociation barrier are found to be stable. This stability results from the partitioning of available energy between the rotational and vibrational degrees of freedom of the radical, the effects of a centrifugal barrier along the reaction coordinate, and the effects of the kinetic shift in the secondary dissociation of the allyl radical. The present results suggest that the primary dissociation of allyl iodide to allyl radicals plus I*({sup 2}P{sub 1/2}) is more important than previously suspected.

  12. Product channels in the 193-nm photodissociation of HCNO (fulminic acid)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feng, Wenhui; Hershberger, John F.

    2016-06-01

    IR diode laser spectroscopy was used to detect the products of HCNO (fulminic acid) photolysis at 193 nm. Six product channels are energetically possible at this photolysis wavelength: O + HCN, H + NCO/CNO, CN + OH, CO + NH, NO + CH and HNCO. In some experiments, isotopically labeled 15N18O, C2D6 or C6H12 reagents were included into the photolysis mixture in order to suppress and/or redirect possible secondary reactions. HCN, OC18O, 15N15NO, CO, DCN and HNCO molecules were detected upon laser photolysis of HCNO/reagents/buffer gas mixtures. Analysis of the yields of product molecules leads to the following photolysis quantum yields: ϕ1a (O + HCN) = 0.38 ± 0.04, ϕ1b (H + (NCO)) = 0.07 ± 0.02, ϕ1c (CN + OH) = 0.24 ± 0.03, ϕ1d (CO + NH(a1Δ)) < 0.22 ± 0.1, ϕ1e (HNCO) = 0.02 ± 0.01 and ϕ1f (CH + NO) = 0.21 ± 0.1, respectively.

  13. Improving vacuum-UV (VUV) photolysis of organic compounds in water with a phosphor converted xenon excimer lamp emitting at 193 nm.

    PubMed

    Schulze-Hennings, U; Pötschke, L; Wietor, C; Bringmann, S; Braun, N; Hayashi, D; Linnemann, V; Pinnekamp, J

    A novel vacuum ultraviolet excimer lamp emitting light at 193 nm was used to investigate the degradation of organic micropollutants in ultrapure water and wastewater treatment plant (WWTP) effluent. Overall, light at 193 nm proved to be efficient to degrade the investigated micropollutants (diclofenac, diatrizoic acid, sulfamethoxazole). Experiments with WWTP effluent proved the ability of radiation at 193 nm to degrade micropollutants which are hardly removed with commonly used oxidation technologies like ozonation (diatrizoic acid, ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid, perfluorooctanoic acid, and perfluorooctanesulfonic acid).

  14. Detection of OH radical in laser induced photodissociation of tetrahydrofuran at 193 nm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    SenGupta, Sumana; Upadhyaya, Hari P.; Kumar, Awadhesh; Naik, Prakash D.; Bajaj, Paramanand

    2005-03-01

    On excitation at 193nm, tetrahydrofuran (THF) generates OH as one of the photodissociation products. The nascent energy state distribution of the OH radical was measured employing laser induced fluorescence technique. It is observed that the OH radical is formed mostly in the ground vibrational level, with low rotational excitation (˜3%). The rotational distribution of OH (v″=0,J) is characterized by rotational temperature of 1250±140K. Two spin-orbit states, Π3/22 and Π1/22 of OH are populated statistically. But, there is a preferential population in Λ doublet levels. For all rotational numbers, the Π+2(A') levels are preferred to the Π-2(A″) levels. The relative translational energy associated with the photoproducts in the OH channel is calculated to be 17.4±2.2kcalmol-1, giving an fT value of ˜36%, and the remaining 61% of the available energy is distributed in the internal modes of the other photofragment, i.e., C4H7. The observed distribution of the available energy agrees well with a hybrid model of energy partitioning, predicting an exit barrier of ≈16kcalmol-1. Based on both ab initio molecular orbital calculations and experimental results, a plausible mechanism for OH formation is proposed. The mechanism involves three steps, the C-O bond cleavage of the ring, H atom migration to the O atom, and the C-OH bond scission, in sequence, to generate OH from the ground electronic state of THF. Besides this high energy reaction channel, other photodissociation channels of THF have been identified by detecting the stable products, using Fourier transform infrared and gas chromatography.

  15. Photoinitiated decomposition of substituted ethylenes: The photodissociation of vinyl chloride and acrylonitrile at 193 nm

    SciTech Connect

    Blank, D.A.; Suits, A.G.; Lee, Y.T.

    1997-04-01

    Ethylene and its substituted analogues (H{sub 2}CCHX) are important molecules in hydrogen combustion. As the simplest {pi}-bonded hydrocarbons these molecules serve as prototypical systems for understanding the decomposition of this important class of compounds. The authors have used the technique of photofragment translational spectroscopy at beamline 9.0.2.1 to investigate the dissociation of vinyl chloride (X=Cl) and acrylonitrile (X=CN) following absorption at 193 nm. The technique uses a molecular beam of the reactant seeded in helium which is crossed at 90 degrees with the output of an excimer laser operating on the ArF transition, 193.3 nm. The neutral photoproducts which recoil out of the molecular beam travel 15.1 cm where they are photoionized by the VUV undulator radiation, mass selected, and counted as a function of time. The molecular beam source is rotatable about the axis of the dissociation laser. The authors have directly observed all four of the following dissociation channels for both systems: (1) H{sub 2}CCHX {r_arrow} H + C{sub 2}H{sub 2}X; (2) H{sub 2}CCHX {r_arrow} X + C{sub 2}H{sub 3}; (3) H{sub 2}CCHX {r_arrow} H{sub 2} + C{sub 2}HX; and (4) H{sub 2}CCHX {r_arrow} HX + C{sub 2}H{sub 2}. They measured translational energy distributions for all of the observed channels and measured the photoionization onset for many of the photoproducts which provided information about their chemical identity and internal energy content. In the case of acrylonitrile, selective product photoionization provided the ability to discriminate between channels 2 and 4 which result in the same product mass combination.

  16. Photolysis of Pure Solid O3 and O2 Films at 193nm

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Raut, U.; Loeffler, M. J.; Fama, M.; Baragiola, R. A.

    2011-01-01

    We studied quantitatively the photochemistry of solid O3 and O2 films at 193 nm and 22 K with infrared spectroscopy and microgravimetry. Photolysis of pure ozone destroyed O3, but a small amount of ozone remained in the film at high fluence. Photolysis of pure O2 produced O3 in an amount that increased with photon fluence to a stationary level. For both O2 and O3 films, the O3:O2 ratio at large fluences is ?0.07, about two orders of magnitude larger than those obtained in gas phase photolysis. This enhancement is attributed to the increased photodissociation of O2 due to photoabsorption by O2 dimers, a process significant at solid-state densities. We obtain initial quantum yield for ozone synthesis from solid oxygen, phi (O3) = 0.24 0.06, and quantum yields for destruction of O3 and O2 in their parent solids, phi(-O3) = 1.0 0.2 and phi(-O2) = 0.36 0.1. Combined with known photoabsorption cross sections, we estimate probabilities for geminate recombination of 0.5 0.1 for O3 fragments and 0.88 0.03 for oxygen atoms from O2 dissociation. Using a single parameter kinetic model, we deduce the ratio of reaction cross sections for an O atom with O2 vs. O3 to be 0.1 0.2. The general good agreement of the model with the data suggests the validity of the central assumption of efficient energy and spin relaxation of photofragments in the solid prior to their reactions with other species.

  17. Photodissociation of vinyl cyanide at 193 nm: Nascent product distributions of the molecular elimination channels

    SciTech Connect

    Wilhelm, Michael J.; Nikow, Matthew; Letendre, Laura; Dai Hailung

    2009-01-28

    The photodissociation dynamics of vinyl cyanide (H{sub 2}CCHCN, acrylonitrile) and deuterated vinyl cyanide (D{sub 2}CCDCN) at 193 nm are examined using time-resolved Fourier transform infrared emission spectroscopy. Prior photofragment translational spectroscopy studies [D. A. Blank et al., J. Chem. Phys. 108, 5784 (1998)] of the dissociation have observed the presence of four main dissociation channels; two molecular and two radical in nature. However, with the exception of a<0.01 quantum yield determined for the CN radical loss channel, the branching ratios of the remaining three elimination channels were not measured. The time-resolved emission spectra, including those from the deuterated samples, revealed the presence of acetylene, hydrogen cyanide (HCN), as well as the energetically less stable isomer hydrogen isocyanide (HNC). Acetylene is found in two distinct energetic distributions, suggesting that both three- and four-centered elimination reactions are occurring significantly in the dissociation. In contrast to prior ab initio studies that have suggested the dominant nature of the three-center elimination of molecular hydrogen (H{sub 2}) and cyanovinylidene (:C=CHCN), we find this reaction channel to be of little importance as there is no evidence to support any significant presence of rovibrationally excited cyanoacetylene. Spectral modeling of the product distributions allows for the first experimental determination of the relative occurrence of the three-centered (resulting in HCN+vinylidene) versus four-centered (HNC+acetylene) elimination channels as 3.34 to 1.00, in contrast to the previously calculated value of 126:1. Rice-Ramsperger-Kassel-Marcus analysis depicts that the transition state energy of the four-centered reaction should be about 10 kcal mole{sup -1} lower than the three-centered reaction.

  18. Defectivity reduction studies for ArF immersion lithography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matsunaga, Kentaro; Kondoh, Takehiro; Kato, Hirokazu; Kobayashi, Yuuji; Hayasaki, Kei; Ito, Shinichi; Yoshida, Akira; Shimura, Satoru; Kawasaki, Tetsu; Kyoda, Hideharu

    2007-03-01

    Immersion lithography is widely expected to meet the manufacturing requirements of future device nodes. A critical development in immersion lithography has been the construction of a defect-free process. Two years ago, the authors evaluated the impact of water droplets made experimentally on exposed resist films and /or topcoat. (1) The results showed that the marks of drying water droplet called watermarks became pattern defects with T-top profile. In the case that water droplets were removed by drying them, formation of the defects was prevented. Post-exposure rinse process to remove water droplets also prevented formation of the defects. In the present work, the authors evaluated the effect of pre- and post-exposure rinse processes on hp 55nm line and space pattern with Spin Rinse Process Station (SRS) and Post Immersion Rinse Process Station (PIR) modules on an inline lithography cluster with the Tokyo Electron Ltd. CLEAN TRACK TM LITHIUS TM i+ and ASML TWINSCAN XT:1700Fi , 193nm immersion scanner. It was found that total defectivity is decreased by pre- and post-exposure rinse. In particular, bridge defects and large bridge defects were decreased by pre- and post-exposure rinse. Pre- and post-exposure rinse processes are very effective to reduce the bridge and large bridge defects of immersion lithography.

  19. Scanner OPC signatures: automatic vendor-to-vendor OPE matching

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Renwick, Stephen P.

    2009-03-01

    As 193nm lithography continues to be stretched and the k1 factor decreases, optical proximity correction (OPC) has become a vital part of the lithographer's tool kit. Unfortunately, as is now well known, the design variations of lithographic scanners from different vendors cause them to have slightly different optical-proximity effect (OPE) behavior, meaning that they print features through pitch in distinct ways. This in turn means that their response to OPC is not the same, and that an OPC solution designed for a scanner from Company 1 may or may not work properly on a scanner from Company 2. Since OPC is not inexpensive, that causes trouble for chipmakers using more than one brand of scanner. Clearly a scanner-matching procedure is needed to meet this challenge. Previously, automatic matching has only been reported for scanners of different tool generations from the same manufacturer. In contrast, scanners from different companies have been matched using expert tuning and adjustment techniques, frequently requiring laborious test exposures. Automatic matching between scanners from Company 1 and Company 2 has remained an unsettled problem. We have recently solved this problem and introduce a novel method to perform the automatic matching. The success in meeting this challenge required three enabling factors. First, we recognized the strongest drivers of OPE mismatch and are thereby able to reduce the information needed about a tool from another supplier to that information readily available from all modern scanners. Second, we developed a means of reliably identifying the scanners' optical signatures, minimizing dependence on process parameters that can cloud the issue. Third, we carefully employed standard statistical techniques, checking for robustness of the algorithms used and maximizing efficiency. The result is an automatic software system that can predict an OPC matching solution for scanners from different suppliers without requiring expert intervention.

  20. INTERACTION OF LASER RADIATION WITH MATTER: Rearrangement of a phosphosilicate glass network induced by the 193-nm radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Larionov, Yu V.; Sokolov, V. O.; Plotnichenko, V. G.

    2008-10-01

    The IR absorption and Raman spectra of phosphosilicate glass (PSG) are measured during its exposure to radiation at a wavelength of 193 nm. The obtained data demonstrate the complicated rearrangement dynamics of the glass network around phosphor atoms and of the glass network as a whole. The experimental dependences are explained by the model of the PSG network based on the concepts of the theory of rigidity percolation.

  1. The interaction of 193-nm excimer laser irradiation with single-crystal zinc oxide: Neutral atomic zinc and oxygen emission

    SciTech Connect

    Kahn, E. H.; Langford, S. C.; Dickinson, J. T.; Boatner, Lynn A

    2013-01-01

    We report mass-resolved time-of-flight measurements of neutral particles from the surface of single-crystal ZnO during pulsed 193-nm irradiation at laser fluences below the threshold for avalanche breakdown. The major species emitted are atomic Zn and O. We examine the emissions of atomic Zn as a function of laser fluence and laser exposure. Defects at the ZnO surface appear necessary for the detection of these emissions. Our results suggest that the production of defects is necessary to explain intense sustained emissions at higher fluence. Rapid, clean surface etching and high atomic zinc kinetic energies seen at higher laser fluences are also discussed.

  2. Detection of sodium and potassium in single human red blood cells by 193-nm laser ablative sampling: a feasibility demonstration.

    PubMed

    Ng, C W; Cheung, N H

    2000-01-01

    The feasibility of quantifying sodium and potassium in single human erythrocytes was demonstrated by spectrochemical analysis of emissions from plasmas produced by 193-nm laser ablation of blood cells confined in a sheath flow. In one scheme, single blood cells that happened to be in the ablation volume were sampled. In another scheme, individual blood cells were first sighted and then synchronously ablated downstream. Plasma emission spectra of single ablated cells were captured, and the ratios of the analyte line intensity to the root-mean-square fluctuation of the continuum background were measured to be about 18 for sodium and 30 for potassium.

  3. Statistical Examination of the a and a + 1 Fragment Ions from 193 nm Ultraviolet Photodissociation Reveals Local Hydrogen Bonding Interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morrison, Lindsay J.; Rosenberg, Jake A.; Singleton, Jonathan P.; Brodbelt, Jennifer S.

    2016-09-01

    Dissociation of proteins and peptides by 193 nm ultraviolet photodissociation (UVPD) has gained momentum in proteomic studies because of the diversity of backbone fragments that are produced and subsequent unrivaled sequence coverage obtained by the approach. The pathways that form the basis for the production of particular ion types are not completely understood. In this study, a statistical approach is used to probe hydrogen atom elimination from a + 1 radical ions, and different extents of elimination are found to vary as a function of the identity of the C-terminal residue of the a product ions and the presence or absence of hydrogen bonds to the cleaved residue.

  4. New polymers for 193-nm single-layer resists based on substituted cycloolefins/maleic anhydride resins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rushkin, Ilya L.; Houlihan, Francis M.; Kometani, Janet M.; Hutton, Richard S.; Timko, Allen G.; Reichmanis, Elsa; Nalamasu, Omkaram; Gabor, Allen H.; Medina, Arturo N.; Slater, Sydney G.; Neisser, Mark O.

    1999-06-01

    A series of new polymers for 193 nm single layer resist based on maleic anhydride/cycloolefin systems with minimum amount of acrylate units were synthesized. In order to minimize the acrylate content, the cycloolefin moiety of the polymers was functionalized with side groups designed to either promotes adhesion to silicon substrate and/or impart the imaging functionality. All polymers were prepared by free-radical polymerization in moderate to high yields and were characterized by variety of techniques. The initial lithographic evaluation of the new resists was carried out. It was found that acrylates can be successfully replaced with appropriately substituted cycloolefins to provide good resolution. The etch resistance of the new materials generally improves with increase in cycloolefin content. The Onishi and Kunz type plots will be discussed.

  5. Collision-induced desorption in 193-nm photoinduced reactions in (O{sub 2}+CO) adlayers on Pt(112)

    SciTech Connect

    Han Song; Ma Yunsheng; Matsushima, Tatsuo

    2005-09-01

    The spatial distribution of desorbing O{sub 2} and CO{sub 2} was examined in 193-nm photoinduced reactions in O{sub 2}+CO adlayers on stepped Pt (112)=[(s)3(111)x(001)]. The O{sub 2} desorption collimated in inclined ways in the plane along the surface trough, confirming the hot-atom collision mechanism. In the presence of CO(a), the product CO{sub 2} desorption also collimated in an inclined way, whereas the inclined O{sub 2} desorption was suppressed. The inclined O{sub 2} and CO{sub 2} desorption is explained by a common collision-induced desorption model. At high O{sub 2} coverage, the CO{sub 2} desorption collimated closely along the (111) terrace normal.

  6. Revisiting the mechanisms involved in Line Width Roughness smoothing of 193 nm photoresist patterns during HBr plasma treatment

    SciTech Connect

    Brihoum, M.; Ramos, R.; Menguelti, K.; Cunge, G.; Pargon, E.; Joubert, O.

    2013-01-07

    HBr plasma treatments are widely used in nanoscale lithographic technologies to increase the plasma etch resistance of 193 nm photoresist masks as well as to decrease their Line Width Roughness (LWR). VUV irradiation of the photoresist is known to play a major role in this process by inducing polymer chains rearrangement and finally LWR reduction. However, in the plasma environment (i.e., with radical and ion bombardment), the interaction layer formed at the resist surface perturbs this mechanism and a lower LWR reduction is achieved compared to VUV only treatment. So far the nature of the interaction layer, its formation mechanism and its relation with the resist pattern LWR were all unclear. In this paper, we show that a graphite-like layer is formed on the resist patterns by the redeposition of carbon-based species originating from the plasma dissociation of outgassed photo-etched resist moieties. We show that the presence of this layer inhibits the LWR minimization and causes an increase in the LWR when it becomes thick enough (i.e., a few nanometers). We present evidences that the difference in the mechanical properties of the graphite-like top layer which coats the resist patterns and the bulk of the resist patterns is correlated to the LWR after plasma treatment. We can conclude that the optimization of an HBr cure process relies on the minimization of the carbon redeposition while keeping a significant VUV light flux and we show that this can be achieved by using pulsed plasma processes.

  7. In situ, real-time detection of soot particles coated with NaCl using 193 nm light

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choi, J. H.; Stipe, C. B.; Koshland, C. P.; Lucas, D.

    2006-09-01

    We report in situ, real-time detection of soot particles coated with NaCl using excimer laser fragmentation fluorescence spectroscopy (ELFFS). Carbon atom fluorescence at 248 nm and the Na D-line at 589 nm are used as signatures of soot and NaCl, respectively. Soot particles are encapsulated with a NaCl layer in a well-controlled inverted flame burner. NaCl particles are injected into the methane-air co-flow flame to coat the soot particles. ArF laser irradiation of the coated particles in an air stream at 1.14 J/cm2 produces fluorescence from Na, C, and CH. At 0.69 J/cm2, which is slightly above the fluorescence threshold, but not enough for considerable fragmentation of the particles, Na D-line persists with little carbon and no CH observed. These results suggest that the photolytic fragmentation-fluorescence using 193 nm excitation can be effectively used for in situ, real-time chemical analysis of core-shell nanoparticles.

  8. The photodissociation dynamics of O2 at 193 nm: an O3PJ angular momentum polarization study.

    PubMed

    Brouard, M; Cireasa, R; Clark, A P; Quadrini, F; Vallance, C

    2006-12-21

    In the following paper we present translational anisotropy and angular momentum polarization data for O((3)P(1)) and O((3)P(2)) products of the photodissociation of molecular oxygen at 193 nm. The data were obtained using polarized laser photodissociation coupled with resonantly enhanced multiphoton ionization and velocity-map ion imaging. Under the jet-cooled conditions employed, absorption is believed to be dominated by excitation into the Herzberg continuum. The experimental data are compared with previous experiments and theoretical calculations at this and other wavelengths. Semi-classical calculations performed by Groenenboom and van Vroonhoven [J. Chem. Phys, 2002, 116, 1965] are used to estimate the alignment parameters arising from incoherent excitation and dissociation and these are shown to agree qualitatively well with the available experimental data. Following the work of Alexander et al. [J. Chem. Phys, 2003, 118, 10566], orientation and alignment parameters arising from coherent excitation and dissociation are modelled more approximately by estimating phase differences generated subsequent to dissociation via competing adiabatic pathways leading to the same asymptotic products. These calculations lend support to the view that large values of the coherent alignment moments, but small values of the corresponding orientation moments, could arise from coherent excitation of (and subsequent dissociation via) parallel and perpendicular components of the Herzberg I, II and III transitions.

  9. Double patterning in lithography for 65nm node with oxidation process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jeong, Eunsoo; Kim, Jeahee; Choi, Kwangsun; Lee, Minkon; Lee, Doosung; Kim, Myungsoo; Park, Chansik

    2008-03-01

    Recently, in order to increase the number of transistors in wafer by small feature size, optical lithography has been changed to low wavelength from 365nm to 193nm and high NA of 0.93. And further wavelength is aggressively shifting to 13.5nm for more small feature size, i.e., Extreme Ultra Violet Lithography(EUVL), a kind of Next Generation Lithography(NGL)1. And other technologies are developed such as water immersion(193nm) and photo resist Double Patterning(DP). Immersion lens system has high NA up to 1.3 due to high n of water(n=1.44 at 193nm), the parameter k1 is process constant, but 0.25 is a tough limit at a equal line and space, if we use immersion lens with 193nm wavelength than limit of resolution is 37nm. Especially, Double Exposure Technique(DET) process is widely studied because of the resolution enhancement ability using a same material and machine, despite of process complication. And SADP(Self Aligned Double Patten) is newly researched for overlay and LER(Line Edge Roughness) enhancement. In this paper, we illustrate the feasibility of the shift double pattern for 65nm-node flash using a 193nm light dipole source and the possibility of decrease minimum feature size using a property of silicon shrinkage during thermal oxidation process.

  10. Nanosecond-time-response temperature measurements using radiation thermometry during 193-nm and 247-nm pulsed light irradiation: comparison of corneal surface temperature histories

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ishihara, Miya; Arai, Tsunenori; Sato, Shunichi; Morimoto, Yuji; Obara, Minoru; Kikuchi, Makoto

    2001-07-01

    We have developed the fast time-response measurement of thermal radiation with 15ns rise time to monitor the corneal surface temperature during ArF excimer laser ablation. In this study, e aim to investigate the influence of the relation between the corneal penetration depth and sampling depth of the measurement system on the measured temperature using 193 nm and 247 nm pulsed lights which have different penetration depths of cornea. When the sampling depth was defined as the penetration depth of cornea at the thermal radiation wavelength, we obtained about 3 micrometers of the sampling depth by pulsed photothermal radiometry (PPTR). In the case of the 247 nm light irradiation, where the corneal absorption coefficient at 247 nm was approximately equal to that for the thermal radiation, we found that the measured temperature rises were same as the estimated temperature rises based on the photothermal process. In contrast, in the case of the 193 nm light irradiation, where the absorption coefficient at 193 nm was larger than that for the thermal radiation, we found that the measured temperature rises were lower than the estimated temperature rises.

  11. Simulations of immersion lithography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bai, Min; Lei, Junjiang; Zhang, Lin; Shiely, James P.

    2005-05-01

    Immersion lithography has been regarded as the most viable contender to extend the resolution capability of optical lithography using 193nm wavelength. In parallel with the tremendous effort of overcoming the engineering challenges in immersion, support from modeling and simulations is strongly needed. Although immersion simulation has become available through a number of simulation tools, we need to investigate the model generation and its compatibility within the context of full-chip optical proximity correction (OPC). In this paper, we will describe the physics of a full vector model that is necessary for the high NA optical modeling under immersion. In this full vector model, we consider not only the plane wave decomposition as light travels from the mask to wafer plane, but also the refraction, transmission and reflection of light through a thin film stack on the wafer. We integrated this comprehensive vector model into Synopsys OPC modeling tool ProGen. Through ProGen simulation results, we will discuss several important merits of immersion lithography, as well as the full portability of immersion models into OPC process flow.

  12. Charting CEBL's role in mainstream semiconductor lithography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lam, David K.

    2013-09-01

    historically kept it out of mainstream fabs. Thanks to continuing EBDW advances combined with the industry's move to unidirectional (1D) gridded layout style, EBDW promises to cost-efficiently complement 193nm ArF immersion (193i) optical lithography in high volume manufacturing (HVM). Patterning conventional 2D design layouts with 193i is a major roadblock in device scaling: the resolution limitations of optical lithography equipment have led to higher mask cost and increased lithography complexity. To overcome the challenge, IC designers have used 1D layouts with "lines and cuts" in critical layers.1 Leading logic and memory chipmakers have been producing advanced designs with lines-and-cuts in HVM for several technology nodes in recent years. However, cut masks in multiple optical patterning are getting extremely costly. Borodovsky proposes Complementary Lithography in which another lithography technology is used to pattern line-cuts in critical layers to complement optical lithography.2 Complementary E-Beam Lithography (CEBL) is a candidate to pattern the Cuts of optically printed Lines. The concept of CEBL is gaining acceptance. However, challenges in throughput, scaling, and data preparation rate are threatening to deny CEBL's role in solving industry's lithography problem. This paper will examine the following issues: The challenges of massively parallel pixel writing The solutions of multiple mini-column design/architecture in: Boosting CEBL throughput Resolving issues of CD control, CDU, LER, data rate, higher resolution, and 450mm wafers The role of CEBL in next-generation solution of semiconductor lithography

  13. Laser ablation of ceramic Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} at 193 nm and 248 nm: The importance of single-photon ionization processes

    SciTech Connect

    Pelaez, R. J.; Afonso, C. N.; Bator, M.; Lippert, T.

    2013-06-14

    The aim of this work is to demonstrate that single-photon photoionization processes make a significant difference in the expansion and temperature of the plasma produced by laser ablation of ceramic Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} in vacuum as well as to show their consequences in the kinetic energy distribution of the species that eventually will impact on the film properties produced by pulsed laser deposition. This work compares results obtained by mass spectrometry and optical spectroscopy on the composition and features of the plasma produced by laser ablation at 193 nm and 248 nm, i.e., photon energies that are, respectively, above and below the ionization potential of Al, and for fluences between threshold for visible plasma and up to Almost-Equal-To 2 times higher. The results show that the ionic composition and excitation of the plasma as well as the ion kinetic energies are much higher at 193 nm than at 248 nm and, in the latter case, the population of excited ions is even negligible. The comparison of Maxwell-Boltzmann temperature, electron temperatures, and densities of the plasmas produced with the two laser wavelengths suggests that the expansion of the plasma produced at 248 nm is dominated by a single population. Instead, the one produced at 193 nm is consistent with the existence of two populations of cold and hot species, the latter associated to Al{sup +} ions that travel at the forefront and produced by single photon ionization as well as Al neutrals and double ionized ions produced by electron-ion impact. The results also show that the most energetic Al neutrals in the plasma produced at the two studied wavelengths are in the ground state.

  14. Surface modification of a MoSiON phase shift mask to reduce critical dimension variation after exposure to a 193-nm ArF excimer laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choo, Hyeokseong; Seo, Dongwan; Lim, Sangwoo

    2014-08-01

    Introduction of a MoSi-based phase shift mask (PSM) improves photolithography resolution by causing light to shift phase by 180° thus canceling the overlap. However, when MoSiON PSM was exposed to an ArF excimer laser (λ = 193 nm), a significant increase in patterned critical dimension (CD) was observed. It was confirmed that the CD increase resulted from oxidation progression into the MoSiON layer. In this study, N2O or NH3 plasma treatment and thermal annealing in NH3 effectively suppressed CD variation after ArF laser exposure. While the compositional ratio of Si, N, O, and Mo elements in the MoSiON layer was not changed, an increase in oxygen content only in the top 5 nm was observed. Therefore, it is concluded that slight oxidation of the top surface of MoSiON PSM by introducing either N2O or NH3 plasma treatment or thermal annealing in NH3 suppresses an increase in the patterned CD of MoSiON PSM after exposure to a 193-nm ArF excimer laser.

  15. Thin film 193nm TNK measurement using multi-domain genetic algorithm (MDGA) with a combination of beam profile reflectometry (BPR), absolute ellipsometry (AE), and spectroscopic ellipsometry (SE)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Opsal, Jon L.; Leng, Jingmin; Ke, Chih-Ming; Chen, Pei-Hung; Chen, Jeng-Horng; Ku, Yao-Ching

    2003-11-01

    In the l30nm process, controlling the critical dimension uniformity (CDU) within a wafer is crucial. In order to minimize CDU within a wafer, CD swing amplitude against film thickness must be minimized. It is observed that the CD swing amplitude is closely related to the reflectivity of the anti-reflective coating (ARC) layer under the resist. The suppressed reflectivity (ideally zero) from the ARC layer and underlying layers can be achieved by properly selecting a combination of thickness (T), refractive index (N) and extinction coefficient (K) of the ARC layer. Accurate and repeatable measurements of T, N, and K at a wavelength of 193nm play a key role in this film optimization process. In this paper we propose a new method to simultaneously measure T, N, and K for various silicon oxynitride (SION) and organic ARC films. The new methodology uses a multi-domain genetic algorithm (MDGA) to search for global fitting residual minima for SION and organic ARC films using 21-point line-scan data sets logged on each wafer with a combination of BPR, AE and SE measurement technologies. The MDGA-obtained dispersion curves form constituents of a Bruggeman effective medium approximation (EMA) model. By using this unique metrology tool combination, swing amplitudes can be reduced to less than 5nm. The measurement variations of N&K at 193nm from machine to machine on SION and organic ARC films can be minimized to as small as 0.002. We point out that there are no 193nm N&K standards in the world. In this work, we used a set of Therma-Wave standards with thicknesses traceable to NIST standards. We also used the published thermal oxide and crystalline Si dielectric constants (i.e., N&Ks) as our standards for dispersion. The matching of SE (as well as the other technologies) of each tool is ensured through calibrations of SE to the same set of standards. Finally, a recipe using the combination of BPR, AE, and SE technologies allows one to deal with the large TNK variations

  16. Electron stimulated desorption of the metallic substrate at monolayer coverage: Sensitive detection via 193 nm laser photoionization of neutral aluminum desorbed from CH3O/Al(111)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Young, C. E.; Whitten, J. E.; Pellin, M. J.; Gruen, D. M.; Jones, P. L.

    A fortuitous overlap between the gain profile of the 193 nm ArF excimer laser and the Al autoionizing transition (sup 2)S(sub 1/2) (512753/cm) yields to the left (sup 2)P(sup 0)J has been exploited in the direct observation of substrate metal atoms in an electron simulated desorption (ESD) process from the monolayer adsorbate system CH3O/Al(111). The identity of the mass 27 photoion was established as Al(+) by (1) isotopic substitution of C-13 in the methanol employed for methoxy formation, and (2) tunable laser scans utilizing the DJ-2 (J = 3/2, 5/2) intermediate levels at approximately 32436/cm and a 248 nm ionization step. An ESD yield of approximately x 10(exp -6) Al atoms/(electron at 1 keV) was established by comparison with a sputtering experiment in the same apparatus. Velocity distributions measured for the desorbed Al species showed some differences in comparison with methoxy velocity data: a slightly lower peak velocity and a significantly less prominent high-velocity component.

  17. Analyzing velocity map images to distinguish the primary methyl photofragments from those produced upon C-Cl bond photofission in chloroacetone at 193 nm

    SciTech Connect

    Alligood, Bridget W.; Straus, Daniel B.; Butler, Laurie J.

    2011-07-21

    We use a combination of crossed laser-molecular beam scattering experiments and velocity map imaging experiments to investigate the three primary photodissociation channels of chloroacetone at 193 nm: C-Cl bond photofission yielding CH{sub 3}C(O)CH{sub 2} radicals, C-C bond photofission yielding CH{sub 3}CO and CH{sub 2}Cl products, and C-CH{sub 3} bond photofission resulting in CH{sub 3} and C(O)CH{sub 2}Cl products. Improved analysis of data previously reported by our group quantitatively identifies the contribution of this latter photodissociation channel. We introduce a forward convolution procedure to identify the portion of the signal, derived from the methyl image, which results from a two-step process in which C-Cl bond photofission is followed by the dissociation of the vibrationally excited CH{sub 3}C(O)CH{sub 2} radicals to CH{sub 3}+ COCH{sub 2}. Subtracting this from the total methyl signal identifies the methyl photofragments that result from the CH{sub 3}+ C(O)CH{sub 2}Cl photofission channel. We find that about 89% of the chloroacetone molecules undergo C-Cl bond photofission to yield CH{sub 3}C(O)CH{sub 2} and Cl products; approximately 8% result in C-C bond photofission to yield CH{sub 3}CO and CH{sub 2}Cl products, and the remaining 2.6% undergo C-CH{sub 3} bond photofission to yield CH{sub 3} and C(O)CH{sub 2}Cl products.

  18. EUV lithography imaging using novel pellicle membranes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pollentier, Ivan; Vanpaemel, Johannes; Lee, Jae Uk; Adelmann, Christoph; Zahedmanesh, Houman; Huyghebaert, Cedric; Gallagher, Emily E.

    2016-03-01

    EUV mask protection against defects during use remains a challenge for EUV lithography. A stand-off protective membrane - a pellicle - is targeted to prevent yield losses in high volume manufacturing during handling and exposure, just as it is for 193nm lithography. The pellicle is thin enough to transmit EUV exposure light, yet strong enough to remain intact and hold any particles out of focus during exposure. The development of pellicles for EUV is much more challenging than for 193nm lithography for multiple reasons including: high absorption of most materials at EUV wavelength, pump-down sequences in the EUV vacuum system, and exposure to high intensity EUV light. To solve the problems of transmission and film durability, various options have been explored. In most cases a thin core film is considered, since the deposition process for this is well established and because it is the simplest option. The transmission specification typically dictates that membranes are very thin (~50nm or less), which makes both fabrication and film mechanical integrity difficult. As an alternative, low density films (e.g. including porosity) will allow thicker membranes for a given transmission specification, which is likely to improve film durability. The risk is that the porosity could influence the imaging. At imec, two cases of pellicle concepts based on reducing density have been assessed : (1) 3D-patterned SiN by directed self-assembly (DSA), and (2) carbon nanomaterials such as carbon nanotubes (CNT) and carbon nanosheets (CNS). The first case is based on SiN membranes that are 3D-patterned by Directed Self Assembly (DSA). The materials are tested relative to the primary specifications: EUV transmission and film durability. A risk assessment of printing performance is provided based on simulations of scattered energy. General conclusions on the efficacy of various approaches will provided.

  19. Lithography options for the 32nm half pitch node and their implications on resist and material technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gronheid, Roel; Hendrickx, Eric; Wiaux, Vincent; Maenhoudt, Mireille; Goethals, Mieke; Vandenberghe, Geert; Ronse, Kurt

    2008-03-01

    There still remain three major technological lithography options for high volume manufacturing at the 32nm half pitch node: 193nm immersion lithography with high index materials, enabling NA>1.6 193nm double patterning and EUV lithography. In this paper the pros and cons of these three options will be discussed. Particular interest will be paid to the consequences of the final choice on the resist technology. High index 193nm immersion lithography also requires high index resist materials, which are under development but still far removed from the target refractive index and absorbance specifications not to mention lithographical performance. For double patterning the pitch may be relaxed, but the resists still need to be able to print very narrow lines and/or trenches. Moreover, it would be preferred for the resists to support pattern or image freezing techniques in order to step away from the litho-etch-litho-etch approach and make double patterning more cost effective. For EUV the resist materials need to meet very aggressive sensitivity specifications. In itself this is possible, but it is difficult to simultaneously maintain performance in terms of resolution and line width roughness. A new parameter (K LUP) for assessing resist performance in terms of these three performance criteria will be introduced.

  20. Lithography strategy for 65-nm node

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borodovsky, Yan A.; Schenker, Richard E.; Allen, Gary A.; Tejnil, Edita; Hwang, David H.; Lo, Fu-Chang; Singh, Vivek K.; Gleason, Robert E.; Brandenburg, Joseph E.; Bigwood, Robert M.

    2002-07-01

    Intel will start high volume manufacturing (HVM) of the 65nm node in 2005. Microprocessor density and performance trends will continue to follow Moore's law and cost-effective patterning solutions capable of supporting it have to be found, demonstrated and developed during 2002-2004. Given the uncertainty regarding the readiness and respective capabilities of 157nm and 193nm lithography to support 65nm technology requirements, Intel is developing both lithographic options and corresponding infrastructure with the intent to use both options in manufacturing. Development and use of dual lithographic options for a given technology node in manufacturing is not a new paradigm for Intel: whenever introduction of a new exposure wavelength presented excessive risk to the manufacturing schedule, Intel developed parallel patterning approaches in time for the manufacturing ramp. Both I-line and 248nm patterning solutions were developed and successfully used in manufacturing of the 350nm node at Intel. Similarly, 248nm and 193nm patterning solutions were fully developed for 130nm node high volume manufacturing.

  1. Immersion lithography bevel solutions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tedeschi, Len; Tamada, Osamu; Sanada, Masakazu; Yasuda, Shuichi; Asai, Masaya

    2008-03-01

    The introduction of Immersion lithography, combined with the desire to maximize the number of potential yielding devices per wafer, has brought wafer edge engineering to the forefront for advanced semiconductor manufactures. Bevel cleanliness, the position accuracy of the lithography films, and quality of the EBR cut has become more critical. In this paper, the effectiveness of wafer track based solutions to enable state-of-art bevel schemes is explored. This includes an integrated bevel cleaner and new bevel rinse nozzles. The bevel rinse nozzles are used in the coating process to ensure a precise, clean film edge on or near the bevel. The bevel cleaner is used immediately before the wafer is loaded into the scanner after the coating process. The bevel cleaner shows promise in driving down defectivity levels, specifically printing particles, while not damaging films on the bevel.

  2. Ion Implant Enabled 2x Lithography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martin, Patrick M.; Godet, Ludovic; Cheung, Andrew; de Cock, Gael; Hatem, Chris

    2011-01-01

    Ion implantation has many applications in microelectronics beyond doping. The broad range of species available combined with the ability to precisely control dose, angle, and energy offers compelling advantages for use in precision material modification. The application to lithography has been reported elsewhere. Integrating ion implantation into the lithography process enables scaling the feature size requirements beyond the 15 nm node with a simplified double patterning sequence. In addition, ion implant may be used to remove line edge roughness, providing tremendous advantages to meet extreme lithography imaging requirements and provide additional device stability. We examine several species (e.g. Si, Ar, etc.) and the effect of energy and impact angle on several commercially available 193 nm immersion photoresists using a Varian VIISta® single wafer high current ion implanter. The treated photoresist will be evaluated for stability in an integrated double patterning application with ion implant used to freeze the primary image. We report on critical dimension impact, pattern integrity, optical property modification, and adhesion. We analyze the impact of line edge roughness improvement beyond the work of C. Struck including the power spectral distribution. TGA and FTIR Spectroscopy results for the implanted photoresist materials will also be included.

  3. Hydrogen Migration and Vinylidene Pathway for Formation of Methane in the 193 nm Photodissociation of Propene: CH3CH=CH2 and CD3CD=CD2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zhao, Yi-Lei; Laufer, Allan H.; Halpern, Joshua B.; Fahr, Askar

    2007-01-01

    Photodissociation channels and the final product yields from the 193 nm photolysis of propene-h6 (CH2=CHCH3) and propene-d6 (CD2=CDCD3) have been investigated, employing gas chromatography, mass spectroscopy, and flame ionization (GC/MS/FID) detection methods. The yields of methane as well as butadiene relative to ethane show considerable variations when propene-h6 or propene-d6 are photolyzed. This suggests significant variances in the relative importance of primary photolytic processes and/or secondary radical reactions, occurring subsequent to the photolysis. Theoretical calculations suggest the potential occurrence of an intramolecular dissociation through a mechanism involving vinylidene formation, accompanied by an ethylenic H-migration through the pi-orbitals. This process affects the final yields of methane-h4 versus methane-d4 with respect to other products. The product yields from previous studies of the 193 nm photolysis of methyl vinyl ketone-h6 and -d6 (CH2=CHCOCH3, CD2=CDCOCD3), alternative precursors for generating methyl and vinyl radicals, are compared with the current results for propene.

  4. 32nm node technology development using interference immersion lithography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sewell, Harry; McCafferty, Diane; Markoya, Louis; Hendrickx, Eric; Hermans, Jan; Ronse, Kurt

    2005-05-01

    The 38nm and 32nm lithography nodes are the next major targets for optical lithography on the Semiconductor Industry Roadmap. The recently developed water-based immersion lithography using ArF illumination will be able to provide an optical solution for lithography at the 45nm node, but it will not be able to achieve the 38nm or the 32nm nodes as currently defined. To achieve these next lithographic nodes will require new, very high refractive index fluids to replace the water used in current immersion systems. This paper describes tests and experiments using an interference immersion lithography test jig to develop key technology for the 32nm node. Interference imaging printers have been available for years, and with the advent of Immersion Lithography, they have a new use. Interference immersion image printing offers users a rapid, cost-effective way to develop immersion lithography, particularly at extremely high resolutions. Although it can never replace classical lens-based lithography systems for semiconductor device production, it does offer a way to develop resist and fluid technology at a relatively low cost. Its simple image-forming format offers easy access to the basic physics of advanced imaging. Issues such as: Polarization of the image forming light rays; Fluid/resist interaction during exposure; Topcoat film performance; and the Line Edge Roughness (LER) of resists at extremely high resolutions can all be readily studied. Experiments are described and results are provided for work on: 32nm imaging tests; high refractive index fluid testing using 193nm wavelength at resolutions well beyond current lens-based system capabilities; and polarization configuration testing on 45nm, 38nm, and 32nm L/S features. Results on the performance of resists and topcoats are reported for 32nm L/S features.

  5. Demonstration of EDA flow for massively parallel e-beam lithography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brandt, P.; Belledent, J.; Tranquillin, C.; Figueiro, T.; Meunier, S.; Bayle, S.; Fay, A.; Milléquant, M.; Icard, B.; Wieland, M.

    2014-03-01

    Today's soaring complexity in pushing the limits of 193nm immersion lithography drives the development of other technologies. One of these alternatives is mask-less massively parallel electron beam lithography, (MP-EBL), a promising candidate in which future resolution needs can be fulfilled at competitive cost. MAPPER Lithography's MATRIX MP-EBL platform has currently entered an advanced stage of development. The first tool in this platform, the FLX 1200, will operate using more than 1,300 beams, each one writing a stripe 2.2μm wide. 0.2μm overlap from stripe to stripe is allocated for stitching. Each beam is composed of 49 individual sub-beams that can be blanked independently in order to write in a raster scan pixels onto the wafer.

  6. Preliminary characterisation of new glass reference materials (GSA-1G, GSC-1G, GSD-1G and GSE-1G) by laser ablation-inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry using 193 nm, 213 nm and 266 nm wavelengths

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Guillong, M.; Hametner, K.; Reusser, E.; Wilson, S.A.; Gunther, D.

    2005-01-01

    New glass reference materials GSA-1G, GSC-1G, GSD-1G and GSE-1G have been characterised using a prototype solid state laser ablation system capable of producing wavelengths of 193 nm, 213 nm and 266 nm. This system allowed comparison of the effects of different laser wavelengths under nearly identical ablation and ICP operating conditions. The wavelengths 213 nm and 266 nm were also used at higher energy densities to evaluate the influence of energy density on quantitative analysis. In addition, the glass reference materials were analysed using commercially available 266 nm Nd:YAG and 193 nm ArF excimer lasers. Laser ablation analysis was carried out using both single spot and scanning mode ablation. Using laser ablation ICP-MS, concentrations of fifty-eight elements were determined with external calibration to the NIST SRM 610 glass reference material. Instead of applying the more common internal standardisation procedure, the total concentration of all element oxide concentrations was normalised to 100%. Major element concentrations were compared with those determined by electron microprobe. In addition to NIST SRM 610 for external calibration, USGS BCR-2G was used as a more closely matrix-matched reference material in order to compare the effect of matrix-matched and non matrix-matched calibration on quantitative analysis. The results show that the various laser wavelengths and energy densities applied produced similar results, with the exception of scanning mode ablation at 266 nm without matrix-matched calibration where deviations up to 60% from the average were found. However, results acquired using a scanning mode with a matrix-matched calibration agreed with results obtained by spot analysis. The increased abundance of large particles produced when using a scanning ablation mode with NIST SRM 610, is responsible for elemental fractionation effects caused by incomplete vaporisation of large particles in the ICP.

  7. Hybrid source mask optimization for robust immersion lithography.

    PubMed

    Ma, Xu; Han, Chunying; Li, Yanqiu; Wu, Bingliang; Song, Zhiyang; Dong, Lisong; Arce, Gonzalo R

    2013-06-20

    To keep pace with the shrinkage of critical dimension, source and mask optimization (SMO) has emerged as a promising resolution enhancement technique to push the resolution of 193 nm argon fluoride immersion lithography systems. However, most current pixelated SMO approaches relied on scalar imaging models that are no longer accurate for immersion lithography systems with hyper-NA (NA>1). This paper develops a robust hybrid SMO (HSMO) algorithm based on a vector imaging model capable of effectively improving the robustness of immersion lithography systems to defocus and dose variations. The proposed HSMO algorithm includes two steps. First, the individual source optimization approach is carried out to rapidly reduce the cost function. Subsequently, the simultaneous SMO approach is applied to further improve the process robustness by exploiting the synergy in the joint optimization of source and mask patterns. The conjugate gradient method is used to update the source and mask pixels. In addition, a source regularization approach and source postprocessing are both used to improve the manufacturability of the optimized source patterns. Compared to the mask optimization method, the HSMO algorithm achieves larger process windows, i.e., extends the depth of focus and exposure latitude, thus more effectively improving the process robustness of 45 nm immersion lithography systems.

  8. High-n immersion lithography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sewell, Harry; Mulkens, Jan; Graeupner, Paul; McCafferty, Diane; Markoya, Louis; Donders, Sjoerd; Cortie, Rogier; Meijers, Ralph; Evangelista, Fabrizio; Samarakone, Nandarisi

    2008-03-01

    A two-year study on the feasibility of High-n Immersion Lithography shows very promising results. This paper reports the findings of the study. The evaluation shows the tremendous progress made in the development of second-generation immersion fluid technology. Candidate fluids from several suppliers have been evaluated. All the commercial fluids evaluated are viable, so there are a number of options. Life tests have been conducted on bench top fluid-handling systems and the results referenced to full-scale systems. Parameters such as Dose per Laser Pulse, Pulse Rate, Fluid Flow Rate, and Fluid Absorbency at 193nm, and Oxygen/Air Contamination Levels were explored. A detailed evaluation of phenomena such as Last Lens Element (LLE) contamination has been conducted. Lens cleaning has been evaluated. A comparison of High-n fluid-based technology and water-based immersion technology shows interesting advantages of High-n fluid in the areas of Defect and Resist Interaction. Droplet Drying tests, Resist Staining evaluations, and Resist Contrast impact studies have all been run. Defect-generating mechanisms have been identified and are being eliminated. The lower evaporation rate of the High-n fluids compared with water shows the advantages of High-n Immersion. The core issue for the technology, the availability of High-n optical material for use as the final lens element, is updated. Samples of LuAG material have been received from development partners and have been evaluated. The latest status of optical materials and the technology timelines are reported. The potential impact of the availability of the technology is discussed. Synergy with technologies such as Double Patterning is discussed. The prospects for <22nm (hp) are evaluated.

  9. Coaxial Lithography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ozel, Tuncay

    The optical and electrical properties of heterogeneous nanowires are profoundly related to their composition and nanoscale architecture. However, the intrinsic constraints of conventional synthetic and lithographic techniques have limited the types of multi-compositional nanowires that can be realized and studied in the laboratory. This thesis focuses on bridging templated electrochemical synthesis and lithography for expanding current synthetic capabilities with respect to materials generality and the ability to tailor two-dimensional growth in the formation of core-shell structures for the rational design and preparation of nanowires with very complex architectures that cannot be made by any other techniques. Chapter 1 introduces plasmonics, templated electrochemical synthesis, and on-wire lithography concepts and their significances within chemistry and materials science. Chapter 2 details a powerful technique for the deposition of metals and semiconductors with nanometer resolution in segment and gap lengths using on-wire lithography, which serves as a new platform to explore plasmon-exciton interactions in the form of long-range optical nanoscale rulers. Chapter 3 highlights an approach for the electrochemical synthesis of solution dispersible core-shell polymeric and inorganic semiconductor nanowires with metallic leads. A photodetector based on a single core-shell semiconductor nanowire is presented to demonstrate the functionality of the nanowires produced using this approach. Chapter 4 describes a new materials general technique, termed coaxial lithography (COAL), bridging templated electrochemical synthesis and lithography for generating coaxial nanowires in a parallel fashion with sub-10 nanometer resolution in both axial and radial dimensions. Combinations of coaxial nanowires composed of metals, metal oxides, metal chalcogenides, conjugated polymers, and a core/shell semiconductor nanowire with an embedded plasmonic nanoring are presented to

  10. The Photodissociation of Nitromethane at 193 nm.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1983-02-28

    gas fill; the focus and alignment were kept constant. The dissociation products were detected in the plane of the laser and molecular beams by a...This background is presumably due to scattereo light from the intense laser dissociating or desorbing diffusion pump oil from the wall behind the...When dissociated , other nitroalkanes exhibit the same emission spectrum as CH3NO2, suggesting little transfer of energy from the excited NO2 group to

  11. Expected innovations of optical lithography in the next 10 years

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Owa, Soichi; Hirayanagi, Noriyuki

    2016-03-01

    In the past 10 years, immersion lithography has been the most effective high volume manufacturing method for the critical layers of semiconductor devices. Thinking of the next 10 years, we can expect continuous improvement on existing 300 mm wafer scanners with better accuracy and throughput to enhance the total output value per input cost. This value productivity, however, can be upgraded also by larger innovations which might happen in optical lithography. In this paper, we will discuss the possibilities and the impossibilities of potential innovation ideas of optical lithography, which are 450 mm wafer, optical maskless, multicolor lithography, and metamaterial.

  12. Scanner Art

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jaworski, Joy; Murphy, Kris

    2009-01-01

    In this article, the authors describe how they incorporated environmental awareness into their art curriculum. Here, they describe a digital photography project in which their students used flatbed scanners as cameras. Their students composed their objects directly on the scanner. The lesson enabled students to realize that artists have voices…

  13. How much further can lithography process windows be improved?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hockey, Mary Ann; Lin, Qin; Calderas, Eric

    2012-03-01

    Utilizing thin photoresist layers for successful pattern transfer has gained acceptance as the lithography process of record, primarily due to the incorporation of silicon-containing hardmask (HM) layers for added etching resistance. Our work includes understanding the impact of HfO2 and ZrO2 nanocrystal additives incorporated into spin-on HM materials. The goal is to quantify both etch selectivity and the improvements in the lithography process windows with the addition of HfO2 nanocrystals into various types of polymers. Conventional 193-nm photoresists and spin-on carbon materials were selected as references for etch selectivity calculations. Results indicate there are process window advantages with improvements in the depth of focus (DOF) and overall pattern collapse margins. In addition, the ability to quantify line width roughness (LWR) as a function of resolution has been accomplished for these HM materials, and results show low levels of LWR are achievable. Overall lithography process margins are positive for DOF, exposure latitude (EL), LWR, and pattern collapse with the incorporation of HfO2-enhanced HM coatings for etch protection.

  14. New filter rating method in practice for sub-30-nm lithography process filter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Umeda, Toru; Mizuno, Takehito; Tsuzuki, Shuichi; Numaguchi, Toru

    2010-04-01

    A new method for rating retention in lithography process filters has been developed. The method employs a gold nanoparticle contaminant challenge, inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry as a concentration detector, and dynamic light scattering as a particle size detector, all of which enable accurate, reliable filter retention rating below 30 nm. There is good agreement between results obtained with the new method and results obtained with a conventional polystyrene latex bead challenge. A filter that was rated at 10 nm using extrapolative methods was confirmed to be 10 nm using the new challenge test. Microbridge removal efficiency of polyethylene filters rated by the new method was studied in a 193 nm (dry) lithography process and the new method was verified. When applied to commercially available filters that are rated below 30 nm, the new method revealed significant differences in removal efficiency among similarly labeled filters.

  15. Coaxial lithography.

    PubMed

    Ozel, Tuncay; Bourret, Gilles R; Mirkin, Chad A

    2015-04-01

    The optical and electrical properties of heterogeneous nanowires are profoundly related to their composition and nanoscale architecture. However, the intrinsic constraints of conventional synthetic and lithographic techniques have limited the types of multi-compositional nanowire that can be created and studied in the laboratory. Here, we report a high-throughput technique that can be used to prepare coaxial nanowires with sub-10 nm control over the architectural parameters in both axial and radial dimensions. The method, termed coaxial lithography (COAL), relies on templated electrochemical synthesis and can create coaxial nanowires composed of combinations of metals, metal oxides, metal chalcogenides and conjugated polymers. To illustrate the possibilities of the technique, a core/shell semiconductor nanowire with an embedded plasmonic nanoring was synthesized--a structure that cannot be prepared by any previously known method--and its plasmon-excitation-dependent optoelectronic properties were characterized.

  16. VUV lithography

    DOEpatents

    George, Edward V.; Oster, Yale; Mundinger, David C.

    1990-01-01

    Deep UV projection lithography can be performed using an e-beam pumped solid excimer UV source, a mask, and a UV reduction camera. The UV source produces deep UV radiation in the range 1700-1300A using xenon, krypton or argon; shorter wavelengths of 850-650A can be obtained using neon or helium. A thin solid layer of the gas is formed on a cryogenically cooled plate and bombarded with an e-beam to cause fluorescence. The UV reduction camera utilizes multilayer mirrors having high reflectivity at the UV wavelength and images the mask onto a resist coated substrate at a preselected demagnification. The mask can be formed integrally with the source as an emitting mask.

  17. VUV lithography

    DOEpatents

    George, E.V.; Oster, Y.; Mundinger, D.C.

    1990-12-25

    Deep UV projection lithography can be performed using an e-beam pumped solid excimer UV source, a mask, and a UV reduction camera. The UV source produces deep UV radiation in the range 1,700--1,300A using xenon, krypton or argon; shorter wavelengths of 850--650A can be obtained using neon or helium. A thin solid layer of the gas is formed on a cryogenically cooled plate and bombarded with an e-beam to cause fluorescence. The UV reduction camera utilizes multilayer mirrors having high reflectivity at the UV wavelength and images the mask onto a resist coated substrate at a preselected demagnification. The mask can be formed integrally with the source as an emitting mask. 6 figs.

  18. A study of high peroxynitrite generated in purge head outlet of charger with continuous supply of superior purification CDA system for 193 nm ArF reticle haze prevention

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chu, Fu-Sheng; Chiou, Shean-Hwan

    2008-05-01

    In this study, A phenomenon of high peroxynitrite generated in purge gas in purge head outlet of RSP SMIF-POD Charger was found. A superior purification CDA("CDA" is abbreviated from Clean Dry Air) continuous purge system has been used in 193nm ArF reticle chemical free preservation process for mask Haze control. Ion Chromatography(IC) and Gas Chromatography Mass Spectrometry(thermal desorber GC-MS) methods are used to analyze and verify inorganic ion and volatility organic compound cleanliness of purge gas, respectively. After IC analysis, high nitrate ion concentration was detected in UPW("UPW" is abbreviated from Ultra-Purification Water). As a result of this study, It is confident of presuming that high peroxynitrite contamination in purge gas in purge head outlet was caused by the blow type in-line gas ionizer, high potential(approximate 2KV) needle discharge influence on the inside of purge piping of Charger. After bypass in-line gas ionizer apparatus, the IC analysis result has a tendency towards a diminution in peroxynitrite that nitrate ion was not detected in UPW at all. At the same operation condition, if purge gas replace by superior purification AN2(A Class Nitrogen) and the inference conjectured that high ammonium ion response in UPW would take place. According to our study, superior purification CDA passed through the emitter tip of blow type in-line gas ionizers and under high potential needle discharge influence, high peroxynitrite concentration was generated in purge gas in purge head outlet of Charger. Due to the generation of peroxynitrite ion contamination in purge gas, it was not suitable to apply in the prevention of ESD damage of mask pattern in superior purification CDA(Clean Dry Air) continuous purge system. In this study, we also unexpectedly find that the blow type in-line gas ionizer with thermoplastic conductive tube resulted in purge gas a large number of volatility organic compounds(VOCs) contamination. VOC outgassing was generated

  19. Evaluation of corneal ablation by an optical parametric oscillator (OPO) at 2.94 μm and an Er:YAG laser and comparison to ablation by a 193-nm excimer laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Telfair, William B.; Hoffman, Hanna J.; Nordquist, Robert E.; Eiferman, Richard A.

    1998-06-01

    Purpose: This study first evaluated the corneal ablation characteristics of (1) an Nd:YAG pumped OPO (Optical Parametric Oscillator) at 2.94 microns and (2) a short pulse Er:YAG laser. Secondly, it compared the histopathology and surface quality of these ablations with (3) a 193 nm excimer laser. Finally, the healing characteristics over 4 months of cat eyes treated with the OPO were evaluated. Methods: Custom designed Nd:YAG/OPO and Er:YAG lasers were integrated with a new scanning delivery system to perform PRK myopic correction procedures. After initial ablation studies to determine ablation thresholds and rates, human cadaver eyes and in-vivo cat eyes were treated with (1) a 6.0 mm Dia, 30 micron deep PTK ablation and (2) a 6.0 mm Dia, -5.0 Diopter PRK ablation. Cadaver eyes were also treated with a 5.0 mm Dia, -5.0 Diopter LASIK ablation. Finally, cats were treated with the OPO in a 4 month healing study. Results: Ablation thresholds below 100 mJ/cm2 and ablation rates comparable to the excimer were demonstrated for both infrared systems. Light Microscopy (LM) showed no thermal damage for low fluence treatments, but noticeable thermal damage at higher fluences. SEM and TEM revealed morphologically similar surfaces for low fluence OPO and excimer samples with a smooth base and no evidence of collagen shrinkage. The Er:YAG and higher fluence OPO treated samples revealed more damage along with visible collagen coagulation and shrinkage in some cases. Healing was remarkably unremarkable. All eyes had a mild healing response with no stromal haze and showed topographic flattening. LM demonstrated nothing except a moderate increase in keratocyte activity in the upper third of the stroma. TEM confirmed this along with irregular basement membranes. Conclusions: A non- thermal ablation process called photospallation is demonstrated for the first time using short pulse infrared lasers yielding damage zones comparable to the excimer and healing which is also comparable to

  20. Cylindrical Scanner

    SciTech Connect

    Hall, Thomas E.

    1999-04-29

    The CS system is designed to provide a very fast imaging system in order to search for weapons on persons in an airport environment. The Cylindrical Scanner moves a vertical transceiver array rapidly around a person standing stationary. The software can be segmented in to three specific tasks. The first task is data acquisition and scanner control. At the operator's request, this task commands the scanner to move and the radar transceiver array to send data to the computer system in a known and well-ordered manner. The array is moved over the complete aperture in 10 to 12 seconds. At the completion of the array movement the second software task automatically reconstructs the high-resolution image from the radar data utilizing the integrated DSP boards. The third task displays the resulting images, as they become available, to the computer screen for user review and analysis.

  1. EUV lithography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kemp, Kevin; Wurm, Stefan

    2006-10-01

    Extreme ultraviolet lithography (EUVL) technology and infrastructure development has made excellent progress over the past several years, and tool suppliers are delivering alpha tools to customers. However, requirements in source, mask, optics, and resist are very challenging, and significant development efforts are still needed to support beta and production-level performance. Some of the important advances in the past few years include increased source output power, tool and optics system development and integration, and mask blank defect reduction. For example, source power has increased to levels approaching specification, but reliable source operation at these power levels has yet to be fully demonstrated. Significant efforts are also needed to achieve the resolution, line width roughness, and photospeed requirements for EUV photoresists. Cost of ownership and extendibility to future nodes are key factors in determining the outlook for the manufacturing insertion of EUVL. Since wafer throughput is a critical cost factor, source power, resist sensitivity, and system design all need to be carefully considered. However, if the technical and business challenges can be met, then EUVL will be the likely technology of choice for semiconductor manufacturing at the 32, 22, 16 and 11 nm half-pitch nodes. To cite this article: K. Kemp, S. Wurm, C. R. Physique 7 (2006).

  2. Silicon-based anti-reflective spin-on hardmask materials for 45 nm pattern of immersion ArF lithography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Sang Kyun; Cho, Hyeon Mo; Koh, Sang Ran; Kim, Mi-young; Yoon, Hui Chan; Chung, Yong-jin; Kim, Jong Seob; Chang, Tuwon

    2008-03-01

    In current semiconductor manufacturing processes, hardmasks have become more prevalent in patterning of small features. A silicon-containing hardmask, which can be spun onto wafers, is desirable in terms of mass production throughput and cost of ownership. Previously, we reported a paper on silicon-based anti-reflective spin-on hardmask materials for 193 nm lithography. In this paper, hardmask materials for 45 nm pattern of immersion ArF lithography are described. To achieve 45 nm patterning, a different base resin platform from the previous paper has been used. Furthermore, we have improved the etch resistance by changing our synthesis method without modifying the resin platform and silicon contents. Despite these changes, an excellent storage stability, which is one of the essential requirements for the materials, is still maintained. Characterization and lithographic performance of 45 nm immersion ArF lithography using our new materials are described in detail.

  3. Verification of optical proximity effect in immersion lithography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suganaga, Toshifumi; Maejima, Shinroku; Hanawa, Tetsuro; Ishibashi, Takeo; Nakao, Shuji; Shirai, Seiichiro; Narimatsu, Koichiro; Suko, Kazuyuki; Shiraishi, Kenichi; Ishii, Yuki; Ando, Tomoyuki; Ohmori, Katsumi

    2006-03-01

    193 nm lithography is one of the most promising technologies for next-generation lithography and is being actively evaluated for making it practicable (1,2). First, we evaluated an immersion lithography tool (engineering evaluation tool (EET)) (3) and a dry lithography tool (S307E) with the same numerical aperture (NA = 0.85), manufactured by Nikon Corporation. As a result, an increase in the depth of focus (DOF) of the EET to 200 nm in comparison with the DOF (110 nm) of the dry exposure tool was confirmed in a 90 nm isolated space pattern. Next, the optical proximity effect (OPE) in this pattern was evaluated. Generally, when an immersion lithography tool is compared with a dry one with the same NA or both the tools, only an increase in the DOF is found. However, we confirmed that the OPE (The OPE of the 90 nm isolated space pattern is defined as the difference in the space width between a dense space and an isolated space.) of the dry exposure tool for the 90 nm isolated space pattern reduced from 33.1 nm to 14.1 nm by immersion lithography. As the effect of the reduction of 19 nm, the OPE reduced to 15.2 nm by the effect of the top coatings (TCs) and to 3.8 nm by the optical characteristics. An impact of about 5 nm on the OPE was confirmed by the process parameters-film thickness and the pre-bake temperature of the TC. In the case that the solvent was replaced with a high boiling point solvent, the impact changed from 5 to 20 nm further, the replacement of the solvent had a considerable impact on the OPE. However, this influence differs considerably according to the kind of resists; further, it was shown that the addition of acid materials and a change in the polymer base resulted in a high impact on the OPE for a certain resist. Thus, it was demonstrated that the selection of TC is very important for the OPE in immersion lithography.

  4. Metrology for Grayscale Lithography

    SciTech Connect

    Murali, Raghunath

    2007-09-26

    Three dimensional microstructures find applications in diffractive optical elements, photonic elements, etc. and can be efficiently fabricated by grayscale lithography. Good process control is important for achieving the desired structures. Metrology methods for grayscale lithography are discussed. Process optimization for grayscale e-beam lithography is explored and various process parameters that affect the grayscale process are discussed.

  5. Process window simulation study with immersion lithography for 45-nm technology node

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Oseo; Gutmann, Alois; Neumueller, Walter; Back, David

    2004-05-01

    As the potentials of experimental studies are still limited, a predictive resist image simulation of Immersion lithography is very important for a better understanding of the technology. One of the most critical issues in Immersion lithography is the description of the influence of immersion which is the presence of a uniform liquid layer between the last objective lens and the photo resist, on optical lithography. It enables the real part of the index of refraction in the image space, and the numerical aperture of the projection lens, to be greater than unity. Therefore, it is virtually involves Maxwell vector solution approach, including polarization effects and arbitrary thin film multi-layers. This paper discusses the improvement in process window afforded by immersion under a variety of conditions, including 193nm and 157nm, Off-axis illumination, Attenuated Phase Shift Mask for 65nm and 45nm technology node. Comparisons with dry and liquid lithography simulations are used to evaluate the availability and the performance of the proposed approach. The implemented resist simulation approach is examined the impact to the process window of variations in liquid refractive index as well.

  6. Top-surface imaging resists for lithography with strongly attenuated radiation

    SciTech Connect

    Ray-Chaudhuri, A.; Kubiak, G.; Henderson, C.; Wheeler, D.; Pollagi, T.

    1997-09-01

    Strong resist photoabsorption at wavelengths below 248 nm necessitates the use of a thin layer imaging (TLI) scheme for microlithography using 193 nm, 157 nm, or 13.4 nm radiation. Previous to this work, a TLI process commonly known as silylated top surface imaging (TSI) was developed by a Sandia/AT and T team for use in extreme ultraviolet lithography (EUVL) at 13.4 nm. Using this bilayer process, 0.13 {micro}m resolution with 87{degree} sidewalls in 0.7 {micro}m of resist was achieved for EUV exposures. New imaging layer polymers, silylation reagents and crosslinkers, and process conditions were screened for improvement in this TSI process with the ultimate goal of demonstrating a resist technology capable of 0.10 {micro}m critical dimension (CD). The results of these attempted improvements to the TSI process are described in this report.

  7. Optical scanner

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Finkel, Mitchell W. (Inventor)

    1987-01-01

    An optical scanner for imaging lines in an object plane onto a linear array in a focal plane either continuously or discretely is described. The scanner consists of a set of four mutually perpendicularly oriented plane corner mirrors which provide a reflecting path that describes a parallelogram. In addition, there is a plane parallel scanning mirror with a front and back reflecting surface located midway between the first and fourth corner mirrors. It is oriented so that in the mid-scan position it is parallel to the first corner mirror, and therefore perpendicular to the fourth corner mirror. As the scan mirror rotates, rays incident from a plurality of lines in the object plane are selectively directed through the optical system arriving at a common intersection on the back surface of the scanning mirror where the rays are colinearly directed toward a lens and then imaged onto the linear array in the focal plane. A set of compensating mirrors may be introduced just before the imaging lens to compensate for a small and generally negligible path difference delta sub l between the axial and marginal rays.

  8. Optimization of BARC process for hyper-NA immersion lithography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Kilyoung; Lee, Junghyung; Lee, Sungkoo; Park, Dongheok; Bok, Cheolkyu; Moon, Seungchan

    2008-03-01

    The extension of current 193nm immersion lithography technology is depending on increasing the numerical aperture (NA). High-resolution imaging requires the decrease of photoresist thickness to compensate for smaller depth of focus (DOF) and prevent pattern collapse. Poor etch selectivity between photoresist and BARC reads to the use of thinner BARC with faster etch-rate. Also, controlling reflectance over a wider range of incident angles for hyper-NA above 1.0 gives more challenge for thin BARC. To reduce substrate reflectivity, various material strategies (dual-layer BARC such as organic/inorganic BARC or organic/organic BARC, Si-based ARC/spin-on carbon (SOC), and so on) have been introduced through many papers. Organic dual-layer BARC is capable of suppressing reflectivity through wide range of incident angles. But, the inevitable increase of its thickness is not a desirable direction due to the decreasing trend of photoresist thickness. When amorphous carbon (a-C) is used as a hardmask for sub-stack, the combination of organic/inorganic BARC (i.e. SiON) is currently well known process. Si-ARC/SOC may be the promising candidates of hardmask because Si component of Si-ARC affords a high etch selectivity to photoresist and its combination with SOC decreases reflectance. The optical constants of above organic materials can be tuned to control the substrate reflectivity for hyper-NA.

  9. Controlled Scanning Probe Lithography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruskell, Todd G.; Sarid, Dror; Workman, Richard K.; Pyle, Jason L.

    1997-03-01

    A method for real-time monitoring of the quality and quantity of silicon oxide grown on silicon using conducting-tip scanning probe lithography has been developed. The sub-picoampere tip-sample currents measured during lithography in ambient conditions are shown to be proportional to the amount of silicon oxide being grown. In addition, we have demonstrated the ability to control the composition of the grown material by altering the lithographic environment. Silicon nitride growth is shown to result from lithography on silicon samples in an environment of annhydrous ammonia.

  10. Plasma etch challenges with new EUV lithography material introduction for patterning for MOL and BEOL

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Changwoo; Nagabhirava, Bhaskar; Goss, Michael; Wang, Peng; Friddle, Phil; Schmitz, Stafan; Wu, Jian; Yang, Richard; Mignot, Yann; Rassoul, Nouradine; Hamieh, Bassem; Beique, Genevieve; Labonte, Andre; Labelle, Catherine; Arnold, John; Mucci, John

    2015-03-01

    As feature critical dimension (CD) shrinks towards and beyond the 7nm node, patterning techniques for optical lithography with double and triple exposure will be replaced by EUV patterning. EUV enables process and overlay improvement, as well as a potential cost reduction due to fewer wafer passes and masks required for patterning. However, the EUV lithography technique introduces newer types of resists that are thinner and softer compared to conventional 193nm resists currently being used. The main challenge is to find the key etch process parameters to improve the EUV resist selectivity, reduce LER and LWR, minimize line end shrink, improve tip-to-tip degradation, and avoid line wiggling while still enabling previous schemes such as trench-first-metal-hard-mask (TFMHM), self-aligned via (SAV) and self-aligned contact (SAC). In this paper, we will discuss some of the approaches that we have investigated to define the best etch process adjustments to enable EUV patterning. RF pulsing is one of the key parameters utilized to overcome most of the previously described challenges, and has also been coupled with stack optimization. This study will focus on RF pulsing (high vs. low frequency results) and bias control (RF frequency dependence). In particular, pulsing effects on resist morphology, selectivity and profile management will be reported, as well as the role of aspect ratio and etch chemistry on organic mask wiggling and collapse. This work was performed by the Research Alliance Teams at various IBM Research and Development Facilities.

  11. Resist Materials for Extreme Ultraviolet Lithography: Toward Low-Cost Single-Digit-Nanometer Patterning.

    PubMed

    Ashby, Paul D; Olynick, Deirdre L; Ogletree, D Frank; Naulleau, Patrick P

    2015-10-14

    Extreme ultraviolet lithography (EUVL) is the leading technology for enabling miniaturization of computational components over the next decade. Next-generation resists will need to meet demanding performance criteria of 10 nm critical dimension, 1.2 nm line-edge roughness, and 20 mJ cm(-2) exposure dose. Here, the current state of the development of EUV resist materials is reviewed. First, pattern formation in resist materials is described and the Hansen solubility sphere (HSS) is used as a framework for understanding the pattern-development process. Then, recent progress in EUVL resist chemistry and characterization is discussed. Incremental advances are obtained by transferring chemically amplified resist materials developed for 193 nm lithography to EUV wavelengths. Significant advances will result from synthesizing high-absorbance resist materials using heavier atoms. In the framework of the HSS model, these materials have significant room for improvement and thus offer great promise as high-performance EUV resists for patterning of sub-10 nm features.

  12. Ion beam lithography system

    DOEpatents

    Leung, Ka-Ngo

    2005-08-02

    A maskless plasma-formed ion beam lithography tool provides for patterning of sub-50 nm features on large area flat or curved substrate surfaces. The system is very compact and does not require an accelerator column and electrostatic beam scanning components. The patterns are formed by switching beamlets on or off from a two electrode blanking system with the substrate being scanned mechanically in one dimension. This arrangement can provide a maskless nano-beam lithography tool for economic and high throughput processing.

  13. Thirty years of lithography simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mack, Chris A.

    2005-05-01

    Thirty years ago Rick Dill and his team at IBM published the first account of lithography simulation - the accurate description of semiconductor optical lithography by mathematical equations. Since then, lithography simulation has grown dramatically in importance in four important areas: as a research tool, as a development tool, as a manufacturing tool, and as a learning tool. In this paper, the history of lithography simulations is traced from its roots to today"s indispensable tools for lithographic technology development. Along the way, an attempt will be made to define the true value of lithography simulation to the semiconductor industry.

  14. An ice lithography instrument.

    PubMed

    Han, Anpan; Chervinsky, John; Branton, Daniel; Golovchenko, J A

    2011-06-01

    We describe the design of an instrument that can fully implement a new nanopatterning method called ice lithography, where ice is used as the resist. Water vapor is introduced into a scanning electron microscope (SEM) vacuum chamber above a sample cooled down to 110 K. The vapor condenses, covering the sample with an amorphous layer of ice. To form a lift-off mask, ice is removed by the SEM electron beam (e-beam) guided by an e-beam lithography system. Without breaking vacuum, the sample with the ice mask is then transferred into a metal deposition chamber where metals are deposited by sputtering. The cold sample is then unloaded from the vacuum system and immersed in isopropanol at room temperature. As the ice melts, metal deposited on the ice disperses while the metals deposited on the sample where the ice had been removed by the e-beam remains. The instrument combines a high beam-current thermal field emission SEM fitted with an e-beam lithography system, cryogenic systems, and a high vacuum metal deposition system in a design that optimizes ice lithography for high throughput nanodevice fabrication. The nanoscale capability of the instrument is demonstrated with the fabrication of nanoscale metal lines.

  15. An ice lithography instrument

    SciTech Connect

    Han, Anpan; Chervinsky, John; Branton, Daniel; Golovchenko, J. A.

    2011-06-15

    We describe the design of an instrument that can fully implement a new nanopatterning method called ice lithography, where ice is used as the resist. Water vapor is introduced into a scanning electron microscope (SEM) vacuum chamber above a sample cooled down to 110 K. The vapor condenses, covering the sample with an amorphous layer of ice. To form a lift-off mask, ice is removed by the SEM electron beam (e-beam) guided by an e-beam lithography system. Without breaking vacuum, the sample with the ice mask is then transferred into a metal deposition chamber where metals are deposited by sputtering. The cold sample is then unloaded from the vacuum system and immersed in isopropanol at room temperature. As the ice melts, metal deposited on the ice disperses while the metals deposited on the sample where the ice had been removed by the e-beam remains. The instrument combines a high beam-current thermal field emission SEM fitted with an e-beam lithography system, cryogenic systems, and a high vacuum metal deposition system in a design that optimizes ice lithography for high throughput nanodevice fabrication. The nanoscale capability of the instrument is demonstrated with the fabrication of nanoscale metal lines.

  16. Optical characterization of 193nm amorphous carbon ARC films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leng, Jingmin; Opsal, Jon; Pois, Heath

    2005-05-01

    In this study, the optical properties of amorphous carbon (aC) ARC films are investigated using an Opti-probe OP7341, and a metrology solution that robustly measures a broad range of process conditions is presented. We find that the aC material is consistent with uni-axial anisotropy, and that this effect may have important implications for photolithography. These results are obtained through the combination of multiple technologies in one tool: spectroscopic ellipsometry (SE); spectroscopic reflectometry or broadband (BB), with a wavelength range of 190-840 nm; single wavelength (673 nm) but multiple incident angle beam profile reflectometry (BPR) and beam profile ellipsometry (BPE), and single wavelength (633nm) absolute ellipsometry (AE). The combination of technologies at multiple angles and wavelengths provides additional optical information and sensitivity not possible with single-technology approaches. A complex wavelength dependent anisotropy model was developed for this analysis, and is compared with a real anisotropy model. The complex anisotropy model and the effective medium approximation (EMA) with two and three components were applied to a set of 12 wafer set with thickness swing aC films in the range of 500-750 Å as well as a second set of 23 pre- and post- etch wafers. The complex anisotropy model clearly has the advantage of best fit the BPR profiles along with the SE Fourier coefficients. The etch rate obtained by the complex anisotropy also showed a much narrower variation as compared with the EMA2 and EMA32 models with the real anisotropy.

  17. Photochemistry of cyano- and dicyanoacetylene at 193 nm

    SciTech Connect

    Halpern, J.B.; Petway, L.; Lu, R.; Jackson, W.M.; McCrary, V.R. ); Nottingham, W. )

    1990-03-08

    The far-UV photochemistry of cyano- and dicyanoacetylene has been studied. In particular, those photolysis channels have been characterized that lead to the production of excited-state fragments and CN in the ground electronic state. Following photolysis of HC{sub 3}N, in addition to direct production of CN and C{sub 2}H, there is a second dissociation channel leading to C{sub 3}N and H atoms. The results also show that at high laser intensity the HC{sub 3}N dissociates by two-photon photolysis and that the C{sub 3}N undergoes secondary photolysis. Photolysis of C{sub 4}NH{sub 2} produces CN and C{sub 3}N radicals.

  18. Polygon scanners revisited

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sweeney, Michael N.

    1997-07-01

    The demands for increased throughput, pixel density, and format size in the laser beam imaging field continue to challenge opto-mechanical scanning products and the electronics that drive them. The polygon line scanner has superior scan rate and scan efficiency among candidate mechanical scanners but, historically, has had inferior cross- scan and in-scan accuracy. To date, due to cost considerations, these limitations have excluded the polygon scanner from practical use in high resolution, flat field, large format commercial applications. This paper illustrates the tradeoffs among the three most common mechanical scanners; single reflection rotary scanner, resonant galvanometric scanner, and polygon scanner. The purpose of this discussion is to illustrate that the polygon scanner holds the best promise of advancing the state-of-art in reasonable cost, large format, high resolution, flat field imaging once the problems of cross-scan and in-scan errors are reconciled in the design of the system. Also introduced is a polygon scanning system that fulfills the requirements of an advanced flat field, large format line imaging platform.

  19. Focusing laser scanner

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Callen, W. R.; Weaver, J. E.

    1979-01-01

    Economical laser scanner assembled from commercially available components, modulates and scans focused laser beam over area up to 5.1 by 5.1 cm. Scanner gives resolution comparable to that of conventional television. Device is highly applicable to area of analog and digital storage and retrieval.

  20. Microfluidic Applications of Soft Lithography

    SciTech Connect

    Rose, K A; Krulevitch, P; Hamilton, J

    2001-04-10

    The soft lithography fabrication technique was applied to three microfluidic devices. The method was used to create an original micropump design and retrofit to existing designs for a DNA manipulation device and a counter biological warfare sample preparation device. Each device presented unique and original challenges to the soft lithography application. AI1 design constraints of the retrofit devices were satisfied using PDMS devices created through variation of soft lithography methods. The micropump utilized the versatility of PDMS, creating design options not available with other materials. In all cases, the rapid processing of soft lithography reduced the fabrication time, creating faster turnaround for design modifications.

  1. Option of resolution enhancement technology in advanced lithography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Yanqui; Zhou, Yuan

    2007-12-01

    Hyper-numerical aperture ArF scanner has being designed to meet the needs of 45nm node. Resolution enhancement technology, such as phase shift mask, off-axis illumination, and innovation processing technology must be employed in hyper-numerical aperture ArF lithography. However the cross talk of phase shift mask, off axis illumination, polarization effect, and resist stack impacts lithography performance significantly. Option of resolution enhancement technology is presented in conjunction with optimal dual-layers bottom anti-refactive coating and polarized illumination by our program and Prolith 9.0. Multi options of resolution enhancement technology are obtained to maintain a small CD, good CD uniformity (CDU), reasonable process window (PW) and fidelity of resist profile.

  2. Evidence of CH{sub 2}O (a-tilde{sup 3}A{sub 2}) and C{sub 2}H{sub 4} (a-tilde{sup 3}B{sub 1u}) produced from photodissociation of 1,3-trimethylene oxide at 193 nm

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, S.-H.; Ong, C.-S.; Lee, Yuan T.

    2006-02-21

    We investigated the dissociative ionization of formaldehyde (CH{sub 2}O) and ethene (C{sub 2}H{sub 4}) produced from photolysis of 1,3-trimethylene oxide at 193 nm using a molecular-beam apparatus and vacuum-ultraviolet radiation from an undulator for direct ionization. The CH{sub 2}O (C{sub 2}H{sub 4}) product suffers from severe dissociative ionization to HCO{sup +} (C{sub 2}H{sub 3}{sup +} and C{sub 2}H{sub 2}{sup +}) even though photoionization energy is as small as 9.8 eV. Branching ratios of fragmentation of CH{sub 2}O and C{sub 2}H{sub 4} following ionization are revealed as a function of kinetic energy of products using ionizing photons from 9.8 to 14.8 eV. Except several exceptions, branching ratios of daughter ions increase with increasing photon energy but decrease with increasing kinetic energy. The title reaction produces CH{sub 2}O and C{sub 2}H{sub 4} mostly on electronic ground states but a few likely on triplet states; C{sub 2}H{sub 4} (a-tilde{sup 3}B{sub 1u}) seems to have a yield greater than CH{sub 2}O (a-tilde{sup 3}A{sub 2}). The distinct features observed at small kinetic energies of daughter ions are attributed to dissociative ionization of photoproducts CH{sub 2}O (a-tilde{sup 3}A{sub 2}) and C{sub 2}H{sub 4} (a-tilde{sup 3}B{sub 1u}). The observation of triplet products indicates that intersystem crossing occurs prior to fragmentation of 1,3-trimethylene oxide.

  3. Lithography, metrology and nanomanufacturing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liddle, J. Alexander; Gallatin, Gregg M.

    2011-07-01

    Semiconductor chip manufacturing is by far the predominant nanomanufacturing technology in the world today. Top-down lithography techniques are used for fabrication of logic and memory chips since, in order to function, these chips must essentially be perfect. Assuring perfection requires expensive metrology. Top of the line logic sells for several hundred thousand dollars per square metre and, even though the required metrology is expensive, it is a small percentage of the overall manufacturing cost. The level of stability and control afforded by current lithography tools means that much of this metrology can be online and statistical. In contrast, many of the novel types of nanomanufacturing currently being developed will produce products worth only a few dollars per square metre. To be cost effective, the required metrology must cost proportionately less. Fortunately many of these nanofabrication techniques, such as block copolymer self-assembly, colloidal self-assembly, DNA origami, roll-2-roll nano-imprint, etc., will not require the same level of perfection to meet specification. Given the variability of these self-assembly processes, in order to maintain process control, these techniques will require some level of real time online metrology. Hence we are led to the conclusion that future nanomanufacturing may well necessitate ``cheap'' nanometre scale metrology which functions real time and on-line, e.g. at GHz rates, in the production stream. In this paper we review top-down and bottom-up nanofabrication techniques and compare and contrast the various metrology requirements.

  4. Lithography, metrology and nanomanufacturing.

    PubMed

    Liddle, J Alexander; Gallatin, Gregg M

    2011-07-01

    Semiconductor chip manufacturing is by far the predominant nanomanufacturing technology in the world today. Top-down lithography techniques are used for fabrication of logic and memory chips since, in order to function, these chips must essentially be perfect. Assuring perfection requires expensive metrology. Top of the line logic sells for several hundred thousand dollars per square metre and, even though the required metrology is expensive, it is a small percentage of the overall manufacturing cost. The level of stability and control afforded by current lithography tools means that much of this metrology can be online and statistical. In contrast, many of the novel types of nanomanufacturing currently being developed will produce products worth only a few dollars per square metre. To be cost effective, the required metrology must cost proportionately less. Fortunately many of these nanofabrication techniques, such as block copolymer self-assembly, colloidal self-assembly, DNA origami, roll-2-roll nano-imprint, etc., will not require the same level of perfection to meet specification. Given the variability of these self-assembly processes, in order to maintain process control, these techniques will require some level of real time online metrology. Hence we are led to the conclusion that future nanomanufacturing may well necessitate "cheap" nanometre scale metrology which functions real time and on-line, e.g. at GHz rates, in the production stream. In this paper we review top-down and bottom-up nanofabrication techniques and compare and contrast the various metrology requirements.

  5. Bubble-Pen Lithography.

    PubMed

    Lin, Linhan; Peng, Xiaolei; Mao, Zhangming; Li, Wei; Yogeesh, Maruthi N; Rajeeva, Bharath Bangalore; Perillo, Evan P; Dunn, Andrew K; Akinwande, Deji; Zheng, Yuebing

    2016-01-13

    Current lithography techniques, which employ photon, electron, or ion beams to induce chemical or physical reactions for micro/nano-fabrication, have remained challenging in patterning chemically synthesized colloidal particles, which are emerging as building blocks for functional devices. Herein, we develop a new technique - bubble-pen lithography (BPL) - to pattern colloidal particles on substrates using optically controlled microbubbles. Briefly, a single laser beam generates a microbubble at the interface of colloidal suspension and a plasmonic substrate via plasmon-enhanced photothermal effects. The microbubble captures and immobilizes the colloidal particles on the substrate through coordinated actions of Marangoni convection, surface tension, gas pressure, and substrate adhesion. Through directing the laser beam to move the microbubble, we create arbitrary single-particle patterns and particle assemblies with different resolutions and architectures. Furthermore, we have applied BPL to pattern CdSe/ZnS quantum dots on plasmonic substrates and polystyrene (PS) microparticles on two-dimensional (2D) atomic-layer materials. With the low-power operation, arbitrary patterning and applicability to general colloidal particles, BPL will find a wide range of applications in microelectronics, nanophotonics, and nanomedicine.

  6. Understanding the photoresist surface-liquid interface for ArF immersion lithography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Conley, Will; LeSuer, Robert J.; Fan, Frank F.; Bard, Allen J.; Taylor, Chris; Tsiartas, Pavlos; Willson, Grant; Romano, Andrew; Dammel, Ralph

    2005-05-01

    Extraction of small molecule components into water from photoresist materials designed for 193 nm immersion lithography has been observed. Leaching of photoacid generator (PAG) has been monitored using three techniques: liquid scintillation counting (LSC); liquid chromatography mass spectrometry (LCMS); and scanning electrochemical microscopy (SECM). LSC was also used to detect leaching of residual casting solvent (RCS) and base. The amount of PAG leaching from the resist films, 30 - 50 ng/cm2, was quantified using LSC. Both LSC and LCMS results suggest that PAG and photoacid leach from the film only upon initial contact with water (within 10 seconds) and minimal leaching occurs thereafter for immersion times up to 30 minutes. Exposed films show an increase in the amount of photoacid anion leaching by upwards of 20% relative to unexposed films. Films pre-rinsed with water for 30 seconds showed no further PAG leaching as determined by LSC. No statistically significant amount of residual casting solvent was extracted after 30 minutes of immersion. Base extraction was quantified at 2 ng/cm2 after 30 seconds. The leaching process is qualitatively described by a model based on the stratigraphy of resist films.

  7. Arrays of metallic micro-/nano-structures by means of colloidal lithography and laser dewetting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Constantinescu, C.; Deepak, K. L. N.; Delaporte, P.; Utéza, O.; Grojo, D.

    2016-06-01

    Long-range arrays of prismatoid metal nanostructures are fabricated by a hybrid methodology, i.e. using Langmuir microsphere films and laser-assisted dewetting. As the initial step, we use colloidal lithography. Monolayers of 1-5 μm polystyrene microspheres covered with a thermally evaporated Ag or Au thin film of controlled thickness (5-50 nm) are then used as masks to pattern the surface of quartz, BK7 glass or silicon substrates, typically in the order of cm2. When removing the spheres by physico-chemical means (ultrasound bath and solvent wash), the resulting surface shows an array of nm-size prismatoid structures (Fischer patterns), that can be further processed by laser. Thus, by using two different lasers (355-nm wavelength, 50-ps duration and 193-nm wavelength, 15-ns duration) for the metal dewetting, we control the shape of the deposited nanostructures. A detailed study is presented here on the reshaping of such metal structures through laser annealing. This new hybrid methodology expands the panel of microsphere-assisted technologies employed in preparing surface nanomaterials.

  8. Extending lithography with advanced materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guerrero, Douglas J.

    2014-03-01

    Material evolution has been a key enabler of lithography nodes in the last 30 years. This paper explores the evolution of anti-reflective coatings and their transformation from materials that provide only reflection control to advanced multifunctional layers. It is expected that complementary processes that do not require a change in wavelength will continue to dominate the development of new devices and technology nodes. New device architecture, immersion lithography, negative-tone development, multiple patterning, and directed self-assembly have demonstrated the capabilities of extending lithography nodes beyond what anyone thought would be possible. New material advancements for future technology nodes are proposed.

  9. Programmable imprint lithography template

    DOEpatents

    Cardinale, Gregory F.; Talin, Albert A.

    2006-10-31

    A template for imprint lithography (IL) that reduces significantly template production costs by allowing the same template to be re-used for several technology generations. The template is composed of an array of spaced-apart moveable and individually addressable rods or plungers. Thus, the template can be configured to provide a desired pattern by programming the array of plungers such that certain of the plungers are in an "up" or actuated configuration. This arrangement of "up" and "down" plungers forms a pattern composed of protruding and recessed features which can then be impressed onto a polymer film coated substrate by applying a pressure to the template impressing the programmed configuration into the polymer film. The pattern impressed into the polymer film will be reproduced on the substrate by subsequent processing.

  10. Modeling scanner signatures in the context of OPC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Qiaolin; Tyminski, Jacek K.; Lucas, Kevin

    2007-10-01

    The requirement for OPC modeling accuracy becomes increasingly stringent as the semiconductor industry enters sub- 0.1um regime. Targeting at capturing the IC pattern printing characteristics through the lithography process, an OPC model is usually in the form of the first principle optical imaging component, refined by some phenomenological components such as resist and etch. The phenomenological components can be adjusted appropriately in order to fit the OPC model to the silicon measurement data. The optical imaging component is the backbone for the OPC model, and it is the key to a stable and physics-centric OPC model. Scanner systematic signatures such as illuminator pupil-fill, illuminator polarization, lens aberration, lens apodization, flare, etc., previously ignored without significant accuracy sacrifice at previous technology nodes, but are playing non-negligible roles at 45nm node and beyond. In order to ensure that the OPC modeling tool can accurately model these important scanner systematic signatures, the core engine (i.e. the optical imaging simulator) of OPC simulator must be able to model these signatures with sufficient accuracy. In this paper, we study the impact on optical proximity effect (OPE) of the aforementioned scanner systematic signatures on several 1D (simple line space, doublet line and doublet space) and 2D (dense line end pullback, isolated line end pullback and T-bar line end pullback) OPC test patterns. We demonstrate that the scanner systematic signatures have significant OPE impact on the level of several nanometers. The predicted OPEs and impact from our OPC simulator matches well with results from an industry standard lithography simulator, and this has laid the foundation of accurate and physics-centric OPC model with the systematic scanner signatures incorporated.

  11. Off-axis illumination of lithography tool

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xing, Han; Lin, Li; Bin, Ma

    2013-12-01

    Lithography tool is a necessary part for LSI and VLSI. The illumination system design is an important part in the lithography optical system design. Off-axis illumination technology is an effective way to reducing resolution of lithography. The paper introduction the basic components of lithography tool, the principle of off-axis illumination reducing the resolution of lithography and focus on the two implementations of OAI technology, finally point out advantages and disadvantage of the two implementations.

  12. Biochip scanner device

    DOEpatents

    Perov, Alexander; Belgovskiy, Alexander I.; Mirzabekov, Andrei D.

    2001-01-01

    A biochip scanner device used to detect and acquire fluorescence signal data from biological microchips or biochips and method of use are provided. The biochip scanner device includes a laser for emitting a laser beam. A modulator, such as an optical chopper modulates the laser beam. A scanning head receives the modulated laser beam and a scanning mechanics coupled to the scanning head moves the scanning head relative to the biochip. An optical fiber delivers the modulated laser beam to the scanning head. The scanning head collects the fluorescence light from the biochip, launches it into the same optical fiber, which delivers the fluorescence into a photodetector, such as a photodiode. The biochip scanner device is used in a row scanning method to scan selected rows of the biochip with the laser beam size matching the size of the immobilization site.

  13. Portable biochip scanner device

    DOEpatents

    Perov, Alexander; Sharonov, Alexei; Mirzabekov, Andrei D.

    2002-01-01

    A portable biochip scanner device used to detect and acquire fluorescence signal data from biological microchips (biochips) is provided. The portable biochip scanner device employs a laser for emitting an excitation beam. An optical fiber delivers the laser beam to a portable biochip scanner. A lens collimates the laser beam, the collimated laser beam is deflected by a dichroic mirror and focused by an objective lens onto a biochip. The fluorescence light from the biochip is collected and collimated by the objective lens. The fluorescence light is delivered to a photomultiplier tube (PMT) via an emission filter and a focusing lens. The focusing lens focuses the fluorescence light into a pinhole. A signal output of the PMT is processed and displayed.

  14. Nanoimprint lithography for nanodevice fabrication

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barcelo, Steven; Li, Zhiyong

    2016-09-01

    Nanoimprint lithography (NIL) is a compelling technique for low cost nanoscale device fabrication. The precise and repeatable replication of nanoscale patterns from a single high resolution patterning step makes the NIL technique much more versatile than other expensive techniques such as e-beam or even helium ion beam lithography. Furthermore, the use of mechanical deformation during the NIL process enables grayscale lithography with only a single patterning step, not achievable with any other conventional lithography techniques. These strengths enable the fabrication of unique nanoscale devices by NIL for a variety of applications including optics, plasmonics and even biotechnology. Recent advances in throughput and yield in NIL processes demonstrate the potential of being adopted for mainstream semiconductor device fabrication as well.

  15. Nanoimprint lithography for nanodevice fabrication.

    PubMed

    Barcelo, Steven; Li, Zhiyong

    2016-01-01

    Nanoimprint lithography (NIL) is a compelling technique for low cost nanoscale device fabrication. The precise and repeatable replication of nanoscale patterns from a single high resolution patterning step makes the NIL technique much more versatile than other expensive techniques such as e-beam or even helium ion beam lithography. Furthermore, the use of mechanical deformation during the NIL process enables grayscale lithography with only a single patterning step, not achievable with any other conventional lithography techniques. These strengths enable the fabrication of unique nanoscale devices by NIL for a variety of applications including optics, plasmonics and even biotechnology. Recent advances in throughput and yield in NIL processes demonstrate the potential of being adopted for mainstream semiconductor device fabrication as well.

  16. Resolution improvement and pattern generator development for the maskless micro-ion-beam reduction lithography system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Ximan

    The shrinking of IC devices has followed the Moore's Law for over three decades, which states that the density of transistors on integrated circuits will double about every two years. This great achievement is obtained via continuous advance in lithography technology. With the adoption of complicated resolution enhancement technologies, such as the phase shifting mask (PSM), the optical proximity correction (OPC), optical lithography with wavelength of 193 nm has enabled 45 nm printing by immersion method. However, this achievement comes together with the skyrocketing cost of masks, which makes the production of low volume application-specific IC (ASIC) impractical. In order to provide an economical lithography approach for low to medium volume advanced IC fabrication, a maskless ion beam lithography method, called Maskless Micro-ion-beam Reduction Lithography (MMRL), has been developed in the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory. The development of the prototype MMRL system has been described by Dr. Vinh Van Ngo in his Ph.D. thesis. But the resolution realized on the prototype MMRL system was far from the design expectation. In order to improve the resolution of the MMRL system, the ion optical system has been investigated. By integrating a field-free limiting aperture into the optical column, reducing the electromagnetic interference and cleaning the RF plasma, the resolution has been improved to around 50 nm. Computational analysis indicates that the MMRL system can be operated with an exposure field size of 0.25 mm and a beam half angle of 1.0 mrad on the wafer plane. Ion-ion interactions have been studied with a two-particle physics model. The results are in excellent agreement with those published by the other research groups. The charge-interaction analysis of MMRL shows that the ion-ion interactions must be reduced in order to obtain a throughput higher than 10 wafers per hour on 300-mm wafers. In addition, two different maskless lithography strategies

  17. Generation of arbitrary freeform source shapes using advanced illumination systems in high-NA immersion scanners

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zimmermann, Jörg; Gräupner, Paul; Neumann, Jens T.; Hellweg, Dirk; Jürgens, Dirk; Patra, Michael; Hennerkes, Christoph; Maul, Manfred; Geh, Bernd; Engelen, Andre; Noordman, Oscar; Mulder, Melchior; Park, Sean; De Vocht, Joep

    2010-04-01

    The application of customized and freeform illumination source shapes is a key enabler for continued shrink using 193 nm water based immersion lithography at the maximum possible NA of 1.35. In this paper we present the capabilities of the DOE based Aerial XP illuminator and the new programmable FlexRay illuminator. Both of these advanced illumination systems support the generation of such arbitrarily shaped illumination sources. We explain how the different parts of the optical column interact in forming the source shape with which the reticle is illuminated. Practical constraints of the systems do not limit the capabilities to utilize the benefit of freeform source shapes vs. classic pupil shapes. Despite a different pupil forming mechanism in the two illuminator types, the resulting pupils are compatible regarding lithographic imaging performance so that processes can be transferred between the two illuminator types. Measured freeform sources can be characterized by applying a parametric fit model, to extract information for optimum pupil setup, and by importing the measured source bitmap into an imaging simulator to directly evaluate its impact on CD and overlay. We compare measured freeform sources from both illuminator types and demonstrate the good matching between measured FlexRay and DOE based freeform source shapes.

  18. Lithography focus/exposure control and corrections to improve CDU

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Young Ki; Yelverton, Mark; Lee, Joungchel; Cheng, Jerry; Wei, Hong; Kim, Jeong Soo; Gutjahr, Karsten; Gao, Jie; Karur-Shanmugam, Ram; Herrera, Pedro; Huang, Kevin; Volkovich, Roie; Pierson, Bill

    2013-04-01

    As leading edge lithography moves to advanced nodes which requires better critical dimension (CD) control ability within wafer. Current methods generally make exposure corrections by field via factory automation or by sub-recipe to improve CD uniformity. KLA-Tencor has developed a method to provide CD uniformity (CDU) control using a generated Focus/Exposure (F/E) model from a representative process. Exposure corrections by each field can be applied back to the scanner so as to improve CD uniformity through the factory automation. CDU improvement can be observed either at after lithography or after etch metrology steps. In addition to corrections, the graphic K-T Analyzer interface also facilitates the focus/exposure monitoring at the extreme wafer edge. This paper will explain the KT CDFE method and the application in production environment. Run to run focus/exposure monitoring will be carried out both on monitoring and production wafers to control the wafer process and/or scanner fleet. CDU improvement opportunities will be considered as well.

  19. Extension of practical k1 limit in EUV lithography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Sarohan; Lee, Inwhan; Koo, Sunyoung; Lee, Junghyung; Lim, Chang-Moon

    2016-03-01

    Sub 0.3k1 regime has been widely adopted for high volume manufacturing (HVM) of optical lithography due to various resolution enhancement technologies (RETs). It is not certain when such low k1 is feasible in EUV, though most technologies are available in EUV also. In this paper, experimental results on patterning performance of line space (L/S) and contact hole (C/H) in EUV lithography will be presented. First, practical k1 value with 0.33NA EUV lithography was investigated through experiment using NXE3300 EUV tool. Patterning limit, as defined by local critical dimension uniformity (LCDU) for C/H array pattern were measured with respect to various design rules. It was evaluated that the effect of off axis illumination (OAI) mode with various illumination conditions to improve the patterning performance and to reduce k1 limit. Then the experimental results of LCDU were compared with normalized image log slope (NILS) values from simulation. EUV source mask optimization (SMO) technologies to increase NILS with FlexPupil option of EUV scanner were evaluated and possibility of further improvement was also discussed.

  20. Optical fuel pin scanner

    DOEpatents

    Kirchner, Tommy L.; Powers, Hurshal G.

    1983-01-01

    An optical scanner for indicia arranged in a focal plane at a cylindrical outside surface by use of an optical system including a rotatable dove prism. The dove prism transmits a rotating image of an encircled cylindrical surface area to a stationary photodiode array.

  1. Hybrid Dispersion Laser Scanner

    PubMed Central

    Goda, K.; Mahjoubfar, A.; Wang, C.; Fard, A.; Adam, J.; Gossett, D. R.; Ayazi, A.; Sollier, E.; Malik, O.; Chen, E.; Liu, Y.; Brown, R.; Sarkhosh, N.; Di Carlo, D.; Jalali, B.

    2012-01-01

    Laser scanning technology is one of the most integral parts of today's scientific research, manufacturing, defense, and biomedicine. In many applications, high-speed scanning capability is essential for scanning a large area in a short time and multi-dimensional sensing of moving objects and dynamical processes with fine temporal resolution. Unfortunately, conventional laser scanners are often too slow, resulting in limited precision and utility. Here we present a new type of laser scanner that offers ∼1,000 times higher scan rates than conventional state-of-the-art scanners. This method employs spatial dispersion of temporally stretched broadband optical pulses onto the target, enabling inertia-free laser scans at unprecedented scan rates of nearly 100 MHz at 800 nm. To show our scanner's broad utility, we use it to demonstrate unique and previously difficult-to-achieve capabilities in imaging, surface vibrometry, and flow cytometry at a record 2D raster scan rate of more than 100 kHz with 27,000 resolvable points. PMID:22685627

  2. Hybrid dispersion laser scanner.

    PubMed

    Goda, K; Mahjoubfar, A; Wang, C; Fard, A; Adam, J; Gossett, D R; Ayazi, A; Sollier, E; Malik, O; Chen, E; Liu, Y; Brown, R; Sarkhosh, N; Di Carlo, D; Jalali, B

    2012-01-01

    Laser scanning technology is one of the most integral parts of today's scientific research, manufacturing, defense, and biomedicine. In many applications, high-speed scanning capability is essential for scanning a large area in a short time and multi-dimensional sensing of moving objects and dynamical processes with fine temporal resolution. Unfortunately, conventional laser scanners are often too slow, resulting in limited precision and utility. Here we present a new type of laser scanner that offers ∼1,000 times higher scan rates than conventional state-of-the-art scanners. This method employs spatial dispersion of temporally stretched broadband optical pulses onto the target, enabling inertia-free laser scans at unprecedented scan rates of nearly 100 MHz at 800 nm. To show our scanner's broad utility, we use it to demonstrate unique and previously difficult-to-achieve capabilities in imaging, surface vibrometry, and flow cytometry at a record 2D raster scan rate of more than 100 kHz with 27,000 resolvable points.

  3. Extreme ultraviolet lithography machine

    DOEpatents

    Tichenor, Daniel A.; Kubiak, Glenn D.; Haney, Steven J.; Sweeney, Donald W.

    2000-01-01

    An extreme ultraviolet lithography (EUVL) machine or system for producing integrated circuit (IC) components, such as transistors, formed on a substrate. The EUVL machine utilizes a laser plasma point source directed via an optical arrangement onto a mask or reticle which is reflected by a multiple mirror system onto the substrate or target. The EUVL machine operates in the 10-14 nm wavelength soft x-ray photon. Basically the EUV machine includes an evacuated source chamber, an evacuated main or project chamber interconnected by a transport tube arrangement, wherein a laser beam is directed into a plasma generator which produces an illumination beam which is directed by optics from the source chamber through the connecting tube, into the projection chamber, and onto the reticle or mask, from which a patterned beam is reflected by optics in a projection optics (PO) box mounted in the main or projection chamber onto the substrate. In one embodiment of a EUVL machine, nine optical components are utilized, with four of the optical components located in the PO box. The main or projection chamber includes vibration isolators for the PO box and a vibration isolator mounting for the substrate, with the main or projection chamber being mounted on a support structure and being isolated.

  4. Decal transfer lithography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Childs, William Robert

    A new soft-lithographic method for micropatterning polymeric resists, Decal Transfer Lithography (DTL), is described. This technique is based on the adhesive transfer of elastomeric decal patterns via the engineered adhesion and release properties of a compliant poly(dimethylsiloxane) (PDMS) patterning tool. This procedure is capable of transferring micron to sub-micron-sized features with high fidelity over large substrate areas in both open and closed forms, negative and positive image contrasts. Methods are introduced to promote adhesion of PDMS to noble metals using either of two methods: self-assembling monolayers (SAMs) or silicon dioxide capping layers. A novel UV/Ozone (UVO) mask was developed, which allows the photopatterning of UVO modifications of polymer surfaces. This modification in turn enables the direct photoinitiated patterning of resist patterns transferred by the soft-lithographic DTL method Photodefined-Cohesive Mechanical Failure (P-CMF), which fuses the design rules of the contact based adhesive transfer of PDMS in DTL with those of photolithography. The second, so-called Spartacus method, transfers the design rules of photolithography directly onto PDMS surfaces, enabling a photodefined adhesive transfer of PDMS films onto silicon oxide surfaces. The most significant advance embodied in the DTL method, however, is that is offers useful new capabilities for the design and fabrication of patterns of non-planar surfaces, 3D microfluidic assemblies, and microreactors.

  5. Lithography overlay controller formulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bode, Christopher A.; Toprac, Anthony J.; Edwards, Richard D.; Edgar, Thomas F.

    2000-08-01

    Lithography overlay refers to the measurement of the alignment of successive patterns within the manufacture of semiconductor devices. Control of overlay has become of great importance in semiconductor manufacturing, as the tolerance for overlay error is continually shrinking in order to manufacture next-generation semiconductor products. Run-to-run control has become an attractive solution to many control problems within the industry, including overlay. The term run-to-run control refers to any automated procedure whereby recipe settings are updated between successive process runs in order to keep the process under control. The following discussion will present the formulation of such a controller by examining control of overlay. A brief introduction of overlay will be given, highlighting the control challenge overlay presents. A data management methodology that groups like processes together in order to improve controllability, referred to as control threads, will then be presented. Finally, a discussion of linear model predictive control will show its utility in feedback run-to-run control.

  6. Inverse pupil wavefront optimization for immersion lithography.

    PubMed

    Han, Chunying; Li, Yanqiu; Dong, Lisong; Ma, Xu; Guo, Xuejia

    2014-10-10

    As the critical dimension of integrated circuits is continuously shrunk, thick mask induced aberration (TMIA) cannot be ignored in the lithography image process. Recently, a set of pupil wavefront optimization (PWO) approaches has been proposed to compensate for TMIA, based on a wavefront manipulator in modern scanners. However, these prior PWO methods have two intrinsic drawbacks. First, the traditional methods fell short in building up the analytical relationship between the pupil wavefront and the cost function, and used time-consuming algorithms to solve for the PWO problem. Second, in traditional methods, only the spherical aberrations were optimized to compensate for the focus exposure matrix tilt and best focus shift induced by TMIA. Thus, the degrees of freedom were limited during the optimization procedure. To overcome these restrictions, we build the analytical relationship between the pupil wavefront and the cost function based on Abbe vector imaging theory. With this analytical model and the Fletcher-Reeves conjugate-gradient algorithm, an inverse PWO method is innovated to balance the TMIA including 37 Zernike terms. Simulation results illustrate that our approach significantly improves image fidelity within a larger process window. This demonstrates that TMIA is effectively compensated by our inverse PWO approach.

  7. Lithography focus/exposure control and corrections to improve CDU at post etch step

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Young Ki; Yelverton, Mark; Tristan, John; Lee, Joungchel; Gutjahr, Karsten; Hsu, Ching-Hsiang; Wei, Hong; Wang, Lester; Li, Chen; Subramany, Lokesh; Chung, Woong Jae; Kim, Jeong Soo; Ramanathan, Vidya; Yap, LipKong; Gao, Jie; Karur-Shanmugam, Ram; Golotsvan, Anna; Herrera, Pedro; Huang, Kevin; Pierson, Bill

    2014-04-01

    As leading edge lithography moves to advanced nodes in high-mix, high-volume manufacturing environment, automated control of critical dimension (CD) within wafer has become a requirement. Current control methods to improve CD uniformity (CDU) generally rely upon the use of field by field exposure corrections via factory automation or through scanner sub-recipe. Such CDU control methods are limited to lithography step and cannot be extended to etch step. In this paper, a new method to improve CDU at post etch step by optimizing exposure at lithography step is introduced. This new solution utilizes GLOBALFOUNDRIES' factory automation system and KLA-Tencor's K-T Analyzer as the infrastructure to calculate and feed the necessary field by field level exposure corrections back to scanner, so as to achieve the optimal CDU at post etch step. CD at post lithography and post etch steps are measured by scatterometry metrology tools respectively and are used by K-T Analyzer as the input for correction calculations. This paper will explain in detail the philosophy as well as the methodology behind this novel CDU control solution. In addition, applications and use cases will be reviewed to demonstrate the capability and potential of this solution. The feasibility of adopting this solution in high-mix, high-volume manufacturing environment will be discussed as well.

  8. Photoinhibition superresolution lithography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Forman, Darren Lawrence

    While the prospect of nanoscale manufacturing has generated tremendous excitement, arbitrary patterning at nanometer length scales cannot be brought about with current photolithography---the technology that for decades has driven electronics miniaturization and enabled mass production of digital logic, memory, MEMS and flat-panel displays. This is due to the relatively long wavelength of light and diffraction, which imposes a physical not technological limit on the resolution of a far-field optical pattern. Photoinhibited superresolution (PInSR) lithography is a new scheme designed to beat the diffraction limit through two-color confinement of photopolymerization and, via efficient single-photon absorption kinetics, also be high-throughput capable. This thesis describes development of an integrated optical and materials system for investigating spatiotemporal dynamics of photoinhibited superresolution lithography, with a demonstrated 3x superresolution beyond the diffraction limit. The two-color response, arising from orthogonal photogeneration of species that participate in competing reactions, is shown to be highly complex. This is both a direct and indirect consequence of mobility. Interesting trade-offs arise: thin-film resins (necessitated by single-photon absorption kinetics) require high viscosity for film stability, but the photoinhibition effect is suppressed in viscous resins. Despite this apparent suppression, which can be overcome with high excitation of the photoinhibition system, the low mobility afforded by viscous materials is beneficial for confinement of active species. Diffusion-induced blurring of patterned photoinhibition is problematic in a resin with viscosity = 1,000 cP, and overcome in a resin with viscosity eta = 500,000 cP. Superresolution of factor 3x beyond the diffraction limit is demonstrated at 0.2 NA, with additional results indicating superresolution ability at 1.2 NA. Investigating the effect of diminished photoinhibition efficacy

  9. Physical Limitations in Lithography for Microelectronics.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Flavin, P. G.

    1981-01-01

    Describes techniques being used in the production of microelectronics kits which have replaced traditional optical lithography, including contact and optical projection printing, and X-ray and electron beam lithography. Also includes limitations of each technique described. (SK)

  10. Investigation on Laser Scanners

    SciTech Connect

    Fuss, B.

    2004-09-30

    The study and purchase of a three-dimensional laser scanner for a number of diverse metrology tasks at SLAC will be covered. Specifications including range, accuracy, scan density, resolution, field of view and more are discussed and the results of field tests and demonstrations by four potential vendors is covered. This will include details on the scanning of accelerator components in a now defunct ring on site and how the instruments compare.

  11. High throughput optical scanner

    SciTech Connect

    Basiji, David A.; van den Engh, Gerrit J.

    2001-01-01

    A scanning apparatus is provided to obtain automated, rapid and sensitive scanning of substrate fluorescence, optical density or phosphorescence. The scanner uses a constant path length optical train, which enables the combination of a moving beam for high speed scanning with phase-sensitive detection for noise reduction, comprising a light source, a scanning mirror to receive light from the light source and sweep it across a steering mirror, a steering mirror to receive light from the scanning mirror and reflect it to the substrate, whereby it is swept across the substrate along a scan arc, and a photodetector to receive emitted or scattered light from the substrate, wherein the optical path length from the light source to the photodetector is substantially constant throughout the sweep across the substrate. The optical train can further include a waveguide or mirror to collect emitted or scattered light from the substrate and direct it to the photodetector. For phase-sensitive detection the light source is intensity modulated and the detector is connected to phase-sensitive detection electronics. A scanner using a substrate translator is also provided. For two dimensional imaging the substrate is translated in one dimension while the scanning mirror scans the beam in a second dimension. For a high throughput scanner, stacks of substrates are loaded onto a conveyor belt from a tray feeder.

  12. Porphyrin-Based Photocatalytic Lithography

    SciTech Connect

    Bearinger, J; Stone, G; Christian, A; Dugan, L; Hiddessen, A; Wu, K J; Wu, L; Hamilton, J; Stockton, C; Hubbell, J

    2007-10-15

    Photocatalytic lithography is an emerging technique that couples light with coated mask materials in order to pattern surface chemistry. We excite porphyrins to create radical species that photocatalytically oxidize, and thereby pattern, chemistries in the local vicinity. The technique advantageously does not necessitate mass transport or specified substrates, it is fast and robust and the wavelength of light does not limit the resolution of patterned features. We have patterned proteins and cells in order to demonstrate the utility of photocatalytic lithography in life science applications.

  13. Polymer nanofibers by soft lithography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pisignano, Dario; Maruccio, Giuseppe; Mele, Elisa; Persano, Luana; Di Benedetto, Francesca; Cingolani, Roberto

    2005-09-01

    The fabrication of polymeric fibers by soft lithography is demonstrated. Polyurethane, patterned by capillarity-induced molding with high-resolution elastomeric templates, forms mm-long fibers with a diameter below 0.3μm. The Young's modulus of the fabricated structures, evaluated by force-distance scanning probe spectroscopy, has a value of 0.8MPa. This is an excellent example of nanostructures feasible by the combination of soft nanopatterning and high-resolution fabrication approaches for master templates, and particularly electron-beam lithography.

  14. Microfabrication using soft lithography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Xiao-Mei

    Soft Lithography is a group of non-photolithographic techniques currently being explored in our group. Four such techniques-microcontact printing (μCP), replica molding (REM), micromolding in capillaries (MIMIC), and microtransfer molding (μTM)-have been demonstrated for fabricating micro- and nanostructures of a variety of materials with dimension >=30 nm. Part I (Chapters 1-5) reviews several aspects of the three molding techniques REM, MIMIC, and μTM. Chapters 1-3 describe μTM and MIMIC, and the use of these techniques in the fabrication of functional devices. μTM is capable of generating μm-scale structures over large areas, on both planar and contoured surfaces, and is able to make 3-dimensional structures layer by layer. The capability of μTM and MIMIC has been demonstrated in the fabrication of single-mode waveguides, waveguide couplers and interferometers. The coupling between waveguides can be tailored by waveguide spacing or the differential in curing time between the waveguides and the cladding. Chapters 4-5 demonstrate the combination of REM and shrinkable polystyrene (PS) films to reduce the feature size of microstructures and to generate microstructures with high aspect ratios on both planar and curved surfaces. A shrinkable PS film is patterned with relief structures, and then heated and shrinks. Thermal shrinkage results in a 100-fold increase in the aspect ratio of the patterned microstructures in the PS film. The microstructures in the shrunken PS films can be transferred to many other materials by REM. Part II (Chapters 6-7) focuses on two issues in the microfabrication using self-assembled monolayers (SAMs) as ultrathin resists. Chapter 6 describes a selective etching solution for transferring patterns of SAMs of alkanethiolates into the underlying layers (e.g., gold, silver, and copper). This etching solution uses thiosulfate as the ligand that coordinates to the metal ions, and ferricyanide as the oxidant. It has been demonstrated to be

  15. Challenges with hyper-NA (NA>1.0) polarized light lithography for sub λ/4 resolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Flagello, Donis G.; Hansen, Steven; Geh, Bernd; Totzeck, Michael

    2005-05-01

    The use of immersion technology will extend the lifetime of 193nm and 157nm lithography by enabling numerical apertures (NA) much greater than 1.0. This paper explores the effects that will occur when the high NA systems are augmented with polarization.. Specifically we show that there are strong interactions between the polarization induced by the reticle and polarization in the optics. This has a direct impact on the across-field specification of the polarization of the optical system as it causes a large variation in the imaging impact in photoresist. The impact of lens and reticle birefringence on the imaging is also analyzed. We show that reticle birefringence should not be a major concern when the birefringence is maintained to 2nm/cm - 4nm/cm levels. The lens can be modeled by a Jones matrix approach, where multiple pupils must be defined for each polarization state. We show the impact of the optical components by using a rigorous photoresist simulation on the process window of sub-50nm features using NA>1.3. The simulator uses a full Maxwell equation solver for the mask, polarized illumination, a Jones matrix approach for the pupil, and a photoresist simulation with calibrated model. The photoresist process is also shown to interact with polarization. Different photoresist will show varying degrees of sensitivity to polarization variation.

  16. Using scanning electrochemical microscopy to probe chemistry at the solid-liquid interface in chemically amplified immersion lithography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    LeSuer, Robert J.; Fan, Fu-Ren F.; Bard, Allen J.; Taylor, J. Christopher; Tsiartas, Pavlos; Willson, Grant; Conley, Willard E.; Feit, Gene; Kunz, Roderick R.

    2004-05-01

    Three modes of scanning electrochemical microscopy (SECM) - voltammetry, pH, and conductivity - have been used to better understand the chemistry at, and diffusion through, the solid/liquid interface formed between a resist film and water in 193 nm immersion lithography. Emphasis has been placed on investigating the photoacid generator (PAG), triphenylsulfonium perfluorobutanesulfonate, and the corresponding photoacid. The reduction of triphenylsulfonium at a hemispherical Hg microelectrode was monitored using square wave voltammetry to detect trace amounts of the PAG leaching from the surface. pH measurements at a 100 μm diameter Sb microelectrode show the formation of acid in the water layer above a resist upon exposure with UV irradiation. Bipolar conductance measurements at a 100 μm Pt tip positioned 100 μm from the surface indicate that the conductivity of the solution during illumination is dependent upon the percentage of PAG in the film. Liquid chromatography mass spectrometric analysis of water samples in contact with resist films has been used to quantify the amounts (< 10 ng/cm2) of PAG leaching from the film in the dark which occurs within the first 30 seconds of contact time. Washing the film removes approximately 80% of the total leachable PAG.

  17. Scanner focus metrology for advanced node scanner monitoring and control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Jimyung; Park, Youngsik; Jeong, Taehwa; Kim, Suhyun; Yoon, Kwang-Sub; Choi, Byoung-il; Levinski, Vladimir; Kandel, Daniel; Feler, Yoel; Gutman, Nadav; Island-Ashwal, Eltsafon; Cooper, Moshe; Choi, DongSub; Herzel, Eitan; David, Tien; Kim, JungWook

    2015-03-01

    Scanner Focus window of the lithographic process becomes much smaller due to the shrink of the device node and multipatterning approach. Consequently, the required performance of scanner focus becomes tighter and more complicated. Focus control/monitoring methods such as "field-by-field focus control" or "intra-field focus control" is a necessity. Moreover, tight scanner focus performance requirement starts to raise another fundamental question: accuracy of the reported scanner focus. The insufficient accuracy of the reported scanner focus using the existing methods originates from: a) Focus measurement quality, which is due to low sensitivity of measured targets, especially around the nominal production focus. b) The scanner focus is estimated using special targets, e.g. large pitch target and not using the device-like structures (irremovable aberration impact). Both of these factors are eliminated using KLA-Tencor proprietary "Focus Offset" technology.

  18. 51. View of upper radar scanner switch in radar scanner ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    51. View of upper radar scanner switch in radar scanner building 105 from upper catwalk level showing emanating waveguides from upper switch (upper one-fourth of photograph) and emanating waveguides from lower radar scanner switch in vertical runs. - Clear Air Force Station, Ballistic Missile Early Warning System Site II, One mile west of mile marker 293.5 on Parks Highway, 5 miles southwest of Anderson, Anderson, Denali Borough, AK

  19. 90nm node contact hole patterning through applying model based OPC in KrF lithography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jeon, Young-Doo; Lee, Sang-Uk; Choi, Jaeyoung; Kim, Jeahee; Han, Jaewon

    2008-03-01

    As semiconductor technologies move toward 90nm generation and below, contact hole is one of the most challenging features to print in the semiconductor manufacturing process. There are two principal difficulties in order to define small contact hole pattern on wafer. One is insufficient process margin besides poor resolution compared with line & space pattern. The other is that contact hole should be made through pitches and sometimes random contact hole pattern should be fabricated. Therefore advanced ArF lithography scanner should be used for small contact hole printing with RETs (Resolution Enhancement Techniques) such as immersion lithography, OPC(Optical Proximity Correction), PSM(Phase Shift Mask), high NA(Numerical Aperture), OAI(Off-Axis Illumination), SRAF(Sub-resolution Assistant Feature), mask biasing and thermal flow. Like this, ArF lithography propose the method of enhancing resolution, however, we must spend an enormous amount of CoC(cost of ownership) to utilize ArF photolithography process than KrF. In this paper, we suggest the method of contact holes patterning by using KrF lithography tool in 90nm sFlash(stand alone Flash)devices. For patterning of contact hole, we apply RETs which combine OAI and Model based OPC. Additionally, in this paper we present the result of hole pattern images which operate ArF lithography equipment. Also, this study describes comparison of two wafer images that ArF lithography process which is used mask biasing and Rule based OPC, KrF lithography process which is applied hybrid OPC.

  20. Biomolecular Patterning via Photocatalytic Lithography

    SciTech Connect

    Bearinger, J P; Hiddessen, A L; Wu, K J; Christian, A T; Dugan, L C; Stone, G; Camarero, J; Hinz, A K; Hubbell, J A

    2005-02-18

    We have developed a novel method for patterning surface chemistry: Photocatalytic Lithography. This technique relies on inexpensive stamp materials and light; it does not necessitate mass transport or specified substrates, and the wavelength of light should not limit feature resolution. We have demonstrated the utility of this technique through the patterning of proteins, single cells and bacteria.

  1. Maskless, reticle-free, lithography

    DOEpatents

    Ceglio, Natale M.; Markle, David A.

    1997-11-25

    A lithography system in which the mask or reticle, which usually carries the pattern to be printed onto a substrate, is replaced by a programmable array of binary (i.e. on/off) light valves or switches which can be programmed to replicate a portion of the pattern each time an illuminating light source is flashed. The pattern of light produced by the programmable array is imaged onto a lithographic substrate which is mounted on a scanning stage as is common in optical lithography. The stage motion and the pattern of light displayed by the programmable array are precisely synchronized with the flashing illumination system so that each flash accurately positions the image of the pattern on the substrate. This is achieved by advancing the pattern held in the programmable array by an amount which corresponds to the travel of the substrate stage each time the light source flashes. In this manner the image is built up of multiple flashes and an isolated defect in the array will only have a small effect on the printed pattern. The method includes projection lithographies using radiation other than optical or ultraviolet light. The programmable array of binary switches would be used to control extreme ultraviolet (EUV), x-ray, or electron, illumination systems, obviating the need for stable, defect free masks for projection EUV, x-ray, or electron, lithographies.

  2. Advanced oxidation scanning probe lithography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ryu, Yu K.; Garcia, Ricardo

    2017-04-01

    Force microscopy enables a variety of approaches to manipulate and/or modify surfaces. Few of those methods have evolved into advanced probe-based lithographies. Oxidation scanning probe lithography (o-SPL) is the only lithography that enables the direct and resist-less nanoscale patterning of a large variety of materials, from metals to semiconductors; from self-assembled monolayers to biomolecules. Oxidation SPL has also been applied to develop sophisticated electronic and nanomechanical devices such as quantum dots, quantum point contacts, nanowire transistors or mechanical resonators. Here, we review the principles, instrumentation aspects and some device applications of o-SPL. Our focus is to provide a balanced view of the method that introduces the key steps in its evolution, provides some detailed explanations on its fundamentals and presents current trends and applications. To illustrate the capabilities and potential of o-SPL as an alternative lithography we have favored the most recent and updated contributions in nanopatterning and device fabrication.

  3. Advanced oxidation scanning probe lithography.

    PubMed

    Ryu, Yu K; Garcia, Ricardo

    2017-04-07

    Force microscopy enables a variety of approaches to manipulate and/or modify surfaces. Few of those methods have evolved into advanced probe-based lithographies. Oxidation scanning probe lithography (o-SPL) is the only lithography that enables the direct and resist-less nanoscale patterning of a large variety of materials, from metals to semiconductors; from self-assembled monolayers to biomolecules. Oxidation SPL has also been applied to develop sophisticated electronic and nanomechanical devices such as quantum dots, quantum point contacts, nanowire transistors or mechanical resonators. Here, we review the principles, instrumentation aspects and some device applications of o-SPL. Our focus is to provide a balanced view of the method that introduces the key steps in its evolution, provides some detailed explanations on its fundamentals and presents current trends and applications. To illustrate the capabilities and potential of o-SPL as an alternative lithography we have favored the most recent and updated contributions in nanopatterning and device fabrication.

  4. Maskless, reticle-free, lithography

    DOEpatents

    Ceglio, N.M.; Markle, D.A.

    1997-11-25

    A lithography system in which the mask or reticle, which usually carries the pattern to be printed onto a substrate, is replaced by a programmable array of binary (i.e. on/off) light valves or switches which can be programmed to replicate a portion of the pattern each time an illuminating light source is flashed. The pattern of light produced by the programmable array is imaged onto a lithographic substrate which is mounted on a scanning stage as is common in optical lithography. The stage motion and the pattern of light displayed by the programmable array are precisely synchronized with the flashing illumination system so that each flash accurately positions the image of the pattern on the substrate. This is achieved by advancing the pattern held in the programmable array by an amount which corresponds to the travel of the substrate stage each time the light source flashes. In this manner the image is built up of multiple flashes and an isolated defect in the array will only have a small effect on the printed pattern. The method includes projection lithographies using radiation other than optical or ultraviolet light. The programmable array of binary switches would be used to control extreme ultraviolet (EUV), x-ray, or electron, illumination systems, obviating the need for stable, defect free masks for projection EUV, x-ray, or electron, lithographies. 7 figs.

  5. Graphic Arts/Offset Lithography.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hoisington, James; Metcalf, Joseph

    This revised curriculum for graphic arts is designed to provide secondary and postsecondary students with entry-level skills and an understanding of current printing technology. It contains lesson plans based on entry-level competencies for offset lithography as identified by educators and industry representatives. The guide is divided into 15…

  6. Integrated display scanner

    DOEpatents

    Veligdan, James T.

    2004-12-21

    A display scanner includes an optical panel having a plurality of stacked optical waveguides. The waveguides define an inlet face at one end and a screen at an opposite end, with each waveguide having a core laminated between cladding. A projector projects a scan beam of light into the panel inlet face for transmission from the screen as a scan line to scan a barcode. A light sensor at the inlet face detects a return beam reflected from the barcode into the screen. A decoder decodes the return beam detected by the sensor for reading the barcode. In an exemplary embodiment, the optical panel also displays a visual image thereon.

  7. Plasmonic films based on colloidal lithography.

    PubMed

    Ai, Bin; Yu, Ye; Möhwald, Helmuth; Zhang, Gang; Yang, Bai

    2014-04-01

    This paper reviews recent advances in the field of plasmonic films fabricated by colloidal lithography. Compared with conventional lithography techniques such as electron beam lithography and focused ion beam lithography, the unconventional colloidal lithography technique with advantages of low-cost and high-throughput has made the fabrication process more efficient, and moreover brought out novel films that show remarkable surface plasmon features. These plasmonic films include those with nanohole arrays, nanovoid arrays and nanoshell arrays with precisely controlled shapes, sizes, and spacing. Based on these novel nanostructures, optical and sensing performances can be greatly enhanced. The introduction of colloidal lithography provides not only efficient fabrication processes but also plasmonic films with unique nanostructures, which are difficult to be fabricated by conventional lithography techniques.

  8. Double exposure technology for KrF lithography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Geisler, S.; Bauer, J.; Haak, U.; Stolarek, D.; Schulz, K.; Wolf, H.; Meier, W.; Trojahn, M.; Matthus, E.; Beyer, H.; Old, G.; Marschmeyer, St.; Kuck, B.

    2008-04-01

    The application of Double Exposure Lithography (DEL) would enlarge the capability of 248 nm exposure technique to smaller pitch. We will use the DEL for the integration of critical layers for dedicated applications requiring resolution enhancement into 0.13 μm BiCMOS technology. In this paper we present the overlay precision and the focus difference of 1st and 2nd exposure as critical parameters of the DEL for k I <= 0.3 lithography (100 nm half pitch) with binary masks (BIM). The realization of excellent overlay (OVL) accuracy is a main key of double exposure and double patterning techniques. We show the DEL requires primarily a good mask registration, when the wafer stays in the scanner for both exposures without alignment between 1st and 2nd exposure. The exposure tool overlay error is more a practical limit for double patterning lithography (DPL). Hence we prefer the DEL for the resolution enhancement, especially if we use the KrF high NA lithography tool for 130 nm generation. Experimental and simulated results show that the critical dimension uniformity (CDU) depends strongly on the overlay precision. The DEL results show CDU is not only affected by the OVL but also by an optical proximity effect of 1st and 2nd exposure and the mask registration. The CD uniformity of DEL demands a low focus difference between 1st and 2nd exposure and therefore requires a good focus repeatability of the exposure tool. The Depth of Focus (DOF) of 490 nm at stable CD of lines was achieved for DEL. If we change the focus of one of the exposures the CD-focus performance of spaces was reduced with simultaneous line position changing. CDU vs. focus difference between 1st and 2nd exposure demands a focus repeatability <100 nm for the exposure tool. Summary, the results show DEL has the potential to be a practical lithography enhancement method for device fabrication using high NA KrF tool generation.

  9. Resolution Improvement and Pattern Generator Development for theMaskless Micro-Ion-Beam Reduction Lithography System

    SciTech Connect

    Jiang, Ximan

    2006-05-18

    The shrinking of IC devices has followed the Moore's Law for over three decades, which states that the density of transistors on integrated circuits will double about every two years. This great achievement is obtained via continuous advance in lithography technology. With the adoption of complicated resolution enhancement technologies, such as the phase shifting mask (PSM), the optical proximity correction (OPC), optical lithography with wavelength of 193 nm has enabled 45 nm printing by immersion method. However, this achievement comes together with the skyrocketing cost of masks, which makes the production of low volume application-specific IC (ASIC) impractical. In order to provide an economical lithography approach for low to medium volume advanced IC fabrication, a maskless ion beam lithography method, called Maskless Micro-ion-beam Reduction Lithography (MMRL), has been developed in the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory. The development of the prototype MMRL system has been described by Dr. Vinh Van Ngo in his Ph.D. thesis. But the resolution realized on the prototype MMRL system was far from the design expectation. In order to improve the resolution of the MMRL system, the ion optical system has been investigated. By integrating a field-free limiting aperture into the optical column, reducing the electromagnetic interference and cleaning the RF plasma, the resolution has been improved to around 50 nm. Computational analysis indicates that the MMRL system can be operated with an exposure field size of 0.25 mm and a beam half angle of 1.0 mrad on the wafer plane. Ion-ion interactions have been studied with a two-particle physics model. The results are in excellent agreement with those published by the other research groups. The charge-interaction analysis of MMRL shows that the ion-ion interactions must be reduced in order to obtain a throughput higher than 10 wafers per hour on 300-mm wafers. In addition, two different maskless lithography strategies

  10. X-ray lithography source

    DOEpatents

    Piestrup, Melvin A.; Boyers, David G.; Pincus, Cary

    1991-01-01

    A high-intensity, inexpensive X-ray source for X-ray lithography for the production of integrated circuits. Foil stacks are bombarded with a high-energy electron beam of 25 to 250 MeV to produce a flux of soft X-rays of 500 eV to 3 keV. Methods of increasing the total X-ray power and making the cross section of the X-ray beam uniform are described. Methods of obtaining the desired X-ray-beam field size, optimum frequency spectrum and elminating the neutron flux are all described. A method of obtaining a plurality of station operation is also described which makes the process more efficient and economical. The satisfying of these issues makes transition radiation an exellent moderate-priced X-ray source for lithography.

  11. X-ray lithography source

    DOEpatents

    Piestrup, M.A.; Boyers, D.G.; Pincus, C.

    1991-12-31

    A high-intensity, inexpensive X-ray source for X-ray lithography for the production of integrated circuits is disclosed. Foil stacks are bombarded with a high-energy electron beam of 25 to 250 MeV to produce a flux of soft X-rays of 500 eV to 3 keV. Methods of increasing the total X-ray power and making the cross section of the X-ray beam uniform are described. Methods of obtaining the desired X-ray-beam field size, optimum frequency spectrum and eliminating the neutron flux are all described. A method of obtaining a plurality of station operation is also described which makes the process more efficient and economical. The satisfying of these issues makes transition radiation an excellent moderate-priced X-ray source for lithography. 26 figures.

  12. EUV Lithography: New Metrology Challenges

    SciTech Connect

    Wood, Obert

    2007-09-26

    Extreme ultraviolet lithography is one of the most promising printing techniques for high volume semiconductor manufacturing at the 22 nm half-pitch device node and beyond. Because its imaging wavelength is approximately twenty times shorter than those currently in use (13.5 nm versus 193-248 nm) and because EUV optics and masks must be provided with highly-precise reflective multilayer coatings, EUV lithography presents a number of new and difficult metrology challenges. In this paper, the current status of the metrology tools being used to characterize the figure and finish of EUV mirror surfaces, the defectivity and flatness of EUV mask blanks and the outgassing rates of EUV resist materials are discussed.

  13. What Scanner products are available?

    Atmospheric Science Data Center

    2014-12-08

    ... and longwave estimate. ERBS covers all 24-hour local time, but only for regions between 60N and 60S. Scanner and Nonscanner ... algorithm. Because of these differences, it is best to work with these two data sets separately. ERBE/ERBS scanner operated ...

  14. Multispectral scanner optical system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stokes, R. C.; Koch, N. G. (Inventor)

    1980-01-01

    An optical system for use in a multispectral scanner of the type used in video imaging devices is disclosed. Electromagnetic radiation reflected by a rotating scan mirror is focused by a concave primary telescope mirror and collimated by a second concave mirror. The collimated beam is split by a dichroic filter which transmits radiant energy in the infrared spectrum and reflects visible and near infrared energy. The long wavelength beam is filtered and focused on an infrared detector positioned in a cryogenic environment. The short wavelength beam is dispersed by a pair of prisms, then projected on an array of detectors also mounted in a cryogenic environment and oriented at an angle relative to the optical path of the dispersed short wavelength beam.

  15. Laser Scanner Demonstration

    SciTech Connect

    Fuss, B.

    2005-09-06

    In the Summer of 2004 a request for proposals went out to potential vendors to offer a three-dimensional laser scanner for a number of unique metrology tasks at the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center (SLAC). Specifications were established including range, accuracy, scan density, resolution and field of view in consideration of anticipated department requirements. Four vendors visited the site to present their system and they were asked to perform three unique tests with their system on a two day visit to SLAC. Two of the three tests were created to emulate real-world applications at SLAC while the third was an accuracy and resolution series of experiments. The scope of these tests is presented and some of the vendor's results are included.

  16. A character string scanner

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Enison, R. L.

    1971-01-01

    A computer program called Character String Scanner (CSS), is presented. It is designed to search a data set for any specified group of characters and then to flag this group. The output of the CSS program is a listing of the data set being searched with the specified group of characters being flagged by asterisks. Therefore, one may readily identify specific keywords, groups of keywords or specified lines of code internal to a computer program, in a program output, or in any other specific data set. Possible applications of this program include the automatic scan of an output data set for pertinent keyword data, the editing of a program to change the appearance of a certain word or group of words, and the conversion of a set of code to a different set of code.

  17. Space-multiplexed optical scanner.

    PubMed

    Riza, Nabeel A; Yaqoob, Zahid

    2004-05-01

    A low-loss two-dimensional optical beam scanner that is capable of delivering large (e.g., > 10 degrees) angular scans along the elevation as well as the azimuthal direction is presented. The proposed scanner is based on a space-switched parallel-serial architecture that employs a coarse-scanner module and a fine-scanner module that produce an ultrahigh scan space-fill factor, e.g., 900 x 900 distinguishable beams in a 10 degrees (elevation) x 10 degrees (azimuth) scan space. The experimentally demonstrated one-dimensional version of the proposed scanner has a supercontinuous scan, 100 distinguishable beam spots in a 2.29 degrees total scan range, and 1.5-dB optical insertion loss.

  18. Nanoimprint lithography for microfluidics manufacturing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kreindl, Gerald; Matthias, Thorsten

    2013-12-01

    The history of imprint technology as lithography method for pattern replication can be traced back to 1970's but the most significant progress has been made by the research group of S. Chou in the 1990's. Since then, it has become a popular technique with a rapidly growing interest from both research and industrial sides and a variety of new approaches have been proposed along the mainstream scientific advances. Nanoimprint lithography (NIL) is a novel method for the fabrication of micro/nanometer scale patterns with low cost, high throughput and high resolution. Unlike traditional optical lithographic approaches, which create pattern through the use of photons or electrons to modify the chemical and physical properties of the resist, NIL relies on direct mechanical deformation of the resist and can therefore achieve resolutions beyond the limitations set by light diffraction or beam scattering that are encountered in conventional lithographic techniques. The ability to fabricate structures from the micro- to the nanoscale with high precision in a wide variety of materials is of crucial importance to the advancement of micro- and nanotechnology and the biotech- sciences as a whole and will be discussed in this paper. Nanoimprinting can not only create resist patterns, as in lithography, but can also imprint functional device structures in various polymers, which can lead to a wide range of applications in electronics, photonics, data storage, and biotechnology.

  19. X ray lithography in Japan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clemens, James T.; Hill, Robert W.; Cerrina, Franco; Fuller, Gene E.; Pease, R. F.

    1991-10-01

    Integrated circuits (semiconductors) are the key components of modern computers, communication systems, consumer electronics, and the new generations of smart machines and instruments. Japan's strong position and growing influence in the manufacture of semiconductors and systems based on them is well known and well documented. Microlithography is one the most critical elements of the semiconductor manufacturing process because it determines the minimum feature size and the functional capabilities of the semiconductor. Because it is used many times in the manufacturing sequence, the quality of the microlithography process (i.e., number of defects, control for feature size, etc.) is critical in determining the yield and cost of semiconductors and hence the competitiveness of the electronics industry. At present all volume semiconductor manufacturing is done with optical UV (ultraviolet) projection lithography, twenty-year-old photographic technology which has been and is still evolving. There are many issues that limit the technical capability and cost-effectiveness of UV lithography, and thus, alternate lithographic techniques are continuously being researched and developed. X-ray lithography, which was invented in the early 1970's, holds the promise of providing higher yields in manufacturing semiconductors by virtue of enhanced process latitude, process robustness, and resolution.

  20. Maskless, resistless ion beam lithography

    SciTech Connect

    Ji, Qing

    2003-01-01

    As the dimensions of semiconductor devices are scaled down, in order to achieve higher levels of integration, optical lithography will no longer be sufficient for the needs of the semiconductor industry. Alternative next-generation lithography (NGL) approaches, such as extreme ultra-violet (EUV), X-ray, electron-beam, and ion projection lithography face some challenging issues with complicated mask technology and low throughput. Among the four major alternative NGL approaches, ion beam lithography is the only one that can provide both maskless and resistless patterning. As such, it can potentially make nano-fabrication much simpler. This thesis investigates a focused ion beam system for maskless, resistless patterning that can be made practical for high-volume production. In order to achieve maskless, resistless patterning, the ion source must be able to produce a variety of ion species. The compact FIB system being developed uses a multicusp plasma ion source, which can generate ion beams of various elements, such as O2+, BF2+, P+ etc., for surface modification and doping applications. With optimized source condition, around 85% of BF2+, over 90% of O2+ and P+ have been achieved. The brightness of the multicusp-plasma ion source is a key issue for its application to maskless ion beam lithography. It can be substantially improved by optimizing the source configuration and extractor geometry. Measured brightness of 2 keV He+ beam is as high as 440 A/cm2 • Sr, which represents a 30x improvement over prior work. Direct patterning of Si thin film using a focused O2+ ion beam has been investigated. A thin surface oxide film can be selectively formed using 3 keV O2+ ions with the dose of 1015 cm-2. The oxide can then serve as a hard mask for patterning of the Si film. The

  1. Immersion and dry scanner extensions for sub-10nm production nodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weichselbaum, Stefan; Bornebroek, Frank; de Kort, Toine; Droste, Richard; de Graaf, Roelof F.; van Ballegoij, Rob; Botter, Herman; McLaren, Matthew G.; de Boeij, Wim P.

    2015-03-01

    Progressing towards the 10nm and 7nm imaging node, pattern-placement and layer-to-layer overlay requirements keep on scaling down and drives system improvements in immersion (ArFi) and dry (ArF/KrF) scanners. A series of module enhancements in the NXT platform have been introduced; among others, the scanner is equipped with exposure stages with better dynamics and thermal control. Grid accuracy improvements with respect to calibration, setup, stability, and layout dependency tighten MMO performance and enable mix and match scanner operation. The same platform improvements also benefit focus control. Improvements in detectability and reproducibility of low contrast alignment marks enhance the alignment solution window for 10nm logic processes and beyond. The system's architecture allows dynamic use of high-order scanner optimization based on advanced actuators of projection lens and scanning stages. This enables a holistic optimization approach for the scanner, the mask, and the patterning process. Productivity scanner design modifications esp. stage speeds and optimization in metrology schemes provide lower layer costs for customers using immersion lithography as well as conventional dry technology. Imaging, overlay, focus, and productivity data is presented, that demonstrates 10nm and 7nm node litho-capability for both (immersion & dry) platforms.

  2. NXT:1980Di immersion scanner for 7nm and 5nm production nodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Graaf, Roelof; Weichselbaum, Stefan; Droste, Richard; McLaren, Matthew; Koek, Bert; de Boeij, Wim

    2016-03-01

    Immersion scanners remain the critical lithography workhorses in semiconductor device manufacturing. When progressing towards the 7nm device node for logic and D18 device node for DRAM production, pattern-placement and layer-to-layer overlay requirements keep progressively scaling down and consequently require system improvements in immersion scanners. The on-product-overlay requirements are approaching levels of only a few nanometers, imposing stringent requirements on the scanner tool design in terms of reproducibility, accuracy and stability. In this paper we report on the performance of the NXT:1980Di immersion scanner. The NXT:1980Di builds upon the NXT:1970Ci, that is widely used for 16nm, 14nm and 10nm high-volume manufacturing. We will discuss the NXT:1980Di system- and sub-system/module enhancements that drive the scanner overlay, focus and productivity performance. Overlay, imaging, focus, productivity and defectivity data will be presented for multiple tools. To further reduce the on-product overlay system performance, alignment sensor contrast improvements as well as active reticle temperature conditioning are implemented on the NXT:1980Di. Reticle temperature conditioning will reduce reticle heating overlay and the higher contrast alignment sensor will improve alignment robustness for processed alignment targets. Due to an increased usage of multiple patterning techniques, an increased number of immersion exposures is required. NXT:1980Di scanner design modifications raised productivity levels from 250wph to 275wph. This productivity enhancement provides lower cost of ownership (CoO) for customers using immersion technology.

  3. Intraoral 3D scanner

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kühmstedt, Peter; Bräuer-Burchardt, Christian; Munkelt, Christoph; Heinze, Matthias; Palme, Martin; Schmidt, Ingo; Hintersehr, Josef; Notni, Gunther

    2007-09-01

    Here a new set-up of a 3D-scanning system for CAD/CAM in dental industry is proposed. The system is designed for direct scanning of the dental preparations within the mouth. The measuring process is based on phase correlation technique in combination with fast fringe projection in a stereo arrangement. The novelty in the approach is characterized by the following features: A phase correlation between the phase values of the images of two cameras is used for the co-ordinate calculation. This works contrary to the usage of only phase values (phasogrammetry) or classical triangulation (phase values and camera image co-ordinate values) for the determination of the co-ordinates. The main advantage of the method is that the absolute value of the phase at each point does not directly determine the coordinate. Thus errors in the determination of the co-ordinates are prevented. Furthermore, using the epipolar geometry of the stereo-like arrangement the phase unwrapping problem of fringe analysis can be solved. The endoscope like measurement system contains one projection and two camera channels for illumination and observation of the object, respectively. The new system has a measurement field of nearly 25mm × 15mm. The user can measure two or three teeth at one time. So the system can by used for scanning of single tooth up to bridges preparations. In the paper the first realization of the intraoral scanner is described.

  4. Coastal Zone Color Scanner

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, B.

    1988-01-01

    The Coastal Zone Color Scanner (CZCS) spacecraft ocean color instrument is capable of measuring and mapping global ocean surface chlorophyll concentration. It is a scanning radiometer with multiband capability. With new electronics and some mechanical, and optical re-work, it probably can be made flight worthy. Some additional components of a second flight model are also available. An engineering study and further tests are necessary to determine exactly what effort is required to properly prepare the instrument for spaceflight and the nature of interfaces to prospective spacecraft. The CZCS provides operational instrument capability for monitoring of ocean productivity and currents. It could be a simple, low cost alternative to developing new instruments for ocean color imaging. Researchers have determined that with global ocean color data they can: specify quantitatively the role of oceans in the global carbon cycle and other major biogeochemical cycles; determine the magnitude and variability of annual primary production by marine phytoplankton on a global scale; understand the fate of fluvial nutrients and their possible affect on carbon budgets; elucidate the coupling mechanism between upwelling and large scale patterns in ocean basins; answer questions concerning the large scale distribution and timing of spring blooms in the global ocean; acquire a better understanding of the processes associated with mixing along the edge of eddies, coastal currents, western boundary currents, etc., and acquire global data on marine optical properties.

  5. Study on RLS trade-off resist upgrade for production ready EUV lithography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Junghyung; Kim, Jieun; Jeong, Seunguk; Lim, Mijung; Koo, Sunyoung; Lim, Chang-Moon; Kim, Young-Sik

    2016-03-01

    Extreme Ultraviolet (EUV) is the most promising technology as substitute for multiple patterning based on ArF immersion lithography. If enough productivity can be accomplished, EUV will take main role in the chip manufacturing. Since the introduction of NXE3300, many significant results have been achieved in source power and availability, but lots of improvements are still required in various aspects for the implementation of EUV lithography on high volume manufacturing. Among them, it is especially important to attain high sensitivity resist without degrading other resolution performance. In this paper, performances of various resists were evaluated with real device patterns on NXE3300 scanner and technical progress of up-to-date EUV resists will be shown by comparing with the performance of their predecessors. Finally the prospect of overcoming the triangular trade-off between sensitivity, resolution, line edge roughness (LER) and achieving high volume manufacturing will be discussed.

  6. Discharge produced plasma source for EUV lithography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borisov, V.; Eltzov, A.; Ivanov, A.; Khristoforov, O.; Kirykhin, Yu.; Vinokhodov, A.; Vodchits, V.; Mishhenko, V.; Prokofiev, A.

    2007-04-01

    Extreme ultraviolet (EUV) radiation is seen as the most promising candidate for the next generation of lithography and semiconductor chip manufacturing for the 32 nm node and below. The paper describes experimental results obtained with discharge produced plasma (DPP) sources based on pinch effect in a Xe and Sn vapour as potential tool for the EUV lithography. Problems of DPP source development are discussed.

  7. MSS D Multispectral Scanner System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lauletta, A. M.; Johnson, R. L.; Brinkman, K. L. (Principal Investigator)

    1982-01-01

    The development and acceptance testing of the 4-band Multispectral Scanners to be flown on LANDSAT D and LANDSAT D Earth resources satellites are summarized. Emphasis is placed on the acceptance test phase of the program. Test history and acceptance test algorithms are discussed. Trend data of all the key performance parameters are included and discussed separately for each of the two multispectral scanner instruments. Anomalies encountered and their resolutions are included.

  8. Mask lithography for display manufacturing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sandstrom, T.; Ekberg, P.

    2010-05-01

    The last ten years have seen flat displays conquer our briefcases, desktops, and living rooms. There has been an enormous development in production technology, not least in lithography and photomasks. Current masks for large displays are more than 2 m2 and make 4-6 1X prints on glass substrates that are 9 m2. One of the most challenging aspects of photomasks for displays is the so called mura, stripes or blemishes which cause visible defects in the finished display. For the future new and even tighter maskwriter specifications are driven by faster transistors and more complex pixel layouts made necessary by the market's wish for still better image quality, multi-touch panels, 3D TVs, and the next wave of e-book readers. Large OLED screens will pose new challenges. Many new types of displays will be lowcost and use simple lithography, but anything which can show video and high quality photographic images needs a transistor backplane and sophisticated masks for its production.

  9. Logic gate scanner focus control in high-volume manufacturing using scatterometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dare, Richard J.; Swain, Bryan; Laughery, Michael

    2004-05-01

    Tool matching and optimal process control are critical requirements for success in semiconductor manufacturing. It is imperative that a tool"s operating conditions are understood and controlled in order to create a process that is repeatable and produces devices within specifications. Likewise, it is important where possible to match multiple systems using some methodology, so that regardless of which tool is used the process remains in control. Agere Systems is currently using Timbre Technologies" Optical Digital Profilometry (ODP) scatterometry for controlling Nikon scanner focus at the most critical lithography layer; logic gate. By adjusting focus settings and verifying the resultant changes in resist profile shape using ODP, it becomes possible to actively control scanner focus to achieve a desired resist profile. Since many critical lithography processes are designed to produce slightly re-entrant resist profiles, this type of focus control is not possible via Critical Dimension Scanning Electron Microscopy (CDSEM) where reentrant profiles cannot be accurately determined. Additionally, the high throughput and non-destructive nature of this measurement technique saves both cycle time and wafer costs compared to cross-section SEM. By implementing an ODP daily process check and after any maintenance on a scanner, Agere successfully enabled focus drift control, i.e. making necessary focus or equipment changes in order to maintain a desired resist profile.

  10. Particle Lithography Enables Fabrication of Multicomponent Nanostructures

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Wei-feng; Swartz, Logan A.; Li, Jie-Ren; Liu, Yang; Liu, Gang-yu

    2014-01-01

    Multicomponent nanostructures with individual geometries have attracted much attention because of their potential to carry out multiple functions synergistically. The current work reports a simple method using particle lithography to fabricate multicomponent nanostructures of metals, proteins, and organosiloxane molecules, each with its own geometry. Particle lithography is well-known for its capability to produce arrays of triangular-shaped nanostructures with novel optical properties. This paper extends the capability of particle lithography by combining a particle template in conjunction with surface chemistry to produce multicomponent nanostructures. The advantages and limitations of this approach will also be addressed. PMID:24707328

  11. Multi-shaped beam proof of lithography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Slodowski, Matthias; Doering, Hans-Joachim; Dorl, Wolfgang; Stolberg, Ines A.

    2010-03-01

    In this paper a full package high throughput multi electron-beam approach, called Multi Shaped Beam (MSB), for applications in mask making as well as direct write will be presented including complex proof-of-lithography results. The basic concept enables a significant exposure shot count reduction for advanced patterns compared to standard Variable Shaped Beam (VSB) systems and allows full pattern flexibility by concurrently using MSB, VSB and Cell Projection (CP). Proof of lithography results will be presented, which have been performed using a fully operational electron-beam lithography system including data path and substrate scanning by x/y-stage movement.

  12. Method for extreme ultraviolet lithography

    DOEpatents

    Felter, T. E.; Kubiak, G. D.

    2000-01-01

    A method of producing a patterned array of features, in particular, gate apertures, in the size range 0.4-0.05 .mu.m using projection lithography and extreme ultraviolet (EUV) radiation. A high energy laser beam is used to vaporize a target material in order to produce a plasma which in turn, produces extreme ultraviolet radiation of a characteristic wavelength of about 13 nm for lithographic applications. The radiation is transmitted by a series of reflective mirrors to a mask which bears the pattern to be printed. The demagnified focused mask pattern is, in turn, transmitted by means of appropriate optics and in a single exposure, to a substrate coated with photoresists designed to be transparent to EUV radiation and also satisfy conventional processing methods.

  13. Method for extreme ultraviolet lithography

    DOEpatents

    Felter, T. E.; Kubiak, Glenn D.

    1999-01-01

    A method of producing a patterned array of features, in particular, gate apertures, in the size range 0.4-0.05 .mu.m using projection lithography and extreme ultraviolet (EUV) radiation. A high energy laser beam is used to vaporize a target material in order to produce a plasma which in turn, produces extreme ultraviolet radiation of a characteristic wavelength of about 13 nm for lithographic applications. The radiation is transmitted by a series of reflective mirrors to a mask which bears the pattern to be printed. The demagnified focused mask pattern is, in turn, transmitted by means of appropriate optics and in a single exposure, to a substrate coated with photoresists designed to be transparent to EUV radiation and also satisfy conventional processing methods.

  14. Defect tolerant transmission lithography mask

    DOEpatents

    Vernon, Stephen P.

    2000-01-01

    A transmission lithography mask that utilizes a transparent substrate or a partially transparent membrane as the active region of the mask. A reflective single layer or multilayer coating is deposited on the membrane surface facing the illumination system. The coating is selectively patterned (removed) to form transmissive (bright) regions. Structural imperfections and defects in the coating have negligible effect on the aerial image of the mask master pattern since the coating is used to reflect radiation out of the entrance pupil of the imaging system. Similarly, structural imperfections in the clear regions of the membrane have little influence on the amplitude or phase of the transmitted electromagnetic fields. Since the mask "discards," rather than absorbs, unwanted radiation, it has reduced optical absorption and reduced thermal loading as compared to conventional designs. For EUV applications, the mask circumvents the phase defect problem, and is independent of the thermal load during exposure.

  15. Mask requirements for advanced lithography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trybula, Walter J.; Engelstad, Roxann L.

    1998-06-01

    Within the n ext 10 years, sub-100 nm features will be required for state-of-the-industry devices. The tolerances for errors at 100 nm or less are substantially smaller than can be achieved today. A critical element of the error budget is the mask. For the 100 nm generation, the 4x mask image placement requirement is 20 nm with CD requirements as low as 9 nm. The challenge would be significant if the only improvement were to develop superior optical masks. There are multiple advanced technologies that are vying to be the successor to optical lithography. Each of these has a unique mask requirement. The leading contenders for the next generation are 1x x-ray, projection e-beam, ion beam, EUV and cell projection e-beam. The x-ray design is a proximity system that employs a 1x membrane mask. Projection e-beam uses a membrane mask with stabilizing struts. Ion beam lithography employs a stencil membrane mask with a carbon coating. EUV employs a 13 nm radiation source that requires a reflective mask. Cell projection e-beam has 25x or greater image masks that are stitched on the wafer. All the technologies indicated above. Once a total error budget for the mask is known, it is necessary to divide the total into the constituent parts. The major sources of distortion can be categorized into eight areas: mask blank processing, e- beam writing, pattern transfer, pellicle effects, mounting, thermal loadings, dynamic effects during exposure and radiation damage. The distortions introduced by each of these depend upon the type of mask; so, individual mask calculations must be made. The purpose of this paper is to review the modeling requirements of each of the categories and to highlight some results from each of the mask configurations.

  16. Multispectral Scanner for Monitoring Plants

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gat, Nahum

    2004-01-01

    A multispectral scanner has been adapted to capture spectral images of living plants under various types of illumination for purposes of monitoring the health of, or monitoring the transfer of genes into, the plants. In a health-monitoring application, the plants are illuminated with full-spectrum visible and near infrared light and the scanner is used to acquire a reflected-light spectral signature known to be indicative of the health of the plants. In a gene-transfer- monitoring application, the plants are illuminated with blue or ultraviolet light and the scanner is used to capture fluorescence images from a green fluorescent protein (GFP) that is expressed as result of the gene transfer. The choice of wavelength of the illumination and the wavelength of the fluorescence to be monitored depends on the specific GFP.

  17. Source mask optimization study based on latest Nikon immersion scanner

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Jun; Wei, Fang; Chen, Lijun; Zhang, Chenming; Zhang, Wei; Nishinaga, Hisashi; El-Sewefy, Omar; Gao, Gen-Sheng; Lafferty, Neal; Meiring, Jason; Zhang, Recoo; Zhu, Cynthia

    2016-03-01

    The 2x nm logic foundry node has many challenges since critical levels are pushed close to the limits of low k1 ArF water immersion lithography. For these levels, improvements in lithographic performance can translate to decreased rework and increased yield. Source Mask Optimization (SMO) is one such route to realize these image fidelity improvements. During SMO, critical layout constructs are intensively optimized in both the mask and source domain, resulting in a solution for maximum lithographic entitlement. From the hardware side, advances in source technology have enabled free-form illumination. The approach allows highly customized illumination, enabling the practical application of SMO sources. The customized illumination sources can be adjusted for maximum versatility. In this paper, we present a study on a critical layer of an advanced foundry logic node using the latest ILT based SMO software, paired with state-of-the-art scanner hardware and intelligent illuminator. Performance of the layer's existing POR source is compared with the ideal SMO result and the installed source as realized on the intelligent illuminator of an NSR-S630D scanner. Both simulation and on-silicon measurements are used to confirm that the performance of the studied layer meets established specifications.

  18. Combined dose and geometry correction (DMG) for low energy multi electron beam lithography (5kV): application to the 16nm node

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martin, Luc; Manakli, Serdar; Bayle, Sebastien; Belledent, Jérôme; Soulan, Sebastien; Wiedemann, Pablo; Farah, Abdi; Schiavone, Patrick

    2012-03-01

    Lithography faces today many challenges to meet the ITRS road-map. 193nm is still today the only existing industrial option to address high volume production for the 22nm node. Nevertheless to achieve such a resolution, double exposure is mandatory for critical level patterning. EUV lithography is still challenged by the availability of high power source and mask defectivity and suffers from a high cost of ownership perspective. Its introduction is now not foreseen before 2015. Parallel to these mask-based technologies, maskless lithography regularly makes significant progress in terms of potential and maturity. The massively parallel e-beam solution appears as a real candidate for high volume manufacturing. Several industrial projects are under development, one in the US, with the KLA REBL project and two in Europe driven by IMS Nanofabrication (Austria; MAPPER (The Netherlands). Among the developments to be performed to secure the takeoff of the multi-beam technology, the availability of a rapid and robust data treatment solution will be one of the major challenges. Within this data preparation flow, advanced proximity effect corrections must be implemented to address the 16nm node and below. This paper will detail this process and compare correction strategies in terms of robustness and accuracy. It will be based on results obtained using a MAPPER tool within the IMAGINE program driven by CEA-LETI, in Grenoble, France. All proximity effects corrections and the dithering step were performed using the software platform Inscale® from Aselta Nanographics. One important advantage of Inscale® is the ability to combine both model based dose and geometry adjustment to accurately pattern critical features. The paper will focus on the advantage of combining those two corrections at the 16nm node instead of using only geometry corrections. Thanks to the simulation capability of Inscale®, pattern fidelity and correction robustness will be evaluated and compared between

  19. 28nm node process optimization: a lithography centric view

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seltmann, Rolf

    2014-10-01

    Many experts claim that the 28nm technology node will be the most cost effective technology node forever. This results from primarily from the cost of manufacturing due to the fact that 28nm is the last true Single Patterning (SP) node. It is also affected by the dramatic increase of design costs and the limited shrink factor of the next following nodes. Thus, it is assumed that this technology still will be alive still for many years. To be cost competitive, high yields are mandatory. Meanwhile, leading edge foundries have optimized the yield of the 28nm node to such a level that that it is nearly exclusively defined by random defectivity. However, it was a long way to go to come to that level. In my talk I will concentrate on the contribution of lithography to this yield learning curve. I will choose a critical metal patterning application. I will show what was needed to optimize the process window to a level beyond the usual OPC model work that was common on previous nodes. Reducing the process (in particular focus) variability is a complementary need. It will be shown which improvements were needed in tooling, process control and design-mask-wafer interaction to remove all systematic yield detractors. Over the last couple of years new scanner platforms were introduced that were targeted for both better productivity and better parametric performance. But this was not a clear run-path. It needed some extra affords of the tool suppliers together with the Fab to bring the tool variability down to the necessary level. Another important topic to reduce variability is the interaction of wafer none-planarity and lithography optimization. Having an accurate knowledge of within die topography is essential for optimum patterning. By completing both the variability reduction work and the process window enhancement work we were able to transfer the original marginal process budget to a robust positive budget and thus ensuring high yield and low costs.

  20. Choosing a Scanner: Points To Consider before Buying a Scanner.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Raby, Chris

    1998-01-01

    Outlines ten factors to consider before buying a scanner: size of document; type of document; color; speed and volume; resolution; image enhancement; image compression; optical character recognition; scanning subsystem; and the option to use a commercial bureau service. The importance of careful analysis of requirements is emphasized. (AEF)

  1. Secrets of subwavelength imaging and lithography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hemmer, Philip R.

    2011-08-01

    To understand the limits and tradeoffs of nearly all existing subwavelength imaging techniques it sufficient to understand magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and its generalizations. In many cases, subwavelength optical lithography can be viewed as the inverse problem to imaging and so the same principles apply. A simple review of MRI is given which shows how the most popular subwavelength imaging and lithography techniques naturally arise as special cases.

  2. A case study in scanner optimisation.

    PubMed

    Dudley, N J; Gibson, N M

    2014-02-01

    Ultrasound scanner preset programmes are factory set or tailored to user requirements. Scanners may, therefore, have different settings for the same application, even on similar equipment in a single department. The aims of this study were: (1) to attempt to match the performance of two scanners, where one was preferred and (2) to assess differences between six scanners used for breast ultrasound within our organisation. The Nottingham Ultrasound Quality Assurance software was used to compare imaging performance. Images of a Gammex RMI 404GS test object were collected from six scanners, using default presets, factory presets and settings matched to a preferred scanner. Resolution, low contrast performance and high contrast performance were measured. The performance of two scanners was successfully matched, where one had been preferred. Default presets varied across the six scanners, three different presets being used. The most used preset differed in settings across the scanners, most notably in the use of different frequency modes. The factory preset was more consistent across the scanners, the main variation being in dynamic range (55-70 dB). Image comparisons showed significant differences, which were reduced or eliminated by adjustment of settings to match a reference scanner. It is possible to match scanner performance using the Nottingham Ultrasound Quality Assurance software as a verification tool. Ultrasound users should be aware that scanners may not behave in a similar fashion, even with apparently equivalent presets. It should be possible to harmonise presets by consensus amongst users.

  3. Ultrasonic scanner for footprint identification

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Derr, L. J.

    1974-01-01

    Scanner includes transducer, acoustical drive, acoustical receiver, X and Y position indicators, and cathode-ray tube. Transducer sends ultrasonic pulses into shoe sole or shoeprint. Reflected signals are picked up by acoustic receiver and fed to cathode-ray tube. Resulting display intensity is directly proportional to reflected signal magnitude.

  4. Scanner as a Fine Art

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fontes, Kris

    2008-01-01

    Not every art department is fortunate enough to have access to digital cameras and image-editing software, but if a scanner, computer, and printer are available, students can create some imaginative and surreal work. This high-school level lesson begins with a discussion of self-portraits, and then moves to students creating images by scanning…

  5. Improvements to Existing Jefferson Lab Wire Scanners

    SciTech Connect

    McCaughan, Michael D.; Tiefenback, Michael G.; Turner, Dennis L.

    2013-06-01

    This poster will detail the augmentation of selected existing CEBAF wire scanners with commercially available hardware, PMTs, and self created software in order to improve the scanners both in function and utility.

  6. Extreme-UV lithography condenser

    DOEpatents

    Sweatt, William C.; Sweeney, Donald W.; Shafer, David; McGuire, James

    2001-01-01

    Condenser system for use with a ringfield camera in projection lithography where the condenser includes a series of segments of a parent aspheric mirror having one foci at a quasi-point source of radiation and the other foci at the radius of a ringfield have all but one or all of their beams translated and rotated by sets of mirrors such that all of the beams pass through the real entrance pupil of a ringfield camera about one of the beams and fall onto the ringfield radius as a coincident image as an arc of the ringfield. The condenser has a set of correcting mirrors with one of the correcting mirrors of each set, or a mirror that is common to said sets of mirrors, from which the radiation emanates, is a concave mirror that is positioned to shape a beam segment having a chord angle of about 25 to 85 degrees into a second beam segment having a chord angle of about 0 to 60 degrees.

  7. Array imaging system for lithography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kirner, Raoul; Mueller, Kevin; Malaurie, Pauline; Vogler, Uwe; Noell, Wilfried; Scharf, Toralf; Voelkel, Reinhard

    2016-09-01

    We present an integrated array imaging system based on a stack of microlens arrays. The microlens arrays are manufactured by melting resist and reactive ion etching (RIE) technology on 8'' wafers (fused silica) and mounted by wafer-level packaging (WLP)1. The array imaging system is configured for 1X projection (magnification m = +1) of a mask pattern onto a planar wafer. The optical system is based on two symmetric telescopes, thus anti-symmetric wavefront aberrations like coma, distortion, lateral color are minimal. Spherical aberrations are reduced by using microlenses with aspherical lens profiles. In our system design approach, sub-images of individual imaging channels do not overlap to avoid interference. Image superposition is achieved by moving the array imaging system during the exposure time. A tandem Koehler integrator illumination system (MO Exposure Optics) is used for illumination. The angular spectrum of the illumination light underfills the pupils of the imaging channels to avoid crosstalk. We present and discuss results from simulation, mounting and testing of a first prototype of the investigated array imaging system for lithography.

  8. Signal response metrology (SRM): a new approach for lithography metrology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pandev, Stilian; Fang, Fang; Kim, Young Ki; Tsai, Jamie; Vaid, Alok; Subramany, Lokesh; Sanko, Dimitry; Ramanathan, Vidya; Zhou, Ren; Venkataraman, Kartik; Haupt, Ronny

    2015-03-01

    CD uniformity requirements at 20nm and more advanced nodes have challenged the precision limits of CD-SEM metrology, conventionally used for scanner qualification and in-line focus/dose monitoring on product wafers. Optical CD metrology has consequently gained adoption for these applications because of its superior precision, but has been limited adopted, due to challenges with long time-to-results and robustness to process variation. Both of these challenges are due to the limitations imposed by geometric modeling of the photoresist (PR) profile as required by conventional RCWA-based scatterometry. Signal Response Metrology (SRM) is a new technique that obviates the need for geometric modeling by directly correlating focus, dose, and CD to the spectral response of a scatterometry tool. Consequently, it suggests superior accuracy and robustness to process variation for focus/dose monitoring, as well as reducing the time to set up a new measurement recipe from days to hours. This work describes the fundamental concepts of SRM and the results of its application to lithography metrology and control. These results include time to results and measurement performance data on Focus, Dose and CD measurements performed on real devices and on design rule metrology targets.

  9. Novel metal containing resists for EUV lithography extendibility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    De Simone, Danilo; Sayan, Safak; Dei, Satoshi; Pollentier, Ivan; Kuwahara, Yuhei; Vandenberghe, Geert; Nafus, Kathleen; Shiratani, Motohiro; Nakagawa, Hisashi; Naruoka, Takehiko

    2016-03-01

    Strong interest has recently developed among the researchers in the use of metals in extreme ultraviolet (EUV) lithography photoresists [1, 2] aiming to simultaneously achieve the resolution, line-width roughness and sensitivity (RLS) requirements for 10nm technology node and below and have the highest productivity with low exposure dose requirements (below 20mJ/cm2). In this paper two different metal containing resists (MCR) are discussed: the first one uses metal oxide nanoparticles (NP) bonded with ligands as an alternative non chemically amplified EUV photoresist; the second one introduces a metal species (the sensitizer) into a conventional chemically amplified EUV photoresist. In both cases, the metal is added to the resist system to increase the absorption of EUV photons as well as increase the generation of secondary electrons, thereby making more effective use of the dose. The initial work is focused on manufacturing compatibility, concerning metal cross-contamination, outgassing and hydrides formation risk. Next, lithographic performance is evaluated with respect to the RLS requirements by patterning on NXE:3300 full field scanner exposure tool, with particular emphasis on the material stability of different formulations.. Finally, imaging results at different processing conditions are also reported and discussed.

  10. Lithography aware overlay metrology target design method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Myungjun; Smith, Mark D.; Lee, Joonseuk; Jung, Mirim; Lee, Honggoo; Kim, Youngsik; Han, Sangjun; Adel, Michael E.; Lee, Kangsan; Lee, Dohwa; Choi, Dongsub; Liu, Zephyr; Itzkovich, Tal; Levinski, Vladimir; Levy, Ady

    2016-03-01

    We present a metrology target design (MTD) framework based on co-optimizing lithography and metrology performance. The overlay metrology performance is strongly related to the target design and optimizing the target under different process variations in a high NA optical lithography tool and measurement conditions in a metrology tool becomes critical for sub-20nm nodes. The lithography performance can be quantified by device matching and printability metrics, while accuracy and precision metrics are used to quantify the metrology performance. Based on using these metrics, we demonstrate how the optimized target can improve target printability while maintaining the good metrology performance for rotated dipole illumination used for printing a sub-100nm diagonal feature in a memory active layer. The remaining challenges and the existing tradeoff between metrology and lithography performance are explored with the metrology target designer's perspective. The proposed target design framework is completely general and can be used to optimize targets for different lithography conditions. The results from our analysis are both physically sensible and in good agreement with experimental results.

  11. IR line scanner on UAV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Shi-chao; Qin, Jie-xin; Qi, Hong-xing; Xiao, Gong-hai

    2011-08-01

    This paper introduces the designing principle and method of the IR line scanner on UAV in three aspects of optical-mechanical system, electronics system and processing software. It makes the system achieve good results in practical application that there are many features in the system such as light weight, small size, low power assumption, wide field of view, high instantaneous field of view, high noise equivalent temperature difference, wirelessly controlled and so on. The entire system is designed as follows: Multi-element scanner is put into use for reducing the electrical noise bandwidth, and then improving SNR; Square split aperture scanner is put into use for solving the image ratation distortion, besides fit for large velocity to height ratio; DSP is put into use for non-uniformity correction and background nosie subtraction, and then improving the imagery quality; SD card is put into use as image data storage media instead of the hard disk; The image data is stored in SD card in FAT32 file system, easily playbacked by processing software on Windows and Linux operating system; wireless transceiver module is put into use for wirelessly controlled.

  12. Vacuum Attachment for XRF Scanner

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schramm, Harry F.; Kaiser, Bruce

    2005-01-01

    Vacuum apparatuses have been developed for increasing the range of elements that can be identified by use of x-ray fluorescent (XRF) scanners of the type mentioned in the two immediately preceding articles. As a consequence of the underlying physical principles, in the presence of air, such an XRF scanner is limited to analysis of chlorine and elements of greater atomic number. When the XRF scanner is operated in a vacuum, it extends the range of analysis to lower atomic numbers - even as far as aluminum and sodium. Hence, more elements will be available for use in XRF labeling of objects as discussed in the two preceding articles. The added benefits of the extended capabilities also have other uses for NASA. Detection of elements of low atomic number is of high interest to the aerospace community. High-strength aluminum alloys will be easily analyzed for composition. Silicon, a major contaminant in certain processes, will be detectable before the process is begun, possibly eliminating weld or adhesion problems. Exotic alloys will be evaluated for composition prior to being placed in service where lives depend on them. And in the less glamorous applications, such as bolts and fasteners, substandard products and counterfeit items will be evaluated at the receiving function and never allowed to enter the operation

  13. Force-controlled inorganic crystallization lithography.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Chao-Min; LeDuc, Philip R

    2006-09-20

    Lithography plays a key role in integrated circuits, optics, information technology, biomedical applications, catalysis, and separation technologies. However, inorganic lithography techniques remain of limited utility for applications outside of the typical foci of integrated circuit manufacturing. In this communication, we have developed a novel stamping method that applies pressure on the upper surface of the stamp to regulate the dewetting process of the inorganic buffer and the evaporation rate of the solvent in this buffer between the substrate and the surface of the stamp. We focused on generating inorganic microstructures with specific locations and also on enabling the ability to pattern gradients during the crystallization of the inorganic salts. This approach utilized a combination of lithography with bottom-up growth and assembly of inorganic crystals. This work has potential applications in a variety of fields, including studying inorganic material patterning and small-scale fabrication technology.

  14. Data sharing system for lithography APC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kawamura, Eiichi; Teranishi, Yoshiharu; Shimabara, Masanori

    2007-03-01

    We have developed a simple and cost-effective data sharing system between fabs for lithography advanced process control (APC). Lithography APC requires process flow, inter-layer information, history information, mask information and so on. So, inter-APC data sharing system has become necessary when lots are to be processed in multiple fabs (usually two fabs). The development cost and maintenance cost also have to be taken into account. The system handles minimum information necessary to make trend prediction for the lots. Three types of data have to be shared for precise trend prediction. First one is device information of the lots, e.g., process flow of the device and inter-layer information. Second one is mask information from mask suppliers, e.g., pattern characteristics and pattern widths. Last one is history data of the lots. Device information is electronic file and easy to handle. The electronic file is common between APCs and uploaded into the database. As for mask information sharing, mask information described in common format is obtained via Wide Area Network (WAN) from mask-vender will be stored in the mask-information data server. This information is periodically transferred to one specific lithography-APC server and compiled into the database. This lithography-APC server periodically delivers the mask-information to every other lithography-APC server. Process-history data sharing system mainly consists of function of delivering process-history data. In shipping production lots to another fab, the product-related process-history data is delivered by the lithography-APC server from the shipping site. We have confirmed the function and effectiveness of data sharing systems.

  15. System considerations for maskless lithography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karnowski, Thomas; Joy, David; Allard, Larry; Clonts, Lloyd

    2004-05-01

    Lithographic processes for printing device structures on integrated circuits (ICs) are the fundamental technology behind Moore's law. Next-generation techniques like maskless lithography or ML2 have the advantage that the long, tedious and expensive process of fabricating a unique mask for the manufactured chip is not necessary. However, there are some rather daunting prblems with establishing ML2 as a viable commercial technology. The data rate necessary for ML2 to be competitive in manufacturing is not feasible with technology in the near future. There is also doubt that the competing technologies for the writing mechanisms and corresponding photoresist (or analogous medium) will be able to accurately produce the desired patterns necessary to produce multi-layer semiconductor devices. In this work, we model the maskless printing system from a signal processing point of view, utilizing image processing algorithms and concepts to study the effects of various real-world constraints and their implications for a ML2 system. The ML2 elements are discrete devices, and it is doubtful that their motion can be controlled to the level where a one-for-one element to exposed pixel relationship is allowable. Some level of sub-element resolution can be achieved with gray scale levels, but with the highly integrated manufacturing practices required to achieve massive parallelism, the most effective elements will be simple on-ofrf switches that fire a fixed level of energy at the target medium. Consequently gray-scale level devidces are likely not an option. Another problem with highly integrated manufacturing methods is device uniformity. Consequently, we analyze the redundant scanning array concept (RSA) conceived by Berglund et al. which can defeat many of these problems. We determine some basic equations governing its application and we focus on applying the technique to an array of low-energy electron emitters. Using the results of Monte Carlo simulations on electron beam

  16. SYSTEM CONSIDERATIONS FOR MASKLESS LITHOGRAPHY

    SciTech Connect

    Karnowski, Thomas Paul; Joy, David; Allard Jr, Lawrence Frederick; Clonts, Lloyd G

    2004-01-01

    Lithographic processes for printing device structures on integrated circuits (ICs) are the fundamental technology behind Moore's law. Next-generation techniques like maskless lithography or ML2 have the advantage that the long, tedious and expensive process of fabricating a unique mask for the manufactured chip is not necessary. However, there are some rather daunting problems with establishing ML2 as a viable commercial technology. The data rate necessary for ML2 to be competitive in manufacturing is not feasible with technology in the near future. There is also doubt that the competing technologies for the writing mechanisms and corresponding photoresist (or analogous medium) will be able to accurately produce the desired patterns necessary to produce multi-layer semiconductor devices. In this work, we model the maskless printing system from a signal processing point of view, utilizing image processing algorithms and concepts to study the effects of various real-world constraints and their implications for a ML2 system. The ML2 elements are discrete devices, and it is doubtful that their motion can be controlled to the level where a one-for-one element to exposed pixel relationship is allowable. Some level of sub-element resolution can be achieved with gray scale levels, but with the highly integrated manufacturing practices required to achieve massive parallelism, the most effective elements will be simple on-off switches that fire a fixed level of energy at the target medium. Consequently gray-scale level devices are likely not an option. Another problem with highly integrated manufacturing methods is device uniformity. Consequently, we analyze the redundant scanning array concept (RSA) conceived by Berglund et al. which can defeat many of these problems. We determine some basic equations governing its application and we focus on applying the technique to an array of low-energy electron emitters. Using the results of Monte Carlo simulations on electron beam

  17. The photodissociation of oxetane at 193 nm as the reverse of the Paterno-Buchi reaction

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Shih-Huang

    2009-12-14

    We investigated the photodissociation of oxetane (1,3-trimethylene oxide) at 193.3 nm in a molecular-beam apparatus using photofragment-translational spectroscopy and selective photoionization. We measured time-of-flight (TOF) spectra and angular anisotropy parameters {beta}(t) as a function of flight time of products at m/z=26-30 u utilizing photoionization energies from 9.8 to 14.8 eV. The TOF distributions of the products alter greatly with the employed photon energy, whereas their {beta}(t) distributions are insensitive to the photon energy. Dissociation to H{sub 2}CO+C{sub 2}H{sub 4} is the major channel in the title reaction. Three distinct dissociation paths with branching ratios 0.923:0.058:0.019 are responsible for the three features observed in the distribution of kinetic energy released in the channel H{sub 2}CO+C{sub 2}H{sub 4}. The observation of H{sub 2} and H atoms, {approx}1% in branching, indicates that products H{sub 2}CO and C{sub 2}H{sub 4} spontaneously decompose to only a small extent. Most HCO, C{sub 2}H{sub 3}, and C{sub 2}H{sub 2} ions originate from dissociative photoionization of products H{sub 2}CO and C{sub 2}H{sub 4}. Except atomic H and H{sub 2}, the photoproducts have large angular anisotropies, {beta}{>=}-0.8, which reflects rapid dissociation of oxetane following optical excitation at 193.3 nm. The mechanisms of dissociation of oxetane are addressed. Our results confirm the quantum-chemical calculations of Palmer et al. and provide profound insight into the Paterno-Buchi reaction.

  18. The photodissociation of oxetane at 193 nm as the reverse of the Paterno-Buchi reaction.

    PubMed

    Lee, Shih-Huang

    2009-12-14

    We investigated the photodissociation of oxetane (1,3-trimethylene oxide) at 193.3 nm in a molecular-beam apparatus using photofragment-translational spectroscopy and selective photoionization. We measured time-of-flight (TOF) spectra and angular anisotropy parameters beta(t) as a function of flight time of products at m/z=26-30 u utilizing photoionization energies from 9.8 to 14.8 eV. The TOF distributions of the products alter greatly with the employed photon energy, whereas their beta(t) distributions are insensitive to the photon energy. Dissociation to H(2)CO+C(2)H(4) is the major channel in the title reaction. Three distinct dissociation paths with branching ratios 0.923:0.058:0.019 are responsible for the three features observed in the distribution of kinetic energy released in the channel H(2)CO+C(2)H(4). The observation of H(2) and H atoms, approximately 1% in branching, indicates that products H(2)CO and C(2)H(4) spontaneously decompose to only a small extent. Most HCO, C(2)H(3), and C(2)H(2) ions originate from dissociative photoionization of products H(2)CO and C(2)H(4). Except atomic H and H(2), the photoproducts have large angular anisotropies, beta>or=-0.8, which reflects rapid dissociation of oxetane following optical excitation at 193.3 nm. The mechanisms of dissociation of oxetane are addressed. Our results confirm the quantum-chemical calculations of Palmer et al. and provide profound insight into the Paterno-Buchi reaction.

  19. The photodissociation of oxetane at 193 nm as the reverse of the Paterno-Buchi reaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Shih-Huang

    2009-12-01

    We investigated the photodissociation of oxetane (1,3-trimethylene oxide) at 193.3 nm in a molecular-beam apparatus using photofragment-translational spectroscopy and selective photoionization. We measured time-of-flight (TOF) spectra and angular anisotropy parameters β(t) as a function of flight time of products at m /z=26-30 u utilizing photoionization energies from 9.8 to 14.8 eV. The TOF distributions of the products alter greatly with the employed photon energy, whereas their β(t) distributions are insensitive to the photon energy. Dissociation to H2CO+C2H4 is the major channel in the title reaction. Three distinct dissociation paths with branching ratios 0.923:0.058:0.019 are responsible for the three features observed in the distribution of kinetic energy released in the channel H2CO+C2H4. The observation of H2 and H atoms, ˜1% in branching, indicates that products H2CO and C2H4 spontaneously decompose to only a small extent. Most HCO, C2H3, and C2H2 ions originate from dissociative photoionization of products H2CO and C2H4. Except atomic H and H2, the photoproducts have large angular anisotropies, β ≥-0.8, which reflects rapid dissociation of oxetane following optical excitation at 193.3 nm. The mechanisms of dissociation of oxetane are addressed. Our results confirm the quantum-chemical calculations of Palmer et al. and provide profound insight into the Paterno-Buchi reaction.

  20. Simple method for measuring acid generation quantum efficiency at 193 nm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Szmanda, Charles R.; Kavanagh, Robert J.; Bohland, John F.; Cameron, James F.; Trefonas, Peter, III; Blacksmith, Robert F.

    1999-06-01

    Traditional methods of measuring the Dill C Parameter involve monitoring the absorbance of a resist as a function of exposure. In chemically amplified resist, absorbance changes with exposure are small and frequently have little correlation to the amount of photoacid generated.

  1. Photolysis of solid NH3 and NH3-H2O mixtures at 193 nm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Loeffler, M. J.; Baragiola, R. A.

    2010-12-01

    We have studied UV photolysis of solid ammonia and ammonia-dihydrate samples at 40 K, using infrared spectroscopy, mass spectrometry, and microgravimetry. We have shown that in the pure NH3 sample, the main species ejected are NH3, H2, and N2, where the hydrogen and nitrogen increase with laser fluence. This increase in N2 ejection with laser fluence explains the increase in mass loss rate detected by a microbalance. In contrast, for the ammonia-water mixture, we see very weak signals of H2 and N2 in the mass spectrometer, consistent with the very small mass loss during the experiment and with a <5% decrease in the NH3 infrared absorption bands spectroscopy after a fluence of ˜3 × 1019 photons/cm2. The results imply that ammonia-ice mixtures in the outer solar system are relatively stable under solar irradiation.

  2. Advanced mask technique to improve bit line CD uniformity of 90 nm node flash memory in low-k1 lithography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Jong-doo; Choi, Jae-young; Kim, Jea-hee; Han, Jae-won

    2008-10-01

    As devices size move toward 90nm technology node or below, defining uniform bit line CD of flash devices is one of the most challenging features to print in KrF lithography. There are two principal difficulties in defining bit line on wafer. One is insufficient process margin besides poor resolution compared with ArF lithography. The other is that asymmetric bit line should be made for OPC(Optical Proximity Correction) modeling. Therefore advanced ArF lithography scanner should be used for define bit line with RETs (Resolution Enhancement Techniques) such as immersion lithography, OPC, PSM(Phase Shift Mask), high NA(Numerical Aperture), OAI(Off-Axis Illumination), SRAF(Sub-resolution Assistant Feature), and mask biasing.. Like this, ArF lithography propose the method of enhancing resolution, however, we must spend an enormous amount of CoC(cost of ownership) to utilize ArF photolithography process than KrF. In this paper, we suggest method to improve of bit line CD uniformity, patterned by KrF lithographic process in 90nm sFlash(stand alone Flash) devices. We applied new scheme of mask manufacturing, which is able to realize 2 different types of mask, binary and phase-shift, into one plate. Finally, we could get the more uniform bit lines and we expect to get more stable properties then before applying this technique.

  3. Coastal zone color scanner retrospective

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mitchell, B. Greg

    1994-04-01

    The following special section of the Journal of Geophysical Research is dedicated to a retrospective of scientific studies using the coastal zone color scanner (CZCS) instrument. The CZCS was launched in late 1978 aboard the Nimbus 7 satellite as a "proof-of-concept" instrument to demonstrate the feasibility of using satellite platforms to monitor the distribution of oceanic phytoplankton in the world's oceans. It provided data until the middle of 1986. Phytoplankton primary production contributes approximately one half of the global biospheric fixation of organic matter by photosynthesis, thereby forming the base of the oceanic food web and providing a major sink for atmospheric CO2.

  4. 100 nm half-pitch double exposure KrF lithography using binary masks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Geisler, S.; Bauer, J.; Haak, U.; Stolarek, D.; Schulz, K.; Wolf, H.; Meier, W.; Trojahn, M.; Matthus, E.

    2008-03-01

    In this paper we investigate the process margin for the 100nm half - pitch double exposure KrF lithography using binary masks for different illumination settings. The application of Double Exposure Lithography (DEL) would enlarge the capability of 248 nm exposure technique to smaller pitch e.g. for the integration of dedicated layers into 0.13 μm BiCMOS with critical dimension (CD) requirements exceeding the standard 248 nm lithography specification. The DEL was carried out with a KrF Scanner (Nikon S207D, NA Lens = 0.82) for a critical dimension (CD) of 100nm half pitch. The chemical amplified positive resists SL4800 or UV2000 (Rohm & Haas) with a thickness of 325nm were coated on a 70 nm AR10L (Rohm & Haas) bottom anti-reflective coating (BARC). With a single exposure and using binary masks it is not possible to resolve 100nm lines with a pitch of 200 nm, due to the refraction and the resolution limit. First we investigated the effect of focus variation. It is shown that the focus difference of 1st and 2nd exposure is one critical parameter of the DEL. This requires a good focus repeatability of the scanner. The depth of focus (DOF) of 360 nm with the coherence parameter σ = 0.4 was achieved for DEL with SL4800 resist. The influence of the better resist resolution of UV2000 on the process window will be shown (DOF = 460 nm). If we change the focus of one of the exposures the CD and DOF performance of spaces is reduced with simultaneous line position changing. Second we investigated the effect of different illumination shapes and settings. The results for conventional illumination with different values for σ and annular illumination with σ inner = 0.57 and σ outer = 0.85 will be shown. In summary, the results show that DEL has the potential to be a practical lithography enhancement method for device fabrication using high NA KrF tool generation.

  5. Towards ultimate optical lithography with NXT:1950i dual stage immersion platform

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Castenmiller, Tom; van de Mast, Frank; de Kort, Toine; van de Vin, Coen; de Wit, Marten; Stegen, Raf; van Cleef, Stefan

    2010-04-01

    Optical lithography, currently being used for 45-nm semiconductor devices, is expected to be extended further towards the 32-nm and 22-nm node. A further increase of lens NA will not be possible but fortunately the shrink can be enabled with new resolution enhancement methods like source mask optimization (SMO) and double patterning techniques (DPT). These new applications lower the k1 dramatically and require very tight overlay control and CD control to be successful. In addition, overall cost per wafer needs to be lowered to make the production of semiconductor devices acceptable. For this ultimate era of optical lithography we have developed the next generation dual stage NXT:1950i immersion platform. This system delivers wafer throughput of 175 wafers per hour together with an overlay of 2.5nm. Several extensions are offered enabling 200 wafers per hour and improved imaging and on product overlay. The high productivity is achieved using a dual wafer stage with planar motor that enables a high acceleration and high scan speed. With the dual stage concept wafer metrology is performed in parallel with the wafer exposure. The free moving planar stage has reduced overhead during chuck exchange which also improves litho tool productivity. In general, overlay contributors are coming from the lithography system, the mask and the processing. Main contributors for the scanner system are thermal wafer and stage control, lens aberration control, stage positioning and alignment. The back-bone of the NXT:1950i enhanced overlay performance is the novel short beam fixed length encoder grid-plate positioning system. By eliminating the variable length interferometer system used in the previous generation scanners the sensitivity to thermal and flow disturbances are largely reduced. The alignment accuracy and the alignment sensitivity for process layers are improved with the SMASH alignment sensor. A high number of alignment marker pairs can be used without throughput loss, and

  6. Interference Lithography for Optical Devices and Coatings

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-01-01

    fabricate self- healing coatings that use water from the environment to catalyze polymerization. Polymerization induced phase separation was used to... catalyzed by moisture in air; if the indices of the two polymers are matched, the coatings turn transparent after healing. Interference lithography...self- healing coatings that use water from the environment to catalyze polymerization. Polymerization induced phase separation was used to sequester

  7. Liquid-Phase Beam Pen Lithography.

    PubMed

    He, Shu; Xie, Zhuang; Park, Daniel J; Liao, Xing; Brown, Keith A; Chen, Peng-Cheng; Zhou, Yu; Schatz, George C; Mirkin, Chad A

    2016-02-24

    Beam pen lithography (BPL) in the liquid phase is evaluated. The effect of tip-substrate gap and aperture size on patterning performance is systematically investigated. As a proof-of-concept experiment, nanoarrays of nucleotides are synthesized using BPL in an organic medium, pointing toward the potential of using liquid phase BPL to perform localized photochemical reactions that require a liquid medium.

  8. Mask characterization for CDU budget breakdown in advanced EUV lithography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nikolsky, Peter; Strolenberg, Chris; Nielsen, Rasmus; Nooitgedacht, Tjitte; Davydova, Natalia; Yang, Greg; Lee, Shawn; Park, Chang-Min; Kim, Insung; Yeo, Jeong-Ho

    2012-11-01

    As the ITRS Critical Dimension Uniformity (CDU) specification shrinks, semiconductor companies need to maintain a high yield of good wafers per day and a high performance (and hence market value) of finished products. This cannot be achieved without continuous analysis and improvement of on-product CDU as one of the main drivers for process control and optimization with better understanding of main contributors from the litho cluster: mask, process, metrology and scanner. In this paper we will demonstrate a study of mask CDU characterization and its impact on CDU Budget Breakdown (CDU BB) performed for an advanced EUV lithography with 1D and 2D feature cases. We will show that this CDU contributor is one of the main differentiators between well-known ArFi and new EUV CDU budgeting principles. We found that reticle contribution to intrafield CDU should be characterized in a specific way: mask absorber thickness fingerprints play a role comparable with reticle CDU in the total reticle part of the CDU budget. Wafer CD fingerprints, introduced by this contributor, may or may not compensate variations of mask CD's and hence influence on total mask impact on intrafield CDU at the wafer level. This will be shown on 1D and 2D feature examples in this paper. Also mask stack reflectivity variations should be taken into account: these fingerprints have visible impact on intrafield CDs at the wafer level and should be considered as another contributor to the reticle part of EUV CDU budget. We observed also MEEF-through-field fingerprints in the studied EUV cases. Variations of MEEF may also play a role for the total intrafield CDU and may be taken into account for EUV Lithography. We characterized MEEF-through-field for the reviewed features, the results to be discussed in our paper, but further analysis of this phenomenon is required. This comprehensive approach to characterization of the mask part of EUV CDU characterization delivers an accurate and integral CDU Budget

  9. Academic and Career Advising of Scanners

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bloom, Arvid J.; Tripp, Philip R.; Shaffer, Leigh S.

    2011-01-01

    "Scanners" has become a common term for a recently identified category of people who find choosing just one interest or career path difficult (Sher, 2006). Academic and career advisors who work with scanners will likely find that these students have difficulty selecting an academic major or career path and that they seem to suffer anxiety and a…

  10. 21 CFR 892.1220 - Fluorescent scanner.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Fluorescent scanner. 892.1220 Section 892.1220 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES RADIOLOGY DEVICES Diagnostic Devices § 892.1220 Fluorescent scanner. (a) Identification....

  11. 21 CFR 892.1220 - Fluorescent scanner.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Fluorescent scanner. 892.1220 Section 892.1220 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES RADIOLOGY DEVICES Diagnostic Devices § 892.1220 Fluorescent scanner. (a) Identification....

  12. 21 CFR 892.1220 - Fluorescent scanner.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Fluorescent scanner. 892.1220 Section 892.1220 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES RADIOLOGY DEVICES Diagnostic Devices § 892.1220 Fluorescent scanner. (a) Identification....

  13. 21 CFR 892.1220 - Fluorescent scanner.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Fluorescent scanner. 892.1220 Section 892.1220 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES RADIOLOGY DEVICES Diagnostic Devices § 892.1220 Fluorescent scanner. (a) Identification....

  14. 21 CFR 892.1220 - Fluorescent scanner.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Fluorescent scanner. 892.1220 Section 892.1220 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES RADIOLOGY DEVICES Diagnostic Devices § 892.1220 Fluorescent scanner. (a) Identification....

  15. Discriminant analyses of Bendix scanner data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Richardson, A. J.; Wiegand, C. L.; Leamer, R. W.; Gerbermann, A. H.; Torline, R. J.

    1972-01-01

    Flights over Weslaco, Texas are discussed, using the 9-channel Bendix scanner, providing calibrated data in the 380 to 1000 nm wavelength interval. These flights were at 2000 ft. These data gave seasonal coverage from the time signals, representing mainly the soil background. The ground truth data are provided; signature processing studies relating scanner data to ground truth were also carried out.

  16. Non-Destructive Testing Scanner

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1990-01-01

    Bio-Imaging Research's technology that originated in an aerospace program has come full circle with a new aerospace adaptation called the Advanced Computed Tomography Inspection System, or ACTIS. The medical version of CT scans the human body for tumors or other abnormalities, the ACTIS system finds imperfections in aerospace structures and components, such as castings, assemblies, rocket motors and nozzles. ACTIS is described by its developer as the most versatile CT scanner available for non-destructive testing applications. ACTIS is a variable geometry system. ACTIS source and detectors can be moved closer together or farther apart to optimize the geometry for different sizes of test objects. The combination of variable geometry, three sources, and focusing detectors makes ACTIS cost effective for a broad range of applications. System can scan anything from very small turbine blades to large rocket assemblies.

  17. X-ray microtomographic scanners

    SciTech Connect

    Syryamkin, V. I. Klestov, S. A.

    2015-11-17

    The article studies the operating procedures of an X-ray microtomographic scanner and the module of reconstruction and analysis 3D-image of a test sample in particular. An algorithm for 3D-image reconstruction based on image shadow projections and mathematical methods of the processing are described. Chapter 1 describes the basic principles of X-ray tomography and general procedures of the device developed. Chapters 2 and 3 are devoted to the problem of resources saving by the system during the X-ray tomography procedure, which is achieved by preprocessing of the initial shadow projections. Preprocessing includes background noise removing from the images, which reduces the amount of shadow projections in general and increases the efficiency of the group shadow projections compression. In conclusion, the main applications of X-ray tomography are presented.

  18. Laser Scanner For Automatic Storage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carvalho, Fernando D.; Correia, Bento A.; Rebordao, Jose M.; Rodrigues, F. Carvalho

    1989-01-01

    The automated magazines are beeing used at industry more and more. One of the problems related with the automation of a Store House is the identification of the products envolved. Already used for stock management, the Bar Codes allows an easy way to identify one product. Applied to automated magazines, the bar codes allows a great variety of items in a small code. In order to be used by the national producers of automated magazines, a devoted laser scanner has been develloped. The Prototype uses an He-Ne laser whose beam scans a field angle of 75 degrees at 16 Hz. The scene reflectivity is transduced by a photodiode into an electrical signal, which is then binarized. This digital signal is the input of the decodifying program. The machine is able to see barcodes and to decode the information. A parallel interface allows the comunication with the central unit, which is responsible for the management of automated magazine.

  19. Combined PET/MRI scanner

    DOEpatents

    Schlyer, David; Woody, Craig L.; Rooney, William; Vaska, Paul; Stoll, Sean; Pratte, Jean-Francois; O'Connor, Paul

    2007-10-23

    A combined PET/MRI scanner generally includes a magnet for producing a magnetic field suitable for magnetic resonance imaging, a radiofrequency (RF) coil disposed within the magnetic field produced by the magnet and a ring tomograph disposed within the magnetic field produced by the magnet. The ring tomograph includes a scintillator layer for outputting at least one photon in response to an annihilation event, a detection array coupled to the scintillator layer for detecting the at least one photon outputted by the scintillator layer and for outputting a detection signal in response to the detected photon and a front-end electronic array coupled to the detection array for receiving the detection signal, wherein the front-end array has a preamplifier and a shaper network for conditioning the detection signal.

  20. Spaceborne scanner imaging system errors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Prakash, A.

    1982-01-01

    The individual sensor system design elements which are the priori components in the registration and rectification process, and the potential impact of error budgets on multitemporal registration and side-lap registration are analyzed. The properties of scanner, MLA, and SAR imaging systems are reviewed. Each sensor displays internal distortion properties which to varying degrees make it difficult to generate on orthophoto projection of the data acceptable for multiple pass registration or meeting national map accuracy standards and is also affected to varying degrees by relief displacements in moderate to hilly terrain. Nonsensor related distortions, associated with the accuracy of ephemeris determination and platform stability, have a major impact on local geometric distortions. Platform stability improvements expected from the new multi mission spacecraft series and improved ephemeris and ground control point determination from the NAVSTAR/global positioning satellite systems are reviewed.

  1. Prospects of DUV OoB suppression techniques in EUV lithography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Chang-Min; Kim, Insung; Kim, Sang-Hyun; Kim, Dong-Wan; Hwang, Myung-Soo; Kang, Soon-Nam; Park, Cheolhong; Kim, Hyun-Woo; Yeo, Jeong-Ho; Kim, Seong-Sue

    2014-04-01

    Though scaling of source power is still the biggest challenge in EUV lithography (EUVL) technology era, CD and overlay controls for transistor's requirement are also precondition of adopting EUVL in mass production. Two kinds of contributors are identified as risks for CDU and Overlay: Infrared (IR) and deep ultraviolet (DUV) out of band (OOB) radiations from laser produced plasma (LPP) EUV source. IR from plasma generating CO2 laser that causes optics heating and wafer overlay error is well suppressed by introducing grating on collector to diffract IR off the optical axis and is the effect has been confirmed by operation of pre-production tool (NXE3100). EUV and DUV OOB which are reflected from mask black boarder (BB) are root causes of EUV-specific CD error at the boundaries of exposed shots which would result in the problem of CDU out of spec unless sufficiently suppressed. Therefore, control of DUV OOB reflection from the mask BB is one of the key technologies that must be developed prior to EUV mass production. In this paper, quantitative assessment on the advantage and the disadvantage of potential OOB solutions will be discussed. EUV and DUV OOB impacts on wafer CDs are measured from NXE3100 & NXE3300 experiments. Significant increase of DUV OOB impact on CD from NXE3300 compared with NXE3100 is observed. There are three ways of technology being developed to suppress DUV OOB: spectral purity filter (SPF) as a scanner solution, multi-layer etching as a solution on mask, and resist top-coating as a process solution. PROs and CONs of on-scanner, on-mask, and on-resist solution for the mass production of EUV lithography will be discussed.

  2. Soft molding lithography of conjugated polymers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pisignano, Dario; Persano, Luana; Cingolani, Roberto; Gigli, Giuseppe; Babudri, Francesco; Farinola, Gianluca M.; Naso, Francesco

    2004-02-01

    We report on the nanopatterning of conjugated polymers by soft molding, and exploit the glass transition of the organic compound in conformal contact with an elastomeric element. We succeeded in printing different compounds with resolution down to 300 nm at temperatures up to 300 °C in vacuum. No significant variation of the photoluminescence (PL) spectra nor heavy degradation of the PL quantum yield was observed after the lithography process. Based on the high resolution achieved and on the well-retained luminescence properties of the patterned compounds, we conclude that high-temperature soft lithography is a valid, flexible and straightforward technique for one-step realization of organic-based devices.

  3. Evaluation of EUV resist performance below 20nm CD using helium ion lithography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maas, Diederik; van Veldhoven, Emile; van Langen-Suurling, Anja; Alkemade, Paul F. A.; Wuister, Sander; Hoefnagels, Rik; Verspaget, Coen; Meessen, Jeroen; Fliervoet, Timon

    2014-04-01

    For the introduction of EUV lithography, development of high performance EUV resists is of key importance. This development involves studies into resist sensitivity, resolving power and pattern uniformity. We have used a sub-nanometer-sized 30 keV helium ion beam to expose chemically amplified (CAR) EUV resists. There are similarities in the response of resists to He+ ions and EUV photons: both excite Secondary Electrons with similar energy distributions.The weak backscattering of the He+ ions results in ultra-low proximity effects. This fact enables the exposure of dense and detailed patterns by focused He+ ion beams without the need for proximity correction. This paper presents contact holes and lines at 40-nm pitch in an EUV CAR resist. We have used resist sensitivity, contrast, resolution (CD) and pattern fidelity (LCDU, LWR and dose-to-print) as metrics for a comparison of SHIBL with EUVL. We show that Scanning Helium Ion Beam Lithography (SHIBL) can be a useful and economically attractive technology to (pre-)screen novel EUV resists prior to their final performance evaluation in an EUV scanner.

  4. Roughness and variability in EUV lithography: Who is to blame? (part 1)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vaglio Pret, Alessandro; Gronheid, Roel; Younkin, Todd R.; Winroth, Gustaf; Biafore, John J.; Anno, Yusuke; Hoshiko, Kenji; Constantoudis, Vassilios

    2013-04-01

    Process variability in today's EUV lithography might be a showstopper for features below 27nm dimensions. At these feature sizes, electrical devices are influenced by quantum effects and thus have to face the discrete behavior of light and matter. More in general, lithography uncertainties arise from each lithographic element: the source, the photomask, the optical system, and the photoresist. In order to individually assess all the different contributions to the final resist roughness, a EUV mask with known absorber pattern variability was used to expose different resists at different process conditions. CD-SEM analyses were performed on both mask absorber and resist pattern and then used to build a stochastic resist model. In this first paper, we present a complete characterization of the root causes which are responsible of the CD nonuniformity for 27nm half-pitch dense contact-holes exposed with the ASML NXE:3100 scanner installed at imec. Using the same stochastic model, a simulated evaluation to quantify the possible impact of the different elements composing the lithographic process is performed at higher numerical aperture.

  5. The study of lithography conditions to use advanced resist performance properly

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Zhengkai; Wang, Wuping; Chen, Quan; Aoyama, Hajime; Takemasa, Kengo; Sei, Toshihiko; Miyazawa, Tami; Matsuyama, Tomoyuki; Shao, Chun

    2015-03-01

    Correlation of resist modeling of printed features with lithographic data is a necessary part of developing new lithographic processes. Recently, we have found a case in which the most advanced resist types sometimes show better behavior than expectations from optical simulation in terms of dose latitude, MEEF (mask error enhancement factor), and even CD variation through different pitches. This superior resist performance may allow greater margin for error in each component, such as mask, scanner, and metrology in very low-k1 lithography. On the other hand, since the resist pattern CD for the most advanced resist is very much different from the prediction of optical simulation, it is a challenge to build OPC models using the exposure result with the resist. In order to solve this issue, we have tried to use several litho parameters to reduce the gap between optical simulation and resist CDs for OPC modeling. In this paper we discuss the effect of the parameters to reduce the gap between optical model and actual resist behavior with keeping superior performance as much as possible. The method we mention may be a key to use the most advanced resist in near future. As a result the life of ArF immersion lithography in the critical layer would be extended than we expect today.

  6. Implementation of assist features in EUV lithography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Fan; Burkhardt, Martin; Raghunathan, Ananthan; Torres, Andres; Gupta, Rachit; Word, James

    2015-03-01

    The introduction of EUV lithography will happen at a critical feature pitch which corresponds to a k1 factor of roughly 0.45. While this number seems not very aggressive compared to recent ArF lithography nodes, the number is sufficiently low that the introduction of assist features has to be considered. While the small NA makes the k1 factor larger, the depth of focus still needs to be scaled down with wavelength. However the exposure tool's focus control is not greatly improved over the ArF tools, so other solutions to improve the depth of focus, e.g. SRAFs, are needed. On the other hand, sub-resolution assist features (SRAFs) require very small mask dimensions, which make masks more costly to write and inspect. Another disadvantage of SRAFs is the fact that they may cause pattern-dependent best focus shift due to thick mask effects. Those effects can be predicted, but the shift of best focus and the associated tilt of Bossung curves make the process more difficult to control. We investigate the impact of SRAFs on printing in EUV lithography and evaluate advantages and disadvantages. By using image quality parameters such as best focus (BF), and depth of focus (DOF), respectively with and without SRAFs, we will answer the question if we can gain a net benefit for 1D and 2D patterns by adding SRAFs. SRAFs will only be introduced if any net improvement in process variation (PV) outweighs the additional expense of assist patterning on the mask. In this paper, we investigate the difference in printing behavior of symmetric and asymmetric SRAF placement and whether through slit effect needs to be considered in SRAF placement for EUV lithography.

  7. Formation of Magnetic Anisotropy by Lithography

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Si Nyeon; Nam, Yoon Jae; Kim, Yang Doo; Choi, Jun Woo; Lee, Heon; Lim, Sang Ho

    2016-01-01

    Artificial interface anisotropy is demonstrated in alternating Co/Pt and Co/Pd stripe patterns, providing a means of forming magnetic anisotropy using lithography. In-plane hysteresis loops measured along two principal directions are explained in depth by two competing shape and interface anisotropies, thus confirming the formation of interface anisotropy at the Co/Pt and Co/Pd interfaces of the stripe patterns. The measured interface anisotropy energies, which are in the range of 0.2–0.3 erg/cm2 for both stripes, are smaller than those observed in conventional multilayers, indicating a decrease in smoothness of the interfaces when formed by lithography. The demonstration of interface anisotropy in the Co/Pt and Co/Pd stripe patterns is of significant practical importance, because this setup makes it possible to form anisotropy using lithography and to modulate its strength by controlling the pattern width. Furthermore, this makes it possible to form more complex interface anisotropy by fabricating two-dimensional patterns. These artificial anisotropies are expected to open up new device applications such as multilevel bits using in-plane magnetoresistive thin-film structures. PMID:27216420

  8. Deep-UV microsphere projection lithography.

    PubMed

    Bonakdar, Alireza; Rezaei, Mohsen; Brown, Robert L; Fathipour, Vala; Dexheimer, Eric; Jang, Sung Jun; Mohseni, Hooman

    2015-06-01

    In this Letter, we present a single-exposure deep-UV projection lithography at 254-nm wavelength that produces nanopatterns in a scalable area with a feature size of 80 nm. In this method, a macroscopic lens projects a pixelated optical mask on a monolayer of hexagonally arranged microspheres that reside on the Fourier plane and image the mask's pattern into a photoresist film. Our macroscopic lens shrinks the size of the mask by providing an imaging magnification of ∼1.86×10(4), while enhancing the exposure power. On the other hand, microsphere lens produces a sub-diffraction limit focal point-a so-called photonic nanojet-based on the near-surface focusing effect, which ensures an excellent patterning accuracy against the presence of surface roughness. Ray-optics simulation is utilized to design the bulk optics part of the lithography system, while a wave-optics simulation is implemented to simulate the optical properties of the exposed regions beneath the microspheres. We characterize the lithography performance in terms of the proximity effect, lens aberration, and interference effect due to refractive index mismatch between photoresist and substrate.

  9. Overlay distortions in wafer-scale integration lithography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Flack, Warren W.

    1993-08-01

    Wafer scale integration (WSI) lithography is the technique used to fabricate ultra large scale integration (ULSI) integrated circuits significantly greater in size than current products. Applications for WSI lithography include large solid state detector arrays, large area liquid crystal displays, high speed mainframe supercomputers, and large random access memories. The lithography technology required to manufacture these devices is particularly challenging, requiring stringent control of both submicron critical dimensions and accurate alignment of level to level device patterns over large chip areas.

  10. Polymeric waveguide Bragg grating filter using soft lithography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kocabas, Askin; Aydinli, Atilla

    2006-10-01

    We use the soft lithography technique to fabricate a polymeric waveguide Bragg grating filter. Master grating structure is patterned by e-beam lithography. Using an elastomeric stamp and capillary action, uniform grating structures with very thin residual layers are transferred to the UV curable polymer without the use of an imprint machine. The waveguide layer based on BCB optical polymer is fabricated by conventional optical lithography. This approach provides processing simplicity to fabricate Bragg grating filters.

  11. Eddy current X-Y scanner system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kurtz, G. W.

    1983-01-01

    The Nondestructive Evaluation Branch of the Materials and Processes Laboratory became aware of a need for a miniature, portable X-Y scanner capable of performing eddy current or other nondestructive testing scanning operations such as ultrasonic, or small areas of flat plate. The technical description and operational theory of the X-Y scanner system designed and built to fulfill this need are covered. The scanner was given limited testing and performs according to its design intent, which is to scan flat plate areas of approximately 412 sq cm (64 sq in) during each complete cycle of scanning.

  12. Polarization manipulation in single refractive prism based holography lithography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiong, Wenjie; Xu, Yi; Xiao, Yujian; Lv, Xiaoxu; Wu, Lijun

    2015-01-01

    We propose theoretically and demonstrate experimentally a simple but effective strategy for polarization manipulation in single refractive prism based holographic lithography. By tuning the polarization of a single laser beam, we can obtain the pill shape interference pattern with a high-contrast where a complex optical setup and multiple polarizers are needed in the conventional holography lithography. Fabrication of pill shape two-dimensional polymer photonic crystals using one beam and one shoot holography lithography is shown as an example to support our theoretical results. This integrated polarization manipulation technique can release the crucial stability restrictions imposed on the multiple beams holography lithography.

  13. 75 FR 44015 - Certain Semiconductor Products Made by Advanced Lithography Techniques and Products Containing...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-07-27

    ... COMMISSION Certain Semiconductor Products Made by Advanced Lithography Techniques and Products Containing... importation of certain semiconductor products made by advanced lithography techniques and products containing... certain semiconductor products made by advanced lithography techniques or products containing same...

  14. Miniaturized micro-optical scanners

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Motamedi, M. Edward; Andrews, Angus P.; Gunning, William J.; Khoshnevisan, Moshen

    1994-11-01

    Optical beam scanners are critical components for airborne and space-based laser radar, on- machine-inspection systems, factory automation systems, and optical communication systems. We describe here a laser beam steering system based on dithering two complementary (positive and negative) microlens arrays. When the two microlens arrays are translated relative to one another in the plane parallel to their surfaces, the transmitted light beam is scanned in two directions. We have demonstrated scanning speeds up to 300 Hz with a pair of 6-mm- aperture microlens arrays designed for input from a HeNe laser. The output beam covers a discrete 16 X 16 spot scan pattern with about 3.6 mrad separation and only 400 (mu) rad of beam divergence, in close agreement with design predictions. This demo system is relatively compact; less than 2 in. on a side. We also describe several near-term applications, some critical design trade-offs, and important fabrication and design issues.

  15. Information extraction techniques for multispectral scanner data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Malila, W. A.; Crane, R. B.; Turner, R. E.

    1972-01-01

    The applicability of recognition-processing procedures for multispectral scanner data from areas and conditions used for programming the recognition computers to other data from different areas viewed under different measurement conditions was studied. The reflective spectral region approximately 0.3 to 3.0 micrometers is considered. A potential application of such techniques is in conducting area surveys. Work in three general areas is reported: (1) Nature of sources of systematic variation in multispectral scanner radiation signals, (2) An investigation of various techniques for overcoming systematic variations in scanner data; (3) The use of decision rules based upon empirical distributions of scanner signals rather than upon the usually assumed multivariate normal (Gaussian) signal distributions.

  16. High voltage battery cell scanner development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lepisto, J. W.; Decker, D. K.; Graves, J.

    1983-01-01

    Battery cell voltage scanners have been previously used in low voltage spacecraft applications. In connection with future missions involving an employment of high-power high voltage power subsystems and/or autonomous power subsystem management for unattended operation, it will be necessary to utilize battery cell voltage scanners to provide battery cell voltage information for early detection of impending battery cell degradation/failures. In preparation for such missions, a novel battery cell voltage scanner design has been developed. The novel design makes use of low voltage circuit modules which can be applied to high voltage batteries in a building block fashion. A description is presented of the design concept and test results of the high voltage battery cell scanner, and its operation with an autonomously managed power subsystem is discussed.

  17. Hand-held optical fuel pin scanner

    DOEpatents

    Kirchner, T.L.; Powers, H.G.

    1980-12-07

    An optical scanner for indicia arranged in a focal plane perpendicular to an optical system including a rotatable dove prism. The dove prism transmits a rotating image to a stationary photodiode array.

  18. Hand-held optical fuel pin scanner

    DOEpatents

    Kirchner, Tommy L.; Powers, Hurshal G.

    1987-01-01

    An optical scanner for indicia arranged in a focal plane perpendicular to an optical system including a rotatable dove prism. The dove prism transmits a rotating image to a stationary photodiode array.

  19. Measuring CT scanner variability of radiomics features

    PubMed Central

    Mackin, Dennis; Fave, Xenia; Zhang, Lifei; Fried, David; Yang, Jinzhong; Taylor, Brian; Rodriguez-Rivera, Edgardo; Dodge, Cristina; Jones, A. Kyle; Court, Laurence

    2015-01-01

    Objectives The purpose of this study was to determine the significance of inter-scanner variability in CT image radiomics studies. Materials and Methods We compared the radiomics features calculated for non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) tumors from 20 patients with those calculated for 17 scans of a specially designed radiomics phantom. The phantom comprised 10 cartridges, each filled with different materials to produce a wide range of radiomics feature values. The scans were acquired using General Electric, Philips, Siemens, and Toshiba scanners from four medical centers using their routine thoracic imaging protocol. The radiomics feature studied included the mean and standard deviations of the CT numbers as well as textures derived from the neighborhood gray-tone difference matrix. To quantify the significance of the inter-scanner variability, we introduced the metric feature noise. To look for patterns in the scans, we performed hierarchical clustering for each cartridge. Results The mean CT numbers for the 17 CT scans of the phantom cartridges spanned from -864 to 652 Hounsfield units compared with a span of -186 to 35 Hounsfield units for the CT scans of the NSCLC tumors, showing that the phantom’s dynamic range includes that of the tumors. The inter-scanner variability of the feature values depended on both the cartridge material and the feature, and the variability was large relative to the inter-patient variability in the NSCLC tumors for some features. The feature inter-scanner noise was greatest for busyness and least for texture strength. Hierarchical clustering produced different clusters of the phantom scans for each cartridge, although there was some consistent clustering by scanner manufacturer. Conclusions The variability in the values of radiomics features calculated on CT images from different CT scanners can be comparable to the variability in these features found in CT images of NSCLC tumors. These inter-scanner differences should be

  20. Fabrication of metallic nanowires and nanoribbons using laser interference lithography and shadow lithography

    SciTech Connect

    Park, Joong- Mok; Nalwa, Kanwar Singh; Leung, Wai; Constant, Kristen; Chaudhary, Sumit; Ho, Kai-Ming

    2010-04-30

    Ordered and free-standing metallic nanowires were fabricated by e-beam deposition on patterned polymer templates made by interference lithography. The dimensions of the nanowires can be controlled through adjustment of deposition conditions and polymer templates. Grain size, polarized optical transmission and electrical resistivity were measured with ordered and free-standing nanowires.

  1. Uncertainty Propagation for Terrestrial Mobile Laser Scanner

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mezian, c.; Vallet, Bruno; Soheilian, Bahman; Paparoditis, Nicolas

    2016-06-01

    Laser scanners are used more and more in mobile mapping systems. They provide 3D point clouds that are used for object reconstruction and registration of the system. For both of those applications, uncertainty analysis of 3D points is of great interest but rarely investigated in the literature. In this paper we present a complete pipeline that takes into account all the sources of uncertainties and allows to compute a covariance matrix per 3D point. The sources of uncertainties are laser scanner, calibration of the scanner in relation to the vehicle and direct georeferencing system. We suppose that all the uncertainties follow the Gaussian law. The variances of the laser scanner measurements (two angles and one distance) are usually evaluated by the constructors. This is also the case for integrated direct georeferencing devices. Residuals of the calibration process were used to estimate the covariance matrix of the 6D transformation between scanner laser and the vehicle system. Knowing the variances of all sources of uncertainties, we applied uncertainty propagation technique to compute the variance-covariance matrix of every obtained 3D point. Such an uncertainty analysis enables to estimate the impact of different laser scanners and georeferencing devices on the quality of obtained 3D points. The obtained uncertainty values were illustrated using error ellipsoids on different datasets.

  2. Internal state manipulation for neutral atom lithography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thywissen, Joseph Hermann

    2000-11-01

    We examine how the manipulation of the internal states of atoms can be used for atom lithography. Metastable argon atoms pattern a substrate by activating the growth of a carbonaceous material on the surface. We develop resist/etch systems that support 20 nm feature sizes, 2:1 aspect ratios, and 103 feature height amplification. Gold, silver, silicon, silicon dioxide, and silicon nitride substrates are patterned. Standing wave quenching (SWQ) light masks are used to create 65nm- wide features spaced 401 nm apart. One application of SWQ is to create a length reference artifact. We present a detailed error budget for the pattern periodicity, and find that an accuracy of better than one part in 106 is possible. We demonstrate atom resonance lithography (ARL), the first use of frequency encoding of spatial information for atom lithography. ARL has the potential to create patterns in two dimensions whose feature size is smaller than 20 nm and whose spacing is not limited by the wavelength of the patterning light. We form features in silicon that are 2.2 μm wide and spaced 20 μm apart. Using multiple probe frequencies, we demonstrate that multiple features can be created over the area covered by a monotonic gradient. The appendices include original contributions to the theory of manipulating atoms using micro- electromagnets. We propose several ways to create a magnetic waveguide using microfabricated wire patterns on a surface. We also discuss several implications of tight confinement: single mode atom guides, elongated traps with quasi-one-dimensional energetics, and constrictions whose conductance is quantized.

  3. Preliminary microfluidic simulations for immersion lithography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wei, Alexander C.; Nellis, Greg F.; Abdo, Amr Y.; Engelstad, Roxann L.; Chen, Cheng-Fu; Switkes, Michael; Rothschild, Mordechai

    2003-06-01

    The premise behind immersion lithography is to improve the resolution for optical lithography technology by increasing the index of refraction in the space between the final projection lens of an exposure system and the device wafer. This is accomplished through the insertion of a high index liquid in place of the low index air that currently fills the gap. The fluid management system must reliably fill the lens-wafer gap with liquid, maintain the fill under the lens throughout the entire wafer exposure process, and ensure that no bubbles are entrained during filling or scanning. This paper presents a preliminary analysis of the fluid flow characteristics of a liquid between the lens and the wafer in immersion lithography. The objective of this feasibility study was to identify liquid candidates that meet both optical and specific fluid mechanical requirements. The mechanics of the filling process was analyzed to simplify the problem and identify those fluid properties and system parameters that affect the process. Two-dimensional computational fluid dynamics (CFD) models of the fluid between the lens and the wafer were developed for simulating the process. The CFD simulations were used to investigate two methods of liquid deposition. In the first, a liquid is dispensed onto the wafer as a "puddle" and then the wafer and liquid move under the lens. This is referred to as passive filling. The second method involves the use of liquid jets in close proximity to the edge of the lens and is referred to as active filling. Numerical simulations of passive filling included a parametric study of the key dimensionless group influencing the filling process and an investigation of the effects of the fluid/wafer and fluid/lens contact angles and wafer direction. The model results are compared with experimental measurements. For active filling, preliminary simulation results characterized the influence of the jets on fluid flow.

  4. Plasma formed ion beam projection lithography system

    DOEpatents

    Leung, Ka-Ngo; Lee, Yung-Hee Yvette; Ngo, Vinh; Zahir, Nastaran

    2002-01-01

    A plasma-formed ion-beam projection lithography (IPL) system eliminates the acceleration stage between the ion source and stencil mask of a conventional IPL system. Instead a much thicker mask is used as a beam forming or extraction electrode, positioned next to the plasma in the ion source. Thus the entire beam forming electrode or mask is illuminated uniformly with the source plasma. The extracted beam passes through an acceleration and reduction stage onto the resist coated wafer. Low energy ions, about 30 eV, pass through the mask, minimizing heating, scattering, and sputtering.

  5. Directly patterned inorganic hardmask for EUV lithography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stowers, Jason K.; Telecky, Alan; Kocsis, Michael; Clark, Benjamin L.; Keszler, Douglas A.; Grenville, Andrew; Anderson, Chris N.; Naulleau, Patrick P.

    2011-04-01

    This paper describes a metal oxide patternable hardmask designed for EUV lithography. The material has imaged 15-nm half-pitch by projection EUV exposure on the SEMATECH Berkeley MET, and 12-nm half-pitch by electron beam exposure. The platform is highly absorbing (16 μm-1) and etch resistant (>100:1 for silicon). These properties enable resist film thickness to be reduced to 20nm, thereby reducing aspect ratio and susceptibility to pattern collapse. New materials and processes show a path to improved photospeed. This paper also presents data for on coating uniformity, metal-impurity content, outgassing, pattern transfer, and resist strip.

  6. Film stacking architecture for immersion lithography process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goto, Tomohiro; Sanada, Masakazu; Miyagi, Tadashi; Shigemori, Kazuhito; Kanaoka, Masashi; Yasuda, Shuichi; Tamada, Osamu; Asai, Masaya

    2008-03-01

    In immersion lithography process, film stacking architecture will be necessary due to film peeling. However, the architecture will restrict lithographic area within a wafer due to top side EBR accuracy In this paper, we report an effective film stacking architecture that also allows maximum lithographic area. This study used a new bevel rinse system on RF3 for all materials to make suitable film stacking on the top side bevel. This evaluation showed that the new bevel rinse system allows the maximum lithographic area and a clean wafer edge. Patterning defects were improved with suitable film stacking.

  7. Metallic nanowires by full wafer stencil lithography.

    PubMed

    Vazquez-Mena, O; Villanueva, G; Savu, V; Sidler, K; van den Boogaart, M A F; Brugger, J

    2008-11-01

    Aluminum and gold nanowires were fabricated using 100 mm stencil wafers containing nanoslits fabricated with a focused ion beam. The stencils were aligned and the nanowires deposited on a substrate with predefined electrical pads. The morphology and resistivity of the wires were studied. Nanowires down to 70 nm wide and 5 mum long have been achieved showing a resistivity of 10 microOmegacm for Al and 5 microOmegacm for Au and maximum current density of approximately 10(8) A/cm(2). This proves the capability of stencil lithography for the fabrication of metallic nanowires on a full wafer scale.

  8. Wave and Particle in Molecular Interference Lithography

    SciTech Connect

    Juffmann, Thomas; Truppe, Stefan; Geyer, Philipp; Major, Andras G.; Arndt, Markus; Deachapunya, Sarayut; Ulbricht, Hendrik

    2009-12-31

    The wave-particle duality of massive objects is a cornerstone of quantum physics and a key property of many modern tools such as electron microscopy, neutron diffraction or atom interferometry. Here we report on the first experimental demonstration of quantum interference lithography with complex molecules. Molecular matter-wave interference patterns are deposited onto a reconstructed Si(111) 7x7 surface and imaged using scanning tunneling microscopy. Thereby both the particle and the quantum wave character of the molecules can be visualized in one and the same image. This new approach to nanolithography therefore also represents a sensitive new detection scheme for quantum interference experiments.

  9. Highly absorbing ARC for DUV lithography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pavelchek, Edward K.; Meador, James D.; Guerrero, Douglas J.; Lamb, James E., III; Kache, Ajit; doCanto, Manuel; Adams, Timothy G.; Stark, David R.; Miller, Daniel A.

    1996-06-01

    The properties of a new anti-reflective coating for 248 nm lithography are described. It is formed by thermally cross-linking a spin-on organic coating, and has an absorbance greater than 12/micrometers. It is compatible with UVIIHS and APEX-E photoresists. Thin films (less than 600 angstrom over silicon substrates) are found to completely suppress standing waves, to reduce EO swing curves to less than 3%, and to offer good CD control over typical field oxide topography. The etch rate was found to be comparable to that of the APEX-E photoresist.

  10. Lithography-Free Microchannel Fabrication in PDMS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sankaran, Jeyantt S.; Kahsai, Wintana T.; Pham, Uyen H. T.; Iqbal, Samir M.

    2011-03-01

    We report a novel method for the fabrication of microchannels that could potentially be used for pervaporation experiments, cell adhesion and cell movement studies and detection of selective protein bio-markers. PDMS can sustain high temperatures, has a high young's modulus and it is biologically inert. Hydrophobic-hydrophilic interactions at gel point of PDMS form the basis of the presented technique. The repulsion of hydrophilic particles by the hydrophobic polymer matrix, stemming from the reduction of entropy and free energy variations during polymerization, provides an elegant lithography-independent approach for the fabrication of self-aligned microchannels. This work was supported by National Science Foundation CAREER Grant (ECCS 0845669).

  11. Focused ion beam lithography and anodization combined nanopore patterning.

    PubMed

    Lu, Kathy; Zhao, Jingzhong

    2010-10-01

    In this study, focused ion beam lithography and anodization are combined to create different nanopore patterns. Uniform-, alternating-, and gradient-sized shallow nanopore arrays are first made on high purity aluminum by focused ion beam lithography. These shallow pore arrays are then used as pore initiation sites during anodization by different electrolytes. Depending on the nature of the anodization electrolyte, the nanopore patterns by focused ion beam lithography play different roles in further pore development during anodization. The pore-to-pore distance by focused ion beam lithography should match with that by anodization for guided pore development to be effective. Ordered and heterogeneous nanopore arrays are obtained by the focused ion beam lithography and anodization combined approach.

  12. MEMS temperature scanner: principles, advances, and applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Otto, Thomas; Saupe, Ray; Stock, Volker; Gessner, Thomas

    2010-02-01

    Contactless measurement of temperatures has gained enormous significance in many application fields, ranging from climate protection over quality control to object recognition in public places or military objects. Thereby measurement of linear or spatially temperature distribution is often necessary. For this purposes mostly thermographic cameras or motor driven temperature scanners are used today. Both are relatively expensive and the motor drive devices are limited regarding to the scanning rate additionally. An economic alternative are temperature scanner devices based on micro mirrors. The micro mirror, attached in a simple optical setup, reflects the emitted radiation from the observed heat onto an adapted detector. A line scan of the target object is obtained by periodic deflection of the micro scanner. Planar temperature distribution will be achieved by perpendicularly moving the target object or the scanner device. Using Planck radiation law the temperature of the object is calculated. The device can be adapted to different temperature ranges and resolution by using different detectors - cooled or uncooled - and parameterized scanner parameters. With the basic configuration 40 spatially distributed measuring points can be determined with temperatures in a range from 350°C - 1000°C. The achieved miniaturization of such scanners permits the employment in complex plants with high building density or in direct proximity to the measuring point. The price advantage enables a lot of applications, especially new application in the low-price market segment This paper shows principle, setup and application of a temperature measurement system based on micro scanners working in the near infrared range. Packaging issues and measurement results will be discussed as well.

  13. Anti-reflective coating for multipatterning lithography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guerrero, Douglas J.; Gibbons, Steve; Lowes, Joyce; Mercado, Ramil

    2008-03-01

    New bottom anti-reflective coatings (BARCs) have been developed that can be incorporated into multiple patterning schemes utilizing scanner-track-only processes. The BARCs have modifiable optical properties and can be removed during the resist development step. Several dual patterning schemes were investigated for trench printing. The most promising process produced 110 nm trenches with approximately 1:1 space ratios. The etch characteristics of these BARCs under fluorinated and oxygenated gases were determined.

  14. Pattern transfer processes for 157-nm lithography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miyoshi, Seiro; Furukawa, Takamitsu; Watanabe, Hiroyuki; Irie, Shigeo; Itani, Toshiro

    2002-07-01

    We describe and evaluate three kinds of pattern transfer processes that are suitable for 157-nm lithography. These transfer processes are 1) a hard mask (HM) process using SiO as a HM material, 2) a HM process using an organic bottom anti-reflecting coating (BARC)/SiN structure, and 3) a bi- layer process using a silicon-containing resist and an organic film as the bottom layer. In all of these processes, the underlayer fo the resist acts as an anti-reflecting layer. For the HM processes, we patterned a newly developed fluorine-containing resist using a 157-nm microstepper, and transferred the resist patterns to the hard mask by reactive ion etching (RIE) with minimal critical dimension shift. Using the HM pattern, we then fabricated a 65nm Wsi/poly-Si gate pattern using a high-NA microstepper (NA=0.85). With the bi-layer process, we transferred a 60nm 1:1 lines and spaces pattern of a newly developed silicon-containing resist to a 300nm-thick organic film by RIE. The fabrication of a 65nm 1:1 gate pattern and 60nm 1:1 organic film patten clearly demonstrated that 157-nm lithography is the best candidate for fabricating sub-70nm node devices.

  15. Mask cost of ownership for advanced lithography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muzio, Edward G.; Seidel, Philip K.

    2000-07-01

    As technology advances, becoming more difficult and more expensive, the cost of ownership (CoO) metric becomes increasingly important in evaluating technical strategies. The International SEMATECH CoC analysis has steadily gained visibility over the past year, as it attempts to level the playing field between technology choices, and create a fair relative comparison. In order to predict mask cots for advanced lithography, mask process flows are modeled using bets-known processing strategies, equipment cost, and yields. Using a newly revised yield mode, and updated mask manufacture flows, representative mask flows can be built. These flows are then used to calculate mask costs for advanced lithography down to the 50 nm node. It is never the goal of this type of work to provide absolute cost estimates for business planning purposes. However, the combination of a quantifiable yield model with a clearly defined set of mask processing flows and a cost model based upon them serves as an excellent starting point for cost driver analysis and process flow discussion.

  16. Economic consequences of high throughput maskless lithography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hartley, John G.; Govindaraju, Lakshmi

    2005-11-01

    Many people in the semiconductor industry bemoan the high costs of masks and view mask cost as one of the significant barriers to bringing new chip designs to market. All that is needed is a viable maskless technology and the problem will go away. Numerous sites around the world are working on maskless lithography but inevitably, the question asked is "Wouldn't a one wafer per hour maskless tool make a really good mask writer?" Of course, the answer is yes, the hesitation you hear in the answer isn't based on technology concerns, it's financial. The industry needs maskless lithography because mask costs are too high. Mask costs are too high because mask pattern generators (PG's) are slow and expensive. If mask PG's become much faster, mask costs go down, the maskless market goes away and the PG supplier is faced with an even smaller tool demand from the mask shops. Technical success becomes financial suicide - or does it? In this paper we will present the results of a model that examines some of the consequences of introducing high throughput maskless pattern generation. Specific features in the model include tool throughput for masks and wafers, market segmentation by node for masks and wafers and mask cost as an entry barrier to new chip designs. How does the availability of low cost masks and maskless tools affect the industries tool makeup and what is the ultimate potential market for high throughput maskless pattern generators?

  17. Atomic Image Projection Electron Beam Lithography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Ki-Bum

    2006-03-01

    While we are approaching to the nanotechnology era, as was proposed by Richard Feynman in 1959, our main concern still lies in how one can controllably manufacture and utilize nanometer scale features. The top-down approaches, most notably, lithography based techniques still have the problem of throughput although it has been successfully demonstrate to make features with the size less than 10 nm. The bottom-up approaches, either utilizing chemical vapor deposition process to make carbon nanotube or wet-chemical process to make size controllable quantum dots and rods, still have the limitation of extending it to many different types of materials and also delivering them on a wafer size substrate to make nanodevices. In this talk, we will propose a novel electron beam lithography technique to make nanometer scale features. The novelty of this process lies in the fact that one can utilize the crystalline lattice image commonly observed by the high resolution transmission electron microscopy as an ultimate mask to generate nanometer scale patterns. Using this technique, we demonstrate that down to 45 nm pitch size can be resolved on hydrogen silsesquioxine (HSQ) e-beam resist material. The patterns are formed on Si substarte with the dot size of about 30 nm and the line size of about 25 nm. This technique can be extend to define less than 10 nm size features only if the suitable resist is developed.

  18. LANSCE-R WIRE-SCANNER SYSTEM

    SciTech Connect

    Gruchalla, Michael E.

    2011-01-01

    The National Instruments cRIO platform is used for the new LANSCE-R wire-scanner systems. All wire-scanner electronics are integrated into a single BiRa BiRIO 4U cRIO chassis specifically designed for the cRIO crate and all interface electronics. The BiRIO chassis, actuator and LabVIEW VIs provide a complete wire-scanner system integrated with EPICS. The new wire-scanner chassis includes an 8-slot cRIO crate with Virtex-5 LX 110 FPGA and Power-PC real-time controller, the LANL-developed cRIO 2-axis wire-sensor analog interface module (AFE), NI9222 cRIO 4-channel 16-bit digitizer, cRIO resolver demodulator, cRIO event receiver, front-panel touch panel display, motor driver, and all necessary software, interface wiring, connectors and ancillary components. This wirescanner system provides a complete, turn-key, 2-axis wire-scanner system including 2-channel low-noise sensewire interface with variable DC wire bias and wireintegrity monitor, 16-bit signal digitizers, actuator motor drive and control, actuator position sensing, limit-switch interfaces, event receiver, LabVIEW and EPICS interface, and both remote operation and full stand-alone operation using the touch panel.

  19. Cognition for robot scanner based remote welding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thombansen, U.; Ungers, Michael

    2014-02-01

    The effort for reduced cycle times in manufacturing has supported the development of remote welding systems which use a combination of scanners for beam delivery and robots for scanner positioning. Herein, close coupling of both motions requires a precise command of the robot trajectory and the scanner positioning to end up with a combined beam delivery. Especially the path precision of the robot plays a vital role in this kinematic chain. In this paper, a sensor system is being presented which allows tracking the motion of the laser beam against the work piece. It is based on a camera system which is coaxially connected to the scanner thus observing the relative motion of the laser beam relative to the work piece. The acquired images are processed with computer vision algorithms from the field of motion detection. The suitability of the algorithms is being demonstrated with a motion tracking tool which visualizes the homogeneity of the tracking result. The reported solution adds cognitive capabilities to manufacturing systems for robot scanner based materials processing. It allows evaluation of the relative motion between work piece and the laser beam. Moreover, the system can be used to adapt system programming during set-up of a manufacturing task or to evaluate the functionality of a manufacturing system during production. The presented sensor system will assist in optimizing manufacturing processes.

  20. Enabling high volume manufacturing of double patterning immersion lithography with the XLR 600ix ArF light source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rokitski, Rostislav; Fleurov, Vladimir; Bergstedt, Robert; Ye, Hong; Rafac, Robert; Jacques, Robert; Trintchouk, Fedor; Ishihara, Toshihiko; Rao, Rajasekhar; Cacouris, Theodore; Brown, Daniel; Partlo, William

    2009-03-01

    Deep ultraviolet (DUV) lithography improvements have been focused on two paths: further increases in the effective numerical aperture (NA) beyond 1.3, and double patterning (DP). High-index solutions for increasing the effective NA have not gained significant momentum due to several technical factors, and have been eclipsed by an aggressive push to make DP a high-volume manufacturing solution. The challenge is to develop a cost-effective solution using a process that effectively doubles the lithography steps required for critical layers, while achieving a higher degree of overlay performance. As a result, the light source requirements for DP fall into 3 main categories: (a) higher power to enable higher throughput on the scanner, (b) lower operating costs to offset the increased number of process steps, and (c) high stability of optical parameters to support more stringent process requirements. The XLR 600i (6kHz, 90W @15mJ) was introduced last year to enable DP by leveraging the higher performance and lower operating costs of the ring architecture XLR 500i (6kHz, 60W @10mJ) platform currently used for 45nm immersion lithography in production around the world. In February 2009, the XLR 600ix was introduced as a 60/90W switchable product to provide flexibility in the transition to higher power requirements as scanner capabilities are enhanced. The XLR 600ix includes improved optics materials to meet reliability requirements while operating at higher internal fluences. In this paper we will illustrate the performance characteristics during extended testing. Examples of performance include polarization stability, divergence and pointing stability, which enable consistent pupil fill under extreme illumination conditions, as well as overall thermal stability which maintains constant beam performance under large changes in laser operating modes. Furthermore, the unique beam uniformity characteristics that the ring architecture generates result in lower peak energy

  1. CT densitometry of the lungs: Scanner performance

    SciTech Connect

    Kemerink, G.J.; Lamers, R.J.S.; Thelissen, G.R.P.; Engelshoven, J.M.A. van

    1996-01-01

    Our goal was to establish the reproducibility and accuracy of the CT scanner in densitometry of the lungs. Scanner stability was assessed by analysis of daily quality checks. Studies using a humanoid phantom and polyethylene foams for lung were performed to measure reproducibility and accuracy. The dependence of the CT-estimated density on reconstruction filter, zoom factor, slice thickness, table height, data truncation, and objects outside the scan field was determined. Stability of the system at air density was within {approx}1 HU and at water density within {approx}2 HU. Reproducibility and accuracy for densities found for lung were within 2-3%. Dependence on the acquisition and reconstruction parameters was neglible, with the exceptions of the ultra high resolution reconstruction algorithm in the case of emphysema, and objects outside the scan field. The performance of the CT scanner tested is quite adequate for densitometry of the lungs. 26 refs., 5 figs., 4 tabs.

  2. A flexible and wearable terahertz scanner

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suzuki, D.; Oda, S.; Kawano, Y.

    2016-12-01

    Imaging technologies based on terahertz (THz) waves have great potential for use in powerful non-invasive inspection methods. However, most real objects have various three-dimensional curvatures and existing THz technologies often encounter difficulties in imaging such configurations, which limits the useful range of THz imaging applications. Here, we report the development of a flexible and wearable THz scanner based on carbon nanotubes. We achieved room-temperature THz detection over a broad frequency band ranging from 0.14 to 39 THz and developed a portable THz scanner. Using this scanner, we performed THz imaging of samples concealed behind opaque objects, breakages and metal impurities of a bent film and multi-view scans of a syringe. We demonstrated a passive biometric THz scan of a human hand. Our results are expected to have considerable implications for non-destructive and non-contact inspections, such as medical examinations for the continuous monitoring of health conditions.

  3. Scanner identification with extension to forgery detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khanna, Nitin; Chiu, George T. C.; Allebach, Jan P.; Delp, Edward J.

    2008-02-01

    Digital images can be obtained through a variety of sources including digital cameras and scanners. With rapidly increasing functionality and ease of use of image editing software, determining authenticity and identifying forged regions, if any, is becoming crucial for many applications. This paper presents methods for authenticating and identifying forged regions in images that have been acquired using flatbed scanners. The methods are based on using statistical features of imaging sensor pattern noise as a fingerprint for the scanner. An anisotropic local polynomial estimator is used for obtaining the noise patterns. A SVM classifier is trained for using statistical features of pattern noise for classifying smaller blocks of an image. This feature vector based approach is shown to identify the forged regions with high accuracy.

  4. How flatbed scanners upset accurate film dosimetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Battum, L. J.; Huizenga, H.; Verdaasdonk, R. M.; Heukelom, S.

    2016-01-01

    Film is an excellent dosimeter for verification of dose distributions due to its high spatial resolution. Irradiated film can be digitized with low-cost, transmission, flatbed scanners. However, a disadvantage is their lateral scan effect (LSE): a scanner readout change over its lateral scan axis. Although anisotropic light scattering was presented as the origin of the LSE, this paper presents an alternative cause. Hereto, LSE for two flatbed scanners (Epson 1680 Expression Pro and Epson 10000XL), and Gafchromic film (EBT, EBT2, EBT3) was investigated, focused on three effects: cross talk, optical path length and polarization. Cross talk was examined using triangular sheets of various optical densities. The optical path length effect was studied using absorptive and reflective neutral density filters with well-defined optical characteristics (OD range 0.2-2.0). Linear polarizer sheets were used to investigate light polarization on the CCD signal in absence and presence of (un)irradiated Gafchromic film. Film dose values ranged between 0.2 to 9 Gy, i.e. an optical density range between 0.25 to 1.1. Measurements were performed in the scanner’s transmission mode, with red-green-blue channels. LSE was found to depend on scanner construction and film type. Its magnitude depends on dose: for 9 Gy increasing up to 14% at maximum lateral position. Cross talk was only significant in high contrast regions, up to 2% for very small fields. The optical path length effect introduced by film on the scanner causes 3% for pixels in the extreme lateral position. Light polarization due to film and the scanner’s optical mirror system is the main contributor, different in magnitude for the red, green and blue channel. We concluded that any Gafchromic EBT type film scanned with a flatbed scanner will face these optical effects. Accurate dosimetry requires correction of LSE, therefore, determination of the LSE per color channel and dose delivered to the film.

  5. Miniature rotating transmissive optical drum scanner

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lewis, Robert (Inventor); Parrington, Lawrence (Inventor); Rutberg, Michael (Inventor)

    2013-01-01

    A miniature rotating transmissive optical scanner system employs a drum of small size having an interior defined by a circumferential wall rotatable on a drum axis, an optical element positioned within the interior of the drum, and a light-transmissive lens aperture provided at an angular position in the circumferential wall of the drum for scanning a light beam to or from the optical element in the drum along a beam azimuth angle as the drum is rotated. The miniature optical drum scanner configuration obtains a wide scanning field-of-view (FOV) and large effective aperture is achieved within a physically small size.

  6. The conical scanner evaluation system design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cumella, K. E.; Bilanow, S.; Kulikov, I. B.

    1982-01-01

    The software design for the conical scanner evaluation system is presented. The purpose of this system is to support the performance analysis of the LANDSAT-D conical scanners, which are infrared horizon detection attitude sensors designed for improved accuracy. The system consists of six functionally independent subsystems and five interface data bases. The system structure and interfaces of each of the subsystems is described and the content, format, and file structure of each of the data bases is specified. For each subsystem, the functional logic, the control parameters, the baseline structure, and each of the subroutines are described. The subroutine descriptions include a procedure definition and the input and output parameters.

  7. Multispectral scanner imagery for plant community classification.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Driscoll, R. S.; Spencer, M. M.

    1973-01-01

    Optimum channel selection among 12 channels of multispectral scanner imagery identified six as providing the best information for computerized classification of 11 plant communities and two nonvegetation classes. Intensive preprocessing of the spectral data was required to eliminate bidirectional reflectance effects of the spectral imagery caused by scanner view angle and varying geometry of the plant canopy. Generalized plant community types - forest, grassland, and hydrophytic systems - were acceptably classified based on ecological analysis. Serious, but soluble, errors occurred with attempts to classify specific community types within the grassland system. However, special clustering analyses provided for improved classification of specific grassland communities.

  8. LANSCE Wire Scanner System Prototype: Switchyard Test

    SciTech Connect

    Sedillo, James D

    2012-04-11

    On November 19, 2011, the beam diagnostics team of Los Alamos National Laboratory's LANSCE accelerator facility conducted a test of a prototype wire scanner system for future deployment within the accelerator's switchyard area. The primary focus of this test was to demonstrate the wire scanner control system's ability to extend its functionality beyond acquiring lower energy linac beam profile measurements to acquiring data in the switchyard. This study summarizes the features and performance characteristics of the electronic and mechanical implementation of this system with details focusing on the test results.

  9. Step and flash imprint lithography for semiconductor high volume manufacturing?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malloy, M.; Litt, L. C.

    2010-03-01

    Step and Flash Imprint Lithography (SFIL), a form of ultraviolet nanoimprint lithography (UV-NIL), is recognized for its resolution and patterning abilities. It is one of the few next generation lithography techniques capable of meeting the resolution requirements of future semiconductor devices. However, many integration issues such as defectivity, throughput, and overlay must be resolved before SFIL can be used for semiconductor high volume manufacturing (HVM). This paper discusses the current status of SFIL, including the process and templates, and shows where more industry collaboration is needed to solve the most critical issues.

  10. Hybrid hotspot detection using regression model and lithography simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kimura, Taiki; Matsunawa, Tetsuaki; Nojima, Shigeki; Pan, David Z.

    2016-03-01

    As minimum feature sizes shrink, unexpected hotspots appear on wafers. Therefore, it is important to detect and fix these hotspots at design stage to reduce development time and manufacturing cost. Currently, as the most accurate approach, lithography simulation is widely used to detect such hotspots. However, it is known to be time-consuming. This paper proposes a novel aerial image synthesizing method using regression and minimum lithography simulation for only hotspot detection. Experimental results show hotspot detection on the proposed method is equivalent compared with the results on the conventional hotspot detection method which uses only lithography simulation with much less computational cost.

  11. Photonic integrated circuits: new challenges for lithography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bolten, Jens; Wahlbrink, Thorsten; Prinzen, Andreas; Porschatis, Caroline; Lerch, Holger; Giesecke, Anna Lena

    2016-10-01

    In this work routes towards the fabrication of photonic integrated circuits (PICs) and the challenges their fabrication poses on lithography, such as large differences in feature dimension of adjacent device features, non-Manhattan-type features, high aspect ratios and significant topographic steps as well as tight lithographic requirements with respect to critical dimension control, line edge roughness and other key figures of merit not only for very small but also for relatively large features, are highlighted. Several ways those challenges are faced in today's low-volume fabrication of PICs, including the concept multi project wafer runs and mix and match approaches, are presented and possible paths towards a real market uptake of PICs are discussed.

  12. Nanoimprint lithography using disposable biomass template

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hanabata, Makoto; Takei, Satoshi; Sugahara, Kigen; Nakajima, Shinya; Sugino, Naoto; Kameda, Takao; Fukushima, Jiro; Matsumoto, Yoko; Sekiguchi, Atsushi

    2016-04-01

    A novel nanoimprint lithography process using disposable biomass template having gas permeability was investigated. It was found that a disposable biomass template derived from cellulose materials shows an excellent gas permeability and decreases transcriptional defects in conventional templates such as quartz, PMDS, DLC that have no gas permeability. We believe that outgasses from imprinted materials are easily removed through the template. The approach to use a cellulose for template material is suitable as the next generation of clean separation technology. It is expected to be one of the defect-less thermal nanoimprint lithographic technologies. It is also expected that volatile materials and solvent including materials become available that often create defects and peelings in conventional temples that have no gas permeability.

  13. Photoresist composition for extreme ultraviolet lithography

    DOEpatents

    Felter, T. E.; Kubiak, G. D.

    1999-01-01

    A method of producing a patterned array of features, in particular, gate apertures, in the size range 0.4-0.05 .mu.m using projection lithography and extreme ultraviolet (EUV) radiation. A high energy laser beam is used to vaporize a target material in order to produce a plasma which in turn, produces extreme ultraviolet radiation of a characteristic wavelength of about 13 nm for lithographic applications. The radiation is transmitted by a series of reflective mirrors to a mask which bears the pattern to be printed. The demagnified focused mask pattern is, in turn, transmitted by means of appropriate optics and in a single exposure, to a substrate coated with photoresists designed to be transparent to EUV radiation and also satisfy conventional processing methods. A photoresist composition for extreme ultraviolet radiation of boron carbide polymers, hydrochlorocarbons and mixtures thereof.

  14. Patterning proteins and cells using soft lithography.

    PubMed

    Kane, R S; Takayama, S; Ostuni, E; Ingber, D E; Whitesides, G M

    1999-12-01

    This review describes the pattering of proteins and cells using a non-photolithographic microfabrication technology, which we call 'soft lithography' because it consists of a set of related techniques, each of which uses stamps or channels fabricated in an elastomeric ('soft') material for pattern transfer. The review covers three soft lithographic techniques: microcontact printing, patterning using microfluidic channels, and laminar flow patterning. These soft lithographic techniques are inexpensive, are procedurally simple, and can be used to pattern a variety of planar and non-planar substrates. Their successful application does not require stringent regulation of the laboratory environment, and they can be used to pattern surfaces with delicate ligands. They provide control over both the surface chemistry and the cellular environment. We discuss both the procedures for patterning based on these soft lithographic techniques, and their applications in biosensor technology, in tissue engineering, and for fundamental studies in cell biology.

  15. Femtolitre chemistry assisted by microfluidic pen lithography

    PubMed Central

    Carbonell, Carlos; Stylianou, Kyriakos C.; Hernando, Jordi; Evangelio, Emi; Barnett, Sarah A.; Nettikadan, Saju; Imaz, Inhar; Maspoch, Daniel

    2013-01-01

    Chemical reactions at ultrasmall volumes are becoming increasingly necessary to study biological processes, to synthesize homogenous nanostructures and to perform high-throughput assays and combinatorial screening. Here we show that a femtolitre reaction can be realized on a surface by handling and mixing femtolitre volumes of reagents using a microfluidic stylus. This method, named microfluidic pen lithography, allows mixing reagents in isolated femtolitre droplets that can be used as reactors to conduct independent reactions and crystallization processes. This strategy overcomes the high-throughput limitations of vesicles and micelles and obviates the usually costly step of fabricating microdevices and wells. We anticipate that this process enables performing distinct reactions (acid-base, enzymatic recognition and metal-organic framework synthesis), creating multiplexed nanoscale metal-organic framework arrays, and screening combinatorial reactions to evaluate the crystallization of novel peptide-based materials. PMID:23863998

  16. Photoresist composition for extreme ultraviolet lithography

    SciTech Connect

    Felter, T.E.; Kubiak, G.D.

    1999-11-23

    A method of producing a patterned array of features, in particular, gate apertures, in the size range 0.4--0.05 {mu}m using projection lithography and extreme ultraviolet (EUV) radiation is disclosed. A high energy laser beam is used to vaporize a target material in order to produce a plasma which in turn, produces extreme ultraviolet radiation of a characteristic wavelength of about 13 nm for lithographic applications. The radiation is transmitted by a series of reflective mirrors to a mask which bears the pattern to be printed. The demagnified focused mask pattern is, in turn, transmitted by means of appropriate optics and in a single exposure, to a substrate coated with photoresists designed to be transparent to EUV radiation and also satisfy conventional processing methods. A photoresist composition for extreme ultraviolet radiation of boron carbide polymers, hydrochlorocarbons and mixtures thereof.

  17. An operational multispectral scanner for bathymetric surveys - The ABS NORDA scanner

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Haimbach, Stephen P.; Joy, Richard T.; Hickman, G. Daniel

    1987-01-01

    The Naval Ocean Research and Development Activity (NORDA) is developing the Airborne Bathymetric Survey (ABS) system, which will take shallow water depth soundings from a Navy P-3 aircraft. The system combines active and passive sensors to obtain optical measurements of water depth. The ABS NORDA Scanner is the systems passive multispectral scanner whose design goal is to provide 100 percent coverage of the seafloor, to depths of 20 m in average coastal waters. The ABS NORDA Scanner hardware and operational environment is discussed in detail. The optical model providing the basis for depth extraction is reviewed and the proposed data processing routine discussed.

  18. Reflective electron beam lithography: lithography results using CMOS controlled digital pattern generator chip

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gubiotti, Thomas; Sun, Jeff Fuge; Freed, Regina; Kidwingira, Francoise; Yang, Jason; Bevis, Chris; Carroll, Allen; Brodie, Alan; Tong, William M.; Lin, Shy-Jay; Wang, Wen-Chuan; Haspeslagh, Luc; Vereecke, Bart

    2013-03-01

    Maskless electron beam lithography can potentially extend semiconductor manufacturing to the 10 nm logic (16 nm half pitch) technology node and beyond. KLA-Tencor is developing Reflective Electron Beam Lithography (REBL) technology targeting high-volume 10 nm logic node performance. REBL uses a novel multi-column wafer writing system combined with an advanced stage architecture to enable the throughput and resolution required for a NGL system. Using a CMOS Digital Pattern Generator (DPG) chip with over one million microlenses, the system is capable of maskless printing of arbitrary patterns with pixel redundancy and pixel-by-pixel grayscaling at the wafer. Electrons are generated in a flood beam via a thermionic cathode at 50-100 keV and decelerated to illuminate the DPG chip. The DPG-modulated electron beam is then reaccelerated and demagnified 80-100x onto the wafer to be printed. Previously, KLA-Tencor reported on the development progress of the REBL tool for maskless lithography at and below the 10 nm logic technology node. Since that time, the REBL team has made good progress towards developing the REBL system and DPG for direct write lithography. REBL has been successful in manufacturing a CMOS controlled DPG chip with a stable charge drain coating and with all segments functioning. This DPG chip consists of an array of over one million electrostatic lenslets that can be switched on or off via CMOS voltages to pattern the flood electron beam. Testing has proven the validity of the design with regards to lenslet performance, contrast, lifetime, and pattern scrolling. This chip has been used in the REBL demonstration platform system for lithography on a moving stage in both PMMA and chemically amplified resist. Direct imaging of the aerial image has also been performed by magnifying the pattern at the wafer plane via a mag stack onto a YAG imaging screen. This paper will discuss the chip design improvements and new charge drain coating that have resulted in a

  19. Pitch doubling through dual-patterning lithography challenges in integration and litho budgets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dusa, Mircea; Quaedackers, John; Larsen, Olaf F. A.; Meessen, Jeroen; van der Heijden, Eddy; Dicker, Gerald; Wismans, Onno; de Haas, Paul; van Ingen Schenau, Koen; Finders, Jo; Vleeming, Bert; Storms, Geert; Jaenen, Patrick; Cheng, Shaunee; Maenhoudt, Mireille

    2007-03-01

    We present results from investigating critical challenges of pitch doubling through Double Patterning to meet manufacturing requirements for 32nm 1/ II pitch on 1.2NA lithography system. Simulations of lithography alternatives identified manufacturable Dose-Focus latitudes for a dual-line positive process option which led to an experimental setup based on a single hardmask process. Key challenges of the selected process relate to the presence or absence of the hardmask layer during 1 st or 2 nd patterning step. This has an effect on wafer topography, process setup, etch bias and wafer litho-to-etch CDU offsets, which will create two final CDU populations. Therefore, there are two metrology challenges, separation between the two CD populations and overlay-at-resolution using CDSEM. They were addressed by designing appropriate CD and overlay targets and by implementing an adequate dense sampling allowing modeling of wafer and field CD distributions. We introduced a new CDU model to calculate double patterning budgets based on defining CD from its edges and pooling CD variance from two adjacent patterns within 2*Pitch distance. For a single line and 1.35NA system, the model predicted 3.1nm variance with mask CDU and etch bias being the major contributors. We achieved an experimental resolution of 32-nm 1/ II pitch on 1.2NA system, which equals 0.20k1. Experimental results at 32-nm resolution were confirmed in a pre-manufacturing environment on a full lot of 24 wafers, with raw CDU of 6nm (3s). After modeling and correcting for interfield (wafer) and intrafield spatial distributions, CDU was improved to 2.5nm (3s). Best overlay results equaled scanner SMO capability of ~7nm (mean+3s).

  20. Learning and Teaching with a Computer Scanner

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Planinsic, G.; Gregorcic, B.; Etkina, E.

    2014-01-01

    This paper introduces the readers to simple inquiry-based activities (experiments with supporting questions) that one can do with a computer scanner to help students learn and apply the concepts of relative motion in 1 and 2D, vibrational motion and the Doppler effect. We also show how to use these activities to help students think like…

  1. Bottled liquid explosive scanner by near infrared

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Itozaki, Hideo

    2016-05-01

    A bottled liquid explosive scanner has been developed using near infrared technology for glass or PET bottles and ultrasound technology for metal cans. It has database of near infrared absorbance spectra and sound velocities of various liquids. Scanned liquids can be identified by using this database. This device has been certified by ECAC and installed at Japanese international airport.

  2. Miniature 'Wearable' PET Scanner Ready for Use

    SciTech Connect

    Paul Vaska

    2011-03-09

    Scientists from BNL, Stony Brook University, and collaborators have demonstrated the efficacy of a "wearable," portable PET scanner they've developed for rats. The device will give neuroscientists a new tool for simultaneously studying brain function and behavior in fully awake, moving animals.

  3. Wire scanner software and firmware issues

    SciTech Connect

    Gilpatrick, John Doug

    2008-01-01

    The Los Alamos Neutron Science Center facility presently has 110 slow wire scanning profile measurement instruments located along its various beam lines. These wire scanners were developed and have been operating for at least 30 years. While the wire scanners solved many problems to operate and have served the facility well they have increasingly suffered from several problems or limitations, such as maintenance and reliability problems, antiquated components, slow data acquisition, and etc. In order to refurbish these devices, these wire scanners will be replaced with newer versions. The replacement will consist of a completely new beam line actuator, new cables, new electronics and brand new software and firmware. This note describes the functions and modes of operation that LabVIEW VI software on the real time controller and FPGA LabVIEW firmware will be required. It will be especially interesting to understand the overall architecture of these LabVIEW VIs. While this note will endeavor to describe all of the requirements and issues for the wire scanners, undoubtedly, there will be missing details that will be added as time progresses.

  4. Ultrasonic Scanner Control and Data Acquisition

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hemann, John

    2002-01-01

    The research accomplishments under this grant were very extensive in the areas of ULTRASONIC SCANNER CONTROL AND DATA ACQUISITION. Rather than try to summarize all this research I have enclosed research papers and reports which were completed with the hnding provided by the grant. These papers and reports are listed below:

  5. Miniature 'Wearable' PET Scanner Ready for Use

    ScienceCinema

    Paul Vaska

    2016-07-12

    Scientists from BNL, Stony Brook University, and collaborators have demonstrated the efficacy of a "wearable," portable PET scanner they've developed for rats. The device will give neuroscientists a new tool for simultaneously studying brain function and behavior in fully awake, moving animals.

  6. Biomedical imaging and sensing using flatbed scanners.

    PubMed

    Göröcs, Zoltán; Ozcan, Aydogan

    2014-09-07

    In this Review, we provide an overview of flatbed scanner based biomedical imaging and sensing techniques. The extremely large imaging field-of-view (e.g., ~600-700 cm(2)) of these devices coupled with their cost-effectiveness provide unique opportunities for digital imaging of samples that are too large for regular optical microscopes, and for collection of large amounts of statistical data in various automated imaging or sensing tasks. Here we give a short introduction to the basic features of flatbed scanners also highlighting the key parameters for designing scientific experiments using these devices, followed by a discussion of some of the significant examples, where scanner-based systems were constructed to conduct various biomedical imaging and/or sensing experiments. Along with mobile phones and other emerging consumer electronics devices, flatbed scanners and their use in advanced imaging and sensing experiments might help us transform current practices of medicine, engineering and sciences through democratization of measurement science and empowerment of citizen scientists, science educators and researchers in resource limited settings.

  7. Rail profile control using laser triangulation scanners

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boronahin, Ð. ńlexandr M.; Larionov, Daniil Yu.; Podgornaya, Liudmila N.; Shalymov, Roman V.; Filatov, Yuri V.; Bokhman, Evgueny D.

    2016-11-01

    Rail track geometric parameters measurement requires knowledge of left and right rail head location in each section. First of all displacement in transverse plane of rail head point located at a distance of 14 mm below the running surface, must be controlled [1]. It is carried out by detecting of each rail profile using triangulation laser scanners. Optical image recognition is carried out successfully in the laboratory, approaches used for this purpose are widely known. However, laser scanners operation has several features on railways leading to necessity of traditional approaches adaptation for solving these particular problems. The most significant problem is images noisiness due to the solar flashes and the effect of "Moon path" on the smooth rail surface. Using of optical filters gives inadequate result, because scanner laser diodes radiation frequency varies with temperature changes that forbid the use of narrow-band filters. Consideration of these features requires additional constructive and algorithmic solutions, including involvement of information from other sensors of the system. The specific usage of optical scanners for rail profiles control is the subject of the paper.

  8. Dedicated PET scanners for breast imaging.

    PubMed

    Freifelder, R; Karp, J S

    1997-12-01

    We have used computer simulations to compare two designs for a PET scanner dedicated to breast imaging with a whole-body PET scanner. The new designs combine high spatial resolution, high sensitivity, and good energy resolution to detect small, low-contrast masses. The detectors are position sensitive NaI(Tl) scintillators. The first design is a ring scanner surrounding the breast and the second consists of two planar detectors placed on opposite sides of the breast. We have employed standard performance measures to compare the different designs: contrast, percentage standard deviation of the background, and signal-to-noise ratios of reconstructed images. The results of the simulations show that both of the proposed designs have better lesion detectability than a whole-body scanner. The results also show that contrast is higher in the ring breast system but that the noise is lower in the planar breast system. Overall, the ring system yields images with the best signal-to-noise ratios, although the planar system offers practical advantages for imaging the breast and axilla.

  9. Dedicated PET scanners for breast imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Freifelder, Richard; Karp, Joel S.

    1997-12-01

    We have used computer simulations to compare two designs for a PET scanner dedicated to breast imaging with a whole-body PET scanner. The new designs combine high spatial resolution, high sensitivity, and good energy resolution to detect small, low-contrast masses. The detectors are position sensitive NaI(Tl) scintillators. The first design is a ring scanner surrounding the breast and the second consists of two planar detectors placed on opposite sides of the breast. We have employed standard performance measures to compare the different designs: contrast, percentage standard deviation of the background, and signal-to-noise ratios of reconstructed images. The results of the simulations show that both of the proposed designs have better lesion detectability than a whole-body scanner. The results also show that contrast is higher in the ring breast system but that the noise is lower in the planar breast system. Overall, the ring system yields images with the best signal-to-noise ratios, although the planar system offers practical advantages for imaging the breast and axilla.

  10. Sub-10 nm patterning using EUV interference lithography.

    PubMed

    Päivänranta, Birgit; Langner, Andreas; Kirk, Eugenie; David, Christian; Ekinci, Yasin

    2011-09-16

    Extreme ultraviolet (EUV) lithography is currently considered as the leading technology for high-volume manufacturing below sub-20 nm feature sizes. In parallel, EUV interference lithography based on interference transmission gratings has emerged as a powerful tool for industrial and academic research. In this paper, we demonstrate nanopatterning with sub-10 nm resolution using this technique. Highly efficient and optimized molybdenum gratings result in resolved line/space patterns down to 8 nm half-pitch and show modulation down to 6 nm half-pitch. These results show the performance of optical nanopatterning in the sub-10 nm range and currently mark the record for photon-based lithography. Moreover, an efficient phase mask completely suppressing the zeroth-order diffraction and providing 50 nm line/space patterns over large areas is evaluated. Such efficient phase masks pave the way towards table-top EUV interference lithography systems.

  11. Development of motorized plasma lithography for cell patterning.

    PubMed

    Deguchi, Shinji; Nagasawa, Yohei; Saito, Akira C; Matsui, Tsubasa S; Yokoyama, Sho; Sato, Masaaki

    2014-03-01

    The micropatterning of cells, which restricts the adhesive regions on the substrate and thus controls cell geometry, is used to study mechanobiology-related cell functions. Plasma lithography is a means of providing such patterns and uses a spatially-selective plasma treatment. Conventional plasma lithography employs a positionally-fixed mask with which the geometry of the patterns is determined and thus is not suited for producing on-demand geometries of patterns. To overcome this, we have manufactured a new device with a motorized mask mounted in a vacuum chamber of a plasma generator, which we designate motorized plasma lithography. Our pilot tests indicate that various pattern geometries can be obtained with the control of a shielding mask during plasma treatment. Our approach can thus omit the laborious process of preparing photolithographically microfabricated masks required for the conventional plasma lithography.

  12. 23. SITE BUILDING 002 SCANNER BUILDING RADAR CONTROL ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    23. SITE BUILDING 002 - SCANNER BUILDING - RADAR CONTROL INTERFACE "RCL NO. 2" WITH COMPUTER CONTROL DISC DRIVE UNITS IN FOREGROUND. - Cape Cod Air Station, Technical Facility-Scanner Building & Power Plant, Massachusetts Military Reservation, Sandwich, Barnstable County, MA

  13. Occurrence and characteristics of mutual interference between LIDAR scanners

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Gunzung; Eom, Jeongsook; Park, Seonghyeon; Park, Yongwan

    2015-05-01

    The LIDAR scanner is at the heart of object detection of the self-driving car. Mutual interference between LIDAR scanners has not been regarded as a problem because the percentage of vehicles equipped with LIDAR scanners was very rare. With the growing number of autonomous vehicle equipped with LIDAR scanner operated close to each other at the same time, the LIDAR scanner may receive laser pulses from other LIDAR scanners. In this paper, three types of experiments and their results are shown, according to the arrangement of two LIDAR scanners. We will show the probability that any LIDAR scanner will interfere mutually by considering spatial and temporal overlaps. It will present some typical mutual interference scenario and report an analysis of the interference mechanism.

  14. 24. SITE BUILDING 002 SCANNER BUILDING OPERATIONS CENTER ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    24. SITE BUILDING 002 - SCANNER BUILDING - OPERATIONS CENTER -- MWOC IN OPEARATION AT 1924 ZULU TIME. 26 OCTOBER, 1999. - Cape Cod Air Station, Technical Facility-Scanner Building & Power Plant, Massachusetts Military Reservation, Sandwich, Barnstable County, MA

  15. 13. SITE BUILDING 002 SCANNER BUILDING "B" FACE ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    13. SITE BUILDING 002 - SCANNER BUILDING - "B" FACE LOADING DOCK AND PERSONNEL ACCESS RAMP TO FALLOUT SHELTER. - Cape Cod Air Station, Technical Facility-Scanner Building & Power Plant, Massachusetts Military Reservation, Sandwich, Barnstable County, MA

  16. 2. SITE BUILDING 002 SCANNER BUILDING VIEW IS ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    2. SITE BUILDING 002 - SCANNER BUILDING - VIEW IS LOOKING NORTH 80° WEST "B" FACE ALONG BUILDING "A" FACE. - Cape Cod Air Station, Technical Facility-Scanner Building & Power Plant, Massachusetts Military Reservation, Sandwich, Barnstable County, MA

  17. 28. SITE BUILDING 002 SCANNER BUILDING AT INTERIOR ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    28. SITE BUILDING 002 - SCANNER BUILDING - AT INTERIOR OF LEVEL 5, FACE A - SHOWS ANTENNA RECEIVERS, EMITTERS/RECEIVERS, IN GENERAL ARRANGEMENT. - Cape Cod Air Station, Technical Facility-Scanner Building & Power Plant, Massachusetts Military Reservation, Sandwich, Barnstable County, MA

  18. 22. SITE BUILDING 002 SCANNER BUILDING RADAR CONTROL ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    22. SITE BUILDING 002 - SCANNER BUILDING - RADAR CONTROL ROOM. RECEIVER EQUIPMENT ON RIGHT WITH RF RADIATION MONITOR CABINET. - Cape Cod Air Station, Technical Facility-Scanner Building & Power Plant, Massachusetts Military Reservation, Sandwich, Barnstable County, MA

  19. Evolution in the concentration of activities in lithography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Levinson, Harry J.

    2016-03-01

    From a perusal of the proceedings of the SPIE Advanced Lithography Symposium, the progression of new concepts in lithographic technology can be seen. A new idea first appears in a few papers, and over time, there is an increase in the number of papers on the same topic. Eventually the method becomes commonplace, and the number of papers on the topic declines, as the idea becomes part of our industry's working knowledge. For example, one or two papers on resolution enhancement techniques (RETs) appeared in the proceedings of the Optical Microlithography Conference in 1989 and 1990. By 1994, the total number of papers had increased to 35. Early lithographers focused on practical issues, such as adhesion promotion and resist edge bead. The introduction of simulation software brought on the next era of lithography. This was followed by a period of time in which RETs were developed and brought to maturity. The introduction of optical proximity corrections (OPC) initiated the next major era of lithography. The traditional path for scaling by using shorter wavelengths, decreasing k1 and increasing numerical aperture has given way to the current era of optical multiple patterning and lithography-design co-optimization. There has been sufficient activity in EUV lithography R and D to justify a separate EUV Lithography Conference as part of the annual Advanced Lithography Symposium. Each era builds on the cumulative knowledge gained previously. Over time, there have been parallel developments in optics, exposure tools, resist, metrology and mask technology, many of which were associated with changes in the wavelength of light used for leading-edge lithography.

  20. Application of optical CD metrology for alternative lithography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Asano, Masafumi; Kawamoto, Akiko; Matsuki, Kazuto; Godny, Stephane; Lin, Tingsheng; Wakamoto, Koichi

    2013-04-01

    Directed self-assembly (DSA) and nanoimprint lithography (NIL) have been widely developed for low-cost nanoscale patterning. Although they are currently regarded as "alternative lithography," some papers show their potential to be candidates for next-generation lithography (NGL). To actualize the potential, the contribution of metrology engineers is necessary. Since the characteristics of the lithography techniques are different from those of conventional lithography, new metrology schemes correlated with each characteristic are required. In DSA of block copolymer (BCP), a guide is needed to control the direction and position of BCP. Therefore, it is necessary to monitor the relationship between the guide and the BCP pattern. Since the depth of guide or the coating thickness variation of BCP over guide influences the behavior of phase separation of BCP, 3D metrology becomes increasingly important. In NIL, residual resist thickness (RLT) underneath the pattern should be measured because its variation affects the CD variation of transferred pattern. 3D metrology is also important in NIL. Optical critical dimension (OCD) metrology will be a powerful tool for 3D metrology. In this work, some applications of OCD for alternative lithography have been studied. For DSA, we have tried to simultaneously monitor the guide and BCP pattern in a DSA-based contact hole shrinking process. Sufficient measurement accuracy for CD and shapes for guide and BCP patterns was achievable. For NIL, sufficient sensitivity to RLT measurement was obtained.

  1. 21 CFR 892.1300 - Nuclear rectilinear scanner.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Nuclear rectilinear scanner. 892.1300 Section 892...) MEDICAL DEVICES RADIOLOGY DEVICES Diagnostic Devices § 892.1300 Nuclear rectilinear scanner. (a) Identification. A nuclear rectilinear scanner is a device intended to image the distribution of radionuclides...

  2. 21 CFR 892.1330 - Nuclear whole body scanner.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Nuclear whole body scanner. 892.1330 Section 892...) MEDICAL DEVICES RADIOLOGY DEVICES Diagnostic Devices § 892.1330 Nuclear whole body scanner. (a) Identification. A nuclear whole body scanner is a device intended to measure and image the distribution...

  3. 21 CFR 892.1330 - Nuclear whole body scanner.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Nuclear whole body scanner. 892.1330 Section 892...) MEDICAL DEVICES RADIOLOGY DEVICES Diagnostic Devices § 892.1330 Nuclear whole body scanner. (a) Identification. A nuclear whole body scanner is a device intended to measure and image the distribution...

  4. 21 CFR 892.1300 - Nuclear rectilinear scanner.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Nuclear rectilinear scanner. 892.1300 Section 892...) MEDICAL DEVICES RADIOLOGY DEVICES Diagnostic Devices § 892.1300 Nuclear rectilinear scanner. (a) Identification. A nuclear rectilinear scanner is a device intended to image the distribution of radionuclides...

  5. 21 CFR 892.1330 - Nuclear whole body scanner.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Nuclear whole body scanner. 892.1330 Section 892...) MEDICAL DEVICES RADIOLOGY DEVICES Diagnostic Devices § 892.1330 Nuclear whole body scanner. (a) Identification. A nuclear whole body scanner is a device intended to measure and image the distribution...

  6. 21 CFR 892.1300 - Nuclear rectilinear scanner.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Nuclear rectilinear scanner. 892.1300 Section 892...) MEDICAL DEVICES RADIOLOGY DEVICES Diagnostic Devices § 892.1300 Nuclear rectilinear scanner. (a) Identification. A nuclear rectilinear scanner is a device intended to image the distribution of radionuclides...

  7. 21 CFR 892.1330 - Nuclear whole body scanner.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Nuclear whole body scanner. 892.1330 Section 892...) MEDICAL DEVICES RADIOLOGY DEVICES Diagnostic Devices § 892.1330 Nuclear whole body scanner. (a) Identification. A nuclear whole body scanner is a device intended to measure and image the distribution...

  8. 21 CFR 892.1300 - Nuclear rectilinear scanner.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Nuclear rectilinear scanner. 892.1300 Section 892...) MEDICAL DEVICES RADIOLOGY DEVICES Diagnostic Devices § 892.1300 Nuclear rectilinear scanner. (a) Identification. A nuclear rectilinear scanner is a device intended to image the distribution of radionuclides...

  9. 21 CFR 892.1330 - Nuclear whole body scanner.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Nuclear whole body scanner. 892.1330 Section 892...) MEDICAL DEVICES RADIOLOGY DEVICES Diagnostic Devices § 892.1330 Nuclear whole body scanner. (a) Identification. A nuclear whole body scanner is a device intended to measure and image the distribution...

  10. 21 CFR 892.1300 - Nuclear rectilinear scanner.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Nuclear rectilinear scanner. 892.1300 Section 892...) MEDICAL DEVICES RADIOLOGY DEVICES Diagnostic Devices § 892.1300 Nuclear rectilinear scanner. (a) Identification. A nuclear rectilinear scanner is a device intended to image the distribution of radionuclides...

  11. Applications of Optical Scanners in an Academic Center.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Molinari, Carol; Tannenbaum, Robert S.

    1995-01-01

    Describes optical scanners, including how the technology works; applications in data management and research; development of instructional materials; and providing community services. Discussion includes the three basic types of optical scanners: optical character recognition (OCR), optical mark readers (OMR), and graphic scanners. A sidebar…

  12. 21 CFR 882.1925 - Ultrasonic scanner calibration test block.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Ultrasonic scanner calibration test block. 882... Ultrasonic scanner calibration test block. (a) Identification. An ultrasonic scanner calibration test block is a block of material with known properties used to calibrate ultrasonic scanning devices (e.g.,...

  13. 21 CFR 882.1925 - Ultrasonic scanner calibration test block.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Ultrasonic scanner calibration test block. 882... Ultrasonic scanner calibration test block. (a) Identification. An ultrasonic scanner calibration test block is a block of material with known properties used to calibrate ultrasonic scanning devices (e.g.,...

  14. Successful demonstration of a comprehensive lithography defect monitoring strategy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peterson, Ingrid B.; Breaux, Louis H.; Cross, Andrew; von den Hoff, Michael

    2003-07-01

    This paper describes the validation of the methodology, the model and the impact of an optimized Lithography Defect Monitoring Strategy at two different semiconductor manufacturing factories. The lithography defect inspection optimization was implemented for the Gate Module at both factories running 0.13-0.15μm technologies on 200mm wafers, one running microprocessor and the other memory devices. As minimum dimensions and process windows decrease in the lithography area, new technologies and technological advances with resists and resist systems are being implemented to meet the demands. Along with these new technological advances in the lithography area comes potentially unforeseen defect issues. The latest lithography processes involve new resists in extremely thin, uniform films, exposing the films under conditions of highly optimized focus and illumination, and finally removing the resist completely and cleanly. The lithography cell is defined as the cluster of process equipment that accomplishes the coating process (surface prep, resist spin, edge-bead removal and soft bake), the alignment and exposure, and the developing process (post-exposure bake, develop, rinse) of the resist. Often the resist spinning process involves multiple materials such as BARC (bottom ARC) and / or TARC (top ARC) materials in addition to the resist itself. The introduction of these new materials with the multiple materials interfaces and the tightness of the process windows leads to an increased variety of defect mechanisms in the lithography area. Defect management in the lithography area has become critical to successful product introduction and yield ramp. The semiconductor process itself contributes the largest number and variety of defects, and a significant portion of the total defects originate within the lithography cell. From a defect management perspective, the lithography cell has some unique characteristics. First, defects in the lithography process module have the

  15. Improvement of lithography process by using a FlexRay illuminator for memory applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Thomas; Huang, Chun-Yen; Chiou, Tsann-Bim; Hsu, Michael; Shih, Chiang-Lin; Chen, Alek; Wei, Ming-Kang

    2011-04-01

    As is well recognized, source mask optimization (SMO) is a highly effective means of extending the lifetime of a certain photolithography generation without an expensive upgrade to the next generation optical system. More than an academic theory, source optimization first found practical applications in the debut of the pixel-like programmable illuminator in 2009 for producing near freeform illumination. Based on programmed illumination, related studies have demonstrated a nearly identical optical performance to that generated by the conventionally adopted diffractive optical element (DOE) device without the prolonged manufacturing time and relatively high cost of stocking up various DOEs. By using a commercially available pixel-like programmable illuminator from ASML, i.e. the FlexRay, this study investigates the effectiveness of FlexRay in enhancing image contrast and common process window. Before wafer exposure, full SMO and source-only (SO) optimization are implemented by Tachyon SMO software to select the optimum illumination source. Wafer exposure is performed by ASML XT:1950i scanner equipped with a FlexRay illuminator on a critical layer of DRAM process with known hotspots of resist peeling. Pupil information is collected by a sensor embedded in the scanner to confirm the produced source shape against the programmed source and the optically simulated CD. When the FlexRay illuminator is used, experimental results indicate that lithography hotspots are eliminated and depth of focus is improved by as much as 50% in comparison with those from a traditional AERIAL illuminator. Regular focus-exposure matrix (FEM) and the subsequent critical defects scanning reveal that the common process window of the tight-pitched array and the periphery can be enhanced simultaneously with no hotspot identified. Therefore, a programmed source is undoubtedly invaluable in terms of additional manufacturing flexibility and lower cost of ownership when attempting to improve product

  16. Fabrication of subwavelength holes using nanoimprint lithography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weiss, A.; Besser, J.; Baum, M.; Saupe, R.; Otto, T.; Gessner, T.

    2013-03-01

    Driven by the demand of miniaturized and highly integrated functionalities in the area of photonics and photonic circuits, the metal or plasmon optics has become a promising method for manipulating light at the nanometer scale. Especially the application of periodic sub wavelength hole structures within an opaque metal film on a dielectric substrate holds many advantages for the realization of optical filters, since the variation of the hole diameter and the periodicity allows a selective filter response. This paper is concerned with the modeling, fabrication and characterization of a sub wavelength hole array for surface plasmon enhanced transmission of light [1]. The theoretical backgrounds as well as the basics of the simulation by Finite-Difference Time-Domain (FDTD) are described for the target structure with a hole diameter of 180 nm and a periodicity of 400 nm. By using a double-molding technology via nanoimprint lithography the fabrication of this sub wavelength hole array with a peak wavelength of 470 nm and full width at half maximum of 50 nm from a silicon nanopillar master is demonstrated. In order to ensure the dimensional stability of the molded structures, characterization was consequently done by means of a self made non-contact mode atomic force microscope.

  17. Maskless plasmonic lithography at 22 nm resolution.

    PubMed

    Pan, Liang; Park, Yongshik; Xiong, Yi; Ulin-Avila, Erick; Wang, Yuan; Zeng, Li; Xiong, Shaomin; Rho, Junsuk; Sun, Cheng; Bogy, David B; Zhang, Xiang

    2011-01-01

    Optical imaging and photolithography promise broad applications in nano-electronics, metrologies, and single-molecule biology. Light diffraction however sets a fundamental limit on optical resolution, and it poses a critical challenge to the down-scaling of nano-scale manufacturing. Surface plasmons have been used to circumvent the diffraction limit as they have shorter wavelengths. However, this approach has a trade-off between resolution and energy efficiency that arises from the substantial momentum mismatch. Here we report a novel multi-stage scheme that is capable of efficiently compressing the optical energy at deep sub-wavelength scales through the progressive coupling of propagating surface plasmons (PSPs) and localized surface plasmons (LSPs). Combining this with airbearing surface technology, we demonstrate a plasmonic lithography with 22 nm half-pitch resolution at scanning speeds up to 10 m/s. This low-cost scheme has the potential of higher throughput than current photolithography, and it opens a new approach towards the next generation semiconductor manufacturing.

  18. Coherence management in lithography printing systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bernasconi, Johana; Scharf, Toralf; Herzig, Hans Peter; Voelkel, Reinhard; Bramati, Arianna

    2016-03-01

    In proximity lithography, interference and diffraction effects arise when printing small features because of the proximity gap. Different techniques are used in order to control and take advantage of these effects. In this paper, the focus is set on the MO Exposure Optics developed to shape the angular spectrum of the exposure light. The MO Exposure Optics contains several elements including microlens arrays that have certain symmetry and sampling. The MO Exposure Optics allows to set the angle of illumination and can be used to define spatial coherence. We study here in detail the influence of different illumination settings on optical proximity correction (OPC) structures. We apply this concept for the first time to a LED illumination. The propagation of light after an optical proximity correction structure is measured by recording aerial images over a distance of up to 60 μm behind the mask with a high resolution microscope setup.1 As an example structure, we investigate here an optical proximity correction structure that is intended to make the edge of a line sharper. Using illumination filter plates that limit the angle of illumination and increase the coherence lead to pronounced interference effects in aerial images as expected. But special settings of the illumination allow to achieve comparable results with much larger illumination angles and higher throughput. We will show examples and analyze the results

  19. Resist profile simulation with fast lithography model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, Yan-Ying; Chou, Chih-Shiang; Tang, Yu-Po; Huang, Wen-Chun; Liu, Ru-Gun; Gau, Tsai-Sheng

    2014-03-01

    A traditional approach to construct a fast lithographic model is to match wafer top-down SEM images, contours and/or gauge CDs with a TCC model plus some simple resist representation. This modeling method has been proven and is extensively used for OPC modeling. As the technology moves forward, this traditional approach has become insufficient in regard to lithography weak point detection, etching bias prediction, etc. The drawback of this approach is from metrology and simulation. First, top-down SEM is only good for acquiring planar CD information. Some 3D metrology such as cross-section SEM or AFM is necessary to obtain the true resist profile. Second, the TCC modeling approach is only suitable for planar image simulation. In order to model the resist profile, full 3D image simulation is needed. Even though there are many rigorous simulators capable of catching the resist profile very well, none of them is feasible for full-chip application due to the tremendous consumption of computational resource. The authors have proposed a quasi-3D image simulation method in the previous study [1], which is suitable for full-chip simulation with the consideration of sidewall angles, to improve the model accuracy of planar models. In this paper, the quasi-3D image simulation is extended to directly model the resist profile with AFM and/or cross-section SEM data. Resist weak points detected by the model generated with this 3D approach are verified on the wafer.

  20. Evaporative Lithography in Open Microfluidic Channel Networks.

    PubMed

    Lone, Saifullah; Zhang, Jia Ming; Vakarelski, Ivan U; Li, Er Qiang; Thoroddsen, Sigurdur T

    2017-03-13

    We demonstrate a direct capillary-driven method based on wetting and evaporation of various suspensions to fabricate regular two-dimensional wires in an open microfluidic channel through continuous deposition of micro- or nanoparticles under evaporative lithography, akin to the coffee-ring effect. The suspension is gently placed in a loading reservoir connected to the main open microchannel groove on a PDMS substrate. Hydrophilic conditions ensure rapid spreading of the suspension from the loading reservoir to fill the entire channel length. Evaporation during the spreading and after the channel is full increases the particle concentration toward the end of the channel. This evaporation-induced convective transport brings particles from the loading reservoir toward the channel end where this flow deposits a continuous multilayered particle structure. The particle deposition front propagates backward over the entire channel length. The final dry deposit of the particles is thereby much thicker than the initial volume fraction of the suspension. The deposition depth is characterized using a 3D imaging profiler, whereas the deposition topography is revealed using a scanning electron microscope. The patterning technology described here is robust and passive and hence operates without an external field. This work may well become a launching pad to construct low-cost and large-scale thin optoelectronic films with variable thicknesses and interspacing distances.

  1. Reflective masks for extreme ultraviolet lithography

    SciTech Connect

    Nguyen, Khanh Bao

    1994-05-01

    Extreme ultraviolet lithographic masks are made by patterning multilayer reflective coatings with high normal incidence reflectivity. Masks can be patterned by depositing a patterned absorber layer above the coating or by etching the pattern directly into the coating itself. Electromagnetic simulations showed that absorber-overlayer masks have superior imaging characteristics over etched masks (less sensitive to incident angles and pattern profiles). In an EUVL absorber overlayer mask, defects can occur in the mask substrate, reflective coating, and absorber pattern. Electromagnetic simulations showed that substrate defects cause the most severe image degradation. A printability study of substrate defects for absorber overlayer masks showed that printability of 25 nm high substrate defects are comparable to defects in optical lithography. Simulations also indicated that the manner in which the defects are covered by multilayer reflective coatings can affect printability. Coverage profiles that result in large lateral spreading of defect geometries amplify the printability of the defects by increasing their effective sizes. Coverage profiles of Mo/Si coatings deposited above defects were studied by atomic force microscopy and TEM. Results showed that lateral spread of defect geometry is proportional to height. Undercut at defect also increases the lateral spread. Reductions in defect heights were observed for 0.15 μm wide defect lines. A long-term study of Mo/Si coating reflectivity revealed that Mo/Si coatings with Mo as the top layer suffer significant reductions in reflectivity over time due to oxidation.

  2. Pattern collapse mitigation strategies for EUV lithography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goldfarb, Dario L.; Bruce, Robert L.; Bucchignano, James J.; Klaus, David P.; Guillorn, Michael A.; Wu, Chunghsi J.

    2012-03-01

    In this study, a comprehensive approach towards assessing pattern collapse challenges and solutions for Extreme Ultraviolet Lithography (EUV) resists beyond the 14nm node is undertaken. The fundamental forces that drive pattern deformation are reassessed in order to propose a generalized design criterion for EUV photoresists and aqueous surfactanated rinses. Furthermore, ultimate pattern collapse solutions such as solvent drying utilizing pressurized fluids (supercritical CO2) are exemplified for sub-60nm pitch EUV patterning. In parallel, alternative EUV integration schemes that use a metal-based hardmask (MHM) are studied using a specifically tailored self-assembled monolayer (SAM) to prevent delamination-driven pattern collapse due to resist-hardmask interfacial adhesion failure. Finally, the marginal image transfer of 40nm pitched L/S of ultrathin EUV resist into a SiARC-underlayer stack appears to be gated by the EUV resist resolution limit and the reduced film thickness budget. An alternative method for achieving improved postetch line width roughness (LWR) with an ultrathin MHM-based integration scheme is herein demonstrated.

  3. Analysis of the blurring in stencil lithography.

    PubMed

    Vazquez-Mena, O; Villanueva, L G; Savu, V; Sidler, K; Langlet, P; Brugger, J

    2009-10-14

    A quantitative analysis of blurring and its dependence on the stencil-substrate gap and the deposition parameters in stencil lithography, a high resolution shadow mask technique, is presented. The blurring is manifested in two ways: first, the structure directly deposited on the substrate is larger than the stencil aperture due to geometrical factors, and second, a halo of material is formed surrounding the deposited structure, presumably due to surface diffusion. The blurring is studied as a function of the gap using dedicated stencils that allow a controlled variation of the gap. Our results show a linear relationship between the gap and the blurring of the directly deposited structure. In our configuration, with a material source of approximately 5 mm and a source-substrate distance of 1 m, we find that a gap size of approximately 10 microm enlarges the directly deposited structures by approximately 50 nm. The measured halo varies from 0.2 to 3 microm in width depending on the gap, the stencil aperture size and other deposition parameters. We also show that the blurring can be reduced by decreasing the nominal deposition thickness, the deposition rate and the substrate temperature.

  4. Materials for future lithography (Invited Paper)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang, Seung Wook; Yang, Da; Dai, Junyan; Felix, Nelson; Bratton, Daniel; Tsuchiya, Kousuke; Kwark, Young-Je; Bravo-Vasquez, Juan-Pablo; Ober, Christopher K.; Cao, Heidi B.; Deng, Hai

    2005-05-01

    The demands for high resolution and issues of line edge roughness require a reconsideration of current resist design strategies. In particular, EUV lithography will provide an opportunity to examine new resist concepts including new elemental compositions and low molar mass resists or molecular resists. In the former case, resist compositions incorporating elements such as silicon and boron have been explored for EUV resists and will be described. In an example of the latter case, molecular glass resists have been designed using synthetic architectures in globular and core-arm forms ranging from one to multiple arms. Moreover, our studies include a series of ring and irregularly shaped small molecules modified to give imaging performance. These materials have been explored to improve line edge roughness (LER) compared to common polymer resists. Several examples of polymeric and molecular glass resists will be described. Several compositions showed high glass transition temperatures (Tg) of ~ 120°C and possessed no crystallinity as seen from XRD studies. Negative-tone molecular glass resists with a T-shaped phenolic core structure, 4-[4-[1,1-Bis(4-hydroxyphenyl)ethyl

  5. X-ray lithography using holographic images

    DOEpatents

    Howells, Malcolm R.; Jacobsen, Chris

    1995-01-01

    A non-contact X-ray projection lithography method for producing a desired X-ray image on a selected surface of an X-ray-sensitive material, such as photoresist material on a wafer, the desired X-ray image having image minimum linewidths as small as 0.063 .mu.m, or even smaller. A hologram and its position are determined that will produce the desired image on the selected surface when the hologram is irradiated with X-rays from a suitably monochromatic X-ray source of a selected wavelength .lambda.. On-axis X-ray transmission through, or off-axis X-ray reflection from, a hologram may be used here, with very different requirements for monochromaticity, flux and brightness of the X-ray source. For reasonable penetration of photoresist materials by X-rays produced by the X-ray source, the wavelength X, is preferably chosen to be no more than 13.5 nm in one embodiment and more preferably is chosen in the range 1-5 nm in the other embodiment. A lower limit on linewidth is set by the linewidth of available microstructure writing devices, such as an electron beam.

  6. Smartphone Sensors for Stone Lithography Authentication

    PubMed Central

    Schirripa Spagnolo, Giuseppe; Cozzella, Lorenzo; Papalillo, Donato

    2014-01-01

    Nowadays mobile phones include quality photo and video cameras, access to wireless networks and the internet, GPS assistance and other innovative systems. These facilities open them to innovative uses, other than the classical telephonic communication one. Smartphones are a more sophisticated version of classic mobile phones, which have advanced computing power, memory and connectivity. Because fake lithographs are flooding the art market, in this work, we propose a smartphone as simple, robust and efficient sensor for lithograph authentication. When we buy an artwork object, the seller issues a certificate of authenticity, which contains specific details about the artwork itself. Unscrupulous sellers can duplicate the classic certificates of authenticity, and then use them to “authenticate” non-genuine works of art. In this way, the buyer will have a copy of an original certificate to attest that the “not original artwork” is an original one. A solution for this problem would be to insert a system that links together the certificate and the related specific artwork. To do this it is necessary, for a single artwork, to find unique, unrepeatable, and unchangeable characteristics. In this article we propose an innovative method for the authentication of stone lithographs. We use the color spots distribution captured by means of a smartphone camera as a non-cloneable texture of the specific artworks and an information management system for verifying it in mobility stone lithography. PMID:24811077

  7. Metal hierarchical patterning by direct nanoimprint lithography

    PubMed Central

    Radha, Boya; Lim, Su Hui; Saifullah, Mohammad S. M.; Kulkarni, Giridhar U.

    2013-01-01

    Three-dimensional hierarchical patterning of metals is of paramount importance in diverse fields involving photonics, controlling surface wettability and wearable electronics. Conventionally, this type of structuring is tedious and usually involves layer-by-layer lithographic patterning. Here, we describe a simple process of direct nanoimprint lithography using palladium benzylthiolate, a versatile metal-organic ink, which not only leads to the formation of hierarchical patterns but also is amenable to layer-by-layer stacking of the metal over large areas. The key to achieving such multi-faceted patterning is hysteretic melting of ink, enabling its shaping. It undergoes transformation to metallic palladium under gentle thermal conditions without affecting the integrity of the hierarchical patterns on micro- as well as nanoscale. A metallic rice leaf structure showing anisotropic wetting behavior and woodpile-like structures were thus fabricated. Furthermore, this method is extendable for transferring imprinted structures to a flexible substrate to make them robust enough to sustain numerous bending cycles. PMID:23446801

  8. Proximity correction for electron beam lithography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marrian, Christie R.; Chang, Steven; Peckerar, Martin C.

    1996-09-01

    As the critical dimensions required in mask making and direct write by electron beam lithography become ever smaller, correction for proximity effects becomes increasingly important. Furthermore, the problem is beset by the fact that only a positive energy dose can be applied with an electron beam. We discuss techniques such as chopping and dose shifting, which have been proposed to meet the positivity requirement. An alternative approach is to treat proximity correction as an optimization problem. Two such methods, local area dose correction and optimization using a regularizer proportional to the informational entropy of the solution, are compared. A notable feature of the regularized proximity correction is the ability to correct for forward scattering by the generation of a 'firewall' set back from the edge of a feature. As the forward scattering width increases, the firewall is set back farther from the feature edge. The regularized optimization algorithm is computationally time consuming using conventional techniques. However, the algorithm lends itself to a microelectronics integrated circuit coprocessor implementation, which could perform the optimization faster than even the fastest work stations. Scaling the circuit to larger number of pixels is best approached with a hybrid serial/parallel digital architecture that would correct for proximity effects over 108 pixels in about 1 h. This time can be reduced by simply adding additional coprocessors.

  9. A compact vertical scanner for atomic force microscopes.

    PubMed

    Park, Jae Hong; Shim, Jaesool; Lee, Dong-Yeon

    2010-01-01

    A compact vertical scanner for an atomic force microscope (AFM) is developed. The vertical scanner is designed to have no interference with the optical microscope for viewing the cantilever. The theoretical stiffness and resonance of the scanner are derived and verified via finite element analysis. An optimal design process that maximizes the resonance frequency is performed. To evaluate the scanner's performance, experiments are performed to evaluate the travel range, resonance frequency, and feedback noise level. In addition, an AFM image using the proposed vertical scanner is generated.

  10. Electrothermal MEMS fiber scanner for optical endomicroscopy.

    PubMed

    Seo, Yeong-Hyeon; Hwang, Kyungmin; Park, Hyeon-Cheol; Jeong, Ki-Hun

    2016-02-22

    We report a novel MEMS fiber scanner with an electrothermal silicon microactuator and a directly mounted optical fiber. The microactuator comprises double hot arm and cold arm structures with a linking bridge and an optical fiber is aligned along a silicon fiber groove. The unique feature induces separation of resonant scanning frequencies of a single optical fiber in lateral and vertical directions, which realizes Lissajous scanning during the resonant motion. The footprint dimension of microactuator is 1.28 x 7 x 0.44 mm3. The resonant scanning frequencies of a 20 mm long optical fiber are 239.4 Hz and 218.4 Hz in lateral and vertical directions, respectively. The full scanned area indicates 451 μm x 558 μm under a 16 Vpp pulse train. This novel laser scanner can provide many opportunities for laser scanning endomicroscopic applications.

  11. Compact conscious animal positron emission tomography scanner

    DOEpatents

    Schyler, David J.; O'Connor, Paul; Woody, Craig; Junnarkar, Sachin Shrirang; Radeka, Veljko; Vaska, Paul; Pratte, Jean-Francois; Volkow, Nora

    2006-10-24

    A method of serially transferring annihilation information in a compact positron emission tomography (PET) scanner includes generating a time signal for an event, generating an address signal representing a detecting channel, generating a detector channel signal including the time and address signals, and generating a composite signal including the channel signal and similarly generated signals. The composite signal includes events from detectors in a block and is serially output. An apparatus that serially transfers annihilation information from a block includes time signal generators for detectors in a block and an address and channel signal generator. The PET scanner includes a ring tomograph that mounts onto a portion of an animal, which includes opposing block pairs. Each of the blocks in a block pair includes a scintillator layer, detection array, front-end array, and a serial encoder. The serial encoder includes time signal generators and an address signal and channel signal generator.

  12. The Galileo star scanner observations at Amalthea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fieseler, Paul D.; Adams, Olen W.; Vandermey, Nancy; Theilig, E. E.; Schimmels, Kathryn A.; Lewis, George D.; Ardalan, Shadan M.; Alexander, Claudia J.

    2004-06-01

    In November of 2002, the Galileo spacecraft passed within 250 km of Jupiter's moon Amalthea. An onboard telescope, the star scanner, observed a series of bright flashes near the moon. It is believed that these flashes represent sunlight reflected from 7 to 9 small moonlets located within about 3000 km of Amalthea. From star scanner geometry considerations and other arguments, we can constrain the diameter of the observed bodies to be between 0.5 m to several tens of kilometers. In September of 2003, while crossing Amalthea's orbit just prior to Galileo's destruction in the jovian atmosphere, a single additional body seems to have been observed. It is suspected that these bodies are part of a discrete rocky ring embedded within Jupiter's Gossamer ring system.

  13. Point Relay Scanner Utilizing Ellipsoidal Mirrors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Manhart, Paul K. (Inventor); Pagano, Robert J. (Inventor)

    1997-01-01

    A scanning system uses a polygonal mirror assembly with each facet of the polygon having an ellipsoidal mirror located thereon. One focal point of each ellipsoidal mirror is located at a common point on the axis of rotation of the polygonal mirror assembly. As the mirror assembly rotates. a second focal point of the ellipsoidal mirrors traces out a scan line. The scanner can be utilized for scanned output display of information or for scanning information to be detected.

  14. Telescope with a wide field of view internal optical scanner

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Degnan, III, John James (Inventor); Zheng, Yunhui (Inventor)

    2012-01-01

    A telescope with internal scanner utilizing either a single optical wedge scanner or a dual optical wedge scanner and a controller arranged to control a synchronous rotation of the first and/or second optical wedges, the wedges constructed and arranged to scan light redirected by topological surfaces and/or volumetric scatterers. The telescope with internal scanner further incorporates a first converging optical element that receives the redirected light and transmits the redirected light to the scanner, and a second converging optical element within the light path between the first optical element and the scanner arranged to reduce an area of impact on the scanner of the beam collected by the first optical element.

  15. Intelligent control system based on ARM for lithography tool

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Changlong; Tang, Xiaoping; Hu, Song; Wang, Nan

    2014-08-01

    The control system of traditional lithography tool is based on PC and MCU. The PC handles the complex algorithm, human-computer interaction, and communicates with MCU via serial port; The MCU controls motors and electromagnetic valves, etc. This mode has shortcomings like big volume, high power consumption, and wasting of PC resource. In this paper, an embedded intelligent control system of lithography tool, based on ARM, is provided. The control system used S5PV210 as processor, completing the functions of PC in traditional lithography tool, and provided a good human-computer interaction by using LCD and capacitive touch screen. Using Android4.0.3 as operating system, the equipment provided a cool and easy UI which made the control more user-friendly, and implemented remote control and debug, pushing video information of product by network programming. As a result, it's convenient for equipment vendor to provide technical support for users. Finally, compared with traditional lithography tool, this design reduced the PC part, making the hardware resources efficiently used and reducing the cost and volume. Introducing embedded OS and the concepts in "The Internet of things" into the design of lithography tool can be a development trend.

  16. Neutral atom lithography with metastable helium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Allred, Claire Shean

    In this dissertation we describe our performance of resist assisted neutral atom lithography using a bright beam of metastable 23S1 Helium (He*). Metastable Helium atoms have 20 eV of internal energy making them easy to detect and able to destroy a resist. The He* is produced by a reverse flow DC discharge source and then collimated with the bichromatic force, followed by three optical molasses velocity compression stages. The atoms in the resulting beam have a mean longitudinal velocity of 1125 m/s and a divergence of 1.1 mrad. The typical beam flux is 2 x 109 atoms/mm2s through a 0.1mm diameter aperture 70 cm away from the source. The internal energy of the atoms damages the molecules of a self assembled monolayer (SAM) of nonanethiol. The undisturbed SAM protects a 200 A layer of gold that has been evaporated onto a prepared Silicon wafer from a wet chemical etch. Two methods are used to pattern the He* atoms before they destroy the SAM. First, a Nickel micro mesh was used to protect the SAM. These experiments established an appropriate dosage and etch time for patterning. The samples were analyzed with an atomic force microscope and found to have an edge resolution of 63 nm. Then, patterning was accomplished using the dipole force the atoms experience while traversing a standing wave of lambda = 1083nm light tuned 500MHz below the 23S 1 → 23P2 transition. Depending on the intensity of the light, the He* atoms are focused or channeled into lines separated by lambda/2. The lines cover the entire exposed length of the substrate, about 3 mm. They are about 3 mm long, corresponding to about twice the beam waist of the laser standing wave. Thus there are 6 x 10 3 lines of length 5500lambda. These results agree with our numerical simulations of the experiment.

  17. 3D resolution gray-tone lithography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dumbravescu, Niculae

    2000-04-01

    With the conventional micro machining technologies: isotropic and anisotropic, dry and wet etching, a few shapes can be done. To overcome this limitation, both binary multi- tasking technique or direct EB writing were used, but an inexpensive one-step UV-lithographic method, using a so- called 'gray-tone reticle', seems to be the best choice to produce local intensity modulation during exposure process. Although, by using this method and common technologies in standard IC fabrication it is easy to obtain an arbitrarily 3D shaping of positive thick resists, there are some limitations, too. The maximum number of gray-levels, on projection reticle, achieved by e-beam writing, are only 200. Also, for very thick resists, the limited focus depth of the projection objective gives a poor lateral resolution. These are the reasons why the author prose da new approach to enhance the 3D resolution of gray-tone lithography applied for thick resist. By a high resolution, both for vertical direction, as well as for horizontal direction. Particular emphasis was put on the design, manufacturing and use of halftone transmission masks, required for UV- lithographic step in the fabrication process of mechanical, optical or electronics components. The original design and fabrication method for the gray-tone test reticle were supported by experiments showing the main advantage of this new technology: the 3D structuring of thick resist in a single exposure step and also a very promising aspect ratio obtained of over 9:1. Preliminary experimental results are presented for positive thick resists in SEM micrographs. A future optimization of the lithographic process opens interesting perspectives for application of this high 3D resolution structuring method in the fabrication process of different products, with imposed complex smooth profiles, such as: x-ray LiGA-masks, refractive optics and surface- relief DOEs.

  18. Antireflective surface patterned by rolling mask lithography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seitz, Oliver; Geddes, Joseph B.; Aryal, Mukti; Perez, Joseph; Wassei, Jonathan; McMackin, Ian; Kobrin, Boris

    2014-03-01

    A growing number of commercial products such as displays, solar panels, light emitting diodes (LEDs and OLEDs), automotive and architectural glass are driving demand for glass with high performance surfaces that offer anti-reflective, self-cleaning, and other advanced functions. State-of-the-art coatings do not meet the desired performance characteristics or cannot be applied over large areas in a cost-effective manner. "Rolling Mask Lithography" (RML™) enables highresolution lithographic nano-patterning over large-areas at low-cost and high-throughput. RML is a photolithographic process performed using ultraviolet (UV) illumination transmitted through a soft cylindrical mask as it rolls across a substrate. Subsequent transfer of photoresist patterns into the substrate is achieved using an etching process, which creates a nanostructured surface. The current generation exposure tool is capable of patterning one-meter long substrates with a width of 300 mm. High-throughput and low-cost are achieved using continuous exposure of the resist by the cylindrical photomask. Here, we report on significant improvements in the application of RML™ to fabricate anti-reflective surfaces. Briefly, an optical surface can be made antireflective by "texturing" it with a nano-scale pattern to reduce the discontinuity in the index of refraction between the air and the bulk optical material. An array of cones, similar to the structure of a moth's eye, performs this way. Substrates are patterned using RML™ and etched to produce an array of cones with an aspect ratio of 3:1, which decreases the reflectivity below 0.1%.

  19. Complete data preparation flow for Massively Parallel E-Beam lithography on 28nm node full-field design

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fay, Aurélien; Browning, Clyde; Brandt, Pieter; Chartoire, Jacky; Bérard-Bergery, Sébastien; Hazart, Jérôme; Chagoya, Alexandre; Postnikov, Sergei; Saib, Mohamed; Lattard, Ludovic; Schavione, Patrick

    2016-03-01

    Massively parallel mask-less electron beam lithography (MP-EBL) offers a large intrinsic flexibility at a low cost of ownership in comparison to conventional optical lithography tools. This attractive direct-write technique needs a dedicated data preparation flow to correct both electronic and resist processes. Moreover, Data Prep has to be completed in a short enough time to preserve the flexibility advantage of MP-EBL. While the MP-EBL tools have currently entered an advanced stage of development, this paper will focus on the data preparation side of the work for specifically the MAPPER Lithography FLX-1200 tool [1]-[4], using the ASELTA Nanographics Inscale software. The complete flow as well as the methodology used to achieve a full-field layout data preparation, within an acceptable cycle time, will be presented. Layout used for Data Prep evaluation was one of a 28 nm technology node Metal1 chip with a field size of 26x33mm2, compatible with typical stepper/scanner field sizes and wafer stepping plans. Proximity Effect Correction (PEC) was applied to the entire field, which was then exported as a single file to MAPPER Lithography's machine format, containing fractured shapes and dose assignments. The Soft Edge beam to beam stitching method was employed in the specific overlap regions defined by the machine format as well. In addition to PEC, verification of the correction was included as part of the overall data preparation cycle time. This verification step was executed on the machine file format to ensure pattern fidelity and accuracy as late in the flow as possible. Verification over the full chip, involving billions of evaluation points, is performed both at nominal conditions and at Process Window corners in order to ensure proper exposure and process latitude. The complete MP-EBL data preparation flow was demonstrated for a 28 nm node Metal1 layout in 37 hours. The final verification step shows that the Edge Placement Error (EPE) is kept below 2.25 nm

  20. Design and control of a nanoprecision XYΘ scanner

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choi, Young-Man; Kim, Jung Jae; Kim, Jinwoo; Gweon, Dae-Gab

    2008-04-01

    This paper describes the design and control of a nanoprecision XYΘ scanner consisting of voice coil motors and air bearing guides. The proposed scanner can be installed on a conventional XY stage with long strokes to improve the positioning accuracy and settling performance. Major design considerations in developing a high precision scanner are sensor accuracy, actuator properties, structural stability, guide friction, and thermal expansion. Considering these factors, the proposed scanner is made of invar, which has a small thermal expansion coefficient and good structural stiffness. Four voice coil motors drive the scanner, which is suspended by four air bearing pads, in the x, y, and θ directions. The scanner's position is measured by three laser interferometers which decouple the scanner from the conventional stage. The mirror blocks reflecting the laser beams are fixed using viscoelastic sheets, ensuring that the scanner has a well-damped structural mode. A time delay control algorithm is implemented on the real-time controller to control the scanner. The effectiveness of the proposed scanner is verified experimentally.

  1. Recent micro-CT scanner developments at UGCT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dierick, Manuel; Van Loo, Denis; Masschaele, Bert; Van den Bulcke, Jan; Van Acker, Joris; Cnudde, Veerle; Van Hoorebeke, Luc

    2014-04-01

    This paper describes two X-ray micro-CT scanners which were recently developed to extend the experimental possibilities of microtomography research at the Centre for X-ray Tomography (www.ugct.ugent.be) of the Ghent University (Belgium). The first scanner, called Nanowood, is a wide-range CT scanner with two X-ray sources (160 kVmax) and two detectors, resolving features down to 0.4 μm in small samples, but allowing samples up to 35 cm to be scanned. This is a sample size range of 3 orders of magnitude, making this scanner well suited for imaging multi-scale materials such as wood, stone, etc. Besides the traditional cone-beam acquisition, Nanowood supports helical acquisition, and it can generate images with significant phase-contrast contributions. The second scanner, known as the Environmental micro-CT scanner (EMCT), is a gantry based micro-CT scanner with variable magnification for scanning objects which are not easy to rotate in a standard micro-CT scanner, for example because they are physically connected to external experimental hardware such as sensor wiring, tubing or others. This scanner resolves 5 μm features, covers a field-of-view of about 12 cm wide with an 80 cm vertical travel range. Both scanners will be extensively described and characterized, and their potential will be demonstrated with some key application results.

  2. EUV source power and lifetime: the most critical issues for EUV lithography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stamm, Uwe; Kleinschmidt, Juergen; Gaebel, Kai; Birner, Henry; Ahmad, Imtiaz; Bolshukhin, Denis; Brudermann, Jesko; Chinh, Tran Duc; Flohrer, Frank; Goetze, Sven; Hergenhan, Guido; Kloepfel, Diethard; Korobotchko, Vladimir; Mader, Bjorn; Mueller, Rainer; Ringling, Jens; Schriever, Guido; Ziener, Christian

    2004-05-01

    exceeding 100 million discharges at 1 kHz repetition frequency. The same lifetime was achieved for the components of the discharge system itself. The progress in the development of high-power discharge sources resulted in an EUV power of 150 W in continuous operation at 4.5 kHz repetition rate by implementation of porous metal cooling technology. The EUV plasma has a FWHM-diameter of 0.5 mm and a FWHM-length of 1.5 mm. The intermediate focus power is calculated to be in the range of 15 W - 20 W, depending somewhat on the transmission of the optical path to the intermediate focus and on the etendue specification. The typical fluctuations of the EUV energy are standard deviation s<5% without any active stabilization. Discharge sources with Sn as emitter were investigated as more efficient alternative to Xenon. Estimates regarding Sn sources reveal the potential of achieving 65 W intermediate focus power by using developed porous metal cooling technology. Improvement of cooling could open the path to 115 W of power for high volume manufacturing using EUV lithography. However, Sn-sources are technologically risky und much less advanced than Xe sources, since fuel-handling and debris mitigation is much more challenging in comparison to Xe-sources. GDPP and LPP sources still compete for the technology of high volume manufacturing sources for EUV lithography. Optimization potential of the etendue of the optical system of EUV scanners will certainly influence any technology decision for HVM sources.

  3. Recent developments of x-ray lithography in Canada

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chaker, Mohamed; Boily, Stephane; Ginovker, A.; Jean, Alain; Kieffer, Jean-Claude; Mercier, P. P.; Pepin, Henri; Leung, Pak; Currie, John F.; Lafontaine, Hugues

    1991-08-01

    An overview of current activities in Canada is reported, including x-ray lithography studies based on laser plasma sources and x-ray mask development. In particular, the application of laser plasma sources for x-ray lithography is discussed, taking into account the industrial requirement and the present state of laser technology. The authors describe the development of silicon carbide membranes for x-ray lithography application. SiC films were prepared using either a 100 kHz plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition (PECVD) system or a laser ablation technique. These membranes have a relatively large diameter (> 1 in.) and a high optical transparency (> 50%). Experimental studies on stresses in tungsten films deposited with triode sputtering are reported.

  4. Thickness optimization for lithography process on silicon substrate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Su, Xiaojing; Su, Yajuan; Liu, Yansong; Chen, Fong; Liu, Zhimin; Zhang, Wei; Li, Bifeng; Gao, Tao; Wei, Yayi

    2015-03-01

    With the development of the lithography, the demand for critical dimension (CD) and CD uniformity (CDU) has reached a new level, which is harder and harder to achieve. There exists reflection at the interface between photo-resist and substrate during lithography exposure. This reflection has negative impact on CD and CDU control. It is possible to optimize the litho stack and film stack thickness on different lithography conditions. With the optimized stack, the total reflectivity for all incident angles at the interface can be controlled less than 0.5%, ideally 0.1%, which enhances process window (PW) most of the time. The theoretical results are verified by the experiment results from foundry, which helps the foundry achieve the mass production finally.

  5. Deconstructing contact hole CD printing variability in EUV lithography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Civay, D.; Wallow, T.; Doganaksoy, N.; Verduijn, E.; Schmid, G.; Mangat, P.

    2014-04-01

    Lithographic CD printing variability can be easily captured with a CDU measurement, however delineating the most significant sources causing the variability is challenging. In EUV lithography, the resist, reticle, metrology methodology, and stochastics are examples of factors that influence printing variability. Determining the most significant sources of variability in contact hole and via patterning is particularly interesting because the variability can be measured as a function of two tethered dimensions. Contact hole (CH) variability has a direct impact on device performance while via variability affects metal area scaling and design. By studying sources of variability opportunities for improving device performance and scaling can be identified. In this paper, we will examine sources of contact patterning variability in EUV lithography comprehensively using various EUV exposure tools as well as simulation methods. We will present a benchmark of current state of the art materials and patterning methods with the goal of assessing contact hole printability at the limit of 0.33 NA EUV lithography.

  6. Sequence-Specific Molecular Lithography on Single DNA Molecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Keren, Kinneret; Krueger, Michael; Gilad, Rachel; Ben-Yoseph, Gdalyahu; Sivan, Uri; Braun, Erez

    2002-07-01

    Recent advances in the realization of individual molecular-scale electronic devices emphasize the need for novel tools and concepts capable of assembling such devices into large-scale functional circuits. We demonstrated sequence-specific molecular lithography on substrate DNA molecules by harnessing homologous recombination by RecA protein. In a sequence-specific manner, we patterned the coating of DNA with metal, localized labeled molecular objects and grew metal islands on specific sites along the DNA substrate, and generated molecularly accurate stable DNA junctions for patterning the DNA substrate connectivity. In our molecular lithography, the information encoded in the DNA molecules replaces the masks used in conventional microelectronics, and the RecA protein serves as the resist. The molecular lithography works with high resolution over a broad range of length scales from nanometers to many micrometers.

  7. Graphene nanoribbon superlattices fabricated via He ion lithography

    SciTech Connect

    Archanjo, Braulio S.; Fragneaud, Benjamin; Gustavo Cançado, Luiz; Winston, Donald; Miao, Feng; Alberto Achete, Carlos; Medeiros-Ribeiro, Gilberto

    2014-05-12

    Single-step nano-lithography was performed on graphene sheets using a helium ion microscope. Parallel “defect” lines of ∼1 μm length and ≈5 nm width were written to form nanoribbon gratings down to 20 nm pitch. Polarized Raman spectroscopy shows that crystallographic orientation of the nanoribbons was partially maintained at their lateral edges, indicating a high-fidelity lithography process. Furthermore, Raman analysis of large exposure areas with different ion doses reveals that He ions produce point defects with radii ∼ 2× smaller than do Ga ions, demonstrating that scanning-He{sup +}-beam lithography can texture graphene with less damage.

  8. Reducing DfM to practice: the lithography manufacturability assessor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liebmann, Lars; Mansfield, Scott; Han, Geng; Culp, James; Hibbeler, Jason; Tsai, Roger

    2006-03-01

    The need for accurate quantification of all aspects of design for manufacturability using a mutually compatible set of quality-metrics and units-of-measure, is reiterated and experimentally verified. A methodology to quantify the lithography component of manufacturability is proposed and its feasibility demonstrated. Three stages of lithography manufacturability assessment are described: process window analysis on realistic integrated circuits following layout manipulations for resolution enhancement and the application of optical proximity correction, failure sensitivity analysis on simulated achievable dimensional bounds (a.k.a. variability bands), and yield risk analysis on iso-probability bands. The importance and feasibility of this technique is demonstrated by quantifying the lithography manufacturability impact of redundant contact insertion and Critical Area optimization in units that can be used to drive an overall layout optimization. The need for extensive experimental calibration and improved simulation accuracy is also highlighted.

  9. Pattern-integrated interference lithography: prospects for nano- and microelectronics.

    PubMed

    Leibovici, Matthieu C R; Burrow, Guy M; Gaylord, Thomas K

    2012-10-08

    In recent years, limitations in optical lithography have challenged the cost-effective manufacture of nano- and microelectronic chips. Spatially regular designs have been introduced to improve manufacturability. However, regular designed layouts typically require an interference step followed by a trim step. These multiple steps increase cost and reduce yield. In the present work, Pattern-Integrated Interference Lithography (PIIL) is introduced to address this problem. PIIL is the integration of interference lithography and superposed pattern mask imaging, combining the interference and the trim into a single-exposure step. Example PIIL implementations and experimental demonstrations are presented. The degrees of freedom associated with the source, pattern mask, and Fourier filter designs are described.

  10. Partitioning of Excess Energy in the Photolysis of ClCN and BrCN at 193 NM.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1982-04-08

    7c orbital, and thus concluded that the upper state was a linear III system. Rabelais , et al (12), in a study of the electronic structure of sixteen...thea continuum corresponds to a (OA’ or IA") * XlE + ) transition. If Rabelais , et al are correct in their conclusion that the excited state is bent

  11. Coaxial Measurement of the Translational Distribution of CS Produced in the Laser Photolysis of CS2 at 193nm.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1983-11-04

    IKasakawi, and R. Bersohn, J. Chemn. Phys. 72, 4058 (1980). *2. M.C. Addison, C.D. Bryne and R.J. Donovan, Chem. Phys. Letters, 64, 57 (1979). *3. J.E...population of CS2 fragments produced in processes: (a). CS2- + hV CS ( Z ,v" ) + S (3p) represented by 0; (b). CS2 + hv CS (X1 Z +,v") + S (1D...0 0 1 1 1 fl l i 0 z 0 - >0 -) p ~m 0 z D:O m l CCD X CA > 0__ -" -’ o- o 0 -0 "C 0 o 00 CL CL 0 0 -." - ’ .:.-:.- "- * -.5

  12. ILT for double exposure lithography with conventional and novel materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Poonawala, Amyn; Borodovsky, Yan; Milanfar, Peyman

    2007-03-01

    Multiple paths exists to provide lithography solutions pursuant to Moore's Law for next 3-5 generations of technology, yet each of those paths inevitably leads to solutions eventually requiring patterning at k I < 0.30 and below. In this article, we explore double exposure single development lithography for k I >= 0.25 (using conventional resist) and k1 < 0.25 (using new out-of-sight out-of-mind materials). For the case of k I >= 0.25, we propose a novel double exposure inverse lithography technique (ILT) to split the pattern. Our algorithm is based on our earlier proposed single exposure ILT framework, and works by decomposing the aerial image (instead of the target pattern) into two parts. It also resolves the phase conflicts automatically as part of the decomposition, and the combined aerial image obtained using the estimated masks has a superior contrast. For the case of k I < 0.25, we focus on analyzing the use of various dual patterning techniques enabled by the use of hypothetic materials with properties that allow for the violation of the linear superposition of intensities from the two exposures. We investigate the possible use of two materials: contrast enhancement layer (CEL) and two-photon absorption resists. We propose a mathematical model for CEL, define its characteristic properties, and derive fundamental bounds on the improvement in image log-slope. Simulation results demonstrate that double exposure single development lithography using CEL enables printing 80nm gratings using dry lithography. We also combine ILT, CEL, and DEL to synthesize 2-D patterns with k I = 0.185. Finally, we discuss the viability of two-photon absorption resists for double exposure lithography.

  13. The study of chromeless phase lithography (CPL) for 45nm lithography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tan, Soon Yoeng; Lin, Qunying; Tay, Cho Jui; Quan, Chenggen

    2006-10-01

    Chromeless Phase Lithography (CPL) has been used to achieve high resolution by using phase edge interference in addition with high NA and off-axis illuminations such as annular and quasar for sub-wavelength lithography. There are two types of CPL. One is the totally chromeless pure phase type and the other is the zebra chrome pattern type for critical line dimensions. Both types of CPL masks require adding in chrome pads in some structures such as circuit line junction region to improve the resolution. Zebra type CPL mask making has reached the limitation due to small chrome peeling issue during mask cleaning and small space writing resolution issue for sub-45nm technology. In this paper, two types of CPL masks are studied. The investigation shows the differences on mask making and wafer performance. For mask making, process limitation studies such as writing, etching and cleaning will be evaluated. Data on mask CD (Critical Dimension) performance, registration, overlay, phase and transmission are collected and analyzed. For wafer performance, process window comparison, CD through pitch, MEEF (Mask Error Enhancement Factor) and linearity will be characterized for these two CPL mask types. Minimum resolution of less than 160nm pitch with reasonable good process window has been achieved with both mask types. Chromeless pure phase type has advantages on mask making while zebra type has the advantages on wafer performance. Furthermore, SRAF (Sub-Resolution Assist Feature) are added to improve wafer printing process windows. Detailed characterization work done on assist features are presented. Assist feature can improve process window by improving the contrast of isolated lines.

  14. High-fidelity replication of Dammann gratings using soft lithography.

    PubMed

    Wang, Wei; Zhou, Changhe; Jia, Wei

    2008-04-01

    We report the experimental results of using the soft lithography method for replication of Dammann gratings. By using an elastomeric stamp, uniform grating structures were transferred to the UV-curable polymer. To evaluate the quality of the replication, diffraction images and light intensity were measured. Compared with the master devices, the replicas of Dammann gratings show a slight deviation in both surface relief profile and optical performance. Experimental results demonstrated that high-fidelity replication of Dammann gratings is realized by using soft lithography with low cost and high throughput.

  15. Microphotonic parabolic light directors fabricated by two-photon lithography

    SciTech Connect

    Atwater, J. H.; Spinelli, P.; Kosten, E.; Parsons, J.; Van Lare, C.; Van de Groep, J.; Garcia de Abajo, J.; Polman, A.; Atwater, H. A.

    2011-10-10

    We have fabricated microphotonic parabolic light directors using two-photon lithography, thin-film processing, and aperture formation by focused ion beam lithography. Optical transmission measurements through upright parabolic directors 22 μm high and 10 μm in diameter exhibit strong beam directivity with a beam divergence of 5.6°, in reasonable agreement with ray-tracing and full-field electromagnetic simulations. The results indicate the suitability of microphotonic parabolic light directors for producing collimated beams for applications in advanced solar cell and light-emitting diode designs.

  16. Quantum lithography beyond the diffraction limit via Rabi-oscillations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liao, Zeyang; Al-Amri, Mohammad; Zubairy, M. Suhail

    2011-03-01

    We propose a quantum optical method to do the sub-wavelength lithography. Our method is similar to the traditional lithography but adding a critical step before dissociating the chemical bound of the photoresist. The subwavelength pattern is achieved by inducing the multi-Rabi-oscillation between the two atomic levels. The proposed method does not require multiphoton absorption and the entanglement of photons. This method is expected to be realizable using current technology. This work is supported by a grant from the Qatar National Research Fund (QNRF) under the NPRP project and a grant from the King Abdulaziz City for Science and Technology (KACST).

  17. A Feasibility Study of 50 nm Resolution with Low Energy Electron Beam Proximity Projection Lithography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoshizawa, Masaki; Savas, T. A.

    2002-01-01

    Patterns of 50 nm lines and spaces were demonstrated by low energy electron beam proximity lithography using 47-nm-thick poly methyl methacrylate (PMMA) and stencil masks fabricated by achromatic interference lithography (AIL). The result indicates the validity of the resolution analysis previously reported and the resolution capabilities of low energy electron beam proximity projection lithography (LEEPL) as a 50 nm node technology.

  18. Fast wire scanner for intense electron beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moore, T.; Agladze, N. I.; Bazarov, I. V.; Bartnik, A.; Dobbins, J.; Dunham, B.; Full, S.; Li, Y.; Liu, X.; Savino, J.; Smolenski, K.

    2014-02-01

    We have developed a cost-effective, fast rotating wire scanner for use in accelerators where high beam currents would otherwise melt even carbon wires. This new design uses a simple planetary gear setup to rotate a carbon wire, fixed at one end, through the beam at speeds in excess of 20 m/s. We present results from bench tests, as well as transverse beam profile measurements taken at Cornell's high-brightness energy recovery linac photoinjector, for beam currents up to 35 mA.

  19. Ocean color imagery: Coastal zone color scanner

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hovis, W. A.

    1975-01-01

    Investigations into the feasibility of sensing ocean color from high altitude for determination of chlorophyll and sediment distributions were carried out using sensors on NASA aircraft, coordinated with surface measurements carried out by oceanographic vessels. Spectrometer measurements in 1971 and 1972 led to development of an imaging sensor now flying on a NASA U-2 and the Coastal Zone Color Scanner to fly on Nimbus G in 1978. Results of the U-2 effort show the imaging sensor to be of great value in sensing pollutants in the ocean.

  20. A volume scanner for diffuse imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vafa, Elham; Roberts, Nicolas; Sharafutdinova, Galiya; Holdsworth, John

    2016-11-01

    Non-invasive optical screening mammography has a significant barrier in the extreme scatter of human tissue at optical wavelengths. A volume scanner suited for high numerical aperture capture of scattered light from diffuse media has been designed, modelled using Trace Pro software and experimentally constructed. Modelling results indicate the presence of an embedded volume with different scatter properties from the bulk yields a measurable difference in the overall scatter pattern and intensity recorded. Work towards a full tomographic reconstruction from scattered light recorded on the two dimensional array detector is currently underway.

  1. A laser scanner for 35mm film

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Callen, W. R.; Weaver, J. E.

    1977-01-01

    The design, construction, and testing of a laser scanning system is described. The scanner was designed to deliver a scanned beam over a 2.54 cm by 2.54 cm or a 5.08 cm by 5.08 cm format. In order to achieve a scan resolution and rate comparable to that of standard television, an acousto-optic deflector was used for one axis of the scan, and a light deflecting galvanometer for deflection along the other axis. The acoustic optic deflector has the capability of random access scan controlled by a digital computer.

  2. Positron Scanner for Locating Brain Tumors

    DOE R&D Accomplishments Database

    Rankowitz, S.; Robertson, J. S.; Higinbotham, W. A.; Rosenblum, M. J.

    1962-03-01

    A system is described that makes use of positron emitting isotopes for locating brain tumors. This system inherently provides more information about the distribution of radioactivity in the head in less time than existing scanners which use one or two detectors. A stationary circular array of 32 scintillation detectors scans a horizontal layer of the head from many directions simultaneously. The data, consisting of the number of counts in all possible coincidence pairs, are coded and stored in the memory of a Two-Dimensional Pulse-Height Analyzer. A unique method of displaying and interpreting the data is described that enables rapid approximate analysis of complex source distribution patterns. (auth)

  3. LAPR: An experimental aircraft pushbroom scanner

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wharton, S. W.; Irons, J. I.; Heugel, F.

    1980-01-01

    A three band Linear Array Pushbroom Radiometer (LAPR) was built and flown on an experimental basis by NASA at the Goddard Space Flight Center. The functional characteristics of the instrument and the methods used to preprocess the data, including radiometric correction, are described. The radiometric sensitivity of the instrument was tested and compared to that of the Thematic Mapper and the Multispectral Scanner. The radiometric correction procedure was evaluated quantitatively, using laboratory testing, and qualitatively, via visual examination of the LAPR test flight imagery. Although effective radiometric correction could not yet be demonstrated via laboratory testing, radiometric distortion did not preclude the visual interpretation or parallel piped classification of the test imagery.

  4. The Lick Observatory image-dissector scanner.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Robinson, L. B.; Wampler, E. J.

    1972-01-01

    A scanner that uses an image dissector to scan the output screen of an image tube has proven to be a sensitive and linear detector for faint astronomical spectra. The image-tube phosphor screen acts as a short-term storage element and allows the system to approach the performance of an ideal multichannel photon counter. Pulses resulting from individual photons, emitted from the output phosphor and detected by the image dissector, trigger an amplifier-discriminator and are counted in a 24-bit, 4096-word circulating memory. Aspects of system performance are discussed, giving attention to linearity, dynamic range, sensitivity, stability, and scattered light properties.

  5. Capillary Force Lithography for Cardiac Tissue Engineering

    PubMed Central

    Macadangdang, Jesse; Lee, Hyun Jung; Carson, Daniel; Jiao, Alex; Fugate, James; Pabon, Lil; Regnier, Michael; Murry, Charles; Kim, Deok-Ho

    2014-01-01

    Cardiovascular disease remains the leading cause of death worldwide1. Cardiac tissue engineering holds much promise to deliver groundbreaking medical discoveries with the aims of developing functional tissues for cardiac regeneration as well as in vitro screening assays. However, the ability to create high-fidelity models of heart tissue has proven difficult. The heart’s extracellular matrix (ECM) is a complex structure consisting of both biochemical and biomechanical signals ranging from the micro- to the nanometer scale2. Local mechanical loading conditions and cell-ECM interactions have recently been recognized as vital components in cardiac tissue engineering3-5. A large portion of the cardiac ECM is composed of aligned collagen fibers with nano-scale diameters that significantly influences tissue architecture and electromechanical coupling2. Unfortunately, few methods have been able to mimic the organization of ECM fibers down to the nanometer scale. Recent advancements in nanofabrication techniques, however, have enabled the design and fabrication of scalable scaffolds that mimic the in vivo structural and substrate stiffness cues of the ECM in the heart6-9. Here we present the development of two reproducible, cost-effective, and scalable nanopatterning processes for the functional alignment of cardiac cells using the biocompatible polymer poly(lactide-co-glycolide) (PLGA)8 and a polyurethane (PU) based polymer. These anisotropically nanofabricated substrata (ANFS) mimic the underlying ECM of well-organized, aligned tissues and can be used to investigate the role of nanotopography on cell morphology and function10-14. Using a nanopatterned (NP) silicon master as a template, a polyurethane acrylate (PUA) mold is fabricated. This PUA mold is then used to pattern the PU or PLGA hydrogel via UV-assisted or solvent-mediated capillary force lithography (CFL), respectively15,16. Briefly, PU or PLGA pre-polymer is drop dispensed onto a glass coverslip and the PUA

  6. Nanoimprint lithography for functional polymer patterning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cui, Dehu

    2011-07-01

    Organic semiconductors have generated huge interested in recent years for low-cost and flexible electronics. Current and future device applications for semiconducting polymers include light-emitting diodes, thin-film transistors, photovoltaic cells, photodetectors, lasers, and memories. The performance of conjugated polymer devices depends on two major factors: the chain conformation in polymer film and the device architecture. Highly ordered chain structure usually leads to much improved performance by enhancing interchain interaction to facilitate carrier transport. The goal of this research is to improve the performance of organic devices with the nanoimprint lithography. The work begins with the controlling of polymer chain orientation in patterned nanostructures through nanoimprint mold design and process parameter manipulation, and studying the effect of chain ordering on material properties. Then, step-and-repeat thermal nanoimprint technique for large-scale continuous manufacturing of conjugated polymer nanostructures is developed. After that, Systematic investigation of polymer chain configuration by Raman spectroscopy is carried out to understand how nanoimprint process parameters, such as mold pattern size, temperature, and polymer molecular weight, affects polymer chain configuration. The results indicate that chain orientation in nanoimprinted polymer micro- and nanostructures is highly related to the nanoimprint temperature and the dimensions of the mold structures. The ability to create nanoscale polymer micro- and nanostructures and manipulate their internal chain conformation establishes an original experimental platform that enables studying the properties of functional polymers at the micro- and nanoscale and understanding their fundamental structure-property relationships. In addition to the impact on basic research, the techniques developed in this work are important in applied research and development. Large-area conjugated polymer micro- and

  7. 52. View from ground level showing lower radar scanner switch ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    52. View from ground level showing lower radar scanner switch with open port door in radar scanner building 105 showing emanating waveguides from lower switch in vertical run; photograph also shows catwalk to upper scanner switch in upper left side of photograph and structural supports. - Clear Air Force Station, Ballistic Missile Early Warning System Site II, One mile west of mile marker 293.5 on Parks Highway, 5 miles southwest of Anderson, Anderson, Denali Borough, AK

  8. Integrated Electro-optical Laser-Beam Scanners

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Boord, Warren T.

    1990-01-01

    Scanners using solid-state devices compact, consume little power, and have no moving parts. Integrated electro-optical laser scanner, in conjunction with external lens, points outgoing beam of light in any number of different directions, depending on number of upper electrodes. Offers beam-deflection angles larger than those of acousto-optic scanners. Proposed for such diverse applications as nonimpact laser printing, color imaging, ranging, barcode reading, and robotic vision.

  9. The use of mobile 3D scanners in maxillofacial surgery.

    PubMed

    Peters, Florian; Möhlhenrich, Stephan Christian; Ayoub, Nassim; Goloborodko, Evgeny; Ghassemi, Alireza; Lethaus, Bernd; Hölzle, Frank; Modabber, Ali

    There are many possibilities for the use of three-dimensional (3D) scanners in maxillofacial surgery. This study aimed to investigate whether the bundling and syncing of two 3D scanners has advantages over single-scanner acquisition in terms of scan quality and the time required to scan an object. Therefore, the speed and precision of 3D data acquisition with one scanner versus two synced scanners was measured in 30 subjects. This was done by analyzing the results obtained by scanning test objects attached to the forehead and cheeks of the subjects. Statistical methods included the Student t test for paired samples. Single-scanner recording resulted in significantly lower mean error of measurement than synced recording with two scanners for length (P < 0.001), all frontal/lateral plane angles (P = 0.034, P < 0.001, P = 0.002, P = 0.003), and side/side plane angles (P = 0.014, P < 0.001, P = 0.015, P = 0.011) of the test object on the cheek. Likewise, the single-scanner method resulted in a significantly lowermean error of measurement than the two-scanner method for frontal/lower plane angles (P < 0.001), right/lower plane angles (P < 0.001), and left/lower plane angles (P = 0.002). Conversely, synced recording of data with two scanners resulted in a significant reduction of scanning time (P < 0.001). Compared to data acquisition with a single 3D scanner, the bundling of two 3D scanners resulted in faster scanning times but lower scan quality.

  10. Antenna Near-Field Probe Station Scanner

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zaman, Afroz J. (Inventor); Lee, Richard Q. (Inventor); Darby, William G. (Inventor); Barr, Philip J. (Inventor); Lambert, Kevin M (Inventor); Miranda, Felix A. (Inventor)

    2011-01-01

    A miniaturized antenna system is characterized non-destructively through the use of a scanner that measures its near-field radiated power performance. When taking measurements, the scanner can be moved linearly along the x, y and z axis, as well as rotationally relative to the antenna. The data obtained from the characterization are processed to determine the far-field properties of the system and to optimize the system. Each antenna is excited using a probe station system while a scanning probe scans the space above the antenna to measure the near field signals. Upon completion of the scan, the near-field patterns are transformed into far-field patterns. Along with taking data, this system also allows for extensive graphing and analysis of both the near-field and far-field data. The details of the probe station as well as the procedures for setting up a test, conducting a test, and analyzing the resulting data are also described.

  11. An empirical study of scanner system parameters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Landgrebe, D.; Biehl, L.; Simmons, W.

    1976-01-01

    The selection of the current combination of parametric values (instantaneous field of view, number and location of spectral bands, signal-to-noise ratio, etc.) of a multispectral scanner is a complex problem due to the strong interrelationship these parameters have with one another. The study was done with the proposed scanner known as Thematic Mapper in mind. Since an adequate theoretical procedure for this problem has apparently not yet been devised, an empirical simulation approach was used with candidate parameter values selected by the heuristic means. The results obtained using a conventional maximum likelihood pixel classifier suggest that although the classification accuracy declines slightly as the IFOV is decreased this is more than made up by an improved mensuration accuracy. Further, the use of a classifier involving both spatial and spectral features shows a very substantial tendency to resist degradation as the signal-to-noise ratio is decreased. And finally, further evidence is provided of the importance of having at least one spectral band in each of the major available portions of the optical spectrum.

  12. Quest for an open MRI scanner.

    PubMed

    Bertora, Franco; Borceto, Alice; Viale, Andrea; Sandini, Giulio

    2014-01-01

    A study of the motor cortex during the programming, execution and mental representation of voluntary movement is of great relevance; its evaluation in conditions close to reality is necessary, given the close integration of the visuomotor, sensory feedback and proprioceptive systems, as of yet, a functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging (fMRI) scanner allowing a human subject to maintain erect stance, observe the surroundings and conserve limb freedom is still a dream. The need for high field suggests a solenoid magnet geometry that forces an unnatural posture that affects the results, particularly when the motor cortex is investigated. In contrast in a motor functional study, the scanner should allow the subject to sit or stand, with unobstructed sight and unimpeded movement. Two approaches are presented here to solve this problem. In the first approach, an increased field intensity in an open magnet is obtained lining the "back wall" of the cavity with a sheet of current: this boosts the field intensity at the cost of the introduction of a gradient, which has to be canceled by the introduction of an opposite gradient; The second approach is an adaptation of the "double doughnut" architecture, in which the cavity widens at the center to provide additional room for the subject. The detailed design of this kind of structure has proven the feasibility of the solution.

  13. Innovative Technologies for Maskless Lithography and Non-Conventional Patterning

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2008-08-01

    the purpose of directly maskless lithography, and at developing functional materials for direct printing of semiconductors , dielectrics, and...printable nanomaterial semiconductors , dielectrics, and insulators were developed, and used to realize a range of directly printed active components for...configurations were investigated. The first, the electron bombardment source (EBS), features a thin semiconductor (single crystal diamond) membrane with a

  14. Novel ultra-high sensitive 'metal resist' for EUV lithography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fujimori, Toru; Tsuchihashi, Toru; Minegishi, Shinya; Kamizono, Takashi; Itani, Toshiro

    2016-03-01

    This study describes the use of a novel ultra-high sensitive `metal resist' for use in extreme ultraviolet (EUV) lithography. Herein, the development of a metal resist has been studied for improving the sensitivity when using metal-containing non-chemically amplified resist materials; such materials are metal-containing organic-inorganic hybrid compounds and are referred to as EUVL Infrastructure Development Center, Inc. (EIDEC) standard metal EUV resist (ESMR). The novel metal resist's ultra-high sensitivity has previously been investigated for use with electron beam (EB) lithography. The first demonstration of ESMR performance was presented in SPIE2015, where it was shown to achieve 17-nm lines with 1.5 mJ/cm2: equivalent in EUV lithography tool. The sensitivity of ESMR using EUV open-flame exposure was also observed to have the same high sensitivity as that when using EB lithography tool. Therefore, ESMR has been confirmed to have the potential of being used as an ultra-high sensitive EUV resist material. The metal-containing organic-inorganic hybrid compounds and the resist formulations were investigated by measuring their sensitivity and line-width roughness (LWR) improvement. Furthermore, new processing conditions, such as new development and rinse procedures, are an extremely effective way of improving lithographic performance. In addition, the optimal dry-etching selective conditions between the metal resist and spin-on carbon (SOC) were obtained. The etched SOC pattern was successfully constructed from a stacked film of metal resist and SOC.

  15. Multilayer reflective coatings for extreme-ultraviolet lithography

    SciTech Connect

    Montcalm, C., LLNL

    1998-03-10

    Multilayer mirror coatings which reflect extreme ultraviolet (EUV) radiation are a key enabling technology for EUV lithography. Mo/Si multilayers with reflectances of 67.5% at 13.4 nm are now routinely achieved and reflectances of 70 2% at 11.4 nm were obtained with MO/Be multilayers. High reflectance is achieved with careful control of substrate quality, layer thicknesses, multilayer materials, interface quality, and surface termination. Reflectance and film stress were found to be stable relative to the requirements for application to EUV lithography. The run-to-run reproducibility of the reflectance peak position was characterized to be better than 0.2%, providing the required wavelength matching among the seven multilayer-coated mirrors used in the present lithography system design. Uniformity of coating was improved to better than 0.5% across 150 mm diameter substrates. These improvements in EUV multilayer mirror technology will enable us to meet the stringent specifications for coating the large optical substrates for our next-generation EUV lithography system.

  16. Shadow overlap ion-beam lithography for nanoarchitectures.

    PubMed

    Choi, Yeonho; Hong, Soongweon; Lee, Luke P

    2009-11-01

    Precisely constructed nanoscale devices and nanoarchitectures with high spatial resolution are critically needed for applications in high-speed electronics, high-density memory, efficient solar cells, optoelectronics, plasmonics, optical antennas, chemical sensors, biological sensors, and nanospectroscopic imaging. Current methods of classical optical lithography are limited by the diffraction effect of light for nanolithography, and the state of art of e-beam or focused ion beam lithography limit the throughput and further reduction less than few nanometers for large-area batch fabrication. However, these limits can be surpassed surprisingly by utilizing the overlap of two shadow images. Here we present shadow overlap of ion-beam lithography (SOIL), which can combine the advantages of parallel processing, tunable capability of geometries, cost-effective method, and high spatial resolution nanofabrication technique. The SOIL method relies on the overlap of shadows created by the directional metal deposition and etching angles on prepatterned structures. Consequently, highly tunable patterns can be obtained. As examples, unprecedented nanoarchitectures for optical antennas are demonstrated by SOIL. We expect that SOIL can have a significant impact not only on nanoscale devices, but also large-scale (i.e., micro and macro) three-dimensional innovative lithography.

  17. Diffractive element in extreme-UV lithography condenser

    DOEpatents

    Sweatt, William C.; Ray-Chaudhurl, Avijit K.

    2000-01-01

    Condensers having a mirror with a diffraction grating in projection lithography using extreme ultra-violet significantly enhances critical dimension control. The diffraction grating has the effect of smoothing the illumination at the camera's entrance pupil with minimum light loss. Modeling suggests that critical dimension control for 100 nm features can be improved from 3 nm to less than about 0.5 nm.

  18. Diffractive element in extreme-UV lithography condenser

    DOEpatents

    Sweatt, William C.; Ray-Chaudhuri, Avijit

    2001-01-01

    Condensers having a mirror with a diffraction grating in projection lithography using extreme ultra-violet significantly enhances critical dimension control. The diffraction grating has the effect of smoothing the illumination at the camera's entrance pupil with minimum light loss. Modeling suggests that critical dimension control for 100 nm features can be improved from 3 nm to less than about 0.5 nm.

  19. Condenser for extreme-UV lithography with discharge source

    DOEpatents

    Sweatt, William C.; Kubiak, Glenn D.

    2001-01-01

    Condenser system, for use with a ringfield camera in projection lithography, employs quasi grazing-incidence collector mirrors that are coated with a suitable reflective metal such as ruthenium to collect radiation from a discharge source to minimize the effect of contaminant accumulation on the collecting mirrors.

  20. Three-Dimensional Nano-Lithography for Emerging Technologies

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2005-09-27

    SUBJECT TERMS Grayscale lithography, micro - and nano -fabrication, 3D micro ...meso-optics for optical system integration, and the burgeoning field of micro -electro-mechanical systems (MEMS), provide drive in the micro - and nano ...scientific literature, and presentations at conferences devoted to micro - and nano -fabrication and micro - optics. More importantly, we developed technology

  1. Beyond EUV lithography: a comparative study of efficient photoresists' performance

    PubMed Central

    Mojarad, Nassir; Gobrecht, Jens; Ekinci, Yasin

    2015-01-01

    Extreme ultraviolet (EUV) lithography at 13.5 nm is the main candidate for patterning integrated circuits and reaching sub-10-nm resolution within the next decade. Should photon-based lithography still be used for patterning smaller feature sizes, beyond EUV (BEUV) lithography at 6.x nm wavelength is an option that could potentially meet the rigid demands of the semiconductor industry. We demonstrate simultaneous characterization of the resolution, line-edge roughness, and sensitivity of distinct photoresists at BEUV and compare their properties when exposed to EUV under the same conditions. By using interference lithography at these wavelengths, we show the possibility for patterning beyond 22 nm resolution and characterize the impact of using higher energy photons on the line-edge roughness and exposure latitude. We observe high sensitivity of the photoresist performance on its chemical content and compare their overall performance using the Z-parameter criterion. Interestingly, inorganic photoresists have much better performance at BEUV, while organic chemically-amplified photoresists would need serious adaptations for being used at such wavelength. Our results have immediate implications for deeper understanding of the radiation chemistry of novel photoresists at the EUV and soft X-ray spectra. PMID:25783209

  2. Patterning of membrane masks for projection e-beam lithography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fetter, Linus A.; Biddick, Christopher J.; Blakey, Myrtle I.; Liddle, James A.; Peabody, Milton L., Jr.; Novembre, Anthony E.; Tennant, Donald M.

    1996-12-01

    A process for high-resolution patterning of the membrane- type masks used in the SCALPEL (SCattering with Angular Limitation in Projection Electron-beam Lithography) lithography system is described. SCALPEL is a 4X projection electron beam lithography tool with the potential to extend commercial lithographic capability well into the deep sub-micron range: the recently-completed SCALPEL proof- of-concept (SPOC) system has printed 0.08 micrometers lines in thick resist on Si. The details of the patterning process we currently employ and metrology results from the first series of masks are presented here. The SPOC mask blank consists of a segmented W-coated SiN (Si-rich) membrane, fabricated on a 4' Si wafer. The blank is patterned with 45 different test chips using a vector-scanned e-beam lithography tool. Metrology is performed on completed masks, and results from measurements of line-edge roughness, CD linearity, and pattern uniformity are presented. We examine the need for proximity effect correction of the pattern data, and compare the effect of correction on pattern data file size for a variety of mask technologies.

  3. Instrumentation for Microfabrication with Deep X-ray Lithography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pantenburg, F. J.

    2007-01-01

    Deep X-ray lithography for microfabrication is performed at least at ten synchrotron radiation centers worldwide. The characteristic energies of these sources range from 1.4 keV up to 8 keV, covering mask making capabilities, deep X-ray lithography up to ultra deep x-ray lithography of several millimeters resist thickness. Limitations in deep X-ray lithography arise from hard X-rays in the SR-spectrum leading to adhesion losses of resist lines after the developing process, as well as heat load due to very high fluxes leading to thermal expansion of mask and resist during exposure and therefore to microstructure distortion. Considering the installations at ANKA as an example, the advantages of mirrors and central beam stops for DXRL are presented. Future research work will concentrate on feature sizes much below 1 μm, while the commercialization of DXRL goes in the direction of massive automation, including parallel exposures of several samples in a very wide SR-fan, developing and inspection.

  4. Nanoscale molecular-switch devices fabricated by imprint lithography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Yong; Ohlberg, Douglas A. A.; Li, Xuema; Stewart, Duncan R.; Stanley Williams, R.; Jeppesen, Jan O.; Nielsen, Kent A.; Stoddart, J. Fraser; Olynick, Deirdre L.; Anderson, Erik

    2003-03-01

    Nanoscale molecular-electronic devices comprising a single molecular monolayer of bistable [2]rotaxanes sandwiched between two 40-nm metal electrodes were fabricated using imprint lithography. Bistable current-voltage characteristics with high on-off ratios and reversible switching properties were observed. Such devices may function as basic elements for future ultradense electronic circuitry.

  5. Biologically inspired omniphobic surfaces by reverse imprint lithography.

    PubMed

    Hensel, René; Finn, Andreas; Helbig, Ralf; Braun, Hans-Georg; Neinhuis, Christoph; Fischer, Wolf-Joachim; Werner, Carsten

    2014-04-02

    Springtail skin morphology is translated into robust omniphobic polymer membranes by reverse imprint lithography. The combination of overhanging cross-sections and their arrangement in a self-supporting comblike pattern are crucial for mechanically stable coatings that can be even applied to curved surfaces.

  6. Mask characterization for critical dimension uniformity budget breakdown in advanced extreme ultraviolet lithography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nikolsky, Peter; Strolenberg, Chris; Nielsen, Rasmus; Nooitgedacht, Tjitte; Davydova, Natalia; Yang, Greg; Lee, Shawn; Park, Chang-Min; Kim, Insung; Yeo, Jeong-Ho

    2013-04-01

    As the International Technology Roadmap for Semiconductors critical dimension uniformity (CDU) specification shrinks, semiconductor companies need to maintain a high yield of good wafers per day and high performance (and hence market value) of finished products. This cannot be achieved without continuous analysis and improvement of on-product CDU as one of the main drivers for process control and optimization with better understanding of main contributors from the litho cluster: mask, process, metrology and scanner. We will demonstrate a study of mask CDU characterization and its impact on CDU Budget Breakdown (CDU BB) performed for advanced extreme ultraviolet (EUV) lithography with 1D (dense lines) and 2D (dense contacts) feature cases. We will show that this CDU contributor is one of the main differentiators between well-known ArFi and new EUV CDU budgeting principles. We found that reticle contribution to intrafield CDU should be characterized in a specific way: mask absorber thickness fingerprints play a role comparable with reticle CDU in the total reticle part of the CDU budget. Wafer CD fingerprints, introduced by this contributor, may or may not compensate variations of mask CDs and hence influence on total mask impact on intrafield CDU at the wafer level. This will be shown on 1D and 2D feature examples. Mask stack reflectivity variations should also be taken into account: these fingerprints have visible impact on intrafield CDs at the wafer level and should be considered as another contributor to the reticle part of EUV CDU budget. We also observed mask error enhancement factor (MEEF) through field fingerprints in the studied EUV cases. Variations of MEEF may play a role towards the total intrafield CDU and may need to be taken into account for EUV lithography. We characterized MEEF-through-field for the reviewed features, with results herein, but further analysis of this phenomenon is required. This comprehensive approach to quantifying the mask part of

  7. Fabrication of Diffractive Optical Elements for an Integrated Compact Optical-MEMS Laser Scanner

    SciTech Connect

    WENDT,JOEL R.; KRYGOWSKI,T.W.; VAWTER,GREGORY A.; SPAHN,OLGA B.; SWEATT,WILLIAM C.; WARREN,MIAL E.; REYES,DAVID NMN

    2000-07-13

    The authors describe the microfabrication of a multi-level diffractive optical element (DOE) onto a micro-electromechanical system (MEMS) as a key element in an integrated compact optical-MEMS laser scanner. The DOE is a four-level off-axis microlens fabricated onto a movable polysilicon shuttle. The microlens is patterned by electron beam lithography and etched by reactive ion beam etching. The DOE was fabricated on two generations of MEMS components. The first generation design uses a shuttle suspended on springs and displaced by a linear rack. The second generation design uses a shuttle guided by roller bearings and driven by a single reciprocating gear. Both the linear rack and the reciprocating gear are driven by a microengine assembly. The compact design is based on mounting the MEMS module and a vertical cavity surface emitting laser (VCSEL) onto a fused silica substrate that contains the rest of the optical system. The estimated scan range of the system is {+-}4{degree} with a spot size of 0.5 mm.

  8. Protein assay structured on paper by using lithography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilhelm, E.; Nargang, T. M.; Al Bitar, W.; Waterkotte, B.; Rapp, B. E.

    2015-03-01

    There are two main challenges in producing a robust, paper-based analytical device. The first one is to create a hydrophobic barrier which unlike the commonly used wax barriers does not break if the paper is bent. The second one is the creation of the (bio-)specific sensing layer. For this proteins have to be immobilized without diminishing their activity. We solve both problems using light-based fabrication methods that enable fast, efficient manufacturing of paper-based analytical devices. The first technique relies on silanization by which we create a flexible hydrophobic barrier made of dimethoxydimethylsilane. The second technique demonstrated within this paper uses photobleaching to immobilize proteins by means of maskless projection lithography. Both techniques have been tested on a classical lithography setup using printed toner masks and on a lithography system for maskless lithography. Using these setups we could demonstrate that the proposed manufacturing techniques can be carried out at low costs. The resolution of the paper-based analytical devices obtained with static masks was lower due to the lower mask resolution. Better results were obtained using advanced lithography equipment. By doing so we demonstrated, that our technique enables fabrication of effective hydrophobic boundary layers with a thickness of only 342 μm. Furthermore we showed that flourescine-5-biotin can be immobilized on the non-structured paper and be employed for the detection of streptavidinalkaline phosphatase. By carrying out this assay on a paper-based analytical device which had been structured using the silanization technique we proofed biological compatibility of the suggested patterning technique.

  9. 27. SITE BUILDING 002 SCANNER BUILDING OPERATIONS CENTER ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    27. SITE BUILDING 002 - SCANNER BUILDING - OPERATIONS CENTER - MWOC MONITOR NO. 4 IN OPERATION AT 2002 ZULU, OCTOBER 26, 1999 CAPE COD, AS PAVE PAWS. - Cape Cod Air Station, Technical Facility-Scanner Building & Power Plant, Massachusetts Military Reservation, Sandwich, Barnstable County, MA

  10. 26. SITE BUILDING 002 SCANNER BUILDING OPERATIONS CENTER ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    26. SITE BUILDING 002 - SCANNER BUILDING - OPERATIONS CENTER - MWOC IN OPERATION AT 1945 ZULU TIME, 26 OCTOBER, 1999. "SPACE TRACK BOARD" DATA SHOWING ITEMS #16609 MIR (RUSSIA) AND #25544 ISS (INTERNATIONAL SPACE STATION) BEING TRACKED. - Cape Cod Air Station, Technical Facility-Scanner Building & Power Plant, Massachusetts Military Reservation, Sandwich, Barnstable County, MA

  11. 21. SITE BUILDING 002 SCANNER BUILDING LOOKING AT ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    21. SITE BUILDING 002 - SCANNER BUILDING - LOOKING AT DISC STORAGE SYSTEMS A AND B (A OR B ARE REDUNDANT SYSTEMS), ONE MAINFRAME COMPUTER ON LINE, ONE ON STANDBY WITH STORAGE TAPE, ONE ON STANDBY WITHOUT TAPE INSTALLED. - Cape Cod Air Station, Technical Facility-Scanner Building & Power Plant, Massachusetts Military Reservation, Sandwich, Barnstable County, MA

  12. 20. SITE BUILDING 002 SCANNER BUILDING IN COMPUTER ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    20. SITE BUILDING 002 - SCANNER BUILDING - IN COMPUTER ROOM LOOKING AT "CONSOLIDATED MAINTENANCE OPERATIONS CENTER" JOB AREA AND OPERATION WORK CENTER. TASKS INCLUDE RADAR MAINTENANCE, COMPUTER MAINTENANCE, CYBER COMPUTER MAINTENANCE AND RELATED ACTIVITIES. - Cape Cod Air Station, Technical Facility-Scanner Building & Power Plant, Massachusetts Military Reservation, Sandwich, Barnstable County, MA

  13. 19. SITE BUILDING 002 SCANNER BUILDING AIR POLICE ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    19. SITE BUILDING 002 - SCANNER BUILDING - AIR POLICE SITE SECURITY OFFICE WITH "SITE PERIMETER STATUS PANEL" AND REAL TIME VIDEO DISPLAY OUTPUT FROM VIDEO CAMERA SYSTEM AT SECURITY FENCE LOCATIONS. - Cape Cod Air Station, Technical Facility-Scanner Building & Power Plant, Massachusetts Military Reservation, Sandwich, Barnstable County, MA

  14. 25. SITE BUILDING 002 SCANNER BUILDING OPERATIONS CENTER ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    25. SITE BUILDING 002 - SCANNER BUILDING - OPERATIONS CENTER - MWOC IN OPERATION AT 1930 ZULU TIME, 26 OCTOBER, 1999. MWOC SCREEN ALSO SHOWS RADAR "FACE A" AND "FACE B" ACTIVE STATUS. - Cape Cod Air Station, Technical Facility-Scanner Building & Power Plant, Massachusetts Military Reservation, Sandwich, Barnstable County, MA

  15. Laser excited confocal microscope fluorescence scanner and method

    DOEpatents

    Mathies, R.A.; Peck, K.

    1992-02-25

    A fluorescent scanner is designed for scanning the fluorescence from a fluorescence labeled separated sample on a sample carrier. The scanner includes a confocal microscope for illuminating a predetermined volume of the sample carrier and/or receiving and processing fluorescence emissions from the volume to provide a display of the separated sample. 8 figs.

  16. 10. SITE BUILDING 002 SCANNER BUILDING LOOKING AT ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    10. SITE BUILDING 002 - SCANNER BUILDING - LOOKING AT SOUTHWEST CORNER "B" FACE AND "C" FACE ON WEST AND EVAPORATIVE COOLING TOWER AT NORTH. VIEW IS LOOKING NORTH 45° EAST. - Cape Cod Air Station, Technical Facility-Scanner Building & Power Plant, Massachusetts Military Reservation, Sandwich, Barnstable County, MA

  17. 5. SITE BUILDING 002 SCANNER BUILDING AT "A" ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    5. SITE BUILDING 002 - SCANNER BUILDING - AT "A" FACE (ON SOUTH SIDE) LOOKING DIRECTLY UP RADAR SYSTEM EMITTER/ANTENNA ARRAY FACE WITH 90MM STANDARD LENS. - Cape Cod Air Station, Technical Facility-Scanner Building & Power Plant, Massachusetts Military Reservation, Sandwich, Barnstable County, MA

  18. 6. SITE BUILDING 002 SCANNER BUILDING AT "A" ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    6. SITE BUILDING 002 - SCANNER BUILDING - AT "A" FACE (ON SOUTH SIDE) LOOKING DIRECTLY UP RADAR SYSTEM EMITTER/ANTENNA ARRAY FACE WITH 65MM WIDE ANGLE LENS. - Cape Cod Air Station, Technical Facility-Scanner Building & Power Plant, Massachusetts Military Reservation, Sandwich, Barnstable County, MA

  19. 9. SITE BUILDING 002 SCANNER BUILDING LOOKING AT ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    9. SITE BUILDING 002 - SCANNER BUILDING - LOOKING AT "C" FACE RADAR SYSTEM EMITTER/ANTENNA. VIEW IS LOOKING SOUTH 30° EAST (NOTE: "C" FACE NOT IN USE AT FACILITY). - Cape Cod Air Station, Technical Facility-Scanner Building & Power Plant, Massachusetts Military Reservation, Sandwich, Barnstable County, MA

  20. Quantitative Assay for Starch by Colorimetry Using a Desktop Scanner

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Matthews, Kurt R.; Landmark, James D.; Stickle, Douglas F.

    2004-01-01

    The procedure to produce standard curve for starch concentration measurement by image analysis using a color scanner and computer for data acquisition and color analysis is described. Color analysis is performed by a Visual Basic program that measures red, green, and blue (RGB) color intensities for pixels within the scanner image.

  1. 29. SITE BUILDING 002 SCANNER BUILDING FLOOR 3A ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    29. SITE BUILDING 002 - SCANNER BUILDING - FLOOR 3A ("A" FACE) AT SYSTEM LAYOUT GRID 17. GENERAL OBLIQUE VIEW OF "A" FACE INTERIOR SHOWING RADAR EMITTER/ANTENNA INTERFACE ELECTRONICS. - Cape Cod Air Station, Technical Facility-Scanner Building & Power Plant, Massachusetts Military Reservation, Sandwich, Barnstable County, MA

  2. Study of PET scanner designs using clinical metrics to optimize the scanner axial FOV and crystal thickness

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Surti, S.; Werner, M. E.; Karp, J. S.

    2013-06-01

    The aim of this study is to understand the trade-off between crystal thickness and scanner axial field-of-view FOV (AFOV) for clinical PET imaging. Clinical scanner design has evolved towards 20-25 mm thick crystals and 16-22 cm long scanner AFOV, as well as time-of-flight (TOF) imaging. While Monte Carlo studies demonstrate that longer AFOV and thicker crystals will lead to higher scanner sensitivity, cost has prohibited the building of commercial scanners with >22 cm AFOV. In this study, we performed a series of system simulations to optimize the use of a given amount of crystal material by evaluating the impact on system sensitivity and noise equivalent counts (NEC), as well as image quality in terms of lesion detectability. We evaluated two crystal types (LSO and LaBr3) and fixed the total crystal volume used for each type (8.2 L of LSO and 17.1 L of LaBr3) while varying the crystal thickness and scanner AFOV. In addition, all imaging times were normalized so that the total scan time needed to scan a 100 cm long object with multiple bed positions was kept constant. Our results show that the highest NEC cm-1 in a 35 cm diameter ×70 cm long line source cylinder is achieved for an LSO scanner with 10 mm long crystals and AFOV of 36 cm, while for LaBr3 scanners, the highest NEC cm-1 is obtained with 20 mm long crystals and an AFOV of 38 cm. Lesion phantom simulations show that the best lesion detection performance is achieved in scanners with long AFOV (≥36 cm) and using thin crystals (≤10 mm of LSO and ≤20 mm of LaBr3). This is due to a combination of improved NEC, as well as improved lesion contrast estimation due to better spatial resolution in thinner crystals. Alternatively, for lesion detection performance similar to that achieved in standard clinical scanner designs, the long AFOV scanners can be used to reduce the total scan time without increasing the amount of crystal used in the scanner. In addition, for LaBr3 based scanners, the reduced lesion

  3. Study of PET scanner designs using clinical metrics to optimize the scanner axial FOV and crystal thickness

    PubMed Central

    Surti, S; Werner, M E; Karp, J S

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this study is to understand the trade-off between crystal thickness and scanner axial FOV (AFOV) for clinical PET imaging. Clinical scanner design has evolved towards 20–25 mm thick crystals and 16–22 cm long scanner AFOV, as well as time-of-flight (TOF) imaging. While Monte Carlo studies demonstrate that longer AFOV and thicker crystals will lead to higher scanner sensitivity, cost has prohibited the building of commercial scanners with > 22 cm AFOV. In this study, we performed a series of system simulations to optimize the use of a given amount of crystal material by evaluating the impact on system sensitivity and NEC, as well image quality in terms of lesion detectability. We evaluated two crystal types (LSO and LaBr3) and fixed the total crystal volume used for each type (8.2 liters of LSO and 17.1 liters of LaBr3) while varying the crystal thickness and scanner AFOV. In addition, all imaging times were normalized so that the total scan time needed to scan a 100 cm long object with multiple bed positions was kept constant. Our results show that the highest NEC/cm in a 35 cm diameter×70 cm long line source cylinder is achieved for an LSO scanner with 10 mm long crystals and AFOV of 36 cm while for LaBr3 scanners, the highest NEC/cm is obtained with 20 mm long crystals and an AFOV of 38 cm. Lesion phantom simulations show best lesion detection performance is achieved in scanners with long AFOV (≥ 36 cm) and using thin crystals (≤ 10 mm of LSO and ≤ 20 mm of LaBr3). This is due to a combination of improved NEC, as well as improved lesion contrast estimation due to better spatial resolution in thinner crystals. Alternatively, for lesion detection performance similar to that achieved in standard clinical scanner designs, the long AFOV scanners can be used to reduce the total scan time without increasing the amount of crystal used in the scanner. In addition, for LaBr3 based scanners, the reduced lesion contrast relative to LSO based scanners

  4. Temporal analysis of multispectral scanner data.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Richardson, A. J.; Wiegand, C. L.; Torline, R. J.

    1973-01-01

    Multispectral scanner reflectance data were sampled for bare soil, cotton, sorghum, corn, and citrus at four dates during a growing season (April, May, June, and July 1969) to develop a time-dependent signature for crop and soil discrimination. Discrimination tests were conducted for single-date and multidate formats using training and test data sets. For classifications containing several crops, the multidate or temporal approach improved discrimination compared with the single-date approach. The multidate approach also preserved recognition accuracy better in going from training fields to test fields than the single-date analysis. The spectral distinctiveness of bare soil versus vegetation resulted in essentially equal discrimination using single-date versus multidate data for those two categories.

  5. Quadrupole resonance scanner for narcotics detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shaw, Julian D.; Moeller, C. R.; Magnuson, Erik E.; Sheldon, Alan G.

    1994-10-01

    Interest in non-invasive, non-hazardous, bulk detection technologies for narcotics interdiction has risen over the last few years. As part of our continuing research and development programs in detection of narcotics and explosives using sensitive magnetic measuring devices, we present the first commercially available prototype Quadrupole Resonance (QR) scanner for narcotics detection. The portable narcotics detection system was designed in modular form such that a single QR base system could be easily used with a variety of custom detection heads. The QR system presented in this paper is suitable for scanning items up to 61 X 35 X 13 cm in size, and was designed to scan mail packages and briefcase-sized items for the presence of narcotics. System tests have shown that detection sensitivity is comparable that obtained in laboratory systems.

  6. On the spectral quality of scanner illumination with LEDs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cui, Chengwu

    2013-01-01

    Document scanner illumination has evolved along with general illumination technologies. LEDs have become more and more popular as the illumination sources for document scanning. LED technologies provide a wide range of choices both in terms of structural design and spectral compositions. In this report, we examine some popular LED technologies used for document scanner. We evaluate the color rendering performance of scanner models with different illumination technologies by examining their rendering of the Macbeth ColorChecker™ in sRGB. We found that more phosphors in phosphor conversion types of white LEDs may not be necessarily advantageous in terms of scanner color rendering performance. Also CIS type of scanner may be sensitive to the peak wavelength shift and can be particularly problematic when the peaks are out of certain range.

  7. Optical performance requirements for MEMS-scanner-based microdisplays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Urey, Hakan; Wine, David W.; Osborn, Thor D.

    2000-08-01

    High-resolution and high frame rate dynamic microdisplays can be implemented by scanning a photon beam in a raster format across the viewer's retina. Microvision is developing biaxial MEMS scanners for such video display applications. This paper discusses the optical performance requirements for scanning display systems. The display resolution directly translates into a scan-angle-mirror-size product and the frame rate translates into vertical and horizontal scanner frequencies. (theta) -product and fh are both very important figures of merit for scanner performance comparison. In addition, the static and dynamic flatness of the scanners, off-axis motion and scan repeatability, scanner position sensor accuracy all have a direct impact on display image quality.

  8. Ultra-Miniature Lidar Scanner for Launch Range Data Collection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Geng, Jason

    2012-01-01

    The most critical component in lidar is its laser scanner, which delivers pulsed or CW laser to target with desirable field of view (FOV). Most existing lidars use a rotating or oscillating mirror for scanning, resulting in several drawbacks. A lidar scanning technology was developed that could achieve very high scanning speed, with an ultra-miniature size and much lighter weight. This technology promises at least a 10x performance improvement in these areas over existing lidar scanners. Features of the proposed ultra-miniature lidar scanner include the ability to make the entire scanner <2 mm in diameter; very high scanning speed (e.g. 5 - 20 kHz, in contrast to several hundred Hz in existing scanners); structure design to meet stringent requirements on size, weight, power, and compactness for various applications; and the scanning speed and FOV can be altered for obtaining high image resolutions of targeted areas and for diversified uses.

  9. Quantifying imaging performance bounds of extreme dipole illumination in high NA optical lithography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Myungjun; Smith, Mark D.; Biafore, John; Graves, Trey; Levy, Ady

    2016-10-01

    We present a framework to analyze the performance of optical imaging in a hyper numerical aperture (NA) immersion lithography scanner. We investigate the method to quantify imaging performance by computing upperand lower-bounds on the threshold normalized image log-slope (NILS) and the depth of focus (DOF) in conjunction with the traditional image quality metrics such as the mask error enhancement factor (MEEF) and the linearity for various different pitches and line to space (LS) duty cycles. The effects of the interaction between the light illumination and the feature size are extensively characterized based on the aerial image (AI) behavior in particular for the extreme dipole illumination that is one of the commonly used off-axis illuminations for sub-100nm logic and memory devices, providing resolution near the physical limit of an optical single patterning step. The proposed aerial imaging-based DOF bounds are compared to the results obtained from an experimentally calibrated resist model, and we observed good agreement. In general, the extreme dipole illumination is only optimal for a single particular pitch, therefore understanding the through-pitch imaging performance bound, which depends on the illumination shape, pattern size, and process conditions, is critically important. We find that overall imaging performance varies depending upon the number of diffracted beams passing through the scanner optics. An even number of beams provides very different trends compared to the results from an odd-number of beams. This significant non-linear behavior occurs in certain pitch regions corresponding to 3 beam interference imaging. In this region the imaging performance and the pattern printability become extremely sensitive to the LS duty cycle. In addition, there is a notable tradeoff between the DOF and the NILS that is observed in the problematic 3-beam region and this tradeoff eventually affects the achievable process window (PW). Given the practical real

  10. Color accuracy and reproducibility in whole slide imaging scanners

    PubMed Central

    Shrestha, Prarthana; Hulsken, Bas

    2014-01-01

    Abstract We propose a workflow for color reproduction in whole slide imaging (WSI) scanners, such that the colors in the scanned images match to the actual slide color and the inter-scanner variation is minimum. We describe a new method of preparation and verification of the color phantom slide, consisting of a standard IT8-target transmissive film, which is used in color calibrating and profiling the WSI scanner. We explore several International Color Consortium (ICC) compliant techniques in color calibration/profiling and rendering intents for translating the scanner specific colors to the standard display (sRGB) color space. Based on the quality of the color reproduction in histopathology slides, we propose the matrix-based calibration/profiling and absolute colorimetric rendering approach. The main advantage of the proposed workflow is that it is compliant to the ICC standard, applicable to color management systems in different platforms, and involves no external color measurement devices. We quantify color difference using the CIE-DeltaE2000 metric, where DeltaE values below 1 are considered imperceptible. Our evaluation on 14 phantom slides, manufactured according to the proposed method, shows an average inter-slide color difference below 1 DeltaE. The proposed workflow is implemented and evaluated in 35 WSI scanners developed at Philips, called the Ultra Fast Scanners (UFS). The color accuracy, measured as DeltaE between the scanner reproduced colors and the reference colorimetric values of the phantom patches, is improved on average to 3.5 DeltaE in calibrated scanners from 10 DeltaE in uncalibrated scanners. The average inter-scanner color difference is found to be 1.2 DeltaE. The improvement in color performance upon using the proposed method is apparent with the visual color quality of the tissue scans. PMID:26158041

  11. Fabricating Blazed Diffraction Gratings by X-Ray Lithography

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mouroulis, Pantazis; Hartley, Frank; Wilson, Daniel

    2004-01-01

    Gray-scale x-ray lithography is undergoing development as a technique for fabricating blazed diffraction gratings. As such, gray-scale x-ray lithography now complements such other grating-fabrication techniques as mechanical ruling, holography, ion etching, laser ablation, laser writing, and electron-beam lithography. Each of these techniques offers advantages and disadvantages for implementing specific grating designs; no single one of these techniques can satisfy the design requirements for all applications. Gray-scale x-ray lithography is expected to be advantageous for making gratings on steeper substrates than those that can be made by electron-beam lithography. This technique is not limited to sawtooth groove profiles and flat substrates: various groove profiles can be generated on arbitrarily shaped (including highly curved) substrates with the same ease as sawtooth profiles can be generated on flat substrates. Moreover, the gratings fabricated by this technique can be made free of ghosts (spurious diffraction components attributable to small spurious periodicities in the locations of grooves). The first step in gray-scale x-ray lithography is to conformally coat a substrate with a suitable photoresist. An x-ray mask (see Figure 1) is generated, placed between the substrate and a source of collimated x-rays, and scanned over the substrate so as to create a spatial modulation in the exposure of the photoresist. Development of the exposed photoresist results in a surface corrugation that corresponds to the spatial modulation and that defines the grating surface. The grating pattern is generated by scanning an appropriately shaped x-ray area mask along the substrate. The mask example of Figure 1 would generate a blazed grating profile when scanned in the perpendicular direction at constant speed, assuming the photoresist responds linearly to incident radiation. If the resist response is nonlinear, then the mask shape can be modified to account for the

  12. XLR 500i: recirculating ring ArF light source for immersion lithography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brown, D. J. W.; O'Keeffe, P.; Fleurov, V. B.; Rokitski, R.; Bergstedt, R.; Fomenkov, I. V.; O'Brien, K.; Farrar, N. R.; Partlo, W. N.

    2007-03-01

    As Argon Fluoride (ArF) lithography moves into high volume production, ArF light sources need to meet performance requirements beyond the traditional drivers of power and bandwidth. The first key requirement is a continuous decrease in Cost of Ownership (CoO) where the industry requirement is for reduction in ArF CoO in line with the historical cost reduction demonstrated for Krypton Fluoride (KrF) light sources. A second requirement is improved light source performance stability. As CD control requirements shrink, following the ITRS roadmap, all process parameters which affect CD variation need tighter control. In the case of the light source, these include improved control of bandwidth, pulse energy stability and wavelength. In particular, CD sensitivity to exposure dose has become a serious challenge for device processing and improvements to laser pulse energy stability can contribute to significantly better dose control. To meet these performance challenges Cymer has designed a new dual chamber laser architecture. The Recirculating Ring design requires 10X less energy from the Master Oscillator (MO). This new configuration enables the MO chamber lifetime to reach that of the power amplifier chamber at around 30Bp. In addition, other optical modules in the system such as the line narrowing module experience lower light intensity, ensuring even longer optics lifetime. Furthermore, the Recirculating Ring configuration operates in much stronger saturation. MO energy instabilities are reduced by a factor of 9X when passed through the Ring. The output energy stability exhibits the characteristics of a fully saturated amplifier and pulse energy stability improvement of 1.5X is realized. This performance enables higher throughput scanner operation with enhanced dose control. The Recirculating Ring technology will be introduced on the XLR 500i, Cymer's fifth-generation dual chamber-based light source built on the production-proven XLA platform. This paper will describe

  13. Nodal line-scanning method for maskless optical lithography.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Kenneth C

    2014-12-01

    Maskless optical lithography can improve the economics and performance of multi-patterning by eliminating photomasks and by simplifying the lithography exposure technology. It could also potentially eliminate the need for multi-patterning by enabling dual-wavelength, nonlinear optical recording methods. High-resolution, maskless patterning can be achieved with a scanned-spot-array system in which modulated, diffraction-limited focus spots write the exposure pattern. Each spot has a central zero-intensity interference null along a line parallel to the scan direction for printing sub-resolution line patterns. High throughput can be achieved at the comparatively low repetition rate of excimer lasers (e.g., 6 kHz). The low repetition rate simplifies the optical modulation technology, enabling the use of supplemental modulation controls including dynamic gray-level and beam-centration controls for resolution enhancement.

  14. Particulate templates and ordered liquid bridge networks in evaporative lithography.

    PubMed

    Vakarelski, Ivan U; Kwek, Jin W; Tang, Xiaosong; O'Shea, Sean J; Chan, Derek Y C

    2009-12-01

    We investigate the properties of latex particle templates required to optimize the development of ordered liquid bridge networks in evaporative lithography. These networks are key precursors in the assembly of solutions of conducting nanoparticles into large, optically transparent, and conducting microwire networks on substrates (Vakarelski, I. U.; Chan, D. Y. C.; Nonoguchi, T.; Shinto, H.; Higashitani, K. Phys. Rev. Lett., 2009, 102, 058303). An appropriate combination of heat treatment and oxygen plasma etching of a close-packed latex particle monolayer is shown to create open-spaced particle templates which facilitates the formation of ordered fully connected liquid bridge networks that are critical to the formation of ordered microwire networks. Similar results can also be achieved if non-close-packed latex particle templates with square or honeycomb geometries are used. The present results have important implications for the development of the particulate templates to control the morphology of functional microwire networks by evaporative lithography.

  15. 4-Nitrobenzene Grafted in Porous Silicon: Application to Optical Lithography.

    PubMed

    Tiddia, Mariavitalia; Mula, Guido; Sechi, Elisa; Vacca, Annalisa; Cara, Eleonora; De Leo, Natascia; Fretto, Matteo; Boarino, Luca

    2016-12-01

    In this work, we report a method to process porous silicon to improve its chemical resistance to alkaline solution attacks based on the functionalization of the pore surface by the electrochemical reduction of 4-nitrobenzendiazonium salt. This method provides porous silicon with strong resistance to the etching solutions used in optical lithography and allows the fabrication of tailored metallic contacts on its surface. The samples were studied by chemical, electrochemical, and morphological methods. We demonstrate that the grafted samples show a resistance to harsh alkaline solution more than three orders of magnitude larger than that of pristine porous silicon, being mostly unmodified after about 40 min. The samples maintained open pores after the grafting, making them suitable for further treatments like filling by polymers. Optical lithography was performed on the functionalized samples, and electrochemical characterization results are shown.

  16. Combined capillary force and step and flash lithography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mele, Elisa; Di Benedetto, Francesca; Persano, Luana; Pisignano, Dario; Cingolani, Roberto

    2005-04-01

    The combination of a key element of soft lithography, namely the elastomeric stamp, with the operation principle of step and flash imprint lithography results in a moulding procedure allowing high throughput and remarkable operational simplicity. 100 nm scale dense features can be fabricated via in situ polymerization of a polyurethane fluid, simultaneous to the capillary penetration into the recessed regions of high-resolution elastomeric elements. Excellent pattern definition has been obtained for features down to 200 nm, with aspect ratio of around unity over areas of the order of cm2. The physical principles of the fluidic motion within the sub-µm channels are also discussed, to estimate the maximum aspect ratio achievable before the complete curing of the employed photopolymer.

  17. Rapid prototyping of microstructures by soft lithography for biotechnology.

    PubMed

    Wolfe, Daniel B; Qin, Dong; Whitesides, George M

    2010-01-01

    This chapter describes the methods and specific procedures used to fabricate microstructures by soft lithography. These techniques are useful for the prototyping of devices useful for applications in biotechnology. Fabrication by soft lithography does not require specialized or expensive equipment; the materials and facilities necessary are found commonly in biological and chemical laboratories in both academia and industry. The combination of the fact that the materials are low-cost and that the time from design to prototype device can be short (< 24 h) makes it possible to use and to screen rapidly devices that also can be disposable. Here we describe the procedures for fabricating microstructures with lateral dimensions as small as 1 mum. These types of microstructures are useful for microfluidic devices, cell-based assays, and bioengineered surfaces.

  18. Materials for and performance of multilayer lithography schemes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weimer, Marc; Wang, Yubao; Neef, Charles J.; Claypool, James; Edwards, Kevin; Zu, Zhimin

    2007-03-01

    The 45-nm node will require the use of thinner photoresists, which necessitates the use of multilayer pattern transfer schemes. One common multilayer approach is the use of a silicon-rich anti-reflective hardmask (Si BARC) with a carbon-rich pattern transfer underlayer (spin-on carbon, or SOC). The combination of the two layers provides a highly planar platform for a thin resist, and provides a route to etch substrates due to the alternating plasma etch selectivities of the organic resist, inorganic Si BARC, and organic SOC. Yet such schemes will need to be optimized both for pattern transfer and optics. Optimizing optics under hyper-NA immersion conditions is more complicated than with standard (that is, NA<1) lithography. A rigorous calculation technique is used to evaluate and compare standard lithography to a hyper-NA case using a multilayer stack. An example of such a stack is shown to have reasonable lithographic performance.

  19. Metallic nanodot arrays by stencil lithography for plasmonic biosensing applications.

    PubMed

    Vazquez-Mena, Oscar; Sannomiya, Takumi; Villanueva, Luis G; Voros, Janos; Brugger, Juergen

    2011-02-22

    The fabrication of gold nanodots by stencil lithography and its application for optical biosensing based on localized surface plasmon resonance are presented. Arrays of 50-200 nm wide nanodots with different spacing of 50-300 nm are fabricated without any resist, etching, or lift-off process. The dimensions and morphology of the nanodots were characterized by scanning electron and atomic force microscopy. The fabricated nanodots showed localized surface plasmon resonance in their extinction spectra in the visible range. The resonance wavelength depends on the periodicity and dimensions of the nanodots. Bulk refractive index measurements and model biosensing of streptavidin were successfully performed based on the plasmon resonance shift induced by local refractive index change when biomolecules are adsorbed on the nanodots. These results demonstrate the potential of stencil lithography for the realization of plasmon-based biosensing devices.

  20. Source development for extreme ultraviolet lithography and water window imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    O'Sullivan, G.; Dunne, P.; Kilbane, D.; Liu, L.; Lokasani, R.; Long, E.; Li, B. W.; McCormack, T.; O'Reilly, F.; Shiel, J.; Sokell, E.; Suzuki, C.; Wu, T.; Higashiguchi, T.

    2017-03-01

    Sources based on laser produced plasmas of tin (Sn) are currently being developed for extreme ultraviolet lithography for semiconductor fabrication. Since they operate at short wavelength (13.5 nm) they are capable of producing features with critical dimensions in the 10 nm range. Already next generation lithography sources operating at an even lower wavelength of around 6.7-6.8 nm have been proposed and research is ongoing on their feasibility for both large scale manufacturing and `at wavelength' metrology. The high resolution afforded by such short wavelengths is also of use for applications such as surface patterning and microscopy and the results of recent experiments to identify sources for operation in the `water window' (2.34-4.2 nm), where carbon absorbs strongly but water does not are summarized.

  1. Nanostructure patterning on flexible substrates using electron beam lithography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nagaraj, K. S.; Sangeeth, K.; Hegde, G. M.

    2014-06-01

    Patterning nanostructures on flexible substrates plays a key role in the emerging flexible electronics technology. The flexible electronic devices are inexpensive and can be conformed to any shape. The potential applications for such devices are sensors, displays, solar cells, RFID, high-density biochips, optoelectronics etc. E-beam lithography is established as a powerful tool for nanoscale fabrication, but its applicability on insulating flexible substrates is often limited because of surface charging effects. This paper presents the fabrication of nanostructures on insulating flexible substrates using low energy E-beam lithography along with metallic layers for charge dissipation. Nano Structures are patterned on different substrates of materials such as acetate and PET foils. The fabrication process parameters such as the proximity gap of exposure, the exposure dosage and developing conditions have been optimized for each substrate.

  2. Maskless, parallel patterning with zone-plate array lithography

    SciTech Connect

    Carter, D. J. D.; Gil, Dario; Menon, Rajesh; Mondol, Mark K.; Smith, Henry I.; Anderson, Erik H.

    1999-11-01

    Zone-plate array lithography (ZPAL) is a maskless lithography scheme that uses an array of shuttered zone plates to print arbitrary patterns on a substrate. An experimental ultraviolet ZPAL system has been constructed and used to simultaneously expose nine different patterns with a 3x3 array of zone plates in a quasidot-matrix fashion. We present exposed patterns, describe the system design and construction, and discuss issues essential to a functional ZPAL system. We also discuss another ZPAL system which operates with 4.5 nm x radiation from a point source. We present simulations which show that, with our existing x-ray zone plates and this system, we should be able to achieve 55 nm resolution. (c) 1999 American Vacuum Society.

  3. Coupling-aware mixed dummy metal insertion for lithography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deng, Liang; Wong, Martin D. F.; Chao, Kai-Yuan; Xiang, Hua

    2007-03-01

    As integrated circuits manufacturing technology is advancing into 65nm and 45nm nodes, extensive resolution enhancement techniques (RET) are needed to correctly manufacture a chip design. The widely used RET called offaxis illumination (OAI) introduces forbidden pitches which lead to very complex design rules. It has been observed that imposing uniformity on layout designs can substantially improve printability under OAI. In this paper, two types of assist features for the metal layer are proposed to improve the uniformity, printable assist feature and segmented printable assist feature. They bring different costs on performance and manufacturing. Coupling and lithography costs from these assist features are discussed. Optimal insertion algorithm is proposed to use both types of dummy metals, considering trade-offs between coupling and lithography costs.

  4. Enhancement of height resolution in direct laser lithography.

    PubMed

    Rhee, Hyug-Gyo; Lee, Yun-Woo

    2012-01-02

    To address the requirements of multi-level semiconductors, we propose a new technique for overcoming the height limitation of direct laser lithography. In the proposed system, an original source beam is fed into an interference generator that divides the input beam by 50: 50 into two output beams. After going through an imaging lens, these two beams make two focusing spots, which are slightly separated in the axial direction. In the overlapped region, these two spots generate a small interferogram that shortens the depth of focus. By using this phenomenon, we are able to overcome the height limitation of direct laser lithography. The governing equations are also derived in this manuscript by using the Gaussian beam model.

  5. Bioimprinting strategies: from soft lithography to biomimetic sensors and beyond.

    PubMed

    Mujahid, Adnan; Iqbal, Naseer; Afzal, Adeel

    2013-12-01

    Imprinting is a straightforward, yet a reliable technique to develop dynamic artificial recognition materials-so called as synthetic antibodies. Surface imprinting strategies such as soft lithography allow biological stereotyping of polymers and sol-gel phases to prepare extremely selective receptor layers, which can be combined with suitable transducer systems to develop high performance biomimetic sensors. This article presents an overview of the remarkable technical advancements in the field of surface bioimprinting with particular emphasis on surface imprinted bioanalyte detection systems and their applications in rapid bioanalysis and biotechnology. Herein, we discuss a variety of surface imprinting strategies including soft lithography, template immobilization, grafting, emulsion polymerization, and others along with their biomimetic sensor applications, merits and demerits. The pioneering research works on surface patterned biosensors are described with selected examples of detecting biological agents ranging from small biomolecules and proteins to living cells and microorganisms.

  6. Immersion and dry lithography monitoring for flash memories (after develop inspection and photo cell monitor) using a darkfield imaging inspector with advanced binning technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parisi, P.; Mani, A.; Perry-Sullivan, C.; Kopp, J.; Simpson, G.; Renis, M.; Padovani, M.; Severgnini, C.; Piacentini, P.; Piazza, P.; Beccalli, A.

    2009-12-01

    After-develop inspection (ADI) and photo-cell monitoring (PM) are part of a comprehensive lithography process monitoring strategy. Capturing defects of interest (DOI) in the lithography cell rather than at later process steps shortens the cycle time and allows for wafer re-work, reducing overall cost and improving yield. Low contrast DOI and multiple noise sources make litho inspection challenging. Broadband brightfield inspectors provide the highest sensitivity to litho DOI and are traditionally used for ADI and PM. However, a darkfield imaging inspector has shown sufficient sensitivity to litho DOI, providing a high-throughput option for litho defect monitoring. On the darkfield imaging inspector, a very high sensitivity inspection is used in conjunction with advanced defect binning to detect pattern issues and other DOI and minimize nuisance defects. For ADI, this darkfield inspection methodology enables the separation and tracking of 'color variation' defects that correlate directly to CD variations allowing a high-sampling monitor for focus excursions, thereby reducing scanner re-qualification time. For PM, the darkfield imaging inspector provides sensitivity to critical immersion litho defects at a lower cost-of-ownership. This paper describes litho monitoring methodologies developed and implemented for flash devices for 65nm production and 45nm development using the darkfield imaging inspector.

  7. Handheld laser scanner automatic registration based on random coding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, Lei; Yu, Chun-ping; Wang, Li

    2011-06-01

    Current research on Laser Scanner often focuses mainly on the static measurement. Little use has been made of dynamic measurement, that are appropriate for more problems and situations. In particular, traditional Laser Scanner must Keep stable to scan and measure coordinate transformation parameters between different station. In order to make the scanning measurement intelligently and rapidly, in this paper ,we developed a new registration algorithm for handleheld laser scanner based on the positon of target, which realize the dynamic measurement of handheld laser scanner without any more complex work. the double camera on laser scanner can take photograph of the artificial target points to get the three-dimensional coordinates, this points is designed by random coding. And then, a set of matched points is found from control points to realize the orientation of scanner by the least-square common points transformation. After that the double camera can directly measure the laser point cloud in the surface of object and get the point cloud data in an unified coordinate system. There are three major contributions in the paper. Firstly, a laser scanner based on binocular vision is designed with double camera and one laser head. By those, the real-time orientation of laser scanner is realized and the efficiency is improved. Secondly, the coding marker is introduced to solve the data matching, a random coding method is proposed. Compared with other coding methods,the marker with this method is simple to match and can avoid the shading for the object. Finally, a recognition method of coding maker is proposed, with the use of the distance recognition, it is more efficient. The method present here can be used widely in any measurement from small to huge obiect, such as vehicle, airplane which strengthen its intelligence and efficiency. The results of experiments and theory analzing demonstrate that proposed method could realize the dynamic measurement of handheld laser

  8. Maskless micro-ion-beam reduction lithography system

    DOEpatents

    Leung, Ka-Ngo; Barletta, William A.; Patterson, David O.; Gough, Richard A.

    2005-05-03

    A maskless micro-ion-beam reduction lithography system is a system for projecting patterns onto a resist layer on a wafer with feature size down to below 100 nm. The MMRL system operates without a stencil mask. The patterns are generated by switching beamlets on and off from a two electrode blanking system or pattern generator. The pattern generator controllably extracts the beamlet pattern from an ion source and is followed by a beam reduction and acceleration column.

  9. Design and fabrication of diverse metamaterial structures by holographic lithography.

    PubMed

    Yang, Yi; Li, Qiuze; Wang, Guo Ping

    2008-07-21

    We demonstrate a holographic lithography for the fabrication of diverse metamaterial structures by using an optical prism. Cylindrical nanoshells, U-shaped resonator arrays, and double-split ring arrays are obtained experimentally by real time modulating the phase relation of the interference beams. This easy-to-use method may provide a roadway for the design and fabrication of future metamaterials requiring diverse structures for effectively manipulating electromagnetic properties at optical frequencies.

  10. 3D nanostructures fabricated by advanced stencil lithography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yesilkoy, F.; Flauraud, V.; Rüegg, M.; Kim, B. J.; Brugger, J.

    2016-02-01

    This letter reports on a novel fabrication method for 3D metal nanostructures using high-throughput nanostencil lithography. Aperture clogging, which occurs on the stencil membranes during physical vapor deposition, is leveraged to create complex topographies on the nanoscale. The precision of the 3D nanofabrication method is studied in terms of geometric parameters and material types. The versatility of the technique is demonstrated by various symmetric and chiral patterns made of Al and Au.

  11. 3D nanostructures fabricated by advanced stencil lithography.

    PubMed

    Yesilkoy, F; Flauraud, V; Rüegg, M; Kim, B J; Brugger, J

    2016-03-07

    This letter reports on a novel fabrication method for 3D metal nanostructures using high-throughput nanostencil lithography. Aperture clogging, which occurs on the stencil membranes during physical vapor deposition, is leveraged to create complex topographies on the nanoscale. The precision of the 3D nanofabrication method is studied in terms of geometric parameters and material types. The versatility of the technique is demonstrated by various symmetric and chiral patterns made of Al and Au.

  12. Etched-multilayer phase shifting masks for EUV lithography

    DOEpatents

    Chapman, Henry N.; Taylor, John S.

    2005-04-05

    A method is disclosed for the implementation of phase shifting masks for EUV lithography. The method involves directly etching material away from the multilayer coating of the mask, to cause a refractive phase shift in the mask. By etching into the multilayer (for example, by reactive ion etching), rather than depositing extra material on the top of the multilayer, there will be minimal absorption loss associated with the phase shift.

  13. 450mm wafer patterning with jet and flash imprint lithography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thompson, Ecron; Hellebrekers, Paul; Hofemann, Paul; LaBrake, Dwayne L.; Resnick, Douglas J.; Sreenivasan, S. V.

    2013-09-01

    The next step in the evolution of wafer size is 450mm. Any transition in sizing is an enormous task that must account for fabrication space, environmental health and safety concerns, wafer standards, metrology capability, individual process module development and device integration. For 450mm, an aggressive goal of 2018 has been set, with pilot line operation as early as 2016. To address these goals, consortiums have been formed to establish the infrastructure necessary to the transition, with a focus on the development of both process and metrology tools. Central to any process module development, which includes deposition, etch and chemical mechanical polishing is the lithography tool. In order to address the need for early learning and advance process module development, Molecular Imprints Inc. has provided the industry with the first advanced lithography platform, the Imprio® 450, capable of patterning a full 450mm wafer. The Imprio 450 was accepted by Intel at the end of 2012 and is now being used to support the 450mm wafer process development demands as part of a multi-year wafer services contract to facilitate the semiconductor industry's transition to lower cost 450mm wafer production. The Imprio 450 uses a Jet and Flash Imprint Lithography (J-FILTM) process that employs drop dispensing of UV curable resists to assist high resolution patterning for subsequent dry etch pattern transfer. The technology is actively being used to develop solutions for markets including NAND Flash memory, patterned media for hard disk drives and displays. This paper reviews the recent performance of the J-FIL technology (including overlay, throughput and defectivity), mask development improvements provided by Dai Nippon Printing, and the application of the technology to a 450mm lithography platform.

  14. Preparation of ring resonator based on PDMS using laser lithography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jandura, D.; Pudis, D.; Gaso, P.

    2016-12-01

    In this paper we present preparation process of ring resonator in racetrack configuration based on polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS). 3D laser lithography in combination with imprinting technique was used to pattern photoresist layer as a master for imprinting process. In the next step, PDMS ring resonator was imprinted and filled with core PDMS. Finally, morphological properties of prepared device were investigated by scanning electron microscope (SEM) and confocal microscope and transmission spectrum measurements were performed.

  15. Fabrication of Plasmonic Nanodiscs by Photonic Nanojet Lithography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Jooyoung; Cho, Kyuman; Kim, Inho; Kim, Won Mok; Lee, Taek Sung; Lee, Kyeong-Seok

    2012-02-01

    In this study, we present and demonstrate a new route to the fabrication of plasmonic nanostructures with a controlled size and shape using photonic nanojet lithography. Through the approach of dual-layer lift-off, the achievable size was remarkably reduced to a sub-100 nm scale and the introduction of an engineered diffuser was proved to give a facile and precise way of controlling the anisotropy in shape without a process burden even when the spherical focusing beads are used.

  16. Multiphoton laser lithography for the fabrication of plasmonic components

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Passinger, Sven; Koch, Jürgen; Kiyan, Roman; Reinhardt, Carsten; Chichkov, Boris N.

    2006-08-01

    In this contribution, we demonstrate multi-photon femtosecond laser lithography for the fabrication and rapid prototyping of plasmonic components. Using this technology different dielectric and metallic SPP-structures can be fabricated in a low-cost and time-efficient way. Resolution limits of this technology will be discussed. Investigations of the optical properties of the fabricated SPP-structures by far-field leakage radiation microscopy will be reported.

  17. Large-Area Zone Plate Fabrication with Optical Lithography

    SciTech Connect

    Denbeaux, G.

    2011-09-09

    Zone plates as condenser optics for x-ray microscopes offer simple optical designs for both illumination and spectral resolution when used as a linear monochromator. However, due to the long write times for electron beam lithography, both the availability and the size of zone plates for condensers have been limited. Since the resolution provided by the linear monochromator scales almost linearly with the diameter of the zone plate, the full potential for zone plate monochromators as illumination systems for x-ray microscopes has not been achieved. For example, the 10-mm-diameter zone plate has demonstrated a spectral resolution of E/{Delta}E = 700[1], but with a 26-mm-diameter zone plate, the calculated spectral resolution is higher than E/{Delta}E = 3000. These large-area zone plates are possible to fabricate with the leading edge semiconductor lithography tools such as those available at the College of Nanoscale Science and Engineering at the University at Albany. One of the lithography tools available is the ASML TWINSCAN XT: 1950i with 37-nm resolution [2]. A single 300-mm wafer can contain more than 60 fields, each with a large area condenser, and the throughput of the tool can be more than one wafer every minute.

  18. PSM design for inverse lithography with partially coherent illumination.

    PubMed

    Ma, Xu; Arce, Gonzalo R

    2008-11-24

    Phase-shifting masks (PSM) are resolution enhancement techniques (RET) used extensively in the semiconductor industry to improve the resolution and pattern fidelity of optical lithography. Recently, a set of gradient-based PSM optimization methods have been developed to solve for the inverse lithography problem under coherent illumination. Most practical lithography systems, however, use partially coherent illumination due to non-zero width and off-axis light sources, which introduce partial coherence factors that must be accounted for in the optimization of PSMs. This paper thus focuses on developing a framework for gradient-based PSM optimization methods which account for the inherent nonlinearities of partially coherent illumination. In particular, the singular value decomposition (SVD) is used to expand the partially coherent imaging equation by eigenfunctions into a sum of coherent systems (SOCS). The first order coherent approximation corresponding to the largest eigenvalue is used in the PSM optimization. In order to influence the solution patterns to have more desirable manufacturability properties and higher fidelity, a post-processing of the mask pattern based on the 2D discrete cosine transformation (DCT) is introduced. Furthermore, a photoresist tone reversing technique is exploited in the design of PSMs to project extremely sparse patterns.

  19. Advanced lithography parameters extraction by using scatterometry system: part II

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Wenzhan; Hsieh, Michael; Koh, Huipeng; Zhou, Meisheng

    2008-03-01

    As the advanced IC device process shrinks to below sub-micron dimensions (65nm, 45 nm and beyond), the overall CD error budget becomes more and more challenging. The impact of lithography process parameters other than exposure energy and defocus on final CD results cannot be ignored any more. In this paper we continue the development of the advanced lithography parameters model which we presented last year. This year we achieved to decouple 4 lithography parameters: exposure, focus, PEB temperature and laser bandwidth (or z-blur). To improve the accuracy and precision of the model, new scatterometry marks are designed to reduce the pitch dependent accuracy impact of sidewall angle and photoresist height for scatterometry metrology. The concept of this kind of scatterometry mark design is from T.A. Brunner's paper "Process Monitor Gating" [SPIE Vol. 6518, 2007]. With this concept, new scatterometry marks are designed to increase the accuracy of scatterometry measurement without sacrificing the process sensitivity and thus improve the model prediction accuracy.

  20. Inverse Tomo-Lithography for Making Microscopic 3D Parts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    White, Victor; Wiberg, Dean

    2003-01-01

    According to a proposal, basic x-ray lithography would be extended to incorporate a technique, called inverse tomography, that would enable the fabrication of microscopic three-dimensional (3D) objects. The proposed inverse tomo-lithographic process would make it possible to produce complex shaped, submillimeter-sized parts that would be difficult or impossible to make in any other way. Examples of such shapes or parts include tapered helices, paraboloids with axes of different lengths, and even Archimedean screws that could serve as rotors in microturbines. The proposed inverse tomo-lithographic process would be based partly on a prior microfabrication process known by the German acronym LIGA (lithographie, galvanoformung, abformung, which means lithography, electroforming, molding). In LIGA, one generates a precise, high-aspect ratio pattern by exposing a thick, x-ray-sensitive resist material to an x-ray beam through a mask that contains the pattern. One can electrodeposit metal into the developed resist pattern to form a precise metal part, then dissolve the resist to free the metal. Aspect ratios of 100:1 and patterns into resist thicknesses of several millimeters are possible.

  1. Nanopatterning of ultrananocrystalline diamond thin films via block copolymer lithography.

    SciTech Connect

    Ramanathan, M.; Darling, S. B.; Sumant, A. V.; Auciello, O.

    2010-07-01

    Nanopatterning of diamond surfaces is critical for the development of diamond-based microelectromechanical system/nanoelectromechanical system (MEMS/NEMS), such as resonators or switches. Micro-/nanopatterning of diamond materials is typically done using photolithography or electron beam lithography combined with reactive ion etching (RIE). In this work, we demonstrate a simple process, block copolymer (BCP) lithography, for nanopatterning of ultrananocrystalline diamond (UNCD) films to produce nanostructures suitable for the fabrication of NEMS based on UNCD. In BCP lithography, nanoscale self-assembled polymeric domains serve as an etch mask for pattern transfer. The authors used thin films of a cylinder-forming organic-inorganic BCP, poly(styrene-block-ferrocenyldimethylsilane), PS-b-PFS, as an etch mask on the surface of UNCD films. Orientational control of the etch masking cylindrical PFS blocks is achieved by manipulating the polymer film thickness in concert with the annealing treatment. We have observed that the surface roughness of UNCD layers plays an important role in transferring the pattern. Oxygen RIE was used to etch the exposed areas of the UNCD film underneath the BCP. Arrays of both UNCD posts and wirelike structures have been created using the same starting polymeric materials as the etch mask.

  2. Advantages of Using Soft Materials in Scanning Probe Lithography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brown, Keith A.; Eichelsdoerfer, Daniel J.; Wang, Mary X.; Mirkin, Chad A.

    2014-03-01

    Scanning probes based upon soft materials provide new capabilities and insights into the science of scanning probe lithography. Specifically, we have explored a cantilever-free architecture that consists of an array of sharp probes on an elastomeric film on a glass slide. This architecture allows every probe in an array to be in simultaneous, gentle contact with a surface, allowing one to perform lithography with millions of probes in parallel. Here, we describe three recent developments in cantilever-free scanning probe lithography that were enabled by the elastomeric material. 1) As the mechanical properties of elastomers can be readily tuned, it is possible to tailor the spring constant of the probes.1 2) The high coefficient of thermal expansion of elastomers means that local heating can be used to physically actuate individual probes allowing for arbitrary patterning.2 3) Solvents retained in the elastomer can mediate molecular printing and allow a user to pattern hydrophilic and hydrophobic materials in totally dry environments. 1D. J. Eichelsdoerfer, et al., Nano Lett. 13, 664 (2013). 2K. A. Brown, et al., Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. USA 110, 12921 (2013).

  3. Low Cost Lithography Tool for High Brightness LED Manufacturing

    SciTech Connect

    Andrew Hawryluk; Emily True

    2012-06-30

    The objective of this activity was to address the need for improved manufacturing tools for LEDs. Improvements include lower cost (both capital equipment cost reductions and cost-ofownership reductions), better automation and better yields. To meet the DOE objective of $1- 2/kilolumen, it will be necessary to develop these highly automated manufacturing tools. Lithography is used extensively in the fabrication of high-brightness LEDs, but the tools used to date are not scalable to high-volume manufacturing. This activity addressed the LED lithography process. During R&D and low volume manufacturing, most LED companies use contact-printers. However, several industries have shown that these printers are incompatible with high volume manufacturing and the LED industry needs to evolve to projection steppers. The need for projection lithography tools for LED manufacturing is identified in the Solid State Lighting Manufacturing Roadmap Draft, June 2009. The Roadmap states that Projection tools are needed by 2011. This work will modify a stepper, originally designed for semiconductor manufacturing, for use in LED manufacturing. This work addresses improvements to yield, material handling, automation and throughput for LED manufacturing while reducing the capital equipment cost.

  4. [Testing an ultrasonic scanner for determination of urinary bladder volume].

    PubMed

    Rohde, T; Jensen, K M; Colstrup, H

    1992-11-30

    Bladderscan BVI 2000 is a portable ultrasound scanner, specially constructed for determination of bladder volume. We have tested this scanner for accuracy, systematic errors and the training required to use it. The bladder volumes measured by ultrasound scanning were compared with the true volumes. Fifty-six measurements were made. We found the accuracy of BVI 2000 sufficient to determine bladder volumes as either small or large. We found no systematic errors. No special training is required to use the scanner. The device is thus useful in most clinical situations when greater accuracy than indicated here is not necessary.

  5. Design study for Thermal Infrared Multispectral Scanner (TIMS)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stanich, C. G.; Osterwisch, F. G.; Szeles, D. M.; Houtman, W. H.

    1981-01-01

    The feasibility of dividing the 8-12 micrometer thermal infrared wavelength region into six spectral bands by an airborne line scanner system was investigated. By combining an existing scanner design with a 6 band spectrometer, a system for the remote sensing of Earth resources was developed. The elements in the spectrometer include an off axis reflective collimator, a reflective diffraction grating, a triplet germanium imaging lens, a photoconductive mercury cadmium telluride sensor array, and the mechanical assembly to hold these parts and maintain their optical alignment across a broad temperature range. The existing scanner design was modified to accept the new spectrometer and two field filling thermal reference sources.

  6. A general solution for the registration of optical multispectral scanners

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rader, M. L.

    1974-01-01

    The paper documents a general theory for registration (mapping) of data sets gathered by optical scanners such as the ERTS satellite MSS and the Skylab S-192 MSS. This solution is generally applicable to scanners which have rotating optics. Navigation data and ground control points are used in a statistically weighted adjustment based on a mathematical model of the dynamics of the spacecraft and the scanner system. This adjustment is very similar to the well known photogrammetric adjustments used in aerial mapping. Actual tests have been completed on NASA aircraft 24 channel MSS data, and the results are very encouraging.

  7. [Innovation and Future Technologies for PET Scanners].

    PubMed

    Yamaya, Taiga

    2015-01-01

    Positron emission tomography (PET) plays important roles in cancer diagnosis, neuroimaging and molecular imaging research; but potential points remain for which big improvements could be made, including spatial resolution, sensitivity and manufacturing costs. Higher spatial resolution is essential to enable earlier diagnosis, and improved sensitivity results in reduced radiation exposure and shortened measurement time. Therefore, research on next generation PET technologies remains a hot topic worldwide. In this paper, innovation and future technologies for the next generation PET scanners, such as time-of-flight measurement and simultaneous PET/MRI measurement, are described. Among them, depth-of-interaction (DOI) measurement in the radiation sensor will be a key technology to get any significant improvement in sensitivity while maintaining high spatial resolution. DOI measurement also has a potential to expand PET application fields because it allows for more flexible detector arrangement. As an example, the world's first, open-type PET geometry "OpenPET", which is expected to lead to PET imaging during treatment, is under development. The DOI detector itself continues to evolve with the help of recently developed semiconductor photodetectors, often referred to as silicon photomultipliers.

  8. LANDSAT-4 horizon scanner performance evaluation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bilanow, S.; Chen, L. C.; Davis, W. M.; Stanley, J. P.

    1984-01-01

    Representative data spans covering a little more than a year since the LANDSAT-4 launch were analyzed to evaluate the flight performance of the satellite's horizon scanner. High frequency noise was filtered out by 128-point averaging. The effects of Earth oblateness and spacecraft altitude variations are modeled, and residual systematic errors are analyzed. A model for the predicted radiance effects is compared with the flight data and deficiencies in the radiance effects modeling are noted. Correction coefficients are provided for a finite Fourier series representation of the systematic errors in the data. Analysis of the seasonal dependence of the coefficients indicates the effects of some early mission problems with the reference attitudes which were computed by the onboard computer using star trackers and gyro data. The effects of sun and moon interference, unexplained anomalies in the data, and sensor noise characteristics and their power spectrum are described. The variability of full orbit data averages is shown. Plots of the sensor data for all the available data spans are included.

  9. Focal plane scanner with reciprocating spatial window

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mao, Chengye (Inventor)

    2000-01-01

    A focal plane scanner having a front objective lens, a spatial window for selectively passing a portion of the image therethrough, and a CCD array for receiving the passed portion of the image. All embodiments have a common feature whereby the spatial window and CCD array are mounted for simultaneous relative reciprocating movement with respect to the front objective lens, and the spatial window is mounted within the focal plane of the front objective. In a first embodiment, the spatial window is a slit and the CCD array is one-dimensional, and successive rows of the image in the focal plane of the front objective lens are passed to the CCD array by an image relay lens interposed between the slit and the CCD array. In a second embodiment, the spatial window is a slit, the CCD array is two-dimensional, and a prism-grating-prism optical spectrometer is interposed between the slit and the CCD array so as to cause the scanned row to be split into a plurality of spectral separations onto the CCD array. In a third embodiment, the CCD array is two-dimensional and the spatial window is a rectangular linear variable filter (LVF) window, so as to cause the scanned rows impinging on the LVF to be bandpass filtered into spectral components onto the CCD array through an image relay lens interposed between the LVF and the CCD array.

  10. From Beamline to Scanner with 225Ac

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Robertson, Andrew K. H.; Ramogida, Caterina F.; Kunz, Peter; Rodriguez-Rodriguez, Cristina; Schaffer, Paul; Sossi, Vesna

    2016-09-01

    Due to the high linear energy transfer and short range of alpha-radiation, targeted radiation therapy using alpha-emitting pharmaceuticals that successfully target small disease clusters will kill target cells with limited harm to healthy tissue, potentially treating the most aggressive forms of cancer. As the parent of a decay chain with four alpha- and two beta-decays, 225Ac is a promising candidate for such a treatment. However, this requires retention of the entire decay chain at the target site, preventing the creation of freely circulating alpha-emitters that reduce therapeutic effect and increase toxicity to non-target tissues. Two major challenges to 225Ac pharmaceutical development exist: insufficient global supply, and the difficulty of preventing toxicity by retaining the entire decay chain at the target site. While TRIUMF works towards large-scale (C i amounts) production of 225Ac, we already use our Isotope Separation On-Line facility to provide small (< 1 mCi) quantities for in-house chemistry and imaging research that aims to improve and assess 225Ac radiopharmaceutical targeting. This presentation provides an overview of this research program and the journey of 225Ac from the beamline to the scanner. This research is funded by the Natural Sciences and Engineering Research Council of Canada.

  11. High-power sources for EUV lithography: state of the art

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stamm, Uwe; Kleinschmidt, Juergen; Gaebel, Kai M.; Birner, Henry; Ahmad, Imtiaz; Bolshukhin, Denis; Brudermann, Jesko; Chinh, Tran Duc; Flohrer, Frank; Goetze, Sven; Hergenhan, Guido; Kloepfel, Diethard; Korobochko, Vladimir; Mader, Bjoern; Mueller, Rainer; Ringling, Jens; Schriever, Guido; Ziener, Christian

    2004-09-01

    discharge pre-ionization. Prototype commercial gas discharge sources with an EUV power of 35W in 2π sr were already delivered for integration into EUV microsteppers. These sources are equipped with a debris-filter which results in an optics lifetime exceeding 100 million discharges at 1 kHz repetition frequency. The same lifetime was achieved for the components of the discharge system itself. The progress in the development of high-power discharge sources resulted in an EUV power of 150 W in continuous operation at 4.5 kHz repetition rate by implementation of porous metal cooling technology. The EUV plasma has a FWHM-diameter of 0.5 mm and a FWHM-length of 1.5 mm. The intermediate focus power is calculated to be in the range of 15 W - 20 W, depending somewhat on the transmission of the optical path to the intermediate focus and on the etendue specification. The typical fluctuations of the EUV energy are standard deviation σ<5% without any active stabilization. Discharge sources with Sn as emitter were investigated as more efficient alternative to Xenon. Estimates regarding Sn sources reveal the potential of achieving 65 W intermediate focus power by using developed porous metal cooling technology. Improvement of cooling could open the path to 115 W of power for high volume manufacturing using EUV lithography. However, Sn-sources are technologically risky und much less advanced than Xe sources, since fuel-handling and debris mitigation is much more challenging in comparison to Xe-sources. GDPP and LPP sources still compete for the technology of high volume manufacturing sources for EUV lithography. Optimization potential of the etendue of the optical system of EUV scanners will certainly influence any technology decision for HVM sources.

  12. Determination of noise equivalent reflectance for a multispectral scanner: A scanner sensitivity study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gibbons, D. E.; Richard, R. R.

    1979-01-01

    The methods used to calculate the sensitivity parameter noise equivalent reflectance of a remote-sensing scanner are explored, and the results are compared with values measured over calibrated test sites. Data were acquired on four occasions covering a span of 4 years and providing various atmospheric conditions. One of the calculated values was based on assumed atmospheric conditions, whereas two others were based on atmospheric models. Results indicate that the assumed atmospheric conditions provide useful answers adequate for many purposes. A nomograph was developed to indicate sensitivity variations due to geographic location, time of day, and season.

  13. Design of soft x-ray varied-line-spacing grating based on electron beam lithography-near field lithography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Dakui; Chen, Huoyao; Kroker, Stefanie; Käsebier, Thomas; Liu, Zhengkun; Qiu, Keqiang; Liu, Ying; Kley, Ernst-Bernhard; Xu, Xiangdong; Hong, Yilin; Fu, Shaojun

    2016-10-01

    Soft x-ray varied line spacing grating (VLSG), which is a vital optical element for laser plasma diagnosis and spectrometry analysis, is conventionally fabricated by holographic lithography or mechanical ruling. In order to overcome the issues of the above fabrication methods, a method based on electron beam lithography-near field lithography (EBL-NFH) is proposed to make good use of the flexibility of EBL and the high throughput of NFH. In this paper, we showed a newly designed soft x-ray VLSG with a central groove density of 3600 lines/mm, which is to be realized based on EBL-NFH. First, the optimization of the spatial distribution of line density and groove profile of the VLSG was shown. As an important element in NFH, a fused silica mask plays a key role during NFH in order to obtain a required line density of VLSG. Therefore, second, the transfer relationship of spatial distribution of line densities between fused silica mask and resist grating was investigated in different exposure modes during NFH. We proposed a formulation about the transfer of line density to design of the groove density distribution of a fused silica grating mask. Finally, the spatial distribution of line densities between the fused silica mask, which is to be fabrication by using EBL, was demonstrated.

  14. Lithography alternatives meet design style reality: How do they "line" up?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smayling, Michael C.

    2016-03-01

    Optical lithography resolution scaling has stalled, giving innovative alternatives a window of opportunity. One important factor that impacts these lithographic approaches is the transition in design style from 2D to 1D for advanced CMOS logic. Just as the transition from 3D circuits to 2D fabrication 50 years ago created an opportunity for a new breed of electronics companies, the transition today presents exciting and challenging time for lithographers. Today, we are looking at a range of non-optical lithography processes. Those considered here can be broadly categorized: self-aligned lithography, self-assembled lithography, deposition lithography, nano-imprint lithography, pixelated e-beam lithography, shot-based e-beam lithography .Do any of these alternatives benefit from or take advantage of 1D layout? Yes, for example SAPD + CL (Self Aligned Pitch Division combined with Complementary Lithography). This is a widely adopted process for CMOS nodes at 22nm and below. Can there be additional design / process co-optimization? In spite of the simple-looking nature of 1D layout, the placement of "cut" in the lines and "holes" for interlayer connections can be tuned for a given process capability. Examples of such optimization have been presented at this conference, typically showing a reduction of at least one in the number of cut or hole patterns needed.[1,2] Can any of the alternatives complement each other or optical lithography? Yes.[3] For example, DSA (Directed Self Assembly) combines optical lithography with self-assembly. CEBL (Complementary e-Beam Lithography) combines optical lithography with SAPD for lines with shot-based e-beam lithography for cuts and holes. Does one (shrinking) size fit all? No, that's why we have many alternatives. For example NIL (Nano-imprint Lithography) has been introduced for NAND Flash patterning where the (trending lower) defectivity is acceptable for the product. Deposition lithography has been introduced in 3D NAND Flash to

  15. Accurate lithography hotspot detection based on PCA-SVM classifier with hierarchical data clustering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Jhih-Rong; Yu, Bei; Pan, David Z.

    2014-03-01

    As technology nodes continues shrinking, layout patterns become more sensitive to lithography processes, resulting in lithography hotspots that need to be identified and eliminated during physical verification. In this paper, we propose an accurate hotspot detection approach based on PCA (principle component analysis)-SVM (sup- port vector machine) classifier. Several techniques, including hierarchical data clustering, data balancing, and multi-level training, are provided to enhance performance of the proposed approach. Our approach is accurate and more efficient than conventional time-consuming lithography simulation; in the meanwhile, provides high flexibility to adapt to new lithography processes and rules.

  16. NOAA-9 Earth Radiation Budget Experiment (ERBE) scanner offsets determination

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Avis, Lee M.; Paden, Jack; Lee, Robert B., III; Pandey, Dhirendra K.; Stassi, Joseph C.; Wilson, Robert S.; Tolson, Carol J.; Bolden, William C.

    1994-01-01

    The Earth Radiation Budget Experiment (ERBE) instruments are designed to measure the components of the radiative exchange between the Sun, Earth and space. ERBE is comprised of three spacecraft, each carrying a nearly identical set of radiometers: a three-channel narrow-field-of-view scanner, a two-channel wide-field-of-view (limb-to-limb) non-scanning radiometer, a two-channel medium field-of view (1000 km) non-scanning radiometer, and a solar monitor. Ground testing showed the scanners to be susceptible to self-generated and externally generated electromagnetic noise. This paper describes the pre-launch corrective measures taken and the post-launch corrections to the NOAA-9 scanner data. The NOAA-9 scanner has met the mission objectives in accuracy and precision, in part because of the pre-launch reductions of and post-launch data corrections for the electromagnetic noise.

  17. Agricultural Applications and Requirements for Thermal Infrared Scanners

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wiegand, C. L.

    1971-01-01

    Some of the applications of thermal scanner data in agriculture are presented along with illustrations of some of the factors affecting the temperature of plants, soil, and water. Examples of thermal imagery are included.

  18. Superwide-angle coverage code-multiplexed optical scanner.

    PubMed

    Riza, Nabeel A; Arain, Muzammil A

    2004-05-01

    A superwide-angle coverage code-multiplexed optical scanner is presented that has the potential to provide 4 pi-sr coverage. As a proof-of-concept experiment, an angular scan range of 288 degrees for six randomly distributed beams is demonstrated. The proposed scanner achieves its superwide coverage by exploiting a combination of phase-encoded transmission and reflection holography within an in-line hologram recording-retrieval geometry. The basic scanner unit consists of one phase-only digital mode spatial light modulator for code entry (i.e., beam scan control) and a holographic material from which we obtained what we believe is the first-of-a-kind extremely wide coverage, low component count, high speed (e.g., microsecond domain), and large aperture (e.g., > 1-cm diameter) scanner.

  19. Building a 3D Computed Tomography Scanner From Surplus Parts.

    PubMed

    Haidekker, Mark A

    2014-01-01

    Computed tomography (CT) scanners are expensive imaging devices, often out of reach for small research groups. Designing and building a CT scanner from modular components is possible, and this article demonstrates that realization of a CT scanner from components is surprisingly easy. However, the high costs of a modular X-ray source and detector limit the overall cost savings. In this article, the possibility of building a CT scanner with available surplus X-ray parts is discussed, and a practical device is described that incurred costs of less than $16,000. The image quality of this device is comparable with commercial devices. The disadvantage is that design constraints imposed by the available components lead to slow scan speeds and a resolution of 0.5 mm. Despite these limitations, a device such as this is attractive for imaging studies in the biological and biomedical sciences, as well as for advancing CT technology itself.

  20. Whole-body 3D scanner and scan data report

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Addleman, Stephen R.

    1997-03-01

    With the first whole-body 3D scanner now available the next adventure confronting the user is what to do with all of the data. While the system was built for anthropologists, it has created interest among users from a wide variety of fields. Users with applications in the fields of anthropology, costume design, garment design, entertainment, VR and gaming have a need for the data in formats unique to their fields. Data from the scanner is being converted to solid models for art and design and NURBS for computer graphics applications. Motion capture has made scan data move and dance. The scanner has created a need for advanced application software just as other scanners have in the past.