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Sample records for 193nm scanner lithography

  1. A thick CESL stressed ultra-small (Lg=40-nm) SiGe-channel MOSFET fabricated with 193-nm scanner lithography and TEOS hard mask etching

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liao, Wen-Shiang; Chen, Tung-Hung; Lin, Hsin-Hung; Chang, Wen-Tung; Shih, Tommy; Tsen, Huan-Chiu; Chung, Lee

    2007-03-01

    A 100Å-thick SiGe (22.5%) channel MOSFET with gate length down to 40nm has been successfully integrated with 14Å nitrided gate oxide as well as a 1200Å high-compressive PECVD ILD-SiNx stressing layer as the contact etching stop layer (CESL) that enhances the PMOS electron mobility with +33% current gain. To achieve a poly-Si gate length target of 400Å (40nm), a 193nm scanner lithography and an aggressive oxide hard mask etching techniques were used. First, a 500Å-thick TEOS hard mask layer was deposited upon the 1500Å-thick poly-Si gate electrode. Second, both 1050Å-thick bottom anti-reflective coating (BARC) and 2650Å-thick photoresist (P/R) were coated and a 193nm scanner lithography tool was used for the gate layout patterning with nominal logic 90nm exposure energy. Then, a deep sub-micron plasma etcher was used for an aggressive P/R and BARC trimming down processing and the TEOS hard mask was subsequently plasma etched in another etching chamber without breaking the plasma etcher's vacuum. Continuously, the P/R and BARC were removed with a plasma ashing and RCA cleaning. Moreover, the patterned Si-fin capping oxide can be further trimmed down with a diluted HF (aq) solution (DHF) while rendering the RCA cleaning process and the remained TEOS hard mask is still thick enough for the subsequent poly-Si gate main etching. Finally, an ultra narrow poly-Si gate length of 40nm with promising PMOS drive current enhancement can be formed through a second poly-Si etching, which is above the underneath SiGe (22.5%) conduction channel as well as its upper 14Å-thick nitrided gate oxide.

  2. Carbon dioxide gas purification and analytical measurement for leading edge 193nm lithography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Riddle Vogt, Sarah; Landoni, Cristian; Applegarth, Chuck; Browning, Matt; Succi, Marco; Pirola, Simona; Macchi, Giorgio

    2015-03-01

    The use of purified carbon dioxide (CO2) has become a reality for leading edge 193 nm immersion lithography scanners. Traditionally, both dry and immersion 193 nm lithographic processes have constantly purged the optics stack with ultrahigh purity compressed dry air (UHPCDA). CO2 has been utilized for a similar purpose as UHPCDA. Airborne molecular contamniation (AMC) purification technologies and analytical measurement methods have been extensively developed to support the Lithography Tool Manufacturers purity requirements. This paper covers the analytical tests and characterizations carried out to assess impurity removal from 3.0 N CO2 (beverage grade) for its final utilization in 193 nm and EUV scanners.

  3. Alternatives to chemical amplification for 193nm lithography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baylav, Burak; Zhao, Meng; Yin, Ran; Xie, Peng; Scholz, Chris; Smith, Bruce; Smith, Thomas; Zimmerman, Paul

    2010-04-01

    Research has been conducted to develop alternatives to chemically amplified 193 nm photoresist materials that will be able to achieve the requirements associated with sub-32 nm device technology. New as well as older photoresist design concepts for non-chemically amplified 193 nm photoresists that have the potential to enable improvements in line edge roughness while maintaining adequate sensitivity, base solubility, and dry etch resistance for high volume manufacturing are being explored. The particular platforms that have been explored in this work include dissolution inhibitor photoresist systems, chain scissioning polymers, and photoresist systems based on polymers incorporating formyloxyphenyl functional groups. In studies of two-component acidic polymer/dissolution inhibitor systems, it was found that compositions using ortho-nitrobenzyl cholate (NBC) as the dissolution inhibitor and poly norbornene hexafluoro alcohol (PNBHFA) as the base resin are capable of printing 90 nm dense line/space patterns upon exposure to a 193 nm laser. Studies of chain scission enhancement in methylmethacrylate copolymers showed that incorporating small amounts of absorptive a-cleavage monomers significantly enhanced sensitivity with an acceptable increase in absorbance at 193 nm. Specifically, it was found that adding 3 mol% of α-methyl styrene (α-MS) reduced the dose to clear of PMMA-based resist from 1400 mJ/cm2 to 420 mJ/cm2. Preliminary data are also presented on a direct photoreactive design concept based on the photo-Fries reaction of formyloxyphenyl functional groups in acrylic copolymers.

  4. A Comparison of Photoresist Resolution Metrics using 193 nm and EUV Lithography

    SciTech Connect

    Jones, Juanita; Pathak, Piyush; Wallow, Thomas; LaFontaine, Bruno; Deng, Yunfei; Kim, Ryoung-han; Kye, Jongwook; Levinson, Harry; Naulleau, Patrick; Anderson, Chris

    2007-08-20

    Image blur due to chemical amplification represents a fundamental limit to photoresist performance and manifests itself in many aspects of lithographic performance. Substantial progress has been made in linking image blur with simple resolution metrics using EUV lithography. In this presentation, they examine performance of 193 nm resist and EUV resist systems using modulation transfer function, corner rounding, and other resolution metrics. In particular, they focus on cross-comparisons in which selected EUV and 193 nm resist are evaluated using both EUV and 193 nm lithography. Simulation methods linking 193 nm and EUV performance will be described as well. Results from simulation indicate that image blur in current generation 193 nm photoresists is comparable to that of many EUV resists, but that ultra-low diffusion materials designs used in very high resolution EUV resists can result in substantially lower blur. In addition to detailing correlations between EUV and 193 nm experimental methods, they discuss their utility in assessing performance needs of future generation photoresists.

  5. Study of barrier coats for application in immersion 193-nm lithography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Houlihan, Francis; Kim, Wookyu; Sakamuri, Raj; Hamilton, Keino; Dimerli, Alla; Abdallah, David; Romano, Andrew; Dammel, Ralph R.; Pawlowski, Georg; Raub, Alex; Brueck, Steve

    2005-05-01

    We will describe our barrier coat approach for use in immersion 193 nm lithography. These barrier coats may act as either simple barriers providing protection against loss of resist components into water or in the case of one type of these formulations which have a refractive index at 193 nm which is the geometric mean between that of the resist and water provide, also top antireflective properties. Either type of barrier coat can be applied with a simple spinning process compatible with PGMEA based resin employing standard solvents such as alcohols and be removed during the usual resist development process with aqueous 0.26 N TMAH. We will discuss both imaging results with these materials on acrylate type 193 nm resists and also show some fundamental studies we have done to understand the function of the barrier coat and the role of differing spinning solvents and resins. We will show LS (55 nm) and Contact Hole (80 nm) resolved with a 193 nm resist exposed with the interferometric tool at the University of New Mexico (213 nm) with and without the use of a barrier coat.

  6. Chemical trimming overcoat: an enhancing composition and process for 193nm lithography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Cong; Rowell, Kevin; Joesten, Lori; Baranowski, Paul; Kaur, Irvinder; Huang, Wanyi; Leonard, JoAnne; Jeong, Hae-Mi; Im, Kwang-Hwyi; Estelle, Tom; Cutler, Charlotte; Pohlers, Gerd; Yin, Wenyan; Fallon, Patricia; Li, Mingqi; Jeon, Hyun; Xu, Cheng Bai; Trefonas, Pete

    2016-03-01

    As the critical dimension of devices is approaching the resolution limit of 193nm photo lithography, multiple patterning processes have been developed to print smaller CD and pitch. Multiple patterning and other advanced lithographic processes often require the formation of isolated features such as lines or posts by direct lithographic printing. The formation of isolated features with an acceptable process window, however, can pose a challenge as a result of poor aerial image contrast at defocus. Herein we report a novel Chemical Trimming Overcoat (CTO) as an extra step after lithography that allows us to achieve smaller feature size and better process window.

  7. Front-end-of-line process development using 193-nm lithography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pollentier, Ivan K.; Ercken, Monique; Eliat, Astrid; Delvaux, Christie; Jaenen, Patrick; Ronse, Kurt G.

    2001-04-01

    It is expected that 193nm lithography will be introduced in front-end-of-line processing for all critical layers at the 100nm node, and possibly also for some layers at the 130nm node, where critical layers are required to have the lowest mask cost. These processes are currently being investigated at IMEC for CMOS logic applications. While the lithographic performance of 193 nm resists has improved significantly in the last year, most materials still have important processing issues that need further improvement. On one hand, the resists material itself suffers from for example poor dry etch resistance and SEM CD shrinkage. On the other hand, interaction with other materials such as SiON inorganic ARCs becomes more challenging in terms of footing behavior, adhesion, and line edge roughness. In this paper, the 193nm processing experience gained at IMEC will be outlined, as well as solutions for manufacturability. Front- end-of-line integration results will also be shown, mainly for gate applications. It will be demonstrated that currently several commercial resist are capable of printing 130nm gates within the +/- 10 percent CD tolerance, even after gate etch. The impact of line edge roughness will also be discussed. Finally, the feasibility of printing 100nm logic patterns using only binary masks has been demonstrated, including gate etch.

  8. Inspection of advanced computational lithography logic reticles using a 193-nm inspection system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Ching-Fang; Lin, Mei-Chun; Lai, Mei-Tsu; Hsu, Luke T. H.; Chin, Angus; Lee, S. C.; Yen, Anthony; Wang, Jim; Chen, Ellison; Wu, David; Broadbent, William H.; Huang, William; Zhu, Zinggang

    2010-09-01

    We report inspection results of early 22-nm logic reticles designed with both conventional and computational lithography methods. Inspection is performed using a state-of-the-art 193-nm reticle inspection system in the reticleplane inspection mode (RPI) where both rule-based sensitivity control (RSC) and a newer modelbased sensitivity control (MSC) method are tested. The evaluation includes defect detection performance using several special test reticles designed with both conventional and computational lithography methods; the reticles contain a variety of programmed critical defects which are measured based on wafer print impact. Also included are inspection results from several full-field product reticles designed with both conventional and computational lithography methods to determine if low nuisance-defect counts can be achieved. These early reticles are largely single-die and all inspections are performed in the die-to-database inspection mode only.

  9. 193nm immersion lithography for high-performance silicon photonic circuits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Selvaraja, Shankar K.; Winroth, Gustaf; Locorotondo, Sabrina; Murdoch, Gayle; Milenin, Alexey; Delvaux, Christie; Ong, Patrick; Pathak, Shibnath; Xie, Weiqiang; Sterckx, Gunther; Lepage, Guy; Van Thourhout, Dries; Bogaerts, Wim; Van Campenhout, Joris; Absil, Philippe

    2014-04-01

    Large-scale photonics integration has been proposed for many years to support the ever increasing requirements for long and short distance communications as well as package-to-package interconnects. Amongst the various technology options, silicon photonics has imposed itself as a promising candidate, relying on CMOS fabrication processes. While silicon photonics can share the technology platform developed for advanced CMOS devices it has specific dimension control requirements. Though the device dimensions are in the order of the wavelength of light used, the tolerance allowed can be less than 1% for certain devices. Achieving this is a challenging task which requires advanced patterning techniques along with process control. Another challenge is identifying an overlapping process window for diverse pattern densities and orientations on a single layer. In this paper, we present key technology challenges faced when using optical lithography for silicon photonics and advantages of using the 193nm immersion lithography system. We report successful demonstration of a modified 28nm- STI-like patterning platform for silicon photonics in 300mm Silicon-On-Insulator wafer technology. By careful process design, within-wafer CD variation (1sigma) of <1% is achieved for both isolated (waveguides) and dense (grating) patterns in silicon. In addition to dimensional control, low sidewall roughness is a crucial to achieve low scattering loss in the waveguides. With this platform, optical propagation loss as low as ~0.7 dB/cm is achieved for high-confinement single mode waveguides (450x220nm). This is an improvement of >20 % from the best propagation loss reported for this cross-section fabricated using e-beam lithography. By using a single-mode low-confinement waveguide geometry the loss is further reduced to ~0.12 dB/cm. Secondly, we present improvement in within-device phase error in wavelength selective devices, a critical parameter which is a direct measure of line

  10. Extending photo-patternable low-κ concept to 193nm lithography and e-beam lithography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Qinghuang; Nelson, A.; Bozano, L.; Brock, P.; Cohen, S.; Davis, B.; Kwong, R.; Liniger, E.; Neumayer, D.; Rathore, J. S.; Shobha, H.; Sooriyakumaran, R.; Purushothaman, S.; Miller, R.; Allen, R.; Spooner, T.; Wisnieff, R.

    2011-04-01

    Increasing complexity and manufacturing costs, along with the fundamental limits of planar CMOS devices, threaten to slow down the historical pace of progress in the semiconductor industry. We have proposed and demonstrated proof-of-concept of a simple and low-cost way to fabricate dual-damascene copper (Cu) on-chip interconnect or Back-End-Of-the- Line (BEOL) structures using a novel multifunctional on-chip electrical insulator called a photo-patternable low dielectric constant (low-κ) dielectric (PPLK) material [Q. Lin, et al, Proc. SPIE, 2010]. This demonstration was accomplished with a silsesquioxane-based (SiCOH), κ=2.7 material which is compatible with 248 nm optical lithography. In this paper, we report on the extension of the photo-patternable low-κ concept to the ultra-low-κ (κ<2.5) regime and resolution down well below 100 nm with 193 nm lithography as well as e-beam lithography. We have accomplished this demonstration using the same silsesquioxane-based (SiCOH) material platform as that of the 248 nm photo-patternable low-κ materials. The 193 nm photo-patternable low-κ materials possess dielectric constants below 2.5 and are able to resolve 100 nm half-pith line/space features with dry 193 nm single exposure lithography. The resolution of photopatternable low-κ materials can be pushed down to 40 nm half-pith line and space features with a line-edge-roughness less than 3.0 nm with e-beam lithography.

  11. Next-generation 193-nm laser for sub-100-nm lithography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duffey, Thomas P.; Blumenstock, Gerry M.; Fleurov, Vladimir B.; Pan, Xiaojiang; Newman, Peter C.; Glatzel, Holger; Watson, Tom A.; Erxmeyer, J.; Kuschnereit, Ralf; Weigl, Bernhard

    2001-09-01

    The next generation 193 nm (ArF) laser has been designed and developed for high-volume production lithography. The NanoLithTM 7000, offering 20 Watts average output power at 4 kHz repetition rates is designed to support the highest exposure tool scan speeds for maximum productivity and wafer throughput. Fundamental design changes made to the laser core technologies are described. These advancements in core technology support the delivery of highly line-narrowed light with lithography, meeting specifications for bandwidth, dose stability (+/- 0.3% in 20 ms window) and wavelength stability (+/- 0.05 pm average line center error in 20 ms window) across 2 - 4 kHz repetition rates. Improvements in optical materials and coatings have led to increased lifetime of optics modules. Optimization of the discharge electrode design has increased chamber lifetime. Early life-testing indicates that the NanoLithTM core technologies have the potential for 400% reduction of cost of consumables as compared to its predecessor, the ELX-5000A and has been discussed elsewhere.

  12. Extremely long life and low-cost 193nm excimer laser chamber technology for 450mm wafer multipatterning lithography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsushima, Hiroaki; Katsuumi, Hisakazu; Ikeda, Hiroyuki; Asayama, Takeshi; Kumazaki, Takahito; Kurosu, Akihiko; Ohta, Takeshi; Kakizaki, Kouji; Matsunaga, Takashi; Mizoguchi, Hakaru

    2014-04-01

    193nm ArF excimer lasers are widely used as light sources for the lithography process of semiconductor production. 193nm ArF exicmer lasers are expected to continue to be the main solution in photolithography, since advanced lithography technologies such as multiple patterning and Self-Aligned Double Patterning (SADP) are being developed. In order to apply these technologies to high-volume semiconductor manufacturing, the key is to reduce the total operating cost. To reduce the total operating cost, life extension of consumable part and reduction of power consumption are an important factor. The chamber life time and power consumption are a main factor to decide the total operating cost. Therefore, we have developed the new technology for extension of the chamber life time and low electricity consumption. In this paper, we will report the new technology to extend the life time of the laser chamber and to reduce the electricity consumption.

  13. Extension of 193 nm dry lithography to 45-nm half-pitch node: double exposure and double processing technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Biswas, Abani M.; Li, Jianliang; Hiserote, Jay A.; Melvin, Lawrence S., III

    2006-10-01

    Immersion lithography and multiple exposure techniques are the most promising methods to extend lithography manufacturing to the 45nm node. Although immersion lithography has attracted much attention recently as a promising optical lithography extension, it will not solve all the problems at the 45-nm node. The 'dry' option, (i.e. double exposure/etch) which can be realized with standard processing practice, will extend 193-nm lithography to the end of the current industry roadmap. Double exposure/etch lithography is expensive in terms of cost, throughput time, and overlay registration accuracy. However, it is less challenging compared to other possible alternatives and has the ability to break through the κ I barrier (0.25). This process, in combination with attenuated PSM (att-PSM) mask, is a good imaging solution that can reach, and most likely go beyond, the 45-nm node. Mask making requirements in a double exposure scheme will be reduced significantly. This can be appreciated by the fact that the separation of tightly-pitched mask into two less demanding pitch patterns will reduce the stringent specifications for each mask. In this study, modeling of double exposure lithography (DEL) with att-PSM masks to target 45-nm node is described. In addition, mask separation and implementation issues of optical proximity corrections (OPC) to improve process window are studied. To understand the impact of OPC on the process window, Fourier analysis of the masks has been carried out as well.

  14. Top surface imaging process and materials development for 193 nm and extreme ultraviolet lithography

    SciTech Connect

    Rao, V.; Hutchinson, J.; Holl, S.; Langston, J.; Henderson, C.; Wheeler, D.R.; Cardinale, G.; OConnell, D.; Goldsmith, J.; Bohland, J.; Taylor, G.; Sinta, R.

    1998-11-01

    The maturity and acceptance of top surface imaging (TSI) technology have been hampered by several factors including inadequate resist sensitivity and line edge roughness. We have found that the use of a chemically amplified resist can improve the sensitivity in these systems by 1.5{endash} 2{times} without compromising the line edge roughness. In addition, we have shown improved line edge roughness by increasing the molecular weight of the polymeric resin in the resist. Using these materials approaches, we have been able to show excellent resolution images with the TSI process for both 193 nm and extreme ultraviolet (13.4 nm) patterning. {copyright} {ital 1998 American Vacuum Society.}

  15. Double-exposure materials for pitch division with 193nm lithography: requirements, results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bristol, Robert; Shykind, David; Kim, Sungwon; Borodovsky, Yan; Schwartz, Evan; Turner, Courtney; Masson, Georgeta; Min, Ke; Esswein, Katherine; Blackwell, James M.; Suetin, Nikolay

    2009-03-01

    We present the results of both theoretical and experimental investigations of materials for application either as a reversible Contrast Enhancement Layer (rCEL) or a Two-Stage PAG. The purpose of these materials is to enable Litho- Litho-Etch (LLE) patterning for Pitch Division (PD) at the 16nm logic node (2013 Manufacturing). For the rCEL, we find from modeling using an E-M solver that such a material must posses a bleaching capability equivalent to a Dill A parameter of greater than 100. This is at least a factor of ten greater than that achieved so far at 193nm by any usable organic material we have tested. In the case of the Two-Stage PAG, analytical and lithographic modeling yields a usable material process window, in terms of reversibility and two-photon vs. one-photon acid production rates (branching ratio). One class of materials, based on the cycloadduct of a tethered pair of anthracenes, has shown promise under testing at 193nm in acetonitrile. Sufficient reversibility without acid production, enabled by near-UV exposure, has been achieved. Acid production as a function of dose shows a clear quadratic component, consistent with a branching ratio greater than 1. The experimental data also supports a acid contrast value of approximately 0.05 that could in principle be obtained with this molecule under a pitch division double-exposure scenario.

  16. Low leaching and low LWR photoresist development for 193 nm immersion lithography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ando, Nobuo; Lee, Youngjoon; Miyagawa, Takayuki; Edamatsu, Kunishige; Takemoto, Ichiki; Yamamoto, Satoshi; Tsuchida, Yoshinobu; Yamamoto, Keiko; Konishi, Shinji; Nakano, Katsushi; Tomoharu, Fujiwara

    2006-03-01

    receding contact angle become very important issue for not only defectivity but also scanner throughput. Some of our experimental results along this line of study are also included in the report. The last topic covered is LWR (Line Width Roughness) as an essential leverage for performance improvement, especially for the smaller CD that immersion lithography is aiming to define. Our recent effort to find effect and working concept to reduce LWR with low leaching materials is also described.

  17. Minimizing wafer defectivity during high-temperature baking of organic films in 193nm lithography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Randall, Mai; Longstaff, Christopher; Ueda, Kenichi; Nicholson, Jim; Winter, Thomas

    2006-03-01

    Demands for continued defect reduction in 300mm IC manufacturing is driving process engineers to examine all aspects of the apply process for improvement. Process engineers, and their respective tool sets, are required to process films at temperatures above the boiling point of the casting solvents. This can potentially lead to the sublimation of the film chemical components. The current methods used to minimize wafer defectivity due to bake residues include frequent cleaning of bake plate modules and surrounding equipment, process optimization, and hardware improvements until more robust chemistries are available. IBM has evaluated the Tokyo Electron CLEAN TRACK TM ACT TM 12 high exhaust high temperature hotplate (HHP) lid to minimize wafer level contamination due to the outgasing of a bottom anti-reflective coating (BARC) films during the high temperature bake process. Goal was to minimize airborne contamination (particles in free space), reduce hotplate contamination build up, and ultimately reduce defects on the wafer. This evaluation was performed on a 193nm BARC material. Evaluation data included visual hardware inspections, airborne particle counting, relative thickness build up measurements on hotplate lids, wafer level defect measurements, and electrical open fail rate. Film coat thickness mean and uniformity were also checked to compare the high exhaust HHP with the standard HHP lid. Chemical analysis of the HHP module residue was performed to identify the source material. The work will quantify potential cost savings achieved by reducing added wafer defects during processing and extending PM frequency for equipment cleaning.

  18. AltPSM contact hole application at DRAM 4xnm nodes with dry 193nm lithography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Noelscher, Christoph; Henkel, Thomas; Jauzion-Graverolle, Franck; Hennig, Mario; Morgana, Nicolo; Schlief, Ralph; Moukara, Molela; Koehle, Roderick; Neubauer, Ralf

    2008-03-01

    To avoid expensive immersion lithography and to further use existing dry tools for critical contact layer lithography at 4Xnm DRAM nodes the application of altPSM is investigated and compared to attPSM. Simulations and experiments with several test masks showed that by use of altPSM with suitable 0°/180° coloring and assist placement 30nm smaller contacts can be resolved through pitch with sufficient process windows (PW). This holds for arrays of contacts with variable lengths through short and long side pitches. A further benefit is the lower mask error enhancement factor (MEEF). Nevertheless 3D mask errors (ME) consume benefits in the PW and the assist placement and coloring of the main features (MF) put some constraints on the chip design. An altPSM compatible 4Xnm full-chip layout was realized without loss of chip area. Mask making showed very convincing results with respect to CDU, etch depth uniformity and defectiveness. The printed intra-field CD uniformity was comparable to attPSM despite the smaller target CDs. Room for improvement is identified in OPC accuracy and in automatic assist placement and sizing.

  19. A comparative study for mask defect tolerance on phase and transmission for dry and immersion 193-nm lithography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ling, Moh Lung; Chua, Gek Soon; Tay, Cho Jui; Quan, Chenggen; Lin, Qunying

    2007-03-01

    193nm immersion lithography has successfully enabled numerical aperture (NA) greater than 1.0 which allows rooms for improvement in resolution as well as depth of focus. In this study, critical dimension (CD) and depth of focus (DOF) performance for the 45nm technology node for dry and immersion lithography is compared using commercial available simulation tool. The study is based on one dimensional line and space pattern with pitch vary from 150 to 500nm. The effects of mask transmission and phase angle change on CD through pitch performance and DOF are also presented in this paper. Increase in mask transmission will result in increase of CD through pitch and reduction of DOF. When phase angle for the phase shift mask is less than 180 degree, CD through pitch and DOF drop. Finally, mask defects caused by haze on several locations which include MoSi lines, line edges, and space between line ends are simulated. The influence of these defects on CD and the potential line end bridging problem is presented.

  20. Development of high-performance negative-tone resists for 193-nm lithography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hattori, Takashi; Yokoyama, Yoshiyuki; Kimura, Kaori; Yamanaka, Ryoko; Tanaka, Toshihiko; Fukuda, Hiroshi

    2003-06-01

    We have been developing negative-tone resist systems utilizing an acid-catalyzed intramolecular esterification of γ- and δ-hydroxy acid for ArF phase-shifting lithography. In this paper, α-acryloyloxy-β, β-dimethyl-γ-butyrolactone (DBLA), adamantane lactone acrylate (AdLA), and norbornene lactone acrylate (NLA) were examined as a precursor of hydroxy acid. It was found that AdLA and NLA are not hydrolyzed intro hydroxy acid under an alkali hydrolysis condition. DBLA was found to produce γ-hydroxy acid, which is stable in the resist solution. The γ-hydroxy acid derived from DBLA becomes γ-lactone relatively easily by an acid-catalyzed reaction and can be used to make resists insoluble. Since the variation and the flexibility of the copolymer composition of the base polymer can be increased, the resist properties are controllable and the pattern quality can be improved by utilizing γ-hydroxy acid derived from DBLA.

  1. Determination of complex index of immersion liquids at 193 nm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stehle, Jean-Louis; Piel, Jean-Philippe; Campillo-Carreto, Jose

    2006-03-01

    The next nodes in immersion lithography will require the scanners to use the 193 nm ArF* laser line with a very large numerical aperture and a liquid between the optics and the resist. (1) Immersion lithography at 193 nm requests very specific parameters for the fluid. The first generation is using the deionized Water (DIW) very pure and not recycled, but when a new optical material for the last lens will be available with a refractive index (RI) larger than 1.85, a higher refractive index fluid could be used, enabling second and maybe third generation of immersion lithography at 193 nm. So the 45 and maybe the 32 nm nodes could be covered with this high Index fluids (HIF).

  2. Challenges of 29nm half-pitch NAND Flash STI patterning with 193nm dry lithography and self-aligned double patterning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chiu, M. C.; Lin, Benjamin Szu-Min; Tsai, M. F.; Chang, Y. S.; Yeh, M. H.; Ying, T. H.; Ngai, Chris; Jin, Jaklyn; Yuen, Stephen; Huang, Sem; Chen, Yongmei; Miao, Liyan; Tai, Kevin; Conley, Amiad; Liu, Ian

    2008-11-01

    High NA (1.35) Immersion litho runs into the fundamental limit of printing at 40-45nm half pitch (HP). The next generation EUVL tool is known to be ready not until year 2012. Double patterning (DP) technology has been identified as the extension of optical photolithography technologies to 3xnm and 2xnm half-pitch for the low k1 regime to fill in the gap between Immersion lithography and EUVL. Self Aligned Double Patterning (SADP) Technology utilized mature process technology to reduce risk and faster time to market to support the continuation of Moore's Law of Scaling to reduce the cost/function. SADP uses spacer to do the pitch splitting bypass the conventional double patterning (e.g. Litho-Freeze-Litho-Etch (LFLE), or Litho-Etch-Litho-Etch (LELE)) overlay problem. Having a tight overlay performance is extremely critical for NAND Flash manufacturers to achieve a fast yield ramp in production. This paper describes the challenges and accomplishment of a Line-By-Spacer (LBS) SADP scheme to pattern the 29nm half-pitch NAND Flash STI application. A 193nm Dry lithography was chosen to pattern on top of the amorphous carbon (a-C) film stack. The resist pattern will be transferred on the top a-C core layer follow by spacer deposition and etch to achieve the pitch splitting. Then the spacer will be used to transfer to the bottom a-C universal hardmask. This high selectivity a-C hardmask will be used to transfer the 29nm half-pitch pattern to the STI. Good within wafer CD uniformity (CDU) <2nm and line width roughness (LWR) <2nm for the 29nm half-pitch NAND FLASH STI were demonstrated as the benefits using double amorphous carbon hardmask layers. The relationships among the photoresist CDs, CD trimming , as-deposited spacer film thickness, spacer width and the final STI line/core space/gap space CDs will also be discussed in this paper since patterning is combining both lithography performance with CVD and Etch process performance. Film selection for amorphous carbon and

  3. Novel spin-coating technology for 248-nm/193-nm DUV lithography and low-k spin on dielectrics of 200-mm/300-mm wafers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gurer, Emir; Zhong, Tom X.; Lewellen, John W.; Lee, Ed C.

    2000-06-01

    An alternative coating technology was developed for 248 nm/193 nm DUV lithography and low-k spin on dielectric (SOD) materials used in the interconnect area. This is a 300 mm enabling technology which overcomes turbulent flow limitations above 2000 rpm and it prevents 40 - 60% reduction on the process latitudes of evaporation-related variables, common to 300 mm conventional coaters. Our new coating technology is fully enclosed and it is capable of controlling the solvent concentration above the resist film dynamically in the gas phase. This feature allows a direct control of the evaporation mass transfer which determines the quality of the final resist profiles. Following process advantages are reported in this paper: (1) Demonstrated that final resist film thickness can be routinely varied by 4000 angstrom at a fixed drying spin speed, thus minimizing the impact of turbulence wall for 300 mm wafers. (2) Evaporation control allows wider range of useful thickness from a fixed viscosity material. (3) Latitudes of evaporation-related process variables is about 40% larger than that of a conventional coater. (4) Highly uniform films of 0.05% were obtained for 8800 angstrom target thickness with tighter wafer-wafer profile control because of the enclosed nature of the technology. (5) Dynamic evaporation control facilitates resist consumption minimization. Preliminary results indicate feasibility of a 0.4 cc process of record (POR) for a 200 mm substrate. (6) Lower COO due to demonstrated relative insensitivity to environmental variables, robust resist consumption minimization and superior process capabilities. (7) Improved planarization and gap fill properties for the new generation photoresist/low-k SOD materials deposited using this enclosed coating technology.

  4. Negative-tone 193-nm resists

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cho, Sungseo; Vander Heyden, Anthony; Byers, Jeff D.; Willson, C. Grant

    2000-06-01

    A great deal of progress has been made in the design of single layer positive tone resists for 193 nm lithography. Commercial samples of such materials are now available from many vendors. The patterning of certain levels of devices profits from the use of negative tone resists. There have been several reports of work directed toward the design of negative tones resists for 193 nm exposure but, none have performed as well as the positive tone systems. Polymers with alicyclic structures in the backbone have emerged as excellent platforms from which to design positive tone resists for 193 nm exposure. We now report the adaptation of this class of polymers to the design of high performance negative tone 193 nm resists. New systems have been prepared that are based on a polarity switch mechanism for modulation of the dissolution rate. The systems are based on a polar, alicyclic polymer backbone that includes a monomer bearing a glycol pendant group that undergoes the acid catalyzed pinacol rearrangement upon exposure and bake to produce the corresponding less polar ketone. This monomer was copolymerized with maleic anhydride and a norbornene bearing a bis-trifluoromethylcarbinol. The rearrangement of the copolymer was monitored by FT-IR as a function of temperature. The synthesis of the norbornene monomers will be presented together with characterization of copolymers of these monomers with maleic anhydride. The lithographic performance of the new resist system will also be presented.

  5. Inline detection of Chrome degradation on binary 193nm photomasks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dufaye, Félix; Sippel, Astrid; Wylie, Mark; García-Berríos, Edgardo; Crawford, Charles; Hess, Carl; Sartelli, Luca; Pogliani, Carlo; Miyashita, Hiroyuki; Gough, Stuart; Sundermann, Frank; Brochard, Christophe

    2013-09-01

    193nm binary photomasks are still used in the semiconductor industry for the lithography of some critical layers for the nodes 90nm and 65nm, with high volumes and over long periods. However, these 193nm binary photomasks can be impacted by a phenomenon of chrome oxidation leading to critical dimensions uniformity (CDU) degradation with a pronounced radial signature. If not detected early enough, this CDU degradation may cause defectivity issues and lower yield on wafers. Fortunately, a standard cleaning and repellicle service at the mask shop has been demonstrated as efficient to remove the grown materials and get the photomask CD back on target.Some detection methods have been already described in literature, such as wafer CD intrafield monitoring (ACLV), giving reliable results but also consuming additional SEM time with less precision than direct photomask measurement. In this paper, we propose another approach, by monitoring the CDU directly on the photomask, concurrently with defect inspection for regular requalification to production for wafer fabs. For this study, we focused on a Metal layer in a 90nm technology node. Wafers have been exposed with production conditions and then measured by SEM-CD. Afterwards, this photomask has been measured with a SEM-CD in mask shop and also inspected on a KLA-Tencor X5.2 inspection system, with pixels 125 and 90nm, to evaluate the Intensity based Critical Dimension Uniformity (iCDU) option. iCDU was firstly developed to provide feed-forward CDU maps for scanner intrafield corrections, from arrayed dense structures on memory photomasks. Due to layout complexity and differing feature types, CDU monitoring on logic photomasks used to pose unique challenges.The selection of suitable feature types for CDU monitoring on logic photomasks is no longer an issue, since the transmitted intensity map gives all the needed information, as shown in this paper. In this study, the photomask was heavily degraded after more than 18,000 300

  6. Advances in hardware, software, and automation for 193nm aerial image measurement systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zibold, Axel M.; Schmid, R.; Seyfarth, A.; Waechter, M.; Harnisch, W.; Doornmalen, H. v.

    2005-05-01

    A new, second generation AIMS fab 193 system has been developed which is capable of emulating lithographic imaging of any type of reticles such as binary and phase shift masks (PSM) including resolution enhancement technologies (RET) such as optical proximity correction (OPC) or scatter bars. The system emulates the imaging process by adjustment of the lithography equivalent illumination and imaging conditions of 193nm wafer steppers including circular, annular, dipole and quadrupole type illumination modes. The AIMS fab 193 allows a rapid prediction of wafer printability of critical mask features, including dense patterns and contacts, defects or repairs by acquiring through-focus image stacks by means of a CCD camera followed by quantitative image analysis. Moreover the technology can be readily applied to directly determine the process window of a given mask under stepper imaging conditions. Since data acquisition is performed electronically, AIMS in many applications replaces the need for costly and time consuming wafer prints using a wafer stepper/ scanner followed by CD SEM resist or wafer analysis. The AIMS fab 193 second generation system is designed for 193nm lithography mask printing predictability down to the 65nm node. In addition to hardware improvements a new modular AIMS software is introduced allowing for a fully automated operation mode. Multiple pre-defined points can be visited and through-focus AIMS measurements can be executed automatically in a recipe based mode. To increase the effectiveness of the automated operation mode, the throughput of the system to locate the area of interest, and to acquire the through-focus images is increased by almost a factor of two in comparison with the first generation AIMS systems. In addition a new software plug-in concept is realised for the tools. One new feature has been successfully introduced as "Global CD Map", enabling automated investigation of global mask quality based on the local determination of

  7. Photodissociation of Methyl Iodide at 193 NM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Hong; Pratt, Stephen

    2014-05-01

    A new measurement of the photodissociation of CH3I at 193 nm is reported in which we use a combination of vacuum ultraviolet photoionization and velocity map ion imaging. The iodine photofragments are probed by single-photon ionization at photon energies above and below the photoionization threshold of I(2P3/2) . The relative I(2P3/2) and I*(2P1/2) photoionization cross sections are determined at these wavelengths by using the known branching fractions for the photodissociation at 266 nm. Velocity map ion images indicate that the branching fraction for I(2P3/2) atoms is non-zero, and yield a value of 0.07 +/- 0.01. Interestingly, the translational energy distribution extracted from the image shows that the translational energy of the I(2P3/2) fragments is significantly smaller than that of the I*(2P1/2) atoms. This observation indicates the internal rotational/vibrational energy of the CH3 co-fragment is very high in the I(2P3/2) channel. The results can be interpreted in a manner consistent with the previous measurements, and provide a more complete picture of the dissociation dynamics of this prototypical molecule. This work was supported by the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Science, Office of Basic Energy Sciences, Division of Chemical Sciences, Geosciences, and Biosciences under contract No. DE-AC02-06CH11357.

  8. EUV reticle inspection with a 193nm reticle inspector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Broadbent, William; Inderhees, Gregg; Yamamoto, Tetsuya; Lee, Isaac; Lim, Phillip

    2013-06-01

    The prevailing industry opinion is that EUV Lithography (EUVL) will enter High Volume Manufacturing (HVM) in the 2015 - 2017 timeframe at the 16nm HP node. Every year the industry assesses the key risk factors for introducing EUVL into HVM - blank and reticle defects are among the top items. To reduce EUV blank and reticle defect levels, high sensitivity inspection is needed. To address this EUV inspection need, KLA-Tencor first developed EUV blank inspection and EUV reticle inspection capability for their 193nm wavelength reticle inspection system - the Teron 610 Series (2010). This system has become the industry standard for 22nm / 3xhp optical reticle HVM along with 14nm / 2xhp optical pilot production; it is further widely used for EUV blank and reticle inspection in R and D. To prepare for the upcoming 10nm / 1xhp generation, KLA-Tencor has developed the Teron 630 Series reticle inspection system which includes many technical advances; these advances can be applied to both EUV and optical reticles. The advanced capabilities are described in this paper with application to EUV die-to-database and die-to-die inspection for currently available 14nm / 2xhp generation EUV reticles. As 10nm / 1xhp generation optical and EUV reticles become available later in 2013, the system will be tested to identify areas for further improvement with the goal to be ready for pilot lines in early 2015.

  9. 193-nm photoresist development at Union Chemical Labs., ITRI

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fang, Mao-Ching; Chang, Jui-Fa; Tai, Ming-Chia; Lin, Tzu-Yu; Liu, Ting-Chung; Liu, Chien-Hung

    2000-06-01

    Union Chemical Laboratories has designed and synthesized novel copolymers of norbornene-alt-derivatives, maleic anhydride and alicyclic acrylate for ArF excimer laser lithography. These polymers are prepared using a free-radical copolymerization process. Applying the resin for 193-nm single layer chemically amplified photoresist composed of cholate derivative with a PAG leads to a good resolution below 0.13 micrometer line/space patterns using an ArF stepper and 2.38 wt% tetramethylammonium hydroxide aqueous solution as a developer. Furthermore, alternating phase shift mask was used in combination with a feature size as small as 0.1 micrometer. To overcome post exposure delay (PED) effect caused by airborne contamination, three new base additives were used in the resist formulation. The etching-resist ability of resists by reaction ion etching (RIE) was showed better than conventional g-line and KrF excimer laser resists. Experimental results of CHF3/CF4 as etch gas, indicate that the etching rate selectivity with respect to SiO2 is about 0.5. The UCL photoresists also showed good shelf life stability.

  10. Refractive index change during exposure for 193-nm chemically amplified resists

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oh, Hye-Keun; Sohn, Young-Soo; Sung, Moon-Gyu; Lee, Young-Mi; Lee, Eun-Mi; Byun, Sung Hwan; An, Ilsin; Lee, Kun-Sang; Park, In-Ho

    1999-06-01

    Some of the important areas to be improved for lithography simulation are getting correct exposure parameters and determining the change of refractive index. It is known that the real and imaginary refractive indices are changed during exposure. We obtained these refractive index changes during exposure for 193 nm chemically amplified resists. The variations of the transmittance as well as the resist thickness were measured during ArF excimer laser exposure. We found that the refractive index change is directly related to the concentration of the photo acid generator and de-protected resin. It is important to know the exact values of acid concentration from the exposure parameters since a small difference in acid concentration magnifies the variation in the amplified de-protection during post exposure bake. We developed and used a method to extract Dill ABC exposure parameters for 193 nm chemically amplified resist from the refractive index change upon exposure.

  11. High speed hydraulic scanner for deep x-ray lithography

    SciTech Connect

    Milne, J.C.; Johnson, E.D.

    1997-07-01

    From their research and development in hard x-ray lithography, the authors have found that the conventional leadscrew driven scanner stages do not provide adequate scan speed or travel. These considerations have led the authors to develop a scanning system based on a long stroke hydraulic drive with 635 mm of travel and closed loop feedback to position the stage to better than 100 micrometers. The control of the device is through a PC with a custom LabView interface coupled to simple x-ray beam diagnostics. This configuration allows one to set a variety of scan parameters, including target dose, scan range, scan rates, and dose rate. Results from the prototype system at beamline X-27B are described as well as progress on a production version for the X-14B beamline.

  12. Non-reciprocal double-exposure materials for 193nm pitch division

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bristol, Robert; Roberts, Jeanette; Shykind, David; Blackwell, James M.

    2010-04-01

    We present an overview of lithography results achieved for materials to support "leave-on-chuck" double-exposure pitch-division patterning. These materials attempt to make use of a non-reciprocal photoresponse in which the same number of absorbed 193nm photons can produce different remaining levels of resist, depending upon whether the photons are received all at once or in two separate exposures. This, in principle, allows for the use of two exposures, using independent masks and without removing the wafer from the chuck, to produce non-regular patterning down to one half the pitch limit of the scanner. Such behavior could be produced, for example, by a reversible two-stage Photoacid Generator (PAG) or other non-reciprocal mechanisms. Several stages of lithography screening were done on a large number of candidate systems. Initially, thermal stability, casting behavior, and single-exposure (SE) contrast curves were investigated to determine whether the system behaved as a usable photoresist. The next stage of testing probed non-reciprocal response, in the form of double-exposure (DE) contrast curves, typically with an intervening whole-wafer flood exposure at a longer wavelength to enact the nonreciprocity. The key criterion for the material to pass this stage was to show a shifted contrast curve (difference in photospeed) for DE vs. SE. Such a shift would then imply that pitch-division imaging would be possible for this material. After identifying materials which exhibited this SE vs. DE contrast curve shift, the next step was actual DE patterning. Since the laboratory tool used for these exposures does not have the precise alignment needed to interleave the two exposures for pitch division, we employed a technique in which the second exposure is rotated slightly with respect to the first exposure. This results in a Moiré-type pattern in which the two aerial images transition between overlap and interleave across the wafer. One particular PAG + sensitizer did

  13. Faster qualification of 193-nm resists for 100-nm development using photo cell monitoring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jones, Chris M.; Kallingal, Chidam; Zawadzki, Mary T.; Jeewakhan, Nazneen N.; Kaviani, Nazila N.; Krishnan, Prakash; Klaum, Arthur D.; Van Ess, Joel

    2003-05-01

    The development of 100-nm design rule technologies is currently taking place in many R&D facilities across the world. For some critical alyers, the transition to 193-nm resist technology has been required to meet this leading edge design rule. As with previous technology node transitions, the materials and processes available are undergoing changes and improvements as vendors encounter and solve problems. The initial implementation of the 193-nm resits process did not meet the photolithography requirements of some IC manufacturers due to very high Post Exposure Bake temperature sensitivity and consequently high wafer to wafer CD variation. The photoresist vendors have been working to improve the performance of the 193-nm resists to meet their customer's requirements. Characterization of these new resists needs to be carried out prior to implementation in the R&D line. Initial results on the second-generation resists evaluated at Cypress Semicondcutor showed better CD control compared to the aelrier resist with comparable Depth of Focus (DOF), Exposure Latitute, Etch Resistance, etc. In addition to the standard lithography parameters, resist characterization needs to include defect density studies. It was found that the new resists process with the best CD control, resulted in the introduction of orders of magnitude higher yield limiting defects at Gate, Contact adn Local Interconnect. The defect data were shared with the resists vendor and within days of the discovery the resist vendor was able to pinpoint the source of the problem. The fix was confirmed and the new resists were successfully released to production. By including defect monitoring into the resist qualification process, Cypress Semiconductor was able to 1) drive correction actions earlier resulting in faster ramp and 2) eliminate potential yield loss. We will discuss in this paper how to apply the Micro Photo Cell Monitoring methodology for defect monitoring in the photolithogprhay module and the

  14. Advances in 193 nm excimer lasers for mass spectrometry applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Delmdahl, Ralph; Esser, Hans-Gerd; Bonati, Guido

    2016-03-01

    Ongoing progress in mass analysis applications such as laser ablation inductively coupled mass spectrometry of solid samples and ultraviolet photoionization mediated sequencing of peptides and proteins is to a large extent driven by ultrashort wavelength excimer lasers at 193 nm. This paper will introduce the latest improvements achieved in the development of compact high repetition rate excimer lasers and elaborate on the impact on mass spectrometry instrumentation. Various performance and lifetime measurements obtained in a long-term endurance test over the course of 18 months will be shown and discussed in view of the laser source requirements of different mass spectrometry tasks. These sampling type applications are served by excimer lasers delivering pulsed 193 nm output of several mJ as well as fast repetition rates which are already approaching one Kilohertz. In order to open up the pathway from the laboratory to broader market industrial use, sufficient component lifetimes and long-term stable performance behavior have to be ensured. The obtained long-term results which will be presented are based on diverse 193 nm excimer laser tube improvements aiming at e.g. optimizing the gas flow dynamics and have extended the operational life the laser tube for the first time over several billion pulses even under high duty-cycle conditions.

  15. Solid sampling with 193-nm excimer laser ablation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Delmdahl, Ralph

    2007-02-01

    Reproducible and sensitive elemental analysis of solid samples is a crucial task in areas of geology (e.g. microanalysis of fluid inclusions), material sciences, industrial quality control as well as in environmental, forensic and biological studies. To date the most versatile detection method is mass-spectroscopic multi-element analysis. In order to obtain reproducible results, this requires transferring the solid sample into the gas-phase while preserving the sample's stoichiometric composition. Laser ablation in combination with Inductively Coupled Plasma-Mass Spectrometry (LA-ICP-MS) is a proven powerful technique to meet the requirements for reliable solid sample analysis. The sample is laser ablated in an air-tight cell and the aerosol is carried by an inert gas to a micro-wave induced plasma where its constituents are atomized and ionized prior to mass analysis. The 193 nm excimer laser ablation, in particular, provides athermal sample ablation with very precise lateral ablation and controlled depth profiling. The high photon energy and beam homogeneity of the 193 nm excimer laser system avoids elemental fractionation and permits clean ablation of even transmissive solid materials such as carbonates, fluorites and pure quartz.

  16. Absolute measurements of nonlinear absorption near LIDT at 193 nm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blaschke, Holger; Ristau, Detlev; Welsch, Eberhard; Apel, Oliver

    2001-04-01

    Previous investigations indicate that oxide coatings exhibit non-linear absorption phenomena below 200 nm. Hereby, absorption data of Al2O3 thin film coatings has been determined absolutely by laser calorimetry (LCA) at 193 nm in the low fluence regime. As an alternative, on the basis of the pulsed surface thermal lens technique (STL), photothermal measurements allow to determine the absorption relatively at fluence levels both in the subdamage fluence range far from the damage onset and close to the LIDT. By combining the two measurement techniques, the absolute determination of linear as well as multiphoton absorption can be achieved also in the vicinity of the laser damage fluences. This is of crucial interest because the initiation of damage onset can be observed immediately. Absolute absorption data of Al2O3 coatings at different laser fluences stating of some mJoule/cm2 will be presented for the wavelength 193 nm. Thus, the correlation between the increase of absorption and the onset of breakdown can be illustrated impressively. The evaluation and discussion of the experimental results are focused on the degree of non-linearity of the investigated absorption behavior of oxide single layers initiating the optical breakdown of UV oxide coatings.

  17. 300-mW narrow-linewidth deep-ultraviolet light generation at 193 nm by frequency mixing between Yb-hybrid and Er-fiber lasers.

    PubMed

    Xuan, Hongwen; Zhao, Zhigang; Igarashi, Hironori; Ito, Shinji; Kakizaki, Kouji; Kobayashi, Yohei

    2015-04-20

    A narrow-linewidth, high average power deep-ultraviolet (DUV) coherent laser emitting at 193 nm is demonstrated by frequency mixing a Yb-hybrid laser with an Er-fiber laser. The Yb-hybrid laser consists of Yb-fiber lasers and an Yb:YAG amplifier. The average output power of the 193 nm laser is 310 mW at 6 kHz, which corresponds to a pulse energy of 51 μJ. To the best of our knowledge, this is the highest average power and pulse energy ever reported for a narrow-linewidth 193 nm light generated by a combination of solid-state and fiber lasers with frequency mixing. We believe this laser will be beneficial for the application of interference lithography by seeding an injection-locking ArF eximer laser. PMID:25969096

  18. 300-mW narrow-linewidth deep-ultraviolet light generation at 193 nm by frequency mixing between Yb-hybrid and Er-fiber lasers.

    PubMed

    Xuan, Hongwen; Zhao, Zhigang; Igarashi, Hironori; Ito, Shinji; Kakizaki, Kouji; Kobayashi, Yohei

    2015-04-20

    A narrow-linewidth, high average power deep-ultraviolet (DUV) coherent laser emitting at 193 nm is demonstrated by frequency mixing a Yb-hybrid laser with an Er-fiber laser. The Yb-hybrid laser consists of Yb-fiber lasers and an Yb:YAG amplifier. The average output power of the 193 nm laser is 310 mW at 6 kHz, which corresponds to a pulse energy of 51 μJ. To the best of our knowledge, this is the highest average power and pulse energy ever reported for a narrow-linewidth 193 nm light generated by a combination of solid-state and fiber lasers with frequency mixing. We believe this laser will be beneficial for the application of interference lithography by seeding an injection-locking ArF eximer laser.

  19. Tuning and simulating a 193-nm resist for 2D applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Howard, William B.; Wiaux, Vincent; Ercken, Monique; Bui, Bang; Byers, Jeff D.; Pochkowski, Mike

    2002-07-01

    For some applications, the usefulness of lithography simulation results depends strongly on the matching between experimental conditions and the simulation input parameters. If this matching is optimized and other sources of error are minimized, then the lithography model can be used to explain printed wafer experimental results. Further, simulation can be useful in predicting the results or in choosing the correct set of experiments. In this paper, PROLITH and ProDATA AutoTune were used to systematically vary simulation input parameters to match measured results on printed wafers used in a 193 nm process. The validity of the simulation parameters was then checked using 3D simulation compared to 2D top-down SEM images. The quality of matching was evaluated using the 1D metrics of average gate CD and Line End Shortening (LES). To ensure the most accurate simulation, a new approach was taken to create a compound mask from GDSII contextual information surrounding an accurate SEM image of the reticle region of interest. Corrections were made to account for all metrology offsets.

  20. Photorefractive keratectomy at 193 nm using an erodible mask

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gordon, Michael; Brint, Stephen F.; Durrie, Daniel S.; Seiler, Theo; Friedman, Marc D.; Johnsson, N. M. F.; King, Michael C.; Muller, David F.

    1992-08-01

    Clinical experience with more than ten thousand sighted eyes has demonstrated great promise for correcting myopia with photorefractive keratectomy (PRK). Previously reported techniques have incorporated computer-controlled irises, diaphragms, and apertures to regulate the desired distribution of 193 nm radiation onto the eye. This paper reports on an entirely new approach for performing PRK which utilizes an erodible mask to control the shape transfer process. Compared to the more traditional techniques, the erodible mask offers promise of correcting a broad range of refractive errors. In this paper the erodible mask and associated hardware are described in detail. We describe the shape transfer experiments used to predict the functional relationship between the desired refractive correction and the mask shape. We report on early clinical results from five patients with myopic astigmatism. We conclude that the early shape transfer experiments overestimated the spherical component of the correction by 1.25 diopters and underestimated the cylindrical component by approximately 0.85 diopters. The data suggest there may be biological effects which evoke different healing responses when myopic PRK corrections are performed with and without astigmatism. Clinical trials are proceeding with the mask shapes adjusted for these observations.

  1. Scanner performance predictor and optimizer in further low-k1 lithography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aoyama, Hajime; Nakashima, Toshiharu; Ogata, Taro; Kudo, Shintaro; Kita, Naonori; Ikeda, Junji; Matsui, Ryota; Yamamoto, Hajime; Sukegawa, Ayako; Makino, Katsushi; Murayama, Masayuki; Masaki, Kazuo; Matsuyama, Tomoyuki

    2014-03-01

    Due to the importance of errors in lithography scanners, masks, and computational lithography in low-k1 lithography, application software is used to simultaneously reduce them. We have developed "Masters" application software, which is all-inclusive term of critical dimension uniformity (CDU), optical proximity effect (OPE), overlay (OVL), lens control (LNS), tool maintenance (MNT) and source optimization for wide process window (SO), for compensation of the issues on imaging and overlay. In this paper, we describe the more accurate and comprehensive solution of OPE-Master, LNS-Master and SO-Master with functions of analysis, prediction and optimization. Since OPE-Master employed a rigorous simulation, a root cause of error in OPE matching was found out. From the analysis, we had developed an additional knob and evaluated a proof-of- concept for the improvement. Influence of thermal issues on projection optics is evaluated with a heating prediction, and an optimization with scanner knobs on an optimized source taken into account mask 3D effect for obtaining usable process window. Furthermore, we discuss a possibility of correction for reticle expansion by heating comparing calculation and measurement.

  2. A new high-aperture 193 nm microscope for the traceable dimensional characterization of micro- and nanostructures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ehret, G.; Pilarski, F.; Bergmann, D.; Bodermann, B.; Buhr, E.

    2009-08-01

    A new deep UV transmission microscope for traceable micro- and nanometrology is currently being set up at the Physikalisch-Technische Bundesanstalt (PTB), the National Metrology Institute of Germany. The new microscope is especially designed to enable linewidth measurements of micro- and nanostructures with an unsurpassed absolute measurement uncertainty of down to 10 nm (95% confidence interval). The optical resolution is about 100 nm. The main field of this tool will be critical dimension (CD) metrology of photomasks used in optical lithography. In particular, this system offers the possibility of 'at-wavelength' metrology for the currently applied 193 nm lithography technology. The high lateral resolution will be attained by means of 193 nm excimer laser radiation for illumination in conjunction with a high-aperture objective (NA = 0.9). The illumination and imaging system will provide various imaging modalities, ranging from ordinary brightfield to specially structured illumination schemes. Traceability to the SI unit 'meter' will be accomplished by means of laser interferometry. The mechanical set-up is characterized by an ultra-stable bridge construction on a granite base and has been designed with special emphasis on realizing a positioning stability in the nanometer range. The instrument is being set up in the Clean Room Centre of the PTB and will be ready for operation in mid 2009. Simulation calculations, based on a rigorous optical modeling of the expected microscope images, are presented. These simulations are made for the important application of measuring Cr structures on quartz photomasks. Based on these simulations and on available data of the uncertainties of various experimental parameters—including instrument and sample parameters—expected uncertainty budgets for the measurement of the width of Cr lines on quartz substrates are estimated.

  3. Absorption coefficients for water vapor at 193 nm from 300 to 1073 K

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kessler, W. J.; Carleton, K. L.; Marinelli, W. J.

    1993-01-01

    Measurements of the water absorption coefficient at 193 nm from 300 to 1073 K are reported. The measurements were made using broadband VUV radiation and a monochromator-based detection system. The water vapor was generated by a saturator and metered into a flowing, 99 cm absorption cell via a water vapor mass flow meter. The 193 nm absorption coefficient measurements are compared to room temperature and high temperature shock tube measurements with good agreement. The absorption can be parameterized by a nu3 vibrational mode reaction coordinate and the thermal population of the nu3 mode.

  4. Rotational Spectrum of CBr by Kinetic Microwave Spectroscopy of 193-nm Photolysis Products of Bromoform.

    PubMed

    Hassouna; Walters; Demuynck; Bogey

    2000-03-01

    We have measured the first millimeter-wave spectrum of CBr. The radical was produced by pulsed UV-laser photolysis of bromoform at 193 nm and detected using kinetic spectroscopy. We have significantly improved the rotational and fine structure constants for the ground vibrational state. The hyperfine structure due to the bromine nucleus has been resolved and quadrupole and magnetic hyperfine parameters evaluated for the first time. Copyright 2000 Academic Press.

  5. Rayleigh rejection filters for 193-nm ArF laser Raman spectroscopy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mckenzie, Robert L.

    1993-01-01

    Selected organic absorbers and their solvents are evaluated as spectral filters for the rejection of 193-nm Rayleigh light associated with the use of an ArF excimer laser for Raman spectroscopy. A simply constructed filter cell filled with 0.5 percent acetone in water and an optical path of 7 mm is shown effectively to eliminate stray Rayleigh light underlying the Raman spectrum from air while transmitting 60 percent of the Raman light scattered by O2.

  6. Time-resolved FTIR studies of the photodissociation of pyruvic acid at 193 nm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hall, Gregory E.; Muckerman, James T.; Preses, Jack M.; Flynn, Ralph E. Weston George W., Jr.

    1992-05-01

    Infrared emission from carbon dioxide produced in the 193 nm photolysis of pyruvic acid vapor has been investigated using time-resolved Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy as a probe. A broad feature, strongly red-shifted from the antisymmetric stretching fundamental (ν 3) of CO 2, dominates the early spectrum. A statistical model using a linear surprisal is shown to provide good agreement with the observed spectral contour, but only if the energy available to the photofragments corresponds to the direct formation of acetaldehyde along with CO 2.

  7. 193-nm-laser-induced spectral shift in HR coated mirrors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cho, Byungil; Rudisill, J. Earl; Danielewicz, Edward

    2012-12-01

    High-reflectance mirrors, fabricated by use of fluoride coating materials, were irradiated for extended periods by a 193-nm kilohertz repetitive laser source. This irradiation promoted a spectral shift in the reflectance band towards shorter wavelengths. In efforts to determine the mechanism for the observed spectral shifts, various models were investigated by employing such techniques as spectrophotometry, surface profile interferometry, coating design simulation, and x-ray diffraction. The result of the investigation indicates that layers near the top surface of the coating structure underwent densification, which resulted in the observed spectral shift.

  8. Collateral damage-free debridement using 193nm ArF laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wynne, James J.; Felsenstein, Jerome M.; Trzcinski, Robert; Zupanski-Nielsen, Donna; Connors, Daniel P.

    2011-03-01

    Burn eschar and other necrotic areas of the skin and soft tissue are anhydrous compared to the underlying viable tissue. A 193 nm ArF excimer laser, emitting electromagnetic radiation at 6.4 eV at fluence exceeding the ablation threshold, will debride such necrotic areas. Because such radiation is strongly absorbed by aqueous chloride ions through the nonthermal process of electron photodetachment, debridement will cease when hydrated (with chloride ions) viable tissue is exposed, avoiding collateral damage to this tissue. Such tissue will be sterile and ready for further treatment, such as a wound dressing and/or a skin graft.

  9. Clinical use of the 193-nm excimer laser in the treatment of corneal scars.

    PubMed

    Sher, N A; Bowers, R A; Zabel, R W; Frantz, J M; Eiferman, R A; Brown, D C; Rowsey, J J; Parker, P; Chen, V; Lindstrom, R L

    1991-04-01

    Phototherapeutic keratectomy using a 193-nm excimer laser was performed at four centers on 33 sighted patients with corneal opacity and/or irregular astigmatism. Pathologic conditions included anterior stromal and superficial scarring from postinfectious and posttraumatic causes, including inactive herpes simplex virus, anterior corneal dystrophies, recurrent erosions, granular dystrophy, and band keratopathy. Most patients received peribulbar anesthesia and underwent removal of the epithelium prior to laser ablation. A majority of patients had a reduction in the amount of corneal scarring and approximately half had improved visual acuity. No intraocular reaction or changes in endothelial counts were seen, and some patients avoided the need for penetrating keratoplasty. Reepithelialization usually occurred within 4 or 5 days and we noted no significant scarring secondary to use of the laser. It was difficult to eliminate preexisting irregular astigmatism despite the use of surface modulators, such as methylcellulose. A hyperopic shift secondary to corneal flattening was encountered in approximately 50% of the patients. A combination of myopic ablation, followed immediately by a secondary hyperopic steepening, may minimize this refractive change. The 193-nm excimer laser is an effective new tool in the treatment of selected patients with superficial corneal opacity from a variety of conditions. PMID:2012547

  10. 193 nm excimer laser sclerostomy in pseudophakic patients with advanced open angle glaucoma.

    PubMed Central

    Allan, B D; van Saarloos, P P; Cooper, R L; Constable, I J

    1994-01-01

    A modified open mask system incorporating an en face air jet to dry the target area during ablation and a conjunctival plication mechanism, which allows ab externo delivery of the 193 nm excimer laser without prior conjunctival dissection, has been developed to form small bore sclerostomies accurately and atraumatically. Full thickness sclerostomies, and sclerostomies guarded by a smaller internal ostium can be created. A pilot therapeutic trial was conducted in pseudophakic patients with advanced open angle glaucoma. Six full thickness sclerostomies (200 microns and 400 microns diameter) and three guarded sclerostomies were created in nine patients by 193 nm excimer laser ablation (fluence per pulse 400 mJ/cm2, pulse rate 16 Hz, air jet pressure intraocular pressure +25 mm Hg). After 6 months' follow up, intraocular pressure was controlled (< or = 16 mm Hg) in eight of the nine patients (6/9 without medication). Early postoperative complications included hyphaema (trace--2.5 mm) (6/9), temporary fibrinous sclerostomy occlusion (4/9), profound early hypotony (all patients without fibrinous occlusion), and suprachoroidal haemorrhage in one case. Conjunctival laser wounds were self sealing. Small bore laser sclerostomy procedures are functionally equivalent to conventional full thickness procedures, producing early postoperative hypotony, with an increased risk of suprachoroidal haemorrhage in association with this. Further research is required to improve control over internal guarding in excimer laser sclerostomy before clinical trials of this technique can safely proceed. Images PMID:8148335

  11. Internal state distribution of the CF fragment from the 193 nm photodissociation of CFCl and CFBr

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shin, Seung Keun; Dagdigian, Paul J.

    2007-04-01

    The dynamics of the 193nm photodissociation of the CFCl and CFBr molecules have been investigated in a molecular beam experiment. The CFCl and CFBr parent molecules were generated by pyrolysis of CHFCl2 and CFBr3, respectively, and the CFCl and the CF photofragment were detected by laser fluorescence excitation. The 193nm attenuation cross section of CFCl was determined from the reduction of the CF photofragment signal as a function of the photolysis laser fluence. The internal state distribution was derived from the analysis of laser fluorescence excitation spectra in the AΣ+2-XΠ2 band system. A very low degree of rotational excitation, with essentially equal A' and A″ Λ-doublet populations, and no vibrational excitation were found in the CF photofragment. The energy available to the photofragments is hence predominantly released as translational energy. The CF internal state distribution is consistent with the dissociation of a linear intermediate state. Considerations of CFCl electronic states suggest that a bent Rydberg state is initially excited.

  12. Laser-written binary OMOG photomasks for high-volume non-critical 193-nm photolithographic layers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rivière, Rémi; Gopalakrishnan, Selvi; Mazur, Martin; Öner, Nevzat; Mühle, Sven; Seltmann, Rolf

    2014-10-01

    Photomasks are key elements of photolithographic processes, implying that their degradation must be reliably monitored and strongly mitigated. Indeed, the photo-induced oxidation of Cr in Cr On Glass (COG) photomasks and the concomitant electrostatic-field migration present in high-volume production using 193-nm photolithographic scanners severely deteriorate the pattern transfer quality, therefore limiting the lifetime of these reticles. To moderate this effect, Opaque MoSi On Glass (OMOG) photomasks, significantly less prone to such degradation, are currently being massively used in leading-edge microfabrication flows. The type of mask fabrication process normally used involving ebeam writing is however not adapted for non-critical photolithographic layers that do not yet benefit from its inherent performances but still suffer from its high cost and its long processing time. It is therefore proposed in this work to combine the simplicity of laser writing and the resistance of MoSi to degradation by using laser-written binary OMOG photomasks for the non-critical layers (e.g. ion-implantation) of a 28-nm production flow. To evaluate one of this new reticle, its pattern transfer fidelity is compared to the one of a laser-written binary COG mask already qualified for production from a photolithographic quality perspective, both masks being treated using the same optical proximity correction (OPC) model. Dispersive and dissipative properties, critical dimension uniformity, pattern linearity and pattern proximity are directly measured on wafer level, subsequently revealing that both photomasks match in terms of OPC parameters. The utilized OPC model is moreover proven robust against the use of both types of masks, consequently making the conversion from COG to OMOG particularly simple. These experimental results therefore qualify the new mask fabrication type and pave the way for a major utilization in high-volume production.

  13. In die mask overlay control for 14nm double-patterning lithography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chou, William; Cheng, James; Tseng, Alex C. P.; Wu, J. K.; Chang, Chin Kuei; Cheng, Jeffrey; Lee, Adder; Huang, Chain Ting; Peng, N. T.; Hsu, Simon C. C.; Yu, Chun Chi; Lu, Colbert; Yu, Julia; Craig, Peter; Pollock, Chuck; Ham, Young; McMurran, Jeff

    2015-10-01

    According to the ITRS roadmap, semiconductor industry drives the 193nm lithography to its limits, using techniques like Double Pattern Technology (DPT), Source Mask Optimization (SMO) and Inverse Lithography Technology (ILT). In terms of considering the photomask metrology, full in-die measurement capability is required for registration and overlay control with challenging specifications for repeatability and accuracy. Double patterning using 193nm immersion lithography has been adapted as the solution to enable 14nm technology nodes. The overlay control is one of the key figures for the successful realization of this technology. In addition to the various error contributions from the wafer scanner, the reticles play an important role in terms of considering lithographic process contributed errors. Accurate pattern placement of the features on reticles with a registration error below 4nm is mandatory to keep overall photomask contributions to overlay of sub 20nm logic within the allowed error budget. In this paper, we show in-die registration errors using 14nm DPT product masks, by measuring in-die overlay patterns comparing with regular registration patterns. The mask measurements are used to obtain an accurate model to predict mask contribution on wafer overlay of double patterning technology.

  14. 193 nm Excimer laser processing of Si/Ge/Si(100) micropatterns

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gontad, F.; Conde, J. C.; Chiussi, S.; Serra, C.; González, P.

    2016-01-01

    193 nm Excimer laser assisted growth and crystallization of amorphous Si/Ge bilayer patterns with circular structures of 3 μm diameter and around 25 nm total thickness, is presented. Amorphous patterns were grown by Laser induced Chemical Vapor Deposition, using nanostencils as shadow masks and then irradiated with the same laser to induce structural and compositional modifications for producing crystalline SiGe alloys through fast melting/solidification cycles. Compositional and structural analyses demonstrated that pulses of 240 mJ/cm2 lead to graded SiGe alloys with Si rich discs of 2 μm diameter on top, a buried Ge layer, and Ge rich SiGe rings surrounding each feature, as predicted by previous numerical simulation.

  15. Photoinduced absorption and refractive-index induction in phosphosilicate fibres by radiation at 193 nm

    SciTech Connect

    Rybaltovsky, A A; Sokolov, V O; Plotnichenko, V G; Lanin, Aleksei V; Semenov, S L; Dianov, Evgenii M; Gur'yanov, A N; Khopin, V F

    2007-04-30

    The photoinduced room-temperature-stable increase in the refractive index by {approx}5x10{sup -4} at a wavelength of 1.55 {mu}m was observed in phosphosilicate fibres without their preliminary loading with molecular hydrogen. It is shown that irradiation of preliminary hydrogen-loaded fibres by an ArF laser at 193 nm enhances the efficiency of refractive-index induction by an order of magnitude. The induced-absorption spectra of preforms with a phosphosilicate glass core and optical fibres fabricated from them are studied in a broad spectral range from 150 to 5000 nm. The intense induced-absorption band ({approx}800 cm{sup -1}) at 180 nm is found, which strongly affects the formation of the induced refractive index. The quantum-chemical model of a defect related to this band is proposed. (optical fibres)

  16. Three-body dissociations: The photodissociation of dimethyl sulfoxide at 193 nm

    SciTech Connect

    Blank, D.A.; North, S.W.; Stranges, D.

    1997-04-01

    When a molecule with two equivalent chemical bonds is excited above the threshold for dissociation of both bonds, how the rupture of the two bonds is temporally coupled becomes a salient question. Following absorption at 193 nm dimethyl sulfoxide (CH{sub 3}SOCH{sub 3}) contains enough energy to rupture both C-S bonds. This can happen in a stepwise (reaction 1) or concerted (reaction 2) fashion where the authors use rotation of the SOCH{sub 3} intermediate prior to dissociation to define a stepwise dissociation: (1) CH{sub 3}SOCH{sub 3} {r_arrow} 2CH{sub 3} + SO; (2a) CH{sub 3}SOCH{sub 3} {r_arrow} CH{sub 3} + SOCH{sub 3}; and (2b) SOCH{sub 3} {r_arrow} SO + CH{sub 3}. Recently, the dissociation of dimethyl sulfoxide following absorption at 193 nm was suggested to involve simultaneous cleavage of both C-S bonds on an excited electronic surface. This conclusion was inferred from laser induced fluorescence (LIF) and resonant multiphoton ionization (2+1 REMPI) measurements of the internal energy content in the CH{sub 3} and SO photoproducts and a near unity quantum yield measured for SO. Since this type of concerted three body dissociation is very interesting and a rather rare event in photodissociation dynamics, the authors chose to investigate this system using the technique of photofragment translational spectroscopy at beamline 9.0.2.1. The soft photoionization provided by the VUV undulator radiation allowed the authors to probe the SOCH{sub 3} intermediate which had not been previously observed and provided good evidence that the dissociation of dimethyl sulfoxide primarily proceeds via a two step dissociation, reaction 2.

  17. DNA damage and altered gene expression in cultured human skin fibroblasts exposed to 193-nm excimer laser radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Samid, Dvorit; Flessate, Denise M.; Miller, Alexandra C.; Rimoldi, Donata

    1990-06-01

    Tissue ablation using 193nm excimer lasers is being considered for a variety of surgical procedures, yet little is known regarding the potential mutagenic risk to human cells. The effects of sublethal doses of radiation on cellular DNA and gene expression have been examined in cultured human skin fibroblasts. Northern blot analysis of mRNA revealed an increase in the levels of the c-f. proto-oncogene, interstitial collagenase, and metallothionein transcripts after laser radiation at either 193nm or 248nm. Similar changes in gene expression have been previously observed in cells treated with different carcinogens, including classical UV light (254nm) and phorbol esters. In contrast to the conventional UV light or laser radiation at 248nm, the 193nm radiation did not cause significant pyrimidine dimer formation, as determined by measurements of unscheduled DNA synthesis. However, both 193nm and 248nm radiation induced micronuclei formation, indicative of chromosome breakage. These data indicate that exposure of actively replicating human skin cells to sublethal doses of 193nm laser radiation may result in molecular changes associated with carcinogenesis.

  18. An AC phase measuring interferometer for measuring dn/dT of fused silica and calcium fluoride at 193 nm

    SciTech Connect

    Shagam, R.N.

    1998-09-01

    A novel method for the measurement of the change in index of refraction vs. temperature (dn/dT) of fused silica and calcium fluoride at the 193 nm wavelength has been developed in support of thermal modeling efforts for the development of 193 nm-based photolithographic exposure tools. The method, based upon grating lateral shear interferometry, uses a transmissive linear grating to divide a 193 nm laser beam into several beam paths by diffraction which propagate through separate identical material samples. One diffracted order passing through one sample overlaps the undiffracted beam from a second sample and forms interference fringes dependent upon the optical path difference between the two samples. Optical phase delay due to an index change from heating one of the samples causes the interference fringes to change sinusoidally with phase. The interferometer also makes use of AC phase measurement techniques through lateral translation of the grating. Results for several samples of fused silica and calcium fluoride are demonstrated.

  19. Photodissociation of the Propargyl (C3D3) Radicals at 248 nm and 193 nm

    SciTech Connect

    Neumark., D.M.; Crider, P.E.; Castiglioni, L.; Kautzman, K.K.

    2009-01-21

    The photodissociation of perdeuterated propargyl (D{sub 2}CCCD) and propynyl (D{sub 3}CCC) radicals was investigated using fast beam photofragment translational spectroscopy. Radicals were produced from their respective anions by photodetachment at 540 nm and 450 nm (below and above the electron affinity of propynyl). The radicals were then photodissociated by 248 nm or 193 nm light. The recoiling photofragments were detected in coincidence with a time- and position-sensitive detector. Three channels were observed: D{sub 2} loss, CD + C{sub 2}D{sub 2}, and CD{sub 3} + C{sub 2}. Obervation of the D loss channel was incompatible with this experiment and was not attempted. Our translational energy distributions for D{sub 2} loss peaked at nonzero translational energy, consistent with ground state dissociation over small (< 1 eV) exit barriers with respect to separated products. Translational energy distributions for the two heavy channels peaked near zero kinetic energy, indicating dissociation on the ground state in the absence of exit barriers.

  20. Hydrogen atom formation from the photodissociation of water ice at 193 nm.

    PubMed

    Yabushita, Akihiro; Hashikawa, Yuichi; Ikeda, Atsushi; Kawasaki, Masahiro; Tachikawa, Hiroto

    2004-03-15

    The TOF spectra of photofragment hydrogen atoms from the 193 nm photodissociation of amorphous ice at 90-140 K have been measured. The spectra consist of both a fast and a slow components that are characterized by average translational energies of 2k(B)T(trans)=0.39+/-0.04 eV (2300+/-200 K) and 0.02 eV (120+/-20 K), respectively. The incident laser power dependency of the hydrogen atom production suggests one-photon process. The electronic excitation energy of a branched cluster, (H(2)O)(6+1), has been theoretically calculated, where (H(2)O)(6+1) is a (H(2)O)(6) cyclic cluster attached by a water molecule with the hydrogen bond. The photoabsorption of this branched cluster is expected to appear at around 200 nm. The source of the hydrogen atoms is attributed to the photodissociation of the ice surface that is attached by water molecules with the hydrogen bond. Atmospheric implications are estimated for the photodissociation of the ice particles (Noctilucent clouds) at 190-230 nm in the region between 80 and 85 km altitude.

  1. Photodissociation of CF 3Br at 193 nm: evidence for a distorted dissociation pathway

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thelen, M.-A.; Felder, P.

    1996-03-01

    The photodissociation of CF 3Br at 193 nm has been studied by photofragment translational spectroscopy. The primary dissociation step leads to the formation of CF 3 radicals and Br atoms in the electronic ground state and in the spin-orbit excited state, with relative quantum yields φ( Br) = 0.47 ± 0.05 and φ( Br∗) = 0.53 ∓ 0.05 , respectively. At higher laser fluences the slowest and internally hottest CF 3 radicals undergo photoinduced secondary dissociation to CF 2 + F. The anisotropy parameters derived from measurements with a polarized photolysis laser are β( Br) = 1.8 ± 0.2 and β( Br∗) = 0.7 ± 0.3 . The experimental results are discussed in terms of a model that involves the initial excitation of two repulsive electronic states 3Q 0 and 1Q 1 via transitions polarized parallel and perpendicular to the CBr bond, respectively. From the observed β parameters it is concluded that in roughly two thirds of the molecules dissociation proceeds via a distorted geometry in which the molecular symmetry C 3v is reduced to C s through the effect of e-type bending vibrations.

  2. A new look at the photodissociation of methyl iodide at 193 nm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Hong; Pratt, S. T.

    2013-12-01

    A new measurement of the photodissociation of CH3I at 193 nm is reported in which we use a combination of vacuum ultraviolet photoionization and velocity map ion imaging. The iodine photofragments are probed by single-photon ionization at photon energies above and below the photoionization threshold of I(2P3/2). The relative I(2P3/2) and I*(2P1/2) photoionization cross sections are determined at these wavelengths by using the known branching fractions for the photodissociation at 266 nm. Velocity map ion images indicate that the branching fraction for I(2P3/2) atoms is non-zero, and yield a value of 0.07 ± 0.01. Interestingly, the translational energy distribution extracted from the image shows that the translational energy of the I(2P3/2) fragments is significantly smaller than that of the I*(2P1/2) atoms. This observation indicates the internal rotational/vibrational energy of the CH3 co-fragment is very high in the I(2P3/2) channel. The results can be interpreted in a manner consistent with the previous measurements, and provide a more complete picture of the dissociation dynamics of this prototypical molecule.

  3. A new look at the photodissociation of methyl iodide at 193 nm

    SciTech Connect

    Xu, Hong; Pratt, S. T.

    2013-12-07

    A new measurement of the photodissociation of CH{sub 3}I at 193 nm is reported in which we use a combination of vacuum ultraviolet photoionization and velocity map ion imaging. The iodine photofragments are probed by single-photon ionization at photon energies above and below the photoionization threshold of I({sup 2}P{sub 3/2}). The relative I({sup 2}P{sub 3/2}) and I{sup *}({sup 2}P{sub 1/2}) photoionization cross sections are determined at these wavelengths by using the known branching fractions for the photodissociation at 266 nm. Velocity map ion images indicate that the branching fraction for I({sup 2}P{sub 3/2}) atoms is non-zero, and yield a value of 0.07 ± 0.01. Interestingly, the translational energy distribution extracted from the image shows that the translational energy of the I({sup 2}P{sub 3/2}) fragments is significantly smaller than that of the I{sup *}({sup 2}P{sub 1/2}) atoms. This observation indicates the internal rotational/vibrational energy of the CH{sub 3} co-fragment is very high in the I({sup 2}P{sub 3/2}) channel. The results can be interpreted in a manner consistent with the previous measurements, and provide a more complete picture of the dissociation dynamics of this prototypical molecule.

  4. 193 nm Ultraviolet Photodissociation Mass Spectrometry for Phosphopeptide Characterization in the Positive and Negative Ion Modes.

    PubMed

    Robinson, Michelle R; Taliaferro, Juliana M; Dalby, Kevin N; Brodbelt, Jennifer S

    2016-08-01

    Advances in liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) have permitted phosphoproteomic analysis on a grand scale, but ongoing challenges specifically associated with confident phosphate localization continue to motivate the development of new fragmentation techniques. In the present study, ultraviolet photodissociation (UVPD) at 193 nm is evaluated for the characterization of phosphopeptides in both positive and negative ion modes. Compared to the more standard higher energy collisional dissociation (HCD), UVPD provided more extensive fragmentation with improved phosphate retention on product ions. Negative mode UVPD showed particular merit for detecting and sequencing highly acidic phosphopeptides from alpha and beta casein, but was not as robust for larger scale analysis because of lower ionization efficiencies in the negative mode. HeLa and HCC70 cell lysates were analyzed by both UVPD and HCD. While HCD identified more phosphopeptides and proteins compared to UVPD, the unique matches from UVPD analysis could be combined with the HCD data set to improve the overall depth of coverage compared to either method alone. PMID:27425180

  5. Product channels in the 193-nm photodissociation of HCNO (fulminic acid)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feng, Wenhui; Hershberger, John F.

    2016-06-01

    IR diode laser spectroscopy was used to detect the products of HCNO (fulminic acid) photolysis at 193 nm. Six product channels are energetically possible at this photolysis wavelength: O + HCN, H + NCO/CNO, CN + OH, CO + NH, NO + CH and HNCO. In some experiments, isotopically labeled 15N18O, C2D6 or C6H12 reagents were included into the photolysis mixture in order to suppress and/or redirect possible secondary reactions. HCN, OC18O, 15N15NO, CO, DCN and HNCO molecules were detected upon laser photolysis of HCNO/reagents/buffer gas mixtures. Analysis of the yields of product molecules leads to the following photolysis quantum yields: ϕ1a (O + HCN) = 0.38 ± 0.04, ϕ1b (H + (NCO)) = 0.07 ± 0.02, ϕ1c (CN + OH) = 0.24 ± 0.03, ϕ1d (CO + NH(a1Δ)) < 0.22 ± 0.1, ϕ1e (HNCO) = 0.02 ± 0.01 and ϕ1f (CH + NO) = 0.21 ± 0.1, respectively.

  6. Defect tracking for nanoimprint lithography using optical surface scanner and scanning electron microscope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Zhaoning; Kurataka, Nobuo; Tran, Hieu; Gauzner, Gene

    2016-09-01

    Fast optical surface scanners are used in combination with high-resolution scanning electron microscopes to facilitate the identification and tracking of nanoimprint defects. We have confirmed that hard particles cause permanent template damages during imprint, resulting in repeating imprint defects. Since contaminants encountered during imprint are dominated by hard metal oxide particles capable of causing such damage, stringent pre-imprint substrate screening is a critical requirement in a manufacturing environment.

  7. Defectivity reduction studies for ArF immersion lithography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matsunaga, Kentaro; Kondoh, Takehiro; Kato, Hirokazu; Kobayashi, Yuuji; Hayasaki, Kei; Ito, Shinichi; Yoshida, Akira; Shimura, Satoru; Kawasaki, Tetsu; Kyoda, Hideharu

    2007-03-01

    Immersion lithography is widely expected to meet the manufacturing requirements of future device nodes. A critical development in immersion lithography has been the construction of a defect-free process. Two years ago, the authors evaluated the impact of water droplets made experimentally on exposed resist films and /or topcoat. (1) The results showed that the marks of drying water droplet called watermarks became pattern defects with T-top profile. In the case that water droplets were removed by drying them, formation of the defects was prevented. Post-exposure rinse process to remove water droplets also prevented formation of the defects. In the present work, the authors evaluated the effect of pre- and post-exposure rinse processes on hp 55nm line and space pattern with Spin Rinse Process Station (SRS) and Post Immersion Rinse Process Station (PIR) modules on an inline lithography cluster with the Tokyo Electron Ltd. CLEAN TRACK TM LITHIUS TM i+ and ASML TWINSCAN XT:1700Fi , 193nm immersion scanner. It was found that total defectivity is decreased by pre- and post-exposure rinse. In particular, bridge defects and large bridge defects were decreased by pre- and post-exposure rinse. Pre- and post-exposure rinse processes are very effective to reduce the bridge and large bridge defects of immersion lithography.

  8. Photolysis of Pure Solid O3 and O2 Films at 193nm

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Raut, U.; Loeffler, M. J.; Fama, M.; Baragiola, R. A.

    2011-01-01

    We studied quantitatively the photochemistry of solid O3 and O2 films at 193 nm and 22 K with infrared spectroscopy and microgravimetry. Photolysis of pure ozone destroyed O3, but a small amount of ozone remained in the film at high fluence. Photolysis of pure O2 produced O3 in an amount that increased with photon fluence to a stationary level. For both O2 and O3 films, the O3:O2 ratio at large fluences is ?0.07, about two orders of magnitude larger than those obtained in gas phase photolysis. This enhancement is attributed to the increased photodissociation of O2 due to photoabsorption by O2 dimers, a process significant at solid-state densities. We obtain initial quantum yield for ozone synthesis from solid oxygen, phi (O3) = 0.24 0.06, and quantum yields for destruction of O3 and O2 in their parent solids, phi(-O3) = 1.0 0.2 and phi(-O2) = 0.36 0.1. Combined with known photoabsorption cross sections, we estimate probabilities for geminate recombination of 0.5 0.1 for O3 fragments and 0.88 0.03 for oxygen atoms from O2 dissociation. Using a single parameter kinetic model, we deduce the ratio of reaction cross sections for an O atom with O2 vs. O3 to be 0.1 0.2. The general good agreement of the model with the data suggests the validity of the central assumption of efficient energy and spin relaxation of photofragments in the solid prior to their reactions with other species.

  9. Photodissociation of vinyl cyanide at 193 nm: Nascent product distributions of the molecular elimination channels

    SciTech Connect

    Wilhelm, Michael J.; Nikow, Matthew; Letendre, Laura; Dai Hailung

    2009-01-28

    The photodissociation dynamics of vinyl cyanide (H{sub 2}CCHCN, acrylonitrile) and deuterated vinyl cyanide (D{sub 2}CCDCN) at 193 nm are examined using time-resolved Fourier transform infrared emission spectroscopy. Prior photofragment translational spectroscopy studies [D. A. Blank et al., J. Chem. Phys. 108, 5784 (1998)] of the dissociation have observed the presence of four main dissociation channels; two molecular and two radical in nature. However, with the exception of a<0.01 quantum yield determined for the CN radical loss channel, the branching ratios of the remaining three elimination channels were not measured. The time-resolved emission spectra, including those from the deuterated samples, revealed the presence of acetylene, hydrogen cyanide (HCN), as well as the energetically less stable isomer hydrogen isocyanide (HNC). Acetylene is found in two distinct energetic distributions, suggesting that both three- and four-centered elimination reactions are occurring significantly in the dissociation. In contrast to prior ab initio studies that have suggested the dominant nature of the three-center elimination of molecular hydrogen (H{sub 2}) and cyanovinylidene (:C=CHCN), we find this reaction channel to be of little importance as there is no evidence to support any significant presence of rovibrationally excited cyanoacetylene. Spectral modeling of the product distributions allows for the first experimental determination of the relative occurrence of the three-centered (resulting in HCN+vinylidene) versus four-centered (HNC+acetylene) elimination channels as 3.34 to 1.00, in contrast to the previously calculated value of 126:1. Rice-Ramsperger-Kassel-Marcus analysis depicts that the transition state energy of the four-centered reaction should be about 10 kcal mole{sup -1} lower than the three-centered reaction.

  10. Dynamics of ions produced by laser ablation of several metals at 193 nm

    SciTech Connect

    Baraldi, G.; Perea, A.; Afonso, C. N.

    2011-02-15

    This work reports the study of ion dynamics produced by ablation of Al, Cu, Ag, Au, and Bi targets using nanosecond laser pulses at 193 nm as a function of the laser fluence from threshold up to 15 J cm{sup -2}. An electrical (Langmuir) probe has been used for determining the ion yield as well as kinetic energy distributions. The results clearly evidence that ablation of Al shows unique features when compared to other metals. The ion yield both at threshold (except for Al, which shows a two-threshold-like behavior) and for a fixed fluence above threshold scale approximately with melting temperature of the metal. Comparison of the magnitude of the yield reported in literature using other wavelengths allows us to conclude its dependence with wavelength is not significant. The evolution of the ion yield with fluence becomes slower for fluences above 4-5 J cm{sup -2} with no indication of saturation suggesting that ionization processes in the plasma are still active up to 15 J cm{sup -2} and production of multiple-charged ions are promoted. This dependence is mirrored in the proportion of ions with kinetic energies higher than 200 eV. This proportion is not significant around threshold fluence for all metals except for Al, which is already 20%. The unique features of Al are discussed in terms of the energy of laser photons (6.4 eV) that is enough to induce direct photoionization from the ground state only in the case of this metal.

  11. Photoinitiated decomposition of substituted ethylenes: The photodissociation of vinyl chloride and acrylonitrile at 193 nm

    SciTech Connect

    Blank, D.A.; Suits, A.G.; Lee, Y.T.

    1997-04-01

    Ethylene and its substituted analogues (H{sub 2}CCHX) are important molecules in hydrogen combustion. As the simplest {pi}-bonded hydrocarbons these molecules serve as prototypical systems for understanding the decomposition of this important class of compounds. The authors have used the technique of photofragment translational spectroscopy at beamline 9.0.2.1 to investigate the dissociation of vinyl chloride (X=Cl) and acrylonitrile (X=CN) following absorption at 193 nm. The technique uses a molecular beam of the reactant seeded in helium which is crossed at 90 degrees with the output of an excimer laser operating on the ArF transition, 193.3 nm. The neutral photoproducts which recoil out of the molecular beam travel 15.1 cm where they are photoionized by the VUV undulator radiation, mass selected, and counted as a function of time. The molecular beam source is rotatable about the axis of the dissociation laser. The authors have directly observed all four of the following dissociation channels for both systems: (1) H{sub 2}CCHX {r_arrow} H + C{sub 2}H{sub 2}X; (2) H{sub 2}CCHX {r_arrow} X + C{sub 2}H{sub 3}; (3) H{sub 2}CCHX {r_arrow} H{sub 2} + C{sub 2}HX; and (4) H{sub 2}CCHX {r_arrow} HX + C{sub 2}H{sub 2}. They measured translational energy distributions for all of the observed channels and measured the photoionization onset for many of the photoproducts which provided information about their chemical identity and internal energy content. In the case of acrylonitrile, selective product photoionization provided the ability to discriminate between channels 2 and 4 which result in the same product mass combination.

  12. Integration considerations for 130-nm device patterning using ArF lithography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Okoroanyanwu, Uzodinma; Levinson, Harry J.; Yang, Chih-Yuh; Pangrle, Suzette K.; Schefske, Jeff A.; Kent, Eric

    2000-07-01

    With the delivery of ful field ArF steppers and scanners to the leading edge IC manufacturers in 1999 for process development work, the industry is poised to implement ArF lithography in volume production in a few years from now. The introduction of ArF lithography in large volume deice manufacturing will be at the 130-nm technology node, with a k1-factor of roughly 0.4. This will represent the first time in the history of the semiconductor industry when the critical feature size of first generation devices for a given technology node is significantly smaller than the lithographic wavelength used in the patterning. Accordingly, there are a number of integration issues that must be resolved to ensure the successful implement of this technology. Such issues include antireflection coatings issues like reflectivity control and thickness, and the tradeoffs between using organic and inorganic ARCs; resist material issues like optical absorption, feature profile, CD uniformity and line edge roughness; and etch issues like resist loss, line edge roughening, endcap pullback, etc. For instance, one of the major problems with most currently available 193-nm resists is their high optical absorption at the exposure wavelength. This necessitates the use of significantly thinner 193-nm resist films than have been the case in earlier lithographic regimes, but etch considerations preclude this option as these materials do not have bey good etch stability. A balance between absorption and etch requirements must therefore be struck to ensure the successful implementation of this lithography. The above outlined integration issues involved in striking this balance are the subject of this paper, and they will be presented from a patterning perspective. Our exposures are made with ASML/900 full field scanner.

  13. Generation of intense 10-ps, 193-nm pulses using simple distributed feedback dye lasers and an ArF(*) amplifier.

    PubMed

    Hatten, D L; Cui, Y; Iii, W T; Mikes, T; Goldhar, J

    1992-11-20

    A pair of holographic distributed feedback dye lasers is used to generate 10-ps pulses at two selected wavelengths that are mixed in a BBO crystal to produce a pulse ~ 10 ps in duration at 193 nm. This seed pulse is subsequently amplified in an ArF(*) excimer laser to an energy of 10-15 mJ with <40 microJ in amplified spontaneous emission. The pulses are nearly transform limited and diffraction limited.

  14. Study of defect verification based on lithography simulation with a SEM system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoshikawa, Shingo; Fujii, Nobuaki; Kanno, Koichi; Imai, Hidemichi; Hayano, Katsuya; Miyashita, Hiroyuki; Shida, Soichi; Murakawa, Tsutomu; Kuribara, Masayuki; Matsumoto, Jun; Nakamura, Takayuki; Matsushita, Shohei; Hara, Daisuke; Pang, Linyong

    2015-07-01

    In a Photomask manufacturing process, mask defect inspection is an increasingly important topic for 193nm optical lithography. Further extension of 193nm optical lithography to the next technology nodes, staying at a maximum numerical aperture (NA) of 1.35, pushes lithography to its utmost limits. This extension from technologies like ILT and SMO requires more complex mask patterns. In mask defect inspection, defect verification becomes more difficult because many nuisance defects are detected in aggressive mask features. One of the solutions is lithography simulation like AIMS. An issue with AIMS, however, is the low throughput of measurement, analysis etc.

  15. Improving vacuum-UV (VUV) photolysis of organic compounds in water with a phosphor converted xenon excimer lamp emitting at 193 nm.

    PubMed

    Schulze-Hennings, U; Pötschke, L; Wietor, C; Bringmann, S; Braun, N; Hayashi, D; Linnemann, V; Pinnekamp, J

    2016-01-01

    A novel vacuum ultraviolet excimer lamp emitting light at 193 nm was used to investigate the degradation of organic micropollutants in ultrapure water and wastewater treatment plant (WWTP) effluent. Overall, light at 193 nm proved to be efficient to degrade the investigated micropollutants (diclofenac, diatrizoic acid, sulfamethoxazole). Experiments with WWTP effluent proved the ability of radiation at 193 nm to degrade micropollutants which are hardly removed with commonly used oxidation technologies like ozonation (diatrizoic acid, ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid, perfluorooctanoic acid, and perfluorooctanesulfonic acid). PMID:27533863

  16. The interaction of 193-nm excimer laser irradiation with single-crystal zinc oxide: Neutral atomic zinc and oxygen emission

    SciTech Connect

    Kahn, E. H.; Langford, S. C.; Dickinson, J. T.; Boatner, Lynn A

    2013-01-01

    We report mass-resolved time-of-flight measurements of neutral particles from the surface of single-crystal ZnO during pulsed 193-nm irradiation at laser fluences below the threshold for avalanche breakdown. The major species emitted are atomic Zn and O. We examine the emissions of atomic Zn as a function of laser fluence and laser exposure. Defects at the ZnO surface appear necessary for the detection of these emissions. Our results suggest that the production of defects is necessary to explain intense sustained emissions at higher fluence. Rapid, clean surface etching and high atomic zinc kinetic energies seen at higher laser fluences are also discussed.

  17. Statistical Examination of the a and a + 1 Fragment Ions from 193 nm Ultraviolet Photodissociation Reveals Local Hydrogen Bonding Interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morrison, Lindsay J.; Rosenberg, Jake A.; Singleton, Jonathan P.; Brodbelt, Jennifer S.

    2016-09-01

    Dissociation of proteins and peptides by 193 nm ultraviolet photodissociation (UVPD) has gained momentum in proteomic studies because of the diversity of backbone fragments that are produced and subsequent unrivaled sequence coverage obtained by the approach. The pathways that form the basis for the production of particular ion types are not completely understood. In this study, a statistical approach is used to probe hydrogen atom elimination from a + 1 radical ions, and different extents of elimination are found to vary as a function of the identity of the C-terminal residue of the a product ions and the presence or absence of hydrogen bonds to the cleaved residue.

  18. Photodissociation dynamics of the methyl perthiyl radical at 248 and 193 nm using fast-beam photofragment translational spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harrison, Aaron W.; Ryazanov, Mikhail; Sullivan, Erin N.; Neumark, Daniel M.

    2016-07-01

    The photodissociation dynamics of the methyl perthiyl radical (CH3SS) have been investigated using fast-beam coincidence translational spectroscopy. Methyl perthiyl radicals were produced by photodetachment of the CH3SS- anion followed by photodissociation at 248 nm (5.0 eV) and 193 nm (6.4 eV). Photofragment mass distributions and translational energy distributions were measured at each dissociation wavelength. Experimental results show S atom loss as the dominant (96%) dissociation channel at 248 nm with a near parallel, anisotropic angular distribution and translational energy peaking near the maximal energy available to ground state CH3S and S fragments, indicating that the dissociation occurs along a repulsive excited state. At 193 nm, S atom loss remains the major fragmentation channel, although S2 loss becomes more competitive and constitutes 32% of the fragmentation. The translational energy distributions for both channels are very broad at this wavelength, suggesting the formation of the S2 and S atom products in several excited electronic states.

  19. Photodissociation dynamics of the methyl perthiyl radical at 248 and 193 nm using fast-beam photofragment translational spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Harrison, Aaron W; Ryazanov, Mikhail; Sullivan, Erin N; Neumark, Daniel M

    2016-07-14

    The photodissociation dynamics of the methyl perthiyl radical (CH3SS) have been investigated using fast-beam coincidence translational spectroscopy. Methyl perthiyl radicals were produced by photodetachment of the CH3SS(-) anion followed by photodissociation at 248 nm (5.0 eV) and 193 nm (6.4 eV). Photofragment mass distributions and translational energy distributions were measured at each dissociation wavelength. Experimental results show S atom loss as the dominant (96%) dissociation channel at 248 nm with a near parallel, anisotropic angular distribution and translational energy peaking near the maximal energy available to ground state CH3S and S fragments, indicating that the dissociation occurs along a repulsive excited state. At 193 nm, S atom loss remains the major fragmentation channel, although S2 loss becomes more competitive and constitutes 32% of the fragmentation. The translational energy distributions for both channels are very broad at this wavelength, suggesting the formation of the S2 and S atom products in several excited electronic states.

  20. Mask topography effect in chromeless phase lithography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Philipsen, Vicky; Bekaert, Joost; Vandenberghe, Geert; Jonckheere, Rik; Van Den Broeke, Douglas; Socha, Robert

    2004-12-01

    Different types of phase-shift masks (PSM) in combination with the proper illumination condition are widely used to allow 193nm lithography to print ever-decreasing pitches with a sufficient process window. A viable option for the 65nm node is Chromeless Phase Lithography (CPL), which combines a chromeless phase shift mask and 193nm off-axis illumination. It has been demonstrated that CPL has a high flexibility for through pitch imaging. Also concerning mask making CPL masks showed advantages over alternating and attenuated PSM [1]. This paper discusses how the mask quality and its topography influence the imaging performance of CPL. It is shown that mask topography is an important factor for CPL, as the imaging relies also on the quartz depth differences in the mask. The wafer image is sensitive to phase variations induced by the quartz etch depth and the sidewall profile. Their impact is separately studied using rigorous 3D mask electro-magnetic field simulations (Sigma-C Solid-CM). Correlation of experimental results to simulation explains that the observed pitch-dependent tilt in the Bossung curves is mainly related to the 3D character of the mask. In search for a global compensation valid through pitch, the simulation study also evaluates the effect of other contributors such as lens aberrations in the optical system, assist features and half-toning Cr zebra lines in the design. However, as the tilt is inherent to the CPL mask fabrication, a compensation of the Bossung tilt effect can only be obtained for specific combinations of all sources, as will be shown. We concentrate on the imaging of 70nm lines and 100nm contact holes in pitches ranging from dense up to isolated. The wafers are exposed on an ASML PAS5500/1100 ArF scanner working with a 0.75NA projection lens and various types of off-axis illumination. The wafers are evaluated on a top-down CD SEM (KLA-Tencor 8250XR).

  1. 193 nm Ultraviolet Photodissociation Mass Spectrometry of Tetrameric Protein Complexes Provides Insight into Quaternary and Secondary Protein Topology.

    PubMed

    Morrison, Lindsay J; Brodbelt, Jennifer S

    2016-08-31

    Protein-protein interfaces and architecture are critical to the function of multiprotein complexes. Mass spectrometry-based techniques have emerged as powerful strategies for characterization of protein complexes, particularly for heterogeneous mixtures of structures. In the present study, activation and dissociation of three tetrameric protein complexes (streptavidin, transthyretin, and hemoglobin) in the gas phase was undertaken by 193 nm ultraviolet photodissociation (UVPD) for the characterization of higher order structure. High pulse energy UVPD resulted in the production of dimers and low charged monomers exhibiting symmetrical charge partitioning among the subunits (the so-called symmetrical dissociation pathways), consistent with the subunit organization of the complexes. In addition, UVPD promoted backbone cleavages of the monomeric subunits, the abundances of which corresponded to the more flexible loop regions of the proteins. PMID:27480400

  2. Collision-induced desorption in 193-nm photoinduced reactions in (O{sub 2}+CO) adlayers on Pt(112)

    SciTech Connect

    Han Song; Ma Yunsheng; Matsushima, Tatsuo

    2005-09-01

    The spatial distribution of desorbing O{sub 2} and CO{sub 2} was examined in 193-nm photoinduced reactions in O{sub 2}+CO adlayers on stepped Pt (112)=[(s)3(111)x(001)]. The O{sub 2} desorption collimated in inclined ways in the plane along the surface trough, confirming the hot-atom collision mechanism. In the presence of CO(a), the product CO{sub 2} desorption also collimated in an inclined way, whereas the inclined O{sub 2} desorption was suppressed. The inclined O{sub 2} and CO{sub 2} desorption is explained by a common collision-induced desorption model. At high O{sub 2} coverage, the CO{sub 2} desorption collimated closely along the (111) terrace normal.

  3. Photolytic decomposition of adsorbed tellurium and cadmium alkyl species at 295 K upon 193 nm photon irradiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stinespring, C. D.; Freedman, A.

    1988-06-01

    The photolytic decomposition of adspecies formed by the adsorption of tellurium and cadmium alkyls at 295 K under ultrahigh-vacuum conditions has been studied using x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. Dimethyl tellurium adsorbed at submonolayer coverages on a polycrystalline gold substrate has been observed to undergo nearly quantitative photolytic decomposition at 193 nm to form metallic tellurium. The hydrocarbon photofragments produced in the decomposition lead to negligible carbon contamination on the gold surface. Dimethyl cadmium adsorbed on amorphous SiO2 both desorbs and decomposes to form the metal adspecies. In this case, most of the carbon remains as hydrocarbon and carbidic contaminants. Monomethyl adspecies of both metals formed on Si(100) and GaAs(100) surfaces are inactive with respect to decomposition at the low fluences (0.25 mJ cm-2) used in these experiments; however, substantial desorption is observed.

  4. Revisiting the mechanisms involved in Line Width Roughness smoothing of 193 nm photoresist patterns during HBr plasma treatment

    SciTech Connect

    Brihoum, M.; Ramos, R.; Menguelti, K.; Cunge, G.; Pargon, E.; Joubert, O.

    2013-01-07

    HBr plasma treatments are widely used in nanoscale lithographic technologies to increase the plasma etch resistance of 193 nm photoresist masks as well as to decrease their Line Width Roughness (LWR). VUV irradiation of the photoresist is known to play a major role in this process by inducing polymer chains rearrangement and finally LWR reduction. However, in the plasma environment (i.e., with radical and ion bombardment), the interaction layer formed at the resist surface perturbs this mechanism and a lower LWR reduction is achieved compared to VUV only treatment. So far the nature of the interaction layer, its formation mechanism and its relation with the resist pattern LWR were all unclear. In this paper, we show that a graphite-like layer is formed on the resist patterns by the redeposition of carbon-based species originating from the plasma dissociation of outgassed photo-etched resist moieties. We show that the presence of this layer inhibits the LWR minimization and causes an increase in the LWR when it becomes thick enough (i.e., a few nanometers). We present evidences that the difference in the mechanical properties of the graphite-like top layer which coats the resist patterns and the bulk of the resist patterns is correlated to the LWR after plasma treatment. We can conclude that the optimization of an HBr cure process relies on the minimization of the carbon redeposition while keeping a significant VUV light flux and we show that this can be achieved by using pulsed plasma processes.

  5. Surface morphology and subsurface damaged layer of various glasses machined by 193-nm ArF excimer laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liao, Yunn-shiuan; Chen, Ying-Tung; Chao, Choung-Lii; Liu, Yih-Ming

    2005-01-01

    Owing to the high bonding energy, most of the glasses are removed by photo-thermal rather than photo-chemical effect when they are ablated by the 193 or 248nm excimer lasers. Typically, the machined surface is covered by re-deposited debris and the sub-surface, sometimes surface as well, is scattered with micro-cracks introduced by thermal stress generated during the process. This study aimed to investigate the nature and extent of the surface morphology and sub-surface damaged (SSD) layer induced by the laser ablation. The effects of laser parameters such as fluence, shot number and repetition rate on the morphology and SSD were discussed. An ArF excimer laser (193 nm) was used in the present study to machine glasses such as soda-lime, Zerodur and BK-7. It is found that the melt ejection and debris deposition tend to pile up higher and become denser in structure under a higher energy density, repetition rate and shot number. There are thermal stress induced lateral cracks when the debris covered top layer is etched away. Higher fluence and repetition rate tend to generate more lateral and median cracks which propagate into the substrate. The changes of mechanical properties of the SSD layer were also investigated.

  6. Combined overlay, focus and CD metrology for leading edge lithography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ebert, Martin; Cramer, Hugo; Tel, Wim; Kubis, Michael; Megens, Henry

    2011-04-01

    and Focus measurements respectively. In addition CD profile information can be measured enabling proximity matching applications. By using a technique [2][3][4] to de-convolve dose and focus based on the profile measurement of a well-characterized process monitor target, we show that the dose and focus signature of a high NA 193nm immersion scanner can be effectively measured and corrected. A similar approach was also taken to address overlay errors using the diffraction based overlay capability [5] of the same metrology tool. We demonstrate the advantage of having a single metrology tool solution, which enables us to reduce dose, focus and overlay variability to their minimum non-correctable signatures. This technique makes use of the high accuracy and repeatability of the YieldStar tool and provides a common reference of scanner setup and user process. Using ASML's YieldStar in combination with ASML scanners, and control solutions allows for a direct link from the metrology tool to the system settings, ensuring that the appropriate system settings can be easily and directly updated.

  7. Charting CEBL's role in mainstream semiconductor lithography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lam, David K.

    2013-09-01

    historically kept it out of mainstream fabs. Thanks to continuing EBDW advances combined with the industry's move to unidirectional (1D) gridded layout style, EBDW promises to cost-efficiently complement 193nm ArF immersion (193i) optical lithography in high volume manufacturing (HVM). Patterning conventional 2D design layouts with 193i is a major roadblock in device scaling: the resolution limitations of optical lithography equipment have led to higher mask cost and increased lithography complexity. To overcome the challenge, IC designers have used 1D layouts with "lines and cuts" in critical layers.1 Leading logic and memory chipmakers have been producing advanced designs with lines-and-cuts in HVM for several technology nodes in recent years. However, cut masks in multiple optical patterning are getting extremely costly. Borodovsky proposes Complementary Lithography in which another lithography technology is used to pattern line-cuts in critical layers to complement optical lithography.2 Complementary E-Beam Lithography (CEBL) is a candidate to pattern the Cuts of optically printed Lines. The concept of CEBL is gaining acceptance. However, challenges in throughput, scaling, and data preparation rate are threatening to deny CEBL's role in solving industry's lithography problem. This paper will examine the following issues: The challenges of massively parallel pixel writing The solutions of multiple mini-column design/architecture in: Boosting CEBL throughput Resolving issues of CD control, CDU, LER, data rate, higher resolution, and 450mm wafers The role of CEBL in next-generation solution of semiconductor lithography

  8. Trace element analysis of synthetic mono- and poly-crystalline CaF 2 by ultraviolet laser ablation inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry at 266 and 193 nm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koch, J.; Feldmann, I.; Hattendorf, B.; Günther, D.; Engel, U.; Jakubowski, N.; Bolshov, M.; Niemax, K.; Hergenröder, R.

    2002-06-01

    The analytical figures of merit for ultraviolet laser ablation-inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (UV-LA-ICP-MS) at 266 nm with respect to the trace element analysis of high-purity, UV-transmitting alkaline earth halides are investigated and discussed. Ablation threshold energy density values and ablation rates for mono- and poly-crystalline CaF 2 samples were determined. Furthermore, Pb-, Rb-, Sr-, Ba- and Yb-specific analysis was performed. For these purposes, a pulsed Nd:YAG laser operated at the fourth harmonic of the fundamental wavelength (λ=266 nm) and a double-focusing sector field ICP-MS detector were employed. Depending on the background noise and isotope-specific sensitivity, the detection limits typically varied from 0.7 ng/g for Sr to 7 ng/g in the case of Pb. The concentrations were determined using a glass standard reference material (SRM NIST612). In order to demonstrate the sensitivity of the arrangement described, comparative measurements by means of a commercial ablation system consisting of an ArF excimer laser (λ=193 nm) and a quadrupole-type ICP-MS (ICP-QMS) instrument were carried out. The accuracy of both analyses was in good agreement, whereas ablation at 266 nm and detection using sector-field ICP-MS led to a sensitivity that was one order of magnitude above that obtained at 193 nm with ICP-QMS.

  9. Dynamics of N-OH bond dissociation in cyclopentanone and cyclohexanone oxime at 193 nm: laser-induced fluorescence detection of nascent OH (v'', J'').

    PubMed

    Kawade, Monali N; Saha, Ankur; Upadhyaya, Hari P; Kumar, Awadhesh; Naik, Prakash D

    2010-12-01

    Cyclohexanone oxime (CHO) and cyclopentanone oxime (CPO) in the vapor phase undergo N-OH bond scission upon excitation at 193 nm to produce OH, which was detected state selectively employing laser-induced fluorescence. The measured energy distribution between fragments for both oximes suggests that in CHO the OH produced is mostly vibrationally cold, with moderate rotational excitation, whereas in CPO the OH fragment is also formed in v'' = 1 (~2%). The rotational population of OH (v'' = 0, J'') from CHO is characterized by a rotational temperature of 1440 ± 80 K, whereas the rotational populations of OH (v'' = 0, J'') and OH (v'' = 1, J'') from CPO are characterized by temperatures of 1360 ± 90 K and 930 ± 170 K, respectively. A high fraction of the available energy is partitioned to the relative translation of the fragments with f(T) values of 0.25 and 0.22 for CHO and CPO, respectively. In the case of CHO, the Λ-doublet states of the nascent OH radical are populated almost equally in lower rotational quantum levels N'', with a preference for Π(+) (A') states for higher N''. However, there is no preference for either of the two spin orbit states Π(3/2) and Π(1/2) of OH. The nascent OH product in CPO is equally distributed in both Λ-doublet states of Π(+) (A') and Π(-) (A'') for all N'', but has a preference for the Π(3/2) spin orbit state. Experimental work in combination with theoretical calculations suggests that both CHO and CPO molecules at 193 nm are excited to the S(2) state, which undergoes nonradiative relaxation to the T(2) state. Subsequently, molecules undergo the N-OH bond dissociation from the T(2) state with an exit barrier to produce OH (v'', J'').

  10. Electron Beam Lithography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harriott, Lloyd R.

    1997-04-01

    Electron beams have played a significant role in semiconductor technology for more than twenty years. Early electron beam machines used a raster scanned beam spot to write patterns in electron-sensitive polymer resist materials. The main application of electron beam lithography has been in mask making. Despite the inherently high spatial resolution and wide process margins of electron beam lithography, the writing rate for semiconductor wafers has been too slow to be economically viable on a large scale. In the late 1970's, variable shape electron beam writing was developed, projecting a rectangular beam whose size can be varied for each "shot" exposure of a particular pattern, allowing some integrated circuits to be made economically where a variety of "customized" patterns are desired. In the cell or block projection electron beam exposure technique, a unit cell of a repetitive pattern is projected repeatedly to increase the level of parallelism. This can work well for highly repetitive patterns such as memory chips but is not well suited to complex varying patterns such as microprocessors. The rapid progress in the performance of integrated circuits has been largely driven by progress in optical lithography, through improvements in lens design and fabrication as well as the use of shorter wavelengths for the exposure radiation. Due to limitations from the opacity of lens and mask materials, it is unlikely that conventional optical printing methods can be used at wavelengths below 193 nm or feature sizes much below 180 nm. One candidate technology for a post-optical era is the Scattering with Angular Limitation Projection Electron-beam Lithography (SCALPEL) approach, which combines the high resolution and wide process latitude inherent in electron beam lithography with the throughput of a parallel projection system. A mask consisting of a low atomic number membrane and a high atomic number pattern layer is uniformly illuminated with high energy (100 ke

  11. High-refractive index material design for ArF immersion lithography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Furukawa, Taiichi; Kishida, Takanori; Miyamatsu, Takashi; Kawaguchi, Kazuo; Yamada, Kinji; Tominaga, Tetsuo; Slezak, Mark; Hieda, Katsuhiko

    2007-03-01

    High-refractive-index fluids (HIFs) are being considered to replace water as the immersion fluid in next generation 193nm immersion scanner. At SPIE 2006, we have demonstrated the attractive optical properties and good imaging performance for our HIF candidates, HIL-001 and HIL-002. In this paper, we will describe our latest results on the remaining issues for the practical application of HIF candidates, as well as introduce 3 rd generation fluids for the further extension of ArF immersion lithography. In order to improve the fluid transparency, we have tried two approaches. One is the improvement of transparency for HIL-001 based on a refining technology and the other is to develop a novel HIF candidate by using computational chemistry, which is named HIL-203. By passing through a suitable refining unit, HIL-001 can reach a transmittance of >99%/mm, which is as high as water. This new purification method can be applied to an on-site reuse system. It was also found that the refining unit was very effective to eliminate the impurities coming from the photo-degradation of HIL, chemical substances contamination under the air exposure, and leaching of resist components such as photo-acid generator or quencher. We have developed a new fluid for 3 rd generation immersion fluids. It had a higher refractive index than that of HIL-001 or HIL-203; however, it still falls short of our target value. Additionally, by using a novel design concept, we have developed a top-coat with high refractive index for HIL immersion lithography, which gave an appropriate contact angle for scanning exposure.

  12. Electron stimulated desorption of the metallic substrate at monolayer coverage: Sensitive detection via 193 nm laser photoionization of neutral aluminum desorbed from CH3O/Al(111)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Young, C. E.; Whitten, J. E.; Pellin, M. J.; Gruen, D. M.; Jones, P. L.

    A fortuitous overlap between the gain profile of the 193 nm ArF excimer laser and the Al autoionizing transition (sup 2)S(sub 1/2) (512753/cm) yields to the left (sup 2)P(sup 0)J has been exploited in the direct observation of substrate metal atoms in an electron simulated desorption (ESD) process from the monolayer adsorbate system CH3O/Al(111). The identity of the mass 27 photoion was established as Al(+) by (1) isotopic substitution of C-13 in the methanol employed for methoxy formation, and (2) tunable laser scans utilizing the DJ-2 (J = 3/2, 5/2) intermediate levels at approximately 32436/cm and a 248 nm ionization step. An ESD yield of approximately x 10(exp -6) Al atoms/(electron at 1 keV) was established by comparison with a sputtering experiment in the same apparatus. Velocity distributions measured for the desorbed Al species showed some differences in comparison with methoxy velocity data: a slightly lower peak velocity and a significantly less prominent high-velocity component.

  13. EUV lithography imaging using novel pellicle membranes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pollentier, Ivan; Vanpaemel, Johannes; Lee, Jae Uk; Adelmann, Christoph; Zahedmanesh, Houman; Huyghebaert, Cedric; Gallagher, Emily E.

    2016-03-01

    EUV mask protection against defects during use remains a challenge for EUV lithography. A stand-off protective membrane - a pellicle - is targeted to prevent yield losses in high volume manufacturing during handling and exposure, just as it is for 193nm lithography. The pellicle is thin enough to transmit EUV exposure light, yet strong enough to remain intact and hold any particles out of focus during exposure. The development of pellicles for EUV is much more challenging than for 193nm lithography for multiple reasons including: high absorption of most materials at EUV wavelength, pump-down sequences in the EUV vacuum system, and exposure to high intensity EUV light. To solve the problems of transmission and film durability, various options have been explored. In most cases a thin core film is considered, since the deposition process for this is well established and because it is the simplest option. The transmission specification typically dictates that membranes are very thin (~50nm or less), which makes both fabrication and film mechanical integrity difficult. As an alternative, low density films (e.g. including porosity) will allow thicker membranes for a given transmission specification, which is likely to improve film durability. The risk is that the porosity could influence the imaging. At imec, two cases of pellicle concepts based on reducing density have been assessed : (1) 3D-patterned SiN by directed self-assembly (DSA), and (2) carbon nanomaterials such as carbon nanotubes (CNT) and carbon nanosheets (CNS). The first case is based on SiN membranes that are 3D-patterned by Directed Self Assembly (DSA). The materials are tested relative to the primary specifications: EUV transmission and film durability. A risk assessment of printing performance is provided based on simulations of scattered energy. General conclusions on the efficacy of various approaches will provided.

  14. Feasibility study of optical/e-beam complementary lithography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hohle, Christoph; Choi, Kang-Hoon; Freitag, Martin; Gutsch, Manuela; Jaschinsky, Philipp; Kahlenberg, Frank; Klein, Christof; Klikovits, Jan; Paul, Jan; Rudolph, Matthias; Thrun, Xaver

    2012-03-01

    Using electron beam direct write (EBDW) as a complementary approach together with standard optical lithography at 193nm or EUV wavelength has been proposed only lately and might be a reasonable solution for low volume CMOS manufacturing and special applications as well as design rule restrictions. Here, the high throughput of the optical litho can be combined with the high resolution and the high flexibility of the e-beam by using a mix & match approach (Litho- Etch-Litho-Etch, LELE). Complementary Lithography is mainly driven by special design requirements for unidirectional (1-D gridded) Manhattan type design layouts that enable scaling of advanced logic chips. This requires significant data prep efforts such as layout splitting. In this paper we will show recent results of Complementary Lithography using 193nm immersion generated 50nm lines/space pattern addressing the 32nm logic technology node that were cut with electron beam direct write. Regular lines and space arrays were patterned at GLOBALFOUNDRIES Dresden and have been cut in predefined areas using a VISTEC SB3050DW e-beam direct writer (50KV Variable Shaped Beam) at Fraunhofer Center Nanoelectronic Technologies (CNT), Dresden, as well as on the PML2 tool at IMS Nanofabrication, Vienna. Two types of e-beam resists were used for the cut exposure. Integration issues as well as overlay requirements and performance improvements necessary for this mix & match approach will be discussed.

  15. Immersion lithography bevel solutions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tedeschi, Len; Tamada, Osamu; Sanada, Masakazu; Yasuda, Shuichi; Asai, Masaya

    2008-03-01

    The introduction of Immersion lithography, combined with the desire to maximize the number of potential yielding devices per wafer, has brought wafer edge engineering to the forefront for advanced semiconductor manufactures. Bevel cleanliness, the position accuracy of the lithography films, and quality of the EBR cut has become more critical. In this paper, the effectiveness of wafer track based solutions to enable state-of-art bevel schemes is explored. This includes an integrated bevel cleaner and new bevel rinse nozzles. The bevel rinse nozzles are used in the coating process to ensure a precise, clean film edge on or near the bevel. The bevel cleaner is used immediately before the wafer is loaded into the scanner after the coating process. The bevel cleaner shows promise in driving down defectivity levels, specifically printing particles, while not damaging films on the bevel.

  16. Point-of-use filtration strategy for negative tone developer in extended immersion and extreme-ultraviolet (EUV) lithography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    D'Urzo, L.; Foubert, P.; Stokes, H.; Thouroude, Y.; Xia, A.; Wu, Aiwen

    2015-03-01

    Negative tone development (NTD) has dramatically gained popularity in 193 nm dry and immersion lithography, due to their superior imaging performance [1, 2 and 3]. Popular negative tone developers are organic solvents such as n- butyl acetate (n-BA), aliphatic ketones, or high-density alcohols such as Methyl Isobutyl Carbinol (MIBC). In this work, a comparative study between ultra-high molecular weight polyethylene (UPE) and polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE) POU filtration for n-BA based NTD has been carried out. Results correlate with the occurrence or the mitigation of micro bridges in a 45 nm dense line pattern created through immersion lithography as a function of POU membrane.

  17. Hydrogen Migration and Vinylidene Pathway for Formation of Methane in the 193 nm Photodissociation of Propene: CH3CH=CH2 and CD3CD=CD2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zhao, Yi-Lei; Laufer, Allan H.; Halpern, Joshua B.; Fahr, Askar

    2007-01-01

    Photodissociation channels and the final product yields from the 193 nm photolysis of propene-h6 (CH2=CHCH3) and propene-d6 (CD2=CDCD3) have been investigated, employing gas chromatography, mass spectroscopy, and flame ionization (GC/MS/FID) detection methods. The yields of methane as well as butadiene relative to ethane show considerable variations when propene-h6 or propene-d6 are photolyzed. This suggests significant variances in the relative importance of primary photolytic processes and/or secondary radical reactions, occurring subsequent to the photolysis. Theoretical calculations suggest the potential occurrence of an intramolecular dissociation through a mechanism involving vinylidene formation, accompanied by an ethylenic H-migration through the pi-orbitals. This process affects the final yields of methane-h4 versus methane-d4 with respect to other products. The product yields from previous studies of the 193 nm photolysis of methyl vinyl ketone-h6 and -d6 (CH2=CHCOCH3, CD2=CDCOCD3), alternative precursors for generating methyl and vinyl radicals, are compared with the current results for propene.

  18. Manufacturing implementation of scatterometry and other techniques for 300-mm lithography tool controls

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wiltshire, T.; Corliss, D.; Brunner, T.; Ausschnitt, C.; Young, R.; Nielson, R.; Hwang, E.; Iannucci, J., Jr.

    2009-03-01

    Focus and dose control of lithography tools for leading edge semiconductor manufacturing are critical to obtaining acceptable process yields and device performance. The need for these controls is increasing due to the apparent limitation of optical water immersion lithography at NA values of approximately 1.35 and the need to use the same equipment for 45nm, 32nm, and 22nm node production. There is a rich history of lithographic controls using various techniques described in the literature. These techniques include (but are not limited to) Phase Grating Focus Monitoring1 (PGFM), optical CD control using optical overlay metrology equipment (OOCD)2,3, and in more recent years optical scatterometry4,5. Some of the techniques, even though they are technically sound, have not been practical to implement in volume manufacturing as controls for various reasons. This work describes the implementation and performance of two of these techniques (optical scatterometry and OOCD) in a volume 300mm production facility. Data to be reviewed include: - General implementation approach. - Scatterometry dose and focus stability data for 193nm immersion and 248nm dry lithography systems. - Analysis of the stability of optical scatterometry dose and focus deconvolution coefficients over time for 193nm immersion and 248nm dry systems. - Comparison between scatterometry and OOCD techniques for focus monitoring of 248nm dry systems. The presentation will also describe the practical issues with implementing these techniques as well as describe some possible extensions to enhance the current capabilities being described.

  19. Preliminary characterisation of new glass reference materials (GSA-1G, GSC-1G, GSD-1G and GSE-1G) by laser ablation-inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry using 193 nm, 213 nm and 266 nm wavelengths

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Guillong, M.; Hametner, K.; Reusser, E.; Wilson, S.A.; Gunther, D.

    2005-01-01

    New glass reference materials GSA-1G, GSC-1G, GSD-1G and GSE-1G have been characterised using a prototype solid state laser ablation system capable of producing wavelengths of 193 nm, 213 nm and 266 nm. This system allowed comparison of the effects of different laser wavelengths under nearly identical ablation and ICP operating conditions. The wavelengths 213 nm and 266 nm were also used at higher energy densities to evaluate the influence of energy density on quantitative analysis. In addition, the glass reference materials were analysed using commercially available 266 nm Nd:YAG and 193 nm ArF excimer lasers. Laser ablation analysis was carried out using both single spot and scanning mode ablation. Using laser ablation ICP-MS, concentrations of fifty-eight elements were determined with external calibration to the NIST SRM 610 glass reference material. Instead of applying the more common internal standardisation procedure, the total concentration of all element oxide concentrations was normalised to 100%. Major element concentrations were compared with those determined by electron microprobe. In addition to NIST SRM 610 for external calibration, USGS BCR-2G was used as a more closely matrix-matched reference material in order to compare the effect of matrix-matched and non matrix-matched calibration on quantitative analysis. The results show that the various laser wavelengths and energy densities applied produced similar results, with the exception of scanning mode ablation at 266 nm without matrix-matched calibration where deviations up to 60% from the average were found. However, results acquired using a scanning mode with a matrix-matched calibration agreed with results obtained by spot analysis. The increased abundance of large particles produced when using a scanning ablation mode with NIST SRM 610, is responsible for elemental fractionation effects caused by incomplete vaporisation of large particles in the ICP.

  20. Patterning strategy for low-K1 lithography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hwang, David H.; Cheng, Wen-Hao

    2004-08-01

    Moore's law has been guiding the semiconductor industry for four decades. Lithography is the key enabler to keep the industry on the technology treadmill. Lithographers have been facing unprecedented challenges during last five years to keep the technology on the technology treadmill by developing various kinds of resolution enhancement techniques (RETs). In low K1 regime, co-optimization of design, layout mask, OPC, lithography and etching is the primary strategy to deliver a production-worthy patterning solution. Optical shrink is not a trivial task anymore. Intel always pursues parallel patterning techniques based on the dual exposure wavelength patterning strategy. While EUVL is the preferred patterning solution for 32nm node, 193nm immersion lithography with super high NA illumination is one of the parallel patterning strategies. The effects of polarization at super high NA illumination on mask technology, such as lens reduction ratio, blank absorber thickness and image imbalance correction, and restriction on design layout are addressed in this paper. Contact patterning is extremely challenging at low K1. Contact shape factor (circularity) which impacts the design rule will be discussed in this paper. Explosion of data file size and mask write time, stringent mask CD control and mask defect disposition are direct consequences of low-K1/high-MEEF (Mask Error Enhancement Factor) lithography. Mask makers alone cannot resolve the challenges in a cost effective manner. A seamless integration solution is a must.

  1. High-n immersion lithography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sewell, Harry; Mulkens, Jan; Graeupner, Paul; McCafferty, Diane; Markoya, Louis; Donders, Sjoerd; Cortie, Rogier; Meijers, Ralph; Evangelista, Fabrizio; Samarakone, Nandarisi

    2008-03-01

    A two-year study on the feasibility of High-n Immersion Lithography shows very promising results. This paper reports the findings of the study. The evaluation shows the tremendous progress made in the development of second-generation immersion fluid technology. Candidate fluids from several suppliers have been evaluated. All the commercial fluids evaluated are viable, so there are a number of options. Life tests have been conducted on bench top fluid-handling systems and the results referenced to full-scale systems. Parameters such as Dose per Laser Pulse, Pulse Rate, Fluid Flow Rate, and Fluid Absorbency at 193nm, and Oxygen/Air Contamination Levels were explored. A detailed evaluation of phenomena such as Last Lens Element (LLE) contamination has been conducted. Lens cleaning has been evaluated. A comparison of High-n fluid-based technology and water-based immersion technology shows interesting advantages of High-n fluid in the areas of Defect and Resist Interaction. Droplet Drying tests, Resist Staining evaluations, and Resist Contrast impact studies have all been run. Defect-generating mechanisms have been identified and are being eliminated. The lower evaporation rate of the High-n fluids compared with water shows the advantages of High-n Immersion. The core issue for the technology, the availability of High-n optical material for use as the final lens element, is updated. Samples of LuAG material have been received from development partners and have been evaluated. The latest status of optical materials and the technology timelines are reported. The potential impact of the availability of the technology is discussed. Synergy with technologies such as Double Patterning is discussed. The prospects for <22nm (hp) are evaluated.

  2. Scanner Art

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jaworski, Joy; Murphy, Kris

    2009-01-01

    In this article, the authors describe how they incorporated environmental awareness into their art curriculum. Here, they describe a digital photography project in which their students used flatbed scanners as cameras. Their students composed their objects directly on the scanner. The lesson enabled students to realize that artists have voices…

  3. EUV mask particle adders during scanner exposure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hyun, Yoonsuk; Kim, Jinsoo; Kim, Kyuyoung; Koo, Sunyoung; Kim, SeoMin; Kim, Youngsik; Lim, Changmoon; Kwak, Nohjung

    2015-03-01

    As EUV reaches high volume manufacturing, scanner source power and reticle defectivity attract a lot of attention. Keeping a EUV mask clean after mask production is as essential as producing a clean EUV mask. Even though EUV pellicle is actively investigated, we might expose EUV masks without EUV pellicle for some time. To keep clean EUV mask under pellicle-less lithography, EUV scanner cleanliness needs to meet the requirement of high volume manufacturing. In this paper, we will show the cleanliness of EUV scanners in view of mask particle adders during scanner exposure. From this we will find several tendencies of mask particle adders depending on mask environment in scanner. Further we can categorize mask particle adders, which could show the possible causes of particle adders during exposure in scanners.

  4. Coaxial Lithography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ozel, Tuncay

    The optical and electrical properties of heterogeneous nanowires are profoundly related to their composition and nanoscale architecture. However, the intrinsic constraints of conventional synthetic and lithographic techniques have limited the types of multi-compositional nanowires that can be realized and studied in the laboratory. This thesis focuses on bridging templated electrochemical synthesis and lithography for expanding current synthetic capabilities with respect to materials generality and the ability to tailor two-dimensional growth in the formation of core-shell structures for the rational design and preparation of nanowires with very complex architectures that cannot be made by any other techniques. Chapter 1 introduces plasmonics, templated electrochemical synthesis, and on-wire lithography concepts and their significances within chemistry and materials science. Chapter 2 details a powerful technique for the deposition of metals and semiconductors with nanometer resolution in segment and gap lengths using on-wire lithography, which serves as a new platform to explore plasmon-exciton interactions in the form of long-range optical nanoscale rulers. Chapter 3 highlights an approach for the electrochemical synthesis of solution dispersible core-shell polymeric and inorganic semiconductor nanowires with metallic leads. A photodetector based on a single core-shell semiconductor nanowire is presented to demonstrate the functionality of the nanowires produced using this approach. Chapter 4 describes a new materials general technique, termed coaxial lithography (COAL), bridging templated electrochemical synthesis and lithography for generating coaxial nanowires in a parallel fashion with sub-10 nanometer resolution in both axial and radial dimensions. Combinations of coaxial nanowires composed of metals, metal oxides, metal chalcogenides, conjugated polymers, and a core/shell semiconductor nanowire with an embedded plasmonic nanoring are presented to

  5. Expected innovations of optical lithography in the next 10 years

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Owa, Soichi; Hirayanagi, Noriyuki

    2016-03-01

    In the past 10 years, immersion lithography has been the most effective high volume manufacturing method for the critical layers of semiconductor devices. Thinking of the next 10 years, we can expect continuous improvement on existing 300 mm wafer scanners with better accuracy and throughput to enhance the total output value per input cost. This value productivity, however, can be upgraded also by larger innovations which might happen in optical lithography. In this paper, we will discuss the possibilities and the impossibilities of potential innovation ideas of optical lithography, which are 450 mm wafer, optical maskless, multicolor lithography, and metamaterial.

  6. Bridging the gap from mask to physical design for multiple patterning lithography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Bei; Gao, Jhih-Rong; Xu, Xiaoqing; Pan, David Z.

    2014-03-01

    Due to the delay of EUVL, multiple patterning techniques have been used to extend the 193nm lithography to 22nm/14nm nodes, and possibly further. There are many studies on MPL layout decompositions at the mask synthesis stage to resolve the coloring conflicts, minimize the stitches, balance the mask density, or even mitigate the undesirable overlay effects. Meanwhile, there are studies showing that it is very important to consider the multiple patterning implications at earlier physical design stages so that the overall design and manufacturing closure can be reached. In this paper, we will show some recent results and propose a unified physical design methodology for standard cell compliance, pin access, routing, and placement to bridge the gap from mask/layout decomposition to physical design, while accommodating various requirements from double/triple patterning lithography in certain "correct by construction" manner.

  7. Lithography optics: its present and future

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matsumoto, Koichi; Mori, Takashi

    1998-09-01

    Firstly, various technical aspects of ArF optics are surveyed. At present, the ArF excimer laser is regarded as one of the most promising candidates as a next-generation light source for optical lithography. Discussions are ranging over some critical issues of ArF optics. The lifetime of ArF optics supposedly limited by the radiation compaction of silica glass is estimated in comparison with KrF optics. Availability of calcium fluoride (CaF2) is also discussed. As a designing issue, a comparative study is made about the optical configuration, dioptric or catadioptric. In the end, our resist-based performance is shown. Secondly, estimated are the future trend regarding minimum geometry and the optical parameters, such as numerical aperture and wavelength. For the estimation, simulations based on aerial images are performed, where in the resolution limit is defined as a minimum feature size which retains practical depth of focus. Pattern geometry is classified into two categories, which are dense lines and isolated lines. Available wavelengths are assumed to be KrF excimer laser ((λ =248 nm), ArF excimer laser (λ =193 nm) and F2 excimer laser (λ =157 nm). Based upon the simulation results, the resolution limit is estimated for each geometry and each wavelength.

  8. Cylindrical Scanner

    1999-04-29

    The CS system is designed to provide a very fast imaging system in order to search for weapons on persons in an airport environment. The Cylindrical Scanner moves a vertical transceiver array rapidly around a person standing stationary. The software can be segmented in to three specific tasks. The first task is data acquisition and scanner control. At the operator's request, this task commands the scanner to move and the radar transceiver array to sendmore » data to the computer system in a known and well-ordered manner. The array is moved over the complete aperture in 10 to 12 seconds. At the completion of the array movement the second software task automatically reconstructs the high-resolution image from the radar data utilizing the integrated DSP boards. The third task displays the resulting images, as they become available, to the computer screen for user review and analysis.« less

  9. Polymer and Material Design for Lithography From 50 nm Node to the sub-16 nm Node

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trefonas, Peter

    2012-02-01

    Microlithography is one of the technologies which enabled the Information Age. Developing at the intersection of optical physics, polymer science and photochemistry, the need for ever smaller high fidelity patterns to build integrated circuits is currently pushing the technology evolution from 193 nm immersion lithography to extreme ultraviolet lithography (13.5 nm) to alternate patterning technologies such as directed self assembly (DSA) of block copolymers. Essential to the success of this progression is a rapid application of new concepts and materials in polymer science. We will discuss the requirements for 193 immersion lithography and how advanced acrylic random polymers are being designed with chemical amplification functionality to meet these needs. The special requirements of a water immersion lithography led to the invention and rapid commercial application of surface assembled embedded barrier layer polymers. Design of polymers for EUV lithography is having to respond to much different challenges, prominent being the dearth of photons in the exposure step, and the other being how to maximize the efficiency of photoacid production. In parallel, alternative lithographic approaches are being developed using directed self assembly of block copolymers which realize pattern frequency multiplication. We will update with our progress in the applications of polymers designed for DSA.

  10. E-beam to complement optical lithography for 1D layouts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lam, David K.; Liu, Enden D.; Smayling, Michael C.; Prescop, Ted

    2011-04-01

    The semiconductor industry is moving to highly regular designs, or 1D gridded layouts, to enable scaling to advanced nodes, as well as improve process latitude, chip size and chip energy consumption. The fabrication of highly regular ICs is straightforward. Poly and metal layers are arranged into 1D layouts. These 1D layouts facilitate a two-step patterning approach: a line-creation step, followed by a line-cutting step, to form the desired IC pattern (See Figure 1). The first step, line creation, can be accomplished with a variety of lithography techniques including 193nm immersion (193i) and Self-Aligned Double Patterning (SADP). It appears feasible to create unidirectional parallel lines to at least 11 nm half-pitch, with two applications of SADP for pitch division by four. Potentially, this step can also be accomplished with interference lithography or directed self assembly in the future. The second step, line cutting, requires an extremely high-resolution lithography technique. At advanced nodes, the only options appear to be the costly quadruple patterning with 193i, or EUV or E-Beam Lithography (EBL). This paper focuses on the requirements for a lithography system for "line cutting", using EBL to complement Optical. EBL is the most cost-effective option for line cutting at advanced nodes for HVM.

  11. Material design for immersion lithography with high refractive index fluid (HIF)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miyamatsu, Takashi; Wang, Yong; Shima, Motoyuki; Kusumoto, Shiro; Chiba, Takashi; Nakagawa, Hiroki; Hieda, Katsuhiko; Shimokawa, Tsutomu

    2005-05-01

    ArF immersion lithography is considered as the most promising next generation technology which enables to a 45 nm node device manufacturing and below. Not only depth of focus enlargement, immersion lithography enables to use hyper numerical aperture (NA) larger than 1.0 and achieve higher resolution capability. For 193nm lithography, water is an ideal immersion fluid, providing suitable refractive index and transmission properties. Furthermore the higher refractive index fluid is expected to provide a potential extension of optical lithography to the 32 nm node. This paper describes the material design for immersion lithography with high refractive index fluid. We have developed promising high refractive index fluids which satisfy the requirement for immersion fluid by screening wide variety of organic compounds. The physical and chemical properties of this high refractive index fluid are discussed in detail. Also the topcoat material which has good matching with high refractive index fluid is developed. While this topcoat material is soluble into aqueous TMAH developer, it does not dissolve into water or high refractive index fluid and gives suitable contact angle for immersion scan exposure. Immersion exposure experiments using high refractive index fluid with and w/o topcoat material was carried out and its lithographic performance is presented in this paper.

  12. VUV lithography

    DOEpatents

    George, E.V.; Oster, Y.; Mundinger, D.C.

    1990-12-25

    Deep UV projection lithography can be performed using an e-beam pumped solid excimer UV source, a mask, and a UV reduction camera. The UV source produces deep UV radiation in the range 1,700--1,300A using xenon, krypton or argon; shorter wavelengths of 850--650A can be obtained using neon or helium. A thin solid layer of the gas is formed on a cryogenically cooled plate and bombarded with an e-beam to cause fluorescence. The UV reduction camera utilizes multilayer mirrors having high reflectivity at the UV wavelength and images the mask onto a resist coated substrate at a preselected demagnification. The mask can be formed integrally with the source as an emitting mask. 6 figs.

  13. VUV lithography

    DOEpatents

    George, Edward V.; Oster, Yale; Mundinger, David C.

    1990-01-01

    Deep UV projection lithography can be performed using an e-beam pumped solid excimer UV source, a mask, and a UV reduction camera. The UV source produces deep UV radiation in the range 1700-1300A using xenon, krypton or argon; shorter wavelengths of 850-650A can be obtained using neon or helium. A thin solid layer of the gas is formed on a cryogenically cooled plate and bombarded with an e-beam to cause fluorescence. The UV reduction camera utilizes multilayer mirrors having high reflectivity at the UV wavelength and images the mask onto a resist coated substrate at a preselected demagnification. The mask can be formed integrally with the source as an emitting mask.

  14. Maskless lithography

    DOEpatents

    Sweatt, W.C.; Stulen, R.H.

    1999-02-09

    The present invention provides a method for maskless lithography. A plurality of individually addressable and rotatable micromirrors together comprise a two-dimensional array of micromirrors. Each micromirror in the two-dimensional array can be envisioned as an individually addressable element in the picture that comprises the circuit pattern desired. As each micromirror is addressed it rotates so as to reflect light from a light source onto a portion of the photoresist coated wafer thereby forming a pixel within the circuit pattern. By electronically addressing a two-dimensional array of these micromirrors in the proper sequence a circuit pattern that is comprised of these individual pixels can be constructed on a microchip. The reflecting surface of the micromirror is configured in such a way as to overcome coherence and diffraction effects in order to produce circuit elements having straight sides. 12 figs.

  15. Maskless lithography

    DOEpatents

    Sweatt, William C.; Stulen, Richard H.

    1999-01-01

    The present invention provides a method for maskless lithography. A plurality of individually addressable and rotatable micromirrors together comprise a two-dimensional array of micromirrors. Each micromirror in the two-dimensional array can be envisioned as an individually addressable element in the picture that comprises the circuit pattern desired. As each micromirror is addressed it rotates so as to reflect light from a light source onto a portion of the photoresist coated wafer thereby forming a pixel within the circuit pattern. By electronically addressing a two-dimensional array of these micromirrors in the proper sequence a circuit pattern that is comprised of these individual pixels can be constructed on a microchip. The reflecting surface of the micromirror is configured in such a way as to overcome coherence and diffraction effects in order to produce circuit elements having straight sides.

  16. Resists for next generation lithography

    SciTech Connect

    Brainard, Robert L.; Barclay, George G.; Anderson, Erik H.; Ocola, Leonidas E.

    2001-10-03

    Four Next Generation Lithographic options (EUV, x-ray, EPL, IPL) are compared against four current optical technologies (i-line, DUV, 193 nm, 157 nm) for resolution capabilities based on wavelength. As the wavelength of the incident radiation decreases, the nature of the interaction with the resist changes. At high energies, optical density is less sensitive to molecular structure then at 157 nm.

  17. Optical scanner

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Finkel, Mitchell W. (Inventor)

    1987-01-01

    An optical scanner for imaging lines in an object plane onto a linear array in a focal plane either continuously or discretely is described. The scanner consists of a set of four mutually perpendicularly oriented plane corner mirrors which provide a reflecting path that describes a parallelogram. In addition, there is a plane parallel scanning mirror with a front and back reflecting surface located midway between the first and fourth corner mirrors. It is oriented so that in the mid-scan position it is parallel to the first corner mirror, and therefore perpendicular to the fourth corner mirror. As the scan mirror rotates, rays incident from a plurality of lines in the object plane are selectively directed through the optical system arriving at a common intersection on the back surface of the scanning mirror where the rays are colinearly directed toward a lens and then imaged onto the linear array in the focal plane. A set of compensating mirrors may be introduced just before the imaging lens to compensate for a small and generally negligible path difference delta sub l between the axial and marginal rays.

  18. Low-loss, flat-topped and spectrally uniform silicon-nanowire-based 5th-order CROW fabricated by ArF-immersion lithography process on a 300-mm SOI wafer.

    PubMed

    Jeong, Seok-Hwan; Shimura, Daisuke; Simoyama, Takasi; Seki, Miyoshi; Yokoyama, Nobuyuki; Ohtsuka, Minoru; Koshino, Keiji; Horikawa, Tsuyoshi; Tanaka, Yu; Morito, Ken

    2013-12-16

    We report superior spectral characteristics of silicon-nanowire-based 5th-order coupled resonator optical waveguides (CROW) fabricated by 193-nm ArF-immersion lithography process on a 300-mm silicon-on-insulator wafer. We theoretically analyze spectral characteristics, considering random phase errors caused by micro fabrication process. It will be experimentally demonstrated that the fabricated devices exhibit a low excess loss of 0.4 ± 0.2 dB, a high out-of-band rejection ratio of >40dB, and a wide flatband width of ~2 nm. Furthermore, we evaluate manufacturing tolerances for intra-dies and inter-dies, comparing with the cases for 248-nm KrF-dry lithography process. It will be shown that the 193-nm ArF-immersion lithography process can provide much less excess phase errors of Si-nanowire waveguides, thus enabling to give better filter spectral characteristics. Finally, spectral superiorities will be reconfirmed by measuring 25 Gbps modulated signals launched into the fabricated device. Clear eye diagrams are observed when the wavelengths of modulated signals are stayed within almost passband of the 5th-order CROW.

  19. Extension of optical lithography by mask-litho integration with computational lithography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takigawa, T.; Gronlund, K.; Wiley, J.

    2010-05-01

    Wafer lithography process windows can be enlarged by using source mask co-optimization (SMO). Recently, SMO including freeform wafer scanner illumination sources has been developed. Freeform sources are generated by a programmable illumination system using a micro-mirror array or by custom Diffractive Optical Elements (DOE). The combination of freeform sources and complex masks generated by SMO show increased wafer lithography process window and reduced MEEF. Full-chip mask optimization using source optimized by SMO can generate complex masks with small variable feature size sub-resolution assist features (SRAF). These complex masks create challenges for accurate mask pattern writing and low false-defect inspection. The accuracy of the small variable-sized mask SRAF patterns is degraded by short range mask process proximity effects. To address the accuracy needed for these complex masks, we developed a highly accurate mask process correction (MPC) capability. It is also difficult to achieve low false-defect inspections of complex masks with conventional mask defect inspection systems. A printability check system, Mask Lithography Manufacturability Check (M-LMC), is developed and integrated with 199-nm high NA inspection system, NPI. M-LMC successfully identifies printable defects from all of the masses of raw defect images collected during the inspection of a complex mask. Long range mask CD uniformity errors are compensated by scanner dose control. A mask CD uniformity error map obtained by mask metrology system is used as input data to the scanner. Using this method, wafer CD uniformity is improved. As reviewed above, mask-litho integration technology with computational lithography is becoming increasingly important.

  20. Limitation of blend type of resist platform on EUV lithography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hirayama, Taku; Kim, Su Min; Na, Hai Sub; Koh, Chawon; Kim, Hyun Woo

    2012-03-01

    Chemically amplified resist (CAR) system is being widely used not only for 248 nm and 193 nm lithography but for Extreme Ultra Violet Lithography (EUVL).[1] And CAR system is based on blend resist platform which is formulated with polymer and photo-acid generator (PAG) independently. In EUVL to aim at 22 nm node and beyond, EUV resists are required to achieve much higher acid generation efficiency and overcome RLS (Resolution, Line edge roughness, Sensitivity) trade-off using some ideas such as increase in PAG concentration and film absorption coefficient, suppression of acid diffusion length and so on.[2-6] Increase in PAG loading ratio is a promising strategy to improve EUV resist performance,[7-10] however there must be upper limitation of PAG loading ratio on blend resist platform due to lowering film Tg induced by a plasticization effect of blended PAG. This plasticization effect of blended PAG would have another impact to increase acid diffusion length, resulting in low resolution and significant thickness loss, especially on ultra thin film condition. On the other hand, utilizing the PAG having bulky cation structure was beneficial in order to maintain dark loss (in other word, top loss) of the patterned features, however, this type of cation would show low quantum yield driven by the substituent on a cation structure, so that total performance such as ultimate resolution deteriorated. From these results, the bound resist platform which has PAG unit on polymer backbone as branch would be promising platform because of its potential advantages such as suppression of dark loss, no plasticization effect and control of acid diffusion.

  1. 7nm logic optical lithography with OPC-Lite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smayling, Michael C.; Tsujita, Koichiro; Yaegashi, Hidetami; Axelrad, Valery; Nakayama, Ryo; Oyama, Kenichi; Yamauchi, Shohei; Ishii, Hiroyuki; Mikami, Koji

    2015-03-01

    The CMOS logic 22nm node was the last one done with single patterning. It used a highly regular layout style with Gridded Design Rules (GDR). Smaller nodes have required the same regular layout style but with multiple patterning for critical layers. A "line/cut" approach is being used to achieve good pattern fidelity and process margin.[1] As shown in Fig. 1, even with "line" patterns, pitch division will eventually be necessary. For the "cut" pattern, Design-Source-Mask Optimization (DSMO) has been demonstrated to be effective at the 20nm node and below.[2,3,4] Single patterning was found to be suitable down to 16nm, while double patterning extended optical lithography for cuts to the 10-12nm nodes. Design optimization avoided the need for triple patterning. Lines can be patterned with 193nm immersion with no complex OPC. The final line dimensions can be achieved by applying pitch division by two or four.[5] In this study, we extend the scaling using simplified OPC to the 7nm node for critical FEOL and BEOL layers. The test block is a reasonably complex logic function with ~100k gates of combinatorial logic and flip-flops, scaled from previous experiments. Simulation results show that for cuts at 7nm logic dimensions, the gate layer can be done with single patterning whose minimum pitch is 53nm, possibly some of the 1x metal layers can be done with double patterning whose minimum pitch is 53nm, and the contact layer will require triple patterning whose minimum pitch is 68nm. These pitches are less than the resolution limit of ArF NA=1.35 (72nm). However these patterns can be separated by a combination of innovative SMO for less than optical resolution limit and a process trick of hole-repair technique. An example of triple patterning coloring is shown in Fig 3. Fin and local interconnect are created by lines and trims. The number of trim patterns are 3 times (min. pitch=90nm) and twice (min. pitch=120nm), respectively. The small number of masks, large pitches, and

  2. Sub-20nm hybrid lithography using optical, pitch-division, and e-beam

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Belledent, J.; Smayling, M.; Pradelles, J.; Pimenta-Barros, P.; Barnola, S.; Mage, L.; Icard, B.; Lapeyre, C.; Soulan, S.; Pain, L.

    2012-03-01

    A roadmap extending far beyond the current 22nm CMOS node has been presented several times. [1] This roadmap includes the use of a highly regular layout style which can be decomposed into "lines and cuts."[2] The "lines" can be done with existing optical immersion lithography and pitch division with self-aligned spacers.[3] The "cuts" can be done with either multiple exposures using immersion lithography, or a hybrid solution using either EUV or direct-write ebeam.[ 4] The choice for "cuts" will be driven by the availability of cost-effective, manufacturing-ready equipment and infrastructure. Optical lithography improvements have enabled scaling far beyond what was expected; for example, soft x-rays (aka EUV) were in the semiconductor roadmap as early as 1994 since optical resolution was not expected for sub-100nm features. However, steady improvements and innovations such as Excimer laser sources and immersion photolithography have allowed some manufacturers to build 22nm CMOS SOCs with single-exposure optical lithography. With the transition from random complex 2D shapes to regular 1D-patterns at 28nm, the "lines and cuts" approach can extend CMOS logic to at least the 7nm node. The spacer double patterning for lines and optical cuts patterning is expected to be used down to the 14nm node. In this study, we extend the scaling to 18nm half-pitch which is approximately the 10-11nm node using spacer pitch division and complementary e-beam lithography. For practical reasons, E-Beam lithography is used as well to expose the "mandrel" patterns that support the spacers. However, in a production mode, it might be cost effective to replace this step by a standard 193nm exposure and applying the spacer technique twice to divide the pitch by 3 or 4. The Metal-1 "cut" pattern is designed for a reasonably complex logic function with ~100k gates of combinatorial logic and flip-flops. Since the final conductor is defined by a Damascene process, the "cut" patterns become islands

  3. 1x stencil masks fabrication and their use in Low-Energy Electron-beam Proximity Lithography (LEEPL)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Behringer, Uwe F. W.

    2004-12-01

    Thirty years ago it was the common believe of most of the lithographer that the limit end for the optical lithography will be at about 1 μm ground rule. So NGL tools were developed to go in the 500nm and 250nm regions. 15 years later the different optical lithography techniques were still alive exposing feature sizes down to 200nm and the NGL tool developer had to move to 100nm and below. Today 100nm features made by optical lithography is world wide a common technique in most of the modern chip manufacturing plants, and feature sizes beyond the used wavelength are state of art. So do we really need NGL or will the optical lithography lives forever? Well, there are already optical system available or will be soon delivered to the manufacturing lines which are able to expose feature sizes down to 70nm and even to 50nm if they use 193nm immersion lithography. But for what price? The optical lithography became extremely expensive. Reticles for the 70nm technology full with OPC structures may cost up to 500 K and an optical reticle set up to 2 Million. So in my understanding the introduction of any NGL technique will only happen if such a technique can demonstrate at least the same performance as the optical lithography but at a lower cost level. The best understood NGLs are the electron beam lithography techniques used in e-beam direct writing tools for the exposure of masks and reticles or e-beam techniques which expose the wafers using masks like E-beam Projection Lithography (EPL) or Low Energy E-beam Proximity Lithography (LEEPL) respectively. Both EPL and LEEPL require a similar mask technique so called stencil masks. The first 1x stencil masks (a silicon wafer with a thin membrane area containing the pattern as physical holes) were developed by IBM Germany more than 25 years ago and perfected in the Advanced Mask Facility (AMF) at IBM Vermont. Today, these 1x stencil masks used for LEEPL are mainly produced by Hoya, DNP, Toppan and NTT-AT in Japan. This paper

  4. Resist Materials for Extreme Ultraviolet Lithography: Toward Low-Cost Single-Digit-Nanometer Patterning.

    PubMed

    Ashby, Paul D; Olynick, Deirdre L; Ogletree, D Frank; Naulleau, Patrick P

    2015-10-14

    Extreme ultraviolet lithography (EUVL) is the leading technology for enabling miniaturization of computational components over the next decade. Next-generation resists will need to meet demanding performance criteria of 10 nm critical dimension, 1.2 nm line-edge roughness, and 20 mJ cm(-2) exposure dose. Here, the current state of the development of EUV resist materials is reviewed. First, pattern formation in resist materials is described and the Hansen solubility sphere (HSS) is used as a framework for understanding the pattern-development process. Then, recent progress in EUVL resist chemistry and characterization is discussed. Incremental advances are obtained by transferring chemically amplified resist materials developed for 193 nm lithography to EUV wavelengths. Significant advances will result from synthesizing high-absorbance resist materials using heavier atoms. In the framework of the HSS model, these materials have significant room for improvement and thus offer great promise as high-performance EUV resists for patterning of sub-10 nm features. PMID:26079187

  5. Advanced Mask Aligner Lithography (AMALITH)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Voelkel, Reinhard; Vogler, Uwe; Bramati, Arianna

    2015-03-01

    Mask aligner lithography is very attractive for less-critical lithography layers and is widely used for LED, display, CMOS image sensor, micro-fluidics and MEMS manufacturing. Mask aligner lithography is also a preferred choice the semiconductor back-end for 3D-IC, TSV interconnects, advanced packaging (AdP) and wafer-level-packaging (WLP). Mask aligner lithography is a mature technique based on shadow printing and has not much changed since the 1980s. In shadow printing lithography a geometric pattern is transferred by free-space propagation from a photomask to a photosensitive layer on a wafer. The inherent simplicity of the pattern transfer offers ease of operation, low maintenance, moderate capital expenditure, high wafers-per-hour (WPH) throughput, and attractive cost-of-ownership (COO). Advanced mask aligner lithography (AMALITH) comprises different measures to improve shadow printing lithography beyond current limits. The key enabling technology for AMALITH is a novel light integrator systems, referred to as MO Exposure Optics® (MOEO). MOEO allows to fully control and shape the properties of the illumination light in a mask aligner. Full control is the base for accurate simulation and optimization of the shadow printing process (computational lithography). Now photolithography enhancement techniques like customized illumination, optical proximity correction (OPC), phase masks (AAPSM), half-tone lithography and Talbot lithography could be used in mask aligner lithography. We summarize the recent progress in advanced mask aligner lithography (AMALITH) and discuss possible measures to further improve shadow printing lithography.

  6. Image scanner technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Montuori, J. S.

    1980-01-01

    Three classes of scanning devices are evaluated against a hypothetical set of requirements for a digital mapping system: electronic scanners, which may use cathode ray tubes (CRT), vidicon or image dissector tubes; electro-optical scanners, which may use lasers, light-emitting diodes, or conventional lamps as sources of illumination; and solid-state scanners, which may use charge-coupled devices (CCD), charge injection devices (CID), charge-coupled photodiode devices (CCPD), or self-scanned photodiode devices (SSPD). The major performance criteria for digital mapping application are resolution, format accommodation, data rates, geometric accuracy, photometric accuracy and dynamic range. Systems adaptable to all these requirements include: drumtype laser scanners, rotating-mirror laser scanners, and solid-state scanners comprised of a series of optically butted linear arrays. These requirements, as well as the operating environment (i.e., production or research and development), must be evaluated before the appropriate technology can be selected and a system design recommended.

  7. Self-aligned double patterning process for 32/32nm contact/space and beyond using 193 immersion lithography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mebarki, Bencherki; Miao, Liyan; Chen, Yongmei; Yu, James; Blanco, Pokhui; Makeeff, James; Shu, Jen; Bencher, Christopher; Naik, Mehul; Ngai, Christopher Sui Wing

    2010-04-01

    State of the art production single print lithography for contact is limited to ~43-44nm half-pitch given the parameters in the classic photolithography resolution formula for contacts in 193 immersion tool (k1 >= 0.3, NA = 1.35, and λ = 193nm). Single print lithography limitations can be overcome by (1) Process / Integration based techniques such as double-printing (DP), and spacer based self-aligned double patterning (SADP), (2) Non-standard printing techniques such as electron-beam (eBeam), extreme ultraviolet lithography (EUVL), nano-imprint Lithography (NIL). EUV tools are under development, while nanoimprint is a developmental tool only. Spacer based SADP for equal line/space is well documented as successful patterning technique for 3xnm and beyond. In this paper, we present an adaptation of selfaligned double patterning process to 2-D regular 32/32nm contact/space array. Using SADP process, we successfully achieved an equal contact/space of 32/32nm using 193 immersion lithography that is only capable of 43-44nm resolvable half-pitch contact printing. The key and unique innovation of this work is the use of a 2-D (x and y axis) pillar structure to achieve equal contact/space. Final result is a dense contact array of 32nm half-pitch in 2-D structure (x and y axis). This is achieved on simplified stack of Substrate / APF / Nitride. Further transfer of this new contact pattern from nitride to the substrate (e.g., Oxide, APF, Poly, Si...) is possible. The technique is potentially extendible to 22/22nm contact/space and beyond.

  8. Ion beam lithography system

    DOEpatents

    Leung, Ka-Ngo

    2005-08-02

    A maskless plasma-formed ion beam lithography tool provides for patterning of sub-50 nm features on large area flat or curved substrate surfaces. The system is very compact and does not require an accelerator column and electrostatic beam scanning components. The patterns are formed by switching beamlets on or off from a two electrode blanking system with the substrate being scanned mechanically in one dimension. This arrangement can provide a maskless nano-beam lithography tool for economic and high throughput processing.

  9. Impact of topographic mask models on scanner matching solutions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tyminski, Jacek K.; Pomplun, Jan; Renwick, Stephen P.

    2014-03-01

    Of keen interest to the IC industry are advanced computational lithography applications such as Optical Proximity Correction of IC layouts (OPC), scanner matching by optical proximity effect matching (OPEM), and Source Optimization (SO) and Source-Mask Optimization (SMO) used as advanced reticle enhancement techniques. The success of these tasks is strongly dependent on the integrity of the lithographic simulators used in computational lithography (CL) optimizers. Lithographic mask models used by these simulators are key drivers impacting the accuracy of the image predications, and as a consequence, determine the validity of these CL solutions. Much of the CL work involves Kirchhoff mask models, a.k.a. thin masks approximation, simplifying the treatment of the mask near-field images. On the other hand, imaging models for hyper-NA scanner require that the interactions of the illumination fields with the mask topography be rigorously accounted for, by numerically solving Maxwell's Equations. The simulators used to predict the image formation in the hyper-NA scanners must rigorously treat the masks topography and its interaction with the scanner illuminators. Such imaging models come at a high computational cost and pose challenging accuracy vs. compute time tradeoffs. Additional complication comes from the fact that the performance metrics used in computational lithography tasks show highly non-linear response to the optimization parameters. Finally, the number of patterns used for tasks such as OPC, OPEM, SO, or SMO range from tens to hundreds. These requirements determine the complexity and the workload of the lithography optimization tasks. The tools to build rigorous imaging optimizers based on first-principles governing imaging in scanners are available, but the quantifiable benefits they might provide are not very well understood. To quantify the performance of OPE matching solutions, we have compared the results of various imaging optimization trials obtained

  10. Thirty years of lithography simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mack, Chris A.

    2005-05-01

    Thirty years ago Rick Dill and his team at IBM published the first account of lithography simulation - the accurate description of semiconductor optical lithography by mathematical equations. Since then, lithography simulation has grown dramatically in importance in four important areas: as a research tool, as a development tool, as a manufacturing tool, and as a learning tool. In this paper, the history of lithography simulations is traced from its roots to today"s indispensable tools for lithographic technology development. Along the way, an attempt will be made to define the true value of lithography simulation to the semiconductor industry.

  11. Extending immersion lithography down to 1x nm production nodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Boeij, Wim P.; Pieternella, Remi; Bouchoms, Igor; Leenders, Martijn; Hoofman, Marjan; de Graaf, Roelof; Kok, Haico; Broman, Par; Smits, Joost; Kuit, Jan-Jaap; McLaren, Matthew

    2013-04-01

    In this paper we report on the performance enhancements on the NXT immersion scanner platform to support the immersion lithography roadmap. We particular discuss scanner modules that enable future overlay and focus requirements. Among others we describe the improvements in grid calibrations and grid matching; thermal control of reticle heating with dynamic systems adjustments; aberration tuning and FlexWave-lens heating control as well as aberration- and overlay-metrology on wafer-2-wafer timescales. Finally we address reduction of leveling process dependencies, stage servo dynamics and wafer table flatness to enhance on-product focus and leveling performance. We present and discuss module- and system-data of the above mentioned scanner improvements.

  12. Beam pen lithography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huo, Fengwei; Zheng, Gengfeng; Liao, Xing; Giam, Louise R.; Chai, Jinan; Chen, Xiaodong; Shim, Wooyoung; Mirkin, Chad A.

    2010-09-01

    Lithography techniques are currently being developed to fabricate nanoscale components for integrated circuits, medical diagnostics and optoelectronics. In conventional far-field optical lithography, lateral feature resolution is diffraction-limited. Approaches that overcome the diffraction limit have been developed, but these are difficult to implement or they preclude arbitrary pattern formation. Techniques based on near-field scanning optical microscopy can overcome the diffraction limit, but they suffer from inherently low throughput and restricted scan areas. Highly parallel two-dimensional, silicon-based, near-field scanning optical microscopy aperture arrays have been fabricated, but aligning a non-deformable aperture array to a large-area substrate with near-field proximity remains challenging. However, recent advances in lithographies based on scanning probe microscopy have made use of transparent two-dimensional arrays of pyramid-shaped elastomeric tips (or `pens') for large-area, high-throughput patterning of ink molecules. Here, we report a massively parallel scanning probe microscopy-based approach that can generate arbitrary patterns by passing 400-nm light through nanoscopic apertures at each tip in the array. The technique, termed beam pen lithography, can toggle between near- and far-field distances, allowing both sub-diffraction limit (100 nm) and larger features to be generated.

  13. An ice lithography instrument

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, Anpan; Chervinsky, John; Branton, Daniel; Golovchenko, J. A.

    2011-06-01

    We describe the design of an instrument that can fully implement a new nanopatterning method called ice lithography, where ice is used as the resist. Water vapor is introduced into a scanning electron microscope (SEM) vacuum chamber above a sample cooled down to 110 K. The vapor condenses, covering the sample with an amorphous layer of ice. To form a lift-off mask, ice is removed by the SEM electron beam (e-beam) guided by an e-beam lithography system. Without breaking vacuum, the sample with the ice mask is then transferred into a metal deposition chamber where metals are deposited by sputtering. The cold sample is then unloaded from the vacuum system and immersed in isopropanol at room temperature. As the ice melts, metal deposited on the ice disperses while the metals deposited on the sample where the ice had been removed by the e-beam remains. The instrument combines a high beam-current thermal field emission SEM fitted with an e-beam lithography system, cryogenic systems, and a high vacuum metal deposition system in a design that optimizes ice lithography for high throughput nanodevice fabrication. The nanoscale capability of the instrument is demonstrated with the fabrication of nanoscale metal lines.

  14. Extreme ultraviolet lithography and three dimensional integrated circuit—A review

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Banqiu; Kumar, Ajay

    2014-03-01

    Extreme ultraviolet lithography (EUVL) and three dimensional integrated circuit (3D IC) were thoroughly reviewed. Since proposed in 1988, EUVL obtained intensive studies globally and, after 2000, became the most promising next generation lithography method even though challenges were present in almost all aspects of EUVL technology. Commercial step-and-scan tools for preproduction are installed now with full field capability; however, EUV source power at intermediate focus (IF) has not yet met volume manufacturing requirements. Compared with the target of 200 W in-band power at IF, current tools can supply only approximately 40-55 W. EUVL resist has improved significantly in the last few years, with 13 nm line/space half-pitch resolution being produced with approximately 3-4 nm line width roughness (LWR), but LWR needs 2× improvement. Creating a defect-free EUVL mask is currently an obstacle. Actual adoption of EUVL for 22 nm and beyond technology nodes will depend on the extension of current optical lithography (193 nm immersion lithography, combined with multiple patterning techniques), as well as other methods such as 3D IC. Lithography has been the enabler for IC performance improvement by increasing device density, clock rate, and transistor rate. However, after the turn of the century, IC scaling resulted in short-channel effect, which decreases power efficiency dramatically, so clock frequency almost stopped increasing. Although further IC scaling by lithography reduces gate delay, interconnect delay and memory wall are dominant in determining the IC performance. 3D IC technology is a critical technology today because it offers a reasonable route to further improve IC performance. It increases device density, reduces the interconnect delay, and breaks memory wall with the application of 3D stacking using through silicon via. 3D IC also makes one chip package have more functional diversification than those enhanced only by shrinking the size of the features

  15. Mechanism of single-layer 193-nm dissolution inhibition resist

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yan, Zhenglin; Houlihan, Francis M.; Reichmanis, Elsa; Nalamasu, Omkaram; Reiser, Arnost; Dabbagh, Gary; Hutton, Richard S.; Osei, Dan; Sousa, Jose; Bolan, Kevin J.

    2000-06-01

    We have found that the progress of developer base into films of terpolymers of norbornene (NB)-maleic anhydride (MA) and acrylic acid (AA) is a percolation process with a critical site concentration of x(c) equals 0.084 which suggests that every acrylic acid site in the terpolymer of norbornene-maleic anhydride-acrylic acid can make 12 monomer units of the polymer water compatible. In practice these systems are being used with various tert-butyl esters of cholic acid as dissolution inhibitors. The cholates differ very much in their dissolution inhibition factors (lowest t-butyl cholate (1.3) to highest t-butyl lithocholate glutarate dimer (7.4). The change in these factors corrected for molarity follow the hydrophobic character of the dissolution as measured by log(p). A quick screening method has also been established to evaluate dissolution inhibitors based on our observation that the cloud point (the volume % acetone in a water/acetone which gives persistent cloudiness) parallels the dissolution inhibiting power as measured by the dissolution inhibition factor. For dissolution promotion, optimal results are obtained with t-butyl 1,3,5-cyclohexanetricarboxylate (f equals -6.3) and poorest results with t-butyl lithocholate (f equals -2.8); this appears to track with the number of carboxyl groups and the hydrophobicity of the carboxylic acids. The Rmax found for resist formulations tracks well with these findings. Another factor in determining the ultimate achievable contrast is the degree of acidolytic deprotection achieved by the material. It appears that acidolyticaly cleaveable carboxylate esters with a higher concentration of electron withdrawing groups such as t-butyl 1,3,5-cyclohexanetricarboxylate are more effective.

  16. Metal-Mesh Lithography

    PubMed Central

    Tang, Zhao; Wei, Qingshan; Wei, Alexander

    2011-01-01

    Metal-mesh lithography (MML) is a practical hybrid of microcontact printing and capillary force lithography that can be applied over millimeter-sized areas with a high level of uniformity. MML can be achieved by blotting various inks onto substrates through thin copper grids, relying on preferential wetting and capillary interactions between template and substrate for pattern replication. The resulting mesh patterns, which are inverted relative to those produced by stenciling or serigraphy, can be reproduced with low micrometer resolution. MML can be combined with other surface chemistry and lift-off methods to create functional microarrays for diverse applications, such as periodic islands of gold nanorods and patterned corrals for fibroblast cell cultures. PMID:22103322

  17. Metal-mesh lithography.

    PubMed

    Tang, Zhao; Wei, Qingshan; Wei, Alexander

    2011-12-01

    Metal-mesh lithography (MML) is a practical hybrid of microcontact printing and capillary force lithography that can be applied over millimeter-sized areas with a high level of uniformity. MML can be achieved by blotting various inks onto substrates through thin copper grids, relying on preferential wetting and capillary interactions between template and substrate for pattern replication. The resulting mesh patterns, which are inverted relative to those produced by stenciling or serigraphy, can be reproduced with low micrometer resolution. MML can be combined with other surface chemistry and lift-off methods to create functional microarrays for diverse applications, such as periodic islands of gold nanorods and patterned corrals for fibroblast cell cultures.

  18. Distortion free projection lithography

    SciTech Connect

    Hawryluk, A.M.; Ceglio, N.M.; Phillion, D.W.; Gaines, D.P.

    1991-07-09

    Soft x-ray projection lithography (SXPL) may be used to fabricate high resolution structures for future devices, but will require an all-reflecting optical system with {approximately} 100 nm resolution and < 10 nm image distortion over large fields-of-view. In present designs, the lithographic tool for SXPL is envisioned as a ring-field'' scanning system with multiple (3--5), possibly aspheric, imaging optics fabricated to {approximately} < 1 nm figure precision. In its present form, several technologies must be developed before this tool can become practical. A simple, non-scanning optical system with less expensive optics, reduced mirror reflection losses and lower source power requirements would be very attractive. We have developed a technique, called Encoded Mask Lithography (EML), which allows for distortion free, high resolution reticle replication over a large field-of-view while using an imaging system with substantial inherent distortion. When applied to SXPL, EML allows us to use a simple, two spherical mirror imaging system. The simplified optical system used in EML eases optic fabrication requirements, obviates the need for mask-to-wafer scanning, and decreases multilayer mirror reflection losses and source power requirements. Although developed for SXPL, this concept is applicable to all forms of projection lithography where distortion over large fields may be a problem. 10 refs., 4 figs.

  19. Extreme ultraviolet Talbot interference lithography.

    PubMed

    Li, Wei; Marconi, Mario C

    2015-10-01

    Periodic nanopatterns can be generated using lithography based on the Talbot effect or optical interference. However, these techniques have restrictions that limit their performance. High resolution Talbot lithography is limited by the very small depth of focus and the demanding requirements in the fabrication of the master mask. Interference lithography, with large DOF and high resolution, is limited to simple periodic patterns. This paper describes a hybrid extreme ultraviolet lithography approach that combines Talbot lithography and interference lithography to render an interference pattern with a lattice determined by a Talbot image. As a result, the method enables filling the arbitrary shaped cells produced by the Talbot image with interference patterns. Detailed modeling, system design and experimental results using a tabletop EUV laser are presented. PMID:26480070

  20. Microfluidic Applications of Soft Lithography

    SciTech Connect

    Rose, K A; Krulevitch, P; Hamilton, J

    2001-04-10

    The soft lithography fabrication technique was applied to three microfluidic devices. The method was used to create an original micropump design and retrofit to existing designs for a DNA manipulation device and a counter biological warfare sample preparation device. Each device presented unique and original challenges to the soft lithography application. AI1 design constraints of the retrofit devices were satisfied using PDMS devices created through variation of soft lithography methods. The micropump utilized the versatility of PDMS, creating design options not available with other materials. In all cases, the rapid processing of soft lithography reduced the fabrication time, creating faster turnaround for design modifications.

  1. Study on photochemical analysis system (VLES) for EUV lithography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sekiguchi, A.; Kono, Y.; Kadoi, M.; Minami, Y.; Kozawa, T.; Tagawa, S.; Gustafson, D.; Blackborow, P.

    2007-03-01

    A system for photo-chemical analysis of EUV lithography processes has been developed. This system has consists of 3 units: (1) an exposure that uses the Z-Pinch (Energetiq Tech.) EUV Light source (DPP) to carry out a flood exposure, (2) a measurement system RDA (Litho Tech Japan) for the development rate of photo-resists, and (3) a simulation unit that utilizes PROLITH (KLA-Tencor) to calculate the resist profiles and process latitude using the measured development rate data. With this system, preliminary evaluation of the performance of EUV lithography can be performed without any lithography tool (Stepper and Scanner system) that is capable of imaging and alignment. Profiles for 32 nm line and space pattern are simulated for the EUV resist (Posi-2 resist by TOK) by using VLES that hat has sensitivity at the 13.5nm wavelength. The simulation successfully predicts the resist behavior. Thus it is confirmed that the system enables efficient evaluation of the performance of EUV lithography processes.

  2. A novel mask structure for measuring the defocus of scanner

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dong, Lisong; Song, Zhiyang; Su, Xiaojing; Wei, Yayi

    2016-03-01

    A new focus monitor mask having novel grating structure is proposed to measure the focus variation of the scanner. The grating pattern composes of transparent line, opaque line, π-phase shift groove and π/2 -phase shift groove with their width ratio equivalent to 1:4:1:2. By using this structure, one of the first order and one of the second order of the diffraction spectrum are eliminated. Therefore, the lithography image is formed by the interference of the zeroth order and the left positive (or negative) 1st and 2nd orders, which is more sensitive to the subtle change of focus. The basic principle and characteristic of the proposed mask is described in this paper. Simulations with the lithography simulator PROLITH shows that the monitoring accuracy is improved more than 25%, compared with the conventional phase grating focus monitor (PGFM). The novel mask proposed in our job has potential to be an efficient candidate for measuring the defocus of scanner in the immersion lithography with hyper NA.

  3. Arrays of metallic micro-/nano-structures by means of colloidal lithography and laser dewetting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Constantinescu, C.; Deepak, K. L. N.; Delaporte, P.; Utéza, O.; Grojo, D.

    2016-06-01

    Long-range arrays of prismatoid metal nanostructures are fabricated by a hybrid methodology, i.e. using Langmuir microsphere films and laser-assisted dewetting. As the initial step, we use colloidal lithography. Monolayers of 1-5 μm polystyrene microspheres covered with a thermally evaporated Ag or Au thin film of controlled thickness (5-50 nm) are then used as masks to pattern the surface of quartz, BK7 glass or silicon substrates, typically in the order of cm2. When removing the spheres by physico-chemical means (ultrasound bath and solvent wash), the resulting surface shows an array of nm-size prismatoid structures (Fischer patterns), that can be further processed by laser. Thus, by using two different lasers (355-nm wavelength, 50-ps duration and 193-nm wavelength, 15-ns duration) for the metal dewetting, we control the shape of the deposited nanostructures. A detailed study is presented here on the reshaping of such metal structures through laser annealing. This new hybrid methodology expands the panel of microsphere-assisted technologies employed in preparing surface nanomaterials.

  4. A reliable higher power ArF laser with advanced functionality for immersion lithography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kurosu, Akihiko; Nakano, Masaki; Yashiro, Masanori; Yoshino, Masaya; Tsushima, Hiroaki; Masuda, Hiroyuki; Kumazaki, Takahito; Matsumoto, Shinichi; Kakizaki, Kouji; Matsunaga, Takashi; Okazaki, Shinji; Fujimoto, Junichi; Mizoguchi, Hakaru

    2012-03-01

    193nm ArF eximer lasers are expected to continue to be the main solution in photolithography, since advanced lithography tecnologies such as Multiple patterning and Self-aligned double patterning (SADP) are being developed. In order to appliy these tecnologies to high-volume semiconductor manufactureing, the key is to contain chip manufactureing costs. Therefore, improvement on Reliability, Availability and Maintainability of ArF excimer lasers is important.[1] We works on improving productivity and reducing downtime of ArF exmer lasers, which leads to Reliability, Availability and Maintainability improvemnet. First in this paper, our focus drilling tecnique, which increases depth of focus (DoF) by spectral bandwidth tuning is introdueced. This focus drilling enables to increase DoF for isolated contact holes. and it not degrades the wafer stage speed.[2] Second, a technique which eables to reduce gas refill time to zero is introduced. This technique reduces downtime so Availavility is expected to improve. In this paper, we report these tecniques by using simulation resutls and partially experimental resutls provided by a semiconductor manufacturer.

  5. Optical simulations for fractional fluorine terminated coatings on nanoimprint lithography masks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seidel, Thomas E.; Goldberg, Alexander; Halls, Mathew D.

    2015-10-01

    Simulations of the optical intensity within Nano Imprint Lithography (NIL) mask features have been made for patterned quartz masks having ultrathin film coatings with different indices of refraction. Fractionally fluorine terminated surfaces, previously proposed for improving the yield of NIL processes, are briefly reviewed. Optical intensity solutions within the feature were obtained using Panoramictech Maxwell solver software for variances in the optical constants of the coating films, aspect ratio, feature size, and wavelength.. The coated masks have conformal surface, higher index of refraction under-layer coating and a fractional terminated fluorine hydrocarbon (FHC) monomolecular layer. The values of optical constants for the FHC layers are unknown, so a range of ad-hoc values were simulated. Optical constants for quartz mask and Al2O3, TiO2 and Si under-layer films are taken from the literature. Wavelengths were varied from 193nm to 365nm. The question of photo-dissociation of the FHC layer for higher energy photons is addressed from first principles, with the result that the F-terminated layers are stable at higher wavelengths. Preliminary simulations for features filled with resist over various substrates are dependent on the antireflection character of the underlying film system. The optical intensity is generally increased within the simulated mask feature when coated with a higher index/FHC films relative to the uncoated reference quartz mask for ~5nm physical feature sizes.

  6. Biochip scanner device

    DOEpatents

    Perov, Alexander; Belgovskiy, Alexander I.; Mirzabekov, Andrei D.

    2001-01-01

    A biochip scanner device used to detect and acquire fluorescence signal data from biological microchips or biochips and method of use are provided. The biochip scanner device includes a laser for emitting a laser beam. A modulator, such as an optical chopper modulates the laser beam. A scanning head receives the modulated laser beam and a scanning mechanics coupled to the scanning head moves the scanning head relative to the biochip. An optical fiber delivers the modulated laser beam to the scanning head. The scanning head collects the fluorescence light from the biochip, launches it into the same optical fiber, which delivers the fluorescence into a photodetector, such as a photodiode. The biochip scanner device is used in a row scanning method to scan selected rows of the biochip with the laser beam size matching the size of the immobilization site.

  7. Portable biochip scanner device

    DOEpatents

    Perov, Alexander; Sharonov, Alexei; Mirzabekov, Andrei D.

    2002-01-01

    A portable biochip scanner device used to detect and acquire fluorescence signal data from biological microchips (biochips) is provided. The portable biochip scanner device employs a laser for emitting an excitation beam. An optical fiber delivers the laser beam to a portable biochip scanner. A lens collimates the laser beam, the collimated laser beam is deflected by a dichroic mirror and focused by an objective lens onto a biochip. The fluorescence light from the biochip is collected and collimated by the objective lens. The fluorescence light is delivered to a photomultiplier tube (PMT) via an emission filter and a focusing lens. The focusing lens focuses the fluorescence light into a pinhole. A signal output of the PMT is processed and displayed.

  8. Bubble-Pen Lithography.

    PubMed

    Lin, Linhan; Peng, Xiaolei; Mao, Zhangming; Li, Wei; Yogeesh, Maruthi N; Rajeeva, Bharath Bangalore; Perillo, Evan P; Dunn, Andrew K; Akinwande, Deji; Zheng, Yuebing

    2016-01-13

    Current lithography techniques, which employ photon, electron, or ion beams to induce chemical or physical reactions for micro/nano-fabrication, have remained challenging in patterning chemically synthesized colloidal particles, which are emerging as building blocks for functional devices. Herein, we develop a new technique - bubble-pen lithography (BPL) - to pattern colloidal particles on substrates using optically controlled microbubbles. Briefly, a single laser beam generates a microbubble at the interface of colloidal suspension and a plasmonic substrate via plasmon-enhanced photothermal effects. The microbubble captures and immobilizes the colloidal particles on the substrate through coordinated actions of Marangoni convection, surface tension, gas pressure, and substrate adhesion. Through directing the laser beam to move the microbubble, we create arbitrary single-particle patterns and particle assemblies with different resolutions and architectures. Furthermore, we have applied BPL to pattern CdSe/ZnS quantum dots on plasmonic substrates and polystyrene (PS) microparticles on two-dimensional (2D) atomic-layer materials. With the low-power operation, arbitrary patterning and applicability to general colloidal particles, BPL will find a wide range of applications in microelectronics, nanophotonics, and nanomedicine.

  9. Hybrid Dispersion Laser Scanner

    PubMed Central

    Goda, K.; Mahjoubfar, A.; Wang, C.; Fard, A.; Adam, J.; Gossett, D. R.; Ayazi, A.; Sollier, E.; Malik, O.; Chen, E.; Liu, Y.; Brown, R.; Sarkhosh, N.; Di Carlo, D.; Jalali, B.

    2012-01-01

    Laser scanning technology is one of the most integral parts of today's scientific research, manufacturing, defense, and biomedicine. In many applications, high-speed scanning capability is essential for scanning a large area in a short time and multi-dimensional sensing of moving objects and dynamical processes with fine temporal resolution. Unfortunately, conventional laser scanners are often too slow, resulting in limited precision and utility. Here we present a new type of laser scanner that offers ∼1,000 times higher scan rates than conventional state-of-the-art scanners. This method employs spatial dispersion of temporally stretched broadband optical pulses onto the target, enabling inertia-free laser scans at unprecedented scan rates of nearly 100 MHz at 800 nm. To show our scanner's broad utility, we use it to demonstrate unique and previously difficult-to-achieve capabilities in imaging, surface vibrometry, and flow cytometry at a record 2D raster scan rate of more than 100 kHz with 27,000 resolvable points. PMID:22685627

  10. Freestanding Complex Optical Scanners.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Frisbie, David A.

    A complex freestanding optical mark recognition (OMR) scanner is one which is not on-line to an external processor; it has intelligence stemming from an internal processor located within the unit or system. The advantages and disadvantages of a complex OMR can best be assessed after identifying the scanning needs and constraints of the potential…

  11. Programmable imprint lithography template

    DOEpatents

    Cardinale, Gregory F.; Talin, Albert A.

    2006-10-31

    A template for imprint lithography (IL) that reduces significantly template production costs by allowing the same template to be re-used for several technology generations. The template is composed of an array of spaced-apart moveable and individually addressable rods or plungers. Thus, the template can be configured to provide a desired pattern by programming the array of plungers such that certain of the plungers are in an "up" or actuated configuration. This arrangement of "up" and "down" plungers forms a pattern composed of protruding and recessed features which can then be impressed onto a polymer film coated substrate by applying a pressure to the template impressing the programmed configuration into the polymer film. The pattern impressed into the polymer film will be reproduced on the substrate by subsequent processing.

  12. Method for maskless lithography

    DOEpatents

    Sweatt, William C.; Stulen, Richard H.

    2000-01-01

    The present invention provides a method for maskless lithography. A plurality of individually addressable and rotatable micromirrors together comprise a two-dimensional array of micromirrors. Each micromirror in the two-dimensional array can be envisioned as an individually addressable element in the picture that comprises the circuit pattern desired. As each micromirror is addressed it rotates so as to reflect light from a light source onto a portion of the photoresist coated wafer thereby forming a pixel within the circuit pattern. By electronically addressing a two-dimensional array of these micromirrors in the proper sequence a circuit pattern that is comprised of these individual pixels can be constructed on a microchip. The reflecting surface of the micromirror is configured in such a way as to overcome coherence and diffraction effects in order to produce circuit elements having straight sides.

  13. Nanoimprint lithography for nanodevice fabrication

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barcelo, Steven; Li, Zhiyong

    2016-09-01

    Nanoimprint lithography (NIL) is a compelling technique for low cost nanoscale device fabrication. The precise and repeatable replication of nanoscale patterns from a single high resolution patterning step makes the NIL technique much more versatile than other expensive techniques such as e-beam or even helium ion beam lithography. Furthermore, the use of mechanical deformation during the NIL process enables grayscale lithography with only a single patterning step, not achievable with any other conventional lithography techniques. These strengths enable the fabrication of unique nanoscale devices by NIL for a variety of applications including optics, plasmonics and even biotechnology. Recent advances in throughput and yield in NIL processes demonstrate the potential of being adopted for mainstream semiconductor device fabrication as well.

  14. High refractive index materials design for the next generation ArF immersion lithography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Furukawa, Taiichi; Kishida, Takanori; Yasuda, Kyouyuu; Shimokawa, Tsutomu; Liu, Zhi; Slezak, Mark; Hieda, Katsuhiko

    2008-03-01

    High-refractive-index fluids (HIFs) are being considered to replace water as the immersion fluid in next generation 193nm immersion scanner. We have demonstrated the attractive optical properties for our HIF candidates, HIL-001, HIL-203 and HIL-204. Especially, HIL-203 and HIL-204 have higher transmittance compared to water. In this paper, we describe our latest results on the comparative evaluations including photo-degradation behavior and lens contamination phenomenon in a flow system. For laser induced fluid degradation behavior, it was shown the higher initial transmittance resulted in the higher laser durability. However, the complicated phenomenon was observed for the lens contamination test. That is, HIL-204 with higher initial transmittance showed higher lens contamination rate than HIL-203. From several analyses, the complicated behaviors among HILs were speculated to be caused by the different nature of photo-degraded impurities. In order to control the fluid transmittance change and suppress the lens contamination during exposure, the refining process was definitely necessary for HIL reuse system. Based on the refining mechanism and the refining material design, we have developed an appropriate refinement unit named Refine B. This approach provided us with the result that Refine B could control the change of fluid transmittance and suppress the lens contamination rate.

  15. LIGA Scanner Control Software

    1999-02-01

    The LIGA Scanner Software is a graphical user interface package that facilitates controlling the scanning operation of x-rays from a synchrotron and sample manipulation for making LIGA parts. The process requires scanning of the LIGA mask and the PMMA resist through a stationary x-ray beam to provide an evenly distributed x-ray exposure over the wafer. This software package has been written specifically to interface with Aerotech motor controllers.

  16. High throughput optical scanner

    DOEpatents

    Basiji, David A.; van den Engh, Gerrit J.

    2001-01-01

    A scanning apparatus is provided to obtain automated, rapid and sensitive scanning of substrate fluorescence, optical density or phosphorescence. The scanner uses a constant path length optical train, which enables the combination of a moving beam for high speed scanning with phase-sensitive detection for noise reduction, comprising a light source, a scanning mirror to receive light from the light source and sweep it across a steering mirror, a steering mirror to receive light from the scanning mirror and reflect it to the substrate, whereby it is swept across the substrate along a scan arc, and a photodetector to receive emitted or scattered light from the substrate, wherein the optical path length from the light source to the photodetector is substantially constant throughout the sweep across the substrate. The optical train can further include a waveguide or mirror to collect emitted or scattered light from the substrate and direct it to the photodetector. For phase-sensitive detection the light source is intensity modulated and the detector is connected to phase-sensitive detection electronics. A scanner using a substrate translator is also provided. For two dimensional imaging the substrate is translated in one dimension while the scanning mirror scans the beam in a second dimension. For a high throughput scanner, stacks of substrates are loaded onto a conveyor belt from a tray feeder.

  17. Impact of reticle absorber on the imaging properties in ArFi lithography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Finders, Jo; Mouraille, O.; Bouma, A.; Ngai, A.; Grim, K.; van Praagh, J.; Toma, C.; Miyazaki, J.; Higuchi, M.; Kojima, Y.; Connolly, B.; Englard, I.; Cohen, Y.; Mangan, S.; Ben Yishai, Michael; Jullian, Karine

    2012-02-01

    In this paper we compare the imaging properties of lithographic test structures formed on test masks with different reticle absorbers for use in1.35 NA immersion lithography. We will look into different aspects like process windows and CD fingerprints. Beyond that we look into the topographic effects caused by the different absorbers, the mask 3D effects. We will study the interaction between the different masks and immersion scanner. Special attention is given towards the correctability of the intrafield CD fingerprint by mask and scanner applying dose corrections.

  18. Advanced metrology for the 14 nm node double patterning lithography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carau, D.; Bouyssou, R.; Dezauzier, C.; Besacier, M.; Gourgon, C.

    2014-05-01

    In microelectronics the two crucial parameters for the lithography step are the critical dimension, which is the width of the smallest printable pattern, and the misalignment error of the reticle, called overlay. For the 14 nm node, the limit of scanner resolution can be overcome by the double patterning technique, which requires a maximum overlay error between the two reticles of 3 nm [1]. The current approach in the measurements of critical dimension and overlay is to treat them separately, but it has become much more complex in the double patterning context, since they are no longer independent. In this paper, a strategy of a common measurement is developed. The aim of the strategy is to measure simultaneously overlay and critical dimension in the metal level double patterning grating before the second etch process. The scatterometry technique is well known for critical dimension measurement. This study demonstrates that the overlay between the two gratings can also be deduced. Thanks to this original scatterometry-based method, it becomes possible to provide information on the lithography step quality before the second etch process; therefore the lithography can be reworked if it is necessary.

  19. The use of EUV lithography to produce demonstration devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    LaFontaine, Bruno; Deng, Yunfei; Kim, Ryoung-Han; Levinson, Harry J.; McGowan, Sarah; Okoroanyanwu, Uzodinma; Seltmann, Rolf; Tabery, Cyrus; Tchikoulaeva, Anna; Wallow, Tom; Wood, Obert; Arnold, John; Canaperi, Don; Colburn, Matthew; Kimmel, Kurt; Koay, Chiew-Seng; Mclellan, Erin; Medeiros, Dave; Rao, Satyavolu Papa; Petrillo, Karen; Yin, Yunpeng; Mizuno, Hiroyuki; Bouten, Sander; Crouse, Michael; van Dijk, Andre; van Dommelen, Youri; Galloway, Judy; Han, Sang-In; Kessels, Bart; Lee, Brian; Lok, Sjoerd; Niekrewicz, Brian; Pierson, Bill; Routh, Robert; Schmit-Weaver, Emil; Cummings, Kevin; Word, James

    2008-03-01

    In this paper, we describe the integration of EUV lithography into a standard semiconductor manufacturing flow to produce demonstration devices. 45 nm logic test chips with functional transistors were fabricated using EUV lithography to pattern the first interconnect level (metal 1). This device fabrication exercise required the development of rule-based 'OPC' to correct for flare and mask shadowing effects. These corrections were applied to the fabrication of a full-field mask. The resulting mask and the 0.25-NA fullfield EUV scanner were found to provide more than adequate performance for this 45 nm logic node demonstration. The CD uniformity across the field and through a lot of wafers was 6.6% (3σ) and the measured overlay on the test-chip (product) wafers was well below 20 nm (mean + 3σ). A resist process was developed and performed well at a sensitivity of 3.8 mJ/cm2, providing ample process latitude and etch selectivity for pattern transfer. The etch recipes provided good CD control, profiles and end-point discrimination, allowing for good electrical connection to the underlying levels, as evidenced by electrical test results. Many transistors connected with Cu-metal lines defined using EUV lithography were tested electrically and found to have characteristics very similar to 45 nm node transistors fabricated using more traditional methods.

  20. Extreme ultraviolet lithography machine

    SciTech Connect

    Tichenor, D.A.; Kubiak, G.D.; Haney, S.J.; Sweeney, D.W.

    2000-02-29

    An extreme ultraviolet lithography (EUVL) machine or system is disclosed for producing integrated circuit (IC) components, such as transistors, formed on a substrate. The EUVL machine utilizes a laser plasma point source directed via an optical arrangement onto a mask or reticle which is reflected by a multiple mirror system onto the substrate or target. The EUVL machine operates in the 10--14 nm wavelength soft x-ray photon. Basically the EUV machine includes an evacuated source chamber, an evacuated main or project chamber interconnected by a transport tube arrangement, wherein a laser beam is directed into a plasma generator which produces an illumination beam which is directed by optics from the source chamber through the connecting tube, into the projection chamber, and onto the reticle or mask, from which a patterned beam is reflected by optics in a projection optics (PO) box mounted in the main or projection chamber onto the substrate. In one embodiment of a EUVL machine, nine optical components are utilized, with four of the optical components located in the PO box. The main or projection chamber includes vibration isolators for the PO box and a vibration isolator mounting for the substrate, with the main or projection chamber being mounted on a support structure and being isolated.

  1. Extreme ultraviolet lithography machine

    DOEpatents

    Tichenor, Daniel A.; Kubiak, Glenn D.; Haney, Steven J.; Sweeney, Donald W.

    2000-01-01

    An extreme ultraviolet lithography (EUVL) machine or system for producing integrated circuit (IC) components, such as transistors, formed on a substrate. The EUVL machine utilizes a laser plasma point source directed via an optical arrangement onto a mask or reticle which is reflected by a multiple mirror system onto the substrate or target. The EUVL machine operates in the 10-14 nm wavelength soft x-ray photon. Basically the EUV machine includes an evacuated source chamber, an evacuated main or project chamber interconnected by a transport tube arrangement, wherein a laser beam is directed into a plasma generator which produces an illumination beam which is directed by optics from the source chamber through the connecting tube, into the projection chamber, and onto the reticle or mask, from which a patterned beam is reflected by optics in a projection optics (PO) box mounted in the main or projection chamber onto the substrate. In one embodiment of a EUVL machine, nine optical components are utilized, with four of the optical components located in the PO box. The main or projection chamber includes vibration isolators for the PO box and a vibration isolator mounting for the substrate, with the main or projection chamber being mounted on a support structure and being isolated.

  2. 51. View of upper radar scanner switch in radar scanner ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    51. View of upper radar scanner switch in radar scanner building 105 from upper catwalk level showing emanating waveguides from upper switch (upper one-fourth of photograph) and emanating waveguides from lower radar scanner switch in vertical runs. - Clear Air Force Station, Ballistic Missile Early Warning System Site II, One mile west of mile marker 293.5 on Parks Highway, 5 miles southwest of Anderson, Anderson, Denali Borough, AK

  3. Integrated display scanner

    DOEpatents

    Veligdan, James T.

    2004-12-21

    A display scanner includes an optical panel having a plurality of stacked optical waveguides. The waveguides define an inlet face at one end and a screen at an opposite end, with each waveguide having a core laminated between cladding. A projector projects a scan beam of light into the panel inlet face for transmission from the screen as a scan line to scan a barcode. A light sensor at the inlet face detects a return beam reflected from the barcode into the screen. A decoder decodes the return beam detected by the sensor for reading the barcode. In an exemplary embodiment, the optical panel also displays a visual image thereon.

  4. Photoinhibition superresolution lithography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Forman, Darren Lawrence

    While the prospect of nanoscale manufacturing has generated tremendous excitement, arbitrary patterning at nanometer length scales cannot be brought about with current photolithography---the technology that for decades has driven electronics miniaturization and enabled mass production of digital logic, memory, MEMS and flat-panel displays. This is due to the relatively long wavelength of light and diffraction, which imposes a physical not technological limit on the resolution of a far-field optical pattern. Photoinhibited superresolution (PInSR) lithography is a new scheme designed to beat the diffraction limit through two-color confinement of photopolymerization and, via efficient single-photon absorption kinetics, also be high-throughput capable. This thesis describes development of an integrated optical and materials system for investigating spatiotemporal dynamics of photoinhibited superresolution lithography, with a demonstrated 3x superresolution beyond the diffraction limit. The two-color response, arising from orthogonal photogeneration of species that participate in competing reactions, is shown to be highly complex. This is both a direct and indirect consequence of mobility. Interesting trade-offs arise: thin-film resins (necessitated by single-photon absorption kinetics) require high viscosity for film stability, but the photoinhibition effect is suppressed in viscous resins. Despite this apparent suppression, which can be overcome with high excitation of the photoinhibition system, the low mobility afforded by viscous materials is beneficial for confinement of active species. Diffusion-induced blurring of patterned photoinhibition is problematic in a resin with viscosity = 1,000 cP, and overcome in a resin with viscosity eta = 500,000 cP. Superresolution of factor 3x beyond the diffraction limit is demonstrated at 0.2 NA, with additional results indicating superresolution ability at 1.2 NA. Investigating the effect of diminished photoinhibition efficacy

  5. Physical Limitations in Lithography for Microelectronics.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Flavin, P. G.

    1981-01-01

    Describes techniques being used in the production of microelectronics kits which have replaced traditional optical lithography, including contact and optical projection printing, and X-ray and electron beam lithography. Also includes limitations of each technique described. (SK)

  6. SERI laser scanner system

    SciTech Connect

    Matson, R.J.; Cannon, T.W.

    1980-10-01

    A Laser Scanner System (LSS) produces a photoresponse map and can be used for the nondestructive detection of nonuniformities in the photoresponse of a semiconductor device. At SERI the photoresponse maps are used to identify solar cell faults including microcracks, metallization breaks, regions of poor contact between metallization and the underlying emitter surface, and variations in emitter sheet resistance. The SERI LSS is patterned after the LSS unit documented in the NBS Special Publication 400-24 A Laser Scanner for Semiconductor Devices by D.E. Sawyer and D.W. Berning. Assuming reader familiarity with the above publication, the modifications introduced by SERI are specified with the intention that the two reports can be used to reproduce the SERI LSS. The optical and electronic systems are reviewed, briefly discussing the significant items of each. The most notable difference between the two systems is the SERI substitution of commercially available state-of-the-art modular electronics for the discreet component circuitry used in the NBS LSS.

  7. Polymer nanofibers by soft lithography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pisignano, Dario; Maruccio, Giuseppe; Mele, Elisa; Persano, Luana; Di Benedetto, Francesca; Cingolani, Roberto

    2005-09-01

    The fabrication of polymeric fibers by soft lithography is demonstrated. Polyurethane, patterned by capillarity-induced molding with high-resolution elastomeric templates, forms mm-long fibers with a diameter below 0.3μm. The Young's modulus of the fabricated structures, evaluated by force-distance scanning probe spectroscopy, has a value of 0.8MPa. This is an excellent example of nanostructures feasible by the combination of soft nanopatterning and high-resolution fabrication approaches for master templates, and particularly electron-beam lithography.

  8. Porphyrin-Based Photocatalytic Lithography

    SciTech Connect

    Bearinger, J; Stone, G; Christian, A; Dugan, L; Hiddessen, A; Wu, K J; Wu, L; Hamilton, J; Stockton, C; Hubbell, J

    2007-10-15

    Photocatalytic lithography is an emerging technique that couples light with coated mask materials in order to pattern surface chemistry. We excite porphyrins to create radical species that photocatalytically oxidize, and thereby pattern, chemistries in the local vicinity. The technique advantageously does not necessitate mass transport or specified substrates, it is fast and robust and the wavelength of light does not limit the resolution of patterned features. We have patterned proteins and cells in order to demonstrate the utility of photocatalytic lithography in life science applications.

  9. Microfabrication using soft lithography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Xiao-Mei

    Soft Lithography is a group of non-photolithographic techniques currently being explored in our group. Four such techniques-microcontact printing (μCP), replica molding (REM), micromolding in capillaries (MIMIC), and microtransfer molding (μTM)-have been demonstrated for fabricating micro- and nanostructures of a variety of materials with dimension >=30 nm. Part I (Chapters 1-5) reviews several aspects of the three molding techniques REM, MIMIC, and μTM. Chapters 1-3 describe μTM and MIMIC, and the use of these techniques in the fabrication of functional devices. μTM is capable of generating μm-scale structures over large areas, on both planar and contoured surfaces, and is able to make 3-dimensional structures layer by layer. The capability of μTM and MIMIC has been demonstrated in the fabrication of single-mode waveguides, waveguide couplers and interferometers. The coupling between waveguides can be tailored by waveguide spacing or the differential in curing time between the waveguides and the cladding. Chapters 4-5 demonstrate the combination of REM and shrinkable polystyrene (PS) films to reduce the feature size of microstructures and to generate microstructures with high aspect ratios on both planar and curved surfaces. A shrinkable PS film is patterned with relief structures, and then heated and shrinks. Thermal shrinkage results in a 100-fold increase in the aspect ratio of the patterned microstructures in the PS film. The microstructures in the shrunken PS films can be transferred to many other materials by REM. Part II (Chapters 6-7) focuses on two issues in the microfabrication using self-assembled monolayers (SAMs) as ultrathin resists. Chapter 6 describes a selective etching solution for transferring patterns of SAMs of alkanethiolates into the underlying layers (e.g., gold, silver, and copper). This etching solution uses thiosulfate as the ligand that coordinates to the metal ions, and ferricyanide as the oxidant. It has been demonstrated to be

  10. Multispectral scanner optical system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stokes, R. C.; Koch, N. G. (Inventor)

    1980-01-01

    An optical system for use in a multispectral scanner of the type used in video imaging devices is disclosed. Electromagnetic radiation reflected by a rotating scan mirror is focused by a concave primary telescope mirror and collimated by a second concave mirror. The collimated beam is split by a dichroic filter which transmits radiant energy in the infrared spectrum and reflects visible and near infrared energy. The long wavelength beam is filtered and focused on an infrared detector positioned in a cryogenic environment. The short wavelength beam is dispersed by a pair of prisms, then projected on an array of detectors also mounted in a cryogenic environment and oriented at an angle relative to the optical path of the dispersed short wavelength beam.

  11. A character string scanner

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Enison, R. L.

    1971-01-01

    A computer program called Character String Scanner (CSS), is presented. It is designed to search a data set for any specified group of characters and then to flag this group. The output of the CSS program is a listing of the data set being searched with the specified group of characters being flagged by asterisks. Therefore, one may readily identify specific keywords, groups of keywords or specified lines of code internal to a computer program, in a program output, or in any other specific data set. Possible applications of this program include the automatic scan of an output data set for pertinent keyword data, the editing of a program to change the appearance of a certain word or group of words, and the conversion of a set of code to a different set of code.

  12. Space-multiplexed optical scanner.

    PubMed

    Riza, Nabeel A; Yaqoob, Zahid

    2004-05-01

    A low-loss two-dimensional optical beam scanner that is capable of delivering large (e.g., > 10 degrees) angular scans along the elevation as well as the azimuthal direction is presented. The proposed scanner is based on a space-switched parallel-serial architecture that employs a coarse-scanner module and a fine-scanner module that produce an ultrahigh scan space-fill factor, e.g., 900 x 900 distinguishable beams in a 10 degrees (elevation) x 10 degrees (azimuth) scan space. The experimentally demonstrated one-dimensional version of the proposed scanner has a supercontinuous scan, 100 distinguishable beam spots in a 2.29 degrees total scan range, and 1.5-dB optical insertion loss.

  13. Space-multiplexed optical scanner.

    PubMed

    Riza, Nabeel A; Yaqoob, Zahid

    2004-05-01

    A low-loss two-dimensional optical beam scanner that is capable of delivering large (e.g., > 10 degrees) angular scans along the elevation as well as the azimuthal direction is presented. The proposed scanner is based on a space-switched parallel-serial architecture that employs a coarse-scanner module and a fine-scanner module that produce an ultrahigh scan space-fill factor, e.g., 900 x 900 distinguishable beams in a 10 degrees (elevation) x 10 degrees (azimuth) scan space. The experimentally demonstrated one-dimensional version of the proposed scanner has a supercontinuous scan, 100 distinguishable beam spots in a 2.29 degrees total scan range, and 1.5-dB optical insertion loss. PMID:15130010

  14. Graphic Arts/Offset Lithography.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hoisington, James; Metcalf, Joseph

    This revised curriculum for graphic arts is designed to provide secondary and postsecondary students with entry-level skills and an understanding of current printing technology. It contains lesson plans based on entry-level competencies for offset lithography as identified by educators and industry representatives. The guide is divided into 15…

  15. Maskless, reticle-free, lithography

    DOEpatents

    Ceglio, Natale M.; Markle, David A.

    1997-11-25

    A lithography system in which the mask or reticle, which usually carries the pattern to be printed onto a substrate, is replaced by a programmable array of binary (i.e. on/off) light valves or switches which can be programmed to replicate a portion of the pattern each time an illuminating light source is flashed. The pattern of light produced by the programmable array is imaged onto a lithographic substrate which is mounted on a scanning stage as is common in optical lithography. The stage motion and the pattern of light displayed by the programmable array are precisely synchronized with the flashing illumination system so that each flash accurately positions the image of the pattern on the substrate. This is achieved by advancing the pattern held in the programmable array by an amount which corresponds to the travel of the substrate stage each time the light source flashes. In this manner the image is built up of multiple flashes and an isolated defect in the array will only have a small effect on the printed pattern. The method includes projection lithographies using radiation other than optical or ultraviolet light. The programmable array of binary switches would be used to control extreme ultraviolet (EUV), x-ray, or electron, illumination systems, obviating the need for stable, defect free masks for projection EUV, x-ray, or electron, lithographies.

  16. Maskless, reticle-free, lithography

    DOEpatents

    Ceglio, N.M.; Markle, D.A.

    1997-11-25

    A lithography system in which the mask or reticle, which usually carries the pattern to be printed onto a substrate, is replaced by a programmable array of binary (i.e. on/off) light valves or switches which can be programmed to replicate a portion of the pattern each time an illuminating light source is flashed. The pattern of light produced by the programmable array is imaged onto a lithographic substrate which is mounted on a scanning stage as is common in optical lithography. The stage motion and the pattern of light displayed by the programmable array are precisely synchronized with the flashing illumination system so that each flash accurately positions the image of the pattern on the substrate. This is achieved by advancing the pattern held in the programmable array by an amount which corresponds to the travel of the substrate stage each time the light source flashes. In this manner the image is built up of multiple flashes and an isolated defect in the array will only have a small effect on the printed pattern. The method includes projection lithographies using radiation other than optical or ultraviolet light. The programmable array of binary switches would be used to control extreme ultraviolet (EUV), x-ray, or electron, illumination systems, obviating the need for stable, defect free masks for projection EUV, x-ray, or electron, lithographies. 7 figs.

  17. Biomolecular Patterning via Photocatalytic Lithography

    SciTech Connect

    Bearinger, J P; Hiddessen, A L; Wu, K J; Christian, A T; Dugan, L C; Stone, G; Camarero, J; Hinz, A K; Hubbell, J A

    2005-02-18

    We have developed a novel method for patterning surface chemistry: Photocatalytic Lithography. This technique relies on inexpensive stamp materials and light; it does not necessitate mass transport or specified substrates, and the wavelength of light should not limit feature resolution. We have demonstrated the utility of this technique through the patterning of proteins, single cells and bacteria.

  18. Double exposure technology for KrF lithography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Geisler, S.; Bauer, J.; Haak, U.; Stolarek, D.; Schulz, K.; Wolf, H.; Meier, W.; Trojahn, M.; Matthus, E.; Beyer, H.; Old, G.; Marschmeyer, St.; Kuck, B.

    2008-04-01

    The application of Double Exposure Lithography (DEL) would enlarge the capability of 248 nm exposure technique to smaller pitch. We will use the DEL for the integration of critical layers for dedicated applications requiring resolution enhancement into 0.13 μm BiCMOS technology. In this paper we present the overlay precision and the focus difference of 1st and 2nd exposure as critical parameters of the DEL for k I <= 0.3 lithography (100 nm half pitch) with binary masks (BIM). The realization of excellent overlay (OVL) accuracy is a main key of double exposure and double patterning techniques. We show the DEL requires primarily a good mask registration, when the wafer stays in the scanner for both exposures without alignment between 1st and 2nd exposure. The exposure tool overlay error is more a practical limit for double patterning lithography (DPL). Hence we prefer the DEL for the resolution enhancement, especially if we use the KrF high NA lithography tool for 130 nm generation. Experimental and simulated results show that the critical dimension uniformity (CDU) depends strongly on the overlay precision. The DEL results show CDU is not only affected by the OVL but also by an optical proximity effect of 1st and 2nd exposure and the mask registration. The CD uniformity of DEL demands a low focus difference between 1st and 2nd exposure and therefore requires a good focus repeatability of the exposure tool. The Depth of Focus (DOF) of 490 nm at stable CD of lines was achieved for DEL. If we change the focus of one of the exposures the CD-focus performance of spaces was reduced with simultaneous line position changing. CDU vs. focus difference between 1st and 2nd exposure demands a focus repeatability <100 nm for the exposure tool. Summary, the results show DEL has the potential to be a practical lithography enhancement method for device fabrication using high NA KrF tool generation.

  19. Resolution Improvement and Pattern Generator Development for theMaskless Micro-Ion-Beam Reduction Lithography System

    SciTech Connect

    Jiang, Ximan

    2006-05-18

    The shrinking of IC devices has followed the Moore's Law for over three decades, which states that the density of transistors on integrated circuits will double about every two years. This great achievement is obtained via continuous advance in lithography technology. With the adoption of complicated resolution enhancement technologies, such as the phase shifting mask (PSM), the optical proximity correction (OPC), optical lithography with wavelength of 193 nm has enabled 45 nm printing by immersion method. However, this achievement comes together with the skyrocketing cost of masks, which makes the production of low volume application-specific IC (ASIC) impractical. In order to provide an economical lithography approach for low to medium volume advanced IC fabrication, a maskless ion beam lithography method, called Maskless Micro-ion-beam Reduction Lithography (MMRL), has been developed in the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory. The development of the prototype MMRL system has been described by Dr. Vinh Van Ngo in his Ph.D. thesis. But the resolution realized on the prototype MMRL system was far from the design expectation. In order to improve the resolution of the MMRL system, the ion optical system has been investigated. By integrating a field-free limiting aperture into the optical column, reducing the electromagnetic interference and cleaning the RF plasma, the resolution has been improved to around 50 nm. Computational analysis indicates that the MMRL system can be operated with an exposure field size of 0.25 mm and a beam half angle of 1.0 mrad on the wafer plane. Ion-ion interactions have been studied with a two-particle physics model. The results are in excellent agreement with those published by the other research groups. The charge-interaction analysis of MMRL shows that the ion-ion interactions must be reduced in order to obtain a throughput higher than 10 wafers per hour on 300-mm wafers. In addition, two different maskless lithography strategies

  20. Side scanner for supermarkets: a new scanner design standard

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, Charles K.; Cheng, J. K.

    1996-09-01

    High speed UPC bar code has become a standard mode of data capture for supermarkets in the US, Europe, and Japan. The influence of the ergonomics community on the design of the scanner is evident. During the past decade the ergonomic issues of cashier in check-outs has led to occupational hand-wrist cumulative trauma disorders, in most cases causing carpal tunnel syndrome, a permanent hand injury. In this paper, the design of a side scanner to resolve the issues is discussed. The complex optical module and the sensor for aforesaid side scanner is described. The ergonomic advantages offer the old counter mounted vertical scanner has been experimentally proved by the industrial funded study at an independent university.

  1. Coastal Zone Color Scanner

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, B.

    1988-01-01

    The Coastal Zone Color Scanner (CZCS) spacecraft ocean color instrument is capable of measuring and mapping global ocean surface chlorophyll concentration. It is a scanning radiometer with multiband capability. With new electronics and some mechanical, and optical re-work, it probably can be made flight worthy. Some additional components of a second flight model are also available. An engineering study and further tests are necessary to determine exactly what effort is required to properly prepare the instrument for spaceflight and the nature of interfaces to prospective spacecraft. The CZCS provides operational instrument capability for monitoring of ocean productivity and currents. It could be a simple, low cost alternative to developing new instruments for ocean color imaging. Researchers have determined that with global ocean color data they can: specify quantitatively the role of oceans in the global carbon cycle and other major biogeochemical cycles; determine the magnitude and variability of annual primary production by marine phytoplankton on a global scale; understand the fate of fluvial nutrients and their possible affect on carbon budgets; elucidate the coupling mechanism between upwelling and large scale patterns in ocean basins; answer questions concerning the large scale distribution and timing of spring blooms in the global ocean; acquire a better understanding of the processes associated with mixing along the edge of eddies, coastal currents, western boundary currents, etc., and acquire global data on marine optical properties.

  2. Extreme Ultraviolet Lithography - Reflective Mask Technology

    SciTech Connect

    Walton, C.C.; Kearney, P.A.; Mirkarimi, P.B.; Bowers, J.M.; Cerjan, C.; Warrick, A.L.; Wilhelmsen, K.; Fought, E.; Moore, C.; Larson, C.; Baker, S.; Burkhart, S.C.; Hector, S.D.

    2000-05-09

    EUVL mask blanks consist of a distributed Bragg reflector made of 6.7nm-pitch bi-layers of MO and Si deposited upon a precision Si or glass substrate. The layer deposition process has been optimized for low defects, by application of a vendor-supplied but highly modified ion-beam sputter deposition system. This system is fully automated using SMIF technology to obtain the lowest possible environmental- and handling-added defect levels. Originally designed to coat 150mm substrates, it was upgraded in July, 1999 to 200 mm and has coated runs of over 50 substrates at a time with median added defects >100nm below 0.05/cm{sup 2}. These improvements have resulted from a number of ion-beam sputter deposition system modifications, upgrades, and operational changes, which will be discussed. Success in defect reduction is highly dependent upon defect detection, characterization, and cross-platform positional registration. We have made significant progress in adapting and extending commercial tools to this purpose, and have identified the surface scanner detection limits for different defect classes, and the signatures of false counts and non-printable scattering anomalies on the mask blank. We will present key results and how they have helped reduce added defects. The physics of defect reduction and mitigation is being investigated by a program on multilayer growth over deliberately placed perturbations (defects) of varying size. This program includes modeling of multilayer growth and modeling of defect printability. We developed a technique for depositing uniformly sized gold spheres on EUVL substrates, and have studied the suppression of the perturbations during multilayer growth under varying conditions. This work is key to determining the lower limit of critical defect size for EUV Lithography. We present key aspects of this work. We will summarize progress in all aspects of EUVL mask blank development, and present detailed results on defect reduction and mask blank

  3. NXT:1980Di immersion scanner for 7nm and 5nm production nodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Graaf, Roelof; Weichselbaum, Stefan; Droste, Richard; McLaren, Matthew; Koek, Bert; de Boeij, Wim

    2016-03-01

    Immersion scanners remain the critical lithography workhorses in semiconductor device manufacturing. When progressing towards the 7nm device node for logic and D18 device node for DRAM production, pattern-placement and layer-to-layer overlay requirements keep progressively scaling down and consequently require system improvements in immersion scanners. The on-product-overlay requirements are approaching levels of only a few nanometers, imposing stringent requirements on the scanner tool design in terms of reproducibility, accuracy and stability. In this paper we report on the performance of the NXT:1980Di immersion scanner. The NXT:1980Di builds upon the NXT:1970Ci, that is widely used for 16nm, 14nm and 10nm high-volume manufacturing. We will discuss the NXT:1980Di system- and sub-system/module enhancements that drive the scanner overlay, focus and productivity performance. Overlay, imaging, focus, productivity and defectivity data will be presented for multiple tools. To further reduce the on-product overlay system performance, alignment sensor contrast improvements as well as active reticle temperature conditioning are implemented on the NXT:1980Di. Reticle temperature conditioning will reduce reticle heating overlay and the higher contrast alignment sensor will improve alignment robustness for processed alignment targets. Due to an increased usage of multiple patterning techniques, an increased number of immersion exposures is required. NXT:1980Di scanner design modifications raised productivity levels from 250wph to 275wph. This productivity enhancement provides lower cost of ownership (CoO) for customers using immersion technology.

  4. Immersion and dry scanner extensions for sub-10nm production nodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weichselbaum, Stefan; Bornebroek, Frank; de Kort, Toine; Droste, Richard; de Graaf, Roelof F.; van Ballegoij, Rob; Botter, Herman; McLaren, Matthew G.; de Boeij, Wim P.

    2015-03-01

    Progressing towards the 10nm and 7nm imaging node, pattern-placement and layer-to-layer overlay requirements keep on scaling down and drives system improvements in immersion (ArFi) and dry (ArF/KrF) scanners. A series of module enhancements in the NXT platform have been introduced; among others, the scanner is equipped with exposure stages with better dynamics and thermal control. Grid accuracy improvements with respect to calibration, setup, stability, and layout dependency tighten MMO performance and enable mix and match scanner operation. The same platform improvements also benefit focus control. Improvements in detectability and reproducibility of low contrast alignment marks enhance the alignment solution window for 10nm logic processes and beyond. The system's architecture allows dynamic use of high-order scanner optimization based on advanced actuators of projection lens and scanning stages. This enables a holistic optimization approach for the scanner, the mask, and the patterning process. Productivity scanner design modifications esp. stage speeds and optimization in metrology schemes provide lower layer costs for customers using immersion lithography as well as conventional dry technology. Imaging, overlay, focus, and productivity data is presented, that demonstrates 10nm and 7nm node litho-capability for both (immersion & dry) platforms.

  5. X-ray lithography source

    DOEpatents

    Piestrup, M.A.; Boyers, D.G.; Pincus, C.

    1991-12-31

    A high-intensity, inexpensive X-ray source for X-ray lithography for the production of integrated circuits is disclosed. Foil stacks are bombarded with a high-energy electron beam of 25 to 250 MeV to produce a flux of soft X-rays of 500 eV to 3 keV. Methods of increasing the total X-ray power and making the cross section of the X-ray beam uniform are described. Methods of obtaining the desired X-ray-beam field size, optimum frequency spectrum and eliminating the neutron flux are all described. A method of obtaining a plurality of station operation is also described which makes the process more efficient and economical. The satisfying of these issues makes transition radiation an excellent moderate-priced X-ray source for lithography. 26 figures.

  6. X-ray lithography source

    DOEpatents

    Piestrup, Melvin A.; Boyers, David G.; Pincus, Cary

    1991-01-01

    A high-intensity, inexpensive X-ray source for X-ray lithography for the production of integrated circuits. Foil stacks are bombarded with a high-energy electron beam of 25 to 250 MeV to produce a flux of soft X-rays of 500 eV to 3 keV. Methods of increasing the total X-ray power and making the cross section of the X-ray beam uniform are described. Methods of obtaining the desired X-ray-beam field size, optimum frequency spectrum and elminating the neutron flux are all described. A method of obtaining a plurality of station operation is also described which makes the process more efficient and economical. The satisfying of these issues makes transition radiation an exellent moderate-priced X-ray source for lithography.

  7. EUV Lithography: New Metrology Challenges

    SciTech Connect

    Wood, Obert

    2007-09-26

    Extreme ultraviolet lithography is one of the most promising printing techniques for high volume semiconductor manufacturing at the 22 nm half-pitch device node and beyond. Because its imaging wavelength is approximately twenty times shorter than those currently in use (13.5 nm versus 193-248 nm) and because EUV optics and masks must be provided with highly-precise reflective multilayer coatings, EUV lithography presents a number of new and difficult metrology challenges. In this paper, the current status of the metrology tools being used to characterize the figure and finish of EUV mirror surfaces, the defectivity and flatness of EUV mask blanks and the outgassing rates of EUV resist materials are discussed.

  8. MSS D Multispectral Scanner System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lauletta, A. M.; Johnson, R. L.; Brinkman, K. L. (Principal Investigator)

    1982-01-01

    The development and acceptance testing of the 4-band Multispectral Scanners to be flown on LANDSAT D and LANDSAT D Earth resources satellites are summarized. Emphasis is placed on the acceptance test phase of the program. Test history and acceptance test algorithms are discussed. Trend data of all the key performance parameters are included and discussed separately for each of the two multispectral scanner instruments. Anomalies encountered and their resolutions are included.

  9. 3D ultrafast laser scanner

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mahjoubfar, A.; Goda, K.; Wang, C.; Fard, A.; Adam, J.; Gossett, D. R.; Ayazi, A.; Sollier, E.; Malik, O.; Chen, E.; Liu, Y.; Brown, R.; Sarkhosh, N.; Di Carlo, D.; Jalali, B.

    2013-03-01

    Laser scanners are essential for scientific research, manufacturing, defense, and medical practice. Unfortunately, often times the speed of conventional laser scanners (e.g., galvanometric mirrors and acousto-optic deflectors) falls short for many applications, resulting in motion blur and failure to capture fast transient information. Here, we present a novel type of laser scanner that offers roughly three orders of magnitude higher scan rates than conventional methods. Our laser scanner, which we refer to as the hybrid dispersion laser scanner, performs inertia-free laser scanning by dispersing a train of broadband pulses both temporally and spatially. More specifically, each broadband pulse is temporally processed by time stretch dispersive Fourier transform and further dispersed into space by one or more diffractive elements such as prisms and gratings. As a proof-of-principle demonstration, we perform 1D line scans at a record high scan rate of 91 MHz and 2D raster scans and 3D volumetric scans at an unprecedented scan rate of 105 kHz. The method holds promise for a broad range of scientific, industrial, and biomedical applications. To show the utility of our method, we demonstrate imaging, nanometer-resolved surface vibrometry, and high-precision flow cytometry with real-time throughput that conventional laser scanners cannot offer due to their low scan rates.

  10. Maskless, resistless ion beam lithography

    SciTech Connect

    Ji, Qing

    2003-03-10

    As the dimensions of semiconductor devices are scaled down, in order to achieve higher levels of integration, optical lithography will no longer be sufficient for the needs of the semiconductor industry. Alternative next-generation lithography (NGL) approaches, such as extreme ultra-violet (EUV), X-ray, electron-beam, and ion projection lithography face some challenging issues with complicated mask technology and low throughput. Among the four major alternative NGL approaches, ion beam lithography is the only one that can provide both maskless and resistless patterning. As such, it can potentially make nano-fabrication much simpler. This thesis investigates a focused ion beam system for maskless, resistless patterning that can be made practical for high-volume production. In order to achieve maskless, resistless patterning, the ion source must be able to produce a variety of ion species. The compact FIB system being developed uses a multicusp plasma ion source, which can generate ion beams of various elements, such as O{sub 2}{sup +}, BF{sub 2}{sup +}, P{sup +} etc., for surface modification and doping applications. With optimized source condition, around 85% of BF{sub 2}{sup +}, over 90% of O{sub 2}{sup +} and P{sup +} have been achieved. The brightness of the multicusp-plasma ion source is a key issue for its application to maskless ion beam lithography. It can be substantially improved by optimizing the source configuration and extractor geometry. Measured brightness of 2 keV He{sup +} beam is as high as 440 A/cm{sup 2} {center_dot} Sr, which represents a 30x improvement over prior work. Direct patterning of Si thin film using a focused O{sub 2}{sup +} ion beam has been investigated. A thin surface oxide film can be selectively formed using 3 keV O{sub 2}{sup +} ions with the dose of 10{sup 15} cm{sup -2}. The oxide can then serve as a hard mask for patterning of the Si film. The process flow and the experimental results for directly patterned poly-Si features

  11. Exposure tool chuck flatness study and effects on lithography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mukherjee-Roy, Moitreyee; Tan, Cher-Huan; Tan, Yong K.; Samudra, Ganesh S.

    2001-04-01

    The flatness of the chuck on the stepper or scanner is critical to obtain good patterning performance especially in the sub quarter micron regime. In this study an attempt has been made to u7nderstand the flatness signature of the chuck by measuring the flatness of a super flat wafer in two different notch orientations and subtracting the signatures. If the chuck or the wafer were ideally flat then there would be no different in flatness signatures between the two orientations. However in practice difference was found as neither the chuck nor the wafer is perfectly flat. This difference could be used to obtain an understanding about the flatness signature on the scanner chuck itself. This signature could be used by equipment manufacturers as an additional method to measure chuck flatness so that only superior chucks are used for equipment that are being made for sub quarter micron lithography. The second part of this study consisted of finding out the effect of this flatness on the resulting CD on wafers. Wafers, with different flatness signatures, were exposed at different orientations and the CD variations were evaluated. All wafers showed improvements in the orientation of better flatness. For some wafers the improvements was significant but for others the result was close to the CD variation due to rework. This could be attributed to the inherent signatures on the wafers and how abrupt the change in flatness was. The wafer deformation factor was not analyzed for brevity as this would make the problem far more complex.

  12. Multispectral Scanner for Monitoring Plants

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gat, Nahum

    2004-01-01

    A multispectral scanner has been adapted to capture spectral images of living plants under various types of illumination for purposes of monitoring the health of, or monitoring the transfer of genes into, the plants. In a health-monitoring application, the plants are illuminated with full-spectrum visible and near infrared light and the scanner is used to acquire a reflected-light spectral signature known to be indicative of the health of the plants. In a gene-transfer- monitoring application, the plants are illuminated with blue or ultraviolet light and the scanner is used to capture fluorescence images from a green fluorescent protein (GFP) that is expressed as result of the gene transfer. The choice of wavelength of the illumination and the wavelength of the fluorescence to be monitored depends on the specific GFP.

  13. [Scanner examination of the kidney].

    PubMed

    Richard, F; Khoury, S; Parienty, R; Ducellier, R; Fourcade, R; Küss, R

    1980-01-01

    On the basis of a large series of documents, the authors participate in establishment of the classification of scanner appearances of urological diseases of the kidney : peripheral or parapelvic sub-capsular cysts, carcinomas and their spread, multiple tumours but of different nature in the same kidney, angiomyolipomas, polycystic disease, renal abscess, hydated cyst, non-invasive exploration of kidneys showed to be non-functioning by I.V.U., tumours of the intrarenal excretory system, lumbar trauma, long-term surveillance of the retroperitoneal space in individuals undergoing surgery for a urological malignant renoureteric tumour. The authors suggest a new chronological arrangement of investigations in the presence of a renal mass discovered by I.V.U. Scanner has its place between echotomography and renal arteriography. Investigations may be stopped at renal echotomography when this examination offers definite evidence of the fluid nature of the mass. Solid or doubtful nature of the mass necessitates the use of a scanner examination.

  14. Why bother with x-ray lithography?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, Henry I.; Schattenburg, Mark L.

    1992-07-01

    The manufacture of state-of-the-art integrated circuits uses UV optical projection lithography. Conventional wisdom (i.e., the trade journals) holds that this technology will take the industry to quarter-micrometer minimum features sizes and below. So, why bother with X-ray lithography? The reason is that lithography is a 'system problem', and proximity X-ray lithography is better matched to that system problem than any other technology, once the initial investment is surmounted. X-ray lithography offers the most cost-effective path to the future of ultra-large-scale integrated circuits with feature sizes of tenth micrometer and below (i.e., gigascale electronics and quantum-effect electronics).

  15. Source mask optimization study based on latest Nikon immersion scanner

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Jun; Wei, Fang; Chen, Lijun; Zhang, Chenming; Zhang, Wei; Nishinaga, Hisashi; El-Sewefy, Omar; Gao, Gen-Sheng; Lafferty, Neal; Meiring, Jason; Zhang, Recoo; Zhu, Cynthia

    2016-03-01

    The 2x nm logic foundry node has many challenges since critical levels are pushed close to the limits of low k1 ArF water immersion lithography. For these levels, improvements in lithographic performance can translate to decreased rework and increased yield. Source Mask Optimization (SMO) is one such route to realize these image fidelity improvements. During SMO, critical layout constructs are intensively optimized in both the mask and source domain, resulting in a solution for maximum lithographic entitlement. From the hardware side, advances in source technology have enabled free-form illumination. The approach allows highly customized illumination, enabling the practical application of SMO sources. The customized illumination sources can be adjusted for maximum versatility. In this paper, we present a study on a critical layer of an advanced foundry logic node using the latest ILT based SMO software, paired with state-of-the-art scanner hardware and intelligent illuminator. Performance of the layer's existing POR source is compared with the ideal SMO result and the installed source as realized on the intelligent illuminator of an NSR-S630D scanner. Both simulation and on-silicon measurements are used to confirm that the performance of the studied layer meets established specifications.

  16. Mask lithography for display manufacturing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sandstrom, T.; Ekberg, P.

    2010-05-01

    The last ten years have seen flat displays conquer our briefcases, desktops, and living rooms. There has been an enormous development in production technology, not least in lithography and photomasks. Current masks for large displays are more than 2 m2 and make 4-6 1X prints on glass substrates that are 9 m2. One of the most challenging aspects of photomasks for displays is the so called mura, stripes or blemishes which cause visible defects in the finished display. For the future new and even tighter maskwriter specifications are driven by faster transistors and more complex pixel layouts made necessary by the market's wish for still better image quality, multi-touch panels, 3D TVs, and the next wave of e-book readers. Large OLED screens will pose new challenges. Many new types of displays will be lowcost and use simple lithography, but anything which can show video and high quality photographic images needs a transistor backplane and sophisticated masks for its production.

  17. What Scanner products are available?

    Atmospheric Science Data Center

    2014-12-08

    ... the ERBE scanner CD which gives all the S4G monthly mean 2.5 degree gridded data from both single satellite and combined-satellite product in ASCII format. Also, ordering the S4G HDF data online and using the ncdump utility to perform a straight ASCII dump is another ...

  18. Scanner as a Fine Art

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fontes, Kris

    2008-01-01

    Not every art department is fortunate enough to have access to digital cameras and image-editing software, but if a scanner, computer, and printer are available, students can create some imaginative and surreal work. This high-school level lesson begins with a discussion of self-portraits, and then moves to students creating images by scanning…

  19. A year in the life of an immersion lithography alpha tool at Albany NanoTech

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tittnich, Michael; Hartley, John; Denbeaux, Greg; Okoroanyanwu, Uzo; Levinson, Harry; Petrillo, Karen; Robinson, Chris; Gil, Dario; Corliss, Dan; Back, David; Brandl, Stefan; Schwarz, Christian; Goodwin, Frank; Wei, Yayi; Martinick, Brian; Housley, Richard; Benson, Peter; Cummings, Kevin

    2006-03-01

    Immersion Lithography continues to get more and more attention as a possible solution for the 45nm technology node puzzle. In 2005, there has, indeed, been a lot of progress made. It has gone from a laboratory curiosity to being one of the industry's prime contenders for the lithography technology of choice for the 45nm node. Yet a lot of work remains to be done before it's fully implemented into production. Today, there are over a dozen full field immersion scanners in R&D and pilot lines all around the world. The first full field, pre-production "Alpha" version of the ASML Twinscan AT 1150i was delivered to Albany NanoTech in August, 2004. A consortium made up of AMD, IBM, Infineon, and Micron Technology began early evaluation of immersion technology and in December of 2004, the production of the world's first Power PC microprocessor using immersion lithography, processed on this tool, was announced by IBM. This paper will present a summary of some of the work that was done on this system over the past year. It will also provide an overview of Albany NanoTech, the facility, its capabilities, and the programs in place. Its operating model, which is heavily focused on cooperative joint ventures, is described. The immersion data presented is a review of the work done by AMD, IBM, Infineon Technologies, and Micron Technology, all members of the INVENT Lithography Consortium in place at Albany NanoTech. All the data was published and presented by the authors in much more detail at the 2005 International Symposium on Immersion Lithography, in Bruges, Belgium.

  20. Improvements to Existing Jefferson Lab Wire Scanners

    SciTech Connect

    McCaughan, Michael D.; Tiefenback, Michael G.; Turner, Dennis L.

    2013-06-01

    This poster will detail the augmentation of selected existing CEBAF wire scanners with commercially available hardware, PMTs, and self created software in order to improve the scanners both in function and utility.

  1. A Simple X-Y Scanner.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Halse, M. R.; Hudson, W. J.

    1986-01-01

    Describes an X-Y scanner used to create acoustic holograms. Scanner is computer controlled and can be adapted to digitize pictures. Scanner geometry is discussed. An appendix gives equipment details. The control program in ATOM BASIC and 6502 machine code is available from the authors. (JM)

  2. Defect tolerant transmission lithography mask

    DOEpatents

    Vernon, Stephen P.

    2000-01-01

    A transmission lithography mask that utilizes a transparent substrate or a partially transparent membrane as the active region of the mask. A reflective single layer or multilayer coating is deposited on the membrane surface facing the illumination system. The coating is selectively patterned (removed) to form transmissive (bright) regions. Structural imperfections and defects in the coating have negligible effect on the aerial image of the mask master pattern since the coating is used to reflect radiation out of the entrance pupil of the imaging system. Similarly, structural imperfections in the clear regions of the membrane have little influence on the amplitude or phase of the transmitted electromagnetic fields. Since the mask "discards," rather than absorbs, unwanted radiation, it has reduced optical absorption and reduced thermal loading as compared to conventional designs. For EUV applications, the mask circumvents the phase defect problem, and is independent of the thermal load during exposure.

  3. Method for extreme ultraviolet lithography

    DOEpatents

    Felter, T. E.; Kubiak, Glenn D.

    1999-01-01

    A method of producing a patterned array of features, in particular, gate apertures, in the size range 0.4-0.05 .mu.m using projection lithography and extreme ultraviolet (EUV) radiation. A high energy laser beam is used to vaporize a target material in order to produce a plasma which in turn, produces extreme ultraviolet radiation of a characteristic wavelength of about 13 nm for lithographic applications. The radiation is transmitted by a series of reflective mirrors to a mask which bears the pattern to be printed. The demagnified focused mask pattern is, in turn, transmitted by means of appropriate optics and in a single exposure, to a substrate coated with photoresists designed to be transparent to EUV radiation and also satisfy conventional processing methods.

  4. Method for extreme ultraviolet lithography

    DOEpatents

    Felter, T. E.; Kubiak, G. D.

    2000-01-01

    A method of producing a patterned array of features, in particular, gate apertures, in the size range 0.4-0.05 .mu.m using projection lithography and extreme ultraviolet (EUV) radiation. A high energy laser beam is used to vaporize a target material in order to produce a plasma which in turn, produces extreme ultraviolet radiation of a characteristic wavelength of about 13 nm for lithographic applications. The radiation is transmitted by a series of reflective mirrors to a mask which bears the pattern to be printed. The demagnified focused mask pattern is, in turn, transmitted by means of appropriate optics and in a single exposure, to a substrate coated with photoresists designed to be transparent to EUV radiation and also satisfy conventional processing methods.

  5. Simulation of LANDSAT multispectral scanner spatial resolution with airborne scanner data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hlavka, C. A.

    1986-01-01

    A technique for simulation of low spatial resolution satellite imagery by using high resolution scanner data is described. The scanner data is convolved with the approximate point spread function of the low resolution data and then resampled to emulate low resolution imagery. The technique was successfully applied to Daedalus airborne scanner data to simulate a portion of a LANDSAT multispectra scanner scene.

  6. 28nm node process optimization: a lithography centric view

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seltmann, Rolf

    2014-10-01

    Many experts claim that the 28nm technology node will be the most cost effective technology node forever. This results from primarily from the cost of manufacturing due to the fact that 28nm is the last true Single Patterning (SP) node. It is also affected by the dramatic increase of design costs and the limited shrink factor of the next following nodes. Thus, it is assumed that this technology still will be alive still for many years. To be cost competitive, high yields are mandatory. Meanwhile, leading edge foundries have optimized the yield of the 28nm node to such a level that that it is nearly exclusively defined by random defectivity. However, it was a long way to go to come to that level. In my talk I will concentrate on the contribution of lithography to this yield learning curve. I will choose a critical metal patterning application. I will show what was needed to optimize the process window to a level beyond the usual OPC model work that was common on previous nodes. Reducing the process (in particular focus) variability is a complementary need. It will be shown which improvements were needed in tooling, process control and design-mask-wafer interaction to remove all systematic yield detractors. Over the last couple of years new scanner platforms were introduced that were targeted for both better productivity and better parametric performance. But this was not a clear run-path. It needed some extra affords of the tool suppliers together with the Fab to bring the tool variability down to the necessary level. Another important topic to reduce variability is the interaction of wafer none-planarity and lithography optimization. Having an accurate knowledge of within die topography is essential for optimum patterning. By completing both the variability reduction work and the process window enhancement work we were able to transfer the original marginal process budget to a robust positive budget and thus ensuring high yield and low costs.

  7. Advanced wavefront engineering for improved imaging and overlay applications on a 1.35 NA immersion scanner

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Staals, Frank; Andryzhyieuskaya, Alena; Bakker, Hans; Beems, Marcel; Finders, Jo; Hollink, Thijs; Mulkens, Jan; Nachtwein, Angelique; Willekers, Rob; Engblom, Peter; Gruner, Toralf; Zhang, Youping

    2011-04-01

    In this paper we describe the basic principle of FlexWave, a new high resolution wavefront manipulator, and discuss experimental data on imaging, focus and overlay. For this we integrated the FlexWave module in a 1.35 NA immersion scanner. With FlexWave we can perform both static and dynamic wavefront corrections. Wavefront control with FlexWave minimizes lens aberrations under high productivity usage of the scanner, hence maintaining overlay and focus performance, but moreover, the high resolution wavefront tuning can be used to compensate for litho related effects. Especially now mask 3D effects are becoming a major error component, additional tuning is required. Optimized wavefront can be achieved with computational lithography, by either co-optimizing source, mask, and Wavefront Target prior to tape-out, or by tuning Wavefront Targets for specific masks and scanners after the reticle is made.

  8. Gradient-based inverse extreme ultraviolet lithography.

    PubMed

    Ma, Xu; Wang, Jie; Chen, Xuanbo; Li, Yanqiu; Arce, Gonzalo R

    2015-08-20

    Extreme ultraviolet (EUV) lithography is the most promising successor of current deep ultraviolet (DUV) lithography. The very short wavelength, reflective optics, and nontelecentric structure of EUV lithography systems bring in different imaging phenomena into the lithographic image synthesis problem. This paper develops a gradient-based inverse algorithm for EUV lithography systems to effectively improve the image fidelity by comprehensively compensating the optical proximity effect, flare, photoresist, and mask shadowing effects. A block-based method is applied to iteratively optimize the main features and subresolution assist features (SRAFs) of mask patterns, while simultaneously preserving the mask manufacturability. The mask shadowing effect may be compensated by a retargeting method based on a calibrated shadowing model. Illustrative simulations at 22 and 16 nm technology nodes are presented to validate the effectiveness of the proposed methods. PMID:26368764

  9. Vacuum Attachment for XRF Scanner

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schramm, Harry F.; Kaiser, Bruce

    2005-01-01

    Vacuum apparatuses have been developed for increasing the range of elements that can be identified by use of x-ray fluorescent (XRF) scanners of the type mentioned in the two immediately preceding articles. As a consequence of the underlying physical principles, in the presence of air, such an XRF scanner is limited to analysis of chlorine and elements of greater atomic number. When the XRF scanner is operated in a vacuum, it extends the range of analysis to lower atomic numbers - even as far as aluminum and sodium. Hence, more elements will be available for use in XRF labeling of objects as discussed in the two preceding articles. The added benefits of the extended capabilities also have other uses for NASA. Detection of elements of low atomic number is of high interest to the aerospace community. High-strength aluminum alloys will be easily analyzed for composition. Silicon, a major contaminant in certain processes, will be detectable before the process is begun, possibly eliminating weld or adhesion problems. Exotic alloys will be evaluated for composition prior to being placed in service where lives depend on them. And in the less glamorous applications, such as bolts and fasteners, substandard products and counterfeit items will be evaluated at the receiving function and never allowed to enter the operation

  10. Nanometer x-ray lithography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hartley, Frank T.; Khan Malek, Chantal G.

    1999-10-01

    New developments for x-ray nanomachining include pattern transfer onto non-planar surfaces coated with electrodeposited resists using synchrotron radiation x-rays through extremely high-resolution mask made by chemically assisted focused ion beam lithography. Standard UV photolithographic processes cannot maintain sub-micron definitions over large variation in feature topography. The ability of x-ray printing to pattern thin or thick layers of photoresist with high resolution on non-planar surfaces of large and complex topographies with limited diffraction and scattering effects and no substrate reflection is known and can be exploited for patterning microsystems with non-planar 3D geometries as well as multisided and multilayered substrates. Thin conformal coatings of electro-deposited positive and negative tone photoresist have been shown to be x-ray sensitive and accommodate sub-micro pattern transfer over surface of extreme topographical variations. Chemically assisted focused ion beam selective anisotropic erosion was used to fabricate x-ray masks directly. Masks with feature sizes less than 20 nm through 7 microns of gold were made on bulk silicon substrates and x-ray mask membranes. The technique is also applicable to other high density materials. Such masks enable the primary and secondary patterning and/or 3D machining of Nano-Electro-Mechanical Systems over large depths or complex relief and the patterning of large surface areas with sub-optically dimensioned features.

  11. Extreme-UV lithography condenser

    DOEpatents

    Sweatt, William C.; Sweeney, Donald W.; Shafer, David; McGuire, James

    2001-01-01

    Condenser system for use with a ringfield camera in projection lithography where the condenser includes a series of segments of a parent aspheric mirror having one foci at a quasi-point source of radiation and the other foci at the radius of a ringfield have all but one or all of their beams translated and rotated by sets of mirrors such that all of the beams pass through the real entrance pupil of a ringfield camera about one of the beams and fall onto the ringfield radius as a coincident image as an arc of the ringfield. The condenser has a set of correcting mirrors with one of the correcting mirrors of each set, or a mirror that is common to said sets of mirrors, from which the radiation emanates, is a concave mirror that is positioned to shape a beam segment having a chord angle of about 25 to 85 degrees into a second beam segment having a chord angle of about 0 to 60 degrees.

  12. Masks for extreme ultraviolet lithography

    SciTech Connect

    Cardinale, G; Goldsmith, J; Kearney, P A; Larson, C; Moore, C E; Prisbrey, S; Tong, W; Vernon, S P; Weber, F; Yan, P-Y

    1998-09-01

    In extreme ultraviolet lithography (EUVL), the technology specific requirements on the mask are a direct consequence of the utilization of radiation in the spectral region between 10 and 15 nm. At these wavelengths, all condensed materials are highly absorbing and efficient radiation transport mandates the use of all-reflective optical systems. Reflectivity is achieved with resonant, wavelength-matched multilayer (ML) coatings on all of the optical surfaces - including the mask. The EUV mask has a unique architecture - it consists of a substrate with a highly reflective ML coating (the mask blank) that is subsequently over-coated with a patterned absorber layer (the mask). Particulate contamination on the EUVL mask surface, errors in absorber definition and defects in the ML coating all have the potential to print in the lithographic process. While highly developed technologies exist for repair of the absorber layer, no viable strategy for the repair of ML coating defects has been identified. In this paper the state-of-the-art in ML deposition technology, optical inspection of EUVL mask blank defects and candidate absorber patterning approaches are reviewed.

  13. Semiconductor foundry, lithography, and partners

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Burn J.

    2002-07-01

    The semiconductor foundry took off in 1990 with an annual capacity of less than 0.1M 8-inch-equivalent wafers at the 2-mm node. In 2000, the annual capacity rose to more than 10M. Initially, the technology practiced at foundries was 1 to 2 generations behind that at integrated device manufacturers (IDMs). Presently, the progress in 0.13-mm manufacturing goes hand-in-hand with any of the IDMs. There is a two-order of magnitude rise in output and the progress of technology development outpaces IDMs. What are the reasons of the success? Is it possible to sustain the pace? This paper shows the quick rise of foundries in capacity, sales, and market share. It discusses the their uniqueness which gives rise to advantages in conjunction with challenges. It also shows the role foundries take with their customer partners and supplier partners, their mutual dependencies, as well as expectations. What role then does lithography play in the foundries? What are the lithographic challenges to sustain the pace of technology? The experience of technology development and transfer, at one of the major foundries, is used to illustrate the difficulties and progresses made. Looking into the future, as semiconductor manufacturing will become even more expensive and capital investment more prohibitive, we will make an attempt to suggest possible solutions.

  14. Multi-focal multiphoton lithography.

    PubMed

    Ritschdorff, Eric T; Nielson, Rex; Shear, Jason B

    2012-03-01

    Multiphoton lithography (MPL) provides unparalleled capabilities for creating high-resolution, three-dimensional (3D) materials from a broad spectrum of building blocks and with few limitations on geometry, qualities that have been key to the design of chemically, mechanically, and biologically functional microforms. Unfortunately, the reliance of MPL on laser scanning limits the speed at which fabrication can be performed, making it impractical in many instances to produce large-scale, high-resolution objects such as complex micromachines, 3D microfluidics, etc. Previously, others have demonstrated the possibility of using multiple laser foci to simultaneously perform MPL at numerous sites in parallel, but use of a stage-scanning system to specify fabrication coordinates resulted in the production of identical features at each focal position. As a more general solution to the bottleneck problem, we demonstrate here the feasibility for performing multi-focal MPL using a dynamic mask to differentially modulate foci, an approach that enables each fabrication site to create independent (uncorrelated) features within a larger, integrated microform. In this proof-of-concept study, two simultaneously scanned foci produced the expected two-fold decrease in fabrication time, and this approach could be readily extended to many scanning foci by using a more powerful laser. Finally, we show that use of multiple foci in MPL can be exploited to assign heterogeneous properties (such as differential swelling) to micromaterials at distinct positions within a fabrication zone.

  15. Multi-focal multiphoton lithography.

    PubMed

    Ritschdorff, Eric T; Nielson, Rex; Shear, Jason B

    2012-03-01

    Multiphoton lithography (MPL) provides unparalleled capabilities for creating high-resolution, three-dimensional (3D) materials from a broad spectrum of building blocks and with few limitations on geometry, qualities that have been key to the design of chemically, mechanically, and biologically functional microforms. Unfortunately, the reliance of MPL on laser scanning limits the speed at which fabrication can be performed, making it impractical in many instances to produce large-scale, high-resolution objects such as complex micromachines, 3D microfluidics, etc. Previously, others have demonstrated the possibility of using multiple laser foci to simultaneously perform MPL at numerous sites in parallel, but use of a stage-scanning system to specify fabrication coordinates resulted in the production of identical features at each focal position. As a more general solution to the bottleneck problem, we demonstrate here the feasibility for performing multi-focal MPL using a dynamic mask to differentially modulate foci, an approach that enables each fabrication site to create independent (uncorrelated) features within a larger, integrated microform. In this proof-of-concept study, two simultaneously scanned foci produced the expected two-fold decrease in fabrication time, and this approach could be readily extended to many scanning foci by using a more powerful laser. Finally, we show that use of multiple foci in MPL can be exploited to assign heterogeneous properties (such as differential swelling) to micromaterials at distinct positions within a fabrication zone. PMID:22282105

  16. Secondary Electrons in EUV Lithography

    SciTech Connect

    Torok, Justin; Re, Ryan Del; Herbol, Henry; Das, Sanjana; Bocharova, Irina; Paolucci, Angela; Ocola, Leonidas E.; Ventrice Jr., Carl; Lifshin, Eric; Denbeaux, Greg; Brainard, Robert L.

    2013-01-01

    Secondary electrons play critical roles in several imaging technologies, including extreme ultraviolet (EUV) lithography. At longer wavelengths of light (e.g. 193 and 248 nm), the photons are directly involved in the photochemistry occurring during photolysis. EUV light (13.5 nm, 92 eV), however, first creates a photoelectron, and this electron, or its subsequent daughter electrons create most of the chemical changes that occur during exposure. Despite the importance of these electrons, the details surrounding the chemical events leading to acid production remain poorly understood. Previously reported experimental results using high PAG-loaded resists have demonstrated that up to five or six photoacids can be generated per incident photon. Until recently, only electron recombination events were thought to play a role in acid generation, requiring that at least as many secondary electrons are produced to yield a given number of acid molecules. However, the initial results we have obtained using a Monte Carlo-based modeling program, LESiS, demonstrate that only two to three secondary electrons are made per absorbed EUV photon. A more comprehensive understanding of EUV-induced acid generation is therefore needed for the development of higher performance resists

  17. A novel Si micromachined moving-coil induction actuated mm-sized resonant scanner

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oliveira, L. C. M.; Barbaroto, P. R.; Ferreira, L. O. S.; Doi, I.

    2006-01-01

    A novel silicon micromachined moving-coil scanner with electromagnetic induction actuation principle is presented. It was manufactured by the Si-LIG process, silicon-lithography-electroforming (Galvanoformung, from German), where its mechanical structure was made by bulk silicon micromachining of 200 µm thick (1 0 0) silicon substrate, and its armature was patterned by deep UV lithography and Au electroplating. The monolithic mechanical structure is a 12 × 24 mm2 rectangular frame connected by 4.5 mm long torsion bars to a 4 × 10 mm2 rectangular rotor. On one face of the rotor is the armature, a 70 µm thick, single turn, electroplated Au coil with 3.3 mΩ electrical resistance. The other face of the rotor was mirrored by a 1480 Å thick Al film. An external magnetic circuit generated a constant 0.115 T magnetic field parallel to the coil plane and a 0.01 T (peak value) field normal to the coil plane. A maximum mechanical deflection angle of 9.0° pp at the 1311.5 Hz resonance frequency was measured, and a quality factor, Q, of 347 was achieved in air. A mathematical model for the device was derived and a dimensioning procedure was developed. The results show that electromagnetic induction actuation is adequate for mm-sized systems and capable of producing resonant scanners with performance compatible with applications such as bar code readers.

  18. Coastal zone color scanner retrospective

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mitchell, B. Greg

    1994-04-01

    The following special section of the Journal of Geophysical Research is dedicated to a retrospective of scientific studies using the coastal zone color scanner (CZCS) instrument. The CZCS was launched in late 1978 aboard the Nimbus 7 satellite as a "proof-of-concept" instrument to demonstrate the feasibility of using satellite platforms to monitor the distribution of oceanic phytoplankton in the world's oceans. It provided data until the middle of 1986. Phytoplankton primary production contributes approximately one half of the global biospheric fixation of organic matter by photosynthesis, thereby forming the base of the oceanic food web and providing a major sink for atmospheric CO2.

  19. The solar cell laser scanner

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miller, E. L.; Chern, S.-S.; Shumka, A.

    1981-01-01

    As part of the Low Cost Solar Array Program at Jet Propulsion Laboratory, failure analyses have been performed on over 300 photovoltaic modules from thirty different manufacturers and five countries. Because of the volume of work and the variety of module types encountered, it has been necessary to develop non-destructive techniques to rapidly locate the failure sites. This paper will present design details and results obtained with one instrument developed specifically for this purpose, the Solar Cell Laser Scanner (SCLS). The effects of applying a bias current to the modules will also be discussed, based upon experimental observations and computer generated predictions.

  20. Cost-effective x-ray lithography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roltsch, Tom J.

    1991-08-01

    The push towards faster, denser VLSI device structures and eventually to ULSI devices means ever-decreasing design rules for IC manufacturers. In order to define patterns on silicon and gallium arsenide substrates with feature sizes of 0.25 microns, lithography, metallization, and electronic materials processing techniques will be pushed beyond current limitations. Of these technologies, lithography in the sub-0.5 micron region appears to be the main obstacle yet to be overcome. As deep-UV optical systems become more expensive and the useful field sized decrease in the attempt to achieve finer resolutions, the question of whether to switch to an alternate lithographic method becomes imminent. X-ray lithography is the leading candidate. In this paper, the question of whether x-ray lithography is economically superior to optical lithography and the cost-effectiveness of x-ray lithography are addressed. Also, the question of how x-ray lithography can be performed in a production environment is considered. First shown is that more elaborate optical systems are simply not going to match x-ray proximity system in terms of resolution because of the need to use exotic lens materials or complicated and ever finer reflection systems, none of which can correct for diffraction effects, yet must be corrected for every other aberration. The economic superiority of a synchrotron-based x- ray lithography beamline is demonstrated in a production facility using a processing-cost model based on Shinji Okazaki's cost-per-bit model. Considered, as well, is the strong possibility that exists for the use of an optically based production line which would use an anode or plasma x-ray stepper to define only the smallest geometries, such as the gate level on a DRAM chip. It is shown that it is unlikely, even pushing the limits of materials and optics, that deep-UV systems will be able to define patterns below 0.35 microns in a production environment. X-ray lithography systems could define 0

  1. 0.33-k1 ArF lithography for 100-nm DRAM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bok, Cheol-Kyu; Kim, Seok-Kyun; Kim, Hee-Bom; Oh, Jin-Sung; Ahn, Chang-Nam; Shin, Ki-Soo

    2002-07-01

    We have evaluated 0.33k1 ArF lithography using 0.63NA scanner to develop 100 nm DRAM. ArF resist problems were resist pattern shrinkage during CD SEM measurement, resist pattern collapse during wet development and poor etch resistance. Off-Site Measurement (OSM) method has been developed for decreasing pattern shrinkage. With OSM method, 8nm of CD shrinkage was down to 2nm for 100nm L/S patterns. We have found a proper BARC material that prevents resist patterns falling down. Lack of etch resistance was compensated by hard mask. With W/SiN hard mask, acrylate- type resist patterns were transferred well into W/poly-Si gate patterns. We have simulated process window of critical DRAM cell patterns (isolation, gate, bit line contact, storage node) in the simple off-axis illumination (OAI) and optical proximity correction (OPC) conditions based on single exposure. Simulation results were verified by lithography tests and it turned out that 0.33k1 process was possible with exposure latitude of above 10% and focus latitude of more than 0.4 micrometers . 0.33k1 ArF lithography was successfully implemented into 100 nm DRAM with CD uniformity of 10nm (3 (sigma) ) and overlay accuracy of 30 nm (mean +3 (sigma) ). We have also evaluated double exposure technique using dipole illumination targeting 90 nm in order to see the possibility of 0.29k1 process. 0.29k1 process was also likely to be possible, although some specific improvements were recommended for the wider process window. From the simulation and resist patterning results, we believe that 0.85 NA lens will be able to extend ArF lithography into 75 nm by single exposure technology using crosspole illumination (0.33k1 process) and 65 nm by double exposure technology using dipole and crosspole illumination (0.29k1 process).

  2. Soft Lithography Using Nectar Droplets.

    PubMed

    Biswas, Saheli; Chakrabarti, Aditi; Chateauminois, Antoine; Wandersman, Elie; Prevost, Alexis M; Chaudhury, Manoj K

    2015-12-01

    In spite of significant advances in replication technologies, methods to produce well-defined three-dimensional structures are still at its infancy. Such a limitation would be evident if we were to produce a large array of simple and, especially, compound convex lenses, also guaranteeing that their surfaces would be molecularly smooth. Here, we report a novel method to produce such structures by cloning the 3D shape of nectar drops, found widely in nature, using conventional soft lithography.The elementary process involves transfer of a thin patch of the sugar solution coated on a glass slide onto a hydrophobic substrate on which this patch evolves into a microdroplet. Upon the absorption of water vapor, such a microdroplet grows linearly with time, and its final size can be controlled by varying its exposure time to water vapor. At any stage of the evolution of the size of the drop, its shape can be cloned onto a soft elastomer by following the well-known methods of molding and cross-linking the same. A unique new science that emerges in our attempt to understand the transfer of the sugar patch and its evolution to a spherical drop is the elucidation of the mechanics underlying the contact of a deformable sphere against a solid support intervening a thin liquid film. A unique aspect of this work is to demonstrate that higher level structures can also be generated by transferring even smaller nucleation sites on the surface of the primary lenses and then allowing them to grow by absorption of water vapor. What results at the end is either a well-controlled distribution of smooth hemispherical lenses or compound structures that could have potential applications in the fundamental studies of contact mechanics, wettability, and even in optics. PMID:26563988

  3. Lithography and design in partnership: a new roadmap

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kahng, Andrew B.

    2008-10-01

    We discuss the notion of a 'shared technology roadmap' between lithography and design from several perspectives. First, we examine cultural gaps and other intrinsic barriers to a shared roadmap. Second, we discuss how lithography technology can change the design technology roadmap. Third, we discuss how design technology can change the lithography technology roadmap. We conclude with an example of the 'flavor' of technology roadmapping activity that can truly bridge lithography and design.

  4. Photomask lifetime issues in ArF lithography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eschbach, Florence; Coon, Peter; Greenebaum, Barbara; Mittal, Anurag; Sanchez, Peter; Tanzil, Daniel; Ng, Grace; Yun, Henry; Sengupta, Archita

    2005-06-01

    Photomask lifetime has become a challenge since the introduction of high volume manufacturing 193nm photolithograph. Photomask lifetime is being impacted by a broad range of environmental and process factors resulting in inorganics crystals and organic contaminants formation as well as pellicle lifetime issues. Extensive work has been published on strategies for reduction of inorganic crystals photoinduced defects formation mainly focusing on photomask clean process improvements. This paper will focus on identifying root causes for photoinduced contaminants forming within the pellicle space area as well as identify environmental factors which have the potential of impacting pellicle membrane longevity. Outgasing experiments coupled with 193nm laser exposure tests were conducted to decouple and rank reticle/pellicle storage materials as well as pellicle outgasing contributors to photoinduced defects and identify factors impacting pellicle membrance longevity. Analytical test were conducted to compare the relative levels of reticle storage materials and pellicle outgasing contaminants. Experiments aimed at quantifying the fab environment contribution to photoinduced defects formation and impact on pellicle membrane lifetime will be discussed. Environmental conditions minimizing external contributing factors impacting photomask front side photoinduced defects formation and pellicle membrance longevity will be suggested.

  5. SYSTEM CONSIDERATIONS FOR MASKLESS LITHOGRAPHY

    SciTech Connect

    Karnowski, Thomas Paul; Joy, David; Allard Jr, Lawrence Frederick; Clonts, Lloyd G

    2004-01-01

    Lithographic processes for printing device structures on integrated circuits (ICs) are the fundamental technology behind Moore's law. Next-generation techniques like maskless lithography or ML2 have the advantage that the long, tedious and expensive process of fabricating a unique mask for the manufactured chip is not necessary. However, there are some rather daunting problems with establishing ML2 as a viable commercial technology. The data rate necessary for ML2 to be competitive in manufacturing is not feasible with technology in the near future. There is also doubt that the competing technologies for the writing mechanisms and corresponding photoresist (or analogous medium) will be able to accurately produce the desired patterns necessary to produce multi-layer semiconductor devices. In this work, we model the maskless printing system from a signal processing point of view, utilizing image processing algorithms and concepts to study the effects of various real-world constraints and their implications for a ML2 system. The ML2 elements are discrete devices, and it is doubtful that their motion can be controlled to the level where a one-for-one element to exposed pixel relationship is allowable. Some level of sub-element resolution can be achieved with gray scale levels, but with the highly integrated manufacturing practices required to achieve massive parallelism, the most effective elements will be simple on-off switches that fire a fixed level of energy at the target medium. Consequently gray-scale level devices are likely not an option. Another problem with highly integrated manufacturing methods is device uniformity. Consequently, we analyze the redundant scanning array concept (RSA) conceived by Berglund et al. which can defeat many of these problems. We determine some basic equations governing its application and we focus on applying the technique to an array of low-energy electron emitters. Using the results of Monte Carlo simulations on electron beam

  6. X-ray microtomographic scanners

    SciTech Connect

    Syryamkin, V. I. Klestov, S. A.

    2015-11-17

    The article studies the operating procedures of an X-ray microtomographic scanner and the module of reconstruction and analysis 3D-image of a test sample in particular. An algorithm for 3D-image reconstruction based on image shadow projections and mathematical methods of the processing are described. Chapter 1 describes the basic principles of X-ray tomography and general procedures of the device developed. Chapters 2 and 3 are devoted to the problem of resources saving by the system during the X-ray tomography procedure, which is achieved by preprocessing of the initial shadow projections. Preprocessing includes background noise removing from the images, which reduces the amount of shadow projections in general and increases the efficiency of the group shadow projections compression. In conclusion, the main applications of X-ray tomography are presented.

  7. Combined PET/MRI scanner

    DOEpatents

    Schlyer, David; Woody, Craig L.; Rooney, William; Vaska, Paul; Stoll, Sean; Pratte, Jean-Francois; O'Connor, Paul

    2007-10-23

    A combined PET/MRI scanner generally includes a magnet for producing a magnetic field suitable for magnetic resonance imaging, a radiofrequency (RF) coil disposed within the magnetic field produced by the magnet and a ring tomograph disposed within the magnetic field produced by the magnet. The ring tomograph includes a scintillator layer for outputting at least one photon in response to an annihilation event, a detection array coupled to the scintillator layer for detecting the at least one photon outputted by the scintillator layer and for outputting a detection signal in response to the detected photon and a front-end electronic array coupled to the detection array for receiving the detection signal, wherein the front-end array has a preamplifier and a shaper network for conditioning the detection signal.

  8. Advanced mask technique to improve bit line CD uniformity of 90 nm node flash memory in low-k1 lithography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Jong-doo; Choi, Jae-young; Kim, Jea-hee; Han, Jae-won

    2008-10-01

    As devices size move toward 90nm technology node or below, defining uniform bit line CD of flash devices is one of the most challenging features to print in KrF lithography. There are two principal difficulties in defining bit line on wafer. One is insufficient process margin besides poor resolution compared with ArF lithography. The other is that asymmetric bit line should be made for OPC(Optical Proximity Correction) modeling. Therefore advanced ArF lithography scanner should be used for define bit line with RETs (Resolution Enhancement Techniques) such as immersion lithography, OPC, PSM(Phase Shift Mask), high NA(Numerical Aperture), OAI(Off-Axis Illumination), SRAF(Sub-resolution Assistant Feature), and mask biasing.. Like this, ArF lithography propose the method of enhancing resolution, however, we must spend an enormous amount of CoC(cost of ownership) to utilize ArF photolithography process than KrF. In this paper, we suggest method to improve of bit line CD uniformity, patterned by KrF lithographic process in 90nm sFlash(stand alone Flash) devices. We applied new scheme of mask manufacturing, which is able to realize 2 different types of mask, binary and phase-shift, into one plate. Finally, we could get the more uniform bit lines and we expect to get more stable properties then before applying this technique.

  9. 21 CFR 892.1220 - Fluorescent scanner.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Fluorescent scanner. 892.1220 Section 892.1220 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES RADIOLOGY DEVICES Diagnostic Devices § 892.1220 Fluorescent scanner. (a) Identification....

  10. 21 CFR 892.1220 - Fluorescent scanner.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Fluorescent scanner. 892.1220 Section 892.1220 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES RADIOLOGY DEVICES Diagnostic Devices § 892.1220 Fluorescent scanner. (a) Identification....

  11. 21 CFR 892.1220 - Fluorescent scanner.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Fluorescent scanner. 892.1220 Section 892.1220 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED... fluorescent scanner is a device intended to measure the induced fluorescent radiation in the body by...

  12. 21 CFR 892.1220 - Fluorescent scanner.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Fluorescent scanner. 892.1220 Section 892.1220 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED... fluorescent scanner is a device intended to measure the induced fluorescent radiation in the body by...

  13. Scanner Art and Links to Physics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Russell, David

    2005-01-01

    A photocopier or scanner can be used to produce not only the standard motion graphs of physics, but a variety of other graphs that resemble gravitational and electrical fields. This article presents a starting point for exploring scanner graphics, which brings together investigation in art and design, physics, mathematics, and information…

  14. Simple method for measuring acid generation quantum efficiency at 193 nm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Szmanda, Charles R.; Kavanagh, Robert J.; Bohland, John F.; Cameron, James F.; Trefonas, Peter, III; Blacksmith, Robert F.

    1999-06-01

    Traditional methods of measuring the Dill C Parameter involve monitoring the absorbance of a resist as a function of exposure. In chemically amplified resist, absorbance changes with exposure are small and frequently have little correlation to the amount of photoacid generated.

  15. The photodissociation of oxetane at 193 nm as the reverse of the Paterno-Buchi reaction

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Shih-Huang

    2009-12-14

    We investigated the photodissociation of oxetane (1,3-trimethylene oxide) at 193.3 nm in a molecular-beam apparatus using photofragment-translational spectroscopy and selective photoionization. We measured time-of-flight (TOF) spectra and angular anisotropy parameters {beta}(t) as a function of flight time of products at m/z=26-30 u utilizing photoionization energies from 9.8 to 14.8 eV. The TOF distributions of the products alter greatly with the employed photon energy, whereas their {beta}(t) distributions are insensitive to the photon energy. Dissociation to H{sub 2}CO+C{sub 2}H{sub 4} is the major channel in the title reaction. Three distinct dissociation paths with branching ratios 0.923:0.058:0.019 are responsible for the three features observed in the distribution of kinetic energy released in the channel H{sub 2}CO+C{sub 2}H{sub 4}. The observation of H{sub 2} and H atoms, {approx}1% in branching, indicates that products H{sub 2}CO and C{sub 2}H{sub 4} spontaneously decompose to only a small extent. Most HCO, C{sub 2}H{sub 3}, and C{sub 2}H{sub 2} ions originate from dissociative photoionization of products H{sub 2}CO and C{sub 2}H{sub 4}. Except atomic H and H{sub 2}, the photoproducts have large angular anisotropies, {beta}{>=}-0.8, which reflects rapid dissociation of oxetane following optical excitation at 193.3 nm. The mechanisms of dissociation of oxetane are addressed. Our results confirm the quantum-chemical calculations of Palmer et al. and provide profound insight into the Paterno-Buchi reaction.

  16. Interplay of three-dimensional profile change and CD variation in 193-nm advanced binary photomasks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Yun-Yue; Su, Sean; Hsush, Wen-Chang; Lien, Ta-Cheng; Chen, Jia-Jen; Lee, Shin-Chang; Yen, Anthony

    2012-06-01

    In this study, the relationship between the depth profile of features and critical dimension (CD) deviation on MoSi binary photomasks is comprehensively investigated using 3D atomic force microscopy (3D-AFM) and aerial image metrology system (AIMS). Detailed profile description based on various surface analysis techniques, was performed to reconstruct the profile at various stages of the mask fabrication process. It is found that profile change and sidewall byproduct formation are strongly correlated with the etching environment, wet cleaning, and post-treatment. These process-induced profile changes subsequently lead to wafer CD change which can be verified by deviation in AIMS and CDSEM measurements. Visualization of these 3D profile and morphology change clearly reveals that etching gas control forms an outer layer, to enhance etch selectivity, film strength, and immunity to the mask cleaning process. Our finding provides a direction for optimizing advanced photomask materials and processing.

  17. Photolysis of solid NH3 and NH3-H2O mixtures at 193 nm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Loeffler, M. J.; Baragiola, R. A.

    2010-12-01

    We have studied UV photolysis of solid ammonia and ammonia-dihydrate samples at 40 K, using infrared spectroscopy, mass spectrometry, and microgravimetry. We have shown that in the pure NH3 sample, the main species ejected are NH3, H2, and N2, where the hydrogen and nitrogen increase with laser fluence. This increase in N2 ejection with laser fluence explains the increase in mass loss rate detected by a microbalance. In contrast, for the ammonia-water mixture, we see very weak signals of H2 and N2 in the mass spectrometer, consistent with the very small mass loss during the experiment and with a <5% decrease in the NH3 infrared absorption bands spectroscopy after a fluence of ˜3 × 1019 photons/cm2. The results imply that ammonia-ice mixtures in the outer solar system are relatively stable under solar irradiation.

  18. 100 nm half-pitch double exposure KrF lithography using binary masks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Geisler, S.; Bauer, J.; Haak, U.; Stolarek, D.; Schulz, K.; Wolf, H.; Meier, W.; Trojahn, M.; Matthus, E.

    2008-03-01

    In this paper we investigate the process margin for the 100nm half - pitch double exposure KrF lithography using binary masks for different illumination settings. The application of Double Exposure Lithography (DEL) would enlarge the capability of 248 nm exposure technique to smaller pitch e.g. for the integration of dedicated layers into 0.13 μm BiCMOS with critical dimension (CD) requirements exceeding the standard 248 nm lithography specification. The DEL was carried out with a KrF Scanner (Nikon S207D, NA Lens = 0.82) for a critical dimension (CD) of 100nm half pitch. The chemical amplified positive resists SL4800 or UV2000 (Rohm & Haas) with a thickness of 325nm were coated on a 70 nm AR10L (Rohm & Haas) bottom anti-reflective coating (BARC). With a single exposure and using binary masks it is not possible to resolve 100nm lines with a pitch of 200 nm, due to the refraction and the resolution limit. First we investigated the effect of focus variation. It is shown that the focus difference of 1st and 2nd exposure is one critical parameter of the DEL. This requires a good focus repeatability of the scanner. The depth of focus (DOF) of 360 nm with the coherence parameter σ = 0.4 was achieved for DEL with SL4800 resist. The influence of the better resist resolution of UV2000 on the process window will be shown (DOF = 460 nm). If we change the focus of one of the exposures the CD and DOF performance of spaces is reduced with simultaneous line position changing. Second we investigated the effect of different illumination shapes and settings. The results for conventional illumination with different values for σ and annular illumination with σ inner = 0.57 and σ outer = 0.85 will be shown. In summary, the results show that DEL has the potential to be a practical lithography enhancement method for device fabrication using high NA KrF tool generation.

  19. Investigation of hyper-NA scanner emulation for photomask CDU performance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Poortinga, Eric; Scheruebl, Thomas; Conley, Will; Sundermann, Frank

    2007-02-01

    As the semiconductor industry moves toward immersion lithography using numerical apertures above 1.0 the quality of the photomask becomes even more crucial. Photomask specifications are driven by the critical dimension (CD) metrology within the wafer fab. Knowledge of the CD values at resist level provides a reliable mechanism for the prediction of device performance. Ultimately, tolerances of device electrical properties drive the wafer linewidth specifications of the lithography group. Staying within this budget is influenced mainly by the scanner settings, resist process, and photomask quality. Tightening of photomask specifications is one mechanism for meeting the wafer CD targets. The challenge lies in determining how photomask level metrology results influence wafer level imaging performance. Can it be inferred that photomask level CD performance is the direct contributor to wafer level CD performance? With respect to phase shift masks, criteria such as phase and transmission control are generally tightened with each technology node. Are there other photomask relevant influences that effect wafer CD performance? A comprehensive study is presented supporting the use of scanner emulation based photomask CD metrology to predict wafer level within chip CD uniformity (CDU). Using scanner emulation with the photomask can provide more accurate wafer level prediction because it inherently includes all contributors to image formation related to the 3D topography such as the physical CD, phase, transmission, sidewall angle, surface roughness, and other material properties. Emulated images from different photomask types were captured to provide CD values across chip. Emulated scanner image measurements were completed using an AIMS TM45-193i with its hyper-NA, through-pellicle data acquisition capability including the Global CDU Map TM software option for AIMS TM tools. The through-pellicle data acquisition capability is an essential prerequisite for capturing final CDU

  20. Mask characterization for CDU budget breakdown in advanced EUV lithography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nikolsky, Peter; Strolenberg, Chris; Nielsen, Rasmus; Nooitgedacht, Tjitte; Davydova, Natalia; Yang, Greg; Lee, Shawn; Park, Chang-Min; Kim, Insung; Yeo, Jeong-Ho

    2012-11-01

    As the ITRS Critical Dimension Uniformity (CDU) specification shrinks, semiconductor companies need to maintain a high yield of good wafers per day and a high performance (and hence market value) of finished products. This cannot be achieved without continuous analysis and improvement of on-product CDU as one of the main drivers for process control and optimization with better understanding of main contributors from the litho cluster: mask, process, metrology and scanner. In this paper we will demonstrate a study of mask CDU characterization and its impact on CDU Budget Breakdown (CDU BB) performed for an advanced EUV lithography with 1D and 2D feature cases. We will show that this CDU contributor is one of the main differentiators between well-known ArFi and new EUV CDU budgeting principles. We found that reticle contribution to intrafield CDU should be characterized in a specific way: mask absorber thickness fingerprints play a role comparable with reticle CDU in the total reticle part of the CDU budget. Wafer CD fingerprints, introduced by this contributor, may or may not compensate variations of mask CD's and hence influence on total mask impact on intrafield CDU at the wafer level. This will be shown on 1D and 2D feature examples in this paper. Also mask stack reflectivity variations should be taken into account: these fingerprints have visible impact on intrafield CDs at the wafer level and should be considered as another contributor to the reticle part of EUV CDU budget. We observed also MEEF-through-field fingerprints in the studied EUV cases. Variations of MEEF may also play a role for the total intrafield CDU and may be taken into account for EUV Lithography. We characterized MEEF-through-field for the reviewed features, the results to be discussed in our paper, but further analysis of this phenomenon is required. This comprehensive approach to characterization of the mask part of EUV CDU characterization delivers an accurate and integral CDU Budget

  1. Development of MOEMS technology in maskless lithography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, David; Klenk, Dieter

    2009-02-01

    Micro-opto-electro-mechanical-systems (MOEMS) have proven to be a facilitating technology in the lithography industry. Recently, there have been significant advancements in digital micromirror device (DMD) based maskless lithography. These advancements have been in the areas of throughput, resolution, accuracy, and cost reduction. This progression in digital micromirror evolution provides considerable opportunities to displace existing lithographic techniques. Precise control of the individual mircormirrors, including scrolling, and full utilization of the FPGA, have allowed DMD-based lithography systems to reach new levels of throughput and repeatability, while reducing production and warranty costs. Throughput levels have far surpassed scanning laser techniques. Chip level cooling technologies allow for higher incident power to be reliably distributed over larger areas of the substrate. Resolution roadmaps are in place to migrate from the current 2400dpi (11μm) to 4800dpi (5.3μm). Without the constraints of mask requirements, mask alignment, storage, and defect analysis are not required, thus increasing accuracy and reducing cost. This contribution will examine the advancements in and benefits of DMD based maskless lithography.

  2. EUV lithography cost of ownership analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Hawryluk, A.M.; Ceglio, N.M.

    1995-01-19

    The cost of fabricating state-of-the-art integrated circuits (ICs) has been increasing and it will likely be economic rather than technical factors that ultimately limit the progress of ICs toward smaller devices. It is estimated that lithography currently accounts for approximately one-third the total cost of fabricating modem ICs({sup 1}). It is expected that this factor will be fairly stable for the forseeable future, and as a result, any lithographic process must be cost-effective before it can be considered for production. Additionally, the capital equipment cost for a new fabrication facility is growing at an exponential rate (2); it will soon require a multibillion dollar investment in capital equipment alone to build a manufacturing facility. In this regard, it is vital that any advanced lithography candidate justify itself on the basis of cost effectiveness. EUV lithography is no exception and close attention to issues of wafer fabrication costs have been a hallmark of its early history. To date, two prior cost analyses have been conducted for EUV lithography (formerly called {open_quotes}Soft X-ray Projection Lithography{close_quotes}). The analysis by Ceglio, et. al., provided a preliminary system design, set performance specifications and identified critical technical issues for cost control. A follow-on analysis by Early, et.al., studied the impact of issues such as step time, stepper overhead, tool utilization, escalating photoresist costs and limited reticle usage on wafer exposure costs. This current study provides updated system designs and specifications and their impact on wafer exposure costs. In addition, it takes a first cut at a preliminary schematic of an EUVL fabrication facility along with an estimate of the capital equipment costs for such a facility.

  3. A comparison of film and phosphor scanners

    SciTech Connect

    Chancellor, T.; Morris, R.A.

    1993-10-01

    Signal-to-noise ratios (SNRs) and spatial distortions have been measured for three types of scanners: the Molecular Dynamics (MD) and DuPont film scanners and the MD phosphor scanner. The MD film scanner is a deployable and compact scanner that gives a peak SNR of 110 for low (< 2.0) optical densities (ODs), but the spatial distortions across the digitized film plane are significant. The authors compare this with the DuPont film scanner, which has equally good SNRs at low ODs, but very low spatial distortions. The DuPont also allows the user to define an OD range and contains a prescan function to find the suitable range if the user cannot input such a value; its scan times are quick, and the hardware allows for internal data averaging before being stored to disk. The MD phosphor imager has excellent low-dose capability, producing usable images at a 10-{mu}rad dose (from a 150-pkeV source) but its SNRs are low compared to the film scanner, but they can be increased by adjusting the photomultiplier tube voltage and laser radius across the scan arc.

  4. Eddy current X-Y scanner system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kurtz, G. W.

    1983-01-01

    The Nondestructive Evaluation Branch of the Materials and Processes Laboratory became aware of a need for a miniature, portable X-Y scanner capable of performing eddy current or other nondestructive testing scanning operations such as ultrasonic, or small areas of flat plate. The technical description and operational theory of the X-Y scanner system designed and built to fulfill this need are covered. The scanner was given limited testing and performs according to its design intent, which is to scan flat plate areas of approximately 412 sq cm (64 sq in) during each complete cycle of scanning.

  5. Pulsed Doppler lidar airborne scanner

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dimarzio, C. A.; Mcvicker, D. B.; Morrow, C. E.; Negus, C. C.

    1985-01-01

    This report covers the work accomplished during the reporting period on Pulsed Doppler Lidar Airborne Scanner and describes plans for the next reporting period. The objectives during the current phase of the contract are divided into four phases. Phase 1 includes ground testing of the system and analysis of data from the 1981 Severe Storms Test Flights. Phase 2 consists of preflight preparation and planning for the 1983 flight series. The flight test itself will be performed during Phase 3, and Phase 4 consists of post-flight analysis and operation of the system after that flight test. The range profile from five samples taken during Flight 10, around 1700 Z is given. The lowest curve is taken from data collected upwind of Mt. Shasta at about 10,000 feet of altitude, in a clear atmosphere, where no signals were observed. It thus is a good representation of the noise level as a function of range. The next curve was taken downwind of the mountain, and shows evidence of atmospheric returns. There is some question as to whether the data are valid at all ranges, or some ranges are contaminated by the others.

  6. Flexure pivots for oscillatory scanners

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brown, David C.; Pruyn, Kristopher

    2002-06-01

    Flexures are quite ancient, and their use as pivots is also ancient. Long before the use of the most primitive sleeve bearings leather strap flexures were used as trunk lidhinges and the like. Early engines of war, including the ballista of the Romans, technically advanced hand bows, and the cross bows of the fourteenth century all employ flexure pivots as their enabling technology. Designers of modern scientific instruments, including optical and laser scanning equipment exploit the same attributes of the flexure which appealed to their forefathers: simplicity, reliability, lack of internal clearance, long service life, ease of construction, and often, it's high mechanical Q. A special case of the flexure pivot, the torsional pivot, has made possible very long lived scanners at speeds which are far out of the reach of other bearing types. Since success with flexures requires consideration of some simple but non-intuitive issues such as stress distribution and stress corrosion, this talk will emphasize the practicum of flexure design and application.

  7. 21 CFR 892.1220 - Fluorescent scanner.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... fluorescent scanner is a device intended to measure the induced fluorescent radiation in the body by exposing the body to certain x-rays or low-energy gamma rays. This generic type of device may include...

  8. High voltage battery cell scanner development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lepisto, J. W.; Decker, D. K.; Graves, J.

    1983-01-01

    Battery cell voltage scanners have been previously used in low voltage spacecraft applications. In connection with future missions involving an employment of high-power high voltage power subsystems and/or autonomous power subsystem management for unattended operation, it will be necessary to utilize battery cell voltage scanners to provide battery cell voltage information for early detection of impending battery cell degradation/failures. In preparation for such missions, a novel battery cell voltage scanner design has been developed. The novel design makes use of low voltage circuit modules which can be applied to high voltage batteries in a building block fashion. A description is presented of the design concept and test results of the high voltage battery cell scanner, and its operation with an autonomously managed power subsystem is discussed.

  9. Information extraction techniques for multispectral scanner data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Malila, W. A.; Crane, R. B.; Turner, R. E.

    1972-01-01

    The applicability of recognition-processing procedures for multispectral scanner data from areas and conditions used for programming the recognition computers to other data from different areas viewed under different measurement conditions was studied. The reflective spectral region approximately 0.3 to 3.0 micrometers is considered. A potential application of such techniques is in conducting area surveys. Work in three general areas is reported: (1) Nature of sources of systematic variation in multispectral scanner radiation signals, (2) An investigation of various techniques for overcoming systematic variations in scanner data; (3) The use of decision rules based upon empirical distributions of scanner signals rather than upon the usually assumed multivariate normal (Gaussian) signal distributions.

  10. A method for benchmarking CT scanners.

    PubMed

    Al-Farsi, A; Michael, G; Thiele, D

    2005-09-01

    This study involved the development of an objective method to compare the performance of five CT scanners for the purpose of benchmarking. The method used to assess the scanners was to determine the dose-normalised noise at a spatial resolution of 5.5 cm(-1). This gave a dose-normalised percent noise between 0.37% and 0.76%. The scanners were also assessed for radiation dose to patients undergoing abdomen and head CT examinations. Patients' dose-length product (DLP) for the abdomen clinical examinations varied from 305 to 685 mGy-cm, and for the head clinical examinations from 333 to 900 mGy-cm. The study results demonstrated that the comparison of dose and spatial resolution normalised percent noise levels is a useful method of comparing CT scanner performance.

  11. Hand-held optical fuel pin scanner

    DOEpatents

    Kirchner, T.L.; Powers, H.G.

    1980-12-07

    An optical scanner for indicia arranged in a focal plane perpendicular to an optical system including a rotatable dove prism. The dove prism transmits a rotating image to a stationary photodiode array.

  12. Hand-held optical fuel pin scanner

    DOEpatents

    Kirchner, Tommy L.; Powers, Hurshal G.

    1987-01-01

    An optical scanner for indicia arranged in a focal plane perpendicular to an optical system including a rotatable dove prism. The dove prism transmits a rotating image to a stationary photodiode array.

  13. How flatbed scanners upset accurate film dosimetry.

    PubMed

    van Battum, L J; Huizenga, H; Verdaasdonk, R M; Heukelom, S

    2016-01-21

    Film is an excellent dosimeter for verification of dose distributions due to its high spatial resolution. Irradiated film can be digitized with low-cost, transmission, flatbed scanners. However, a disadvantage is their lateral scan effect (LSE): a scanner readout change over its lateral scan axis. Although anisotropic light scattering was presented as the origin of the LSE, this paper presents an alternative cause. Hereto, LSE for two flatbed scanners (Epson 1680 Expression Pro and Epson 10000XL), and Gafchromic film (EBT, EBT2, EBT3) was investigated, focused on three effects: cross talk, optical path length and polarization. Cross talk was examined using triangular sheets of various optical densities. The optical path length effect was studied using absorptive and reflective neutral density filters with well-defined optical characteristics (OD range 0.2-2.0). Linear polarizer sheets were used to investigate light polarization on the CCD signal in absence and presence of (un)irradiated Gafchromic film. Film dose values ranged between 0.2 to 9 Gy, i.e. an optical density range between 0.25 to 1.1. Measurements were performed in the scanner's transmission mode, with red-green-blue channels. LSE was found to depend on scanner construction and film type. Its magnitude depends on dose: for 9 Gy increasing up to 14% at maximum lateral position. Cross talk was only significant in high contrast regions, up to 2% for very small fields. The optical path length effect introduced by film on the scanner causes 3% for pixels in the extreme lateral position. Light polarization due to film and the scanner's optical mirror system is the main contributor, different in magnitude for the red, green and blue channel. We concluded that any Gafchromic EBT type film scanned with a flatbed scanner will face these optical effects. Accurate dosimetry requires correction of LSE, therefore, determination of the LSE per color channel and dose delivered to the film.

  14. Study on CD variation in the vicinity of the exposure field edge in EUV lithography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lim, Chang-Moon; Kim, Seokkyun; Park, Jun-Taek; Hyun, Yoonsuk; Lee, Jong-Su; Koo, Sunyoung; Kim, Myoungsoo; Kang, Hyosang

    2012-03-01

    Intra-field CD uniformity control is one of hurdles in EUV lithography. Reflection imaging system intrinsic to EUV causes CD non-uniformity especially in exposure field edge. To analyze dominant contributors to make this intra-field CD non-uniformity in EUV lithography, influence of flare from adjacent fields and in-band and out of band refection from reticle masking blind(REMA) and mask black border were investigated through intensive sampling of CD measurement. Also mask border condition and REMA open settings are split into various settings to find out the impacts from each contributor. Two ASML EUV scanners, alpha demo tool(ADT) and pre-production tool(PPT) are used for the experiment. Fortunately, DUV out of band(OoB), reflection of REMA and the flare from adjacent fields are found to be not significant in NXE3100. The results presented here lead us to the conclusion that the EUV refection from mask black border is the main contributor and CD non-uniformity of the field edge can be overcome through optimized REMA setting.

  15. Scatterometry-based metrology for the 14nm node double patterning lithography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carau, D.; Bouyssou, R.; Ducoté, J.; Dettoni, F.; Ostrovsky, A.; Le Gratiet, B.; Dezauzier, C.; Besacier, M.; Gourgon, C.

    2015-03-01

    Critical dimension and overlay measurements have become a key challenge in microelectronics process control, and the weight of metrology in the success of a patterning technique is increasing. For the 14 nm node, the limit of scanner resolution can be overcome by double patterning, which requires a maximum overlay variability of 3 nm between the two reticles of the first metal level. In the double patterning case of metal layers, critical dimension of line spaces and overlay are no longer independent. In this paper, the possibility of a common measurement after the second lithography is studied. Scatterometry has been used to fit successfully the critical dimension of the two sublevels. As sensitivity to overlay is too low in device-like target, a strategy has been implemented from diffraction-based overlay measurement. So it becomes possible to provide information on the lithography step quality before the second etch process to enable rework if necessary. Finally a scatterometry target has been designed to fit simultaneously the two critical dimensions and overlay. This target, which is designed to maximize overlay sensitivity, has been placed in the next 14 nm CMOS product and is expected to make this scatterometry method even more attractive.

  16. Tunable lithography masks using chiral nematic fluids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jeong, Hyeon Su; Srinivasarao, Mohan; Jung, Hee-Tae

    2013-03-01

    We present a facile route for pattern formation using chiral nematic fluids as tunable masks in lithography process. The chiral nematic phase prepared by adding a chiral dopant (CB15) to 5CB acted as a set of parallel cylindrical lenses and as a polarization selective photomask for the preparation of periodic line patterns. The pitch of the helical twist was easily controlled by the concentration of chiral agent and the feature size of the resulting pattern was easily tuned. Because of the high mobility of the small liquid crystalline compound, the preparation of chiral nematic fluids based lithography masks requires only a few seconds. This approach has significant advantages including facility, range of surface ordering, and rate of forming periodic arrays. Current affiliation: SK Innovation, Daejeon, Korea

  17. Uncertainty Propagation for Terrestrial Mobile Laser Scanner

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mezian, c.; Vallet, Bruno; Soheilian, Bahman; Paparoditis, Nicolas

    2016-06-01

    Laser scanners are used more and more in mobile mapping systems. They provide 3D point clouds that are used for object reconstruction and registration of the system. For both of those applications, uncertainty analysis of 3D points is of great interest but rarely investigated in the literature. In this paper we present a complete pipeline that takes into account all the sources of uncertainties and allows to compute a covariance matrix per 3D point. The sources of uncertainties are laser scanner, calibration of the scanner in relation to the vehicle and direct georeferencing system. We suppose that all the uncertainties follow the Gaussian law. The variances of the laser scanner measurements (two angles and one distance) are usually evaluated by the constructors. This is also the case for integrated direct georeferencing devices. Residuals of the calibration process were used to estimate the covariance matrix of the 6D transformation between scanner laser and the vehicle system. Knowing the variances of all sources of uncertainties, we applied uncertainty propagation technique to compute the variance-covariance matrix of every obtained 3D point. Such an uncertainty analysis enables to estimate the impact of different laser scanners and georeferencing devices on the quality of obtained 3D points. The obtained uncertainty values were illustrated using error ellipsoids on different datasets.

  18. Implementation of assist features in EUV lithography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Fan; Burkhardt, Martin; Raghunathan, Ananthan; Torres, Andres; Gupta, Rachit; Word, James

    2015-03-01

    The introduction of EUV lithography will happen at a critical feature pitch which corresponds to a k1 factor of roughly 0.45. While this number seems not very aggressive compared to recent ArF lithography nodes, the number is sufficiently low that the introduction of assist features has to be considered. While the small NA makes the k1 factor larger, the depth of focus still needs to be scaled down with wavelength. However the exposure tool's focus control is not greatly improved over the ArF tools, so other solutions to improve the depth of focus, e.g. SRAFs, are needed. On the other hand, sub-resolution assist features (SRAFs) require very small mask dimensions, which make masks more costly to write and inspect. Another disadvantage of SRAFs is the fact that they may cause pattern-dependent best focus shift due to thick mask effects. Those effects can be predicted, but the shift of best focus and the associated tilt of Bossung curves make the process more difficult to control. We investigate the impact of SRAFs on printing in EUV lithography and evaluate advantages and disadvantages. By using image quality parameters such as best focus (BF), and depth of focus (DOF), respectively with and without SRAFs, we will answer the question if we can gain a net benefit for 1D and 2D patterns by adding SRAFs. SRAFs will only be introduced if any net improvement in process variation (PV) outweighs the additional expense of assist patterning on the mask. In this paper, we investigate the difference in printing behavior of symmetric and asymmetric SRAF placement and whether through slit effect needs to be considered in SRAF placement for EUV lithography.

  19. Formation of Magnetic Anisotropy by Lithography

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Si Nyeon; Nam, Yoon Jae; Kim, Yang Doo; Choi, Jun Woo; Lee, Heon; Lim, Sang Ho

    2016-01-01

    Artificial interface anisotropy is demonstrated in alternating Co/Pt and Co/Pd stripe patterns, providing a means of forming magnetic anisotropy using lithography. In-plane hysteresis loops measured along two principal directions are explained in depth by two competing shape and interface anisotropies, thus confirming the formation of interface anisotropy at the Co/Pt and Co/Pd interfaces of the stripe patterns. The measured interface anisotropy energies, which are in the range of 0.2–0.3 erg/cm2 for both stripes, are smaller than those observed in conventional multilayers, indicating a decrease in smoothness of the interfaces when formed by lithography. The demonstration of interface anisotropy in the Co/Pt and Co/Pd stripe patterns is of significant practical importance, because this setup makes it possible to form anisotropy using lithography and to modulate its strength by controlling the pattern width. Furthermore, this makes it possible to form more complex interface anisotropy by fabricating two-dimensional patterns. These artificial anisotropies are expected to open up new device applications such as multilevel bits using in-plane magnetoresistive thin-film structures. PMID:27216420

  20. Formation of Magnetic Anisotropy by Lithography.

    PubMed

    Kim, Si Nyeon; Nam, Yoon Jae; Kim, Yang Doo; Choi, Jun Woo; Lee, Heon; Lim, Sang Ho

    2016-01-01

    Artificial interface anisotropy is demonstrated in alternating Co/Pt and Co/Pd stripe patterns, providing a means of forming magnetic anisotropy using lithography. In-plane hysteresis loops measured along two principal directions are explained in depth by two competing shape and interface anisotropies, thus confirming the formation of interface anisotropy at the Co/Pt and Co/Pd interfaces of the stripe patterns. The measured interface anisotropy energies, which are in the range of 0.2-0.3 erg/cm(2) for both stripes, are smaller than those observed in conventional multilayers, indicating a decrease in smoothness of the interfaces when formed by lithography. The demonstration of interface anisotropy in the Co/Pt and Co/Pd stripe patterns is of significant practical importance, because this setup makes it possible to form anisotropy using lithography and to modulate its strength by controlling the pattern width. Furthermore, this makes it possible to form more complex interface anisotropy by fabricating two-dimensional patterns. These artificial anisotropies are expected to open up new device applications such as multilevel bits using in-plane magnetoresistive thin-film structures. PMID:27216420

  1. Self-segregating materials for immersion lithography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sanders, Daniel P.; Sundberg, Linda K.; Brock, Phillip J.; Ito, Hiroshi; Truong, Hoa D.; Allen, Robert D.; McIntyre, Gregory R.; Goldfarb, Dario L.

    2008-03-01

    In this paper, we employ the self-segregating materials approach used in topcoat-free resists for water immersion lithography to extend the performance of topcoat materials for water immersion and to increase the contact angles of organic fluids on topcoat-free resists for high index immersion lithography. By tailoring polymers that segregate to the air and resist interfaces of the topcoat, high contact angle topcoats with relatively low fluorine content are achieved. While graded topcoats may extend the performance and/or reduce the cost of topcoat materials, the large amount of unprotected acidic groups necessary for TMAH development prevent them from achieving the high contact angles and low hysteresis exhibited by topcoat-free resists. Another application of this self-segregating approach is tailoring resist surfaces for high index immersion. Due to the low surface tension and higher viscosities of organic fluids relative to water and their lower contact angles on most surfaces, film pulling cannot be prevented without dramatically reducing wafer scan rates; however, tuning the surface energy of the resist may be important to control stain morphology and facilitate fluid removal from the wafer. By tailoring fluoropolymer additives for high contact angles with second generation organic high index immersion fluids, we show herein that topcoat-free resists can be developed specifically for high index immersion lithography with good contact angles and lithographic imaging performance.

  2. Metallic resist for phase-change lithography

    PubMed Central

    Zeng, Bi Jian; Huang, Jun Zhu; Ni, Ri Wen; Yu, Nian Nian; Wei, Wei; Hu, Yang Zhi; Li, Zhen; Miao, Xiang Shui

    2014-01-01

    Currently, the most widely used photoresists in optical lithography are organic-based resists. The major limitations of such resists include the photon accumulation severely affects the quality of photolithography patterns and the size of the pattern is constrained by the diffraction limit. Phase-change lithography, which uses semiconductor-based resists such as chalcogenide Ge2Sb2Te5 films, was developed to overcome these limitations. Here, instead of chalcogenide, we propose a metallic resist composed of Mg58Cu29Y13 alloy films, which exhibits a considerable difference in etching rate between amorphous and crystalline states. Furthermore, the heat distribution in Mg58Cu29Y13 thin film is better and can be more easily controlled than that in Ge2Sb2Te5 during exposure. We succeeded in fabricating both continuous and discrete patterns on Mg58Cu29Y13 thin films via laser irradiation and wet etching. Our results demonstrate that a metallic resist of Mg58Cu29Y13 is suitable for phase change lithography, and this type of resist has potential due to its outstanding characteristics. PMID:24931505

  3. Immersion and 32nm lithography: now and future

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kameyama, Masaomi; McCallum, Martin

    2007-12-01

    The amazing growth of the semiconductor industry over the past decades has been supported, and in many cases driven, by miniaturization of devices. Behind this has been one strong backbone - lithography. In the 1970's, devices had geometries of several micrometers, but now we are about to enter 45nm device pre-production and shortly after move it into volume-production. Immersion lithography, although having a short development time, is already in production and will become the primary technology driver. What we need to do now is identify the solutions for 32nm lithography. There are several candidates for 32nm lithography, such as EUVL, High Index Immersion and Double Patterning / Double Exposure. Other more esoteric technologies such as nanoimprint and maskless lithography have also been mentioned. In this paper, the present status of Immersion lithography will be reviewed and each of the 32nm candidates are reviewed.

  4. Challenges for 1x-nm device fabrication using EUVL: scanner and mask

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arnold, William H.

    2011-11-01

    EUVL lithography using high resolution step and scan systems operating at 13.5nm is being inserted in leading edge production lines for memory and logic devices. These tools use mirror optics and either laser produced plasma (LPP) or discharge produced plasma (DPP) sources along with reflective reduction masks to image circuit features. These tools show their capability to meet the challenging device requirements for imaging and overlay. Next generation scanners with resolution and overlay capability to produce 1X nm (10 nm class) memory and logic devices are in preparation. Challenges remain for EUVL, the principal of which are increasing source power enabling high productivity, building a volume mask business encouraging rapid learning cycles, and improving resist performance so it is capable of sub 20nm resolution.

  5. A compact X-ray lithography lattice using superferric magnets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Swenson, C. A.; Huson, F. R.; Mackay, W. W.; Chen, L. K.; Ohnuma, S.

    A conceptual lattice design for a very compact superconducting synchrotron dedicated to X-ray lithography is presented. The synchrotron radiation produced in the high field superconducting magnets has a critical wavelength of 10 angstrom at a beam energy of about 787 MeV. The size and angular divergence of the beam in this lattice can satisfy future requirements for X-ray lithography. An optimization of the lithography parameters is presented.

  6. EUV High-NA scanner and mask optimization for sub 8 nm resolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Schoot, Jan; van Ingen Schenau, Koen; Bottiglieri, Gerardo; Troost, Kars; Zimmerman, John; Migura, Sascha; Kneer, Bernhard; Neumann, Jens Timo; Kaiser, Winfried

    2015-10-01

    EUV lithography for resolution below 8 nm half pitch requires the numerical aperture (NA) of the projection lens to be significantly larger than the current state-of-the-art 0.33NA. In order to be economically viable, a throughput in the range of 100 wafers per hour is needed. As a result of the increased NA, the incidence angles of the light rays at the mask increase significantly. Consequently the shadowing and the variation of the multi-layer reflectivity deteriorate the aerial image contrast to unacceptably low values at the current 4x magnification. The only solution to reduce the angular range at the mask is to increase the magnification. Simulations show that we have to double the magnification to 8x in order to overcome the shadowing effects. Assuming that the mask infrastructure will not change the mask form factor, this would inevitably lead to a field size that is a quarter of the field size of current 0.33NA step and scan systems. This would reduce the throughput of the high-NA scanner to a value significantly below 100 wafers per hour unless additional measures are taken. This paper presents an anamorphic step and scan system capable to print fields that are half the field size of the current full field. The anamorphic system has the potential to achieve a throughput in excess of 150 wafers per hour by increasing the transmission of the optics as well as increasing the acceleration of the wafer stage and mask stage. This makes it an economically viable lithography solution. The proposed 4x/8x magnification is not the only logical solution. There are potentially other magnifications to increase the scanner performance while at the same time reducing the mask requirements.

  7. EUV high-NA scanner and mask optimization for sub-8nm resolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Schoot, Jan; van Ingen Schenau, Koen; Bottiglieri, Gerardo; Troost, Kars; Zimmerman, John; Migura, Sascha; Kneer, Bernhard; Neumann, Jens Timo; Kaiser, Winfried

    2016-03-01

    EUV lithography for resolution below 8 nm half pitch requires the numerical aperture (NA) of the projection lens to be significantly larger than the current state-of-the-art 0.33NA. In order to be economically viable, a throughput in the range of 100 wafers per hour is needed. As a result of the increased NA, the incidence angles of the light rays at the mask increase significantly. Consequently the shadowing and the variation of the multi-layer reflectivity deteriorate the aerial image contrast to unacceptably low values at the current 4x magnification. The only solution to reduce the angular range at the mask is to increase the magnification. Simulations show that we have to double the magnification to 8x in order to overcome the shadowing effects. Assuming that the mask infrastructure will not change the mask form factor, this would inevitably lead to a field size that is a quarter of the field size of current 0.33NA step and scan systems. This would reduce the throughput of the high-NA scanner to a value significantly below 100 wafers per hour unless additional measures are taken. This paper presents an anamorphic step and scan system capable to print fields that are half the field size of the current full field. The anamorphic system has the potential to achieve a throughput in excess of 150 wafers per hour by increasing the transmission of the optics as well as increasing the acceleration of the wafer stage and mask stage. This makes it an economically viable lithography solution. The proposed 4x/8x magnification is not the only logical solution. There are potentially other magnifications to increase the scanner performance while at the same time reducing the m ask requirements.

  8. MEMS temperature scanner: principles, advances, and applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Otto, Thomas; Saupe, Ray; Stock, Volker; Gessner, Thomas

    2010-02-01

    Contactless measurement of temperatures has gained enormous significance in many application fields, ranging from climate protection over quality control to object recognition in public places or military objects. Thereby measurement of linear or spatially temperature distribution is often necessary. For this purposes mostly thermographic cameras or motor driven temperature scanners are used today. Both are relatively expensive and the motor drive devices are limited regarding to the scanning rate additionally. An economic alternative are temperature scanner devices based on micro mirrors. The micro mirror, attached in a simple optical setup, reflects the emitted radiation from the observed heat onto an adapted detector. A line scan of the target object is obtained by periodic deflection of the micro scanner. Planar temperature distribution will be achieved by perpendicularly moving the target object or the scanner device. Using Planck radiation law the temperature of the object is calculated. The device can be adapted to different temperature ranges and resolution by using different detectors - cooled or uncooled - and parameterized scanner parameters. With the basic configuration 40 spatially distributed measuring points can be determined with temperatures in a range from 350°C - 1000°C. The achieved miniaturization of such scanners permits the employment in complex plants with high building density or in direct proximity to the measuring point. The price advantage enables a lot of applications, especially new application in the low-price market segment This paper shows principle, setup and application of a temperature measurement system based on micro scanners working in the near infrared range. Packaging issues and measurement results will be discussed as well.

  9. 75 FR 44015 - Certain Semiconductor Products Made by Advanced Lithography Techniques and Products Containing...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-07-27

    ... COMMISSION Certain Semiconductor Products Made by Advanced Lithography Techniques and Products Containing... importation of certain semiconductor products made by advanced lithography techniques and products containing... certain semiconductor products made by advanced lithography techniques or products containing same...

  10. LANSCE-R WIRE-SCANNER SYSTEM

    SciTech Connect

    Gruchalla, Michael E.

    2011-01-01

    The National Instruments cRIO platform is used for the new LANSCE-R wire-scanner systems. All wire-scanner electronics are integrated into a single BiRa BiRIO 4U cRIO chassis specifically designed for the cRIO crate and all interface electronics. The BiRIO chassis, actuator and LabVIEW VIs provide a complete wire-scanner system integrated with EPICS. The new wire-scanner chassis includes an 8-slot cRIO crate with Virtex-5 LX 110 FPGA and Power-PC real-time controller, the LANL-developed cRIO 2-axis wire-sensor analog interface module (AFE), NI9222 cRIO 4-channel 16-bit digitizer, cRIO resolver demodulator, cRIO event receiver, front-panel touch panel display, motor driver, and all necessary software, interface wiring, connectors and ancillary components. This wirescanner system provides a complete, turn-key, 2-axis wire-scanner system including 2-channel low-noise sensewire interface with variable DC wire bias and wireintegrity monitor, 16-bit signal digitizers, actuator motor drive and control, actuator position sensing, limit-switch interfaces, event receiver, LabVIEW and EPICS interface, and both remote operation and full stand-alone operation using the touch panel.

  11. Cognition for robot scanner based remote welding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thombansen, U.; Ungers, Michael

    2014-02-01

    The effort for reduced cycle times in manufacturing has supported the development of remote welding systems which use a combination of scanners for beam delivery and robots for scanner positioning. Herein, close coupling of both motions requires a precise command of the robot trajectory and the scanner positioning to end up with a combined beam delivery. Especially the path precision of the robot plays a vital role in this kinematic chain. In this paper, a sensor system is being presented which allows tracking the motion of the laser beam against the work piece. It is based on a camera system which is coaxially connected to the scanner thus observing the relative motion of the laser beam relative to the work piece. The acquired images are processed with computer vision algorithms from the field of motion detection. The suitability of the algorithms is being demonstrated with a motion tracking tool which visualizes the homogeneity of the tracking result. The reported solution adds cognitive capabilities to manufacturing systems for robot scanner based materials processing. It allows evaluation of the relative motion between work piece and the laser beam. Moreover, the system can be used to adapt system programming during set-up of a manufacturing task or to evaluate the functionality of a manufacturing system during production. The presented sensor system will assist in optimizing manufacturing processes.

  12. Fabrication of metallic nanowires and nanoribbons using laser interference lithography and shadow lithography

    SciTech Connect

    Park, Joong- Mok; Nalwa, Kanwar Singh; Leung, Wai; Constant, Kristen; Chaudhary, Sumit; Ho, Kai-Ming

    2010-04-30

    Ordered and free-standing metallic nanowires were fabricated by e-beam deposition on patterned polymer templates made by interference lithography. The dimensions of the nanowires can be controlled through adjustment of deposition conditions and polymer templates. Grain size, polarized optical transmission and electrical resistivity were measured with ordered and free-standing nanowires.

  13. Laser scanners: from industrial to biomedical applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duma, Virgil-Florin

    2013-11-01

    We present a brief overview of our contributions in the field of laser scanning technologies, applied for a variety of applications, from industrial, dimensional measurements to high-end biomedical imaging, such as Optical Coherence Tomography (OCT). Polygon Mirror (PM) scanners are presented, as applied from optical micrometers to laser sources scanned in frequency for Swept Sources (SSs) OCT. Galvanometer-based scanners (GSs) are approached to determine the optimal scanning function in order to obtain the highest possible duty cycle. We demonstrated that this optimal scanning function is linear plus parabolic, and not linear plus sinusoidal, as it has been previously considered in the literature. Risley prisms (rotational double wedges) scanners are pointed out, with our exact approach to determine and simulate their scan patterns in order to optimize their use in several types of applications, including OCT. A discussion on the perspectives of scanning in biomedical imaging, with a focus on OCT concludes the study.

  14. CT densitometry of the lungs: Scanner performance

    SciTech Connect

    Kemerink, G.J.; Lamers, R.J.S.; Thelissen, G.R.P.; Engelshoven, J.M.A. van

    1996-01-01

    Our goal was to establish the reproducibility and accuracy of the CT scanner in densitometry of the lungs. Scanner stability was assessed by analysis of daily quality checks. Studies using a humanoid phantom and polyethylene foams for lung were performed to measure reproducibility and accuracy. The dependence of the CT-estimated density on reconstruction filter, zoom factor, slice thickness, table height, data truncation, and objects outside the scan field was determined. Stability of the system at air density was within {approx}1 HU and at water density within {approx}2 HU. Reproducibility and accuracy for densities found for lung were within 2-3%. Dependence on the acquisition and reconstruction parameters was neglible, with the exceptions of the ultra high resolution reconstruction algorithm in the case of emphysema, and objects outside the scan field. The performance of the CT scanner tested is quite adequate for densitometry of the lungs. 26 refs., 5 figs., 4 tabs.

  15. How flatbed scanners upset accurate film dosimetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Battum, L. J.; Huizenga, H.; Verdaasdonk, R. M.; Heukelom, S.

    2016-01-01

    Film is an excellent dosimeter for verification of dose distributions due to its high spatial resolution. Irradiated film can be digitized with low-cost, transmission, flatbed scanners. However, a disadvantage is their lateral scan effect (LSE): a scanner readout change over its lateral scan axis. Although anisotropic light scattering was presented as the origin of the LSE, this paper presents an alternative cause. Hereto, LSE for two flatbed scanners (Epson 1680 Expression Pro and Epson 10000XL), and Gafchromic film (EBT, EBT2, EBT3) was investigated, focused on three effects: cross talk, optical path length and polarization. Cross talk was examined using triangular sheets of various optical densities. The optical path length effect was studied using absorptive and reflective neutral density filters with well-defined optical characteristics (OD range 0.2-2.0). Linear polarizer sheets were used to investigate light polarization on the CCD signal in absence and presence of (un)irradiated Gafchromic film. Film dose values ranged between 0.2 to 9 Gy, i.e. an optical density range between 0.25 to 1.1. Measurements were performed in the scanner’s transmission mode, with red-green-blue channels. LSE was found to depend on scanner construction and film type. Its magnitude depends on dose: for 9 Gy increasing up to 14% at maximum lateral position. Cross talk was only significant in high contrast regions, up to 2% for very small fields. The optical path length effect introduced by film on the scanner causes 3% for pixels in the extreme lateral position. Light polarization due to film and the scanner’s optical mirror system is the main contributor, different in magnitude for the red, green and blue channel. We concluded that any Gafchromic EBT type film scanned with a flatbed scanner will face these optical effects. Accurate dosimetry requires correction of LSE, therefore, determination of the LSE per color channel and dose delivered to the film.

  16. Overview of Lithography: Challenges and Metrologies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Levinson, Harry J.

    2003-09-01

    Semiconductor microlithography is rapidly reaching a point where it becomes exceedingly difficult to shrink features at historical rates. We will no longer be able to increase process windows by going to shorter wavelengths with optical lithography, because we are running out of useable wavelengths. This necessitates either the implementation of processes with very small process windows or a transition to radically new types of lithographic technologies. Either situation presents numerous challenges to lithographers and metrologists. Particularly daunting are the requirements for gate linewidth control for microprocessors. Reducing variation requires improvement in the components of variation, each of which must be smaller than the total result. In order to improve a particular parameter, such as CD variation, metrology must be adequate for identifying improvements in the components of that parameter, not just the total. This places very tight requirements on metrology capability. Departing from optical lithography into the Brave New World of Next Generation Lithography will necessitate new metrology capabilities in several areas, not just the measurement of features on wafers. Creating the capabilities that will be needed in the future requires that funding be available for the requisite development. The need for huge amounts of funding to develop new lithographic technologies will likely necessitate a slowing down in the pace at which we shrink features. It is absolutely essential that a balance is re-established between the prices that purchasers of chips are willing to pay and chip development and manufacturing costs. This will be very challenging with 300 mm wafer fabs coming on-line, since low chip prices have historically been associated with overcapacity in the semiconductor industry, and it is anticipated that new lithographic technologies will be very expensive.

  17. Image-projection ion-beam lithography

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, P.A. )

    1989-09-01

    Image-projection ion-beam lithography is an attractive alternative for submicron patterning because it may provide high throughput; it uses demagnification to gain advantages in reticle fabrication, inspection, and lifetime; and it enjoys the precise deposition characteristics of ions which cause essentially no collateral damage. This lithographic option involves extracting low-mass ions (e.g., He{sup +} ) from a plasma source, transmitting the ions at low voltage through a stencil reticle, and then accelerating and focusing the ions electrostatically onto a resist-coated wafer. While the advantages of this technology have been demonstrated experimentally by the work of IMS (Austria), many difficulties still impede extension of the technology to the high-volume production of microelectronic devices. We report a computational study of a lithography system designed to address problem areas in field size, telecentricity, and chromatic and geometric aberration. We present a novel ion-column-design approach and conceptual ion-source and column designs which address these issues. We find that image-projection ion-beam technology should in principle meet high-volume-production requirements. The technical success of our present relatively compact-column design requires that a glow-discharge-based ion source (or equivalent cold source) be developed and that moderate further improvement in geometric aberration levels be obtained. Our system requires that image predistortion be employed during reticle fabrication to overcome distortion due to residual image nonlinearity and space-charge forces. This constitutes a software data preparation step, as do correcting for distortions in electron lithography columns and performing proximity-effect corrections. Areas needing further fundamental work are identified.

  18. Film stacking architecture for immersion lithography process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goto, Tomohiro; Sanada, Masakazu; Miyagi, Tadashi; Shigemori, Kazuhito; Kanaoka, Masashi; Yasuda, Shuichi; Tamada, Osamu; Asai, Masaya

    2008-03-01

    In immersion lithography process, film stacking architecture will be necessary due to film peeling. However, the architecture will restrict lithographic area within a wafer due to top side EBR accuracy In this paper, we report an effective film stacking architecture that also allows maximum lithographic area. This study used a new bevel rinse system on RF3 for all materials to make suitable film stacking on the top side bevel. This evaluation showed that the new bevel rinse system allows the maximum lithographic area and a clean wafer edge. Patterning defects were improved with suitable film stacking.

  19. The next generation of maskless lithography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Diez, Steffen

    2016-02-01

    The essential goal for fast prototyping of microstructures is to reduce the cycle time. Conventional methods up to now consist of creating designs with a CAD software, then fabricating or purchasing a Photomask and finally using a mask aligner to transfer the pattern to the photoresist. The new Maskless Aligner (MLA) enables to expose the pattern directly without fabricating a mask, which results in a significantly shorter prototyping cycle. To achieve this short prototyping cycle, the MLA has been improved in many aspects compared to other direct write lithography solutions: exposure speed, user interface, ease of operation and flexibility.

  20. Nanoimprint lithography: an enabling technology for nanophotonics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yao, Yuhan; Liu, He; Wang, Yifei; Li, Yuanrui; Song, Boxiang; Bratkovsk, Alexandre; Wang, Shih-Yuan; Wu, Wei

    2015-11-01

    Nanoimprint lithography (NIL) is an indispensable tool to realize a fast and accurate nanoscale patterning in nanophotonics due to high resolution and high yield. The number of publication on NIL has increased from less than a hundred per year to over three thousand per year. In this paper, the most recent developments on NIL patterning transfer processes and its applications on nanophotonics are discussed and reviewed. NIL has been opening up new opportunities for nanophotonics, especially in fabricating optical meta-materials. With more researches on this low-cost high-throughput fabrication technology, we should anticipate a brighter future for nanophotonics and NIL.

  1. Wave and Particle in Molecular Interference Lithography

    SciTech Connect

    Juffmann, Thomas; Truppe, Stefan; Geyer, Philipp; Major, Andras G.; Arndt, Markus; Deachapunya, Sarayut; Ulbricht, Hendrik

    2009-12-31

    The wave-particle duality of massive objects is a cornerstone of quantum physics and a key property of many modern tools such as electron microscopy, neutron diffraction or atom interferometry. Here we report on the first experimental demonstration of quantum interference lithography with complex molecules. Molecular matter-wave interference patterns are deposited onto a reconstructed Si(111) 7x7 surface and imaged using scanning tunneling microscopy. Thereby both the particle and the quantum wave character of the molecules can be visualized in one and the same image. This new approach to nanolithography therefore also represents a sensitive new detection scheme for quantum interference experiments.

  2. Plasma formed ion beam projection lithography system

    DOEpatents

    Leung, Ka-Ngo; Lee, Yung-Hee Yvette; Ngo, Vinh; Zahir, Nastaran

    2002-01-01

    A plasma-formed ion-beam projection lithography (IPL) system eliminates the acceleration stage between the ion source and stencil mask of a conventional IPL system. Instead a much thicker mask is used as a beam forming or extraction electrode, positioned next to the plasma in the ion source. Thus the entire beam forming electrode or mask is illuminated uniformly with the source plasma. The extracted beam passes through an acceleration and reduction stage onto the resist coated wafer. Low energy ions, about 30 eV, pass through the mask, minimizing heating, scattering, and sputtering.

  3. Multispectral scanner imagery for plant community classification.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Driscoll, R. S.; Spencer, M. M.

    1973-01-01

    Optimum channel selection among 12 channels of multispectral scanner imagery identified six as providing the best information for computerized classification of 11 plant communities and two nonvegetation classes. Intensive preprocessing of the spectral data was required to eliminate bidirectional reflectance effects of the spectral imagery caused by scanner view angle and varying geometry of the plant canopy. Generalized plant community types - forest, grassland, and hydrophytic systems - were acceptably classified based on ecological analysis. Serious, but soluble, errors occurred with attempts to classify specific community types within the grassland system. However, special clustering analyses provided for improved classification of specific grassland communities.

  4. Infrared scanner concept verification test report

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bachtel, F. D.

    1980-01-01

    The test results from a concept verification test conducted to assess the use of an infrared scanner as a remote temperature sensing device for the space shuttle program are presented. The temperature and geometric resolution limits, atmospheric attenuation effects including conditions with fog and rain, and the problem of surface emissivity variations are included. It is concluded that the basic concept of using an infrared scanner to determine near freezing surface temperatures is feasible. The major problem identified is concerned with infrared reflections which result in significant errors if not controlled. Action taken to manage these errors result in design and operational constraints to control the viewing angle and surface emissivity.

  5. Metal Optics For Laser Profile Scanners

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klauke, T.; Hock, F.

    1987-01-01

    Laser scanners are a valuable tool for qualitiy control in hostile hot and vibrating environments. Their high measuring speed allows time minimisation of disturbing influences. The loss of accuracy of systems due to thermal distortion could be minimised by designing mechanical-optical systems with low temperature gradients and small differences between thermal expansions of the components. For application in the forging production a laser scanner measuring in situ a series of profile lines describing the hot forging tools has been designed using aluminium for all distortion sensitive mechanical and optical components.

  6. Miniature rotating transmissive optical drum scanner

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lewis, Robert (Inventor); Parrington, Lawrence (Inventor); Rutberg, Michael (Inventor)

    2013-01-01

    A miniature rotating transmissive optical scanner system employs a drum of small size having an interior defined by a circumferential wall rotatable on a drum axis, an optical element positioned within the interior of the drum, and a light-transmissive lens aperture provided at an angular position in the circumferential wall of the drum for scanning a light beam to or from the optical element in the drum along a beam azimuth angle as the drum is rotated. The miniature optical drum scanner configuration obtains a wide scanning field-of-view (FOV) and large effective aperture is achieved within a physically small size.

  7. Medical imaging with a microwave tomographic scanner.

    PubMed

    Jofre, L; Hawley, M S; Broquetas, A; de los Reyes, E; Ferrando, M; Elias-Fusté, A R

    1990-03-01

    A microwave tomographic scanner for biomedical applications is presented. The scanner consists of a 64 element circular array with a useful diameter of 20 cm. Electronically scanning the transmitting and receiving antennas allows multiview measurements with no mechanical movement. Imaging parameters are appropriate for medical use: a spatial resolution of 7 mm and a contrast resolution of 1% for a measurement time of 3 s. Measurements on tissue-simulating phantoms and volunteers, together with numerical simulations, are presented to assess the system for absolute imaging of tissue distribution and for differential imaging of physiological, pathological, and induced changes in tissues. PMID:2329003

  8. Bone mineral computation with a rectilinear scanner

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ullman, J.; Brown, S.; Silverstein, A.; Vogel, J. M.

    1974-01-01

    A portable rectilinear transmission scanner and associated computerized data reduction techniques for estimating bone mineral content are described. This unit can be easily disassembled for transport to various measurement sites and has been used to estimate the bone mineral content of the os calcis, radius, and ulna in the Apollo and Skylab astronauts. The scanner is used to obtain multiple rows of data from which a bone profile is derived. Bone edges are determined with the aid of a digital computer program which employs an algorithm that determines the greatest rate of change of the counting rate.

  9. LANSCE Wire Scanner System Prototype: Switchyard Test

    SciTech Connect

    Sedillo, James D

    2012-04-11

    On November 19, 2011, the beam diagnostics team of Los Alamos National Laboratory's LANSCE accelerator facility conducted a test of a prototype wire scanner system for future deployment within the accelerator's switchyard area. The primary focus of this test was to demonstrate the wire scanner control system's ability to extend its functionality beyond acquiring lower energy linac beam profile measurements to acquiring data in the switchyard. This study summarizes the features and performance characteristics of the electronic and mechanical implementation of this system with details focusing on the test results.

  10. EXPERIMENTS IN LITHOGRAPHY FROM REMOTE SENSOR IMAGERY.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kidwell, R. H.; McSweeney, J.; Warren, A.; Zang, E.; Vickers, E.

    1983-01-01

    Imagery from remote sensing systems such as the Landsat multispectral scanner and return beam vidicon, as well as synthetic aperture radar and conventional optical camera systems, contains information at resolutions far in excess of that which can be reproduced by the lithographic printing process. The data often require special handling to produce both standard and special map products. Some conclusions have been drawn regarding processing techniques, procedures for production, and printing limitations.

  11. Economic consequences of high throughput maskless lithography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hartley, John G.; Govindaraju, Lakshmi

    2005-11-01

    Many people in the semiconductor industry bemoan the high costs of masks and view mask cost as one of the significant barriers to bringing new chip designs to market. All that is needed is a viable maskless technology and the problem will go away. Numerous sites around the world are working on maskless lithography but inevitably, the question asked is "Wouldn't a one wafer per hour maskless tool make a really good mask writer?" Of course, the answer is yes, the hesitation you hear in the answer isn't based on technology concerns, it's financial. The industry needs maskless lithography because mask costs are too high. Mask costs are too high because mask pattern generators (PG's) are slow and expensive. If mask PG's become much faster, mask costs go down, the maskless market goes away and the PG supplier is faced with an even smaller tool demand from the mask shops. Technical success becomes financial suicide - or does it? In this paper we will present the results of a model that examines some of the consequences of introducing high throughput maskless pattern generation. Specific features in the model include tool throughput for masks and wafers, market segmentation by node for masks and wafers and mask cost as an entry barrier to new chip designs. How does the availability of low cost masks and maskless tools affect the industries tool makeup and what is the ultimate potential market for high throughput maskless pattern generators?

  12. Mask cost of ownership for advanced lithography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muzio, Edward G.; Seidel, Philip K.

    2000-07-01

    As technology advances, becoming more difficult and more expensive, the cost of ownership (CoO) metric becomes increasingly important in evaluating technical strategies. The International SEMATECH CoC analysis has steadily gained visibility over the past year, as it attempts to level the playing field between technology choices, and create a fair relative comparison. In order to predict mask cots for advanced lithography, mask process flows are modeled using bets-known processing strategies, equipment cost, and yields. Using a newly revised yield mode, and updated mask manufacture flows, representative mask flows can be built. These flows are then used to calculate mask costs for advanced lithography down to the 50 nm node. It is never the goal of this type of work to provide absolute cost estimates for business planning purposes. However, the combination of a quantifiable yield model with a clearly defined set of mask processing flows and a cost model based upon them serves as an excellent starting point for cost driver analysis and process flow discussion.

  13. Mask and lithography techniques for FPD

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sandstrom, T.; Wahlsten, M.; Sundelin, E.; Hansson, G.; Svensson, A.

    2015-09-01

    Large-field projection lithography for FPDs has developed gradually since the 90s. The LCD screen technology has remained largely unchanged and incremental development has given us better image quality, larger screen sizes, and above all lower cost per area. Recently new types of mobile devices with very high pixel density and/or OLED displays have given rise to dramatically higher requirem ents on photomask technology. Devices with 600 ppi or m ore need lithography with higher optical resolution and better linewidth control. OLED di splays pose new challenges with high sensitivity to transistor parameters and to capacitive cross-talk. New mask requirements leads to new maskwriter requirements and Mycronic has developed a new generation of large -area mask writers with significantly improved properties. This paper discusses and shows data for the improved writers. Mask production to high er quality stan dards also need metrology to verify the quality and Mycronic has introduced a 2D metrology tool with accuracy adequate for current and future masks. New printing or additive methods of producing disp lays on plastic or metal foil will make low-cost disp lays available. This inexpensive type of disp lays will exist side by side with the photographic quality displays of TVs and mobile devices, which will continue to be a challenge in terms of mask and production quality.

  14. Inverse lithography source optimization via compressive sensing.

    PubMed

    Song, Zhiyang; Ma, Xu; Gao, Jie; Wang, Jie; Li, Yanqiu; Arce, Gonzalo R

    2014-06-16

    Source optimization (SO) has emerged as a key technique for improving lithographic imaging over a range of process variations. Current SO approaches are pixel-based, where the source pattern is designed by solving a quadratic optimization problem using gradient-based algorithms or solving a linear programming problem. Most of these methods, however, are either computational intensive or result in a process window (PW) that may be further extended. This paper applies the rich theory of compressive sensing (CS) to develop an efficient and robust SO method. In order to accelerate the SO design, the source optimization is formulated as an underdetermined linear problem, where the number of equations can be much less than the source variables. Assuming the source pattern is a sparse pattern on a certain basis, the SO problem is transformed into a l1-norm image reconstruction problem based on CS theory. The linearized Bregman algorithm is applied to synthesize the sparse optimal source pattern on a representation basis, which effectively improves the source manufacturability. It is shown that the proposed linear SO formulation is more effective for improving the contrast of the aerial image than the traditional quadratic formulation. The proposed SO method shows that sparse-regularization in inverse lithography can indeed extend the PW of lithography systems. A set of simulations and analysis demonstrate the superiority of the proposed SO method over the traditional approaches.

  15. Inverse lithography technique for advanced CMOS nodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Villaret, Alexandre; Tritchkov, Alexander; Entradas, Jorge; Yesilada, Emek

    2013-04-01

    Resolution Enhancement Techniques have continuously improved over the last decade, driven by the ever growing constraints of lithography process. Despite the large number of RET applied, some hotspot configurations remain challenging for advanced nodes due to aggressive design rules. Inverse Lithography Technique (ILT) is evaluated here as a substitute to the dense OPC baseline. Indeed ILT has been known for several years for its near-to-ideal mask quality, while also being potentially more time consuming in terms of OPC run and mask processing. We chose to evaluate Mentor Graphics' ILT engine "pxOPCTM" on both lines and via hotspot configurations. These hotspots were extracted from real 28nm test cases where the dense OPC solution is not satisfactory. For both layer types, the reference OPC consists of a dense OPC engine coupled to rule-based and/or model-based assist generation method. The same CM1 model is used for the reference and the ILT OPC. ILT quality improvement is presented through Optical Rule Check (ORC) results with various adequate detectors. Several mask manufacturing rule constraints (MRC) are considered for the ILT solution and their impact on process ability is checked after mask processing. A hybrid OPC approach allowing localized ILT usage is presented in order to optimize both quality and runtime. A real mask is prepared and fabricated with this method. Finally, results analyzed on silicon are presented to compare localized ILT to reference dense OPC.

  16. Miniature 'Wearable' PET Scanner Ready for Use

    ScienceCinema

    Paul Vaska

    2016-07-12

    Scientists from BNL, Stony Brook University, and collaborators have demonstrated the efficacy of a "wearable," portable PET scanner they've developed for rats. The device will give neuroscientists a new tool for simultaneously studying brain function and behavior in fully awake, moving animals.

  17. Wire scanner software and firmware issues

    SciTech Connect

    Gilpatrick, John Doug

    2008-01-01

    The Los Alamos Neutron Science Center facility presently has 110 slow wire scanning profile measurement instruments located along its various beam lines. These wire scanners were developed and have been operating for at least 30 years. While the wire scanners solved many problems to operate and have served the facility well they have increasingly suffered from several problems or limitations, such as maintenance and reliability problems, antiquated components, slow data acquisition, and etc. In order to refurbish these devices, these wire scanners will be replaced with newer versions. The replacement will consist of a completely new beam line actuator, new cables, new electronics and brand new software and firmware. This note describes the functions and modes of operation that LabVIEW VI software on the real time controller and FPGA LabVIEW firmware will be required. It will be especially interesting to understand the overall architecture of these LabVIEW VIs. While this note will endeavor to describe all of the requirements and issues for the wire scanners, undoubtedly, there will be missing details that will be added as time progresses.

  18. Bottled liquid explosive scanner by near infrared

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Itozaki, Hideo

    2016-05-01

    A bottled liquid explosive scanner has been developed using near infrared technology for glass or PET bottles and ultrasound technology for metal cans. It has database of near infrared absorbance spectra and sound velocities of various liquids. Scanned liquids can be identified by using this database. This device has been certified by ECAC and installed at Japanese international airport.

  19. Learning and Teaching with a Computer Scanner

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Planinsic, G.; Gregorcic, B.; Etkina, E.

    2014-01-01

    This paper introduces the readers to simple inquiry-based activities (experiments with supporting questions) that one can do with a computer scanner to help students learn and apply the concepts of relative motion in 1 and 2D, vibrational motion and the Doppler effect. We also show how to use these activities to help students think like…

  20. MRI Scanners Guide Therapy to Tumors.

    PubMed

    2015-11-01

    A new study shows that MRI scanners can direct magnetically labeled macrophages bearing an oncolytic virus toward primary and metastatic tumors in mice. Researchers hope this approach, called magnetic resonance targeting, can be scaled for use in humans, to improve the delivery of cell-based cancer therapy. PMID:26370155

  1. Miniature 'Wearable' PET Scanner Ready for Use

    SciTech Connect

    Paul Vaska

    2011-03-09

    Scientists from BNL, Stony Brook University, and collaborators have demonstrated the efficacy of a "wearable," portable PET scanner they've developed for rats. The device will give neuroscientists a new tool for simultaneously studying brain function and behavior in fully awake, moving animals.

  2. Ultrasonic Scanner Control and Data Acquisition

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hemann, John

    2002-01-01

    The research accomplishments under this grant were very extensive in the areas of ULTRASONIC SCANNER CONTROL AND DATA ACQUISITION. Rather than try to summarize all this research I have enclosed research papers and reports which were completed with the hnding provided by the grant. These papers and reports are listed below:

  3. 24. SITE BUILDING 002 SCANNER BUILDING OPERATIONS CENTER ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    24. SITE BUILDING 002 - SCANNER BUILDING - OPERATIONS CENTER -- MWOC IN OPEARATION AT 1924 ZULU TIME. 26 OCTOBER, 1999. - Cape Cod Air Station, Technical Facility-Scanner Building & Power Plant, Massachusetts Military Reservation, Sandwich, Barnstable County, MA

  4. 23. SITE BUILDING 002 SCANNER BUILDING RADAR CONTROL ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    23. SITE BUILDING 002 - SCANNER BUILDING - RADAR CONTROL INTERFACE "RCL NO. 2" WITH COMPUTER CONTROL DISC DRIVE UNITS IN FOREGROUND. - Cape Cod Air Station, Technical Facility-Scanner Building & Power Plant, Massachusetts Military Reservation, Sandwich, Barnstable County, MA

  5. Occurrence and characteristics of mutual interference between LIDAR scanners

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Gunzung; Eom, Jeongsook; Park, Seonghyeon; Park, Yongwan

    2015-05-01

    The LIDAR scanner is at the heart of object detection of the self-driving car. Mutual interference between LIDAR scanners has not been regarded as a problem because the percentage of vehicles equipped with LIDAR scanners was very rare. With the growing number of autonomous vehicle equipped with LIDAR scanner operated close to each other at the same time, the LIDAR scanner may receive laser pulses from other LIDAR scanners. In this paper, three types of experiments and their results are shown, according to the arrangement of two LIDAR scanners. We will show the probability that any LIDAR scanner will interfere mutually by considering spatial and temporal overlaps. It will present some typical mutual interference scenario and report an analysis of the interference mechanism.

  6. 13. SITE BUILDING 002 SCANNER BUILDING "B" FACE ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    13. SITE BUILDING 002 - SCANNER BUILDING - "B" FACE LOADING DOCK AND PERSONNEL ACCESS RAMP TO FALLOUT SHELTER. - Cape Cod Air Station, Technical Facility-Scanner Building & Power Plant, Massachusetts Military Reservation, Sandwich, Barnstable County, MA

  7. 11. SITE BUILDING 002 SCANNER BUILDING EVAPORATIVE COOLING ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    11. SITE BUILDING 002 - SCANNER BUILDING - EVAPORATIVE COOLING TOWER SYSTEM IN FOREGROUND. - Cape Cod Air Station, Technical Facility-Scanner Building & Power Plant, Massachusetts Military Reservation, Sandwich, Barnstable County, MA

  8. Calibration and equivalency analysis of image plate scanners

    SciTech Connect

    Williams, G. Jackson Maddox, Brian R.; Chen, Hui; Kojima, Sadaoki; Millecchia, Matthew

    2014-11-15

    A universal procedure was developed to calibrate image plate scanners using radioisotope sources. Techniques to calibrate scanners and sources, as well as cross-calibrate scanner models, are described to convert image plate dosage into physical units. This allows for the direct comparison of quantitative data between any facility and scanner. An empirical relation was also derived to establish sensitivity response settings for arbitrary gain settings. In practice, these methods may be extended to any image plate scanning system.

  9. Calibration and equivalency analysis of image plate scanners.

    PubMed

    Williams, G Jackson; Maddox, Brian R; Chen, Hui; Kojima, Sadaoki; Millecchia, Matthew

    2014-11-01

    A universal procedure was developed to calibrate image plate scanners using radioisotope sources. Techniques to calibrate scanners and sources, as well as cross-calibrate scanner models, are described to convert image plate dosage into physical units. This allows for the direct comparison of quantitative data between any facility and scanner. An empirical relation was also derived to establish sensitivity response settings for arbitrary gain settings. In practice, these methods may be extended to any image plate scanning system. PMID:25430350

  10. Single spherical mirror optic for extreme ultraviolet lithography enabled by inverse lithography technology.

    PubMed

    Scranton, Gregg; Bhargava, Samarth; Ganapati, Vidya; Yablonovitch, Eli

    2014-10-20

    Traditionally, aberration correction in extreme ultraviolet (EUV) projection optics requires the use of multiple lossy mirrors, which results in prohibitively high source power requirements. We analyze a single spherical mirror projection optical system where aberration correction is built into the mask itself, through Inverse Lithography Technology (ILT). By having fewer mirrors, this would reduce the power requirements for EUV lithography. We model a single spherical mirror system with orders of magnitude more spherical aberration than would ever be tolerated in a traditional multiple mirror system. By using ILT, (implemented by an adjoint-based gradient descent optimization algorithm), we design photomasks that successfully print test patterns, in spite of these enormous aberrations. This mathematical method was tested with a 6 plane wave illumination source. Nonetheless, it would have poor power throughput from a totally incoherent source. PMID:25401536

  11. Improved near field lithography by surface plasmon resonance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zeng, Beibei; Zhao, Yanhui; Fang, Liang; Wang, Changtao; Luo, Xiangang

    2009-05-01

    Conventionally, the finest pattern obtained in optical lithography is determined by wavelength and numerical aperture of optical system, due to diffraction effect. This principle delivers theoretical obstacles for nano lithography using conventional light source, like Hg lamp. According to theory, this obstacle can be circumvented with near field lithography (NFL) technique, just by confining the mask and photo resist into sub-wavelength dimensions. Sub-wavelength patterns with features down to 100nm can be realized in the NFL, as demonstrated numerically and experimentally in many papers. One obvious problem associated with NFL is that low efficiency in the lithography process, since it is difficult to transmit through sub-wavelength scaled apertures in the mask. This usually results in the deleterious effect to the patterns on photo resist. In this paper, we demonstrate that the extraordinary optical transmission (EOT) effect helps to solve this problem. It is found that noble metal, instead of chromium, usually gives much greater transmission when employed as mask material. The enhancement is contributed to resonant excitation of surface plasmon mode. Further, the transmission can be enhanced by appropriately design of patterns. The polarization of illumination light affects lithography efficiency as well. As illustrative examples, mask patterns like lines group, grating structure and holes array are designed and simulated with greatly improved lithography efficiency. This method is believed to have potential applications in nano lithography.

  12. Applications of Optical Scanners in an Academic Center.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Molinari, Carol; Tannenbaum, Robert S.

    1995-01-01

    Describes optical scanners, including how the technology works; applications in data management and research; development of instructional materials; and providing community services. Discussion includes the three basic types of optical scanners: optical character recognition (OCR), optical mark readers (OMR), and graphic scanners. A sidebar…

  13. Scanner show-through reduction using reflective optics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feng, Xiao-fan

    2003-12-01

    Document scanners are used to convert paper documents to digital format for document distribution or archiving. Scanners are also used in copier and fax machine to convert document to electrical signal in analog and digital format. Most document scanners use white backing to avoid black border or black hole in scanned images. One problem with white backing is that show-through from the backside is visible for duplex printed (two sided) documents. This paper describes an optical method to eliminate show-through without reverting back to the black border or black hole. The scanner cover is made into a saw-tooth shaped mirror surface. The surface is oriented so that it reflects the light from the scanner lamp to the scanner lens. When scanning the scanner cover as in the case of a hole in the paper, it reflects light (specular reflection) from the scanner lamp directly to the scanner lens. Because the scanner lamp is much brighter than the reflected light from the document, only a small portion of the reflected light is needed to have the same output as scanning a piece of white paper. Radiometric calculation shows that this new approach can reduce the overall reflection from the scanner cover to 8% when scanning a document, and yet, appear to be white when no document is in between the cover and scan bar. The show-through is greatly reduced due to this reduced overall reflection from the scanner cover.

  14. 21 CFR 892.1330 - Nuclear whole body scanner.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ...) MEDICAL DEVICES RADIOLOGY DEVICES Diagnostic Devices § 892.1330 Nuclear whole body scanner. (a) Identification. A nuclear whole body scanner is a device intended to measure and image the distribution of... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Nuclear whole body scanner. 892.1330 Section...

  15. 21 CFR 892.1300 - Nuclear rectilinear scanner.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Nuclear rectilinear scanner. 892.1300 Section 892...) MEDICAL DEVICES RADIOLOGY DEVICES Diagnostic Devices § 892.1300 Nuclear rectilinear scanner. (a) Identification. A nuclear rectilinear scanner is a device intended to image the distribution of radionuclides...

  16. 21 CFR 892.1330 - Nuclear whole body scanner.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Nuclear whole body scanner. 892.1330 Section 892...) MEDICAL DEVICES RADIOLOGY DEVICES Diagnostic Devices § 892.1330 Nuclear whole body scanner. (a) Identification. A nuclear whole body scanner is a device intended to measure and image the distribution...

  17. 21 CFR 892.1330 - Nuclear whole body scanner.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Nuclear whole body scanner. 892.1330 Section 892...) MEDICAL DEVICES RADIOLOGY DEVICES Diagnostic Devices § 892.1330 Nuclear whole body scanner. (a) Identification. A nuclear whole body scanner is a device intended to measure and image the distribution...

  18. 21 CFR 892.1300 - Nuclear rectilinear scanner.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Nuclear rectilinear scanner. 892.1300 Section 892...) MEDICAL DEVICES RADIOLOGY DEVICES Diagnostic Devices § 892.1300 Nuclear rectilinear scanner. (a) Identification. A nuclear rectilinear scanner is a device intended to image the distribution of radionuclides...

  19. 21 CFR 892.1330 - Nuclear whole body scanner.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Nuclear whole body scanner. 892.1330 Section 892...) MEDICAL DEVICES RADIOLOGY DEVICES Diagnostic Devices § 892.1330 Nuclear whole body scanner. (a) Identification. A nuclear whole body scanner is a device intended to measure and image the distribution...

  20. 21 CFR 892.1300 - Nuclear rectilinear scanner.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Nuclear rectilinear scanner. 892.1300 Section 892...) MEDICAL DEVICES RADIOLOGY DEVICES Diagnostic Devices § 892.1300 Nuclear rectilinear scanner. (a) Identification. A nuclear rectilinear scanner is a device intended to image the distribution of radionuclides...

  1. 21 CFR 892.1300 - Nuclear rectilinear scanner.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Nuclear rectilinear scanner. 892.1300 Section 892...) MEDICAL DEVICES RADIOLOGY DEVICES Diagnostic Devices § 892.1300 Nuclear rectilinear scanner. (a) Identification. A nuclear rectilinear scanner is a device intended to image the distribution of radionuclides...

  2. 21 CFR 892.1330 - Nuclear whole body scanner.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Nuclear whole body scanner. 892.1330 Section 892...) MEDICAL DEVICES RADIOLOGY DEVICES Diagnostic Devices § 892.1330 Nuclear whole body scanner. (a) Identification. A nuclear whole body scanner is a device intended to measure and image the distribution...

  3. 21 CFR 882.1925 - Ultrasonic scanner calibration test block.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Ultrasonic scanner calibration test block. 882.1925 Section 882.1925 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN... Ultrasonic scanner calibration test block. (a) Identification. An ultrasonic scanner calibration test...

  4. Hybrid hotspot detection using regression model and lithography simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kimura, Taiki; Matsunawa, Tetsuaki; Nojima, Shigeki; Pan, David Z.

    2016-03-01

    As minimum feature sizes shrink, unexpected hotspots appear on wafers. Therefore, it is important to detect and fix these hotspots at design stage to reduce development time and manufacturing cost. Currently, as the most accurate approach, lithography simulation is widely used to detect such hotspots. However, it is known to be time-consuming. This paper proposes a novel aerial image synthesizing method using regression and minimum lithography simulation for only hotspot detection. Experimental results show hotspot detection on the proposed method is equivalent compared with the results on the conventional hotspot detection method which uses only lithography simulation with much less computational cost.

  5. Workshop on compact storage ring technology: applications to lithography

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1986-05-30

    Project planning in the area of x-ray lithography is discussed. Three technologies that are emphasized are the light source, the lithographic technology, and masking technology. The needs of the semiconductor industry in the lithography area during the next decade are discussed, particularly as regards large scale production of high density dynamic random access memory devices. Storage ring parameters and an overall exposure tool for x-ray lithography are addressed. Competition in this area of technology from Germany and Japan is discussed briefly. The design of a storage ring is considered, including lattice design, magnets, and beam injection systems. (LEW)

  6. Lithography aspects of dual-damascene interconnect technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maenhoudt, Mireille; Van Goidsenhoven, Diziana; Pollentier, Ivan K.; Ronse, Kurt G.; Lepage, Muriel; Struyf, Herbert; Van Hove, Marleen

    2001-04-01

    The introduction of Cu and low-k dielectrics in back-end-of- line processes has serious implications for lithography. Different low-k material shave different reflective properties and also the potential use of hard masks has consequences for lithography. Furthermore, depending on the integration scheme that is chosen, various issues for lithography and etch are showing up. While the first photo step is on a planar substrate, the second photo has to cover a topography. This can have large implications on CD uniformity and the amount of material left for the subsequent etch.

  7. Lithography trends based on projections of the ITRS (Invited Paper)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arden, Wolfgang

    2005-06-01

    The microelectronic industry has gone through an enormous technical evolution in the last four decades. Both the tech-nological and economic challenges of microelectronics were increasing consistently in the past few years. This paper discusses the future trends in micro- and nano-technologies with special emphasis on lithography. The trends of minia-turization will be sketched with reference to the International Technology Roadmap for Semiconductors (ITRS). After a description of general trends in technology node timing, an overview will be given on the future lithography require-ments and the technical solutions including options for post-optical lithography as, for example, Extreme UV.

  8. Vapor deposited release layers for nanoimprint lithography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Tong; Kobrin, Boris; Wanebo, Mike; Nowak, Romek; Yi, Richard; Chinn, Jeff; Bender, Markus; Fuchs, Andreas; Otto, Martin

    2006-03-01

    This paper presents the advantages of using a vapor deposited self-assembled monolayer (SAM) as a mold release layer for nano-imprint lithography. The release SAM was formed from a perfluorinated organo-silane precursor at room temperature in the gaseous state by a technique called Molecular Vapor Deposition (MVD TM). In contrast to a conventional coating from a liquid immersion sequence, the vapor deposition process forms a particulate free film resulting in a substantial reduction of surface defects. Another advantage of the vapor process is its excellent conformity onto the nanoscale topography of the mold. The self-assembling and self-limiting characteristics of the MVD process enables excellent CD control of the mold pattern. Pattern replication as small as 38nm features was achieved. Various other quantitative metrics of the MVD release layer are presented in this paper.

  9. Photoresist composition for extreme ultraviolet lithography

    DOEpatents

    Felter, T. E.; Kubiak, G. D.

    1999-01-01

    A method of producing a patterned array of features, in particular, gate apertures, in the size range 0.4-0.05 .mu.m using projection lithography and extreme ultraviolet (EUV) radiation. A high energy laser beam is used to vaporize a target material in order to produce a plasma which in turn, produces extreme ultraviolet radiation of a characteristic wavelength of about 13 nm for lithographic applications. The radiation is transmitted by a series of reflective mirrors to a mask which bears the pattern to be printed. The demagnified focused mask pattern is, in turn, transmitted by means of appropriate optics and in a single exposure, to a substrate coated with photoresists designed to be transparent to EUV radiation and also satisfy conventional processing methods. A photoresist composition for extreme ultraviolet radiation of boron carbide polymers, hydrochlorocarbons and mixtures thereof.

  10. Inverse lithography using sparse mask representations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ionescu, Radu C.; Hurley, Paul; Apostol, Stefan

    2015-03-01

    We present a novel optimisation algorithm for inverse lithography, based on optimization of the mask derivative, a domain inherently sparse, and for rectilinear polygons, invertible. The method is first developed assuming a point light source, and then extended to general incoherent sources. What results is a fast algorithm, producing manufacturable masks (the search space is constrained to rectilinear polygons), and flexible (specific constraints such as minimal line widths can be imposed). One inherent trick is to treat polygons as continuous entities, thus making aerial image calculation extremely fast and accurate. Requirements for mask manufacturability can be integrated in the optimization without too much added complexity. We also explain how to extend the scheme for phase-changing mask optimization.

  11. Anamorphic high-NA EUV lithography optics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Migura, Sascha; Kneer, Bernhard; Neumann, Jens Timo; Kaiser, Winfried; van Schoot, Jan

    2015-09-01

    EUV lithography (EUVL) for a limit resolution below 8 nm requires the numerical aperture (NA) of the projection optics to be larger than 0.50. For such a high-NA optics a configuration of 4x magnification, full field size of 26 x 33 mm² and 6'' mask is not feasible anymore. The increased chief ray angle and higher NA at reticle lead to non-acceptable mask shadowing effects. These shadowing effects can only be controlled by increasing the magnification, hence reducing the system productivity or demanding larger mask sizes. We demonstrate that the best compromise in imaging, productivity and field split is a so-called anamorphic magnification and a half field of 26 x 16.5 mm² but utilizing existing 6'' mask infrastructure. We discuss the optical solutions for such anamorphic high-NA EUVL.

  12. Resist materials for 157-nm lithography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Toriumi, Minoru; Ishikawa, Seiichi; Miyoshi, Seiro; Naito, Takuya; Yamazaki, Tamio; Watanabe, Manabu; Itani, Toshiro

    2001-08-01

    Fluoropolymers are key materials for single layer resists of 157nm lithography. We have been studying fluoropolymers to identify their potential for base resins of 157nm photoresist. Many fluoropolymers showed high optical transparencies, with absorption coefficients of 0.01micrometers -1 to 2micrometers -1 at 157nm, and dry- etching resistance comparable to an ArF resist, and non- swelling solubility in the standard developer. Positive- tone resists were formulated using fluoropolymers that fulfill practical resist requirements. They showed good sensitivities, from 1 mJ/cm(superscript 2 to 10 mJ/cm2, and contrast in the sensitivity curves. They were able to be patterned using a F2 laser microstepper.

  13. Femtolitre chemistry assisted by microfluidic pen lithography

    PubMed Central

    Carbonell, Carlos; Stylianou, Kyriakos C.; Hernando, Jordi; Evangelio, Emi; Barnett, Sarah A.; Nettikadan, Saju; Imaz, Inhar; Maspoch, Daniel

    2013-01-01

    Chemical reactions at ultrasmall volumes are becoming increasingly necessary to study biological processes, to synthesize homogenous nanostructures and to perform high-throughput assays and combinatorial screening. Here we show that a femtolitre reaction can be realized on a surface by handling and mixing femtolitre volumes of reagents using a microfluidic stylus. This method, named microfluidic pen lithography, allows mixing reagents in isolated femtolitre droplets that can be used as reactors to conduct independent reactions and crystallization processes. This strategy overcomes the high-throughput limitations of vesicles and micelles and obviates the usually costly step of fabricating microdevices and wells. We anticipate that this process enables performing distinct reactions (acid-base, enzymatic recognition and metal-organic framework synthesis), creating multiplexed nanoscale metal-organic framework arrays, and screening combinatorial reactions to evaluate the crystallization of novel peptide-based materials. PMID:23863998

  14. Lithography process window analysis with calibrated model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Wenzhan; Yu, Jin; Lo, James; Liu, Johnson

    2004-05-01

    As critical-dimension shrink below 0.13 μm, the SPC (Statistical Process Control) based on CD (Critical Dimension) control in lithography process becomes more difficult. Increasing requirements of a shrinking process window have called on the need for more accurate decision of process window center. However in practical fabrication, we found that systematic error introduced by metrology and/or resist process can significantly impact the process window analysis result. Especially, when the simple polynomial functions are used to fit the lithographic data from focus exposure matrix (FEM), the model will fit these systematic errors rather than filter them out. This will definitely impact the process window analysis and determination of the best process condition. In this paper, we proposed to use a calibrated first principle model to do process window analysis. With this method, the systematic metrology error can be filtered out efficiently and give a more reasonable window analysis result.

  15. Nanoimprint lithography using disposable biomass template

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hanabata, Makoto; Takei, Satoshi; Sugahara, Kigen; Nakajima, Shinya; Sugino, Naoto; Kameda, Takao; Fukushima, Jiro; Matsumoto, Yoko; Sekiguchi, Atsushi

    2016-04-01

    A novel nanoimprint lithography process using disposable biomass template having gas permeability was investigated. It was found that a disposable biomass template derived from cellulose materials shows an excellent gas permeability and decreases transcriptional defects in conventional templates such as quartz, PMDS, DLC that have no gas permeability. We believe that outgasses from imprinted materials are easily removed through the template. The approach to use a cellulose for template material is suitable as the next generation of clean separation technology. It is expected to be one of the defect-less thermal nanoimprint lithographic technologies. It is also expected that volatile materials and solvent including materials become available that often create defects and peelings in conventional temples that have no gas permeability.

  16. Novel electrostatic column for ion projection lithography

    SciTech Connect

    Chalupka, A.; Stengl, G.; Buschbeck, H.; Lammer, G.; Vonach, H.; Fischer, R.; Hammel, E.; Loeschner, H.; Nowak, R.; Wolf, P. ); Finkelstein, W.; Hill, R.W. ); Berry, I.L. ); Harriott, L.R. ); Melngailis, J. ); Randall, J.N. ); Wolfe, J.C. ); Stroh, H.; Wollnik, H. ); Mondelli, A.A.; Petillo, J.J. ); Leung, K. (Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory, University of Californi

    1994-11-01

    Ion projection lithography (IPL) is being considered for high volume sub-0.25-[mu]m lithography. A novel ion-optical column has been designed for exposing 20[times]20 mm[sup 2] fields at 3[times] reduction from stencil mask to wafer substrates. A diverging lens is realized by using the stencil mask as the first electrode of the ion-optical column. The second and third electrode form an accelerating field lens. The aberrations of the first two lenses (diverging lens and field lens) are compensated by an asymmetric Einzel lens projecting an ion image of the stencil mask openings onto the wafer substrate with better than 2 mrad telecentricity. Less than 30 nm intrafield distortion was calculated within 20[times]20 mm[sup 2] exposure fields. The calculation uncertainty is estimated to be about 10 nm. The calculation holds for helium ions with [approx]10 keV ion energy at the stencil mask and 150 keV ion energy at the wafer plane. A virtual ion source size of 10 [mu]m has been assumed. The calculated chromatic aberrations are less than 60 nm, assuming 6 eV energy spread of the ions extracted from a duoplasmatron source. Recently a multicusp ion source has been developed for which preliminary results indicate an energy spread of less than 2 eV. Thus, with a multicusp source chromatic aberrations of less than 20 nm are to be expected. The ion energy at the crossover between the field lens and the asymmetric Einzel lens is 200 keV. Therefore, stochastic space charge induced degradations in resolution can be kept sufficiently low. The divergence of the ion image projected to the wafer plane is less than 2 mrad. Thus, the usable'' depth of focus for the novel ion optics is in the order of 10 [mu]m.

  17. Integrating nanosphere lithography in device fabrication

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Laurvick, Tod V.; Coutu, Ronald A.; Lake, Robert A.

    2016-03-01

    This paper discusses the integration of nanosphere lithography (NSL) with other fabrication techniques, allowing for nano-scaled features to be realized within larger microelectromechanical system (MEMS) based devices. Nanosphere self-patterning methods have been researched for over three decades, but typically not for use as a lithography process. Only recently has progress been made towards integrating many of the best practices from these publications and determining a process that yields large areas of coverage, with repeatability and enabled a process for precise placement of nanospheres relative to other features. Discussed are two of the more common self-patterning methods used in NSL (i.e. spin-coating and dip coating) as well as a more recently conceived variation of dip coating. Recent work has suggested the repeatability of any method depends on a number of variables, so to better understand how these variables affect the process a series of test vessels were developed and fabricated. Commercially available 3-D printing technology was used to incrementally alter the test vessels allowing for each variable to be investigated individually. With these deposition vessels, NSL can now be used in conjunction with other fabrication steps to integrate features otherwise unattainable through current methods, within the overall fabrication process of larger MEMS devices. Patterned regions in 1800 series photoresist with a thickness of ~700nm are used to capture regions of self-assembled nanospheres. These regions are roughly 2-5 microns in width, and are able to control the placement of 500nm polystyrene spheres by controlling where monolayer self-assembly occurs. The resulting combination of photoresist and nanospheres can then be used with traditional deposition or etch methods to utilize these fine scale features in the overall design.

  18. Benchtop micromolding of polystyrene by soft lithography.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yuli; Balowski, Joseph; Phillips, Colleen; Phillips, Ryan; Sims, Christopher E; Allbritton, Nancy L

    2011-09-21

    Polystyrene (PS), a standard material for cell culture consumable labware, was molded into microstructures with high fidelity of replication by an elastomeric polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) mold. The process was a simple, benchtop method based on soft lithography using readily available materials. The key to successful replica molding by this simple procedure relies on the use of a solvent, for example, gamma-butyrolactone, which dissolves PS without swelling the PDMS mold. PS solution was added to the PDMS mold, and evaporation of the solvent was accomplished by baking the mold on a hotplate. Microstructures with feature sizes as small as 3 μm and aspect ratios as large as 7 were readily molded. Prototypes of microfluidic chips made from PS were prepared by thermal bonding of a microchannel molded in PS with a flat PS substrate. The PS microfluidic chip displayed much lower adsorption and absorption of hydrophobic molecules (e.g. rhodamine B) compared to a comparable chip created from PDMS. The molded PS surface exhibited stable surface properties after plasma oxidation as assessed by contact angle measurement. The molded, oxidized PS surface remained an excellent surface for cell culture based on cell adhesion and proliferation. To demonstrate the application of this process for cell biology research, PS was micromolded into two different microarray formats, microwells and microposts, for segregation and tracking of non-adherent and adherent cells, respectively. The micromolded PS possessed properties that were ideal for biological and bioanalytical needs, thus making it an alternative material to PDMS and suitable for building lab-on-a-chip devices by soft lithography methods.

  19. Compact conscious animal positron emission tomography scanner

    DOEpatents

    Schyler, David J.; O'Connor, Paul; Woody, Craig; Junnarkar, Sachin Shrirang; Radeka, Veljko; Vaska, Paul; Pratte, Jean-Francois; Volkow, Nora

    2006-10-24

    A method of serially transferring annihilation information in a compact positron emission tomography (PET) scanner includes generating a time signal for an event, generating an address signal representing a detecting channel, generating a detector channel signal including the time and address signals, and generating a composite signal including the channel signal and similarly generated signals. The composite signal includes events from detectors in a block and is serially output. An apparatus that serially transfers annihilation information from a block includes time signal generators for detectors in a block and an address and channel signal generator. The PET scanner includes a ring tomograph that mounts onto a portion of an animal, which includes opposing block pairs. Each of the blocks in a block pair includes a scintillator layer, detection array, front-end array, and a serial encoder. The serial encoder includes time signal generators and an address signal and channel signal generator.

  20. The Galileo star scanner observations at Amalthea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fieseler, Paul D.; Adams, Olen W.; Vandermey, Nancy; Theilig, E. E.; Schimmels, Kathryn A.; Lewis, George D.; Ardalan, Shadan M.; Alexander, Claudia J.

    2004-06-01

    In November of 2002, the Galileo spacecraft passed within 250 km of Jupiter's moon Amalthea. An onboard telescope, the star scanner, observed a series of bright flashes near the moon. It is believed that these flashes represent sunlight reflected from 7 to 9 small moonlets located within about 3000 km of Amalthea. From star scanner geometry considerations and other arguments, we can constrain the diameter of the observed bodies to be between 0.5 m to several tens of kilometers. In September of 2003, while crossing Amalthea's orbit just prior to Galileo's destruction in the jovian atmosphere, a single additional body seems to have been observed. It is suspected that these bodies are part of a discrete rocky ring embedded within Jupiter's Gossamer ring system.

  1. Ghost signals in Allison emittance scanners

    SciTech Connect

    Stockli, Martin P.; Leitner, M.; Moehs, D.P.; Keller, R.; Welton, R.F.; /SNS Project, Oak Ridge /Tennessee U.

    2004-12-01

    For over 20 years, Allison scanners have been used to measure emittances of low-energy ion beams. We show that scanning large trajectory angles produces ghost signals caused by the sampled beamlet impacting on an electric deflection plate. The ghost signal strength is proportional to the amount of beam entering the scanner. Depending on the ions, and their velocity, the ghost signals can have the opposite or the same polarity as the main beam signals. The ghost signals cause significant errors in the emittance estimates because they appear at large trajectory angles. These ghost signals often go undetected because they partly overlap with the real signals, are mostly below the 1% level, and often hide in the noise. A simple deflection plate modification is shown to reduce the ghost signal strength by over 99%.

  2. Ghost Signals In Allison Emittance Scanners

    SciTech Connect

    Stockli, Martin P.; Leitner, M.; Keller, R.; Moehs, D.P.; Welton, R. F.

    2005-03-15

    For over 20 years, Allison scanners have been used to measure emittances of low-energy ion beams. We show that scanning large trajectory angles produces ghost signals caused by the sampled beamlet impacting on an electric deflection plate. The ghost signal strength is proportional to the amount of beam entering the scanner. Depending on the ions, and their velocity, the ghost signals can have the opposite or the same polarity as the main beam signals. The ghost signals cause significant errors in the emittance estimates because they appear at large trajectory angles. These ghost signals often go undetected because they partly overlap with the real signals, are mostly below the 1% level, and often hide in the noise. A simple deflection plate modification is shown to reduce the ghost signal strength by over 99%.

  3. Electrothermal MEMS fiber scanner for optical endomicroscopy.

    PubMed

    Seo, Yeong-Hyeon; Hwang, Kyungmin; Park, Hyeon-Cheol; Jeong, Ki-Hun

    2016-02-22

    We report a novel MEMS fiber scanner with an electrothermal silicon microactuator and a directly mounted optical fiber. The microactuator comprises double hot arm and cold arm structures with a linking bridge and an optical fiber is aligned along a silicon fiber groove. The unique feature induces separation of resonant scanning frequencies of a single optical fiber in lateral and vertical directions, which realizes Lissajous scanning during the resonant motion. The footprint dimension of microactuator is 1.28 x 7 x 0.44 mm3. The resonant scanning frequencies of a 20 mm long optical fiber are 239.4 Hz and 218.4 Hz in lateral and vertical directions, respectively. The full scanned area indicates 451 μm x 558 μm under a 16 Vpp pulse train. This novel laser scanner can provide many opportunities for laser scanning endomicroscopic applications.

  4. A compact vertical scanner for atomic force microscopes.

    PubMed

    Park, Jae Hong; Shim, Jaesool; Lee, Dong-Yeon

    2010-01-01

    A compact vertical scanner for an atomic force microscope (AFM) is developed. The vertical scanner is designed to have no interference with the optical microscope for viewing the cantilever. The theoretical stiffness and resonance of the scanner are derived and verified via finite element analysis. An optimal design process that maximizes the resonance frequency is performed. To evaluate the scanner's performance, experiments are performed to evaluate the travel range, resonance frequency, and feedback noise level. In addition, an AFM image using the proposed vertical scanner is generated.

  5. Learning and teaching with a computer scanner

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Planinsic, G.; Gregorcic, B.; Etkina, E.

    2014-09-01

    This paper introduces the readers to simple inquiry-based activities (experiments with supporting questions) that one can do with a computer scanner to help students learn and apply the concepts of relative motion in 1 and 2D, vibrational motion and the Doppler effect. We also show how to use these activities to help students think like scientists. They will conduct simple experiments, construct different explanations for their observations, test their explanations in new experiments and represent their ideas in multiple ways.

  6. Point Relay Scanner Utilizing Ellipsoidal Mirrors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Manhart, Paul K. (Inventor); Pagano, Robert J. (Inventor)

    1997-01-01

    A scanning system uses a polygonal mirror assembly with each facet of the polygon having an ellipsoidal mirror located thereon. One focal point of each ellipsoidal mirror is located at a common point on the axis of rotation of the polygonal mirror assembly. As the mirror assembly rotates. a second focal point of the ellipsoidal mirrors traces out a scan line. The scanner can be utilized for scanned output display of information or for scanning information to be detected.

  7. A near-infrared confocal scanner

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Seungwoo; Yoo, Hongki

    2014-06-01

    In the semiconductor industry, manufacturing of three-dimensional (3D) packages or 3D integrated circuits is a high-performance technique that requires combining several functions in a small volume. Through-silicon vias, which are vertical electrical connections extending through a wafer, can be used to direct signals between stacked chips, thus increasing areal density by stacking and connecting multiple patterned chips. While defect detection is essential in the semiconductor manufacturing process, it is difficult to identify defects within a wafer or to monitor the bonding results between bonded surfaces because silicon and many other semiconductor materials are opaque to visible wavelengths. In this context, near-infrared (NIR) imaging is a promising non-destructive method to detect defects within silicon chips, to inspect bonding between chips and to monitor the chip alignment since NIR transmits through silicon. In addition, a confocal scanner provides high-contrast, optically-sectioned images of the specimen due to its ability to reject out-of-focus noise. In this study, we report an NIR confocal scanner that rapidly acquires high-resolution images with a large field of view through silicon. Two orthogonal line-scanning images can be acquired without rotating the system or the specimen by utilizing two orthogonally configured resonant scanning mirrors. This NIR confocal scanner can be efficiently used as an in-line inspection system when manufacturing semiconductor devices by rapidly detecting defects on and beneath the surface.

  8. Telescope with a wide field of view internal optical scanner

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Degnan, III, John James (Inventor); Zheng, Yunhui (Inventor)

    2012-01-01

    A telescope with internal scanner utilizing either a single optical wedge scanner or a dual optical wedge scanner and a controller arranged to control a synchronous rotation of the first and/or second optical wedges, the wedges constructed and arranged to scan light redirected by topological surfaces and/or volumetric scatterers. The telescope with internal scanner further incorporates a first converging optical element that receives the redirected light and transmits the redirected light to the scanner, and a second converging optical element within the light path between the first optical element and the scanner arranged to reduce an area of impact on the scanner of the beam collected by the first optical element.

  9. Impacts of cost functions on inverse lithography patterning.

    PubMed

    Yu, Jue-Chin; Yu, Peichen

    2010-10-25

    For advanced CMOS processes, inverse lithography promises better patterning fidelity than conventional mask correction techniques due to a more complete exploration of the solution space. However, the success of inverse lithography relies highly on customized cost functions whose design and know-how have rarely been discussed. In this paper, we investigate the impacts of various objective functions and their superposition for inverse lithography patterning using a generic gradient descent approach. We investigate the most commonly used objective functions, which are the resist and aerial images, and also present a derivation for the aerial image contrast. We then discuss the resulting pattern fidelity and final mask characteristics for simple layouts with a single isolated contact and two nested contacts. We show that a cost function composed of a dominant resist-image component and a minor aerial-image or image-contrast component can achieve a good mask correction and contour targets when using inverse lithography patterning.

  10. Lithography imaging control by enhanced monitoring of light source performance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alagna, Paolo; Zurita, Omar; Lalovic, Ivan; Seong, Nakgeuon; Rechsteiner, Gregory; Thornes, Joshua; D'havé, Koen; Van Look, Lieve; Bekaert, Joost

    2013-04-01

    Reducing lithography pattern variability has become a critical enabler of ArF immersion scaling and is required to ensure consistent lithography process yield for sub-30nm device technologies. As DUV multi-patterning requirements continue to shrink, it is imperative that all sources of lithography variability are controlled throughout the product life-cycle, from technology development to high volume manufacturing. Recent developments of new ArF light-source metrology and monitoring capabilities have been introduced in order to improve lithography patterning control.[1] These technologies enable performance monitoring of new light-source properties, relating to illumination stability, and enable new reporting and analysis of in-line performance.

  11. Direct-write scanning probe lithography: towards a desktop fab

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giam, Louise R.; Senesi, Andrew J.; Liao, Xing; Wong, Lu Shin; Chai, Jinan; Eichelsdoerfer, Daniel J.; Shim, Wooyoung; Rasin, Boris; He, Shu; Mirkin, Chad A.

    2011-06-01

    Massively parallel scanning-probe based methods have been used to address the challenges of nanometer to millimeter scale printing for a variety of materials and mark a step towards the realization of a "desktop fab." Such tools enable simple, flexible, high-throughput, and low-cost nano- and microscale patterning, which allow researchers to rapidly synthesize and study systems ranging from nanoparticle synthesis to biological processes. We have developed a novel scanning probe-based cantilever-free printing method termed polymer pen lithography (PPL), which uses an array of elastomeric tips to transfer materials (e.g. alkanethiols, proteins, polymers) in a direct-write manner onto a variety of surfaces. This technique takes the best attributes of dip-pen nanolithography (DPN) and eliminates many of the disadvantages of contact printing. Various related techniques such as beam pen lithography (BPL), scanning probe block copolymer lithography (SPBCL), and hard-tip, soft spring lithography (HSL) are also discussed.

  12. Evolution in the concentration of activities in lithography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Levinson, Harry J.

    2016-03-01

    From a perusal of the proceedings of the SPIE Advanced Lithography Symposium, the progression of new concepts in lithographic technology can be seen. A new idea first appears in a few papers, and over time, there is an increase in the number of papers on the same topic. Eventually the method becomes commonplace, and the number of papers on the topic declines, as the idea becomes part of our industry's working knowledge. For example, one or two papers on resolution enhancement techniques (RETs) appeared in the proceedings of the Optical Microlithography Conference in 1989 and 1990. By 1994, the total number of papers had increased to 35. Early lithographers focused on practical issues, such as adhesion promotion and resist edge bead. The introduction of simulation software brought on the next era of lithography. This was followed by a period of time in which RETs were developed and brought to maturity. The introduction of optical proximity corrections (OPC) initiated the next major era of lithography. The traditional path for scaling by using shorter wavelengths, decreasing k1 and increasing numerical aperture has given way to the current era of optical multiple patterning and lithography-design co-optimization. There has been sufficient activity in EUV lithography R and D to justify a separate EUV Lithography Conference as part of the annual Advanced Lithography Symposium. Each era builds on the cumulative knowledge gained previously. Over time, there have been parallel developments in optics, exposure tools, resist, metrology and mask technology, many of which were associated with changes in the wavelength of light used for leading-edge lithography.

  13. A survey of advanced excimer optical imaging and lithography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matsumoto, Koichi; Suwa, Kyoichi

    1998-11-01

    The first item discussed in this paper is to estimate the future trend regarding minimum geometry and the optical parameters, such as NA and wavelength. Simulations based on aerial images are performed for the estimation. The resolution limit is defined as a minimum feature size which retains practical depth of focus (DOF). Pattern geometry is classified into two categories, which are dense lines and isolated lines. Available wavelengths are assumed to be KrF excimer laser (λ=248 nm), ArF excimer laser (λ=193 nm) and F2 excimer laser (λ=157 nm). Based upon the simulation results, the resolution limit is estimated for each geometry and each wavelength. The second item is to survey ArF optics. At present, the ArF excimer laser is regarded as one of the most promising candidates as a next-generation light source. Discussions are ranging over some critical issues. The lifetime of ArF optics supposedly limited by the radiation compaction of silica glass is estimated in comparison with KrF optics. Availability of calcium fluoride (CaF2) is also discussed. As a designing issue, a comparative study is made about the optical configuration, dioptric or catadioptric. In the end, our resist-based performance is shown.

  14. Successful demonstration of a comprehensive lithography defect monitoring strategy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peterson, Ingrid B.; Breaux, Louis H.; Cross, Andrew; von den Hoff, Michael

    2003-07-01

    This paper describes the validation of the methodology, the model and the impact of an optimized Lithography Defect Monitoring Strategy at two different semiconductor manufacturing factories. The lithography defect inspection optimization was implemented for the Gate Module at both factories running 0.13-0.15μm technologies on 200mm wafers, one running microprocessor and the other memory devices. As minimum dimensions and process windows decrease in the lithography area, new technologies and technological advances with resists and resist systems are being implemented to meet the demands. Along with these new technological advances in the lithography area comes potentially unforeseen defect issues. The latest lithography processes involve new resists in extremely thin, uniform films, exposing the films under conditions of highly optimized focus and illumination, and finally removing the resist completely and cleanly. The lithography cell is defined as the cluster of process equipment that accomplishes the coating process (surface prep, resist spin, edge-bead removal and soft bake), the alignment and exposure, and the developing process (post-exposure bake, develop, rinse) of the resist. Often the resist spinning process involves multiple materials such as BARC (bottom ARC) and / or TARC (top ARC) materials in addition to the resist itself. The introduction of these new materials with the multiple materials interfaces and the tightness of the process windows leads to an increased variety of defect mechanisms in the lithography area. Defect management in the lithography area has become critical to successful product introduction and yield ramp. The semiconductor process itself contributes the largest number and variety of defects, and a significant portion of the total defects originate within the lithography cell. From a defect management perspective, the lithography cell has some unique characteristics. First, defects in the lithography process module have the

  15. Nanoparticle fabrication by geometrically confined nanosphere lithography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Denomme, Ryan C.; Iyer, Krishna; Kreder, Michael; Smith, Brendan; Nieva, Patricia M.

    2013-07-01

    Arrays of metal nanoparticles, typically gold or silver, exhibit localized surface plasmon resonance, a phenomenon that has many applications, such as chemical and biological sensing. However, fabrication of metal nanoparticle arrays with high uniformity and repeatability, at a reasonable cost, is difficult. Nanosphere lithography (NSL) has been used before to produce inexpensive nanoparticle arrays through the use of monolayers of self-assembled microspheres as a deposition mask. However, control over the size and location of the arrays, as well as uniformity over large areas is poor, thus limiting its use to research purposes. In this paper, a new NSL method, called here geometrically confined NSL (GCNSL), is presented. In GCNSL, microsphere assembly is confined to geometric patterns defined in photoresist, allowing high-precision and large-scale nanoparticle patterning while still remaining low cost. Using this new method, it is demonstrated that 400 nm polystyrene microspheres can be assembled inside of large arrays of photoresist patterns. Results show that optimal microsphere assembly is achieved with long and narrow rectangular photoresist patterns. The combination of microsphere monolayers and photoresist patterns is then used as a deposition mask to produce silver nanoparticles at precise locations on the substrate with high uniformity, repeatability, and quality.

  16. Image-projection ion-beam lithography

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, P.A.

    1989-01-01

    Image-projection ion-beam lithography promises high-throughput patterning with wide process latitude, excellent resolution, and minimal damage to underlying circuit layers. The process involves extracting helium ions from a plasma source, transmitting the ions at low voltage through a stencil reticle, and then accelerating and focusing the ions electrostatically onto the wafer. A key feature is the use of image demagnification which simplifies reticle fabrication and inspection, and leads to low power loading on the reticle and long reticle life. In this paper we report computational studies aimed at improving field size, linearity, and telecentricity over that demonstrated experimentally in the pioneering work by Ion Microfabrication Systems, GmbH (Vienna) during the past decade. We study a mechanically simple arrangement of equal-radii coaxial tubular lenses. We employ ion column optimization by simulated annealing and uncover a new optimization strategy which may be applicable in other optimization work. The resulting column design is much improved over our initial attempts based on an iterative optimization procedure. However, we still are unable to eliminate image distortion, and we would need either to rely on reticle predistortion or on use of a more complex electrode system for a production application. 15 refs., 5 figs.

  17. X-ray lithography using holographic images

    DOEpatents

    Howells, Malcolm R.; Jacobsen, Chris

    1995-01-01

    A non-contact X-ray projection lithography method for producing a desired X-ray image on a selected surface of an X-ray-sensitive material, such as photoresist material on a wafer, the desired X-ray image having image minimum linewidths as small as 0.063 .mu.m, or even smaller. A hologram and its position are determined that will produce the desired image on the selected surface when the hologram is irradiated with X-rays from a suitably monochromatic X-ray source of a selected wavelength .lambda.. On-axis X-ray transmission through, or off-axis X-ray reflection from, a hologram may be used here, with very different requirements for monochromaticity, flux and brightness of the X-ray source. For reasonable penetration of photoresist materials by X-rays produced by the X-ray source, the wavelength X, is preferably chosen to be no more than 13.5 nm in one embodiment and more preferably is chosen in the range 1-5 nm in the other embodiment. A lower limit on linewidth is set by the linewidth of available microstructure writing devices, such as an electron beam.

  18. Reflective masks for extreme ultraviolet lithography

    SciTech Connect

    Nguyen, Khanh Bao

    1994-05-01

    Extreme ultraviolet lithographic masks are made by patterning multilayer reflective coatings with high normal incidence reflectivity. Masks can be patterned by depositing a patterned absorber layer above the coating or by etching the pattern directly into the coating itself. Electromagnetic simulations showed that absorber-overlayer masks have superior imaging characteristics over etched masks (less sensitive to incident angles and pattern profiles). In an EUVL absorber overlayer mask, defects can occur in the mask substrate, reflective coating, and absorber pattern. Electromagnetic simulations showed that substrate defects cause the most severe image degradation. A printability study of substrate defects for absorber overlayer masks showed that printability of 25 nm high substrate defects are comparable to defects in optical lithography. Simulations also indicated that the manner in which the defects are covered by multilayer reflective coatings can affect printability. Coverage profiles that result in large lateral spreading of defect geometries amplify the printability of the defects by increasing their effective sizes. Coverage profiles of Mo/Si coatings deposited above defects were studied by atomic force microscopy and TEM. Results showed that lateral spread of defect geometry is proportional to height. Undercut at defect also increases the lateral spread. Reductions in defect heights were observed for 0.15 {mu}m wide defect lines. A long-term study of Mo/Si coating reflectivity revealed that Mo/Si coatings with Mo as the top layer suffer significant reductions in reflectivity over time due to oxidation.

  19. Characterization of 'metal resist' for EUV lithography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Toriumi, Minoru; Sato, Yuta; Kumai, Reiji; Yamashita, Yoshiyuki; Tsukiyama, Koichi; Itani, Toshiro

    2016-03-01

    We characterized EIDEC metal resist for EUV lithography by various measurement methods. The low-voltage aberration-corrected scanning transmission electron microscopy combined with electron energy-loss spectroscopy showed the morphology of metal resists in nanometer regions and enabled studying the distribution of resist component in the resist film. The zirconium oxide metal resist kept the core-shell structure in the resist films and the titanium oxide metal resist showed the aggregation in the film. X-ray diffractometry and ab initio molecular dynamics simulation showed the amorphous structure with short-range order of the zirconium oxide metal resist. X-ray Photoelectron spectroscopy of the zirconium oxide-methacrylic acid metal resist showed the decomposition of the shell molecules and the increase of electron density at zirconium atoms after the EUV exposure. Infrared (IR) spectra indicated that the shell molecules made the various bindings to the metal core and the specific vibrational mode of shell molecules showed the divergent responsivity to the irradiation wavenumber of the IR Free electron laser.

  20. Smartphone sensors for stone lithography authentication.

    PubMed

    Spagnolo, Giuseppe Schirripa; Cozzella, Lorenzo; Papalillo, Donato

    2014-01-01

    Nowadays mobile phones include quality photo and video cameras, access to wireless networks and the internet, GPS assistance and other innovative systems. These facilities open them to innovative uses, other than the classical telephonic communication one. Smartphones are a more sophisticated version of classic mobile phones, which have advanced computing power, memory and connectivity. Because fake lithographs are flooding the art market, in this work, we propose a smartphone as simple, robust and efficient sensor for lithograph authentication. When we buy an artwork object, the seller issues a certificate of authenticity, which contains specific details about the artwork itself. Unscrupulous sellers can duplicate the classic certificates of authenticity, and then use them to "authenticate" non-genuine works of art. In this way, the buyer will have a copy of an original certificate to attest that the "not original artwork" is an original one. A solution for this problem would be to insert a system that links together the certificate and the related specific artwork. To do this it is necessary, for a single artwork, to find unique, unrepeatable, and unchangeable characteristics. In this article we propose an innovative method for the authentication of stone lithographs. We use the color spots distribution captured by means of a smartphone camera as a non-cloneable texture of the specific artworks and an information management system for verifying it in mobility stone lithography. PMID:24811077

  1. Resist profile simulation with fast lithography model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, Yan-Ying; Chou, Chih-Shiang; Tang, Yu-Po; Huang, Wen-Chun; Liu, Ru-Gun; Gau, Tsai-Sheng

    2014-03-01

    A traditional approach to construct a fast lithographic model is to match wafer top-down SEM images, contours and/or gauge CDs with a TCC model plus some simple resist representation. This modeling method has been proven and is extensively used for OPC modeling. As the technology moves forward, this traditional approach has become insufficient in regard to lithography weak point detection, etching bias prediction, etc. The drawback of this approach is from metrology and simulation. First, top-down SEM is only good for acquiring planar CD information. Some 3D metrology such as cross-section SEM or AFM is necessary to obtain the true resist profile. Second, the TCC modeling approach is only suitable for planar image simulation. In order to model the resist profile, full 3D image simulation is needed. Even though there are many rigorous simulators capable of catching the resist profile very well, none of them is feasible for full-chip application due to the tremendous consumption of computational resource. The authors have proposed a quasi-3D image simulation method in the previous study [1], which is suitable for full-chip simulation with the consideration of sidewall angles, to improve the model accuracy of planar models. In this paper, the quasi-3D image simulation is extended to directly model the resist profile with AFM and/or cross-section SEM data. Resist weak points detected by the model generated with this 3D approach are verified on the wafer.

  2. Metal hierarchical patterning by direct nanoimprint lithography

    PubMed Central

    Radha, Boya; Lim, Su Hui; Saifullah, Mohammad S. M.; Kulkarni, Giridhar U.

    2013-01-01

    Three-dimensional hierarchical patterning of metals is of paramount importance in diverse fields involving photonics, controlling surface wettability and wearable electronics. Conventionally, this type of structuring is tedious and usually involves layer-by-layer lithographic patterning. Here, we describe a simple process of direct nanoimprint lithography using palladium benzylthiolate, a versatile metal-organic ink, which not only leads to the formation of hierarchical patterns but also is amenable to layer-by-layer stacking of the metal over large areas. The key to achieving such multi-faceted patterning is hysteretic melting of ink, enabling its shaping. It undergoes transformation to metallic palladium under gentle thermal conditions without affecting the integrity of the hierarchical patterns on micro- as well as nanoscale. A metallic rice leaf structure showing anisotropic wetting behavior and woodpile-like structures were thus fabricated. Furthermore, this method is extendable for transferring imprinted structures to a flexible substrate to make them robust enough to sustain numerous bending cycles. PMID:23446801

  3. Smartphone Sensors for Stone Lithography Authentication

    PubMed Central

    Schirripa Spagnolo, Giuseppe; Cozzella, Lorenzo; Papalillo, Donato

    2014-01-01

    Nowadays mobile phones include quality photo and video cameras, access to wireless networks and the internet, GPS assistance and other innovative systems. These facilities open them to innovative uses, other than the classical telephonic communication one. Smartphones are a more sophisticated version of classic mobile phones, which have advanced computing power, memory and connectivity. Because fake lithographs are flooding the art market, in this work, we propose a smartphone as simple, robust and efficient sensor for lithograph authentication. When we buy an artwork object, the seller issues a certificate of authenticity, which contains specific details about the artwork itself. Unscrupulous sellers can duplicate the classic certificates of authenticity, and then use them to “authenticate” non-genuine works of art. In this way, the buyer will have a copy of an original certificate to attest that the “not original artwork” is an original one. A solution for this problem would be to insert a system that links together the certificate and the related specific artwork. To do this it is necessary, for a single artwork, to find unique, unrepeatable, and unchangeable characteristics. In this article we propose an innovative method for the authentication of stone lithographs. We use the color spots distribution captured by means of a smartphone camera as a non-cloneable texture of the specific artworks and an information management system for verifying it in mobility stone lithography. PMID:24811077

  4. Positron Scanner for Locating Brain Tumors

    DOE R&D Accomplishments Database

    Rankowitz, S.; Robertson, J. S.; Higinbotham, W. A.; Rosenblum, M. J.

    1962-03-01

    A system is described that makes use of positron emitting isotopes for locating brain tumors. This system inherently provides more information about the distribution of radioactivity in the head in less time than existing scanners which use one or two detectors. A stationary circular array of 32 scintillation detectors scans a horizontal layer of the head from many directions simultaneously. The data, consisting of the number of counts in all possible coincidence pairs, are coded and stored in the memory of a Two-Dimensional Pulse-Height Analyzer. A unique method of displaying and interpreting the data is described that enables rapid approximate analysis of complex source distribution patterns. (auth)

  5. The solid state area scanner photometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rakos, K. D.

    The design and operation of a solid-state area-scanner photometer for observations of binaries are reported. Tracking and seeing errors are shown to be more significant than photoelectron statistics in determining overall accuracy; hence a system using individually recorded short scans and computer processing is adopted. A linear self-scanned photodiode array comprising 128 discrete Si photodiodes arranged on a 2.5 x 3.2-mm surface with virtually no dead space and having 80-percent quantum efficiency is used on a 1-m telescope at 1-sec integration time with thermoelectric cooling to -30 C. Good accuracy is obtained for binaries of magnitude 10 or less.

  6. A laser scanner for 35mm film

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Callen, W. R.; Weaver, J. E.

    1977-01-01

    The design, construction, and testing of a laser scanning system is described. The scanner was designed to deliver a scanned beam over a 2.54 cm by 2.54 cm or a 5.08 cm by 5.08 cm format. In order to achieve a scan resolution and rate comparable to that of standard television, an acousto-optic deflector was used for one axis of the scan, and a light deflecting galvanometer for deflection along the other axis. The acoustic optic deflector has the capability of random access scan controlled by a digital computer.

  7. LAPR: An experimental aircraft pushbroom scanner

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wharton, S. W.; Irons, J. I.; Heugel, F.

    1980-01-01

    A three band Linear Array Pushbroom Radiometer (LAPR) was built and flown on an experimental basis by NASA at the Goddard Space Flight Center. The functional characteristics of the instrument and the methods used to preprocess the data, including radiometric correction, are described. The radiometric sensitivity of the instrument was tested and compared to that of the Thematic Mapper and the Multispectral Scanner. The radiometric correction procedure was evaluated quantitatively, using laboratory testing, and qualitatively, via visual examination of the LAPR test flight imagery. Although effective radiometric correction could not yet be demonstrated via laboratory testing, radiometric distortion did not preclude the visual interpretation or parallel piped classification of the test imagery.

  8. An all-nickel magnetostatic MEMS scanner

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weber, Niklas; Zappe, Hans; Seifert, Andreas

    2012-12-01

    The design, fabrication and detailed characterization of a fully electroplated, magnetostatic low-cost MEMS scanning mirror are presented. By electroplating bright nickel on a sacrificial substrate, robust soft-magnetic micromirrors may be fabricated. The technology is simpler and cheaper than the standard process using bulk silicon micromachining of silicon-on-insulator wafers for fabricating magnetostatic scanners. The presented Ni mirrors exhibit deflection angles of ±7° at resonance for small external magnetic fields of 0.23 mT. Such magnetic fields are easily generated by miniaturized solenoids, making integration, for instance, into endoscopic systems possible.

  9. Ocean color imagery: Coastal zone color scanner

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hovis, W. A.

    1975-01-01

    Investigations into the feasibility of sensing ocean color from high altitude for determination of chlorophyll and sediment distributions were carried out using sensors on NASA aircraft, coordinated with surface measurements carried out by oceanographic vessels. Spectrometer measurements in 1971 and 1972 led to development of an imaging sensor now flying on a NASA U-2 and the Coastal Zone Color Scanner to fly on Nimbus G in 1978. Results of the U-2 effort show the imaging sensor to be of great value in sensing pollutants in the ocean.

  10. Biomedical applications of a real-time terahertz color scanner.

    PubMed

    Schirmer, Markus; Fujio, Makoto; Minami, Masaaki; Miura, Jiro; Araki, Tsutomu; Yasui, Takeshi

    2010-01-01

    A real-time THz color scanner has the potential to further expand the application scope of THz spectral imaging based on its rapid image acquisition rate. We demonstrated three possible applications of a THz color scanner in the biomedical field: imaging of pharmaceutical tablets, human teeth, and human hair. The first application showed the scanner's potential in total inspection for rapid quality control of pharmaceutical tablets moving on a conveyor belt. The second application demonstrated that the scanner can be used to identify a potential indicator for crystallinity of dental tissue. In the third application, the scanner was successfully used to visualize the drying process of wet hairs. These demonstrations indicated the high potential of the THz color scanner for practical applications in the biomedical field. PMID:21258472

  11. Multi-mirror adaptive optics for control of thermally induced aberrations in extreme ultraviolet lithography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Habets, Michel; Scholten, Joni; Weiland, Siep; Coene, Wim

    2016-03-01

    The imaging quality of the projection optics of an extreme ultraviolet lithography scanner degrades under the influence of thermally induced deformations of its mirrors. Wavefronts of different reticle points encounter different parts of the deformed mirrors, resulting in a field dependent wavefront error. This paper presents how ideas from multi-conjugate adaptive optics can be used to reduce these thermally induced aberrations. To this end a generic deformable mirror model is implemented. Linear actuator sensitivities are derived directly, based on nominal ray locations and directions, enabling fast prototyping. An integrated opto-thermo-mechanical mirror heating model is used to determine the evolution of thermally induced abberations over time. This transient simulation is used to analyze four different adaptive optics configurations and two different control algorithms. It is shown that by employing the multi-objective goal-attainment method, it is possible to improve the optical performance significantly when compared to minimizing the l2-norm of the total residual wavefront error vector.

  12. Progress in EUV lithography towards manufacturing from an exposure tool perspective

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hermans, Jan V.; Laidler, David; Foubert, Philippe; D'havé, Koen; Cheng, Shaunee; Dusa, Mircea; Hendrickx, Eric

    2012-03-01

    EUV lithography is a candidate for device manufacturing for the 16nm node and beyond. To prepare for insertion into manufacturing, the challenges of this new technology need to be addressed. Therefore, the ASML NXE:3100 preproduction tool was installed at imec replacing the ASML EUV Alpha Demo Tool (ADT). Since the technology has moved to a pre-production phase, EUV technology has to mature and it needs to meet the strong requirements of sub 16nm devices. We discuss the CD uniformity and overlay performance of the NXE:3100. We focus on EUV specific contributions to CD and overlay control, that were identified in earlier work on the ADT. The contributions to overlay originate from the use of vacuum technology and reflective optics inside the scanner, which are needed for EUV light transmission and throughput. Because the optical column is in vacuum, both wafer and reticle are held by electrostatic chucks instead of vacuum chucks and this can affect overlay. Because the reticle is reflective, any reticle (clamp) unflatness directly translates into a distortion error on wafer (non-telecentricity). For overlay, the wafer clamping performance is not only determined by the exposure chuck, but also by the wafer type that is used. We will show wafer clamping repeatability with different wafer types and discuss the thermal stability of the wafer during exposure.

  13. Integrated Electro-optical Laser-Beam Scanners

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Boord, Warren T.

    1990-01-01

    Scanners using solid-state devices compact, consume little power, and have no moving parts. Integrated electro-optical laser scanner, in conjunction with external lens, points outgoing beam of light in any number of different directions, depending on number of upper electrodes. Offers beam-deflection angles larger than those of acousto-optic scanners. Proposed for such diverse applications as nonimpact laser printing, color imaging, ranging, barcode reading, and robotic vision.

  14. 52. View from ground level showing lower radar scanner switch ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    52. View from ground level showing lower radar scanner switch with open port door in radar scanner building 105 showing emanating waveguides from lower switch in vertical run; photograph also shows catwalk to upper scanner switch in upper left side of photograph and structural supports. - Clear Air Force Station, Ballistic Missile Early Warning System Site II, One mile west of mile marker 293.5 on Parks Highway, 5 miles southwest of Anderson, Anderson, Denali Borough, AK

  15. Interferometric Laser Scanner for Direction Determination.

    PubMed

    Kaloshin, Gennady; Lukin, Igor

    2016-01-21

    In this paper, we explore the potential capabilities of new laser scanning-based method for direction determination. The method for fully coherent beams is extended to the case when interference pattern is produced in the turbulent atmosphere by two partially coherent sources. The performed theoretical analysis identified the conditions under which stable pattern may form on extended paths of 0.5-10 km in length. We describe a method for selecting laser scanner parameters, ensuring the necessary operability range in the atmosphere for any possible turbulence characteristics. The method is based on analysis of the mean intensity of interference pattern, formed by two partially coherent sources of optical radiation. Visibility of interference pattern is estimated as a function of propagation pathlength, structure parameter of atmospheric turbulence, and spacing of radiation sources, producing the interference pattern. It is shown that, when atmospheric turbulences are moderately strong, the contrast of interference pattern of laser scanner may ensure its applicability at ranges up to 10 km.

  16. Interferometric Laser Scanner for Direction Determination

    PubMed Central

    Kaloshin, Gennady; Lukin, Igor

    2016-01-01

    In this paper, we explore the potential capabilities of new laser scanning-based method for direction determination. The method for fully coherent beams is extended to the case when interference pattern is produced in the turbulent atmosphere by two partially coherent sources. The performed theoretical analysis identified the conditions under which stable pattern may form on extended paths of 0.5–10 km in length. We describe a method for selecting laser scanner parameters, ensuring the necessary operability range in the atmosphere for any possible turbulence characteristics. The method is based on analysis of the mean intensity of interference pattern, formed by two partially coherent sources of optical radiation. Visibility of interference pattern is estimated as a function of propagation pathlength, structure parameter of atmospheric turbulence, and spacing of radiation sources, producing the interference pattern. It is shown that, when atmospheric turbulences are moderately strong, the contrast of interference pattern of laser scanner may ensure its applicability at ranges up to 10 km. PMID:26805841

  17. Antenna Near-Field Probe Station Scanner

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zaman, Afroz J. (Inventor); Lee, Richard Q. (Inventor); Darby, William G. (Inventor); Barr, Philip J. (Inventor); Lambert, Kevin M (Inventor); Miranda, Felix A. (Inventor)

    2011-01-01

    A miniaturized antenna system is characterized non-destructively through the use of a scanner that measures its near-field radiated power performance. When taking measurements, the scanner can be moved linearly along the x, y and z axis, as well as rotationally relative to the antenna. The data obtained from the characterization are processed to determine the far-field properties of the system and to optimize the system. Each antenna is excited using a probe station system while a scanning probe scans the space above the antenna to measure the near field signals. Upon completion of the scan, the near-field patterns are transformed into far-field patterns. Along with taking data, this system also allows for extensive graphing and analysis of both the near-field and far-field data. The details of the probe station as well as the procedures for setting up a test, conducting a test, and analyzing the resulting data are also described.

  18. Quest for an open MRI scanner.

    PubMed

    Bertora, Franco; Borceto, Alice; Viale, Andrea; Sandini, Giulio

    2014-01-01

    A study of the motor cortex during the programming, execution and mental representation of voluntary movement is of great relevance; its evaluation in conditions close to reality is necessary, given the close integration of the visuomotor, sensory feedback and proprioceptive systems, as of yet, a functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging (fMRI) scanner allowing a human subject to maintain erect stance, observe the surroundings and conserve limb freedom is still a dream. The need for high field suggests a solenoid magnet geometry that forces an unnatural posture that affects the results, particularly when the motor cortex is investigated. In contrast in a motor functional study, the scanner should allow the subject to sit or stand, with unobstructed sight and unimpeded movement. Two approaches are presented here to solve this problem. In the first approach, an increased field intensity in an open magnet is obtained lining the "back wall" of the cavity with a sheet of current: this boosts the field intensity at the cost of the introduction of a gradient, which has to be canceled by the introduction of an opposite gradient; The second approach is an adaptation of the "double doughnut" architecture, in which the cavity widens at the center to provide additional room for the subject. The detailed design of this kind of structure has proven the feasibility of the solution.

  19. Interferometric Laser Scanner for Direction Determination.

    PubMed

    Kaloshin, Gennady; Lukin, Igor

    2016-01-01

    In this paper, we explore the potential capabilities of new laser scanning-based method for direction determination. The method for fully coherent beams is extended to the case when interference pattern is produced in the turbulent atmosphere by two partially coherent sources. The performed theoretical analysis identified the conditions under which stable pattern may form on extended paths of 0.5-10 km in length. We describe a method for selecting laser scanner parameters, ensuring the necessary operability range in the atmosphere for any possible turbulence characteristics. The method is based on analysis of the mean intensity of interference pattern, formed by two partially coherent sources of optical radiation. Visibility of interference pattern is estimated as a function of propagation pathlength, structure parameter of atmospheric turbulence, and spacing of radiation sources, producing the interference pattern. It is shown that, when atmospheric turbulences are moderately strong, the contrast of interference pattern of laser scanner may ensure its applicability at ranges up to 10 km. PMID:26805841

  20. Intelligent control system based on ARM for lithography tool

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Changlong; Tang, Xiaoping; Hu, Song; Wang, Nan

    2014-08-01

    The control system of traditional lithography tool is based on PC and MCU. The PC handles the complex algorithm, human-computer interaction, and communicates with MCU via serial port; The MCU controls motors and electromagnetic valves, etc. This mode has shortcomings like big volume, high power consumption, and wasting of PC resource. In this paper, an embedded intelligent control system of lithography tool, based on ARM, is provided. The control system used S5PV210 as processor, completing the functions of PC in traditional lithography tool, and provided a good human-computer interaction by using LCD and capacitive touch screen. Using Android4.0.3 as operating system, the equipment provided a cool and easy UI which made the control more user-friendly, and implemented remote control and debug, pushing video information of product by network programming. As a result, it's convenient for equipment vendor to provide technical support for users. Finally, compared with traditional lithography tool, this design reduced the PC part, making the hardware resources efficiently used and reducing the cost and volume. Introducing embedded OS and the concepts in "The Internet of things" into the design of lithography tool can be a development trend.

  1. Antireflective surface patterned by rolling mask lithography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seitz, Oliver; Geddes, Joseph B.; Aryal, Mukti; Perez, Joseph; Wassei, Jonathan; McMackin, Ian; Kobrin, Boris

    2014-03-01

    A growing number of commercial products such as displays, solar panels, light emitting diodes (LEDs and OLEDs), automotive and architectural glass are driving demand for glass with high performance surfaces that offer anti-reflective, self-cleaning, and other advanced functions. State-of-the-art coatings do not meet the desired performance characteristics or cannot be applied over large areas in a cost-effective manner. "Rolling Mask Lithography" (RML™) enables highresolution lithographic nano-patterning over large-areas at low-cost and high-throughput. RML is a photolithographic process performed using ultraviolet (UV) illumination transmitted through a soft cylindrical mask as it rolls across a substrate. Subsequent transfer of photoresist patterns into the substrate is achieved using an etching process, which creates a nanostructured surface. The current generation exposure tool is capable of patterning one-meter long substrates with a width of 300 mm. High-throughput and low-cost are achieved using continuous exposure of the resist by the cylindrical photomask. Here, we report on significant improvements in the application of RML™ to fabricate anti-reflective surfaces. Briefly, an optical surface can be made antireflective by "texturing" it with a nano-scale pattern to reduce the discontinuity in the index of refraction between the air and the bulk optical material. An array of cones, similar to the structure of a moth's eye, performs this way. Substrates are patterned using RML™ and etched to produce an array of cones with an aspect ratio of 3:1, which decreases the reflectivity below 0.1%.

  2. Complete data preparation flow for Massively Parallel E-Beam lithography on 28nm node full-field design

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fay, Aurélien; Browning, Clyde; Brandt, Pieter; Chartoire, Jacky; Bérard-Bergery, Sébastien; Hazart, Jérôme; Chagoya, Alexandre; Postnikov, Sergei; Saib, Mohamed; Lattard, Ludovic; Schavione, Patrick

    2016-03-01

    Massively parallel mask-less electron beam lithography (MP-EBL) offers a large intrinsic flexibility at a low cost of ownership in comparison to conventional optical lithography tools. This attractive direct-write technique needs a dedicated data preparation flow to correct both electronic and resist processes. Moreover, Data Prep has to be completed in a short enough time to preserve the flexibility advantage of MP-EBL. While the MP-EBL tools have currently entered an advanced stage of development, this paper will focus on the data preparation side of the work for specifically the MAPPER Lithography FLX-1200 tool [1]-[4], using the ASELTA Nanographics Inscale software. The complete flow as well as the methodology used to achieve a full-field layout data preparation, within an acceptable cycle time, will be presented. Layout used for Data Prep evaluation was one of a 28 nm technology node Metal1 chip with a field size of 26x33mm2, compatible with typical stepper/scanner field sizes and wafer stepping plans. Proximity Effect Correction (PEC) was applied to the entire field, which was then exported as a single file to MAPPER Lithography's machine format, containing fractured shapes and dose assignments. The Soft Edge beam to beam stitching method was employed in the specific overlap regions defined by the machine format as well. In addition to PEC, verification of the correction was included as part of the overall data preparation cycle time. This verification step was executed on the machine file format to ensure pattern fidelity and accuracy as late in the flow as possible. Verification over the full chip, involving billions of evaluation points, is performed both at nominal conditions and at Process Window corners in order to ensure proper exposure and process latitude. The complete MP-EBL data preparation flow was demonstrated for a 28 nm node Metal1 layout in 37 hours. The final verification step shows that the Edge Placement Error (EPE) is kept below 2.25 nm

  3. EUV source power and lifetime: the most critical issues for EUV lithography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stamm, Uwe; Kleinschmidt, Juergen; Gaebel, Kai; Birner, Henry; Ahmad, Imtiaz; Bolshukhin, Denis; Brudermann, Jesko; Chinh, Tran Duc; Flohrer, Frank; Goetze, Sven; Hergenhan, Guido; Kloepfel, Diethard; Korobotchko, Vladimir; Mader, Bjorn; Mueller, Rainer; Ringling, Jens; Schriever, Guido; Ziener, Christian

    2004-05-01

    exceeding 100 million discharges at 1 kHz repetition frequency. The same lifetime was achieved for the components of the discharge system itself. The progress in the development of high-power discharge sources resulted in an EUV power of 150 W in continuous operation at 4.5 kHz repetition rate by implementation of porous metal cooling technology. The EUV plasma has a FWHM-diameter of 0.5 mm and a FWHM-length of 1.5 mm. The intermediate focus power is calculated to be in the range of 15 W - 20 W, depending somewhat on the transmission of the optical path to the intermediate focus and on the etendue specification. The typical fluctuations of the EUV energy are standard deviation s<5% without any active stabilization. Discharge sources with Sn as emitter were investigated as more efficient alternative to Xenon. Estimates regarding Sn sources reveal the potential of achieving 65 W intermediate focus power by using developed porous metal cooling technology. Improvement of cooling could open the path to 115 W of power for high volume manufacturing using EUV lithography. However, Sn-sources are technologically risky und much less advanced than Xe sources, since fuel-handling and debris mitigation is much more challenging in comparison to Xe-sources. GDPP and LPP sources still compete for the technology of high volume manufacturing sources for EUV lithography. Optimization potential of the etendue of the optical system of EUV scanners will certainly influence any technology decision for HVM sources.

  4. Identification of scanner models by comparison of scanned hologram images.

    PubMed

    Sugawara, Shigeru

    2014-08-01

    A method to identify scanner models that had been used to forge low-level counterfeit currencies was proposed in this study. The method identified a scanner model by characterizing differences between hologram images that exist in low-level counterfeit currencies. Twenty scanners of 18 different models were used to make samples of hologram images used in this study. The method was divided into two steps: identification of capturing conditions and identification of the scanner model. The first proposed protocol used correlations of spatial distribution of brightness to identify capturing conditions. A second proposed protocol used correlations of color distributions to identify a scanner model. The effectiveness of the protocols was demonstrated with numerical methods and sample images. The preliminary study revealed that it is necessary to consider the orientation of the holograms when the scanner models were identified, but 180° rotations can be ignored. Moreover, it is necessary to consider position in the main scanning direction of the bed for charged-coupled-device scanners. The demonstration showed that the first protocol could correctly identify the capturing conditions of almost all hologram images. However, one image could not be identified correctly; the protocol could distinguish images captured by charged-coupled-device scanners and those captured by contact image sensor scanners if the hologram was placed on the right or left edge of the scanner bed, but could not distinguish them if the hologram was placed on the inside. The demonstration also showed that the second protocol could correctly identify scanner models of all hologram images.

  5. Receding contact lines: From sliding drops to immersion lithography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Winkels, K. G.; Peters, I. R.; Evangelista, F.; Riepen, M.; Daerr, A.; Limat, L.; Snoeijer, J. H.

    2011-02-01

    Instabilities of receding contact lines often occur through the formation of a corner with a very sharp tip. These dewetting structures also appear in the technology of Immersion Lithography, where water is put between the lens and the silicon wafer to increase the optical resolution. In this paper we aim to compare corners appearing in Immersion Lithography to those at the tail of gravity driven-drops sliding down an incline. We use high speed recordings to measure the dynamic contact angle and the sharpness of the corner, for varying contact line velocity. It is found that these quantities behave very similarly for Immersion Lithography and drops on an incline. In addition, the results agree well with predictions by a lubrication model for cornered contact lines, hinting at a generic structure of dewetting corners.

  6. Shadowing effect modeling and compensation for EUV lithography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, Hua; Zavyalova, Lena; Su, Irene; Shiely, James; Schmoeller, Thomas

    2011-04-01

    Extreme ultraviolet (EUV) lithography is one of the leading technologies for 16nm and smaller node device patterning. One patterning issue intrinsic to EUV lithography is the shadowing effect due to oblique illumination at the mask and mask absorber thickness. This effect can cause CD errors up to a few nanometers, consequently needs to be accounted for in OPC modeling and compensated accordingly in mask synthesis. Because of the dependence on the reticle field coordinates, shadowing effect is very different from the traditional optical and resist effects. It poses challenges to modeling, compensation, and verification that were not encountered in tradition optical lithography mask synthesis. In this paper, we present a systematic approach for shadowing effect modeling and model-based shadowing compensation. Edge based shadowing effect calculation with reticle and scan information is presented. Model calibration and mask synthesis flows are described. Numerical experiments are performed to demonstrate the effectiveness of the approach.

  7. Deconstructing contact hole CD printing variability in EUV lithography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Civay, D.; Wallow, T.; Doganaksoy, N.; Verduijn, E.; Schmid, G.; Mangat, P.

    2014-04-01

    Lithographic CD printing variability can be easily captured with a CDU measurement, however delineating the most significant sources causing the variability is challenging. In EUV lithography, the resist, reticle, metrology methodology, and stochastics are examples of factors that influence printing variability. Determining the most significant sources of variability in contact hole and via patterning is particularly interesting because the variability can be measured as a function of two tethered dimensions. Contact hole (CH) variability has a direct impact on device performance while via variability affects metal area scaling and design. By studying sources of variability opportunities for improving device performance and scaling can be identified. In this paper, we will examine sources of contact patterning variability in EUV lithography comprehensively using various EUV exposure tools as well as simulation methods. We will present a benchmark of current state of the art materials and patterning methods with the goal of assessing contact hole printability at the limit of 0.33 NA EUV lithography.

  8. Recent progress in nanoparticle photoresists development for EUV lithography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kasahara, Kazuki; Kosma, Vasiliki; Odent, Jeremy; Xu, Hong; Yu, Mufei; Giannelis, Emmanuel P.; Ober, Christopher K.

    2016-03-01

    Extreme ultraviolet (EUV) lithography is a promising candidate for next generation lithography. For high volume manufacturing of semiconductor devices, significant improvement of resolution and sensitivity is required for successful implementation of EUV resists. Performance requirements for such resists demand the development of entirely new resist platforms. Cornell University has intensely studied metal oxide nanoparticle photoresists with high sensitivity for EUV lithography applications. Zirconium oxide nanoparticles with PAG enabling sub 30nm line negative tone patterns at an EUV dose below 5 mJ/cm2 show one of the best EUV sensitivity results ever reported. In this paper, recent progress in metal oxide nanoparticle photoresist research will be discussed. Several studies regarding composition investigation and new metal element study are reported.

  9. Thickness optimization for lithography process on silicon substrate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Su, Xiaojing; Su, Yajuan; Liu, Yansong; Chen, Fong; Liu, Zhimin; Zhang, Wei; Li, Bifeng; Gao, Tao; Wei, Yayi

    2015-03-01

    With the development of the lithography, the demand for critical dimension (CD) and CD uniformity (CDU) has reached a new level, which is harder and harder to achieve. There exists reflection at the interface between photo-resist and substrate during lithography exposure. This reflection has negative impact on CD and CDU control. It is possible to optimize the litho stack and film stack thickness on different lithography conditions. With the optimized stack, the total reflectivity for all incident angles at the interface can be controlled less than 0.5%, ideally 0.1%, which enhances process window (PW) most of the time. The theoretical results are verified by the experiment results from foundry, which helps the foundry achieve the mass production finally.

  10. X-ray lithography: a system integration effort

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Selzer, Robert A.; Heaton, John; Vladimirsky, Yuli; Simon, Klaus

    1999-06-01

    Despite growing expectations of significant progress in projection lithography using shorter wavelengths, x-ray lithography is still the most developed and production ready technology compared with the other NGL approaches. For the timely introduction of this technology into the manufacturing environment the development of fully integrated x-ray lithography systems becomes very important. Reflecting manufacturing and R and D demands, the x-ray technology integration has been pursued for goth synchrotron radiation and x-ray point source based approaches. While the synchrotron-based approach provides the high volume platform, the point source will provide the platform for low volume production and R and D efforts. SAL recognizes the needs for both, a synchrotron based stepper as well as a point source stepper and is focused on meeting those needs. This paper will present the status of integration efforts at SAL utilizing a point source system.

  11. Graphene nanoribbon superlattices fabricated via He ion lithography

    SciTech Connect

    Archanjo, Braulio S.; Fragneaud, Benjamin; Gustavo Cançado, Luiz; Winston, Donald; Miao, Feng; Alberto Achete, Carlos; Medeiros-Ribeiro, Gilberto

    2014-05-12

    Single-step nano-lithography was performed on graphene sheets using a helium ion microscope. Parallel “defect” lines of ∼1 μm length and ≈5 nm width were written to form nanoribbon gratings down to 20 nm pitch. Polarized Raman spectroscopy shows that crystallographic orientation of the nanoribbons was partially maintained at their lateral edges, indicating a high-fidelity lithography process. Furthermore, Raman analysis of large exposure areas with different ion doses reveals that He ions produce point defects with radii ∼ 2× smaller than do Ga ions, demonstrating that scanning-He{sup +}-beam lithography can texture graphene with less damage.

  12. Immersion defectivity study with volume production immersion lithography tool

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakano, Katsushi; Kato, Hiroshi; Fujiwara, Tomoharu; Shiraishi, K.; Iriuchijima, Yasuhiro; Owa, Soichi; Malik, Irfan; Woodman, Steve; Terala, Prasad; Pelissier, Christine; Zhang, Haiping

    2007-03-01

    ArF immersion lithography has become accepted as the critical layer patterning solution for lithography going forward. Volume production of 55 nm devices using immersion lithography has begun. One of the key issues for the success of volume production immersion lithography is the control of immersion defectivity. Because the defectivity is influenced by the exposure tool, track, materials, and the wafer environment, a broad range of analysis and optimization is needed to minimize defect levels. Defect tests were performed using a dedicated immersion cluster consisting of a volume production immersion exposure tool, Nikon NSR-S609B, having NA of 1.07, and a resist coater-developer, TEL LITHIUS i+. Miniaturization of feature size by immersion lithography requires higher sensitivity defect inspection. In this paper, first we demonstrate the high sensitivity defect measurement using a next generation wafer inspection system, KLA-Tencor 2800 and Surfscan SP2, on both patterned and non-patterned wafers. Long-term defect stability is very important from the viewpoint of device mass production. Secondly, we present long-term defectivity data using a topcoat-less process. For tool and process qualification, a simple monitor method is required. Simple, non-pattern immersion scanned wafer measurement has been proposed elsewhere, but the correlation between such a non-pattern defect and pattern defect must be confirmed. In this paper, using a topcoat process, the correlation between topcoat defects and pattern defects is analyzed using the defect source analysis (DSA) method. In case of accidental tool contamination, a cleaning process should be established. Liquid cleaning is suitable because it can be easily introduced through the immersion nozzle. An in-situ tool cleaning method is introduced. A broad range of optimization of tools, materials, and processes provide convincing evidence that immersion lithography is ready for volume production chip manufacturing.

  13. ILT for double exposure lithography with conventional and novel materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Poonawala, Amyn; Borodovsky, Yan; Milanfar, Peyman

    2007-03-01

    Multiple paths exists to provide lithography solutions pursuant to Moore's Law for next 3-5 generations of technology, yet each of those paths inevitably leads to solutions eventually requiring patterning at k I < 0.30 and below. In this article, we explore double exposure single development lithography for k I >= 0.25 (using conventional resist) and k1 < 0.25 (using new out-of-sight out-of-mind materials). For the case of k I >= 0.25, we propose a novel double exposure inverse lithography technique (ILT) to split the pattern. Our algorithm is based on our earlier proposed single exposure ILT framework, and works by decomposing the aerial image (instead of the target pattern) into two parts. It also resolves the phase conflicts automatically as part of the decomposition, and the combined aerial image obtained using the estimated masks has a superior contrast. For the case of k I < 0.25, we focus on analyzing the use of various dual patterning techniques enabled by the use of hypothetic materials with properties that allow for the violation of the linear superposition of intensities from the two exposures. We investigate the possible use of two materials: contrast enhancement layer (CEL) and two-photon absorption resists. We propose a mathematical model for CEL, define its characteristic properties, and derive fundamental bounds on the improvement in image log-slope. Simulation results demonstrate that double exposure single development lithography using CEL enables printing 80nm gratings using dry lithography. We also combine ILT, CEL, and DEL to synthesize 2-D patterns with k I = 0.185. Finally, we discuss the viability of two-photon absorption resists for double exposure lithography.

  14. Mix-and-match lithography for half-micron technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Flack, Warren W.; Dameron, David H.

    1991-08-01

    Half-micron lithography for a production environment is not considered realistic with currently available lithography tools. While optical steppers have high wafer throughputs, they do not have sufficient process latitude at half-micron geometries. In contrast, advanced technologies with sufficient capabilities for half-micron processing such as direct-write e-beam and x-ray lithography are extremely expensive and have low effective throughputs. A mix-and- match lithography approach can take advantage of the best features of both types of systems by sing an optical stepper for noncritical levels and an advanced lithography system for critical levels. In order to facilitate processing of a triple level metal half-micron CMOS technology, a mix-and-match scheme has been developed between a Hitachi HL-700 D e-beam direct write system and an Ultratech 1500 wide-field 1x stepper. The Hitachi is used to pattern an accurate zero or registration level. All critical levels are exposed on the Hitachi and aligned back to this zero level. The Ultratech is used to align all other process levels which do not have critical targets that are placed on subsequent process levels. The mix-and-match approach is discussed, and optical to e-beam as well as e-beam to optical alignment results from seven production lots are presented. The linear alignment error components X translation, Y translation, rotation and magnification are extracted and analyzed to determine their source. It was found that a simple adjustment improved the registration capabilities of these two lithography tools by reducing the X translation, Y translation and rotation standard deviations by a factor of two or more, while greatly reducing the magnification errors between the two tools.

  15. Modeling the rovibrationally excited C2H4OH radicals from the photodissociation of 2-bromoethanol at 193 nm.

    PubMed

    Ratliff, B J; Womack, C C; Tang, X N; Landau, W M; Butler, L J; Szpunar, D E

    2010-04-15

    This study photolytically generates, from 2-bromoethanol photodissociation, the 2-hydroxyethyl radical intermediate of the OH + ethene reaction and measures the velocity distribution of the stable radicals. We introduce an impulsive model to characterize the partitioning of internal energy in the C(2)H(4)OH fragment. It accounts for zero-point and thermal vibrational motion to determine the vibrational energy distribution of the nascent C(2)H(4)OH radicals and the distribution of total angular momentum, J, as a function of the total recoil kinetic energy imparted in the photodissociation. We render this system useful for the study of the subsequent dissociation of the 2-hydroxyethyl radical to the possible asymptotic channels of the OH + ethene reaction. The competition between these channels depends on the internal energy and the J distribution of the radicals. First, we use velocity map imaging to separately resolve the C(2)H(4)OH + Br((2)P(3/2)) and C(2)H(4)OH + Br((2)P(1/2)) photodissociation channels, allowing us to account for the 10.54 kcal/mol partitioned to the Br((2)P(1/2)) cofragment. We determine an improved resonance enhanced multiphoton ionization (REMPI) line strength for the Br transitions at 233.681 nm (5p (4)P(1/2) <-- 4p (2)P(3/2)) and 234.021 nm (5p (2)S(1/2) <-- 4p (2)P(1/2)) and obtain a spin-orbit branching ratio for Br((2)P(1/2)):Br((2)P(3/2)) of 0.26 +/- 0.03:1. Energy and momentum conservation give the distribution of total internal energy, rotational and vibrational, in the C(2)H(4)OH radicals. Then, using 10.5 eV photoionization, we measure the velocity distribution of the radicals that are stable to subsequent dissociation. The onset of dissociation occurs at internal energies much higher than those predicted by theoretical methods and reflects the significant amount of rotational energy imparted to the C(2)H(4)OH photofragment. Instead of estimating the mean rotational energy with an impulsive model from the equilibrium geometry of 2-bromoethanol, our model explicitly includes weighting over geometries across the quantum wave function with zero, one, and two quanta in the harmonic mode that most strongly alters the exit impact parameter. The model gives a nearly perfect prediction of the measured velocity distribution of stable radicals near the dissociation onset using a G4 prediction of the C-Br bond energy and the dissociation barrier for the OH + ethene channel calculated by Senosiain et al. (J. Phys. Chem. A 2006, 110, 6960). The model also indicates that the excited state dissociation proceeds primarily from a conformer of 2-bromoethanol that is trans across the C-C bond. We discuss the possible extensions of our model and the effect of the radical intermediate's J-distribution on the branching between the OH + ethene product channels. PMID:20302318

  16. Ablation de ZnO par laser UV (193 nm) : nano-agrégats en phase gazeuse

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ozerov, I.; Bulgakov, A.; Nelson, D.; Castell, R.; Sentis, M.; Marine, W.

    2003-06-01

    La condensation de nano-agrégats d'oxyde de zinc en phase gazeuse est mise en évidence lors de l'ablation de ZnO massif par laser ArF pulsé. Nous comparons l'évolution spatio-temporelle de la forme du panache d'ablation (plume) de ZnO sous vide et sous atmosphère de gaz de couverture (oxygène et/ou hélium) à partir des images CCD et des résultats issus d'analyses spectroscopiques. L'expansion du plasma et la croissance des nano-clusters sont influencées par l'effet du confinement de la plume dû aux collisions entre les particules ablatées et les molécules de gaz ambiant ainsi que par les réactions chimiques dans le cas de l'oxygène. Le spectre de rayonnement du plasma est constitué principalement par l'émission d'atomes excités de Zn neutre. Nous avons observé la photoluminescence des nano-agrégats en suspension dans le gaz ainsi que leur décomposition par laser ArF.

  17. Development and numerical solution of a mechanistic model for corneal tissue ablation with the 193 nm argon fluoride excimer laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fisher, Brian T.; Hahn, David W.

    2007-02-01

    We detail the development and implementation of a global ablation model that incorporates a dynamically changing tissue absorption coefficient. Detailed spectroscopic measurements rule out plasma-shielding effects during the laser-tissue interaction and thereby support a photochemical mechanism. The model predicts ablation rate behavior that agrees well with a variety of experimental ablation rate data and that substantially deviates from a static Beer-Lambert model. The dynamic model predicts an enhancement in the tissue absorption coefficient of about 25%-50% as compared with the initial, static value. In addition, the model predicts an increase in the tissue ablation rate as corneal hydration increases, which may provide additional insight into variations in refractive surgery outcome.

  18. Fabrication of Diffractive Optical Elements for an Integrated Compact Optical-MEMS Laser Scanner

    SciTech Connect

    WENDT,JOEL R.; KRYGOWSKI,T.W.; VAWTER,GREGORY A.; SPAHN,OLGA B.; SWEATT,WILLIAM C.; WARREN,MIAL E.; REYES,DAVID NMN

    2000-07-13

    The authors describe the microfabrication of a multi-level diffractive optical element (DOE) onto a micro-electromechanical system (MEMS) as a key element in an integrated compact optical-MEMS laser scanner. The DOE is a four-level off-axis microlens fabricated onto a movable polysilicon shuttle. The microlens is patterned by electron beam lithography and etched by reactive ion beam etching. The DOE was fabricated on two generations of MEMS components. The first generation design uses a shuttle suspended on springs and displaced by a linear rack. The second generation design uses a shuttle guided by roller bearings and driven by a single reciprocating gear. Both the linear rack and the reciprocating gear are driven by a microengine assembly. The compact design is based on mounting the MEMS module and a vertical cavity surface emitting laser (VCSEL) onto a fused silica substrate that contains the rest of the optical system. The estimated scan range of the system is {+-}4{degree} with a spot size of 0.5 mm.

  19. Quadrupole resonance scanner for narcotics detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shaw, Julian D.; Moeller, C. R.; Magnuson, Erik E.; Sheldon, Alan G.

    1994-10-01

    Interest in non-invasive, non-hazardous, bulk detection technologies for narcotics interdiction has risen over the last few years. As part of our continuing research and development programs in detection of narcotics and explosives using sensitive magnetic measuring devices, we present the first commercially available prototype Quadrupole Resonance (QR) scanner for narcotics detection. The portable narcotics detection system was designed in modular form such that a single QR base system could be easily used with a variety of custom detection heads. The QR system presented in this paper is suitable for scanning items up to 61 X 35 X 13 cm in size, and was designed to scan mail packages and briefcase-sized items for the presence of narcotics. System tests have shown that detection sensitivity is comparable that obtained in laboratory systems.

  20. Echelle crossed grating millimeter wave beam scanner.

    PubMed

    Furxhi, Orges; Marks, Daniel L; Brady, David J

    2014-06-30

    We present a two-dimensional, active, millimeter-wave, electronic beam scanner, with Doppler capabilities for stand-off imaging. The two-dimensional scan is achieved by mapping the millimeter wave spectrum to space using a pair of crossed gratings. The active transceiver and heterodyne quadrature detection allow the measurement of the relative phase between two consecutive measurements and the synthesis of the scene's Doppler signature. The frame rate of the imager is currently limited by the sweep rate of the vector network analyzer which is used to drive the millimeter wave extenders. All of the beam steering components are passive and can be designed to operate at any wavelength. The system design, characterization and measurements are presented and further uses and improvements are suggested.

  1. Advanced clinical KCD scanner for digital radiography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    DiBianca, Frank A.; Davis, Keana M.; Jordan, Lawrence M.; Laughter, Joseph S.; Krishnamurthy, Anand; Hu, Bo

    1998-07-01

    One of the goals of medical imaging scientists and bioengineers remains the development of digital electronic technologies that can replace film-based methods of acquiring x-ray images. With the achievement of this goal, all diagnostic imaging technologies would be based on digital techniques with all the attending benefits. Based on the performance of numerous research prototype small-field and one large-field Kinestatic Charge Detector (KCD) system for digital radiography, a large-field clinical KCD scanner is currently being designed and built for technical evaluation and for clinical evaluation of 200 volunteer patients (including clinical comparisons with film, storage phosphor, and other available clinical systems). The state of development of this clinical KCD system, including detector, data-acquisition system and scanning gantry design, is reviewed in this paper.

  2. Temporal analysis of multispectral scanner data.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Richardson, A. J.; Wiegand, C. L.; Torline, R. J.

    1973-01-01

    Multispectral scanner reflectance data were sampled for bare soil, cotton, sorghum, corn, and citrus at four dates during a growing season (April, May, June, and July 1969) to develop a time-dependent signature for crop and soil discrimination. Discrimination tests were conducted for single-date and multidate formats using training and test data sets. For classifications containing several crops, the multidate or temporal approach improved discrimination compared with the single-date approach. The multidate approach also preserved recognition accuracy better in going from training fields to test fields than the single-date analysis. The spectral distinctiveness of bare soil versus vegetation resulted in essentially equal discrimination using single-date versus multidate data for those two categories.

  3. Wetlands mapping with spot multispectral scanner data

    SciTech Connect

    Mackey, H.E. Jr. ); Jensen, J.R. . Dept. of Geography)

    1989-01-01

    Government facilities such as the US Department of Energy's Savannah River Plant (SRP) near Aiken, South Carolina, often use remote sensing data to assist in environmental management. Airborne multispectral scanner (MSS) data have been acquired at SRP since 1981. Various types of remote sensing data have been used to map and characterize wetlands. Regional Landsat MSS and TM satellite data have been used for wetlands mapping by various government agencies and private organizations. Furthermore, SPOT MSS data are becoming available and provide opportunities for increased spacial resolution and temporal coverage for wetlands mapping. This paper summarizes the initial results from using five dates of SPOT MSS data from April through October, 1987, as a means to monitor seasonal wetland changes in freshwater wetlands of the SRP. 11 refs., 4 figs.

  4. Directed self-assembly graphoepitaxy template generation with immersion lithography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Yuansheng; Lei, Junjiang; Andres Torres, J.; Hong, Le; Word, James; Fenger, Germain; Tritchkov, Alexander; Lippincott, George; Gupta, Rachit; Lafferty, Neal; He, Yuan; Bekaert, Joost; Vanderberghe, Geert

    2015-07-01

    We present an optimization methodology for the template designs of subresolution contacts using directed self-assembly (DSA) with graphoepitaxy and immersion lithography. We demonstrate the flow using a 60-nm-pitch contact design in doublet with Monte Carlo simulations for DSA. We introduce the notion of template error enhancement factor (TEEF) to gauge the sensitivity of DSA printing infidelity to template printing infidelity and evaluate optimized template designs with TEEF metrics. Our data show that source mask optimization and inverse lithography technology are critical to achieve sub-80 nm non-L0 pitches for DSA patterns using 193i.

  5. EUV lithography optics for sub-9nm resolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kneer, Bernhard; Migura, Sascha; Kaiser, Winfried; Neumann, Jens Timo; van Schoot, Jan

    2015-03-01

    EUV lithography for resolution below 9 nm requires the numerical aperture of the projection optics to be significantly larger than 0.45. A configuration of 4x magnification, full field size and 6'' reticle is not feasible anymore. The increased chief ray angle and higher NA at reticle lead to non-acceptable shadowing effects, which can only be controlled by increasing the magnification, hence reducing the system productivity. We demonstrate that the best compromise in imaging, productivity and field split is a so-called anamorphic magnification and a half field of 26 x 16.5 mm². We discuss the optical solutions for anamorphic high-NA lithography.

  6. Nanometer-scale placement in electron-beam lithography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ferrera, Juan

    2000-12-01

    Electron-beam lithography is capable of high-resolution lithographic pattern generation (down to 10 nm or below). However, for conventional e-beam lithography, pattern- placement accuracy is inferior to resolution. Despite significant efforts to improve pattern placement, a limit is being approached. The placement capability of conventional e-beam tools is insufficient to fabricate narrow-band optical filters and lasers, which require sub-micrometer-pitch gratings with a high degree of spatial coherence. Moreover, it is widely recognized that placement accuracy will not be sufficient for future semiconductor device generations, with minimum feature sizes below 100 nm. In electron-beam lithography, an electromagnetic deflection system is used in conjunction with a laser-interferometer-controlled stage to generate high-resolution patterns over large areas. Placement errors arise because the laser interferometer monitors the stage position, but the e-beam can independently drift relative to the stage. Moreover, the laser interferometer can itself drift during exposure. To overcome this fundamental limitation, the method of spatial phase-locked electron-beam lithography has been proposed. The beam position is referenced to a high- fidelity grid, exposed by interference lithography, on the substrate surface. In this method, pattern-placement performance depends upon the accuracy of the reference grid and the precision with which patterns can be locked to the grid. The grid must be well characterized to serve as a reliable fiducial. This document describes work done to characterize grids generated by interference lithography. A theoretical model was developed to describe the spatial-phase progression of interferometric gratings and grids. The accuracy of the interference lithography apparatus was found to be limited by substrate mounting errors and uncertainty in setting the geometrical parameters that determine the angle of interference. Experimental measurements were

  7. 34. SITE BUILDING 002 SCANNER BUILDING ROOM 105 ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    34. SITE BUILDING 002 - SCANNER BUILDING - ROOM 105 - CHILLER ROOM, SHOWING SINGLE COMPRESSOR, LIQUID CHILLERS AND "CHILLED WATER RETURN", COOLING TOWER 'TOWER WATER RETURN" AND 'TOWER WATER SUPPLY" LINES. - Cape Cod Air Station, Technical Facility-Scanner Building & Power Plant, Massachusetts Military Reservation, Sandwich, Barnstable County, MA

  8. 19. SITE BUILDING 002 SCANNER BUILDING AIR POLICE ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    19. SITE BUILDING 002 - SCANNER BUILDING - AIR POLICE SITE SECURITY OFFICE WITH "SITE PERIMETER STATUS PANEL" AND REAL TIME VIDEO DISPLAY OUTPUT FROM VIDEO CAMERA SYSTEM AT SECURITY FENCE LOCATIONS. - Cape Cod Air Station, Technical Facility-Scanner Building & Power Plant, Massachusetts Military Reservation, Sandwich, Barnstable County, MA

  9. 25. SITE BUILDING 002 SCANNER BUILDING OPERATIONS CENTER ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    25. SITE BUILDING 002 - SCANNER BUILDING - OPERATIONS CENTER - MWOC IN OPERATION AT 1930 ZULU TIME, 26 OCTOBER, 1999. MWOC SCREEN ALSO SHOWS RADAR "FACE A" AND "FACE B" ACTIVE STATUS. - Cape Cod Air Station, Technical Facility-Scanner Building & Power Plant, Massachusetts Military Reservation, Sandwich, Barnstable County, MA

  10. 26. SITE BUILDING 002 SCANNER BUILDING OPERATIONS CENTER ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    26. SITE BUILDING 002 - SCANNER BUILDING - OPERATIONS CENTER - MWOC IN OPERATION AT 1945 ZULU TIME, 26 OCTOBER, 1999. "SPACE TRACK BOARD" DATA SHOWING ITEMS #16609 MIR (RUSSIA) AND #25544 ISS (INTERNATIONAL SPACE STATION) BEING TRACKED. - Cape Cod Air Station, Technical Facility-Scanner Building & Power Plant, Massachusetts Military Reservation, Sandwich, Barnstable County, MA

  11. 29. SITE BUILDING 002 SCANNER BUILDING FLOOR 3A ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    29. SITE BUILDING 002 - SCANNER BUILDING - FLOOR 3A ("A" FACE) AT SYSTEM LAYOUT GRID 17. GENERAL OBLIQUE VIEW OF "A" FACE INTERIOR SHOWING RADAR EMITTER/ANTENNA INTERFACE ELECTRONICS. - Cape Cod Air Station, Technical Facility-Scanner Building & Power Plant, Massachusetts Military Reservation, Sandwich, Barnstable County, MA

  12. 20. SITE BUILDING 002 SCANNER BUILDING IN COMPUTER ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    20. SITE BUILDING 002 - SCANNER BUILDING - IN COMPUTER ROOM LOOKING AT "CONSOLIDATED MAINTENANCE OPERATIONS CENTER" JOB AREA AND OPERATION WORK CENTER. TASKS INCLUDE RADAR MAINTENANCE, COMPUTER MAINTENANCE, CYBER COMPUTER MAINTENANCE AND RELATED ACTIVITIES. - Cape Cod Air Station, Technical Facility-Scanner Building & Power Plant, Massachusetts Military Reservation, Sandwich, Barnstable County, MA

  13. 21. SITE BUILDING 002 SCANNER BUILDING LOOKING AT ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    21. SITE BUILDING 002 - SCANNER BUILDING - LOOKING AT DISC STORAGE SYSTEMS A AND B (A OR B ARE REDUNDANT SYSTEMS), ONE MAINFRAME COMPUTER ON LINE, ONE ON STANDBY WITH STORAGE TAPE, ONE ON STANDBY WITHOUT TAPE INSTALLED. - Cape Cod Air Station, Technical Facility-Scanner Building & Power Plant, Massachusetts Military Reservation, Sandwich, Barnstable County, MA

  14. Quantitative Assay for Starch by Colorimetry Using a Desktop Scanner

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Matthews, Kurt R.; Landmark, James D.; Stickle, Douglas F.

    2004-01-01

    The procedure to produce standard curve for starch concentration measurement by image analysis using a color scanner and computer for data acquisition and color analysis is described. Color analysis is performed by a Visual Basic program that measures red, green, and blue (RGB) color intensities for pixels within the scanner image.

  15. 27. SITE BUILDING 002 SCANNER BUILDING OPERATIONS CENTER ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    27. SITE BUILDING 002 - SCANNER BUILDING - OPERATIONS CENTER - MWOC MONITOR NO. 4 IN OPERATION AT 2002 ZULU, OCTOBER 26, 1999 CAPE COD, AS PAVE PAWS. - Cape Cod Air Station, Technical Facility-Scanner Building & Power Plant, Massachusetts Military Reservation, Sandwich, Barnstable County, MA

  16. Laser excited confocal microscope fluorescence scanner and method

    DOEpatents

    Mathies, R.A.; Peck, K.

    1992-02-25

    A fluorescent scanner is designed for scanning the fluorescence from a fluorescence labeled separated sample on a sample carrier. The scanner includes a confocal microscope for illuminating a predetermined volume of the sample carrier and/or receiving and processing fluorescence emissions from the volume to provide a display of the separated sample. 8 figs.

  17. 10. SITE BUILDING 002 SCANNER BUILDING LOOKING AT ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    10. SITE BUILDING 002 - SCANNER BUILDING - LOOKING AT SOUTHWEST CORNER "B" FACE AND "C" FACE ON WEST AND EVAPORATIVE COOLING TOWER AT NORTH. VIEW IS LOOKING NORTH 45° EAST. - Cape Cod Air Station, Technical Facility-Scanner Building & Power Plant, Massachusetts Military Reservation, Sandwich, Barnstable County, MA

  18. Imaging control functions of optical scanners

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nishinaga, Hisashi; Hirayama, Toru; Fujii, Daiyu; Yamamoto, Hajime; Irihama, Hiroshi; Ogata, Taro; Koizumi, Yukio; Suzuki, Kenta; Fujishima, Yohei; Matsuyama, Tomoyuki; Kawaguchi, Ryoichi

    2014-03-01

    For future printing based on multiple patterning and directed self-assembly, critical dimension and overlay requirements become tighter for immersion lithography. Thermal impact of exposure to both the projection lens and reticle expansion becomes the dominant factor for high volume production. A new procedure to tune the thermal control function is needed to maintain the tool conditions to obtain high productivity and accuracy. Additionally, new functions of both hardware and software are used to improve the imaging performance even during exposure with high-dose conditions. In this paper, we describe the procedure to tune the thermal control parameters which indicate the response of projection lens aberration and reticle expansion separately. As new functionalities to control the thermal lens aberration, wavefront-based lens control software and reticle bending hardware are introduced. By applying these functions, thermal focus control can be improved drastically. Further, the capability of prediction of reticle expansion is discussed, including experimental data from overlay exposure and aerial image sensor results.

  19. Nanoimprint lithography for functional polymer patterning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cui, Dehu

    2011-07-01

    Organic semiconductors have generated huge interested in recent years for low-cost and flexible electronics. Current and future device applications for semiconducting polymers include light-emitting diodes, thin-film transistors, photovoltaic cells, photodetectors, lasers, and memories. The performance of conjugated polymer devices depends on two major factors: the chain conformation in polymer film and the device architecture. Highly ordered chain structure usually leads to much improved performance by enhancing interchain interaction to facilitate carrier transport. The goal of this research is to improve the performance of organic devices with the nanoimprint lithography. The work begins with the controlling of polymer chain orientation in patterned nanostructures through nanoimprint mold design and process parameter manipulation, and studying the effect of chain ordering on material properties. Then, step-and-repeat thermal nanoimprint technique for large-scale continuous manufacturing of conjugated polymer nanostructures is developed. After that, Systematic investigation of polymer chain configuration by Raman spectroscopy is carried out to understand how nanoimprint process parameters, such as mold pattern size, temperature, and polymer molecular weight, affects polymer chain configuration. The results indicate that chain orientation in nanoimprinted polymer micro- and nanostructures is highly related to the nanoimprint temperature and the dimensions of the mold structures. The ability to create nanoscale polymer micro- and nanostructures and manipulate their internal chain conformation establishes an original experimental platform that enables studying the properties of functional polymers at the micro- and nanoscale and understanding their fundamental structure-property relationships. In addition to the impact on basic research, the techniques developed in this work are important in applied research and development. Large-area conjugated polymer micro- and

  20. Capillary force lithography for cardiac tissue engineering.

    PubMed

    Macadangdang, Jesse; Lee, Hyun Jung; Carson, Daniel; Jiao, Alex; Fugate, James; Pabon, Lil; Regnier, Michael; Murry, Charles; Kim, Deok-Ho

    2014-06-10

    Cardiovascular disease remains the leading cause of death worldwide(1). Cardiac tissue engineering holds much promise to deliver groundbreaking medical discoveries with the aims of developing functional tissues for cardiac regeneration as well as in vitro screening assays. However, the ability to create high-fidelity models of heart tissue has proven difficult. The heart's extracellular matrix (ECM) is a complex structure consisting of both biochemical and biomechanical signals ranging from the micro- to the nanometer scale(2). Local mechanical loading conditions and cell-ECM interactions have recently been recognized as vital components in cardiac tissue engineering(3-5). A large portion of the cardiac ECM is composed of aligned collagen fibers with nano-scale diameters that significantly influences tissue architecture and electromechanical coupling(2). Unfortunately, few methods have been able to mimic the organization of ECM fibers down to the nanometer scale. Recent advancements in nanofabrication techniques, however, have enabled the design and fabrication of scalable scaffolds that mimic the in vivo structural and substrate stiffness cues of the ECM in the heart(6-9). Here we present the development of two reproducible, cost-effective, and scalable nanopatterning processes for the functional alignment of cardiac cells using the biocompatible polymer poly(lactide-co-glycolide) (PLGA)(8) and a polyurethane (PU) based polymer. These anisotropically nanofabricated substrata (ANFS) mimic the underlying ECM of well-organized, aligned tissues and can be used to investigate the role of nanotopography on cell morphology and function(10-14). Using a nanopatterned (NP) silicon master as a template, a polyurethane acrylate (PUA) mold is fabricated. This PUA mold is then used to pattern the PU or PLGA hydrogel via UV-assisted or solvent-mediated capillary force lithography (CFL), respectively(15,16). Briefly, PU or PLGA pre-polymer is drop dispensed onto a glass coverslip

  1. Capillary Force Lithography for Cardiac Tissue Engineering

    PubMed Central

    Macadangdang, Jesse; Lee, Hyun Jung; Carson, Daniel; Jiao, Alex; Fugate, James; Pabon, Lil; Regnier, Michael; Murry, Charles; Kim, Deok-Ho

    2014-01-01

    Cardiovascular disease remains the leading cause of death worldwide1. Cardiac tissue engineering holds much promise to deliver groundbreaking medical discoveries with the aims of developing functional tissues for cardiac regeneration as well as in vitro screening assays. However, the ability to create high-fidelity models of heart tissue has proven difficult. The heart’s extracellular matrix (ECM) is a complex structure consisting of both biochemical and biomechanical signals ranging from the micro- to the nanometer scale2. Local mechanical loading conditions and cell-ECM interactions have recently been recognized as vital components in cardiac tissue engineering3-5. A large portion of the cardiac ECM is composed of aligned collagen fibers with nano-scale diameters that significantly influences tissue architecture and electromechanical coupling2. Unfortunately, few methods have been able to mimic the organization of ECM fibers down to the nanometer scale. Recent advancements in nanofabrication techniques, however, have enabled the design and fabrication of scalable scaffolds that mimic the in vivo structural and substrate stiffness cues of the ECM in the heart6-9. Here we present the development of two reproducible, cost-effective, and scalable nanopatterning processes for the functional alignment of cardiac cells using the biocompatible polymer poly(lactide-co-glycolide) (PLGA)8 and a polyurethane (PU) based polymer. These anisotropically nanofabricated substrata (ANFS) mimic the underlying ECM of well-organized, aligned tissues and can be used to investigate the role of nanotopography on cell morphology and function10-14. Using a nanopatterned (NP) silicon master as a template, a polyurethane acrylate (PUA) mold is fabricated. This PUA mold is then used to pattern the PU or PLGA hydrogel via UV-assisted or solvent-mediated capillary force lithography (CFL), respectively15,16. Briefly, PU or PLGA pre-polymer is drop dispensed onto a glass coverslip and the PUA

  2. On the spectral quality of scanner illumination with LEDs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cui, Chengwu

    2013-01-01

    Document scanner illumination has evolved along with general illumination technologies. LEDs have become more and more popular as the illumination sources for document scanning. LED technologies provide a wide range of choices both in terms of structural design and spectral compositions. In this report, we examine some popular LED technologies used for document scanner. We evaluate the color rendering performance of scanner models with different illumination technologies by examining their rendering of the Macbeth ColorChecker™ in sRGB. We found that more phosphors in phosphor conversion types of white LEDs may not be necessarily advantageous in terms of scanner color rendering performance. Also CIS type of scanner may be sensitive to the peak wavelength shift and can be particularly problematic when the peaks are out of certain range.

  3. Ultra-Miniature Lidar Scanner for Launch Range Data Collection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Geng, Jason

    2012-01-01

    The most critical component in lidar is its laser scanner, which delivers pulsed or CW laser to target with desirable field of view (FOV). Most existing lidars use a rotating or oscillating mirror for scanning, resulting in several drawbacks. A lidar scanning technology was developed that could achieve very high scanning speed, with an ultra-miniature size and much lighter weight. This technology promises at least a 10x performance improvement in these areas over existing lidar scanners. Features of the proposed ultra-miniature lidar scanner include the ability to make the entire scanner <2 mm in diameter; very high scanning speed (e.g. 5 - 20 kHz, in contrast to several hundred Hz in existing scanners); structure design to meet stringent requirements on size, weight, power, and compactness for various applications; and the scanning speed and FOV can be altered for obtaining high image resolutions of targeted areas and for diversified uses.

  4. Comparison study for sub-0.13-μm lithography between ArF and KrF lithography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Seok-Kyun; Kim, YoungSik; Kim, Jin-Soo; Bok, Cheol-Kyu; Ham, Young-Mog; Baik, Ki-Ho

    2000-07-01

    In this paper we investigated the feasibility of printing sub-0.13 micrometers device patterns with ArF and KrF lithography by using experiment and simulation. To do this we evaluated various cell structures with different sizes from 0.26 micrometers to 0.20 micrometers pitch. In experiment 0.60NA ArF and 0.70NA KrF exposure tools, commercial and in house resists and bottom anti-reflective coating (BARC) materials are used. To predict and compare with experimental data we also used our developed simulation tool HOST base don diffused aerial iamge model. We found that ArF lithography performance is a little bit better than KrF and therefore 0.70NA KrF lithography can be used up to 0.12 micrometers design rule device and 0.60NA ArF lithography can be used up to 0.11 micrometers . But to get more than 10 percent expose latitude, 0.13 micrometers with KrF and 0.12 micrometers with ArF are the minimum design rule size. However to obtain process margin we had to use extreme off-axis illumination (OAI) which results in large isolated- dense bias and poor linearity including isolated pattern. Using higher NA can reduce ID bias and mask error factor. For contact hole it is more effective to use KrF lithography because resist thermal flow process can be used to shrink C/H size. Our developed ArF resist and BARC shows good performance and we can reduce k1 value up to 0.34. Through this study we verified again that ArF lithography can be applied for sub-0.13 micrometers device through sub-0.10 micrometers with high contrast resist and 0.75NA exposure tool.

  5. A PC-based multispectral scanner data evaluation workstation: Application to Daedalus scanners

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jedlovec, Gary J.; James, Mark W.; Smith, Matthew R.; Atkinson, Robert J.

    1991-01-01

    In late 1989, a personal computer (PC)-based data evaluation workstation was developed to support post flight processing of Multispectral Atmospheric Mapping Sensor (MAMS) data. The MAMS Quick View System (QVS) is an image analysis and display system designed to provide the capability to evaluate Daedalus scanner data immediately after an aircraft flight. Even in its original form, the QVS offered the portability of a personal computer with the advanced analysis and display features of a mainframe image analysis system. It was recognized, however, that the original QVS had its limitations, both in speed and processing of MAMS data. Recent efforts are presented that focus on overcoming earlier limitations and adapting the system to a new data tape structure. In doing so, the enhanced Quick View System (QVS2) will accommodate data from any of the four spectrometers used with the Daedalus scanner on the NASA ER2 platform. The QVS2 is designed around the AST 486/33 MHz CPU personal computer and comes with 10 EISA expansion slots, keyboard, and 4.0 mbytes of memory. Specialized PC-McIDAS software provides the main image analysis and display capability for the system. Image analysis and display of the digital scanner data is accomplished with PC-McIDAS software.

  6. Color accuracy and reproducibility in whole slide imaging scanners

    PubMed Central

    Shrestha, Prarthana; Hulsken, Bas

    2014-01-01

    Abstract We propose a workflow for color reproduction in whole slide imaging (WSI) scanners, such that the colors in the scanned images match to the actual slide color and the inter-scanner variation is minimum. We describe a new method of preparation and verification of the color phantom slide, consisting of a standard IT8-target transmissive film, which is used in color calibrating and profiling the WSI scanner. We explore several International Color Consortium (ICC) compliant techniques in color calibration/profiling and rendering intents for translating the scanner specific colors to the standard display (sRGB) color space. Based on the quality of the color reproduction in histopathology slides, we propose the matrix-based calibration/profiling and absolute colorimetric rendering approach. The main advantage of the proposed workflow is that it is compliant to the ICC standard, applicable to color management systems in different platforms, and involves no external color measurement devices. We quantify color difference using the CIE-DeltaE2000 metric, where DeltaE values below 1 are considered imperceptible. Our evaluation on 14 phantom slides, manufactured according to the proposed method, shows an average inter-slide color difference below 1 DeltaE. The proposed workflow is implemented and evaluated in 35 WSI scanners developed at Philips, called the Ultra Fast Scanners (UFS). The color accuracy, measured as DeltaE between the scanner reproduced colors and the reference colorimetric values of the phantom patches, is improved on average to 3.5 DeltaE in calibrated scanners from 10 DeltaE in uncalibrated scanners. The average inter-scanner color difference is found to be 1.2 DeltaE. The improvement in color performance upon using the proposed method is apparent with the visual color quality of the tissue scans. PMID:26158041

  7. Design Optimization of a TOF, Breast PET Scanner

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Eunsin; Werner, Matthew E.; Karp, Joel S.; Surti, Suleman

    2013-01-01

    A dedicated breast positron emission tomography (PET) scanner with limited angle geometry can provide flexibility in detector placement around the patient as well as the ability to combine it with other imaging modalities. A primary challenge of a stationary limited angle scanner is the reduced image quality due to artifacts present in the reconstructed image leading to a loss in quantitative information. Previously it has been shown that using time-of-flight (TOF) information in image reconstruction can help reduce these image artifacts arising due to missing angular projections. Our goal in this work is to optimize the TOF, breast scanner design by performing studies for estimating image uniformity and lesion activity uptake as a function of system timing resolution, scanner angular coverage and shape. Our results show that (i) 1.5 × 1.5 × 15 mm3 lutetium oxy-orthosilicate (LSO) crystals provide a high spatial resolution and system sensitivity relative to clinical scanners, (ii) 2/3 angular coverage scanner design with TOF timing resolution less than 600 ps is appropriate for providing a tomographic image with fewer artifacts and good lesion uptake estimation relative to other partial ring designs studied in this work, (iii) a flat scanner design with 2/3 angular coverage is affected more by larger parallax error than a curved scanner geometry with the same angular coverage, but provides more uniform lesion contrast estimate over the imaging field-of-view (FOV), (iv) 2/3 angular coverage, flat, 300 ps TOF scanner design (for short, practical scan times of ≤ 5 mins per breast) provides similar precision of contrast recovery coefficient (CRC) values to a full curved, non-TOF scanner, and (v) employing depth-of-interaction (DOI) measuring detector and/or implementing resolution modeling (RM) in image reconstruction lead to improved and more uniform spatial resolution and lesion contrast over the whole FOV. PMID:24078744

  8. Waveguide effect in high-NA EUV lithography: The key to extending EUV lithography to the 4-nm node

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yeung, Michael; Barouch, Eytan; Oh, Hye-Keun

    2015-06-01

    One of the main concerns about EUV lithography is whether or not it can be extended to very high numerical aperture. In this paper, rigorous electromagnetic simulation is first used to show that there is an interesting waveguide effect occurring in the 4-nm feature size regime. An exact mathematical analysis is then presented to explain the effect observed in the simulation. This waveguide effect is applied to simulate the printing of 4-nm lines and spaces with excellent aerial-image contrast and peak intensity. The feasibility of EUV lithography for printing logic circuits containing general two-dimensional patterns with 4-nm feature size is also demonstrated.

  9. Mask characterization for critical dimension uniformity budget breakdown in advanced extreme ultraviolet lithography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nikolsky, Peter; Strolenberg, Chris; Nielsen, Rasmus; Nooitgedacht, Tjitte; Davydova, Natalia; Yang, Greg; Lee, Shawn; Park, Chang-Min; Kim, Insung; Yeo, Jeong-Ho

    2013-04-01

    As the International Technology Roadmap for Semiconductors critical dimension uniformity (CDU) specification shrinks, semiconductor companies need to maintain a high yield of good wafers per day and high performance (and hence market value) of finished products. This cannot be achieved without continuous analysis and improvement of on-product CDU as one of the main drivers for process control and optimization with better understanding of main contributors from the litho cluster: mask, process, metrology and scanner. We will demonstrate a study of mask CDU characterization and its impact on CDU Budget Breakdown (CDU BB) performed for advanced extreme ultraviolet (EUV) lithography with 1D (dense lines) and 2D (dense contacts) feature cases. We will show that this CDU contributor is one of the main differentiators between well-known ArFi and new EUV CDU budgeting principles. We found that reticle contribution to intrafield CDU should be characterized in a specific way: mask absorber thickness fingerprints play a role comparable with reticle CDU in the total reticle part of the CDU budget. Wafer CD fingerprints, introduced by this contributor, may or may not compensate variations of mask CDs and hence influence on total mask impact on intrafield CDU at the wafer level. This will be shown on 1D and 2D feature examples. Mask stack reflectivity variations should also be taken into account: these fingerprints have visible impact on intrafield CDs at the wafer level and should be considered as another contributor to the reticle part of EUV CDU budget. We also observed mask error enhancement factor (MEEF) through field fingerprints in the studied EUV cases. Variations of MEEF may play a role towards the total intrafield CDU and may need to be taken into account for EUV lithography. We characterized MEEF-through-field for the reviewed features, with results herein, but further analysis of this phenomenon is required. This comprehensive approach to quantifying the mask part of

  10. Biologically inspired omniphobic surfaces by reverse imprint lithography.

    PubMed

    Hensel, René; Finn, Andreas; Helbig, Ralf; Braun, Hans-Georg; Neinhuis, Christoph; Fischer, Wolf-Joachim; Werner, Carsten

    2014-04-01

    Springtail skin morphology is translated into robust omniphobic polymer membranes by reverse imprint lithography. The combination of overhanging cross-sections and their arrangement in a self-supporting comblike pattern are crucial for mechanically stable coatings that can be even applied to curved surfaces. PMID:24375518

  11. Correcting lithography hot spots during physical-design implementation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luk-Pat, Gerard T.; Miloslavsky, Alexander; Ikeuchi, Atsuhiko; Suzuki, Hiroaki; Kyoh, Suigen; Izuha, Kyoko; Tseng, Frank; Wen, Linni

    2006-10-01

    As the technology node shrinks, printed-wafer shapes show progressively less similarity to the design-layout shapes, even with optical proximity correction (OPC). Design tools have a restricted ability to address this shape infidelity. Their understanding of lithography effects is limited, taking the form of design rules that try to prevent "Hot Spots" - locations that demonstrate wafer-printing problems. These design rules are becoming increasingly complex and therefore less useful in addressing the lithography challenges. Therefore, design tools that have a better understanding of lithography are becoming a necessity for technology nodes of 65 nm and below. The general goal of this work is to correct lithography Hot Spots during physical-design implementation. The specific goal is to automatically fix a majority of the Hot Spots in the Metal 2 layers and above, with a run time on the order of a few hours per layer. Three steps were taken to achieve this goal. First, Hot Spot detection was made faster by using rule-based detection. Second, Hot Spot correction was automated by using rule-based correction. Third, convergence of corrections was avoided by performing correction locally, which means that correcting one Hot Spot was very unlikely to create new Hot Spots.

  12. Matrix-assisted polymer pen lithography induced Staudinger Ligation.

    PubMed

    Bian, Shudan; Schesing, Kevin B; Braunschweig, Adam B

    2012-05-21

    The Staudinger Ligation has been combined with Polymer Pen Lithography to create patterns of fluorescent and redox-active inks with 1-micrometer scale feature diameters over centimeter-scale areas. This report presents a straightforward strategy to expand the scope of organic reactions employed in surface science. PMID:22509494

  13. Beyond EUV lithography: a comparative study of efficient photoresists' performance

    PubMed Central

    Mojarad, Nassir; Gobrecht, Jens; Ekinci, Yasin

    2015-01-01

    Extreme ultraviolet (EUV) lithography at 13.5 nm is the main candidate for patterning integrated circuits and reaching sub-10-nm resolution within the next decade. Should photon-based lithography still be used for patterning smaller feature sizes, beyond EUV (BEUV) lithography at 6.x nm wavelength is an option that could potentially meet the rigid demands of the semiconductor industry. We demonstrate simultaneous characterization of the resolution, line-edge roughness, and sensitivity of distinct photoresists at BEUV and compare their properties when exposed to EUV under the same conditions. By using interference lithography at these wavelengths, we show the possibility for patterning beyond 22 nm resolution and characterize the impact of using higher energy photons on the line-edge roughness and exposure latitude. We observe high sensitivity of the photoresist performance on its chemical content and compare their overall performance using the Z-parameter criterion. Interestingly, inorganic photoresists have much better performance at BEUV, while organic chemically-amplified photoresists would need serious adaptations for being used at such wavelength. Our results have immediate implications for deeper understanding of the radiation chemistry of novel photoresists at the EUV and soft X-ray spectra. PMID:25783209

  14. Beyond EUV lithography: a comparative study of efficient photoresists' performance.

    PubMed

    Mojarad, Nassir; Gobrecht, Jens; Ekinci, Yasin

    2015-01-01

    Extreme ultraviolet (EUV) lithography at 13.5 nm is the main candidate for patterning integrated circuits and reaching sub-10-nm resolution within the next decade. Should photon-based lithography still be used for patterning smaller feature sizes, beyond EUV (BEUV) lithography at 6.x nm wavelength is an option that could potentially meet the rigid demands of the semiconductor industry. We demonstrate simultaneous characterization of the resolution, line-edge roughness, and sensitivity of distinct photoresists at BEUV and compare their properties when exposed to EUV under the same conditions. By using interference lithography at these wavelengths, we show the possibility for patterning beyond 22 nm resolution and characterize the impact of using higher energy photons on the line-edge roughness and exposure latitude. We observe high sensitivity of the photoresist performance on its chemical content and compare their overall performance using the Z-parameter criterion. Interestingly, inorganic photoresists have much better performance at BEUV, while organic chemically-amplified photoresists would need serious adaptations for being used at such wavelength. Our results have immediate implications for deeper understanding of the radiation chemistry of novel photoresists at the EUV and soft X-ray spectra. PMID:25783209

  15. Condenser for extreme-UV lithography with discharge source

    DOEpatents

    Sweatt, William C.; Kubiak, Glenn D.

    2001-01-01

    Condenser system, for use with a ringfield camera in projection lithography, employs quasi grazing-incidence collector mirrors that are coated with a suitable reflective metal such as ruthenium to collect radiation from a discharge source to minimize the effect of contaminant accumulation on the collecting mirrors.

  16. Diffractive element in extreme-UV lithography condenser

    DOEpatents

    Sweatt, William C.; Ray-Chaudhurl, Avijit K.

    2000-01-01

    Condensers having a mirror with a diffraction grating in projection lithography using extreme ultra-violet significantly enhances critical dimension control. The diffraction grating has the effect of smoothing the illumination at the camera's entrance pupil with minimum light loss. Modeling suggests that critical dimension control for 100 nm features can be improved from 3 nm to less than about 0.5 nm.

  17. Diffractive element in extreme-UV lithography condenser

    DOEpatents

    Sweatt, William C.; Ray-Chaudhuri, Avijit

    2001-01-01

    Condensers having a mirror with a diffraction grating in projection lithography using extreme ultra-violet significantly enhances critical dimension control. The diffraction grating has the effect of smoothing the illumination at the camera's entrance pupil with minimum light loss. Modeling suggests that critical dimension control for 100 nm features can be improved from 3 nm to less than about 0.5 nm.

  18. Effective decomposition algorithm for self-aligned double patterning lithography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Hongbo; Du, Yuelin; Wong, Martin D. F.; Topaloglu, Rasit; Conley, Will

    2011-04-01

    Self-aligned double patterning (SADP) lithography is a novel lithography technology that has the intrinsic capability to reduce the overlay in the double patterning lithography (DPL). Although SADP is the critical technology to solve the lithography difficulties in sub-32nm 2D design, the questions - how to decompose a layout with reasonable overlay and how to perform a decomposability check - are still two open problems with no published work. In this paper, by formulating the problem into a SAT formation, we can answer the above two questions optimally. This is the first published paper with detailed algorithm to perform the SADP decomposition. In a layout, we can efficiently check whether a layout is decomposable. For a decomposable layout, our algorithm guarantees to find a decomposition solution with reasonable overlay reduction requirement. With little changes on the clauses in the SAT formula, we can address the decomposition problem for both the positive tone process and the negative tone process. Experimental results validate our method, and decomposition results for Nangate Open Cell Library and larger test cases are also provided with competitive run times.

  19. Technology of alignment mark in electron beam lithography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Min; Xu, Tang; Chen, Baoqin; Niu, Jiebin

    2014-08-01

    Electron beam direct wring lithography has been an indispensable approach by which all sorts of novel nano-scale devices include many kinds optical devices can be fabricated. Alignment accuracy is a key factor especially to those devices which need multi-level lithography. In addition to electron beam lithography system itself the quality of alignment mark directly influences alignment accuracy. This paper introduces fundamental of alignment mark detection and discusses some techniques of alignment mark fabrication along with considerations for obtaining highly accurate alignment taking JBX5000LS and JBX6300FS e-beam lithography systems for example. The fundamental of alignment mark detection is expounded first. Many kinds of factors which can impact on the quality of alignment mark are analyzed including mark materials, depth of mark groove and influence of multi-channel process. It has been proved from experiments that material used as metal mark with higher average atomic number is better beneficial for getting high alignment accuracy. Depth of mark groove is required to 1.5~5 μm on our experience. The more process steps alignment mark must pass through, the more probability of being damaged there will be. So the compatibility of alignment mark fabrication with the whole device process and the protection of alignment mark are both need to be considered in advance.

  20. Solid state laser driver for Extreme Ultraviolet Lithography. Revision 1

    SciTech Connect

    Zapata, L.E.; Honig, J.; Reichert, P.; Hackel, L.A.

    1994-05-01

    We describe the design and initial performance of a Nd:YAG laser master oscillator/phase conjugated power amplifier as a driver for extreme ultraviolet lithography. The design provides 0.5 to 1 joule per pulse with about 5 ns pulse width and excellent beam quality up through 1.5 kHz repetition frequency.

  1. Substrate conformal imprint lithography for nanophotonics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Verschuuren, M. A.

    2010-03-01

    The field of nano-photonics studies the interaction and control of light with dielectric, semiconductor and metal structures which are comparable in size or smaller than the vacuum wavelength of light. In this thesis we present Substrate Conformal Imprint Lithography (SCIL) as a novel wafer-scale nanoimprint method with nano-scale resolution which combines the resolution and accuracy of rigid stamps with the flexibility of soft stamp methods. Chapter two describes the SCIL soft nanoimprint process and introduces a novel silica sol-gel imprint resist. A new soft rubber stamp material is described which enables sub-10 nm resolution. We demonstrate that SCIL imprinted patterns have on average less than 0.1 nm distortion and demonstrate sub-50 nm overlay alignment. Chapter 3 demonstrates 30 nm dense structures and features with aspect ratios from 1/640 up to 5. Imprinted sol-gel patterns can be transferred into underlying materials while maintaining sub-10 nm resolution. Two methods are demonstrated to pattern noble metals in particle arrays and sub-wavelength hole arrays. SCIL is applied to produce photonic crystal power InGaN LEDs which exhibit strong modification of the emission pattern. Chapter 4 demonstrates a relatively simple route towards 3D woodpile type photonic crystals. We show a four layer woodpile type structure with 70 nm features on a 240 nm pitch, which is temperature stable up to 1000 C. Chapter 5 demonstrates a novel fabrication route to large area nano hole arrays, which are interesting as angle independent color filters and for sensor applications. A solid state index matched hole array exhibits SPP mediated super resonant transmission. Chapter 6 treats single mode polarization stabilized Vertical Cavity Surface Emitting Lasers (VCSELs). The lasers produced by SCIL exhibit equal performance as devices produced by e-beam. VCSELs with SCIL imprinted sub-wavelength gratings increase the laser efficiency by 29 % compared to conventional gratings

  2. Protein assay structured on paper by using lithography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilhelm, E.; Nargang, T. M.; Al Bitar, W.; Waterkotte, B.; Rapp, B. E.

    2015-03-01

    There are two main challenges in producing a robust, paper-based analytical device. The first one is to create a hydrophobic barrier which unlike the commonly used wax barriers does not break if the paper is bent. The second one is the creation of the (bio-)specific sensing layer. For this proteins have to be immobilized without diminishing their activity. We solve both problems using light-based fabrication methods that enable fast, efficient manufacturing of paper-based analytical devices. The first technique relies on silanization by which we create a flexible hydrophobic barrier made of dimethoxydimethylsilane. The second technique demonstrated within this paper uses photobleaching to immobilize proteins by means of maskless projection lithography. Both techniques have been tested on a classical lithography setup using printed toner masks and on a lithography system for maskless lithography. Using these setups we could demonstrate that the proposed manufacturing techniques can be carried out at low costs. The resolution of the paper-based analytical devices obtained with static masks was lower due to the lower mask resolution. Better results were obtained using advanced lithography equipment. By doing so we demonstrated, that our technique enables fabrication of effective hydrophobic boundary layers with a thickness of only 342 μm. Furthermore we showed that flourescine-5-biotin can be immobilized on the non-structured paper and be employed for the detection of streptavidinalkaline phosphatase. By carrying out this assay on a paper-based analytical device which had been structured using the silanization technique we proofed biological compatibility of the suggested patterning technique.

  3. Controlling linewidth roughness in step and flash imprint lithography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmid, Gerard M.; Khusnatdinov, Niyaz; Brooks, Cynthia B.; LaBrake, Dwayne; Thompson, Ecron; Resnick, Douglas J.; Owens, Jordan; Ford, Arnie; Sasaki, Shiho; Toyama, Nobuhito; Kurihara, Masaaki; Hayashi, Naoya; Kobayashi, Hideo; Sato, Takashi; Nagarekawa, Osamu; Hart, Mark W.; Gopalakrishnan, Kailash; Shenoy, Rohit; Jih, Ron; Zhang, Ying; Sikorski, Edmund; Rothwell, Mary Beth; Yoshitake, Shusuke; Sunaoshi, Hitoshi; Yasui, Kenichi

    2008-04-01

    Despite the remarkable progress made in extending optical lithography to deep sub-wavelength imaging, the limit for the technology seems imminent. At 22nm half pitch design rules, neither very high NA tools (NA 1.6), nor techniques such as double patterning are likely to be sufficient. One of the key challenges in patterning features with these dimensions is the ability to minimize feature roughness while maintaining reasonable process throughput. This limitation is particularly challenging for electron and photon based NGL technologies, where fast chemically amplified resists are used to define the patterned images. Control of linewidth roughness (LWR) is critical, since it adversely affects device speed and timing in CMOS circuits. Imprint lithography has been included on the ITRS Lithography Roadmap at the 32 and 22 nm nodes. This technology has been shown to be an effective method for replication of nanometer-scale structures from a template (imprint mask). As a high fidelity replication process, the resolution of imprint lithography is determined by the ability to create a master template having the required dimensions. Although the imprint process itself adds no additional linewidth roughness to the patterning process, the burden of minimizing LWR falls to the template fabrication process. Non chemically amplified resists, such as ZEP520A, are not nearly as sensitive but have excellent resolution and can produce features with very low LWR. The purpose of this paper is to characterize LWR for the entire imprint lithography process, from template fabrication to the final patterned substrate. Three experiments were performed documenting LWR in the template, imprint, and after pattern transfer. On average, LWR was extremely low (less than 3nm, 3σ), and independent of the processing step and feature size.

  4. Linewidth roughness characterization in step and flash imprint lithography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmid, Gerard M.; Khusnatdinov, Niyaz; Brooks, Cynthia B.; LaBrake, Dwayne; Thompson, Ecron; Resnick, Douglas J.

    2008-05-01

    Despite the remarkable progress made in extending optical lithography to deep sub-wavelength imaging, the limit for the technology seems imminent. At 22nm half pitch design rules, neither very high NA tools (NA 1.6), nor techniques such as double patterning are likely to be sufficient. One of the key challenges in patterning features with these dimensions is the ability to minimize feature roughness while maintaining reasonable process throughput. This limitation is particularly challenging for electron and photon based NGL technologies, where fast chemically amplified resists are used to define the patterned images. Control of linewidth roughness (LWR) is critical, since it adversely affects device speed and timing in CMOS circuits. Imprint lithography has been included on the ITRS Lithography Roadmap at the 32 and 22 nm nodes. This technology has been shown to be an effective method for replication of nanometer-scale structures from a template (imprint mask). As a high fidelity replication process, the resolution of imprint lithography is determined by the ability to create a master template having the required dimensions. Although the imprint process itself adds no additional linewidth roughness to the patterning process, the burden of minimizing LWR falls to the template fabrication process. Non chemically amplified resists, such as ZEP520A, are not nearly as sensitive but have excellent resolution and can produce features with very low LWR. The purpose of this paper is to characterize LWR for the entire imprint lithography process, from template fabrication to the final patterned substrate. Three experiments were performed documenting LWR in the template, imprint, and after pattern transfer. On average, LWR was extremely low (less than 3nm, 3σ), and independent of the processing step and feature size.

  5. Handheld laser scanner automatic registration based on random coding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, Lei; Yu, Chun-ping; Wang, Li

    2011-06-01

    Current research on Laser Scanner often focuses mainly on the static measurement. Little use has been made of dynamic measurement, that are appropriate for more problems and situations. In particular, traditional Laser Scanner must Keep stable to scan and measure coordinate transformation parameters between different station. In order to make the scanning measurement intelligently and rapidly, in this paper ,we developed a new registration algorithm for handleheld laser scanner based on the positon of target, which realize the dynamic measurement of handheld laser scanner without any more complex work. the double camera on laser scanner can take photograph of the artificial target points to get the three-dimensional coordinates, this points is designed by random coding. And then, a set of matched points is found from control points to realize the orientation of scanner by the least-square common points transformation. After that the double camera can directly measure the laser point cloud in the surface of object and get the point cloud data in an unified coordinate system. There are three major contributions in the paper. Firstly, a laser scanner based on binocular vision is designed with double camera and one laser head. By those, the real-time orientation of laser scanner is realized and the efficiency is improved. Secondly, the coding marker is introduced to solve the data matching, a random coding method is proposed. Compared with other coding methods,the marker with this method is simple to match and can avoid the shading for the object. Finally, a recognition method of coding maker is proposed, with the use of the distance recognition, it is more efficient. The method present here can be used widely in any measurement from small to huge obiect, such as vehicle, airplane which strengthen its intelligence and efficiency. The results of experiments and theory analzing demonstrate that proposed method could realize the dynamic measurement of handheld laser

  6. Design study for Thermal Infrared Multispectral Scanner (TIMS)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stanich, C. G.; Osterwisch, F. G.; Szeles, D. M.; Houtman, W. H.

    1981-01-01

    The feasibility of dividing the 8-12 micrometer thermal infrared wavelength region into six spectral bands by an airborne line scanner system was investigated. By combining an existing scanner design with a 6 band spectrometer, a system for the remote sensing of Earth resources was developed. The elements in the spectrometer include an off axis reflective collimator, a reflective diffraction grating, a triplet germanium imaging lens, a photoconductive mercury cadmium telluride sensor array, and the mechanical assembly to hold these parts and maintain their optical alignment across a broad temperature range. The existing scanner design was modified to accept the new spectrometer and two field filling thermal reference sources.

  7. PET/CT scanner instrumentation, challenges, and solutions.

    PubMed

    Alessio, Adam M; Kinahan, Paul E; Cheng, Phillip M; Vesselle, Hubert; Karp, Joel S

    2004-11-01

    PET/CT scanners offer a hardware solution for aligning and viewing functional and anatomic images that is immune to many of the errors in strictly software registration techniques. Moreover, PET attenuation-corrected emission scans benefit from the use of the onboard CT for fast, low-noise attenuation correction. Along with the significant improved localization and reduced acquisition time, PET/CT scanners also introduce new instrumentation challenges ranging from patient movement to quantitative attenuation correction. This article provides an overview of current PET/CT scanner technology, a discussion of challenges faced by these systems, and pending solutions.

  8. Focal plane scanner with reciprocating spatial window

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mao, Chengye (Inventor)

    2000-01-01

    A focal plane scanner having a front objective lens, a spatial window for selectively passing a portion of the image therethrough, and a CCD array for receiving the passed portion of the image. All embodiments have a common feature whereby the spatial window and CCD array are mounted for simultaneous relative reciprocating movement with respect to the front objective lens, and the spatial window is mounted within the focal plane of the front objective. In a first embodiment, the spatial window is a slit and the CCD array is one-dimensional, and successive rows of the image in the focal plane of the front objective lens are passed to the CCD array by an image relay lens interposed between the slit and the CCD array. In a second embodiment, the spatial window is a slit, the CCD array is two-dimensional, and a prism-grating-prism optical spectrometer is interposed between the slit and the CCD array so as to cause the scanned row to be split into a plurality of spectral separations onto the CCD array. In a third embodiment, the CCD array is two-dimensional and the spatial window is a rectangular linear variable filter (LVF) window, so as to cause the scanned rows impinging on the LVF to be bandpass filtered into spectral components onto the CCD array through an image relay lens interposed between the LVF and the CCD array.

  9. LANDSAT-4 horizon scanner performance evaluation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bilanow, S.; Chen, L. C.; Davis, W. M.; Stanley, J. P.

    1984-01-01

    Representative data spans covering a little more than a year since the LANDSAT-4 launch were analyzed to evaluate the flight performance of the satellite's horizon scanner. High frequency noise was filtered out by 128-point averaging. The effects of Earth oblateness and spacecraft altitude variations are modeled, and residual systematic errors are analyzed. A model for the predicted radiance effects is compared with the flight data and deficiencies in the radiance effects modeling are noted. Correction coefficients are provided for a finite Fourier series representation of the systematic errors in the data. Analysis of the seasonal dependence of the coefficients indicates the effects of some early mission problems with the reference attitudes which were computed by the onboard computer using star trackers and gyro data. The effects of sun and moon interference, unexplained anomalies in the data, and sensor noise characteristics and their power spectrum are described. The variability of full orbit data averages is shown. Plots of the sensor data for all the available data spans are included.

  10. [Innovation and Future Technologies for PET Scanners].

    PubMed

    Yamaya, Taiga

    2015-01-01

    Positron emission tomography (PET) plays important roles in cancer diagnosis, neuroimaging and molecular imaging research; but potential points remain for which big improvements could be made, including spatial resolution, sensitivity and manufacturing costs. Higher spatial resolution is essential to enable earlier diagnosis, and improved sensitivity results in reduced radiation exposure and shortened measurement time. Therefore, research on next generation PET technologies remains a hot topic worldwide. In this paper, innovation and future technologies for the next generation PET scanners, such as time-of-flight measurement and simultaneous PET/MRI measurement, are described. Among them, depth-of-interaction (DOI) measurement in the radiation sensor will be a key technology to get any significant improvement in sensitivity while maintaining high spatial resolution. DOI measurement also has a potential to expand PET application fields because it allows for more flexible detector arrangement. As an example, the world's first, open-type PET geometry "OpenPET", which is expected to lead to PET imaging during treatment, is under development. The DOI detector itself continues to evolve with the help of recently developed semiconductor photodetectors, often referred to as silicon photomultipliers. PMID:26753392

  11. Meteorological waves (by Ocean Color Scanner Data)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Evdoshenko, M. A.

    2014-10-01

    Data of normalized water leaving radiance at a wavelength 859 nm Lwn(859) of 250-m spatial resolution obtained from Moderate Ocean Color Scanners (MODIS) installed on Aqua and Terra satellites were used to study meteorological waves. These waves are caused by atmospheric internal gravity waves at the expense of a change of atmospheric pressure impacting the sea surface and bringing a change in its level; they are observable everywhere in the ocean. Examples of meteorological waves were considered for the eastern part of the Black Sea, where they appeared as stripes of alternate brightness on Lwn(859) images. It is shown that meteorological waves at one and the same place can be totally generated by atmospheric waves spreading at different heights of the lower troposphere. The 3D characteristics of meteorological waves were evaluated including the direction of wave propagation, crest length reaching more than one hundred kilometers, wavelength of several tens centimeters, and wave amplitude of several tens of centimeters. For conditions of intermittent cloudiness, imposition in a difference mode of the level L1b radiance image with the signature of atmospheric waves in a cloud and of the level L2 water leaving the radiance image with the signature of meteorological waves enabled us to examine the phase structure of waves and to reveal the existence of resonance.

  12. Determination of noise equivalent reflectance for a multispectral scanner: A scanner sensitivity study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gibbons, D. E.; Richard, R. R.

    1979-01-01

    The methods used to calculate the sensitivity parameter noise equivalent reflectance of a remote-sensing scanner are explored, and the results are compared with values measured over calibrated test sites. Data were acquired on four occasions covering a span of 4 years and providing various atmospheric conditions. One of the calculated values was based on assumed atmospheric conditions, whereas two others were based on atmospheric models. Results indicate that the assumed atmospheric conditions provide useful answers adequate for many purposes. A nomograph was developed to indicate sensitivity variations due to geographic location, time of day, and season.

  13. A variable-resolution rotate-only computed tomography scanner.

    PubMed

    Hangartner, T N

    1994-10-01

    The Rotoscan is a computed tomography scanner that combines the advantages of variable geometric resolution and adjustable size of measurement diameter of translate-rotate scanners with the improved speed of rotate-only scanners. Because of the small number of only 26 detectors used for this scanner, a special data collection scheme of multiple rotations with interleaved detector positions was employed. In order to avoid angular data interpolation after reordering of the projections from the fan- to a parallel-beam geometry, the detectors were incrementally moved at a right angle to the centerline of the fan rather than rotated about the source. The measurement time of 40 s for one cross-section is comparable to that of second-generation systems. However, for longer measurement diameters, the measurement time for second-generation systems increases, whereas that of the Rotoscan remains constant.

  14. Scanning properties of a resonant fiber-optic piezoelectric scanner.

    PubMed

    Li, Zhi; Yang, Zhe; Fu, Ling

    2011-12-01

    We develop a resonant fiber-optic scanner using four piezoelectric elements arranged as a square tube, which is efficient to manufacture and drive. Using coupled-field model based on finite element method, scanning properties of the scanner, including vibration mode, resonant frequency, and scanning range, are numerically studied. We also physically measure the effects of geometry sizes and drive signals on the scanning properties, thus providing a foundation for general purpose designs. A scanner adopted in a prototype of imaging system, with a diameter of ~2 mm and driven by a voltage of 10 V (peak to peak), demonstrates the scanning performance by obtaining an image of resolution target bars. The proposed fiber-optic scanner can be applied to micro-endoscopy that requires two-dimensional scanning of fibers. PMID:22225224

  15. Agricultural Applications and Requirements for Thermal Infrared Scanners

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wiegand, C. L.

    1971-01-01

    Some of the applications of thermal scanner data in agriculture are presented along with illustrations of some of the factors affecting the temperature of plants, soil, and water. Examples of thermal imagery are included.

  16. 21 CFR 892.1300 - Nuclear rectilinear scanner.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ...) Identification. A nuclear rectilinear scanner is a device intended to image the distribution of radionuclides in the body by means of a detector (or detectors) whose position moves in two directions with respect...

  17. Superwide-angle coverage code-multiplexed optical scanner.

    PubMed

    Riza, Nabeel A; Arain, Muzammil A

    2004-05-01

    A superwide-angle coverage code-multiplexed optical scanner is presented that has the potential to provide 4 pi-sr coverage. As a proof-of-concept experiment, an angular scan range of 288 degrees for six randomly distributed beams is demonstrated. The proposed scanner achieves its superwide coverage by exploiting a combination of phase-encoded transmission and reflection holography within an in-line hologram recording-retrieval geometry. The basic scanner unit consists of one phase-only digital mode spatial light modulator for code entry (i.e., beam scan control) and a holographic material from which we obtained what we believe is the first-of-a-kind extremely wide coverage, low component count, high speed (e.g., microsecond domain), and large aperture (e.g., > 1-cm diameter) scanner.

  18. Geometric theory of horizon scanners. [onboard spacecraft for attitude determination

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fang, B. T.

    1975-01-01

    The note presents a general geometrical theory of spacecraft horizon scanners for the purpose of actual attitude determination, as opposed to just attitude stabilization. Analysis is carried out in terms of the scanning angles and three sets of auxiliary axes: the scanner axes, the nonscanning axes, and the orbital axes. Euler angles (yaw, pitch, and roll) transform the orbital axes to the nonscanning axes, and spacecraft attitude is determined directly from the attitude of the nonscanning axes relative to the orbital axes. In most applications the scanning speed is fast, so that it can be assumed that the attitude of the spacecraft does not change during a scan; however, a perturbation analysis is provided for errors committed by neglecting attitude changes. The analysis is valid for all types of scanners; in addition, the case where two scanners with different half-cone angles are used is considered.

  19. Superwide-angle coverage code-multiplexed optical scanner.

    PubMed

    Riza, Nabeel A; Arain, Muzammil A

    2004-05-01

    A superwide-angle coverage code-multiplexed optical scanner is presented that has the potential to provide 4 pi-sr coverage. As a proof-of-concept experiment, an angular scan range of 288 degrees for six randomly distributed beams is demonstrated. The proposed scanner achieves its superwide coverage by exploiting a combination of phase-encoded transmission and reflection holography within an in-line hologram recording-retrieval geometry. The basic scanner unit consists of one phase-only digital mode spatial light modulator for code entry (i.e., beam scan control) and a holographic material from which we obtained what we believe is the first-of-a-kind extremely wide coverage, low component count, high speed (e.g., microsecond domain), and large aperture (e.g., > 1-cm diameter) scanner. PMID:15143655

  20. High-performance horizontal side scanner using holographic technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, Charles C. K.

    1998-06-01

    A new holographic technique has been used to make a compact, accurate and reliable POS scanner. The holo-window technology permits compact POS scanner optical scanning in horizontal plan while maintaining excellent performance in changing the scan direction, equalizing the scan velocity and collecting the signal light. The holo-window design and fabrication in the holographic optical element (HOE) for such a compact POS scanner are described in this paper. Additionally this new horizontal side scanning possesses large depth of field (greater than 10 inches), allows the grocery items to be scanned horizontally thus eliminating the commonly experienced carpal tunnel syndrome (CTS) hand injuries of the checkers. This newly designed POS scanner has been recognized by industry as the standard for the future POS scanning configuration.

  1. Whole-body 3D scanner and scan data report

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Addleman, Stephen R.

    1997-03-01

    With the first whole-body 3D scanner now available the next adventure confronting the user is what to do with all of the data. While the system was built for anthropologists, it has created interest among users from a wide variety of fields. Users with applications in the fields of anthropology, costume design, garment design, entertainment, VR and gaming have a need for the data in formats unique to their fields. Data from the scanner is being converted to solid models for art and design and NURBS for computer graphics applications. Motion capture has made scan data move and dance. The scanner has created a need for advanced application software just as other scanners have in the past.

  2. Fabricating Blazed Diffraction Gratings by X-Ray Lithography

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mouroulis, Pantazis; Hartley, Frank; Wilson, Daniel

    2004-01-01

    Gray-scale x-ray lithography is undergoing development as a technique for fabricating blazed diffraction gratings. As such, gray-scale x-ray lithography now complements such other grating-fabrication techniques as mechanical ruling, holography, ion etching, laser ablation, laser writing, and electron-beam lithography. Each of these techniques offers advantages and disadvantages for implementing specific grating designs; no single one of these techniques can satisfy the design requirements for all applications. Gray-scale x-ray lithography is expected to be advantageous for making gratings on steeper substrates than those that can be made by electron-beam lithography. This technique is not limited to sawtooth groove profiles and flat substrates: various groove profiles can be generated on arbitrarily shaped (including highly curved) substrates with the same ease as sawtooth profiles can be generated on flat substrates. Moreover, the gratings fabricated by this technique can be made free of ghosts (spurious diffraction components attributable to small spurious periodicities in the locations of grooves). The first step in gray-scale x-ray lithography is to conformally coat a substrate with a suitable photoresist. An x-ray mask (see Figure 1) is generated, placed between the substrate and a source of collimated x-rays, and scanned over the substrate so as to create a spatial modulation in the exposure of the photoresist. Development of the exposed photoresist results in a surface corrugation that corresponds to the spatial modulation and that defines the grating surface. The grating pattern is generated by scanning an appropriately shaped x-ray area mask along the substrate. The mask example of Figure 1 would generate a blazed grating profile when scanned in the perpendicular direction at constant speed, assuming the photoresist responds linearly to incident radiation. If the resist response is nonlinear, then the mask shape can be modified to account for the

  3. LANDSAT-4 multispectral scanner (MSS) subsystem radiometric characterization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Alford, W. (Editor); Barker, J. (Editor); Clark, B. P.; Dasgupta, R.

    1983-01-01

    The multispectral band scanner (mass) and its spectral characteristics are described and methods are given for relating video digital levels on computer compatible tapes to radiance into the sensor. Topics covered include prelaunch calibration procedures and postlaunch radiometric processng. Examples of current data resident on the MSS image processing system are included. The MSS on LANDSAT 4 is compared with the scanners on earlier LANDSAT satellites.

  4. Spectra of clinical CT scanners using a portable Compton spectrometer

    SciTech Connect

    Duisterwinkel, H. A.; Abbema, J. K. van; Kawachimaru, R.; Paganini, L.; Graaf, E. R. van der; Brandenburg, S.; Goethem, M. J. van

    2015-04-15

    Purpose: Spectral information of the output of x-ray tubes in (dual source) computer tomography (CT) scanners can be used to improve the conversion of CT numbers to proton stopping power and can be used to advantage in CT scanner quality assurance. The purpose of this study is to design, validate, and apply a compact portable Compton spectrometer that was constructed to accurately measure x-ray spectra of CT scanners. Methods: In the design of the Compton spectrometer, the shielding materials were carefully chosen and positioned to reduce background by x-ray fluorescence from the materials used. The spectrum of Compton scattered x-rays alters from the original source spectrum due to various physical processes. Reconstruction of the original x-ray spectrum from the Compton scattered spectrum is based on Monte Carlo simulations of the processes involved. This reconstruction is validated by comparing directly and indirectly measured spectra of a mobile x-ray tube. The Compton spectrometer is assessed in a clinical setting by measuring x-ray spectra at various tube voltages of three different medical CT scanner x-ray tubes. Results: The directly and indirectly measured spectra are in good agreement (their ratio being 0.99) thereby validating the reconstruction method. The measured spectra of the medical CT scanners are consistent with theoretical spectra and spectra obtained from the x-ray tube manufacturer. Conclusions: A Compton spectrometer has been successfully designed, constructed, validated, and applied in the measurement of x-ray spectra of CT scanners. These measurements show that our compact Compton spectrometer can be rapidly set-up using the alignment lasers of the CT scanner, thereby enabling its use in commissioning, troubleshooting, and, e.g., annual performance check-ups of CT scanners.

  5. 47. View of "dry air inlets" to waveguides entering scanner ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    47. View of "dry air inlets" to waveguides entering scanner building 105. Dried air is generated under pressure by Ingersoll-Rand dehumidified/dessicator and compressor system. View is at entrance from passageway that links into corner of scanner building. - Clear Air Force Station, Ballistic Missile Early Warning System Site II, One mile west of mile marker 293.5 on Parks Highway, 5 miles southwest of Anderson, Anderson, Denali Borough, AK

  6. Reflective electron-beam lithography performance for the 10nm logic node

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Freed, Regina; Gubiotti, Thomas; Sun, Jeff; Cheung, Anthony; Yang, Jason; McCord, Mark; Petric, Paul; Carroll, Allen; Ummethala, Upendra; Hale, Layton; Hench, John; Kojima, Shinichi; Mieher, Walter; Bevis, Chris F.

    2012-11-01

    Maskless electron beam lithography has the potential to extend semiconductor manufacturing to the sub-10 nm technology node. KLA-Tencor is currently developing Reflective Electron Beam Lithography (REBL) for high-volume 10 nm logic (16 nm HP). This paper reviews progress in the development of the REBL system towards its goal of 100 wph throughput for High Volume Lithography (HVL) at the 2X and 1X nm nodes. In this paper we introduce the Digital Pattern Generator (DPG) with integrated CMOS and MEMs lenslets that was manufactured at TSMC and IMEC. For REBL, the DPG is integrated to KLA-Tencor pattern generating software that can be programmed to produce complex, gray-scaled lithography patterns. Additionally, we show printing results for a range of interesting lithography patterns using Time Domain Imaging (TDI). Previously, KLA-Tencor reported on the development of a Reflective Electron Beam Lithography (REBL) tool for maskless lithography at and below the 22 nm technology node1. Since that time, the REBL team and its partners (TSMC, IMEC) have made good progress towards developing the REBL system and Digital Pattern Generator (DPG) for direct write lithography. Traditionally, e-beam direct write lithography has been too slow for most lithography applications. Ebeam direct write lithography has been used for mask writing rather than wafer processing since the maximum blur requirements limit column beam current - which drives e-beam throughput. To print small features and a fine pitch with an e-beam tool requires a sacrifice in processing time unless one significantly increases the total number of beams on a single writing tool. Because of the continued uncertainty with regards to the optical lithography roadmap beyond the 22 nm technology node, the semiconductor equipment industry is in the process of designing and testing e-beam lithography tools with the potential for HVL.

  7. MFP scanner motion characterization using self-printed target

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Minwoong; Bauer, Peter; Wagner, Jerry K.; Allebach, Jan P.

    2015-01-01

    Multifunctional printers (MFP) are products that combine the functions of a printer, scanner, and copier. Our goal is to help customers to be able to easily diagnose scanner or print quality issues with their products by developing an automated diagnostic system embedded in the product. We specifically focus on the characterization of scanner motions, which may be defective due to irregular movements of the scan-head. The novel design of our test page and two-stage diagnostic algorithm are described in this paper. The most challenging issue is to evaluate the scanner performance properly when both printer and scanner units contribute to the motion errors. In the first stage called the uncorrected-print-error-stage, aperiodic and periodic motion behaviors are characterized in both the spatial and frequency domains. Since it is not clear how much of the error is contributed by each unit, the scanned input is statistically analyzed in the second stage called the corrected-print-error-stage. Finally, the described diagnostic algorithms output the estimated scan error and print error separately as RMS values of the displacement of the scan and print lines, respectively, from their nominal positions in the scanner or printer motion direction. We validate our test page design and approaches by ground truth obtained from a high-precision, chrome-on-glass reticle manufactured using semiconductor chip fabrication technologies.

  8. Laboratory and field portable system for calibrating airborne multispectral scanners

    SciTech Connect

    Kuhlow, W.W.

    1981-01-01

    Manufacturers of airborne multispectral scanners suggest procedures for calibration and alignment that are usually awkward and even questionable. For example, the procedures may require: separating the scanner from calibration and alignment sources by 100 feet or more, employing folding mirrors, tampering with the detectors after the procedures are finished, etc. Under the best of conditions such procedures require about three hours yielding questionable confidence in the results; under many conditions, however, procedures commonly take six to eight hours, yielding no satisfactory results. EG and G, Inc. has designed and built a calibration and alignment system for airborne scanners which solves those problems, permitting the procedures to be carried out in about two to three hours. This equipment can be quickly disassembled, transported with the scanner in all but the smallest single engine aircraft, and reassembled in a few hours. The subsystems of this equipment are commonly available from manufacturers of optical and electronic equipment. The other components are easily purchased, or fabricated. The scanner discussed is the Model DS-1260 digital line scanner manufactured by Daedalus Enterprises, Inc. It is a dual-sensor system which is operated in one of two combination of sensors: one spectrometer head (which provides simultaneous coverage in ten visible channels) and one thermal infrared detector, or simply two thermal infrared detectors.

  9. Nanostructure patterning on flexible substrates using electron beam lithography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nagaraj, K. S.; Sangeeth, K.; Hegde, G. M.

    2014-06-01

    Patterning nanostructures on flexible substrates plays a key role in the emerging flexible electronics technology. The flexible electronic devices are inexpensive and can be conformed to any shape. The potential applications for such devices are sensors, displays, solar cells, RFID, high-density biochips, optoelectronics etc. E-beam lithography is established as a powerful tool for nanoscale fabrication, but its applicability on insulating flexible substrates is often limited because of surface charging effects. This paper presents the fabrication of nanostructures on insulating flexible substrates using low energy E-beam lithography along with metallic layers for charge dissipation. Nano Structures are patterned on different substrates of materials such as acetate and PET foils. The fabrication process parameters such as the proximity gap of exposure, the exposure dosage and developing conditions have been optimized for each substrate.

  10. A temperature control algorithm of immersion liquid for immersion lithography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, Junwei; Li, Xiaoping; Lei, Min; Chen, Bing; Wang, Jinchun

    2014-03-01

    Immersion lithography is one of the main technologies used to manufacture integrated circuits with the shortest feature size. In immersion lithography, temperature of immersion liquid is strictly constrained and its allowable range is less than +/-0.01°C at 22°C. To meet this requirement, a temperature control algorithm adopted by the test rig which controls the temperature of the immersion liquid with process cooling water (PCW) via heat exchangers is proposed. By adjusting the flow rate of PCW through the heat exchangers, the control system varies the amount of heat exchanged, and the temperature of the immersion liquid can be properly controlled. The temperature control rig is a multi-disturbed, timevariant, non-linear and time-delayed system and its transfer function varies with the inlet temperature and flow rates of the streams through the heat exchangers. Considering the characteristics of the system, a cascade-connected fuzzy PID feedback algorithm is designed.

  11. Metallic nanodot arrays by stencil lithography for plasmonic biosensing applications.

    PubMed

    Vazquez-Mena, Oscar; Sannomiya, Takumi; Villanueva, Luis G; Voros, Janos; Brugger, Juergen

    2011-02-22

    The fabrication of gold nanodots by stencil lithography and its application for optical biosensing based on localized surface plasmon resonance are presented. Arrays of 50-200 nm wide nanodots with different spacing of 50-300 nm are fabricated without any resist, etching, or lift-off process. The dimensions and morphology of the nanodots were characterized by scanning electron and atomic force microscopy. The fabricated nanodots showed localized surface plasmon resonance in their extinction spectra in the visible range. The resonance wavelength depends on the periodicity and dimensions of the nanodots. Bulk refractive index measurements and model biosensing of streptavidin were successfully performed based on the plasmon resonance shift induced by local refractive index change when biomolecules are adsorbed on the nanodots. These results demonstrate the potential of stencil lithography for the realization of plasmon-based biosensing devices. PMID:21192666

  12. 4-Nitrobenzene Grafted in Porous Silicon: Application to Optical Lithography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tiddia, Mariavitalia; Mula, Guido; Sechi, Elisa; Vacca, Annalisa; Cara, Eleonora; De Leo, Natascia; Fretto, Matteo; Boarino, Luca

    2016-09-01

    In this work, we report a method to process porous silicon to improve its chemical resistance to alkaline solution attacks based on the functionalization of the pore surface by the electrochemical reduction of 4-nitrobenzendiazonium salt. This method provides porous silicon with strong resistance to the etching solutions used in optical lithography and allows the fabrication of tailored metallic contacts on its surface. The samples were studied by chemical, electrochemical, and morphological methods. We demonstrate that the grafted samples show a resistance to harsh alkaline solution more than three orders of magnitude larger than that of pristine porous silicon, being mostly unmodified after about 40 min. The samples maintained open pores after the grafting, making them suitable for further treatments like filling by polymers. Optical lithography was performed on the functionalized samples, and electrochemical characterization results are shown.

  13. XUV free-electron laser-based projection lithography systems

    SciTech Connect

    Newnam, B.E.

    1990-01-01

    Free-electron laser sources, driven by rf-linear accelerators, have the potential to operate in the extreme ultraviolet (XUV) spectral range with more than sufficient average power for high-volume projection lithography. For XUV wavelengths from 100 nm to 4 nm, such sources will enable the resolution limit of optical projection lithography to be extended from 0.25 {mu}m to 0.05{mu}m and with an adequate total depth of focus (1 to 2 {mu}m). Recent developments of a photoinjector of very bright electron beams, high-precision magnetic undulators, and ring-resonator cavities raise our confidence that FEL operation below 100 nm is ready for prototype demonstration. We address the motivation for an XUV FEL source for commercial microcircuit production and its integration into a lithographic system, include reflecting reduction masks, reflecting XUV projection optics and alignment systems, and surface-imaging photoresists. 52 refs., 7 figs.

  14. Controlled Fabrication of Si Nanowires with Nanodots Using Nanosphere Lithography.

    PubMed

    Li, Wei; Wang, Shaolei; He, Sufeng; Hu, Mingyue; Ge, Pengpeng; Wang, Jing; Guo, YanYan

    2016-02-01

    In this paper, we introduce an easy method for fabricating Si nanowires with nanodots using nanosphere lithography. First, a self-assembly ordered single layer of polystyrene nanospheres with a diameter of 220 nm was prepared on Si substrate. Secondly, the polystyrene spheres monolayer was etched by 02 with different time from 10 s to 35 s. After this etching process, the polystyrene nanowires between polystyrene spheres were fabrication. If the etching time was longer than 35 s, there were no polystyrene nanowires. Thereafter, the following etching process with carbon fluoride was performanced. The polystyrene nanowires and nanosphers were worked as masks. Finally, the Si nanowires with nanodots were formed. The size and morphology can be controlled by etching process. This technique for forming nanostructure arrays using nanosphere lithography can be applied in many areas of science and technology.

  15. Rapid soft lithography by bottom-up enhanced capillarity.

    PubMed

    Pisignano, Dario; Di Benedetto, Francesca; Persano, Luana; Gigli, Giuseppe; Cingolani, Roberto

    2004-06-01

    The growing demand for new solutions to pursue the trend of micro- and nanoelectronics predicted by Moore's law is stimulating the development of new high-resolution, low-cost lithographies. Here we demonstrate that several bottom-up approaches can be used to increase the throughput of soft lithography by exploiting the enhanced hydrophilicity, the low viscosity, and the fragility of the employed materials. In particular, the customized functionalization of the involved surfaces to improve the wettability to polymer fluids and the dramatic decrease of the viscosity of polymer compounds as the temperature is increased, together with the good thermal stability of the functionalized surfaces, allow a faster filling of elastomeric channels, up to almost an order of magnitude with respect to conventional microfluidics.

  16. Super-resolved optical lithography with phase controlled source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hong, Peilong; Zhang, Guoquan

    2015-05-01

    Recently, we have demonstrated that second-order subwavelength interference could be realized in an optical lithography scheme with an effective entangled source [P. Hong and G. Zhang, Phys. Rev. A 88, 043838 (2013), 10.1103/PhysRevA.88.043838]. In this paper, by considering the correlation function in both the source plane and observation plane, we show how the coherence property of such a source is controlled via introduction of random-phase correlation, which finally affects the two-photon interference effect observed in the far-field plane. Furthermore, by introducing different but similar random-phase correlations, we generalize the phase controlled source with particular high-order coherence properties to obtain higher-order subwavelength interference, i.e., high-order super-resolved optical lithography. These results show the importance of phase control in generating a light field with particular high-order coherence properties.

  17. 4-Nitrobenzene Grafted in Porous Silicon: Application to Optical Lithography.

    PubMed

    Tiddia, Mariavitalia; Mula, Guido; Sechi, Elisa; Vacca, Annalisa; Cara, Eleonora; De Leo, Natascia; Fretto, Matteo; Boarino, Luca

    2016-12-01

    In this work, we report a method to process porous silicon to improve its chemical resistance to alkaline solution attacks based on the functionalization of the pore surface by the electrochemical reduction of 4-nitrobenzendiazonium salt. This method provides porous silicon with strong resistance to the etching solutions used in optical lithography and allows the fabrication of tailored metallic contacts on its surface. The samples were studied by chemical, electrochemical, and morphological methods. We demonstrate that the grafted samples show a resistance to harsh alkaline solution more than three orders of magnitude larger than that of pristine porous silicon, being mostly unmodified after about 40 min. The samples maintained open pores after the grafting, making them suitable for further treatments like filling by polymers. Optical lithography was performed on the functionalized samples, and electrochemical characterization results are shown. PMID:27686091

  18. 32 nm logic patterning options with immersion lithography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lai, K.; Burns, S.; Halle, S.; Zhuang, L.; Colburn, M.; Allen, S.; Babcock, C.; Baum, Z.; Burkhardt, M.; Dai, V.; Dunn, D.; Geiss, E.; Haffner, H.; Han, G.; Lawson, P.; Mansfield, S.; Meiring, J.; Morgenfeld, B.; Tabery, C.; Zou, Y.; Sarma, C.; Tsou, L.; Yan, W.; Zhuang, H.; Gil, D.; Medeiros, D.

    2008-03-01

    The semiconductor industry faces a lithographic scaling limit as the industry completes the transition to 1.35 NA immersion lithography. Both high-index immersion lithography and EUV lithography are facing technical challenges and commercial timing issues. Consequently, the industry has focused on enabling double patterning technology (DPT) as a means to circumvent the limitations of Rayleigh scaling. Here, the IBM development alliance demonstrate a series of double patterning solutions that enable scaling of logic constructs by decoupling the pattern spatially through mask design or temporally through innovative processes. These techniques have been successfully employed for early 32nm node development using 45nm generation tooling. Four different double patterning techniques were implemented. The first process illustrates local RET optimization through the use of a split reticle design. In this approach, a layout is decomposed into a series of regions with similar imaging properties and the illumination conditions for each are independently optimized. These regions are then printed separately into the same resist film in a multiple exposure process. The result is a singly developed pattern that could not be printed with a single illumination-mask combination. The second approach addresses 2D imaging with particular focus on both line-end dimension and linewidth control [1]. A double exposure-double etch (DE2) approach is used in conjunction with a pitch-filling sacrificial feature strategy. The third double exposure process, optimized for via patterns also utilizes DE2. In this method, a design is split between two separate masks such that the minimum pitch between any two vias is larger than the minimum metal pitch. This allows for final structures with vias at pitches beyond the capability of a single exposure. In the fourth method,, dark field double dipole lithography (DDL) has been successfully applied to BEOL metal structures and has been shown to be

  19. Etched-multilayer phase shifting masks for EUV lithography

    DOEpatents

    Chapman, Henry N.; Taylor, John S.

    2005-04-05

    A method is disclosed for the implementation of phase shifting masks for EUV lithography. The method involves directly etching material away from the multilayer coating of the mask, to cause a refractive phase shift in the mask. By etching into the multilayer (for example, by reactive ion etching), rather than depositing extra material on the top of the multilayer, there will be minimal absorption loss associated with the phase shift.

  20. Design and fabrication of diverse metamaterial structures by holographic lithography.

    PubMed

    Yang, Yi; Li, Qiuze; Wang, Guo Ping

    2008-07-21

    We demonstrate a holographic lithography for the fabrication of diverse metamaterial structures by using an optical prism. Cylindrical nanoshells, U-shaped resonator arrays, and double-split ring arrays are obtained experimentally by real time modulating the phase relation of the interference beams. This easy-to-use method may provide a roadway for the design and fabrication of future metamaterials requiring diverse structures for effectively manipulating electromagnetic properties at optical frequencies. PMID:18648445

  1. 3D nanostructures fabricated by advanced stencil lithography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yesilkoy, F.; Flauraud, V.; Rüegg, M.; Kim, B. J.; Brugger, J.

    2016-02-01

    This letter reports on a novel fabrication method for 3D metal nanostructures using high-throughput nanostencil lithography. Aperture clogging, which occurs on the stencil membranes during physical vapor deposition, is leveraged to create complex topographies on the nanoscale. The precision of the 3D nanofabrication method is studied in terms of geometric parameters and material types. The versatility of the technique is demonstrated by various symmetric and chiral patterns made of Al and Au.

  2. 3D nanostructures fabricated by advanced stencil lithography.

    PubMed

    Yesilkoy, F; Flauraud, V; Rüegg, M; Kim, B J; Brugger, J

    2016-03-01

    This letter reports on a novel fabrication method for 3D metal nanostructures using high-throughput nanostencil lithography. Aperture clogging, which occurs on the stencil membranes during physical vapor deposition, is leveraged to create complex topographies on the nanoscale. The precision of the 3D nanofabrication method is studied in terms of geometric parameters and material types. The versatility of the technique is demonstrated by various symmetric and chiral patterns made of Al and Au. PMID:26884085

  3. 450mm wafer patterning with jet and flash imprint lithography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thompson, Ecron; Hellebrekers, Paul; Hofemann, Paul; LaBrake, Dwayne L.; Resnick, Douglas J.; Sreenivasan, S. V.

    2013-09-01

    The next step in the evolution of wafer size is 450mm. Any transition in sizing is an enormous task that must account for fabrication space, environmental health and safety concerns, wafer standards, metrology capability, individual process module development and device integration. For 450mm, an aggressive goal of 2018 has been set, with pilot line operation as early as 2016. To address these goals, consortiums have been formed to establish the infrastructure necessary to the transition, with a focus on the development of both process and metrology tools. Central to any process module development, which includes deposition, etch and chemical mechanical polishing is the lithography tool. In order to address the need for early learning and advance process module development, Molecular Imprints Inc. has provided the industry with the first advanced lithography platform, the Imprio® 450, capable of patterning a full 450mm wafer. The Imprio 450 was accepted by Intel at the end of 2012 and is now being used to support the 450mm wafer process development demands as part of a multi-year wafer services contract to facilitate the semiconductor industry's transition to lower cost 450mm wafer production. The Imprio 450 uses a Jet and Flash Imprint Lithography (J-FILTM) process that employs drop dispensing of UV curable resists to assist high resolution patterning for subsequent dry etch pattern transfer. The technology is actively being used to develop solutions for markets including NAND Flash memory, patterned media for hard disk drives and displays. This paper reviews the recent performance of the J-FIL technology (including overlay, throughput and defectivity), mask development improvements provided by Dai Nippon Printing, and the application of the technology to a 450mm lithography platform.

  4. Fabrication of Micro Lens Array by UV-LED Lithography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iguchi, Yusuke; Matsumoto, Yoshinori

    High curvature micro lens array of 240-570 μm diameters and 110-270 μm heights has been fabricated by using UV-LED lithography and imprinting technique. Curved SU-8 structures were fabricated by backside exposure through thin glass substrate because UV-LED array light source has wide directivity characteristics of UV dose. The structure was transferred to Polydimethylsiloxsane (PDMS) mold. Micro lens array of photosensitive acrylic resin was fabricated by using the mold.

  5. Maskless micro-ion-beam reduction lithography system

    DOEpatents

    Leung, Ka-Ngo; Barletta, William A.; Patterson, David O.; Gough, Richard A.

    2005-05-03

    A maskless micro-ion-beam reduction lithography system is a system for projecting patterns onto a resist layer on a wafer with feature size down to below 100 nm. The MMRL system operates without a stencil mask. The patterns are generated by switching beamlets on and off from a two electrode blanking system or pattern generator. The pattern generator controllably extracts the beamlet pattern from an ion source and is followed by a beam reduction and acceleration column.

  6. Nanopatterning of ultrananocrystalline diamond thin films via block copolymer lithography.

    SciTech Connect

    Ramanathan, M.; Darling, S. B.; Sumant, A. V.; Auciello, O.

    2010-07-01

    Nanopatterning of diamond surfaces is critical for the development of diamond-based microelectromechanical system/nanoelectromechanical system (MEMS/NEMS), such as resonators or switches. Micro-/nanopatterning of diamond materials is typically done using photolithography or electron beam lithography combined with reactive ion etching (RIE). In this work, we demonstrate a simple process, block copolymer (BCP) lithography, for nanopatterning of ultrananocrystalline diamond (UNCD) films to produce nanostructures suitable for the fabrication of NEMS based on UNCD. In BCP lithography, nanoscale self-assembled polymeric domains serve as an etch mask for pattern transfer. The authors used thin films of a cylinder-forming organic-inorganic BCP, poly(styrene-block-ferrocenyldimethylsilane), PS-b-PFS, as an etch mask on the surface of UNCD films. Orientational control of the etch masking cylindrical PFS blocks is achieved by manipulating the polymer film thickness in concert with the annealing treatment. We have observed that the surface roughness of UNCD layers plays an important role in transferring the pattern. Oxygen RIE was used to etch the exposed areas of the UNCD film underneath the BCP. Arrays of both UNCD posts and wirelike structures have been created using the same starting polymeric materials as the etch mask.

  7. Large-Area Zone Plate Fabrication with Optical Lithography

    SciTech Connect

    Denbeaux, G.

    2011-09-09

    Zone plates as condenser optics for x-ray microscopes offer simple optical designs for both illumination and spectral resolution when used as a linear monochromator. However, due to the long write times for electron beam lithography, both the availability and the size of zone plates for condensers have been limited. Since the resolution provided by the linear monochromator scales almost linearly with the diameter of the zone plate, the full potential for zone plate monochromators as illumination systems for x-ray microscopes has not been achieved. For example, the 10-mm-diameter zone plate has demonstrated a spectral resolution of E/{Delta}E = 700[1], but with a 26-mm-diameter zone plate, the calculated spectral resolution is higher than E/{Delta}E = 3000. These large-area zone plates are possible to fabricate with the leading edge semiconductor lithography tools such as those available at the College of Nanoscale Science and Engineering at the University at Albany. One of the lithography tools available is the ASML TWINSCAN XT: 1950i with 37-nm resolution [2]. A single 300-mm wafer can contain more than 60 fields, each with a large area condenser, and the throughput of the tool can be more than one wafer every minute.

  8. Considerations for cost of ownership in EUV lithography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Keen, Anthony; Bailey, Christopher; Donders, Jos; Condon, Neil

    2011-04-01

    The cost of ownership of semiconductor manufacturing equipment is typically addressed in terms of raw utility consumption. Focusing on energy, the average consumption of a typical semiconductor fabrication plant has doubled over a recent 10 year period, with approximately 30% of this energy currently attributed to vacuum equipment. Compared to conventional optical lithography, extreme ultraviolet lithography (EUVL) requires the adoption of a vacuum subsystem to enable the technology, bringing an additional vacuum requirement to semiconductor fabs. With this trend it is increasingly important to focus on more efficient ways of operating semiconductor manufacturing tools and their supporting equipment. Clever operation through employment of 'GREEN' modes can provide significant utility savings. However, in semiconductor lithography, tool uptime is a critical parameter to be considered in any cost of ownership model, and the facility vacuum equipment plays an intimate role here, so including redundancy in pumping equipment can be a key enabler to maintaining tool uptime. Consequently optimizing the design of the vacuum subsystem will help to reduce the overall footprint, utility consumption and energy costs associated with this process.

  9. Large-Area Zone Plate Fabrication with Optical Lithography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Denbeaux, G.

    2011-09-01

    Zone plates as condenser optics for x-ray microscopes offer simple optical designs for both illumination and spectral resolution when used as a linear monochromator. However, due to the long write times for electron beam lithography, both the availability and the size of zone plates for condensers have been limited. Since the resolution provided by the linear monochromator scales almost linearly with the diameter of the zone plate, the full potential for zone plate monochromators as illumination systems for x-ray microscopes has not been achieved. For example, the 10-mm-diameter zone plate has demonstrated a spectral resolution of E/ΔE = 700 [1], but with a 26-mm-diameter zone plate, the calculated spectral resolution is higher than E/ΔE = 3000. These large-area zone plates are possible to fabricate with the leading edge semiconductor lithography tools such as those available at the College of Nanoscale Science and Engineering at the University at Albany. One of the lithography tools available is the ASML TWINSCAN XT: 1950i with 37-nm resolution [2]. A single 300-mm wafer can contain more than 60 fields, each with a large area condenser, and the throughput of the tool can be more than one wafer every minute.

  10. Fabrication of 70nm split ring resonators by nanoimprint lithography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sharp, Graham J.; Khokhar, Ali Z.; Johnson, Nigel P.

    2012-05-01

    We report on the fabrication of 70 nm wide, high resolution rectangular U-shaped split ring resonators (SRRs) using nanoimprint lithography (NIL). The fabrication method for the nanoimprint stamp does not require dry etching. The stamp is used to pattern SRRs in a thin PMMA layer followed by metal deposition and lift-off. Nanoimprinting in this way allows high resolution patterns with a minimum feature size of 20 nm. This fabrication technique yields a much higher throughput than conventional e-beam lithography and each stamp can be used numerous times to imprint patterns. Reflectance measurements of fabricated aluminium SRRs on silicon substrates show a so-called an LC resonance peak in the visible spectrum under transverse electric polarisation. Fabricating the SRRs by NIL rather than electron beam lithography allows them to be scaled to smaller dimensions without any significant loss in resolution, partly because pattern expansion caused by backscattered electrons and the proximity effect are not present with NIL. This in turn helps to shift the magnetic response to short wavelengths while still retaining a distinct LC peak.

  11. Optical Lithography on non-flat surfaces; A Case Study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moore, Clayton; Newton, Conrad; Geerts, Wilhelmus; Palmer, Daniel; Tamir, Dan

    2008-10-01

    Only a few studies of optical lithography on non-flat substrates have been reported. Most of these systems only work on polished very well defined substrates. For example, Ball Semiconductor developed a system for projection lithography on polished spherical balls of 1 mm diameter. We propose a system that works on an arbitrary surface and enables lithography on a wide variety of substrates including the wings of insects or a single crystalline grain of a ceramic sample. The system consists of a computer controlled laser beam that is focused through an optical microscope on an XY-table. The size of the beam can be changed by varying the size of the aperture or the change of the objective. The focus of the microscope can be automatically adjusted enabling to follow the 3D profile of the sample's surface. The laser intensity is automatically adjusted to keep the dose constant as the samples profile and the speed of the xy-table very. A cross-compiler, which utilizes principles of computer graphics to figure the required exposure parameters based on the surface of the object was developed. It accepts a text file, a vector based graphic file, or a raster image and generates a file with instructions for the laser beam writer.

  12. Inverse Tomo-Lithography for Making Microscopic 3D Parts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    White, Victor; Wiberg, Dean

    2003-01-01

    According to a proposal, basic x-ray lithography would be extended to incorporate a technique, called inverse tomography, that would enable the fabrication of microscopic three-dimensional (3D) objects. The proposed inverse tomo-lithographic process would make it possible to produce complex shaped, submillimeter-sized parts that would be difficult or impossible to make in any other way. Examples of such shapes or parts include tapered helices, paraboloids with axes of different lengths, and even Archimedean screws that could serve as rotors in microturbines. The proposed inverse tomo-lithographic process would be based partly on a prior microfabrication process known by the German acronym LIGA (lithographie, galvanoformung, abformung, which means lithography, electroforming, molding). In LIGA, one generates a precise, high-aspect ratio pattern by exposing a thick, x-ray-sensitive resist material to an x-ray beam through a mask that contains the pattern. One can electrodeposit metal into the developed resist pattern to form a precise metal part, then dissolve the resist to free the metal. Aspect ratios of 100:1 and patterns into resist thicknesses of several millimeters are possible.

  13. Low Cost Lithography Tool for High Brightness LED Manufacturing

    SciTech Connect

    Andrew Hawryluk; Emily True

    2012-06-30

    The objective of this activity was to address the need for improved manufacturing tools for LEDs. Improvements include lower cost (both capital equipment cost reductions and cost-ofownership reductions), better automation and better yields. To meet the DOE objective of $1- 2/kilolumen, it will be necessary to develop these highly automated manufacturing tools. Lithography is used extensively in the fabrication of high-brightness LEDs, but the tools used to date are not scalable to high-volume manufacturing. This activity addressed the LED lithography process. During R&D and low volume manufacturing, most LED companies use contact-printers. However, several industries have shown that these printers are incompatible with high volume manufacturing and the LED industry needs to evolve to projection steppers. The need for projection lithography tools for LED manufacturing is identified in the Solid State Lighting Manufacturing Roadmap Draft, June 2009. The Roadmap states that Projection tools are needed by 2011. This work will modify a stepper, originally designed for semiconductor manufacturing, for use in LED manufacturing. This work addresses improvements to yield, material handling, automation and throughput for LED manufacturing while reducing the capital equipment cost.

  14. High-power sources for EUV lithography: state of the art

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stamm, Uwe; Kleinschmidt, Juergen; Gaebel, Kai M.; Birner, Henry; Ahmad, Imtiaz; Bolshukhin, Denis; Brudermann, Jesko; Chinh, Tran Duc; Flohrer, Frank; Goetze, Sven; Hergenhan, Guido; Kloepfel, Diethard; Korobochko, Vladimir; Mader, Bjoern; Mueller, Rainer; Ringling, Jens; Schriever, Guido; Ziener, Christian

    2004-09-01

    discharge pre-ionization. Prototype commercial gas discharge sources with an EUV power of 35W in 2π sr were already delivered for integration into EUV microsteppers. These sources are equipped with a debris-filter which results in an optics lifetime exceeding 100 million discharges at 1 kHz repetition frequency. The same lifetime was achieved for the components of the discharge system itself. The progress in the development of high-power discharge sources resulted in an EUV power of 150 W in continuous operation at 4.5 kHz repetition rate by implementation of porous metal cooling technology. The EUV plasma has a FWHM-diameter of 0.5 mm and a FWHM-length of 1.5 mm. The intermediate focus power is calculated to be in the range of 15 W - 20 W, depending somewhat on the transmission of the optical path to the intermediate focus and on the etendue specification. The typical fluctuations of the EUV energy are standard deviation σ<5% without any active stabilization. Discharge sources with Sn as emitter were investigated as more efficient alternative to Xenon. Estimates regarding Sn sources reveal the potential of achieving 65 W intermediate focus power by using developed porous metal cooling technology. Improvement of cooling could open the path to 115 W of power for high volume manufacturing using EUV lithography. However, Sn-sources are technologically risky und much less advanced than Xe sources, since fuel-handling and debris mitigation is much more challenging in comparison to Xe-sources. GDPP and LPP sources still compete for the technology of high volume manufacturing sources for EUV lithography. Optimization potential of the etendue of the optical system of EUV scanners will certainly influence any technology decision for HVM sources.

  15. CT scanner x-ray spectrum estimation from transmission measurements

    PubMed Central

    Duan, Xinhui; Wang, Jia; Yu, Lifeng; Leng, Shuai; McCollough, Cynthia H.

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: In diagnostic CT imaging, multiple important applications depend on the knowledge of the x-ray spectrum, including Monte Carlo dose calculations and dual-energy material decomposition analysis. Due to the high photon flux involved, it is difficult to directly measure spectra from the x-ray tube of a CT scanner. One potential method for indirect measurement involves estimating the spectrum from transmission measurements. The expectation maximization (EM) method is an accurate and robust method to solve this problem. In this article, this method was evaluated in a commercial CT scanner. Methods: Two step-wedges (polycarbonate and aluminum) were used to produce different attenuation levels. Transmission measurements were performed on the scanner and the measured data from the scanner were exported to an external computer to calculate the spectra. The EM method was applied to solve the equations that represent the attenuation processes of polychromatic x-ray photons. Estimated spectra were compared to the spectra simulated using a software provided by the manufacturer of the scanner. To test the accuracy of the spectra, a verification experiment was performed using a phantom containing different depths of water. The measured transmission data were compared to the transmission values calculated using the estimated spectra. Results: Spectra of 80, 100, 120, and 140 kVp from a dual-source CT scanner were estimated. The estimated and simulated spectra were well matched. The differences of mean energies were less than 1 keV. In the verification experiment, the measured and calculated transmission values were in excellent agreement. Conclusions: Spectrum estimation using transmission data and the EM method is a quantitatively accurate and robust technique to estimate the spectrum of a CT system. This method could benefit studies relying on accurate knowledge of the x-ray spectra from CT scanner. PMID:21452736

  16. Color accuracy and reproducibility in whole slide imaging scanners

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shrestha, Prarthana; Hulsken, Bas

    2014-03-01

    In this paper, we propose a work-flow for color reproduction in whole slide imaging (WSI) scanners such that the colors in the scanned images match to the actual slide color and the inter scanner variation is minimum. We describe a novel method of preparation and verification of the color phantom slide, consisting of a standard IT8- target transmissive film, which is used in color calibrating and profiling the WSI scanner. We explore several ICC compliant techniques in color calibration/profiling and rendering intents for translating the scanner specific colors to the standard display (sRGB) color-space. Based on the quality of color reproduction in histopathology tissue slides, we propose the matrix-based calibration/profiling and absolute colorimetric rendering approach. The main advantage of the proposed work-ow is that it is compliant to the ICC standard, applicable to color management systems in different platforms, and involves no external color measurement devices. We measure objective color performance using CIE-DeltaE2000 metric, where DeltaE values below 1 is considered imperceptible. Our evaluation 14 phantom slides, manufactured according to the proposed method, show an average inter-slide color difference below 1 DeltaE. The proposed work-flow is implemented and evaluated in 35 Philips Ultra Fast Scanners (UFS). The results show that the average color difference between a scanner and the reference is 3.5 DeltaE, and among the scanners is 3.1 DeltaE. The improvement on color performance upon using the proposed method is apparent on the visual color quality of the tissues scans.

  17. Direct write electron beam lithography: a historical overview

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pfeiffer, Hans C.

    2010-09-01

    Maskless pattern generation capability in combination with practically limitless resolution made probe-forming electron beam systems attractive tools in the semiconductor fabrication process. However, serial exposure of pattern elements with a scanning beam is a slow process and throughput presented a key challenge in electron beam lithography from the beginning. To meet this challenge imaging concepts with increasing exposure efficiency have been developed projecting ever larger number of pixels in parallel. This evolution started in the 1960s with the SEM-type Gaussian beam systems writing one pixel at a time directly on wafers. During the 1970s IBM pioneered the concept of shaped beams containing multiple pixels which led to higher throughput and an early success of e-beam direct write (EBDW) in large scale manufacturing of semiconductor chips. EBDW in a mix-and match approach with optical lithography provided unique flexibility in part number management and cycle time reduction and proved extremely cost effective in IBM's Quick-Turn-Around-Time (QTAT) facilities. But shaped beams did not keep pace with Moore's law because of limitations imposed by the physics of charged particles: Coulomb interactions between beam electrons cause image blur and consequently limit beam current and throughput. A new technology approach was needed. Physically separating beam electrons into multiple beamlets to reduce Coulomb interaction led to the development of massively parallel projection of pixels. Electron projection lithography (EPL) - a mask based imaging technique emulating optical steppers - was pursued during the 1990s by Bell Labs with SCALPEL and by IBM with PREVAIL in partnership with Nikon. In 2003 Nikon shipped the first NCR-EB1A e-beam stepper based on the PREVAIL technology to Selete. It exposed pattern segments containing 10 million pixels in single shot and represented the first successful demonstration of massively parallel pixel projection. However the window

  18. Advances with the new AIMS fab 193 2nd generation: a system for the 65 nm node including immersion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zibold, Axel M.; Poortinga, E.; Doornmalen, H. v.; Schmid, R.; Scherubl, T.; Harnisch, W.

    2005-06-01

    The Aerial Image Measurement System, AIMS, for 193nm lithography emulation is established as a standard for the rapid prediction of wafer printability for critical structures including dense patterns and defects or repairs on masks. The main benefit of AIMS is to save expensive image qualification consisting of test wafer exposures followed by wafer CD-SEM resist or wafer analysis. By adjustment of numerical aperture (NA), illumination type and partial coherence (σ) to match any given stepper/ scanner, AIMS predicts the printability of 193nm reticles such as binary with, or without OPC and phase shifting. A new AIMS fab 193 second generation system with a maximum NA of 0.93 is now available. Improvements in field uniformity, stability over time, measurement automation and higher throughput meet the challenging requirements of the 65nm node. A new function, "Global CD Map" can be applied to automatically measure and analyse the global CD uniformity of repeating structures across a reticle. With the options of extended depth-of-focus (EDOF) software and the upcoming linear polarisation capability in the illumination the new AIMS fab 193 second generation system is able to cover both dry and immersion requirements for NA < 1. Rigorous simulations have been performed to study the effects of polarisation for imaging by comparing the aerial image of the AIMS to the resist image of the scanner.

  19. Lithography alternatives meet design style reality: How do they "line" up?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smayling, Michael C.

    2016-03-01

    Optical lithography resolution scaling has stalled, giving innovative alternatives a window of opportunity. One important factor that impacts these lithographic approaches is the transition in design style from 2D to 1D for advanced CMOS logic. Just as the transition from 3D circuits to 2D fabrication 50 years ago created an opportunity for a new breed of electronics companies, the transition today presents exciting and challenging time for lithographers. Today, we are looking at a range of non-optical lithography processes. Those considered here can be broadly categorized: self-aligned lithography, self-assembled lithography, deposition lithography, nano-imprint lithography, pixelated e-beam lithography, shot-based e-beam lithography .Do any of these alternatives benefit from or take advantage of 1D layout? Yes, for example SAPD + CL (Self Aligned Pitch Division combined with Complementary Lithography). This is a widely adopted process for CMOS nodes at 22nm and below. Can there be additional design / process co-optimization? In spite of the simple-looking nature of 1D layout, the placement of "cut" in the lines and "holes" for interlayer connections can be tuned for a given process capability. Examples of such optimization have been presented at this conference, typically showing a reduction of at least one in the number of cut or hole patterns needed.[1,2] Can any of the alternatives complement each other or optical lithography? Yes.[3] For example, DSA (Directed Self Assembly) combines optical lithography with self-assembly. CEBL (Complementary e-Beam Lithography) combines optical lithography with SAPD for lines with shot-based e-beam lithography for cuts and holes. Does one (shrinking) size fit all? No, that's why we have many alternatives. For example NIL (Nano-imprint Lithography) has been introduced for NAND Flash patterning where the (trending lower) defectivity is acceptable for the product. Deposition lithography has been introduced in 3D NAND Flash to

  20. An RF dosimeter for independent SAR measurement in MRI scanners

    SciTech Connect

    Qian, Di; Bottomley, Paul A.; El-Sharkawy, AbdEl-Monem M.; Edelstein, William A.

    2013-12-15

    Purpose: The monitoring and management of radio frequency (RF) exposure is critical for ensuring magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) safety. Commercial MRI scanners can overestimate specific absorption rates (SAR) and improperly restrict clinical MRI scans or the application of new MRI sequences, while underestimation of SAR can lead to tissue heating and thermal injury. Accurate scanner-independent RF dosimetry is essential for measuring actual exposure when SAR is critical for ensuring regulatory compliance and MRI safety, for establishing RF exposure while evaluating interventional leads and devices, and for routine MRI quality assessment by medical physicists. However, at present there are no scanner-independent SAR dosimeters. Methods: An SAR dosimeter with an RF transducer comprises two orthogonal, rectangular copper loops and a spherical MRI phantom. The transducer is placed in the magnet bore and calibrated to approximate the resistive loading of the scanner's whole-body birdcage RF coil for human subjects in Philips, GE and Siemens 3 tesla (3T) MRI scanners. The transducer loop reactances are adjusted to minimize interference with the transmit RF field (B{sub 1}) at the MRI frequency. Power from the RF transducer is sampled with a high dynamic range power monitor and recorded on a computer. The deposited power is calibrated and tested on eight different MRI scanners. Whole-body absorbed power vs weight and body mass index (BMI) is measured directly on 26 subjects. Results: A single linear calibration curve sufficed for RF dosimetry at 127.8 MHz on three different Philips and three GE 3T MRI scanners. An RF dosimeter operating at 123.2 MHz on two Siemens 3T scanners required a separate transducer and a slightly different calibration curve. Measurement accuracy was ∼3%. With the torso landmarked at the xiphoid, human adult whole‑body absorbed power varied approximately linearly with patient weight and BMI. This indicates that whole-body torso SAR is on