Science.gov

Sample records for 1961-1990 national solar

  1. 1961-1990 Solar Radiation Data Base

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1990-01-01

    A new 1961-1990 Solar Radiation Data Base for the United States is being compiled at the Solar Energy Research Institute. Using solar radiation and climate data collected by the National Weather Service (NWS) from 1977 to 1990 and improved computer models to fill in missing data, this update will significantly upgrade the current national SOLMET/ERSATZ data base.

  2. National Solar Radiation Data Base (1961-1990). Final technical report. Volume 2

    SciTech Connect

    1995-01-01

    The 1961-1990 National Solar Radiation Data Base (NSRDB) for the United States was completed in September 1992. This was the final product of four years of work under the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Solar Radiation Resource Assessment Project. The NSRDB contains 30 years of hourly data for five solar radiation elements and 15 meteorological elements for 239 sites. The user`s manual (NSRDB-Volume 1, 1992) for the NSRDB provides detailed information on the structure of the data base and the products that have been produced from it. Most users of the data base will find all of the information that they need in Volume 1. Volume 2 has been written primarily for researchers who need more information about the methods employed in producing the data base. In addition to research results, we have included information on practical lessons learned from this project. Therefore, Volume 2 should be of value to anyone developing a similar data base for other regions or other countries. Most of the solar radiation data in the NSRDB and the previous SOLMET (SOLar METeorological) data base were generated by computer models. Therefore, a major part of this report is centered around the METeorological/STATistical (METSTAT) model (Section 3.0), its input data (Sections 5.0 and 6.0), its use in producing the NSRDB (Sections 4.0 and 7.0), and comparisons with the models used in producing the SOLMET data base (Section 10.0).

  3. User`s manual for TMY2s: Derived from the 1961--1990 National Solar Radiation Data Base

    SciTech Connect

    Marion, W.; Urban, K.

    1995-06-01

    This report is a user`s manual that describes typical meteorological year (TMY) data sets derived from the 1961-1990 National Solar Radiation Data Base. The TMY is a data set of hourly values of solar radiation and meteorological elements for a 1-year period. The intended use if for computer simulations of solar energy conversion systems and building systems. Section 1 of the manual provides general information about the TMYs; Section 2 lists the stations and provides station identifying information and classification; Section 3 details the contents of the TMY2 files and provides the hourly records of data values; Section 4 compares TMY2 with 30-year data sets; Appendices provide procedures used to develop TMYs and a table to convert SI data to other units.

  4. National Solar Radiation Database 1991-2005 Update: User's Manual

    SciTech Connect

    Wilcox, S.

    2007-04-01

    This manual describes how to obtain and interpret the data products from the updated 1991-2005 National Solar Radiation Database (NSRDB). This is an update of the original 1961-1990 NSRDB released in 1992.

  5. National Solar Radiation Data Bases (NSRDB): 1961 to 1990 and 1991 to 2005

    DOE Data Explorer

    The National Solar Radiation Data Base 1961-1990 (NSRDB) contains 30 years of solar radiation and supplementary meteorological data from 237 NWS sites in the U.S., plus sites in Guam and Puerto Rico. The updated 1991-2005 National Solar Radiation Database holds solar and meteorological data for 1,454 locations in the United States and its territories. See also the interactive data maps for the 1961 to 1990 data at http://rredc.nrel.gov/solar/old_data/nsrdb/1961-1990/redbook/atlas/.

  6. Climate Atlas of Croatia 1961-1990, 1971-2000

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zaninovic, K.

    2009-09-01

    Following the recommendation of the World Meteorological Organisation, each member state National meteorological service is expected to develop a Climate Atlas. For the previous climate period (1931-1960) the area of Croatia was covered by the Climate Atlas of Yugoslavia, published in 1969, and the new Climate Atlas of Croatia 1961-1990, 1971-2000 is published recently. The Climate Atlas comprises maps of the spatial distribution of climatological elements, graphs of the annual course of climatological elements at ten chosen meteorological stations and a textual description of the relevant climate characteristics and their causes. It ends with tables of the mean 30-year monthly, seasonal and annual values of climatological elements at 20 stations representative of the climate diversity of Croatia. Because of the time variability of climatological parameters and the perceived warming in the last decade of the 20th century, the tables have been expanded to include the 1971-2000 climate period. The Atlas is intended to help experts engaged in the study of the effects of climate change to adapt their research and professional work to local climate conditions thus mitigating meteorological risks and contributing to environmental protection and to the social and economic development of the country.

  7. Progress on an Updated National Solar Radiation Data Base for the United States: Preprint

    SciTech Connect

    Wilcox, S.; Anderberg, M.; George, R.; Marion, W.; Myers, D.; Renne, D.; Beckman, W.; DeGaetano, A.; Gueymard, C.; Perez, R.; Plantico, M.; Stackhouse, P.; Vignola, F.

    2005-09-01

    In 1992, The National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) released the 1961-1990 National Solar Radiation Data Base (NSRDB), a 30-year set of hourly solar radiation data. In 2003, NREL undertook an NSRDB update project for the decade of 1991-2000.

  8. Progress on an Updated National Solar Radiation Data Base: Preprint

    SciTech Connect

    Wilcox, S.; Anderberg, M.; George, R.; Marion, W.; Myers, D.; Renne, D.; Beckman, W.; DeGaetano, A.; Gueymard, C.; Perez, R.; Plantico, M.; Stackhouse, P.; Vignola, F.

    2004-03-01

    In 1992, The National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) released the 1961-1990 National Solar Radiation Data Base (NSRDB), a 30-year set of hourly solar radiation data. In April 2003, NREL convened a meeting of experts to investigate issues concerning a proposed update of the NSRDB. The panel determined that an important difficulty posed by the update was the shift from manual to automated cloud observations at National Weather Service stations in the United States. The solar model used in the original NSRDB relied heavily on the methodology and resolution of the manual cloud observations. The meeting participants recommended that NREL produce a plan for creating an update using currently available meteorological observations and satellite imagery. This paper describes current progress toward a plan for an updated NSRDB.

  9. A National Solar Digital Observatory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hill, F.

    2000-05-01

    The continuing development of the Internet as a research tool, combined with an improving funding climate, has sparked new interest in the development of Internet-linked astronomical data bases and analysis tools. Here I outline a concept for a National Solar Digital Observatory (NSDO), a set of data archives and analysis tools distributed in physical location at sites which already host such systems. A central web site would be implemented from which a user could search all of the component archives, select and download data, and perform analyses. Example components include NSO's Digital Library containing its synoptic and GONG data, and the forthcoming SOLIS archive. Several other archives, in various stages of development, also exist. Potential analysis tools include content-based searches, visualized programming tools, and graphics routines. The existence of an NSDO would greatly facilitate solar physics research, as a user would no longer need to have detailed knowledge of all solar archive sites. It would also improve public outreach efforts. The National Solar Observatory is operated by AURA, Inc. under a cooperative agreement with the National Science Foundation.

  10. The National Solar Permitting Database

    2014-08-31

    "The soft costs of solar—costs not associated with hardware—remain stubbornly high. Among the biggest soft costs are those associated with inefficiencies in local permitting and inspection. A study by the National Renewable Energy Laboratory and Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory estimates that these costs add an average of $0.22/W per residential installation. This project helps reduce non-hardware/balance of system (BOS) costs by creating and maintaining a free and available site of permitting requirements and solar systemmore » verification software that installers can use to reduce time, capital, and resource investments in tracking permitting requirements. Software tools to identify best permitting practices can enable government stakeholders to optimize their permitting process and remove superfluous costs and requirements. Like ""a Wikipedia for solar permitting"", users can add, edit, delete, and update information for a given jurisdiction. We incentivize this crowdsourcing approach by recognizing users for their contributions in the form of SEO benefits to their company or organization by linking back to users' websites."« less

  11. The National Solar Permitting Database

    SciTech Connect

    Gunderson, Renic

    2014-08-31

    "The soft costs of solar—costs not associated with hardware—remain stubbornly high. Among the biggest soft costs are those associated with inefficiencies in local permitting and inspection. A study by the National Renewable Energy Laboratory and Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory estimates that these costs add an average of $0.22/W per residential installation. This project helps reduce non-hardware/balance of system (BOS) costs by creating and maintaining a free and available site of permitting requirements and solar system verification software that installers can use to reduce time, capital, and resource investments in tracking permitting requirements. Software tools to identify best permitting practices can enable government stakeholders to optimize their permitting process and remove superfluous costs and requirements. Like ""a Wikipedia for solar permitting"", users can add, edit, delete, and update information for a given jurisdiction. We incentivize this crowdsourcing approach by recognizing users for their contributions in the form of SEO benefits to their company or organization by linking back to users' websites."

  12. India's National Large Solar Telescope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hasan, S. S.

    2012-12-01

    India's 2-m National Large Solar Telescope (NLST) is aimed primarily at carrying out observations of the solar atmosphere with high spatial and spectral resolution. A comprehensive site characterization program, that commenced in 2007, has identified two superb sites in the Himalayan region at altitudes greater than 4000-m that have extremely low water vapor content and are unaffected by monsoons. With an innovative optical design, the NLST is an on-axis Gregorian telescope with a low number of optical elements to reduce the number of reflections and yield a high throughput with low polarization. In addition, it is equipped with a high-order adaptive optics to produce close to diffraction limited performance. To control atmospheric and thermal perturbations of the observations, the telescope will function with a fully open dome, to achieve its full potential atop a 25 m tower. Given its design, NLST can also operate at night, without compromising its solar performance. The post-focus instruments include broad-band and tunable Fabry-Pérot narrow-band imaging instruments; a high resolution spectropolarimeter and an Echelle spectrograph for night time astronomy. This project is led by the Indian Institute of Astrophysics and has national and international partners. Its geographical location will fill the longitudinal gap between Japan and Europe and is expected to be the largest solar telescope with an aperture larger than 1.5 m till the ATST and EST come into operation. An international consortium has been identified to build the NLST. The facility is expected to be commissioned by 2016.

  13. New typical meterological years and solar radiation data manual

    SciTech Connect

    Marion, W.

    1995-09-01

    A new solar radiation data manual and new typical meterological years (TMYs) were developed by the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) Analytic Studies Division under the Solar Radiation Resource Assessment Project. These tasks were funded and monitored by the Photovoltaics Branch of the Department of Energy Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy. The new manual and the new TMYs were derived from the 1961-1990 National Solar Radiation Data Base (NSRDB). The new manual is entitled Solar Radiation Data Manual for Flat-Plate and Concentrating Collectors. It provides designers and engineers of solar-energy-related systems with average monthly and yearly solar radiation values for various types of collectors for 239 stations in the United States and its territories. The new TMY data sets are referred to as TMY2s. This distinguishes them from earlier TMY data sets derived from the 1952-1975 SOLMET/ERSATZ data base. This paper describes the new data manual and the new TMY2s.

  14. NREL Solar Radiation Resource Assessment Project: Status and outlook

    SciTech Connect

    Renne, D.; Riordan, C.; Maxwell, E.; Stoffel, T.; Marion, B.; Rymes, M.; Wilcox, S.; Myers, D.

    1992-05-01

    This report summarizes the activities and accomplishments of NREL's Solar Radiation Resource Assessment Project during fiscal year 1991. Currently, the primary focus of the SRRAP is to produce a 1961--1990 National Solar Radiation Data Base, providing hourly values of global horizontal, diffuse, and direct normal solar radiation at approximately 250 sites around the United States. Because these solar radiation quantities have been measured intermittently at only about 50 of these sites, models were developed and applied to the majority of the stations to provide estimates of these parameters. Although approximately 93% of the data base consists of modeled data this represents a significant improvement over the SOLMET/ERSATZ 1952--1975 data base. The magnitude and importance of this activity are such that the majority of SRRAP human and financial in many other activities, which are reported here. These include the continued maintenance of a solar radiation monitoring network in the southeast United States at six Historically Black Colleges and Universities (HBCU's), the transfer of solar radiation resource assessment technology through a variety of activities, participation in international programs, and the maintenance and operation of NREL's Solar Radiation Research Laboratory. 17 refs.

  15. National Energy Act statutes and solar energy

    SciTech Connect

    Howard, J.

    1980-02-01

    The National Energy Act of 1978 contains many provisions that will significantly affect solar technology commercialization and solar energy users. Four of the five statutes that comprise the National Energy Act deserve close attention. The National Energy Conservation Policy Act will promote residential solar installations. The Energy Tax Act will accelerate both residential and commercial solar system applications. The Public Utilities Regulatory Policies Act promotes efficient use of utility resources as well as decentralized power production. And, the Power Plan and Industrial Fuel Use Act places severe restrictions on future burning of petroleum and natural gas, which should lead some operators to build or convert to solar energy systems. Each of the preceding acts are considered in separate sections of this report. Federal regulations issued pursuant to the various provisions are also identified and discussed, and some of the problems with the provisions and regulations are noted.

  16. NREL Solar Radiation Resource Assessment Project: Status and outlook. FY 1991 annual progress report

    SciTech Connect

    Renne, D.; Riordan, C.; Maxwell, E.; Stoffel, T.; Marion, B.; Rymes, M.; Wilcox, S.; Myers, D.

    1992-05-01

    This report summarizes the activities and accomplishments of NREL`s Solar Radiation Resource Assessment Project during fiscal year 1991. Currently, the primary focus of the SRRAP is to produce a 1961--1990 National Solar Radiation Data Base, providing hourly values of global horizontal, diffuse, and direct normal solar radiation at approximately 250 sites around the United States. Because these solar radiation quantities have been measured intermittently at only about 50 of these sites, models were developed and applied to the majority of the stations to provide estimates of these parameters. Although approximately 93% of the data base consists of modeled data this represents a significant improvement over the SOLMET/ERSATZ 1952--1975 data base. The magnitude and importance of this activity are such that the majority of SRRAP human and financial in many other activities, which are reported here. These include the continued maintenance of a solar radiation monitoring network in the southeast United States at six Historically Black Colleges and Universities (HBCU`s), the transfer of solar radiation resource assessment technology through a variety of activities, participation in international programs, and the maintenance and operation of NREL`s Solar Radiation Research Laboratory. 17 refs.

  17. National Solar Thermal Test Facility

    SciTech Connect

    Cameron, C.P.

    1989-12-31

    This is a brief report about a Sandia National Laboratory facility which can provide high-thermal flux for simulation of nuclear thermal flash, measurements of the effects of aerodynamic heating on radar transmission, etc

  18. NLST: the Indian National Large Solar Telescope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hasan, S. S.; Soltau, D.; Kärcher, H.; Süss, M.; Berkefeld, T.

    2010-07-01

    India is planning a new solar telescope with an aperture of 2-m for carrying out high resolution studies of the Sun. Site characterization is underway at high altitude locations in the Himalayan mountains. A detailed concept design for NLST (National Large Solar Telescope) has been completed. The optical design of the telescope is optimized for high optical throughput and uses a minimum number of optical elements. A high order AO system is integrated part of the design that works with a modest Fried's parameter of 7-cm to give diffraction limited performance. The telescope will be equipped with a suite of post-focus instruments including a high resolution spectrograph and a polarimeter. NLST will also be used for carrying out stellar observations during the night. The mechanical design of the telescope, building, and the innovative dome is optimized to take advantage of the natural air flush which will help to keep the open telescope in temperature equilibrium. After its completion (planned for 2014), NLST will fill a gap in longitude between the major solar facilities in USA and Europe, and it will be for years the largest solar telescope in the world

  19. Solar activities at Sandia National Laboratories

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klimas, Paul C.; Hasti, David E.

    The use of renewable energy technologies is typically thought of as an integral part of creating and sustaining an environment that maximizes the overall quality of life of the Earth's present inhabitants and does not leave an undue burden on future generations. Sandia National Laboratories has been a leader in developing and deploying many of these technologies over the last two decades. A common but special aspect of all of these activities is that they are all conducted in cooperation with various types of partners. Some of these partners have an interest in seeing these systems grow in the marketplace, while others are primarily concerned with economic benefits that can come from immediate use of these renewable energy systems. This paper describes solar thermal and photovoltaic technology activities at Sandia that are intended to accelerate the commercialization of these solar systems.

  20. National Student Solar Spectrograph Competition overview

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Larimer, Randal M.; DesJardins, Angela; Shaw, Joseph A.; Kankelborg, Charles C.; Palmer, Christopher; Springer, Larry; Key, Joey; Knighton, W. Berk; Repasky, Kevin S.; Pust, Nathan J.; Hobish, Mitchell K.; Wilson, Edmond W.; Fitzgerald, Carrie; Fitzgerald, Ryan; Trickel, Thomas; Jensen, Clyde; Dorsett, Skye; Anderson, Matt; Boger, Jim; McCrady, Nate; Naylor, Jaylene; Battle, Laurie

    2012-10-01

    The yearly National Student Solar Spectrograph Competition (NSSSC) is Montana Space Grant Consortium's Education and Public Outreach (EP/O) Program for NASA's Interface Region Imaging Spectrograph (IRIS) mission. The NSSSC is designed to give schools with less aerospace activity such as Minority Serving Institutions and Community Colleges an opportunity for hands on real world research experience. The NSSSC provides students from across the country the opportunity to work as part of an undergraduate interdisciplinary team to design, build and test a ground based solar spectrograph. Over the course of nine months, teams come up with their own science goals and then build an instrument to collect data in support of their goals. Teams then travel to Bozeman, MT to demonstrate their instruments and present their results in a competitive science fair environment. This paper and poster will discuss the 2011-2012 competition along with results as well as provide information on the 2012 -2013 competition opportunities.

  1. National Large Solar Telescope of Russia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Demidov, Mikhail

    One of the most important task of the modern solar physics is multi-wavelength observations of the small-scale structure of solar atmosphere on different heights, including chromosphere and corona. To do this the large-aperture telescopes are necessary. At present time there several challenging projects of the large (and even giant) solar telescopes in the world are in the process of construction or designing , the most known ones among them are 4-meter class telescopes ATST in USA and EST in Europe. Since 2013 the development of the new Large Solar Telescope (LST) with 3 meter diameter of the main mirror is started in Russia as a part (sub-project) of National Heliogeophysical Complex (NHGC) of the Russian Academy of Sciences. It should be located at the Sayan solar observatory on the altitude more then 2000 m. To avoid numerous problems of the off-axis optical telescopes (despite of the obvious some advantages of the off-axis configuration) and to meet to available financial budget, the classical on-axis Gregorian scheme on the alt-azimuth mount has been chosen. The scientific equipment of the LST-3 will include several narrow-band tunable filter devices and spectrographs for different wavelength bands, including infrared. The units are installed either at the Nasmyth focus or/and on the rotating coude platform. To minimize the instrumental polarization the polarization analyzer is located near diagonal mirror after M2 mirror. High order adaptive optics is used to achieve the diffraction limited performances. It is expected that after some modification of the optical configuration the LST-3 will operate as an approximately 1-m mirror coronograph in the near infrared spectral lines. Possibilities for stellar observations during night time are provided as well.

  2. National solar energy education directory. Second edition

    SciTech Connect

    Corcoleotes, G; Cronin, S; Kramer, K; O'Connor, K

    1980-01-01

    The information contained in this directory is derived from responses to a national survey of educational institutions and organizations involved in solar energy educational activities beyond the secondary school level. Phone calls and follow-up mail requests were used to gather additional information when necessary. Every survey instrument was read, coded, and edited before entry into the data base from which this directory was produced. The Directory is organized alphabetically by state. Institutions and organizations within each state are categorized according to type (Colleges and Universities, Junior/Community Colleges, Vocational/Technical Schools, and Other Educational Institutions and Organizations) and listed alphabetically within these categories. Within each institutional listing the amount of information provided will vary according to the completeness of the survey response received from that institution. (MHR)

  3. Online National Solar Energy Directory and 2005 Solar Decathlon Product Directory. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Hamm, Julia; Taylor, Mike

    2008-12-31

    The Solar Electric Power Association (SEPA), in partnership with the American Solar Energy Society, developed an online National Solar Energy Directory with clear, comprehensive information on suppliers and purchasing options. The site was originally located at FindSolar.com, but has recently been moved to Find-Solar.org. The original FindSolar.com domain name has been taken by the American Solar Energy Society (a partner in this project) and utilized for a similar but different project. This Find-Solar.org directory offers the rapidly growing base of potential solar customers a simple, straightforward destination to learn about their solar options. Members of the public are able to easily locate contractors in their geographic area and verify companies' qualifications with accurate third-party information. It allows consumers to obtain key information on the economics, incentives, desirability, and workings of a solar energy system, as well as competing quotes from different contractors and reviews from customers they have worked with previously. Find-Solar.org is a means of facilitating the growing public interest in solar power and overcoming a major barrier to widespread development of U.S. solar markets. In addition to the development of Find-Solar.org, SEPA developed a separate online product directory for the 2005 DOE Solar Decathlon to facilitate the communication of information about the energy efficiency and renewable energy products used in each university team's home.

  4. National Solar Radiation Database 1991-2010 Update: User's Manual

    SciTech Connect

    Wilcox, S. M.

    2012-08-01

    This user's manual provides information on the updated 1991-2010 National Solar Radiation Database. Included are data format descriptions, data sources, production processes, and information about data uncertainty.

  5. Environmental data for sites in the National Solar Data Network

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1981-06-01

    Environmental information collected at the sites of the National Solar Data Network is presented in the form of tables for each solar site. The sites are grouped into 12 zones, each of which consists of several adjacent states. The insolation table presents the total, diffuse, direct, maximum, and extraterrestrial radiation for the solar site. It also shows the ratio of total to extraterrestrial radiation as a percent. The temperature table gives the average, daytime, nighttime, maximum, minimum and inlet-water temperatures for the solar site. All of the passive and some of the active solar sites are equipped with wind sensors which provide information for two wind tables furnishing wind speed and direction. For some sites, a humidity table provides relative humidity values for day and night. It also gives values for the maximum and minimum humidity for each day. A technical discussion of the instruments and measurements used to obtain these data tables is included. (LEW)

  6. 15 CFR 950.5 - National Geophysical and Solar-Terrestrial Data Center (NGSDC).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 15 Commerce and Foreign Trade 3 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false National Geophysical and Solar... National Geophysical and Solar-Terrestrial Data Center (NGSDC). The National Geophysical and Solar... geophysical data as well as ionospheric, solar, and other space environment data; develops...

  7. 15 CFR 950.5 - National Geophysical and Solar-Terrestrial Data Center (NGSDC).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 15 Commerce and Foreign Trade 3 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false National Geophysical and Solar... National Geophysical and Solar-Terrestrial Data Center (NGSDC). The National Geophysical and Solar... geophysical data as well as ionospheric, solar, and other space environment data; develops...

  8. 15 CFR 950.5 - National Geophysical and Solar-Terrestrial Data Center (NGSDC).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 15 Commerce and Foreign Trade 3 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false National Geophysical and Solar... National Geophysical and Solar-Terrestrial Data Center (NGSDC). The National Geophysical and Solar... geophysical data as well as ionospheric, solar, and other space environment data; develops...

  9. 15 CFR 950.5 - National Geophysical and Solar-Terrestrial Data Center (NGSDC).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 15 Commerce and Foreign Trade 3 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false National Geophysical and Solar... National Geophysical and Solar-Terrestrial Data Center (NGSDC). The National Geophysical and Solar... geophysical data as well as ionospheric, solar, and other space environment data; develops...

  10. National solar data network success stories

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    1981-09-01

    Three of the most successful applications in the MASEC reporting region are described. The three sites are the Scattergood School site in West Branch, Iowa; the South Dakota School of Mines site located at the Mount Rushmore Memorial Visitor's Center in Keystone, South Dakota, and the Telex Communications site in Blue Earth, Minnesota. The first is a school recreation center, the second a park recreation center, and the third a business. All three are active systems and each exhibits a variety of approaches to providing space and domestic water heating. The major success of each is that a substantial portion of the heating load was provided by solar energy. The success of the NSDN program is that it indictes the approaches and parts of the systems that seem to work best, so that conclusions can be made about which applications are appropriate in varying circumstances. A brief report is presented for each system explaining the system, the energy flow through the system, the total cost, and the energy saved per year.

  11. National solar data network success stories

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1981-09-01

    Three of the most successful applications in the MASEC reporting region are described. The three sites are the Scattergood School site in West Branch, Iowa; the South Dakota School of Mines site located at the Mount Rushmore Memorial Visitor's Center in Keystone, South Dakota, and the Telex Communications site in Blue Earth, Minnesota. The first is a school recreation center, the second a park recreation center, and the third a business. All three are active systems and each exhibits a variety of approaches to providing space and domestic water heating. The major success of each is that a substantial portion of the heating load was provided by solar energy. The success of the NSDN program is that it indicates the approaches and parts of the systems that seem to work best, so that conclusions can be made about which applications are appropriate in varying circumstances. A brief report is presented for each system explaining the system, the energy flow through the system, the total cost, and the energy saved per year.

  12. Solar pond research at the Los Alamos National Laboratory

    SciTech Connect

    Jones, G.F.; Meyer, K.A.; Hedstrom, J.C.; Grimmer, D.P.

    1984-01-01

    A description of solar pond research at Los Alamos National Laboratory is presented. The main issues in the theory of solar ponds are discussed. Among these are the interfacial-boundary-layer model, models for interface motion and pond performance, heat extraction, and ground heat loss. The core of the research effort at Los Alamos was the development of a one-dimensional computer program to accurately predict dynamic performance of a solar pond. The computer model and the experiments that were designed and performed to validate it are described. The experiments include two laboratory tanks wherein temperature, salinity, and flow visualization data were obtained and a 232 m/sup 2/ outdoor solar pond. Results from preliminary validation show good agreement between the pond's predicted dynamic behavior and that which actually occurred in the experiments. More validation using data from full-sized solar ponds is needed. A new correlation for the ratio of interfacial salt-flux to heat-flux is proposed which agrees well with our data. Recommendations for future research are given.

  13. A Solar Station for Education and Research on Solar Activity at a National University in Peru

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ishitsuka, J. K.

    2006-11-01

    pepe@geo.igp.gob.pe Beginning in 1937, the Carnegie Institution of Washington made active regional observations with a spectro-helioscope at the Huancayo Observatory. In 1957, during the celebration of the International Geophysical Year Mutsumi Ishitsuka arrived at the Geophysical Institute of Peru and restarted solar observations from the Huancayo Observatory. Almost 69 years have passed and many contributions for the geophysical and solar sciences have been made. Now the Instituto Geofisico del Peru (IGP), in cooperation with the Faculty of Sciences of the Universidad Nacional San Luis Gonzaga de Ica (UNICA), and with the support of the National Astronomical Observatory of Japan, are planning to construct a solar station refurbishing a coelostat that worked for many years at the Huancayo Observatory. A 15 cm refractor telescope is already installed at the university, for the observation of sunspots. A solar Flare Monitor Telescope (FMT) from Hida Observatory of Kyoto University could be sent to Peru and installed at the solar station at UNICA. As the refurbished coelostat, FMT will become a good tool to improve education and research in sciences.

  14. National Student Solar Spectrograph Competition Overview and Results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Des Jardins, Angela C.; Larimer, R.; Shaw, J. A.; Kankelborg, C.; Palmer, C.; Key, J. S.; Nakagawa, W.; Springer, L.; Knighton, W.; Repasky, K. S.; Pust, N. J.; Babbitt, W.; Jaeggli, S. A.; Hobish, M. K.; Wilson, E. W.; Anderson, M.; Boger, J.; McCrady, N.; Naylor, J.; Turcotte, S.; Lines, T.; Strobel, N.; Cooper, W.; Darke, R.; Head, R.; Kimball, D.; Kissel, G.; Buck, K.; Lawrence, L.; Wragg, J.; Runyon, C. J.; Spacher, P.; Dumitriu, I.; Nollenberg, J. G.; Estaban, R.

    2013-07-01

    The yearly National Student Solar Spectrograph Competition (NSSSC) is Montana Space Grant Consortium's Education and Public Outreach (EP/O) Program for NASA's Interface Region Imaging Spectrograph (IRIS) mission. The NSSSC is designed to give institutions with less aerospace activity such as Minority Serving Institutions and Community Colleges an opportunity for hands on real world research experience. The NSSSC provides students from across the country the opportunity to work as part of an undergraduate interdisciplinary team to design, build and test a ground based solar spectrograph. Over the course of nine months, teams come up with their own science goals and then build an instrument to collect data in support of their goals. Teams then travel to Bozeman, MT to demonstrate their instruments and present their results in a competitive science fair environment. This poster will present the 2012-2013 competition results.Abstract (2,250 Maximum Characters): The yearly National Student Solar Spectrograph Competition (NSSSC) is Montana Space Grant Consortium's Education and Public Outreach (EP/O) Program for NASA's Interface Region Imaging Spectrograph (IRIS) mission. The NSSSC is designed to give institutions with less aerospace activity such as Minority Serving Institutions and Community Colleges an opportunity for hands on real world research experience. The NSSSC provides students from across the country the opportunity to work as part of an undergraduate interdisciplinary team to design, build and test a ground based solar spectrograph. Over the course of nine months, teams come up with their own science goals and then build an instrument to collect data in support of their goals. Teams then travel to Bozeman, MT to demonstrate their instruments and present their results in a competitive science fair environment. This poster will present the 2012-2013 competition results.

  15. The National Large Solar Telescope (NLST) of India

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hasan, S. S.

    2012-12-01

    The Indian National Large Solar Telescope (NLST) will be a state-of-the-art 2-m class telescope for carrying out high-resolution studies in the solar atmosphere. Recent numerical simulations suggest that crucial physical processes like vortex flow, dissipation of magnetic fields and the generation of MHD waves can occur efficiently over length scales of tens of kilometers. Current telescopes are unable to resolve solar feature to this level at visible wavelengths. NLST will not only achieve good spatial resolution, but will also have a high photon throughput in order to carry out spectropolarimetric observations to accurately measure vector magnetic fields in the solar atmosphere with a good signal to noise ratio. The main science goals of NLST include: a) Magnetic field generation and the solar cycle; b) Dynamics of magnetized regions; c) Helioseismology; d) Long term variability; e) Energetic phenomena and Activity; and f) Night time astronomy. The optical design of the telescope is optimized for high optical throughput and uses a minimum number of optical elements. A high order adaptive optics system is integrated as part of the design that works with a modest Fried's parameter of 7-cm to give diffraction limited performance. The telescope will be equipped with a suite of post-focus instruments including a high resolution spectrograph and a polarimeter. NLST will also be used for carrying out stellar observations during the night. The mechanical design of the telescope, building, and the innovative dome takes advantage of the natural air flush which will help to keep the open telescope in temperature equilibrium. Critical to the successful implementation of NLST is the selection of a site with optimum atmospheric properties, such as the number of sunshine hours and good "seeing" over long periods. A site characterization programme carried over several years has established the existence of suitable sites in the Ladakh region. After its completion, currently

  16. Passive solar progress: a simplified guide to the 3rd national passive solar conference

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, H.; Howell, Y.; Richards, D.

    1980-10-01

    Some of the concepts and practices that have come to be known as passive solar heating and cooling are introduced, and a current picture of the field is presented. Much of the material presented is derived from papers given at the 3rd National Passive Solar Conference held in San Jose, California in January 1979 and sponsored by the US Department of Energy. Extracts and data from these papers have been integrated in the text with explanatory and descriptive material. In this way, it is attempted to present technical information in an introductory context. Topics include design considerations, passive and hybrid systems and applications, sizing methods and performance prediction, and implementation issues. A glossary is included. (WHK)

  17. Heat Pipe Solar Receiver Development Activities at Sandia National Laboratories

    SciTech Connect

    Adkins, D.R.; Andraka, C.E.; Moreno, J.B.; Moss, T.A.; Rawlinson, K.S.; Showalter, S.K.

    1999-01-08

    Over the past decade, Sandia National Laboratories has been involved in the development of receivers to transfer energy from the focus of a parabolic dish concentrator to the heater tubes of a Stirling engine. Through the isothermal evaporation and condensation of sodium. a heat-pipe receiver can efficiently transfer energy to an engine's working fluid and compensate for irregularities in the flux distribution that is delivered by the concentrator. The operation of the heat pipe is completely passive because the liquid sodium is distributed over the solar-heated surface by capillary pumping provided by a wick structure. Tests have shown that using a heat pipe can boost the system performance by twenty percent when compared to directly illuminating the engine heater tubes. Designing heat pipe solar receivers has presented several challenges. The relatively large area ({approximately}0.2 m{sup 2}) of the receiver surface makes it difficult to design a wick that can continuously provide liquid sodium to all regions of the heated surface. Selecting a wick structure with smaller pores will improve capillary pumping capabilities of the wick, but the small pores will restrict the flow of liquid and generate high pressure drops. Selecting a wick that is comprised of very tine filaments can increase the permeability of the wick and thereby reduce flow losses, however, the fine wick structure is more susceptible to corrosion and mechanical damage. This paper provides a comprehensive review of the issues encountered in the design of heat pipe solar receivers and solutions to problems that have arisen. Topics include: flow characterization in the receiver, the design of wick systems. the minimization of corrosion and dissolution of metals in sodium systems. and the prevention of mechanical failure in high porosity wick structures.

  18. Actual versus design performance of solar systems in the National Solar Data Network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Logee, T. L.; Kendall, P. W.

    1984-09-01

    Field measured performance were compared to the designer predicted performance. The field measured data were collected by the National Solar Data Network (NSDN) over a period of 6 years. Data from 25 solar systems were selected from a data pool of some 170 solar systems. Several concerns arose which can be partially allayed by study of the NSDN data. These are: what types of failures occurred and why; how good was the design versus actual performance; why was predicted performance not achieved in the field; and which components should be integrated with a system type for good performance. The measured results were also compared to f-chart 5.1 results. This comparison is a type of normalization in that all systems are modeled with the same process. An added benefit of this normalization is a further validation of the f-Chart model on a fairly large scale. The systems are modeled using equipment design parameters, measured loads, and f-Chart weather data from nearby cities.

  19. Toward a national plan for the accelerated commercialization of solar energy: the implications of a national commitment

    SciTech Connect

    Bennington, G.; Bohannon, M.; Gerstein, R.; Hartzler, R.; Kannan, N.; Miller, G.; Rebibo, K.; Shulman, M.; Spewak, P.; Taul, J.

    1980-01-01

    This report analyzes the expected benefits, costs, and implications of three levels of federal commitment and subsidy for the accelerated commercialization of solar energy. It includes estimates of potential solar use representing 16 to 23 percent of the nation's energy supply in the year 2000. Projections are based on data available as of early 1979.

  20. Solar membrane distillation: desalination for the Navajo Nation.

    PubMed

    Karanikola, Vasiliki; Corral, Andrea F; Mette, Patrick; Jiang, Hua; Arnoldand, Robert G; Ela, Wendell P

    2014-01-01

    Provision of clean water is among the most serious, long-term challenges in the world. To an ever increasing degree, sustainable water supply depends on the utilization of water of impaired initial quality. This is particularly true in developing nations and in water-stressed areas such as the American Southwest. One clear example is the Navajo Nation. The reservation covers 27,000 square miles, mainly in northeastern Arizona. Low population density coupled with water scarcity and impairment makes provision of clean water particularly challenging. The Navajos rely primarily on ground water, which is often present in deep aquifers or of brackish quality. Commonly, reverse osmosis (RO) is chosen to desalinate brackish ground water, since RO costs are competitive with those of thermal desalination, even for seawater applications. However, both conventional thermal distillation and RO are energy intensive, complex processes that discourage decentralized or rural implementation. In addition, both technologies demand technical experience for operation and maintenance, and are susceptible to scaling and fouling unless extensive feed pretreatment is employed. Membrane distillation (MD), driven by vapor pressure gradients, can potentially overcome many of these drawbacks. MD can operate using low-grade, sub-boiling sources of heat and does not require extensive operational experience. This presentation discusses a project on the Navajo Nation, Arizona (Native American tribal lands) that is designed to investigate and deploy an autonomous (off-grid) system to pump and treat brackish groundwater using solar energy. Βench-scale, hollow fiber MD experiment results showed permeate water fluxes from 21 L/m2·d can be achieved with transmembrane temperature differences between 40 and 80˚C. Tests run with various feed salt concentrations indicate that the permeate flux decreases only about 25% as the concentration increases from 0 to 14% (w/w), which is four times seawater salt

  1. Solar membrane distillation: desalination for the Navajo Nation.

    PubMed

    Karanikola, Vasiliki; Corral, Andrea F; Mette, Patrick; Jiang, Hua; Arnoldand, Robert G; Ela, Wendell P

    2014-01-01

    Provision of clean water is among the most serious, long-term challenges in the world. To an ever increasing degree, sustainable water supply depends on the utilization of water of impaired initial quality. This is particularly true in developing nations and in water-stressed areas such as the American Southwest. One clear example is the Navajo Nation. The reservation covers 27,000 square miles, mainly in northeastern Arizona. Low population density coupled with water scarcity and impairment makes provision of clean water particularly challenging. The Navajos rely primarily on ground water, which is often present in deep aquifers or of brackish quality. Commonly, reverse osmosis (RO) is chosen to desalinate brackish ground water, since RO costs are competitive with those of thermal desalination, even for seawater applications. However, both conventional thermal distillation and RO are energy intensive, complex processes that discourage decentralized or rural implementation. In addition, both technologies demand technical experience for operation and maintenance, and are susceptible to scaling and fouling unless extensive feed pretreatment is employed. Membrane distillation (MD), driven by vapor pressure gradients, can potentially overcome many of these drawbacks. MD can operate using low-grade, sub-boiling sources of heat and does not require extensive operational experience. This presentation discusses a project on the Navajo Nation, Arizona (Native American tribal lands) that is designed to investigate and deploy an autonomous (off-grid) system to pump and treat brackish groundwater using solar energy. Βench-scale, hollow fiber MD experiment results showed permeate water fluxes from 21 L/m2·d can be achieved with transmembrane temperature differences between 40 and 80˚C. Tests run with various feed salt concentrations indicate that the permeate flux decreases only about 25% as the concentration increases from 0 to 14% (w/w), which is four times seawater salt

  2. The Prospects of Solar Energy for Developing Nations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ramachandran, A.; Gururaja, J.

    1979-01-01

    Discussed are the potential application of solar energy and its possible benefits to developing countries. Various energy needs, including domestic, agricultural, and household, that could be met by using solar energy are discussed. (BT)

  3. Microgrid-Ready Solar PV; NREL (National Renewable Energy Laboratory)

    SciTech Connect

    2015-07-01

    Designing new solar projects to be 'microgrid-ready' enables the U.S. DoD, other federal agencies, and the private sector to plan future microgrid initiatives to utilize solar PV as a generating resource. This fact sheet provides background information with suggested language for several up-front considerations that can be added to a solar project procurement or request for proposal (RFP) that will help ensure that PV systems are built for future microgrid connection.

  4. National Program for Solar Heating and Cooling of Buildings. Project Data Summaries. Vol. II: Demonstration Support.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Energy Research and Development Administration, Washington, DC. Div. of Solar Energy.

    Brief abstracts of projects funded by the Energy Research and Development Administration (ERDA) and conducted under the National Program for Solar Heating and Cooling of Buildings are presented in three volumes. This, the second volume, identifies the major efforts currently underway in support of the national program. The National Aeronautics and…

  5. Design, construction, and implementation of a ground-based solar spectrograph for the National Student Solar Spectrograph Competition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Keeler, E.; Moen, D.; Peck, C.; Zimny, C.; Repasky, K.

    2012-10-01

    A solar spectrograph is an instrument that takes incoming sunlight over a specified portion of the sun's emitted electromagnetic spectrum and separates the light into its constituent frequency components, or spectrum. The components are then sent to a detector that measures intensity, which reveals the location of spectral properties of the light such as absorption and emission lines. The National Student Solar Spectrograph Competition (NSSSC) is a Montana Space Grant Consortium sponsored competition where undergraduate student teams from across the country design, build, and implement a ground-based solar spectrograph to perform any solar related task and demonstrate their spectrographs for the competition in May 2012 in Bozeman, MT. Each team is given a 2,000-dollar budget to build their spectrograph, which cannot be exceeded, and all spectrographs must follow regulations in the NSSSC guidelines. This team designed a spectrograph to be capable of imaging the sun across the visible spectrum using spatial filters and a standard photo detector rather than a traditional charge-coupled device due to budget limitations. The spectrograph analyzes the spectrum of small sections of the sun to determine how the spectrum varies across solar features such as the corona, active regions, and quiet regions. In addition to solar imaging, the spectrograph will also analyze atmospheric absorption of the solar spectrum by comparing the measured spectrum to the theoretical spectrum calculated from the blackbody equation.

  6. National solar technology roadmap: Nano-architecture PV

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Yong

    2007-06-01

    This roadmap addresses nano-architecture solar cells that use nanowires, nanotubes, and nanocrystals, including single-component, core-shell, embedded nanowires or nanocrystals either as absorbers or transporters.

  7. Solar energy to meet the nation's energy needs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rom, F. E.; Thomas, R. L.

    1973-01-01

    Discussion of the possibilities afforded by solar energy as one of the alternative energy sources capable to take the place of the dwindling oil and gas reserves. Solar energy, being a nondepleting clean source of energy, is shown to be capable of providing energy in all the forms in which it is used today. Steps taken toward providing innovative solutions that are economically competitive with other systems are briefly reviewed.

  8. Solar energy to meet the nation's energy needs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rom, F. E.; Thomas, R. L.

    1973-01-01

    Solar energy, being a non-depleting clean source of energy, is shown to be capable of providing energy in all the forms in which it is used today. It can be used to generate electricity, for heating and cooling buildings, and for producing clean renewable gaseous, liquid and solid fuel. There is little question of the technical feasibility for utilizing solar energy. The chief problem is rapidly providing innovative solutions that are economically competititive with other systems.

  9. An assessment of solar energy as a national energy resource

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Donovan, P.; Woodward, W.; Cherry, W. E.; Morse, F. H.; Herwig, L. O.

    1972-01-01

    The applications are discussed of solar energy for thermal energy for buildings; chemical and biological conversion of organic materials to liquid, solid, and gaseous fuels; and the generation of electricity. It is concluded that if solar development programs are successful, building heating for public use is possible within 5 years, building cooling in 6 to 10 years, synthetic fuels from organic materials in 5 to 8 years, and electricity production in 10 to 15 years.

  10. Unit: Solar Energy, Inspection Pack, National Trial Print.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Australian Science Education Project, Toorak, Victoria.

    This unit is one of a series developed by the Australian Science Education Project (ASEP) for use by students at the junior secondary level (grades 7-10) in Australian schools. The unit is a trial version dealing with solar energy, and may be used independently or integrated into a sequential program with other units. All students complete the…

  11. National solar technology roadmap: Multiple-exciton-generation PV

    SciTech Connect

    Ellingson, Randy

    2007-06-01

    This roadmap addresses the development of solar cells based on inorganic semiconductor nanocrystals (NCs)—such as spherical quantum dots (QDs), quantum rods (QRs), or quantum wires (QWs)—focusing on their potential to improve upon bulk semiconductor cell efficiencies by efficient multiple-exciton generation (MEG

  12. Physics-Based GOES Satellite Product for Use in NREL's National Solar Radiation Database: Preprint

    SciTech Connect

    Sengupta, M.; Habte, A.; Gotseff, P.; Weekley, A.; Lopez, A.; Molling, C.; Heidinger, A.

    2014-07-01

    The National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), University of Wisconsin, and National Oceanic Atmospheric Administration are collaborating to investigate the integration of the Satellite Algorithm for Shortwave Radiation Budget (SASRAB) products into future versions of NREL's 4-km by 4-km gridded National Solar Radiation Database (NSRDB). This paper describes a method to select an improved clear-sky model that could replace the current SASRAB global horizontal irradiance and direct normal irradiances reported during clear-sky conditions.

  13. Toward a national plan for the accelerated commercialization of solar energy. Workbook summaries

    SciTech Connect

    Gerstein, R.E.; Kannan, N.P.; Miller, C.G.; Shulman, M.J.; Taul, J.W. Jr.; de Jong, D.L.

    1980-01-01

    These workbooks contain preliminary data and assumptions used during the preparation of inputs to a National Plan for the Accelerated Commercialization of Solar Energy (NPAC). The workbooks indicate the market potential, competitive position, market penetration, and technological characteristics of solar technologies over the next twenty years for five market sectors: residential buildings; commercial and institutional buildings; agricultural and industrial process heat; utility applications; and synthetic fuels and chemicals. The workbooks also present projections of the mix of solar technologies by US Census Region. In some cases, data have been aggregated to the national level. Emphasis of the workbooks is on a mid-price fuel scenario, Option II, that meets about a 20 percent solar goal by the year 2000. The energy demand for the mid-price scenario is projected at 115 quads in the year 2000.

  14. Evaluating Solar Resource Data Obtained from Multiple Radiometers Deployed at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory: Preprint

    SciTech Connect

    Habte, A.; Sengupta, M.; Andreas, A.; Wilcox, S.; Stoffel, T.

    2014-09-01

    Solar radiation resource measurements from radiometers are used to predict and evaluate the performance of photovoltaic and concentrating solar power systems, validate satellite-based models for estimating solar resources, and advance research in solar forecasting and climate change. This study analyzes the performance of various commercially available radiometers used for measuring global horizontal irradiances (GHI) and direct normal irradiances (DNI). These include pyranometers, pyrheliometers, rotating shadowband irradiometers, and a pyranometer with a shading ring deployed at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory's Solar Radiation Research Laboratory (SRRL). The radiometers in this study were deployed for one year (from April 1, 2011, through March 31, 2012) and compared to measurements from radiometers with the lowest values of estimated measurement uncertainties for producing reference GHI and DNI.

  15. March 1982 environmental data for sites in the National Solar Data Network

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1982-03-01

    Environmental information collected at the sites of the National Solar Data Network is presented in the form of tables for each solar site. The sites are grouped into 12 zones, each of which consists of several adjacent states. The insolation table presents the total, diffuse, direct, maximum, and extraterrestrial radiation for the solar site. It also shows the ratio of total to extraterrestrial radiation as a percent. The temperature table gives the average, daytime, nighttime, maximum, minimum and inlet-water temperatures for the solar site. All of the passive and some of the active solar sites are equipped with wind sensors which provide information for two wind tables furnishing wind speed and direction. For some sites, a humidity table provides relative humidity values for day and night. It also gives values for the maximum and minimum humidity for each day. A technical discussion of the instruments and measurements used to obtain these data tables is included. (LEW)

  16. The utilization of solar energy to help meet our nation's energy needs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thomas, R. L.

    1973-01-01

    The nation's energy needs, domestic energy resources, and possible future energy resources are briefly discussed in this paper. Three potential solutions, coal, nuclear and solar are compared as to benefits and problems. The paper primarily discusses the options available in using solar energy as a natural energy resource. These options are discussed under the generation of electricity, heating and cooling of buildings, and the production of clean fuel.

  17. First national intercomparison of solar ultraviolet radiometers in Italy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Diémoz, H.; Siani, A. M.; Casale, G. R.; di Sarra, A.; Serpillo, B.; Petkov, B.; Scaglione, S.; Bonino, A.; Facta, S.; Fedele, F.; Grifoni, D.; Verdi, L.; Zipoli, G.

    2011-05-01

    A blind intercomparison of ground-based ultraviolet (UV) instruments has been organized for the first time in Italy. The campaign was coordinated by the Environmental Protection Agency of Aosta Valley (ARPA Valle d'Aosta) and took place in Saint-Christophe (45.8° N, 7.4° E, 570 m a.s.l.), in the Alpine region, from 8 to 23 June 2010. It involved 8 institutions, 10 broadband radiometers, 2 filter radiometers and 2 spectroradiometers. Synchronized measurements of downward global solar UV irradiance at the ground were collected and the raw series were then individually processed by the respective operators on the basis of their own procedures and calibration data. The comparison was performed in terms of global solar UV Index and integrated UV-A irradiance against a well-calibrated double monochromator spectroradiometer as reference. An improved algorithm for comparing broadband data and spectra has been developed. For some instruments, we found average deviations ranging from -16 % up to 20 % relative to the reference and diurnal variations as large as 15 % even in clear days. Remarkable deviations also arose from instruments recently in operation and never involved in field intercomparison.

  18. First national intercomparison of solar ultraviolet radiometers in Italy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Diémoz, H.; Siani, A. M.; Casale, G. R.; di Sarra, A.; Serpillo, B.; Petkov, B.; Scaglione, S.; Bonino, A.; Facta, S.; Fedele, F.; Grifoni, D.; Verdi, L.; Zipoli, G.

    2011-08-01

    A blind intercomparison of ground-based ultraviolet (UV) instruments has been organized for the first time in Italy. The campaign was coordinated by the Environmental Protection Agency of Aosta Valley (ARPA Valle d'Aosta) and took place in Saint-Christophe (45.8° N, 7.4° E, 570 m a.s.l.), in the Alpine region, from 8 to 23 June 2010. It involved 8 institutions, 10 broadband radiometers, 2 filter radiometers and 2 spectroradiometers. Synchronized measurements of downward global solar UV irradiance at the ground were collected and the raw series were then individually processed by the respective operators on the base of their own procedures and calibration data. A radiative transfer model was successfully applied as an interpretative tool. The input parameters and output results are described in detail. The comparison was performed in terms of global solar UV Index and integrated UV-A irradiance against a well-calibrated double monochromator spectroradiometer as reference. An improved algorithm for comparing broadband data and spectra has been developed and is discussed in detail. For some instruments, we found average deviations ranging from -16 % up to 20 % relative to the reference and diurnal variations as large as 15 % even in clear days. Remarkable deviations were found for the instruments calibrated in the manufacturers' facilities and never involved in field intercomparison. Finally, some recommendations to the UV operators based on the campaign results are proposed.

  19. Performance of a solar-heated assembly building at Sandia National Laboratories

    SciTech Connect

    Haskins, D.E.

    1980-09-01

    The passive solar-heating system of the assembly building at Sandia National Laboratories' Photovoltaic Advanced Systems Test Facility is described and the thermal analysis of the building is given. Performance predictions are also given, and actual performance for December 1979 and January 1980 are shown.

  20. Validation of the National Solar Radiation Database (NSRDB) (2005-2012): Preprint

    SciTech Connect

    Sengupta, Manajit; Weekley, Andrew; Habte, Aron; Lopez, Anthony; Molling, Christine

    2015-09-15

    Publicly accessible, high-quality, long-term, satellite-based solar resource data is foundational and critical to solar technologies to quantify system output predictions and deploy solar energy technologies in grid-tied systems. Solar radiation models have been in development for more than three decades. For many years, the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) developed and/or updated such models through the National Solar Radiation Data Base (NSRDB). There are two widely used approaches to derive solar resource data from models: (a) an empirical approach that relates ground-based observations to satellite measurements and (b) a physics-based approach that considers the radiation received at the satellite and creates retrievals to estimate clouds and surface radiation. Although empirical methods have been traditionally used for computing surface radiation, the advent of faster computing has made operational physical models viable. The Global Solar Insolation Project (GSIP) is an operational physical model from the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) that computes global horizontal irradiance (GHI) using the visible and infrared channel measurements from the Geostationary Operational Environmental Satellites (GOES) system. GSIP uses a two-stage scheme that first retrieves cloud properties and then uses those properties in the Satellite Algorithm for Surface Radiation Budget (SASRAB) model to calculate surface radiation. NREL, the University of Wisconsin, and NOAA have recently collaborated to adapt GSIP to create a high temporal and spatial resolution data set. The product initially generates the cloud properties using the AVHRR Pathfinder Atmospheres-Extended (PATMOS-x) algorithms [3], whereas the GHI is calculated using SASRAB. Then NREL implements accurate and high-resolution input parameters such as aerosol optical depth (AOD) and precipitable water vapor (PWV) to compute direct normal irradiance (DNI) using the DISC model. The AOD and

  1. Monitoring Solar-terrestrial Interaction at the United Nations Office at Vienna

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gadimova, Sharafat; Haubold, Hans

    Earth's ionosphere reacts strongly to the intense X-ray and ultraviolet radiation released by the Sun during solar events. Stanford's Solar Center, Electrical Engineering Department developed inexpensive space weather monitors that scholars around the world can use to track changes to the Earth's ionosphere. Two versions of the monitors exist -a low-cost version named SID (Sudden Ionospheric Disturbances) designed to detect solar flares; and a more sensitive version named AWESOME (Atmospheric Weather Electromagnetic System of Observation, Modeling, and Education) that provides both solar and nighttime research-quality data. Through the United Nations Basic Space Science Initiative (UNBSSI), such monitors have been deployed to high schools and universities in developing nations of the world for the International Space Weather Initiative (ISWI, see http://www.stil.bas.bg/ISWI/). The monitors come preassem-bled, the hosts build their own antenna, and provide a computer to record the data and an internet connection to share their data with worldwide network of SIDs and AWESOMEs. These networks are advancing the understanding of the fundamental heliophysical processes that govern the Sun, Earth and heliosphere, particularly phenomena of space weather. Mon-itoring the fundamental processes responsible for solar-terrestrial coupling are vital to being able to understand the influence of the Sun on the near-Earth environment. A SID monitor is successfully operating at the United Nations Office at Vienna (UNOV) and will be extended to an AWESOME shortly. This project will also be supported by the programme on global naviga-tion satellite systems (GNSS) applications, implemented through the International Committee on GNSS (ICG, see http://www.icgsecretariat.org).

  2. Prototype Spectro-Polarimeter for the India's National Large Solar Telescope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elayavalli Rangarajan, Komandur; Sankarasubramanian, Kasiviswanathan; Srivastava, Nandita; Venkatakrishnan, Parameswaran; Mathew, Shibu; Bayanna, Raja; Hasan, Sirajul; Prabhu, Kesavan

    2013-04-01

    India's National Large Solar Telescope (NLST) of two meter aperture size is proposed to be set up in Ladakh region of Himalayas at a height of around 4300 meters. A high resolution spectrograph along with a polarimeter is planned as one of the backend instruments for NLST. Prototype development of the NLST Spectro-Polarimeter (SP) is proposed to be designed and developed for usage at the back focal plane of the Multi-Application Solar Telescope (MAST) recently installed at the Udaipur Solar Observatory. Design of the prototype SP is discussed in detail along with the scientific goals. The SP is designed to be operated in three wavelengths to observe photospheric and chromospheric layers of the solar atmosphere simultaneously. Vector magnetic fields will be calculated in these layers. High resolution of the designed SP will provide accurate estimates of velocities. Highly resolved polarized line profiles will allow us to obtain the height variation of vector magnetic fields when used along with suitable inversion codes (like SPINOR or SIR).

  3. VOYAGE!, a Scale Model of the Solar System on the National Mall

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bennett, J. O.; Schoemer, J.; Goldstein, J. J.

    1994-12-01

    The Laboratory for Astrophysics (LfA) at the National Air and Space Museum (NASM) is proposing a new exhibit: an outdoor model of the Solar System on the National Mall, dedicated to the Spirit of Human Exploration. At one ten- billionth of the size of the actual Solar System, the model would provide a unique educational tool to illustrate the vast distances that characterize our local corner of the universe. Mounted on pedestals along a gravel walkway between the U.S. Capitol and the Washington Monument for 0.6 kilometers (an easy walk for over 10 million visitors a year), plaques would tactilely depict the scaled sizes and distances of the Sun, the planets, and their larger satellites in polished bronze. Porcelain enamel insets in the bronze would display color photographs, language-independent educational pictograms, and an international pictoral listing of spacecraft that have visited these bodies. Designed for a multi-cultural audience of varied ages and educational backgrounds, and with easy access to persons with disabilities, the model would celebrate humanity's long and ongoing relationship with Earth's nearest neighbors. Ideally, this exhibit will be supported by teacher-activity packets, self-guided tours, exportable models, computer software, and multi-lingual audio programs. This proposal is being partially funded by the NASA Solar Systems division.

  4. Scientific Programmes with India's National Large Solar Telescope and their contribution to Prominence Research

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hasan, S. S.

    2014-01-01

    The primary objective of the 2-m National Large Solar Telescope (NLST) is to study the solar atmosphere with high spatial and spectral resolution. With an innovative optical design, NLST is an on-axis Gregorian telescope with a low number of optical elements and a high throughput. In addition, it is equipped with a high order adaptive optics system to produce close to diffraction limited performance. NLST will address a large number of scientific questions with a focus on high resolution observations. With NLST, high spatial resolution observations of prominences will be possible in multiple spectral lines. Studies of magnetic fields, filament eruptions as a whole, and the dynamics of filaments on fine scales using high resolution observations will be some of the major areas of focus.

  5. Solar-terrestrial models at the National Space Science Data Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bilitza, D.

    1991-01-01

    The National Space Science Data Center (NSSDC) and World Data Center A for Rockets and Satellites (WDC-A-R&S) has a long record of participation in the worldwide efforts to establish and improve empirical models for the different regions of the solar-terrestrial environment. The center maintains a unique archive of solar-terrestrial models and related applications software, described in a recently published models catalog. The software packages are distributed on tape, diskette, and on-line on the Space Physics Analysis Network (SPAN). Four of the most frequently requested models (IRI, MSIS/CIRA, IGRF, AE-8/AP-8) can also be accessed and run on the NSSDC Online Documentation and Information Service (NODIS) account, which can be reached from any SPAN node.

  6. Evaluation of Radiometers Deployed at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory's Solar Radiation Research Laboratory

    SciTech Connect

    Habte, A.; Wilcox, S.; Stoffel, T.

    2014-02-01

    This study analyzes the performance of various commercially available radiometers used for measuring global horizontal irradiances and direct normal irradiances. These include pyranometers, pyrheliometers, rotating shadowband radiometers, and a pyranometer with fixed internal shading and are all deployed at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory's Solar Radiation Research Laboratory. Data from 32 global horizontal irradiance and 19 direct normal irradiance radiometers are presented. The radiometers in this study were deployed for one year (from April 1, 2011, through March 31, 2012) and compared to measurements from radiometers with the lowest values of estimated measurement uncertainties for producing reference global horizontal irradiances and direct normal irradiances.

  7. Safety procedures for the 100-kW solar photovoltaic system at Natural Bridges National Monument

    SciTech Connect

    Hopkinson, R.F.

    1981-09-01

    The 100-kWp solar photovoltaic power system at Natural Bridges National Monument is a unique electrical power-generation system and special safety guidelines have been developed to govern its operation. General safety requirements have been set forth to safeguard newcomers to the PV system at Natural Bridges National Monument. Procedures to be used in event of emergency, including a recommended shutdown procedure, are included together with specific safety hazards inherent in the array field, battery room, control room, and inverter room. It is the intention of this book to inform guides for visitors, operators, and maintenance personnel of the nature of these safety hazards and to detail means of effectively dealing with them.

  8. A comparison of data from SOLMET/ERSATZ and the National Solar Radiation Data Base

    SciTech Connect

    Marion, W.; Myers, D.

    1992-11-01

    This report compares data from the new National Solar Radiation Data Base (NSRDB) with data from the earlier SOLMET/ERSATZ data base. It compares the two data bases, station-by-station, with respect to their long-term average daily values of global horizontal and direct normal solar radiation. We conclude that on an annual basis, NSRDB values for global horizontal radiation are within [plus minus]5% of SOLMET/ERSATZ values for 60% of the stations, more than 5% greater than the SOLMET/ERSATZ values for 30% of the stations, and more than 5% less than the SOLMET/ERSATZ values for 10% of the stations. On an annual basis for direct nominal radiation, the NSRDB values are with [plus minus]5% of the SOLMET/ERSATZ data for only 40% of the stations, more than 5% greater than the SOLMET/ERSATZ values for 45% of the stations, and more than 5% less than the SOLMET/ERSATZ values for 15% of the stations. In general, the NSRDB shows higher values of solar radiation for the eastern United States, particularly the Northeast, and lower values for some of the western states (Arizona, Colorado, Idaho, Nevada, New Mexico, Utah, and Wyoming). However, because some of the stations within a state show higher values of solar radiation while others show lower values, this generalization may be misleading when concerned with a particular station. Consequently, the appendices provide tables showing a station-by-station comparison of the NSRDB and SOLMET/ERSATZ data. In addition to comparing annual values, the tables compare the two data bases for the months of August and December. This comparison shows larger differences between the two data bases for December.

  9. Toward a National Plan for the Accelerated Commercialization of Solar Energy: residential/commercial buildings market sector workbook

    SciTech Connect

    Taul, Jr., J. W.; de Jong, D. L.

    1980-01-01

    This workbook contains preliminary data and assumptions used during the preparation of inputs to a National Plan for the Accelerated Commercialization of Solar Energy (NPAC). The workbook indicates the market potential, competitive position, market penetration, and technological characteristics of solar technologies for this market sector over the next twenty years. The workbook also presents projections of the mix of solar technologies by US Census Regions. In some cases, data have been aggregated to the national level. Emphasis of the workbook is on a mid-price fuel scenario, Option II, that meets about a 20% solar goal by the year 2000. The energy demand for the mid-price scenario is projected at 115 quads in the year 2000. The workbook, prepared in April 1979, represents government policies and programs anticipated at that time.

  10. Primary calibration of solar cells based on DSR method at the National Institute of Metrology of China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, Yingwei; Xiong, Limin; Zhang, Junchao; Meng, Haifeng; Cai, Chuan; Zhang, Bifeng; Xie, Linlin; Liu, Dingpu

    2015-08-01

    A primary standard measurement facility based on differential spectral responsivity (DSR) method for calibration of reference solar cells was realized at National Institute of Metrology (NIM), China. The primary calibration of the critical spectral parameters and short-circuit current of reference cells, not only with WPVS (World photovoltaic Scale) design but with non-regularly shaped, can be performed by this standard facility. The linearity measurement can be carried out by measuring DSR of the solar cells at different bias levels in the spectral range from 300nm to 1200nm. The characterization and performance of the facility were reported. An uncertainty of 0.9% (k=2) for short-circuit current of WPVS reference solar cells was able to be obtained. A more accurate and better calibration service for solar photovoltaic (PV) cells could be provided to local or international solar cell research community, testing labs and industry users and manufacturers.

  11. Implementing Best Practices for Data Quality Assessment of the National Renewable Energy Laboratory's Solar Resource and Meteorological Assessment Project

    SciTech Connect

    Wilcox, S. M.; McCormack, P.

    2011-01-01

    Effective solar radiation measurements for research and economic analyses require a strict protocol for maintenance, calibration, and documentation to minimize station down-time and data corruption. The National Renewable Energy Laboratory's Concentrating Solar Power: Best Practices Handbook for the Collection and Use of Solar Resource Data (1) includes guidelines for operating a solar measure-ment station. This paper describes a suite of automated and semi-automated routines based on the best practices hand-book as developed for the National Renewable Energy La-boratory Solar Resource and Meteorological Assessment Project. These routines allow efficient inspection and data flagging to alert operators of conditions that require imme-diate attention. Although the handbook is targeted for con-centrating solar power applications, the quality-assessment procedures described are generic and should benefit many solar measurement applications. The routines use data in one-minute measurement resolution, as suggested by the handbook, but they could be modified for other time scales.

  12. 15 CFR 950.5 - National Geophysical and Solar-Terrestrial Data Center (NGSDC).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ...-A (Solid-Earth Geophysics, Solar Terrestrial Physics, and Glaciology). (a) Geophysical and solar... geological data, including data on heat flow, cores, samples, and sediments. (2) Solar-Terrestrial...

  13. National Program for Solar Heating and Cooling of Buildings. Project Date Summaries. Vol. I: Commercial and Residential Demonstrations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Energy Research and Development Administration, Washington, DC. Div. of Solar Energy.

    Three volumes present brief abstracts of projects funded by the Energy Research and Development Administration (ERDA) and conducted under the National Program for Solar Heating and Cooling of Buildings through July 1976. The overall federal program includes demonstrations of heating and/or combined cooling for residential and commercial buildings…

  14. Implementing Best Practices for Data Quality Assessment of the National Renewable Energy Laboratory?s Solar Resource and Meteorological Assessment Project: Preprint

    SciTech Connect

    Wilcox, S. M.; McCormack, P.

    2011-04-01

    Effective solar radiation measurements for research and economic analyses require a strict protocol for maintenance, calibration, and documentation to minimize station downtime and data corruption. The National Renewable Energy Laboratory's Concentrating Solar Power: Best Practices Handbook for the Collection and Use of Solar Resource Data includes guidelines for operating a solar measurement station. This paper describes a suite of automated and semi-automated routines based on the best practices handbook as developed for the National Renewable Energy Laboratory Solar Resource and Meteorological Assessment Project. These routines allow efficient inspection and data flagging to alert operators of conditions that require immediate attention. Although the handbook is targeted for concentrating solar power applications, the quality-assessment procedures described are generic and should benefit many solar measurement applications. The routines use data in one-minute measurement resolution, as suggested by the handbook, but they could be modified for other time scales.

  15. Energy in Mexico: a profile of solar energy activity in its national context

    SciTech Connect

    Hawkins, D.

    1980-04-01

    The geopolitical, economic, and cultural aspects of the United States of Mexico are presented. Mexico's energy profile includes the following: energy policy objectives, government energy structure, organizations for implementation, indigeneous energy sources, imported energy sources, solar energy research and development, solar energy organizations and solar energy related legislation and administrative policies. International agreements, contacts, manufacturers, and projects are listed. (MRH)

  16. Solar energy in Italy: a profile of renewable energy activity in its national context

    SciTech Connect

    Shea, C.A.

    1980-12-01

    The following are included: country overview; energy summary; Italian Republic-geopolitical, economic, and cultural aspects; the energy profile; imported energy sources; solar energy research and development; solar energy organizations; solar energy related legislation and administration policies; and international agreements, contacts, manufacturers, and projects. (MHR)

  17. Toward a national plan for the accelerated commercialization of solar energy: guidelines for regional planning

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, G.; Bennington, G.; Bohannon, M.; Gerstein, R.; Kannan, N.; Page, A.; Rebibo, K.; Shulman, M.; Swepak, P.; Taul, J.

    1980-01-01

    This document provides data and guidelines for the development of regional programs for the accelerated commercialization of solar energy. It estimates the solar potential for individual regions based on the solar resources, competing costs of energy, and specific regional characteristics. It also points out the primary decision makers, technology distributors, and potential barriers that should be addressed by a commercialization program.

  18. Site evaluation study for the Indian National Large Solar Telescope using microthermal measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dhananjay, K.

    2014-01-01

    A microthermal seeing measurement device has been developed in-house to measure the temperature structure function DT(r, h) and the air temperature Tair(h). A pressure sensor, located adjacent to it, measures the average barometric pressure P(h). From the data measured, the temperature structure coefficient C_T^2(r, h) and the refractive index structure constant C_N^2(h) are computed for the five equidistant microthermal seeing layers in the 3-15 m range in the surface layers. A statistical analysis is performed on the local coherence length ro(loc)(h1, h2). Corresponding values of the atmospheric seeing ɛ(loc)(h1, h2) for all 10 microthermal seeing slabs is also computed and plotted, and the data are logged in real time. Because the characterization of the three sites is under way and the best site for the National Large Solar Telescope facility is yet to be determined, in this paper I discuss the preliminary results obtained from the Hanle site. A summary of the first results is as follows: ɛ(loc) (3 m, 6 m) = 0.663 arcsec, ɛ(loc) (6 m, 9 m) = 0.465 arcsec, ɛ(loc) (9 m, 12 m) = 0.363 arcsec and ɛ(loc) (12 m, 15 m) = 0.315 arcsec.

  19. What Changed in Article 690-Solar Photovoltaic Systems- of the 1999 National Electrical Code?

    SciTech Connect

    Bower, W.; Wiles, J.

    1999-01-12

    Article 690, Solar Photovoltaic Power Systems, has been in the National Electrical Code (NEC) since 1984. An NFPA-appointed Task Group for Article 690 proposed changes to Article 690 for both the 1996 and 1999 codes. The Task Group, supported by more than 50 professionals from throughout the photovoltaic (PV) industry, met seven times during the 1999 code cycle to integrate the needs of the industry with the needs of electrical inspectors and end users to ensure the safety of PV systems. The Task Group proposed 57 changes to Article 690, and all the changes were accepted in the review process. The performance and cost of PV installations were always a consideration as these changes were formed but safety was the number-one priority. All of the proposals were well substantiated and coordinated throughout the PV industry and with representatives of Underwriters Laboratories, Inc (UL). The most significant changes that were made in Article 690 for the 1999 NEC along with some of the rationale are discussed in the remainder of this article.

  20. Estimating expected change of wind speed and solar radiation in the Carpathian basin using fine resolution regional climate models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bartholy, J.; Pongracz, R.; Dobor, L.; Miklos, E.; Gelybo, G. Y.

    2009-04-01

    Spatial resolution of global climate models (GCMs) are inappropriate to describe regional climate processes; therefore, GCM outputs may be misleading to compose regional climate change scenarios for the 21st century. In order to provide better estimations for regional climate parameters, fine resolution regional climate models (RCM) can be used. RCMs are limited area models nested in GCMs, i.e., the initial and the boundary conditions of RCMs are provided by the GCM outputs. In order to estimate the regional climate change expected in the Carpathian basin, outputs from several RCMs are summarized and analyzed for the periods of 2071-2100 (in case of A2 and B2 emission scenarios) and 1961-1990 (representing the current baseline climatic conditions). The RCM output variables with 50 km resolution horizontal are available from the completed European project PRUDENCE (Prediction of Regional scenarios and Uncertainties for Defining EuropeaN Climate change risks and Effects). Wind speed and solar radiation are both important meteorological parameters in terms of renewable energy potentials. The results suggest that in the Carpathian basin wind speed is likely to increase in all months by the end of the 21st century in case of both scenarios, which increases the wind energy potential in the region. Solar radiation is projected to increase in the summer half-year, and slightly decrease in winter. Thus, solar energy use during summer may become a more efficient renewable source in the future.

  1. Solar and Wind Energy Resource Assessment (SWERA) Data from the National Renewable Energy Library and the United Nations Environment Program (UNEP)

    DOE Data Explorer

    The SWERA Programme provides easy access to credible renewable energy data to stimulate investment in, and development of, renewable energy technologies. The Solar and Wind Energy Resource Assessment (SWERA) started in 2001 to advance the large-scale use of renewable energy technologies by increasing the availability and accessibility of high-quality solar and wind resource information. SWERA began as a pilot project with funding from the Global Environment Facility (GEF) and managed by the United Nations Environment Programme's (UNEP) Division of Technology, Industry and Economics (DTIE) in collaboration with more than 25 partners around the world. With the success of the project in 13 pilot countries SWERA expanded in 2006 into a full programme. Its expanded mission is to provide high quality information on renewable energy resources for countries and regions around the world, along with the tools needed to apply these data in ways that facilitate renewable energy policies and investments.[from the SWERA Guide at http://swera.unep.net/index.php?id=sweraguide_chp1] DOE and, in particular, the National Renewable Energy Laboratory, has been a functioning partner from the beginning. NREL was part of the original technical team involved in mapping, database, and GIS activities. Solar, wind, and meteorological data for selected countries can be accessed through a variety of different tools and interfaces.

  2. U.S. Solar Resource Maps and Tools from the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL)

    DOE Data Explorer

    Solar maps provide monthly average daily total solar resource information on grid cells. The insolation values represent the resource available to a flat plate collector, such as a photovoltaic panel, oriented due south at an angle from horizontal to equal to the latitude of the collector location. [Copied from http://www.nrel.gov/gis/solar.html] Several types of solar maps are made available. The U.S. Solar resource maps show the resource potential for energy from photovoltaics and from concentrating solar power (CSP). Both sets of maps are available in low or high resolution. A dynamic map based on version 2 of PVWATTS calculates electrical energy performance estimates for a grid-connected photovoltaic system. The map of U.S. Solar Measurement Station Locations is also dynamic, showing the spatial distribution of measurement stations across the U.S. that are monitored by programs and agencies such as DOE's Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Program or NREL's Cooperative Network for Renewable Resource Measurements (CONFRRM). Clicking on a station location will take the user to the website of that station. Finally, static map images providing solar resource information averaged by month are also available.

  3. National Program Plan for Research and Development in Solar Heating and Cooling. Interim Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Energy Research and Development Administration, Washington, DC. Div. of Solar Energy.

    This report presents the Energy Research and Development Administration (ERDA) program plan for solar heating and cooling of buildings and for agricultural and industrial process applications. An overview of the program plan is followed by a description of the ten paths to the solar heating and cooling of buildings and a brief discussion of the…

  4. Solar radiation observation stations with complete listing of data archived by the National Climatic Center, Asheville, North Carolina and initial listing of data not currently archived

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carter, E. A.; Wells, R. E.; Williams, B. B.; Christensen, D. L.

    1976-01-01

    A listing is provided of organizations taking solar radiation data, the 166 stations where observations are made, the type of equipment used, the form of the recorded data, and the period of operation of each station. Included is a listing of the data from 150 solar radiation stations collected over the past 25 years and stored by the National Climatic Center.

  5. Design, construction, and initial operation of the Los Alamos National Laboratory salt-gradient solar pond

    SciTech Connect

    Jones, G.F.; Meyer, K.A.; Hedstrom, J.C.; Dreicer, J.S.; Grimmer, D.P.

    1983-01-01

    A 232 m/sup 2/ solar pond was constructed at Los Alamos National Laboratory for the purpose of studying pond hydrodynamics on a large scale and to complement the flow visualization and one-dimensional pond simulator experiments that are ongoing at the Laboratory. Design methods and construction techniques, some of which are unique to this pond, are described in detail. The pond was excavated from a soft volcanic rock known as tuff; such rock forms a large fraction of the Los Alamos area surface geology. Because tuff has a small thermal conductivity, little insulation was required to reduce perimeter energy losses. In addition, the strength of tuff permitted the pond to be built with vertical side walls; this design eliminated local side wall convection in the gradient zone that is possible with sloping side walls. Instrumentation in the pond consists of traversing and fixed rakes of thermometers and salinity probes, an underwater pyranometer, and a weather station. The traversing rake is a wheeled trolley driven vertically on a rectangular rail. Installed on the trolley are coplanar platinum RTDs, a point conductivity probe, and an induction salinometer. The stationary rake supports 28 thermocouples and 28 sample-fluid withdrawal taps located every 10 cm. About 127 T of sodium chloride has been introduced and is nearly dissolved. A 120-cm-thick salinity gradient was established and the pond is heating. Preliminary results indicate a lower-convective-zone heating rate of 1.2/sup 0/C/day during the pond's first month of operation. Recommendations on pond design, construction, and instrumentation are presented.

  6. National commercial solar heating and cooling demonstration: purposes, program activities, and implications for future programs

    SciTech Connect

    Koontz, R.; Genest, M.; Bryant, B.

    1980-05-01

    The Solar Heating and Cooling Demonstration Act of 1974 created a set of activities to demonstrate the potential use of solar heating within a three-year period and of combined solar heating and cooling within a five-year period. This study assesses the Commercial Demonstration Program portion of the activity in terms of its stated goals and objectives. The primary data base was DOE contractor reports on commercial demonstration projects. It was concluded that the program did not provide data to support a positive decision for the immediate construction or purchase of commercial solar systems. However, the program may have contributed to other goals in the subsequent legislation; i.e., research and development information, stimulation of the solar industry, and more informed policy decisions.

  7. Five Year Research and Development Plan, 1986-1990. National Solar Thermal Technology Program

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    1986-09-01

    This Solar Thermal Technology Program Five Year Research and Development Plan discusses the planning process and describes in more detail the first five years of the long term strategy for the development of solar thermal technology. The overall strategy is to focus and structure the activities which should lead to broad economic competitiveness for solar thermal. The state of each of the technologies is first assessed to determine the characteristics of the next system which could be built. These are referred to as current capabilities. Cost/performance goals are then determined which would allow solar thermal technology to compete in the free marketplace for electricity and heat production and appear to be technically achievable in the 1990's. The critical advanced components and development decisions are identified and finally, tasks addressing each of these are delineated.

  8. Long term solar activity and ionospheric prediction services rendered by the National Physical Laboratory, New Delhi

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reddy, B. M.; Aggarwal, S.; Lakshmi, D. R.; Shastri, S.; Mitra, A. P.

    1979-01-01

    The data base used in solar and ionospheric prediction services is described. Present prediction techniques are discussed and compared with actual observations. Future prediction techniques using computers are also discussed.

  9. Solar Decathlon 2011, The National Mall, Washington, D.C., Fall 2011 (Brochure)

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    2010-04-01

    This brochure provides a high-level overview of the U.S. Department of Energy Solar Decathlon 2011-the competition's background, purpose, impact, 10 contests, 20 teams, and where to go for additional information.

  10. Renewable Resources: a national catalog of model projects. Volume 4. Western Solar Utilization Network Region

    SciTech Connect

    1980-07-01

    This compilation of diverse conservation and renewable energy projects across the United States was prepared through the enthusiastic participation of solar and alternate energy groups from every state and region. Compiled and edited by the Center for Renewable Resources, these projects reflect many levels of innovation and technical expertise. In many cases, a critique analysis is presented of how projects performed and of the institutional conditions associated with their success or failure. Some 2000 projects are included in this compilation; most have worked, some have not. Information about all is presented to aid learning from these experiences. The four volumes in this set are arranged in state sections by geographic region, coinciding with the four Regional Solar Energy Centers. The table of contents is organized by project category so that maximum cross-referencing may be obtained. This volume includes information on the Western Solar Utilization Network Region. (WHK)

  11. Renewable Resources: a national catalog of model projects. Volume 3. Southern Solar Energy Center Region

    SciTech Connect

    1980-07-01

    This compilation of diverse conservation and renewable energy projects across the United States was prepared through the enthusiastic participation of solar and alternate energy groups from every state and region. Compiled and edited by the Center for Renewable Resources, these projects reflect many levels of innovation and technical expertise. In many cases, a critique analysis is presented of how projects performed and of the institutional conditions associated with their success or failure. Some 2000 projects are included in this compilation; most have worked, some have not. Information about all is presented to aid learning from these experiences. The four volumes in this set are arranged in state sections by geographic region, coinciding with the four Regional Solar Energy Centers. The table of contents is organized by project category so that maximum cross-referencing may be obtained. This volume includes information on the Southern Solar Energy Center Region. (WHK)

  12. Renewable Resources: a national catalog of model projects. Volume 1. Northeast Solar Energy Center Region

    SciTech Connect

    1980-07-01

    This compilation of diverse conservation and renewable energy projects across the United States was prepared through the enthusiastic participation of solar and alternate energy groups from every state and region. Compiled and edited by the Center for Renewable Resources, these projects reflect many levels of innovation and technical expertise. In many cases, a critique analysis is presented of how projects performed and of the institutional conditions associated with their success or failure. Some 2000 projects are included in this compilation; most have worked, some have not. Information about all is presented to aid learning from these experiences. The four volumes in this set are arranged in state sections by geographic region, coinciding with the four Regional Solar Energy Centers. The table of contents is organized by project category so that maximum cross-referencing may be obtained. This volume includes information on the Northeast Solar Energy Center Region. (WHK).

  13. Solar energy system installed at Mount Rushmore National Visitor Center in Keystone, South Dakota

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1979-01-01

    The design and installation of the solar energy system installed at the Mount Rushmore Visitor Center is described. The system was designed to furnish about 45 percent of the heating for the total facility and about 53 percent partial cooling for the 2000 square foot observatory.

  14. Source document compilation: Los Alamos investigations related to the environment, engineering, geology, and hydrology, 1961--1990. Volume 1

    SciTech Connect

    Purtymun, W.D.

    1994-03-01

    This document is a compilation of informal reports, letters, and memorandums regarding geologic and hydrologic studies and investigations such as foundation investigations for structures, drilling or coring for environmental studies, development of water supply, or construction of test or observation wells for monitoring. Also included are replies requested for specific environmental, engineering, geologic, and hydrologic problems. The purpose of this document is to preserve and make the original data available to the environmental studies that are now in progress at Los Alamos and provide a reference for and supplement the LAMS report ``Records of Observation Wells, Test Holes, Test Wells, Supply Wells, Springs, and Surface water stations at Los Alamos: with Reference to the Geology and Hydrology,`` which is in preparation. The informal reports and memorandums are listed chronologically from December 1961 to January 1990. Item 208 is a descriptive history of the US Geological Survey`s activities at Los Alamos from 1946 through 1972. The history includes a list of published and unpublished reports that cover geology, hydrology, water supply, waste disposal, and environmental monitoring in the Los Alamos area.

  15. Source document compilation: Los Alamos investigations related to the environment, engineering, geology, and hydrology, 1961--1990. Volume 2

    SciTech Connect

    Purtymun, W.D.

    1994-03-01

    This document is a compilation of informal reports, letters, and memorandums regarding geologic and hydrologic studies and investigations such as foundation investigations for structures, drilling or coring for environmental studies, development of water supply, or construction of test or observation wells for monitoring. Also included are replies requested for specific environmental, engineering, geologic, and hydrologic problems. The purpose of this document is to preserve and make the original data available to the environmental studies that are now in progress at Los Alamos and provide a reference for and supplement the LAMS report ``Records of Observation Wells, Test Holes, Test Wells, Supply Wells, Springs, and Surface water stations at Los Alamos: with Reference to the Geology and Hydrology,`` which is in preparation. The informal reports and memorandums are listed chronologically from December 1961 to January 1990. Item 208 is a descriptive history of the US Geological Survey`s activities at Los Alamos from 1946 through 1972. The history includes a list of published and unpublished reports that cover geology, hydrology, water supply, waste disposal, and environmental monitoring in the Los Alamos area.

  16. Solar energy system performance evaluation: Seasonal report for Colt Yosemite, Yosemite National Park, California

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    1980-08-01

    The system's operational performance from May 1979 through April 1980 is described. Solar energy satisfied 23 percent of the total performance load, which was significantly below the design value of 56 percent. A fossil savings of 80.89 million Btu's or 578 gallons of fuel oil is estimated. If uncontrolled losses could have been reduced to an inconsequential level, the system's efficiency would have been improved considerably.

  17. Solar energy system performance evaluation: Seasonal report for Colt Yosemite, Yosemite National Park, California

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1980-01-01

    The system's operational performance from May 1979 through April 1980 is described. Solar energy satisfied 23 percent of the total performance load, which was significantly below the design value of 56 percent. A fossil savings of 80.89 million Btu's or 578 gallons of fuel oil is estimated. If uncontrolled losses could have been reduced to an inconsequential level, the system's efficiency would have been improved considerably.

  18. Flat-plate solar array project: Government and industry responding to national needs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Adcock, J. Patrick; Knecht, Robert D.

    1988-01-01

    This document recounts the accomplishments of the 11-year Flat-Plate Solar Array Project, which is recognized as one of the most successful and comprehensive technology-transfer efforts ever achieved through government-sponsored research and development. Few Federal research projects can claim the degree of industry involvement that was a fundamental aspect of the FSA Project. This philosophy in turn led to an extraordinary transfer of technology to the private sector, and assured that a maximum amount of the taxpayers' dollars were devoted to research of primary importance to the technology's commercialization.

  19. National Passive Solar Conference, 4th, Kansas City, MO, October 3-5, 1979, Proceedings. Volume 4

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Franta, G.

    1981-10-01

    Papers concern recent experience in the research, development and application of passive solar technology. Specific topics include the legislative barriers and incentives to passive solar systems, coupled thermal and lighting simulations for evaluating daylighting design effectiveness, passive solar applications in inner city housing, radiative cooling in a desert climate, salinity gradient solar ponds, the retrofit of a masonry home for passive space heating, the performances of active and passive solar domestic hot water systems, builder experience with passive solar home construction, the use of solar energy installations on farm buildings, and a method of determining the thermal performance of passive storage walls.

  20. Siemens solar CIS photovoltaic module and system performance at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory

    SciTech Connect

    Strand, T.; Kroposki, B.; Hansen, R.; Willett, D.

    1996-05-01

    This paper evaluates the individual module and array performance of Siemens Solar Industries copper indium diselenide (CIS) polycrystalline thin-film technology. This is accomplished by studying module and array performance over time. Preliminary temperature coefficients for maximum power, maximum-power voltage, maximum-power current, open-circuit voltage, short-circuit current, and fill factor are determined at both the module and array level. These coefficients are used to correct module/array performance to 25{degrees}C to evaluate stability. The authors show that CIS exhibits a strong inverse correlation between array power and back-of-module temperature. This is due mainly to the narrow bandgap of the CIS material, which results in a strong inverse correlation between voltage and temperature. They also show that the temperature-corrected module and array performance has been relatively stable over the evaluation interval ({approx}2 years).

  1. Shared Solar: Current Landscape, Market Potential, and the Impact of Federal Securities Regulation; NREL (National Renewable Energy Laboratory)

    SciTech Connect

    2015-05-27

    This presentation provides a high-level overview of the current U.S. shared solar landscape, the impact that a given shared solar program's structure has on requiring federal securities oversight, as well as an estimate of market potential for U.S. shared solar deployment.

  2. SunShot Prize: America's Most Affordable Rooftop Solar: A Competition To Spur Low-Cost Rooftop Solar Installations Across The Nation (Fact Sheet)

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    2012-06-01

    The SunShot Prize encourages novel public-private partnerships, original business models, and innovative approaches to installing clean, renewable solar energy. The sustainable business strategies developed by participants will provide transferable lessons that can be applied nationwide to hasten America's transition to affordable clean energy in a post-subsidy market.

  3. Toward a national plan for the accelerated commercialization of solar energy: the role of state and local government

    SciTech Connect

    Gadsby, N.

    1980-05-01

    This report characterizes solar technologies and related markets. It summarizes constraints and concerns that presently inhibit their accelerated commercialization and discusses the potential of subfederal units of government to remove, or at least alleviate, such barriers. It addresses the need for increased federal support if the potential for solar energy is to be realized.

  4. Flat-plate solar array project of the US Department of Energy's National Photovoltaics Program: Ten years of progress

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Christensen, Elmer

    1985-01-01

    The Flat-Plate Solar Array (FSA) Project, a Government-sponsored photovoltaics project, was initiated in January 1975 (previously named the Low-Cost Silicon Solar Array Project) to stimulate the development of PV systems for widespread use. Its goal then was to develop PV modules with 10% efficiency, a 20-year lifetime, and a selling price of $0.50 per peak watt of generating capacity (1975 dollars). It was recognized that cost reduction of PV solar-cell and module manufacturing was the key achievement needed if PV power systems were to be economically competitive for large-scale terrestrial use.

  5. New Multijunction Design Leads to Ultra-Efficient Solar Cell; Highlights in Research & Development, NREL (National Renewable Energy Laboratory)

    SciTech Connect

    2015-09-01

    NREL has demonstrated a 45.7% conversion efficiency for a four-junction solar cell at 234 suns concentration. This achievement represents one of the highest photovoltaic research cell efficiencies ever achieved across all types of solar cells. NREL's new solar cell, which is designed for operation in a concentrator photovoltaic (CPV) system where it can receive more than 1,000 suns of concentrated sunlight, greatly improves earlier designs by adding an additional high quality absorber layer to achieve an ultra-high efficiency.

  6. Electricity from photovoltaic solar cells. Flat-Plate Solar Array Project of the US Department of Energy's National Photovoltaics Program: 10 years of progress

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Christensen, Elmer

    1985-01-01

    The objectives were to develop the flat-plate photovoltaic (PV) array technologies required for large-scale terrestrial use late in the 1980s and in the 1990s; advance crystalline silicon PV technologies; develop the technologies required to convert thin-film PV research results into viable module and array technology; and to stimulate transfer of knowledge of advanced PV materials, solar cells, modules, and arrays to the PV community. Progress reached on attaining these goals, along with future recommendations are discussed.

  7. Insolation data manual: long-term monthly averages of solar radiation, temperature, degree-days and global anti K/sub T/ for 248 national weather service stations

    SciTech Connect

    Knapp, C L; Stoffel, T L; Whitaker, S D

    1980-10-01

    Monthly averaged data is presented which describes the availability of solar radiation at 248 National Weather Service stations. Monthly and annual average daily insolation and temperature values have been computed from a base of 24 to 25 years of data. Average daily maximum, minimum, and monthly temperatures are provided for most locations in both Celsius and Fahrenheit. Heating and cooling degree-days were computed relative to a base of 18.3/sup 0/C (65/sup 0/F). For each station, global anti K/sub T/ (cloudiness index) were calculated on a monthly and annual basis. (MHR)

  8. Cool Earth Solar

    ScienceCinema

    Lamkin, Rob; McIlroy, Andy; Swalwell, Eric; Rajan, Kish

    2016-07-12

    In a public-private partnership that takes full advantage of the Livermore Valley Open Campus (LVOC) for the first time, Sandia National Laboratories and Cool Earth Solar have signed an agreement that could make solar energy more affordable and accessible. In this piece, representatives from Sandia, Cool Earth Solar, and leaders in California government all discuss the unique partnership and its expected impact.

  9. Alternatives in solar energy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schueler, D. G.

    1978-01-01

    Although solar energy has the potential of providing a significant source of clean and renewable energy for a variety of applications, it is expected to penetrate the nation's energy economy very slowly. The alternative solar energy technologies which employ direct collection and conversion of solar radiation as briefly described.

  10. Cool Earth Solar

    SciTech Connect

    Lamkin, Rob; McIlroy, Andy; Swalwell, Eric; Rajan, Kish

    2013-04-22

    In a public-private partnership that takes full advantage of the Livermore Valley Open Campus (LVOC) for the first time, Sandia National Laboratories and Cool Earth Solar have signed an agreement that could make solar energy more affordable and accessible. In this piece, representatives from Sandia, Cool Earth Solar, and leaders in California government all discuss the unique partnership and its expected impact.

  11. Solar energy system economic evaluation final report for SEMCO-Loxahatchee, Loxahatchee National Wildlife refuge, Palm Beach County, Florida

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1980-01-01

    Economic analysis of the solar energy system installed at Loxahatchee, was developed for Loxahatchee and four other sites typical of a wide range of environmental and economic conditions in the continental United States. This analysis was accomplished based on the technical and economic models in the f Chart design procedure with inputs based on the characteristics of the installed system and local conditions. The results are expressed in terms of the economic parameters of present worth of system costs over a projected twenty year life, life cycle savings, year of positive savings and year of payback for the optimized solar energy system at each of the analysis sites. The sensitivity of the economic evaluation to uncertainties in constituent system and economic variables was also investigated. The results demonstrate that the solar energy system is economically viable at all of the five sites for which the analysis was conducted.

  12. Renewable Resources: a national catalog of model projects. Volume 2. Mid-American Solar Energy Complex Region

    SciTech Connect

    1980-07-01

    This compilation of diverse conservation and renewable energy projects across the United States was prepared through the enthusiastic participation of solar and alternate energy groups from every state and region. Compiled and edited by the Center for Renewable Resources, these projects reflect many levels of innovation and technical expertise. In many cases, a critique analysis is presented of how projects performed and of the institutional conditions associated with their success or failure. Some 2000 projects are included in this compilation; most have worked, some have not. Information about all is presented to aid learning from these experiences. The four volumes in this set are arranged in state sections by geographic region, coinciding with the four Regional Solar Energy Centers. The table of contents is organized by project category so that maximum cross-referencing may be obtained. This volume includes information on the Mid-American Solar Energy Complex Region. (WHK)

  13. Solar energy system economic evaluation: final report for SEMCO-Loxahatchee, Loxahatchee National Wildlife Refuge, Palm Beach County, Florida

    SciTech Connect

    1980-07-01

    The economic analysis of the solar energy system that was installed at Loxahatchee, Florida Operational Test Site (OTS) is developed for Loxahatchee and four other sites typical of a wide range of environmental and economic conditions in the continental United States. This analysis is accomplished based on the technical and economic models in the f-Chart design procedure with inputs based on the characteristics of the installed system and local conditions. The results are expressed in terms of the economic parameters of present worth of system costs over a projected twenty year life, life cycle savings, year of positive savings and year of payback for the optimized solar energy system at each of the analysis sites. The sensitivity of the economic evaluation to uncertainties in constituent system and economic variables is also investigated. The results demonstrate that the solar energy system is economically viable at all of the five sites for which the analysis was conducted.

  14. The Variability and Intermittency of Wind and Solar Power Can Be Overcome Without Storage By Using the National Energy With Weather System (NEWS) Simulator To Design A National US Electric (and Energy) Sector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clack, C.; MacDonald, A. E.; Wilczak, J. M.; Alexander, A.; Dunbar, A. D.; Xie, Y.; Picciano, P.; Paine, J.; Terry, L.; Marquis, M.

    2015-12-01

    The importance of weather-driven renewable energies for the United States energy portfolio is growing. The main perceived problems with weather-driven renewable energies are their intermittent nature, low power density, and high costs. The Cooperative Institute for the Research in Environmental Sciences at the University of Colorado collaborated with the Earth Systems Research Laboratory of the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration to construct a mathematical optimization of a reduced form of the US electric sector. Care was taken to retain salient features of the electric sector, while allowing for detailed weather and power data to be incorporated for wind and solar energies. The National Energy with Weather System (NEWS) simulator was created. With the NEWS simulator tests can be performed that are unique and insightful. The simulator can maintain the status quo and build out a system following costs or imposed targets for carbon dioxide emission reductions. It can find the least cost electric sector for each state, or find a national power system that incorporates vast amounts of variable generation. In the current presentation, we will focus on one of the most unique aspects of the NEWS simulator; the ability to specify a specific amount of wind and/or solar each hour for a three-year historical period for the least total cost. The simulator can find where to place wind and solar to reduce variability (ramping requirements for back-up generators). The amount of variable generation each hour is very different to an RPS type standard because the generators need to work in concert for long periods of time. The results indicate that for very similar costs the amount of back-up generation (natural gas or storage) can be reduced significantly.

  15. Eastern Renewable Generation Integration Study: Flexibility and High Penetrations of Wind and Solar; NREL (National Renewable Energy Laboratory)

    SciTech Connect

    Bloom, Aaron; Townsend, Aaron; Palchak, David

    2015-07-29

    Balancing wind and solar in a model is relatively easy. All you need to do is assume a very large system with infinite flexibility! But what if you don't have an infinitely flexible system? What if there are thousands of generators nestled in a handful of regions that are unlikely to change their operational practices? Would you still have enough flexibility to balance hundreds of gigawatts of wind and solar at a 5 minute level? At NREL, we think we can, and our industry partners agree. This presentation was presented at the IEEE Power and Energy Society General Meeting by Aaron Bloom, highlighting results of the Eastern Renewable Generation Integration Study.

  16. Chromospheric Variability: Analysis of 36 years of Time Series from the National Solar Observatory/Sacramento Peak Ca II K-line Monitoring Program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Scargle, Jeffrey D.; Keil, Stephen L.; Worden, Simon P.

    2014-01-01

    Analysis of more than 36 years of time series of seven parameters measured in the NSO/AFRL/Sac Peak K-line monitoring program elucidates five elucidates five components of the variation: (1) the solar cycle (period approx. 11 years), (2) quasi-periodic variations (periods approx 100 days), (3) a broad band stochastic process (wide range of periods), (4) rotational modulation, and (5) random observational errors. Correlation and power spectrum analyses elucidate periodic and aperiodic variation of the chromospheric parameters. Time-frequency analysis illuminates periodic and quasi periodic signals, details of frequency modulation due to differential rotation, and in particular elucidates the rather complex harmonic structure (1) and (2) at time scales in the range approx 0.1 - 10 years. These results using only full-disk data further suggest that similar analyses will be useful at detecting and characterizing differential rotation in stars from stellar light-curves such as those being produced by NASA's Kepler observatory. Component (3) consists of variations over a range of timescales, in the manner of a 1/f random noise process. A timedependent Wilson-Bappu effect appears to be present in the solar cycle variations (1), but not in the stochastic process (3). Component (4) characterizes differential rotation of the active regions, and (5) is of course not characteristic of solar variability, but the fact that the observational errors are quite small greatly facilitates the analysis of the other components. The recent data suggest that the current cycle is starting late and may be relatively weak. The data analyzed in this paper can be found at the National Solar Observatory web site http://nsosp.nso.edu/cak_mon/, or by file transfer protocol at ftp://ftp.nso.edu/idl/cak.parameters.

  17. 2010 Solar Technologies Market Report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    2011-11-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) 2010 Solar Technologies Market Report details the market conditions and trends for photovoltaic (PV) and concentrating solar power (CSP) technologies. Produced by the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), the report provides a comprehensive overview of the solar electricity market and identifies successes and trends within the market from both global and national perspectives.

  18. Solar Decathlon Visitors Guide 2011, National Mall, West Potomac Park, Washington, D.C., September 23 - October 2, 2011 (Brochure)

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    2011-09-01

    Guide to the student-designed houses, ten contests, exhibits, and workshops of the U.S. Department of Energy 2011 Solar Decathlon, held in Washington, D.C., from September 23 through October 2, 2011. Teams of college students designed and built the solar-powered houses on display here. They represent 13 U.S. states, five countries, and four continents. Now the teams are rising to the challenge by competing in 10 contests over nine days, with the championship trophy on the line. This is their time to shine. The 2011 teams may share a common goal - to design and build the best energy-efficient house powered by the sun - but their strategies are different. One house is made of precast concrete, while another 'dances' in response to its environment. Another house is meant to sit atop a building, proving the sky's the limit for energy innovation. Whatever your idea of sustainable living may be, you are bound to find it at the Solar Decathlon.

  19. Fact Sheet: Best Practices Handbook for the Collection and Use of Solar Energy Applications; Best Practices Handbook for the Collection and Use of Solar Energy Applications (Fact Sheet), Energy Systems Integration (ESI), NREL (National Renewable Energy Laboratory)

    SciTech Connect

    2015-06-01

    This fact sheet presents highlights from the Best Practices Handbook for the Collection and Use of Solar Resource Data for Solar Energy Applications, which provides detailed information about solar resource data and the resulting data products needed for planning each stage of large concentrating solar power systems, from initial site selection to system operations.

  20. Solar Decathlon 2005

    SciTech Connect

    Warner, C.; Nahan, R.; King, R.

    2005-01-01

    Solar Decathlon 2005 is a U.S. Department of Energy and National Renewable Energy Laboratory competition involving 19 colleges and universities from the United States, Canada, and Spain. These teams will compete to design, build, and demonstrate solar homes. In fall 2005, teams will transport their competition solar houses to Washington, D.C., where they will construct a solar village on the National Mall. When the houses are assembled, the teams will compete against each other in 10 contests (hence, a decathlon) for about a week. The contests range from design to comfort to energy performance. Each team must provide an aesthetically pleasing entry that produces sufficient solar energy for space conditioning, hot water, lighting, appliances, and an electric car. The Solar Decathlon is co-sponsored by BP, The Home Depot, the American Institute of Architects, the National Association of Home Builders, and the DIY Network. For more information, visit the Web site at www.solardecathlon.org.

  1. Concentrating Solar Power (Fact Sheet)

    SciTech Connect

    DOE Solar Energy Technologies Program

    2011-10-13

    Concentrating Solar Power (CSP) offers a utility-scale, firm, dispatchable renewable energy option that can help meet the nation's goal of making solar energy cost competitive with other energy sources by the end of the decade.

  2. Drivers for the Value of Demand Response under Increased Levels of Wind and Solar Power; NREL (National Renewable Energy Laboratory)

    SciTech Connect

    Hale, Elaine

    2015-07-30

    Demand response may be a valuable flexible resource for low-carbon electric power grids. However, there are as many types of possible demand response as there are ways to use electricity, making demand response difficult to study at scale in realistic settings. This talk reviews our state of knowledge regarding the potential value of demand response in several example systems as a function of increasing levels of wind and solar power, sometimes drawing on the analogy between demand response and storage. Overall, we find demand response to be promising, but its potential value is very system dependent. Furthermore, demand response, like storage, can easily saturate ancillary service markets.

  3. Solar cooking in China

    SciTech Connect

    Wang Xiping

    1992-12-31

    In the past 20 years, solar cooking has developed rapidly in China. Its popularity is easy to understand since China is a nation with a rural population of 800 million, 30% to 40% of which lack firewood. In recent years a number of scientists and engineers have researched solar cooking and tested solar cookers. The Solar Energy Laboratory has worked on the application of solar energy, especially solar cookers, and has made a number of significant achievements in the following areas: solar cooker theory; methods of designing solar cookers, testing characteristics of thermal efficiency; materials for cooker construction, and technological processes for producing cookers. This paper discusses their achievements and plans for future research.

  4. Solar astronomy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rosner, Robert; Noyes, Robert; Antiochos, Spiro K.; Canfield, Richard C.; Chupp, Edward L.; Deming, Drake; Doschek, George A.; Dulk, George A.; Foukal, Peter V.; Gilliland, Ronald L.

    1991-01-01

    An overview is given of modern solar physics. Topics covered include the solar interior, the solar surface, the solar atmosphere, the Large Earth-based Solar Telescope (LEST), the Orbiting Solar Laboratory, the High Energy Solar Physics mission, the Space Exploration Initiative, solar-terrestrial physics, and adaptive optics. Policy and related programmatic recommendations are given for university research and education, facilitating solar research, and integrated support for solar research.

  5. Final Summary of Research Report to the National Aeronautics and Space Administration Origins of Solar Systems Program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    O'D. Alexander, Conel

    2003-01-01

    The chondrites are aggregates of components (e.g. chondrules, chondrule rims and matrix) that formed in the nebula but, at present, there is no consensus on how any of these components formed or whether their formation produced or post dated the chemical fractionations between the chondrites. Chondrites are, at present, the most primitive Solar System objects available for laboratory study and the conditions under which their principle components formed would provide the most direct constraints for models of nebula formation and evolution. The conditions under which chondrules formed is of particular importance because, if their relative abundance in chondrites approximates that in the nebula, they are the products of one of the most energetic and pervasive processes that operated in the early Solar System. The goal of this proposal was to combine theoretical modeling with a comprehensive study of the elemental and isotopic compositions of the major components in unequilibrated ordinary chondrites (UOCs), with the aim of determining the conditions in the nebula at the time of their formation. The isotopes of volatile and moderately volatile elements should be particularly revealing of conditions during chondrule formation, as evaporation under most conditions would lead to isotopic mass fractionation. Modeling of chondrule and matrix formation requires the development of a kinetic model of evaporation and condensation, and calibration of this model against experiments. Cosmic spherules present an opportunity to test our evaporation models under flash heating conditions that would be difficult to simulate experimentally. However, there is surprisingly little known about the isotopic compositions of silicate cosmic spherules, and a number of questions need to be addressed. Is the range of compositions they exhibit due to evaporation? If they are, are the relative volatilities consistent with the models/experiments and are the isotopic fractionations consistent with

  6. Million Solar Roofs

    SciTech Connect

    2003-11-01

    Since its announcement in June 1997, the Million Solar Roofs Initiative has generated a major buzz in communities, states, and throughout the nation. With more than 300,000 installations, the buzz is getting louder. This brochure describes Million Solar Roofs activities and partnerships.

  7. National Energy with Weather System Simultator (NEWS) Sets Bounds on Cost Effective Wind and Solar PV Deployment in the USA without the Use of Storage.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clack, C.; MacDonald, A. E.; Alexander, A.; Dunbar, A. D.; Xie, Y.; Wilczak, J. M.

    2014-12-01

    The importance of weather-driven renewable energies for the United States energy portfolio is growing. The main perceived problems with weather-driven renewable energies are their intermittent nature, low power density, and high costs. In 2009, we began a large-scale investigation into the characteristics of weather-driven renewables. The project utilized the best available weather data assimilation model to compute high spatial and temporal resolution power datasets for the renewable resources of wind and solar PV. The weather model used is the Rapid Update Cycle for the years of 2006-2008. The team also collated a detailed electrical load dataset for the contiguous USA from the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission for the same three-year period. The coincident time series of electrical load and weather data allows the possibility of temporally correlated computations for optimal design over large geographic areas. The past two years have seen the development of a cost optimization mathematic model that designs electric power systems. The model plans the system and dispatches it on an hourly timescale. The system is designed to be reliable, reduce carbon, reduce variability of renewable resources and move the electricity about the whole domain. The system built would create the infrastructure needed to reduce carbon emissions to 0 by 2050. The advantages of the system is reduced water demain, dual incomes for farmers, jobs for construction of the infrastructure, and price stability for energy. One important simplified test that was run included existing US carbon free power sources, natural gas power when needed, and a High Voltage Direct Current power transmission network. This study shows that the costs and carbon emissions from an optimally designed national system decrease with geographic size. It shows that with achievable estimates of wind and solar generation costs, that the US could decrease its carbon emissions by up to 80% by the early 2030s, without an

  8. Purdue Solar Energy Utilization Laboratory

    SciTech Connect

    Agrawal, Rakesh

    2014-01-21

    The objective of this project is to establish and set-up a laboratory that will facilitate research and development of new low-cost and high-efficiency solar energy utilization technologies at Purdue University. The outcome will help spur the creation of solar energy start-up companies and eventually a solar energy industry in Indiana that can help fulfill the growing national demand for solar energy.

  9. Concentrating Solar Power (Fact Sheet)

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    2011-10-01

    Concentrating Solar Power (CSP) offers a utility-scale, firm, dispatchable renewable energy option that can help meet the nation's goal of making solar energy cost competitive with other energy sources by the end of the decade. The DOE SunShot Initiative is a collaborative national initiative to make solar energy technologies cost-competitive with other forms of energy by reducing the cost of solar energy systems by about 75% by the end of the decade. Reducing the total installed cost for utility-scale solar electricity to roughly 6 cents per kilowatt hour without subsidies will result in rapid, large-scale adoption of solar electricity across the United States. Reaching this goal will re-establish American technological leadership, improve the nation's energy security, and strengthen U.S. economic competitiveness in the global clean energy race. SunShot will work to bring down the full cost of solar - including the costs of solar cells and installation by focusing on four main pillars: (1) Technologies for solar cells and arrays that convert sunlight to energy; (2) Electronics that optimize the performance of the installation; (3) Improvements in the efficiency of solar manufacturing processes; and (4) Installation, design, and permitting for solar energy systems.

  10. User's Manual for TMY2s - Typical Meteorological Years

    SciTech Connect

    1995-06-01

    This user's manual describes typical meteorological year (TMY) data sets derived from the 1961-1990 National Solar Radiation Data Base (NSRDB). Because they are based on more recent and accurate data and will make possible more accurate performance and economic analyses of energy systems, these data sets are ecommended for use in place of earlier TMY data sets derived from the 1952-1975 SOLMET/ERSATZ data base. To distinguish between the old and new TMY data sets, the new TMY data sets are referred to as TMY2s. TMY and TMY2 data sets cannot be used interchangeably because of differences in time (solar versus local), formats, elements, and units. Unless they are revised, computer programs designed for TMY data will not work with TMY2 data.

  11. Interstate Solar Coordination Council. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Block, David L.

    1981-02-15

    The ISCC program accomplishments and future plans are reported as follows: overall activities; development of a national standards and certification program for solar collectors; development of a national organization for operating the collector certification program; review of applicability and use of solar collector rating procedures; development of a program for evaluation/testing/certification of solar systems; development of ISCC as a formal and independent organization; development of sizing and installation manual; and coordination efforts with other solar groups. (MHR)

  12. Insolation data manual: Long-term monthly averages of solar radiation, temperature, degree-days, and global KT for 248 National Weather Service stations and direct normal solar radiation data manual: Long-term, monthly mean, daily totals for 235 National Weather Service stations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    1990-07-01

    The Insolation Data Manual presents monthly averaged data which describes the availability of solar radiation at 248 National Weather Service (NWS) stations, principally in the United States. Monthly and annual average daily insolation and temperature values have been computed from a base of 24 to 25 years of data, generally from 1952 to 1975, and listed for each location. Insolation values represent monthly average daily totals of global radiation on a horizontal surface and are depicted using the three units of measurement: kJ/sq m per day, Btu/sq ft per day and langleys per day. Average daily maximum, minimum and monthly temperatures are provided for most locations in both Celsius and Fahrenheit. Heating and cooling degree-days were computed relative to a base of 18.3 C (65 F). For each station, global KT (cloudiness index) values were calculated on a monthly and annual basis. Global KT is an index of cloudiness and indicates fractional transmittance of horizontal radiation, from the top of the atmosphere to the earth's surface. The second section of this volume presents long-term monthly and annual averages of direct normal solar radiation for 235 NWS stations, including a discussion of the basic derivation process. This effort is in response to a generally recognized need for reliable direct normal data and the recent availability of 23 years of hourly averages for 235 stations. The relative inaccessibility of these data on microfiche further justifies reproducing at least the long-term averages in a useful format. In addition to a definition of terms and an overview of the ADIPA model, a discussion of model validation results is presented.

  13. Argonne Solar Energy Program annual report. Summary of solar program activities for fiscal year 1979

    SciTech Connect

    1980-06-01

    The R and D work done at Argonne National Laboratory on solar energy technologies during the period October 1, 1978 to September 30, 1979 is described. Technical areas included in the ANL solar program are solar energy collection, heating and cooling, thermal energy storage, ocean thermal energy conversion, photovoltaics, biomass conversion, satellite power systems, and solar liquid-metal MHD power systems.

  14. Annual DOE active solar heating and cooling contractors' review meeting. Premeeting proceedings and project summaries

    SciTech Connect

    None,

    1981-09-01

    Ninety-three project summaries are presented which discuss the following aspects of active solar heating and cooling: Rankine solar cooling systems; absorption solar cooling systems; desiccant solar cooling systems; solar heat pump systems; solar hot water systems; special projects (such as the National Solar Data Network, hybrid solar thermal/photovoltaic applications, and heat transfer and water migration in soils); administrative/management support; and solar collector, storage, controls, analysis, and materials technology. (LEW)

  15. Solar Energy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Eaton, William W.

    Presented is the utilization of solar radiation as an energy resource principally for the production of electricity. Included are discussions of solar thermal conversion, photovoltic conversion, wind energy, and energy from ocean temperature differences. Future solar energy plans, the role of solar energy in plant and fossil fuel production, and…

  16. Solar energy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rapp, D.

    1981-01-01

    The book opens with a review of the patterns of energy use and resources in the United States, and an exploration of the potential of solar energy to supply some of this energy in the future. This is followed by background material on solar geometry, solar intensities, flat plate collectors, and economics. Detailed attention is then given to a variety of solar units and systems, including domestic hot water systems, space heating systems, solar-assisted heat pumps, intermediate temperature collectors, space heating/cooling systems, concentrating collectors for high temperatures, storage systems, and solar total energy systems. Finally, rights to solar access are discussed.

  17. Solar energy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rapp, D.

    The book opens with a review of the patterns of energy use and resources in the United States, and an exploration of the potential of solar energy to supply some of this energy in the future. This is followed by background material on solar geometry, solar intensities, flat plate collectors, and economics. Detailed attention is then given to a variety of solar units and systems, including domestic hot water systems, space heating systems, solar-assisted heat pumps, intermediate temperature collectors, space heating/cooling systems, concentrating collectors for high temperatures, storage systems, and solar total energy systems. Finally, rights to solar access are discussed.

  18. Solar Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1979-01-01

    The solar collectors shown are elements of domestic solar hot water systems produced by Solar One Ltd., Virginia Beach, Virginia. Design of these systems benefited from technical expertise provided Solar One by NASA's Langley Research Center. The company obtained a NASA technical support package describing the d e sign and operation of solar heating equipment in NASA's Tech House, a demonstration project in which aerospace and commercial building technology are combined in an energy- efficient home. Solar One received further assistance through personal contact with Langley solar experts. The company reports that the technical information provided by NASA influenced Solar One's panel design, its selection of a long-life panel coating which increases solar collection efficiency, and the method adopted for protecting solar collectors from freezing conditions.

  19. Solar Thermal Propulsion Test

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1999-01-01

    Researchers at the Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) have designed, fabricated, and tested the first solar thermal engine, a non-chemical rocket engine that produces lower thrust but has better thrust efficiency than a chemical combustion engine. MSFC turned to solar thermal propulsion in the early 1990s due to its simplicity, safety, low cost, and commonality with other propulsion systems. Solar thermal propulsion works by acquiring and redirecting solar energy to heat a propellant. The 20- by 24-ft heliostat mirror (not shown in this photograph) has a dual-axis control that keeps a reflection of the sunlight on the 18-ft diameter concentrator mirror, which then focuses the sunlight to a 4-in focal point inside the vacuum chamber. The focal point has 10 kilowatts of intense solar power. This image, taken during the test, depicts the light being concentrated into the focal point inside the vacuum chamber. As part of MSFC's Space Transportation Directorate, the Propulsion Research Center serves as a national resource for research of advanced, revolutionary propulsion technologies. The mission is to move the Nation's capabilities beyond the confines of conventional chemical propulsion into an era of aircraft-like access to Earth orbit, rapid travel throughout the solar system, and exploration of interstellar space.

  20. Solar Energy Technologies Program Newsletter - September 2009

    SciTech Connect

    2009-10-01

    This quarterly newsletter is intended for participants and stakeholders in the DOE Solar Program. The content includes features on technology development, market transformation, and policy analysis for solar. Highlights include solar industry updates, DOE funding opportunity announcements and awards, and national laboratory technology developments.

  1. Solar Energy Technologies Program Newsletter - July 2009

    SciTech Connect

    2009-07-01

    This quarterly newsletter is intended for participants and stakeholders in the DOE Solar Program. The content includes features on technology development, market transformation, and policy analysis for solar. Highlights include solar industry updates, DOE funding opportunity announcements and awards, and national laboratory technology developments.

  2. Solar Decathlon: Powered by the Sun (Revised)

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    2005-08-01

    The Solar Decathlon is a collegiate competition to design and build the most energy efficient, solar-powered house. It is also an event on the National Mall in Washington D.C. to which the public is invited. This gatefold brochure describes the Solar Decathlon 2005 competition and event, including a schedule of activities.

  3. The Solar Dynamo Zoo

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Egeland, Ricky; Soon, Willie H.; Baliunas, Sallie L.; Hall, Jeffrey C.; Pevtsov, Alexei A.; Henry, Gregory W.

    2016-05-01

    We present composite time series of Ca II H & K line core emission indices of up to 50 years in length for a set of 27 solar-analog stars (spectral types G0-G5; within ~10% of the solar mass) and the Sun. These unique data are available thanks to the long-term dedicated efforts of the Mount Wilson Observatory HK project, the Lowell Observatory Solar-Stellar Spectrograph, and the National Solar Observatory/Air Force Research Laboratory/Sacremento Peak K-line monitoring program. The Ca II H & K emission originates in the lower chromosphere and is strongly correlated with the presence of magnetic plage regions in the Sun. These synoptic observations allow us to trace the patterns long-term magnetic variability and explore dynamo behavior over a wide range of rotation regimes and stellar evolution timescales.

  4. Solar Collectors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1980-01-01

    Solar Energy's solar panels are collectors for a solar energy system which provides heating for a drive-in bank in Akron, OH. Collectors were designed and manufactured by Solar Energy Products, a firm established by three former NASA employees. Company President, Frank Rom, an example of a personnel-type technology transfer, was a Research Director at Lewis Research Center, which conducts extensive solar heating and cooling research, including development and testing of high-efficiency flat-plate collectors. Rom acquired solar energy expertise which helped the company develop two types of collectors, one for use in domestic/commercial heating systems and the other for drying grain.

  5. Solar Indices Forecasting Tool

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Henney, Carl John; Shurkin, Kathleen; Arge, Charles; Hill, Frank

    2016-05-01

    Progress to forecast key space weather parameters using SIFT (Solar Indices Forecasting Tool) with the ADAPT (Air Force Data Assimilative Photospheric flux Transport) model is highlighted in this presentation. Using a magnetic flux transport model, ADAPT, we estimate the solar near-side field distribution that is used as input into empirical models for predicting F10.7(solar 10.7 cm, 2.8 GHz, radio flux), the Mg II core-to-wing ratio, and selected bands of solar far ultraviolet (FUV) and extreme ultraviolet (EUV) irradiance. Input to the ADAPT model includes the inferred photospheric magnetic field from the NISP ground-based instruments, GONG & VSM. Besides a status update regarding ADAPT and SIFT models, we will summarize the findings that: 1) the sum of the absolute value of strong magnetic fields, associated with sunspots, is shown to correlate well with the observed daily F10.7 variability (Henney et al. 2012); and 2) the sum of the absolute value of weak magnetic fields, associated with plage regions, is shown to correlate well with EUV and FUV irradiance variability (Henney et al. 2015). This work utilizes data produced collaboratively between Air Force Research Laboratory (AFRL) and the National Solar Observatory (NSO). The ADAPT model development is supported by AFRL. The input data utilized by ADAPT is obtained by NISP (NSO Integrated Synoptic Program). NSO is operated by the Association of Universities for Research in Astronomy (AURA), Inc., under a cooperative agreement with the National Science Foundation (NSF). The 10.7 cm solar radio flux data service, utilized by the ADAPT/SIFT F10.7 forecasting model, is operated by the National Research Council of Canada and National Resources Canada, with the support of the Canadian Space Agency.

  6. Solar Cooking

    Atmospheric Science Data Center

    2014-09-25

    ... (kWh/m2/day) Amount of electromagnetic energy (solar radiation) incident on the surface of the earth. Also referred to as total or global solar radiation.   Midday insolation (kWh/m2/day) Average ...

  7. Solar Lentigo

    MedlinePlus

    ... hyperpigmented) lesion caused by natural or artificial ultraviolet (UV) light. Solar lentigines may be single or multiple. This ... simplex) because it is caused by exposure to UV light. Solar lentigines are benign, but they do indicate ...

  8. Solar Equipment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1983-01-01

    A medical refrigeration and a water pump both powered by solar cells that convert sunlight directly into electricity are among the line of solar powered equipment manufactured by IUS (Independent Utility Systems) for use in areas where conventional power is not available. IUS benefited from NASA technology incorporated in the solar panel design and from assistance provided by Kerr Industrial Applications Center.

  9. Buying Solar.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dawson, Joe

    Presented are guidelines for buying solar systems for the individual consumer. This is intended to help the consumer reduce many of the risks associated with the purchase of solar systems, particularly the risks of fraud and deception. Engineering terms associated with solar technology are presented and described to enable the consumer to discuss…

  10. Solar Energy Technologies Program FY08 Annual Report

    SciTech Connect

    none,

    2009-05-01

    These reports chronicle the research and development (R&D) results of the Solar Program for the fiscal year. In particular, the report describes R&D performed by the Program's national laboratories and its university and industry partners within PV R&D, Solar Thermal R&D, which encompasses solar water heating and concentrating solar power (CSP), and other subprograms.

  11. Solar nutrinos

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bahcall, J. N.

    1981-01-01

    The topics covered include: an overview of the subject of solar neutrinos, a brief summary of the theory of stellar evolution, a description of the main sources of solar neutrinos, a brief summary of the results of the Brookhaven C1-37 experiment, an anaysis of the principal solar neutrino experiments, and a discussion of how solar neutrino experiments can be used to detect the collapse of stars in the Galaxy. A description of how the Ga-71 experiment can be used to decide whether the origin of the present discrepancy between theory and observation lies in conventional solar models or conventional physics is presented.

  12. Solar flair.

    PubMed Central

    Manuel, John S

    2003-01-01

    Design innovations and government-sponsored financial incentives are making solar energy increasingly attractive to homeowners and institutional customers such as school districts. In particular, the passive solar design concept of daylighting is gaining favor among educators due to evidence of improved performance by students working in daylit classrooms. Electricity-generating photovoltaic systems are also becoming more popular, especially in states such as California that have high electric rates and frequent power shortages. To help spread the word about solar power, the U.S. Department of Energy staged its first-ever Solar Decathlon in October 2002. This event featured solar-savvy homes designed by 14 college teams. PMID:12573926

  13. Solar flair.

    PubMed

    Manuel, John S

    2003-02-01

    Design innovations and government-sponsored financial incentives are making solar energy increasingly attractive to homeowners and institutional customers such as school districts. In particular, the passive solar design concept of daylighting is gaining favor among educators due to evidence of improved performance by students working in daylit classrooms. Electricity-generating photovoltaic systems are also becoming more popular, especially in states such as California that have high electric rates and frequent power shortages. To help spread the word about solar power, the U.S. Department of Energy staged its first-ever Solar Decathlon in October 2002. This event featured solar-savvy homes designed by 14 college teams.

  14. Solar Optics

    SciTech Connect

    Rozsnyai, B.F.

    2000-10-04

    Solar opacities are presented from the center of the Sun to the photosphere. The temperatures, densities and hydrogen mass fractions are taken from the standard solar model. For the heavy element abundances the Grevesse mixture is used. In the solar interior photoabsorption is dominated by free-free absorption and they compare two sets of opacities based on two different models for the inverse bremsstrahlung. The radiative luminosities calculated from the two sets of opacities are compared with those predicted by previous models of the standard solar model and also with the known luminosity of the Sun. pressures, specific heats and the speed of sound in the solar plasma are also presented.

  15. Solar flair.

    PubMed

    Manuel, John S

    2003-02-01

    Design innovations and government-sponsored financial incentives are making solar energy increasingly attractive to homeowners and institutional customers such as school districts. In particular, the passive solar design concept of daylighting is gaining favor among educators due to evidence of improved performance by students working in daylit classrooms. Electricity-generating photovoltaic systems are also becoming more popular, especially in states such as California that have high electric rates and frequent power shortages. To help spread the word about solar power, the U.S. Department of Energy staged its first-ever Solar Decathlon in October 2002. This event featured solar-savvy homes designed by 14 college teams. PMID:12573926

  16. Solar Energy: Solar System Economics.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Knapp, Henry H., III

    This module on solar system economics is one of six in a series intended for use as supplements to currently available materials on solar energy and energy conservation. Together with the recommended texts and references (sources are identified), these modules provide an effective introduction to energy conservation and solar energy technologies.…

  17. Solar Sailing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, Les

    2009-01-01

    Solar sailing is a topic of growing technical and popular interest. Solar sail propulsion will make space exploration more affordable and offer access to destinations within (and beyond) the solar system that are currently beyond our technical reach. The lecture will describe solar sails, how they work, and what they will be used for in the exploration of space. It will include a discussion of current plans for solar sails and how advanced technology, such as nanotechnology, might enhance their performance. Much has been accomplished recently to make solar sail technology very close to becoming an engineering reality and it will soon be used by the world s space agencies in the exploration of the solar system and beyond. The first part of the lecture will summarize state-of-the-art space propulsion systems and technologies. Though these other technologies are the key to any deep space exploration by humans, robots, or both, solar-sail propulsion will make space exploration more affordable and offer access to distant and difficult destinations. The second part of the lecture will describe the fundamentals of space solar sail propulsion and will describe the near-, mid- and far-term missions that might use solar sails as a propulsion system. The third part of the lecture will describe solar sail technology and the construction of current and future sailcraft, including the work of both government and private space organizations.

  18. Solar Physics at Evergreen

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zita, E. J.; Bogdan, T. J.; Carlsson, M.; Judge, P.; Heller, N.; Johnson, M.; Petty, S.

    2004-05-01

    We have recently established a solar physics research program at The Evergreen State College. Famed for its cloudy skies, the Pacific Northwest is an ideal location for solar physics research activities that do not require local observations. Collaborators from the High Altitude Observatory (HAO) at the National Center for Atmospheric Research have shared solar data from satellite-borne instruments such as TRACE and SUMER. HAO colleagues also share data from computer simulations of magneto-hydrodynamics (MHD) in the chromosphere, generated by the Institute for Theoretical Astrophysics (ITA) at the University of Oslo. Evergreen students and faculty learned to analyze data from satellites and simulations, in Boulder and Oslo, and established an infrastructure for continuing our analyses in Olympia. We are investigating the role of magnetic waves in heating the solar atmosphere. Comparing data from satellites and simulations shows that acoustic oscillations from the photosphere cannot effectively propagate into the chromosphere, but that magnetic waves can carry energy up toward the hot, thin corona. We find that acoustic waves can change into magnetic waves, especially near the magnetic "canopy," a region where the sound speed is comparable to magnetic wave speeds. Understanding MHD wave transformations and their role in energy transport can help answer outstanding questions about the anomalous heating of the solar atmosphere. Ref: Waves in the magnetized solar atmosphere II: Waves from localized sources in magnetic flux concentrations. Bogdan et al., 2003, ApJ 597

  19. EDITORIAL Solar harvest Solar harvest

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Demming, Anna

    2010-12-01

    into the charge transport mechanism and trap distribution in these composites [3]. An advantage of investigating solar cell technology based on organic materials rather than silicon is that silicon photovoltaics requires high-purity silicon, whereas the material demands of organic technology are not nearly so strict. Work by researchers in Denmark and Germany highlights the simplicity and tolerance to ambient conditions of organic photovoltaic fabrication in the demonstration of a nanostructured polymer solar cell made from a thermocleavable polymer material and zinc oxide nanoparticles. All the manipulations during device preparation could be carried out in air at around 20 °C and 35% humidity [4]. A possible route to enhancing cell performance is through the improvment of the transport efficiency. Researchers in Taiwan demonstrate how effectively this can be implemented in a hybrid device comprising TiO2 nanorods and poly[2-methoxy-5-(2-ethyl-hexyloxy)-1,4-phenylene vinylene] (MEH-PPV) [5]. In addition, inorganic semiconductor nanocrystals that have tunable optical bandgaps can be combined with organic semiconductors for the fabrication of hybrid photovoltaic devices with broad spectral sensitivity. A collaboration of researchers in the UK and the US has now developed a near-infrared sensitive hybrid photovoltaic system with PbS nanocrystals and C60. The reported improvement in device performance is attributed to increased carrier mobility of the PbS nanocrystal film [6]. In this issue, Patrick G Nicholson and Fernando A Castro from the National Physical Laboratory in the UK present a topical review on the principles and techniques for the characterization of organic photovoltaics [7]. The review presents a comprehensive picture of the current state-of-the-art understanding of the working mechanisms behind organic solar cells, and also describes electronic morphological considerations relevant to optimizing the devices, as well as different nanoscale techniques for

  20. SOLTECH 92 proceedings: Solar Process Heat Program

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-03-01

    This document is a limited Proceedings, documenting the presentations given at the symposia conducted by the US Department of Energy's (DOE) Solar Industrial Program and Solar Thermal Electrical Program at SOLTECH92. The SOLTECH92 national solar energy conference was held in Albuquerque, New Mexico during the period February 17--20, 1992. The National Renewable Energy Laboratory manages the Solar Industrial Program; Sandia National Laboratories (Albuquerque) manages the Solar Thermal Electric Program. The symposia sessions were as follows: (1) Solar Industrial Program and Solar Thermal Electric Program Overviews, (2) Solar Process Heat Applications, (3) Solar Decontamination of Water and Soil; (4) Solar Building Technologies, (5) Solar Thermal Electric Systems, (6) PV Applications and Technologies. For each presentation given in these symposia, these Proceedings provide a one- to two-page abstract and copies of the viewgraphs and/or 35mm slides utilized by the speaker. Some speakers provided additional materials in the interest of completeness. The materials presented in this document were not subjected to a peer review process.

  1. Solar assisted heat pumps: A possible wave of the future

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smetana, F. O.

    1976-01-01

    With the higher costs of electric power and the widespread interest to use solar energy to reduce the national dependence on fossil fuels, heat pumps are examined to determine their suitability for use with solar energy systems.

  2. Solar greenhouse

    SciTech Connect

    Baldwin, R.E.

    1980-04-01

    A solar greenhouse is disclosed wherein plants are grown and utilized as collectors to absorb solar radiation and produce heat laden humidified air through the process of evapotranspiration. This humidified air is then further heated by solar energy. Energy is then extracted from the humidified air by cooling the air and condensing the water vapor within the air. The extracted heat can then be stored and utilized as required to heat the greenhouse and plants.

  3. Sensitivity of Concentrating Solar Power Trough Performance, Cost and Financing with Solar Advisor Model

    SciTech Connect

    Blair, N.; Mehos, M.; Christensen, C.

    2008-03-01

    A comprehensive solar technology systems analysis model, the Solar Advisor Model (SAM) was developed to support the federal R&D community and the solar industry. This model, developed by staff at NREL and Sandia National Laboratory, is able to model the costs, finances, and performance of concentrating solar power and photovoltaics (PV). Currently, parabolic troughs and concentrating PV are the two concentrating technologies modeled within the SAM environment.

  4. Solar Physics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wu, S. T.

    2000-01-01

    The areas of emphasis are: (1) develop theoretical models of the transient release of magnetic energy in the solar atmosphere, e.g., in solar flares, eruptive prominences, coronal mass ejections, etc.; (2) investigate the role of the Sun's magnetic field in the structuring of solar corona by the development of three-dimensional numerical models that describe the field configuration at various heights in the solar atmosphere by extrapolating the field at the photospheric level; (3) develop numerical models to investigate the physical parameters obtained by the ULYSSES mission; (4) develop numerical and theoretical models to investigate solar activity effects on the solar wind characteristics for the establishment of the solar-interplanetary transmission line; and (5) develop new instruments to measure solar magnetic fields and other features in the photosphere, chromosphere transition region and corona. We focused our investigation on the fundamental physical processes in solar atmosphere which directly effect our Planet Earth. The overall goal is to establish the physical process for the Sun-Earth connections.

  5. Solar Simulator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1981-01-01

    Oriel Corporation's simulators have a high pressure xenon lamp whose reflected light is processed by an optical system to produce a uniform solar beam. Because of many different types of applications, the simulators must be adjustable to replicate many different areas of the solar radiation spectrum. Simulators are laboratory tools for such purposes as testing and calibrating solar cells, or other solar energy systems, testing dyes, paints and pigments, pharmaceuticals and cosmetic preparations, plant and animal studies, food and agriculture studies and oceanographic research.

  6. A generalized analysis of solar space heating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clark, J. A.

    A life-cycle model is developed for solar space heating within the United States. The model consists of an analytical relationship among five dimensionless parameters that include all pertinent technical, climatological, solar, operating and economic factors that influence the performance of a solar space heating system. An important optimum condition presented is the break-even metered cost of conventional fuel at which the cost of the solar system is equal to that of a conventional heating system. The effect of Federal (1980) and State (1979) income tax credits on these costs is determined. A parameter that includes both solar availability and solar system utilization is derived and plotted on a map of the U.S. This parameter shows the most favorable present locations for solar space heating application to be in the Central and Mountain States. The data employed are related to the rehabilitated solar data recently made available by the National Climatic Center.

  7. Lowry Range Solar Station: Arapahoe County, Colorado (Data)

    DOE Data Explorer

    Yoder, M.; Andreas, A.

    2008-05-30

    A partnership with industry and U.S. Department of Energy's National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) to collect solar data to support future solar power generation in the United States. The measurement station monitors global horizontal, direct normal, and diffuse horizontal irradiance to define the amount of solar energy that hits this particular location. The solar measurement instrumentation is also accompanied by meteorological monitoring equipment to provide scientists with a complete picture of the solar power possibilities.

  8. A comparison of the solar-gas and solar-electric interface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mannella, G. G.

    1982-01-01

    The introduction of large-scale solar-derived gas, electricity, and home heat into the national pipeline, electric grid, and fuel supply systems is discussed. Natural gas is shown to be substitutable for most other energy sources, having a lower cost per energy unit than electricity or oil, and able to be augmented by biomass derived methane or solar derived hydrogen. The latter is perceived as an unproven technology, both economically and technically. Solar home heating systems will lower the utilities' rate base and lead to minimum charge rates for solar customers and higher rates for regular customers unless utilities are permitted to enter the solar heating business as an extension of their role as a service institution. Dispersed solar electric systems are seen to be the least economical use of solar systems, while the solar-gas system offers the greatest potential as a bridge for solar technologies into residential, institutional, and commercial markets.

  9. Summary of solar energy technology characterizations

    SciTech Connect

    D'Alessio, Dr., Gregory J.; Blaunstein, Dr., Robert R.

    1980-09-01

    This report summarizes the design, operating, energy, environmental, and economic characteristics of 38 model solar systems used in the Technology Assessment of Solar Energy Systems Project including solar heating and cooling of buildings, agricultural and industrial process heat, solar electric conversion, and industrial biomass systems. The generic systems designs utilized in this report were based on systems studies and mission analyses performed by the DOE National Laboratories and the MITRE Corporation. The purpose of those studies were to formulate materials and engineering cost data and performance data of solar equipment once mass produced.

  10. Solar Technology Acceleration Center (SolarTAC): Solar Resource & Meteorological Assessment Project (SOLRMAP); Aurora, Colorado (Data)

    DOE Data Explorer

    Wilcox, S.; Andreas, A.

    2011-02-11

    Located in Colorado, near Denver International Airport, SolarTAC is a private, member-based, 74-acre outdoor facility where the solar industry tests, validates, and demonstrates advanced solar technologies. SolarTAC was launched in 2008 by a public-private consortium, including Midwest Research Institute (MRI). As a supporting member of SolarTAC, the U.S. Department of Energy's National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) has established a high quality solar and meteorological measurement station at this location. This Solar Resource and Meteorological Assessment Project (SOLRMAP) provides high quality measurements to support deployment of power projects in the United States. The no-funds-exchanged collaboration brings NREL solar resource assessment expertise together with industry needs for measurements. The end result is high quality data sets to support the financing, design, and monitoring of large scale solar power projects for industry in addition to research-quality data for NREL model development. NREL provides consultation for instrumentation and station deployment, along with instrument calibrations, data acquisition, quality assessment, data distribution, and summary reports. Industry participants provide equipment, infrastructure, and station maintenance.

  11. Assessment of active solar systems in the residential sector of North Carolina, 1974 - 1995

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brown, D.; St. John, K.

    1981-02-01

    An evaluation is presented of the contribution active solar systems can make in North Carolina's residential sector over the next 15 years. The report is divided into 5 parts: introduction; current solar industry status; projected use of active solar systems to 1995; maximum potential for active solar systems to 1995; recommendations for state solar incentives. Information in the appendices includes: conversion methodology; square feet of collector to Btu; economic analysis of solar systems based on life costs; methodology for percentage breakdowns on projected solar system sales; North Carolina solar manufacturers/distributors and national manufacturers; solar legislation; economic analysis of solar systems; and data sources.

  12. Updates to ISO 21348 (determining solar irradiances)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tobiska, W. Kent

    2012-07-01

    The ISO 21348 (Determining Solar Irradiances) International Standard is going through a document update. A consensus solar spectrum, solar indices/proxies descriptions, solar model descriptions, and solar measurement descriptions are among the Annexes that are proposed to the standard. These topics will be reviewed and described. The International Standards Organization (ISO) published IS 21348 in 2007 after 7 years of development by the international scientific community. In ISO, documents are reviewed on a regular basis and reaffirmed, updated, or deleted according to the votes of national delegations represented in ISO. IS 21348 provides guidelines for specifying the process of determining solar irradiances. Solar irradiances are reported through products such as measurement sets, reference spectra, empirical models, theoretical models and solar irradiance proxies or indices. These products are used in scientific and engineering applications to characterize within the natural space environment solar irradiances that are relevant to space systems and materials. Examples of applications using input solar irradiance energy include the determination of atmospheric densities for spacecraft orbit determination, attitude control and re-entry calculations, as well as for debris mitigation and collision avoidance activity. Direct and indirect pressure from solar irradiance upon spacecraft surfaces also affects attitude control separately from atmospheric density effects. Solar irradiances are used to provide inputs for a) calculations of ionospheric parameters, b) photon-induced radiation effects, and c) radiative transfer modeling of planetary atmospheres. Input solar irradiance energy is used to characterize material properties related to spacecraft thermal control, including surface temperatures, reflectivity, absorption and degradation. Solar energy applications requiring a standard process for determining solar irradiance energy include i) solar cell power

  13. Solar Technologies

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    von Hippel, Frank; Williams, Robert H.

    1975-01-01

    As fossil fuels decrease in availability and environmental concerns increase, soalr energy is becoming a potential major energy source. Already solar energy is used for space heating in homes. Proposals for solar-electric generating systems include land-based or ocean-based collectors and harnessing wind and wave power. Photosynthesis can also…

  14. Solar Sprint

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tabor, Richard; Anderson, Stephen

    2007-01-01

    In the "Solar Sprint" activity, students design, test, and race a solar-powered car built with Legos. The use of ratios is incorporated to simulate the actual work of scientists and engineers. This method encourages fourth-grade students to think about multiple variables and stimulates their curiosity when an activity doesn't come out as…

  15. Solar Eclipse

    Atmospheric Science Data Center

    2013-04-19

    ...   View Larger Image On June 10, 2002 the Moon obscured the central portion of the solar disk in a phenomenon known as an annular solar eclipse. Partial phases of the eclipse were visible throughout much of southeast Asia and North ...

  16. Solar Thermal Propulsion Test Facility

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1999-01-01

    Researchers at the Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) have designed, fabricated and tested the first solar thermal engine, a non-chemical rocket engine that produces lower thrust but has better thrust efficiency than a chemical combustion engine. MSFC turned to solar thermal propulsion in the early 1990s due to its simplicity, safety, low cost, and commonality with other propulsion systems. Solar thermal propulsion works by acquiring and redirecting solar energy to heat a propellant. This photograph, taken at MSFC's Solar Thermal Propulsion Test Facility, shows a concentrator mirror, a combination of 144 mirrors forming this 18-ft diameter concentrator, and a vacuum chamber that houses the focal point. The 20- by 24-ft heliostat mirror (not shown in this photograph) has a dual-axis control that keeps a reflection of the sunlight on the 18-foot diameter concentrator mirror, which then focuses the sunlight to a 4-in focal point inside the vacuum chamber. The focal point has 10 kilowatts of intense solar power. As part of MSFC's Space Transportation Directorate, the Propulsion Research Center serves as a national resource for research of advanced, revolutionary propulsion technologies. The mission is to move the Nation's capabilities beyond the confines of conventional chemical propulsion into an era of aircraft-like access to Earth-orbit, rapid travel throughout the solar system, and exploration of interstellar space.

  17. Solar Thermal Propulsion Test Facility

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1999-01-01

    Researchers at the Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) have designed, fabricated, and tested the first solar thermal engine, a non-chemical rocket engine that produces lower thrust but has better thrust efficiency than a chemical combustion engine. MSFC turned to solar thermal propulsion in the early 1990s due to its simplicity, safety, low cost, and commonality with other propulsion systems. Solar thermal propulsion works by acquiring and redirecting solar energy to heat a propellant. This photograph shows a fully assembled solar thermal engine placed inside the vacuum chamber at the test facility prior to testing. The 20- by 24-ft heliostat mirror (not shown in this photograph) has a dual-axis control that keeps a reflection of the sunlight on the 18-ft diameter concentrator mirror, which then focuses the sunlight to a 4-in focal point inside the vacuum chamber. The focal point has 10 kilowatts of intense solar power. As part of MSFC's Space Transportation Directorate, the Propulsion Research Center serves as a national resource for research of advanced, revolutionary propulsion technologies. The mission is to move theNation's capabilities beyond the confines of conventional chemical propulsion into an era of aircraft-like access to Earth orbit, rapid travel throughout the solar system, and exploration of interstellar space.

  18. Final report for %22High performance computing for advanced national electric power grid modeling and integration of solar generation resources%22, LDRD Project No. 149016.

    SciTech Connect

    Reno, Matthew J.; Riehm, Andrew Charles; Hoekstra, Robert John; Munoz-Ramirez, Karina; Stamp, Jason Edwin; Phillips, Laurence R.; Adams, Brian M.; Russo, Thomas V.; Oldfield, Ron A.; McLendon, William Clarence, III; Nelson, Jeffrey Scott; Hansen, Clifford W.; Richardson, Bryan T.; Stein, Joshua S.; Schoenwald, David Alan; Wolfenbarger, Paul R.

    2011-02-01

    Design and operation of the electric power grid (EPG) relies heavily on computational models. High-fidelity, full-order models are used to study transient phenomena on only a small part of the network. Reduced-order dynamic and power flow models are used when analysis involving thousands of nodes are required due to the computational demands when simulating large numbers of nodes. The level of complexity of the future EPG will dramatically increase due to large-scale deployment of variable renewable generation, active load and distributed generation resources, adaptive protection and control systems, and price-responsive demand. High-fidelity modeling of this future grid will require significant advances in coupled, multi-scale tools and their use on high performance computing (HPC) platforms. This LDRD report demonstrates SNL's capability to apply HPC resources to these 3 tasks: (1) High-fidelity, large-scale modeling of power system dynamics; (2) Statistical assessment of grid security via Monte-Carlo simulations of cyber attacks; and (3) Development of models to predict variability of solar resources at locations where little or no ground-based measurements are available.

  19. DOE Solar Energy Technologies Program FY 2005 Annual Report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    2006-03-01

    The DOE Solar Energy Technologies Program FY 2005 Annual Report chronicles the R&D results of the U.S. Department of Energy Solar Energy Technologies Program for Fiscal Year 2005. In particular, the report describes R&D performed by the Program?s national laboratories (National Renewable Energy Laboratory, Sandia National Laboratories, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, and Brookhaven National Laboratory) and university and industry partners.

  20. DOE Solar Energy Technologies Program: FY 2004 Annual Report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    2005-10-01

    The DOE Solar Energy Technologies Program FY 2004 Annual Report chronicles the R&D results of the U.S. Department of Energy Solar Energy Technologies Program for Fiscal Year 2004. In particular, the report describes R&D performed by the Program's national laboratories (National Renewable Energy Laboratory, Sandia National Laboratories, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, and Brookhaven National Laboratory) and university and industry partners.

  1. DOE Solar Energy Technologies Program FY 2006 Annual Report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    2007-07-01

    The DOE Solar Energy Technologies Program FY 2006 Annual Report chronicles the R&D results of the U.S. Department of Energy Solar Energy Technologies Program for Fiscal Year 2005. In particular, the report describes R&D performed by the Program's national laboratories (National Renewable Energy Laboratory, Sandia National Laboratories, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, and Brookhaven National Laboratory) and university and industry partners.

  2. DOE Solar Energy Technologies Program 2007 Annual Report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    2008-07-01

    The DOE Solar Energy Technologies Program FY 2007 Annual Report chronicles the R&D results of the U.S. Department of Energy Solar Energy Technologies Program from October 2006 to September 2007. In particular, the report describes R&D performed by the Program's national laboratories (National Renewable Energy Laboratory, Sandia National Laboratories, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, and Brookhaven National Laboratory) and university and industry partners.

  3. Solar electricity and solar fuels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spiers, David J.

    1989-04-01

    The nature of solar radiation and its variation with location is described. The distribution of energy in the solar spectrum places immediate limits on the theoretical efficiency of conversion processes, since practical absorbers cannot convert all wavelengths received to useful energy. The principles of solar energy conversion methods are described. Absorption of solar energy can give rise to direct electrical generation, heating, or chemical change. Electrical generation from sunlight can be achieved by photovoltaic systems directly or by thermal systems which use solar heat to drive a heat engine and generator. The technology used and under research for promising ways of producing electricity or fuel from solar energy is described. Photovoltaic technology is established today for remote area, small power applications, and photovoltaic module sales alone are over 100 million dollars per year at present. The photovoltaic market has grown steadily since the mid-1970's, as prices have fallen continuously. Future energy options are briefly described. The merits of a sustainable energy economy, based on renewable energy resources, including solar energy, are emphasized, as this seems to provide the only hope of eliminating the problems caused by the build-up of atmospheric carbon dioxide, acid rain pollution and nuclear waste disposal. There is no doubt that clean fuels which were derived from solar energy and either did not involve carbon dioxide and used atmospheric carbon dioxide as the source dioxide as the source of carbon would be a worthy ideal. Methods described could one day achieve this.

  4. False Dawn of a Solar Age: A History of Solar Heating and Power During the Energy Crisis, 1973-1986

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scavo, Jordan Michael

    The unfolding of the energy crisis in the early 1970s brought solar to the fore as a topic for national discussion. National dialogues about solar power and national energy policy were one way that Americans interpreted their present and envisioned their nation's future. Yet, policy makers and the general public considered alternative energies, including solar, largely based on the economic conditions of their eras, considerations that, at least until the Reagan era, often transcended political ideologies and parties. Energy prices and the emerging political expediency of replacing fossil fuels were the primary drivers in shaping federal energy policies and public interest during this era. Enthusiasm for solar power often corresponded to the market price of petroleum. By the late 1970s, a lot of people believed the same. Amid growing public enthusiasm, President Carter eventually came out strongly in favor of solar energy, mounting solar panels on the White House and unveiling a plan to procure 20% of the nation's energy from the sun by the year 2000. During the 1960s and 1970s, Americans changed their energy values in response to concerns over environmentalism and the antinuclear movement. Pollution, environmental disasters, and energy crises during the 1960s and 1970s brought terms like "clean energy" and "renewable energy" into the national lexicon, and solar often served as the most prominent symbol of those ideas. At the same time, advocates presented solar as a stark contrast to nuclear: solar energy made life on earth possible; nuclear energy made it perilous. Science fiction and futurism shaped the American popular imagination through its presentation of solar technology. Each genre suffused the other and ingrained in the American national consciousness a sense of grandiose wonderment about the potential for solar energy, a potential that often did not match the contemporary applications for solar technology. The emergence of solar industries alarmed oil

  5. The Solar-B Mission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Antiochos, Spiro; Acton, Loren; Canfield, Richard; Davila, Joseph; Davis, John; Dere, Kenneth; Doschek, George; Golub, Leon; Harvey, John; Hathaway, David; Hudson, Hugh; Moore, Ronald; Lites, Bruce; Rust, David; Strong, Keith; Title, Alan

    1997-01-01

    Solar-B, the next ISAS mission (with major NASA participation), is designed to address the fundamental question of how magnetic fields interact with plasma to produce solar variability. The mission has a number of unique capabilities that will enable it to answer the outstanding questions of solar magnetism. First, by escaping atmospheric seeing, it will deliver continuous observations of the solar surface with unprecedented spatial resolution. Second, Solar-B will deliver the first accurate measurements of all three components of the photospheric magnetic field. Solar-B will measure both the magnetic energy driving the photosphere and simultaneously its effects in the corona. Solar-B offers unique programmatic opportunities to NASA. It will continue an effective collaboration with our most reliable international partner. It will deliver images and data that will have strong public outreach potential. Finally, the science of Solar-B is clearly related to the themes of origins and plasma astrophysics, and contributes directly to the national space weather and global change programs.

  6. Solar ponds

    SciTech Connect

    Jayadev, T.S.; Edesess, M.

    1980-04-01

    This report first describes the different types of solar ponds including the nonconvecting salt gradient pond and various saltless pond designs. It then discusses the availability and cost of salts for salt gradient ponds, and compares the economics of salty and saltless ponds as a function of salt cost. A simple computational model is developed to approximate solar pond performance. This model is later used to size solar ponds for district heating and industrial process heat applications. For district heating, ponds are sized to provide space conditioning for a group of homes, in different regions of the United States. Size requirements is on the order of one acre for a group of 25 to 50 homes. An economic analysis is performed of solar ponds used in two industrial process heat applications. The analysis finds that solar ponds are competitive when conventional heat sources are priced at $5 per million Btu and expected to rise in price at a rate of 10% per year. The application of solar ponds to the generation of electricity is also discussed. Total solar pond potential for displacing conventional energy sources is estimated in the range of from one to six quadrillion Btu per year in the near and intermediate future.

  7. Solar sail

    SciTech Connect

    Drexler, K.E.

    1986-09-30

    This patent describes a solar sail propulsion system comprising: solar sail means for intercepting light pressure to produce thrust, the solar sail means being a thin metal film; tension truss means having two ends attached at one end to the solar sail means for transferring the thrust from the solar sail and for preventing gross deformation of the solar sail under light pressure, the solar sail means being a plurality of separate generally two-dimensional pieces joined by springs to the tension truss means; a payload attached to the other end of the tension truss means, the tension truss means comprising a plurality of attachment means for attaching shroud lines to the top of the tension truss means and a plurality of the shroud lines attached to the attachment means at one of their ends and the payload at the other; a plurality of reel means attached to the shroud lines for controllably varying the length of the lines; and a plurality of reflective panel means attached to the sail means for controlling the orientation of the system.

  8. Solar ponds

    SciTech Connect

    Jayadev, T.S.; Edesess, M.

    1980-04-01

    The different types of solar ponds are described, including the nonconvecting salt gradient pond and various saltless pond designs. Then the availability and cost of salts for salt gradient ponds are discussed and costs are compared. A simple computational model is developed to approximate solar pond performance. This model is later used to size solar ponds for district heating and industrial process heat applications. For district heating, ponds are sized to provide space conditioning for a group of homes, in different regions of the United States. Size requirement is on the order of one acre for a group of 25 to 50 homes. An economic analysis is performed of solar ponds used in two industrial process heat applications. The analysis finds that solar ponds are competitive when conventional heat sources are priced at $5 per million Btu and expected to rise in price at a rate of 10% per year. The application of solar ponds to the generation of electricity is also discussed. Total solar pond potential for displacing conventional energy sources is estimated in the range of from one to six quadrillion Btu per year in the near and intermediate future.

  9. Technical Assistance for Southwest Solar Technologies Inc. Final Report

    SciTech Connect

    Munoz-Ramos, Karina; Brainard, James Robert; McIntyre, Annie; Bauer, Stephen J.; Akin, Lili A.; Nicol, Katherine; Hayden, Herb

    2012-07-01

    Southwest Solar Technologies Inc. is constructing a Solar-Fuel Hybrid Turbine energy system. This innovative energy system combines solar thermal energy with compressed air energy storage and natural gas fuel backup capability to provide firm, non-intermittent power. In addition, the energy system will have very little impact on the environment since, unlike other Concentrated Solar Power (CSP) technologies, it requires minimal water. In 2008 Southwest Solar Technologies received a Solar America Showcase award from the Department of Energy for Technical Assistance from Sandia National Laboratories. This report details the work performed as part of the Solar America Showcase award for Southwest Solar Technologies. After many meetings and visits between Sandia National Labs and Southwest Solar Technologies, several tasks were identified as part of the Technical Assistance and the analysis and results for these are included here.

  10. Solar economy and technology update

    SciTech Connect

    Brotherton, T.K.

    1983-06-01

    The industry, national, and consumer perspectives on solar power are reviewed. With a 30% increase in dealer/installers, and a 30% attrition rate, about 60% of the participants in the market are ''new kids on the block.'' The installed value of the market was $750 million in 1981. There was a 30% decline in volumes, due to the recession, in 1982. As for the national perspective, solar is labor intensive, and generated a billion dollars worth of jobs. As the DOE has abandoned all but high risk ''core technology'' RandD has faltered some. But desiccant heat pumps, polymer collectors, and parabolic collectors are discussed.

  11. Midtemperature solar systems test faclity predictions for thermal performance based on test data: Solar Kinetics T-700 solar collector with glass reflector surface

    SciTech Connect

    Harrison, T.D.

    1981-03-01

    Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque (SNLA), is currently conducting a program to predict the performance and measure the characteristics of commercially available solar collectors that have the potential for use in industrial process heat and enhanced oil recovery applications. The thermal performance predictions for the Solar Kinetics solar line-focusing parabolic trough collector for five cities in the US are presented. (WHK)

  12. Solar Two

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1998-04-01

    Solar Two is a concentrating solar power plant that can supply electric power on demand to the local utility, Southern California Edison Company. It can do so because it operates not only during sunny parts of the day, but it can store enough thermal energy from the sun to operate during cloudy periods and after dark, for up to three hours, at its rated output of 10 megawatts (MW). For the first time ever, a utility scale solar power plant can supply electricity when the utility needs it most, to satisfy the energy requirements of its customers.

  13. Sunshot Initiative High Penetration Solar Portal

    DOE Data Explorer

    The DOE SunShot Initiative is a collaborative national initiative to make solar energy cost-competitive with other forms of energy by the end of the decade. Reducing the installed cost of solar energy systems by about 75% will drive widespread large-scale adoption of this renewable energy and restore U.S. leadership in the global clean energy race. The High Penetration Solar Portal was created as a resource to aggregate the most relevant and timely information related to high penetration solar scenarios and integrating solar into the grid. The site is designed so that utilities, grant awardees, regulators, researchers, and other solar professionals can easily share data, case studies, lessons learned, and demonstration project findings. [from https://solarhighpen.energy.gov/about_the_high_penetration_solar_portal

  14. Communicating Solar Astronomy to the public

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yaji, Kentaro; Solar Observatory NAOJ, The

    2015-08-01

    The Sun is the nearest star to us, so that the public is greatly interested in the Sun itself and in solar activity. The Solar Observatory, National Astronomical Observatory of Japan is one of the solar research divisions. Various data of the Sun obtained with our instruments, systematically accumulated more than one hundred years since 1910s, are open to not only researchers but also the public as online database. So, we have many chances that the public request solar images for the education and the media. In addition, we release daily solar observation informations on the web and with social media and guide visitors to our observation facilities. It is reviewed about the public relations and outreach activities of the Solar Observatory, including recent solar observation topics.

  15. U.S. Solar-Terrestrial Research Program

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Intriligator, Devrie S.

    The Committee on Solar-Terrestrial Research (CSTR) of the National Research Council of the National Academy of Sciences is charged with looking after the health of solar-terrestrial research in the United States. In 1984 the National Academy Press published the CSTR report “National Solar-Terrestrial Research Program.” This program implements the recommendations of the earlier National Research Council study “Solar-Terrestrial Research for the 1980's” (1981). The earlier study, which took over 18 months to complete and involved the participation of more than 150 scientists, specifically identified the principal scientific and management recommendations required for a balanced solar-terrestrial program. The present study was undertaken by CSTR in the fall of 1983 in response to a request from several concerned federal agencies and the Board on Atmospheric Sciences and Climate. Together, the two studies constitute a set that prescribes a broad-gaged solar-terrestrial program.

  16. Solar chulha

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jadhao, P. H.; Patrikar, S. R.

    2016-05-01

    The main goal of the proposed system is to transfer energy from sun to the cooking load that is located in the kitchen. The energy is first collected by the solar collector lens system and two curve bars of same radius of curvature are mounted parallel and adjacent to each other at different height the solar collector is clamed on this two bars such that solar collector is exactly perpendicular to sunlight. The topology includes an additional feature which is window in the wall through which the beam is collimated is directed in the of kitchen. The solar energy that is collected is directed by the mirror system into the kitchen, where it is redirected to cooking platform located in the kitchen. The special feature in this system full Indian meal can be made since cooking platform is indoors.

  17. Solar dryer

    SciTech Connect

    Dodelin, R.W.; Hurst, D.W.; Osos, G.R.

    1984-02-07

    Fabrics are dried by tumbling the fabrics in a drying chamber into which hot air is introduced. The hot air is formed by passing ambient air through a solar heater to heat the air to a first temperature, and then further heating the air with a second heater such as a burner. The burner can be one which burns a fuel in the presence of combustion air. The combustion air can be a portion of the air that is passed through the solar heater. After drying the fabrics by this method, the drying zone can be cooled and the fabrics can be further dried by passing air through the solar heater, and then without further heating the air that has passed through the solar heater, introducing the air to the drying chamber.

  18. Solar cell

    SciTech Connect

    Frank, R.I.; Kaplow, R.

    1980-08-26

    An improved solar cell designed for optimum efficiency is comprised of a plurality of series connected unit solar cells formed from a common substrate of semiconductor material. Each unit solar cell has spaced elongate sidewalls, and a ''dead space'' area between adjoining sidewalls of adjacent units is made substantially smaller than an active, light receiving area, extending between the opposite sidewalls of each individual unit. In addition, the width of the active area is concisely limited to ensure that radiation incident on the active area is incident at a point which is spaced from the p-n junction of each unit by no more than a predetermined optimum distance. Reducing the ''dead space'' area while concisely limiting the width of the active area provides improved solar cell performance without requiring focusing lenses.

  19. Solar Energy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Building Design and Construction, 1977

    1977-01-01

    Describes 21 completed projects now using solar energy for heating, cooling, or electricity. Included are elementary schools in Atlanta and San Diego, a technical school in Detroit, and Trinity University in San Antonio, Texas. (MLF)

  20. Solar Nexus.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Murphy, Jim

    1980-01-01

    The design team for the Solar Energy Research Institute (SERI) has pushed the state of the energy art to its current limits for the initial phase, with provisions for foreseeable and even speculative future applications. (Author/MLF)

  1. Solar Cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1983-01-01

    The Heat Exchanger Method (HEM) produces high efficiency crystal ingots in an automated well-insulated furnace offering low equipment, labor and energy costs. The "grown" silicon crystals are used to make solar cells, or photovoltaic cells which convert sunlight directly into electricity. The HEM method is used by Crystal Systems, Inc. and was developed under a NASA/Jet Propulsion Laboratory contract. The square wafers which are the result of the process are sold to companies manufacturing solar panels.

  2. So You Want to Train Solar Technicians.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ensign, M. Dale; Richins, Michael Paul

    1978-01-01

    Considers the role of solar energy in meeting the nation's energy requirements and the future needs for solar technicians and mechanics. Discusses the precautions community colleges must take in training these workers, to ensure that the demand be met without flooding the job market. (MB)

  3. Solar Schematic

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1979-01-01

    The home shown at right is specially designed to accommodate solar heating units; it has roof planes in four directions, allowing placement of solar collectors for best exposure to the sun. Plans (bottom) and complete working blueprints for the solar-heated house are being marketed by Home Building Plan Service, Portland, Oregon. The company also offers an inexpensive schematic (center) showing how a homeowner only moderately skilled in the use of tools can build his own solar energy system, applicable to new or existing structures. The schematic is based upon the design of a low-cost solar home heating system built and tested by NASA's Langley Research Center; used to supplement a warm-air heating system, it can save the homeowner about 40 percent of his annual heating bill for a modest investment in materials and components. Home Building Plan Service saved considerable research time by obtaining a NASA technical report which details the Langley work. The resulting schematic includes construction plans and simplified explanations of solar heat collection, collectors and other components, passive heat factors, domestic hot water supply and how to work with local heating engineers.

  4. Concentrating solar collector-performance tests

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1979-01-01

    Report summarizes test results from evaluation of concentrating solar collector thermal performance, from transient behavior, and incident-of-angle behavior. Tests were conducted using National Bureau of Standards recommedations and specifications.

  5. Advancing Concentrating Solar Power Research (Fact Sheet)

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    2014-02-01

    Researchers at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) provide scientific, engineering, and analytical expertise to help advance innovation in concentrating solar power (CSP). This fact sheet summarizes how NREL is advancing CSP research.

  6. Solar System Visualization: Global Science Maps

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    DeJong, E. M.

    1994-01-01

    The goal of the Solar System Visualization (SSV) project is to re-explore the planets using the data from previous National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) planetary missions on and public information.

  7. Development of Solar Scintillometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gupta, Sudhir Kumar; Mathew, Shibu K.; Venkatakrishnan, P.

    2006-09-01

    The index of scintillation measurement is a good parameter to compare different sites for image quality or `seeing'.We have developed a scintillometer, which is deployed on the high resolution SPAR telescope in the island site of Udaipur Solar Observatory, for the site characterization to specify the proposed MAST (Multi Application Solar Telescope). The scintillometer consists of a miniature telescope, termed as micro telescope (4mm aperture, 15mm focal length) mounted on a drive which tracks the Sun continuously, associated amplifiers and a data acquisition system. A photodiode is used as the detector. The telescope along with detector was obtained from National Solar Observatory (NSO), and is similar to the one used for Advanced Technology Solar Telescope (ATST) site survey. At USO we developed the amplifier and data acquisition system for the scintillometer. A 24-bit analog to digital converter based system was designed, assembled, tested and used as the data acquisition system (DAS). In this paper, we discuss the instrumentation and present the initial results.

  8. Solar Ca II K Observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bertello, Luca; Pevtsov, Alexei A.; Tlatov, Andrey; Singh, Jagdev

    2016-07-01

    Some of the most important archives of past and current long-term solar synoptic observations in the resonance line of Ca II K are described here. These observations are very important for understanding the state of the solar magnetism on time scales up to several decades. The first observations of this kind began in 1904 at the Kodaikanal Observatory (India), followed by similar programs at different other locations. Regular full-disk Ca II K monitoring programs started in 1915 at the Mount Wilson Observatory (USA) and in 1917 at the National Solar Observatory of Japan. Beginning in 1919 and in 1926 regular observations were taken also at the Paris-Meudon Observatory (France) and at the "Donati solar tower telescope of the Arcetri Astrophysical Observatory in Italy, respectively. In 1926 the the Astronomical Observatory of the Coimbra University in Portugal started its own program of Ca II K observations. Although some of these programs have been terminated over the years, their data archives constitute a unique resource for studies of solar variability. In the early 1970s, the National Solar Observatory (NSO) at Sacramento Peak (USA) started a new program of daily Sun-as-a-star observations in the Ca II K line. Today the NSO is continuing these observations through its Synoptic Optical Long-term Investigations of the Sun (SOLIS) facility.

  9. Solar Physics at Evergreen: Solar Dynamo and Chromospheric MHD

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zita, E. J.; Maxwell, J.; Song, N.; Dikpati, M.

    2006-12-01

    We describe our five year old solar physics research program at The Evergreen State College. Famed for its cloudy skies, the Pacific Northwest is an ideal location for theoretical and remote solar physics research activities. Why does the Sun's magnetic field flip polarity every 11 years or so? How does this contribute to the magnetic storms Earth experiences when the Sun's field reverses? Why is the temperature in the Sun's upper atmosphere millions of degrees higher than the Sun's surface temperature? How do magnetic waves transport energy in the Sun’s chromosphere and the Earth’s atmosphere? How does solar variability affect climate change? Faculty and undergraduates investigate questions such as these in collaboration with the High Altitude Observatory (HAO) at the National Center for Atmospheric Research (NCAR) in Boulder. We will describe successful student research projects, logistics of remote computing, and our current physics investigations into (1) the solar dynamo and (2) chromospheric magnetohydrodynamics.

  10. The Solar Corona at the 2015 Total Solar Eclipse

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pasachoff, Jay M.; Carter, Allison L.

    2015-04-01

    We report on our successful observations of the solar corona at the 20 March 2015 total solar eclipse from our site at a latitude of about 78° on the Svalbard archipelago, and related observations by colleagues aloft. Our equipment included cameras for imaging at a variety of scales for use in making high-contrast composites, as reported our Astrophysical Journal article (2015) about our 2012 total solar eclipse observations and similar articles about the corona and changes in it at previous total eclipses. Our Svalbard equipment also included a spectrograph, with which we continued our monitoring of the ratio of the Fe XIV and Fe X coronal lines, which has recently been >1 with the solar maximum, a reversal from <1 at earlier eclipses closer to the last solar minimum. Our 2013 observations from Gabon showed two coronal mass ejections and an erupting prominence; the 2015 eclipse showed an erupting prominence and some unusual coronal structure in an overall coronal shape typical of solar maximum. We use our ground-based eclipse observations to fill the gap in imaging between the SDO and SWAP (17.4 nm) EUV observations on the solar disk and the inner location of the LASCO C2 occultation disk, with STEREO observations providing the possibility of three-dimensional interpretations. Our expedition was supported by a grant (9616-14) from the Committee for Research and Exploration of the National Geographic Society.

  11. Boston, Massachusetts: Solar in Action (Brochure)

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    2011-10-01

    built solar-ready. (3) Defined solar's role in emergency preparedness with the Boston Mayor's Office of Emergency Preparedness. (4) Worked with local organizations to maximize Boston's participation in state incentive programs and innovative financing mechanisms. Solar Boston partners include DOE, MTC, local utilities and unions, an anonymous foundation, and a broad range of local, regional, and national clean-energy stakeholders. Solar Boston kicked off its partner program on January 10, 2008, sponsoring a workshop on 'Thinking BIG about Boston's Solar Energy Future,' to discuss how state, utility, and municipal programs can work together. Presentations were given by Solar Boston, Keyspan/National Grid, NSTAR, and MTC.

  12. High-flux solar photon processes

    SciTech Connect

    Lorents, D.C.; Narang, S.; Huestis, D.C.; Mooney, J.L.; Mill, T.; Song, H.K.; Ventura, S.

    1992-06-01

    This study was commissioned by the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) for the purpose of identifying high-flux photoprocesses that would lead to beneficial national and commercial applications. The specific focus on high-flux photoprocesses is based on the recent development by NREL of solar concentrator technology capable of delivering record flux levels. We examined photolytic and photocatalytic chemical processes as well as photothermal processes in the search for processes where concentrated solar flux would offer a unique advantage. 37 refs.

  13. Save With Solar, Fall 1998, Vol. 1, No. 3

    SciTech Connect

    Eiffert, P.

    1998-12-30

    This issue of Save with Solar highlights awards for federal renewable energy projects in FY 1998, the Million Solar Roofs Initiative, a special exhibition in New York City featuring solar technologies, PV systems working in Volcanoes National Park, and PV Super ESPC contracts.

  14. Solar Activity and Solar Eruptions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sterling, Alphonse C.

    2006-01-01

    Our Sun is a dynamic, ever-changing star. In general, its atmosphere displays major variation on an 11-year cycle. Throughout the cycle, the atmosphere occasionally exhibits large, sudden outbursts of energy. These "solar eruptions" manifest themselves in the form of solar flares, filament eruptions, coronal mass ejections (CMEs), and energetic particle releases. They are of high interest to scientists both because they represent fundamental processes that occur in various astrophysical context, and because, if directed toward Earth, they can disrupt Earth-based systems and satellites. Research over the last few decades has shown that the source of the eruptions is localized regions of energy-storing magnetic field on the Sun that become destabilized, leading to a release of the stored energy. Solar scientists have (probably) unraveled the basic outline of what happens in these eruptions, but many details are still not understood. In recent years we have been studying what triggers these magnetic eruptions, using ground-based and satellite-based solar observations in combination with predictions from various theoretical models. We will present an overview of solar activity and solar eruptions, give results from some of our own research, and discuss questions that remain to be explored.

  15. Parameterization of solar flare dose

    SciTech Connect

    Lamarche, A.H.; Poston, J.W.

    1996-12-31

    A critical aspect of missions to the moon or Mars will be the safety and health of the crew. Radiation in space is a hazard for astronauts, especially high-energy radiation following certain types of solar flares. A solar flare event can be very dangerous if astronauts are not adequately shielded because flares can deliver a very high dose in a short period of time. The goal of this research was to parameterize solar flare dose as a function of time to see if it was possible to predict solar flare occurrence, thus providing a warning time. This would allow astronauts to take corrective action and avoid receiving a dose greater than the recommended limit set by the National Council on Radiation Protection and Measurements (NCRP).

  16. Solar energy for village development.

    PubMed

    Brown, N L; Howe, J W

    1978-02-10

    The National Academy of Sciences held a joint workshop with the Government of Tanzania last August on the potential of solar energy for the villages of that country. Costs of five solar technologies (mini-hydroelectric generators, wind, methane generation from organic wastes, photovoltaic cells, and flat-plate solar collectors) were compared with costs of diesel-generated electricity and with electricity from the national grid. Each of the five technologies is either now competitive with diesel or will be in a few years. Although the figures presented are not conclusive since they are derived from calculations rather than an actual test, the results are encouraging enough to warrant serious testing in Third World villages.

  17. Photovoltaics: solar electric power systems

    SciTech Connect

    1980-02-01

    The operation and uses of solar cells and the National Photovoltaic Program are briefly described. Eleven DOE photovoltaic application projects are described including forest lookout towers; Wilcox Memorial Hospital in Hawaii; WBNO daytime AM radio station; Schuchuli Indian Village; Meade, Nebraska, agricultural experiment; Mt. Laguna Air Force Station; public schools and colleges; residential applications; and Sea World of Florida. (WHK)

  18. Solar Neutrinos

    DOE R&D Accomplishments Database

    Davis, R. Jr.; Harmer, D. S.

    1964-12-01

    The prospect of studying the solar energy generation process directly by observing the solar neutrino radiation has been discussed for many years. The main difficulty with this approach is that the sun emits predominantly low energy neutrinos, and detectors for observing low fluxes of low energy neutrinos have not been developed. However, experimental techniques have been developed for observing neutrinos, and one can foresee that in the near future these techniques will be improved sufficiently in sensitivity to observe solar neutrinos. At the present several experiments are being designed and hopefully will be operating in the next year or so. We will discuss an experiment based upon a neutrino capture reaction that is the inverse of the electron-capture radioactive decay of argon-37. The method depends upon exposing a large volume of a chlorine compound, removing the radioactive argon-37 and observing the characteristic decay in a small low-level counter.

  19. Solar Minimum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lopresto, James C.; Mathews, John; Manross, Kevin

    1995-12-01

    Calcium K plage, H alpha plage and sunspot area have been monitored daily on the INTERNET since November of 1992. The plage and sunspot area have been measured by image processing. The purpose of the project is to investigate the degree of correlation between plage area and solar irradiance. The plage variation shows the expected variation produced by solar rotation and the longer secular changes produced by the solar cycle. The H alpha and sunspot plage area reached a minimum in about late 1994 or early 1995. This is in agreement with the K2 spectral index obtained daily from Sacramento Peak Observatory. The Calcium K plage area minimum seems delayed with respect to the others mentioned above. The minimum of the K line plage area is projected to come within the last few months of 1995.

  20. Solar ADEPT: Efficient Solar Energy Systems

    SciTech Connect

    2011-01-01

    Solar ADEPT Project: The 7 projects that make up ARPA-E's Solar ADEPT program, short for 'Solar Agile Delivery of Electrical Power Technology,' aim to improve the performance of photovoltaic (PV) solar energy systems, which convert the sun's rays into electricity. Solar ADEPT projects are integrating advanced electrical components into PV systems to make the process of converting solar energy to electricity more efficient.

  1. Multipurpose Communication Satellite solar array

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bastard, J. L.; Guyot, Ph.

    Through research and development studies, Aerospatiale has developed with the French National Space Agency (CNES) a new concept of a rigid Solar Array (GSR) which covers a range of power between 1 kW and 10 kW EOL 7 yr. This technology is used by Aerospatiale on the currently running programs:—TELECOM 1, Telecommunication satellite, spinned in transfer; —ARABSAT, Telecommunication satellite, 3-axis stabilized in transfer; —TELE-X and TV-SAT/TDF1, Direct Broadcasting satellites, 3-axis stabilized in transfer. This paper deals with the description and the electrical and mechanical performance of the Multipurpose Communication Satellite Solar Array (M.C.S.). For this satellite, which is expected to be launched in 1984, Aerospatiale has selected the following concept: primary power (1.4 kW EOL 7 yr) will be provided by two separate sun-oriented solar array wings equipped with AEG Telefunken BSR (Back Surface Reflector) solar cells. This solar generator is directly derived from the GSR technology. Owing to the three-axis stabilization of the satellite and the partial deployment of the solar array during the transfer phase it has been necessary to use a primary and a secondary hold-down devices. In the same way the position of the shunt on the solar generator induced an increase of the mass, because of the supplementary hold-down point and of the support structure. Now scribing Laser System leads to the optimization of the solar cells dimensions and allows a better fill factor of the panels and so an increase of the power performance. Beside the M.C.S concept which is fully adapted as regards its mission specifications, it was interesting to present different concepts of solar generators optimized not only as regards mass budget but also power budget. These concepts covering a large range of powers are fully adapted to telecommunication missions.

  2. Solar Energy and You.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Conservation and Renewable Energy Inquiry and Referral Service (DOE), Silver Spring, MD.

    This booklet provides an introduction to solar energy by discussing: (1) how a home is heated; (2) how solar energy can help in the heating process; (3) the characteristics of passive solar houses; (4) the characteristics of active solar houses; (5) how solar heat is stored; and (6) other uses of solar energy. Also provided are 10 questions to…

  3. India Solar Resource Data: Enhanced Data for Accelerated Deployment (Fact Sheet)

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    2014-08-01

    Identifying potential locations for solar photovoltaic (PV) and concentrating solar power (CSP) projects requires an understanding of the underlying solar resource. Under a bilateral partnership between the United States and India - the U.S.-India Energy Dialogue - the National Renewable Energy Laboratory has updated Indian solar data and maps using data provided by the Ministry of New and Renewable Energy (MNRE) and the National Institute for Solar Energy (NISE). This fact sheet overviews the updated maps and data, which help identify high-quality solar energy projects. This can help accelerate the deployment of solar energy in India.

  4. Solar system exploration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chapman, Clark R.; Ramlose, Terri (Editor)

    1989-01-01

    The goal of planetary exploration is to understand the nature and development of the planets, as illustrated by pictures from the first two decades of spacecraft missions and by the imaginations of space artists. Planets, comets, asteroids, and moons are studied to discover the reasons for their similarities and differences and to find clues that contain information about the primordial process of planet origins. The scientific goals established by the National Academy of Sciences as the foundation of NASA's Solar System Exploration Program are covered: to determine the nature of the planetary system, to understand its origin and evolution, the development of life on Earth, and the principles that shape present day Earth.

  5. Solar thermal power systems. Summary report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1980-06-01

    The work accomplished by the Aerospace Corporation from April 1973 through November 1979 in the mission analysis of solar thermal power systems is summarized. Sponsorship of this effort was initiated by the National Science Foundation, continued by the Energy Research and Development Administration, and most recently directed by the United States Department of Energy, Division of Solar Thermal Systems. Major findings and conclusions are sumarized for large power systems, small power systems, solar total energy systems, and solar irrigation systems, as well as special studies in the areas of energy storage, industrial process heat, and solar fuels and chemicals. The various data bases and computer programs utilized in these studies are described, and tables are provided listing financial and solar cost assumptions for each study. An extensive bibliography is included to facilitate review of specific study results and methodology.

  6. Solar heating

    SciTech Connect

    Resnick, M.; Startevant, R.C.

    1985-01-22

    A solar heater has an outlet conduit above an inlet conduit intercoupling a solar heating chamber with the inside of a building through a window opening. In one form the solar collecting chamber is outside the building below the window and the outlet conduit and inlet conduit are contiguous and pass through the window opening between the windowsill and the lower sash. In another form of the invention the solar collecting chambers are located beside each side of the window and joined at the top by the outlet conduit that passes through an opening between the upper window sash and the top of the window frame and at the bottom by an inlet conduit that passes through an opening between the lower sash and the windowsill. The outlet conduit carries photoelectric cells that provide electrical energy for driving a squirrel-cage fan in the outlet conduit through a mercury switch seated on a damper actuated by a bimetallic coil that closes the damper when the temperature in the outlet conduit goes below a predetermined temperature.

  7. Solar VLBI

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tapping, K. F.; Kuijpers, J.

    1986-01-01

    In April, 1981, radio telescopes at Dwingeloo (The Netherlands) and Onsala (Sweden) were used as a long-baseline interferometer at a wavelength of 18 cm. The baseline of 619 km gave a spatial resolution on the Sun of about 45 km. The major problems of Solar Very Long Baseline Interferometry are discussed.

  8. Solar Directory.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pesko, Carolyn, Ed.

    This directory is designed to help the researcher and developer, the manufacturer and distributor, and the general public communicate together on a mutually beneficial basis. Its content covers the wide scope of solar energy activity in the United States primarily, but also in other countries, at the academic, governmental, and industrial levels.…

  9. Solar Power

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ford, Norman C.; Kane, Joseph W.

    1971-01-01

    Proposes a method of collecting solar energy by using available plastics for Fresnel lenses to focus heat onto a converter where thermal dissociation of water would produce hydrogen. The hydrogen would be used as an efficient non-polluting fuel. Cost estimates are included. (AL)

  10. Solar Eclipse

    Atmospheric Science Data Center

    2013-04-16

    ... View Larger Image Within that narrow window during a solar eclipse where an observer on Earth can watch the Moon's shadow obscure ... of the imagery acquired during Terra orbit 20920. The panels cover an area of about 380 kilometers x 2909 kilometers and use data ...

  11. Solar oven

    SciTech Connect

    Golder, J.C.

    1981-10-06

    A portable, foldable solar oven is provided wherein the basic construction material is ordinary cardboard, some surfaces of which are coated with a reflective material. The portable oven doubles as an insulated container for keeping refrigerated foodstuffs cold while being transported to a distant site for cooking.

  12. Solar Energy Directory: A Directory of Domestic and International Firms Involved in Solar Energy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Centerline Co., Phoenix, AZ.

    This directory is intended to provide a link between suppliers of solar energy technology and information and potential users of these products. Included are over 1400 national and international entries. These listings include architects, associations, education sources, wind power technology and information sources, solar research organizations,…

  13. Solar Energy Technologies Program - Growing Solar Power Industry Brightens Job Market (Green Jobs)

    SciTech Connect

    2010-04-01

    U.S. solar power capacity is expanding rapidly as part of the national initiative to double renewable energy resources in three years. This growth is helping to generate many new, well-paid jobs in solar power for American workers.

  14. Distributed Solar Photovoltaic Power Production - Technology and Benefits

    SciTech Connect

    Matos, Al; Stuby, Rick

    2011-11-02

    As part of its nationally recognized Solar 4 All program, PSE&G has partnered with Petra Solar to deploy the world’s first and largest pole attached solar project. The project, based on Petra Solar’s distributed Smart Solar solution, will create a 40 megawatt solar “virtual power plant.” In deployment as 200,000 individual grid-connected solar power producers on utility poles in PSE&G territory, Petra Solar SunWave® solutions leverage Smart Grid communications and high-tech panel-level inverters to implement a robust system with many technical benefits over traditional solar photovoltaic solutions. The program overview, deployment model, smart grid communications and enabling inverter technology and safety features will be presented, as well the future challenges of, and solutions for, solar power intermittency as photovoltaic penetration on the electric grid increases.

  15. Solar electric systems

    SciTech Connect

    Warfield, G.

    1984-01-01

    Electricity from solar sources is the subject. The state-of-the-art of photovoltaics, wind energy and solar thermal electric systems is presented and also a broad range of solar energy activities throughout the Arab world is covered. Contents, abridged: Solar radiation fundamentals. Basic theory solar cells. Solar thermal power plants. Solar energy activities at the scientific research council in Iraq. Solar energy program at Kuwait Institute for Scientific Research. Prospects of solar energy for Egypt. Non-conventional energy in Syria. Wind and solar energies in Sudan. Index.

  16. New instruments for solar research

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rust, David M.; O'Byrne, John W.; Sterner, Raymond E., II

    1990-01-01

    In fulfilment of its goal to develop early detection and warning of emerging solar magnetic fields, the Center for Applied Solar Physics (CASP) has designed and constructed a solar vector magnetograph (VMG) that will provide unique data on the sunspot regions where flares originate. The instrument is reportedly beginning to approach its goals of measuring all three components of the solar magnetic field with a sensitivity of 50 to 100 G and a spatial resolution on the sun of about 700 km (1 arcsec). Importance of new high-resolution capabilities is stressed and the interpretation of VMG measurements is discussed. The performance of the solar VMG, installed in a 6-m dome at the National Solar Observatory at Sacramento Peak in Sunspot, New Mexico, and its construction and environment are described; particular attention is given to the use and function of the filters. Initial results are examined, including a description and analysis of a magnetogram obtained after installation of an improved blocking filter.

  17. The changing solar industry

    SciTech Connect

    Wilson, A.

    1990-03-01

    The July 1989 announcement that Atlantic Richfield had agreed to sell its ARCO Solar division to Siemens of West Germany sent shock waves throughout the U.S. photovoltaics (PV) industry, the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) and among investigators. The largest PV manufacturer in the world was being sold because it had failed to make enough money for its parent company, and a foreign company was purchasing it - presumably because no U.S. company or investor package had come up with a high enough offer. Given the millions of dollars in government financed research and development funds that ARCO had benefited from, some government officials talked of blocking the sale, an effort that could only have succeeded if it was demonstrated that the sale would compromise national security - which was not the case. With the acquisition scheduled to be completed on February 28, 1990 - the newly acquired company will be called Siemens Solar Industries - many in the industry were wondering what the impact on the industry would be. Would buy-America sentiment help Siemens Solar's competitors Would investors become nervous over the potential profitability of any PV companies and pull back Would it become more difficult to obtain R D funds from a now gun-shy Department of Energy These questions are discussed.

  18. Collecting Solar Energy. Solar Energy Education Project.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    O'Brien, Alexander

    This solar energy learning module for use with junior high school students offers a list of activities, a pre-post test, job titles, basic solar energy vocabulary, and diagrams of solar energy collectors and installations. The purpose is to familiarize students with applications of solar energy and titles of jobs where this knowledge could be…

  19. Solar Impulse's Solar-Powered Plane

    ScienceCinema

    Moniz, Ernest; Piccard, Bertrand; Reicher, Dan

    2016-07-12

    Solar Impulse lands in Washington, DC at Washington Dulles International Airport as part of its journey across the United States. Secretary Ernest Moniz speaks about how advancements like those at the Department of Energy are leading the way for innovations like the solar-powered plane. Footage of the solar-powered plane courtesy of Solar Impulse.

  20. Solar Impulse's Solar-Powered Plane

    SciTech Connect

    Moniz, Ernest; Piccard, Bertrand; Reicher, Dan

    2013-07-08

    Solar Impulse lands in Washington, DC at Washington Dulles International Airport as part of its journey across the United States. Secretary Ernest Moniz speaks about how advancements like those at the Department of Energy are leading the way for innovations like the solar-powered plane. Footage of the solar-powered plane courtesy of Solar Impulse.

  1. Solar concentrator

    SciTech Connect

    Smyth, J.S.

    1982-06-08

    A solar concentrator having an open framework formed as a geodesic dome. A rotatable support axle extends substantially diametrically across the dome and has the opposite ends thereof supported on the framework. The support axle defines a first rotational axis which is oriented to extend substantially parallel with the earth's north-south axis. A support post is hingedly mounted on the support shaft substantially at the midpoint thereof for permitting angular displacement of the support post relative to the support shaft about a second rotational axis which is perpendicular to the first axis. A dishshaped reflector assembly is positioned within the interior of the framework and fixedly secured to the support post. First and second drives effect angular displacement of the reflector assembly about the first and second axes, respectively, to permit tracking of the solar position.

  2. Solar cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Treble, F. C.

    1980-11-01

    The history, state of the art, and future prospects of solar cells are reviewed. Solar cells are already competitive in a wide range of low-power applications, and during the 1980's they are expected to become cheaper to run than diesel or gasoline generators, the present mainstay of isolated communities. At this stage they will become attractive for water pumping, irrigation, and rural electrification, particularly in developing countries. With further cost reduction, they may be used to augment grid supplies in domestic, commercial, institutional, and industrial premises. Cost reduction to the stage where photovoltaics becomes economic for large-scale power generation in central stations depends on a technological breakthrough in the development of thin-film cells. DOE aims to reach this goal by 1990, so that by the end of the century about 20% of the estimated annual additions to their electrical generating capacity will be photovoltaic.

  3. Solar Flares

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Savage, Sabrina

    2013-01-01

    Because the Earth resides in the atmosphere of our nearest stellar neighbor, events occurring on the Sun's surface directly affect us by interfering with satellite operations and communications, astronaut safety, and, in extreme circumstances, power grid stability. Solar flares, the most energetic events in our solar system, are a substantial source of hazardous space weather affecting our increasingly technology-dependent society. While flares have been observed using ground-based telescopes for over 150 years, modern space-bourne observatories have provided nearly continuous multi-wavelength flare coverage that cannot be obtained from the ground. We can now probe the origins and evolution of flares by tracking particle acceleration, changes in ionized plasma, and the reorganization of magnetic fields. I will walk through our current understanding of why flares occur and how they affect the Earth and also show several examples of these fantastic explosions.

  4. Solar rotation.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dziembowski, W.

    Sunspot observations made by Johannes Hevelius in 1642 - 1644 are the first ones providing significant information about the solar differential rotation. In modern astronomy the determination of the rotation rate is done in a routine way by measuring positions of various structures on the solar surface as well as by studying the Doppler shifts of spectral lines. In recent years a progress in helioseismology enabled determination of the rotation rate in the layers inaccessible for direct observations. There are still uncertainties concerning, especially, the temporal variations of the rotation rate and its behaviour in the radiative interior. We are far from understanding the observations. Theoretical works have not yet resulted in a satisfactory model for the angular momentum transport in the convective zone.

  5. Solar Technology Center

    SciTech Connect

    Boehm, Bob

    2011-04-27

    The Department of Energy, Golden Field Office, awarded a grant to the UNLV Research Foundation (UNLVRF) on August 1, 2005 to develop a solar and renewable energy information center. The Solar Technology Center (STC) is to be developed in two phases, with Phase I consisting of all activities necessary to determine feasibility of the project, including design and engineering, identification of land access issues and permitting necessary to determine project viability without permanently disturbing the project site, and completion of a National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) Environmental Assessment. Phase II is the installation of infrastructure and related structures, which leads to commencement of operations of the STC. The STC is located in the Boulder City designated 3,000-acre Eldorado Valley Energy Zone, approximately 15 miles southwest of downtown Boulder City and fronting on Eldorado Valley Drive. The 33-acre vacant parcel has been leased to the Nevada Test Site Development Corporation (NTSDC) by Boulder City to accommodate a planned facility that will be synergistic with present and planned energy projects in the Zone. The parcel will be developed by the UNLVRF. The NTSDC is the economic development arm of the UNLVRF. UNLVRF will be the entity responsible for overseeing the lease and the development project to assure compliance with the lease stipulations established by Boulder City. The STC will be operated and maintained by University of Nevada, Las Vegas (UNLV) and its Center for Energy Research (UNLV-CER). Land parcels in the Eldorado Valley Energy Zone near the 33-acre lease are committed to the construction and operation of an electrical grid connected solar energy production facility. Other projects supporting renewable and solar technologies have been developed within the energy zone, with several more developments in the horizon.

  6. Solar observations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1981-01-01

    High energy processes that take place in the Sun's atmosphere and the relationship of these phenomena to the basic problems of solar activity are discussed. Gamma ray emission exhibits characteristics of the conditions in regions where accelerated high energy particles interact. A number of gamma ray production mechanisms are considered. These include: the Compton effect, magnetobremsstrahlung, pi meson production by proton-proton interaction or by proton-antiproton annihilation, fission and neutral of charged particle radiative capture on inelastic scatter.

  7. Velocities in Solar Pores

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balasubramaniam, K. S.; Keil, S. L.; Smaldone, L. A.

    1996-05-01

    We investigate the three dimensional structure of solar pores and their surroundings using high spatial and spectral resolution data. We present evidence that surface velocities decrease around pores with a corresponding increase in the line-of-sight (LOS) velocities. LOS velocities in pores increase with the strength of the magnetic field. Surface velocities show convergence toward a weak downflow which appear to trace boundaries resembling meso-granular and super granular flows. The observed magnetic fields in the pores appear near these boundaries. We analyze the vertical velocity structure in pores and show that they generally have downflows decreasing exponentially with height, with a scale height of about 90 km. Evidence is also presented for the expanding nature of flux tubes. Finally we describe a phenomenological model for pores. This work was supported by AFOSR Task 2311G3. LAS was partially supported by the Progetto Nazionale Astrofisica e Fisica Cosmica of MURST and Scambi Internazionali of the Universita degli Studi di Napoli Frederico II. National Solar Observatory, NOAO, is operated for the National Science Foundation by AURA, Inc.

  8. Solar Oscillations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Duvall, Thomas

    2004-01-01

    Oscillations were first detected in the solar photosphere in 1962 by Leighton and students. In 1970 it was calculated that these oscillations, with a period near five minutes, were the manifestations of acoustic waves trapped in the interior. The subsequent measurements of the frequencies of global oscillation modes from the spatio-temporal power spectrum of the waves made possible the refinement of solar interior models. Over the years, increased understanding of the nuclear reaction rates, the opacity, the equation of state, convection, and gravitational settling have resulted. Mass flows shift the frequencies of modes leading to very accurate measurements of the interior rotation as a function of radius and latitude. In recent years, analogues of terrestrial seismology have led to a tomography of the interior, including measurements of global north-south flows and flow and wave speed measurements below features such as sunspots. The future of helioseismology seems bright with the approval of NASA's Solar Dynamics Observatory mission, to be launched in 2008.

  9. Solar cooker

    SciTech Connect

    Zwach, D.M.

    1987-09-29

    A solar unit is described comprising a solar oven having an open end. A generally concave parabolic main reflector is joined to the oven to move therewith and reflect solar radiation away from the oven. The main reflector has a central opening to the oven open end, a generally parabolic convex secondary reflector for reflecting the radiation from the main reflector through the central opening to the open end of the oven, means for mounting the secondary reflector on the main reflector for movement, a frame, and means for mounting the oven on the frame for adjustable movement relative to the frame. This permits adjusting the angular position relative to the earth. The last mentioned means includes means for supporting the oven including first and second pairs of pivot members that respectively have a fist pivot axis and a second pivot axis that extends perpendicular to the first pivot axis. The oven extends between each of the first pivot members and each of the second pivot members.

  10. SOLTECH 92 proceedings: Solar Process Heat Program. Volume 1

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-03-01

    This document is a limited Proceedings, documenting the presentations given at the symposia conducted by the US Department of Energy`s (DOE) Solar Industrial Program and Solar Thermal Electrical Program at SOLTECH92. The SOLTECH92 national solar energy conference was held in Albuquerque, New Mexico during the period February 17--20, 1992. The National Renewable Energy Laboratory manages the Solar Industrial Program; Sandia National Laboratories (Albuquerque) manages the Solar Thermal Electric Program. The symposia sessions were as follows: (1) Solar Industrial Program and Solar Thermal Electric Program Overviews, (2) Solar Process Heat Applications, (3) Solar Decontamination of Water and Soil; (4) Solar Building Technologies, (5) Solar Thermal Electric Systems, (6) PV Applications and Technologies. For each presentation given in these symposia, these Proceedings provide a one- to two-page abstract and copies of the viewgraphs and/or 35mm slides utilized by the speaker. Some speakers provided additional materials in the interest of completeness. The materials presented in this document were not subjected to a peer review process.

  11. Solar Sail Spaceflight Simulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lisano, Michael; Evans, James; Ellis, Jordan; Schimmels, John; Roberts, Timothy; Rios-Reyes, Leonel; Scheeres, Daniel; Bladt, Jeff; Lawrence, Dale; Piggott, Scott

    2007-01-01

    The Solar Sail Spaceflight Simulation Software (S5) toolkit provides solar-sail designers with an integrated environment for designing optimal solar-sail trajectories, and then studying the attitude dynamics/control, navigation, and trajectory control/correction of sails during realistic mission simulations. Unique features include a high-fidelity solar radiation pressure model suitable for arbitrarily-shaped solar sails, a solar-sail trajectory optimizer, capability to develop solar-sail navigation filter simulations, solar-sail attitude control models, and solar-sail high-fidelity force models.

  12. Solar-stellar astrophysics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jordan, S. D.

    1982-01-01

    Nonthermal physical processes in the solar atmosphere are discussed. The solar atmospheric regions are defined, and solar convection and its phenomena are explained. The relationship of the solar dynamo, magnetic field, and flares is explored. The solar atmospheric velocity fields are discussed, and the unresolved problem of the nature of atmospheric heating is detailed. The solar wind heating and acceleration are discussed and the need for global solar atmospheric models is emphasized. The application of these solar nonthermal processes to the stars in general is then taken up, employing the same categories as were applied to the solar atmosphere.

  13. Solar Sails

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Young, Roy

    2006-01-01

    The Solar Sail Propulsion investment area has been one of the three highest priorities within the In-Space Propulsion Technology (ISPT) Project. In the fall of 2003, the NASA Headquarters' Science Mission Directorate provided funding and direction to mature the technology as far as possible through ground research and development from TRL 3 to 6 in three years. A group of experts from government, industry, and academia convened in Huntsville, Alabama to define technology gaps between what was needed for science missions to the inner solar system and the current state of the art in ultra1ightweight materials and gossamer structure design. This activity set the roadmap for development. The centerpiece of the development would be the ground demonstration of scalable solar sail systems including masts, sails, deployment mechanisms, and attitude control hardware and software. In addition, new materials would be subjected to anticipated space environments to quantify effects and assure mission life. Also, because solar sails are huge structures, and it is not feasible to validate the technology by ground test at full scale, a multi-discipline effort was established to develop highly reliable analytical models to serve as mission assurance evidence in future flight program decision-making. Two separate contractor teams were chosen to develop the SSP System Ground Demonstrator (SGD). After a three month conceptual mission/system design phase, the teams developed a ten meter diameter pathfinder set of hardware and subjected it to thermal vacuum tests to compare analytically predicted structural behavior with measured characteristics. This process developed manufacturing and handling techniques and refined the basic design. In 2005, both contractor teams delivered 20 meter, four quadrant sail systems to the largest thermal vacuum chamber in the world in Plum Brook, Ohio, and repeated the tests. Also demonstrated was the deployment and articulation of attitude control

  14. SunShot Initiative: Making Solar Energy Affordable for All Americans (Fact Sheet)

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    2013-10-01

    Through SunShot, DOE supports efforts by private companies, universities, and national laboratories to drive down the cost of solar electricity to $0.06 per kilowatt-hour, making solar energy affordable for more American families and businesses.

  15. Solar Innovator | Alta Devices

    ScienceCinema

    Mattos, Laila; Le, Minh

    2016-07-12

    Selected to participate in the Energy Department's SunShot Initiative, Alta Devices produces solar cells that convert sunlight into electricity at world record-breaking levels of efficiency. Through its innovative solar technology Alta is helping bring down the cost of solar. Learn more about the Energy Department's efforts to advance solar technology at energy.gov/solar .

  16. Solar energy collector

    DOEpatents

    Brin, Raymond L.; Pace, Thomas L.

    1978-01-01

    The invention relates to a solar energy collector comprising solar energy absorbing material within chamber having a transparent wall, solar energy being transmitted through the transparent wall, and efficiently absorbed by the absorbing material, for transfer to a heat transfer fluid. The solar energy absorbing material, of generally foraminous nature, absorbs and transmits the solar energy with improved efficiency.

  17. Solar Innovator | Alta Devices

    SciTech Connect

    Mattos, Laila; Le, Minh

    2012-01-01

    Selected to participate in the Energy Department's SunShot Initiative, Alta Devices produces solar cells that convert sunlight into electricity at world record-breaking levels of efficiency. Through its innovative solar technology Alta is helping bring down the cost of solar. Learn more about the Energy Department's efforts to advance solar technology at energy.gov/solar .

  18. Solar Thermal Reactor Materials Characterization

    SciTech Connect

    Lichty, P. R.; Scott, A. M.; Perkins, C. M.; Bingham, C.; Weimer, A. W.

    2008-03-01

    Current research into hydrogen production through high temperature metal oxide water splitting cycles has created a need for robust high temperature materials. Such cycles are further enhanced by the use of concentrated solar energy as a power source. However, samples subjected to concentrated solar radiation exhibited lifetimes much shorter than expected. Characterization of the power and flux distributions representative of the High Flux Solar Furnace(HFSF) at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory(NREL) were compared to ray trace modeling of the facility. In addition, samples of candidate reactor materials were thermally cycled at the HFSF and tensile failure testing was performed to quantify material degradation. Thermal cycling tests have been completed on super alloy Haynes 214 samples and results indicate that maximum temperature plays a significant role in reduction of strength. The number of cycles was too small to establish long term failure trends for this material due to the high ductility of the material.

  19. Solar Cycle Variations in the Solar Interior

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rhodes, E. J.

    2012-12-01

    This presentation will review the observational evidence for solar cycle-dependent changes in the structure and dynamical motions of the solar interior. It will include the results of studies that have been carried out using the tools of both global and local heiloseismology during Solar Cycles 22, 23, and 24. The presentation will describe results obtained with both ground- and space-based helioseismic programs, and it will also describe the role that these helioseismic studies have played in providing inputs to theoretical studies of the solar dynamo. Among the topics that will be covered are temporal changes in the solar torsional oscillations, the solar meridional circulation, the solar seismic radius, the subsurface vorticity, and the solar p-mode oscillation frequencies and widths. Also covered will be evidence for temporal changes in the solar interior that are related to the emergence of active regions on both the near and far sides of the Sun.

  20. Enron Corporation bets $150 million on solar-powered generation

    SciTech Connect

    1995-09-01

    This nation`s largest natural gas company is betting $150 million that it can produce solar power at rates competitive with those of energy generated from oil, gas and coal. The Enron Corporation plans to build a photovoltaic power plant in the southern Nevada desert that would be the largest operation in the country making electricity directly from sunlight, producing enough to power a city of 100,000 people. It is expected to begin operating in two to three years. Some of the nation`s leading solar power experts say Enron`s optimistic goal probably is reachable. The cost of solar power generation has quietly declined by two-thirds. Far from depending on some wondrous breakthrough, the experts say, Enron can offer commercially competitive solar power by inexpensively mass-producing solar panels and then employing thousands of them in the Nevada desert.

  1. Solar Energy for Rural Egypt

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abdelsalam, Tarek I.; Darwish, Ziad; Hatem, Tarek M.

    Egypt is currently experiencing the symptoms of an energy crisis, such as electricity outage and high deficit, due to increasing rates of fossil fuels consumption. Conversely, Egypt has a high solar availability of more than 18.5 MJ daily. Additionally, Egypt has large uninhabited deserts on both sides of the Nile valley and Sinai Peninsula, which both represent more than 96.5 % of the nation's total land area. Therefore, solar energy is one of the promising solutions for the energy shortage in Egypt. Furthermore, these vast lands are advantageous for commissioning large-scaled solar power projects, not only in terms of space availability, but also of availability of high quality silicon (sand) required for manufacturing silicon wafers used in photovoltaic (PV) modules. Also, rural Egypt is considered market a gap for investors, due to low local competition, and numerous remote areas that are not connected to the national electricity grid. Nevertheless, there are some obstacles that hinder the progress of solar energy in Egypt; for instance, the lack of local manufacturing capabilities, security, and turbulent market in addition to other challenges. This paper exhibits an experience of the authors designing and installing decentralized PV solar systems, with a total rated power of about 11 kW, installed at two rural villages in at the suburbs of Fayoum city, in addition to a conceptual design of a utility scale, 2 MW, PV power plant to be installed in Kuraymat. The outcomes of this experience asserted that solar PV systems can be a more technically and economically feasible solution for the energy problem in rural villages.

  2. Rapid Deposition Technology Holds the Key for the World's Largest Solar Manufacturer (Fact Sheet)

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    2010-10-01

    Thanks in part to years of collaboration with the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), a manufacturer of thin-film solar modules has grown from a small garage-type operation to become the world's largest manufacturer of solar modules. First Solar, Inc. now manufactures cadmium telluride (CdTe) solar modules throughout the world, but it began in Ohio as a small company called Solar Cells, Inc.

  3. Solar Neutrino Problem

    DOE R&D Accomplishments Database

    Davis, R. Jr.; Evans, J. C.; Cleveland, B. T.

    1978-04-28

    A summary of the results of the Brookhaven solar neutrino experiment is given and discussed in relation to solar model calculations. A review is given of the merits of various new solar neutrino detectors that were proposed.

  4. Solar collector

    SciTech Connect

    Nevins, R.L.

    1981-10-27

    A heat sink in the form of a mesh is interposed between two spaced panes in a window or door light. A combination of holes and passageways formed in the window sash frame members permit the selective establishment of convective air currents past the mesh to absorb the solar converted thermal heat stored in the sink. By manipulating the source of the air for these convective currents (I.E. From the inside or the outside of a building) and by choosing the volume into which the warmed air currents are to be discharged (I.E. Inside or outside the building) significant heating and cooling efficiencies are achieved.

  5. Solar Electricity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1988-01-01

    ARCO Solar manufactures PV Systems tailored to a broad variety of applications. PV arrays are routinely used at remote communications installations to operate large microwave repeaters, TV and radio repeaters rural telephone, and small telemetry systems that monitor environmental conditions. Also used to power agricultural water pumping systems, to provide electricity for isolated villages and medical clinics, for corrosion protection for pipelines and bridges, to power railroad signals, air/sea navigational aids, and for many types of military systems. ARCO is now moving into large scale generation for utilities.

  6. Advances in Solar Radiometry and Metrology

    SciTech Connect

    Myers, D.; Andreas, A.; Reda, I.; Gotseff, P.; Wilcox, S.; Stoffel, T.; Anderberg, M.

    2005-01-01

    The Solar Radiometry and Metrology task at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) provides traceable optical radiometric calibrations and measurements to photovoltaic (PV) researchers and the PV industry. Traceability of NREL solar radiometer calibrations to the World Radiometric Reference (WRR) was accomplished during the NREL Pyrheliometer Comparison in October 2003. The task has calibrated 10 spectral and more than 180 broadband radiometers for solar measurements. Other accomplishments include characterization of pyranometer thermal offset errors with laboratory and spectral modeling tools; developing a simple scheme to correct pyranometer data for known responsivity variations; and measuring detailed spectral distributions of the NREL High Intensity Pulsed Solar Simulator (HIPSS) as a function of lamp voltage and time. The optical metrology functions support the NREL Measurement and Characterization Task effort for ISO 17025 accreditation of NREL Solar Reference Cell Calibrations. Optical metrology functions have been integrated into the NREL quality system and audited for ISO17025 compliance.

  7. The Physics of Solar Sails

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hollerman, William Andrew

    2003-01-01

    The concept of using photon pressure for propulsion has been considered since Tsiolkovsky in 1921. In fact, Tsiolkovsky and Tsander wrote of 'using tremendous mirrors of very thin sheets' and 'using the pressure of sunlight to attain cosmic velocities' in 1924. The term 'solar sailing' was coined in the late 1950s and was popularized by Arthur C. Clarke in the short story Sunjammer (The Wind From the Sun) in May 1964. The National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) used sailing techniques to extend the operational life of the Mariner 10 spacecraft in 1974-1975. A problem in the control system was causing Mariner 10 to go off course. By controlling the attitude of Mariner 10 and the angle of the solar power panels relative to the Sun, ground controllers were able to correct the problem without using precious fuel. Once thought to be difficult or impossible, solar sailing has come out of science fiction and into the realm of possibility. Any spacecraft using this method would need to deploy a thin sail that could be as large as many kilometers in extent. Candidate sail materials should be: 1) strong, 2) ultra-lightweight (density of a few g/sq m), 3) able to be folded or crushed until deployed, 4) subject to minimal sagging or stretching, and 5) resistant to ionizing radiation, such as galactic and solar particles (electrons and protons), x-rays, ultraviolet light, and magnetically trapped charged particles. Solar sails must be resistant to each of these types of radiation.

  8. Solar drying in the Caribbean

    SciTech Connect

    Headley, O. )

    1992-03-01

    The United Nations Food and Agricultural Organisation (FAO) has estimated that a quarter of crops are lost through inadequate handling after harvesting. The use of solar dryers can reduce these losses and improve the quality of food. Oliver Headley of the University of the West Indies overviews a range of dryers developed in the Caribbean region. Solar dryers have been used in various parts of the Caribbean for the past eighteen years. The main types are: closed cycle dryers with separate flat plate collector; open cycle dryers with roof vanes against direct sunlight; open cycle dryers with rockbed heat storage units; open cycle dryers with chimneys for air circulation; wire basket dryers with flow through ventilation; barn roof collectors feeding packed bed dryers. During the dry season (January to April), mean daily insolation in a typical Caribbean island is about 25 MJ/m{sup 2}. With such an abundant resource, solar crop drying emerged as a preferred method for the preservation of perishable commodities. In territories without fossil fuel reserves solar energy is an obvious alternative since it does not involve expenditure of scarce foreign exchange. Research and development work in solar crop drying was conducted both at experimental sites in the University and in rural districts throughout the region. Several types of dryer were designed and tested.

  9. Solar greenhouses in Minnesota

    SciTech Connect

    Polich, M.

    1981-12-01

    After a discussion of solar greenhouse phenomena and the potential for heat collection and food production, design recommendations are provided for attached heat collecting solar sunspaces and for attached food producing solar greenhouses. Also, design of a single solar structure to maximize heat collection and food production is considered. A method of predicting the performance for attached heat collecting solar sunspaces is given in which the solar savings fraction is calculated. (LEW)

  10. Conversion of solar energy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Semenov, N. N.; Shilov, A. E.

    The papers presented in this volume provide an overview of current theoretical and experimental research related to the conversion and practical utilization of solar energy. Topics discussed include semiconductor photovoltaic cells, orbital solar power stations, chemical and biological methods of solar energy conversion, and solar energy applications. Papers are included on new theoretical models of solar cells and prospects for increasing their efficiency, metrology and optical studies of solar cells, and some problems related to the thermally induced deformations of large space structures.

  11. Qualification test and analysis report: Solar collectors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1978-01-01

    Test results show that the Owens-Illinois Sunpak TM Model SEC 601 air-cooled collector meets the national standards and codes as defined in the Subsystem Peformance Specification and Verification Plan of NASA/MSFC, dated October 28, 1976. The program calls for the development, fabrication, qualification and delivery of an air-cooled solar collector for solar heating, combined heating and cooling, and/or hot water systems.

  12. Photovoltaic solar radiometric measurements and evaluation

    SciTech Connect

    Myers, D.R.; Cannon, T.W.

    1996-01-01

    We describe current activities in radiometric measurements by the Photovoltaic (PV) Solar Radiometric Measurements and Evaluation Team as part of the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) PV Module and System Performance and Engineering Project. Scientific and engineering understanding of incident solar irradiance is provided through radiometric instrumentation and/or measurement methods. Recently, deployed reference broadband radiometric and meteorological instrumentation and spectral instrumentation provide the project with best-practice routine and specialized radiometric data. {copyright} {ital 1996 American Institute of Physics.}

  13. Midtemperature solar systems test facility predictions for thermal performance based on test data: solar kinetics T-600 solar collector with FEK 244 reflector surface

    SciTech Connect

    Harrison, T.D.

    1981-04-01

    Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque (SNLA), is currently conducting a program to predict the performance and measure the characteristics of commercially available solar collectors that have the potential for use in industrial process heat and enhanced oil recovery applications. The thermal performance predictions for the Solar Kinetics T-600 solar line-focusing parabolic trough collector are presented for three output temperatures at five cities in the US. (WHK)

  14. NOAA Data Rescue of Key Solar Databases and Digitization of Historical Solar Images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coffey, H. E.

    2006-08-01

    Over a number of years, the staff at NOAA National Geophysical Data Center (NGDC) has worked to rescue key solar databases by converting them to digital format and making them available via the World Wide Web. NOAA has had several data rescue programs where staff compete for funds to rescue important and critical historical data that are languishing in archives and at risk of being lost due to deteriorating condition, loss of any metadata or descriptive text that describe the databases, lack of interest or funding in maintaining databases, etc. The Solar-Terrestrial Physics Division at NGDC was able to obtain funds to key in some critical historical tabular databases. Recently the NOAA Climate Database Modernization Program (CDMP) funded a project to digitize historical solar images, producing a large online database of historical daily full disk solar images. The images include the wavelengths Calcium K, Hydrogen Alpha, and white light photos, as well as sunspot drawings and the comprehensive drawings of a multitude of solar phenomena on one daily map (Fraunhofer maps and Wendelstein drawings). Included in the digitization are high resolution solar H-alpha images taken at the Boulder Solar Observatory 1967-1984. The scanned daily images document many phases of solar activity, from decadal variation to rotational variation to daily changes. Smaller versions are available online. Larger versions are available by request. See http://www.ngdc.noaa.gov/stp/SOLAR/ftpsolarimages.html. The tabular listings and solar imagery will be discussed.

  15. Solar Energy Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1984-01-01

    Calibrated in kilowatt hours per square meter, the solar counter produced by Dodge Products, Inc. provides a numerical count of the solar energy that has accumulated on a surface. Solar energy sensing, measuring and recording devices in corporate solar cell technology developed by Lewis Research Center. Customers for their various devices include architects, engineers and others engaged in construction and operation of solar energy facilities; manufacturers of solar systems or solar related products, such as glare reducing windows; and solar energy planners in federal and state government agencies.

  16. Solar Heating and Cooling

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Duffie, John A.; Beckman, William A.

    1976-01-01

    Describes recent research that has made solar energy economically competitive with other energy sources. Includes solar energy building architecture, storage systems, and economic production data. (MLH)

  17. Solar skylight

    DOEpatents

    Adamson, James C.

    1984-01-01

    A reflective shutter rotates within a skylight housing in such a fashion as to control solar energy thereby providing a combination of heating, lighting, and ventilation. The skylight housing has three faces: a glazed southern face, a glazed northern face, and an open downwardly oriented face to the interior of the structure. Counter-weighted pivot arms support the shutter at either end causing the center of rotation to pass through the center of gravity. The shutter has three basic positions: In the first position, during the winter day, the shutter closes off the northern face, allowing solar energy to enter directly into the supporting structure providing heat gain and daylighting. In the second position, during the winter night, the shutter closes off the open face to the interior, providing insulation between the structure and the skylight housing. In the third position, during the non-heating season, the shutter closes off the southern face blocking unwanted heat gain but allowing diffuse northern light to penetrate for daylighting. In this last position, a means is provided for ventilating by natural convection. The apparatus can be operated either manually or by motor.

  18. Solar collector

    DOEpatents

    Wilhelm, William G.

    1982-01-01

    The field of this invention is solar collectors, and more particularly, the invention pertains to a flat plate collector that employs high performance thin films. The solar collector of this invention overcomes several problems in this field, such as excessive hardware, cost and reliability, and other prior art drawbacks outlined in the specification. In the preferred form, the apparatus features a substantially rigid planar frame (14). A thin film window (42) is bonded to one planar side of the frame. An absorber (24) of laminate construction is comprised of two thin film layers (24a, 24b) that are sealed perimetrically. The layers (24a, 24b) define a fluid-tight planar envelope (24c) of large surface area to volume through which a heat transfer fluid flows. Absorber (24) is bonded to the other planar side of the frame. The thin film construction of the absorber assures substantially full envelope wetting and thus good efficiency. The window and absorber films stress the frame adding to the overall strength of the collector.

  19. Solar vector magnetograph for Max 1991 programs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rust, D. M.; Obyrne, J. W.; Harris, T. J.

    1988-01-01

    An instrument for measuring solar magnetic fields is under construction. Key requirements for any solar vector magnetograph are high spatial resolution, high optical throughput, fine spectral selectivity, and ultralow instrumental polarization. An available 25 cm Cassegrain telescope will provide 0.5 arcsec spatial resolution. Spectral selection will be accomplished with a 150 mA filter based on electrically tunable solid Fabry-Perot etalon. Filter and polarization analyzer design concepts for the magnetograph are described in detail. The instrument will be tested at JHU/APL, and then moved to the National Solar Observatory in late 1988. It will be available to support the Max 1991 program.

  20. Si concentrator solar cell development. [Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Krut, D.D.

    1994-10-01

    This is the final report of a program to develop a commercial, high-efficiency, low-cost concentrator solar cell compatible with Spectrolab`s existing manufacturing infrastructure for space solar cells. The period covered is between 1991 and 1993. The program was funded through Sandia National Laboratories through the DOE concentrator initiative and, was also cost shared by Spectrolab. As a result of this program, Spectrolab implemented solar cells achieving an efficiency of over 19% at 200 to 300X concentration. The cells are compatible with DOE guidelines for a cell price necessary to achieve a cost of electricity of 12 cents a kilowatthour.

  1. Solar Energy: Solar and the Weather.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Knapp, Henry H., III

    This module on solar and the weather is one of six in a series intended for use as supplements to currently available materials on solar energy and energy conservation. Together with the recommended texts and references (sources are identified), these modules provide an effective introduction to energy conservation and solar energy technologies.…

  2. Solar Energy: Solar System Design Fundamentals.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Knapp, Henry H., III

    This module on solar system design fundamentals is one of six in a series intended for use as supplements to currently available materials on solar energy and energy conservation. Together with the recommended texts and references (sources are identified), these modules provide an effective introduction to energy conservation and solar energy…

  3. Solar active region display system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Golightly, M.; Raben, V.; Weyland, M.

    2003-04-01

    The Solar Active Region Display System (SARDS) is a client-server application that automatically collects a wide range of solar data and displays it in a format easy for users to assimilate and interpret. Users can rapidly identify active regions of interest or concern from color-coded indicators that visually summarize each region's size, magnetic configuration, recent growth history, and recent flare and CME production. The active region information can be overlaid onto solar maps, multiple solar images, and solar difference images in orthographic, Mercator or cylindrical equidistant projections. Near real-time graphs display the GOES soft and hard x-ray flux, flare events, and daily F10.7 value as a function of time; color-coded indicators show current trends in soft x-ray flux, flare temperature, daily F10.7 flux, and x-ray flare occurrence. Through a separate window up to 4 real-time or static graphs can simultaneously display values of KP, AP, daily F10.7 flux, GOES soft and hard x-ray flux, GOES >10 and >100 MeV proton flux, and Thule neutron monitor count rate. Climatologic displays use color-valued cells to show F10.7 and AP values as a function of Carrington/Bartel's rotation sequences - this format allows users to detect recurrent patterns in solar and geomagnetic activity as well as variations in activity levels over multiple solar cycles. Users can customize many of the display and graph features; all displays can be printed or copied to the system's clipboard for "pasting" into other applications. The system obtains and stores space weather data and images from sources such as the NOAA Space Environment Center, NOAA National Geophysical Data Center, the joint ESA/NASA SOHO spacecraft, and the Kitt Peak National Solar Observatory, and can be extended to include other data series and image sources. Data and images retrieved from the system's database are converted to XML and transported from a central server using HTTP and SOAP protocols, allowing

  4. Solar electric systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Warfield, G.

    Subjects discussed in connection with solar electricity are related to solar radiation fundamentals, wind electric conversion and utilization, the basic theory of solar cells, photovoltaic materials, photovoltaic technology, components of solar thermal electric systems, solar thermal power plants, and integrated solar thermal electric complexes. The solar technology development in the Arab world is also examined, taking into account the horizon of solar energy in the Arab countries, solar energy activities at the Scientific Research Council in Iraq, solar energy activities at the Royal Scientific Society in Jordan, the solar energy program at Kuwait Institute for Scientific Research, application of solar energy in Libya, prospects of solar energy for Egypt, solar energy programs in Qatar, performance characteristics of a 350 kW photovoltaic power system for Saudi Arabian villages, nonconventional energy in Syria, wind and solar energies in Sudan, solar electric research and development program in Tunisia, and solar energy research and utilization in Yemen Arab Republic. No individual items are abstracted in this volume

  5. Solar pond

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miller, C. G.; Stephens, J. B. (Inventor)

    1978-01-01

    Shallow pools of liquid to collect low-temperature solar generated thermal energy are described. Narrow elongated trenches, grouped together over a wide area, are lined with a heat-absorbing black liner. The heat-absorbing liquid is kept separate from the thermal energy removing fluid by means such as clear polyethylene material. The covering for the pond may be a fluid or solid. If the covering is a fluid, fire fighting foam, continuously generated, or siloons are used to keep the surface covering clean and insulated. If the thermal energy removing fluid is a gas, a fluid insulation layer contained in a flat polyethlene tubing is used to cover the pond. The side of the tube directed towards the sun is treated to block out ultraviolet radiation and trap in infrared radiation.

  6. Solar collector

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, R.L.

    1983-05-31

    A solar energy water heating unit is provided which heats water from a swimming pool by passing the water through a series of spiral hoses mounted on a supporting surface. The supporting surface is mounted on a platform raised from the ground and is cone-shaped to allow for at least a portion of each hose line to be exposed to the sun at all times of the day. The spiral hose lines are mounted in spiral grooves provided on the supporting surface. A pump pumps the water from the swimming pool to the inlet of the hose lines, which inlet is adjacent the lowermost edge of the supporting surface so that the water is always pumped upwardly to the outlet end of the hose lines adjacent the apex of the supporting surface.

  7. Solar collector

    DOEpatents

    Wilhelm, W.G.

    The invention pertains to a flat plate collector that employs high performance thin films. The solar collector of this invention overcomes several problems in this field, such as excessive hardware, cost and reliability, and other prior art drawbacks outlined in the specification. In the preferred form, the apparatus features a substantially rigid planar frame. A thin film window is bonded to one planar side of the frame. An absorber of laminate construction is comprised of two thin film layers that are sealed perimetrically. The layers define a fluid-tight planar envelope of large surface area to volume through which a heat transfer fluid flows. Absorber is bonded to the other planar side of the frame. The thin film construction of the absorber assures substantially full envelope wetting and thus good efficiency. The window and absorber films stress the frame adding to the overall strength of the collector.

  8. Solar flares

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zirin, H.

    1974-01-01

    A review of the knowledge about solar flares which has been obtained through observations from the earth and from space by various methods. High-resolution cinematography is best carried out at H-alpha wavelengths to reveal the structure, time history, and location of flares. The classification flares in H alpha according to either physical or morphological criteria is discussed. The study of flare morphology, which shows where, when, and how flares occur, is important for evaluating theories of flares. Consideration is given to studies of flares by optical spectroscopy, radio emissions, and at X-ray and XUV wavelengths. Research has shown where and possibly why flares occur, but the physics of the instability involved, of the particle acceleration, and of the heating are still not understood.

  9. Coating Processes Boost Performance of Solar Cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2012-01-01

    NASA currently has spacecraft orbiting Mercury (MESSENGER), imaging the asteroid Vesta (Dawn), roaming the red plains of Mars (the Opportunity rover), and providing a laboratory for humans to advance scientific research in space (the International Space Station, or ISS). The heart of the technology that powers those missions and many others can be held in the palm of your hand - the solar cell. Solar, or photovoltaic (PV), cells are what make up the panels and arrays that draw on the Sun s light to generate electricity for everything from the Hubble Space Telescope s imaging equipment to the life support systems for the ISS. To enable NASA spacecraft to utilize the Sun s energy for exploring destinations as distant as Jupiter, the Agency has invested significant research into improving solar cell design and efficiency. Glenn Research Center has been a national leader in advancing PV technology. The Center s Photovoltaic and Power Technologies Branch has conducted numerous experiments aimed at developing lighter, more efficient solar cells that are less expensive to manufacture. Initiatives like the Forward Technology Solar Cell Experiments I and II in which PV cells developed by NASA and private industry were mounted outside the ISS have tested how various solar technologies perform in the harsh conditions of space. While NASA seeks to improve solar cells for space applications, the results are returning to Earth to benefit the solar energy industry.

  10. Toward a Solar Civilization

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hippel, Frank von; Williams, Robert H.

    1977-01-01

    The future of solar energy is examined environmentally, socially, and economically. Coal and nuclear fission are discussed as long-range energy alternatives and U. S. regional strategies are suggested. Discussed in detail are low temperature solar heat, solar electricity, and chemical fuels from solar energy. (MA)

  11. A Solar Energy Bibliography.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Guthrie, David L.; Riley, Robert A.

    This document contains 5,000 references to literature through 1976 dealing with various aspects of solar energy. Categories are established according to area of solar research. These categories include: (1) overview; (2) measurement; (3) low-range solar energy collection (below 120 degrees C); (4) intermediate-range solar energy collection (120…

  12. Solar heating and you

    SciTech Connect

    1994-08-01

    This fact sheet for use with primary school classes describes what solar collectors are and how they work, passive solar rooms, flat-plate collectors, and why one should use solar heating systems. Making a solar air heater is described step-by-step with illustrations. A resource list for both students and teachers is provided for further information.

  13. Solar and space physics decadal strategy outlines key recommendations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Showstack, Randy

    2012-08-01

    Significant achievements during the past 10 years “set the stage for transformative advances in solar and space physics for the coming decade,” according to a new decadal strategy, released on 15 August by a committee of the U.S. National Research Council (NRC). The report, Solar and Space Physics: A Science for a Technological Society, includes overarching goals and key recommendations for basic and applied research in solar and space physics for 2013-2022.

  14. Photovoltaic solar concentrator

    SciTech Connect

    Nielson, Gregory N.; Cruz-Campa, Jose Luis; Okandan, Murat; Resnick, Paul J.; Sanchez, Carlos Anthony; Clews, Peggy J.; Gupta, Vipin P.

    2015-09-08

    A process including forming a photovoltaic solar cell on a substrate, the photovoltaic solar cell comprising an anchor positioned between the photovoltaic solar cell and the substrate to suspend the photovoltaic solar cell from the substrate. A surface of the photovoltaic solar cell opposite the substrate is attached to a receiving substrate. The receiving substrate may be bonded to the photovoltaic solar cell using an adhesive force or a metal connecting member. The photovoltaic solar cell is then detached from the substrate by lifting the receiving substrate having the photovoltaic solar cell attached thereto and severing the anchor connecting the photovoltaic solar cell to the substrate. Depending upon the type of receiving substrate used, the photovoltaic solar cell may be removed from the receiving substrate or remain on the receiving substrate for use in the final product.

  15. Solar array drive system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Berkopec, F. D.; Sturman, J. C.; Stanhouse, R. W.

    1976-01-01

    A solar array drive system consisting of a solar array drive mechanism and the corresponding solar array drive electronics is being developed. The principal feature of the solar array drive mechanism is its bidirectional capability which enables its use in mechanical redundancy. The solar array drive system is of a widely applicable design. This configuration will be tested to determine its acceptability for generic mission sets. Foremost of the testing to be performed is the testing for extended duration.

  16. Development of Solar Research

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wittmann, Axel D.; Wolfschmidt, Gudrun; Duerbeck, Hilmar W.

    Originally based on a workshop on “Development of Solar Research”, held in Freiburg/Breisgau, this book contains articles on megalithic structures, the Nebra sky-disk, ancient sun cults, the observation of sunspots, the photography of the sun during eclipses, eclipse maps and expeditions, solar telescopes, solar physics during the Nazi era, archives of solar observations, scientific ballooning for solar research, site-testing on the Canary Islands, as well as on international cooperation.

  17. Solar collector array

    SciTech Connect

    Hall, John Champlin; Martins, Guy Lawrence

    2015-09-06

    A method and apparatus for efficient manufacture, assembly and production of solar energy. In one aspect, the apparatus may include a number of modular solar receiver assemblies that may be separately manufactured, assembled and individually inserted into a solar collector array housing shaped to receive a plurality of solar receivers. The housing may include optical elements for focusing light onto the individual receivers, and a circuit for electrically connecting the solar receivers.

  18. Space Moves: Adding Movement to Solar System Lessons

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jenkins, Deborah Bainer; Heidorn, Brent

    2009-01-01

    Earth and space science figure prominently in the National Science Education Standards for levels 5-8 (NRC 1996). The Earth in the Solar System standard focuses on students' ability to understand (1) the composition of the solar system (Earth, Moon, Sun, planets with their moons, and smaller objects like asteroids and comets) and (2) that…

  19. Eastern Renewable Generation Integration Study Solar Dataset (Presentation)

    SciTech Connect

    Hummon, M.

    2014-04-01

    The National Renewable Energy Laboratory produced solar power production data for the Eastern Renewable Generation Integration Study (ERGIS) including "real time" 5-minute interval data, "four hour ahead forecast" 60-minute interval data, and "day-ahead forecast" 60-minute interval data for the year 2006. This presentation provides a brief overview of the three solar power datasets.

  20. Photovoltaic solar concentrator module

    SciTech Connect

    Chiang, C.J.

    1991-05-16

    This invention consists of a planar photovoltaic concentrator module for producing an electrical signal from incident solar radiation which includes an electrically insulating housing having a front wall, an opposing back wall and a hollow interior. A solar cell having electrical terminals is positioned within the interior of the housing. A planar conductor is connected with a terminal of the solar cell of the same polarity. A lens forming the front wall of the housing is operable to direct solar radiation incident to the lens into the interior of the housing. A refractive optical element in contact with the solar cell and facing the lens receives the solar radiation directed into the interior of the housing by the lens and directs the solar radiation to the solar cell to cause the solar cell to generate an electrical signal. An electrically conductive planar member is positioned in the housing to rest on the housing back wall in supporting relation with the solar cell terminal of opposite polarity. The planar member is operable to dissipate heat radiated by the solar cell as the solar cell generates an electrical signal and further forms a solar cell conductor connected with the solar cell terminal to permit the electrical signal generated by the solar cell to be measured between the planar member and the conductor.

  1. Solar Energy Technologies Program Newsletter - Fourth Quarter 2009

    SciTech Connect

    DOE Solar Energy Technologies Program

    2009-12-31

    The Fourth Quarter 2009 edition of the Solar Energy Technologies Program newsletter summarizes the activities for the past three months, funding opportunities, highlights from the national labs, and upcoming events.

  2. Solar Energy Technologies Program Newsletter - First Quarter 2010

    SciTech Connect

    2010-04-22

    The first quarter 2010 edition of the Solar Energy Technologies Program newsletter summarizes the activities for the past three months, funding opportunities, highlights from the national labs, and upcoming events.

  3. Process Technology and Advanced Concepts: Organic Solar Cells (Fact Sheet)

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    2011-06-01

    Capabilities fact sheet for the National Center for Photovoltaics: Process Technology and Advanced Concepts: Organic Solar Cell that includes scope, core competencies and capabilities, and contact/web information.

  4. Four Schools Put Solar Heating to the Test

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    American School and University, 1974

    1974-01-01

    The National Science Foundation has awarded four companies over a million dollars to carry out solar energy space-heating experiments at different schools in Massachusetts, Minnesota, Maryland, and Virginia. (MLF)

  5. Solar still

    SciTech Connect

    Gruntman, L.R.

    1980-08-26

    A solar still adapted to float on a body of water has a toroidal evaporating chamber with sunlight admitting and absorbing, respectively, top and bottom walls for vaporizing water from the body admitted to overlie the bottom wall. A surrounding inner float ring and underlying toroidal inflatable float support the chamber. A condenser depends from and communicates with the evaporating chamber through elongate coaxial vapor outlet and air return tubes, and in turn supplies distillate to a pendent holding tank. A rotatable shaft extending coaxially down through the evaporating chamber carries a fan to propel vapor from the evaporating chamber into the condenser due to rotation of a windmill atop the chamber. A curved reflector is rotatably driven atop the inner ring to direct additional sunlight on the evaporating chamber as the sun moves overhead. An outer float ring loosely coaxially surrounds the inner float ring. The annular water surface between the float rings, covered by a transparent film, forms an oxygen production zone occupiable by oxygen producing phytoplankton fed by nutrients in water brought up from beneath the thermocline by thermosiphon flow between the warm condenser and a surrounding heat skirt. Pump units mounted on the outer float ring remove distilled water and any oxygen produced, the latter for example to a device for dissolving the oxygen below the thermocline in the body of water.

  6. Solar oven

    SciTech Connect

    Burns, T.J.; Burns, C.L.

    1989-07-18

    This patent describes a solar oven. It comprises: an oven chamber having an open end and defining an interior cooking chamber; means providing a flat-back interior surface on the cooking chamber for absorbing sunlight and converting the absorbed sunlight into heat; an oven door hingedly mounted over the open end and movable between open and closed positions relative to the open end; means for pivotably supporting the oven chamber about a first substantially horizontal pivot axis; user-actuable latch means for selectively retaining the oven chamber in selected positions around the first horizontal axis, the user-actuable latch means including a user releasable ratchet mechanism including a plurality of ratchet teeth formed on the oven chamber and ratchet pawl pivoted to the support means in a position to engage selective ones of the ratchet teeth to retain the over chamber in selected orientations around the horizontal axis, the latch means further including means for pivoting the pawl into and out of the path of movement of the ratchet teeth to thereby achieve the selective positioning; a tray disposed within the interior cooking chamber for supporting foodstuffs during coking; pivot means for pivotally mounting the tray within the interior cooking chamber for movement around a second substantially horizontal pivot axis such that the tray can be positioned so as to maintain the foodstuffs in a substantially level position independently of the position of the oven chamber around the first pivot axis.

  7. Solar Resource & Meteorological Assessment Project (SOLRMAP): Observed Atmospheric and Solar Information System (OASIS); Tucson, Arizona (Data)

    DOE Data Explorer

    Wilcox, S.; Andreas, A.

    2010-11-03

    The U.S. Department of Energy's National Renewable Energy Laboratory collaborates with the solar industry to establish high quality solar and meteorological measurements. This Solar Resource and Meteorological Assessment Project (SOLRMAP) provides high quality measurements to support deployment of power projects in the United States. The no-funds-exchanged collaboration brings NREL solar resource assessment expertise together with industry needs for measurements. The end result is high quality data sets to support the financing, design, and monitoring of large scale solar power projects for industry in addition to research-quality data for NREL model development. NREL provides consultation for instrumentation and station deployment, along with instrument calibrations, data acquisition, quality assessment, data distribution, and summary reports. Industry participants provide equipment, infrastructure, and station maintenance.

  8. The Coronal Solar Magnetism Observatory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tomczyk, S.; Landi, E.; Zhang, J.; Lin, H.; DeLuca, E. E.

    2015-12-01

    Measurements of coronal and chromospheric magnetic fields are arguably the most important observables required for advances in our understanding of the processes responsible for coronal heating, coronal dynamics and the generation of space weather that affects communications, GPS systems, space flight, and power transmission. The Coronal Solar Magnetism Observatory (COSMO) is a proposed ground-based suite of instruments designed for routine study of coronal and chromospheric magnetic fields and their environment, and to understand the formation of coronal mass ejections (CME) and their relation to other forms of solar activity. This new facility will be operated by the High Altitude Observatory of the National Center for Atmospheric Research (HAO/NCAR) with partners at the University of Michigan, the University of Hawaii and George Mason University in support of the solar and heliospheric community. It will replace the current NCAR Mauna Loa Solar Observatory (http://mlso.hao.ucar.edu). COSMO will enhance the value of existing and new observatories on the ground and in space by providing unique and crucial observations of the global coronal and chromospheric magnetic field and its evolution. The design and current status of the COSMO will be reviewed.

  9. Advances in Solar Power Forecasting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haupt, S. E.; Kosovic, B.; Drobot, S.

    2014-12-01

    The National Center for Atmospheric Research and partners are building a blended SunCast Solar Power Forecasting system. This system includes several short-range nowcasting models and improves upon longer range numerical weather prediction (NWP) models as part of the "Public-Private-Academic Partnership to Advance Solar Power Forecasting." The nowcasting models being built include statistical learning models that include cloud regime prediction, multiple sky imager-based advection models, satellite image-based advection models, and rapid update NWP models with cloud assimilation. The team has also integrated new modules into the Weather Research and Forecasting Model (WRF) to better predict clouds, aerosols, and irradiance. The modules include a new shallow convection scheme; upgraded physics parameterizations of clouds; new radiative transfer modules that specify GHI, DNI, and DIF prediction; better satellite assimilation methods; and new aerosol estimation methods. These new physical models are incorporated into WRF-Solar, which is then integrated with publically available NWP models via the Dynamic Integrated Forecast (DICast) system as well as the Nowcast Blender to provide seamless forecasts at partner utility and balancing authority commercial solar farms. The improvements will be described and results to date discussed.

  10. Solar Thermal Propulsion Test Facility at MSFC

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1999-01-01

    This photograph shows an overall view of the Solar Thermal Propulsion Test Facility at the Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC). The 20-by 24-ft heliostat mirror, shown at the left, has dual-axis control that keeps a reflection of the sunlight on an 18-ft diameter concentrator mirror (right). The concentrator mirror then focuses the sunlight to a 4-in focal point inside the vacuum chamber, shown at the front of concentrator mirror. Researchers at MSFC have designed, fabricated, and tested the first solar thermal engine, a non-chemical rocket engine that produces lower thrust but has better thrust efficiency than chemical a combustion engine. MSFC turned to solar thermal propulsion in the early 1990s due to its simplicity, safety, low cost, and commonality with other propulsion systems. Solar thermal propulsion works by acquiring and redirecting solar energy to heat a propell nt. As part of MSFC's Space Transportation Directorate, the Propulsion Research Center serves as a national resource for research of advanced, revolutionary propulsion technologies. The mission is to move the Nation's capabilities beyond the confines of conventional chemical propulsion into an era of aircraft-like access to Earth-orbit, rapid travel throughout the solar system, and exploration of interstellar space.

  11. Test results, Industrial Solar Technology parabolic trough solar collector

    SciTech Connect

    Dudley, V.E.; Evans, L.R.; Matthews, C.W.

    1995-11-01

    Sandia National Laboratories and Industrial Solar Technology are cost-sharing development of advanced parabolic trough technology. As part of this effort, several configurations of an IST solar collector were tested to determine the collector efficiency and thermal losses with black chrome and black nickel receiver selective coatings, combined with aluminized film and silver film reflectors, using standard Pyrex{reg_sign} and anti-reflective coated Pyrex{reg_sign} glass receiver envelopes. The development effort has been successful, producing an advanced collector with 77% optical efficiency, using silver-film reflectors, a black nickel receiver coating, and a solgel anti-reflective glass receiver envelope. For each receiver configuration, performance equations were empirically derived relating collector efficiency and thermal losses to the operating temperature. Finally, equations were derived showing collector performance as a function of input insolation value, incident angle, and operating temperature.

  12. Advanced solar space missions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bohlin, J. D.

    1979-01-01

    The space missions in solar physics planned for the next decade are similar in that they will have, for the most part, distinct, unifying science objectives in contrast to the more general 'exploratory' nature of the Orbiting Solar Observatory and Skylab/ATM missions of the 1960's and 70's. In particular, the strategy for advanced solar physics space missions will focus on the quantitative understanding of the physical processes that create and control the flow of electromagnetic and particulate energy from the sun and through interplanetary space at all phases of the current sunspot cycle No. 21. Attention is given to the Solar Maximum Mission, the International Solar Polar Mission, solar physics on an early Shuttle mission, principal investigator class experiments for future spacelabs, the Solar Optical Telescope, the Space Science Platform, the Solar Cycle and Dynamics Mission, and an attempt to send a spacecraft to within 4 solar radii of the sun's surface.

  13. Solar Design Workbook

    SciTech Connect

    Franta, G.; Baylin, F.; Crowther, R.; Dubin, F.; Grace, A., Griffith, J.W.; Holtz, M.; Kutscher, C.; Nordham, D.; Selkowitz, S.; Villecco, M.

    1981-06-01

    This Solar Design Workbook presents solar building design applications for commercial buildir^s. The book is divided into four sections. The first section describes the variety of solar applications in buildings including conservation aspects, solar fundamentals, passive systems, active systems, daylighting, and other solar options. Solar system design evaluation techniques including considerations for building energy requirements, passive systems, active systems, and economics are presented in Section II. The third section attempts to assist the designer in the building design process for energy conservation and solar applications including options and considerations for pre-design, design, and post-design phases. The information required for the solar design proee^ has not been fully developed at this time. Therefore, Section III is incomplete, but an overview of the considerations with some of the design proces elements is presented. Section IV illustrates ease studies that utilize solar applications in the building design.

  14. SOLARES - A new hope for solar energy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Billman, K. W.; Gilbreath, W. P.; Bowen, S. W.

    1978-01-01

    A system of orbiting reflectors, SOLARES, has been studied as a possible means of reducing the diurnal variation and enhancing the average intensity of sunlight with a space system of minimum mass and complexity. The key impact that such a system makes on the economic viability of solar farming and other solar applications is demonstrated. The system is compatible with incremental implementation and continual expansion to meet the world's power needs. Key technology, environmental, and economic issues and payoffs are identified. SOLARES appears to be economically superior to other advanced, and even competitive with conventional, energy systems and could be scaled to completely abate our fossil fuel usage for power generation. Development of the terrestrial solar conversion technique, optimized for this new artificial source of solar radiation, yet remains.

  15. 76 FR 80385 - Draft Environmental Impact Statement and Proposed Maricopa Sun Solar Complex Multi-Species...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-12-23

    ... Fish and Wildlife Service Draft Environmental Impact Statement and Proposed Maricopa Sun Solar Complex... (EIS) under the National Environmental Policy Act for the proposed Maricopa Sun Solar Complex Habitat... your information request or comment is in reference to the Maricopa Sun Solar Complex...

  16. TESTING AT NREL OF THE MINIPILOT SOLAR SYSTEM FOR HAZARDOUS WASTE THERMAL DESTRUCTION

    EPA Science Inventory

    A minipilot solar system (MSS) was built at MRI, transported to the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), and tested at NREL's high flux solar furnace. The MSS involved combustion of a liquid feed in a combustion reactor equipped with a quartz window at one end for solar i...

  17. Solar Radiation Monitoring Station (SoRMS): Humboldt State University, Arcata, California (Data)

    DOE Data Explorer

    Wilcox, S.; Andreas, A.

    2007-05-02

    A partnership with HSU and U.S. Department of Energy's National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) to collect solar data to support future solar power generation in the United States. The measurement station monitors global horizontal, direct normal, and diffuse horizontal irradiance to define the amount of solar energy that hits this particular location.

  18. Solar Flare Observations at Submm-waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaufmann, P.; Raulin, J.-P.; Correia, E.; Costa, J. E. R.; Guillermo, C.; de Castro, Giménez; Silva, A. V. R.; Levato, H.; Rovira, M.; Mandrini, C.; Fernández-Borda, R.; Bauer, O.

    We report on the recent installation of the new Solar Submillimeter Telescope(SST) at the El Leoncito site, located in the Argentinean Andes, and also show first observational results. The instrument consists of a radome-enclosed 1.5-m cassegrain reflector and a system of two radiometers at 405 GHz and four at 212 GHz. The SST observes the quiet Sun and solar bursts simultaneously at both submillimeter-wave frequencies with a sampling rate of 1 millisecond. Since SST has seen the "first light" in May 1999, nearly 45 hours of continuous tracking of solar active regions were collected during short campaigns which produced first evidence for solar activity. The project has been funded by the Brazilian agency FAPESP, receiving support from the Argentinean agency CONICET through their institutes CASLEO and IAFE and from IAP, University of Bern and the Swiss National Science Foundation.

  19. Advanced reflector materials for solar concentrators

    SciTech Connect

    Jorgensen, G; Williams, T; Wendelin, T

    1994-10-01

    This paper describes the research and development program at the U.S. National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) in advanced reflector materials for solar concentrators. NREL's research thrust is to develop solar reflector materials that maintain high specular reflectance for extended lifetimes under outdoor service conditions and whose cost is significantly lower than existing products. Much of this work has been in collaboration with private-sector companies that have extensive expertise in vacuum-coating and polymer-film technologies. Significant progress and other promising developments will be discussed. These are expected to lead to additional improvements needed to commercialize solar thermal concentration systems and make them economically attractive to the solar manufacturing industry. To explicitly demonstrate the optical durability of candidate reflector materials in real-world service conditions, a network of instrumented outdoor exposure sites has been activated.

  20. Spectral Solar Radiation Data Base at NREL

    DOE Data Explorer

    The Solar Energy Research Institute (SERI)*, Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI), Florida Solar Energy Center (FSEC), and Pacific Gas and Electric Company (PG&E) cooperated to produce a spectral solar radiation data base representing a range of atmospheric conditions (or climates) that is applicable to several different types of solar collectors. Data that are included in the data base were collected at FSEC from October 1986 to April 1988, and at PG&E from April 1987 to April 1988. FSEC operated one EPRI and one SERI spectroradiometer almost daily at Cape Canaveral, which contributed nearly 2800 spectra to the data base. PG&E operated one EPRI spectroradiometer at San Ramon, Calif., as resources permitted, contributing nearly 300 spectra to the data base. SERI collected about 200 spectra in the Denver/Golden, Colo., area form November 1987 to February 1988 as part of a research project to study urban spectral solar radiation, and added these data to the data base. *In September 1991 the Solar Energy Research Institute became the National Renewable Energy Laboratory. [Description taken from http://rredc.nrel.gov/solar/old_data/spectral/

  1. Reconstruction of solar UV irradiance since 1974

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krivova, N. A.; Solanki, S. K.; Wenzler, T.; Podlipnik, B.

    2009-09-01

    Variations of the solar UV irradiance are an important driver of chemical and physical processes in the Earth's upper atmosphere and may also influence global climate. Here we reconstruct solar UV irradiance in the range 115-400 nm over the period 1974-2007 by making use of the recently developed empirical extension of the Spectral And Total Irradiance Reconstruction (SATIRE) models employing Solar Ultraviolet Spectral Irradiance Monitor (SUSIM) data. The evolution of the solar photospheric magnetic flux, which is a central input to the model, is described by the magnetograms and continuum images recorded at the Kitt Peak National Solar Observatory between 1974 and 2003 and by the Michelson Doppler Imager instrument on SOHO since 1996. The reconstruction extends the available observational record by 1.5 solar cycles. The reconstructed Ly-α irradiance agrees well with the composite time series by Woods et al. (2000). The amplitude of the irradiance variations grows with decreasing wavelength and in the wavelength regions of special interest for studies of the Earth's climate (Ly-α and oxygen absorption continuum and bands between 130 and 350 nm) is 1-2 orders of magnitude stronger than in the visible or if integrated over all wavelengths (total solar irradiance).

  2. Solar buildings. Overview: The Solar Buildings Program

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1998-04-01

    Buildings account for more than one third of the energy used in the United States each year, consuming vast amounts of electricity, natural gas, and fuel oil. Given this level of consumption, the buildings sector is rife with opportunity for alternative energy technologies. The US Department of Energy`s Solar Buildings Program was established to take advantage of this opportunity. The Solar Buildings Program is engaged in research, development, and deployment on solar thermal technologies, which use solar energy to produce heat. The Program focuses on technologies that have the potential to produce economically competitive energy for the buildings sector.

  3. Rigid Solar Generator (GSR) solar arrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martin, G. A.; Laget, R.; Urbain, G.; Bastard, J. L.

    The Telecom, TV-SAT, and ARABSAT solar arrays are described. The Telecom minimal power requirement of 110 W during the spinned transfer phase (solar array stowed on the spacecraft walls) and 1054 W summer solstice on orbit (3 axis stabilized), led to a 3 panels per wing solar array with panel dimensions of 1295.4 x 2047 mm. The TV-SAT and ARABSAT arrays differ from Telecom by their partial deployment in transfer orbit. The arrays contain 14,256 solar cells for primary power and 1560 cells for battery charging. Cells are 180 micron thick back surface reflectors.

  4. Classic papers in Solar Energy: Solar distillation

    SciTech Connect

    Howe, E.D.

    1990-06-01

    The following Classic Paper was presented by Professor Howe at the first international Conference on Solar Energy at Tucson, Arizona, USA in 1955. That conference was sponsored by the Association of Applied solar Energy (AFASE), the precursor of ISES. Although this paper does not represent the many developments in solar distillation later applied by Professor Howe in the South Pacific, it is a classic paper because it presents Professor Howe's pioneering work in setting up the Seawater Conversion Laboratory in Richmond for the University of California at Berkeley, US. The research of Professor Howe and his colleagues at the Seawater Conversion Laboratory formed the foundation of contemporary solar energy desalination and distillation systems.

  5. Components of the Solar Thermal Propulsion Engine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    Researchers at the Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) have designed, fabricated, and tested the first solar thermal engine, a non-chemical rocket engine that produces lower thrust but has better thrust efficiency than a chemical combustion engine. This photograph shows components for the thermal propulsion engine being laid out prior to assembly. MSFC turned to solar thermal propulsion in the early 1990s due to its simplicity, safety, low cost, and commonality with other propulsion systems. As part of MSFC's Space Transportation Directorate, the Propulsion Research Center serves as a national resource for research of advanced, revolutionary propulsion technologies. The mission is to move the Nation's capabilities beyond the confines of conventional chemical propulsion into an era of aircraft-like access to Earth-orbit, rapid travel throughout the solar system, and exploration of interstellar space.

  6. Introduction to solar technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fisk, M. J.; Anderson, H. C. W.

    An introductory textbook of the basic theoretical, engineering, and architectural principles of solar energy conversion systems is presented, with an emphasis on building heating applications. Attention is given to solar radiation measurement and heat transfer by radiation, convection, and conduction. The functional characteristics of flat plate collectors are explored, together with heat storage technologies, designs, and controls. Consideration is given to parameters affecting system design, selection, and optimization, and passive solar building heating systems are described, including architectural details. Concentrating solar collectors are discussed in conjunction with heat engines and air conditioning units. Finally, solar energy electricity generating technologies are reviewed, as are factors affecting the future uses of solar energy.

  7. Solar Thermal Propulsion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gerrish, Harold P., Jr.

    2003-01-01

    This paper presents viewgraphs on Solar Thermal Propulsion (STP). Some of the topics include: 1) Ways to use Solar Energy for Propulsion; 2) Solar (fusion) Energy; 3) Operation in Orbit; 4) Propulsion Concepts; 5) Critical Equations; 6) Power Efficiency; 7) Major STP Projects; 8) Types of STP Engines; 9) Solar Thermal Propulsion Direct Gain Assembly; 10) Specific Impulse; 11) Thrust; 12) Temperature Distribution; 13) Pressure Loss; 14) Transient Startup; 15) Axial Heat Input; 16) Direct Gain Engine Design; 17) Direct Gain Engine Fabrication; 18) Solar Thermal Propulsion Direct Gain Components; 19) Solar Thermal Test Facility; and 20) Checkout Results.

  8. A Solar Irradiance Climate Data Record

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coddington, O.; Lean, J. L.; Pilewskie, P.; Snow, M.; Lindholm, D.

    2016-08-01

    We present a new climate data record for total solar irradiance and solar spectral irradiance between 1610 and the present day with associated wavelength and time-dependent uncertainties and quarterly updates. The data record, which is part of the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration’s (NOAA) Climate Data Record (CDR) program, provides a robust, sustainable, and scientifically defensible record of solar irradiance that is of sufficient length, consistency, and continuity for use in studies of climate variability and climate change on multiple time scales and for user groups spanning climate modeling, remote sensing, and natural resource and renewable energy industries. The data record, jointly developed by the University of Colorado’s Laboratory for Atmospheric and Space Physics (LASP) and the Naval Research Laboratory (NRL), is constructed from solar irradiance models that determine the changes with respect to quiet sun conditions when facular brightening and sunspot darkening features are present on the solar disk where the magnitude of the changes in irradiance are determined from the linear regression of a proxy magnesium (Mg) II index and sunspot area indices against the approximately decade-long solar irradiance measurements of the Solar Radiation and Climate Experiment (SORCE). To promote long-term data usage and sharing for a broad range of users, the source code, the dataset itself, and supporting documentation are archived at NOAA's National Centers for Environmental Information (NCEI). In the future, the dataset will also be available through the LASP Interactive Solar Irradiance Data Center (LISIRD) for user-specified time periods and spectral ranges of interest.

  9. Assessment of a Solar System Walk

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    LoPresto, Michael C.; Murrell, Steven R.; Kirchner, Brian

    2010-01-01

    The idea of sending students and the general public on a walk through a scale model of the solar system in an attempt to instill an appreciation of the relative scales of the sizes of the objects compared to the immense distances between them is certainly not new. A good number of such models exist, including one on the National Mall in…

  10. Improving the efficiency of solar photovoltaic power system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aribisala, Henry A.

    As the local and national clamor for foreign energy independent United States continues to grow unabated; renewable energy has been receiving increased focus and it's widely believed that it's not only the answer to ever increasing demand for energy in this country, but also the environmentally friendly means of meeting such demand. During the spring of 2010, I was involved with a 5KW solar power system design project; the project involved designing and building solar panels and associated accessories like the solar array mounts and Solar Inverter system. One of the key issues we ran into during the initial stage of the project was how to select efficient solar cells for panel building at a reasonable cost. While we were able to purchase good solar cells within our allocated budget, the issue of design for efficiency was not fully understood , not just in the contest of solar cells performance , but also in the overall system efficiency of the whole solar power system, hence the door was opened for this thesis. My thesis explored and expanded beyond the scope of the aforementioned project to research different avenues for improving the efficiency of solar photo-voltaic power system from the solar cell level to the solar array mounting, array tracking and DC-AC inversion system techniques.

  11. Technical developments in molten salt solar central receiver systems

    SciTech Connect

    Grant, G.; Johnson, S.D.; Smith, D.C.

    1984-08-01

    Solar system components have undergone considerable analysis and evaluation through various efforts such as the Saguaro and Solar 100 design programs and the experimental work conducted by Sandia National Laboratories. While the foregoing work has established the feasibility of molten salt solar plant design, further prototypical testing is necessary prior to the construction of large scale plants. Work is underway on a program to demonstrate the viability of the receiver design, the operation of full size hot and cold salt pumps, and the operability of major salt valves for a commercial solar plant. This work will be undertaken at the Central Receiver Test Facility (CRTF) in Albuquerque.

  12. Strong Solar Control of Infrared Aurora on Jupiter: Correlation Since the Last Solar Maximum

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kostiuk, T.; Livengood, T. A.; Hewagama, T.

    2009-01-01

    Polar aurorae in Jupiter's atmosphere radiate throughout the electromagnetic spectrum from X ray through mid-infrared (mid-IR, 5 - 20 micron wavelength). Voyager IRIS data and ground-based spectroscopic measurements of Jupiter's northern mid-IR aurora, acquired since 1982, reveal a correlation between auroral brightness and solar activity that has not been observed in Jovian aurora at other wavelengths. Over nearly three solar cycles, Jupiter auroral ethane emission brightness and solar 10.7 cm radio flux and sunspot number are positively correlated with high confidence. Ethane line emission intensity varies over tenfold between low and high solar activity periods. Detailed measurements have been made using the GSFC HIPWAC spectrometer at the NASA IRTF since the last solar maximum, following the mid-IR emission through the declining phase toward solar minimum. An even more convincing correlation with solar activity is evident in these data. Current analyses of these results will be described, including planned measurements on polar ethane line emission scheduled through the rise of the next solar maximum beginning in 2009, with a steep gradient to a maximum in 2012. This work is relevant to the Juno mission and to the development of the Europa Jupiter System Mission. Results of observations at the Infrared Telescope Facility (IRTF) operated by the University of Hawaii under Cooperative Agreement no. NCC5-538 with the National Aeronautics and Space Administration, Science Mission Directorate, Planetary Astronomy Program. This work was supported by the NASA Planetary Astronomy Program.

  13. Proceedings of the Annual Solar Thermal Technology Research and Development Conference

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Couch, W. A.

    1989-02-01

    The Annual Solar Thermal Technology Research and Development Conference is being held at the Holiday Inn Crowne Plaza in Arlington, Virgina, March 8 and 9, 1989. This year the conference is meeting in conjunction with SOLTECH '89. SOLTECH '89 is a jointly sponsored meeting of the Solar Energy Industries Association, Interstate Solar Coordination Council, Sandia National Laboratories and the Solar Energy Research Institute. This report contains the agenda, extended abstracts and most significant visual aids used by the speakers during the Solar Thermal Technology research and development sessions. The program is divided into three sessions: Solar Electric Technology, Non-Electric Research and Development and Applications, and Concentrators.

  14. Solar-Collector Radiometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kendall, J. M., Jr

    1984-01-01

    Water-cooled Kendall radiometer measures output of solar energy concentrators. Unit measures irradiance up to 30,000 solar constants with 1 percent accuracy and responds to wavelengths from ultraviolet to far infrared.

  15. Solar engineering 1994

    SciTech Connect

    Klett, D.E.; Hogan, R.E.; Tanaka, Tadayoshi

    1994-01-01

    This volume of 83 papers constitutes the Proceedings of the 1994 International Solar Energy Conference held March 27--30, 1994 in San Francisco, California. The Conference was jointly sponsored by the Solar Energy Division of the American Society of Mechanical Engineers, The Japan Society of Mechanical Engineers and the Japan Solar Energy Society. This is the fourth cooperation between ASME, JSME and JSES in cosponsoring the International Solar Energy Conference. The papers cover a wide range of solar technologies from low temperature solar ponds and desalinization to high temperature concentrators for space applications and central receivers for terrestrial power generation. Other topics covered include solar detoxification of hazardous waste, dish Stirling systems, solar cooling, photovoltaics, building energy analysis and conservation, simulation, and testing and measurement techniques. All papers were indexed separately for the data base.

  16. Solar power roof shingle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Forestieri, A. F.; Ratajczak, A. F.; Sidorak, L. G.

    1975-01-01

    Silicon solar cell module provides both all-weather protection and electrical power. Module consists of array of circular silicon solar cells bonded to fiberglass substrate roof shingle with fluorinated ethylene propylene encapsulant.

  17. Solar Neutral Particles

    NASA Video Gallery

    This animation shows a neutral solar particle's path leaving the sun, following the magnetic field lines out to the heliosheath. The solar particle hits a hydrogen atom, stealing its electron, and ...

  18. Solar Resource Assessment

    SciTech Connect

    Renne, D.; George, R.; Wilcox, S.; Stoffel, T.; Myers, D.; Heimiller, D.

    2008-02-01

    This report covers the solar resource assessment aspects of the Renewable Systems Interconnection study. The status of solar resource assessment in the United States is described, and summaries of the availability of modeled data sets are provided.

  19. Purification of Solar Ponds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carpenter, S.

    1985-01-01

    Flocculatory agents added to solar saltponds remove turbidity to increase solar-energy collection efficiency. Flocculating agent or bacteriocide used to remove micro-organisms sprayed onto pond from airplane and allowed to settle to bottom of pond.

  20. Solar Wind Five

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Neugebauer, M. (Editor)

    1983-01-01

    Topics of discussion were: solar corona, MHD waves and turbulence, acceleration of the solar wind, stellar coronae and winds, long term variations, energetic particles, plasma distribution functions and waves, spatial dependences, and minor ions.

  1. Glory Solar Array Deployment

    NASA Video Gallery

    The Glory spacecraft uses Orbital Sciences Corporation Space Systems Group's LEOStar-1 bus design, with deployable, four-panel solar arrays. This conceptual animation reveals Glory's unique solar a...

  2. Solar-Heated Gasifier

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Qader, S. A.

    1985-01-01

    Catalytic coal and biomass gasifer system heated by solar energy. Sunlight from solar concentrator focused through quartz window onto ceramic-honeycomb absorber surface, which raises temperature of reactant steam, fluidizing gas, and reactor walls.

  3. Solar Energy Project, Activities: General Solar Topics.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tullock, Bruce, Ed.; And Others

    This guide contains lesson plans and outlines of activities which introduce students to concepts and issues relating to solar energy. Lessons frequently presented in the context of solar energy as it relates to contemporary energy problems. Each unit presents an introduction; objectives; necessary skills and knowledge; materials; method;…

  4. Total solar irradiance values determined using Earth Radiation Budget Experiment (ERBE) radiometers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, Robert B., III; Gibson, Michael A.; Natarajan, Sudha

    1988-01-01

    During the October 1984 through January 1988 period, the ERBE solar monitors on the NASA Earth Radiation Satellite and on the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration NOAA 9 and NOAA 10 spacecraft were used to obtain mean total solar irradiance values of 1365, 1365, and 1363 W/sq m, respectively. Secular variations in the solar irradiance have been observed, and they appear to be correlated with solar activity.

  5. Solar energy applications in the tropics

    SciTech Connect

    Lim, B.B.

    1983-01-01

    This book presents the papers given at a seminar on the use of solar energy in tropical regions. Topics considered at the seminar included solar decision making, solar radiation measurement, solar air conditioning, solar refrigeration, solar collectors, solar water heaters, photovoltaics, solar architecture, solar heating systems, research programs, solar drying, and performance testing.

  6. Solar Energy Technician/Installer

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moore, Pam

    2007-01-01

    Solar power (also known as solar energy) is solar radiation emitted from the sun. Large panels that absorb the sun's energy as the sun beats down on them gather solar power. The energy in the rays can be used for heat (solar thermal energy) or converted to electricity (photovoltaic energy). Each solar energy project, from conception to…

  7. Mexican national pyronometer network calibration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    VAldes, M.; Villarreal, L.; Estevez, H.; Riveros, D.

    2013-12-01

    In order to take advantage of the solar radiation as an alternate energy source it is necessary to evaluate the spatial and temporal availability. The Mexican National Meterological Service (SMN) has a network with 136 meteorological stations, each coupled with a pyronometer for measuring the global solar radiation. Some of these stations had not been calibrated in several years. The Mexican Department of Energy (SENER) in order to count on a reliable evaluation of the solar resource funded this project to calibrate the SMN pyrometer network and validate the data. The calibration of the 136 pyronometers by the intercomparison method recommended by the World Meterological Organization (WMO) requires lengthy observations and specific environmental conditions such as clear skies and a stable atmosphere, circumstances that determine the site and season of the calibration. The Solar Radiation Section of the Instituto de Geofísica of the Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México is a Regional Center of the WMO and is certified to carry out the calibration procedures and emit certificates. We are responsible for the recalibration of the pyronometer network of the SMN. A continuous emission solar simulator with exposed areas with 30cm diameters was acquired to reduce the calibration time and not depend on atmospheric conditions. We present the results of the calibration of 10 thermopile pyronometers and one photovoltaic cell by the intercomparison method with more than 10000 observations each and those obtained with the solar simulator.

  8. Solar disk sextant

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sofia, S.; Chiu, H.-Y.; Maier, E.; Schatten, K. H.; Minott, P.; Endal, A. S.

    1984-01-01

    This paper presents the conceptual design of an instrument, called the solar disk sextant, to be used in space to measure the shape and the size of the sun and their variations. The instrumental parameters required to produce sufficient sensitivity to address the problems of solar oblateness, solar pulsations, and global size changes of climatic importance are given.

  9. Solar installer's training program

    SciTech Connect

    Schmidt, W.J.; Philbin, J.

    1981-01-01

    Instructions are given for the installation of solar domestic water heating systems, space heating systems, and pool heating systems. The basic procedures for installing any solar heating system are presented with reference to solar domestic hot water systems, and the space and pool systems are taught on that basis. (LEW)

  10. Solar Photovoltaic Cells.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mickey, Charles D.

    1981-01-01

    Reviews information on solar radiation as an energy source. Discusses these topics: the key photovoltaic material; the bank theory of solids; conductors, semiconductors, and insulators; impurity semiconductors; solid-state photovoltaic cell operation; limitations on solar cell efficiency; silicon solar cells; cadmium sulfide/copper (I) sulfide…

  11. Experimenting with Solar Energy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Roman, Harry T.

    2004-01-01

    Over the past 25 years, the author has had the opportunity to study the subject of solar energy and to get involved with the installation, operation, and testing of solar energy systems. His work has taken him all over the United States and put him in contact with solar experts from around the world. He has also had the good fortune of seeing some…

  12. Solar tracking system

    DOEpatents

    Okandan, Murat; Nielson, Gregory N.

    2016-07-12

    Solar tracking systems, as well as methods of using such solar tracking systems, are disclosed. More particularly, embodiments of the solar tracking systems include lateral supports horizontally positioned between uprights to support photovoltaic modules. The lateral supports may be raised and lowered along the uprights or translated to cause the photovoltaic modules to track the moving sun.

  13. Inexpensive Photovoltaic Solar Radiometer.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kissner, Fritz

    1981-01-01

    Describes a low-cost instrument using a solar cell as a sensor to measure both instantaneous and integrated value of solar flux. Constructing and calibrating such an instrument constitutes an undergraduate experimental project, affording students an opportunity to examine a variety of aspects associated with solar energy measurements. (Author/SK)

  14. Build a Solar Greenhouse.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Conservation and Renewable Energy Inquiry and Referral Service (DOE), Silver Spring, MD.

    Attached solar greenhouses are relatively inexpensive and easy to build; they can provide additional heat to homes all winter as well as fresh vegetables and flowers. This bulletin: (1) describes the characteristics of a solar greenhouse; (2) provides a checklist of five items to consider before building a solar greenhouse; (3) describes the four…

  15. Solar Job Related Training.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lennox Industries, Inc., Dallas, TX.

    This book contains comprehensive instruction in design, installation, and service procedures for typical solar space heat and domestic hot water systems. The book is comprised of five major sections. Solar Systems: Past and Present presents a brief look at how far solar technology has advanced. Included in this section are descriptions of over…

  16. Here Comes Solar Prove!

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mobius, E.; Gloeckler, G.; Goldstein, B.; Habbal, S.; McNutt, R.; Randolph, J.; Title, A.; Tsurutani, B.

    1998-01-01

    Flying a trajectory perpendicular to the Earth-Sun line during its perihelion passage, Solar Probe will use in-situ and imaging instruments to provide the first three dimentional viewing of the corona, direct observations of solar polar regions, and local sampling of the solar environment. These primary observations are complemented by context-setting cruise measurements and Earth-based observations.

  17. Application of solar energy; Proceedings of the Third Southeastern Conference, Huntsville, Ala., April 17-19, 1978

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wu, S. T. (Editor); Christensen, D. L.; Head, R. R.

    1978-01-01

    Demonstration projects, systems-subsystems simulation programs, applications (heating, cooling, agricultural, industrial), and climatic data testing (standards, economics, institutional) are the topics of the book. Economics of preheating water for commercial use and collecting, processing, and dissemination of data for the national demonstration program are discussed. Computer simulation of a solar energy system and graphical representation of solar collector performance are considered. Attention is given to solar driven heat pumps, solar cooling equipment, hybrid passive/active solar systems, and solar farm buildings. Evaluation of a thermographic scanning device for solar energy and conservation applications, use of meteorological data in system evaluation, and biomass conversion potential are presented.

  18. Development of 2.8-GHz Solar Flux Receivers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yun, Youngjoo; Park, Yong-Sun; Kim, Chang-Hee; Lee, Bangwon; Kim, Jung-Hoon; Yoo, Saeho; Lee, Chul-Hwan; Han, Jinwook; Kim, Young Yun

    2014-12-01

    We report the development of solar flux receivers operating at 2.8 GHz to monitor solar radio activity. Radio waves from the sun are amplified, filtered, and then transmitted to a power meter sensor without frequency down-conversion. To measure solar flux, a calibration scheme is designed with a noise source, an ambient load, and a hot load at 100° C. The receiver is attached to a 1.8 m parabolic antenna in Icheon, owned by National Radio Research Agency, and observation is being conducted during day time on a daily basis. We compare the solar fluxes measured for last seven months with solar fluxes obtained by DRAO in Penticton, Canada, and by the Hiraiso solar observatory in Japan, and finally establish equations to convert observed flux to the so-called Penticton flux with an accuracy better than 3.2 sfu.

  19. Fiscal Year 2005 Solar Radiometry and Metrology Task Accomplishments

    SciTech Connect

    Myers, D.; Andreas, A.; Reda, I.; Gotseff, P.; Wilcox, S.; Stoffel, T.; Anderberg, M.; Kay, B.; Bowen, A.

    2005-11-01

    The National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) Solar Radiometry and Metrology task provides traceable optical radiometric calibrations and measurements to photovoltaic (PV) researchers and the PV industry. Traceability of NREL solar radiometer calibrations to the World Radiometric Reference (WRR) was accomplished during Pyrheliometer Comparison at NREL in October 2004. Ten spectral and more than 200 broadband radiometers for solar measurements were calibrated this year. We measured detailed spectral distributions of the NREL and PV industry Pulsed Solar Simulators and are analyzing the influence of environmental variables on radiometer uncertainty. New systems for indoor and outdoor solar radiometer calibrations and ultraviolet (UV) spectral measurements and UV radiometer calibrations were purchased and tested. Optical metrology functions support the NREL Measurement and Characterization Task effort for ISO 17025 accreditation of NREL Solar Reference Cell Calibrations and have been integrated into the NREL quality system and audited for ISO17025 compliance.

  20. Bringing Real Solar Physics to the High School Classroom

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seaton, Daniel

    2006-06-01

    UNH's Partnership for Research Opportunities to Benefit Education (PROBE) project sends graduate students into high school classrooms across New Hampshire in order to help introduce students to authentic scientific inquiry. As one of ten graduate fellows, I worked with students in in ninth through twelfth grades in physical science, physics, earth science, and astronomy classes; helping students carry out individual and class projects on physics and solar physics. Projects related to solar physics included the production and analysis of plasma using a microwave oven, measurement of the solar constant, measurement of the solar rotation rate, solar spectroscopy, analysis of data from TRACE and SOHO, and the construction of various solar-powered devices. This work was generously supported by a grant from the National Science Foundation's GK-12 initiative (NSF#0338277).

  1. Texas Solar Collaboration DOE Rooftop Solar Challenge City of Houston Project Summary

    SciTech Connect

    Ronk, Jennifer

    2013-02-14

    The City of Houston is committed to achieving a sustainable solar infrastructure. In 2008, Houston was named a United States Department of Energy (DOE) Solar America City. As a Solar America City, Houston teamed with the Houston Advanced Research Center (HARC), Sandia National Laboratory (Sandia), industry, and academia, to implement the Solar Houston Initiative and prepare the Solar Houston Plan. The Solar Houston initiative was focused on identifying and overcoming barriers associated with establishing a solar infrastructure that is incorporated into the City of Houston’s overall energy plan. A broad group of Houston area stakeholders, facilitated by HARC, came together to develop a comprehensive solar plan that went beyond technology to address barriers and establish demonstrations, public outreach, education programs and other activities. The plan included proposed scopes of work in four program areas: policies, solar integration, public outreach, and education. Through the support of the DOE SunShot Rooftop Solar Challenge (RSC) grant to the Texas Collaboration (San Antonio, Austin, and Hosuton), Houston has been able to implement several of the recommendations of the Solar Houston Plan. Specific recommendations that this project was able to support include; Working with the other Texas Solar America Cities (San Antonio and Austin), to harmonize permitting and inspection processes to simplify for installers and lower soft costs of installation; Participating in state level solar policy groups such as the Texas Renewable Energy Industries Association (TRIEA); Continued coordination with the local transmission and distribution utility (CenterPoint) and retail electric providers (REP); Identification of opportunities to improve permitting and interconnection; Providing training on PV systems to City inspectors; Educating the public by continuing outreach, training, and workshops, particularly using the the Green Building Resources Center; Evaluating methods of

  2. Solar For Schools: A Case Study in Identifying and Implementing Solar Photovoltaic (PV) Projects in Three California School Districts: Preprint

    SciTech Connect

    Kandt, A.

    2011-04-01

    The Department of Energy's (DOE) Solar America Showcase program seeks to accelerate demand for solar technologies among key end use market sectors. As part of this activity the DOE provides Technical Assistance through its national laboratories to large-scale, high-visibility solar installation projects. The Solar Schools Assessment and Implementation Project (SSAIP) in the San Francisco Bay area was selected for a 2009 DOE Solar American Showcase award. SSAIP was formed through the efforts of the nonprofit Sequoia Foundation and includes three school districts: Berkeley, West Contra Costa, and Oakland Unified School Districts. This paper summarizes the technical assistance efforts that resulted from this technical assistance support. It serves as a case study and reference document detailing the steps and processes that could be used to successfully identify, fund, and implement solar PV projects in school districts across the country.

  3. Solar radiation absorbing material

    DOEpatents

    Googin, John M.; Schmitt, Charles R.; Schreyer, James M.; Whitehead, Harlan D.

    1977-01-01

    Solar energy absorbing means in solar collectors are provided by a solar selective carbon surface. A solar selective carbon surface is a microporous carbon surface having pores within the range of 0.2 to 2 micrometers. Such a surface is provided in a microporous carbon article by controlling the pore size. A thermally conductive substrate is provided with a solar selective surface by adhering an array of carbon particles in a suitable binder to the substrate, a majority of said particles having diameters within the range of about 0.2-10 microns.

  4. Solar Cycle #24 and the Solar Dynamo

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schatten, Kenneth; Pesnell, W. Dean

    2007-01-01

    We focus on two solar aspects related to flight dynamics. These are the solar dynamo and long-term solar activity predictions. The nature of the solar dynamo is central to solar activity predictions, and these predictions are important for orbital planning of satellites in low earth orbit (LEO). The reason is that the solar ultraviolet (UV) and extreme ultraviolet (EUV) spectral irradiances inflate the upper atmospheric layers of the Earth, forming the thermosphere and exosphere through which these satellites orbit. Concerning the dynamo, we discuss some recent novel approaches towards its understanding. For solar predictions we concentrate on a solar precursor method, in which the Sun's polar field plays a major role in forecasting the next cycle s activity based upon the Babcock-Leighton dynamo. With a current low value for the Sun s polar field, this method predicts that solar cycle #24 will be one of the lowest in recent times, with smoothed F10.7 radio flux values peaking near 130 plus or minus 30 (2 sigma), in the 2013 timeframe. One may have to consider solar activity as far back as the early 20th century to find a cycle of comparable magnitude. Concomitant effects of low solar activity upon satellites in LEO will need to be considered, such as enhancements in orbital debris. Support for our prediction of a low solar cycle #24 is borne out by the lack of new cycle sunspots at least through the first half of 2007. Usually at the present epoch in the solar cycle (approx. 7+ years after the last solar maximum), for a normal size following cycle, new cycle sunspots would be seen. The lack of their appearance at this time is only consistent with a low cycle #24. Polar field observations of a weak magnitude are consistent with unusual structures seen in the Sun s corona. Polar coronal holes are the hallmarks of the Sun's open field structures. At present, it appears that the polar coronal holes are relatively weak, and there have been many equatorial coronal holes

  5. Solar Cycle #24 and the Solar Dynamo

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pesnell, W. Dean; Schatten, Kenneth

    2007-01-01

    We focus on two solar aspects related to flight dynamics. These are the solar dynamo and long-term solar activity predictions. The nature of the solar dynamo is central to solar activity predictions, and these predictions are important for orbital planning of satellites in low earth orbit (LEO). The reason is that the solar ultraviolet (UV) and extreme ultraviolet (EUV) spectral irradiances inflate the upper atmospheric layers of the Earth, forming the thermosphere and exosphere through which these satellites orbit. Concerning the dynamo, we discuss some recent novel approaches towards its understanding. For solar predictions we concentrate on a solar precursor method, in which the Sun s polar field plays a major role in forecasting the next cycle s activity based upon the Babcock- Leighton dynamo. With a current low value for the Sun s polar field, this method predicts that solar cycle #24 will be one of the lowest in recent times, with smoothed F10.7 radio flux values peaking near 130+ 30 (2 4, in the 2013 timeframe. One may have to consider solar activity as far back as the early 20th century to find a cycle of comparable magnitude. Concomitant effects of low solar activity upon satellites in LEO will need to be considered, such as enhancements in orbital debris. Support for our prediction of a low solar cycle #24 is borne out by the lack of new cycle sunspots at least through the first half of 2007. Usually at the present epoch in the solar cycle (-7+ years after the last solar maximum), for a normal size following cycle, new cycle sunspots would be seen. The lack of their appearance at this time is only consistent with a low cycle #24. Polar field observations of a weak magnitude are consistent with unusual structures seen in the Sun s corona. Polar coronal holes are the hallmarks of the Sun s open field structures. At present, it appears that the polar coronal holes are relatively weak, and there have been many equatorial coronal holes. This appears

  6. Advanced Technology Solar Telescope Construction: Progress Report

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rimmele, Thomas R.; McMullin, J.; Keil, S.; Goode, P.; Knoelker, M.; Kuhn, J.; Rosner, R.; ATST Team

    2012-05-01

    The 4m Advance Technology Solar Telescope (ATST) on Haleakala will be the most powerful solar telescope and the world’s leading ground-based resource for studying solar magnetism that controls the solar wind, flares, coronal mass ejections and variability in the Sun’s output. The ATST will provide high resolution and high sensitivity observations of the dynamic solar magnetic fields throughout the solar atmosphere, including the corona at infrared wavelengths. With its 4 m aperture, ATST will resolve magnetic features at their intrinsic scales. A high order adaptive optics system delivers a corrected beam to the initial set of five state-of-the-art, facility class instrumentation located in the coude laboratory facility. Photopheric and chromospheric magnetometry is part of the key mission of four of these instruments. Coronal magnetometry and spectroscopy will be performed by two of these instruments at infrared wavelengths. The ATST project has transitioned from design and development to its construction phase. Site construction is expected to begin in April 2012. The project has awarded design and fabrication contracts for major telescope subsystems. A robust instrument program has been established and all instruments have passed preliminary design reviews or critical design reviews. A brief overview of the science goals and observational requirements of the ATST will be given, followed by a summary of the project status of the telescope and discussion of the approach to integrating instruments into the facility. The National Science Foundation (NSF) through the National Solar Observatory (NSO) funds the ATST Project. The NSO is operated under a cooperative agreement between the Association of Universities for Research in Astronomy, Inc. (AURA) and NSF.

  7. Progress in solar engineering

    SciTech Connect

    Yogi Goswami, D.

    1987-01-01

    This book presents reviews of various areas of solar energy technology, including wind energy technology and ocean thermal energy conversion (OTEC). It also identifies and suggests needs and future directions of research and development. The subjects covered in this book include solar thermal power technology, solar thermal storage, solar ponds, industrial process heat, solar water heating, active and passive solar cooling methods, low-cost collector development, photovoltaic research and applications, wind energy technology, and OTEC. Also covered are the status of the technology, basic and applied research, design and analysis methods, and performance and operational experiences of various systems. The book will thus be helpful as a review of various solar, wind, and OTEC technologies.

  8. Solar variability datalogger

    DOE PAGES

    Lave, Matthew; Stein, Joshua; Smith, Ryan

    2016-07-28

    To address the lack of knowledge of local solar variability, we have developed and deployed a low-cost solar variability datalogger (SVD). While most currently used solar irradiance sensors are expensive pyranometers with high accuracy (relevant for annual energy estimates), low-cost sensors display similar precision (relevant for solar variability) as high-cost pyranometers, even if they are not as accurate. In this work, we present evaluation of various low-cost irradiance sensor types, describe the SVD, and present validation and comparison of the SVD collected data. In conclusion, the low cost and ease of use of the SVD will enable a greater understandingmore » of local solar variability, which will reduce developer and utility uncertainty about the impact of solar photovoltaic (PV) installations and thus will encourage greater penetrations of solar energy.« less

  9. Solar energy modulator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hale, R. R. (Inventor); Mcdougal, A. R.

    1984-01-01

    A module is described with a receiver having a solar energy acceptance opening and supported by a mounting ring along the optic axis of a parabolic mirror in coaxial alignment for receiving solar energy from the mirror, and a solar flux modulator plate for varying the quantity of solar energy flux received by the acceptance opening of the module. The modulator plate is characterized by an annular, plate-like body, the internal diameter of which is equal to or slightly greater than the diameter of the solar energy acceptance opening of the receiver. Slave cylinders are connected to the modulator plate for supporting the plate for axial displacement along the axis of the mirror, therby shading the opening with respect to solar energy flux reflected from the surface of the mirror to the solar energy acceptance opening.

  10. Manual for solar specialists

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1982-07-01

    The objective of the manual is to meet the specific training needs of code enforcement personnel in connection with the examination of plans for and the inspection of solar energy installations. There is a brief historical review and discussion of geographical dependence of solar feasibility. The fundamentals of solar energy are presented to establish the quantity of solar energy which can be anticipated in a particular geographic location. The active, passive, and hybrid solar systems are described, telling how insolation is collected, stored, and distributed by various means. The physical and theoretical components of solar systems are related to specific code enforcement techniques. Also, the recommended requirements to code officials for solar heating, cooling, and hot water systems are reviewed and discussed. (LEW)

  11. Mars Solar Power

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Landis, Geoffrey A.; Kerslake, Thomas W.; Jenkins, Phillip P.; Scheiman, David A.

    2004-01-01

    NASA missions to Mars, both robotic and human, rely on solar arrays for the primary power system. Mars presents a number of challenges for solar power system operation, including a dusty atmosphere which modifies the spectrum and intensity of the incident solar illumination as a function of time of day, degradation of the array performance by dust deposition, and low temperature operation. The environmental challenges to Mars solar array operation will be discussed and test results of solar cell technology operating under Mars conditions will be presented, along with modeling of solar cell performance under Mars conditions. The design implications for advanced solar arrays for future Mars missions is discussed, and an example case, a Martian polar rover, are analyzed.

  12. Photovoltaic solar cell

    SciTech Connect

    Nielson, Gregory N.; Gupta, Vipin P.; Okandan, Murat; Watts, Michael R.

    2015-09-08

    A photovoltaic solar concentrator is disclosed with one or more transverse-junction solar cells (also termed point contact solar cells) and a lens located above each solar cell to concentrate sunlight onto the solar cell to generate electricity. Piezoelectric actuators tilt or translate each lens to track the sun using a feedback-control circuit which senses the electricity generated by one or more of the solar cells. The piezoelectric actuators can be coupled through a displacement-multiplier linkage to provide an increased range of movement of each lens. Each lens in the solar concentrator can be supported on a frame (also termed a tilt plate) having three legs, with the movement of the legs being controlled by the piezoelectric actuators.

  13. Photovoltaic solar concentrator

    DOEpatents

    Nielson, Gregory N.; Okandan, Murat; Resnick, Paul J.; Cruz-Campa, Jose Luis

    2012-12-11

    A photovoltaic solar concentrator is disclosed with one or more transverse-junction solar cells (also termed point contact solar cells) and a lens located above each solar cell to concentrate sunlight onto the solar cell to generate electricity. Piezoelectric actuators tilt or translate each lens to track the sun using a feedback-control circuit which senses the electricity generated by one or more of the solar cells. The piezoelectric actuators can be coupled through a displacement-multiplier linkage to provide an increased range of movement of each lens. Each lens in the solar concentrator can be supported on a frame (also termed a tilt plate) having three legs, with the movement of the legs being controlled by the piezoelectric actuators.

  14. Photovoltaic solar concentrator

    DOEpatents

    Nielson, Gregory N.; Gupta, Vipin P.; Okandan, Murat; Watts, Michael R.

    2016-03-15

    A photovoltaic solar concentrator is disclosed with one or more transverse-junction solar cells (also termed point contact solar cells) and a lens located above each solar cell to concentrate sunlight onto the solar cell to generate electricity. Piezoelectric actuators tilt or translate each lens to track the sun using a feedback-control circuit which senses the electricity generated by one or more of the solar cells. The piezoelectric actuators can be coupled through a displacement-multiplier linkage to provide an increased range of movement of each lens. Each lens in the solar concentrator can be supported on a frame (also termed a tilt plate) having three legs, with the movement of the legs being controlled by the piezoelectric actuators.

  15. Introduction to the Chinese Giant Solar Telescope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Z.; Deng, Y.; Ji, H.

    2012-12-01

    In order to detect the fine structures of solar magnetic field and dynamic field, an 8 meter solar telescope has been proposed by Chinese solar community. Due to the advantages of ring structure in polarization detection and thermal control, the current design of CGST (Chinese Giant Solar Telescope) is an 8 meter ring solar telescope. The spatial resolution of CGST is equivalent to an 8 meter diameter telescope, and the light-gathering power equivalent to a 5 meter full aperture telescope. The integrated simulation of optical system and imaging ability such as optical design, MCAO, active maintenance of primary mirror were carried out in this paper. Mechanical system was analyzed by finite element method too. The results of simulation and analysis showed that the current design could meet the demand of most science cases not only in infrared band but also in near infrared band and even in visible band. CGST was proposed by all solar observatories in Chinese Academy of Sciences and several overseas scientists. It is supported by CAS (Chinese Academy of Sciences) and NSFC (National Natural Science Foundation of China) as a long term astronomical project.

  16. Introduction to the Chinese Giant Solar Telescope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Zhong; Deng, Yuanyong; Jin, Zhenyu; Ji, Haisheng

    2012-09-01

    In order to detect the fine structures of solar magnetic field and dynamic field, an 8 meter solar telescope has been proposed by Chinese solar community. Due to the advantages of ring structure in polarization detection and thermal control, the current design of CGST (Chinese Giant Solar Telescope) is an 8 meter ring solar telescope. The spatial resolution of CGST is equivalent to an 8 meter diameter telescope, and the light-gathering power equivalent to a 5 meter full aperture telescope. The integrated simulation of optical system and imaging ability such as optical design, MCAO, active maintenance of primary mirror were carried out in this paper. Mechanical system was analyzed by finite element method too. The results of simulation and analysis showed that the current design could meet the demand of most science cases not only in infrared band but also in near infrared band and even in visible band. CGST was proposed by all solar observatories in Chinese Academy of Sciences and several overseas scientists. It is supported by CAS and NSFC (National Natural Science Foundation of China) as a long term astronomical project.

  17. Innovative solar thermochemical water splitting.

    SciTech Connect

    Hogan, Roy E. Jr.; Siegel, Nathan P.; Evans, Lindsey R.; Moss, Timothy A.; Stuecker, John Nicholas; Diver, Richard B., Jr.; Miller, James Edward; Allendorf, Mark D.; James, Darryl L.

    2008-02-01

    Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) is evaluating the potential of an innovative approach for splitting water into hydrogen and oxygen using two-step thermochemical cycles. Thermochemical cycles are heat engines that utilize high-temperature heat to produce chemical work. Like their mechanical work-producing counterparts, their efficiency depends on operating temperature and on the irreversibility of their internal processes. With this in mind, we have invented innovative design concepts for two-step solar-driven thermochemical heat engines based on iron oxide and iron oxide mixed with other metal oxides (ferrites). The design concepts utilize two sets of moving beds of ferrite reactant material in close proximity and moving in opposite directions to overcome a major impediment to achieving high efficiency--thermal recuperation between solids in efficient counter-current arrangements. They also provide inherent separation of the product hydrogen and oxygen and are an excellent match with high-concentration solar flux. However, they also impose unique requirements on the ferrite reactants and materials of construction as well as an understanding of the chemical and cycle thermodynamics. In this report the Counter-Rotating-Ring Receiver/Reactor/Recuperator (CR5) solar thermochemical heat engine and its basic operating principals are described. Preliminary thermal efficiency estimates are presented and discussed. Our ferrite reactant material development activities, thermodynamic studies, test results, and prototype hardware development are also presented.

  18. MODIS Solar Reflective Calibration Traceability

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Xiong, Xiaoxiong; Butler, Jim

    2009-01-01

    Long-term climate data records often consist of observations made by multiple sensors. It is, therefore, extremely important to have instrument overlap, to be able to track instrument stability, to quantify, measurement uncertainties, and to establish absolute scale traceable to the International System of Units (SI). The Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) is a key instrument for both the Terra and Aqua missions, which were launched in December 1999 and May 2002, respectively. It has 20 reflective solar bands (RSB) with wavelengths from 0.41 to 2.2 micrometers and observes the Earth at three nadir spatial resolutions: 0.25km, 0.5km, and 1km. MODIS RSB on-orbit calibration is reflectance based with reference to the bidirectional reflectance factor (BRF) of its on-board solar diffuser (SD). The SD BRF characterization was made pre-launch by the instrument vendor using reference samples traceable directly to the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST). On-orbit SD reflectance degradation is tracked by an on-board solar diffuser monitor (SDSM). This paper provides details of this calibration chain, from prelaunch to on-orbit operation, and associated uncertainty assessments. Using MODIS as an example, this paper also discusses challenges and key design requirements for future missions developed for accurate climate studies.

  19. Commercialization of solar space power

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pant, Alok; Sera, Gary

    1995-01-01

    The objective of this research is to help U.S. companies commercialize renewable energy in India, with a special focus on solar energy. The National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) Mid-Continent Technology Transfer Center (MCTTC) is working with ENTECH, Inc., a solar photovoltaic (SPV) systems manufacturer to form partnerships with Indian companies. MCTTC has conducted both secondary and primary market research and obtained travel funding to meet potential Indian partners face to face. MCTTC and ENTECH traveled to India during June 2-20, 1994, and visited New Delhi, Bombay, Pune and Calcutta. Meetings were held with several key government officials and premier Indian business houses and entrepreneurs in the area of solar energy. A firsthand knowledge of India's renewable energy industry was gained, and companies were qualified in terms of capabilities and commitment to the SPV business. The World Bank has awarded India with 280 million to commercialize renewable energies, including 55 million for SPV. There is a market in India for both small-scale (kW) and large SPV (MW) applications. Each U.S. company needs to form a joint venture with an Indian firm and let the latter identify the states and projects with the greatest business potential. Several big Indian companies and entrepreneurs are planning to enter the SPV business, and they currently are seeking foreign technology partners. Since the lager companies have adopted a more conservative approach, however, partnerships with entrepreneurs might offer the quickest route to market entry in India.

  20. Sandia solar dryer: preliminary performance evaluation

    SciTech Connect

    Glass, J.S.; Holm-Hansen, T.; Tills, J.; Pierce, J.D.

    1986-01-01

    Preliminary performance evaluations were conducted with the prototype modular solar dryer for wastewater sludge at Sandia National Laboratories. Operational parameters which appeared to influence sludge drying efficiency included condensation system capacity and air turbulence at the sludge surface. Sludge heating profiles showed dependencies on sludge moisture content, sludge depth and seasonal variability in available solar energy. Heat-pasteurization of sludge in the module was demonstrated in two dynamic-processing experiments. Through balanced utilization of drying and heating functions, the facility has the potential for year-round sludge treatment application.

  1. NREL Success Stories - Quest for Inexpensive Silicon Solar Cells

    ScienceCinema

    Branz, Howard

    2016-07-12

    Scientists at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) share their story about a successful partnership with Oak Ridge National Laboratory and the Ampulse Corporation and how support from the US Department of Energy's Technology Commercialization & Deployment Fund has helped it and their silicon solar cell research thrive.

  2. Assessment of solar and wind energy resources in Ethiopia. I. Solar energy

    SciTech Connect

    Drake, F.; Mulugetta, Y.

    1996-09-01

    This paper describes how data from a variety of sources are merged to present new countrywide maps of the solar energy distribution over Ethiopia. The spatial coverage of stations with radiation data was found to be unsatisfactory for the purpose of a countrywide solar energy assessment exercise. Therefore, radiation had to be predicted from sunshine hours by employing empirical models. Using data from seven stations in Ethiopia, linear and quadratic correlation relationships between monthly mean daily solar radiation and sunshine hours per day have been developed. These regional models show a distinct improvement over previously employed countrywide models. To produce a national solar-energy distribution profile, a spatial extension of the radiation/sunshine relationships had to be carried out. To do this, the intercepts(a) and slopes(b) of each of the seven linear regression equations and another six from previous studies, completed in neighbouring Sudan, Kenya and Yemen, were used to interpolate the corresponding values to areas between them. Subsequent to these procedures, 142 stations providing only sunshine data were assigned their `appropriate` a and b values to estimate the amount of solar radiation received, which was then used to produce annual and monthly solar radiation distribution maps for Ethiopia. The results show that in all regions solar energy is an abundant resource. 19 refs., 11 figs., 4 tabs.

  3. Solar eclipse monitoring for solar energy applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reda, Ibrahim

    2015-04-01

    In recent years, the interest in using solar energy as a major contributor to renewable energy applications has increased, and the focus to optimize the use of electrical energy based on demand and resources from different locations has strengthened. This article includes a procedure for implementing an algorithm to calculate the Moon's zenith angle with uncertainty of ±0.001° and azimuth angle with uncertainty of ±0.003°. In conjunction with Solar Position Algorithm, the angular distance between the Sun and the Moon is used to develop a method to instantaneously monitor the partial or total solar eclipse occurrence for solar energy applications. This method can be used in many other applications for observers of the Sun and the Moon positions for applications limited to the stated uncertainty.

  4. Solar Resource & Meteorological Assessment Project (SOLRMAP): Southwest Solar Research Park (Formerly SolarCAT) Rotating Shadowband Radiometer (RSR); Phoenix, Arizona (Data)

    DOE Data Explorer

    Wilcox, S.; Andreas, A.

    2010-09-27

    The U.S. Department of Energy's National Renewable Energy Laboratory collaborates with the solar industry to establish high quality solar and meteorological measurements. This Solar Resource and Meteorological Assessment Project (SOLRMAP) provides high quality measurements to support deployment of power projects in the United States. The no-funds-exchanged collaboration brings NREL solar resource assessment expertise together with industry needs for measurements. The end result is high quality data sets to support the financing, design, and monitoring of large scale solar power projects for industry in addition to research-quality data for NREL model development. NREL provides consultation for instrumentation and station deployment, along with instrument calibrations, data acquisition, quality assessment, data distribution, and summary reports. Industry participants provide equipment, infrastructure, and station maintenance.

  5. Opportunities and Challenges for Solar Minigrid Development in Rural India

    SciTech Connect

    Thirumurthy, N.; Harrington, L.; Martin, D.; Thomas, L.; Takpa, J.; Gergan, R.

    2012-09-01

    The goal of this report is to inform investors about the potential of solar minigrid technologies to serve India's rural market. Under the US-India Energy Dialogue, the US Department of Energy's (DOE) National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) is supporting the Indian Ministry of New and Renewable Energy (MNRE)'s Jawaharlal Nehru National Solar Mission (JNNSM) in performing a business-case and policy-oriented analysis on the deployment of solar minigrids in India. The JNNSM scheme targets the development of 2GW of off-grid solar power by 2022 and provides large subsidies to meet this target. NREL worked with electricity capacity and demand data supplied by the Ladakh Renewable Energy Development Agency (LREDA) from Leh District, to develop a technical approach for solar minigrid development. Based on the NREL-developed, simulated solar insolation data for the city of Leh, a 250-kW solar photovoltaic (PV) system can produce 427,737 kWh over a 12-month period. The business case analysis, based on several different scenarios and JNNSM incentives shows the cost of power ranges from Rs. 6.3/kWh (US$0.126) to Rs. 9/kWh (US$0.18). At these rates, solar power is a cheaper alternative to diesel. An assessment of the macro-environment elements--including political, economic, environmental, social, and technological--was also performed to identify factors that may impact India?s energy development initiatives.

  6. Solar Cycle 24 and the Solar Dynamo

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pesnell, W. D.; Schatten, K.

    2007-01-01

    We will discuss the polar field precursor method for solar activity prediction, which predicts cycle 24 will be significantly lower than recent activity cycles, and some new ideas rejuvenating Babcock's shallow surface dynamo. The polar field precursor method is based on Babcock and Leighton's dynamo models wherein the polar field at solar minimum plays a major role in generating the next cycle's toroidal field and sunspots. Thus, by examining the polar fields of the Sun near solar minimum, a forecast for the next cycle's activity is obtained. With the current low value for the Sun's polar fields, this method predicts solar cycle 24 will be one of the lowest in recent times, with smoothed F10.7 radio flux values peaking near 135 plus or minus 35 (2 sigma), in the 2012-2013 timeframe (equivalent to smoothed Rz near 80 plus or minus 35 [2 sigma]). One may have to consider solar activity as far back as the early 20th century to find a cycle of comparable magnitude. We discuss unusual behavior in the Sun's polar fields that support this prediction. Normally, the solar precursor method is consistent with the geomagnetic precursor method, wherein geomagnetic variations are thought to be a good measure of the Sun's polar field strength. Because of the unusual polar field, the Earth does not appear to be currently bathed in the Sun's extended polar field (the interplanetary field), hence negating the primal cause behind the geomagnetic precursor technique. We also discuss how percolation may support Babcock's original shallow solar dynamo. In this process ephemeral regions from the solar magnetic carpet, guided by shallow surface fields, may collect to form pores and sunspots.

  7. SOHO hunts elusive solar prey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    1995-10-01

    therefore have a direct impact on human activity. Indeed, all of these effects are of such vital importance that national centres employ space weather forecasters and continuously monitor the Sun from the ground and space to warn of threatening solar activity. The Solar-Terrestrial Science Programme - comprising of SOHO and its sister-mission Cluster - are aimed at obtaining a fuller understanding of the vital link between the Sun and the Earth. SOHO will look back at the ultimate source of it all, the Sun, in order to identify and analyse the ultimate source of the phenomena that cause terrestrial effects. Cluster will investigate in detail and - being a flotilla of four magnetospheric spacecraft - in three dimensions, the physical mature of the processes that are induced in the near-Earth environment. "All those who have worked tirelessly on the SOHO payload, spacecraft and ground segment are to be congratulated in their excellent work and for having developed the most remarkable tool to help us understand the Sun and its environment, the heliosphere", said Roger Bonnet.

  8. Hybrids of Solar Sail, Solar Electric, and Solar Thermal Propulsion for Solar-System Exploration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilcox, Brian H.

    2012-01-01

    Solar sails have long been known to be an attractive method of propulsion in the inner solar system if the areal density of the overall spacecraft (S/C) could be reduced to approx.10 g/sq m. It has also long been recognized that the figure (precise shape) of useful solar sails needs to be reasonably good, so that the reflected light goes mostly in the desired direction. If one could make large reflective surfaces with reasonable figure at an areal density of approx.10 g/sq m, then several other attractive options emerge. One is to use such sails as solar concentrators for solar-electric propulsion. Current flight solar arrays have a specific output of approx. 100W/kg at 1 Astronomical Unit (AU) from the sun, and near-term advances promise to significantly increase this figure. A S/C with an areal density of 10 g/sq m could accelerate up to 29 km/s per year as a solar sail at 1 AU. Using the same sail as a concentrator at 30 AU, the same spacecraft could have up to approx. 45 W of electric power per kg of total S/C mass available for electric propulsion (EP). With an EP system that is 50% power-efficient, exhausting 10% of the initial S/C mass per year as propellant, the exhaust velocity is approx. 119 km/s and the acceleration is approx. 12 km/s per year. This hybrid thus opens attractive options for missions to the outer solar system, including sample-return missions. If solar-thermal propulsion were perfected, it would offer an attractive intermediate between solar sailing in the inner solar system and solar electric propulsion for the outer solar system. In the example above, both the solar sail and solar electric systems don't have a specific impulse that is near-optimal for the mission. Solar thermal propulsion, with an exhaust velocity of the order of 10 km/s, is better matched to many solar system exploration missions. This paper derives the basic relationships between these three propulsion options and gives examples of missions that might be enabled by

  9. Prediction of global solar irradiance based on time series analysis: Application to solar thermal power plants energy production planning

    SciTech Connect

    Martin, Luis; Marchante, Ruth; Cony, Marco; Zarzalejo, Luis F.; Polo, Jesus; Navarro, Ana

    2010-10-15

    Due to strong increase of solar power generation, the predictions of incoming solar energy are acquiring more importance. Photovoltaic and solar thermal are the main sources of electricity generation from solar energy. In the case of solar thermal energy plants with storage energy system, its management and operation need reliable predictions of solar irradiance with the same temporal resolution as the temporal capacity of the back-up system. These plants can work like a conventional power plant and compete in the energy stock market avoiding intermittence in electricity production. This work presents a comparisons of statistical models based on time series applied to predict half daily values of global solar irradiance with a temporal horizon of 3 days. Half daily values consist of accumulated hourly global solar irradiance from solar raise to solar noon and from noon until dawn for each day. The dataset of ground solar radiation used belongs to stations of Spanish National Weather Service (AEMet). The models tested are autoregressive, neural networks and fuzzy logic models. Due to the fact that half daily solar irradiance time series is non-stationary, it has been necessary to transform it to two new stationary variables (clearness index and lost component) which are used as input of the predictive models. Improvement in terms of RMSD of the models essayed is compared against the model based on persistence. The validation process shows that all models essayed improve persistence. The best approach to forecast half daily values of solar irradiance is neural network models with lost component as input, except Lerida station where models based on clearness index have less uncertainty because this magnitude has a linear behaviour and it is easier to simulate by models. (author)

  10. Solar Energy and the Western Asian Countries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    De Morais Mendonca Teles, Antonio

    2016-07-01

    The Western Asian countries receive the most abundant solar radiation of the world. They also have enormous reserves of oil and natural gas. But the world reserves of those fuels will certainly diminish greatly as the worldwide demand for energy will increase steadily in the coming decades. And the suppliers of energy will have to contend with public concerns about the polluting effects of those fuels and the possible dangers of nuclear energy. Clearly a power source based on an non exhaustible and non-polluting fuel could be expected to find a role. It now appears that such a source is at hand in the solar energy. Here in this paper, under the principles in the United Nations' Agenda 21, we suggest to Western Asian countries, the study and own development of the following technologies based on solar energy; and comment about them: *photo-voltaic solar cell power plants - in the future, its cost per kilowatt-hour will probably be competitive as to other sources of electrical energy. A new technique, the solar non-imaging concentrator, with amorphous silicon-based thin films solar cells at the focus of the concentrators, can collect and intensify solar radiation far better than conventional concentrators do, thus reducing much more the cost; *bio-gas - using biological gas to produce energy and for heating/cooling purposes; *wind generation of electricity - it's nowadays, a non-expensive technique; *water pump for irrigation and human consuming, driving their power from photovoltaic cells; *and the study and own development of solar lasers for peaceful scientific studies. In this new kind of laser, the external necessary pumping energy comes from the high intensity of sunlight, produced with non-imaging concentrators. Solar lasers can give unexpected new great uses for mankind. Those achievements will require international cooperation and transfer of information, sustained research and development work, and some initial subsides by independent governments. Solar

  11. Culinary nationalism.

    PubMed

    Ferguson, Priscilla Parkhurst

    2010-01-01

    Culinary consciousness raisers, cooking texts often serve as vehicles of national identification. From Pampille (Marthe Allard Daudet) and her cookbook, Les Bons Plats de France, in 1913 to the international culinary competitions of today such as the Bocuse d'or, culinary distinction promotes national interests. In contrast to the strident nationalism of the early twentieth century, culinary nationalism today operates in an increasingly globalized world. National culinary distinction defines the nation and sells its products in a highly competitive international arena. A recent culinary text, the South Korean film Le Grand Chef [Sik Gaek ] (2007), illustrates the phenomenon, subsuming national culinary promotion in a mega culinary competition, all in the service of Korean culinary achievement. PMID:21539054

  12. Culinary nationalism.

    PubMed

    Ferguson, Priscilla Parkhurst

    2010-01-01

    Culinary consciousness raisers, cooking texts often serve as vehicles of national identification. From Pampille (Marthe Allard Daudet) and her cookbook, Les Bons Plats de France, in 1913 to the international culinary competitions of today such as the Bocuse d'or, culinary distinction promotes national interests. In contrast to the strident nationalism of the early twentieth century, culinary nationalism today operates in an increasingly globalized world. National culinary distinction defines the nation and sells its products in a highly competitive international arena. A recent culinary text, the South Korean film Le Grand Chef [Sik Gaek ] (2007), illustrates the phenomenon, subsuming national culinary promotion in a mega culinary competition, all in the service of Korean culinary achievement.

  13. Progressing Deployment of Solar Photovoltaic Installations in the United States

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kwan, Calvin Lee

    2011-07-01

    This dissertation evaluates the likelihood of solar PV playing a larger role in national and state level renewable energy portfolios. I examine the feasibility of large-scale solar PV arrays on college campuses, the financials associated with large-scale solar PV arrays and finally, the influence of environmental, economic, social and political variables on the distribution of residential solar PV arrays in the United States. Chapter two investigates the challenges and feasibility of college campuses adopting a net-zero energy policy. Using energy consumption data, local solar insolation data and projected campus growth, I present a method to identify the minimum sized solar PV array that is required for the City College campus of the Los Angeles Community College District to achieve net-zero energy status. I document how current energy demand can be reduced using strategic demand side management, with remaining energy demand being met using a solar PV array. Chapter three focuses on the financial feasibility of large-scale solar PV arrays, using the proposed City College campus array as an example. I document that even after demand side energy management initiatives and financial incentives, large-scale solar PV arrays continue to have ROIs greater than 25 years. I find that traditional financial evaluation methods are not suitable for environmental projects such as solar PV installations as externalities are not taken into account and therefore calls for development of alternative financial valuation methods. Chapter four investigates the influence of environmental, social, economic and political variables on the distribution of residential solar PV arrays across the United States using ZIP code level data from the 2000 US Census. Using data from the National Renewable Energy Laboratory's Open PV project, I document where residential solar PVs are currently located. A zero-inflated negative binomial model was run to evaluate the influence of selected variables

  14. Report from solar physics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Walker, A. B. C.; Acton, L.; Brueckner, G.; Chupp, E. L.; Hudson, H. S.; Roberts, W.

    1989-01-01

    A discussion of the nature of solar physics is followed by a brief review of recent advances in the field. These advances include: the first direct experimental confirmation of the central role played by thermonuclear processes in stars; the discovery that the 5-minute oscillations of the Sun are a global seismic phenomenon that can be used as a probe of the structure and dynamical behavior of the solar interior; the discovery that the solar magnetic field is subdivided into individual flux tubes with field strength exceeding 1000 gauss. Also covered was a science strategy for pure solar physics. Brief discussions are given of solar-terrestrial physics, solar/stellar relationships, and suggested space missions.

  15. Solar thermal aircraft

    DOEpatents

    Bennett, Charles L.

    2007-09-18

    A solar thermal powered aircraft powered by heat energy from the sun. A heat engine, such as a Stirling engine, is carried by the aircraft body for producing power for a propulsion mechanism, such as a propeller. The heat engine has a thermal battery in thermal contact with it so that heat is supplied from the thermal battery. A solar concentrator, such as reflective parabolic trough, is movably connected to an optically transparent section of the aircraft body for receiving and concentrating solar energy from within the aircraft. Concentrated solar energy is collected by a heat collection and transport conduit, and heat transported to the thermal battery. A solar tracker includes a heliostat for determining optimal alignment with the sun, and a drive motor actuating the solar concentrator into optimal alignment with the sun based on a determination by the heliostat.

  16. Bright Idea: Solar Energy Primer.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Missouri State Dept. of Natural Resources, Jefferson City.

    This booklet is intended to address questions most frequently asked about solar energy. It provides basic information and a starting point for prospective solar energy users. Information includes discussion of solar space heating, solar water heating, and solar greenhouses. (Author/RE)

  17. SOLAR EFFECTS ON BUILDING DESIGN.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Building Research Inst., Inc., Washington, DC.

    A REPORT OF A PROGRAM HELD AS PART OF THE BUILDING RESEARCH INSTITUTE 1962 SPRING CONFERENCE ON THE SOLAR EFFECTS ON BUILDING DESIGN. TOPICS DISCUSSED ARE--(1) SOLAR ENERGY DATA APPLICABLE TO BUILDING DESIGN, (2) THERMAL EFFECTS OF SOLAR RADIATION ON MAN, (3) SOLAR EFFECTS ON ARCHITECTURE, (4) SOLAR EFFECTS ON BUILDING COSTS, (5) SELECTION OF…

  18. Solar Renewable Energy. Teaching Unit.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Buchanan, Marion; And Others

    This unit develops the concept of solar energy as a renewable resource. It includes: (1) an introductory section (developing understandings of photosynthesis and impact of solar energy); (2) information on solar energy use (including applications and geographic limitations of solar energy use); and (3) future considerations of solar energy…

  19. Climate Fundamentals for Solar Heating.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Conservation and Renewable Energy Inquiry and Referral Service (DOE), Silver Spring, MD.

    The design of any solar heating system is influenced heavily by climate; in this bulletin, information on climate as related to solar heating is as related to solar heating is provided. Topics discussed include: (1) solar radiation; (2) degree days; (3) climate and calculations which make use of solar radiation and degree days; and (4)…

  20. Report on solar-neutrino experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Davis, R. Jr.

    1982-01-01

    This report on solar neutrino experiments will include a summary of the results of the chlorine detector, and an account of our plans to build a gallium solar neutrino experiment. In addition to discussing the experimental side of the solar neutrino problem I would like to relate our experiences during the last 15 years in working in the Homestake Gold Mine. In the course of our work at Homestake a number of independent groups have asked to use our facilities and, because of the cooperative and helpful attitude of the Mine management, these experimentalists could be easily accommodated. A brief account of these experiences may be useful for the main business of this workshop, building large particle detectors for observing nucleon decay, and the related question of the need for a national underground physics facility.

  1. National Intelligence and National Prosperity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hunt, Earl; Wittmann, Werner

    2008-01-01

    What is the relation between the cognitive competence of a national population that nation's economic prosperity? Lynn and Vanhanen [Lynn, R. & Vanhanen, T. (2002). "IQ and the wealth of nations." Westport, CT: Praeger.] presented data pointing to an exceptionally strong relationship between IQ scores and Gross Domestic Product per capita (GDP/c).…

  2. 77 FR 4334 - Proposed Collection; Comment Request; Solar Cell: A Mobile UV Manager for Smart Phones (NCI)

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-01-27

    ... HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health Proposed Collection; Comment Request; Solar Cell: A Mobile... (OMB) for review and approval. Proposed Collection: Title: Solar Cell: A Mobile UV Manager for Smart... overall goal of the study is to design a smart phone application, Solar Cell, which uses smart...

  3. 77 FR 2734 - Proposed Collection; Comment Request: Solar Cell: A Mobile UV Manager for Smart Phones (NCI)

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-01-19

    ... HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health Proposed Collection; Comment Request: Solar Cell: A Mobile... (OMB) for review and approval. Proposed Collection: Title: Solar Cell: A Mobile UV Manager for Smart... overall goal of the study is to design a smart phone application, Solar Cell, which uses smart...

  4. Horizontally mounted solar collector

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Black, D. H. (Inventor)

    1979-01-01

    Solar energy is collected by using a vertical deflector assembly, a stationary reflector and a horizontally mounted solar collector. The deflector assembly contains a plurality of vanes which change the direction of the solar energy to the vertical, while constantly keeping the same side of the deflector facing the sun. The vertical rays are then reflected off the stationary reflector and are then absorbed by the collector.

  5. Solar selective absorption coatings

    DOEpatents

    Mahoney, Alan R.; Reed, Scott T.; Ashley, Carol S.; Martinez, F. Edward

    2004-08-31

    A new class of solar selective absorption coatings are disclosed. These coatings comprise a structured metallic overlayer such that the overlayer has a sub-micron structure designed to efficiently absorb solar radiation, while retaining low thermal emissivity for infrared thermal radiation. A sol-gel layer protects the structured metallic overlayer from mechanical, thermal, and environmental degradation. Processes for producing such solar selective absorption coatings are also disclosed.

  6. Solar selective absorption coatings

    DOEpatents

    Mahoney, Alan R.; Reed, Scott T.; Ashley, Carol S.; Martinez, F. Edward

    2003-10-14

    A new class of solar selective absorption coatings are disclosed. These coatings comprise a structured metallic overlayer such that the overlayer has a sub-micron structure designed to efficiently absorb solar radiation, while retaining low thermal emissivity for infrared thermal radiation. A sol-gel layer protects the structured metallic overlayer from mechanical, thermal, and environmental degradation. Processes for producing such solar selective absorption coatings are also disclosed.

  7. Solar energy emplacement developer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mortensen, Michael; Sauls, Bob

    1991-01-01

    A preliminary design was developed for a Lunar Power System (LPS) composed of photovoltaic arrays and microwave reflectors fabricated from lunar materials. The LPS will collect solar energy on the surface of the Moon, transform it into microwave energy, and beam it back to Earth where it will be converted into usable energy. The Solar Energy Emplacement Developer (SEED) proposed will use a similar sort of solar energy collection and dispersement to power the systems that will construct the LPS.

  8. Solar cell encapsulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gupta, Amitava (Inventor); Ingham, John D. (Inventor); Yavrouian, Andre H. (Inventor)

    1983-01-01

    A polymer syrup for encapsulating solar cell assemblies. The syrup includes uncrosslinked poly(n-butyl)acrylate dissolved in n-butyl acrylate monomer. Preparation of the poly(n-butyl)acrylate and preparation of the polymer syrup is disclosed. Methods for applying the polymer syrup to solar cell assemblies as an encapsulating pottant are described. Also included is a method for solar cell construction utilizing the polymer syrup as a dual purpose adhesive and encapsulating material.

  9. Solar heating and cooling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bartera, R. E.

    1978-01-01

    To emphasize energy conservation and low cost energy, the systems of solar heating and cooling are analyzed and compared with fossil fuel systems. The application of solar heating and cooling systems for industrial and domestic use are discussed. Topics of discussion include: solar collectors; space heating; pools and spas; domestic hot water; industrial heat less than 200 F; space cooling; industrial steam; and initial systems cost. A question and answer period is generated which closes out the discussion.

  10. Heterojunction solar cell

    DOEpatents

    Olson, J.M.

    1994-08-30

    A high-efficiency single heterojunction solar cell is described wherein a thin emitter layer (preferably Ga[sub 0.52]In[sub 0.48]P) forms a heterojunction with a GaAs absorber layer. The conversion efficiency of the solar cell is at least 25.7%. The solar cell preferably includes a passivating layer between the substrate and the absorber layer. An anti-reflection coating is preferably disposed over the emitter layer. 1 fig.

  11. Heterojunction solar cell

    DOEpatents

    Olson, Jerry M.

    1994-01-01

    A high-efficiency single heterojunction solar cell wherein a thin emitter layer (preferably Ga.sub.0.52 In.sub.0.48 P) forms a heterojunction with a GaAs absorber layer. The conversion effiency of the solar cell is at least 25.7%. The solar cell preferably includes a passivating layer between the substrate and the absorber layer. An anti-reflection coating is preferably disposed over the emitter layer.

  12. Solar Filament Eruption, Solar Tsunami - Close-up

    NASA Video Gallery

    Close-up of magnetic solar filament erupting during the early hours of February 24, 2012. Notice closer to the surface the solar atmosphere splits and waves of solar material fan out in opposite di...

  13. Solar Cycle Predictions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pesnell, William Dean

    2012-01-01

    Solar cycle predictions are needed to plan long-term space missions; just like weather predictions are needed to plan the launch. Fleets of satellites circle the Earth collecting many types of science data, protecting astronauts, and relaying information. All of these satellites are sensitive at some level to solar cycle effects. Predictions of drag on LEO spacecraft are one of the most important. Launching a satellite with less propellant can mean a higher orbit, but unanticipated solar activity and increased drag can make that a Pyrrhic victory as you consume the reduced propellant load more rapidly. Energetic events at the Sun can produce crippling radiation storms that endanger all assets in space. Solar cycle predictions also anticipate the shortwave emissions that cause degradation of solar panels. Testing solar dynamo theories by quantitative predictions of what will happen in 5-20 years is the next arena for solar cycle predictions. A summary and analysis of 75 predictions of the amplitude of the upcoming Solar Cycle 24 is presented. The current state of solar cycle predictions and some anticipations how those predictions could be made more accurate in the future will be discussed.

  14. Solar wind composition

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ogilvie, K. W.; Coplan, M. A.

    1995-01-01

    Advances in instrumentation have resulted in the determination of the average abundances of He, C, N, O, Ne, Mg, Si, S, and Fe in the solar wind to approximately 10%. Comparisons with solar energetic particle (SEP) abundances and galactic cosmic ray abundances have revealed many similarities, especially when compared with solar photospheric abundances. It is now well established that fractionation in the corona results in an overabundance (with respect to the photosphere) of elements with first ionization potentials less than 10 eV. These observations have in turn led to the development of fractionation models that are reasonably successful in reproducing the first ionization (FIP) effect. Under some circumstances it has been possible to relate solar wind observations to particular source regions in the corona. The magnetic topologies of the source regions appear to have a strong influence on the fractionation of elements. Comparisons with spectroscopic data are particularly useful in classifying the different topologies. Ions produced from interstellar neutral atoms are also found in the solar wind. These ions are picked up by the solar wind after ionization by solar radiation or charge exchange and can be identified by their velocity in the solar wind. The pick-up ions provide most of the pressure in the interplanetary medium at large distances. Interstellar abundances can be derived from the observed fluxes of solar wind pick-up ions.

  15. Solar radiation on Mars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Appelbaum, Joseph; Flood, Dennis J.

    1989-01-01

    Detailed information on solar radiation characteristics on Mars are necessary for effective design of future planned solar energy systems operating on the surface of Mars. Presented here is a procedure and solar radiation related data from which the diurnally, hourly and daily variation of the global, direct beam and diffuse insolation on Mars are calculated. The radiation data are based on measured optical depth of the Martian atmosphere derived from images taken of the sun with a special diode on the Viking cameras; and computation based on multiple wavelength and multiple scattering of the solar radiation.

  16. Long Island Solar Farm

    SciTech Connect

    Anders, R.

    2013-05-01

    The Long Island Solar Farm (LISF) is a remarkable success story, whereby very different interest groups found a way to capitalize on unusual circumstances to develop a mutually beneficial source of renewable energy. The uniqueness of the circumstances that were necessary to develop the Long Island Solar Farm make it very difficult to replicate. The project is, however, an unparalleled resource for solar energy research, which will greatly inform large-scale PV solar development in the East. Lastly, the LISF is a superb model for the process by which the project developed and the innovation and leadership shown by the different players.

  17. Preface: Solar Dynamo Frontiers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miesch, Mark S.

    2016-10-01

    The last six years have seen substantial progress in our understanding of the solar dynamo, fueled by continuing advances in observations and modeling. With the launch of NASAs Solar Dynamics Observatory (SDO) in 2010 came an unprecedented window on the evolving magnetic topology of the Sun, highlighting its intricate 3D structure and global connectivity. The Helioseismic Magnetic Imager (HMI) instrument on SDO in particular has provided potentially transformative yet enigmatic insights into the internal dynamics of the solar convection zone that underlie the dynamo. One of these enigmas is the amplitude and structure of deep solar convection.

  18. The solar absolute spectral irradiance 1150-3173 A - May 17, 1982

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mount, G. H.; Rottman, G. J.

    1983-01-01

    The full-disk solar spectral irradiance in the spectral range 1150-3173 A was obtained from a rocket observation above White Sands Missile Range, NM, on May 17, 1982, half way in time between solar maximum and solar minimum. Comparison with measurements made during solar maximum in 1980 indicate a large decrease in the absolute solar irradiance at wavelengths below 1900 A to approximately solar minimum values. No change above 1900 A from solar maximum to this flight was observed to within the errors of the measurements. Irradiance values lower than the Broadfoot results in the 2100-2500 A spectral range are found, but excellent agreement with Broadfoot between 2500 and 3173 A is found. The absolute calibration of the instruments for this flight was accomplished at the National Bureau of Standards Synchrotron Radiation Facility which significantly improves calibration of solar measurements made in this spectral region.

  19. Solar Radiation Modeling and Measurements for Renewable Energy Applications: Data and Model Quality; Preprint

    SciTech Connect

    Myers, D. R.

    2003-03-01

    Measurement and modeling of broadband and spectral terrestrial solar radiation is important for the evaluation and deployment of solar renewable energy systems. We discuss recent developments in the calibration of broadband solar radiometric instrumentation and improving broadband solar radiation measurement accuracy. An improved diffuse sky reference and radiometer calibration and characterization software and for outdoor pyranometer calibrations is outlined. Several broadband solar radiation model approaches, including some developed at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory, for estimating direct beam, total hemispherical and diffuse sky radiation are briefly reviewed. The latter include the Bird clear sky model for global, direct beam, and diffuse terrestrial solar radiation; the Direct Insolation Simulation Code (DISC) for estimating direct beam radiation from global measurements; and the METSTAT (Meteorological and Statistical) and Climatological Solar Radiation (CSR) models that estimate solar radiation from meteorological data. We conclude that currently the best model uncertainties are representative of the uncertainty in measured data.

  20. Solar-Cycle Variations of the Differential Rotation and Tachocline

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Howe, R.

    2002-05-01

    Over the past several years, helioseismic data from the Michelson Doppler Imager aboard the SOHO spacecraft, and from the Global Oscillation Network Group, have allowed us to study the changing dynamics of the solar convection zone in greater detail than ever before. We now know that the zonal flows of the so-called torsional oscillation extend well into the convection zone though apparently not to its base, and there seem to be rotation variations of a shorter period around the tachocline region which is crucial to theories of the solar cycle. At higher latitudes, the rotation rate varies strongly during the solar cycle. Modeling and simulation studies attempt to reproduce this behavior with varying degrees of success. The National Solar Observatory is operated by the Association of Universities for Research in Astronomy (AURA), under a cooperative agreement with the National Science Foundation. This work was partly supported by NASA contract S-92698-F.

  1. Activities for Teaching Solar Energy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mason, Jack Lee; Cantrell, Joseph S.

    1980-01-01

    Plans and activities are suggested for teaching elementary children about solar energy. Directions are included for constructing a flat plate collector and a solar oven. Activities for a solar field day are given. (SA)

  2. Make Your Own Solar Panel.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Suzuki, David

    1992-01-01

    Presents an activity in which students make a simulated solar panel to learn about the principles behind energy production using solar panels. Provides information about how solar panels function to produce energy. (MCO)

  3. Solar light bulb

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, D.A.

    1983-07-26

    A system for generating light directly using solar energy is provided herein. It includes a concentrator and accumulator for the sun's rays to generate a concentrated beam of visible solar radiation. A distributor shaft is provided for distributing the beam of visible solar radiation. A fork is provided in the distributor shaft to define a plurality of branch lines, each provided with a mirror at the intersection to direct the beam down the respective branch line to permit parallel fractions of the beam to be reflected off the respective mirrors and to pass down the respective branch line. A solar bulb is provided including a double walled upper bulbous portion including the inlet from the branch line and a pair of heat outlet tubes, and a double walled lower bulbous portion, the upper portion thereof being divergently reflective, with the lower portion having walls which are either transparent or translucent to provide greater light diffusion, and the space between the two walls being maintained under vacuum to provide heat insulation values. A structure is provided within the solar bulb for the absorption and radiation of the concentrated beam of visible solar radiation. Preferably structure is provided connected to the solar bulb to draw in outside air in the summer to direct it past the solar bulb and to air vent hot air produced at the solar bulb to the outside, thereby providing light with minimal heat in the summer. The same structure is operated in the winter to draw in household air to direct it past the solar bulb and to recirculate such heated air produced at the solar bulb to the house, thereby providing light and heat in the winter.

  4. The Solar Wind

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goldstein, B. E.

    1998-01-01

    The first evidence of the solar wind was provided through observations of comet tail deflections by L. Biermann in 1951. A cometary ion tail is oriented along the difference between the cometary and solar wind velocities, whereas the dust tail is in the antisunward direction; the ion tail directions demonstrated the existence of an outflow of ionized gas from the Sun (the solar wind) and allowed estimates of solar wind speed. Spacecraft observations have now established that at 1 AU the solar wind has a typical ion number density of about 7 /cc and is composed by number of about 95% protons and 5% Helium, with other minor ions also present. The solar wind as observed at 1 AU in the ecliptic has speeds typically in the range 300-700 km/ s. At such speeds ions travel from the Sun to 1 AU in from 2.5 to 6 days. The impact of the solar wind on planets with magnetic fields (Earth, Jupiter, Saturn, Uranus, Neptune) causes phenomena such as magnetospheres, aurorae, and geomagnetic storms, whereas at objects lacking magnetospheres (Mars, Venus, comets), atmospheric neutrals undergo charge exchange and are picked up by the solar wind flow. The solar wind also shields the Earth from low energy cosmic rays, and is responsible for the existence of the anomalous component of the cosmic rays a low energy component that is created locally rather than in the galaxy. Presented here is a brief introduction to the solar wind and a description of some current topics of research. Solar wind properties vary a great deal due to the changing magnetic structure on the Sun.

  5. Potential for Development of Solar and Wind Resource in Bhutan

    SciTech Connect

    Gilman, P.; Cowlin, S.; Heimiller, D.

    2009-09-01

    With support from the U.S. Agency for International Development (USAID), the U.S. Department of Energy's National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) produced maps and data of the wind and solar resources in Bhutan. The solar resource data show that Bhutan has an adequate resource for flat-plate collectors, with annual average values of global horizontal solar radiation ranging from 4.0 to 5.5 kWh/m2-day (4.0 to 5.5 peak sun hours per day). The information provided in this report may be of use to energy planners in Bhutan involved in developing energy policy or planning wind and solar projects, and to energy analysts around the world interested in gaining an understanding of Bhutan's wind and solar energy potential.

  6. Economics of geothermal, solar, and conventional space heating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fassbender, L. L.; Bloomster, C. H.; Price, B. A.

    1980-12-01

    With the recent price increases in imported oil and natural gas and the planned decontrol of domestic prices, geothermal and solar energy becomes competitive for residential space heating throughout most of the country. Geothermal energy could competitively provide about 40% of the national demand for space heat and domestic hot water (about 7 quads based on 1980 demands). Nearly all of the geothermal energy demand would be in high population density areas. Solar energy could competitively provide about 50% (about 9 quads) of the annual demand. Most of the solar energy demand would be concentrated in suburban and rural areas. Conventional energy should remain competitive for about 30% (about 5 quads) of the annual demand. Conventional energy demand would be concentrated in the South and as supplemental energy for solar/conventional systems. Geothermal solar, and conventional energy would be equally competitive for about 20% of the annual demand, which is why the individual market shares add to 120%.

  7. Historically Black Colleges and Universities (HBCU) Solar Radiation Monitoring Network

    DOE Data Explorer

    The Historically Black Colleges and Universities (HBCU) Solar Radiation Monitoring Network operated from November 1985 through December 1996. The six-station network provided 5-minute averaged measurements of global and diffuse horizontal solar irradiance. The data were processed at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) to improve the assessment of the solar radiation resources in the southeastern United States. Three of the stations also measured the direct-normal solar irradiance with a pyrheliometer mounted in an automatic sun tracker. All data are archived in the Standard Broadband Format (SBF) with quality-assessment indicators. Monthly data summaries and plots are also available for each month. In January 1997 the HBCU sites became part of the CONFRRM solar monitoring network.

  8. PV technology and success of solar electricity in Vietnam

    SciTech Connect

    Dung, T.Q.

    1997-12-31

    Since 1990 the PV Technology and the Solar electricity have been strongly developed in Vietnam. The PV experts of Solarlab have studied and set up an appropriate PV Technology responding to local Market needs. It has not only stood well but has been also transferred to Mali Republic and Lao P.D.R. The PV off grid systems of Solarlab demonstrate good efficiency and low prices. Over 60 solar stations and villages have been built to provide solar lighting for about 3000 families along the country in remote, mountainous areas and islands. 400 families are using stand-alone Solar Home Systems. The Solar electricity has been chosen for Rural Electrification and National Telecommunication Network in remote and mountainous regions. Many International projects in cooperation with FONDEM-France, SELF USA and Governmental PV projects have been realized by Solarlab. The experiences of maintenance, management and finance about PV development in Vietnam are also mentioned.

  9. Characteristics of the earth radiation budget experiment solar monitors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, Robert B., III; Barkstrom, Bruce R.; Cess, Robert D.

    1987-01-01

    The earth radiation budget experiment solar monitors, active cavity pyrheliometers, have been developed to measure every two weeks the total optical solar irradiance from the earth radiation budget satellite (ERBS) and the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration NOAA-9 spacecraft platforms. In the unfiltered 0.2-50-micron wavelength broadband region, the monitors were used to obtain 1365 W/sq m as the mean value for the solar irradiance, with measurement precisions and accuracies approaching 0.1 and 0.2 percent, respectively. The design and characteristics of the solar monitors are presented along with the data reduction model. For the October 1984 through July 1985 period, the resulting ERBS and NOAA-9 solar irradiance values are intercompared.

  10. Future mission studies: Preliminary comparisons of solar flux models

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ashrafi, S.

    1991-01-01

    The results of comparisons of the solar flux models are presented. (The wavelength lambda = 10.7 cm radio flux is the best indicator of the strength of the ionizing radiations such as solar ultraviolet and x-ray emissions that directly affect the atmospheric density thereby changing the orbit lifetime of satellites. Thus, accurate forecasting of solar flux F sub 10.7 is crucial for orbit determination of spacecrafts.) The measured solar flux recorded by National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) is compared against the forecasts made by Schatten, MSFC, and NOAA itself. The possibility of a combined linear, unbiased minimum-variance estimation that properly combines all three models into one that minimizes the variance is also discussed. All the physics inherent in each model are combined. This is considered to be the dead-end statistical approach to solar flux forecasting before any nonlinear chaotic approach.

  11. Solar System Exploration, 1995-2000

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Squyres, S.; Varsi, G.; Veverka, J.; Soderblom, L.; Black, D.; Stern, A.; Stetson, D.; Brown, R. A.; Niehoff, J.; Squibb, G.

    1994-01-01

    Goals for planetary exploration during the next decade include: (1) determine how our solar system formed, and understand whether planetary systems are a common phenomenon through out the cosmos; (2) explore the diverse changes that planets have undergone throughout their history and that take place at present, including those that distinguish Earth as a planet; (3) understand how life might have formed on Earth, whether life began anywhere else in the solar system, and whether life (including intelligent beings) might be a common cosmic phenomenon; (4) discover and investigate natural phenomena that occur under conditions not realizable in laboratories; (5) discover and inventory resources in the solar system that could be used by human civilizations in the future; and (6) make the solar system a part of the human experience in the same way that Earth is, and hence lay the groundwork for human expansion into the solar system in the coming century. The plan for solar system exploration is motivated by these goals as well as the following principle: The solar system exploration program will conduct flight programs and supporting data analysis and scientific research commensurate with United States leadership in space exploration. These programs and research must be of the highest scientific merit, they must be responsive to public excitement regarding planetary exploration, and they must contribute to larger national goals in technology and education. The result will be new information, which is accessible to the public, creates new knowledge, and stimulates programs of education to increase the base of scientific knowledge in the general public.

  12. Global Magnetohydrodynamic Modeling of the Solar Corona

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Linker, Jon A.

    1998-01-01

    The coronal magnetic field defines the structure of the solar corona, the position of the heliospheric current sheet, the regions of fast and slow solar wind, and the most likely sites of coronal mass ejections. There are few measurements of the magnetic fields in the corona, but the line-of-sight component of the global magnetic fields in the photosphere have been routinely measured for many years (for example, at Stanford's Wilcox Solar Observatory, and at the National Solar Observatory at Kitt Peak). The SOI/MDI instrument is now providing high-resolution full-disk magnetograms several times a day. Understanding the large-scale structure of the solar corona and inner heliosphere requires accurately mapping the measured photospheric magnetic field into the corona and outward. Ideally, a model should not only extrapolate the magnetic field, but should self-consistently reconstruct both the plasma and magnetic fields in the corona and solar wind. Support from our NASA SR&T contract has allowed us to develop three-dimensional magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) computations of the solar corona that incorporate observed photospheric magnetic fields into the boundary conditions. These calculations not only describe the magnetic field in the corona and interplanetary spice, but also predict the plasma properties as well. Our computations thus far have been successful in reproducing many aspects of both coronal and interplanetary data, including the structure of the streamer belt, the location of coronal hole boundaries, and the position and shape of the heliospheric current sheet. The most widely used technique for extrapolating the photospheric magnetic field into the corona and heliosphere are potential field models, such as the potential field source-surface model (PFSS),and the potential field current-sheet (PFCS) model

  13. Arkansas solar-retrofit guide

    SciTech Connect

    Skiles, A.

    1981-06-01

    How solar retrofits should be designed to suit the climate and resources of Arkansas is reported. Retrofits examined are solar greenhouses, solar air heaters, and solar batch water heaters. A composite of successful construction and operation methods is presented in a format to help individuals build solar retrofits for themselves. Appended are a glossary, listings of references and information sources, and solar radiation data for Arkansas. (LEW)

  14. Upside-Down Solar Cell Achieves Record Efficiencies (Fact Sheet)

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    2010-12-01

    The inverted metamorphic multijunction (IMM) solar cell is an exercise in efficient innovation - literally, as the technology boasted the highest demonstrated efficiency for converting sunlight into electrical energy at its debut in 2005. Scientists at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) inverted the conventional photovoltaic (PV) structure to revolutionary effect, achieving solar conversion efficiencies of 33.8% and 40.8% under one-sun and concentrated conditions, respectively.

  15. A comprehensive review of market research on solar water heaters

    SciTech Connect

    Ghent, P.; Keller, C.

    1999-11-01

    This is the second report of a four-task project to develop a marketing plan designed for businesses interested in marketing solar water heaters in the new home industry. The objective of this task is to identify key elements in previous studies on the marketing of solar water heaters in the new home industry. This review includes studies performed by FOCUS Marketing Services, the National Association of Home Builders Research Center, Symmetrics Marketing Corporation, and the California Energy Commission.

  16. Solar heating and cooling technical data and systems analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Christensen, D. L.

    1976-01-01

    The acquisition and processing of selected parametric data for inclusion in a computerized Data Base using the Marshall Information Retrieval and Data System (MIRADS) developed by NASA-MSFC is discussed. This data base provides extensive technical and socioeconomic information related to solar energy heating and cooling on a national scale. A broadly based research approach was used to assist in the support of program management and the application of a cost-effective program for solar energy development and demonstration.

  17. Solar Power System Design for the Solar Probe+ Mission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Landis, Geoffrey A.; Schmitz, Paul C.; Kinnison, James; Fraeman, Martin; Roufberg, Lew; Vernon, Steve; Wirzburger, Melissa

    2008-01-01

    Solar Probe+ is an ambitious mission proposed to the solar corona, designed to make a perihelion approach of 9 solar radii from the surface of the sun. The high temperature, high solar flux environment makes this mission a significant challenge for power system design. This paper summarizes the power system conceptual design for the solar probe mission. Power supplies considered included nuclear, solar thermoelectric generation, solar dynamic generation using Stirling engines, and solar photovoltaic generation. The solar probe mission ranges from a starting distance from the sun of 1 AU, to a minimum distance of about 9.5 solar radii, or 0.044 AU, from the center of the sun. During the mission, the solar intensity ranges from one to about 510 times AM0. This requires power systems that can operate over nearly three orders of magnitude of incident intensity.

  18. Solar ponds: a selected bibliography

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1981-11-01

    This bibliography contains citations on: regular solar ponds; shallow solar ponds; and patents. Certain references are specifically recommended. The data bases searched for the bibliography are listed. (LEW)

  19. Solar structure and terrestrial weather

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilcox, J. M.

    1976-01-01

    The possibility that solar activity has discernible effects on terrestrial weather is considered. Research involving correlation of weather conditions with solar and geomagnetic activity is discussed.

  20. Solar Radiation Research Laboratory (Poster)

    SciTech Connect

    Stoffel, T.; Andreas, A.; Reda, I.; Dooraghi, M.; Habte, A.; Kutchenreiter, M.; Wilcox, S.

    2012-07-01

    SunShot Initiative awardee posters describing the different technologies within the four subprograms of the DOE Solar Program (Photovoltaics, Concentrating Solar Power, Soft Costs, and Systems Integration).

  1. Foundational Solar Resource Research (Poster)

    SciTech Connect

    Orwig, K.; Wilcox, S.; Sengupta, M.; Habte, A.; Anderberg, M.; Stoffel, T.

    2012-07-01

    SunShot Initiative awardee posters describing the different technologies within the four subprograms of the DOE Solar Program (Photovoltaics, Concentrating Solar Power, Soft Costs, and Systems Integration).

  2. Solar School House.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Harrison, David

    The Solar Schoolhouse at the Lathrop E. Smith Environmental Education Center (Rockville, Maryland) is described. Background and construction information is given. Drawings of the Schoolhouse's four sides are provided, as well as drawings illustrating the greenhouse effect, a solar collector, the Schoolhouse's summer cooling and winter heating…

  3. The Solar Energy Notebook.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rankins, William H., III; Wilson, David A.

    This publication is a handbook for the do-it-yourselfer or anyone else interested in solar space and water heating. Described are methods for calculating sun angles, available energy, heating requirements, and solar heat storage. Also described are collector and system designs with mention of some design problems to avoid. Climatological data for…

  4. Solar array deployment mechanism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Calassa, Mark C.; Kackley, Russell

    1995-05-01

    This paper describes a Solar Array Deployment Mechanism (SADM) used to deploy a rigid solar array panel on a commercial spacecraft. The application required a deployment mechanism design that was not only lightweight, but also could be produced and installed at the lowest possible cost. This paper covers design, test, and analysis of a mechanism that meets these requirements.

  5. Solar cell device

    SciTech Connect

    Nishiura, M.; Haruki, H.; Miyagi, M.; Sakai, H.; Uchida, Y.

    1984-06-26

    A solar cell array is equipped with serially or parallel connected reverse polarity diodes formed simultaneously with the array. The diodes are constituted by one or more solar cells of the array which may be shaded to prevent photoelectric conversion, and which are electrically connected in reverse polarity with respect to the remaining cells.

  6. Solar Electricity for Homes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Roman, Harry T.

    2012-01-01

    Every day, the sun showers the Earth with millions of times more energy than its people use. The only problem is that energy is spread out over the entire Earth's surface and must be harvested. Engineers are learning to capture and use some of this energy to make electricity for homes. Solar panels make up the heart of a solar system. They can be…

  7. Leaves: Nature's Solar Collectors

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Isabelle, Aaron D.; de Groot, Cornelis

    2009-01-01

    One of the most captivating things about plants is the way they capture the Sun's energy, but this can be a difficult topic to cover with elementary students. Therefore, to help students to make a concrete connection to this abstract concept, this series of solar-energy lessons focuses on leaves and how they act as "solar collectors." As students…

  8. Curriculum Reviews: Solar Energy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Riley, Joseph P.

    1982-01-01

    Reviews Solar Energy Education Project (SEEP), a set of 10 curriculum guides emphasizing process skills as well as content for grades K-9. Solar concepts are taught almost exclusively through process activities and, although developed in Australia, the curriculum is easily adaptable to American classrooms. (Author/JN)

  9. Solar Energy Development Progresses

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chemical and Engineering News, 1975

    1975-01-01

    Discusses an engineering conference at which participants agreed that solar energy is a feasible energy source, although costs of such technology are presently very high. Also describes recent developments in solar energy research, and estimates the costs of this technology. (MLH)

  10. Pioneering with Solar Power.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pollack, George; Pollack, Mary

    1982-01-01

    Describes the development of Mississippi County Community College's (MCCC's) solar energy system. Explains the functioning of the campus's computer-controlled photovoltaic concentrator system, MCCC's cooperative agreement with the Arkansas-Missouri Power Company, program funding, the integration of the solar system with other building components,…

  11. Solar Energy Project: Text.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tullock, Bruce, Ed.; And Others

    The text is a compilation of background information which should be useful to teachers wishing to obtain some technical information on solar technology. Twenty sections are included which deal with topics ranging from discussion of the sun's composition to the legal implications of using solar energy. The text is intended to provide useful…

  12. Solar array deployment mechanism

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Calassa, Mark C.; Kackley, Russell

    1995-01-01

    This paper describes a Solar Array Deployment Mechanism (SADM) used to deploy a rigid solar array panel on a commercial spacecraft. The application required a deployment mechanism design that was not only lightweight, but also could be produced and installed at the lowest possible cost. This paper covers design, test, and analysis of a mechanism that meets these requirements.

  13. Solar Energy: Heat Transfer.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Knapp, Henry H., III

    This module on heat transfer is one of six in a series intended for use as supplements to currently available materials on solar energy and energy conservation. Together with the recommended texts and references (sources are identified), these modules provide an effective introduction to energy conservation and solar energy technologies. The…

  14. Solar Energy: Heat Storage.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Knapp, Henry H., III

    This module on heat storage is one of six in a series intended for use as supplements to currently available materials on solar energy and energy conservation. Together with the recommended texts and references (sources are identified), these modules provide an effective introduction to energy conservation and solar energy technologies. The module…

  15. Solar Energy: Home Heating.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Knapp, Henry H., III

    This module on home heating is one of six in a series intended for use as supplements to currently available materials on solar energy and energy conservation. Together with the recommended texts and references (sources are identified), these modules provide an effective introduction to energy conservation and solar energy technologies. The module…

  16. Solar sensor with autocollimator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fain, D. L.; Hall, J. M.; Johnson, D. F.

    1972-01-01

    Monolithic structure, consisting of fused quartz fabricated solar sensor and autocollimator, measures angle between reference surface on spacecraft and solar vector. Device compensates for errors caused by changes in the alignment of its mountings or component parts. Integrated concept is advantageous whenever sensor mounting errors constitute problems.

  17. Residential Solar Systems.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fulkerson, Dan

    This publication contains student and teacher instructional materials for a course in residential solar systems. The text is designed either as a basic solar course or as a supplement to extend student skills in areas such as architectural drafting, air conditioning and refrigeration, and plumbing. The materials are presented in four units…

  18. Reliable solar cookers

    SciTech Connect

    Magney, G.K.

    1992-12-31

    The author describes the activities of SERVE, a Christian relief and development agency, to introduce solar ovens to the Afghan refugees in Pakistan. It has provided 5,000 solar cookers since 1984. The experience has demonstrated the potential of the technology and the need for a durable and reliable product. Common complaints about the cookers are discussed and the ideal cooker is described.

  19. Solar Technology Curriculum, 1980.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Seward County Community Coll., Liberal, KS.

    This curriculum guide contains lecture outlines and handouts for training solar technicians in the installation, maintenance, and repair of solar energy hot water and space heating systems. The curriculum consists of four modular units developed to provide a model through which community colleges and area vocational/technical schools can respond…

  20. Solar still. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Adams, W.D.

    1983-07-20

    Passive solar heating was used in a still in which a packed column packed with popped popcorn separates the alcohol and water vapors. The still's performance was not satisfactory, and it is concluded that passive solar heating could have been better used to preheat makeup water for the fermentation process and to maintain proper fermentation temperatures during the winter. (LEW)

  1. Homemade Solar Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1981-01-01

    Through the use of NASA Tech Briefs, Peter Kask, was able to build a solarized domestic hot water system. Also by applying NASA's solar energy design information, he was able to build a swimming pool heating system with minimal outlay for materials.

  2. Solar Energy Project: Reader.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tullock, Bruce, Ed.; And Others

    This document is designed to give both teachers and students the opportunity to review a variety of representative articles on solar energy. Consideration is given to the sun's role in man's past, present, and future. The present state of solar technology is examined theoretically, economically, and comparatively in light of growing need for…

  3. Indium phosphide solar cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weinberg, Irving

    1991-01-01

    The direction for InP solar cell research; reduction of cell cost; increase of cell efficiency; measurements needed to better understand cell performance; n/p versus p/n; radiation effects; major problems in cell contacting; and whether the present level of InP solar cell research in the USA should be maintained, decreased, or increased were considered.

  4. The SOLAR Alternative.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Warren, E. H., Jr.; Walton, A. L.

    1984-01-01

    Only when the sun's energy can be captured at a comparable or lower opportunity cost than that of competing sources will solar energy systems become viable alternatives. Economic issues of solar energy are discussed. The legitimate role of government is also examined. (RM)

  5. Solar space vehicle

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, R.E.

    1982-10-19

    This invention relates to space vehicle where solar energy is used to generate steam, which in turn, propels the vehicle in space. A copper boiler is provided and a novel solar radiation condensing means is used to focus the sunlight on said boiler. Steam generated in said boiler is exhausted to the environment to provide a thrust for the vehicle.

  6. Insights on Solar Twins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sousa Duarte, Tharcisyo Sa e.; Soares da Costa, Jefferson; Dias do Nascimento Júnior, José

    2015-08-01

    The question about how to define a real solar twin are still active. Cayrel de Strobe et al. (1981) defined a solar twin like a star having at the same time the physical parameters, Teff, gravity, bolometric magnitude, microturbulent velocity, and chemical composition. We presented the more extensive sample of solar twins known to date. From these targets we will study the behavior of the solar twins as a function of fundamentals stellar parameters, effective temperature, luminosity, age, convective envelope mass deepening (1 - M*/M⊙), lithium abundance and rotation period. We selected the solar twins from observations with the spectropolarimeters ESPaDOnS at CFHT and the Narval at TBL and also on literature. All objects have high resolution and high signal to noise. Analyze this sample of solar twins will help us to understand how these stars whether located around of the Sun's place. Our preliminary results show that the lithium abundance presents one clear correlation with stellar age. The (1 - M*/M⊙) values obtained through our method provided good agreement with the solar value. The rotation periods allow us to assess the solar twins as a function of gyrochronology.

  7. Solar Energy Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1981-01-01

    A waste water treatment plant in Wilton, Maine, where sludge is converted to methane gas, and Monsanto Company's Environmental Health Laboratory in St. Louis Missouri, where more than 200 solar collectors provide preheating of boiler feed water for laboratory use are representative of Grumman's Sunstream line of solar energy equipment. This equipment was developed with technology from NASA's Apollo lunar module program.

  8. Solar oscillation frequency and solar neutrino predictions

    SciTech Connect

    Cox, A.N.

    1990-07-05

    The light and velocity variations of the Sun and solar-like stars are unique among intrinsic variable stars. Unlike all other standard classes, such as Cepheids, B stars, and white dwarfs, the pulsation driving is caused by coupling with the acoustic noise in the upper convection zone. Each global pulsation mode is just another degree of freedom for the turbulent convection, and energy is shared equally between these g{sup {minus}}-modes and the solar oscillation modes. This driving and damping, together with the normal stellar pulsation mechanisms produce extremely low amplitude solar oscillations. Actually, the surface layer radiative damping is strong, and the varying oscillation mode amplitudes manifest the stochastic convection driving and the steady damping. Thus stability calculations for solar-like pulsations are difficult and mostly inconclusive, but calculations of pulsation periods are as straightforward as for all the other classes of intrinsic variable stars. The issue that is important for the Sun is its internal structure, because the mass, radius, and luminosity are extremely well known. Conventionally, we need the pulsation constants for each of millions of modes. Unknown parameters for constructing solar models are the composition and its material pressure, energy, and opacity, as well as the convection mixing length. We treat the nuclear energy and neutrino production formulas as sufficiently well known. The presence of weakly interacting massive particles (WIMPs) orbiting the solar center affects the predicted oscillation frequencies so that they do not agree with observations as well as those for models without WIMPs. 34 refs., 4 figs.

  9. Solar Deployment System (SolarDS) Model: Documentation and Sample Results

    SciTech Connect

    Denholm, P.; Drury, E.; Margolis, R.

    2009-09-01

    The Solar Deployment System (SolarDS) model is a bottom-up, market penetration model that simulates the potential adoption of photovoltaics (PV) on residential and commercial rooftops in the continental United States through 2030. NREL developed SolarDS to examine the market competitiveness of PV based on regional solar resources, capital costs, electricity prices, utility rate structures, and federal and local incentives. The model uses the projected financial performance of PV systems to simulate PV adoption for building types and regions then aggregates adoption to state and national levels. The main components of SolarDS include a PV performance simulator, a PV annual revenue calculator, a PV financial performance calculator, a PV market share calculator, and a regional aggregator. The model simulates a variety of installed PV capacity for a range of user-specified input parameters. PV market penetration levels from 15 to 193 GW by 2030 were simulated in preliminary model runs. SolarDS results are primarily driven by three model assumptions: (1) future PV cost reductions, (2) the maximum PV market share assumed for systems with given financial performance, and (3) PV financing parameters and policy-driven assumptions, such as the possible future cost of carbon emissions.

  10. Roof Integrated Solar Absorbers: The Measured Performance of ''Invisible'' Solar Collectors: Preprint

    SciTech Connect

    Colon, C. J.; Merrigan, T.

    2001-10-19

    The Florida Solar Energy Center (FSEC), with the support of the National Renewable Energy Laboratory, has investigated the thermal performance of solar absorbers that are an integral, yet indistinguishable, part of a building's roof. The first roof-integrated solar absorber (RISA) system was retrofitted into FSEC's Flexible Roof Facility in Cocoa, Florida, in September 1998. This ''proof-of-concept'' system uses the asphalt shingle roof surface and the plywood decking under the shingles as an unglazed solar absorber. Data was gathered for a one-year period on the system performance. In Phase 2, two more RISA prototypes were constructed and submitted for testing. The first used the asphalt shingles on the roof surface with the tubing mounted on the underside of the plywood decking. The second prototype used metal roofing panels over a plywood substrate and placed the polymer tubing between the plywood decking and the metal roofing. This paper takes a first look at the thermal performance results for the ''invisible'' solar absorbers that use the actual roof surface of a building for solar heat collection.

  11. Midtemperature solar systems test facility predictions for thermal performance based on test data: AAI solar collector with pressure-formed glass reflector surface

    SciTech Connect

    Harrison, T.D.

    1981-03-01

    Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque (SNLA), is currently conducting a program to predict the performance and measure the characteristics of commercially available solar collectors that have the potential for use in industrial process heat and enhance oil recovery applications. The thermal performance predictions for the AAI solar line-focusing slat-type collector for five cities in the US are presented. (WHK)

  12. Solar system plasma turbulence and intermittency at the maximum and minimum of the solar cycle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Echim, Marius M.

    2015-04-01

    discuss how the exploitation of data bases produced by the FP7 project STORM contribute to developing a (virtual) laboratory for studying solar system plasma turbulence and intermittency. Research supported by the European FP7 Programme (grant agreement 313038/STORM), and a national grant CNCS -UEFISCDI, project number PN-II-ID-PCE-2012-4-0418.

  13. Recent Progress in Heliogyro Solar Sail Structural Dynamics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilkie, William K.; Warren, Jerry E.; Horta, Lucas G.; Juang, Jer-Nan; Gibbs, Samuel C.; Dowell, E.; Guerrant, Daniel; Lawrence Dale

    2014-01-01

    Results from recent National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) research on the structural dynamics and control characteristics of heliogyro solar sails are summarized. Specific areas under investigation include coupled nonlinear finite element analysis of heliogyro membrane blade with solar radiation pressure effects, system identification of spinning membrane structures, solarelastic stability analysis of heliogyro solar sails, including stability during blade deployment, and results from small-scale in vacuo dynamics experiments with spinning high-aspect ratio membranes. A low-cost, rideshare payload heliogyro technology demonstration mission concept, used as a mission context for these heliogyro structural dynamics and solarelasticity investigations, is also described.

  14. Solar Resource Measurements in Sacramento, California: Cooperative Research and Development Final Report, CRADA Number CRD-06-205

    SciTech Connect

    Stoffel, Tom

    2013-10-01

    Site-specific, long-term, continuous, and high-resolution measurements of solar irradiance are important for developing renewable resource data. These data are used for several research and development activities consistent with the NREL mission: establish a national 30-year climatological database of measured solar irradiances; provide high quality ground-truth data for satellite remote sensingvalidation; support development of radiative transfer models for estimating solar irradiance from available meteorological observations; provide solar resource information needed for technology deployment and operations.

  15. Focal Point Inside the Vacuum Chamber for Solar Thermal Propulsion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1999-01-01

    Researchers at the Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) have designed, fabricated, and tested the first solar thermal engine, a non-chemical rocket engine that produces lower thrust but has better thrust efficiency than a chemical combustion engine. MSFC turned to solar thermal propulsion in the early 1990s due to its simplicity, safety, low cost, and commonality with other propulsion systems. Solar thermal propulsion works by acquiring and redirecting solar energy to heat a propellant. The 20- by 24-ft heliostat mirror (not shown in this photograph) has dual-axis control that keeps a reflection of the sunlight on an 18-ft diameter concentrator mirror, which then focuses the sunlight to a 4-in focal point inside the vacuum chamber. The focal point has 10 kilowatts of intense solar power. This photograph is a close-up view of a 4-in focal point inside the vacuum chamber at the MSFC Solar Thermal Propulsion Test facility. As part of MSFC's Space Transportation Directorate, the Propulsion Research Center serves as a national resource for research of advanced, revolutionary propulsion technologies. The mission is to move the Nation's capabilities beyond the confines of conventional chemical propulsion into an era of aircraft-like access to Earth orbit, rapid travel throughout the solar system, and exploration of interstellar space.

  16. Solar wind travel time

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Russell, C. T.

    A useful rule of thumb in solar terrestrial studies is that the solar wind travels 4 Earth radii (RE) per minute. Long-term studies of solar wind velocity [e.g., Luhmann et al., 1993; 1994] show that the median velocity is about 420 km/s, corresponding to 3.96 RE min-1. The quartiles are about 370 km/s and 495 km/s, corresponding to 3.48 Re min-1 and 4.66 Re min-1 respectively. This number helps estimate the delays expected when observing a discontinuity at a solar wind monitor; one example is ISEE-3 when it was at the forward libration point (about 60 min). It is also helpful for estimating how much time passes before the dayside magnetosphere is compressed as denser solar wind flows by (about 2.5 min).

  17. Solar cell shingle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Forestieri, A. F.; Ratajczak, A. F.; Sidorak, L. G. (Inventor)

    1977-01-01

    A solar cell shingle was made of an array of solar cells on a lower portion of a substantially rectangular shingle substrate made of fiberglass cloth or the like. The solar cells may be encapsulated in flourinated ethylene propylene or some other weatherproof translucent or transparent encapsulant to form a combined electrical module and a roof shingle. The interconnected solar cells were connected to connectors at the edge of the substrate through a connection to a common electrical bus or busses. An overlap area was arranged to receive the overlap of a cooperating similar shingle so that the cell portion of the cooperating shingle may overlie the overlap area of the roof shingle. Accordingly, the same shingle serves the double function of an ordinary roof shingle which may be applied in the usual way and an array of cooperating solar cells from which electrical energy may be collected.

  18. Contrasting Large Solar Events

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lanzerotti, Louis J.

    2010-10-01

    After an unusually long solar minimum, solar cycle 24 is slowly beginning. A large coronal mass ejection (CME) from sunspot 1092 occurred on 1 August 2010, with effects reaching Earth on 3 August and 4 August, nearly 38 years to the day after the huge solar event of 4 August 1972. The prior event, which those of us engaged in space research at the time remember well, recorded some of the highest intensities of solar particles and rapid changes of the geomagnetic field measured to date. What can we learn from the comparisons of these two events, other than their essentially coincident dates? One lesson I took away from reading press coverage and Web reports of the August 2010 event is that the scientific community and the press are much more aware than they were nearly 4 decades ago that solar events can wreak havoc on space-based technologies.

  19. Water Impacts of High Solar PV Electricity Penetration

    SciTech Connect

    Macknick, Jordan; Cohen, Stuart

    2015-09-01

    This analysis provides a detailed national and regional description of the water-related impacts and constraints of high solar electricity penetration scenarios in the U.S. in 2030 and 2050. A modified version of the Regional Energy Deployment System (ReEDS) model that incorporates water resource availability and costs as a constraint in each of its 134 Balancing Area (BA) regions was utilized to explore national and regional differences in water use impacts and solar deployment locations under different solar energy cost and water availability scenarios (Macknick et al. 2015). Water resource availability and cost data are from recently completed research at Sandia National Laboratories (Tidwell et al. 2013a). Scenarios analyzed include two business-as-usual solar energy cost cases, one with and one without considering available water resources, and four solar energy cost cases that meet the SunShot cost goals (i.e., $1/watt for utility-scale PV systems), with varying levels of water availability restrictions. This analysis provides insight into the role solar energy technologies have in the broader electricity sector under scenarios of water constraints.

  20. Solar Variability and Climate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haigh, Joanna D.

    Solar radiation is the fundamental energy source for the atmosphere and the global average equilibrium temperature of the Earth is determined by a balance between the energy acquired by the solar radiation absorbed and the energy lost to space by the emission of heat radiation. The interaction of this radiation with the climate system is complex but it is clear that any change in total solar irradiance (TSI) has the potential to influence climate. In the past, although many papers were written on relationships between sunspot numbers and the weather, the topic of solar influences on climate was often disregarded by meteorologists. This was due to a combination of factors of which the key was the lack of any robust measurements indicating that solar radiation did indeed vary. There was also mistrust of the statistical validity of the evidence and, importantly, no established scientific mechanisms whereby the apparent changes in the Sun might induce detectable signals near the Earth's surface. Another influence was a desire by the meteorological profession to distance itself from the Astrometeorology movement popular in the 19th century (anderson1999). Nowadays, with improved measurements of solar and climate parameters, evidence for an influence of solar variability on the climate of the lower atmosphere has emerged from the noise. This article provides a brief review of the observational evidence and an outline of the mechanisms whereby rather small changes in solar radiation may induce detectable signals near the Earth's surface is not possible to review here all potential mechanisms for solar-climate links. What is presented offers, necessarily, a personal perspective but, of the areas that are not covered, two may be pertinent: the effects of solar energetic particles on stratospheric composition (see e.g. jackman et al. 2005) and the possible influence of galactic cosmic rays on clouds through ionisation processes (see Marsh, this volume).

  1. Solar Multi-Conjugate Adaptive Optics at the Dunn Solar Telescope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rimmele, T.; Hegwer, S.; Richards, K.; Woeger, F.

    technique that provides real-time diffraction limited imaging over an extended FOV [4]. The development of MCAO for existing solar telescopes and, in particular, for the next generation large aperture solar telescopes is thus a top priority. The Sun is an ideal object for the development of MCAO since solar structure provides "multiple guide stars" in any desired configuration. It is therefore not surprising that the first successful on-the-sky MCAO experiments were performed at the Dunn Solar Telescope and at a solar telescope on the Canary Islands. However, further development is needed before operational solar MCAO can be implemented at future large aperture solar telescopes such as the ATST on Haleakala [5]. MCAO development must progress beyond these initial proof-of-concept experiments and should include laboratory experiments and on-sky demonstrations under controlled or well characterized conditions as well as quantitative performance analysis and comparison to model predictions. At the DST we recently implemented a dedicated MCAO bench with the goal of developing well-characterized, operational MCAO. The MCAO system uses 2 deformable mirrors conjugated to the telescope entrance pupil and a layer in the upper atmosphere, respectively. DM2 can be placed at conjugates ranging from 2 km to 10 km altitude. For our initial experiments we have used a staged approach in which the 97 actuator, 76 subaperture correlating Shack-Hartmann solar adaptive optics system normally operated at the DST is followed by the second DM and the tomographic wavefront sensor, which uses three "solar guide stars". We use modal reconstruction algorithms for both DMs. We have successfully and stably locked the MCAO system on artificial objects (slides), for which 1 The National Solar Observatory is operated by the Association of Universities for Research in Astronomy under a cooperative agreement with the National Science Foundation, for the benefit of the astronomical community turbulence

  2. The new climate data record of total and spectral solar irradiance: Current progress and future steps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coddington, Odele; Lean, Judith; Rottman, Gary; Pilewskie, Peter; Snow, Martin; Lindholm, Doug

    2016-04-01

    We present a climate data record of Total Solar Irradiance (TSI) and Solar Spectral Irradiance (SSI), with associated time and wavelength dependent uncertainties, from 1610 to the present. The data record was developed jointly by the Laboratory for Atmospheric and Space Physics (LASP) at the University of Colorado Boulder and the Naval Research Laboratory (NRL) as part of the National Oceanographic and Atmospheric Administration's (NOAA) National Centers for Environmental Information (NCEI) Climate Data Record (CDR) Program, where the data record, source code, and supporting documentation are archived. TSI and SSI are constructed from models that determine the changes from quiet Sun conditions arising from bright faculae and dark sunspots on the solar disk using linear regression of proxies of solar magnetic activity with observations from the SOlar Radiation and Climate Experiment (SORCE) Total Irradiance Monitor (TIM), Spectral Irradiance Monitor (SIM), and SOlar Stellar Irradiance Comparison Experiment (SOLSTICE). We show that TSI can be separately modeled to within TIM's measurement accuracy from solar rotational to solar cycle time scales and we assume that SSI measurements are reliable on solar rotational time scales. We discuss the model formulation, uncertainty estimates, and operational implementation and present comparisons of the modeled TSI and SSI with the measurement record and with other solar irradiance models. We also discuss ongoing work to assess the sensitivity of the modeled irradiances to model assumptions, namely, the scaling of solar variability from rotational-to-cycle time scales and the representation of the sunspot darkening index.

  3. Energy Conversion: Nano Solar Cell

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yahaya, Muhammad; Yap, Chi Chin; Mat Salleh, Muhamad

    2009-09-01

    Problems of fossil-fuel-induced climate change have sparked a demand for sustainable energy supply for all sectors of economy. Most laboratories continue to search for new materials and new technique to generate clean energy at affordable cost. Nanotechnology can play a major role in solving the energy problem. The prospect for solar energy using Si-based technology is not encouraging. Si photovoltaics can produce electricity at 20-30 c//kWhr with about 25% efficiency. Nanoparticles have a strong capacity to absorb light and generate more electrons for current as discovered in the recent work of organic and dye-sensitized cell. Using cheap preparation technique such as screen-printing and self-assembly growth, organic cells shows a strong potential for commercialization. Thin Films research group at National University Malaysia has been actively involved in these areas, and in this seminar, we will present a review works on nanomaterials for solar cells and particularly on hybrid organic solar cell based on ZnO nanorod arrays. The organic layer consisting of poly[2-methoxy-5-(2-ethylhexyloxy)-1, 4-phenylenevinylene] (MEHPPV) and [6, 6]-phenyl C61-butyric acid 3-ethylthiophene ester (PCBE) was spin-coated on ZnO nanorod arrays. ZnO nanorod arrays were grown on FTO glass substrates which were pre-coated with ZnO nanoparticles using a low temperature chemical solution method. A gold electrode was used as the top contact. The device gave a short circuit current density of 2.49×10-4 mA/cm2 and an open circuit voltage of 0.45 V under illumination of a projector halogen light at 100 mW/cm2.

  4. Solar '80s: A Teacher's Handbook for Solar Energy Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    LaHart, David E.

    This guide is intended to assist the teacher in exploring energy issues and the technology of solar energy conversion and associated technologies. Sections of the guide include: (1) Rationale; (2) Technology Overview; (3) Sun Day Suggestions for School; (4) Backyard Solar Water Heater; (5) Solar Tea; (6) Biogas; (7) Solar Cells; (8) Economics; (9)…

  5. Solar Simulator Represents the Mars Surface Solar Environment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stella, Paul M.; Dawson, Stephen F.; Mueller, Robert L.; Mardesich, Nick; Rapp, Donald

    2009-01-01

    A report discusses the development of a Mars surface, laboratory-based solar simulator to create solar cells that can function better on Mars. The Mars Optimized Solar cell Technology (MOST) required defining the surface incident spectrum, developing an appropriate laboratory solar simulator measurement capability, and developing and testing commercial cells modified for the Mars surface spectrum.

  6. Renewing Solar Science. The Solar Maximum Repair Mission.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Neal, Valerie

    This publication describes the Solar Maximum Repair Mission for restoring the operational capability of the solar observatory in space by using the Space Shuttle. Major sections include: (1) "The Solar Maximum Mission" (describing the duties of the mission); (2) "Studying Solar Flares" (summarizing the major scientific accomplishments of the…

  7. Preliminary design package for solar collector and solar pump

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1978-01-01

    A solar-operated pump using an existing solar collector, for use on solar heating and cooling and hot water systems is described. Preliminary design criteria of the collector and solar-powered pump is given including: design drawings, verification plans, and hazard analysis.

  8. Solar Cell Fabrication Studies Pertinent to Developing Countries.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prah, Joseph Henry

    That there is a need in the world today, and in the Third World in particular, for developing renewable energy sources is a proposition without question. Toward that end, the harnessing of solar energy has attracted much attention recently. In this thesis, we have addressed the question of Photovoltaics among the many approaches to the problem as being of poignant relevance in the Third World. Based on our studies, which involved the physics of solar cells, various solar cell configurations, the materials for their fabrication and their fabrication sequences, we arrived at the conclusion that silicon homojunction solar cells are best suited to the present needs and environment of, and suitable for development in the Third World, though Cadmium Sulphide-Cuprous Sulphide solar cell could be considered as a viable future candidate. Attendant with the adoption of photovoltaics as electric energy supply, is the problem of technology transfer and development. Towards that goal, we carried out in the laboratory, the fabrication of solar cells using very simple fabrication sequences and materials to demonstrate that tolerable efficiencies are achievable by their use. The view is also presented that for a thriving and viable solar cell industry in the Third World, the sine qua non is an integrated national policies involving all facets of solar cell manufacture and application, namely, material processing and fabrication, basic research, and development and socio -economic acceptance of solar cell appliances. To demonstrate how basic research could benefit solar cell fabrication, we undertook a number of experiments, such as varying our fabrication sequences and materials, finding their radiation tolerance, and carrying out Deep Level Transient Spectroscopy (DLTS) studies, in an attempt to understand some of the fabrication and environmental factors which limit solar cell performance. We thus found that subjecting wafers to preheat treatments does not improve solar cell

  9. Solar Access to Public Capital (SAPC) Mock Securitization Project

    SciTech Connect

    Mendelsohn, Michael; Lowder, Travis; Rottman, Mary; Borod, Ronald; Gabig, Nathan; Henne, Stephen; Caplin, Conrad; Notte, Quentin

    2015-12-21

    In late 2012, the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) initiated the Solar Access to Public Capital (SAPC) working group. Backed by a three-year funding facility from the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), NREL set out to organize the solar, legal, banking, capital markets, engineering, and other relevant stakeholder communities in order to open lower-cost debt investment for solar asset deployment. SAPC engaged its members to standardize contracts, develop best practices, and comprehend how the rating agencies perceive solar project portfolios as an investment asset class. Rating agencies opine on the future creditworthiness of debt obligations. Issuers often seek investment-grade ratings from the rating agencies in order to satisfy the desires of their investors. Therefore, for the solar industry to access larger pools of capital at a favorable cost, it is critical to increase market participants' understanding of solar risk parameters. The process provided valuable information to address rating agency perceptions of risk that, without such information, could require costly credit enhancement or higher yields to attract institutional investors. Two different securities were developed--one for a hypothetical residential solar portfolio and one for a hypothetical commercial solar portfolio. Five rating agencies (Standard and Poor's, Moody's, KBRA, Fitch, and DBRS) participated and provided extensive feedback, some through conversations that extended several months. The findings represented in this report are a composite summary of that feedback and do not indicate any specific feedback from any single rating agency.

  10. The solar flare myth

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gosling, J. T.

    1993-01-01

    Many years of research have demonstrated that large, nonrecurrent geomagnetic storms, shock wave disturbances in the solar wind, and energetic particle events in interplanetary space often occur in close association with large solar flares. This result has led to a pradigm of cause and effect - that large solar flares are the fundamental cause of these events in the near-Earth space environmemt. This paradigm, which I call 'the solar flare myth,' dominates the popular perception of the relationship between solar activity and interplanetary and geomagnetic events and has provided much of the pragmatic rationale for the study of the solar flare phenomenon. Yet there is good evidence that this paradigm is wrong and that flares do not generally play a central role in producing major transient disturbances in the near-Earth space environment. In this paper I outline a different paradigm of cause and effect that removes solar flares from their central position in the chain of events leading from the Sun to near-Earth space. Instead, this central role is given to events known as coronal mass ejections.

  11. Solar Hot Water Heater

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1978-01-01

    The solar panels pictured below, mounted on a Moscow, Idaho home, are part of a domestic hot water heating system capable of providing up to 100 percent of home or small business hot water needs. Produced by Lennox Industries Inc., Marshalltown, Iowa, the panels are commercial versions of a collector co-developed by NASA. In an effort to conserve energy, NASA has installed solar collectors at a number of its own facilities and is conducting research to develop the most efficient systems. Lewis Research Center teamed with Honeywell Inc., Minneapolis, Minnesota to develop the flat plate collector shown. Key to the collector's efficiency is black chrome coating on the plate developed for use on spacecraft solar cells, the coating prevents sun heat from "reradiating," or escaping outward. The design proved the most effective heat absorber among 23 different types of collectors evaluated in a Lewis test program. The Lennox solar domestic hot water heating system has three main components: the array of collectors, a "solar module" (blue unit pictured) and a conventional water heater. A fluid-ethylene glycol and water-is circulated through the collectors to absorb solar heat. The fluid is then piped to a double-walled jacket around a water tank within the solar module.

  12. Ozark Mountain solar home

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, B.

    1998-03-01

    If seeing is believing, Kyle and Christine Sarratt are believers. The couple has been living in their passive solar custom home for almost two years, long enough to see a steady stream of eye-opening utility bills and to experience the quality and comfort of energy-efficient design. Skeptical of solar homes at first, the Sarratts found an energy-conscious designer that showed them how they could realize their home-building dreams and live in greater comfort while spending less money. As Kyle says, {open_quotes}We knew almost nothing about solar design and weren`t looking for it, but when we realized we could get everything we wanted in a home and more, we were sold.{close_quotes} Now the couple is enjoying the great feeling of solar and wood heat in the winter, natural cooling in the summer and heating/cooling bills that average less than $20/month. The Sarratts` home overlooks a large lake near the town of Rogers, tucked up in the northwest corner of Arkansas. It is one of three completed homes out of 29 planned for the South Sun Estates subdivision, where homes are required by covenant to incorporate passive solar design principles. Orlo Stitt, owner of Stitt Energy Systems and developer of the subdivision, has been designing passive solar, energy-efficient homes for twenty years. His passive solar custom home development is the first in Arkansas.

  13. Solar flares: an overview.

    PubMed

    Rust, D M

    1992-01-01

    This is a survey of solar phenomena and physical models that may be useful for improving forecasts of solar flares and proton storms in interplanetary space. Knowledge of the physical processes that accelerate protons has advanced because of gamma-ray and X-ray observations from the Solar Maximum Mission telescopes. Protons are accelerated at the onset of flares, but the duration of any subsequent proton storm at 1 AU depends on the structure of the interplanetary fields. X-ray images of the solar corona show possible fast proton escape paths. Magnetographs and high-resolution visible-band images show the magnetic field structure near the acceleration region and the heating effects of sunward-directed protons. Preflare magnetic field growth and shear may be the most important clues to the physical processes that generate high energy solar particles. Any dramatic improvement in flare forecasts will require high resolution solar telescopes in space. Several possibilities for improvements in the art of flare forecasting are presented, among them: the use of acoustic tomography to probe for subsurface magnetic fields; a satellite-borne solar magnetograph; and an X-ray telescope to monitor the corona for eruptions.

  14. Solar Wind Complexity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iliopoulos, A.; Pavlos, G.; Karakatsanis, L.; Xenakis, M.; Pavlos, E.

    2013-09-01

    In this study results concerning the nonlinear analysis of the ion flux solar wind time series of three shock phenomena, occurred during 24 October 2011, 09 September 2011 and 26 September 2011 correspondingly, as well as the non-extensive statistical theory of Tsallis are presented. In particular, the triplet of Tsallis, as well as the correlation dimension and the Lyapunov exponent spectrum were estimated for the solar wind time series. Also the multifractal scaling exponent spectrum , the generalized Renyi dimension spectrum and the spectrum of the structure function exponents were estimated experimentally and theoretically using the entropy principle included in Tsallis non-extensive statistical theory. Our analysis showed clearly the following: a) a phase transition process in the solar wind dynamics from high dimensional non-Gaussian self-organized critical (SOC) state to a low dimensional also non-Gaussian chaotic state, b) strong intermittent solar wind turbulence and anomalous (multifractal) diffusion solar wind process, c) faithful agreement of Tsallis non-equilibrium statistical theory with the experimental estimations, d) non-Gaussian probability distribution function , ii) and , iii) for the solar wind index and its underlying non-equilibrium solar dynamics.

  15. Anomalously Weak Solar Convection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hanasoge, Shravan M.; Duvall, Thomas L.; Sreenivasan, Katepalli R.

    2012-01-01

    Convection in the solar interior is thought to comprise structures on a spectrum of scales. This conclusion emerges from phenomenological studies and numerical simulations, though neither covers the proper range of dynamical parameters of solar convection. Here, we analyze observations of the wavefield in the solar photosphere using techniques of time-distance helioseismology to image flows in the solar interior. We downsample and synthesize 900 billion wavefield observations to produce 3 billion cross-correlations, which we average and fit, measuring 5 million wave travel times. Using these travel times, we deduce the underlying flow systems and study their statistics to bound convective velocity magnitudes in the solar interior, as a function of depth and spherical- harmonic degree l..Within the wavenumber band l < 60, convective velocities are 20-100 times weaker than current theoretical estimates. This constraint suggests the prevalence of a different paradigm of turbulence from that predicted by existing models, prompting the question: what mechanism transports the heat flux of a solar luminosity outwards? Advection is dominated by Coriolis forces for wavenumbers l < 60, with Rossby numbers smaller than approximately 10(exp -2) at r/R-solar = 0.96, suggesting that the Sun may be a much faster rotator than previously thought, and that large-scale convection may be quasi-geostrophic. The fact that isorotation contours in the Sun are not coaligned with the axis of rotation suggests the presence of a latitudinal entropy gradient.

  16. Solar Eagle 2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roberto, Richard D.

    1995-01-01

    During a 22-month period from February 1991 to December 1993, a dedicated group of students, faculty, and staff at California State University, Los Angeles completed a project to design, build, and race their second world class solar-powered electric vehicle, the Solar Eagle 2. This is the final report of that project. As a continuation of the momentum created by the success of the GM-sponsored Sunrayce USA in 1990, the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) picked up the banner from General Motors as sponsors of Sunrayce 93. In February 1991, the DOE sent a request for proposals to all universities in North America inviting them to submit a proposal outlining how they would design, build, and test a solar-powered electric vehicle for a seven-day race from Arlington, Texas to Minneapolis, Minnesota, to be held in June 1993. Some 70 universities responded. At the end of a proposal evaluation process, 36 universities including CSLA were chosen to compete. This report documents the Solar Eagle 2 project--the approaches take, what was learned, and how our experience from the first Solar Eagle was incorporated into Solar Eagle 2. The intent is to provide a document that would assist those who may wish to take up the challenge to build Solar Eagle 3.

  17. Solar home show: Homes designed for the solar homebuilders program

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    1982-07-01

    Ten passive solar homes are presented that resulted from a program to demonstrate that passive solar homes can be attractive, affordable, functional, and therefore, marketable. For each home is given: the designer and builder, floor plans, perspective of the outside, passive solar and conservation features, and a comparison of the estimated heating bill for the house and a conventional house the same size. A brief discussion is included on the basics of passive solar design, ventilation and cooling, and solar access.

  18. Lateral superlattice solar cells

    SciTech Connect

    Mascarenhas, A.; Zhang, Y.; Millunchick, J.M.; Twesten, R.D.; Jones, E.D.

    1997-10-01

    A novel structure which comprises of a lateral superlattice as the active layer of a solar cell is proposed. If the alternating regions A and B of a lateral superlattice ABABAB... are chosen to have a Type-II band offset, it is shown that the performance of the active absorbing region of the solar cell is optimized. In essence, the Type-II lateral superlattice region can satisfy the material requirements for an ideal solar cells active absorbing region, i.e. simultaneously having a very high transition probability for photogeneration and a very long minority carrier recombination lifetime.

  19. SOLAR-A

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ninomiya, K.; Ogawara, Y.

    1991-01-01

    The DSN (Deep Space Network) mission support requirements for SOLAR-A are summarized. The SOLAR-A mission objectives are to investigate high energy phenomena of the Sun using x-ray telescopes and spectrometers during the maximum activity period of the solar cycle. The spacecraft will be launched into a circular earth orbit of approximately 500 km altitude and 31 deg inclination. The mission objectives are outlined and the DSN support requirements are defined through the presentation of tables and narratives describing the spacecraft profile; DSN support coverage; frequency assignments; support parameters for telemetry, command and support systems; and tracking support responsibility.

  20. Can solar power deliver?

    PubMed

    Nelson, Jenny; Emmott, Christopher J M

    2013-08-13

    Solar power represents a vast resource which could, in principle, meet the world's needs for clean power generation. Recent growth in the use of photovoltaic (PV) technology has demonstrated the potential of solar power to deliver on a large scale. Whilst the dominant PV technology is based on crystalline silicon, a wide variety of alternative PV materials and device concepts have been explored in an attempt to decrease the cost of the photovoltaic electricity. This article explores the potential for such emerging technologies to deliver cost reductions, scalability of manufacture, rapid carbon mitigation and new science in order to accelerate the uptake of solar power technologies.