Science.gov

Sample records for 1992-93 collider run

  1. Perceptions, 1992-93.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sarda, Lynn VanEseltine, Ed.

    1993-01-01

    This document consists of the four issues of the journal "Perceptions" issued during the 1992/93 publishing year (volume 27). This journal deals with services for students with emotional disturbances. The Winter 1992 issue contains the agenda of a 1992 conference on "Educational Excellence with Diminishing Resources" sponsored by the Association…

  2. Program Effectiveness in AISD 1992-93.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wilkinson, David; Mangino, Evangelina

    The Office of Research and Evaluation (ORE) of the Austin Independent School District (AISD) (Texas) reviews the effectiveness of many of the school district's special programs. In 1992-93, ORE reviewed 60 programs or program components. Cost effectiveness was calculated for 31 programs, using an achievement effect measure for 10, a dropout…

  3. American Association for Higher Education (AAHE) Bulletin, 1992-93.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Marchese, Theodore J., Ed.

    1993-01-01

    The 10 issues of this organizational bulletin for the 1992/93 school year present articles, panel discussions, interviews, and essays on issues concerning the advancement of higher education. Among the topics and issues discussed are the following: an interview with Parker J. Palmer concerning community and commitment in higher education;…

  4. IFLA Core Programmes 1992/93. Revised Edition.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    International Federation of Library Associations and Institutions, The Hague (Netherlands).

    This brochure provides information on the background, objectives, location, management, funding, and current developments in 1992-93 International Federation of Library Associations (IFLA) core programs. The following programs are discussed: (1) Universal Bibliographic Control and International MARC (UBCIM), including work on the development of…

  5. Student Service and Philanthropy Project 1992-93.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Budin, Howard; And Others

    The Student Service and Philanthropy Project (SSPP) was designed to afford students an opportunity to assume leadership roles in promoting positive social change in their community. This document presents a 1992-93 evaluation of the SSPP concerning the program's implementation and the perceptions of its success on the part of students and project…

  6. Modelling the Fermilab Collider to determine optimal running

    SciTech Connect

    McCrory, E.

    1994-12-01

    A Monte Carlo-type model of the Fermilab Collider has been constructed, the goal of which is to accurately represent the operation of the Collider, incorporating the aspects of the facility which affect operations in order to determine how to run optimally. In particular, downtime for the various parts of the complex are parameterized and included. Also, transfer efficiencies, emittance growths, changes in the luminosity lifetime and other effects are included and randomized in a reasonable manner. This Memo is an outgrowth of TM-1878, which presented an entirely analytical model of the Collider. It produced a framework for developing intuition on the way in which the major components of the collider affect the luminosity, like the stacking rate and the shot set-up time, for example. However, without accurately including downtime effects, it is not possible to say with certainty that the analytical approach can produce accurate guidelines for optimizing the performance of the Collider. This is the goal of this analysis. We first discuss the way the model is written, describing the object-oriented approach taken in C++. The parameters of the simulation are described. Then the potential criteria for ending stores are described and analyzed. Next, a typical store and a typical week are derived. Then, a final conclusion on the best end-of-store criterion is made. Finally, ideas for future analysis are presented.

  7. Dropout and Migration Statistics: District of Columbia Public Schools. School Year 1992-93.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    District of Columbia Public Schools, Washington, DC. Research Branch.

    The annual dropout and migration statistics report of the District of Columbia public schools reflects the guidelines, definitions, and tracking procedures of the District schools. School year 1992-93 was the fourth year of implementation of this project in the D.C. public schools. In school year 1992-93 the total number of dropouts was 2,499,…

  8. Water withdrawal and use in Maryland, 1992-93

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wheeler, J.C.

    1997-01-01

    During 1992, about 1,430 million gallons per day (Mgal/d) of freshwater was withdrawn from surface-water and ground-water sources in Maryland. Total freshwater withdrawals increased during 1993 to about 1,480 Mgal/d. Saline surface- water withdrawals for cooling condensers increased from about 5,350 Mgal/d during 1992 to 5,840 Mgal/d during 1993. During 1992-93, most freshwater withdrawals (about 1,180 Mgal/d during 1992 and 1,200 Mgal/d during 1993) were from surface-water sources. Nearly 70 percent of the fresh surface water was withdrawn in the Potomac River drainage basin. Most ground water (about 178 Mgal/d in 1992 and 194 Mgal/d in 1993) was withdrawn in the Upper Chesapeake drainage basin.The Potomac Group aquifers provided most of the ground water (about 61 Mgal/d during 1992 and 64 Mgal/d during 1993). Ten water-use categoriesrepresent the major demands on the surface-water and ground-water resources of the State: Public supply, domestic, commercial, industrial, mining, thermoelectric power, hydroelectric power, livestock, irrigation, and aquaculture. Largest withdrawals were for public supply (790 Mgal/d during 1992 and 812 Mgal/d during 1993), and the water was used by residences, commercial establishments, and industries. Baltimore City received the largest public-supply deliveries (about 126 Mgal/d during1992 and 129 Mgal/d during 1993). Freshwater withdrawals for self-supplied domestic, commercial, mining, aquaculture, and irrigation uses increased during the period, whereas withdrawals for industrial and thermoelectric power uses decreased.

  9. Staff Helping Attain Relevant Education (Project SHARE): Final Evaluation Report, 1992-93. OREA Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ranadive, Jyoti

    Project SHARE (Staff Helping Attain Relevant Education), a project funded by Title VII of the Elementary and Secondary Education Act, was in its third and final year of operation in 1992-93, in eight primary schools in the Bronx, Brooklyn, and Manhattan (New York). The project served 141 limited English proficient students from low-income families…

  10. Chapter 2 Grade One Teacher Training Program. 1992-93. Final Evaluation Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pollock, Jack

    The 1992-93 Grade One Teacher Training Program was designed to provide first-grade classroom teachers an opportunity to increase the effectiveness of their initial instruction and first line of intervention so as to reduce the number of pupils needing a second level of intervention, such as the Reading Recovery or Early Literacy intervention…

  11. Louisiana's Achievements for Sex Equity in Vocational Education 1992-93.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hargroder, Margaret

    In 1992-93, Louisiana had many achievements toward sex equity in vocational education. As state enrollment continued to grow, many efforts were undertaken to increase sex equity in vocational programs and to increase the occupational success of groups targeted by the Carl D. Perkins Applied Vocational and Technology Education Act. Among…

  12. Cost of Education Index, 1992-93 Biennium. Final Report of the Legislative Education Board.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Texas State Legislature, Austin. Legislative Education Board.

    The development of Texas' new cost-of-education index (CEI) for 1992-93 is described in this report. The two components of the index are price, which adjusts for regional price variations beyond the control of local districts, and scale, which adjusts for diseconomies of scale due to differences in district size as measured by pupil attendance.…

  13. Social Change and Adult Education Research. Adult Education Research in Nordic Countries 1992/93.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tampere Univ., Hameelinna (Finland). Dept. of Education.

    This yearbook contains 18 papers reflecting the major trends in adult education research in the Nordic countries in 1992-93. The following papers are included: "Popular Adult Education and Social Mobilization: Reflections in Connection with the Swedish Committee on Power" (Rubenson); "Direction of Finnish Adult Education Policies…

  14. Piecing Together an Integrated Approach to Drug-Free Schools. 1992-93 Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wiehe, James A.

    The federal Drug-Free Schools and Communities (DFSC) Act of 1986 provides funding to school districts to help eliminate drug and alcohol use on their campuses. In 1992-93, the Austin Independent School District (AISD) received $467,362 from the act. The funds supported a wide assortment of preventative and educational programs regarding the…

  15. Elementary Technology Demonstration Schools: The Third Year 1992-93. Publication Number 92.31.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sabatino, Melissa

    The 1992-93 school year was the third year of the Elementary Technology Demonstration Schools program of the Austin (Texas) schools; the project is funded by International Business Machines Corporation (IBM) and Apple Computer Inc. Grants from these corporations were used to equip three elementary schools with IBM equipment and one with Apple…

  16. Transfer Graduate Follow-Up Study, 1991-92 & 1992-93.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Central Piedmont Community Coll., Charlotte, NC. Dept. of Planning and Research.

    In 1994, Central Piedmont Community College (CPCC), in North Carolina, conducted a survey of graduates from the 1991-92 and 1992-93 academic years who had subsequently enrolled in a four-year college and university to determine outcomes and assess graduates' satisfaction with the college, comparing findings with outcomes from previous years.…

  17. RHIC Performance as a 100 GeV Polarized Proton Collider in Run-9

    SciTech Connect

    Montag, C.; Ahrens, L.; Bai, M.; Beebe-Wang, J.; Blaskiewicz, M.; Brennan, J.M.; Brown, K.A.; Bruno, D.; Connolly, R.; DOttavio, T.; Drees, A.; Fedotov, A.V.; Fischer, W.; Ganetis, G.; Gardner, C.; Glenn, J.; Hahn, H.; Harvey, M.; Hayes, T.; Huang, H.; Ingrassia, P.; Jamilkowski, J.; Kayran, D.; Kewisch, J.; Lee, R.C.; Luccio, A.U.; Luo, Y.; MacKay, W.W.; Makdisi, Y.; Malitsky, N.; Marr, G.; Marusic, A.; Menga, P.M.; Michnoff, R.; Minty, M.; Morris, J.; Oerter, B.; Pilat, F.; Pile, P.; Pozdeyev, E.; Ptitsyn, V.; Robert-Demolaize, G.; Roser, T.; Russo, T.; Satogata, T.; Schoefer, V.; Schultheiss, C.; Severino, F.; Sivertz, M.; Smith, K.; Tepikian, S.; Thieberger, P.; Trbojevic, D.; Tsoupas, N.; Tuozzolo, J.; Zaltsman, A.; Zelenski, A.; Zeno, K.; Zhang, S.Y.

    2010-05-23

    During the second half of Run-9, the Relativisitc Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) provided polarized proton collisions at two interaction points. The spin orientation of both beams at these collision points was controlled by helical spin rotators, and physics data were taken with different orientations of the beam polarization. Recent developments and improvements will be presented, as well as luminosity and polarization performance achieved during Run-9.

  18. GO, an exec for running the programs: CELL, COLLIDER, MAGIC, PATRICIA, PETROS, TRANSPORT and TURTLE

    SciTech Connect

    Shoaee, H.

    1982-05-01

    An exec has been written and placed on the PEP group's public disk (PUBRL 192) to facilitate the use of several PEP related computer programs available on VM. The exec's program list currently includes: CELL, COLLIDER, MAGIC, PATRICIA, PETROS, TRANSPORT, and TURTLE. In addition, provisions have been made to allow addition of new programs to this list as they become available. The GO exec is directly callable from inside the Wylbur editor (in fact, currently this is the only way to use the GO exec.) It provides the option of running any of the above programs in either interactive or batch mode. In the batch mode, the GO exec sends the data in the Wylbur active file along with the information required to run the job to the batch monitor (BMON, a virtual machine that schedules and controls execution of batch jobs). This enables the user to proceed with other VM activities at his/her terminal while the job executes, thus making it of particular interest to the users with jobs requiring much CPU time to execute and/or those wishing to run multiple jobs independently. In the interactive mode, useful for small jobs requiring less CPU time, the job is executed by the user's own Virtual Machine using the data in the active file as input. At the termination of an interactive job, the GO exec facilitates examination of the output by placing it in the Wylbur active file.

  19. Integrated Methods for Pupils To Reinforce Occupational and Verbal Effectiveness (Project IMPROVE). Final Evaluation Report, 1992-93. OREA Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Guadalupe, Deana R.

    Integrated Methods for Pupils to Reinforce Occupational and Vocational Effectiveness (Project IMPROVE) was a federally funded project in its second year of operation in two Manhattan (New York) high schools in 1992-93. It served limited-English-proficient students, 186 Latino and 13 Asian-American, in grades 9-12. Students received instruction in…

  20. Harmony in Career Learning and Scholastic System (Project HI-CLASS). Final Evaluation Report 1992-93. OREA Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Duque, Diana L.

    Harmony in Career Learning and Scholastic System (Project HI-CLASS) was a Transitional Bilingual Education Title VII-funded program in its fifth and final year in 1992-93. The project offered instructional and support services to 641 students of limited English proficiency (LEP) at three sites, all of which had many immigrant students, in…

  1. Follow-Up Survey of PVCC Graduates of the Class of 1992-93. Research Report Number 6-94.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fowler, Paul G.

    Since 1974, Piedmont Virginia Community College (PVCC) has conducted annual surveys of its graduates to obtain information on jobs, career satisfaction, transfer to other institutions, and the effect of PVCC on careers and further education. Findings from the survey of 1992-93 graduates, based on responses from 52.5% of the 232 alumni surveyed,…

  2. How Segregated are Michigan's Schools? Changes in Enrollment from 1992-93 to 2004-05. Policy Report 27

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Landauer-Menchik, Bettie

    2006-01-01

    A 2002 study, "Race in American Public Schools: Rapidly Resegregating School Districts," identified Michigan as the state with the most segregated schools in the nation. The present data brief looks at changes in the distribution of Michigan's African American students between 1992-93 and 2004-05 to determine if African American students…

  3. E.C.I.A. Chapter 1 Children's Art Carnival Creative Reading Program 1992-93. OREA Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    New York City Board of Education, Brooklyn, NY. Office of Research, Evaluation, and Assessment.

    A study described the 1992-93 Chapter 1 Children's Art Carnival (CAC) Chapter 1 Reading and Writing Program and assessed the effectiveness of its implementation. The program is an intensive holistic reading and reading-oriented arts program for Chapter 1-eligible students who have scored below the cutoff point in a standardized reading test or…

  4. The Class "C" Survey, 1992-93. Comparisons of Budgets, Levies and Enrollments of Class "C" Montana School Districts.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Western Montana Coll., Dillon. Montana Rural Education Center.

    Financial data of the 1992-93 school year were collected from 86 of the 99 surveyed Class C school districts in Montana, which range in size from 56 to 484 students in Grades K-12. This report consists almost entirely of data tables providing information on enrollment, taxable valuation, guaranteed tax base per mill, general fund budget,…

  5. Outcome of pulmonary tuberculosis treatment in the tertiary care setting -- Toronto 1992/93

    PubMed Central

    Wobeser, W; Yuan, L; Naus, M

    1999-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Completion of treatment of active cases of tuberculosis (TB) is the most important priority of TB control programs. This study was carried out to assess treatment completion for active cases of pulmonary TB in Toronto. METHODS: Consecutive cases of culture-proven pulmonary TB were obtained from the microbiology laboratories of 5 university-affiliated tertiary care centres in Toronto in 1992/93. A standard data-collection tool was used to abstract information from inpatient and outpatient charts. For patients who were transferred to other treatment centres or lost to follow-up, the local health unit was contacted for information about treatment completion. If incomplete information was obtained from these sources, data from the provincial Reportable Disease Information System were also reviewed. The main outcome analysed was treatment outcome, with cases classified as completed (record of treatment completion noted), transferred (patient transferred to another centre but no treatment results available), defaulted (record of defaulting in patient chart but no record of treatment completion elsewhere, or patient still receiving treatment more than 15 months after diagnosis) or dead (patient died before treatment completion). RESULTS: Of the 145 patients 84 (58%) completed treatment, 25 (17%) died, 22 (15%) defaulted and 14 (10%) were transferred. The corresponding values for the 22 patients with HIV coinfection were 6 (27%), 5 (23%), 8 (36%) and 3 (14%). Independent predictors of failure to complete treatment were injection drug use (adjusted odds ratio [OR] 5.7, 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.5 to 22.0), HIV infection (adjusted OR 4.6, 95% CI 1.4 to 14.7) and adverse drug reaction (adjusted OR 2.9, 95% CI 1.1 to 7.9). Independent predictors of death included age more than 50 years (adjusted OR 16.7, 95% CI 2.6 to 105.1), HIV infection (adjusted OR 16.1, 95% CI 3.9 to 66.4), immunosuppressive therapy (adjusted OR 8.0, 95% CI 1.9 to 34.4) and infection with

  6. Changes in breeding bird populations in North Dakota: 1967 to 1992-93

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Igl, L.D.; Johnson, D.H.

    1997-01-01

    We compared breeding bird populations in North Dakota using surveys conducted in 1967 and 1992-93. In decreasing order, the five most frequently occurring species were Horned Lark (Eremophila alpestris), Brown-headed Cowbird (Molothrus ater), Western Meadowlark (Sturnella neglecta), Red-winged Blackbird (Agelaius phoeniceus), and Eastern Kingbird (Tyrannus tyrannus). The five most abundant species--Horned Lark, Chestnut-collared Longspur (Calcarius ornatus), Red-winged Blackbird, Western Meadowlark, and Brown-headed Cowbird-accounted for 31-41% of the estimated statewide breeding bird population in the three years. Although species composition remained relatively similar among years, between-year patterns in abundance and frequency varied considerably among species. Data from this survey and the North American Breeding Bird Survey indicated that species exhibiting significant declines were primarily grassland- and wetland-breeding birds, whereas species exhibiting significant increases primarily were those associated with human structures and woody vegetation. Population declines and increases for species with similar habitat associations paralleled breeding habitat changes, providing evidence that factors on the breeding grounds are having a detectable effect on breeding birds in the northern Great Plains.

  7. The upgraded Pixel Detector of the ATLAS Experiment for Run 2 at the Large Hadron Collider

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Backhaus, M.

    2016-09-01

    During Run 1 of the Large Hadron Collider (LHC), the ATLAS Pixel Detector has shown excellent performance. The ATLAS collaboration took advantage of the first long shutdown of the LHC during 2013 and 2014 and extracted the ATLAS Pixel Detector from the experiment, brought it to surface and maintained the services. This included the installation of new service quarter panels, the repair of cables, and the installation of the new Diamond Beam Monitor (DBM). Additionally, a completely new innermost pixel detector layer, the Insertable B-Layer (IBL), was constructed and installed in May 2014 between a new smaller beam pipe and the existing Pixel Detector. With a radius of 3.3 cm the IBL is located extremely close to the interaction point. Therefore, a new readout chip and two new sensor technologies (planar and 3D) are used in the IBL. In order to achieve best possible physics performance the material budget was improved with respect to the existing Pixel Detector. This is realized using lightweight staves for mechanical support and a CO2 based cooling system. This paper describes the improvements achieved during the maintenance of the existing Pixel Detector as well as the performance of the IBL during the construction and commissioning phase. Additionally, first results obtained during the LHC Run 2 demonstrating the distinguished tracking performance of the new Four Layer ATLAS Pixel Detector are presented.

  8. Nanosecond-Timescale Intra-Bunch-Train Feedback for the Linear Collider: Results of the FONT2 Run

    SciTech Connect

    Barlow, R.; Dufau, M.; Kalinin, A.; Myatt, G.; Perry, C.; Burrows, P.N.; Hartin, T.; Hussain, S.M.; Molloy, S.; White, G.R.; Adolphsen, C.; Frisch, J.C.; Hendrickson, L.; Jobe, R.K.; Markiewicz, T.; McCormick, D.J.; Nelson, J.; Ross, M.C.; Smith, S.; Smith, T.J.; /SLAC

    2005-05-11

    We report on experimental results from the December 2003/January 2004 data run of the Feedback On Nanosecond Timescales (FONT) experiment at the Next Linear Collider Test Accelerator at SLAC. We built a second-generation prototype intra-train beam-based feedback system incorporating beam position monitors, fast analogue signal processors, a feedback circuit, fast-risetime amplifiers and stripline kickers. We applied a novel real-time charge-normalization scheme to account for beam current variations along the train. We used the system to correct the position of the 170-nanosecond-long bunchtrain at NLCTA. We achieved a latency of 53 nanoseconds, representing a significant improvement on FONT1 (2002), and providing a demonstration of intra-train feedback for the Linear Collider.

  9. SDA-based diagnostic and analysis tools for Collider Run II

    SciTech Connect

    Bolshakov, T.B.; Lebrun, P.; Panacek, S.; Papadimitriou, V.; Slaughter, J.; Xiao, A.; /Fermilab

    2005-05-01

    Operating and improving the understanding of the Fermilab Accelerator Complex for the colliding beam experiments requires advanced software methods and tools. The Shot Data Analysis (SDA) has been developed to fulfill this need. Data from the Fermilab Accelerator Complex is stored in a relational database, and is served to programs and users via Web-based tools. Summary tables are systematically generated during and after a store. These tables (the Supertable, the Recomputed Emittances, the Recomputed Intensities and other tables) are discussed here.

  10. Search for chargino and neutralino at Run II of the Tevatron Collider

    SciTech Connect

    Canepa, Anadi

    2006-08-01

    In this dissertation we present a search for the associated production of charginos and neutralinos, the supersymmetric partners of the Standard Model bosons. We analyze a data sample representing 745 pb-1 of integrated luminosity collected by the CDF experiment at the p$\\bar{p}$ Tevatron collider. We compare the Standard Model predictions with the observed data selecting events with three leptons and missing transverse energy. Finding no excess, we combine the results of our search with similar analyses carried out at CDF and set an upper limit on the chargino mass in SUSY scenarios.

  11. UARS MLS Observations of Lower Stratospheric ClO in the 1992-93 and 1993-94 Arctic Winter Vortices

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Waters, J. W.; Manney, G. L.; Read, W. G.; Froidevaux, L.; Flower, D. A.; Jarnot, R. F.

    1995-01-01

    UARS (Upper Atmosphere Research Satellite) MLS (Microwave Limb Sounder) measurements of lower stratospheric ClO during the 1992-93 and 1993-94 Arctic winters are presented. Enhanced ClO in the 1992-93 winter was first observed in early December, and extensively during February when temperatures were continually low enough for PSCs. Sporadic episodes of enhanced ClO were observed for most of the 1993-94 winter as minimum temperatures hovered near the PSC threshold, with largest ClO amounts occurring in early March after a sudden deep cooling in late February.

  12. UARS MLS observations of lower stratospheric ClO in the 1992-93 and 1993-94 Arctic winter vortices

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Waters, J. W.; Manney, G. L.; Read, W. G.; Froidevaux, L.; Flower, D. A.; Jarnot, R. F.

    1995-01-01

    Upper Atmosphere Research Satellite (UARS) Microwave Limb Sounder (MLS) measurements of lower stratospheric ClO during 1992-93 and 1993-94 Arctic winters are presented. Enhanced ClO in the 1992-93 winter was first observed in early December, and extensively during February when temperatures were continually low enough for polar stratospheric cloud (PSCs). Sporadic episodes of enhanced ClO were observed for most of the 1993-94 winter as minimum temperatures hovered near the PSC threshold, with largest ClO amounts occurring in early March after a sudden deep cooling in late February.

  13. Particle multiplicities in lead-lead collisions at the CERN large hadron collider from nonlinear evolution with running coupling corrections.

    PubMed

    Albacete, Javier L

    2007-12-31

    We present predictions for the pseudorapidity density of charged particles produced in central Pb-Pb collisions at the LHC. Particle production in such collisions is calculated in the framework of k(t) factorization. The nuclear unintegrated gluon distributions at LHC energies are determined from numerical solutions of the Balitsky-Kovchegov equation including recently calculated running coupling corrections. The initial conditions for the evolution are fixed by fitting Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider data at collision energies square root[sNN]=130 and 200 GeV per nucleon. We obtain dNch(Pb-Pb)/deta(square root[sNN]=5.5 TeV)/eta=0 approximately 1290-1480.

  14. The International Academy for Bilingual Education and Bicultural Studies, Community School District 2, Manhattan. Final Evaluation Report, 1992-93. OER Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lynch, Joanne

    This report presents an evaluation of the International Academy for Bilingual Education and Bicultural Studies, an Elementary and Secondary Education Act Title VII-funded project in its third year of operation in 1992-93. The program provided instructional and support services to 74 Chinese- and English-speaking students in 1 pre-kindergarten, 1…

  15. Cognitive Academic Language Learning Approach (Project CALLA), Community School District 2 Special Alternative Instruction Program. Final Evaluation Report, 1992-93. OREA Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lynch, Joanne

    Cognitive Academic Language Learning Approach (Project CALLA) was a federally funded program serving 960 limited-English-proficient students in 10 Manhattan (New York) elementary schools in 1992-93 its third year of operation. The project provided instruction in English as a Second Language (ESL), mathematics, science, and social studies in…

  16. Dealing with Debt: 1992-93 Bachelor's Degree Recipients 10 Years Later. Postsecondary Education Descriptive Analysis Report. NCES 2006-156

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Choy, Susan P.; Li, Xiaojie

    2006-01-01

    The first part of this report describes the undergraduate borrowing patterns of 1992-93 bachelor's degree recipients and their graduate enrollment and additional borrowing through 2003. These graduates would have completed their undergraduate borrowing prior to the changes introduced by the 1992 reauthorization of the Higher Education Act. At that…

  17. ARL Statistics, 1992-93. A Compilation of Statistics from the One Hundred and Nineteen Members of the Association of Research Libraries.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Daval, Nicola, Comp.; Brennan, Patricia, Comp.

    This report presents data for the 108 university libraries and 11 public or private, independent research libraries that were members of the Association of Research Libraries (ARL) during the 1992-93 fiscal year. Data are reported in alphabetical order on collections (volumes in library, gross and net volumes added, monographs purchased, current…

  18. KIRIS Accountability Cycle 2 Technical Manual. Based on the Analysis of Data from the 1992-93 through 1995-96 School Years.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dings, Jonathan

    This technical manual provides information about the technical characteristics of the Kentucky Instructional Results Information System (KIRIS), the assessment component of the Kentucky Education Reform Act Accountability System. The time period covered is Accountability Cycle 2, which spanned the school years 1992-93 through 1995-96. Sections of…

  19. Projections of Public and Nonpublic School Enrollment and High School Graduates in New York State: 1974-75 to 1992-93.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    New York State Education Dept., Albany. Information Center on Education.

    The school enrollment projections presented in this report are based on the application of a modified version of the cohort survival model. Retention ratios from grade to grade were analyzed for six prior years and the trend extended over the 19-year period from 1974-75 to 1992-93. Actual birth figures, population estimates, and projected New York…

  20. Quality of water and chemistry of bottom sediment in the Rillito Creek basin, Tucson, Arizona, 1992-93

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Tadayon, Saeid

    1995-01-01

    Physical and chemical data were collected from four surface-water sites, six ground-water sites, and two bottom-sediment sites during 1992-93. Specific conductance, hardness, alkalinity, and dissolved- solids concentrations generally were higher in ground water than in surface water. The median concentrations of dissolved major ions, with the exception of potassium, were higher in ground water than in surface water. In surface water and ground water, calcium was the dominant cation, and bicarbonate was the dominant anion. Concentrations of dissolved nitrite and nitrite plus nitrate in surface water and ground water did not exceed the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency maximum contaminant levels of 1 and 10 milligrams per liter for drinking water, respectively. Ammonium plus organic nitrogen in bottom sediment was detected at the highest concentration of any nitrogen species. Median values for most of the dissolved trace elements in surface water and ground water were below the detection levels. Dissolved trace elements in surface water and ground water did not exceed the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency maximum contaminant levels for drinking water. Trace-element concentrations in bottom sediment were similar to trace-element concentrations reported for soils of the western conterminous United States. Several organochlorine pesticides and priority pollutants were detected in surface-water and bottom-sediment samples; however, they did not exceed water-quality standards. Pesticides or priority pollutants were not detected in ground-water samples.

  1. Serological and epidemiological analysis of the prevalence of Bartonella spp. antibodies in Swedish elite orienteers 1992-93.

    PubMed

    McGill, S; Wesslen, L; Hjelm, E; Holmberg, M; Rolf, C; Friman, G

    2001-01-01

    The emergence of the popular, physically demanding and highly nature-interactive sport of orienteering was marked in Sweden by an elevated rate of sudden unexpected cardiac deaths in young competitors during the years 1979-92, with a common underlying cause or causes suspected. Subsequently, sera were collected during 1992-93 from the elite segment of orienteers holding a nationally ranked position, and a survey compiling various epidemiological data was performed. In this study, a total of 1136 sera were analyzed by indirect-fluorescent antibody assay for the presence of IgG antibodies against 3 Bartonella spp.: B. henselae, B. elizabethae and B. quintana. In total, 31% (355/1136) were seropositive for at least 1 species of Bartonella, with titers ranging up to 1/512; 350/1136 (31%) had antibodies against B. elizabethae, 34/1136 (3.0%) against B. henselae and 16/1136 (1.4%) against B. quintana. Males and females showed equal rates of 31% seropositisity to Bartonella spp. (males 241/766; females 114/370). In comparison, 322 time-matched sera from healthy blood donors had antibodies to Bartonella spp. in 6.8% of cases (p < 0.001). The observed high prevalence of Bartonella spp. antibodies found in Swedish elite orienteers may be indicative of a connection with risk factors for the development of myocarditis and sudden unexpected cardiac death.

  2. Increasing socioeconomic inequality in childhood undernutrition in urban India: trends between 1992-93, 1998-99 and 2005-06.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Abhishek; Kumari, Divya; Singh, Aditya

    2015-10-01

    This article examines the trends and pattern in socioeconomic inequality in stunting, underweight and wasting among children aged <3 years in urban India over a 14-year period. We use three successive rounds of the National Family Health Survey data conducted during 1992-93, 1998-99 and 2005-06. The selected socioeconomic predictors are household wealth and mother's education level. We use principal component analysis to compute a separate wealth index for urban India for all three rounds of the survey. We have used descriptive statistics, concentration index and pooled logistic regression to analyse the data. The results show that between 1992-93 and 2005-06, the prevalence of childhood undernutrition has declined across household wealth quintiles and educational level of mothers. However, the pace of decline is much higher among the better-off socioeconomic groups than among the least-affluent groups. The result of pooled logistic regression analysis shows that the socioeconomic inequality in childhood undernutrition in urban India has increased over the study period. The salient findings of this study call for separate programmes targeting the children of lower socioeconomic groups in urban population of India.

  3. Hydrogeologic and agricultural-chemical data for the South Skunk River alluvial aquifer at a site in Story County, Iowa, 1992-93

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Buchmiller, R.C.

    1995-01-01

    A reconnaissance study was conducted during 1992-93 to collect background hydrogeologic and agricultural-chemical data for the South Skunk River alluvial aquifer near Ames, Iowa. Observation wells were drilled to characterize the surficial geologic materials of a field-scale study site and to provide locations for collecting waterlevel and agricultural-chemical data. Walnut Creek, a tributary to the South Skunk River, forms a lateral boundary on the northern edge of the field site. Water-level measurements showed a hydraulic-head gradient towards the South Skunk River under both wet and dry conditions at the study site. Walnut Creek appears to be losing water to the aquifer during most hydrologic conditions. More than 20 milligrams per liter of nitrate as nitrogen were present consistently in water from the southeastern part of the study site. Nitrate-as-nitrogen concentrations in water samples from other locations routinely did not exceed 10 milligrams per liter. The herbicide atrazine was detected most often, 36 of 38 times, in water samples collected from observation wells adjacent to Walnut Creek. Atrazine was not used on the study site during 1992-93 but was found frequently in water samples from Walnut Creek. Therefore, Walnut Creek appears to be a source of herbicide contamination to the alluvial aquifer.

  4. Ion colliders

    SciTech Connect

    Fischer, W.

    2011-12-01

    Ion colliders are research tools for high-energy nuclear physics, and are used to test the theory of Quantum Chromo Dynamics (QCD). The collisions of fully stripped high-energy ions create matter of a temperature and density that existed only microseconds after the Big Bang. Ion colliders can reach higher densities and temperatures than fixed target experiments although at a much lower luminosity. The first ion collider was the CERN Intersecting Storage Ring (ISR), which collided light ions [77Asb1, 81Bou1]. The BNL Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) is in operation since 2000 and has collided a number of species at numerous energies. The CERN Large Hadron Collider (LHC) started the heavy ion program in 2010. Table 1 shows all previous and the currently planned running modes for ISR, RHIC, and LHC. All three machines also collide protons, which are spin-polarized in RHIC. Ion colliders differ from proton or antiproton colliders in a number of ways: the preparation of the ions in the source and the pre-injector chain is limited by other effects than for protons; frequent changes in the collision energy and particle species, including asymmetric species, are typical; and the interaction of ions with each other and accelerator components is different from protons, which has implications for collision products, collimation, the beam dump, and intercepting instrumentation devices such a profile monitors. In the preparation for the collider use the charge state Z of the ions is successively increased to minimize the effects of space charge, intrabeam scattering (IBS), charge change effects (electron capture and stripping), and ion-impact desorption after beam loss. Low charge states reduce space charge, intrabeam scattering, and electron capture effects. High charge states reduce electron stripping, and make bending and acceleration more effective. Electron stripping at higher energies is generally more efficient. Table 2 shows the charge states and energies in the

  5. Salary-Trend Studies of Faculty for the Years 1992-93 and 1995-96 in the Following Academic Disciplines/Major Fields: History, General...Visual and Performing Arts.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Howe, Richard D.

    This document provides comparative salary trend data for full-time faculty at 212 public and 337 private colleges and universities, based on two surveys, one for the baseline year 1992-93 and the other for the "trend" year 1995-96. For each of 26 disciplines, a summary review provides a definition of the discipline; information on average salaries…

  6. Performance Trends and Use of Accommodations on a Statewide Assessment: Students with Disabilities in the KIRIS On-Demand Assessments from 1992-93 through 1995-96. State Assessment Series, Maryland/Kentucky Report 3.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Trimble, Scott

    This report discusses the performance of students with disabilities on the Kentucky Instructional Results Information System (KIRIS) on-demand assessments. These assessments, which consist of constructed response or essay-like questions over the period of 1992-93 through 1995-96, are part of the regular KIRIS assessment, which also includes…

  7. Salary-Trend Studies of Faculty for the Years 1992-93 and 1995-96 in the Following Academic Disciplines/Major Fields: Accounting, Art, General...Geology.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Howe, Richard D.

    This document provides comparative salary trend data for full-time faculty at 212 public and 337 private colleges and universities, based on two surveys, one for the baseline year 1992-93 and the other for the "trend" year 1995-96. For each of the 25 disciplines, a summary review provides a definition of the discipline; information on average…

  8. New College Graduates at Work: Employment among 1992-93, 1999-2000, and 2007-08 Bachelor's Degree Recipients 1 Year after Graduation. Stats in Brief. NCES 2014-003

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Staklis, Sandra; Skomsvold, Paul

    2014-01-01

    This Statistics in Brief examines the employment outcomes of college graduates 1 year after earning a bachelor's degree. It compares 2007-08 bachelor's degree recipients who graduated at the start of the recent recession with their peers who graduated in 1992-93 and 1999-2000. Different labor market conditions characterized these three time…

  9. Institutional Effectiveness Assessment Process, 1992-93. Executive Summary. Hospitality and Service Occupations Division, Food Sciences Department, Food Production Program, Food Production Management Program, Pastry and Specialty Baking Program.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    South Seattle Community Coll., Washington.

    In the 1992-93 academic year, the Hospitality and Food Sciences Department at South Seattle Community College conducted surveys of current and former students and local foodservice employers to determine the level of satisfaction with Department programs. Specifically, the surveys focused on four key outcomes: determining the extent to which…

  10. Computer-science guest-lecture series at Langston University sponsored by the U.S. Geological Survey; abstracts, 1992-93

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Steele, K. S.

    1994-01-01

    Langston University, a Historically Black University located at Langston, Oklahoma, has a computing and information science program within the Langston University Division of Business. Since 1984, Langston University has participated in the Historically Black College and University program of the U.S. Department of Interior, which provided education, training, and funding through a combined earth-science and computer-technology cooperative program with the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS). USGS personnel have presented guest lectures at Langston University since 1984. Students have been enthusiastic about the lectures, and as a result of this program, 13 Langston University students have been hired by the USGS on a part-time basis while they continued their education at the University. The USGS expanded the offering of guest lectures in 1992 by increasing the number of visits to Langston University, and by inviting participation of speakers from throughout the country. The objectives of the guest-lecture series are to assist Langston University in offering state-of-the-art education in the computer sciences, to provide students with an opportunity to learn from and interact with skilled computer-science professionals, and to develop a pool of potential future employees for part-time and full-time employment. This report includes abstracts for guest-lecture presentations during 1992-93 school year.

  11. Volunteer Voice. 1992-93.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Volunteer Voice, 1993

    1993-01-01

    Four issues of "Volunteer Voice," a newsletter of the Tacoma, Washington Community House Training Project, are presented. The project provides English-as-a-Second-Language (ESL) instruction and support to refugees. Contents of Number 1 (Summer 1992) include an account of one volunteer's initial encounter; a game for teaching adverbs; instructions…

  12. Field screening of water quality, bottom sediment, and biota associated with irrigation drainage, Wind River Indian Reservation, Wyoming, 1992-93

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Grasso, Dennis N.; Jennings, Mary E.; Sadler, Wilfrid J.

    1995-01-01

    Physical, chemical, and biological data were collected in 1992-93 from irrigation drainage areas and wetlands of the Wind River Federal Irrigation Project, Wind River Indian Reservation, Wyoming. Most samples collected had concentrations of chemical constituents less than the established levels of concern for water, bottom sediment, and biota. In the Little Wind Unit irrigation area, however, selenium and mercury concentrations in water exceeded criteria established by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency. Six water samples analyzed from the Little Wind Unit in 1993 had selenium concentrations that equaled or exceeded 5 micrograms per liter. Concentrations of mercury in water were 0.1 micrograms per liter or less, except at four sites: one sample collected in 1993 from Sharp Nose Draw (4.9 micrograms per liter) and three samples collected in 1992 from Little Wind Unit and Johnstown Unit (0.2 micrograms per liter). Mercury concentrations in all bottom-sediment samples were less than 0.02 micrograms per liter, except at Sharp Nose Pond where a concentration of 0.02 micrograms per liter was measured. Selenium concentrations in some aquatic vegetation, inverte- brates, fish, bird eggs, and bird livers collected from the Little Wind Unit in 1993 exceeded established levels of concern. At Goose Pond and Sharp Nose Pond, selenium in the livers of five bird samples collected exceeded the 10 micrograms per gram level associated with reproductive failure in aquatic birds. Mercury concentrations in the livers of birds sampled at Sharp Nose Pond also were greater than suggested levels in dietary items for the protection of sensitive species of mammals and birds that regularly consume aquatic organisms.

  13. Exotic colliders

    SciTech Connect

    Chattopadhyay, S.

    1994-11-01

    The motivation, feasibility and potential for two unconventional collider concepts - the Gamma-Gamma Collider and the Muon Collider - are described. The importance of the development of associated technologies such as high average power, high repetition rate lasers and ultrafast phase-space techniques are outlined.

  14. Approximate changes in water levels in wells completed in the Chicot and Evangeline aquifers, 1977-93 and 1992-93, and measured compaction, 1973-92, in the Houston-Galveston region, Texas

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kasmarek, Mark C.; Coplin, L.S.; Campodonico, Al

    1993-01-01

    This report is one in a series of reports that depict water-level changes since 1977 and compaction of subsurface material since 1973.  The report was prepared in cooperation with the Harris-Galveston Coastal Subsidence District and the City of Houston, and presents maps showing the approximate changes in water levels in wells completed in the Chicot and Evangeline aquifers, 1977-93 and 1992-93 (figs. 1-4), and measured compaction, 1973-92 (figs. 5 and 6), in the Houston-Galveston region.  The Houston-Galveston region includes Harris and Galveston Counties and adjacent parts of Brazoria, Fort Bend, Waller, Montgomery, Liberty, and Chambers Counties.

  15. Muon colliders

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Palmer, R. B.; Sessler, A.; Skrinsky, A.; Tollestrup, A.; Baltz, A. J.; Chen, P.; Cheng, W.-H.; Cho, Y.; Courant, E.; Fernow, R. C.; Gallardo, J. C.; Garren, A.; Green, M.; Kahn, S.; Kirk, H.; Lee, Y. Y.; Mills, F.; Mokhov, N.; Morgan, G.; Neuffer, D.; Noble, R.; Norem, J.; Popovic, M.; Schachinger, L.; Silvestrov, G.; Summers, D.; Stumer, I.; Syphers, M.; Torun, Y.; Trbojevic, D.; Turner, W.; Van Ginneken, A.; Vsevolozhskaya, T.; Weggel, R.; Willen, E.; Winn, D.; Wurtele, J.

    1996-05-01

    Muon Colliders have unique technical and physics advantages and disadvantages when compared with both hadron and electron machines. They should thus be regarded as complementary. Parameters are given of 4 TeV and 0.5 TeV high luminosity μ+μ- colliders, and of a 0.5 TeV lower luminosity demonstration machine. We discuss the various systems in such muon colliders, starting from the proton accelerator needed to generate the muons and proceeding through muon cooling, acceleration and storage in a collider ring. Problems of detector background are also discussed.

  16. Muon colliders

    SciTech Connect

    Palmer, R.B. |; Sessler, A.; Skrinsky, A.

    1996-01-01

    Muon Colliders have unique technical and physics advantages and disadvantages when compared with both hadron and electron machines. They should thus be regarded as complementary. Parameters are given of 4 TeV and 0.5 TeV high luminosity {micro}{sup +}{micro}{sup {minus}}colliders, and of a 0.5 TeV lower luminosity demonstration machine. We discuss the various systems in such muon colliders, starting from the proton accelerator needed to generate the muons and proceeding through muon cooling, acceleration and storage in a collider ring. Problems of detector background are also discussed.

  17. Search for top quark at Fermilab Collider

    SciTech Connect

    Sliwa, K.; The CDF Collaboration

    1991-10-01

    The status of a search for the top quark with Collider Detector at Fermilab (CDF), based on a data sample recorded during the 1988--1989 run is presented. The plans for the next Fermilab Collider run in 1992--1993 and the prospects of discovering the top quark are discussed. 19 refs., 4 figs., 2 tabs.

  18. Water-quality assessment of the Albemarle-Pamlico Drainage Basin, North Carolina and Virginia; organochlorine compounds in Asiatic clam (Corbicula fluminea) soft tissues and whole redbrest sunfish (Lepomis auritus) 1992-93

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Smith, K.E.; Ruhl, P.M.

    1996-01-01

    The analysis of potential contaminants in biological tissues is an important part of many water-quality assessment programs, including the National Water-Quality Assessment (NAWQA) Program. Tissue analyses often are used to provide information about (1) direct threats to ecosystem integrity, and (2) the occurrence and distribution of potential contaminants in the environment. During 1992-93, Asiatic clam (Corbicula fluminea) soft tissues and whole redbreast sunfish (Lepomis auritus) samples were collected and analyzed to obtain information about the occurrence and distribution of organochlorine compounds in the Albemarle-Pamlico drainage Basin of North Carolina and Virginia. The investigation was conducted as part of the NAWQA Program. Relatively few organochlorine compounds were detected and of the compounds detected, all were detected in relatively low concentrations. The organochlorine compounds detected were p,p'-DDD, p,p'-DDE, p,p'-DDT, dieldrin, trans-nonachlor, PCB's, and toxaphene. Multiple compounds were detected at 16 of 19 sites sampled. Compared to Asiatic clams, redbreast sunfish appear to be better bioindicators of organochlorine contamination in aquatic systems. Except for one detection of toxaphene, pesticide concentrations are well below the National Academy of Sciences and National Academy of Engineering (NAS/NAE) guidelines for the protection of fish-eating wildlife.

  19. Water-quality assessment of the Albemarle-Pamlico drainage basin, North Carolina and Virginia; trace elements in Asiatic clam (Corbicula fluminea) soft tissues and redbreast sunfish (Lepomis auritus) livers, 1992-93

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ruhl, P.M.; Smith, K.E.

    1996-01-01

    The analysis of potential contaminants in biological tissues is an important part of many water-quality assessment programs, including the National Water-Quality Assessment (NAWQA) Program. Tissue analyses often are used to provide information about (1) direct threats to ecosystem integrity, and (2) the occurrence and distribution of potential contaminants in the environment. During 1992-93, trace elements in Asiatic clam (Corbicula fluminea) soft tissues and redbreast sunfish (Lepomis auritus) livers were analyzed to obtain information about the occurrence and distribution of trace element contaminants in the Albemarle-Pamlico Drainage Basin of North Carolina and Virginia. The investigation was conducted as part of the NAWQA Program. All but 3 of the 22 trace elements that were analyzed were detected. Although all 10 of the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (U.S. EPA) priority pollutants were detected in the tissues sampled, they were present in relatively low concentrations. Concentrations of U.S. EPA priority pollutants in Asiatic clams collected in the Albemarle-Pamlico Drainage Basin are similar to concentrations observed in other NAWQA study units in the southeastern United States. Mercury (a U.S. EPA priority pollutant) was widely detected, being present in 29 of 30 tissue samples, but concentrations did not exceed the FDA action level for mercury of a risk-based screening value for the general public. Mercury concentrations in Asiatic clams were similar to concentrations in other NAWQA study areas in the Southeast.

  20. Measurement of σ(p$\\bar{p}$ -> t$\\bar{t}$) in the τ + jets channel by the D0 experiment at Run II of the Tevatron Collider

    SciTech Connect

    Arov, Mikhail

    2008-07-01

    The top quark is the heaviest and most mysterious of the known elementary particles. Therefore, careful study of its production rate and other properties is of utmost importance for modern particle physics. The Tevatron is the only facility currently capable of studying top quark properties by on-shell production. Measurement of the top quark pair production cross section is one of the major goals of the Tevatron Run II physics program. It provides an excellent test of QCD at energies exceeding 100 GeV. We report on a new measurement of p$\\bar{p}$ → t$\\bar{t}$ production at √s = 1.96 TeV using 350 pb-1 of data collected with the D0 detector between 2002 and 2005. We focus on the final state where a W boson from one of the top quarks decays into a τ lepton and its associated neutrino, while the other decays into a quark-antiquark pair. We aim to select those events in which the τ lepton subsequently decays to one or three charged hadrons, zero or more neutral hadrons and a tau neutrino (the charge conjugate processes are implied in all of the above). The observable signature thus consists of a narrow calorimeter shower with associated track(s) characteristic of a hadronic tau decay, four or more jets, of which two are initiated by b quarks accompanying the W's in the top quark decays, and a large net missing momentum in the transverse plane due to the energetic neutrino-antineutrino pair that leave no trace in the detector media. The preliminary result for the measured cross section is: σ(t$\\bar{t}$) = 5.1$+4.3\\atop{-3.5}$(stat) $+0.7\\atop{-0.7}$(syst) ± 0.3 (lumi.) pb.

  1. Literacy Works, Volume 4, 1992-93.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Literacy Works, 1993

    1993-01-01

    Four issues of the newsletter are included. Number 1, with the theme "Literacy and New Canadians," includes an editorial on the government's new language training programs, articles on programs for newcomers, news from the Prairie Literacy Institute, and short reports on a theater project and adolescent problems. Focusing on…

  2. Future colliders

    SciTech Connect

    Palmer, R.B.; Gallardo, J.C.

    1996-10-01

    The high energy physics advantages, disadvantages and luminosity requirements of hadron (pp, pp), of lepton (e{sup +}e{sup {minus}}, {mu}{sup +} {mu}{sup {minus}}) and photon-photon colliders are considered. Technical arguments for increased energy in each type of machine are presented. Their relative size, and the implications of size on cost are discussed.

  3. Tevatron instrumentation: boosting collider performance

    SciTech Connect

    Shiltsev, Vladimir; Jansson, Andreas; Moore, Ronald; /Fermilab

    2006-05-01

    The Tevatron in Collider Run II (2001-present) is operating with six times more bunches, many times higher beam intensities and luminosities than in Run I (1992-1995). Beam diagnostics were crucial for the machine start-up and the never-ending luminosity upgrade campaign. We present the overall picture of the Tevatron diagnostics development for Run II, outline machine needs for new instrumentation, present several notable examples that led to Tevatron performance improvements, and discuss the lessons for the next big machines--LHC and ILC.

  4. Beam instrumentation for the Tevatron Collider

    SciTech Connect

    Moore, Ronald S.; Jansson, Andreas; Shiltsev, Vladimir; /Fermilab

    2009-10-01

    The Tevatron in Collider Run II (2001-present) is operating with six times more bunches and many times higher beam intensities and luminosities than in Run I (1992-1995). Beam diagnostics were crucial for the machine start-up and the never-ending luminosity upgrade campaign. We present the overall picture of the Tevatron diagnostics development for Run II, outline machine needs for new instrumentation, present several notable examples that led to Tevatron performance improvements, and discuss the lessons for future colliders.

  5. Coordinating the 2009 RHIC Run

    ScienceCinema

    Brookhaven Lab - Mei Bai

    2016-07-12

    Physicists working at the Brookhaven National Lab's Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) are exploring the puzzle of proton spin as they begin taking data during the 2009 RHIC run. For the first time, RHIC is running at a record energy of 500 giga-elect

  6. Coordinating the 2009 RHIC Run

    SciTech Connect

    Brookhaven Lab - Mei Bai

    2009-04-13

    Physicists working at the Brookhaven National Lab's Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) are exploring the puzzle of proton spin as they begin taking data during the 2009 RHIC run. For the first time, RHIC is running at a record energy of 500 giga-elect

  7. Run II luminosity progress

    SciTech Connect

    Gollwitzer, K.; /Fermilab

    2007-06-01

    The Fermilab Tevatron Collider Run II program continues at the energy and luminosity frontier of high energy particle physics. To the collider experiments CDF and D0, over 3 fb{sup -1} of integrated luminosity has been delivered to each. Upgrades and improvements in the Antiproton Source of the production and collection of antiprotons have led to increased number of particles stored in the Recycler. Electron cooling and associated improvements have help make a brighter antiproton beam at collisions. Tevatron improvements to handle the increased number of particles and the beam lifetimes have resulted in an increase in luminosity.

  8. Positrons for linear colliders

    SciTech Connect

    Ecklund, S.

    1987-11-01

    The requirements of a positron source for a linear collider are briefly reviewed, followed by methods of positron production and production of photons by electromagnetic cascade showers. Cross sections for the electromagnetic cascade shower processes of positron-electron pair production and Compton scattering are compared. A program used for Monte Carlo analysis of electromagnetic cascades is briefly discussed, and positron distributions obtained from several runs of the program are discussed. Photons from synchrotron radiation and from channeling are also mentioned briefly, as well as positron collection, transverse focusing techniques, and longitudinal capture. Computer ray tracing is then briefly discussed, followed by space-charge effects and thermal heating and stress due to showers. (LEW)

  9. High Energy Colliders

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Palmer, R. B.; Gallardo, J. C.

    INTRODUCTION PHYSICS CONSIDERATIONS GENERAL REQUIRED LUMINOSITY FOR LEPTON COLLIDERS THE EFFECTIVE PHYSICS ENERGIES OF HADRON COLLIDERS HADRON-HADRON MACHINES LUMINOSITY SIZE AND COST CIRCULAR e^{+}e^- MACHINES LUMINOSITY SIZE AND COST e^{+}e^- LINEAR COLLIDERS LUMINOSITY CONVENTIONAL RF SUPERCONDUCTING RF AT HIGHER ENERGIES γ - γ COLLIDERS μ ^{+} μ^- COLLIDERS ADVANTAGES AND DISADVANTAGES DESIGN STUDIES STATUS AND REQUIRED R AND D COMPARISION OF MACHINES CONCLUSIONS DISCUSSION

  10. Running Away

    MedlinePlus

    ... Emergency Room? What Happens in the Operating Room? Running Away KidsHealth > For Kids > Running Away A A ... life on the streets. continue The Reality of Running Away When you think about running away, you ...

  11. Collider and detector protection at beam accidents

    SciTech Connect

    I. L. Rakhno; N. V. Mokhov; A. I. Drozhdin

    2003-12-10

    Dealing with beam loss due to abort kicker prefire is considered for hadron colliders. The prefires occurred at Tevatron (Fermilab) during Run I and Run II are analyzed and a protection system implemented is described. The effect of accidental beam loss in the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) at CERN on machine and detector components is studied via realistic Monte Carlo calculations. The simulations show that beam loss at an unsynchronized beam abort would result in severe heating of conventional and superconducting magnets and possible damage to the collider detector elements. A proposed set of collimators would reduce energy deposition effects to acceptable levels. Special attention is paid to reducing peak temperature rise within the septum magnet and minimizing quench region length downstream of the LHC beam abort straight section.

  12. Running Away

    MedlinePlus

    ... problems of life on the streets. continue The Reality of Running Away When you think about running ... more fights. Sounds great and exciting, right? In reality, running away is anything but fun. Kids and ...

  13. State of hadron collider physics

    SciTech Connect

    Grannis, P.D. |

    1993-12-01

    The 9th Topical Workshop on Proton-Antiproton Collider Physics in Tsukuba Japan demonstrated clearly the enormous breadth of physics accessible in hadron cowders. Although no significant chinks were reported in the armor of the Standard Model, new results presented in this meeting have expanded our knowledge of the electroweak and strong interactions and have extended the searches for non-standard phenomena significantly. Much of the new data reported came from the CDF and D0 experiments at the Fermilab cowder. Superb operation of the Tevatron during the 1992-1993 Run and significant advances on the detector fronts -- in particular, the emergence of the new D0 detector as a productive physics instrument in its first outing and the addition of the CDF silicon vertex detector -- enabled much of this advance. It is noteworthy however that physics from the CERN collider experiments UA1 and UA4 continued to make a large impact at this meeting. In addition, very interesting summary talks were given on new results from HERA, cosmic ray experiments, on super-hadron collider physics, and on e{sup +}e{sup {minus}} experiments at LEP and TRISTAN. These summaries are reported in elsewhere in this volume.

  14. Setup and performance of RHIC for the 2008 run with deuteron-gold collisions.

    SciTech Connect

    Gardner,C.; Abreu, N.P.; Ahren, L.; Alessi, J.; Bai, M.; et al.

    2008-06-23

    This year (2008) deuterons and gold ions were collided in the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) at Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) for the first time since 2003. The setup and performance of the collider for the 2008 run is reviewed with a focus on improvements that have led to an order of magnitude increase in luminosity over that achieved in the 2003 run.

  15. Muon collider design

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Palmer, R.; Sessler, A.; Skrinsky, A.; Tollestrup, A.; Baltz, A.; Caspi, S.; P., Chen; W-H., Cheng; Y., Cho; Cline, D.; Courant, E.; Fernow, R.; Gallardo, J.; Garren, A.; Gordon, H.; Green, M.; Gupta, R.; Hershcovitch, A.; Johnstone, C.; Kahn, S.; Kirk, H.; Kycia, T.; Y., Lee; Lissauer, D.; Luccio, A.; McInturff, A.; Mills, F.; Mokhov, N.; Morgan, G.; Neuffer, D.; K-Y., Ng; Noble, R.; Norem, J.; Norum, B.; Oide, K.; Parsa, Z.; Polychronakos, V.; Popovic, M.; Rehak, P.; Roser, T.; Rossmanith, R.; Scanlan, R.; Schachinger, L.; Silvestrov, G.; Stumer, I.; Summers, D.; Syphers, M.; Takahashi, H.; Torun, Y.; Trbojevic, D.; Turner, W.; van Ginneken, A.; Vsevolozhskaya, T.; Weggel, R.; Willen, E.; Willis, W.; Winn, D.; Wurtele, J.; Zhao, Y.

    1996-11-01

    Muon Colliders have unique technical and physics advantages and disadvantages when compared with both hadron and electron machines. They should thus be regarded as complementary. Parameters are given of 4 TeV and 0.5 TeV high luminosity \\mu^+ \\mu^- colliders, and of a 0.5 TeV lower luminosity demonstration machine. We discuss the various systems in such muon colliders, starting from the proton accelerator needed to generate the muons and proceeding through muon cooling, acceleration and storage in a collider ring. Detector background, polarization, and nonstandard operating conditions are discussed.

  16. The development of colliders

    SciTech Connect

    Sessler, A.M.

    1997-03-01

    During the period of the 50`s and the 60`s colliders were developed. Prior to that time there were no colliders, and by 1965 a number of small devices had worked, good understanding had been achieved, and one could speculate, as Gersh Budker did, that in a few years 20% of high energy physics would come from colliders. His estimate was an under-estimate, for now essentially all of high energy physics comes from colliders. The author presents a brief review of that history: sketching the development of the concepts, the experiments, and the technological advances which made it all possible.

  17. SLAC Linear Collider

    SciTech Connect

    Richter, B.

    1985-12-01

    A report is given on the goals and progress of the SLAC Linear Collider. The status of the machine and the detectors are discussed and an overview is given of the physics which can be done at this new facility. Some ideas on how (and why) large linear colliders of the future should be built are given.

  18. Towards future circular colliders

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benedikt, Michael; Zimmermann, Frank

    2016-09-01

    The Large Hadron Collider (LHC) at the European Organization for Nuclear Research (CERN) presently provides proton-proton collisions at a center-of-mass (c.m.) energy of 13 TeV. The LHC design was started more than 30 years ago, and its physics program will extend through the second half of the 2030's. The global Future Circular Collider (FCC) study is now preparing for a post-LHC project. The FCC study focuses on the design of a 100-TeV hadron collider (FCC-hh) in a new ˜100 km tunnel. It also includes the design of a high-luminosity electron-positron collider (FCCee) as a potential intermediate step, and a lepton-hadron collider option (FCC-he). The scope of the FCC study comprises accelerators, technology, infrastructure, detectors, physics, concepts for worldwide data services, international governance models, and implementation scenarios. Among the FCC core technologies figure 16-T dipole magnets, based on Nb3 S n superconductor, for the FCC-hh hadron collider, and a highly-efficient superconducting radiofrequency system for the FCC-ee lepton collider. Following the FCC concept, the Institute of High Energy Physics (IHEP) in Beijing has initiated a parallel design study for an e + e - Higgs factory in China (CEPC), which is to be succeeded by a high-energy hadron collider (SPPC). At present a tunnel circumference of 54 km and a hadron collider c.m. energy of about 70 TeV are being considered. After a brief look at the LHC, this article reports the motivation and the present status of the FCC study, some of the primary design challenges and R&D subjects, as well as the emerging global collaboration.

  19. Linear collider: a preview

    SciTech Connect

    Wiedemann, H.

    1981-11-01

    Since no linear colliders have been built yet it is difficult to know at what energy the linear cost scaling of linear colliders drops below the quadratic scaling of storage rings. There is, however, no doubt that a linear collider facility for a center of mass energy above say 500 GeV is significantly cheaper than an equivalent storage ring. In order to make the linear collider principle feasible at very high energies a number of problems have to be solved. There are two kinds of problems: one which is related to the feasibility of the principle and the other kind of problems is associated with minimizing the cost of constructing and operating such a facility. This lecture series describes the problems and possible solutions. Since the real test of a principle requires the construction of a prototype I will in the last chapter describe the SLC project at the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center.

  20. Photon collider at TESLA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Telnov, Valery

    2001-10-01

    High energy photon colliders ( γγ, γe) based on backward Compton scattering of laser light is a very natural addition to e +e - linear colliders. In this report, we consider this option for the TESLA project. Recent study has shown that the horizontal emittance in the TESLA damping ring can be further decreased by a factor of four. In this case, the γγ luminosity in the high energy part of spectrum can reach about (1/3) Le +e -. Typical cross-sections of interesting processes in γγ collisions are higher than those in e +e - collisions by about one order of magnitude, so the number of events in γγ collisions will be more than that in e +e - collisions. Photon colliders can, certainly, give additional information and they are the best for the study of many phenomena. The main question is now the technical feasibility. The key new element in photon colliders is a very powerful laser system. An external optical cavity is a promising approach for the TESLA project. A free electron laser is another option. However, a more straightforward solution is "an optical storage ring (optical trap)" with a diode pumped solid state laser injector which is today technically feasible. This paper briefly reviews the status of a photon collider based on the linear collider TESLA, its possible parameters and existing problems.

  1. Running Shoes.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Connors, G. Patrick

    This guide explains the purpose of running shoes and provides tips for purchasing them. A brief explanation of the difference between training shoes and racing shoes is followed by a list of characteristics of running shoes that should be considered when buying them. These characteristics include heel fit, heel elevation and width, the inner and…

  2. The development of colliders

    SciTech Connect

    Sessler, A.M.

    1993-02-01

    Don Kerst, Gersh Budker, and Bruno Touschek were the individuals, and the motivating force, which brought about the development of colliders, while the laboratories at which it happened were Stanford, MURA, the Cambridge Electron Accelerator, Orsay, Frascati, CERN, and Novosibirsk. These laboratories supported, during many years, this rather speculative activity. Of course, many hundreds of physicists contributed to the development of colliders but the men who started it, set it in the right direction, and forcefully made it happen, were Don, Gersh, and Bruno. Don was instrumental in the development of proton-proton colliders, while Bruno and Gersh spearheaded the development of electron-positron colliders. In this brief review of the history, I will sketch the development of the concepts, the experiments, and the technological developments which made possible the development of colliders. It may look as if the emphasis is on theoretical concepts, but that is really not the case, for in this field -- the physics of beams -- the theory and experiment go hand in hand; theoretical understanding and advances are almost always motivated by the need to explain experimental results or the desire to construct better experimental devices.

  3. Reading Recovery Program Evaluation. Report 1992-93.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Salinas, Analida; And Others

    A study evaluated the effectiveness of the first two years of the Reading Recovery program at the McAllen Independent School District, Texas. Thirteen campuses participated in the first year (1991-92) while 16 campuses participated in 1993. In addition, the Literacy Program, designed to expand the positive effects of Reading Recovery strategies in…

  4. Economic Development Program Funding Plan: 1992-93.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stanley, Pat; Prentiss, John

    In 1988, the Chancellor's Office of the California Community Colleges (CCC) established an Economic Development Program (EDP) to support community colleges' efforts to provide education, training, and technical services to business and industry. The EDP's mission was to establish model programs, demonstration projects, and college/business…

  5. Hydrodynamic measurements in Suisun Bay, California, 1992-93

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Gartner, Jeffrey W.; Burau, Jon R.

    1999-01-01

    Sea level, velocity, temperature, and salinity (conductivity and temperature) data collected in Suisun Bay, California, from December 11, 1992, through May 31, 1993, by the U.S. Geological Survey are documented in this report. Sea-level data were collected at four locations and temperature and salinity data were collected at seven locations. Velocity data were collected at three locations using acoustic Doppler current profilers and at four other locations using point velocity meters. Sea-level and velocity data are presented in three forms (1) harmonic analysis results, (2) time-series plots (sea level, current speed, and current direction versus time), and (3) time-series plots of the low-pass filtered data. Temperature and salinity data are presented as plots of raw and low-pass filtered time series. The velocity and salinity data collected during this study document a period when the residual current patterns and salt field were significantly altered by large Delta outflow (three peaks in excess of 2,000 cubic meters per second). Residual current profiles were consistently seaward with magnitudes that fluctuated primarily in concert with Delta outflow and secondarily with the spring-neap tide cycle. The freshwater inputs advected salinity seaward of Suisun Bay for most of this study. Except for a 10-day period at the beginning of the study, dynamically significant salinities (>2) were seaward of Suisun Bay, which resulted in little or no gravitational circulation transport.

  6. Citrus County Professional Orientation Program, 1992-93.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Citrus County Board of Public Instruction, Inverness, FL.

    The Citrus County (Florida) Professional Orientation Program is designed to increase student learning by providing a set of supervised support services for teachers in the first year(s) of teaching that will assist them in their continuing professional development. The program provides for the development, demonstration, and documentation of…

  7. Project Familia. Final Evaluation Report, 1992-93. OREA Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Clarke, Candice

    Project Familia was an Elementary and Secondary Education Act Title VII funded project that, in the year covered by this evaluation, served 41 special education students of limited English proficiency (LEP) from 5 schools, with the participation of 54 parents and 33 siblings. Participating students received English language enrichment and…

  8. Arts Partners Program Report 1992-93. OER Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ficklen, Frances

    Four case studies were conducted to evaluate the Arts Partners project, an umbrella program which brings together schools and art agencies who hire professional writers, artists, dancers, and musicians to hold 10-week residencies with students. The four schools, chosen randomly, included three elementary schools--one in upper Manhattan, one in the…

  9. Project Aprendizaje. Final Evaluation Report 1992-93.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Clark, Andrew

    This report provides evaluative information regarding the effectiveness of Project Aprendizaje, a New York City program that served 269 Spanish-speaking students of limited English proficiency (LEP). The project promoted parent and community involvement by sponsoring cultural events, such as a large Latin American festival. Students developed…

  10. A Guide to Delegate Participation, 1992-93.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Muldoon, James P., Jr., Ed.

    This publication is designed to help students prepare for participation in Model United Nations activities. A Model U.N. conference simulates the activities of a United Nations body, usually the Security Council or the General Assembly and its committees. Participants assume the roles of representatives of Member States to the United Nations…

  11. The Muon Collider

    SciTech Connect

    Zisman, Michael S

    2010-05-17

    We describe the scientific motivation for a new type of accelerator, the muon collider. This accelerator would permit an energy-frontier scientific program and yet would fit on the site of an existing laboratory. Such a device is quite challenging, and requires a substantial R&D program. After describing the ingredients of the facility, the ongoing R&D activities of the Muon Accelerator Program are discussed. A possible U.S. scenario that could lead to a muon collider at Fermilab is briefly mentioned.

  12. The Muon Collider

    SciTech Connect

    Zisman, Michael S.

    2011-01-05

    We describe the scientific motivation for a new type of accelerator, the muon collider. This accelerator would permit an energy-frontier scientific program and yet would fit on the site of an existing laboratory. Such a device is quite challenging, and requires a substantial R&D program. After describing the ingredients of the facility, the ongoing R&D activities of the Muon Accelerator Program are discussed. A possible U.S. scenario that could lead to a muon collider at Fermilab is briefly mentioned.

  13. From the LHC to Future Colliders

    SciTech Connect

    De Roeck, A.; Ellis, J.; Grojean, C.; Heinemeyer, S.; Jakobs, K.; Weiglein, G.; Azuelos, G.; Dawson, S.; Gripaios, B.; Han, T.; Hewett, J.; Lancaster, M.; Mariotti, C.; Moortgat, F.; Moortgat-Pick, G.; Polesello, G.; Riemann, S.; Assamagan, K.; Bechtle, P.; Carena, M.; Chachamis, G.; /more authors..

    2010-06-11

    Discoveries at the LHC will soon set the physics agenda for future colliders. This report of a CERN Theory Institute includes the summaries of Working Groups that reviewed the physics goals and prospects of LHC running with 10 to 300 fb{sup -1} of integrated luminosity, of the proposed sLHC luminosity upgrade, of the ILC, of CLIC, of the LHeC and of a muon collider. The four Working Groups considered possible scenarios for the first 10 fb{sup -1} of data at the LHC in which (i) a state with properties that are compatible with a Higgs boson is discovered, (ii) no such state is discovered either because the Higgs properties are such that it is difficult to detect or because no Higgs boson exists, (iii) a missing-energy signal beyond the Standard Model is discovered as in some supersymmetric models, and (iv) some other exotic signature of new physics is discovered. In the contexts of these scenarios, theWorking Groups reviewed the capabilities of the future colliders to study in more detail whatever new physics may be discovered by the LHC. Their reports provide the particle physics community with some tools for reviewing the scientific priorities for future colliders after the LHC produces its first harvest of new physics from multi-TeV collisions.

  14. Hadron collider physics

    SciTech Connect

    Pondrom, L.

    1991-10-03

    An introduction to the techniques of analysis of hadron collider events is presented in the context of the quark-parton model. Production and decay of W and Z intermediate vector bosons are used as examples. The structure of the Electroweak theory is outlined. Three simple FORTRAN programs are introduced, to illustrate Monte Carlo calculation techniques. 25 refs.

  15. High energy colliders

    SciTech Connect

    Palmer, R.B.; Gallardo, J.C.

    1997-02-01

    The authors consider the high energy physics advantages, disadvantages and luminosity requirements of hadron (pp, p{anti p}), lepton (e{sup +}e{sup {minus}}, {mu}{sup +}{mu}{sup {minus}}) and photon-photon colliders. Technical problems in obtaining increased energy in each type of machine are presented. The machines relative size are also discussed.

  16. High luminosity particle colliders

    SciTech Connect

    Palmer, R.B.; Gallardo, J.C.

    1997-03-01

    The authors consider the high energy physics advantages, disadvantages and luminosity requirements of hadron (pp, p{anti p}), lepton (e{sup +}e{sup {minus}}, {mu}{sup +}{mu}{sup {minus}}) and photon-photon colliders. Technical problems in obtaining increased energy in each type of machine are presented. The machines relative size are also discussed.

  17. Introductory Lectures on Collider Physics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tait, Tim M. P.; Wang, Lian-Tao

    2013-12-01

    These are elementary lectures about collider physics. They are aimed at graduate students who have some background in computing Feynman diagrams and the Standard Model, but assume no particular sophistication with the physics of high energy colliders.

  18. Accelarators, Colliders and Their Application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilson, E.

    This document is part of Subvolume C 'Accelerators and Colliders' of Volume 21 'Elementary Particles' of Landolt-Börnstein - Group I 'Elementary Particles, Nuclei and Atoms'. It contains the Chapter '1 Accelarators, Colliders and Their Application' with the content:

  19. RHIC Polarized proton performance in run-8

    SciTech Connect

    Montag,C.; Bai, M.; MacKay, W.W.; Roser, T.; Abreu, N.; Ahrens, L.; Barton, D.; Beebe-Wang, J.; Blaskiewicz, M.; Brennan, J.M.; Brown, K.A.; Bruno, D.; Bunce, G.; Calaga, R.; Cameron, P.; Connolly, R.; D'Ottavio, T.; Drees, A.; Fedotov, A.V.; Fischer, W.; Ganetis, G.; Gardner, C.; Glenn, J.; Hayes, T.; Huang, H.; Ingrassia, P.; Kayran, D.A.; Kewisch, J.; Lee, R.C.; Lin, F.; Litvinenko, V.N.; Luccio, A.U.; Luo, Y.; Makdisi, Y.; Malitsky, N.; Marr, G.; Marusic, A.; Michnoff, R.; Morris, J.; Oerter, B.; Pilat, F.; Pile, P.; Robert-Demolaize, G.; Russo, T.; Satogata, T.; Schultheiss, C.; Sivertz, M.; Smith, K.; Tepikian, S.; D. Trbojevic, D.; Tsoupas, N.; Tuozzolo, J.; Zaltsman, A.; Zelenski, A.; Zeno, K.; Zhang, S.Y.

    2008-10-06

    During Run-8, the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) provided collisions of spin-polarized proton beams at two interaction regions. Physics data were taken with vertical orientation of the beam polarization, which in the 'Yellow' RHIC ring was significantly lower than in previous years. We present recent developments and improvements as well as the luminosity and polarization performance achieved during Run-8, and we discuss possible causes of the not as high as previously achieved polarization performance of the 'Yellow' ring.

  20. RHIC polarized proton performance in run-8.

    SciTech Connect

    Montag,C.; Abreu, N.; Ahrens, L.; Bai, M.; Barton, D.; et al.

    2008-06-23

    During Run-8, the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) provided collisions of spin-polarized proton beams at two interaction regions. Helical spin rotators at these two interaction regions were used to control the spin orientation of both beams at the collision points. Physics data were taken with different orientations of the beam polarization. We present recent developments and improvements as well as the luminosity and polarization performance achieved during Run-8.

  1. The Ssart of Run II at CDF

    SciTech Connect

    Marco Rescigno

    2002-10-29

    After a hiatus of almost 6 years and an extensive upgrade, Tevatron, the world largest proton-antiproton collider, has resumed the operation for the so called RUN II. In this paper we give a brief overview of the many new features of the Tevatron complex and of the upgraded CDF experiment, and show the presently achieved detector performances as well as highlights of the RUN II physics program in the beauty and electroweak sector.

  2. Accelerators, Colliders, and Snakes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Courant, Ernest D.

    2003-12-01

    The author traces his involvement in the evolution of particle accelerators over the past 50 years. He participated in building the first billion-volt accelerator, the Brookhaven Cosmotron, which led to the introduction of the "strong-focusing" method that has in turn led to the very large accelerators and colliders of the present day. The problems of acceleration of spin-polarized protons are also addressed, with discussions of depolarizing resonances and "Siberian snakes" as a technique for mitigating these resonances.

  3. Bouncing and Colliding Branes

    SciTech Connect

    Lehners, Jean-Luc

    2007-11-20

    In a braneworld description of our universe, we must allow for the possibility of having dynamical branes around the time of the big bang. Some properties of such domain walls in motion are discussed here, for example the ability of negative-tension domain walls to bounce off spacetime singularities and the consequences for cosmological perturbations. In this context, we will also review a colliding branes solution of heterotic M-theory that has been proposed as a model for early universe cosmology.

  4. Small t physics at the Tevatron Collider

    SciTech Connect

    Bertani, M.; Giacomalli, G.; Maleyran, R.; Manarin, A.; Amos, N.; DeSalvo, R.; Baker, W.; Ellsworth, R.; Dimitroyannis, D.; Block, M.

    1987-05-11

    The first physics run of the superconducting Tevatron Collider at Fermilab ended this morning. A status report will be presented on the progress of the small angle elastic scattering and total cross section experiment, E710. The goals of this experiment are to measure the total proton-antiproton cross section from ..sqrt..s = 300 to 2000 GeV, the slope of the diffraction peak and rho, the ratio of the real to imaginary part of the forward scattering amplitude, at these energies. 1 ref., 8 figs.

  5. Signatures for Majorana neutrinos at hadron colliders.

    PubMed

    Han, Tao; Zhang, Bin

    2006-10-27

    The Majorana nature of neutrinos may only be experimentally verified via lepton-number violating processes involving charged leptons. We explore the Delta L = 2 like-sign dilepton production at hadron colliders to search for signals of Majorana neutrinos. We find significant sensitivity for resonant production of a Majorana neutrino in the mass range of 10-80 GeV at the current run of the Tevatron with 2 fb(-1) integrated luminosity and in the range of 10-400 GeV at the CERN LHC with 100 fb(-1).

  6. Muon colliders and neutrino factories

    SciTech Connect

    Geer, S.; /Fermilab

    2010-09-01

    Over the last decade there has been significant progress in developing the concepts and technologies needed to produce, capture and accelerate {Omicron}(10{sup 21}) muons/year. This development prepares the way for a new type of neutrino source (Neutrino Factory) and a new type of very high energy lepton-antilepton collider (Muon Collider). This article reviews the motivation, design and R&D for Neutrino Factories and Muon Colliders.

  7. Physics at a photon collider

    SciTech Connect

    Stefan Soldner-Rembold

    2002-09-30

    A Photon Collider will provide unique opportunities to study the SM Higgs boson and to determine its properties. MSSM Higgs bosons can be discovered at the Photon Collider for scenarios where they might escape detection at the LHC. As an example for the many other physics topics which can be studied at a Photon Collider, recent results on Non-Commutative Field Theories are also discussed.

  8. Muon Colliders and Neutrino Factories

    SciTech Connect

    Geer, Steve; /Fermilab

    2009-11-01

    Over the past decade, there has been significant progress in developing the concepts and technologies needed to produce, capture, and accelerate {Omicron}(10{sup 21}) muons per year. These developments have paved the way for a new type of neutrino source (neutrino factory) and a new type of very high energy lepton-antilepton collider (muon collider). This article reviews the motivation, design, and research and development for future neutrino factories and muon colliders.

  9. Photon and jet physics at the Collider Detector at Fermilab

    SciTech Connect

    J. Dittmann

    2002-10-25

    We summarize recent Run 1 photon and jet measurements from p{bar b} collisions at {radical}s = 0.63 TeV and 1.8 TeV using data collected at the Collider Detector at Fermilab (CDF). First Run 2 results at {radical}s = 1.96 TeV are also presented together with predictions of the kinematic reach accessible with 15 fb{sup -1} of Run 2 data. Data are compared to the predictions of Quantum Chromodynamics (QCD).

  10. Tracking at CDF: algorithms and experience from Run I and Run II

    SciTech Connect

    Snider, F.D.; /Fermilab

    2005-10-01

    The authors describe the tracking algorithms used during Run I and Run II by CDF at the Fermilab Tevatron Collider, covering the time from about 1992 through the present, and discuss the performance of the algorithms at high luminosity. By tracing the evolution of the detectors and algorithms, they reveal some of the successful strategies used by CDF to address the problems of tracking at high luminosities.

  11. Prospects for collider searches for dark matter with heavy quarks

    SciTech Connect

    Artoni, Giacomo; Lin, Tongyan; Penning, Bjoern; Sciolla, Gabriella; Venturini, Alessio

    2013-08-05

    We present projections for future collider searches for dark matter produced in association with bottom or top quarks. Such production channels give rise to final states with missing transverse energy and one or more b-jets. Limits are given assuming an effective scalar operator coupling dark matter to quarks, where the dedicated analysis discussed here improves significantly over a generic monojet analysis. We give updated results for an anticipated high-luminosity LHC run at 14 TeV and for a 33 TeV hadron collider.

  12. Collider Detector at Fermilab (CDF): Data from B Hadrons Research

    DOE Data Explorer

    The Collider Detector at Fermilab (CDF) is a Tevatron experiment at Fermilab. The Tevatron, a powerful particle accelerator, accelerates protons and antiprotons close to the speed of light, and then makes them collide head-on inside the CDF detector. The CDF detector is used to study the products of such collisions. The CDF Physics Group is organized into six working groups, each with a specific focus. The Bottom group studies the production and decay of B hadrons. Their public web page makes data and numerous figures available from both CDF Runs I and II.

  13. High Energy Colliders as Tools to Understand the Early Universe

    SciTech Connect

    Tait, Tim

    2008-08-16

    Cosmological observations have reached a new era of precision, and reveal many interesting and puzzling features of the Universe. I will briefly review two of the most exciting mysteries: the nature of the dark components of the Universe, and the origin of the asymmetry between matter and anti-matter. I will argue that our best hope of unraveling these questions will need to combine information from the heavens with measurements in the lab at high energy particle accelerators. The end of run II of the Tevatron, the up-coming Large Hadron Collider and proposed International Linear Collider all have great potential to help us answer these questions in the near future.

  14. Collider Signal I :. Resonance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tait, Tim M. P.

    2010-08-01

    These TASI lectures were part of the summer school in 2008 and cover the collider signal associated with resonances in models of physics beyond the Standard Model. I begin with a review of the Z boson, one of the best-studied resonances in particle physics, and review how the Breit-Wigner form of the propagator emerges in perturbation theory and discuss the narrow width approximation. I review how the LEP and SLAC experiments could use the kinematics of Z events to learn about fermion couplings to the Z. I then make a brief survey of models of physics beyond the Standard Model which predict resonances, and discuss some of the LHC observables which we can use to discover and identify the nature of the BSM physics. I finish up with a discussion of the linear moose that one can use for an effective theory description of a massive color octet vector particle.

  15. ALPs at colliders

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mimasu, Ken; Sanz, Verónica

    2015-06-01

    New pseudo-scalars, often called axion-like particles (ALPs), abound in model-building and are often associated with the breaking of a new symmetry. Traditional searches and indirect bounds are limited to light axions, typically in or below the KeV range for ALPs coupled to photons. We present collider bounds on ALPs from mono-γ, tri-γ and mono-jet searches in a model independent fashion, as well as the prospects for the LHC and future machines. We find that they are complementary to existing searches, as they are sensitive to heavier ALPs and have the capability to cover an otherwise inaccessible region of parameter space. We also show that, assuming certain model dependent correlations between the ALP coupling to photons and gluons as well as considering the validity of the effective description of ALP interactions, mono-jet searches are in fact more suitable and effective in indirectly constraining ALP scenarios.

  16. Soviet Hadron Collider

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kotchetkov, Dmitri

    2017-01-01

    Rapid growth of the high energy physics program in the USSR during 1960s-1970s culminated with a decision to build the Accelerating and Storage Complex (UNK) to carry out fixed target and colliding beam experiments. The UNK was to have three rings. One ring was to be built with conventional magnets to accelerate protons up to the energy of 600 GeV. The other two rings were to be made from superconducting magnets, each ring was supposed to accelerate protons up to the energy of 3 TeV. The accelerating rings were to be placed in an underground tunnel with a circumference of 21 km. As a 3 x 3 TeV collider, the UNK would make proton-proton collisions with a luminosity of 4 x 1034 cm-1s-1. Institute for High Energy Physics in Protvino was a project leading institution and a site of the UNK. Accelerator and detector research and development studies were commenced in the second half of 1970s. State Committee for Utilization of Atomic Energy of the USSR approved the project in 1980, and the construction of the UNK started in 1983. Political turmoil in the Soviet Union during late 1980s and early 1990s resulted in disintegration of the USSR and subsequent collapse of the Russian economy. As a result of drastic reduction of funding for the UNK, in 1993 the project was restructured to be a 600 GeV fixed target accelerator only. While the ring tunnel and proton injection line were completed by 1995, and 70% of all magnets and associated accelerator equipment were fabricated, lack of Russian federal funding for high energy physics halted the project at the end of 1990s.

  17. Hadron collider physics at UCR

    SciTech Connect

    Kernan, A.; Shen, B.C.

    1997-07-01

    This paper describes the research work in high energy physics by the group at the University of California, Riverside. Work has been divided between hadron collider physics and e{sup +}-e{sup {minus}} collider physics, and theoretical work. The hadron effort has been heavily involved in the startup activities of the D-Zero detector, commissioning and ongoing redesign. The lepton collider work has included work on TPC/2{gamma} at PEP and the OPAL detector at LEP, as well as efforts on hadron machines.

  18. Physics at future hadron colliders

    SciTech Connect

    U. Baur et al.

    2002-12-23

    We discuss the physics opportunities and detector challenges at future hadron colliders. As guidelines for energies and luminosities we use the proposed luminosity and/or energy upgrade of the LHC (SLHC), and the Fermilab design of a Very Large Hadron Collider (VLHC). We illustrate the physics capabilities of future hadron colliders for a variety of new physics scenarios (supersymmetry, strong electroweak symmetry breaking, new gauge bosons, compositeness and extra dimensions). We also investigate the prospects of doing precision Higgs physics studies at such a machine, and list selected Standard Model physics rates.

  19. When Black Holes Collide

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baker, John

    2010-01-01

    Among the fascinating phenomena predicted by General Relativity, Einstein's theory of gravity, black holes and gravitational waves, are particularly important in astronomy. Though once viewed as a mathematical oddity, black holes are now recognized as the central engines of many of astronomy's most energetic cataclysms. Gravitational waves, though weakly interacting with ordinary matter, may be observed with new gravitational wave telescopes, opening a new window to the universe. These observations promise a direct view of the strong gravitational dynamics involving dense, often dark objects, such as black holes. The most powerful of these events may be merger of two colliding black holes. Though dark, these mergers may briefly release more energy that all the stars in the visible universe, in gravitational waves. General relativity makes precise predictions for the gravitational-wave signatures of these events, predictions which we can now calculate with the aid of supercomputer simulations. These results provide a foundation for interpreting expect observations in the emerging field of gravitational wave astronomy.

  20. QCD at collider energies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nicolaidis, A.; Bordes, G.

    1986-05-01

    We examine available experimental distributions of transverse energy and transverse momentum, obtained at the CERN pp¯ collider, in the context of quantum chromodynamics. We consider the following. (i) The hadronic transverse energy released during W+/- production. This hadronic transverse energy is made out of two components: a soft component which we parametrize using minimum-bias events and a semihard component which we calculate from QCD. (ii) The transverse momentum of the produced W+/-. If the transverse momentum (or the transverse energy) results from a single gluon jet we use the formalism of Dokshitzer, Dyakonov, and Troyan, while if it results from multiple-gluon emission we use the formalism of Parisi and Petronzio. (iii) The relative transverse momentum of jets. While for W+/- production quarks play an essential role, jet production at moderate pT and present energies is dominated by gluon-gluon scattering and therefore we can study the Sudakov form factor of the gluon. We suggest also how through a Hankel transform of experimental data we can have direct access to the Sudakov form factors of quarks and gluons.

  1. A 233 km Tunnel for Lepton and Hadron Colliders

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Summers, D. J.; Cremaldi, L. M.; Datta, A.; Duraisamy, M.; Luo, T.; Lyons, G. T.

    2012-07-01

    A decade ago, a cost analysis was conducted to bore a 233 km circumference Very Large Hadron Collider (VLHC) tunnel passing through Fermilab. Here we outline implementations of $e^+e^-$, $p \\bar{p}$, and $\\mu^+ \\mu^-$ collider rings in this tunnel using recent technological innovations. The 240 and 500 GeV $e^+e^-$ colliders employ Crab Waist Crossings, ultra low emittance damped bunches, short vertical IP focal lengths, superconducting RF, and low coercivity, grain oriented silicon steel/concrete dipoles. Some details are also provided for a high luminosity 240 GeV $e^+ e^-$ collider and 1.75 TeV muon accelerator in a Fermilab site filler tunnel. The 40 TeV $p \\bar{p}$ collider uses the high intensity Fermilab $\\bar{p}$ source, exploits high cross sections for $p \\bar{p}$ production of high mass states, and uses 2 Tesla ultra low carbon steel/YBCO superconducting magnets run with liquid neon. The 35 TeV muon ring ramps the 2 Tesla superconducting magnets at 9 Hz every 0.4 seconds, uses 250 GV of superconducting RF to accelerate muons from 1.75 to 17.5 TeV in 63 orbits with 71% survival, and mitigates neutrino radiation with phase shifting, roller coaster motion in a FODO lattice.

  2. A 233 km tunnel for lepton and hadron colliders

    SciTech Connect

    Summers, D. J.; Cremaldi, L. M.; Datta, A.; Duraisamy, M.; Luo, T.; Lyons, G. T.

    2012-12-21

    A decade ago, a cost analysis was conducted to bore a 233 km circumference Very Large Hadron Collider (VLHC) tunnel passing through Fermilab. Here we outline implementations of e{sup +}e{sup -}, pp-bar , and {mu}{sup +}{mu}{sup -} collider rings in this tunnel using recent technological innovations. The 240 and 500 GeV e{sup +}e{sup -} colliders employ Crab Waist Crossings, ultra low emittance damped bunches, short vertical IP focal lengths, superconducting RF, and low coercivity, grain oriented silicon steel/concrete dipoles. Some details are also provided for a high luminosity 240 GeV e{sup +}e{sup -} collider and 1.75 TeV muon accelerator in a Fermilab site filler tunnel. The 40 TeV pp-bar collider uses the high intensity Fermilab p-bar source, exploits high cross sections for pp-bar production of high mass states, and uses 2 Tesla ultra low carbon steel/YBCO superconducting magnets run with liquid neon. The 35 TeV muon ring ramps the 2 Tesla superconducting magnets at 9 Hz every 0.4 seconds, uses 250 GV of superconducting RF to accelerate muons from 1.75 to 17.5 TeV in 63 orbits with 71% survival, and mitigates neutrino radiation with phase shifting, roller coaster motion in a FODO lattice.

  3. Type II seesaw model and multilepton signatures at hadron colliders

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mitra, Manimala; Niyogi, Saurabh; Spannowsky, Michael

    2017-02-01

    We investigate multilepton signatures, arising from the decays of doubly charged and singly charged Higgs bosons in the Type II seesaw model. Depending on the vacuum expectation value of the triplet vΔ , the doubly and singly charged Higgs bosons can decay into a large variety of multilepton final states. We explore all possible decay modes corresponding to different regimes of vΔ that generate distinguishing four and five leptonic signatures. We focus on the 13 TeV Large Hadron Collider (LHC) and further extend the study to a very high energy proton-proton collider (VLHC) with a center-of-mass energy of 100 TeV. We find that a doubly charged Higgs boson of masses around 375 GeV can be discovered at immediate LHC runs. A heavier mass of 630 GeV can instead be discovered at the high-luminosity run of the LHC or at the VLHC with 30 fb-1 .

  4. Beam Rounders for Circular Colliders

    SciTech Connect

    A. Burov; S. Nagaitsev; Ya. Derbenev

    2001-07-01

    By means of linear optics, an arbitrary uncoupled beam can be locally transformed into a round (rotation-invariant) state and then back. This provides an efficient way to round beams in the interaction region of circular colliders.

  5. Beam rounders for circular colliders

    SciTech Connect

    A. Burov and S. Nagaitsev

    2002-12-10

    By means of linear optics, an arbitrary uncoupled beam can be locally transformed into a round (rotation-invariant) state and then back. This provides an efficient way to round beams in the interaction region of circular colliders.

  6. Physicists dream of supersized collider

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hao, Cindy

    2015-12-01

    Particle physicists in China are hopeful that the Chinese government will allocate 1 billion yuan (about £104m) to design what would be the world's largest particle accelerator - the Circular Electron Positron Collider (CEPC).

  7. CDF - Run II Status and Prospects

    SciTech Connect

    Manfred Paulini

    2003-03-17

    After a five year upgrade period, the CDF detector located at the Fermilab Tevatron Collider is back in operation taking high quality data with all subsystems functional. We report on the status of the CDF experiment in Run II and discuss the start-up of the Tevatron accelerator. First physics results from CDF are presented. We also discuss the prospects for B physics in RunII, in particular the measurements of B{sub S}{sup 0} flavour oscillations and CP violation in B decays.

  8. Positron sources for Linear Colliders

    SciTech Connect

    Gai Wei; Liu Wanming

    2009-09-02

    Positron beams have many applications and there are many different concepts for positron sources. In this paper, only positron source techniques for linear colliders are covered. In order to achieve high luminosity, a linear collider positron source should have a high beam current, high beam energy, small emittance and, for some applications, a high degree of beam polarization. There are several different schemes presently being developed around the globe. Both the differences between these schemes and their common technical challenges are discussed.

  9. Muon muon collider: Feasibility study

    SciTech Connect

    1996-06-18

    A feasibility study is presented of a 2 + 2 TeV muon collider with a luminosity of L = 10{sup 35} cm{sup {minus}2} s{sup {minus}1}. The resulting design is not optimized for performance, and certainly not for cost; however, it does suffice--the authors believe--to allow them to make a credible case, that a muon collider is a serious possibility for particle physics and, therefore, worthy of R and D support so that the reality of, and interest in, a muon collider can be better assayed. The goal of this support would be to completely assess the physics potential and to evaluate the cost and development of the necessary technology. The muon collider complex consists of components which first produce copious pions, then capture the pions and the resulting muons from their decay; this is followed by an ionization cooling channel to reduce the longitudinal and transverse emittance of the muon beam. The next stage is to accelerate the muons and, finally, inject them into a collider ring which has a small beta function at the colliding point. This is the first attempt at a point design and it will require further study and optimization. Experimental work will be needed to verify the validity of diverse crucial elements in the design.

  10. Mass reach scaling for future hadron colliders

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rizzo, Thomas G.

    2015-04-01

    The primary goal of any future hadron collider is to discover new physics (NP) associated with a high mass scale, , beyond the range of the LHC. In order to maintain the same relative mass reach for rate-limited NP, , as increases, Richter recently reminded us that the required integrated luminosity obtainable at future hadron colliders (FHC) must grow rapidly, , in the limit of naive scaling. This would imply, e.g., a 50-fold increase in the required integrated luminosity when going from the 14 TeV LHC to a FHC with TeV, an increase that would prove quite challenging on many different fronts. In this paper we point out, due to the scaling violations associated with the evolution of the parton density functions (PDFs) and the running of the strong coupling, , that the actual luminosity necessary in order to maintain any fixed value of the relative mass reach is somewhat greater than this scaling result indicates. However, the actual values of the required luminosity scaling are found to be dependent upon the detailed nature of the NP being considered. Here we elucidate this point explicitly by employing several specific benchmark examples of possible NP scenarios and briefly discuss the (relatively weak) search impact in each case if these luminosity goals are not met.

  11. Supersymmetry searches at the Collider Detector at Fermilab

    SciTech Connect

    D. Tsybychev

    2001-12-28

    This article presents the current experimental results of searches for Supersymmetry (SUSY) at the Collider Detector at Fermilab (CDF), using over 110 pb{sup -1} of proton-antiproton collision data with {radical}s = 1800 GeV collected during the period 1992-1995. Since no signal was found, limits on the production of supersymmetric particles are derived. The prospects for supersymmetry searches at Run II of the Tevatron, that began in March 2001, are also discussed here.

  12. A Photon Collider Experiment based on SLC

    SciTech Connect

    Gronberg, J

    2003-11-01

    Technology for a photon collider experiment at a future TeV-scale linear collider has been under development for many years. The laser and optics technology has reached the point where a GeV-scale photon collider experiment is now feasible. We report on the photon-photon luminosities that would be achievable at a photon collider experiment based on a refurbished Stanford Linear Collider.

  13. Muon Collider Task Force Report

    SciTech Connect

    Ankenbrandt, C.; Alexahin, Y.; Balbekov, V.; Barzi, E.; Bhat, C.; Broemmelsiek, D.; Bross, A.; Burov, A.; Drozhdin, A.; Finley, D.; Geer, S.; /Fermilab /Argonne /Brookhaven /Jefferson Lab /LBL, Berkeley /MUONS Inc., Batavia /UCLA /UC, Riverside /Mississippi U.

    2007-12-01

    Muon Colliders offer a possible long term path to lepton-lepton collisions at center-of-mass energies {radical}s {ge} 1 TeV. In October 2006 the Muon Collider Task Force (MCTF) proposed a program of advanced accelerator R&D aimed at developing the Muon Collider concept. The proposed R&D program was motivated by progress on Muon Collider design in general, and in particular, by new ideas that have emerged on muon cooling channel design. The scope of the proposed MCTF R&D program includes muon collider design studies, helical cooling channel design and simulation, high temperature superconducting solenoid studies, an experimental program using beams to test cooling channel RF cavities and a 6D cooling demonstration channel. The first year of MCTF activities are summarized in this report together with a brief description of the anticipated FY08 R&D activities. In its first year the MCTF has made progress on (1) Muon Collider ring studies, (2) 6D cooling channel design and simulation studies with an emphasis on the HCC scheme, (3) beam preparations for the first HPRF cavity beam test, (4) preparations for an HCC four-coil test, (5) further development of the MANX experiment ideas and studies of the muon beam possibilities at Fermilab, (6) studies of how to integrate RF into an HCC in preparation for a component development program, and (7) HTS conductor and magnet studies to prepare for an evaluation of the prospects for of an HTS high-field solenoid build for a muon cooling channel.

  14. Recent results from hadron colliders

    SciTech Connect

    Frisch, H.J. )

    1990-12-10

    This is a summary of some of the many recent results from the CERN and Fermilab colliders, presented for an audience of nuclear, medium-energy, and elementary particle physicists. The topics are jets and QCD at very high energies, precision measurements of electroweak parameters, the remarkably heavy top quark, and new results on the detection of the large flux of B mesons produced at these machines. A summary and some comments on the bright prospects for the future of hadron colliders conclude the talk. 39 refs., 44 figs., 3 tabs.

  15. Particle Physics after the Higgs-Boson Discovery: Opportunities for the Large Hadron Collider

    SciTech Connect

    Quigg, Chris

    2015-08-24

    The first run of the Large Hadron Collider at CERN brought the discovery of the Higgs boson, an apparently elementary scalar particle with a mass of 125 GeV, the avatar of the mechanism that hides the electroweak symmetry. Then, a new round of experimentation is beginning, with the energy of the proton–proton colliding beams raised to 6.5 TeV per beam, from 4 TeV at the end of the first run. I summarize what we have learned about the Higgs boson, and calls attention to some issues that will be among our central concerns in the near future.

  16. Muon Muon Collider: Feasibility Study

    SciTech Connect

    Gallardo, J.C.; Palmer, R.B.; Tollestrup, A.V.; Sessler, A.M.; Skrinsky, A.N.; Ankenbrandt, C.; Geer, S.; Griffin, J.; Johnstone, C.; Lebrun, P.; McInturff, A.; Mills, Frederick E.; Mokhov, N.; Moretti, A.; Neuffer, D.; Ng, K.Y.; Noble, R.; Novitski, I.; Popovic, M.; Qian, C.; Van Ginneken, A. /Fermilab /Brookhaven /Wisconsin U., Madison /Tel Aviv U. /Indiana U. /UCLA /LBL, Berkeley /SLAC /Argonne /Sobolev IM, Novosibirsk /UC, Davis /Munich, Tech. U. /Virginia U. /KEK, Tsukuba /DESY /Novosibirsk, IYF /Jefferson Lab /Mississippi U. /SUNY, Stony Brook /MIT /Columbia U. /Fairfield U. /UC, Berkeley

    2012-04-05

    A feasibility study is presented of a 2 + 2 TeV muon collider with a luminosity of L = 10{sup 35} cm{sup -2}s{sup -1}. The resulting design is not optimized for performance, and certainly not for cost; however, it does suffice - we believe - to allow us to make a credible case, that a muon collider is a serious possibility for particle physics and, therefore, worthy of R and D support so that the reality of, and interest in, a muon collider can be better assayed. The goal of this support would be to completely assess the physics potential and to evaluate the cost and development of the necessary technology. The muon collider complex consists of components which first produce copious pions, then capture the pions and the resulting muons from their decay; this is followed by an ionization cooling channel to reduce the longitudinal and transverse emittance of the muon beam. The next stage is to accelerate the muons and, finally, inject them into a collider ring wich has a small beta function at the colliding point. This is the first attempt at a point design and it will require further study and optimization. Experimental work will be needed to verify the validity of diverse crucial elements in the design. Muons because of their large mass compared to an electron, do not produce significant synchrotron radiation. As a result there is negligible beamstrahlung and high energy collisions are not limited by this phenomena. In addition, muons can be accelerated in circular devices which will be considerably smaller than two full-energy linacs as required in an e{sup +} - e{sup -} collider. A hadron collider would require a CM energy 5 to 10 times higher than 4 TeV to have an equivalent energy reach. Since the accelerator size is limited by the strength of bending magnets, the hadron collider for the same physics reach would have to be much larger than the muon collider. In addition, muon collisions should be cleaner than hadron collisions. There are many detailed particle

  17. Muon Colliders: The Next Frontier

    ScienceCinema

    Tourun, Yagmur [Illinois Institute of Technology, Chicago, Illinois, United States

    2016-07-12

    Muon Colliders provide a path to the energy frontier in particle physics but have been regarded to be "at least 20 years away" for 20 years. I will review recent progress in design studies and hardware R&D and show that a Muon Collider can be established as a real option for the post-LHC era if the current vigorous R&D effort revitalized by the Muon Collider Task Force at Fermilab can be supported to its conclusion. All critical technologies are being addressed and no show-stoppers have emerged. Detector backgrounds have been studied in detail and appear to be manageable and the physics can be done with existing detector technology. A muon facility can be built through a staged scenario starting from a low-energy muon source with unprecedented intensity for exquisite reach for rare processes, followed by a Neutrino Factory with ultrapure neutrino beams with unparalleled sensitivity for disentangling neutrino mixing, leading to an energy frontier Muon Collider with excellent energy resolution.

  18. The very large hadron collider

    SciTech Connect

    1998-09-01

    This paper reviews the purposes to be served by a very large hadron collider and the organization and coordination of efforts to bring it about. There is some discussion of magnet requirements and R&D and the suitability of the Fermilab site.

  19. B physics at hadron colliders

    SciTech Connect

    Butler, J.N.; /Fermilab

    2005-09-01

    This paper discusses the physics opportunity and challenges for doing high precision B physics experiments at hadron colliders. It describes how these challenges have been addressed by the two currently operating experiments, CDF and D0, and how they are addressed by three experiments, ATLAS, CMS, and LHCb, at the LHC.

  20. Dr. Sheehan on Running.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sheehan, George A.

    This book is both a personal and technical account of the experience of running by a heart specialist who began a running program at the age of 45. In its seventeen chapters, there is information presented on the spiritual, psychological, and physiological results of running; treatment of athletic injuries resulting from running; effects of diet…

  1. Physics at high energy photon photon colliders

    SciTech Connect

    Chanowitz, M.S.

    1994-06-01

    I review the physic prospects for high energy photon photon colliders, emphasizing results presented at the LBL Gamma Gamma Collider Workshop. Advantages and difficulties are reported for studies of QCD, the electroweak gauge sector, supersymmetry, and electroweak symmetry breaking.

  2. Shedding Light on Dark Matter at Colliders

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mitsou, Vasiliki A.

    2013-12-01

    Dark matter remains one of the most puzzling mysteries in Fundamental Physics of our times. Experiments at high-energy physics colliders are expected to shed light to its nature and determine its properties. This review focuses on recent searches for dark matter signatures at the Large Hadron Collider, also discussing related prospects in future e+e- colliders.

  3. Future Electron-Hadron Colliders

    SciTech Connect

    Litvinenko, V.

    2010-05-23

    Outstanding research potential of electron-hadron colliders (EHC) was clearly demonstrated by first - and the only - electron-proton collider HERA (DESY, Germany). Physics data from HERA revealed new previously unknown facets of Quantum Chromo-Dynamics (QCD). EHC is an ultimate microscope probing QCD in its natural environment, i.e. inside the hadrons. In contrast with hadrons, electrons are elementary particles with known initial state. Hence, scattering electrons from hadrons provides a clearest pass to their secrets. It turns EHC into an ultimate machine for high precision QCD studies and opens access to rich physics with a great discovery potential: solving proton spin puzzle, observing gluon saturation or physics beyond standard model. Access to this physics requires high-energy high-luminosity EHCs and a wide reach in the center-of-mass (CM) energies. This paper gives a brief overview of four proposed electron-hadron colliders: ENC at GSI (Darmstadt, Germany), ELIC/MEIC at TJNAF (Newport News, VA, USA), eRHIC at BNL (Upton, NY, USA) and LHeC at CERN (Geneva, Switzerland). Future electron-hadron colliders promise to deliver very rich physics not only in the quantity but also in the precision. They are aiming at very high luminosity two-to-four orders of magnitude beyond the luminosity demonstrated by the very successful HERA. While ENC and LHeC are on opposite side of the energy spectrum, eRHIC and ELIC are competing for becoming an electron-ion collider (EIC) in the U.S. Administrations of BNL and Jlab, in concert with US DoE office of Nuclear Physics, work on the strategy for down-selecting between eRHIC and ELIC. The ENC, EIC and LHeC QCD physics programs to a large degree are complimentary to each other and to the LHC physics. In last decade, an Electron Ion Collider (EIC) collaboration held about 25 collaboration meetings to develop physics program for EIC with CM energy {approx}100 GeV. One of these meetings was held at GSI, where ENC topic was in the

  4. COLLIDE: Collisions into Dust Experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Colwell, Joshua E.

    1999-01-01

    The Collisions Into Dust Experiment (COLLIDE) was completed and flew on STS-90 in April and May of 1998. After the experiment was returned to Earth, the data and experiment were analyzed. Some anomalies occurred during the flight which prevented a complete set of data from being obtained. However, the experiment did meet its criteria for scientific success and returned surprising results on the outcomes of very low energy collisions into powder. The attached publication, "Low Velocity Microgravity Impact Experiments into Simulated Regolith," describes in detail the scientific background, engineering, and scientific results of COLLIDE. Our scientific conclusions, along with a summary of the anomalies which occurred during flight, are contained in that publication. We offer it as our final report on this grant.

  5. Polarized proton collider at RHIC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alekseev, I.; Allgower, C.; Bai, M.; Batygin, Y.; Bozano, L.; Brown, K.; Bunce, G.; Cameron, P.; Courant, E.; Erin, S.; Escallier, J.; Fischer, W.; Gupta, R.; Hatanaka, K.; Huang, H.; Imai, K.; Ishihara, M.; Jain, A.; Lehrach, A.; Kanavets, V.; Katayama, T.; Kawaguchi, T.; Kelly, E.; Kurita, K.; Lee, S. Y.; Luccio, A.; MacKay, W. W.; Mahler, G.; Makdisi, Y.; Mariam, F.; McGahern, W.; Morgan, G.; Muratore, J.; Okamura, M.; Peggs, S.; Pilat, F.; Ptitsin, V.; Ratner, L.; Roser, T.; Saito, N.; Satoh, H.; Shatunov, Y.; Spinka, H.; Syphers, M.; Tepikian, S.; Tominaka, T.; Tsoupas, N.; Underwood, D.; Vasiliev, A.; Wanderer, P.; Willen, E.; Wu, H.; Yokosawa, A.; Zelenski, A. N.

    2003-03-01

    In addition to heavy ion collisions (RHIC Design Manual, Brookhaven National Laboratory), RHIC will also collide intense beams of polarized protons (I. Alekseev, et al., Design Manual Polarized Proton Collider at RHIC, Brookhaven National Laboratory, 1998 [2]), reaching transverse energies where the protons scatter as beams of polarized quarks and gluons. The study of high energy polarized protons beams has been a long term part of the program at BNL with the development of polarized beams in the Booster and AGS rings for fixed target experiments. We have extended this capability to the RHIC machine. In this paper we describe the design and methods for achieving collisions of both longitudinal and transverse polarized protons in RHIC at energies up to s=500 GeV.

  6. Crab Cavities for Linear Colliders

    SciTech Connect

    Burt, G.; Ambattu, P.; Carter, R.; Dexter, A.; Tahir, I.; Beard, C.; Dykes, M.; Goudket, P.; Kalinin, A.; Ma, L.; McIntosh, P.; Shulte, D.; Jones, Roger M.; Bellantoni, L.; Chase, B.; Church, M.; Khabouline, T.; Latina, A.; Adolphsen, C.; Li, Z.; Seryi, Andrei; /SLAC

    2011-11-08

    Crab cavities have been proposed for a wide number of accelerators and interest in crab cavities has recently increased after the successful operation of a pair of crab cavities in KEK-B. In particular crab cavities are required for both the ILC and CLIC linear colliders for bunch alignment. Consideration of bunch structure and size constraints favour a 3.9 GHz superconducting, multi-cell cavity as the solution for ILC, whilst bunch structure and beam-loading considerations suggest an X-band copper travelling wave structure for CLIC. These two cavity solutions are very different in design but share complex design issues. Phase stabilisation, beam loading, wakefields and mode damping are fundamental issues for these crab cavities. Requirements and potential design solutions will be discussed for both colliders.

  7. ep Collider experiments and physics

    SciTech Connect

    Atwood, D.; Baur, U.; Bluemlein, J.

    1992-12-31

    The physics prospects for detectors at ep colliders are examined. Colliders considered include the HERA facility at DESY, LEP I {times} LHC, and LEP II {times} LHC at CERN. Physics topics studied include machine energy and polarization, as well as detector resolution, calibration, jet identification and backgrounds from beam-gas interactions. QCD topics include measurements of the quark and gluon structure functions and parton distributions, as well as the expansion of the observable cross section into angular functions. Electroweak topics include measurements of the weak mixing angle, radiative corrections, and WW{gamma} (WWZ) couplings. Topics beyond the standard model include observation of new Z`s, indirect production of Leptoquarks, pair production of sfermions and searches for R-parity-violating SUSY particle production.

  8. Collective accelerator for electron colliders

    SciTech Connect

    Briggs, R.J.

    1985-05-13

    A recent concept for collective acceleration and focusing of a high energy electron bunch is discussed, in the context of its possible applicability to large linear colliders in the TeV range. The scheme can be considered to be a member of the general class of two-beam accelerators, where a high current, low voltage beam produces the acceleration fields for a trailing high energy bunch.

  9. CDF Run II silicon tracking projects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sill, Alan; CDF Collaboration

    2000-06-01

    Design features, functionality, and expected performance are reviewed for the silicon charged particle track detectors to be used by the Collider Detector at Fermilab (CDF) during the upcoming Run II of the Fermilab Tevatron. The original design has been supplemented by addiition of a new layer of silicon mounted on the beam pipe that improves the vertexing performance of the combined assembly. Progress has been made in many areas of design and construction of the silicon sensors, readout electronics, and associated systems. The resulting detector array should provide substantial improvements in coverage and performance over those of previous CDF silicon vertex detectors.

  10. Luminosity limitations for Electron-Ion Collider

    SciTech Connect

    Valeri Lebedev

    2000-09-01

    The major limitations on reaching the maximum luminosity for an electron ion collider are discussed in application to the ring-ring and linac-ring colliders. It is shown that with intensive electron cooling the luminosity of 10{sup 33} cm{sup -2} s{sup -1} is feasible for both schemes for the center-of-mass collider energy above approximately 15 GeV. Each scheme has its own pros and cons. The ring-ring collider is better supported by the current accelerator technology while the linac-ring collider suggests unique features for spin manipulations of the electron beam. The article addresses a general approach to a choice of collider scheme and parameters leaving details for other conference publications dedicated to particular aspects of the ring-ring and linac-ring colliders.

  11. Scaling behavior of circular colliders dominated by synchrotron radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Talman, Richard

    2015-08-01

    The scaling formulas in this paper — many of which involve approximation — apply primarily to electron colliders like CEPC or FCC-ee. The more abstract “radiation dominated” phrase in the title is intended to encourage use of the formulas — though admittedly less precisely — to proton colliders like SPPC, for which synchrotron radiation begins to dominate the design in spite of the large proton mass. Optimizing a facility having an electron-positron Higgs factory, followed decades later by a p, p collider in the same tunnel, is a formidable task. The CEPC design study constitutes an initial “constrained parameter” collider design. Here the constrained parameters include tunnel circumference, cell lengths, phase advance per cell, etc. This approach is valuable, if the constrained parameters are self-consistent and close to optimal. Jumping directly to detailed design makes it possible to develop reliable, objective cost estimates on a rapid time scale. A scaling law formulation is intended to contribute to a “ground-up” stage in the design of future circular colliders. In this more abstract approach, scaling formulas can be used to investigate ways in which the design can be better optimized. Equally important, by solving the lattice matching equations in closed form, as contrasted with running computer programs such as MAD, one can obtain better intuition concerning the fundamental parametric dependencies. The ground-up approach is made especially appropriate by the seemingly impossible task of simultaneous optimization of tunnel circumference for both electrons and protons. The fact that both colliders will be radiation dominated actually simplifies the simultaneous optimization task. All GeV scale electron accelerators are “synchrotron radiation dominated”, meaning that all beam distributions evolve within a fraction of a second to an equilibrium state in which “heating” due to radiation fluctuations is canceled by the “cooling” in

  12. On Running and Psychotherapy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dukes, Denzel; And Others

    1980-01-01

    Frederic Leer's article "Running as an Adjunct to Psychotherapy" (January 1980 issue of this journal) is criticized by three authors. They focus on the psychological and social effects of running and its usefulness as a treatment for depressed adults. (LAB)

  13. Measurement of the Top Quark Mass with the Collider Detector at Fermilab

    SciTech Connect

    Sato, Koji

    2005-02-01

    We present a measurement of the top quark mass using tt pair creation events decaying into the lepton+jets channel in pp collisions at √s = 1.96 TeV. The data sample used in this analysis was collected with the Collider Detector at Fermilab (CDF) in Tevatron Run II during the period from March 2002 through August 2003.

  14. Biomechanics of Distance Running.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cavanagh, Peter R., Ed.

    Contributions from researchers in the field of running mechanics are included in the 13 chapters of this book. The following topics are covered: (1) "The Mechanics of Distance Running: A Historical Perspective" (Peter Cavanagh); (2) "Stride Length in Distance Running: Velocity, Body Dimensions, and Added Mass Effects" (Peter Cavanagh, Rodger…

  15. The dijet invariant mass at the Tevatron Collider

    SciTech Connect

    Giannetti, P. )

    1990-05-09

    The differential cross section of the process p + pbar {yields} jet + jet + X as a function of the dijet invariant mass has been measured with the CDF detector at a center of mass energy of 1.8 TeV at the Tevatron Collider in Fermilab. The present analysis is based on the sample of events collected in the 1988/89 run, amounting to a total integrated luminosity of 4.2 pb{sup {minus}1}. A comparison to leading order QCD and quark compositeness predictions is presented as well as a study of the sensitivity of the mass spectrum to the gluon radiation. 10 refs., 6 figs.

  16. A large hadron electron collider at CERN

    SciTech Connect

    Abelleira Fernandez, J. L.

    2015-04-06

    This document provides a brief overview of the recently published report on the design of the Large Hadron Electron Collider (LHeC), which comprises its physics programme, accelerator physics, technology and main detector concepts. The LHeC exploits and develops challenging, though principally existing, accelerator and detector technologies. This summary is complemented by brief illustrations of some of the highlights of the physics programme, which relies on a vastly extended kinematic range, luminosity and unprecedented precision in deep inelastic scattering. Illustrations are provided regarding high precision QCD, new physics (Higgs, SUSY) and eletron-ion physics. The LHeC is designed to run synchronously with the LHC in the twenties and to achieve an integrated luminosity of O(100)fb–1. It will become the cleanest high resolution microscope of mankind and will substantially extend as well as complement the investigation of the physics of the TeV energy scale, which has been enabled by the LHC.

  17. Proposal for a Bottom Collider Detector

    SciTech Connect

    Van Berg, R.; Hughes, R.; Lockyer, N. S.; Karchin, P.

    1987-03-01

    The ultimate goal of this experiment is to record about 100 million bottom events tagged with a lepton trigger. It is only with a sample of this size that CP violation and very rare decays from bottom can be studied. In order to produce 109 bottom events an integrated luminosity of 500 pb-1 is needed, which could be accomplished in a one year run of 107 sec at a luminosity of 5 x 1031 cm-2sec-1, assuming a total bottom cross section of 10 μbarns. With a trigger efficiency of about 10 percent, the goal of about 108 bottom events recorded seems attainable. Having produced and recorded this large data set, the task of reconstructing these events and extracting physics will be a tremendous challenge to the detector design and physicists involved. This experiment begins the process of how t,o best tag a very large sample of bottom events in a high energy hadron collider environment. The most challenging aspects concern studying the secondary vertices when multiple scattering effects are large and detecting very soft leptons in a busy tracking environment. This will lead to a better exploitation of the high luminosity Tevatron as well as eventually preparing for the SSC.

  18. A large hadron electron collider at CERN

    DOE PAGES

    Abelleira Fernandez, J. L.

    2015-04-06

    This document provides a brief overview of the recently published report on the design of the Large Hadron Electron Collider (LHeC), which comprises its physics programme, accelerator physics, technology and main detector concepts. The LHeC exploits and develops challenging, though principally existing, accelerator and detector technologies. This summary is complemented by brief illustrations of some of the highlights of the physics programme, which relies on a vastly extended kinematic range, luminosity and unprecedented precision in deep inelastic scattering. Illustrations are provided regarding high precision QCD, new physics (Higgs, SUSY) and eletron-ion physics. The LHeC is designed to run synchronously withmore » the LHC in the twenties and to achieve an integrated luminosity of O(100)fb–1. It will become the cleanest high resolution microscope of mankind and will substantially extend as well as complement the investigation of the physics of the TeV energy scale, which has been enabled by the LHC.« less

  19. Colliding with a crunching bubble

    SciTech Connect

    Freivogel, Ben; Freivogel, Ben; Horowitz, Gary T.; Shenker, Stephen

    2007-03-26

    In the context of eternal inflation we discuss the fate of Lambda = 0 bubbles when they collide with Lambda< 0 crunching bubbles. When the Lambda = 0 bubble is supersymmetric, it is not completely destroyed by collisions. If the domain wall separating the bubbles has higher tension than the BPS bound, it is expelled from the Lambda = 0 bubble and does not alter its long time behavior. If the domain wall saturates the BPS bound, then it stays inside the Lambda = 0 bubble and removes a finite fraction of future infinity. In this case, the crunch singularity is hidden behind the horizon of a stable hyperbolic black hole.

  20. Stability of colliding ion beams

    SciTech Connect

    Foote, E.A.; Kulsrud, R.M.

    1980-11-01

    We determine conditions for stability of two identical colliding ion beams in the presence of neutralizing electrons, but no background ions. Such a situation is envisioned for the Counterstreaming Ion Torus. The ion beams are taken to be Maxwellian in their frames of reference. The approximation of electrostatic and electromagnetic modes is made. The stability of the electrostatic modes depends on the relation between the ion electron temperature ratio and the relative beam velocities. The stability of the electromagnetic mode depends on the relation between the ion plasma ..beta.. and the relative beam velocities.

  1. Detector Background at Muon Colliders

    SciTech Connect

    Mokhov, N.V.; Striganov, S.I.; /Fermilab

    2011-09-01

    Physics goals of a Muon Collider (MC) can only be reached with appropriate design of the ring, interaction region (IR), high-field superconducting magnets, machine-detector interface (MDI) and detector. Results of the most recent realistic simulation studies are presented for a 1.5-TeV MC. It is shown that appropriately designed IR and MDI with sophisticated shielding in the detector have a potential to substantially suppress the background rates in the MC detector. The main characteristics of backgrounds are studied.

  2. Fast feedback for linear colliders

    SciTech Connect

    Hendrickson, L.; Adolphsen, C.; Allison, S.; Gromme, T.; Grossberg, P.; Himel, T.; Krauter, K.; MacKenzie, R.; Minty, M.; Sass, R.

    1995-05-01

    A fast feedback system provides beam stabilization for the SLC. As the SLC is in some sense a prototype for future linear colliders, this system may be a prototype for future feedbacks. The SLC provides a good base of experience for feedback requirements and capabilities as well as a testing ground for performance characteristics. The feedback system controls a wide variety of machine parameters throughout the SLC and associated experiments, including regulation of beam position, angle, energy, intensity and timing parameters. The design and applications of the system are described, in addition to results of recent performance studies.

  3. LHC: The Large Hadron Collider

    ScienceCinema

    Lincoln, Don

    2016-07-12

    The Large Hadron Collider (or LHC) is the world’s most powerful particle accelerator. In 2012, scientists used data taken by it to discover the Higgs boson, before pausing operations for upgrades and improvements. In the spring of 2015, the LHC will return to operations with 163% the energy it had before and with three times as many collisions per second. It’s essentially a new and improved version of itself. In this video, Fermilab’s Dr. Don Lincoln explains both some of the absolutely amazing scientific and engineering properties of this modern scientific wonder.

  4. LHC: The Large Hadron Collider

    SciTech Connect

    Lincoln, Don

    2015-03-04

    The Large Hadron Collider (or LHC) is the world’s most powerful particle accelerator. In 2012, scientists used data taken by it to discover the Higgs boson, before pausing operations for upgrades and improvements. In the spring of 2015, the LHC will return to operations with 163% the energy it had before and with three times as many collisions per second. It’s essentially a new and improved version of itself. In this video, Fermilab’s Dr. Don Lincoln explains both some of the absolutely amazing scientific and engineering properties of this modern scientific wonder.

  5. Muon Colliders and Neutrino Factories

    SciTech Connect

    Kaplan, Daniel M.

    2015-05-29

    Muon colliders and neutrino factories are attractive options for future facilities aimed at achieving the highest lepton-antilepton collision energies and precision measurements of Higgs boson and neutrino mixing matrix parameters. The facility performance and cost depend on how well a beam of muons can be cooled. Recent progress in muon cooling design studies and prototype tests nourishes the hope that such facilities could be built starting in the coming decade. The status of the key technologies and their various demonstration experiments is summarized. Prospects "post-P5" are also discussed.

  6. The MICE Run Control System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hanlet, Pierrick; Mice Collaboration

    2014-06-01

    The Muon Ionization Cooling Experiment (MICE) is a demonstration experiment to prove the feasibility of cooling a beam of muons for use in a Neutrino Factory and/or Muon Collider. The MICE cooling channel is a section of a modified Study II cooling channel which will provide a 10% reduction in beam emittance. In order to ensure a reliable measurement, MICE will measure the beam emittance before and after the cooling channel at the level of 1%, or a relative measurement of 0.001. This renders MICE a precision experiment which requires strict controls and monitoring of all experimental parameters in order to control systematic errors. The MICE Controls and Monitoring system is based on EPICS and integrates with the DAQ, Data monitoring systems, and a configuration database. The new MICE Run Control has been developed to ensure proper sequencing of equipment and use of system resources to protect data quality. A description of this system, its implementation, and performance during recent muon beam data collection will be discussed.

  7. International Workshop on Linear Colliders 2010

    SciTech Connect

    2010-10-25

    IWLC2010 International Workshop on Linear Colliders 2010ECFA-CLIC-ILC joint meeting: Monday 18 October - Friday 22 October 2010Venue: CERN and CICG (International Conference Centre Geneva, Switzerland) This year, the International Workshop on Linear Colliders organized by the European Committee for Future Accelerators (ECFA) will study the physics, detectors and accelerator complex of a linear collider covering both CLIC and ILC options.Contact Workshop Secretariat  IWLC2010 is hosted by CERN

  8. RHIC performance for FY2011 Au+Au heavy ion run

    SciTech Connect

    Marr, G.; Ahrens, L.; Bai, M.; Beebe-Wang, J.; Blackler, I.; Blaskiewicz, M.; Brennan, J.M.; Brown, K.A.; Bruno, D.; Butler, J.; Carlson, C.; Connolly, R.; D'Ottavio, T.; Drees, K.A.; Fedotov, A.V.; Fischer, W.; Fu, W.; Gardner, C.J.; Gassner, D.M.; Glenn, J.W.; Gu, X.; Harvey, M.; Hayes, T.; Hoff, L.; Huang, H.; Ingrassia, P.F.; Jamilkowski, J.P.; Kling, N.; Lafky, M.; Laster, J.S.; Liu, C.; Luo, Y.; Mapes, M.; Marusic, A.; Mernick, K.; Michnoff, R.J.; Minty, M.G.; Montag, C.; Morris, J.; Naylor, C.; Nemesure, S.; Polizzo, S.; Ptitsyn, V.; Robert-Demolaize, G.; Roser, T.; Sampson, P.; Sandberg, J.; Schoefer, V.; Schultheiss, C.; Severino, F.; Shrey, T.; Smith, K.; Steski, D.; Tepikian, S.; Thieberger, P.; Trbojevic, D.; Tsoupas, N.; Tuozzolo, J.E.; VanKuik, B.; Wang, G.; Wilinski, M.; Zaltsman, A.; Zeno, K.; Zhang, S.Y.

    2011-09-04

    Following the Fiscal Year (FY) 2010 (Run-10) Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) Au+Au run, RHIC experiment upgrades sought to improve detector capabilities. In turn, accelerator improvements were made to improve the luminosity available to the experiments for this run (Run-11). These improvements included: a redesign of the stochastic cooling systems for improved reliability; a relocation of 'common' RF cavities to alleviate intensity limits due to beam loading; and an improved usage of feedback systems to control orbit, tune and coupling during energy ramps as well as while colliding at top energy. We present an overview of changes to the Collider and review the performance of the collider with respect to instantaneous and integrated luminosity goals. At the conclusion of the FY 2011 polarized proton run, preparations for heavy ion run proceeded on April 18, with Au+Au collisions continuing through June 28. Our standard operations at 100 GeV/nucleon beam energy was bracketed by two shorter periods of collisions at lower energies (9.8 and 13.5 GeV/nucleon), continuing a previously established program of low and medium energy runs. Table 1 summarizes our history of heavy ion operations at RHIC.

  9. Governance of the International Linear Collider Project

    SciTech Connect

    Foster, B.; Barish, B.; Delahaye, J.P.; Dosselli, U.; Elsen, E.; Harrison, M.; Mnich, J.; Paterson, J.M.; Richard, F.; Stapnes, S.; Suzuki, A.; Wormser, G.; Yamada, S.; /KEK, Tsukuba

    2012-05-31

    Governance models for the International Linear Collider Project are examined in the light of experience from similar international projects around the world. Recommendations for one path which could be followed to realize the ILC successfully are outlined. The International Linear Collider (ILC) is a unique endeavour in particle physics; fully international from the outset, it has no 'host laboratory' to provide infrastructure and support. The realization of this project therefore presents unique challenges, in scientific, technical and political arenas. This document outlines the main questions that need to be answered if the ILC is to become a reality. It describes the methodology used to harness the wisdom displayed and lessons learned from current and previous large international projects. From this basis, it suggests both general principles and outlines a specific model to realize the ILC. It recognizes that there is no unique model for such a laboratory and that there are often several solutions to a particular problem. Nevertheless it proposes concrete solutions that the authors believe are currently the best choices in order to stimulate discussion and catalyze proposals as to how to bring the ILC project to fruition. The ILC Laboratory would be set up by international treaty and be governed by a strong Council to whom a Director General and an associated Directorate would report. Council would empower the Director General to give strong management to the project. It would take its decisions in a timely manner, giving appropriate weight to the financial contributions of the member states. The ILC Laboratory would be set up for a fixed term, capable of extension by agreement of all the partners. The construction of the machine would be based on a Work Breakdown Structure and value engineering and would have a common cash fund sufficiently large to allow the management flexibility to optimize the project's construction. Appropriate contingency, clearly

  10. Accelerator aspects of photon colliders at TESLA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walker, Nicholas J.

    2001-10-01

    The TESLA linear collider is being primarily designed as a 500- 800 GeV centre of mass e +e - linear collider. However, a second interaction region is being incorporated into the design with a crossing angle of 32 mrad, which is suitable for use as a γγ collider. In this paper we will review those aspects of the current machine design which are critical to the operation of TESLA as a photon collider, paying particular attention to the preservation of small horizontal emittances, and—in the absence of beamstrahlung—limits on reduced horizontal beam cross-section at the interaction point.

  11. Can Unshod Running Reduce Running Injuries?

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-06-08

    protein? Lieberman considered how humans could take down a boar or antelope while other predators like lions and hyenas were on the prowl. He...referenced research that reported African hunters chasing antelopes and Tarahumara Indians running down deer till their hooves fell off.35 Lieberman...

  12. Well liner running shoe

    SciTech Connect

    Bell, J.F.

    1994-01-11

    Wellbore liners are set with a running shoe comprising a cylindrical body, end cap, check valve and receiver member in assembly. The receiver member includes threads for receiving the coupling sleeve of a running tool, and retaining wickers for engagement with a cement plug or dart to retain the same permanently engaged with and blocking the flow of fluid through the running shoe. A running tool for use with the shoe includes a coupling sleeve which is retained on a support mandrel by a collar which is secured to the mandrel with a shear pin so that pressuring up the workstring, in the event of a stuck coupling sleeve, will permit retrieval of the main part of the running tool and the workstring. The interior parts of the running shoe are made of aluminum or plastic for easy drill-out to extend the wellbore beyond the end of the liner. 3 figs.

  13. Performance of the ATLAS Muon Trigger in Run I and Upgrades for Run II

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kobayashi, Dai

    2015-12-01

    The ATLAS experiment at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) has taken data at a centre-of-mass energy between 900 GeV and 8 TeV during Run I (2009-2013). The LHC delivered an integrated luminosity of about 20 fb-1 in 2012, which required dedicated strategies to ensure the highest possible physics output while effectively reducing the event rate. The Muon High Level Trigger has successfully adapted to the changing environment from low instantaneous luminosity (1032 cm-2 s-1) in 2010 to the peak high instantaneous luminosity (1034 cm-2 s-1). The selection strategy has been optimized for the various physics analyses involving muons in the final state. We will present the excellent performance achieved during Run I. In preparation for the next data taking period (Run II) several hardware and software upgrades to the ATLAS Muon Trigger have been performed to deal with the increased trigger rate expected at higher centre-of-mass energy and increased instantaneous luminosity. We will highlight the development of novel algorithms that have been developed to maintain a highly efficient event selection while reducing the processing time by a factor of three. In addition, the two stages of the high level trigger that was deployed in Run I will be merged for Run II. We will discuss novel approaches that are being developed to further improve the trigger algorithms for Run II and beyond.

  14. Very large hadron collider (VLHC)

    SciTech Connect

    1998-09-01

    A VLHC informal study group started to come together at Fermilab in the fall of 1995 and at the 1996 Snowmass Study the parameters of this machine took form. The VLHC as now conceived would be a 100 TeV hadron collider. It would use the Fermilab Main Injector (now nearing completion) to inject protons at 150 GeV into a new 3 TeV Booster and then into a superconducting pp collider ring producing 100 TeV c.m. interactions. A luminosity of {approximately}10{sup 34} cm{sup -2}s{sup -1} is planned. Our plans were presented to the Subpanel on the Planning for the Future of US High- Energy Physics (the successor to the Drell committee) and in February 1998 their report stated ``The Subpanel recommends an expanded program of R&D on cost reduction strategies, enabling technologies, and accelerator physics issues for a VLHC. These efforts should be coordinated across laboratory and university groups with the aim of identifying design concepts for an economically and technically viable facility`` The coordination has been started with the inclusion of physicists from Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL), Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL), and Cornell University. Clearly, this collaboration must expanded internationally as well as nationally. The phrase ``economically and technically viable facility`` presents the real challenge.

  15. Results from p p colliders

    SciTech Connect

    Huth, J.

    1991-08-01

    Recent results {bar p}p colliders are presented. From elastic scattering experiments at the Tevatron, an average value of {sigma}{sub tot} = 72.1{plus minus}2 mb is reported, along with a new measurement of {rho} = 0.13 {plus minus} 0.7. New measurements of jet direct photon and high p{sub t} W and Z production are compared to more precise, higher order predictions from perturbative QCD. Recently available data on the W mass and width give combined values for M{sub W} = 80.14{plus minus}0.27 GeV/c{sup 2}, and {Gamma}(W) =2. 14 {plus minus} 0.08 GeV. From electroweak radiative corrections and M{sub W}, one finds M{sub top} = 130{plus minus}40 GeV/c{sup 2}, with a 95% C.L. upper limit at 210 GeV/c{sup 2}. Current limits on M{sub top} are presented, along with a review of the prospects for top discovery. From jet data there is no evidence of quark substructure down to the distance scale of 1.4 {times} 10{sup {minus}17} cm, nor is there evidence for supersymmetry or heavy gauge bosons at {bar p}p colliders, allowing lower limits on M{sub W}, > 520 GeV/c{sup 2} and M{sub Z} 412 GeV/c{sup 2}. 66 refs., 26 figs.

  16. Triathlon: running injuries.

    PubMed

    Spiker, Andrea M; Dixit, Sameer; Cosgarea, Andrew J

    2012-12-01

    The running portion of the triathlon represents the final leg of the competition and, by some reports, the most important part in determining a triathlete's overall success. Although most triathletes spend most of their training time on cycling, running injuries are the most common injuries encountered. Common causes of running injuries include overuse, lack of rest, and activities that aggravate biomechanical predisposers of specific injuries. We discuss the running-associated injuries in the hip, knee, lower leg, ankle, and foot of the triathlete, and the causes, presentation, evaluation, and treatment of each.

  17. Progress in Antiproton Production at the Fermilab Tevatron Collider

    SciTech Connect

    Pasquinelli, Ralph J.; Drendel, Brian; Gollwitzer, Keith; Johnson, Stan; Lebedev, Valeri; Leveling, Anthony; Morgan, James; Nagaslaev, Vladimir; Peterson, Dave; Sondgeroth, Alan; Werkema, Steve; /Fermilab

    2009-04-01

    Fermilab Collider Run II has been ongoing since 2001. During this time peak luminosities in the Tevatron have increased from approximately 10 x 10{sup 30} cm{sup -2}sec{sup -1} to 300 x 10{sup 30} cm{sup 02}sec{sup -1}. A major contributing factor in this remarkable performance is a greatly improved antiproton production capability. Since the beginning of Run II, the average antiproton accumulation rate has increased from 2 x 10{sup 10}{anti p}/hr to about 24 x 10{sup 10}{anti p}/hr. Peak antiproton stacking rates presently exceed 28 x 10{sup 10}{anti p}/hr. The antiproton stacking rate has nearly doubled since 2005. It is this recent progress that is the focus of this paper. The process of transferring antiprotons to the Recycler Ring for subsequent transfer to the collider has been significantly restructured and streamlined, yielding additional cycle time for antiproton production. Improvements to the target station have greatly increased the antiproton yield from the production target. The performance of the Antiproton Source stochastic cooling systems has been enhanced by upgrades to the cooling electronics, accelerator lattice optimization, and improved operating procedures. In this paper, we will briefly report on each of these modifications.

  18. Computing and data handling requirements for SSC (Superconducting Super Collider) and LHC (Large Hadron Collider) experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Lankford, A.J.

    1990-05-01

    A number of issues for computing and data handling in the online in environment at future high-luminosity, high-energy colliders, such as the Superconducting Super Collider (SSC) and Large Hadron Collider (LHC), are outlined. Requirements for trigger processing, data acquisition, and online processing are discussed. Some aspects of possible solutions are sketched. 6 refs., 3 figs.

  19. Collider Detector at Fermilab (CDF): Data from Supersymmetry, New Phenomena Research of the CDF Exotics Group

    DOE Data Explorer

    The Collider Detector at Fermilab (CDF) is a Tevatron experiment at Fermilab. The Tevatron, a powerful particle accelerator, accelerates protons and antiprotons close to the speed of light, and then makes them collide head-on inside the CDF detector. The CDF detector is used to study the products of such collisions. The CDF Physics Group at Fermilab is organized into six working groups, each with a specific focus. The Exotics group searches for Supersymmetry and other New Phenomena. Their public web page makes data and numerous figures available from both CDF Runs I and II.

  20. Collider Detector at Fermilab (CDF): Data from the Top Group's Top Quark Research

    DOE Data Explorer

    The Collider Detector at Fermilab (CDF) is a Tevatron experiment at Fermilab. The Tevatron, a powerful particle accelerator, accelerates protons and antiprotons close to the speed of light, and then makes them collide head-on inside the CDF detector. The CDF detector is used to study the products of such collisions. The CDF Physics Group at Fermilab is organized into six working groups, each with a specific focus. The Top group studies the properties of the top quark, the heaviest known fundamental particle. Their public web page makes data and numerous figures available from both CDF Runs I and II.

  1. Overcoming the "Run" Response

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Swanson, Patricia E.

    2013-01-01

    Recent research suggests that it is not simply experiencing anxiety that affects mathematics performance but also how one responds to and regulates that anxiety (Lyons and Beilock 2011). Most people have faced mathematics problems that have triggered their "run response." The issue is not whether one wants to run, but rather…

  2. Research and Development of Future Muon Collider

    SciTech Connect

    Yonehara, K.; /Fermilab

    2012-05-01

    Muon collider is a considerable candidate of the next generation high-energy lepton collider machine. A novel accelerator technology must be developed to overcome several intrinsic issues of muon acceleration. Recent research and development of critical beam elements for a muon accelerator, especially muon beam phase space ionization cooling channel, are reviewed in this paper.

  3. Polarization Effects at a Muon Collider

    SciTech Connect

    Parsa, Z.

    1998-11-01

    For Muon Colliders, Polarization will be a useful tool if high polarization is achievable with little luminosity loss. Formulation and effects of beam polarization and luminosity including polarization effects in Higgs resonance studies are discussed for improving precision measurements and Higgs resonance ''discovery'' capability e.g. at the First Muon Collider (FMC).

  4. Instability of colliding metastable strings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hiramatsu, Takashi; Eto, Minoru; Kamada, Kohei; Kobayashi, Tatsuo; Ookouchi, Yutaka

    2014-01-01

    The breaking of U(1) R symmetry plays a crucial role in modeling the breaking of supersymmetry (SUSY). In the models that possess both SUSY preserving and SUSY breaking vacua, tube-like cosmic strings called R-tubes, whose surfaces are constituted by domain walls interpolating a false and a true vacuum with some winding numbers, can exist. Their (in)stability can strongly constrain SUSY breaking models theirselves. In the present study, we investigate the dynamical (in)stability of two colliding metastable tube-like strings by field-theoretic simulations. From them, we find that the strings become unstable, depending on the relative collision angle and speed of two strings, and the false vacuum is eventually filled out by the true vacuum owing to rapid expansion of the strings or unstable bubbles created as remnants of the collision.

  5. Collider searches for extra dimensions

    SciTech Connect

    Landsberg, Greg; /Brown U.

    2004-12-01

    Searches for extra spatial dimensions remain among the most popular new directions in our quest for physics beyond the Standard Model. High-energy collider experiments of the current decade should be able to find an ultimate answer to the question of their existence in a variety of models. Until the start of the LHC in a few years, the Tevatron will remain the key player in this quest. In this paper, we review the most recent results from the Tevatron on searches for large, TeV{sup -1}-size, and Randall-Sundrum extra spatial dimensions, which have reached a new level of sensitivity and currently probe the parameter space beyond the existing constraints. While no evidence for the existence of extra dimensions has been found so far, an exciting discovery might be just steps away.

  6. Mutual colliding impact fast ignition

    SciTech Connect

    Winterberg, Friedwardt

    2014-09-15

    It is proposed to apply the well established colliding beam technology of high energy physics to the fast hot spot ignition of a highly compressed DT (deuterium-tritium) target igniting a larger D (deuterium) burn, by accelerating a small amount of solid deuterium, and likewise a small amount of tritium, making a head-on collision in the center of the target, projecting them through conical ducts situated at the opposite side of the target and converging in its center. In their head-on collision, the relative collision velocity is 5/3 times larger compared to the collision velocity of a stationary target. The two pieces have for this reason to be accelerated to a smaller velocity than would otherwise be needed to reach upon impact the same temperature. Since the velocity distribution of the two head-on colliding projectiles is with its two velocity peaks non-Maxwellian, the maximum cross section velocity product turns out to be substantially larger than the maximum if averaged over a Maxwellian. The D and T projectiles would have to be accelerated with two sabots driven by powerful particle or laser beams, permitting a rather large acceleration length. With the substantially larger cross section-velocity product by virtue of the non-Maxwellian velocity distribution, a further advantage is that the head-on collision produces a large magnetic field by the thermomagnetic Nernst effect, enhancing propagating burn. With this concept, the ignition of the neutron-less hydrogen-boron (HB{sup 11}) reaction might even be possible in a heterogeneous assembly of the hydrogen and the boron to reduce the bremsstrahlung-losses, resembling the heterogeneous assembly in a graphite-natural uranium reactor, there to reduce the neutron losses.

  7. ATLAS Tile Calorimeter performance with Run 1 data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cerdá Alberich, L.

    2016-07-01

    The performance of the central hadronic calorimeter, TileCal, in the ATLAS Experiment at the Large Hadron Collider is studied using cosmic-ray muons and the large sample of proton-proton collisions acquired during the Run 1 of LHC (2010-2012). Results are presented for the precision of the absolute energy scale and timing, noise characterization, and time-stability of the detector. The results show that the Tile Calorimeter performance is within the design requirements of the detector.

  8. Fast Bunch Integrators at Fermilab During Run II

    SciTech Connect

    Meyer, Thomas; Briegel, Charles; Fellenz, Brian; Vogel, Greg; /Fermilab

    2011-07-13

    The Fast Bunch Integrator is a bunch intensity monitor designed around the measurements made from Resistive Wall Current Monitors. During the Run II period these were used in both Tevatron and Main Injector for single and multiple bunch intensity measurements. This paper presents an overview of the design and use of these systems during this period. During the Run II era the Fast Bunch integrators have found a multitude of uses. From antiproton transfers to muti-bunch beam coalescing, Main Injector transfers to halo scraping and lifetime measurements, the Fast Bunch Integrators have proved invaluable in the creation and maintenance of Colliding Beams stores at Fermilab.

  9. The Muon system of the run II D0 detector

    SciTech Connect

    Abazov, V.M.; Acharya, B.S.; Alexeev, G.D.; Alkhazov, G.; Anosov, V.A.; Baldin, B.; Banerjee, S.; Bardon, O.; Bartlett, J.F.; Baturitsky, M.A.; Beutel, D.; Bezzubov, V.A.; Bodyagin, V.; Butler, J.M.; Cease, H.; Chi, E.; Denisov, D.; Denisov, S.P.; Diehl, H.T.; Doulas, S.; Dugad, S.R.; /Beijing, Inst. High Energy Phys. /Charles U. /Prague, Tech. U. /Prague, Inst. Phys. /San Francisco de Quito U. /Tata Inst. /Dubna, JINR /Moscow, ITEP /Moscow State U. /Serpukhov, IHEP /St. Petersburg, INP /Arizona U. /Florida State U. /Fermilab /Northern Illinois U. /Indiana U. /Boston U. /Northeastern U. /Brookhaven /Washington U., Seattle /Minsk, Inst. Nucl. Problems

    2005-03-01

    The authors describe the design, construction and performance of the upgraded D0 muon system for Run II of the Fermilab Tevatron collider. Significant improvements have been made to the major subsystems of the D0 muon detector: trigger scintillation counters, tracking detectors, and electronics. The Run II central muon detector has a new scintillation counter system inside the iron toroid and an improved scintillation counter system outside the iron toroid. In the forward region, new scintillation counter and tracking systems have been installed. Extensive shielding has been added in the forward region. A large fraction of the muon system electronics is also new.

  10. Analysis of failed ramps during the RHIC FY09 run

    SciTech Connect

    Minty, M.

    2014-08-15

    The Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) is a versatile accelerator that supports operation with polarized protons of up to 250 GeV and ions with up to 100 GeV/nucleon. During any running period, various operating scenarios with different particle species, beam energies or accelerator optics are commissioned. In this report the beam commissioning periods for establishing full energy beams (ramp development periods) from the FY09 run are summarized and, for the purpose of motivating further developments, we analyze the reasons for all failed ramps.

  11. Run Anyone?... Everyone!

    PubMed Central

    McInnis, W. P.

    1974-01-01

    Fitness and health have become bywords in the past decade, signifying increased emphasis on these factors as necessary for good psychological and physical health. Reasons are given why we should run and how to do it. There is a discussion of the technique of running, and equipment. Brief mention is made of complications. An attempt is made to interest the individual in the benefits of running as a sport as well as the best method for the average person to achieve fitness and health. PMID:20469054

  12. Compensatable muon collider calorimeter with manageable backgrounds

    SciTech Connect

    Raja, Rajendran

    2015-02-17

    A method and system for reducing background noise in a particle collider, comprises identifying an interaction point among a plurality of particles within a particle collider associated with a detector element, defining a trigger start time for each of the pixels as the time taken for light to travel from the interaction point to the pixel and a trigger stop time as a selected time after the trigger start time, and collecting only detections that occur between the start trigger time and the stop trigger time in order to thereafter compensate the result from the particle collider to reduce unwanted background detection.

  13. On the Future High Energy Colliders

    SciTech Connect

    Shiltsev, Vladimir

    2015-09-28

    High energy particle colliders have been in the forefront of particle physics for more than three decades. At present the near term US, European and international strategies of the particle physics community are centered on full exploitation of the physics potential of the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) through its high-luminosity upgrade (HL-LHC). A number of the next generation collider facilities have been proposed and are currently under consideration for the medium and far-future of accelerator-based high energy physics. In this paper we offer a uniform approach to evaluation of various accelerators based on the feasibility of their energy reach, performance potential and cost range.

  14. International Workshop on Linear Colliders 2010

    ScienceCinema

    None

    2016-07-12

    IWLC2010 International Workshop on Linear Colliders 2010ECFA-CLIC-ILC joint meeting: Monday 18 October - Friday 22 October 2010Venue: CERN and CICG (International Conference Centre Geneva, Switzerland) This year, the International Workshop on Linear Colliders organized by the European Committee for Future Accelerators (ECFA) will study the physics, detectors and accelerator complex of a linear collider covering both CLIC and ILC options.Contact Workshop Secretariat  IWLC2010 is hosted by CERN

  15. Beamstrahlung spectra in next generation linear colliders

    SciTech Connect

    Barklow, T.; Chen, P. ); Kozanecki, W. )

    1992-04-01

    For the next generation of linear colliders, the energy loss due to beamstrahlung during the collision of the e{sup +}e{sup {minus}} beams is expected to substantially influence the effective center-of-mass energy distribution of the colliding particles. In this paper, we first derive analytical formulae for the electron and photon energy spectra under multiple beamstrahlung processes, and for the e{sup +}e{sup {minus}} and {gamma}{gamma} differential luminosities. We then apply our formulation to various classes of 500 GeV e{sup +}e{sup {minus}} linear collider designs currently under study.

  16. SLAC linear collider conceptual design report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1980-06-01

    The linear collider system is described in detail, including the transport system, the collider lattice, final focusing system, positron production, beam damping and compression, high current electron source, instrumentation and control, and the beam luminosity. The experimental facilities and the experimental uses are discussed along with the construction schedule and estimated costs. Appendices include a discussion of space charge effects in the linear accelerator, emittance growth in the collider, the final focus system, beam-beam instabilities and pinch effects, and detector backgrounds. (GHT)

  17. Report of Snowmass 2001 working group E2: Electron - positron colliders from the phi to the Z

    SciTech Connect

    Zhen-guo Zhao et al.

    2002-12-23

    We report on the status and plans of experiments now running or proposed for electron-positron colliders at energies between the {phi} and the Z. The e{sup +}e{sup -}B and charm factories we considered were PEP-II/BABAR, KEKB/Belle, superKEK, SuperBABAR, and CESR-c/CLEO-c. We reviewed the programs at the {phi} factory at Frascati and the proposed PEP-N facility at Stanford Linear Accelerator Center. We studied the prospects for B physics with a dedicated linear collider Z factory, associated with the TESLA high energy linear collider. In all cases, we compared the physics reach of these facilities with that of alternative experiments at hadron colliders or fixed target facilities.

  18. Nonglobal correlations in collider physics

    DOE PAGES

    Moult, Ian; Larkoski, Andrew J.

    2016-01-13

    Despite their importance for precision QCD calculations, correlations between in- and out-of-jet regions of phase space have never directly been observed. These so-called non-global effects are present generically whenever a collider physics measurement is not explicitly dependent on radiation throughout the entire phase space. In this paper, we introduce a novel procedure based on mutual information, which allows us to isolate these non-global correlations between measurements made in different regions of phase space. We study this procedure both analytically and in Monte Carlo simulations in the context of observables measured on hadronic final states produced in e+e- collisions, though itmore » is more widely applicable.The procedure exploits the sensitivity of soft radiation at large angles to non-global correlations, and we calculate these correlations through next-to-leading logarithmic accuracy. The bulk of these non-global correlations are found to be described in Monte Carlo simulation. They increase by the inclusion of non-perturbative effects, which we show can be incorporated in our calculation through the use of a model shape function. As a result, this procedure illuminates the source of non-global correlations and has connections more broadly to fundamental quantities in quantum field theory.« less

  19. The Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fischer, Wolfram

    The Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC), shown in Fig. 1, was build to study the interactions of quarks and gluons at high energies [Harrison, Ludlam and Ozaki (2003)]. The theory of Quantum Chromodynamics (QCD) describes these interactions. One of the main goals for the RHIC experiments was the creation and study of the Quark-Gluon Plasma (QGP), which was expected to be formed after the collision of heavy ions at a temperature of approximately 2 trillion kelvin (or equivalently an energy of 150 MeV). The QGP is the substance which existed only a few microseconds after the Big Bang. The QGP was anticipated to be weakly interacting like a gas but turned out to be strongly interacting and more like a liquid. Among its unusual properties is its extremely low viscosity [Auerbach and Schlomo (2009)], which makes the QGP the substance closest to a perfect liquid known to date. The QGP is opaque to moderate energy quarks and gluons leading to a phenomenon called jet quenching, where of a jet and its recoil jet only one is observable and the other suppressed after traversing and interacting with the QGP [Jacak and Müller (2012)]...

  20. Nonglobal correlations in collider physics

    SciTech Connect

    Moult, Ian; Larkoski, Andrew J.

    2016-01-13

    Despite their importance for precision QCD calculations, correlations between in- and out-of-jet regions of phase space have never directly been observed. These so-called non-global effects are present generically whenever a collider physics measurement is not explicitly dependent on radiation throughout the entire phase space. In this paper, we introduce a novel procedure based on mutual information, which allows us to isolate these non-global correlations between measurements made in different regions of phase space. We study this procedure both analytically and in Monte Carlo simulations in the context of observables measured on hadronic final states produced in e+e- collisions, though it is more widely applicable.The procedure exploits the sensitivity of soft radiation at large angles to non-global correlations, and we calculate these correlations through next-to-leading logarithmic accuracy. The bulk of these non-global correlations are found to be described in Monte Carlo simulation. They increase by the inclusion of non-perturbative effects, which we show can be incorporated in our calculation through the use of a model shape function. As a result, this procedure illuminates the source of non-global correlations and has connections more broadly to fundamental quantities in quantum field theory.

  1. Hourglass effects for asymmetric colliders

    SciTech Connect

    Furman, M.A.

    1991-05-01

    We give the expressions for the geometrical reduction factor of the luminosity and the geometrical beam-beam aggravating factor'' for the general asymmetric case, for tri-gaussian bunches colliding head on. With these formulas we attempt a (limited) analytic understanding of the multiparticle tracking simulations carried out for the proposed SLAC/LBL/LLNL B factory when parasitic crossings are ignored. We conclude the following: (a) the geometrical reduction in luminosity is {approximately}6% relative to the zero-bunch-length (nominal) value; (b) only the vertical beam-beam parameter of the LER is significantly altered by the hourglass effect: the geometrical enhancement of the central positron's vertical beam-beam parameter is {approximately}10% relative to the nominal value, and (c) the positrons at the head or tail of the bunch have vertical beam-beam parameters much larger than nominal. We discuss the electromagnetic disruption effect only qualitatively. This effect probably compensates (or overcompensates) the geometrical reduction of the luminosity, and it is possibly detrimental for the beam-beam parameters. 7 refs., 3 figs.

  2. Proton-antiproton collider physics

    SciTech Connect

    Shochet, M.J.

    1995-07-01

    The 9th {anti p}p Workshop was held in Tsukuba, Japan in October, 1993. A number of important issues remained after that meeting: Does QCD adequately describe the large cross section observed by CDF for {gamma} production below 30 GeV? Do the CDF and D0 b-production cross sections agree? Will the Tevatron live up to its billing as a world-class b-physics facility? How small will the uncertainty in the W mass be? Is there anything beyond the Minimal Standard Model? And finally, where is the top quark? Presentations at this workshop addressed all of these issues. Most of them are now resolved, but new questions have arisen. This summary focuses on the experimental results presented at the meeting by CDF and D0 physicists. Reviews of LEP and HERA results, future plans for hadron colliders and their experiments, as well as important theoretical presentations are summarized elsewhere in this volume. Section 1 reviews physics beyond the Minimal Standard Model. Issues in b and c physics are addressed in section 3. Section 4 focuses on the top quark. Electroweak physics is reviewed in section 5, followed by QCD studies in section 6. Conclusions are drawn in section 7.

  3. The Fermilab PBAR-P Collider: Present status and future plans

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, R.

    1988-11-01

    The Tevatron Collider is performing beyond expectations for its first physics run. The peak luminosity is already 1.6 times the design goal of 10/sup 30/ cm/sup /minus/2/ s/sup /minus/1/. The anticipated integrated luminosity recorded by the major detector, CDF, is 3 inverse picobarns which should be sufficient to see the top quark if its mass is less than 110 GeV. The next two Collider runs will have improved performance with luminosity approaching 10/sup 31/ at two interaction regions. In the years between 1993 and 2000, the Collider energy will be increased by using the highest field superconducting magnets then available, where 8.8 T would give 2 TeV on 2 TeV pbar-p collisions with a luminosity above 10/sup 31/. To facilitate this possibility and to improve the general Collider capabilities, a new 150 GeV Main Injector is now being designed. 3 figs., 2 tabs.

  4. SPICE: Simulation Package for Including Flavor in Collider Events

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Engelhard, Guy; Feng, Jonathan L.; Galon, Iftah; Sanford, David; Yu, Felix

    2010-01-01

    supersymmetric particles in theories with lepton flavor violation. The inputs are the parameters of any of several standard flavor-conserving supersymmetric models, supplemented by flavor-violating parameters determined, for example, by horizontal flavor symmetries. The output are files that may be used for detailed simulation of supersymmetric events at particle colliders. Solution method: Simpson's rule integrator, basic algebraic computation. Additional comments: SPICE interfaces with SOFTSUSY and SUSYHIT to produce the low energy sparticle spectrum. Flavor mixing for sleptons and sneutrinos is fully implemented; flavor mixing for squarks is not included. Running time: <1 minute. Running time is dominated by calculating the possible and relevant three-body flavor-violating decays of sleptons, which is usually 10-15 seconds per slepton. References:B.C. Allanach, Comput. Phys. Commun. 143 (2002) 305, arXiv:hep-ph/0104145. B.C. Allanach, M.A. Bernhardt, arXiv:0903.1805 [hep-ph]. A. Djouadi, M.M. Muhlleitner, M. Spira, Acta Phys. Pol. B 38 (2007) 635, arXiv:hep-ph/0609292.

  5. Hit-and-run planetary collisions.

    PubMed

    Asphaug, Erik; Agnor, Craig B; Williams, Quentin

    2006-01-12

    Terrestrial planet formation is believed to have concluded in our Solar System with about 10 million to 100 million years of giant impacts, where hundreds of Moon- to Mars-sized planetary embryos acquired random velocities through gravitational encounters and resonances with one another and with Jupiter. This led to planet-crossing orbits and collisions that produced the four terrestrial planets, the Moon and asteroids. But here we show that colliding planets do not simply merge, as is commonly assumed. In many cases, the smaller planet escapes from the collision highly deformed, spun up, depressurized from equilibrium, stripped of its outer layers, and sometimes pulled apart into a chain of diverse objects. Remnants of these 'hit-and-run' collisions are predicted to be common among remnant planet-forming populations, and thus to be relevant to asteroid formation and meteorite petrogenesis.

  6. Collider Interplay for Supersymmetry, Higgs and Dark Matter.

    PubMed

    Buchmueller, O; Citron, M; Ellis, J; Guha, S; Marrouche, J; Olive, K A; de Vries, K; Zheng, Jiaming

    We discuss the potential impacts on the CMSSM of future LHC runs and possible [Formula: see text] and higher-energy proton-proton colliders, considering searches for supersymmetry via  [Formula: see text] events, precision electroweak physics, Higgs measurements and dark matter searches. We validate and present estimates of the physics reach for exclusion or discovery of supersymmetry via [Formula: see text] searches at the LHC, which should cover the low-mass regions of the CMSSM parameter space favoured in a recent global analysis. As we illustrate with a low-mass benchmark point, a discovery would make possible accurate LHC measurements of sparticle masses using the MT2 variable, which could be combined with cross-section and other measurements to constrain the gluino, squark and stop masses and hence the soft supersymmetry-breaking parameters [Formula: see text] and [Formula: see text] of the CMSSM. Slepton measurements at CLIC would enable [Formula: see text] and [Formula: see text] to be determined with high precision. If supersymmetry is indeed discovered in the low-mass region, precision electroweak and Higgs measurements with a future circular [Formula: see text] collider (FCC-ee, also known as TLEP) combined with LHC measurements would provide tests of the CMSSM at the loop level. If supersymmetry is not discovered at the LHC, it is likely to lie somewhere along a focus-point, stop-coannihilation strip or direct-channel A / H resonance funnel. We discuss the prospects for discovering supersymmetry along these strips at a future circular proton-proton collider such as FCC-hh. Illustrative benchmark points on these strips indicate that also in this case FCC-ee could provide tests of the CMSSM at the loop level.

  7. Final focus systems for linear colliders

    SciTech Connect

    Erickson, R.A.

    1987-11-01

    The final focus system of a linear collider must perform two primary functions, it must focus the two opposing beams so that their transverse dimensions at the interaction point are small enough to yield acceptable luminosity, and it must steer the beams together to maintain collisions. In addition, the final focus system must transport the outgoing beams to a location where they can be recycled or safely dumped. Elementary optical considerations for linear collider final focus systems are discussed, followed by chromatic aberrations. The design of the final focus system of the SLAC Linear Collider (SLC) is described. Tuning and diagnostics and steering to collision are discussed. Most of the examples illustrating the concepts covered are drawn from the SLC, but the principles and conclusions are said to be generally applicable to other linear collider designs as well. 26 refs., 17 figs. (LEW)

  8. Decoupling schemes for the SSC Collider

    SciTech Connect

    Cai, Y.; Bourianoff, G.; Cole, B.; Meinke, R.; Peterson, J.; Pilat, F.; Stampke, S.; Syphers, M.; Talman, R.

    1993-05-01

    A decoupling system is designed for the SSC Collider. This system can accommodate three decoupling schemes by using 44 skew quadrupoles in the different configurations. Several decoupling schemes are studied and compared in this paper.

  9. Photon Collider Physics with Real Photon Beams

    SciTech Connect

    Gronberg, J; Asztalos, S

    2005-11-03

    Photon-photon interactions have been an important probe into fundamental particle physics. Until recently, the only way to produce photon-photon collisions was parasitically in the collision of charged particles. Recent advances in short-pulse laser technology have made it possible to consider producing high intensity, tightly focused beams of real photons through Compton scattering. A linear e{sup +}e{sup -} collider could thus be transformed into a photon-photon collider with the addition of high power lasers. In this paper they show that it is possible to make a competitive photon-photon collider experiment using the currently mothballed Stanford Linear Collider. This would produce photon-photon collisions in the GeV energy range which would allow the discovery and study of exotic heavy mesons with spin states of zero and two.

  10. RF pulse compression for future linear colliders

    SciTech Connect

    Wilson, P.B.

    1995-05-01

    Future (nonsuperconducting) linear colliders will require very high values of peak rf power per meter of accelerating structure. The role of rf pulse compression in producing this power is examined within the context of overall rf system design for three future colliders at energies of 1.0--1.5 TeV, 5 TeV and 25 TeV. In order keep the average AC input power and the length of the accelerator within reasonable limits, a collider in the 1.0--1.5 TeV energy range will probably be built at an x-band rf frequency, and will require a peak power on the order of 150--200 MW per meter of accelerating structure. A 5 TeV collider at 34 GHz with a reasonable length (35 km) and AC input power (225 MW) would require about 550 MW per meter of structure. Two-beam accelerators can achieve peak powers of this order by applying dc pulse compression techniques (induction linac modules) to produce the drive beam. Klystron-driven colliders achieve high peak power by a combination of dc pulse compression (modulators) and rf pulse compression, with about the same overall rf system efficiency (30--40%) as a two-beam collider. A high gain (6.8) three-stage binary pulse compression system with high efficiency (80%) is described, which (compared to a SLED-11 system) can be used to reduce the klystron peak power by about a factor of two, or alternately, to cut the number of klystrons in half for a 1.0--1.5 TeV x-band collider. For a 5 TeV klystron-driven collider, a high gain, high efficiency rf pulse compression system is essential.

  11. The Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider, Rhic

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Foelsche, H.; Hahn, H.; Harrison, M.; Ozaki, S.; Rhoades-Brown, M. J.

    1993-03-01

    The scope of the first relativistic energy heavy ion collider, RHIC, is discussed. Particular attention is paid to those novel features of a heavy ion collider that are distinct from the more usual proton machines. These features are derived from the experimental requirements of operation with a variety of ion species over a wide energy range as well as the increased demands on available ion sources and injector complexes. Storage of heavy ion beams for many hours is severely impacted by intrabeam scattering.

  12. Physics goals of the next linear collider

    SciTech Connect

    Kuhlman, S.; Marciano, W.J.; Gunion, J. F.; NLC ZDR Design Group; NLC Physics Working Group

    1996-05-01

    We present the prospects for the next generation of high-energy physics experiments with electron-positron colliding beams. This report summarizes the current status of the design and technological basis of a linear collider of center of mass energy 500 GeV-1.5 TeV, and the opportunities for high-energy physics experiments that this machine is expected to open. 132 refs., 54 figs., 14 tabs.

  13. Nuclear collisions at the Future Circular Collider

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Armesto, N.; Dainese, A.; d'Enterria, D.; Masciocchi, S.; Roland, C.; Salgado, C. A.; van Leeuwen, M.; Wiedemann, U. A.

    2016-12-01

    The Future Circular Collider is a new proposed collider at CERN with centre-of-mass energies around 100 TeV in the pp mode. Ongoing studies aim at assessing its physics potential and technical feasibility. Here we focus on updates in physics opportunities accessible in pA and AA collisions not covered in previous Quark Matter contributions, including Quark-Gluon Plasma and gluon saturation studies, novel hard probes of QCD matter, and photon-induced collisions.

  14. Final focus designs for crab waist colliders

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bogomyagkov, A.; Levichev, E.; Piminov, P.

    2016-12-01

    The crab waist collision scheme promises significant luminosity gain. The successful upgrade of the DA Φ NE collider proved the principle of crab waist collision and increased luminosity 3 times. Therefore, several new projects try to implement the scheme. The paper reviews interaction region designs with the crab waist collision scheme for already existent collider DA Φ NE and SuperKEKB, presently undergoing commissioning, for the projects of SuperB in Italy, CTau in Novosibirsk and FCC-ee at CERN.

  15. MUON COLLIDERS - IONIZATION COOLING AND SOLENOIDS.

    SciTech Connect

    PARSA,Z.

    1999-03-29

    For a muon collider, to obtain the needed luminosity, the phase space volume must be greatly reduced within the muon life time. The ionization cooling is the preferred method used to compress the phase space and reduce the emittance to obtain high luminosity muon beams. Alternating solenoid lattices has been proposed for muon colliders, where the emittance are huge. We present an overview, discuss formalism, transfer maps for solenoid magnets and beam dynamics.

  16. Accelerator Considerations of Large Circular Colliders

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chao, Alex

    As we consider the tremendous physics reaches of the big future circular electron-positron and proton-proton colliders, it might be advisable to keep a close track of what accelerator challenges they face. Good progresses are being made, and yet it is reported here that substantial investments in funding, manpower, as well as a long sustained time to the R&D efforts will be required in preparation to realize these dream colliders.

  17. Accelerator considerations of large circular colliders

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chao, Alex

    2016-07-01

    As we consider the tremendous physics reaches of the big future circular electron-positron and proton-proton colliders, it might be advisable to keep a close track of what accelerator challenges they face. Good progresses are being made, and yet it is reported here that substantial investments in funding, manpower, as well as a long sustained time to the R&D efforts will be required in preparation to realize these dream colliders.

  18. Prevention of running injuries.

    PubMed

    Fields, Karl B; Sykes, Jeannie C; Walker, Katherine M; Jackson, Jonathan C

    2010-01-01

    Evidence for preventive strategies to lessen running injuries is needed as these occur in 40%-50% of runners on an annual basis. Many factors influence running injuries, but strong evidence for prevention only exists for training modification primarily by reducing weekly mileage. Two anatomical factors - cavus feet and leg length inequality - demonstrate a link to injury. Weak evidence suggests that orthotics may lessen risk of stress fracture, but no clear evidence proves they will reduce the risk of those athletes with leg length inequality or cavus feet. This article reviews other potential injury variables, including strength, biomechanics, stretching, warm-up, nutrition, psychological factors, and shoes. Additional research is needed to determine whether interventions to address any of these will help prevent running injury.

  19. Considerations on Energy Frontier Colliders after LHC

    SciTech Connect

    Shiltsev, Vladimir

    2016-11-15

    Since 1960’s, particle colliders have been in the forefront of particle physics, 29 total have been built and operated, 7 are in operation now. At present the near term US, European and international strategies of the particle physics community are centered on full exploitation of the physics potential of the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) through its high-luminosity upgrade (HL-LHC). The future of the world-wide HEP community critically depends on the feasibility of possible post-LHC colliders. The concept of the feasibility is complex and includes at least three factors: feasibility of energy, feasibility of luminosity and feasibility of cost. Here we overview all current options for post-LHC colliders from such perspective (ILC, CLIC, Muon Collider, plasma colliders, CEPC, FCC, HE-LHC) and discuss major challenges and accelerator R&D required to demonstrate feasibility of an energy frontier accelerator facility following the LHC. We conclude by taking a look into ultimate energy reach accelerators based on plasmas and crystals, and discussion on the perspectives for the far future of the accelerator-based particle physics. This paper largely follows previous study [1] and the presenta ion given at the ICHEP’2016 conference in Chicago [2].

  20. The International Linear Collider Technical Design Report - Volume 2: Physics

    SciTech Connect

    Baer, Howard; Barklow, Tim; Fujii, Keisuke; Gao, Yuanning; Hoang, Andre; Kanemura, Shinya; List, Jenny; Logan, Heather E.; Nomerotski, Andrei; Perelstein, Maxim; Peskin, Michael E.; Pöschl, Roman; Reuter, Jürgen; Riemann, Sabine; Savoy-Navarro, Aurore; Tait, Tim P.; Yu, Jaehoon

    2013-06-26

    The International Linear Collider Technical Design Report (TDR) describes in four volumes the physics case and the design of a 500 GeV centre-of-mass energy linear electron-positron collider based on superconducting radio-frequency technology using Niobium cavities as the accelerating structures. The accelerator can be extended to 1 TeV and also run as a Higgs factory at around 250 GeV and on the Z0 pole. A comprehensive value estimate of the accelerator is give, together with associated uncertainties. It is shown that no significant technical issues remain to be solved. Once a site is selected and the necessary site-dependent engineering is carried out, construction can begin immediately. The TDR also gives baseline documentation for two high-performance detectors that can share the ILC luminosity by being moved into and out of the beam line in a "push-pull" configuration. These detectors, ILD and SiD, are described in detail. They form the basis for a world-class experimental programme that promises to increase significantly our understanding of the fundamental processes that govern the evolution of the Universe.

  1. The International Linear Collider Technical Design Report - Volume 4: Detectors

    SciTech Connect

    Behnke, Ties

    2013-06-26

    The International Linear Collider Technical Design Report (TDR) describes in four volumes the physics case and the design of a 500 GeV centre-of-mass energy linear electron-positron collider based on superconducting radio-frequency technology using Niobium cavities as the accelerating structures. The accelerator can be extended to 1 TeV and also run as a Higgs factory at around 250 GeV and on the Z0 pole. A comprehensive value estimate of the accelerator is give, together with associated uncertainties. It is shown that no significant technical issues remain to be solved. Once a site is selected and the necessary site-dependent engineering is carried out, construction can begin immediately. The TDR also gives baseline documentation for two high-performance detectors that can share the ILC luminosity by being moved into and out of the beam line in a "push-pull" configuration. These detectors, ILD and SiD, are described in detail. They form the basis for a world-class experimental programme that promises to increase significantly our understanding of the fundamental processes that govern the evolution of the Universe.

  2. Beam-beam observations in the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider

    SciTech Connect

    Luo, Y.; Fischer, W.; White, S.

    2015-06-24

    The Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) at Brookhaven National Laboratory has been operating since 2000. Over the past decade, thanks to the continuously increased bunch intensity and reduced β*s at the interaction points, the maximum peak luminosity in the polarized proton operation has been increased by more than two orders of magnitude. In this article, we first present the beam-beam observations in the previous RHIC polarized proton runs. Then we analyze the mechanisms for the beam loss and emittance growth in the presence of beam-beam interaction. The operational challenges and limitations imposed by beam-beam interaction and their remedies are also presented. In the end, we briefly introduce head-on beam-beam compensation with electron lenses in RHIC.

  3. New Horizons Program Planning/Evaluation Report for 1992-93. Focus on Program Evaluation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sallade, Ronald

    The New Horizons Program of the Des Moines (Iowa) public schools provides supportive services such as counseling, attendance monitoring, career-related instruction, work experience, and coordination with community agencies to dropout-prone students and their families to improve academic achievement and increase graduation rates. Work experience is…

  4. Austin Youth River Watch Program: 1992-93 Final Report. Publication Number 92.33.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Turner, Jeannine

    The City of Austin (Texas) provides funds for an educational initiative to involve minority high school students in water quality issues and to reduce the dropout rate through positive role model interaction with academically successful students. Principal program activities were testing river water for pollutants and tutoring at-risk students by…

  5. Native American Public Broadcasting Consortium Catalog of Programming 1992-93.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Native American Public Broadcasting Consortium, Lincoln, NE.

    This catalog describes over 100 telecommunication programs offered through The Native American Public Broadcasting Consortium (NAPBC). The NAPBC is a nonprofit organization whose mission is to produce and encourage the production and successful use of quality public telecommunication programs by and about Native Americans. Indices to audio visual…

  6. The Wisdom Is Now (Project WIN) Final Evaluation Report, 1992-93. OREA Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bruno, Paula

    The Wisdom Is Now (Project WIN) was designed to increase student English proficiency, native language proficiency, and academic achievement, increase parent involvement, and encourage staff development at the High School for the Humanities and the School of Fashion industries in New York City. It served a total of 349 students of limited English…

  7. Quality Assessment in Scottish Higher Education 1992-93. Annual Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sizer, John

    This first evaluation in a Scottish national program of higher education quality assessment reports on evaluation of programs in the fields of economics and electrical and electronic engineering. Section 1 contains background information about legislation establishing the evaluation program, quality assessment and quality audit, the role of the…

  8. 1992-93 Results of geomorphological and field studies Volcanic Studies Program, Yucca Mountain Project

    SciTech Connect

    Wells, S.G.

    1993-10-01

    Field mapping and stratigraphic studies were completed of the Black Tank volcanic center, which represents the southwestern most eruptive center in the Cima volcanic field of California. The results of this mapping are presented. Contacts between volcanic units and geomorphic features were field checked, incorporating data from eight field trenches as well as several exposures along Black Tank Wash. Within each of the eight trenches, logs were measured and stratigraphic sections were described. These data indicate that three, temporally separate volcanic eruptions occurred at the Black Tank center. The field evidence for significant time breaks between each stratigraphic unit is the presence of soil and pavement-bounded unconformities.

  9. Center Stage: A Platform for the Discussion of Teaching/Learning Ideas, 1992-93.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sova, Ann; And Others

    1993-01-01

    The serial "Center Stage" is designed to provide a forum for the presentation and discussion of effective teaching methods, ideas, and experiences of the faculty at Broome Community College (BCC), in Binghamton, New York. Volume 3 includes seven issues, focusing on the following themes: (1) human discovery, including articles on…

  10. Presidential Leadership and Decisionmaking: National Security Strategy in Transition, 1992-93

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1993-04-15

    6 Jablonsky has described a paradigm as a set of shared assumptions. The incongruence of the above assumptions at least tells us that no strategy can...Michael M. Lombardo, "What Makes a Top Executive?" Psychology Today (February 1983). McKitrick, Jeffrey S. former Assistant to Vice President Quayle...AD-A265 48E.r-. I Ti. vMi e epmel h pape• M e * A of ft =*am a " & ot woemm*I refluci fte ViWs of * a Dqemmt of De a or my of itt q-- TMr demmam may wot

  11. 1992-93 Graduate Follow-Up Report. Wisconsin Technical College System Board.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wisconsin State Board of Vocational, Technical, and Adult Education, Madison.

    Each year, a follow-up study is conducted to gather data on the activities and perceptions of students approximately six months after their graduation from Wisconsin's Technical Colleges (WTC). Specifically, the survey seeks to identify the current activities of WTC graduates, determine the extent to which current activities are related to the…

  12. Availability of Products from National Workplace Literacy Grants (1992-93).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Office of Vocational and Adult Education (ED), Washington, DC. Div. of Adult Education and Literacy.

    This publication lists some of the curriculum resources that were produced through the National Workplace Literacy Program, Section 371 of the Adult Education Act, as amended by the National Literacy Act of 1991. The curriculum resources in this publication were developed during 1992-1993 of the demonstration program. The curriculum materials are…

  13. Multiwavelength lidar measurements of stratospheric aerosols above Spitsbergen during winter 1992/93

    SciTech Connect

    Beyerle, G.; Neuber, R.; Schrems, O. ); Wittrock, F. ); Knudsen, B. )

    1994-01-01

    Using a multiwavelength lidar the authors measured aerosols from the tropopause to altitudes of 30 km in the period December 1992 to March 1993. They analyzed backscatter and depolarization measurements to infer information on aerosol size and phase. During most of this period they saw evidence of a liquid drop aerosol layer in the lower stratosphere which was of a volcanic origin. In January they observed polar stratospheric clouds on numerous occasions, and particle size was found to depend strongly on the cooling rate.

  14. Queens Tri-School Confederation 1992-93 Evaluation Report. OREA Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dworkowitz, Barbara

    This report presents the evaluation results of the Queens Tri-School Confederation magnet programs in New York City: programs designed to reduce minority-group isolation among high school students in three high schools and simultaneously improve the quality of their education through the sharing of resources and expertise. These programs, which…

  15. An Environmental Scan Update, 1992-93. 2020: Perfect Vision for the Next Century.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Friedel, J. N., Ed.

    1992-01-01

    A key component to Eastern Iowa Community College District's (EICCD) strategic planning process, called "2020 Vision: A Perfect Vision for the Future," was the publication of the report "An Environmental Scan" in 1989, which summarized major trends occurring in the external environment which may impact the community college,…

  16. West Valley Demonstration Project Community Relations Plan, FY 1992/93

    SciTech Connect

    Chamberlain, J.D.

    1991-09-01

    The West Valley Demonstration Project (WVDP) Community Relations Plan establishes a framework of community outreach activities through which to provide the public current, accurate WVDP information, respond to public inquiries, and to receive comments from interested individuals and organizations. An open, effective community relations program is essential to developing public understanding of WVDP goals and direction. The mission of the WVDP is to solve an existing environmental concern by solidifying high-level nuclear waste, transporting the solidified waste to a federal repository for permanent disposal, and effectively closing the facilities used. As an environmental restoration and radioactive waste management project, being conducted at the site of a former nuclear fuel reprocessing facility, the WVDP is a matter of considerable public interest. Safe, effective site operations and the development of technology to meet WVDP goals are both focal points for interested individuals, technical organizations and societies, and environmental and educational groups.

  17. Follow-Up of JCCC Career Program Completers, Class of 1992-93.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johnson County Community Coll., Overland Park, KS. Office of Institutional Research.

    In an overall plan to assess institutional effectiveness, Johnson County Community College (JCCC) in Kansas conducts annual follow-up studies of students who completed career programs during the previous academic year, and also surveys employers of those completers. In fall 1993, surveys were mailed to 768 career program completers, including…

  18. DOE/EPSCoR Traineeship Program: Progress report, academic year 1992--93. Annual report 1993

    SciTech Connect

    Hodgson, D.; Steadman, J.

    1993-12-31

    This progress report reviews the University of Wyoming`s approach to implementing the DOE Traineeship Program, and briefly describes the research performed by the DOE/EPSCoR Trainees during the academic year, 1992--1993. These brief descriptions of individual research projects demonstrate the wide scope of energy-related research that the DOE-EPSCoR Traineeships have initiated in Wyoming. The availability of this funding has encouraged many talented students to continue their education in fields of interest to DOE. These additional bright, energetic graduate students have improved the educational atmosphere for everyone. The visibility of the DOE program has sharpened the focus of the science and engineering departments on the energy-related research of importance to Wyoming and DOE. The impact of the DOE Traineeships in Wyoming has been substantial and very positive. It has not only increased the number of students studying in energy-related disciplines, but has also increased the quality of their graduate research. The program has also increased the visibility of DOE in Wyoming and has helped focus attention on the energy and environmental graduate education which is so essential to the University and the State.

  19. Les Houches 2015: Physics at TeV Colliders Standard Model Working Group Report

    SciTech Connect

    Andersen, J.R.; et al.

    2016-05-16

    This Report summarizes the proceedings of the 2015 Les Houches workshop on Physics at TeV Colliders. Session 1 dealt with (I) new developments relevant for high precision Standard Model calculations, (II) the new PDF4LHC parton distributions, (III) issues in the theoretical description of the production of Standard Model Higgs bosons and how to relate experimental measurements, (IV) a host of phenomenological studies essential for comparing LHC data from Run I with theoretical predictions and projections for future measurements in Run II, and (V) new developments in Monte Carlo event generators.

  20. Who Runs Our Universities?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Watson, David

    2012-01-01

    Inside the academy there is a cultural perspective that it should run itself, in the sense that "business as usual" should be done with no one's hands obviously on the levers. This theory reaches its high point in the "self-government" of Oxford and Cambridge colleges. In this article, the author explores the question,…

  1. Running Wheel for Earthworms

    PubMed Central

    Wilson, W. Jeffrey; Johnson, Brandon A.

    2016-01-01

    We describe the construction and use of a running wheel responsive to the movement of the earthworm. The wheel employs readily available, inexpensive components and is easily constructed. Movement of the wheel can be monitored visually or via standard behavioral laboratory computer interfaces. Examples of data are presented, and possibilities for use in the teaching classroom are discussed. PMID:27385934

  2. The Art of Running

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brown, Jill Harris

    2007-01-01

    Every year, the Parent-Teacher Association of Ferndale Elementary School in Atlanta, Georgia sponsors a fun road race for the students, teachers, families, and community. This annual event has inspired the author to develop the Running and Art project to show off her students' art and squeeze in a little art history, too. In this article, the…

  3. PROSPECTS FOR COLLIDERS AND COLLIDER PHYSICS TO THE 1 PEV ENERGY SCALE

    SciTech Connect

    KING,B.J.

    2000-05-05

    A review is given of the prospects for future colliders and collider physics at the energy frontier. A proof-of-plausibility scenario is presented for maximizing the authors progress in elementary particle physics by extending the energy reach of hadron and lepton colliders as quickly and economically as might be technically and financially feasible. The scenario comprises 5 colliders beyond the LHC--one each of e{sup +}e{sup {minus}} and hadron colliders and three {mu}{sup +}{mu}{sup {minus}} colliders--and is able to hold to the historical rate of progress in the log-energy reach of hadron and lepton colliders, reaching the 1 PeV constituent mass scale by the early 2040's. The technical and fiscal requirements for the feasibility of the scenario are assessed and relevant long-term R and D projects are identified. Considerations of both cost and logistics seem to strongly favor housing most or all of the colliders in the scenario in a new world high energy physics laboratory.

  4. Update of Run 1 b results at CDF

    SciTech Connect

    J. Tseng

    2002-08-13

    While the Collider Detector at Fermilab (CDF) is starting a new data run, it is also finishing analyses based on the 100 pb{sup -1} ''Run 1'' data sample collected between 1992 and 1996. In particular, the {Lambda}{sub b} lifetime has been measured using the exclusive decay channel {Lambda}{sub b} {yields} J/{psi}{Lambda}{sup 0}. The B{sup +} cross section, based upon the decay B{sup +} {yields} J/{psi}K{sup +}, has been finalized, as well as the ratio of inclusive b quark cross sections at {radical}s = 630 GeV and 1800 GeV. Early results from the new data run with the displaced-track trigger, which shows great promise for b physics at CDF, are presented.

  5. SETUP AND PERFORMANCE OF THE RHIC INJECTOR ACCELERATORS FOR THE 2005 RUN WITH COPPER IONS.

    SciTech Connect

    AHRENS, L.; ALESSI, J.; GARDNER, C.J.

    2005-05-16

    Copper ions for the 2005 run [1] of the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) at Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) are accelerated in the Tandem, Booster and AGS prior to injection into RHIC. The setup and performance of these accelerators with copper are reviewed in this paper.

  6. Does Addiction Run in Families?

    MedlinePlus

    ... Addiction Run in Families? Does Addiction Run in Families? Listen PDF: EasyToRead_WhatIsAddiction_Final_012017.pdf Addiction ... Español English Español "Heart disease runs in some families. Addiction runs in ours." ©istock.com/ Antonio_Diaz ...

  7. The PDF4LHC report on PDFs and LHC data: Results from Run I and preparation for Run II

    DOE PAGES

    Rojo, Juan; Accardi, Alberto; Ball, Richard D.; ...

    2015-09-16

    The accurate determination of Parton Distribution Functions (PDFs) of the proton is an essential ingredient of the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) program. PDF uncertainties impact a wide range of processes, from Higgs boson characterization and precision Standard Model measurements to New Physics searches. A major recent development in modern PDF analyses has been to exploit the wealth of new information contained in precision measurements from the LHC Run I, as well as progress in tools and methods to include these data in PDF fits. In this report we summarize the information that PDF-sensitive measurements at the LHC have provided somore » far, and review the prospects for further constraining PDFs with data from the recently started Run II. As a result, this document aims to provide useful input to the LHC collaborations to prioritize their PDF-sensitive measurements at Run II, as well as a comprehensive reference for the PDF-fitting collaborations.« less

  8. The PDF4LHC report on PDFs and LHC data: Results from Run I and preparation for Run II

    SciTech Connect

    Rojo, Juan; Accardi, Alberto; Ball, Richard D.; Cooper-Sarkar, Amanda; de Roeck, Albert; Farry, Stephen; Ferrando, James; Forte, Stefano; Gao, Jun; Harland-Lang, Lucian; Huston, Joey; Glazov, Alexander; Gouzevitch, Maxime; Gwenlan, Claire; Lipka, Katerina; Lisovyi, Mykhailo; Mangano, Michelangelo; Nadolsky, Pavel; Perrozzi, Luca; Plačakytė, Ringaile; Radescu, Voica; Salam, Gavin P.; Thorne, Robert

    2015-09-16

    The accurate determination of Parton Distribution Functions (PDFs) of the proton is an essential ingredient of the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) program. PDF uncertainties impact a wide range of processes, from Higgs boson characterization and precision Standard Model measurements to New Physics searches. A major recent development in modern PDF analyses has been to exploit the wealth of new information contained in precision measurements from the LHC Run I, as well as progress in tools and methods to include these data in PDF fits. In this report we summarize the information that PDF-sensitive measurements at the LHC have provided so far, and review the prospects for further constraining PDFs with data from the recently started Run II. As a result, this document aims to provide useful input to the LHC collaborations to prioritize their PDF-sensitive measurements at Run II, as well as a comprehensive reference for the PDF-fitting collaborations.

  9. The PDF4LHC report on PDFs and LHC data: results from Run I and preparation for Run II

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rojo, Juan; Accardi, Alberto; Ball, Richard D.; Cooper-Sarkar, Amanda; de Roeck, Albert; Farry, Stephen; Ferrando, James; Forte, Stefano; Gao, Jun; Harland-Lang, Lucian; Huston, Joey; Glazov, Alexander; Gouzevitch, Maxime; Gwenlan, Claire; Lipka, Katerina; Lisovyi, Mykhailo; Mangano, Michelangelo; Nadolsky, Pavel; Perrozzi, Luca; Plačakytė, Ringaile; Radescu, Voica; Salam, Gavin P.; Thorne, Robert

    2015-10-01

    The accurate determination of the parton distribution functions (PDFs) of the proton is an essential ingredient of the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) program. PDF uncertainties impact a wide range of processes, from Higgs boson characterization and precision Standard Model measurements to new physics searches. A major recent development in modern PDF analyses has been to exploit the wealth of new information contained in precision measurements from the LHC Run I, as well as progress in tools and methods to include these data in PDF fits. In this report we summarize the information that PDF-sensitive measurements at the LHC have provided so far, and review the prospects for further constraining PDFs with data from the recently started Run II. This document aims to provide useful input to the LHC collaborations to prioritize their PDF-sensitive measurements at Run II, as well as a comprehensive reference for the PDF-fitting collaborations.

  10. WRF nature run

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Michalakes, J.; Hacker, J.; Loft, R.; McCracken, M. O.; Snavely, A.; Wright, N. J.; Spelce, T.; Gorda, B.; Walkup, R.

    2008-07-01

    The Weather Research and Forecast (WRF) model is a model of the atmosphere for mesoscale research and operational numerical weather prediction (NWP). A petascale problem for WRF is a nature run that provides very high-resolution 'truth' against which more coarse simulations or perturbation runs may be com-pared for purposes of studying predictability, stochastic parameterization, and fundamental dynamics. We carried out a nature run involving an idealized high resolution rotating fluid on the hemisphere, at a size and resolution never before attempted, and used it to investigate scales that span the k-3 to k-5/3 kinetic energy spectral transition, via simulations. We used up to 15,360 processors of the New York Blue IBM BG/L machine at Stony Brook Uni-versity and Brookhaven National Laboratory. The grid we employed has 4486 by 4486 horizontal grid points and 101 vertical levels (2 billion cells) at 5km resolution; this is 32 times larger than the previously largest 63 million cell 2.5km resolution WRF CONUS benchmark [10]). To solve a problem of this size, we worked through issues of parallel I/O and scalability and employed more processors than have ever been used in a WRF run. We achieved a sustained 3.4 Tflop/s on the New York Blue sys-tem, inputting and then generating an enormous amount of data to produce a scientifically meaningful result. More than 200 GB of data was input to initialize the run, which then generated output datasets of 40 GB each simulated hour. The cost of output was considered a key component of our investigation. Then we ran the same problem on more than 12K processors of the XT4 system at NERSC and achieved 8.8 Tflop/s. Our primary result however is not just scalability and a high Tflop/s number, but capture of atmosphere features never before represented by simulation, and taking an important step towards understanding weather predict-ability at high resolution.

  11. Seismic studies for Fermilab future collider projects

    SciTech Connect

    Lauh, J.; Shiltsev, V.

    1997-11-01

    Ground motion can cause significant beam emittance growth and orbit oscillations in large hadron colliders due to a vibration of numerous focusing magnets. Larger accelerator ring circumference leads to smaller revolution frequency and, e.g. for the Fermilab Very Large Hadron Collider(VLHC) 50-150 Hz vibrations are of particular interest as they are resonant with the beam betatron frequency. Seismic measurements at an existing large accelerator under operation can help to estimate the vibrations generated by the technical systems in future machines. Comparison of noisy and quiet microseismic conditions might be useful for proper choice of technical solutions for future colliders. This article presents results of wide-band seismic measurements at the Fermilab site, namely, in the tunnel of the Tevatron and on the surface nearby, and in two deep tunnels in the Illinois dolomite which is though to be a possible geological environment of the future accelerators.

  12. The Tevatron Hadron Collider: A short history

    SciTech Connect

    Tollestrup, A.V.

    1994-11-01

    The subject of this presentation was intended to cover the history of hadron colliders. However this broad topic is probably better left to historians. I will cover a much smaller portion of this subject and specialize my subject to the history of the Tevatron. As we will see, the Tevatron project is tightly entwined with the progress in collider technology. It occupies a unique place among accelerators in that it was the first to make use of superconducting magnets and indeed the basic design now forms a template for all machines using this technology. It was spawned in an incredibly productive era when new ideas were being generated almost monthly and it has matured into our highest energy collider complete with two large detectors that provide the major facility in the US for probing high Pt physics for the coming decade.

  13. Lattice of the NICA Collider Rings

    SciTech Connect

    Sidorin, Anatoly; Kozlov, Oleg; Meshkov, Igor; Mikhaylov, Vladimir; Trubnikov, Grigoriy; Lebedev, Valeri Nagaitsev, Sergei; Senichev, Yurij; /Julich, Forschungszentrum

    2010-05-01

    The Nuclotron-based Ion Collider fAcility (NICA) is a new accelerator complex being constructed at JINR. It is designed for collider experiments with ions and protons and has to provide ion-ion (Au{sup 79+}) and ion-proton collisions in the energy range 1 {divided_by} 4.5 GeV/n and collisions of polarized proton-proton and deuteron-deuteron beams. Collider conceptions with constant {gamma}{sub tr} and with possibility of its variation are considered. The ring has the racetrack shape with two arcs and two long straight sections. Its circumference is about 450m. The straight sections are optimized to have {beta}* {approx} 35cm in two IPs and a possibility of final betatron tune adjustment.

  14. The Large Hadron Collider: Redefining High Energy

    SciTech Connect

    Demers, Sarah

    2007-06-19

    Particle physicists have a description of the forces of nature known as the Standard Model that has successfully withstood decades of testing at laboratories around the world. Though the Standard Model is powerful, it is not complete. Important details like the masses of particles are not explained well, and realities as fundamental as gravity, dark matter, and dark energy are left out altogether. I will discuss gaps in the model and why there is hope that some puzzles will be solved by probing high energies with the Large Hadron Collider. Beginning next year, this machine will accelerate protons to record energies, hurling them around a 27 kilometer ring before colliding them 40 million times per second. Detectors the size of five-story buildings will record the debris of these collisions. The new energy frontier made accessible by the Large Hadron Collider will allow thousands of physicists to explore nature's fundamental forces and particles from a fantastic vantage point.

  15. B meson physics with polarized electron beams at linear colliders running at the Z

    SciTech Connect

    Atwood, W.B.

    1988-12-01

    The expected large cross section for e e Z and subsequent decay to b/bar b/ quarks makes the Z an attractive placeto pursue B meson physics. The cross section for b-quark production at the Z is compared to resonance production at the UPSILON/sub 4s/ and UPSILON/sub 5s/. In addition the big electroweak asymmetries, thought to exist in Z decays to b/bar b/ quarks with polarized electron beams, provide an outstanding handle for observation of such effects as B - /bar B/ mixing. In this paper, the feasibility of such measurements is investigated and, with relatively small samples of Z's (a few hundred thousand), both B/sub d/ and B/sub s/ meson mixing are shown to be measurable. The subject of CP violation in neutral B mesons is discussed last, but presently such measurements seem to be out of reach. 7 refs., 7 figs., 3 tabs.

  16. International linear collider reference design report

    SciTech Connect

    Aarons, G.

    2007-06-22

    The International Linear Collider will give physicists a new cosmic doorway to explore energy regimes beyond the reach of today's accelerators. A proposed electron-positron collider, the ILC will complement the Large Hadron Collider, a proton-proton collider at the European Center for Nuclear Research (CERN) in Geneva, Switzerland, together unlocking some of the deepest mysteries in the universe. With LHC discoveries pointing the way, the ILC -- a true precision machine -- will provide the missing pieces of the puzzle. Consisting of two linear accelerators that face each other, the ILC will hurl some 10 billion electrons and their anti-particles, positrons, toward each other at nearly the speed of light. Superconducting accelerator cavities operating at temperatures near absolute zero give the particles more and more energy until they smash in a blazing crossfire at the centre of the machine. Stretching approximately 35 kilometres in length, the beams collide 14,000 times every second at extremely high energies -- 500 billion-electron-volts (GeV). Each spectacular collision creates an array of new particles that could answer some of the most fundamental questions of all time. The current baseline design allows for an upgrade to a 50-kilometre, 1 trillion-electron-volt (TeV) machine during the second stage of the project. This reference design provides the first detailed technical snapshot of the proposed future electron-positron collider, defining in detail the technical parameters and components that make up each section of the 31-kilometer long accelerator. The report will guide the development of the worldwide R&D program, motivate international industrial studies and serve as the basis for the final engineering design needed to make an official project proposal later this decade.

  17. The Next Linear Collider: NLC2001

    SciTech Connect

    D. Burke et al.

    2002-01-14

    Recent studies in elementary particle physics have made the need for an e{sup +}e{sup -} linear collider able to reach energies of 500 GeV and above with high luminosity more compelling than ever [1]. Observations and measurements completed in the last five years at the SLC (SLAC), LEP (CERN), and the Tevatron (FNAL) can be explained only by the existence of at least one particle or interaction that has not yet been directly observed in experiment. The Higgs boson of the Standard Model could be that particle. The data point strongly to a mass for the Higgs boson that is just beyond the reach of existing colliders. This brings great urgency and excitement to the potential for discovery at the upgraded Tevatron early in this decade, and almost assures that later experiments at the LHC will find new physics. But the next generation of experiments to be mounted by the world-wide particle physics community must not only find this new physics, they must find out what it is. These experiments must also define the next important threshold in energy. The need is to understand physics at the TeV energy scale as well as the physics at the 100-GeV energy scale is now understood. This will require both the LHC and a companion linear electron-positron collider. A first Zeroth-Order Design Report (ZDR) [2] for a second-generation electron-positron linear collider, the Next Linear Collider (NLC), was published five years ago. The NLC design is based on a high-frequency room-temperature rf accelerator. Its goal is exploration of elementary particle physics at the TeV center-of-mass energy, while learning how to design and build colliders at still higher energies. Many advances in accelerator technologies and improvements in the design of the NLC have been made since 1996. This Report is a brief update of the ZDR.

  18. Top quark studies at hadron colliders

    SciTech Connect

    Sinervo, P.K.

    1997-01-01

    The techniques used to study top quarks at hadron colliders are presented. The analyses that discovered the top quark are described, with emphasis on the techniques used to tag b quark jets in candidate events. The most recent measurements of top quark properties by the CDF and DO Collaborations are reviewed, including the top quark cross section, mass, branching fractions, and production properties. Future top quark studies at hadron colliders are discussed, and predictions for event yields and uncertainties in the measurements of top quark properties are presented.

  19. Slepton Pair Production at Hadron Colliders

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fuks, B.

    2007-04-01

    In R-parity conserving supersymmetric models, sleptons are produced in pairs at hadron colliders. We show that measurements of the longitudinal single-spin asymmetry at possible polarization upgrades of existing colliders allow for a direct extraction of the slepton mixing angle. A calculation of the transverse-momentum spectrum shows the importance of resummed contributions at next-to-leading logarithmic accuracy in the small and intermediate transverse-momentum regions and little dependence on unphysical scales and non-perturbative contributions.

  20. SUSY CP phases and asymmetries at colliders

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kittel, Olaf

    2009-06-01

    In the Minimal Supersymmetric Standard Model, physical phases of complex parameters lead to CP violation. We show how triple products of particle momenta or spins can be used to construct asymmetries, that allow us to probe these CP phases. To give specific examples, we discuss the production of neutralinos at the International Linear Collider (ILC). For the Large Hadron Collider (LHC), we discuss CP asymmetries in squark decays, and in the tri-lepton signal. We find that the CP asymmetries can be as large as 60%.

  1. Collider physics for the late 1980's

    SciTech Connect

    Hinchliffe, I.

    1987-02-27

    Topics in the Standard Model of strong and electroweak interactions and how these topics are relevant for the high energy colliders are discussed. Radiative corrections in the Glashow-Weinberg-Salam model are discussed, stressing how these corrections may be measured at LEP and the SLC. CP violation is discussed, followed by a discussion of the Higgs boson and the searches which can be carried out for it. Some features of quantum chromodynamics are discussed which are relevant to hadron colliders. Some of the problems which the Standard Model does not solve are discussed. 115 refs., 53 figs. (LEW)

  2. Suppressing Electron Cloud in Future Linear Colliders

    SciTech Connect

    Pivi, M; Kirby, R.E.; Raubenheimer, T.O.; Le Pimpec, F.; /PSI, Villigen

    2005-05-27

    Any accelerator circulating positively charged beams can suffer from a build-up of an electron cloud (EC) in the beam pipe. The cloud develops through ionization of residual gases, synchrotron radiation and secondary electron emission and, when severe, can cause instability, emittance blow-up or loss of the circulating beam. The electron cloud is potentially a luminosity limiting effect for both the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) and the International Linear Collider (ILC). For the ILC positron damping ring, the development of the electron cloud must be suppressed. This paper discusses the state-of-the-art of the ongoing SLAC and international R&D program to study potential remedies.

  3. Collision avoidance by running insects: antennal guidance in cockroaches.

    PubMed

    Baba, Yoshichika; Tsukada, Akira; Comer, Christopher M

    2010-07-01

    Cockroaches were observed with videographic methods as escape running was initiated, but with obstacles in the path of their run. The goal was to determine the repertoire of possible responses to obstacles and the sensory cues used to trigger the responses. Intact cockroaches collided with obstacles on only about 10% of trials. The most common collision avoidance strategy was simply to stop running prior to impact. However, occasionally animals moved vertically and climbed over the barrier, or turned and navigated an edge of the obstacle, or completely reversed run direction. The avoidance strategies chosen depended on the size and configuration of the obstacle. Tests for the use of vision in detecting obstacles showed that its role, if any, is small. However, all manipulations that altered the antennal system changed behavior in a way consistent with the hypothesis that antennal mechanosensation plays a major role in collision avoidance. For example, reducing antennal length, or severing the main antennal nerve without altering the length produced significant increases in the frequency of collisions. Tests with tethered insects showed that (1) the antennae are preferentially directed forward as animals run, and (2) nearly simultaneous contact with both antennae is required to make the cockroach stop. Our data indicate that running cockroaches employ strategies that set their sensorimotor systems in a mode of readiness to deal with obstacles and they suggest that sensory information about the presence and configuration of obstacles is used to make choices, at very short latencies, about how to respond to obstructions.

  4. Collider Detector at Fermilab (CDF): Data from Standard Model and Supersymmetric Higgs Bosons Research of the Higgs Group

    DOE Data Explorer

    The Collider Detector at Fermilab (CDF) is a Tevatron experiment at Fermilab. The Tevatron, a powerful particle accelerator, accelerates protons and antiprotons close to the speed of light, and then makes them collide head-on inside the CDF detector. The CDF detector is used to study the products of such collisions. The CDF Physics Group at Fermilab is organized into six working groups, each with a specific focus. The Higgs group searches for Standard Model and Supersymmetric Higgs bosons. Their public web page makes data and numerous figures available from both CDF Runs I and II.

  5. Collider Detector at Fermilab (CDF): Data from the QCD Group's Research into Properties of the Strong Interaction

    DOE Data Explorer

    ,

    The Collider Detector at Fermilab (CDF) is a Tevatron experiment at Fermilab. The Tevatron, a powerful particle accelerator, accelerates protons and antiprotons close to the speed of light, and then makes them collide head-on inside the CDF detector. The CDF detector is used to study the products of such collisions. The CDF Physics Group at Fermilab is organized into six working groups, each with a specific focus. The QCD group studies the properties of the strong interaction. Their public web page makes data and numerous figures available from both CDF Runs I and II.

  6. Testing Higgs coupling precision and new physics scales at lepton colliders

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ge, Shao-Feng; He, Hong-Jian; Xiao, Rui-Qing

    2016-10-01

    The next-generation lepton colliders, such as CEPC, FCC-ee, and ILC will make precision measurement of the Higgs boson properties. We first extract the Higgs coupling precision from Higgs observables at CEPC to illustrate the potential of future lepton colliders. Depending on the related event rates, the precision can reach percentage level for most couplings. Then, we try to estimate the new physics scales that can be indirectly probed with Higgs and electroweak precision observables. The Higgs observables, together with the existing electroweak precision observables, can probe new physics up to 10 TeV (40 TeV for the gluon-related operator 𝒪g) at 95% C.L. Including the Z/W mass measurements and Z-pole observables at CEPC further pushes the limit up to 35 TeV. Although Z-pole running is originally for the purpose of machine calibration, it can be as important as the Higgs observables for probing the new physics scales indirectly. The indirect probe of new physics scales at lepton colliders can mainly cover the energy range to be explored by the following hadron colliders of pp (50-100 TeV), such as SPPC and FCC-hh.

  7. PDU Run 10

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1981-09-01

    PDU Run 10, a 46-day H-Coal syncrude mode operation using Wyodak coal, successfully met all targeted objectives, and was the longest PDU operation to date in this program. Targeted coal conversion of 90 W % was exceeded with a C/sub 4/-975/sup 0/F distillate yield of 43 to 48 W %. Amocat 1A catalyst was qualified for Pilot Plant operation based on improved operation and superior performance. PDU 10 achieved improved yields and lower hydrogen consumption compared to PDU 6, a similar operation. High hydroclone efficiency and high solids content in the vacuum still were maintained throughout the run. Steady operations at lower oil/solids ratios were demonstrated. Microautoclave testing was introduced as an operational aid. Four additional studies were successfully completed during PDU 10. These included a catalyst tracer study in conjunction with Sandia Laboratories; tests on letdown valve trims for Battelle; a fluid dynamics study with Amoco; and special high-pressure liquid sampling.

  8. Black Holes and the Large Hadron Collider

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Roy, Arunava

    2011-01-01

    The European Center for Nuclear Research or CERN's Large Hadron Collider (LHC) has caught our attention partly due to the film "Angels and Demons." In the movie, an antimatter bomb attack on the Vatican is foiled by the protagonist. Perhaps just as controversial is the formation of mini black holes (BHs). Recently, the American Physical Society…

  9. QCD parton model at collider energies

    SciTech Connect

    Ellis, R.K.

    1984-09-01

    Using the example of vector boson production, the application of the QCD improved parton model at collider energies is reviewed. The reliability of the extrapolation to SSC energies is assessed. Predictions at ..sqrt..S = 0.54 TeV are compared with data. 21 references.

  10. Physics Case for the International Linear Collider

    SciTech Connect

    Fujii, Keisuke; Grojean, Christophe; Peskin, Michael E.; Barklow, Tim; Gao, Yuanning; Kanemura, Shinya; Kim, Hyungdo; List, Jenny; Nojiri, Mihoko; Perelstein, Maxim; Poeschl, Roman; Reuter, Juergen; Simon, Frank; Tanabe, Tomohiko; Yu, Jaehoon; Wells, James D.; Murayama, Hitoshi; Yamamoto, Hitoshi; /Tohoku U.

    2015-06-23

    We summarize the physics case for the International Linear Collider (ILC). We review the key motivations for the ILC presented in the literature, updating the projected measurement uncertainties for the ILC experiments in accord with the expected schedule of operation of the accelerator and the results of the most recent simulation studies.

  11. Future Accelerators, Muon Colliders, and Neutrino Factories

    SciTech Connect

    Richard A Carrigan, Jr.

    2001-12-19

    Particle physics is driven by five great topics. Neutrino oscillations and masses are now at the fore. The standard model with extensions to supersymmetry and a Higgs to generate mass explains much of the field. The origins of CP violation are not understood. The possibility of extra dimensions has raised tantalizing new questions. A fifth topic lurking in the background is the possibility of something totally different. Many of the questions raised by these topics require powerful new accelerators. It is not an overstatement to say that for some of the issues, the accelerator is almost the experiment. Indeed some of the questions require machines beyond our present capability. As this volume attests, there are parts of the particle physics program that have been significantly advanced without the use of accelerators such as the subject of neutrino oscillations and many aspects of the particle-cosmology interface. At this stage in the development of physics, both approaches are needed and important. This chapter first reviews the status of the great accelerator facilities now in operation or coming on within the decade. Next, midrange possibilities are discussed including linear colliders with the adjunct possibility of gamma-gamma colliders, muon colliders, with precursor neutrino factories, and very large hadron colliders. Finally visionary possibilities are considered including plasma and laser accelerators.

  12. Beam-beam issues in asymmetric colliders

    SciTech Connect

    Furman, M.A.

    1992-07-01

    We discuss generic beam-beam issues for proposed asymmetric e{sup +}- e{sup -} colliders. We illustrate the issues by choosing, as examples, the proposals by Cornell University (CESR-B), KEK, and SLAC/LBL/LLNL (PEP-II).

  13. Proton-proton colliding beam facility ISABELLE

    SciTech Connect

    Hahn, H

    1980-01-01

    This paper attempts to present the status of the ISABELLE construction project, which has the objective of building a 400 + 400 GeV proton colliding beam facility. The major technical features of the superconducting accelerators with their projected performance are described. Progress made so far, difficulties encountered, and the program until completion in 1986 is briefly reviewed.

  14. Difficult Decisions: The Superconducting Super Collider.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Newton, David E.; Slesnick, Irwin L.

    1990-01-01

    The fundamental principles of the superconducting super collider are presented. Arguments for the construction of this apparatus and policy issues surrounding its construction are discussed. Charts of the fundamental atomic particles and forces and the history of particle accelerators are provided. An activity for discussing this controversial…

  15. Beam dynamics issues for linear colliders

    SciTech Connect

    Ruth, R.D.

    1987-09-01

    In this paper we discuss various beam dynamics issues for linear colliders. The emphasis is to explore beam dynamics effects which lead to an effective dilution of the emittance of the beam and thus to a loss of luminosity. These considerations lead to various tolerances which are evaluated for a particular parameter set.

  16. The status of the Stanford Linear Collider

    SciTech Connect

    Stiening, R.

    1987-03-01

    The Stanford Linear Collider is described, and the status of commissioning of the major SLC systems is given, including the electron source and 1.2 GeV linac, storage rings, 50 GeV linac, and positron source. Beam transport between the linac and final focus, and the final focus optical system are described. (LEW)

  17. RHIC FY15 pp Run RHIC and AGS polarization analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Huang, H.; Adams, P.

    2016-02-20

    The polarization information is important for the spin physics program in Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC). There are discrepancies between AGS and RHIC polarization measurements. First, the face value of AGS polarization is higher than RHIC ones in general. Second, the measured polarization profile (described by the profile ratio R) is stronger in AGS than in RHIC. This note analyzes the polarization data from FY15 pp run period. The results show that the differences between AGS and RHIC polarization measurements are reasonable, but the R value difference is puzzling. The difference between blue and yellow ring is worth of spin simulation to explain.

  18. Linear Collider Physics Resource Book Snowmass 2001

    SciTech Connect

    Ronan , M.T.

    2001-06-01

    The American particle physics community can look forward to a well-conceived and vital program of experimentation for the next ten years, using both colliders and fixed target beams to study a wide variety of pressing questions. Beyond 2010, these programs will be reaching the end of their expected lives. The CERN LHC will provide an experimental program of the first importance. But beyond the LHC, the American community needs a coherent plan. The Snowmass 2001 Workshop and the deliberations of the HEPAP subpanel offer a rare opportunity to engage the full community in planning our future for the next decade or more. A major accelerator project requires a decade from the beginning of an engineering design to the receipt of the first data. So it is now time to decide whether to begin a new accelerator project that will operate in the years soon after 2010. We believe that the world high-energy physics community needs such a project. With the great promise of discovery in physics at the next energy scale, and with the opportunity for the uncovering of profound insights, we cannot allow our field to contract to a single experimental program at a single laboratory in the world. We believe that an e{sup +}e{sup -} linear collider is an excellent choice for the next major project in high-energy physics. Applying experimental techniques very different from those used at hadron colliders, an e{sup +}e{sup -} linear collider will allow us to build on the discoveries made at the Tevatron and the LHC, and to add a level of precision and clarity that will be necessary to understand the physics of the next energy scale. It is not necessary to anticipate specific results from the hadron collider programs to argue for constructing an e{sup +}e{sup -} linear collider; in any scenario that is now discussed, physics will benefit from the new information that e{sup +}e{sup -} experiments can provide. This last point merits further emphasis. If a new accelerator could be designed and

  19. Towards a Future Linear Collider and The Linear Collider Studies at CERN

    ScienceCinema

    None

    2016-07-12

    During the week 18-22 October, more than 400 physicists will meet at CERN and in the CICG (International Conference Centre Geneva) to review the global progress towards a future linear collider. The 2010 International Workshop on Linear Colliders will study the physics, detectors and accelerator complex of a linear collider covering both the CLIC and ILC options. Among the topics presented and discussed will be the progress towards the CLIC Conceptual Design Report in 2011, the ILC Technical Design Report in 2012, physics and detector studies linked to these reports, and an increasing numbers of common working group activities. The seminar will give an overview of these topics and also CERN’s linear collider studies, focusing on current activities and initial plans for the period 2011-16. n.b: The Council Chamber is also reserved for this colloquium with a live transmission from the Main Auditorium.

  20. High-brightness injectors for hadron colliders

    SciTech Connect

    Wangler, T.P.

    1990-01-01

    The counterrotating beams in collider rings consist of trains of beam bunches with N{sub B} particles per bunch, spaced a distance S{sub B} apart. When the bunches collide, the interaction rate is determined by the luminosity, which is defined as the interaction rate per unit cross section. For head-on collisions between cylindrical Gaussian beams moving at speed {beta}c, the luminosity is given by L = N{sub B}{sup 2}{beta}c/4{pi}{sigma}{sup 2}S{sub B}, where {sigma} is the rms beam size projected onto a transverse plane (the two transverse planes are assumed identical) at the interaction point. This beam size depends on the rms emittance of the beam and the focusing strength, which is a measure of the 2-D phase-space area in each transverse plane, and is defined in terms of the second moments of the beam distribution. Our convention is to use the rms normalized emittance, without factors of 4 or 6 that are sometimes used. The quantity {tilde {beta}} is the Courant-Synder betatron amplitude function at the interaction point, a characteristic of the focusing lattice and {gamma} is the relativistic Lorentz factor. Achieving high luminosity at a given energy, and at practical values of {tilde {beta}} and S{sub B}, requires a large value for the ratio N{sub B}{sup 2}/{var epsilon}{sub n}, which implies high intensity and small emittance. Thus, specification of the luminosity sets the requirements for beam intensity and emittance, and establishes the requirements on the performance of the injector to the collider ring. In general, for fixed N{sub B}, the luminosity can be increased if {var epsilon}{sub n} can be reduced. The minimum emittance of the collider is limited by the performance of the injector; consequently the design of the injector is of great importance for the ultimate performance of the collider.

  1. Space-charge limitations in a collider

    SciTech Connect

    Fedotov, A.; Heimerle, M.

    2010-08-03

    Design of several projects which envision hadron colliders operating at low energies such as NICA at JINR [1] and Electron-Nucleon Collider at FAIR [2] is under way. In Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL), a new physics program requires operation of Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) with heavy ions at low energies at g=2.7-10 [3]. In a collider, maximum achievable luminosity is typically limited by beam-beam effects. For heavy ions significant luminosity degradation, driving bunch length and transverse emittance growth, comes from Intrabeam Scattering (IBS). At these low energies, IBS growth can be effectively counteracted, for example, with cooling techniques. If IBS were the only limitation, one could achieve small hadron beam emittance and bunch length with the help of cooling, resulting in a dramatic luminosity increase. However, as a result of low energies, direct space-charge force from the beam itself is expected to become the dominant limitation. Also, the interplay of both beambeam and space-charge effects may impose an additional limitation on achievable maximum luminosity. Thus, understanding at what values of space-charge tune shift one can operate in the presence of beam-beam effects in a collider is of great interest for all of the above projects. Operation of RHIC for Low-Energy physics program started in 2010 which allowed us to have a look at combined impact of beam-beam and space-charge effects on beam lifetime experimentally. Here we briefly discuss expected limitation due to these effects with reference to recent RHIC experience.

  2. SAVAGE RUN WILDERNESS, WYOMING.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    McCallum, M.E.; Kluender, Steven E.

    1984-01-01

    Mineral evaluation and related surveys were conducted in the Savage Run Wilderness in Wyoming and results of these studies indicate probable mineral-resource potential in four areas. Gold and (or) silver mineralization in veins associated with faults was found in two areas; all known occurrences inside the wilderness are very small in size. Slightly anomalous values of platinum, palladium, and nickel were recorded from rock-chip and stream- sediment samples from the southeast portion of the wilderness where layered mafic rocks predominate, and a probable resource potential exists for platinum, palladium, and nickel. An area of sheared rocks in the northeastern corner of the wilderness has a probable resource potential for copper. The nature of the geologic terrane precludes the occurrence of organic fuels.

  3. Running WASP at Argonne

    SciTech Connect

    Huber, C.C.

    1981-01-01

    The WASP model was initially implemented at Argonne for the International Training course on Electric System Planning being conducted at Argonne. This implementation was done with special consideration to course participants who are unfamiliar with WASP and with the computer system they use during the course. Cataloged Procedures were developed for this purpose. The procedures simplify using WASP and enable participants to quickly start using WASP with a minimum of training. Within the procedures, features were added that enhance WASP. These features include a formatted printout of WASP input data and a historical log of all runs and inut data used. For the RENAME step, an alternate method is presented, with special comment concerning the WASP3 release.

  4. The Running Athlete

    PubMed Central

    Henning, P. Troy

    2014-01-01

    Context: Pelvic stress fractures, osteitis pubis, and snapping hip syndrome account for a portion of the overuse injuries that can occur in the running athlete. Evidence Acquisition: PubMed searches were performed for each entity using the following keywords: snapping hip syndrome, coxa sultans, pelvic stress fracture, and osteitis pubis from 2008 to 2013. Topic reviews, case reports, case series, and randomized trials were included for review. Study Design: Clinical review. Level of Evidence: Level 4. Results: Collectively, 188 articles were identified. Of these, 58 were included in this review. Conclusion: Based on the available evidence, the majority of these overuse injuries can be managed non-operatively. Primary treatment should include removal from offending activity, normalizing regional muscle strength/length imbalances and nutritional deficiencies, and mitigating training errors through proper education of the athlete and training staff. Strength of Recommendation Taxonomy: C PMID:24587861

  5. Barefoot running: biomechanics and implications for running injuries.

    PubMed

    Altman, Allison R; Davis, Irene S

    2012-01-01

    Despite the technological developments in modern running footwear, up to 79% of runners today get injured in a given year. As we evolved barefoot, examining this mode of running is insightful. Barefoot running encourages a forefoot strike pattern that is associated with a reduction in impact loading and stride length. Studies have shown a reduction in injuries to shod forefoot strikers as compared with rearfoot strikers. In addition to a forefoot strike pattern, barefoot running also affords the runner increased sensory feedback from the foot-ground contact, as well as increased energy storage in the arch. Minimal footwear is being used to mimic barefoot running, but it is not clear whether it truly does. The purpose of this article is to review current and past research on shod and barefoot/minimal footwear running and their implications for running injuries. Clearly more research is needed, and areas for future study are suggested.

  6. SLAC electron-positron colliders: present and future

    SciTech Connect

    Richter, B.

    1986-09-01

    Stanford University's colliding beam program is outlined, including the SPEAR and PEP colliders and the SLAC linear collider. The accelerator developments to be pursued on these facilities are discussed, as well as advanced accelerator research and development. The items covered in the advanced accelerator research include beamstrahlung, stability requirements, breakdown limits, and power sources. (LEW)

  7. Higgs boson and Z physics at the first muon collider

    SciTech Connect

    Demarteau, M.; Han, T.

    1998-01-01

    The potential for the Higgs boson and Z-pole physics at the first muon collider is summarized, based on the discussions at the ``Workshop on the Physics at the First Muon Collider and at the Front End of a Muon Collider``.

  8. MADANALYSIS 5, a user-friendly framework for collider phenomenology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Conte, Eric; Fuks, Benjamin; Serret, Guillaume

    2013-01-01

    We present MADANALYSIS 5, a new framework for phenomenological investigations at particle colliders. Based on a C++ kernel, this program allows us to efficiently perform, in a straightforward and user-friendly fashion, sophisticated physics analyses of event files such as those generated by a large class of Monte Carlo event generators. MADANALYSIS 5 comes with two modes of running. The first one, easier to handle, uses the strengths of a powerful PYTHON interface in order to implement physics analyses by means of a set of intuitive commands. The second one requires one to implement the analyses in the C++ programming language, directly within the core of the analysis framework. This opens unlimited possibilities concerning the level of complexity which can be reached, being only limited by the programming skills and the originality of the user. Program summaryProgram title: MadAnalysis 5 Catalogue identifier: AENO_v1_0 Program summary URL:http://cpc.cs.qub.ac.uk/summaries/AENO_v1_0.html Program obtainable from: CPC Program Library, Queen's University, Belfast, N. Ireland Licensing provisions: Permission to use, copy, modify and distribute this program is granted under the terms of the GNU General Public License. No. of lines in distributed program, including test data, etc.: 31087 No. of bytes in distributed program, including test data, etc.: 399105 Distribution format: tar.gz Programming language: PYTHON, C++. Computer: All platforms on which Python version 2.7, Root version 5.27 and the g++ compiler are available. Compatibility with newer versions of these programs is also ensured. However, the Python version must be below version 3.0. Operating system: Unix, Linux and Mac OS operating systems on which the above-mentioned versions of Python and Root, as well as g++, are available. Classification: 11.1. External routines: ROOT (http://root.cern.ch/drupal/) Nature of problem: Implementing sophisticated phenomenological analyses in high-energy physics through a

  9. Coupled-bunch instabilities of the Tevatron at Run II

    SciTech Connect

    K. Y. Ng

    2003-03-06

    The longitudinal and transverse coupled-bunch instabilities of the Tevatron at Run II are addressed in two scenarios. The first scenario corresponds to the present Run II condition: 36 proton bunches on 36 antiprotons. Each proton bunch contains 1.7 x 10{sup 11} particles with a rms bunch length 60 cm. The second scenario is for the future upgrade when there are 108 proton bunches colliding with 108 antiproton bunches. Each proton bunch contains 2.7 x 10{sup 11} particles with a rms bunch length 50 cm. The analysis shows that the growth rates of transverse coupled-bunch instabilities are slow and will be damped by a small betatron tune spread. On the other hand, growth rates of longitudinal coupled-bunch instabilities will be fast especially for the 108-by-108 scenario.

  10. Collider signatures of flavorful Higgs bosons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Altmannshofer, Wolfgang; Eby, Joshua; Gori, Stefania; Lotito, Matteo; Martone, Mario; Tuckler, Douglas

    2016-12-01

    Motivated by our limited knowledge of the Higgs couplings to the first two generation fermions, we analyze the collider phenomenology of a class of two Higgs doublet models (2HDMs) with a nonstandard Yukawa sector. One Higgs doublet is mainly responsible for the masses of the weak gauge bosons and the third-generation fermions, while the second Higgs doublet provides mass for the lighter fermion generations. The characteristic collider signatures of this setup differ significantly from well-studied 2HDMs with natural flavor conservation, flavor alignment, or minimal flavor violation. New production mechanisms for the heavy scalar, pseudoscalar, and charged Higgs involving second-generation quarks can become dominant. The most interesting decay modes include H /A →c c ,t c ,μ μ ,τ μ and H±→c b ,c s ,μ ν . Searches for low-mass dimuon resonances are currently among the best probes of the heavy Higgs bosons in this setup.

  11. Slepton Flavor Physics at Linear Colliders

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dine, Michael; Grossman, Yuval; Thomas, Scott

    If low energy supersymmetry is realized in nature it is possible that a first generation linear collider will only have access to some of the superpartners with electroweak quantum numbers. Among these, sleptons can provide sensitive probes for lepton flavor violation through potentially dramatic lepton violating signals. Theoretical proposals to understand the absence of low energy quark and lepton flavor changing neutral currents are surveyed and many are found to predict observable slepton flavor violating signals at linear colliders. The observation or absence of such sflavor violation will thus provide important indirect clues to very high energy physics. Previous analyses of slepton flavor oscillations are also extended to include the effects of finite width and mass differences.

  12. Probes of Universal Extra Dimensions at Colliders

    SciTech Connect

    Rizzo, Thomas G.

    2001-06-28

    In the Universal Extra Dimensions model of Appelquist, Cheng and Dobrescu, all of the Standard Model fields are placed in the bulk and thus have Kaluza-Klein (KK) excitations. These KK states can only be pair produced at colliders due to the tree-level conservation of KK number, with the lightest of them being stable and possibly having a mass as low as {approx_equal} 350 400 GeV. After calculating the contribution to g-2 in this model we investigate the production cross sections and signatures for these particles at both hadron and lepton colliders. We demonstrate that these signatures critically depend upon whether the lightest KK states remain stable or are allowed to decay by any of a number of new physics mechanisms. These mechanisms which induce KK decays are studied in detail.

  13. Future high energy colliders symposium. Summary report

    SciTech Connect

    Parsa, Z. |

    1996-12-31

    A `Future High Energy Colliders` Symposium was held October 21-25, 1996 at the Institute for Theoretical Physics (ITP) in Santa Barbara. This was one of the 3 symposia hosted by the ITP and supported by its sponsor, the National Science Foundation, as part of a 5 month program on `New Ideas for Particle Accelerators`. The long term program and symposia were organized and coordinated by Dr. Zohreh Parsa of Brookhaven National Laboratory/ITP. The purpose of the symposium was to discuss the future direction of high energy physics by bringing together leaders from the theoretical, experimental and accelerator physics communities. Their talks provided personal perspectives on the physics objectives and the technology demands of future high energy colliders. Collectively, they formed a vision for where the field should be heading and how it might best reach its objectives.

  14. TARGETRY FOR A MU+MU- COLLIDER.

    SciTech Connect

    KIRK,H.G.

    1999-03-29

    The requirement for high luminosity in a {mu}{sup +}{mu}{sup -} collider leads one to conclude that a prodigious source of pions is needed followed by an efficient capture/decay channel. Significant targetry issues are raised by these demands. Among these are (1) the best target configuration to tolerate a high-rep rate, high-power proton beam ({approx} 10{sup 14} ppp at 15 Hz), (2) the pion spectra of the produced pions and (3) the best configuration for maximizing the quantity of captured pions. In this paper, the current thinking of the {mu}{sup +}{mu}{sup -} collider collaboration for solutions to these issues is discussed. In addition, we give a description of the R&D program designed to provide a proof-of-principle for a muon capture system capable of meeting the demands of a future high-luminosity machine.

  15. Testing electroweak baryogenesis with future colliders

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Curtin, David; Meade, Patrick; Yu, Chiu-Tien

    2014-11-01

    Electroweak Baryogenesis (EWBG) is a compelling scenario for explaining the matter-antimatter asymmetry in the universe. Its connection to the electroweak phase transition makes it inherently testable. However, completely excluding this scenario can seem difficult in practice, due to the sheer number of proposed models. We investigate the possibility of postulating a "no-lose" theorem for testing EWBG in future e + e - or hadron colliders. As a first step we focus on a factorized picture of EWBG which separates the sources of a stronger phase transition from those that provide new sources of CP violation. We then construct a "nightmare scenario" that generates a strong first-order phase transition as required by EWBG, but is very difficult to test experimentally. We show that a 100 TeV hadron collider is both necessary and possibly sufficient for testing the parameter space of the nightmare scenario that is consistent with EWBG.

  16. New DIS and collider results on PDFs

    SciTech Connect

    Rizvi, E.

    2015-05-15

    The HERA ep collider experiments have measured the proton structure functions over a wide kinematic range. New data from the H1 experiment now extend the range to higher 4-momentum transfer (√(Q{sup 2})) over which a precision of ∼ 2% is achieved in the neutral current channel. A factor of two reduction in the systematic uncertainties over previous measurement is attained. The charged current structure function measurements are also significantly improved in precision. These data, when used in QCD analyses of the parton density functions (PDFs) reduce the PDF uncertainties particularly at high momentum fractions x which is relevant to low energy neutrino scattering cross sections. New data from the LHC pp collider experiments may also offer significant high x PDF improvements as the experimental uncertainties improve.

  17. Initial operation of the Tevatron collider

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, R.

    1987-03-01

    The Tevatron is now the highest energy proton synchrotron and the only accelerator made with superconducting magnets. Operating since 1983 as a fixed-target machine at energies up to 800 GeV, it has now been modified to operate as a 900 GeV antiproton-proton collider. This paper describes the initial operation of the machine in this mode. The new features of the Fermilab complex, including the antiproton source and the Main Ring injector with its two overpasses and new rf requirements, are discussed. Beam characteristics in the Tevatron (including lifetimes, emittances, luminosity, beam-beam tune shifts, backgrounds, and low beta complications), the coordination of the steps in the accelerator chain, and the commissioning history are also discussed. Finally, some plans for the improvement of the collider are presented.

  18. Reverse Emittance Exchange for Muon Colliders

    SciTech Connect

    V. Ivanov, A. Afanasev, C.M. Ankenbrandt, R.P. Johnson, G.M. Wang, S.A. Bogacz, Y.S. Derbenev

    2009-05-01

    Muon collider luminosity depends on the number of muons in the storage ring and on the transverse size of the beams in collision. Ionization cooling as it is currently envisioned will not cool the beam sizes sufficiently well to provide adequate luminosity without large muon intensities. Six-dimensional cooling schemes will reduce the longitudinal emittance of a muon beam so that smaller high frequency RF cavities can be used for later stages of cooling and for acceleration. However, the bunch length at collision energy is then shorter than needed to match the interaction region beta function. New ideas to shrink transverse beam dimensions by lengthening each bunch will help achieve high luminosity in muon colliders. Analytic expressions for the reverse emittance exchange mechanism were derived, including a new resonant method of beam focusing.

  19. Really large hadron collider working group summary

    SciTech Connect

    Dugan, G.; Limon, P.; Syphers, M.

    1996-12-01

    A summary is presented of preliminary studies of three 100 TeV center-of-mass hadron colliders made with magnets of different field strengths, 1.8T, 9.5T and 12.6T. Descriptions of the machines, and some of the major and most challenging subsystems, are presented, along with parameter lists and the major issues for future study.

  20. Top physics at the Tevatron Collider

    SciTech Connect

    Margaroli, Fabrizio; /Purdue U.

    2007-10-01

    The top quark has been discovered in 1995 at the CDF and DO experiments located in the Tevatron ring at the Fermilab laboratory. After more than a decade the Tevatron collider, with its center-of-mass energy collisions of 1.96 TeV, is still the only machine capable of producing such exceptionally heavy particle. Here I present a selection of the most recent CDF and DO measurements performed analyzing {approx} 1 fb{sup -1} of integrated luminosity.

  1. Longitudinal damping in the Tevatron collider

    SciTech Connect

    Kerns, Q.A.; Jackson, G.; Kerns, C.R.; Miller, H.; Reid, J.; Siemann, R.; Wildman, D.

    1989-03-01

    This paper describes the damper design for 6 proton on 6 pbar bunches in the Tevatron collider. Signal pickup, transient phase detection, derivative networks, and phase correction via the high-level rf are covered. Each rf station is controlled by a slow feedback loop. In addition, global feedback loops control each set of four cavities, one set for protons and one set for antiprotons. Operational experience with these systems is discussed. 7 refs., 9 figs.

  2. Polarized muon beams for muon collider

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Skrinsky, A. N.

    1996-11-01

    An option for the production of intense and highly polarized muon beams, suitable for a high-luminosity muon collider, is described briefly. It is based on a multi-channel pion-collection system, narrow-band pion-to-muon decay channels, proper muon spin gymnastics, and ionization cooling to combine all of the muon beams into a single bunch of ultimately low emittance.

  3. Progress report on the SLAC Linear Collider

    SciTech Connect

    Rees, J.

    1986-06-01

    The SLAC Linear Collider project (SLC) is reported as being near completion. The performance specifications are tabulated both for the initial form and for eventual goals. Various parts of the SLC are described and the status of their construction is reported, including the front end electron gun and booster, the linac, damping ring, positron source, SLC arcs, and conventional facilities. 5 refs., 12 figs. (LEW)

  4. Backward running or absence of running from Creutz ratios

    SciTech Connect

    Giedt, Joel; Weinberg, Evan

    2011-10-01

    We extract the running coupling based on Creutz ratios in SU(2) lattice gauge theory with two Dirac fermions in the adjoint representation. Depending on how the extrapolation to zero fermion mass is performed, either backward running or an absence of running is observed at strong bare coupling. This behavior is consistent with other findings which indicate that this theory has an infrared fixed point.

  5. Muon Collider Machine-Detector Interface

    SciTech Connect

    Mokhov, Nikolai V.; /Fermilab

    2011-08-01

    In order to realize the high physics potential of a Muon Collider (MC) a high luminosity of {mu}{sup +}{mu}{sup -}-collisions at the Interaction Point (IP) in the TeV range must be achieved ({approx}10{sup 34} cm{sup -2}s{sup -1}). To reach this goal, a number of demanding requirements on the collider optics and the IR hardware - arising from the short muon lifetime and from relatively large values of the transverse emittance and momentum spread in muon beams that can realistically be obtained with ionization cooling should be satisfied. These requirements are aggravated by limitations on the quadrupole gradients as well as by the necessity to protect superconducting magnets and collider detectors from muon decay products. The overall detector performance in this domain is strongly dependent on the background particle rates in various sub-detectors. The deleterious effects of the background and radiation environment produced by the beam in the ring are very important issues in the Interaction Region (IR), detector and Machine-Detector Interface (MDI) designs. This report is based on studies presented very recently.

  6. Structure and Dynamics of Colliding Plasma Jets

    DOE PAGES

    Li, C.; Ryutov, D.; Hu, S.; ...

    2013-12-01

    Monoenergetic-proton radiographs of laser-generated, high-Mach-number plasma jets colliding at various angles shed light on the structures and dynamics of these collisions. The observations compare favorably with results from 2D hydrodynamic simulations of multistream plasma jets, and also with results from an analytic treatment of electron flow and magnetic field advection. In collisions of two noncollinear jets, the observed flow structure is similar to the analytic model’s prediction of a characteristic feature with a narrow structure pointing in one direction and a much thicker one pointing in the opposite direction. Spontaneous magnetic fields, largely azimuthal around the colliding jets and generatedmore » by the well-known ∇Te ×∇ne Biermann battery effect near the periphery of the laser spots, are demonstrated to be “frozen in” the plasma (due to high magnetic Reynolds number RM ~5×10⁴) and advected along the jet streamlines of the electron flow. These studies provide novel insight into the interactions and dynamics of colliding plasma jets.« less

  7. Structure and Dynamics of Colliding Plasma Jets

    SciTech Connect

    Li, C.; Ryutov, D.; Hu, S.; Rosenberg, M.; Zylstra, A.; Seguin, F.; Frenje, J.; Casey, D.; Gatu Johnson, M.; Manuel, M.; Rinderknecht, H.; Petrasso, R.; Amendt, P.; Park, H.; Remington, B.; Wilks, S.; Betti, R.; Froula, D.; Knauer, J.; Meyerhofer, D.; Drake, R.; Kuranz, C.; Young, R.; Koenig, M.

    2013-12-01

    Monoenergetic-proton radiographs of laser-generated, high-Mach-number plasma jets colliding at various angles shed light on the structures and dynamics of these collisions. The observations compare favorably with results from 2D hydrodynamic simulations of multistream plasma jets, and also with results from an analytic treatment of electron flow and magnetic field advection. In collisions of two noncollinear jets, the observed flow structure is similar to the analytic model’s prediction of a characteristic feature with a narrow structure pointing in one direction and a much thicker one pointing in the opposite direction. Spontaneous magnetic fields, largely azimuthal around the colliding jets and generated by the well-known ∇Te ×∇ne Biermann battery effect near the periphery of the laser spots, are demonstrated to be “frozen in” the plasma (due to high magnetic Reynolds number RM ~5×10⁴) and advected along the jet streamlines of the electron flow. These studies provide novel insight into the interactions and dynamics of colliding plasma jets.

  8. Neutrino Factory and Muon Collider Fellow

    SciTech Connect

    Hanson, Gail G.; Snopak, Pavel; Bao, Yu

    2015-03-20

    Muons are fundamental particles like electrons but much more massive. Muon accelerators can provide physics opportunities similar to those of electron accelerators, but because of the larger mass muons lose less energy to radiation, allowing more compact facilities with lower operating costs. The way muon beams are produced makes them too large to fit into the vacuum chamber of a cost-effective accelerator, and the short muon lifetime means that the beams must be reduced in size rather quickly, without losing too many of the muons. This reduction in size is called "cooling." Ionization cooling is a new technique that can accomplish such cooling. Intense muon beams can then be accelerated and injected into a storage ring, where they can be used to produce neutrino beams through their decays or collided with muons of the opposite charge to produce a muon collider, similar to an electron-positron collider. We report on the research carried out at the University of California, Riverside, towards producing such muon accelerators, as part of the Muon Accelerator Program based at Fermilab. Since this research was carried out in a university environment, we were able to involve both undergraduate and graduate students.

  9. Linear collider IR and final focus introduction

    SciTech Connect

    Irwin, J.; Burke, D.

    1991-09-01

    The Linear Collider subgroup of the Accelerator Physics working group concerned itself with all aspects of the Next Linear Collider (NLC) design from the end of the accelerating structure to and through the interaction region. Within this region are: (1) a collimation section, (2) muon protection (of the detector from the collimator), (3) final focus system, (4) interaction point physics, and (5) detector masking from synchrotron radiation and beam-beam pair production. These areas of study are indicated schematically in Fig. 1. The parameters for the Next Linear Collider are still in motion, but attention has settled on a handful of parameter sets. Energies under consideration vary from 0.5 to 1.5 TeV in the center of mass, and luminosities vary from 10{sup 33} to 10{sup 34} cm{sup {minus}2}s{sup {minus}1}. To be concrete we chose as a guide for our studies the parameter sets labeled F and G, Table 1 from Palmer. These cover large and small crossing angle cases and 0.4 m to 1.8 m of free length at the interaction point.

  10. Advanced Concepts for Electron-Ion Collider

    SciTech Connect

    Yaroslav Derbenev

    2002-08-01

    A superconducting energy recovery linac (ERL) of 5 to 10 GeV was proposed earlier as an alternative to electron storage rings to deliver polarized electron beam for electron-ion collider (EIC). To enhance the utilization efficiency of electron beam from a polarized source, it is proposed to complement the ERL by circulator ring (CR) wherein the injected electrons undergo up to 100 revolutions colliding with the ion beam. In this way, electron injector and linac operate in pulsed current (beam energy recovery) regime of a relatively low average current, while the polarization is still easily delivered and preserved. To make it also easier delivering and manipulating the proton and light ion polarization, twisted (figure 8) synchrotrons are proposed for heavy particle booster and collider ring. Same type of beam orbit can be used then for electron circulator. Electron cooling (EC) of the ion beam is considered an inevitable component of high luminosity EIC (1033/s. cm2 or above). It is recognized that EC also gives a possibility to obtain very short ion bunches, that allows much stronger final focusing. At the same time, short bunches make feasible the crab crossing (and traveling focus for ion beam) at collision points, hence, allow maximizing the collision rate. As a result, one can anticipate the luminosity increase by one or two orders of magnitude.

  11. The Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider at Brookhaven

    SciTech Connect

    Hahn, H.

    1988-01-01

    The conceptual design of a Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RACK) to be constructed in the existing 3.8 km tunnel at Brookhaven has been developed. The collider has been designed to provide collisions of gold ions at six intersection points with a luminosity of about 5 /times/ 10/sup 26/cm/sup /minus/2/sec/sup /minus/1/ at an energy of 100 GeV/u in each beam. Collisions with different ion species, including protons, will be possible. The collider consists of two interlaced, but otherwise separate, superconducting magnet rings. The 9.7 m long dipoles will operate at 3.5 T. Their 8 cm aperture was determined by the dimensions of gold ion beams taking into account diffusion due to intrabeam scattering. Heavy ion beams will be available from the Tandem Van de Graaff/Booster/AGS complex. The salient design features and the reasons for major design choices of the proposed machine are discussed in this paper. 24 refs., 7 figs., 2 tabs.

  12. 2001 Report on the Next Linear Collider

    SciTech Connect

    Gronnberg, J; Breidenbach; Burke, D; Corlett, J; Dombeck, T; Markiewicz, T

    2001-08-28

    Recent studies in elementary particle physics have made the need for an e{sup +}e{sup -} linear collider able to reach energies of 500 GeV and above with high luminosity more compelling than ever [1]. Observations and measurements completed in the last five years at the SLC (SLAC), LEP (CERN), and the Tevatron (FNAL) can be explained only by the existence of at least one particle or interaction that has not yet been directly observed in experiment. The Higgs boson of the Standard Model could be that particle. The data point strongly to a mass for the Higgs boson that is just beyond the reach of existing colliders. This brings great urgency and excitement to the potential for discovery at the upgraded Tevatron early in this decade, and almost assures that later experiments at the LHC will find new physics. But the next generation of experiments to be mounted by the world-wide particle physics community must not only find this new physics, they must find out what it is. These experiments must also define the next important threshold in energy. The need is to understand physics at the TeV energy scale as well as the physics at the 100-GeV energy scale is now understood. This will require both the LHC and a companion linear electron-positron collider.

  13. An Electron-Ion Collider at CEBAF

    SciTech Connect

    Kees de Jager; Lia Merminga; Ya. Derbenev

    2002-10-01

    Electron-ion colliders with a center of mass energy between 15 and 100 GeV, a luminosity of at least 10{sup 33}cm{sup -1}s{sup -1}, and a polarization of both beams at or above 80% have been proposed for future studies of hadronic structure. The scheme proposed here would accelerate the electron beam using the CEBAF recirculating linac with energy recovery. If all accelerating structures presently installed in the CEBAF tunnel are replaced by ones with a {approx}20 MV/m gradient, then a single recirculation results in an electron beam energy of about 5 GeV. After colliding with protons/light ions circulating in a figure-of-eight storage ring (for flexibility of spin manipulation) at an energy of up to 100 GeV, the electrons are re-injected into the CEBAF accelerator for deceleration and energy recovery. In this report several lay-out options and their respective feasibilities will be presented and discussed, together with parameters which would provide a luminosity of up to 1 x 10{sup 35} cm{sup -2}s{sup -1}. The feasibility of combining such a collider at a center-of-mass energy [sq rt] s of up to 43 GeV with a fixed target facility of 25 GeV is also explored.

  14. 2009: A Colliding-Wind Odyssey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fahed, R.; Moffat, A. F. J.; Zorec, J.; Eversberg, T.; Chené, A. N.; Alves, F.; Arnold, W.; Bergmann, T.; Corcoran, M. F.; Correia Viegas, N. G.; Dougherty, S. M.; Fernando, A.; Frémat, Y.; Gouveia Carreira, L. F.; Hunger, T.; Knapen, J. H.; Leadbeater, R.; Marques Dias, F.; Martayan, C.; Morel, T.; Pittard, J. M.; Pollock, A. M. T.; Rauw, G.; Reinecke, N.; Ribeiro, J.; Romeo, N.; Sánchez-Gallego, J. R.; dos Santos, E. M.; Schanne, L.; Stahl, O.; Stober, Ba.; Stober, Be.; Vollmann, K.; Williams, P. M.

    2012-12-01

    We present the results from two optical spectroscopic campaigns on colliding-wind binaries (CWB) which both occurred in 2009. The first one was on WR 140 (WC7pd + O5.5fc), the archetype of CWB, which experienced periastron passage of its highly elliptical 8-year orbit in January. The WR 140 campaign consisted of a unique and constructive collaboration between amateur and professional astronomers and took place at half a dozen locations, including Teide Observatory, Observatoire de Haute Provence, Dominion Astrophysical Observatory, Observatoire du Mont-Mégantic and at several small private observatories. The second campaign was on a selection of 5 short-period WR + O binaries not yet studied for colliding-wind effects: WR 12 (WN8h), WR 21 (WN5o + O7 V), WR 30 (WC6 + O7.5 V), WR 31 (WN4o + O8), and WR 47 (WN6o + O5). The campaign took place at Leoncito Observatory, Argentina, during 1 month. We provide updated values of most of these systems for the orbital parameters, new estimates for the WR and O star masses and new constraints on the mass-loss rates and colliding wind geometry.

  15. Study of the Polarization Deterioration During Physics Stores in RHIC Polarized Proton Runs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duan, Z.; Qin, Q.; Bai, M.; Roser, T.

    2016-02-01

    As the only high energy polarized proton collider in the world, the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) has achieved a great success in colliding polarized proton beams up to 255GeV per beam energy with over 50% average store polarizations for spin physics studies. With the help of Siberian snakes as well as outstanding beam control during the acceleration, polarization loss during acceleration up to 100 GeV is negligible. However, about 10% polarization loss was observed between acceleration from 100 GeV to 255 GeV. In addition, a mild polarization deterioration during long store for physics data taking was also observed. In this paper, studies in understanding the store depolarizing mechanism is reported, including the analysis of polarization deterioration data based on the past couple of RHIC polarized proton runs.

  16. The QCD running coupling

    DOE PAGES

    Deur, Alexandre; Brodsky, Stanley J.; de Téramond, Guy F.

    2016-05-09

    Here, we review present knowledge onmore » $$\\alpha_{s}$$, the Quantum Chromodynamics (QCD) running coupling. The dependence of $$\\alpha_s(Q^2)$$ on momentum transfer $Q$ encodes the underlying dynamics of hadron physics --from color confinement in the infrared domain to asymptotic freedom at short distances. We will survey our present theoretical and empirical knowledge of $$\\alpha_s(Q^2)$$, including constraints at high $Q^2$ predicted by perturbative QCD, and constraints at small $Q^2$ based on models of nonperturbative dynamics. In the first, introductory, part of this review, we explain the phenomenological meaning of the coupling, the reason for its running, and the challenges facing a complete understanding of its analytic behavior in the infrared domain. In the second, more technical, part of the review, we discuss $$\\alpha_s(Q^2)$$ in the high momentum transfer domain of QCD. We review how $$\\alpha_s$$ is defined, including its renormalization scheme dependence, the definition of its renormalization scale, the utility of effective charges, as well as `` Commensurate Scale Relations" which connect the various definitions of the QCD coupling without renormalization scale ambiguity. We also report recent important experimental measurements and advanced theoretical analyses which have led to precise QCD predictions at high energy. As an example of an important optimization procedure, we discuss the ``Principle of Maximum Conformality" which enhances QCD's predictive power by removing the dependence of the predictions for physical observables on the choice of the gauge and renormalization scheme. In last part of the review, we discuss $$\\alpha_s(Q^2)$$ in the low momentum transfer domain, where there has been no consensus on how to define $$\\alpha_s(Q^2)$$ or its analytic behavior. We will discuss the various approaches used for low energy calculations. Among them, we will discuss the light-front holographic approach to QCD in the strongly coupled

  17. The QCD running coupling

    SciTech Connect

    Deur, Alexandre; Brodsky, Stanley J.; de Téramond, Guy F.

    2016-05-09

    Here, we review present knowledge on $\\alpha_{s}$, the Quantum Chromodynamics (QCD) running coupling. The dependence of $\\alpha_s(Q^2)$ on momentum transfer $Q$ encodes the underlying dynamics of hadron physics --from color confinement in the infrared domain to asymptotic freedom at short distances. We will survey our present theoretical and empirical knowledge of $\\alpha_s(Q^2)$, including constraints at high $Q^2$ predicted by perturbative QCD, and constraints at small $Q^2$ based on models of nonperturbative dynamics. In the first, introductory, part of this review, we explain the phenomenological meaning of the coupling, the reason for its running, and the challenges facing a complete understanding of its analytic behavior in the infrared domain. In the second, more technical, part of the review, we discuss $\\alpha_s(Q^2)$ in the high momentum transfer domain of QCD. We review how $\\alpha_s$ is defined, including its renormalization scheme dependence, the definition of its renormalization scale, the utility of effective charges, as well as `` Commensurate Scale Relations" which connect the various definitions of the QCD coupling without renormalization scale ambiguity. We also report recent important experimental measurements and advanced theoretical analyses which have led to precise QCD predictions at high energy. As an example of an important optimization procedure, we discuss the ``Principle of Maximum Conformality" which enhances QCD's predictive power by removing the dependence of the predictions for physical observables on the choice of the gauge and renormalization scheme. In last part of the review, we discuss $\\alpha_s(Q^2)$ in the low momentum transfer domain, where there has been no consensus on how to define $\\alpha_s(Q^2)$ or its analytic behavior. We will discuss the various approaches used for low energy calculations. Among them, we will discuss the light-front holographic approach to QCD in the strongly coupled regime and its prediction

  18. Voluntary Wheel Running in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Goh, Jorming; Ladiges, Warren

    2015-01-01

    Voluntary wheel running in the mouse is used to assess physical performance and endurance and to model exercise training as a way to enhance health. Wheel running is a voluntary activity in contrast to other experimental exercise models in mice, which rely on aversive stimuli to force active movement. The basic protocol consists of allowing mice to run freely on the open surface of a slanted plastic saucer-shaped wheel placed inside a standard mouse cage. Rotations are electronically transmitted to a USB hub so that frequency and rate of running can be captured to a software program for data storage and analysis for variable time periods. Mice are individually housed so that accurate recordings can be made for each animal. Factors such as mouse strain, gender, age, and individual motivation, which affect running activity, must be considered in the design of experiments using voluntary wheel running. PMID:26629772

  19. Testable SUSY spectra from GUTs at a 100 TeV pp collider

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Antusch, Stefan; Sluka, Constantin

    2016-10-01

    Grand Unified Theories (GUTs) are attractive candidates for more fundamental elementary particle theories. They cannot only unify the Standard Model (SM) interactions but also different types of SM fermions, in particular quarks and leptons, in joint representations of the GUT gauge group. We discuss how comparing predictive supersymmetric GUT models with the experimental results for quark and charged lepton masses leads to constraints on the SUSY spectrum. We show an example from a recent analysis where the resulting superpartner masses where found just beyond the reach of LHC Run 1, but fully within the reach of a 100 TeV pp collider.

  20. Physics opportunities of a 100 TeV proton-proton collider

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arkani-Hamed, Nima; Han, Tao; Mangano, Michelangelo; Wang, Lian-Tao

    2016-10-01

    The discovery of the Higgs boson at the LHC exposes some of the most profound mysteries fundamental physics has encountered in decades, opening the door to the next phase of experimental exploration. More than ever, this will necessitate new machines to push us deeper into the energy frontier. In this article, we discuss the physics motivation and present the physics potential of a proton-proton collider running at an energy significantly beyond that of the LHC and a luminosity comparable to that of the LHC. 100 TeV is used as a benchmark of the center of mass energy, with integrated luminosities of 3ab-1- 30ab-1.

  1. Gaugino physics of split supersymmetry spectra at the LHC and future proton colliders

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jung, Sunghoon; Wells, James D.

    2014-04-01

    Discovery of the Higgs boson and lack of discovery of superpartners in the first run at the LHC are both predictions of split supersymmetry with thermal dark matter. We discuss what it would take to find gluinos at hadron supercolliders, including the LHC at 14 TeV center-of-mass energy, and future pp colliders at 100 TeV and 200 TeV. We generalize the discussion by reexpressing the search capacity in terms of the gluino to lightest superpartner mass ratio and apply results to other scenarios, such as gauge mediation and mirage mediation.

  2. Measurement of B(t --> Wb)/B(t--> Wq) at the collider detector at fermilab.

    PubMed

    Acosta, D; Adelman, J; Affolder, T; Akimoto, T; Albrow, M G; Ambrose, D; Amerio, S; Amidei, D; Anastassov, A; Anikeev, K; Annovi, A; Antos, J; Aoki, M; Apollinari, G; Arisawa, T; Arguin, J-F; Artikov, A; Ashmanskas, W; Attal, A; Azfar, F; Azzi-Bacchetta, P; Bacchetta, N; Bachacou, H; Badgett, W; Barbaro-Galtieri, A; Barker, G J; Barnes, V E; Barnett, B A; Baroiant, S; Bauer, G; Bedeschi, F; Behari, S; Belforte, S; Bellettini, G; Bellinger, J; Belloni, A; Ben-Haim, E; Benjamin, D; Beretvas, A; Berry, T; Bhatti, A; Binkley, M; Bisello, D; Bishai, M; Blair, R E; Blocker, C; Bloom, K; Blumenfeld, B; Bocci, A; Bodek, A; Bolla, G; Bolshov, A; Bortoletto, D; Boudreau, J; Bourov, S; Brau, B; Bromberg, C; Brubaker, E; Budagov, J; Budd, H S; Burkett, K; Busetto, G; Bussey, P; Byrum, K L; Cabrera, S; Campanelli, M; Campbell, M; Canelli, F; Canepa, A; Casarsa, M; Carlsmith, D; Carosi, R; Carron, S; Cavalli-Sforza, M; Castro, A; Catastini, P; Cauz, D; Cerri, A; Cerrito, L; Chapman, J; Chen, Y C; Chertok, M; Chiarelli, G; Chlachidze, G; Chlebana, F; Cho, I; Cho, K; Chokheli, D; Chou, J P; Chuang, S; Chung, K; Chung, W-H; Chung, Y S; Cijliak, M; Ciobanu, C I; Ciocci, M A; Clark, A G; Clark, D; Coca, M; Connolly, A; Convery, M; Conway, J; Cooper, B; Copic, K; Cordelli, M; Cortiana, G; Cranshaw, J; Cuevas, J; Cruz, A; Culbertson, R; Currat, C; Cyr, D; Dagenhart, D; Da Ronco, S; D'Auria, S; de Barbaro, P; De Cecco, S; Deisher, A; De Lentdecker, G; Dell'Orso, M; Demers, S; Demortier, L; Deninno, M; de Pedis, D; Derwent, P F; Dionisi, C; Dittmann, J R; DiTuro, P; Dörr, C; Dominguez, A; Donati, S; Donega, M; Donini, J; D'Onofrio, M; Dorigo, T; Ebina, K; Efron, J; Ehlers, J; Erbacher, R; Erdmann, M; Errede, D; Errede, S; Eusebi, R; Fang, H-C; Farrington, S; Fedorko, I; Fedorko, W T; Feild, R G; Feindt, M; Fernandez, J P; Field, R D; Flanagan, G; Flores-Castillo, L R; Foland, A; Forrester, S; Foster, G W; Franklin, M; Freeman, J C; Fujii, Y; Furic, I; Gajjar, A; Gallinaro, M; Galyardt, J; Garcia-Sciveres, M; Garfinkel, A F; Gay, C; Gerberich, H; Gerdes, D W; Gerchtein, E; Giagu, S; Giannetti, P; Gibson, A; Gibson, K; Ginsburg, C; Giolo, K; Giordani, M; Giunta, M; Giurgiu, G; Glagolev, V; Glenzinski, D; Gold, M; Goldschmidt, N; Goldstein, D; Goldstein, J; Gomez, G; Gomez-Ceballos, G; Goncharov, M; González, O; Gorelov, I; Goshaw, A T; Gotra, Y; Goulianos, K; Gresele, A; Griffiths, M; Grosso-Pilcher, C; Grundler, U; da Costa, J Guimaraes; Haber, C; Hahn, K; Hahn, S R; Halkiadakis, E; Hamilton, A; Han, B-Y; Handler, R; Happacher, F; Hara, K; Hare, M; Harr, R F; Harris, R M; Hartmann, F; Hatakeyama, K; Hauser, J; Hays, C; Hayward, H; Heinemann, B; Heinrich, J; Hennecke, M; Herndon, M; Hill, C; Hirschbuehl, D; Hocker, A; Hoffman, K D; Holloway, A; Hou, S; Houlden, M A; Huffman, B T; Huang, Y; Hughes, R E; Huston, J; Ikado, K; Incandela, J; Introzzi, G; Iori, M; Ishizawa, Y; Issever, C; Ivanov, A; Iwata, Y; Iyutin, B; James, E; Jang, D; Jayatilaka, B; Jeans, D; Jensen, H; Jeon, E J; Jones, M; Joo, K K; Jun, S Y; Junk, T; Kamon, T; Kang, J; Unel, M Karagoz; Karchin, P E; Kato, Y; Kemp, Y; Kephart, R; Kerzel, U; Khotilovich, V; Kilminster, B; Kim, D H; Kim, H S; Kim, J E; Kim, M J; Kim, M S; Kim, S B; Kim, S H; Kim, Y K; Kirby, M; Kirsch, L; Klimenko, S; Klute, M; Knuteson, B; Ko, B R; Kobayashi, H; Kong, D J; Kondo, K; Konigsberg, J; Kordas, K; Korn, A; Korytov, A; Kotwal, A V; Kovalev, A; Kraus, J; Kravchenko, I; Kreymer, A; Kroll, J; Kruse, M; Krutelyov, V; Kuhlmann, S E; Kwang, S; Laasanen, A T; Lai, S; Lami, S; Lammel, S; Lancaster, M; Lander, R; Lannon, K; Lath, A; Latino, G; Lazzizzera, I; Lecci, C; Lecompte, T; Lee, J; Lee, J; Lee, S W; Lefèvre, R; Leonardo, N; Leone, S; Levy, S; Lewis, J D; Li, K; Lin, C; Lin, C S; Lindgren, M; Lipeles, E; Liss, T M; Lister, A; Litvintsev, D O; Liu, T; Liu, Y; Lockyer, N S; Loginov, A; Loreti, M; Loverre, P; Lu, R-S; Lucchesi, D; Lujan, P; Lukens, P; Lungu, G; Lyons, L; Lys, J; Lysak, R; Lytken, E; MacQueen, D; Madrak, R; Maeshima, K; Maksimovic, P; Manca, G; Margaroli, F; Marginean, R; Marino, C; Martin, A; Martin, M; Martin, V; Martínez, M; Maruyama, T; Matsunaga, H; Mattson, M; Mazzanti, P; McFarland, K S; McGivern, D; McIntyre, P M; McNamara, P; McNulty, R; Mehta, A; Menzemer, S; Menzione, A; Merkel, P; Mesropian, C; Messina, A; Miao, T; Miladinovic, N; Miles, J; Miller, L; Miller, R; Miller, J S; Mills, C; Miquel, R; Miscetti, S; Mitselmakher, G; Miyamoto, A; Moggi, N; Mohr, B; Moore, R; Morello, M; Fernandez, P A Movilla; Muelmenstaedt, J; Mukherjee, A; Mulhearn, M; Muller, T; Mumford, R; Munar, A; Murat, P; Nachtman, J; Nahn, S; Nakano, I; Napier, A; Napora, R; Naumov, D; Necula, V; Nelson, T; Neu, C; Neubauer, M S; Nielsen, J; Nigmanov, T; Nodulman, L; Norniella, O; Ogawa, T; Oh, S H; Oh, Y D; Ohsugi, T; Okusawa, T; Oldeman, R; Orava, R; Orejudos, W; Osterberg, K; Pagliarone, C; Palencia, E; Paoletti, R; Papadimitriou, V; Paramonov, A A; Pashapour, S; Patrick, J; Pauletta, G; Paulini, M; Paus, C; Pellett, D; Penzo, A; Phillips, T J; Piacentino, G; Piedra, J; Pitts, K T; Plager, C; Pondrom, L; Pope, G; Portell, X; Poukhov, O; Pounder, N; Prakoshyn, F; Pronko, A; Proudfoot, J; Ptohos, F; Punzi, G; Rademacker, J; Rahaman, M A; Rakitine, A; Rappoccio, S; Ratnikov, F; Ray, H; Reisert, B; Rekovic, V; Renton, P; Rescigno, M; Rimondi, F; Rinnert, K; Ristori, L; Robertson, W J; Robson, A; Rodrigo, T; Rolli, S; Roser, R; Rossin, R; Rott, C; Russ, J; Rusu, V; Ruiz, A; Ryan, D; Saarikko, H; Sabik, S; Safonov, A; St Denis, R; Sakumoto, W K; Salamanna, G; Saltzberg, D; Sanchez, C; Santi, L; Sarkar, S; Sato, K; Savard, P; Savoy-Navarro, A; Schlabach, P; Schmidt, E E; Schmidt, M P; Schmitt, M; Schwarz, T; Scodellaro, L; Scott, A L; Scribano, A; Scuri, F; Sedov, A; Seidel, S; Seiya, Y; Semenov, A; Semeria, F; Sexton-Kennedy, L; Sfiligoi, I; Shapiro, M D; Shears, T; Shepard, P F; Sherman, D; Shimojima, M; Shochet, M; Shon, Y; Shreyber, I; Sidoti, A; Sill, A; Sinervo, P; Sisakyan, A; Sjolin, J; Skiba, A; Slaughter, A J; Sliwa, K; Smirnov, D; Smith, J R; Snider, F D; Snihur, R; Soderberg, M; Soha, A; Somalwar, S V; Spalding, J; Spezziga, M; Spinella, F; Squillacioti, P; Stadie, H; Stanitzki, M; Stelzer, B; Stelzer-Chilton, O; Stentz, D; Strologas, J; Stuart, D; Suh, J S; Sukhanov, A; Sumorok, K; Sun, H; Suzuki, T; Taffard, A; Tafirout, R; Takano, H; Takashima, R; Takeuchi, Y; Takikawa, K; Tanaka, M; Tanaka, R; Tanimoto, N; Tecchio, M; Teng, P K; Terashi, K; Tesarek, R J; Tether, S; Thom, J; Thompson, A S; Thomson, E; Tipton, P; Tiwari, V; Tkaczyk, S; Toback, D; Tollefson, K; Tomura, T; Tonelli, D; Tönnesmann, M; Torre, S; Torretta, D; Tourneur, S; Trischuk, W; Tsuchiya, R; Tsuno, S; Tsybychev, D; Turini, N; Ukegawa, F; Unverhau, T; Uozumi, S; Usynin, D; Vacavant, L; Vaiciulis, A; Varganov, A; Vejcik, S; Velev, G; Veszpremi, V; Veramendi, G; Vickey, T; Vidal, R; Vila, I; Vilar, R; Vollrath, I; Volobouev, I; von der Mey, M; Wagner, P; Wagner, R G; Wagner, R L; Wagner, W; Wallny, R; Walter, T; Wan, Z; Wang, M J; Wang, S M; Warburton, A; Ward, B; Waschke, S; Waters, D; Watts, T; Weber, M; Wester, W C; Whitehouse, B; Whiteson, D; Wicklund, A B; Wicklund, E; Williams, H H; Wilson, P; Winer, B L; Wittich, P; Wolbers, S; Wolfe, C; Wolter, M; Worcester, M; Worm, S; Wright, T; Wu, X; Würthwein, F; Wyatt, A; Yagil, A; Yamashita, T; Yamamoto, K; Yamaoka, J; Yang, C; Yang, U K; Yao, W; Yeh, G P; Yoh, J; Yorita, K; Yoshida, T; Yu, I; Yu, S; Yun, J C; Zanello, L; Zanetti, A; Zaw, I; Zetti, F; Zhou, J; Zucchelli, S

    2005-09-02

    We present a measurement of the ratio of top-quark branching fractions R = B(t --> Wb)/B(t --> Wq), where q can be a b, s, or a d quark, using lepton-plus-jets and dilepton data sets with an integrated luminosity of approximately 162 pb(-1) collected with the Collider Detector at Fermilab during Run II of the Tevatron. The measurement is derived from the relative numbers of tt events with different multiplicity of identified secondary vertices. We set a lower limit of R > 0.61 at 95% confidence level.

  3. Operating Procedure Changes to Improve Antiproton Production at the Fermilab Tevatron Collider

    SciTech Connect

    Drendel, B.; Morgan, J.P.; Vander Meulen, D.; /Fermilab

    2009-04-01

    Since the start of Fermilab Collider Run II in 2001, the maximum weekly antiproton accumulation rate has increased from 400 x 10{sup 10} Pbars/week to approximately 3,700 x 10{sup 10} Pbars/week. There are many factors contributing to this increase, one of which involves changes to operational procedures that have streamlined and automated Antiproton Source production. Automation has been added to the beam line orbit control, stochastic cooling power level management, and RF settings. In addition, daily tuning efforts have been streamlined by implementing sequencer driven tuning software.

  4. Biodiversity conservation in running waters

    SciTech Connect

    Allan, J.D. ); Flecker, A.S. )

    1993-01-01

    In the concerns about biodiversity conservation, fresh waters have received less attention than tropical forests and oceans. However, running waters harbor a diverse panoply of species, habitats, and ecosystems, including some of the most threatened and many having great value to human society. An overview of the biological diversity of running waters and the state of imperilment is presented. Six major factors that threaten destruction of running water species and ecosystems are discussed: habitat loss and degradation; species invasions; overharvesting; secondary extinctions; chemical and organic pollution; global climate change. General measures for recovery and restoration of running waters conclude the article.

  5. A Running Start: Resource Guide for Youth Running Programs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jenny, Seth; Becker, Andrew; Armstrong, Tess

    2016-01-01

    The lack of physical activity is an epidemic problem among American youth today. In order to combat this, many schools are incorporating youth running programs as a part of their comprehensive school physical activity programs. These youth running programs are being implemented before or after school, at school during recess at the elementary…

  6. [Calorimeter based detectors for high energy hadron colliders]. [Progress report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-08-04

    This document provides a progress report on research that has been conducted under DOE Grant DEFG0292ER40697 for the past year, and describes proposed work for the second year of this 8 year grant starting November 15, 1992. Personnel supported by the contract include 4 faculty, 1 research faculty, 4 postdocs, and 9 graduate students. The work under this grant has in the past been directed in two complementary directions -- DO at Fermilab, and the second SSC detector GEM. A major effort has been towards the construction and commissioning of the new Fermilab Collider detector DO, including design, construction, testing, the commissioning of the central tracking and the central calorimeters. The first DO run is now underway, with data taking and analysis of the first events. Trigger algorithms, data acquisition, calibration of tracking and calorimetry, data scanning and analysis, and planning for future upgrades of the DO detector with the advent of the FNAL Main Injector are all involved. The other effort supported by this grant has been towards the design of GEM, a large and general-purpose SSC detector with special emphasis on accurate muon measurement over a large solid angle. This effort will culminate this year in the presentation to the SSC laboratory of the GEM Technical Design Report. Contributions are being made to the detector design, coordination, and physics simulation studies with special emphasis on muon final states. Collaboration with the RD5 group at CERN to study muon punch through and to test cathode strip chamber prototypes was begun.

  7. Using Data from the Large Hadron Collider in the Classroom

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, Jeremy

    2017-01-01

    Now is an exciting time for physics students, because they have access to technology and experiments all over the world that were unthinkable a generation ago. Therefore, now is also the ideal time to bring these experiments into the classroom, so students can see what cutting edge science looks like, both in terms of the underlying physics and in terms of the technology used to gather data. With the continued running of the Large Hadron Collider at CERN, and the lab's continued dedication to providing open, worldwide access to their data, there is a unique opportunity for students to use these data in a manner very similar to how it's done in the particle physics community. In this session, we will explore ways for students to analyze real data from the CMS experiment at the LHC, plot these data to discover patterns and signals, and use these plots to determine quantities such as the invariant masses of the W, Z and Higgs bosons. Furthermore, we will show how such activities already fit well into standard introductory physics classes, and can in fact enhance already-existing lessons in the topics of momentum, kinematics, energy and electromagnetism.

  8. The QCD running coupling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deur, Alexandre; Brodsky, Stanley J.; de Téramond, Guy F.

    2016-09-01

    We review the present theoretical and empirical knowledge for αs, the fundamental coupling underlying the interactions of quarks and gluons in Quantum Chromodynamics (QCD). The dependence of αs(Q2) on momentum transfer Q encodes the underlying dynamics of hadron physics-from color confinement in the infrared domain to asymptotic freedom at short distances. We review constraints on αs(Q2) at high Q2, as predicted by perturbative QCD, and its analytic behavior at small Q2, based on models of nonperturbative dynamics. In the introductory part of this review, we explain the phenomenological meaning of the coupling, the reason for its running, and the challenges facing a complete understanding of its analytic behavior in the infrared domain. In the second, more technical, part of the review, we discuss the behavior of αs(Q2) in the high momentum transfer domain of QCD. We review how αs is defined, including its renormalization scheme dependence, the definition of its renormalization scale, the utility of effective charges, as well as "Commensurate Scale Relations" which connect the various definitions of the QCD coupling without renormalization-scale ambiguity. We also report recent significant measurements and advanced theoretical analyses which have led to precise QCD predictions at high energy. As an example of an important optimization procedure, we discuss the "Principle of Maximum Conformality", which enhances QCD's predictive power by removing the dependence of the predictions for physical observables on the choice of theoretical conventions such as the renormalization scheme. In the last part of the review, we discuss the challenge of understanding the analytic behavior αs(Q2) in the low momentum transfer domain. We survey various theoretical models for the nonperturbative strongly coupled regime, such as the light-front holographic approach to QCD. This new framework predicts the form of the quark-confinement potential underlying hadron spectroscopy and

  9. Dark Matter Benchmark Models for Early LHC Run-2 Searches. Report of the ATLAS/CMS Dark Matter Forum

    SciTech Connect

    Abercrombie, Daniel

    2015-07-06

    One of the guiding principles of this report is to channel the efforts of the ATLAS and CMS collaborations towards a minimal basis of dark matter models that should influence the design of the early Run-2 searches. At the same time, a thorough survey of realistic collider signals of Dark Matter is a crucial input to the overall design of the search program.

  10. Characterization of the first prototype of the ALICE SAMPA ASIC for LHC Run 3 and beyond

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tambave, G.; Engeseth, K. P.; Velure, A.

    2017-03-01

    A Large Ion Collider Experiment (ALICE) at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) is planing to upgrade its Time Projection Chamber (TPC) due to the expected higher Pb-Pb collision-rates in the next running period (Run 3) of the LHC starting in 2020. In the upgraded TPC, Gas Electron Multiplier (GEM) chambers and continuous readout system will replace Multi-Wire Proportional (MWP) chambers and conventional triggered readout. In the continuous readout, GEM signals will be processed using a 32 channel SAMPA ASIC. The first version of the SAMPA (MPW1) was delivered in 2014 and the production of final version is in progress. In this paper, the test results obtained for charge injection to the device using pulse generator as well as GEM detector prototype are reported.

  11. Searches for the Standard Model Higgs boson at the LEP collider

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Igo-Kemenes, Peter; Read, Alexander L.

    2016-10-01

    The Large Electron Positron (LEP) collider installed at CERN provided unprecedented possibilities for studying the properties of elementary particles during the years 1989-2000. The four detectors associated to the collider, run by the ALEPH, DELPHI, L3, and OPAL Collaborations, were based on the latest available technologies. The conjunction of high collision energies, precise instrumentation and data analysis techniques allowed the Standard Model (SM) of elementary particles to be tested at the level of quantum corrections. The search for new particles, in particular the long-sought Higgs boson, was one of the primary research subjects. During the twelve years of LEP, data samples of the highest quality and statistical weight were analysed. Concerning the search for the SM Higgs boson, the domain extending from zero mass to the kinematic limit imposed by the collider energy was scrutinised. The spirit of scientific competition gradually gave way to a collaborative effort, allowing the final results of LEP to be optimised. The methodology of Higgs boson searches is summarised in this paper together with the statistical methods adopted to combine the data of the four collaborations.

  12. Solid State Technology Meets Collider Challenge

    SciTech Connect

    Hazi, A

    2005-09-20

    Probing the frontiers of particle physics and delving into the mysteries of the universe and its beginnings require machines that can accelerate beams of fundamental particles to very high energies and then collide those beams together, producing a multitude of exotic subatomic particles. The proposed Next Linear Collider (NLC), being developed by Stanford Linear Accelerator Center (SLAC), Lawrence Livermore and Lawrence Berkeley national laboratories, and Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory (Fermilab), is such a machine. The NLC is expected to produce a variety of subatomic particles by smashing together electrons and their antimatter counterparts (positrons) at nearly the speed of light with energies in the teraelectronvolt (TeV) range. Plans are that the NLC will initially operate at 0.5 TeV and ultimately be scaled up to 1.5 TeV. (See S&TR, April 2000, pp. 12-16.) Work at the facility will complement the research to be conducted at another high-energy particle accelerator, the 14-TeV Large Hadron Collider at the European Laboratory for Particle Physics (commonly known by the acronym CERN from its former name) in Geneva, which is scheduled for completion in 2007. Achieving beam energy levels in the TeV range requires modulator systems that can convert ac line power--the same type of power one gets from the wall plug--into dc pulses. Ultimately, these pulses are transformed into radiofrequency (rf) pulses that ''kick'' the particles up to the required energy levels. Livermore scientists and engineers have designed a solid-state modulator to replace oldstyle modulators based on vacuum-tube technology. These new modulators promise to be far more efficient, reliable, and serviceable than the previous components. Livermore's Laboratory Directed Research and Development Program supported the basic research and development on the solid-state modulator technology, and SLAC supported the systems integration.

  13. The dark penguin shines light at colliders

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Primulando, Reinard; Salvioni, Ennio; Tsai, Yuhsin

    2015-07-01

    Collider experiments are one of the most promising ways to constrain Dark Matter (DM) interactions. For several types of DM-Standard Model couplings, a meaningful interpretation of the results requires to go beyond effective field theory, considering simplified models with light mediators. This is especially important in the case of loop-mediated interactions. In this paper we perform the first simplified model study of the magnetic dipole interacting DM, by including the one-loop momentum-dependent form factors that mediate the coupling — given by the Dark Penguin — in collider processes. We compute bounds from the monojet, monophoton, and diphoton searches at the 8 and 14 TeV LHC, and compare the results to those of direct and indirect detection experiments. Future searches at the 100 TeV hadron collider and at the ILC are also addressed. We find that the optimal search strategy requires loose cuts on the missing transverse energy, to capture the enhancement of the form factors near the threshold for on-shell production of the mediators. We consider both minimal models and models where an additional state beyond the DM is accessible. In the latter case, under the assumption of anarchic flavor structure in the dark sector, the LHC monophoton and diphoton searches will be able to set much stronger bounds than in the minimal scenario. A determination of the mass of the heavier dark fermion might be feasible using the M T2 variable. In addition, if the Dark Penguin flavor structure is almost aligned with that of the DM mass, a displaced signal from the decay of the heavier dark fermion into the DM and photon can be observed. This allows us to set constraints on the mixings and couplings of the model from an existing search for non-pointing photons.

  14. Electron Cloud Effect in the Linear Colliders

    SciTech Connect

    Pivi, M

    2004-09-13

    Beam induced multipacting, driven by the electric field of successive positively charged bunches, may arise from a resonant motion of electrons, generated by secondary emission, bouncing back and forth between opposite walls of the vacuum chamber. The electron-cloud effect (ECE) has been observed or is expected at many storage rings [1]. In the beam pipe of the Damping Ring (DR) of a linear collider, an electron cloud is produced initially by ionization of the residual gas and photoelectrons from the synchrotron radiation. The cloud is then sustained by secondary electron emission. This electron cloud can reach equilibrium after the passage of only a few bunches. The electron-cloud effect may be responsible for collective effects as fast coupled-bunch and single-bunch instability, emittance blow-up or incoherent tune shift when the bunch current exceeds a certain threshold, accompanied by a large number of electrons in the vacuum chamber. The ECE was identified as one of the most important R&D topics in the International Linear Collider Report [2]. Systematic studies on the possible electron-cloud effect have been initiated at SLAC for the GLC/NLC and TESLA linear colliders, with particular attention to the effect in the positron main damping ring (MDR) and the positron Low Emittance Transport which includes the bunch compressor system (BCS), the main linac, and the beam delivery system (BDS). We present recent computer simulation results for the main features of the electron cloud generation in both machine designs. Thus, single and coupled-bunch instability thresholds are estimated for the GLC/NLC design.

  15. Chromaticity correction for a muon collider optics

    SciTech Connect

    Alexahin, Y.; Gianfelice-Wendt, E.; Kapin, V.; /Fermilab

    2011-03-01

    Muon Collider (MC) is a promising candidate for the next energy frontier machine. However, in order to obtain peak luminosity in the 10{sup 34} cm{sup 2}s{sup -1} range the collider lattice designmust satisfy a number of stringent requirements. In particular the expected large momentum spread of the muon beam and the very small {beta}* call for a careful correction of the chromatic effects. Here we present a particular solution for the interaction region (IR) optics whose distinctive feature is a three-sextupole local chromatic correction scheme. The scheme may be applied to other future machines where chromatic effects are expected to be large. The expected large muon energy spread requires the optics to be stable over a wide range of momenta whereas the required luminosity calls for {beta}* in the mm range. To avoid luminosity degradation due to hour-glass effect, the bunch length must be comparatively small. To keep the needed RF voltage within feasible limits the momentum compaction factor must be small over the wide range of momenta. A low {beta}* means high sensitivity to alignment and field errors of the Interaction Region (IR) quadrupoles and large chromatic effects which limit the momentum range of optics stability and require strong correction sextupoles, which eventually limit the Dynamic Aperture (DA). Finally, the ring circumference should be as small as possible, luminosity being inversely proportional to the collider length. A promising solution for a 1.5 TeV center of mass energy MC with {beta}* = 1 m in both planes has been proposed. This {beta}* value has been chosen as a compromise between luminosity and feasibility based on the magnet design and energy deposition considerations. The proposed solution for the IR optics together with a new flexible momentum compaction arc cell design allows to satisfy all requirements and is relatively insensitive to the beam-beam effect.

  16. Oxygen cost of running barefoot vs. running shod.

    PubMed

    Hanson, N J; Berg, K; Deka, P; Meendering, J R; Ryan, C

    2011-06-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the oxygen cost of running barefoot vs. running shod on the treadmill as well as overground. 10 healthy recreational runners, 5 male and 5 female, whose mean age was 23.8±3.39 volunteered to participate in the study. Subjects participated in 4 experimental conditions: 1) barefoot on treadmill, 2) shod on treadmill, 3) barefoot overground, and 4) shod overground. For each condition, subjects ran for 6 min at 70% vVO (2)max pace while VO (2), heart rate (HR), and rating of perceived exertion (RPE) were assessed. A 2 × 2 (shoe condition x surface) repeated measures ANOVA revealed that running with shoes showed significantly higher VO (2) values on both the treadmill and the overground track (p<0.05). HR and RPE were significantly higher in the shod condition as well (p<0.02 and p<0.01, respectively). For the overground and treadmill conditions, recorded VO (2) while running shod was 5.7% and 2.0% higher than running barefoot. It was concluded that at 70% of vVO (2)max pace, barefoot running is more economical than running shod, both overground and on a treadmill.

  17. The Large Hadron Collider and Grid computing.

    PubMed

    Geddes, Neil

    2012-02-28

    We present a brief history of the beginnings, development and achievements of the worldwide Large Hadron Collider Computing Grid (wLCG). The wLCG is a huge international endeavour, which is itself embedded within, and directly influences, a much broader computing and information technology landscape. It is often impossible to identify true cause and effect, and they may appear very different from the different perspectives (e.g. information technology industry or academic researcher). This account is no different. It represents a personal view of the developments over the last two decades and is therefore inevitably biased towards those things in which the author has been personally involved.

  18. Relativistic klystron research for linear colliders

    SciTech Connect

    Allen, M.A.; Callin, R.S.; Deruyter, H.; Eppley, K.R.; Fant, K.S.; Fowkes, W.R.; Herrmannsfeldt, W.B.; Higo, T.; Hoag, H.A.; Koontz, R.F.

    1988-09-01

    Relativistic klystrons are being developed as a power source for high gradient accelerator applications which include large linear electron-positron colliders, compact accelerators, and FEL sources. We have attained 200 MW peak power at 11.4 GHz from a relativistic klystron, and 140 MV/m longitudinal gradient in a short 11.4 GHz accelerator section. We report here on the design of our relativistic klystrons, the results of our experiments so far, and some of our plans for the near future. 5 refs., 9 figs., 1 tab.

  19. Black Holes and the Large Hadron Collider

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roy, Arunava

    2011-12-01

    The European Center for Nuclear Research or CERN's Large Hadron Collider (LHC) has caught our attention partly due to the film ``Angels and Demons.'' In the movie, an antimatter bomb attack on the Vatican is foiled by the protagonist. Perhaps just as controversial is the formation of mini black holes (BHs). Recently, the American Physical Society1 website featured an article on BH formation at the LHC.2 This article examines some aspects of mini BHs and explores the possibility of their detection at the LHC.

  20. SUSY Without Prejudice at Linear Colliders

    SciTech Connect

    Rizzo, Thomas G.

    2008-12-11

    We explore the physics of the general CP-conserving MSSM with Minimal Flavor Violation, the pMSSM. The 19 soft SUSY breaking parameters are chosen so to satisfy all existing experimental and theoretical constraints assuming that the WIMP is the lightest neutralino. We scan this parameter space twice using both flat and log priors and compare the results which yield similar conclusions. Constraints from both LEP and the Tevatron play an important role in obtaining our final model samples. Implications for future TeV-scale e{sup +}e{sup -} linear colliders (LC) are discussed.

  1. A COMPLETE SCHEME FOR A MUON COLLIDER.

    SciTech Connect

    PALMER,R.B.; BERG, J.S.; FERNOW, R.C.; GALLARDO, J.C.; KIRK, H.G.; ALEXAHIN, Y.; NEUFFER, D.; KAHN, S.A.; SUMMERS, D.

    2007-09-01

    A complete scheme for production, cooling, acceleration, and ring for a 1.5 TeV center of mass muon collider is presented, together with parameters for two higher energy machines. The schemes starts with the front end of a proposed neutrino factory that yields bunch trains of both muon signs. Six dimensional cooling in long-period helical lattices reduces the longitudinal emittance until it becomes possible to merge the trains into single bunches, one of each sign. Further cooling in all dimensions is applied to the single bunches in further helical lattices. Final transverse cooling to the required parameters is achieved in 50 T solenoids.

  2. Broader Impacts of the International Linear Collider

    SciTech Connect

    Bardeen, M.; Ruchti, R.

    2005-08-01

    Large-scale scientific endeavors such as the International Linear Collider Project can have a lasting impact on education and outreach to our society. The ILC will provide a discovery platform for frontier physical science and it will also provide a discovery platform for broader impacts and social science. The importance of Broader Impacts of Science in general and the ILC in particular are described. Additionally, a synopsis of education and outreach activities carried out as an integral part of the Snowmass ILC Workshop is provided.

  3. Next linear collider test accelerator injector upgrade

    SciTech Connect

    Yeremian, A.D.; Miller, R.H.

    1995-12-31

    The Next Linear Collider Test Accelerator (NLCTA) is being constructed at SLAC to demonstrate multibunch beam loading compensation, suppression of higher order deflecting modes and measure transverse components of the accelerating fields in X-band accelerating structures. Currently a simple injector which provides the average current necessary for the beam loading compensations studies is under construction. An injector upgrade is planned to produce bunch trains similar to that of the NLC with microbunch intensity, separation and energy spread, identical to that of NLC. We discuss the design of the NLCTA injector upgrade.

  4. Drell-Yan production at collider energies

    SciTech Connect

    Neerven, W.L. Van

    1995-07-01

    We present some results of the Drell-Yan cross sections d{sigma}/dm and {sigma}{sub tot} which includes the O ({alpha}{sub s}{sup 2}) contribution to the coefficient function. In particular we study the total cross section {sigma}{sub tot} for vector boson production and d{sigma}/dm for low invariant masses m of the lepton pairs at large hadron collider energies. This study includes a detailed discussion of the dependence of the cross sections on the chosen scheme ({bar M}S versus DIS) and the factorization scale.

  5. Electron Ion Collider transverse spin physics

    SciTech Connect

    Prokudin, Alexei

    2011-07-01

    Electron Ion Collider is a future high energy facility for studies of the structure of the nucleon. Three-dimensional parton structure is one of the main goals of EIC. In momentum space Transverse Momentum Dependent Distributions (TMDs) are the key ingredients to map such a structure. At leading twist spin structure of spin-1/2 hadron can be described by 8 TMDs. Experimentally these functions can be studied in polarised SIDIS experiments. We discuss Sivers distribution function that describes distribution of unpolarised quarks in a transversely polarised nucleon and transversity that measures distribution of transversely polarised quarks in a transversely polarised nucleon

  6. Electron Ion Collider transverse spin physics

    SciTech Connect

    Prokudin, Alexei

    2011-07-15

    Electron Ion Collider is a future high energy facility for studies of the structure of the nucleon. Three-dimensional parton structure is one of the main goals of EIC. In momentum space Transverse Momentum Dependent Distributions (TMDs) are the key ingredients to map such a structure. At leading twist spin structure of spin-1/2 hadron can be described by 8 TMDs. Experimentally these functions can be studied in polarised SIDIS experiments. We discuss Sivers distribution function that describes distribution of unpolarised quarks in a transversely polarised nucleon and transversity that measures distribution of transversely polarised quarks in a transversely polarised nucleon.

  7. Luminosity Limitations of Linear Colliders Based on Plasma Acceleration

    SciTech Connect

    Lebedev, Valeri; Burov, Alexey; Nagaitsev, Sergei

    2016-01-01

    Particle acceleration in plasma creates a possibility of exceptionally high accelerating gradients and appears as a very attractive option for future linear electron-positron and/or photon-photon colliders. These high accelerating gradients were already demonstrated in a number of experiments. Furthermore, a linear collider requires exceptionally high beam brightness which still needs to be demonstrated. In this article we discuss major phenomena which limit the beam brightness of accelerated beam and, consequently, the collider luminosity.

  8. Circular lepton colliders as an option for a Higgs factory: The highest energy circular lepton collider

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zimmermann, Frank

    With a maximum centre-of-mass energy of 209 GeV, LEP2, in operation at CERN until 2001, has been the highest energy e+e-. collider so far. The discovery, in 2012 by two LHC experiments, of a Higgs-like boson at an energy reachable by a collider slightly more energetic than LEP2, together with the excellent performance achieved in the two B factories PEP-II and KEKB during the first decade of the 21st century, have led to new proposals for a next-generation circular e+e-. collider at the energy frontier [1-5]. In order to serve as a Higgs factory such a collider needs to be able to operate at least at a centre-of-mass energy of 240 GeV (for efficient e+e- → ZH production), i.e. 15% above the LEP2 peak energy. Reaching even higher energies, e.g. 350 GeV centre-of-mass (CM), for tbar t production or 500 GeV for ZHH and Ztbar t studies would be possible for a new ring of larger circumference...

  9. Linear collider approach to a B anti B factory

    SciTech Connect

    Wilson, P.B.

    1987-06-01

    In this paper we consider the basic design expression and principal design constraints for a linear collider suitable for a B anti-B factory: Energy approx. =10 GeV, luminosity 10/sup 33/-10/sup 34/ cm/sup -2/s/sup -1/, energy resolution approx. =10/sup -2/. The design of room temperature linear colliders for a B factory is discussed. In such colliders, the rf energy stored in the linac structure is thrown away after each linac pulse. Linear colliders using superconducting rf cavities are considered. Some brief conclusions are presented.

  10. Klystron switching power supplies for the Internation Linear Collider

    SciTech Connect

    Fraioli, Andrea; /Cassino U. /INFN, Pisa

    2009-12-01

    The International Linear Collider is a majestic High Energy Physics particle accelerator that will give physicists a new cosmic doorway to explore energy regimes beyond the reach of today's accelerators. ILC will complement the Large Hadron Collider (LHC), a proton-proton collider at the European Center for Nuclear Research (CERN) in Geneva, Switzerland, by producing electron-positron collisions at center of mass energy of about 500 GeV. In particular, the subject of this dissertation is the R&D for a solid state Marx Modulator and relative switching power supply for the International Linear Collider Main LINAC Radio Frequency stations.

  11. Numerical calculation of ion polarization in the NICA collider

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kovalenko, A. D.; Butenko, A. V.; Kekelidze, V. D.; Mikhaylov, V. A.; Kondratenko, M. A.; Kondratenko, A. M.; Filatov, Yu N.

    2016-02-01

    The NICA Collider with two solenoid Siberian snakes is “transparent” to the spin. The collider transparent to the spin provides a unique capability to control any polarization direction of protons and deuterons using additional weak solenoids without affecting orbital parameters of the beam. The spin tune induced by the control solenoids must significantly exceed the strength of the zero-integer spin resonance, which contains a coherent part associated with errors in the collider's magnetic structure and an incoherent part associated with the beam emittances. We present calculations of the coherent part of the resonance strength in the NICA collider for proton and deuteron beams.

  12. Far Future Colliders and Required R&D Program

    SciTech Connect

    Shiltsev, V.; /Fermilab

    2012-06-01

    Particle colliders for high energy physics have been in the forefront of scientific discoveries for more than half a century. The accelerator technology of the collider has progressed immensely, while the beam energy, luminosity, facility size and the cost have grown by several orders of magnitude. The method of colliding beams has not fully exhausted its potential but its pace of progress has greatly slowed down. In this paper we very briefly review the R&D toward near future colliders and make an attempt to look beyond the current horizon and outline the changes in the paradigm required for the next breakthroughs.

  13. The Very Large Hadron Collider: The farthest energy frontier

    SciTech Connect

    Barletta, William A.

    2001-06-21

    The Very Large Hadron Collider (or Eloisatron) represents what may well be the final step on the energy frontier of accelerator-based high energy physics. While an extremely high luminosity proton collider at 100-200 TeV center of mass energy can probably be built in one step with LHC technology, that machine would cost more than what is presently politically acceptable. This talk summarizes the strategies of collider design including staged deployment, comparison with electron-positron colliders, opportunities for major innovation, and the technical challenges of reducing costs to manageable proportions. It also presents the priorities for relevant R and D for the next few years.

  14. Wheel running in the wild.

    PubMed

    Meijer, Johanna H; Robbers, Yuri

    2014-07-07

    The importance of exercise for health and neurogenesis is becoming increasingly clear. Wheel running is often used in the laboratory for triggering enhanced activity levels, despite the common objection that this behaviour is an artefact of captivity and merely signifies neurosis or stereotypy. If wheel running is indeed caused by captive housing, wild mice are not expected to use a running wheel in nature. This however, to our knowledge, has never been tested. Here, we show that when running wheels are placed in nature, they are frequently used by wild mice, also when no extrinsic reward is provided. Bout lengths of running wheel behaviour in the wild match those for captive mice. This finding falsifies one criterion for stereotypic behaviour, and suggests that running wheel activity is an elective behaviour. In a time when lifestyle in general and lack of exercise in particular are a major cause of disease in the modern world, research into physical activity is of utmost importance. Our findings may help alleviate the main concern regarding the use of running wheels in research on exercise.

  15. Comparing Tsallis and Boltzmann temperatures from relativistic heavy ion collider and large hadron collider heavy-ion data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Y.-Q.; Liu, F.-H.

    2016-03-01

    The transverse momentum spectra of charged particles produced in Au + Au collisions at the relativistic heavy ion collider and in Pb + Pb collisions at the large hadron collider with different centrality intervals are described by the multisource thermal model which is based on different statistic distributions for a singular source. Each source in the present work is described by the Tsallis distribution and the Boltzmann distribution, respectively. Then, the interacting system is described by the (two-component) Tsallis distribution and the (two-component) Boltzmann distribution, respectively. The results calculated by the two distributions are in agreement with the experimental data of the Solenoidal Tracker At Relativistic heavy ion collider, Pioneering High Energy Nuclear Interaction eXperiment, and A Large Ion Collider Experiment Collaborations. The effective temperature parameters extracted from the two distributions on the descriptions of heavy-ion data at the relativistic heavy ion collider and large hadron collider are obtained to show a linear correlation.

  16. ICOOL: A TOOL FOR MUON COLLIDER SIMULATIONS.

    SciTech Connect

    FERNOW,R.C.

    2001-09-28

    Current ideas for designing neutrino factories [ 1,2] and muon colliders [3] require unique configurations of fields and materials to prepare the muon beam for acceleration. This so-called front end system must accomplish the goals of phase rotation, bunching and cooling. We have continued the development of a 3-D tracking code, ICOOL [4], for examining possible muon collider front end configurations. A system is described in terms of a series of longitudinal regions with associated material and field properties. The tracking takes place in a coordinate system that follows a reference orbit through the system. The code takes into account decays and interactions of {approx}50-500 MeV/c muons in matter. Material geometry regions include cylinders and wedges. A number of analytic models are provided for describing the field configurations. Simple diagnostics are built into the code, including calculation of emittances and correlations, longitudinal traces, histograms and scatter plots. A number of auxiliary codes can be used for pre-processing, post-processing and optimization.

  17. Magnetic Turbulence in colliding laser produced plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gekelman, Walter; Collette, Andrew

    2006-10-01

    We describe a series of experiments, which involve the collision of two dense (initially, δnlpp/n0>>1) laser-produced plasmas (llp) within an ambient, highly magnetized (RciColliding plasmas can be used to study generation of magnetic turbulence and spontaneous generation of magnetic fields. The plasma column (He, Ne, 1-4 X10^12 cm^3) is 18 m long and 60 cm in diameter, 15 ms duration and pulsed at 1 Hz. Two carbon targets are struck by 1.5 J (10 ns,10 μ, 1 Hz) laser beams. The lpp's form diamagnetic bubbles in which a large percentage of the background magnetic field (600G collide. Fast camera (3 ns) photographs show the bubble surfaces become corrugated after the collision. Small magnetic field probes are used to study the magnetic turbulence. One probe is fixed and the second moved in a small volume close to the targets. An ensemble each location within the volume is used to determine correlations and cross-spectral functions of the magnetic turbulence. The current systems of the waves are fully three-dimensional and are reported in the adjacent poster by Collette et al. [1] M. Van Zeeland, W. Gekelman, Laser Plasma Diamagnetism in the presence of an ambient magnetized plasma, Phys. Plasmas, 11, 320 (2004)

  18. Collider signatures of flavorful Higgs bosons

    DOE PAGES

    Altmannshofer, Wolfgang; Eby, Joshua; Gori, Stefania; ...

    2016-12-30

    Motivated by our limited knowledge of the Higgs couplings to the first two generation fermions, we analyze the collider phenomenology of a class of two Higgs doublet models (2HDMs) with a nonstandard Yukawa sector. One Higgs doublet is mainly responsible for the masses of the weak gauge bosons and the third-generation fermions, while the second Higgs doublet provides mass for the lighter fermion generations. The characteristic collider signatures of this setup differ significantly from well-studied 2HDMs with natural flavor conservation, flavor alignment, or minimal flavor violation. New production mechanisms for the heavy scalar, pseudoscalar, and charged Higgs involving second-generation quarksmore » can become dominant. The most interesting decay modes include H/A → cc,tc,μμ,τμ and H± → cb,cs,μν. As a result, searches for low-mass dimuon resonances are currently among the best probes of the heavy Higgs bosons in this setup.« less

  19. Dark Matter: Collider vs. direct searches

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jacques, T.

    2016-07-01

    Effective Field Theories (EFTs) are a useful tool across a wide range of DM searches, including LHC searches and direct detection. Given the current lack of indications about the nature of the DM particle and its interactions, a model independent interpretation of the collider bounds appears mandatory, especially in complementarity with the reinterpretation of the exclusion limits within a choice of simplified models, which cannot exhaust the set of possible completions of an effective Lagrangian. However EFTs must be used with caution at LHC energies, where the energy scale of the interaction is at a scale where the EFT approximation can no longer be assumed to be valid. Here we introduce some tools that allow the validity of the EFT approximation to be quantified, and provide case studies for two operators. We also show a technique that allows EFT constraints from collider searches to be made substantially more robust, even at large center-of-mass energies. This allows EFT constraints from different classes of experiment to be compared in a much more robust manner.

  20. Cooling of electronics in collider experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Richard P. Stanek et al.

    2003-11-07

    Proper cooling of detector electronics is critical to the successful operation of high-energy physics experiments. Collider experiments offer unique challenges based on their physical layouts and hermetic design. Cooling systems can be categorized by the type of detector with which they are associated, their primary mode of heat transfer, the choice of active cooling fluid, their heat removal capacity and the minimum temperature required. One of the more critical detector subsystems to require cooling is the silicon vertex detector, either pixel or strip sensors. A general design philosophy is presented along with a review of the important steps to include in the design process. Factors affecting the detector and cooling system design are categorized. A brief review of some existing and proposed cooling systems for silicon detectors is presented to help set the scale for the range of system designs. Fermilab operates two collider experiments, CDF & D0, both of which have silicon systems embedded in their detectors. A review of the existing silicon cooling system designs and operating experience is presented along with a list of lessons learned.

  1. First results from the SPS collider

    SciTech Connect

    Meinke, R.B.

    1982-01-01

    First results from experiment UA5 at the CERN SPS collider studying anti pp collisions at ..sqrt.. s = 540 GeV are presented. The central region pseudorapidity density is 3.0 +/- 0.1 for non-diffractive events. The FWHM of the observed pseudorapidity distribution is narrower than expected from a simple extrapolation of ISR data which can be interpreted as an increase in the mean P/sub t/ for hadron production. A value of 27.4 +/- 2.0 is obtained for the mean charged multiplicity (n/sub ch/) of produced hadrons. This is not in disagreement with an extrapolation using a quadratic fit in lns to previous lower energy data up to ISR energies, but excludes an s/sup 1/4/ or stronger dependence of (n/sub ch/) on s. Correlations between charged particles of positive and negative c.m.s. pseudorapidity have been analysed. In contrast to ISR energies, where long range correlations have been found to be small, they appear to be as important as short range correlations at collider energies. Preliminary results on correlations between charged particles and photons over a limited acceptance in the central region of pseudo-rapidity are given.

  2. Collider signatures of flavorful Higgs bosons

    SciTech Connect

    Altmannshofer, Wolfgang; Eby, Joshua; Gori, Stefania; Lotito, Matteo; Martone, Mario; Tuckler, Douglas

    2016-12-30

    Motivated by our limited knowledge of the Higgs couplings to the first two generation fermions, we analyze the collider phenomenology of a class of two Higgs doublet models (2HDMs) with a nonstandard Yukawa sector. One Higgs doublet is mainly responsible for the masses of the weak gauge bosons and the third-generation fermions, while the second Higgs doublet provides mass for the lighter fermion generations. The characteristic collider signatures of this setup differ significantly from well-studied 2HDMs with natural flavor conservation, flavor alignment, or minimal flavor violation. New production mechanisms for the heavy scalar, pseudoscalar, and charged Higgs involving second-generation quarks can become dominant. The most interesting decay modes include H/A → cc,tc,μμ,τμ and H± → cb,cs,μν. As a result, searches for low-mass dimuon resonances are currently among the best probes of the heavy Higgs bosons in this setup.

  3. Run-to-Run Control Strategy for Diabetes Management

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-11-02

    quite serious ( diabetic coma), and the long- term implications of varying glucose levels ( nephropathy , retinopathy, and other tissue damage ) have...Trial Re- search Group, \\The e ect of intensive treatment of diabetes on the development and progression of long{term complications in insulin{dependent...1 RUN-TO-RUN CONTROL STRATEGY FOR DIABETES MANAGEMENT F.J. Doyle III1, B. Srinivasan2, and D. Bonvin2 1Department of Chemical Engineering, University

  4. Low-energy run of Fermilab Electron Cooler's beam generation system

    SciTech Connect

    Prost, Lionel; Shemyakin, Alexander; Fedotov, Alexei; Kewisch, Jorg; /Brookhaven

    2010-08-01

    As a part of a feasibility study of using the Fermilab Electron Cooler for a low-energy Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) run at Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL), the cooler operation at 1.6 MeV electron beam energy was tested in a short beam line configuration. The main result of the study is that the cooler beam generation system is suitable for BNL needs. In a striking difference with running 4.3 MeV beam, no unprovoked beam recirculation interruptions were observed.

  5. Prospects for the Simultaneous Operation of the Tevatron Collider and pp Experiments in the Antiproton Source Accumulator

    SciTech Connect

    Werkema, Steven J.; /Fermilab

    2001-06-07

    This document is a slightly expanded version of a portion of the Proton Driver design report. The Proton Driver group gets the credit for the original idea of running an Accumulator experiment in the BTeV era. The work presented here is a study of the feasibility of this idea. The addition of the Recycler Ring to the Fermilab accelerator complex provides an opportunity to continue the program of {bar p}p physics in the Antiproton Source Accumulator that was started by Fermilab experiments E760 and E835. The operational scenario presented here utilizes the Recycler Ring as an antiproton bank from which the colliders makes 'withdrawals' as needed to maintain the required luminosity in the Tevatron. The Accumulator is only needed to re-supply the bank in between withdrawals. When the {anti p} stacking rate is sufficiently high, and the luminosity requirements of the Collider experiments are sufficiently low, there will be time between Collider fills and subsequent refilling of the recycler to deliver beam to an experiment in the Accumulator. In the scenario envisioned here, the impact of the Accumulator experiment on the luminosity delivered to the Collider experiments is very small. If the Run II antiproton stacking rate goals are met, the operational conditions required for running Accumulator based experiments will be met during the BTeV era. A simple model of the operation of the Fermilab accelerator complex for BTeV and an experiment in the Accumulator has been developed. The model makes predictions of the rate at which luminosity is delivered to BTeV and an Accumulator experiment. This model was used to examine the impact of the proton driver on this experimental program.

  6. Searches for the Standard Model Higgs boson at the Tevatron collider

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fisher, Wade C.; Junk, Thomas R.

    2016-10-01

    During Run II of the Tevatron collider, which took place from 2001 until 2011, the CDF and D0 detectors each collected approximately 10 fb -1 of poverline p collision data at a center-of-mass energy of √ s = 1.96 TeV. This dataset allowed for tests for the presence of the SM Higgs boson in the mass range 90-200 GeV in the production modes gg → H, W/ZH, vector-boson fusion, and toverline tH, with H decay modes H → boverline b, H → W+W-, H → τ+τ-, H → γγ, and H → ZZ. This chapter summarizes the search methods and the results of the Higgs boson search at the Tevatron. The increased sophistication of the analysis techniques as the collider run progressed is discussed, covering the strategies used over time to improve the sensitivity and breadth of the analyses. Using the full Tevatron data sample for both experiments, the combined Higgs search in all channels observes an excess consistent with the predicted SM Higgs boson signal with mass of 125 GeV, with a significance of 3.0 standard deviations above the background prediction.

  7. STAR FORMATION IN TURBULENT MOLECULAR CLOUDS WITH COLLIDING FLOW

    SciTech Connect

    Matsumoto, Tomoaki; Dobashi, Kazuhito; Shimoikura, Tomomi

    2015-03-10

    Using self-gravitational hydrodynamical numerical simulations, we investigated the evolution of high-density turbulent molecular clouds swept by a colliding flow. The interaction of shock waves due to turbulence produces networks of thin filamentary clouds with a sub-parsec width. The colliding flow accumulates the filamentary clouds into a sheet cloud and promotes active star formation for initially high-density clouds. Clouds with a colliding flow exhibit a finer filamentary network than clouds without a colliding flow. The probability distribution functions (PDFs) for the density and column density can be fitted by lognormal functions for clouds without colliding flow. When the initial turbulence is weak, the column density PDF has a power-law wing at high column densities. The colliding flow considerably deforms the PDF, such that the PDF exhibits a double peak. The stellar mass distributions reproduced here are consistent with the classical initial mass function with a power-law index of –1.35 when the initial clouds have a high density. The distribution of stellar velocities agrees with the gas velocity distribution, which can be fitted by Gaussian functions for clouds without colliding flow. For clouds with colliding flow, the velocity dispersion of gas tends to be larger than the stellar velocity dispersion. The signatures of colliding flows and turbulence appear in channel maps reconstructed from the simulation data. Clouds without colliding flow exhibit a cloud-scale velocity shear due to the turbulence. In contrast, clouds with colliding flow show a prominent anti-correlated distribution of thin filaments between the different velocity channels, suggesting collisions between the filamentary clouds.

  8. Collider Detector at Fermilab (CDF): Data from W, Z bosons and Drell Yan lepton pairs research of the CDF Electroweak Group

    DOE Data Explorer

    The Collider Detector at Fermilab (CDF) is a Tevatron experiment at Fermilab. The Tevatron, a powerful particle accelerator, accelerates protons and antiprotons close to the speed of light, and then makes them collide head-on inside the CDF detector. The CDF detector is used to study the products of such collisions. The CDF Physics Group at Fermilab is organized into six working groups, each with a specific focus. The Electroweak group studies production and properties of W, Z bosons and Drell Yan lepton pairs. Their public web page makes data and numerous figures available from both CDF Runs I and II.

  9. Observations of running penumbral waves.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zirin, H.; Stein, A.

    1972-01-01

    Quiet sunspots with well-developed penumbrae show running intensity waves with period running around 300 sec. The waves appear connected with umbral flashes of exactly half the period. Waves are concentric, regular, with velocity constant around 10 km/sec. They are probably sound waves and show intensity fluctuation in H alpha centerline or wing of 10 to 20%. The energy is tiny compared to the heat deficit of the umbra.

  10. Development work for a superconducting linear collider

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Matheisen, Axel

    1995-01-01

    For future linear e(+)e(-) colliders in the TeV range several alternatives are under discussion. The TESLA approach is based on the advantages of superconductivity. High Q values of the accelerator structures give high efficiency for converting RF power into beam power. A low resonance frequency for the RF structures can be chosen to obtain a large number of electrons (positrons) per bunch. For a given luminosity the beam dimensions can be chosen conservatively which leads to relaxed beam emittance and tolerances at the final focus. Each individual superconducting accelerator component (resonator cavity) of this linear collider has to deliver an energy gain of 25 MeV/m to the beam. Today s.c. resonators are in use at CEBAF/USA, at DESY/Germany, Darmstadt/Germany KEK/Japan and CERN/Geneva. They show acceleration gradients between 5 MV/m and 10 MV/m. Encouraging experiments at CEA Saclay and Cornell University showed acceleration gradients of 20 MV/m and 25 MV/m in single and multicell structures. In an activity centered at DESY in Hamburg/Germany the TESLA collaboration is constructing a 500 MeV superconducting accelerator test facility (TTF) to demonstrate that a linear collider based on this technique can be built in a cost effective manner and that the necessary acceleration gradients of more than 15 MeV/m can be reached reproducibly. The test facility built at DESY covers an area of 3.000 m2 and is divided into 3 major activity areas: (1) The testlinac, where the performance ofthe modular components with an electron beam passing the 40 m long acceleration section can be demonstrated. (2) The test area, where all individual resonators are tested before installation into a module. (3) The preparation and assembly area, where assembly of cavities and modules take place. We report here on the design work to reach a reduction of costs compared to actual existing superconducting accelerator structures and on the facility set up to reach high acceleration gradients in

  11. e-A PHYSICS AT A COLLIDER.

    SciTech Connect

    G. T. GARVEY

    2001-01-09

    An electron-nucleus (e-A) collider with center-of-mass energy in excess of 50 GeV per electron-nucleon collision will allow the physics community to obtain unprecedented new knowledge of the partonic structure of nuclei. If reliable information is to be extracted on these partonic densities, it is essential to realize that with our current level of understanding of QCD, momentum transfers to the struck partons greater than 1 GeV/c are necessary. This requirement puts a priority on high center-of-mass energy if partonic densities are to be measured over a wide range. Comparing the partonic structure of the free nucleon to that of bound nucleons and measuring the systematic changes in that structure as a function of nucleon number (A) will provide deeper insight into the origins and dynamics of nuclear binding. In addition, e-A collisions will allow the exploration of partonic densities appreciably higher than is accessible in e-p collisions. An e-A collider will allow one to measure the gluonic structure functions of nuclei down to x {approx} 10{sup -3}, information valuable in its own right and essential to a quantitative understanding of highly relativistic A-A collisions. The time-space evolution of partons can only be investigated by studying the modifications of hard collisions that take place when nuclear targets are employed. In a hard collision the partonic fragments interact, hadronize, and reinteract on their way to the distant detectors without revealing their evolution into the hadrons finally detected. Nuclear targets of differing A place varying amounts of nuclear matter in proximity to the hard collision producing unique information about the quantum fluctuations of incident projectile prior to the collision and on the early evolution of the produced partons. Using charged leptons (e, {mu}) to investigate this physics has been the richest source of information to date and extending the reach of these investigations by the constructing an e -A collider

  12. Effects of running velocity on running kinetics and kinematics.

    PubMed

    Brughelli, Matt; Cronin, John; Chaouachi, Anis

    2011-04-01

    Sixteen semiprofessional Australian football players performed running bouts at incremental velocities of 40, 60, 80, and 100% of their maximum velocity on a Woodway nonmotorized force treadmill. As running velocity increased from 40 to 60%, peak vertical and peak horizontal forces increased by 14.3% (effect size [ES] = 1.0) and 34.4% (ES = 4.2), respectively. The changes in peak vertical and peak horizontal forces from 60 to 80% were 1.0% (ES = 0.05) and 21.0% (ES = 2.9), respectively. Finally, the changes in peak vertical and peak horizontal forces from 80% to maximum were 2.0% (ES = 0.1) and 24.3% (ES = 3.4). In addition, both stride frequency and stride length significantly increased with each incremental velocity (p < 0.05). Conversely, contact times and the vertical displacement of the center of mass significantly decreased with increased running velocity (p < 0.05). A significant positive correlation was found between horizontal force and maximum running velocity (r = 0.47). For the kinematic variables, only stride length was found to have a significant positive correlation with maximum running velocity (r = 0.66). It would seem that increasing maximal sprint velocity may be more dependent on horizontal force production as opposed to vertical force production.

  13. Running of the running and entropy perturbations during inflation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van de Bruck, Carsten; Longden, Chris

    2016-07-01

    In single field slow-roll inflation, one expects that the spectral index ns-1 is first order in slow-roll parameters. Similarly, its running αs=d ns/d log k and the running of the running βs=d αs/d log k are second and third order and therefore expected to be progressively smaller, and usually negative. Hence, such models of inflation are in considerable tension with a recent analysis hinting that βs may actually be positive, and larger than αs. Motivated by this, in this work we ask the question of what kinds of inflationary models may be useful in achieving such a hierarchy of runnings, particularly focusing on two-field models of inflation in which the late-time transfer of power from isocurvature to curvature modes allows for a much more diverse range of phenomenology. We calculate the runnings due to this effect and briefly apply our results to assess the feasibility of finding |βs|≳|αs| in some specific models.

  14. CDF Run IIb Silicon Vertex Detector DAQ Upgrade

    SciTech Connect

    S. Behari et al.

    2003-12-18

    The CDF particle detector operates in the beamline of the Tevatron proton-antiproton collider at Fermilab, Batavia, IL. The Tevatron is expected to undergo luminosity upgrades (Run IIb) in the future, resulting in a higher number of interactions per beam crossing. To operate in this dense radiation environment, an upgrade of CDF's silicon vertex detector (SVX) subsystem and a corresponding upgrade of its VME-based DAQ system has been explored. Prototypes of all the Run IIb SVX DAQ components have been constructed, assembled into a test stand and operated successfully using an adapted version of CDF's network-capable DAQ software. In addition, a PCI-based DAQ system has been developed as a fast and inexpensive tool for silicon detector and DAQ component testing in the production phase. In this paper they present an overview of the Run IIb silicon DAQ upgrade, emphasizing the new features and improvements incorporated into the constituent VME boards, and discuss a PCI-based DAQ system developed to facilitate production tests.

  15. ATLAS Metadata Infrastructure Evolution for Run 2 and Beyond

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Gemmeren, P.; Cranshaw, J.; Malon, D.; Vaniachine, A.

    2015-12-01

    ATLAS developed and employed for Run 1 of the Large Hadron Collider a sophisticated infrastructure for metadata handling in event processing jobs. This infrastructure profits from a rich feature set provided by the ATLAS execution control framework, including standardized interfaces and invocation mechanisms for tools and services, segregation of transient data stores with concomitant object lifetime management, and mechanisms for handling occurrences asynchronous to the control framework's state machine transitions. This metadata infrastructure is evolving and being extended for Run 2 to allow its use and reuse in downstream physics analyses, analyses that may or may not utilize the ATLAS control framework. At the same time, multiprocessing versions of the control framework and the requirements of future multithreaded frameworks are leading to redesign of components that use an incident-handling approach to asynchrony. The increased use of scatter-gather architectures, both local and distributed, requires further enhancement of metadata infrastructure in order to ensure semantic coherence and robust bookkeeping. This paper describes the evolution of ATLAS metadata infrastructure for Run 2 and beyond, including the transition to dual-use tools—tools that can operate inside or outside the ATLAS control framework—and the implications thereof. It further examines how the design of this infrastructure is changing to accommodate the requirements of future frameworks and emerging event processing architectures.

  16. Design considerations for a laser-plasma linear collider

    SciTech Connect

    Schroeder, C. B.; Esarey, E.; Geddes, C. G. R.; Toth, Cs.; Leemans, W. P.

    2008-08-01

    Design considerations for a next-generation electron-positron linear collider based on laser-plasma-accelerators are discussed. Several of the advantages and challenges of laser-plasma based accelerator technology are addressed. An example of the parameters for a 1 TeV laser-plasma based collider is presented.

  17. The Threshold of Embedded M Collider Bias and Confounding Bias

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kelcey, Benjamin; Carlisle, Joanne

    2011-01-01

    Of particular import to this study, is collider bias originating from stratification on retreatment variables forming an embedded M or bowtie structural design. That is, rather than assume an M structural design which suggests that "X" is a collider but not a confounder, the authors adopt what they consider to be a more reasonable…

  18. Comparison of two approaches to linear collider design

    SciTech Connect

    Schnell, W.

    1987-11-01

    This paper reviews linear collider parameters. It aims at analyzing two specific design approachs - the ones for CLIC at CERN and for a TeV linear collider at SLAC - which appear to lead into remarkably different directions although they start from the same premises and try to respect the same boundary conditions. 19 refs.

  19. Design considerations for a laser-plasma linear collider

    SciTech Connect

    Schroeder, C. B.; Esarey, E.; Geddes, C. G. R.; Toth, Cs.; Leemans, W. P.

    2009-01-22

    Design considerations for a next-generation electron-positron linear collider based on laser-plasma-accelerators are discussed. Several of the advantages and challenges of laser-plasma-based accelerator technology are addressed. An example of the parameters for a 1 TeV laser-plasma-based collider is presented.

  20. Big Science and the Large Hadron Collider

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giudice, Gian Francesco

    2012-03-01

    The Large Hadron Collider (LHC), the particle accelerator operating at CERN, is probably the most complex and ambitious scientific project ever accomplished by humanity. The sheer size of the enterprise, in terms of financial and human resources, naturally raises the question whether society should support such costly basic-research programs. I address this question by first reviewing the process that led to the emergence of Big Science and the role of large projects in the development of science and technology. I then compare the methodologies of Small and Big Science, emphasizing their mutual linkage. Finally, after examining the cost of Big Science projects, I highlight several general aspects of their beneficial implications for society.

  1. Beam Dynamics Considerations in Electron Ion Colliders

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krafft, Geoffrey

    2015-04-01

    The nuclear physics community is converging on the idea that the next large project after FRIB should be an electron-ion collider. Both Brookhaven National Lab and Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility have developed accelerator designs, both of which need novel solutions to accelerator physics problems. In this talk we discuss some of the problems that must be solved and their solutions. Examples in novel beam optics systems, beam cooling, and beam polarization control will be presented. Authored by Jefferson Science Associates, LLC under U.S. DOE Contract No. DE-AC05-06OR23177. The U.S. Government retains a non-exclusive, paid-up, irrevocable, world-wide license to publish or reproduce this manuscript for U.S. Government purposes.

  2. Minimal walking technicolor: Setup for collider physics

    SciTech Connect

    Foadi, Roshan; Frandsen, Mads T.; Ryttov, Thomas A.; Sannino, Francesco

    2007-09-01

    Different theoretical and phenomenological aspects of the minimal and nonminimal walking technicolor theories have recently been studied. The goal here is to make the models ready for collider phenomenology. We do this by constructing the low energy effective theory containing scalars, pseudoscalars, vector mesons, and other fields predicted by the minimal walking theory. We construct their self-interactions and interactions with standard model fields. Using the Weinberg sum rules, opportunely modified to take into account the walking behavior of the underlying gauge theory, we find interesting relations for the spin-one spectrum. We derive the electroweak parameters using the newly constructed effective theory and compare the results with the underlying gauge theory. Our analysis is sufficiently general such that the resulting model can be used to represent a generic walking technicolor theory not at odds with precision data.

  3. Small air showers and collider physics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Capdevielle, J. N.; Gawin, J.; Grochalska, B.

    1985-01-01

    At energies lower than 2.5 X 10 to the 5 GeV (in Lab. system), more accurate information on nucleon-nucleon collision (p-p collider and on primary composition now exist. The behavior of those both basic elements in cosmic ray phenomenology from ISR energy suggests some tendencies for reasonable extrapolation in the next decade 2.0x10 to the 5 to 2.0x10 to the 6 GeV. Small showers in altitude, recorded in the decade 2 X 10 to the 4 to 2 X 10 to the 5 GeV offers a good tool to testify the validity of all the Monte-Carlo simulation analysis and appreciate how nucleon-air collision are different from nucleon-nucleon collisions.

  4. The Structure of Jets at Hadron Colliders

    SciTech Connect

    Larkoski, Andrew James

    2012-08-01

    Particle physics seeks to understand the interactions and properties of the fundamental particles. To gain understanding, there is an interplay between theory and experiment. Models are proposed to explain how particles behave and interact. These models make precise predictions that can be tested. Experiments are built and executed to measure the properties of these particles, providing necessary tests for the theories that attempt to explain the realm of fundamental particles. However, there is also another level of interaction between theory and experiment; the development of new experiments demands the study of how particles will behave with respect to the measured observables toward the goal of understanding the details and idiosyncrasies of the measurements very well. Only once these are well-modeled and understood can one be con dent that the data that are measured is trustworthy. The modeling and interpretation of the physics of a proton collider, such as the LHC, is the main topic of this thesis.

  5. Performance of the SLAC Linear Collider klystrons

    SciTech Connect

    Allen, M.A.; Fowkes, W.R.; Koontz, R.F.; Schwarz, H.D.; Seeman, J.T.; Vlieks, A.E.

    1987-01-01

    There are now 200 new, high power 5045 klystrons installed on the two-mile Stanford Linear Accelerator. Peak power per klystron averages over 63 MW. Average energy contribution is above 240 MeV per station. Electron beam energy has been measured as high as 53 GeV. Energy instability due to klystron malfunction is less than 0.2%. The installed klystrons have logged over one million operating hours with close to 20,000 klystron hours cumulative operating time between failures. Data are being accumulated on klystron operation and failure modes with failure signatures starting to become apparent. To date, no wholesale failure modes have surfaced that would impair the SLAC Linear Collider (SLC) program.

  6. Illuminating new electroweak states at hadron colliders

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ismail, Ahmed; Izaguirre, Eder; Shuve, Brian

    2016-07-01

    In this paper, we propose a novel powerful strategy to perform searches for new electroweak states. Uncolored electroweak states appear in generic extensions of the Standard Model (SM) and yet are challenging to discover at hadron colliders. This problem is particularly acute when the lightest state in the electroweak multiplet is neutral and all multiplet components are approximately degenerate. In this scenario, production of the charged fields of the multiplet is followed by decay into nearly invisible states; if this decay occurs promptly, the only way to infer the presence of the reaction is through its missing energy signature. Our proposal relies on emission of photon radiation from the new charged states as a means of discriminating the signal from SM backgrounds. We demonstrate its broad applicability by studying two examples: a pure Higgsino doublet and an electroweak quintuplet field.

  7. Optimal, real-time control--colliders

    SciTech Connect

    Spencer, J.E.

    1991-05-01

    With reasonable definitions, optimal control is possible for both classical and quantal systems with new approaches called PISC(Parallel) and NISC(Neural) from analogy with RISC (Reduced Instruction Set Computing). If control equals interaction, observation and comparison to some figure of merit with interaction via external fields, then optimization comes from varying these fields to give design or operating goals. Structural stability can then give us tolerance and design constraints. But simulations use simplified models, are not in real-time and assume fixed or stationary conditions, so optimal control goes far beyond convergence rates of algorithms. It is inseparable from design and this has many implications for colliders. 12 refs., 3 figs.

  8. Illuminating new electroweak states at hadron colliders

    DOE PAGES

    Ismail, Ahmed; Izaguirre, Eder; Shuve, Brian

    2016-07-01

    In this paper, we propose a novel powerful strategy to perform searches for new electroweak states. Uncolored electroweak states appear in generic extensions of the Standard Model (SM) and yet are challenging to discover at hadron colliders. This problem is particularly acute when the lightest state in the electroweak multiplet is neutral and all multiplet components are approximately degenerate. In this scenario, production of the charged fields of the multiplet is followed by decay into nearly invisible states; if this decay occurs promptly, the only way to infer the presence of the reaction is through its missing energy signature. Ourmore » proposal relies on emission of photon radiation from the new charged states as a means of discriminating the signal from SM backgrounds. Lastly, we demonstrate its broad applicability by studying two examples: a pure Higgsino doublet and an electroweak quintuplet field.« less

  9. Illuminating new electroweak states at hadron colliders

    SciTech Connect

    Ismail, Ahmed; Izaguirre, Eder; Shuve, Brian

    2016-07-01

    In this paper, we propose a novel powerful strategy to perform searches for new electroweak states. Uncolored electroweak states appear in generic extensions of the Standard Model (SM) and yet are challenging to discover at hadron colliders. This problem is particularly acute when the lightest state in the electroweak multiplet is neutral and all multiplet components are approximately degenerate. In this scenario, production of the charged fields of the multiplet is followed by decay into nearly invisible states; if this decay occurs promptly, the only way to infer the presence of the reaction is through its missing energy signature. Our proposal relies on emission of photon radiation from the new charged states as a means of discriminating the signal from SM backgrounds. Lastly, we demonstrate its broad applicability by studying two examples: a pure Higgsino doublet and an electroweak quintuplet field.

  10. SSC collider dipole magnets field angle data

    SciTech Connect

    Kuchnir, M.; Bleadon, M.; Schmidt, E.; Bossert, R.; Carson, J.; Delchamps, S.W.; Gourlay, S.; Hanft, R.; Koska, W.; Lamm, M.J.; Mazur, P.O.; Orris, D.; Ozelis, J.; Strait, J.; Wake, M. ); DiMarco, J.; Devred, A.; Kuzminski, J.; Yu, Y.; Zheng, H. ); Ogitsu, T. (Superconducting Super Collider

    1992-09-01

    In the fabrication of both 40 and 50 mm collider dipole superconducting magnets, surveys of the direction of the magnetic field along their length have been taken. This data besides being used for certifying compliance with the specifications for the finished magnet, yields interesting information on the straightness and rigidity of the coil placement between some stages in their manufacture and testing. A discussion on the measuring equipment and procedures is given. All of the 40 mm magnets that were built or cryostat at Fermilab have at least one of these surveys, and a summary of the data on them is presented. Most of the 50 mm magnets built and cold tested at Fermilab have been surveyed before and after insertion in the cryostat and before and after being cold tested. A summary of this data is also presented.

  11. Tracking study of hadron collider boosters

    SciTech Connect

    Machida, S.; Bourianoff, G.; Huang, Y.; Mahale, N.

    1992-07-01

    A simulation code SIMPSONS (previously called 6D-TEASE T) of single- and multi-particle tracking has been developed for proton synchrotrons. The 6D phase space coordinates are calculated each time step including acceleration with an arbitrary ramping curve by integration of the rf phase. Space-charge effects are modelled by means of the Particle In Cell (PIC) method. We observed the transverse emittance growth around the injection energy of the Low Energy Booster (LEB) of the Superconducting Super Collider (SSC) with and without second harmonic rf cavities which reduce peak line density. We also employed the code to see the possible transverse emittance deterioration around the transition energy in the Medium Energy Booster (MEB) and to estimate the emittance dilution due to an injection error of the MEB.

  12. Sfermion precision measurements at a linear collider

    SciTech Connect

    A. Freitas et al.

    2003-09-25

    At future e{sup +}e{sup -} linear colliders, the event rates and clean signals of scalar fermion production--in particular for the scalar leptons--allow very precise measurements of their masses and couplings and the determination of their quantum numbers. Various methods are proposed for extracting these parameters from the data at the sfermion thresholds and in the continuum. At the same time, NLO radiative corrections and non-zero width effects have been calculated in order to match the experimental accuracy. The substantial mixing expected for the third generation sfermions opens up additional opportunities. Techniques are presented for determining potential CP-violating phases and for extracting tan {beta} from the stau sector, in particular at high values. The consequences of possible large mass differences in the stop and sbottom system are explored in dedicated analyses.

  13. Ground motion data for International Collider models

    SciTech Connect

    Volk, J.T.; LeBrun, P.; Shiltsev, V.; Singatulin, S.; /Fermilab

    2007-11-01

    The proposed location for the International Linear Collider (ILC) in the Americas region is Fermilab in Batavia Illinois. If built at this location the tunnels would be located in the Galena Platteville shale at a depth of 100 or more meters below the surface. Studies using hydro static water levels and seismometers have been conducted in the MINOS hall and the LaFrange Mine in North Aurora Illinois to determine the level of ground motion. Both these locations are in the Galena Platteville shale and indicate the typical ground motion to be expected for the ILC. The data contains both natural and cultural noise. Coefficients for the ALT law are determined. Seismic measurements at the surface and 100 meters below the surface are presented.

  14. The Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider control system

    SciTech Connect

    Clifford, T.S.; Barton, D.S.; Oerter, B.R.

    1997-12-01

    The Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider control system has been used in the commissioning of the AGS to RHIC transfer line and in the first RHIC sextant test. Much of the controls infrastructure for networks and links has been installed throughout the collider. All of the controls hardware modules needed to be built for early RHIC operations have been designed and tested. Many of these VME modules are already being used in normal AGS operations. Over 150 VME based front end computers and device controllers will be installed by the Summer of 1998 in order to be ready for Fall of 1998. A few features are being added to the front end computer core software. The bulk of the Accelerator Device Objects (ADOs) which are instantiated in the FECs, have been written and tested in the early commissioning. A configuration database has been designed. Generic control and display of ADO parameters via a spreadsheet like program on the console level computers was provided early on in the control system development. User interface tools that were developed for the AGS control system have been used in RHIC applications. Some of the basic operations programs, like alarm display and save/restore, that are used in the AGS operations have been or will be expanded to support RHIC operations. A model for application programs which involves a console level manager servicing ADOs have been verified with a few RHIC applications. More applications need to be written for the Fall of 1998 commissioning effort. A sequencer for automatic control of the fill is being written with the expectation that it will be useful in early commissioning.

  15. The future of the Large Hadron Collider and CERN.

    PubMed

    Heuer, Rolf-Dieter

    2012-02-28

    This paper presents the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) and its current scientific programme and outlines options for high-energy colliders at the energy frontier for the years to come. The immediate plans include the exploitation of the LHC at its design luminosity and energy, as well as upgrades to the LHC and its injectors. This may be followed by a linear electron-positron collider, based on the technology being developed by the Compact Linear Collider and the International Linear Collider collaborations, or by a high-energy electron-proton machine. This contribution describes the past, present and future directions, all of which have a unique value to add to experimental particle physics, and concludes by outlining key messages for the way forward.

  16. Time resolved diagnostics of ions in colliding carbon plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Singh, Ravi Pratap; Gupta, Shyam L.; Thareja, Raj K.

    2014-11-14

    We report a comparative study of the dynamic behaviour of ions at different pressures in laser ablated colliding and single plasma plumes using 2D imaging, optical emission spectroscopy (OES) and a retarding field analyser (RFA). 2D imaging shows the splitting of plasma plumes due to different velocities of various plasma species. OES shows enhancement in abundance of ionic species with their presence for a longer time in colliding plume. C{sub 2} molecular formation is seen at later time in colliding plume compared to single plume and is attributed to dominating collisional processes in the colliding region of the plumes. The time of flight distribution of ions traced by the RFA shows the variation with change in fluence as well as ambient pressure for both colliding and single plume. Time of flight analysis of ions also shows the appearance of a fast peak in ion signal due to acceleration of ions at larger fluence.

  17. Detectors for Linear Colliders: Calorimetry at a Future Electron-Positron Collider (3/4)

    ScienceCinema

    None

    2016-07-12

    Calorimetry will play a central role in determining the physics reach at a future e+e- collider. The requirements for calorimetry place the emphasis on achieving an excellent jet energy resolution. The currently favoured option for calorimetry at a future e+e- collider is the concept of high granularity particle flow calorimetry. Here granularity and a high pattern recognition capability is more important than the single particle calorimetric response. In this lecture I will describe the recent progress in understanding the reach of high granularity particle flow calorimetry and the related R&D; efforts which concentrate on test beam demonstrations of the technological options for highly granular calorimeters. I will also discuss alternatives to particle flow, for example the technique of dual readout calorimetry.

  18. Detectors for Linear Colliders: Calorimetry at a Future Electron-Positron Collider (3/4)

    SciTech Connect

    2010-02-17

    Calorimetry will play a central role in determining the physics reach at a future e+e- collider. The requirements for calorimetry place the emphasis on achieving an excellent jet energy resolution. The currently favoured option for calorimetry at a future e+e- collider is the concept of high granularity particle flow calorimetry. Here granularity and a high pattern recognition capability is more important than the single particle calorimetric response. In this lecture I will describe the recent progress in understanding the reach of high granularity particle flow calorimetry and the related R&D; efforts which concentrate on test beam demonstrations of the technological options for highly granular calorimeters. I will also discuss alternatives to particle flow, for example the technique of dual readout calorimetry.

  19. Collider Phenomenology with Split-UED

    SciTech Connect

    Kong, Kyoungchul; Park, Seong Chan; Rizzo, Thomas G.; /SLAC

    2011-12-15

    We investigate the collider implications of Split Universal Extra Dimensions. The non-vanishing fermion mass in the bulk, which is consistent with the KK-parity, largely modifies the phenomenology of Minimal Universal Extra Dimensions. We scrutinize the behavior of couplings and study the discovery reach of the Tevatron and the LHC for level-2 Kaluza-Klein modes in the dilepton channel, which would indicates the presence of the extra dimensions. Observation of large event rates for dilepton resonances can result from a nontrivial fermion mass profile along the extra dimensions, which, in turn, may corroborate extra dimensional explanation for the observation of the positron excess in cosmic rays. The Minimal Universal Extra Dimensions scenario has received great attention. Recently non-vanishing bulk fermion masses have been introduced without spoiling the virtue of KK-parity. The fermion profiles are no longer simple sine/cosine functions and depend upon the specific values of bulk parameters. The profiles of fermions are split along the extra dimensions while the wave functions of the bosons remain the same as in UED. A simple introduction of a KK-parity conserving bulk fermion mass has significant influences on collider aspects as well as astrophysical implications of UED. For instance, the DM annihilation fraction into certain SM fermion pairs is either enhanced or reduced (compared to the MUED case) so that one can perhaps explain the PAMELA positron excess while suppressing the anti-proton flux. In this paper, we have concentrated on collider phenomenology of Split Universal Extra Dimensions. We have revisited the KK decomposition in detail and analyzed wave function overlaps to compute relevant couplings for collider studies. We have discussed general collider implication for level-1 KK modes and level-2 KK with non-zero bulk mass and have computed LHC reach for the EW level-2 KK bosons, {gamma}{sub 2} and Z{sub 2}, in the dilepton channel. The LHC should

  20. Status and future directions for advanced accelerator research - conventional and non-conventional collider concepts

    SciTech Connect

    Siemann, R.H.

    1997-01-01

    The relationship between advanced accelerator research and future directions for particle physics is discussed. Comments are made about accelerator research trends in hadron colliders, muon colliders, and e{sup +}3{sup {minus}} linear colliders.

  1. RHIC Au beam in Run 2014

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, S. Y.

    2014-09-15

    Au beam at the RHIC ramp in run 2014 is reviewed together with the run 2011 and run 2012. Observed bunch length and longitudinal emittance are compared with the IBS simulations. The IBS growth rate of the longitudinal emittance in run 2014 is similar to run 2011, and both are larger than run 2012. This is explained by the large transverse emittance at high intensity observed in run 2012, but not in run 2014. The big improvement of the AGS ramping in run 2014 might be related to this change. The importance of the injector intensity improvement in run 2014 is emphasized, which gives rise to the initial luminosity improvement of 50% in run 2014, compared with the previous Au-Au run 2011. In addition, a modified IBS model, which is calibrated using the RHIC Au runs from 9.8 GeV/n to 100 GeV/n, is presented and used in the study.

  2. Kinematic top analyses at CDF

    SciTech Connect

    Cobal-Grassman, M.; CDF Collaboration

    1996-01-01

    We present an update of the top quark analysis using kinematic techniques in {rho}{ovr string {rho}} collisions at {radical}s = 1.8 TeV with the Collider Detector at Fermilab (CDF). We reported before on a study which used 19.3 pb{sup -1} of data from the 1992-93 collider run, but now we use a larger data sample of 67 pb{sup -1}. First, we analyze the total transverse energy of the hard collision in W+{ge}3 jet events, showing the likely presence of a t{ovr string t} component in the event sample. Next, we compare in more detail the kinematic structure of W+{ge}3 jet events with expectations for top pair production and with background processes, predominantly direct W+ jet production. We again find W+{ge}3 jet events which cannot be explained in terms of background, but show kinematic features as expected from top. These events also show evidence for beauty quarks. The findings confirm the observation of top events made earlier in the data of the 1992-93 collider run.

  3. Tests of proton structure functions using leptons at CDF and DØ: W charge asymmetry and Drell-Yan production

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barbaro, Pawel de

    1996-02-01

    High statistics W charge asymmetry measurements at the Tevatron p¯p collider significantly constrain the u and d quark distributions, and specifically the slope of the d(x)/u(x) in the x range 0.007 to 0.27. We present measurements of the lepton charge asymmetry as a function of lepton rapidity, A(yl) at √s=1.8 TeV for ‖yl‖<2.0, for W decays to electrons and muons recorded by the CDF detector during the 1992-93 run (≊20 pb-1), and the first ≊50 pb-1 of data from the 1994-95 run. These precise data make possible further discrimination between sets of modern parton distributions. In particular it is found that the most recent parton distributions, which included the CDF 1992-93 W asymmetry data in their fits (MRSA, CTEQ3M and GRV94) are still in good agreement with the more precise data from the 1994-95 run. W charge asymmetry results from DO/ based on ≊6.5 pb-1 of data from the 1992-93 run and ≊29.7 pb-1 of data from the 1994-1995 run, using the W decays to muons, are also presented and are found to be consistent with CDF results. In addition, we present preliminary measurement of the Drell-Yan cross-section by CDF using a dielectron sample collected during the 1993-94 run (≊20 pb-1) and a high mass dimuon sample from the combined 1993-94 and 1994-95 runs (≊70 pb-1). The measurement is in good agreement with predictions using the most recent parton density functions in a dilepton mass range between 11 and 350 GeV/c2.

  4. CDF Run 2 muon system

    SciTech Connect

    C. M. Ginsburg

    2004-02-05

    The CDF muon detection system for Run 2 of the Fermilab Tevatron is described. Muon stubs are detected for |{eta}| < 1.5, and are matched to tracks in the central drift chamber at trigger level 1 for |{eta}| < 1.25. Detectors in the |{eta}| < 1 central region, built for previous runs, have been enhanced to survive the higher rate environment and closer bunch spacing (3.5 {micro}sec to 396 nsec) of Run 2. Azimuthal gaps in the central region have been filled in. New detectors have been added to extend the coverage from |{eta}| < 1 to |{eta}| < 1.5, consisting of four layers of drift chambers covered with matching scintillators for triggering. The Level 1 Extremely Fast Tracker supplies matching tracks with measured p{sub T} for the muon trigger. The system has been in operation for over 18 months. Operating experience and reconstructed data are presented.

  5. Supersymmetric QCD one-loop effects in (un)polarized top-pair production at hadron colliders

    SciTech Connect

    Berge, Stefan; Hollik, Wolfgang; Mosle, Wolf M.; Wackeroth, Doreen

    2007-08-01

    We study the effects of O({alpha}{sub s}) supersymmetric QCD (SQCD) corrections on the total production rate and kinematic distributions of polarized and unpolarized top-pair production in pp and pp collisions. At the Fermilab Tevatron pp collider, top-quark pairs are mainly produced via quark-antiquark annihilation, qq{yields}tt, while at the CERN LHC pp collider gluon-gluon scattering, gg{yields}tt, dominates. We compute the complete set of O({alpha}{sub s}) SQCD corrections to both production channels and study their dependence on the parameters of the minimal supersymmetric standard model. In particular, we discuss the prospects for observing strong, loop-induced SUSY effects in top-pair production at the Tevatron run II and the LHC.

  6. Unique radiation problems associated with the SLAC Linear Collider

    SciTech Connect

    Jenkins, T.M.; Nelson, W.R.

    1987-01-01

    The SLAC Linear Collider (SLC) is a variation of a new class of linear colliders whereby two linear accelerators are aimed at each other to collide intense bunches of electrons and positrons together. Conventional storage rings are becoming ever more costly as the energy of the stored beams increases such that the cost of two linear colliders per GeV is less than that of electron-positron storage rings at cm energies above about 100 GeV. The SLC being built at SLAC is designed to achieve a center-of-mass energy of 100 GeV by accelerating intense bunches of particles, both electrons and positrons, in the SLAC linac and transporting them along two different arcs to a point where they are focused to a small radius and made to collide head on. The SLC has two main goals. The first is to develop the physics and technology of linear colliders. The other is to achieve center-of-mass energies above 90 GeV in order to investigate the unification of the weak and electromagnetic interactions in the energy range above 90 GeV; (i.e., Z/sup 0/, etc.). This note discusses a few of the special problems that were encountered by the Radiation Physics group at SLAC during the design and construction of the SLAC Linear Collider. The nature of these problems is discussed along with the methods employed to solve them.

  7. [Stress fracture after changing to barefoot running].

    PubMed

    Christensen, Mikkel

    2014-12-15

    Barefoot running is increasing in popularity but little is known about the implications in respect to injuries. It has been proposed that barefoot running is associated with a decrease in running injuries as it represents a more natural way of running. A 50-year-old runner with a weekly running distance of 50 km presented suffering from a stress fracture of the second metatarsal after six weeks of intensive barefoot running.

  8. Multi-waveband observations of colliding galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Appleton, P. N.; Robson, E. I.; Schombert, James M.

    1990-11-01

    Colliding galaxies represent a major challenge to both theorists and observers because of the large variety of phenomena which are expected to come into play during the interaction. Strong gravitational fluctuations may drive non-linear waves and instabilities throughout the stars and gas leading to enhanced star formation, nuclear activity and ultimately a mixing of the morphological components of the original galaxies. One relatively uncomplicated class of colliding galaxy where stellar waves play an important role in star formation are ring galaxies. Ring galaxies are probably formed when a companion galaxy passes through the center of a disk system driving circular waves through the disk (Lynds and Toomre 1976, Toomre 1978, Struck-Marcell 1990). Off-center collisions can generate non-circular waves and can be loosely described as banana-shaped although they may exhibit more complex forms as the waves expand into the disk. The propagation of such stellar and gaseous waves through the disk leads to enhanced star formation (e.g., Appleton and Struck-Marcell 1987a; Jeske 1986) and provides a unique probe of the response of the interstellar medium (ISM) to a propagating wave (see Appleton and Struck-Marcell 1987b). Here, the authors report results for 3 systems; the irregular ring Arp 143 (=VV 117); Wakamatsu's Seyfert ring (A0959-755; see Wakamatsu and Nishida 1987) and the brighter member of the pair of ring galaxies comprising of AM 1358-221. The most complete multi-wavelength data is for Arp 143. Optical charge coupled device (CCD) observations made with the 60 inch Palomar telescope at BV and r band, near-IR images at J (1.25 microns), H (1.65 microns) and k (2.2 microns) bands from the infrared camera (IRCAM) InSb array camera on the 3.8m United Kingdon Infrared Telescope (UKIRT) telescope and very large array (VLA) observations at 20cm in both the neutral hydrogen line and radio continuum are described. The observations of Wakamatsu's ring and AM 1358 were

  9. Teaching Bank Runs through Films

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Flynn, David T.

    2009-01-01

    The author advocates the use of films to supplement textbook treatments of bank runs and panics in money and banking or general banking classes. Modern students, particularly those in developed countries, tend to be unfamiliar with potential fragilities of financial systems such as a lack of deposit insurance or other safety net mechanisms. Films…

  10. Running and Breathing in Mammals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bramble, Dennis M.; Carrier, David R.

    1983-01-01

    Mechanical constraints appear to require that locomotion and breathing be synchronized in running mammals. Phase locking of limb and respiratory frequency has now been recorded during treadmill running in jackrabbits and during locomotion on solid ground in dogs, horses, and humans. Quadrupedal species normally synchronize the locomotor and respiratory cycles at a constant ratio of 1:1 (strides per breath) in both the trot and gallop. Human runners differ from quadrupeds in that while running they employ several phase-locked patterns (4:1, 3:1, 2:1, 1:1, 5:2, and 3:2), although a 2:1 coupling ratio appears to be favored. Even though the evolution of bipedal gait has reduced the mechanical constraints on respiration in man, thereby permitting greater flexibility in breathing pattern, it has seemingly not eliminated the need for the synchronization of respiration and body motion during sustained running. Flying birds have independently achieved phase-locked locomotor and respiratory cycles. This hints that strict locomotor-respiratory coupling may be a vital factor in the sustained aerobic exercise of endothermic vertebrates, especially those in which the stresses of locomotion tend to deform the thoracic complex.

  11. ATLAS LAr calorimeter performance and LHC Run-2 commissioning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spettel, Fabian

    2016-07-01

    The ATLAS detector was built to study proton-proton collisions produced by the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) at a center of mass energy of up to 14 TeV. The Liquid Argon (LAr) calorimeters are used for all electromagnetic calorimetry as well as the hadronic calorimetry in the endcap and forward regions. They have shown excellent performance during the first LHC data taking campaign, from 2010 to 2012, so-called Run 1, at a peak luminosity of 8 ×1033cm-2s-1. During the next run, peak luminosities of 1.5 ×1034cm-2s-1 and even higher are expected at a 25 ns bunch spacing. Such a high collision rate may have an impact on the quality of the energy reconstruction which is attempted to be maintained at a high level using a calibration procedure described in this contribution. It also poses major challenges to the first level of the trigger system which is constrained to a maximal rate of 100 kHz. For Run-3, scheduled to start in 2019, instantaneous luminosity as high as 3 ×1034cm-2s-1 are foreseen imposing an upgrade of the LAr trigger system to maintain its performance. A demonstrator containing prototypes of the upgraded trigger electronic architecture has been installed on one of the barrel electromagnetic calorimeter readout front end crates to test it during the Run-2 campaign. The new architecture and its benefits for data taking will be discussed below as well as the results from first beam splash events.

  12. Prospects for heavy flavor physics at hadron colliders

    SciTech Connect

    Butler, J.N.

    1997-09-01

    The role of hadron colliders in the observation and study of CP violation in B decays is discussed. We show that hadron collider experiments can play a significant role in the early studies of these phenomena and will play an increasingly dominant role as the effort turns towards difficult to measure decays, especially those of the B{sub s} meson, and sensitive searches for rare decays and subtle deviations from Standard Model predictions. We conclude with a discussion of the relative merits of hadron collider detectors with `forward` vs `central` rapidity coverage.

  13. Science and status of the Electron Ion Collider

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deshpande, A.

    The US Nuclear Science Advisory Committee (NSAC) recently recommended the construction of a high-luminosity, high-energy Electron Ion Collider (EIC), with polarized beams capable of colliding polarized electrons with polarized proton and light ion beams, and with any nucleus. The s range between 40GeV and 140GeV, and luminosity range from 1033‑34cm‑2s‑1 were recommended. It is anticipated that under the current guidance from the DOE, the collider could become operational in the second half of the 2020’s. This paper summarizes its science and the scope of this over all project.

  14. Beamstrahlung spectra in next generation linear colliders. Revision

    SciTech Connect

    Barklow, T.; Chen, P.; Kozanecki, W.

    1992-04-01

    For the next generation of linear colliders, the energy loss due to beamstrahlung during the collision of the e{sup +}e{sup {minus}} beams is expected to substantially influence the effective center-of-mass energy distribution of the colliding particles. In this paper, we first derive analytical formulae for the electron and photon energy spectra under multiple beamstrahlung processes, and for the e{sup +}e{sup {minus}} and {gamma}{gamma} differential luminosities. We then apply our formulation to various classes of 500 GeV e{sup +}e{sup {minus}} linear collider designs currently under study.

  15. Polarized e-p elastic scattering in the collider frame

    SciTech Connect

    Sofiatti, C.; Donnelly, T. W.

    2011-07-15

    Double polarization elastic e-vector-p-vector cross sections and asymmetries are considered in collider kinematics. Covariant expressions are derived for the general situation involving crossed beams; these are checked against the well-known results obtained when the proton is at rest. Results are given using modern models for the proton electromagnetic form factors for kinematics of interest in e-p colliders such as the Electron-Ion Collider facility which is in its planning stage. In context, parity-violating elastic e-vector-p scattering is compared and contrasted with these double-polarization (parity-conserving) results.

  16. TOP AND HIGGS PHYSICS AT THE HADRON COLLIDERS

    SciTech Connect

    Jabeen, Shabnam

    2013-10-20

    This review summarizes the recent results for top quark and Higgs boson measurements from experiments at Tevatron, a proton–antiproton collider at a center-of-mass energy of √ s =1 . 96 TeV, and the Large Hadron Collider, a proton–proton collider at a center- of-mass energy of √ s = 7 TeV. These results include the discovery of a Higgs-like boson and measurement of its various properties, and measurements in the top quark sector, e.g. top quark mass, spin, charge asymmetry and production of single top quark.

  17. Intense ion-beam dynamics in the NICA collider

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kozlov, O. S.; Meshkov, I. N.; Sidorin, A. O.; Trubnikov, G. V.

    2016-12-01

    The problems of intense ion-beam dynamics in the developed and optimized optical structure of the NICA collider are considered. Conditions for beam collisions and obtaining the required parameters of luminosity in the operation energy range are discussed. The restriction on collider luminosity is related to effects of the domination of the space charge and intrabeam scattering. Applying methods of cooling, electron and stochastic ones, will permit one to suppress these effects and reach design luminosity. The work also deals with systems of magnetic field correction and problems of calculating the dynamic aperture of the collider.

  18. Target and collection optimization for muon colliders

    SciTech Connect

    Mokhov, N.V.; Noble, R.J.; Van Ginneken, A.

    1996-01-10

    To achieve adequate luminosity in a muon collider it is necessary to produce and collect large numbers of muons. The basic method used in this paper follows closely a proposed scheme which starts with a proton beam impinging on a thick target ({approximately} one interaction length) followed by a long solenoid which collects muons resulting mainly from pion decay. Production and collection of pions and their decay muons must be optimized while keeping in mind limitations of target integrity and of the technology of magnets and cavities. Results of extensive simulations for 8 GeV protons on various targets and with various collection schemes are reported. Besides muon yields results include-energy deposition in target and solenoid to address cooling requirements for these systems. Target composition, diameter, and length are varied in this study as well as the configuration and field strengths of the solenoid channel. A curved solenoid field is introduced to separate positive and negative pions within a few meters of the target. This permits each to be placed in separate RF buckets for acceleration which effectively doubles the number of muons per bunch available for collisions and increases the luminosity fourfold.

  19. Hadron collider limits on anomalous WWγ couplings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barger, Kevin R.; Reno, M. H.

    1995-01-01

    A next-to-leading log calculation of the reactions pp and pp¯-->W+/-γX is presented including a triboson gauge coupling from non-standard-model contributions. The additional term arises by considering the standard model as a low energy effective theory. Two approaches are made for comparison. The first approach considers the triboson WWγ coupling as being uniquely fixed by tree level unitarity at high energies to its standard model form and, consequently, suppresses the non-standard-model contributions with form factors. The second approach is to ignore such considerations and calculate the contributions to non-standard-model triboson gauge couplings without such suppressions, using the first term in the momentum expansion of an effective chiral Lagrangian. It is found that at Fermilab Tevatron energies the two approaches do not differ much in quantitative results, while at large Hadron Collider (LHC) energies the two approaches give significantly different predictions for production rates. At the Tevatron and LHC, however, the sensitivity limits on the anomalous coupling of WWγ are too weak to usefully constrain parameters in the chiral Lagrangian.

  20. Simulating graviton production at hadron colliders

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Aquino, Priscila; Hagiwara, Kaoru; Li, Qiang; Maltoni, Fabio

    2011-06-01

    Spin-2 particles and in particular gravitons are predicted in many new physics scenarios at the TeV scale. Depending on the details of models such new states might show up as a continuum, massless particles, or TeV scale resonances. Correspondingly, very different discovery signatures should be exploited, from the search of excesses in events with multi jets and large missing transverse energy, to resonances in weak boson or jet pair productions. We present a very general and flexible implementation in M ad-G raph/M adE vent of spin-2 particles interacting with the standard model particles via the energy momentum tensor, which encompasses all of the most popular TeV scale models featuring gravitons. By merging matrix elements with parton shower, we can generate inclusive samples of graviton + jets at the hadron colliders in several scenarios (ADD, zero-mass graviton and RS). We compare and validate our results against the corresponding next-to-leading order QCD calculations.

  1. Electron Lenses for the Large Hadron Collider

    SciTech Connect

    Stancari, Giulio; Valishev, Alexander; Bruce, Roderik; Redaelli, Stefano; Rossi, Adriana; Salvachua, Belen

    2014-07-01

    Electron lenses are pulsed, magnetically confined electron beams whose current-density profile is shaped to obtain the desired effect on the circulating beam. Electron lenses were used in the Fermilab Tevatron collider for bunch-by-bunch compensation of long-range beam-beam tune shifts, for removal of uncaptured particles in the abort gap, for preliminary experiments on head-on beam-beam compensation, and for the demonstration of halo scraping with hollow electron beams. Electron lenses for beam-beam compensation are being commissioned in RHIC at BNL. Within the US LHC Accelerator Research Program and the European HiLumi LHC Design Study, hollow electron beam collimation was studied as an option to complement the collimation system for the LHC upgrades. This project is moving towards a technical design in 2014, with the goal to build the devices in 2015-2017, after resuming LHC operations and re-assessing needs and requirements at 6.5 TeV. Because of their electric charge and the absence of materials close to the proton beam, electron lenses may also provide an alternative to wires for long-range beam-beam compensation in LHC luminosity upgrade scenarios with small crossing angles.

  2. Operational decoupling in the SSC Collider

    SciTech Connect

    Bourianoff, G.

    1991-11-01

    This paper will summarize a recent study of the effects and correction of linear coupling in the Superconducting Super Collider (SSC) lattice. There are several aspects of the SSC lattice that make direct extrapolation of techniques used on existing machines unreliable. The most obvious aspect of the SSC which departs from previous experience is the small dynamic aperture which lies well within the beampipe. A second aspect is the existence of long arcs with low superperiodicity which allow various sources of skew quadrupole to accumulate to large, and, perhaps, nonlinear values. A third aspect is the relatively large value of systematic skew quadrupole error in the main dipoles. This results from asymmetric placement of the cold mass in the cryostat. Coupling must be considered harmful if it leads to irreversible emittance blow-up, a decrease in the dynamic aperture, or inoperability of the machine. These negative effects are generally related to coupling terms that accumulate to large and, hence, nonlinear values prior to correction. The harmful effects can also be caused by the linearly coupled orbits interacting with high-order multipole fields that exist in the other magnets.

  3. Design of beam optics for the future circular collider e+e- collider rings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oide, K.; Aiba, M.; Aumon, S.; Benedikt, M.; Blondel, A.; Bogomyagkov, A.; Boscolo, M.; Burkhardt, H.; Cai, Y.; Doblhammer, A.; Haerer, B.; Holzer, B.; Jowett, J. M.; Koop, I.; Koratzinos, M.; Levichev, E.; Medina, L.; Ohmi, K.; Papaphilippou, Y.; Piminov, P.; Shatilov, D.; Sinyatkin, S.; Sullivan, M.; Wenninger, J.; Wienands, U.; Zhou, D.; Zimmermann, F.

    2016-11-01

    A beam optics scheme has been designed for the future circular collider-e+e- (FCC-ee). The main characteristics of the design are: beam energy 45 to 175 GeV, 100 km circumference with two interaction points (IPs) per ring, horizontal crossing angle of 30 mrad at the IP and the crab-waist scheme [P. Raimondi, D. Shatilov, and M. Zobov, arXiv:physics/0702033; P. Raimondi, M. Zobov, and D. Shatilov, in Proceedings of the 22nd Particle Accelerator Conference, PAC-2007, Albuquerque, NM (IEEE, New York, 2007), p. TUPAN037.] with local chromaticity correction. The crab-waist scheme is implemented within the local chromaticity correction system without additional sextupoles, by reducing the strength of one of the two sextupoles for vertical chromatic correction at each side of the IP. So-called "tapering" of the magnets is applied, which scales all fields of the magnets according to the local beam energy to compensate for the effect of synchrotron radiation (SR) loss along the ring. An asymmetric layout near the interaction region reduces the critical energy of SR photons on the incoming side of the IP to values below 100 keV, while matching the geometry to the beam line of the FCC proton collider (FCC-hh) [A. Chancé et al., Proceedings of IPAC'16, 9-13 May 2016, Busan, Korea, TUPMW020 (2016).] as closely as possible. Sufficient transverse/longitudinal dynamic aperture (DA) has been obtained, including major dynamical effects, to assure an adequate beam lifetime in the presence of beamstrahlung and top-up injection. In particular, a momentum acceptance larger than ±2 % has been obtained, which is better than the momentum acceptance of typical collider rings by about a factor of 2. The effects of the detector solenoids including their compensation elements are taken into account as well as synchrotron radiation in all magnets. The optics presented in this paper is a step toward a full conceptual design for the collider. A number of issues have been identified for further

  4. Design of beam optics for the future circular collider e+e- collider rings

    DOE PAGES

    Oide, Katsunobu; Aiba, M.; Aumon, S.; ...

    2016-11-21

    A beam optics scheme has been designed for the future circular collider- e+e- (FCC-ee). The main characteristics of the design are: beam energy 45 to 175 GeV, 100 km circumference with two interaction points (IPs) per ring, horizontal crossing angle of 30 mrad at the IP and the crab-waist scheme [P. Raimondi, D. Shatilov, and M. Zobov, arXiv:physics/0702033; P. Raimondi, M. Zobov, and D. Shatilov, in Proceedings of the 22nd Particle Accelerator Conference, PAC-2007, Albuquerque, NM (IEEE, New York, 2007), p. TUPAN037.] with local chromaticity correction. The crab-waist scheme is implemented within the local chromaticity correction system without additional sextupoles,more » by reducing the strength of one of the two sextupoles for vertical chromatic correction at each side of the IP. So-called “tapering” of the magnets is applied, which scales all fields of the magnets according to the local beam energy to compensate for the effect of synchrotron radiation (SR) loss along the ring. An asymmetric layout near the interaction region reduces the critical energy of SR photons on the incoming side of the IP to values below 100 keV, while matching the geometry to the beam line of the FCC proton collider (FCC-hh) [A. Chancé et al., Proceedings of IPAC’16, 9–13 May 2016, Busan, Korea, TUPMW020 (2016).] as closely as possible. Sufficient transverse/longitudinal dynamic aperture (DA) has been obtained, including major dynamical effects, to assure an adequate beam lifetime in the presence of beamstrahlung and top-up injection. In particular, a momentum acceptance larger than ±2% has been obtained, which is better than the momentum acceptance of typical collider rings by about a factor of 2. The effects of the detector solenoids including their compensation elements are taken into account as well as synchrotron radiation in all magnets. The optics presented in this study is a step toward a full conceptual design for the collider. Finally, a number of issues have

  5. Physics performance and upgrade for Run II of the ATLAS pixel detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miglioranzi, S.

    2015-05-01

    The ATLAS pixel detector is the innermost detector of the ATLAS experiment at the Large Hadron Collider at CERN, providing high-resolution measurements of charged particle trajectories in the high radiation environment close to the collision region. The operation and performance of the pixel detector during the first years of LHC running are described. More than 96% of the detector modules were operational during this period, with an average intrinsic hit efficiency larger than 99%. The alignment of the detector was found to be stable at the few-micron level over long periods of time. Detector material description, tracking performances in Run I and expectations for the upcoming Run II are presented.

  6. A new micro-strip tracker for the new generation of experiments at hadron colliders

    SciTech Connect

    Dinardo, Mauro E.

    2005-12-01

    This thesis concerns the development and characterization of a prototype Silicon micro-strip detector that can be used in the forward (high rapidity) region of a hadron collider. These detectors must operate in a high radiation environment without any important degradation of their performance. The innovative feature of these detectors is the readout electronics, which, being completely data-driven, allows for the direct use of the detector information at the lowest level of the trigger. All the particle hits on the detector can be readout in real-time without any external trigger and any particular limitation due to dead-time. In this way, all the detector information is available to elaborate a very selective trigger decision based on a fast reconstruction of tracks and vertex topology. These detectors, together with the new approach to the trigger, have been developed in the context of the BTeV R&D program; our aim was to define the features and the design parameters of an optimal experiment for heavy flavour physics at hadron colliders. Application of these detectors goes well beyond the BTeV project and, in particular, involves the future upgrades of experiments at hadron colliders, such as Atlas, CMS and LHCb. These experiments, indeed, are already considering for their future high-intensity runs a new trigger strategy a la BTeV. Their aim is to select directly at trigger level events containing Bhadrons, which, on several cases, come from the decay of Higgs bosons, Zo's or W±'s; the track information can also help on improving the performance of the electron and muon selection at the trigger level. For this reason, they are going to develop new detectors with practically the same characteristics as those of BTeV. To this extent, the work accomplished in this thesis could serve as guide-line for those upgrades.

  7. Bilingual Readiness for Achieving through Valued Opportunities (Project BRAVO) Final Evaluation Report, 1992-93. OREA Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Choonoo, John

    This report presents an evaluation of the Bilingual Readiness for Achieving through Valued Opportunities (Project BRAVO), an Elementary and Secondary Education Act Title VII-funded project in its first year of operation at Boys and Girls High School in Brooklyn (New York) and Louis D. Brandeis High School in Manhattan (New York). Participating…

  8. Bilingual Enrichment Services and Training (Project BEST): Community School District 2, Manhattan. Final Evaluation Report, 1992-93. OER Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Musante, Patricia

    This report presents an evaluation of Bilingual Enrichment Services and Training (Project BEST), an Elementary and Secondary Education Act Title VII-funded project in its third year of operation at four schools in Manhattan. The project served 266 Cantonese-, Fukienese, and Mandarin-speaking gifted students of limited English proficiency.…

  9. Students Upgrading through Computer and Career Education System Services (Project SUCCESS). Final Evaluation Report 1992-93. OER Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    New York City Board of Education, Brooklyn, NY. Office of Educational Research.

    Student Upgrading through Computer and Career Education System Services (Project SUCCESS) was an Elementary and Secondary Education Act Title VII-funded project in its third year of operation. Project SUCCESS served 460 students of limited English proficiency at two high schools in Brooklyn and one high school in Manhattan (New York City).…

  10. Exemplary Capacity Building Program of Transitional Bilingual Education, Community School District 3. Final Evaluation Report, 1992-93. OREA Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cantalupo, Denise

    The Exemplary Capacity Building Program of Transitional Bilingual Education was a federally funded program serving 266 limited-English-speaking, Spanish-speaking students in two Manhattan (New York) elementary schools. Participating students received instruction in English as a Second Language (ESL), native language arts (NLA), and content areas.…

  11. Quality of surface and ground water in the White Creek and Mossy Creek watersheds, White County, Georgia, 1992-93

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Peck, Michael F.; Garrett, Jerry W.

    1994-01-01

    Surface- and ground-water quality data were collected and evaluated from streams and wells in the White Creek and Mossy Creek watersheds in White County, Georgia, during three sampling periods in 1992 and 1993, to identify stream reaches and wells affected by nonpoint-source contaminants. Livestock operations in these watersheds account for approximately 9.8 million tons of manure per year, which is spread over about 5,000 acres of pasture and cropland in the watersheds. White Creek and Mossy Creek are tributaries of the Chattahoochee River which flows into Lake Sidney Lanier. Lake Sidney Lanier and the Chattahoochee River downstream from the lake are the primary sources of drinking water for the Atlanta Metropolitan area and numerous smaller communities downstream of Atlanta. Water samples were collected from 31 stream sites during baseflow and stormwater-runoff conditions and from 8 shallow wells completed in the regolith and 16 deeper wells completed in the crystalline bedrock. All water samples were analyzed for the nutrients ammonia, nitrite plus nitrate, and orthophosphate. None of the surface-water samples from either sampling period had concentrations of these constituents that exceed the Georgia Department of Natural Resources, Environmental Protection Division (EPD), drinking-water standards. Generally, in both watersheds, the streamwater temperature was cool, specific conductance low, dissolved oxygen high, and pH near neutral. Ground-water samples collected from 8 shallow regolith wells and the 16 deep bedrock wells had nutrient concentrations below EPD drinking-water standards, except for two of the deep bedrock wells with nitrite plus nitrate concentrations slightly above the 10 mg/L drinking-water standard of EPD.

  12. Curriculum Developed through Project 05-485-150-613: Services to the Disadvantaged--Curriculum Development FY 1992-93.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Blackhawk Technical Coll., Janesville, WI.

    This document consists of 37 draft curriculum maps and 3 curricula that were developed to enable vocational students to make a smooth transition from their high school vocational program to an associate degree or vocational diploma program at Blackhawk Technical College in Wisconsin. The career maps outline the reading, mathematics, and other…

  13. Nonpoint sources of pesticides in the San Joaquin River, California; input from winter storms, 1992-93

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Domagalski, Joseph L.

    1995-01-01

    Organophosphate insecticides, including chlor- pyrifos, diazinon, and methidathion, are applied to dormant orchards in the San Joaquin Valley, California, during late December through January. This time frame coincides with the period of heaviest rainfall in the valley, and rainfall mobilizes a portion of these pesticides from the orchards. The pesticides enter the San Joaquin River and have been detected along the perennial reach of the river. A storm on the evening of February 7 and the morning of February 8, 1993, deposited more than an inch and a half of rain in the San Joaquin Valley. Two distinct peaks of organophosphate pesticide concentrations were measured at the mouth of the San Joaquin River during a single rise in discharge. Both peaks were attributed to contrasts between the soil texture and hydrology of the eastern and western valley. The fine soil texture and small size of the western tributary basins contributed to rapid runoff. Diazinon concentrations peaked within hours after rainfall ended and then decreased because of a combination of dilution with pesticide-free runoff from the nearby Coast Ranges and decreased pesticide concentrations in the agricultural runoff. Data for the Merced River, a large tributary of the eastern San Joaquin Valley, are sparse, but indicate that peak concentrations occurred at least a day after those of the western tributary streams. That delay may be due to the presence of well-drained soils, the larger size of the drainage basins, and the management of surface-water drainage networks. Runoff from a subsequent storm, on February 18 and 19, contained significantly lower concentrations of most organophosphate pesticides, indicating that runoff from the first storm had already removed most of the pesticides available for rainfall-induced transport.

  14. Pueblo Community College Objectives: 1990-91 Completed, 1991-92 Current, 1992-93 Projected, 1995-96 Projected.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pueblo Community Coll., CO.

    This report focuses on the institutional goals of Pueblo Community College (PCC), including completed, planned, and projected objectives classified by administrative division. First, goals for the President's Office are presented, covering affirmative action and activities of the Business and Industry Services Division (i.e., customized training,…

  15. Origins of the Principles for Review of Executive Compensation 1992-93. Research & Occasional Paper Series: CSHE.6.2008

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pelfrey, Patricia A.

    2008-01-01

    This paper looks at the 1992-3 compensation controversy at the University of California in light of the factors that shaped the board's policy response to the controversy, the Principles for Review of Executive Compensation. It discusses the events of 1992-3 in the context of the public and political debate over the appropriate model for executive…

  16. A Continuation of Politics by Other Means: The "Politics" of a Peacekeeping Mission in Cambodia (1992-93)

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-02-01

    observes that UN peace- keeping missions can be too tied to theory and doctrine and ignore reality. Instead, he argues for missions that understand the...causal theories to explain the suc- cess and failure of peacekeeping missions. Works that address the complexities of the interactions among the...Foreign interven- tions had played a contributing role in Cambodia’s turmoil, but the paradox was purely Cambodian. Ne- gotiations were necessary

  17. Language Arts Grades 6-12. Program Evaluation 1992-93. Focus on Program Evaluation 93-144.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wadden, Jerry M.

    The Language Arts Supervisor of the Des Moines, Iowa Independent Community School District is responsible for supervising and coordinating all aspects of the middle and high school language arts program. Aspects of the program include curriculum development, instructional material selection and implementation, staff development, evaluation, and…

  18. Pion production for neutrino factories and muon colliders

    SciTech Connect

    Mokhov, N.V.; Guidman, K.K.; Strait, J.B.; Striganov, S.I.; /Fermilab

    2009-12-01

    Optimization of pion and muon production/collection for neutrino factories and muon colliders is described along with recent developments of the MARS15 code event generators and effects influencing the choice of the optimal beam energy.

  19. Rf System Requirements for JLab’s MEIC Collider Ring

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Shaoheng; Li, Rui; Rimmer, Robert A.; Wang, Haipeng; Zhang, Yuhong

    2013-06-01

    The Medium-energy Electron Ion Collider (MEIC), proposed by Jefferson Lab, consists of a series of accelerators. At the top energy are the electron and ion collider rings. For the ion ring, it accelerates five long ion bunches to colliding energy and rebunches ions into a train of very short bunches before colliding. A set of low frequency RF system is needed for the long ion bunch energy ramping. Another set of high frequency RF cavities is needed to rebunch ions. For the electron ring, superconducting RF (SRF) cavities are needed to compensate the synchrotron radiation energy loss. The impedance of the SRF cavities must be low enough to keep the high current electron beam stable. The preliminary design requirements of these RF cavities are presented.

  20. The ATLAS Experiment at the CERN Large Hadron Collider

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    ATLAS Collaboration; Aad, G.; Abat, E.; Abdallah, J.; Abdelalim, A. A.; Abdesselam, A.; Abdinov, O.; Abi, B. A.; Abolins, M.; Abramowicz, H.; Acerbi, E.; Acharya, B. S.; Achenbach, R.; Ackers, M.; Adams, D. L.; Adamyan, F.; Addy, T. N.; Aderholz, M.; Adorisio, C.; Adragna, P.; Aharrouche, M.; Ahlen, S. P.; Ahles, F.; Ahmad, A.; Ahmed, H.; Aielli, G.; Åkesson, P. F.; Åkesson, T. P. A.; Akimov, A. V.; Alam, S. M.; Albert, J.; Albrand, S.; Aleksa, M.; Aleksandrov, I. N.; Aleppo, M.; Alessandria, F.; Alexa, C.; Alexander, G.; Alexopoulos, T.; Alimonti, G.; Aliyev, M.; Allport, P. P.; Allwood-Spiers, S. E.; Aloisio, A.; Alonso, J.; Alves, R.; Alviggi, M. G.; Amako, K.; Amaral, P.; Amaral, S. P.; Ambrosini, G.; Ambrosio, G.; Amelung, C.; Ammosov, V. V.; Amorim, A.; Amram, N.; Anastopoulos, C.; Anderson, B.; Anderson, K. J.; Anderssen, E. C.; Andreazza, A.; Andrei, V.; Andricek, L.; Andrieux, M.-L.; Anduaga, X. S.; Anghinolfi, F.; Antonaki, A.; Antonelli, M.; Antonelli, S.; Apsimon, R.; Arabidze, G.; Aracena, I.; Arai, Y.; Arce, A. T. H.; Archambault, J. P.; Arguin, J.-F.; Arik, E.; Arik, M.; Arms, K. E.; Armstrong, S. R.; Arnaud, M.; Arnault, C.; Artamonov, A.; Asai, S.; Ask, S.; Åsman, B.; Asner, D.; Asquith, L.; Assamagan, K.; Astbury, A.; Athar, B.; Atkinson, T.; Aubert, B.; Auerbach, B.; Auge, E.; Augsten, K.; Aulchenko, V. M.; Austin, N.; Avolio, G.; Avramidou, R.; Axen, A.; Ay, C.; Azuelos, G.; Baccaglioni, G.; Bacci, C.; Bachacou, H.; Bachas, K.; Bachy, G.; Badescu, E.; Bagnaia, P.; Bailey, D. C.; Baines, J. T.; Baker, O. K.; Ballester, F.; Baltasar Dos Santos Pedrosa, F.; Banas, E.; Banfi, D.; Bangert, A.; Bansal, V.; Baranov, S. P.; Baranov, S.; Barashkou, A.; Barberio, E. L.; Barberis, D.; Barbier, G.; Barclay, P.; Bardin, D. Y.; Bargassa, P.; Barillari, T.; Barisonzi, M.; Barnett, B. M.; Barnett, R. M.; Baron, S.; Baroncelli, A.; Barone, M.; Barr, A. J.; Barreiro, F.; Barreiro Guimarães da Costa, J.; Barrillon, P.; Barriuso Poy, A.; Barros, N.; Bartheld, V.; Bartko, H.; Bartoldus, R.; Basiladze, S.; Bastos, J.; Batchelor, L. E.; Bates, R. L.; Batley, J. R.; Batraneanu, S.; Battistin, M.; Battistoni, G.; Batusov, V.; Bauer, F.; Bauss, B.; Baynham, D. E.; Bazalova, M.; Bazan, A.; Beauchemin, P. H.; Beaugiraud, B.; Beccherle, R. B.; Beck, G. A.; Beck, H. P.; Becks, K. H.; Bedajanek, I.; Beddall, A. J.; Beddall, A.; Bednár, P.; Bednyakov, V. A.; Bee, C.; Behar Harpaz, S.; Belanger, G. A. N.; Belanger-Champagne, C.; Belhorma, B.; Bell, P. J.; Bell, W. H.; Bella, G.; Bellachia, F.; Bellagamba, L.; Bellina, F.; Bellomo, G.; Bellomo, M.; Beltramello, O.; Belymam, A.; Ben Ami, S.; Ben Moshe, M.; Benary, O.; Benchekroun, D.; Benchouk, C.; Bendel, M.; Benedict, B. H.; Benekos, N.; Benes, J.; Benhammou, Y.; Benincasa, G. P.; Benjamin, D. P.; Bensinger, J. R.; Benslama, K.; Bentvelsen, S.; Beretta, M.; Berge, D.; Bergeaas, E.; Berger, N.; Berghaus, F.; Berglund, S.; Bergsma, F.; Beringer, J.; Bernabéu, J.; Bernardet, K.; Berriaud, C.; Berry, T.; Bertelsen, H.; Bertin, A.; Bertinelli, F.; Bertolucci, S.; Besson, N.; Beteille, A.; Bethke, S.; Bialas, W.; Bianchi, R. M.; Bianco, M.; Biebel, O.; Bieri, M.; Biglietti, M.; Bilokon, H.; Binder, M.; Binet, S.; Bingefors, N.; Bingul, A.; Bini, C.; Biscarat, C.; Bischof, R.; Bischofberger, M.; Bitadze, A.; Bizzell, J. P.; Black, K. M.; Blair, R. E.; Blaising, J. J.; Blanch, O.; Blanchot, G.; Blocker, C.; Blocki, J.; Blondel, A.; Blum, W.; Blumenschein, U.; Boaretto, C.; Bobbink, G. J.; Bocci, A.; Bocian, D.; Bock, R.; Boehm, M.; Boek, J.; Bogaerts, J. A.; Bogouch, A.; Bohm, C.; Bohm, J.; Boisvert, V.; Bold, T.; Boldea, V.; Bondarenko, V. G.; Bonino, R.; Bonis, J.; Bonivento, W.; Bonneau, P.; Boonekamp, M.; Boorman, G.; Boosten, M.; Booth, C. N.; Booth, P. S. L.; Booth, P.; Booth, J. R. A.; Borer, K.; Borisov, A.; Borjanovic, I.; Bos, K.; Boscherini, D.; Bosi, F.; Bosman, M.; Bosteels, M.; Botchev, B.; Boterenbrood, H.; Botterill, D.; Boudreau, J.; Bouhova-Thacker, E. V.; Boulahouache, C.; Bourdarios, C.; Boutemeur, M.; Bouzakis, K.; Boyd, G. R.; Boyd, J.; Boyer, B. H.; Boyko, I. R.; Bozhko, N. I.; Braccini, S.; Braem, A.; Branchini, P.; Brandenburg, G. W.; Brandt, A.; Brandt, O.; Bratzler, U.; Braun, H. M.; Bravo, S.; Brawn, I. P.; Brelier, B.; Bremer, J.; Brenner, R.; Bressler, S.; Breton, D.; Brett, N. D.; Breugnon, P.; Bright-Thomas, P. G.; Brochu, F. M.; Brock, I.; Brock, R.; Brodbeck, T. J.; Brodet, E.; Broggi, F.; Broklova, Z.; Bromberg, C.; Brooijmans, G.; Brouwer, G.; Broz, J.; Brubaker, E.; Bruckman de Renstrom, P. A.; Bruncko, D.; Bruni, A.; Bruni, G.; Bruschi, M.; Buanes, T.; Buchanan, N. J.; Buchholz, P.; Budagov, I. A.; Büscher, V.; Bugge, L.; Buira-Clark, D.; Buis, E. J.; Bujor, F.; Buran, T.; Burckhart, H.; Burckhart-Chromek, D.; Burdin, S.; Burns, R.; Busato, E.; Buskop, J. J. F.; Buszello, K. P.; Butin, F.; Butler, J. M.; Buttar, C. M.; Butterworth, J.; Butterworth, J. M.; Byatt, T.; Cabrera Urbán, S.; Cabruja Casas, E.; Caccia, M.; Caforio, D.; Cakir, O.; Calafiura, P.; Calderini, G.; Calderón Terol, D.; Callahan, J.; Caloba, L. P.; Caloi, R.; Calvet, D.; Camard, A.; Camarena, F.; Camarri, P.; Cambiaghi, M.; Cameron, D.; Cammin, J.; Campabadal Segura, F.; Campana, S.; Canale, V.; Cantero, J.; Capeans Garrido, M. D. M.; Caprini, I.; Caprini, M.; Caprio, M.; Caracinha, D.; Caramarcu, C.; Carcagno, Y.; Cardarelli, R.; Cardeira, C.; Cardiel Sas, L.; Cardini, A.; Carli, T.; Carlino, G.; Carminati, L.; Caron, B.; Caron, S.; Carpentieri, C.; Carr, F. S.; Carter, A. A.; Carter, J. R.; Carvalho, J.; Casadei, D.; Casado, M. P.; Cascella, M.; Caso, C.; Castelo, J.; Castillo Gimenez, V.; Castro, N.; Castrovillari, F.; Cataldi, G.; Cataneo, F.; Catinaccio, A.; Catmore, J. R.; Cattai, A.; Caughron, S.; Cauz, D.; Cavallari, A.; Cavalleri, P.; Cavalli, D.; Cavalli-Sforza, M.; Cavasinni, V.; Ceradini, F.; Cerna, C.; Cernoch, C.; Cerqueira, A. S.; Cerri, A.; Cerutti, F.; Cervetto, M.; Cetin, S. A.; Cevenini, F.; Chalifour, M.; Chamizo llatas, M.; Chan, A.; Chapman, J. W.; Charlton, D. G.; Charron, S.; Chekulaev, S. V.; Chelkov, G. A.; Chen, H.; Chen, L.; Chen, T.; Chen, X.; Cheng, S.; Cheng, T. L.; Cheplakov, A.; Chepurnov, V. F.; Cherkaoui El Moursli, R.; Chesneanu, D.; Cheu, E.; Chevalier, L.; Chevalley, J. L.; Chevallier, F.; Chiarella, V.; Chiefari, G.; Chikovani, L.; Chilingarov, A.; Chiodini, G.; Chouridou, S.; Chren, D.; Christiansen, T.; Christidi, I. A.; Christov, A.; Chu, M. L.; Chudoba, J.; Chuguev, A. G.; Ciapetti, G.; Cicalini, E.; Ciftci, A. K.; Cindro, V.; Ciobotaru, M. D.; Ciocio, A.; Cirilli, M.; Citterio, M.; Ciubancan, M.; Civera, J. V.; Clark, A.; Cleland, W.; Clemens, J. C.; Clement, B. C.; Clément, C.; Clements, D.; Clifft, R. W.; Cobal, M.; Coccaro, A.; Cochran, J.; Coco, R.; Coe, P.; Coelli, S.; Cogneras, E.; Cojocaru, C. D.; Colas, J.; Colijn, A. P.; Collard, C.; Collins-Tooth, C.; Collot, J.; Coluccia, R.; Comune, G.; Conde Muiño, P.; Coniavitis, E.; Consonni, M.; Constantinescu, S.; Conta, C.; Conventi, F. A.; Cook, J.; Cooke, M.; Cooper-Smith, N. J.; Cornelissen, T.; Corradi, M.; Correard, S.; Corso-Radu, A.; Coss, J.; Costa, G.; Costa, M. J.; Costanzo, D.; Costin, T.; Coura Torres, R.; Courneyea, L.; Couyoumtzelis, C.; Cowan, G.; Cox, B. E.; Cox, J.; Cragg, D. A.; Cranmer, K.; Cranshaw, J.; Cristinziani, M.; Crosetti, G.; Cuenca Almenar, C.; Cuneo, S.; Cunha, A.; Curatolo, M.; Curtis, C. J.; Cwetanski, P.; Czyczula, Z.; D'Auria, S.; D'Onofrio, M.; Da Rocha Gesualdi Mello, A.; Da Silva, P. V. M.; Da Silva, R.; Dabrowski, W.; Dael, A.; Dahlhoff, A.; Dai, T.; Dallapiccola, C.; Dallison, S. J.; Dalmau, J.; Daly, C. H.; Dam, M.; Damazio, D.; Dameri, M.; Danielsen, K. M.; Danielsson, H. O.; Dankers, R.; Dannheim, D.; Darbo, G.; Dargent, P.; Daum, C.; Dauvergne, J. P.; David, M.; Davidek, T.; Davidson, N.; Davidson, R.; Dawson, I.; Dawson, J. W.; Daya, R. K.; De, K.; de Asmundis, R.; de Boer, R.; DeCastro, S.; DeGroot, N.; de Jong, P.; de La Broise, X.; DeLa Cruz-Burelo, E.; DeLa Taille, C.; DeLotto, B.; DeOliveira Branco, M.; DePedis, D.; de Saintignon, P.; DeSalvo, A.; DeSanctis, U.; DeSanto, A.; DeVivie DeRegie, J. B.; DeZorzi, G.; Dean, S.; Dedes, G.; Dedovich, D. V.; Defay, P. O.; Degele, R.; Dehchar, M.; Deile, M.; DelPapa, C.; DelPeso, J.; DelPrete, T.; Delagnes, E.; Delebecque, P.; Dell'Acqua, A.; Della Pietra, M.; della Volpe, D.; Delmastro, M.; Delpierre, P.; Delruelle, N.; Delsart, P. 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W.; Mueller, J.; Müller, M.; Muijs, A.; Muller, T. R.; Munar, A.; Munday, D. J.; Murakami, K.; Murillo Garcia, R.; Murray, W. J.; Myagkov, A. G.; Myska, M.; Nagai, K.; Nagai, Y.; Nagano, K.; Nagasaka, Y.; Nairz, A. M.; Naito, D.; Nakamura, K.; Nakamura, Y.; Nakano, I.; Nanava, G.; Napier, A.; Nassiakou, M.; Nasteva, I.; Nation, N. R.; Naumann, T.; Nauyock, F.; Nderitu, S. K.; Neal, H. A.; Nebot, E.; Nechaeva, P.; Neganov, A.; Negri, A.; Negroni, S.; Nelson, C.; Nemecek, S.; Nemethy, P.; Nepomuceno, A. A.; Nessi, M.; Nesterov, S. Y.; Neukermans, L.; Nevski, P.; Newcomer, F. M.; Nichols, A.; Nicholson, C.; Nicholson, R.; Nickerson, R. B.; Nicolaidou, R.; Nicoletti, G.; Nicquevert, B.; Niculescu, M.; Nielsen, J.; Niinikoski, T.; Niinimaki, M. J.; Nikitin, N.; Nikolaev, K.; Nikolic-Audit, I.; Nikolopoulos, K.; Nilsen, H.; Nilsson, B. S.; Nilsson, P.; Nisati, A.; Nisius, R.; Nodulman, L. J.; Nomachi, M.; Nomoto, H.; Noppe, J.-M.; Nordberg, M.; Norniella Francisco, O.; Norton, P. R.; Novakova, J.; Nowak, M.; Nozaki, M.; Nunes, R.; Nunes Hanninger, G.; Nunnemann, T.; Nyman, T.; O'Connor, P.; O'Neale, S. W.; O'Neil, D. C.; O'Neill, M.; O'Shea, V.; Oakham, F. G.; Oberlack, H.; Obermaier, M.; Oberson, P.; Ochi, A.; Ockenfels, W.; Odaka, S.; Odenthal, I.; Odino, G. A.; Ogren, H.; Oh, S. H.; Ohshima, T.; Ohshita, H.; Okawa, H.; Olcese, M.; Olchevski, A. G.; Oliver, C.; Oliver, J.; Olivo Gomez, M.; Olszewski, A.; Olszowska, J.; Omachi, C.; Onea, A.; Onofre, A.; Oram, C. J.; Ordonez, G.; Oreglia, M. J.; Orellana, F.; Oren, Y.; Orestano, D.; Orlov, I. O.; Orr, R. S.; Orsini, F.; Osborne, L. S.; Osculati, B.; Osuna, C.; Otec, R.; Othegraven, R.; Ottewell, B.; Ould-Saada, F.; Ouraou, A.; Ouyang, Q.; Øye, O. K.; Ozcan, V. E.; Ozone, K.; Ozturk, N.; Pacheco Pages, A.; Padhi, S.; Padilla Aranda, C.; Paganis, E.; Paige, F.; Pailler, P. M.; Pajchel, K.; Palestini, S.; Palla, J.; Pallin, D.; Palmer, M. J.; Pan, Y. B.; Panikashvili, N.; Panin, V. 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D.; Pimenta Dos Santos, M. A.; Pina, J.; Pinfold, J. L.; Ping, J.; Pinhão, J.; Pinto, B.; Pirotte, O.; Placakyte, R.; Placci, A.; Plamondon, M.; Plano, W. G.; Pleier, M.-A.; Pleskach, A. V.; Podkladkin, S.; Podlyski, F.; Poffenberger, P.; Poggioli, L.; Pohl, M.; Polak, I.; Polesello, G.; Policicchio, A.; Polini, A.; Polychronakos, V.; Pomarede, D. M.; Pommès, K.; Ponsot, P.; Pontecorvo, L.; Pope, B. G.; Popescu, R.; Popovic, D. S.; Poppleton, A.; Popule, J.; Portell Bueso, X.; Posch, C.; Pospelov, G. E.; Pospichal, P.; Pospisil, S.; Postranecky, M.; Potrap, I. N.; Potter, C. J.; Poulard, G.; Pousada, A.; Poveda, J.; Prabhu, R.; Pralavorio, P.; Prasad, S.; Prast, J.; Prat, S.; Prata, M.; Pravahan, R.; Preda, T.; Pretzl, K.; Pribyl, L.; Price, D.; Price, L. E.; Price, M. J.; Prichard, P. M.; Prieur, D.; Primavera, M.; Primor, D.; Prokofiev, K.; Prosso, E.; Proudfoot, J.; Przysiezniak, H.; Puigdengoles, C.; Purdham, J.; Purohit, M.; Puzo, P.; Pylaev, A. 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H.; Roda, C.; Rodier, S.; Roe, S.; Røhne, O.; Rohrbach, F.; Roldán, J.; Rolli, S.; Romance, J. B.; Romaniouk, A.; Romanov, V. M.; Romeo, G.; Roos, L.; Ros, E.; Rosati, S.; Rosenbaum, F.; Rosenbaum, G. A.; Rosenberg, E. I.; Rosselet, L.; Rossi, L. P.; Rossi, L.; Rotaru, M.; Rothberg, J.; Rottländer, I.; Rousseau, D.; Rozanov, A.; Rozen, Y.; Ruber, R.; Ruckert, B.; Rudolph, G.; Rühr, F.; Ruggieri, F.; Ruggiero, G.; Ruiz, H.; Ruiz-Martinez, A.; Rulikowska-Zarebska, E.; Rumiantsev, V.; Rumyantsev, L.; Runge, K.; Runolfsson, O.; Rusakovich, N. A.; Rust, D. R.; Rutherfoord, J. P.; Ruwiedel, C.; Ryabov, Y. F.; Ryadovikov, V.; Ryan, P.; Rybkine, G.; da Costa, J. Sá; Saavedra, A. F.; Saboumazrag, S.; F-W Sadrozinski, H.; Sadykov, R.; Sakamoto, H.; Sala, P.; Salamon, A.; Saleem, M.; Salihagic, D.; Salt, J.; Saltó Bauza, O.; Salvachúa Ferrando, B. M.; Salvatore, D.; Salzburger, A.; Sampsonidis, D.; Samset, B. H.; Sánchez Sánchez, C. A.; Sanchis Lozano, M. A.; Sanchis Peris, E.; Sandaker, H.; Sander, H. G.; Sandhoff, M.; Sandvoss, S.; Sankey, D. P. C.; Sanny, B.; Sansone, S.; Sansoni, A.; Santamarina Rios, C.; Santander, J.; Santi, L.; Santoni, C.; Santonico, R.; Santos, J.; Sapinski, M.; Saraiva, J. G.; Sarri, F.; Sasaki, O.; Sasaki, T.; Sasao, N.; Satsounkevitch, I.; Sauvage, D.; Sauvage, G.; Savard, P.; Savine, A. Y.; Savinov, V.; Savoy-Navarro, A.; Savva, P.; Saxon, D. H.; Says, L. P.; Sbarra, C.; Sbrissa, E.; Sbrizzi, A.; Scannicchio, D. A.; Schaarschmidt, J.; Schacht, P.; Schäfer, U.; Schaffer, A. C.; Schaile, D.; Schaller, M.; Schamov, A. G.; Schegelsky, V. A.; Scheirich, D.; Schernau, M.; Scherzer, M. I.; Schiavi, C.; Schick, H.; Schieck, J.; Schieferdecker, P.; Schioppa, M.; Schlager, G.; Schlenker, S.; Schlereth, J. L.; Schmid, P.; Schmidt, M. P.; Schmitt, C.; Schmitt, K.; Schmitz, M.; Schmücker, H.; Schoerner, T.; Scholte, R. C.; Schott, M.; Schouten, D.; Schram, M.; Schricker, A.; Schroff, D.; Schuh, S.; Schuijlenburg, H. W.; Schuler, G.; Schultes, J.; Schultz-Coulon, H.-C.; Schumacher, J.; Schumacher, M.; Schune, Ph; Schwartzman, A.; Schweiger, D.; Schwemling, Ph; Schwick, C.; Schwienhorst, R.; Schwierz, R.; Schwindling, J.; Scott, W. G.; Secker, H.; Sedykh, E.; Seguin-Moreau, N.; Segura, E.; Seidel, S. C.; Seiden, A.; Seixas, J. M.; Sekhniaidze, G.; Seliverstov, D. M.; Selldén, B.; Seman, M.; Semprini-Cesari, N.; Serfon, C.; Serin, L.; Seuster, R.; Severini, H.; Sevior, M. E.; Sexton, K. A.; Sfyrla, A.; Shah, T. P.; Shan, L.; Shank, J. T.; Shapiro, M.; Shatalov, P. B.; Shaver, L.; Shaw, C.; Shears, T. G.; Sherwood, P.; Shibata, A.; Shield, P.; Shilov, S.; Shimojima, M.; Shin, T.; Shiyakova, M.; Shmeleva, A.; Shoa, M.; Shochet, M. J.; Shupe, M. A.; Sicho, P.; Sidoti, A.; Siebel, A.; Siebel, M.; Siegrist, J.; Sijacki, D.; Silva, J.; Silverstein, S. B.; Simak, V.; Simic, Lj; Simion, S.; Simmons, B.; Simonyan, M.; Sinervo, P.; Sipica, V.; Siragusa, G.; Sisakyan, A. N.; Sivoklokov, S.; Sjölin, J.; Skubic, P.; Skvorodnev, N.; Slattery, P.; Slavicek, T.; Sliwa, K.; Sloan, T. J.; Sloper, J.; Smakhtin, V.; Small, A.; Smirnov, S. Yu; Smirnov, Y.; Smirnova, L.; Smirnova, O.; Smith, N. A.; Smith, B. C.; Smith, D. S.; Smith, J.; Smith, K. M.; Smith, B.; Smizanska, M.; Smolek, K.; Snesarev, A. A.; Snow, S. W.; Snow, J.; Snuverink, J.; Snyder, S.; Soares, M.; Soares, S.; Sobie, R.; Sodomka, J.; Söderberg, M.; Soffer, A.; Solans, C. A.; Solar, M.; Sole, D.; Solfaroli Camillocci, E.; Solodkov, A. A.; Solov'yanov, O. V.; Soloviev, I.; Soluk, R.; Sondericker, J.; Sopko, V.; Sopko, B.; Sorbi, M.; Soret Medel, J.; Sosebee, M.; Sosnovtsev, V. V.; Sospedra Suay, L.; Soukharev, A.; Soukup, J.; Spagnolo, S.; Spano, F.; Speckmayer, P.; Spegel, M.; Spencer, E.; Spighi, R.; Spigo, G.; Spila, F.; Spiriti, E.; Spiwoks, R.; Spogli, L.; Spousta, M.; Sprachmann, G.; Spurlock, B.; St. Denis, R. D.; Stahl, T.; Staley, R. J.; Stamen, R.; Stancu, S. N.; Stanecka, E.; Stanek, R. W.; Stanescu, C.; Stapnes, S.; Starchenko, E. A.; Staroba, P.; Stastny, J.; Staude, A.; Stavina, P.; Stavrianakou, M.; Stavropoulos, G.; Stefanidis, E.; Steffens, J. L.; Stekl, I.; Stelzer, H. J.; Stenzel, H.; Stewart, G.; Stewart, T. D.; Stiller, W.; Stockmanns, T.; Stodulski, M.; Stonjek, S.; Stradling, A.; Straessner, A.; Strandberg, J.; Strandlie, A.; Strauss, M.; Strickland, V.; Striegel, D.; Strizenec, P.; Ströhmer, R.; Strom, D. M.; Strong, J. A.; Stroynowski, R.; Stugu, B.; Stumer, I.; Su, D.; Subramania, S.; Suchkov, S. I.; Sugaya, Y.; Sugimoto, T.; Suk, M.; Sulin, V. V.; Sultanov, S.; Sun, Z.; Sundal, B.; Sushkov, S.; Susinno, G.; Sutcliffe, P.; Sutton, M. R.; Sviridov, Yu M.; Sykora, I.; Szczygiel, R. R.; Szeless, B.; Szymocha, T.; Sánchez, J.; Ta, D.; Taboada Gameiro, S.; Tadel, M.; Tafirout, R.; Taga, A.; Takai, H.; Takashima, R.; Takeda, H.; Takeshita, T.; Talby, M.; Talyshev, A.; Tamsett, M. C.; Tanaka, J.; Tanaka, K.; Tanaka, R.; Tanaka, S.; Tanaka, S.; Tanaka, Y.; Tappern, G. P.; Tapprogge, S.; Tarem, S.; Tarrade, F.; Tarrant, J.; Tartarelli, G.; Tas, P.; Tasevsky, M.; Tayalati, Y.; Taylor, F. E.; Taylor, G.; Taylor, G. N.; Taylor, R. P.; Tcherniatine, V.; Tegenfeldt, F.; Teixeira-Dias, P.; Ten Kate, H.; Teng, P. K.; Ter-Antonyan, R.; Terada, S.; Terron, J.; Terwort, M.; Teuscher, R. J.; Tevlin, C. M.; Thadome, J.; Thion, J.; Thioye, M.; Thomas, A.; Thomas, J. P.; Thomas, T. L.; Thomas, E.; Thompson, R. J.; Thompson, A. S.; Thun, R. P.; Tic, T.; Tikhomirov, V. O.; Tikhonov, Y. A.; Timm, S.; Timmermans, C. J. W. P.; Tipton, P.; Tique Aires Viegas, F. J.; Tisserant, S.; Titov, M.; Tobias, J.; Tocut, V. M.; Toczek, B.; Todorova-Nova, S.; Tojo, J.; Tokár, S.; Tokushuku, K.; Tomasek, L.; Tomasek, M.; Tomasz, F.; Tomoto, M.; Tompkins, D.; Tompkins, L.; Toms, K.; Tonazzo, A.; Tong, G.; Tonoyan, A.; Topfel, C.; Topilin, N. D.; Torrence, E.; Torres Pais, J. G.; Toth, J.; Touchard, F.; Tovey, D. R.; Tovey, S. N.; Towndrow, E. F.; Trefzger, T.; Treichel, M.; Treis, J.; Tremblet, L.; Tribanek, W.; Tricoli, A.; Trigger, I. M.; Trilling, G.; Trincaz-Duvoid, S.; Tripiana, M. F.; Trischuk, W.; Trka, Z.; Trocmé, B.; Troncon, C.; C-L Tseng, J.; Tsiafis, I.; Tsiareshka, P. V.; Tsipolitis, G.; Tskhadadze, E. G.; Tsukerman, I. I.; Tsulaia, V.; Tsuno, S.; Turala, M.; Turk Cakir, I.; Turlay, E.; Tuts, P. M.; Twomey, M. S.; Tyndel, M.; Typaldos, D.; Tyrvainen, H.; Tzamarioudaki, E.; Tzanakos, G.; Ueda, I.; Uhrmacher, M.; Ukegawa, F.; Ullán Comes, M.; Unal, G.; Underwood, D. G.; Undrus, A.; Unel, G.; Unno, Y.; Urkovsky, E.; Usai, G.; Usov, Y.; Vacavant, L.; Vacek, V.; Vachon, B.; Vahsen, S.; Valderanis, C.; Valenta, J.; Valente, P.; Valero, A.; Valkar, S.; Valls Ferrer, J. A.; Van der Bij, H.; van der Graaf, H.; van der Kraaij, E.; Van Eijk, B.; van Eldik, N.; van Gemmeren, P.; van Kesteren, Z.; van Vulpen, I.; Van Berg, R.; Vandelli, W.; Vandoni, G.; Vaniachine, A.; Vannucci, F.; Varanda, M.; Varela Rodriguez, F.; Vari, R.; Varnes, E. W.; Varouchas, D.; Vartapetian, A.; Varvell, K. E.; Vassilakopoulos, V. I.; Vassilieva, L.; Vataga, E.; Vaz, L.; Vazeille, F.; Vedrine, P.; Vegni, G.; Veillet, J. J.; Vellidis, C.; Veloso, F.; Veness, R.; Veneziano, S.; Ventura, A.; Ventura, S.; Vercesi, V.; Verducci, M.; Verkerke, W.; Vermeulen, J. C.; Vertogardov, L.; Vetterli, M. C.; Vichou, I.; Vickey, T.; Viehhauser, G. H. A.; Vigeolas, E.; Villa, M.; Villani, E. G.; Villate, J.; Villella, I.; Vilucchi, E.; Vincent, P.; Vincke, H.; Vincter, M. G.; Vinogradov, V. B.; Virchaux, M.; Viret, S.; Virzi, J.; Vitale, A.; Vivarelli, I.; Vives, R.; Vives Vaques, F.; Vlachos, S.; Vogt, H.; Vokac, P.; Vollmer, C. F.; Volpi, M.; Volpini, G.; von Boehn-Buchholz, R.; von der Schmitt, H.; von Toerne, E.; Vorobel, V.; Vorobiev, A. P.; Vorozhtsov, A. S.; Vorozhtsov, S. B.; Vos, M.; Voss, K. C.; Voss, R.; Vossebeld, J. H.; Vovenko, A. S.; Vranjes, N.; Vrba, V.; Vreeswijk, M.; Anh, T. Vu; Vuaridel, B.; Vudragovic, M.; Vuillemin, V.; Vuillermet, R.; Wänanen, A.; Wahlen, H.; Walbersloh, J.; Walker, R.; Walkowiak, W.; Wall, R.; Wallny, R. S.; Walsh, S.; Wang, C.; Wang, J. C.; Wappler, F.; Warburton, A.; Ward, C. P.; Warner, G. P.; Warren, M.; Warsinsky, M.; Wastie, R.; Watkins, P. M.; Watson, A. T.; Watts, G.; Waugh, A. T.; Waugh, B. M.; Weaverdyck, C.; Webel, M.; Weber, G.; Weber, J.; Weber, M.; Weber, P.; Weidberg, A. R.; Weilhammer, P. M.; Weingarten, J.; Weiser, C.; Wellenstein, H.; Wellisch, H. P.; Wells, P. S.; Wemans, A.; Wen, M.; Wenaus, T.; Wendler, S.; Wengler, T.; Wenig, S.; Wermes, N.; Werneke, P.; Werner, P.; Werthenbach, U.; Wheeler-Ellis, S. J.; Whitaker, S. P.; White, A.; White, M. J.; White, S.; Whittington, D.; Wicek, F.; Wicke, D.; Wickens, F. J.; Wiedenmann, W.; Wielers, M.; Wienemann, P.; Wiesmann, M.; Wiesmann, M.; Wijnen, T.; Wildauer, A.; Wilhelm, I.; Wilkens, H. G.; Williams, H. H.; Willis, W.; Willocq, S.; Wilmut, I.; Wilson, J. A.; Wilson, A.; Wingerter-Seez, I.; Winton, L.; Witzeling, W.; Wlodek, T.; Woehrling, E.; Wolter, M. W.; Wolters, H.; Wosiek, B.; Wotschack, J.; Woudstra, M. J.; Wright, C.; Wu, S. L.; Wu, X.; Wuestenfeld, J.; Wunstorf, R.; Xella-Hansen, S.; Xiang, A.; Xie, S.; Xie, Y.; Xu, G.; Xu, N.; Yamamoto, A.; Yamamoto, S.; Yamaoka, H.; Yamazaki, Y.; Yan, Z.; Yang, H.; Yang, J. C.; Yang, S.; Yang, U. K.; Yang, Y.; Yang, Z.; Yao, W.-M.; Yao, Y.; Yarradoddi, K.; Yasu, Y.; Ye, J.; Yilmaz, M.; Yoosoofmiya, R.; Yorita, K.; Yoshida, H.; Yoshida, R.; Young, C.; Youssef, S. P.; Yu, D.; Yu, J.; Yu, M.; Yu, X.; Yuan, J.; Yurkewicz, A.; Zaets, V. G.; Zaidan, R.; Zaitsev, A. M.; Zajac, J.; Zajacova, Z.; Zalite, A. Yu; Zalite, Yo K.; Zanello, L.; Zarzhitsky, P.; Zaytsev, A.; Zdrazil, M.; Zeitnitz, C.; Zeller, M.; Zema, P. F.; Zendler, C.; Zenin, A. V.; Zenis, T.; Zenonos, Z.; Zenz, S.; Zerwas, D.; Zhang, H.; Zhang, J.; Zheng, W.; Zhang, X.; Zhao, L.; Zhao, T.; Zhao, X.; Zhao, Z.; Zhelezko, A.; Zhemchugov, A.; Zheng, S.; Zhichao, L.; Zhou, B.; Zhou, N.; Zhou, S.; Zhou, Y.; Zhu, C. G.; Zhu, H. Z.; Zhuang, X. A.; Zhuravlov, V.; Zilka, B.; Zimin, N. I.; Zimmermann, S.; Ziolkowski, M.; Zitoun, R.; Zivkovic, L.; Zmouchko, V. V.; Zobernig, G.; Zoccoli, A.; Zoeller, M. M.; Zolnierowski, Y.; Zsenei, A.; zur Nedden, M.; Zychacek, V.

    2008-08-01

    The ATLAS detector as installed in its experimental cavern at point 1 at CERN is described in this paper. A brief overview of the expected performance of the detector when the Large Hadron Collider begins operation is also presented.

  1. Higgs boson production at hadron colliders: Signal and background processes

    SciTech Connect

    David Rainwater; Michael Spira; Dieter Zeppenfeld

    2004-01-12

    We review the theoretical status of signal and background calculations for Higgs boson production at hadron colliders. Particular emphasis is given to missing NLO results, which will play a crucial role for the Tevatron and the LHC.

  2. High Energy Accelerator and Colliding Beam User Group

    SciTech Connect

    Snow, G.A.; Skuja, A.

    1992-05-01

    This report discusses research in the following areas: the study of e{sup +}e{sup {minus}} interactions; Hadron collider physics at Fermilab; fixed target physics and particle physics of general interest; and, the solenoidal detector collaboration at SSCL.

  3. Status of the MEIC ion collider ring design

    SciTech Connect

    Morozov, V. S.; Derbenev, Ya. S.; Harwood, L.; Hutton, A.; Lin, F.; Pilat, F.; Zhang, Y.; Cai, Y.; Nosochkov, Y. M.; Sullivan, M.; Wang, M-H; Wienands, U.; Gerity, J.; Mann, T.; McIntyre, P.; Pogue, N. J.; Satttarov, A.

    2015-07-14

    We present an update on the design of the ion collider ring of the Medium-energy Electron-Ion Collider (MEIC) proposed by Jefferson Lab. The design is based on the use of super-ferric magnets. It provides the necessary momentum range of 8 to 100 GeV/c for protons and ions, matches the electron collider ring design using PEP-II components, fits readily on the JLab site, offers a straightforward path for a future full-energy upgrade by replacing the magnets with higher-field ones in the same tunnel, and is more cost effective than using presently available current-dominated superconducting magnets. We describe complete ion collider optics including an independently-designed modular detector region.

  4. Status of the MEIC ion collider ring design

    SciTech Connect

    Morozov, Vasiliy; Derbenev, Yaroslav; Harwood, Leigh; Hutton, Andrew; Lin, Fanglei; Pilat, Fulvia; Zhang, Yuhong; Cai, Yunhai; Nosochkov, Y. M.; Sullivan, Michael; Wang, M.-H.; Wienands, Uli; Gerity, James; Mann, Thomas; McIntyre, Peter; Pogue, Nathaniel; Sattarov, Akhdiyor

    2015-09-01

    We present an update on the design of the ion collider ring of the Medium-energy Electron-Ion Collider (MEIC) proposed by Jefferson Lab. The design is based on the use of super-ferric magnets. It provides the necessary momentum range of 8 to 100 GeV/c for protons and ions, matches the electron collider ring design using PEP-II components, fits readily on the JLab site, offers a straightforward path for a future full-energy upgrade by replacing the magnets with higher-field ones in the same tunnel, and is more cost effective than using presently available current-dominated super-conducting magnets. We describe complete ion collider optics including an independently-designed modular detector region.

  5. Superconducting Super Collider: The presidential transition heightens uncertainty

    SciTech Connect

    Taubes, G.

    1993-02-05

    Funding for the Superconducting Super Collider remains uncertain with the election of Bill Clinton. As a result, the Japanese are delaying their decision on whether or not to supply approximately $1 billion. The costs of delay or termination are discussed.

  6. Optical data transmission at the superconducting super collider

    SciTech Connect

    Leskovar, B. )

    1990-04-01

    Digital and analog data transmissions via fiber optics for the Superconducting Super Collider have been investigated. The state of the art of optical transmitters, low loss fiber waveguides, receivers and associated electronics components are reviewed and summarized. Emphasis is placed on the effects of the radiation environment on the performance of an optical data transmission system components. Also, the performance of candidate components of the wide band digital and analog transmission systems intended for deployment of the Superconducting Super Collider Detector is discussed.

  7. Coherent beam-beam interaction with four colliding beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Podobedov, B.; Siemann, R. H.

    1995-09-01

    The coherent beam-beam interaction in the absence of Landau damping is studied with a computer simulation of four space-charge-compensated colliding beams. Results are presented for the modes, phase space structures, widths, and growth rates of coherent beam-beam resonances. These results are compared with solutions of the Vlasov equation, and with measurements made at the Dispositif de Collisions dans l'Igloo (DCI) storage ring in Orsay, France, which operated with space-charge-compensated colliding beams.

  8. Optical data transmission at the superconducting super collider

    SciTech Connect

    Leskovar, B.

    1989-04-01

    Digital and analog data transmissions via fiber optics for the Superconducting Super Collider have been investigated. The state of the art of optical transmitters, low loss fiber waveguides, receivers and associated electronics components are reviewed and summarized. Emphasis is placed on the effects of the radiation environment on the performance of an optical data transmission system components. Also, the performance of candidate components of the wide band digital and analog transmission systems intended for deployment in the Superconducting Super Collider Detector is discussed.

  9. Heavy Meson Production at a Low-Energy Photon Collider

    SciTech Connect

    Asztalos, S

    2004-04-15

    A low-energy {gamma}{gamma} collider has been discussed in the context of a testbed for a {gamma}{gamma} interaction region at the Next Linear Collider(NLC). We consider the production of heavy mesons at such a testbed using Compton-backscattered photons and demonstrate that their production rivals or exceeds those by BELLE, BABAR or LEP where they are produced indirectly via virtual {gamma}{gamma} luminosities.

  10. Ion polarization in the MEIC figure-8 ion collider ring

    SciTech Connect

    V.S. Morozov, Ya.S. Derbenev, Y. Zhang, P. Chevtsov, A.M. Kondratenko, M.A. Kondratenko, Yu.N. Filatov

    2012-07-01

    The nuclear physics program envisaged at the Medium-energy Electron-Ion Collider (MEIC) currently being developed at the Jefferson Lab calls for collisions of 3-11 GeV/c longitudinally polarized electrons and 20-100 GeV/c, in equivalent proton momentum, longitudinally/ transversely polarized protons/ deuterons/ light ions. We present a scheme that provides the required ion polarization arrangement in the MEIC's ion collider ring.

  11. Preventing Running Injuries through Barefoot Activity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hart, Priscilla M.; Smith, Darla R.

    2008-01-01

    Running has become a very popular lifetime physical activity even though there are numerous reports of running injuries. Although common theories have pointed to impact forces and overpronation as the main contributors to chronic running injuries, the increased use of cushioning and orthotics has done little to decrease running injuries. A new…

  12. Physiologic Responses to Treadmill and Water Running.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bishop, Phillip A.; And Others

    1989-01-01

    Presents results of a study of the physiological responses of uninjured runners to running on a treadmill and in water. Water running may lessen an injured athlete's rate of deconditioning, but indications are that the metabolic cost of water running is not significantly greater than that of treadmill running. (SM)

  13. Selective running tool for wells

    SciTech Connect

    Semar, J.E.

    1988-05-24

    A downhole running tool for positioning and locking tool support mandrels within landing nipples of thin production tubing string of a well is described comprising: (a) housing means adapted for connection to a tool string and forming an internal receptacle; (b) an elongated core member being disposed within the internal receptacle and being telescopically movable to collapsed and extended positions defined by spaced stops formed by the housing means, a portion of the elongated core member extending from the housing for connection with a tool support mandrel; and (c) releasable retainer means normally retaining the elongated core member at a substantially fixed set position within the internal receptacle and being released responsive to engagement with the landing nipple during upward movement of the downhole running tool to thus permit collapsing telescoping movement of the elongated core to a mandrel locating position within the internal receptacle.

  14. Will there be energy frontier colliders after LHC?

    SciTech Connect

    Shiltsev, Vladimir

    2016-09-15

    High energy particle colliders have been in the forefront of particle physics for more than three decades. At present the near term US, European and international strategies of the particle physics community are centered on full exploitation of the physics potential of the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) through its high-luminosity upgrade (HL-LHC). The future of the world-wide HEP community critically depends on the feasibility of possible post-LHC colliders. The concept of the feasibility is complex and includes at least three factors: feasibility of energy, feasibility of luminosity and feasibility of cost. Here we overview all current options for post-LHC colliders from such perspective (ILC, CLIC, Muon Collider, plasma colliders, CEPC, FCC, HE-LHC) and discuss major challenges and accelerator R&D required to demonstrate feasibility of an energy frontier accelerator facility following the LHC. We conclude by taking a look into ultimate energy reach accelerators based on plasmas and crystals, and discussion on the perspectives for the far future of the accelerator-based particle physics.

  15. Crystal Ball: On the Future High Energy Colliders

    SciTech Connect

    Shiltsev, Vladimir

    2015-09-20

    High energy particle colliders have been in the forefront of particle physics for more than three decades. At present the near term US, European and international strategies of the particle physics community are centered on full exploitation of the physics potential of the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) through its high-luminosity upgrade (HL-LHC). A number of next generation collider facilities have been proposed and are currently under consideration for the medium- and far-future of the accelerator-based high energy physics. In this paper we offer a uniform approach to evaluation of various accelerators based on the feasibility of their energy reach, performance reach and cost range. We briefly review such post-LHC options as linear e+e- colliders in Japan (ILC) or at CERN (CLIC), muon collider, and circular lepton or hadron colliders in China (CepC/SppC) and Europe (FCC). We conclude with a look into ultimate energy reach accelerators based on plasmas and crystals, and some perspectives for the far future of accelerator-based particle physics.

  16. The International Linear Collider Technical Design Report - Volume 1: Executive Summary

    SciTech Connect

    Behnke, Ties; Brau, James E.; Foster, Brian; Fuster, Juan; Harrison, Mike; Paterson, James McEwan; Peskin, Michael; Stanitzki, Marcel; Walker, Nicholas; Yamamoto, Hitoshi

    2013-06-26

    The International Linear Collider Technical Design Report (TDR) describes in four volumes the physics case and the design of a 500 GeV centre-of-mass energy linear electron-positron collider based on superconducting radio-frequency technology using Niobium cavities as the accelerating structures. The accelerator can be extended to 1 TeV and also run as a Higgs factory at around 250 GeV and on the Z0 pole. A comprehensive value estimate of the accelerator is give, together with associated uncertainties. It is shown that no significant technical issues remain to be solved. Once a site is selected and the necessary site-dependent engineering is carried out, construction can begin immediately. The TDR also gives baseline documentation for two high-performance detectors that can share the ILC luminosity by being moved into and out of the beam line in a "push-pull" configuration. These detectors, ILD and SiD, are described in detail. They form the basis for a world-class experimental programme that promises to increase significantly our understanding of the fundamental processes that govern the evolution of the Universe.

  17. The International Linear Collider Technical Design Report - Volume 3.II: Accelerator Baseline Design

    SciTech Connect

    Adolphsen, Chris

    2013-06-26

    The International Linear Collider Technical Design Report (TDR) describes in four volumes the physics case and the design of a 500 GeV centre-of-mass energy linear electron-positron collider based on superconducting radio-frequency technology using Niobium cavities as the accelerating structures. The accelerator can be extended to 1 TeV and also run as a Higgs factory at around 250 GeV and on the Z0 pole. A comprehensive value estimate of the accelerator is give, together with associated uncertainties. It is shown that no significant technical issues remain to be solved. Once a site is selected and the necessary site-dependent engineering is carried out, construction can begin immediately. The TDR also gives baseline documentation for two high-performance detectors that can share the ILC luminosity by being moved into and out of the beam line in a "push-pull" configuration. These detectors, ILD and SiD, are described in detail. They form the basis for a world-class experimental programme that promises to increase significantly our understanding of the fundamental processes that govern the evolution of the Universe.

  18. The International Linear Collider Technical Design Report - Volume 3.I: Accelerator \\& in the Technical Design Phase

    SciTech Connect

    Adolphsen, Chris

    2013-06-26

    The International Linear Collider Technical Design Report (TDR) describes in four volumes the physics case and the design of a 500 GeV centre-of-mass energy linear electron-positron collider based on superconducting radio-frequency technology using Niobium cavities as the accelerating structures. The accelerator can be extended to 1 TeV and also run as a Higgs factory at around 250 GeV and on the Z0 pole. A comprehensive value estimate of the accelerator is give, together with associated uncertainties. It is shown that no significant technical issues remain to be solved. Once a site is selected and the necessary site-dependent engineering is carried out, construction can begin immediately. The TDR also gives baseline documentation for two high-performance detectors that can share the ILC luminosity by being moved into and out of the beam line in a "push-pull" configuration. These detectors, ILD and SiD, are described in detail. They form the basis for a world-class experimental programme that promises to increase significantly our understanding of the fundamental processes that govern the evolution of the Universe.

  19. Observation of exclusive dijet production at the Fermilab Tevatron pmacr p collider

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aaltonen, T.; Adelman, J.; Akimoto, T.; Albrow, M. G.; González, B. Álvarez; Amerio, S.; Amidei, D.; Anastassov, A.; Annovi, A.; Antos, J.; Aoki, M.; Apollinari, G.; Apresyan, A.; Arisawa, T.; Artikov, A.; Ashmanskas, W.; Attal, A.; Aurisano, A.; Azfar, F.; Azzi-Bacchetta, P.; Azzurri, P.; Bacchetta, N.; Badgett, W.; Barbaro-Galtieri, A.; Barnes, V. E.; Barnett, B. A.; Baroiant, S.; Bartsch, V.; Bauer, G.; Beauchemin, P.-H.; Bedeschi, F.; Bednar, P.; Behari, S.; Bellettini, G.; Bellinger, J.; Belloni, A.; Benjamin, D.; Beretvas, A.; Beringer, J.; Berry, T.; Bhatti, A.; Binkley, M.; Bisello, D.; Bizjak, I.; Blair, R. E.; Blocker, C.; Blumenfeld, B.; Bocci, A.; Bodek, A.; Boisvert, V.; Bolla, G.; Bolshov, A.; Bortoletto, D.; Boudreau, J.; Boveia, A.; Brau, B.; Bridgeman, A.; Brigliadori, L.; Bromberg, C.; Brubaker, E.; Budagov, J.; Budd, H. S.; Budd, S.; Burkett, K.; Busetto, G.; Bussey, P.; Buzatu, A.; Byrum, K. L.; Cabrera, S.; Campanelli, M.; Campbell, M.; Canelli, F.; Canepa, A.; Carlsmith, D.; Carosi, R.; Carrillo, S.; Carron, S.; Casal, B.; Casarsa, M.; Castro, A.; Catastini, P.; Cauz, D.; Cavalli-Sforza, M.; Cerri, A.; Cerrito, L.; Chang, S. H.; Chen, Y. C.; Chertok, M.; Chiarelli, G.; Chlachidze, G.; Chlebana, F.; Cho, K.; Chokheli, D.; Chou, J. P.; Choudalakis, G.; Chuang, S. H.; Chung, K.; Chung, W. H.; Chung, Y. S.; Ciobanu, C. I.; Ciocci, M. A.; Clark, A.; Clark, D.; Compostella, G.; Convery, M. E.; Conway, J.; Cooper, B.; Copic, K.; Cordelli, M.; Cortiana, G.; Crescioli, F.; Almenar, C. Cuenca; Cuevas, J.; Culbertson, R.; Cully, J. C.; Dagenhart, D.; Datta, M.; Davies, T.; de Barbaro, P.; de Cecco, S.; Deisher, A.; de Lentdecker, G.; de Lorenzo, G.; Dell'Orso, M.; Demortier, L.; Deng, J.; Deninno, M.; de Pedis, D.; Derwent, P. F.; di Giovanni, G. P.; Dionisi, C.; di Ruzza, B.; Dittmann, J. R.; D'Onofrio, M.; Donati, S.; Dong, P.; Donini, J.; Dorigo, T.; Dube, S.; Efron, J.; Erbacher, R.; Errede, D.; Errede, S.; Eusebi, R.; Fang, H. C.; Farrington, S.; Fedorko, W. T.; Feild, R. G.; Feindt, M.; Fernandez, J. P.; Ferrazza, C.; Field, R.; Flanagan, G.; Forrest, R.; Forrester, S.; Franklin, M.; Freeman, J. C.; Furic, I.; Gallinaro, M.; Galyardt, J.; Garberson, F.; Garcia, J. E.; Garfinkel, A. F.; Genser, K.; Gerberich, H.; Gerdes, D.; Giagu, S.; Giakoumopolou, V.; Giannetti, P.; Gibson, K.; Gimmell, J. L.; Ginsburg, C. M.; Giokaris, N.; Giordani, M.; Giromini, P.; Giunta, M.; Glagolev, V.; Glenzinski, D.; Gold, M.; Goldschmidt, N.; Golossanov, A.; Gomez, G.; Gomez-Ceballos, G.; Goncharov, M.; González, O.; Gorelov, I.; Goshaw, A. T.; Goulianos, K.; Gresele, A.; Grinstein, S.; Grosso-Pilcher, C.; Group, R. C.; Grundler, U.; da Costa, J. Guimaraes; Gunay-Unalan, Z.; Haber, C.; Hahn, K.; Hahn, S. R.; Halkiadakis, E.; Hamilton, A.; Han, B.-Y.; Han, J. Y.; Handler, R.; Happacher, F.; Hara, K.; Hare, D.; Hare, M.; Harper, S.; Harr, R. F.; Harris, R. M.; Hartz, M.; Hatakeyama, K.; Hauser, J.; Hays, C.; Heck, M.; Heijboer, A.; Heinemann, B.; Heinrich, J.; Henderson, C.; Herndon, M.; Heuser, J.; Hewamanage, S.; Hidas, D.; Hill, C. S.; Hirschbuehl, D.; Hocker, A.; Hou, S.; Houlden, M.; Hsu, S.-C.; Huffman, B. T.; Hughes, R. E.; Husemann, U.; Huston, J.; Incandela, J.; Introzzi, G.; Iori, M.; Ivanov, A.; Iyutin, B.; James, E.; Jayatilaka, B.; Jeans, D.; Jeon, E. J.; Jindariani, S.; Johnson, W.; Jones, M.; Joo, K. K.; Jun, S. Y.; Jung, J. E.; Junk, T. R.; Kamon, T.; Kar, D.; Karchin, P. E.; Kato, Y.; Kephart, R.; Kerzel, U.; Khotilovich, V.; Kilminster, B.; Kim, D. H.; Kim, H. S.; Kim, J. E.; Kim, M. J.; Kim, S. B.; Kim, S. H.; Kim, Y. K.; Kimura, N.; Kirsch, L.; Klimenko, S.; Klute, M.; Knuteson, B.; Ko, B. R.; Koay, S. A.; Kondo, K.; Kong, D. J.; Konigsberg, J.; Korytov, A.; Kotwal, A. V.; Kraus, J.; Kreps, M.; Kroll, J.; Krumnack, N.; Kruse, M.; Krutelyov, V.; Kubo, T.; Kuhlmann, S. E.; Kuhr, T.; Kulkarni, N. P.; Kusakabe, Y.; Kwang, S.; Laasanen, A. T.; Lai, S.; Lami, S.; Lammel, S.; Lancaster, M.; Lander, R. L.; Lannon, K.; Lath, A.; Latino, G.; Lazzizzera, I.; Lecompte, T.; Lee, J.; Lee, J.; Lee, Y. J.; Lee, S. W.; Lefèvre, R.; Leonardo, N.; Leone, S.; Levy, S.; Lewis, J. D.; Lin, C.; Lin, C. S.; Linacre, J.; Lindgren, M.; Lipeles, E.; Lister, A.; Litvintsev, D. O.; Liu, T.; Lockyer, N. S.; Loginov, A.; Loreti, M.; Lovas, L.; Lu, R.-S.; Lucchesi, D.; Lueck, J.; Luci, C.; Lujan, P.; Lukens, P.; Lungu, G.; Lyons, L.; Lys, J.; Lysak, R.; Lytken, E.; Mack, P.; MacQueen, D.; Madrak, R.; Maeshima, K.; Makhoul, K.; Maki, T.; Maksimovic, P.; Malde, S.; Malik, S.; Manca, G.; Manousakis, A.; Margaroli, F.; Marino, C.; Marino, C. P.; Martin, A.; Martin, M.; Martin, V.; Martínez, M.; Martínez-Ballarín, R.; Maruyama, T.; Mastrandrea, P.; Masubuchi, T.; Mattson, M. E.; Mazzanti, P.; McFarland, K. S.; McIntyre, P.; McNulty, R.; Mehta, A.; Mehtala, P.; Menzemer, S.; Menzione, A.; Merkel, P.; Mesropian, C.; Messina, A.; Miao, T.; Miladinovic, N.; Miles, J.; Miller, R.; Mills, C.; Milnik, M.; Mitra, A.; Mitselmakher, G.; Miyake, H.; Moed, S.; Moggi, N.; Moon, C. S.; Moore, R.; Morello, M.; Fernandez, P. Movilla; Mülmenstädt, J.; Mukherjee, A.; Muller, Th.; Mumford, R.; Murat, P.; Mussini, M.; Nachtman, J.; Nagai, Y.; Nagano, A.; Naganoma, J.; Nakamura, K.; Nakano, I.; Napier, A.; Necula, V.; Neu, C.; Neubauer, M. S.; Nielsen, J.; Nodulman, L.; Norman, M.; Norniella, O.; Nurse, E.; Oh, S. H.; Oh, Y. D.; Oksuzian, I.; Okusawa, T.; Oldeman, R.; Orava, R.; Osterberg, K.; Griso, S. Pagan; Pagliarone, C.; Palencia, E.; Papadimitriou, V.; Papaikonomou, A.; Paramonov, A. A.; Parks, B.; Pashapour, S.; Patrick, J.; Pauletta, G.; Paulini, M.; Paus, C.; Pellett, D. E.; Penzo, A.; Phillips, T. J.; Piacentino, G.; Piedra, J.; Pinera, L.; Pitts, K.; Plager, C.; Pondrom, L.; Portell, X.; Poukhov, O.; Pounder, N.; Prakoshyn, F.; Pronko, A.; Proudfoot, J.; Ptohos, F.; Punzi, G.; Pursley, J.; Rademacker, J.; Rahaman, A.; Ramakrishnan, V.; Ranjan, N.; Redondo, I.; Reisert, B.; Rekovic, V.; Renton, P.; Rescigno, M.; Richter, S.; Rimondi, F.; Ristori, L.; Robson, A.; Rodrigo, T.; Rogers, E.; Rolli, S.; Roser, R.; Rossi, M.; Rossin, R.; Roy, P.; Ruiz, A.; Russ, J.; Rusu, V.; Saarikko, H.; Safonov, A.; Sakumoto, W. K.; Salamanna, G.; Saltó, O.; Santi, L.; Sarkar, S.; Sartori, L.; Sato, K.; Savoy-Navarro, A.; Scheidle, T.; Schlabach, P.; Schmidt, E. E.; Schmidt, M. A.; Schmidt, M. P.; Schmitt, M.; Schwarz, T.; Scodellaro, L.; Scott, A. L.; Scribano, A.; Scuri, F.; Sedov, A.; Seidel, S.; Seiya, Y.; Semenov, A.; Sexton-Kennedy, L.; Sfyria, A.; Shalhout, S. Z.; Shapiro, M. D.; Shears, T.; Shepard, P. F.; Sherman, D.; Shimojima, M.; Shochet, M.; Shon, Y.; Shreyber, I.; Sidoti, A.; Sinervo, P.; Sisakyan, A.; Slaughter, A. J.; Slaunwhite, J.; Sliwa, K.; Smith, J. R.; Snider, F. D.; Snihur, R.; Soderberg, M.; Soha, A.; Somalwar, S.; Sorin, V.; Spalding, J.; Spinella, F.; Spreitzer, T.; Squillacioti, P.; Stanitzki, M.; Denis, R. St.; Stelzer, B.; Stelzer-Chilton, O.; Stentz, D.; Strologas, J.; Stuart, D.; Suh, J. S.; Sukhanov, A.; Sun, H.; Suslov, I.; Suzuki, T.; Taffard, A.; Takashima, R.; Takeuchi, Y.; Tanaka, R.; Tecchio, M.; Teng, P. K.; Terashi, K.; Thom, J.; Thompson, A. S.; Thompson, G. A.; Thomson, E.; Tipton, P.; Tiwari, V.; Tkaczyk, S.; Toback, D.; Tokar, S.; Tollefson, K.; Tomura, T.; Tonelli, D.; Torre, S.; Torretta, D.; Tourneur, S.; Trischuk, W.; Tu, Y.; Turini, N.; Ukegawa, F.; Uozumi, S.; Vallecorsa, S.; van Remortel, N.; Varganov, A.; Vataga, E.; Vázquez, F.; Velev, G.; Vellidis, C.; Veszpremi, V.; Vidal, M.; Vidal, R.; Vila, I.; Vilar, R.; Vine, T.; Vogel, M.; Volobouev, I.; Volpi, G.; Würthwein, F.; Wagner, P.; Wagner, R. G.; Wagner, R. L.; Wagner-Kuhr, J.; Wagner, W.; Wakisaka, T.; Wallny, R.; Wang, S. M.; Warburton, A.; Waters, D.; Weinberger, M.; Wester, W. C., III; Whitehouse, B.; Whiteson, D.; Wicklund, A. B.; Wicklund, E.; Williams, G.; Williams, H. H.; Wilson, P.; Winer, B. L.; Wittich, P.; Wolbers, S.; Wolfe, C.; Wright, T.; Wu, X.; Wynne, S. M.; Yagil, A.; Yamamoto, K.; Yamaoka, J.; Yamashita, T.; Yang, C.; Yang, U. K.; Yang, Y. C.; Yao, W. M.; Yeh, G. P.; Yoh, J.; Yorita, K.; Yoshida, T.; Yu, G. B.; Yu, I.; Yu, S. S.; Yun, J. C.; Zanello, L.; Zanetti, A.; Zaw, I.; Zhang, X.; Zheng, Y.; Zucchelli, S.

    2008-03-01

    We present the first observation and cross section measurement of exclusive dijet production in pmacr p interactions, pmacr p→ pmacr +dijet+p. Using a data sample of 310pb-1 collected by the Run II Collider Detector at Fermilab at s=1.96TeV, exclusive cross sections for events with two jets of transverse energy ETjet≥10GeV have been measured as a function of minimum ETjet. The exclusive signal is extracted from fits to data distributions based on Monte Carlo simulations of expected dijet signal and background shapes. The simulated background distribution shapes are checked in a study of a largely independent data sample of 200pb-1 of b-tagged jet events, where exclusive dijet production is expected to be suppressed by the Jz=0 total angular momentum selection rule. Results obtained are compared with theoretical expectations, and implications for exclusive Higgs boson production at the pp Large Hadron Collider at s=14TeV are discussed.

  20. Collider signatures for the heavy lepton triplet in the type I+III seesaw mechanism

    SciTech Connect

    Arhrib, Abdesslam; Bajc, Borut; Ghosh, Dilip Kumar; Han, Tao; Huang, Gui-Yu; Puljak, Ivica; Senjanovic, Goran

    2010-09-01

    The minimal SU(5) theory augmented by the fermionic adjoint representation restores the coupling constant unification and gives realistic neutrino masses and mixing through the hybrid Type I and Type III seesaw. The crucial prediction of the theory is an SU(2) lepton triplet with the mass below TeV. We study the signature of these heavy leptons at the hadron and lepton colliders. The smoking gun evidence of the theory, as in general seesaw mechanisms, is {Delta}L=2 lepton-number violation through events of a pair of like-sign leptons plus four jets without significant missing energy at hadron colliders. We find that via this unique channel the heavy lepton can be searched for up to a mass of 200 GeV at the Tevatron with 8 fb{sup -1}, and up to 450 (700) GeV at the LHC of 14 TeV C.M. energy with 10(100) fb{sup -1}. The 7 TeV LHC run of 1 fb{sup -1} is expected to probe a mass window of 110-200 GeV. We also comment on how to distinguish this theory from other models with similar heavy leptons. Finally, we compare the production rates and angular distributions of heavy leptons in e{sup +}e{sup -} collisions for various models.

  1. Observation of Exclusive Dijet Production at the Fermilab Tevatron p-pbar Collider

    SciTech Connect

    Aaltonen, T.; Adelman, J.; Akimoto, T.; Albrow, M.G.; Gonzalez, B.Alvarez; Amerio, S.; Amidei, D.; Anastassov, A.; Annovi, A.; Antos, J.; Aoki, M.; /Illinois U., Urbana /Fermilab

    2007-12-01

    The authors present the first observation and cross section measurement of exclusive dijet production in {bar p}p interactions, {bar p}p {yields} {bar p} + dijet + p. Using a data sample of 310 pb{sup -1} collected by the Run II Collider Detector at Fermilab at {radical}s = 1.96 TeV, exclusive cross sections for events with two jets of transverse energy E{sub T}{sup jet} {ge} 10 GeV have been measured as a function of minimum E{sub T}{sup jet}. The exclusive signal is extracted from fits to data distributions based on Monte Carlo simulations of expected dijet signal and background shapes. The simulated background distribution shapes are checked in a study of a largely independent data sample of 200 pb{sup -1} of b-tagged jet events, where exclusive dijet production is expected to be suppressed by the J{sub z} = 0 total angular momentum selection rule. Results obtained are compared with theoretical expectations, and implications for exclusive Higgs boson production at the pp Large Hadron Collider at {radical}s = 14 TeV are discussed.

  2. Dense pair plasma generation by two laser pulses colliding in a cylinder channel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Jian-Xun; Ma, Yan-Yun; Yu, Tong-Pu; Zhao, Jun; Yang, Xiao-Hu; Zou, De-Bin; Zhang, Guo-Bo; Zhao, Yuan; Yang, Jing-Kang; Li, Han-Zhen; Zhuo, Hong-Bin; Shao, Fu-Qiu; Kawata, Shigeo

    2017-03-01

    An all-optical scheme for high-density pair plasmas generation is proposed by two laser pulses colliding in a cylinder channel. Two dimensional particle-in-cell simulations show that, when the first laser pulse propagates in the cylinder, electrons are extracted out of the cylinder inner wall and accelerated to high energies. These energetic electrons later run into the second counter-propagating laser pulse, radiating a large amount of high-energy gamma photons via the Compton back-scattering process. The emitted gamma photons then collide with the second laser pulse to initiate the Breit–Wheeler process for pairs production. Due to the strong self-generated fields in the cylinder, positrons are confined in the channel to form dense pair plasmas. Totally, the maximum density of pair plasmas can be 4.60× {10}27 {{{m}}}-3, for lasers with an intensity of 4× {10}22 {{W}}\\cdot {{cm}}-2. Both the positron yield and density are tunable by changing the cylinder radius and the laser parameters. The generated dense pair plasmas can further facilitate investigations related to astrophysics and particle physics. Project supported by the National Natural Science Foundation (Grant Nos. 11475260, 11305264, 11622547, 11375265, and 11474360), the National Basic Research Program of China (Grant No. 2013CBA01504), the Research Project of National University of Defense Technology, China (Contract No. JC14-02-02), and the Science Challenge Program, China (Grant No. JCKY2016212A505).

  3. High-Power Multimode X-Band RF Pulse Compression System for Future Linear Colliders

    SciTech Connect

    Tantawi, S.G.; Nantista, C.D.; Dolgashev, V.A.; Pearson, C.; Nelson, J.; Jobe, K.; Chan, J.; Fant, K.; Frisch, J.; Atkinson, D.; /LLNL, Livermore

    2005-08-10

    We present a multimode X-band rf pulse compression system suitable for a TeV-scale electron-positron linear collider such as the Next Linear Collider (NLC). The NLC main linac operating frequency is 11.424 GHz. A single NLC rf unit is required to produce 400 ns pulses with 475 MW of peak power. Each rf unit should power approximately 5 m of accelerator structures. The rf unit design consists of two 75 MW klystrons and a dual-moded resonant-delay-line pulse compression system that produces a flat output pulse. The pulse compression system components are all overmoded, and most components are designed to operate with two modes. This approach allows high-power-handling capability while maintaining a compact, inexpensive system. We detail the design of this system and present experimental cold test results. We describe the design and performance of various components. The high-power testing of the system is verified using four 50 MW solenoid-focused klystrons run off a common 400 kV solid-state modulator. The system has produced 400 ns rf pulses of greater than 500 MW. We present the layout of our system, which includes a dual-moded transmission waveguide system and a dual-moded resonant line (SLED-II) pulse compression system. We also present data on the processing and operation of this system, which has set high-power records in coherent and phase controlled pulsed rf.

  4. Running: Improving Form to Reduce Injuries.

    PubMed

    2015-08-01

    Running is often perceived as a good option for "getting into shape," with little thought given to the form, or mechanics, of running. However, as many as 79% of all runners will sustain a running-related injury during any given year. If you are a runner-casual or serious-you should be aware that poor running mechanics may contribute to these injuries. A study published in the August 2015 issue of JOSPT reviewed the existing research to determine whether running mechanics could be improved, which could be important in treating running-related injuries and helping injured runners return to pain-free running.

  5. GASIFICATION TEST RUN TC06

    SciTech Connect

    Southern Company Services, Inc.

    2003-08-01

    This report discusses test campaign TC06 of the Kellogg Brown & Root, Inc. (KBR) Transport Reactor train with a Siemens Westinghouse Power Corporation (Siemens Westinghouse) particle filter system at the Power Systems Development Facility (PSDF) located in Wilsonville, Alabama. The Transport Reactor is an advanced circulating fluidized-bed reactor designed to operate as either a combustor or a gasifier using a particulate control device (PCD). The Transport Reactor was operated as a pressurized gasifier during TC06. Test run TC06 was started on July 4, 2001, and completed on September 24, 2001, with an interruption in service between July 25, 2001, and August 19, 2001, due to a filter element failure in the PCD caused by abnormal operating conditions while tuning the main air compressor. The reactor temperature was varied between 1,725 and 1,825 F at pressures from 190 to 230 psig. In TC06, 1,214 hours of solid circulation and 1,025 hours of coal feed were attained with 797 hours of coal feed after the filter element failure. Both reactor and PCD operations were stable during the test run with a stable baseline pressure drop. Due to its length and stability, the TC06 test run provided valuable data necessary to analyze long-term reactor operations and to identify necessary modifications to improve equipment and process performance as well as progressing the goal of many thousands of hours of filter element exposure.

  6. Running Jobs in the Vacuum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McNab, A.; Stagni, F.; Ubeda Garcia, M.

    2014-06-01

    We present a model for the operation of computing nodes at a site using Virtual Machines (VMs), in which VMs are created and contextualized for experiments by the site itself. For the experiment, these VMs appear to be produced spontaneously "in the vacuum" rather having to ask the site to create each one. This model takes advantage of the existing pilot job frameworks adopted by many experiments. In the Vacuum model, the contextualization process starts a job agent within the VM and real jobs are fetched from the central task queue as normal. An implementation of the Vacuum scheme, Vac, is presented in which a VM factory runs on each physical worker node to create and contextualize its set of VMs. With this system, each node's VM factory can decide which experiments' VMs to run, based on site-wide target shares and on a peer-to-peer protocol in which the site's VM factories query each other to discover which VM types they are running. A property of this system is that there is no gate keeper service, head node, or batch system accepting and then directing jobs to particular worker nodes, avoiding several central points of failure. Finally, we describe tests of the Vac system using jobs from the central LHCb task queue, using the same contextualization procedure for VMs developed by LHCb for Clouds.

  7. Sorting chromatic sextupoles for easily and effectively correcting second order chromaticity in the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider

    SciTech Connect

    Luo,Y.; Tepikian, S.; Fischer, W.; Robert-Demolaize, G.; Trbojevic, D.

    2009-01-02

    Based on the contributions of the chromatic sextupole families to the half-integer resonance driving terms, we discuss how to sort the chromatic sextupoles in the arcs of the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) to easily and effectively correct the second order chromaticities. We propose a method with 4 knobs corresponding to 4 pairs of chromatic sextupole families to online correct the second order chromaticities. Numerical simulation justifies this method, showing that this method reduces the unbalance in the correction strengths of sextupole families and avoids the reversal of sextupole polarities. Therefore, this method yields larger dynamic apertures for the proposed RHIC 2009 100GeV polarized proton run lattices.

  8. Overview of real-time kernels at the Superconducting Super Collider Laboratory

    SciTech Connect

    Low, K.; Acharya, S.; Allen, M.; Faught, E.; Haenni, D.; Kalbfleisch, C.

    1991-05-01

    The Superconducting Super Collider Laboratory (SSCL) will have many subsystems that will require real-time microprocessor control. Examples of such sub-systems requiring real-time controls are power supply ramp generators and quench protection monitors for the superconducting magnets. We plan on using a commercial multitasking real-time kernel in these systems. These kernels must perform in a consistent, reliable and efficient manner. Actual performance measurements have been conducted on four different kernels, all running on the same hardware platform. The measurements fall into two categories. Throughput measurements covering the non-real-time'' aspects of the kernel include process creation/termination times, interprocess communication facilities involving messages, semaphores and shared memory and memory allocation/deallocation. Measurements concentrating on real-time response are context switch times, interrupt latencies and interrupt task response. 6 refs., 2 tabs.

  9. a Search for Rare Beauty Meson Decays at the CERN Super Proton-Antiproton Synchrotron Collider

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ankoviak, Kevin Michael

    1991-02-01

    A search for the decays B^0 tomu^+mu^- , B to mu^+mu^-X and B_{rm d}to mu ^+mu^-K^{ rm 0*}, which are expected to be rare if mediated by Flavor Changing Neutral Currents, is presented. Using data collected during the 1984-1989 CERN pp Collider runs, the UA1 search was carried out using mu^+ mu^- events with 3.9 GeV/c ^2 < M_{mumu} < 5.5 GeV/c^2. 90% confidence level upper limits on the branching ratios B^0 tomu^+mu^- of 8.3 times 10^{ -6}, Btomu^+mu ^-X of 5.0 times 10 ^{-5}, and B_{d}tomu^+mu^ - K^{0*} of 2.3 times 10^{-5} were found. Implications for upper limits on the t-quark mass and constraints to Standard Model extensions are also discussed.

  10. Recent results on direct photons from CDF (Collider Detector at Fermilab)

    SciTech Connect

    Harris, R.M.

    1990-06-01

    We report on preliminary measurements of direct photons in {bar p}p collisions at {radical}s = 1.8 TeV from the 1988--89 run of the Collider Detector at Fermilab (CDF). The inclusive direct photon cross section, measured for photon transverse momentum in the range 13 < P{sub t} < 68 GeV, has an excess at low P{sub t} compared to recent Quantum Chromodynamic (QCD) calculations. The pseudorapidity distribution of the away-side jet, for events with 27 < P{sub t} < 33 GeV, agrees with QCD predictions. Measurements of the K{sub t} kick in photon-jet events are also presented. 8 refs., 10 figs., 1 tab.

  11. Study of the heavy flavor content of jets produced in W events at the Tevatron collider

    SciTech Connect

    G. Apollinari

    2002-08-01

    We present a detailed study of the heavy flavor content in the W + jet data sample collected with the CDF detector during the 1992-1995 collider run at Fermilab. Rates of heavy flavor jets, identified via the observation of secondary vertices or semileptonic decays of b and c quarks, are in good agreement with a standard model simulation including production of the top quark. An exception is the number of events in which a single jet has both a secondary vertex and a semileptonic decay tag. In the W + 2,3 jet data, we expect 4.4 {+-} 0.6 and we find 13 such events. The kinematic properties of this small sample of events are statistically difficult to reconcile with the simulation of standard model processes.

  12. OPERATIONS AND PERFORMANCE OF RHIC AS A CU-CU COLLIDER.

    SciTech Connect

    PILAT, R.; AHRENS, L.; BAI, M.; BARTON, D.S.; ET AL.

    2005-05-16

    The 5th year of RHIC operations, started in November 2004 and expected to last till June 2005, consists of a physics run with Cu-Cu collisions at 100 GeV/u followed by one with polarized protons (pp) at 100 GeV [l]. We will address here the overall performance of the RHIC complex used for the first time as a Cu-Cu collider, and compare it with previous operational experience with Au, PP and asymmetric d-Au collisions. We will also discuss operational improvements, such as a {beta}* squeeze to 85cm in the high luminosity interaction regions from the design value of 1m, system improvements, machine performance and limitations, and address reliability and uptime issues.

  13. The discovery of the Higgs boson at the Large Hadron Collider

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nisati, A.; Tonelli, G.

    2015-11-01

    This paper summarises the work done by the ATLAS and CMS collaborations, and by the teams of the Large Hadron Collider at CERN, that led to the discovery of a new particle, with mass near 125GeV and properties consistent with the ones predicted for the Standard Model Higgs boson. An overview of the Standard Model, with a description of the role of the Higgs boson in the theory, and a summary of the searches for this particle prior to the LHC operations is also given. The paper presents the results obtained by ATLAS and CMS from the analysis of the full data set produced in the first physics run of LHC. After a short discussion on the implications of the discovery, the future prospects for the precision study of the new particle are lastly discussed.

  14. Constraining RS Models by Future Flavor and Collider Measurements: A Snowmass Whitepaper

    SciTech Connect

    Agashe, Kaustubh; Bauer, Martin; Goertz, Florian; Lee, Seung J.; Vecchi, Luca; Wang, Lian-Tao; Yu, Felix

    2013-10-03

    Randall-Sundrum models are models of quark flavor, because they explain the hierarchies in the quark masses and mixings in terms of order one localization parameters of extra dimensional wavefunctions. The same small numbers which generate the light quark masses suppress contributions to flavor violating tree level amplitudes. In this note we update universal constraints from electroweak precision parameters and demonstrate how future measurements of flavor violation in ultra rare decay channels of Kaons and B mesons will constrain the parameter space of this type of models. We show how collider signatures are correlated with these flavor measurements and compute projected limits for direct searches at the 14 TeV LHC run, a 14 TeV LHC luminosity upgrade, a 33 TeV LHC energy upgrade, and a potential 100 TeV machine. We further discuss the effects of a warped model of leptons in future measurements of lepton flavor violation.

  15. Workshop on physics at the first muon collider and front-end of a muon collider: A brief summary

    SciTech Connect

    Geer, S.

    1998-02-01

    In November 1997 a workshop was held at Fermilab to explore the physics potential of the first muon collider, and the physics potential of the accelerator complex at the `front-end` of the collider. An extensive physics program emerged from the workshop. This paper attempts to summarize this physics program and to identify the main conclusions from the workshop. 14 refs., 1 fig., 5 tabs.

  16. Simulations and measurements of beam loss patterns at the CERN Large Hadron Collider

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bruce, R.; Assmann, R. W.; Boccone, V.; Bracco, C.; Brugger, M.; Cauchi, M.; Cerutti, F.; Deboy, D.; Ferrari, A.; Lari, L.; Marsili, A.; Mereghetti, A.; Mirarchi, D.; Quaranta, E.; Redaelli, S.; Robert-Demolaize, G.; Rossi, A.; Salvachua, B.; Skordis, E.; Tambasco, C.; Valentino, G.; Weiler, T.; Vlachoudis, V.; Wollmann, D.

    2014-08-01

    The CERN Large Hadron Collider (LHC) is designed to collide proton beams of unprecedented energy, in order to extend the frontiers of high-energy particle physics. During the first very successful running period in 2010-2013, the LHC was routinely storing protons at 3.5-4 TeV with a total beam energy of up to 146 MJ, and even higher stored energies are foreseen in the future. This puts extraordinary demands on the control of beam losses. An uncontrolled loss of even a tiny fraction of the beam could cause a superconducting magnet to undergo a transition into a normal-conducting state, or in the worst case cause material damage. Hence a multistage collimation system has been installed in order to safely intercept high-amplitude beam protons before they are lost elsewhere. To guarantee adequate protection from the collimators, a detailed theoretical understanding is needed. This article presents results of numerical simulations of the distribution of beam losses around the LHC that have leaked out of the collimation system. The studies include tracking of protons through the fields of more than 5000 magnets in the 27 km LHC ring over hundreds of revolutions, and Monte Carlo simulations of particle-matter interactions both in collimators and machine elements being hit by escaping particles. The simulation results agree typically within a factor 2 with measurements of beam loss distributions from the previous LHC run. Considering the complex simulation, which must account for a very large number of unknown imperfections, and in view of the total losses around the ring spanning over 7 orders of magnitude, we consider this an excellent agreement. Our results give confidence in the simulation tools, which are used also for the design of future accelerators.

  17. Muon Physics at Run-I and its upgrade plan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benekos, Nektarios Chr.

    2015-05-01

    The Large Hadron Collider (LHC) and its multi-purpose Detector, ATLAS, has been operated successfully at record centre-of-mass energies of 7 and TeV. After this successful LHC Run-1, plans are actively advancing for a series of upgrades, culminating roughly 10 years from now in the high luminosity LHC (HL-LHC) project, delivering of order five times the LHC nominal instantaneous luminosity along with luminosity leveling. The final goal is to extend the data set from about few hundred fb-1 expected for LHC running to 3000 fb-1 by around 2030. To cope with the corresponding rate increase, the ATLAS detector needs to be upgraded. The upgrade will proceed in two steps: Phase I in the LHC shutdown 2018/19 and Phase II in 2023-25. The largest of the ATLAS Phase-1 upgrades concerns the replacement of the first muon station of the highrapidity region, the so called New Small Wheel. This configuration copes with the highest rates expected in Phase II and considerably enhances the performance of the forward muon system by adding triggering functionality to the first muon station. Prospects for the ongoing and future data taking are presented. This article presents the main muon physics results from LHC Run-1 based on a total luminosity of 30 fb^-1. Prospects for the ongoing and future data taking are also presented. We will conclude with an update of the status of the project and the steps towards a complete operational system, ready to be installed in ATLAS in 2018/19.

  18. Linear collider research and development at SLAC, LBL and LLNL

    SciTech Connect

    Mattison, T.S.

    1988-10-01

    The study of electron-positron (e/sup +/e/sup /minus//) annihilation in storage ring colliders has been very fruitful. It is by now well understood that the optimized cost and size of e/sup +/e/sup /minus// storage rings scales as E(sub cm//sup 2/ due to the need to replace energy lost to synchrotron radiation in the ring bending magnets. Linear colliders, using the beams from linear accelerators, evade this scaling law. The study of e/sup +/e/sup /minus// collisions at TeV energy will require linear colliders. The luminosity requirements for a TeV linear collider are set by the physics. Advanced accelerator research and development at SLAC is focused toward a TeV Linear Collider (TLC) of 0.5--1 TeV in the center of mass, with a luminosity of 10/sup 33/--10/sup 34/. The goal is a design for two linacs of less than 3 km each, and requiring less than 100 MW of power each. With a 1 km final focus, the TLC could be fit on Stanford University land (although not entirely within the present SLAC site). The emphasis is on technologies feasible for a proposal to be framed in 1992. Linear collider development work is progressing on three fronts: delivering electrical energy to a beam, delivering a focused high quality beam, and system optimization. Sources of high peak microwave radio frequency (RF) power to drive the high gradient linacs are being developed in collaboration with Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory (LBL) and Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL). Beam generation, beam dynamics and final focus work has been done at SLAC and in collaboration with KEK. Both the accelerator physics and the utilization of TeV linear colliders were topics at the 1988 Snowmass Summer Study. 14 refs., 4 figs., 1 tab.

  19. Barefoot running: does it prevent injuries?

    PubMed

    Murphy, Kelly; Curry, Emily J; Matzkin, Elizabeth G

    2013-11-01

    Endurance running has evolved over the course of millions of years and it is now one of the most popular sports today. However, the risk of stress injury in distance runners is high because of the repetitive ground impact forces exerted. These injuries are not only detrimental to the runner, but also place a burden on the medical community. Preventative measures are essential to decrease the risk of injury within the sport. Common running injuries include patellofemoral pain syndrome, tibial stress fractures, plantar fasciitis, and Achilles tendonitis. Barefoot running, as opposed to shod running (with shoes), has recently received significant attention in both the media and the market place for the potential to promote the healing process, increase performance, and decrease injury rates. However, there is controversy over the use of barefoot running to decrease the overall risk of injury secondary to individual differences in lower extremity alignment, gait patterns, and running biomechanics. While barefoot running may benefit certain types of individuals, differences in running stance and individual biomechanics may actually increase injury risk when transitioning to barefoot running. The purpose of this article is to review the currently available clinical evidence on barefoot running and its effectiveness for preventing injury in the runner. Based on a review of current literature, barefoot running is not a substantiated preventative running measure to reduce injury rates in runners. However, barefoot running utility should be assessed on an athlete-specific basis to determine whether barefoot running will be beneficial.

  20. Collider ring particle loss tracking with SSCTRK

    SciTech Connect

    Garavaglia, T.; Kauffmann, S.K.; Stiening, R.

    1990-04-01

    The SSCTRK numerical simulation tracking code has been used to study the benefit of increasing the SSC dipole magnet aperture from 4 to 5 cm. This study has been carried out for both hypothetical highly corrected and plausibly corrected machines, the former having no systematic multipole errors and chromaticity identically zero. The choice of tune values, phase advance per cell, random multipole errors, systematic multipole errors and chromaticity (for the plausibly corrected machines), closed orbit error, the criterion for particle loss, etc. are set forth in detail. Runs of 10{sup 5} turns and 3 {times} 10{sup 6} turns are presented together with the approximate dynamic apertures they yield from their particle loss patterns.

  1. Constraining Dark Matter Interactions with Pseudoscalar and Scalar Mediators Using Collider Searches for Multijets plus Missing Transverse Energy.

    PubMed

    Buchmueller, Oliver; Malik, Sarah A; McCabe, Christopher; Penning, Bjoern

    2015-10-30

    The monojet search, looking for events involving missing transverse energy (E_{T}) plus one or two jets, is the most prominent collider dark matter search. We show that multijet searches, which look for E_{T} plus two or more jets, are significantly more sensitive than the monojet search for pseudoscalar- and scalar-mediated interactions. We demonstrate this in the context of a simplified model with a pseudoscalar interaction that explains the excess in GeV energy gamma rays observed by the Fermi Large Area Telescope. We show that multijet searches already constrain a pseudoscalar interpretation of the excess in much of the parameter space where the mass of the mediator M_{A} is more than twice the dark matter mass m_{DM}. With the forthcoming run of the Large Hadron Collider at higher energies, the remaining regions of the parameter space where M_{A}>2m_{DM} will be fully explored. Furthermore, we highlight the importance of complementing the monojet final state with multijet final states to maximize the sensitivity of the search for the production of dark matter at colliders.

  2. Fatigue associated with prolonged graded running.

    PubMed

    Giandolini, Marlene; Vernillo, Gianluca; Samozino, Pierre; Horvais, Nicolas; Edwards, W Brent; Morin, Jean-Benoît; Millet, Guillaume Y

    2016-10-01

    Scientific experiments on running mainly consider level running. However, the magnitude and etiology of fatigue depend on the exercise under consideration, particularly the predominant type of contraction, which differs between level, uphill, and downhill running. The purpose of this review is to comprehensively summarize the neurophysiological and biomechanical changes due to fatigue in graded running. When comparing prolonged hilly running (i.e., a combination of uphill and downhill running) to level running, it is found that (1) the general shape of the neuromuscular fatigue-exercise duration curve as well as the etiology of fatigue in knee extensor and plantar flexor muscles are similar and (2) the biomechanical consequences are also relatively comparable, suggesting that duration rather than elevation changes affects neuromuscular function and running patterns. However, 'pure' uphill or downhill running has several fatigue-related intrinsic features compared with the level running. Downhill running induces severe lower limb tissue damage, indirectly evidenced by massive increases in plasma creatine kinase/myoglobin concentration or inflammatory markers. In addition, low-frequency fatigue (i.e., excitation-contraction coupling failure) is systematically observed after downhill running, although it has also been found in high-intensity uphill running for different reasons. Indeed, low-frequency fatigue in downhill running is attributed to mechanical stress at the interface sarcoplasmic reticulum/T-tubule, while the inorganic phosphate accumulation probably plays a central role in intense uphill running. Other fatigue-related specificities of graded running such as strategies to minimize the deleterious effects of downhill running on muscle function, the difference of energy cost versus heat storage or muscle activity changes in downhill, level, and uphill running are also discussed.

  3. ATLAS jet trigger update for the LHC run II

    SciTech Connect

    Delgado, A. T.

    2015-07-01

    The CERN Large Hadron Collider is the biggest and most powerful particle collider ever built. It produces up to 40 million proton-proton collisions per second at unprecedented energies to explore the fundamental laws and properties of Nature. The ATLAS experiment is one of the detectors that analyses and records these collisions. It generates dozens of GB/s of data that has to be reduced before it can be permanently stored, the event selection is made by the ATLAS trigger system, which reduces the data volume by a factor of 105. The trigger system has to be highly configurable in order to adapt to changing running conditions and maximize the physics output whilst keeping the output rate under control. A particularly interesting pattern generated during collisions consists of a collimated spray of particles, known as a hadronic jet. To retain the interesting jets and efficiently reject the overwhelming background, optimal jet energy resolution is needed. Therefore the Jet trigger software requires CPU-intensive reconstruction algorithms. In order to reduce the resources needed for the reconstruction step, a partial detector readout scheme was developed, which effectively suppresses the low activity regions of the calorimeter. In this paper we describe the overall ATLAS trigger software, and the jet trigger in particular, along with the improvements made on the system. We then focus on detailed studies of the algorithm timing and the performance impact of the full and partial calorimeter readout schemes. We conclude with an outlook of the jet trigger plans for the next LHC data-taking period. (authors)

  4. First measurements of inclusive W and Z cross sections from run II of the fermilab tevatron collider.

    PubMed

    Acosta, D; Affolder, T; Akimoto, T; Albrow, M G; Ambrose, D; Amerio, S; Amidei, D; Anastassov, A; Anikeev, K; Annovi, A; Antos, J; Aoki, M; Apollinari, G; Arisawa, T; Arguin, J-F; Artikov, A; Ashmanskas, W; Attal, A; Azfar, F; Azzi-Bacchetta, P; Bacchetta, N; Bachacou, H; Badgett, W; Barbaro-Galtieri, A; Barker, G J; Barnes, V E; Barnett, B A; Baroiant, S; Barone, M; Bauer, G; Bedeschi, F; Behari, S; Belforte, S; Bellettini, G; Bellinger, J; Benjamin, D; Beretvas, A; Bhatti, A; Binkley, M; Bisello, D; Bishai, M; Blair, R E; Blocker, C; Bloom, K; Blumenfeld, B; Bocci, A; Bodek, A; Bolla, G; Bolshov, A; Booth, P S L; Bortoletto, D; Boudreau, J; Bourov, S; Bromberg, C; Brubaker, E; Budagov, J; Budd, H S; Burkett, K; Busetto, G; Bussey, P; Byrum, K L; Cabrera, S; Calafiura, P; Campanelli, M; Campbell, M; Canepa, A; Casarsa, M; Carlsmith, D; Carron, S; Carosi, R; Cavalli-Sforza, M; Castro, A; Catastini, P; Cauz, D; Cerri, A; Cerri, C; Cerrito, L; Chapman, J; Chen, C; Chen, Y C; Chertok, M; Chiarelli, G; Chlachidze, G; Chlebana, F; Cho, I; Cho, K; Chokheli, D; Chu, M L; Chuang, S; Chung, J Y; Chung, W-H; Chung, Y S; Ciobanu, C I; Ciocci, M A; Clark, A G; Clark, D; Coca, M; Connolly, A; Convery, M; Conway, J; Cooper, B; Cordelli, M; Cortiana, G; Cranshaw, J; Cuevas, J; Culbertson, R; Currat, C; Cyr, D; Dagenhart, D; Da Ronco, S; D'Auria, S; de Barbaro, P; De Cecco, S; De Lentdecker, G; Dell'Agnello, S; Dell'Orso, M; Demers, S; Demortier, L; Deninno, M; De Pedis, D; Derwent, P F; Dionisi, C; Dittmann, J R; Doksus, P; Dominguez, A; Donati, S; Donega, M; Donini, J; D'Onofrio, M; Dorigo, T; Drollinger, V; Ebina, K; Eddy, N; Ely, R; Erbacher, R; Erdmann, M; Errede, D; Errede, S; Eusebi, R; Fang, H-C; Farrington, S; Fedorko, I; Feild, R G; Feindt, M; Fernandez, J P; Ferretti, C; Field, R D; Fiori, I; Flanagan, G; Flaugher, B; Flores-Castillo, L R; Foland, A; Forrester, S; Foster, G W; Franklin, M; Freeman, J; Frisch, H; Fujii, Y; Furic, I; Gajjar, A; Gallas, A; Galyardt, J; Gallinaro, M; Garcia-Sciveres, M; Garfinkel, A F; Gay, C; Gerberich, H; Gerdes, D W; Gerchtein, E; Giagu, S; Giannetti, P; Gibson, A; Gibson, K; Ginsburg, C; Giolo, K; Giordani, M; Giurgiu, G; Glagolev, V; Glenzinski, D; Gold, M; Goldschmidt, N; Goldstein, D; Goldstein, J; Gomez, G; Gomez-Ceballos, G; Goncharov, M; González, O; Gorelov, I; Goshaw, A T; Gotra, Y; Goulianos, K; Gresele, A; Grosso-Pilcher, C; Guenther, M; Guimaraes da Costa, J; Haber, C; Hahn, K; Hahn, S R; Halkiadakis, E; Handler, R; Happacher, F; Hara, K; Hare, M; Harr, R F; Harris, R M; Hartmann, F; Hatakeyama, K; Hauser, J; Hays, C; Hayward, H; Heider, E; Heinemann, B; Heinrich, J; Hennecke, M; Herndon, M; Hill, C; Hirschbuehl, D; Hocker, A; Hoffman, K D; Holloway, A; Hou, S; Houlden, M A; Huffman, B T; Huang, Y; Hughes, R E; Huston, J; Ikado, K; Incandela, J; Introzzi, G; Iori, M; Ishizawa, Y; Issever, C; Ivanov, A; Iwata, Y; Iyutin, B; James, E; Jang, D; Jarrell, J; Jeans, D; Jensen, H; Jeon, E J; Jones, M; Joo, K K; Jun, S; Junk, T; Kamon, T; Kang, J; Karagoz Unel, M; Karchin, P E; Kartal, S; Kato, Y; Kemp, Y; Kephart, R; Kerzel, U; Khotilovich, V; Kilminster, B; Kim, D H; Kim, H S; Kim, J E; Kim, M J; Kim, M S; Kim, S B; Kim, S H; Kim, T H; Kim, Y K; King, B T; Kirby, M; Kirsch, L; Klimenko, S; Knuteson, B; Ko, B R; Kobayashi, H; Koehn, P; Kong, D J; Kondo, K; Konigsberg, J; Kordas, K; Korn, A; Korytov, A; Kotelnikov, K; Kotwal, A V; Kovalev, A; Kraus, J; Kravchenko, I; Kreymer, A; Kroll, J; Kruse, M; Krutelyov, V; Kuhlmann, S E; Kuznetsova, N; Laasanen, A T; Lai, S; Lami, S; Lammel, S; Lancaster, J; Lancaster, M; Lander, R; Lannon, K; Lath, A; Latino, G; Lauhakangas, R; Lazzizzera, I; Le, Y; Lecci, C; Lecompte, T; Lee, J; Lee, J; Lee, S W; Leonardo, N; Leone, S; Lewis, J D; Li, K; Lin, C; Lin, C S; Lindgren, M; Liss, T M; Litvintsev, D O; Liu, T; Liu, Y; Lockyer, N S; Loginov, A; Loreti, M; Loverre, P; Lu, R-S; Lucchesi, D; Lujan, P; Lukens, P; Lyons, L; Lys, J; Lysak, R; Macqueen, D; Madrak, R; Maeshima, K; Maksimovic, P; Malferrari, L; Manca, G; Marginean, R; Martin, M; Martin, A; Martin, V; Martínez, M; Maruyama, T; Matsunaga, H; Mattson, M; Mazzanti, P; McFarland, K S; McGivern, D; McIntyre, P M; McNamara, P; Ncnulty, R; Menzemer, S; Menzione, A; Merkel, P; Mesropian, C; Messina, A; Miao, T; Miladinovic, N; Miller, L; Miller, R; Miller, J S; Miquel, R; Miscetti, S; Mitselmakher, G; Miyamoto, A; Miyazaki, Y; Moggi, N; Mohr, B; Moore, R; Morello, M; Moulik, T; Movilla Fernandez, P A; Mukherjee, A; Mulhearn, M; Muller, T; Mumford, R; Munar, A; Murat, P; Nachtman, J; Nahn, S; Nakamura, I; Nakano, I; Napier, A; Napora, R; Naumov, D; Necula, V; Niell, F; Nielsen, J; Nelson, C; Nelson, T; Neu, C; Neubauer, M S; Newman-Holmes, C; Nicollerat, A-S; Nigmanov, T; Nodulman, L; Norniella, O; Oesterberg, K; Ogawa, T; Oh, S H; Oh, Y D; Ohsugi, T; Okusawa, T; Oldeman, R; Orava, R; Orejudos, W; Pagliarone, C; Palmonari, F; Paoletti, R; Papadimitriou, V; Pashapour, S; Patrick, J; Pauletta, G; Paulini, M; Pauly, T; Paus, C; Pellett, D; Penzo, A; Phillips, T J; Piacentino, G; Piedra, J; Pitts, K T; Plager, C; Pompos, A; Pondrom, L; Pope, G; Poukhov, O; Prakoshyn, F; Pratt, T; Pronko, A; Proudfoot, J; Ptohos, F; Punzi, G; Rademacker, J; Rakitine, A; Rappoccio, S; Ratnikov, F; Ray, H; Reichold, A; Reisert, B; Rekovic, V; Renton, P; Rescigno, M; Rimondi, F; Rinnert, K; Ristori, L; Robertson, W J; Robson, A; Rodrigo, T; Rolli, S; Rosenson, L; Roser, R; Rossin, R; Rott, C; Russ, J; Ruiz, A; Ryan, D; Saarikko, H; Safonov, A; St Denis, R; Sakumoto, W K; Salamanna, G; Saltzberg, D; Sanchez, C; Sansoni, A; Santi, L; Sarkar, S; Sato, K; Savard, P; Savoy-Navarro, A; Schemitz, P; Schlabach, P; Schmidt, E E; Schmidt, M P; Schmitt, M; Scodellaro, L; Scribano, A; Scuri, F; Sedov, A; Seidel, S; Seiya, Y; Semeria, F; Sexton-Kennedy, L; Sfiligoi, I; Shapiro, M D; Shears, T; Shepard, P F; Shimojima, M; Shochet, M; Shon, Y; Shreyber, I; Sidoti, A; Siegrist, J; Siket, M; Sill, A; Sinervo, P; Sisakyan, A; Skiba, A; Slaughter, A J; Sliwa, K; Smirnov, D; Smith, J R; Snider, F D; Snihur, R; Somalwar, S V; Spalding, J; Spezziga, M; Spiegel, L; Spinella, F; Spiropulu, M; Squillacioti, P; Stadie, H; Stefanini, A; Stelzer, B; Stelzer-Chilton, O; Strologas, J; Stuart, D; Sukhanov, A; Sumorok, K; Sun, H; Suzuki, T; Taffard, A; Tafirout, R; Takach, S F; Takano, H; Takashima, R; Takeuchi, Y; Takikawa, K; Tanaka, M; Tanaka, R; Tanimoto, N; Tapprogge, S; Tecchio, M; Teng, P K; Terashi, K; Tesarek, R J; Tether, S; Thom, J; Thompson, A S; Thomson, E; Tipton, P; Tiwari, V; Tkaczyk, S; Toback, D; Tollefson, K; Tomura, T; Tonelli, D; Tönnesmann, M; Torre, S; Torretta, D; Trischuk, W; Tseng, J; Tsuchiya, R; Tsuno, S; Tsybychev, D; Turini, N; Turner, M; Ukegawa, F; Unverhau, T; Uozumi, S; Usynin, D; Vacavant, L; Vaiciulis, A; Varganov, A; Vataga, E; Vejcik, S; Velev, G; Veramendi, G; Vickey, T; Vidal, R; Vila, I; Vilar, R; Volobouev, I; von der Mey, M; Wagner, R G; Wagner, R L; Wagner, W; Wallny, R; Walter, T; Yamashita, T; Yamamoto, K; Wan, Z; Wang, M J; Wang, S M; Warburton, A; Ward, B; Waschke, S; Waters, D; Watts, T; Weber, M; Wester, W C; Whitehouse, B; Wicklund, A B; Wicklund, E; Williams, H H; Wilson, P; Winer, B L; Wittich, P; Wolbers, S; Wolter, M; Worcester, M; Worm, S; Wright, T; Wu, X; Würthwein, F; Wyatt, A; Yagil, A; Yang, U K; Yao, W; Yeh, G P; Yi, K; Yoh, J; Yoon, P; Yorita, K; Yoshida, T; Yu, I; Yu, S; Yu, Z; Yun, J C; Zanello, L; Zanetti, A; Zaw, I; Zetti, F; Zhou, J; Zsenei, A; Zucchelli, S

    2005-03-11

    We report the first measurements of inclusive W and Z cross sections times leptonic branching ratios for pp collisions at square root[s]=1.96 TeV, based on their decays to electrons and muons. The data correspond to an integrated luminosity of 72 pb(-1) recorded with the CDF detector at the Fermilab Tevatron. We test e-mu universality in W decays, and we measure the ratio of leptonic W and Z rates from which the leptonic branching fraction B(W-->lnu) can be extracted as well as an indirect value for the total width of the W and the Cabibbo-Kobayashi-Maskawa matrix element, |V(cs)|.

  5. Using Drell-Yan to probe the underlying event in Run II at Collider Detector at Fermilab (CDF)

    SciTech Connect

    Kar, Deepak

    2008-12-01

    We study the behavior of charged particles produced in association with Drell-Yan lepton-pairs in the region of the Z-boson in proton-antiproton collisions at 1.96 TeV. We use the direction of the Z-boson in each event to define 'toward', 'away', and 'transverse' regions. For Drell-Yan production (excluding the leptons) both the 'toward' and 'transverse' regions are very sensitive to the 'underlying event', which is defined as everything except the two hard scattered components. The data are corrected to the particle level and are then compared with several PYTHIA models (with multiple parton interactions) and HERWIG (without multiple parton interactions) at the particle level (i.e. generator level). The data are also compared with a previous analysis on the behavior of the 'underlying event' in high transverse momentum jet production. The goal is to produce data that can be used by the theorists to tune and improve the QCD Monte-Carlo models of the 'underlying event' that are used to simulate hadron-hadron collisions.

  6. Effective leg stiffness in running.

    PubMed

    Blum, Yvonne; Lipfert, Susanne W; Seyfarth, Andre

    2009-10-16

    Leg stiffness is a common parameter used to characterize leg function during bouncing gaits, like running and hopping. In the literature, different methods to approximate leg stiffness based on kinetic and kinematic parameters are described. A challenging point in estimating leg stiffness is the definition of leg compression during contact. In this paper four methods (methods A-D) based on ground reaction forces (GRF) and one method (method E) relying on temporal parameters are described. Leg stiffness calculated by these five methods is compared with running patterns, predicted by the spring mass model. The best and simplest approximation of leg stiffness is method E. It requires only easily accessible parameters (contact time, flight time, resting leg length, body mass and the leg's touch down angle). Method D is of similar quality but additionally requires the time-dependent progression of the GRF. The other three methods show clear differences from the model predictions by over- or underestimating leg stiffness, especially at slow speeds. Leg stiffness is derived from a conceptual model of legged locomotion and does not exist without this model. Therefore, it is important to prove which experimental method is suited best for approximating the stiffness in a specific task. This will help to interpret the predictions of the conceptual model in comparison with experimental data.

  7. HVM capabilities of CPE run-to-run overlay control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Subramany, Lokesh; Chung, Woong Jae; Gutjahr, Karsten; Garcia-Medina, Miguel; Sparka, Christian; Yap, Lipkong; Demirer, Onur; Karur-Shanmugam, Ramkumar; Riggs, Brent; Ramanathan, Vidya; Robinson, John C.; Pierson, Bill

    2015-03-01

    With the introduction of N2x and N1x process nodes, leading-edge factories are facing challenging demands of shrinking design margins. Previously un-corrected high-order signatures, and un-compensated temporal changes of high-order signatures, carry an important potential for improvement of on-product overlay (OPO). Until recently, static corrections per exposure (CPE), applied separately from the main APC correction, have been the industry's standard for critical layers [1], [2]. This static correction is setup once per device and layer and then updated periodically or when a machine change point generates a new overlay signature. This is a non-ideal setup for two reasons. First, any drift or sudden shift in tool signature between two CPE update periods can cause worse OPO and a higher rework rate, or, even worse, lead to yield loss at end of line. Second, these corrections are made from full map measurements that can be in excess of 1,000 measurements per wafer [3]. Advanced overlay control algorithms utilizing Run-to-Run (R2R) CPE can be used to reduce the overlay signatures on product in High Volume Manufacturing (HVM) environments. In this paper, we demonstrate the results of a R2R CPE control scheme in HVM. The authors show an improvement up to 20% OPO Mean+3Sigma values on several critical immersion layers at the 28nm and 14 nm technology nodes, and a reduction of out-of-spec residual points per wafer (validated on full map). These results are attained by closely tracking process tool signature changes by means of APC, and with an affordable metrology load which is significantly smaller than full wafer measurements.

  8. Prospects for very-high-gradient linac-colliders

    SciTech Connect

    Wilson, P.B.

    1981-02-01

    The energy realistically attainable by an electron-positron storage ring is limited by the RF voltage and power requirements imposed by synchrotron radiation to about 100 GeV. To reach energies of 300 x 300 GeV and higher in a colliding beam machine of reasonable dimensions, we must look to the linac-collider operating at an energy gradient on the order of 100 MV/m. Proper choice of an RF structure or such a collider can minimize the total RF power requirement and the effects of longitudinal and transverse single-bunch beam loading. For an operating frequency in the range 4 to 6 GHz, the total RF power requirement for a 300 x 300 GeV collider with a luminosity of 10/sup 32/ cm/sup -2/s/sup -1/ accelerating 10/sup 11/ particles per bunch is on the order of 50 MW. To drive this collider, RF power sources are needed having a peak output power in the range 1-2 GW. Possibilities for attaining these peak power levels by direct generation and by energy storage and fast switching are discussed.

  9. THE RHIC INJECTOR ACCELERATORS CONFIGURATIONS, AND PERFORMANCE FOR THE RHIC 2003 AU - D PHYSICS RUN.

    SciTech Connect

    Ahrens, L; Benjamin, J; Blaskiewicz, M; Brennan, J M; Brown, K A; Carlson, K A; Delong, J; D'Ottavio, T; Frak, B; Gardner, C J; Glenn, J W; Harvey, M; Hayes, T; Hseuh, H- C; Ingrassia, P; Lowenstein, D; Mackay, W; Marr, G; Morris, J; Roser, T; Satogata, T; Smith, G; Smith, K S; Steski, D; Tsoupas, N; Thieberger, P; Zeno, K; Zhang, S Y

    2003-05-12

    The RHIC 2003 Physics Run [1] required collisions between gold ions and deuterons. The injector necessarily had to deliver adequate quality (transverse and longitudinal emittance) and quantity of both species. For gold this was a continuing evolution from past work [2]. For deuterons it was new territory. For the filling of the RHIC the injector not only had to deliver quality beams but also had to switch between these species quickly. This paper details the collider requirements and our success in meeting these. Some details of the configurations employed are given.

  10. SETUP AND PERFORMANCE OF THE RHIC INJECTOR ACCELERATORS FOR THE 2007 RUN WITH GOLD IONS

    SciTech Connect

    GARDNER,C.; AHRENS, L.; ALESSI, J.; BENJAMIN, J.; BLASKIEWICZ, M.; ET AL.

    2007-06-25

    Gold ions for the 2007 run of the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) at Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) are accelerated in the Tandem, Booster and AGS prior to injection into RHIC. The setup and performance of this chain of accelerators is reviewed with a focus on improvements in the quality of beam delivered to RHIC. In particular, more uniform stripping foils between Booster and AGS7 and a new bunch merging scheme in AGS have provided beam bunches with reduced longitudinal emittance for RHIC.

  11. Ventilatory Threshold, Running Economy and Distance Running Performance of Trained Athletes.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Powers, Scott K.; And Others

    1983-01-01

    In an attempt to identify physiological factors that account for success in distance running, researchers evaluated relationships among ventilatory threshold, running economy, and distance running performance. Subjects were trained male runners with similar maximal aerobic power. (Authors/PP)

  12. Is Running Bad for Your Knees?

    MedlinePlus

    ... https://medlineplus.gov/news/fullstory_162903.html Is Running Bad for Your Knees? Study suggests it may ... THURSDAY, Jan. 5, 2017 (HealthDay News) -- Everybody believes running can leave you sore and swollen, right? Well, ...

  13. Running Parallel Discrete Event Simulators on Sierra

    SciTech Connect

    Barnes, P. D.; Jefferson, D. R.

    2015-12-03

    In this proposal we consider porting the ROSS/Charm++ simulator and the discrete event models that run under its control so that they run on the Sierra architecture and make efficient use of the Volta GPUs.

  14. Running as an Adjunct to Psychotherapy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Leer, Frederic

    1980-01-01

    Physical benefits of running have been highly publicized. Explores the equally valuable psychological benefits to be derived from running and examines how mastering a physical skill can be generalized to mastery in other areas of life. (Author)

  15. Projects for ultra-high-energy circular colliders at CERN

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bogomyagkov, A. V.; Koop, I. A.; Levichev, E. B.; Piminov, P. A.; Sinyatkin, S. V.; Shatilov, D. N.; Benedict, M.; Oide, K.; Zimmermann, F.

    2016-12-01

    Within the Future Circular Collider (FCC) design study launched at CERN in 2014, it is envisaged to construct hadron (FCC-hh) and lepton (FCC-ee) ultra-high-energy machines aimed to replace the LHC upon the conclusion of its research program. The Budker Institute of Nuclear Physics is actively involved in the development of the FCC-ee electron-positron collider. The Crab Waist (CR) scheme of the collision region that has been proposed by INP and will be implemented at FCC-ee is expected to provide high luminosity over a broad energy range. The status and development of the FCC project are described, and its parameters and limitations are discussed for the lepton collider in particular.

  16. Update on the MEIC electron collider ring design

    SciTech Connect

    Lin, Fangei; Derbenev, Yaroslav S.; Harwood, Leigh; Hutton, Andrew; Morozov, Vasiliy; Pilat, Fulvia; Zhang, Yuhong; Cai, Y.; Nosochkov, Y. M.; Sullivan, Michael; Wang, M.-H; Wienands, Uli

    2015-09-01

    The electron collider ring of the Medium-energy Electron-Ion Collider (MEIC) at Jefferson Lab is designed to accumulate and store a high-current polarized electron beam for collisions with an ion beam. We consider a design of the electron collider ring based on reusing PEP-II components, such as magnets, power supplies, vacuum system, etc. This has the potential to significantly reduce the cost and engineering effort needed to bring the project to fruition. This paper reports on an electron ring optics design considering the balance of PEP-II hardware parameters (such as dipole sagitta, magnet field strengths and acceptable synchrotron radiation power) and electron beam quality in terms of equilibrium emittances.

  17. Update on the MEIC electron collider ring design

    SciTech Connect

    Lin, F.; Derbenev, Ya. S.; Harwood, L.; Hutton, A.; Morozov, V. S.; Pilat, F.; Zhang, Y.; Cai, Y.; Nosochkov, Y. M.; Sullivan, M.; Wang, M-H; Wienands, U.

    2015-07-14

    The electron collider ring of the Medium-energy Electron-Ion Collider (MEIC) at Jefferson Lab is designed to accumulate and store a high-current polarized electron beam for collisions with an ion beam. We consider a design of the electron collider ring based on reusing PEPII components, such as magnets, power supplies, vacuum system, etc. This has the potential to significantly reduce the cost and engineering effort needed to bring the project to fruition. This paper reports on an electron ring optics design considering the balance of PEP-II hardware parameters (such as dipole sagitta, magnet field strengths and acceptable synchrotron radiation power) and electron beam quality in terms of equilibrium emittances.

  18. Symmetric Achromatic Low-Beta Collider Interaction Region Design Concept

    SciTech Connect

    Morozov, Vasiliy S.; Derbenev, Yaroslav S.; Lin, Fanglei; Johnson, Rolland P.

    2013-01-01

    We present a new symmetry-based concept for an achromatic low-beta collider interaction region design. A specially-designed symmetric Chromaticity Compensation Block (CCB) induces an angle spread in the passing beam such that it cancels the chromatic kick of the final focusing quadrupoles. Two such CCB?s placed symmetrically around an interaction point allow simultaneous compensation of the 1st-order chromaticities and chromatic beam smear at the IP without inducing significant 2nd-order aberrations. We first develop an analytic description of this approach and explicitly formulate 2nd-order aberration compensation conditions at the interaction point. The concept is next applied to develop an interaction region design for the ion collider ring of an electron-ion collider. We numerically evaluate performance of the design in terms of momentum acceptance and dynamic aperture. The advantages of the new concept are illustrated by comparing it to the conventional distributed-sextupole chromaticity compensation scheme.

  19. Massive Stars in Colliding Wind Systems: the GLAST Perspective

    SciTech Connect

    Reimer, Anita; Reimer, Olaf; /Stanford U., HEPL /KIPAC, Menlo Park

    2011-11-29

    Colliding winds of massive stars in binary systems are considered as candidate sites of high-energy non-thermal photon emission. They are already among the suggested counterparts for a few individual unidentified EGRET sources, but may constitute a detectable source population for the GLAST observatory. The present work investigates such population study of massive colliding wind systems at high-energy gamma-rays. Based on the recent detailed model (Reimer et al. 2006) for non-thermal photon production in prime candidate systems, we unveil the expected characteristics of this source class in the observables accessible at LAT energies. Combining the broadband emission model with the presently cataloged distribution of such systems and their individual parameters allows us to conclude on the expected maximum number of LAT-detections among massive stars in colliding wind binary systems.

  20. The magnet system of the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC)

    SciTech Connect

    Greene, A.; Anerella, M.; Cozzolino, J.

    1995-07-01

    The Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider now under construction at Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) is a colliding ring accelerator to be completed in 1999. Through collisions of heavy ions it is hoped to observe the creation of matter at extremely high temperatures and densities, similar to what may have occurred in the original ``Big Bang.`` The collider rings will consist of 1740 superconducting magnet elements. Some of elements are being manufactured by industrial partners (Northrop Grumman and Everson Electric). Others are being constructed or assembled at BNL. A description is given of the magnet designs, the plan for manufacturing and test results. In the manufacturing of the magnets, emphasis has been placed on uniformity of their performance and on quality. Results so far indicate that this emphasis has been very successful.