Science.gov

Sample records for 1999-04 tesla fel-report

  1. Edison vs. Tesla

    ScienceCinema

    Hogan, Kathleen; Wallace, Hal; Ivestor, Rob

    2016-07-12

    As Edison vs. Tesla week heats up at the Energy Department, we are exploring the rivalry between Thomas Edison and Nikola Tesla and how their work is still impacting the way we use energy today. Whether you're on Team Tesla or Team Edison, both inventors were key players in creating things like batteries, power plants and wireless technologies -- all innovations we still use today. And as we move toward a clean energy future, energy efficient lighting, like LED bulbs, and more efficient electric motors not only help us save money on electricity costs but help combat climate change. For this, Tesla and Edison both deserve our recognition.

  2. Edison vs. Tesla

    SciTech Connect

    Hogan, Kathleen; Wallace, Hal; Ivestor, Rob

    2013-11-20

    As Edison vs. Tesla week heats up at the Energy Department, we are exploring the rivalry between Thomas Edison and Nikola Tesla and how their work is still impacting the way we use energy today. Whether you're on Team Tesla or Team Edison, both inventors were key players in creating things like batteries, power plants and wireless technologies -- all innovations we still use today. And as we move toward a clean energy future, energy efficient lighting, like LED bulbs, and more efficient electric motors not only help us save money on electricity costs but help combat climate change. For this, Tesla and Edison both deserve our recognition.

  3. TESLA Coil Research

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1992-05-01

    Sloan’s work was actually predated by the earlier work of Nikola Tesla . Sloan mistakenly identified " Tesla Coils" as lumped tuned resonators. The...Lefvw WsnJ L REPORT o]i 3. REPRT TYPE AND OATES COVEIRD May 1992 Special/Aug 1992 - May 1992 Z TITLE AND 5U§nUT S. FUNDING NUMIHRS Tesla Coil Research...STATEMENT 1211. ’ISTRIUUTION COOD Approved for public release; dis~ribution is unlimited 13. ABSTRACT (Masrmum 200 worw) High repetition rate Tesla

  4. Photon collider at TESLA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Telnov, Valery

    2001-10-01

    High energy photon colliders ( γγ, γe) based on backward Compton scattering of laser light is a very natural addition to e +e - linear colliders. In this report, we consider this option for the TESLA project. Recent study has shown that the horizontal emittance in the TESLA damping ring can be further decreased by a factor of four. In this case, the γγ luminosity in the high energy part of spectrum can reach about (1/3) Le +e -. Typical cross-sections of interesting processes in γγ collisions are higher than those in e +e - collisions by about one order of magnitude, so the number of events in γγ collisions will be more than that in e +e - collisions. Photon colliders can, certainly, give additional information and they are the best for the study of many phenomena. The main question is now the technical feasibility. The key new element in photon colliders is a very powerful laser system. An external optical cavity is a promising approach for the TESLA project. A free electron laser is another option. However, a more straightforward solution is "an optical storage ring (optical trap)" with a diode pumped solid state laser injector which is today technically feasible. This paper briefly reviews the status of a photon collider based on the linear collider TESLA, its possible parameters and existing problems.

  5. TESLA & ILC Cryomodules

    SciTech Connect

    Peterson, T. J.; Weisend, II, J. G.

    2016-01-01

    The TESLA collaboration developed a unique variant of SRF cryomodule designs, the chief feature being use of the large, low pressure helium vapor return pipe as the structural support backbone of the cryomodule. Additional innovative features include all cryogenic piping within the cryomodule (no parallel external cryogenic transfer line), long strings of RF cavities within a single cryomodule, and cryomodules connected in series. Several projects, including FLASH and XFEL at DESY, LCLS-II at SLAC, and the ILC technical design have adopted this general design concept. Advantages include saving space by eliminating the external transfer line, relatively tight packing of RF cavities along the beamline due to fewer warm-cold transitions, and potentially lower costs. However, a primary disadvantage is the relative lack of independence for warm-up, replacement, and cool-down of individual cryomodules.

  6. [70 years of Nikola Tesla studies].

    PubMed

    Juznic, Stanislav

    2013-01-01

    Nikola Tesla's studies of chemistry are described including his not very scholarly affair in Maribor. After almost a century and half of hypothesis at least usable scenario of Tesla's life and "work" in Maribor is provided. The chemistry achievements of Tesla's most influential professors Martin Sekulić and Tesla's Graz professors are put into the limelight. The fact that Tesla in Graz studied on the technological chemistry Faculty of Polytechnic is focused.

  7. Nikola Tesla: the Moon's rotation.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tomić, A.; Jovanović, B. S.

    1993-09-01

    The review of three articles by N. Tesla, published in the year 1919 in the journal "Electrical experimenter" is given, with special reference to the astronomical contents and to circumstances in which they appeared.

  8. [Nikola Tesla in medicine, too].

    PubMed

    Hanzek, Branko; Jakobović, Zvonimir

    2007-12-01

    Using primary and secondary sources we have shown in this paper the influence of Nikola Tesla's work on the field of medicine. The description of his experiments conduced within secondary-school education programs aimed to present the popularization of his work in Croatia. Although Tesla was dedicated primarily to physics and was not directly involved in biomedical research, his work significantly contributed to paving the way of medical physics particularly radiology and high-frequency electrotherapy.

  9. Nikola Tesla Educational Opportunity School.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Design Cost Data, 2001

    2001-01-01

    Describes the architectural design, costs, general description, and square footage data for the Nikola Tesla Educational Opportunity School in Colorado Springs, Colorado. A floor plan and photos are included along with a list of manufacturers and suppliers used for the project. (GR)

  10. Tesla - A Flash of a Genius

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Teodorani, M.

    2005-10-01

    This book, which is entirely dedicated to the inventions of scientist Nikola Tesla, is divided into three parts: a) all the most important innovative technological creations from the alternate current to the death ray, Tesla research in fundamental physics with a particular attention to the concept of "ether", ball lightning physics; b) the life and the bright mind of Nikola Tesla and the reasons why some of his most recent findings were not accepted by the establishment; c) a critical discussion of the most important work by Tesla followers.

  11. [Nikola Tesla: flashes of inspiration].

    PubMed

    Villarejo-Galende, Albero; Herrero-San Martín, Alejandro

    2013-01-16

    Nikola Tesla (1856-1943) was one of the greatest inventors in history and a key player in the revolution that led to the large-scale use of electricity. He also made important contributions to such diverse fields as x-rays, remote control, radio, the theory of consciousness or electromagnetism. In his honour, the international unit of magnetic induction was named after him. Yet, his fame is scarce in comparison with that of other inventors of the time, such as Edison, with whom he had several heated arguments. He was a rather odd, reserved person who lived for his inventions, the ideas for which came to him in moments of inspiration. In his autobiography he relates these flashes with a number of neuropsychiatric manifestations, which can be seen to include migraine auras, synaesthesiae, obsessions and compulsions.

  12. Conduction-coupled Tesla transformer.

    PubMed

    Reed, J L

    2015-03-01

    A proof-of-principle Tesla transformer circuit is introduced. The new transformer exhibits the high voltage-high power output signal of shock-excited transformers. The circuit, with specification of proper circuit element values, is capable of obtaining extreme oscillatory voltages. The primary and secondary portions of the circuit communicate solely by conduction. The destructive arcing between the primary and secondary inductors in electromagnetically coupled transformers is ubiquitous. Flashover is eliminated in the new transformer as the high-voltage inductors do not interpenetrate and so do not possess an annular volume of electric field. The inductors are remote from one another. The high voltage secondary inductor is isolated in space, except for a base feed conductor, and obtains earth by its self-capacitance to the surroundings. Governing equations, for the ideal case of no damping, are developed from first principles. Experimental, theoretical, and circuit simulator data are presented for the new transformer. Commercial high-temperature superconductors are discussed as a means to eliminate the counter-intuitive damping due to small primary inductances in both the electromagnetic-coupled and new conduction-coupled transformers.

  13. Science up to 100 tesla

    SciTech Connect

    Campbell, L.J.

    1995-05-01

    100 Tesla is the highest attainable field that can be held for milli-sec in a non-destructive magnet. The strongest steels turn soft under stresses of 4GPa, which is the magnetic pressure of 100 T. Until there is a breakthrough in materials, magnets having all the low temperature and high pressure trimmings will be limited to about 100 T. Within the field range 1-100 T far more resources are now devoted to producing the highest possible continuous fields (40+5 T) than to producing longer pulsed fields above 50 T. This illustrates that the utility of the field can be more important than the strength of the field to researchers in condensed matter. Discoveries are typically made in new territory, but this can be new combinations of pressure, temperature, and magnetic field, or new probes and new materials. If any activity has kept up with the proliferation of new experiments and new facilities in high magnetic field research it is the listing of experiments that could and should be done in high fields. Part of the reason for the vitality of high field research is that high fields provide a generic environment. Compared to particle accelerators and plasma machines a high field laboratory is a setting for generic science, like synchrotron light sources or neutron scattering centers. Although the latter two installations probes states, while a magnetic field creates a state. Because it is unrealistic to try to list all the science opportunities at high fields, the author list sources for lists in the public domain and gives a few examples.

  14. Accelerator aspects of photon colliders at TESLA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walker, Nicholas J.

    2001-10-01

    The TESLA linear collider is being primarily designed as a 500- 800 GeV centre of mass e +e - linear collider. However, a second interaction region is being incorporated into the design with a crossing angle of 32 mrad, which is suitable for use as a γγ collider. In this paper we will review those aspects of the current machine design which are critical to the operation of TESLA as a photon collider, paying particular attention to the preservation of small horizontal emittances, and—in the absence of beamstrahlung—limits on reduced horizontal beam cross-section at the interaction point.

  15. Report on first TESLA window assembly test

    SciTech Connect

    Sun, D.; Koepke, K.

    1993-10-01

    RF input couplers for the superconducting cavities of the TESLA are under development at DESY and Fermilab. The coaxial part of the Fermilab input coupler has been tested up to 1.7 MW at Fermilab using 805 MHz rf power source. The test results, procedure and test setup are described.

  16. Nikola Tesla, the Ether and his Telautomaton

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Milar, Kendall

    2014-03-01

    In the nineteenth century physicists' understanding of the ether changed dramatically. New developments in thermodynamics, energy physics, and electricity and magnetism dictated new properties of the ether. These have traditionally been examined from the perspective of the scientists re-conceptualizing the ether. However Nikola Tesla, a prolific inventor and writer, presents a different picture of nineteenth century physics. Alongside the displays that showcased his inventions he presented alternative interpretations of physical, physiological and even psychical research. This is particularly evident in his telautomaton, a radio remote controlled boat. This invention and Tesla's descriptions of it showcase some of his novel interpretations of physical theories. He offered a perspective on nineteenth century physics that focused on practical application instead of experiment. Sometimes the understanding of physical theories that Tesla reached was counterproductive to his own inventive work; other times he offered new insights. Tesla's utilitarian interpretation of physical theories suggests a more scientifically curious and invested inventor than previously described and a connection between the scientific and inventive communities.

  17. Design and scaling of microscale Tesla turbines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krishnan, Vedavalli G.; Romanin, Vince; Carey, Van P.; Maharbiz, Michel M.

    2013-12-01

    We report on the scaling properties and loss mechanisms of Tesla turbines and provide design recommendations for scaling such turbines to the millimeter scale. Specifically, we provide design, fabrication and experimental data for a low-pressure head hydro Tesla micro-turbine. We derive the analytical turbine performance for incompressible flow and then develop a more detailed model that predicts experimental performance by including a variety of loss mechanisms. We report the correlation between them and the experimental results. Turbines with 1 cm rotors, 36% peak efficiency (at 2 cm3 s-1 flow) and 45 mW unloaded peak power (at 12 cm3 s-1 flow) are demonstrated. We analyze the causes for head loss and shaft power loss and derive constraints on turbine design. We then analyze the effect of scaling down on turbine efficiency, power density and rotor revolutions/min. Based on the analysis, we make recommendations for the design of ˜1 mm microscale Tesla turbines.

  18. 76 FR 60124 - Tesla Motors, Inc.; Grant of Petition for Temporary Exemption From the Electronic Stability...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-09-28

    ... TRANSPORTATION National Highway Traffic Safety Administration Tesla Motors, Inc.; Grant of Petition for Temporary... Stability Control Systems. SUMMARY: This notice grants the petition of Tesla Motors, Inc. (Tesla) for the....S.C. 30113 and the procedures in 49 CFR Part 555, Tesla Motors, Inc. (Tesla) submitted a...

  19. Jakob Narkiewicz-Jodko-Tesla ``Predecessor''

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Samuilov, Vladimir; Kiselev, Vladimir

    2014-03-01

    Prof. Jakob Narkiewicz-Jodko (1947-1905) is a bright figure in the history of science of the XIXth century. His major discoveries are: Electrography - the method of the visualization of electric discharge from the bodies due to the application of high strength and high frequency electric fields, and one of the first observations of the propagation of the electromagnetic waives and information transfer over the distances. We review Prof. Jakob Narkiewicz-Jodko's research results and explain our point why we consider him as the predecessor of Nikola Tesla.

  20. Neuromagnetic effects of pico-Tesla stimulation.

    PubMed

    Troebinger, Luzia; Anninos, Photios; Barnes, Gareth

    2015-09-01

    We used a double-blind experimental design to look for an effect of pico-Tesla magnetic stimulation in healthy subjects. Pico-Tesla stimulation is thought to increase the dominant frequency of 2-7 Hz oscillations in the human brain. We used magnetoencephalography to measure resting state brain activity. Each subject had two separate recording sessions consisting of three runs in between which they were given real or sham pT stimulation. We then tried to predict the real and sham stimulation sessions based on changes in the mean peak frequency in the 2-7 Hz band. Our predictions for these individual runs were 8 out of 14 at chance level (p = 0.39). After unblinding, we found no significant effect (p = 0.11) of an increase in the frequency range (2-7 Hz) across the subject group. Finally, we performed a Bayesian model comparison between the effect size predicted from previous clinical studies and a null model. Even though this study had a sensitivity advantage of at least one order of magnitude over previous work, we found the null model to be significantly (2000 times) more likely.

  1. Quantitative techniques for musculoskeletal MRI at 7 Tesla.

    PubMed

    Bangerter, Neal K; Taylor, Meredith D; Tarbox, Grayson J; Palmer, Antony J; Park, Daniel J

    2016-12-01

    Whole-body 7 Tesla MRI scanners have been approved solely for research since they appeared on the market over 10 years ago, but may soon be approved for selected clinical neurological and musculoskeletal applications in both the EU and the United States. There has been considerable research work on musculoskeletal applications at 7 Tesla over the past decade, including techniques for ultra-high resolution morphological imaging, 3D T2 and T2* mapping, ultra-short TE applications, diffusion tensor imaging of cartilage, and several techniques for assessing proteoglycan content in cartilage. Most of this work has been done in the knee or other extremities, due to technical difficulties associated with scanning areas such as the hip and torso at 7 Tesla. In this manuscript, we first provide some technical context for 7 Tesla imaging, including challenges and potential advantages. We then review the major quantitative MRI techniques being applied to musculoskeletal applications on 7 Tesla whole-body systems.

  2. Nikola Tesla: the man behind the magnetic field unit.

    PubMed

    Roguin, Ariel

    2004-03-01

    The magnetic field strength of both the magnet and gradient coils used in MR imaging equipment is measured in Tesla units, which are named for Nikola Tesla. This article presents the life and achievements of this Serbian-American inventor and researcher who discovered the rotating magnetic field, the basis of most alternating-current machinery. Nikola Tesla had 700 patents in the United States and Europe that covered every aspect of science and technology. Tesla's discoveries include the Tesla coil, AC electrical conduction, improved lighting, newer forms of turbine engines, robotics, fluorescent light, wireless transmission of electrical energy, radio, remote control, discovery of cosmic radio waves, and the use of the ionosphere for scientific purposes. He was a genius whose discoveries had a pivotal role in advancing us into the modern era.

  3. Nikola Tesla and the wireless transmission of energy

    SciTech Connect

    Marincic, A.S.

    1982-10-01

    Nikola Tesla, the inventor of the polyphase-current system, is best known for his contribution regarding induction and other types of alternating-current machines. His patents and his published and unpublished notes about wireless transmission of energy are less known and, if known to some extent, they are usually wrongly interpreted. For many years the author studied Tesla's works on wireless transmission of energy and that what is given here is a review of relevant documents, unpublished notes and letters from the archives of the Nikola Tesla Museum in Belgrade. An attempt is made to explain Tesla's physical model on the basis of which he concluded that the wireless transmission of energy on a global scale is possible. His model is critically examined in view of the present day knowledge of extremely low frequency propagation phenomena.

  4. Progress toward 10 tesla accelerator dipoles

    SciTech Connect

    Hassenzahl, W.; Gilbert, G.; Taylor, C.; Meuser, R.

    1983-08-01

    A 9.1 T central field has been achieved in a Nb-Ti dipole operating in pressurized helium II at 1.8 K. Three different Nb-Ti dipoles, without iron yokes, have achieved central fields of 8.0, 8.6, and 9.1 T - all short sample performance for the conductors at 1.8 K. In helium I, at 4.3 K, the maximum central fields are from 1.5 to 2.0 T lower. Ten-tesla magnets have been designed for both Nb-Ti operating at 1.8 K and Nb/sub 3/Sn operating at 4.2 K. They are based on a very small beam aperture, (40 to 45 mm), very high current density in the superconductors (over 1000 A/mm/sup 2/), and a very low ratio of stabilizing copper to superconductor (about 1). Both layer and block designs have been developed that utilize Rutherford Cable. Magnet cycling from 0 to 6 T has been carried out for field change rate up to 1 T/s; the cyclic heating at 1 T/s is 36 W per meter. At a more representative rate of 0.2 T/s the heating rate is only 2 W/m. Progress in the program to use Nb/sub 3/Sn and NbTi superconductor, in 10 T accelerator magnets is also discussed.

  5. Report on the TESLA Engineering Study/Review

    SciTech Connect

    Cornuelle, John C.

    2002-08-30

    In March, 2001, the TESLA Collaboration published its Technical Design Report (TDR, see references and links in Appendix), the first sentence of which stated ''...TESLA (TeV-Energy Superconducting Linear Collider) (will be) a superconducting electron-positron collider of initially 500 GeV total energy, extendable to 800 GeV, and an integrated X-ray laser laboratory.'' The TDR included cost and manpower estimates for a 500 GeV e{sup +}e{sup -} collider (250 on 250 GeV) based on superconducting RF cavity technology. This was submitted as a proposal to the German government. The government asked the German Science Council to evaluate this proposal. The recommendation from this body is anticipated to be available by November 2002. The government has indicated that it will react on this recommendation by mid-2003. In June 2001, Steve Holmes, Fermilab's Associate Director for Accelerators, commissioned Helen Edwards and Peter Garbincius to organize a study of the TESLA Technical Design Report and the associated cost and manpower estimates. Since the elements and methodology used in producing the TESLA cost estimate were somewhat different from those used in preparing similar estimates for projects within the U.S., it is important to understand the similarities, differences, and equivalences between the TESLA estimate and U.S. cost estimates. In particular, the project cost estimate includes only purchased equipment, materials, and services, but not manpower from DESY or other TESLA collaborating institutions, which is listed separately. It does not include the R&D on the TESLA Test Facility (TTF) nor the costs of preparing the TDR nor the costs of performing the conceptual studies so far. The manpower for the pre-operations commissioning program (up to beam) is included in the estimate, but not the electrical power or liquid Nitrogen (for initial cooldown of the cryogenics plant). There is no inclusion of any contingency or management reserve. If the U.S. were to become

  6. Quantitative techniques for musculoskeletal MRI at 7 Tesla

    PubMed Central

    Taylor, Meredith D.; Tarbox, Grayson J.; Palmer, Antony J.; Park, Daniel J.

    2016-01-01

    Whole-body 7 Tesla MRI scanners have been approved solely for research since they appeared on the market over 10 years ago, but may soon be approved for selected clinical neurological and musculoskeletal applications in both the EU and the United States. There has been considerable research work on musculoskeletal applications at 7 Tesla over the past decade, including techniques for ultra-high resolution morphological imaging, 3D T2 and T2* mapping, ultra-short TE applications, diffusion tensor imaging of cartilage, and several techniques for assessing proteoglycan content in cartilage. Most of this work has been done in the knee or other extremities, due to technical difficulties associated with scanning areas such as the hip and torso at 7 Tesla. In this manuscript, we first provide some technical context for 7 Tesla imaging, including challenges and potential advantages. We then review the major quantitative MRI techniques being applied to musculoskeletal applications on 7 Tesla whole-body systems. PMID:28090448

  7. [Studies of three-dimensional cardiac late gadolinium enhancement MRI at 3.0 Tesla].

    PubMed

    Ishimoto, Takeshi; Ishihara, Masaru; Ikeda, Takayuki; Kawakami, Momoe

    2008-12-20

    Cardiac late Gadolinium enhancement MR imaging has been shown to allow assessment of myocardial viability in patients with ischemic heart disease. The current standard approach is a 3D inversion recovery sequence at 1.5 Tesla. The aims of this study were to evaluate the technique feasibility and clinical utility of MR viability imaging at 3.0 Tesla in patients with myocardial infarction and cardiomyopathy. In phantom and volunteer studies, the inversion time required to suppress the signal of interests and tissues was prolonged at 3.0 Tesla. In the clinical study, the average inversion time to suppress the signal of myocardium at 3.0 Tesla with respect to MR viability imaging at 1.5 Tesla was at 15 min after the administration of contrast agent (304.0+/-29.2 at 3.0 Tesla vs. 283.9+/-20.9 at 1.5 Tesla). The contrast between infarction and viable myocardium was equal at both field strengths (4.06+/-1.30 at 3.0 Tesla vs. 4.42+/-1.85 at 1.5 Tesla). Even at this early stage, MR viability imaging at 3.0 Tesla provides high quality images in patients with myocardial infarction. The inversion time is significantly prolonged at 3.0 Tesla. The contrast between infarction and viable myocardium at 3.0 Tesla are equal to 1.5 Tesla. Further investigation is needed for this technical improvement, for clinical evaluation, and for limitations.

  8. Three-dimensional flow measurements in a tesla turbine rotor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fuchs, Thomas; Schosser, Constantin; Hain, Rainer; Kaehler, Christian

    2015-11-01

    Tesla turbines are fluid mechanical devices converting flow energy into rotation energy by two physical effects: friction and adhesion. The advantages of the tesla turbine are its simple and robust design, as well as its scalability, which makes it suitable for custom power supply solutions, and renewable energy applications. To this day, there is a lack of experimental data to validate theoretical studies, and CFD simulations of these turbines. This work presents a comprehensive analysis of the flow through a tesla turbine rotor gap, with a gap height of only 0.5 mm, by means of three-dimensional Particle Tracking Velocimetry (3D-PTV). For laminar flows, the experimental results match the theory very well, since the measured flow profiles show the predicted second order parabolic shape in radial direction and a fourth order behavior in circumferential direction. In addition to these laminar measurements, turbulent flows at higher mass flow rates were investigated.

  9. Challenges for picoTesla Magnetic-Tunnel-Junction Sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Egelhoff, William; Pong, Philip; McMichael, Robert; Nowak, Edmund; Edelstein, Alan; Burnett, James; Fisher, Greg

    2008-03-01

    The extension of small, inexpensive, low-power, low frequency, ultra-sensitive magnetic sensors to fields between 1 nanoTesla and 1 picoTesla, an area currently dominated by fluxgates, optically-pumped magnetometers, and SQUIDS, would be a paradigm shift for the field of magnetic sensors. The necessary elements for picoTesla MTJ sensors have been identified by modeling the noise characteristics. The results help identify the experimental challenges that exist in the integration of the necessary components of the sensor and illustrate the trade-offs that must be considered. For example, values of the TMR above 100% contribute very little, while lowering the saturation field of the free layer below 10 Oe is essential. These and other insights identify the critical issues than need attention and can guide research into productive directions.

  10. Optic Nerve Assessment Using 7-Tesla Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Arun D.; Platt, Sean M.; Lystad, Lisa; Lowe, Mark; Oh, Sehong; Jones, Stephen E.; Alzahrani, Yahya; Plesec, Thomas

    2016-01-01

    Purpose The purpose of this study was to correlate high-resolution magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and histologic findings in a case of juxtapapillary choroidal melanoma with clinical evidence of optic nerve invasion. Methods With institutional review board approval, an enucleated globe with choroidal melanoma and optic nerve invasion was imaged using a 7-tesla MRI followed by histopathologic evaluation. Results Optical coherence tomography, B-scan ultrasonography, and 1.5-tesla MRI of the orbit (1-mm sections) could not detect optic disc invasion. Ex vivo, 7-tesla MRI detected optic nerve invasion, which correlated with histopathologic features. Conclusions Our case demonstrates the potential to document the existence of optic nerve invasion in the presence of an intraocular tumor, a feature that has a major bearing on decision making, particularly for consideration of enucleation. PMID:27239461

  11. Time Synchronization in Hierarchical TESLA Wireless Sensor Networks

    SciTech Connect

    Jason L. Wright; Milos Manic

    2009-08-01

    Time synchronization and event time correlation are important in wireless sensor networks. In particular, time is used to create a sequence events or time line to answer questions of cause and effect. Time is also used as a basis for determining the freshness of received packets and the validity of cryptographic certificates. This paper presents secure method of time synchronization and event time correlation for TESLA-based hierarchical wireless sensor networks. The method demonstrates that events in a TESLA network can be accurately timestamped by adding only a few pieces of data to the existing protocol.

  12. Paul Drude's Prediction of Nonreciprocal Mutual Inductance for Tesla Transformers

    PubMed Central

    McGuyer, Bart

    2014-01-01

    Inductors, transmission lines, and Tesla transformers have been modeled with lumped-element equivalent circuits for over a century. In a well-known paper from 1904, Paul Drude predicts that the mutual inductance for an unloaded Tesla transformer should be nonreciprocal. This historical curiosity is mostly forgotten today, perhaps because it appears incorrect. However, Drude's prediction is shown to be correct for the conditions treated, demonstrating the importance of constraints in deriving equivalent circuits for distributed systems. The predicted nonreciprocity is not fundamental, but instead is an artifact of the misrepresentation of energy by an equivalent circuit. The application to modern equivalent circuits is discussed. PMID:25542040

  13. 77 FR 60672 - Grant of Authority for Subzone Status; Tesla Motors, Inc., (Electric Passenger Vehicles), Palo...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-10-04

    ... Foreign-Trade Zones Board Grant of Authority for Subzone Status; Tesla Motors, Inc., (Electric Passenger... establish a special-purpose subzone at the electric passenger vehicle manufacturing facilities of Tesla... electric passenger vehicles and related powertrain components at the Tesla Motors, Inc., facilities...

  14. Identifying Needed Technical Standards: The LITA TESLA Committee at Work.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carter, Ruth C.

    1984-01-01

    Efforts of the Technical Standards for Library Automation Committee (TESLA), a division-wide committee of the Library Information and Technology Association (LITA) of the American Library Association, are described. The current status of suggested technical standards and recommended action are detailed. Five sources are given. (Author/EJS)

  15. Functionality of veterinary identification microchips following low- (0.5 tesla) and high-field (3 tesla) magnetic resonance imaging.

    PubMed

    Piesnack, Susann; Frame, Mairi E; Oechtering, Gerhard; Ludewig, Eberhard

    2013-01-01

    The ability to read patient identification microchips relies on the use of radiofrequency pulses. Since radiofrequency pulses also form an integral part of the magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) process, the possibility of loss of microchip function during MRI scanning is of concern. Previous clinical trials have shown microchip function to be unaffected by MR imaging using a field strength of 1 Tesla and 1.5. As veterinary MRI scanners range widely in field strength, this study was devised to determine whether exposure to lower or higher field strengths than 1 Tesla would affect the function of different types of microchip. In a phantom study, a total of 300 International Standards Organisation (ISO)-approved microchips (100 each of three different types: ISO FDX-B 1.4 × 9 mm, ISO FDX-B 2.12 × 12 mm, ISO HDX 3.8 × 23 mm) were tested in a low field (0.5) and a high field scanner (3.0 Tesla). A total of 50 microchips of each type were tested in each scanner. The phantom was composed of a fluid-filled freezer pack onto which a plastic pillow and a cardboard strip with affixed microchips were positioned. Following an MRI scan protocol simulating a head study, all of the microchips were accurately readable. Neither 0.5 nor 3 Tesla imaging affected microchip function in this study.

  16. 76 FR 33402 - Tesla Motors, Inc.; Receipt of Petition for Renewal of Temporary Exemption from the Advanced Air...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-06-08

    ... National Highway Traffic Safety Administration Tesla Motors, Inc.; Receipt of Petition for Renewal of... Part 555, Tesla Motors, Inc., has petitioned the agency for renewal of a temporary exemption from... procedures in 49 CFR Part 555, Tesla Motors, Inc., (Tesla) has submitted a petition asking the agency...

  17. A 10 tesla table-top controlled waveform magnet.

    PubMed

    Roy Choudhury, Aditya N; Venkataraman, V

    2012-04-01

    Controlled waveform magnets (CWMs) are a class of pulsed magnets whose pulse shape with time can be programmed by the user. With a CWM, the user gains control not only over the magnitude of the field but also over its rate of change. In this work we present a table-top CWM, driven by a capacitor bank, capable of producing virtually any user-shaped magnetic field waveform up to 10 tesla. Insulated gate bipolar transistor chips have been paralleled to form the high current switch and paralleled chips of SiC Schottky diodes form the crowbar diode module. Sample controlled waveforms including flat-tops up to 10 tesla and some triangular magnetic field pulses have been successfully generated for 10-20 ms with a ripple <1%.

  18. RHQT Nb3Al 15-Tesla magnet design study

    SciTech Connect

    Yamada, R.; Ambrosio, G.; Barzi, E.; Kashikin, V.; Kikuchi, A.; Novitski, I.; Takeuchi, T.; Wake, M.; Zlobin, A.; /Fermilab /NIMC, Tsukuba /KEK, Tsukuba

    2005-09-01

    Feasibility study of 15-Tesla dipole magnets wound with a new copper stabilized RHQT Nb{sub 3}Al Rutherford cable is presented. A new practical long copper stabilized RHQT Nb{sub 3}Al strand is presented, which is being developed and manufactured at the National Institute of Material Science (NIMS) in Japan. It has achieved a non-copper J{sub c} of 1000A/mm{sup 2} at 15 Tesla at 4.2K, with a copper over non-copper ratio of 1.04, and a filament size less than 50 microns. For this design study a short Rutherford cable with 28 Nb{sub 3}Al strands of 1 mm diameter will be fabricated late this year. The cosine theta magnet cross section is designed using ROXIE, and the stress and strain in the coil is estimated and studied with the characteristics of the Nb{sub 3}Al strand. The advantages and disadvantages of the Nb{sub 3}Al cable are compared with the prevailing Nb{sub 3}Sn cable from the point of view of stress-strain, J{sub c}, and possible degradation of stabilizer due to cabling. The Nb{sub 3}Al coil of the magnet, which will be made by wind and react method, has to be heat treated at 800 degree C for 10 hours. As preparation for the 15 Tesla magnet, a series of tests on strand and Rutherford cables are considered.

  19. Comments on the New Tesla Electromagnetics. Part I. Discrepancies in Present EM Theory,

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1982-01-01

    new "superrelativity" to describe the expanded electromagnetic reality uncovered by Nikola Tesla . (14) "Charge" is assumed to be quantized, in addition...California, 94030, 1980. The present electromagnetics is just a special case of a much more fundamental electromagnetics discovered by Nikola Tesla , just...AD-RI27 574 COMMENTS ON THE NEW TESLA ELECTROMAGNET ICS PART I L/i DISCREPANCIES IN PRESENT EM THEORY(U) BEARDEN (THOMAS E) HUNTSVILLE AL T E BEARDEN

  20. Automated hippocampal subfield segmentation at 7 tesla MRI

    PubMed Central

    Wisse, Laura E.M.; Kuijf, Hugo J.; Honingh, Anita M.; Wang, Hongzhi; Pluta, John B.; Das, Sandhitsu R.; Wolk, David A.; Zwanenburg, Jaco J.M.; Yushkevich, Paul A.; Geerlings, Mirjam I.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose We aimed to evaluate an automated technique to segment hippocampal subfields and the entorhinal cortex (ERC) at 7 tesla MRI. Materials and Methods Cornu Ammonis (CA)1, CA2, CA3, dentate gyrus (DG), subiculum (SUB) and ERC were manually segmented, covering most of the long axis of the hippocampus, on 0.70 mm3 T2-weighted 7 tesla images of twenty-six participants (59±9 years, 46% men). The Automated Segmentation of Hippocampal Subfields (ASHS) approach was applied and evaluated using leave-one-out cross-validation. Results Comparison of automated segmentations with corresponding manual segmentation yielded a Dice similarity coefficient (DSC) of >0.75 for CA1, DG, SUB and ERC; and >0.54 for CA2 and CA3. Intraclass correlation coefficients (ICC) were >0.74 for CA1, DG and SUB; and >0.43 for CA2, CA3 and the ERC. Restricting the comparison of the ERC segmentation to a smaller range along the anterior-posterior axis improved both ICCs (left: 0.71; right: 0.82) and DSCs (left: 0.78; right: 0.77). The accuracy of ASHS vs a manual rater was lower, though only slightly for most subfields, than the intra-rater reliability of an expert manual rater, but was similar or slightly higher than the accuracy of an expert vs. a manual rater with ~170h of training for almost all subfields. Conclusion This work demonstrates the feasibility of using a computational technique to automatically label hippocampal subfields and the ERC at 7 tesla MRI, with a high accuracy for most subfields that is competitive with the labor intensive manual segmentation. The software and atlas are publicly available: http://www.nitrc.org/projects/ashs/. PMID:26846925

  1. Field quality measurements of a 2-Tesla transmission line magnet

    SciTech Connect

    Velev, G.V.; Foster, W.; Kashikhin, V.; Mazur, P.; Oleck, A.; Piekarz, H.; Schlabach, P.; Sylvester, C.; Wake, M.; /KEK, Tsukuba

    2005-09-01

    A prototype 2-Tesla superconducting transmission line magnet for future hadron colliders was designed, built and tested at Fermilab. The 1.5 m long, combined-function gradient-dipole magnet has a vertical pole aperture of 20 mm. To measure the magnetic field quality in such a small magnet aperture, a specialized rotating coil of 15.2 mm diameter, 0.69 m long was fabricated. Using this probe, a program of magnetic field quality measurements was successfully performed. Results of the measurements are presented and discussed.

  2. 77 FR 22383 - Petition for Exemption From the Federal Motor Vehicle Motor Theft Prevention Standard; TESLA

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-04-13

    ... National Highway Traffic Safety Administration Petition for Exemption From the Federal Motor Vehicle Motor... full the petition of Tesla Motors Inc's. (Tesla) for an exemption of the Model S vehicle line in... is likely to be as effective in reducing and deterring motor vehicle theft as compliance with...

  3. Coaxial Coupling Scheme for TESLA/ILC-type Cavities

    SciTech Connect

    J.K. Sekutowicz, P. Kneisel

    2010-05-01

    This paper reports about our efforts to develop a flangeable coaxial coupler for both HOM and fundamental coupling for 9-cell TESLA/ILC-type cavities. The cavities were designed in early 90‘s for pulsed operation with a low duty factor, less than 1 %. The proposed design of the coupler has been done in a way, that the magnetic flux B at the flange connection is minimized and only a field of <5 mT would be present at the accelerating field Eacc of ~ 36 MV/m (B =150 mT in the cavity). Even though we achieved reasonably high Q-values at low field, the cavity/coupler combination was limited in the cw mode to only ~ 7 MV/m, where a thermally initiated degradation occurred. We have improved the cooling conditions by initially drilling radial channels every 30 degrees, then every 15 degrees into the shorting plate. The modified prototype performed well up to 9 MV/m in cw mode. This paper reports about our experiences with the further modified coaxial coupler and about test results in cw and low duty cycle pulsed mode, similar to the TESLA/ILC operation conditions.

  4. 76 FR 60118 - Tesla Motors, Inc. Grant of Petition for Renewal of a Temporary Exemption From the Advanced Air...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-09-28

    ... National Highway Traffic Safety Administration Tesla Motors, Inc. Grant of Petition for Renewal of a... (FMVSS) No. 208, Occupant Crash Protection. SUMMARY: This notice grants the petition of Tesla Motors, Inc. (Tesla) for the renewal of a temporary exemption of its Roadster model from the advanced air...

  5. The NHMFL 60 tesla, 100 millisecond pulsed magnet

    SciTech Connect

    Boenig, H.J.; Campbell, L.J.; Rickel, D.G.; Rogers, J.D.; Schillig, J.B.; Sims, J.R.; Pernambuco-Wise, P.; Schneider-Muntau, H.J.

    1992-11-09

    Among the new facilities to be offered by the National Science Foundation through the National High Magnetic Field Laboratory (NHMFL) are pulsed fields that can only be achieved at a national user facility by virtue of their strength, duration, and volume. In particular, a 44 mm bore pulsed magnet giving a 60 tesla field for 100 ms is in the final design stage. This magnet will be powered by a 1.4 GW motor-generator at Los Alamos and is an important step toward proving design principles that will be needed for the higher field quasi-stationary pulsed magnets that this power source is capable of driving. This report will discuss specifications and parameters of this magnet.

  6. Report on the TESLA engineering study/review

    SciTech Connect

    C. Boffo et al.

    2002-07-18

    A team from Argonne National Lab, Cornell, Fermilab, Jefferson Lab, and SLAC has studied the TESLA TDR and its associated cost and manpower estimates, concentrating on the five largest cost sub-systems (Main Linac Modules, Main Linac RF Systems, Civil Engineering, Machine Infrastructure, and XFEL Incremental). These elements were concerned mainly with providing energy reach. We did not study the lower cost, but still technically challenging elements providing luminosity and physics capability, namely damping rings, beam delivery system, beam injection system, positron production, polarized beams, etc. The study did not attempt to validate the TDR cost estimates, but rather its purpose was to understand the technology and status of the large cost items, and the methodology by which their estimated cost was determined. In addition, topics of project oversight were studied.

  7. Note on the SC Linear Collider TESLA Cavity Design

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sekutowicz, J.; Proch, D.; Tang, C.

    1997-05-01

    The experience we have gained over the last few years from experiments with superconducting cavities for the TESLA test facility justifies a revision of the design decided almost five years ago. The proposed new design takes advantage of the high quality factor Q0 > 10^10 and the low electron emission as demonstrated by some tested cavities. The main aim of the new design is to simplify the production and preparation of sc cavities and thus to reduce the cost of the linear collider. The new cavity shape has an enlarged iris diameter with the following advantages: significant lower loss factors, simplified and less expensive scheme for the HOM damping, suitability of hydroforming and higher stability of the field profile.

  8. Sampling Hyperpolarized Molecules Utilizing a 1 Tesla Permanent Magnetic Field

    PubMed Central

    Tee, Sui Seng; DiGialleonardo, Valentina; Eskandari, Roozbeh; Jeong, Sangmoo; Granlund, Kristin L.; Miloushev, Vesselin; Poot, Alex J.; Truong, Steven; Alvarez, Julio A.; Aldeborgh, Hannah N.; Keshari, Kayvan R.

    2016-01-01

    Hyperpolarized magnetic resonance spectroscopy (HP MRS) using dynamic nuclear polarization (DNP) is a technique that has greatly enhanced the sensitivity of detecting 13C nuclei. However, the HP MRS polarization decays in the liquid state according to the spin-lattice relaxation time (T1) of the nucleus. Sampling of the signal also destroys polarization, resulting in a limited temporal ability to observe biologically interesting reactions. In this study, we demonstrate that sampling hyperpolarized signals using a permanent magnet at 1 Tesla (1T) is a simple and cost-effective method to increase T1s without sacrificing signal-to-noise. Biologically-relevant information may be obtained with a permanent magnet using enzyme solutions and in whole cells. Of significance, our findings indicate that changes in pyruvate metabolism can also be quantified in a xenograft model at this field strength. PMID:27597137

  9. Operating nanoliter scale NMR microcoils in a 1 tesla field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McDowell, Andrew F.; Adolphi, Natalie L.

    2007-09-01

    Microcoil probes enclosing sample volumes of 1.2, 3.3, 7.0, and 81 nanoliters are constructed as nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) detectors for operation in a 1 tesla permanent magnet. The probes for the three smallest volumes utilize a novel auxiliary tuning inductor for which the design criteria are given. The signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) and line width of water samples are measured. Based on the measured DC resistance of the microcoils, together with the calculated radio frequency (RF) resistance of the tuning inductor, the SNR is calculated and shown to agree with the measured values. The details of the calculations indicate that the auxiliary inductor does not degrade the NMR probe performance. The diameter of the wire used to construct the microcoils is shown to affect the signal line widths.

  10. MRI at 7 Tesla and above: demonstrated and potential capabilities.

    PubMed

    Kraff, Oliver; Fischer, Anja; Nagel, Armin M; Mönninghoff, Christoph; Ladd, Mark E

    2015-01-01

    With more than 40 installed MR systems worldwide operating at 7 Tesla or higher, ultra-high-field (UHF) imaging has been established as a platform for clinically oriented research in recent years. Along with technical developments that, in part, have also been successfully transferred to lower field strengths, MR imaging and spectroscopy at UHF have demonstrated capabilities and potentials for clinical diagnostics in a variety of studies. In terms of applications, this overview article focuses on already achieved advantages for in vivo imaging, i.e., in imaging the brain and joints of the musculoskeletal system, but also considers developments in body imaging, which is particularly challenging. Furthermore, new applications for clinical diagnostics such as X-nuclei imaging and spectroscopy, which only really become feasible at ultra-high magnetic fields, will be presented.

  11. Sampling Hyperpolarized Molecules Utilizing a 1 Tesla Permanent Magnetic Field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tee, Sui Seng; Digialleonardo, Valentina; Eskandari, Roozbeh; Jeong, Sangmoo; Granlund, Kristin L.; Miloushev, Vesselin; Poot, Alex J.; Truong, Steven; Alvarez, Julio A.; Aldeborgh, Hannah N.; Keshari, Kayvan R.

    2016-09-01

    Hyperpolarized magnetic resonance spectroscopy (HP MRS) using dynamic nuclear polarization (DNP) is a technique that has greatly enhanced the sensitivity of detecting 13C nuclei. However, the HP MRS polarization decays in the liquid state according to the spin-lattice relaxation time (T1) of the nucleus. Sampling of the signal also destroys polarization, resulting in a limited temporal ability to observe biologically interesting reactions. In this study, we demonstrate that sampling hyperpolarized signals using a permanent magnet at 1 Tesla (1T) is a simple and cost-effective method to increase T1s without sacrificing signal-to-noise. Biologically-relevant information may be obtained with a permanent magnet using enzyme solutions and in whole cells. Of significance, our findings indicate that changes in pyruvate metabolism can also be quantified in a xenograft model at this field strength.

  12. Design and prototype fabrication of a 30 tesla cryogenic magnet

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Prok, G. M.; Swanson, M. C.; Brown, G. V.

    1977-01-01

    A liquid neon cooled magnet was designed to produce 30 teslas in steady operation. To ensure the correctness of the heat transfer relationships used, supercritical neon heat transfer tests were made. Other tests made before the final design included tests on the effect of the magnetic field on pump motors, tensile shear tests on the cryogenic adhesives, and simulated flow studies for the coolant. The magnet will consist of two pairs of coils, cooled by forced convection of supercritical neon. Heat from the supercritical neon will be rejected through heat exchangers which are made of roll bonded copper panels and are submerged in a pool of saturated liquid neon. A partial mock up coil was wound to identify the tooling required to wind the magnet. This was followed by winding a prototype pair of coils. The prototype winding established procedures for fabricating the final magnet and revealed slight changes needed in the final design.

  13. Comparison of the TESLA, NLC and CLIC beam collimation performance

    SciTech Connect

    Alexandr I Drozhdin et al.

    2003-03-27

    This note describes studies performed in the framework of the Collimation Task Force organized to support the work of the International Linear Collider Technical Review Committee. The post-linac beam-collimation systems in the TESLA, JLC/NLC and CLIC linear-collider designs are compared using the same computer code under the same assumptions. Their performance is quantified in terms of beam-halo and synchrotron-radiation collimation efficiency. The performance of the current designs varies across projects, and does not always meet the original design goals. But these comparisons suggest that achieving the required performance in a future linear collider is feasible. The post-TRC plans of the Collimation Task Force are briefly outlined in closing.

  14. A Single Crystal Niobium RF Cavity of the TESLA Shape

    SciTech Connect

    Singer, W.; Singer, X.; Kneisel, P.

    2007-08-09

    A fabrication method for single crystal niobium cavities of the TESLA shape was proposed on the basis of metallographic investigations and electron beam welding tests on niobium single crystals. These tests showed that a cavity can be produced without grain boundaries even in the welding area. An appropriate annealing allows the outgassing of hydrogen and stress relaxation of the material without destruction of the single crystal. A prototype single crystal single cell cavity was build. An accelerating gradient of 37.5 MV/m was reached after approximately 110 {mu}m of Buffered Chemical Polishing (BCP) and in situ baking at 120 deg. C for 6 hrs with a quality factor exceeding 2x1010 at 1.8 K. The developed fabrication method can be extended to fabrication of multi cell cavities.

  15. A Single Crystal Niobium RF Cavity of the TESLA Shape

    SciTech Connect

    W. Singer; X. Singer; P. Kneisel

    2007-09-01

    A fabrication method for single crystal niobium cavities of the TESLA shape was proposed on the basis of metallographic investigations and electron beam welding tests on niobium single crystals. These tests showed that a cavity can be produced without grain boundaries even in the welding area. An appropriate annealing allows the outgassing of hydrogen and stress relaxation of the material without destruction of the single crystal. A prototype single crystal single cell cavity was built. An accelerating gradient of 37.5 MV/m was reached after approximately 110 mu-m of Buffered Chanical Polishing (BCP) and in situ baking at 120°C for 6 hrs with a quality factor exceeding 2x1010 at 1.8 K. The developed fabrication method can be extended to fabrication of multi cell cavities.

  16. Design, performance and production of the Fermilab TESLA RF input couplers

    SciTech Connect

    Champion, M.

    1996-10-01

    The TeV Energy Superconducting Linear Accelerator (TESLA) requires as one of its technical components a radiofrequency (rf) input coupler that transfers 1.3 GHz rf energy from the rf distribution system to a nine-cell superconducting accelerating cavity operating at a temperature of 1.8 K. The input coupler design is driven by numerous design criteria, which result in a rather complicated implementation. The production of twelve input couplers for the TESLA Test Facility (TTF) is underway at Fermilab, with the first two couplers having been delivered late in 1995. This paper discusses the Fermilab TESLA rf input coupler design, recent test results, and production issues.

  17. MEASUREMENT OF THE TRANSVERSE BEAM DYNAMICS IN A TESLA-TYPE SUPERCONDUCTING CAVITY

    SciTech Connect

    Halavanau, A.; Eddy, N.; Edstrom, D.; Lunin, A.; Piot, P.; Ruan, J.; Solyak, N.

    2016-09-26

    Superconducting linacs are capable of producing intense, ultra-stable, high-quality electron beams that have widespread applications in Science and Industry. Many project are based on the 1.3-GHz TESLA-type superconducting cavity. In this paper we provide an update on a recent experiment aimed at measuring the transfer matrix of a TESLA cavity at the Fermilab Accelerator Science and Technology (FAST) facility. The results are discussed and compared with analytical and numerical simulations.

  18. Beamstrahlung Photon Load on the TESLA Extraction Septum Blade(LCC-0104)

    SciTech Connect

    Seryi, A

    2003-10-02

    This note describes work performed in the framework of the International Linear Collider Technical Review Committee [1] to estimate the power load on the TESLA extraction septum blade due to beamstrahlung photons. It is shown, that under realistic conditions the photon load can be several orders of magnitude higher than what was estimated in the TESLA TDR [2] for the ideal Gaussian beams, potentially representing a serious limitation of the current design.

  19. Dobutamine stress cardiovascular magnetic resonance at 3 Tesla

    PubMed Central

    Kelle, S; Hamdan, A; Schnackenburg, B; Köhler, U; Klein, C; Nagel, E; Fleck, E

    2008-01-01

    Purpose The assessment of inducible wall motion abnormalities during high-dose dobutamine-stress cardiovascular magnetic resonance (DCMR) is well established for the identification of myocardial ischemia at 1.5 Tesla. Its feasibility at higher field strengths has not been reported. The present study was performed to prospectively determine the feasibility and diagnostic accuracy of DCMR at 3 Tesla for depicting hemodynamically significant coronary artery stenosis (≥ 50% diameter stenosis) in patients with suspected or known coronary artery disease (CAD). Materials and methods Thirty consecutive patients (6 women) (66 ± 9.3 years) were scheduled for DCMR between January and May 2007 for detection of coronary artery disease. Patients were examined with a Philips Achieva 3 Tesla system (Philips Healthcare, Best, The Netherlands), using a spoiled gradient echo cine sequence. Technical parameters were: spatial resolution 2 × 2 × 8 mm3, 30 heart phases, spoiled gradient echo TR/TE: 4.5/2.6 msec, flip angle 15°. Images were acquired at rest and stress in accordance with a standardized high-dose dobutamine-atropine protocol during short breath-holds in three short and three long-axis views. Dobutamine was administered using a standard protocol (10 μg increments every 3 minutes up to 40 μg dobutamine/kg body weight/minute plus atropine if required to reach target heart rate). The study protocol included administration of 0.1 mmol/kg/body weight Gd-DTPA before the cine images at rest were acquired to improve the image quality. The examination was terminated if new or worsening wall-motion abnormalities or chest pain occurred or when > 85% of age-predicted maximum heart rate was reached. Myocardial ischemia was defined as new onset of wall-motion abnormality in at least one segment. In addition, late gadolinium enhancement (LGE) was performed. Images were evaluated by two blinded readers. Diagnostic accuracy was determined with coronary angiography as the reference

  20. Feasibility Study of a HOM IOT for TESLA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schütt, Petra; Weiland, Thomas; Gamp, Alexander; Lu, Fuhai

    1997-05-01

    For the TESLA linear collider 1.3 GHz RF sources with 10 MW peak power and about 70% efficiency are needed. As an alternative to the development of a Multibeam-Klystron, we investigate the feasibility of an IOT (Inductive Output Tube). This is a very compact RF source: The time structure of the beam is produced by a gated emission cathode and the output cavity is directly adjacent to the anode. Unlike IOTs, conventional klystrons lose some of their design efficiency when they are operated below saturation, because only the RF component of the beam is reduced and not the DC beam current. In contrast to this the cathode current of an IOT is controlled by the drive power. In order to keep the gun voltage low, we investigate a device with a hollow beam where the output cavity is excited in a higher order mode (HOM), as was recently suggested by CPI(E.Lien, H.Bohlen, US Patent Application Serial No. 08/413,034). Computer simulations are carried out with the CAD-system MAFIA. First, an existing Klystrode TM IOT built by CPI is analysed. Simulation results will be shown and compared to experimental data. Based upon this experience, a design strategy is discussed for the HOM IOT.

  1. Cascading Tesla Oscillating Flow Diode for Stirling Engine Gas Bearings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dyson, Rodger

    2012-01-01

    Replacing the mechanical check-valve in a Stirling engine with a micromachined, non-moving-part flow diode eliminates moving parts and reduces the risk of microparticle clogging. At very small scales, helium gas has sufficient mass momentum that it can act as a flow controller in a similar way as a transistor can redirect electrical signals with a smaller bias signal. The innovation here forces helium gas to flow in predominantly one direction by offering a clear, straight-path microchannel in one direction of flow, but then through a sophisticated geometry, the reversed flow is forced through a tortuous path. This redirection is achieved by using microfluid channel flow to force the much larger main flow into this tortuous path. While microdiodes have been developed in the past, this innovation cascades Tesla diodes to create a much higher pressure in the gas bearing supply plenum. In addition, the special shape of the leaves captures loose particles that would otherwise clog the microchannel of the gas bearing pads.

  2. A passively suspended Tesla pump left ventricular assist device.

    PubMed

    Izraelev, Valentin; Weiss, William J; Fritz, Bryan; Newswanger, Raymond K; Paterson, Eric G; Snyder, Alan; Medvitz, Richard B; Cysyk, Joshua; Pae, Walter E; Hicks, Dennis; Lukic, Branka; Rosenberg, Gerson

    2009-01-01

    The design and initial test results of a new passively suspended Tesla type left ventricular assist device blood pump are described. Computational fluid dynamics (CFD) analysis was used in the design of the pump. Overall size of the prototype device is 50 mm in diameter and 75 mm in length. The pump rotor has a density lower than that of blood and when spinning inside the stator in blood it creates a buoyant centering force that suspends the rotor in the radial direction. The axial magnetic force between the rotor and stator restrain the rotor in the axial direction. The pump is capable of pumping up to 10 L/min at a 70 mm Hg head rise at 8,000 revolutions per minute (RPM). The pump has demonstrated a normalized index of hemolysis level below 0.02 mg/dL for flows between 2 and 9.7 L/min. An inlet pressure sensor has also been incorporated into the inlet cannula wall and will be used for control purposes. One initial in vivo study showed an encouraging result. Further CFD modeling refinements are planned and endurance testing of the device.

  3. Design and prototype fabrication of a 30 tesla cryogenic magnet

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Prok, G. M.; Swanson, M. C.; Brown, G. V.

    1977-01-01

    A liquid-neon-cooled magnet has been designed to produce 30 teslas in steady operation. Its feasibility was established by a previously reported parametric study. To ensure the correctness of the heat transfer relationships used, supercritical neon heat transfer tests were made. Other tests made before the final design included tests on the effect of the magnetic field on pump motors; tensile-shear tests on the cryogenic adhesives; and simulated flow studies for the coolant. The magnet will be made of two pairs of coils, cooled by forced convection of supercritical neon. Heat from the supercritical neon will be rejected through heat exchangers which are made of roll-bonded copper panels and are submerged in a pool of saturated liquid neon. A partial mock-up coil was wound to identify the tooling required to wind the magnet. This was followed by winding a prototype pair of coils. The prototype winding established procedures for fabricating the final magnet and revealed slight changes needed in the final design.

  4. A Passively-Suspended Tesla Pump Left Ventricular Assist Device

    PubMed Central

    Izraelev, Valentin; Weiss, William J.; Fritz, Bryan; Newswanger, Raymond K.; Paterson, Eric G.; Snyder, Alan; Medvitz, Richard B.; Cysyk, Joshua; Pae, Walter E.; Hicks, Dennis; Lukic, Branka; Rosenberg, Gerson

    2009-01-01

    The design and initial test results of a new passively suspended Tesla type LAVD blood pump are described. CFD analysis was used in the design of the pump. Overall size of the prototype device is 50 mm in diameter and 75 mm in length. The pump rotor has a density lower than that of blood and when spinning inside the stator in blood it creates a buoyant centering force that suspends the rotor in the radial direction. The axial magnetic force between the rotor and stator restrain the rotor in the axial direction. The pump is capable of pumping up to 10 liters/min at a 70 mmHg head rise at 8000 RPM. The pump has demonstrated a normalized index of hemolysis level below .02 mg/dL for flows between 2 and 9.7 L/min. An inlet pressure sensor has also been incorporated into the inlet cannula wall and will be used for control purposes. One initial in vivo study showed an encouraging result. Further CFD modeling refinements are planned as well as endurance testing of the device. PMID:19770799

  5. [Examination of upper abdominal region in high spatial resolution diffusion-weighted imaging using 3-Tesla MRI].

    PubMed

    Terada, Masaki; Matsushita, Hiroki; Oosugi, Masanori; Inoue, Kazuyasu; Yaegashi, Taku; Anma, Takeshi

    2009-03-20

    The advantage of the higher signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) of 3-Tesla magnetic resonance imaging (3-Tesla) has the possibility of contributing to the improvement of high spatial resolution without causing image deterioration. In this study, we compared SNR and the apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) value with 3-Tesla as the condition in the diffusion-weighted image (DWI) parameter of the 1.5-Tesla magnetic resonance imaging (1.5-Tesla) and we examined the high spatial resolution images in the imaging method [respiratory-triggering (RT) method and breath free (BF) method] and artifact (motion and zebra) in the upper abdominal region of DWI at 3-Tesla. We have optimized scan parameters based on phantom and in vivo study. As a result, 3-Tesla was able to obtain about 1.5 times SNR in comparison with the 1.5-Tesla, ADC value had few differences. Moreover, the RT method was effective in correcting the influence of respiratory movement in comparison with the BF method, and image improvement by the effective acquisition of SNR and reduction of the artifact were provided. Thus, DWI of upper abdominal region was a useful sequence for the high spatial resolution in 3-Tesla.

  6. The pioneers of interplanetary communication: From Gauss to Tesla

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raulin-Cerceau, Florence

    2010-12-01

    The present overview covers the period from 1820 to the beginning of the 20th century. Emphasis is laid on the latter half of the 19th century because many efforts have been done at that time to elaborate schemes for contacting our neighboring planets by interplanetary telegraphy. This period knew many advances not only in planetary studies but also in the nascent field of telecommunications. Such a context led astronomers who were also interested in the problem of planetary habitability, to envisage that other planets could be contacted, especially the planet Mars. Interplanetary communication using a celestial telegraphy was planned during this period of great speculations about life on Mars. This paper focuses on four authors: the Frenchmen C. Flammarion, Ch. Cros, A. Mercier and the Serbian N. Tesla, who formulated early proposals to communicate with Mars or Venus. The first proposals (which remained only theoretical) showed that an initial reflection had started as early as the second part of the 19th century on the type of language that could be both universal and distinguishable from a natural signal. Literary history of interplanetary communication preceded by far the scientific one. Authors of the 1900s were very prolific on this topic. French fictions are mentioned in this paper as examples of such a literature. This incursion into selected texts stresses the fact that the problem of techniques and messages employed to communicate with other planets goes beyond the strict scientific framework. Finally, this paper aims to highlight the similarities as well as the differences between the different proposals and to underline what that could possibly help present SETI research to define messages supposed to be sent to other planetary systems.

  7. A Laminar Flow-Based Microfluidic Tesla Pump via Lithography Enabled 3D Printing.

    PubMed

    Habhab, Mohammed-Baker; Ismail, Tania; Lo, Joe Fujiou

    2016-11-23

    Tesla turbine and its applications in power generation and fluid flow were demonstrated by Nicholas Tesla in 1913. However, its real-world implementations were limited by the difficulty to maintain laminar flow between rotor disks, transient efficiencies during rotor acceleration, and the lack of other applications that fully utilize the continuous flow outputs. All of the aforementioned limits of Tesla turbines can be addressed by scaling to the microfluidic flow regime. Demonstrated here is a microscale Tesla pump designed and fabricated using a Digital Light Processing (DLP) based 3D printer with 43 µm lateral and 30 µm thickness resolutions. The miniaturized pump is characterized by low Reynolds number of 1000 and a flow rate of up to 12.6 mL/min at 1200 rpm, unloaded. It is capable of driving a mixer network to generate microfluidic gradient. The continuous, laminar flow from Tesla turbines is well-suited to the needs of flow-sensitive microfluidics, where the integrated pump will enable numerous compact lab-on-a-chip applications.

  8. Diagnostic usefulness of 3 tesla MRI of the brain for cushing disease in a child.

    PubMed

    Ono, Erina; Ozawa, Ayako; Matoba, Kaori; Motoki, Takanori; Tajima, Asako; Miyata, Ichiro; Ito, Junko; Inoshita, Naoko; Yamada, Syozo; Ida, Hiroyuki

    2011-10-01

    It is sometimes difficult to confirm the location of a microadenoma in Cushing disease. Recently, we experienced an 11-yr-old female case of Cushing disease with hyperprolactinemia. She was referred to our hospital because of decrease of height velocity with body weight gain. On admission, she had typical symptoms of Cushing syndrome. Although no pituitary microadenomas were detected on 1.5 Tesla MRI of the brain, endocrinological examinations including IPS and CS sampling were consistent with Cushing disease with hyperprolactinemia. Oral administration of methyrapone instead of neurosurgery was started after discharge, but subsequent 3 Tesla MRI of the brain clearly demonstrated a 3-mm less-enhanced lesion in the left side of the pituitary gland. Finally, transsphenoidal surgery was performed, and a 3.5-mm left-sided microadenoma was resected. Compared with 1.5 Tesla MRI, 3 Tesla MRI offers the advantage of a higher signal to noise ratio (SNR), which provides higher resolution and proper image quality. Therefore, 3 Tesla MRI is a very useful tool to localize microadenomas in Cushing disease in children as well as in adults. It will be the first choice of radiological examinations in suspected cases of Cushing disease.

  9. A Laminar Flow-Based Microfluidic Tesla Pump via Lithography Enabled 3D Printing

    PubMed Central

    Habhab, Mohammed-Baker; Ismail, Tania; Lo, Joe Fujiou

    2016-01-01

    Tesla turbine and its applications in power generation and fluid flow were demonstrated by Nicholas Tesla in 1913. However, its real-world implementations were limited by the difficulty to maintain laminar flow between rotor disks, transient efficiencies during rotor acceleration, and the lack of other applications that fully utilize the continuous flow outputs. All of the aforementioned limits of Tesla turbines can be addressed by scaling to the microfluidic flow regime. Demonstrated here is a microscale Tesla pump designed and fabricated using a Digital Light Processing (DLP) based 3D printer with 43 µm lateral and 30 µm thickness resolutions. The miniaturized pump is characterized by low Reynolds number of 1000 and a flow rate of up to 12.6 mL/min at 1200 rpm, unloaded. It is capable of driving a mixer network to generate microfluidic gradient. The continuous, laminar flow from Tesla turbines is well-suited to the needs of flow-sensitive microfluidics, where the integrated pump will enable numerous compact lab-on-a-chip applications. PMID:27886051

  10. Note: Tesla based pulse generator for electrical breakdown study of liquid dielectrics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Veda Prakash, G.; Kumar, R.; Patel, J.; Saurabh, K.; Shyam, A.

    2013-12-01

    In the process of studying charge holding capability and delay time for breakdown in liquids under nanosecond (ns) time scales, a Tesla based pulse generator has been developed. Pulse generator is a combination of Tesla transformer, pulse forming line, a fast closing switch, and test chamber. Use of Tesla transformer over conventional Marx generators makes the pulse generator very compact, cost effective, and requires less maintenance. The system has been designed and developed to deliver maximum output voltage of 300 kV and rise time of the order of tens of nanoseconds. The paper deals with the system design parameters, breakdown test procedure, and various experimental results. To validate the pulse generator performance, experimental results have been compared with PSPICE simulation software and are in good agreement with simulation results.

  11. Liquid neon heat transfer as applied to a 30 tesla cryomagnet

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Papell, S. S.; Hendricks, R. C.

    1975-01-01

    Since superconducting magnets cooled by liquid helium are limited to magnetic fields of about 18 teslas, the design of a 30 tesla cryomagnet necessitates forced convection liquid neon heat transfer in small coolant channels. As these channels are too small to handle the vapor flow if the coolant were to boil, the design philosophy calls for suppressing boiling by subjecting the fluid to high pressures. Forced convection heat transfer data are obtained by using a blowdown technique to force the fluid vertically through a resistance-heated instrumented tube. The data are obtained at inlet temperatures between 28 and 34 K and system pressures between 28 to 29 bars. Data correlation is limited to a very narrow range of test conditions, since the tests were designed to simulate the heat transfer characteristics in the coolant channels of the 30 tesla cryomagnet concerned. The results can therefore be applied directly to the design of the magnet system.-

  12. Nikola Tesla: Why was he so much resisted and forgotten? [Retrospectroscope].

    PubMed

    Valentinuzzi, Max E; Ortiz, Martin Hill; Cervantes, Daniel; Leder, Ron S

    2016-01-01

    Recently, during the Christmas season, a friend of mine visited me and, sneaking a look at my bookshelves, found two rather old Nikola Tesla biographies, which I had used to prepare a "Retrospectroscope" column for the then-named IEEE Engineering in Medicine and Biology Magazine when our dear friend Alvin Wald was its editor-inchief [2]. Eighteen years have elapsed since then; soon, the idea came up of revamping the article. Cynthia Weber, the magazine's current associate editor, considered it acceptable, and here is the new note divided in two parts: that is, a slightly revised version of the original article followed by new material, including some quite interesting information regarding Tesla's homes and laboratories. On top of this, Tesla is not devoid of a science fiction touch, as mentioned at the end.

  13. Magnetic Semiconductor Quantum Wells in High Fields to 60 Tesla: Photoluminescence Linewidth Annealing at Magnetization Steps

    SciTech Connect

    Awschalom, D.D.; Crooker, S.A.; Lyo, S.K.; Rickel, D.G.; Samarth, N.

    1999-05-24

    Magnetic semiconductors offer a unique possibility for strongly tuning the intrinsic alloy disorder potential with applied magnetic field. We report the direct observation of a series of step-like reductions in the magnetic alloy disorder potential in single ZnSe/Zn(Cd,Mn)Se quantum wells between O and 60 Tesla. This disorder, measured through the linewidth of low temperature photoluminescence spectra drops abruptly at -19, 36, and 53 Tesla, in concert with observed magnetization steps. Conventional models of alloy disorder (developed for nonmagnetic semiconductors) reproduce the general shape of the data, but markedly underestimate the size of the linewidth reduction.

  14. 3.0 Tesla vs 1.5 Tesla breast magnetic resonance imaging in newly diagnosed breast cancer patients

    PubMed Central

    Butler, Reni S; Chen, Christine; Vashi, Reena; Hooley, Regina J; Philpotts, Liane E

    2013-01-01

    AIM: To compare 3.0 Tesla (T) vs 1.5T magnetic resonance (MR) imaging systems in newly diagnosed breast cancer patients. METHODS: Upon Institutional Review Board approval, a Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act-compliant retrospective review of 147 consecutive 3.0T MR examinations and 98 consecutive 1.5T MR examinations in patients with newly diagnosed breast cancer between 7/2009 and 5/2010 was performed. Eleven patients who underwent neoadjuvant chemotherapy in the 3.0T group were excluded. Mammographically occult suspicious lesions (BIRADS Code 4 and 5) additional to the index cancer in the ipsilateral and contralateral breast were identified. Lesion characteristics and pathologic diagnoses were recorded, and results achieved with both systems compared. Statistical significance was analyzed using Fisher’s exact test. RESULTS: In the 3.0T group, 206 suspicious lesions were identified in 55% (75/136) of patients and 96% (198/206) of these lesions were biopsied. In the 1.5T group, 98 suspicious lesions were identified in 53% (52/98) of patients and 90% (88/98) of these lesions were biopsied. Biopsy results yielded additional malignancies in 24% of patients in the 3.0T group vs 14% of patients in the 1.5T group (33/136 vs 14/98, P = 0.07). Average size and histology of the additional cancers was comparable. Of patients who had a suspicious MR imaging study, additional cancers were found in 44% of patients in the 3.0T group vs 27% in the 1.5T group (33/75 vs 14/52, P = 0.06), yielding a higher positive predictive value (PPV) for biopsies performed with the 3.0T system. CONCLUSION: 3.0T MR imaging detected more additional malignancies in patients with newly diagnosed breast cancer and yielded a higher PPV for biopsies performed with the 3.0T system. PMID:24003354

  15. [3 Tesla MRI: successful results with higher field strengths].

    PubMed

    Schmitt, F; Grosu, D; Mohr, C; Purdy, D; Salem, K; Scott, K T; Stoeckel, B

    2004-01-01

    The recent development of 3 Tesla MRI (3T MRI) has been fueled by promise of increased signal-to-noise ratio(SNR). Many are excited about the opportunity to not only use the increased SNR for clearer images, but also the chance to exchange it for better resolution or faster scans. These possibilities have caused a rapid increase in the market for 3T MRI, where the faster scanning tips an already advantageous economic outlook in favor of the user. As a result, the global market for 3T has grown from a research only market just a few years ago to an ever-increasing clinically oriented customer base. There are, however, significant obstacles to 3T MRI presented by the physics at higher field strengths. For example, the T1 relaxation times are prolonged with increasing magnet field strength. Further, the increased RF-energy deposition (SAR), the larger the chemical shift and the stronger susceptibility effect have to be considered as challenges. It is critical that one looks at both the advantages and disadvantages of using 3T. While there are many issues to address aand a number of different methods for doing so, to properly tackle each of these concerns will take time and effort on the part od researchers and clinicians. The optimization of 3T MRI scanning will have to be a combined effort, though much of the work to date has been in neuroimaging. Multiple applications have been explored in addition to clinical anatomical imaging, where resolution is improved showing structure in the brain never seen before in human MRI. Body and cardiac imaging provide a great challenge but are also achievable at 3T. As an example, the full range of clinical applications currently achieved on today's state-of-the-art 1.5T cardiac MR scanners has also been demonstrated at 3T. In the body, the full range of contrast is available over large fields of view allowing whole liver studies in the clinic or, as needed, one may choose a smaller field of view for high-resolution imaging of the

  16. Shot noise startup of the 6 nm SASE FEL at the TESLA test facility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pierini, P.; Fawley, W. M.

    1996-02-01

    We present here the results of an extensive simulation activity for the TESLA SASE FEL. We have used the program GINGER to determine the FEL saturation length and the power fluctuations from shot to shot. The spectral properties of the output power and the correlation functions are investigated and compared with available theoretical models.

  17. Prospects for 6 to 10 tesla magnets for a TEVATRON upgrade

    SciTech Connect

    Mantsch, Paul M.

    1988-07-08

    The first SSC physics is at least 10 years away. An upgrade of the Fermilab Tevatron will ensure the continuity of a vigorous high-energy physics program until the SSC turns on. Three basic proposals are under consideration: /bar p/p at 3 /times/ 10/sup 31/ --Increase luminosity by improvements to the p source. pp at 1 TeV and 2 /times/ 10/sup 32/--Move the main ring to a new tunnel, build a second Tevatron ring, and /bar p/p > 1.5 TeV and 7 /times/ 10/sup 30/--Replace the tevatron with a higher energy ring. The last two options requires about a hundred 6.6-tesla dipoles in addition to a ring of Tevatron strength (4.4 T) magnets. These higher-field magnets are necessary in both rings to lengthen the straight sections in order to realize the collision optics. The third option requires a ring of magnets of 6.6 T or slightly higher to replace the present Tevatron plus a number of special 8--9 tesla magnets. The viability of the high-energy option then depends on the practicality of sizable numbers of reliable 8--9 tesla dipoles as well as 800 6.6-tesla dipoles. The following develops a specification for an 8.8 T dipole, examines the design considerations and reviews the current state of high-field magnet development. 22 figs., 3 tabs.

  18. A laser system for the TESLA photon collider based on an external ring resonator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Will, I.; Quast, T.; Redlin, H.; Sandner, W.

    2001-10-01

    We present a concept of a laser system for a photon collider at the TESLA linac. It is based on an external optical ring cavity which is pumped by a short-pulse laser. A detailed discussion of the geometry of the external cavity is given.

  19. 76 FR 47639 - Tesla Motors, Inc.; Receipt of Petition for Temporary Exemption From the Electronic Stability...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-08-05

    ... determine how best to optimize its battery design and vehicle software for future vehicle offerings such as... database of information for its future vehicle offerings. Tesla states that it cannot replicate this data... long range, highway-capable, battery-powered electric vehicle in the United States will lead to...

  20. Design study of 15-Tesla RHQT Nb3Al block type dipole magnet

    SciTech Connect

    Yamada, R.; Ambrosio, G.; Barzi, E.; Kashikin, V.; Kikuchi, A.; Novitski, I.; Takeuchi, T.; Wake, M.; Zlobin, A.; /Fermilab /NIMC, Tsukuba /KEK, Tsukuba

    2005-09-01

    The design study of the block type 15-Tesla RHQT Nb{sub 3}Al dipole magnet, and its merits over Nb{sub 3}Sn magnets are presented. The copper stabilized RHQT Nb{sub 3}Al strand is now becoming commercially available for the application to the accelerator magnets. A 1 mm diameter RHQT Nb{sub 3}Al strand with filament size about 50 {mu}, non-copper Jc about 1000 A/mm{sup 2} at 15 Tesla at 4.2K, copper ratio of 50%, can now be produced over several hundred meters. The stress and strain characteristics of the Nb{sub 3}Al strand are superior to the Nb{sub 3}Sn strand. Another advantage is that it can tolerate a longitudinal strain up to 0.55%. The RHQT Nb{sub 3}Al Rutherford cable will have less chance of contamination of the stabilizer, compared to Nb{sub 3}Sn cable. These characteristics of the RHQT Nb{sub 3}Al will be beneficial for designing and producing 15-Tesla dipole magnets. An example 15-Tesla magnet cross section, utilizing the RHQT Nb{sub 3}Sn strand is presented. A systematic investigation on RHQT Nb{sub 3}Al strands, its Rutherford cables, and building a small racetrack magnet for cable testing are proposed.

  1. Encouraging a "Romantic Understanding" of Science: The Effect of the Nikola Tesla Story

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hadzigeorgiou, Yannis; Klassen, Stephen; Klassen, Cathrine Froese

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to discuss and apply the notion of romantic understanding by outlining its features and its potential role in science education, to identify its features in the story of Nikola Tesla, and to describe an empirical study conducted to determine the effect of telling such a story to Grade 9 students. Elaborated features of…

  2. Design study of steady-state 30-tesla liquid-neon-cooled magnet

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Prok, G. M.; Brown, G. V.

    1976-01-01

    A design for a 30-tesla, liquid-neon-cooled magnet was reported which is capable of continuous operation. Cooled by nonboiling, forced-convection heat transfer to liquid neon flowing at 2.8 cu m/min in a closed, pressurized heat-transfer loop and structurally supported by a tapered structural ribbon, the tape-wound coils with a high-purity-aluminum conductor will produce over 30 teslas for 1 minute at 850 kilowatts. The magnet will have an inside diameter of 7.5 centimeters and an outside diameter of 54 centimeters. The minimum current density at design field will be 15.7 kA/sq cm.

  3. Rapid Parametric Mapping of the Longitudinal Relaxation Time T1 Using Two-Dimensional Variable Flip Angle Magnetic Resonance Imaging at 1.5 Tesla, 3 Tesla, and 7 Tesla

    PubMed Central

    Dieringer, Matthias A.; Deimling, Michael; Santoro, Davide; Wuerfel, Jens; Madai, Vince I.; Sobesky, Jan; von Knobelsdorff-Brenkenhoff, Florian; Schulz-Menger, Jeanette; Niendorf, Thoralf

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Visual but subjective reading of longitudinal relaxation time (T1) weighted magnetic resonance images is commonly used for the detection of brain pathologies. For this non-quantitative measure, diagnostic quality depends on hardware configuration, imaging parameters, radio frequency transmission field (B1+) uniformity, as well as observer experience. Parametric quantification of the tissue T1 relaxation parameter offsets the propensity for these effects, but is typically time consuming. For this reason, this study examines the feasibility of rapid 2D T1 quantification using a variable flip angles (VFA) approach at magnetic field strengths of 1.5 Tesla, 3 Tesla, and 7 Tesla. These efforts include validation in phantom experiments and application for brain T1 mapping. Methods T1 quantification included simulations of the Bloch equations to correct for slice profile imperfections, and a correction for B1+. Fast gradient echo acquisitions were conducted using three adjusted flip angles for the proposed T1 quantification approach that was benchmarked against slice profile uncorrected 2D VFA and an inversion-recovery spin-echo based reference method. Brain T1 mapping was performed in six healthy subjects, one multiple sclerosis patient, and one stroke patient. Results Phantom experiments showed a mean T1 estimation error of (-63±1.5)% for slice profile uncorrected 2D VFA and (0.2±1.4)% for the proposed approach compared to the reference method. Scan time for single slice T1 mapping including B1+ mapping could be reduced to 5 seconds using an in-plane resolution of (2×2) mm2, which equals a scan time reduction of more than 99% compared to the reference method. Conclusion Our results demonstrate that rapid 2D T1 quantification using a variable flip angle approach is feasible at 1.5T/3T/7T. It represents a valuable alternative for rapid T1 mapping due to the gain in speed versus conventional approaches. This progress may serve to enhance the capabilities of

  4. Programmable infusion pump and catheter: evaluation using 3-tesla magnetic resonance imaging.

    PubMed

    Shellock, Frank G; Crivelli, Rocco; Venugopalan, Ramakrishna

    2008-07-01

    Objective.  This study assessed 3-Tesla magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) issues for a programmable infusion pump and associated catheters. Methods.  A programmable infusion pump and associated catheters (MedStream Programmable Infusion Pump, 40 mL; SureStream TI Coil-Reinforced Intraspinal Catheter; SureStream TI Connector; and SureStream Silicone Catheter; Codman and Shurtleff Inc., a Johnson & Johnson Company, Raynham, MA, USA) underwent evaluation for magnetic field interactions (deflection angle and torque), heating (transmit/receive body radiofrequency coil; whole-body averaged specific absorption rate, 3 W/kg for 15 min), functional changes (before and after MRI using eight different MRI conditions), and artifacts (T1-weighted spin-echo and gradient-echo pulse sequences) at 3-Tesla. Results.  The programmable infusion pump and associated catheters exhibited minor magnetic field interactions. Heating was not excessive (≤ 1.9°), especially considering the experimental conditions used for this evaluation (ie, relatively high radiofrequency power/specific absorption rate level and use of a nonperfused phantom). The function of three out of six pumps was temporarily altered by exposures to 3-Tesla MRI conditions. Reset was achieved in each case. Artifacts were relatively large for the pump and minor for the catheter. Conclusions.  The programmable infusion pump and catheters will not pose increased risk to a patient examined using 3-Tesla MRI as long as specific safety guidelines are followed, which includes interrogation of the pump post-MRI to ensure proper settings. Artifacts for the programmable infusion pump may impact the diagnostic use of MRI if the area of interest is in the same area or near the device.

  5. A modified post damping ring bunch compressor beamline for the TESLA linear collider

    SciTech Connect

    Philippe R.-G. Piot; Winfried Decking

    2004-03-23

    We propose a modified bunch compressor beamline, downstream of the damping ring, for the TESLA linear collider. This modified beamline uses a third harmonic radio-frequency section based on the 3.9 GHz superconducting cavity under development at Fermilab. In our design the beam deceleration is about {approx}50 MeV instead of {approx}450 MeV in the original design proposed.

  6. 7-Tesla MRI demonstrates absence of structural lesions in patients with vestibular paroxysmia

    PubMed Central

    Rommer, Paulus S.; Wiest, Gerald; Kronnerwetter, Claudia; Zach, Heidemarie; Loader, Benjamin; Elwischger, Kirsten; Trattnig, Siegfried

    2015-01-01

    Vestibular parxoysmia (VP) is a rare vestibular disorder. A neurovascular cross-compression (NVCC) between the vestibulochochlear nerve and an artery seems to be responsible for short attacks of vertigo in this entity. An NVCC can be seen in up to every fourth subject. The significance of these findings is not clear, as not all subjects suffer from symptoms. The aim of the present study was to assess possible structural lesions of the vestibulocochlear nerve by means of high field magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), and whether high field MRI may help to differentiate symptomatic from asymptomatic subjects. 7 Tesla MRI was performed in six patients with VP and confirmed NVCC seen on 1.5 and 3.0 MRI. No structural abnormalities were detected in any of the patients in 7 Tesla MRI. These findings imply that high field MRI does not help to differentiate between symptomatic and asymptomatic NVCC and that the symptoms of VP are not caused by structural nerve lesions. This supports the hypothesis that the nystagmus associated with VP has to be conceived pathophysiologically as an excitatory vestibular phenomenon, being not related to vestibular hypofunction. 7 Tesla MRI outperforms conventional MRI in image resolution and may be useful in vestibular disorders. PMID:26106306

  7. An 8-GW long-pulse generator based on Tesla transformer and pulse forming network.

    PubMed

    Su, Jiancang; Zhang, Xibo; Li, Rui; Zhao, Liang; Sun, Xu; Wang, Limin; Zeng, Bo; Cheng, Jie; Wang, Ying; Peng, Jianchang; Song, Xiaoxin

    2014-06-01

    A long-pulse generator TPG700L based on a Tesla transformer and a series pulse forming network (PFN) is constructed to generate intense electron beams for the purpose of high power microwave (HPM) generation. The TPG700L mainly consists of a 12-stage PFN, a built-in Tesla transformer in a pulse forming line, a three-electrode gas switch, a transmission line with a trigger, and a load. The Tesla transformer and the compact PFN are the key technologies for the development of the TPG700L. This generator can output electrical pulses with a width as long as 200 ns at a level of 8 GW and a repetition rate of 50 Hz. When used to drive a relative backward wave oscillator for HPM generation, the electrical pulse width is about 100 ns on a voltage level of 520 kV. Factors affecting the pulse waveform of the TPG700L are also discussed. At present, the TPG700L performs well for long-pulse HPM generation in our laboratory.

  8. An 8-GW long-pulse generator based on Tesla transformer and pulse forming network

    SciTech Connect

    Su, Jiancang; Zhang, Xibo; Li, Rui; Zhao, Liang Sun, Xu; Wang, Limin; Zeng, Bo; Cheng, Jie; Wang, Ying; Peng, Jianchang; Song, Xiaoxin

    2014-06-15

    A long-pulse generator TPG700L based on a Tesla transformer and a series pulse forming network (PFN) is constructed to generate intense electron beams for the purpose of high power microwave (HPM) generation. The TPG700L mainly consists of a 12-stage PFN, a built-in Tesla transformer in a pulse forming line, a three-electrode gas switch, a transmission line with a trigger, and a load. The Tesla transformer and the compact PFN are the key technologies for the development of the TPG700L. This generator can output electrical pulses with a width as long as 200 ns at a level of 8 GW and a repetition rate of 50 Hz. When used to drive a relative backward wave oscillator for HPM generation, the electrical pulse width is about 100 ns on a voltage level of 520 kV. Factors affecting the pulse waveform of the TPG700L are also discussed. At present, the TPG700L performs well for long-pulse HPM generation in our laboratory.

  9. Assessment of MRI Issues at 3 Tesla for a New Metallic Tissue Marker.

    PubMed

    Cronenweth, Charlotte M; Shellock, Frank G

    2015-01-01

    Purpose. To assess the MRI issues at 3 Tesla for a metallic tissue marker used to localize removal areas of tissue abnormalities. Materials and Methods. A newly designed, metallic tissue marker (Achieve Marker, CareFusion, Vernon Hills, IL) used to mark biopsy sites, particularly in breasts, was assessed for MRI issues which included standardized tests to determine magnetic field interactions (i.e., translational attraction and torque), MRI-related heating, and artifacts at 3 Tesla. Temperature changes were determined for the marker using a gelled-saline-filled phantom. MRI was performed at a relatively high specific absorption rate (whole body averaged SAR, 2.9-W/kg). MRI artifacts were evaluated using T1-weighted, spin echo and gradient echo pulse sequences. Results. The marker displayed minimal magnetic field interactions (2-degree deflection angle and no torque). MRI-related heating was only 0.1°C above background heating (i.e., the heating without the tissue marker present). Artifacts seen as localized signal loss were relatively small in relation to the size and shape of the marker. Conclusions. Based on the findings, the new metallic tissue marker is acceptable or "MR Conditional" (using current labeling terminology) for a patient undergoing an MRI procedure at 3 Tesla or less.

  10. Focused tight dressing does not prevent cochlear implant magnet migration under 1.5 Tesla MRI.

    PubMed

    Cuda, D; Murri, A; Succo, G

    2013-04-01

    We report a retrospective case of inner magnet migration, which occurred after 1.5 Tesla MRI scanning in an adult recipient of a bilateral cochlear implant (CI) despite a focused head dressing. The patient, bilaterally implanted with Nucleus 5 CIs (Cochlear LTD, Sydney, Australia), underwent a 1.5 Tesla cholangio-MRI scan for biliary duct pathology. In subsequent days, a focal skin alteration appeared over the left inner coil. Plain skull radiographs showed partial magnet migration on the left side. Surgical exploration confirmed magnet twisting; the magnet was effectively repositioned. Left CI performance was restored to pre-migration level. The wound healed without complications. Thus, focused dressing does not prevent magnet migration in CI recipients undergoing 1.5 Tesla MRI. All patients should be counselled on this potential complication. A minor surgical procedure is required to reposition the magnet. Nevertheless, timely diagnosis is necessary to prevent skin breakdown and subsequent device contamination. Plain skull radiograph is very effective in identifying magnet twisting; it should be performed systematically after MRI or minimally on all suspected cases.

  11. 7-Tesla MRI demonstrates absence of structural lesions in patients with vestibular paroxysmia.

    PubMed

    Rommer, Paulus S; Wiest, Gerald; Kronnerwetter, Claudia; Zach, Heidemarie; Loader, Benjamin; Elwischger, Kirsten; Trattnig, Siegfried

    2015-01-01

    Vestibular parxoysmia (VP) is a rare vestibular disorder. A neurovascular cross-compression (NVCC) between the vestibulochochlear nerve and an artery seems to be responsible for short attacks of vertigo in this entity. An NVCC can be seen in up to every fourth subject. The significance of these findings is not clear, as not all subjects suffer from symptoms. The aim of the present study was to assess possible structural lesions of the vestibulocochlear nerve by means of high field magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), and whether high field MRI may help to differentiate symptomatic from asymptomatic subjects. 7 Tesla MRI was performed in six patients with VP and confirmed NVCC seen on 1.5 and 3.0 MRI. No structural abnormalities were detected in any of the patients in 7 Tesla MRI. These findings imply that high field MRI does not help to differentiate between symptomatic and asymptomatic NVCC and that the symptoms of VP are not caused by structural nerve lesions. This supports the hypothesis that the nystagmus associated with VP has to be conceived pathophysiologically as an excitatory vestibular phenomenon, being not related to vestibular hypofunction. 7 Tesla MRI outperforms conventional MRI in image resolution and may be useful in vestibular disorders.

  12. A Tesla-type repetitive nanosecond pulse generator for solid dielectric breakdown research.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Liang; Pan, Ya Feng; Su, Jian Cang; Zhang, Xi Bo; Wang, Li Min; Fang, Jin Peng; Sun, Xu; Lui, Rui

    2013-10-01

    A Tesla-type repetitive nanosecond pulse generator including a pair of electrode and a matched absorption resistor is established for the application of solid dielectric breakdown research. As major components, a built-in Tesla transformer and a gas-gap switch are designed to boost and shape the output pulse, respectively; the electrode is to form the anticipated electric field; the resistor is parallel to the electrode to absorb the reflected energy from the test sample. The parameters of the generator are a pulse width of 10 ns, a rise and fall time of 3 ns, and a maximum amplitude of 300 kV. By modifying the primary circuit of the Tesla transformer, the generator can produce both positive and negative pulses at a repetition rate of 1-50 Hz. In addition, a real-time measurement and control system is established based on the solid dielectric breakdown requirements for this generator. With this system, experiments on test samples made of common insulation materials in pulsed power systems are conducted. The preliminary experimental results show that the constructed generator is capable to research the solid dielectric breakdown phenomenon on a nanosecond time scale.

  13. Tesla: An application for real-time data analysis in High Energy Physics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aaij, R.; Amato, S.; Anderlini, L.; Benson, S.; Cattaneo, M.; Clemencic, M.; Couturier, B.; Frank, M.; Gligorov, V. V.; Head, T.; Jones, C.; Komarov, I.; Lupton, O.; Matev, R.; Raven, G.; Sciascia, B.; Skwarnicki, T.; Spradlin, P.; Stahl, S.; Storaci, B.; Vesterinen, M.

    2016-11-01

    Upgrades to the LHCb computing infrastructure in the first long shutdown of the LHC have allowed for high quality decay information to be calculated by the software trigger making a separate offline event reconstruction unnecessary. Furthermore, the storage space of the triggered candidate is an order of magnitude smaller than the entire raw event that would otherwise need to be persisted. Tesla is an application designed to process the information calculated by the trigger, with the resulting output used to directly perform physics measurements.

  14. Poly-coil design for a 60 tesla quasi-stationary magnet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boenig, H. J.; Campbell, L. J.; Hodgdon, M. L.; Lopez, E. A.; Rickel, D. G.; Rogers, J. D.; Schillig, J. B.; Sims, J. R.; Pernambuco-Wise, P.; Schneider-Muntau, H. J.

    1993-02-01

    Among the new facilities to be offered by the National Science Foundation through the National High Magnetic Field Laboratory (NHMFL) are pulsed fields that can only be achieved at a national user facility by virtue of their strength, duration, and volume. In particular, a 44 mm bore pulsed magnet giving a 60 tesla field for 100 ms is in the final design stage. This magnet will be powered by a 1.4 GW motor-generator at Los Alamos and is an important step toward proving design principles that will be needed for the higher field quasi-stationary pulsed magnets that this power source is capable of driving.

  15. Experimental determination of magnetohydrodynamic seawater thruster performance in a two Tesla test facility

    SciTech Connect

    Picologlou, B.; Doss, E.; Black, D.; Sikes, W.C.

    1992-09-01

    A two Tesla test facility was designed, built, and operated to investigate the performance of magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) seawater thrusters. The results of this investigation are used to validate MHD thruster performance computer models. The facility test loop, its components, and their design are presented in detail. Additionally, the test matrix and its rational are discussed. finally, representative experimental results of the test program are presented, and are compared to pretest computer model predictions. Good agreement between predicted and measured data has served to validate the thruster performance computer models.

  16. Experimental determination of magnetohydrodynamic seawater thruster performance in a two Tesla test facility

    SciTech Connect

    Picologlou, B.; Doss, E.; Black, D. ); Sikes, W.C. )

    1992-01-01

    A two Tesla test facility was designed, built, and operated to investigate the performance of magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) seawater thrusters. The results of this investigation are used to validate MHD thruster performance computer models. The facility test loop, its components, and their design are presented in detail. Additionally, the test matrix and its rational are discussed. finally, representative experimental results of the test program are presented, and are compared to pretest computer model predictions. Good agreement between predicted and measured data has served to validate the thruster performance computer models.

  17. Experimental determination of magnetohydrodynamic seawater thruster performance in a two Tesla test facility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Picologlou, B.; Doss, E.; Black, D.; Sikes, W. C.

    1992-08-01

    A two Tesla test facility was designed, built, and operated to investigate the performance of magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) seawater thrusters. The results of this investigation are used to validate MHD thruster performance computer models. The facility test loop, its components, and their design are presented in detail. Additionally, the test matrix and its rational are discussed. Finally, representative experimental results of the test program are presented, and are compared to pretest computer model predictions. Good agreement between predicted and measured data has served to validate the thruster performance computer models.

  18. Adapting TESLA technology for future cw light sources using HoBiCaT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kugeler, O.; Neumann, A.; Anders, W.; Knobloch, J.

    2010-07-01

    The HoBiCaT facility has been set up and operated at the Helmholtz-Zentrum-Berlin and BESSY since 2005. Its purpose is testing superconducting cavities in cw mode of operation and it was successfully demonstrated that TESLA pulsed technology can be used for cw mode of operation with only minor changes. Issues that were addressed comprise of elevated dynamic thermal losses in the cavity walls, necessary modifications in the cryogenics and the cavity processing, the optimum choice of operational parameters such as cavity temperature or bandwidth, the characterization of higher order modes in the cavity, and the usability of existing tuners and couplers for cw.

  19. Science and Technology of the TESLA Electron-Positron Linear Collider

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wagner, Albrecht

    2002-07-01

    Recent analyses of the long term future of particles physics in Asia, Europe, and the U.S.A. have led to the consensus that the next major facility to be built to unravel the secrets of the micro-cosmos is an electron-positron linear collider in the energy range of 500 to 1000 GeV. This collider should be constructed in an as timely fashion as possible to overlap with the Large Hadron Collider, under construction at CERN. Here, the scientific potential and the technological aspects of the TESLA projects, a superconducting collider with an integrated X-ray laser laboratory, are summarised.

  20. 3.0 Tesla magnetic resonance imaging: A new standard in liver imaging?

    PubMed

    Girometti, Rossano

    2015-07-28

    An ever-increasing number of 3.0 Tesla (T) magnets are installed worldwide. Moving from the standard of 1.5 T to higher field strength implies a number of potential advantage and drawbacks, requiring careful optimization of imaging protocols or implementation of novel hardware components. Clinical practice and literature review suggest that state-of-the-art 3.0 T is equivalent to 1.5 T in the assessment of focal liver lesions and diffuse liver disease. Therefore, further technical improvements are needed in order to fully exploit the potential of higher field strength.

  1. Liquid neon heat transfer as applied to a 30 tesla cryomagnet

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Papell, S. S.; Hendricks, R. C.

    1975-01-01

    A 30-tesla magnet design is studied which calls for forced convection liquid neon heat transfer in small coolant channels. The design also requires suppressing boiling by subjecting the fluid to high pressures through use of magnet coils enclosed in a pressure vessel which is maintained at the critical pressure of liquid neon. This high pressure reduces the possibility of the system flow instabilities which may occur at low pressures. The forced convection heat transfer data presented were obtained by using a blowdown technique to force the fluid to flow vertically through a resistance heated, instrumented tube.

  2. COMPARISON OF THE TESLA, NLC AND CLIC BEAM-COLLIMATION SYSTEM PERFORMANCE

    SciTech Connect

    Seryi, Andrei

    2003-05-28

    This report describes studies performed in the frame-work of the Collimation Task Force organized to support the work of the second International Linear Collider Technical Review Committee. The post-linac beam-collimation systems in the TESLA, JLC/NLC and CLIC linear-collider designs are compared using the same computer code under the same assumptions. Their performance is quantified in terms of beam-halo and synchrotron-radiation collimation efficiency. The performance of the current designs varies across projects, and does not always meet the original design goals. But these comparisons suggest that achieving the required performance in a future linear collider is feasible.

  3. Comparison of the TESLA, NLC and CLIC beam-collimation system performance

    SciTech Connect

    Alexandr I Drozhdin; Grahame Blair; Lewis P Keller

    2003-05-28

    This report describes studies performed in the framework of the Collimation Task Force organized to support the work of the International Linear Collider Technical Review Committee. The post-linac beam-collimation systems in the TESLA, JLC/NLC and CLIC linear-collider designs are compared using the same computer code under the same assumptions. Their performance is quantified in terms of beam-halo and synchrotron-radiation collimation efficiency. The performance of the current designs varies across projects, and does not always meet the original design goals. But these comparisons suggest that achieving the required performance in a future linear collider is feasible.

  4. Assessment of the immune responsiveness of mice exposed to a 1. 5-Tesla stationary magnetic field

    SciTech Connect

    Tenforde, T.S.; Shifrine, M.

    1984-01-01

    Humoral and cell-mediated immune responses were assayed following a 6-day exposure of LAF1/J mice to a 1.50 Tesla (1 T . 10(4) Gauss) stationary magnetic field. In tests of the immune response to sheep erythrocytes, the number of Jerne plaques formed by spleen lymphocytes and the level of serum IgM were not significantly different for the exposed mice in comparison with control animals. Tests for mitogen-induced lymphocyte proliferation also demonstrated no significant differences in the response of spleen lymphocytes from exposed and control groups of mice.

  5. 3.0 Tesla magnetic resonance imaging: A new standard in liver imaging?

    PubMed Central

    Girometti, Rossano

    2015-01-01

    An ever-increasing number of 3.0 Tesla (T) magnets are installed worldwide. Moving from the standard of 1.5 T to higher field strength implies a number of potential advantage and drawbacks, requiring careful optimization of imaging protocols or implementation of novel hardware components. Clinical practice and literature review suggest that state-of-the-art 3.0 T is equivalent to 1.5 T in the assessment of focal liver lesions and diffuse liver disease. Therefore, further technical improvements are needed in order to fully exploit the potential of higher field strength. PMID:26244063

  6. Chemical exchange saturation transfer MR imaging of Parkinson’s disease at 3 Tesla

    PubMed Central

    Li, Chunmei; Peng, Shuai; Wang, Rui; Chen, Haibo; Su, Wen; Zhao, Xuna; Zhou, Jinyuan; Chen, Min

    2015-01-01

    Objectives To demonstrate the feasibility of using chemical exchange saturation transfer (CEST) imaging to detect Parkinson’s disease (PD) in patients at 3 Tesla. Methods Twenty-seven PD patients (17 men and 10 women; age range, 54–77 years) and 22 age-matched normal controls (13 men and 9 women; age range, 55–73 years) were examined on a 3-Tesla MRI system. Magnetization transfer spectra with 31 different frequency offsets (−6 to 6 ppm) were acquired at two transverse slices of the head, including the basal ganglia and midbrain. One-way analysis of variance tests was used to compare the differences in CEST imaging signals between PD patients and normal controls. Results Total CEST signal between the offsets of 0 and 4 ppm in the substantia nigra was significantly lower in PD patients than in normal controls (P=0.006), which could be associated with the loss of dopaminergic neurons. Protein-based CEST imaging signals at the offset of 3.5 ppm in the globus pallidus, putamen and caudate were significantly increased in PD patients, compared to normal controls (P<0.001, P=0.003, P<0.001, respectively). Conclusions CEST imaging signals could potentially serve as imaging biomarkers to aid in the non-invasive molecular diagnosis of PD. PMID:25038850

  7. 3D calculations of the Superconducting Super Collider (SSC) 3 Tesla magnet

    SciTech Connect

    Lari, R.J.

    1984-01-01

    A 20 TeV Superconducting Super Collider (SSC) proton accelerator is being proposed by the High Energy Physics Community. One proposal would consist of a ring of magnets 164 km in circumference with a field strength of 3 Tesla and would cost 2.7 billion dollars. The magnet consists of stacked steel laminations with superconducting coils. The desired field uniformity is obtained for all fields from 0.2 to 3 Tesla by using three (or more) different pole shapes. These three different laminations are stacked in the order 1-2-3-1-2-3-... creating a truly three dimensional geometry. A three laminated stack 1-2-3 with periodic boundary conditions at 1 and 3 was assigned about 5000 finite elements per lamination and solved using the computer program TOSCA. To check the TOSCA results, the field of each of the three different shaped laminations was calculated separately using periodic boundary conditions and compared to the two dimensional field calculations using TRIM. This was done for a constant permeability of 2000 and using the B-H table for fully annealed 1010 steel. The difference of the field calculations in the region of interest was always less than +-.2%

  8. In vivo sensitivity estimation and imaging acceleration with rotating RF coil arrays at 7 Tesla.

    PubMed

    Li, Mingyan; Jin, Jin; Zuo, Zhentao; Liu, Feng; Trakic, Adnan; Weber, Ewald; Zhuo, Yan; Xue, Rong; Crozier, Stuart

    2015-03-01

    Using a new rotating SENSitivity Encoding (rotating-SENSE) algorithm, we have successfully demonstrated that the rotating radiofrequency coil array (RRFCA) was capable of achieving a significant reduction in scan time and a uniform image reconstruction for a homogeneous phantom at 7 Tesla. However, at 7 Tesla the in vivo sensitivity profiles (B1(-)) become distinct at various angular positions. Therefore, sensitivity maps at other angular positions cannot be obtained by numerically rotating the acquired ones. In this work, a novel sensitivity estimation method for the RRFCA was developed and validated with human brain imaging. This method employed a library database and registration techniques to estimate coil sensitivity at an arbitrary angular position. The estimated sensitivity maps were then compared to the acquired sensitivity maps. The results indicate that the proposed method is capable of accurately estimating both magnitude and phase of sensitivity at an arbitrary angular position, which enables us to employ the rotating-SENSE algorithm to accelerate acquisition and reconstruct image. Compared to a stationary coil array with the same number of coil elements, the RRFCA was able to reconstruct images with better quality at a high reduction factor. It is hoped that the proposed rotation-dependent sensitivity estimation algorithm and the acceleration ability of the RRFCA will be particularly useful for ultra high field MRI.

  9. Wakefield and RF Kicks Due to Coupler Asymmetry in TESLA-Type Accelerating Cavities

    SciTech Connect

    Bane, K.L.F.; Adolphsen, C.; Li, Z.; Dohlus, M.; Zagorodnov, I.; Gonin, I.; Lunin, A.; Solyak, N.; Yakovlev, V.; Gjonaj, E.; Weiland, T.; /Darmstadt, Tech. Hochsch.

    2008-07-07

    In a future linear collider, such as the International Linear Collider (ILC), trains of high current, low emittance bunches will be accelerated in a linac before colliding at the interaction point. Asymmetries in the accelerating cavities of the linac will generate fields that will kick the beam transversely and degrade the beam emittance and thus the collider performance. In the main linac of the ILC, which is filled with TESLA-type superconducting cavities, it is the fundamental (FM) and higher mode (HM) couplers that are asymmetric and thus the source of such kicks. The kicks are of two types: one, due to (the asymmetry in) the fundamental RF fields and the other, due to transverse wakefields that are generated by the beam even when it is on axis. In this report we calculate the strength of these kicks and estimate their effect on the ILC beam. The TESLA cavity comprises nine cells, one HM coupler in the upstream end, and one (identical, though rotated) HM coupler and one FM coupler in the downstream end (for their shapes and location see Figs. 1, 2) [1]. The cavity is 1.1 m long, the iris radius 35 mm, and the coupler beam pipe radius 39 mm. Note that the couplers reach closer to the axis than the irises, down to a distance of 30 mm.

  10. Encouraging a "Romantic Understanding" of Science: The Effect of the Nikola Tesla Story

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hadzigeorgiou, Yannis; Klassen, Stephen; Klassen, Cathrine Froese

    2012-08-01

    The purpose of this paper is to discuss and apply the notion of romantic understanding by outlining its features and its potential role in science education, to identify its features in the story of Nikola Tesla, and to describe an empirical study conducted to determine the effect of telling such a story to Grade 9 students. Elaborated features of the story are the humanization of meaning, an association with heroes and heroic qualities, the limits of reality and extremes of experience, a sense of wonder, and a contesting of conventions and conventional ideas. The study demonstrates the learning benefits of encouraging a romantic understanding through a story that is structured explicitly around the identified features, in this instance in the context of the production and transmission of alternating current electricity. Quantitative and qualitative analyses of journal entries showed that the group of students who were encouraged to understand the concept of alternating current romantically (the experimental group) became more involved with both the content and the context of the story than a comparison group of students who were taught the concept explicitly, without a context (the control group). The students in the experimental group also performed statistically better on a science-content test taken 1 week and again 8 weeks after the indicated teaching intervention. This finding, along with the content analyses of students' journals, provided evidence of romantic understanding of the science content for those students who listened to the Tesla story.

  11. 77 FR 2269 - Foreign-Trade Zone 18-San Jose, CA, Application for Subzone, Tesla Motors, Inc. (Electric...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-01-17

    ... the foreign components used in export production. The company anticipates that 40 to 65 percent of the... procedures. Customs duties also could possibly be deferred or reduced on foreign status production equipment. Tesla would also be exempt from duty payments on foreign inputs that become scrap during the...

  12. Comparison of different undulator schemes with superimposed alternating gradients for the VUV-FEL at the TESLA Test Facility

    SciTech Connect

    Pflueger, J.; Nikitina, Y.M.

    1995-12-31

    For the VUV-FEL at the TESLA Test Facility an undulator with a total length of 30 m is needed. In this study three different approaches to realize an undulator with a sinusoidal plus a superimposed quadrupolar field were studied with the 3D code MAFIA.

  13. Recurrent ulnar nerve entrapment at the elbow: Correlation of surgical findings and 3-Tesla magnetic resonance neurography.

    PubMed

    Chhabra, Avneesh; Wadhwa, Vibhor; Thakkar, Rashmi S; Carrino, John A; Dellon, A Lee

    2013-01-01

    The authors describe the correlation between 3-Tesla magnetic resonance neurography (MRN) and surgical findings in two patients who underwent multiple previous failed ulnar nerve surgeries. MRN correctly localized the site of the abnormality. Prospectively observed MRN findings of perineural fibrosis, ulnar nerve re-entrapment abnormalities, medial antebrachial cutaneous neuroma and additional median nerve entrapment were confirmed surgically.

  14. Human in vivo cardiac phosphorus NMR spectroscopy at 3.0 Tesla

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bruner, Angela Properzio

    One of the newest methods with great potential for use in clinical diagnosis of heart disease is human, cardiac, phosphorus NMR spectroscopy (cardiac p 31 MRS). Cardiac p31 MRS is able to provide quantitative, non-invasive, functional information about the myocardial energy metabolites such as pH, phosphocreatine (PCr), and adenosinetriphosphate (ATP). In addition to the use of cardiac p3l MRS for other types of cardiac problems, studies have shown that the ratio of PCr/ATP and pH are sensitive and specific markers of ischemia at the myocardial level. In human studies, typically performed at 1.5 Tesla, PCr/ATP has been relatively easy to measure but often requires long scan times to provide adequate signal-to-noise (SNR). In addition, pH which relies on identification of inorganic phosphate (Pi), has rarely been obtained. Significant improvement in the quality of cardiac p31 MRS was achieved through the use of the General Electric SIGNATM 3.0 Tesla whole body magnet, improved coil designs and optimized pulse sequences. Phantom and human studies performed on many types of imaging and spectroscopy sequences, identified breathhold gradient-echo imaging and oblique DRESS p31 spectroscopy as the best compromises between SNR, flexibility and quality localization. Both single-turn and quadrature 10-cm diameter, p31 radiofrequency coils, were tested with the quadrature coil providing greater SNR, but at a greater depth to avoid skeletal muscle contamination. Cardiac p31 MRS obtained in just 6 to 8 minutes, gated, showed both improved SNR and discernment of Pi allowing for pH measurement. A handgrip, in-magnet exerciser was designed, created and tested at 1.5 and 3.0 Tesla on volunteers and patients. In ischemic patients, this exercise was adequate to cause a repeated drop in PCr/ATP and pH with approximately eight minutes of isometric exercise at 30% maximum effort. As expected from literature, this exercise did not cause a drop in PCr/ATP for reference volunteers.

  15. Impairment of chondrocyte biosynthetic activity by exposure to 3-tesla high-field magnetic resonance imaging is temporary.

    PubMed

    Sunk, Ilse-Gerlinde; Trattnig, Siegfried; Graninger, Winfried B; Amoyo, Love; Tuerk, Birgit; Steiner, Carl-Walter; Smolen, Josef S; Bobacz, Klaus

    2006-01-01

    The influence of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) devices at high field strengths on living tissues is unknown. We investigated the effects of a 3-tesla electromagnetic field (EMF) on the biosynthetic activity of bovine articular cartilage. Bovine articular cartilage was obtained from juvenile and adult animals. Whole joints or cartilage explants were subjected to a pulsed 3-tesla EMF; controls were left unexposed. Synthesis of sulfated glycosaminoglycans (sGAGs) was measured by using [35S]sulfate incorporation; mRNA encoding the cartilage markers aggrecan and type II collagen, as well as IL-1beta, were analyzed by RT-PCR. Furthermore, effects of the 3-tesla EMF were determined over the course of time directly after exposure (day 0) and at days 3 and 6. In addition, the influence of a 1.5-tesla EMF on cartilage sGAG synthesis was evaluated. Chondrocyte cell death was assessed by staining with Annexin V and TdT-mediated dUTP nick end labelling (TUNEL). Exposure to the EMF resulted in a significant decrease in cartilage macromolecule synthesis. Gene expression of both aggrecan and IL-1beta, but not of collagen type II, was reduced in comparison with controls. Staining with Annexin V and TUNEL revealed no evidence of cell death. Interestingly, chondrocytes regained their biosynthetic activity within 3 days after exposure, as shown by proteoglycan synthesis rate and mRNA expression levels. Cartilage samples exposed to a 1.5-tesla EMF remained unaffected. Although MRI devices with a field strength of more than 1.5 T provide a better signal-to-noise ratio and thereby higher spatial resolution, their high field strength impairs the biosynthetic activity of articular chondrocytes in vitro. Although this decrease in biosynthetic activity seems to be transient, articular cartilage exposed to high-energy EMF may become vulnerable to damage.

  16. Preliminary Measurement of the Transfer Matrix of a TESLA-type Cavity at FAST

    SciTech Connect

    Halavanau, Aliaksei; Eddy, Nathan; Edstrom, Dean; Lunin, Andrei; Piot, Philippe; Ruan, Jinhao; Santucci, James; Solyak, Nikolay

    2016-06-01

    Superconducting linacs are capable of producing intense, ultra-stable, high-quality electron beams that have widespread application in Science and Industry. Many current and planned projects employ 1.3-GHz 9-cell superconducting cavities of the TESLA design*. In the present paper we discuss the transverse-focusing properties of such a cavity and non-ideal transverse-map effects introduced by field asymmetries in the vicinity of the input and high-order-mode radiofrequency (RF) couplers**. We especially consider the case of a cavity located downstream of an RF-gun in a setup similar to the photoinjector of the Fermilab Accelerator Science and Technology (FAST) facility. Preliminary experimental measurements of the CC2 cavity transverse matrix were carried out at the FAST facility. The results are discussed and compared with analytical and numerical simulations.

  17. Optical Signatures from Magnetic 2-D Electron Gases in High Magnetic Fields to 60 Tesla

    SciTech Connect

    Crooker, S.A.; Kikkawa, J.M.; Awschalom, D.D.; Smorchikova, I.P.; Samarth, N.

    1998-11-08

    We present experiments in the 60 Tesla Long-Pulse magnet at the Los Alamos National High Magnetic Field Lab (NHMFL) focusing on the high-field, low temperature photoluminescence (PL) from modulation-doped ZnSe/Zn(Cd,Mn)Se single quantum wells. High-speed charge-coupled array detectors and the long (2 second) duration of the magnet pulse permit continuous acquisition of optical spectra throughout a single magnet shot. High-field PL studies of the magnetic 2D electron gases at temperatures down to 350mK reveal clear intensity oscillations corresponding to integer quantum Hall filling factors, from which we determine the density of the electron gas. At very high magnetic fields, steps in the PL energy are observed which correspond to the partial unlocking of antiferromagnetically bound pairs of Mn2+ spins.

  18. First Operating Experiences of Beam Position Monitors in the TESLA Test Facility Linac

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lorenz, R.; Sachwitz, M.; Schreiber, H. J.; Tonisch, F.; Castellano, M.; Patteri, P.; Tazzioli, F.; Catani, L.

    1997-05-01

    Different types of monitors where installed in the TESLA Test Facility Linac to measure the beam position. At each superconducting quadrupole, the transverse beam position will be measured with a resolution of better than 10 μm, using a cylindrical cavity excited in the TM_110-mode by an off-center beam. In addition, two 'warm' cavities working at room temperature were built for the Injector I and the Bunch Compressor. The amplitude of the TM_110-mode and its phase are measured in a homodyne receiver. For the experimental area, stripline monitors having a resolution of better than 100 μm were built, tested and installed. The averaged position of the whole bunch train of Injector I is measured in a narrowband receiver using the amplitude-to-phase conversion. This paper summarizes the designs, cold tests and first operating experiences of both monitor types.

  19. D-zero rototrack: first stage of D-zero 2 Tesla solenoid field mapping device

    SciTech Connect

    Yamada, R.; Korienek, J.; Krider, J.; Lindenmeyer, C.; Miksa, D.; Miksa, R.

    1997-09-01

    A simple and portable field mapping device was developed at Fermilab and successfully used to test the D0 2 Tesla solenoid at Toshiba Works in Japan. A description of the mechanical structure, electric driving and control system, and software of the field mapping device is given. Four Hall probe elements of Group3 Digital Gaussmeters are mounted on the radial extension arm of a carriage, which is mounted on a central rotating beam. The system gives two dimensional motions (axial and rotational) to the Hall probes. To make the system compact and portable, we used a laptop computer with PCMCIA cards. For the control system we used commercially available software LabVIEW and Motion Toolbox, and for the data analysis we used Microsoft Excel.

  20. A test of a 2 Tesla superconducting transmission line magnet system

    SciTech Connect

    Piekarz, Henryk; Carcagno, Ruben; Claypool, Brad; Foster, George W.; Hays, Steven L.; Huang, Yuenian; Kashikhin, Vladimir; Malamud, Ernest; Mazur, Peter O.; Nehring, Roger; Oleck, Andrew; Rabehl, Roger; Schlabach, Phil; Sylvester, Cosmore; Velev, Gueorgui; Volk, James; Wake, Masayoshi; /KEK, Tsukuba

    2005-09-01

    Superconducting transmission line magnet test system for an injector accelerator of a staged VLHC proton-proton colliding beam accelerator has been built and operated at Fermilab. The 1.5 m long, twin-aperture, combined function dipole magnet of 2 Tesla field is excited by a single turn 100 kA transmission line superconductor. The 100 kA dc current is generated using dc-dc switching converters powered by a bulk 240 kW supply. A pair of horizontally placed conventional leads facilitates transfer of this current to the magnet transmission line superconductor operating at liquid helium temperature. Fabrication of magnet components and magnet assembly work are described. The magnet test system and its operation are presented, and the performance is summarized.

  1. Preattentive mechanisms of change detection in early auditory cortex: a 7 Tesla fMRI study.

    PubMed

    Szycik, G R; Stadler, J; Brechmann, A; Münte, T F

    2013-12-03

    The auditory system continuously monitors the environment for irregularities in an automatic, preattentive fashion. This is presumably accomplished by two mechanisms: a sensory mechanism detects a deviant sound on the basis of differential refractoriness of neural populations sensitive to the standard and deviant sounds, whereas the cognitive mechanism reveals deviance by comparing incoming auditory information with a template derived from previous input. Using fast event-related high-resolution functional magnetic resonance imaging at 7 Tesla we show that both mechanisms can be mapped to different parts of the auditory cortex both at the group level and the single-subject level. The sensory mechanism is supported by primary auditory areas in Heschl's gyrus whereas the cognitive mechanism is implemented in more anterior secondary auditory areas. Both mechanisms are equally engaged by simple sine-wave tones and speech-related phonemes indicating that streams of speech and non-speech stimuli are processed in a similar fashion.

  2. Fabrication and characterization of a MEMS nano-Tesla ferromagnetic-piezoelectric magnetic sensor array

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qu, Peng; Gollapudi, Sreenivasulu; Bidthanapally, Rao; Srinivasan, Gopalan; Petrov, Vladimir; Qu, Hongwei

    2016-06-01

    A self-biased MEMS magnetic sensor array with ferromagnetic-piezoelectric composites has been fabricated and characterized. The array with two Quartz-Nickel-Metglas cantilevers with nano-tesla sensitivity was fabricated by MEMS processes including silicon-quartz low temperature bonding, quartz wafer thinning, and electroplating of thick nickel thin films. Under self-biasing due to magnetization grading of ferromagnetic layer, magnetoelectric coefficients of 6.6 and 5.6 V/cm Oe and resolutions of ˜0.58 and ˜0.75 nT are obtained at the mechanical resonant frequencies of 191.5 and 184.8 Hz for the two sensors in the array, respectively. Such arrays have the potential for applications in biomagnetic imaging technologies including magneto-cardiography.

  3. Shot noise startup of the 6 NM SASE FEL at the Tesla Test Facility

    SciTech Connect

    Pierini, P.; Fawley, W.M.

    1995-12-31

    We present here an analysis of the shot noise startup of the 6 nm SASE FEI proposal at the TESLA Test Facility in DESY The statistical of the saturation length and output power due to the intrinsic randomness of the noise startup are investigated with the use of the 2D time dependent code GINGER, that takes into account propagation effects and models shot noise. We then provide estimates for the spectral contents and linewidth of the emitted radiation and describe its spiking characteristics. The output radiation will develop superradiant spikes seeded by the shot noise in the electron beam, which can entrance the average emitted power at the expense of some spectral broadening.

  4. Current Progress in Fabrication of a 14 Tesla Nb3Sn Dipole

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holik, Eddie, III; Benson, Christopher; Damborsky, Kyle; Diaczenko, Nick; Elliott, Tim; Garrison, Ray; Jaisle, Andrew; McInturff, Alfred; McIntyre, Peter; Sattarov, Dior

    2012-03-01

    The Accelerator Technology Laboratory at Texas A&M is fabricating a model dipole magnet, TAMU3, designed to operate at a 14 Tesla bore field. The dipole employs an advanced internal-tin Nb3Sn/Cu composite strand with enhanced current density. The coils must be processed through a heat treatment after winding, during which the Sn within the heterogeneous strands diffuse into the Cu/Nb matrix to form high-performance superconducting layers. Heat treatment of the first coil assembly revealed tin leakage from the Sn cores that was caused by omission of a pre-anneal step in the heat treatment. We are evaluating the electrical properties of the coil, the microstructure and short-sample superconducting performance of cut-off samples of current leads to determine the extent of damage to the performance of the windings. Results of those tests and plans for construction of TAMU3 will be presented.

  5. Steering and focusing effects in TESLA cavity due to high order mode and input couplers

    SciTech Connect

    Piot, P.; Dohlus, M.; Flottmann, K.; Marx, M.; Wipf, S.G.; /DESY

    2005-05-01

    Many state-of-art electron accelerator proposals incorporate TESLA-type superconducting radio-frequency (rf) cavities [1]. These standing wave rf cavities include rf input couplers and a pair of high order mode (HOM) couplers to absorb the energy associated to HOM field excited as the bunch passes through the cavity. In the present paper we investigate, using numerical simulations, the impact of the input and HOM couplers on the beam dynamics to zeroth and first order in initial position, and present parametric studies of the strength of these effects for various incoming beam energies. We finally study the impact of this asymmetric field on the beam dynamics, taking as an example the low energy section of the X-ray FEL injector.

  6. Parameter study of the VUV-FEL at the Tesla Test Facility

    SciTech Connect

    Brefeld, W.; Faatz, B.

    1995-12-31

    In this contribution we present a detailed study of the influence of the electron beam and machine parameters on the performance of the TTF VUV FEL, which is in its design stage at DESY. The TTF FEL will be a 6 nm SASE device operating with the beam provided by the Tesla Test Facility superconducting linac, driven by an rf photcathode gun. The FEL output power and saturation length have been assessed with the use of different 2D3-D steady state simulation codes. The parameter range over which the FEL would reach saturation within the specified undulator length of 25 to 30 m have been determined and checked against semi-analytical expressions.

  7. GRASE imaging at 3 Tesla with template interactive phase-encoding.

    PubMed

    Jovicich, J; Norris, D G

    1998-06-01

    A new method for ordering the phase-encoding gradient is proposed, and an application for short effective TE gradient- and spin-echo (GRASE) imaging is demonstrated. The proposed method calculates the phase-encoding order from the signal decay of a template scan (hence "template interactive phase-encoding" or TIPE). Computer simulations are used to compare the point spread functions of different phase-encoding orders giving short effective echo times (kb centric GRASE, centric GRASE, centric TIPE). The conventional centric phase-encoding order is also considered for GRASE. The conventional centric method is sensitive to both amplitude and phase modulation of the signal in k-space. The centric TIPE method gives the least amplitude modulation artifacts but is vulnerable to phase artifacts. The TIPE experiment was implemented on a 3 Tesla system. To the best of our knowledge, we present the first in vivo GRASE images at this field strength.

  8. Design of the superconducting magnet for 9.4 Tesla whole-body magnetic resonance imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Y.; Wang, Q.; Dai, Y.; Ni, Z.; Zhu, X.; Li, L.; Zhao, B.; Chen, S.

    2017-02-01

    A superconducting magnet for 9.4 Tesla whole-body magnetic resonance imaging is designed and fabricated in Institute of Electrical Engineering, Chinese Academy of Sciences. In this paper, the electromagnetic design methods of the main coils and compensating coils are presented. Sensitivity analysis is performed for all superconducting coils. The design of the superconducting shimming coils is also presented and the design of electromagnetic decoupling of the Z2 coils from the main coils is introduced. Stress and strain analysis with both averaged and detailed models is performed with finite element method. A quench simulation code with anisotropic continuum model and control volume method is developed by us and is verified by experimental study. By means of the quench simulation code, the quench protection system for the 9.4 T magnet is designed for the main coils, the compensating coils and the shimming coils. The magnet cryostat design with zero helium boiling-off technology is also introduced.

  9. LEFT VERSUS RIGHT HEMISPHERE DIFFERENCES IN BRAIN CONNECTIVITY: 4-TESLA HARDI TRACTOGRAPHY IN 569 TWINS.

    PubMed

    Daianu, Madelaine; Jahanshad, Neda; Dennis, Emily L; Toga, Arthur W; McMahon, Katie L; de Zubicaray, Greig I; Martin, Nicholas G; Wright, Margaret J; Hickie, Ian B; Thompson, Paul M

    2012-05-01

    Diffusion imaging can map anatomical connectivity in the living brain, offering new insights into fundamental questions such as how the left and right brain hemispheres differ. Anatomical brain asymmetries are related to speech and language abilities, but less is known about left/right hemisphere differences in brain wiring. To assess this, we scanned 457 young adults (age 23.4±2.0 SD years) and 112 adolescents (age 12-16) with 4-Tesla 105-gradient high-angular resolution diffusion imaging. We extracted fiber tracts throughout the brain with a Hough transform method. A 70×70 connectivity matrix was created, for each subject, based on the proportion of fibers intersecting 70 cortical regions. We identified significant differences in the proportions of fibers intersecting left and right hemisphere cortical regions. The degree of asymmetry in the connectivity matrices varied with age, as did the asymmetry in network topology measures such as the small-world effect.

  10. Wake fields in 9-cell TESLA accelerating structures : Spectral Element Discontinuous Galerkin (SEDG) simulations.

    SciTech Connect

    Min, M.; Fischer, P. F.; Chae, Y.-C.

    2007-01-01

    Using our recently developed high-order accurate Maxwell solver, NEKCEM, we carried out longitudinal wakefield calculations for a 9-cell TESLA cavity structure in 3D. Indirect method is used for wake potential calculations. Computational results with NEKCEM are compared with those of GdfidL. NEKCEM uses a spectral element discontinuous Galerkin (SEDG) method based on a domain decomposition approach using spectral-element discretizations on Gauss-Lobatto-Legendre grids with body-conforming hexahedral meshes. The numerical scheme is designed to ensure high-order spectral accuracy, using the discontinuous Galerkin form with boundary conditions weakly enforced through a flux term between elements. Concerns related to implementation on wake potential calculations are discussed, and wake potential calculations with indirect method by NEKCEM compared with the results of the finite difference time-domain code GdfidL.

  11. Magnet Design and Analysis of a 40 Tesla Long Pulse System Energized by a Battery Bank

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lv, Y. L.; Peng, T.; Wang, G. B.; Ding, T. H.; Han, X. T.; Pan, Y.; Li, L.

    2013-03-01

    A 40 tesla long pulse magnet and a battery bank as the power supply have been designed. This is now under construction at the Wuhan National High Magnetic Field Center. The 22 mm bore magnet will generate smooth pulses with duration 1 s and rise time 0.5 s. The battery bank consists of 945 12V/200 Ah lead-acid battery cells. The magnet and battery bank were optimized by codes developed in-house and by ANSYS. The coil was made from soft copper with internal reinforcement by fiber-epoxy composite; it is divided into two sections connected in series. The inner section consists of helix coils with each layer reinforced by Zylon composite. The outer section will be wound from copper sheet and externally reinforced by carbon fiber composite.

  12. Comparison of the TESLA, NLC and CLIC Beam Collimation Systems Performance

    SciTech Connect

    Keller, Lewis P

    2003-03-27

    This note describes studies performed in the framework of the Collimation Task Force organized to support the work of the International Linear Collider Technical Review Committee. The post-linac beam-collimation systems in the TESLA, JLC/NLC and CLIC linear-collider designs are compared using the same computer code under the same assumptions. Their performance is quantified in terms of beam-halo and synchrotron-radiation collimation efficiency. The performance of the current designs varies across projects and does not always meet the original design goals. However, these comparisons suggest that achieving the required performance in a future linear collider is feasible. The post-TRC plans of the Collimation Task Force are outlined briefly in closing.

  13. Low-noise nano superconducting quantum interference device operating in Tesla magnetic fields.

    PubMed

    Schwarz, Tobias; Nagel, Joachim; Wölbing, Roman; Kemmler, Matthias; Kleiner, Reinhold; Koelle, Dieter

    2013-01-22

    Superconductivity in the cuprate YBa(2)Cu(3)O(7) (YBCO) persists up to huge magnetic fields (B) up to several tens of Teslas, and sensitive direct current (dc) superconducting quantum interference devices (SQUIDs) can be realized in epitaxially grown YBCO films by using grain boundary Josephson junctions (GBJs). Here we present the realization of high-quality YBCO nanoSQUIDs, patterned by focused ion beam milling. We demonstrate low-noise performance of such a SQUID up to B = 1 T applied parallel to the plane of the SQUID loop at the temperature T = 4.2 K. The GBJs are shunted by a thin Au layer to provide nonhysteretic current voltage characteristics, and the SQUID incorporates a 90 nm wide constriction which is used for on-chip modulation of the magnetic flux through the SQUID loop. The white flux noise of the device increases only slightly from 1.3 μΦ(0)/(Hz)(1/2) at B = 0 to 2.3 μΦ(0)/(Hz))(1/2) at 1 T. Assuming that a point-like magnetic particle with magnetization in the plane of the SQUID loop is placed directly on top of the constriction and taking into account the geometry of the SQUID, we calculate a spin sensitivity S(μ)(1/2) = 62 μ(B)/(Hz))(1/2) at B = 0 and 110 μ(B)/(Hz))(1/2) at 1 T. The demonstration of low noise of such a SQUID in Tesla fields is a decisive step toward utilizing the full potential of ultrasensitive nanoSQUIDs for direct measurements of magnetic hysteresis curves of magnetic nanoparticles and molecular magnets.

  14. Magnetic Texture & Frustration in Quantum Magnets via Strain Measurements to 100 Tesla

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jaime, Marcelo

    2014-03-01

    Strong geometrical frustration in magnets leads to exotic states, such as spin liquids, spin supersolids, magnetic solitons, and complex magnetic textures. SrCu2(BO3)2 , a spin-1/2 Heisenberg antiferromagnet in the archetypical Shastry-Sutherland lattice, exhibits a rich spectrum of magnetization plateaus and stripe-like magnetic textures in applied fields. We observed new magnetic textures via optical FBG magnetostriction and magnetocaloric measurements in fields up to 100.75 Tesla at 73.6 T and at 82 T which we attribute, using a controlled density matrix renormalization group approach, to a 2/5 plateau and to the long-predicted 1/2-saturation plateau. The plateau predicted at 2/5 saturation is particularly interesting since strain appears to be the only experimental probe with enough sensitivity to reveal it as magnetization probes see a much more gradual change in the same field range. BiCu2PO6 is a frustrated two-leg spin ladder compound with a spin gap that can be closed with a magnetic field of approximately 20T to induce a soliton lattice. Time permitting, I will also discuss magnetization, magnetostriction and specific heat vs magnetic fields to 65 T used to obtain the anisotropic (H,T) phase diagram in BiCu2PO6 single crystal samples. Work at the NHMFL was supported by the National Science Foundation, the US Department of Energy Office of Basic Energy Science through the project ``Science at 100 Tesla,'' and the State of Florida.

  15. A 10 Kelvin 3 Tesla Magnet for Space Flight ADR Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tuttle, Jim; Shirron, Peter; Canavan, Edgar; DiPirro, Michael; Riall, Sara; Pourrahimi, Shahin

    2003-01-01

    Many future space flight missions are expected to use adiabatic demagnetization refrigerators (ADRs) to reach detector operating temperatures well below one Kelvin. The goal is to operate each ADR with a mechanical cooler as its heat sink, thus avoiding the use of liquid cryogens. Although mechanical coolers are being developed to operate at temperatures of 6 Kelvin and below, there is a large efficiency cost associated with operating them at the bottom of their temperature range. For the multi-stage ADR system being developed at Goddard Space Flight Center, the goal is to operate with a 10 Kelvin mechanical cooler heat sink. With currently available paramagnetic materials, the highest temperature ADR stage in such a system will require a magnetic field of approximately three Tesla. Thus the goal is to develop a small, lightweight three Tesla superconducting magnet for operation at 10 Kelvin. It is important that this magnet have a low current/field ratio. Because traditional NbTi magnets do not operate safely above about six Kelvin, a magnet with a higher Tc is required. The primary focus has been on Nb3Sn magnets. Since standard Nb3Sn wire must be coated with thick insulation, wound on a magnet mandrel and then reacted, standard Nb,Sn magnets are quite heavy and require high currents Superconducting Systems developed a Nb3Sn wire which can be drawn down to small diameter, reacted, coated with thin insulation and then wound on a small diameter coil form. By using this smaller wire and operating closer to the wire s critical current, it should be possible to reduce the mass and operating current of 10 Kelvin magnets. Using this "react-then-wind" technology, Superconducting Systems has produced prototype 10 Kelvin magnets. This paper describes the development and testing of these magnets and discusses the outlook for including 10 Kelvin magnets on space-flight missions.

  16. Modules for 6.0 Tesla, vertically separated, clustered or distributed lattices

    SciTech Connect

    Peggs, S.

    1985-10-01

    A total of four lattices have been designed for distributed and (3,3) clustered versions of the SSC, and are available in the SSC database, SSCDB. These lattices are constructed of the same four basic modules, which with only minor tuning can be re-organised to form many conceivable realistic geometries. One module is trivial, consisting of regular cells in a long main arc. The description of the other three modules is the central theme of this report. Potential improvements in both the modules and their implementation are also mentioned. The lattices, with the generic name VSDlbnn.DAT, are in MAD/standard input format in the [SSCDB.LATTICES] directory of the database. Lower case letters in the generic name represent variable characters, where {open_quotes}b{close_quotes} is either C or D, according to whether the lattice is (3,3) Clustered or Distributed, and where {open_quotes}nn{close_quotes} is 01 or 10, according to whether the collision beta is {beta}{sup *} = 1.0 or 10.0 metres, in luminosity or injection lattices. The general title {open_quotes}VS{close_quotes} stands for the Vertical Separation of the two beam lines, with a (total) separation in the main arcs of 0.70 metres, while the notation {open_quotes}Dl{close_quotes} reflects the regular cell dipoles of 6.0 Tesla ({open_quotes}D{close_quotes}), with a phase advance per cell of 60 degrees ({open_quotes}1{close_quotes}). The half cell length is 100 metres. It would be useful for lattice designers and users in the SSC design community to agree on some such lattice naming convention, even if the agreement is merely informal. Two criticisms of the above convention are first, that since the magnet selection for the SSC has fixed the dipole field to be close to 6.4 Tesla, the {open_quotes}D{close_quotes} definition of dipole strength is redundant, and second, that collision betas of less than 1.0 metre can not be handled unless three digits, {open_quotes}nnn{close_quotes}, are included.

  17. Magnetic resonance imaging investigation of the bone conduction implant – a pilot study at 1.5 Tesla

    PubMed Central

    Jansson, Karl-Johan Fredén; Håkansson, Bo; Reinfeldt, Sabine; Rigato, Cristina; Eeg-Olofsson, Måns

    2015-01-01

    Purpose The objective of this pilot study was to investigate if an active bone conduction implant (BCI) used in an ongoing clinical study withstands magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of 1.5 Tesla. In particular, the MRI effects on maximum power output (MPO), total harmonic distortion (THD), and demagnetization were investigated. Implant activation and image artifacts were also evaluated. Methods and materials One implant was placed on the head of a test person at the position corresponding to the normal position of an implanted BCI and applied with a static pressure using a bandage and scanned in a 1.5 Tesla MRI camera. Scanning was performed both with and without the implant, in three orthogonal planes, and for one spin-echo and one gradient-echo pulse sequence. Implant functionality was verified in-between the scans using an audio processor programmed to generate a sequence of tones when attached to the implant. Objective verification was also carried out by measuring MPO and THD on a skull simulator as well as retention force, before and after MRI. Results It was found that the exposure of 1.5 Tesla MRI only had a minor effect on the MPO, ie, it decreased over all frequencies with an average of 1.1±2.1 dB. The THD remained unchanged above 300 Hz and was increased only at lower frequencies. The retention magnet was demagnetized by 5%. The maximum image artifacts reached a distance of 9 and 10 cm from the implant in the coronal plane for the spin-echo and the gradient-echo sequence, respectively. The test person reported no MRI induced sound from the implant. Conclusion This pilot study indicates that the present BCI may withstand 1.5 Tesla MRI with only minor effects on its performance. No MRI induced sound was reported, but the head image was highly distorted near the implant. PMID:26604836

  18. Sex hormone status in male rats after exposure to 50 Hz, 5 mTesla magnetic field.

    PubMed

    Mostafa, R M; Moustafa, Y M; Ali, F M; Shafik, A

    2006-01-01

    The question of whether extremely low frequency magnetic fields can affect biological system has attracted attention. The theoretical possibility of such an interaction is often questioned and the site of interaction is unknown. The influence of extremely low frequency magnetic field of 50 Hz, 5 mTesla on sex hormone status was studied. 60 male albino rats were divided into 6 groups and were continuously exposed to 50 Hz, 5 mTesla magnetic field generated by magnetic field chamber for periods of 1, 2 and 4 weeks. For each experimental point, sham treated group was used as a control. Assay of serum testosterone LH, FSH, and prolactin were performed. Serum testosterone showed no significant changes. FSH showed significant increase than sham exposed group after 1 week magnetic field exposure. LH showed significant increase than sham exposed group only after 4 weeks magnetic field exposure, while serum prolactin hormone level showed a significant increase in all magnetic field exposed groups than sham exposed animals. Exposure to 50 Hz, 5 mTesla magnetic field for periods of 1, 2 and 4 weeks has no effect on testosterone level, some changes on FSH and LH serum levels and increase in serum prolactin level.

  19. Is the Ellipsoid Formula the New Standard for 3-Tesla MRI Prostate Volume Calculation without Endorectal Coil?

    PubMed

    Haas, Matthias; Günzel, Karsten; Miller, Kurt; Hamm, Bernd; Cash, Hannes; Asbach, Patrick

    2017-01-01

    Prostate volume in multiparametric MRI (mpMRI) is of clinical importance. For 3-Tesla mpMRI without endorectal coil, there is no distinctive standard for volume calculation. We tested the accuracy of the ellipsoid formula with planimetric volume measurements as reference and investigated the correlation of gland volume and cancer detection rate on MRI/ultrasound (MRI/US) fusion-guided biopsy. One hundred forty-three patients with findings on 3-Tesla mpMRI suspicious of cancer and subsequent MRI/US fusion-guided targeted biopsy and additional systematic biopsy were analyzed. T2-weighted images were used for measuring the prostate diameters and for planimetric volume measurement by a segmentation software. Planimetric and calculated prostate volumes were compared with clinical data. The median prostate volume was 48.1 ml (interquartile range (IQR) 36.9-62.1 ml). Volume calculated by the ellipsoid formula showed a strong concordance with planimetric volume, with a tendency to underestimate prostate volume (median volume 43.1 ml (IQR 31.2-58.8 ml); r = 0.903, p < 0.001). There was a moderate, significant inverse correlation of prostate volume to a positive biopsy result (r = -0.24, p = 0.004). The ellipsoid formula gives sufficient approximation of prostate volume on 3-Tesla mpMRI without endorectal coil. It allows a fast, valid volume calculation in prostate MRI datasets.

  20. Performance Analysis of Memory Transfers and GEMM Subroutines on NVIDIA Tesla GPU Cluster

    SciTech Connect

    Allada, Veerendra, Benjegerdes, Troy; Bode, Brett

    2009-08-31

    Commodity clusters augmented with application accelerators are evolving as competitive high performance computing systems. The Graphical Processing Unit (GPU) with a very high arithmetic density and performance per price ratio is a good platform for the scientific application acceleration. In addition to the interconnect bottlenecks among the cluster compute nodes, the cost of memory copies between the host and the GPU device have to be carefully amortized to improve the overall efficiency of the application. Scientific applications also rely on efficient implementation of the BAsic Linear Algebra Subroutines (BLAS), among which the General Matrix Multiply (GEMM) is considered as the workhorse subroutine. In this paper, they study the performance of the memory copies and GEMM subroutines that are critical to port the computational chemistry algorithms to the GPU clusters. To that end, a benchmark based on the NetPIPE framework is developed to evaluate the latency and bandwidth of the memory copies between the host and the GPU device. The performance of the single and double precision GEMM subroutines from the NVIDIA CUBLAS 2.0 library are studied. The results have been compared with that of the BLAS routines from the Intel Math Kernel Library (MKL) to understand the computational trade-offs. The test bed is a Intel Xeon cluster equipped with NVIDIA Tesla GPUs.

  1. MEG evaluation of pico-Tesla external TMS on multiple sclerosis patients.

    PubMed

    Anninos, P; Adamopoulos, A; Kotini, A; Tsagas, N

    2016-07-01

    Magnetoencephalographic (MEG) recordings of 10 multiple sclerosis (MS) patients (2 men, 8 women, mean 41.3±9.5 years, mean disease duration 12.7±7.2 years) were obtained using a whole-head 122 - channel MEG system in a magnetically shielded room of low magnetic noise. Our experimental design was double-blind in order to look for possible effect of external pico - Tesla Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation (pT-TMS). The external pT-TMS was applied on the MS patients with proper field characteristics (magnetic field amplitude: 1-7.5pT, frequency: the alpha-rhythm of the patient 8-13Hz) which were obtained prior to the application of pT-TMS. Each MS patient had two separate recording sessions consisting of 3 runs in between where were given real or sham pT-TMS. It was then tried to predict the real and sham stimulation sessions based on the changes in the mean peak frequency difference (MPFD) observed in the brain of the patients in the 2-7Hz frequency band. After unblinding it was found a significant effect of an increase of frequencies in the range of 2-7Hz across the subjects followed by an improvement and normalization of the MEG.

  2. New microwave beam position monitors for the TESLA test facility—FEL

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kamps, T.; Lorenz, R.

    1998-12-01

    Beam-based alignment is essential for the operation of the SASE-FEL at the TESLA Test Facility Linac. In order to ensure the overlap of the photon beam and the electron beam, the position of the electron beam has to be measured along the undulator beamline with a high resolution. Due to the severe space limitations, a new microwave concept is being considered. It is based on special ridged waveguides coupling by small slots to the magnetic field of the electron beam. The four waveguides and slots of each monitor were split into two symmetric pairs separated in beam direction. All waveguides are about 35 degrees apart in azimuth from the horizontal axis and will be fabricated using electro-discharge machining (EDM). Waveguide-to-coax adaptors were designed to couple the signal of each waveguide into a coaxial cable. The goal is to measure the averaged position of a bunch train in a narrowband receiver with a center frequency of 12 GHz. A prototype of this monitor was built and tested on a testbench, as well as at the CLIC Test Facility at CERN. The paper summarizes the concept, the design, and further improvements of the waveguide monitor.

  3. Constructing a 4-TESLA Large Thin Solenoid at the Limit of what can BE Safely Operated

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hervé, A.

    The 4-tesla, 6 m free bore CMS solenoid has been successfully tested, operated and mapped at CERN during the autumn of 2006 in a surface hall and fully recommissioned in the underground experimental area in the autumn of 2008. The conceptual design started in 1990, the R&D studies in 1993, and the construction was approved in 1997. At the time the main parameters of this project were considered beyond what was thought possible as, in particular, the total stored magnetic energy reaches 2.6 GJ for a specific magnetic energy density exceeding 11 kJ/kg of cold mass. During this period, the international design and construction team had to make several important technical choices, particularly mechanical ones, to maximize the chances of reaching the nominal induction of 4 T. These design choices are explained and critically reviewed in the light of what is presently known to determine if better solutions would be possible today for constructing a new large high-field thin solenoid for a future detector magnet.

  4. Constructing a 4-Tesla Large Thin Solenoid at the Limit of what can BE Safely Operated

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hervé, A.

    The 4-tesla, 6m free bore CMS solenoid has been successfully tested, operated and mapped at CERN during the autumn of 2006 in a surface hall and fully recommissioned in the underground experimental area in the autumn of 2008. The conceptual design started in 1990, the R&D studies in 1993, and the construction was approved in 1997. At the time the main parameters of this project were considered beyond what was thought possible as, in particular, the total stored magnetic energy reaches 2.6GJ for a specific magnetic energy density exceeding 11 kJ/kg of cold mass. During this period, the international design and construction team had to make several important technical choices, particularly mechanical ones, to maximize the chances of reaching the nominal induction of 4T. These design choices are explained and critically reviewed in the light of what is presently known to determine if better solutions would be possible today for constructing a new large high-field thin solenoid for a future detector magnet.

  5. Imaging islets labeled with magnetic nanoparticles at 1.5 Tesla.

    PubMed

    Tai, Joo Ho; Foster, Paula; Rosales, Alma; Feng, Biao; Hasilo, Craig; Martinez, Violetta; Ramadan, Soha; Snir, Jonatan; Melling, C W James; Dhanvantari, Savita; Rutt, Brian; White, David J G

    2006-11-01

    We have developed a magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) technique for imaging Feridex (superparamagnetic iron oxide [SPIO])-labeled islets of Langerhans using a standard clinical 1.5-Tesla (T) scanner and employing steady-state acquisition imaging sequence (3DFIESTA). Both porcine and rat islets were labeled with SPIO by a transfection technique using a combination of poly-l-lysine and electroporation. Electron microscopy demonstrated presence of SPIO particles within the individual islet cells, including beta-cells and particles trapped between cell membranes. Our labeling method produced a transfection rate of 860 pg to 3.4 ng iron per islet, dependent on the size of the islet. The labeling procedure did not disrupt either the function or viability of the islets. In vitro 3DFIESTA magnetic resonance images of single-labeled islets corresponded with their optical images. In vivo T2*-weighted scan using 1.5 T detected as few as 200 SPIO-labeled islets transplanted under rat kidney capsule, which correlated with immunohistochemistry of the transplant for insulin and iron. Ex vivo 3DFIESTA images of kidneys containing 200, 800 or 2,000 SPIO-labeled islet isografts showed good correlation between signal loss and increasing numbers of islets. These data provide evidence that islets can be labeled with SPIO and imaged using clinically available 1.5- T MRI.

  6. Tuning magnetic disorder in diluted magnetic semiconductors using high fields to 89 Tesla

    SciTech Connect

    Crooker, Scott A; Samarth, Nitin

    2008-01-01

    We describe recent and ongoing studies at the National High Magnetic Field Laboratory at Los Alamos using the new '100 Tesla Multi-Shot Magnet', which is presently delivering fields up to {approx}89 T during its commissioning. We discuss the first experiments performed in this magnet system, wherein the linewidth of low-temperature photoluminescence spectra was used to directly reveal the degree of magnetic alloy disorder 'seen' by excitons in single Zn{sub 0.80}Cd{sub 0.22}Mn{sub 0.08}Se quantum wells. The magnetic potential landscape in II-VI diluted magnetic semiconductors (DMS) is typically smoothed when the embedded Mn{sup 2+} spins align in an applied field. However, an important (but heretofore untested) prediction of current models of compositional disorder is that magnetic alloy fluctuations in many DMS compounds should increase again in very large magnetic fields approaching 100 T. We observed precisely this increase above {approx}70 T, in agreement with a simple model of magnetic alloy disorder.

  7. An inverted-microstrip resonator for human head proton MR imaging at 7 tesla.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xiaoliang; Ugurbil, Kamil; Sainati, Robert; Chen, Wei

    2005-03-01

    As an extension of the previously developed microstrip transmission line (MTL) RF coil design, a high-frequency RF volume coil using multiple inverted MTL (iMTL) resonators for human head imaging at high magnetic field strength of 7 tesla (T) is reported. Compared to conventional MTL resonators, iMTL resonators can operate at higher frequency with lower losses and, thus, are suitable for designs of high-frequency RF volume coils with large coil size for human MR imaging and spectroscopy at high fields. An approach using capacitive terminations was analyzed and applied to the design of the iMTL volume coil for improving RF field homogeneity and broadening frequency-tuning range. A performance-comparison study was conducted between the prototype iMTL volume coil and a custom-built TEM volume coil at 7 T. The iMTL volume coil presents a comparable SNR and intrinsic B1 homogeneity to the TEM volume coil. Phantom and the human head images acquired using the iMTL volume coil are also presented. The proposed iMTL volume coil provides an efficient and alternative solution to design high-frequency and large-size volume coils for human MR applications at very high fields.

  8. Human brain diffusion tensor imaging at submillimeter isotropic resolution on a 3Tesla clinical MRI scanner.

    PubMed

    Chang, Hing-Chiu; Sundman, Mark; Petit, Laurent; Guhaniyogi, Shayan; Chu, Mei-Lan; Petty, Christopher; Song, Allen W; Chen, Nan-kuei

    2015-09-01

    The advantages of high-resolution diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) have been demonstrated in a recent post-mortem human brain study (Miller et al., NeuroImage 2011;57(1):167-181), showing that white matter fiber tracts can be much more accurately detected in data at a submillimeter isotropic resolution. To our knowledge, in vivo human brain DTI at a submillimeter isotropic resolution has not been routinely achieved yet because of the difficulty in simultaneously achieving high resolution and high signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) in DTI scans. Here we report a 3D multi-slab interleaved EPI acquisition integrated with multiplexed sensitivity encoded (MUSE) reconstruction, to achieve high-quality, high-SNR and submillimeter isotropic resolution (0.85×0.85×0.85mm(3)) in vivo human brain DTI on a 3Tesla clinical MRI scanner. In agreement with the previously reported post-mortem human brain DTI study, our in vivo data show that the structural connectivity networks of human brains can be mapped more accurately and completely with high-resolution DTI as compared with conventional DTI (e.g., 2×2×2mm(3)).

  9. 21 Tesla Fourier Transform Ion Cyclotron Resonance Mass Spectrometer Greatly Expands Mass Spectrometry Toolbox

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shaw, Jared B.; Lin, Tzu-Yung; Leach, Franklin E.; Tolmachev, Aleksey V.; Tolić, Nikola; Robinson, Errol W.; Koppenaal, David W.; Paša-Tolić, Ljiljana

    2016-12-01

    We provide the initial performance evaluation of a 21 Tesla Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometer operating at the Environmental Molecular Sciences Laboratory at the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory. The spectrometer constructed for the 21T system employs a commercial dual linear ion trap mass spectrometer coupled to a FTICR spectrometer designed and built in-house. Performance gains from moving to higher magnetic field strength are exemplified by the measurement of peptide isotopic fine structure, complex natural organic matter mixtures, and large proteins. Accurate determination of isotopic fine structure was demonstrated for doubly charged Substance P with minimal spectral averaging, and 8158 molecular formulas assigned to Suwannee River Fulvic Acid standard with root-mean-square (RMS) error of 10 ppb. We also demonstrated superior performance for intact proteins; namely, broadband isotopic resolution of the entire charge state distribution of apo-transferrin (78 kDa) and facile isotopic resolution of monoclonal antibody under a variety of acquisition parameters (e.g., 6 s time-domains with absorption mode processing yielded resolution of approximately 1 M at m/z = 2700).

  10. 7 Tesla fMRI Reveals Systematic Functional Organization for Binocular Disparity in Dorsal Visual Cortex

    PubMed Central

    Goncalves, Nuno R.; Ban, Hiroshi; Sánchez-Panchuelo, Rosa M.; Francis, Susan T.; Schluppeck, Denis

    2015-01-01

    The binocular disparity between the views of the world registered by the left and right eyes provides a powerful signal about the depth structure of the environment. Despite increasing knowledge of the cortical areas that process disparity from animal models, comparatively little is known about the local architecture of stereoscopic processing in the human brain. Here, we take advantage of the high spatial specificity and image contrast offered by 7 tesla fMRI to test for systematic organization of disparity representations in the human brain. Participants viewed random dot stereogram stimuli depicting different depth positions while we recorded fMRI responses from dorsomedial visual cortex. We repeated measurements across three separate imaging sessions. Using a series of computational modeling approaches, we report three main advances in understanding disparity organization in the human brain. First, we show that disparity preferences are clustered and that this organization persists across imaging sessions, particularly in area V3A. Second, we observe differences between the local distribution of voxel responses in early and dorsomedial visual areas, suggesting different cortical organization. Third, using modeling of voxel responses, we show that higher dorsal areas (V3A, V3B/KO) have properties that are characteristic of human depth judgments: a simple model that uses tuning parameters estimated from fMRI data captures known variations in human psychophysical performance. Together, these findings indicate that human dorsal visual cortex contains selective cortical structures for disparity that may support the neural computations that underlie depth perception. PMID:25698743

  11. A Tesla-pulse forming line-plasma opening switch pulsed power generator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Novac, B. M.; Kumar, R.; Smith, I. R.

    2010-10-01

    A pulsed power generator based on a high-voltage Tesla transformer which charges a 3.85 Ω/55 ns water-filled pulse forming line to 300 kV has been developed at Loughborough University as a training tool for pulsed power students. The generator uses all forms of insulation specific to pulsed power technology, liquid (oil and water), gas (SF6), and magnetic insulation in vacuum, and a number of fast voltage and current sensors are implemented for diagnostic purposes. A miniature (centimeter-size) plasma opening switch has recently been coupled to the output of the pulse forming line, with the overall system comprising the first phase of a program aimed at the development of a novel repetitive, table-top generator capable of producing 15 GW pulses for high power microwave loads. Technical details of all the generator components and the main experimental results obtained during the program and demonstrations of their performance are presented in the paper, together with a description of the various diagnostic tools involved. In particular, it is shown that the miniature plasma opening switch is capable of reducing the rise time of the input current while significantly increasing the load power. Future plans are outlined in the conclusions.

  12. Feasibility of MHD submarine propulsion. Phase II, MHD propulsion: Testing in a two Tesla test facility

    SciTech Connect

    Doss, E.D.; Sikes, W.C.

    1992-09-01

    This report describes the work performed during Phase 1 and Phase 2 of the collaborative research program established between Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) and Newport News Shipbuilding and Dry Dock Company (NNS). Phase I of the program focused on the development of computer models for Magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) propulsion. Phase 2 focused on the experimental validation of the thruster performance models and the identification, through testing, of any phenomena which may impact the attractiveness of this propulsion system for shipboard applications. The report discusses in detail the work performed in Phase 2 of the program. In Phase 2, a two Tesla test facility was designed, built, and operated. The facility test loop, its components, and their design are presented. The test matrix and its rationale are discussed. Representative experimental results of the test program are presented, and are compared to computer model predictions. In general, the results of the tests and their comparison with the predictions indicate that thephenomena affecting the performance of MHD seawater thrusters are well understood and can be accurately predicted with the developed thruster computer models.

  13. An efficient tensor transpose algorithm for multicore CPU, Intel Xeon Phi, and NVidia Tesla GPU

    SciTech Connect

    Lyakh, Dmitry I.

    2015-01-05

    An efficient parallel tensor transpose algorithm is suggested for shared-memory computing units, namely, multicore CPU, Intel Xeon Phi, and NVidia GPU. The algorithm operates on dense tensors (multidimensional arrays) and is based on the optimization of cache utilization on x86 CPU and the use of shared memory on NVidia GPU. From the applied side, the ultimate goal is to minimize the overhead encountered in the transformation of tensor contractions into matrix multiplications in computer implementations of advanced methods of quantum many-body theory (e.g., in electronic structure theory and nuclear physics). A particular accent is made on higher-dimensional tensors that typically appear in the so-called multireference correlated methods of electronic structure theory. Depending on tensor dimensionality, the presented optimized algorithms can achieve an order of magnitude speedup on x86 CPUs and 2-3 times speedup on NVidia Tesla K20X GPU with respect to the na ve scattering algorithm (no memory access optimization). Furthermore, the tensor transpose routines developed in this work have been incorporated into a general-purpose tensor algebra library (TAL-SH).

  14. An efficient tensor transpose algorithm for multicore CPU, Intel Xeon Phi, and NVidia Tesla GPU

    DOE PAGES

    Lyakh, Dmitry I.

    2015-01-05

    An efficient parallel tensor transpose algorithm is suggested for shared-memory computing units, namely, multicore CPU, Intel Xeon Phi, and NVidia GPU. The algorithm operates on dense tensors (multidimensional arrays) and is based on the optimization of cache utilization on x86 CPU and the use of shared memory on NVidia GPU. From the applied side, the ultimate goal is to minimize the overhead encountered in the transformation of tensor contractions into matrix multiplications in computer implementations of advanced methods of quantum many-body theory (e.g., in electronic structure theory and nuclear physics). A particular accent is made on higher-dimensional tensors that typicallymore » appear in the so-called multireference correlated methods of electronic structure theory. Depending on tensor dimensionality, the presented optimized algorithms can achieve an order of magnitude speedup on x86 CPUs and 2-3 times speedup on NVidia Tesla K20X GPU with respect to the na ve scattering algorithm (no memory access optimization). Furthermore, the tensor transpose routines developed in this work have been incorporated into a general-purpose tensor algebra library (TAL-SH).« less

  15. A combined study of MEG and pico-Tesla TMS on children with autism disorder.

    PubMed

    Anninos, Photios; Chatzimichael, Athanasios; Adamopoulos, Adam; Kotini, Athanasia; Tsagas, Nicolaos

    2016-12-01

    Magnetoencephalographic (MEG) recordings from the brain of 10 children with autism (6 boys and 4 girls, with ages range from 5-12 years, mean[Formula: see text][Formula: see text][Formula: see text]SD: 8.3[Formula: see text][Formula: see text][Formula: see text]2.1) were obtained using a whole-head 122-channel MEG system in a magnetically shielded room of low magnetic noise. A double-blind experimental design was used in order to look for possible effect of external pico-Tesla Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation (pT-TMS). The pT-TMS was applied on the brain of the autistic children with proper field characteristics (magnetic field amplitude: 1-7.5[Formula: see text]pT, frequency: the alpha - rhythm of the patient 8-13[Formula: see text]Hz). After unblinding it was found a significant effect of an increase of frequencies in the range of 2-7[Formula: see text]Hz across the subjects followed by an improvement and normalization of their MEG recordings. The statistical analysis of our results showed a statistical significance at 6 out of 10 patients (60%). It is also observed an increase of alpha activity in autistic children at the end of one month after pT-TMS treatment at home. In conclusion, the application of pT-TMS has the prospective to be a noninvasive, safe and important modality in the management of autism children.

  16. Dynamic Multi-Coil Shimming of the Human Brain at 7 Tesla

    PubMed Central

    Juchem, Christoph; Nixon, Terence W.; McIntyre, Scott; Boer, Vincent O.; Rothman, Douglas L.; de Graaf, Robin A.

    2011-01-01

    High quality magnetic field homogenization of the human brain (i.e. shimming) for MR imaging and spectroscopy is a demanding task. The susceptibility differences between air and tissue are a longstanding problem as they induce complex field distortions in the prefrontal cortex and the temporal lobes. To date, the theoretical gains of high field MR have only been realized partially in the human brain due to limited magnetic field homogeneity. A novel shimming technique for the human brain is presented that is based on the combination of non-orthogonal basis fields from 48 individual, circular coils. Custom-built amplifier electronics enabled the dynamic application of the multi-coil shim fields in a slice-specific fashion. Dynamic multi-coil (DMC) shimming is shown to eliminate most of the magnetic field inhomogeneity apparent in the human brain at 7 Tesla and provided improved performance compared to state-of-the-art dynamic shim updating with zero through third order spherical harmonic functions. The novel technique paves the way for high field MR applications of the human brain for which excellent magnetic field homogeneity is a prerequisite. PMID:21824794

  17. The Safety of MR Conditional Cochlear Implant at 1.5 Tesla Magnetic Resonance Imaging System.

    PubMed

    Takahashi, Daisuke; Ogura, Akio; Hayashi, Norio; Seino, Shinya; Kawai, Ryosuke; Matsuda, Tsuyoshi; Doi, Tsukasa; Tsuchihashi, Toshio

    2016-08-01

    In magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) examination of the patients with the cochlear implant, only limited data have a mention for safety information in the instruction manual supplied by the manufacturers. Therefore, imaging operators require more detailed safety information for implant device. We conducted detailed examination about displacement force, torque, and demagnetizing of the cochlear implant magnet based on American Society for Testing and Materials (ASTM) standard using the PULSAR and CONCERTO (MED-EL) with 1.5 tesla MRI system. As a result, the displacement force and the torque of the implant magnet were less than the numerical values descried in the manual. Therefore, these have almost no effect on the body under the condition described in a manual. In addition, the demagnetizing factor of the cochlear implant magnet occurred by a change magnetic field. The demagnetization depended on the direction of a line of magnetic force of the static magnetic field and the implant magnet. In conclusion, the operator must warn the position of the patients on inducing in the magnet room.

  18. Studies on a VUV free electron laser at the TESLA Test Facility at DESY

    SciTech Connect

    Rossbach, J.

    1995-12-31

    The TESLA Test Facility (TTF) currently under construction at DESY is a test-bed for acceleration sections of a high-gradient, high efficiency superconducting linear collider. Due to ist unrivaled ability to sustain high beam quality during acceleration, a superconducting rf linac is considered the optimum choice to drive a Free Electron Laser (FEL). We aim at a photon wavelength of {lambda} = 6 manometer utilizing the TTF after is has been extended to 1 GeV beam energy. Due to lack of mirrors and seed-lasers in this wavelength regime, a single pass FEL and Self-Amplified-Spontaneous-Emission (SASE) is considered. A first test is foreseen at a larger photon wavelength. The overall design as well as both electron and photon beam properties will be discussed. To reach the desired photon wavelength, the main components that have to be added to the TTF are: (a) a low emittance rf gun including space charge compensation (b) a two stage bunch compressor increasing the peak bunch current from 100 A up to 2500 A (c) four more accelerating modules to achieve 1 GeV beam energy (d) a 25 m long undulator (period length 27 mm, peak field 0.5 T) The average brillance will be larger than 1-10{sup 22}photons/s/mm{sup 2}/mrad{sup 2}/0.1%. Each 800 {mu}s long pulse will contain up to 7200 equidistant bunches. The repetition frequency of the linac is 10 Hz.

  19. Two-Slotted Surface Coil Array for Magnetic Resonance Imaging at 4 Tesla

    SciTech Connect

    Solis, S. E.; Hernandez, J. A.; Rodriguez, A. O.; Tomasi, D.

    2008-08-11

    Arrays of antennas have been widely accepted for magnetic resonance imaging applications due to their high signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) over large volumes of interest. A new surface coil based on the magnetron tube and called slotted surface coil, has been recently introduced by our group. This coil design experimentally demonstrated a significant improvement over the circular-shaped coil when used in the receive-only mode. The slotted coils formed a two-sheet structure with a 90 deg. separation and each coil had 6 circular slots. Numerical simulations were performed using the finite element method for this coil design to study the behaviour of the array magnetic field. Then, we developed a two-coil array for brain magnetic resonance imaging to be operated at the resonant frequency of 170 MHz in the transceiver mode. Phantom images were acquired with our coil array and standard pulse sequences on a research-dedicated 4 Tesla scanner. Numerical simulations demonstrated that electromagnetic interaction between the coil elements is negligible, and that the magnetic field showed a good uniformity. In vitro images showed the feasibility of this coil array for standard pulses for high field magnetic resonance imaging.

  20. Computational fluid dynamics design and analysis of a passively suspended Tesla pump left ventricular assist device.

    PubMed

    Medvitz, Richard B; Boger, David A; Izraelev, Valentin; Rosenberg, Gerson; Paterson, Eric G

    2011-05-01

    This article summarizes the use of computational fluid dynamics (CFD) to design a novel suspended Tesla left ventricular assist device. Several design variants were analyzed to study the parameters affecting device performance. CFD was performed at pump speeds of 6500, 6750, and 7000 rpm and at flow rates varying from 3 to 7 liters per minute (LPM). The CFD showed that shortening the plates nearest the pump inlet reduced the separations formed beneath the upper plate leading edges and provided a more uniform flow distribution through the rotor gaps, both of which positively affected the device hydrodynamic performance. The final pump design was found to produce a head rise of 77 mm Hg with a hydraulic efficiency of 16% at the design conditions of 6 LPM through flow and a 6750 rpm rotation rate. To assess the device hemodynamics the strain rate fields were evaluated. The wall shear stresses demonstrated that the pump wall shear stresses were likely adequate to inhibit thrombus deposition. Finally, an integrated field hemolysis model was applied to the CFD results to assess the effects of design variation and operating conditions on the device hemolytic performance.

  1. Mapping quantal touch using 7 Tesla functional magnetic resonance imaging and single-unit intraneural microstimulation

    PubMed Central

    Sanchez Panchuelo, Rosa Maria; Ackerley, Rochelle; Glover, Paul M; Bowtell, Richard W; Wessberg, Johan

    2016-01-01

    Using ultra-high field 7 Tesla (7T) functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI), we map the cortical and perceptual responses elicited by intraneural microstimulation (INMS) of single mechanoreceptive afferent units in the median nerve, in humans. Activations are compared to those produced by applying vibrotactile stimulation to the unit’s receptive field, and unit-type perceptual reports are analyzed. We show that INMS and vibrotactile stimulation engage overlapping areas within the topographically appropriate digit representation in the primary somatosensory cortex. Additional brain regions in bilateral secondary somatosensory cortex, premotor cortex, primary motor cortex, insula and posterior parietal cortex, as well as in contralateral prefrontal cortex are also shown to be activated in response to INMS. The combination of INMS and 7T fMRI opens up an unprecedented opportunity to bridge the gap between first-order mechanoreceptive afferent input codes and their spatial, dynamic and perceptual representations in human cortex. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.12812.001 PMID:27154626

  2. Practical Methods for Improving B1+ Homogeneity in 3 Tesla Breast Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Winkler, Simone A.; Rutt, Brian K.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose To improve image contrast and B1+ field homogeneity in 3 Tesla (T) breast MR. Materials and Methods Two practical B1+ shimming methods for 3T breast MR are presented; low-cost passive shimming using local pads of high dielectric permittivity (εr from 0 to 100), and two-channel radiofrequency (RF) shimming (adjusting Q-I amplitude ratios and phase differences of 0 to −4 dB and 90 to 45 degrees), as well as a combination of both methods. The technique has been studied both in simulation using a numerical body model with added mammary tissue and in vivo in six subjects. Results Large improvements are observed with both methods, leading to a decrease in left–right B1+ asymmetry ratio of 1.24 to 1.00 (simulation) and from 1.26 to 1.01 (in vivo). RF safety was not adversely affected. Conclusion Both RF shimming and dielectric shimming were shown to improve inhomogeneity in the B1+ field in 3T breast MR. PMID:24723508

  3. Electromagnetic perspective on the operation of RF coils at 1.5-11.7 Tesla.

    PubMed

    Ibrahim, Tamer S; Mitchell, Chad; Schmalbrock, Petra; Lee, Robert; Chakeres, Donald W

    2005-09-01

    In this work experimental and numerical studies of the MR signal were performed at frequencies ranging from 64 MHz to 485 MHz, utilizing three different MRI coils: a single-strut transverse electromagnetic (TEM)-based coil, a TEM resonator, and a high-pass birdcage coil. The experimental analyses were conducted using 1.5 and 8 Tesla whole-body systems and volume RF head coils. The simulation data were obtained utilizing an in-house-developed finite difference time domain (FDTD) model. Pertinent data from the numerical and experimental setups were compared, and a remarkable agreement between the two methods was found that clearly demonstrates the effectiveness of the FDTD method when it is applied rigorously. The numerical and experimental studies demonstrate the complexity of the electromagnetic (EM) fields and their role in the MR signal. These studies also reveal unique similarities and differences between the transmit and receive field distributions at various field strengths. Finally, for ultra high-field operations, it was demonstrated mathematically, numerically, and experimentally that highly asymmetric inhomogeneous images can be acquired even for linear excitation, symmetrical load geometries, and symmetrical load positioning within the coil.

  4. Comparison of 3 and 7 Tesla Magnetic Resonance Imaging of Obstructive Hydrocephalus Caused by Tectal Glioma

    PubMed Central

    Moon, Hyeong Cheol; Baek, Hyeon-Man

    2016-01-01

    Obstructive hydrocephalus caused by tectal glioma, which relived by neuroendoscopy, have been described using 3.0 Tesla magnetic resonance imaging (3T MRI) so far, we present the results obtained from 3T and 7T MRI in this patient. A 21-year-old woman presented at our hospital with gait disturbance, hormonal insufficiency, and urinary incontinence that began prior to 6 years of age. 3.0T MRI revealed a non-enhancing tectal mass along with obstructive hydrocephalus. The mass measured approximately 1.1×1.0×1.2 cm. An endoscopic third ventriculostomy was performed to relieve the hydrocephalus. We compared hydrocephalus and cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) flow findings from 3T and 7T MRI, both preoperative and postoperative at 1, 6 months. Intraventricular CSF voiding on T2-weighted images obtained with 7T MRI showed greater fluid inversion than those obtained with 3T MRI. This study shows that 7T brain MRI can provide detailed information on hydrocephalus caused by tectal glioma. Further studies are needed to develop refined 7T MRI protocols for better images of hydrocephalus. PMID:27867929

  5. Examining the McGurk illusion using high-field 7 Tesla functional MRI

    PubMed Central

    Szycik, Gregor R.; Stadler, Jörg; Tempelmann, Claus; Münte, Thomas F.

    2012-01-01

    In natural communication speech perception is profoundly influenced by observable mouth movements. The additional visual information can greatly facilitate intelligibility but incongruent visual information may also lead to novel percepts that neither match the auditory nor the visual information as evidenced by the McGurk effect. Recent models of audiovisual (AV) speech perception accentuate the role of speech motor areas and the integrative brain sites in the vicinity of the superior temporal sulcus (STS) for speech perception. In this event-related 7 Tesla fMRI study we used three naturally spoken syllable pairs with matching AV information and one syllable pair designed to elicit the McGurk illusion. The data analysis focused on brain sites involved in processing and fusing of AV speech and engaged in the analysis of auditory and visual differences within AV presented speech. Successful fusion of AV speech is related to activity within the STS of both hemispheres. Our data supports and extends the audio-visual-motor model of speech perception by dissociating areas involved in perceptual fusion from areas more generally related to the processing of AV incongruence. PMID:22529797

  6. Effect of 1. 5 tesla nuclear magnetic resonance imaging scanner on implanted permanent pacemakers

    SciTech Connect

    Hayes, D.L.; Holmes, D.R. Jr.; Gray, J.E.

    1987-10-01

    Patients with a permanent pacemaker are currently restricted from diagnostic nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) imaging because of potential adverse effects on the pacemaker by the magnet. Previous work has shown that NMR imaging will result in asynchronous pacing of the pulse generator within a given distance of the magnet. The radiofrequency signal generated by the system may also result in rapid cardiac pacing, which may have deleterious effects. This study utilized a 1.5 tesla unit in an in vivo laboratory animal to evaluate the unit's effects on eight different pulse generators from two manufacturers. All pacemakers functioned in an asynchronous mode when placed within a certain distance of the magnet. In addition, transient reed switch inhibition was observed. Seven of the eight pulse generators paced rapidly when exposed to the radiofrequency signal and there was a dramatic decrease in arterial blood pressure. Whether effective rapid cardiac pacing would occur could not be predicted before exposure to the magnetic resonance unit. Nuclear magnetic resonance imaging with high magnetic fields in patients with a pacemaker should continue to be avoided until the mechanism of the rapid cardiac pacing can be further delineated and either predicted or prevented.

  7. CFD Design and Analysis of a Passively Suspended Tesla Pump Left Ventricular Assist Device

    PubMed Central

    Medvitz, Richard B.; Boger, David A.; Izraelev, Valentin; Rosenberg, Gerson; Paterson, Eric G.

    2012-01-01

    This paper summarizes the use of computational fluid dynamics (CFD) to design a novelly suspended Tesla LVAD. Several design variants were analyzed to study the parameters affecting device performance. CFD was performed at pump speeds of 6500, 6750 and 7000 RPM and at flow rates varying from 3 to 7 liter-per-minute (LPM). The CFD showed that shortening the plates nearest the pump inlet reduced the separations formed beneath the upper plate leading edges and provided a more uniform flow distribution through the rotor gaps, both of which positively affected the device hydrodynamic performance. The final pump design was found to produce a head rise of 77 mmHg with a hydraulic efficiency of 16% at the design conditions of 6 LPM throughflow and a 6750 RPM rotation rate. To assess the device hemodynamics the strain rate fields were evaluated. The wall shear stresses demonstrated that the pump wall shear stresses were likely adequate to inhibit thrombus deposition. Finally, an integrated field hemolysis model was applied to the CFD results to assess the effects of design variation and operating conditions on the device hemolytic performance. PMID:21595722

  8. 21 Tesla Fourier Transform Ion Cyclotron Resonance Mass Spectrometer Greatly Expands Mass Spectrometry Toolbox

    SciTech Connect

    Shaw, Jared B.; Lin, Tzu-Yung; Leach, Franklin E.; Tolmachev, Aleksey V.; Tolić, Nikola; Robinson, Errol W.; Koppenaal, David W.; Paša-Tolić, Ljiljana

    2016-10-12

    We provide the initial performance evaluation of a 21 Tesla Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometer operating at the Environmental Molecular Sciences Laboratory at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory. The spectrometer constructed for the 21T system employs a commercial dual linear ion trap mass spectrometer coupled to a FTICR spectrometer designed and built in-house. Performance gains from moving to higher magnetic field strength are exemplified by the measurement of peptide isotopic fine structure, complex natural organic matter mixtures, and large proteins. Accurate determination of isotopic fine structure was demonstrated for doubly charged substance P with minimal spectral averaging, and 8,158 molecular formulas assigned to Suwannee River Fulvic Acid standard with RMS error of 10 ppb. We also demonstrated superior performance for intact proteins; namely, broadband isotopic resolution of the entire charge state distribution of apotransferrin (78 kDa) and facile isotopic resolution of monoclonal antibody under a variety of acquisition parameters (e.g. 6 s time-domains with absorption mode processing yielded resolution of approximately 1M at m/z =2,700).

  9. Partial epilepsy: A pictorial review of 3 TESLA magnetic resonance imaging features

    PubMed Central

    Abud, Lucas Giansante; Thivard, Lionel; Abud, Thiago Giansante; Nakiri, Guilherme Seizem; dos Santos, Antonio Carlos; Dormont, Didier

    2015-01-01

    Epilepsy is a disease with serious consequences for patients and society. In many cases seizures are sufficiently disabling to justify surgical evaluation. In this context, Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) is one of the most valuable tools for the preoperative localization of epileptogenic foci. Because these lesions show a large variety of presentations (including subtle imaging characteristics), their analysis requires careful and systematic interpretation of MRI data. Several studies have shown that 3 Tesla (T) MRI provides a better image quality than 1.5 T MRI regarding the detection and characterization of structural lesions, indicating that high-field-strength imaging should be considered for patients with intractable epilepsy who might benefit from surgery. Likewise, advanced MRI postprocessing and quantitative analysis techniques such as thickness and volume measurements of cortical gray matter have emerged and in the near future, these techniques will routinely enable more precise evaluations of such patients. Finally, the familiarity with radiologic findings of the potential epileptogenic substrates in association with combined use of higher field strengths (3 T, 7 T, and greater) and new quantitative analytical post-processing techniques will lead to improvements regarding the clinical imaging of these patients. We present a pictorial review of the major pathologies related to partial epilepsy, highlighting the key findings of 3 T MRI. PMID:26375569

  10. 7 tesla FMRI reveals systematic functional organization for binocular disparity in dorsal visual cortex.

    PubMed

    Goncalves, Nuno R; Ban, Hiroshi; Sánchez-Panchuelo, Rosa M; Francis, Susan T; Schluppeck, Denis; Welchman, Andrew E

    2015-02-18

    The binocular disparity between the views of the world registered by the left and right eyes provides a powerful signal about the depth structure of the environment. Despite increasing knowledge of the cortical areas that process disparity from animal models, comparatively little is known about the local architecture of stereoscopic processing in the human brain. Here, we take advantage of the high spatial specificity and image contrast offered by 7 tesla fMRI to test for systematic organization of disparity representations in the human brain. Participants viewed random dot stereogram stimuli depicting different depth positions while we recorded fMRI responses from dorsomedial visual cortex. We repeated measurements across three separate imaging sessions. Using a series of computational modeling approaches, we report three main advances in understanding disparity organization in the human brain. First, we show that disparity preferences are clustered and that this organization persists across imaging sessions, particularly in area V3A. Second, we observe differences between the local distribution of voxel responses in early and dorsomedial visual areas, suggesting different cortical organization. Third, using modeling of voxel responses, we show that higher dorsal areas (V3A, V3B/KO) have properties that are characteristic of human depth judgments: a simple model that uses tuning parameters estimated from fMRI data captures known variations in human psychophysical performance. Together, these findings indicate that human dorsal visual cortex contains selective cortical structures for disparity that may support the neural computations that underlie depth perception.

  11. Measurement and evaluation of the acoustic noise of a 3 Tesla MR scanner.

    PubMed

    Hattori, Yoko; Fukatsu, Hiroshi; Ishigaki, Takeo

    2007-01-01

    We measured the sound level and frequencies of the acoustic noise generated by a 3 Tesla (T) MR scanner, and investigated the subjective sound level for 30 healthy volunteers with either earplugs, headphones or both. The sound level of 3T was found to be higher than that of 1.5T in all sequences. The peak sound pressure level of 3T ranged from 125.7 dB for MR angiography to 130.7 dB for single shot EPI on the linear scale. The equivalent noise level was from 110.0 dB for FLAIR to 115.8 dB for T1-IR on the A-weighted scale, which exceeded 99 dB, the level regulated by the International Electrotechnical Commission (IEC). The study of the subjective sound level showed that the effect of noise reduction was not significantly different between earplugs and headphones. However, the use of both devices could reduce the subjective sound level significantly better than either one alone (P < 0.01). Thus we propose wearing both devices for ear-protection during 3T examinations.

  12. High resolution MRI anatomy of the cat brain at 3 Tesla

    PubMed Central

    Gray-Edwards, Heather L.; Salibi, Nouha; Josephson, Eleanor M.; Hudson, Judith A.; Cox, Nancy R.; Randle, Ashley N.; McCurdy, Victoria J.; Bradbury, Allison M.; Wilson, Diane U.; Beyers, Ronald J.; Denney, Thomas S.; Martin, Douglas R.

    2014-01-01

    Background Feline models of neurologic diseases, such as lysosomal storage diseases, leukodystrophies, Parkinson’s disease, stroke and NeuroAIDS, accurately recreate many aspects of human disease allowing for comparative study of neuropathology and the testing of novel therapeutics. Here we describe in vivo visualization of fine structures within the feline brain that were previously only visible post mortem. New Method 3 Tesla MR images were acquired using T1-weighted (T1w) 3D magnetization-prepared rapid gradient echo (MPRAGE) sequence (0.4mm isotropic resolution) and T2-weighted (T2w) turbo spin echo (TSE) images (0.3×0.3×1 mm3 resolution). Anatomic structures were identified based on feline and canine histology. Results T2w high resolution MR images with detailed structural identification are provided in transverse, sagittal and dorsal planes. T1w MR images are provided electronically in three dimensions for unrestricted spatial evaluation. Comparison with Existing Methods Many areas of the feline brain previously unresolvable on MRI are clearly visible in three orientations, including the dentate, interpositus and fastigial cerebellar nuclei, cranial nerves, lateral geniculate nucleus, optic radiation, cochlea, caudal colliculus, temporal lobe, precuneus, spinocerebellar tract, vestibular nuclei, reticular formation, pyramids and rostral and middle cerebral arteries. Additionally, the feline brain is represented in 3 dimensions for the first time. Conclusions These data establish normal appearance of detailed anatomical structures of the feline brain, which provide reference when evaluating neurologic disease or testing efficacy of novel therapeutics in animal models. PMID:24525327

  13. Axonal diameter and density estimated with 7-Tesla hybrid diffusion imaging in transgenic Alzheimer rats

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Daianu, Madelaine; Jacobs, Russell E.; Town, Terrence; Thompson, Paul M.

    2016-03-01

    Diffusion-weighted MR imaging (DWI) is a powerful tool to study brain tissue microstructure. DWI is sensitive to subtle changes in the white matter (WM), and can provide insight into abnormal brain changes in diseases such as Alzheimer's disease (AD). In this study, we used 7-Tesla hybrid diffusion imaging (HYDI) to scan 3 transgenic rats (line TgF344-AD; that model the full clinico-pathological spectrum of the human disease) ex vivo at 10, 15 and 24 months. We acquired 300 DWI volumes across 5 q-sampling shells (b=1000, 3000, 4000, 8000, 12000 s/mm2). From the top three b-value shells with highest signal-to-noise ratios, we reconstructed markers of WM disease, including indices of axon density and diameter in the corpus callosum (CC) - directly quantifying processes that occur in AD. As expected, apparent anisotropy progressively decreased with age; there were also decreases in the intra- and extra-axonal MR signal along axons. Axonal diameters were larger in segments of the CC (splenium and body, but not genu), possibly indicating neuritic dystrophy - characterized by enlarged axons and dendrites as previously observed at the ultrastructural level (see Cohen et al., J. Neurosci. 2013). This was further supported by increases in MR signals trapped in glial cells, CSF and possibly other small compartments in WM structures. Finally, tractography detected fewer fibers in the CC at 10 versus 24 months of age. These novel findings offer great potential to provide technical and scientific insight into the biology of brain disease.

  14. In vivo 7 Tesla imaging of the dentate granule cell layer in Schizophrenia

    PubMed Central

    Kirov, Ivan I.; Hardy, Caitlin J.; Matsuda, Kant; Messinger, Julie; Cankurtaran, Ceylan Z.; Warren, Melina; Wiggins, Graham C.; Perry, Nissa N.; Babb, James S.; Goetz, Raymond R.; George, Ajax; Malaspina, Dolores; Gonen, Oded

    2013-01-01

    PURPOSE The hippocampus is central to the pathophysiology of schizophrenia. Histology shows abnormalities in the dentate granule cell layer (DGCL), but its small size (~100 micron thickness) has precluded in vivo human studies. We used ultra high field magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) to compare DGCL morphology of schizophrenic patients to matched controls’. METHOD Bilateral hippocampi of 16 schizophrenia patients (10 male) 40.7±10.6 years old (mean ±standard deviation) were imaged at 7 Tesla MRI with heavily T2*-weighted gradient-echo sequence at 232 micron in-plane resolution (0.08 μL image voxels). Fifteen matched controls (8 male, 35.6±9.4 years old) and one ex vivo post mortem hippocampus (that also underwent histopathology) were scanned with same protocol. Three blinded neuroradiologists rated each DGCL on a qualitative scale of 1 to 6 (from “not discernible” to “easily visible, appearing dark gray or black”) and mean left and right DGCL scores were compared using a non-parametric Mann-Whitney test. RESULTS MRI identification of the DGCL was validated with histopathology. Mean right and left DGCL ratings in patients (3.2±1.0 and 3.5±1.2) were not statistically different from controls’ (3.9±1.1 and 3.8±0.8), but patients’ had a trend for lower right DGCL score (p=0.07), which was significantly associated with patient diagnosis (p=0.05). The optimal 48% sensitivity and 80% specificity for schizophrenia was achieved with a DGCL rating of ≤2. CONCLUSION Decreased contrast in the right DGCL in schizophrenia was predictive of schizophrenia diagnosis. Better utility of this metric as a schizophrenia biomarker may be achieved in future studies of patients with homogeneous disease subtypes and progression rates. PMID:23664589

  15. Gadolinium Enhanced MR Coronary Vessel Wall Imaging at 3.0 Tesla.

    PubMed

    Kelle, Sebastian; Schlendorf, Kelly; Hirsch, Glenn A; Gerstenblith, Gary; Fleck, Eckart; Weiss, Robert G; Stuber, Matthias

    2010-10-11

    Purpose. We evaluated the influence of the time between low-dose gadolinium (Gd) contrast administration and coronary vessel wall enhancement (LGE) detected by 3T magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in healthy subjects and patients with coronary artery disease (CAD). Materials and Methods. Four healthy subjects (4 men, mean age 29 ± 3 years and eleven CAD patients (6 women, mean age 61 ± 10 years) were studied on a commercial 3.0 Tesla (T) whole-body MR imaging system (Achieva 3.0 T; Philips, Best, The Netherlands). T1-weighted inversion-recovery coronary magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) was repeated up to 75 minutes after administration of low-dose Gadolinium (Gd) (0.1 mmol/kg Gd-DTPA). Results. LGE was seen in none of the healthy subjects, however in all of the CAD patients. In CAD patients, fifty-six of 62 (90.3%) segments showed LGE of the coronary artery vessel wall at time-interval 1 after contrast. At time-interval 2, 34 of 42 (81.0%) and at time-interval 3, 29 of 39 evaluable segments (74.4%) were enhanced. Conclusion. In this work, we demonstrate LGE of the coronary artery vessel wall using 3.0 T MRI after a single, low-dose Gd contrast injection in CAD patients but not in healthy subjects. In the majority of the evaluated coronary segments in CAD patients, LGE of the coronary vessel wall was already detectable 30-45 minutes after administration of the contrast agent.

  16. Prostate cancer detection using multiparametric 3 – tesla MRI and fusion biopsy: preliminary results

    PubMed Central

    Mussi, Thais Caldara; Garcia, Rodrigo Gobbo; de Queiroz, Marcos Roberto Gomes; Lemos, Gustavo Caserta; Baroni, Ronaldo Hueb

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Objective: To evaluate the diagnostic efficacy of transrectal ultrasonography (US) biopsy with imaging fusion using multiparametric (mp) magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in patients with suspicion of prostate cancer (PCa), with an emphasis on clinically significant tumors according to histological criteria. Materials and Methods: A total of 189 consecutive US/MRI fusion biopsies were performed obtaining systematic and guided samples of suspicious areas on mpMRI using a 3 Tesla magnet without endorectal coil. Clinical significance for prostate cancer was established based on Epstein criteria. Results: In our casuistic, the average Gleason score was 7 and the average PSA was 5.0ng/mL. Of the 189 patients that received US/MRI biopsies, 110 (58.2%) were positive for PCa. Of those cases, 88 (80%) were clinically significant, accounting for 46.6% of all patients. We divided the MRI findings into 5 Likert scales of probability of having clinically significant PCa. The positivity of US/MRI biopsy for clinically significant PCa was 0%, 17.6% 23.5%, 53.4% and 84.4% for Likert scores 1, 2, 3, 4 and 5, respectively. There was a statistically significant difference in terms of biopsy results between different levels of suspicion on mpMRI and also when biopsy results were divided into groups of clinically non-significant versus clinically significant between different levels of suspicion on mpMRI (p-value <0.05 in both analyzes). Conclusion: We found that there is a significant difference in cancer detection using US/MRI fusion biopsy between low-probability and intermediate/high probability Likert scores using mpMRI. PMID:27532112

  17. A 0.5 Tesla Transverse-Field Alternating Magnetic Field Demagnetizer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schillinger, W. E.; Morris, E. R.; Finn, D. R.; Coe, R. S.

    2015-12-01

    We have built an alternating field demagnetizer that can routinely achieve a maximum field of 0.5 Tesla. It uses an amorphous magnetic core with an air-cooled coil. We have started with a 0.5 T design, which satisfies most of our immediate needs, but we can certainly achieve higher fields. In our design, the magnetic field is transverse to the bore and uniform to 1% over a standard (25 mm) paleomagnetic sample. It is powered by a 1 kW power amplifier and is compatible with our existing sample handler for automated demagnetization and measurement (Morris et al., 2009). It's much higher peak field has enabled us to completely demagnetize many of the samples that previously we could not with commercial equipment. This capability is especially needed for high-coercivity sedimentary and igneous rocks that contain magnetic minerals that alter during thermal demagnetization. It will also enable detailed automated demagnetization of high coercivity phases in extraterrestrial samples, such as native iron, iron-alloy and sulfide minerals that are common in lunar rocks and meteorites. Furthermore, it has opened the door for us to use the rock-magnetic technique of component analysis, using coercivity distributions derived from very detailed AF demagnetization of NRM and remanence produced in the laboratory to characterize the magnetic mineralogy of sedimentary rocks. In addition to the many benefits this instrument has brought to our own research, a much broader potential impact is to replace the transverse coils in automated AF demagnetization systems, which typically are limited to peak fields around 0.1 T.

  18. Clinical Evaluation of Stereotactic Target Localization Using 3-Tesla MRI for Radiosurgery Planning

    SciTech Connect

    MacFadden, Derek; Zhang Beibei; Brock, Kristy K.; Hodaie, Mojgan; Laperriere, Normand; Schwartz, Michael; Tsao, May; Stainsby, Jeffrey; Lockwood, Gina; Mikulis, David; Menard, Cynthia

    2010-04-15

    Purpose: Increasing the magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) field strength can improve image resolution and quality, but concerns remain regarding the influence on geometric fidelity. The objectives of the present study were to spatially investigate the effect of 3-Tesla (3T) MRI on clinical target localization for stereotactic radiosurgery. Methods and Materials: A total of 39 patients were enrolled in a research ethics board-approved prospective clinical trial. Imaging (1.5T and 3T MRI and computed tomography) was performed after stereotactic frame placement. Stereotactic target localization at 1.5T vs. 3T was retrospectively analyzed in a representative cohort of patients with tumor (n = 4) and functional (n = 5) radiosurgical targets. The spatial congruency of the tumor gross target volumes was determined by the mean discrepancy between the average gross target volume surfaces at 1.5T and 3T. Reproducibility was assessed by the displacement from an averaged surface and volume congruency. Spatial congruency and the reproducibility of functional radiosurgical targets was determined by comparing the mean and standard deviation of the isocenter coordinates. Results: Overall, the mean absolute discrepancy across all patients was 0.67 mm (95% confidence interval, 0.51-0.83), significantly <1 mm (p < .010). No differences were found in the overall interuser target volume congruence (mean, 84% for 1.5T vs. 84% for 3T, p > .4), and the gross target volume surface mean displacements were similar within and between users. The overall average isocenter coordinate discrepancy for the functional targets at 1.5T and 3T was 0.33 mm (95% confidence interval, 0.20-0.48), with no patient-specific differences between the mean values (p >.2) or standard deviations (p >.1). Conclusion: Our results have provided clinically relevant evidence supporting the spatial validity of 3T MRI for use in stereotactic radiosurgery under the imaging conditions used.

  19. Single-Bunch Electron Cloud Effects in the GLC/NLC, US-Cold and TESLA Low Emittance Transport Lines

    SciTech Connect

    Bates, D.

    2005-04-12

    This paper examines the severity of the electron cloud effects in the Low Emittance Transport (LET) of linear colliders including the Bunch-Compressor System (BCS) and Beam Delivery System (BDS). We examine the electron cloud effects in the normal-conducting GLC/NLC or X-Band, and the super-conducting US-Cold and TESLA linear collider designs through the use of specially developed computer simulation codes. An estimate of the critical cloud density is given for the BDS and BCS of the X-Band collider.

  20. Instability Thresholds And Generation of the Electron-Cloud in the GLC/NLC And Tesla Damping Rings

    SciTech Connect

    Pivi, M.

    2005-04-11

    In the beam pipe of the Damping Ring (DR) of a linear collider, an electron cloud may be produced by ionization of residual gas or photoelectrons and develop by the secondary emission process [1]. Coupling between the electrons and the circulating beam can cause coupled-bunch instabilities, coherent single-bunch instabilities or incoherent tune spreads that may lead to increased emittance, beam blow-up and ultimately to beam losses. We present recent computer simulation results for the electron cloud instability thresholds in the GLC/NLC (X-Band) main DR and for the TESLA DR.

  1. A 4 Tesla Superconducting Magnet Developed for a 6 Circle Huber Diffractometer at the XMaS Beamline

    SciTech Connect

    Thompson, P. B. J.; Brown, S. D.; Bouchenoire, L.; Mannix, D.; Paul, D. F.; Lucas, C. A.; Kervin, J.; Cooper, M. J.; Arakawa, P.; Laughon, G.

    2007-01-19

    We report here on the development and testing of a 4 Tesla cryogen free superconducting magnet designed to fit within the Euler cradle of a 6 circle Huber diffractometer, allowing scattering in both the vertical and horizontal planes. The geometry of this magnet allows the field to be applied in three orientations. The first being along the beam direction, the second with the field transverse to the beam direction a horizontal plane and finally the field can be applied vertically with respect to the beam. The magnet has a warm bore and an open geometry of 180 deg. , allowing large access to reciprocal space. A variable temperature insert has been developed, which is capable of working down to a temperature of 1.7 K and operating over a wide range of angles whilst maintaining a temperature stability of a few mK. Initial ferromagnetic diffraction measurements have been carried out on single crystal Tb and Dy samples.

  2. MHD seawater thruster performance: A comparison of predictions with experimental results from a two Tesla test facility

    SciTech Connect

    Picologlou, B.F.; Doss, E.D.; Geyer, H.K. ); Sikes, W.C.; Ranellone, R.F. )

    1992-01-01

    A two Tesla test facility was designed, built, and operated to investigate the performance of magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) seawater thrusters. The results of this investigation are used to validate a design oriented MHD thruster performance computer code. The thruster performance code consists of a one-dimensional MHD hydrodynamic model coupled to a two-dimensional electrical model. The code includes major loss mechanisms affecting the performance of the thruster. Among these losses are the joule dissipation losses, frictional losses, electrical end losses, and single electrode potential losses. The facility test loop, its components, and their design are presented in detail. Additionally, the test matrix and its rationale are discussed. Representative experimental results of the test program are presented, and are compared to pretest computer model predictions. Good agreement between predicted and measured data has served to validate the thruster performance computer models.

  3. Recent Electron-Cloud Simulation Results for the Main Damping Rings of the NLC and the TESLA Linear Colliders

    SciTech Connect

    Pivi, Mauro T F

    2003-05-19

    In the beam pipe of the Main Damping Ring (MDR) of the Next Linear Collider (NLC), ionization of residual gases and secondary emission give rise to an electron-cloud which stabilizes to equilibrium after few bunch trains. In this paper, we present recent computer simulation results for the main features of the electron cloud at the NLC and preliminary simulation results for the TESLA main damping rings, obtained with the code POSINST that has been developed at LBNL, and lately in collaboration with SLAC, over the past 7 years. Possible remedies to mitigate the effect are also discussed. We have recently included the possibility to simulate different magnetic field configurations in our code including solenoid, quadrupole, sextupole and wiggler.

  4. Recent electron-cloud simulation results for the main damping rings of the NLC and TESLA linear colliders

    SciTech Connect

    Pivi, M.; Raubenheimer, T.O.; Furman, M.A.

    2003-05-01

    In the beam pipe of the Main Damping Ring (MDR) of the Next Linear Collider (NLC), ionization of residual gases and secondary emission give rise to an electron-cloud which stabilizes to equilibrium after few bunch trains. In this paper, we present recent computer simulation results for the main features of the electron cloud at the NLC and preliminary simulation results for the TESLA main damping rings, obtained with the code POSINST that has been developed at LBNL, and lately in collaboration with SLAC, over the past 7 years. Possible remedies to mitigate the effect are also discussed. We have recently included the possibility to simulate different magnetic field configurations in our code including solenoid, quadrupole, sextupole and wiggler.

  5. Proton MRS of the unilateral substantia nigra in the human brain at 4 tesla: detection of high GABA concentrations.

    PubMed

    Oz, Gülin; Terpstra, Melissa; Tkác, Ivan; Aia, Pratibha; Lowary, Jodi; Tuite, Paul J; Gruetter, Rolf

    2006-02-01

    Parkinson's disease (PD) is characterized by loss of dopaminergic neurons in the substantia nigra (SN), the cause of which is unknown. Characterization of early SN pathology could prove beneficial in the treatment and diagnosis of PD. The present study shows that with the use of short-echo (5 ms) Stimulated-Echo Acquisition Mode (STEAM) spectroscopy and LCModel, a neurochemical profile consisting of 10 metabolites, including gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA), glutamate (Glu), and glutathione (GSH), can be measured from the unilateral SN at 4 tesla. The neurochemical profile of the SN is unique and characterized by a fourfold higher GABA/Glu ratio compared to the cortex, in excellent agreement with established neurochemistry. The presence of elevated GABA levels in SN was validated with the use of editing, suggesting that partial volume effects were greatly reduced. These findings establish the feasibility of obtaining a neurochemical profile of the unilateral human SN by single-voxel spectroscopy in small volumes.

  6. A six-channel pediatric coil array for detection of children spinal pathologies by MRI at 1.5 Tesla

    SciTech Connect

    López Terrones, Marcos Alonso; Solís-Nájera, Sergio Enrique

    2014-11-07

    Nowadays, magnetic resonance (MR) in Mexico has become a standard technique for clinical imaging. Although most of the times the MR systems contain only coils oriented for adults. Radiologists use these coils for children studies due to the non-availability of pediatric coils. Image quality is decreased due to the low signal to noise ratio delivered to the system. The development of RF coils is always focused towards increasing SNR and optimizing the RF penetration into the sample. Moreover, spinal pathologies in children, which are an important topic in pediatric care, cover congenital and neuromuscular disorders that occur in childhood. In this work, the design of a dedicated six-channel coil for detection of spinal pathologies at 1.5 Tesla is addressed. Numerical electromagnetic simulations were performed in order to evaluate their magnetic field performance at (63.6 MHz) 1.5 Tesla. The magnetic field uniformity as well as the RF penetration depth of the coil configurations was evaluated in order to find the best/optimized coil array configuration. The coil is comprised of three rows, one with 4 coil elements and two with only one coil element. Phantom and in vivo images were acquired with the six-channel pediatric coil array. The phantom images agree with the simulated data. In vivo images acquired with the 6-channel pediatric coil array have shown very good penetration depth and homogeneity, which allow better image quality throughout the whole FOV. In addition, the parallel imaging capabilities of the array allow the acceleration of the experiments avoiding possible motion artifacts.

  7. Force and torque effects of a 1.5-Tesla MRI scanner on cardiac pacemakers and ICDs.

    PubMed

    Luechinger, R; Duru, F; Scheidegger, M B; Boesiger, P; Candinas, R

    2001-02-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is a widely accepted tool for the diagnosis of a variety of disease states. However, the presence of an implanted pacemaker is considered to be a strict contraindication to MRI in a vast majority of centers due to safety concerns. In phantom studies, the authors investigated the force and torque effects of the static magnetic field of MRI on pacemakers and ICDs. Thirty-one pacemakers (15 dual chamber and 16 single chamber units) from eight manufacturers and 13 ICDs from four manufacturers were exposed to the static magnetic field of a 1.5-Tesla MRI scanner. Magnetic force and acceleration measurements were obtained quantitatively, and torque measurements were made qualitatively. For pacemakers, the measured magnetic force was in the range of 0.05-3.60 N. Pacemakers released after 1995 had low magnetic force values as compared to the older devices. For these devices, the measured acceleration was even lower than the gravity of the earth (< 9.81 N/kg). Likewise, the torque levels were significantly reduced in newer generation pacemakers (< or = 2 from a scale of 6). ICD devices, except for one recent model, showed higher force (1.03-5.85 N), acceleration 9.5-34.2 N/kg), and torque (5-6 out of 6) levels. In conclusion, modern pacemakers present no safety risk with respect to magnetic force and torque induced by the static magnetic field of a 1.5-Tesla MRI scanner. However, ICD devices, despite considerable reduction in size and weight, may still pose problems due to strong magnetic force and torque.

  8. A six-channel pediatric coil array for detection of children spinal pathologies by MRI at 1.5 Tesla

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    López Terrones, Marcos Alonso; Solís-Nájera, Sergio Enrique

    2014-11-01

    Nowadays, magnetic resonance (MR) in Mexico has become a standard technique for clinical imaging. Although most of the times the MR systems contain only coils oriented for adults. Radiologists use these coils for children studies due to the non-availability of pediatric coils. Image quality is decreased due to the low signal to noise ratio delivered to the system. The development of RF coils is always focused towards increasing SNR and optimizing the RF penetration into the sample. Moreover, spinal pathologies in children, which are an important topic in pediatric care, cover congenital and neuromuscular disorders that occur in childhood. In this work, the design of a dedicated six-channel coil for detection of spinal pathologies at 1.5 Tesla is addressed. Numerical electromagnetic simulations were performed in order to evaluate their magnetic field performance at (63.6 MHz) 1.5 Tesla. The magnetic field uniformity as well as the RF penetration depth of the coil configurations was evaluated in order to find the best/optimized coil array configuration. The coil is comprised of three rows, one with 4 coil elements and two with only one coil element. Phantom and in vivo images were acquired with the six-channel pediatric coil array. The phantom images agree with the simulated data. In vivo images acquired with the 6-channel pediatric coil array have shown very good penetration depth and homogeneity, which allow better image quality throughout the whole FOV. In addition, the parallel imaging capabilities of the array allow the acceleration of the experiments avoiding possible motion artifacts.

  9. The fluid dynamics of work transfer in the non-uniform viscous rotating flow within a Tesla disc turbomachine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guha, Abhijit; Sengupta, Sayantan

    2014-03-01

    In this article, the fluid dynamics of work transfer within the narrow spacing (usually of the order of 100 μm) of multiple concentric discs of a Tesla disc turbomachine (turbine or compressor) has been analysed theoretically and computationally. Both the overall work transfer and its spatial development have been considered. It has been established that the work transfer mechanism in a Tesla disc turbomachine is very different from that in a conventional turbomachine, and the formulation of the Euler's work equation for the disc turbomachine contains several conceptual subtleties because of the existence of complex, three dimensional, non-uniform, viscous flow features. A work equivalence principle has been enunciated, which establishes the equality between the magnitudes of work transfer determined rigorously from two different approaches—one based on the shear stress acting on the disc surfaces and the other based on the change in angular momentum of the fluid. Care is needed in identifying the shear stress components that are responsible for the generation or absorption of useful power. It is shown from the Reynolds transport theorem that mass-flow-averaged tangential velocities (as opposed to the normally used area-averaged values) must be used in determining the change in angular momentum; the calculation has to be carefully formulated since both radial velocity (that determines throughput) and tangential velocity (that generates torque) depend strongly on the coordinate perpendicular to the disc surfaces. The principle of work transfer has been examined both in the absolute and relative frames of reference, revealing the subtle role played by Coriolis force. The concept of a new non-dimensional quantity called the torque potential fraction (Δ tilde H) is introduced. The value of Δ tilde H at any radial position increases with a decrease in inter-disc spacing. The computational fluid dynamic analysis shows that, for small value of inter-disc spacing and

  10. Dynamic Multi-Coil Technique (DYNAMITE) Shimming for Echo-Planar Imaging of the Human Brain at 7 Tesla

    PubMed Central

    Juchem, Christoph; Rudrapatna, S. Umesh; Nixon, Terence W.; de Graaf, Robin A.

    2014-01-01

    Gradient-echo echo-planar imaging (EPI) is the primary method of choice in functional MRI and other methods relying on fast MRI to image brain activation and connectivity. However, the high susceptibility of EPI towards B0 magnetic field inhomogeneity poses serious challenges. Conventional magnetic field shimming with low-order spherical harmonic (SH) functions is capable of compensating shallow field distortions, but performs poorly for global brain shimming or on specific areas with strong susceptibility-induced B0 distortions such as the prefrontal cortex (PFC). Excellent B0 homogeneity has been demonstrated recently in the human brain at 7 Tesla with the DYNAmic Multi-coIl TEchnique (DYNAMITE) for magnetic field shimming (Juchem et al., J Magn Reson (2011) 212:280-288). Here, we report the benefits of DYNAMITE shimming for multi-slice EPI and T2* mapping. A standard deviation of 13 Hz was achieved for the residual B0 distribution in the human brain at 7 Tesla with DYNAMITE shimming and was 60% lower compared to conventional shimming that employs static zero through third order SH shapes. The residual field inhomogeneity with SH shimming led to an average 8 mm shift at acquisition parameters commonly used for fMRI and was reduced to 1.5-3 mm with DYNAMITE shimming. T2* values obtained from the prefrontal and temporal cortices with DYNAMITE shimming were 10-50% longer than those measured with SH shimming. The reduction of the confounding macroscopic B0 field gradients with DYNAMITE shimming thereby promises improved access to the relevant microscopic T2* effects. The combination of high spatial resolution and DYNAMITE shimming allows largely artifact-free EPI and T2* mapping throughout the brain, including prefrontal and temporal lobe areas. DYNAMITE shimming is expected to critically benefit a wide range of MRI applications that rely on excellent B0 magnetic field conditions including EPI-based fMRI to study various cognitive processes and assessing large

  11. Analysis of the Tesla transformer operation at the first half-wave of the output voltage taking into account ohmic losses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Palchikov, E. I.; Ryabchun, A. M.

    2016-06-01

    The speed and efficiency of the Tesla transformer at the first half-wave of the output voltage are studied as a function of the Q factors of the circuits and their coupling factor. Calculated results and experimental data are considered. It is shown that for given Q factors, there is an optimal value of the coupling factor providing the highest efficiency, which can be calculated and for which designers should work.

  12. In vivo functional connectome of human brainstem nuclei of the ascending arousal, autonomic and motor systems by high spatial resolution 7 Tesla fMRI

    PubMed Central

    Bianciardi, Marta; Toschi, Nicola; Eichner, Cornelius; Polimeni, Jonathan R.; Setsompop, Kawin; Brown, Emery N.; Hamalainen, Matti S.; Rosen, Bruce R.; Wald, Lawrence L.

    2016-01-01

    Object To map the in vivo human functional connectivity of several brainstem nuclei with the rest of the brain by using seed-based correlation of ultra-high magnetic field functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) data. Materials and Methods We used the recently developed template of 11 brainstem nuclei derived from multi-contrast structural MRI at 7 Tesla as seed regions to determine their connectivity to the rest of the brain. To achieve this, we utilized the increased contrast-to-noise ratio of 7 Tesla fMRI compared to 3 Tesla and the time efficient simultaneous multi-slice imaging to cover the brain with high spatial resolution (1.1 mm-isotropic nominal resolution) while maintaining a short repetition time (2.5 s). Results The delineated Pearson’s correlation-based functional connectivity diagrams (connectomes) of 11 brainstem nuclei of the ascending arousal, motor and autonomic systems from 12 controls are presented and discussed in the context of existing histology and animal work. Conclusion Considering that the investigated brainstem nuclei play a crucial role in several vital functions, the delineated preliminary connectomes might prove useful for future in vivo research and clinical studies of human brainstem function and pathology, including disorders of consciousness, sleep disorders, autonomic disorders, Parkinson’s disease and other motor disorders. PMID:27126248

  13. Generating Long Scale-Length Plasma Jets Embedded in a Uniform, Multi-Tesla Magnetic-Field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manuel, Mario; Kuranz, Carolyn; Rasmus, Alex; Klein, Sallee; Fein, Jeff; Belancourt, Patrick; Drake, R. P.; Pollock, Brad; Hazi, Andrew; Park, Jaebum; Williams, Jackson; Chen, Hui

    2013-10-01

    Collimated plasma jets emerge in many classes of astrophysical objects and are of great interest to explore in the laboratory. In many cases, these astrophysical jets exist within a background magnetic field where the magnetic pressure approaches the plasma pressure. Recent experiments performed at the Jupiter Laser Facility utilized a custom-designed solenoid to generate the multi-tesla fields necessary to achieve proper magnetization of the plasma. Time-gated interferometry, Schlieren imaging, and proton radiography were used to characterize jet evolution and collimation under varying degrees of magnetization. Experimental results will be presented and discussed. This work is funded by the NNSA-DS and SC-OFES Joint Program in High-Energy-Density Laboratory Plasmas, grant number DE-NA0001840, by the National Laser User Facility Program, grant number DE-NA0000850, by the Predictive Sciences Academic Alliances Program in NNSA-ASC, grant number DEFC52-08NA28616, and by NASA through Einstein Postdoctoral Fellowship grant number PF3-140111 awarded by the Chandra X-ray Center, which is operated by the Smithsonian Astrophysical Observatory for NASA under contract NAS8-03060.

  14. Improving heat generation of magnetic nanoparticles by pre-orientation of particles in a static three tesla magnetic field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beck, Mathias M.; Lammel, Christian; Gleich, Bernhard

    2017-04-01

    Inductive heating of electrically insulating materials like fiberglass reinforced thermoplastics (FRTP) without susceptors is not possible. However, due to their low thermal conductivity a volumetric heat generation method is advisable to reach short heating times to melt this material for reshaping. This can be done with magnetic nanoparticles as susceptors within the thermoplastic of the FRTP using Néel relaxation. During the heating process the particle's magnetic moment rotates with the field while the particle itself is fixed within the thermoplastic. Therefore the heat dissipation of each particle depends on its orientation within the field. To achieve the maximum heat generation of the particles we pre-oriented the particles within a plastic at the best angle to the applied AC field for induction. To do this, five mass percent nanoparticles were dispersed in an epoxy resin, which was then hardened at room temperature in a static three Tesla magnetic field. After its solidification the heating behavior of the sample was compared to a reference sample, which was hardened without a field. The oriented particles showed an increased heating rate when oriented parallel to the applied AC field. The absorption rate was 3.3 times as high as the undirected reference sample. When the alternating electromagnetic field was perpendicular to the oriented particles, the specific absorption rate was similar to that of the reference sample. We compare this result with theory and with calculations from literature, and conduct a numerical simulation.

  15. A high-resolution 7-Tesla fMRI dataset from complex natural stimulation with an audio movie

    PubMed Central

    Hanke, Michael; Baumgartner, Florian J.; Ibe, Pierre; Kaule, Falko R.; Pollmann, Stefan; Speck, Oliver; Zinke, Wolf; Stadler, Jörg

    2014-01-01

    Here we present a high-resolution functional magnetic resonance (fMRI) dataset – 20 participants recorded at high field strength (7 Tesla) during prolonged stimulation with an auditory feature film (“Forrest Gump”). In addition, a comprehensive set of auxiliary data (T1w, T2w, DTI, susceptibility-weighted image, angiography) as well as measurements to assess technical and physiological noise components have been acquired. An initial analysis confirms that these data can be used to study common and idiosyncratic brain response patterns to complex auditory stimulation. Among the potential uses of this dataset are the study of auditory attention and cognition, language and music perception, and social perception. The auxiliary measurements enable a large variety of additional analysis strategies that relate functional response patterns to structural properties of the brain. Alongside the acquired data, we provide source code and detailed information on all employed procedures – from stimulus creation to data analysis. In order to facilitate replicative and derived works, only free and open-source software was utilized. PMID:25977761

  16. iTesla Power Systems Library (iPSL): A Modelica library for phasor time-domain simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vanfretti, L.; Rabuzin, T.; Baudette, M.; Murad, M.

    The iTesla Power Systems Library (iPSL) is a Modelica package providing a set of power system components for phasor time-domain modeling and simulation. The Modelica language provides a systematic approach to develop models using a formal mathematical description, that uniquely specifies the physical behavior of a component or the entire system. Furthermore, the standardized specification of the Modelica language (Modelica Association [1]) enables unambiguous model exchange by allowing any Modelica-compliant tool to utilize the models for simulation and their analyses without the need of a specific model transformation tool. As the Modelica language is being developed with open specifications, any tool that implements these requirements can be utilized. This gives users the freedom of choosing an Integrated Development Environment (IDE) of their choice. Furthermore, any integration solver can be implemented within a Modelica tool to simulate Modelica models. Additionally, Modelica is an object-oriented language, enabling code factorization and model re-use to improve the readability of a library by structuring it with object-oriented hierarchy. The developed library is released under an open source license to enable a wider distribution and let the user customize it to their specific needs. This paper describes the iPSL and provides illustrative application examples.

  17. Improved fiber-optic link for the phase reference distribution system for the TESLA technology based projects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Czuba, Krzysztof; Felber, Matthias

    2005-09-01

    The UV Free-Electron Laser (UVFEL) [1], The X-Ray Free-Electron Laser (XFEL) [2] and The International Linear Accelerator (ILC) [9] projects will require phase synchronization of various RF frequency subsystems on kilometer distances with accuracy better than 1ps. To fulfill these requirements, a phase reference distribution system concept was proposed and a prototype was developed for tests in the TESLA Test Facility 2 (TTF2). An important part of the phase reference system is the fiber-optic phase stable, long distance link described in this paper. An interferometrical scheme with feedback on phase, suppressing long term phase drifts induced by temperature changes was developed and tested in laboratory and under accelerator conditions. A motorized optical delay line was used in the system to compensate for phase errors. Described are error considerations and most important project issues like the hardware development and the real time phase controller software. The presented measurement results satisfy the design requirements. Experience gained during the experiments yielded proposals for system improvements.

  18. In vivo high-resolution localized 1H MR spectroscopy in the awake rat brain at 7 Tesla

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Su; Ji, Yadong; Chen, Xi; Yang, Yihong; Gullapalli, Rao; Masri, Radi

    2012-01-01

    In vivo localized high-resolution 1H MR spectroscopy was performed in multiple brain regions without the use of anesthetic or paralytic agents in awake head-restrained rats that were previously trained in a simulated MRI environment using a 7 Tesla MR system. Spectra were obtained using a short echo time single-voxel point-resolved spectroscopy technique with voxel size ranging from 27–32.4 mm3 in the regions of anterior cingulate cortex, somatosensory cortex, hippocampus, and thalamus. Quantifiable spectra, without the need for any additional post-processing to correct for possible motion were reliably detected including the metabolites of interest such as γ-aminobutyric acid, glutamine, glutamate, myo-inositol, N-acetylaspartate, taurine, glycerophosphorylcholine/phosphorylcholine, creatine/phosphocreatine, and N-acetylaspartate/N-acetylaspartylglutamate. The spectral quality was comparable to spectra from anesthetized animals with sufficient spectral dispersion to separate metabolites such as glutamine and glutamate. Results from this study suggest that reliable information on major metabolites can be obtained without the confounding effects of anesthesia or paralytic agents in rodents. PMID:22570299

  19. 1.5-Tesla Multiparametric-Magnetic Resonance Imaging for the detection of clinically significant prostate cancer

    PubMed Central

    POPITA, CRISTIAN; POPITA, ANCA RALUCA; SITAR-TAUT, ADELA; PETRUT, BOGDAN; FETICA, BOGDAN; COMAN, IOAN

    2017-01-01

    Background and aim Multiparametric-magnetic resonance imaging (mp-MRI) is the main imaging modality used for prostate cancer detection. The aim of this study is to evaluate the diagnostic performance of mp-MRI at 1.5-Tesla (1.5-T) for the detection of clinically significant prostate cancer. Methods In this ethical board approved prospective study, 39 patients with suspected prostate cancer were included. Patients with a history of positive prostate biopsy and patients treated for prostate cancer were excluded. All patients were examined at 1.5-T MRI, before standard transrectal ultrasonography–guided biopsy. Results The overall sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value and negative predictive value for mp-MRI were 100%, 73.68%, 80% and 100%, respectively. Conclusion Our results showed that 1.5 T mp-MRI has a high sensitivity for detection of clinically significant prostate cancer and high negative predictive value in order to rule out significant disease. PMID:28246496

  20. High current superconductivity in FeSe0.5Te0.5-coated conductors at 30 tesla.

    PubMed

    Si, Weidong; Han, Su Jung; Shi, Xiaoya; Ehrlich, Steven N; Jaroszynski, J; Goyal, Amit; Li, Qiang

    2013-01-01

    Although high-temperature superconductor cuprates have been discovered for more than 25 years, superconductors for high-field application are still based on low-temperature superconductors, such as Nb(3)Sn. The high anisotropies, brittle textures and high manufacturing costs limit the applicability of the cuprates. Here we demonstrate that the iron superconductors, without most of the drawbacks of the cuprates, have a superior high-field performance over low-temperature superconductors at 4.2 K. With a CeO(2) buffer, critical current densities >10(6)  A cm(-2) were observed in iron-chalcogenide FeSe(0.5)Te(0.5) films grown on single-crystalline and coated conductor substrates. These films are capable of carrying critical current densities exceeding 10(5) A cm(-2) under 30 tesla magnetic fields, which are much higher than those of low-temperature superconductors. High critical current densities, low magnetic field anisotropies and relatively strong grain coupling make iron-chalcogenide-coated conductors particularly attractive for high-field applications at liquid helium temperatures.

  1. A Novel 9.4 Tesla FTICR Mass Spectrometer with Improved Sensitivity, Mass Resolution, and Mass Range

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaiser, Nathan K.; Quinn, John P.; Blakney, Gregory T.; Hendrickson, Christopher L.; Marshall, Alan G.

    2011-08-01

    Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance (FTICR) mass spectrometry provides unparalleled mass measurement accuracy and resolving power. However, propagation of the technique into new analytical fields requires continued advances in instrument speed and sensitivity. Here, we describe a substantial redesign of our custom-built 9.4 tesla FTICR mass spectrometer that improves sensitivity, acquisition speed, and provides an optimized platform for future instrumentation development. The instrument was designed around custom vacuum chambers for improved ion optical alignment, minimized distance from the external ion trap to magnetic field center, and high conductance for effective differential pumping. The length of the transfer optics is 30% shorter than the prior system, for reduced time-of-flight mass discrimination and increased ion transmission and trapping efficiency at the ICR cell. The ICR cell, electrical vacuum feedthroughs, and cabling have been improved to reduce the detection circuit capacitance (and improve detection sensitivity) 2-fold. The design simplifies access to the ICR cell, and the modular vacuum flange accommodates new ICR cell technology, including linearized excitation, high surface area detection, and tunable electrostatic trapping potential.

  2. Differences in Velopharyngeal Structure during Speech among Asians Revealed by 3-Tesla Magnetic Resonance Imaging Movie Mode

    PubMed Central

    Nunthayanon, Kulthida; Honda, Ei-ichi; Shimazaki, Kazuo; Ohmori, Hiroko; Inoue-Arai, Maristela Sayuri; Kurabayashi, Tohru; Ono, Takashi

    2015-01-01

    Objective. Different bony structures can affect the function of the velopharyngeal muscles. Asian populations differ morphologically, including the morphologies of their bony structures. The purpose of this study was to compare the velopharyngeal structures during speech in two Asian populations: Japanese and Thai. Methods. Ten healthy Japanese and Thai females (five each) were evaluated with a 3-Tesla (3 T) magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scanner while they produced vowel-consonant-vowel syllable (/asa/). A gradient-echo sequence, fast low-angle shot with segmented cine and parallel imaging technique was used to obtain sagittal images of the velopharyngeal structures. Results. MRI was carried out in real time during speech production, allowing investigations of the time-to-time changes in the velopharyngeal structures. Thai subjects had a significantly longer hard palate and produced shorter consonant than Japanese subjects. The velum of the Thai participants showed significant thickening during consonant production and their retroglossal space was significantly wider at rest, whereas the dimensional change during task performance was similar in the two populations. Conclusions. The 3 T MRI movie method can be used to investigate velopharyngeal function and diagnose velopharyngeal insufficiency. The racial differences may include differences in skeletal patterns and soft-tissue morphology that result in functional differences for the affected structures. PMID:26273584

  3. Geometric accuracy of 3D coordinates of the Leksell stereotactic skull frame in 1.5 Tesla- and 3.0 Tesla-magnetic resonance imaging: a comparison of three different fixation screw materials

    PubMed Central

    Nakazawa, Hisato; Mori, Yoshimasa; Yamamuro, Osamu; Komori, Masataka; Shibamoto, Yuta; Uchiyama, Yukio; Tsugawa, Takahiko; Hagiwara, Masahiro

    2014-01-01

    We assessed the geometric distortion of 1.5-Tesla (T) and 3.0-T magnetic resonance (MR) images with the Leksell skull frame system using three types of cranial quick fixation screws (QFSs) of different materials—aluminum, aluminum with tungsten tip, and titanium—for skull frame fixation. Two kinds of acrylic phantoms were placed on a Leksell skull frame using the three types of screws, and were scanned with computed tomography (CT), 1.5-T MR imaging and 3.0-T MR imaging. The 3D coordinates for both strengths of MR imaging were compared with those for CT. The deviations of the measured coordinates at selected points (x = 50, 100 and 150; y = 50, 100 and 150) were indicated on different axial planes (z = 50, 75, 100, 125 and 150). The errors of coordinates with QFSs of aluminum, tungsten-tipped aluminum, and titanium were <1.0, 1.0 and 2.0 mm in the entire treatable area, respectively, with 1.5 T. In the 3.0-T field, the errors with aluminum QFSs were <1.0 mm only around the center, while the errors with tungsten-tipped aluminum and titanium were >2.0 mm in most positions. The geometric accuracy of the Leksell skull frame system with 1.5-T MR imaging was high and valid for clinical use. However, the geometric errors with 3.0-T MR imaging were larger than those of 1.5-T MR imaging and were acceptable only with aluminum QFSs, and then only around the central region. PMID:25034732

  4. The effects of orientation and attention during surround suppression of small image features: A 7 Tesla fMRI study

    PubMed Central

    Schallmo, Michael-Paul; Grant, Andrea N.; Burton, Philip C.; Olman, Cheryl A.

    2016-01-01

    Although V1 responses are driven primarily by elements within a neuron's receptive field, which subtends about 1° visual angle in parafoveal regions, previous work has shown that localized fMRI responses to visual elements reflect not only local feature encoding but also long-range pattern attributes. However, separating the response to an image feature from the response to the surrounding stimulus and studying the interactions between these two responses demands both spatial precision and signal independence, which may be challenging to attain with fMRI. The present study used 7 Tesla fMRI with 1.2-mm resolution to measure the interactions between small sinusoidal grating patches (targets) at 3° eccentricity and surrounds of various sizes and orientations to test the conditions under which localized, context-dependent fMRI responses could be predicted from either psychophysical or electrophysiological data. Targets were presented at 8%, 16%, and 32% contrast while manipulating (a) spatial extent of parallel (strongly suppressive) or orthogonal (weakly suppressive) surrounds, (b) locus of attention, (c) stimulus onset asynchrony between target and surround, and (d) blocked versus event-related design. In all experiments, the V1 fMRI signal was lower when target stimuli were flanked by parallel versus orthogonal context. Attention amplified fMRI responses to all stimuli but did not show a selective effect on central target responses or a measurable effect on orientation-dependent surround suppression. Suppression of the V1 fMRI response by parallel surrounds was stronger than predicted from psychophysics but showed a better match to previous electrophysiological reports. PMID:27565016

  5. Novel magnetic textures in SrCu2(BO3)2 from magnetostriction up to 97.4 tesla

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jaime, Marcelo

    2012-02-01

    Quantum magnets are model systems wherein strongly frustrated spin interactions generate a variety of exotic magnetic phases of current interest, including quantum spin ices, spin liquids, spin supersolids and complex magnetic superstructures. SrCu2(BO3)2, the only classic realization of the spin-1/2 Heisenberg antiferromagnet in the Shastry-Sutherland (orthogonal spin dimer) lattice is known to exhibit numerous magnetization plateaus due formation of stripe-like magnetic textures in high fields. However, the fine structure of these plateaus remains controversial on both experimental and theoretical fronts due to the existing limits for achievable magnetic fields in the laboratory, the sensitivity of current magnetization techniques, and the uncontrolled nature of available theoretical approaches for highly frustrated magnetic lattices. This talk will describe how we probe magnetic textures in SrCu2(BO3)2 via a recently-developed magnetostriction technique based on optical fiber Bragg gratings [1]. We achieve microstrain (nm-resolution) sensitivity in ultrahigh pulsed fields to 97.4 T using the NHMFL 100 tesla multi-pulse magnet system [2]. The magnetostriction data reveal fine structure corresponding to all magnetization plateaus, and a significant lattice response to the long-predicted 1/2-saturation plateau at 82 T, as well as a new feature at 73.6 T that we attribute to a never before observed structure corresponding to 2/5 of magnetization saturation [3]. These data are complemented by simultaneous magnetocaloric-effect measurements, and are supported by numerical results obtained using a controlled density matrix renormalization group method.[4pt] [1] Daou R. et al., Rev. Sci. Instrum. 81, 033909 (2010).[0pt] [2] Sims J.R., et al. IEEE Trans. Appl. Supercond. 18, 587-591 (2008).[0pt] [3] M. Jaime et al., submitted. In collaboration with R. Daou, S.A. Crooker, F. Weickert, A. Uchida, A. Feiguin, C.D. Batista, H. Dabkowska, and B. Gaulin.

  6. Comparison of radiofrequency body coils for MRI at 3 Tesla: a simulation study using parallel transmission on various anatomical targets

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Xiaoping; Zhang, Xiaotong; Tian, Jinfeng; Schmitter, Sebastian; Hanna, Brian; Strupp, John; Pfeuffer, Josef; Hamm, Michael; Wang, Dingxin; Nistler, Juergen; He, Bin; Vaughan, J. Thomas; Ugurbil, Kamil; Van de Moortele, Pierre-Francois

    2015-01-01

    The performance of multichannel transmit coil layouts and parallel transmission (pTx) radiofrequency (RF) pulse design was evaluated with respect to transmit B1 (B1+) homogeneity and Specific Absorption Rate (SAR) at 3 Tesla for a whole body coil. Five specific coils were modeled and compared: a 32-rung birdcage body coil (driven either in a fixed quadrature mode or a two-channel transmit mode), two single-ring stripline arrays (with either 8 or 16 elements), and two multi-ring stripline arrays (with 2 or 3 identical rings, stacked in the z-axis and each comprising eight azimuthally distributed elements). Three anatomical targets were considered, each defined by a 3D volume representative of a meaningful region of interest (ROI) in routine clinical applications. For a given anatomical target, global or local SAR controlled pTx pulses were designed to homogenize RF excitation within the ROI. At the B1+ homogeneity achieved by the quadrature driven birdcage design, pTx pulses with multichannel transmit coils achieved up to ~8 fold reduction in local and global SAR. When used for imaging head and cervical spine or imaging thoracic spine, the double-ring array outperformed all coils including the single-ring arrays. While the advantage of the double-ring array became much less pronounced for pelvic imaging with a substantially larger ROI, the pTx approach still provided significant gains over the quadrature birdcage coil. For all design scenarios, using the 3-ring array did not necessarily improve the RF performance. Our results suggest that pTx pulses with multichannel transmit coils can reduce local and global SAR substantially for body coils while attaining improved B1+ homogeneity, particularly for a “z-stacked” double-ring design with coil elements arranged on two transaxial rings. PMID:26332290

  7. Single Session Imaging of Cerebellum at 7 Tesla: Obtaining Structure and Function of Multiple Motor Subsystems in Individual Subjects

    PubMed Central

    Batson, Melissa A.; Petridou, Natalia; Klomp, Dennis W. J.; Frens, Maarten A.; Neggers, Sebastiaan F. W.

    2015-01-01

    The recent increase in the use of high field MR systems is accompanied by a demand for acquisition techniques and coil systems that can take advantage of increased power and accuracy without being susceptible to increased noise. Physical location and anatomical complexity of targeted regions must be considered when attempting to image deeper structures with small nuclei and/or complex cytoarchitechtonics (i.e. small microvasculature and deep nuclei), such as the brainstem and the cerebellum (Cb). Once these obstacles are overcome, the concomitant increase in signal strength at higher field strength should allow for faster acquisition of MR images. Here we show that it is technically feasible to quickly and accurately detect blood oxygen level dependent (BOLD) signal changes and obtain anatomical images of Cb at high spatial resolutions in individual subjects at 7 Tesla in a single one-hour session. Images were obtained using two high-density multi-element surface coils (32 channels in total) placed beneath the head at the level of Cb, two channel transmission, and three-dimensional sensitivity encoded (3D, SENSE) acquisitions to investigate sensorimotor activations in Cb. Two classic sensorimotor tasks were used to detect Cb activations. BOLD signal changes during motor activity resulted in concentrated clusters of activity within the Cb lobules associated with each task, observed consistently and independently in each subject: Oculomotor vermis (VI/VII) and CrusI/II for pro- and anti-saccades; ipsilateral hemispheres IV-VI for finger tapping; and topographical separation of eye- and hand- activations in hemispheres VI and VIIb/VIII. Though fast temporal resolution was not attempted here, these functional patches of highly specific BOLD signal changes may reflect small-scale shunting of blood in the microvasculature of Cb. The observed improvements in acquisition time and signal detection are ideal for individualized investigations such as differentiation of

  8. Synchronous optical transmission data link integrated with FPGA for TESLA FEL SIMCON system: long data vector optical transceiver module tests

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zielinski, Jerzy S.; Pozniak, Krzysztof T.; Romaniuk, Ryszard S.

    2006-10-01

    The X-ray free-electron laser X-FEL that is being planned at the DESY research center in cooperation with European partners will produce high-intensity ultra-short X-ray flashes with the properties of laser light. This new light source, which can only be described in terms of superlatives, will open up a whole range of new possibilities for the natural sciences. It could also offer very promising opportunities for industrial users. SIMCON (SIMulator and CONtroller) is the project of the fast, low latency digital controller dedicated to the LLRF system in VUV FEL experiment. The main purpose of the project is to create a controller to stabilize the vector sum of fields in cavities of one cryo-module in the experiment. The device can be also used as the simulator of the cavity and test bench for other devices. The synchronic, optical link project was made for the accelerator X-FEL laser TESLA, the LLRF control system experiment at DESY, Hamburg. The control and diagnostic data is transmitted up to 2.5Gbit/s through a plastic fiber in a distance up to a few hundred meters. The link is synchronized once after power up, and never resynchronized when data is transmitted with maximum speed. The one way link bit error rate is less then 10 -15. The transceiver component written in VHDL that works in the dedicated Altera® Stratix® GX FPGA circuit. During the work in the PERG laboratory a 2.5Gbit/s serial link with the long vector parallel interface transceiver was created. Long-Data-Vector transceiver transmits 16bit vector each 8ns with 120ns latency.

  9. Single session imaging of cerebellum at 7 Tesla: obtaining structure and function of multiple motor subsystems in individual subjects.

    PubMed

    Batson, Melissa A; Petridou, Natalia; Klomp, Dennis W J; Frens, Maarten A; Neggers, Sebastiaan F W

    2015-01-01

    The recent increase in the use of high field MR systems is accompanied by a demand for acquisition techniques and coil systems that can take advantage of increased power and accuracy without being susceptible to increased noise. Physical location and anatomical complexity of targeted regions must be considered when attempting to image deeper structures with small nuclei and/or complex cytoarchitechtonics (i.e. small microvasculature and deep nuclei), such as the brainstem and the cerebellum (Cb). Once these obstacles are overcome, the concomitant increase in signal strength at higher field strength should allow for faster acquisition of MR images. Here we show that it is technically feasible to quickly and accurately detect blood oxygen level dependent (BOLD) signal changes and obtain anatomical images of Cb at high spatial resolutions in individual subjects at 7 Tesla in a single one-hour session. Images were obtained using two high-density multi-element surface coils (32 channels in total) placed beneath the head at the level of Cb, two channel transmission, and three-dimensional sensitivity encoded (3D, SENSE) acquisitions to investigate sensorimotor activations in Cb. Two classic sensorimotor tasks were used to detect Cb activations. BOLD signal changes during motor activity resulted in concentrated clusters of activity within the Cb lobules associated with each task, observed consistently and independently in each subject: Oculomotor vermis (VI/VII) and CrusI/II for pro- and anti-saccades; ipsilateral hemispheres IV-VI for finger tapping; and topographical separation of eye- and hand- activations in hemispheres VI and VIIb/VIII. Though fast temporal resolution was not attempted here, these functional patches of highly specific BOLD signal changes may reflect small-scale shunting of blood in the microvasculature of Cb. The observed improvements in acquisition time and signal detection are ideal for individualized investigations such as differentiation of

  10. Correlation of 1.5 Tesla Magnetic Resonance Imaging with Clinical and Intraoperative Findings for Lumbar Disc Herniation

    PubMed Central

    Bhave, Arvind; Patil, Sanjay

    2016-01-01

    Study Design A single-center prospective study. Purpose A magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scan is undeniably the gold standard for the diagnosis of a lumbar disc prolapse. Unfortunately it shares a strong association with incidental findings. In this study, we aimed to determine the extent to which a 1.5 Tesla MRI correlates with the clinical features and intraoperative findings in cases of lumbar disc prolapse. Overview of Literature Few studies have correlated MRI with clinical findings, and none have extended this correlation to intraoperative findings. Methods Over a 2-year period, 50 consecutive patients with lumbar disc herniation requiring discectomy were studied. The MRI findings we observed consisted of the prolapse level, type, position, migration, high-intensity zones (HIZ), lateral recess, and foraminal stenosis. A logistic regression analysis was performed to determine the significance for the various MRI findings. Finally, the MRI observations were confirmed with intraoperative findings and inferences were drawn. Results MRI scan sensitivity and specificity for determining surgically significant levels was 100% and 94.94%, respectively. Straight leg raising test was positive in 74% of patients, with 85%, 43%, and 75% for paracentral, central, and foraminal levels, respectively. A foraminal compromise was the only MRI parameter to share a significant association with neurological deficits. Patients with a HIZ on the MRI had a significant increase in back pain and 63% exhibited identifiable annular tears intraoperatively. The intraoperative anatomical findings correlated extensively with the MRI findings. Conclusions MRI findings strongly correlate with intraoperative features and can serve as a useful tool when planning surgery due to the accurate depiction of the morphometric features. However, the decision for surgery should be made only when detailed clinical findings in conjunction with MRI findings allow for an accurate identification of the

  11. Simultaneous Imaging of Radiation-Induced Cerebral Microbleeds, Arteries and Veins, Using a Multiple Gradient Echo Sequence at 7 Tesla

    PubMed Central

    Bian, Wei; Banerjee, Suchandrima; Kelly, Douglas A.C.; Hess, Christopher P.; Larson, Peder E.Z.; Chang, Susan M.; Nelson, Sarah J.; Lupo, Janine M.

    2016-01-01

    Background The purpose of this study was to implement and evaluate the utility of a multi-echo sequence at 7 Tesla (T) for simultaneous time-of-flight (TOF) MR-angiography (MRA) and susceptibility-weighted imaging (SWI) of radiation-induced cerebral microbleeds (CMBs), intracranial arteries, and veins. Methods A four-echo gradient-echo sequence was implemented on a 7T scanner. The first echo was used to create TOF-MRA images, while the remaining echoes were combined to visualize CMBs and veins on SWI images. The sequence was evaluated on eight brain tumor patients with known radiation-induced CMBs. Single-echo images were also acquired to visually and quantitatively compare the contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR) of small- and intermediate-vessels between acquisitions. The number of CMBs detected with each acquisition was also quantified. Statistical significance was determined using a Wilcoxon signed-rank test. Results Compared with the single-echo sequences, the CNR of small and intermediate arteries increased 7.6% (P < 0.03) and 9.5% (P = 0.06), respectively, while the CNR of small and intermediate veins were not statistically different between sequences (P = 0.95 and P = 0.46, respectively). However, these differences were not discernible by visual inspection. Also the multi-echo sequence detected 18.3% more CMBs (P < 0.008) due to higher slice resolution. Conclusion The proposed 7T multi-echo sequence depicts arteries, veins, and CMBs on a single image to facilitate quantitative evaluation of radiation-induced vascular injury. PMID:25471321

  12. Optimizing texture measures quantifying bone structures as well as MR-sequences at 3 Tesla: an integrative statistical approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raeth, Christoph W.; Mueller, Dirk; Rummeny, Ernst J.; Link, Thomas M.; Vogel, Mika; Koenig, Hartmut; Boehm, Holger; Monetti, Roberto

    2006-03-01

    High resolution MR-scanners working with magnetic field strengths of 3 Tesla are clinically available nowadays. They offer the possibility to obtain 3D images with unprecedented spatial resolution and/or signal-to-noise-ratio (SNR) allowing for an accurate visualization of the trabecular bone structure. It has been demonstrated that scaling indices are well suited to quantify these structures, especially to discriminate between plate-like and rod-like structural elements, which is crucial for the diagnosis of osteoporosis. Until now image quality has mainly been assessed by visual impression or by measures based on the SNR. In this work we present a methodology to assess different MR-sequences with respect to the texture measure that is used later in the image analysis. We acquired for a bone specimen HR-MR-sequences with different spatial resolution and signal to noise ratio. For these data sets we selected two volumes of interest (VOI) of same size located in the trabecular bone and in the background of the image. For both VOIs the scaling indices are calculated for different scale parameters. Subsequently the 'texture contrast' between structure and background is calculated by comparing the probability distributions of the scaling indices using a quadratic distance measure. By means of the contrast the optimal set of scale parameters is determined. By comparing the contrast for the different MR sequences the best suited ones are determined. It turns out that sequences with slightly lower spatial resolution but better signal to noise ration yield a better texture contrast than sequences with the best spatial resolution. The presented methodology offers the possibility to optimize simultaneously texture measures and MR-sequences, which will allow for an adapted and thus optimized analysis of image structures, e.g. trabecular bone, in the HR-MR data.

  13. Local Multi-Channel RF Surface Coil versus Body RF Coil Transmission for Cardiac Magnetic Resonance at 3 Tesla: Which Configuration Is Winning the Game?

    PubMed Central

    Winter, Lukas; Dieringer, Matthias A.; Els, Antje; Oezerdem, Celal; Rieger, Jan; Kuehne, Andre; Cassara, Antonino M.; Pfeiffer, Harald; Wetterling, Friedrich; Niendorf, Thoralf

    2016-01-01

    Introduction The purpose of this study was to demonstrate the feasibility and efficiency of cardiac MR at 3 Tesla using local four-channel RF coil transmission and benchmark it against large volume body RF coil excitation. Methods Electromagnetic field simulations are conducted to detail RF power deposition, transmission field uniformity and efficiency for local and body RF coil transmission. For both excitation regimes transmission field maps are acquired in a human torso phantom. For each transmission regime flip angle distributions and blood-myocardium contrast are examined in a volunteer study of 12 subjects. The feasibility of the local transceiver RF coil array for cardiac chamber quantification at 3 Tesla is demonstrated. Results Our simulations and experiments demonstrate that cardiac MR at 3 Tesla using four-channel surface RF coil transmission is competitive versus current clinical CMR practice of large volume body RF coil transmission. The efficiency advantage of the 4TX/4RX setup facilitates shorter repetition times governed by local SAR limits versus body RF coil transmission at whole-body SAR limit. No statistically significant difference was found for cardiac chamber quantification derived with body RF coil versus four-channel surface RF coil transmission. Our simulation also show that the body RF coil exceeds local SAR limits by a factor of ~2 when driven at maximum applicable input power to reach the whole-body SAR limit. Conclusion Pursuing local surface RF coil arrays for transmission in cardiac MR is a conceptually appealing alternative to body RF coil transmission, especially for patients with implants. PMID:27598923

  14. Nonenhanced peripheral MR-angiography (MRA) at 3 Tesla: evaluation of quiescent-interval single-shot MRA in patients undergoing digital subtraction angiography.

    PubMed

    Wagner, Moritz; Knobloch, Gesine; Gielen, Martin; Lauff, Marie-Teres; Romano, Valentina; Hamm, Bernd; Kröncke, Thomas

    2015-04-01

    Quiescent-interval single-shot MRA (QISS-MRA) is a promising nonenhanced imaging technique for assessment of peripheral arterial disease (PAD). Previous studies at 3 Tesla included only very limited numbers of patients for correlation of QISS-MRA with digital subtraction angiography (DSA) as standard of reference (SOR). The aim of this prospective institutional review board-approved study was to compare QISS-MRA at 3 Tesla with DSA in a larger patient group. Our study included 32 consecutive patients who underwent QISS-MRA, contrast-enhanced MRA (CE-MRA), and DSA. Two readers independently performed a per-segment evaluation of QISS-MRA and CE-MRA for image quality and identification of non-significant stenosis (<50%) versus significant stenosis (50-100%). The final dataset included 1,027 vessel segments. Reader 1 and 2 rated image quality as diagnostic in 96.8 and 98.0% of the vessel segments on QISS-MRA and in 99.3 and 98.4% of the vessel segments on CE-MRA, respectively. DSA was available for 922 segments and detected significant stenosis in 133 segments (14.4%). Consensus reading yielded the following diagnostic parameters for QISS-MRA versus CE-MRA: sensitivity: 83.5% (111/133) versus 82.7% (110/133), p = 0.80; specificity: 93.9% (741/789) versus 95.7% (755/789), p = 0.25; and diagnostic accuracy: 92.4% (852/922) versus 93.8% (865/922), p = 0.35. In conclusion, using DSA as SOR, QISS-MRA and CE-MRA at 3 Tesla showed similar diagnostic accuracy in the assessment of PAD. A limitation of QISS-MRA was the lower rate of assessable vessel segments compared to CE-MRA.

  15. Automatic hippocampus segmentation of 7.0 Tesla MR images by combining multiple atlases and auto-context models

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Minjeong; Wu, Guorong; Li, Wei; Wang, Li; Son, Young-Don; Cho, Zang-Hee; Shen, Dinggang

    2014-01-01

    In many neuroscience and clinical studies, accurate measurement of hippocampus is very important to reveal the inter-subject anatomical differences or the subtle intra-subject longitudinal changes due to aging or dementia. Although many automatic segmentation methods have been developed, their performances are still challenged by the poor image contrast of hippocampus in the MR images acquired especially from 1.5 or 3.0 Tesla (T) scanners. With the recent advance of imaging technology, 7.0 T scanner provides much higher image contrast and resolution for hippocampus study. However, the previous methods developed for segmentation of hippocampus from 1.5 T or 3.0 T images do not work for the 7.0 T images, due to different levels of imaging contrast and texture information. In this paper, we present a learning-based algorithm for automatic segmentation of hippocampi from 7.0 T images, by taking advantages of the state-of-the-art multi-atlas framework and also the auto-context model (ACM). Specifically, ACM is performed in each atlas domain to iteratively construct sequences of location-adaptive classifiers by integrating both image appearance and local context features. Due to the plenty texture information in 7.0 T images, more advanced texture features are also extracted and incorporated into the ACM during the training stage. Then, under the multi-atlas segmentation framework, multiple sequences of ACM-based classifiers are trained for all atlases to incorporate the anatomical variability. In the application stage, for a new image, its hippocampus segmentation can be achieved by fusing the labeling results from all atlases, each of which is obtained by applying the atlas-specific ACM-based classifiers. Experimental results on twenty 7.0 T images with the voxel size of 0.35 × 0.35 × 0.35 mm3 show very promising hippocampus segmentations (in terms of Dice overlap ratio 89.1 ± 0.020), indicating high applicability for the future clinical and neuroscience studies

  16. Sacrotuberous Ligament Healing following Surgical Division during Transgluteal Pudendal Nerve Decompression: A 3-Tesla MR Neurography Study

    PubMed Central

    Fritz, Jan; Fritz, Benjamin; Dellon, A. Lee

    2016-01-01

    Pelvic pain due to chronic pudendal nerve (PN) compression, when treated surgically, is approached with a transgluteal division of the sacrotuberous ligament (STL). Controversy exists as to whether the STL heals spontaneously or requires grafting. Therefore, the aim of this study was to determine how surgically divided and unrepaired STL heal. A retrospective evaluation of 10 patients who had high spatial resolution 3-Tesla magnetic resonance imaging (3T MRI) exams of the pelvis was done using an IRB-approved protocol. Each patient was referred for residual pelvic pain after a transgluteal STL division for chronic pudendal nerve pain. Of the 10 patients, 8 had the STL divided and not repaired, while 2 had the STL divided and reconstructed with an allograft tendon. Of the 8 that were left unrepaired, 6 had bilateral surgery. Outcome variables included STL integrity and thickness. Normative data for the STL were obtained through a control group of 20 subjects. STL integrity and thickness were measured directly on 3 T MR Neurography images, by two independent Radiologists. The integrity and thickness of the post-surgical STL was evaluated 39 months (range, 9–55) after surgery. Comparison was made with the native contra-lateral STL in those who had unilateral STL division, and with normal, non-divided STL of subjects of the control group. The normal STL measured 3 mm (minimum and maximum of absolute STL thickness, 2–3 mm). All post-operative STL were found to be continuous regardless of the surgical technique used. Measured at level of Alcock’s canal in the same plane as the obturator internus tendon posterior to the ischium, the mean anteroposterior STL diameter was 5 mm (range, 4–5 mm) in the group of prior STL division without repair and 8 mm (range, 8–9 mm) in the group with the STL reconstructed with grafts (p<0.05). The group of healed STLs were significantly thicker than the normal STL (p<0.05). We conclude that a surgically divided STL will heal

  17. Bloch‐Siegert B1+‐mapping for human cardiac 31P‐MRS at 7 Tesla

    PubMed Central

    Robson, Matthew D.; Rodgers, Christopher T.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose Phosphorus MR spectroscopy (31P‐MRS) is a powerful tool for investigating tissue energetics in vivo. Cardiac 31P‐MRS is typically performed using surface coils that create an inhomogeneous excitation field across the myocardium. Accurate measurements of B1+ (and hence flip angle) are necessary for quantitative analysis of 31P‐MR spectra. We demonstrate a Bloch‐Siegert B1+‐mapping method for this purpose. Theory and Methods We compare acquisition strategies for Bloch‐Siegert B1+‐mapping when there are several spectral peaks. We optimize a Bloch‐Siegert sensitizing (Fermi) pulse for cardiac 31P‐MRS at 7 Tesla (T) and apply it in a three‐dimensional (3D) chemical shift imaging sequence. We validate this in phantoms and skeletal muscle (against a dual‐TR method) and present the first cardiac 31P B1+‐maps at 7T. Results The Bloch‐Siegert method correlates strongly (Pearson's r = 0.90 and 0.84) and has bias <25 Hz compared with a multi‐TR method in phantoms and dual‐TR method in muscle. Cardiac 3D B1+‐maps were measured in five normal volunteers. B1+ maps based on phosphocreatine and alpha‐adenosine‐triphosphate correlated strongly (r = 0.62), confirming that the method is T1 insensitive. Conclusion The 3D 31P Bloch‐Siegert B1+‐mapping is consistent with reference methods in phantoms and skeletal muscle. It is the first method appropriate for 31P B1+‐mapping in the human heart at 7T. Magn Reson Med 76:1047–1058, 2016. © 2015 The Authors. Magnetic Resonance in Medicine published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. on behalf of International Society for Magnetic Resonance in Medicine. This is an open access article under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits use, distribution and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited. PMID:26509652

  18. Three-Tesla magnetic resonance elastography for hepatic fibrosis: Comparison with diffusion-weighted imaging and gadoxetic acid-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging

    PubMed Central

    Park, Hee Sun; Kim, Young Jun; Yu, Mi Hye; Choe, Won Hyeok; Jung, Sung Il; Jeon, Hae Jeong

    2014-01-01

    AIM: To evaluate the feasibility of 3-Tesla magnetic resonance elastography (MRE) for hepatic fibrosis and to compare that with diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI) and gadoxetic acid-enhanced magnetic resonance (MR) imaging. METHODS: Forty-two patients were included in the study. On MRE, mean stiffness values were measured on the elastograms in kilopascals. The apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) of the liver was measured using DWI. On gadoxetic acid enhanced MR, the contrast enhancement index (CEI) was calculated as signal intensity (SI)post/SIpre, where SIpost is liver-to-muscle SI ratio on hepatobiliary phase images and SIpre is that on nonenhanced images. Correlation between aspartate aminotransferase to the platelet ratio index (APRI) and three MR parameters was assessed. Each MR parameter was compared between a hepatic fibrosis (HF) group and non-hepatic fibrosis (nHF) group. RESULTS: Liver stiffness showed strong positive correlation with APRI [Spearman correlation coeffiecient (r) = 0.773, P < 0.0001], while ADC and CEI showed weak or prominent negative correlation (r = -0.28 and -0.321, respectively). In the HF group, only liver stiffness showed strong correlation with APRI (r = 0.731, P < 0.0001). Liver stiffness, ADC, and APRI were significantly different between the HF group and nHF group. CONCLUSION: MRE at 3-Tesla could be a feasible method for the assessment of hepatic fibrosis. PMID:25516671

  19. Measurement of the weighted peak level for occupational exposure to gradient magnetic fields for 1.5 and 3 Tesla MRI body scanners.

    PubMed

    Bonutti, F; Tecchio, M; Maieron, M; Trevisan, D; Negro, C; Calligaris, F

    2016-03-01

    The purpose of this work is to give a contribution to the construction of a comprehensive knowledge of the exposure levels to gradient magnetic fields (GMF) in terms of the weighed peak (WP), especially for 3 Tesla scanners for which there are still few works available in the literature. A new generation probe for the measurement of electromagnetic fields in the range of 1 Hz-400 kHz was used to assess the occupational exposure levels to the GMF for 1.5 and 3.0 Tesla MRI body scanners, using the method of the WP according to the International Commission on Non-Ionizing Radiation Protection (ICNIRP) approach. The probe was placed at a height of 1.1 m, close to the MRI scanners, where operators could stay during some medical procedures with particular issues. The measurements were performed for a set of typical acquisition sequences for body (liver) and head exams. The measured values of WP were in compliance with ICNIRP 2010 reference levels for occupational exposures.

  20. Lighten Up: Tesla.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wiebe, Ann

    1994-01-01

    Presents a lesson plan detailing an interdisciplinary mathematics/science activity in which students take a home survey of light bulbs and then design an energy-saving lighting system for a home. Contains reproducible student worksheets. (MKR)

  1. Evaluation of Artifacts and Distortions of Titanium Applicators on 3.0-Tesla MRI: Feasibility of Titanium Applicators in MRI-Guided Brachytherapy for Gynecological Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Yusung; Muruganandham, Manickam; Modrick, Joseph M.; Bayouth, John E.

    2011-07-01

    Purpose: The aim of this study was to characterize the levels of artifacts and distortions of titanium applicators on 3.0-Tesla magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Methods and Materials: Fletcher-Suit-Delclos-style tandem and ovoids (T and O) and tandem and ring applicator (T and R) were examined. The quality assurance (QA) phantoms for each applicator were designed and filled with copper sulphate solution (1.5 g/l). The artifacts were quantified with the registration of corresponding computed tomography (CT) images. A favorable MR sequence was searched in terms of artifacts. Using the sequence, the artifacts were determined. The geometric distortions induced by the applicators were quantified through each registration of CT and MRI without applicators. The artifacts of T and O were also evaluated on in vivo MRI datasets of 5 patients. Results: T1-weighted MRI with 1-mm slice thickness was found as a favorable MR sequence. Applying the sequence, the artifacts at the tandem tip of T and O and T and R were determined as 1.5 {+-} 0.5 mm in a superior direction in phantom studies. In the ovoids of T and O, we found artifacts less than 1.5 {+-} 0.5 mm. The artifacts of a T and O tandem in vivo were found as less than 2.6 {+-} 1.3 mm on T1-weighted MRI, whereas less than 6.9 {+-} 3.4 mm on T2-weighted MRI. No more than 1.2 {+-} 0.6 mm (3.0 {+-} 1.5 mm) of distortions, due to a titanium applicator, were measured on T1-weighted MRI (T2-). Conclusion: In 3.0-Tesla MRI, we found the artifact widths at the tip of tandem were less than 1.5 {+-} 0.5 mm for both T and O and T and R when using T1-weighted MRI in phantom studies. However, exclusive 3.0-Tesla MRI-guided brachytherapy planning with a titanium applicator should be cautiously implemented.

  2. Modular version of SIMCON, FPGA based, DSP integrated, LLRF control system for TESLA FEL part I: SIMCON 3.0 motherboard

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pozniak, Krzysztof T.; Romaniuk, Ryszard S.; Kierzkowski, Krzysztof

    2006-03-01

    The paper includes a description of predicted functionalities to be implemented in a universal motherboard (MB) for the next generation of LLRF control system for TESLA. The motherboard bases on a number of quasi-autonomous embedded executive modules. The modules are implemented in a few FPGA chips featured by the MB. The paper presents a practical design of the MB. The initial (basic) solution of the MB has the Cyclone as the chip where the board management is embedded. The board features communication modules - VME and micro, single chip PC with Ethernet. The board provides power supply for the FPGA chips. The board has fast internal communication between particular modules. The described Motherboard serves for experiments with the SIMCON 3.0 system.

  3. Cold RF test and associated mechanical features correlation of a TESLA-style 9-cell superconducting niobium cavity built in China

    SciTech Connect

    Dai, Jing; Quan, Sheng-Wen; Zhang, Bao-Cheng; Lin, Lin; Hao, Jian-Kui; Zhu, Feng; Xu, Wen-Can; He, Fei-Si; Jin, Song; Wang, Fang; Liu, Ke-Xin; Geng, R L; Zhao, Kui

    2012-02-01

    The RF performance of a 1.3 GHz 9-cell superconducting niobium cavity was evaluated at cryogenic temperatures following surface processing by using the standard ILC-style recipe. The cavity is a TESLA-style 9-cell superconducting niobium cavity, with complete end group components including a higher order mode coupler, built in China for practical applications. An accelerating gradient of 28.6 MV/m was achieved at an unloaded quality factor of 4 x 10{sup 9}. The morphological property of mechanical features on the RF surface of this cavity was characterized through optical inspection. Correlation between the observed mechanical features and the RF performance of the cavity is attempted.

  4. Luminosity, Energy and Polarization Studies for the Linear Collider: Comparing e+e- and e-e- for NLC and TESLA

    SciTech Connect

    Woods, M

    2004-02-25

    We present results from luminosity, energy and polarization studies at a future Linear Collider. We compare e{sup +}e{sup -} and e{sup -}e{sup -} modes of operation and consider both NLC and TESLA beam parameter specifications at a center-of-mass energy of 500 GeV. Realistic colliding beam distributions are used, which include dynamic effects of the beam transport from the Damping Rings to the Interaction Point. Beam-beam deflections scans and their impact for beam-based feedbacks are considered. A transverse kink instability is studied, including its impact on determining the luminosity-weighted center-of-mass energy. Polarimetry in the extraction line from the IP is presented, including results on beam distributions at the Compton IP and at the Compton detector.

  5. The connective tissue and ligaments of the distal interphalangeal joint: a review and investigation using ultra-high field 16.4 Tesla magnetic resonance imaging.

    PubMed

    Slattery, D; Aland, C; Durbridge, G; Cowin, G

    2014-05-01

    This study reviews the literature on the anatomy of the connective tissues surrounding the distal interphalangeal joint and further characterizes the three-dimensional relationships of these structures with ultra-high field magnetic resonance imaging. Ten cadaver fingers, fixed in a solution of 5% agar and 4% formalin, were imaged utilising an ultrashield 16.4 Tesla ultra-high field magnetic resonance imaging, yielding a total of 4000 images. Images were analysed using Osirix™ (version 5.5.1 32 bit edition) for three-dimensional reconstruction. We found numerous conflicting descriptions of the connective tissue structures around the distal interphalangeal joint. Based upon our literature review and imaging studies we have defined precisely Cleland's ligaments, the oblique proximal septum, Grayson's ligaments, the dorsal plate, and the interosseous ligaments of the distal interphalangeal joint.

  6. Technical Note: Compact three-tesla magnetic resonance imager with high-performance gradients passes ACR image quality and acoustic noise tests

    PubMed Central

    Weavers, Paul T.; Shu, Yunhong; Tao, Shengzhen; Huston, John; Lee, Seung-Kyun; Graziani, Dominic; Mathieu, Jean-Baptiste; Trzasko, Joshua D.; Foo, Thomas K.-F.; Bernstein, Matt A.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: A compact, three-tesla magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) system has been developed. It features a 37 cm patient aperture, allowing the use of commercial receiver coils. Its design allows simultaneously for gradient amplitudes of 85 millitesla per meter (mT/m) sustained and 700 tesla per meter per second (T/m/s) slew rates. The size of the gradient system allows for these simultaneous performance targets to be achieved with little or no peripheral nerve stimulation, but also raises a concern about the geometric distortion as much of the imaging will be done near the system’s maximum 26 cm field-of-view. Additionally, the fast switching capability raises acoustic noise concerns. This work evaluates the system for both the American College of Radiology’s (ACR) MRI image quality protocol and the Food and Drug Administration’s (FDA) nonsignificant risk (NSR) acoustic noise limits for MR. Passing these two tests is critical for clinical acceptance. Methods: In this work, the gradient system was operated at the maximum amplitude and slew rate of 80 mT/m and 500 T/m/s, respectively. The geometric distortion correction was accomplished by iteratively determining up to the tenth order spherical harmonic coefficients using a fiducial phantom and position-tracking software, with seventh order correction utilized in the ACR test. Acoustic noise was measured with several standard clinical pulse sequences. Results: The system passes all the ACR image quality tests. The acoustic noise as measured when the gradient coil was inserted into a whole-body MRI system conforms to the FDA NSR limits. Conclusions: The compact system simultaneously allows for high gradient amplitude and high slew rate. Geometric distortion concerns have been mitigated by extending the spherical harmonic correction to higher orders. Acoustic noise is within the FDA limits. PMID:26936710

  7. Gray Matter-Specific Changes in Brain Bioenergetics after Acute Sleep Deprivation: A 31P Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy Study at 4 Tesla

    PubMed Central

    Plante, David T.; Trksak, George H.; Jensen, J. Eric; Penetar, David M.; Ravichandran, Caitlin; Riedner, Brady A.; Tartarini, Wendy L.; Dorsey, Cynthia M.; Renshaw, Perry F.; Lukas, Scott E.; Harper, David G.

    2014-01-01

    Study Objectives: A principal function of sleep may be restoration of brain energy metabolism caused by the energetic demands of wakefulness. Because energetic demands in the brain are greater in gray than white matter, this study used linear mixed-effects models to examine tissue-type specific changes in high-energy phosphates derived using 31P magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS) after sleep deprivation and recovery sleep. Design: Experimental laboratory study. Setting: Outpatient neuroimaging center at a private psychiatric hospital. Participants: A total of 32 MRS scans performed in eight healthy individuals (mean age 35 y; range 23-51 y). Interventions: Phosphocreatine (PCr) and β-nucleoside triphosphate (NTP) were measured using 31P MRS three dimensional-chemical shift imaging at high field (4 Tesla) after a baseline night of sleep, acute sleep deprivation, and 2 nights of recovery sleep. Novel linear mixed-effects models were constructed using spectral and tissue segmentation data to examine changes in bioenergetics in gray and white matter. Measurements and Results: PCr increased in gray matter after 2 nights of recovery sleep relative to sleep deprivation with no significant changes in white matter. Exploratory analyses also demonstrated that increases in PCr were associated with increases in electroencephalographic slow wave activity during recovery sleep. No significant changes in β-NTP were observed. Conclusions: These results demonstrate that sleep deprivation and subsequent recovery-induced changes in high-energy phosphates primarily occur in gray matter, and increases in phosphocreatine after recovery sleep may be related to sleep homeostasis. Citation: Plante DT, Trksak GH, Jensen JE, Penetar DM, Ravichandran C, Riedner BA, Tartarini WL, Dorsey CM, Renshaw PF, Lukas SE, Harper DG. Gray matter-specific changes in brain bioenergetics after acute sleep deprivation: a 31P magnetic resonance spectroscopy study at 4 Tesla. SLEEP 2014

  8. 3 Tesla multiparametric MRI for GTV-definition of Dominant Intraprostatic Lesions in patients with Prostate Cancer – an interobserver variability study

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Purpose To evaluate the interobserver variability of gross tumor volume (GTV) - delineation of Dominant Intraprostatic Lesions (DIPL) in patients with prostate cancer using published MRI criteria for multiparametric MRI at 3 Tesla by 6 different observers. Material and methods 90 GTV-datasets based on 15 multiparametric MRI sequences (T2w, diffusion weighted (DWI) and dynamic contrast enhanced (DCE)) of 5 patients with prostate cancer were generated for GTV-delineation of DIPL by 6 observers. The reference GTV-dataset was contoured by a radiologist with expertise in diagnostic imaging of prostate cancer using MRI. Subsequent GTV-delineation was performed by 5 radiation oncologists who received teaching of MRI-features of primary prostate cancer before starting contouring session. GTV-datasets were contoured using Oncentra Masterplan® and iplan® Net. For purposes of comparison GTV-datasets were imported to the Artiview® platform (Aquilab®), GTV-values and the similarity indices or Kappa indices (KI) were calculated with the postulation that a KI > 0.7 indicates excellent, a KI > 0.6 to < 0.7 substantial and KI > 0.5 to < 0.6 moderate agreement. Additionally all observers rated difficulties of contouring for each MRI-sequence using a 3 point rating scale (1 = easy to delineate, 2 = minor difficulties, 3 = major difficulties). Results GTV contouring using T2w (KI-T2w = 0.61) and DCE images (KI-DCE = 0.63) resulted in substantial agreement. GTV contouring using DWI images resulted in moderate agreement (KI-DWI = 0.51). KI-T2w and KI-DCE was significantly higher than KI-DWI (p = 0.01 and p = 0.003). Degree of difficulty in contouring GTV was significantly lower using T2w and DCE compared to DWI-sequences (both p < 0.0001). Analysis of delineation differences revealed inadequate comparison of functional (DWI, DCE) to anatomical sequences (T2w) and lack of awareness of non-specific imaging findings as a source of erroneous

  9. Energetic and Cell Membrane Metabolic Products in Patients with Primary Insomnia: A 31-Phosphorus Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy Study at 4 Tesla

    PubMed Central

    Harper, David G.; Plante, David T.; Jensen, J. Eric; Ravichandran, Caitlin; Buxton, Orfeu M.; Benson, Kathleen L.; O'Connor, Shawn P.; Renshaw, Perry F.; Winkelman, John W.

    2013-01-01

    Study Objectives: Primary insomnia (PI) is a sleep disorder characterized by difficulty with sleep initiation, maintenance, and/or the experience of nonrestorative sleep combined with a subsequent impairment of daytime functioning. The hyperarousal hypothesis has emerged as the leading candidate to explain insomnia symptoms in the absence of specific mental, physical, or substance-related causes. We hypothesized that the cellular energetic metabolites, including beta nucleoside triphosphate, which in magnetic resonance spectroscopy approximates adenosine triphosphate (ATP), and phosphocreatine (PCr), would show changes in PI reflecting increased energy demand. Design and Setting: Matched-groups, cross-sectional study performed at two university-based hospitals. Patients: Sixteen medication-free individuals (eight males, eight females; mean ± standard deviation (SD) age = 37.2 ± 8.4 y) with PI and 16 good sleepers (nine males, seven females; mean ± SD age = 37.6 ± 4.7 y). Measurements: Diagnosis was established for all individuals by unstructured clinical interview, Structured Clinical Interview for Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, Fourth Edition (SCID), sleep diary, and actigraphy. Polysomnography was collected in individuals with PI. Phosphorous magnetic resonance spectroscopy (31P MRS) data were collected on all individuals at 4 Tesla. We assessed cell membrane (anabolic precursors and catabolic metabolites) and bioenergetic (ATP, phosphocreatine) metabolites in gray matter and white matter to determine their relationship to the presence and severity of PI. Results: Individuals with PI showed lower phosphocreatine in gray matter and an unexpected decrease of phosphocholine, a precursor of the cell membrane compound phosphatidylcholine, in white matter. In addition, there was a trend toward a negative association between polysomnographically determined wake after sleep onset and gray matter beta-nucleoside triphosphate and white matter

  10. Assessment of safety and interference issues of radio frequency identification devices in 0.3 Tesla magnetic resonance imaging and computed tomography.

    PubMed

    Periyasamy, M; Dhanasekaran, R

    2014-01-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate two issues regarding magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) including device functionality and image artifacts for the presence of radio frequency identification devices (RFID) in association with 0.3 Tesla at 12.7 MHz MRI and computed tomography (CT) scanning. Fifteen samples of RFID tags with two different sizes (wristband and ID card types) were tested. The tags were exposed to several MR-imaging conditions during MRI examination and X-rays of CT scan. Throughout the test, the tags were oriented in three different directions (axial, coronal, and sagittal) relative to MRI system in order to cover all possible situations with respect to the patient undergoing MRI and CT scanning, wearing a RFID tag on wrist. We observed that the tags did not sustain physical damage with their functionality remaining unaffected even after MRI and CT scanning, and there was no alternation in previously stored data as well. In addition, no evidence of either signal loss or artifact was seen in the acquired MR and CT images. Therefore, we can conclude that the use of this passive RFID tag is safe for a patient undergoing MRI at 0.3 T/12.7 MHz and CT Scanning.

  11. Bilateral breast MRI by use of dual-source parallel radiofrequency excitation and image-based shimming at 3 Tesla: improvement in homogeneity on fat-suppression imaging.

    PubMed

    Ishizaka, Kinya; Kato, Fumi; Terae, Satoshi; Mito, Suzuko; Oyama-Manabe, Noriko; Kamishima, Tamotsu; Nakanishi, Mitsuhiro; Sugimori, Hiroyuki; Hamaguchi, Hiroyuki; Shirato, Hiroki

    2015-01-01

    In this study, we aimed to compare fat-suppression homogeneity on breast MR imaging by using dual-source parallel radiofrequency excitation and image-based shimming (DS-IBS) with single-source radiofrequency excitation with volume shim (SS-Vol) at 3 Tesla. Twenty patients were included. Axial three-dimensional T1-weighted turbo-field-echo breast images with DS-IBS and SS-Vol were obtained. Fat suppression was scored with four grade points. The contrast of the pectoral muscle and the fat in each breast area was obtained in the head medial, head lateral, foot medial, and foot lateral areas. The axillary space was calculated and compared between DS-IBS and SS-Vol. The average DS-IBS score was significantly higher than that of SS-Vol. The mean contrasts of fat in the foot lateral areas and axillary spaces on DS-IBS images were significantly higher than on SS-Vol images.

  12. Signal-to-noise ratio and spectral linewidth improvements between 1.5 and 7 Tesla in proton echo-planar spectroscopic imaging.

    PubMed

    Otazo, Ricardo; Mueller, Bryon; Ugurbil, Kamil; Wald, Lawrence; Posse, Stefan

    2006-12-01

    This study characterizes gains in sensitivity and spectral resolution of proton echo-planar spectroscopic imaging (PEPSI) with increasing magnetic field strength (B(0)). Signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) per unit volume and unit time, and intrinsic linewidth (LW) of N-acetyl-aspartate (NAA), creatine (Cr), and choline (Cho) were measured with PEPSI at 1.5, 3, 4, and 7 Tesla on scanners that shared a similar software and hardware platform, using circularly polarized (CP) and eight-channel phased-array (PA) head coils. Data were corrected for relaxation effects and processed with a time-domain matched filter (MF) adapted to each B(0). The SNR and LW measured with PEPSI were very similar to those measured with conventional point-resolved spectroscopy (PRESS) SI. Measurements with the CP coil demonstrated a nearly linear SNR gain with respect to B(0) in central brain regions. For the PA coil, the SNR-B(0) relationship was less than linear, but there was a substantial SNR increase in comparison to the CP coil. The LW in units of ppm decreased with B(0), resulting in improved spectral resolution. These studies using PEPSI demonstrated linear gains in SNR with respect to B(0), consistent with theoretical expectations, and a decrease in ppm LW with increasing B(0).

  13. 13C MRS of Human Brain at 7 Tesla Using [2-13C]Glucose Infusion and Low Power Broadband Stochastic Proton Decoupling

    PubMed Central

    Li, Shizhe; An, Li; Yu, Shao; Araneta, Maria Ferraris; Johnson, Christopher S.; Wang, Shumin; Shen, Jun

    2015-01-01

    Purpose 13C magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS) of human brain at 7 Tesla (T) may pose patient safety issues due to high RF power deposition for proton decoupling. The purpose of present work is to study the feasibility of in vivo 13C MRS of human brain at 7 T using broadband low RF power proton decoupling. Methods Carboxylic/amide 13C MRS of human brain by broadband stochastic proton decoupling was demonstrated on a 7 T scanner. RF safety was evaluated using the finite-difference time-domain method. 13C signal enhancement by nuclear Overhauser effect (NOE) and proton decoupling was evaluated in both phantoms and in vivo. Results At 7 T, the peak amplitude of carboxylic/amide 13C signals was increased by a factor of greater than 4 due to the combined effects of NOE and proton decoupling. The 7 T 13C MRS technique used decoupling power and average transmit power of less than 35 W and 3.6 W, respectively. Conclusion In vivo 13C MRS studies of human brain can be performed at 7 T well below the RF safety threshold by detecting carboxylic/amide carbons with broadband stochastic proton decoupling. PMID:25917936

  14. Judging roughness by sight--a 7-Tesla fMRI study on responsivity of the primary somatosensory cortex during observed touch of self and others.

    PubMed

    Kuehn, Esther; Trampel, Robert; Mueller, Karsten; Turner, Robert; Schütz-Bosbach, Simone

    2013-08-01

    Observing another person being touched activates our own somatosensory system. Whether the primary somatosensory cortex (S1) is also activated during the observation of passive touch, and which subregions of S1 are responsible for self- and other-related observed touch is currently unclear. In our study, we first aimed to clarify whether observing passive touch without any action component can robustly increase activity in S1. Secondly, we investigated whether S1 activity only increases when touch of others is observed, or also when touch of one's own body is observed. We were particularly interested in which subregions of S1 are responsible for either process. We used functional magnetic resonance imaging at 7 Tesla to measure S1 activity changes when participants observed videos of their own or another's hand in either egocentric or allocentric perspective being touched by different pieces of sandpaper. Participants were required to judge the roughness of the different sandpaper surfaces. Our results clearly show that S1 activity does increase in response to observing passive touch, and that activity changes are localized in posterior but not in anterior parts of S1. Importantly, activity increases in S1 were particularly related to observing another person being touched. Self-related observed touch, in contrast, caused no significant activity changes within S1. We therefore assume that posterior but not anterior S1 is part of a system for sharing tactile experiences with others.

  15. In vivo assessment of iron content of the cerebral cortex in healthy aging using 7-Tesla T2*-weighted phase imaging.

    PubMed

    Buijs, Mathijs; Doan, Nhat Trung; van Rooden, Sanneke; Versluis, Maarten J; van Lew, Baldur; Milles, Julien; van der Grond, Jeroen; van Buchem, Mark A

    2016-09-15

    Accumulation of brain iron has been suggested as a biomarker of neurodegeneration. Increased iron has been seen in the cerebral cortex in postmortem studies of neurodegenerative diseases and healthy aging. Until recently, the diminutive thickness of the cortex and its relatively low iron content have hampered in vivo study of cortical iron accumulation. Using phase images of a T2*-weighted sequence at ultrahigh field strength (7 Tesla), we examined the iron content of 22 cortical regions in 70 healthy subjects aged 22-80 years. The cortex was automatically segmented and parcellated, and phase shift was analyzed using an in-house developed method. We found a significant increase in phase shift with age in 20 of 22 cortical regions, concurrent with current understanding of cortical iron accumulation. Our findings suggest that increased cortical iron content can be assessed in healthy aging in vivo. The high spatial resolution and sensitivity to iron of our method make it a potentially useful tool for studying cortical iron accumulation in healthy aging and neurodegenerative diseases.

  16. 7-Tesla Susceptibility-Weighted Imaging to Assess the Effects of Radiotherapy on Normal-Appearing Brain in Patients With Glioma

    SciTech Connect

    Lupo, Janine M.; Chuang, Cynthia F.; Chang, Susan M.; Barani, Igor J.; Jimenez, Bert; Hess, Christopher P.; Nelson, Sarah J.

    2012-03-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the intermediate- and long-term imaging manifestations of radiotherapy on normal-appearing brain tissue in patients with treated gliomas using 7T susceptibility-weighted imaging (SWI). Methods and Materials: SWI was performed on 25 patients with stable gliomas on a 7 Tesla magnet. Microbleeds were identified as discrete foci of susceptibility that did not correspond to vessels. The number of microbleeds was counted within and outside of the T2-hyperintense lesion. For 3 patients, radiation dosimetry maps were reconstructed and fused with the 7T SWI data. Results: Multiple foci of susceptibility consistent with microhemorrhages were observed in patients 2 years after chemoradiation. These lesions were not present in patients who were not irradiated. The prevalence of microhemorrhages increased with the time since completion of radiotherapy, and these lesions often extended outside the boundaries of the initial high-dose volume and into the contralateral hemisphere. Conclusions: High-field SWI has potential for visualizing the appearance of microbleeds associated with long-term effects of radiotherapy on brain tissue. The ability to visualize these lesions in normal-appearing brain tissue may be important in further understanding the utility of this treatment in patients with longer survival.

  17. Is the Susceptibility Vessel Sign on 3-Tesla Magnetic Resonance T2*-Weighted Imaging a Useful Tool to Predict Recanalization in Intravenous Tissue Plasminogen Activator?

    PubMed

    Yamamoto, N; Satomi, J; Harada, M; Izumi, Y; Nagahiro, S; Kaji, R

    2016-09-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the independent factors associated with the absence of recanalization approximately 24 h after intravenous administration of tissue-type plasminogen activator (IV TPA). The previous studies have been conducted using 1.5-Tesla (T) magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). We studied whether the characteristics of 3-T MRI findings were useful to predict outcome and recanalization after IV tPA. Patients with internal carotid artery (ICA) or middle cerebral artery (MCA) (horizontal portion, M1; Sylvian portion, M2) occlusion and treated by IV tPA were enrolled. We studied whether the presence of susceptibility vessel sign (SVS) at M1 and low clot burden score on T2*-weighted imaging (T2*-CBS) on 3-T MRI were associated with the absence of recanalization. A total of 49 patients were enrolled (27 men; mean age, 73.9 years). MR angiography obtained approximately 24 h after IV tPA revealed recanalization in 21 (42.9 %) patients. Independent factors associated with the absence of recanalization included ICA or proximal M1 occlusion (odds ratio, 69.6; 95 % confidence interval, 5.05-958.8, p = 0.002). In this study, an independent factor associated with the absence of recanalization may be proximal occlusion of the cerebral arteries rather than SVS in the MCA or low T2*-CBS on 3-T MRI.

  18. Topography of Cortical Microbleeds in Alzheimer's Disease with and without Cerebral Amyloid Angiopathy: A Post-Mortem 7.0-Tesla MRI Study.

    PubMed

    De Reuck, J; Auger, F; Durieux, N; Deramecourt, V; Cordonnier, C; Pasquier, F; Maurage, C A; Leys, D; Bordet, R

    2015-11-01

    Cortical microbleeds (CMBs) detected on T2*-weighted gradient-echo (GRE) magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) are considered as a possible hallmark of cerebral amyloid angiopathy (CAA). The present post-mortem 7.0-tesla MRI study investigates whether topographic differences exist in Alzheimer's brains without (AD) and with CAA (AD-CAA). The distribution of CMBs in thirty-two post-mortem brains, consisting of 12 AD, 8 AD-CAA and 12 controls, was mutually compared on T2*-GRE MRI of six coronal sections of a cerebral hemisphere. The mean numbers of CMBs were determined in twenty-two different gyri. As a whole there was a trend of more CMBs on GRE MRI in the prefrontal section of the AD, the AD-CAA as well as of the control brains. Compared to controls AD brains had significantly more CMBs in the superior frontal, the inferior temporal, the rectus and the cinguli gyrus, and in the insular cortex. In AD-CAA brains CMBs were increased in all gyri with exception of the medial parietal gyrus and the hippocampus. AD-CAA brains showed a highly significant increase of CMBs in the inferior parietal gyrus (p value: 0.001) and a significant increase in the precuneus and the cuneus (p value: 0.01) compared to the AD brains. The differences in topographic distribution of CMBs between AD and AD-CAA brains should be further investigated on MRI in clinically suspected patients.

  19. Aging and magnetism: Presenting a possible new holistic paradigm for ameliorating the aging process and the effects thereof, through externally applied physiologic PicoTesla magnetic fields.

    PubMed

    Jacobson, Jerry; Sherlag, Benjamin

    2015-09-01

    A new holistic paradigm is proposed for slowing our genomic-based biological clocks (e.g. regulation of telomere length), and decreasing heat energy exigencies for maintenance of physiologic homeostasis. Aging is considered the result of a progressive slow burn in small volumes of tissues with increase in the quantum entropic states; producing desiccation, microscopic scarring, and disruption of cooperative coherent states. Based upon piezoelectricity, i.e. photon-phonon transductions, physiologic PicoTesla range magnetic fields may decrease the production of excessive heat energy through target specific, bio molecular resonant interactions, renormalization of intrinsic electromagnetic tissue profiles, and autonomic modulation. Prospectively, we hypothesize that deleterious effects of physical trauma, immunogenic microbiological agents, stress, and anxiety may be ameliorated. A particle-wave equation is cited to ascertain magnetic field parameters for application to the whole organism thereby achieving desired homeostasis; secondary to restoration of structure and function on quantum levels. We hypothesize that it is at the atomic level that physical events shape the flow of signals and the transmission of energy in bio molecular systems. References are made to experimental data indicating the aspecific efficacy of non-ionizing physiologic magnetic field profiles for treatment of various pathologic states.

  20. The effect of changes to MOLLI scheme on T1 mapping and extra cellular volume calculation in healthy volunteers with 3 tesla cardiovascular magnetic resonance imaging

    PubMed Central

    McDiarmid, Adam K.; Broadbent, David A.; Higgins, David M.; Swoboda, Peter P.; Kidambi, Ananth; Ripley, David P.; Erhayiem, Bara; Musa, Tarique A.; Dobson, Laura E.; Greenwood, John P.

    2015-01-01

    Background Diffuse myocardial fibrosis may be quantified with magnetic resonance (MR) by calculating extracellular volume (ECV) fraction from native and post-contrast T1 values. The ideal modified look-locker inversion recovery (MOLLI) sequence for deriving T1 values has not been determined. This study aims to establish if systematic differences exist between suggested MOLLI schemes. Methods Twelve phantom gels were studied with inversion recovery spin echo MR at 3.0 tesla to determine reference T1. Gels were then scanned with six MOLLI sequences (3s)3b(3s)5b; 4b(3s)3b(3s)2b; 5b(3s)3b with flip angles of both 35° and 50° at a range of heart rates (HRs). In 10 healthy volunteers MOLLI studies were performed on two separate occasions. Mid ventricular native and post contrast T1 was measured and ECV (%) calculated. Results In phantoms, the co-efficient of variability at simulated HR [40-100] with a flip angle of 35° ranged from 6.77 to 9.55, and at 50° from 7.71 to 11.10. T1 was under-estimated by all MOLLI acquisitions. Error was greatest with longer T1, and increased as HR increased. The 10 volunteers had normal MR studies. Native T1 time was similar for all acquisitions but highest with the 5b(3s)3b 35° scheme (1,189.1±33.46 ms). Interstudy reproducibility was similar for all MOLLIs. Conclusions The 5b(3s)3b MOLLI scheme agreed best with reference T1, without statistical difference between the six schemes. The shorter breath-hold time of 5b(3s)3b scheme may be preferable in clinical studies and warrants further investigation. PMID:26435913

  1. Impact of preoperative and postoperative membranous urethral length measured by 3 Tesla magnetic resonance imaging on urinary continence recovery after robotic-assisted radical prostatectomy

    PubMed Central

    Song, Wan; Kim, Chan Kyo; Park, Byung Kwan; Jeon, Hwang Gyun; Jeong, Byong Chang; Seo, Seong Il; Jeon, Seong Soo; Choi, Han Yong; Lee, Hyun Moo

    2017-01-01

    Introduction We sought to investigate the impact of preoperative and postoperative membranous urethral length (MUL) on urinary continence using 3 Tesla (3T) magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) after robotic-assisted radical prostatectomy (RARP). Methods Between 2008 and 2013, 190 men with RARP underwent preoperative and postoperative MRI. Patients who received adjuvant radiotherapy or who were lost to followup were excluded, leaving 186 patients eligible for analysis. Preoperative MUL was estimated from the prostate apex to the penile bulb, while postoperative MUL was estimated from the bladder neck to penile bulb. Patients with no pads or protection were considered to have complete continence. Logistic regression analysis was used to identify predictors associated with urinary incontinence at six and 12 months. Results Age was commonly associated with urinary incontinence at six and 12 months. In addition, diabetes mellitus (DM) was another factor associated with urinary incontinence at 12 months. When adjusting these variables, preoperative MUL ≤16 mm (95% confidence interval [CI] 1.01–1.14; p=0.022), postoperative MUL ≤14 mm (95% CI 1.16–9.80; p=0.025) and percent change of MUL >18% (95% CI 1.17–7.23; p=0.021) were significantly associated with urinary incontinence at six months. However, at 12 months, preoperative MUL ≤13.5 mm (95% CI 1.85–19.21; p=0.003) and postoperative MUL ≤13 mm (95% CI 1.24–13.84; p=0.021) had impacts on urinary incontinence, but not percent change of MUL. Conclusions Preoperative and postoperative MUL were significantly associated with urinary continence recovery after RARP. Therefore, efforts to preserve MUL are highly recommended during surgery for optimal continence outcomes after RARP. PMID:28360954

  2. High resolution spectroscopy and chemical shift imaging of hyperpolarized 129Xe dissolved in the human brain in vivo at 1.5 tesla

    PubMed Central

    Rao, Madhwesha; Stewart, Neil J.; Norquay, Graham; Griffiths, Paul D.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Upon inhalation, xenon diffuses into the bloodstream and is transported to the brain, where it dissolves in various compartments of the brain. Although up to five chemically distinct peaks have been previously observed in 129Xe rat head spectra, to date only three peaks have been reported in the human head. This study demonstrates high resolution spectroscopy and chemical shift imaging (CSI) of 129Xe dissolved in the human head at 1.5 Tesla. Methods A 129Xe radiofrequency coil was built in‐house and 129Xe gas was polarized using spin‐exchange optical pumping. Following the inhalation of 129Xe gas, NMR spectroscopy was performed with spectral resolution of 0.033 ppm. Two‐dimensional CSI in all three anatomical planes was performed with spectral resolution of 2.1 ppm and voxel size 20 mm × 20 mm. Results Spectra of hyperpolarized 129Xe dissolved in the human head showed five distinct peaks at 188 ppm, 192 ppm, 196 ppm, 200 ppm, and 217 ppm. Assignment of these peaks was consistent with earlier studies. Conclusion High resolution spectroscopy and CSI of hyperpolarized 129Xe dissolved in the human head has been demonstrated. For the first time, five distinct NMR peaks have been observed in 129Xe spectra from the human head in vivo. Magn Reson Med 75:2227–2234, 2016. © 2016 The Authors Magnetic Resonance in Medicine published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. on behalf of International Society for Magnetic Resonance in Medicine. This is an open access article under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits use, distribution and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited. PMID:27080441

  3. Assessment of Age-Related Morphometric Changes of Subcortical Structures in Healthy People Using Ultra-High Field 7 Tesla Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Xue-Yuan; Zhao, Lei; Yu, Tao; Qiao, Liang; Ni, Duan-Yu; Zhang, Guo-Jun; Li, Yong-Jie

    2016-01-01

    Objective: To assess the age-related morphometric changes of subcortical structures in healthy people. Materials and Methods: Ultra-high field 7 tesla magnetic resonance (MR) imaging in humans was used to visualize the subcortical structures of healthy young, middle-aged and elderly participants. Using the magnetization-prepared two rapid acquisition gradient echo (MP2RAGE) sequence, we assessed the visibility of the margins of the thalamus and white matter in the thalamus, as well as the anterior commissure (AC) and posterior commissure (PC) length, the maximal height of the thalamus, the half width of the third ventricle and the distance between the AC and the center of the mammillothalamic tract (MTT) at the level of the AC-PC plane. All quantitative data were statistically evaluated. Results: The AC-PC length did not differ significantly among the three groups. The maximal height of the thalamus decreased with age (rs(53) = −0.719, p < 0.001). The half width of the third ventricle (rs(53) = 0.705, p < 0.001) and the distance between the AC and the center of the MTT (rs(53) = 0.485, p < 0.001) increased with age. The distance between the AC and the center of the MTT of the young and the elderly participants differed significantly (p = 0.007). Conclusion: The AC-PC length is not a good candidate for proportional correction during atlas-to-patient registration. The maximal height of the thalamus and the half width of the third ventricle correlated strongly with age, and the MTT position in relation to the AC shifted posteriorly as age increased. These age-related morphometric changes of subcortical structures should be considered in targeting for functional neurosurgery. PMID:27725800

  4. Evaluation of the WARP-turbo spin echo sequence for 3 Tesla magnetic resonance imaging of stifle joints in dogs with stainless steel tibial plateau leveling osteotomy implants.

    PubMed

    Simpler, Renee E; Kerwin, Sharon C; Eichelberger, Bunita M; Wall, Corey R; Thompson, James A; Padua, Abraham; Purdy, David; Griffin, John F

    2014-01-01

    Susceptibility artifacts caused by ferromagnetic implants compromise magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of the canine stifle after tibial plateau leveling osteotomy (TPLO) procedures. The WARP-turbo spin echo sequence is being developed to mitigate artifacts and utilizes slice encoding for metal artifact reduction. The aim of the current study was to evaluate the WARP-turbo spin echo sequence for imaging post TPLO canine stifle joints. Proton density weighted images of 19 canine cadaver limbs were made post TPLO using a 3 Tesla MRI scanner. Susceptibility artifact sizes were recorded and compared for WARP vs. conventional turbo spin echo sequences. Three evaluators graded depiction quality for the tibial tuberosity, medial and lateral menisci, tibial osteotomy, and caudal cruciate ligament as sufficient or insufficient to make a diagnosis. Artifacts were subjectively smaller and local structures were better depicted in WARP-turbo spin echo images. Signal void area was also reduced by 75% (sagittal) and 49% (dorsal) in WARP vs. conventional turbo spin echo images. Evaluators were significantly more likely to grade local anatomy depiction as adequate for making a diagnosis in WARP-turbo spin echo images in the sagittal but not dorsal plane. The proportion of image sets with anatomic structure depiction graded adequate to make a diagnosis ranged from 28 to 68% in sagittal WARP-turbo spin echo images compared to 0-19% in turbo spin echo images. Findings indicated that the WARP-turbo spin echo sequence reduces the severity of susceptibility artifacts in canine stifle joints post TPLO. However, variable depiction of local anatomy warrants further refinement of the technique.

  5. Preoperative 3-Tesla Multiparametric Endorectal Magnetic Resonance Imaging Findings and the Odds of Upgrading and Upstaging at Radical Prostatectomy in Men With Clinically Localized Prostate Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Hegde, John V.; Chen, Ming-Hui; Mulkern, Robert V.; Fennessy, Fiona M.; D'Amico, Anthony V.; Tempany, Clare M.C.

    2013-02-01

    Purpose: To investigate whether 3-T esla (3T) multiparametric endorectal MRI (erMRI) can add information to established predictors regarding occult extraprostatic or high-grade prostate cancer (PC) in men with clinically localized PC. Methods and Materials: At a single academic medical center, this retrospective study's cohort included 118 men with clinically localized PC who underwent 3T multiparametric erMRI followed by radical prostatectomy, from 2008 to 2011. Multivariable logistic regression analyses in all men and in 100 with favorable-risk PC addressed whether erMRI evidence of T3 disease was associated with prostatectomy T3 or Gleason score (GS) 8-10 (in patients with biopsy GS {<=}7) PC, adjusting for age, prostate-specific antigen level, clinical T category, biopsy GS, and percent positive biopsies. Results: The accuracy of erMRI prediction of extracapsular extension and seminal vesicle invasion was 75% and 95%, respectively. For all men, erMRI evidence of a T3 lesion versus T2 was associated with an increased odds of having pT3 disease (adjusted odds ratio [AOR] 4.81, 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.36-16.98, P=.015) and pGS 8-10 (AOR 5.56, 95% CI 1.10-28.18, P=.038). In the favorable-risk population, these results were AOR 4.14 (95% CI 1.03-16.56), P=.045 and AOR 7.71 (95% CI 1.36-43.62), P=.021, respectively. Conclusions: Three-Tesla multiparametric erMRI in men with favorable-risk PC provides information beyond that contained in known preoperative predictors about the presence of occult extraprostatic and/or high-grade PC. If validated in additional studies, this information can be used to counsel men planning to undergo radical prostatectomy or radiation therapy about the possible need for adjuvant radiation therapy or the utility of adding hormone therapy, respectively.

  6. Development of Brain Structural Connectivity between Ages 12 and 30: A 4-Tesla Diffusion Imaging Study in 439 Adolescents and Adults

    PubMed Central

    Dennis, Emily L.; Jahanshad, Neda; McMahon, Katie L.; de Zubicaray, Greig I.; Martin, Nicholas G.; Hickie, Ian B.; Toga, Arthur W.; Wright, Margaret J.; Thompson, Paul M.

    2013-01-01

    Understanding how the brain matures in healthy individuals is critical for evaluating deviations from normal development in psychiatric and neurodevelopmental disorders. The brain’s anatomical networks are profoundly re-modeled between childhood and adulthood, and diffusion tractography offers unprecedented power to reconstruct these networks and neural pathways in vivo. Here we tracked changes in structural connectivity and network efficiency in 439 right-handed individuals aged 12 to 30 (211 female/126 male adults, mean age=23.6, SD=2.19; 31 female/24 male 12 year olds, mean age=12.3, SD=0.18; and 25 female/22 male 16 year olds, mean age=16.2, SD=0.37). All participants were scanned with high angular resolution diffusion imaging (HARDI) at 4 Tesla. After we performed whole brain tractography, 70 cortical gyral-based regions of interest were extracted from each participant’s co-registered anatomical scans. The degree of fiber connections between all pairs of cortical regions, or nodes, were found to create symmetric fiber density matrices, reflecting the structural brain network. From those 70×70 matrices we computed graph theory metrics characterizing structural connectivity. Several key global and nodal metrics changed across development, showing increased network integration, with some connections pruned and others strengthened. The increases and decreases in fiber density, however, were not distributed proportionally across the brain. The frontal cortex had a disproportionate number of decreases in fiber density while the temporal cortex had a disproportionate number of increases in fiber density. This large-scale analysis of the developing structural connectome offers a foundation to develop statistical criteria for aberrant brain connectivity as the human brain matures. PMID:22982357

  7. An ecophysiological study of plants growing on the fly ash deposits from the "Nikola Tesla-A" thermal power station in Serbia.

    PubMed

    Pavlović, Pavle; Mitrović, Miroslava; Djurdjević, Lola

    2004-05-01

    This ecophysiological research on the ash deposits from the "Nikola Tesla-A" thermal power station in Serbia covered 10 plant species (Tamarix gallica, Populus alba, Spiraea van-hauttei, Ambrosia artemisifolia, Amorpha fruticosa, Eupatorium cannabinum, Crepis setosa, Epilobium collinum, Verbascum phlomoides, and Cirsium arvense). This paper presents the results of a water regime analysis, photosynthetic efficiency and trace elements (B, Cu, Mn, Zn, Pb, and Cd) content in vegetative plant parts. Water regime parameters indicate an overall stability in plant-water relations. During the period of summer drought, photosynthetic efficiency (Fv/Fm) was low, ranging from 0.429 to 0.620 for all the species that were analyzed. An analysis of the tissue trace elements content showed a lower trace metal concentration in the plants than in the ash, indicating that heavy metals undergo major concentration during the combustion process and some are not readily taken up by plants. The Zn and Pb concentrations in all of the examined species were normal whereas Cu and Mn concentrations were in the deficiency range. Boron concentrations in plant tissues were high, with some species even showing levels of more than 100 microg/g (Populus sp., Ambrosia sp., Amorpha sp., and Cirsium sp.). The presence of Cd was not detected. In general, it can be concluded from the results of this research that biological recultivation should take into account the existing ecological, vegetation, and floristic potential of an immediate environment that is abundant in life forms and ecological types of plant species that can overgrow the ash deposit relatively quickly. Selected species should be adapted to toxic B concentrations with moderate demands in terms of mineral elements (Cu and Mn).

  8. Development of Cerebral Microbleeds in the APP23-Transgenic Mouse Model of Cerebral Amyloid Angiopathy—A 9.4 Tesla MRI Study

    PubMed Central

    Reuter, Björn; Venus, Alexander; Heiler, Patrick; Schad, Lothar; Ebert, Anne; Hennerici, Michael G.; Grudzenski, Saskia; Fatar, Marc

    2016-01-01

    Background: Cerebral amyloid angiopathy (CAA) is characterized by extracellular deposition of amyloid β (Aβ) around cerebral arteries and capillaries and leads to an increased risk for vascular dementia, spontaneous lobar hemorrhage, convexal subarachnoid hemorrhage, and transient focal neurological episodes, which might be an indicator of imminent spontaneous intracerebral hemorrhage. In CAA cerebral microbleeds (cMBs) with a cortical/juxtacortical distribution are frequently observed in standard magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). In vivo MRI of transgenic mouse models of CAA may serve as a useful tool to investigate translational aspects of the disease. Materials and Methods: APP23-transgenic mice demonstrate cerebrovascular Aβ deposition with subsequent neuropathological changes characteristic for CAA. We performed a 9.4 Tesla high field MRI study using T2, T2* and time of flight-magnetic resonance angiograpy (TOF-MRA) sequences in APP23-transgenic mice and wildtype (wt) littermates at the age of 8, 12, 16, 20 and 24 months, respectively. Numbers, size, and location of cMBs are reported. Results: T2* imaging demonstrated cMBs (diameter 50–300 μm) located in the neocortex and, to a lesser degree, in the thalamus. cMBs were detected at the earliest at 16 months of age. Numbers increased exponentially with age, with 2.5 ± 2 (median ± interquartilrange) at 16 months, 15 ± 6 at 20 months, and 31.5 ± 17 at 24 months of age, respectively. Conclusion: We report the temporal and spatial development of cMBs in the aging APP23-transgenic mouse model which develops characteristic pathological patterns known from human CAA. We expect this mouse model to serve as a useful tool to non-invasively monitor mid- and longterm translational aspects of CAA and to investigate experimental therapeutic strategies in longitudinal studies. PMID:27458375

  9. In vivo imaging of pancreatic tumours and liver metastases using 7 Tesla MRI in a murine orthotopic pancreatic cancer model and a liver metastases model

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Pancreatic cancer is the fourth leading cause of tumour death in the western world. However, appropriate tumour models are scarce. Here we present a syngeneic murine pancreatic cancer model using 7 Tesla MRI and evaluate its clinical relevance and applicability. Methods 6606PDA murine pancreatic cancer cells were orthotopically injected into the pancreatic head. Liver metastases were induced through splenic injection. Animals were analyzed by MRI three and five weeks following injection. Tumours were detected using T2-weighted high resolution sequences. Tumour volumes were determined by callipers and MRI. Liver metastases were analyzed using gadolinium-EOB-DTPA and T1-weighted 3D-Flash sequences. Tumour blood flow was measured using low molecular gadobutrol and high molecular gadolinium-DTPA. Results MRI handling and applicability was similar to human systems, resolution as low as 0.1 mm. After 5 weeks tumour volumes differed significantly (p < 0.01) when comparing calliper measurments (n = 5, mean 1065 mm3+/-243 mm3) with MRI (mean 918 mm3+/-193 mm3) with MRI being more precise. Histology (n = 5) confirmed MRI tumour measurements (mean size MRI 38.5 mm2+/-22.8 mm2 versus 32.6 mm2+/-22.6 mm2 (histology), p < 0,0004) with differences due to fixation and processing of specimens. After splenic injection all mice developed liver metastases with a mean of 8 metastases and a mean volume of 173.8 mm3+/-56.7 mm3 after 5 weeks. Lymphnodes were also easily identified. Tumour accumulation of gadobutrol was significantly (p < 0.05) higher than gadolinium-DTPA. All imaging experiments could be done repeatedly to comply with the 3R-principle thus reducing the number of experimental animals. Conclusions This model permits monitoring of tumour growth and metastasis formation in longitudinal non-invasive high-resolution MR studies including using contrast agents comparable to human pancreatic cancer. This multidisciplinary environment enables radiologists, surgeons and

  10. Reproducibility and Reliability of Quantitative and Weighted T1 and T2∗ Mapping for Myelin-Based Cortical Parcellation at 7 Tesla

    PubMed Central

    Haast, Roy A. M.; Ivanov, Dimo; Formisano, Elia; Uludaǧ, Kâmil

    2016-01-01

    Different magnetic resonance (MR) parameters, such as R1 (=1/T1) or T2∗, have been used to visualize non-invasively the myelin distribution across the cortical sheet. Myelin contrast is consistently enhanced in the primary sensory and some higher order cortical areas (such as MT or the cingulate cortex), which renders it suitable for subject-specific anatomical cortical parcellation. However, no systematic comparison has been performed between the previously proposed MR parameters, i.e., the longitudinal and transversal relaxation values (or their ratios), for myelin mapping at 7 Tesla. In addition, usually these MR parameters are acquired in a non-quantitative manner (“weighted” parameters). Here, we evaluated the differences in ‘parcellability,’ contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR) and inter- and intra-subject variability and reproducibility, respectively, between high-resolution cortical surface maps based on these weighted MR parameters and their quantitative counterparts in ten healthy subjects. All parameters were obtained in a similar acquisition time and possible transmit- or receive-biases were removed during post-processing. It was found that CNR per unit time and parcellability were lower for the transversal compared to the longitudinal relaxation parameters. Further, quantitative R1 was characterized by the lowest inter- and intra-subject coefficient of variation (5.53 and 1.63%, respectively), making R1 a better parameter to map the myelin distribution compared to the other parameters. Moreover, quantitative MRI approaches offer the advantage of absolute rather than relative characterization of the underlying biochemical composition of the tissue, allowing more reliable comparison within subjects and between healthy subjects and patients. Finally, we explored two parcellation methods (thresholding the MR parameter values vs. surface gradients of these values) to determine areal borders based on the cortical surface pattern. It is shown that both

  11. A Wire Position Monitor System for the 1.3 FHZ Tesla-Style Cryomodule at the Fermilab New-Muon-Lab Accelerator

    SciTech Connect

    Eddy, N.; Fellenz, B.; Prieto, P.; Semenov, A.; Voy, D.C.; Wendt, M.; /Fermilab

    2011-08-17

    The first cryomodule for the beam test facility at the Fermilab New-Muon-Lab building is currently under RF commissioning. Among other diagnostics systems, the transverse position of the helium gas return pipe with the connected 1.3 GHz SRF accelerating cavities is measured along the {approx}15 m long module using a stretched-wire position monitoring system. An overview of the wire position monitor system technology is given, along with preliminary results taken at the initial module cooldown, and during further testing. As the measurement system offers a high resolution, we also discuss options for use as a vibration detector. An electron beam test facility, based on superconducting RF (SRF) TESLA-style cryomodules is currently under construction at the Fermilab New-Muon-Lab (NML) building. The first, so-called type III+, cryomodule (CM-1), equipped with eight 1.3 GHz nine-cell accelerating cavities was recently cooled down to 2 K, and is currently under RF conditioning. The transverse alignment of the cavity string within the cryomodule is crucial for minimizing transverse kick and beam break-up effects, generated by the high-order dipole modes of misaligned accelerating structures. An optimum alignment can only be guaranteed during the assembly of the cavity string, i.e. at room temperatures. The final position of the cavities after cooldown is uncontrollable, and therefore unknown. A wire position monitoring system (WPM) can help to understand the transverse motion of the cavities during cooldown, their final location and the long term position stability after cryo-temperatures are settled, as well as the position reproducibility for several cold-warm cycles. It also may serve as vibration sensor, as the wire acts as a high-Q resonant detector for mechanical vibrations in the low-audio frequency range. The WPM system consists out of a stretched-wire position detection system, provided with help of INFN-Milano and DESY Hamburg, and RF generation and read

  12. Resection and Resolution of Bone Marrow Lesions Associated with an Improvement of Pain after Total Knee Replacement: A Novel Case Study Using a 3-Tesla Metal Artefact Reduction MRI Sequence

    PubMed Central

    Haywood, Brett; Pearson, Richard G.; Scammell, Brigitte E.

    2016-01-01

    We present our case report using a novel metal artefact reduction magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) sequence to observe resolution of subchondral bone marrow lesions (BMLs), which are strongly associated with pain, in a patient after total knee replacement surgery. Large BMLs were seen preoperatively on the 3-Tesla MRI scans in a patient with severe end stage OA awaiting total knee replacement surgery. Twelve months after surgery, using a novel metal artefact reduction MRI sequence, we were able to visualize the bone-prosthesis interface and found complete resection and resolution of these BMLs. This is the first reported study in the UK to use this metal artefact reduction MRI sequence at 3-Tesla showing that resection and resolution of BMLs in this patient were associated with an improvement of pain and function after total knee replacement surgery. In this case it was associated with a clinically significant improvement of pain and function after surgery. Failure to eradicate these lesions may be a cause of persistent postoperative pain that is seen in up to 20% of patients following TKR surgery. PMID:27648327

  13. Molecular imaging of angiogenesis in nascent Vx-2 rabbit tumors using a novel alpha(nu)beta3-targeted nanoparticle and 1.5 tesla magnetic resonance imaging.

    PubMed

    Winter, Patrick M; Caruthers, Shelton D; Kassner, Andrea; Harris, Thomas D; Chinen, Lori K; Allen, John S; Lacy, Elizabeth K; Zhang, Huiying; Robertson, J David; Wickline, Samuel A; Lanza, Gregory M

    2003-09-15

    leaky tumor neovasculature but did not appreciably migrate into the interstitium, leading to a 56% increase in MR signal at 2 h. Pretargeting of the alpha(nu)beta(3)-integrin with nonparamagnetic nanoparticles competitively blocked the specific binding of alpha(nu)beta(3)-targeted paramagnetic nanoparticles, decreasing the MR signal enhancement (50%) to a level attributable to local extravasation. The MR signal of adjacent hindlimb muscle or contralateral control tissues was unchanged by either the alpha(nu)beta(3)-targeted or control paramagnetic agents. Immunohistochemistry of alpha(nu)beta(3)-integrin corroborated the extent and asymmetric distribution of neovascularity observed by MRI. These studies demonstrate the potential of this targeted molecular imaging agent to detect and characterize (both biochemically and morphologically) early angiogenesis induced by minute solid tumors with a clinical 1.5 Tesla MRI scanner, facilitating the localization of nascent cancers or metastases, as well as providing tools to phenotypically categorize and segment patient populations for therapy and to longitudinally follow the effectiveness of antitumor treatment regimens.

  14. Comparison of Two Accelerators for Monte Carlo Radiation Transport Calculations, NVIDIA Tesla M2090 GPU and Intel Xeon Phi 5110p Coprocessor: A Case Study for X-ray CT Imaging Dose Calculation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Tianyu; Xu, X. George; Carothers, Christopher D.

    2014-06-01

    Hardware accelerators are currently becoming increasingly important in boosting high performance computing sys- tems. In this study, we tested the performance of two accelerator models, NVIDIA Tesla M2090 GPU and Intel Xeon Phi 5110p coprocessor, using a new Monte Carlo photon transport package called ARCHER-CT we have developed for fast CT imaging dose calculation. The package contains three code variants, ARCHER - CTCPU, ARCHER - CTGPU and ARCHER - CTCOP to run in parallel on the multi-core CPU, GPU and coprocessor architectures respectively. A detailed GE LightSpeed Multi-Detector Computed Tomography (MDCT) scanner model and a family of voxel patient phantoms were included in the code to calculate absorbed dose to radiosensitive organs under specified scan protocols. The results from ARCHER agreed well with those from the production code Monte Carlo N-Particle eXtended (MCNPX). It was found that all the code variants were significantly faster than the parallel MCNPX running on 12 MPI processes, and that the GPU and coprocessor performed equally well, being 2.89~4.49 and 3.01~3.23 times faster than the parallel ARCHER - CTCPU running with 12 hyperthreads.

  15. The Role of 3 Tesla Diffusion-Weighted Imaging in the Differential Diagnosis of Benign versus Malignant Cervical Lymph Nodes in Patients with Head and Neck Squamous Cell Carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Pranno, Nicola; Sartori, Alessandro; Gigli, Silvia; Lo Mele, Luigi; Marsella, Luigi Tonino

    2014-01-01

    Objective. The aim of this study was to validate the role of diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI) at 3 Tesla in the differential diagnosis between benign and malignant laterocervical lymph nodes in patients with head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC). Materials and Methods. Before undergoing surgery, 80 patients, with biopsy proven HNSCC, underwent a magnetic resonance exam. Sensitivity (Se) and specificity (Spe) of conventional criteria and DWI in detecting laterocervical lymph node metastases were calculated. Histological results from neck dissection were used as standard of reference. Results. In the 239 histologically proven metastatic lymphadenopathies, the mean apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) value was 0.903 × 10−3 mm2/sec. In the 412 pathologically confirmed benign lymph nodes, an average ADC value of 1.650 × 10−3 mm2/sec was found. For differentiating between benign versus metastatic lymph nodes, DWI showed Se of 97% and Spe of 93%, whereas morphological criteria displayed Se of 61% and Spe of 98%. DWI showed an area under the ROC curve (AUC) of 0.964, while morphological criteria displayed an AUC of 0.715. Conclusions. In a DWI negative neck for malignant lymph nodes, the planned dissection could be converted to a wait-and-scan policy, whereas DWI positive neck would support the decision to perform a neck dissection. PMID:25003115

  16. Minimally Invasive Magnetic Resonance Imaging-Guided Free-Hand Aspiration of Symptomatic Nerve Route Compressing Lumbosacral Cysts Using a 1.0-Tesla Open Magnetic Resonance Imaging System

    SciTech Connect

    Bucourt, Maximilian de Streitparth, Florian Collettini, Federico; Guettler, Felix; Rathke, Hendrik; Lorenz, Britta; Rump, Jens; Hamm, Bernd; Teichgraeber, U. K.

    2012-02-15

    Purpose: To evaluate the feasibility of minimally invasive magnetic resonance imaging (MRI)-guided free-hand aspiration of symptomatic nerve route compressing lumbosacral cysts in a 1.0-Tesla (T) open MRI system using a tailored interactive sequence. Materials and Methods: Eleven patients with MRI-evident symptomatic cysts in the lumbosacral region and possible nerve route compressing character were referred to a 1.0-T open MRI system. For MRI interventional cyst aspiration, an interactive sequence was used, allowing for near real-time position validation of the needle in any desired three-dimensional plane. Results: Seven of 11 cysts in the lumbosacral region were successfully aspirated (average 10.1 mm [SD {+-} 1.9]). After successful cyst aspiration, each patient reported speedy relief of initial symptoms. Average cyst size was 9.6 mm ({+-}2.6 mm). Four cysts (8.8 {+-} 3.8 mm) could not be aspirated. Conclusion: Open MRI systems with tailored interactive sequences have great potential for cyst aspiration in the lumbosacral region. The authors perceive major advantages of the MR-guided cyst aspiration in its minimally invasive character compared to direct and open surgical options along with consecutive less trauma, less stress, and also less side-effects for the patient.

  17. Low episodic memory performance in cognitively normal elderly subjects is associated with increased posterior cingulate gray matter N-acetylaspartate: a (1)H MRSI study at 7 Tesla.

    PubMed

    Schreiner, Simon J; Kirchner, Thomas; Wyss, Michael; Van Bergen, Jiri M G; Quevenco, Frances C; Steininger, Stefanie C; Griffith, Erica Y; Meier, Irene; Michels, Lars; Gietl, Anton F; Leh, Sandra E; Brickman, Adam M; Hock, Christoph; Nitsch, Roger M; Pruessmann, Klaas P; Henning, Anke; Unschuld, Paul G

    2016-12-01

    Low episodic memory performance characterizes elderly subjects at increased risk for Alzheimer's disease (AD) and may reflect neuronal dysfunction within the posterior cingulate cortex and precuneus (PCP) region. To investigate a potential association between cerebral neurometabolism and low episodic memory in the absence of cognitive impairment, tissue-specific magnetic resonance spectroscopic imaging at ultrahigh field strength of 7 Tesla was used to investigate the PCP region in a healthy elderly study population (n = 30, age 70 ± 5.7 years, Mini-Mental State Examination 29.4 ± 4.1). The Verbal Learning and Memory Test (VLMT) was administered as part of a neuropsychological battery for assessment of episodic memory performance. Significant differences between PCP gray and white matter could be observed for glutamate-glutamine (p = 0.001), choline (p = 0.01), and myo-inositol (p = 0.02). Low Verbal Learning and Memory Test performance was associated with high N-acetylaspartate in PCP gray matter (p = 0.01) but not in PCP white matter. Our data suggest that subtle decreases in episodic memory performance in the elderly may be associated with increased levels of N-acetylaspartate as a reflection of increased mitochondrial energy capacity in PCP gray matter.

  18. Thermal effects of high-field (1.5 tesla) magnetic resonance imaging of the spine. Clinical experience above a specific absorption rate of 0.4 W/kg.

    PubMed

    Shellock, F G; Schaefer, D J; Grundfest, W; Crues, J V

    1986-01-01

    Current safety guidelines recommend limiting the exposure to radiofrequency (RF) radiation used for clinical magnetic resonance imaging to a whole body average specific absorption rate (SAR) of 0.4 W/kg. Since it may be desirable to image with SARs that exceed this level during MRI of the spine, we evaluated the thermal responses associated with these procedures. Body and skin temperatures were determined in 25 patients immediately before and after MRI. Since the eye is particularly susceptible to thermal injury, corneal temperature was also measured. High-resolution thermography was performed on three subjects to evaluate the surface heating pattern and identify potential thermal 'hot spots'. A 1.5 tesla/64 MHz MRI system with quadrature transmission and reception was used iN this study. The whole body average specific absorption rate ranged from 0.5 to 1.3 W/kg. Ambient conditions were room temperature 20-24 degrees C and relative humidity between 40 and 50 per cent. There was a slight but statistically significant (p less than 0.01) increase in body temperature after MRI (36.5 +/- 0.4 to 36.7 +/- 0.4 degrees C). Temperatures of the hand (30.4 +/- 1.4 to 31.2 +/- 1.0 degrees C), positioning isocenter (32.1 +/- 0.6 to 32.9 +/- 0.5), and cornea (32.5 +/- 0.6 to 32.9 +/- 0.5 degrees C) also increased a statistically significant amount. Thermographic imaging revealed normal heating patterns with no surface 'hot spots'. We conclude that the temperature changes associated with MRI of the spine at the SARs we studied were well below known thresholds for adverse effects and do not appear to be harmful to patients.

  19. Tumor Volume Changes on 1.5 Tesla Endorectal MRI During Neoadjuvant Androgen Suppression Therapy for Higher-Risk Prostate Cancer and Recurrence in Men Treated Using Radiation Therapy Results of the Phase II CALGB 9682 Study

    SciTech Connect

    D'Amico, Anthony V. Halabi, Susan; Tempany, Clare; Titelbaum, David; Philips, George K.; Loffredo, Marian; McMahon, Elizabeth; Sanford, Ben; Vogelzang, Nicholas J.; Small, Eric J.

    2008-05-01

    Purpose: We prospectively determined whether the change in tumor volume (TV) during 2 months of neoadjuvant androgen suppression therapy (nAST) measured using conventional 1.5 Tesla endorectal magnetic resonance imaging (eMRI) was associated with the risk of recurrence after radiation (RT) and 6 months of AST. Patients and Methods: Between 1997 and 2001, 180 men with clinical stage T1c-T3cN0M0 adenocarcinoma of the prostate were registered. Fifteen were found to be ineligible and the institutional MR radiologist could not assess the TV in 32, leaving 133 for analysis. Multivariable Cox regression analysis was used to assess whether a significant association existed between eMRI-defined TV progression during nAST and time to recurrence adjusting for prostate-specific antigen (PSA) level, Gleason score (8 to 10 or 7 vs. 6 or less) and stage (T3 vs. T1-2). Results: After a median follow up of 6.7 years and adjusting for known prognostic factors, there was a significant increase in the risk of PSA failure (HR, 2.3 [95% CI, 1.1-4.5; p = 0.025) in men with eMRI-defined TV progression during nAST. Specifically, adjusted estimates of PSA failure were significantly higher (p = 0.032) in men with, compared with men without, eMRI-defined TV progression reaching 38% vs. 19%, respectively, by 5 years. Conclusion: Eradicating intraprostatic hormone refractory prostate cancer (HRPC) by maximizing local control and randomized trials assessing whether survival is improved when agents active against HRPC are combined with maximal local therapy are needed in men who progress based on eMRI during nAST.

  20. The Interventional Loopless Antenna at 7 Tesla

    PubMed Central

    Ertürk, Mehmet Arcan; El-Sharkawy, AbdEl-Monem M.; Bottomley, Paul A.

    2012-01-01

    The loopless antenna MRI detector is comprised of a tuned coaxial cable with an extended central conductor that can be fabricated at sub-millimeter diameters for inteventional use in guidewires, catheters or needles. Prior work up to 4.7T suggests a near-quadratic gain in signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) with field strength, and safe operation at 3T. Here for the first time, the SNR performance and RF safety of the loopless antenna is investigated both theoretically, using the electro-magnetic method-of-moments, and experimentally in a standard 7T human scanner. The results are compared with equivalent 3T devices. An absolute SNR gain of 5.7±1.5-fold was realized at 7T vs. 3T: more than 20-fold higher than at 1.5T. The effective field-of-view (FOV) area also increased approximately 10-fold compared to 3T. Testing in a saline gel phantom suggested safe operation is possible with maximum local 1-g average specific absorption rates of <12W/kg and temperature increases of <1.9°C, normalized to a 4W/kg RF field exposure at 7T. The antenna did not affect the power applied to the scanner's transmit coil. The SNR gain enabled MRI microscopy at 40-50μm resolution in diseased human arterial specimens, offering the potential of high-resolution large-FOV or endoscopic MRI for targeted intervention in focal disease. PMID:22161992

  1. 4 Tesla MRI for Neurodegenerative Diseases

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2005-10-01

    gyrus. Histological studies have shown that these subfields are differently affected by different diseases, e.g. Alzheimer Disease (AD) affects... Neurogenesis by Suppressing Microglia Activation Project start date: 9/16/05 REPORTABLE OUTCOMES Presentations: Yu Zhang, PhD: Tractography

  2. Hydroforming of Tesla Cavities at Desy

    SciTech Connect

    W. Singer; H. Kaiser; X. Singer; I. Gonin; I. Zhelezov; T. Khabibullin; P. Kneisel; K. Saito

    2000-07-01

    Since several years the development of seamless niobium cavity fabrication by hydro forming is being pursued at DESY. This technique offers the possibility of lower cost of fabrication and perhaps better rf performance of the cavities because of the elimination of electron-beam welds, which in the standard fabrication technique have sometimes lead to inferior cavity performance due to defects. Several single cell 1300 MHz cavities have been formed from high purity seamless niobium tubes, which are under computer control expanded with internal pressure while simultaneously being swaged axially. The seamless tubes have been made by either back extrusion and flow forming or by spinning or deep drawing. Standard surface treatment techniques such as high temperature post purification, buffered chemical polishing (BCP), electropolishing (EP) and high pressure ultra pure water rinsing (HPR) have been applied to these cavities. The cavities exhibited high Q - values of 2 x 10{sup 10} at 2K and residual resistances as low as 3 n{Omega} after the removal of a surface layer of app. 100 {micro}m by BCP. Surprisingly, even at high gradients up to the maximum measured values of E{sub acc} {approx} 33 MV/m the Q-value did not decrease in the absence of field emission as often observed. After electropolishing of additional 100 {micro}m one of the cavities reached an accelerating gradient of E{sub acc} {ge} 42 MV/m.

  3. High resolution spectroscopic imaging of GABA at 3 Tesla.

    PubMed

    Zhu, He; Edden, Richard A E; Ouwerkerk, Ronald; Barker, Peter B

    2011-03-01

    A spin echo-based MRSI sequence was developed to acquire edited spectra of γ-aminobutyric acid in an entire slice. Water and lipid signals were suppressed by a dual-band presaturation sequence, which included integrated outer volume suppression pulses for additional lipid suppression. Experiments in three normal volunteers were performed at 3 T using a 32-channel head coil. High signal-to-noise ratio spectra and metabolic images of γ-aminobutyric acid were acquired from nominal 4.5 cm3 voxels (estimated actual voxel size 7.0 cm3) in a scan time of 17 min. The sequence is also expected to co-edit homocarnosine and macromolecules, giving a composite γ-aminobutyric acid+ resonance. The γ-aminobutyric acid+ to water ratio was measured using a companion water MRSI scan and was found to correlate linearly with the % gray matter (GM) of each voxel (γ-aminobutyric acid+/water=(1.5×GM+3.2)×10(-5), R=0.27), with higher γ-aminobutyric acid+ levels in gray matter compared with white. In conclusion, high signal-to-noise ratio γ-aminobutyric acid-MRSI is possible at 3 T within clinically feasible scan times.

  4. High Resolution Spectroscopic Imaging of GABA at 3 Tesla

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, He; Edden, Richard A. E.; Ouwerkerk, Ronald; Barker, Peter B.

    2011-01-01

    A spin echo-based MRSI sequence was developed to acquire edited spectra of γ-aminobutyric acid in an entire slice. Water and lipid signals were suppressed by a dual-band presaturation sequence, which included integrated outer volume suppression pulses for additional lipid suppression. Experiments in three normal volunteers were performed at 3 T using a 32-channel head coil. High signal-to-noise ratio spectra and metabolic images of γ-aminobutyric acid were acquired from nominal 4.5 cm3 voxels (estimated actual voxel size 7.0 cm3) in a scan time of 17 min. The sequence is also expected to co-edit homocarnosine and macromolecules, giving a composite γ-aminobutyric acid+ resonance. The γ-aminobutyric acid+ to water ratio was measured using a companion water MRSI scan and was found to correlate linearly with the % gray matter (GM) of each voxel (γ-aminobutyric acid+/water = (1.5 × GM + 3.2) × 10−5, R = 0.27), with higher γ-aminobutyric acid+ levels in gray matter compared with white. In conclusion, high signal-to-noise ratio γ-aminobutyric acid-MRSI is possible at 3 T within clinically feasible scan times. PMID:21337399

  5. Classification of Text Processing Components: The Tesla Role System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hermes, Jürgen; Schwiebert, Stephan

    The modeling of component interactions represents a major challenge in designing component systems. In most cases, the components in such systems interact via the results they produce. This approach results in two conflicting requirements that have to be satisfied. On the one hand, the interfaces between the components are subject to exact specifications. On the other hand, however, the component interfaces should not be excessively restricted as this might require the data produced by the components to be converted into the system’s data format. This might pose certain difficulties if complex data types (e.g., graphs or matrices) have to be stored as they often require non-trivial access methods that are not supported by a general data format.

  6. T1- and T2-weighted imaging at 8 Tesla.

    PubMed

    Kangarlu, A; Abduljalil, A M; Robitaille, P M

    1999-01-01

    In this work, both T1- and T2-weighted fast imaging methods at 8 T are presented. These include the modified driven equilibrium Fourier transform (MDEFT) and rapid acquisition with relaxation enhancement (RARE) methods, respectively. Axial MDEFT images were acquired with large nutation angles, both partially suppressing gray and white matter and permitting the visualization of vascular structures rich in unsaturated spins. Sagittal RARE images, acquired from the same volunteer, were highly T2-weighted, thus highlighting the CSF. At the same time, they provided good visualization of the corpus callosum, cerebellum, and gray and white matter structures. Importantly, both MDEFT and RARE images could be acquired without violating specific absorption rate guidelines.

  7. 3-Tesla MRI Response to TACE in HCC (Liver Cancer)

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-08-22

    Adult Primary Hepatocellular Carcinoma; Advanced Adult Primary Liver Cancer; Localized Resectable Adult Primary Liver Cancer; Localized Unresectable Adult Primary Liver Cancer; Stage A Adult Primary Liver Cancer (BCLC); Stage B Adult Primary Liver Cancer (BCLC)

  8. From Tesla to Tetris: Mental Rotation, Vocation, and Gifted Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    von Károlyi, Catya

    2013-01-01

    Mental rotation ability is important for success in a number of academic and career fields, especially the science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) domains. Individual differences in intelligence, spatial ability, strategy selection biases, and gender are all associated with proficiency in mental rotation. Interventions and…

  9. High Spatial Resolution Cardiovascular Magnetic Resonance at 7.0 Tesla in Patients with Hypertrophic Cardiomyopathy – First Experiences: Lesson Learned from 7.0 Tesla

    PubMed Central

    Prothmann, Marcel; von Knobelsdorff-Brenkenhoff, Florian; Töpper, Agnieszka; Dieringer, Matthias A.; Shahid, Etham; Graessl, Andreas; Rieger, Jan; Lysiak, Darius; Thalhammer, C.; Huelnhagen, Till; Kellman, Peter; Niendorf, Thoralf; Schulz-Menger, Jeanette

    2016-01-01

    Background Cardiovascular Magnetic Resonance (CMR) provides valuable information in patients with hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM) based on myocardial tissue differentiation and the detection of small morphological details. CMR at 7.0T improves spatial resolution versus today’s clinical protocols. This capability is as yet untapped in HCM patients. We aimed to examine the feasibility of CMR at 7.0T in HCM patients and to demonstrate its capability for the visualization of subtle morphological details. Methods We screened 131 patients with HCM. 13 patients (9 males, 56 ±31 years) and 13 healthy age- and gender-matched subjects (9 males, 55 ±31years) underwent CMR at 7.0T and 3.0T (Siemens, Erlangen, Germany). For the assessment of cardiac function and morphology, 2D CINE imaging was performed (voxel size at 7.0T: (1.4x1.4x2.5) mm3 and (1.4x1.4x4.0) mm3; at 3.0T: (1.8x1.8x6.0) mm3). Late gadolinium enhancement (LGE) was performed at 3.0T for detection of fibrosis. Results All scans were successful and evaluable. At 3.0T, quantification of the left ventricle (LV) showed similar results in short axis view vs. the biplane approach (LVEDV, LVESV, LVMASS, LVEF) (p = 0.286; p = 0.534; p = 0.155; p = 0.131). The LV-parameters obtained at 7.0T where in accordance with the 3.0T data (pLVEDV = 0.110; pLVESV = 0.091; pLVMASS = 0.131; pLVEF = 0.182). LGE was detectable in 12/13 (92%) of the HCM patients. High spatial resolution CINE imaging at 7.0T revealed hyperintense regions, identifying myocardial crypts in 7/13 (54%) of the HCM patients. All crypts were located in the LGE-positive regions. The crypts were not detectable at 3.0T using a clinical protocol. Conclusions CMR at 7.0T is feasible in patients with HCM. High spatial resolution gradient echo 2D CINE imaging at 7.0T allowed the detection of subtle morphological details in regions of extended hypertrophy and LGE. PMID:26863618

  10. Sultan: an 8 Tesla, 1 meter bore test facility for the outer solenoid

    SciTech Connect

    Pasotti, G.; Ricci, M.V.; Sacchetti, N.; Spadoni, M.

    1981-09-01

    In the framework of the international collaboration among SIN-Villigen (CH), ECN-Patten (NL) and CNEN-Frascati (I) aiming at the realization of the SULTAN (SUpraLeitender TestANlage) test facility the CNEN contribution is concerned with the realization of the outer part of the solenoid, i.e., the section which will provide the 6T field in the useful region, the remaining 2T being supplied by the coaxial ECN insert. A description of the 6T superconducting solenoid is presented. The main features are: (1) pancake structure wound by a Nb-Ti multifilamentary hollow cable; and (2) cooling by forced flow of slightly subcooled liquid helium. Details of the design, winding technique and structure, the hydraulic circuitry as well as the status report of the construction are discussed. 10 refs.

  11. Conceptual design of an 8 Tesla superconducting wiggler for a dedicated digital subtraction angiography source

    SciTech Connect

    Blum, E.B.

    1993-09-01

    One of the most important techniques used to diagnose heart disease is coronary angiography. Coronary angiography is only used when it is absolutely essential because of the risk of fatalities and other serious complications arising from the insertion of the catheter. The technique also exposes the patients to large amounts of x-rays. Research, begun at SSRL and continued on the X17 beam line at NSLS, demonstrated the feasibility of imaging human coronary arteries following venous injection of the contrast agent. The technique, caged digital subtraction angiography (DSA), uses two monochromatic beams of x-rays, one slightly above and one slightly below the iodine K absorption edge (33.169 KeV) to collect simultaneous images. When the two images are subtracted, the contrast agent, contained primarily in the blood vessels, is revealed and the background that is common to both images is suppressed. The images must be collected during a single heartbeat to avoid blurring from motion of the blood vessels. Conventional x-ray sources are too weak to provide the intense flux that is required in the narrow energy bandwidth of the beams. Only the most powerful synchrotron radiation beams from wiggler magnet sources can provide the intensity required in the short exposure time. Although DSA experiments have shown promise, they have been conducted at large, research synchrotron radiation facilities. A small, dedicated source will be needed before DSA can be used as a standard medical procedure. Such x-ray sources as laser backscattering, Cherenkov radiation, parametric x-radiation, and channeling radiation have been suggested for hospital based DSA sources but none of them appear to produce enough flux to be useful. Barring the discovery of a new source of intense x-rays, only synchrotron radiation seems to meet the requirements for DSA. This report briefly describes the preliminary design of a high field, superconducting wiggler magnet that can be used as a DSA source.

  12. A 4.7 tesla meter solenoid for a partial Siberian Snake

    SciTech Connect

    Ratner, L.; Leonhardt, W.; Otter, A.; Ellstrom, L.

    1994-07-01

    The authors describe the engineering design of a 4.7 T-m solenoid magnet which will be installed at the Brookhaven National Laboratory AGS for a partial Siberian Snake Experiment which is an interlaboratory collaboration. The magnet has an overall length of 2.5 m, a clear bore of 15 cm and operates at a peak field of 2 T. It is pulsed at 3 second intervals with a peak current of 9,500 A dc driven from a 150 V power supply. The construction uses conventional hollow copper coils but the return flux yokes are made from 1/8 inch plates bolted together. On assembly the flux yokes and endplates are clamped tightly to the coil to prevent any movement during the current pulse. The fabrication experience and test data will be presented. The magnet was installed in the summer of 1993.

  13. High resolution neurography of the brachial plexus by 3 Tesla magnetic resonance imaging.

    PubMed

    Cejas, C; Rollán, C; Michelin, G; Nogués, M

    2016-01-01

    The study of the structures that make up the brachial plexus has benefited particularly from the high resolution images provided by 3T magnetic resonance scanners. The brachial plexus can have mononeuropathies or polyneuropathies. The mononeuropathies include traumatic injuries and trapping, such as occurs in thoracic outlet syndrome due to cervical ribs, prominent transverse apophyses, or tumors. The polyneuropathies include inflammatory processes, in particular chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathy, Parsonage-Turner syndrome, granulomatous diseases, and radiation neuropathy. Vascular processes affecting the brachial plexus include diabetic polyneuropathy and the vasculitides. This article reviews the anatomy of the brachial plexus and describes the technique for magnetic resonance neurography and the most common pathologic conditions that can affect the brachial plexus.

  14. 96-Channel Receive-Only Head Coil for 3 Tesla: Design Optimization and Evaluation

    PubMed Central

    Wiggins, Graham C.; Polimeni, Jonathan R.; Potthast, Andreas; Schmitt, Melanie; Alagappan, Vijay; Wald, Lawrence L.

    2010-01-01

    The benefits and challenges of highly parallel array coils for head imaging were investigated through the development of a 3T receive-only phased-array head coil with 96 receive elements constructed on a close-fitting helmet-shaped former. We evaluated several designs for the coil elements and matching circuitry, with particular attention to sources of signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) loss, including various sources of coil loading and coupling between the array elements. The SNR and noise amplification (g-factor) in accelerated imaging were quantitatively evaluated in phantom and human imaging and compared to a 32-channel array built on an identical helmet-shaped former and to a larger commercial 12-channel head coil. The 96-channel coil provided substantial SNR gains in the distal cortex compared to the 12- and 32-channel coils. The central SNR for the 96-channel coil was similar to the 32-channel coil for optimum SNR combination and 20% lower for root-sum-of-squares combination. There was a significant reduction in the maximum g-factor for 96 channels compared to 32; for example, the 96-channel maximum g-factor was 65% of the 32-channel value for acceleration rate 4. The performance of the array is demonstrated in highly accelerated brain images. PMID:19623621

  15. Upper critical field reaches 90 tesla near the Mott transition in fulleride superconductors

    PubMed Central

    Kasahara, Y.; Takeuchi, Y.; Zadik, R. H.; Takabayashi, Y.; Colman, R. H.; McDonald, R. D.; Rosseinsky, M. J.; Prassides, K.; Iwasa, Y.

    2017-01-01

    Controlled access to the border of the Mott insulating state by variation of control parameters offers exotic electronic states such as anomalous and possibly high-transition-temperature (Tc) superconductivity. The alkali-doped fullerides show a transition from a Mott insulator to a superconductor for the first time in three-dimensional materials, but the impact of dimensionality and electron correlation on superconducting properties has remained unclear. Here we show that, near the Mott insulating phase, the upper critical field Hc2 of the fulleride superconductors reaches values as high as ∼90 T—the highest among cubic crystals. This is accompanied by a crossover from weak- to strong-coupling superconductivity and appears upon entering the metallic state with the dynamical Jahn–Teller effect as the Mott transition is approached. These results suggest that the cooperative interplay between molecular electronic structure and strong electron correlations plays a key role in realizing robust superconductivity with high-Tc and high-Hc2. PMID:28211544

  16. Dual-Band Water and Lipid Suppression for MR Spectroscopic Imaging at 3 Tesla

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, He; Ouwerkerk, Ronald; Barker, Peter B.

    2011-01-01

    A dual-band water and lipid suppression sequence was developed for multislice sensitivity-encoded proton MR spectroscopic imaging of the human brain. The presaturation scheme consisted of five dual-band frequency-modulated radiofrequency pulses based on hypergeometric functions integrated with eight outer volume suppression (OVS) pulses. The flip angles of the dual-band pulses were optimized through computer simulations to maximize suppression factors over a range of transmitter amplitude of radiofrequency field and water and lipid T1 values. The resulting hypergeometric dual band with OVS (HGDB + OVS) sequence was implemented at 3 T in a multislice sensitivity-encoded proton MR spectroscopic imaging experiment and compared to a conventional water suppression scheme (variable pulse power and optimized relaxation delays (VAPOR)) with OVS. The HGDB sequence was significantly shorter than the VAPOR sequence (230 versus 728 msec). Both HGDB + OVS and VAPOR + OVS produced good water suppression, while lipid suppression with the HGDB + OVS sequence was far superior. In sensitivity-encoded proton MR spectroscopic imaging data, artifacts from extracranial lipid signals were significantly lower with HGDB + OVS. The shorter duration of HGDB compared to VAPOR also allows reduced pulse repetition time values in the multislice acquisition. PMID:20512851

  17. Dual-band water and lipid suppression for MR spectroscopic imaging at 3 Tesla.

    PubMed

    Zhu, He; Ouwerkerk, Ronald; Barker, Peter B

    2010-06-01

    A dual-band water and lipid suppression sequence was developed for multislice sensitivity-encoded proton MR spectroscopic imaging of the human brain. The presaturation scheme consisted of five dual-band frequency-modulated radiofrequency pulses based on hypergeometric functions integrated with eight outer volume suppression (OVS) pulses. The flip angles of the dual-band pulses were optimized through computer simulations to maximize suppression factors over a range of transmitter amplitude of radiofrequency field and water and lipid T(1) values. The resulting hypergeometric dual band with OVS (HGDB + OVS) sequence was implemented at 3 T in a multislice sensitivity-encoded proton MR spectroscopic imaging experiment and compared to a conventional water suppression scheme (variable pulse power and optimized relaxation delays (VAPOR)) with OVS. The HGDB sequence was significantly shorter than the VAPOR sequence (230 versus 728 msec). Both HGDB + OVS and VAPOR + OVS produced good water suppression, while lipid suppression with the HGDB + OVS sequence was far superior. In sensitivity-encoded proton MR spectroscopic imaging data, artifacts from extracranial lipid signals were significantly lower with HGDB + OVS. The shorter duration of HGDB compared to VAPOR also allows reduced pulse repetition time values in the multislice acquisition.

  18. Dynamic Multi-Coil Technique (DYNAMITE) Shimming of the Rat Brain at 11.7 Tesla

    PubMed Central

    Juchem, Christoph; Herman, Peter; Sanganahalli, Basavaraju G.; Brown, Peter B.; McIntyre, Scott; Nixon, Terence W.; Green, Dan; Hyder, Fahmeed; de Graaf, Robin A.

    2014-01-01

    The in vivo rat model is a workhorse in neuroscience research, preclinical studies and drug development. A repertoire of MR tools has been developed for its investigation, however, high levels of B0 magnetic field homogeneity are required for meaningful results. The homogenization of magnetic fields in the rat brain, i.e. shimming, is a difficult task due to a multitude of complex, susceptibility-induced field distortions. Conventional shimming with spherical harmonic (SH) functions is capable of compensating shallow field distortions in limited areas, e.g. in the cortex, but performs poorly in difficult-to-shim subcortical structures or for the entire brain. Based on the recently introduced multi-coil approach for magnetic field modeling, the DYNAmic Multi-coIl TEchnique (DYNAMITE) is introduced for magnetic field shimming of the in vivo rat brain and its benefits for gradient-echo echo-planar imaging (EPI) are demonstrated. An integrated multi-coil/radio-frequency (MC/RF) system comprising 48 individual localized DC coils for B0 shimming and a surface transceive RF coil has been developed that allows MR investigations of the anesthetized rat brain in vivo. DYNAMITE shimming with this MC/RF setup is shown to reduce the B0 standard deviation to a third of that achieved with current shim technology employing static first through third order SH shapes. The EPI signal over the rat brain increased by 31% and a 24% gain in usable EPI voxels could be realized. DYNAMITE shimming is expected to critically benefit a wide range of preclinical and neuroscientific MR research. Improved magnetic field homogeneity, along with the achievable large brain coverage of this method will be crucial when signal pathways, cortical circuitry or the brain’s default network are studied. Along with the efficiency gains of MC-based shimming compared to SH approaches demonstrated recently, DYNAMITE shimming has the potential to replace conventional SH shim systems in small bore animal scanners. PMID:24839167

  19. An unshielded radio-frequency atomic magnetometer with sub-femtoTesla sensitivity

    SciTech Connect

    Keder, David A.; Prescott, David W.; Conovaloff, Adam W.; Sauer, Karen L.

    2014-12-15

    We demonstrate a radio-frequency potassium-vapor magnetometer operating with sensitivities of 0.3 fT/√(Hz) at 0.5 MHz and 0.9 fT/√(Hz) at 1.31 MHz in the absence of radio-frequency and mu-metal or magnetic shielding. The use of spatially separated magnetometers, two voxels within the same cell, permits for the subtraction of common mode noise and the retention of a gradient signal, as from a local source. At 0.5 MHz the common mode noise was white and measured to be 3.4 fT/√(Hz); upon subtraction the noise returned to the values observed when the magnetometer was shielded. At 1.31 MHz, the common mode noise was from a nearby radio station and was reduced by a factor of 33 upon subtraction, limited only by the radio signal picked up by receiver electronics. Potential applications include in-the-field low-field magnetic resonance, such as the use of nuclear quadrupole resonance for the detection of explosives.

  20. Pediatric cardiovascular interventional devices: effect on CMR images at 1.5 and 3 Tesla

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background To predict the type and extent of CMR artifacts caused by commonly used pediatric trans-catheter devices at 1.5 T and 3 T as an aid to clinical planning and patient screening. Methods Eleven commonly used interventional, catheter-based devices including stents, septal occluders, vascular plugs and embolization coils made from either stainless steel or nitinol were evaluated ex-vivo at both 1.5T and 3T. Pulse sequences and protocols commonly used for cardiovascular magnetic resonance (CMR) were evaluated, including 3D high-resolution MR angiography (MRA), time-resolved MRA, 2D balanced-SSFP cine and 2D phase-contrast gradient echo imaging (GRE). We defined the signal void amplification factor (F) as the ratio of signal void dimension to true device dimension. F1 and F2 were measured in the long axis and short axes respectively of the device. We defined F3 as the maximum extent of the off-resonance dark band artifact on SSFP measured in the B0direction. The effects of field strength, sequence type, orientation, flip angle and phase encode direction were tested. Clinical CMR images in 3 patients with various indwelling devices were reviewed for correlation with the in-vitro findings. Results F1 and F2 were higher (p<0.05) at 3T than at 1.5T for all sequences except 3D-MRA. Stainless steel devices produced greater off-resonance artifact on SSFP compared to nitinol devices (p<0.05). Artifacts were most severe with the stainless steel Flipper detachable embolization coil (Cook Medical, Bloomington, IN), with F1 and F2 10 times greater than with stainless steel stents. The orientation of stents changed the size of off-resonance artifacts by up to two fold. Sequence type did influence the size of signal void or off-resonance artifact (p<0.05). Varying the flip angle and phase encode direction did not affect image artifact. Conclusion Stainless steel embolization coils render large zones of anatomy uninterpretable, consistent with predictions based on ex-vivo testing. Most other commonly used devices produce only mild artifact ex-vivo and are compatible with diagnostic quality in-vivo studies. Knowledge of ex-vivo device behavior can help predict the technical success or failure of CMR scans and may preempt the performance of costly, futile studies. PMID:23782716

  1. Tracking Iron in Multiple Sclerosis: A Combined Imaging and Histopathological Study at 7 Tesla

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bagnato, Francesca; Hametner, Simon; Yao, Bing; van Gelderen, Peter; Merkle, Hellmut; Cantor, Fredric K.; Lassmann, Hans; Duyn, Jeff H.

    2011-01-01

    Previous authors have shown that the transverse relaxivity R[subscript 2][superscript *] and frequency shifts that characterize gradient echo signal decay in magnetic resonance imaging are closely associated with the distribution of iron and myelin in the brain's white matter. In multiple sclerosis, iron accumulation in brain tissue may reflect a…

  2. Stroking or Buzzing? A Comparison of Somatosensory Touch Stimuli Using 7 Tesla fMRI

    PubMed Central

    van der Zwaag, Wietske; Gruetter, Rolf; Martuzzi, Roberto

    2015-01-01

    Studying body representations in the brain helps us to understand how we humans relate to our own bodies. The in vivo mapping of the somatosensory cortex, where these representations are found, is greatly facilitated by the high spatial resolution and high sensitivity to brain activation available at ultra-high field. In this study, the use of different stimulus types for somatotopic mapping of the digits at ultra-high field, specifically manual stroking and mechanical stimulation, was compared in terms of sensitivity and specificity of the brain responses. Larger positive responses in digit regions of interest were found for manual stroking than for mechanical stimulation, both in terms of average and maximum t-value and in terms of number of voxels with significant responses to the tactile stimulation. Responses to manual stroking were higher throughout the entire post-central sulcus, but the difference was especially large on its posterior wall, i.e. in Brodmann area 2. During mechanical stimulation, cross-digit responses were more negative than during manual stroking, possibly caused by a faster habituation to the stimulus. These differences indicate that manual stroking is a highly suitable stimulus for fast somatotopic mapping procedures, especially if Brodmann area 2 is of interest. PMID:26285027

  3. Magnetic field measurements of a clinical MR imager at 1.5 tesla

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muhech, A.; Tellez, I.; Esteva, M.; Marrufo, O.; Jimenez, L.; Vazquez, F.; Taboada, J.; Rodriguez, A. O.

    2012-10-01

    In the clinical environment is mandatory to run periodically measurements of uniformity of the magnetic field produced by the magnet to assure good image quality. The phase difference method was used to measure the magnetic field uniformity of the 1.5 T scanner of the Instituto Nacional de Neurologia y Neurocirugia MVS. The uniformity field values showed that the imager performance is reasonably good for clinical imaging. Some concern was raised since results may not be good enough for magnetic resonance spectroscopy runs.

  4. An additive manufacturing acrylic for use in the 32 Tesla all superconducting magnet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnson, Zachary

    The National High Magnetic Field Laboratory is building a world record all superconducting magnet known as the "32T". It requires many thousands of parts, but in particular one kind is unusually expensive to manufacture, called "heater lead covers". These parts are traditionally made out of a glass filled epoxy known as G-10, and conventionally machined. The machining is the expensive portion, as there are many tight tolerance details. The proposal in this paper is to change the material and manufacturing method to additive manufacturing with the material called "RGD 430". The cost per part with traditional machining is approximately 1,500 each. The cost per part with additive manufacturing of RGD 430 is approximately 32.5 each. There will be at least 14 of this style of part on the completed 32T project. Thus the total cost for the project will be reduced from 21,000 to 455, a 98% cost savings. The additive manufacturing also allows the machine designers to expand the dimensions of the part to any shape possible. Through testing of the material it was found to follow the common polymer characteristics. Its linear elastic modulus at cryogenic temperatures approached 10 GPa. The yield strength was always over 100 MPa, when not damaged. The fracture mechanism was repeatable, and brittle in cryogenic environments. The geometric tolerancing of the additive manufacturing process are, as expected extremely precise. The final tolerances for dimensions in the profile of the printer are more precise than +/- 0.10mm. The final tolerances for dimensions in the thickness of the printer are more precise than +/-0.25mm. Before utilizing the material, there should be a few additional tests run on it to ensure it will work in-situ. Those tests are outside the scope of this thesis.

  5. Upper critical field reaches 90 tesla near the Mott transition in fulleride superconductors.

    PubMed

    Kasahara, Y; Takeuchi, Y; Zadik, R H; Takabayashi, Y; Colman, R H; McDonald, R D; Rosseinsky, M J; Prassides, K; Iwasa, Y

    2017-02-17

    Controlled access to the border of the Mott insulating state by variation of control parameters offers exotic electronic states such as anomalous and possibly high-transition-temperature (Tc) superconductivity. The alkali-doped fullerides show a transition from a Mott insulator to a superconductor for the first time in three-dimensional materials, but the impact of dimensionality and electron correlation on superconducting properties has remained unclear. Here we show that, near the Mott insulating phase, the upper critical field Hc2 of the fulleride superconductors reaches values as high as ∼90 T-the highest among cubic crystals. This is accompanied by a crossover from weak- to strong-coupling superconductivity and appears upon entering the metallic state with the dynamical Jahn-Teller effect as the Mott transition is approached. These results suggest that the cooperative interplay between molecular electronic structure and strong electron correlations plays a key role in realizing robust superconductivity with high-Tc and high-Hc2.

  6. A 128-Channel Receive-Only Cardiac Coil for Highly Accelerated Cardiac MRI at 3 Tesla

    PubMed Central

    Schmitt, Melanie; Potthast, Andreas; Sosnovik, David E.; Polimeni, Jonathan R.; Wiggins, Graham C.; Triantafyllou, Christina; Wald, Lawrence L.

    2008-01-01

    A 128-channel receive-only array coil is described and tested for cardiac imaging at 3T. The coil is closely contoured to the body with a “clam-shell” geometry with 68 posterior and 60 anterior elements, each 75 mm in diameter, and arranged in a continuous overlapped array of hexagonal symmetry to minimize nearest neighbor coupling. Signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) and noise amplification for parallel imaging (G-factor) were evaluated in phantom and volunteer experiments. These results were compared to those of commercially available 24-channel and 32-channel coils in routine use for cardiac imaging. The in vivo measurements with the 128-channel coil resulted in SNR gains compared to the 24-channel coil (up to 2.2-fold in the apex). The 128- and 32-channel coils showed similar SNR in the heart, likely dominated by the similar element diameters of these coils. The maximum G-factor values were up to seven times better for a seven-fold acceleration factor (R = 7) compared to the 24-channel coil and up to two-fold improved compared to the 32-channel coil. The ability of the 128-channel coil to facilitate highly accelerated cardiac imaging was demonstrated in four volunteers using acceleration factors up to seven-fold (R = 7) in a single spatial dimension. PMID:18506789

  7. Magnetic resonance microscopy at 14 Tesla and correlative histopathology of human brain tumor tissue.

    PubMed

    Gonzalez-Segura, Ana; Morales, Jose Manuel; Gonzalez-Darder, Jose Manuel; Cardona-Marsal, Ramon; Lopez-Gines, Concepcion; Cerda-Nicolas, Miguel; Monleon, Daniel

    2011-01-01

    Magnetic Resonance Microscopy (MRM) can provide high microstructural detail in excised human lesions. Previous MRM images on some experimental models and a few human samples suggest the large potential of the technique. The aim of this study was the characterization of specific morphological features of human brain tumor samples by MRM and correlative histopathology. We performed MRM imaging and correlative histopathology in 19 meningioma and 11 glioma human brain tumor samples obtained at surgery. To our knowledge, this is the first MRM direct structural characterization of human brain tumor samples. MRM of brain tumor tissue provided images with 35 to 40 µm spatial resolution. The use of MRM to study human brain tumor samples provides new microstructural information on brain tumors for better classification and characterization. The correlation between MRM and histopathology images allowed the determination of image parameters for critical microstructures of the tumor, like collagen patterns, necrotic foci, calcifications and/or psammoma bodies, vascular distribution and hemorrhage among others. Therefore, MRM may help in interpreting the Clinical Magnetic Resonance images in terms of cell biology processes and tissue patterns. Finally, and most importantly for clinical diagnosis purposes, it provides three-dimensional information in intact samples which may help in selecting a preferential orientation for the histopathology slicing which contains most of the informative elements of the biopsy. Overall, the findings reported here provide a new and unique microstructural view of intact human brain tumor tissue. At this point, our approach and results allow the identification of specific tissue types and pathological features in unprocessed tumor samples.

  8. An unshielded radio-frequency atomic magnetometer with sub-femtoTesla sensitivity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Keder, David A.; Prescott, David W.; Conovaloff, Adam W.; Sauer, Karen L.

    2014-12-01

    We demonstrate a radio-frequency potassium-vapor magnetometer operating with sensitivities of 0.3 fT/ √{ Hz } at 0.5 MHz and 0.9 fT/ √{ Hz } at 1.31 MHz in the absence of radio-frequency and mu-metal or magnetic shielding. The use of spatially separated magnetometers, two voxels within the same cell, permits for the subtraction of common mode noise and the retention of a gradient signal, as from a local source. At 0.5 MHz the common mode noise was white and measured to be 3.4 fT/ √{ Hz } ; upon subtraction the noise returned to the values observed when the magnetometer was shielded. At 1.31 MHz, the common mode noise was from a nearby radio station and was reduced by a factor of 33 upon subtraction, limited only by the radio signal picked up by receiver electronics. Potential applications include in-the-field low-field magnetic resonance, such as the use of nuclear quadrupole resonance for the detection of explosives.

  9. Multiparametric 3-Tesla Endorectal MR Imaging after External Beam Radiation Therapy of Prostate Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Westphalen, Antonio C.; Reed, Galen D.; Vinh, Phillip P.; Sotto, Christopher; Vigneron, Daniel B.; Kurhanewicz, John

    2012-01-01

    Purpose To determine the best combination of magnetic resonance (MR) imaging parameters for the detection of locally recurrent prostate cancer after external beam radiation therapy. Materials and Methods Our IRB approved this study with a waiver of informed consent. Twenty-six patients with suspected recurrence due to biochemical failure were part of this research. The MR protocol included T2-weighted, MR spectroscopic, and diffusion-weighted MR imaging. Transrectal ultrasound-guided biopsy was the standard of reference. We used logistic regression to model the probability of a positive outcome and generalized estimating equations to account for clustering. The diagnostic performance of imaging was described using receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curves. Results The area under the ROC curve of MR spectroscopic imaging (MRSI) was 83.0% (95% CI = 75.5 to 89.1). The combination of all MR techniques did not significantly improve the performance of imaging beyond the accuracy of MRSI alone, but a trend towards improved discrimination was noted (86.9%; 95% CI = 77.6 to 93.4; P = 0.09). Conclusion In conclusion, incorporation of MRSI to T2-weighted and/or diffusion-weighted MR imaging significantly improves the assessment of patients with suspected recurrence after radiotherapy and a combined approach with all three modalities may have the best diagnostic performance. PMID:22535708

  10. High resolution 3 Tesla contrast-enhanced MR angiography of the hands in Raynaud's disease.

    PubMed

    Walcher, J; Strecker, R; Goldacker, S; Winterer, J; Langer, M; Bley, T A

    2007-04-01

    Raynaud's disease is associated with disorders in blood circulation of the hands. The gold standard to visualise pathology of digital arteries is catheter angiography. Contrast-enhanced MR angiography (CE MRA) has developed even more as an alternative non-invasive method to digital subtraction angiography, mostly for pelvic or lower limb vessels. We report a case of primary Raynaud's disease with high-grade stenosis and an occlusion of the digital arteries. This case illustrates the benefit and efficiency of CE MRA at high fields in depicting location and extension of peripheral arterial alterations.

  11. Upper critical field reaches 90 tesla near the Mott transition in fulleride superconductors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kasahara, Y.; Takeuchi, Y.; Zadik, R. H.; Takabayashi, Y.; Colman, R. H.; McDonald, R. D.; Rosseinsky, M. J.; Prassides, K.; Iwasa, Y.

    2017-02-01

    Controlled access to the border of the Mott insulating state by variation of control parameters offers exotic electronic states such as anomalous and possibly high-transition-temperature (Tc) superconductivity. The alkali-doped fullerides show a transition from a Mott insulator to a superconductor for the first time in three-dimensional materials, but the impact of dimensionality and electron correlation on superconducting properties has remained unclear. Here we show that, near the Mott insulating phase, the upper critical field Hc2 of the fulleride superconductors reaches values as high as ~90 T--the highest among cubic crystals. This is accompanied by a crossover from weak- to strong-coupling superconductivity and appears upon entering the metallic state with the dynamical Jahn-Teller effect as the Mott transition is approached. These results suggest that the cooperative interplay between molecular electronic structure and strong electron correlations plays a key role in realizing robust superconductivity with high-Tc and high-Hc2.

  12. Multi circular-cavity surface coil for magnetic resonance imaging of monkey's brain at 4 Tesla

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Osorio, A. I.; Solis-Najera, S. E.; Vázquez, F.; Wang, R. L.; Tomasi, D.; Rodriguez, A. O.

    2014-11-01

    Animal models in medical research has been used to study humans diseases for several decades. The use of different imaging techniques together with different animal models offers a great advantage due to the possibility to study some human pathologies without the necessity of chirurgical intervention. The employ of magnetic resonance imaging for the acquisition of anatomical and functional images is an excellent tool because its noninvasive nature. Dedicated coils to perform magnetic resonance imaging experiments are obligatory due to the improvement on the signal-to-noise ratio and reduced specific absorption ratio. A specifically designed surface coil for magnetic resonance imaging of monkey's brain is proposed based on the multi circular-slot coil. Numerical simulations of the magnetic and electric fields were also performed using the Finite Integration Method to solve Maxwell's equations for this particular coil design and, to study the behavior of various vector magnetic field configurations and specific absorption ratio. Monkey's brain images were then acquired with a research-dedicated magnetic resonance imaging system at 4T, to evaluate the anatomical images with conventional imaging sequences. This coil showed good quality images of a monkey's brain and full compatibility with standard pulse sequences implemented in research-dedicated imager.

  13. Conceptual design of a 2 tesla superconducting solenoid for the Fermilab D{O} detector upgrade

    SciTech Connect

    Brzezniak, J.; Fast, R.W.; Krempetz, K.

    1994-05-01

    This paper presents a conceptual design of a superconducting solenoid to be part of a proposed upgrade for the D0 detector. This detector was completed in 1992, and has been taking data since then. The Fermilab Tevatron had scheduled a series of luminosity enhancements prior to the startup of this detector. In response to this accelerator upgrade, efforts have been underway to design upgrades for D0 to take advantage of the new luminosity, and improvements in detector technology. This magnet is conceived as part of the new central tracking system for D0, providing a radiation-hard high-precision magnetic tracking system with excellent electron identification.

  14. [Optimized study technic in meniscopathies by NMR tomographic 3D imaging at 1.5 tesla].

    PubMed

    Skalej, M; Klose, U; Küper, K

    1988-02-01

    Traumatic and degenerative changes in the meniscus can be demonstrated well by MRT, but the small size and complex anatomical structure of the menisci present practical problems. A correct understanding is only possible by images in several planes and good resolution, making the examination a lengthy procedure. A technique is therefore described using 3-D images and reconstruction of high-resolution films, which allows rapid examination of the menisci in optimal planes.

  15. Analytical studies of advanced high-field designs: 20-tesla large-bore superconducting magnets

    SciTech Connect

    Hoard, R.W.; Cornish, D.N.; Scanlan, R.M.; Zbasnik, J.P.; Leber, R.L.; Hickman, R.B.; Lee, J.D.

    1983-09-30

    Several emerging technologies have been combined in a conceptual design study demonstrating the feasibility of producing ultrahigh magnetic fields from large-bore superconducting solenoid magnets. Several designs have been produced that approach peak fields of 20-T in 2.0-m diameter inner bores. The analytical expressions comprising the main features of CONDUCTOR and ADVMAGNET, the two computer programs used in the design of these advanced magnets, are also discussed. These magnets and design techniques will make a paramount contribution to the national mirror-fusion endeavor and to the newly emerging field of nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) whole-body scanners.

  16. Test of a 1.8 Tesla, 400 Hz Dipole for a Muon Synchrotron

    SciTech Connect

    Summers, D.J.; Cremaldi, L.M.; Hart, T.L.; Perera, L.P.; Reep, M.; Witte, H.; Hansen, S.; Lopes, M.L.; Reidy Jr., J.; /Oxford High School

    2012-05-01

    A 1.8 T dipole magnet using thin grain oriented silicon steel laminations has been constructed as a prototype for a muon synchrotron ramping at 400 Hz. Following the practice in large 3 phase transformers and our own Opera-2d simulations, joints are mitred to take advantage of the magnetic properties of the steel which are much better in the direction in which the steel was rolled. Measurements with a Hysteresigraph 5500 and Epstein frame show a high magnetic permeability which minimizes stored energy in the yoke allowing the magnet to ramp quickly with modest voltage. Coercivity is low which minimizes hysteresis losses. A power supply with a fast Insulated Gate Bipolar Transistor (IGBT) switch and a capacitor was constructed. Coils are wound with 12 gauge copper wire. Thin wire and laminations minimize eddy current losses. The magnetic field was measured with a peak sensing Hall probe.

  17. Orientation of diamagnetic layered transition metal oxide particles in 1-tesla magnetic fields.

    PubMed

    Sklute, Elizabeth C; Eguchi, Miharu; Henderson, Camden N; Angelone, Mark S; Yennawar, Hemant P; Mallouk, Thomas E

    2011-02-16

    The magnetic field-driven orientation of microcrystals of six diamagnetic layered transition metal oxides (HLaNb(2)O(7), HCa(2)Nb(3)O(10)·0.5H(2)O, KNaCa(2)Nb(4)O(13), KTiTaO(5), KTiNbO(5), and H(2.2)K(1.8)Nb(6)O(17)·nH(2)O) suspended in epoxy resins was studied by X-ray diffraction using permanent magnets producing a 0.8 T field. Although the degree of orientation, quantified as the Hermans order parameter, was strongly affected by the particle size distribution, in all cases microcrystals with ∼1-2 μm lateral dimensions were found to orient with the magnetic field vector in the layer plane. Control of the orientation of ionically conducting layered oxides is of interest for practical applications in batteries and fuel cells. The consistent direction of orientation of the lamellar oxides studied can be rationalized in the framework of a quantitative bond anisotropy model developed by Uyeda (Phys. Chem. Miner.1993, 20, 77-80). The asymmetry of metal-oxygen bonding at the faces of the octahedral layers results in long and short M-O bonds perpendicular to the plane of the sheets. This distortion of the M-O octahedra, which is a structural feature of almost all layered materials that contain octahedral bonding frameworks, gives rise to the diamagnetic anisotropy and results in an easy axis or plane of magnetization in the plane of the sheets.

  18. Installation and Commissioning of a 6-Tesla Superconducting Wavelength Shifter at Taiwan Light Source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang, C. H.; Chang, H. P.; Chen, Jenny; Chen, J. R.; Fan, T. C.; Hwang, C. S.; Hsiung, G. Y.; Hsu, K. T.; Kuo, C. C.; Luo, G. H.; Wang, D. J.; Wang, M. H.

    2005-09-01

    The Taiwan Light Source (TLS) is the first third-generation light source in Asia. The storage ring has six straight sections one section for injection, one for the RF cavities and diagnostic instrumentation and four sections for insertion devices, which are U5, U9, EPU and W20. Generating high-energy X-ray photons is a high priority at TLS. A single hybrid type wiggler is associated with three beam lines to serve X-ray users. The installed Superconducting Wavelength Shifter (SWLS) is very compact in size and can produce very high-energy photons. The injection section at TLS can barely accommodate the SWLS. The expected multipole components of the SWLS are strong, shrink the dynamic aperture; perturb the beta function, and reduce the beam lifetime. The increase in the synchrotron radiation by the SWLS also changes beam emittance and increases the energy spread. The influence of SWLS on the low-energy, 1.5 GeV, storage-ring should not be neglected. The downstream kicker with the water-cooled copper mask must be modified to prevent a potential meltdown of the welding junction of the ceramic chamber because the heat load is high. The 1.2 μs half-sine pulse field of the kicker is then altered by the copper-made radiation mask, which is installed inside the ceramic chamber. The operating capability of cryogenic system is established to ensure the smooth commissioning of the SWLS. The magnetic field mapping, the dynamic aperture simulation data and commissioning results will be presented and discussed herein.

  19. Sequence Comparison for Non-Enhanced MRA of the Lower Extremity Arteries at 7 Tesla

    PubMed Central

    Johst, Sören; Orzada, Stephan; Fischer, Anja; Schäfer, Lena C.; Nassenstein, Kai; Umutlu, Lale; Lauenstein, Thomas C.; Ladd, Mark E.; Maderwald, Stefan

    2014-01-01

    In this study three sequences for non-contrast-enhanced MRA of the lower extremity arteries at 7T were compared. Cardiac triggering was used with the aim to reduce signal variations in the arteries. Two fast single-shot 2D sequences, a modified Ultrafast Spoiled Gradient Echo (UGRE) sequence and a variant of the Quiescent-Interval Single-Shot (QISS) sequence were triggered via phonocardiogram and compared in volunteer examinations to a non-triggered 2D gradient echo (GRE) sequence. For image acquisition, a 16-channel transmit/receive coil and a manually positionable AngioSURF table were used. To tackle B1 inhomogeneities at 7T, Time-Interleaved Acquisition of Modes (TIAMO) was integrated in GRE and UGRE. To compare the three sequences quantitatively, a vessel-to-background ratio (VBR) was measured in all volunteers and stations. In conclusion, cardiac triggering was able to suppress flow artifacts satisfactorily. The modified UGRE showed only moderate image artifacts. Averaged over all volunteers and stations, GRE reached a VBR of 4.18±0.05, UGRE 5.20±0.06, and QISS 2.72±0.03. Using cardiac triggering and TIAMO imaging technique was essential to perform non-enhanced MRA of the lower extremities vessels at 7T. The modified UGRE performed best, as observed artifacts were only moderate and the highest average VBR was reached. PMID:24454963

  20. Gain length dependence on phase shake in the VUV-FEL at the TESLA Test Facility

    SciTech Connect

    Pflueger, J.; Pierini, P.

    1995-12-31

    The TTF VUV FEL, which is in its design stage at DESY, consists of a 30 m long SASE FEL which will radiate around 6 nm, driven by a superconducting linac with final energy of 1 GeV. One of the important issues in its design is the undulator performance, which is studied in this paper. The present setup, including FODO lattice, is discussed in this paper. Results of simulations, including the realistic wiggler field errors and beam stearing, are presented. Dependence of the performance, in particular the gain and saturation length as well as the saturation peak power, on the wiggler field errors is discussed.

  1. Simulation Study on Active Noise Control for a 4 Tesla MRI Scanner

    PubMed Central

    Li, Mingfeng; Lim, Teik C.; Lee, Jing-Huei

    2008-01-01

    The purpose of this work is to study computationally the possibility of the application of a hybrid active noise control technique for MRI acoustic noise reduction. A hybrid control system combined with both feedforward and feedback loops embedded is proposed for potential application on active MRI noise reduction. A set of computational simulation studies were performed. Sets of MRI acoustic noise emissions measured at the patient's left ear location were recorded and used in the simulation study. By comparing three different control systems, namely the feedback, the feedforward and the hybrid control, our results revealed that the hybrid control system is the most effective. The hybrid control system achieved approximately a 20 dB reduction at the principal frequency component. We concluded that the proposed hybrid active control scheme could have a potential application for MRI scanner noise reduction. PMID:18060719

  2. In Situ Active Control of Noise in a 4-Tesla MRI Scanner

    PubMed Central

    Li, Mingfeng; Rudd, Brent; Lim, Teik C.; Lee, Jing-Huei

    2011-01-01

    Purpose To evaluate the effectiveness of the proposed active noise control (ANC) system for the reduction of the acoustic noise emission generated by a 4 T MRI scanner during operation and to assess the feasibility of developing an ANC device that can be deployed in situ. Materials and Methods Three typical scanning sequences, namely EPI (echo planar imaging), GEMS (gradient echo multi-slice) and MDEFT (Modified Driven Equilibrium Fourier Transform), were used for evaluating the performance of the ANC system, which was composed of a magnetic compatible headset and a multiple reference feedforward filtered-x least mean square controller. Results The greatest reduction, about 55 dB, was achieved at the harmonic at a frequency of 1.3 kHz in the GEMS case. Approximately 21 dB and 30 dBA overall reduction was achieved for GEMS noise across the entire audible frequency range. For the MDEFT sequence, the control system achieved 14 dB and 14 dBA overall reduction in the audible frequency range, while 13 dB and 14 dBA reduction was obtained for the EPI case. Conclusion The result is highly encouraging because it shows great potential for treating MRI noise with an ANC application during real time scanning. PMID:21751284

  3. Measurement of brain glutamate and glutamine by spectrally-selective refocusing at 3 Tesla.

    PubMed

    Choi, Changho; Coupland, Nicholas J; Bhardwaj, Paramjit P; Malykhin, Nikolai; Gheorghiu, Dan; Allen, Peter S

    2006-05-01

    A new single-voxel proton NMR spectrally-selective refocusing method for measuring glutamate (Glu) and glutamine (Gln) in the human brain in vivo at 3T is reported. Triple-resonance selective 180 degrees RF pulses with a bandwidth of 12 Hz were implemented within point-resolved spectroscopy (PRESS) for selective detection of Glu or Gln, and simultaneous acquisition of creatine singlets for use as a reference in phase correction. The carriers of the spectrally-selective 180 degrees pulses and the echo times (TEs) were optimized with both numerical and experimental analyses of the filtering performance, which enabled measurements of the target metabolites with negligible contamination from N-acetylaspartate and glutathione. The concentrations of Glu and Gln in the prefrontal cortex were estimated to be 9.7+/-0.5 and 3.0+/-0.7 mM (mean+/-SD, N=7), with reference to Cr at 8 mM.

  4. Detailing radio frequency heating induced by coronary stents: a 7.0 Tesla magnetic resonance study.

    PubMed

    Santoro, Davide; Winter, Lukas; Müller, Alexander; Vogt, Julia; Renz, Wolfgang; Ozerdem, Celal; Grässl, Andreas; Tkachenko, Valeriy; Schulz-Menger, Jeanette; Niendorf, Thoralf

    2012-01-01

    The sensitivity gain of ultrahigh field Magnetic Resonance (UHF-MR) holds the promise to enhance spatial and temporal resolution. Such improvements could be beneficial for cardiovascular MR. However, intracoronary stents used for treatment of coronary artery disease are currently considered to be contra-indications for UHF-MR. The antenna effect induced by a stent together with RF wavelength shortening could increase local radiofrequency (RF) power deposition at 7.0 T and bears the potential to induce local heating, which might cause tissue damage. Realizing these constraints, this work examines RF heating effects of stents using electro-magnetic field (EMF) simulations and phantoms with properties that mimic myocardium. For this purpose, RF power deposition that exceeds the clinical limits was induced by a dedicated birdcage coil. Fiber optic probes and MR thermometry were applied for temperature monitoring using agarose phantoms containing copper tubes or coronary stents. The results demonstrate an agreement between RF heating induced temperature changes derived from EMF simulations versus MR thermometry. The birdcage coil tailored for RF heating was capable of irradiating power exceeding the specific-absorption rate (SAR) limits defined by the IEC guidelines by a factor of three. This setup afforded RF induced temperature changes up to +27 K in a reference phantom. The maximum extra temperature increase, induced by a copper tube or a coronary stent was less than 3 K. The coronary stents examined showed an RF heating behavior similar to a copper tube. Our results suggest that, if IEC guidelines for local/global SAR are followed, the extra RF heating induced in myocardial tissue by stents may not be significant versus the baseline heating induced by the energy deposited by a tailored cardiac transmit RF coil at 7.0 T, and may be smaller if not insignificant than the extra RF heating observed under the circumstances used in this study.

  5. Development of a 3 tesla - 10 Hz pulsed magnet-modulator system

    SciTech Connect

    Krausse, G.J.; Butterfield, K.B.

    1984-01-01

    In order to support the experimental work done at the Los Alamos Meson Physics Facility new instrumentation and data collection systems of advanced design are developed on a regular basis. Within the instrumentation system for an experiment at LAMPF, The Photo-Excitation of the H/sup -/ Ion Resonances, there exists a need for a pulsed air-core electromagnet and modulator system. The magnet must be capable of producing a field strength of 0 to 3T in a volume of 3.5 cm/sup 3/. In addition it must be radiation resistant, have a uniform field, operate in a high vacuum with little or no outgassing, and the physical layout of the magnet must provide minimal azimuthal obstruction to both the ion and laser beams. The modulator must be capable of producing up to a 15KA pulse with duration of two ..mu..s at a maximum repetition rate of 10 Hz. Modulator layout must be extremely reliable so that data collection time is not lost during the experiment. This paper describes in detail the development of the system.

  6. Automated tuning of an eight-channel cardiac transceive array at 7 tesla using piezoelectric actuators

    PubMed Central

    Keith, Graeme A; Rodgers, Christopher T; Hess, Aaron T; Snyder, Carl J; Vaughan, J Thomas; Robson, Matthew D

    2015-01-01

    Purpose Ultra-high field (UHF) MR scanning in the body requires novel coil designs due to B1 field inhomogeneities. In the transverse electromagnetic field (TEM) design, maximum B1 transmit power can only be achieved if each individual transmit element is tuned and matched for different coil loads, which requires a considerable amount of valuable scanner time. Methods An integrated system for autotuning a multichannel parallel transmit (pTx) cardiac TEM array was devised, using piezoelectric actuators, power monitoring equipment and control software. The reproducibility and performance of the system were tested and the power responses of the coil elements were profiled. An automated optimization method was devised and evaluated. Results The time required to tune an eight-element pTx cardiac RF array was reduced from a mean of 30 min to less than 10 min with the use of this system. Conclusion Piezoelectric actuators are an attractive means of tuning RF coil arrays to yield more efficient B1 transmission into the subject. An automated mechanism for tuning these elements provides a practical solution for cardiac imaging at UHF, bringing this technology closer to clinical use. Magn Reson Med 73:2390–2397, 2015. © 2014 The Authors. Magnetic Resonance in Medicine published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. on behalf of International Society for Magnetic Resonance in Medicine. PMID:24986525

  7. Milli-tesla NMR and spectrophotometry of liquids hyperpolarized by dissolution dynamic nuclear polarization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Yue; Chen, Chia-Hsiu; Wilson, Zechariah; Savukov, Igor; Hilty, Christian

    2016-09-01

    Hyperpolarization methods offer a unique means of improving low signal strength obtained in low-field NMR. Here, simultaneous measurements of NMR at a field of 0.7 mT and laser optical absorption from samples hyperpolarized by dissolution dynamic nuclear polarization (D-DNP) are reported. The NMR measurement field closely corresponds to a typical field encountered during sample injection in a D-DNP experiment. The optical spectroscopy allows determination of the concentration of the free radical required for DNP. Correlation of radical concentration to NMR measurement of spin polarization and spin-lattice relaxation time allows determination of relaxivity and can be used for optimization of the D-DNP process. Further, the observation of the nuclear Overhauser effect originating from hyperpolarized spins is demonstrated. Signals from 1H and 19F in a mixture of trifluoroethanol and water are detected in a single spectrum, while different atoms of the same type are distinguished by J-coupling patterns. The resulting signal changes of individual peaks are indicative of molecular contact, suggesting a new application area of hyperpolarized low-field NMR for the determination of intermolecular interactions.

  8. Observations of ETI under dielectric-overcoated aluminum pulsed to hundreds of Tesla

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hutchinson, Trevor; Bauer, Bruno; Fuelling, Stephan; Yates, Kevin; Awe, Thomas; Yelton, Graham

    2016-10-01

    MagLIF is an inertial confinement concept that takes advantage of relaxed fusion criteria due to premagnetized and preheated fuel. The drive surface is particularly susceptible to highly azimuthally correlated magneto-Rayleigh Taylor (MRT) instabilities, which section the liner wall and compromise confinement. This degree of azimuthal correlation is not due to residual lathe machining or surface roughness and a growing body of evidence suggest electrothermal instabilities (ETI) seed the MRT instability and allow for levels of azimuthal correlation that have been observed experimentally. Implementation of dielectric coatings on Sandia's Z accelerator has reduced MRT amplitudes by at least a factor of ten, which simulations suggest is due to mass tamping of the ETI. However, neither ETI nor its theorized suppression via an applied dielectric overcoat has been experimentally observed on a thick wire. We will report on experimental observations of ETI on the surface of 500 um radius aluminum rods with a 70 um parylene-N overcoat pulsed with 1 MA in 100 ns. This work was funded in part by Sandia's Laboratory Directed Research and Development Program (Project No. 178661).

  9. Magnetic resonance imaging of rodent spinal cord with an improved performance coil at 7 Tesla

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Solis-Najera, S. E.; Rodriguez, A. O.

    2014-11-01

    Magnetic Resonance Imaging of animal models provide reliable means to study human diseases. The image acquisition particularly determined by the radio frequency coil to detect the signal emanated from a particular region of interest. A scaled-down version of the slotted surface coil was built based on the previous results of a magnetron-type surface coil for human applications. Our coil prototype had a 2 cm total diameter and six circular slots and was developed for murine spinal cord at 7 T. Electromagnetic simulations of the slotted and circular coils were also performed to compute the spatially dependent magnetic and electric fields using a simulated saline-solution sphere. The quality factor of both coils was experimentally measured giving a lower noise figure and a higher quality factor for the slotted coil outperforming the circular coil. Images of the spinal cord of a rat were acquired using standard pulse sequences. The slotted surface coil can be a good tool for spinal cord rat imaging using conventional pulse sequences at 7 T.

  10. Brain of rats intoxicated with acrylamide: observation with 4.7 tesla magnetic resonance.

    PubMed

    Kinoshita, Y; Matsumura, H; Igisu, H; Yokota, A

    2000-10-01

    When rats were injected intraperitoneally with acrylamide (50 mg/kg per day) for 8 days, all animals developed ataxia and weakness in the hindlimbs. On examining their brain with an ultrahigh-field (4.7 T) magnetic resonance (MR) spectrometer, the lateral ventricles on both sides and the third ventricle were dilated. The aqueduct and cisterns were also enlarged. The size of the cerebral cortex was quantified in three MR image slices covering the cerebrum. Compared with the images of the brain of body weight-matched controls, the cerebral cortex of rats intoxicated with acrylamide was found to be smaller in the primary motor area in all slices, and in the primary or secondary sensory area in two slices. Taken together with previous enzymatic analyses, rats intoxicated with acrylamide (50 mg/kg per day for 8 days) seem to represent an animal model of acrylamide encephalopathy not only biochemically but also structurally.

  11. Commissioning report of the MuCool 5 Tesla solenoid coupled with helium refrigerator

    SciTech Connect

    Geynisman, Michael; /Fermilab

    2010-05-01

    MuCool 5T solenoid was successfully cooled down and operated coupled with MTA 'Brown' refrigerator. The system performed as designed with substantial performance margin. All process alarms and interlocks, as well as ODH and fire alarms, were active and performed as designed. The cooldown of the refrigerator started from warm conditions and took 44 hours to accumulate liquid helium level and solenoid temperature below 5K. Average liquid nitrogen consumption for the refrigerator precool and solenoid shield was measured as 20 gal/hr (including boil-off). Helium losses were small (below 30 scfh). The system was stable and with sufficient margin of performance and ran stably without wet expansion engine. Quench response demonstrated proper operation of the relieving devices and pointed to necessity of improving tightness of the relieving manifolds. Boil-off test demonstrated average heat load of 3 Watts for the unpowered solenoid. The solenoid can stay up to 48 hours cold and minimally filled if the nitrogen shield is maintained. A list of improvements includes commencing into operations the second helium compressor and completion of improvements and tune-ups for system efficiency.

  12. Strain-Induced Pseudo-Magnetic Fields Greater Than 300 Tesla in Graphene Nanobubbles

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-07-30

    Berkeley, Berkeley, CA 94720, USA. 2Materials Science Division, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, CA 94720, USA. 3Instituto de Ciencia ...Notes 1. N. A. Gershenfeld, I. L. Chuang, Science 275, 350 (1997). 2. W. S. Warren, Science 277, 1688 (1997). 3. T. D. Ladd et al., Nature 464, 45 (2010...4. L. Childress et al., Science 314, 281 (2006). 5. M. V. G. Dutt et al., Science 316, 1312 (2007). 6. P. Neumann et al., Science 320, 1326 (2008

  13. Impact of Gd3+ doping and glassing solvent deuteration on 13C DNP at 5 Tesla

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kiswandhi, Andhika; Lama, Bimala; Niedbalski, Peter; Goderya, Mudrekh; Long, Joanna; Lumata, Lloyd

    Dynamic nuclear polarization (DNP) is a technique which can be used to amplify signals in nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) by several thousand-fold. The most commonly available DNP system typically operates at the W-band field or 3.35 T, at which it has been shown that 13C NMR signal can be enhanced by deuteration and Gd3+ doping. In this work, we have investigated the applicability of these procedures at 5 T. Our results indicate that the deuteration of the glassing matrix still yields an enhancement of 13C DNP when 4-oxo-TEMPO free radical is used. The effect is attributed to the lower heat load of the deuterons compared to protons. An addition of a trace amount of Gd3+ gives a modest enhancement of the signal when trityl OX063 is used, albeit with a less pronounced relative enhancement compared to the results obtained at 3.35 T. The results suggest that the enhancement obtained via Gd3+ doping may become saturated at higher field. These results will be discussed using a thermodynamic model of DNP. This work is supported by US Dept of Defense Award No. W81XWH-14-1-0048 and Robert A. Welch Foundation Grant No. AT-1877.

  14. Scanning fast and slow: current limitations of 3 Tesla functional MRI and future potential

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boubela, Roland N.; Kalcher, Klaudius; Nasel, Christian; Moser, Ewald

    2014-02-01

    Functional MRI at 3T has become a workhorse for the neurosciences, e.g., neurology, psychology, and psychiatry, enabling non-invasive investigation of brain function and connectivity. However, BOLD-based fMRI is a rather indirect measure of brain function, confounded by fluctuation related signals, e.g. head or brain motion, brain pulsation, blood flow, intermixed with susceptibility differences close or distant to the region of neuronal activity. Even though a plethora of preprocessing strategies have been published to address these confounds, their efficiency is still under discussion. In particular, physiological signal fluctuations closely related to brain supply may mask BOLD signal changes related to "true" neuronal activation. Here we explore recent technical and methodological advancements aimed at disentangling the various components, employing fast multiband vs. standard EPI, in combination with fast temporal ICA.Our preliminary results indicate that fast (TR< 0.5s) scanning may help to identify and eliminate physiologic components, increasing tSNR and functional contrast. In addition, biological variability can be studied and task performance better correlated to other measures. This should increase specificity and reliability in fMRI studies. Furthermore, physiological signal changes during scanning may then be recognized as a source of information rather than a nuisance. As we are currently still undersampling the complexity of the brain, even at a rather coarse macroscopic level, we should be very cautious in the interpretation of neuroscientific findings, in particular when comparing different groups (e.g., age, sex, medication, pathology, etc.). From a technical point of view our goal should be to sample brain activity at layer specific resolution with low TR, covering as much of the brain as possible without violating SAR limits. We hope to stimulate discussion towards a better understanding and a more quantitative use of fMRI.

  15. Superconducting 72-pole Indirect Cooling 3Tesla Wiggler for CLIC Damping Ring and ANKA Image Beamline

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bragin, A.; Gusev, Ye.; Khrushchev, S.; Mezentsev, N.; Shkaruba, V.; Syrovatin, V.; Tarasenko, O.; Tsukanov, V.; Volkov, A.; K. Zolotarev; Zorin, A.

    One of the directions of BINP activity is the creation of multipole superconducting wigglers with the magnetic field levels from 2 T to 7.5 T which are installed on many SR sources. Special efforts were made by BINP to develop the cryogenic system with zero liquid helium consumption. The next significant step became the design and creation of superconducting full size prototype of damping wiggler for CLIC project where supposed the installation of 104 wigglers. For operation of CLIC damping wiggler it is required the magnetic field of 3 T and the period about 50 mm with a beam vertical aperture of 13 mm. Design features of the wiggler which was proposed and created by BINP is the application of the indirect cooling method. In this case Nb-Ti magnet with the length of 1.9 m and the weight of 700 kg is located in a vacuum and is cooled by four Gifford-McMahon cryocoolers. To maintain the temperature about 4.2 K on the magnet it is used the tubes with circulating liquid helium as the heat conducting elements. To increase the efficiency of pre-cooling down of the magnet it is used nitrogen-based heat pipes of siphon type. The features of the magnetic and cryogenic systems of CLIC damping wiggler full size prototype and test results are presented in this article.

  16. 4 Tesla Whole Body MRI MRSI System for Investigation of Neurodegenerative Diseases

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2004-10-01

    tools for data processing. 14. SUBJECT TERMS 15. NUMBER OF PAGES Magnetic resonance imaging, gulf war syndrome, alzheimer’s disease , 9 brain 16. PRICE...imaging system fully dedicated to study neurodegenerative disorders of the brain, including Alzheimer’s disease , Parkinson’s disease, Posttraumatic...resolution (0.5 x 0.4 x 2mm) Turbo Spin Echo image showing subfieldshave found that certain diseases, such as of the hippocampus Alzheimer’s disease and

  17. Magnetic Resonance Microscopy at 14 Tesla and Correlative Histopathology of Human Brain Tumor Tissue

    PubMed Central

    Gonzalez-Segura, Ana; Morales, Jose Manuel; Gonzalez-Darder, Jose Manuel; Cardona-Marsal, Ramon; Lopez-Gines, Concepcion; Cerda-Nicolas, Miguel; Monleon, Daniel

    2011-01-01

    Magnetic Resonance Microscopy (MRM) can provide high microstructural detail in excised human lesions. Previous MRM images on some experimental models and a few human samples suggest the large potential of the technique. The aim of this study was the characterization of specific morphological features of human brain tumor samples by MRM and correlative histopathology. We performed MRM imaging and correlative histopathology in 19 meningioma and 11 glioma human brain tumor samples obtained at surgery. To our knowledge, this is the first MRM direct structural characterization of human brain tumor samples. MRM of brain tumor tissue provided images with 35 to 40 µm spatial resolution. The use of MRM to study human brain tumor samples provides new microstructural information on brain tumors for better classification and characterization. The correlation between MRM and histopathology images allowed the determination of image parameters for critical microstructures of the tumor, like collagen patterns, necrotic foci, calcifications and/or psammoma bodies, vascular distribution and hemorrhage among others. Therefore, MRM may help in interpreting the Clinical Magnetic Resonance images in terms of cell biology processes and tissue patterns. Finally, and most importantly for clinical diagnosis purposes, it provides three-dimensional information in intact samples which may help in selecting a preferential orientation for the histopathology slicing which contains most of the informative elements of the biopsy. Overall, the findings reported here provide a new and unique microstructural view of intact human brain tumor tissue. At this point, our approach and results allow the identification of specific tissue types and pathological features in unprocessed tumor samples. PMID:22110653

  18. Design and Evaluation of a Hybrid Radiofrequency Applicator for Magnetic Resonance Imaging and RF Induced Hyperthermia: Electromagnetic Field Simulations up to 14.0 Tesla and Proof-of-Concept at 7.0 Tesla

    PubMed Central

    Winter, Lukas; Özerdem, Celal; Hoffmann, Werner; Santoro, Davide; Müller, Alexander; Waiczies, Helmar; Seemann, Reiner; Graessl, Andreas; Wust, Peter; Niendorf, Thoralf

    2013-01-01

    This work demonstrates the feasibility of a hybrid radiofrequency (RF) applicator that supports magnetic resonance (MR) imaging and MR controlled targeted RF heating at ultrahigh magnetic fields (B0≥7.0T). For this purpose a virtual and an experimental configuration of an 8-channel transmit/receive (TX/RX) hybrid RF applicator was designed. For TX/RX bow tie antenna electric dipoles were employed. Electromagnetic field simulations (EMF) were performed to study RF heating versus RF wavelength (frequency range: 64 MHz (1.5T) to 600 MHz (14.0T)). The experimental version of the applicator was implemented at B0 = 7.0T. The applicators feasibility for targeted RF heating was evaluated in EMF simulations and in phantom studies. Temperature co-simulations were conducted in phantoms and in a human voxel model. Our results demonstrate that higher frequencies afford a reduction in the size of specific absorption rate (SAR) hotspots. At 7T (298 MHz) the hybrid applicator yielded a 50% iso-contour SAR (iso-SAR-50%) hotspot with a diameter of 43 mm. At 600 MHz an iso-SAR-50% hotspot of 26 mm in diameter was observed. RF power deposition per RF input power was found to increase with B0 which makes targeted RF heating more efficient at higher frequencies. The applicator was capable of generating deep-seated temperature hotspots in phantoms. The feasibility of 2D steering of a SAR/temperature hotspot to a target location was demonstrated by the induction of a focal temperature increase (ΔT = 8.1 K) in an off-center region of the phantom. Temperature simulations in the human brain performed at 298 MHz showed a maximum temperature increase to 48.6C for a deep-seated hotspot in the brain with a size of (19×23×32)mm3 iso-temperature-90%. The hybrid applicator provided imaging capabilities that facilitate high spatial resolution brain MRI. To conclude, this study outlines the technical underpinnings and demonstrates the basic feasibility of an 8-channel hybrid TX/RX applicator that supports MR imaging, MR thermometry and targeted RF heating in one device. PMID:23613896

  19. Design and evaluation of a hybrid radiofrequency applicator for magnetic resonance imaging and RF induced hyperthermia: electromagnetic field simulations up to 14.0 Tesla and proof-of-concept at 7.0 Tesla.

    PubMed

    Winter, Lukas; Özerdem, Celal; Hoffmann, Werner; Santoro, Davide; Müller, Alexander; Waiczies, Helmar; Seemann, Reiner; Graessl, Andreas; Wust, Peter; Niendorf, Thoralf

    2013-01-01

    This work demonstrates the feasibility of a hybrid radiofrequency (RF) applicator that supports magnetic resonance (MR) imaging and MR controlled targeted RF heating at ultrahigh magnetic fields (B0≥7.0T). For this purpose a virtual and an experimental configuration of an 8-channel transmit/receive (TX/RX) hybrid RF applicator was designed. For TX/RX bow tie antenna electric dipoles were employed. Electromagnetic field simulations (EMF) were performed to study RF heating versus RF wavelength (frequency range: 64 MHz (1.5T) to 600 MHz (14.0T)). The experimental version of the applicator was implemented at B0 = 7.0T. The applicators feasibility for targeted RF heating was evaluated in EMF simulations and in phantom studies. Temperature co-simulations were conducted in phantoms and in a human voxel model. Our results demonstrate that higher frequencies afford a reduction in the size of specific absorption rate (SAR) hotspots. At 7T (298 MHz) the hybrid applicator yielded a 50% iso-contour SAR (iso-SAR-50%) hotspot with a diameter of 43 mm. At 600 MHz an iso-SAR-50% hotspot of 26 mm in diameter was observed. RF power deposition per RF input power was found to increase with B0 which makes targeted RF heating more efficient at higher frequencies. The applicator was capable of generating deep-seated temperature hotspots in phantoms. The feasibility of 2D steering of a SAR/temperature hotspot to a target location was demonstrated by the induction of a focal temperature increase (ΔT = 8.1 K) in an off-center region of the phantom. Temperature simulations in the human brain performed at 298 MHz showed a maximum temperature increase to 48.6C for a deep-seated hotspot in the brain with a size of (19×23×32)mm(3) iso-temperature-90%. The hybrid applicator provided imaging capabilities that facilitate high spatial resolution brain MRI. To conclude, this study outlines the technical underpinnings and demonstrates the basic feasibility of an 8-channel hybrid TX/RX applicator that supports MR imaging, MR thermometry and targeted RF heating in one device.

  20. A 2 Tesla Full Scale High Performance Periodic Permanent Magnet Model for Attractive (228 KN) and repulsive Maglev

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stekly, Z. J. J.; Gardner, C.; Domigan, P.; Baker, J.; Hass, M.; McDonald, C.; Wu, C.; Farrell, R. A.

    1996-01-01

    Two 214.5 cm. long high performance periodic (26 cm period) permanent magnet half-assemblies were designed and constructed for use as a wiggler using Nd-B-Fe and vanadium permendur as hard and soft magnetic materials by Field Effects, a division of Intermagnetics General Corporation. Placing these assemblies in a supporting structure with a 2.1 cm pole to pole separation resulted in a periodic field with a maximum value of 2.04 T. This is believed to be the highest field ever achieved by this type of device. The attractive force between the two 602 kg magnet assemblies is 228 kN, providing enough force for suspension of a 45,500 kg vehicle. If used in an attractive maglev system with an appropriate flat iron rail, one assembly will generate the same force with a gap of 1.05 cm leading to a lift to weight ratio of 38.6, not including the vehicle attachment structure. This permanent magnet compares well with superconducting systems which have lift to weight ratios in the range of 5 to 10. This paper describes the magnet assemblies and their measured magnetic performance. The measured magnetic field and resulting attractive magnetic force have a negative spring characteristic. Appropriate control coils are necessary to provide stable operation. The estimated performance of the assemblies in a stable repulsive mode, with eddy currents in a conducting guideway, is also discussed.

  1. Exciton diamagnetic shifts and valley Zeeman effects in monolayer WS2 and MoS2 to 65 Tesla

    DOE PAGES

    Stier, Andreas V.; McCreary, Kathleen M.; Jonker, Berend T.; ...

    2016-02-09

    In bulk and quantum-confined semiconductors, magneto-optical studies have historically played an essential role in determining the fundamental parameters of excitons (size, binding energy, spin, dimensionality and so on). Here we report low-temperature polarized reflection spectroscopy of atomically thin WS2 and MoS2 in high magnetic fields to 65 T. Both the A and B excitons exhibit similar Zeeman splittings of approximately –230 μeV T–1 (g-factor ≃–4), thereby quantifying the valley Zeeman effect in monolayer transition-metal disulphides. Crucially, these large fields also allow observation of the small quadratic diamagnetic shifts of both A and B excitons in monolayer WS2, from which radiimore » of ~1.53 and ~1.16 nm are calculated. Further, when analysed within a model of non-local dielectric screening, these diamagnetic shifts also constrain estimates of the A and B exciton binding energies (410 and 470 meV, respectively, using a reduced A exciton mass of 0.16 times the free electron mass). Lastly, these results highlight the utility of high magnetic fields for understanding new two-dimensional materials.« less

  2. Adapted RF Pulse Design for SAR Reduction in Parallel Excitation with Experimental Verification at 9.4 Tesla

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Xiaoping; Akgün, Can; Vaughan, J. Thomas; Andersen, Peter; Strupp, John; Uğurbil, Kâmil; Van de Moortele, Pierre-François

    2010-01-01

    Parallel excitation holds strong promises to mitigate the impact of large transmit B1 (B1+) distortion at very high magnetic field. Accelerated RF pulses, however, inherently tend to require larger values in RF peak power which may result in substantial increase in Specific Absorption Rate in tissues, which is a constant concern for patient safety at very high field. In this study, we demonstrate adapted rate RF pulse design allowing for SAR reduction while preserving excitation target accuracy. Compared with other proposed implementations of adapted rate RF pulses, our approach is compatible with any k-space trajectories, does not require an analytical expression of the gradient waveform and can be used for large flip angle excitation. We demonstrate our method with numerical simulations based on electromagnetic modeling and we include an experimental verification of transmit pattern accuracy on an 8 transmit channel 9.4 T system. PMID:20556882

  3. Analysis of DNA Double-Strand Breaks and Cytotoxicity after 7 Tesla Magnetic Resonance Imaging of Isolated Human Lymphocytes

    PubMed Central

    Guttek, Karina; Hartig, Roland; Godenschweger, Frank; Roggenbuck, Dirk; Ricke, Jens; Reinhold, Dirk; Speck, Oliver

    2015-01-01

    The global use of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is constantly growing and the field strengths increasing. Yet, only little data about harmful biological effects caused by MRI exposure are available and published research analyzing the impact of MRI on DNA integrity reported controversial results. This in vitro study aimed to investigate the genotoxic and cytotoxic potential of 7 T ultra-high-field MRI on isolated human peripheral blood mononuclear cells. Hence, unstimulated mononuclear blood cells were exposed to 7 T static magnetic field alone or in combination with maximum permissible imaging gradients and radiofrequency pulses as well as to ionizing radiation during computed tomography and γ-ray exposure. DNA double-strand breaks were quantified by flow cytometry and automated microscopy analysis of immunofluorescence stained γH2AX. Cytotoxicity was studied by CellTiter-Blue viability assay and [3H]-thymidine proliferation assay. Exposure of unstimulated mononuclear blood cells to 7 T static magnetic field alone or combined with varying gradient magnetic fields and pulsed radiofrequency fields did not induce DNA double-strand breaks, whereas irradiation with X- and γ-rays led to a dose-dependent induction of γH2AX foci. The viability assay revealed a time- and dose-dependent decrease in metabolic activity only among samples exposed to γ-radiation. Further, there was no evidence for altered proliferation response after cells were exposed to 7 T MRI or low doses of ionizing radiation (≤ 0.2 Gy). These findings confirm the acceptance of MRI as a safe non-invasive diagnostic imaging tool, but whether MRI can induce other types of DNA lesions or DNA double-strand breaks during altered conditions still needs to be investigated. PMID:26176601

  4. 1.5 Tesla MRI-Conditional 12-lead ECG for MR Imaging and Intra-MR Intervention

    PubMed Central

    Tse, Zion Tsz Ho; Dumoulin, Charles L.; Clifford, Gari D.; Schweitzer, Jeff; Qin, Lei; Oster, Julien; Jerosch-Herold, Michael; Kwong, Raymond Y.; Michaud, Gregory; Stevenson, William G.; Schmidt, Ehud J.

    2013-01-01

    Propose High-fidelity 12-lead Electrocardiogram (ECG) is important for physiological monitoring of patients during MR-guided intervention and cardiac MR imaging. Issues in obtaining non-corrupted ECGs inside MRI include a superimposed Magneto-Hydro-Dynamic (MHD) voltage, gradient-switching induced-voltages, and radiofrequency (RF) heating. These problems increase with magnetic field. We intended to develop and clinically validate a 1.5T MRI-conditional 12-lead ECG system. Methods The system was constructed, including transmission-lines to reduce radio-frequency induction, and switching-circuits to remove induced voltages. Adaptive filters, trained by 12-lead measurements outside MRI and in two orientations inside MRI, were used to remove MHD. The system was tested on ten (one exercising) volunteers and four arrhythmia patients. Results Switching circuits removed most imaging-induced voltages (residual noise <3% of the R-wave). MHD removal provided intra-MRI ECGs that varied by <3.8% from those outside the MRI, preserving the true ST segment. In premature-ventricular-contraction (PVC) patients, clean ECGs separated PVC and sinus-rhythm beats. Measured heating was <1.5 C0. The system reliably acquired multiphase (SSFP) wall-motion-cine and phase-contrast-cine scans, including in subjects where 4-lead gating failed. The system required a minimum TR of 4ms to allow robust ECG processing. Conclusion High-fidelity intra-MRI 12-lead ECG is possible. PMID:23580148

  5. Voltage-based Device Tracking in a 1.5 Tesla MRI during Imaging: Initial validation in swine models

    PubMed Central

    Schmidt, Ehud J; Tse, Zion TH; Reichlin, Tobias R; Michaud, Gregory F; Watkins, Ronald D; Butts-Pauly, Kim; Kwong, Raymond Y; Stevenson, William; Schweitzer, Jeffrey; Byrd, Israel; Dumoulin, Charles L

    2013-01-01

    Purpose Voltage-based device-tracking (VDT) systems are commonly used for tracking invasive devices in electrophysiological (EP) cardiac-arrhythmia therapy. During EP procedures, electro-anatomic-mapping (EAM) workstations provide guidance by integrating VDT location and intra-cardiac-ECG information with X-ray, CT, Ultrasound, and MR images. MR assists navigation, mapping and radio-frequency-ablation. Multi-modality interventions require multiple patient transfers between an MRI and the X-ray/ultrasound EP suite, increasing the likelihood of patient-motion and image mis-registration. An MRI-compatible VDT system may increase efficiency, since there is currently no single method to track devices both inside and outside the MRI scanner. Methods An MRI-compatible VDT system was constructed by modifying a commercial system. Hardware was added to reduce MRI gradient-ramp and radio-frequency-unblanking-pulse interference. VDT patches and cables were modified to reduce heating. Five swine cardiac VDT EAM-mapping interventions were performed, navigating inside and thereafter outside the MRI. Results Three-catheter VDT interventions were performed at >12 frames-per-second both inside and outside the MRI scanner with <3mm error. Catheters were followed on VDT- and MRI-derived maps. Simultaneous VDT and imaging was possible in repetition-time (TR) >32 msec sequences with <0.5mm errors, and <5% MRI SNR loss. At shorter TRs, only intra-cardiac-ECG was reliable. RF Heating was <1.5C°. Conclusion An MRI-compatible VDT system is feasible. PMID:23580479

  6. Diagnosis of temporomandibular dysfunction syndrome--image quality at 1.5 and 3.0 Tesla magnetic resonance imaging.

    PubMed

    Schmid-Schwap, Martina; Drahanowsky, Wolfgang; Bristela, Margit; Kundi, Michael; Piehslinger, Eva; Robinson, Soraya

    2009-05-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the differences in expert ratings of quality of magnetic resonance images (MRI) of the temporomandibular joint in 24 patients with suspected anterior disc displacement examined in randomized order at 1.5 and 3.0 T. Parasagittal (closed and opened mouth) and paracoronal sections were performed with a surface coil. Two experienced examiners blinded to patient status and type of MRI diagnosed the images according to position of condyle, position and changes in the signal, and disc shape. In addition, perceptibility of position and disc shape were assessed. A highly significant difference in the perceptibility of disc shape (P < 0.001) and position (P < 0.001) was obtained. With comparable examination sequences and identical resolution, the 3.0 T MRI of the temporomandibular joint increases the perceptibility of joint structures.

  7. Proton echo-planar spectroscopic imaging of J-coupled resonances in human brain at 3 and 4 Tesla.

    PubMed

    Posse, Stefan; Otazo, Ricardo; Caprihan, Arvind; Bustillo, Juan; Chen, Hongji; Henry, Pierre-Gilles; Marjanska, Malgorzata; Gasparovic, Charles; Zuo, Chun; Magnotta, Vincent; Mueller, Bryon; Mullins, Paul; Renshaw, Perry; Ugurbil, Kamil; Lim, Kelvin O; Alger, Jeffry R

    2007-08-01

    In this multicenter study, 2D spatial mapping of J-coupled resonances at 3T and 4T was performed using short-TE (15 ms) proton echo-planar spectroscopic imaging (PEPSI). Water-suppressed (WS) data were acquired in 8.5 min with 1-cm(3) spatial resolution from a supraventricular axial slice. Optimized outer volume suppression (OVS) enabled mapping in close proximity to peripheral scalp regions. Constrained spectral fitting in reference to a non-WS (NWS) scan was performed with LCModel using correction for relaxation attenuation and partial-volume effects. The concentrations of total choline (tCho), creatine + phosphocreatine (Cr+PCr), glutamate (Glu), glutamate + glutamine (Glu+Gln), myo-inositol (Ins), NAA, NAA+NAAG, and two macromolecular resonances at 0.9 and 2.0 ppm were mapped with mean Cramer-Rao lower bounds (CRLBs) between 6% and 18% and approximately 150-cm(3) sensitive volumes. Aspartate, GABA, glutamine (Gln), glutathione (GSH), phosphoethanolamine (PE), and macromolecules (MMs) at 1.2 ppm were also mapped, although with larger mean CRLBs between 30% and 44%. The CRLBs at 4T were 19% lower on average as compared to 3T, consistent with a higher signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) and increased spectral resolution. Metabolite concentrations were in the ranges reported in previous studies. Glu concentration was significantly higher in gray matter (GM) compared to white matter (WM), as anticipated. The short acquisition time makes this methodology suitable for clinical studies.

  8. A Large Volume Double Channel 1H-X RF Probe for Hyperpolarized Magnetic Resonance at 0.0475 Tesla

    PubMed Central

    Coffey, Aaron M.; Shchepin, Roman V.; Wilkens, Ken; Waddell, Kevin W.; Chekmenev, Eduard Y.

    2012-01-01

    In this work we describe a large volume 340 mL 1H-X magnetic resonance (MR) probe for studies of hyperpolarized compounds at 0.0475 T. 1H/13C and 1H/15N probe configurations are demonstrated with the potential for extension to 1H/129Xe. The primary applications of this probe are preparation and quality assurance of 13C and 15N hyperpolarized contrast agents using PASADENA (parahydrogen and synthesis allow dramatically enhanced nuclear alignment) and other parahydrogen-based methods of hyperpolarization. The probe is efficient and permits 62 μs 13C excitation pulses at 5.3 Watts, making it suitable for portable operation. The sensitivity and detection limits of this probe, tuned to 13C, are compared with a commercial radio frequency (RF) coil operating at 4.7 T. We demonstrate that low field MR of hyperpolarized contrast agents could be as sensitive as conventional high field detection and outline potential improvements and optimization of the probe design for preclinical in vivo MRI. PASADENA application of this low-power probe is exemplified with 13C hyperpolarized 2-hydroxyethyl propionate-1-13C,2,3,3-d3. PMID:22706029

  9. Three-dimensional T2-weighted MRI of the Human Femoral Arterial Vessel Wall at 3.0Tesla

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Zhuoli; Fan, Zhaoyang; Carroll, Timothy J.; Chung, YiuCho; Weale, Peter; Jerecic, Renate; Li, Debiao

    2010-01-01

    OBJECTIVES To evaluate the potential use of a novel 3D turbo spin-echo (TSE) T2-weighted (T2w) technique for assessing the vessel wall in the superficial femoral artery at 3.0T. BACKGROUND Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) can be used for the noninvasive assessment of atherosclerotic plaque burden in the peripheral circulation. While black-blood 2D TSE techniques have been used for femoral arterial wall imaging, these techniques require prolonged imaging time to cover a large field of view required to cover the leg. Recently, variable-flip-angle 3D TSE T2w (SPACE) has been introduced as a fast vessel wall imaging technique with submillimeter spatial resolution. A systematic investigation of the application of this technique to femoral arterial wall imaging has yet to be performed. METHODS Fifteen healthy volunteers and 3 patients with peripheral arterial disease (PAD) underwent 3D SPACE imaging of the superficial femoral artery at 3.0T, with the conventional 2D TSE T2w imaging as a reference. Muscle-lumen contrast to noise ratio (CNR) and wall/lumen volumes (WV, LV) were measured at the matched locations on the 3D and 2D image sets. Statistical comparison on a per-subject basis was conducted to determine the difference and agreement between 3D SPACE and the 2D TSE techniques. RESULTS The 3D SPACE data sets enabled vessel visualization from arbitrary orientation through multi-planar reformation (MPR) technique. Muscle-lumen CNR was significantly higher with 3D SPACE than with the 2D TSE (3.12 ± 0.84 vs. 2.17 ± 0.34, p < 0.01). This trend was confirmed when CNR efficiency (CNReff) values were further compared. A similar trend was observed in PAD patients (SPACE vs. 2D TSE T2w: CNR 2.35 ± 0.13 vs. 1.77 ± 0.25; CNReff 15.35 ± 0.61 vs. 3.59 ± 2.62. all p < 0.05). Measurements of WV and LV from the 3D and 2D techniques were highly correlated in volunteers and PAD patients (volunteers, WV: linear regression r2 = 0.98, LV: r2 = 0.98, p < 0.001 for both; patients, WV: linear regression r2 = 0.96, LV: r2 = 0.94, p < 0.001 for both). CONCLUSION We established the feasibily of using the 3D SPACE technique for vessel wall imaging in the superficial femoral artery at 3.0T. High-, isotropic-resolution SPACE images, with the aid of MPR, enable superior vessel wall visualization. Superior blood signal suppression comparable vessel wall vessel wall morphological measurements, and superior time efficiency relative to conventional 2D TSE imaging suggest the great potential of the SPACE method as a non-invasive imaging technique for the assessment of atherosclerotic plaque burden in PAD patients. PMID:19692844

  10. Feasibility of single breath-hold left ventricular function with 3 Tesla TSENSE acquisition and 3D modeling analysis

    PubMed Central

    Young, Alistair A; Cowan, Brett R; Schoenberg, Stefan O; Wintersperger, Bernd J

    2008-01-01

    Background A single breath-hold evaluation of ventricular function would allow assessment in cases where scan time or patient tolerance is limited. Spatiotemporal acceleration techniques such as TSENSE decrease cardiovascular MR acquisition time, but standard slice summation analysis requires enough short axis slices to cover the left ventricle (LV). By reducing the number of short axis slices, incorporating long axis slices, and applying a 3D model based analysis, it may be possible to obtain accurate LV mass and volumes. We evaluated LV volume, mass and ejection fraction at 3.0T using a 3D modeling analysis in 9 patients with a history of myocardial infarction and one healthy volunteer. Acquisition consisted of a standard short axis SSFP stack and a 15 heart-beat single breath-hold six slice multi-planar (4 short and 2 long axis) TSENSE SSFP protocol with an acceleration factor of R = 4. Results Differences (standard minus accelerated protocol mean ± s.d.) and coefficients of variation (s.d. of differences as a percentage of the average estimate) were 7.5 ± 9.6 mL and 6% for end-diastolic volume (p = 0.035), 0.4 ± 5.1 mL and 7% for end-systolic volume (p = NS), 7.1 ± 8.1 mL and 9% for stroke volume (p = 0.022), 2.2 ± 2.8% and 5% for ejection fraction (p = 0.035), and -7.1 ± 6.2 g and 4% for LV mass (p = 0.005), respectively. Intra- and inter-observer errors were similar for both protocols (p = NS for all measures). Conclusion These results suggest that clinically useful estimates of LV function can be obtained in a TSENSE accelerated single breath-hold reduced slice acquisition at 3T using 3D modeling analysis techniques. PMID:18495040

  11. Phosphorus-31 metabolism of human breast--an in vivo magnetic resonance spectroscopic study at 1.5 Tesla.

    PubMed

    Twelves, C J; Lowry, M; Porter, D A; Dobbs, N A; Graves, P E; Smith, M A; Richards, M A

    1994-01-01

    We have studied the metabolism of compounds containing 31P in normal breast using magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS). Spectra were acquired from non-lactating pre-menopausal breast (n = 14 women), lactating breast (n = 8) and post-menopausal breast (n = 8). The standard acquisition protocol used a 5.5 cm surface coil with the volunteer prone to minimize chest wall signal contamination. In pre-menopausal non-lactating women the phosphocreatine (PCr) peak area, expressed relative to the sum of all 31P peak areas, was negatively correlated with breast size (r = -0.56, p = 0.02) suggesting that much of the PCr signal originated from the chest wall. The phosphodiester (PDE) relative peak area was positively correlated with breast size (r = 0.71; p = 0.002). Spectra could be acquired at all phases of the menstrual cycle. In sequential examinations of five women not taking the oral contraceptive pill (OCP), phosphomonoester (PME) relative peak area was significantly lower on Week 2 than other weeks of the cycle (p = 0.03). Among pre-menopausal women no clear difference was apparent between the spectra from women taking the OCP and those not taking the OCP. Lactating breast had significantly higher PME relative peak area than non-lactating pre-menopausal breast (p = 0.02), probably reflecting the higher proportion of epithelial tissue in lactation; the lower PCr relative peak area in lactating breast (p = 0.05) is probably due to the greater size of the breast during lactation. Spectra were acquired from post-menopausal women but with a relatively low signal-to-noise ratio. The only significant difference between 31P relative peak areas of breast spectra acquired from pre- and post-menopausal women was that less PCr was detected in the post-menopausal volunteers (p = 0.03), probably as a result of differences in breast size.

  12. Diffusion Tensor Imaging of the Uterine Zones Related to the Menstrual Cycle and Menopausal Status at 3 Tesla MRI

    PubMed Central

    Kılıçkesmez, Özgür; Fırat, Zeynep; Oygen, Ayşegül; Bozkurt, Duygu Kara; Güzelbey, Tevfik; Gürses, Bengi; Taşdelen, Neslihan

    2016-01-01

    Background Diffusion and diffusion tensor imaging techniques (DTI) are widely available and used both in central nervous system and body imaging, including gynecological diseases. Aims The aims of this study were to assess the capability of DTI of uterine zones in relation to the menstrual cycle and ascertain the normal apparent diffusion coefficient and fractional anisotropy values at 3T magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Study Design Prospective clinical study. Methods A total of 13 young reproductive and 12 postmenopausal healthy volunteers were included in the study. MRI examination included sagittal T2-weighted and single-shot echo planar imaging DTI obtained under free breathing. Fractional anisotropy (FA) values of the endometrium, junctional zone, and myometrium were determined. Results The median (minimum-maximum) FA of the endometrium, myometrium, and junctional zone of the reproductive group were 0.31 (0.260–0.465), 0.42 (0.302–0.664), and 0.58 (0.420–0.745), respectively, in the proliferative phase and 0.26 (0.180–0.413), 0.48 (0.357–0.656), and 0.59 (0.490–0.675)], respectively, in the secretory phase. In the postmenopausal group, the FA values of the endometrium, myometrium, and junctional zone were 0.275 (0.136–0.425), 0.255 (0.191–0.553), and 0.27 (0.129–0.397), respectively. Apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) values of the endometrium, myometrium, and junctional zone of the reproductive group were 1.25±0.254 (0.970–1.463), 1.67 (1.213–1.854), and 1.23 (0.853–1.301), respectively, in the proliferative phase and 1.32±0.283 (1.165–1.706), 1.55 (1.360–1.791), and 1.17 (1.163–1.705), respectively, in the secretory phase. In the postmenopausal group, the ADC values of the endometrium, myometrium, and junctional zone were measured as 1.100±0.192 (0.850–1.302), 1.14 (0.864–1.283), and 1.09 (0.912–1.291). The FA values of the endometrium and myometrium were lower in the secretory phase of the reproductive group, while ADC values were higher. However, both the FA and ADC values were lower in the postmenopausal group. Conclusion The present study showed that uterine DTI is feasible when used quantitatively. While FA values tend to decrease, ADC values increase significantly in all zones in the secretory phase except the junctional zone. Zonal FA and ADC values of postmenopausal women are lower in comparison to those in young women. PMID:27994912

  13. A 4-channel 3 Tesla phased array receive coil for awake rhesus monkey fMRI and diffusion MRI experiments.

    PubMed

    Khachaturian, Mark Haig

    2010-01-01

    Awake monkey fMRI and diffusion MRI combined with conventional neuroscience techniques has the potential to study the structural and functional neural network. The majority of monkey fMRI and diffusion MRI experiments are performed with single coils which suffer from severe EPI distortions which limit resolution. By constructing phased array coils for monkey MRI studies, gains in SNR and anatomical accuracy (i.e., reduction of EPI distortions) can be achieved using parallel imaging. The major challenges associated with constructing phased array coils for monkeys are the variation in head size and space constraints. Here, we apply phased array technology to a 4-channel phased array coil capable of improving the resolution and image quality of full brain awake monkey fMRI and diffusion MRI experiments. The phased array coil is that can adapt to different rhesus monkey head sizes (ages 4-8) and fits in the limited space provided by monkey stereotactic equipment and provides SNR gains in primary visual cortex and anatomical accuracy in conjunction with parallel imaging and improves resolution in fMRI experiments by a factor of 2 (1.25 mm to 1.0 mm isotropic) and diffusion MRI experiments by a factor of 4 (1.5 mm to 0.9 mm isotropic).

  14. Investigation of the Saturation Pulse Artifact in Non-Enhanced MR Angiography of the Lower Extremity Arteries at 7 Tesla

    PubMed Central

    Johst, Sören; Maderwald, Stefan; Fischer, Anja; Quick, Harald H.; Ladd, Mark E.; Orzada, Stephan

    2015-01-01

    When performing non-enhanced time-of-flight MR angiography of the lower extremity arteries at 7 T with cardiac triggering, the acquisition time is a crucial consideration. Therefore, in previous studies, saturation RF pulses were applied only every second TR. In the axial source images a slight artifact with an appearance similar to aliasing could be observed. The purpose of this study was to investigate the origin of this artifact. The reason for the artifact is supposed to be related to the two effective TRs during acquisition caused by the sparsely applied saturation RF pulse. Several sequence variants were simulated and implemented within the sequence source code to examine this hypothesis. An adaptation of the excitation flip angles for each TR as well as a correction factor for the k-space data was calculated. Additionally, a different ordering of the k-space data during acquisition was implemented as well as the combination of the latter with the k-space correction factor. The observations from the simulations were verified using both a static and a flow phantom and, finally, in a healthy volunteer using the same measurement setup as in previous volunteer and patient studies. Of all implemented techniques, only the reordering of the k-space was capable of suppressing the artifact almost completely at the cost of creating a ringing artifact. The phantom measurements showed the same results as the simulations and could thus confirm the hypothesis regarding the origin of the artifact. This was additionally verified in the healthy volunteer. The origin of the artifact could be confirmed to be the periodic signal variation caused by two effective TRs during acquisition. PMID:25785837

  15. Acoustic cardiac triggering: a practical solution for synchronization and gating of cardiovascular magnetic resonance at 7 Tesla

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background To demonstrate the applicability of acoustic cardiac triggering (ACT) for imaging of the heart at ultrahigh magnetic fields (7.0 T) by comparing phonocardiogram, conventional vector electrocardiogram (ECG) and traditional pulse oximetry (POX) triggered 2D CINE acquisitions together with (i) a qualitative image quality analysis, (ii) an assessment of the left ventricular function parameter and (iii) an examination of trigger reliability and trigger detection variance derived from the signal waveforms. Results ECG was susceptible to severe distortions at 7.0 T. POX and ACT provided waveforms free of interferences from electromagnetic fields or from magneto-hydrodynamic effects. Frequent R-wave mis-registration occurred in ECG-triggered acquisitions with a failure rate of up to 30% resulting in cardiac motion induced artifacts. ACT and POX triggering produced images free of cardiac motion artefacts. ECG showed a severe jitter in the R-wave detection. POX also showed a trigger jitter of approximately Δt = 72 ms which is equivalent to two cardiac phases. ACT showed a jitter of approximately Δt = 5 ms only. ECG waveforms revealed a standard deviation for the cardiac trigger offset larger than that observed for ACT or POX waveforms. Image quality assessment showed that ACT substantially improved image quality as compared to ECG (image quality score at end-diastole: ECG = 1.7 ± 0.5, ACT = 2.4 ± 0.5, p = 0.04) while the comparison between ECG vs. POX gated acquisitions showed no significant differences in image quality (image quality score: ECG = 1.7 ± 0.5, POX = 2.0 ± 0.5, p = 0.34). Conclusions The applicability of acoustic triggering for cardiac CINE imaging at 7.0 T was demonstrated. ACT's trigger reliability and fidelity are superior to that of ECG and POX. ACT promises to be beneficial for cardiovascular magnetic resonance at ultra-high field strengths including 7.0 T. PMID:21080933

  16. Investigation of Parallel Radiofrequency Transmission for the Reduction of Heating in Long Conductive Leads in 3 Tesla Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    PubMed Central

    McElcheran, Clare E.; Yang, Benson; Anderson, Kevan J. T.; Golenstani-Rad, Laleh; Graham, Simon J.

    2015-01-01

    Deep Brain Stimulation (DBS) is increasingly used to treat a variety of brain diseases by sending electrical impulses to deep brain nuclei through long, electrically conductive leads. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of patients pre- and post-implantation is desirable to target and position the implant, to evaluate possible side-effects and to examine DBS patients who have other health conditions. Although MRI is the preferred modality for pre-operative planning, MRI post-implantation is limited due to the risk of high local power deposition, and therefore tissue heating, at the tip of the lead. The localized power deposition arises from currents induced in the leads caused by coupling with the radiofrequency (RF) transmission field during imaging. In the present work, parallel RF transmission (pTx) is used to tailor the RF electric field to suppress coupling effects. Electromagnetic simulations were performed for three pTx coil configurations with 2, 4, and 8-elements, respectively. Optimal input voltages to minimize coupling, while maintaining RF magnetic field homogeneity, were determined for all configurations using a Nelder-Mead optimization algorithm. Resulting electric and magnetic fields were compared to that of a 16-rung birdcage coil. Experimental validation was performed with a custom-built 4-element pTx coil. In simulation, 95-99% reduction of the electric field at the tip of the lead was observed between the various pTx coil configurations and the birdcage coil. Maximal reduction in E-field was obtained with the 8-element pTx coil. Magnetic field homogeneity was comparable to the birdcage coil for the 4- and 8-element pTx configurations. In experiment, a temperature increase of 2±0.15°C was observed at the tip of the wire using the birdcage coil, whereas negligible increase (0.2±0.15°C) was observed with the optimized pTx system. Although further research is required, these initial results suggest that the concept of optimizing pTx to reduce DBS heating effects holds considerable promise. PMID:26237218

  17. Radio frequency magnetic field mapping of a 3 Tesla birdcage coil: experimental and theoretical dependence on sample properties.

    PubMed

    Alecci, M; Collins, C M; Smith, M B; Jezzard, P

    2001-08-01

    The RF B(1) distribution was studied, theoretically and experimentally, in phantoms and in the head of volunteers using a 3 T MRI system equipped with a birdcage coil. Agreement between numerical simulation and experiment demonstrates that B(1) distortion at high field can be explained with 3D full-Maxwell calculations. It was found that the B(1) distribution in the transverse plane is strongly dependent on the dielectric properties of the sample. We show that this is a consequence of RF penetration effects combined with RF standing wave effects. In contrast, along the birdcage coil z-axis the B(1) distribution is determined mainly by the coil geometry. In the transverse plane, the region of B(1) uniformity (within 10% of the maximum) was 15 cm with oil, 6 cm with distilled water, 11 cm with saline, and 10 cm in the head. Along z the B(1) uniformity was 9 cm with phantoms and 7 cm in the head.

  18. Cognitive effects of head-movements in stray fields generated by a 7 Tesla whole-body MRI magnet.

    PubMed

    de Vocht, F; Stevens, T; Glover, P; Sunderland, A; Gowland, P; Kromhout, H

    2007-05-01

    The study investigates the impact of exposure to the stray magnetic field of a whole-body 7 T MRI scanner on neurobehavioral performance and cognition. Twenty seven volunteers completed four sessions, which exposed them to approximately 1600 mT (twice), 800 mT and negligible static field exposure. The order of exposure was assigned at random and was masked by placing volunteers in a tent to hide their position relative to the magnet bore. Volunteers completed a test battery assessing auditory working memory, eye-hand co-ordination, and visual perception. During three sessions the volunteers were instructed to complete a series of standardized head movements to generate additional time-varying fields ( approximately 300 and approximately 150 mT.s(-1) r.m.s.). In one session, volunteers were instructed to keep their heads as stable as possible. Performance on a visual tracking task was negatively influenced (P<.01) by 1.3% per 100 mT exposure. Furthermore, there was a trend for performance on two cognitive-motor tests to be decreased (P<.10). No effects were observed on working memory. Taken together with results of earlier studies, these results suggest that there are effects on visual perception and hand-eye co-ordination, but these are weak and variable between studies. The magnitude of these effects may depend on the magnitude of time-varying fields and not so much on the static field. While this study did not include exposure above 1.6 T, it suggests that use of strong magnetic fields is not a significant confounder in fMRI studies of cognitive function. Future work should further assess whether ultra-high field may impair performance of employees working in the vicinity of these magnets.

  19. Prefrontal glutamate levels differentiate early phase schizophrenia and methamphetamine addiction: a (1)H MRS study at 3Tesla.

    PubMed

    Crocker, Candice E; Bernier, Denise C; Hanstock, Christopher C; Lakusta, Bonnie; Purdon, Scot E; Seres, Peter; Tibbo, Philip G

    2014-08-01

    Acute symptoms of methamphetamine-induced psychosis are similar to those of primary schizophrenia. Understanding similarities or differences in the biological substrate of these psychoses could lead to early differentiation of these two clinical conditions resulting in more efficient treatment strategies. Proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy was acquired from the medial prefrontal cortex in 29 unmedicated patients with first episode of psychosis (FEP), 29 abstinent methamphetamine-addicted people (METH) and 45 healthy controls (HCs) (age range 17.3 to 29.9years old). The METH group displayed robust reductions in concentration levels of glutamate (Glu) relative to FEP (Cohen's d=1.20) and HC (d=0.87). The METH group also displayed reduced levels of N-acetylaspartate (NAA) relative to FEP (d=0.53) and HC (d=0.76). The HC group displayed a positive association between levels of Glu and NAA, r(45)=0.52, p<0.001, while the two clinical groups failed to show this normal association. This suggests that the cellular metabolism is altered in both conditions. These data support the assumption that cellular abnormalities differ between primary schizophrenia and methamphetamine addiction despite the overlap in clinical presentation.

  20. Accuracy and stability of measuring GABA, glutamate, and glutamine by proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy: A phantom study at 4 Tesla

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Henry, Michael E.; Lauriat, Tara L.; Shanahan, Meghan; Renshaw, Perry F.; Jensen, J. Eric

    2011-02-01

    Proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy has the potential to provide valuable information about alterations in gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA), glutamate (Glu), and glutamine (Gln) in psychiatric and neurological disorders. In order to use this technique effectively, it is important to establish the accuracy and reproducibility of the methodology. In this study, phantoms with known metabolite concentrations were used to compare the accuracy of 2D J-resolved MRS, single-echo 30 ms PRESS, and GABA-edited MEGA-PRESS for measuring all three aforementioned neurochemicals simultaneously. The phantoms included metabolite concentrations above and below the physiological range and scans were performed at baseline, 1 week, and 1 month time-points. For GABA measurement, MEGA-PRESS proved optimal with a measured-to-target correlation of R2 = 0.999, with J-resolved providing R2 = 0.973 for GABA. All three methods proved effective in measuring Glu with R2 = 0.987 (30 ms PRESS), R2 = 0.996 (J-resolved) and R2 = 0.910 (MEGA-PRESS). J-resolved and MEGA-PRESS yielded good results for Gln measures with respective R2 = 0.855 (J-resolved) and R2 = 0.815 (MEGA-PRESS). The 30 ms PRESS method proved ineffective in measuring GABA and Gln. When measurement stability at in vivo concentration was assessed as a function of varying spectral quality, J-resolved proved the most stable and immune to signal-to-noise and linewidth fluctuation compared to MEGA-PRESS and 30 ms PRESS.

  1. A high resolution 7-Tesla resting-state fMRI test-retest dataset with cognitive and physiological measures.

    PubMed

    Gorgolewski, Krzysztof J; Mendes, Natacha; Wilfling, Domenica; Wladimirow, Elisabeth; Gauthier, Claudine J; Bonnen, Tyler; Ruby, Florence J M; Trampel, Robert; Bazin, Pierre-Louis; Cozatl, Roberto; Smallwood, Jonathan; Margulies, Daniel S

    2015-01-01

    Here we present a test-retest dataset of functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) data acquired at rest. 22 participants were scanned during two sessions spaced one week apart. Each session includes two 1.5 mm isotropic whole-brain scans and one 0.75 mm isotropic scan of the prefrontal cortex, giving a total of six time-points. Additionally, the dataset includes measures of mood, sustained attention, blood pressure, respiration, pulse, and the content of self-generated thoughts (mind wandering). This data enables the investigation of sources of both intra- and inter-session variability not only limited to physiological changes, but also including alterations in cognitive and affective states, at high spatial resolution. The dataset is accompanied by a detailed experimental protocol and source code of all stimuli used.

  2. Exciton diamagnetic shifts and valley Zeeman effects in monolayer WS2 and MoS2 to 65 Tesla

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stier, Andreas V.; McCreary, Kathleen M.; Jonker, Berend T.; Kono, Junichiro; Crooker, Scott A.

    2016-02-01

    In bulk and quantum-confined semiconductors, magneto-optical studies have historically played an essential role in determining the fundamental parameters of excitons (size, binding energy, spin, dimensionality and so on). Here we report low-temperature polarized reflection spectroscopy of atomically thin WS2 and MoS2 in high magnetic fields to 65 T. Both the A and B excitons exhibit similar Zeeman splittings of approximately -230 μeV T-1 (g-factor ~=-4), thereby quantifying the valley Zeeman effect in monolayer transition-metal disulphides. Crucially, these large fields also allow observation of the small quadratic diamagnetic shifts of both A and B excitons in monolayer WS2, from which radii of ~1.53 and ~1.16 nm are calculated. Further, when analysed within a model of non-local dielectric screening, these diamagnetic shifts also constrain estimates of the A and B exciton binding energies (410 and 470 meV, respectively, using a reduced A exciton mass of 0.16 times the free electron mass). These results highlight the utility of high magnetic fields for understanding new two-dimensional materials.

  3. [Imaging anatomy of the cranial nerves using 3.0 Tesla MRI: a practical review for clinicians].

    PubMed

    Chávez-Barba, Oscar; Martínez-Martínez, Lidieth; Cazares-Arellano, José Luis; Martínez-López, Manuel; Roldan-Valadez, Ernesto

    2011-01-01

    Magnetic resonance (MR) imaging is the method of choice to evaluate the cranial nerves (CN). These nerves constitute a group of structures that have acquired during their phylogenetic development a high degree of specialization. There are 12 pairs of CN to which we use their specific name or number. The olfactory (I) and optic (II) pairs are not real nerves but tracts from the encephalon. The spinal nerve (XI) derives from superior cervical segment of the spine. The other 9 pairs of CN are related with the brain stem. Although the skull base foramina can be seen on computed tomography, the nerves themselves can only be visualized in detail on MR. That means, in order to see the different segments of nerves I to XII, the right sequences must be used. It is important to provide detailed clinical information to the radiologist so that a tailored MR study can be performed. In this review, the basic imaging anatomy of the 12 CN is discussed and illustrated briefly with an emphasis on more advanced extra-axial anatomy, illustrated with high-resolution MR images. Clinicians looking for complete anatomic descriptions and/or MR illustrations are advised to consult specialized textbooks considering it is not possible to describe all of the anatomy in one article. This manuscript is intended to be a practical review for clinicians.

  4. Microvascular obstruction assessed by 3-tesla magnetic resonance imaging in acute myocardial infarction is correlated with plasma troponin I levels

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Microvascular obstruction (MVO) at the acute phase of myocardial infarction (MI) is associated with poor prognosis. We aimed to evaluate the correlation between plasma cardiac troponin I (cTnI) at the acute phase of MI and extent of no-reflow, as assessed by 3-T cardiac magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Secondly, we defined a cut-off value for cTnI predictive of no-reflow. Methods 51 consecutive patients with no previous history of cardiovascular disease, presenting ST elevation MI within <12 h. Infarct size and extent of no-reflow were evaluated by 3-T MRI at day 5. Extent of no-reflow at 15 minutes (MVO) was correlated with cTnI at admission, 6, 12, 24, 48 and 72 hours. At 6 months, MRI was performed to evaluate the impact of MVO on LV remodeling. Results MVO was diagnosed in 29 patients (57%). Extent of MVO was significantly correlated to peak troponin, cTnI (except admission values) and area under the curve. Using Receiver-operating characteristic (ROC) curve analysis, a cut-off cTnI value >89 ng/mL at 12 h seemed to best predict presence of early MVO (sensitivity 63%, specificity 88%). At 6 months, MVO was associated with left ventricular (LV) remodeling, resulting in higher LV volumes. Conclusion There is a relationship between cTnI at the acute phase of AMI and extent of MVO as assessed by 3-T cardiac MRI. A cut-off cTnI value of 89 ng/mL at 12 h seems to best predict presence of MVO, which contributes to LV remodeling. PMID:24886208

  5. Metastability exchange optical pumping of 3He gas up to hundreds of millibars at 4.7 Tesla

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nikiel-Osuchowska, Anna; Collier, Guilhem; Głowacz, Bartosz; Pałasz, Tadeusz; Olejniczak, Zbigniew; Wȩglarz, Władysław P.; Tastevin, Geneviève; Nacher, Pierre-Jean; Dohnalik, Tomasz

    2013-09-01

    Metastability exchange optical pumping (MEOP) is experimentally investigated in 3He at 4.7 T, at room temperature and for gas pressures ranging from 1 to 267 mbar. The 23S-23P transition at 1083 nm is used for optical pumping and for detection of the laser-induced orientation of 3He atoms in the rf discharge plasma. The collisional broadening rate is measured (12.0 ± 0.4 MHz mbar-1 FHWM) and taken into account for accurate absorption-based measurements of both nuclear polarization in the ground state and atom number density in the metastable 23S state. The results lay the ground for a comprehensive assessment of the efficiency of MEOP, by comparison with achievements at lower field (1 mT-2 T) over an extended range of operating conditions. Stronger hyperfine decoupling in the optically pumped 23S state is observed to systematically lead to slower build-up of 3He orientation in the ground state, as expected. The nuclear polarizations obtained at 4.7 T still decrease at high pressure but in a less dramatic way than observed at 2 T in the same sealed glass cells. To date, thanks to the linear increase in gas density, they correspond to the highest nuclear magnetizations achieved by MEOP in pure 3He gas. The improved efficiency puts less demanding requirements for compression stages in polarized gas production systems and makes high-field MEOP particularly attractive for magnetic resonance imaging of the lungs, for instance.

  6. Using fMRI to guide neurosurgery in a combined 1.5Tesla MR operating room

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Haiying; Hall, Walter A.; Martin, Alastair J.; Maxwell, Robert E.; Truwit, Charles L.

    2001-05-01

    To take advantage of MR-guided surgical procedures performed in a combined MR-OR, we have implemented and validated a practical fMRI scheme for localizing primary motor area and assessing its proximity to a lesion volume. The fMRI scheme consists of a dynamical blood oxygenation level dependent (BOLD) imaging technique and a motor task paradigm. The functional imaging was based on gradient-echo (GE) echo planar imaging (EPI) (TR/TE equals 3000/50 m sec). The task paradigm involves a periodic finger movement in which subject was instructed to tap his/her thumb on the other four fingers sequentially as well as to alternate between the right and left sides. During the task, a dynamical fMRI was performed concurrently covering the volume of interest. By using the fMRI scheme, we have successfully performed ten fMRI examinations immediately prior to surgery in the combined MR- OR on the same surgical table top to localize the eloquent functional area of interests. Also we have developed methods of detrending and presenting fMRI results to neurosurgeons in an intuitive 3-dimensional surface-rendered display format that closely matches the patient head position under intervention. Representative cases showed that fMRI results helped neurosurgeons making the optimal surgical decisions prior to craniotomy.

  7. 27 CFR 200.55 - Content.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    1999-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 2 1999-04-01 1999-04-01 false Content. 200.55 Section 200.55 ALCOHOL, TOBACCO AND OTHER EXCISE TAXES-Continued RULES OF PRACTICE IN PERMIT PROCEEDINGS Hearing Procedure Citations § 200.55 Content. (a) Citation for the suspension, revocation or annulment...

  8. Laser Jamming in the 3 to 5 microns Wavelength Band

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1998-04-01

    A382 25 20 CD E C CO cr 10 • CD • ■ o • - - • ■ ■ 8 • cP • V ■ 0 0 • o • * 9 o 0 * • » • 0 0 • 8 • ■ 0 • 1 1 1...34, TNO-FEL report FEL 96- A225 , November 1996 (Confidential). [6] Heuvel, J.C. van den. "Eye-safe lasers with high power", TNO-FEL report FEL 95-A137

  9. Dynamic Contrast-Enhanced MRI Parameters as Biomarkers in Assessing Head and Neck Lesions After Chemoradiotherapy Using a Wide-Bore 3 Tesla Scanner.

    PubMed

    Lerant, Gergely; Sarkozy, Peter; Takacsi-Nagy, Zoltan; Polony, Gabor; Tamas, Laszlo; Toth, Erika; Boer, Andras; Javor, Laszlo; Godeny, Maria

    2015-09-01

    Pilot studies have shown promising results in characterizing head and neck tumors (HNT) using dynamic contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (DCE-MRI), differentiating between malignant and benign lesions and evaluating changes in response to chemoradiotherapy (CRT). Our aim was to find DCE-MRI parameters, biomarkers in evaluating the post-CRT status. Two hundred and five patients with head and neck lesions were examined with DCE-MRI sequences. The time intensity curves (TIC) were extracted and processed to acquire time-to-peak (TTP), relative maximum enhancement (RME), relative wash-out (RWO), and two new parameters attack and decay. These parameters were analyzed using univariate tests in SPSS (Statistical Package for the Social Sciences, version 17, SPSS Inc. Chicago, USA) to identify parameters that could be used to infer tumor malignancy and post-CRT changes. Multiple parameters of curve characteristics were significantly different between malignant tumors after CRT (MACRT) and changes caused by CRT. The best-performing biomarkers were the attack and the decay. We also found multiple significant (p < 0.05) parameters for both the benign and malignant status as well as pre- and post-CRT status. Our large cohort of data supports the increasing role of DCE-MRI in HNT differentiation, particularly for the assessment of post-CRT status along with accurate morphological imaging.

  10. Abnormalities of Cerebral Deep Medullary Veins on 7 Tesla MRI in Amnestic Mild Cognitive Impairment and Early Alzheimer's Disease: A Pilot Study.

    PubMed

    Bouvy, Willem H; Kuijf, Hugo J; Zwanenburg, Jaco J M; Koek, Huiberdina L; Kappelle, L Jaap; Luijten, Peter R; Ikram, M Kamran; Biessels, Geert Jan

    2017-03-06

    Cerebral small vessel disease (SVD) contributes to cognitive impairment and dementia. SVD may affect veins, but veins are difficult to detect with 1.5 and 3T MRI. We compared deep medullary veins (DMVs) visualized on 7T-MRI between patients with early Alzheimer's sisease (eAD; n = 17) or amnestic MCI (aMCI; n = 12) and controls (n = 40). The number and density of DMVs was similar in patients and controls, but tortuosity was higher in eAD (Cohen's d = 0.7, 95% CI: 0.1-1.2, p = 0.02) and aMCI (Cohen's d = 0.8, 95% CI: 0.2-1.5, p = 0.01), independent of brain atrophy. Venous changes provide a new perspective on vascular involvement in dementia.

  11. Diffusion-Weighted Imaging in 3.0 Tesla Breast MRI: Diagnostic Performance and Tumor Characterization Using Small Subregions vs. Whole Tumor Regions of Interest

    PubMed Central

    Arponent, Otso; Sudah, Mazen; Masarwah, Amro; Taina, Mikko; Rautiainen, Suvi; Könönen, Mervi; Sironen, Reijo; Kosma, Veli-Matti; Sutela, Anna; Hakumäki, Juhana; Vanninen, Ritva

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) values are increasingly reported in breast MRI. As there is no standardized method for ADC measurements, we evaluated the effect of the size of region of interest (ROI) to diagnostic utility and correlation to prognostic markers of breast cancer. Methods This prospective study was approved by the Institutional Ethics Board; the need for written informed consent for the retrospective analyses of the breast MRIs was waived by the Chair of the Hospital District. We compared diagnostic accuracy of ADC measurements from whole-lesion ROIs (WL-ROIs) to small subregions (S-ROIs) showing the most restricted diffusion and evaluated correlations with prognostic factors in 112 consecutive patients (mean age 56.2±11.6 years, 137 lesions) who underwent 3.0-T breast MRI. Results Intra- and interobserver reproducibility were substantial (κ = 0.616–0.784; Intra-Class Correlation 0.589–0.831). In receiver operating characteristics analysis, differentiation between malignant and benign lesions was excellent (area under curve 0.957–0.962, cut-off ADC values for WL-ROIs: 0.87×10−3 mm2s-1; S-ROIs: 0.69×10−3 mm2s-1, P<0.001). WL-ROIs/S-ROIs achieved sensitivities of 95.7%/91.3%, specificities of 89.5%/94.7%, and overall accuracies of 89.8%/94.2%. In S-ROIs, lower ADC values correlated with presence of axillary metastases (P = 0.03), high histological grade (P = 0.006), and worsened Nottingham Prognostic Index Score (P<0.05). In both ROIs, ADC values correlated with progesterone receptors and advanced stage (P<0.01), but not with HER2, estrogen receptors, or Ki-67. Conclusions ADC values assist in breast tumor characterization. Small ROIs were more accurate than whole-lesion ROIs and more frequently associated with prognostic factors. Cut-off values differed significantly depending on measurement procedure, which should be recognized when comparing results from the literature. Instead of using a whole lesion covering ROI, a small ROI could be advocated in diffusion-weighted imaging. PMID:26458106

  12. Reproducibility of Kidney Perfusion Measurements With Arterial Spin Labeling at 1.5 Tesla MRI Combined With Semiautomatic Segmentation for Differential Cortical and Medullary Assessment

    PubMed Central

    Hammon, Matthias; Janka, Rolf; Siegl, Christian; Seuss, Hannes; Grosso, Roberto; Martirosian, Petros; Schmieder, Roland E.; Uder, Michael; Kistner, Iris

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Magnetic resonance imaging with arterial spin labeling (ASL) is a noninvasive approach to measure organ perfusion. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the reproducibility of ASL kidney perfusion measurements with semiautomatic segmentation, which allows separate quantification of cortical and medullary perfusion. The right kidneys of 14 healthy volunteers were examined 6 times on 2 occasions (3 times at each occasion). There was a 10-minute pause between each examination and a 14-day interval between the 2 occasions. Cortical, medullary, and whole kidney parenchymal perfusion was determined with customized semiautomatic segmentation software. Coefficient of variances (CVs) and intraclass correlations (ICCs) were calculated. Mean whole, cortical, and medullary kidney perfusion was 307.26 ± 25.65, 337.10 ± 34.83, and 279.61 ± 26.73 mL/min/100 g, respectively. On session 1, mean perfusion for the whole kidney, cortex, and medulla was 307.08 ± 26.91, 336.79 ± 36.54, and 279.60 ± 27.81 mL/min/100 g, respectively, and on session 2, 307.45 ± 24.65, 337.41 ± 33.48, and 279.61 ± 25.94 mL/min/100 g, respectively (P > 0.05; R2 = 0.60/0.59/0.54). For whole, cortical, and medullary kidney perfusion, the total ICC/CV were 0.97/3.43 ± 0.86%, 0.97/4.19 ± 1.33%, and 0.96/4.12 ± 1.36%, respectively. Measurements did not differ significantly and showed a very good correlation (P > 0.05; R2 = 0.75/0.76/0.65). ASL kidney measurements combined with operator-independent semiautomatic segmentation revealed high correlation and low variance of cortical, medullary, and whole kidney perfusion. PMID:26986143

  13. Sodium-23 MRI of whole spine at 3 Tesla using a 5-channel receive-only phased-array and a whole-body transmit resonator.

    PubMed

    Malzacher, Matthias; Kalayciyan, Raffi; Konstandin, Simon; Haneder, Stefan; Schad, Lothar R

    2016-03-01

    Sodium magnetic resonance imaging ((23)Na MRI) is a unique and non-invasive imaging technique which provides important information on cellular level about the tissue of the human body. Several applications for (23)Na MRI were investigated with regard to the examination of the tissue viability and functionality for example in the brain, the heart or the breast. The (23)Na MRI technique can also be integrated as a potential monitoring instrument after radiotherapy or chemotherapy. The main contribution in this work was the adaptation of (23)Na MRI for spine imaging, which can provide essential information on the integrity of the intervertebral disks with respect to the early detection of disk degeneration. In this work, a transmit-only receive-only dual resonator system was designed and developed to cover the whole human spine using (23)Na MRI and increase the receive sensitivity. The resonator system consisted of an already presented (23)Na whole-body resonator and a newly developed 5-channel receive-only phased-array. The resonator system was first validated using bench top and phantom measurements. A threefold SNR improvement at the depth of the spine (∼7cm) over the whole-body resonator was achieved using the spine array. (23)Na MR measurements of the human spine using the transmit-only receive-only resonator system were performed on a healthy volunteer within an acquisition time of 10minutes. A density adapted 3D radial sequence was chosen with 6mm isotropic resolution, 49ms repetition time and a short echo time of 540μs. Furthermore, it was possible to quantify the tissue sodium concentration in the intervertebral discs in the lumbar region (120ms repetition time) using this setup.

  14. Quantitative assessment of cerebral hemodynamic parameters by QUASAR arterial spin labeling in Alzheimer's disease and cognitively normal Elderly adults at 3-tesla.

    PubMed

    Mak, Henry K F; Chan, Queenie; Zhang, Zhipeng; Petersen, Esben T; Qiu, Deqiang; Zhang, Linda; Yau, Kelvin K W; Chu, Leung-Wing; Golay, Xavier

    2012-01-01

    QUASAR arterial spin labeling (ASL) was used to investigate the role of vascular impairment in Alzheimer's disease (AD). We hypothesized that the hemodynamic parameters monitoring cerebrovascular integrity, i.e., cerebral blood flow (CBF), arterial blood volume (aBV), and arterial transit time (aTT), would be affected. 13 AD patients and 15 healthy control (HC) subjects underwent 3T MRI scanning. Two separate blood flow acquisitions were obtained with 1 slice overlap for whole brain coverage. CBF, aBV, and aTT maps were calculated using in-house software. Preprocessing and statistical analyses were performed on SPM5. Region-of-interest (ROI) studies of ten selected cerebral regions were also conducted. There were significant differences in mini mental status exam (MMSE) (AD: 16.3 ± 4.55, HC: 28.5 ± 2.00) and Alzheimer's disease assessment scale-cognitive subscale (ADAS-cog) scores (AD: 25.25 ± 9.64, HC: 5.51 ± 2.62) between the 2 groups (p < 0.001) but none in age (p = 0.068). CBF decreased significantly (p < 0.01) in AD compared to controls in the right middle cingulate, left cuneus, left inferior and middle frontal, right superior frontal, left inferior parietal, and right supramarginal gyri. ROI studies confirmed significant hemodynamic impairments in AD compared to HC (p < 0.05): CBF in middle and posterior cingulate, aBV in left superior temporal, right inferior parietal, and posterior cingulate, and aTT in left inferior frontal and middle cingulate gyri. CBF correlated positively while aTT correlated negatively to MMSE, and vice versa for ADAS-cog. Using QUASAR ASL, we found patterns of regional hemodynamic impairment typical of moderate AD, suggesting underlying vascular abnormality. As potential biomarkers, these hemodynamic parameters could differentiate patients from volunteers, and possibly indicate the conversion from healthy aging to mild cognitive impairment to AD.

  15. Quantification of Abdominal Fat in Obese and Healthy Adolescents Using 3 Tesla Magnetic Resonance Imaging and Free Software for Image Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Eloi, Juliana Cristina; Epifanio, Matias; de Gonçalves, Marília Maia; Pellicioli, Augusto; Vieira, Patricia Froelich Giora; Dias, Henrique Bregolin; Bruscato, Neide; Soder, Ricardo Bernardi; Santana, João Carlos Batista; Mouzaki, Marialena; Baldisserotto, Matteo

    2017-01-01

    Background and Aims Computed tomography, which uses ionizing radiation and expensive software packages for analysis of scans, can be used to quantify abdominal fat. The objective of this study is to measure abdominal fat with 3T MRI using free software for image analysis and to correlate these findings with anthropometric and laboratory parameters in adolescents. Methods This prospective observational study included 24 overweight/obese and 33 healthy adolescents (mean age 16.55 years). All participants underwent abdominal MRI exams. Visceral and subcutaneous fat area and percentage were correlated with anthropometric parameters, lipid profile, glucose metabolism, and insulin resistance. Student’s t test and Mann-Whitney’s test was applied. Pearson’s chi-square test was used to compare proportions. To determine associations Pearson’s linear correlation or Spearman’s correlation were used. Results In both groups, waist circumference (WC) was associated with visceral fat area (P = 0.001 and P = 0.01 respectively), and triglycerides were associated with fat percentage (P = 0.046 and P = 0.071 respectively). In obese individuals, total cholesterol/HDL ratio was associated with visceral fat area (P = 0.03) and percentage (P = 0.09), and insulin and HOMA-IR were associated with visceral fat area (P = 0.001) and percentage (P = 0.005). Conclusions 3T MRI can provide reliable and good quality images for quantification of visceral and subcutaneous fat by using a free software package. The results demonstrate that WC is a good predictor of visceral fat in obese adolescents and visceral fat area is associated with total cholesterol/HDL ratio, insulin and HOMA-IR. PMID:28129354

  16. Dapsone improves functional deficit and diminishes brain damage evaluated by 3-Tesla magnetic resonance image after transient cerebral ischemia and reperfusion in rats.

    PubMed

    Diaz-Ruiz, Araceli; Roldan-Valadez, Ernesto; Ortiz-Plata, Alma; Mondragón-Lozano, Rodrigo; Heras-Romero, Yessica; Mendez-Armenta, Marisela; Osorio-Rico, Laura; Nava-Ruiz, Concepción; Ríos, Camilo

    2016-09-01

    Stroke is a frequent cause of death and the first of disability in the world population. We have shown that dapsone acts as an antioxidant, antiinflammatory and antiapoptotic agent after brain Ischemia reperfusion (I/R) in rats; however, its therapeutic efficacy, measured by imaging has not been characterized. In this context, the aim of this study was to evaluate the neuroprotective effect of dapsone by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and to correlate imaging markers with motor function and oxidative stress after transient cerebral ischemia and reperfusion (I/R). We used male rats throughout the experiment. Functional deficit after I/R was assessed by using Longa scale. The area of brain tissue damage was measured by histology. The nuclear factor erythroid 2-related factor 2 (Nrf-2) and the amount of reactive oxygen species (ROS) were measured as biomarkers of oxidative stress. Finally, difussion tensor MRI was employed to measure the fractional anisotropy (FA), as a MRI marker of the pathophysiologic brain status. Results showed a better functional recovery and less damaged tissue in animals treated with dapsone vs control group. The values of FA were higher in animals receiving treatment, indicating a better preservation of brain structure. At early stages of the damage, dapsone was able to reduce both oxidative markers (Nrf-2 and ROS). Our findings provide new evidence for the efficacy of dapsone when administered during the acute phase after I/R and that quantitative sequences of MRI are useful for characterizing its potential therapeutic benefits after stroke.

  17. Tumor Detection at 3 Tesla with an Activatable Cell Penetrating Peptide Dendrimer (ACPPD-Gd), a T1 Magnetic Resonance (MR) Molecular Imaging Agent

    PubMed Central

    Malone, Christopher D.; Olson, Emilia S.; Mattrey, Robert F.; Jiang, Tao; Tsien, Roger Y.; Nguyen, Quyen T.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose The ability to detect small malignant lesions with magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is limited by inadequate accumulations of Gd with standard chelate agents. To date, no T1-targeted agents have proven superiority to Gd chelates in their ability to detect small tumors at clinically relevant field strengths. Activatable cell-penetrating peptides and their Gd-loaded dendrimeric form (ACPPD-Gd) have been shown to selectively accumulate in tumors. In this study we compared the performance of ACPPD-Gd vs. untargeted Gd chelates to detect small tumors in rodent models using a clinical 3T-MR system. Materials and Methods This study was approved by the Institutional-Animal Care-and-Use Committee. 2 of 4 inguinal breast fat pads of 16 albino-C57BL/6 mice were inoculated with tumor Py8119 cells and the other 2 with saline at random. MRI at 3T was performed at 4, 9, and 14 days after inoculation on 8 mice 24-hours after injection of 0.036mmol Gd/kg (ACPPD-Gd), and before and 2–3 minutes after 0.1 mmol/kg gadobutrol on the other 8 mice. T1-weighted (T1w) tumor signal normalized to muscle, was compared among the non-contrast, gadobutrol, and ACPPD-Gd groups using ANOVA. Experienced and trainee readers blinded to experimental conditions assessed for the presence of tumor in each of the 4 breast regions. Receiver operator characteristic (ROC) curves and area-under-curve (AUC) values were constructed and analyzed. Results Tumors ≥1mm3 were iso-intense to muscle without contrast on T1w sequences. They enhanced diffusely and homogeneously by 57±20% (p<0.001) 24 hours after ACPPD-Gd and by 25±13% (p<0.001) immediately after gadobutrol. The nearly 2-fold difference was similar for small tumors (1-5mm3) (45±19% vs. 19±18%, p = 0.03). ACPPD-Gd tended to improve tumor detection by an experienced reader (AUC 0.98 vs 0.91) and significantly more for a trainee (0.93 vs. 0.82, p = 0.02) compared to gadobutrol. This improvement was more pronounced when obvious tumors (>5mm3) were removed from the ROC analysis for both the experienced observer (0.96 vs. 0.86) and more so for the trainee (0.86 vs. 0.69, p = 0.04). Conclusion ACPPD-Gd enhances MMP-expressing tumors of any size at 3T 24 hours after administration, improving their detection by blinded observers when compared to non-contrast and contrast groups given commercial Gd-chelates and imaged during the equilibrium phase. PMID:26336058

  18. Integrated RF probe for in vivo multinuclear spectroscopy and functional imaging of rat brain using an 11.7 Tesla 89 mm bore vertical microimager.

    PubMed

    Li, S; Shen, J

    2005-07-01

    To acquire high quality in vivo NMR data from rat brain using a vertical 89-mm bore magnet, specially designed NMR probes with integrated RF coils and animal handling capability are required. An RF probe design that is also capable of rat head fixation, body support and suitable for physiology monitoring and maintenance was constructed for an 89 mm bore, 11.7 T, vertical microimager which is equipped with a 57-mm i.d. gradient insert. Design concept and practical aspects of probe construction are described in detail. The device allows accurate and highly reproducible positioning of rat head inside the magnet while providing excellent RF performance. Typical results from fMRI, localized in vivo proton and multinuclear spectroscopy using this probe system are presented.

  19. Prostate Cancer Detection Using High-Spatial Resolution MRI at 7.0 Tesla: Correlation with Histopathologic Findings at Radical Prostatectomy

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-10-01

    Radical Prostatectomy 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER 6. AUTHOR(S) Andrew B. Rosenkrantz, M.D. 5d. PROJECT NUMBER 5e. TASK NUMBER E - Mail ...resolution high SNR images. Our ultimate system employed two transmit-receive elements and six receive-only elements, avoiding parallel transmission...prostate imaging at 7.0T and tested initially in human volunteers. Such a system does not require parallel transmission. A system with two

  20. Development and evaluation of an algorithm for the computer-assisted segmentation of the human hypothalamus on 7-Tesla magnetic resonance images.

    PubMed

    Schindler, Stephanie; Schönknecht, Peter; Schmidt, Laura; Anwander, Alfred; Strauß, Maria; Trampel, Robert; Bazin, Pierre-Louis; Möller, Harald E; Hegerl, Ulrich; Turner, Robert; Geyer, Stefan

    2013-01-01

    Post mortem studies have shown volume changes of the hypothalamus in psychiatric patients. With 7T magnetic resonance imaging this effect can now be investigated in vivo in detail. To benefit from the sub-millimeter resolution requires an improved segmentation procedure. The traditional anatomical landmarks of the hypothalamus were refined using 7T T1-weighted magnetic resonance images. A detailed segmentation algorithm (unilateral hypothalamus) was developed for colour-coded, histogram-matched images, and evaluated in a sample of 10 subjects. Test-retest and inter-rater reliabilities were estimated in terms of intraclass-correlation coefficients (ICC) and Dice's coefficient (DC). The computer-assisted segmentation algorithm ensured test-retest reliabilities of ICC≥.97 (DC≥96.8) and inter-rater reliabilities of ICC≥.94 (DC = 95.2). There were no significant volume differences between the segmentation runs, raters, and hemispheres. The estimated volumes of the hypothalamus lie within the range of previous histological and neuroimaging results. We present a computer-assisted algorithm for the manual segmentation of the human hypothalamus using T1-weighted 7T magnetic resonance imaging. Providing very high test-retest and inter-rater reliabilities, it outperforms former procedures established at 1.5T and 3T magnetic resonance images and thus can serve as a gold standard for future automated procedures.

  1. Is the Volume of the Caudate Nuclei Associated With Area of Secondary Hyperalgesia? – Protocol for a 3-Tesla MRI Study of Healthy Volunteers

    PubMed Central

    Asghar, Mohammad Sohail; Wetterslev, Jørn; Pipper, Christian Bressen; Johan Mårtensson, Johan; Becerra, Lino; Christensen, Anders; Nybing, Janus Damm; Havsteen, Inger; Boesen, Mikael; Dahl, Jørgen Berg

    2016-01-01

    Background Experience and development of pain may be influenced by a number of physiological, psychological, and psychosocial factors. In a previous study we found differences in neuronal activation to noxious stimulation, and microstructural neuroanatomical differences, when comparing healthy volunteers with differences in size of the area of secondary hyperalgesia following a standardized burn injury. Objective We aim to investigate the degree of association between the volume of pain-relevant structures in the brain and the size of the area of secondary hyperalgesia following brief thermal sensitization. Methods The study consists of one experimental day, in which whole-brain magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scans will be conducted including T1-weighed three-dimensional anatomy scan, diffusion tensor imaging, and resting state functional MRI. Before the experimental day, all included participants will undergo experimental pain testing in a parallel study (Clinicaltrials.gov Identifier: NCT02527395). Results from this experimental pain testing, as well as the size of the area of secondary hyperalgesia from the included participants, will be extracted from this parallel study. Results The association between the volume of pain-relevant structures in the brain and the area of secondary hyperalgesia will be investigated by linear regression of the estimated best linear unbiased predictors on the individual volumes of the pain relevant brain structures. Conclusions We plan to investigate the association between experimental pain testing parameters and the volume, connectivity, and resting state activity of pain-relevant structures in the brain. These results may improve our knowledge of the mechanisms responsible for the development of acute and chronic pain. ClinicalTrial Danish Research Ethics Committee (identifier: H-15010473). Danish Data Protection Agency (identifier: RH-2015-149). Clinicaltrials.gov NCT02567318; http://clinicaltrials.gov/ct2/show/NCT02567318 (Archived by WebCite at http://www.webcitation.org/6i4OtP0Oi) PMID:27317630

  2. Evaluation of intracranial neoplasia and noninfectious meningoencephalitis in dogs by use of short echo time, single voxel proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy at 3.0 Tesla.

    PubMed

    Carrera, Inés; Richter, Henning; Beckmann, Katrin; Meier, Dieter; Dennler, Matthias; Kircher, Patrick R

    2016-05-01

    OBJECTIVE To investigate metabolite concentrations of the brains of dogs with intracranial neoplasia or noninfectious meningoencephalitis by use of short echo time, single voxel proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy ((1)H MRS) at 3.0 T. ANIMALS 29 dogs with intracranial lesions (14 with neoplasia [3 oligodendromas, 3 glioblastomas multiformes, 3 astrocytomas, 2 lymphomas, and 3 meningiomas] and 15 is with noninfectious meningoencephalitis) and 10 healthy control dogs. PROCEDURES Short echo time, single voxel (1)H-MRS at 3.0 T was performed on neoplastic and noninfectious inflammatory intracranial lesions identified with conventional MRI. Metabolites of interest included N-acetyl aspartate (NAA), total choline, creatine, myoinositol, the glutamine-glutamate complex (Glx), glutathione, taurine, lactate, and lipids. Data were analyzed with postprocessing fitting algorithm software. Metabolite concentrations relative to brain water content were calculated and compared with results for the healthy control dogs, which had been previously evaluated with the same (1)H MRS technique. RESULTS NAA, creatine, and Glx concentrations were reduced in the brains of dogs with neoplasia and noninfectious meningoencephalitis, whereas choline concentration was increased. Concentrations of these metabolites differed significantly between dogs with neoplasia and dogs with noninfectious meningoencephalitis. Concentrations of NAA, creatine, and Glx were significantly lower in dogs with neoplasia, whereas the concentration of choline was significantly higher in dogs with neoplasia. Lipids were predominantly found in dogs with high-grade intra-axial neoplasia, meningioma, and necrotizing meningoencephalitis. A high concentration of taurine was found in 10 of 15 dogs with noninfectious meningoencephalitis. CONCLUSIONS AND CLINICAL RELEVANCE (1)H MRS provided additional metabolic information about intracranial neoplasia and noninfectious meningoencephalitis in dogs.

  3. 3.0 Tesla MRI in the early evaluation of inferior alveolar nerve neurological complications after mandibular third molar extraction: a prospective study

    PubMed Central

    Pranno, N; Barchetti, F; Sorrentino, V; Lo Mele, L

    2014-01-01

    Objectives: To evaluate the use of 3.0 T MRI in the prognosis of inferior alveolar nerve (IAN) sensory disorders after mandibular third molar extraction, in the early post-operative period. Methods: 343 IANs were examined before and 3 days after surgery. Two radiologists evaluated the course of the nerve and the relative signal intensity (RSI). Cohen's kappa coefficient (κ) and intraclass correlation coefficient (ICC) were used to evaluate the interobserver (k = 0.891) and intra-observer variability (ICC = 0.927; 0.914, respectively). The IANs were divided into four groups on the basis of neurosensory disorders recovery time. ANOVA was used to evaluate the differences among the RSIs of the four groups, and multiple comparisons were performed with Tukey's range test. Results: No differences in the course of IANs were found before and after surgery. In 280 IANs, no iatrogenic paraesthesia was found (Group A). 63 IANs showed a neurosensory impairment. 38 IANs showed recovery of post-operative paraesthesia at 3-month follow-up (Group B). 16 IANs showed a full recovery of iatrogenic paraesthesia at 6-month follow-up (Group C). Seven IANs displayed a full recovery at 12-month follow-up and two IANs showed persistence of neurosensory disorders at 18-month follow-up (Group D). The one-way ANOVA results indicated statistically significant difference among all groups (p < 0.05), except between Groups C and D (p = 0.504). Conclusions: The early evaluation of RSI values represents a valid tool to determine the prognosis of IAN sensory disorders after mandibular third molar extraction. PMID:24947977

  4. 7-Tesla Magnetic Resonance Imaging Precisely and Noninvasively Reflects Inflammation and Remodeling of the Skeletal Muscle in a Mouse Model of Antisynthetase Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Sciorati, Clara; Esposito, Antonio; Campana, Lara; Canu, Tamara; Monno, Antonella; Palmisano, Anna; De Cobelli, Francesco; Del Maschio, Alessandro; Ascheman, Dana P.; Manfredi, Angelo A.; Rovere-Querini, Patrizia

    2014-01-01

    Inflammatory myopathies comprise heterogeneous disorders. Their etiopathogenesis is poorly understood, because of the paucity of informative experimental models and of approaches for the noninvasive study of inflamed tissues. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) provides information about the state of the skeletal muscle that reflects various facets of inflammation and remodeling. This technique has been scarcely used in experimental models of inflammatory myopathies. We characterized the performance of MRI in a well-established mouse model of myositis and the antisynthetase syndrome, based on the immunization of wild-type mice with the amino-terminal fragment of histidyl-tRNA synthetase (HisRS). Over an eight-week period following myositis induction, MRI enabled precise identification of pathological events taking place in muscle tissue. Areas of edema and of active inflammation identified by histopathology paralleled muscle modifications detected noninvasively by MRI. Muscles changes were chronologically associated with the establishment of autoimmunity, as reflected by the development of anti-HisRS antibodies in the blood of immunized mice. MR imaging easily appreciated muscle damage and remodeling even if actual disruption of myofiber integrity (as assessed by serum concentrations of creatinine phosphokinase) was limited. Thus, MR imaging represents an informative and noninvasive analytical tool for studying in vivo immune-mediated muscle involvement. PMID:24895622

  5. A hypothetical mathematical construct explaining the mechanism of biological amplification in an experimental model utilizing picoTesla (PT) electromagnetic fields.

    PubMed

    Saxena, Anjali; Jacobson, Jerry; Yamanashi, William; Scherlag, Benjamin; Lamberth, John; Saxena, Brij

    2003-06-01

    We seek to answer the conundrum: What is the fundamental mechanism by which very weak, low frequency Electromagnetic fields influence biosystems? In considering the hydrophobicity of intramembranous protein (IMP) H-bonds which cross the phospholipid bilayer of plasma membranes, and the necessity for photonic recycling in cell surface interactions after dissipation of energetic states, present models lack structure and thermodynamic properties to maintain (DeltaE) sufficient energy sources necessary for amplifications by factors of 10(12). Even though one accepts that the ligand-receptor association alters the conformation of extracellular, extruding portions of IMP's at the cell surface, and that this change can be transmitted to the cytoplasm by the transmembranous helical segments by nonlinear vibrations of proteins with generation of soliton waves, one is still unable to account for repair and balanced function. Indeed, responses of critical molecules to certain magnetic field signals may include enhanced vibrational amplitudes, increased quanta of thermal energies and order inducing interactions. We may accept that microtrabecular reticulum-receptor is associated with actin filaments and ATP molecules which contribute to the activation of the cyclase enzyme system through piezoelectricity. Magnetic fields will pass through the membrane which sharply attenuates the electric field component of an EM field, due to its high impedance. Furthermore, EM oscillations are converted to mechanical vibrations; i.e., photon-phonon transduction, to induce molecular vibrations of frequencies specifically responsible for bioamplifications of weak triggers at the membrane surface, as well as GAP junctions. The hydrogen bonds of considerable importance are those in proteins (10(12)Hz) and DNA (10(11)Hz) and may be viewed as centers of EM radiation emission in the range from the mm microwaves to the far IR. However, classical electrodynamical theory does not yield a model for biomolecular resonant responses which are integrated over time and account for the connection between the phonon field and photons. Jacobson Resonance does supply an initial physical mechanism, as equivalencies in energy to that of Zeeman Resonance (i.e., zero-order magnetic resonance) and cyclotron resonance may be derived from the DeBroglie wave particle equation. For the first time, we view the introduction of Relativity Theory to biology in the expression, mc(2)=BvLq, where m is the mass of a particle in the 'box' or 'string' (molecule in a biosystem), c is the velocity of electromagnetic field in space, independent of its inertial frame of reference, B is the magnetic flux density,v is the velocity of the carrier or 'string' (a one or two dimensional 'box') in which the particle exists, L is its dimension (length) and q represents a unit charge q=1C, by defining electromotive force as energy per unit charge. Equivalencies suggest that qvBL is one of the fundamental expressions of energy of a charged wave-particle in magnetic fields, just as Zeeman and cyclotron resonance energy expressions, gbetaB and qhB/2pim, and is applicable to all charged particles (molecules in biological systems). There may exist spontaneous, independent and incessant interactions of magnetic vector B and particles in biosystems which exert Lorentz forces. Lorentz forces may be transmitted from EM field to gravitational field as a gravity wave which return to the phonon field as microgravitational fluctuations to therein produce quantum vibrational states that increase quanta of thermal energies integrated over time. This may account for the differential of 10(12) between photonic energy of ELF waves and the Boltzman energy kT. Recent data from in vivo controlled studies are included as empirical support for the various hypotheses presented.

  6. Spectroscopy of the helium 2 3S 2 3P transition above 0.01 Tesla application to optical pumping studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Courtade, E.; Marion, F.; Nacher, P. J.; Tastevin, G.; Dohnalik, T.; Kiersnowski, K.

    2000-08-01

    Optical pumping of helium makes use of the 2 3S-2 3P transition at 1083 nm. We report on a study of this transition in magnetic fields up to 1.5 T. Based on these results, an optical method to measure nuclear polarisation in arbitrary field has been developed. Preliminary results on optical pumping at 0.1 T are presented.

  7. 3D Fast Spin Echo With Out-of-Slab Cancellation: A Technique for High-Resolution Structural Imaging of Trabecular Bone at 7 Tesla

    PubMed Central

    Magland, Jeremy F.; Rajapakse, Chamith S.; Wright, Alexander C.; Acciavatti, Raymond; Wehrli, Felix W.

    2016-01-01

    Spin-echo-based pulse sequences are desirable for the application of high-resolution imaging of trabecular bone but tend to involve high-power deposition. Increased availability of ultrahigh field scanners has opened new possibilities for imaging with increased signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) efficiency, but many pulse sequences that are standard at 1.5 and 3 T exceed specific absorption rate limits at 7 T. A modified, reduced specific absorption rate, three-dimensional, fast spin-echo pulse sequence optimized specifically for in vivo trabecular bone imaging at 7 T is introduced. The sequence involves a slab-selective excitation pulse, low-power nonselective refocusing pulses, and phase cycling to cancel undesired out-of-slab signal. In vivo images of the distal tibia were acquired using the technique at 1.5, 3, and 7 T field strengths, and SNR was found to increase at least linearly using receive coils of identical geometry. Signal dependence on the choice of refocusing flip angles in the echo train was analyzed experimentally and theoretically by combining the signal from hundreds of coherence pathways, and it is shown that a significant specific absorption rate reduction can be achieved with negligible SNR loss. PMID:20187181

  8. Multi-slice 1H MRSI of the human brain at 7 Tesla using dynamic B0 and B1 shimming

    PubMed Central

    Boer, Vincent O.; Klomp, Dennis W.J.; Juchem, Christoph; Luijten, Peter R.; de Graaf, Robin A.

    2011-01-01

    Proton MR spectroscopic imaging of the human brain at ultra high field (≥7T) is challenging due to increased RF power deposition, increased magnetic field B0 inhomogeneity and increased RF magnetic field inhomogeneity. And, especially for multi-slice sequences, these effects directly inhibit the potential gains of higher magnetic field and can even cause a reduction in data quality. However, recent developments in dynamic B0 magnetic field shimming and dynamic multi-transmit RF control allow for new acquisition strategies. Therefore, in this work slice-by-slice B0 and B1 shimming was developed to optimize both B0 magnetic field homogeneity and nutation angle over a large portion of the brain. Together with a low-power water and lipid suppression sequence and pulse-acquire spectroscopic imaging, a multi-slice MRSI sequence is shown to be feasible at 7T. This now allows for multi-slice metabolic imaging of the human brain with high sensitivity and high chemical shift resolution at ultra high field. PMID:22162089

  9. Non-Invasive Evaluation of the GABAergic/Glutamatergic System in Autistic Patients Observed by MEGA-Editing Proton MR Spectroscopy Using a Clinical 3 Tesla Instrument

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Harada, Masafumi; Taki, Masako M.; Nose, Ayumi; Kubo, Hitoshi; Mori, Kenji; Nishitani, Hiromu; Matsuda, Tsuyoshi

    2011-01-01

    Amino acids related to neurotransmitters and the GABAergic/glutamatergic system were measured using a 3 T-MRI instrument in 12 patients with autism and 10 normal controls. All measurements were performed in the frontal lobe (FL) and lenticular nuclei (LN) using a conventional sequence for n-acetyl aspartate (NAA) and glutamate (Glu), and the…

  10. Vacuum properties of high quality value tuning fork in high magnetic field up to 8 Tesla and at mK temperatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Človečko, M.; Kupka, M.; Skyba, P.; Vavrek, F.

    2014-12-01

    Tuning forks are very popular experimental tools widely applied in low and ultra low temperature physics as mechanical resonators and cantilevers in the study of quantum liquids, STM and AFM techniques, etc. As an added benefit, these forks being cooled, have very high Q-value, typically 106 and their properties seems to be magnetic field independent. We present preliminary vacuum measurements of a commercial tuning fork oscillating at frequency 32 kHz conducted in magnetic fields up to 8 T and at temperature ~ 10 mK. We found an additional weak damping of the tuning fork motion depending on magnetic field magnitude and we discuss physical nature of the observed phenomena.

  11. Prostate Cancer Detection Using High-Spatial Resolution MRI at 7.0 Tesla: Correlation with Histopathologic Findings at Radical Prostatectomy

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-10-01

    focal region of decreased T2 signal in the peripheral zone suspicious for tumor in both patients. In patient 1, the suspicious area was located in...the right posterolateral peripheral zone (Figure 1a); in patient 2, the suspicious area was located in the left posterolateral peripheral zone (Figure...Following prostatectomy, pathologic analysis of the specimen demonstrated a dominant Gleason 3+4 tumor in the posterior right apical peripheral

  12. T2‐Weighted intracranial vessel wall imaging at 7 Tesla using a DANTE‐prepared variable flip angle turbo spin echo readout (DANTE‐SPACE)

    PubMed Central

    Viessmann, Olivia; Li, Linqing; Benjamin, Philip

    2016-01-01

    Purpose To optimize intracranial vessel wall imaging (VWI) at 7T for sharp wall depiction and high boundary contrast. Methods A variable flip angle turbo spin echo scheme (SPACE) was optimized for VWI. SPACE provides black‐blood contrast, but has less crushing effect on cerebrospinal fluid (CSF). However, a delay alternating with nutation for tailored excitation (DANTE) preparation suppresses the signal from slowly moving spins of a few mm per second. Therefore, we optimized a DANTE‐preparation module for 7T. Signal‐to‐noise ratio (SNR), contrast‐to‐noise ratio (CNR), and signal ratio for vessel wall, CSF, and lumen were calculated for SPACE and DANTE‐SPACE in 11 volunteers at the middle cerebral artery (MCA). An exemplar MCA stenosis patient was scanned with DANTE‐SPACE. Results The 7T‐optimized SPACE sequence improved the vessel wall point‐spread function by 17%. The CNR between the wall and CSF was doubled (12.2 versus 5.6) for the DANTE‐SPACE scans compared with the unprepared SPACE. This increase was significant in the right hemisphere (P = 0.016), but not in the left (P = 0.090). The CNR between wall and lumen was halved, but remained at a high value (24.9 versus 56.5). Conclusion The optimized SPACE sequence improves VWI at 7T. Additional DANTE preparation increases the contrast between the wall and CSF. Increased outer boundary contrast comes at the cost of reduced inner boundary contrast. Magn Reson Med 77:655–663, 2017. © 2016 The Authors Magnetic Resonance in Medicine published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. on behalf of International Society for Magnetic Resonance in Medicine. This is an open access article under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits use, distribution and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited. PMID:26890988

  13. Layer-Specific Manganese-Enhanced MRI of the Diabetic Rat Retina in Light and Dark Adaptation at 11.7 Tesla

    PubMed Central

    Muir, Eric R.; Chandra, Saurav B.; De La Garza, Bryan H.; Velagapudi, Chakradhar; Abboud, Hanna E.; Duong, Timothy Q.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose. To employ high-resolution manganese-enhanced MRI (MEMRI) to study abnormal calcium activity in different cell layers in streptozotocin-induced diabetic rat retinas, and to determine whether MEMRI detects changes at earlier time points than previously reported. Methods. Sprague-Dawley rats were studied 14 days (n = 8) and 30 days (n = 5) after streptozotocin (STZ) or vehicle (n = 7) injection. Manganese-enhanced MRI at 20 × 20 × 700 μm, in which contrast is based on manganese as a calcium analogue and an MRI contrast agent, was obtained in light and dark adaptation of the retina in the same animals in which one eye was covered and the fellow eye was not. The MEMRI activity encoding of the light and dark adaptation was achieved in awake conditions and imaged under anesthesia. Results. Manganese-enhanced MRI showed three layers, corresponding to the inner retina, outer retina, and the choroid. In normal animals, the outer retina showed higher MEMRI activity in dark compared to light; the inner retina displayed lower activity in dark compared to light; and the choroid showed no difference in activity. Manganese-enhanced MRI activity changed as early as 14 days after hyperglycemia and decreased with duration of hyperglycemia in the outer retina in dark relative to light adaptation. The choroid also had altered MEMRI activity at 14 days, which returned to normal by 30 days. No differences in MEMRI activity were detected in the inner retina. Conclusions. Manganese-enhanced MRI detects progressive reduction in calcium activity with duration of hyperglycemia in the outer retina as early as 14 days after hyperglycemia, earlier than any other time point reported in the literature. PMID:26098468

  14. Si-N membrane microcalorimetry: Thermal conductivity and specific heat of thin films from 2-500K in magnetic fields to 8 Tesla.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zink, Barry

    2003-03-01

    Understanding the thermal behavior of mesoscopic systems and thin films is a critical issue of both fundamental and technological solid state science. Despite the wealth of knowledge in principle available from accurate measurement of specific heat and thermal conductivity of thin films, there are relatively few results of this type, due to the difficulty of isolating the small heat capacities and thermal conductivities from the typically large background contribution of conventional apparatus. Our group at UC San Diego uses amorphous Si-N membranes to thermally isolate small samples from their environment and allow accurate thermal measurements. Recent work adds the ability to measure thermal conductivity of films as thin as 150 Angstrom over a broad temperature range [1] to our well-established techniques for measuring Cp of small samples.[2] Our microcalorimeter is also particularly well-suited for measurements of both Cp and k in high magnetic fields [3]. The micromachining techniques used to fabricate the calorimeter allow production of significant numbers of calorimeters with well-controlled dimensions and highly reproducible properties which facilitates studies of the thermal properties of thin film and tiny crystals. In this talk I will briefly review the fabrication of our microcalorimeter and the techniques for measuring Cp and k. I will present example data and results of numerical heat flow simulations used to further our understanding of heat flow in the microcalorimeter [1] B. L. Zink, B. Revaz, J. J. Cherry and F. Hellman, Submitted to RSI, Sept. 2002 [2] D. W. Denlinger et al., Rev. Sci. Inst 65, 946-59 (1994) [3] B. L. Zink, B. Revaz, R. Sappey and F. Hellman, Rev. Sci. Instrum. 73, 1841 (2002)

  15. Pulsed-coil magnet systems for applying 10-30 Tesla Fields to cm-scale targets on Sandia's Z facility

    DOE PAGES

    Rovang, Dean C.; Lamppa, Derek C.; Cuneo, Michael Edward; ...

    2014-12-04

    We have successfully integrated the capability to apply uniform, high magnetic fields (10–30 T) to high energy density experiments on the Z facility. This system uses an 8-mF, 15-kV capacitor bank to drive large-bore (5 cm diameter), high-inductance (1–3 mH) multi-turn, multi-layer electromagnets that slowly magnetize the conductive targets used on Z over several milliseconds (time to peak field of 2–7 ms). This system was commissioned in February 2013 and has been used successfully to magnetize more than 30 experiments up to 10 T that have produced exciting and surprising physics results. These experiments used split-magnet topologies to maintain diagnosticmore » lines of sight to the target. We then describe the design, integration, and operation of the pulsed coil system into the challenging and harsh environment of the Z Machine. We also describe our plans and designs for achieving fields up to 20 T with a reduced-gap split-magnet configuration, and up to 30 T with a solid magnet configuration in pursuit of the Magnetized Liner Inertial Fusion concept.« less

  16. Integrating structural and functional imaging for computer assisted detection of prostate cancer on multi-protocol in vivo 3 Tesla MRI

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Viswanath, Satish; Bloch, B. Nicolas; Rosen, Mark; Chappelow, Jonathan; Toth, Robert; Rofsky, Neil; Lenkinski, Robert; Genega, Elizabeth; Kalyanpur, Arjun; Madabhushi, Anant

    2009-02-01

    Screening and detection of prostate cancer (CaP) currently lacks an image-based protocol which is reflected in the high false negative rates currently associated with blinded sextant biopsies. Multi-protocol magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) offers high resolution functional and structural data about internal body structures (such as the prostate). In this paper we present a novel comprehensive computer-aided scheme for CaP detection from high resolution in vivo multi-protocol MRI by integrating functional and structural information obtained via dynamic-contrast enhanced (DCE) and T2-weighted (T2-w) MRI, respectively. Our scheme is fully-automated and comprises (a) prostate segmentation, (b) multimodal image registration, and (c) data representation and multi-classifier modules for information fusion. Following prostate boundary segmentation via an improved active shape model, the DCE/T2-w protocols and the T2-w/ex vivo histological prostatectomy specimens are brought into alignment via a deformable, multi-attribute registration scheme. T2-w/histology alignment allows for the mapping of true CaP extent onto the in vivo MRI, which is used for training and evaluation of a multi-protocol MRI CaP classifier. The meta-classifier used is a random forest constructed by bagging multiple decision tree classifiers, each trained individually on T2-w structural, textural and DCE functional attributes. 3-fold classifier cross validation was performed using a set of 18 images derived from 6 patient datasets on a per-pixel basis. Our results show that the results of CaP detection obtained from integration of T2-w structural textural data and DCE functional data (area under the ROC curve of 0.815) significantly outperforms detection based on either of the individual modalities (0.704 (T2-w) and 0.682 (DCE)). It was also found that a meta-classifier trained directly on integrated T2-w and DCE data (data-level integration) significantly outperformed a decision-level meta-classifier, constructed by combining the classifier outputs from the individual T2-w and DCE channels.

  17. Chemical characterization of a prominent phosphomonoester resonance from mammalian brain. 31P and 1H NMR analysis at 4.7 and 14.1 tesla

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pettegrew, J. W.; Kopp, S. J.; Dadok, J.; Minshew, N. J.; Feliksik, J. M.; Glonek, T.; Cohen, M. M.

    A prominent 31P NMR resonance at 3.84 ppm in mammalian brain has been identified as ethanolamine phosphate. The identification was based on 1H and 31P NMR findings (including pH titrations) at 4.7 and 14.1 T, as well as thin-layer chromatography studies. We previously incorrectly assigned the 3.84 ppm resonance to ribose-5-phosphate. The incorrect assignment occurred because the two compounds have very similar 31P chemical shifts, and because we did not carefully consider the effects of counter ions and ionic strengths when interpreting the 31P chemical shifts. In separate preliminary studies we have demonstrated ethanolamine phosphate to be high in immature developing brain and in the degenerating brain of Alzheimer's and Huntington's disease patients. Ethanolamine phosphate may therefore serve as a sensitive marker of membrane phospholipid turnover for both in vitro and in vivo31P NMR studies.

  18. MRI of cells and mice at 1 and 7 Tesla with Gd-targeting agents: when the low field is better!

    PubMed

    Geninatti-Crich, Simonetta; Szabo, Ibolya; Alberti, Diego; Longo, Dario; Aime, Silvio

    2011-01-01

    Tumor cells were targeted with Gd-loaded/LDL (low density lipoproteins) adducts consisting of ca 300 Gd(III) amphiphilic complexes incorporated in the lipophilic LDL particles. The long reorientational time of the Gd(III) complex in the supramolecular adduct yielded a relaxivity peak at ca 1 T, whereas its relaxivity at 7 T was 5 times less. The field-dependent relaxivity markedly affected the signal enhancement attainable at the two magnetic fields. As tumor cells showed up-regulation of LDL transporters, B16 melanoma cells were labeled with the Gd-loaded/LDL adduct. Each cell contained ca 2 × 10(9) Gd atoms. Upon dispersion of 5000 labeled cells in 1 μl of agar, signal intensity (SI) enhancements of about 30 and 7% were observed at 1 and 7 T, respectively. The results obtained on cellular systems were confirmed in vivo upon the administration of Gd-loaded/LDL particles to C57 mice bearing a transplanted melanoma (B16) tumor. From the herein reported results, one may conclude that, for slowly moving Gd complexes, it is possible to obtain in vivo sensitivity enhancements at 1 T several times higher than that attained at high fields.

  19. A combined solenoid-surface RF coil for high-resolution whole-brain rat imaging on a 3.0 Tesla clinical MR scanner.

    PubMed

    Underhill, Hunter R; Yuan, Chun; Hayes, Cecil E

    2010-09-01

    Rat brain models effectively simulate a multitude of human neurological disorders. Improvements in coil design have facilitated the wider utilization of rat brain models by enabling the utilization of clinical MR scanners for image acquisition. In this study, a novel coil design, subsequently referred to as the rat brain coil, is described that exploits and combines the strengths of both solenoids and surface coils into a simple, multichannel, receive-only coil dedicated to whole-brain rat imaging on a 3.0 T clinical MR scanner. Compared with a multiturn solenoid mouse body coil, a 3-cm surface coil, a modified Helmholtz coil, and a phased-array surface coil, the rat brain coil improved signal-to-noise ratio by approximately 72, 61, 78, and 242%, respectively. Effects of the rat brain coil on amplitudes of static field and radiofrequency field uniformity were similar to each of the other coils. In vivo, whole-brain images of an adult male rat were acquired with a T(2)-weighted spin-echo sequence using an isotropic acquisition resolution of 0.25 x 0.25 x 0.25 mm(3) in 60.6 min. Multiplanar images of the in vivo rat brain with identification of anatomic structures are presented. Improvement in signal-to-noise ratio afforded by the rat brain coil may broaden experiments that utilize clinical MR scanners for in vivo image acquisition.

  20. The Travelling-Wave Primate System: A New Solution for Magnetic Resonance Imaging of Macaque Monkeys at 7 Tesla Ultra-High Field

    PubMed Central

    Herrmann, Tim; Mallow, Johannes; Plaumann, Markus; Luchtmann, Michael; Stadler, Jörg; Mylius, Judith; Brosch, Michael; Bernarding, Johannes

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Neuroimaging of macaques at ultra-high field (UHF) is usually conducted by combining a volume coil for transmit (Tx) and a phased array coil for receive (Rx) tightly enclosing the monkey’s head. Good results have been achieved using vertical or horizontal magnets with implanted or near-surface coils. An alternative and less costly approach, the travelling-wave (TW) excitation concept, may offer more flexible experimental setups on human whole-body UHF magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) systems, which are now more widely available. Goal of the study was developing and validating the TW concept for in vivo primate MRI. Methods The TW Primate System (TWPS) uses the radio frequency shield of the gradient system of a human whole-body 7 T MRI system as a waveguide to propagate a circularly polarized B1 field represented by the TE11 mode. This mode is excited by a specifically designed 2-port patch antenna. For receive, a customized neuroimaging monkey head receive-only coil was designed. Field simulation was used for development and evaluation. Signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) was compared with data acquired with a conventional monkey volume head coil consisting of a homogeneous transmit coil and a 12-element receive coil. Results The TWPS offered good image homogeneity in the volume-of-interest Turbo spin echo images exhibited a high contrast, allowing a clear depiction of the cerebral anatomy. As a prerequisite for functional MRI, whole brain ultrafast echo planar images were successfully acquired. Conclusion The TWPS presents a promising new approach to fMRI of macaques for research groups with access to a horizontal UHF MRI system. PMID:26066653

  1. Highly adaptive RF excitation scheme based on conformal resonant CRLH metamaterial ring antennas for 7-Tesla traveling-wave magnetic resonance imaging.

    PubMed

    Erni, Daniel; Liebig, Thorsten; Rennings, Andreas; Koster, Norbert H L; Fröhlich, Jürg

    2011-01-01

    We propose an adaptive RF antenna system for the excitation (and manipulation) of the fundamental circular waveguide mode (TE(11)) in the context of high-field (7T) traveling-wave magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). The system consists of composite right-/left-handed (CRLH) meta-material ring antennas that fully conforms to the inner surface of the MRI bore. The specific use of CRLH metamaterials is motivated by its inherent dispersion engineering capabilities, which is needed when designing resonant ring structures for virtually any predefined diameter operating at the given Larmor frequency (i.e. 298 MHz). Each functional group of the RF antenna system consists of a pair of subsequently spaced and correspondingly fed CRLH ring antennas, allowing for the unidirectional excitation of propagating, circularly polarized B(1) mode fields. The same functional group is also capable to simultaneously mold an incoming, counter-propagating mode. Given these functionalities we are proposing now a compound scheme (i.e. periodically arranged multiple antenna pairs)--termed as "MetaBore"--that is apt to provide a tailored RF power distribution as well as full wave reflection compensation virtually at any desired location along the bore.

  2. MO-FG-207-02: Technological Advances and Challenges: Experience with Time-Of-Flight PET Combined with 3-Tesla MRI

    SciTech Connect

    Jansen, F.

    2015-06-15

    The use of integrated PET/MRI systems in clinical applications can best benefit from understanding their technological advances and limitations. The currently available clinical PET/MRI systems have their own characteristics. Thorough analyses of existing technical data and evaluation of necessary performance metrics for quality assurances could be conducted to optimize application-specific PET/MRI protocols. This Symposium will focus on technical advances and limitations of clinical PET/MRI systems, and how this exciting imaging modality can be utilized in applications that can benefit from both PET and MRI. Learning Objectives: To understand the technological advances of clinical PET/MRI systems To correctly identify clinical applications that can benefit from PET/MRI To understand ongoing work to further improve the current PET/MRI technology Floris Jansen is a GE Healthcare employee.

  3. Using Nikola Tesla's Story and His Experiments as Presented in the Film "The Prestige" to Promote Scientific Inquiry: A Report of an Action Research Project

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hadzigeorgiou, Yannis; Garganourakis, Vassilios

    2010-01-01

    This paper reports on an action research project undertaken with the primary aim of investigating the extent to which situations that evoke a sense of wonder can promote scientific inquiry. Given the intense interest, curiosity, and wonder that some students had begun to develop after seeing the film "The Prestige", a science teacher…

  4. Exciton diamagnetic shifts and valley Zeeman effects in monolayer WS2 and MoS2 to 65 Tesla

    SciTech Connect

    Stier, Andreas V.; McCreary, Kathleen M.; Jonker, Berend T.; Kono, Junichiro; Crooker, Scott A.

    2016-02-09

    In bulk and quantum-confined semiconductors, magneto-optical studies have historically played an essential role in determining the fundamental parameters of excitons (size, binding energy, spin, dimensionality and so on). Here we report low-temperature polarized reflection spectroscopy of atomically thin WS2 and MoS2 in high magnetic fields to 65 T. Both the A and B excitons exhibit similar Zeeman splittings of approximately –230 μeV T–1 (g-factor ≃–4), thereby quantifying the valley Zeeman effect in monolayer transition-metal disulphides. Crucially, these large fields also allow observation of the small quadratic diamagnetic shifts of both A and B excitons in monolayer WS2, from which radii of ~1.53 and ~1.16 nm are calculated. Further, when analysed within a model of non-local dielectric screening, these diamagnetic shifts also constrain estimates of the A and B exciton binding energies (410 and 470 meV, respectively, using a reduced A exciton mass of 0.16 times the free electron mass). Lastly, these results highlight the utility of high magnetic fields for understanding new two-dimensional materials.

  5. Exciton diamagnetic shifts and valley Zeeman effects in monolayer WS2 and MoS2 to 65 Tesla.

    PubMed

    Stier, Andreas V; McCreary, Kathleen M; Jonker, Berend T; Kono, Junichiro; Crooker, Scott A

    2016-02-09

    In bulk and quantum-confined semiconductors, magneto-optical studies have historically played an essential role in determining the fundamental parameters of excitons (size, binding energy, spin, dimensionality and so on). Here we report low-temperature polarized reflection spectroscopy of atomically thin WS2 and MoS2 in high magnetic fields to 65 T. Both the A and B excitons exhibit similar Zeeman splittings of approximately -230 μeV T(-1) (g-factor ≃-4), thereby quantifying the valley Zeeman effect in monolayer transition-metal disulphides. Crucially, these large fields also allow observation of the small quadratic diamagnetic shifts of both A and B excitons in monolayer WS2, from which radii of ∼1.53 and ∼1.16 nm are calculated. Further, when analysed within a model of non-local dielectric screening, these diamagnetic shifts also constrain estimates of the A and B exciton binding energies (410 and 470 meV, respectively, using a reduced A exciton mass of 0.16 times the free electron mass). These results highlight the utility of high magnetic fields for understanding new two-dimensional materials.

  6. High nuclear polarization of 3He at low and high pressure by metastability exchange optical pumping at 1.5 tesla

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abboud, M.; Sinatra, A.; Maître, X.; Tastevin, G.; Nacher, P.-J.

    2004-11-01

    Metastability exchange optical pumping of helium-3 is performed in a strong magnetic field of 1.5 T. The achieved nuclear polarizations, between 80% at 1.33 mbar and 25% at 67 mbar, show a substantial improvement at high pressures with respect to standard low-field optical pumping. The specific mechanisms of metastability exchange optical pumping at high field are investigated, advantages and intrinsic limitations are discussed. From a practical point of view, these results open the way to alternative technological solutions for polarized helium-3 applications and in particular for magnetic-resonance imaging of human lungs.

  7. Multi-channel metabolic imaging, with SENSE reconstruction, of hyperpolarized [1- 13C] pyruvate in a live rat at 3.0 tesla on a clinical MR scanner

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tropp, James; Lupo, Janine M.; Chen, Albert; Calderon, Paul; McCune, Don; Grafendorfer, Thomas; Ozturk-Isik, Esin; Larson, Peder E. Z.; Hu, Simon; Yen, Yi-Fen; Robb, Fraser; Bok, Robert; Schulte, Rolf; Xu, Duan; Hurd, Ralph; Vigneron, Daniel; Nelson, Sarah

    2011-01-01

    We report metabolic images of 13C, following injection of a bolus of hyperpolarized [1-13C] pyruvate in a live rat. The data were acquired on a clinical scanner, using custom coils for volume transmission and array reception. Proton blocking of all carbon resonators enabled proton anatomic imaging with the system body coil, to allow for registration of anatomic and metabolic images, for which good correlation was achieved, with some anatomic features (kidney and heart) clearly visible in a carbon image, without reference to the corresponding proton image. Parallel imaging with sensitivity encoding was used to increase the spatial resolution in the SI direction of the rat. The signal to noise ratio in was in some instances unexpectedly high in the parallel images; variability of the polarization among different trials, plus partial volume effects, are noted as a possible cause of this.

  8. Pulsed-coil magnet systems for applying 10-30 Tesla Fields to cm-scale targets on Sandia's Z facility

    SciTech Connect

    Rovang, Dean C.; Lamppa, Derek C.; Cuneo, Michael Edward; Owen, Albert; Mckenney, John; Johnson, Drew; Radovich, Shawn; Kaye, Ronald J.; McBride, Ryan D; Alexander, C. Scott; Awe, Thomas James; Slutz, Stephen A.; Sefkow, Adam B; Haill, Thomas A.; Jones, Peter Andrew; Argo, Jeffrey W; Dalton, Devon; Robertson, Grafton Kincannon; Waisman, Eduardo Mario; Sinars, Daniel Brian; Meissner, Joel; Milhous, Mark; Nguyen, Doan; Mielke, Chuck

    2014-12-04

    We have successfully integrated the capability to apply uniform, high magnetic fields (10–30 T) to high energy density experiments on the Z facility. This system uses an 8-mF, 15-kV capacitor bank to drive large-bore (5 cm diameter), high-inductance (1–3 mH) multi-turn, multi-layer electromagnets that slowly magnetize the conductive targets used on Z over several milliseconds (time to peak field of 2–7 ms). This system was commissioned in February 2013 and has been used successfully to magnetize more than 30 experiments up to 10 T that have produced exciting and surprising physics results. These experiments used split-magnet topologies to maintain diagnostic lines of sight to the target. We then describe the design, integration, and operation of the pulsed coil system into the challenging and harsh environment of the Z Machine. We also describe our plans and designs for achieving fields up to 20 T with a reduced-gap split-magnet configuration, and up to 30 T with a solid magnet configuration in pursuit of the Magnetized Liner Inertial Fusion concept.

  9. Practical design of a 4 Tesla double-tuned RF surface coil for interleaved 1H and 23Na MRI of rat brain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alecci, M.; Romanzetti, S.; Kaffanke, J.; Celik, A.; Wegener, H. P.; Shah, N. J.

    2006-08-01

    MRI is proving to be a very useful tool for sodium quantification in animal models of stroke, ischemia, and cancer. In this work, we present the practical design of a dual-frequency RF surface coil that provides 1H and 23Na images of the rat head at 4 T. The dual-frequency RF surface coil comprised of a large loop tuned to the 1H frequency and a smaller co-planar loop tuned to the 23Na frequency. The mutual coupling between the two loops was eliminated by the use of a trap circuit inserted in the smaller coil. This independent-loop design was versatile since it enabled a separate optimisation of the sensitivity and RF field distributions of the two coils. To allow for an easy extension of this simple double-tuned coil design to other frequencies (nuclei) and dimensions, we describe in detail the practical aspects of the workbench design and MRI testing using a phantom that mimics in vivo conditions. A comparison between our independent-loop, double-tuned coil and a single-tuned 23Na coil of equal size obtained with a phantom matching in vivo conditions, showed a reduction of the 23Na sensitivity (about 28 %) because of signal losses in the trap inductance. Typical congruent 1H and 23Na rat brain images showing good SNR ( 23Na: brain 7, ventricular cerebrospinal fluid 11) and spatial resolution ( 23Na: 1.25 × 1.25 × 5 mm 3) are also reported. The in vivo SNR values obtained with this coil were comparable to, if not better than, other contemporary designs in the literature.

  10. 3-Dimensional Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopic Imaging at 3 Tesla for Early Response Assessment of Glioblastoma Patients During External Beam Radiation Therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Muruganandham, Manickam; Clerkin, Patrick P.; Smith, Brian J.; Anderson, Carryn M.; Morris, Ann; Capizzano, Aristides A.; Magnotta, Vincent; McGuire, Sarah M.; Smith, Mark C.; Bayouth, John E.; Buatti, John M.

    2014-09-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the utility of 3-dimensional magnetic resonance (3D-MR) proton spectroscopic imaging for treatment planning and its implications for early response assessment in glioblastoma multiforme. Methods and Materials: Eighteen patients with newly diagnosed, histologically confirmed glioblastoma had 3D-MR proton spectroscopic imaging (MRSI) along with T2 and T1 gadolinium-enhanced MR images at simulation and at boost treatment planning after 17 to 20 fractions of radiation therapy. All patients received standard radiation therapy (RT) with concurrent temozolomide followed by adjuvant temozolomide. Imaging for response assessment consisted of MR scans every 2 months. Progression-free survival was defined by the criteria of MacDonald et al. MRSI images obtained at initial simulation were analyzed for choline/N-acetylaspartate ratios (Cho/NAA) on a voxel-by-voxel basis with abnormal activity defined as Cho/NAA ≥2. These images were compared on anatomically matched MRSI data collected after 3 weeks of RT. Changes in Cho/NAA between pretherapy and third-week RT scans were tested using Wilcoxon matched-pairs signed rank tests and correlated with progression-free survival, radiation dose and location of recurrence using Cox proportional hazards regression. Results: After a median follow-up time of 8.6 months, 50% of patients had experienced progression based on imaging. Patients with a decreased or stable mean or median Cho/NAA values had less risk of progression (P<.01). Patients with an increase in mean or median Cho/NAA values at the third-week RT scan had a significantly greater chance of early progression (P<.01). An increased Cho/NAA at the third-week MRSI scan carried a hazard ratio of 2.72 (95% confidence interval, 1.10-6.71; P=.03). Most patients received the prescription dose of RT to the Cho/NAA ≥2 volume, where recurrence most often occurred. Conclusion: Change in mean and median Cho/NAA detected at 3 weeks was a significant predictor of early progression. The potential impact for risk-adaptive therapy based on early spectroscopic findings is suggested.

  11. Molecular MRI differentiation between primary central nervous system lymphomas and high-grade gliomas using endogenous protein-based amide proton transfer MR imaging at 3 Tesla

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Shanshan; Yu, Hao; Wang, Xianlong; Lu, Shilong; Li, Yufa; Feng, Lyujin; Zhang, Yi; Heo, Hye-Young; Lee, Dong-Hoon; Zhou, Jinyuan; Wen, Zhibo

    2015-01-01

    Objectives To show the ability of using the amide-proton-transfer-weighted (APTW) MRI signals as imaging biomarkers to differentiate primary central-nervous-system lymphomas (PCNSLs) from high-grade gliomas (HGGs). Methods Eleven patients with lymphomas and 21 patients with HGGs were examined. Magnetization-transfer (MT) spectra over an offset range of ±6 ppm and the conventional MT ratio (MTR) at 15.6 ppm were acquired. The APTW signals, total chemical-exchange-saturation-transfer signal (integral between 0 and 5 ppm, CESTtotal), and MTR signal were obtained and compared between PCNSLs and HGGs. The diagnostic performance was assessed with the receiver-operating-characteristic-curve analysis. Results The PCNSLs usually showed more homogeneous APTW hyperintensity (spatially compared to the normal brain tissue) than the HGGs. The APTWmax, APTWmax-min, and CESTtotal signal intensities were significantly lower (P < 0.05, 0.001, and 0.05, respectively), while the APTWmin and MTR were significantly higher (both P < 0.01) in PCNSL lesions than in HGG lesions. The APTW values in peritumoral oedema were significantly lower for PCNSLs than for HGGs (P < 0.01). APTWmax-min had the highest area under the receiver-operating-characteristic curve (0.963) and accuracy (94.1%) in differentiating PCNSLs from HGGs. Conclusions The protein-based APTW signal would be a valuable MRI biomarker by which to identify PCNSLs and HGGs presurgically. PMID:25925361

  12. Determination of the Upper Critical Field of a Single Crystal LiFeAs: The Magnetic Torque Study up to 35 Tesla

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kurita, Nobuyuki; Kitagawa, Kentaro; Matsubayashi, Kazuyuki; Kismarahardja, Ade; Choi, Eun-Sang; Brooks, James S.; Uwatoko, Yoshiya; Uji, Shinya; Terashima, Taichi

    2011-01-01

    We report on the upper critical field Bc2 of a superconducting LiFeAs single crystal with Tc ˜ 16 K, determined from magnetic torque measurements in dc-magnetic fields up to 35 T and at temperatures down to 0.3 K. Bc2 at 0.3 K is obtained to be 26.4 and 15.5 T for the applied field Ba \\parallel ab and Ba \\parallel c, respectively. The anisotropy param eter Γ = Bc2ab/Bc2c is ˜3 at Tc and decreases to 1.7 as T → 0, showing rather isotropic superconductivity. While Bc2 is orbitally-limited for Ba \\parallel c, the spin-paramagnetic effect is evident in the temperature dependence of Bc2 for Ba \\parallel ab.

  13. Design and Development of Wireless Power Transmission for Unmanned Air Vehicles

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-09-01

    by radio waves can be traced back to Heinrich Hertz [9] and Nikola Tesla [10–12]. In 1899, Tesla was the first to carry out experiments on power...The Life of Nikola Tesla . New York: Washburn, 1944. [11] Margaret Cheney, Tesla : Man Out of Time. Mattituck, New York: Amereon House, 1981. 60...

  14. An Annotated Bibliography of Studies and Reports Produced by the Advanced Decision Architectures Consortium of the Collaborative Technology Alliance from 2001 to 2010

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-12-01

    In one version of the story the scientist and inventor Nikola Tesla visited Henry Ford at his automobile factory. The factory was having some kind...of difficulty with its systems, and Ford asked Tesla if he could help identify the problem area. Tesla \\ . walked up to a wall of boilerplates...impressed, and told Tesla to send an invoice. The bill arrived, for $10,000. Ford, never known for his generosity, was astonished at the cost of writing

  15. Lecture Notes on Engineering Measurement for Software Engineers

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1993-04-01

    atmospheric pressure, ioniza- tion of either sign equal to one electrostatic unit of charge Nikola Tesla American physi- tesla : magnetic 1 weber per...scale) Charles R. Richter (scale) Michael Faraday (2 answers) Wilhelm Rontgen Enrico Fermi Nikola Tesla Karl Friedrich Gauss Allesandro Volta Joseph... tesla matician, astro- flux density nomer 1777-1855 Joseph Henry American physi- henry: inductance inductance of a circuit in which cist 1797-1878 the

  16. RPAs: Revolution or Retrogression?

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-04-01

    However, the results were not at all commensurate with the effort invested.6 Nikola Tesla immigrated to the United States and patented many things in...combat.suite101.com/article.cfm/Japanese _balloon_bombs_of_wwii (accessed 14 October 2009). 7. “ Nikola Tesla ,” http://www.crhystalinks.com/tesla.html...accessed 14 October 2009); Nikola Tesla , “The Transmission of Electrical Energy without Wires as a Means for Furthering Peace,” Electrical World

  17. Strategy in the Robotic Age: A Case for Autonomous Warfare

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-09-01

    Nikola Tesla demonstrated the first remotely piloted vehicle. The device was small and offered limited capability, but it was a precursor to the...MCDP-1, 67. 90 Nikola Tesla , My Inventions: The Autobiography of Nikola Tesla (Williston, VT: Hart Bros., 1919; reprinted 1982), Kindle edition, 61...www.defense.gov/pubs/DOD-USRM-2013.pdf. 152 Ray Kurzweil, interviewed December 7, 2006 and published in Singer, Wired for War, 102. 59 Nikola Tesla when

  18. Diagnostic Value of Diffusion-weighted Imaging and Apparent Diffusion Coefficient Values in the Differentiation of Breast Lesions, Histpathologic Subgroups and Correlatıon with Prognostıc Factors using 3.0 Tesla MR

    PubMed Central

    Akın, Yasin; Uğurlu, M. Ümit; Kaya, Handan; Arıbal, Erkin

    2016-01-01

    Objective The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of the apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) and diffusion-weighted imaging in differentiating benign from malignant breast lesions, histopathologic subtypes of breast tumors, and to find a correlation with prognostic factors using 3T MR. Materials and Methods A total of 165 patients aged between 16 and 78 years with 181 histopathologically-verifed breast lesions were enrolled in this study. A 3T MR system and bilateral phased array breast coil was used. Diffusion-weighted imaging was performed with spin echo “echo planar” with “b” values: 50, 400, and 800 seconds/mm2. ADC values were calculated for normal fibroglandular tissue and breast lesions. ADC values of independent groups were compared using Student’s t-test. ROC analysis was used to find a threshold ADC value in the differentiation of lesions. Results The mean ADC values were 1.35±0.16 × 10−3 mm2/s for normal fibroglandular tissue, 1.41±0.24 × 10−3 mm2/s for benign breast lesions and 0.83±0.19 × 10−3 mm2/s for malignant breast lesions. The AUC with ROC analysis was 0.945 and the threshold for ADC was 1.08 × 10−3 mm2/s with a sensitivity and specificity of 92% and 92%, respectively. The threshold value for ADC ratio was 0.9 with 96% sensitivity and 89% specificity. The mean ADC of malignant breast lesions was statistically lower for benign lesions (p<0.01). We found no correlation between the mean ADC values and ER-PR receptor, Her2, and Ki-67 values. Conclusion Diffusion-weighted imaging has high diagnostic value with high sensitivity and specificity in differentiating malignant and benign breast lesions.

  19. Analysis of Monoclonal Antibodies in Human Serum as a Model for Clinical Monoclonal Gammopathy by Use of 21 Tesla FT-ICR Top-Down and Middle-Down MS/MS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, Lidong; Anderson, Lissa C.; Barnidge, David R.; Murray, David L.; Hendrickson, Christopher L.; Marshall, Alan G.

    2017-03-01

    The cellular metabolome is considered to be a representation of cellular phenotype and cellular response to changes to internal or external events. Methods to expand the coverage of the expansive physiochemical properties that makeup the metabolome currently utilize multi-step extractions and chromatographic separations prior to chemical detection, leading to lengthy analysis times. In this study, a single-step procedure for the extraction and separation of a sample using a micro-capillary as a separatory funnel to achieve analyte partitioning within an organic/aqueous immiscible solvent system is described. The separated analytes are then spotted for MALDI-MS imaging and distribution ratios are calculated. Initially, the method is applied to standard mixtures for proof of partitioning. The extraction of an individual cell is non-reproducible; therefore, a broad chemical analysis of metabolites is necessary and will be illustrated with the one-cell analysis of a single Snu-5 gastric cancer cell taken from a cellular suspension. The method presented here shows a broad partitioning dynamic range as a single-step method for lipid analysis demonstrating a decrease in ion suppression often present in MALDI analysis of lipids.

  20. Gd-EOB-DTPA-enhanced 3.0-Tesla MRI findings for the preoperative detection of focal liver lesions: Comparison with iodine-enhanced multi-detector computed tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Hyong-Hu; Goo, Eun-Hoe; Im, In-Chul; Lee, Jae-Seung; Kim, Moon-Jib; Kwak, Byung-Joon; Chung, Woon-Kwan; Dong, Kyung-Rae

    2012-12-01

    The safety of gadolinium-ethoxybenzyl-diethylenetriamine-pentaacetic-acid (Gd-EOB-DTPA) has been confirmed, but more study is needed to assess the diagnostic accuracy of Gd-EOB-DTPA-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in patients with a hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) for whom surgical treatment is considered or with a metastatic hepatoma. Research is also needed to examine the rate of detection of hepatic lesions compared to multi-detector computed tomography (MDCT), which is used most frequently to localize and characterize a HCC. Gd-EOB-DTPA-enhanced MRI and iodine-enhanced MDCT imaging were compared for the preoperative detection of focal liver lesions. The clinical usefulness of each method was examined. The current study enrolled 79 patients with focal liver lesions who preoperatively underwent MRI and MDCT. In these patients, there was less than one month between the two diagnostic modalities. Imaging data were taken before and after contrast enhancement in both methods. To evaluate the images, we analyzed the signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) and the contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR) in the lesions and the liver parenchyma. To compare the sensitivity of the two methods, we performed a quantitative analysis of the percentage signal intensity of the liver (PSIL) on a high resolution picture archiving and communication system (PACS) monitor (paired-samples t-test, p < 0.05). The enhancement was evaluated based on a consensus of four observers. The enhancement pattern and the morphological features during the arterial and the delayed phases were correlated between the Gd-EOB-DTPA-enhanced MRI findings and the iodine-enhanced MDCT by using an adjusted x2 test. The SNRs, CNRs, and PSIL all had a greater detection rate in Gd-EOB-DTPA enhanced MRI than in iodine-enhanced MDCT. Hepatocyte-selective uptake was observed 20 minutes after the injection in the focal nodular hyperplasia (FNH, 9/9), adenoma (9/10), and highly-differentiated HCC (grade G1, 27/30). Rim enhancement was detected in all metastases (30/30). During the arterial and the delayed phases, good overall agreement between the gadoxetic-acid-enhanced MR and CT was observed (x2 test, p < 0.05). For the preoperative detection of focal liver lesions, Gd-EOB-DTPA-enhanced MRI had a higher diagnostic value and higher detection rate than iodine-enhanced MDCT. The arterial and the delayed dynamic enhancement patterns, and the gadoxetic-acid-enhanced MR imaging can provide information on the possible degree of cellular differentiation of a HCC, adenoma or metastatic tumor.

  1. Early Choline Levels From 3-Tesla MR Spectroscopy After Exclusive Radiation Therapy in Patients With Clinically Localized Prostate Cancer are Predictive of Plasmatic Levels of PSA at 1 Year

    SciTech Connect

    Crehange, Gilles; Maingon, Philippe; Gauthier, Melanie; Parfait, Sebastien; Cochet, Alexandre; Mirjolet, Celine; Bonnetain, Franck; Cormier, Luc; Brunotte, Francois; Walker, Paul

    2011-11-15

    Purpose: To investigate the time course response of prostate metabolism to irradiation using magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS) at 3-month intervals and its impact on biochemical control. Methods and Materials: Between January 2008 and April 2010, 24 patients with localized prostate cancer were prospectively enrolled in the Evaluation of the Response to Irradiation with MR Spectroscopy (ERIS) trial. All the patients had been treated with intensity-modulated radiation therapy with or without long-term adjuvant hormonal therapy (LTHT) and underwent 3-T MRS and prostate-specific antigen (PSA) assays at baseline and every 3 months thereafter up to 12 months. Results: After radiation, the mean normalized citrate level (citrate/water) decreased significantly over time, both in the peripheral zone (PZ) (p = 0.0034) and in the entire prostate (p = 0.0008), whereas no significant change was observed in mean normalized choline levels (choline/water) in the PZ (p = 0.84) and in the entire prostate (p = 0.95). At 6 months after radiation, the mean choline level was significantly lower in the PZ for patients with a PSA value of {<=}0.5 ng/mL at 12 months (4.9 {+-} 1.7 vs. 7.1 {+-} 1.5, p = 0.0378). Similar results were observed at 12 months in the PZ (6.2 {+-} 2.3 vs. 11.4 {+-} 4.1, p = 0.0117 for choline level and 3.4 {+-} 0.7 vs. 16.1 {+-} 6.1, p = 0.0054 for citrate level) and also in the entire prostate (6.2 {+-} 1.9 vs. 10.4 {+-} 3.2, p = 0.014 for choline level and 3.0 {+-} 0.8 vs. 13.3 {+-} 4.7, p = 0.0054 for citrate level). For patients receiving LTHT, there was no correlation between choline or citrate levels and PSA value, either at baseline or at follow-up. Conclusions: Low normalized choline in the PZ, 6 months after radiation, predicts which patients attained a PSA {<=}0.5 ng/mL at 1 year. Further analyses with longer follow-up times are warranted to determine whether or not these new biomarkers can conclusively predict the early radiation response and the clinical outcome for patients with or without LTHT.

  2. Biological responses of human solid tumor cells to X-ray irradiation within a 1.5-Tesla magnetic field generated by a magnetic resonance imaging-linear accelerator.

    PubMed

    Wang, Li; Hoogcarspel, Stan Jelle; Wen, Zhifei; van Vulpen, Marco; Molkentine, David P; Kok, Jan; Lin, Steven H; Broekhuizen, Roel; Ang, Kie-Kian; Bovenschen, Niels; Raaymakers, Bas W; Frank, Steven J

    2016-10-01

    Devices that combine magnetic resonance imaging with linear accelerators (MRL) represent a novel tool for MR-guided radiotherapy. However, whether magnetic fields (MFs) generated by these devices affect the radiosensitivity of tumors is unknown. We investigated the influence of a 1.5-T MF on cell viability and radioresponse of human solid tumors. Human head/neck cancer and lung cancer cells were exposed to single or fractionated 6-MV X-ray radiation; effects of the MF on cell viability were determined by cell plating efficiency and on radioresponsiveness by clonogenic cell survival. Doses needed to reduce the fraction of surviving cells to 37% of the initial value (D0s) were calculated for multiple exposures to MF and radiation. Results were analyzed using Student's t-tests. Cell viability was no different after single or multiple exposures to MRL than after exposure to a conventional linear accelerator (Linac, without MR-generated MF) in 12 of 15 experiments (all P > 0.05). Single or multiple exposures to MF had no influence on cell radioresponse (all P > 0.05). Cells treated up to four times with an MRL or a Linac further showed no changes in D0s with MF versus without MF (all P > 0.05). In conclusion, MF within the MRL does not seem to affect in vitro tumor radioresponsiveness as compared with a conventional Linac. Bioelectromagnetics. 37:471-480, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  3. Analysis of a Van de Graaff Generator for EMP Direct Current Survivability Testing

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-03-01

    Conference on Nikola Tesla , Farmingville, New York, 2006. [16] T & M Research Products, "SERIES SDN-414 Current Viewing Resistors Description," [Online...Accessed 18 October 2012]. 101 [15] G. L. Johnson, " Tesla Coil Impedance," in The First Tesla Museum and Science Center International

  4. Efficient Rectenna Design for Wireless Power Transmission for MAV Applications

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2005-12-01

    to the days of Hertz and Tesla , when it was discovered that energy could be transported in electromagnetic waves in free space. Nikola Tesla was the...electromagnetic fields in the air. His work was further explored by Tesla [3, 4] who noted that the earth had its own resonance that could be used to...

  5. Frequency Mapping for the Operational Frequency Manager

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2008-03-01

    waves by Heinrich Hertz. Created radio waves using a Spark Gap Transmitter. 1893 Nikolai Tesla transmits radio waves. 1896 Guglielmo M. Marconi ...radio. Cellular technology can trace it roots to two very pioneering inventors Nokolai Tesla and Guglielimo Marconi . The first generation of cell...shoulders of Tesla, Marconi and many others that are unnamed. The technology included above, cellular technology and packet data are key components of

  6. Noninvasive MR-Guided HIFU Therapy of TSC-Associated Renal Angiomyolipomas

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-09-01

    therapy and a new Ingenia 1.5 Tesla MRI scanner from Philips HealthCare. Using the new instrumentation, we established a large animal MR-guided HIFU... Tesla multi-channel MR imaging system. 1b. Software development. Dynamic parallel imaging and motion correction methods will be developed on...Philips 3.0 Tesla multi-channel MR imaging system. Real-time reconstruction will be implemented. Four major imaging methods, T1 weighted imaging, T2

  7. Environmental Impact Analysis Process. Final Environmental Impact Statement. Part 2. Proposed High Frequency Active Auroral Research Program.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1993-07-01

    which I will identify by page number. Nikola Tesla , built huge facilities early in this century to study electricity and the earth’s ability to...I believe you have left out some critical points which the public will want to have answers to before construction and operation begin. Like Tesla ...based on the proposed tax laws), then it would be helpful to have a BTU equivalent for the facility and its components as well. 11-4 Like Tesla , the

  8. An Improved Rectenna for Wireless Power Transmission for Unmanned Air Vehicles

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-09-01

    A. Background The concept of wireless power transmission (WPT) dates back to the days of Heinrich Hertz and Nikola Tesla [1], who discovered that...energy could be transported by electromagnetic waves in free space. Tesla considered the use of wireless power transmission employing low-frequency...his article, Brown wrote a description of the development of WPT and the milestones along the way. Previously, Tesla carried out numerous

  9. Integrating the Unmanned Aircraft System into the National Airspace System

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-06-18

    successful.15 In 1884, a Serbian named Nikola Tesla , migrated to the United States with his idea of remotely controlling objects without any controls...attached. Tesla demonstrated the ability to remotely control objects wirelessly with the use of a small boat commanded by sending frequencies...through radio transmissions or radio waves. In 1915, twelve years following the Wright Brothers first piloted flight, Tesla would publish his

  10. The UAV and the Current and Future Regulatory Construction for Integration into the National Airspace System

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2005-07-01

    vehicles had already begun. In fact, a giant step toward wireless control from a separate or remote location was already taken by Nikola Tesla who in...1898 successfully demonstrated a radio control system he called “telautomaton.” 68 Nikola Tesla was a Serbian electrical engineer-inventor and...J. Seifer, Wizard: The Life and Times of Nikola Tesla Biography of a Genius, 377 (1996). 67 See Newcome, supra note 23, at 16-7. 68 Seifer

  11. East Europe Report, Economic and Industrial Affairs, No. 2400.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1983-05-18

    Transactions have also been concluded in other areas. Thus " Nikola Tesla " of Zagreb will deliver to Czechoslovakia equipment for telephone offices...were 141.1 percent fulfilled by this sector, or overfulfilled by Kcs 60 million. Only the production of CMOS circuits by the Tesla Electronics...production by Kcs 92 million, or by more than one-half. All of this increase came from the Bratislava Tesla Consumer Electronics VHJ, which in 1982 placed

  12. Minimizing Losses in a Space Laser Power Beaming System

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-03-01

    focused sunlight onto enemy ships to set them ablaze (Perram, 2009). In more recent history the inventor Nikola Tesla proposed a wireless power...in which to power modern conveniences than running wires through walls or along ceilings and floors. This Tesla Effect can be easily demonstrated...using a Tesla Coil to ionize air particles and create a current in a modern fluorescent tube. Once the device has been turned on simply holding the

  13. Mission Analysis and Design for Space Based Inter-Satellite Laser Power Beaming

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-03-01

    20]. Finally, as shown in Figure 2.1, 1891 saw Nikola Tesla file for U.S. Patent No. 454,622 “System of Electric Lighting”. At the World Columbian...Laser-Beamer Power . Tech- nical Report 2014/34883, Jet Propulsion Laboratory, February 1993. 14. Aldrich, Lisa J. Nikola Tesla and the Taming of... Tesla , Nikola . “The Transmission of Electrical Energy without Wires,” Electrical World and Engineer (March 1904). 33. Tribble, Alan C. The Space

  14. The History and Effects of the Kosovo Polje Mythology

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2005-06-17

    Century, in which the Serbian-American inventor, writer, and eccentric, Nikola Tesla , wrote about the famous Serb poet Zmai Iovan Iovanovich. In this pro...Politics of Serbia in the 1990s. New York: Columbia University Press, 1999. Tesla , Nikola , “Zmai Iovan Iovanovich: The Chief Servian Poet.” The...2Florian Bieber, “Nationalist Mobilization and Stories of Serb Suffering,” Rethinking History 6, no. 1 (2002): 98. 3Nikola Tesla , “Zmai Iovan Iovanovich

  15. Overmanned and Undertrained: Preparing UAS Crewmembers for Unmanned Close Air Support

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-03-22

    of Significant Events67 1884 Nikola Tesla , father of remote control, immigrates to the United States, arriving in New York City reportedly with...plans for a remotely controlled airplane. He begins working for Thomas Edison’s company. 1898 Tesla submits a paper describing a remotely controlled...Martin, refuses to publish it due to its outlandishness. May 1898 Tesla demonstrates his “telautomaton,” a remotely controlled boat, at an

  16. USSR and Eastern Europe Scientific Abstracts, Electronics and Electrical Engineering, No. 43.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-11-02

    621.394.763 ’ NIKOLA TESLA ’ TYPE D TELEGRAPH EXCHANGE Moscow ELEKTROSVYAZ’ in Russian No 6, Jun 78 pp 31-35 manuscript received 10 Sep 77...Yugoslav Nikola Tesla firm in Zagreb and used presently in Moscow, Leningrad, Kiev and Minsk do not meet the requirements of the 200- baud...THE NEW SECAM/PAL DECODER DESIGNED FOR FUTURE PRODUCTION OF TESLA ORAVA COLOR TELEVISION RECEIVERS Prague SDELOVACI TECHNIKA in Czech Vol 26 No 4

  17. JPRS Report, East Europe

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1991-06-14

    groups of the Nikola Petkov Bulgarian National Agrarian Union [BZNS-NP] and the BZNS [Bulgarian National Agrarian Union] on forming a joint parliamen...underway between Tesla Roznov and Samsung and between Tesla Strasnice and Goldstar on cooperation in the production of color television sets. According...1990 and March 1991. Since March, this negative development has even "accelerated." Tesla Pardubice, for example, will "soon" lay off another 800

  18. A Follow-up Study on Wireless Power Transmission for Unmanned Air Vehicles

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-12-01

    Popovic, “Wireless Powering for Low-Power Distributed Sensors,” Sixth International Symposium Nikola Tesla , 18-20 October 2006. [32] Avago...1 I. INTRODUCTION A. MICROWAVE WIRELESS POWER TRANSMISSION The concept of power transmission dates back to Heinrich Hertz [1] and Nikola ... Tesla [2]. Tesla aimed to develop a high power transmitter to ascertain the law of propagation of current through the earth and the atmosphere. Although

  19. Deflating British Radar Myths of World War II

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1997-03-01

    this interference was well enough known for scientists to theorize how to use this interference. In 1900, Nikola Tesla suggested a wireless system...which would use reflected radio waves to locate objects and even to measure their distance. Tesla explained the concept of radar as, “When we raise...of a moving object such as a vessel at sea.” Unfortunately, Tesla was considered an anarchist and was never given funding for his ideas. His ideas

  20. Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy: An Objectives Technique for the Quantification of Prostate Cancer Pathologies

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-02-01

    the magnetic field strength of 1.5T (T – Tesla , the unit for magnetic field strength, named after Nikola Tesla 1856-1943). To give context to this... Tesla , the unit for magnetic field strength TE = Echo time TLE = Temporal lobe epilepsy TM = Mixing time TR = Recycle time VOI = Volume of interest WHO...Ugurbil K. Localized in vivo 13C- NMR of glutamate metabolism in the human brain: initial results at 4 tesla . Dev Neurosci 1998; 20(4-5): 380-388. [297

  1. The Impact of Pregnancy on U.S. Army Readiness

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1999-04-01

    AU/ACSC/016/1999-04 AIR COMMAND AND STAFF COLLEGE AIR UNIVERSITY THE IMPACT OF PREGNANCY ON U.S. ARMY READINESS By Merideth A. Bucher, Major, U.S...Base, Alabama April 1999 ii Disclaimer The views expressed in this academic research paper are those of the author( s ) and do not reflect the official...vi THE IMPACT OF PREGNANCY ON U.S

  2. 40 CFR Table 6 to Subpart Fff of... - Site-Specific Compliance Schedules and Increments of Progress a

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... Resource Recovery Facility Long Beach, California January 11, 1999 04/30/99 10/31/99 04/30/00 12/19/00 All..., Pennsylvania 11/01/98 05/18/99 11/14/99 11/19/00 12/19/00 I-95 Energy/Resource Recovery Facility Lorton... construction Increment 4Complete on-site construction Increment 5Final compliance c Stanislaus...

  3. 40 CFR Table 6 to Subpart Fff of... - Site-Specific Compliance Schedules and Increments of Progress a

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... Resource Recovery Facility Long Beach, California January 11, 1999 04/30/99 10/31/99 04/30/00 12/19/00 All..., Pennsylvania 11/01/98 05/18/99 11/14/99 11/19/00 12/19/00 I-95 Energy/Resource Recovery Facility Lorton... construction Increment 4Complete on-site construction Increment 5Final compliance c Stanislaus...

  4. 40 CFR Table 6 to Subpart Fff of... - Site-Specific Compliance Schedules and Increments of Progress a

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... Resource Recovery Facility Long Beach, California January 11, 1999 04/30/99 10/31/99 04/30/00 12/19/00 All..., Pennsylvania 11/01/98 05/18/99 11/14/99 11/19/00 12/19/00 I-95 Energy/Resource Recovery Facility Lorton... construction Increment 4Complete on-site construction Increment 5Final compliance c Stanislaus...

  5. 40 CFR Table 6 to Subpart Fff of... - Site-Specific Compliance Schedules and Increments of Progress a

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... Resource Recovery Facility Long Beach, California January 11, 1999 04/30/99 10/31/99 04/30/00 12/19/00 All..., Pennsylvania 11/01/98 05/18/99 11/14/99 11/19/00 12/19/00 I-95 Energy/Resource Recovery Facility Lorton... construction Increment 4Complete on-site construction Increment 5Final compliance c Stanislaus...

  6. 40 CFR Table 6 to Subpart Fff of... - Site-Specific Compliance Schedules and Increments of Progress a

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... Resource Recovery Facility Long Beach, California January 11, 1999 04/30/99 10/31/99 04/30/00 12/19/00 All..., Pennsylvania 11/01/98 05/18/99 11/14/99 11/19/00 12/19/00 I-95 Energy/Resource Recovery Facility Lorton... construction Increment 4Complete on-site construction Increment 5Final compliance c Stanislaus...

  7. The Role of Dosimetry in High-Quality EMI Risk Assessment

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-09-14

    Republic Slovenia • Croatian Agency for Telecommunications • City of Zagreb SPONSORS: • EOARD European Office of Aerospace R&D • Ericsson- Nikola Tesla ...Interactions, Heating, and Artefacts at 1.5- Tesla . J Magn Reson Imaging. 14: 295-299. 10. Shellock FG, Gounis M, Wakhloo A. 2005. Detachalbe Coil for Cerebral

  8. Gains in the Education of Mathematics and Science GEMS: Teaching Robotics to High School Students

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-01-01

    the sensing plus reacting definition. 24 Start of Modern Robots • Military Systems drive research • In 1898 Nikola Tesla publicly...demonstrated a radio-controlled (teleoperated) boat, similar to a modern radio operated vehicle. Tesla hoped to develop the wireless torpedo into a weapon

  9. Biological Effects of Nonionizing Electromagnetic Radiation. Volume IV. Number 4.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1980-06-01

    Nikola Tesla , who demonstrated that not feasible to extrapolate data from experimental oscillations around 20 kHz could not be perceived animals to...magnetic field, was used in conjunction decreases until at 2,450 MHz, for an assumed 1-cm fat with steady magnetic fields of less than 0.5 tesla to

  10. International Seminar on The Role of Dosimetry in High-Quality EMF Risk Assessment Held in Ljubljana, Slovenia and Zagreb, Croatia on 13-15 September 2006

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-09-01

    Republic Slovenia • Croatian Agency for Telecommunications • City of Zagreb SPONSORS: • EOARD European Office of Aerospace R&D • Ericsson- Nikola Tesla ...Interactions, Heating, and Artefacts at 1.5- Tesla . J Magn Reson Imaging. 14: 295-299. 10. Shellock FG, Gounis M, Wakhloo A. 2005. Detachalbe Coil for Cerebral

  11. People Capability Maturity Model (P-CMM) Version 2.0, Second Edition

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-07-01

    Software Development in India.” Crosstalk 14, 8 (2001): 9–11. Ericsson 08 Ericsson Nikola Tesla d. d. “Business results of joint stock company Ericsson... Nikola Tesla in Q1 2008.” [online]. Available WWW <URL: http://www.ericsson.hr/investors/actual_2008/results_q1.shtml>. Eskildsen 00 Eskildsen, J. K

  12. Assessing the Economic and Environmental Impacts Associated with Current Street Lighting Technologies

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-03-01

    lamps are a relatively new lighting technology for street lighting, the principles behind the technology date to the 1890s when Nikolas Tesla ...demonstrated the transfer of power to electrodeless incandescent and fluorescent bulbs (Roberts, 2009). Tesla was granted patent 454,622 to cover an early

  13. East Europe Report, Economic and Industrial Affairs

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-11-02

    observance of the completion of the " Nikola Tesla " basic (main) 380-kilovolt power transmission network through Yugoslavia, which had been under...Committee for the construction of the Nikola Tesla 380-kilovolt pwoer transmission network. The electricity deficiency during the past 2 years has

  14. Mesh Networks within A Distributed Operations Framework Utilizing IP Based Radios

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-09-01

    9 Nikola Tesla , Modern Mechanics and Inventions, July, 1934 10 When discussing or referencing IP the authors are specifically...they wander off through equation after equation, and eventually build a structure which has no relation to reality. Nikola Tesla9 A. OVERVIEW

  15. Evaluating Detection and Estimation Capabilities of Magnetometer-Based Vehicle Sensors

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-05-01

    3x 2 −R2) + 3M2xy R5 ( teslas ) (1) B2 = 10 −7M2(3y 2 −R2) + 3M1xy R5 ( teslas ), (2) where M = (M1,M2) is the induced moment of vehicle, R is the range...Magnetometer bandwidth 11 Hz Magnetometer sensitivity 9× 10−10 Tesla False Alarm Probability (PFA) 1× 10−6 Table 1: Detection Simulation Parameters 5...Sample Results Probabilities of detection and bounds on the kinematic variances are computed for light vehicles ( cars ) and off road vehicles (ATVs

  16. Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy: An Objective Technique for the Quantification of Prostate Cancer Pathologies

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-02-01

    named after Nikola Tesla 1856-1943). To give context to this magnitude, the average Earth field strength is on the order of 0.00005T. For readers who...transferred on ice into a human 7- tesla MR scanner. A single loop surface coil was placed in the middle and around the prostate, though which localized MRS...discussed in this review, if not otherwise specified, were measured at the magnetic field strength of 1.5T (T – Tesla , the unit for magnetic field strength

  17. The Effects on Pilot Retention as a Result of the United States Air Force’s Banked Pilot Program of 1991 to 1993

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1999-04-01

    AU/ACSC/143/1999-04 AIR COMMAND AND STAFF COLLEGE AIR UNIVERSITY THE EFFECTS ON PILOT RETENTION AS A RESULT OF THE UNITED STATES AIR FORCE’S BANKED ...SUBTITLE The Effects on Pilot Retention as a Result of the United States Air Force’s Banked Pilot Program of 1991 to 1993 Unclassified 5a. CONTRACT...RELEASE , 13. SUPPLEMENTARY NOTES 14. ABSTRACT The purpose of this study is to highlight the effects of the United States Air Force’s banked pilot program

  18. Readiness and Retention: Effects of Downsizing and Increased Operations Tempo

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1999-04-01

    AU/ACSC/120/1999-04 AIR COMMAND AND STAFF COLLEGE AIR UNIVERSITY READINESS AND RETENTION: EFFECTS OF DOWNSIZING AND INCREASED OPERATIONS TEMPO by...1999 2. REPORT TYPE Thesis 3. DATES COVERED (FROM - TO) xx-xx-1999 to xx-xx-1999 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Readiness and Retention: Effects of Downsizing ...to reduce defense spending created a period of downsizing . Since 1989 the U.S. Air Force has reduced its force by one-third and experienced 12 years of

  19. Performance predictions for a room temperature, Ericsson cycle, magnetic heat pump

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Purnell, J. G.

    1982-05-01

    The performance potential of a room temperature magnetic heat pump utilizing Gadolinium and operating on an Ericsson Cycle was investigated at magnetic flux densities of 2 and 7-Tesla which represent the upper limits of conventional and superconducting electromagnetics, respectively. At a coefficient of performance of 5, a 7-Tesla system would provide a cooling capacity of at best 1200 BTU per hour per pound of Gadolinium while a 2-Tesla system would operate at approximately 130 BTU per hour per pound of Gadolinium. Magnetic circuit efficiency was not determined but must be high (95-percent or better) in order for the magnetic heat pump performance to compete with conventional cooling systems. It is unlikely the magnetic heat pump investigated could approach the performance and compactness of the conventional cooling systems unless field strengths much greater than 7-Tesla are possible.

  20. Magnetohydrodynamics (MHD) Engineering Test Facility (ETF) 200 MWe power plant. Conceptual Design Engineering Report (CDER) supplement. Magnet system special investigations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1981-01-01

    The results of magnet system special investigations listed below are summarized: 4 Tesla Magnet Alternate Design Study; 6 Tesla Magnet Manufacturability Study. The conceptual design for a 4 Tesla superconducting magnet system for use with an alternate (supersonic) ETF power train is described, and estimated schedule and cost are identified. The magnet design is scaled from the ETF 6 T Tesla design. Results of a manufacturability study and a revised schedule and cost estimate for the ETF 6 T magnet are reported. Both investigations are extensions of the conceptual design of a 6 T magnet system performed earlier as a part of the overall MED-ETF conceptual design described in Conceptual Design Engineering Report (CDER) Vol. V, System Design Description (SDD) 503 dated September, 1981, DOE/NASA/0224-1; NASA CR-165/52.

  1. Three Inexpensive Static-Electricity Demonstrations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gore, Gordon R.; Gregg, William R.

    1992-01-01

    Describes demonstrations to (1) construct an inexpensive static electricity detector; (2) obtain an abundant supply of either negative or positive charge using household items; and (3) create static electricity using a Tesla coil or Van de Graaff generator. (MDH)

  2. Applications of a superconducting solenoidal separator in the experimental investigation of nuclear reactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hinde, D. J.; Carter, I. P.; Dasgupta, M.; Simpson, E. C.; Cook, K. J.; Kalkal, Sunil; Luong, D. H.; Williams, E.

    2017-01-01

    This paper describes applications of a novel superconducting solenoidal separator, with magnetic fields up to 8 Tesla, for studies of nuclear reactions using the Heavy Ion Accelerator Facility at the Australian National University.

  3. International Physics Olympiad (24th) Held in Williamsburg, Virginia on July 10 - 18, 1993

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1993-07-18

    B (x) -2.~,P- ....... -x3’ A B where B is in Tesla [- N/(A m)],K - 10.7 Tesla mVA, x is in m, and j is in A m2 . (2) The period of small torsional...1/T 2) (28.2± .51 )x16 7 Tesla sec2 A(1/T 2)px O x =(120+.001)m :, Data in seconds for 20 oscillations- Pocket Calculator Results: 20 T, , 14.56...sec 2 - • B, ,x) = (34.7±0.8)xlO7 Tesla 134 Method I. . Solution, Page 8 Introduced bucking magnet in transverse position to slow oscillations in

  4. EUROGRAM: July-August 2000

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2000-08-01

    experts briefed a tri-service IR seeker, as well as investigating passive millimeter- group at Edison House. TME traces its history back to wave (MMW...applications. four types of plasma generators; a high-frequency Tesla coil, a pulse repetitive discharge, AC discharges, Test Facilities: Two laboratories...such as shock splitting (two discrete created using an HF Tesla coil and propagated into the waves), unstable shock motion (unsteady shock laboratory

  5. Correlating Hemodynamic Magnetic Resonance Imaging with high-field Intracranial Vessel Wall Imaging in Stroke

    PubMed Central

    Langdon, Weston; Donahue, Manus J.; van der Kolk, Anja G.; Rane, Swati; Strother, Megan K.

    2014-01-01

    Vessel wall magnetic resonance imaging at ultra-high field (7 Tesla) can be used to visualize vascular lesions noninvasively and holds potential for improving stroke-risk assessment in patients with ischemic cerebrovascular disease. We present the first multi-modal comparison of such high-field vessel wall imaging with more conventional (i) 3 Tesla hemodynamic magnetic resonance imaging and (ii) digital subtraction angiography in a 69-year-old male with a left temporal ischemic infarct. PMID:25426229

  6. Isentropic Compression Studies at the Los Alamos National High Magnetic Field Laboratory

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-06-01

    actinide samples in extremes of high magnetic field (to 300 Tesla) [1, 2]. A simple modification to the single-turn magnet has converted it to a fast...Isentropic Compression Studies At The Los Alamos National High Magnetic Field Laboratory 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b. GRANT NUMBER 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT ...Laboratory (NHMFL) at Los Alamos was originally designed to study actinide samples in extremes of high magnetic field (to 300 Tesla) [1, 2]. A simple

  7. Aircraft Pilot Situational Awareness Interface for Airborne Operation of Network Controlled Unmanned Systems (US)

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2008-03-01

    2007-2032. 32 Nicola Tesla and his telautomatons (robots); Tesla further demonstrated remote control of objects by wireless in an exhibition in 1898...really piloted; in a more correct sense, the controllers augment the autopilot .107 This means that every command the pilot gives to the air vehicle...is in fact a command to the autopilot to command the air vehicle. All the unique characteristics of unmanned aviation define a unique set of

  8. Scaling Rules for Pre-Injector Design

    SciTech Connect

    Tom Schwarz; Dan Amidei

    2003-07-13

    Proposed designs of the prebunching system of the NLC and TESLA are based on the assumption that scaling the SLC design to NLC/TESLA requirements should provide the desired performance. A simple equation is developed to suggest a scaling rule in terms of bunch charge and duration. Detailed simulations of prebunching systems scaled from a single design have been run to investigate these issues.

  9. A Parallelization Scheme of the Periodic Signals Tracking Algorithm for Isochronous Mass Spectrometry on GPUs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Ruijiu; Wang, Meng; Yan, Xinliang; Yang, Qiong; Lam, Yihua; Yang, Lei; Zhang, Yuhu

    We developed a new program by using a parallelization scheme of the periodic signals tracking algorithm for isochronous mass spectrometry on GPUs. The computing time of data analysis can be reduced by a factor of ˜71 and ˜346 by using our new program on Tesla C1060 GPU and Tesla K20c GPU, compared to using old program on Xeon E5540 CPU. We succeed in performing real-time data analysis by using this new program.

  10. Chondrule magnetic properties

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wasilewski, P. J.; Obryan, M. V.

    1994-01-01

    The topics discussed include the following: chondrule magnetic properties; chondrules from the same meteorite; and REM values (the ratio for remanence initially measured to saturation remanence in 1 Tesla field). The preliminary field estimates for chondrules magnetizing environments range from minimal to a least several mT. These estimates are based on REM values and the characteristics of the remanence initially measured (natural remanence) thermal demagnetization compared to the saturation remanence in 1 Tesla field demagnetization.

  11. European Science Notes Information Bulletin Reports on Current European/ Middle Eastern Science

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1990-12-01

    smoothly," said 1992 in the Culture & Sports Center, Varna Bulgaria. Chairman, Dr. Nikola Dukov, President of the Center of More information will be...S. Di Capua Scanning Electron Microscopy Developments at the Institute of Scientific Instruments and TESLA in Brno 08:124 Marco S. Di Capua X-Ray...Institute of Scientific Instruments and TESLA in Brno 08:124 Marco S. Di Capua X-Ray Diagnostics and Laser Research at the Nuclear Science and

  12. Geophysical variables and behavior: XCIX. Reductions in numbers of neurons within the parasolitary nucleus in rats exposed perinatally to a magnetic pattern designed to imitate geomagnetic continuous pulsations: implications for sudden infant death.

    PubMed

    Dupont, M J; McKay, B E; Parker, G; Persinger, M A

    2004-06-01

    Correlational analyses have shown a moderate strength association between the occurrence of continuous pulsations, a type of geomagnetic activity within the 0.2-Hz to 5-Hz range, and the occurrence of Sudden Infant Deaths. In the present study, rats were exposed continuously from two days before birth to seven days after birth to 0.5-Hz pulsed-square wave magnetic fields whose intensities were within either the nanoTesla or microTesla range. The magnetic fields were generated in either an east-west (E-W) or north-south (N-S) direction. At 21 days of age, the area of the parasolitary nucleus (but not the solitary nucleus) was significantly smaller, and the numbers of neurons were significantly less in rats that had been exposed to the nanoT fields generated in the east-west direction or to the microTesla fields generated within either E-W or N-S direction relative to those exposed to the N-S nanoTesla fields. These results suggest nanoTesla magnetic fields, when applied in a specific direction, might interact with the local geomagnetic field to affect cell migration in structures within the brain stem that modulate vestibular-related arousal and respiratory or cardiovascular stability.

  13. Genotoxic Effects of Superconducting Static Magnetic Fields (SMFs) on Wheat (Triticum aestivum) Pollen Mother Cells (PMCs)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Pingping; Yin, Ruochun; Chen, Zhiyou; Wu, Lifang; Yu, Zengliang

    2007-04-01

    The effects of superconducting static magnetic fields (SMFs) on the pollen mother cells (PMCs) of wheat were investigated in order to evaluate the possible genotoxic effect of such non-ionizing radiation. The seeds of wheat were exposed to static magnetic fields with either different magnetic flux densities (0, 1, 3, 5 and 7 Tesla) for 5 h or different durations (1, 3 and 5 h) at a magnetic flux density of 7 Tesla. The seeds were germinated at 23oC after exposure and the seedlings were transplanted into the field. The PMCs from young wheat ears were taken and slides were made following the conventional method. The genotoxic effect was evaluated in terms of micronucleus (MN), chromosomal bridge, lagging chromosome and fragments in PMCs. Although the exposed groups of a low field intensity (below 5 Tesla) showed no statistically significant difference in the aberration frequency compared with the unexposed control groups and sham exposed groups, a significant increase in the chromosomal bridge, lagging chromosome, triple-polar segregation or micronucleus was observed at a field strength of 5 Tesla or 7 Tesla, respectively. The analysis of dose-effect relationships indicated that the increased frequency of meiotic abnormal cells correlated with the flux density of the magnetic field and duration, but no linear relationship was observed. Such statistically significant differences indicated a potential genotoxic effect of high static magnetic fields above 5 T.

  14. V/sub 3/Ga-NbTi magnet system with different currents from one power supply

    SciTech Connect

    Eckert, D.; Fischer, K.; Frenzel, C.; Gladun, A.; Holzhaeuser, W.; Knorn, M.; Lange, F.; Moebius, A.; Verges, P.

    1981-09-01

    In recent years the manufacture of Nb/sub 2/Sn or V/sub 3/Ga composite wires by the bronze process has been mastered. Nb/sub 3/Sn was investigated more intensively than V/sub 3/Ga although in high fields V/sub 3/Ga is expected to be superior. Accordingly, V/sub 3/Ga tape was used in a 17.5 Tesla magnet, and multifilamentary V/sub 3/Ga conductor in a 10 Tesla magnet. An 11 Tesla V/sub 3/Ga-NbTi magnet system is described which was produced in a laboratory. A numerical quench analysis for the system is presented. 9 refs.

  15. Measurement of stability of cabled conductors cooled by He I at reduced temperature, or He II

    SciTech Connect

    Hsu, Y.H.; Purcell, J.R.; Chen, W.Y.; Alcorn, J.S.

    1980-09-01

    Stability tests of cabled NbTi alloy conductor are underway at the General Atomic High Field Test Facility, in support of the Team One effort of the DOE 12 Tesla Coil Development Program. A background field of up to 10 tesla within a 20 cm bore is provided by a nested pair of 4.2/sup 0/K bath cooled NbTi coils. An insulated bore insert tube (coldfinger) is provided in order to perform heat pulse/recovery tests of coiled samples in cooling regimes anticipated for the 1 m O.D. coil to be tested at the LLNL 12 tesla facility during FY 82. Specifically, tests are being performed in the 2.5 to 3/sup 0/K He I, and saturated superfluid (He II) regimes. The testing apparatus, procedures, and initial results are presented.

  16. Investigation of Mechanical Activation on Li-N-H Systems Using 6Li Magic Angle Spinning Nuclear Magnetic Resonance at Ultra-High Field

    SciTech Connect

    Hu, Jian Zhi; Kwak, Ja Hun; Yang, Zhenguo; Osborn, William; Markmaitree, Tippawan; Shaw, Leonard D.

    2008-07-15

    Abstract The significantly enhanced spectral resolution in the 6Li MAS NMR spectra of Li-N-H systems at ultra-high field of 21.1 tesla is exploited, for the first time, to study the detailed electronic and chemical environmental changes associated with mechanical activation of Li-N-H system using high energy balling milling. Complementary to ultra-high field studies, the hydrogen discharge dynamics are investigated using variable temperature in situ 1H MAS NMR at 7.05 tesla field. The significantly enhanced spectral resolution using ultra-high filed of 21.1 tesla was demonstrated along with several major findings related to mechanical activation, including the upfield shift of the resonances in 6Li MAS spectra induced by ball milling, more efficient mechanical activation with ball milling at liquid nitrogen temperature than with ball milling at room temperature, and greatly enhanced hydrogen discharge exhibited by the liquid nitrogen ball milled samples.

  17. Test of Two NB Superstructure Prototypes

    SciTech Connect

    Sekutowicz, J.

    2004-04-16

    An alternative layout of the TESLA linear collider [1], based on weakly coupled multi-cell superconducting structures (superstructures), significantly reduces investment cost due to a simplification in the RF system of the main accelerator. In January 1999, preparation of the beam test of the superstructure began in order to prove the feasibility of this layout. Progress in the preparation was reported frequently in Proceedings of TESLA Collaboration Meetings. Last year, two superstructures were installed in the TESLA Test Facility (TTF) linac at DESY to experimentally verify: methods to balance the accelerating gradient in a weakly coupled system, the stability of the energy gain for the entire train of bunches in macro-pulses and the damping of Higher Order Modes (HOMs). We present results of the first cold and beam test of these two Nb prototypes.

  18. Organic Superconductors

    SciTech Connect

    Charles Mielke

    2009-02-27

    Intense magnetic fields are an essential tool for understanding layered superconductors. Fundamental electronic properties of organic superconductors are revealed in intense (60 tesla) magnetic fields. Properties such as the topology of the Fermi surface and the nature of the superconducting order parameter are revealed. With modest maximum critical temperatures~13K the charge transfer salt organic superconductors prove to be incredibly valuable materials as their electronically clean nature and layered (highly anisotropic) structures yield insights to the high temperature superconductors. Observation of de Haas-van Alphen and Shubnikov-de Haas quantum oscillatory phenomena, magnetic field induced superconductivity and re-entrant superconductivity are some of the physical phenomena observed in the charge transfer organic superconductors. In this talk, I will discuss the nature of organic superconductors and give an overview of the generation of intense magnetic fields; from the 60 tesla millisecond duration to the extreme 1000 tesla microsecond pulsed magnetic fields.

  19. Superposed epoch analysis and storm statistics from 25 years of the global geomagnetic disturbance index, USGS-Dst

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Gannon, J.L.

    2012-01-01

    Statistics on geomagnetic storms with minima below -50 nanoTesla are compiled using a 25-year span of the 1-minute resolution disturbance index, U.S. Geological Survey Dst. A sudden commencement, main phase minimum, and time between the two has a magnitude of 35 nanoTesla, -100 nanoTesla, and 12 hours, respectively, at the 50th percentile level. The cumulative distribution functions for each of these features are presented. Correlation between sudden commencement magnitude and main phase magnitude is shown to be low. Small, medium, and large storm templates at the 33rd, 50th, and 90th percentile are presented and compared to real examples. In addition, the relative occurrence of rates of change in Dst are presented.

  20. An open data repository and a data processing software toolset of an equivalent Nordic grid model matched to historical electricity market data.

    PubMed

    Vanfretti, Luigi; Olsen, Svein H; Arava, V S Narasimham; Laera, Giuseppe; Bidadfar, Ali; Rabuzin, Tin; Jakobsen, Sigurd H; Lavenius, Jan; Baudette, Maxime; Gómez-López, Francisco J

    2017-04-01

    This article presents an open data repository, the methodology to generate it and the associated data processing software developed to consolidate an hourly snapshot historical data set for the year 2015 to an equivalent Nordic power grid model (aka Nordic 44), the consolidation was achieved by matching the model׳s physical response w.r.t historical power flow records in the bidding regions of the Nordic grid that are available from the Nordic electricity market agent, Nord Pool. The model is made available in the form of CIM v14, Modelica and PSS/E (Siemens PTI) files. The Nordic 44 model in Modelica and PSS/E were first presented in the paper titled "iTesla Power Systems Library (iPSL): A Modelica library for phasor time-domain simulations" (Vanfretti et al., 2016) [1] for a single snapshot. In the digital repository being made available with the submission of this paper (SmarTSLab_Nordic44 Repository at Github, 2016) [2], a total of 8760 snapshots (for the year 2015) that can be used to initialize and execute dynamic simulations using tools compatible with CIM v14, the Modelica language and the proprietary PSS/E tool are provided. The Python scripts to generate the snapshots (processed data) are also available with all the data in the GitHub repository (SmarTSLab_Nordic44 Repository at Github, 2016) [2]. This Nordic 44 equivalent model was also used in iTesla project (iTesla) [3] to carry out simulations within a dynamic security assessment toolset (iTesla, 2016) [4], and has been further enhanced during the ITEA3 OpenCPS project (iTEA3) [5]. The raw, processed data and output models utilized within the iTesla platform (iTesla, 2016) [4] are also available in the repository. The CIM and Modelica snapshots of the "Nordic 44" model for the year 2015 are available in a Zenodo repository.

  1. Superstructures: First Cold Test and Future Applications

    SciTech Connect

    J. Sekutowicz; C Albrecht; V Ayvazyan; R Bandelmann; T Buttner; P Castro; S Choroba; J Eschke; B Faatz; A Gossel; K Honkavaara; B Horst; J Iverson; K Jensch; H Kaiser; R Kammering; G Kreps; D Kostin; J Lorkiewicz; R Lange; A Matheisen; W -D Moller; H -B Peters; D Proch; K Rehlich; H Schlarb; S Schrieber; D Reschke; S Simrock; W Singer; X Singer; K Twarowski; T Weichert; M Wojtkiewicz; G Wendt; K Zapfe; M Liepe; M Huening; M Ferrario; E Plawski; C Pagani; P Kneisel; G Wu; N Baboi; C Thomas; H Chen; W Huang; C Tang; S Zheng

    2003-09-01

    Superstructures, chains of superconducting multi-cell cavities (subunits) connected by e/2 long tube(s) have been proposed as an alternative layout for the TESLA main accelerator [1]. After three years of preparation, two superstructures, each made of two weakly coupled superconducting 7-cell subunits driven by a single Fundamental Power Coupler (FPC), have been installed in the Tesla Test Facility linac for beam tests. Energy stability, HOM damping, frequency and field adjustment methods were tested. The measured results confirmeSuperstructures, chains of superconducting multi-cell cavities (subunits) connected by e/2 long tube(s) have been proposed as an alternative layout for the TESLA main accelerator [1]. After three years of preparation, two superstructures, each made of two weakly coupled superconducting 7-cell subunits driven by a single Fundamental Power Coupler (FPC), have been installed in the Tesla Test Facility linac for beam tests. Energy stability, HOM damping, frequency and field adjustment methods were tested. The measured results confirmed expectation on the superstructure performance and proved that an alternative layout for the 800 GeV upgrade of the TESLA collider is feasible. We report on the test and give here an overview of its results. The tests confirmed very good damping of HOMs in superstructures and thus has opened a possible new application of this concept to high current energy recovery machines. We have built two 1.5 GHz copper models of two superstructures: 2x5-cells and 2x2-cells to prove further improvement of HOM damping. This contribution presents also measured results on these models. d expectations on the superstructure performance and proved that an alternative layout for the 800 GeV upgrade of the TESLA collider is feasible. We report on the test and give here an overview of its results.

  2. Fullerene Superconductors

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1993-06-17

    K3C63 and Rb3C6J have been investigated. The room temperature microwave resistivity at 60 GHz of pressed powder samples of K3C6J is approximately 5m...cm. The resistivity drops by almost one order of magnitude on cooling to 20K, indicative of metallic behavior, before the samples superconduct at Tc...for Rb3C6j are consistent with weak-coupling and a BCS singlet ground state. Upper critical fields of 28-30 Tesla for K3C60 and 38-55 Tesla for Rb 3C60

  3. A Rare Complication of Cochlear Implantation After Magnetic Resonance Imaging: Reversion of the Magnet.

    PubMed

    Öztürk, Erkan; Doruk, Can; Orhan, Kadir Serkan; Çelik, Mehmet; Polat, Beldan; Güldiken, Yahya

    2017-03-21

    Cochlear implants are mechanical devices used for patients with severe sensory-neural hearing loss, which has an inner magnet. It is proven that 1.5 Tesla magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scanners are safe to use in patients with cochlear implant. In our patient, the authors aim to introduce a rare complication caused after a 1.5 Tesla MRI scanning and the management of this situation; the reversion of the magnet of the implant without displacement and significance of surgery in management.

  4. 18T resistive magnet development. Conceptual design second annual report

    SciTech Connect

    Agarwal, K.L.; Burgeson, J.E.; Gurol, H.; Mancuso, A.; Michels, P.H.

    1985-10-01

    This report documents the work performed on a normal conducting magnet during fiscal year 1985. Emphasis, during the study, was on refinement of the structural design and optimization of the coil current density distribution for either maximum field generation or minimum power consumption. The results have shown that one can generate a 4.4 tesla field using 6.14 megawatts or 3.1 tesla at 1.43 megawatts. The structural design has been modified to stiffen the outer turn of the conductor. The modification was confirmed to be structurally adequate by both analysis and test. 37 figs., 21 tabs.

  5. Apparatus and method for magnetically processing a specimen

    DOEpatents

    Ludtka, Gerard M; Ludtka, Gail M; Wilgen, John B; Kisner, Roger A; Jaramillo, Roger A

    2013-09-03

    An apparatus for magnetically processing a specimen that couples high field strength magnetic fields with the magnetocaloric effect includes a high field strength magnet capable of generating a magnetic field of at least 1 Tesla and a magnetocaloric insert disposed within a bore of the high field strength magnet. A method for magnetically processing a specimen includes positioning a specimen adjacent to a magnetocaloric insert within a bore of a magnet and applying a high field strength magnetic field of at least 1 Tesla to the specimen and to the magnetocaloric insert. The temperature of the specimen changes during the application of the high field strength magnetic field due to the magnetocaloric effect.

  6. Using a Feature Film to Promote Scientific Enquiry

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hadzigeorgiou, Yannis; Kodakos, Tassos; Garganourakis, Vassilios

    2010-01-01

    This article reports on an action research project undertaken with the primary aim of investigating the extent to which a feature film, whose plot included Tesla's demonstrations on the wireless transmission of electrical energy, can promote scientific enquiry. The class that participated in this project was an 11th grade class in a rural area of…

  7. MRI in Diagnosis of a Giant Prostatic Utricle

    PubMed Central

    Schey, William

    2014-01-01

    A prostatic utricle cyst is an epithelial lined diverticulum arising from the prostatic urethra and usually asymptomatic when small. When enlarged, it may be symptomatic and is typically accompanied by hypospadias. We present a case of a markedly enlarged prostatic utricle in a neonate without hypospadias, demonstrated on voiding cystourethrography (VCUG), ultrasound, and 1.5 Tesla MRI. PMID:25133006

  8. A High Performance Computing Framework for Physics-based Modeling and Simulation of Military Ground Vehicles

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-03-25

    number one and Nebulae at number three. Both systems rely on GPU co-processing and use Intel Xeon processors cards and NVIDIA Tesla C2050 GPUs. In...spite of a theoretical peak capability of almost 3 Petaflop/s, Nebulae clocked at 1.271 PFlop/s when running the Linpack benchmark, which puts it

  9. Enabling Computational Dynamics in Distributed Computing Environments Using a Heterogeneous Computing Template

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-08-09

    fastest 10 supercomputers in the world. Both systems rely on GPU co-processing, one using AMD cards, the second, called Nebulae , using NVIDIA Tesla...Page 9 of 10 UNCLASSIFIED capability of almost 3 petaflop/s, the highest in TOP500, Nebulae only holds the No. 2 position on the TOP500 list of the

  10. Quadrupole magnets for the SSC

    SciTech Connect

    Lietzke, A.; Barale, P.; Benjegerdes, R.; Caspi, S.; Cortella, J.; Dell'Orco, D.; Gilbert, W.; Green, M.I.; Mirk, K.; Peters, C.; Scanlan, R.; Taylor, C.E.; Wandesforde, A.

    1992-08-01

    At LBL, we have designed, constructed, and tested ten models (4-1meter, 6-5meter) of the Superconducting Super Collider (SSC) main-ring 5 meter focusing quadrupole magnet (211Tesla/meter). The results of this program are herein summarized.

  11. Shot BEE, A Test of the TEAPOT Series, 22 March 1955.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1981-11-24

    Volume: Shot APPLE 2 * Multi-shot Volume: Shots ESS through MET and Shot ZUCCHINI , the Final TEAPOT Tests. All volumes addressing the test events of...I1w 1( ,I r ESS N TURK I TESLA POST 2 \\BEE A-------------,-’ ZUCCHINI AL 1 ’I IWASP WASP PRIME APPLE 2 t MOTH HORNET HA - _ _ _I HADR II 31 II I News

  12. Compendium of Proposed NTPR Expedited Processing Groups

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-11-01

    Element Size USS AGAWAM (AOG-6) 132.32 (Service & Harbor Control) 122 USS ARIKARA (ATF-98) 132.32 (Service & Harbor Control) 80 USS CARPENTER (DDE-825...Operation UPSHOT-KNOTHOLE (1953). • Shots TESLA, BEE , APPLE I and APPLE II, Operation TEAPOT (1955). • Shot BOLTZMANN, Operation PLUMBBOB (1957). In

  13. A beam trajectory monitor for the TTF-FEL

    SciTech Connect

    Ng, Johnny S. T.

    1997-06-01

    A method to determine the electron beam trajectory inside a long undulator module is described. Three-dimensional information is obtained by imaging the spontaneous radiation off-axis using pinholes and high resolution position sensors. The proposal for such a monitor for the SASE-FEL at the TESLA Test Facility is discussed.

  14. Studies for a beam trajectory monitor for TTF-FEL at DESY

    SciTech Connect

    Mueller, Ute Carina

    1997-06-01

    A beam trajectory monitor for the FEL at the TESLA test facility at DESY has been proposed for the reconstruction of the electron beam trajectory by observing the spontaneous undulator radiation along the beam using the pinhole camera principle. Simulations for this concept have been performed and results are presented here.

  15. Wide-range nuclear magnetic resonance detector

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sturman, J. C.; Jirberg, R. J.

    1972-01-01

    Compact and easy to use solid state nuclear magnetic resonance detector is designed for measuring field strength to 20 teslas in cryogenically cooled magnets. Extremely low noise and high sensitivity make detector applicable to nearly all types of analytical nuclear magnetic resonance measurements and can be used in high temperature and radiation environments.

  16. Sec. Chu Announces the First Auto Loans for Advanced Technologies

    ScienceCinema

    Secretary Chu

    2016-07-12

    Energy Secretary Steven Chu announced $8 billion in conditional loan commitments for the development of innovative, advanced vehicle technologies that will create thousands of green jobs while helping reduce the nation’s dangerous dependence on foreign oil. The first three auto loans for advanced technologies were awarded to Ford Motor Company, Nissan Motors and Tesla Motors.

  17. Performance of a 12-coil superconducting bumpy torus magnet facility

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roth, J. R.; Holmes, A. D.; Keller, T. A.; Krawczonek, W. M.

    1972-01-01

    The bumpy torus facility consists of 12 superconducting coils, each 19 cm i.d. and capable of 3.0 teslas on their axes. The coils are equally spaced around a toroidal array with a major diameter of 1.52 m, and are mounted with the major axis of the torus vertical in a single vacuum tank 2.6 m in diameter. Final shakedown tests of the facility mapped out its magnetic, cryogenic, vacuum, mechanical, and electrical performance. The facility is now ready for use as a plasma physics research facility. A maximum magnetic field on the magnetic axis of 3.23 teslas was held for a period of more than sixty minutes without a coil normalcy. The design field was 3.00 teslas. The steady-state liquid helium boil-off rate was 87 liters per hour of liquid helium without the coils charged. The coil array was stable when subjected to an impulsive loading, even with the magnets fully charged. When the coils were charged to a maximum magnetic field of 3.35 teslas, the system was driven normal without damage.

  18. A 12 coil superconducting bumpy torus magnet facility for plasma research

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roth, J. R.; Holmes, A. D.; Keller, T. A.; Krawczonek, W. M.

    1972-01-01

    A summary is presented of the performance of the two-coil superconducting pilot rig which preceded the NASA Lewis bumpy torus. This pilot rig was operated for 550 experimental runs over a period of 7 years. The NASA Lewis bumpy torus facility consists of 12 superconducting coils, each with a 19 cm in diameter and capable of producing magnetic field strengths of 3.0 teslas on their axes. The magnets are equally spaced around a major circumference 1.52 m in diameter, and are mounted with the major axis of the torus vertical in a single vacuum tank 2.59 m in diameter. The design value of maximum magnetic field on the magnetic axis (3.0 teslas) was reached and exceeded. A maximum magnetic field of 3.23 teslas was held for a period of 60 minutes, and the coils did not go to normal. When the coils were charged to a maximum magnetic field of 3.35 teslas, the coil system was driven normal without damage to the facility.

  19. Solar Corona During the Total Solar Eclipse of August 1, 2008 and Polar Magnetic Fields of the Sun

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pishkalo, N.

    2015-12-01

    The solar corona observed during the total solar eclipse of August 1, 2008 was compared with model configuration of open magnetic lines in the solarcorona started near the solar limb. Magnetic field in the solar corona was calculated in the classic (line-of-sight) approach of a potential field – source surfacemodel. The synoptic data of photosphere magnetic field from the Wilcox Solar Observatory was used as low boundary condition. Polar field corrections 0 to1200 microTesla and the saturation factor of 1.8 were used in calculations. The source surface was situated at the distance of 2.5 solar radii. Observedparameters of coronal rays from (Pishkalo and Baransky, Kinematics and Physics of Celestial Bodies, 2009, 25, 315–318) were compared with the modeledones. The best agreement of observed and modeled parameters was found when the calculation were made with polar field correction of about 600×cos8(θ)mcTesla. It was concluded that during the total solar eclipse of 2008 the strength of magnetic field at the solar poles was averaged to 650–700 microTesla atthe photosphere and to 13–14 microTesla at the source surface.

  20. Hydroglyphics: Demonstration of Selective Wetting on Hydrophilic and Hydrophobic Surfaces

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kim, Philseok; Alvarenga, Jack; Aizenberg, Joanna; Sleeper, Raymond S.

    2013-01-01

    A visual demonstration of the difference between hydrophilic and hydrophobic surfaces has been developed. It involves placing a shadow mask on an optically clear hydrophobic plastic dish, corona treating the surface with a modified Tesla coil, removing the shadow mask, and visualizing the otherwise invisible message or pattern by applying water,…

  1. Numerical Integration with Graphical Processing Unit for QKD Simulation

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-03-27

    Windows system application programming interface (API) timer. The problem sizes studied produce speedups greater than 60x on the NVIDIA Tesla C2075...2.3.1 Many-core Systems . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 12 2.3.2 SIMT Programming ...48 5.1 Future Research . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 49 5.2 Lessons Learned in GPU Programming

  2. Lightning Technology (Supplement)

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1981-01-01

    current on the surface of the cylinder was measured at two points, using Model MGL-S74 B-dot sensors. These sensors have a sensitivity of 0. 1 mV/ Tesla ...Magnetic compass 300 in error * Aircraft flies with one wing low while autopilot is on * High pitched squeal on audio * Motor boat sound on audio * Loss of

  3. Proving Invariants of I/O Automata with TAME

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2002-01-01

    Intelligence, 29(1–4):139–181. Archer, M. 2002. Proving correctness of the basic TESLA multicast stream authentication protocol with TAME. In Informal...introduction to requirements capture using PVS: Specification of a simple autopilot , NASA Technical Memorandum 110255, NASA Langley Research Center

  4. Neural Correlates of Metonymy Resolution

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rapp, Alexander M.; Erb, Michael; Grodd, Wolfgang; Bartels, Mathias; Markert, Katja

    2011-01-01

    Metonymies are exemplary models for complex semantic association processes at the sentence level. We investigated processing of metonymies using event-related functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI). During an 1.5 Tesla fMRI scan, 14 healthy subjects (12 female) read 124 short German sentences with either literal (like "Africa is arid"),…

  5. Prediction of processing tomato peeling outcomes

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Peeling outcomes of processing tomatoes were predicted using multivariate analysis of Magnetic Resonance (MR) images. Tomatoes were obtained from a whole-peel production line. Each fruit was imaged using a 7 Tesla MR system, and a multivariate data set was created from 28 different images. After ...

  6. Sec. Chu Announces the First Auto Loans for Advanced Technologies

    SciTech Connect

    Secretary Chu

    2009-07-16

    Energy Secretary Steven Chu announced $8 billion in conditional loan commitments for the development of innovative, advanced vehicle technologies that will create thousands of green jobs while helping reduce the nation’s dangerous dependence on foreign oil. The first three auto loans for advanced technologies were awarded to Ford Motor Company, Nissan Motors and Tesla Motors.

  7. Tuned cavity magnetometer sensitivity.

    SciTech Connect

    Okandan, Murat; Schwindt, Peter

    2009-09-01

    We have developed a high sensitivity (Tesla/{radical}Hz), non-cryogenic magnetometer that utilizes a novel optical (interferometric) detection technique. Further miniaturization and low-power operation are key advantages of this magnetometer, when compared to systems using SQUIDs which require liquid Helium temperatures and associated overhead to achieve similar sensitivity levels.

  8. Bridgman Growth of Germanium

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Szofran, F. R.; Volz, M. P.; Cobb, S. D.; Motakef, S.

    1997-01-01

    The high-magnetic-field crystal growth facility at the Marshall Space Flight Center will be briefly described. This facility has been used to grow bulk germanium by the Bridgman technique in magnetic fields up to 5 Tesla. The results of investigations of ampoule material on the interface shape and thermal field applied to the melt on stability against convection will be discussed.

  9. Science at 100 T

    SciTech Connect

    Harrison, Neil

    2012-06-01

    100 tesla fields are essential for answering many key questions in condensed matter: (1) Collapse of magnetic length crucial tool for understanding high Tc superconductors; (2) Field can also behave as 'negative pressure' in condensed matter; and (3) Field-tuned emergent phenomena involving commensurability effects.

  10. Efficacy in Microbial Sterilization of Pulsed Magnetic Field Treatment

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Sterilization effects of the pulsed magnetic field with a maximum intensity of 11.37 Tesla were investigated on Escherichia coli AS 1.129, Staphylococcus aureus AS 1.89, Saccharomyces cerevisiae ATTC 7552 and Bacillus subtilis AS 1.921. The well-regulated fluctuations of sterilization effects with m...

  11. Daily Report East Europe Supplement.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-11-02

    understandable: He lived in the West longer than here. But Czech viewers want to hear only Czech from Japanese and Slovak television screens ( Tesla -Ostrava...specific. Nevertheless, my assistant for ecology, Nikola Srbinovski, was continu- ally in contact with the appropriate institutions, inspec

  12. Evolution of Naval Radio-Electronics and Contributions of the Naval Research Laboratory. Revision

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1979-01-01

    Nikola receiving antenna was a 300-foot insulated wire Tesla (1898), Professor Harry Shoemaker (1905), supported on floats from the submarine at a depth...chamber, 63 CW936. 14, 49 TENNESSEE, USS, 49 TBS. 96-97 Terrier missiles, 200-201, 237, 247 XCU. 101 Teals. Nikola , 223 Transcontinental and transoceanic

  13. HPC Insights, Fall 2011

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-01-01

    applications (32 cores and 256 GB per node), and the remaining 22 nodes are used for graphics or general-purpose computing on GPU-based (NVIDIA Tesla ...started posing technical challenges and additional costs. MG Nikolas Justice, Command General of the Research Development and Engineering Command

  14. Convergence and Religious Terrorism in America

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2004-09-01

    multimillion dollar facilities. In addition, Aum’s scientists attempted to buy and manufacture nuclear weapons, and even visited Belgrade inventor Nikola ... Tesla in the hopes of encouraging him to build a seismological weapon (Tucker, 2000, p. 212). Other members of Aum visited 37 Zaire, intending to

  15. AHPCRC (Army High Performance Computing Research Center) Bulletin. Volume 3, Issue 1

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-01-01

    implemented a matched filter on a Tesla GPU, and they are measur- ing its performance. An implementation of matched filtering has also been employed...Dominating Sets on Dynamic Geometric Graphs. Leonidas Guibas, Nikola Milosavljevic, Arik Motskin. 22nd Canadian Conference on Computational Geometry (CCCG

  16. JPRS Report, Soviet Union Economic Affairs.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-11-02

    34Znaniye" Society. At meetings in the Society imeni Nikola Tesla and at Lyublyana Uni- versity, when conversation turned to perestroyka in our country...means of cost accounting took shape at the Nikola - yev-Lvov Combine, but this is impossible without com- plete self-management. Everyday practical

  17. JPRS Report, East Europe.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-11-02

    Yankov] My grandfather and my father were members of the Agrarian Party headed by Nikola Petkov and, after its destruction, did not join any party. In...next week that a one-time delivery of fifty TV sets from the Tesla Orava company is expected, but it is estimated that they all will be gone within

  18. East Europe Report, Political, Sociological and Military Affairs.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-11-02

    Article by Viktor Meier: "In Zagreb the Dogmatists Dream"] [Excerpts] In early summer there was a strike at the " Nikola Tesla " electro- technical...Bucharest garrison. The meeting was opened by Colonel General Marin Nicolescu, deputy minister of national defense. Colonel Nikola Krivlev, military

  19. Support for High Power Laser Ablation 2010

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-04-16

    Bog an3, Stefano Marchesini8, Stefan Hau-Riege2, Nikola Stojanovic5, Jorn Bonse9, Ra’anan Tobey6, Henri Ehrke6, Andrea Cavalleri*’ e, Stefan Dusterer5...diagnostics tools (such as load cells, thrust stands, moment balances, pressure and heat transfer gages), Tesla -level electromagnet and permanent magnets

  20. East Europe Report.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1987-02-17

    such 19 enterprises as the Heavy Engineering Works in Martin and Detva, the ZVL plant in Povazska Bystrica, the CHIRANA plant in Stara Tura, the TESLA ...conversation between Nikola Ljubicic, member of the SFRY State Presidency, and newsmen from Belgrade television. There had been earlier intimations of this