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Sample records for 199mhg perturbed angular

  1. (Perturbed angular correlations in zirconia ceramics)

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1990-01-01

    This is the progress report for the first year of the currently-approved three year funding cycle. We have carried on a vigorous program of experimental and theoretical research on microscopic properties of zirconia and ceria using the Perturbed Angular Correlation (PAC) experimental technique. The experimental method was described in the original proposal and in a number of references as well as several of the technical reports that accompany this progress report.

  2. The mass and angular momentum of reconstructed metric perturbations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van de Meent, Maarten

    2017-06-01

    We prove a key result regarding the mass and angular momentum content of linear vacuum perturbations of the Kerr metric obtained through the formalism developed by Chrzarnowski, Cohen, and Kegeles (CCK). More precisely, we prove that the Abbott-Deser mass and angular momentum integrals of any such perturbation vanish when that perturbation was obtained from a regular Fourier mode of the Hertz potential. As a corollary we obtain a generalization of previous results on the completion of the ‘no string’ radiation gauge metric perturbation generated by a point particle. We find that for any bound orbit around a Kerr black hole, the mass and angular momentum perturbations completing the CCK metric are simply the energy and angular momentum of the particle ‘outside’ the orbit and vanish ‘inside’ the orbit.

  3. Contribution from cosmological scalar perturbations to the angular velocity spectrum of extragalactic sources

    SciTech Connect

    Marakulin, A. O. Sazhina, O. S.; Sazhin, M. V.

    2012-07-15

    The possibility of the influence of adiabatic scalar perturbations on the angular velocity spectrum of extragalactic sources is considered. The multipole expansion coefficients of the angular velocity field in terms of vector spherical harmonics are calculated. We show that there is no contribution from adiabatic perturbations to the angular spectrum for a spatially flat Universe at the dusty stage, while there is a contribution only to the electric multiple coefficients at the stage of {Lambda}-term domination. The cases of long-wavelength and short-wavelength perturbations are considered separately. The relationship between the multipole angular velocity spectrum and the primordial scalar perturbation spectrum is discussed.

  4. Mediolateral angular momentum changes in persons with amputation during perturbed walking.

    PubMed

    Sheehan, Riley C; Beltran, Eduardo J; Dingwell, Jonathan B; Wilken, Jason M

    2015-03-01

    Over 50% of individuals with lower limb amputation fall at least once each year. These individuals also exhibit reduced ability to effectively respond to challenges to frontal plane stability. The range of whole body angular momentum has been correlated with stability and fall risk. This study determined how lateral walking surface perturbations affected the regulation of whole body and individual leg angular momentum in able-bodied controls and individuals with unilateral transtibial amputation. Participants walked at fixed speed in a Computer Assisted Rehabilitation Environment with no perturbations and continuous, pseudo-random, mediolateral platform oscillations. Both the ranges and variability of angular momentum for both the whole body and both legs were significantly greater (p<0.001) during platform oscillations. There were no significant differences between groups in whole body angular momentum range or variability during unperturbed walking. The range of frontal plane angular momentum was significantly greater for those with amputation than for controls for all segments (p<0.05). For the whole body and intact leg, angular momentum ranges were greater for patients with amputation. However, for the prosthetic leg, angular momentum ranges were less for patients than controls. Patients with amputation were significantly more affected by the perturbations. Though patients with amputation were able to maintain similar patterns of whole body angular momentum during unperturbed walking, they were more highly destabilized by the walking surface perturbations. Individuals with transtibial amputation appear to predominantly use altered motion of the intact limb to maintain mediolateral stability.

  5. Mediolateral Angular Momentum Changes in Persons With Amputation During Perturbed Walking✰

    PubMed Central

    Sheehan, Riley C.; Beltran, Eduardo J.; Dingwell, Jonathan B.; Wilken, Jason M.

    2015-01-01

    Over 50% of individuals with lower limb amputation fall at least once each year. These individuals also exhibit reduced ability to effectively respond to challenges to frontal plane stability. The range of whole body angular momentum has been correlated with stability and fall risk. This study determined how lateral walking surface perturbations affected the regulation of whole body and individual leg angular momentum in able-bodied controls and individuals with unilateral transtibial amputation. Participants walked at fixed speed in a Computer Assisted Rehabilitation ENvironment with no perturbations and continuous, pseudo-random, mediolateral platform oscillations. Both the ranges and variability of angular momentum for both the whole body and both legs were significantly greater (p < 0.001) during platform oscillations. There were no significant differences between groups in whole body angular momentum range or variability during unperturbed walking. The range of frontal plane angular momentum was significantly greater for those with amputation than for controls for all segments (p < 0.05). For the whole body and intact leg, angular momentum ranges were greater for patients with amputation. However, for the prosthetic leg, angular momentum ranges were less for patients than controls. Patients with amputation were significantly more affected by the perturbations. Though patients with amputation were able to maintain similar patterns of whole body angular momentum during unperturbed walking, they were more highly destabilized by the walking surface perturbations. Individuals with transtibial amputation appear to predominantly use altered motion of the intact limb to maintain mediolateral stability. PMID:25797789

  6. Linear force and moment equations for an annular smooth shaft seal perturbed both angularly and laterally

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fenwick, J.; Dijulio, R.; Ek, M. C.; Ehrgott, R.

    1982-01-01

    Coefficients are derived for equations expressing the lateral force and pitching moments associated with both planar translation and angular perturbations from a nominally centered rotating shaft with respect to a stationary seal. The coefficients for the lowest order and first derivative terms emerge as being significant and are of approximately the same order of magnitude as the fundamental coefficients derived by means of Black's equations. Second derivative, shear perturbation, and entrance coefficient variation effects are adjudged to be small.

  7. Static Magnetic Properties of Films Measured by Means of Angular Perturbative Magnetoresistance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oliveira, Alexandre; Melo, Abner; da Costa, Ricardo; Chesman, Carlos

    In this work we introduced a new technique to measure magnetic anisotropies and magnetoelectrical properties, such as Anisotropic Magnetoresistance (AMR) and Giant Magnetoresistance (GMR) amplitudes. The Perturbative Magnetoresistance (PMR) consist of a regular collinear four probe magnetoresistance set up with an AC magnetic field (hac) applied perpendicular to the DC (Hdc) one. hac amplitude is about 1.0 Oe and oscillate at 270 Hz. We successfully interpreted the signal response from the voltage measured by lock-in amplifier and proposed a model based on energy minimization to extract magnetic anisotropies, AMR and GMR amplitudes. Measuring the in-plane angular dependency of PMR signal we were able to identify the usual magnetic anisotropy, such as uniaxial, unidirectional and cubic. Taking into account the perturbative nature of this technique (small hac amplitude and low frequency), we argue that angular PMR can be used to investigate some dynamic magnetic effects where static technique can not provide such information. A distinct feature of angular PMR is the capability to be used in saturated and non-saturated regime, so revealing magnetic properties dependency on applied field strength. We addressed the Rotatable Anisotropy as an example in this work.

  8. Second order classical perturbation theory for atom surface scattering: Analysis of asymmetry in the angular distribution

    SciTech Connect

    Zhou, Yun Pollak, Eli; Miret-Artés, Salvador

    2014-01-14

    A second order classical perturbation theory is developed and applied to elastic atom corrugated surface scattering. The resulting theory accounts for experimentally observed asymmetry in the final angular distributions. These include qualitative features, such as reduction of the asymmetry in the intensity of the rainbow peaks with increased incidence energy as well as the asymmetry in the location of the rainbow peaks with respect to the specular scattering angle. The theory is especially applicable to “soft” corrugated potentials. Expressions for the angular distribution are derived for the exponential repulsive and Morse potential models. The theory is implemented numerically to a simplified model of the scattering of an Ar atom from a LiF(100) surface.

  9. Dynamic stability of rotating flexible disk perturbed by the reciprocating angular movement of suspension-slider system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pei, Yong-Chen; Tan, Qing-Chang; Zheng, Fu-Sheng; Zhang, Yong-Qi

    2010-12-01

    To simulate the dynamic process of a magnetic head reading/writing data in a hard disk drive, a rotating flexible thin disk perturbed by the reciprocating angular movement of a suspension-slider system is modelled, where the suspension-slider system is considered as a mass-damping-spring loading system. A system dynamic model is formulated as a parametrically excited system, and its dynamic stability is studied by Hill's method involving harmonic balance. The reciprocating angular movement of the suspension-slider system causes system parametric instability at some angular movement frequencies. The large-amplitude angular movement is especially dangerous, and angular movement frequency must be reduced when the slider works at large radii of the disk. The parametric instability can be avoided or suppressed by operating at: low-frequency and small-amplitude reciprocating angular movement, small mass, large natural frequency and damping of the suspension-slider system, and low-speed rotation of the disk.

  10. Hafnium oxide thin films studied by time differential perturbed angular correlations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dey, C. C.; Dey, S.; Bedi, S. C.; Das, S. K.; Lorenz, M.; Grundmann, M.; Vogt, J.; Butz, T.

    2011-06-01

    We report on the study of hafnium oxide thin films grown by pulsed laser deposition at various partial oxygen pressures by Time Differential Perturbed Angular Correlations using the nuclear probe 181Hf(β-)181Ta to determine the nuclear quadrupole interaction (NQI), and by x-ray diffraction. The samples were neutron activated and measured at room temperature as received as well as after annealing in air. All spectra exhibited two to three inequivalent probe sites, even after annealing. At 0.3 mbar oxygen partial pressure and annealing for 5 hs at 1073 K the majority (88%) of the sites exhibited NQI parameters as reported for the bulk monoclinic phase [ωQ = 125.4(2) Mrad/s, η = 0.335(5)]. We can exclude amorphous as well as cubic and tetragonal hafnium oxide phases in the annealed samples. There was no indication of room-temperature ferromagnetism.

  11. On angularly perturbed Laplace equations in the unit ball of IR{sup n+2} and their distributional boundary values

    SciTech Connect

    Massopust, P.R.

    1997-08-01

    All solutions of an in its angular coordinates continuously perturbed Laplace-Beltrami equation in the open unit ball IB{sup n+2} {contained_in} IR{sup n+2}, n {ge} 1, are characterized. Moreover, it is shown that such pertubations yield distributional boundary values which are different from, but algebraically and topologically equivalent to, the hyperfunctions of Lions & Magenes. This is different from the case of radially perturbed Laplace-Beltrami operators (cf. [7]) where one has stability of distributional boundary values under such perturbations.

  12. Angular velocity perturbations inducing the Papaloizou-Pringle instability and QPOs in the torus around the black hole

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Donmez, Orhan

    2017-06-01

    In this paper, a numerical study of the dynamic of the non-self-gravitating, unmagnetized, non-axisymmetric, and rotating the torus around the non-rotating black hole is presented. We investigate the instability of the rotating torus subject to perturbations presented by increasing or decreasing the angular velocity of the stable torus. We have done, for the first time, an extensive analysis of the torus dynamic response to the perturbation of the angular velocity of the stable torus. We show how the high, moderate, and low values of the perturbations affect the torus dynamic and help us to understand the properties of the instability and quasi-periodic oscillation (QPO). Our numerical simulations indicate the presence of Papaloizou-Pringle instability (PPI) with global m = 1 mode and QPOs for the moderate and lower values of the perturbations on the angular velocity of the stable torus. Furthermore, with the lower values of the perturbations, the torus can lead to a wiggling initially and then PPI is produced in it. Finally, the matter of the torus would be dissipated due to the presence of a strong torque.

  13. Stability of Erythrocyte Ghosts: A γ -Ray Perturbed Angular Correlation Study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kruse, Carol A.; Tin, George W.; Baldeschwieler, John D.

    1983-03-01

    The structural integrity of erythrocyte ghosts made by the preswell and slow-dialysis techniques has been studied in vitro by use of γ -ray perturbed angular correlation (PAC) techniques and also by standard in vitro leakage methods employing sequestered labeled markers. Complexes of 111In3+ and nitrilotriacetate were encapsulated in ghosts made from human, rabbit, rat, and mouse erythrocytes, and their leakage was monitored by both methods. In addition, 125I-labeled bovine serum albumin was encapsulated, and ghost integrity was monitored by conventional leakage measurements. With the PAC technique the percentage of material released from human ghosts was determined quantitatively, and the results were equivalent to those obtained by the conventional method. In addition, at various times after intravenous injection, tissue distribution of the ghosts in the mouse was studied. The percent injected dose per gram of tissue of the labeled surface proteins of erythrocyte ghosts in circulation approximated that of the entrapped labeled albumin. This suggests that the ghost membrane and contents are strongly associated in vivo. Large 125I-labeled bovine serum albumin molecules and small 111In3+-nitrilotriacetate complexes were delivered in high quantities to the lung initially, and to the liver and spleen. Because erythrocyte ghosts have the ability to entrap a wide range of substances and deliver them to specific organs, ghosts may be preferable to other drug carriers or drug therapy for treatment of certain disorders.

  14. Second-Order Perturbation Formula for Magnetocrystalline Anisotropy Using Orbital Angular Momentum Matrix

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kosugi, Taichi; Miyake, Takashi; Ishibashi, Shoji

    2014-04-01

    We derive a second-order perturbation formula for an electronic system subject to spin-orbit interactions (SOI). The energy correction originates in the spin-conserving and the spin-flip transitions. The former are represented by the orbital angular momentum (OAM) acquired via the SOI. The latter come from the quantum fluctuation effect. By using our formula, we examine the relativistic electronic structures of a d orbital chain and L10 alloys. The appearance of OAM in the chain is understood by using a parabolic-bands model and the exact expressions of the single-particle states. The total energy is found to be accurately reproduced by the formula. The self-consistent fully relativistic first-principles calculations based on the density functional theory are performed for five L10 alloys. It is found that the formula reproduces qualitatively the behavior of their exact magnetocrystalline anisotropy (MCA) energies. While the MCA of FePt, CoPt, and FePd originates in the spin-conserving transitions, that in MnAl and MnGa originates in the spin-flip contributions. For FePt, CoPt, and FePd, the tendency of the MCA energy with the variation in the lattice constant obeys basically that of the spin-flip contributions. These results indicate that not only the anisotropy of OAM, but also that of spin-flip contributions must be taken into account for the understanding of the MCA of the L10 alloys.

  15. Atomic jump frequencies in intermetallic compounds studied using perturbed angular correlation of gamma rays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Newhouse, Randal Leslie

    Atomic jump frequencies were determined in a variety of intermetallic compounds through analysis of nuclear relaxation of spectra measured using the nuclear hyperfine technique, perturbed angular correlation (PAC) of gamma rays. Observed at higher temperatures, this relaxation is attributed to fluctuations in the orientation or magnitude of electric field gradients (EFG) at nuclei of 111In/Cd probe atoms as the atoms make diffusive jumps. Jump frequencies were obtained by fitting dynamically relaxed PAC spectra using either an empirical relaxation function or using ab initio relaxation models created using the program PolyPacFit. Jump frequency activation enthalpies were determined from measurements over a range of temperatures. Diffusion was studied in the following systems: 1) Pseudo-binary alloys having the L12 crystal structure such as In3(La1-xPrx). The goal was to see how jump frequencies were affected by random disorder. 2) The family of layered phases, LanCoIn3n+2 ( n=0,1,2,3…∞). The goal was to see how jump frequencies varied with the spacing of Co layers, which were found to block diffusion. 3) Phases having the FeGa3 structure. The goal was to analyze dynamical relaxation for probe atoms having multiple inequivalent jump vectors. 4) Phases having the tetragonal Al4Ba structure. The goal was to search for effects in the PAC spectra caused by fluctuations in magnitudes of EFGs without fluctuations in orientations. Ab initio relaxation models were developed to simulate and fit dynamical relaxation for PAC spectra of FeGa3, and several phases with the Al4Ba structure in order to determine underlying microscopic jump frequencies. In the course of this work, site preferences also were observed for 111In/Cd probe atoms in several FeGa 3 and Al4Ba phases.

  16. A Investigation of the Bleomycin-Dna Interaction Using Perturbed Angular Correlations.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hallee, Gary John

    Perturbed angular correlations (PAC) of the 173 keV-247 keV gamma-gamma cascade in the decay of ('111)In offers a sensitive new approach to probe biological molecules in aqueous solution. We have found that this method can be effectively utilized to study the interaction of anti -tumor drug molecules such as bleomycin, which chelate ('111)In('3+), with double helical DNA. For the small ('111)In-BLM complex, the time-integrated attenuation factor G(,2)(' )=(' )0.40, and when ('111)In-BLM is specifically bound to the large and sluggish DNA molecule, we have G(,2)(' )=(' )0.20 for ('111)In-BLM-DNA. Using these two extreme values as signatures of free and DNA-bound bleomycin fractions, we have studied the binding of BLM to various types of DNA. Binding curves for calf thymus DNA, and poly dA-dT are presented. The size of FLM binding site was determined to be 3.3 base pairs for calf thymus DNA, and 2.5 base pairs for poly dA-dT. These results and association constants compare well with results based on other biochemical methods, such as fluorescence quenching. A highly cooperative interaction of BLM with poly dA-dT was observed, but no evidence of cooperativity was seen in the case of calf thymus DNA. In addition, studies of salt-dependence of the binding revealed cooperative behavior in the case of poly dA-dT, and the covalently closed super-helical DNA of PM-2 bacteriophage, but not for calf thymus DNA. Soft modes of DNA under premelting conditions are suggested to be the likely reason for observed cooperativity in the case of poly dA-dT under the low Na('+) concentrations (<(, )10 mM) involved. In the case of calf thymus DNA, a thermodynamic analysis of ionic effects indicates that 1.2 counter ions are released per BLM molecule bound. Other studies revealed relatively weak binding of ('111)In-BLM to yeast RNA, and a likely conformational change in ('111)In -BLM brought about by the action of dethiothreitol.

  17. Indium donor/metal vacancy defect complexes in cadmium telluride studied with perturbed angular correlation spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Griffith, John Warren

    Semi-insulating, powder samples of Cadmium Telluride (CdTe) have been studied using 111In Time Differential Perturbed Angular Correlation (PAC) Spectroscopy. The samples have been lightly doped (˜10 12 cm-3) with 111In atoms, which occupy well-defined metal (Cd) lattice sites and act as probes of the local environment. These substitutional donors form a single defect complex in CdTe. This complex has been identified and characterized as a function of temperature. Those indium probes that are not complexed occupy metal lattice sites with no defect in the local vicinity. Samples containing metal vacancy concentrations as large as 500 ppm have been prepared by a high temperature anneal and quench. The defect complex involves the trapping of a cadmium metal vacancy bound to the indium probe. The electric field gradient (EFG) experienced by probe atoms has a coupling constant of nuQ = 61.5(5) MHz and is not axially symmetric, with the asymmetry parameter given by eta = 0.16(4). It is believed that this asymmetry results from a relaxation of the chalcogen (Te) atoms adjacent to the metal vacancy, with the tellurium atom shared by the probe atom and the vacancy providing the dominant contribution. The fraction of complexed probe atoms increases as the sample temperature is decreased, and is still increasing at room temperature. Complexed fractions are reproducible on cycling within the temperature range 40 to 200°C. The binding energy of the complex has been measured to be 0.15(2) eV and is independent of metal vacancy concentration, which varies and is dependent on the details of the quench. In rapidly cooled samples, a non-equilibrium number of these defect complexes is observed. This state equilibrates with a time constant of 45(5) hours at 15°C, implying that at least one of the two constituents involved in the complex has a significant diffusion rate at this temperature. Under the assumption that vacancy diffusion mechanisms dominate at this temperature, it is

  18. In vivo Stability of Ester- and Ether-Linked Phospholipid-Containing Liposomes as Measured by Perturbed Angular Correlation Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Derksen, Johannes T.; Baldeschwieler, John D.; Scherphof, Gerrit L.

    1988-12-01

    To evaluate liposome formulations for use as intracellular sustained-release drug depots, we have compared the uptake and degradation in rat liver and spleen of liposomes of various compositions, containing as their bulk phospholipid an ether-linked phospholipid or one of several ester-linked phospholipids, by perturbed angular correlation spectroscopy. Multilamellar and small unilamellar vesicles (MLVs and SUVs), composed of egg phosphatidylcholine, sphingomyelin, distearoyl phosphatidylcholine (DSPC), dipalmitoyl phosphatidylcholine (DPPC) or its analog dihexadecylglycerophosphorylcholine (DHPC), and cholesterol plus phosphatidylserine, and containing 111In complexed to nitrilotriacetic acid, were injected intravenously in rats. Recovery of 111In-labeled liposomes in blood, liver, and spleen was assessed at specific time points after injection and the percentage of liposomes still intact in liver and spleen was determined by measurement of the time-integrated angular perturbation factor 111In of the [G22(∞ )] label. We found that MLVs but not SUVs, having DHPC as their bulk phospholipid, showed an increased resistance against lysosomal degradation as compared to other phospholipid-containing liposomes. The use of diacyl phospholipids with a high gel/liquid-crystalline phase-transition temperature, such as DPPC and DSPC, also retarded degradation of MLV, but not of SUV in the dose range tested, while the rate of uptake of these liposomes by the liver was lower.

  19. In vivo stability of ester- and ether-linked phospholipid-containing liposomes as measured by perturbed angular correlation spectroscopy.

    PubMed Central

    Derksen, J T; Baldeschwieler, J D; Scherphof, G L

    1988-01-01

    To evaluate liposome formulations for use as intracellular sustained-release drug depots, we have compared the uptake and degradation in rat liver and spleen of liposomes of various compositions, containing as their bulk phospholipid an ether-linked phospholipid or one of several ester-linked phospholipids, by perturbed angular correlation spectroscopy. Multilamellar and small unilamellar vesicles (MLVs and SUVs), composed of egg phosphatidylcholine, sphingomyelin, distearoyl phosphatidylcholine (DSPC), dipalmitoyl phosphatidylcholine (DPPC) or its analog dihexadecylglycerophosphorylcholine (DHPC), and cholesterol plus phosphatidylserine, and containing 111In complexed to nitrilotriacetic acid, were injected intravenously in rats. Recovery of 111In-labeled liposomes in blood, liver, and spleen was assessed at specific time points after injection and the percentage of liposomes still intact in liver and spleen was determined by measurement of the time-integrated angular perturbation factor [G22(infinity)] of the 111In label. We found that MLVs but not SUVs, having DHPC as their bulk phospholipid, showed an increased resistance against lysosomal degradation as compared to other phospholipid-containing liposomes. The use of diacyl phospholipids with a high gel/liquid-crystalline phase-transition temperature, such as DPPC and DSPC, also retarded degradation of MLV, but not of SUV in the dose range tested, while the rate of uptake of these liposomes by the liver was lower. PMID:3200855

  20. Angular redistribution of nonlinear perturbations: a universal feature of nonuniform flows.

    PubMed

    Horton, W; Kim, J-H; Chagelishvili, G D; Bowman, J C; Lominadze, J G

    2010-06-01

    Classically, the net action of nonlinear turbulent processes is interpreted as either a direct or inverse cascade. However, in nonuniform/shear flows the dominant process is a nonlinear redistribution over wave number angle of perturbation spatial Fourier harmonics. We call this process a nonlinear transverse redistribution (NTR). This phenomenon is demonstrated for a simple two-dimensional constant shear (non-normal) flow by numerically simulating the nonlinear dynamics of coherent and stochastic vortical perturbations in the flow. NTR is a general feature of nonlinear processes that should manifest itself in nonuniform engineering, environmental, and astrophysical flows. The conventional characterization of turbulence in terms of direct and inverse cascades, which ignores NTR, appears to be misleading for shear flow turbulence. We focus on the action of nonlinear processes on the spectral energy. NTR redistributes perturbations over different quadrants of the wave number plane and the interplay of this nonlinear redistribution with linear phenomena becomes intricate: it can realize either positive or negative feedback. In the case of positive feedback, it repopulates the quadrants in wave number space where the shear flow induces linear transient growth.

  1. Indirect perturbation influence of planets on the variation of the instantaneous angular velocity of the rigid Earth in the lunar-solar gravitational field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Lin-Sen

    2017-08-01

    The differential equation and its solution for indirect influence of the planetary perturbation on the variation of the rotational angular velocity of the rigid Earth in the lunar-solar gravitational field are obtained by using Euler's dynamic equations. The theoretical results show that the angular velocity of the Earth varies with the periodic and mixed periodic variation under the lunar and solar gravitational field due to the planetary perturbation on the Earth orbit. The numerical results for the amplitudes of the periodic terms and the coefficient of the mixed periodic terms are presented.

  2. Growth of Ga2O3 by furnace oxidation of GaN studied by perturbed angular correlations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Steffens, Michael; Vianden, Reiner; Pasquevich, Alberto F.

    2016-12-01

    Ga2O3 is a promising material for use in "solar-blind" UV-detectors which can be produced efficiently by oxidation of GaN. In this study we focus on the evolution of the oxide layer when GaN is heated in air. The experimental method applied is the perturbed angular correlation (PAC) spectroscopy of γ-rays emitted by radioactive nuclides, here 111Cd and 181Ta, whose parent nuclei are ion implanted into films of GaN grown on sapphire. As the emission pattern for nuclei in GaN is clearly distinct from that of nuclei in Ga2O3, the fraction of probe nuclei in the oxide layer can be directly measured and allows to follow the time dependent growth of the oxide on a scale of less than 100 nm. Additional measurements were carried out with the oxidized sample held at fixed temperatures in the temperature range from 19 K to 973 K showing transitions between the hyperfine interactions of 111Cd in the oxide matrix both at high and low temperatures. A model for these transitions is proposed.

  3. Low temperature structural modification in Rb2ZrF6: Investigations by perturbed angular correlation spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dey, S. K.; Dey, C. C.; Saha, S.

    2016-06-01

    Temperature dependent perturbed angular correlation (PAC) measurements in crystalline compounds Rb2ZrF6 and Cs2HfF6 have been performed in the temperature range 298-753 K. In Rb2ZrF6, four discrete quadrupole interaction frequencies have been observed at room temperature which correspond to four minor structural modifications. From previous measurements, on the other hand, two structural modifications of this compound were known. A displacive phase transition, probably, occurs at low temperature due to rotation of the ZrF62- octahedron and produces different structural modifications. From present measurements in Rb2ZrF6, two quadrupole interaction frequencies [ωQ=26.1(3) Mrad/s, η=0.55(2), δ=5(1)% and ωQ=148.7(3) Mrad/s, η=0.538(5), δ=1.2%] have been found at room temperature which were not found from previous studies. In Cs2HfF6, these new structural modifications have not been observed.

  4. A compact digital time differential perturbed angular correlation-spectrometer using field programmable gate arrays and various timestamp algorithms

    SciTech Connect

    Jaeger, Markus; Butz, Tilman; Iwig, Kornelius

    2011-06-15

    A user-friendly fully digital time differential perturbed angular correlation (TDPAC)-spectrometer with six detectors and fast digitizers using field programmable gate arrays (FPGA) is described and performance data are given. The new spectrometer has an online data analysis feature, a compact size, and a time resolution such as conventional analog spectrometers. Its calculation intensive part was implemented inside the digitizer. This gives the possibility to change parameters (energy windows, constant fraction trigger delay) and see their influence immediately in the {gamma}-{gamma} correlation diagrams. Tests were performed which showed that the time resolution using a {sup 60}Co source with energy window set at 1.17 MeV and 1.33 MeV is 265 ps with LaBr{sub 3}(Ce) scintillators and 254 ps with BaF{sub 2} scintillators. A true constant fraction algorithm turned out to be slightly better than the constant fraction of amplitude method. The spectrometer performance was tested with a TDPAC measurement using a {sup 44}Ti in rutile source and a positron lifetime measurement using {sup 22}Na. The maximum possible data rate of the spectrometer is 1.1 x 10{sup 6} {gamma} quanta per detector and second.

  5. Magnetic behavior of La-doped Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4} studied by perturbed angular correlation spectroscopy with {sup 111}Cd and {sup 140}Ce

    SciTech Connect

    Matos, I. T. Bosch-Santos, B.; Cabrera-Pasca, G. A.; Carbonari, A. W.

    2015-05-07

    In this paper, the local magnetic properties of La-doped Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4} (5% and 10%) bulk and Nanoparticles (NPs) samples were studied by measuring hyperfine interactions in a wide range of temperature from 10 to 900 K with perturbed γ-γ angular correlation spectroscopy using {sup 111}In({sup 111}Cd) and {sup 140}La({sup 140}Ce) as probe nuclei. Results for the temperature dependence of the magnetic hyperfine field (B{sub hf}) for bulk and NP samples, pure and doped with La show that its behavior follows a second order Brillouin-like transition from which the Curie temperature (T{sub C}) was determined (T{sub C} ∼ 855 K). Results also show two different regions in NP samples: the core where a minor fraction of probe nuclei with well defined magnetic dipole frequency was observed and the shell where a major fraction with broad distributed electric quadrupolar frequency (surface effect in NP) was observed. The Verwey transition T{sub V} ∼ 120 K, due the order disorder phase, was also observed in all samples. The results are discussed in terms of the magnetic exchange interaction between Fe{sup 2+} and Fe{sup 3+} ions in the two regions of NP.

  6. Cd hyperfine interactions in DNA bases and DNA of mouse strains infected with Trypanosoma cruzi investigated by perturbed angular correlation spectroscopy and ab initio calculations.

    PubMed

    Petersen, Philippe A D; Silva, Andreia S; Gonçalves, Marcos B; Lapolli, André L; Ferreira, Ana Maria C; Carbonari, Artur W; Petrilli, Helena M

    2014-06-03

    In this work, perturbed angular correlation (PAC) spectroscopy is used to study differences in the nuclear quadrupole interactions of Cd probes in DNA molecules of mice infected with the Y-strain of Trypanosoma cruzi. The possibility of investigating the local genetic alterations in DNA, which occur along generations of mice infected with T. cruzi, using hyperfine interactions obtained from PAC measurements and density functional theory (DFT) calculations in DNA bases is discussed. A comparison of DFT calculations with PAC measurements could determine the type of Cd coordination in the studied molecules. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first attempt to use DFT calculations and PAC measurements to investigate the local environment of Cd ions bound to DNA bases in mice infected with Chagas disease. The obtained results also allowed the detection of local changes occurring in the DNA molecules of different generations of mice infected with T. cruzi, opening the possibility of using this technique as a complementary tool in the characterization of complicated biological systems.

  7. Electric field gradients at 181Ta probe in ZrNi: Results from perturbed angular correlation and first-principles calculations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dey, C. C.; Das, Rakesh; Srivastava, S. K.

    2015-07-01

    Results of temperature dependent perturbed angular correlation (PAC) measurements in the equiatomic ZrNi alloy have been reported for the first time using 181Hf probe. At room temperature, values of quadrupole frequency and asymmetry parameter for the major component (~80%) are found to be ωQ=26.8(4) Mrad/s, and η=0.413(7). The resulting electric field gradient comes out to be Vzz=2.99 ×1017 V/cm2 and this corresponds to the probe nuclei occupying the regular substitutional Zr sites. In ZrNi system, no magnetic interaction is observed down to 77 K indicating absence of any magnetism in this material. X-ray diffraction (XRD) and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) studies on an inactive but similarly prepared sample confirm the dominant presence of the orthorhombic ZrNi phase in the sample. A complementary density functional theory (DFT) calculation results in Vzz=-2.35×1017 V/cm2, η=0.46 at the 181Ta probe impurity site and zero magnetic moment on each atomic site, in close agreement with the experimental results. Furthermore, it is found that electric field gradient for the regular component follows a T3/2 temperature dependence between 77 and 353 K, beyond which it varies linearly with temperature.

  8. pH-dependent structural change of reduced spinach plastocyanin studied by perturbed angular correlation of gamma-rays and dynamic light scattering.

    PubMed

    Sas, Klára Nárcisz; Haldrup, Anna; Hemmingsen, Lars; Danielsen, Eva; Øgendal, Lars Holm

    2006-06-01

    In this study the pH-dependent structural changes of reduced spinach plastocyanin were investigated using perturbed angular correlation (PAC) of gamma-rays and dynamic light scattering (DLS). PAC data of Ag-substituted plastocyanin indicated that the coordinating ligands are two histidine residues (His37, His87) and a cysteine residue (Cys84) in a planar configuration, whereas the methionine (Met92) found perpendicular to this plane is not a coordinating ligand at neutral pH. Two slightly different conformations with differences in the Cys-metal ion-His angles could be observed with PAC spectroscopy. At pH 5.3 a third coordination geometry appears which can be explained as the absence of the His87 residue and the coordination of Met92 as a ligand. With DLS the aggregation of reduced plastocyanin could be observed below pH 5.3, indicating that not only the metal binding site but also the aggregation properties of the protein change upon pH reduction. Both the structural changes at the metal binding site and the aggregation are shown to be reversible. These results support the hypothesis that the pH of the thylakoid lumen has to remain moderate during steady-state photosynthesis and indicate that low pH induced aggregation of plastocyanin might serve as a regulatory switch for photosynthesis.

  9. Studies of interaction between He and elements with mass number 140 in Fe by time-differential perturbed-angular-correlation measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ohkubo, Yoshitaka; Taniguchi, Akihiro; Xu, Qiu; Tanigaki, Minoru; Sato, Koichi

    2014-08-01

    Room-temperature time-differential perturbed-angular-correlation (TDPAC) spectra of 140Ce arising through 140Ba-140La from 140Cs in He-doped Fe, unannealed and annealed in vacuum at various temperatures, were obtained in order to examine whether Ce (or rather, La and Ba) and He form complexes having a definite geometrical structure in Fe, as suggested by first-principles density-functional theory calculations. No clear signal of such complexes was observed in the TDPAC spectra. However, the TDPAC spectra indicate that Ce and He form complexes having a variety of geometrical structures. Comparison with reported TDPAC results on 111Cd arising from 111In in He-doped stainless steel shows that the parent atoms (La and Ba) of 140Ce trap He atoms more efficiently than In atoms do, indicating stronger bonding of He to the former atoms, while different from the present case, 111Cd (In)-He complexes form a unique geometrical structure.

  10. Electric field gradients of CeMIn5 (M= Co, Rh, Ir) heavy-fermion systems studied by perturbed angular correlations and ab initio electronic structure calculations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Forker, M.; Silva, P. R. J.; Cavalcante, J. T. P. D.; Cavalcante, F. H. M.; Ramos, S. M.; Saitovitch, H.; Baggio-Saitovitch, E.; Alonso, R.; Taylor, M.; Errico, L. A.

    2013-04-01

    The electric field gradient (EFG) at the highly dilute nuclear probe 111Cd in the heavy fermion systems CeMIn5, M= Co, Rh, and Ir and YCoIn5 has been investigated by perturbed angular correlation (PAC) measurements of the nuclear electric quadrupole interaction (QI) of 111Cd on In sites. Pure and Sn-doped single crystals prepared by In-flux synthesis and polycrystalline samples prepared by arc melting have been studied. The samples were doped with the PAC probe 111Cd by diffusion of the mother isotope 111In. In all samples, several fractions of 111Cd probe nuclei subject to different QI's have been observed, among them a large fraction of 111Cd in unreacted In metal. Detailed calculations of the EFG at In nuclei and at Cd probes on In sites of pure and Sn-doped CeMIn5 were preformed, using the full-potential augmented plane wave+local orbital (APW+lo) formalism and taking into account different variables such as the electronic structure of the hyperfine probes, probe induced structural distortions, and impurity doping. The excellent agreement between the predicted EFG's and the experimental results allows us to assign two of the observed EFG components to the lattice sites 1c and 4i of the CeMIn5 compounds and to explain the pronounced difference of the EFG at In and Cd probes on the same lattice position. Structural distortions induced by the Cd probe and Sn-doping were found to have little effect on the EFG at the Cd probes. We also show that the local spin density approximation (LSDA) and LDA+U calculations predict very similar equilibrium structures and EFG's at the In/Cd sites. The extension of the experiments and the calculations from CeMIn5 to YCoIn5 and LaCoIn5 have established that the influence of the 4f electrons on the EFG's at impurity sites is negligibly small.

  11. Induced Angular Momentum

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Parker, G. W.

    1978-01-01

    Discusses, classically and quantum mechanically, the angular momentum induced in the bound motion of an electron by an external magnetic field. Calculates the current density and its magnetic moment, and then uses two methods to solve the first-order perturbation theory equation for the required eigenfunction. (Author/GA)

  12. Induced Angular Momentum

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Parker, G. W.

    1978-01-01

    Discusses, classically and quantum mechanically, the angular momentum induced in the bound motion of an electron by an external magnetic field. Calculates the current density and its magnetic moment, and then uses two methods to solve the first-order perturbation theory equation for the required eigenfunction. (Author/GA)

  13. LOCAL MAGNETIC BEHAVIOR OF 54Fe in EuFe2As2 AND Eu0.5K0.5Fe2As2: MICROSCOPIC STUDY USING TIME DIFFERENTIAL PERTURBED ANGULAR DISTRIBUTION (TDPAD) SPECTROSCOPY

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mohanta, S. K.; Mishra, S. N.; Davane, S. M.; Layek, S.; Hossain, Z.

    2013-12-01

    In this paper, we report the time differential perturbed angular distribution measurements of 54Fe on a polycrystalline EuFe2As2 and Eu0.5K0.5Fe2As2. The hyperfine field and nuclear spin-relaxation rate are strongly temperature dependent in the paramagnetic state suggesting strong spin fluctuation in the parent compound. The local susceptibility show Curie-Weiss-like temperature dependence and Korringa-like relaxation in the tetragonal phase indicating the presence of local moment. In the orthorhombic phase, the hyperfine field behavior suggesting quasi two-dimensional magnetic ordering. The experimental results are in a good agreement with first-principle calculations based on density functional theory.

  14. Angular Scaling In Jets

    SciTech Connect

    Jankowiak, Martin; Larkoski, Andrew J.; /SLAC

    2012-02-17

    We introduce a jet shape observable defined for an ensemble of jets in terms of two-particle angular correlations and a resolution parameter R. This quantity is infrared and collinear safe and can be interpreted as a scaling exponent for the angular distribution of mass inside the jet. For small R it is close to the value 2 as a consequence of the approximately scale invariant QCD dynamics. For large R it is sensitive to non-perturbative effects. We describe the use of this correlation function for tests of QCD, for studying underlying event and pile-up effects, and for tuning Monte Carlo event generators.

  15. Effect of Ge substitution for Si on the magnetic hyperfine field in LaMn2Si2 compound measured by perturbed angular correlation spectroscopy with 140Ce as probe nuclei

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bosch-Santos, B.; Carbonari, A. W.; Cabrera-Pasca, G. A.; Costa, M. S.; Saxena, R. N.

    2013-05-01

    The effect of substitution of Ge for Si in LaMn2Si2 compound on the magnetic hyperfine field (Bhf) has been investigated by perturbed γ -γ angular correlation (PAC) spectroscopy using 140La(140Ce) as probe nuclei. This compound exhibits antiferromagnetism followed by a ferromagnetic ordering when temperature decreases. The behavior of the ferromagnetic transition when Ge gradually replaces Si, with concentrations of 20%, 40%, 80%, and 100% is discussed. PAC measurements were carried out in the temperature range from 15 K to 325 K. Results for LaMn2Si2 compound showed that the dependence of Bhf with temperature follows the expected behavior for the host magnetization and could be fitted by a Brillouin function for JMn = 5/2. However, the temperature dependence of Bhf for compounds when Si is gradually replaced by Ge showed a deviation from such a behavior, which gradually increases up to a strong deviation observed for LaMn2Ge2. This striking behavior was ascribed to the hybridization of d band of the host and f band of the Ce impurities, which is stronger when the unit cell volume increase as Si ions are substituted by Ge atoms.

  16. Angular Momentum

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shakur, Asif; Sinatra, Taylor

    2013-01-01

    The gyroscope in a smartphone was employed in a physics laboratory setting to verify the conservation of angular momentum and the nonconservation of rotational kinetic energy. As is well-known, smartphones are ubiquitous on college campuses. These devices have a panoply of built-in sensors. This creates a unique opportunity for a new paradigm in…

  17. Angular Momentum

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shakur, Asif; Sinatra, Taylor

    2013-01-01

    The gyroscope in a smartphone was employed in a physics laboratory setting to verify the conservation of angular momentum and the nonconservation of rotational kinetic energy. As is well-known, smartphones are ubiquitous on college campuses. These devices have a panoply of built-in sensors. This creates a unique opportunity for a new paradigm in…

  18. Renormalized Lie perturbation theory

    SciTech Connect

    Rosengaus, E.; Dewar, R.L.

    1981-07-01

    A Lie operator method for constructing action-angle transformations continuously connected to the identity is developed for area preserving mappings. By a simple change of variable from action to angular frequency a perturbation expansion is obtained in which the small denominators have been renormalized. The method is shown to lead to the same series as the Lagrangian perturbation method of Greene and Percival, which converges on KAM surfaces. The method is not superconvergent, but yields simple recursion relations which allow automatic algebraic manipulation techniques to be used to develop the series to high order. It is argued that the operator method can be justified by analytically continuing from the complex angular frequency plane onto the real line. The resulting picture is one where preserved primary KAM surfaces are continuously connected to one another.

  19. Phonons with orbital angular momentum

    SciTech Connect

    Ayub, M. K.; Ali, S.; Mendonca, J. T.

    2011-10-15

    Ion accoustic waves or phonon modes are studied with orbital angular momentum (OAM) in an unmagnetized collissionless uniform plasma, whose constituents are the Boltzmann electrons and inertial ions. For this purpose, we have employed the fluid equations to obtain a paraxial equation in terms of ion density perturbations and discussed its Gaussian beam and Laguerre-Gauss (LG) beam solutions. Furthermore, an approximate solution for the electrostatic potential problem is presented, allowing to express the components of the electric field in terms of LG potential perturbations. The energy flux due to phonons is also calculated and the corresponding OAM is derived. Numerically, it is shown that the parameters such as azimuthal angle, radial and angular mode numbers, and beam waist, strongly modify the profiles of the phonon LG potential. The present results should be helpful in understanding the phonon mode excitations produced by Brillouin backscattering of laser beams in a uniform plasma.

  20. Lensing signals from spin-2 perturbations

    SciTech Connect

    Adamek, Julian; Durrer, Ruth; Tansella, Vittorio E-mail: ruth.durrer@unige.ch

    2016-01-01

    We compute the angular power spectra of the E-type and B-type lensing potentials for gravitational waves from inflation and for tensor perturbations induced by scalar perturbations. We derive the tensor-lensed CMB power spectra for both cases. We also apply our formalism to determine the linear lensing potential for a Bianchi I spacetime with small anisotropy.

  1. The angular momentum of the Oort cloud

    SciTech Connect

    Weissman, P.R. )

    1991-01-01

    An evaluation is made of the work of Marochnik et al. (1988), which estimated that the angular momentum of the Oort cloud is 2-3 orders of magnitude greater than the planetary system's total angular momentum. It is noted that most of the angular momentum in the currently observed Oort cloud is the result of the effects of external perturbers over the solar system's history, and it is demonstrated that the total current angular momentum is probably in the 6.0 x 10 to the 50th to 1.1 x 10 to the 51st g sq cm/sec range; original angular momentum was probably a factor of 5 below such values. 21 refs.

  2. The angular momentum of the Oort cloud

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weissman, Paul R.

    1991-01-01

    An evaluation is made of the work of Marochnik et al. (1988), which estimated that the angular momentum of the Oort cloud is 2-3 orders of magnitude greater than the planetary system's total angular momentum. It is noted that most of the angular momentum in the currently observed Oort cloud is the result of the effects of external perturbers over the solar system's history, and it is demonstrated that the total current angular momentum is probably in the 6.0 x 10 to the 50th to 1.1 x 10 to the 51st g sq cm/sec range; original angular momentum was probably a factor of 5 below such values.

  3. PERTURBING LIGNIFICATION

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Perturbing lignification is possible in multiple and diverse ways. Without obvious growth/development phenotypes, transgenic angiosperms can have lignin levels reduced to half the normal level, can have compositions ranging from very high-guaiacyl/low-syringyl to almost totally syringyl, and can eve...

  4. Perturbed particle disks. [planetary rings application

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Borderies, N.; Goldreich, P.; Tremaine, S.

    1983-01-01

    The velocity ellipsoid in a particle disk near an isolated satellite resonance is determined by solving the Boltzmann moment equations, and solutions are obtained that are stationary functions of the azimuthal angle in a coordinate frame which rotates with the pattern speed of the perturbation potential. The magnitude of the deformation rate tensor in a perturbed particle disk is bounded from above by an expression which includes the orbital angular velocity, the optical depth, and a dimensionless constant of order unity. It is also found that, in sufficiently perturbed regions, there are ranges of azimuthal angle over which the radial component of the angular momentum flux is negative. It is also possible for the angular momentum luminosity to be negative. These results are pertinent to the understanding of sharp edges and density wave decay in planetary rings.

  5. On Angular Momentum

    DOE R&D Accomplishments Database

    Schwinger, J.

    1952-01-26

    The commutation relations of an arbitrary angular momentum vector can be reduced to those of the harmonic oscillator. This provides a powerful method for constructing and developing the properties of angular momentum eigenvectors. In this paper many known theorems are derived in this way, and some new results obtained. Among the topics treated are the properties of the rotation matrices; the addition of two, three, and four angular momenta; and the theory of tensor operators.

  6. Gyroscope test of gravitation: An analysis of the important perturbations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Oconnell, R. F.

    1971-01-01

    Two perturbations, the earth's quadrupole moment and the earth's revolution around the sun, are discussed. Schiff's proposed gyroscope test of gravitation is analyzed, along with the capability of deciphering each separate contribution to the angular velocity of spin precession.

  7. Gyroscope test of gravitation: An analysis of the important perturbations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Oconnell, R. F.

    1971-01-01

    Two perturbations, the earth's quadrupole moment and the earth's revolution around the sun, are discussed. Schiff's proposed gyroscope test of gravitation is analyzed, along with the capability of deciphering each separate contribution to the angular velocity of spin precession.

  8. Angular Acceleration without Torque?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kaufman, Richard D.

    2012-01-01

    Hardly. Just as Robert Johns qualitatively describes angular acceleration by an internal force in his article "Acceleration Without Force?" here we will extend the discussion to consider angular acceleration by an internal torque. As we will see, this internal torque is due to an internal force acting at a distance from an instantaneous center.

  9. Angular Acceleration without Torque?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kaufman, Richard D.

    2012-01-01

    Hardly. Just as Robert Johns qualitatively describes angular acceleration by an internal force in his article "Acceleration Without Force?" here we will extend the discussion to consider angular acceleration by an internal torque. As we will see, this internal torque is due to an internal force acting at a distance from an instantaneous center.

  10. DVL Angular Velocity Recorder

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liebe, Wolfgang

    1944-01-01

    In many studies, especially of nonstationary flight motion, it is necessary to determine the angular velocities at which the airplane rotates about its various axes. The three-component recorder is designed to serve this purpose. If the angular velocity for one flight attitude is known, other important quantities can be derived from its time rate of change, such as the angular acceleration by differentiations, or - by integration - the angles of position of the airplane - that is, the angles formed by the airplane axes with the axis direction presented at the instant of the beginning of the motion that is to be investigated.

  11. Effect of slow rotational diffusion on angular correlations.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Marshall, A. G.; Meares, C. F.

    1972-01-01

    The theory for perturbed angular correlations of gamma radiation has been extended to include the possibility of adiabatic variation in the interaction Hamiltonian, K, for the intermediate state. The calculation begins from a polycrystalline model. It is shown that adiabatic variation in K introduces a time dependence into the angles which express the orientation of the molecular frame. The relevance of the adiabatic limit to the use of perturbed angular correlations of gamma radiation for study of the motion of radioactive species in viscous media is discussed.

  12. Recurrence of angular cheilitis.

    PubMed

    Ohman, S C; Jontell, M; Dahlen, G

    1988-08-01

    The incidence of recurrence of angular cheilitis following a successful antimicrobial treatment was studied in 48 patients. Clinical assessments including a microbial examination were carried out 8 months and 5 yr after termination of treatment. Eighty percent of the patients reported recurrence of their angular cheilitis on one or more occasions during the observation period. Patients with cutaneous disorders associated with dry skin or intraoral leukoplakia had an increased incidence of recrudescence. Neither the presence of denture stomatitis nor the type of microorganisms isolated from the original lesions of angular cheilitis, i.e. Candida albicans and/or Staphylococcus aureus, were associated with the number of recurrences. The present observations indicate that treatment of the majority of patients with angular cheilitis should be considered in a longer perspective than previously supposed, due to the short lasting therapeutic effects of the antimicrobial therapy.

  13. [Malignant angular cheilitis].

    PubMed

    Seoane, J; Vázquez, J; Cazenave, A; de la Cruz Mera, A; Argila, F; Aguado, A

    1996-01-01

    A case of chronic angular cheilitis is reported. Candida albicans was isolated repeatedly and the process developed into epitheliomatous carcinoma. The etiopathogenic role of Candida albicans and possible mechanism of action are discussed.

  14. Cosmological perturbations in unimodular gravity

    SciTech Connect

    Gao, Caixia; Brandenberger, Robert H.; Cai, Yifu; Chen, Pisin E-mail: rhb@hep.physics.mcgill.ca E-mail: chen@slac.stanford.edu

    2014-09-01

    We study cosmological perturbation theory within the framework of unimodular gravity. We show that the Lagrangian constraint on the determinant of the metric required by unimodular gravity leads to an extra constraint on the gauge freedom of the metric perturbations. Although the main equation of motion for the gravitational potential remains the same, the shift variable, which is gauge artifact in General Relativity, cannot be set to zero in unimodular gravity. This non-vanishing shift variable affects the propagation of photons throughout the cosmological evolution and therefore modifies the Sachs-Wolfe relation between the relativistic gravitational potential and the microwave temperature anisotropies. However, for adiabatic fluctuations the difference between the result in General Relativity and unimodular gravity is suppressed on large angular scales. Thus, no strong constraints on the theory can be derived.

  15. Angular velocity discrimination

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kaiser, Mary K.

    1990-01-01

    Three experiments designed to investigate the ability of naive observers to discriminate rotational velocities of two simultaneously viewed objects are described. Rotations are constrained to occur about the x and y axes, resulting in linear two-dimensional image trajectories. The results indicate that observers can discriminate angular velocities with a competence near that for linear velocities. However, perceived angular rate is influenced by structural aspects of the stimuli.

  16. Angular velocity discrimination

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kaiser, Mary K.

    1990-01-01

    Three experiments designed to investigate the ability of naive observers to discriminate rotational velocities of two simultaneously viewed objects are described. Rotations are constrained to occur about the x and y axes, resulting in linear two-dimensional image trajectories. The results indicate that observers can discriminate angular velocities with a competence near that for linear velocities. However, perceived angular rate is influenced by structural aspects of the stimuli.

  17. Cosmological perturbations of quantum-mechanical origin and anisotropy of the microwave background

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grishchuk, L. P.

    1993-01-01

    Cosmological perturbations generated quantum mechanically (as a particular case, during inflation) possess statistical properties of squeezed quantum states. The power spectra of the perturbations are modulated and the angular distribution of the produced temperature fluctuations of the cosmic microwave background radiation is quite specific. An exact formula is derived for the angular correlation function of the temperature fluctuations caused by squeezed gravitational waves. The predicted angular pattern can, in principle, be revealed by observations like those by the Cosmic Background Explorer.

  18. Plasmons carrying orbital angular momentum in quantum plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khan, Shabbir A.; Ali, S.; Mendonca, J. T.; Mendonca

    2013-10-01

    The existence of plasmons with orbital angular momentum due to the Laguerre-Gaussian-type density and potential perturbations is studied in an unmagnetized quantum plasma. Starting from appropriate hydrodynamic equations for the electrostatic electron dynamics, a dispersion equation is derived in paraxial approximation. The Laguerre-Gaussian beam solutions are obtained and the properties of electric field components, energy flux, and corresponding angular momentum density of plasmons are investigated. The electric field lines are found to form helical structures with a dominant axial component. The results are analyzed numerically and the influence of radial and angular mode numbers on potential and electric field components is illustrated.

  19. CMB anisotropies: Total angular momentum method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Wayne; White, Martin

    1997-07-01

    A total angular momentum representation simplifies the radiation transport problem for temperature and polarization anisotropy in the cosmic microwave background (CMB). Scattering terms couple only the quadrupole moments of the distributions and each moment corresponds directly to the observable angular pattern on the sky. We develop and employ these techniques to study the general properties of anisotropy generation from scalar, vector, and tensor perturbations to the metric and the matter, both in the cosmological fluids and from any seed perturbations (e.g., defects) that may be present. The simpler, more transparent form and derivation of the Boltzmann equations brings out the geometric and model-independent aspects of temperature and polarization anisotropy formation. Large angle scalar polarization provides a robust means to distinguish between isocurvature and adiabatic models for structure formation in principle. Vector modes have the unique property that the CMB polarization is dominated by magnetic-type parity at small angles (a factor of 6 in power compared with 0 for the scalars and 8/13 for the tensors) and hence potentially distinguishable independent of the model for the seed. The tensor modes produce a different sign from the scalars and vectors for the temperature-polarization correlations at large angles. We explore conditions under which one perturbation type may dominate over the others including a detailed treatment of the photon-baryon fluid before recombination.

  20. Angular momentum radio

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thidé, B.; Tamburini, F.; Then, H.; Someda, C. G.; Mari, Elletra; Parisi, G.; Spinello, F.; Romanato, Fra

    2014-02-01

    Wireless communication amounts to encoding information onto physical observables carried by electromagnetic (EM) fields, radiating them into surrounding space, and detecting them remotely by an appropriate sensor connected to an informationdecoding receiver. Each observable is second order in the fields and fulfills a conservation law. In present-day radio only the EM linear momentum observable is fully exploited. A fundamental physical limitation of this observable, which represents the translational degrees of freedom of the charges (typically an oscillating current along a linear antenna) and the fields, is that it is single-mode. This means that a linear-momentum radio communication link comprising one transmitting and one receiving antenna, known as a single-input-single-output (SISO) link, can provide only one transmission channel per frequency (and polarization). In contrast, angular momentum, which represents the rotational degrees of freedom, is multi-mode, allowing an angular-momentum SISO link to accommodate an arbitrary number of independent transmission channels on one and the same frequency (and polarization). We describe the physical properties of EM angular momentum and how they can be exploited, discuss real-world experiments, and outline how the capacity of angular momentum links may be further enhanced by employing multi-port techniques, i.e., the angular momentum counterpart of linear-momentum multiple-input-multiple-output (MIMO).

  1. The Angular Momentum Dichotomy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Teklu, Adelheid; Remus, Rhea-Silvia; Dolag, Klaus; Burkert, Andreas

    2015-02-01

    In the context of the formation of spiral galaxies the evolution and distribution of the angular momentum of dark matter halos have been discussed for more than 20 years, especially the idea that the specific angular momentum of the halo can be estimated from the specific angular momentum of its disk (e.g. Fall & Efstathiou (1980), Fall (1983) and Mo et al. (1998)). We use a new set of hydrodynamic cosmological simulations called Magneticum Pathfinder which allow us to split the galaxies into spheroidal and disk galaxies via the circularity parameter ɛ, as commonly used (e.g. Scannapieco et al. (2008)). Here, we focus on the dimensionless spin parameter λ = J |E|1/2 / (G M5/2) (Peebles 1969, 1971), which is a measure of the rotation of the total halo and can be fitted by a lognormal distribution, e.g. Mo et al. (1998). The spin parameter allows one to compare the relative angular momentum of halos across different masses and different times. Fig. 1 reveals a dichotomy in the distribution of λ at all redshifts when the galaxies are split into spheroids (dashed) and disk galaxies (dash-dotted). The disk galaxies preferentially live in halos with slightly larger spin parameter compared to spheroidal galaxies. Thus, we see that the λ of the whole halo reflects the morphology of its central galaxy. For more details and a larger study of the angular momentum properties of disk and spheroidal galaxies, see Teklu et al. (in prep.).

  2. Fluidic angular velocity sensor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Berdahl, C. M. (Inventor)

    1986-01-01

    A fluidic sensor providing a differential pressure signal proportional to the angular velocity of a rotary input is described. In one embodiment the sensor includes a fluid pump having an impeller coupled to a rotary input. A housing forming a constricting fluid flow chamber is connected to the fluid input of the pump. The housing is provided with a fluid flow restrictive input to the flow chamber and a port communicating with the interior of the flow chamber. The differential pressure signal measured across the flow restrictive input is relatively noise free and proportional to the square of the angular velocity of the impeller. In an alternative embodiment, the flow chamber has a generally cylindrical configuration and plates having flow restrictive apertures are disposed within the chamber downstream from the housing port. In this embodiment, the differential pressure signal is found to be approximately linear with the angular velocity of the impeller.

  3. The angular momentum distribution in galactic halos

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Quinn, P. J.; Zurek, W. H.

    1988-08-01

    N-body simulations are used to model the formation of individual galactic halos from scale-free density perturbations in universes dominated by cold, nondissipative dark matter. In well-mixed halos, the angular momentum distribution is shown to have a systematic behavior with power law index n corresponding to that found for circular rotation curves. For a given n, the distribution of angular momentum has the same trend with radius and energy as that implied for a halo in which all the matter has its maximum possible angular momentum. Dynamical mixing during the relaxation of the halo redistributes both angular momentum and binding energy in an orderly manner. The organized nature of the collapse means that relaxation is not completely violent and that the secondary infall paradigm, in its simplest form, needs to be modified to include the organizing effects of dynamical friction. It is shown that the Mestel hypothesis is not consistent with the final collapsed state of halos, but may be applicable to the collapse of the disks of spirals.

  4. Angular shear plate

    DOEpatents

    Ruda, Mitchell C [Tucson, AZ; Greynolds, Alan W [Tucson, AZ; Stuhlinger, Tilman W [Tucson, AZ

    2009-07-14

    One or more disc-shaped angular shear plates each include a region thereon having a thickness that varies with a nonlinear function. For the case of two such shear plates, they are positioned in a facing relationship and rotated relative to each other. Light passing through the variable thickness regions in the angular plates is refracted. By properly timing the relative rotation of the plates and by the use of an appropriate polynomial function for the thickness of the shear plate, light passing therethrough can be focused at variable positions.

  5. Optical orbital angular momentum.

    PubMed

    Barnett, Stephen M; Babiker, Mohamed; Padgett, Miles J

    2017-02-28

    We present a brief introduction to the orbital angular momentum of light, the subject of our theme issue and, in particular, to the developments in the 13 years following the founding paper by Allen et al. (Allen et al. 1992 Phys. Rev. A 45, 8185 (doi:10.1103/PhysRevA.45.8185)). The papers by our invited authors serve to bring the field up to date and suggest where developments may take us next.This article is part of the themed issue 'Optical orbital angular momentum'.

  6. Optical orbital angular momentum

    PubMed Central

    Barnett, Stephen M.; Babiker, Mohamed; Padgett, Miles J.

    2017-01-01

    We present a brief introduction to the orbital angular momentum of light, the subject of our theme issue and, in particular, to the developments in the 13 years following the founding paper by Allen et al. (Allen et al. 1992 Phys. Rev. A 45, 8185 (doi:10.1103/PhysRevA.45.8185)). The papers by our invited authors serve to bring the field up to date and suggest where developments may take us next. This article is part of the themed issue ‘Optical orbital angular momentum’. PMID:28069775

  7. Unveiling Angular Momentum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Robinson, Stephen

    2015-03-01

    Angular momentum is a notoriously difficult concept to grasp. Visualization often requires three-dimensional pictures of vectors pointing in seemingly arbitrary directions. A simple student-run laboratory experiment coupled with intuitive explanations by an instructor can clear up some of the inherent ambiguity of rotational motion. Specifically, the precessional period of a suspended spinning bicycle wheel can be related to the spinning frequency through a simple algebraic expression. An explanation of this precession apart from the concept of angular momentum will be given.

  8. Optical orbital angular momentum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barnett, Stephen M.; Babiker, Mohamed; Padgett, Miles J.

    2017-02-01

    We present a brief introduction to the orbital angular momentum of light, the subject of our theme issue and, in particular, to the developments in the 13 years following the founding paper by Allen et al. (Allen et al. 1992 Phys. Rev. A 45, 8185 (doi:10.1103/PhysRevA.45.8185)). The papers by our invited authors serve to bring the field up to date and suggest where developments may take us next. This article is part of the themed issue 'Optical orbital angular momentum'.

  9. "Angular" plasma cell cheilitis.

    PubMed

    da Cunha Filho, Roberto Rheingantz; Tochetto, Lucas Baldissera; Tochetto, Bruno Baldissera; de Almeida, Hiram Larangeira; Lorencette, Nádia Aparecida; Netto, José Fillus

    2014-03-17

    Plasma cell cheilitis is an extremely rare disease, characterized by erythematous-violaceous, ulcerated and asymptomatic plaques, which evolve slowly. The histological characteristics include dermal infiltrate composed of mature plasmocytes. We report a case of Plasma cell angular cheilitis in a 58-year-old male, localized in the lateral oral commissure.

  10. A UNIFIED THEORY FOR THE EFFECTS OF STELLAR PERTURBATIONS AND GALACTIC TIDES ON OORT CLOUD COMETS

    SciTech Connect

    Collins, Benjamin F.; Sari, Re'em

    2010-11-15

    We examine the effects of passing field stars on the angular momentum of a nearly radial orbit of an Oort cloud comet bound to the Sun. We derive the probability density function of the change in angular momentum from one stellar encounter, assuming a uniform and isotropic field of perturbers. We show that the total angular momentum follows a Levy flight, and determine its distribution function. If there is an asymmetry in the directional distribution of perturber velocities, the marginal probability distribution of each component of the angular momentum vector can be different. The constant torque attributed to Galactic tides arises from a non-cancellation of perturbations with an impact parameter of order the semimajor axis of the comet. When the close encounters are rare, the angular momentum is best modeled by the stochastic growth of stellar encounters. If trajectories passing between the comet and the Sun occur frequently, the angular momentum exhibits the coherent growth attributed to the Galactic tides.

  11. CMB hemispherical asymmetry from non-linear isocurvature perturbations

    SciTech Connect

    Assadullahi, Hooshyar; Wands, David; Firouzjahi, Hassan; Namjoo, Mohammad Hossein E-mail: firouz@mail.ipm.ir E-mail: david.wands@port.ac.uk

    2015-04-01

    We investigate whether non-adiabatic perturbations from inflation could produce an asymmetric distribution of temperature anisotropies on large angular scales in the cosmic microwave background (CMB). We use a generalised non-linear δ N formalism to calculate the non-Gaussianity of the primordial density and isocurvature perturbations due to the presence of non-adiabatic, but approximately scale-invariant field fluctuations during multi-field inflation. This local-type non-Gaussianity leads to a correlation between very long wavelength inhomogeneities, larger than our observable horizon, and smaller scale fluctuations in the radiation and matter density. Matter isocurvature perturbations contribute primarily to low CMB multipoles and hence can lead to a hemispherical asymmetry on large angular scales, with negligible asymmetry on smaller scales. In curvaton models, where the matter isocurvature perturbation is partly correlated with the primordial density perturbation, we are unable to obtain a significant asymmetry on large angular scales while respecting current observational constraints on the observed quadrupole. However in the axion model, where the matter isocurvature and primordial density perturbations are uncorrelated, we find it may be possible to obtain a significant asymmetry due to isocurvature modes on large angular scales. Such an isocurvature origin for the hemispherical asymmetry would naturally give rise to a distinctive asymmetry in the CMB polarisation on large scales.

  12. Boundary perturbation theory for nonanalytic perturbations

    SciTech Connect

    Pomraning, G.C.

    1983-10-01

    First-order perturbation formulas are derived that give the change in the eigenvalue of a reactive system due to a perturbation in the exterior shape of the system. In physical terms, this perturbation involves adding a thin layer of arbitrary material to the surface of the unperturbed system (or deleting material past a material discontinuity). From a mathematical viewpoint, the perturbation is sufficiently general to give rise to a nonanalytic behavior of the eigenvalue on the smallness parameter. Both transport theory and the diffusion approximation are treated.

  13. Angular diameter distances reconsidered in the Newman and Penrose formalism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kling, Thomas P.; Aly, Aly

    2016-02-01

    Using the Newman and Penrose spin coefficient (NP) formalism, we provide a derivation of the Dyer-Roeder equation for the angular diameter distance in cosmological space-times. We show that the geodesic deviation equation written in NP formalism is precisely the Dyer-Roeder equation for a general Friedman-Robertson-Walker (FRW) space-time, and then we examine the angular diameter distance to redshift relation in the case that a flat FRW metric is perturbed by a gravitational potential. We examine the perturbation in the case that the gravitational potential exhibits the properties of a thin gravitational lens, demonstrating how the weak lensing shear and convergence act as source terms for the perturbed Dyer-Roeder equation.

  14. Quantum Heuristics of Angular Momentum

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Levy-Leblond, Jean-Marc

    1976-01-01

    Discusses the quantization of angular momentum components, Heisenberg-type inequalities for their spectral dispersions, and the quantization of the angular momentum modulus, without using operators or commutation relations. (MLH)

  15. Angular cheilitis after tonsillectomy.

    PubMed

    England, R J; Lau, M; Ell, S R

    1999-08-01

    The operation of tonsillectomy requires the oral cavity to be held open mechanically in an unconscious patient, and intra-oral instrumentation to occur. Angular cheilitis may arise as a result of this after operation. This can cause morbidity and delay the re-establishment of a normal diet. The aim of this study was to identify what factors increase the likelihood of developing this problem postoperatively. Sixty patients were randomly selected in a prospective manner. Preoperative, intraoperative and postoperative variables were recorded. The frequency of development of postoperative angular cheilitis was recorded. The prevalence of the condition was related to the prerecorded variables. Parametric analysis showed that the chance of developing angular cheilitis was directly related to the use of diathermy haemostasis (P = 0.05). Logistic regression analysis showed that the odds ratio of developing this complication if diathermy was used is 3.5 (95% confidence intervals 0.99, 12.4) and operation difficulty may also be a relevant variable. No other recorded variables were found to be significant.

  16. Envelope Modes of Beams with Angular Momentum

    SciTech Connect

    Barnard, J J; Losic, B

    2000-08-21

    For a particle beam propagating in an alternating gradient focusing system, envelope equations are often employed to describe the evolution of the beam radii in the two directions transverse to the direction of propagation, and aligned with the principle axes of the alternating gradient system. When the beams have zero net angular momentum and when the alternating gradient focusing is approximated by a continuous focusing system, there are two normal modes to the envelope equations: the 'breathing' mode and a 'quadrupole' mode. In the former, the two radii oscillate in phase, and in the latter the radii oscillate 180 degrees out of phase. In this paper, we extend the analysis to include beams that have a finite angular momentum. We perturb the moment equations of ref. [1], wherein it was assumed that space charge is a distributed in a uniform density ellipse. Two additional modes are obtained. The breathing mode remains, but the quadrupole mode is split into two modes, and a new low frequency mode appears. We calculate the frequencies and eigenmodes of these four modes as a function of tune depression and a dimensionless net angular momentum. These modes can be excited by rotational errors of the quadrupoles in an alternating gradient focusing channel.

  17. Angular Momentum in Dwarf Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Del Popolo, A.

    We study the ``angular momentum catastrophe" in the framework of interaction among baryons and dark matter through dynamical friction. By means of Del Popolo (2009) model we simulate 14 galaxies similar to those investigated by van den Bosch, Burkert and Swaters (2001), and calculate the distribution of their spin parameters and the angular momenta. Our model gives the angular momentum distribution which is in agreement with the van den Bosch et al. observations. Our result shows that the ``angular momentum catastrophe" can be naturally solved in a model that takes into account the baryonic physics and the exchange of energy and angular momentum between the baryonic clumps and dark matter through dynamical friction.

  18. Optical angular momentum and atoms.

    PubMed

    Franke-Arnold, Sonja

    2017-02-28

    Any coherent interaction of light and atoms needs to conserve energy, linear momentum and angular momentum. What happens to an atom's angular momentum if it encounters light that carries orbital angular momentum (OAM)? This is a particularly intriguing question as the angular momentum of atoms is quantized, incorporating the intrinsic spin angular momentum of the individual electrons as well as the OAM associated with their spatial distribution. In addition, a mechanical angular momentum can arise from the rotation of the entire atom, which for very cold atoms is also quantized. Atoms therefore allow us to probe and access the quantum properties of light's OAM, aiding our fundamental understanding of light-matter interactions, and moreover, allowing us to construct OAM-based applications, including quantum memories, frequency converters for shaped light and OAM-based sensors.This article is part of the themed issue 'Optical orbital angular momentum'.

  19. Optical angular momentum and atoms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Franke-Arnold, Sonja

    2017-02-01

    Any coherent interaction of light and atoms needs to conserve energy, linear momentum and angular momentum. What happens to an atom's angular momentum if it encounters light that carries orbital angular momentum (OAM)? This is a particularly intriguing question as the angular momentum of atoms is quantized, incorporating the intrinsic spin angular momentum of the individual electrons as well as the OAM associated with their spatial distribution. In addition, a mechanical angular momentum can arise from the rotation of the entire atom, which for very cold atoms is also quantized. Atoms therefore allow us to probe and access the quantum properties of light's OAM, aiding our fundamental understanding of light-matter interactions, and moreover, allowing us to construct OAM-based applications, including quantum memories, frequency converters for shaped light and OAM-based sensors. This article is part of the themed issue 'Optical orbital angular momentum'.

  20. Angular distributions in multifragmentation

    SciTech Connect

    Stoenner, R.W.; Klobuchar, R.L.; Haustein, P.E.; Virtes, G.J.; Cumming, J.B.; Loveland, W.

    2006-04-15

    Angular distributions are reported for {sup 37}Ar and {sup 127}Xe from 381-GeV {sup 28}Si+Au interactions and for products between {sup 24}Na and {sup 149}Gd from 28-GeV {sup 1}H+Au. Sideward peaking and forward deficits for multifragmentation products are significantly enhanced for heavy ions compared with protons. Projectile kinetic energy does not appear to be a satisfactory scaling variable. The data are discussed in terms of a kinetic-focusing model in which sideward peaking is due to transverse motion of the excited product from the initial projectile-target interaction.

  1. Angular Asteroid Composite

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2017-02-10

    This composite of 25 images of asteroid 2017 BQ6 was generated with radar data collected using NASA's Goldstone Solar System Radar in California's Mojave Desert. The images were gathered on Feb. 7, 2017, between 8:39 and 9:50 p.m. PST (11:39 p.m. EST and 12:50 a.m., Feb. 7), revealing an irregular, angular-appearing asteroid about 660 feet (200 meters) in size that rotates about once every three hours. The images have resolutions as fine as 12 feet (3.75 meters) per pixel. http://photojournal.jpl.nasa.gov/catalog/PIA21452

  2. Orbital angular momentum entanglement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Romero, Mary Jacquiline Romero

    Entanglement in higher dimensions is an attractive concept that is a challenge to realise experimentally. To this end, the entanglement of the orbital angular momentum (OAM) of photons holds promise. The OAM state-space is discrete and theoretically unbounded. In the work that follows, we investigate various aspects of OAM entanglement. We show how the correlations in OAM and its conjugate variable, angular position, are determined by phase- matching and the shape of the pump beam in spontaneous parametric down- conversion. We implement tests of quantum mechanics which have been previously done for other variables. We show the Einstein-Podolsky-Rosen paradox for OAM and angle, supporting the incompatibility of quantum mechanics with locality and realism. We demonstrate violations of Bell-type inequalities, thereby discounting local hidden variables for describing the correlations we observe. We show the Hardy paradox using OAM, again highlighting the nonlocal nature of quantum mechanics. We demonstrate violations of Leggett-type inequalities, thereby discounting nonlocal hidden variables for describing correlations. Lastly, we have looked into the entanglement of topological vortex structures formed from a special superposition of OAM modes and show violations of Bell-type inequalities confined to a finite, isolated volume.

  3. Angular displacement measuring device

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Seegmiller, H. Lee B. (Inventor)

    1992-01-01

    A system for measuring the angular displacement of a point of interest on a structure, such as aircraft model within a wind tunnel, includes a source of polarized light located at the point of interest. A remote detector arrangement detects the orientation of the plane of the polarized light received from the source and compares this orientation with the initial orientation to determine the amount or rate of angular displacement of the point of interest. The detector arrangement comprises a rotating polarizing filter and a dual filter and light detector unit. The latter unit comprises an inner aligned filter and photodetector assembly which is disposed relative to the periphery of the polarizer so as to receive polarized light passing the polarizing filter and an outer aligned filter and photodetector assembly which receives the polarized light directly, i.e., without passing through the polarizing filter. The purpose of the unit is to compensate for the effects of dust, fog and the like. A polarization preserving optical fiber conducts polarized light from a remote laser source to the point of interest.

  4. Angular displacement measuring device

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seegmiller, H. Lee B.

    1992-08-01

    A system for measuring the angular displacement of a point of interest on a structure, such as aircraft model within a wind tunnel, includes a source of polarized light located at the point of interest. A remote detector arrangement detects the orientation of the plane of the polarized light received from the source and compares this orientation with the initial orientation to determine the amount or rate of angular displacement of the point of interest. The detector arrangement comprises a rotating polarizing filter and a dual filter and light detector unit. The latter unit comprises an inner aligned filter and photodetector assembly which is disposed relative to the periphery of the polarizer so as to receive polarized light passing the polarizing filter and an outer aligned filter and photodetector assembly which receives the polarized light directly, i.e., without passing through the polarizing filter. The purpose of the unit is to compensate for the effects of dust, fog and the like. A polarization preserving optical fiber conducts polarized light from a remote laser source to the point of interest.

  5. Density perturbation theory

    SciTech Connect

    Palenik, Mark C.; Dunlap, Brett I.

    2015-07-28

    Despite the fundamental importance of electron density in density functional theory, perturbations are still usually dealt with using Hartree-Fock-like orbital equations known as coupled-perturbed Kohn-Sham (CPKS). As an alternative, we develop a perturbation theory that solves for the perturbed density directly, removing the need for CPKS. This replaces CPKS with a true Hohenberg-Kohn density perturbation theory. In CPKS, the perturbed density is found in the basis of products of occupied and virtual orbitals, which becomes ever more over-complete as the size of the orbital basis set increases. In our method, the perturbation to the density is expanded in terms of a series of density basis functions and found directly. It is possible to solve for the density in such a way that it makes the total energy stationary even if the density basis is incomplete.

  6. Non-Gaussianities in DBI inflation with angular motion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kidani, Taichi; Koyama, Kazuya

    2014-07-01

    We study DBI spinflation models with angular potentials that are derived in string theory. We analyze the background dynamics with different parameter sets and study the impact of changing each parameter on inflationary dynamics. It is known that the conversion of the entropy perturbation into the curvature perturbation gives multifield Dirac-Born-Infeld (DBI) inflation models a possibility of satisfying the observational constraints by relaxing the stringent microphysical constraint that disfavors single-field DBI inflation models. We show that our model is excluded by the Planck satellite observations even with the conversion mechanism regardless of the parameter set.

  7. Orbital angular momentum microlaser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miao, Pei; Zhang, Zhifeng; Sun, Jingbo; Walasik, Wiktor; Longhi, Stefano; Litchinitser, Natalia M.; Feng, Liang

    2016-07-01

    Structured light provides an additional degree of freedom for modern optics and practical applications. The effective generation of orbital angular momentum (OAM) lasing, especially at a micro- and nanoscale, could address the growing demand for information capacity. By exploiting the emerging non-Hermitian photonics design at an exceptional point, we demonstrate a microring laser producing a single-mode OAM vortex lasing with the ability to precisely define the topological charge of the OAM mode. The polarization associated with OAM lasing can be further manipulated on demand, creating a radially polarized vortex emission. Our OAM microlaser could find applications in the next generation of integrated optoelectronic devices for optical communications in both quantum and classical regimes.

  8. Orbital angular momentum microlaser.

    PubMed

    Miao, Pei; Zhang, Zhifeng; Sun, Jingbo; Walasik, Wiktor; Longhi, Stefano; Litchinitser, Natalia M; Feng, Liang

    2016-07-29

    Structured light provides an additional degree of freedom for modern optics and practical applications. The effective generation of orbital angular momentum (OAM) lasing, especially at a micro- and nanoscale, could address the growing demand for information capacity. By exploiting the emerging non-Hermitian photonics design at an exceptional point, we demonstrate a microring laser producing a single-mode OAM vortex lasing with the ability to precisely define the topological charge of the OAM mode. The polarization associated with OAM lasing can be further manipulated on demand, creating a radially polarized vortex emission. Our OAM microlaser could find applications in the next generation of integrated optoelectronic devices for optical communications in both quantum and classical regimes. Copyright © 2016, American Association for the Advancement of Science.

  9. Instantons from perturbation theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Serone, Marco; Spada, Gabriele; Villadoro, Giovanni

    2017-07-01

    In quantum mechanics and quantum field theory perturbation theory generically requires the inclusion of extra contributions nonperturbative in the coupling, such as instantons, to reproduce exact results. We show how full nonperturbative results can be encoded in a suitable modified perturbative series in a class of quantum mechanical problems. We illustrate this explicitly in examples which are known to contain nonperturbative effects, such as the (supersymmetric) double-well potential, the pure anharmonic oscillator, and the perturbative expansion around a false vacuum.

  10. Automated Lattice Perturbation Theory

    SciTech Connect

    Monahan, Christopher

    2014-11-01

    I review recent developments in automated lattice perturbation theory. Starting with an overview of lattice perturbation theory, I focus on the three automation packages currently "on the market": HiPPy/HPsrc, Pastor and PhySyCAl. I highlight some recent applications of these methods, particularly in B physics. In the final section I briefly discuss the related, but distinct, approach of numerical stochastic perturbation theory.

  11. Density matrix perturbation theory.

    PubMed

    Niklasson, Anders M N; Challacombe, Matt

    2004-05-14

    An orbital-free quantum perturbation theory is proposed. It gives the response of the density matrix upon variation of the Hamiltonian by quadratically convergent recursions based on perturbed projections. The technique allows treatment of embedded quantum subsystems with a computational cost scaling linearly with the size of the perturbed region, O(N(pert.)), and as O(1) with the total system size. The method allows efficient high order perturbation expansions, as demonstrated with an example involving a 10th order expansion. Density matrix analogs of Wigner's 2n+1 rule are also presented.

  12. Intrinsic Angular Momentum of Light.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Santarelli, Vincent

    1979-01-01

    Derives a familiar torque-angular momentum theorem for the electromagnetic field, and includes the intrinsic torques exerted by the fields on the polarized medium. This inclusion leads to the expressions for the intrinsic angular momentum carried by the radiation traveling through a charge-free medium. (Author/MA)

  13. Lunar occultation angular diameter measurements.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beavers, W. I.; Eitter, J. J.; Dunham, D. W.; Stein, W. L.

    1980-11-01

    The analysis of one dozen lunar occultation diameter candidate observations are reported. Within this set of occultation measurements at Fick Observatory, six of the stars provide sensible angular diameters, and the remainder appear as virtual point sources. Angular diameter measurements are reported for ɛ Gem, BD+24°0571, υ Cap, R Gem, and BD+23°1518.

  14. Intrinsic Angular Momentum of Light.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Santarelli, Vincent

    1979-01-01

    Derives a familiar torque-angular momentum theorem for the electromagnetic field, and includes the intrinsic torques exerted by the fields on the polarized medium. This inclusion leads to the expressions for the intrinsic angular momentum carried by the radiation traveling through a charge-free medium. (Author/MA)

  15. Switching mechanism senses angular acceleration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1966-01-01

    Switching mechanism actuates an electrical circuit when a predetermined angular acceleration and displacement are reached. A rotor in the mechanism overcomes the restraint of a magnetic detent when the case in which the detent is mounted reaches the predetermined angular acceleration.

  16. The Perturbed Puma Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rong, Shu-Jun; Liu, Qiu-Yu

    2012-04-01

    The puma model on the basis of the Lorentz and CPT violation may bring an economical interpretation to the conventional neutrinos oscillation and part of the anomalous oscillations. We study the effect of the perturbation to the puma model. In the case of the first-order perturbation which keeps the (23) interchange symmetry, the mixing matrix element Ue3 is always zero. The nonzero mixing matrix element Ue3 is obtained in the second-order perturbation that breaks the (23) interchange symmetry.

  17. Annihilation of angular momentum bias during thrusting and spinning-up maneuvers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Longuski, J. M.; Kia, T.; Breckenridge, W. G.

    1989-01-01

    During spinning-up and thrusting maneuvers of rockets and spacecraft, undesired transverse torques (from error sources such as thruster misalignment, center-of-mass offset and thruster mismatch) perturb the angular momentum vector from its original orientation. In this paper a maneuver scheme is presented which virtually annihilates the angular momentum vector bias, even though the magnitude and direction of the perturbing body-fixed torques are unknown. In the analysis it is assumed that the torques are small and constant and that the spacecraft or rocket can be approximated by a rigid body, which may be asymmetric. Typical maneuvers of the Galileo spacecraft are simulated to demonstrate the technique.

  18. Annihilation of angular momentum bias during thrusting and spinning-up maneuvers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Longuski, J. M.; Kia, T.; Breckenridge, W. G.

    1989-01-01

    During spinning-up and thrusting maneuvers of rockets and spacecraft, undesired transverse torques (from error sources such as thruster misalignment, center-of-mass offset and thruster mismatch) perturb the angular momentum vector from its original orientation. In this paper a maneuver scheme is presented which virtually annihilates the angular momentum vector bias, even though the magnitude and direction of the perturbing body-fixed torques are unknown. In the analysis it is assumed that the torques are small and constant and that the spacecraft or rocket can be approximated by a rigid body, which may be asymmetric. Typical maneuvers of the Galileo spacecraft are simulated to demonstrate the technique.

  19. Transverse angular momentum of photons

    SciTech Connect

    Aiello, Andrea

    2010-05-15

    We develop the quantum theory of transverse angular momentum of light beams. The theory applies to paraxial and quasiparaxial photon beams in vacuum and reproduces the known results for classical beams when applied to coherent states of the field. Both the Poynting vector, alias the linear momentum, and the angular-momentum quantum operators of a light beam are calculated including contributions from first-order transverse derivatives. This permits a correct description of the energy flow in the beam and the natural emergence of both the spin and the angular momentum of the photons. We show that for collimated beams of light, orbital angular-momentum operators do not satisfy the standard commutation rules. Finally, we discuss the application of our theory to some concrete cases.

  20. MBL Experiment in Angular Momentum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gluck, Paul

    2002-04-01

    Among the series of beautiful take-home experiments designed by A.P. French and J.G. King for MIT students, the one on angular momentum studies the loss and conservation of angular momentum using a small dc motor as generator. Here we describe a version of the experiment that increases its accuracy, enables students to perform detailed rotational dynamics calculations, and sharpens the ability to isolate the region where the collision occurs.

  1. Perturbed nonlinear differential equations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Proctor, T. G.

    1974-01-01

    For perturbed nonlinear systems, a norm, other than the supremum norm, is introduced on some spaces of continuous functions. This makes possible the study of new types of behavior. A study is presented on a perturbed nonlinear differential equation defined on a half line, and the existence of a family of solutions with special boundedness properties is established. The ideas developed are applied to the study of integral manifolds, and examples are given.

  2. Angular momentum conservation law in light-front quantum field theory

    DOE PAGES

    Chiu, Kelly Yu-Ju; Brodsky, Stanley J.

    2017-03-31

    We prove the Lorentz invariance of the angular momentum conservation law and the helicity sum rule for relativistic composite systems in the light-front formulation. We explicitly show that j3, the z -component of the angular momentum remains unchanged under Lorentz transformations generated by the light-front kinematical boost operators. The invariance of j3 under Lorentz transformations is a feature unique to the front form. Applying the Lorentz invariance of the angular quantum number in the front form, we obtain a selection rule for the orbital angular momentum which can be used to eliminate certain interaction vertices in QED and QCD. Wemore » also generalize the selection rule to any renormalizable theory and show that there exists an upper bound on the change of orbital angular momentum in scattering processes at any fixed order in perturbation theory.« less

  3. Angular momentum conservation law in light-front quantum field theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chiu, Kelly Yu-Ju; Brodsky, Stanley J.

    2017-03-01

    We prove the Lorentz invariance of the angular momentum conservation law and the helicity sum rule for relativistic composite systems in the light-front formulation. We explicitly show that j3, the z -component of the angular momentum remains unchanged under Lorentz transformations generated by the light-front kinematical boost operators. The invariance of j3 under Lorentz transformations is a feature unique to the front form. Applying the Lorentz invariance of the angular quantum number in the front form, we obtain a selection rule for the orbital angular momentum which can be used to eliminate certain interaction vertices in QED and QCD. We also generalize the selection rule to any renormalizable theory and show that there exists an upper bound on the change of orbital angular momentum in scattering processes at any fixed order in perturbation theory.

  4. Total angular momentum waves for scalar, vector, and tensor fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dai, Liang; Kamionkowski, Marc; Jeong, Donghui

    2012-12-01

    Most calculations in cosmological perturbation theory, including those dealing with the inflationary generation of perturbations, their time evolution, and their observational consequences, decompose those perturbations into plane waves (Fourier modes). However, for some calculations, particularly those involving observations performed on a spherical sky, a decomposition into waves of fixed total angular momentum (TAM) may be more appropriate. Here we introduce TAM waves—solutions of fixed total angular momentum to the Helmholtz equation—for three-dimensional scalar, vector, and tensor fields. The vector TAM waves of given total angular momentum can be decomposed further into a set of three basis functions of fixed orbital angular momentum, a set of fixed helicity, or a basis consisting of a longitudinal (L) and two transverse (E and B) TAM waves. The symmetric traceless rank-2 tensor TAM waves can be similarly decomposed into a basis of fixed orbital angular momentum or fixed helicity, or a basis that consists of a longitudinal (L), two vector (VE and VB, of opposite parity), and two tensor (TE and TB, of opposite parity) waves. We show how all of the vector and tensor TAM waves can be obtained by applying derivative operators to scalar TAM waves. This operator approach then allows one to decompose a vector field into three covariant scalar fields for the L, E, and B components and symmetric-traceless-tensor fields into five covariant scalar fields for the L, VE, VB, TE, and TB components. We provide projections of the vector and tensor TAM waves onto vector and tensor spherical harmonics. We provide calculational detail to facilitate the assimilation of this formalism into cosmological calculations. As an example, we calculate the power spectra of the deflection angle for gravitational lensing by density perturbations and by gravitational waves. We comment on an alternative approach to cosmic microwave background fluctuations based on TAM waves. An

  5. Factors influencing perceived angular velocity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kaiser, Mary K.; Calderone, Jack B.

    1991-01-01

    Angular velocity perception is examined for rotations both in depth and in the image plane and the influence of several object properties on this motion parameter is explored. Two major object properties are considered, namely, texture density which determines the rate of edge transitions for rotations in depth, i.e., the number of texture elements that pass an object's boundary per unit of time, and object size which determines the tangential linear velocities and 2D image velocities of texture elements for a given angular velocity. Results of experiments show that edge-transition rate biased angular velocity estimates only when edges were highly salient. Element velocities had an impact on perceived angular velocity; this bias was associated with 2D image velocity rather than 3D tangential velocity. Despite these biases judgements were most strongly determined by the true angular velocity. Sensitivity to this higher order motion parameter appeared to be good for rotations both in depth (y-axis) and parallel to the line of sight (z-axis).

  6. Twisting perturbed parafermions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Belitsky, A. V.

    2017-07-01

    The near-collinear expansion of scattering amplitudes in maximally supersymmetric Yang-Mills theory at strong coupling is governed by the dynamics of stings propagating on the five sphere. The pentagon transitions in the operator product expansion which systematize the series get reformulated in terms of matrix elements of branch-point twist operators in the two-dimensional O(6) nonlinear sigma model. The facts that the latter is an asymptotically free field theory and that there exists no local realization of twist fields prevents one from explicit calculation of their scaling dimensions and operator product expansion coefficients. This complication is bypassed making use of the equivalence of the sigma model to the infinite-level limit of WZNW models perturbed by current-current interactions, such that one can use conformal symmetry and conformal perturbation theory for systematic calculations. Presently, to set up the formalism, we consider the O(3) sigma model which is reformulated as perturbed parafermions.

  7. Vortex perturbation dynamics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Criminale, W. O.; Lasseigne, D. G.; Jackson, T. L.

    1995-01-01

    An initial value approach is used to examine the dynamics of perturbations introduced into a vortex under strain. Both the basic vortex considered and the perturbations are taken as fully three-dimensional. An explicit solution for the time evolution of the vorticity perturbations is given for arbitrary initial vorticity. Analytical solutions for the resulting velocity components are found when the initial vorticity is assumed to be localized. For more general initial vorticity distributions, the velocity components are determined numerically. It is found that the variation in the radial direction of the initial vorticity disturbance is the most important factor influencing the qualitative behavior of the solutions. Transient growth in the magnitude of the velocity components is found to be directly attributable to the compactness of the initial vorticity.

  8. Perturbations for transient acceleration

    SciTech Connect

    Vargas, Cristofher Zuñiga; Zimdahl, Winfried; Hipólito-Ricaldi, Wiliam S. E-mail: hipolito@ceunes.ufes.br

    2012-04-01

    According to the standard ΛCDM model, the accelerated expansion of the Universe will go on forever. Motivated by recent observational results, we explore the possibility of a finite phase of acceleration which asymptotically approaches another period of decelerated expansion. Extending an earlier study on a corresponding homogeneous and isotropic dynamics, in which interactions between dark matter and dark energy are crucial, the present paper also investigates the dynamics of the matter perturbations both on the Newtonian and General Relativistic (GR) levels and quantifies the potential relevance of perturbations of the dark-energy component. In the background, the model is tested against the Supernova type Ia (SNIa) data of the Constitution set and on the perturbative level against growth rate data, among them those of the WiggleZ survey, and the data of the 2dFGRS project. Our results indicate that a transient phase of accelerated expansion is not excluded by current observations.

  9. Variations in atmospheric angular momentum

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rosen, R. D.; Salstein, D. A.

    1981-01-01

    Twice-daily values of the atmosphere's angular momentum about the polar axis during the five years from 1976 through 1980 are presented in graphs and a table. The compilation is based on a global data set, incorporating 90 percent of the mass of the atmosphere. The relationship between changes in the angular momentum of the atmosphere and changes in the length of day is described, as are the main sources of error in the data. The variability in angular momentum is revealed in a preliminary fashion by means of a spectral decomposition. The data presented should stimulate comparisons with other measures of the length of day and so provide a basis for greater understanding of Earth-atmosphere interactions.

  10. Interferometric measurement of angular motion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peña Arellano, Fabián Erasmo; Panjwani, Hasnain; Carbone, Ludovico; Speake, Clive C.

    2013-04-01

    This paper describes the design and realization of a homodyne polarization interferometer for measuring angular motion. The optical layout incorporates carefully designed cat's eye retroreflectors that maximize the measurable range of angular motion and facilitate initial alignment. The retroreflectors are optimized and numerically characterized in terms of defocus and spherical aberrations using Zemax software for optical design. The linearity of the measurement is then calculated in terms of the aberrations. The actual physical interferometer is realized as a compact device with optical components from stock and without relying on adjustable holders. Evaluation of its performance using a commercial autocollimator confirmed a reproducibility within 0.1%, a non-linearity of less than 1 ppm with respect to the autocollimator, an upper limit to its sensitivity of about 5 × 10-11 rad/sqrt{textrm {Hz}} from audioband down to 100 mHz and an angular measurement range of more than ±1°.

  11. Perturbed nonlinear differential equations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Proctor, T. G.

    1972-01-01

    The existence of a solution defined for all t and possessing a type of boundedness property is established for the perturbed nonlinear system y = f(t,y) + F(t,y). The unperturbed system x = f(t,x) has a dichotomy in which some solutions exist and are well behaved as t increases to infinity, and some solution exists and are well behaved as t decreases to minus infinity. A similar study is made for a perturbed nonlinear differential equation defined on a half line, R+, and the existence of a family of solutions with special boundedness properties is established. The ideas are applied to integral manifolds.

  12. Non-Colinearity of Angular Velocity and Angular Momentum

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Burr, A. F.

    1974-01-01

    Discusses the principles, construction, and operation of an apparatus which serves to demonstrate the non-colinearity of the angular velocity and momentum vectors as well as the inertial tensors. Applications of the apparatus to teaching of advanced undergraduate mechanics courses are recommended. (CC)

  13. Non-Colinearity of Angular Velocity and Angular Momentum

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Burr, A. F.

    1974-01-01

    Discusses the principles, construction, and operation of an apparatus which serves to demonstrate the non-colinearity of the angular velocity and momentum vectors as well as the inertial tensors. Applications of the apparatus to teaching of advanced undergraduate mechanics courses are recommended. (CC)

  14. Angular Limb Deformities: Growth Retardation.

    PubMed

    McCarrel, Taralyn M

    2017-08-01

    Angular limb deformities are common in foals; however, the importance of the deformity and if treatment is required depend on the degree of deformity relative to normal conformation for stage of growth, the breed and discipline expectations, age, and response to conservative therapies. This article addresses the importance of the foal conformation examination to determine which foals need surgical intervention to correct an angular deformity and when. Techniques for surgical growth retardation include the transphyseal staple, screw and wire transphyseal bridge, and transphyseal screw. Appropriate timing for intervention for each location and complications associated with each procedure are discussed. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Solar cell angular position transducer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sandford, M. C.; Gray, D. L. (Inventor)

    1980-01-01

    An angular position transducer utilizing photocells and a light source is disclosed. The device uses a fully rotatable baffle which is connected via an actuator shaft to the body whose rotational displacement is to be measured. The baffle blocks the light path between the light source and the photocells so that a constant semicircular beam of light reaches the photocells. The current produced by the photocells is fed through a resistor, a differential amplifier measures the voltage drop across the resistor which indicates the angular position of the actuator shaft and hence of the object.

  16. Automated Angular Momentum Recoupling Algebra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Williams, H. T.; Silbar, Richard R.

    1992-04-01

    We present a set of heuristic rules for algebraic solution of angular momentum recoupling problems. The general problem reduces to that of finding an optimal path from one binary tree (representing the angular momentum coupling scheme for the reduced matrix element) to another (representing the sub-integrals and spin sums to be done). The method lends itself to implementation on a microcomputer, and we have developed such an implementation using a dialect of LISP. We describe both how our code, called RACAH, works and how it appears to the user. We illustrate the use of RACAH for several transition and scattering amplitude matrix elements occurring in atomic, nuclear, and particle physics.

  17. Resilience of hybrid optical angular momentum qubits to turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Farías, Osvaldo Jiménez; D'Ambrosio, Vincenzo; Taballione, Caterina; Bisesto, Fabrizio; Slussarenko, Sergei; Aolita, Leandro; Marrucci, Lorenzo; Walborn, Stephen P.; Sciarrino, Fabio

    2015-02-01

    Recent schemes to encode quantum information into the total angular momentum of light, defining rotation-invariant hybrid qubits composed of the polarization and orbital angular momentum degrees of freedom, present interesting applications for quantum information technology. However, there remains the question as to how detrimental effects such as random spatial perturbations affect these encodings. Here, we demonstrate that alignment-free quantum communication through a turbulent channel based on hybrid qubits can be achieved with unit transmission fidelity. In our experiment, alignment-free qubits are produced with q-plates and sent through a homemade turbulence chamber. The decoding procedure, also realized with q-plates, relies on both degrees of freedom and renders an intrinsic error-filtering mechanism that maps errors into losses.

  18. Resilience of hybrid optical angular momentum qubits to turbulence.

    PubMed

    Farías, Osvaldo Jiménez; D'Ambrosio, Vincenzo; Taballione, Caterina; Bisesto, Fabrizio; Slussarenko, Sergei; Aolita, Leandro; Marrucci, Lorenzo; Walborn, Stephen P; Sciarrino, Fabio

    2015-02-12

    Recent schemes to encode quantum information into the total angular momentum of light, defining rotation-invariant hybrid qubits composed of the polarization and orbital angular momentum degrees of freedom, present interesting applications for quantum information technology. However, there remains the question as to how detrimental effects such as random spatial perturbations affect these encodings. Here, we demonstrate that alignment-free quantum communication through a turbulent channel based on hybrid qubits can be achieved with unit transmission fidelity. In our experiment, alignment-free qubits are produced with q-plates and sent through a homemade turbulence chamber. The decoding procedure, also realized with q-plates, relies on both degrees of freedom and renders an intrinsic error-filtering mechanism that maps errors into losses.

  19. Even perturbations of the self-similar Vaidya space-time

    SciTech Connect

    Nolan, Brien C.; Waters, Thomas J.

    2005-05-15

    We study even parity metric and matter perturbations of all angular modes in self-similar Vaidya space-time. We focus on the case where the background contains a naked singularity. Initial conditions are imposed, describing a finite perturbation emerging from the portion of flat space-time preceding the matter-filled region of space-time. The most general perturbation satisfying the initial conditions is allowed to impinge upon the Cauchy horizon (CH), where the perturbation remains finite: There is no 'blue-sheet' instability. However, when the perturbation evolves through the CH and onto the second future similarity horizon of the naked singularity, divergence necessarily occurs: This surface is found to be unstable. The analysis is based on the study of individual modes following a Mellin transform of the perturbation. We present an argument that the full perturbation remains finite after resummation of the (possibly infinite number of) modes.

  20. Singular perturbation analysis of a reduced model for collective motion: a renormalization group approach.

    PubMed

    Lee, Chiu Fan

    2011-03-01

    In a system of noisy self-propelled particles with interactions that favor directional alignment, collective motion will appear if the density of particles is beyond a critical density. Starting with a reduced model for collective motion, we determine how the critical density depends on the form of the initial perturbation. Specifically, we employ a renormalization-group improved perturbative method to analyze the model equations and show analytically, up to first order in the perturbation parameter, how the critical density is modified by the strength of the initial angular perturbation in the system.

  1. Perturbing turbulence beyond collapse

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kühnen, Jakob; Scarselli, Davide; Hof, Björn; Nonlinear Dynamics; Turbulence Group Team

    2016-11-01

    Wall-bounded turbulent flows are considered to be in principle stable against perturbations and persist as long as the Reynolds number is sufficiently high. We show for the example of pipe flow that a specific perturbation of the turbulent flow field disrupts the genesis of new turbulence at the wall. This leads to an immediate collapse of the turbulent flow and causes complete relaminarisation further downstream. The annihilation of turbulence is effected by a steady manipulation of the streamwise velocity component only, greatly simplifying control efforts which usually require knowledge of the highly complex three dimensional and time dependent velocity fields. We present several different control schemes from laboratory experiments which achieve the required perturbation of the flow for total relaminarisation. Transient growth, a linear amplification mechanism measuring the efficiency of eddies in redistributing shear that quantifies the maximum perturbation energy amplification achievable over a finite time in a linearized framework, is shown to set a clear-cut threshold below which turbulence is impeded in its formation and thus permanently annihilated.

  2. Cosmological perturbations in antigravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oltean, Marius; Brandenberger, Robert

    2014-10-01

    We compute the evolution of cosmological perturbations in a recently proposed Weyl-symmetric theory of two scalar fields with oppositely signed conformal couplings to Einstein gravity. It is motivated from the minimal conformal extension of the standard model, such that one of these scalar fields is the Higgs while the other is a new particle, the dilaton, introduced to make the Higgs mass conformally symmetric. At the background level, the theory admits novel geodesically complete cyclic cosmological solutions characterized by a brief period of repulsive gravity, or "antigravity," during each successive transition from a big crunch to a big bang. For simplicity, we consider scalar perturbations in the absence of anisotropies, with potential set to zero and without any radiation. We show that despite the necessarily wrong-signed kinetic term of the dilaton in the full action, these perturbations are neither ghostlike nor tachyonic in the limit of strongly repulsive gravity. On this basis, we argue—pending a future analysis of vector and tensor perturbations—that, with respect to perturbative stability, the cosmological solutions of this theory are viable.

  3. Controlling the spins angular momentum in ferromagnets with sequences of picosecond acoustic pulses.

    PubMed

    Kim, Ji-Wan; Vomir, Mircea; Bigot, Jean-Yves

    2015-02-17

    Controlling the angular momentum of spins with very short external perturbations is a key issue in modern magnetism. For example it allows manipulating the magnetization for recording purposes or for inducing high frequency spin torque oscillations. Towards that purpose it is essential to modify and control the angular momentum of the magnetization which precesses around the resultant effective magnetic field. That can be achieved with very short external magnetic field pulses or using intrinsically coupled magnetic structures, resulting in a transfer of spin torque. Here we show that using picosecond acoustic pulses is a versatile and efficient way of controlling the spin angular momentum in ferromagnets. Two or three acoustic pulses, generated by femtosecond laser pulses, allow suppressing or enhancing the magnetic precession at any arbitrary time by precisely controlling the delays and amplitudes of the optical pulses. A formal analogy with a two dimensional pendulum allows us explaining the complex trajectory of the magnetic vector perturbed by the acoustic pulses.

  4. Angular Dynamics of a Small Particle in Turbulence.

    PubMed

    Candelier, F; Einarsson, J; Mehlig, B

    2016-11-11

    We compute the angular dynamics of a neutrally buoyant nearly spherical particle immersed in an unsteady fluid. We assume that the particle is small, that its translational slip velocity is negligible, and that unsteady and convective inertia are small perturbations. We derive an approximation for the torque on the particle that determines the first inertial corrections to Jeffery's equation. These corrections arise as a consequence of local vortex stretching and can be substantial in turbulence, where local vortex stretching is strong and closely linked to the irreversibility of turbulence.

  5. Angular structure of lacunarity, and the renormalization group

    PubMed

    Ball; Caldarelli; Flammini

    2000-12-11

    We formulate the angular structure of lacunarity in fractals, in terms of a symmetry reduction of the three point correlation function. This provides a rich probe of universality, and first measurements yield new evidence in support of the equivalence between self-avoiding walks (SAW's) and percolation perimeters in two dimensions. We argue that the lacunarity reveals much of the renormalization group in real space. This is supported by exact calculations for random walks and measured data for percolation clusters and SAW's. Relationships follow between exponents governing inward and outward propagating perturbations, and we also find a very general test for the contribution of long-range interactions.

  6. High angular resolution at LBT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Conrad, A.; Arcidiacono, C.; Bertero, M.; Boccacci, P.; Davies, A. G.; Defrere, D.; de Kleer, K.; De Pater, I.; Hinz, P.; Hofmann, K. H.; La Camera, A.; Leisenring, J.; Kürster, M.; Rathbun, J. A.; Schertl, D.; Skemer, A.; Skrutskie, M.; Spencer, J. R.; Veillet, C.; Weigelt, G.; Woodward, C. E.

    2015-12-01

    High angular resolution from ground-based observatories stands as a key technology for advancing planetary science. In the window between the angular resolution achievable with 8-10 meter class telescopes, and the 23-to-40 meter giants of the future, LBT provides a glimpse of what the next generation of instruments providing higher angular resolution will provide. We present first ever resolved images of an Io eruption site taken from the ground, images of Io's Loki Patera taken with Fizeau imaging at the 22.8 meter LBT [Conrad, et al., AJ, 2015]. We will also present preliminary analysis of two data sets acquired during the 2015 opposition: L-band fringes at Kurdalagon and an occultation of Loki and Pele by Europa (see figure). The light curves from this occultation will yield an order of magnitude improvement in spatial resolution along the path of ingress and egress. We will conclude by providing an overview of the overall benefit of recent and future advances in angular resolution for planetary science.

  7. Noncontact measurement of angular deflection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bryant, E. L.

    1978-01-01

    Technique for measuring instantaneous angular deflection of object requires no physical contact. Technique utilizes two flat refractors, converging lens, and different photocell. Distinction of method is its combination of optical and electromechanical components into feedback system in which measurement error is made to approach zero. Application is foreseen in measurement of torsional strain.

  8. Gas Accretion and Angular Momentum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stewart, Kyle R.

    In this chapter, we review the role of gas accretion to the acquisition of angular momentum, both in galaxies and in their gaseous halos. We begin by discussing angular momentum in dark matter halos, with a brief review of tidal torque theory and the importance of mergers, followed by a discussion of the canonical picture of galaxy formation within this framework, where halo gas is presumed to shock-eat to the virial temperature of the halo, following the same spin distribution as the dark matter halo before cooling to the center of the halo to form a galaxy there. In the context of recent observational evidence demonstrating the presence of high angular momentum gas in galaxy halos, we review recent cosmological hydrodynamic simulations that have begun to emphasize the role of "cold flow" accretion—anisotropic gas accretion along cosmic filaments that does not shock-heat before sinking to the central galaxy. We discuss the implications of these simulations, reviewing a number of recent developments in the literature, and suggest a revision to the canonical model as it relates to the expected angular momentum content of gaseous halos around galaxies.

  9. Olympic Wrestling and Angular Momentum.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carle, Mark

    1988-01-01

    Reported is the use of a wrestling photograph in a noncalculus introductory physics course. The photograph presents a maneuver that could serve as an example for a discussion on equilibrium, forces, torque, and angular motion. Provided are some qualitative thoughts as well as quantitative calculations. (YP)

  10. Energy and angular momentum transfer in binary galaxies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Namboodiri, P. M. S.; Kochhar, R. K.

    1990-01-01

    The authors numerically studied tidal effects of a massive perturber on a satellite galaxy. The model consists of a spherical satellite galaxy and a point mass perturber and the encounter is non-penetrating. A wide range of density ratios and eccentricities of the relative orbits have been considered. The disruption of the satellite galaxy has been observed when the numerical value of the fractional change in the energy is greater than two. The changes in the energy and angular momentum show smooth variation in the case of unbound orbits and irregular variation in the bound orbit cases. It is shown that for a constant pericentral distance, increasing the density ratio decreases the tidal effects; and for a given density ratio an increase in the eccentricity decreases the tidal effects.

  11. A new approach to the propagation of light-like signals in perturbed cosmological backgrounds

    SciTech Connect

    Fanizza, G.; Gasperini, M.; Marozzi, G.; Veneziano, G. E-mail: gasperini@ba.infn.it E-mail: Gabriele.Veneziano@cern.ch

    2015-08-01

    We present a new method to compute the deflection of light rays in a perturbed FLRW geometry. We exploit the properties of the Geodesic Light Cone (GLC) gauge where null rays propagate at constant angular coordinates irrespectively of the given (inhomogeneous and/or anisotropic) geometry. The gravitational deflection of null geodesics can then be obtained, in any other gauge, simply by expressing the angular coordinates of the given gauge in terms of the GLC angular coordinates. We apply this method to the standard Poisson gauge, including scalar perturbations, and give the full result for the deflection effect in terms of the direction of observation and observed redshift up to second order, and up to third order for the leading lensing terms. We also compare our results with those presently available in the literature and, in particular, we provide a new non trivial check of a previous result on the luminosity-redshift relation up to second order in cosmological perturbation theory.

  12. Plate tectonics conserves angular momentum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bowin, C.

    2009-03-01

    A new combined understanding of plate tectonics, Earth internal structure, and the role of impulse in deformation of the Earth's crust is presented. Plate accelerations and decelerations have been revealed by iterative filtering of the quaternion history for the Euler poles that define absolute plate motion history for the past 68 million years, and provide an unprecedented precision for plate angular rotation variations with time at 2-million year intervals. Stage poles represent the angular rotation of a plate's motion between adjacent Euler poles, and from which the maximum velocity vector for a plate can be determined. The consistent maximum velocity variations, in turn, yield consistent estimates of plate accelerations and decelerations. The fact that the Pacific plate was shown to accelerate and decelerate, implied that conservation of plate tectonic angular momentum must be globally conserved, and that is confirmed by the results shown here (total angular momentum ~1.4 E+27 kgm2s-1). Accordingly, if a plate decelerates, other plates must increase their angular momentums to compensate. In addition, the azimuth of the maximum velocity vectors yields clues as to why the "bend" in the Emperor-Hawaiian seamount trend occurred near 46 Myr. This report summarizes processing results for 12 of the 14 major tectonic plates of the Earth (except for the Juan de Fuca and Philippine plates). Plate accelerations support the contention that plate tectonics is a product of torques that most likely are sustained by the sinking of positive density anomalies due to phase changes in subducted gabbroic lithosphere at depth in the upper lower mantle (above 1200 km depth). The tectonic plates are pulled along by the sinking of these positive mass anomalies, rather than moving at near constant velocity on the crests of convection cells driven by rising heat. These results imply that spreading centers are primarily passive reactive features, and fracture zones (and wedge-shaped sites

  13. Covariant Bardeen perturbation formalism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vitenti, S. D. P.; Falciano, F. T.; Pinto-Neto, N.

    2014-05-01

    In a previous work we obtained a set of necessary conditions for the linear approximation in cosmology. Here we discuss the relations of this approach with the so-called covariant perturbations. It is often argued in the literature that one of the main advantages of the covariant approach to describe cosmological perturbations is that the Bardeen formalism is coordinate dependent. In this paper we will reformulate the Bardeen approach in a completely covariant manner. For that, we introduce the notion of pure and mixed tensors, which yields an adequate language to treat both perturbative approaches in a common framework. We then stress that in the referred covariant approach, one necessarily introduces an additional hypersurface choice to the problem. Using our mixed and pure tensors approach, we are able to construct a one-to-one map relating the usual gauge dependence of the Bardeen formalism with the hypersurface dependence inherent to the covariant approach. Finally, through the use of this map, we define full nonlinear tensors that at first order correspond to the three known gauge invariant variables Φ, Ψ and Ξ, which are simultaneously foliation and gauge invariant. We then stress that the use of the proposed mixed tensors allows one to construct simultaneously gauge and hypersurface invariant variables at any order.

  14. Amplitudes of Spiral Perturbations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grosbol, P.; Patsis, P. A.

    2014-03-01

    It has proven very difficult to estimate the amplitudes of spiral perturbations in disk galaxies from observations due to the variation of mass-to-light ratio and extinction across spiral arms. Deep, near-infrared images of grand-design spiral galaxies obtained with HAWK-I/VLT were used to analyze the azimuthal amplitude and shape of arms, which, even in the K-band may, be significantly biased by the presence of young stellar populations. Several techniques were applied to evaluate the relative importance of young stars across the arms, such as surface brightness of the disk with light from clusters subtracted, number density of clusters detected, and texture of the disk. The modulation of the texture measurement, which correlates with the number density of faint clusters, yields amplitudes of the spiral perturbation in the range 0.1-0.2. This estimate gives a better estimate of the mass perturbation in the spiral arms, since it is dominated by old clusters.

  15. Molecular above-threshold-ionization angular distributions with attosecond bichromatic intense XUV laser pulses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yuan, Kai-Jun; Bandrauk, André D.

    2012-01-01

    Angular distributions of molecular above-threshold ionization (MATI) in bichromatic attosecond extreme ultraviolet (XUV) linear polarization laser pulses have been theoretically investigated. Multiphoton ionization in a prealigned molecular ion H2+ produces clear MATI spectra which show a forward-backward asymmetry in angular and momentum distributions which is critically sensitive to the carrier envelope phase (CEP) φ, the time delay Δτ between the two laser pulses, and the photoelectron kinetic energies Ee. The features of the asymmetry in MATI angular distributions are described well by multiphoton perturbative ionization models. Phase differences of continuum electron wave functions can be extracted from the CEP φ and time delay Δτ dependent ionization asymmetry ratio created by interfering multiphoton ionization pathways. At large internuclear distances MATI angular distributions exhibit more complex features due to laser-induced electron diffraction where continuum electron wavelengths are less than the internuclear distance.

  16. Angular velocity of a spheroid log rolling in a simple shear at small Reynolds number

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meibohm, Jan; Candelier, Fabien; Rosen, Tomas; Einarsson, Jonas; Lundell, Fredrik; Mehlig, Bernhard

    2016-11-01

    We analyse the angular velocity of a small neutrally buoyant spheroid log rolling in a simple shear. When the effect of fluid inertia is negligible the angular velocity ω -> equals half the fluid vorticity. We compute by singular perturbation theory how weak fluid inertia reduces the angular velocity in an unbounded shear, and how this reduction depends upon the shape of the spheroid (on its aspect ratio). In addition we determine the angular velocity by direct numerical simulations. The results are in excellent agreement with the theory at small but not too small values of the shear Reynolds number, for all aspect ratios considered. For the special case of a sphere we find ω / s = - 1 / 2 + 0 . 0540Re 3 / 2 where s is the shear rate and Re is the shear Reynolds number. This result differs from that derived by Lin et al. who obtained a numerical coefficient roughly three times larger.

  17. On Dunkl angular momenta algebra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feigin, Misha; Hakobyan, Tigran

    2015-11-01

    We consider the quantum angular momentum generators, deformed by means of the Dunkl operators. Together with the reflection operators they generate a subalgebra in the rational Cherednik algebra associated with a finite real reflection group. We find all the defining relations of the algebra, which appear to be quadratic, and we show that the algebra is of Poincaré-Birkhoff-Witt (PBW) type. We show that this algebra contains the angular part of the Calogero-Moser Hamiltonian and that together with constants it generates the centre of the algebra. We also consider the gl( N ) version of the subalge-bra of the rational Cherednik algebra and show that it is a non-homogeneous quadratic algebra of PBW type as well. In this case the central generator can be identified with the usual Calogero-Moser Hamiltonian associated with the Coxeter group in the harmonic confinement.

  18. Nuclei at High Angular Momentum

    SciTech Connect

    Diamond, R. M.; Stephens, F. S.

    1980-12-01

    It appears that most nuclei show a compromise between purely collective and purely non-collective behavior at very high spins.non~collective behavior in nuclei has been seen only as high as 36 or 37{bar h}, at which point a more collective structure seems to develop. The concepts underlying the study of high angular momentum states are discussed. The factors that limit angular momentum in nuclei are considered. The currently emerging state of physics of very high spin states is reviewed. The detailed calculations currently made for high spin states are described, focusing not on the calculations themselves, but on the physical input to them and results that come out. Production of high-spin states using heavy-ion reactions is reviewed. Studies of {gamma}-rays de-exciting the evaporation residues from heavy-ion reactions are covered. Two types of {gamma} rays occur: those that cool the nucleus to or toward the yrast line, called "statistical," and those that are more or less parallel to the yrast line and remove the angular momentum, called "yrast~like." Collective rotation, in simplest form the motion of a deformed nucleus around an axis perpendicular to its symmetry axis, is also covered.

  19. Achromatic orbital angular momentum generator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bouchard, Frédéric; Mand, Harjaspreet; Mirhosseini, Mohammad; Karimi, Ebrahim; Boyd, Robert W.

    2014-12-01

    We describe a novel approach for generating light beams that carry orbital angular momentum (OAM) by means of total internal reflection in an isotropic medium. A continuous space-varying cylindrically symmetric reflector, in the form of two glued hollow axicons, is used to introduce a nonuniform rotation of polarization into a linearly polarized input beam. This device acts as a full spin-to-orbital angular momentum convertor. It functions by switching the helicity of the incoming beam's polarization, and by conservation of total angular momentum thereby generates a well-defined value of OAM. Our device is broadband, since the phase shift due to total internal reflection is nearly independent of wavelength. We verify the broad-band behaviour by measuring the conversion efficiency of the device for three different wavelengths corresponding to the RGB colours, red, green and blue. An average conversion efficiency of 95% for these three different wavelengths is observed. This device may find applications in imaging from micro- to astronomical systems where a white vortex beam is needed.

  20. Perturbation of mass accretion rate, associated acoustic geometry and stability analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bollimpalli, Deepika A.; Bhattacharya, Sourav; Das, Tapas K.

    2017-02-01

    We investigate the stability of stationary integral solutions of an ideal irrotational fluid in a general static and spherically symmetric background, by studying the profile of the perturbation of the mass accretion rate. We consider low angular momentum axisymmetric accretion flows for three different accretion disk models and consider time dependent and radial linear perturbation of the mass accretion rate. First we show that the propagation of such perturbation can be determined by an effective 2 × 2 matrix, which has qualitatively similar acoustic causal properties as one obtains via the perturbation of the velocity potential. Next, using this matrix we analytically address the stability issues, for both standing and travelling wave configurations generated by the perturbation. Finally, based on this general formalism we briefly discuss the explicit example of the Schwarzschild spacetime and compare our results of stability with the existing literature, which instead address this problem via the perturbation of the velocity potential.

  1. Attitude dynamics of gyrostat-satellites under control by magnetic actuators at small perturbations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Doroshin, Anton V.

    2017-08-01

    The angular motion of gyrostat-satellites with one axial rotor is considered under control by magnetic actuators and at the action of small polyharmonic perturbations of the own dipole magnetic moment's components which are created proportionally to components of the angular velocity of the satellite. The attitude dynamics is investigated in conditions of the coincidence of the vector of magnetic induction of the external magnetic field and the initial angular momentum vector of the satellite. General and heteroclinic analytical solutions are obtained for dynamical parameters at the relative smallness of the magnetic torques. The chaotic regimes are examined on the base of the Melnikov method and Poincaré sections.

  2. A novel robot for imposing perturbations during overground walking: mechanism, control and normative stepping responses.

    PubMed

    Olenšek, Andrej; Zadravec, Matjaž; Matjačić, Zlatko

    2016-06-11

    The most common approach to studying dynamic balance during walking is by applying perturbations. Previous studies that investigated dynamic balance responses predominantly focused on applying perturbations in frontal plane while walking on treadmill. The goal of our work was to develop balance assessment robot (BAR) that can be used during overground walking and to assess normative balance responses to perturbations in transversal plane in a group of neurologically healthy individuals. BAR provides three passive degrees of freedom (DoF) and three actuated DoF in pelvis that are admittance-controlled in such a way that the natural movement of pelvis is not significantly affected. In this study BAR was used to assess normative balance responses in neurologically healthy individuals by applying linear perturbations in frontal and sagittal planes and angular perturbations in transversal plane of pelvis. One way repeated measure ANOVA was used to statistically evaluate the effect of selected perturbations on stepping responses. Standard deviations of assessed responses were similar in unperturbed and perturbed walking. Perturbations in frontal direction evoked substantial pelvis displacement and caused statistically significant effect on step length, step width and step time. Likewise, perturbations in sagittal plane also caused statistically significant effect on step length, step width and step time but with less explicit impact on pelvis movement in frontal plane. On the other hand, except from substantial pelvis rotation angular perturbations did not have substantial effect on pelvis movement in frontal and sagittal planes while statistically significant effect was noted only in step length and step width after perturbation in clockwise direction. Results indicate that the proposed device can repeatedly reproduce similar experimental conditions. Results also suggest that "stepping strategy" is the dominant strategy for coping with perturbations in frontal plane

  3. Angular momentum decomposition for an electron

    SciTech Connect

    Burkardt, Matthias; Hikmat, BC

    2009-04-01

    We calculate the orbital angular momentum of the 'quark' in the scalar diquark model as well as that of the electron in QED (to order {alpha}). We compare the orbital angular momentum obtained from the Jaffe-Manohar decomposition to that obtained from the Ji relation and estimate the importance of the vector potential in the definition of orbital angular momentum.

  4. Angular Momentum Decomposition for an Electron

    SciTech Connect

    Burkardt, Matthias; BC, Hikmat

    2009-01-01

    We calculate the orbital angular momentum of the `quark' in the scalar diquark model as well as that of the electron in QED (to order $\\alpha$). We compare the orbital angular momentum obtained from the Jaffe-Manohar decomposition to that obtained from the Ji relation and estimate the importance of the vector potential in the definition of orbital angular momentum.

  5. Discrete reductive perturbation technique

    SciTech Connect

    Levi, Decio; Petrera, Matteo

    2006-04-15

    We expand a partial difference equation (P{delta}E) on multiple lattices and obtain the P{delta}E which governs its far field behavior. The perturbative-reductive approach is here performed on well-known nonlinear P{delta}Es, both integrable and nonintegrable. We study the cases of the lattice modified Korteweg-de Vries (mKdV) equation, the Hietarinta equation, the lattice Volterra-Kac-Van Moerbeke equation and a nonintegrable lattice KdV equation. Such reductions allow us to obtain many new P{delta}Es of the nonlinear Schroedinger type.

  6. Perturbative cavity quantum electrodynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Hinds., E.A.

    1994-12-31

    Charged particles are coupled to the electromagnetic radiation field at a fundamental level. Even in a vacuum, an atom is perturbed by the zero-point quantum noise of the electromagnetic field, and this coupling is responsible for some basic phenomena such as the Lamb shift and spontaneous radiative decay. These radiative effects can be calculated to high precision using the theory of quantum electrodynamics (QED), and for cases when the atom is in free space, remarkable agreement has been found between theory and experiment. One is led to conclude QED provides a reliable description of the coupling between the charged particles and electromagnetic fields. 101 refs., 20 figs.

  7. Full-sky formulae for weak lensing power spectra from total angular momentum method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamauchi, Daisuke; Namikawa, Toshiya; Taruya, Atsushi

    2013-08-01

    We systematically derive full-sky formulae for the weak lensing power spectra generated by scalar, vector and tensor perturbations from the total angular momentum (TAM) method. Based on both the geodesic and geodesic deviation equations, we first give the gauge-invariant expressions for the deflection angle and Jacobi map as observables of the CMB lensing and cosmic shear experiments. We then apply the TAM method, originally developed in the theoretical studies of CMB, to a systematic derivation of the angular power spectra. The TAM representation, which characterizes the total angular dependence of the spatial modes projected along a line-of-sight, can carry all the information of the lensing modes generated by scalar, vector, and tensor metric perturbations. This greatly simplifies the calculation, and we present a complete set of the full-sky formulae for angular power spectra in both the E-/B-mode cosmic shear and gradient-/curl-mode lensing potential of deflection angle. Based on the formulae, we give illustrative examples of non-vanishing B-mode cosmic shear and curl-mode of deflection angle in the presence of the vector and tensor perturbations, and explicitly compute the power spectra.

  8. Full-sky formulae for weak lensing power spectra from total angular momentum method

    SciTech Connect

    Yamauchi, Daisuke; Taruya, Atsushi; Namikawa, Toshiya E-mail: namikawa@yukawa.kyoto-u.ac.jp

    2013-08-01

    We systematically derive full-sky formulae for the weak lensing power spectra generated by scalar, vector and tensor perturbations from the total angular momentum (TAM) method. Based on both the geodesic and geodesic deviation equations, we first give the gauge-invariant expressions for the deflection angle and Jacobi map as observables of the CMB lensing and cosmic shear experiments. We then apply the TAM method, originally developed in the theoretical studies of CMB, to a systematic derivation of the angular power spectra. The TAM representation, which characterizes the total angular dependence of the spatial modes projected along a line-of-sight, can carry all the information of the lensing modes generated by scalar, vector, and tensor metric perturbations. This greatly simplifies the calculation, and we present a complete set of the full-sky formulae for angular power spectra in both the E-/B-mode cosmic shear and gradient-/curl-mode lensing potential of deflection angle. Based on the formulae, we give illustrative examples of non-vanishing B-mode cosmic shear and curl-mode of deflection angle in the presence of the vector and tensor perturbations, and explicitly compute the power spectra.

  9. Angular momentum blockade in nanoscale high-Tc superconducting grains

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mancarella, Francesco; Balatsky, Alexander; Wallin, Mats; Rosengren, Anders; Nordita-Condensed Matter Collaboration; KTH-Theoretical Physics Collaboration

    2014-03-01

    We discuss the angular momentum blockade in small d-wave SC grains in an external magnetic field. We find abrupt changes in angular momentum state of the condensate (''angular momentum blockade'') as a result of the variation of the external field. The effect represents a direct analog of the Coulomb blockade. We use the Ginzburg-Landau theory to illustrate how the field turns a d-wave order parameter (OP) into a(dx2 -y2 + idxy)-OP. We derive the volume magnetic susceptibility as a function of the field, and corresponding small jumps in magnetization at critical values of the field that should be experimentally observable in SC grains. The observation of these jumps requires a small grain, since their extent is inversely proportional to the number of Cooper pairs in the sample. The general source of instability of the pure d-wave gap is the presence of gap nodes, completely lifted by the secondary OP component. A d + id' -state is chiral and hence has an orbital moment carried by Cooper pairs. We consider fields H <perturbations of the OP. Boundary effects will be also discussed. Recent experiments suggest that nanoscale d-wave SC can be fully gapped and this minimal gap can be modified by an external field. Work supported by the Swedish Research Council grants VR 621-2012-298, VR 621-2012-3984, ERC and DOE.

  10. Two-dimensional angular filter array for angular domain imaging with 3D printed angular filters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ng, Eldon; Carson, Jeffrey J. L.

    2013-02-01

    Angular Domain Imaging (ADI) is a technique that is capable of generating two dimensional shadowgrams of attenuating targets embedded in a scattering medium. In ADI, an angular filter array (AFA) is positioned between the sample and the detector to distinguish between quasi-ballistic photons and scattered photons. An AFA is a series of micro-channels with a high aspect ratio. Previous AFAs from our group were constructed by micro-machining the micro-channels into a silicon wafer, limiting the imaging area to a one dimensional line. Two dimensional images were acquired via scanning. The objective of this work was to extend the AFA design to two dimensions to allow for two dimensional imaging with minimal scanning. The second objective of this work was to perform an initial characterization of the imaging capabilities of the 2D AFA. Our approach was to use rapid 3D prototyping techniques to generate an array of micro-channels. The imaging capabilities were then evaluated by imaging a 0.9 mm graphite rod submerged in a scattering media. Contrast was observed to improve when a second angular filter array was placed in front of the sample to mask the incoming light.

  11. Optical angular momentum in classical electrodynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mansuripur, Masud

    2017-06-01

    Invoking Maxwell’s classical equations in conjunction with expressions for the electromagnetic (EM) energy, momentum, force, and torque, we use a few simple examples to demonstrate the nature of the EM angular momentum. The energy and the angular momentum of an EM field will be shown to have an intimate relationship; a source radiating EM angular momentum will, of necessity, pick up an equal but opposite amount of mechanical angular momentum; and the spin and orbital angular momenta of the EM field, when absorbed by a small particle, will be seen to elicit different responses from the particle.

  12. Perturbations of gravitational instantons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Torre, C. G.

    1990-06-01

    Ashtekar's spinorial formulation of general relativity is used to study perturbations of gravitational instantons corresponding to finite-action solutions of the Euclidean Einstein equations (with a nonzero cosmological constant) possessing an anti-self-dual Weyl curvature tensor. It is shown that, with an appropriate ``on-shell'' form of infinitesimal gauge transformations, the space of solutions to the linearized instanton equation can be described in terms of an elliptic complex; the cohomology of the complex defines gauge-inequivalent perturbations. Using this elliptic complex we prove that there are no nontrivial solutions to the linearized instanton equation on conformally anti-self-dual Einstein spaces with a positive cosmological constant. Thus, the space of gravitational instantons is discrete when the cosmological constant is positive; i.e., the dimension of the gravitational moduli space in this case is zero. We discuss the issue of linearization stability as well as the feasibility of using the Atiyah-Singer index theorem to compute the dimension of the gravitational moduli space when the cosmological constant is negative.

  13. Plate tectonics conserves angular momentum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bowin, C.

    2010-03-01

    A new combined understanding of plate tectonics, Earth internal structure, and the role of impulse in deformation of the Earth's crust is presented. Plate accelerations and decelerations have been revealed by iterative filtering of the quaternion history for the Euler poles that define absolute plate motion history for the past 68 million years, and provide an unprecedented precision for plate angular rotation variations with time at 2-million year intervals. Stage poles represent the angular rotation of a plate's motion between adjacent Euler poles, and from which the maximum velocity vector for a plate can be determined. The consistent maximum velocity variations, in turn, yield consistent estimates of plate accelerations and decelerations. The fact that the Pacific plate was shown to accelerate and decelerate, implied that conservation of plate tectonic angular momentum must be globally conserved, and that is confirmed by the results shown here (total angular momentum ~1.4+27 kg m2 s-1). Accordingly, if a plate decelerates, other plates must increase their angular momentums to compensate. In addition, the azimuth of the maximum velocity vectors yields clues as to why the "bend" in the Emperor-Hawaiian seamount trend occurred near 46 Myr. This report summarizes processing results for 12 of the 14 major tectonic plates of the Earth (except for the Juan de Fuca and Philippine plates). Plate accelerations support the contention that plate tectonics is a product of torques that most likely are sustained by the sinking of positive density anomalies revealed by geoid anomalies of the degree 4-10 packet of the Earth's spherical harmonic coefficients. These linear positive geoid anomalies underlie plate subduction zones and are presumed due to phase changes in subducted gabbroic lithosphere at depth in the upper lower mantle (above 1200 km depth). The tectonic plates are pulled along by the sinking of these positive mass anomalies, rather than moving at near constant

  14. Two-axis angular effector

    DOEpatents

    Vaughn, Mark R.; Robinett, III, Rush D.; Phelan, John R.; Van Zuiden, Don M.

    1997-01-21

    A new class of coplanar two-axis angular effectors. These effectors combine a two-axis rotational joint analogous to a Cardan joint with linear actuators in a manner to produce a wider range of rotational motion about both axes defined by the joint. This new class of effectors also allows design of robotic manipulators having very high strength and efficiency. These effectors are particularly suited for remote operation in unknown surroundings, because of their extraordinary versatility. An immediate application is to the problems which arise in nuclear waste remediation.

  15. The tetrahexahedric angular Calogero model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Correa, Francisco; Lechtenfeld, Olaf

    2015-10-01

    The spherical reduction of the rational Calogero model (of type A n-1 and after removing the center of mass) is considered as a maximally superintegrable quantum system, which describes a particle on the ( n-2)-sphere subject to a very particular potential. We present a detailed analysis of the simplest non-separable case, n=4, whose potential is singular at the edges of a spherical tetrahexahedron. A complete set of independent conserved charges and of Hamiltonian intertwiners is constructed, and their algebra is elucidated. They arise from the ring of polynomials in Dunkl-deformed angular momenta, by classifying the subspaces invariant and antiinvariant under all Weyl reflections, respectively.

  16. Variable Distance Angular Symbology Reader

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schramm, Harry F., Jr. (Inventor); Corder, Eric L. (Inventor)

    2006-01-01

    A variable distance angular symbology, reader utilizes at least one light source to direct light through a beam splitter and onto a target. A target may be angled relative to the impinging light beam up to and maybe even greater than 45deg. A reflected beam from the target passes through the beam splitter and is preferably directed 90deg relative to the light source through a telecentric lens to a scanner which records an image of the target such as a direct part marking code.

  17. Controlling neutron orbital angular momentum.

    PubMed

    Clark, Charles W; Barankov, Roman; Huber, Michael G; Arif, Muhammad; Cory, David G; Pushin, Dmitry A

    2015-09-24

    The quantized orbital angular momentum (OAM) of photons offers an additional degree of freedom and topological protection from noise. Photonic OAM states have therefore been exploited in various applications ranging from studies of quantum entanglement and quantum information science to imaging. The OAM states of electron beams have been shown to be similarly useful, for example in rotating nanoparticles and determining the chirality of crystals. However, although neutrons--as massive, penetrating and neutral particles--are important in materials characterization, quantum information and studies of the foundations of quantum mechanics, OAM control of neutrons has yet to be achieved. Here, we demonstrate OAM control of neutrons using macroscopic spiral phase plates that apply a 'twist' to an input neutron beam. The twisted neutron beams are analysed with neutron interferometry. Our techniques, applied to spatially incoherent beams, demonstrate both the addition of quantum angular momenta along the direction of propagation, effected by multiple spiral phase plates, and the conservation of topological charge with respect to uniform phase fluctuations. Neutron-based studies of quantum information science, the foundations of quantum mechanics, and scattering and imaging of magnetic, superconducting and chiral materials have until now been limited to three degrees of freedom: spin, path and energy. The optimization of OAM control, leading to well defined values of OAM, would provide an additional quantized degree of freedom for such studies.

  18. Discrete Newtonian cosmology: perturbations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ellis, George F. R.; Gibbons, Gary W.

    2015-03-01

    In a previous paper (Gibbons and Ellis 2014 Discrete Newtonian cosmology Class. Quantum Grav. 31 025003), we showed how a finite system of discrete particles interacting with each other via Newtonian gravitational attraction would lead to precisely the same dynamical equations for homothetic motion as in the case of the pressure-free Friedmann-Lemaître-Robertson-Walker cosmological models of general relativity theory, provided the distribution of particles obeys the central configuration equation. In this paper we show that one can obtain perturbed such Newtonian solutions that give the same linearized structure growth equations as in the general relativity case. We also obtain the Dmitriev-Zel’dovich equations for subsystems in this discrete gravitational model, and show how it leads to the conclusion that voids have an apparent negative mass.

  19. Conformal perturbation theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amoretti, Andrea; Magnoli, Nicodemo

    2017-08-01

    Statistical systems near a classical critical point have been intensively studied from both theoretical and experimental points of view. In particular, correlation functions are of relevance in comparing theoretical models with the experimental data of real systems. In order to compute physical quantities near a critical point, one needs to know the model at the critical (conformal) point. In this line, recent progress in the knowledge of conformal field theories, through the conformal bootstrap, gives the hope of getting some interesting results also outside of the critical point. In this paper, we will review and clarify how, starting from the knowledge of the critical correlators, one can calculate in a safe way their behavior outside the critical point. The approach illustrated requires the model to be just scale invariant at the critical point. We will clarify the method by applying it to different kind of perturbations of the 2D Ising model.

  20. Separability of Gravitational Perturbation in Generalized Kerr-Nut Sitter Space-Time

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oota, Takeshi; Yasui, Yukinori

    Generalized Kerr-NUT-de Sitter space-time is the most general space-time which admits a rank-2 closed conformal Killing-Yano tensor. It contains the higher-dimensional Kerr-de Sitter black holes with partially equal angular momenta. We study the separability of gravitational perturbations in the generalized Kerr-NUT-de Sitter space-time. We show that a certain type of tensor perturbations admits the separation of variables. The linearized perturbation equations for the Einstein condition are transformed into the ordinary differential equations of Fuchs type.

  1. Perturbed effects at radiation physics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Külahcı, Fatih; Şen, Zekâi

    2013-09-01

    Perturbation methodology is applied in order to assess the linear attenuation coefficient, mass attenuation coefficient and cross-section behavior with random components in the basic variables such as the radiation amounts frequently used in the radiation physics and chemistry. Additionally, layer attenuation coefficient (LAC) and perturbed LAC (PLAC) are proposed for different contact materials. Perturbation methodology provides opportunity to obtain results with random deviations from the average behavior of each variable that enters the whole mathematical expression. The basic photon intensity variation expression as the inverse exponential power law (as Beer-Lambert's law) is adopted for perturbation method exposition. Perturbed results are presented not only in terms of the mean but additionally the standard deviation and the correlation coefficients. Such perturbation expressions provide one to assess small random variability in basic variables.

  2. Perturbing a quantum gravity condensate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gielen, Steffen

    2015-02-01

    In a recent proposal using the group field theory approach, a spatially homogeneous (generally anisotropic) universe is described as a quantum gravity condensate of "atoms of space," which allows the derivation of an effective cosmological Friedmann equation from the microscopic quantum gravity dynamics. Here we take a first step towards the study of cosmological perturbations over the homogeneous background. We consider a state in which a single "atom" is added to an otherwise homogeneous condensate. Backreaction of the perturbation on the background is negligible and the background dynamics can be solved separately. The dynamics for the perturbation takes the form of a quantum cosmology Hamiltonian for a "wave function," depending on background and perturbations, of the product form usually assumed in a Born-Oppenheimer approximation. We show that the perturbation we consider corresponds to a spatially homogeneous metric perturbation, and for this case derive the usual procedures in quantum cosmology from fundamental quantum gravity.

  3. Hybrid perturbation scheme for wide beamwidth circularly polarized stacked patch microstrip antenna for satellite communication

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hossain, Mohammad Shakawat

    Circularly polarized microstrip antennas are popular for satellite communications due to their circularly polarized orientation. They are used frequently in modern day satellite communication. In order to achieve wide angular coverage in satellite communication, a wide beamwidth is required from the antenna. Traditional single layer microstrip antenna inherently demonstrates low angular beamwidth of approximately 600 to 800and thereby lacks wide angular coverage when used for satellite communication. The objective of this thesis is to design a single-fed stacked microstrip antenna using different perturbation techniques in order to achieve a wide angular beamwidth. This thesis presents a new design for a circularly polarized antenna based on the hybrid perturbation scheme. First, a method of stacked patch-ring with negative perturbation was used to generate a significantly larger beamwidth of 1060. The axial ratio (AR) bandwidth obtained is also significantly larger compared to the case when square rings are used as parasitic and driven rings with a single feed. A simulated impedance bandwidth (S11< - 10 dB) of 16%, 3 dB AR bandwidth of 8% and a peak gain of 8.65 dBic are obtained from this design. Next, a new design of stacked hybrid antenna is presented, which uses hybrid perturbations to generate circular polarization radiation. An enhanced beamwidth of 1260 was obtained. The simulation results are confirmed by the measured results.

  4. Cosmological perturbations in massive bigravity

    SciTech Connect

    Lagos, Macarena; Ferreira, Pedro G. E-mail: p.ferreira1@physics.ox.ac.uk

    2014-12-01

    We present a comprehensive analysis of classical scalar, vector and tensor cosmological perturbations in ghost-free massive bigravity. In particular, we find the full evolution equations and analytical solutions in a wide range of regimes. We show that there are viable cosmological backgrounds but, as has been found in the literature, these models generally have exponential instabilities in linear perturbation theory. However, it is possible to find stable scalar cosmological perturbations for a very particular choice of parameters. For this stable subclass of models we find that vector and tensor perturbations have growing solutions. We argue that special initial conditions are needed for tensor modes in order to have a viable model.

  5. Angular Positioning Sensor for Space Mechanisms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Steiner, Nicolas; Chapuis, Dominique

    2013-09-01

    Angular position sensors are used on various rotating mechanisms such as solar array drive mechanisms, antenna pointing mechanisms, scientific instruments, motors or actuators.Now a days, potentiometers and encoders are mainly used for angular measurement purposes. Both of them have their own pros and cons.As alternative, Ruag Space Switzerland Nyon (RSSN) is developing and qualifying two innovative technologies of angular position sensors which offer easy implementation, medium to very high lifetime and high flexibility with regards to the output signal shape/type.The Brushed angular position sensor uses space qualified processes which are already flying on RSSN's sliprings for many years. A large variety of output signal shape can be implemented to fulfill customer requirements (digital, analog, customized, etc.).The contactless angular position sensor consists in a new radiation hard Application Specific Integrated Circuit (ASIC) based on the Hall effect and providing the angular position without complex processing algorithm.

  6. Oral candidiasis and angular cheilitis.

    PubMed

    Sharon, Victoria; Fazel, Nasim

    2010-01-01

    Candidiasis, an often encountered oral disease, has been increasing in frequency. Most commonly caused by the overgrowth of Candida albicans, oral candidiasis can be divided into several categories including acute and chronic forms, and angular cheilitis. Risk factors for the development of oral candidiasis include immunosuppression, wearing of dentures, pharmacotherapeutics, smoking, infancy and old age, endocrine dysfunction, and decreased salivation. Oral candidiasis may be asymptomatic. More frequently, however, it is physically uncomfortable, and the patient may complain of burning mouth, dysgeusia, dysphagia, anorexia, and weight loss, leading to nutritional deficiency and impaired quality of life. A plethora of antifungal treatments are available. The overall prognosis of oral candidiasis is good, and rarely is the condition life threatening with invasive or recalcitrant disease.

  7. GPDs and Orbital Angular Momentum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burkardt, Matthias

    2017-05-01

    Generalized Parton Distributions provide information on the distribution of quarks in impact parameter space. For transversely polarized nucleons, these impact parameter distributions are transversely distorted and this deviation from axial symmetry leads on average to a net transverse force from the spectators on the active quark in a DIS experiment. This force when acting along the whole trajectory of the active quark leads to transverse single-spin asymmetries. For a longitudinally polarized nucleon target, the transverse force implies a torque acting on the quark Orbital Angular Momentum (OAM). The resulting change in OAM as the quark leaves the target equals the difference between the Jaffe-Manohar and Ji OAMs. In the context of the scalar diquark model we demonstrate that the effect from that torque contributes at the same order as single-spin asymmetries.

  8. Chirality and the angular momentum of light.

    PubMed

    Cameron, Robert P; Götte, Jörg B; Barnett, Stephen M; Yao, Alison M

    2017-02-28

    Chirality is exhibited by objects that cannot be rotated into their mirror images. It is far from obvious that this has anything to do with the angular momentum of light, which owes its existence to rotational symmetries. There is nevertheless a subtle connection between chirality and the angular momentum of light. We demonstrate this connection and, in particular, its significance in the context of chiral light-matter interactions.This article is part of the themed issue 'Optical orbital angular momentum'.

  9. Chirality and the angular momentum of light

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cameron, Robert P.; Götte, Jörg B.; Barnett, Stephen M.; Yao, Alison M.

    2017-02-01

    Chirality is exhibited by objects that cannot be rotated into their mirror images. It is far from obvious that this has anything to do with the angular momentum of light, which owes its existence to rotational symmetries. There is nevertheless a subtle connection between chirality and the angular momentum of light. We demonstrate this connection and, in particular, its significance in the context of chiral light-matter interactions. This article is part of the themed issue 'Optical orbital angular momentum'.

  10. Orbital angular momentum in phase space

    SciTech Connect

    Rigas, I.; Sanchez-Soto, L.L.; Klimov, A.B.; Rehacek, J.; Hradil, Z.

    2011-02-15

    Research Highlights: > We propose a comprehensive Weyl-Wigner formalism for the canonical pair angle-angular momentum. > We present a simple and useful toolkit for the practitioner. > We derive simple evolution equations in terms of a star product in the semiclassical limit. - Abstract: A comprehensive theory of the Weyl-Wigner formalism for the canonical pair angle-angular momentum is presented. Special attention is paid to the problems linked to rotational periodicity and angular-momentum discreteness.

  11. Perturbation of a Schwarzschild Black Hole Due to a Rotating Thin Disk

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Čížek, P.; Semerák, O.

    2017-09-01

    Will, in 1974, treated the perturbation of a Schwarzschild black hole due to a slowly rotating, light, concentric thin ring by solving the perturbation equations in terms of a multipole expansion of the mass-and-rotation perturbation series. In the Schwarzschild background, his approach can be generalized to perturbation by a thin disk (which is more relevant astrophysically), but, due to rather bad convergence properties, the resulting expansions are not suitable for specific (numerical) computations. However, we show that Green’s functions, represented by Will’s result, can be expressed in closed form (without multipole expansion), which is more useful. In particular, they can be integrated out over the source (a thin disk in our case) to yield good converging series both for the gravitational potential and for the dragging angular velocity. The procedure is demonstrated, in the first perturbation order, on the simplest case of a constant-density disk, including the physical interpretation of the results in terms of a one-component perfect fluid or a two-component dust in a circular orbit about the central black hole. Free parameters are chosen in such a way that the resulting black hole has zero angular momentum but non-zero angular velocity, as it is just carried along by the dragging effect of the disk.

  12. Drell-Yan Angular Distributions at the E906 SeaQuest Experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kleinjan, David

    2016-09-01

    Measurement of Drell-Yan angular distributions in the Collins-Soper frame provide a unique study of QCD. Previous experimental results showed a violation of the Lam-Tung relation (1 - λ ≠ 2 ν). This violation could be described by a range of non-perturbative effects, including the naive T-odd Boer-Mulders TMD, which describes spin-momentum correlations in the nucleon. Presently, E906/SeaQuest experiment at Fermilab can measure Drell-Yan dimuon pairs produced from a 120 GeV unpolarized proton beam directed on various nuclear targets. The Drell-Yan angular distributions will be measured at higher-x than previous experiments, further disentangling the role the Boer-Mulders TMD and other non-perturbative effects play in the structure of the nucleon. SeaQuest.

  13. Angular correlations in three-jet events in ep collisions at HERA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abramowicz, H.; Abt, I.; Adamczyk, L.; Adamus, M.; Aggarwal, R.; Antonelli, S.; Antonioli, P.; Antonov, A.; Arneodo, M.; Aushev, V.; Aushev, Y.; Bachynska, O.; Bamberger, A.; Barakbaev, A. N.; Barbagli, G.; Bari, G.; Barreiro, F.; Bartosik, N.; Bartsch, D.; Basile, M.; Behnke, O.; Behr, J.; Behrens, U.; Bellagamba, L.; Bertolin, A.; Bhadra, S.; Bindi, M.; Blohm, C.; Bokhonov, V.; Bołd, T.; Bondarenko, K.; Boos, E. G.; Borras, K.; Boscherini, D.; Bot, D.; Brock, I.; Brownson, E.; Brugnera, R.; Brümmer, N.; Bruni, A.; Bruni, G.; Brzozowska, B.; Bussey, P. J.; Bylsma, B.; Caldwell, A.; Capua, M.; Carlin, R.; Catterall, C. D.; Chekanov, S.; Chwastowski, J.; Ciborowski, J.; Ciesielski, R.; Cifarelli, L.; Cindolo, F.; Contin, A.; Cooper-Sarkar, A. M.; Coppola, N.; Corradi, M.; Corriveau, F.; Costa, M.; D'Agostini, G.; Corso, F. Dal; del Peso, J.; Dementiev, R. K.; De Pasquale, S.; Derrick, M.; Devenish, R. C. E.; Dobur, D.; Dolgoshein, B. A.; Dolinska, G.; Doyle, A. T.; Drugakov, V.; Durkin, L. S.; Dusini, S.; Eisenberg, Y.; Ermolov, P. F.; Eskreys, A.; Fang, S.; Fazio, S.; Ferrando, J.; Ferrero, M. I.; Figiel, J.; Forrest, M.; Foster, B.; Gach, G.; Galas, A.; Gallo, E.; Garfagnini, A.; Geiser, A.; Gialas, I.; Gladilin, L. K.; Gladkov, D.; Glasman, C.; Gogota, O.; Golubkov, Yu. A.; Göttlicher, P.; Grabowska-Bołd, I.; Grebenyuk, J.; Gregor, I.; Grigorescu, G.; Grzelak, G.; Gueta, O.; Guzik, M.; Gwenlan, C.; Haas, T.; Hain, W.; Hamatsu, R.; Hart, J. C.; Hartmann, H.; Hartner, G.; Hilger, E.; Hochman, D.; Hori, R.; Horton, K.; Hüttmann, A.; Ibrahim, Z. A.; Iga, Y.; Ingbir, R.; Ishitsuka, M.; Jakob, H.-P.; Januschek, F.; Jimenez, M.; Jones, T. W.; Jüngst, M.; Kadenko, I.; Kahle, B.; Kananov, S.; Kanno, T.; Karshon, U.; Karstens, F.; Katkov, I. I.; Kaur, M.; Kaur, P.; Keramidas, A.; Khein, L. A.; Kim, J. Y.; Kisielewska, D.; Kitamura, S.; Klanner, R.; Klein, U.; Koffeman, E.; Kooijman, P.; Korol, Ie.; Korzhavina, I. A.; Kotański, A.; Kötz, U.; Kowalski, H.; Kuprash, O.; Kuze, M.; Lee, A.; Levchenko, B. B.; Levy, A.; Libov, V.; Limentani, S.; Ling, T. Y.; Lisovyi, M.; Lobodzinska, E.; Lohmann, W.; Löhr, B.; Lohrmann, E.; Long, K. R.; Longhin, A.; Lontkovskyi, D.; Lukina, O. Yu.; Maeda, J.; Magill, S.; Makarenko, I.; Malka, J.; Mankel, R.; Margotti, A.; Marini, G.; Martin, J. F.; Mastroberardino, A.; Mattingly, M. C. K.; Melzer-Pellmann, I.-A.; Mergelmeyer, S.; Miglioranzi, S.; Mohamad Idris, F.; Monaco, V.; Montanari, A.; Morris, J. D.; Mujkic, K.; Musgrave, B.; Nagano, K.; Namsoo, T.; Nania, R.; Nigro, A.; Ning, Y.; Nobe, T.; Noor, U.; Notz, D.; Nowak, R. J.; Nuncio-Quiroz, A. E.; Oh, B. Y.; Okazaki, N.; Oliver, K.; Olkiewicz, K.; Onishchuk, Yu.; Papageorgiu, K.; Parenti, A.; Paul, E.; Pawlak, J. M.; Pawlik, B.; Pelfer, P. G.; Pellegrino, A.; Perlański, W.; Perrey, H.; Piotrzkowski, K.; Pluciński, P.; Pokrovskiy, N. S.; Polini, A.; Proskuryakov, A. S.; Przybycień, M.; Raval, A.; Reeder, D. D.; Reisert, B.; Ren, Z.; Repond, J.; Ri, Y. D.; Robertson, A.; Roloff, P.; Rubinsky, I.; Ruspa, M.; Sacchi, R.; Salii, A.; Samson, U.; Sartorelli, G.; Savin, A. A.; Saxon, D. H.; Schioppa, M.; Schlenstedt, S.; Schleper, P.; Schmidke, W. B.; Schneekloth, U.; Schönberg, V.; Schörner-Sadenius, T.; Schwartz, J.; Sciulli, F.; Shcheglova, L. M.; Shehzadi, R.; Shimizu, S.; Singh, I.; Skillicorn, I. O.; Słomiński, W.; Smith, W. H.; Sola, V.; Solano, A.; Son, D.; Sosnovtsev, V.; Spiridonov, A.; Stadie, H.; Stanco, L.; Stern, A.; Stewart, T. P.; Stifutkin, A.; Stopa, P.; Suchkov, S.; Susinno, G.; Suszycki, L.; Sztuk-Dambietz, J.; Szuba, D.; Szuba, J.; Tapper, A. D.; Tassi, E.; Terrón, J.; Theedt, T.; Tiecke, H.; Tokushuku, K.; Tomalak, O.; Tomaszewska, J.; Tsurugai, T.; Turcato, M.; Tymieniecka, T.; Vázquez, M.; Verbytskyi, A.; Viazlo, O.; Vlasov, N. N.; Volynets, O.; Walczak, R.; Wan Abdullah, W. A. T.; Whitmore, J. J.; Wiggers, L.; Wing, M.; Wlasenko, M.; Wolf, G.; Wolfe, H.; Wrona, K.; Yagües-Molina, A. G.; Yamada, S.; Yamazaki, Y.; Yoshida, R.; Youngman, C.; Żarnecki, A. F.; Zawiejski, L.; Zenaiev, O.; Zeuner, W.; Zhautykov, B. O.; Zhmak, N.; Zhou, C.; Zichichi, A.; Zolkapli, Z.; Zolko, M.; Zotkin, D. S.

    2012-03-01

    Three-jet production in deep inelastic ep scattering and photoproduction was investigated with the ZEUS detector at HERA using an integrated luminosity of up to 127pb-1. Measurements of differential cross sections are presented as functions of angular correlations between the three jets in the final state and the proton-beam direction. These correlations provide a stringent test of perturbative QCD and show sensitivity to the contributions from different color configurations. Fixed-order perturbative calculations assuming the values of the color factors CF, CA, and TF as derived from a variety of gauge groups were compared to the measurements to study the underlying gauge group symmetry. The measured angular correlations in the deep inelastic ep scattering and photoproduction regimes are consistent with the admixture of color configurations as predicted by SU(3) and disfavour other symmetry groups, such as SU(N) in the limit of large N.

  14. The Angular Momentum of the Solar System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cang, Rongquin; Guo, Jianpo; Hu, Juanxiu; He, Chaoquiong

    2016-05-01

    The angular momentum of the Solar System is a very important physical quantity to the formation and evolution of the Solar System. Previously, the spin angular momentum of the Sun and the orbital angular momentum of the Eight Giant Planets were only taken into consideration, when researchers calculated the angular momentum of the Solar System. Nowadays, it seems narrow and conservative. Using Eggleton's code, we calculate the rotational inertia of the Sun. Furthermore, we obtain that the spin angular momentum of the Sun is 1.8838 x 10^41 kg m^2 s^-1. Besides the spin angular momentum of the Sun and the orbital angular momentum of the Eight Giant Planets, we also account for the orbital angular momentum of the Asteroid Belt, the Kuiper Belt, the Oort Cloud, the Ninth Giant Planet and the Solar Companion. We obtain that the angular momentum of the whole Solar System is 3.3212 x 10^45 kg m^2 s^-1.

  15. Exponential time-dependent perturbation theory in rotationally inelastic scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cross, R. J.

    1983-08-01

    An exponential form of time-dependent perturbation theory (the Magnus approximation) is developed for rotationally inelastic scattering. A phase-shift matrix is calculated as an integral in time over the anisotropic part of the potential. The trajectory used for this integral is specified by the diagonal part of the potential matrix and the arithmetic average of the initial and final velocities and the average orbital angular momentum. The exponential of the phase-shift matrix gives the scattering matrix and the various cross sections. A special representation is used where the orbital angular momentum is either treated classically or may be frozen out to yield the orbital sudden approximation. Calculations on Ar+N2 and Ar+TIF show that the theory generally gives very good agreement with accurate calculations, even where the orbital sudden approximation (coupled-states) results are seriously in error.

  16. Perturbative construction of stationary Randall-Sundrum II black holes on a 5-brane

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stein, Maren

    2016-09-01

    We numerically construct large Randall-Sundrum II brane black holes in 4 and 5 dimensions from associated AdS/CFT spacetimes. Our solutions are leading order perturbations of a representative of the boundary conformal structure of the AdS spacetime sourced by the dual CFT stress tensor. The 4-dimensional solutions are static perturbations of the Euclidean Schwarzschild metric, while the 5-dimensional solutions are perturbations of the Myers-Perry metric with equal angular momenta. We compare the former with previous numerical results for Randall-Sundrum bulk black holes and find good agreement down to a horizon radius of about r H ˜ 30ℓ. The latter are the first numerical results pertaining to rotating Randall-Sundrum black holes. They have the same entropy, but a larger horizon area than Myers-Perry black holes of the same mass and angular momentum.

  17. Thermal perturbation of the Sun

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Twigg, L. W.; Endal, A. S.

    1982-01-01

    Thermal perturbations of the solar convection zone can be modeled (to the first order) by perturbing the mixing length parameter alpha (equal to the ratio of the mixing length to the pressure scale height) used in the standard mixing length theory of convection. Results of such an analysis are presented and discussed in relation to recent work by others.

  18. On dark energy isocurvature perturbation

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Jie; Zhang, Xinmin; Li, Mingzhe E-mail: limz@nju.edu.cn

    2011-06-01

    Determining the equation of state of dark energy with astronomical observations is crucially important to understand the nature of dark energy. In performing a likelihood analysis of the data, especially of the cosmic microwave background and large scale structure data the dark energy perturbations have to be taken into account both for theoretical consistency and for numerical accuracy. Usually, one assumes in the global fitting analysis that the dark energy perturbations are adiabatic. In this paper, we study the dark energy isocurvature perturbation analytically and discuss its implications for the cosmic microwave background radiation and large scale structure. Furthermore, with the current astronomical observational data and by employing Markov Chain Monte Carlo method, we perform a global analysis of cosmological parameters assuming general initial conditions for the dark energy perturbations. The results show that the dark energy isocurvature perturbations are very weakly constrained and that purely adiabatic initial conditions are consistent with the data.

  19. Perturbation theory in electron diffraction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bakken, L. N.; Marthinsen, K.; Hoeier, R.

    1992-12-01

    The Bloch-wave approach is used for discussing multiple inelastic electron scattering and higher-order perturbation theory in inelastic high-energy electron diffraction. In contrast to previous work, the present work describes three-dimensional diffraction so that higher-order Laue zone (HOLZ) effects are incorporated. Absorption is included and eigenvalues and eigenvectors are calculated from a structure matrix with the inclusion of an absorptive potential. Centrosymmetric as well as non-centrosymmetric crystal structures are allowed. An iteration method with a defined generalized propagation function for solving the inelastic coupling equations is described. It is shown that a similar iteration method with the same propagation function can be used for obtaining higher-order perturbation terms for the wave-function when a perturbation is added to the crystal potential. Finally, perturbation theory by matrix calculations when a general perturbation is added to the structure matrix is considered.

  20. Computing singularities of perturbation series

    SciTech Connect

    Kvaal, Simen; Jarlebring, Elias; Michiels, Wim

    2011-03-15

    Many properties of current ab initio approaches to the quantum many-body problem, both perturbational and otherwise, are related to the singularity structure of the Rayleigh-Schroedinger perturbation series. A numerical procedure is presented that in principle computes the complete set of singularities, including the dominant singularity which limits the radius of convergence. The method approximates the singularities as eigenvalues of a certain generalized eigenvalue equation which is solved using iterative techniques. It relies on computation of the action of the Hamiltonian matrix on a vector and does not rely on the terms in the perturbation series. The method can be useful for studying perturbation series of typical systems of moderate size, for fundamental development of resummation schemes, and for understanding the structure of singularities for typical systems. Some illustrative model problems are studied, including a helium-like model with {delta}-function interactions for which Moeller-Plesset perturbation theory is considered and the radius of convergence found.

  1. Measurement of polarization angular coefficients in Z boson leptonic decays with ATLAS at the LHC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fedin, O.

    2017-09-01

    This paper presents the complete set of polarization angular coefficients A 0-7 describing lepton angular distributions in Z boson decay, which were measured at the ATLAS experiment in proton-proton collisions with the energy √ s = 8 TeV. Theoretical values for the difference A 0 - A 2 calculated in the fixed-order QCD perturbation theory O(α s 2 ), demonstrate significant deviation from the measured data, which indicates the necessity of taking into account higher order corrections. The evidence of nonzero coefficients A 5,6,7 was obtained for the first time, in accordance with theoretical calculations in O(α s 2 ) approximation. Measurement of the polarization angular coefficients A i is important for subsequent precision measurement of parameters of the electroweak model at the LHC, such as the sine of Weinberg electroweak mixing angle sin2 θ W and the W boson mass.

  2. Perturbed angular distribution of 237Np gamma rays from the 237U parent

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ansaldo, Eduardo J.

    1980-09-01

    The anisotropy was measured for the 208.0-59.54 keV gamma cascade in 237Np, corresponding to a positive sign for the M1-E2 mixing ratio of the 208.0 keV transition. The sources were prepared by means of the 238U(e, n) reaction. A discussion on the implications of the present results for the study of hyperfine interactions in neptunium compounds and alloys is included.

  3. Analysis of the perturbed Chandler wobble of the Earth pole

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Markov, Yu. G.; Perepelkin, V. V.; Filippova, A. S.

    2017-06-01

    Based on the model of a viscoelastic rigid body for the deformable Earth, we investigate the behavior of the main component of the perturbed Earth pole oscillation process, the Chandler wobble. An amplitude- frequency analysis of the perturbed Chandler wobble of the Earth pole due to the precessional motion of the lunar orbit is provided. The parameters of the complex dynamical process that describes the mutual orientation of the Earth's instantaneous rotation axis, the axis of its figure, and its angular momentum vector are studied qualitatively. Using a numerical-analytical approach, we consider the possibilities for identifying the Chandler wobble parameters and fitting the developed refined theoretical model to the real trajectory measurements of the Earth pole.

  4. Elementary derivation of the perturbation equations of celestial mechanics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burns, J. A.

    1976-01-01

    The equations of celestial mechanics that govern the temporal rates of change of orbital elements are completely derived using elementary dynamics and proceeding only from Newton's equation and its solution. Two orbital equations and the four most meaningful orbital elements - semimajor axis, eccentricity, inclination, and longitude of pericenter - are written in terms of the orbital energy (E) and angular momentum (H) per unit mass. The six resulting equations are differentiated with respect to time to see the effect on the orbital elements of small changes in E and H. The usual perturbation equations in terms of disturbing-force components are then derived by computing the manner in which perturbing forces change E and H. The results are applied in a qualitative discussion of the orbital evolution of particles in nonspherical gravitational fields, through atmospheres, and under the action of tides.

  5. Stellar angular diameters from occultation observations.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qian, B.-C.

    This paper reviews the history of measuring stellar angular diameters from lunar occultation observations and the techniques of data analysis. Several effects which can affect the results of measurement are discussed. The author finds that there may be systematic errors in angular diameters measured by various observatories for Aldebaran.

  6. The Orbital Angular Momentum Sum Rule

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aslan, Fatma; Burkardt, Matthias

    2015-10-01

    As an alternative to the Ji sum rule for the quark angular momentum, a sum rule for the quark orbital angular momentum, based on a twist-3 generalized parton distribution, has been suggested. We study the validity of this sum rule in the context of scalar Yukawa interactions as well as in QED for an electron.

  7. Orbital angular momentum: a personal memoir.

    PubMed

    Allen, L

    2017-02-28

    A definitive statement of the model used to describe orbital angular momentum is essentially now available. Its early history, and the interaction of those who played key roles in its development over 20 years ago in its development, is outlined in this Memoir.This article is part of the themed issue 'Optical orbital angular momentum'.

  8. Angular Momentum Eigenstates for Equivalent Electrons.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tuttle, E. R.; Calvert, J. B.

    1981-01-01

    Simple and efficient methods for adding angular momenta and for finding angular momentum eigenstates for systems of equivalent electrons are developed. Several different common representations are used in specific examples. The material is suitable for a graduate course in quantum mechanics. (SK)

  9. Orbital angular momentum: a personal memoir

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Allen, L.

    2017-02-01

    A definitive statement of the model used to describe orbital angular momentum is essentially now available. Its early history, and the interaction of those who played key roles in its development over 20 years ago in its development, is outlined in this Memoir. This article is part of the themed issue 'Optical orbital angular momentum'.

  10. Angular momentum decomposition of Richardson's pairs

    SciTech Connect

    Dussel, G. G.; Sofia, H. M.

    2008-07-15

    The angular momentum decomposition of pairs obtained using Richardson's exact solution of the pairing Hamiltonian for the deformed {sup 174}Yb nucleus are displayed. The probabilities for low angular momenta of the collective pairs are strikingly different from the ones obtained in the BCS ground state.

  11. Lunar occultation stellar angular diameter measurements. II

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beavers, W. I.; Eitter, J. J.; Cadmus, R. R., Jr.

    1981-09-01

    The results of analyses from 14 of the 200 lunar occultation events observed at the Fick Observatory between November 1972 and January 1975 are reported. These include two measurements with large angular diameters, seven with small or barely resolvable diameters, two point sources, and three cases in which the records are too noisy to allow angular diameter measurements.

  12. Angular Momentum Eigenstates for Equivalent Electrons.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tuttle, E. R.; Calvert, J. B.

    1981-01-01

    Simple and efficient methods for adding angular momenta and for finding angular momentum eigenstates for systems of equivalent electrons are developed. Several different common representations are used in specific examples. The material is suitable for a graduate course in quantum mechanics. (SK)

  13. Orbital angular momentum in the nucleon

    SciTech Connect

    Garvey, Gerald T.

    2010-05-15

    Analysis of the measured value of the integrated d-bar-u-bar asymmetry (I{sub fas} = 0.147 +- 0.027) in the nucleon show it to arise from nucleon fluctuations into baryon plus pion. Requiring angular momentum conservation in these fluctuations shows the associated orbital angular momentum is equal to the value of the flavor asymmetry.

  14. Orbital angular momentum in optical fibers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bozinovic, Nenad

    Internet data traffic capacity is rapidly reaching limits imposed by nonlinear effects of single mode fibers currently used in optical communications. Having almost exhausted available degrees of freedom to orthogonally multiplex data in optical fibers, researchers are now exploring the possibility of using the spatial dimension of fibers, via multicore and multimode fibers, to address the forthcoming capacity crunch. While multicore fibers require complex manufacturing, conventional multi-mode fibers suffer from mode coupling, caused by random perturbations in fibers and modal (de)multiplexers. Methods that have been developed to address the problem of mode coupling so far, have been dependent on computationally intensive digital signal processing algorithms using adaptive optics feedback or complex multiple-input multiple-output algorithms. Here we study the possibility of using the orbital angular momentum (OAM), or helicity, of light, as a means of increasing capacity of future optical fiber communication links. We first introduce a class of specialty fibers designed to minimize mode coupling and show their potential for OAM mode generation in fibers using numerical analysis. We then experimentally confirm the existence of OAM states in these fibers using methods based on fiber gratings and spatial light modulators. In order to quantify the purity of created OAM states, we developed two methods based on mode-image analysis, showing purity of OAM states to be 90% after 1km in these fibers. Finally, in order to demonstrate data transmission using OAM states, we developed a 4-mode multiplexing and demultiplexing systems based on free-space optics and spatial light modulators. Using simple coherent detection methods, we successfully transmit data at 400Gbit/s using four OAM modes at a single wavelength, over 1.1 km of fiber. Furthermore, we achieve data transmission at 1.6Tbit/s using 10 wavelengths and two OAM modes. Our study indicates that OAM light can exist

  15. Physical angular momentum separation for QED

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Weimin

    2017-04-01

    We study the non-uniqueness problem of the gauge-invariant angular momentum separation for the case of QED, which stems from the recent controversy concerning the proper definitions of the orbital angular momentum and spin operator of the individual parts of a gauge field system. For the free quantum electrodynamics without matter, we show that the basic requirement of Euclidean symmetry selects a unique physical angular momentum separation scheme from the multitude of the possible angular momentum separation schemes constructed using the various gauge-invariant extensions (GIEs). Based on these results, we propose a set of natural angular momentum separation schemes for the case of interacting QED by invoking the formalism of asymptotic fields. Some perspectives on such a problem for the case of QCD are briefly discussed.

  16. Angular Resolution Enhanced Spitzer images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Velusamy, T.; Beichman, C. A.; Backus, C. R.; Marsh, K. A.; Thompson, T. J.

    2004-05-01

    We have developed a 'HiRes' software for deconvolution of Spitzer images that increases the angular resolution by a factor of two to three over that obtainable in a standard mosaiced image. This software is an extension of the Maximum Correlation Method (MCM) described by Aumann et al. (1990 AJ, 99, 1674), incorporating features that are applicable to the Spitzer data and FFT convolutions to speed up. While the Spitzer Space Telescope provides unprecedented sensitivity in the infrared, its spatial resolution is limited by the relatively small aperture (0.85 m) of the primary mirror. In this paper we present resolution enhanced Spitzer images demonstrating the benefits of HiRes imaging: (1) The ability to detect sources below the diffraction-limited confusion level; at 160 micron, the corresponding increase in confusion-limited sensitivity is about a factor of two. (2) The ability to separate blended sources, and thereby provide guidance to point-source extraction procedures. (3) An improved ability to show the spatial morphology of resolved sources. This work was performed by the Jet Propulsion Laboratory, California Institute of Technology, under contract with the National Aeronautics and Space Administration.

  17. Angular Momentum of Dwarf Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Butler, Kirsty M.; Obreschkow, Danail; Oh, Se-Heon

    2017-01-01

    We present measurements of baryonic mass {M}{{b}} and specific angular momentum (sAM) {j}{{b}} in 14 rotating dwarf Irregular (dIrr) galaxies from the LITTLE THINGS sample. These measurements, based on 21 cm kinematic data from the Very Large Array and stellar mass maps from the Spitzer Space Telescope, extend previous AM measurements by more than two orders of magnitude in {M}{{b}}. The dwarf galaxies show systematically higher {j}{{b}} values than expected from the {j}{{b}}\\propto {M}{{b}}2/3 scaling of spiral galaxies, representative of a scale-free galaxy formation scenario. This offset can be explained by decreasing baryon mass fractions {f}{{M}}={M}{{b}}/{M}{dyn} (where {M}{dyn} is the dynamical mass) with decreasing {M}{{b}} (for {M}{{b}}< {10}11 {M}ȯ ). We find that the sAM of neutral atomic hydrogen (H i) alone is about 2.5 times higher than that of the stars. The M–j relation of H i is significantly steeper than that of the stars, as a direct consequence of the systematic variation of the H i fraction with {M}{{b}}.

  18. Squeezing of X waves with orbital angular momentum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ornigotti, Marco; Villari, Leone Di Mauro; Szameit, Alexander; Conti, Claudio

    2017-01-01

    Multilevel quantum protocols may potentially supersede standard quantum optical polarization-encoded protocols in terms of amount of information transmission and security. However, for free-space telecommunications, we do not have tools for limiting loss due to diffraction and perturbations, as, for example, turbulence in air. Here we study propagation invariant quantum X waves with angular momentum; this representation expresses the electromagnetic field as a quantum gas of weakly interacting bosons. The resulting spatiotemporal quantized light pulses are not subject to diffraction and dispersion, and are intrinsically resilient to disturbances in propagation. We show that spontaneous down-conversion generates squeezed X waves useful for quantum protocols. Surprisingly, the orbital angular momentum affects the squeezing angle, and we predict the existence of a characteristic axicon aperture for maximal squeezing. These results may boost the applications in free space of quantum optical transmission and multilevel quantum protocols, and may also be relevant for novel kinds of interferometers, such as satellite-based gravitational wave detectors.

  19. The power of perturbation theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Serone, Marco; Spada, Gabriele; Villadoro, Giovanni

    2017-05-01

    We study quantum mechanical systems with a discrete spectrum. We show that the asymptotic series associated to certain paths of steepest-descent (Lefschetz thimbles) are Borel resummable to the full result. Using a geometrical approach based on the PicardLefschetz theory we characterize the conditions under which perturbative expansions lead to exact results. Even when such conditions are not met, we explain how to define a different perturbative expansion that reproduces the full answer without the need of transseries, i.e. non-perturbative effects, such as real (or complex) instantons. Applications to several quantum mechanical systems are presented.

  20. Instabilities in mimetic matter perturbations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Firouzjahi, Hassan; Gorji, Mohammad Ali; Mansoori, Seyed Ali Hosseini

    2017-07-01

    We study cosmological perturbations in mimetic matter scenario with a general higher derivative function. We calculate the quadratic action and show that both the kinetic term and the gradient term have the wrong sings. We perform the analysis in both comoving and Newtonian gauges and confirm that the Hamiltonians and the associated instabilities are consistent with each other in both gauges. The existence of instabilities is independent of the specific form of higher derivative function which generates gradients for mimetic field perturbations. It is verified that the ghost instability in mimetic perturbations is not associated with the higher derivative instabilities such as the Ostrogradsky ghost.

  1. Gauge invariant perturbations of self-similar Lemaitre-Tolman-Bondi spacetime: Even parity modes with l{>=}2

    SciTech Connect

    Waters, Thomas J.; Nolan, Brien C.

    2009-04-15

    In this paper we consider gauge invariant linear perturbations of the metric and matter tensors describing the self-similar Lemaitre-Tolman-Bondi (timelike dust) spacetime containing a naked singularity. We decompose the angular part of the perturbation in terms of spherical harmonics and perform a Mellin transform to reduce the perturbation equations to a set of ordinary differential equations with singular points. We fix initial data so the perturbation is finite on the axis and the past null cone of the singularity, and follow the perturbation modes up to the Cauchy horizon. There we argue that certain scalars formed from the modes of the perturbation remain finite, indicating linear stability of the Cauchy horizon.

  2. Causal compensated perturbations in cosmology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Veeraraghavan, Shoba; Stebbins, Albert

    1990-01-01

    A theoretical framework is developed to calculate linear perturbations in the gravitational and matter fields which arise causally in response to the presence of stiff matter sources in a FRW cosmology. It is shown that, in order to satisfy energy and momentum conservation, the gravitational fields of the source must be compensated by perturbations in the matter and gravitational fields, and the role of such compensation in containing the initial inhomogeneities in their subsequent evolution is discussed. A complete formal solution is derived in terms of Green functions for the perturbations produced by an arbitrary source in a flat universe containing cold dark matter. Approximate Green function solutions are derived for the late-time density perturbations and late-time gravitational waves in a universe containing a radiation fluid. A cosmological energy-momentum pseudotensor is defined to clarify the nature of energy and momentum conservation in the expanding universe.

  3. Inflationary perturbations in bimetric gravity

    SciTech Connect

    Cusin, Giulia; Durrer, Ruth; Guarato, Pietro; Motta, Mariele E-mail: ruth.durrer@unige.ch E-mail: mariele.motta@unige.ch

    2015-09-01

    In this paper we study the generation of primordial perturbations in a cosmological setting of bigravity during inflation. We consider a model of bigravity which can reproduce the ΛCDM background and large scale structure and a simple model of inflation with a single scalar field and a quadratic potential. Reheating is implemented with a toy-model in which the energy density of the inflaton is entirely dissipated into radiation. We present analytic and numerical results for the evolution of primordial perturbations in this cosmological setting. We find that the amplitude of tensor perturbations generated during inflation is sufficiently suppressed to avoid the effects of the tensor instability discovered in refs. [1,2] which develops during the cosmological evolution in the physical sector. We argue that from a pure analysis of the tensor perturbations this bigravity model is compatible with present observations. However, we derive rather stringent limits on inflation from the vector and scalar sectors.

  4. Perturbative gadgets at arbitrary orders

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jordan, Stephen P.; Farhi, Edward

    2008-06-01

    Adiabatic quantum algorithms are often most easily formulated using many-body interactions. However, experimentally available interactions are generally two-body. In 2004, Kempe, Kitaev, and Regev introduced perturbative gadgets, by which arbitrary three-body effective interactions can be obtained using Hamiltonians consisting only of two-body interactions. These three-body effective interactions arise from the third order in perturbation theory. Since their introduction, perturbative gadgets have become a standard tool in the theory of quantum computation. Here we construct generalized gadgets so that one can directly obtain arbitrary k -body effective interactions from two-body Hamiltonians. These effective interactions arise from the k th order in perturbation theory.

  5. Causal compensated perturbations in cosmology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Veeraraghavan, Shoba; Stebbins, Albert

    1990-01-01

    A theoretical framework is developed to calculate linear perturbations in the gravitational and matter fields which arise causally in response to the presence of stiff matter sources in a FRW cosmology. It is shown that, in order to satisfy energy and momentum conservation, the gravitational fields of the source must be compensated by perturbations in the matter and gravitational fields, and the role of such compensation in containing the initial inhomogeneities in their subsequent evolution is discussed. A complete formal solution is derived in terms of Green functions for the perturbations produced by an arbitrary source in a flat universe containing cold dark matter. Approximate Green function solutions are derived for the late-time density perturbations and late-time gravitational waves in a universe containing a radiation fluid. A cosmological energy-momentum pseudotensor is defined to clarify the nature of energy and momentum conservation in the expanding universe.

  6. Robust stability under additive perturbations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bhaya, A.; Desoer, C. A.

    1985-01-01

    A MIMO linear time-invariant feedback system 1S(P,C) is considered which is assumed to be U-stable. The plant P is subjected to an additive perturbation Delta P which is proper but not necessarily stable. It is proved that the perturbed system is U-stable if and only if Delta P(I + Q x Delta P) exp -1 is U-stable.

  7. Lectures on perturbative string theories

    SciTech Connect

    Ooguri, Hirosi; Yin, Z. |

    1997-02-01

    These lecture notes on String Theory constitute an introductory course designed to acquaint the students with some basic factors of perturbative string theories. They are intended as preparation for the more advanced courses on non-perturbative aspects of string theories in the school. The course consists of five lectures: (1) Bosonic String, (2) Toroidal Compactifications, (3) Superstrings, (4) Heterotic Strings, and (5) Orbifold Compactifications.

  8. Wave Angular Momentum in Nonneutral Plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gould, Roy W.

    1999-11-01

    We show that angular momentum and energy are added or removed when exciting a mode, such as a diocotron, Trivelpiece-Gould, or Dubin mode, and we calculate the rates (with sign) at which angular momentum and energy are added by the application of a ``rotating wall" field. Excitation of a mode which rotates faster than the plasma increases the total angular momentum and total energy and compresses the plasma, whereas excitation of a mode which rotates slower than the plasma decreases the total angular momentum and total energy and expands the plasma, in accord with recent ``rotating wall" experiments^1. Furthermore, the transfer rates are sharply peaked when the angular velocity of the ``rotating wall" is equal to the angular velocity of a mode, because mode excitation is a resonant process. Thus mode excitation is a very efficient way to transfer angular momentum and energy to or from the plasma. We also calculate the torque on a spheroidal Coulomb crystal which is phase-locked^2 to a ``rotating wall" field, and discuss phase oscillations and the maximum rate of acceleration which can be achieved. 1 F. Anderegg et al, Phys. Rev. Lett. 81 4875 (1998). 2 X.-P. Huang et al, Phys. Rev. Lett. 80 73 (1998).

  9. Photoelectron angular distributions from two-photon ionizations of atoms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haber, Louis Hamilton

    Photoelectron angular distributions provide detailed information about interferences between different quantum pathways of photoionization. Measurements of photoelectron energies and angular distributions from two-color two-photon ionizations of atoms using ultrashort pulses of extreme ultraviolet and optical light are performed using a novel, homebuilt experimental instrument. The setup is composed of an amplified femtosecond laser system, a high-order harmonic generation source, and an interaction region with photoelectron velocity map imaging The experimental temporal resolution is determined to be approximately 100 fs. Two different types of two-photon ionizations are investigated. Photoelectron angular distributions from resonant two-photon ionizations of helium are measured using the 15th high-order harmonic to excite from the ground state to either the 1s3p 1P1 state at 23.1 eV or to the 1s4p 1 P1 state at 23.7 eV and either 800, 400, or 267 nm to ionize. The anisotropy parameters allow for the determination of the energy-dependent ratios of radial dipole matrix elements and the phase shift differences between the S and D partial waves. Using available total cross section measurements, the absolute partial cross sections of the 1s3p1P 1 state are obtained, providing the complete information on photoionization. The experimental results are in excellent agreement with theoretical predictions using the one-electron model. Additional experiments are aimed at studying atomic free-free transitions. Two-color two-photon above threshold ionizations of helium and argon are investigated using selected high-order harmonics and perturbative infrared dressing fields. The measured anisotropy parameters and cross section ratios of the positive and negative above threshold ionization sidebands are compared to theoretical predictions using second-order perturbation theory and the soft-photon approximation. In general, deviations between the experimental results and the

  10. Wave angular momentum in nonneutral plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gould, Roy W.

    1999-12-01

    Angular momentum and energy are added (or removed) when exciting a mode, such as a diocotron, Trivelpiece-Gould, or Dubin mode, and we discuss rates at which mode angular momentum and energy are added by applied fields. Excitation of a plasma mode is an effective way to transfer angular momentum and energy to the plasma because it is a resonant process. We relate this to recent experiments on compression and expansion of plasmas using a "rotating wall" field. We also calculate the torque on a Coulomb crystal which is phase-locked to a "rotating wall" field and describe phase oscillations and the maximum rate of acceleration which can be achieved.

  11. Angular momentum in the Local Group

    SciTech Connect

    Dunn, A.; Laflamme, R.

    1994-04-01

    We briefly review models for the Local Group and the acquisition of its angular momentum. We describe early attempts to understand the origin of the spin of the galaxies discussing the hypothesis that the Local Group has little angular momentum. Finally we show that using Peebles` least action principle there should be a rather large amount of orbital angular momentum compared to the magnitude of the spin of its galaxies. Therefore the Local Group cannot be thought as tidally isolated. Using Peebles` trajectories we give a possible set of trajectories for Local Group galaxies which would predict their spin.

  12. Chirality and the angular momentum of light

    PubMed Central

    Götte, Jörg B.; Barnett, Stephen M.; Yao, Alison M.

    2017-01-01

    Chirality is exhibited by objects that cannot be rotated into their mirror images. It is far from obvious that this has anything to do with the angular momentum of light, which owes its existence to rotational symmetries. There is nevertheless a subtle connection between chirality and the angular momentum of light. We demonstrate this connection and, in particular, its significance in the context of chiral light–matter interactions. This article is part of the themed issue ‘Optical orbital angular momentum’. PMID:28069764

  13. Supernovae at the Highest Angular Resolution

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dyk, S. Van; Weiler, K.; Sramek, R.; Panagia, N.; Lacey, C.; Montes, M.; Mercaide, J.; Lewin, W.; Fox, D.; Filippenko, A.; Peng, C.

    2000-01-01

    The study of supernovae (SNe) and their environments in host galaxies at the highest possible angular resolution in a number of wavelength regimes is providing vital clues to the nature of their progenitor stars.

  14. Unipolar motor and angular momentum conservation law

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mayer, V. V.; Varaksina, E. I.

    2017-07-01

    A simple unipolar electric motor is described. The motor is a closed electromechanical system. The proposed apparatus allows us to demonstrate angular momentum conservation law at a qualitative level.

  15. Angular velocity-based structural damage detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liao, Yizheng; Kiremidjian, Anne S.; Rajagopal, Ram; Loh, Chin-Hsiung

    2016-04-01

    Damage detection is an important application of structural health monitoring. With the recent development of sensing technology, additional information about structures, angular velocity, has become available. In this paper, the angular velocity signals obtained from gyroscopes are modeled as an autoregressive (AR) model. The damage sensitive features (DSFs) are defined as a function of the AR coefficients. It is found that the mean values of the DSF for the damaged and undamaged signals are different. Also, we show that the angular velocity- based AR model has a linear relationship with the acceleration-based AR model. To test the proposed damage detection method, the algorithm has been tested with the experimental data from a recent shake table test where the damage is introduced systemically. The results indicate that the change of DSF means is statistically significant, and the angular velocity-based DSFs are sensitive to damage.

  16. Orbital angular momentum 25 years on [Invited].

    PubMed

    Padgett, Miles J

    2017-05-15

    Twenty-five years ago Allen, Beijersbergen, Spreeuw, and Woerdman published their seminal paper establishing that light beams with helical phase-fronts carried an orbital angular momentum. Previously orbital angular momentum had been associated only with high-order atomic/molecular transitions and hence considered to be a rare occurrence. The realization that every photon in a laser beam could carry an orbital angular momentum that was in excess of the angular momentum associated with photon spin has led both to new understandings of optical effects and various applications. These applications range from optical manipulation, imaging and quantum optics, to optical communications. This brief review will examine some of the research in the field to date and consider what future directions might hold.

  17. Radially dependent angular acceleration of twisted light.

    PubMed

    Webster, Jason; Rosales-Guzmán, Carmelo; Forbes, Andrew

    2017-02-15

    While photons travel in a straight line at constant velocity in free space, the intensity profile of structured light may be tailored for acceleration in any degree of freedom. Here we propose a simple approach to control the angular acceleration of light. Using Laguerre-Gaussian modes as our twisted beams carrying orbital angular momentum, we show that superpositions of opposite handedness result in a radially dependent angular acceleration as they pass through a focus (waist plane). Due to conservation of orbital angular momentum, we find that propagation dynamics are complex despite the free-space medium: the outer part of the beam (rings) rotates in an opposite direction to the inner part (petals), and while the outer part accelerates, the inner part decelerates. We outline the concepts theoretically and confirm them experimentally. Such exotic structured light beams are topical due to their many applications, for instance in optical trapping and tweezing, metrology, and fundamental studies in optics.

  18. Generalized Uncertainty Principle and angular momentum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bosso, Pasquale; Das, Saurya

    2017-08-01

    Various models of quantum gravity suggest a modification of the Heisenberg's Uncertainty Principle, to the so-called Generalized Uncertainty Principle, between position and momentum. In this work we show how this modification influences the theory of angular momentum in Quantum Mechanics. In particular, we compute Planck scale corrections to angular momentum eigenvalues, the hydrogen atom spectrum, the Stern-Gerlach experiment and the Clebsch-Gordan coefficients. We also examine effects of the Generalized Uncertainty Principle on multi-particle systems.

  19. Angular performance measure for tighter uncertainty relations

    SciTech Connect

    Hradil, Z.; Rehacek, J.; Klimov, A. B.; Rigas, I.; Sanchez-Soto, L. L.

    2010-01-15

    The uncertainty principle places a fundamental limit on the accuracy with which we can measure conjugate quantities. However, the fluctuations of these variables can be assessed in terms of different estimators. We propose an angular performance that allows for tighter uncertainty relations for angle and angular momentum. The differences with previous bounds can be significant for particular states and indeed may be amenable to experimental measurement with the present technology.

  20. Relativistic Electron Wave Packets Carrying Angular Momentum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bialynicki-Birula, Iwo; Bialynicka-Birula, Zofia

    2017-03-01

    There are important differences between the nonrelativistic and relativistic description of electron beams. In the relativistic case the orbital angular momentum quantum number cannot be used to specify the wave functions and the structure of vortex lines in these two descriptions is completely different. We introduce analytic solutions of the Dirac equation in the form of exponential wave packets and we argue that they properly describe relativistic electron beams carrying angular momentum.

  1. Relativistic Electron Wave Packets Carrying Angular Momentum.

    PubMed

    Bialynicki-Birula, Iwo; Bialynicka-Birula, Zofia

    2017-03-17

    There are important differences between the nonrelativistic and relativistic description of electron beams. In the relativistic case the orbital angular momentum quantum number cannot be used to specify the wave functions and the structure of vortex lines in these two descriptions is completely different. We introduce analytic solutions of the Dirac equation in the form of exponential wave packets and we argue that they properly describe relativistic electron beams carrying angular momentum.

  2. An investigation of vortical flowfields due to single and multiple surface perturbations at the forebody

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hamilton, Howard Hugh

    Vortical flowfields produced by one and two cylindrical surface perturbations at the apex of a blunted conical forebody were investigated as a function of geometric parameters that defined the perturbation: axial position, perturbation height, and circumferential position. Static side force and yaw moment measurements, smoke- and oil-flow visualizations and flowfield mappings were used to correlate changes in the flow physics with the aerodynamic loads. The flow physics at the perturbation were dominated by the presence of a horseshoe vortex at the base of the surface perturbation and three-dimensional wake shedding along its height. These phenomena created a region of high Reynolds shear stresses and fluctuation velocities that deformed locally the separation and reattachment lines and increased the strength of the secondary vortex. Nonlinear regressions of the aerodynamic loads as a function of the geometric parameters revealed a fractional power-law dependence of the decay rate of the loads on the perturbation height and a stronger power-law dependence of the growth rate on the axial position. A discrete vortex simulation of the flowfield in which the effect of the perturbations was simulated as a shift in shed vortex particles confirmed these dependencies. A pair of perturbations of equal height located at the same axial position but on opposite sides of the forebody manipulated the separation lines and the related vortices independently of each other. Perturbations placed on the same side of the forebody created flowfields that were dependent of the angular spacing between the pair and the circumferential position of the perturbations. It was concluded that although the presence of single and multiple surface perturbations was sufficient to deform the local surface skin-friction lines, they were not sufficient to change the global topological structure of the mean skin-friction patterns. This change in the topological structure is postulated to be sufficient

  3. Trunk rotation monitor using angular velocity sensors.

    PubMed

    Seo, A; Uda, S

    1997-04-01

    To monitor the low back risk imposed by asymmetric postures at workplaces, a method using angular velocity sensors was studied. According to a simple model analysis, trunk rotation could be calculated from the angular velocities measured at both the waist and shoulder and from the inclination of each angular velocity sensor. We thus developed a new detector consisting of an angular velocity sensor (ENC-05D, Murata, Japan) for detecting angular velocity and an acceleration sensor (ADXL05, Analog Devices, USA) for measuring inclination. The precision of the angular velocity sensor was high as the correlation coefficient between the output of the sensor and the true value was 0.9996. When the detectors were affixed to a subject and compared with data measured by a Vicon System 370 (Oxford Metrics, UK), the correlation coefficients between the two methods were 0.949 and 0.815 during model tasks of box transfer and box lifting, respectively. In a model of lifting boxes at different rates, the mean and standard deviation increased according to the task speed. This method was shown to be of practical use for monitoring trunk rotation.

  4. Partial angular coherence and the angular Schmidt spectrum of entangled two-photon fields

    SciTech Connect

    Jha, Anand Kumar; Boyd, Robert W.; Agarwal, Girish S.

    2011-12-15

    We study partially coherent fields that have a coherent-mode representation in the orbital-angular-momentum-mode basis. For such fields, we introduce the concepts of the angular coherence function and the coherence angle. Such fields are naturally produced by the process of parametric down-conversion--a second-order nonlinear optical process in which a pump photon breaks up into two entangled photons, known as the signal and idler photons. We show that the angular coherence functions of the signal and idler fields are directly related to the angular Schmidt (spiral) spectrum of the down-converted two-photon field and thus that the angular Schmidt spectrum can be measured directly by measuring the angular coherence function of either the signal or the idler field, without requiring coincidence detection.

  5. Computing singularities of perturbation series

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kvaal, Simen; Jarlebring, Elias; Michiels, Wim

    2011-03-01

    Many properties of current ab initio approaches to the quantum many-body problem, both perturbational and otherwise, are related to the singularity structure of the Rayleigh-Schrödinger perturbation series. A numerical procedure is presented that in principle computes the complete set of singularities, including the dominant singularity which limits the radius of convergence. The method approximates the singularities as eigenvalues of a certain generalized eigenvalue equation which is solved using iterative techniques. It relies on computation of the action of the Hamiltonian matrix on a vector and does not rely on the terms in the perturbation series. The method can be useful for studying perturbation series of typical systems of moderate size, for fundamental development of resummation schemes, and for understanding the structure of singularities for typical systems. Some illustrative model problems are studied, including a helium-like model with δ-function interactions for which Møller-Plesset perturbation theory is considered and the radius of convergence found.

  6. Effects of the type and direction of support surface perturbation on postural responses

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Postural control is organized around a task goal. The two most frequently used types of tasks for postural control research are translational (translation along the anterior-posterior axis) and rotational (rotation in sagittal plane) surface perturbations. These types of perturbations rotate the ankle joint, causing different magnitudes and directions of body sway. The purpose of this study was to investigate the effects of the type (translation vs. rotation) and direction (forward/toe up vs. backward/toe down) of the perturbation on postural responses. Method Nineteen healthy subjects were tested with four perturbations, i.e., forward and backward translation and toe up and toe down rotation. The onset latency and magnitude of muscle activations, angular changes, and COM displacements were measured. In addition, the kinematic data were divided into two phases. The initial phase reflected the balance disturbance induced by the platform movement, and the reversal phase reflected the balance reaction. Results The results showed that, in the initial phase, rotational perturbation induced earlier ankle movement and faster and larger vertical COM displacement, while translational and forward/toe up perturbations induced larger head and trunk angular change and faster and larger horizontal COM displacement. In the reversal phase, balance reaction was attained by multi-joint movements. Translational and forward/toe up perturbations that induced larger upper body instability evoked faster muscle activation as well as faster and larger hip or knee joint movements. Conclusions These findings provide insights into an appropriate support surface perturbation for the evaluation and training of balance. PMID:24708582

  7. Measures and models for angular correlation and angular-linear correlation. [correlation of random variables

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, R. A.; Wehrly, T.

    1976-01-01

    Population models for dependence between two angular measurements and for dependence between an angular and a linear observation are proposed. The method of canonical correlations first leads to new population and sample measures of dependence in this latter situation. An example relating wind direction to the level of a pollutant is given. Next, applied to pairs of angular measurements, the method yields previously proposed sample measures in some special cases and a new sample measure in general.

  8. Jet Perturbation by HE target

    SciTech Connect

    Poulsen, P; Kuklo, R M

    2001-03-01

    We have previously reported the degree of attenuation and perturbation by a Cu jet passing through Comp B explosive. Similar tests have now been performed with high explosive (HE) targets having CJ pressures higher than and lower than the CJ pressure of Comp B. The explosives were LX-14 and TNT, respectively. We found that the measured exit velocity of the jet where it transitions from perturbed to solid did not vary significantly as a function of HE type for each HE thickness. The radial momentum imparted to the perturbed jet segment did vary as a function of HE type, however, and we report the radial spreading of the jet and the penetration of a downstream target as a function of HE type and thickness.

  9. A collision history-based approach to Sensitivity/Perturbation calculations in the continuous energy Monte Carlo code SERPENT

    SciTech Connect

    Giuseppe Palmiotti

    2015-05-01

    In this work, the implementation of a collision history-based approach to sensitivity/perturbation calculations in the Monte Carlo code SERPENT is discussed. The proposed methods allow the calculation of the eects of nuclear data perturbation on several response functions: the eective multiplication factor, reaction rate ratios and bilinear ratios (e.g., eective kinetics parameters). SERPENT results are compared to ERANOS and TSUNAMI Generalized Perturbation Theory calculations for two fast metallic systems and for a PWR pin-cell benchmark. New methods for the calculation of sensitivities to angular scattering distributions are also presented, which adopts fully continuous (in energy and angle) Monte Carlo estimators.

  10. Multi-field inflation and cosmological perturbations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gong, Jinn-Ouk

    We provide a concise review on multi-field inflation and cosmological perturbations. We discuss convenient and physically meaningful bases in terms of which perturbations can be systematically studied. We give formal accounts on the gauge fixing conditions and present the perturbation action in two gauges. We also briefly review nonlinear perturbations.

  11. Angular-divergence calculation for Experimental Advanced Superconducting Tokamak neutral beam injection ion source based on spectroscopic measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Chi, Yuan; Hu, Chundong; Zhuang, Ge

    2014-02-15

    Calorimetric method has been primarily applied for several experimental campaigns to determine the angular divergence of high-current ion source for the neutral beam injection system on the Experimental Advanced Superconducting Tokamak (EAST). A Doppler shift spectroscopy has been developed to provide the secondary measurement of the angular divergence to improve the divergence measurement accuracy and for real-time and non-perturbing measurement. The modified calculation model based on the W7AS neutral beam injectors is adopted to accommodate the slot-type accelerating grids used in the EAST's ion source. Preliminary spectroscopic experimental results are presented comparable to the calorimetrically determined value of theoretical calculation.

  12. Generating the curvature perturbation at the end of inflation in string theory.

    PubMed

    Lyth, David H; Riotto, Antonio

    2006-09-22

    In brane inflationary scenarios, the cosmological perturbations are supposed to originate from the vacuum fluctuations of the inflaton field corresponding to the position of the brane. We show that a significant, and possibly dominant, contribution to the curvature perturbation is generated at the end of inflation through the vacuum fluctuations of fields, other than the inflaton, which are light during the inflationary trajectory and become heavy at the brane-antibrane annihilation. These fields appear generically in string compactifications where the background geometry has exact or approximate isometries and parametrize the internal angular directions of the brane.

  13. Stationary perturbations and infinitesimal rotations of static Einstein-Yang-Mills configurations with bosonic matter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brodbeck, Othmar; Heusler, Markus

    1997-11-01

    Using the Kaluza-Klein structure of stationary spacetimes, a framework for analyzing stationary perturbations of static Einstein-Yang-Mills configurations with bosonic matter fields is presented. It is shown that the perturbations giving rise to a nonvanishing ADM angular momentum are governed by a self-adjoint system of equations for a set of gauge-invariant scalar amplitudes. The method is illustrated for SU(2) gauge fields, coupled to a Higgs doublet or a Higgs triplet. It is argued that slowly rotating black holes arise generically in self-gravitating non-Abelian gauge theories with bosonic matter, whereas, in general, soliton solutions do not have rotating counterparts.

  14. Thermal perturbation of the Sun

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Twigg, L. W.; Endal, A. S.

    1981-01-01

    An investigation of thermal perturbations of the solar convective zone via changes in the mixing length parameter were carried out, with a view toward understanding the possible solar radius and luminosity changes cited in the literature. The results show that: (a) a single perturbation of alpha is probably not the cause of the solar radius change and (b) the parameter W = d lambda nR./d lambda nL. can not be characterized by a single value, as implied in recent work.

  15. Magnetic field and angular momentum evolution models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gallet, F.

    2013-11-01

    The magnetic field in young stellar object is clearly the most important component when one dealing with the angular momentum evolution of solar-like stars. It controls this latter one from the pre-main sequence, during the ``disk locking'' phase where the stars magnetically interact with their surrounding disk, to the main-sequence through powerful stellar winds that remove angular momentum from the stellar surface. We present new models for the rotational evolution of solar-like stars between 1 Myr and 10 Gyr with the aim to reproduce the distributions of rotational periods observed for star forming regions and young open clusters within this age range. Our simulations are produced by a recent model dedicated to the study of the angular momentum evolution of solar-type stars. This model include a new wind braking law based on recent numerical simulations of magnetized stellar winds and a specific dynamo and mass-loss prescription are used to link the angular momentum loss-rate to angular velocity evolution. The model additionally allows for a core/envelope decoupling with an angular momentum transfer between these two regions. Since this former model didn't include any physical star/disk interaction description, two star/disk interaction processes are eventually added to it in order to reproduce the apparent small angular velocities to which the stellar surface is subject during the disk accretion phase. We have developed rotational evolution models for slow, median and fast rotators including two star/disk interaction scenarios that are the magnetospheric ejection and the accretion powered stellar winds processes. The models appear to fail at reproducing the rotational behaviour of solar-type stars except when a more intense magnetic field is used during the disk accretion phase.

  16. Maple procedures for the coupling of angular momenta. VIII. Spin-angular coefficients for single-shell configurations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gaigalas, G.; Scharf, O.; Fritzsche, S.

    2005-03-01

    very beginning, the RACAH program has been designed as an interactive environment for the (symbolic) manipulation and computation of expressions from the theories of angular momentum and the atomic shell model. With the present extension of the program, we provide the user with a simple access to the coefficients of fractional grandparentage (CFGP) as well as to the spin-angular coefficients of one- and two-particle physical operators. To facilitate the specification of the tensorial form of the operators, a short but powerful notation has been introduced for the creation and annihilation operators as well as for the products of such operators as required for the development of many-body perturbation theory in a symmetry-adapted basis. All the coefficients and the matrix elements from above are equally supported for both LS- and jj-coupled operators and functions. The main procedures of the present extension are described below in Appendix B. In addition, a list of all available commands of the RACAH program can be found in the file Racah-commands.ps which is distributed together with the code. Typical running time: The program replies promptly on most requests. Even large tabulations of standard quantities and pure spin-angular coefficients for one- and two-particle scalar operators in LS- and jj-coupling can be carried out in a few (tens of) seconds.

  17. Invisible Electronic States and Their Dynamics Revealed by Perturbations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Merer, Anthony J.

    2011-06-01

    Sooner or later everyone working in the field of spectroscopy encounters perturbations. These can range in size from a small shift of a single rotational level to total destruction of the vibrational and rotational patterns of an electronic state. To some workers perturbations are a source of terror, but to others they are the most fascinating features of molecular spectra, because they give information about molecular dynamics, and about states that would otherwise be invisible as a result of unfavorable selection rules. An example of the latter is the essentially complete characterization of the tilde{b}^3A_2 state of SO_2 from the vibronic perturbations it causes in the tilde{a}^3B_1 state. The S_1-trans state of acetylene is a beautiful example of dynamics in action. The level patterns of the three bending vibrations change dramatically with increasing vibrational excitation as a result of the vibrational angular momentum and the approach to the isomerization barrier. Several vibrational levels of the S_1-cis isomer, previously thought to be unobservable, can now be assigned. They obtain their intensity through interactions with nearby levels of the trans isomer.

  18. A transport based one-dimensional perturbation code for reactivity calculations in metal systems

    SciTech Connect

    Wenz, Tracy Renee

    1995-02-01

    A one-dimensional reactivity calculation code is developed using first order perturbation theory. The reactivity equation is based on the multi-group transport equation using the discrete ordinates method for angular dependence. In addition to the first order perturbation approximations, the reactivity code uses only the isotropic scattering data, but cross section libraries with higher order scattering data can still be used with this code. The reactivity code obtains all the flux, cross section, and geometry data from the standard interface files created by ONEDANT, a discrete ordinates transport code. Comparisons between calculated and experimental reactivities were done with the central reactivity worth data for Lady Godiva, a bare uranium metal assembly. Good agreement is found for isotopes that do not violate the assumptions in the first order approximation. In general for cases where there are large discrepancies, the discretized cross section data is not accurately representing certain resonance regions that coincide with dominant flux groups in the Godiva assembly. Comparing reactivities calculated with first order perturbation theory and a straight Δk/k calculation shows agreement within 10% indicating the perturbation of the calculated fluxes is small enough for first order perturbation theory to be applicable in the modeled system. Computation time comparisons between reactivities calculated with first order perturbation theory and straight {Delta}k/k calculations indicate considerable time can be saved performing a calculation with a perturbation code particularly as the complexity of the modeled problems increase.

  19. Adaptation Strategies in Perturbed /s/

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brunner, Jana; Hoole, Phil; Perrier, Pascal

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this work is to investigate the role of three articulatory parameters (tongue position, jaw position and tongue grooving) in the production of /s/. Six normal speakers' speech was perturbed by a palatal prosthesis. The fricative was recorded acoustically and through electromagnetic articulography in four conditions: (1) unperturbed,…

  20. Adaptation Strategies in Perturbed /s/

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brunner, Jana; Hoole, Phil; Perrier, Pascal

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this work is to investigate the role of three articulatory parameters (tongue position, jaw position and tongue grooving) in the production of /s/. Six normal speakers' speech was perturbed by a palatal prosthesis. The fricative was recorded acoustically and through electromagnetic articulography in four conditions: (1) unperturbed,…

  1. New results in perturbative QCD

    SciTech Connect

    Ellis, R.K.

    1985-11-01

    Three topics in perturbative QCD important for Super-collider physics are reviewed. The topics are: (2 2) jet phenomena calculated in O( sT); new techniques for the calculation of tree graphs; and colour coherence in jet phenomena. 31 refs., 6 figs.

  2. Disformal invariance of curvature perturbation

    SciTech Connect

    Motohashi, Hayato; White, Jonathan E-mail: jwhite@post.kek.jp

    2016-02-01

    We show that under a general disformal transformation the linear comoving curvature perturbation is not identically invariant, but is invariant on superhorizon scales for any theory that is disformally related to Horndeski's theory. The difference between disformally related curvature perturbations is found to be given in terms of the comoving density perturbation associated with a single canonical scalar field. In General Relativity it is well-known that this quantity vanishes on superhorizon scales through the Poisson equation that is obtained on combining the Hamiltonian and momentum constraints, and we confirm that a similar result holds for any theory that is disformally related to Horndeski's scalar-tensor theory so long as the invertibility condition for the disformal transformation is satisfied. We also consider the curvature perturbation at full nonlinear order in the unitary gauge, and find that it is invariant under a general disformal transformation if we assume that an attractor regime has been reached. Finally, we also discuss the counting of degrees of freedom in theories disformally related to Horndeski's.

  3. VHS Movies: Perturbations for Morphogenesis.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Holmes, Danny L.

    This paper discusses the concept of a family system in terms of an interactive system of interrelated, interdependent parts and suggests that VHS movies can act as perturbations, i.e., change promoting agents, for certain dysfunctional family systems. Several distinct characteristics of a family system are defined with particular emphasis on…

  4. Recent Developments in Perturbative QCD

    SciTech Connect

    Dixon, Lance J.; /SLAC

    2005-07-11

    I review recent progress in perturbative QCD on two fronts: extending next-to-next-to-leading order QCD corrections to a broader range of collider processes, and applying twistor-space methods (and related spinoffs) to computations of multi-parton scattering amplitudes.

  5. PERTURBATION APPROACH FOR QUANTUM COMPUTATION

    SciTech Connect

    G. P. BERMAN; D. I. KAMENEV; V. I. TSIFRINOVICH

    2001-04-01

    We discuss how to simulate errors in the implementation of simple quantum logic operations in a nuclear spin quantum computer with many qubits, using radio-frequency pulses. We verify our perturbation approach using the exact solutions for relatively small (L = 10) number of qubits.

  6. Singularly Perturbed Lie Bracket Approximation

    SciTech Connect

    Durr, Hans-Bernd; Krstic, Miroslav; Scheinker, Alexander; Ebenbauer, Christian

    2015-03-27

    Here, we consider the interconnection of two dynamical systems where one has an input-affine vector field. We show that by employing a singular perturbation analysis and the Lie bracket approximation technique, the stability of the overall system can be analyzed by regarding the stability properties of two reduced, uncoupled systems.

  7. Basics of QCD perturbation theory

    SciTech Connect

    Soper, D.E.

    1997-06-01

    This is an introduction to the use of QCD perturbation theory, emphasizing generic features of the theory that enable one to separate short-time and long-time effects. The author also covers some important classes of applications: electron-positron annihilation to hadrons, deeply inelastic scattering, and hard processes in hadron-hadron collisions. 31 refs., 38 figs.

  8. Dirac Green function for angular projection potentials.

    PubMed

    Zeller, Rudolf

    2015-11-25

    The aim of this paper is twofold: first, it is shown that the angular dependence of the Dirac Green function can be described analytically for potentials with non-local dependence on the angular variables if they are chosen as projection potentials in angular momentum space. Because the local dependence on the radial variable can be treated to any precision with present computing capabilities, this means that the Green function can be calculated practically exactly. Second, it is shown that a result of this kind not only holds for a single angular projection potential but also more generally, for instance if space is divided into non-overlapping cells and a separate angular projection potential is used in each cell. This opens the way for relativistic density-functional calculations within a different perspective than the conventional one. Instead of trying to obtain the density for a given potential approximately as well as possible, the density is determined exactly for non-local potentials which can approximate arbitrary local potentials as well as desired.

  9. An orbital angular momentum spectrometer for electrons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harvey, Tyler; Grillo, Vincenzo; McMorran, Benjamin

    2016-05-01

    With the advent of techniques for preparation of free-electron and neutron orbital angular momentum (OAM) states, a basic follow-up question emerges: how do we measure the orbital angular momentum state distribution in matter waves? Control of both the energy and helicity of light has produced a range of spectroscopic applications, including molecular fingerprinting and magnetization mapping. Realization of an analogous dual energy-OAM spectroscopy with matter waves demands control of both initial and final energy and orbital angular momentum states: unlike for photons, final state post-selection is necessary for particles that cannot be annihilated. We propose a magnetic field-based mechanism for quantum non-demolition measurement of electron OAM. We show that OAM-dependent lensing is produced by an operator of form U =exp iLzρ2/ℏb2 where ρ =√{x2 +y2 } is the radial position operator, Lz is the orbital angular momentum operator along z, and b is the OAM dispersion length. We can physically realize this operator as a term in the time evolution of an electron in magnetic round lens. We discuss prospects and practical challenges for implementation of a lensing orbital angular momentum measurement. This work was supported by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), Office of Science, Basic Energy Sciences (BES), under the Early Career Research Program Award # DE-SC0010466.

  10. Ultrafast angular momentum transfer in multisublattice ferrimagnets.

    PubMed

    Bergeard, N; López-Flores, V; Halté, V; Hehn, M; Stamm, C; Pontius, N; Beaurepaire, E; Boeglin, C

    2014-03-11

    Femtosecond laser pulses can be used to induce ultrafast changes of the magnetization in magnetic materials. However, one of the unsolved questions is that of conservation of the total angular momentum during the ultrafast demagnetization. Here we report the ultrafast transfer of angular momentum during the first hundred femtoseconds in ferrimagnetic Co0.8Gd0.2 and Co0.74Tb0.26 films. Using time-resolved X-ray magnetic circular dichroism allowed for time-resolved determination of spin and orbital momenta for each element. We report an ultrafast quenching of the magnetocrystalline anisotropy and show that at early times the demagnetization in ferrimagnetic alloys is driven by the local transfer of angular momenta between the two exchange-coupled sublattices while the total angular momentum stays constant. In Co0.74Tb0.26 we have observed a transfer of the total angular momentum to an external bath, which is delayed by ~150 fs.

  11. Variation in Angular Velocity and Angular Acceleration of a Particle in Rectilinear Motion

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mashood, K. K.; Singh, V. A.

    2012-01-01

    We discuss the angular velocity ([image omitted]) and angular acceleration ([image omitted]) associated with a particle in rectilinear motion with constant acceleration. The discussion was motivated by an observation that students and even teachers have difficulty in ascribing rotational motion concepts to a particle when the trajectory is a…

  12. Variation in Angular Velocity and Angular Acceleration of a Particle in Rectilinear Motion

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mashood, K. K.; Singh, V. A.

    2012-01-01

    We discuss the angular velocity ([image omitted]) and angular acceleration ([image omitted]) associated with a particle in rectilinear motion with constant acceleration. The discussion was motivated by an observation that students and even teachers have difficulty in ascribing rotational motion concepts to a particle when the trajectory is a…

  13. Cosmic background anisotropy induced by isotropic, flat-spectrum gravitational-wave perturbations

    SciTech Connect

    Starobinskii, A.A.

    1985-05-01

    A calculation is made of the temperature anisotropy that would be produced in the cosmic microwave background by an isotropic, stochastic ensemble of primordial gravitational waves having a flat initial spectrum. On angular scales THETA > 2 the anisotropy autocorrelation function has practically the same multipole dependence as previously established for the case of flat-spectrum adiabatic perturbations, while on scales THETA < 1 the anisotropy becomes insignificant. Upper limits are placed on the gravitational-wave amplitude and on the expected quadrupole anisotropy.

  14. Excited D{sub s} (and Pentaquarks) in Chiral Perturbation Theory

    SciTech Connect

    Thomas Mehen

    2005-01-01

    I present results of a heavy hadron chiral perturbation theory analysis of the decays and masses of the recently discovered excited charm mesons. The present data on the electromagnetic branching ratios are consistent with heavy quark symmetry predictions and disfavor a molecular interpretation of these states. I also discuss model independent predictions for the strong decays of pentaquarks in the 10-bar representation of SU(3) which can be used to constrain the angular momentum and parity quantum numbers of these states.

  15. Perturbation-theory analysis of ionization by a chirped few-cycle attosecond pulse

    SciTech Connect

    Pronin, E. A.; Starace, Anthony F.; Peng Liangyou

    2011-07-15

    The angular distribution of electrons ionized from an atom by a chirped few-cycle attosecond pulse is analyzed using perturbation theory (PT), keeping terms in the transition amplitude up to second order in the pulse electric field. The dependence of the asymmetry in the ionized electron distributions on both the chirp and the carrier-envelope phase (CEP) of the pulse are explained using a simple analytical formula that approximates the exact PT result. This approximate formula (in which the chirp dependence is explicit) reproduces reasonably well the chirp-dependent oscillations of the electron angular distribution asymmetries found numerically by Peng et al. [Phys. Rev. A 80, 013407 (2009)]. It can also be used to determine the chirp rate of the attosecond pulse from the measured electron angular distribution asymmetry.

  16. Improved numerical projection of angular momentum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    O'Mara, Kevin; Johnson, Calvin

    2015-10-01

    Nuclear many-body states have good angular momenta, but many theoretical building blocks such as deformed Slater determinants do not. Hence one must numerically project out states of good angular momenta, usually through a computationally taxing three-dimensional integral. We took an existing code for angular-momentum projected Hartree-Fock and improved its performance, partly through judicious ordering of the loops, precomputing arrays of important combinatorics, and careful application of parallelization. We also investigated a novel inversion scheme. This work is potentially applicable to multiple approaches in many-body calculations, and should also be generalizable to particle number projection. Supported by SDSU Summer Undergraduate Research Program and by DOE Award Number DE-FG02-96ER40985.

  17. Electromagnetic angular momentum transport in Saturn's rings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goertz, C. K.; Morfill, G. E.; Ip, W.; Gruen, E.; Havnes, O.

    1986-01-01

    It is shown here that submicrometer dust particles sporadically elevated above Saturn's ring are subject to electromagnetic forces which will reduce their angular momentum inside synchronous orbit and increase it outside. When the dust is reabsorbed by the ring the angular momentum of the ring is decreased (increased) inside (outside) of synchronous orbit. For the case of the spokes in Saturn's B-ring it is estimated that the timescale for transporting ring material due to this angular momentum coupling effect is comparable to the viscous transport time or even smaller. It is suggested that the minimum in the optical depth of the B-ring at synchronous orbit is due to this effect.

  18. Energy angular momentum closed-loop guidance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Patera, Russell P.

    2015-03-01

    A novel guidance algorithm for launch vehicle ascent to the desired mission orbit is proposed. The algorithm uses total specific energy and orbital angular momentum as new state vector parameters. These parameters are ideally suited for the ascent guidance task, since the guidance algorithm steers the launch vehicle along a pre-flight optimal trajectory in energy angular momentum space. The guidance algorithm targets apogee, perigee, inclination and right ascension of ascending node. Computational complexities are avoided by eliminating time in the guidance computation and replacing it with angular momentum magnitude. As a result, vehicle acceleration, mass, thrust, length of motor burns, and staging times are also eliminated from the pitch plane guidance calculations. The algorithm does not involve launch vehicle or target state propagation, which results in minimal computational effort. Proof of concept of the new algorithm is presented using several numerical examples that illustrate performance results.

  19. Angular correlations and high energy evolution

    SciTech Connect

    Kovner, Alex; Lublinsky, Michael

    2011-11-01

    We address the question of to what extent JIMWLK evolution is capable of taking into account angular correlations in a high energy hadronic wave function. Our conclusion is that angular (and indeed other) correlations in the wave function cannot be reliably calculated without taking into account Pomeron loops in the evolution. As an example we study numerically the energy evolution of angular correlations between dipole scattering amplitudes in the framework of the large N{sub c} approximation to JIMWLK evolution (the 'projectile dipole model'). Target correlations are introduced via averaging over an (isotropic) ensemble of anisotropic initial conditions. We find that correlations disappear very quickly with rapidity even inside the saturation radius. This is in accordance with our physical picture of JIMWLK evolution. The actual correlations inside the saturation radius in the target QCD wave function, on the other hand, should remain sizable at any rapidity.

  20. Optical angular momentum in a rotating frame.

    PubMed

    Speirits, Fiona C; Lavery, Martin P J; Padgett, Miles J; Barnett, Stephen M

    2014-05-15

    It is well established that light carrying orbital angular momentum (OAM) can be used to induce a mechanical torque causing an object to spin. We consider the complementary scenario: will an observer spinning relative to the beam axis measure a change in OAM as a result of their rotational velocity? Remarkably, although a linear Doppler shift changes the linear momentum of a photon, the angular Doppler shift induces no change in the angular momentum. Further, we examine the rotational Doppler shift in frequency imparted to the incident light due to the relative motion of the beam with respect to the observer and consider what must happen to the measured wavelength if the speed of light c is to remain constant. We show specifically that the OAM of the incident beam is not affected by the rotating observer and that the measured wavelength is shifted by a factor equal and opposite to that of the frequency shift induced by the rotational Doppler effect.

  1. Angular momentum conservation in dipolar energy transfer.

    PubMed

    Guo, Dong; Knight, Troy E; McCusker, James K

    2011-12-23

    Conservation of angular momentum is a familiar tenet in science but has seldom been invoked to understand (or predict) chemical processes. We have developed a general formalism based on Wigner's original ideas concerning angular momentum conservation to interpret the photo-induced reactivity of two molecular donor-acceptor assemblies with physical properties synthetically tailored to facilitate intramolecular energy transfer. Steady-state and time-resolved spectroscopic data establishing excited-state energy transfer from a rhenium(I)-based charge-transfer state to a chromium(III) acceptor can be fully accounted for by Förster theory, whereas the corresponding cobalt(III) adduct does not undergo an analogous reaction despite having a larger cross-section for dipolar coupling. Because this pronounced difference in reactivity is easily explained within the context of the angular momentum conservation model, this relatively simple construct may provide a means for systematizing a broad range of chemical reactions.

  2. The angular electronic band structure and free particle model of aromatic molecules: High-frequency photon-induced ring current

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Öncan, Mehmet; Koç, Fatih; Şahin, Mehmet; Köksal, Koray

    2017-05-01

    This work introduces an analysis of the relationship of first-principles calculations based on DFT method with the results of free particle model for ring-shaped aromatic molecules. However, the main aim of the study is to reveal the angular electronic band structure of the ring-shaped molecules. As in the case of spherical molecules such as fullerene, it is possible to observe a parabolic dispersion of electronic states with the variation of angular quantum number in the planar ring-shaped molecules. This work also discusses the transition probabilities between the occupied and virtual states by analyzing the angular electronic band structure and the possibility of ring currents in the case of spin angular momentum (SAM) or orbital angular momentum (OAM) carrying light. Current study focuses on the benzene molecule to obtain its angular electronic band structure. The obtained electronic band structure can be considered as a useful tool to see the transition probabilities between the electronic states and possible contribution of the states to the ring currents. The photoinduced current due to the transfer of SAM into the benzene molecule has been investigated by using analytical calculations within the frame of time-dependent perturbation theory.

  3. Theoretical analyses on orbital angular momentum modes in conventional graded-index multimode fibre.

    PubMed

    Chen, Shi; Wang, Jian

    2017-06-21

    Orbital angular momentum (OAM) modes are another mode basis to represent spatial modes. There have been increasing interests in exploiting OAM modes in specialty fibres. In this paper, we present a comprehensive characterisation of OAM modes in conventional graded-index multimode fibre (MMF). 1) We synthesise the circularly polarized OAM modes by properly combining two fold degenerate cylindrical vector modes (eigenmodes) and analyse the total angular momentum, i.e. spin angular momentum and orbital angular momentum. 2) We divide all the OAM modes of the conventional graded-index MMF into 10 OAM mode groups with effective refractive index differences between different mode groups above 10(-4) enabling low-level inter-group crosstalk. 3) We study the chromatic dispersion, differential group delay, effective mode area, and nonlinearity for each OAM mode group over a wide wavelength ranging from 1520 to 1630 nm covering the whole C band and L band. 4) We discuss the performance tolerance to fibre ellipticity and bending. 5) We further address the robustness of performance against fibre perturbations including the core size, index contrast and the imperfect index profile of the practically fabricated MMFs. The obtained results may provide theoretical basis for further space-division multiplexing applications employing OAM modes in conventional graded-index MMF.

  4. Pioneering high angular resolution at GTC: FRIDA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prieto, M. A.

    2017-03-01

    FRIDA imager and integral-field spectrograph will provide the GTC community with the first diffraction-limited angular resolutions of a 10 m telescope: 25 - 40 mas in the 1 - 2.5 um range. These angular resolutions are a factor 15 improvement with respect to those of current and/or planned instruments for GTC, factor 1.5 superior to that of JWST. In this talk I will develop on science paths for FRIDA, with natural and laser guide star that illustrate the potential and unique capabilities of GTCAO+FRIDA till the arrival of the ELTs.

  5. Time-resolved orbital angular momentum spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Noyan, Mehmet A.; Kikkawa, James M.

    2015-07-20

    We introduce pump-probe magneto-orbital spectroscopy, wherein Laguerre-Gauss optical pump pulses impart orbital angular momentum to the electronic states of a material and subsequent dynamics are studied with 100 fs time resolution. The excitation uses vortex modes that distribute angular momentum over a macroscopic area determined by the spot size, and the optical probe studies the chiral imbalance of vortex modes reflected off the sample. First observations in bulk GaAs yield transients that evolve on time scales distinctly different from population and spin relaxation, as expected, but with surprisingly large lifetimes.

  6. Angular spectrum analysis in heavy ion collisions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Llanes-Estrada, Felipe J.; Muñoz Martínez, Jose L.

    2017-01-01

    Heavy Ion Collisions serve to study some features of early-universe cosmology. In this contribution we adapt data analysis frequently used to understand the Cosmic Microwave Background anisotropies (such as the Mollweide projection and the angular power spectrum) to heavy ion collisions at the LHC. We examine a few publicly available events of the ALICE collaboration under this light. Because the ALICE time projection chamber has limited coverage in rapidity and some blind angles in the transverse plane, the angular spectrum seems very influenced by the detector's acceptance.

  7. Probing Angular Correlations in Sequential Double Ionization

    SciTech Connect

    Fleischer, A.; Woerner, H. J.; Arissian, L.; Liu, L. R.; Meckel, M.; Rippert, A.; Doerner, R.; Villeneuve, D. M.; Corkum, P. B.; Staudte, A.

    2011-09-09

    We study electron correlation in sequential double ionization of noble gas atoms and HCl in intense, femtosecond laser pulses. We measure the photoelectron angular distributions of Ne{sup +} relative to the first electron in a pump-probe experiment with 8 fs, 800 nm, circularly polarized laser pulses at a peak intensity of a few 10{sup 15} W/cm{sup 2}. Using a linear-linear pump-probe setup, we further study He, Ar, and HCl. We find a clear angular correlation between the two ionization steps in the sequential double ionization intensity regime.

  8. Absolute measurement of hyperspectral and angular reflection.

    PubMed

    Hwang, Jisoo

    2014-09-20

    A new instrument for absolute measurement of hyperspectral and angular reflection is presented. The instrument determines absolute values of angular reflection quantities in a wavelength range from 380 to 780 nm with a 3 nm spectral resolution by using a white source and a CCD-based spectroradiometer. Through uncertainty evaluation, the measurement uncertainty is determined as 1.4%-2.9% (k=2) for white diffuse material of Spectralon. The gonioreflectometric determination and an integrating-sphere-based reflection measurement traceable to KRISS spectral reflectance scale are compared by determining hemispherical reflectance, which results in agreement in their uncertainties.

  9. On the vector model of angular momentum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saari, Peeter

    2016-09-01

    Instead of (or in addition to) the common vector diagram with cones, we propose to visualize the peculiarities of quantum mechanical angular momentum by a completely quantized 3D model. It spotlights the discrete eigenvalues and noncommutativity of components of angular momentum and corresponds to outcomes of measurements—real or computer-simulated. The latter can be easily realized by an interactive worksheet of a suitable program package of algebraic calculations. The proposed complementary method of visualization helps undergraduate students to better understand the counterintuitive properties of this quantum mechanical observable.

  10. Angular momentum paradoxes with solenoids and monopoles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lipkin, Harry J.; Peshkin, Murray

    1982-12-01

    The Poynting vector produced by crossing the Coulomb field from a charged particle with a distant external magnetic field gives rise to a physical angular momentum which must be included in applications of angular momentum conservation and quantization. Simple examples show how the neglect of the return flux in an infinite solenoid or in two-dimensional models can lead to unphysical effects, how the Dirac charge quantization is obtained and can be modified by the presence of additional long range forces, and why the origin must be excluded in describing the motion of a point charge in the field of a fixed point monopole.

  11. Angular and Linear Momentum of Excited Ferromagnets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yan, Peng; Kamra, Akashdeep; Cao, Yunshan; Bauer, Gerrit

    2014-03-01

    The angular momentum vector of a Heisenberg ferromagnet with isotropic exchange interaction is conserved, while under uniaxial crystalline anisotropy the projection of the total spin along the easy axis is a constant of motion. Using Noether's theorem, we prove that these conservation laws persist in the presence of dipole-dipole interactions. However, spin and orbital angular momentum are not conserved separately anymore. We also define the linear momentum of ferromagnetic textures. We illustrate the general principles with special reference to spin transfer torques and identify the emergence of a non-adiabatic effective field acting on domain walls in ferromagnetic insulators

  12. Angular gyrus syndrome mimicking depressive pseudodementia.

    PubMed

    Nagaratnam, Nages; Phan, Tai Anh; Barnett, Claire; Ibrahim, Neamat

    2002-09-01

    A 67-year-old left-handed woman with a diagnosis of pseudodementia was being treated for depression with little benefit. Neuropsychological evaluations revealed features of angular gyrus syndrome, namely, agraphia, alexia, Gerstmann's syndrome and behavioural manifestations such as depression, poor memory, frustration and irritability. A computed tomographic scan showed a right occipito-temporal infarction, which had occurred 18 months earlier. The patient demonstrated aspects of language dysfunction associated with the syndrome and showed reversed lateralization of cerebral functions. Recognizing and distinguishing between angular gyrus syndrome and depression is important because the appropriate therapies differ. The use of the term pseudodementia can be misleading.

  13. Effect of Orbital Angular Momentum on Valence-Quark Helicity Distributions

    SciTech Connect

    Harut Avakian; Stanley J. Brodsky; Alexandre Deur; Feng Yuan

    2007-08-01

    We study the quark helicity distributions at large x in perturbative QCD, taking into account contributions from the valence Fock states of the nucleon which have nonzero orbital angular momentum. These states are necessary to have a nonzero anomalous magnetic moment. We find that the quark orbital angular momentum contributes a large logarithm to the negative helicity quark distributions in addition to its power behavior, scaling as (1-x)^5\\log^2(1-x) in the limit of x\\to 1. Our analysis shows that the ratio of the polarized over unpolarized down quark distributions, \\Delta d/d, will still approach 1 in this limit. By comparing with the experimental data, we find that this ratio should cross zero at x\\approx 0.75.

  14. Angular correlations in the two-photon decay of heliumlike heavy ions

    SciTech Connect

    Surzhykov, A.; Fratini, F.; Volotka, A.; Santos, J. P.; Indelicato, P.; Plunien, G.; Stoehlker, Th.; Fritzsche, S.

    2010-04-15

    The two-photon decay of heavy, helium-like ions is investigated based on second-order perturbation theory and Dirac's relativistic equation. Special attention has been paid to the angular emission of the two photons (i.e., how the angular correlation function depends on the shell structure of the ions in their initial and final states). Moreover, the effects from the (electric and magnetic) nondipole terms in the expansion of the electron-photon interaction are discussed. Detailed calculations have been carried out for the two-photon decay of the 1s2s {sup 1}S{sub 0}, 1s2s {sup 3}S{sub 1}, and 1s2p {sup 3}P{sub 0} states of helium-like Xe{sup 52+}, Au{sup 77+}, and U{sup 90+} ions.

  15. Angular Coefficients Measurement of Drell-Yan Dielectron Pairs at CDF

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, Jiyeon; CDF Collaboration

    2011-04-01

    We report on the measurement of the angular distributions of final state electrons in p p ->γ* / Z ->e+ e events produced in the Z boson region mass range of 66 to 116 GeV/c2 from 2.1 fb-1 of proton anti-proton collisions at √{ s} = 1 . 96 TeV taken by the CDF detector at Fermilab. The transverse momentum (PT) dependent angular coefficients A0, A2, A3, and A4 are compared with several predictions based on Quantum Chromodymnamics (QCD). The PT dependence of A0 and A2 is in agreement with the predictions of perturbative QCD and shows that the production of Z bosons at large PT proceeds via a combination of the quark-antiquark annihilation and the quark-gluon Compton processes. We find a good agreement with the Lam-Tung relation (A0 = A2), which implies that the spin of the gluon is 1.

  16. BRST quantization of cosmological perturbations

    SciTech Connect

    Armendariz-Picon, Cristian; Şengör, Gizem

    2016-11-08

    BRST quantization is an elegant and powerful method to quantize theories with local symmetries. In this article we study the Hamiltonian BRST quantization of cosmological perturbations in a universe dominated by a scalar field, along with the closely related quantization method of Dirac. We describe how both formalisms apply to perturbations in a time-dependent background, and how expectation values of gauge-invariant operators can be calculated in the in-in formalism. Our analysis focuses mostly on the free theory. By appropriate canonical transformations we simplify and diagonalize the free Hamiltonian. BRST quantization in derivative gauges allows us to dramatically simplify the structure of the propagators, whereas Dirac quantization, which amounts to quantization in synchronous gauge, dispenses with the need to introduce ghosts and preserves the locality of the gauge-fixed action.

  17. BRST quantization of cosmological perturbations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Armendariz-Picon, Cristian; Şengör, Gizem

    2016-11-01

    BRST quantization is an elegant and powerful method to quantize theories with local symmetries. In this article we study the Hamiltonian BRST quantization of cosmological perturbations in a universe dominated by a scalar field, along with the closely related quantization method of Dirac. We describe how both formalisms apply to perturbations in a time-dependent background, and how expectation values of gauge-invariant operators can be calculated in the in-in formalism. Our analysis focuses mostly on the free theory. By appropriate canonical transformations we simplify and diagonalize the free Hamiltonian. BRST quantization in derivative gauges allows us to dramatically simplify the structure of the propagators, whereas Dirac quantization, which amounts to quantization in synchronous gauge, dispenses with the need to introduce ghosts and preserves the locality of the gauge-fixed action.

  18. The natural and perturbed troposphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stewart, R. W.; Hameed, S.; Pinto, J.

    1978-01-01

    A quantitative assessment of the chemical and climatic effects of industrial emissions into the atmosphere requires an understanding of the complex interactions of species within the atmosphere and of the atmosphere with other physical systems such as the oceans, lithosphere, and biosphere. The concentration of a particular species is determined by competition between various production and loss processes. The abundances of tropospheric gases are examined. The reactions of the members of the oxygen group are considered along with the models which have been developed to describe the involved relationships. Attention is also given to the natural carbon cycle, perturbations to the carbon cycle, the natural nitrogen cycle, perturbations to the nitrogen cycle, the hydrogen group, the sulfur group, and the halogen group.

  19. Angular asymmetry of low-energy electron emission in ion-atom collisions

    SciTech Connect

    Fainstein, P.D.; Gulyas, L.; Martin, F.; Salin, A.

    1996-05-01

    We show that two factors contribute to the forward-backward angular asymmetry in low-energy electron emission by ion impact: the deviation of the target potential from a pure Coulomb potential and the two-center effect. We perform calculations with various theories that include these two effects: the continuum-distorted-wave{endash}eikonal-initial-state (CDW-EIS) and the CDW approximations based on distorted-wave perturbation theory and a close-coupling calculation using a discrete representation of the continuum. The various theories give consistent results on the asymmetry but discrepancies remain between theory and experiment. {copyright} {ital 1996 The American Physical Society.}

  20. Angular distribution of isothermal expansions of non-quasi-neutral plasmas into a vacuum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yongsheng, Huang; Xiaojiao, Duan; Yijin, Shi; Xiaofei, Lan; Zhixin, Tan; Naiyan, Wang; Xiuzhang, Tang; Yexi, He

    2008-04-01

    A two dimensional planar model is developed for self-similar isothermal expansions of non-quasi-neutral plasmas into a vacuum of solid targets heated by ultraintense laser pulses. The angular ion distribution and the dependence of the maximum ion velocity on laser parameters and target thicknesses are predicted. Considering the self-generated magnetic field of plasma beams as a perturbation, the ion energy on edge at the ion opening angle has an increase of 2% relative to that on the front center. Therefore, the self-generated magnetic field of plasma beams is not large enough to interpret for the ring structures.

  1. Perturbation growth in accreting filaments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clarke, S. D.; Whitworth, A. P.; Hubber, D. A.

    2016-05-01

    We use smoothed particle hydrodynamic simulations to investigate the growth of perturbations in infinitely long filaments as they form and grow by accretion. The growth of these perturbations leads to filament fragmentation and the formation of cores. Most previous work on this subject has been confined to the growth and fragmentation of equilibrium filaments and has found that there exists a preferential fragmentation length-scale which is roughly four times the filament's diameter. Our results show a more complicated dispersion relation with a series of peaks linking perturbation wavelength and growth rate. These are due to gravo-acoustic oscillations along the longitudinal axis during the sub-critical phase of growth. The positions of the peaks in growth rate have a strong dependence on both the mass accretion rate onto the filament and the temperature of the gas. When seeded with a multiwavelength density power spectrum, there exists a clear preferred core separation equal to the largest peak in the dispersion relation. Our results allow one to estimate a minimum age for a filament which is breaking up into regularly spaced fragments, as well as an average accretion rate. We apply the model to observations of filaments in Taurus by Tafalla & Hacar and find accretion rates consistent with those estimated by Palmeirim et al.

  2. R evolution: Improving perturbative QCD

    SciTech Connect

    Hoang, Andre H.; Jain, Ambar; Stewart, Iain W.; Scimemi, Ignazio

    2010-07-01

    Perturbative QCD results in the MS scheme can be dramatically improved by switching to a scheme that accounts for the dominant power law dependence on the factorization scale in the operator product expansion. We introduce the ''MSR scheme'' which achieves this in a Lorentz and gauge invariant way and has a very simple relation to MS. Results in MSR depend on a cutoff parameter R, in addition to the {mu} of MS. R variations can be used to independently estimate (i.) the size of power corrections, and (ii.) higher-order perturbative corrections (much like {mu} in MS). We give two examples at three-loop order, the ratio of mass splittings in the B*-B and D*-D systems, and the Ellis-Jaffe sum rule as a function of momentum transfer Q in deep inelastic scattering. Comparing to data, the perturbative MSR results work well even for Q{approx}1 GeV, and power corrections are reduced compared to MS.

  3. Oral medicine in practice: angular cheilitis.

    PubMed

    Lamey, P J; Lewis, M A

    1989-07-08

    In a series of twelve articles the authors aim to cover the more common oral medicine problems likely to be encountered in dental practice. Whenever possible, clinical photographs have been used to illustrate important points, and the text is deliberately succinct and without references. In the first article, the pathogenesis, investigation and management of angular cheilitis is reviewed.

  4. Angular radiation transfer in inhomogeneous dispersive media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saad, E. A.; El Ghazaly, A. A.; Krim, M. S. Abdel

    1988-10-01

    The equation of radiative transfer for an inhomogeneous dispersive finite medium subject to general boundary conditions is solved. The Padé approximation technique is used to calculate the angular distribution of radiation. Numerical results for the [0/1] Padé approximant lead to numerical results that compare with the exact results.

  5. Inclusion of angular momentum in FREYA

    SciTech Connect

    Randrup, Jørgen; Vogt, Ramona

    2015-05-18

    The event-by-event fission model FREYA generates large samples of complete fission events from which any observable can extracted, including fluctuations of the observables and the correlations between them. We describe here how FREYA was recently refined to include angular momentum throughout. Subsequently we present some recent results for both neutron and photon observables.

  6. Angular distribution of turbulence in wave space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Coleman, G.; Ferziger, J. H.; Bertoglio, J. P.

    1987-01-01

    An alternative to the one-point closure model for turbulence, the large eddy simulation (LES), together with its more exact relative, direct numerical simulation (DNS) are discussed. These methods are beginning to serve as partial substitutes for turbulence experiments. The eddy damped quasi-normal Markovian (EDQNM) theory is reviewed. Angular distribution of the converted data was examined in relationship to EDQNM.

  7. A Novel Permanent Magnetic Angular Acceleration Sensor.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Hao; Feng, Hao

    2015-07-03

    Angular acceleration is an important parameter for status monitoring and fault diagnosis of rotary machinery. Therefore, we developed a novel permanent magnetic angular acceleration sensor, which is without rotation angle limitations and could directly measure the instantaneous angular acceleration of the rotating system. The sensor rotor only needs to be coaxially connected with the rotating system, which enables convenient sensor installation. For the cup structure of the sensor rotor, it has a relatively small rotational inertia. Due to the unique mechanical structure of the sensor, the output signal of the sensor can be directed without a slip ring, which avoids signal weakening effect. In this paper, the operating principle of the sensor is described, and simulated using finite element method. The sensitivity of the sensor is calibrated by torsional pendulum and angle sensor, yielding an experimental result of about 0.88 mV/(rad·s(-2)). Finally, the angular acceleration of the actual rotating system has been tested, using both a single-phase asynchronous motor and a step motor. Experimental result confirms the operating principle of the sensor and indicates that the sensor has good practicability.

  8. Heteromodal conceptual processing in the angular gyrus

    PubMed Central

    Bonner, Michael F.; Peelle, Jonathan E.; Cook, Philip A.; Grossman, Murray

    2013-01-01

    Concepts bind together the features commonly associated with objects and events to form networks in long-term semantic memory. These conceptual networks are the basis of human knowledge and underlie perception, imagination, and the ability to communicate about experiences and the contents of the environment. Although it is often assumed that this distributed semantic information is integrated in higher-level heteromodal association cortices, open questions remain about the role and anatomic basis of heteromodal representations in semantic memory. Here we used combined neuroimaging evidence from functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) and diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) to characterize the cortical networks underlying concept representation. Using a lexical decision task, we examined the processing of concepts in four semantic categories that varied on their sensory-motor feature associations (sight, sound, manipulation, and abstract). We found that the angular gyrus was activated across all categories regardless of their modality-specific feature associations, consistent with a heteromodal account for the angular gyrus. Exploratory analyses suggested that categories with weighted sensory-motor features additionally recruited modality-specific association cortices. Furthermore, DTI tractography identified white matter tracts connecting these regions of modality-specific functional activation with the angular gyrus. These findings are consistent with a distributed semantic network that includes a heteromodal, integrative component in the angular gyrus in combination with sensory-motor feature representations in modality-specific association cortices. PMID:23333416

  9. Size, angular momentum and mass for objects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anglada, Pablo; Gabach-Clement, M. E.; Ortiz, Omar E.

    2017-06-01

    We obtain a geometrical inequality involving the ADM mass, the angular momentum and the size of an ordinary, axially symmetric object. We use the monotonicity of the Geroch quasi-local energy on 2-surfaces along the inverse mean curvature flow. We also compute numerical examples to test the robustness of our hypotheses and results

  10. ANGULAR MOMENTUM ACQUISITION IN GALAXY HALOS

    SciTech Connect

    Stewart, Kyle R.; Brooks, Alyson M.; Bullock, James S.; Maller, Ariyeh H.; Diemand, Juerg; Wadsley, James; Moustakas, Leonidas A.

    2013-05-20

    We use high-resolution cosmological hydrodynamic simulations to study the angular momentum acquisition of gaseous halos around Milky-Way-sized galaxies. We find that cold mode accreted gas enters a galaxy halo with {approx}70% more specific angular momentum than dark matter averaged over cosmic time (though with a very large dispersion). In fact, we find that all matter has a higher spin parameter when measured at accretion than when averaged over the entire halo lifetime, and is well characterized by {lambda} {approx} 0.1, at accretion. Combined with the fact that cold flow gas spends a relatively short time (1-2 dynamical times) in the halo before sinking to the center, this naturally explains why cold flow halo gas has a specific angular momentum much higher than that of the halo and often forms ''cold flow disks.'' We demonstrate that the higher angular momentum of cold flow gas is related to the fact that it tends to be accreted along filaments.

  11. γ - γ Angular Correlation Measurements With GRIFFIN

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maclean, Andrew; Griffin Collaboration

    2015-10-01

    When an excited nuclear state emits successive γ-rays causing a γ - γ cascade an anisotropy is found in the spatial distribution of γ2 with respect to γ1. Defining the direction of γ1 as the z-axis, the intermediate level, in general will have an uneven distribution of m-states. This causes an anisotropy in the angular correlation of the second γ-ray with respect to the first. These angular correlations are expressed by the W (θ) that depends on numerical coefficients described by the sequence of spin-parity values for the nuclear states involved, the multipolarities and mixing ratios. Angular correlations can be used for the assignment of spins and parities for the nuclear states, and thus provide a powerful means to elucidate the structure of nuclei far from stability through β - γ - γ coincidence measurements. In order to explore the sensitivity of the new 16 clover-detector GRIFFIN γ-ray spectrometer at TRIUMF-ISAC to such γ - γ angular correlations, and to optimize its performance for these measurements we have studied a well known γ - γ cascade from 60Co decay through both experimental measurements and Geant4 simulation. Results will be shown in this talk. Work supported by the Canada Foundation for Innovation, the Natural Sciences and Engineering Research Council of Canada and the National Research Council of Canada.

  12. Optical angular momentum: Multipole transitions and photonics

    SciTech Connect

    Andrews, David L.

    2010-03-15

    The premise that multipolar decay should produce photons uniquely imprinted with a measurably corresponding angular momentum is shown in general to be untrue. To assume a one-to-one correlation between the transition multipoles involved in source decay and detector excitation is to impose a generally unsupportable one-to-one correlation between the multipolar form of emission transition and a multipolar character for the detected field. It is specifically proven impossible to determine without ambiguity, by use of any conventional detector, and for any photon emitted through the nondipolar decay of an atomic excited state, a unique multipolar character for the transition associated with its generation. Consistent with the angular quantum uncertainty principle, removal of a detector from the immediate vicinity of the source produces a decreasing angular uncertainty in photon propagation direction, reflected in an increasing range of integer values for the measured angular momentum. In such a context it follows that when the decay of an electronic excited state occurs by an electric quadrupolar transition, for example, any assumption that the radiation so produced is conveyed in the form of 'quadrupole photons' is experimentally unverifiable. The results of the general proof based on irreducible tensor analysis invite experimental verification, and they signify certain limitations on quantum optical data transmission.

  13. A Novel Permanent Magnetic Angular Acceleration Sensor

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Hao; Feng, Hao

    2015-01-01

    Angular acceleration is an important parameter for status monitoring and fault diagnosis of rotary machinery. Therefore, we developed a novel permanent magnetic angular acceleration sensor, which is without rotation angle limitations and could directly measure the instantaneous angular acceleration of the rotating system. The sensor rotor only needs to be coaxially connected with the rotating system, which enables convenient sensor installation. For the cup structure of the sensor rotor, it has a relatively small rotational inertia. Due to the unique mechanical structure of the sensor, the output signal of the sensor can be directed without a slip ring, which avoids signal weakening effect. In this paper, the operating principle of the sensor is described, and simulated using finite element method. The sensitivity of the sensor is calibrated by torsional pendulum and angle sensor, yielding an experimental result of about 0.88 mV/(rad·s−2). Finally, the angular acceleration of the actual rotating system has been tested, using both a single-phase asynchronous motor and a step motor. Experimental result confirms the operating principle of the sensor and indicates that the sensor has good practicability. PMID:26151217

  14. Angular-momentum-bearing modes in fission

    SciTech Connect

    Moretto, L.G.; Peaslee, G.F.; Wozniak, G.J.

    1989-03-01

    The angular-momentum-bearing degrees of freedom involved in the fission process are identified and their influence on experimental observables is discussed. The excitation of these modes is treated in the ''thermal'' limit, and the resulting distributions of observables are calculated. Experiments demonstrating the role of these modes are presented and discussed. 61 refs., 12 figs.

  15. Multi-state complex angular momentum residues

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thylwe, Karl-Erik

    2006-09-01

    A relation between a multi-state complex angular momentum (CAM) pole residue and the corresponding CAM-state wavefunction is derived for a real symmetric potential matrix. The result generalizes a residue formula available for single-channel atomical collision systems and it is based on a diagonalization of the S matrix together with the use of exact Wronskian relations.

  16. Analytical Study of Periodic Solutions on Perturbed Equatorial Two-Body Problem

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abouelmagd, Elbaz I.; Mortari, Daniele; Selim, Hadia H.

    2015-12-01

    This paper presents analytical derivations to study periodic solutions for the two-body problem perturbed by the first zonal harmonic parameter. In particular, three different semianalytical approaches to solve this problem have been studied: (1) the classic perturbation theory, (2) the Lindstedt-Poincaré technique, and (3) the Krylov-Bogoliubov-Mitropolsky method. In addition, the numerical integration by Runge-Kutta algorithm is established. However, the numerical comparison tests show that by increasing the value of angular momentum the solutions provided by Lindstedt-Poincaré and Krylov-Bogoliubov-Mitropolsky methods become similar, and they provide almost identical results using a smaller value for the perturbed parameter which quantify the dynamical flattening of the main body, the Krylov-Bogoliubov-Mitropolsky provides more accurate results to design elliptical periodic solutions than Lindstedt-Poincaré technique when the perturbed parameter has a relatively large value, regardless of the value of angular momentum. This study can be applied to equatorial orbits to obtain closed-form analytical solutions.

  17. Weak lensing generated by vector perturbations and detectability of cosmic strings

    SciTech Connect

    Yamauchi, Daisuke; Namikawa, Toshiya; Taruya, Atsushi E-mail: namikawa@utap.phys.s.u-tokyo.ac.jp

    2012-10-01

    We study the observational signature of vector metric perturbations through the effect of weak gravitational lensing. In the presence of vector perturbations, the non-vanishing signals for B-mode cosmic shear and curl-mode deflection angle, which have never appeared in the case of scalar metric perturbations, naturally arise. Solving the geodesic and geodesic deviation equations, we drive the full-sky formulas for angular power spectra of weak lensing signals, and give the explicit expressions for E-/B-mode cosmic shear and gradient-/curl-mode deflection angle. As a possible source for seeding vector perturbations, we then consider a cosmic string network, and discuss its detectability from upcoming weak lensing and CMB measurements. Based on the formulas and a simple model for cosmic string network, we calculate the angular power spectra and expected signal-to-noise ratios for the B-mode cosmic shear and curl-mode deflection angle. We find that the weak lensing signals are enhanced for a smaller intercommuting probability of the string network, P, and they are potentially detectable from the upcoming cosmic shear and CMB lensing observations. For P ∼ 10{sup −1}, the minimum detectable tension of the cosmic string will be down to Gμ ∼ 5 × 10{sup −8}. With a theoretically inferred smallest value P ∼ 10{sup −3}, we could even detect the string with Gμ ∼ 5 × 10{sup −10}.

  18. Gravitational perturbations of the Schwarzschild spacetime: A practical covariant and gauge-invariant formalism

    SciTech Connect

    Martel, Karl; Poisson, Eric

    2005-05-15

    We present a formalism to study the metric perturbations of the Schwarzschild spacetime. The formalism is gauge invariant, and it is also covariant under two-dimensional coordinate transformations that leave the angular coordinates unchanged. The formalism is applied to the typical problem of calculating the gravitational waves produced by material sources moving in the Schwarzschild spacetime. We examine the radiation escaping to future null infinity as well as the radiation crossing the event horizon. The waveforms, the energy radiated, and the angular-momentum radiated can all be expressed in terms of two gauge-invariant scalar functions that satisfy one-dimensional wave equations. The first is the Zerilli-Moncrief function, which satisfies the Zerilli equation, and which represents the even-parity sector of the perturbation. The second is the Cunningham-Price-Moncrief function, which satisfies the Regge-Wheeler equation, and which represents the odd-parity sector of the perturbation. The covariant forms of these wave equations are presented here, complete with covariant source terms that are derived from the stress-energy tensor of the matter responsible for the perturbation.

  19. Angular vibration measurement using grating and laser interferometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Li; Peng, Jun

    2006-06-01

    Primary angular acceleration calibration standard is developed by CIMM to generate standard rotational angle, angular velocity and angular acceleration, which are traceable to the International System of Units (SI). It can be used to calibrate angular transducers, i.e. angular accelerometer, angular velocity transducer, and rotational angle transducer to obtain amplitude sensitivity and phase shift by sinusoidal vibration. The measurement systems based on grating and laser interferometers are introduced in this paper. The measurement system based on PXI bus instrument is used to control the angular exciter, measure the output signal of the laser interferometers and the transducer to be calibrated synchronously. The methods for calculating the amplitude and phase of sinusoidal angular movement are investigated and high performance has been achieved. It shows the standard can be used in angular movement calibration in the frequency range from 0.1Hz to 200Hz.

  20. Beam Quality Deterioration Due to Angular Dispersion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mokhov, Sergiy

    2014-03-01

    Laser pulses are often manipulated by different optical elements in free space for purposes of filtering, stretching/compression, shaping, and splitting. This is due to the impossibility of using fiber optical components to withstand high energy pulses. The beam quality factor for free-space propagating optical beams, M2, is typically used to characterize the performance of optical elements. Optical element which preserves M2 in the CW regime may in fact worsen M2 for pulses with the same time-averaged power if this optical element exhibits dispersion in the spectral range of the pulse's bandwidth. Basic dispersive effects can be expressed in terms of aberration-free monochromatic beam optics, and they are longitudinal shift of the waist position, transversal shift of the waist center and angular shift of the propagation direction with wavelength tuning. The first two effects are negligible for optical elements much shorter than the Rayleigh length. We have found an analytical expression for the deterioration of M2 from unity due to angular dispersion for a test pulse which has transverse Gaussian beam profile. This expression depends on both the transverse size of the pulse and the mean square variation of the spectral-angular characteristic of the optical element averaged with the spectral weight distribution of the pulse. In particular, with decreasing of beam size, the M2 deteriorates less because the spectral-angular variation of the propagation direction is mitigated by increasing beam divergence due to diffraction. In our judgment, an optical element should be characterized by its angular dispersion properties rather than measurements of M2.

  1. Localizing the angular momentum of linear gravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Butcher, Luke M.; Lasenby, Anthony; Hobson, Michael

    2012-10-01

    In a previous article [L. M. Butcher, , Phys. Rev. D 82, 104040 (2010).], we derived an energy-momentum tensor for linear gravity that exhibited positive energy density and causal energy flux. Here we extend this framework by localizing the angular momentum of the linearized gravitational field, deriving a gravitational spin tensor which possesses similarly desirable properties. By examining the local exchange of angular momentum (between matter and gravity) we find that gravitational intrinsic spin is localized, separately from “orbital” angular momentum, in terms of a gravitational spin tensor. This spin tensor is then uniquely determined by requiring that it obey two simple physically motivated algebraic conditions. Firstly, the spin of an arbitrary (harmonic-gauge) gravitational plane wave is required to flow in the direction of propagation of the wave. Secondly, the spin tensor of any transverse-traceless gravitational field is required to be traceless. (The second condition ensures that local field redefinitions suffice to cast our gravitational energy-momentum tensor and spin tensor as sources of gravity in a quadratic approximation to general relativity.) Additionally, the following properties arise in the spin tensor spontaneously: all transverse-traceless fields have purely spatial spin, and any field generated by a static distribution of matter will carry no spin at all. Following the structure of our previous paper, we then examine the (spatial) angular momentum exchanged between the gravitational field and an infinitesimal detector, and develop a microaveraging procedure that renders the process gauge-invariant. The exchange of nonspatial angular momentum (i.e., moment of energy) is also analyzed, leading us to conclude that a gravitational wave can displace the center of mass of the detector; this conclusion is also confirmed by a “first principles” treatment of the system. Finally, we discuss the spin carried by a gravitational plane wave.

  2. Miniaturized photoelectric angular sensor with simplified design

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dumbravescu, Niculae; Schiaua, Silviu

    1999-09-01

    In building the movable elements of robots, peripheral devices and measuring apparata, increasing the resolution of the angular sensor systems, based on incremental rotary encoders, is essential, together with decreasing the complexity, dimensions and weight. Especially when the angular sensor is integrated in a measuring system, belonging to a programmed light airplane for surveillance, the key issue is to reduce both dimensions and weight. This can be done using a simplified design, which consists in the following solutions: replacement of the fragile Cr on glass substrate, 1.5 mm thick (normally used for the fabrication of incremental disks), with light Cr on polycarbonate substrate, with only 0.15 mm thick; the absence of collimating optics (based on microlenses, used in IR emitter-photocell receiver assembly), as a result of the good coupling efficiency (due to the possible approaching of these elements at minimum 0.45 mm); the shrinkage of the disk's diameters to only 14 mm; the use of surface mounting devices and the related surface mounting technology, enabling to reduce dimensions and weight. The maximum number of slits on a 14 mm diameter dividing disk, usually obtained in a Cr on polycarbonate version, being approx. 1000, no problem occurs in our case, for 360 slits. The requested angular resolution (only 0.5 degrees for the light airplane), using the whole classical '4x digital multiplication' is not necessary, but a lower one of only 2x, resulting in a simplified electronics. The proposed design permitted, that an original arrangement, for building a small size, lightweight, heavy-duty incremental transducer based angular sensor system, to be obtained, useful not only in avionics, but also in robotics, or other special applications. Besides, extending the number of fixed gratings (masks) allows, that many primary signals to be derived, and a further increase in resolution of even 6 angular minutes to be obtained from the initial 360 slits.

  3. Redshift-space distortions with wide angular separations

    SciTech Connect

    Reimberg, Paulo; Bernardeau, Francis; Pitrou, Cyril E-mail: francis.bernardeau@cea.fr

    2016-01-01

    Redshift-space distortions are generally considered in the plane parallel limit, where the angular separation between the two sources can be neglected. Given that galaxy catalogues now cover large fractions of the sky, it becomes necessary to consider them in a formalism which takes into account the wide angle separations. In this article we derive an operational formula for the matter correlators in the Newtonian limit to be used in actual data sets. In order to describe the geometrical nature of the wide angle RSD effect on Fourier space, we extend the formalism developed in configuration space to Fourier space without relying on a plane-parallel approximation, but under the extra assumption of no bias evolution. We then recover the plane-parallel limit not only in configuration space where the geometry is simpler, but also in Fourier space, and we exhibit the first corrections that should be included in large surveys as a perturbative expansion over the plane-parallel results. We finally compare our results to existing literature, and show explicitly how they are related.

  4. Modulations of perturbed KdV wavetrains

    SciTech Connect

    Forest, M.G.; Mclaughlin, D.W.

    1984-04-01

    The modulations of N-phase Korteweg-de Vries (KdV) wavetrains in the presence of external perturbations is investigated. An invariant representation of these modulation equations in terms of differentials on a Riemann surface is derived from averaged perturbed conservation laws. In particular, the explicit dependence of the representation on the external perturbation is obtained. This invariant representation is used to place the equation in a Riemann diagonal form, whose dependence on the external perturbation is explicitly computed. 15 references.

  5. Non-perturbative twist of attosecond extreme-ultraviolet vortex beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hernández García, Carlos; Rego, Laura; San Román, Julio; Picón, Antonio; Plaja, Luis

    2017-02-01

    Extreme-ultraviolet (EUV) attosecond vortices carrying orbital angular momentum (OAM) are produced through high-order harmonic generation (HHG) from the nonlinear conversion of infrared twisted beams. While previous works demonstrated a linear scaling law of the vortex OAM content with the harmonic order, an unexpectedly rich scenario for the OAM buildup appears when HHG is driven by a vortex combination. The non-perturbative nature of HHG increases the OAM content of the attosecond vortices when the driving field presents an azimuthally varying intensity profile. We theoretically explore the underlying mechanisms for this diversity and disentangle the perturbative and non-perturbative nature in the generation of EUV attosecond twisted through numerical simulations.

  6. Bringing "The Moth" to Light: A Planet-Perturbed Disk Scenario for the HD 61005 System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Esposito, Thomas M.; Fitzgerald, Michael P.; Graham, James R.; Kalas, Paul G.; Millar-Blanchaer, Max; Wang, Jason

    2015-12-01

    The HD 61005 debris disk ("The Moth") is notable for its unusual swept-back "wing" morphology, brightness asymmetries, dust ring offset, and a cleared region inside of ~50 AU. Here we present Gemini Planet Imager data that reveal this disk in scattered light down to Jupiter-like separations of <10 AU. Complementary W.M. Keck NIRC2/AO J,H,K imaging shows the disk's outer regions with high angular resolution. Based on these data, we propose a new explanation for the disk's features: that of an unseen planet on an inclined, eccentric orbit perturbing the disk material. To test this scenario, we used secular perturbation theory to construct 3-D dust distributions that informed 2-D scattered-light models, which we then compared with the data via an MCMC analysis. We found that the best-fit models reproduced morphological disk features similar to those observed, indicating that the perturber scenario is plausible for this system.

  7. Reconstructing cosmological matter perturbations using standard candles and rulers

    SciTech Connect

    Alam, Ujjaini; Sahni, Varun; Starobinsky, Alexei A

    2008-01-01

    For a large class of dark energy (DE) models, for which the effective gravitational constant is a constant and there is no direct exchange of energy between DE and dark matter (DM), knowledge of the expansion history suffices to reconstruct the growth factor of linearized density perturbations in the non-relativistic matter component on scales much smaller than the Hubble distance. In this paper, we develop a non-parametric method for extracting information about the perturbative growth factor from data pertaining to the luminosity or angular size distances. A comparison of the reconstructed density contrast with observations of large-scale structure and gravitational lensing can help distinguish DE models such as the cosmological constant and quintessence from models based on modified gravity theories as well as models in which DE and DM are either unified or interact directly. We show that for current supernovae (SNe) data, the linear growth factor at z = 0.3 can be constrained to 5% and the linear growth rate to 6%. With future SNe data, such as expected from the Joint Dark Energy Mission, we may be able to constrain the growth factor to 2%-3% and the growth rate to 3%-4% at z = 0.3 with this unbiased, model-independent reconstruction method. For future baryon acoustic oscillation data which would deliver measurements of both the angular diameter distance and the Hubble parameter, it should be possible to constrain the growth factor at z = 2.5%-9%. These constraints grow tighter with the errors on the data sets. With a large quantity of data expected in the next few years, this method can emerge as a competitive tool for distinguishing between different models of dark energy.

  8. RECONSTRUCTING COSMOLOGICAL MATTER PERTURBATIONS USING STANDARD CANDLES AND RULERS

    SciTech Connect

    Alam, Ujjaini; Sahni, Varun; Starobinsky, Alexei A. E-mail: varun@iucaa.ernet.i

    2009-10-20

    For a large class of dark energy (DE) models, for which the effective gravitational constant is a constant and there is no direct exchange of energy between DE and dark matter (DM), knowledge of the expansion history suffices to reconstruct the growth factor of linearized density perturbations in the non-relativistic matter component on scales much smaller than the Hubble distance. In this paper, we develop a non-parametric method for extracting information about the perturbative growth factor from data pertaining to the luminosity or angular size distances. A comparison of the reconstructed density contrast with observations of large-scale structure and gravitational lensing can help distinguish DE models such as the cosmological constant and quintessence from models based on modified gravity theories as well as models in which DE and DM are either unified or interact directly. We show that for current supernovae (SNe) data, the linear growth factor at z = 0.3 can be constrained to 5% and the linear growth rate to 6%. With future SNe data, such as expected from the Joint Dark Energy Mission, we may be able to constrain the growth factor to 2%-3% and the growth rate to 3%-4% at z = 0.3 with this unbiased, model-independent reconstruction method. For future baryon acoustic oscillation data which would deliver measurements of both the angular diameter distance and the Hubble parameter, it should be possible to constrain the growth factor at z = 2.5%-9%. These constraints grow tighter with the errors on the data sets. With a large quantity of data expected in the next few years, this method can emerge as a competitive tool for distinguishing between different models of dark energy.

  9. Geometric Hamiltonian structures and perturbation theory

    SciTech Connect

    Omohundro, S.

    1984-08-01

    We have been engaged in a program of investigating the Hamiltonian structure of the various perturbation theories used in practice. We describe the geometry of a Hamiltonian structure for non-singular perturbation theory applied to Hamiltonian systems on symplectic manifolds and the connection with singular perturbation techniques based on the method of averaging.

  10. Offset tolerance of an orbital angular momentum optical communication system with angular deflection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yin, Xiao-li; Sang, Hong-qing; Cui, Xiao-Zhou; Chang, Huan; Li, Li; Wu, Guo-hua

    2017-06-01

    This work studied the offset tolerance (OT) with a particular focus on the angular deflection of an orbital angular momentum (OAM) system in free space. We derived an analytical expression of the OT for an angular-deflected Laguerre-Gaussian (LG) beam via Fourier series (FS) expansion and determined the upper bound of the OT for OAM-multiplexed systems. Next, we analyzed the effects of the beam waist, transmitted distance and OAM state number on the OT numerically. The calculation results indicate that the OT of the deflected beam is inversely proportional to the square root of the OAM number and approximately reciprocal to the propagation distance. Finally, we calculated the bit-error rate (BER) and aggregated capacity of multiplexed systems with different sets of channels. The results confirmed that the estimated upper bound is reasonable, especially for larger mode spacings. This work can provide guidance for the design and optimization of angular-deflected OAM-multiplexed communication systems.

  11. Calibrating angular transducer using sinusoidal and shock excitation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Li; Peng, Jun

    2012-06-01

    Primary angular vibration calibration system and primary angular shock calibration system are developed by Changcheng Institute of Metrology and Measurement (CIMM). The both systems using laser interferometer and grating measure rotational angle, angular velocity and angular acceleration, which are traceable to the International System of Units (SI). This paper will study the dynamic performance of an angular accelerometer and a gyro under the excitation of sinusoidal and shock using the calibration systems. It shows that the angular transducers should be calibrated using both sinusoidal and shock excitation to obtain more detailed dynamic information.

  12. Identifying Network Perturbation in Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Logsdon, Benjamin A.; Gentles, Andrew J.; Lee, Su-In

    2016-01-01

    We present a computational framework, called DISCERN (DIfferential SparsE Regulatory Network), to identify informative topological changes in gene-regulator dependence networks inferred on the basis of mRNA expression datasets within distinct biological states. DISCERN takes two expression datasets as input: an expression dataset of diseased tissues from patients with a disease of interest and another expression dataset from matching normal tissues. DISCERN estimates the extent to which each gene is perturbed—having distinct regulator connectivity in the inferred gene-regulator dependencies between the disease and normal conditions. This approach has distinct advantages over existing methods. First, DISCERN infers conditional dependencies between candidate regulators and genes, where conditional dependence relationships discriminate the evidence for direct interactions from indirect interactions more precisely than pairwise correlation. Second, DISCERN uses a new likelihood-based scoring function to alleviate concerns about accuracy of the specific edges inferred in a particular network. DISCERN identifies perturbed genes more accurately in synthetic data than existing methods to identify perturbed genes between distinct states. In expression datasets from patients with acute myeloid leukemia (AML), breast cancer and lung cancer, genes with high DISCERN scores in each cancer are enriched for known tumor drivers, genes associated with the biological processes known to be important in the disease, and genes associated with patient prognosis, in the respective cancer. Finally, we show that DISCERN can uncover potential mechanisms underlying network perturbation by explaining observed epigenomic activity patterns in cancer and normal tissue types more accurately than alternative methods, based on the available epigenomic data from the ENCODE project. PMID:27145341

  13. Development of a primary angular shock calibration system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peng, Jun

    2008-06-01

    Primary angular shock calibration system is developed by Changcheng Institute of Metrology & Measurement (CIMM). It uses brushless servo motor driving the air bearing system to generate rotational angle, angular velocity and angular acceleration. Both grating and heterodyne laser interferometer with diffraction grating is used to measure the angular movement, which are traceable to the International System of Units (SI). It can be used to calibrate angular transducers, i.e. angular accelerometer, angular velocity transducer, and rotational angle transducer to obtain sensitivity by angular shock or other kinds of excitation. Heterodyne laser interferometer with diffraction grating is successfully used in the measurement of angular acceleration. The method of using grating and scanning heads measure angular acceleration is developed. One characteristic of this system is that it could generate different kind of excitation signals, which include half sine, trapezoidal, sinusoidal, etc. and it can work as a high performance rate table to generate constant angular velocity. The preliminary test shows the uncertainty in calibrating angular accelerometer should be better than 2%. This paper introduces the mechanic system, control system and measurement system of the angular shock calibration system.

  14. Transport Studies Using Perturbative Experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Hogeweij, G.M.D.

    2004-03-15

    By inducing a small electron temperature perturbation in a plasma in steady state one can in principle determine the conductive and convective components of the electron heat ux, and the associated thermal diffusivity and convection velocity. The same can be done for other plasma parameters, like density or ion temperature.In this paper experimental and analysis techniques are briey reviewed. The fundamental question whether the uxes are linear functions of the gradients or not is discussed. Experimental results are summarized, including so-called 'non-local' phenomena.

  15. Perturbation analyses of intermolecular interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koyama, Yohei M.; Kobayashi, Tetsuya J.; Ueda, Hiroki R.

    2011-08-01

    Conformational fluctuations of a protein molecule are important to its function, and it is known that environmental molecules, such as water molecules, ions, and ligand molecules, significantly affect the function by changing the conformational fluctuations. However, it is difficult to systematically understand the role of environmental molecules because intermolecular interactions related to the conformational fluctuations are complicated. To identify important intermolecular interactions with regard to the conformational fluctuations, we develop herein (i) distance-independent and (ii) distance-dependent perturbation analyses of the intermolecular interactions. We show that these perturbation analyses can be realized by performing (i) a principal component analysis using conditional expectations of truncated and shifted intermolecular potential energy terms and (ii) a functional principal component analysis using products of intermolecular forces and conditional cumulative densities. We refer to these analyses as intermolecular perturbation analysis (IPA) and distance-dependent intermolecular perturbation analysis (DIPA), respectively. For comparison of the IPA and the DIPA, we apply them to the alanine dipeptide isomerization in explicit water. Although the first IPA principal components discriminate two states (the α state and PPII (polyproline II) + β states) for larger cutoff length, the separation between the PPII state and the β state is unclear in the second IPA principal components. On the other hand, in the large cutoff value, DIPA eigenvalues converge faster than that for IPA and the top two DIPA principal components clearly identify the three states. By using the DIPA biplot, the contributions of the dipeptide-water interactions to each state are analyzed systematically. Since the DIPA improves the state identification and the convergence rate with retaining distance information, we conclude that the DIPA is a more practical method compared with the

  16. Ultra-sensitive and super-resolving angular rotation measurement based on photon orbital angular momentum using parity measurement.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Zijing; Qiao, Tianyuan; Ma, Kun; Cen, Longzhu; Zhang, Jiandong; Wang, Feng; Zhao, Yuan

    2016-08-15

    Photon orbital angular momentum has led to many novel insights and applications in quantum measurement. Photon orbital angular momentum can increase the resolution and sensitivity of angular rotation measurement. However, quantum measurement strategy can further surpass this limit and improve the resolution of angular rotation measurement. This Letter proposes and demonstrates a parity measurement method in angular rotation measurement scheme for the first time. Parity measurement can make the resolution superior to the limit of the existing method. The sensitivity can be improved with higher orbital angular momentum photons. Moreover, this Letter gives a detailed discussion of the change of resolution and sensitivity in the presence of photon loss.

  17. Quantum entanglement of high angular momenta.

    PubMed

    Fickler, Robert; Lapkiewicz, Radek; Plick, William N; Krenn, Mario; Schaeff, Christoph; Ramelow, Sven; Zeilinger, Anton

    2012-11-02

    Single photons with helical phase structures may carry a quantized amount of orbital angular momentum (OAM), and their entanglement is important for quantum information science and fundamental tests of quantum theory. Because there is no theoretical upper limit on how many quanta of OAM a single photon can carry, it is possible to create entanglement between two particles with an arbitrarily high difference in quantum number. By transferring polarization entanglement to OAM with an interferometric scheme, we generate and verify entanglement between two photons differing by 600 in quantum number. The only restrictive factors toward higher numbers are current technical limitations. We also experimentally demonstrate that the entanglement of very high OAM can improve the sensitivity of angular resolution in remote sensing.

  18. Encrypted optical storage with angular multiplexing.

    PubMed

    Matoba, O; Javidi, B

    1999-12-11

    We present the first, to our knowledge, demonstration of an encrypted optical storage based on double-random phase encoding by using angular multiplexing in a photorefractive material. Original two-dimensional data are encrypted by use of two random phase codes located in the input and the Fourier planes and are then stored holographically in a LiNbO(3):Fe crystal. The retrieval of the original data can be achieved with a phase-conjugated readout scheme. We demonstrate the encryption and the decryption of multiple frames of two-dimensional digital data by using angular multiplexing. We also evaluate numerically the influence of the bandwidth of the optical system on the decrypted digital data. The bit error rate as a function of the optical system bandwidth is presented.

  19. Angular MET sensor for precise azimuth determination

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zaitsev, Dmitry; Antonov, Alexander; Krishtop, Vladimir

    2016-12-01

    This paper describes using a MET-based low-noise angular motion sensor to precisely determine azimuth direction in a dynamic-scheme method of measuring Earth's rotation velocity vector. The scheme includes installing a sensor on a rotating platform so that it could scan a space and seek for the position of highest Earth's rotation vector projection on its axis. This method is very efficient provided a low-noise sensor is used. We take a low-cost angular sensor based on MET (molecular electronic transduction) technology. Sensors of this kind were originally developed for the seismic activity monitoring and are well-known for very good noise performance and high sensitivity. This approach, combined with use of special signal processing algorithms, allowed for reaching the accuracy of 0.07° for a measurement time of 200 seconds.

  20. Performance criteria for dosimeter angular response

    SciTech Connect

    Roberson, P.L.; Fox, R. A.; Cummings, F. M.; McDonald, J. C.; Jones, K.L.

    1988-06-01

    This report provides criteria for evaluating the response of personnel dosimeters to radiation at nonperpendicular incidence. The US Department of Energy Laboratory Accreditation Program (DOELAP) ensures that dosimetry systems at DOE facilities meet acceptable standards for precision and accuracy. In the past, these standards were limited to tests for system variability, energy dependence, and level of detection. The proposed criteria will broaden the scope of DOELAP to include the angular response of personnel dosimeters. Because occupational exposures in the workplace are rarely due to radiation from only one direction, dosimeters must accurately assign individual dose equivalent from irradiation at any forward angle of incidence. Including an angular response criterion in DOELAP would improve the quality of personnel monitoring provided that the criterion is developed from appropriate dose quantities. This report provides guidance for assigning individual dose equivalents for radiation fields at nonperpendicular incidence to the dosimeter. 21 refs., 10 figs., 10 tabs.

  1. Angular Momentum Loss Via Stellar Winds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matt, Sean; Pinzon, G.; Greene, T. P.

    2010-01-01

    The evolution of stellar spin rates observed during star formation is not yet understood, due primarily to the fact that it is still not clear which mechanism(s) is responsible for removing angular momentum. Stellar winds may exert significant torques during pre-main-sequence evolution, provided that the mass loss rates are enhanced by several orders of magnitude relative to their main sequence values. This may be possible, if the winds are powered by the accretion process. We present new calculations of the angular momentum loss from enhanced stellar winds and address how this may help our understanding of young star spins. SPM was supported by an appointment to the NASA Postdoctoral Program at Ames Research Center, administered by ORAU through a contract with NASA.

  2. Angular momentum in cluster Spherical Collapse Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cupani, Guido; Mezzetti, Marino; Mardirossian, Fabio

    2011-11-01

    Our new formulation of the Spherical Collapse Model (SCM-L) takes into account the presence of angular momentum associated with the motion of galaxy groups infalling towards the centre of galaxy clusters. The angular momentum is responsible for an additional term in the dynamical equation which is useful to describe the evolution of the clusters in the non-equilibrium region which is investigated in the present paper. Our SCM-L can be used to predict the profiles of several strategic dynamical quantities as the radial and tangential velocities of member galaxies, and the total cluster mass. A good understanding of the non-equilibrium region is important since it is the natural scenario where the infall in galaxy clusters and the accretion phenomena present in these objects can be studied. Our results corroborate previous estimates and are in very good agreement with the analysis of recent observations and of simulated clusters.

  3. Critical angular velocity for vortex lines formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guadagnini, Enore

    2017-07-01

    For helium II inside a rotating cylinder, it is proposed that the formation of vortex lines of the frictionless superfluid component of the liquid is caused by the presence of the rotating quasi-particles gas. By minimising the free energy of the system, the critical value Ω0 of the angular velocity for the formation of the first vortex line is determined. This value nontrivially depends on the temperature, and numerical estimations of its temperature behaviour are produced. It is shown that the latent heat for a vortex formation and the associated discontinuous change in the angular momentum of the quasi-particles gas determine the slope of Ω0 (T) via some kind of Clapeyron equation.

  4. Satellite Angular Rate Estimation From Vector Measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Azor, Ruth; Bar-Itzhack, Itzhack Y.; Harman, Richard R.

    1996-01-01

    This paper presents an algorithm for estimating the angular rate vector of a satellite which is based on the time derivatives of vector measurements expressed in a reference and body coordinate. The computed derivatives are fed into a spacial Kalman filter which yields an estimate of the spacecraft angular velocity. The filter, named Extended Interlaced Kalman Filter (EIKF), is an extension of the Kalman filter which, although being linear, estimates the state of a nonlinear dynamic system. It consists of two or three parallel Kalman filters whose individual estimates are fed to one another and are considered as known inputs by the other parallel filter(s). The nonlinear dynamics stem from the nonlinear differential equation that describes the rotation of a three dimensional body. Initial results, using simulated data, and real Rossi X ray Timing Explorer (RXTE) data indicate that the algorithm is efficient and robust.

  5. Angular cheilitis, part 1: local etiologies.

    PubMed

    Park, Kelly K; Brodell, Robert T; Helms, Stephen E

    2011-06-01

    Angular cheilitis (AC) is a common condition characterized by erythema, moist maceration, ulceration, and crusting at the corners of the mouth. This article focuses on the common local factors that act alone and in combination to produce AC. These factors are categorized as irritant, allergic, and infectious causes. Identifying the underlying etiology of AC is a critical step in developing an effective treatment plan for this condition.

  6. Orbital angular momentum light in microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ritsch-Marte, Monika

    2017-02-01

    Light with a helical phase has had an impact on optical imaging, pushing the limits of resolution or sensitivity. Here, special emphasis will be given to classical light microscopy of phase samples and to Fourier filtering techniques with a helical phase profile, such as the spiral phase contrast technique in its many variants and areas of application. This article is part of the themed issue 'Optical orbital angular momentum'.

  7. Calculated angular distributions of energetic atmospheric neutrons

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Merker, M.

    1975-01-01

    Calculated angular distributions of atmospheric leakage neutron fluxes from 19 MeV to 1 GeV are presented. Comparisons with the balloon measurements of Preszler et al. and Kanbach et al. are made and show substantial agreement, strengthening the belief in the importance of the CRAND (cosmic-ray albedo-neutron decay) contribution to the high-energy protons in the earth's inner radiation belt. The calculation is presented as a means for investigating features of atmospheric flux distributions.

  8. Angular quadratures for improved transport computations

    SciTech Connect

    Abu-Shumays, I.K.

    1999-07-22

    This paper introduces new octant-range, composite-type Gauss and mid-point rule angular quadrature formulas for neutron and photon transport computations. A generalization to octant-range quadratures is also introduced in order to allow for discontinuities at material interfaces for two- and three-dimensional transport problems which can be modeled with 60-degree triangular or hexagonal mesh subdivisions in the x-y plane.

  9. Orbital angular momentum light in microscopy.

    PubMed

    Ritsch-Marte, Monika

    2017-02-28

    Light with a helical phase has had an impact on optical imaging, pushing the limits of resolution or sensitivity. Here, special emphasis will be given to classical light microscopy of phase samples and to Fourier filtering techniques with a helical phase profile, such as the spiral phase contrast technique in its many variants and areas of application.This article is part of the themed issue 'Optical orbital angular momentum'. © 2017 The Author(s).

  10. A Fast Method of Fully Characterizing Sputtering Angular Dependence (Preprint)

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2008-06-17

    A new method has been demonstrated in which a single experiment is used to fully define the sputtering angular dependence of a given material. The...profilometry; the full sputtering angular dependence curve is then extracted using a numerical approach.

  11. Comparison of angular movement measurement using grating and laser interferometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peng, Jun

    2008-06-01

    Primary angular acceleration calibration system is developed by Changcheng Institute of Metrology and Measurement (CIMM) to generate angular vibration and shock, which are traceable to the International System of Units (SI). It can be used to calibrate angular transducers, i.e. angular accelerometer, angular velocity transducer, and rotational angle transducer. Two kinds of system are used in the measurement of angular movement, one is based on circular grating and scanning heads, another is based on laser interferometer with diffraction grating. This paper introduce the comparison results of the two measurement systems in the measurement of angular movement under sinusoidal and shock excitation. The results of the investigations show a good accordance of the newly developed method of using grating and scanning heads measuring angular acceleration in comparison with the laser interferometer method.

  12. Exact-to-precision generalized perturbation for neutron transport calculation

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, C.; Abdel-Khalik, H. S.

    2013-07-01

    This manuscript extends the exact-to-precision generalized perturbation theory (E{sub P}GPT), introduced previously, to neutron transport calculation whereby previous developments focused on neutron diffusion calculation only. The E{sub P}GPT collectively denotes new developments in generalized perturbation theory (GPT) that place premium on computational efficiency and defendable accuracy in order to render GPT a standard analysis tool in routine design and safety reactor calculations. EPGPT constructs a surrogate model with quantifiable accuracy which can replace the original neutron transport model for subsequent engineering analysis, e.g. functionalization of the homogenized few-group cross sections in terms of various core conditions, sensitivity analysis and uncertainty quantification. This is achieved by reducing the effective dimensionality of the state variable (i.e. neutron angular flux) by projection onto an active subspace. Confining the state variations to the active subspace allows one to construct a small number of what is referred to as the 'active' responses which are solely dependent on the physics model rather than on the responses of interest, the number of input parameters, or the number of points in the state phase space. (authors)

  13. On the Milankovitch orbital elements for perturbed Keplerian motion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rosengren, Aaron J.; Scheeres, Daniel J.

    2014-03-01

    We consider sets of natural vectorial orbital elements of the Milankovitch type for perturbed Keplerian motion. These elements are closely related to the two vectorial first integrals of the unperturbed two-body problem; namely, the angular momentum vector and the Laplace-Runge-Lenz vector. After a detailed historical discussion of the origin and development of such elements, nonsingular equations for the time variations of these sets of elements under perturbations are established, both in Lagrangian and Gaussian form. After averaging, a compact, elegant, and symmetrical form of secular Milankovitch-like equations is obtained, which reminds of the structure of canonical systems of equations in Hamiltonian mechanics. As an application of this vectorial formulation, we analyze the motion of an object orbiting about a planet (idealized as a point mass moving in a heliocentric elliptical orbit) and subject to solar radiation pressure acceleration (obeying an inverse-square law). We show that the corresponding secular problem is integrable and we give an explicit closed-form solution.

  14. Angular cheilitis: a clinical and microbial study.

    PubMed

    Ohman, S C; Dahlén, G; Möller, A; Ohman, A

    1986-04-01

    The purpose of this prospective study was to re-examine the relative importance of various factors in the pathogenesis of angular cheilitis. Sixty-four patients with cheilitis were examined clinically and microbiologically. In addition, a subsample of 23 patients was examined for serum iron and transferrin. The clinical appearance of the lip lesions fell into 4 categories. A ground rhagad at the corner of the mouth involving adjacent skin, was the most frequent type among dentate patients, whereas among denture wearers a deep lesion following the labial marginal sulcus was frequently observed. Dentate patients and denture wearers with cheilitis often had atopic constitution or cutaneous diseases. Pathogenic microorganisms were cultured from the lesions in all 64 patients; Staphylococcus aureus in 40 patients and Candida albicans in 45. The results of this study indicate a correlation between angular cheilitis and pathogenic microorganisms. Furthermore, among dentate patients, a correlation exists between cutaneous discomfort and angular cheilitis. Other etiological factors suggested for this disorder were found to be of subordinate importance.

  15. Angular momentum evolution of galaxies in EAGLE

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lagos, Claudia del P.; Theuns, Tom; Stevens, Adam R. H.; Cortese, Luca; Padilla, Nelson D.; Davis, Timothy A.; Contreras, Sergio; Croton, Darren

    2017-02-01

    We use the EAGLE cosmological hydrodynamic simulation suite to study the specific angular momentum of galaxies, j, with the aims of (i) investigating the physical causes behind the wide range of j at fixed mass and (ii) examining whether simple, theoretical models can explain the seemingly complex and non-linear nature of the evolution of j. We find that j of the stars, jstars, and baryons, jbar, are strongly correlated with stellar and baryon mass, respectively, with the scatter being highly correlated with morphological proxies such as gas fraction, stellar concentration, (u-r) intrinsic colour, stellar age and the ratio of circular velocity to velocity dispersion. We compare with available observations at z = 0 and find excellent agreement. We find that jbar follows the theoretical expectation of an isothermal collapsing halo under conservation of specific angular momentum to within ≈50 per cent, while the subsample of rotation-supported galaxies are equally well described by a simple model in which the disc angular momentum is just enough to maintain marginally stable discs. We extracted evolutionary tracks of the stellar spin parameter of EAGLE galaxies and found that the fate of their jstars at z = 0 depends sensitively on their star formation and merger histories. From these tracks, we identified two distinct physical channels behind low jstars galaxies at z = 0: (i) galaxy mergers, and (ii) early star formation quenching. The latter can produce galaxies with low jstars and early-type morphologies even in the absence of mergers.

  16. A Neural Circuit for Angular Velocity Computation

    PubMed Central

    Snider, Samuel B.; Yuste, Rafael; Packer, Adam M.

    2010-01-01

    In one of the most remarkable feats of motor control in the animal world, some Diptera, such as the housefly, can accurately execute corrective flight maneuvers in tens of milliseconds. These reflexive movements are achieved by the halteres, gyroscopic force sensors, in conjunction with rapidly tunable wing steering muscles. Specifically, the mechanosensory campaniform sensilla located at the base of the halteres transduce and transform rotation-induced gyroscopic forces into information about the angular velocity of the fly's body. But how exactly does the fly's neural architecture generate the angular velocity from the lateral strain forces on the left and right halteres? To explore potential algorithms, we built a neuromechanical model of the rotation detection circuit. We propose a neurobiologically plausible method by which the fly could accurately separate and measure the three-dimensional components of an imposed angular velocity. Our model assumes a single sign-inverting synapse and formally resembles some models of directional selectivity by the retina. Using multidimensional error analysis, we demonstrate the robustness of our model under a variety of input conditions. Our analysis reveals the maximum information available to the fly given its physical architecture and the mathematics governing the rotation-induced forces at the haltere's end knob. PMID:21228902

  17. The Cosmology Large Angular Scale Surveyor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harrington, Kathleen; Marriage, Tobias; Ali, Aamir; Appel, John W.; Bennett, Charles L.; Boone, Fletcher; Brewer, Michael; Chan, Manwei; Chuss, David T.; Colazo, Felipe; Dahal, Sumit; Denis, Kevin; Dünner, Rolando; Eimer, Joseph; Essinger-Hileman, Thomas; Fluxa, Pedro; Halpern, Mark; Hilton, Gene; Hinshaw, Gary F.; Hubmayr, Johannes; Iuliano, Jeffrey; Karakla, John; McMahon, Jeff; Miller, Nathan T.; Moseley, Samuel H.; Palma, Gonzalo; Parker, Lucas; Petroff, Matthew; Pradenas, Bastián.; Rostem, Karwan; Sagliocca, Marco; Valle, Deniz; Watts, Duncan; Wollack, Edward; Xu, Zhilei; Zeng, Lingzhen

    2016-07-01

    The Cosmology Large Angular Scale Surveyor (CLASS) is a four telescope array designed to characterize relic primordial gravitational waves from in ation and the optical depth to reionization through a measurement of the polarized cosmic microwave background (CMB) on the largest angular scales. The frequencies of the four CLASS telescopes, one at 38 GHz, two at 93 GHz, and one dichroic system at 145/217 GHz, are chosen to avoid spectral regions of high atmospheric emission and span the minimum of the polarized Galactic foregrounds: synchrotron emission at lower frequencies and dust emission at higher frequencies. Low-noise transition edge sensor detectors and a rapid front-end polarization modulator provide a unique combination of high sensitivity, stability, and control of systematics. The CLASS site, at 5200 m in the Chilean Atacama desert, allows for daily mapping of up to 70% of the sky and enables the characterization of CMB polarization at the largest angular scales. Using this combination of a broad frequency range, large sky coverage, control over systematics, and high sensitivity, CLASS will observe the reionization and recombination peaks of the CMB E- and B-mode power spectra. CLASS will make a cosmic variance limited measurement of the optical depth to reionization and will measure or place upper limits on the tensor-to-scalar ratio, r, down to a level of 0.01 (95% C.L.).

  18. Angular craniometry in craniocervical junction malformation.

    PubMed

    Botelho, Ricardo Vieira; Ferreira, Edson Dener Zandonadi

    2013-10-01

    The craniometric linear dimensions of the posterior fossa have been relatively well studied, but angular craniometry has been poorly studied and may reveal differences in the several types of craniocervical junction malformation. The objectives of this study were to evaluate craniometric angles compared with normal subjects and elucidate the main angular differences among the types of craniocervical junction malformation and the correlation between craniocervical and cervical angles. Angular craniometries were studied using primary cranial angles (basal and Boogard's) and secondary craniocervical angles (clivus canal and cervical spine lordosis). Patients with basilar invagination had significantly wider basal angles, sharper clivus canal angles, larger Boogard's angles, and greater cervical lordosis than the Chiari malformation and control groups. The Chiari malformation group does not show significant differences when compared with normal controls. Platybasia occurred only in basilar invagination and is suggested to be more prevalent in type II than in type I. Platybasic patients have a more acute clivus canal angle and show greater cervical lordosis than non-platybasics. The Chiari group does not show significant differences when compared with the control, but the basilar invagination groups had craniometric variables significantly different from normal controls. Hyperlordosis observed in the basilar inavagination group was associated with craniocervical kyphosis conditioned by acute clivus canal angles.

  19. Time-dependent photoelectron angular distributions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Xiangyang

    1999-09-01

    I show that the angular distribution of electrons photoionized from gas phase targets by short light pulses is time-dependent, when the orbital momentum composition of the photocurrent changes with excitation energy so evolves with the time of detection. A theory of time- dependent photoionization is outlined and general formulas of time-dependent photoelectron flux and angular distribution are given. Two general propagator methods suitable to describe the time-dependent photoionization and scattering processes are developed. The photoionization process is viewed as a local excitation followed by a half scattering. The local excitation process is solved theoretically in a small region around the target core. This approach has been generalized to describe the evolution of a wavepacket in an unbound system. An asymptotic propagator theorem is discovered and used to derive analytic expressions for asymptotic propagators. The origin of the time dependence is explored by parameterizing the time delay and orbital momentum coupling in a two channel model. K-shell photoionization of N2 and CO are calculated with this time- dependent photoionization theory, implemented using a multiple scattering model. Numerical results demonstrate that the time dependence of photoelectron angular distributions is a realistic effect.

  20. The Cosmology Large Angular Scale Surveyor (CLASS)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harrington, Kathleen; Marriange, Tobias; Aamir, Ali; Appel, John W.; Bennett, Charles L.; Boone, Fletcher; Brewer, Michael; Chan, Manwei; Chuss, David T.; Colazo, Felipe; hide

    2016-01-01

    The Cosmology Large Angular Scale Surveyor (CLASS) is a four telescope array designed to characterize relic primordial gravitational waves from in ation and the optical depth to reionization through a measurement of the polarized cosmic microwave background (CMB) on the largest angular scales. The frequencies of the four CLASS telescopes, one at 38 GHz, two at 93 GHz, and one dichroic system at 145/217 GHz, are chosen to avoid spectral regions of high atmospheric emission and span the minimum of the polarized Galactic foregrounds: synchrotron emission at lower frequencies and dust emission at higher frequencies. Low-noise transition edge sensor detectors and a rapid front-end polarization modulator provide a unique combination of high sensitivity, stability, and control of systematics. The CLASS site, at 5200 m in the Chilean Atacama desert, allows for daily mapping of up to 70% of the sky and enables the characterization of CMB polarization at the largest angular scales. Using this combination of a broad frequency range, large sky coverage, control over systematics, and high sensitivity, CLASS will observe the reionization and recombination peaks of the CMB E- and B-mode power spectra. CLASS will make a cosmic variance limited measurement of the optical depth to reionization and will measure or place upper limits on the tensor-to-scalar ratio, r, down to a level of 0.01 (95% C.L.).

  1. The Cosmology Large Angular Scale Surveyor (CLASS)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harrington, Kathleen; Marriange, Tobias; Aamir, Ali; Appel, John W.; Bennett, Charles L.; Boone, Fletcher; Brewer, Michael; Chan, Manwei; Chuss, David T.; Colazo, Felipe; Denis, Kevin; Moseley, Samuel H.; Rostem, Karwan; Wollack, Edward

    2016-01-01

    The Cosmology Large Angular Scale Surveyor (CLASS) is a four telescope array designed to characterize relic primordial gravitational waves from in ation and the optical depth to reionization through a measurement of the polarized cosmic microwave background (CMB) on the largest angular scales. The frequencies of the four CLASS telescopes, one at 38 GHz, two at 93 GHz, and one dichroic system at 145/217 GHz, are chosen to avoid spectral regions of high atmospheric emission and span the minimum of the polarized Galactic foregrounds: synchrotron emission at lower frequencies and dust emission at higher frequencies. Low-noise transition edge sensor detectors and a rapid front-end polarization modulator provide a unique combination of high sensitivity, stability, and control of systematics. The CLASS site, at 5200 m in the Chilean Atacama desert, allows for daily mapping of up to 70% of the sky and enables the characterization of CMB polarization at the largest angular scales. Using this combination of a broad frequency range, large sky coverage, control over systematics, and high sensitivity, CLASS will observe the reionization and recombination peaks of the CMB E- and B-mode power spectra. CLASS will make a cosmic variance limited measurement of the optical depth to reionization and will measure or place upper limits on the tensor-to-scalar ratio, r, down to a level of 0.01 (95% C.L.).

  2. The Cosmology Large Angular Scale Surveyor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harrington, Kathleen; Marriage, Tobias; Ali, Aamir; Appel, John; Bennett, Charles; Boone, Fletcher; Brewer, Michael; Chan, Manwei; Chuss, David T.; Colazo, Felipe; hide

    2016-01-01

    The Cosmology Large Angular Scale Surveyor (CLASS) is a four telescope array designed to characterize relic primordial gravitational waves from inflation and the optical depth to reionization through a measurement of the polarized cosmic microwave background (CMB) on the largest angular scales. The frequencies of the four CLASS telescopes, one at 38 GHz, two at 93 GHz, and one dichroic system at 145217 GHz, are chosen to avoid spectral regions of high atmospheric emission and span the minimum of the polarized Galactic foregrounds: synchrotron emission at lower frequencies and dust emission at higher frequencies. Low-noise transition edge sensor detectors and a rapid front-end polarization modulator provide a unique combination of high sensitivity, stability, and control of systematics. The CLASS site, at 5200 m in the Chilean Atacama desert, allows for daily mapping of up to 70% of the sky and enables the characterization of CMB polarization at the largest angular scales. Using this combination of a broad frequency range, large sky coverage, control over systematics, and high sensitivity, CLASS will observe the reionization and recombination peaks of the CMB E- and B-mode power spectra. CLASS will make a cosmic variance limited measurement of the optical depth to reionization and will measure or place upper limits on the tensor-to-scalar ratio, r, down to a level of 0.01 (95% C.L.).

  3. A neural circuit for angular velocity computation.

    PubMed

    Snider, Samuel B; Yuste, Rafael; Packer, Adam M

    2010-01-01

    In one of the most remarkable feats of motor control in the animal world, some Diptera, such as the housefly, can accurately execute corrective flight maneuvers in tens of milliseconds. These reflexive movements are achieved by the halteres, gyroscopic force sensors, in conjunction with rapidly tunable wing steering muscles. Specifically, the mechanosensory campaniform sensilla located at the base of the halteres transduce and transform rotation-induced gyroscopic forces into information about the angular velocity of the fly's body. But how exactly does the fly's neural architecture generate the angular velocity from the lateral strain forces on the left and right halteres? To explore potential algorithms, we built a neuromechanical model of the rotation detection circuit. We propose a neurobiologically plausible method by which the fly could accurately separate and measure the three-dimensional components of an imposed angular velocity. Our model assumes a single sign-inverting synapse and formally resembles some models of directional selectivity by the retina. Using multidimensional error analysis, we demonstrate the robustness of our model under a variety of input conditions. Our analysis reveals the maximum information available to the fly given its physical architecture and the mathematics governing the rotation-induced forces at the haltere's end knob.

  4. Nuclear structure at high angular momentum

    SciTech Connect

    Stephens, F.S.

    1980-06-01

    This review paper begins by discussing the limits faced in the attempts to get nuclei to hold very high angular momentum. The method presently used to produce nuclei with the maximum angular momentum is described. Then the physics of high-spin states is taken up; some properties of a purely collective, classical rotor are described, and the effects of coupling single-particle motion to this are considered. Next, backbending, its causes, and a new spectroscopy of bands and backbends at high spin values are discussed. Noncollective states occur when the nuclear angular momentum is carried by a few high-j particles and is aligned along a symmetry axis. There results an irregular yrast line, along which there are no collective transitions. Noncollective behavior in the lead region, the hafnium region, and the N = 82 region is examined. Then the discussion moves on to collective behavior and recent studies on continuum spectra. Evidence for rotation is given, and effective moments of inertia for this rotation are evaluated. Finally, current ..gamma..-ray energy correlation studies are described. 68 references, 36 figures. (RWR)

  5. "Phonon" scattering beyond perturbation theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qiu, WuJie; Ke, XueZhi; Xi, LiLi; Wu, LiHua; Yang, Jiong; Zhang, WenQing

    2016-02-01

    Searching and designing materials with intrinsically low lattice thermal conductivity (LTC) have attracted extensive consideration in thermoelectrics and thermal management community. The concept of part-crystalline part-liquid state, or even part-crystalline part-amorphous state, has recently been proposed to describe the exotic structure of materials with chemical- bond hierarchy, in which a set of atoms is weakly bonded to the rest species while the other sublattices retain relatively strong rigidity. The whole system inherently manifests the coexistence of rigid crystalline sublattices and fluctuating noncrystalline substructures. Representative materials in the unusual state can be classified into two categories, i.e., caged and non-caged ones. LTCs in both systems deviate from the traditional T -1 relationship ( T, the absolute temperature), which can hardly be described by small-parameter-based perturbation approaches. Beyond the classical perturbation theory, an extra rattling-like scattering should be considered to interpret the liquid-like and sublattice-amorphization-induced heat transport. Such a kind of compounds could be promising high-performance thermoelectric materials, due to the extremely low LTCs. Other physical properties for these part-crystalline substances should also exhibit certain novelty and deserve further exploration.

  6. Perturbative Methods in Path Integration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnson-Freyd, Theodore Paul

    This dissertation addresses a number of related questions concerning perturbative "path" integrals. Perturbative methods are one of the few successful ways physicists have worked with (or even defined) these infinite-dimensional integrals, and it is important as mathematicians to check that they are correct. Chapter 0 provides a detailed introduction. We take a classical approach to path integrals in Chapter 1. Following standard arguments, we posit a Feynman-diagrammatic description of the asymptotics of the time-evolution operator for the quantum mechanics of a charged particle moving nonrelativistically through a curved manifold under the influence of an external electromagnetic field. We check that our sum of Feynman diagrams has all desired properties: it is coordinate-independent and well-defined without ultraviolet divergences, it satisfies the correct composition law, and it satisfies Schrodinger's equation thought of as a boundary-value problem in PDE. Path integrals in quantum mechanics and elsewhere in quantum field theory are almost always of the shape ∫ f es for some functions f (the "observable") and s (the "action"). In Chapter 2 we step back to analyze integrals of this type more generally. Integration by parts provides algebraic relations between the values of ∫ (-) es for different inputs, which can be packaged into a Batalin--Vilkovisky-type chain complex. Using some simple homological perturbation theory, we study the version of this complex that arises when f and s are taken to be polynomial functions, and power series are banished. We find that in such cases, the entire scheme-theoretic critical locus (complex points included) of s plays an important role, and that one can uniformly (but noncanonically) integrate out in a purely algebraic way the contributions to the integral from all "higher modes," reducing ∫ f es to an integral over the critical locus. This may help explain the presence of analytic continuation in questions like the

  7. Coherent Detection of Orbital Angular Momentum in Radio

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-08-31

    SECURITY CLASSIFICATION OF: The angular momentum propagated by a beam of radiation has two contributions: spin angular momentum (SAM) and orbital...angular momentum (OAM). SAM corresponds to wave polarisation, while OAM-carrying beams are characterized by a phase which is a function of azimuth. We...Coherent detection of orbital angular momentum in radio The views, opinions and/or findings contained in this report are those of the author(s) and

  8. Localization of angular momentum in optical waves propagating through turbulence.

    PubMed

    Sanchez, Darryl J; Oesch, Denis W

    2011-12-05

    This is the first in a series of papers demonstrating that photons with orbital angular momentum can be created in optical waves propagating through distributed turbulence. The scope of this first paper is much narrower. Here, we demonstrate that atmospheric turbulence can impart non-trivial angular momentum to beams and that this non-trivial angular momentum is highly localized. Furthermore, creation of this angular momentum is a normal part of propagation through atmospheric turbulence.

  9. Measuring orbital angular momentum of light with a torsion pendulum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beijersbergen, Marco W.; Woerdman, J. P.

    2005-03-01

    We report experiments aimed at measuring the orbital angular momentum of light by means of a torsion pendulum, in the spirit of the classical spin angular momentum experiment by Beth (1936) but using present-day technology. Although our set-up has adequate sensitivity and resolution to measure orbital angular momentum of light, the systematic errors that are caused by the inherent asymmetry in the conversion of orbital angular moment remain a problem.

  10. Resolution analysis of an angular domain imaging system with two dimensional angular filters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ng, Eldon; Carson, Jeffrey J. L.

    2013-02-01

    Angular Domain Imaging (ADI) employs an angular filter to distinguish between quasi-ballistic and scattered photons based on trajectory. A 2D angular filter array was constructed using 3D printing technology to generate an array of micro-channels 500 μm x 500 μm with a length of 12 cm. The main barrier to 2D imaging with the 2D angular filter array was the shadows cast on the image by the 500 μm walls of the angular filter. The objective of this work was to perform a resolution analysis of the 2D angular filter array. The approach was to position the AFA with a two dimensional positioning stage to obtain images of areas normally obstructed by the walls of the AFA. A digital light processor was also incorporated to generate various light patterns to improve the contrast of the images. A resolution analysis was completed by imaging a knife edge submerged in various uniform scattering media (Intralipid® dilutions with water). The edge response functions obtained were then used to compute the line spread function and the theoretical resolution of the imaging system. The theoretical system resolution was measured to be between 110 μm - 180 μm when the scattering level was at or below 0.7% Intralipid®. The theoretical resolution was in agreement with a previous resolution analysis of a silicon-based angular filter with a similar aspect ratio. The measured resolution was also found to be smaller than the size of an individual channel, suggesting that the resolution of an AFA based ADI system is not dependent on the size of the micro-channel.

  11. Methods in QCD and non-perturbative physics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Dean Junyuel

    1998-11-01

    This thesis explores several new and different methods in the study of QCD and non-perturbative field theory. In Chapter 1 we introduce a sum-rule for large-Nc QCD which relates the density of heavy quarkonium states, the state-averaged square of the wavefunction at the origin, and the heavy quark current-current correlator. Focusing on the region of energy just above perturbative threshold, we calculate the correlator by incorporating arbitrarily high orders in the QCD coupling αs. We use the sum-rule to determine the bottomonium potential using experimentally measured s- wave leptonic widths and compare the result with the potential obtained by direct calculation from the measured s-wave spectrum. We discuss the utility of the sum-rule method for accurate determination of the confining potential. In Chapter 2 we study the singular Landau surfaces of planar diagrams contributing to scattering of a massless quark and antiquark in 3 + 1 dimensions. In particular, we look at singularities which remain after integration with respect to the various angular degrees of freedom. We derive a general relation between these singularities and the singularities of quark-antiquark scattering in 1 + 1 dimensions. We then classify all Landau surfaces of the 1 + 1 dimensional system. Combining these results, we deduce that the singular surfaces of the angle-integrated 3 + 1 dimensional amplitude must satisfy at least one of three conditions, which we call the planar light-cone conditions. We discuss the extension of our results to non-perturbative processes by means of the non- perturbative operator product expansion. Our findings offer new insights into the connection between the 't Hooft model and large-Nc mesons in 3 + 1 dimensions and may prove useful in studies of confinement in relativistic meson systems. In Chapter 3 we introduce a new technique called spherical field theory. Spherical field theory is a non-perturbative method for studying quantum field theories. It uses

  12. Photoelectron angular distribution in two-pathway ionization of neon with femtosecond XUV pulses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Douguet, Nicolas; Gryzlova, Elena V.; Staroselskaya, Ekaterina I.; Bartschat, Klaus; Grum-Grzhimailo, Alexei N.

    2017-05-01

    We analyze the photoelectron angular distribution in two-pathway interference between nonresonant one-photon and resonant two-photon ionization of neon. We consider a bichromatic femtosecond XUV pulse whose fundamental frequency is tuned near the 2p53s atomic states of neon. The time-dependent Schrödinger equation is solved and the results are employed to compute the angular distribution and the associated anisotropy parameters at the main photoelectron line. We also employ a time-dependent perturbative approach, which allows obtaining information on the process for a large range of pulse parameters, including the steady-state case of continuous radiation, i.e., an infinitely long pulse. The results from the two methods are in relatively good agreement over the domain of applicability of perturbation theory. Contribution to the Topical Issue "Many Particle Spectroscopy of Atoms, Molecules, Clusters and Surfaces", edited by A.N. Grum-Grzhimailo, E.V. Gryzlova, Yu V. Popov, and A.V. Solov'yov.

  13. The Cosmology Large Angular Scale Surveyor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ali, Aamir; Appel, John W.; Bennett, Charles L.; Boone, Fletcher; Brewer, Michael; Chan, Manwei; Chuss, David T.; Colazo, Felipe; Dahal, Sumit; Denis, Kevin; Dünner, Rolando; Eimer, Joseph; Essinger-Hileman, Thomas; Fluxa, Pedro; Halpern, Mark; Hilton, Gene; Hinshaw, Gary F.; Hubmayr, Johannes; Iuliano, Jeffrey; Karakla, John; Marriage, Tobias; McMahon, Jeff; Miller, Nathan; Moseley, Samuel H.; Palma, Gonzalo; Parker, Lucas; Petroff, Matthew; Pradenas, Bastián; Rostem, Karwan; Sagliocca, Marco; Valle, Deniz; Watts, Duncan; Wollack, Edward; Xu, Zhilei; Zeng, Lingzhen

    2017-01-01

    The Cosmology Large Angular Scale Surveryor (CLASS) is a ground based telescope array designed to measure the large-angular scale polarization signal of the Cosmic Microwave Background (CMB). The large-angular scale CMB polarization measurement is essential for a precise determination of the optical depth to reionization (from the E-mode polarization) and a characterization of inflation from the predicted polarization pattern imprinted on the CMB by gravitational waves in the early universe (from the B-mode polarization). CLASS will characterize the primordial tensor-to-scalar ratio, r, to 0.01 (95% CL).CLASS is uniquely designed to be sensitive to the primordial B-mode signal across the entire range of angular scales where it could possibly dominate over the lensing signal that converts E-modes to B-modes while also making multi-frequency observations both high and low of the frequency where the CMB-to-foreground signal ratio is at its maximum. The design enables CLASS to make a definitive cosmic-variance-limited measurement of the optical depth to scattering from reionization.CLASS is an array of 4 telescopes operating at approximately 40, 90, 150, and 220 GHz. CLASS is located high in the Andes mountains in the Atacama Desert of northern Chile. The location of the CLASS site at high altitude near the equator minimizes atmospheric emission while allowing for daily mapping of ~70% of the sky.A rapid front end Variable-delay Polarization Modulator (VPM) and low noise Transition Edge Sensor (TES) detectors allow for a high sensitivity and low systematic error mapping of the CMB polarization at large angular scales. The VPM, detectors and their coupling structures were all uniquely designed and built for CLASS.We present here an overview of the CLASS scientific strategy, instrument design, and current progress. Particular attention is given to the development and status of the Q-band receiver currently surveying the sky from the Atacama Desert and the development of

  14. Angular Goos-Hänchen effect in curved dielectric microstructures.

    PubMed

    Tran, N H; Dutriaux, L; Balcou, P; Floch, A L; Bretenaker, F

    1995-06-01

    A macroscopic angular Goos-Hänchen effect at total reflection on curved interfaces is studied experimentally. The results are compared with the complex-angular-momentum model of quasi-critical scattering. An extremum in angular deflection, which has not yet been predicted by any theory other than exact Mie scattering computations, is identified at low size parameters.

  15. Perturbations i have Known and Loved

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Field, Robert W.

    2011-06-01

    A spectroscopic perturbation is a disruption of a ^1Σ-^1Σ-like regular pattern that can embody level-shifts, extra lines, and intensity anomalies. Once upon a time, when a band was labeled ``perturbed,'' it was considered worthless because it could at best yield molecular constants unsuited for archival tables. Nevertheless, a few brave spectroscopists, notably Albin Lagerqvist and Richard Barrow, collected perturbations because they knew that the pattern of multiple perturbations formed an intricate puzzle that would eventually reveal the presence and electronic symmetry of otherwise unobservable electronic states. There are many kinds of patterns of broken patterns. In my PhD thesis I showed how to determine absolute vibrational assignments for the perturber from patterns among the observed values of perturbation matrix elements. When a ^3Π state is perturbed, its six (Ω, parity) components capture a pattern of level shifts and intensity anomalies that reveals more about the nature of the perturber than a simple perturbation of the single component of a ^1Σ state. In perturbation-facilitated OODR, a perturbed singlet level acts as a spectroscopic doorway through which the entire triplet manifold may be systematically explored. For polyatomic molecule vibrations, a vibrational polyad (a group of mutually perturbing vibrational levels, among which the perturbation matrix elements are expected to follow harmonic oscillator scaling rules) can contain more components than a ^3Π state and intrapolyad patterns can be exquisitely sensitive not merely to the nature of an interloper within the polyad but also to the eigenvector character of the vibronic state from which the polyad is viewed. Variation of scaled polyad interaction parameters from one polyad to the next, a pattern of patterns, can signal proximity to an isomerization barrier. Everything in Rydberg-land seems to scale as N⋆-3, yet a trespassing valence state causes all scaling and propensity rules go

  16. A theoretical estimate of intrinsic ellipticity bispectra induced by angular momenta alignments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Merkel, Philipp M.; Schäfer, Björn Malte

    2014-12-01

    Intrinsically aligned galaxy shapes are one of the most important systematics in cosmic shear measurements. So far, theoretical studies of intrinsic alignments almost exclusively focus on their statistics at the two-point level. Results from numerical simulations, however, suggest that third-order measures might be even stronger affected. We therefore investigate the (angular) bispectrum of intrinsic alignments. In our fully analytical study, we describe intrinsic galaxy ellipticities by a physical alignment model, which makes use of tidal torque theory. We derive expressions for the various combinations of intrinsic and gravitationally induced ellipticities, i.e. III-, GII- and GGI-alignments, and compare our results to the shear bispectrum, the GGG-term. The latter is computed using hyperextended perturbation theory. Considering equilateral and squeezed configurations, we find that for a Euclid-like survey intrinsic alignments (III-alignments) start to dominate on angular scales smaller than 20 and 13 arcmin, respectively. This sensitivity to the configuration-space geometry may allow us to exploit the cosmological information contained in both the intrinsic and gravitationally induced ellipticity field. On smallest scales (ℓ ˜ 3000), III-alignments exceed the lensing signal by at least one order of magnitude. The amplitude of the GGI-alignments is the weakest. It stays below that of the shear field on all angular scales irrespective of the wavevector configuration.

  17. Initial conditions for cosmological perturbations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ashtekar, Abhay; Gupt, Brajesh

    2017-02-01

    Penrose proposed that the big bang singularity should be constrained by requiring that the Weyl curvature vanishes there. The idea behind this past hypothesis is attractive because it constrains the initial conditions for the universe in geometric terms and is not confined to a specific early universe paradigm. However, the precise statement of Penrose’s hypothesis is tied to classical space-times and furthermore restricts only the gravitational degrees of freedom. These are encapsulated only in the tensor modes of the commonly used cosmological perturbation theory. Drawing inspiration from the underlying idea, we propose a quantum generalization of Penrose’s hypothesis using the Planck regime in place of the big bang, and simultaneously incorporating tensor as well as scalar modes. Initial conditions selected by this generalization constrain the universe to be as homogeneous and isotropic in the Planck regime as permitted by the Heisenberg uncertainty relations.

  18. Inflationary perturbations and precision cosmology

    SciTech Connect

    Habib, Salman; Heinen, Andreas; Heitmann, Katrin; Jungman, Gerard

    2005-02-15

    Inflationary cosmology provides a natural mechanism for the generation of primordial perturbations which seed the formation of observed cosmic structure and lead to specific signals of anisotropy in the cosmic microwave background radiation. In order to test the broad inflationary paradigm as well as particular models against precision observations, it is crucial to be able to make accurate predictions for the power spectrum of both scalar and tensor fluctuations. We present detailed calculations of these quantities utilizing direct numerical approaches as well as error-controlled uniform approximations, comparing with the (uncontrolled) traditional slow-roll approach. A simple extension of the leading-order uniform approximation yields results for the power spectra amplitudes, the spectral indices, and the running of spectral indices, with accuracy of the order of 0.1%--approximately the same level at which the transfer functions are known. Several representative examples are used to demonstrate these results.

  19. Accuracy of perturbative master equations.

    PubMed

    Fleming, C H; Cummings, N I

    2011-03-01

    We consider open quantum systems with dynamics described by master equations that have perturbative expansions in the system-environment interaction. We show that, contrary to intuition, full-time solutions of order-2n accuracy require an order-(2n+2) master equation. We give two examples of such inaccuracies in the solutions to an order-2n master equation: order-2n inaccuracies in the steady state of the system and order-2n positivity violations. We show how these arise in a specific example for which exact solutions are available. This result has a wide-ranging impact on the validity of coupling (or friction) sensitive results derived from second-order convolutionless, Nakajima-Zwanzig, Redfield, and Born-Markov master equations.

  20. Robust control with structured perturbations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Keel, Leehyun

    1988-01-01

    Two important problems in the area of control systems design and analysis are discussed. The first is the robust stability using characteristic polynomial, which is treated first in characteristic polynomial coefficient space with respect to perturbations in the coefficients of the characteristic polynomial, and then for a control system containing perturbed parameters in the transfer function description of the plant. In coefficient space, a simple expression is first given for the l(sup 2) stability margin for both monic and non-monic cases. Following this, a method is extended to reveal much larger stability region. This result has been extended to the parameter space so that one can determine the stability margin, in terms of ranges of parameter variations, of the closed loop system when the nominal stabilizing controller is given. The stability margin can be enlarged by a choice of better stabilizing controller. The second problem describes the lower order stabilization problem, the motivation of the problem is as follows. Even though the wide range of stabilizing controller design methodologies is available in both the state space and transfer function domains, all of these methods produce unnecessarily high order controllers. In practice, the stabilization is only one of many requirements to be satisfied. Therefore, if the order of a stabilizing controller is excessively high, one can normally expect to have a even higher order controller on the completion of design such as inclusion of dynamic response requirements, etc. Therefore, it is reasonable to have a lowest possible order stabilizing controller first and then adjust the controller to meet additional requirements. The algorithm for designing a lower order stabilizing controller is given. The algorithm does not necessarily produce the minimum order controller; however, the algorithm is theoretically logical and some simulation results show that the algorithm works in general.

  1. Angular-momentum evolution in laser-plasma accelerators.

    PubMed

    Thaury, C; Guillaume, E; Corde, S; Lehe, R; Le Bouteiller, M; Ta Phuoc, K; Davoine, X; Rax, J M; Rousse, A; Malka, V

    2013-09-27

    The transverse properties of an electron beam are characterized by two quantities, the emittance which indicates the electron beam extent in the phase space and the angular momentum which allows for nonplanar electron trajectories. Whereas the emittance of electron beams produced in a laser-plasma accelerator has been measured in several experiments, their angular momentum has been scarcely studied. It was demonstrated that electrons in a laser-plasma accelerator carry some angular momentum, but its origin was not established. Here we identify one source of angular-momentum growth and we present experimental results showing that the angular-momentum content evolves during the acceleration.

  2. Angular Momentum and Galaxy Formation Revisited

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Romanowsky, Aaron J.; Fall, S. Michael

    2012-12-01

    Motivated by a new wave of kinematical tracers in the outer regions of early-type galaxies (ellipticals and lenticulars), we re-examine the role of angular momentum in galaxies of all types. We present new methods for quantifying the specific angular momentum j, focusing mainly on the more challenging case of early-type galaxies, in order to derive firm empirical relations between stellar j sstarf and mass M sstarf (thus extending earlier work by Fall). We carry out detailed analyses of eight galaxies with kinematical data extending as far out as 10 effective radii, and find that data at two effective radii are generally sufficient to estimate total j sstarf reliably. Our results contravene suggestions that ellipticals could harbor large reservoirs of hidden j sstarf in their outer regions owing to angular momentum transport in major mergers. We then carry out a comprehensive analysis of extended kinematic data from the literature for a sample of ~100 nearby bright galaxies of all types, placing them on a diagram of j sstarf versus M sstarf. The ellipticals and spirals form two parallel j sstarf-M sstarf tracks, with log-slopes of ~0.6, which for the spirals are closely related to the Tully-Fisher relation, but for the ellipticals derives from a remarkable conspiracy between masses, sizes, and rotation velocities. The ellipticals contain less angular momentum on average than spirals of equal mass, with the quantitative disparity depending on the adopted K-band stellar mass-to-light ratios of the galaxies: it is a factor of ~3-4 if mass-to-light ratio variations are neglected for simplicity, and ~7 if they are included. We decompose the spirals into disks and bulges and find that these subcomponents follow j sstarf-M sstarf trends similar to the overall ones for spirals and ellipticals. The lenticulars have an intermediate trend, and we propose that the morphological types of galaxies reflect disk and bulge subcomponents that follow separate, fundamental j sstarf

  3. Whole-body angular momentum during stair ascent and descent.

    PubMed

    Silverman, Anne K; Neptune, Richard R; Sinitski, Emily H; Wilken, Jason M

    2014-04-01

    The generation of whole-body angular momentum is essential in many locomotor tasks and must be regulated in order to maintain dynamic balance. However, angular momentum has not been investigated during stair walking, which is an activity that presents a biomechanical challenge for balance-impaired populations. We investigated three-dimensional whole-body angular momentum during stair ascent and descent and compared it to level walking. Three-dimensional body-segment kinematic and ground reaction force (GRF) data were collected from 30 healthy subjects. Angular momentum was calculated using a 13-segment whole-body model. GRFs, external moment arms and net joint moments were used to interpret the angular momentum results. The range of frontal plane angular momentum was greater for stair ascent relative to level walking. In the transverse and sagittal planes, the range of angular momentum was smaller in stair ascent and descent relative to level walking. Significant differences were also found in the ground reaction forces, external moment arms and net joint moments. The sagittal plane angular momentum results suggest that individuals alter angular momentum to effectively counteract potential trips during stair ascent, and reduce the range of angular momentum to avoid falling forward during stair descent. Further, significant differences in joint moments suggest potential neuromuscular mechanisms that account for the differences in angular momentum between walking conditions. These results provide a baseline for comparison to impaired populations that have difficulty maintaining dynamic balance, particularly during stair ascent and descent.

  4. Perturbed Radius of Geosynchronous-Satellite Orbit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kawase, Sei-Ichiro

    We analyze theoretically how the radius of geosynchronous orbits would vary owing to the perturbations due to the sun/moon gravity, solar radiation pressure, and the oblate earth. The analysis is simple, as it uses a diagrammatic method to solve near-circular orbital motions. Results are obtained in seven terms of corrections to the radius of non-perturbed ideal orbits. Each correction term is derived, with clear physical meaning, from each component of the perturbing forces.

  5. Lunar influence on equatorial atmospheric angular momentum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bizouard, Christian; Zotov, Leonid; Sidorenkov, Nikolay

    2014-11-01

    This study investigates the relationship between the equatorial atmospheric angular momentum oscillation in the nonrotating frame and the quasi-diurnal lunar tidal potential. Between 2 and 30 days, the corresponding equatorial component, called Celestial Atmospheric Angular Momentum (CEAM), is mostly constituted of prograde circular motions, especially of a harmonic at 13.66 days, a sidelobe at 13.63 days, and of a weekly broadband variation. A simple equilibrium tide model explains the 13.66 day pressure term as a result of the O1 lunar tide. The powerful episodic fluctuations between 5 and 8 days possibly reflect an atmospheric normal mode excited by the tidal waves Q1 (6.86 days) and σ1 (7.095 days). The lunar tidal influence on the spectral band from 2 to 30 days is confirmed by two specific features, not occurring for seasonal band dominated by the solar thermal effect. First, Northern and Southern Hemispheres contribute equally and synchronously to the CEAM wind term. Second, the pressure and wind terms are proportional, which follows from angular momentum budget considerations where the topographic and friction torques on the solid Earth are much smaller than the one resulting from the equatorial bulge. Such a configuration is expected for the case of tidally induced circulation, where the surface pressure variation is tesseral and cannot contribute to the topographic torque, and tidal winds blow only at high altitudes. The likely effects of the lunar-driven atmospheric circulation on Earth's nutation are estimated and discussed in light of the present-day capabilities of space geodetic techniques.

  6. Angular Rate Estimation Using a Distributed Set of Accelerometers

    PubMed Central

    Park, Sungsu; Hong, Sung Kyung

    2011-01-01

    A distributed set of accelerometers based on the minimum number of 12 accelerometers allows for computation of the magnitude of angular rate without using the integration operation. However, it is not easy to extract the magnitude of angular rate in the presence of the accelerometer noises, and even worse, it is difficult to determine the direction of a rotation because the angular rate is present in its quadratic form within the inertial measurement system equations. In this paper, an extended Kalman filter scheme to correctly estimate both the direction and magnitude of the angular rate through fusion of the angular acceleration and quadratic form of the angular rate is proposed. We also provide observability analysis for the general distributed accelerometers-based inertial measurement unit, and show that the angular rate can be correctly estimated by general nonlinear state estimators such as an extended Kalman filter, except under certain extreme conditions. PMID:22346651

  7. Linear and angular retroreflecting interferometric alignment target

    DOEpatents

    Maxey, L. Curtis

    2001-01-01

    The present invention provides a method and apparatus for measuring both the linear displacement and angular displacement of an object using a linear interferometer system and an optical target comprising a lens, a reflective surface and a retroreflector. The lens, reflecting surface and retroreflector are specifically aligned and fixed in optical connection with one another, creating a single optical target which moves as a unit that provides multi-axis displacement information for the object with which it is associated. This displacement information is useful in many applications including machine tool control systems and laser tracker systems, among others.

  8. Angular Momentum Sensitive Two-Center Interference

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ilchen, M.; Glaser, L.; Scholz, F.; Walter, P.; Deinert, S.; Rothkirch, A.; Seltmann, J.; Viefhaus, J.; Decleva, P.; Langer, B.; Knie, A.; Ehresmann, A.; Al-Dossary, O. M.; Braune, M.; Hartmann, G.; Meissner, A.; Tribedi, L. C.; AlKhaldi, M.; Becker, U.

    2014-01-01

    In quantum mechanics the Young-type double-slit experiment can be performed with electrons either traveling through a double slit or being coherently emitted from two inversion symmetric molecular sites. In the latter one the valence photoionization cross sections of homonuclear diatomic molecules were predicted to oscillate over kinetic energy almost 50 years ago. Beyond the direct proof of the oscillatory behavior of these photoionization cross sections σ, we show that the angular distribution of the emitted electrons reveals hitherto unexplored information on the relative phase shift between the corresponding partial waves through two-center interference patterns.

  9. Angular resolution of stacked resistive plate chambers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Samuel, Deepak; Onikeri, Pratibha B.; Murgod, Lakshmi P.

    2017-01-01

    We present here detailed derivations of mathematical expressions for the accuracy in the arrival direction of particles estimated using a set of stacked resistive plate chambers (RPCs). The expressions are validated against experimental results using data collected from the prototype detectors (without magnet) of the upcoming India-based Neutrino Observatory (INO). We also present a theoretical estimate of angular resolution of such a setup. In principle, these expressions can be used for any other detector with an architecture similar to that of RPCs.

  10. Models and theory for precompound angular distributions

    SciTech Connect

    Blann, M.; Pohl, B.A.; Remington, B.A. ); Scobel, W.; Trabandt, M. . 1. Inst. fuer Experimentalphysik); Byrd, R.C. ); Foster, C.C. ); Bonetti, R.; Chiesa, C. . Ist. di Fisica Generale Applicata); Grimes, S.M. (Ohio Univ

    1990-06-06

    We compare angular distributions calculated by folding nucleon- nucleon scattering kernels, using the theory of Feshbach, Kerman and Koonin, and the systematics of Kalbach, with a wide range of data. The data range from (n,xn) at 14 MeV incident energy to (p,xn) at 160 MeV incident energy. The FKK theory works well with one adjustable parameter, the depth of the nucleon-nucleon interaction potential. The systematics work well when normalized to the hybrid model single differential cross section prediction. The nucleon- nucleon scattering approach seems inadequate. 9 refs., 10 figs.

  11. Angular momentum sensitive two-center interference.

    PubMed

    Ilchen, M; Glaser, L; Scholz, F; Walter, P; Deinert, S; Rothkirch, A; Seltmann, J; Viefhaus, J; Decleva, P; Langer, B; Knie, A; Ehresmann, A; Al-Dossary, O M; Braune, M; Hartmann, G; Meissner, A; Tribedi, L C; AlKhaldi, M; Becker, U

    2014-01-17

    In quantum mechanics the Young-type double-slit experiment can be performed with electrons either traveling through a double slit or being coherently emitted from two inversion symmetric molecular sites. In the latter one the valence photoionization cross sections of homonuclear diatomic molecules were predicted to oscillate over kinetic energy almost 50 years ago. Beyond the direct proof of the oscillatory behavior of these photoionization cross sections σ, we show that the angular distribution of the emitted electrons reveals hitherto unexplored information on the relative phase shift between the corresponding partial waves through two-center interference patterns.

  12. Angular correlation studies in noble gases

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Coleman, P. G.

    1990-01-01

    There has been a recent revival of interest in the measurement of angular correlation of annihilation photons from the decay of positrons and positronium in gases. This revival has been stimulated by the possibility offered by the technique to shed new light on the apparently low positronium formation fraction in the heavier noble gases and to provide information on positronium quenching processes in gases such as oxygen. There is also the potential for learning about positronium slowing down in gases. This review focuses on experimental noble gas work and considers what new information has been, and may be, gained from these studies.

  13. New relativistic Hamiltonian: the angular magnetoelectric coupling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paillard, Charles; Mondal, Ritwik; Berritta, Marco; Dkhil, Brahim; Singh, Surendra; Oppeneer, Peter M.; Bellaiche, Laurent

    2016-10-01

    Spin-Orbit Coupling (SOC) is a ubiquitous phenomenon in the spintronics area, as it plays a major role in allowing for enhancing many well-known phenomena, such as the Dzyaloshinskii-Moriya interaction, magnetocrystalline anisotropy, the Rashba effect, etc. However, the usual expression of the SOC interaction ħ/4m2c2 [E×p] • σ (1) where p is the momentum operator, E the electric field, σ the vector of Pauli matrices, breaks the gauge invariance required by the electronic Hamiltonian. On the other hand, very recently, a new phenomenological interaction, coupling the angular momentum of light and magnetic moments, has been proposed based on symmetry arguments: ξ/2 [r × (E × B)] M, (2) with M the magnetization, r the position, and ξ the interaction strength constant. This interaction has been demonstrated to contribute and/or give rise, in a straightforward way, to various magnetoelectric phenomena,such as the anomalous Hall effect (AHE), the anisotropic magnetoresistance (AMR), the planar Hall effect and Rashba-like effects, or the spin-current model in multiferroics. This last model is known to be the origin of the cycloidal spin arrangement in bismuth ferrite for instance. However, the coupling of the angular momentum of light with magnetic moments lacked a fundamental theoretical basis. Starting from the Dirac equation, we derive a relativistic interaction Hamiltonian which linearly couples the angular momentum density of the electromagnetic (EM) field and the electrons spin. We name this coupling the Angular MagnetoElectric (AME) coupling. We show that in the limit of uniform magnetic field, the AME coupling yields an interaction exactly of the form of Eq. (2), thereby giving a firm theoretical basis to earlier works. The AME coupling can be expressed as: ξ [E × A] • σ (3) with A being the vector potential. Interestingly, the AME coupling was shown to be complementary to the traditional SOC, and together they restore the gauge invariance of the

  14. Kato expansion in quantum canonical perturbation theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nikolaev, Andrey

    2016-06-01

    This work establishes a connection between canonical perturbation series in quantum mechanics and a Kato expansion for the resolvent of the Liouville superoperator. Our approach leads to an explicit expression for a generator of a block-diagonalizing Dyson's ordered exponential in arbitrary perturbation order. Unitary intertwining of perturbed and unperturbed averaging superprojectors allows for a description of ambiguities in the generator and block-diagonalized Hamiltonian. We compare the efficiency of the corresponding computational algorithm with the efficiencies of the Van Vleck and Magnus methods for high perturbative orders.

  15. Generic perturbations of linear integrable Hamiltonian systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bounemoura, Abed

    2016-11-01

    In this paper, we investigate perturbations of linear integrable Hamiltonian systems, with the aim of establishing results in the spirit of the KAM theorem (preservation of invariant tori), the Nekhoroshev theorem (stability of the action variables for a finite but long interval of time) and Arnold diffusion (instability of the action variables). Whether the frequency of the integrable system is resonant or not, it is known that the KAM theorem does not hold true for all perturbations; when the frequency is resonant, it is the Nekhoroshev theorem that does not hold true for all perturbations. Our first result deals with the resonant case: we prove a result of instability for a generic perturbation, which implies that the KAM and the Nekhoroshev theorem do not hold true even for a generic perturbation. The case where the frequency is nonresonant is more subtle. Our second result shows that for a generic perturbation the KAM theorem holds true. Concerning the Nekhrosohev theorem, it is known that one has stability over an exponentially long (with respect to some function of ɛ -1) interval of time and that this cannot be improved for all perturbations. Our third result shows that for a generic perturbation one has stability for a doubly exponentially long interval of time. The only question left unanswered is whether one has instability for a generic perturbation (necessarily after this very long interval of time).

  16. Kato expansion in quantum canonical perturbation theory

    SciTech Connect

    Nikolaev, Andrey

    2016-06-15

    This work establishes a connection between canonical perturbation series in quantum mechanics and a Kato expansion for the resolvent of the Liouville superoperator. Our approach leads to an explicit expression for a generator of a block-diagonalizing Dyson’s ordered exponential in arbitrary perturbation order. Unitary intertwining of perturbed and unperturbed averaging superprojectors allows for a description of ambiguities in the generator and block-diagonalized Hamiltonian. We compare the efficiency of the corresponding computational algorithm with the efficiencies of the Van Vleck and Magnus methods for high perturbative orders.

  17. Simple Theory of Geosynchronous-Orbit Perturbations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kawase, Sei-Ichiro

    A simple perturbation theory is introduced for modeling geosynchronous orbits. The theory uses diagrammatic representations of orbits, and derives the perturbations in a direct manner without using differential equations. Perturbations of major importance are derived, including satellite-longitude changes due to the earth’s asymmetric shape, orbital eccentricity increase due to the sun-radiation pressure, and orbital plane inclination due to the sun/moon attraction. The theory clarifies the physical/geometrical meaning of the perturbations while using minimal mathematical analysis.

  18. Perturbative spacetimes from Yang-Mills theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luna, Andrés; Monteiro, Ricardo; Nicholson, Isobel; Ochirov, Alexander; O'Connell, Donal; Westerberg, Niclas; White, Chris D.

    2017-04-01

    The double copy relates scattering amplitudes in gauge and gravity theories. In this paper, we expand the scope of the double copy to construct spacetime metrics through a systematic perturbative expansion. The perturbative procedure is based on direct calculation in Yang-Mills theory, followed by squaring the numerator of certain perturbative diagrams as specified by the double-copy algorithm. The simplest spherically symmetric, stationary spacetime from the point of view of this procedure is a particular member of the Janis-Newman-Winicour family of naked singularities. Our work paves the way for applications of the double copy to physically interesting problems such as perturbative black-hole scattering.

  19. Singularity perturbed zero dynamics of nonlinear systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Isidori, A.; Sastry, S. S.; Kokotovic, P. V.; Byrnes, C. I.

    1992-01-01

    Stability properties of zero dynamics are among the crucial input-output properties of both linear and nonlinear systems. Unstable, or 'nonminimum phase', zero dynamics are a major obstacle to input-output linearization and high-gain designs. An analysis of the effects of regular perturbations in system equations on zero dynamics shows that whenever a perturbation decreases the system's relative degree, it manifests itself as a singular perturbation of zero dynamics. Conditions are given under which the zero dynamics evolve in two timescales characteristic of a standard singular perturbation form that allows a separate analysis of slow and fast parts of the zero dynamics.

  20. Supernovae data and perturbative deviation from homogeneity

    SciTech Connect

    Enqvist, Kari; Mattsson, Maria; Rigopoulos, Gerasimos E-mail: maria.ronkainen@helsinki.fi

    2009-09-01

    We show that a spherically symmetric perturbation of a dust dominated Ω = 1 FRW universe in the Newtonian gauge can lead to an apparent acceleration of standard candles and provide a fit to the magnitude-redshift relation inferred from the supernovae data, while the perturbation in the gravitational potential remains small at all scales. We also demonstrate that the supernovae data does not necessarily imply the presence of some additional non-perturbative contribution by showing that any Lemaitre-Tolman-Bondi model fitting the supernovae data (with appropriate initial conditions) will be equivalent to a perturbed FRW spacetime along the past light cone.

  1. Gravitational perturbation of the BTZ black hole induced by test particles and weak cosmic censorship in AdS spacetime

    SciTech Connect

    Rocha, Jorge V.; Cardoso, Vitor

    2011-05-15

    We analyze the gravitational perturbations induced by particles falling into a three dimensional, asymptotically AdS black hole geometry. More specifically, we solve the linearized perturbation equations obtained from the geodesic motion of a ringlike distribution of test particles in the BTZ background. This setup ensures that the U(1) symmetry of the background is preserved. The nonasymptotic flatness of the background raises difficulties in attributing the significance of energy and angular momentum to the conserved quantities of the test particles. This issue is well known but, to the best of our knowledge, has never been addressed in the literature. We confirm that the naive expressions for energy and angular momentum are the correct definitions. Finally, we put an asymptotically AdS version of the weak cosmic censorship to a test: by attempting to overspin the BTZ black hole with test particles it is found that the black hole cannot be spun-up past its extremal limit.

  2. Characterization of the Head Stabilization Response to a Lateral Perturbation During Walking in Older Adults

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Buccello-Stout, Regina R.; Cromwell, Ronita L.; Bloomberg, Jacob J.

    2009-01-01

    A main contributor of fractures in older adults is from a lateral fall. The decline in sensory systems results in difficulty maintaining balance stability. Head stabilization contributes to postural control by serving as a stable platform for the sensory systems. The purpose of this study was to characterize the head stabilization response to a lateral perturbation while walking. A total of 16 healthy older adults, aged 66-81 years, walked across a foam pathway 6 times. One piece of the foam pathway covered a movable platform that translated to the left when the subject stepped on the foam. Three trials were randomized in which the platform shifted. Angular rate sensors placed on the center of mass of the head and trunk collected head and trunk movement in all three planes of motion. The roll plane was analyzed to examine motion in the plane of the perturbation. Subjects stepped onto the platform with the right foot. Recovery step time and distance were recorded. The first trial was analyzed to capture the novelty of the perturbation. Results indicate a significant difference in footfall distance t=0.004, p<0.05, as well as the speed of foot recovery t=0.001, p<0.05, between natural and perturbed walking. Results indicate that the head t=0.005, p<0.05, and trunk t=0.0001, p<0.05, velocities increase during perturbed compared to natural walking. Older adults place their recovery foot down faster when perturbed to re-establish their base of support. Head and trunk segments are less stable and move with greater velocities to reestablish stability when perturbed.

  3. Changes in Head Stability Control in Response to a Lateral Perturbation while Walking in Older Adults

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Buccello, Regina R.; Cromwell, Ronita L.; Bloomberg, Jacob J.

    2008-01-01

    Falling is a main contributor of injury in older adults. The decline in sensory systems associated with aging limits information needed to successfully compensate for unexpected perturbations. Therefore, sensory changes result in older adults having problems maintaining balance stability when experiencing an unexpected lateral perturbation (e.g. slip) in the environment. The goal of this study was to determine head stability movement strategies used by older adults when experiencing an unexpected lateral perturbation during walking. A total of 16 healthy adults, aged 66-81 years, walked across a foam pathway 6 times. One piece of the foam pathway covered a movable platform that translated to the left when the subject stepped on the foam. Three trials were randomized in which the platform shifted. Angular rate sensors were placed on the center of mass for the head and trunk segments to collect head and trunk movement in all three planes of motion. The predominant movement strategies for maintaining head stability were determined from the results of the cross-correlation analyses between the head and trunk segments. The Chi square test of independence was used to evaluate the movement pattern distributions of head-trunk coordination during perturbed and non-perturbed walking. When perturbed, head stabilization was significantly challenged in the yaw and roll planes of motion. Subjects demonstrated a movement pattern of the head leading the trunk in an effort to stabilize the head. The older adult subjects used this head stabilization movement pattern to compensate for sensory changes when experiencing the unexpected lateral perturbation.

  4. Characterization of the Head Stabilization Response to a Lateral Perturbation During Walking in Older Adults

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Buccello-Stout, Regina R.; Cromwell, Ronita L.; Bloomberg, Jacob J.

    2009-01-01

    A main contributor of fractures in older adults is from a lateral fall. The decline in sensory systems results in difficulty maintaining balance stability. Head stabilization contributes to postural control by serving as a stable platform for the sensory systems. The purpose of this study was to characterize the head stabilization response to a lateral perturbation while walking. A total of 16 healthy older adults, aged 66-81 years, walked across a foam pathway 6 times. One piece of the foam pathway covered a movable platform that translated to the left when the subject stepped on the foam. Three trials were randomized in which the platform shifted. Angular rate sensors placed on the center of mass of the head and trunk collected head and trunk movement in all three planes of motion. The roll plane was analyzed to examine motion in the plane of the perturbation. Subjects stepped onto the platform with the right foot. Recovery step time and distance were recorded. The first trial was analyzed to capture the novelty of the perturbation. Results indicate a significant difference in footfall distance t=0.004, p<0.05, as well as the speed of foot recovery t=0.001, p<0.05, between natural and perturbed walking. Results indicate that the head t=0.005, p<0.05, and trunk t=0.0001, p<0.05, velocities increase during perturbed compared to natural walking. Older adults place their recovery foot down faster when perturbed to re-establish their base of support. Head and trunk segments are less stable and move with greater velocities to reestablish stability when perturbed.

  5. Separable wave equations for gravitoelectromagnetic perturbations of rotating charged black strings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miranda, Alex S.; Morgan, Jaqueline; Kandus, Alejandra; Zanchin, Vilson T.

    2015-12-01

    Rotating charged black strings are exact solutions of four-dimensional Einstein-Maxwell equations with a negative cosmological constant and a non-trivial spacetime topology. According to the AdS/CFT correspondence, these black strings are dual to rotating thermal states of a strongly interacting quantum field theory with nonzero chemical potential that lives in a cylinder. The dynamics of linear fluctuations in the dual field theory can be studied from the perturbation equations for classical fields in a black-string spacetime. With this motivation in mind, we develop here a completely gauge and tetrad invariant perturbation approach to deal with the gravitoelectromagnetic fluctuations of rotating charged black strings in the presence of sources. As usual, for any charged black hole, a perturbation in the background electromagnetic field induces a metric perturbation and vice versa. In spite of this coupling and the non-vanishing angular momentum, we show that linearization of equations of the Newman-Penrose formalism leads to four separated second-order complex equations for suitable combinations of the spin coefficients, the Weyl and the Maxwell scalars. Then, we generalize the Chandrasekhar transformation theory by the inclusion of sources and apply it to reduce the perturbation problem to four decoupled inhomogeneous wave equations—a pair for each sector of perturbations. The radial part of such wave equations can be put into Schrödinger-like forms after Fourier transforming them with respect to time. We find that the resulting effective potentials form two pairs of supersymmetric partner potentials and, as a consequence, the fundamental variables of one perturbation sector are related to the variables of the other sector. The relevance of such a symmetry in connection to the AdS/CFT correspondence is discussed, and future applications of the pertubation theory developed here are outlined.

  6. Understanding GRETINA using angular correlation method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Austin, Madeline

    2015-10-01

    The ability to trace the path of gamma rays through germanium is not only necessary for taking full advantage of GRETINA but also a promising possibility for homeland security defense against nuclear threats. This research tested the current tracking algorithm using the angular correlation method by comparing results from raw and tracked data to the theoretical model for Co-60. It was found that the current tracking method is unsuccessful in reproducing angular correlation. Variations to the tracking algorithm were made in the FM value, tracking angle, number of angles of separation observed, and window of coincidence in attempt to improve correlation results. From these variations it was observed that having a larger FM improved results, reducing the number of observational angles worsened correlation, and that overall larger tracking angles improved with larger windows of coincidence and vice-verse. Future research would be to refine the angle of measurement for raw data and to explore the possibility of an energy dependence by testing other elements. This work is supported by the United States Department of Energy, Office of Science, under Contract Number DE-AC02-06CH11357

  7. Maximum magnetic moment to angular momentum conjecture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barrow, John D.; Gibbons, G. W.

    2017-03-01

    Conjectures play a central role in theoretical physics, especially those that assert an upper bound to some dimensionless ratio of physical quantities. In this paper we introduce a new such conjecture bounding the ratio of the magnetic moment to angular momentum in nature. We also discuss the current status of some old bounds on dimensionless and dimensional quantities in arbitrary spatial dimension. Our new conjecture is that the dimensionless Schuster-Wilson-Blackett number, c μ /J G1/2 , where μ is the magnetic moment and J is the angular momentum, is bounded above by a number of order unity. We verify that such a bound holds for charged rotating black holes in those theories for which exact solutions are available, including the Einstein-Maxwell theory, Kaluza-Klein theory, the Kerr-Sen black hole, and the so-called STU family of charged rotating supergravity black holes. We also discuss the current status of the maximum tension conjecture, the Dyson luminosity bound, and Thorne's hoop conjecture.

  8. Fast diffusion imaging with high angular resolution.

    PubMed

    Chao, Tzu-Cheng; Chiou, Jr-Yuan George; Maier, Stephan E; Madore, Bruno

    2017-02-01

    High angular resolution diffusion imaging (HARDI) is a well-established method to help reveal the architecture of nerve bundles, but long scan times and geometric distortions inherent to echo planar imaging (EPI) have limited its integration into clinical protocols. A fast imaging method is proposed here that combines accelerated multishot diffusion imaging (AMDI), multiplexed sensitivity encoding (MUSE), and crossing fiber angular resolution of intravoxel structure (CFARI) to reduce spatial distortions and reduce total scan time. A multishot EPI sequence was used to improve geometrical fidelity as compared to a single-shot EPI acquisition, and acceleration in both k-space and diffusion sampling enabled reductions in scan time. The method is regularized and self-navigated for motion correction. Seven volunteers were scanned in this study, including four with volumetric whole brain acquisitions. The average similarity of microstructural orientations between undersampled datasets and their fully sampled counterparts was above 85%, with scan times below 5 min for whole-brain acquisitions. Up to 2.7-fold scan time acceleration along with four-fold distortion reduction was achieved. The proposed imaging strategy can generate HARDI results with relatively good geometrical fidelity and low scan duration, which may help facilitate the transition of HARDI from a successful research tool to a practical clinical one. Magn Reson Med 77:696-706, 2017. © 2016 International Society for Magnetic Resonance in Medicine. © 2016 International Society for Magnetic Resonance in Medicine.

  9. Electron vortices: Beams with orbital angular momentum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lloyd, S. M.; Babiker, M.; Thirunavukkarasu, G.; Yuan, J.

    2017-07-01

    The recent prediction and subsequent creation of electron vortex beams in a number of laboratories occurred after almost 20 years had elapsed since the recognition of the physical significance and potential for applications of the orbital angular momentum carried by optical vortex beams. A rapid growth in interest in electron vortex beams followed, with swift theoretical and experimental developments. Much of the rapid progress can be attributed in part to the clear similarities between electron optics and photonics arising from the functional equivalence between the Helmholtz equations governing the free-space propagation of optical beams and the time-independent Schrödinger equation governing freely propagating electron vortex beams. There are, however, key differences in the properties of the two kinds of vortex beams. This review is primarily concerned with the electron type, with specific emphasis on the distinguishing vortex features: notably the spin, electric charge, current and magnetic moment, the spatial distribution, and the associated electric and magnetic fields. The physical consequences and potential applications of such properties are pointed out and analyzed, including nanoparticle manipulation and the mechanisms of orbital angular momentum transfer in the electron vortex interaction with matter.

  10. Angular Momentum Redistribution in Turbulent Compressible Convection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hurlburt, Neal; Brummell, Nicholas; Toomre, Juri

    1997-08-01

    We consider the dynamics of turbulent compressible convection within a curved local segment of a rotating spherical shell. We aim to understand the disparity between the observed solar differential rotation and previous numerical simulations. The angular extent of the curved domain is limited to a small solid angle in order to exploit fully the available spatial degrees of freedom on current supercomputers and attain the highest possible Reynolds numbers. Here we present simulations with Rayleigh numbers in excess of 10^7, and Prandtl numbers less than 0.1. This computational domain takes the form of a curved, periodic channel in longitude with stress-free sidewalls in latitude and radius. The numerical solutions are obtained using high-order accuracy explicit code. It evaluates spatial derivatives using sixth-order compact finite differences in radius and latitude and psuedospectral methods in longitude and advances the solutions in time using a fourth-order Bulirsch-Stoer integrator. The surface flows form broad, laminar networks which mask the much more turbulent flows of the interior. The dynamics within this turbulent region is controlled by the interactions of a tangled web of strong vortex tubes. These tubes and their interactions redistrubute the angular momentum, generating azimuthal flows with strong shear in both radius and latitude. Lockheed Martin Solar and Astrophysics Lab

  11. Axions and the galactic angular momentum distribution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Banik, N.; Sikivie, P.

    2013-12-01

    We analyze the behavior of axion dark matter before it falls into a galactic gravitational potential well. The axions thermalize sufficiently fast by gravitational self-interactions that almost all go to their lowest-energy state consistent with the total angular momentum acquired from tidal torquing. That state is a state of rigid rotation on the turnaround sphere. It predicts the occurrence and detailed properties of the caustic rings of dark matter for which observational evidence had been found earlier. We show that the vortices in the axion Bose-Einstein condensate (BEC) are attractive, unlike those in superfluid He4 and dilute gases. We expect that a large fraction of the vortices in the axion BEC join into a single big vortex along the rotation axis of the galaxy. The resulting enhancement of caustic rings explains the typical size of the rises in the Milky Way rotation curve attributed to caustic rings. We show that baryons and ordinary cold dark matter particles are entrained by the axion BEC and acquire the same velocity distribution. The resulting baryonic angular momentum distribution gives a good qualitative fit to the distributions observed in dwarf galaxies. We give estimates of the minimum fraction of dark matter that is composed of axions.

  12. Imaging transient events at high angular resolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schaefer, Gail H.

    2016-08-01

    Resolving the spatial structure of transient events provides insights into their physical nature and origin. Recent observations using long baseline optical/infrared interferometry have revealed the size, shape, and angular expansion of bright novae within a few days after their outbursts. This has implications for understanding the timescale for the development of asymmetric features in novae ejecta. Additionally, combining spectroscopic measurements of the expansion velocity with the angular expansion rate provides a way to measure a geometric distance to the nova. In this paper, I provide a review of interferometric observations of novae, with a focus on recent results on the expansion and spatial structure of nova V339 Del in 2013. I also discuss other promising applications of interferometry to transient sources, such as measuring the image size and centroid displacements to measure planetary masses in gravitational microlensing events. Given the timescales of transient events, it is critical for interferometric arrays to respond rapidly to targets of opportunity in order to optimize the instrumental sensitivity and baselines required to resolve the source while its brightness and size change over time.

  13. Detection and recognition of angular frequency patterns.

    PubMed

    Wilson, Hugh R; Propp, Roni

    2015-05-01

    Previous research has extensively explored visual encoding of smoothly curved, closed contours described by sinusoidal variation of pattern radius as a function of polar angle (RF patterns). Although the contours of many biologically significant objects are curved, we also confront shapes with a more jagged and angular appearance. To study these, we introduce here a novel class of visual stimuli that deform smoothly from a circle to an equilateral polygon with N sides (AF patterns). Threshold measurements reveal that both AF and RF patterns can be discriminated from circles at the same deformation amplitude, approximately 18.0arcsec, which is in the hyperacuity range. Thresholds were slightly higher for patterns with 3.0 cycles than for those with 5.0 cycles. Discrimination between AF and RF patterns was 75% correct at an amplitude that was approximately 3.0 times the threshold amplitude, which implies that AF and RF patterns activate different neural populations. Experiments with jittered patterns in which the contour was broken into several pieces and shifted inward or outward had much less effect on AF patterns than on RF patterns. Similarly, thresholds for single angles of AF patterns showed no significant difference from thresholds for the entire AF pattern. Taken together, these results imply that the visual system incorporates angles explicitly in the representation of closed object contours, but it suggests that angular contours are represented more locally than are curved contours.

  14. Orbital angular momentum of general astigmatic modes

    SciTech Connect

    Visser, Jorrit; Nienhuis, Gerard

    2004-07-01

    We present an operator method to obtain complete sets of astigmatic Gaussian solutions of the paraxial wave equation. In case of general astigmatism, the astigmatic intensity and phase distribution of the fundamental mode differ in orientation. As a consequence, the fundamental mode has a nonzero orbital angular momentum, which is not due to phase singularities. Analogous to the operator method for the quantum harmonic oscillator, the corresponding astigmatic higher-order modes are obtained by repeated application of raising operators on the fundamental mode. The nature of the higher-order modes is characterized by a point on a sphere, in analogy with the representation of polarization on the Poincare sphere. The north and south poles represent astigmatic Laguerre-Gaussian modes, similar to circular polarization on the Poincare sphere, while astigmatic Hermite-Gaussian modes are associated with points on the equator, analogous to linear polarization. We discuss the propagation properties of the modes and their orbital angular momentum, which depends on the degree of astigmatism and on the location of the point on the sphere.

  15. Muscle activities during asymmetric trunk angular accelerations.

    PubMed

    Marras, W S; Mirka, G A

    1990-11-01

    The objective of this study was to characterize trunk muscle and intra-abdominal pressure behavior during extensions of the trunk when angular trunk acceleration levels and trunk twist were varied during lifting exertions. Since force is related to acceleration, it was believed that changes in trunk acceleration would cause activity changes in the muscles and abdominal cavity pressurization mechanics that load the spine during manual materials handling tasks. The electromyographic activity of 10 trunk muscles and intra-abdominal pressure were studied in 39 subjects as they moved their trunks under high, medium, and low constant angular acceleration conditions. The results indicated that almost all the muscles were affected by acceleration and asymmetry. Muscle activities of up to 50% of maximum were observed even though a minimal amount of torque was being produced by the back. Coactivation of muscles was also apparent. Muscles located at the greatest distances from the spine, such as the latissimus dorsi and oblique groups, increased their activities the most as trunk acceleration increased. Muscles located farthest from the spine also played an important role as the trunk became more asymmetric. Intra-abdominal pressure changed minimally over the test conditions. The nature of these responses and their impact on spine loading are discussed.

  16. [Sensitivity of four representative angular cephalometric measures].

    PubMed

    Xü, T; Ahn, J; Baumrind, S

    2000-05-01

    Examined the sensitivity of four representative cephalometric angles to the detection of different vectors of craniofacial growth. Landmark coordinate data from a stratified random sample of 48 adolescent subjects were used to calculate conventional values for changes between the pretreatment and end-of-treatment lateral cephalograms. By modifying the end-of-treatment coordinate values appropriately, the angular changes could be recalculated reflecting three hypothetical situations: Case 1. What if there were no downward landmark displacement between timepoints? Case 2. What if there were no forward landmark displacement between timepoints? Case 3. What if there were no Nasion change? These questions were asked for four representative cephalometric angles: SNA, ANB, NAPg and UI-SN. For Case 1, the associations (r) between the baseline and the modified measure for the three angles were very highly significant (P < 0.001) with r2 values no lower than 0.94! For Case 2, however, the associations were much weaker and no r value reached significance. These angular measurements are less sensitive for measuring downward landmark displacement than they are for measuring forward landmark displacement.

  17. Perturbation theory in light-cone quantization

    SciTech Connect

    Langnau, A.

    1992-01-01

    A thorough investigation of light-cone properties which are characteristic for higher dimensions is very important. The easiest way of addressing these issues is by analyzing the perturbative structure of light-cone field theories first. Perturbative studies cannot be substituted for an analysis of problems related to a nonperturbative approach. However, in order to lay down groundwork for upcoming nonperturbative studies, it is indispensable to validate the renormalization methods at the perturbative level, i.e., to gain control over the perturbative treatment first. A clear understanding of divergences in perturbation theory, as well as their numerical treatment, is a necessary first step towards formulating such a program. The first objective of this dissertation is to clarify this issue, at least in second and fourth-order in perturbation theory. The work in this dissertation can provide guidance for the choice of counterterms in Discrete Light-Cone Quantization or the Tamm-Dancoff approach. A second objective of this work is the study of light-cone perturbation theory as a competitive tool for conducting perturbative Feynman diagram calculations. Feynman perturbation theory has become the most practical tool for computing cross sections in high energy physics and other physical properties of field theory. Although this standard covariant method has been applied to a great range of problems, computations beyond one-loop corrections are very difficult. Because of the algebraic complexity of the Feynman calculations in higher-order perturbation theory, it is desirable to automatize Feynman diagram calculations so that algebraic manipulation programs can carry out almost the entire calculation. This thesis presents a step in this direction. The technique we are elaborating on here is known as light-cone perturbation theory.

  18. Perturbation theory in light-cone quantization

    SciTech Connect

    Langnau, A.

    1992-01-01

    A thorough investigation of light-cone properties which are characteristic for higher dimensions is very important. The easiest way of addressing these issues is by analyzing the perturbative structure of light-cone field theories first. Perturbative studies cannot be substituted for an analysis of problems related to a nonperturbative approach. However, in order to lay down groundwork for upcoming nonperturbative studies, it is indispensable to validate the renormalization methods at the perturbative level, i.e., to gain control over the perturbative treatment first. A clear understanding of divergences in perturbation theory, as well as their numerical treatment, is a necessary first step towards formulating such a program. The first objective of this dissertation is to clarify this issue, at least in second and fourth-order in perturbation theory. The work in this dissertation can provide guidance for the choice of counterterms in Discrete Light-Cone Quantization or the Tamm-Dancoff approach. A second objective of this work is the study of light-cone perturbation theory as a competitive tool for conducting perturbative Feynman diagram calculations. Feynman perturbation theory has become the most practical tool for computing cross sections in high energy physics and other physical properties of field theory. Although this standard covariant method has been applied to a great range of problems, computations beyond one-loop corrections are very difficult. Because of the algebraic complexity of the Feynman calculations in higher-order perturbation theory, it is desirable to automatize Feynman diagram calculations so that algebraic manipulation programs can carry out almost the entire calculation. This thesis presents a step in this direction. The technique we are elaborating on here is known as light-cone perturbation theory.

  19. Non-perturbative approach for curvature perturbations in stochastic δ N formalism

    SciTech Connect

    Fujita, Tomohiro; Kawasaki, Masahiro; Tada, Yuichiro E-mail: kawasaki@icrr.u-tokyo.ac.jp

    2014-10-01

    In our previous paper [1], we have proposed a new algorithm to calculate the power spectrum of the curvature perturbations generated in inflationary universe with use of the stochastic approach. Since this algorithm does not need the perturbative expansion with respect to the inflaton fields on super-horizon scale, it works even in highly stochastic cases. For example, when the curvature perturbations are very large or the non-Gaussianities of the curvature perturbations are sizable, the perturbative expansion may break down but our algorithm enables to calculate the curvature perturbations. We apply it to two well-known inflation models, chaotic and hybrid inflation, in this paper. Especially for hybrid inflation, while the potential is very flat around the critical point and the standard perturbative computation is problematic, we successfully calculate the curvature perturbations.

  20. Perturbative theory for Brownian vortexes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moyses, Henrique W.; Bauer, Ross O.; Grosberg, Alexander Y.; Grier, David G.

    2015-06-01

    Brownian vortexes are stochastic machines that use static nonconservative force fields to bias random thermal fluctuations into steadily circulating currents. The archetype for this class of systems is a colloidal sphere in an optical tweezer. Trapped near the focus of a strongly converging beam of light, the particle is displaced by random thermal kicks into the nonconservative part of the optical force field arising from radiation pressure, which then biases its diffusion. Assuming the particle remains localized within the trap, its time-averaged trajectory traces out a toroidal vortex. Unlike trivial Brownian vortexes, such as the biased Brownian pendulum, which circulate preferentially in the direction of the bias, the general Brownian vortex can change direction and even topology in response to temperature changes. Here we introduce a theory based on a perturbative expansion of the Fokker-Planck equation for weak nonconservative driving. The first-order solution takes the form of a modified Boltzmann relation and accounts for the rich phenomenology observed in experiments on micrometer-scale colloidal spheres in optical tweezers.

  1. Chiral perturbation theory with nucleons

    SciTech Connect

    Meissner, U.G.

    1991-09-01

    I review the constraints posed on the interactions of pions, nucleons and photons by the spontaneously broken chiral symmetry of QCD. The framework to perform these calculations, chiral perturbation theory, is briefly discussed in the meson sector. The method is a simultaneous expansion of the Greens functions in powers of external moments and quark masses around the massless case, the chiral limit. To perform this expansion, use is made of a phenomenological Lagrangian which encodes the Ward-identities and pertinent symmetries of QCD. The concept of chiral power counting is introduced. The main part of the lectures of consists in describing how to include baryons (nucleons) and how the chiral structure is modified by the fact that the nucleon mass in the chiral limit does not vanish. Particular emphasis is put on working out applications to show the strengths and limitations of the methods. Some processes which are discussed are threshold photopion production, low-energy compton scattering off nucleons, {pi}N scattering and the {sigma}-term. The implications of the broken chiral symmetry on the nuclear forces are briefly described. An alternative approach, in which the baryons are treated as very heavy fields, is touched upon.

  2. Perturbative theory for Brownian vortexes.

    PubMed

    Moyses, Henrique W; Bauer, Ross O; Grosberg, Alexander Y; Grier, David G

    2015-06-01

    Brownian vortexes are stochastic machines that use static nonconservative force fields to bias random thermal fluctuations into steadily circulating currents. The archetype for this class of systems is a colloidal sphere in an optical tweezer. Trapped near the focus of a strongly converging beam of light, the particle is displaced by random thermal kicks into the nonconservative part of the optical force field arising from radiation pressure, which then biases its diffusion. Assuming the particle remains localized within the trap, its time-averaged trajectory traces out a toroidal vortex. Unlike trivial Brownian vortexes, such as the biased Brownian pendulum, which circulate preferentially in the direction of the bias, the general Brownian vortex can change direction and even topology in response to temperature changes. Here we introduce a theory based on a perturbative expansion of the Fokker-Planck equation for weak nonconservative driving. The first-order solution takes the form of a modified Boltzmann relation and accounts for the rich phenomenology observed in experiments on micrometer-scale colloidal spheres in optical tweezers.

  3. An EM Induction Hi-Speed Rotation Angular Rate Sensor.

    PubMed

    Li, Kai; Li, Yuan; Han, Yan

    2017-03-17

    A hi-speed rotation angular rate sensor based on an electromagnetic induction signal is proposed to provide a possibility of wide range measurement of high angular rates. An angular rate sensor is designed that works on the principle of electromagnetism (EM) induction. In addition to a zero-phase detection technique, this sensor uses the feedback principle of magnetic induction coils in response to a rotating magnetic field. It solves the challenge of designing an angular rate sensor that is suitable for both low and high rotating rates. The sensor was examined for angular rate measurement accuracy in simulation tests using a rotary table. The results show that it is capable of measuring angular rates ranging from 1 rps to 100 rps, with an error within 1.8‰ of the full scale (FS). The proposed sensor is suitable to measurement applications where the rotation angular rate is widely varied, and it contributes to design technology advancements of real-time sensors measuring angular acceleration, angular rate, and angular displacement of hi-speed rotary objects.

  4. An EM Induction Hi-Speed Rotation Angular Rate Sensor

    PubMed Central

    Li, Kai; Li, Yuan; Han, Yan

    2017-01-01

    A hi-speed rotation angular rate sensor based on an electromagnetic induction signal is proposed to provide a possibility of wide range measurement of high angular rates. An angular rate sensor is designed that works on the principle of electromagnetism (EM) induction. In addition to a zero-phase detection technique, this sensor uses the feedback principle of magnetic induction coils in response to a rotating magnetic field. It solves the challenge of designing an angular rate sensor that is suitable for both low and high rotating rates. The sensor was examined for angular rate measurement accuracy in simulation tests using a rotary table. The results show that it is capable of measuring angular rates ranging from 1 rps to 100 rps, with an error within 1.8‰ of the full scale (FS). The proposed sensor is suitable to measurement applications where the rotation angular rate is widely varied, and it contributes to design technology advancements of real-time sensors measuring angular acceleration, angular rate, and angular displacement of hi-speed rotary objects. PMID:28304348

  5. Scalar Quantum Electrodynamics: Perturbation Theory and Beyond

    SciTech Connect

    Bashir, A.; Gutierrez-Guerrero, L. X.; Concha-Sanchez, Y.

    2006-09-25

    In this article, we calculate scalar propagator in arbitrary dimensions and gauge and the three-point scalar-photon vertex in arbitrary dimensions and Feynman gauge, both at the one loop level. We also discuss constraints on their non perturbative structure imposed by requirements of gauge invariance and perturbation theory.

  6. The recursion relation in Lagrangian perturbation theory

    SciTech Connect

    Rampf, Cornelius

    2012-12-01

    We derive a recursion relation in the framework of Lagrangian perturbation theory, appropriate for studying the inhomogeneities of the large scale structure of the universe. We use the fact that the perturbative expansion of the matter density contrast is in one-to-one correspondence with standard perturbation theory (SPT) at any order. This correspondence has been recently shown to be valid up to fourth order for a non-relativistic, irrotational and dust-like component. Assuming it to be valid at arbitrary (higher) order, we express the Lagrangian displacement field in terms of the perturbative kernels of SPT, which are itself given by their own and well-known recursion relation. We argue that the Lagrangian solution always contains more non-linear information in comparison with the SPT solution, (mainly) if the non-perturbative density contrast is restored after the displacement field is obtained.

  7. Covariant generalization of cosmological perturbation theory

    SciTech Connect

    Enqvist, Kari; Hoegdahl, Janne; Nurmi, Sami; Vernizzi, Filippo

    2007-01-15

    We present an approach to cosmological perturbations based on a covariant perturbative expansion between two worldlines in the real inhomogeneous universe. As an application, at an arbitrary order we define an exact scalar quantity which describes the inhomogeneities in the number of e-folds on uniform density hypersurfaces and which is conserved on all scales for a barotropic ideal fluid. We derive a compact form for its conservation equation at all orders and assign it a simple physical interpretation. To make a comparison with the standard perturbation theory, we develop a method to construct gauge-invariant quantities in a coordinate system at arbitrary order, which we apply to derive the form of the nth order perturbation in the number of e-folds on uniform density hypersurfaces and its exact evolution equation. On large scales, this provides the gauge-invariant expression for the curvature perturbation on uniform density hypersurfaces and its evolution equation at any order.

  8. Perturbative stability of catenoidal soap films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jana, Soumya; Kar, Sayan

    2013-09-01

    The perturbative stability of catenoidal soap films formed between parallel, equal radii, coaxial rings is studied using analytical and semi-analytical methods. Using a theorem on the nature of eigenvalues for a class of Sturm-Liouville operators, we show that, for the given boundary conditions, azimuthally asymmetric perturbations are stable, while symmetric perturbations lead to an instability --a result demonstrated in Ben Amar et al. (Eur. Phys. J. B 3, 197 (1998)) using numerics and experiment. Further, we show how to obtain the lowest real eigenvalue of perturbations, using the semi-analytical Asymptotic Iteration Method (AIM). Conclusions using AIM support the analytically obtained result as well as the results by Ben Amar et al.. Finally, we compute the eigenfunctions and show, pictorially, how the perturbed soap film evolves in time.

  9. Eigensolutions to a vibroacoustic interior coupled problem with a perturbation method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Claude, Bertille; Duigou, Laetitia; Girault, Gregory; Cadou, Jean-Marc

    2017-02-01

    In this paper, an efficient and robust numerical method is proposed to solve non-symmetric eigenvalue problems resulting from the spatial discretization with the finite element method of a vibroacoustic interior problem. The proposed method relies on a perturbation method. Finding the eigenvalues consists in determining zero values of a scalar that depends on angular frequency. Numerical tests show that the proposed method is not sensitive to poorly conditioned matrices resulting from the displacement-pressure formulation. Moreover, the computational times required with this method are lower than those needed with a classical technique such as, for example, the Arnoldi method.

  10. Creating high-harmonic beams with controlled orbital angular momentum.

    PubMed

    Gariepy, Genevieve; Leach, Jonathan; Kim, Kyung Taec; Hammond, T J; Frumker, E; Boyd, Robert W; Corkum, P B

    2014-10-10

    A beam with an angular-dependant phase Φ = ℓϕ about the beam axis carries an orbital angular momentum of ℓℏ per photon. Such beams are exploited to provide superresolution in microscopy. Creating extreme ultraviolet or soft-x-ray beams with controllable orbital angular momentum is a critical step towards extending superresolution to much higher spatial resolution. We show that orbital angular momentum is conserved during high-harmonic generation. Experimentally, we use a fundamental beam with |ℓ| = 1 and interferometrically determine that the harmonics each have orbital angular momentum equal to their harmonic number. Theoretically, we show how any small value of orbital angular momentum can be coupled to any harmonic in a controlled manner. Our results open a route to microscopy on the molecular, or even submolecular, scale.

  11. Creating High-Harmonic Beams with Controlled Orbital Angular Momentum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gariepy, Genevieve; Leach, Jonathan; Kim, Kyung Taec; Hammond, T. J.; Frumker, E.; Boyd, Robert W.; Corkum, P. B.

    2014-10-01

    A beam with an angular-dependant phase Φ =ℓϕ about the beam axis carries an orbital angular momentum of ℓℏ per photon. Such beams are exploited to provide superresolution in microscopy. Creating extreme ultraviolet or soft-x-ray beams with controllable orbital angular momentum is a critical step towards extending superresolution to much higher spatial resolution. We show that orbital angular momentum is conserved during high-harmonic generation. Experimentally, we use a fundamental beam with |ℓ|=1 and interferometrically determine that the harmonics each have orbital angular momentum equal to their harmonic number. Theoretically, we show how any small value of orbital angular momentum can be coupled to any harmonic in a controlled manner. Our results open a route to microscopy on the molecular, or even submolecular, scale.

  12. A spectral analysis of the earth's angular momentum budget

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Eubanks, T. M.; Steppe, J. A.; Dickey, J. O.; Callahan, P. S.

    1985-01-01

    The exchange of angular momentum between the solid earth and the atmosphere from January 1976 through March 1982 is investigated using estimates of the earth's rotation from optical astrometry and lunar laser ranging and meteorological estimates of the atmospheric angular momentum M(atm). The physics of the earth's angular momentum budget is described, and earth rotation measurements are related to changes in the angular momentum of the fluid parts of the earth. The availability and reliability of earth rotation and M(atm) data are reported, and the possibility of estimating the exchange of angular momentum with the oceans and with the core is examined. Estimates of the power spectrum, cospectral coherence, and linear transfer functions and an analysis of the unmodeled part of the angular momentum budget are presented and discussed. The amplitude and phase of the semiannual, monthly, and fortnightly tidal variations in the length of day are estimated after removing observed atmospheric excitation.

  13. Motion fading is driven by perceived, not actual angular velocity.

    PubMed

    Kohler, P J; Caplovitz, G P; Hsieh, P-J; Sun, J; Tse, P U

    2010-06-01

    After prolonged viewing of a slowly drifting or rotating pattern under strict fixation, the pattern appears to slow down and then momentarily stop. Here we examine the relationship between such 'motion fading' and perceived angular velocity. Using several different dot patterns that generate emergent virtual contours, we demonstrate that whenever there is a difference in the perceived angular velocity of two patterns of dots that are in fact rotating at the same angular velocity, there is also a difference in the time to undergo motion fading for those two patterns. Conversely, whenever two patterns show no difference in perceived angular velocity, even if in fact rotating at different angular velocities, we find no difference in the time to undergo motion fading. Thus, motion fading is driven by the perceived rather than actual angular velocity of a rotating stimulus.

  14. Coherent control of photoelectron wavepacket angular interferograms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hockett, P.; Wollenhaupt, M.; Baumert, T.

    2015-11-01

    Coherent control over photoelectron wavepackets, via the use of polarization-shaped laser pulses, can be understood as a time and polarization-multiplexed process, where the final (time-integrated) observable coherently samples all instantaneous states of the light-matter interaction. In this work, we investigate this multiplexing via computation of the observable photoelectron angular interferograms resulting from multi-photon atomic ionization with polarization-shaped laser pulses. We consider the polarization sensitivity of both the instantaneous and cumulative continuum wavefunction; the nature of the coherent control over the resultant photoelectron interferogram is thus explored in detail. Based on this understanding, the use of coherent control with polarization-shaped pulses as a methodology for a highly multiplexed coherent quantum metrology is also investigated, and defined in terms of the information content of the observable.

  15. Wideband phase-locked angular modulator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nguyen, L.

    1989-01-01

    A phase-locked loop (PLL) angular modulator scheme has been proposed which has the characteristics of wideband modulation frequency response. The modulator design is independent of the PLL closed-loop transfer function H(s), thereby allowing independent optimization of the loop's parameters as well as the modulator's parameters. A phase modulator implementing the proposed scheme was built to phase modulate a low-noise phase-locked signal source at the output frequency of 2290 MHz. The measurement results validated the analysis by demonstrating that the resulting baseband modulation bandwidth exceeded that of the phase-locked loop by over an order of magnitude. However, it is expected to be able to achieve much wider response still.

  16. Internal reflection sensors with high angular resolution.

    PubMed

    Shavirin, I; Strelkov, O; Vetskous, A; Norton-Wayne, L; Harwood, R

    1996-07-20

    We discuss the use of total internal reflection for the production of sensors with high angular resolution. These sensors are intended for measurement of the angle between a sensor's axis and the direction to a source of radiation or reflecting object. Sensors of this type are used in controlling the position of machine parts in robotics and industry, orienting space vehicles and astronomic devices in relation to the Sun, and as autocollimators for checking angles of deviation. This kind of sensor was used in the Apollo space vehicle some 20 years ago. Using photodetectors with linear and area CCD arrays has opened up new application possibilities for appropriately designed sensors. A generalized methodology is presented applicable to a wide range of tasks. Some modifications that can improve the performance of the basic design are described.

  17. Untangling Galaxy Components - The Angular Momentum Parameter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tabor, Martha; Merrifield, Michael; Aragon-Salamanca, Alfonso

    2017-06-01

    We have developed a new technique to decompose Integral Field spectral data cubes into separate bulge and disk components, allowing us to study the kinematic and stellar population properties of the individual components and how they vary with position. We present here the application of this method to a sample of fast rotator early type galaxies from the MaNGA integral field survey, and demonstrate how it can be used to explore key properties of the individual components. By extracting ages, metallicities and the angular momentum parameter lambda of the bulges and disks, we show how this method can give us new insights into the underlying structure of the galaxies and discuss what this can tell us about their evolution history.

  18. High Orbital Angular Momentum Harmonic Generation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vieira, J.; Trines, R. M. G. M.; Alves, E. P.; Fonseca, R. A.; Mendonça, J. T.; Bingham, R.; Norreys, P.; Silva, L. O.

    2016-12-01

    We identify and explore a high orbital angular momentum (OAM) harmonics generation and amplification mechanism that manipulates the OAM independently of any other laser property, by preserving the initial laser wavelength, through stimulated Raman backscattering in a plasma. The high OAM harmonics spectra can extend at least up to the limiting value imposed by the paraxial approximation. We show with theory and particle-in-cell simulations that the orders of the OAM harmonics can be tuned according to a selection rule that depends on the initial OAM of the interacting waves. We illustrate the high OAM harmonics generation in a plasma using several examples including the generation of prime OAM harmonics. The process can also be realized in any nonlinear optical Kerr media supporting three-wave interactions.

  19. Angular response of hot wire probes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    di Mare, L.; Jelly, T. O.; Day, I. J.

    2017-03-01

    A new equation for the convective heat loss from the sensor of a hot-wire probe is derived which accounts for both the potential and the viscous parts of the flow past the prongs. The convective heat loss from the sensor is related to the far-field velocity by an expression containing a term representing the potential flow around the prongs, and a term representing their viscous effect. This latter term is absent in the response equations available in the literature but is essential in representing some features of the observed response of miniature hot-wire probes. The response equation contains only four parameters but it can reproduce, with great accuracy, the behaviour of commonly used single-wire probes. The response equation simplifies the calibration the angular response of rotated slanted hot-wire probes: only standard King’s law parameters and a Reynolds-dependent drag coefficient need to be determined.

  20. Angular relation of axes in perceptual space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bucher, Urs

    1992-01-01

    The geometry of perceptual space needs to be known to model spatial orientation constancy or to create virtual environments. To examine one main aspect of this geometry, the angular relation between the three spatial axes was measured. Experiments were performed consisting of a perceptual task in which subjects were asked to set independently their apparent vertical and horizontal plane. The visual background provided no other stimuli to serve as optical direction cues. The task was performed in a number of different body tilt positions with pitches and rolls varied in steps of 30 degs. The results clearly show the distortion of orthogonality of the perceptual space for nonupright body positions. Large interindividual differences were found. Deviations from orthogonality up to 25 deg were detected in the pitch as well as in the roll direction. Implications of this nonorthogonality on further studies of spatial perception and on the construction of virtual environments for human interaction is also discussed.

  1. Angular reduction in multiparticle matrix elements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lehman, D. R.; Parke, W. C.

    1989-12-01

    A general method for reduction of coupled spherical harmonic products is presented. When the total angular coupling is zero, the reduction leads to an explicitly real expression in the scalar products of the unit vector arguments of the spherical harmonics. For nonscalar couplings, the reduction gives Cartesian tensor forms for the spherical harmonic products; tensors built from the physical vectors in the original expression. The reduction for arbitrary couplings is given in closed form, making it amenable to symbolic manipulation on a computer. The final expressions do not depend on a special choice of coordinate axes, nor do they contain azimuthal quantum number summations, or do they have complex tensor terms for couplings to a scalar; consequently, they are easily interpretable from the properties of the physical vectors they contain.

  2. Noncontacting method for measuring angular deflection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bryant, E. L. (Inventor)

    1980-01-01

    An apparatus is described for indicating the instantaneous angular deflection of an object about a selected axis without mechanical contact with the object. Light from a light source is transmitted through a flat refractor to a converging lens which focuses the light through another flat refractor onto a differential photocell. The first flat refractor is attached to the object such that when the object is deflected about the selected axis the refractor is also deflected about that axis. The two flat refractors are identical and they are placed an equal distance from the converging lens as are the light source and the photocell. The output of the photocell which is a function of image displacement is fed to a high gain amplifier that drives a galvanometer which rotates the second flat refractor. The second refractor is rotated so that the image displacement is very nearly zero making the galvanometer current a measure of the deflection of the object about the selected axis.

  3. Passive optical element with selective angular reflection

    SciTech Connect

    Tremblay, C.; Rheault, F.; Boulay, R.; Tremblay, R.

    1987-02-01

    This work is related to the development of passive selective transmission materials that will contribute to regularize the solar thermal gain. We propose an original solution to the problem of seasonal control of energetic input into buildings through windows. A passive optical element with selective angular reflection is used to solve this problem. This optical element allows sunlight to enter windows during the fall and winter, whereas, owing to the different astronomical path of the sun, it stops and rejects direct sunlight by means of the optical effect called total internal reflection (TIR) during the central spring-Summer period. The purpose of this paper is to describe the optical element in some detail, to develop the principal design equations, and give the results of the optimization of optical and geometrical parameters.

  4. Angular momentum effects in subbarrier fusion

    SciTech Connect

    Halbert, M.L.; Beene, J.R.; Hensley, D.C.; Honkanen, K.; Semkow, T.M.; Abenante, V.; Sarantites, D.G.; Li, Z.

    1988-01-01

    Angular-momentum distributions sigma/sub L/ for the compound nucleus /sup 164/Yb were deduced from measurements of ..gamma..-ray multiplicity for all significant evaporation residues from fusion of /sup 64/Ni and /sup 100/Mo at and below the Coulomb barrier. The excitation functions can be reproduced with coupled-channels calculations only if additional coupling beyond the known inelastic strengths is included. Even with this augmented coupling, however, at the lowest bombarding energies the experimental sigma/sub L/ extend to higher L values than the predictions. Single-barrier penetration models for a potential with an energy-dependent depth and shape fitted to the excitation function likewise underestimate the role of high-L partial waves. Somewhat better success is achieved with models in which fission is allowed to occur at distances comparable with or even larger than the Coulomb barrier radius. 24 refs., 3 figs., 2 tabs.

  5. High Orbital Angular Momentum Harmonic Generation.

    PubMed

    Vieira, J; Trines, R M G M; Alves, E P; Fonseca, R A; Mendonça, J T; Bingham, R; Norreys, P; Silva, L O

    2016-12-23

    We identify and explore a high orbital angular momentum (OAM) harmonics generation and amplification mechanism that manipulates the OAM independently of any other laser property, by preserving the initial laser wavelength, through stimulated Raman backscattering in a plasma. The high OAM harmonics spectra can extend at least up to the limiting value imposed by the paraxial approximation. We show with theory and particle-in-cell simulations that the orders of the OAM harmonics can be tuned according to a selection rule that depends on the initial OAM of the interacting waves. We illustrate the high OAM harmonics generation in a plasma using several examples including the generation of prime OAM harmonics. The process can also be realized in any nonlinear optical Kerr media supporting three-wave interactions.

  6. Arbitrarily tunable orbital angular momentum of photons.

    PubMed

    Pan, Yue; Gao, Xu-Zhen; Ren, Zhi-Cheng; Wang, Xi-Lin; Tu, Chenghou; Li, Yongnan; Wang, Hui-Tian

    2016-07-05

    Orbital angular momentum (OAM) of photons, as a new fundamental degree of freedom, has excited a great diversity of interest, because of a variety of emerging applications. Arbitrarily tunable OAM has gained much attention, but its creation remains still a tremendous challenge. We demonstrate the realization of well-controlled arbitrarily tunable OAM in both theory and experiment. We present the concept of general OAM, which extends the OAM carried by the scalar vortex field to the OAM carried by the azimuthally varying polarized vector field. The arbitrarily tunable OAM we presented has the same characteristics as the well-defined integer OAM: intrinsic OAM, uniform local OAM and intensity ring, and propagation stability. The arbitrarily tunable OAM has unique natures: it is allowed to be flexibly tailored and the radius of the focusing ring can have various choices for a desired OAM, which are of great significance to the benefit of surprising applications of the arbitrary OAM.

  7. Gluon orbital angular momentum at small x

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hatta, Yoshitaka; Nakagawa, Yuya; Xiao, Bowen; Yuan, Feng; Zhao, Yong

    2017-06-01

    We present a general analysis of the orbital angular momentum (OAM) distribution of gluons Lg(x ) inside the nucleon with particular emphasis on the small-x region. We derive a novel operator representation of Lg(x ) in terms of Wilson lines and argue that it is approximately proportional to the gluon helicity distribution Lg(x )≈-2 Δ G (x ) at small x . We also compute longitudinal single-spin asymmetry in exclusive diffractive dijet production in lepton-nucleon scattering in the next-to-eikonal approximation and show that the asymmetry is a direct probe of the gluon helicity/OAM distribution as well as the QCD odderon exchange.

  8. Orbital Angular Momentum Measurements for Turbulence Characterization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Y.; Sun, W.; MacDonnell, D.; Weimer, C. S.; Hou, W.; Josset, D. B.

    2016-12-01

    Uncertainty in cloud-climate feedback is the primary source of uncertainty in climate sensitivity. Turbulence plays important role in cloud life cycle, but it has never been measured globally. Here we introduce an innovative turbulence characterization technique through orbital angular momentum (OAM) measurements. OAM is sensitive to turbulence. OAM is a new research area in optical communication community to increase bandwidth of free space communication. Turbulence is their problem since it causes changes in OAM and a lot of studies are carried out by that community. There are simple relations between turbulence intensity and OAM change for both weak and strong turbulence (Rodenburg et al., 2012). OAM can be measured using the photon sieve technique developed at NASA Langley Research center (MacDonnell 2016; Sun et al., 2016). This study will lead to a space-based OAM measurement concept for turbulence characterization, which will help improve cloud and climate modeling.

  9. Arbitrarily tunable orbital angular momentum of photons

    PubMed Central

    Pan, Yue; Gao, Xu-Zhen; Ren, Zhi-Cheng; Wang, Xi-Lin; Tu, Chenghou; Li, Yongnan; Wang, Hui-Tian

    2016-01-01

    Orbital angular momentum (OAM) of photons, as a new fundamental degree of freedom, has excited a great diversity of interest, because of a variety of emerging applications. Arbitrarily tunable OAM has gained much attention, but its creation remains still a tremendous challenge. We demonstrate the realization of well-controlled arbitrarily tunable OAM in both theory and experiment. We present the concept of general OAM, which extends the OAM carried by the scalar vortex field to the OAM carried by the azimuthally varying polarized vector field. The arbitrarily tunable OAM we presented has the same characteristics as the well-defined integer OAM: intrinsic OAM, uniform local OAM and intensity ring, and propagation stability. The arbitrarily tunable OAM has unique natures: it is allowed to be flexibly tailored and the radius of the focusing ring can have various choices for a desired OAM, which are of great significance to the benefit of surprising applications of the arbitrary OAM. PMID:27378234

  10. Angular Flow in Toroid Cavity Probes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trautner, Peter; Woelk, Klaus; Bargon, Joachim; Gerald, Rex E.

    2001-08-01

    NMR signals from samples that rotate uniformly about the central conductor of a TCD (toroid cavity detector) exhibit frequency shifts that are directly proportional to the sample's angular velocity. This newly observed effect is based on the unique radiofrequency field inside TCDs, which is variable in direction. If a liquid sample is pumped through a capillary tube wound about the central conductor, the frequency shift is proportional to the flow rate. A mathematical relationship between a volumetric flow rate and the frequency shift is established and experimentally verified to high precision. Additionally, two-dimensional flow-resolved NMR spectroscopy for discrimination between components with different flow velocities yet retaining chemical shift information for structural analysis is presented. The application of the two-dimensional method in chromatographic NMR is suggested. Furthermore, utilization of the frequency-shift effect for rheologic studies if combined with toroid-cavity rotating-frame imaging is proposed.

  11. Optical communication beyond orbital angular momentum.

    PubMed

    Trichili, Abderrahmen; Rosales-Guzmán, Carmelo; Dudley, Angela; Ndagano, Bienvenu; Ben Salem, Amine; Zghal, Mourad; Forbes, Andrew

    2016-06-10

    Mode division multiplexing (MDM) is mooted as a technology to address future bandwidth issues, and has been successfully demonstrated in free space using spatial modes with orbital angular momentum (OAM). To further increase the data transmission rate, more degrees of freedom are required to form a densely packed mode space. Here we move beyond OAM and demonstrate multiplexing and demultiplexing using both the radial and azimuthal degrees of freedom. We achieve this with a holographic approach that allows over 100 modes to be encoded on a single hologram, across a wide wavelength range, in a wavelength independent manner. Our results offer a new tool that will prove useful in realizing higher bit rates for next generation optical networks.

  12. Optical communication beyond orbital angular momentum

    PubMed Central

    Trichili, Abderrahmen; Rosales-Guzmán, Carmelo; Dudley, Angela; Ndagano, Bienvenu; Ben Salem, Amine; Zghal, Mourad; Forbes, Andrew

    2016-01-01

    Mode division multiplexing (MDM) is mooted as a technology to address future bandwidth issues, and has been successfully demonstrated in free space using spatial modes with orbital angular momentum (OAM). To further increase the data transmission rate, more degrees of freedom are required to form a densely packed mode space. Here we move beyond OAM and demonstrate multiplexing and demultiplexing using both the radial and azimuthal degrees of freedom. We achieve this with a holographic approach that allows over 100 modes to be encoded on a single hologram, across a wide wavelength range, in a wavelength independent manner. Our results offer a new tool that will prove useful in realizing higher bit rates for next generation optical networks. PMID:27283799

  13. Angular momentum of dark matter black holes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frampton, Paul H.

    2017-04-01

    We provide strongly suggestive evidence that the halo constituents of dark matter are Primordial Intermediate-Mass Black Holes (PIMBHs). PIMBHs are described by a Kerr metric with two parameters, mass M and angular momentum J. There has been little discussion of J since it plays no role in the upcoming attempt at PIMBH detection by microlensing. Nevertheless J does play a central role in understanding their previous lack of detection, especially by CMB distortion. We explain why bounds previously derived from lack of CMB distortion are too strong for PIMBHs with J non-vanishing and that, provided almost no dark matter black holes originate from stellar collapse, excessive CMB distortion is avoided.

  14. Passive optical element with selective angular reflection.

    PubMed

    Tremblay, C; Rheault, F; Boulay, R; Tremblay, R

    1987-02-01

    This work is related to the development of passive selective transmission materials that will contribute to regularize the solar thermal gain. We propose an original solution to the problem of seasonal control of energetic input into buildings through windows. A passive optical element with selective angular reflection is used to solve this problem. This optical element allows sunlight to enter windows during the fall and winter, whereas, owing to the different astronomical path of the sun, it stops and rejects direct sunlight by means of the optical effect called total internal reflection (TIR) during the central spring-summer period. The purpose of this paper is to describe the optical element in some detail, to develop the principal design equations, and give the results of the optimization of optical and geometrical parameters.

  15. Optical communication beyond orbital angular momentum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trichili, Abderrahmen; Rosales-Guzmán, Carmelo; Dudley, Angela; Ndagano, Bienvenu; Ben Salem, Amine; Zghal, Mourad; Forbes, Andrew

    2016-06-01

    Mode division multiplexing (MDM) is mooted as a technology to address future bandwidth issues, and has been successfully demonstrated in free space using spatial modes with orbital angular momentum (OAM). To further increase the data transmission rate, more degrees of freedom are required to form a densely packed mode space. Here we move beyond OAM and demonstrate multiplexing and demultiplexing using both the radial and azimuthal degrees of freedom. We achieve this with a holographic approach that allows over 100 modes to be encoded on a single hologram, across a wide wavelength range, in a wavelength independent manner. Our results offer a new tool that will prove useful in realizing higher bit rates for next generation optical networks.

  16. Building a non-perturbative quark-gluon vertex from a perturbative one

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bermudez, Rocio

    2016-10-01

    The quark-gluon vertex describes the electromagnetic and the strong interaction among these particles. The description of this interaction at high precision in both regimes, perturbative and non-perturbative, continues being a matter of interest in the context of QCD and Hadron Physics. There exist very helpful models in the literature that explain perturbative aspects of the theory but they fail describing non-perturbative phenomena, as confinement and dynamic chiral symmetry breaking. In this work we study the structure of the quark-gluon vertex in a non-perturbative regime examining QCD, checking results with QED, and working in the Schwinger-Dyson formalism.

  17. Curvature perturbation spectrum in two-field inflation with a turning trajectory

    SciTech Connect

    Pi, Shi; Sasaki, Misao E-mail: misao@yukawa.kyoto-u.ac.jp

    2012-10-01

    We revisit a two-component inflaton model with a turning trajectory in the field space, where the field slowly rolls down along the trajectory. We consider the case when the effective mass in the direction perpendicular to the trajectory, namely the isocurvature direction, is either of the same order as or much larger than the Hubble parameter. Assuming that the turning angular velocity is small, we compute analytically the corrections to the power spectrum of curvature perturbation caused by the mediation of the heavy isocurvature perturbation, and compare our analytic results with the numerical ones. Especially, when M{sub eff}{sup 2} >> H{sup 2}, we find that it is proportional to M{sub eff}{sup −2}. This result is consistent with the one obtained previously by an effective field theory approach.

  18. Comparison of Radiation Pressure Perturbations on Rocket Bodies and Debris at Geosynchronous Earth Orbit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wetterer, C.; Hill, K.; Jah, M.

    2014-09-01

    Recent research has highlighted the need for physically consistent radiation pressure and Bidirectional Reflectance Distribution Function (BRDF) models. This paper seeks to evaluate the impact of BRDF-consistent radiation pressure models compared to changes in the other BRDF parameters. The differences in orbital position arising because of changes in the shape, attitude, angular rates, BRDF parameters, and radiation pressure model are plotted as a function of time for simulated rocket bodies and debris at geo-synchronous orbit (GEO). The initial position and velocity of the space object is kept fixed, and the orbital position difference between a baseline or-bit and the perturbed orbit are plotted as a function of time. This is similar to how the effects of perturbations have been visualized in the past in commonly used astrodynamics references.

  19. Calculating Sputter Rate Angular Dependence Using Optical Profilometry (Preprint)

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-07-26

    This work attempts to determine angular dependence curves for sputter rates of a material based on a single experimental measurement. An aluminum...angular dependence curve to match the given erosion profile. The calculated profile matched well with the experimental profile; however, neither matched...the optimization routine, the angular dependence curve was input to the COLISEUM plasma modeling code, which generated the same erosion profile as the experimental data.

  20. Interpretation of quantum and classical angular momentum polarization moments.

    PubMed

    de Miranda, Marcelo P; Aoiz, F Javier

    2004-08-20

    This Letter presents a derivation of the relationship between the quantum and classical descriptions of angular momentum polarization. The results involve an "uncertainty broadening" term that directly expresses the restrictions imposed by the uncertainty principle. It is argued that neglect of this term can lead to error in the interpretation of theoretical or experimental angular momentum polarization data. Functions that take the uncertainty broadening into account, appropriate for use in quantum or quasiclassical descriptions of spatial distributions of angular momenta, are defined.

  1. Angular Approach Scanning Ion Conductance Microscopy.

    PubMed

    Shevchuk, Andrew; Tokar, Sergiy; Gopal, Sahana; Sanchez-Alonso, Jose L; Tarasov, Andrei I; Vélez-Ortega, A Catalina; Chiappini, Ciro; Rorsman, Patrik; Stevens, Molly M; Gorelik, Julia; Frolenkov, Gregory I; Klenerman, David; Korchev, Yuri E

    2016-05-24

    Scanning ion conductance microscopy (SICM) is a super-resolution live imaging technique that uses a glass nanopipette as an imaging probe to produce three-dimensional (3D) images of cell surface. SICM can be used to analyze cell morphology at nanoscale, follow membrane dynamics, precisely position an imaging nanopipette close to a structure of interest, and use it to obtain ion channel recordings or locally apply stimuli or drugs. Practical implementations of these SICM advantages, however, are often complicated due to the limitations of currently available SICM systems that inherited their design from other scanning probe microscopes in which the scan assembly is placed right above the specimen. Such arrangement makes the setting of optimal illumination necessary for phase contrast or the use of high magnification upright optics difficult. Here, we describe the designs that allow mounting SICM scan head on a standard patch-clamp micromanipulator and imaging the sample at an adjustable approach angle. This angle could be as shallow as the approach angle of a patch-clamp pipette between a water immersion objective and the specimen. Using this angular approach SICM, we obtained topographical images of cells grown on nontransparent nanoneedle arrays, of islets of Langerhans, and of hippocampal neurons under upright optical microscope. We also imaged previously inaccessible areas of cells such as the side surfaces of the hair cell stereocilia and the intercalated disks of isolated cardiac myocytes, and performed targeted patch-clamp recordings from the latter. Thus, our new, to our knowledge, angular approach SICM allows imaging of living cells on nontransparent substrates and a seamless integration with most patch-clamp setups on either inverted or upright microscopes, which would facilitate research in cell biophysics and physiology.

  2. Angular dependence of a simple accident dosimeter

    SciTech Connect

    Devine, R. T.; Romero, L. L.; Olsher, R. H.

    2004-01-01

    A simple dosimeter made of a sulfur tablet, bare and cadmium covered indium foils and a cadmium covered copper foil has been modeled using MCNP5. Studies of the model without phantom or other confounding factors have shown that the cross sections and fluence-to-dose factors generated by the Monte Carlo method agree with those generated by analytic expressions for the high energy component. The threshold cross sections for the detectors on a phantom were calculated. The resulting doses assigned agree well with exposures made to three critical assemblies. In this study the angular dependence on a phantom is studied and compared with measurements taken on the GODIVA reactor. The dosimeter positions on the phantom are facing the source, on the back and the side. In previous papers the modeling of a simple dosimeter made of a sulfur tablet, bare and cadmium covered indium foils and a cadmium covered copper foil has been modeled using MCNP5. The conclusion made was that most of the neutron dose from criticality assemblies results from the high energy neutron fluences determined by the sulfur and indium detectors. The results using doses measured from the GODIVA, SHEBA, and bare and lead shielded SILENE reactors confirmed this. The angular dependence of an accident dosemeter is of interest in evaluating the exposure of personnel. To investigate this effect accident dosemeters were placed on a phantom and exposed to the GODIVA reactor at phantom orientations of 0{sup o}, 45{sup o}, 90{sup o}, 135{sup o}, and 180{sup o} to the assembly center line.

  3. Search for quark compositeness in dijet angular distributions from pp collisions at sqrt(s) = 7 TeV

    SciTech Connect

    Chatrchyan, Serguei; et al.

    2012-05-01

    A search for quark compositeness using dijet angular distributions from pp collisions at sqrt(s) = 7 TeV is presented. The search has been carried out using a data sample corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 2.2 inverse femtobarns, recorded by the CMS experiment at the LHC. Normalized dijet angular distributions have been measured for dijet invariant masses from 0.4 TeV to above 3 TeV and compared with a variety of contact interaction models, including those which take into account the effects of next-to-leading-order QCD corrections. The data are found to be in agreement with the predictions of perturbative QCD, and lower limits are obtained on the contact interaction scale, ranging from 7.5 up to 14.5 TeV at 95% confidence level.

  4. Whole-body angular momentum in incline and decline walking.

    PubMed

    Silverman, Anne K; Wilken, Jason M; Sinitski, Emily H; Neptune, Richard R

    2012-04-05

    Angular momentum is highly regulated over the gait cycle and is important for maintaining dynamic stability and control of movement. However, little is known regarding how angular momentum is regulated on irregular surfaces, such as slopes, when the risk of falling is higher. This study examined the three-dimensional whole-body angular momentum patterns of 30 healthy subjects walking over a range of incline and decline angles. The range of angular momentum was either similar or reduced on decline surfaces and increased on incline surfaces relative to level ground, with the greatest differences occurring in the frontal and sagittal planes. These results suggest that angular momentum is more tightly controlled during decline walking when the risk of falling is greater. In the frontal plane, the range of angular momentum was strongly correlated with the peak hip and knee abduction moments in early stance. In the transverse plane, the strongest correlation occurred with the knee external rotation peak in late stance. In the sagittal plane, all external moment peaks were correlated with the range of angular momentum. The peak ankle plantarflexion, knee flexion and hip extension moments were also strongly correlated with the sagittal-plane angular momentum. These results highlight how able-bodied subjects control angular momentum differently on sloped surfaces relative to level walking and provide a baseline for comparison with pathological populations that are more susceptible to falling.

  5. Angular dynamics of small crystals in viscous flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fries, J.; Einarsson, J.; Mehlig, B.

    2017-01-01

    The angular dynamics of a very small ellipsoidal particle in a viscous flow decouples from its translational dynamics and the particle angular velocity is given by Jeffery's theory. It is known that cuboid particles share these properties. In the literature a special case is most frequently discussed, namely that of axisymmetric particles with a continuous rotation symmetry. Here we compute the angular dynamics of crystals that possess a discrete rotation symmetry and certain mirror symmetries but do not have a continuous rotation symmetry. We give examples of such particles that nevertheless obey Jeffery's theory. However, there are other examples where the angular dynamics is determined by a more general equation of motion.

  6. Ideal linear-chain polymers with fixed angular momentum.

    PubMed

    Brunner, Matthew; Deutsch, J M

    2011-07-01

    The statistical mechanics of a linear noninteracting polymer chain with a large number of monomers is considered with fixed angular momentum. The radius of gyration for a linear polymer is derived exactly by functional integration. This result is then compared to simulations done with a large number of noninteracting rigid links at fixed angular momentum. The simulation agrees with the theory up to finite-size corrections. The simulations are also used to investigate the anisotropic nature of a spinning polymer. We find universal scaling of the polymer size along the direction of the angular momentum, as a function of rescaled angular momentum.

  7. Effects of gait speed on stability of walking revealed by simulated response to tripping perturbation.

    PubMed

    Klemetti, Rudolf; Moilanen, Petro; Avela, Janne; Timonen, Jussi

    2014-01-01

    The objective of this work was to study stability of walking over a range of gait speeds by means of muscle-driven simulations. Fast walking has previously been related to high likelihood of falling due to tripping. Various measures of stability have shown different relationships between walking speed and stability. These measures may not be associated with tripping, so it is unclear whether the increase in likelihood of falling is explicable by an increase in instability. Here, stability with respect to a constant tripping perturbation was quantified as the immediate passive response of torso to the perturbation. Subject-specific muscle-driven simulations of eight young healthy subjects walking at four speeds, created by combining a generic musculoskeletal model with gait data, were analyzed. In the simulations, short perturbations were performed several times throughout the swing-phase by applying a constant backward force to the swing-foot of the model. Maxima of changes in the torso (angular) velocity components during the swing-phase were studied. These changes in the velocity components correlated with the walking speed as follows: anterior-posterior r=0.37 (p<0.05), vertical r=0.41 (p<0.05), and medio-lateral r=-0.40 (p<0.05). Of the angular velocity components, only the vertical component correlated statistically significantly with speed, r=0.52 (p<0.01). The weak and varying speed effects suggest that fast walking is not necessarily more unstable than slow walking, in the sense of response to a constant perturbation. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Orbital angular momentum mode-demultiplexing scheme with partial angular receiving aperture.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Shilie; Hui, Xiaonan; Zhu, Jiangbo; Chi, Hao; Jin, Xiaofeng; Yu, Siyuan; Zhang, Xianmin

    2015-05-04

    For long distance orbital angular momentum (OAM) based transmission, the conventional whole beam receiving scheme encounters the difficulty of large aperture due to the divergence of OAM beams. We propose a novel partial receiving scheme, using a restricted angular aperture to receive and demultiplex multi-OAM-mode beams. The scheme is theoretically analyzed to show that a regularly spaced OAM mode set remain orthogonal and therefore can be de-multiplexed. Experiments have been carried out to verify the feasibility. This partial receiving scheme can serve as an effective method with both space and cost savings for the OAM communications. It is applicable to both free space OAM optical communications and radio frequency (RF) OAM communications.

  9. Near-perfect sorting of orbital angular momentum and angular position states of light.

    PubMed

    O'Sullivan, Malcolm N; Mirhosseini, Mohammad; Malik, Mehul; Boyd, Robert W

    2012-10-22

    We present a novel method for efficient sorting of photons prepared in states of orbital angular momentum (OAM) and angular position (ANG). A log-polar optical transform is used in combination with a holographic beam-splitting method to achieve better mode discrimination and reduced cross-talk than reported previously. Simulating this method for 7 modes, we have calculated an improved mutual information of 2.43 bits/photon and 2.29 bits/photon for OAM and ANG modes respectively. In addition, we present preliminary results from an experimental implementation of this technique. This method is expected to have important applications for high-dimensional quantum key distribution systems.

  10. Bridging Perturbative Expansions with Tensor Networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vanderstraeten, Laurens; Mariën, Michaël; Haegeman, Jutho; Schuch, Norbert; Vidal, Julien; Verstraete, Frank

    2017-08-01

    We demonstrate that perturbative expansions for quantum many-body systems can be rephrased in terms of tensor networks, thereby providing a natural framework for interpolating perturbative expansions across a quantum phase transition. This approach leads to classes of tensor-network states parametrized by few parameters with a clear physical meaning, while still providing excellent variational energies. We also demonstrate how to construct perturbative expansions of the entanglement Hamiltonian, whose eigenvalues form the entanglement spectrum, and how the tensor-network approach gives rise to order parameters for topological phase transitions.

  11. Asymptotic stability of singularly perturbed differential equations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Artstein, Zvi

    2017-02-01

    Asymptotic stability is examined for singularly perturbed ordinary differential equations that may not possess a natural split into fast and slow motions. Rather, the right hand side of the equation is comprised of a singularly perturbed component and a regular one. The limit dynamics consists then of Young measures, with values being invariant measures of the fast contribution, drifted by the slow one. Relations between the asymptotic stability of the perturbed system and the limit dynamics are examined, and a Lyapunov functions criterion, based on averaging, is established.

  12. Perturbing macroscopic magnetohydrodynamic stability for toroidal plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Comer, Kathryn J.

    We have introduced a new perturbative technique to rapidly explore the dependence of long wavelength ideal magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) instabilities on equilibrium profiles, shaping properties, and wall parameters. Traditionally, these relations are studied with numerical parameter scans using computationally intensive stability codes. Our perturbative technique first finds the equilibrium and stability using traditional methods. Subsequent small changes in the original equilibrium parameters change the stability. We quickly find the new stability with an expansion of the energy principle, rather than with another run of the stability codes. We first semi-analytically apply the technique to the screw pinch after eliminating compressional Alfven wave effects. The screw pinch results validate the approach, but also indicate that allowable perturbations to equilibria with certain features may be restricted. Next, we extend the approach to toroidal geometry using experimental equilibria and a simple constructed equilibrium, with the ideal MHD stability code GATO. Stability properties are successfully predicted from perturbed toroidal equilibria when only the vacuum beyond the plasma is perturbed (through wall parameter variations), rather than the plasma itself. Small plasma equilibrium perturbations to both experimental and simple equilibria result in very large errors to the predicted stability, and valid results are found only over a narrow range of most perturbations. Despite the large errors produced when changing plasma parameters, the wall perturbations revealed two useful applications of this technique. Because the calculations are non-iterative matrix multiplications, the convergence issues that can disrupt a full MHD stability code are absent. Marginal stability, therefore, is much easier to find with the perturbative technique. Also, the perturbed results can be input as the initial guess for the eigenvalue for a full stability code, and improve subsequent

  13. Perturbation calculation of thermodynamic density of states

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, Greg; Schulthess, Thomas C; Nicholson, Don M; Eisenbach, Markus; Stocks, George Malcolm

    2011-01-01

    The density of states g( ) is frequently used to calculate the temperature-dependent properties of a thermodynamic system. Here a derivation is given for calculating the warped density of states g ( ) resulting from the addition of a perturbation. The method is validated for a classical Heisenberg model of bcc Fe and the errors in the free energy are shown to be second order in the perturbation. Taking the perturbation to be the difference between a first-principles quantum-mechanical energy and a corresponding classical energy, this method can significantly reduce the computational effort required to calculate g( ) for quantum systems using the Wang-Landau approach.

  14. Vector perturbations in a contracting Universe

    SciTech Connect

    Battefeld, T.J.; Brandenberger, R.

    2004-12-15

    In this note we show that vector perturbations exhibit growing mode solutions in a contracting Universe, such as the contracting phase of the pre big bang or the cyclic/ekpyrotic models of the Universe. This is not a gauge artifact and will in general lead to the breakdown of perturbation theory--a severe problem that has to be addressed in any bouncing model. We also comment on the possibility of explaining, by means of primordial vector perturbations, the existence of the observed large-scale magnetic fields. This is possible since they can be seeded by vorticity.

  15. Quantitative methods in classical perturbation theory.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giorgilli, A.

    Poincaré proved that the series commonly used in Celestial mechanics are typically non convergent, although their usefulness is generally evident. Recent work in perturbation theory has enlightened this conjecture of Poincaré, bringing into evidence that the series of perturbation theory, although non convergent in general, furnish nevertheless valuable approximations to the true orbits for a very large time, which in some practical cases could be comparable with the age of the universe. The aim of the author's paper is to introduce the quantitative methods of perturbation theory which allow to obtain such powerful results.

  16. Cosmological perturbations and the Weinberg theorem

    SciTech Connect

    Akhshik, Mohammad; Firouzjahi, Hassan; Jazayeri, Sadra E-mail: firouz@ipm.ir

    2015-12-01

    The celebrated Weinberg theorem in cosmological perturbation theory states that there always exist two adiabatic scalar modes in which the comoving curvature perturbation is conserved on super-horizon scales. In particular, when the perturbations are generated from a single source, such as in single field models of inflation, both of the two allowed independent solutions are adiabatic and conserved on super-horizon scales. There are few known examples in literature which violate this theorem. We revisit the theorem and specify the loopholes in some technical assumptions which violate the theorem in models of non-attractor inflation, fluid inflation, solid inflation and in the model of pseudo conformal universe.

  17. Formation tracker design of multiple mobile robots with wheel perturbations: adaptive output-feedback approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoo, Sung Jin

    2016-11-01

    This paper presents a theoretical design approach for output-feedback formation tracking of multiple mobile robots under wheel perturbations. It is assumed that these perturbations are unknown and the linear and angular velocities of the robots are unmeasurable. First, adaptive state observers for estimating unmeasurable velocities of the robots are developed under the robots' kinematics and dynamics including wheel perturbation effects. Then, we derive a virtual-structure-based formation tracker scheme according to the observer dynamic surface design procedure. The main difficulty of the output-feedback control design is to manage the coupling problems between unmeasurable velocities and unknown wheel perturbation effects. These problems are avoided by using the adaptive technique and the function approximation property based on fuzzy logic systems. From the Lyapunov stability analysis, it is shown that point tracking errors of each robot and synchronisation errors for the desired formation converge to an adjustable neighbourhood of the origin, while all signals in the controlled closed-loop system are semiglobally uniformly ultimately bounded.

  18. Three dimensional numerical simulations of the effect of cyclic perturbations on liner acceleration.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luttwak, G.; Meyseless, M.

    1997-07-01

    Cyclic perturbations are employed to generate aerodynamically stabilized self forging projectiles with star shaped tails. Typical shaped charges , or self forging projectiles have axial symmetry, thus a two dimensional code can be used to model the configuration. In the presence of most perturbations, the above axial symmetry is lost and a full three dimensional calculation has to be carried out. This kind of numerical simulations are quite challenging,as they have to resolve the thin liner , and to follow its motion over many times its width, while the liner material can undergo severe deformations. The number of zones required to achieve a good resolution can in some cases, surpass the available computer memory in our workstation. However, for a cyclic perturbation over the charge circumference, the computational domain can be limited to an appropiate angular slice of the charge, depending on the wave length of the perturbation. We present numerical simulations, carried out in the three dimensional code MSC/Dytran. We disscuss the implementation of the boundary conditions and the appropiate combination of of Euler and Lagrange techniques utilized. We compare the results of our calculations with published data on the formation of self forging projectiles with star shaped tails.

  19. Acoustic Eigenvalues of a Quasispherical Resonator: Second Order Shape Perturbation Theory for Arbitrary Modes

    PubMed Central

    Mehl, James B.

    2007-01-01

    The boundary-shape formalism of Morse and Ingard is applied to the acoustic modes of a deformed spherical resonator (quasisphere) with rigid boundaries. For boundary shapes described by r = a [1 − ε ℱ(θ, ϕ)], where ε is a small scale parameter and ℱ is a function of order unity, the frequency perturbation is calculated to order ε2. The formal results apply to acoustic modes whose angular dependence is designated by the indices ℓ and m. Specific examples are worked out for the radial (ℓ = 0) and triplet (ℓ = 1) modes, for prolate and oblate spheroids, and for triaxial ellipsoids. The exact eigenvalues for the spheroids, and eigenvalue determined with finite-element calculations, are shown to agree with perturbation theory through terms of order ε2. This work is an extension of the author’s previous papers on the acoustic eigenfrequencies of deformed spherical resonators, which were limited to the second-order perturbation for radial modes [J. Acoust. Soc. Am. 71, 1109-1113 (1982)] and the first order-perturbation for arbitrary modes [J. Acoust. Soc. Am. 79, 278–285 (1986)]. PMID:27110463

  20. Acoustic Eigenvalues of a Quasispherical Resonator: Second Order Shape Perturbation Theory for Arbitrary Modes.

    PubMed

    Mehl, James B

    2007-01-01

    The boundary-shape formalism of Morse and Ingard is applied to the acoustic modes of a deformed spherical resonator (quasisphere) with rigid boundaries. For boundary shapes described by r = a [1 - ε ℱ(θ, ϕ)], where ε is a small scale parameter and ℱ is a function of order unity, the frequency perturbation is calculated to order ε (2). The formal results apply to acoustic modes whose angular dependence is designated by the indices ℓ and m. Specific examples are worked out for the radial (ℓ = 0) and triplet (ℓ = 1) modes, for prolate and oblate spheroids, and for triaxial ellipsoids. The exact eigenvalues for the spheroids, and eigenvalue determined with finite-element calculations, are shown to agree with perturbation theory through terms of order ε (2). This work is an extension of the author's previous papers on the acoustic eigenfrequencies of deformed spherical resonators, which were limited to the second-order perturbation for radial modes [J. Acoust. Soc. Am. 71, 1109-1113 (1982)] and the first order-perturbation for arbitrary modes [J. Acoust. Soc. Am. 79, 278-285 (1986)].

  1. Design of a wearable perturbator for human knee impedance estimation during gait.

    PubMed

    Tucker, Michael R; Moser, Adrian; Lambercy, Olivier; Sulzer, James; Gassert, Roger

    2013-06-01

    Mechanical impedance modulation is the key to natural, stable and efficient human locomotion. An improved understanding of this mechanism is necessary for the development of the next generation of intelligent prosthetic and orthotic devices. This paper documents the design methodologies that were employed to realize a knee perturbator that can experimentally estimate human knee impedance during gait through the application of angular velocity perturbations. The proposed experiment requires a light, transparent, wearable, and remotely actuated device that closely follows the movement of the biological joint. A genetic algorithm was used to design a polycentric hinge whose instantaneous center of rotation is optimized to be kinematically compatible with the human knee. A wafer disc clutch was designed to switch between a high transparency passive mode and a high impedance actuated mode. A remote actuation and transmission scheme was designed to enable high power output perturbations while minimizing the device's mass. Position and torque sensors were designed for device control and to provide data for post-processing and joint impedance estimation. Pending the fabrication and mechanical testing of the device, we expect this knee perturbator to be a valuable tool for experimental investigation of locomotive joint impedance modulation.

  2. The asymptotics of the solution of an equation with a small parameter in a domain with angular points

    SciTech Connect

    Lelikova, Elena F

    2010-12-07

    The asymptotic behaviour of solutions of the first boundary-value problem for a second-order elliptic equation in a domain with angular points is investigated for the case when a small parameter is involved in the equation only as a factor multiplying one of the highest order derivatives and the limit equation is an ordinary differential equation. Although the order of the limit equation coincides with that of the original equation, the problem in question is singularly perturbed. The asymptotic behaviour of the solution of this problem is studied by the method of matched asymptotic expansions. Bibliography: 11 titles.

  3. Perturbed ladder operator method: An algebraic recursive solution of perturbed wave equations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bessis, N.; Bessis, G.

    1990-08-01

    The Schrödinger-Infeld-Hull factorization method is extended within the perturbation scheme in order to treat nonfactorizable Sturm-Liouville eigenequations in the same way as factorizable ones. It is shown that, provided suitable choices of the expansion basis set for the perturbing potential and for the associated perturbed ladder function are made, the solution of the factorizability condition associated with the perturbed eigenequation can be achieved by using an elementary finite difference calculus. An algebraic manufacturing process allowing the determination of the perturbed ladder and factorization functions, capable of handling any order of the perturbation and any type of factorization (Infeld-Hull types A to E), is given. This procedure, well adapted for computer algebra, allows an analytical determination of the perturbed eigenvalues and eigenfunctions without calculation of either the excited unperturbed eigenfunctions or any matrix element. This extension of the exact factorization method within the perturbation scheme can be applied to many model equations of current interest in quantum physics. Special attention is paid to perturbed factorizations that correspond to unperturbed ladder operators that are linear functions of the quantum number (types A to D). Illustrative applications are given. Particularly, the perturbed harmonic-oscillator ladder operators and eigenenergies are obtained in closed form.

  4. Extreme-mass-ratio inspiral corrections to the angular velocity and redshift factor of a mass in circular orbit about a Kerr black hole

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shah, Abhay G.; Friedman, John L.; Keidl, Tobias S.

    2012-10-01

    This is the first of two papers on computing the self-force in a radiation gauge for a particle of mass m moving in circular, equatorial orbit about a Kerr black hole. In the extreme-mass-ratio inspiral (EMRI) framework, with mode-sum renormalization, we compute the renormalized value of the quantity H≔(1)/(2)hαβuαuβ, gauge-invariant under gauge transformations generated by a helically symmetric gauge vector; here, hαβ is the metric perturbation, uα the particle’s 4-velocity. We find the related order m correction to the particle’s angular velocity at fixed renormalized redshift (and to its redshift at fixed angular velocity), each of which can be written in terms of H. The radiative part of the metric perturbation is constructed from a Hertz potential that is extracted from the Weyl scalar by an algebraic inversion T. S. Keidl , Phys. Rev. D 82, 124012 (2010). We then write the spin-weighted spheroidal harmonics as a sum over spin-weighted spherical harmonics Yℓms and use mode-sum renormalization to find the renormalization coefficients by matching a series in L=ℓ+1/2 to the large-L behavior of the expression for H. The nonradiative parts of the perturbed metric associated with changes in mass and angular momentum are calculated in the Kerr gauge.

  5. Intercentrosomal angular separation during mitosis plays a crucial role for maintaining spindle stability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sutradhar, S.; Basu, S.; Paul, R.

    2015-10-01

    Cell division through proper spindle formation is one of the key puzzles in cell biology. In most mammalian cells, chromosomes spontaneously arrange to achieve a stable bipolar spindle during metaphase which eventually ensures proper segregation of the DNA into the daughter cells. In this paper, we present a robust three-dimensional mechanistic model to investigate the formation and maintenance of a bipolar mitotic spindle in mammalian cells under different physiological constraints. Using realistic parameters, we test spindle viability by measuring the spindle length and studying the chromosomal configuration. The model strikingly predicts a feature of the spindle instability arising from the insufficient intercentrosomal angular separation and impaired sliding of the interpolar microtubules. In addition, our model successfully reproduces chromosomal patterns observed in mammalian cells, when activity of different motor proteins is perturbed.

  6. Measurements of the STS orbiter's angular stability during in-orbit operations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Neupert, Werner M.; Epstein, Gabriel L.; Houston, James; Zarechnak, Andrew

    1995-01-01

    We report on measurements of the angular stability, commonly called 'jitter', of the STS Orbiter during normal operations in space. Measurements were carried out by measuring optically the Orbiter's roll and pitch orientation relative to the solar vector as the orbiter was held in a -Z(sub 0) solar inertial orientation (orbiter bay oriented toward the Sun). We also report observations of an interesting perturbation to the orbiter's orientation noted by the crew during the STS-60 mission. These data may be useful in analyzing the in-orbit response of the Orbiter to thruster firings and other applied torques, and may aid in the planning of future experiments that require fine-pointed operations by the orbiter.

  7. Calibration of the head direction network: a role for symmetric angular head velocity cells.

    PubMed

    Stratton, Peter; Wyeth, Gordon; Wiles, Janet

    2010-06-01

    Continuous attractor networks require calibration. Computational models of the head direction (HD) system of the rat usually assume that the connections that maintain HD neuron activity are pre-wired and static. Ongoing activity in these models relies on precise continuous attractor dynamics. It is currently unknown how such connections could be so precisely wired, and how accurate calibration is maintained in the face of ongoing noise and perturbation. Our adaptive attractor model of the HD system that uses symmetric angular head velocity (AHV) cells as a training signal shows that the HD system can learn to support stable firing patterns from poorly-performing, unstable starting conditions. The proposed calibration mechanism suggests a requirement for symmetric AHV cells, the existence of which has previously been unexplained, and predicts that symmetric and asymmetric AHV cells should be distinctly different (in morphology, synaptic targets and/or methods of action on postsynaptic HD cells) due to their distinctly different functions.

  8. Controlling roll perturbations in fruit flies

    PubMed Central

    Beatus, Tsevi; Guckenheimer, John M.; Cohen, Itai

    2015-01-01

    Owing to aerodynamic instabilities, stable flapping flight requires ever-present fast corrective actions. Here, we investigate how flies control perturbations along their body roll angle, which is unstable and their most sensitive degree of freedom. We glue a magnet to each fly and apply a short magnetic pulse that rolls it in mid-air. Fast video shows flies correct perturbations up to 100° within 30 ± 7 ms by applying a stroke-amplitude asymmetry that is well described by a linear proportional–integral controller. For more aggressive perturbations, we show evidence for nonlinear and hierarchical control mechanisms. Flies respond to roll perturbations within 5 ms, making this correction reflex one of the fastest in the animal kingdom. PMID:25762650

  9. Perturbations of black p-branes

    SciTech Connect

    Abdalla, Elcio; Fernandez Piedra, Owen Pavel; Oliveira, Jeferson de; Molina, C.

    2010-03-15

    We consider black p-brane solutions of the low-energy string action, computing scalar perturbations. Using standard methods, we derive the wave equations obeyed by the perturbations and treat them analytically and numerically. We have found that tensorial perturbations obtained via a gauge-invariant formalism leads to the same results as scalar perturbations. No instability has been found. Asymptotically, these solutions typically reduce to a AdS{sub (p+2)}xS{sup (8-p)} space which, in the framework of Maldacena's conjecture, can be regarded as a gravitational dual to a conformal field theory defined in a (p+1)-dimensional flat space-time. The results presented open the possibility of a better understanding the AdS/CFT correspondence, as originally formulated in terms of the relation among brane structures and gauge theories.

  10. General degeneracy in density functional perturbation theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Palenik, Mark C.; Dunlap, Brett I.

    2017-07-01

    Degenerate perturbation theory from quantum mechanics is inadequate in density functional theory (DFT) because of nonlinearity in the Kohn-Sham potential. Herein, we develop the fully general perturbation theory for open-shell, degenerate systems in Kohn-Sham DFT, without assuming the presence of symmetry or equal occupation of degenerate orbitals. To demonstrate the resulting methodology, we apply it to the iron atom in the central field approximation, perturbed by an electric quadrupole. This system was chosen because it displays both symmetry required degeneracy, between the five 3 d orbitals, as well as accidental degeneracy, between the 3 d and 4 s orbitals. The quadrupole potential couples the degenerate 3 d and 4 s states, serving as an example of the most general perturbation.

  11. Simple Perturbation Example for Quantum Chemistry.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Goodfriend, P. L.

    1985-01-01

    Presents a simple example that illustrates various aspects of the Rayleigh-Schrodinger perturbation theory. The example is a particularly good one because it is straightforward and can be compared with both the exact solution and with experimental data. (JN)

  12. The Perturbational MO Method for Saturated Systems.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Herndon, William C.

    1979-01-01

    Summarizes a theoretical approach using nonbonding MO's and perturbation theory to correlate properties of saturated hydrocarbons. Discussion is limited to correctly predicted using this method. Suggests calculations can be carried out quickly in organic chemistry. (Author/SA)

  13. Simple Perturbation Example for Quantum Chemistry.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Goodfriend, P. L.

    1985-01-01

    Presents a simple example that illustrates various aspects of the Rayleigh-Schrodinger perturbation theory. The example is a particularly good one because it is straightforward and can be compared with both the exact solution and with experimental data. (JN)

  14. The Perturbational MO Method for Saturated Systems.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Herndon, William C.

    1979-01-01

    Summarizes a theoretical approach using nonbonding MO's and perturbation theory to correlate properties of saturated hydrocarbons. Discussion is limited to correctly predicted using this method. Suggests calculations can be carried out quickly in organic chemistry. (Author/SA)

  15. Conserved cosmological perturbation in Galileon models

    SciTech Connect

    Gao, Xian

    2011-10-01

    We prove the existence of a fully nonlinear conserved curvature perturbation on large scales in Galileon-type scalar field models in two approaches. The first approach is based on the conservation of energy-momentum tensor of the Galileon field, which is also the familiar approach in understanding the conservation in k-essence or perfect fluid models. We show that the fluid corresponding to the Galileon field becomes perfect and barotropic on large scales, which is responsible to the conservation. The difference from k-essence model is that, besides the energy-momentum conservation, the Einstein equation must be employed in order to complete the proof of barotropy. In the second approach, we derive the fully non-perturbative action for the curvature perturbation ζ in Galileon models on large scales, and argue that ζ = const is indeed an exact solution on large scales. This conservation of curvature perturbation is important since it relates the later and the primordial universe.

  16. Singular Perturbation for Discontinuous Ordinary Differential Equations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Teixeira, M. A.; da Silva, P. R.

    In this article some qualitative aspects of non-smooth systems on ℝn are studied through methods of Geometric Singular Perturbation Theory (GSP-Theory). We present some results that generalize some settings in low dimension, that bridge the space between such systems and singularly perturbed smooth systems. We analyze the local behavior around typical singularities and prove that the dynamics of the so called Sliding Vector Field is determined by the reduced problem on the center manifold.

  17. Local gravitomagnetic perturbations of the lunar orbit

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shahid-Saless, Bahman

    1992-01-01

    Using the metric in the local inertial frame of the Earth, we calculate relativistic effects on the lunar orbit with the synodic month period. It is shown that such perturbations arise entirely from the gravitomagnetic components of the local metric which exist because of the relative motion of the sun with respect to the Earth. In the case of general relativity, the net perturbation has an amplitude of 3 cm for the lunar range.

  18. Iron deficiency: an overlooked predisposing factor in angular cheilitis.

    PubMed

    Murphy, N C; Bissada, N F

    1979-10-01

    Clinicians who recommend the use of antifungal agents for angular cheilitis may be treating the symptoms and not the predisposing cause of the disease. Iron deficiency should be considered as part of the differential diagnosis whenever angular cheilitis is encountered, especially in women of child-bearing age.

  19. Angular cheilitis occurring during orthodontic treatment: a case series.

    PubMed

    Cross, David L; Short, Laura J

    2008-12-01

    Clinical experience has shown that angular cheilitis can occur during orthodontic treatment and may persist into retention, but the incidence of the condition is unknown. The purpose of this paper is to increase the awareness among clinicians of angular cheilitis occurring during orthodontic treatment. It also proposes a treatment regime which may be used.

  20. Distilling angular momentum nonclassical states in trapped ions

    SciTech Connect

    Militello, B.; Messina, A.

    2004-09-01

    In the spirit of quantum nondemolition measurements, we show that by exploiting suitable vibronic couplings and repeatedly measuring the atomic population of a confined ion, it is possible to distill center-of-mass vibrational states with a well-defined square of angular momentum or, alternatively, angular momentum projection Schroedinger cat states.

  1. Modification of the DSN radio frequency angular tropospheric refraction model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Berman, A. L.

    1977-01-01

    The previously derived DSN Radio Frequency Angular Tropospheric Refraction Model contained an assumption which was subsequently seen to be at a variance with the theoretical basis of angular refraction. The modification necessary to correct the model is minor in that the value of a constant is changed.

  2. Angular domain transillumination imaging optimization with an ultrafast gated camera.

    PubMed

    Vasefi, Fartash; Najiminaini, Mohamadreza; Ng, Eldon; Kaminska, Bozena; Chapman, Glenn H; Carson, Jeffery J L

    2010-01-01

    By employing high-aspect-ratio parallel microchannels as an angular filter, quasiballistic photons sensitive to internal structures in a turbid medium can be captured. Scattered photons exiting the turbid medium typically exhibit trajectories with random angles compared to the initial trajectory and are mostly rejected by the filter. However, angular filter arrays cannot differentiate between quasiballistic photons (early arriving) and photons that happen to attain a scattered trajectory that is within the acceptance angle (late arriving). Therefore, we have two objectives: (1) to experimentally characterize the angular distribution and proportion of minimally deviated quasiballistic photons and multiply scattered photons in a turbid medium and (2) to combine time and angular gating principles so that early and late arriving photons can be distinguished. From the angular distribution data, the angular filter with angular acceptance about 0.4 deg yields the highest image contrast for transillumination images. The use of angular domain imaging(ADI) with time-gating enables visualization of submillimeter absorbing objects with approximately seven times higher image contrast compared to ADI in a turbid medium with a scattering level of six times the reduced mean free path.

  3. Schmidt decomposition for non-collinear biphoton angular wave functions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fedorov, M. V.

    2015-06-01

    Schmidt modes of non-collinear biphoton angular wave functions are found analytically. The experimentally realizable procedure for their separation is described. Parameters of the Schmidt decomposition are used to evaluate the degree of the biphoton's angular entanglement. To Vladimir and Margarita Man’ko with great respect and best wishes.

  4. Measurement of angular momentum flux in optical tweezers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rubinsztein-Dunlop, Halina; Asavei, Theodor; Preece, Daryl; Stilgoe, Alexander B.; Heckenberg, Norman R.; Nieminen, Timo A.

    2011-03-01

    It is well established that a light beam can carry angular momentum and therefore when using optical tweezers it is possible to exert torques to twist or rotate microscopic objects. Both spin and orbital angular momentum can be transferred. This transfer can be achieved using birefringent particles exposed to a Gaussian circularly polarized beam. In this case, a transfer of spin angular momentum will occur. The change in spin, and hence the torque, can be readily measured optically. On the other hand, it is much more challenging to measure orbital angular momentum and torque. Laguerre-Gauss mode decomposition, as used for orbital angular momentum encoding for quantum communication, and rotational frequency shift can be used, and are effective methods in a macro-environment. However, the situation becomes more complicated when a measurement is done on microscale, especially with highly focused laser beams. We review the methods for the measurement of the angular momentum of light in optical tweezers, and the challenges faced when measuring orbital angular momentum. We also demonstrate one possible simple method for a quantitative measurement of the orbital angular momentum in optical tweezers.

  5. Non-negative Wigner functions for orbital angular momentum states

    SciTech Connect

    Rigas, I.; Sanchez-Soto, L. L.; Klimov, A. B.; Rehacek, J.; Hradil, Z.

    2010-01-15

    The Wigner function of a pure continuous-variable quantum state is non-negative if and only if the state is Gaussian. Here we show that for the canonical pair angle and angular momentum, the only pure states with non-negative Wigner functions are the eigenstates of the angular momentum. Some implications of this surprising result are discussed.

  6. Modification of the DSN radio frequency angular tropospheric refraction model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Berman, A. L.

    1977-01-01

    The previously derived DSN Radio Frequency Angular Tropospheric Refraction Model contained an assumption which was subsequently seen to be at a variance with the theoretical basis of angular refraction. The modification necessary to correct the model is minor in that the value of a constant is changed.

  7. One particularity of energy-angular secondary electrons spectrum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borisov, S. S.; Zaitsev, S. I.

    2006-05-01

    In this work we discuss the problems of the energy-angular spectrum of backscattered and true secondary electrons simulation using the discrete (DLA) and the continuous (CLA) loss approximations. The presence of an angular spectrum artefact - the deviation from the sinusoidal distribution over the range of 177-18O° from the beam direction is shown.

  8. Minimal microwave anisotrophy from perturbations induced at late times

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jaffe, Andrew H.; Stebbins, Albert; Frieman, Joshua A.

    1994-01-01

    Aside from primordial gravitational instability of the cosmological fluid, various mechanisms have been proposed to generate large-scale structure at relatively late times, including, e.g., 'late-time' cosmological phase transitions. In these scenarios, it is envisioned that the universe is nearly homogeneous at the times of last scattering and that perturbations grow rapidly sometimes after the primordial plasma recombines. On this basis, it was suggested that large inhomogeneities could be generated while leaving relatively little imprint on the cosmic microwave background (MBR) anisotropy. In this paper, we calculate the minimal anisotropies possible in any 'late-time' scenario for structure formation, given the level of inhomogeneity observed at present. Since the growth of the inhomogeneity involves time-varying gravitational fields, these scenarios inevitably generate significant MBR anisotropy via the Sachs-Wolfe effect. Moreover, we show that the large-angle MBR anisotropy produced by the rapid post-recombination growth of inhomogeneity is generally greater than that produced by the same inhomogeneity growth via gravitational instability. In 'realistic' scenarios one can decrease the anisotropy compared to models with primordial adiabatic fluctuations, but only on very small angular scales. The value of any particular measure of the anisotropy can be made small in late-time models, but only by making the time-dependence of the gravitational field sufficiently 'pathological'.

  9. Gauge and motion in perturbation theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pound, Adam

    2015-08-01

    Through second order in perturbative general relativity, a small compact object in an external vacuum spacetime obeys a generalized equivalence principle: although it is accelerated with respect to the external background geometry, it is in free fall with respect to a certain effective vacuum geometry. However, this single principle takes very different mathematical forms, with very different behaviors, depending on how one treats perturbed motion. Furthermore, any description of perturbed motion can be altered by a gauge transformation. In this paper, I clarify the relationship between two treatments of perturbed motion and the gauge freedom in each. I first show explicitly how one common treatment, called the Gralla-Wald approximation, can be derived from a second, called the self-consistent approximation. I next present a general treatment of smooth gauge transformations in both approximations, in which I emphasize that the approximations' governing equations can be formulated in an invariant manner. All of these analyses are carried through second perturbative order, but the methods are general enough to go to any order. Furthermore, the tools I develop, and many of the results, should have broad applicability to any description of perturbed motion, including osculating-geodesic and two-timescale descriptions.

  10. Noise Perturbation for Supervised Speech Separation

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Jitong; Wang, Yuxuan; Wang, DeLiang

    2016-01-01

    Speech separation can be treated as a mask estimation problem, where interference-dominant portions are masked in a time-frequency representation of noisy speech. In supervised speech separation, a classifier is typically trained on a mixture set of speech and noise. It is important to efficiently utilize limited training data to make the classifier generalize well. When target speech is severely interfered by a nonstationary noise, a classifier tends to mistake noise patterns for speech patterns. Expansion of a noise through proper perturbation during training helps to expose the classifier to a broader variety of noisy conditions, and hence may lead to better separation performance. This study examines three noise perturbations on supervised speech separation: noise rate, vocal tract length, and frequency perturbation at low signal-to-noise ratios (SNRs). The speech separation performance is evaluated in terms of classification accuracy, hit minus false-alarm rate and short-time objective intelligibility (STOI). The experimental results show that frequency perturbation is the best among the three perturbations in terms of speech separation. In particular, the results show that frequency perturbation is effective in reducing the error of misclassifying a noise pattern as a speech pattern. PMID:26900194

  11. Dynamics of jet breakup induced by perturbation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shum, Ho Cheung; Li, Jingmei; Mak, Sze Yi

    2014-11-01

    We study the breakup of jet to form droplets, as induced by controlled perturbation, in a microchannel. Controlled mechanical perturbation is introduced to the tubing through which the jet phase is injected into the device, which is monitored under high-speed optical imaging. We measure the frequency of droplet formation and the sizes of the droplets as the frequency and amplitude of the perturbation is varied. Droplets can be induced to form at the perturbation frequency only above a critical frequency and amplitude. In this manner, the droplet size can be precisely controlled. The amplitude needed to induce breakup decreases as the interfacial tension of the system is lowered. Moreover, by selectively varying the wettability of the inner wall of the channel, double emulsion droplets can be generated in one step by applying large-amplitude perturbation of the jet phase. Our work demonstrates the potential of using controlled perturbation to generate droplets with tunable size and shapes, with implications on new designs of liquid dispensing nozzles.

  12. Aliasing Detection and Reduction Scheme on Angularly Undersampled Light Fields.

    PubMed

    Xiao, Zhaolin; Wang, Qing; Zhou, Guoqing; Yu, Jingyi

    2017-05-01

    When using plenoptic camera for digital refocusing, angular undersampling can cause severe (angular) aliasing artifacts. Previous approaches have focused on avoiding aliasing by pre-processing the acquired light field via prefiltering, demosaicing, reparameterization, and so on. In this paper, we present a different solution that first detects and then removes angular aliasing at the light field refocusing stage. Different from previous frequency domain aliasing analysis, we carry out a spatial domain analysis to reveal whether the angular aliasing would occur and uncover where in the image it would occur. The spatial analysis also facilitates easy separation of the aliasing versus non-aliasing regions and angular aliasing removal. Experiments on both synthetic scene and real light field data sets (camera array and Lytro camera) demonstrate that our approach has a number of advantages over the classical prefiltering and depth-dependent light field rendering techniques.

  13. High-dimensional quantum nature of ghost angular Young's diffraction

    SciTech Connect

    Chen Lixiang; Leach, Jonathan; Jack, Barry; Padgett, Miles J.; Franke-Arnold, Sonja; She Weilong

    2010-09-15

    We propose a technique to characterize the dimensionality of entangled sources affected by any environment, including phase and amplitude masks or atmospheric turbulence. We illustrate this technique on the example of angular ghost diffraction using the orbital angular momentum (OAM) spectrum generated by a nonlocal double slit. We realize a nonlocal angular double slit by placing single angular slits in the paths of the signal and idler modes of the entangled light field generated by parametric down-conversion. Based on the observed OAM spectrum and the measured Shannon dimensionality spectrum of the possible quantum channels that contribute to Young's ghost diffraction, we calculate the associated dimensionality D{sub total}. The measured D{sub total} ranges between 1 and 2.74 depending on the opening angle of the angular slits. The ability to quantify the nature of high-dimensional entanglement is vital when considering quantum information protocols.

  14. Pure angular momentum generator using a ring resonator.

    PubMed

    Yu, Y F; Fu, Y H; Zhang, X M; Liu, A Q; Bourouina, T; Mei, T; Shen, Z X; Tsai, D P

    2010-10-11

    This paper reports a pure angular momentum generator using a ring resonator surrounded by a group of nano-rods. The evanescent waves of the circulating light in the ring are scattered by the nano-rods and generate a rotating electromagnetic field, which has only angular momentum but no linear momentum along the axis of rotation. The angular order is determined by the difference between the order of Whispering Gallery mode and the number of the rods, the rotating frequency is equal to the light frequency divided by the angular order. The maximum amplitude of the rotating electromagnetic fields can be 10 times higher than the amplitude of the input field when there are 36 rods (R(rod) = 120 nm, nr = 1.6). The pure angular momentum generator provides a new platform for trapping and rotation of small particles.

  15. Angular displacement perception modulated by force background.

    PubMed

    Lackner, James R; DiZio, Paul

    2009-05-01

    We had recumbent subjects (n = 7) indicate the amplitude of imposed, passive yaw-axis body rotations in the 0, 1, and 1.8 g background force levels generated during parabolic flight maneuvers. The blindfolded subject, restrained in a cradle, aligned a gravity-neutral pointer with the subjective vertical while in an initial position and then tried to keep it aligned with the same external direction during a body rotation, lasting less than 1.5 s about the z-axis 30 degrees, 60 degrees, or 120 degrees in amplitude. All the rotations were above semicircular threshold levels for eliciting perception of angular displacement under terrestrial test conditions. In 1 and 1.8 g test conditions, subjects were able to indicate both the subjective vertical and the amplitude of the body rotation reasonably accurately. By contrast in 0 g, when indicating the subjective vertical, they aligned the pointer with the body midline and kept it nearly aligned with their midline during the subsequent body tilts. They also reported feeling supine throughout the 0 g test periods. The attenuation of apparent self-displacement in 0 g is discussed in terms of (1) a possible failure of integration of semicircular canal velocity signals, (2) a contribution of somatosensory pressure and contact cues, and (3) gravicentric versus body-centric reference frames. The significance of the findings for predicting and preventing motion sickness and disorientation in orbital space flight and in rotating artificial gravity environments is discussed.

  16. CLASS: The Cosmology Large Angular Scale Surveyor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Essinger-Hileman, Thomas; Ali, Aamir; Amiri, Mandana; Appel, John W.; Araujo, Derek; Bennett, Charles L.; Boone, Fletcher; Chan, Manwei; Cho, Hsiao-Mei; Chuss, David T.; Colazo, Felipe; Crowe, Erik; Denis, Kevin; Dunner, Rolando; Eimer, Joseph; Gothe, Dominik; Halpern, Mark; Kogut, Alan J.; Miller, Nathan; Moseley, Samuel; Rostem, Karwan; Stevenson, Thomas; Towner, Deborah; U-Yen, Kongpop; Wollack, Edward

    2014-01-01

    The Cosmology Large Angular Scale Surveyor (CLASS) is an experiment to measure the signature of a gravitational wave background from inflation in the polarization of the cosmic microwave background (CMB). CLASS is a multi-frequency array of four telescopes operating from a high-altitude site in the Atacama Desert in Chile. CLASS will survey 70% of the sky in four frequency bands centered at 38, 93, 148, and 217 GHz, which are chosen to straddle the Galactic-foreground minimum while avoiding strong atmospheric emission lines. This broad frequency coverage ensures that CLASS can distinguish Galactic emission from the CMB. The sky fraction of the CLASS survey will allow the full shape of the primordial B-mode power spectrum to be characterized, including the signal from reionization at low-length. Its unique combination of large sky coverage, control of systematic errors, and high sensitivity will allow CLASS to measure or place upper limits on the tensor-to-scalar ratio at a level of r = 0:01 and make a cosmic-variance-limited measurement of the optical depth to the surface of last scattering, tau. (c) (2014) COPYRIGHT Society of Photo-Optical Instrumentation Engineers (SPIE). Downloading of the abstract is permitted for personal use only.

  17. Millimetre Wave with Rotational Orbital Angular Momentum

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Chao; Ma, Lu

    2016-01-01

    Orbital angular momentum (OAM) has been widely studied in fibre and short-range communications. The implementation of millimetre waves with OAM is expected to increase the communication capacity. Most experiments demonstrate the distinction of OAM modes by receiving all of the energy in the surface vertical to the radiation axis in space. However, the reception of OAM is difficult in free space due to the non-zero beam angle and divergence of energy. The reception of OAM in the space domain in a manner similar to that in optical fibres (i.e., receiving all of the energy rings vertical to the radiation axis) is impractical, especially for long-distance transmission. Here, we fabricate a prototype of the antenna and demonstrate that rather than in the space domain, the OAM can be well received in the time domain via a single antenna by rotating the OAM wave at the transmitter, i.e., the radio wave with rotational OAM. The phase and frequency measured in the experiment reveal that for different OAM modes, the received signals act as a commonly used orthogonal frequency division multiplexing (OFDM) signal in the time domain. This phase rotation has promising prospects for use in the practical reception of different OAMs of millimetre waves in long-distance transmission. PMID:27596746

  18. Angular velocity and centripetal acceleration relationship

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Monteiro, Martín; Cabeza, Cecilia; Marti, Arturo C.; Vogt, Patrik; Kuhn, Jochen

    2014-05-01

    During the last few years, the growing boom of smartphones has given rise to a considerable number of applications exploiting the functionality of the sensors incorporated in these devices. A sector that has unexpectedly taken advantage of the power of these tools is physics teaching, as reflected in several recent papers. In effect, the use of smartphones has been proposed in several physics experiments spanning mechanics, electromagnetism, optics, oscillations, and waves, among other subjects. Although mechanical experiments have received considerable attention, most of them are based on the use of the accelerometer. An aspect that has received less attention is the use of rotation sensors or gyroscopes. An additional advance in the use of these devices is given by the possibility of obtaining data using the accelerometer and the gyroscope simultaneously. The aim of this paper is to consider the relation between the centripetal acceleration and the angular velocity. Instead of using a formal laboratory setup, in this experiment a smartphone is attached to the floor of a merry-go-round, found in many playgrounds. Several experiments were performed with the roundabout rotating in both directions and with the smart-phone at different distances from the center. The coherence of the measurements is shown.

  19. Optical communications beyond orbital angular momentum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rosales-Guzmán, Carmelo; Trichili, Abderrahmen; Dudley, Angela; Ndagano, Bienvenu; Ben Salem, Amine; Zghal, Mourad; Forbes, Andrew

    2016-09-01

    Current optical communication technologies are predicted to face a bandwidth capacity limit in the near future. The nature of the limitation is fundamental rather than technological and is set by nonlinearities in optical fibers. One solution, suggested over 30 years ago, comprises the use of spatial modes of light as information carriers. Along this direction, light beams endowed with orbital angular momentum (OAM) have been demonstrated as potential information carriers in both, free space and fibres. However, recent studies suggest that purely OAM modes does not increase the bandwidth of optical communication systems. In fact, in all work to date, only the azimuthal component of transverse spatial modes has been used. Crucially, all transverse spatial modes require two degrees of freedom to be described; in the context of Laguerre-Gaussian (LGp`) beams these are azimuthal (l) and radial (p), the former responsible for OAM. Here, we demonstrate a technique where both degrees of freedom of LG modes are used as information carrier over free space. We transfer images encoded using 100 spatial modes in three wavelengths as our basis, and employ a spatial demultiplexing scheme that detects all 100 modes simultaneously. Our scheme is a hybrid of MIMO and SMM, and serves as a proof-of-principle demonstration. The cross-talk between the modes is small and independent of whether OAM modes are used or not.

  20. Semiclassical model for attosecond angular streaking.

    PubMed

    Smolarski, M; Eckle, P; Keller, U; Dörner, R

    2010-08-16

    Attosecond angular streaking is a new technique to achieve unsurpassed time accuracy of only a few attoseconds. Recently this has been successfully used to set an upper limit on the electron tunneling delay time in strong laser field ionization. The measurement technique can be modeled with either the time-dependent Schrödinger equation (TDSE) or a more simple semiclassical approach that describes the process in two steps in analogy to the three-step model in high harmonic generation (HHG): step one is the tunnel ionization and step two is the classical motion in the strong laser field. Here we describe in detail a semiclassical model which is based on the ADK theory for the tunneling step, with subsequent classical propagation of the electron in the laser field. We take into account different ellipticities of the laser field and a possible wavelength-dependent ellipticity that is typically observed for pulses in the two-optical-cycle regime. This semiclassical model shows excellent agreement with the experimental result.