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Sample records for 19f chemical shift

  1. Prediction of (19)F NMR Chemical Shifts in Labeled Proteins: Computational Protocol and Case Study.

    PubMed

    Isley, William C; Urick, Andrew K; Pomerantz, William C K; Cramer, Christopher J

    2016-07-01

    The structural analysis of ligand complexation in biomolecular systems is important in the design of new medicinal therapeutic agents; however, monitoring subtle structural changes in a protein's microenvironment is a challenging and complex problem. In this regard, the use of protein-based (19)F NMR for screening low-molecular-weight molecules (i.e., fragments) can be an especially powerful tool to aid in drug design. Resonance assignment of the protein's (19)F NMR spectrum is necessary for structural analysis. Here, a quantum chemical method has been developed as an initial approach to facilitate the assignment of a fluorinated protein's (19)F NMR spectrum. The epigenetic "reader" domain of protein Brd4 was taken as a case study to assess the strengths and limitations of the method. The overall modeling protocol predicts chemical shifts for residues in rigid proteins with good accuracy; proper accounting for explicit solvation of fluorinated residues by water is critical. PMID:27218275

  2. Cluster models and ab initio calculations of (19)F NMR isotropic chemical shifts for inorganic fluorides.

    PubMed

    Body, Monique; Silly, Gilles; Legein, Christophe; Buzaré, Jean-Yves

    2005-05-26

    (19)F NMR isotropic chemical shift (delta(iso)) calculations are performed in crystallized compounds using the GIAO method with the B3LYP hybrid functional at DFT level. Clusters centered on the studied fluorine atoms mimic the crystalline structures. The 6-311+G(d) basis set is chosen for the central fluorine atom, and the LanL2DZ basis set for the others. The metal atoms are described by the 3-21G(2d) basis set or, when not available, by the CRENBL basis set with the corresponding ECP, and augmented with 2d polarization functions when existing. First, for high-symmetry systems (MF, MF(2), and MF(3) compounds), a systematization of the cluster building up from coordination spheres is proposed, generalized to fluoroperovskites and fluoroaluminates KAlF(4) and RbAlF(4). When applied to rather low symmetry systems such as barium fluorometalates BaMgF(4), BaZnF(4), and Ba(2)ZnF(6), the definition of the coordination spheres is far from easy. Then, for structures built up from a MF(6) octahedron network, we may define different "starting clusters": [FM(2)F(8)] for the shared fluorine atoms, [FMF(4)] for the unshared ones, and [FBa(4)](7+) for the "free" ones. Analogous "starting clusters" are then tested on compounds from the NaF-AlF(3), BaF(2)-AlF(3), and CaF(2)-AlF(3) binary systems and for alpha-BaCaAlF(7) that are also built up from a MF(6) octahedron network. For each of these corresponding fluorine sites, delta(iso) values are calculated with the "starting clusters" and several larger clusters and compared to the experimental delta(iso) values. For the barium-containing clusters, the RMS deviation is equal to 51 ppm. It is suggested that this result may be related to the poor quality of the barium basis sets for which no polarization functions are available for the moment. In total, chemical shifts were calculated for 122 fluorine sites, in a various range of compounds. For the clusters without barium, the ab initio method leads to a RMS equal to 22 ppm, which is

  3. 19F high magnetic field NMR study of beta-ZrF4 and CeF4: from spectra reconstruction to correlation between fluorine sites and 19F isotropic chemical shifts.

    PubMed

    Legein, C; Fayon, F; Martineau, C; Body, M; Buzaré, J-Y; Massiot, D; Durand, E; Tressaud, A; Demourgues, A; Péron, O; Boulard, B

    2006-12-25

    High magnetic field and high spinning frequency one- and two-dimensional one-pulse MAS 19F NMR spectra of beta-ZrF4 and CeF4 were recorded and reconstructed allowing the accurate determination of the 19F chemical shift tensor parameters for the seven different crystallographic fluorine sites of each compound. The attributions of the NMR resonances are performed using the superposition model for 19F isotropic chemical shift calculation initially proposed by Bureau et al. (Bureau, B.; Silly, G.; Emery, J.; Buzaré, J.-Y. Chem. Phys. 1999, 249, 85-104). A satisfactory reliability is reached with a root-mean-square (rms) deviation between calculated and measured isotropic chemical shift values equal to 1.5 and 3.5 ppm for beta-ZrF4 and CeF4, respectively. PMID:17173418

  4. Demystifying fluorine chemical shifts: electronic structure calculations address origins of seemingly anomalous (19)F-NMR spectra of fluorohistidine isomers and analogues.

    PubMed

    Kasireddy, Chandana; Bann, James G; Mitchell-Koch, Katie R

    2015-11-11

    Fluorine NMR spectroscopy is a powerful tool for studying biomolecular structure, dynamics, and ligand binding, yet the origins of (19)F chemical shifts are not well understood. Herein, we use electronic structure calculations to describe the changes in (19)F chemical shifts of 2F- and 4F-histidine/(5-methyl)-imidazole upon acid titration. While the protonation of the 2F species results in a deshielded chemical shift, protonation of the 4F isomer results in an opposite, shielded chemical shift. The deshielding of 2F-histidine/(5-methyl)-imidazole upon protonation can be rationalized by concomitant decreases in charge density on fluorine and a reduced dipole moment. These correlations do not hold for 4F-histidine/(5-methyl)-imidazole, however. Molecular orbital calculations reveal that for the 4F species, there are no lone pair electrons on the fluorine until protonation. Analysis of a series of 4F-imidazole analogues, all with delocalized fluorine electron density, indicates that the deshielding of (19)F chemical shifts through substituent effects correlates with increased C-F bond polarity. In summary, the delocalization of fluorine electrons in the neutral 4F species, with gain of a lone pair upon protonation may help explain the difficulty in developing a predictive framework for fluorine chemical shifts. Ideas debated by chemists over 40 years ago, regarding fluorine's complex electronic effects, are shown to have relevance for understanding and predicting fluorine NMR spectra.

  5. Free variable selection QSPR study to predict 19F chemical shifts of some fluorinated organic compounds using Random Forest and RBF-PLS methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goudarzi, Nasser

    2016-04-01

    In this work, two new and powerful chemometrics methods are applied for the modeling and prediction of the 19F chemical shift values of some fluorinated organic compounds. The radial basis function-partial least square (RBF-PLS) and random forest (RF) are employed to construct the models to predict the 19F chemical shifts. In this study, we didn't used from any variable selection method and RF method can be used as variable selection and modeling technique. Effects of the important parameters affecting the ability of the RF prediction power such as the number of trees (nt) and the number of randomly selected variables to split each node (m) were investigated. The root-mean-square errors of prediction (RMSEP) for the training set and the prediction set for the RBF-PLS and RF models were 44.70, 23.86, 29.77, and 23.69, respectively. Also, the correlation coefficients of the prediction set for the RBF-PLS and RF models were 0.8684 and 0.9313, respectively. The results obtained reveal that the RF model can be used as a powerful chemometrics tool for the quantitative structure-property relationship (QSPR) studies.

  6. Site-specific protein backbone and side-chain NMR chemical shift and relaxation analysis of human vinexin SH3 domain using a genetically encoded {sup 15}N/{sup 19}F-labeled unnatural amino acid

    SciTech Connect

    Shi, Pan; Xi, Zhaoyong; Wang, Hu; Shi, Chaowei; Xiong, Ying; Tian, Changlin

    2010-11-19

    Research highlights: {yields} Chemical synthesis of {sup 15}N/{sup 19}F-trifluomethyl phenylalanine. {yields} Site-specific incorporation of {sup 15}N/{sup 19}F-trifluomethyl phenylalanine to SH3. {yields} Site-specific backbone and side chain chemical shift and relaxation analysis. {yields} Different internal motions at different sites of SH3 domain upon ligand binding. -- Abstract: SH3 is a ubiquitous domain mediating protein-protein interactions. Recent solution NMR structural studies have shown that a proline-rich peptide is capable of binding to the human vinexin SH3 domain. Here, an orthogonal amber tRNA/tRNA synthetase pair for {sup 15}N/{sup 19}F-trifluoromethyl-phenylalanine ({sup 15}N/{sup 19}F-tfmF) has been applied to achieve site-specific labeling of SH3 at three different sites. One-dimensional solution NMR spectra of backbone amide ({sup 15}N){sup 1}H and side-chain {sup 19}F were obtained for SH3 with three different site-specific labels. Site-specific backbone amide ({sup 15}N){sup 1}H and side-chain {sup 19}F chemical shift and relaxation analysis of SH3 in the absence or presence of a peptide ligand demonstrated different internal motions upon ligand binding at the three different sites. This site-specific NMR analysis might be very useful for studying large-sized proteins or protein complexes.

  7. NbF{sub 5} and TaF{sub 5}: Assignment of {sup 19}F NMR resonances and chemical bond analysis from GIPAW calculations

    SciTech Connect

    Biswal, Mamata; Body, Monique; Legein, Christophe; Sadoc, Aymeric; Boucher, Florent

    2013-11-15

    The {sup 19}F isotropic chemical shifts (δ{sub iso}) of two isomorphic compounds, NbF{sub 5} and TaF{sub 5}, which involve six nonequivalent fluorine sites, have been experimentally determined from the reconstruction of 1D {sup 19}F MAS NMR spectra. In parallel, the corresponding {sup 19}F chemical shielding tensors have been calculated using the GIPAW method for both experimental and DFT-optimized structures. Furthermore, the [M{sub 4}F{sub 20}] units of NbF{sub 5} and TaF{sub 5} being held together by van der Waals interactions, the relevance of Grimme corrections to the DFT optimization processes has been evaluated. However, the semi-empirical dispersion correction term introduced by such a method does not show any significant improvement. Nonetheless, a complete and convincing assignment of the {sup 19}F NMR lines of NbF{sub 5} and TaF{sub 5} is obtained, ensured by the linearity between experimental {sup 19}F δ{sub iso} values and calculated {sup 19}F isotropic chemical shielding σ{sub iso} values. The effects of the geometry optimizations have been carefully analyzed, confirming among other matters, the inaccuracy of the experimental structure of NbF{sub 5}. The relationships between the fluorine chemical shifts, the nature of the fluorine atoms (bridging or terminal), the position of the terminal ones (opposite or perpendicular to the bridging ones), the fluorine charges, the ionicity and the length of the M–F bonds have been established. Additionally, for three of the {sup 19}F NMR lines of NbF{sub 5}, distorted multiplets, arising from {sup 1}J-coupling and residual dipolar coupling between the {sup 19}F and {sup 93}Nb nuclei, were simulated yielding to values of {sup 93}Nb–{sup 19}F {sup 1}J-coupling for the corresponding fluorine sites. - Graphical abstract: The complete assignment of the {sup 19}F NMR lines of NbF{sub 5} and TaF{sub 5} allow establishing relationships between the {sup 19}F δ{sub iso} values, the nature of the fluorine atoms

  8. Chemical shifts in biomolecules

    PubMed Central

    Case, David A.

    2013-01-01

    Summary NMR chemical shifts are sensitive probes of stucture and dynamics in proteins. Empirical models, based on a large database of measured shifts, take an input structure and provide increasingly accurate estimates of the corresponding shifts. Quantum chemical calculations can provide the same information, with greater generality but (currently) with less accuracy. These methods are now providing new ways to approach NMR structure determination, and new insights into the conformational dynamics of proteins. PMID:23422068

  9. Through-space (19)F-(19)F spin-spin coupling in ortho-fluoro Z-azobenzene.

    PubMed

    Rastogi, Shiva K; Rogers, Robert A; Shi, Justin; Brown, Christopher T; Salinas, Cindy; Martin, Katherine M; Armitage, Jacob; Dorsey, Christopher; Chun, Gao; Rinaldi, Peter; Brittain, William J

    2016-02-01

    We report through-space (TS) (19)F-(19)F coupling for ortho-fluoro-substituted Z-azobenzenes. The magnitude of the TS-coupling constant ((TS) JFF ) ranged from 2.2-5.9 Hz. Using empirical formulas reported in the literature, these coupling constants correspond to non-bonded F-F distances (dFF) of 3.0-3.5 Å. These non-bonded distances are significantly smaller than those determined by X-ray crystallography or density functional theory, which argues that simple models of (19)F-(19)F TS spin-spin coupling solely based dFF are not applicable. (1)H, (13)C and (19)F data are reported for both the E and Z isomers of ten fluorinated azobenzenes. Density functional theory [B3YLP/6-311++G(d,p)] was used to calculate (19) F chemical shifts, and the calculated values deviated 0.3-10.0 ppm compared with experimental values.

  10. CHARACTERIZATION OF TANK 19F SAMPLES

    SciTech Connect

    Oji, L.; Diprete, D.; Click, D.

    2009-12-17

    The Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) was asked by Liquid Waste Operations to characterize Tank 19F closure samples. Tank 19F slurry samples analyzed included the liquid and solid fractions derived from the slurry materials along with the floor scrape bottom Tank 19F wet solids. These samples were taken from Tank 19F in April 2009 and made available to SRNL in the same month. Because of limited amounts of solids observed in Tank 19F samples, the samples from the north quadrants of the tank were combined into one Tank 19F North Hemisphere sample and similarly the south quadrant samples were combined into one Tank 19F South Hemisphere sample. These samples were delivered to the SRNL shielded cell. The Tank 19F samples were analyzed for radiological, chemical and elemental components. Where analytical methods yielded additional contaminants other than those requested by the customer, these results were also reported. The target detection limits for isotopes analyzed were based on detection values of 1E-04 {micro}Ci/g for most radionuclides and customer desired detection values of 1E-05 {micro}Ci/g for I-129, Pa-231, Np-237, and Ra-226. While many of the target detection limits, as specified in the technical task request and task technical and quality assurance plans were met for the species characterized for Tank 19F, some were not met. In a number of cases, the relatively high levels of radioactive species of the same element or a chemically similar element precluded the ability to measure some isotopes to low levels. SRNL, in conjunction with the plant customer, reviewed all these cases and determined that the impacts were negligible.

  11. A computational investigation of electronic structure as well as 19F and 29Si chemical shielding tensors in the fluorinated silicon fullerenes SinFn (n≤60)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anafcheh, Maryam; Ghafouri, Reza

    2013-02-01

    Density functional theory (DFT) calculations are performed to investigate the electronic features of the structures of fluorinated polysilanes SinFn (n=4, 6, 8, 10, 12, 20, 24, 28, 30, 32, 36, 50, and 60). Among all of these fluorinated polysilanes, Si20F20 has the highest binding energy and, thus, stability. The binding energy then shows a very slow (monotonically) decrease as the size of the fluorinated silicon fullerene n≥20 increases which can be related to an increase in fluorine-fluorine repulsion. Following an irregular pattern, the HOMO-LUMO energy gap strongly depends on the size of the cage. On the other hand, 29Si CS parameters detect equivalent electronic environment for silicon atoms within SinHn polysilanes with n≤20 while 29Si NMR pattern indicates a few separated peaks for SinHn polysilanes with n≥20. Seeking correlation between these peaks and local structures around silicon sites, Siα, Siβ, Siγ observed in these models shows that δiso(Siγ)<δiso(Siβ) <δiso(Siα). Obtaining similar values (458.8-478.7 ppm) of 19F calculated chemical shieldings for all the fluorinated polysilanes means the same tendency of the silicon atoms on the surfaces of all cages for contribution to chemical bonding with fluorine atoms.

  12. CHEMICAL SHIFTS IN AMINO ACIDS, PEPTIDES, AND PROTEINS: From Quantum Chemistry to Drug Design

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oldfield, Eric

    2002-10-01

    This chapter discusses recent progress in the investigation and use of 13C, 15N, and 19F nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) chemical shifts and chemical shift tensors in proteins and model systems primarily using quantum chemical (ab initio Hartree-Fock and density functional theory) techniques. Correlations between spectra and structure are made and the techniques applied to other spectroscopic and electrostatic properties as well, including hydrogen bonding, ligand binding to heme proteins, J-couplings, electric field gradients, and atoms-in-molecules theory, together with a brief review of the use of NMR chemical shifts in drug design.

  13. A bisphosphonate for 19F-magnetic resonance imaging

    PubMed Central

    Kenny, Gavin D.; Shaw, Karen P.; Sivachelvam, Saranja; White, Andrew J.P.; Botnar, Rene M.; T.M. de Rosales, Rafael

    2016-01-01

    19F-magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is a promising technique that may allow us to measure the concentration of exogenous fluorinated imaging probes quantitatively in vivo. Here, we describe the synthesis and characterisation of a novel geminal bisphosphonate (19F-BP) that contains chemically-equivalent fluorine atoms that show a single and narrow 19F resonance and a bisphosphonate group that may be used for labelling inorganic materials based in calcium phosphates and metal oxides. The potential of 19F-BP to provide contrast was analysed in vitro and in vivo using 19F-MRI. In vitro studies demonstrated the potential of 19F-BP as an MRI contrast agent in the millimolar concentration range with signal-to-noise ratios (SNR) comparable to previously reported fluorinated probes. The preliminary in vivo MRI study reported here allowed us to visualise the biodistribution of 19F-BP, showing uptake in the liver and in the bladder/urinary system areas. However, bone uptake was not observed. In addition, 19F-BP showed undesirable toxicity effects in mice that prevent further studies with this compound at the required concentrations for MRI contrast. This study highlights the importance of developing 19F MRI probes with the highest signal intensity achievable. PMID:27110036

  14. Site-specific solvent exposure analysis of a membrane protein using unnatural amino acids and {sup 19}F nuclear magnetic resonance

    SciTech Connect

    Shi, Pan; Li, Dong; Chen, Hongwei; Xiong, Ying; Tian, Changlin

    2011-10-22

    Highlights: {yields} Solvent isotope shift analysis of {sup 19}F-tfmF in different H{sub 2}O/D{sub 2}O molar ratio. {yields} Correlation between solvent isotope shift of {sup 19}F-spins and solvent exposure analysis. {yields} Solvent exposure analysis of membrane proteins. -- Abstract: Membrane proteins play an essential role in cellular metabolism, transportation and signal transduction across cell membranes. The scarcity of membrane protein structures has thus far prevented a full understanding of their molecular mechanisms. Preliminary topology studies and residue solvent exposure analysis have the potential to provide valuable information on membrane proteins of unknown structure. Here, a {sup 19}F-containing unnatural amino acid (trimethylfluoro-phenylalanine, tfmF) was applied to accomplish site-specific {sup 19}F spin incorporation at different sites in diacylglycerol kinase (DAGK, an Escherichia coli membrane protein) for site-specific solvent exposure analysis. Due to isotope effect on {sup 19}F spins, a standard curve for {sup 19}F-tfmF chemical shifts was drawn for varying solvent H{sub 2}O/D{sub 2}O ratios. Further site-specific {sup 19}F solvent isotope shift analysis was conducted for DAGK to distinguish residues in water-soluble loops, interfacial areas or hydrophobic membrane regions. This site-specific solvent exposure analysis method could be applied for further topological analysis of other membrane proteins.

  15. A Short History of Three Chemical Shifts

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nagaoka, Shin-ichi

    2007-01-01

    A short history of chemical shifts in nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR), electron spectroscopy for chemical analysis (ESCA) and Mossbauer spectroscopy, which are useful for chemical studies, is described. The term chemical shift is shown to have originated in the mistaken assumption that nuclei of a given element would all undergo resonance at the…

  16. In Vivo Imaging of Stepwise Vessel Occlusion in Cerebral Photothrombosis of Mice by 19F MRI

    PubMed Central

    Kleinschnitz, Christoph; Kampf, Thomas; Jakob, Peter M.; Stoll, Guido

    2011-01-01

    Background 19F magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) was recently introduced as a promising technique for in vivo cell tracking. In the present study we compared 19F MRI with iron-enhanced MRI in mice with photothrombosis (PT) at 7 Tesla. PT represents a model of focal cerebral ischemia exhibiting acute vessel occlusion and delayed neuroinflammation. Methods/Principal Findings Perfluorocarbons (PFC) or superparamagnetic iron oxide particles (SPIO) were injected intravenously at different time points after photothrombotic infarction. While administration of PFC directly after PT induction led to a strong 19F signal throughout the entire lesion, two hours delayed application resulted in a rim-like 19F signal at the outer edge of the lesion. These findings closely resembled the distribution of signal loss on T2-weighted MRI seen after SPIO injection reflecting intravascular accumulation of iron particles trapped in vessel thrombi as confirmed histologically. By sequential administration of two chemically shifted PFC compounds 0 and 2 hours after illumination the different spatial distribution of the 19F markers (infarct core/rim) could be visualized in the same animal. When PFC were applied at day 6 the fluorine marker was only detected after long acquisition times ex vivo. SPIO-enhanced MRI showed slight signal loss in vivo which was much more prominent ex vivo indicative for neuroinflammation at this late lesion stage. Conclusion Our study shows that vessel occlusion can be followed in vivo by 19F and SPIO-enhanced high-field MRI while in vivo imaging of neuroinflammation remains challenging. The timing of contrast agent application was the major determinant of the underlying processes depicted by both imaging techniques. Importantly, sequential application of different PFC compounds allowed depiction of ongoing vessel occlusion from the core to the margin of the ischemic lesions in a single MRI measurement. PMID:22194810

  17. (19)F-encoded combinatorial libraries: discovery of selective metal binding and catalytic peptoids.

    PubMed

    Pirrung, Michael C; Park, Kaapjoo; Tumey, L Nathan

    2002-01-01

    A (19)F NMR method for encoding of combinatorial libraries has been developed. Aryl fluorides whose chemical shifts are modified by aromatic substituents were prepared and attached to resin support beads that were used in the split-pool synthesis of peptoids. The detection of the (19)F NMR signal of tags derived from a single "big bead" was demonstrated. The library diversity arises from peptoid amines and the cyclic anhydrides used in their acylation. The resulting 90-compound library was examined for metal ion binding, and novel ligands for iron and copper were discovered. Their binding constants were determined to be in the low micromolar range using conventional methods. The library was also examined for autocatalysis of acylation, and a molecule possessing the catalytic triad of serine proteases was deduced.

  18. 19F nuclear magnetic resonance investigation of stereoselective binding of isoflurane to bovine serum albumin.

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Y; Tang, P; Firestone, L; Zhang, T T

    1996-01-01

    Whether proteins or lipids are the primary target sites for general anesthetic action has engendered considerable debate. Recent in vivo studies have shown that the S(+) and R(-) enantiomers of isoflurane are not equipotent, implying involvement of proteins. Bovine serum albumin (BSA), a soluble protein devoid of lipid, contains specific binding sites for isoflurane and other anesthetics. We therefore conducted 19F nuclear magnetic resonance measurements to determine whether binding of isoflurane to BSA was stereoselective. Isoflurane chemical shifts were measured as a function of BSA concentration to determine the chemical shift differences between the free and bound isoflurane. KD was determined by measuring the 19F transverse relaxation times (T2) as a function of isoflurane concentration. The binding duration was determined by assessing increases in 1/T2 as a result of isoflurane exchanging between the free and bound states. The S(+) and R(-) enantiomers exhibited no stereoselectivity in chemical shifts and KD values (KD = 1.3 +/- 0.2 mM, mean +/- SE, for S(+), R(-), and the racemic mixture). Nonetheless, stereoselectivity was observed in dynamic binding parameters; the S(+) enantiomer bound with slower association and dissociation rates than the R(-). Images FIGURE 1 PMID:8770230

  19. Synthesis of fluorinated maltose derivatives for monitoring protein interaction by (19)F NMR.

    PubMed

    Braitsch, Michaela; Kählig, Hanspeter; Kontaxis, Georg; Fischer, Michael; Kawada, Toshinari; Konrat, Robert; Schmid, Walther

    2012-01-01

    A novel reporter system, which is applicable to the (19)F NMR investigation of protein interactions, is presented. This approach uses 2-F-labeled maltose as a spy ligand to indirectly probe protein-ligand or protein-protein interactions of proteins fused or tagged to the maltose-binding protein (MBP). The key feature is the simultaneous NMR observation of both (19)F NMR signals of gluco/manno-type-2-F-maltose-isomers; one isomer (α-gluco-type) binds to MBP and senses the protein interaction, and the nonbinding isomers (β-gluco- and/or α/β-manno-type) are utilized as internal references. Moreover, this reporter system was used for relative affinity studies of fluorinated and nonfluorinated carbohydrates to the maltose-binding protein, which were found to be in perfect agreement with published X-ray data. The results of the NMR competition experiments together with the established correlation between (19)F chemical shift data and molecular interaction patterns, suggest valuable applications for studies of protein-ligand interaction interfaces. PMID:22509216

  20. (19)F-labeling of the adenine H2-site to study large RNAs by NMR spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Sochor, F; Silvers, R; Müller, D; Richter, C; Fürtig, B; Schwalbe, H

    2016-01-01

    In comparison to proteins and protein complexes, the size of RNA amenable to NMR studies is limited despite the development of new isotopic labeling strategies including deuteration and ligation of differentially labeled RNAs. Due to the restricted chemical shift dispersion in only four different nucleotides spectral resolution remains limited in larger RNAs. Labeling RNAs with the NMR-active nucleus (19)F has previously been introduced for small RNAs up to 40 nucleotides (nt). In the presented work, we study the natural occurring RNA aptamer domain of the guanine-sensing riboswitch comprising 73 nucleotides from Bacillus subtilis. The work includes protocols for improved in vitro transcription of 2-fluoroadenosine-5'-triphosphat (2F-ATP) using the mutant P266L of the T7 RNA polymerase. Our NMR analysis shows that the secondary and tertiary structure of the riboswitch is fully maintained and that the specific binding of the cognate ligand hypoxanthine is not impaired by the introduction of the (19)F isotope. The thermal stability of the (19)F-labeled riboswitch is not altered compared to the unmodified sequence, but local base pair stabilities, as measured by hydrogen exchange experiments, are modulated. The characteristic change in the chemical shift of the imino resonances detected in a (1)H,(15)N-HSQC allow the identification of Watson-Crick base paired uridine signals and the (19)F resonances can be used as reporters for tertiary and secondary structure transitions, confirming the potential of (19)F-labeling even for sizeable RNAs in the range of 70 nucleotides.

  1. Drug-specific [sup 19]F NMR and dynamic [sup 18]F PET imaging of the cytostatic agent 5-fluorouracil

    SciTech Connect

    Bellemann, M.E.; Brix, G.; Haberkorn, U.; Ostertag, H.J.; Lorenz, W.J. )

    1994-12-01

    The spatial distribution of the antineoplastic agent 5-fluorouracil (5-FU) has been mapped both with [sup 19]F NMR and [sup 18]F PET imaging techniques. For [sup 19]F NMR imaging of 5-FU and its major catabolite [alpha]-fluoro-[beta]-alanine (FBAL), a fast gradient-echo pulse sequence was employed. A chemical-shift selective saturation pulse was used to suppress either the 5-FU or the FBAL resonance before the other component of the [sup 19]F NMR spectrum was images. This approach yielded selective 5-FU and FBAL NMR images free of chemical-shift artifacts in readout and slice-selection direction. In phantom experiments, [sup 19]F 5-FU and FBAL images with a spatial resolution of 12.5 x 12.5 x 20 mm[sup 3] were obtained in 32 min from model solutions with drug and catabolite concentrations similar to those estimated in animals and patients undergoing i.v. chemotherapy with 5-FU. The biodistribution of 5-[[sup 18]F]FU in rats shortly after administration of the drug demonstrated the good vascularization of the transplanted tumors. The metabolic turnover of the cytostatic agent started about 10--20 min p.i. and was predominant in the tumor and liver tissue. The rapid adjustment of the [sup 18]F metabolite concentrations in the transplanted tumors to a steady state provides evidence of anabolic tumor activity, which supports the hypothesis of 5-FU trapping in malignant cells based on [sup 19]F NMR spectroscopy data. The high uptake of 5-[[sup 18]F]FU in the liver, on the other hand, mainly reflects the catabolization of 5-FU to the noncytotoxic FBAL, which leads to a reduced bioavailability of the drug.

  2. Predictions of the fluorine NMR chemical shifts of perfluorinated carboxylic acids, CnF(2n+1)COOH (n = 6-8).

    PubMed

    Liu, Zizhong; Goddard, John D

    2009-12-17

    Perfluorinated carboxylic acids (PFCAs) are a class of persistent environmental pollutants. Commercially available PFCAs are mixtures of linear and branched isomers, possibly with impurities. Different isomers have different physical and chemical properties and toxicities. However, little is known about the properties and the finer details of the structures of the individual branched isomers. Full geometry optimizations for the linear n-alkane (C(6)-C(27)) PFCAs indicated that all have helical structures. The helical angle increases slightly with increasing chain length, from 16.3 degrees in C(6)F(13)COOH to 17.0 degrees in C(27)F(55)COOH. This study predicts (19)F NMR parameters for 69 linear and branched isomers of the perfluoro carboxylic acids C(6)F(13)COOH, C(7)F(15)COOH, and C(8)F(17)COOH. B3LYP-GIAO/6-31++G(d,p)//B3LYP/6-31G(d,p) was used for the NMR calculations with analysis of the chemical shifts by the natural bond orbital method. The predictions of the (19)F chemical shifts revealed the differences among the CF(3), CF(2), and CF groups. In general, the absolute values for the chemical shifts for the CF(3) group are smaller than 90 ppm, for the CF larger than 160 ppm, and for the CF(2) between 110 and 130 ppm. The chemical shifts of the branched isomers are smaller in magnitude than the linear ones. The decrease is correlated with the steric hindrance of the CF(3) groups, the more hindered the CF(3), the greater the decrease in the (19)F chemical shifts. The predicted (19)F chemical shifts are similar to those for analogous perfluoro compounds with other terminal functional groups such as -SO(3)H or -SO(3)NH(2)CH(2)CH(3).

  3. Synthesis of 19F in Wolf-Rayet stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meynet, G.; Arnould, M.

    2000-03-01

    Meynet & Arnould (1993) have suggested that Wolf-Rayet (WR) stars could significantly contaminate the Galaxy with \\chem{19}{F}. In their scenario, \\chem{19}{F} is synthesized at the beginning of the He-burning phase from the \\chem{14}{N} left over by the previous CNO-burning core, and is ejected in the interstellar medium when the star enters its WC phase. Recourse to CNO seeds makes the \\chem{19}{F} yields metallicity-dependent. These yields are calculated on grounds of detailed stellar evolutionary sequences for an extended range of initial masses (from 25 to 120 Msun) and metallicities (Z=0.008, 0.02 and 0.04). The adopted mass loss rate prescription enables to account for the observed variations of WR populations in different environments. The \\chem{19}{F} abundance in the WR winds of 60 M_sun model stars is found to be about 10 to 70 times higher than its initial value, depending on the metallicity. This prediction is used in conjunction with a very simple model for the chemical evolution of the Galaxy to predict that WR stars could be significant (dominant?) contributors to the solar system fluorine content. We also briefly discuss the implications of our model on the possible detection of fluorine at high redshift.

  4. Chemical shift prediction for denatured proteins.

    PubMed

    Prestegard, James H; Sahu, Sarata C; Nkari, Wendy K; Morris, Laura C; Live, David; Gruta, Christian

    2013-02-01

    While chemical shift prediction has played an important role in aspects of protein NMR that include identification of secondary structure, generation of torsion angle constraints for structure determination, and assignment of resonances in spectra of intrinsically disordered proteins, interest has arisen more recently in using it in alternate assignment strategies for crosspeaks in (1)H-(15)N HSQC spectra of sparsely labeled proteins. One such approach involves correlation of crosspeaks in the spectrum of the native protein with those observed in the spectrum of the denatured protein, followed by assignment of the peaks in the latter spectrum. As in the case of disordered proteins, predicted chemical shifts can aid in these assignments. Some previously developed empirical formulas for chemical shift prediction have depended on basis data sets of 20 pentapeptides. In each case the central residue was varied among the 20 amino common acids, with the flanking residues held constant throughout the given series. However, previous choices of solvent conditions and flanking residues make the parameters in these formulas less than ideal for general application to denatured proteins. Here, we report (1)H and (15)N shifts for a set of alanine based pentapeptides under the low pH urea denaturing conditions that are more appropriate for sparse label assignments. New parameters have been derived and a Perl script was created to facilitate comparison with other parameter sets. A small, but significant, improvement in shift predictions for denatured ubiquitin is demonstrated.

  5. Fluorine (19F) MRS and MRI in biomedicine

    PubMed Central

    Ruiz-Cabello, Jesús; Barnett, Brad P.; Bottomley, Paul A.; Bulte, Jeff W.M.

    2011-01-01

    Shortly after the introduction of 1H MRI, fluorinated molecules were tested as MR-detectable tracers or contrast agents. Many fluorinated compounds, which are nontoxic and chemically inert, are now being used in a broad range of biomedical applications, including anesthetics, chemotherapeutic agents, and molecules with high oxygen solubility for respiration and blood substitution. These compounds can be monitored by fluorine (19F) MRI and/or MRS, providing a noninvasive means to interrogate associated functions in biological systems. As a result of the lack of endogenous fluorine in living organisms, 19F MRI of ‘hotspots’ of targeted fluorinated contrast agents has recently opened up new research avenues in molecular and cellular imaging. This includes the specific targeting and imaging of cellular surface epitopes, as well as MRI cell tracking of endogenous macrophages, injected immune cells and stem cell transplants. PMID:20842758

  6. 19F NMR study on the complex of fluorinated vitamin D derivatives with vitamin D receptor: elucidation of the conformation of vitamin D ligands accommodated in the receptor.

    PubMed

    Morizono, Daisuke

    2011-12-28

    Nuclear receptors mediate allosteric communications where ligand binding initiates a cascade of signal transduction. The interaction of vitamin D with vitamin D receptor (VDR) was investigated by (19)F NMR spectroscopy of the complexes of three fluorinated vitamin D derivatives with the full-length rat VDR-LBD. In the (19)F NMR spectra of the VDR-ligand complexes, the A-ring of 4,4-difluoro-1,25(OH)2D3 was revealed to adopt β-conformation in the VDR in solution, and the spectra were shown to be dependent on the dissociation constant. While the complex of 4,4-difluoro-1,25(OH)2D3 with VDR exhibited a clear distinguishable (19)F NMR spectrum, those of (19)F-1,25(OH)2D3 stereoisomers, which have 10-fold higher VDR affinity than 4,4-difluoro-1,25(OH)2D3, did not. The solid-phase NMR technique was useful for (19)F-1,25(OH)2D3 stereoisomers. The fluorinated vitamin D derivatives showed marked changes in the chemical shift (Δ4-19.7 ppm) upon VDR-complex formation, and the ab initio MO method suggested that van der Waals interactions play a major role in the complex formation.

  7. Analysis of dynamics and mechanism of ligand binding to Artocarpus integrifolia agglutinin. A 13C and 19F NMR study.

    PubMed

    Krishna Sastry, M V; Swamy, M J; Surolia, A

    1988-10-15

    Binding of 13C-labeled N-acetylgalactosamine (13C-GalNAc) and N-trifluoroacetylgalactosamine (19F-GalNAc) to Artocarpus integrifolia agglutinin has been studied using 13C and 19F nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy, respectively. Binding of these saccharides resulted in broadening of the resonances, and no change in chemical shift was observed, suggesting that the alpha- and beta-anomers of 13C-GalNAc and 19F-GalNAc experience a magnetically equivalent environment in the lectin combining site. The alpha- and beta-anomers of 13C-GalNAc and 19F-GalNAc were found to be in slow exchange between free and protein bound states. Binding of 13C-GalNAc was studied as a function of temperature. From the temperature dependence of the line broadening, the thermodynamic and kinetic parameters were evaluated. The association rate constants obtained for the alpha-anomers of 13C-GalNAc and 19F-GalNAc (k+1 = 1.01 x 10(5) M-1.s-1 and 0.698 x 10(5) M-1.s-1, respectively) are in close agreement with those obtained for the corresponding beta-anomers (k+1 = 0.95 x 10(5) M-1.s-1 and 0.65 x 10(5) M-1.s-1, respectively), suggesting that the two anomers bind to the lectin by a similar mechanism. In addition these values are several orders of magnitude slower than those obtained for diffusion controlled processes. The dissociation rate constants obtained are 49.9, 56.9, 42, and 43 s-1, respectively, for the alpha- and beta-anomers of 13C-GalNAc and 19F-GalNAc. A two-step mechanism has been proposed for the interaction of 13C-GalNAc and 19F-GalNAc with A. integrifolia lectin in view of the slow association rates and high activation entropies. The thermodynamic parameters obtained for the association and dissociation reactions suggest that the binding process is entropically favored and that there is a small enthalpic contribution.

  8. (19)F-modified proteins and (19)F-containing ligands as tools in solution NMR studies of protein interactions.

    PubMed

    Sharaf, Naima G; Gronenborn, Angela M

    2015-01-01

    (19)F solution NMR is a powerful and versatile tool to study protein structure and protein-ligand interactions due to the favorable NMR characteristics of the (19)F atom, its absence in naturally occurring biomolecules, and small size. Protocols to introduce (19)F atoms into both proteins and their ligands are readily available and offer the ability to conduct protein-observe (using (19)F-labeled proteins) or ligand-observe (using (19)F-containing ligands) NMR experiments. This chapter provides two protocols for the (19)F-labeling of proteins, using an Escherichia coli expression system: (i) amino acid type-specific incorporation of (19)F-modified amino acids and (ii) site-specific incorporation of (19)F-modified amino acids using recombinantly expressed orthogonal amber tRNA/tRNA synthetase pairs. In addition, we discuss several applications, involving (19)F-modified proteins and (19)F-containing ligands.

  9. NMR characterization of cellulose acetate: chemical shift assignments, substituent effects, and chemical shift additivity.

    PubMed

    Kono, Hiroyuki; Hashimoto, Hisaho; Shimizu, Yuuichi

    2015-03-15

    A series of cellulose acetates (CA) with degrees of substitution (DS) ranging from 2.92-0.92 dissolved in dimethylsulfoxide (DMSO)-d6 and cellulose dissolved in tetrabutylammonium fluoride (TBAF)/DMSO-d6 were investigated by two-dimensional NMR spectroscopy. The NMR spectroscopic analysis allowed the determination of the (1)H and (13)C NMR chemical shifts of the eight anhydroglucose units (AGUs) that contain CA: 2,3,6-tri-, 2,3-di-, 2,6-di-, 3,6-di-, 2-mono-, 3-mono-, 6-mono-, and unacetylated AGUs. A comparative analysis of the chemical shift data revealed the substituent effect of acetyl groups at the 2-, 3-, and 6-positions on the (1)H and (13)C nuclei in the same AGU. In addition, chemical shift additivity could be applied to the (1)H and (13)C chemical shifts of CA because the chemical shifts of the diacetylated and triacetylated AGUs could be almost completely explained by the acetyl substituent effects at the 2-, 3-, and 6-positions.

  10. Dissection of the ion-induced folding of the hammerhead ribozyme using 19F NMR

    PubMed Central

    Hammann, Christian; Norman, David G.; Lilley, David M. J.

    2001-01-01

    We have used 19F NMR to analyze the metal ion-induced folding of the hammerhead ribozyme by selective incorporation of 5fluorouridine. We have studied the chemical shift and linewidths of 19F resonances of 5-fluorouridine at the 4 and 7 positions in the ribozyme core as a function of added Mg2+. The data fit well to a simple two-state model whereby the formation of domain 1 is induced by the noncooperative binding of Mg2+ with an association constant in the range of 100 to 500 M−1, depending on the concentration of monovalent ions present. The results are in excellent agreement with data reporting on changes in the global shape of the ribozyme. However, the NMR experiments exploit reporters located in the center of the RNA sections undergoing the folding transitions, thereby allowing the assignment of specific nucleotides to the separate stages. The results define the folding pathway at high resolution and provide a time scale for the first transition in the millisecond range. PMID:11331743

  11. K-39 quadrupolar and chemical shift tensors for organic potassium complexes and diatomic molecules.

    PubMed

    Lee, Philip K; Chapman, Rebecca P; Zhang, Lei; Hu, Jiaxin; Barbour, Leonard J; Elliott, Elizabeth K; Gokel, George W; Bryce, David L

    2007-12-20

    Solid-state potassium-39 NMR spectra of two potassium complexes of crown-ether-based organic ligands (1.KI and 2) have been acquired at 11.75 and 21.1 T and interpreted to provide information on the 39K quadrupolar and chemical shift tensors. The analyses reveal a large potassium chemical shift tensor span of 75+/-20 ppm for 1.KI. This appears to be the first such measurement for potassium in an organic complex, thereby suggesting the utility of potassium chemical shift tensors for characterizing organic and biomolecular K+ binding environments. Compound 2 exhibits a cation-pi interaction between K+ and a phenyl group, and therefore, the 39K NMR tensors obtained for this compound must be partly representative of this interaction. Analyses of potassium-39 spin-rotation data for gaseous 39K19F and 39K35Cl available from molecular beam experiments performed by Cederberg and co-workers reveal the largest potassium CS tensor spans known to date, 84.39 and 141 ppm, respectively. Collectively, the results obtained highlight the potential of ultrahigh-field potassium-39 solid-state NMR spectroscopy and, in particular, the wide range of the anisotropy of the potassium CS tensor when organic and diatomic systems are considered.

  12. The 15N(α,γ)19F reaction and nucleosynthesis of 19F

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilmes, S.; Wilmes, V.; Staudt, G.; Mohr, P.; Hammer, J. W.

    2002-12-01

    Several resonances in the 15N(α,γ)19F reaction have been investigated in the energy range between 0.6 MeV and 2.7 MeV. Resonance strengths and branching ratios have been determined. High sensitivity could be obtained by the combination of the Dynamitron high current accelerator, the windowless gas target system Rhinoceros, and actively shielded germanium detectors. Two levels of 19F could be observed for the first time in the (α,γ) channel, and several weak branchings below the detection limits of previous experiments were measured. Two observed resonances correspond to α-cluster states in 19F, which have been assigned unambiguously. The astrophysical reaction rate is derived from this set of resonance strengths.

  13. Fluorine Chemical Shift Imaging by Nuclear Magnetic Resonance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Heung Kyu

    1990-01-01

    One of the difficulties encountered in ^{19}F NMR imaging of fluorinated blood substitutes is that these compounds often exhibit complex multi-peak spectra. These peaks result in chemical shift artifacts along the readout direction (mis-registration). In addition, each peak excites a different slice (mis-selection) when a slice selection gradient is applied. Another difficulty is due to its low concentration in the human body. Even after injecting a fluorinated compound into a living system up to the safest level, the concentration still does not appear to be enough to give a sufficient SNR. To solve the inherent problem of mis-selection, a simultaneous multislice method has been developed. The essence of this method is to use the two strongest peaks of the spectrum to excite different multiple slices simultaneously in a controlled fashion, with or without a slice gap. The images corresponding to the two spectral lines are then separated from in and out of phase images (Dixon method). A signed magnitude method is proposed in conjunction with the simultaneous multislice method. Corrected images are obtained from the magnitude of the measured images using the sign determined from the phase images. The method was tested in the presence of phase error, such as static magnetic field inhomogeneity. As alternatives, two deconvolution methods have been devised to eliminate the mis-registration artifacts and utilize the multiple spectral lines. The reblurring deconvolution method, an iterative deconvolution method, is utilized without serious noise amplifications. A pseudo parametric Wiener filter, a variation of the Wiener filter combined with a constrained least square filter, is also devised. Since the point spread function and 2D or 3D object data are already available in the time domain as the FID data, the computational overhead for either method is negligible. To enhance the signal to noise ratio and solve the problems of mis-registration and mis

  14. Dual 19F/1H MR gene reporter molecules for in vivo detection of β-galactosidase

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Jian-Xin; Kodibagkar, Vikram D.; Hallac, Rami R.; Liu, Li; Mason, Ralph P.

    2012-01-01

    Increased emphasis on personalized medicine and novel therapies require the development of non-invasive strategies for assessing biochemistry in vivo. The detection of enzyme activity and gene expression in vivo is potentially important for the characterization of diseases and gene therapy. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is a particularly promising tool since it is non-invasive, and has no associated radioactivity, yet penetrates deep tissue. We now demonstrate a novel class of dual 1H/19F nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) lacZ gene reporter molecule to specifically reveal enzyme activity in human tumor xenografts growing in mice. We report the design, synthesis, and characterization of six novel molecules and evaluation of the most effective reporter in mice in vivo. Substrates show a single 19F NMR signal and exposure to β-galactosidase induces a large 19F NMR chemical shift response. In the presence of ferric ions the liberated aglycone generates intense proton MRI T2 contrast. The dual modality approach allows both the detection of substrate and imaging of product enhancing the confidence in enzyme detection. PMID:22352428

  15. Probing different perfluorocarbons for in vivo inflammation imaging by 19F MRI: image reconstruction, biological half-lives and sensitivity.

    PubMed

    Jacoby, Christoph; Temme, Sebastian; Mayenfels, Friederike; Benoit, Nicole; Krafft, Marie Pierre; Schubert, Rolf; Schrader, Jürgen; Flögel, Ulrich

    2014-03-01

    Inflammatory processes can reliably be assessed by (19)F MRI using perfluorocarbons (PFCs), which is primarily based on the efficient uptake of emulsified PFCs by circulating cells of the monocyte-macrophage system and subsequent infiltration of the (19)F-labeled cells into affected tissue. An ideal candidate for the sensitive detection of fluorine-loaded cells is the biochemically inert perfluoro-15-crown-5 ether (PFCE), as it contains 20 magnetically equivalent (19)F atoms. However, the biological half-life of PFCE in the liver and spleen is extremely long, and so this substance is not suitable for future clinical applications. In the present study, we investigated alternative, nontoxic PFCs with predicted short biological half-lives and high fluorine content: perfluorooctyl bromide (PFOB), perfluorodecalin (PFD) and trans-bis-perfluorobutyl ethylene (F-44E). Despite the complex spectra of these compounds, we obtained artifact-free images using sine-squared acquisition-weighted three-dimensional chemical shift imaging and dedicated reconstruction accomplished with in-house-developed software. The signal-to-noise ratio of the images was maximized using a Nutall window with only moderate localization error. Using this approach, the retention times of the different PFCs in murine liver and spleen were determined at 9.4 T. The biological half-lives were estimated to be 9 days (PFD), 12 days (PFOB) and 28 days (F-44E), compared with more than 250 days for PFCE. In vivo sensitivity for inflammation imaging was assessed using an ear clip injury model. The alternative PFCs PFOB and F-44E provided 37% and 43%, respectively, of the PFCE intensities, whereas PFD did not show any signal in the ear model. Thus, for in vivo monitoring of inflammatory processes, PFOB emerges as the most promising candidate for possible future translation of (19)F MR inflammation imaging to human applications. PMID:24353148

  16. Probing different perfluorocarbons for in vivo inflammation imaging by 19F MRI: image reconstruction, biological half-lives and sensitivity.

    PubMed

    Jacoby, Christoph; Temme, Sebastian; Mayenfels, Friederike; Benoit, Nicole; Krafft, Marie Pierre; Schubert, Rolf; Schrader, Jürgen; Flögel, Ulrich

    2014-03-01

    Inflammatory processes can reliably be assessed by (19)F MRI using perfluorocarbons (PFCs), which is primarily based on the efficient uptake of emulsified PFCs by circulating cells of the monocyte-macrophage system and subsequent infiltration of the (19)F-labeled cells into affected tissue. An ideal candidate for the sensitive detection of fluorine-loaded cells is the biochemically inert perfluoro-15-crown-5 ether (PFCE), as it contains 20 magnetically equivalent (19)F atoms. However, the biological half-life of PFCE in the liver and spleen is extremely long, and so this substance is not suitable for future clinical applications. In the present study, we investigated alternative, nontoxic PFCs with predicted short biological half-lives and high fluorine content: perfluorooctyl bromide (PFOB), perfluorodecalin (PFD) and trans-bis-perfluorobutyl ethylene (F-44E). Despite the complex spectra of these compounds, we obtained artifact-free images using sine-squared acquisition-weighted three-dimensional chemical shift imaging and dedicated reconstruction accomplished with in-house-developed software. The signal-to-noise ratio of the images was maximized using a Nutall window with only moderate localization error. Using this approach, the retention times of the different PFCs in murine liver and spleen were determined at 9.4 T. The biological half-lives were estimated to be 9 days (PFD), 12 days (PFOB) and 28 days (F-44E), compared with more than 250 days for PFCE. In vivo sensitivity for inflammation imaging was assessed using an ear clip injury model. The alternative PFCs PFOB and F-44E provided 37% and 43%, respectively, of the PFCE intensities, whereas PFD did not show any signal in the ear model. Thus, for in vivo monitoring of inflammatory processes, PFOB emerges as the most promising candidate for possible future translation of (19)F MR inflammation imaging to human applications.

  17. 19F MRI for quantitative in vivo cell tracking

    PubMed Central

    Srinivas, Mangala; Heerschap, Arend; Ahrens, Eric T.; Figdor, Carl G.; de Vries, I. Jolanda M.

    2010-01-01

    Cellular therapy, including stem cell transplants and dendritic cell vaccines, is typically monitored for dosage optimization, accurate delivery and localization using non-invasive imaging, of which magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is a key modality. 19F MRI retains the advantages of MRI as an imaging modality, while allowing direct detection of labelled cells for unambiguous identification and quantification, unlike typical metal-based contrast agents. Recent developments in 19F MRI-based in vivo cell quantification, the existing clinical use of 19F compounds and current explosive interest in cellular therapeutics have brought 19F imaging technology closer to clinical application. We review the application of 19F MRI to cell tracking, discussing intracellular 19F labels, cell labelling and in vivo quantification, as well as the potential clinical use of 19F MRI. PMID:20427096

  18. Relative Configuration of Natural Products Using NMR Chemical Shifts

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    By comparing calculated with experimental NMR chemical shifts, we were able to determine the relative configurations of three monoterpene diastereomers produced by the walkingstick Anisomorpha buprestoides. The combined RMSDs of both 1H and 13C quantum chemically calculated shifts were able to predi...

  19. Probing the Pu4 + magnetic moment in PuF4 with 19F NMR spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Capan, Cigdem; Dempsey, Richard J.; Sinkov, Sergey; McNamara, Bruce K.; Cho, Herman

    2016-06-01

    The magnetic fields produced by Pu4 + centers have been measured by 19F NMR spectroscopy to elucidate the Pu-F electronic interactions in polycrystalline PuF4. Spectra acquired at applied fields of 2.35 and 7.05 T reveal a linear scaling of the 19F line shape. A model is presented that treats the line broadening and shifts as due to dipolar fields produced by Pu valence electrons in localized noninteracting orbitals. Alternative explanations for the observed line shape involving covalent Pu-F bonding, superexchange interactions, and electronic configurations with enhanced magnetic moments are considered.

  20. Detection of organic sulfur by {sup 15}N and {sup 19}F NMR via formation of iminosulfuranes

    SciTech Connect

    Franz, J.A.; Linehan, J.C.; Lamb, C.N.

    1992-08-01

    We have synthesized new iminosulfuranes from a variety of diaryl-and dialkyl sulfides and dibenzothiophene. The pattern of {sup 15}N chemical shifts indicates that functional groups attached to sulfur are not simply resolved into aryl and alkyl groups. Thus, resolution of sulfur functional groups using {sup 15}N NMR via iminosulfurane does not appear practicable. However, iminosulfurane formation, together with the N-haloamide reaction and the Pummerer rearrangement, provides pathways for chemical discrimination of different sulfur substituents using unique {sup 15}N- or, {sup 19}F-labelled fragments for different categories of sulfur functional groups. In efforts currently underway, we are applying these reactions to methylated extracts and conversion products of the high-organic-sulfur containing Yugoslavian Rasa and Spanish Mequinenza lignites. 1 tab, 14 refs.

  1. Detection of organic sulfur by [sup 15]N and [sup 19]F NMR via formation of iminosulfuranes

    SciTech Connect

    Franz, J.A.; Linehan, J.C.; Lamb, C.N.

    1992-08-01

    We have synthesized new iminosulfuranes from a variety of diaryl-and dialkyl sulfides and dibenzothiophene. The pattern of [sup 15]N chemical shifts indicates that functional groups attached to sulfur are not simply resolved into aryl and alkyl groups. Thus, resolution of sulfur functional groups using [sup 15]N NMR via iminosulfurane does not appear practicable. However, iminosulfurane formation, together with the N-haloamide reaction and the Pummerer rearrangement, provides pathways for chemical discrimination of different sulfur substituents using unique [sup 15]N- or, [sup 19]F-labelled fragments for different categories of sulfur functional groups. In efforts currently underway, we are applying these reactions to methylated extracts and conversion products of the high-organic-sulfur containing Yugoslavian Rasa and Spanish Mequinenza lignites. 1 tab, 14 refs.

  2. Chemical shift guided homology modeling of larger proteins

    PubMed Central

    Shen, Yang; Bax, Ad

    2015-01-01

    We describe an alternate approach to protein structure determination that relies on experimental NMR chemical shifts, plus sparse NOEs if available. The newly introduced alignment method, POMONA, directly exploits the powerful bioinformatics algorithms previously developed for sequence-based homology modeling, but does not require significant sequence similarity. Protein templates, generated by POMONA, are subsequently used as input for chemical shift based Rosetta comparative modeling (CS-RosettaCM) to generate reliable full atom models. PMID:26053889

  3. 19F magnetic resonance imaging of endogenous macrophages in inflammation.

    PubMed

    Temme, Sebastian; Bönner, Florian; Schrader, Jürgen; Flögel, Ulrich

    2012-01-01

    In this article, we review the use of (19) F MRI (magnetic resonance imaging) for in vivo tracking of monocytes and macrophages in the course of tissue inflammation. Emulsified perfluorocarbons (PFCs) are preferentially phagocytized by monocytes/macrophages and are readily detected by (19) F MRI. Because of the lack of any (19) F background in the body, observed signals are robust and exhibit an excellent degree of specificity. As a consequence of progressive infiltration of the labeled immunocompetent cells into inflamed areas, foci of inflammation can be localized as hot spots by simultaneous acquisition of morphologically matched proton ((1) H) and fluorine ((19) F) MRI. The identification of inflammation by (19) F MRI--at a time when the inflammatory cascade is initiated--opens the possibility for an early detection and more timely therapeutic intervention. Since signal intensity in the (19) F images reflects the severity of inflammation, this approach is also suitable to monitor the efficacy of pharmaceutical treatment. Because PFCs are biochemically inert and the fluorine nucleus exhibits high magnetic resonance (MR) sensitivity, (19) F MRI may be applicable for clinical inflammation imaging. PMID:22354793

  4. 19F magnetic resonance imaging of endogenous macrophages in inflammation.

    PubMed

    Temme, Sebastian; Bönner, Florian; Schrader, Jürgen; Flögel, Ulrich

    2012-01-01

    In this article, we review the use of (19) F MRI (magnetic resonance imaging) for in vivo tracking of monocytes and macrophages in the course of tissue inflammation. Emulsified perfluorocarbons (PFCs) are preferentially phagocytized by monocytes/macrophages and are readily detected by (19) F MRI. Because of the lack of any (19) F background in the body, observed signals are robust and exhibit an excellent degree of specificity. As a consequence of progressive infiltration of the labeled immunocompetent cells into inflamed areas, foci of inflammation can be localized as hot spots by simultaneous acquisition of morphologically matched proton ((1) H) and fluorine ((19) F) MRI. The identification of inflammation by (19) F MRI--at a time when the inflammatory cascade is initiated--opens the possibility for an early detection and more timely therapeutic intervention. Since signal intensity in the (19) F images reflects the severity of inflammation, this approach is also suitable to monitor the efficacy of pharmaceutical treatment. Because PFCs are biochemically inert and the fluorine nucleus exhibits high magnetic resonance (MR) sensitivity, (19) F MRI may be applicable for clinical inflammation imaging.

  5. Bayesian inference of protein structure from chemical shift data

    PubMed Central

    Bratholm, Lars A.; Christensen, Anders S.; Hamelryck, Thomas

    2015-01-01

    Protein chemical shifts are routinely used to augment molecular mechanics force fields in protein structure simulations, with weights of the chemical shift restraints determined empirically. These weights, however, might not be an optimal descriptor of a given protein structure and predictive model, and a bias is introduced which might result in incorrect structures. In the inferential structure determination framework, both the unknown structure and the disagreement between experimental and back-calculated data are formulated as a joint probability distribution, thus utilizing the full information content of the data. Here, we present the formulation of such a probability distribution where the error in chemical shift prediction is described by either a Gaussian or Cauchy distribution. The methodology is demonstrated and compared to a set of empirically weighted potentials through Markov chain Monte Carlo simulations of three small proteins (ENHD, Protein G and the SMN Tudor Domain) using the PROFASI force field and the chemical shift predictor CamShift. Using a clustering-criterion for identifying the best structure, together with the addition of a solvent exposure scoring term, the simulations suggests that sampling both the structure and the uncertainties in chemical shift prediction leads more accurate structures compared to conventional methods using empirical determined weights. The Cauchy distribution, using either sampled uncertainties or predetermined weights, did, however, result in overall better convergence to the native fold, suggesting that both types of distribution might be useful in different aspects of the protein structure prediction. PMID:25825683

  6. Bayesian inference of protein structure from chemical shift data.

    PubMed

    Bratholm, Lars A; Christensen, Anders S; Hamelryck, Thomas; Jensen, Jan H

    2015-01-01

    Protein chemical shifts are routinely used to augment molecular mechanics force fields in protein structure simulations, with weights of the chemical shift restraints determined empirically. These weights, however, might not be an optimal descriptor of a given protein structure and predictive model, and a bias is introduced which might result in incorrect structures. In the inferential structure determination framework, both the unknown structure and the disagreement between experimental and back-calculated data are formulated as a joint probability distribution, thus utilizing the full information content of the data. Here, we present the formulation of such a probability distribution where the error in chemical shift prediction is described by either a Gaussian or Cauchy distribution. The methodology is demonstrated and compared to a set of empirically weighted potentials through Markov chain Monte Carlo simulations of three small proteins (ENHD, Protein G and the SMN Tudor Domain) using the PROFASI force field and the chemical shift predictor CamShift. Using a clustering-criterion for identifying the best structure, together with the addition of a solvent exposure scoring term, the simulations suggests that sampling both the structure and the uncertainties in chemical shift prediction leads more accurate structures compared to conventional methods using empirical determined weights. The Cauchy distribution, using either sampled uncertainties or predetermined weights, did, however, result in overall better convergence to the native fold, suggesting that both types of distribution might be useful in different aspects of the protein structure prediction.

  7. Counterion influence on chemical shifts in strychnine salts

    SciTech Connect

    Metaxas, Athena E.; Cort, John R.

    2013-05-01

    The highly toxic plant alkaloid strychnine is often isolated in the form of the anion salt of its protonated tertiary amine. Here we characterize the relative influence of different counterions on 1H and 13C chemical shifts in several strychnine salts in D2O, methanol-d4 (CD3OD) and chloroform-d (CDCl3) solvents. In organic solvents, but not in water, substantial variation in chemical shifts of protons near the tertiary amine was observed among different salts. These secondary shifts reveal differences in the way each anion influences electronic structure within the protonated amine. The distributions of secondary shifts allow salts to be easily distinguished from each other as well as from the free base form. The observed effects are much greater in organic solvents than in water. Slight concentration-dependence in chemical shifts of some protons near the amine was observed for two salts in CDCl3, but this effect is small compared to the influence of the counterion. Distinct chemical shifts in different salt forms of the same compound may be useful as chemical forensic signatures for source attribution and sample matching of alkaloids such as strychnine and possibly other organic acid and base salts.

  8. Counterion influence on chemical shifts in strychnine salts.

    PubMed

    Metaxas, Athena E; Cort, John R

    2013-05-01

    The highly toxic plant alkaloid strychnine is often isolated in the form of the anion salt of its protonated tertiary amine. Here, we characterize the relative influence of different counterions on (1)H and (13)C chemical shifts in several strychnine salts in D2O, methanol-d4 (CD3OD), and chloroform-d (CDCl3) solvents. In organic solvents but not in water, substantial variation in chemical shifts of protons near the tertiary amine was observed among different salts. These secondary shifts reveal differences in the way each anion influences electronic structure within the protonated amine. The distributions of secondary shifts allow salts to be easily distinguished from each other as well as from the free base form. Slight concentration dependence in chemical shifts of some protons near the amine was observed for two salts in CDCl3, but this effect is small compared with the influence of the counterion. Distinct chemical shifts in different salt forms of the same compound may be useful as chemical forensic signatures for source attribution and sample matching of alkaloids such as strychnine and possibly other organic acid and base salts. PMID:23495106

  9. Ultrahigh (19)F Loaded Cu1.75S Nanoprobes for Simultaneous (19)F Magnetic Resonance Imaging and Photothermal Therapy.

    PubMed

    Chen, Hongli; Song, Manli; Tang, Juan; Hu, Gaofei; Xu, Suying; Guo, Zhide; Li, Nannan; Cui, Jiabin; Zhang, Xianzhong; Chen, Xiaoyuan; Wang, Leyu

    2016-01-26

    (19)F magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is a powerful noninvasive, sensitive, and accurate molecular imaging technique for early diagnosis of diseases. The major challenge of (19)F MRI is signal attenuation caused by the reduced solubility of probes with increased number of fluorine atoms and the restriction of molecular mobility. Herein, we present a versatile one-pot strategy for the fabrication of a multifunctional nanoprobe with high (19)F loading (∼2.0 × 10(8 19)F atoms per Cu1.75S nanoparticle). Due to the high (19)F loading and good molecular mobility that results from the small particle size (20.8 ± 2.0 nm) and ultrathin polymer coating, this nanoprobe demonstrates ultrahigh (19)F MRI signal. In vivo tests show that this multifunctional nanoprobe is suitable for (19)F MRI and photothermal therapy. This versatile fabrication strategy has also been readily extended to other single-particle nanoprobes for ablation and sensitive multimodal imaging.

  10. 15N chemical shift referencing in solid state NMR.

    PubMed

    Bertani, Philippe; Raya, Jésus; Bechinger, Burkhard

    2014-01-01

    Solid-state NMR spectroscopy has much advanced during the last decade and provides a multitude of data that can be used for high-resolution structure determination of biomolecules, polymers, inorganic compounds or macromolecules. In some cases the chemical shift referencing has become a limiting factor to the precision of the structure calculations and we have therefore evaluated a number of methods used in proton-decoupled (15)N solid-state NMR spectroscopy. For (13)C solid-state NMR spectroscopy adamantane is generally accepted as an external standard, but to calibrate the (15)N chemical shift scale several standards are in use. As a consequence the published chemical shift values exhibit considerable differences (up to 22 ppm). In this paper we report the (15)N chemical shift of several commonly used references compounds in order to allow for comparison and recalibration of published data and future work. We show that (15)NH4Cl in its powdered form (at 39.3 ppm with respect to liquid NH3) is a suitable external reference as it produces narrow lines when compared to other reference compounds and at the same time allows for the set-up of cross-polarization NMR experiments. The compound is suitable to calibrate magic angle spinning and static NMR experiments. Finally the temperature variation of (15)NH4Cl chemical shift is reported.

  11. In vivo 19F MR imaging and spectroscopy for the BNCT optimization.

    PubMed

    Porcari, P; Capuani, S; D'Amore, E; Lecce, M; La Bella, A; Fasano, F; Migneco, L M; Campanella, R; Maraviglia, B; Pastore, F S

    2009-07-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate in vivo the boron biodistribution and pharmacokinetics of 4-borono-2-fluorophenylalanine ((19)F-BPA) using (19)F MR Imaging ((19)F MRI) and Spectroscopy ((19)F MRS). The correlation between the results obtained by both techniques, (19)F MRI on rat brain and (19)F MRS on blood samples, showed the maximum (19)F-BPA uptake in C6 glioma model at 2.5h after infusion determining the optimal irradiation time. Moreover, the effect of L-DOPA as potential enhancer of (19)F-BPA tumour intake was assessed using (19)F MRI.

  12. In vivo 19F MR imaging and spectroscopy for the BNCT optimization.

    PubMed

    Porcari, P; Capuani, S; D'Amore, E; Lecce, M; La Bella, A; Fasano, F; Migneco, L M; Campanella, R; Maraviglia, B; Pastore, F S

    2009-07-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate in vivo the boron biodistribution and pharmacokinetics of 4-borono-2-fluorophenylalanine ((19)F-BPA) using (19)F MR Imaging ((19)F MRI) and Spectroscopy ((19)F MRS). The correlation between the results obtained by both techniques, (19)F MRI on rat brain and (19)F MRS on blood samples, showed the maximum (19)F-BPA uptake in C6 glioma model at 2.5h after infusion determining the optimal irradiation time. Moreover, the effect of L-DOPA as potential enhancer of (19)F-BPA tumour intake was assessed using (19)F MRI. PMID:19375924

  13. Protein Structure Refinement Using 13Cα Chemical Shift Tensors

    PubMed Central

    Wylie, Benjamin J.; Schwieters, Charles D.; Oldfield, Eric; Rienstra, Chad M.

    2009-01-01

    We have obtained the 13Cα chemical shift tensors for each amino acid in the protein GB1. We then developed a CST force field and incorporated this into the Xplor-NIH structure determination program. GB1 structures obtained by using CST restraints had improved precision over those obtained in the absence of CST restraints, and were also more accurate. When combined with isotropic chemical shifts, distance and vector angle restraints, the root-mean squared error with respect to existing x-ray structures was better than ~1.0 Å. These results are of broad general interest since they show that chemical shift tensors can be used in protein structure refinement, improving both structural accuracy and precision, opening up the way to accurate de novo structure determination. PMID:19123862

  14. Determination of Relative Configuration from Residual Chemical Shift Anisotropy.

    PubMed

    Nath, Nilamoni; Schmidt, Manuel; Gil, Roberto R; Williamson, R Thomas; Martin, Gary E; Navarro-Vázquez, Armando; Griesinger, Christian; Liu, Yizhou

    2016-08-01

    Determination of relative configuration is frequently a rate-limiting step in the characterization of small organic molecules. Solution NMR-based nuclear Overhauser effect and scalar J-coupling constants can provide useful spatial information but often fail when stereocenters are separated by more than 4-5 Å. Residual dipolar couplings (RDCs) can provide a means of assigning relative configuration without limits of distance between stereocenters. However, sensitivity limits their application. Chemical shift is the most readily measured NMR parameter, and partial molecular alignment can reveal the anisotropic component of the chemical shift tensor, manifested as residual chemical shift anisotropy (RCSA). Hence, (13)C RCSAs provide information on the relative orientations of specific structural moieties including nonprotonated carbons and can be used for stereochemical assignment. Herein, we present two robust and sensitive methods to accurately measure and apply (13)C RCSAs for stereochemical assignment. The complementary techniques are demonstrated with five molecules representing differing structural classes. PMID:27294984

  15. Molecular dynamics averaging of Xe chemical shifts in liquids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jameson, Cynthia J.; Sears, Devin N.; Murad, Sohail

    2004-11-01

    The Xe nuclear magnetic resonance chemical shift differences that afford the discrimination between various biological environments are of current interest for biosensor applications and medical diagnostic purposes. In many such environments the Xe signal appears close to that in water. We calculate average Xe chemical shifts (relative to the free Xe atom) in solution in eleven liquids: water, isobutane, perfluoro-isobutane, n-butane, n-pentane, neopentane, perfluoroneopentane, n-hexane, n-octane, n-perfluorooctane, and perfluorooctyl bromide. The latter is a liquid used for intravenous Xe delivery. We calculate quantum mechanically the Xe shielding response in Xe-molecule van der Waals complexes, from which calculations we develop Xe (atomic site) interpolating functions that reproduce the ab initio Xe shielding response in the complex. By assuming additivity, these Xe-site shielding functions can be used to calculate the shielding for any configuration of such molecules around Xe. The averaging over configurations is done via molecular dynamics (MD). The simulations were carried out using a MD technique that one of us had developed previously for the simulation of Henry's constants of gases dissolved in liquids. It is based on separating a gaseous compartment in the MD system from the solvent using a semipermeable membrane that is permeable only to the gas molecules. We reproduce the experimental trends in the Xe chemical shifts in n-alkanes with increasing number of carbons and the large chemical shift difference between Xe in water and in perfluorooctyl bromide. We also reproduce the trend for a given solvent of decreasing Xe chemical shift with increasing temperature. We predict chemical shift differences between Xe in alkanes vs their perfluoro counterparts.

  16. Labeling cells for in vivo tracking using (19)F MRI.

    PubMed

    Srinivas, Mangala; Boehm-Sturm, Philipp; Figdor, Carl G; de Vries, I Jolanda; Hoehn, Mathias

    2012-12-01

    Noninvasive in vivo cell tracking is crucial to fully understand the function of mobile and/or transplanted cells, particularly immune cells and cellular therapeutics. (19)F MRI for cell tracking has several advantages; chief among them are its noninvasive nature which allows longitudinal data acquisition, use of a stable, non-radioactive isotope permitting long-term tracking, the absence of confounding endogenous signal, and the ability to quantify cell numbers from image data. However, generation of sufficient signal i.e. (19)F cell loading is a key challenge, particularly with non-phagocytic cells such as lymphocytes and stem cells. A range of (19)F cell labels have been developed, including emulsions, particles, polymers, and agents for clinical use. Various animal and primary human cells, such as dendritic cells, lymphocytes and phagocytes have been successfully labeled and studied in models of autoimmune disease, inflammation and transplant rejection. Primary human cells, particularly dendritic cells as used in vaccine therapy have been tested for imminent clinical application. Here, we summarize current cell loading strategies and sensitivity of in vivo cell imaging with (19)F MRI, and discuss the processing of image data for accurate quantification of cell numbers. This novel technology is uniquely applicable to the longitudinal and quantitative tracking of cells in vivo.

  17. Clonal distribution of pneumococcal serotype 19F isolates from Ghana.

    PubMed

    Sparding, Nadja; Dayie, Nicholas T K D; Mills, Richael O; Newman, Mercy J; Dalsgaard, Anders; Frimodt-Møller, Niels; Slotved, Hans-Christian

    2015-04-01

    Streptococcus pneumoniae is a major cause of morbidity and mortality worldwide. Pneumococcal strains are classified according to their capsular polysaccharide and more than 90 different serotypes are currently known. In this project, three distinct groups of pneumococcal carriage isolates from Ghana were investigated; isolates from healthy children in Tamale and isolates from both healthy and children attending the outpatient department at a hospital in Accra. The isolates were previously identified and characterized by Gram staining, serotyping and susceptibility to penicillin. In this study, isolates of the common serotype 19F were further investigated by Multi-Locus Sequence Typing (MLST). Overall, 14 different Sequence Types (STs) were identified by MLST, of which nine were novel based on the international MLST database. Two clones within serotype 19F seem to circulate in Ghana, a known ST (ST 4194) and a novel ST (ST 9090). ST 9090 was only found in healthy children in Accra, whereas ST 4194 was found equally in all children studied. In the MLST database, other isolates of ST 4194 were also associated with serotype 19F, and these isolates came from other West African countries. The majority of isolates were penicillin intermediate resistant. In conclusion, two clones within serotype 19F were found to be dominating in pneumococcal carriage in Accra and Tamale in Ghana. Furthermore, it seems as though the clonal distribution of serotype 19F may be different from what is currently known in Ghana in that many new clones were identified. This supports the importance of continued monitoring of pneumococcal carriage in Ghana and elsewhere when vaccines, e.g., PCV-13, have been introduced to monitor the possible future spread of antimicrobial resistant clones.

  18. Chemical-shift MRI of exogenous lipoid pneumonia

    SciTech Connect

    Cox, J.E.; Choplin, R.H.; Chiles, C.

    1996-05-01

    Exogenous lipoid pneumonia results from the aspiration or inhalation of fatty substances, such as mineral oil found in laxatives or nasal medications containing liquid paraffin. We present standard and lipid-sensitive (chemical-shift) MR findings in a patient with histologically confirmed lipoid pneumonia. The loss of signal intensity in an area of airspace disease on opposed-phase imaging was considered specific for the presence of lipid. 14 refs., 3 figs.

  19. Comparative analysis of the interaction of capecitabine and gefitinib with human serum albumin using (19)F nuclear magnetic resonance-based approach.

    PubMed

    Wu, Di; Yan, Jin; Sun, Pingchuan; Xu, Kailin; Li, Shanshan; Yang, Hongqi; Li, Hui

    2016-09-10

    Monitoring the interaction between drugs and proteins is critical to understanding drug transport and metabolism underlying pharmacodynamics. The binding capacities to human serum albumin of two anticancer drugs, capecitabine and gefitinib, were compared via an approach combining (19)F NMR, (1)H saturation transfer difference (STD) NMR, circular dichroism and docking simulations. Results showed that the two drugs interaction with human serum albumin caused (19)F NMR signal shifted to different directions. Capecitabine had accurate binding site and higher binding affinity than gefitinib. This study provided fresh insights into ligand-protein interaction and the strength of (19)F NMR approach in biomedical research was well illustrated in this case.

  20. Comparative analysis of the interaction of capecitabine and gefitinib with human serum albumin using (19)F nuclear magnetic resonance-based approach.

    PubMed

    Wu, Di; Yan, Jin; Sun, Pingchuan; Xu, Kailin; Li, Shanshan; Yang, Hongqi; Li, Hui

    2016-09-10

    Monitoring the interaction between drugs and proteins is critical to understanding drug transport and metabolism underlying pharmacodynamics. The binding capacities to human serum albumin of two anticancer drugs, capecitabine and gefitinib, were compared via an approach combining (19)F NMR, (1)H saturation transfer difference (STD) NMR, circular dichroism and docking simulations. Results showed that the two drugs interaction with human serum albumin caused (19)F NMR signal shifted to different directions. Capecitabine had accurate binding site and higher binding affinity than gefitinib. This study provided fresh insights into ligand-protein interaction and the strength of (19)F NMR approach in biomedical research was well illustrated in this case. PMID:27392172

  1. Characterization of 19A-like 19F pneumococcal isolates from Papua New Guinea and Fiji

    PubMed Central

    Dunne, E.M.; Tikkanen, L.; Balloch, A.; Gould, K.; Yoannes, M.; Phuanukoonnon, S.; Licciardi, P.V.; Russell, F.M.; Mulholland, E.K.; Satzke, C.; Hinds, J.

    2015-01-01

    Molecular identification of Streptococcus pneumoniae serotype 19F is routinely performed by PCR targeting the wzy gene of the capsular biosynthetic locus. However, 19F isolates with genetic similarity to 19A have been reported in the United States and Brazil. We screened 78 pneumococcal carriage isolates and found six 19F wzy variants that originated from children in Papua New Guinea and Fiji. Isolates were characterized using multilocus sequence typing and opsonophagocytic assays. The 19F wzy variants displayed similar susceptibility to anti-19F IgG antibodies compared to standard 19F isolates. Our findings indicate that these 19F variants may be more common than previously believed. PMID:26339490

  2. Chemical shifts of small heterogeneous Ar/Xe clusters

    SciTech Connect

    Lindblad, A.; Rander, T.; Bradeanu, I.; Oehrwall, G.; Bjoerneholm, O.; Mucke, M.; Ulrich, V.; Lischke, T.; Hergenhahn, U.

    2011-03-15

    Heterogeneous rare-gas clusters produced by a coexpansion of an argon/xenon mixture have been studied using synchrotron-radiation-based photoelectron spectroscopy. Both valence and Xe 4d{sub 5/2} core-level photoelectron spectra were recorded for three different concentrations of the primary argon/xenon mixture and, for those mixtures, spectra were recorded at several different stagnation conditions. The studied size regime of the mixed clusters ranges from large, similar to those studied in an earlier paper [Phys. Rev. A 69, 031210(R) (2004)], to very small--as reflected in the cluster line shapes and chemical shifts. The chemical shifts obtained from a curve fitting procedure similar to that used in our earlier paper are discussed in terms of the mixed cluster structure which can be expected from equilibrium considerations and the Lennard-Jones parameters of the constituent atoms. Molecular dynamics simulations of the vertical polarization shifts allow more specific assignments of ''on-top'' sites and interfacial sites.

  3. In vivo (19)F MRI and (19)F MRS of (19)F-labelled boronophenylalanine-fructose complex on a C6 rat glioma model to optimize boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT).

    PubMed

    Porcari, Paola; Capuani, Silvia; D'Amore, Emanuela; Lecce, Mario; La Bella, Angela; Fasano, Fabrizio; Campanella, Renzo; Migneco, Luisa Maria; Pastore, Francesco Saverio; Maraviglia, Bruno

    2008-12-01

    Boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) is a promising binary modality used to treat malignant brain gliomas. To optimize BNCT effectiveness a non-invasive method is needed to monitor the spatial distribution of BNCT carriers in order to estimate the optimal timing for neutron irradiation. In this study, in vivo spatial distribution mapping and pharmacokinetics evaluation of the (19)F-labelled boronophenylalanine (BPA) were performed using (19)F magnetic resonance imaging ((19)F MRI) and (19)F magnetic resonance spectroscopy ((19)F MRS). Characteristic uptake of (19)F-BPA in C6 glioma showed a maximum at 2.5 h after compound infusion as confirmed by both (19)F images and (19)F spectra acquired on blood samples collected at different times after infusion. This study shows the ability of (19)F MRI to selectively map the bio-distribution of (19)F-BPA in a C6 rat glioma model, as well as providing a useful method to perform pharmacokinetics of BNCT carriers. PMID:19001698

  4. Ultrahigh resolution protein structures using NMR chemical shift tensors

    PubMed Central

    Wylie, Benjamin J.; Sperling, Lindsay J.; Nieuwkoop, Andrew J.; Franks, W. Trent; Oldfield, Eric; Rienstra, Chad M.

    2011-01-01

    NMR chemical shift tensors (CSTs) in proteins, as well as their orientations, represent an important new restraint class for protein structure refinement and determination. Here, we present the first determination of both CST magnitudes and orientations for 13Cα and 15N (peptide backbone) groups in a protein, the β1 IgG binding domain of protein G from Streptococcus spp., GB1. Site-specific 13Cα and 15N CSTs were measured using synchronously evolved recoupling experiments in which 13C and 15N tensors were projected onto the 1H-13C and 1H-15N vectors, respectively, and onto the 15N-13C vector in the case of 13Cα. The orientations of the 13Cα CSTs to the 1H-13C and 13C-15N vectors agreed well with the results of ab initio calculations, with an rmsd of approximately 8°. In addition, the measured 15N tensors exhibited larger reduced anisotropies in α-helical versus β-sheet regions, with very limited variation (18 ± 4°) in the orientation of the z-axis of the 15N CST with respect to the 1H-15N vector. Incorporation of the 13Cα CST restraints into structure calculations, in combination with isotropic chemical shifts, transferred echo double resonance 13C-15N distances and vector angle restraints, improved the backbone rmsd to 0.16 Å (PDB ID code 2LGI) and is consistent with existing X-ray structures (0.51 Å agreement with PDB ID code 2QMT). These results demonstrate that chemical shift tensors have considerable utility in protein structure refinement, with the best structures comparable to 1.0-Å crystal structures, based upon empirical metrics such as Ramachandran geometries and χ1/χ2 distributions, providing solid-state NMR with a powerful tool for de novo structure determination. PMID:21969532

  5. In vivo 1H chemical shift imaging of silicone implants.

    PubMed

    Pfleiderer, B; Ackerman, J L; Garrido, L

    1993-05-01

    In order to study the aging process (i.e., silicone migration, fat infiltration) of silicone (polydimethylsiloxane, PDMS) based biomaterials in living subjects by NMR imaging, a hybrid 1H selective excitation and saturation chemical shift imaging technique (IR/CHESS-CSSE) has been developed. This sequence allows selective mapping of the distribution of silicone protons in vivo, while suppressing the contributions of fat and water. Our results indicate that a combined inversion recovery and CHESS pulse, followed by a spoiler gradient, must be applied to suppress all contributions of fat protons to the NMR signal. The sensitivity of our experiments allows the detection of a chemically unchanged silicone concentration of 5% in a voxel of 0.9 mm3 at a signal/noise ratio of 2.

  6. NMR chemical shifts in amino acids: Effects of environments, electric field, and amine group rotation

    SciTech Connect

    Yoon, Young-Gui; Pfrommer, Bernd G.; Louie, Steven G.; Canning, Andrew

    2002-03-03

    The authors present calculations of NMR chemical shifts in crystalline phases of some representative amino acids such as glycine, alanine, and alanyl-alanine. To get an insight on how different environments affect the chemical shifts, they study the transition from the crystalline phase to completely isolated molecules of glycine. In the crystalline limit, the shifts are dominated by intermolecular hydrogen-bonds. In the molecular limit, however, dipole electric field effects dominate the behavior of the chemical shifts. They show that it is necessary to average the chemical shifts in glycine over geometries. Tensor components are analyzed to get the angle dependent proton chemical shifts, which is a more refined characterization method.

  7. Vicinal deuterium perturbations on hydrogen NMR chemical shifts in cyclohexanes.

    PubMed

    O'Leary, Daniel J; Allis, Damian G; Hudson, Bruce S; James, Shelly; Morgera, Katherine B; Baldwin, John E

    2008-10-15

    The substitution of a deuterium for a hydrogen is known to perturb the NMR chemical shift of a neighboring hydrogen atom. The magnitude of such a perturbation may depend on the specifics of bonding and stereochemical relationships within a molecule. For deuterium-labeled cyclohexanes held in a chair conformation at -80 degrees C or lower, all four possible perturbations of H by D as H-C-C-H is changed to D-C-C-H have been determined experimentally, and the variations seen, ranging from 6.9 to 10.4 ppb, have been calculated from theory and computational methods. The predominant physical origins of the NMR chemical shift perturbations in deuterium-labeled cyclohexanes have been identified and quantified. The trends defined by the Delta delta perturbation values obtained through spectroscopic experiments and by theory agree satisfactorily. They do not match the variations typically observed in vicinal J(H-H) coupling constants as a function of dihedral angles.

  8. Tendencies of 31P chemical shifts changes in NMR spectra of nucleotide derivatives.

    PubMed

    Lebedev, A V; Rezvukhin, A I

    1984-07-25

    31P NMR chemical shifts of the selected mono- and oligonucleotide derivatives, including the compounds with P-N, P-C, P-S bonds and phosphite nucleotide analogues have been presented. The influence of substituents upon 31P chemical shifts has been discussed. The concrete examples of 31P chemical shifts data application in the field of nucleotide chemistry have been considered.

  9. Protein Dielectric Constants Determined from NMR Chemical Shift Perturbations

    PubMed Central

    Kukic, Predrag; Farrell, Damien; McIntosh, Lawrence P.; E., Bertrand García-Moreno; Jensen, Kristine Steen; Toleikis, Zigmantas; Teilum, Kaare; Nielsen, Jens Erik

    2015-01-01

    Understanding the connection between protein structure and function requires a quantitative understanding of electrostatic effects. Structure-based electrostatics calculations are essential for this purpose, but their use have been limited by a long-standing discussion on which value to use for the dielectric constants (εeff and εp) required in Coulombic models and Poisson-Boltzmann models. The currently used values for εeff and εp are essentially empirical parameters calibrated against thermodynamic properties that are indirect measurements of protein electric fields. We determine optimal values for εeff and εp by measuring protein electric fields in solution using direct detection of NMR chemical shift perturbations (CSPs). We measured CSPs in fourteen proteins to get a broad and general characterization of electric fields. Coulomb's law reproduces the measured CSPs optimally with a protein dielectric constant (εeff) from 3 to 13, with an optimal value across all proteins of 6.5. However, when the water-protein interface is treated with finite difference Poisson-Boltzmann calculations, the optimal protein dielectric constant (εp) rangedsfrom 2-5 with an optimum of 3. It is striking how similar this value is to the dielectric constant of 2-4 measured for protein powders, and how different it is from the εp of 6-20 used in models based on the Poisson-Boltzmann equation when calculating thermodynamic parameters. Because the value of εp = 3 is obtained by analysis of NMR chemical shift perturbations instead of thermodynamic parameters such as pKa values, it is likely to describe only the electric field and thus represent a more general, intrinsic, and transferable εp common to most folded proteins. PMID:24124752

  10. Automated determination of chemical functionalisation addition routes based on magnetic susceptibility and nucleus independent chemical shifts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Van Lier, G.; Ewels, C. P.; Geerlings, P.

    2008-07-01

    We present a modified version of our previously reported meta-code SACHA, for systematic analysis of chemical addition. The code automates the generation of structures, running of quantum chemical codes, and selection of preferential isomers based on chosen selection rules. While the selection rules for the previous version were based on the total system energy, predicting purely thermodynamic addition patterns, we examine here the possibility of using other system parameters, notably magnetic susceptibility as a descriptor of global aromaticity, and nucleus independent chemical shifts (NICS) as local aromaticity descriptor.

  11. Characterization of solid polymer dispersions of active pharmaceutical ingredients by 19F MAS NMR and factor analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Urbanova, Martina; Brus, Jiri; Sedenkova, Ivana; Policianova, Olivia; Kobera, Libor

    In this contribution the ability of 19F MAS NMR spectroscopy to probe structural variability of poorly water-soluble drugs formulated as solid dispersions in polymer matrices is discussed. The application potentiality of the proposed approach is demonstrated on a moderately sized active pharmaceutical ingredient (API, Atorvastatin) exhibiting extensive polymorphism. In this respect, a range of model systems with the API incorporated in the matrix of polvinylpyrrolidone (PVP) was prepared. The extent of mixing of both components was determined by T1(1H) and T1ρ(1H) relaxation experiments, and it was found that the API forms nanosized domains. Subsequently it was found out that the polymer matrix induces two kinds of changes in 19F MAS NMR spectra. At first, this is a high-frequency shift reaching 2-3 ppm which is independent on molecular structure of the API and which results from the long-range polarization of the electron cloud around 19F nucleus induced by electrostatic fields of the polymer matrix. At second, this is broadening of the signals and formation of shoulders reflecting changes in molecular arrangement of the API. To avoid misleading in the interpretation of the recorded 19F MAS NMR spectra, because both the contributions act simultaneously, we applied chemometric approach based on multivariate analysis. It is demonstrated that factor analysis of the recorded spectra can separate both these spectral contributions, and the subtle structural differences in the molecular arrangement of the API in the nanosized domains can be traced. In this way 19F MAS NMR spectra of both pure APIs and APIs in solid dispersions can be directly compared. The proposed strategy thus provides a powerful tool for the analysis of new formulations of fluorinated pharmaceutical substances in polymer matrices.

  12. SimShiftDB; local conformational restraints derived from chemical shift similarity searches on a large synthetic database.

    PubMed

    Ginzinger, Simon W; Coles, Murray

    2009-03-01

    We present SimShiftDB, a new program to extract conformational data from protein chemical shifts using structural alignments. The alignments are obtained in searches of a large database containing 13,000 structures and corresponding back-calculated chemical shifts. SimShiftDB makes use of chemical shift data to provide accurate results even in the case of low sequence similarity, and with even coverage of the conformational search space. We compare SimShiftDB to HHSearch, a state-of-the-art sequence-based search tool, and to TALOS, the current standard tool for the task. We show that for a significant fraction of the predicted similarities, SimShiftDB outperforms the other two methods. Particularly, the high coverage afforded by the larger database often allows predictions to be made for residues not involved in canonical secondary structure, where TALOS predictions are both less frequent and more error prone. Thus SimShiftDB can be seen as a complement to currently available methods.

  13. STATISTICAL ANALYSIS OF TANK 19F FLOOR SAMPLE RESULTS

    SciTech Connect

    Harris, S.

    2010-09-02

    Representative sampling has been completed for characterization of the residual material on the floor of Tank 19F as per the statistical sampling plan developed by Harris and Shine. Samples from eight locations have been obtained from the tank floor and two of the samples were archived as a contingency. Six samples, referred to in this report as the current scrape samples, have been submitted to and analyzed by SRNL. This report contains the statistical analysis of the floor sample analytical results to determine if further data are needed to reduce uncertainty. Included are comparisons with the prior Mantis samples results to determine if they can be pooled with the current scrape samples to estimate the upper 95% confidence limits (UCL95%) for concentration. Statistical analysis revealed that the Mantis and current scrape sample results are not compatible. Therefore, the Mantis sample results were not used to support the quantification of analytes in the residual material. Significant spatial variability among the current scrape sample results was not found. Constituent concentrations were similar between the North and South hemispheres as well as between the inner and outer regions of the tank floor. The current scrape sample results from all six samples fall within their 3-sigma limits. In view of the results from numerous statistical tests, the data were pooled from all six current scrape samples. As such, an adequate sample size was provided for quantification of the residual material on the floor of Tank 19F. The uncertainty is quantified in this report by an UCL95% on each analyte concentration. The uncertainty in analyte concentration was calculated as a function of the number of samples, the average, and the standard deviation of the analytical results. The UCL95% was based entirely on the six current scrape sample results (each averaged across three analytical determinations).

  14. TANKS 18 AND 19-F EQUIPMENT GROUT FILL MATERIAL EVALUATION AND RECOMMENDATIONS

    SciTech Connect

    Stefanko, D.; Langton, C.

    2011-12-15

    The United States Department of Energy (US DOE) intends to remove Tanks 18-F and 19-F at the Savannah River Site (SRS) from service. The high-level waste (HLW) tanks have been isolated from the F-area Tank Farm (FTF) facilities and will be filled with cementitious grout for the purpose of: (1) physically stabilizing the empty volumes in the tanks, (2) limiting/eliminating vertical pathways from the surface to residual waste on the bottom of the tanks, (3) providing an intruder barrier, and (4) providing an alkaline, chemical reducing environment within the closure boundary to limit solubility of residual radionuclides. Bulk waste and heel waste removal equipment will remain in Tanks 18-F and 19-F when the tanks are closed. This equipment includes: mixer pumps, transfer pumps, transfer jets, equipment support masts, sampling masts and dip tube assemblies. The current Tank 18-F and 19-F closure strategy is to grout the internal void spaces in this equipment to eliminate fast vertical pathways and slow water infiltration to the residual material on the tank floor. This report documents the results of laboratory testing performed to identify a grout formulation for filling the abandoned equipment in Tanks 18-F and 19-F. The objective of this work was to formulate a flowable grout for filling internal voids of equipment that will remain in Tanks 18-F and 19-F during the final closures. This work was requested by V. A. Chander, Tank Farm Closure Engineering, in HLW-TTR-2011-008. The scope for this task is provided in the Task Technical and Quality Assurance Plan (TTQAP), SRNL-RP-2011-00587. The specific objectives of this task were to: (1) Prepare and evaluate the SRR cooling coil grout identified in WSRC-STI-2008-00298 per the TTR for this work. The cooling coil grout is a mixture of BASF MasterFlow{reg_sign} 816 cable grout (67.67 wt. %), Grade 100 ground granulated blast furnace slag (7.52 wt. %) and water (24.81 wt. %); (2) Identify equipment grout placement and

  15. Progress Towards Measurement of the Anapole Moment of 137 Ba19 F

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cahn, Sidney; Altuntas, Emine; Demille, David; Kozlov, Mikhail

    2016-05-01

    Weak interactions inside the nucleus produce a toroidal current distribution around the axis of nuclear spin. This current distribution, known as the nuclear anapole moment is the dominant source of nuclear spin-dependent parity violation (NSD-PV) effects for nuclei with nucleon number A >= 20.We propose to measure the anapole moment of 137 Ba19 F. To diagnose systematics and establish a measurement sequence we use 138 Ba19 F, which has negligible NSD-PV effects. 138 Ba19 F has a larger isotopic abundance and fewer hyperfine levels compared to those of 137 Ba19 F. Therefore fluorescence signals from 138 Ba19 F are approximately 26 times larger than those from 137 Ba19 F. Here we present planned improvements to our apparatus, including a magnetic hexapole lens to improve the molecular beam flux and preliminary spectroscopy measurements with 137 Ba19 F.

  16. Chemical shift imaging of atherosclerosis at 7.0 Tesla.

    PubMed

    Maynor, C H; Charles, H C; Herfkens, R J; Suddarth, S A; Johnson, G A

    1989-01-01

    Chemical shift imaging (CSI) was performed on cadaveric atherosclerotic fibrous plaques, periaortic adipose tissue, and cholesterol standards using a 7.0 Tesla horizontal bore prototype imaging spectrometer. Proton spectroscopy of intact tissue and deuterated chloroform extracted samples was done at the equivalent field strength of 7.0 Tesla on a vertical bore spectrometer, including studies of temperature dependence and T2 relaxation measurements. Spectra obtained using CSI on the imaging magnet were comparable with those from the conventional vertical spectrometer. Fibrous plaques and adipose tissue had unique spectral features, differing in the ratios of their water and various fat components. Chloroform extractions revealed a typical cholesteric ester spectrum for the fibrous plaque in contrast to the triglyceride spectrum of the adipose tissue. These two tissues also had different T2 relaxation measurements of their major fat resonances, with fibrous plaques having a short T2 compared to adipose tissue (15.9 milliseconds vs. 46.2 milliseconds). Temperature dependence studies showed that spectral signal intensity of the fat resonance of the fibrous plaque increased while linewidth decreased with increasing temperature from 24 degrees C to 37 degrees C. Atherosclerotic lesions may be studied at 7.0 Tesla, and NMR parameters defined in the present study may be used for further studies at other magnetic field strengths.

  17. Efficient Acid-catalyzed 18F/19F Fluoride Exchange of BODIPY Dyes

    PubMed Central

    Keliher, Edmund J.; Klubnick, Jenna A.; Reiner, Thomas; Mazitschek, Ralph

    2014-01-01

    Fluorine containing fluorochromes represent important validation agents for PET imaging agents as they can be easily rapidly validated in cells by fluorescence imaging. In particular, the 18F-labeled BODIPY-FL fluorophore has emerged as an important platform but little is known about alternative 18F-labeling strategies or labeling on red shifted fluorophores. Here we explore the acid-catalyzed 18F/19F exchange on a range of commercially available N-hydroxysuccinimidyl ester and maleimide BODIPY fluorophores. We show this method to be a simple and efficient 18F-labeling strategy for a diverse span of fluorescent compounds, including a BODIPY modified PARP-1 inhibitor, and amine- and thiol-reactive BODIPY fluorophores. PMID:24596307

  18. TANK 18-F AND 19-F TANK FILL GROUT SCALE UP TEST SUMMARY

    SciTech Connect

    Stefanko, D.; Langton, C.

    2012-01-03

    High-level waste (HLW) tanks 18-F and 19-F have been isolated from FTF facilities. To complete operational closure the tanks will be filled with grout for the purpose of: (1) physically stabilizing the tanks, (2) limiting/eliminating vertical pathways to residual waste, (3) entombing waste removal equipment, (4) discouraging future intrusion, and (5) providing an alkaline, chemical reducing environment within the closure boundary to control speciation and solubility of select radionuclides. This report documents the results of a four cubic yard bulk fill scale up test on the grout formulation recommended for filling Tanks 18-F and 19-F. Details of the scale up test are provided in a Test Plan. The work was authorized under a Technical Task Request (TTR), HLE-TTR-2011-008, and was performed according to Task Technical and Quality Assurance Plan (TTQAP), SRNL-RP-2011-00587. The bulk fill scale up test described in this report was intended to demonstrate proportioning, mixing, and transportation, of material produced in a full scale ready mix concrete batch plant. In addition, the material produced for the scale up test was characterized with respect to fresh properties, thermal properties, and compressive strength as a function of curing time.

  19. Tendencies of 31P chemical shifts changes in NMR spectra of nucleotide derivatives.

    PubMed

    Lebedev, A V; Rezvukhin, A I

    1984-07-25

    31P NMR chemical shifts of the selected mono- and oligonucleotide derivatives, including the compounds with P-N, P-C, P-S bonds and phosphite nucleotide analogues have been presented. The influence of substituents upon 31P chemical shifts has been discussed. The concrete examples of 31P chemical shifts data application in the field of nucleotide chemistry have been considered. PMID:6087290

  20. Practical use of chemical shift databases for protein solid-state NMR: 2D chemical shift maps and amino-acid assignment with secondary-structure information.

    PubMed

    Fritzsching, K J; Yang, Y; Schmidt-Rohr, K; Hong, Mei

    2013-06-01

    We introduce a Python-based program that utilizes the large database of (13)C and (15)N chemical shifts in the Biological Magnetic Resonance Bank to rapidly predict the amino acid type and secondary structure from correlated chemical shifts. The program, called PACSYlite Unified Query (PLUQ), is designed to help assign peaks obtained from 2D (13)C-(13)C, (15)N-(13)C, or 3D (15)N-(13)C-(13)C magic-angle-spinning correlation spectra. We show secondary-structure specific 2D (13)C-(13)C correlation maps of all twenty amino acids, constructed from a chemical shift database of 262,209 residues. The maps reveal interesting conformation-dependent chemical shift distributions and facilitate searching of correlation peaks during amino-acid type assignment. Based on these correlations, PLUQ outputs the most likely amino acid types and the associated secondary structures from inputs of experimental chemical shifts. We test the assignment accuracy using four high-quality protein structures. Based on only the Cα and Cβ chemical shifts, the highest-ranked PLUQ assignments were 40-60 % correct in both the amino-acid type and the secondary structure. For three input chemical shifts (CO-Cα-Cβ or N-Cα-Cβ), the first-ranked assignments were correct for 60 % of the residues, while within the top three predictions, the correct assignments were found for 80 % of the residues. PLUQ and the chemical shift maps are expected to be useful at the first stage of sequential assignment, for combination with automated sequential assignment programs, and for highly disordered proteins for which secondary structure analysis is the main goal of structure determination.

  1. In vivo19F MRI for Cell Tracking

    PubMed Central

    Srinivas, Mangala; Boehm-Sturm, Philipp; Aswendt, Markus; Pracht, Eberhard D.; Figdor, Carl G.; de Vries, I. Jolanda; Hoehn, Mathias

    2013-01-01

    In vivo19F MRI allows quantitative cell tracking without the use of ionizing radiation. It is a noninvasive technique that can be applied to humans. Here, we describe a general protocol for cell labeling, imaging, and image processing. The technique is applicable to various cell types and animal models, although here we focus on a typical mouse model for tracking murine immune cells. The most important issues for cell labeling are described, as these are relevant to all models. Similarly, key imaging parameters are listed, although the details will vary depending on the MRI system and the individual setup. Finally, we include an image processing protocol for quantification. Variations for this, and other parts of the protocol, are assessed in the Discussion section. Based on the detailed procedure described here, the user will need to adapt the protocol for each specific cell type, cell label, animal model, and imaging setup. Note that the protocol can also be adapted for human use, as long as clinical restrictions are met. PMID:24299964

  2. TANK 18 AND 19-F TIER 1A EQUIPMENT FILL MOCK UP TEST SUMMARY

    SciTech Connect

    Stefanko, D.; Langton, C.

    2011-11-04

    The United States Department of Energy (US DOE) has determined that Tanks 18-F and 19-F have met the F-Tank Farm (FTF) General Closure Plan Requirements and are ready to be permanently closed. The high-level waste (HLW) tanks have been isolated from FTF facilities. To complete operational closure they will be filled with grout for the purpose of: (1) physically stabilizing the tanks, (2) limiting/eliminating vertical pathways to residual waste, (3) discouraging future intrusion, and (4) providing an alkaline, chemical reducing environment within the closure boundary to control speciation and solubility of select radionuclides. Bulk waste removal and heel removal equipment remain in Tanks 18-F and 19-F. This equipment includes the Advance Design Mixer Pump (ADMP), transfer pumps, transfer jets, standard slurry mixer pumps, equipment-support masts, sampling masts, dip tube assemblies and robotic crawlers. The present Tank 18 and 19-F closure strategy is to grout the equipment in place and eliminate vertical pathways by filling voids in the equipment to vertical fast pathways and water infiltration. The mock-up tests described in this report were intended to address placement issues identified for grouting the equipment that will be left in Tank 18-F and Tank 19-F. The Tank 18-F and 19-F closure strategy document states that one of the Performance Assessment (PA) requirements for a closed tank is that equipment remaining in the tank be filled to the extent practical and that vertical flow paths 1 inch and larger be grouted. The specific objectives of the Tier 1A equipment grout mock-up testing include: (1) Identifying the most limiting equipment configurations with respect to internal void space filling; (2) Specifying and constructing initial test geometries and forms that represent scaled boundary conditions; (3) Identifying a target grout rheology for evaluation in the scaled mock-up configurations; (4) Scaling-up production of a grout mix with the target rheology

  3. (19)F-MRI for monitoring human NK cells in vivo.

    PubMed

    Bouchlaka, Myriam N; Ludwig, Kai D; Gordon, Jeremy W; Kutz, Matthew P; Bednarz, Bryan P; Fain, Sean B; Capitini, Christian M

    2016-05-01

    The availability of clinical-grade cytokines and artificial antigen-presenting cells has accelerated interest in using natural killer (NK) cells as adoptive cellular therapy (ACT) for cancer. One of the technological shortcomings of translating therapies from animal models to clinical application is the inability to effectively and non-invasively track these cells after infusion in patients. We have optimized the nonradioactive isotope fluorine-19 ((19)F) as a means to label and track NK cells in preclinical models using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Human NK cells were expanded with interleukin (IL)-2 and labeled in vitro with increasing concentrations of (19)F. Doses as low as 2 mg/mL (19)F were detected by MRI. NK cell viability was only decreased at 8 mg/mL (19)F. No effects on NK cell cytotoxicity against K562 leukemia cells were observed with 2, 4 or 8 mg/mL (19)F. Higher doses of (19)F, 4 mg/mL and 8 mg/mL, led to an improved (19)F signal by MRI with 3 × 10(11) (19)F atoms per NK cell. The 4 mg/mL (19)F labeling had no effect on NK cell function via secretion of granzyme B or interferon gamma (IFNγ), compared to NK cells exposed to vehicle alone. (19)F-labeled NK cells were detectable immediately by MRI after intratumoral injection in NSG mice and up to day 8. When (19)F-labeled NK cells were injected subcutaneously, we observed a loss of signal through time at the site of injection suggesting NK cell migration to distant organs. The (19)F perfluorocarbon is a safe and effective reagent for monitoring the persistence and trafficking of NK cell infusions in vivo, and may have potential for developing novel imaging techniques to monitor ACT for cancer. PMID:27467963

  4. Improved Quantitative 19F MR Molecular Imaging With Flip Angle Calibration and B1-Mapping Compensation

    PubMed Central

    Goette, Matthew J.; Lanza, Gregory M.; Caruthers, Shelton D.; Wickline, Samuel A.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose To improve 19F flip angle calibration and compensate for B1 inhomogeneities in quantitative 19F MRI of sparse molecular epitopes with perfluorocarbon (PFC) nanoparticle (NP) emulsion contrast agents. Materials and Methods Flip angle sweep experiments on PFC-NP point source phantoms with three custom-designed 19F/1H dual-tuned coils revealed a difference in required power settings for 19F and 1H nuclei, which was used to calculate a calibration ratio specific for each coil. An image-based correction technique was developed using B1-field mapping on 1H to correct for 19F and 1H images in two phantom experiments. Results Optimized 19F peak power differed significantly from that of 1H power for each coil (p<0.05). A ratio of 19F/1H power settings yielded a coil-specific and spatially independent calibration value (surface: 1.48±0.06; semi-cylindrical: 1.71±0.02, single-turn-solenoid: 1.92±0.03). 1H-image-based B1 correction equalized the signal intensity of 19F images for two identical 19F PFC-NP samples placed in different parts of the field, which were offset significantly by ~66% (p<0.001) before correction. Conclusion 19F flip angle calibration and B1-mapping compensations to the 19F images employing the more abundant 1H signal as a basis for correction result in a significant change in the quantification of sparse 19F MR signals from targeted PFC NP emulsions. PMID:25425244

  5. Chemical bonding of lead in glasses through isotropic vs anisotropic correlation: PASS shifted echo.

    PubMed

    Fayon, F; Bessada, C; Douy, A; Massiot, D

    1999-03-01

    When observing spin I = (1/2) nuclei with important chemical shift anisotropy in disordered materials, the distribution of isotropic shift can become so large that no accessible spinning rate is able to provide a resolved spectrum. This is the case of 207Pb in glasses where static and high-speed MAS spectra are nearly identical. It is still possible in such a case to rebuild a spinning sideband free spectrum using a shifted echo modified PASS sequence. This makes it possible to discuss isotropic and anisotropic chemical shifts of lead in phosphate glasses, to characterize its structural role and its chemical bonding state.

  6. Through-space (19) F-(15) N couplings for the assignment of stereochemistry in flubenzimine.

    PubMed

    Ghiviriga, Ion; Rubinski, Miles A; Dolbier, William R

    2016-07-01

    Through-space (19) F-(15) N couplings revealed the configuration of flubenzimine, with the CF3 group on N4 pointing towards the lone pair of N5. The (19) F-(15) N coupling constants were measured at natural abundance using a spin-state selective indirect-detection pulse sequence. As (15) N-labelled proteins are routinely synthesized for NMR studies, through-space (19) F-(15) N couplings have the potential to probe the stereochemistry of these proteins by (19) F labelling of some amino acids or can reveal the site of docking of fluorine-containing drugs. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  7. Phosphorus-31 nuclear magnetic resonance chemical shifts of phosphoric acid derivatives.

    PubMed

    Wittmann, Z; Kovács, Z

    1985-07-01

    (31)P nuclear magnetic resonance chemical shifts of alkyi and alkylaryl phosphates, condensed phosphates, phosphoric arids and their salts, are reported. These are listed by classes of compounds so that relationships between chemical shifts and the substituent groups on phosphorus atoms can be recognized. These relationships are useful for qualitative identification of the specific compounds listed and of related compounds by extrapolation.

  8. Predicting (17)O NMR chemical shifts of polyoxometalates using density functional theory.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Rupali; Zhang, Jie; Ohlin, C André

    2016-03-21

    We have investigated the computation of (17)O NMR chemical shifts of a wide range of polyoxometalates using density functional theory. The effects of basis sets and exchange-correlation functionals are explored, and whereas pure DFT functionals generally predict the chemical shifts of terminal oxygen sites quite well, hybrid functionals are required for the prediction of accurate chemical shifts in conjunction with linear regression. By using PBE0/def2-tzvp//PBE0/cc-pvtz(H-Ar), lanl2dz(K-) we have computed the chemical shifts of 37 polyoxometalates, corresponding to 209 (17)O NMR signals. We also show that at this level of theory the protonation-induced pH dependence of the chemical shift of the triprotic hexaniobate Lindqvist anion, [HxNb6O19]((8-x)), can be reproduced, which suggests that hypotheses regarding loci of protonation can be confidently tested. PMID:26925832

  9. Application of /sup 19/F nuclear magnetic resonance to examine covalent modification reactions of tyrosyl derivatives: a study of calcineurin catalysis

    SciTech Connect

    Martin, B.L.; Graves, D.J.

    1988-04-01

    The hydrolysis of fluorotyrosine phosphate by the calmodulin-activated phosphatase calcineurin has been monitored by /sup 19/F nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy. Previous work had established that the /sup 19/F nuclear magnetic resonance shift of the fluorine nucleus was altered after the phosphorylation of the phenolic hydroxyl group. The disappearance of substrate and the appearance of product can be measured simultaneously with this approach. Application of the integrated form of the Michaelis-Menten equation yields estimates of the kinetic parameter, K/sub M/, close to the values obtained by initial rate kinetics. The velocity term, V/sub M/ was also evaluated to be approximately the same value. Calcineurin was determined not to be inactivated over the time period of the reaction. The results demonstrate that /sup 19/F nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy can be applied to the examination of enzyme-catalyzed reactions.

  10. Tanks 18 And 19-F Structural Flowable Grout Fill Material Evaluation And Recommendations

    SciTech Connect

    Langton, C. A.; Stefanko, D. B.

    2013-04-23

    Cementitious grout will be used to close Tanks 18-F and 19-F. The functions of the grout are to: 1) physically stabilize the final landfill by filling the empty volume in the tanks with a non-compressible material; 2) provide a barrier for inadvertent intrusion into the tank; 3) reduce contaminant mobility by a) limiting the hydraulic conductivity of the closed tank and b) reducing contact between the residual waste and infiltrating water; and 4) providing an alkaline, chemically reducing environment in the closed tank to control speciation and solubility of selected radionuclides. The objective of this work was to identify a single (all-in-one) grout to stabilize and isolate the residual radionuclides in the tank, provide structural stability of the closed tank and serve as an inadvertent intruder barrier. This work was requested by V. A. Chander, High Level Waste (HLW) Tank Engineering, in HLW-TTR-2011-008. The complete task scope is provided in the Task Technical and QA Plan, SRNL-RP-2011-00587 Revision 0. The specific objectives of this task were to: 1) Identify new admixtures and dosages for formulating a zero bleed flowable tank fill material selected by HLW Tank Closure Project personnel based on earlier tank fill studies performed in 2007. The chemical admixtures used for adjusting the flow properties needed to be updated because the original admixture products are no longer available. Also, the sources of cement and fly ash have changed, and Portland cements currently available contain up to 5 wt. % limestone (calcium carbonate). 2) Prepare and evaluate the placement, compressive strength, and thermal properties of the selected formulation with new admixture dosages. 3) Identify opportunities for improving the mix selected by HLW Closure Project personnel and prepare and evaluate two potentially improved zero bleed flowable fill design concepts; one based on the reactor fill grout and the other based on a shrinkage compensating flowable fill mix design. 4

  11. Ab Initio Calculation of Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Chemical Shift Anisotropy Tensors 1. Influence of Basis Set on the Calculation of 31P Chemical Shifts

    SciTech Connect

    Alam, T.M.

    1998-09-01

    The influence of changes in the contracted Gaussian basis set used for ab initio calculations of nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) phosphorous chemical shift anisotropy (CSA) tensors was investigated. The isotropic chemical shitl and chemical shift anisotropy were found to converge with increasing complexity of the basis set at the Hartree-Fock @IF) level. The addition of d polarization function on the phosphorous nucIei was found to have a major impact of the calculated chemical shi~ but diminished with increasing number of polarization fimctions. At least 2 d polarization fimctions are required for accurate calculations of the isotropic phosphorous chemical shift. The introduction of density fictional theory (DFT) techniques through tie use of hybrid B3LYP methods for the calculation of the phosphorous chemical shift tensor resulted in a poorer estimation of the NMR values, even though DFT techniques result in improved energy and force constant calculations. The convergence of the W parametem with increasing basis set complexity was also observed for the DFT calculations, but produced results with consistent large deviations from experiment. The use of a HF 6-31 l++G(242p) basis set represents a good compromise between accuracy of the simulation and the complexity of the calculation for future ab initio calculations of 31P NMR parameters in larger complexes.

  12. Detection and differentiation of neutral organic compounds by 19F NMR with a tungsten calix[4]arene imido complex.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Yanchuan; Swager, Timothy M

    2013-12-18

    Fluorinated tungsten calix[4]arene imido complexes were synthesized and used as receptors to detect and differentiate neutral organic compounds. It was found that the binding of specific neutral organic molecules to the tungsten centers induces an upfield shift of the fluorine atom appended on the arylimido group, the extent of which is highly dependent on electronic and steric properties. We demonstrate that the specific bonding and size-selectivity of calix[4]arene tungsten-imido complex combined with (19)F NMR spectroscopy is a powerful new method for the analysis of complex mixtures.

  13. Noninvasive detection of graft rejection by in vivo (19) F MRI in the early stage.

    PubMed

    Flögel, U; Su, S; Kreideweiss, I; Ding, Z; Galbarz, L; Fu, J; Jacoby, C; Witzke, O; Schrader, J

    2011-02-01

    Diagnosis of transplant rejection requires tissue biopsy and entails risks. Here, we describe a new (19) F MRI approach for noninvasive visualization of organ rejection via the macrophage host response. For this, we employed biochemically inert emulsified perfluorocarbons (PFCs), known to be preferentially phagocytized by monocytes and macrophages. Isografts from C57BL/6 or allografts from C57B10.A mice were heterotopically transplanted into C57BL/6 recipients. PFCs were applied intravenously followed by (1) H/(19) F MRI at 9.4 T 24 h after injection. (1) H images showed a similar position and anatomy of the graft in the abdomen for both cases. However, corresponding (19) F signals were only observed in allogenic tissue. (1) H/(19) F MRI enabled us to detect the initial immune response not later than 3 days after surgery, when conventional parameters did not reveal any signs of rejection. In allografts, the observed (19) F signal strongly increased with time and correlated with the extent of rejection. In separate experiments, rapamycin was used to demonstrate the ability of (19) F MRI to monitor immunosuppressive therapy. Thus, PFCs can serve as positive contrast agent for the early detection of transplant rejection by (19) F MRI with high spatial resolution and an excellent degree of specificity due to lack of any (19) F background. PMID:21214858

  14. Noninvasive detection of graft rejection by in vivo (19) F MRI in the early stage.

    PubMed

    Flögel, U; Su, S; Kreideweiss, I; Ding, Z; Galbarz, L; Fu, J; Jacoby, C; Witzke, O; Schrader, J

    2011-02-01

    Diagnosis of transplant rejection requires tissue biopsy and entails risks. Here, we describe a new (19) F MRI approach for noninvasive visualization of organ rejection via the macrophage host response. For this, we employed biochemically inert emulsified perfluorocarbons (PFCs), known to be preferentially phagocytized by monocytes and macrophages. Isografts from C57BL/6 or allografts from C57B10.A mice were heterotopically transplanted into C57BL/6 recipients. PFCs were applied intravenously followed by (1) H/(19) F MRI at 9.4 T 24 h after injection. (1) H images showed a similar position and anatomy of the graft in the abdomen for both cases. However, corresponding (19) F signals were only observed in allogenic tissue. (1) H/(19) F MRI enabled us to detect the initial immune response not later than 3 days after surgery, when conventional parameters did not reveal any signs of rejection. In allografts, the observed (19) F signal strongly increased with time and correlated with the extent of rejection. In separate experiments, rapamycin was used to demonstrate the ability of (19) F MRI to monitor immunosuppressive therapy. Thus, PFCs can serve as positive contrast agent for the early detection of transplant rejection by (19) F MRI with high spatial resolution and an excellent degree of specificity due to lack of any (19) F background.

  15. Quantum calculation of protein NMR chemical shifts based on the automated fragmentation method.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Tong; Zhang, John Z H; He, Xiao

    2015-01-01

    The performance of quantum mechanical methods on the calculation of protein NMR chemical shifts is reviewed based on the recently developed automatic fragmentation quantum mechanics/molecular mechanics (AF-QM/MM) approach. By using the Poisson-Boltzmann (PB) model and first solvation water molecules, the influence of solvent effect is also discussed. Benefiting from the fragmentation algorithm, the AF-QM/MM approach is computationally efficient, linear-scaling with a low pre-factor, and thus can be applied to routinely calculate the ab initio NMR chemical shifts for proteins of any size. The results calculated using Density Functional Theory (DFT) show that when the solvent effect is included, this method can accurately reproduce the experimental ¹H NMR chemical shifts, while the ¹³C NMR chemical shifts are less affected by the solvent. However, although the inclusion of solvent effect shows significant improvement for ¹⁵N chemical shifts, the calculated values still have large deviations from the experimental observations. Our study further demonstrates that AF-QM/MM calculated results accurately reflect the dependence of ¹³C(α) NMR chemical shifts on the secondary structure of proteins, and the calculated ¹H chemical shift can be utilized to discriminate the native structure of proteins from decoys.

  16. Correlation of chemical shifts predicted by molecular dynamics simulations for partially disordered proteins

    PubMed Central

    Karp, Jerome M.; Erylimaz, Ertan

    2015-01-01

    There has been a longstanding interest in being able to accurately predict NMR chemical shifts from structural data. Recent studies have focused on using molecular dynamics (MD) simulation data as input for improved prediction. Here we examine the accuracy of chemical shift prediction for intein systems, which have regions of intrinsic disorder. We find that using MD simulation data as input for chemical shift prediction does not consistently improve prediction accuracy over use of a static X-ray crystal structure. This appears to result from the complex conformational ensemble of the disordered protein segments. We show that using accelerated molecular dynamics (aMD) simulations improves chemical shift prediction, suggesting that methods which better sample the conformational ensemble like aMD are more appropriate tools for use in chemical shift prediction for proteins with disordered regions. Moreover, our study suggests that data accurately reflecting protein dynamics must be used as input for chemical shift prediction in order to correctly predict chemical shifts in systems with disorder. PMID:25416617

  17. Protein backbone angle restraints from searching a database for chemical shift and sequence homology.

    PubMed

    Cornilescu, G; Delaglio, F; Bax, A

    1999-03-01

    Chemical shifts of backbone atoms in proteins are exquisitely sensitive to local conformation, and homologous proteins show quite similar patterns of secondary chemical shifts. The inverse of this relation is used to search a database for triplets of adjacent residues with secondary chemical shifts and sequence similarity which provide the best match to the query triplet of interest. The database contains 13C alpha, 13C beta, 13C', 1H alpha and 15N chemical shifts for 20 proteins for which a high resolution X-ray structure is available. The computer program TALOS was developed to search this database for strings of residues with chemical shift and residue type homology. The relative importance of the weighting factors attached to the secondary chemical shifts of the five types of resonances relative to that of sequence similarity was optimized empirically. TALOS yields the 10 triplets which have the closest similarity in secondary chemical shift and amino acid sequence to those of the query sequence. If the central residues in these 10 triplets exhibit similar phi and psi backbone angles, their averages can reliably be used as angular restraints for the protein whose structure is being studied. Tests carried out for proteins of known structure indicate that the root-mean-square difference (rmsd) between the output of TALOS and the X-ray derived backbone angles is about 15 degrees. Approximately 3% of the predictions made by TALOS are found to be in error.

  18. Gadolinium-modulated 19F signals from Perfluorocarbon Nanoparticles as a New Strategy for Molecular Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Neubauer, Anne M.; Myerson, Jacob; Caruthers, Shelton D.; Hockett, Franklin D.; Winter, Patrick M.; Chen, Junjie; Gaffney, Patrick J.; Robertson, J. David; Lanza, Gregory M.; Wickline, Samuel A.

    2008-01-01

    Recent advances in the design of fluorinated nanoparticles for magnetic resonance molecular imaging have enabled specific detection of 19F nuclei, providing unique and quantifiable spectral signatures. However, a pressing need for signal enhancement exists because the total 19F in imaging voxels is often limited. By directly incorporating a relaxation agent (gadolinium) into the lipid monolayer that surrounds the perfluorocarbon, a marked augmentation of the 19F signal from 200nm nanoparticles was achieved. This design increases the magnetic relaxation rate of the 19F nuclei 4-fold at 1.5 T and effects a 125% increase in signal, an effect which is maintained when they are targeted to human plasma clots. By varying the surface concentration of gadolinium, the relaxation effect can be quantitatively modulated to tailor particle properties. This novel strategy dramatically improves the sensitivity and range of 19F MRI/MRS and forms the basis for designing contrast agents capable of sensing their surface chemistry. PMID:18956457

  19. A robust algorithm for optimizing protein structures with NMR chemical shifts.

    PubMed

    Berjanskii, Mark; Arndt, David; Liang, Yongjie; Wishart, David S

    2015-11-01

    Over the past decade, a number of methods have been developed to determine the approximate structure of proteins using minimal NMR experimental information such as chemical shifts alone, sparse NOEs alone or a combination of comparative modeling data and chemical shifts. However, there have been relatively few methods that allow these approximate models to be substantively refined or improved using the available NMR chemical shift data. Here, we present a novel method, called Chemical Shift driven Genetic Algorithm for biased Molecular Dynamics (CS-GAMDy), for the robust optimization of protein structures using experimental NMR chemical shifts. The method incorporates knowledge-based scoring functions and structural information derived from NMR chemical shifts via a unique combination of multi-objective MD biasing, a genetic algorithm, and the widely used XPLOR molecular modelling language. Using this approach, we demonstrate that CS-GAMDy is able to refine and/or fold models that are as much as 10 Å (RMSD) away from the correct structure using only NMR chemical shift data. CS-GAMDy is also able to refine of a wide range of approximate or mildly erroneous protein structures to more closely match the known/correct structure and the known/correct chemical shifts. We believe CS-GAMDy will allow protein models generated by sparse restraint or chemical-shift-only methods to achieve sufficiently high quality to be considered fully refined and "PDB worthy". The CS-GAMDy algorithm is explained in detail and its performance is compared over a range of refinement scenarios with several commonly used protein structure refinement protocols. The program has been designed to be easily installed and easily used and is available at http://www.gamdy.ca.

  20. In vivo nuclear magnetic resonance chemical shift imaging by selective irradiation.

    PubMed Central

    Bottomley, P A; Foster, T H; Leue, W M

    1984-01-01

    NMR images of preselected chemically shifted species can be obtained by selective irradiation of the remainder of the NMR chemical shift spectrum prior to application of a conventional NMR imaging sequence. The chemical-selective irradiation consists of narrow-bandwidth pi/2 or saturation radio-frequency pulses applied in the absence of imaging gradients. The technique permits substantial reductions in scan and reconstruction times over standard three- and four-dimensional Fourier transform chemical-shift-imaging methods, when images of few spectral peaks are desired. It is also suitable for the elimination of chemical shift artifacts in conventional high-field NMR imaging. In vivo applications of the technique to the head and limbs in a 1.5-T magnetic field yield 1H H2O and -CH2-images, with little detectable -CH2- in muscle and brain. Images PMID:6593729

  1. Effects of structural differences on the NMR chemical shifts in isostructural dipeptides.

    PubMed

    Altheimer, Benjamin D; Mehta, Manish A

    2014-04-10

    Porous crystalline dipeptides have gained recent attention for their potential as gas-storage materials. Within this large class is a group of dipeptides containing alanine, valine, and isoleucine with very similar crystal structures. We report the (13)C (carbonyl and Cα) and (15)N (amine and amide) solid-state NMR isotropic chemical shifts in a series of seven such isostructural porous dipeptides as well as shift tensor data for the carbonyl and amide sites. Using their known crystal structures and aided by ab initio quantum chemical calculations for the resonance assignments, we elucidate trends relating local structure, hydrogen-bonding patterns, and chemical shift. We find good correlation between the backbone dihedral angles and the Cα1 and Cα2 shifts. For the C1 shift tensor, the δ11 value shifts downfield as the hydrogen-bond distance increases, δ22 shifts upfield, and δ33 shows little variation. The C2 shift tensor shows no appreciable correlation with structural parameters. For the N2 tensor, δ11 shows little dependence on the hydrogen-bond length, whereas δ22 and δ33 both show a decrease in shielding as the hydrogen bond shortens. Our analysis teases apart some, but not all, structural contributors to the observed differences the solid-state NMR chemical shifts.

  2. Calculation of NMR chemical shifts in organic solids: accounting for motional effects.

    PubMed

    Dumez, Jean-Nicolas; Pickard, Chris J

    2009-03-14

    NMR chemical shifts were calculated from first principles for well defined crystalline organic solids. These density functional theory calculations were carried out within the plane-wave pseudopotential framework, in which truly extended systems are implicitly considered. The influence of motional effects was assessed by averaging over vibrational modes or over snapshots taken from ab initio molecular dynamics simulations. It is observed that the zero-point correction to chemical shifts can be significant, and that thermal effects are particularly noticeable for shielding anisotropies and for a temperature-dependent chemical shift. This study provides insight into the development of highly accurate first principles calculations of chemical shifts in solids, highlighting the role of motional effects on well defined systems.

  3. A new approach to NMR chemical shift additivity parameters using simultaneous linear equation method.

    PubMed

    Shahab, Yosif A; Khalil, Rabah A

    2006-10-01

    A new approach to NMR chemical shift additivity parameters using simultaneous linear equation method has been introduced. Three general nitrogen-15 NMR chemical shift additivity parameters with physical significance for aliphatic amines in methanol and cyclohexane and their hydrochlorides in methanol have been derived. A characteristic feature of these additivity parameters is the individual equation can be applied to both open-chain and rigid systems. The factors that influence the (15)N chemical shift of these substances have been determined. A new method for evaluating conformational equilibria at nitrogen in these compounds using the derived additivity parameters has been developed. Conformational analyses of these substances have been worked out. In general, the results indicate that there are four factors affecting the (15)N chemical shift of aliphatic amines; paramagnetic term (p-character), lone pair-proton interactions, proton-proton interactions, symmetry of alkyl substituents and molecular association.

  4. An Improved Experiment to Illustrate the Effect of Electronegativity on Chemical Shift.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Boggess, Robert K.

    1988-01-01

    Describes a method for using nuclear magnetic resonance to observe the effect of electronegativity on the chemical shift of protons in similar compounds. Suggests the use of 1,3-dihalopropanes as samples. Includes sample questions. (MVL)

  5. The thermonuclear production of 19F by Wolf-Rayet stars revisited

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Palacios, A.; Arnould, M.; Meynet, G.

    2005-11-01

    New models of rotating and non-rotating stars are computed for initial masses between 25 and 120 M_⊙ and for metallicities Z = 0.004, 0.008, 0.020, and 0.040 with the aim of reexamining the wind contribution of Wolf-Rayet (WR) stars to the 19F enrichment of the interstellar medium. Models with an initial rotation velocity υi = 300 km s-1 are found to globally eject less 19F than the non-rotating models. We compare our new predictions with those of Meynet & Arnould (2000, A&A, 355, 176), and demonstrate that the 19F yields are very sensitive to the still uncertain 19F (α ,p) 22Ne rate and to the adopted mass loss rates. Using the recommended mass loss rate values that take into account the clumping of the WR wind and the NACRE reaction rates, when available, we obtain WR 19F yields that are significantly lower than predicted by Meynet & Arnould (2000, A&A, 355, 176) and that would make WR stars non-important contributors to the galactic 19F budget. In view, however, of the large nuclear and mass loss rate uncertainties, we consider that the question of the WR contribution to the galactic 19F remains quite open.

  6. AFNMR: automated fragmentation quantum mechanical calculation of NMR chemical shifts for biomolecules.

    PubMed

    Swails, Jason; Zhu, Tong; He, Xiao; Case, David A

    2015-10-01

    We evaluate the performance of the automated fragmentation quantum mechanics/molecular mechanics approach (AF-QM/MM) on the calculation of protein and nucleic acid NMR chemical shifts. The AF-QM/MM approach models solvent effects implicitly through a set of surface charges computed using the Poisson-Boltzmann equation, and it can also be combined with an explicit solvent model through the placement of water molecules in the first solvation shell around the solute; the latter substantially improves the accuracy of chemical shift prediction of protons involved in hydrogen bonding with solvent. We also compare the performance of AF-QM/MM on proteins and nucleic acids with two leading empirical chemical shift prediction programs SHIFTS and SHIFTX2. Although the empirical programs outperform AF-QM/MM in predicting chemical shifts, the differences are in some cases small, and the latter can be applied to chemical shifts on biomolecules which are outside the training set employed by the empirical programs, such as structures containing ligands, metal centers, and non-standard residues. The AF-QM/MM described here is implemented in version 5 of the SHIFTS software, and is fully automated, so that only a structure in PDB format is required as input.

  7. Errors in the Calculation of 27Al Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Chemical Shifts

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Xianlong; Wang, Chengfei; Zhao, Hui

    2012-01-01

    Computational chemistry is an important tool for signal assignment of 27Al nuclear magnetic resonance spectra in order to elucidate the species of aluminum(III) in aqueous solutions. The accuracy of the popular theoretical models for computing the 27Al chemical shifts was evaluated by comparing the calculated and experimental chemical shifts in more than one hundred aluminum(III) complexes. In order to differentiate the error due to the chemical shielding tensor calculation from that due to the inadequacy of the molecular geometry prediction, single-crystal X-ray diffraction determined structures were used to build the isolated molecule models for calculating the chemical shifts. The results were compared with those obtained using the calculated geometries at the B3LYP/6-31G(d) level. The isotropic chemical shielding constants computed at different levels have strong linear correlations even though the absolute values differ in tens of ppm. The root-mean-square difference between the experimental chemical shifts and the calculated values is approximately 5 ppm for the calculations based on the X-ray structures, but more than 10 ppm for the calculations based on the computed geometries. The result indicates that the popular theoretical models are adequate in calculating the chemical shifts while an accurate molecular geometry is more critical. PMID:23203134

  8. TANKS 18 AND 19-F STRUCTURAL FLOWABLE GROUT FILL MATERIAL EVALUATION AND RECOMMENDATIONS

    SciTech Connect

    Stefanko, D.; Langton, C.

    2011-11-01

    Cementitious grout will be used to close Tanks 18-F and 19-F. The functions of the grout are to: (1) physically stabilize the final landfill by filling the empty volume in the tanks with a non compressible material; (2) provide a barrier for inadvertent intrusion into the tank; (3) reduce contaminant mobility by (a) limiting the hydraulic conductivity of the closed tank and (b) reducing contact between the residual waste and infiltrating water; and (4) providing an alkaline, chemically reducing environment in the closed tank to control speciation and solubility of selected radionuclides. The objective of this work was to identify a single (all-in-one) grout to stabilize and isolate the residual radionuclides in the tank, provide structural stability of the closed tank and serve as an inadvertent intruder barrier. This work was requested by V. A. Chander, High Level Waste (HLW) Tank Engineering, in HLW-TTR-2011-008. The complete task scope is provided in the Task Technical and QA Plan, SRNL-RP-2011-00587 Revision 0. The specific objectives of this task were to: (1) Identify new admixtures and dosages for formulating a zero bleed flowable tank fill material selected by HLW Tank Closure Project personnel based on earlier tank fill studies performed in 2007. The chemical admixtures used for adjusting the flow properties needed to be updated because the original admixture products are no longer available. Also, the sources of cement and fly ash have changed, and Portland cements currently available contain up to 5 wt. % limestone (calcium carbonate). (2) Prepare and evaluate the placement, compressive strength, and thermal properties of the selected formulation with new admixture dosages. (3) Identify opportunities for improving the mix selected by HLW Closure Project personnel and prepare and evaluate two potentially improved zero bleed flowable fill design concepts; one based on the reactor fill grout and the other based on a shrinkage compensating flowable fill mix

  9. Magnetic couplings in the chemical shift of paramagnetic NMR.

    PubMed

    Vaara, Juha; Rouf, Syed Awais; Mareš, Jiří

    2015-10-13

    We apply the Kurland-McGarvey (J. Magn. Reson. 1970, 2, 286) theory for the NMR shielding of paramagnetic molecules, particularly its special case limited to the ground-state multiplet characterized by zero-field splitting (ZFS) interaction of the form S·D·S. The correct formulation for this problem was recently presented by Soncini and Van den Heuvel (J. Chem. Phys. 2013, 138, 054113). With the effective electron spin quantum number S, the theory involves 2S+1 states, of which all but one are low-lying excited states, between which magnetic couplings take place by Zeeman and hyperfine interactions. We investigate these couplings as a function of temperature, focusing on both the high- and low-temperature behaviors. As has been seen in work by others, the full treatment of magnetic couplings is crucial for a realistic description of the temperature behavior of NMR shielding up to normal measurement temperatures. At high temperatures, depending on the magnitude of ZFS, the effect of magnetic couplings diminishes, and the Zeeman and hyperfine interactions become effectively averaged in the thermally occupied states of the multiplet. At still higher temperatures, the ZFS may be omitted altogether, and the shielding properties may be evaluated using a doublet-like formula, with all the 2S+1 states becoming effectively degenerate at the limit of vanishing magnetic field. We demonstrate these features using first-principles calculations of Ni(II), Co(II), Cr(II), and Cr(III) complexes, which have ZFS of different sizes and signs. A non-monotonic inverse temperature dependence of the hyperfine shift is predicted for axially symmetric integer-spin systems with a positive D parameter of ZFS. This is due to the magnetic coupling terms that are proportional to kT at low temperatures, canceling the Curie-type 1/kT prefactor of the hyperfine shielding in this case. PMID:26574272

  10. Proton chemical shift tensors determined by 3D ultrafast MAS double-quantum NMR spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Rongchun; Mroue, Kamal H; Ramamoorthy, Ayyalusamy

    2015-10-14

    Proton NMR spectroscopy in the solid state has recently attracted much attention owing to the significant enhancement in spectral resolution afforded by the remarkable advances in ultrafast magic angle spinning (MAS) capabilities. In particular, proton chemical shift anisotropy (CSA) has become an important tool for obtaining specific insights into inter/intra-molecular hydrogen bonding. However, even at the highest currently feasible spinning frequencies (110-120 kHz), (1)H MAS NMR spectra of rigid solids still suffer from poor resolution and severe peak overlap caused by the strong (1)H-(1)H homonuclear dipolar couplings and narrow (1)H chemical shift (CS) ranges, which render it difficult to determine the CSA of specific proton sites in the standard CSA/single-quantum (SQ) chemical shift correlation experiment. Herein, we propose a three-dimensional (3D) (1)H double-quantum (DQ) chemical shift/CSA/SQ chemical shift correlation experiment to extract the CS tensors of proton sites whose signals are not well resolved along the single-quantum chemical shift dimension. As extracted from the 3D spectrum, the F1/F3 (DQ/SQ) projection provides valuable information about (1)H-(1)H proximities, which might also reveal the hydrogen-bonding connectivities. In addition, the F2/F3 (CSA/SQ) correlation spectrum, which is similar to the regular 2D CSA/SQ correlation experiment, yields chemical shift anisotropic line shapes at different isotropic chemical shifts. More importantly, since the F2/F1 (CSA/DQ) spectrum correlates the CSA with the DQ signal induced by two neighboring proton sites, the CSA spectrum sliced at a specific DQ chemical shift position contains the CSA information of two neighboring spins indicated by the DQ chemical shift. If these two spins have different CS tensors, both tensors can be extracted by numerical fitting. We believe that this robust and elegant single-channel proton-based 3D experiment provides useful atomistic-level structural and dynamical

  11. Proton chemical shift tensors determined by 3D ultrafast MAS double-quantum NMR spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Rongchun; Mroue, Kamal H.; Ramamoorthy, Ayyalusamy

    2015-10-14

    Proton NMR spectroscopy in the solid state has recently attracted much attention owing to the significant enhancement in spectral resolution afforded by the remarkable advances in ultrafast magic angle spinning (MAS) capabilities. In particular, proton chemical shift anisotropy (CSA) has become an important tool for obtaining specific insights into inter/intra-molecular hydrogen bonding. However, even at the highest currently feasible spinning frequencies (110–120 kHz), {sup 1}H MAS NMR spectra of rigid solids still suffer from poor resolution and severe peak overlap caused by the strong {sup 1}H–{sup 1}H homonuclear dipolar couplings and narrow {sup 1}H chemical shift (CS) ranges, which render it difficult to determine the CSA of specific proton sites in the standard CSA/single-quantum (SQ) chemical shift correlation experiment. Herein, we propose a three-dimensional (3D) {sup 1}H double-quantum (DQ) chemical shift/CSA/SQ chemical shift correlation experiment to extract the CS tensors of proton sites whose signals are not well resolved along the single-quantum chemical shift dimension. As extracted from the 3D spectrum, the F1/F3 (DQ/SQ) projection provides valuable information about {sup 1}H–{sup 1}H proximities, which might also reveal the hydrogen-bonding connectivities. In addition, the F2/F3 (CSA/SQ) correlation spectrum, which is similar to the regular 2D CSA/SQ correlation experiment, yields chemical shift anisotropic line shapes at different isotropic chemical shifts. More importantly, since the F2/F1 (CSA/DQ) spectrum correlates the CSA with the DQ signal induced by two neighboring proton sites, the CSA spectrum sliced at a specific DQ chemical shift position contains the CSA information of two neighboring spins indicated by the DQ chemical shift. If these two spins have different CS tensors, both tensors can be extracted by numerical fitting. We believe that this robust and elegant single-channel proton-based 3D experiment provides useful atomistic

  12. 1H NMR spectra part 31: 1H chemical shifts of amides in DMSO solvent.

    PubMed

    Abraham, Raymond J; Griffiths, Lee; Perez, Manuel

    2014-07-01

    The (1)H chemical shifts of 48 amides in DMSO solvent are assigned and presented. The solvent shifts Δδ (DMSO-CDCl3 ) are large (1-2 ppm) for the NH protons but smaller and negative (-0.1 to -0.2 ppm) for close range protons. A selection of the observed solvent shifts is compared with calculated shifts from the present model and from GIAO calculations. Those for the NH protons agree with both calculations, but other solvent shifts such as Δδ(CHO) are not well reproduced by the GIAO calculations. The (1)H chemical shifts of the amides in DMSO were analysed using a functional approach for near ( ≤ 3 bonds removed) protons and the electric field, magnetic anisotropy and steric effect of the amide group for more distant protons. The chemical shifts of the NH protons of acetanilide and benzamide vary linearly with the π density on the αN and βC atoms, respectively. The C=O anisotropy and steric effect are in general little changed from the values in CDCl3. The effects of substituents F, Cl, Me on the NH proton shifts are reproduced. The electric field coefficient for the protons in DMSO is 90% of that in CDCl3. There is no steric effect of the C=O oxygen on the NH proton in an NH…O=C hydrogen bond. The observed deshielding is due to the electric field effect. The calculated chemical shifts agree well with the observed shifts (RMS error of 0.106 ppm for the data set of 257 entries). PMID:24824670

  13. Theoretical Modeling of (99)Tc NMR Chemical Shifts.

    PubMed

    Hall, Gabriel B; Andersen, Amity; Washton, Nancy M; Chatterjee, Sayandev; Levitskaia, Tatiana G

    2016-09-01

    Technetium-99 (Tc) displays a rich chemistry due to its wide range of accessible oxidation states (from -I to +VII) and ability to form coordination compounds. Determination of Tc speciation in complex mixtures is a major challenge, and (99)Tc nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy is widely used to probe chemical environments of Tc in odd oxidation states. However, interpretation of (99)Tc NMR data is hindered by the lack of reference compounds. Density functional theory (DFT) calculations can help to fill this gap, but to date few computational studies have focused on (99)Tc NMR of compounds and complexes. This work evaluates the effectiveness of both pure generalized gradient approximation and their corresponding hybrid functionals, both with and without the inclusion of scalar relativistic effects, to model the (99)Tc NMR spectra of Tc(I) carbonyl compounds. With the exception of BLYP, which performed exceptionally well overall, hybrid functionals with inclusion of scalar relativistic effects are found to be necessary to accurately calculate (99)Tc NMR spectra. The computational method developed was used to tentatively assign an experimentally observed (99)Tc NMR peak at -1204 ppm to fac-Tc(CO)3(OH)3(2-). This study examines the effectiveness of DFT computations for interpretation of the (99)Tc NMR spectra of Tc(I) coordination compounds in high salt alkaline solutions. PMID:27518482

  14. The ^19F(p,γ)^20Ne Reaction and Breakout from the Cold CNO Cycle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Couture, Aaron; Daly, Jason; Giesen, Ulrich; Görres, Joachim; Lee, Hye-Young; Stech, Edward; Ugalde, Claudio; Wiescher, Michael

    2001-10-01

    The ^19F(p,γ)^20Ne reaction is considered the only candidate for breakout from the cold CNO cycle(Wiescher M., J. Görres, and H. Schatz. J. Phys. G: Nucl. Part. Phys. 25) 1999 R133-R161.. While the reaction rate is expected to be sufficiently small as to make the break-out negligible when considering CNO nucleosynthesis, this has not been experimentally demonstrated. The competing ^19F(p,αγ)^20Ne reaction creates a beam induced background that dominates the observed spectra. While ^19F(p,γ_0,1)^20Ne has been measured down to about 300 keV(Subotić), K. M., R. Ostojić, and B. Z. Stephančić. Nucl. Phys. A331 (1979) 491-501., to date only limited measurements have been made of the total cross-section of ^19F(p,γ)^20Ne at energies below 1 MeV. A new method for suppressing the ^19F(p,αγ)^20Ne background has been developed at the University of Notre Dame. This allowed new low-energy measurements the ^19F(p,γ)^20Ne reaction rates near the region of astrophysical interest. The first results of these measurements will be presented.

  15. Minimizing lipid signal bleed in brain 1H chemical shift imaging by post-acquisition grid shifting

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Yi; Zhou, Jinyuan; Bottomley, Paul A.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose Low spatial resolution in conventional 1H brain chemical shifting imaging (CSI) studies causes partial volume error (PVE) or signal ‘bleed’ that is especially deleterious to voxels near the scalp. The standard spatial apodization approach adversely affects spatial resolution. Here, a novel automated post-processing strategy of partial volume correction employing grid shifting (‘PANGS’) is presented, which minimizes residual PVE without compromising spatial resolution. Methods PANGS shifts the locations of the reconstruction coordinates in a designated region of image space—the scalp, to match the tissue ‘centers-of-mass’ instead of the geometric centers of each voxel, by iteratively minimizing the PVE from the scalp into outside voxels. PANGS’ performance was evaluated by numerical simulation, and in 3T 1H CSI human studies employing outer volume suppression and long echo times. Results PANGS reduced lipid contamination of cortical spectra by up to 86% (54% on average). Metabolite maps exhibited significantly less lipid artifact than conventional and spatially-filtered CSI. All methods generated quantitatively identical spectral peak areas from central brain locations, but spatial filtering increased spectral linewidths and reduced spatial resolution. Conclusion PANGS significantly reduces lipid artifacts in 1H brain CSI spectra and metabolite maps, and improves metabolite detection in cortical regions without compromising resolution. PMID:25168657

  16. Stereoelectronic effects on 1H nuclear magnetic resonance chemical shifts in methoxybenzenes.

    PubMed

    Lambert, Maja; Olsen, Lars; Jaroszewski, Jerzy W

    2006-12-01

    Investigation of all O-methyl ethers of 1,2,3-benzenetriol and 4-methyl-1,2,3-benzenetriol (3-16) by 1H NMR spectroscopy and density-functional calculations disclosed practically useful conformational effects on 1H NMR chemical shifts in the aromatic ring. While the conversion of phenol (2) to anisole (1) causes only small positive changes of 1H NMR chemical shifts (Delta delta < 0.08 ppm) that decrease in the order Hortho > Hmeta > Hpara, the experimental O-methylation induced shifts in ortho-disubstituted phenols are largest for Hpara, Delta delta equals; 0.19 +/- 0.02 ppm (n = 11). The differences are due to different conformational behavior of the OH and OCH3 groups; while the ortho-disubstituted OH group remains planar in polyphenols due to hydrogen bonding and conjugative stabilization, the steric congestion in ortho-disubstituted anisoles outweighs the conjugative effects and forces the Ar-OCH3 torsion out of the ring plane, resulting in large stereoelectronic effects on the chemical shift of Hpara. Conformational searches and geometry optimizations for 3-16 at the B3LYP/6-31G** level, followed by B3LYP/6-311++G(2d,2p) calculations for all low-energy conformers, gave excellent correlation between computed and observed 1H NMR chemical shifts, including agreement between computed and observed chemical shift changes caused by O-methylation. The observed regularities can aid structure elucidation of partly O-methylated polyphenols, including many natural products and drugs, and are useful in connection with chemical shift predictions by desktop computer programs. PMID:17137372

  17. Utilizing the charge field effect on amide (15)N chemical shifts for protein structure validation.

    PubMed

    Bader, Reto

    2009-01-01

    Of all the nuclei in proteins, the nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) chemical shifts of nitrogen are the theoretically least well understood. In this study, quantum chemical methods are used in combination with polarizable-continuum models in order to show that consideration of the effective electric field, including charge screening due to solvation, improves considerably the consistencies of statistical relationships between experimental and computed amide (15)N shifts between various sets of charged and uncharged oligopeptides and small organic molecules. A single conversion scheme between shielding parameters from first principles using density functional theory (DFT) and experimental shifts is derived that holds for all classes of compounds examined here. This relationship is then used to test the accuracy of such (15)N chemical shift predictions in the cyclic decapeptide antibiotic gramicidin S (GS). GS has previously been studied in great detail, both by NMR and X-ray crystallography. It adopts a well-defined backbone conformation, and hence, only a few discrete side chain conformational states need to be considered. Moreover, a charge-relay effect of the two cationic ornithine side chains to the protein backbone has been described earlier by NMR spectroscopy. Here, DFT-derived backbone amide nitrogen chemical shifts were calculated for multiple conformations of GS. Overall, the structural dynamics of GS is revisited in view of chemical shift behavior along with energetic considerations. Together, the study demonstrates proof of concept that (15)N chemical shift information is particularly useful in the analysis and validation of protein conformational states in a charged environment.

  18. Equilibrium simulations of proteins using molecular fragment replacement and NMR chemical shifts.

    PubMed

    Boomsma, Wouter; Tian, Pengfei; Frellsen, Jes; Ferkinghoff-Borg, Jesper; Hamelryck, Thomas; Lindorff-Larsen, Kresten; Vendruscolo, Michele

    2014-09-23

    Methods of protein structure determination based on NMR chemical shifts are becoming increasingly common. The most widely used approaches adopt the molecular fragment replacement strategy, in which structural fragments are repeatedly reassembled into different complete conformations in molecular simulations. Although these approaches are effective in generating individual structures consistent with the chemical shift data, they do not enable the sampling of the conformational space of proteins with correct statistical weights. Here, we present a method of molecular fragment replacement that makes it possible to perform equilibrium simulations of proteins, and hence to determine their free energy landscapes. This strategy is based on the encoding of the chemical shift information in a probabilistic model in Markov chain Monte Carlo simulations. First, we demonstrate that with this approach it is possible to fold proteins to their native states starting from extended structures. Second, we show that the method satisfies the detailed balance condition and hence it can be used to carry out an equilibrium sampling from the Boltzmann distribution corresponding to the force field used in the simulations. Third, by comparing the results of simulations carried out with and without chemical shift restraints we describe quantitatively the effects that these restraints have on the free energy landscapes of proteins. Taken together, these results demonstrate that the molecular fragment replacement strategy can be used in combination with chemical shift information to characterize not only the native structures of proteins but also their conformational fluctuations.

  19. Prediction algorithm for amino acid types with their secondary structure in proteins (PLATON) using chemical shifts.

    PubMed

    Labudde, D; Leitner, D; Krüger, M; Oschkinat, H

    2003-01-01

    The algorithm PLATON is able to assign sets of chemical shifts derived from a single residue to amino acid types with its secondary structure (amino acid species). A subsequent ranking procedure using optionally two different penalty functions yields predictions for possible amino acid species for the given set of chemical shifts. This was demonstrated in the case of the alpha-spectrin SH3 domain and applied to 9 further protein data sets taken from the BioMagRes database. A database consisting of reference chemical shift patterns (reference CSPs) was generated from assigned chemical shifts of proteins with known 3D-structure. This reference CSP database is used in our approach for extracting distributions of amino acid types with their most likely secondary structure elements (namely alpha-helix, beta-sheet, and coil) for single amino acids by comparison with query CSPs. Results obtained for the 10 investigated proteins indicates that the percentage of correct amino acid species in the first three positions in the ranking list, ranges from 71.4% to 93.2% for the more favorable penalty function. Where only the top result of the ranking list for these 10 proteins is considered, 36.5% to 83.1% of the amino acid species are correctly predicted. The main advantage of our approach, over other methods that rely on average chemical shift values is the ability to increase database content by incorporating newly derived CSPs, and therefore to improve PLATON's performance over time.

  20. Benchmarking quantum mechanical calculations with experimental NMR chemical shifts of 2-HADNT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Yuemin; Junk, Thomas; Liu, Yucheng; Tzeng, Nianfeng; Perkins, Richard

    2015-04-01

    In this study, both GIAO-DFT and GIAO-MP2 calculations of nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectra were benchmarked with experimental chemical shifts. The experimental chemical shifts were determined experimentally for carbon-13 (C-13) of seven carbon atoms for the TNT degradation product 2-hydroxylamino-4,6-dinitrotoluene (2-HADNT). Quantum mechanics GIAO calculations were implemented using Becke-3-Lee-Yang-Parr (B3LYP) and other six hybrid DFT methods (Becke-1-Lee-Yang-Parr (B1LYP), Becke-half-and-half-Lee-Yang-Parr (BH and HLYP), Cohen-Handy-3-Lee-Yang-Parr (O3LYP), Coulomb-attenuating-B3LYP (CAM-B3LYP), modified-Perdew-Wang-91-Lee-Yang-Parr (mPW1LYP), and Xu-3-Lee-Yang-Parr (X3LYP)) which use the same correlation functional LYP. Calculation results showed that the GIAO-MP2 method gives the most accurate chemical shift values, and O3LYP method provides the best prediction of chemical shifts among the B3LYP and other five DFT methods. Three types of atomic partial charges, Mulliken (MK), electrostatic potential (ESP), and natural bond orbital (NBO), were also calculated using MP2/aug-cc-pVDZ method. A reasonable correlation was discovered between NBO partial charges and experimental chemical shifts of carbon-13 (C-13).

  1. Multi-nuclear MRS and 19F MRI of 19F-labelled and 10B-enriched p-boronophenylalanine-fructose complex to optimize boron neutron capture therapy: phantom studies at high magnetic fields.

    PubMed

    Porcari, Paola; Capuani, Silvia; Campanella, Renzo; La Bella, Angela; Migneco, Luisa Maria; Maraviglia, Bruno

    2006-06-21

    Reaction yield optimization for the synthesis and the complexation of a boron neutron capture therapy agent (19)F-labelled, (10)B-enriched p-boronophenylalanine-fructose ((19)F-BPA-fr) complex was obtained. (1)H, (19)F, (13)C and (10)B magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS) of the (19)F-BPA-fr complex in aqueous and rat blood solution phantoms and its spatial distribution mapping using (19)F magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) results are reported. 7 T and 9.4 T magnetic fields were used to perform MRI and MRS respectively. Our in vitro results suggest that in vivo studies on (19)F-BPA through (19)F NMR will be feasible. PMID:16757868

  2. Isotope effects on chemical shifts in the study of intramolecular hydrogen bonds.

    PubMed

    Hansen, Poul Erik

    2015-01-30

    The paper deals with the use of isotope effects on chemical shifts in characterizing intramolecular hydrogen bonds. Both so-called resonance-assisted (RAHB) and non-RAHB systems are treated. The importance of RAHB will be discussed. Another very important issue is the borderline between "static" and tautomeric systems. Isotope effects on chemical shifts are particularly useful in such studies. All kinds of intramolecular hydrogen bonded systems will be treated, typical hydrogen bond donors: OH, NH, SH and NH+, typical acceptors C=O, C=N, C=S C=N-. The paper will be deal with both secondary and primary isotope effects on chemical shifts. These two types of isotope effects monitor the same hydrogen bond, but from different angles.

  3. Modeling (15)N NMR chemical shift changes in protein backbone with pressure.

    PubMed

    La Penna, Giovanni; Mori, Yoshiharu; Kitahara, Ryo; Akasaka, Kazuyuki; Okamoto, Yuko

    2016-08-28

    Nitrogen chemical shift is a useful parameter for determining the backbone three-dimensional structure of proteins. Empirical models for fast calculation of N chemical shift are improving their reliability, but there are subtle effects that cannot be easily interpreted. Among these, the effects of slight changes in hydrogen bonds, both intramolecular and with water molecules in the solvent, are particularly difficult to predict. On the other hand, these hydrogen bonds are sensitive to changes in protein environment. In this work, the change of N chemical shift with pressure for backbone segments in the protein ubiquitin is correlated with the change in the population of hydrogen bonds involving the backbone amide group. The different extent of interaction of protein backbone with the water molecules in the solvent is put in evidence. PMID:27586953

  4. Modeling 15N NMR chemical shift changes in protein backbone with pressure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    La Penna, Giovanni; Mori, Yoshiharu; Kitahara, Ryo; Akasaka, Kazuyuki; Okamoto, Yuko

    2016-08-01

    Nitrogen chemical shift is a useful parameter for determining the backbone three-dimensional structure of proteins. Empirical models for fast calculation of N chemical shift are improving their reliability, but there are subtle effects that cannot be easily interpreted. Among these, the effects of slight changes in hydrogen bonds, both intramolecular and with water molecules in the solvent, are particularly difficult to predict. On the other hand, these hydrogen bonds are sensitive to changes in protein environment. In this work, the change of N chemical shift with pressure for backbone segments in the protein ubiquitin is correlated with the change in the population of hydrogen bonds involving the backbone amide group. The different extent of interaction of protein backbone with the water molecules in the solvent is put in evidence.

  5. Achievement of 1 H-19 F heteronuclear experiments using the conventional spectrometer with a shared single high band amplifier.

    PubMed

    Sakuma, Chiseko; Kurita, Jun-ichi; Furihata, Kazuo; Tashiro, Mitsuru

    2015-05-01

    The (1)H-(19) F heteronuclear NMR experiments were achieved using the conventional spectrometer equipped with a single high band amplifier and a (1)H/(19)F/(13) C double-tuned probe. Although double high band amplifiers are generally required to perform such experiments, a simple modification of pathway in the conventional spectrometer was capable of acquiring various (1)H-(19)F heteronuclear spectra. The efficiency of the present technique was demonstrated in an application for (19)F{(1)H} and (1)H{(19)F} saturation transfer difference experiments. PMID:25808615

  6. Achievement of 1 H-19 F heteronuclear experiments using the conventional spectrometer with a shared single high band amplifier.

    PubMed

    Sakuma, Chiseko; Kurita, Jun-ichi; Furihata, Kazuo; Tashiro, Mitsuru

    2015-05-01

    The (1)H-(19) F heteronuclear NMR experiments were achieved using the conventional spectrometer equipped with a single high band amplifier and a (1)H/(19)F/(13) C double-tuned probe. Although double high band amplifiers are generally required to perform such experiments, a simple modification of pathway in the conventional spectrometer was capable of acquiring various (1)H-(19)F heteronuclear spectra. The efficiency of the present technique was demonstrated in an application for (19)F{(1)H} and (1)H{(19)F} saturation transfer difference experiments.

  7. Work function shifts of catalytic metals under hydrogen gas visualized by terahertz chemical microscopy.

    PubMed

    Kiwa, Toshihiko; Hagiwara, Takafumi; Shinomiya, Mitsuhiro; Sakai, Kenji; Tsukada, Keiji

    2012-05-21

    Terahertz chemical microscopy (TCM) was applied to visualize the distribution of the work function shift of catalytic metals under hydrogen gas. TCM measures the chemical potential on the surface of a SiO(2)/Si/sapphire sensing plate without any contact with the plate. By controlling the bias voltage between an electrode on the SiO(2)/ surface and the Si layer, the relationship between the voltage and the THz amplitude from the sensing plate can be obtained. As a demonstration, two types of structures were fabricated on the sensing plate, and the work function shifts due to catalytic reactions were visualized.

  8. (77)Se chemical shift tensor of L-selenocystine: experimental NMR measurements and quantum chemical investigations of structural effects.

    PubMed

    Struppe, Jochem; Zhang, Yong; Rozovsky, Sharon

    2015-03-01

    The genetically encoded amino acid selenocysteine and its dimeric form, selenocystine, are both utilized by nature. They are found in active sites of selenoproteins, enzymes that facilitate a diverse range of reactions, including the detoxification of reactive oxygen species and regulation of redox pathways. Due to selenocysteine and selenocystine's specialized biological roles, it is of interest to examine their (77)Se NMR properties and how those can in turn be employed to study biological systems. We report the solid-state (77)Se NMR measurements of the L-selenocystine chemical shift tensor, which provides the first experimental chemical shift tensor information on selenocysteine-containing systems. Quantum chemical calculations of L-selenocystine models were performed to help understand various structural effects on (77)Se L-selenocystine's chemical shift tensor. The effects of protonation state, protein environment, and substituent of selenium-bonded carbon on the isotropic chemical shift were found to be in a range of ca. 10-20 ppm. However, the conformational effect was found to be much larger, spanning ca. 600 ppm for the C-Se-Se-C dihedral angle range of -180° to +180°. Our calculations show that around the minimum energy structure with a C-Se-Se-C dihedral angle of ca. -90°, the energy costs to alter the dihedral angle in the range from -120° to -60° are within only 2.5 kcal/mol. This makes it possible to realize these conformations in a protein or crystal environment. (77)Se NMR was found to be a sensitive probe to such changes and has an isotropic chemical shift range of 272 ± 30 ppm for this energetically favorable conformation range. The energy-minimized structures exhibited calculated isotropic shifts that lay within 3-9% of those reported in previous solution NMR studies. The experimental solid-state NMR isotropic chemical shift is near the lower bound of this calculated range for these readily accessible conformations. These results suggest

  9. (19)F Paramagnetic Relaxation Enhancement: A Valuable Tool for Distance Measurements in Proteins.

    PubMed

    Matei, Elena; Gronenborn, Angela M

    2016-01-01

    Fluorine NMR paramagnetic relaxation enhancement was evaluated as a versatile approach for extracting distance information in selectively F-labeled proteins. Proof of concept and initial applications are presented for the HIV-inactivating lectin cyanovirin-N. Single F atoms were introduced at the 4-, 5-, 6- or 7 positions of Trp49 and the 4-position of Phe4, Phe54, and Phe80. The paramagnetic nitroxide spin label was attached to Cys residues that were placed into the protein at positions 50 or 52. (19)F-T2  NMR spectra with different relaxation delays were recorded and the transverse (19)F-PRE rate, (19)F-Γ2 , was used to determine the average distance between the F nucleus and the paramagnetic center. Our data show that experimental (19)F PRE-based distances correspond to 0.93 of the (1)HN-PRE distances, in perfect agreement with the gyromagnetic γ(19)F/γ(1)H ratio, thereby demonstrating that (19)F PREs are excellent alternative parameters for quantitative distance measurements in selectively F-labeled proteins.

  10. Quantitation of dexfenfluramine/d-norfenfluramine concentration in primate brain using 19F NMR spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Christensen, J D; Babb, S M; Cohen, B M; Renshaw, P F

    1998-01-01

    Fluorine (19F) magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS) was used to quantify the combined concentration of the anorectic drug dexfenfluramine (DF) and its active metabolite d-norfenfluramine (dNF) in rhesus monkey brain. The accuracy of the MRS technique was assessed by comparison with gas chromatography. Brain 19F MRS signals were converted to brain DF + dNF concentrations after correction for signal relaxation losses and drug distribution in nonbrain tissue. Gas chromatography (GC) was used to assay brain DF and dNF concentrations following MRS evaluation. DF + dNF concentrations measured by 19F MRS averaged 104 +/- 36 microM (mean +/- SD) and GC measurements averaged 71 +/- 12 microM. Correction for the distribution of DF and its metabolites in nonbrain tissue yielded a DF + metabolite brain concentration that was within one standard deviation of the GC-derived value. The concentration of DF plus dNF measured by 19F MRS was similar to or greater than the value obtained by GC, which indicates that DF and its active metabolite dNF are fully detected by 19F MRS in primate brain in vivo. The application of these techniques to human subjects should enable the measurement of low micromolar-range brain concentrations of DF and other fluorinated drugs.

  11. Contribution of 19F resonances on 18O( p, α)15N reaction rate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benmeslem, Meriem; Chafa, Azzedine; Barhoumi, Slimane; Tribeche, Mouloud

    2014-08-01

    The 18O( p, α)15N reaction influences the isotopes production such as 19F, 18O, and 15N which can be used to test the models of stellar evolution. 19F is synthesized in both asymptotic giant branch (AGB) and metal-rich Wolf-Rayet (WR) stars. Using R-matrix theory we allow new values of resonances parameters in 19F. We show that the most important contribution to the differential and total cross section at low energies, comes from the levels in 19F situated at resonances energies E R =151, 680 and 840 keV with spin and parity 1/2+. The total width of the 680 keV resonance is badly known. So, we have focused on this broad resonance corresponding to the 8.65 MeV level in 19F. We delimit the temperature range in which each resonance contribution to the total reaction rate occurs by analyzing the ratio ( N A < σν> i / N A < σν>). This allowed us to show that the 680 and 840 keV broad resonances strongly dominate the reaction rate over the stellar temperature range T 9=0.02-0.06 and T 9=0.5-5. Finally, these results were compared to NACRE and Iliadis astrophysical compilations.

  12. Proton Magnetic Resonance and Human Thyroid Neoplasia III. Ex VivoChemical-Shift Microimaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rutter, Allison; Künnecke, Basil; Dowd, Susan; Russell, Peter; Delbridge, Leigh; Mountford, Carolyn E.

    1996-03-01

    Magnetic-resonance chemical-shift microimaging, with a spatial resolution of 40 × 40 μm, is a modality which can detect alterations to cellular chemistry and hence markers of pathological processes in human tissueex vivo.This technique was used as a chemical microscope to assess follicular thyroid neoplasms, lesions which are unsatisfactorily investigated using standard histopathological techiques or water-based magnetic-resonance imaging. The chemical-shift images at the methyl frequency (0.9 ppm) identify chemical heterogeneity in follicular tumors which are histologically homogeneous. The observed changes to cellular chemistry, detectable in foci of approximately 100 cells or less, support the existence of a preinvasive state hitherto unidentified by current pathological techniques.

  13. Discovery of selective ligands for telomeric RNA G-quadruplexes (TERRA) through 19F-NMR based fragment screening.

    PubMed

    Garavís, Miguel; López-Méndez, Blanca; Somoza, Alvaro; Oyarzabal, Julen; Dalvit, Claudio; Villasante, Alfredo; Campos-Olivas, Ramón; González, Carlos

    2014-07-18

    Telomeric repeat-containing RNA (TERRA) is a novel and very attractive antitumoral target. Here, we report the first successful application of (19)F-NMR fragment-based screening to identify chemically diverse compounds that bind to an RNA molecule such as TERRA. We have built a library of 355 fluorinated fragments, and checked their interaction with a long telomeric RNA as a target molecule. The screening resulted in the identification of 20 hits (hit rate of 5.6%). For a number of binders, their interaction with TERRA was confirmed by (19)F- and (1)H NMR as well as by CD melting experiments. We have also explored the selectivity of the ligands for RNA G-quadruplexes and found that some of the hits do not interact with other nucleic acids such as tRNA and duplex DNA and, most importantly, favor the propeller-like parallel conformation in telomeric DNA G-quadruplexes. This suggests a selective recognition of this particular quadruplex topology and that different ligands may recognize specific sites in propeller-like parallel G-quadruplexes. Such features make some of the resulting binders promising lead compounds for fragment based drug discovery.

  14. Thermal effects and vibrational corrections to transition metal NMR chemical shifts.

    PubMed

    Grigoleit, Sonja; Bühl, Michael

    2004-10-25

    Both zero-point and classical thermal effects on the chemical shift of transition metals have been calculated at appropriate levels of density functional theory for a number of complexes of titanium, vanadium, manganese and iron. The zero-point effects were computed by applying a perturbational approach, whereas classical thermal effects were probed by Car-Parrinello molecular dynamics simulations. The systematic investigation shows that both procedures lead to a deshielding of the magnetic shielding constants evaluated at the GIAO-B3 LYP level, which in general also leads to a downfield shift in the relative chemical shifts, delta. The effect is small for the titanium and vanadium complexes, where it is typically on the order of a few dozen ppm, and is larger for the manganese and iron complexes, where it can amount to several hundred ppm. Zero-point corrections are usually smaller than the classical thermal effect. The pronounced downfield shift is due to the sensitivity of the shielding of the metal centre with regard to the metal-ligand bond length, which increase upon vibrational averaging. Both applied methods improve the accuracy of the chemical shifts in some cases, but not in general.

  15. Conformational Sampling by Ab Initio Molecular Dynamics Simulations Improves NMR Chemical Shift Predictions.

    PubMed

    Dračínský, Martin; Möller, Heiko M; Exner, Thomas E

    2013-08-13

    Car-Parrinello molecular dynamics simulations were performed for N-methyl acetamide as a small test system for amide groups in protein backbones, and NMR chemical shifts were calculated based on the generated ensemble. If conformational sampling and explicit solvent molecules are taken into account, excellent agreement between the calculated and experimental chemical shifts is obtained. These results represent a landmark improvement over calculations based on classical molecular dynamics (MD) simulations especially for amide protons, which are predicted too high-field shifted based on the latter ensembles. We were able to show that the better results are caused by the solute-solvents interactions forming shorter hydrogen bonds as well as by the internal degrees of freedom of the solute. Inspired by these results, we propose our approach as a new tool for the validation of force fields due to its power of identifying the structural reasons for discrepancies between the experimental and calculated data. PMID:26584127

  16. Computation of Chemical Shifts for Paramagnetic Molecules: A Laboratory Experiment for the Undergraduate Curriculum

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pritchard, Benjamin P.; Simpson, Scott; Zurek, Eva; Autschbach, Jochen

    2014-01-01

    A computational experiment investigating the [superscript 1]H and [superscript 13]C nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) chemical shifts of molecules with unpaired electrons has been developed and implemented. This experiment is appropriate for an upper-level undergraduate laboratory course in computational, physical, or inorganic chemistry. The…

  17. Automated assignment of NMR chemical shifts based on a known structure and 4D spectra.

    PubMed

    Trautwein, Matthias; Fredriksson, Kai; Möller, Heiko M; Exner, Thomas E

    2016-08-01

    Apart from their central role during 3D structure determination of proteins the backbone chemical shift assignment is the basis for a number of applications, like chemical shift perturbation mapping and studies on the dynamics of proteins. This assignment is not a trivial task even if a 3D protein structure is known and needs almost as much effort as the assignment for structure prediction if performed manually. We present here a new algorithm based solely on 4D [(1)H,(15)N]-HSQC-NOESY-[(1)H,(15)N]-HSQC spectra which is able to assign a large percentage of chemical shifts (73-82 %) unambiguously, demonstrated with proteins up to a size of 250 residues. For the remaining residues, a small number of possible assignments is filtered out. This is done by comparing distances in the 3D structure to restraints obtained from the peak volumes in the 4D spectrum. Using dead-end elimination, assignments are removed in which at least one of the restraints is violated. Including additional information from chemical shift predictions, a complete unambiguous assignment was obtained for Ubiquitin and 95 % of the residues were correctly assigned in the 251 residue-long N-terminal domain of enzyme I. The program including source code is available at https://github.com/thomasexner/4Dassign . PMID:27484442

  18. Chemical shifts in transition metal dithiocarbamates from infrared and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Payne, R.; Magee, R. J.; Liesegang, J.

    1982-11-01

    Measurements of the IR stretching frequencies of the NC and MS bonds in transition-metal (M) dithiocarbamates show significant correlation with measurement of core level XPS chemical shifts. This is believed to be the first demonstration of such a correlation for a series of solid-phase compounds.

  19. Chemical Shift Assignments of Mouse HOXD13 DNA Binding Domain Bound to Duplex DNA

    PubMed Central

    Turner, Matthew; Zhang, Yonghong; Carlson, Hanqian L.; Stadler, H. Scott; Ames, James B.

    2014-01-01

    The homeobox gene (Hoxd13) codes for a transcription factor protein that binds to AT-rich DNA sequences and controls expression of proteins that control embryonic morphogenesis. We report NMR chemical shift assignments of mouse Hoxd13 DNA binding domain bound to an 11-residue DNA duplex (BMRB no. 25133). PMID:25491407

  20. Quantum vs. classical models of the nitro group for proton chemical shift calculations and conformational analysis.

    PubMed

    Mobli, Mehdi; Abraham, Raymond J

    2005-03-01

    A model based on classical concepts is derived to describe the effect of the nitro group on proton chemical shifts. The calculated chemical shifts are then compared to ab initio (GIAO) calculated chemical shifts. The accuracy of the two models is assessed using proton chemical shifts of a set of rigid organic nitro compounds that are fully assigned in CDCl3 at 700 MHz. The two methods are then used to evaluate the accuracy of different popular post-SCF methods (B3LYP and MP2) and molecular mechanics methods (MMX and MMFF94) in calculating the molecular structure of a set of sterically crowded nitro aromatic compounds. Both models perform well on the rigid molecules used as a test set, although when using the GIAO method a general overestimation of the deshielding of protons near the nitro group is observed. The analysis of the sterically crowded molecules shows that the very popular B3LYP/6-31G(d,p) method produces very poor twist angles for these, and that using a larger basis set [6-311++G(2d,p)] gives much more reasonable results. The MP2 calculations, on the other hand, overestimate the twist angles, which for these compounds compensates for the deshielding effect generally observed for protons near electronegative atoms when using the GIAO method at the B3LYP/6-311++G(2d,p) level. The most accurate results are found when the structures are calculated using B3LYP/6-311++G(2d,p) level of theory, and the chemical shifts are calculated using the CHARGE program based on classical models.

  1. Elucidating the Link between NMR Chemical Shifts and Electronic Structure in d(0) Olefin Metathesis Catalysts.

    PubMed

    Halbert, Stéphanie; Copéret, Christophe; Raynaud, Christophe; Eisenstein, Odile

    2016-02-24

    The nucleophilic carbon of d(0) Schrock alkylidene metathesis catalysts, [M] = CHR, display surprisingly low downfield chemical shift (δ(iso)) and large chemical shift anisotropy. State-of-the-art four-component relativistic calculations of the chemical shift tensors combined with a two-component analysis in terms of localized orbitals allow a molecular-level understanding of their orientations, the magnitude of their principal components (δ11 > δ22 > δ33) and associated δ(iso). This analysis reveals the dominating influence of the paramagnetic contribution yielding a highly deshielded alkylidene carbon. The largest paramagnetic contribution, which originates from the coupling of alkylidene σ(MC) and π*(MC) orbitals under the action of the magnetic field, is analogous to that resulting from coupling σ(CC) and π*(CC) in ethylene; thus, δ11 is in the MCH plane and is perpendicular to the MC internuclear direction. The higher value of carbon-13 δ(iso) in alkylidene complexes relative to ethylene is thus due to the smaller energy gap between σ(MC) and π*(MC) vs this between σ(CC) and π*(CC) in ethylene. This effect also explains why the highest value of δ(iso) is observed for Mo and the lowest for Ta, the values for W and Re being in between. In the presence of agostic interaction, the chemical shift tensor principal components orientation (δ22 or δ33 parallel or perpendicular to π(MX)) is influenced by the MCH angle because it determines the orientation of the alkylidene CHR fragment relative to the MC internuclear axis. The orbital analysis shows how the paramagnetic terms, understood with a localized bond model, determine the chemical shift tensor and thereby δ(iso). PMID:26787258

  2. Elucidating the Link between NMR Chemical Shifts and Electronic Structure in d(0) Olefin Metathesis Catalysts.

    PubMed

    Halbert, Stéphanie; Copéret, Christophe; Raynaud, Christophe; Eisenstein, Odile

    2016-02-24

    The nucleophilic carbon of d(0) Schrock alkylidene metathesis catalysts, [M] = CHR, display surprisingly low downfield chemical shift (δ(iso)) and large chemical shift anisotropy. State-of-the-art four-component relativistic calculations of the chemical shift tensors combined with a two-component analysis in terms of localized orbitals allow a molecular-level understanding of their orientations, the magnitude of their principal components (δ11 > δ22 > δ33) and associated δ(iso). This analysis reveals the dominating influence of the paramagnetic contribution yielding a highly deshielded alkylidene carbon. The largest paramagnetic contribution, which originates from the coupling of alkylidene σ(MC) and π*(MC) orbitals under the action of the magnetic field, is analogous to that resulting from coupling σ(CC) and π*(CC) in ethylene; thus, δ11 is in the MCH plane and is perpendicular to the MC internuclear direction. The higher value of carbon-13 δ(iso) in alkylidene complexes relative to ethylene is thus due to the smaller energy gap between σ(MC) and π*(MC) vs this between σ(CC) and π*(CC) in ethylene. This effect also explains why the highest value of δ(iso) is observed for Mo and the lowest for Ta, the values for W and Re being in between. In the presence of agostic interaction, the chemical shift tensor principal components orientation (δ22 or δ33 parallel or perpendicular to π(MX)) is influenced by the MCH angle because it determines the orientation of the alkylidene CHR fragment relative to the MC internuclear axis. The orbital analysis shows how the paramagnetic terms, understood with a localized bond model, determine the chemical shift tensor and thereby δ(iso).

  3. Magnetic Shift of the Chemical Freeze-out and Electric Charge Fluctuations.

    PubMed

    Fukushima, Kenji; Hidaka, Yoshimasa

    2016-09-01

    We discuss the effect of a strong magnetic field on the chemical freeze-out points in ultrarelativistic heavy-ion collisions. As a result of inverse magnetic catalysis or magnetic inhibition, the crossover onset to hot and dense matter out of quarks and gluons should be shifted to a lower temperature. To quantify this shift we employ the hadron resonance gas model and an empirical condition for the chemical freeze-out. We point out that the charged particle abundances are significantly affected by the magnetic field so that the electric charge fluctuation is largely enhanced, especially at high baryon density. The charge conservation partially cancels the enhancement, but our calculation shows that the electric charge fluctuation could serve as a magnetometer. We find that the fluctuation exhibits a crossover behavior rapidly increased for eB≳(0.4  GeV)^{2}, while the charge chemical potential has smoother behavior with an increasing magnetic field. PMID:27636469

  4. Magnetic Shift of the Chemical Freeze-out and Electric Charge Fluctuations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fukushima, Kenji; Hidaka, Yoshimasa

    2016-09-01

    We discuss the effect of a strong magnetic field on the chemical freeze-out points in ultrarelativistic heavy-ion collisions. As a result of inverse magnetic catalysis or magnetic inhibition, the crossover onset to hot and dense matter out of quarks and gluons should be shifted to a lower temperature. To quantify this shift we employ the hadron resonance gas model and an empirical condition for the chemical freeze-out. We point out that the charged particle abundances are significantly affected by the magnetic field so that the electric charge fluctuation is largely enhanced, especially at high baryon density. The charge conservation partially cancels the enhancement, but our calculation shows that the electric charge fluctuation could serve as a magnetometer. We find that the fluctuation exhibits a crossover behavior rapidly increased for e B ≳(0.4 GeV )2, while the charge chemical potential has smoother behavior with an increasing magnetic field.

  5. Protein structural information derived from NMR chemical shift with the neural network program TALOS-N.

    PubMed

    Shen, Yang; Bax, Ad

    2015-01-01

    Chemical shifts are obtained at the first stage of any protein structural study by NMR spectroscopy. Chemical shifts are known to be impacted by a wide range of structural factors, and the artificial neural network based TALOS-N program has been trained to extract backbone and side-chain torsion angles from (1)H, (15)N, and (13)C shifts. The program is quite robust and typically yields backbone torsion angles for more than 90 % of the residues and side-chain χ 1 rotamer information for about half of these, in addition to reliably predicting secondary structure. The use of TALOS-N is illustrated for the protein DinI, and torsion angles obtained by TALOS-N analysis from the measured chemical shifts of its backbone and (13)C(β) nuclei are compared to those seen in a prior, experimentally determined structure. The program is also particularly useful for generating torsion angle restraints, which then can be used during standard NMR protein structure calculations.

  6. Scalar Relativistic Computations and Localized Orbital Analyses of Nuclear Hyperfine Coupling and Paramagnetic NMR Chemical Shifts

    SciTech Connect

    Aquino, Fredy W.; Pritchard, Ben; Autschbach, Jochen

    2012-02-14

    A method is reported by which calculated hyperfine coupling constants (HFCCs) and paramagnetic NMR (pNMR) chemical shifts can be analyzed in a chemically intuitive way by decomposition into contributions from localized molecular orbitals (LMOs). A new module for density functional calculations with nonhybrid functionals, global hybrids, and range-separated hybrids, utilizing the two-component relativistic zeroth-order regular approximation (ZORA), has been implemented in the parallel open-source NWChem quantum chemistry package. Benchmark results are reported for a test set of few-atom molecules with light and heavy elements. Finite nucleus effects on ¹⁹⁹Hg HFCCs are shown to be on the order of -11 to -15%. A proof of concept for the LMO analysis is provided for the metal and fluorine HFCCs of TiF₃ and NpF₆. Calculated pNMR chemical shifts are reported for the 2-methylphenyl-t-butylnitroxide radical and for five cyclopentadienyl (Cp) sandwich complexes with 3d metals. Nickelocene and vanadocene carbon pNMR shifts are analyzed in detail, demonstrating that the large carbon pNMR shifts calculated as +1540 for Ni (exptl.: +1514) and -443 for V (exptl.: -510) are caused by different spin-polarization mechanisms. For Ni, Cp to Ni π back-donation dominates the result, whereas for vanadocene, V to Cp σ donation with relaxation of the carbon 1s shells can be identified as the dominant mechanism.

  7. 13C solid-state NMR chemical shift anisotropy analysis of the anomeric carbon in carbohydrates.

    PubMed

    Chen, Ying-Ying; Luo, Shun-Yuan; Hung, Shang-Cheng; Chan, Sunney I; Tzou, Der-Lii M

    2005-03-21

    (13)C NMR solid-state structural analysis of the anomeric center in carbohydrates was performed on six monosaccharides: glucose (Glc), mannose (Man), galactose (Gal), galactosamine hydrochloride (GalN), glucosamine hydrochloride (GlcN), and N-acetyl-glucosamine (GlcNAc). In the 1D (13)C cross-polarization/magic-angle spinning (CP/MAS) spectrum, the anomeric center C-1 of these carbohydrates revealed two well resolved resonances shifted by 3-5ppm, which were readily assigned to the anomeric alpha and beta forms. From this experiment, we also extracted the (13)C chemical shift anisotropy (CSA) tensor elements of the two forms from their spinning sideband intensities, respectively. It was found out that the chemical shift tensor for the alpha anomer was more axially symmetrical than that of the beta form. A strong linear correlation was obtained when the ratio of the axial asymmetry of the (13)C chemical shift tensors of the two anomeric forms was plotted in a semilogarithmic plot against the relative population of the two anomers. Finally, we applied REDOR spectroscopy to discern whether or not there were any differences in the sugar ring conformation between the anomers. Identical two-bond distances of 2.57A (2.48A) were deduced for both the alpha and beta forms in GlcNAc (GlcN), suggesting that the two anomers have essentially identical sugar ring scaffolds in these sugars. In light of these REDOR distance measurements and the strong correlation observed between the ratio of the axial asymmetry parameters of the (13)C chemical shift tensors and the relative population between the two anomeric forms, we concluded that the anomeric effect arises principally from interaction of the electron charge clouds between the C-1-O-5 and the C-1-O-1 bonds in these monosaccharides.

  8. Comparison between optimized GRE and RARE sequences for 19F MRI studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soffientini, Chiara D.; Mastropietro, Alfonso; Caffini, Matteo; Cocco, Sara; Zucca, Ileana; Scotti, Alessandro; Baselli, Giuseppe; Bruzzone, Maria Grazia

    2014-03-01

    In 19F-MRI studies limiting factors are the presence of a low signal due to the low concentration of 19F-nuclei, necessary for biological applications, and the inherent low sensitivity of MRI. Hence, acquiring images using the pulse sequence with the best signal to noise ratio (SNR) by optimizing the acquisition parameters specifically to a 19F compound is a core issue. In 19F-MRI, multiple-spin-echo (RARE) and gradient-echo (GRE) are the two most frequently used pulse sequence families; therefore we performed an optimization study of GRE pulse sequences based on numerical simulations and experimental acquisitions on fluorinated compounds. We compared GRE performance to an optimized RARE sequence. Images were acquired on a 7T MRI preclinical scanner on phantoms containing different fluorinated compounds. Actual relaxation times (T1, T2, T2*) were evaluated in order to predict SNR dependence on sequence parameters. Experimental comparisons between spoiled GRE and RARE, obtained at a fixed acquisition time and in steady state condition, showed RARE sequence outperforming the spoiled GRE (up to 406% higher). Conversely, the use of the unbalanced-SSFP showed a significant increase in SNR compared to RARE (up to 28% higher). Moreover, this sequence (as GRE in general) was confirmed to be virtually insensitive to T1 and T2 relaxation times, after proper optimization, thus improving marker independence from the biological environment. These results confirm the efficacy of the proposed optimization tool and foster further investigation addressing in-vivo applicability.

  9. Cell Labeling for 19F MRI: New and Improved Approach to Perfluorocarbon Nanoemulsion Design

    PubMed Central

    Patel, Sravan K.; Williams, Jonathan; Janjic, Jelena M.

    2013-01-01

    This report describes novel perfluorocarbon (PFC) nanoemulsions designed to improve ex vivo cell labeling for 19F magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). 19F MRI is a powerful non-invasive technique for monitoring cells of the immune system in vivo, where cells are labeled ex vivo with PFC nanoemulsions in cell culture. The quality of 19F MRI is directly affected by the quality of ex vivo PFC cell labeling. When co-cultured with cells for longer periods of time, nanoemulsions tend to settle due to high specific weight of PFC oils (1.5–2.0 g/mL). This in turn can decrease efficacy of excess nanoemulsion removal and reliability of the cell labeling in vitro. To solve this problem, novel PFC nanoemulsions are reported which demonstrate lack of sedimentation and high stability under cell labeling conditions. They are monodisperse, have small droplet size (~130 nm) and low polydispersity (<0.15), show a single peak in the 19F nuclear magnetic resonance spectrum at −71.4 ppm and possess high fluorine content. The droplet size and polydispersity remained unchanged after 160 days of follow up at three temperatures (4, 25 and 37 °C). Further, stressors such as elevated temperature in the presence of cells, and centrifugation, did not affect the nanoemulsion droplet size and polydispersity. Detailed synthetic methodology and in vitro testing for these new PFC nanoemulsions is presented. PMID:25586263

  10. Accuracy and precision of protein-ligand interaction kinetics determined from chemical shift titrations.

    PubMed

    Markin, Craig J; Spyracopoulos, Leo

    2012-12-01

    NMR-monitored chemical shift titrations for the study of weak protein-ligand interactions represent a rich source of information regarding thermodynamic parameters such as dissociation constants (K ( D )) in the micro- to millimolar range, populations for the free and ligand-bound states, and the kinetics of interconversion between states, which are typically within the fast exchange regime on the NMR timescale. We recently developed two chemical shift titration methods wherein co-variation of the total protein and ligand concentrations gives increased precision for the K ( D ) value of a 1:1 protein-ligand interaction (Markin and Spyracopoulos in J Biomol NMR 53: 125-138, 2012). In this study, we demonstrate that classical line shape analysis applied to a single set of (1)H-(15)N 2D HSQC NMR spectra acquired using precise protein-ligand chemical shift titration methods we developed, produces accurate and precise kinetic parameters such as the off-rate (k ( off )). For experimentally determined kinetics in the fast exchange regime on the NMR timescale, k ( off ) ~ 3,000 s(-1) in this work, the accuracy of classical line shape analysis was determined to be better than 5 % by conducting quantum mechanical NMR simulations of the chemical shift titration methods with the magnetic resonance toolkit GAMMA. Using Monte Carlo simulations, the experimental precision for k ( off ) from line shape analysis of NMR spectra was determined to be 13 %, in agreement with the theoretical precision of 12 % from line shape analysis of the GAMMA simulations in the presence of noise and protein concentration errors. In addition, GAMMA simulations were employed to demonstrate that line shape analysis has the potential to provide reasonably accurate and precise k ( off ) values over a wide range, from 100 to 15,000 s(-1). The validity of line shape analysis for k ( off ) values approaching intermediate exchange (~100 s(-1)), may be facilitated by more accurate K ( D ) measurements

  11. A sensitive, high resolution magic angle turning experiment for measuring chemical shift tensor principal values

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alderman, D. W.

    1998-12-01

    A sensitive, high-resolution 'FIREMAT' two-dimensional (2D) magic-angle-turning experiment is described that measures chemical shift tensor principal values in powdered solids. The spectra display spinning-sideband patterns separated by their isotropic shifts. The new method's sensitivity and high resolution in the isotropic-shift dimension result from combining the 5pi magic-angle-turning pulse sequence, an extension of the pseudo-2D sideband-suppression data rearrangement, and the TIGER protocol for processing 2D data. TPPM decoupling is used to enhance resolution. The method requires precise synchronization of the pulses and sampling to the rotor position. It is shown that the technique obtains 35 natural-abundance 13C tensors from erythromycin in 19 hours, and high quality naturalabundance 15N tensors from eight sites in potassium penicillin V in three days on a 400MHz spectrometer.

  12. Protein backbone and sidechain torsion angles predicted from NMR chemical shifts using artificial neural networks.

    PubMed

    Shen, Yang; Bax, Ad

    2013-07-01

    A new program, TALOS-N, is introduced for predicting protein backbone torsion angles from NMR chemical shifts. The program relies far more extensively on the use of trained artificial neural networks than its predecessor, TALOS+. Validation on an independent set of proteins indicates that backbone torsion angles can be predicted for a larger, ≥90 % fraction of the residues, with an error rate smaller than ca 3.5 %, using an acceptance criterion that is nearly two-fold tighter than that used previously, and a root mean square difference between predicted and crystallographically observed (ϕ, ψ) torsion angles of ca 12º. TALOS-N also reports sidechain χ(1) rotameric states for about 50 % of the residues, and a consistency with reference structures of 89 %. The program includes a neural network trained to identify secondary structure from residue sequence and chemical shifts.

  13. Two-Dimensional Proton Chemical-Shift Imaging of Human Muscle Metabolites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Jiani; Willcott, M. Robert; Moore, Gregory J.

    1997-06-01

    Large lipid signals and strong susceptibility gradients introduced by muscle-bone interfaces represent major technical challenges forin vivoproton MRS of human muscle. Here, the demonstration of two-dimensional proton chemical-shift imaging of human muscle metabolites is presented. This technique utilizes a chemical-shift-selective method for water and lipid suppression and automatic shimming for optimal homogeneity of the magnetic field. The 2D1H CSI technique described facilitates the acquisition of high-spatial-resolution spectra, and allows one to acquire data from multiple muscle groups in a single experiment. A preliminary investigation utilizing this technique in healthy adult males (n= 4) revealed a highly significant difference in the ratio of the creatine to trimethylamine resonance between the fast and slow twitch muscle groups examined. The technique is robust, can be implemented on a commercial scanner with relative ease, and should prove to be a useful tool for both clinical and basic investigators.

  14. Measurement of 13C chemical shift tensor principal values with a magic-angle turning experiment.

    PubMed

    Hu, J Z; Orendt, A M; Alderman, D W; Pugmire, R J; Ye, C; Grant, D M

    1994-08-01

    The magic-angle turning (MAT) experiment introduced by Gan is developed into a powerful and routine method for measuring the principal values of 13C chemical shift tensors in powdered solids. A large-volume MAT probe with stable rotation frequencies down to 22 Hz is described. A triple-echo MAT pulse sequence is introduced to improve the quality of the two-dimensional baseplane. It is shown that measurements of the principal values of chemical shift tensors in complex compounds can be enhanced by using either short contact times or dipolar dephasing pulse sequences to isolate the powder patterns from protonated or non-protonated carbons, respectively. A model compound, 1,2,3-trimethoxybenzene, is used to demonstrate these techniques, and the 13C principal values in 2,3-dimethylnaphthalene and Pocahontas coal are reported as typical examples.

  15. Characterization of Tricoordinate Boron Chemical Shift Tensors: Definitive High-Field

    SciTech Connect

    Bryce, David L.; Wasylishen, Roderick E.; Gee, Myrlene

    2001-01-01

    Despite the large known chemical shift (CS) range for boron and the large number of 11B NMR studies of glasses, no boron CS tensors have been characterized to date. We report the application of solid-state NMR techniques at moderate (9.4 T) and high (17.63 T) applied magnetic field strengths to the characterization of the boron CS tensors in trimesitylborane (BMes3) and triphenyl borate (B(OPh)3). The boron CS tensor of the former compound exhibits a remarkably large span,? 121 1 ppm, which encompasses the known range of isotropic chemical shifts for tricoordinate boron compounds. Conversely, the effect of the boron CS tensor on the 11B NMR spectra of B(OPh)3 is difficult to observe and quantify even at field strengths as high

  16. Using Neural Networks for 13C NMR Chemical Shift Prediction-Comparison with Traditional Methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meiler, Jens; Maier, Walter; Will, Martin; Meusinger, Reinhard

    2002-08-01

    Interpretation of 13C chemical shifts is essential for structure elucidation of organic molecules by NMR. In this article, we present an improved neural network approach and compare its performance to that of commonly used approaches. Specifically, our recently proposed neural network ( J. Chem. Inf. Comput. Sci. 2000, 40, 1169-1176) is improved by introducing an extended hybrid numerical description of the carbon atom environment, resulting in a standard deviation (std. dev.) of 2.4 ppm for an independent test data set of ˜42,500 carbons. Thus, this neural network allows fast and accurate 13C NMR chemical shift prediction without the necessity of access to molecule or fragment databases. For an unbiased test dataset containing 100 organic structures the accuracy of the improved neural network was compared to that of a prediction method based on the HOSE code ( hierarchically ordered spherical description of environment) using S PECI NFO. The results show the neural network predictions to be of quality (std. dev.=2.7 ppm) comparable to that of the HOSE code prediction (std. dev.=2.6 ppm). Further we compare the neural network predictions to those of a wide variety of other 13C chemical shift prediction tools including incremental methods (C HEMD RAW, S PECT OOL), quantum chemical calculation (G AUSSIAN, C OSMOS), and HOSE code fragment-based prediction (S PECI NFO, ACD/CNMR, P REDICTI T NMR) for the 47 13C-NMR shifts of Taxol, a natural product including many structural features of organic substances. The smallest standard deviations were achieved here with the neural network (1.3 ppm) and S PECI NFO (1.0 ppm).

  17. Chemical Shifts to Metabolic Pathways: Identifying Metabolic Pathways Directly from a Single 2D NMR Spectrum.

    PubMed

    Dubey, Abhinav; Rangarajan, Annapoorni; Pal, Debnath; Atreya, Hanudatta S

    2015-12-15

    Identifying cellular processes in terms of metabolic pathways is one of the avowed goals of metabolomics studies. Currently, this is done after relevant metabolites are identified to allow their mapping onto specific pathways. This task is daunting due to the complex nature of cellular processes and the difficulty in establishing the identity of individual metabolites. We propose here a new method: ChemSMP (Chemical Shifts to Metabolic Pathways), which facilitates rapid analysis by identifying the active metabolic pathways directly from chemical shifts obtained from a single two-dimensional (2D) [(13)C-(1)H] correlation NMR spectrum without the need for identification and assignment of individual metabolites. ChemSMP uses a novel indexing and scoring system comprised of a "uniqueness score" and a "coverage score". Our method is demonstrated on metabolic pathways data from the Small Molecule Pathway Database (SMPDB) and chemical shifts from the Human Metabolome Database (HMDB). Benchmarks show that ChemSMP has a positive prediction rate of >90% in the presence of decluttered data and can sustain the same at 60-70% even in the presence of noise, such as deletions of peaks and chemical shift deviations. The method tested on NMR data acquired for a mixture of 20 amino acids shows a success rate of 93% in correct recovery of pathways. When used on data obtained from the cell lysate of an unexplored oncogenic cell line, it revealed active metabolic pathways responsible for regulating energy homeostasis of cancer cells. Our unique tool is thus expected to significantly enhance analysis of NMR-based metabolomics data by reducing existing impediments.

  18. Fragment-Based Electronic Structure Approach for Computing Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Chemical Shifts in Molecular Crystals.

    PubMed

    Hartman, Joshua D; Beran, Gregory J O

    2014-11-11

    First-principles chemical shielding tensor predictions play a critical role in studying molecular crystal structures using nuclear magnetic resonance. Fragment-based electronic structure methods have dramatically improved the ability to model molecular crystal structures and energetics using high-level electronic structure methods. Here, a many-body expansion fragment approach is applied to the calculation of chemical shielding tensors in molecular crystals. First, the impact of truncating the many-body expansion at different orders and the role of electrostatic embedding are examined on a series of molecular clusters extracted from molecular crystals. Second, the ability of these techniques to assign three polymorphic forms of the drug sulfanilamide to the corresponding experimental (13)C spectra is assessed. This challenging example requires discriminating among spectra whose (13)C chemical shifts differ by only a few parts per million (ppm) across the different polymorphs. Fragment-based PBE0/6-311+G(2d,p) level chemical shielding predictions correctly assign these three polymorphs and reproduce the sulfanilamide experimental (13)C chemical shifts with 1 ppm accuracy. The results demonstrate that fragment approaches are competitive with the widely used gauge-invariant projector augmented wave (GIPAW) periodic density functional theory calculations. PMID:26584373

  19. Energy landscapes of a hairpin peptide including NMR chemical shift restraints.

    PubMed

    Carr, Joanne M; Whittleston, Chris S; Wade, David C; Wales, David J

    2015-08-21

    Methods recently introduced to improve the efficiency of protein structure prediction simulations by adding a restraint potential to a molecular mechanics force field introduce additional input parameters that can affect the performance. Here we investigate the changes in the energy landscape as the relative weight of the two contributions, force field and restraint potential, is systematically altered, for restraint functions constructed from calculated nuclear magnetic resonance chemical shifts. Benchmarking calculations were performed on a 12-residue peptide, tryptophan zipper 1, which features both secondary structure (a β-hairpin) and specific packing of tryptophan sidechains. Basin-hopping global optimization was performed to assess the efficiency with which lowest-energy structures are located, and the discrete path sampling approach was employed to survey the energy landscapes between unfolded and folded structures. We find that inclusion of the chemical shift restraints improves the efficiency of structure prediction because the energy landscape becomes more funnelled and the proportion of local minima classified as native increases. However, the funnelling nature of the landscape is reduced as the relative contribution of the chemical shift restraint potential is increased past an optimal value. PMID:26186565

  20. TALOS+: a hybrid method for predicting protein backbone torsion angles from NMR chemical shifts.

    PubMed

    Shen, Yang; Delaglio, Frank; Cornilescu, Gabriel; Bax, Ad

    2009-08-01

    NMR chemical shifts in proteins depend strongly on local structure. The program TALOS establishes an empirical relation between 13C, 15N and 1H chemical shifts and backbone torsion angles phi and psi (Cornilescu et al. J Biomol NMR 13 289-302, 1999). Extension of the original 20-protein database to 200 proteins increased the fraction of residues for which backbone angles could be predicted from 65 to 74%, while reducing the error rate from 3 to 2.5%. Addition of a two-layer neural network filter to the database fragment selection process forms the basis for a new program, TALOS+, which further enhances the prediction rate to 88.5%, without increasing the error rate. Excluding the 2.5% of residues for which TALOS+ makes predictions that strongly differ from those observed in the crystalline state, the accuracy of predicted phi and psi angles, equals +/-13 degrees . Large discrepancies between predictions and crystal structures are primarily limited to loop regions, and for the few cases where multiple X-ray structures are available such residues are often found in different states in the different structures. The TALOS+ output includes predictions for individual residues with missing chemical shifts, and the neural network component of the program also predicts secondary structure with good accuracy.

  1. Substituent effects in the 13C NMR chemical shifts of alpha-mono-substituted acetonitriles.

    PubMed

    Reis, Adriana K C A; Rittner, Roberto

    2007-03-01

    13C chemical shifts empirical calculations, through a very simple additivity relationship, for the alpha-methylene carbon of some alpha-mono-substituted acetonitriles, Y-CH(2)-CN (Y=H, F, Cl, Br, I, OMe, OEt, SMe, SEt, NMe(2), NEt(2), Me and Et), lead to similar, or even better, results in comparison to the reported values obtained through Quantum Mechanics methods. The observed deviations, for some substituents, are very similar for both approaches. This divergence between experimental and calculated, either empirically or theoretically, values are smaller than for the corresponding acetones, amides, acetic acids and methyl esters, which had been named non-additivity effects (or intramolecular interaction chemical shifts, ICS) and attributed to some orbital interactions. Here, these orbital interactions do not seem to be the main reason for the non-additivity effects in the empirical calculations, which must be due solely to the magnetic anisotropy of the heavy atom present in the substituent. These deviations, which were also observed in the theoretical calculations, were attributed in that case to the non-inclusion of relativistic effects and spin-orbit coupling in the Hamiltonian. Some divergence is also observed for the cyano carbon chemical shifts, probably due to the same reasons.

  2. Investigation of 1H NMR chemical shifts of organic dye with hydrogen bonds and ring currents.

    PubMed

    Park, Sung Soo; Won, Yong Sun; Lee, Woojin; Kim, Jae Hong

    2011-04-01

    The (1)H NMR chemical shifts were theoretically computed for the organic dyes 2-(2,6-dimethyl-4H-pyran-4-ylidene)-malononitrile (1), cyano-(2,6-dimethyl-4H-pyran-4-ylidene)-acetic acid methyl ester (2), 2-(2,6-bis(4-(dimethylamino)styryl)-4H-pyran-4-ylidene)-malononitrile (3), and methyl 2-(2,6-bis(4-(dimethylamino)styryl)-4H-pyran-4-ylidene)-2-cyanoacetate (4) at the GIAO/B3LYP/6-311++G(d,p)//B3LYP/6-311++G(d,p) level of theory. Moreover, the intramolecular rotational barriers of the molecules were calculated to evaluate the internal flexibility with respect to the torsional degrees of freedom, and the nuclear-independent chemical shifts (NICS) were employed to analyze the ring currents. The difference was explained in terms of intramolecular hydrogen bonds and ring currents of the molecules. The (1)H NMR spectra were reproduced by experiments for the comparison with computationally constructed data. Our results suggest a good guideline in interpreting (1)H NMR chemical shifts using computational methods and furthermore a reliable perspective for designing molecular structures.

  3. RASP: rapid and robust backbone chemical shift assignments from protein structure.

    PubMed

    MacRaild, Christopher A; Norton, Raymond S

    2014-03-01

    Chemical shift prediction has an unappreciated power to guide backbone resonance assignment in cases where protein structure is known. Here we describe Resonance Assignment by chemical Shift Prediction (RASP), a method that exploits this power to derive protein backbone resonance assignments from chemical shift predictions. Robust assignments can be obtained from a minimal set of only the most sensitive triple-resonance experiments, even for spectroscopically challenging proteins. Over a test set of 154 proteins RASP assigns 88 % of residues with an accuracy of 99.7 %, using only information available from HNCO and HNCA spectra. Applied to experimental data from a challenging 34 kDa protein, RASP assigns 90 % of manually assigned residues using only 40 % of the experimental data required for the manual assignment. RASP has the potential to significantly accelerate the backbone assignment process for a wide range of proteins for which structural information is available, including those for which conventional assignment strategies are not feasible. PMID:24445369

  4. Electronic structure and nuclear magnetic resonance chemical shift of solids and surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pfrommer, Bernd Georg

    Several different topics related to the electronic structure of solids and surfaces are discussed in this thesis. With the quasi-Newton algorithm for relaxing crystal structures and a new ab initio method to compute nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) chemical shifts, numerical methods are developed and implemented to efficiently compute properties related to the electronic structure. These techniques are then applied to a range of different materials. The quasi-Newton method is used to study the recently discovered high-pressure R8 phase of silicon, and the fcc-hcp high-pressure structural phase transition of xenon. Using the pressure-induced magnetic phase transition of a model atomic hydrogen crystal as a test system, the accuracy of density functional theory in both the generalized gradient approximation (GGA) and the local spin density approximation (LSDA) is compared to variational quantum Monte Carlo (VQMC) calculations (1). Finally, for the first time, the NMR chemical shift of extended systems such as amorphous carbon and the hydrogenated diamond (111) surface are calculated from first principles. 1. In the first chapter, a model body-centered cubic (bcc) atomic hydrogen solid is studied using density functional theory in LSDA and GGA. 2. How a quasi-Newton method can be used to simultaneously relax the internal coordinates and lattice parameters of crystals under pressure is the subject of the second chapter. 3. Chapter three presents a detailed ab initio study of the electronic and structural properties of the recently discovered R8 phase of silicon. 4. In chapter four, the fcc-hcp high pressure structural phase transition of xenon is calculated. 5. Chapter five describes a theory for the ab initio computation of the NMR chemical shift in extended systems, using periodic boundary conditions. 6. In chapter six, the NMR chemical shift spectra of diamond, CVD diamond, and diamond-like amorphous carbon are computed from first principles. 7. Unexpected features

  5. Temperature dependence of contact and dipolar NMR chemical shifts in paramagnetic molecules

    SciTech Connect

    Martin, Bob; Autschbach, Jochen

    2015-02-07

    Using a recently proposed equation for NMR nuclear magnetic shielding for molecules with unpaired electrons [A. Soncini and W. Van den Heuvel, J. Chem. Phys. 138, 021103 (2013)], equations for the temperature (T) dependent isotropic shielding for multiplets with an effective spin S equal to 1/2, 1, 3/2, 2, and 5/2 in terms of electron paramagnetic resonance spin Hamiltonian parameters are derived and then expanded in powers of 1/T. One simplifying assumption used is that a matrix derived from the zero-field splitting (ZFS) tensor and the Zeeman coupling matrix (g-tensor) share the same principal axis system. The influence of the rhombic ZFS parameter E is only investigated for S = 1. Expressions for paramagnetic contact shielding (from the isotropic part of the hyperfine coupling matrix) and pseudo-contact or dipolar shielding (from the anisotropic part of the hyperfine coupling matrix) are considered separately. The leading order is always 1/T. A temperature dependence of the contact shielding as 1/T and of the dipolar shielding as 1/T{sup 2}, which is sometimes assumed in the assignment of paramagnetic chemical shifts, is shown to arise only if S ≥ 1 and zero-field splitting is appreciable, and only if the Zeeman coupling matrix is nearly isotropic (Δg = 0). In such situations, an assignment of contact versus dipolar shifts may be possible based only on linear and quadratic fits of measured variable-temperature chemical shifts versus 1/T. Numerical data are provided for nickelocene (S = 1). Even under the assumption of Δg = 0, a different leading order of contact and dipolar shifts in powers of 1/T is not obtained for S = 3/2. When Δg is not very small, dipolar and contact shifts both depend in leading order in 1/T in all cases, with sizable contributions in order 1/T{sup n} with n = 2 and higher.

  6. A Study on 19F( n,α) Reaction Cross Section

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Uğur, F. A.; Tel, E.; Gökçe, A. A.

    2013-06-01

    In this study, cross sections of neutron induced reactions have been investigated for fluorine target nucleus. The calculations have been made on the excitation functions of 19F ( n,α), 19F( n,xα) reactions. Fluorine (F) and its molten salt compounds (LiF) can serve as a coolant which can be used at high temperatures without reaching a high vapor pressure and also the molten salt compounds are also a good neutron moderator. In these calculations, the pre-equilibrium and equilibrium effects have been investigated. The pre-equilibrium calculations involve the full exciton model and the cascade exciton model. The equilibrium effects are calculated according to the Weisskopf-Ewing model. Also in the present work, reaction cross sections have calculated by using evaluated empirical formulas developed by Tel et al. at 14-15 MeV energy. The obtained results have been discussed and compared with the available experimental data.

  7. Signal turn-on probe for nucleic acid detection based on (19)F nuclear magnetic resonance.

    PubMed

    Sakamoto, Takashi; Shimizu, Yu-ki; Sasaki, Jun; Hayakawa, Hikaru; Fujimoto, Kenzo

    2011-01-01

    To image gene expression in vivo, we designed and synthesized a novel signal turn-on probe for (19)F nuclear magnetic resonance (MR) imaging based on paramagnetic relaxation enhancement. The stem-loop structured oligodeoxyribonucleotide (ODN) having a molecular beacon sequence for point mutated K-ras mRNA was doubly labeled with bis(trifluoromethyl)benzene moiety and Gd-1,4,7,10-tetraazacyclododecane-1,4,7,10-tetraacetic acid chelate moiety at the each termini of the ODN probe, respectively. We found that the (19)F MR signal of the bis(trifluoromethyl)benzene moiety tethered at the 5' termini of the probe turned on by the addition of complementary ODN. The probe has the potential to image gene expressions in vivo.

  8. Amphiphilic Hyperbranched Fluoropolymers as Nanoscopic 19F-Magnetic Resonance Imaging Agent Assemblies

    PubMed Central

    Du, Wenjun; Nyström, Andreas M.; Zhang, Lei; Powell, Kenya T.; Li, Yali; Cheng, Chong; Wickline, Samuel A.; Wooley, Karen L.

    2009-01-01

    Three hyperbranched fluoropolymers were synthesized and their micelles were constructed as potential 19F MRI agents. A hyperbranched star-like core was first synthesized via ATR-SCVCP of 4-chloromethyl styrene (CMS), lauryl acrylate (LA) and 1,1,1-tris(4′-(2″-bromoisobutyryloxy)phenyl)ethane (TBBPE). The polymerization gave a small core with Mn of 5.5 kDa with PDI of 1.6, which served as a macroinitiator. Trifluoroethyl methacrylate (TFEMA) and tert-butyl acrylate (tBA) in different ratio were then “grafted” from the core to give three polymers with Mn of ca. 120 kDa and PDI values of ca. 1.6–1.8. After acidolysis of the tert-butyl ester groups, amphiphilic, hyperbranched star-like polymers with Mn of ca. 100 kDa were obtained. These structures were subjected to micelle formation in aqueous solution to give micelles having TEM-measured diameters ranging from 3–8 nm and DLS-measured hydrodynamic diameters from 20–30 nm. These micelles gave a narrow, single resonance by 19F NMR spectroscopy, with a half width of approximately 130 Hz. The T1/T2 parameters were ca. 500 ms and 50 ms, respectively, and were not significantly affected by the composition and sizes of the micelles. 19F MRI phantom images of these fluorinated micelles were acquired, which demonstrated that these fluorinated micelles maybe useful as novel 19F MRI agents for a variety of biomedical studies. PMID:18795785

  9. Protein NMR chemical shift calculations based on the automated fragmentation QM/MM approach.

    PubMed

    He, Xiao; Wang, Bing; Merz, Kenneth M

    2009-07-30

    An automated fragmentation quantum mechanics/molecular mechanics (AF-QM/MM) approach has been developed to routinely calculate ab initio protein NMR chemical shielding constants. The AF-QM/MM method is linear-scaling and trivially parallel. A general fragmentation scheme is employed to generate each residue-centric region which is treated by quantum mechanics, and the environmental electrostatic field is described with molecular mechanics. The AF-QM/MM method shows good agreement with standard self-consistent field (SCF) calculations of the NMR chemical shieldings for the mini-protein Trp cage. The root-mean-square errors (RMSEs) for 1H, 13C, and 15N NMR chemical shieldings are equal to or less than 0.09, 0.32, and 0.78 ppm, respectively, for all Hartree-Fock (HF) and density functional theory (DFT) calculations reported in this work. The environmental electrostatic potential is necessary to accurately reproduce the NMR chemical shieldings using the AF-QM/MM approach. The point-charge models provided by AMBER, AM1/CM2, PM3/CM1, and PM3/CM2 all effectively model the electrostatic field. The latter three point-charge models are generated via semiempirical linear-scaling SCF calculations of the entire protein system. The correlations between experimental 1H NMR chemical shifts and theoretical predictions are >0.95 for AF-QM/MM calculations using B3LYP with the 6-31G**, 6-311G**, and 6-311++G** basis sets. Our study, not unexpectedly, finds that conformational changes within a protein structure play an important role in the accurate prediction of experimental NMR chemical shifts from theory.

  10. Amyloid imaging using fluorine-19 magnetic resonance imaging ((19)F-MRI).

    PubMed

    Tooyama, Ikuo; Yanagisawa, Daijiro; Taguchi, Hiroyasu; Kato, Tomoko; Hirao, Koichi; Shirai, Nobuaki; Sogabe, Takayuki; Ibrahim, Nor Faeizah; Inubushi, Toshiro; Morikawa, Shigehiro

    2016-09-01

    The formation of senile plaques followed by the deposition of amyloid-β is the earliest pathological change in Alzheimer's disease. Thus, the detection of senile plaques remains the most important early diagnostic indicator of Alzheimer's disease. Amyloid imaging is a noninvasive technique for visualizing senile plaques in the brains of Alzheimer's patients using positron emission tomography (PET) or magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Because fluorine-19 ((19)F) displays an intense nuclear magnetic resonance signal and is almost non-existent in the body, targets are detected with a higher signal-to-noise ratio using appropriate fluorinated contrast agents. The recent introduction of high-field MRI allows us to detect amyloid depositions in the brain of living mouse using (19)F-MRI. So far, at least three probes have been reported to detect amyloid deposition in the brain of transgenic mouse models of Alzheimer's disease; (E,E)-1-fluoro-2,5-bis-(3-hydroxycarbonyl-4-hydroxy)styrylbenzene (FSB), 1,7-bis(4'-hydroxy-3'-trifluoromethoxyphenyl)-4-methoxycarbonylethyl-1,6-heptadiene3,5-dione (FMeC1, Shiga-Y5) and 6-(3',6',9',15',18',21'-heptaoxa-23',23',23'-trifluorotricosanyloxy)-2-(4'-dimethylaminostyryl)benzoxazole (XP7, Shiga-X22). This review presents the recent advances in amyloid imaging using (19)F-MRI, including our own studies.

  11. Probe-Specific Procedure to Estimate Sensitivity and Detection Limits for 19F Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Taylor, Alexander J.; Granwehr, Josef; Lesbats, Clémentine; Krupa, James L.; Six, Joseph S.; Pavlovskaya, Galina E.; Thomas, Neil R.; Auer, Dorothee P.; Meersmann, Thomas; Faas, Henryk M.

    2016-01-01

    Due to low fluorine background signal in vivo, 19F is a good marker to study the fate of exogenous molecules by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) using equilibrium nuclear spin polarization schemes. Since 19F MRI applications require high sensitivity, it can be important to assess experimental feasibility during the design stage already by estimating the minimum detectable fluorine concentration. Here we propose a simple method for the calibration of MRI hardware, providing sensitivity estimates for a given scanner and coil configuration. An experimental “calibration factor” to account for variations in coil configuration and hardware set-up is specified. Once it has been determined in a calibration experiment, the sensitivity of an experiment or, alternatively, the minimum number of required spins or the minimum marker concentration can be estimated without the need for a pilot experiment. The definition of this calibration factor is derived based on standard equations for the sensitivity in magnetic resonance, yet the method is not restricted by the limited validity of these equations, since additional instrument-dependent factors are implicitly included during calibration. The method is demonstrated using MR spectroscopy and imaging experiments with different 19F samples, both paramagnetically and susceptibility broadened, to approximate a range of realistic environments. PMID:27727294

  12. First evidences for 19F(α, p)22Ne at astrophysical energies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    D'Agata, G.; Spitaleri, C.; Pizzone, R. G.; Blagus, S.; Figuera, P.; Grassi, L.; Guardo, G. L.; Gulino, M.; Hayakawa, S.; Indelicato, I.; Kshetri, R.; La Cognata, M.; Lamia, L.; Lattuada, M.; Mijatović, T.; Milin, M.; Miljanic, D.; Prepolec, L.; Sergi, M. L.; Skukan, N.; Soic, N.; Tokic, V.; Tumino, A.; Uroic, M.

    2016-04-01

    19F experimental abundances is overestimated in respect to the theoretical one: it is therefore clear that further investigations are needed. We focused on the 19F(α, p) 22 Ne reaction, representing the main destruction channel in He-rich environments. The lowest energy at which this reaction has been studied with direct methods is E C.M. ≈ 0.91 MeV, while the Gamow region is between 0.39 ÷ 0.8 MeV, far below the Coulomb barrier (3.8 MeV). For this reason, an experiment at Rudjer Boskovic Institute (Zagreb) was performed, applying the Trojan Horse Method. Following this method we selected the quasi-free contribution coming from 6Li(19 F,p22 Ne)2 H at Ebeam=6 MeV at kinematically favourable angles, and the cross section at energies 0 < EC.M. < 1.4 MeV was extracted in arbitrary units, covering the astrophysical region of interest.

  13. High-resolution three-dimensional 19F-magnetic resonance imaging of rat lung in situ: evaluation of airway strain in the perfluorocarbon-filled lung.

    PubMed

    Weigel, Julia K; Steinmann, Daniel; Emerich, Philipp; Stahl, Claudius A; v Elverfeldt, Dominik; Guttmann, Josef

    2011-02-01

    Perfluorocarbons (PFC) are biologically and chemically inert fluids with high oxygen and CO(2) carrying capacities. Their use as liquid intrapulmonary gas carriers during liquid ventilation has been investigated. We established a method of high resolution 3D-(19)F-MRI of the totally PFC-filled lung. The goal of this study was to investigate longitudinal and circumferential airway strain in the setting of increasing airway pressures on 3D-(19)F-MR images of the PFC-filled lung. Sixteen female Wistar rats were euthanized and the liquid perfluorocarbon FC-84 instilled into their lungs. 3D-(19)F-MRI was performed at various intrapulmonary pressures. Measurements of bronchial length and cross-sectional area were obtained from transversal 2D images for each pressure range. Changes in bronchial area were used to determine circumferential strain, while longitudinal strain was calculated from changes in bronchial length. Our method of 3D-(19)F-MRI allowed clear visualization of the great bronchi. Longitudinal strain increased significantly up to 31.1 cmH(2)O. The greatest strain could be found in the range of low airway pressures. Circumferential strain increased strongly with the initial pressure rise, but showed no significant changes above 10.4 cmH(2)O. Longitudinal strain was generally higher in distal airways, while circumferential strain showed no difference. Analysis of mechanical characteristics showed that longitudinal and circumferential airway expansion occurred in an anisotropic fashion. Whereas longitudinal strain still increased with higher pressures, circumferential strain quickly reached a 'strain limit'. Longitudinal strain was higher in distal bronchi, as dense PFCs gravitate to dependent, in this case to dorso-basal parts of the lung, acting as liquid positive end expiratory pressure. PMID:21193813

  14. DFT calculations of 1H and 13C NMR chemical shifts in transition metal hydrides.

    PubMed

    del Rosal, I; Maron, L; Poteau, R; Jolibois, F

    2008-08-14

    Transition metal hydrides are of great interest in chemistry because of their reactivity and their potential use as catalysts for hydrogenation. Among other available techniques, structural properties in transition metal (TM) complexes are often probed by NMR spectroscopy. In this paper we will show that it is possible to establish a viable methodological strategy in the context of density functional theory, that allows the determination of 1H NMR chemical shifts of hydride ligands attached to transition metal atoms in mononuclear systems and clusters with good accuracy with respect to experiment. 13C chemical shifts have also been considered in some cases. We have studied mononuclear ruthenium complexes such as Ru(L)(H)(dppm)2 with L = H or Cl, cationic complex [Ru(H)(H2O)(dppm)2]+ and Ru(H)2(dppm)(PPh3)2, in which hydride ligands are characterized by a negative 1H NMR chemical shift. For these complexes all calculations are in relatively good agreement compared to experimental data with errors not exceeding 20% except for the hydrogen atom in Ru(H)2(dppm)(PPh3)2. For this last complex, the relative error increases to 30%, probably owing to the necessity to take into account dynamical effects of phenyl groups. Carbonyl ligands are often encountered in coordination chemistry. Specific issues arise when calculating 1H or 13C NMR chemical shifts in TM carbonyl complexes. Indeed, while errors of 10 to 20% with respect to experiment are often considered good in the framework of density functional theory, this difference in the case of mononuclear carbonyl complexes culminates to 80%: results obtained with all-electron calculations are overall in very satisfactory agreement with experiment, the error in this case does not exceed 11% contrary to effective core potentials (ECPs) calculations which yield errors always larger than 20%. We conclude that for carbonyl groups the use of ECPs is not recommended, although their use could save time for very large systems, for

  15. DFT calculations of 1H and 13C NMR chemical shifts in transition metal hydrides.

    PubMed

    del Rosal, I; Maron, L; Poteau, R; Jolibois, F

    2008-08-14

    Transition metal hydrides are of great interest in chemistry because of their reactivity and their potential use as catalysts for hydrogenation. Among other available techniques, structural properties in transition metal (TM) complexes are often probed by NMR spectroscopy. In this paper we will show that it is possible to establish a viable methodological strategy in the context of density functional theory, that allows the determination of 1H NMR chemical shifts of hydride ligands attached to transition metal atoms in mononuclear systems and clusters with good accuracy with respect to experiment. 13C chemical shifts have also been considered in some cases. We have studied mononuclear ruthenium complexes such as Ru(L)(H)(dppm)2 with L = H or Cl, cationic complex [Ru(H)(H2O)(dppm)2]+ and Ru(H)2(dppm)(PPh3)2, in which hydride ligands are characterized by a negative 1H NMR chemical shift. For these complexes all calculations are in relatively good agreement compared to experimental data with errors not exceeding 20% except for the hydrogen atom in Ru(H)2(dppm)(PPh3)2. For this last complex, the relative error increases to 30%, probably owing to the necessity to take into account dynamical effects of phenyl groups. Carbonyl ligands are often encountered in coordination chemistry. Specific issues arise when calculating 1H or 13C NMR chemical shifts in TM carbonyl complexes. Indeed, while errors of 10 to 20% with respect to experiment are often considered good in the framework of density functional theory, this difference in the case of mononuclear carbonyl complexes culminates to 80%: results obtained with all-electron calculations are overall in very satisfactory agreement with experiment, the error in this case does not exceed 11% contrary to effective core potentials (ECPs) calculations which yield errors always larger than 20%. We conclude that for carbonyl groups the use of ECPs is not recommended, although their use could save time for very large systems, for

  16. Conformationally selective multidimensional chemical shift ranges in proteins from a PACSY database purged using intrinsic quality criteria

    PubMed Central

    Hong, Mei

    2016-01-01

    We have determined refined multidimensional chemical shift ranges for intra-residue correlations (13C–13C, 15N–13C, etc.) in proteins, which can be used to gain type-assignment and/or secondary-structure information from experimental NMR spectra. The chemical-shift ranges are the result of a statistical analysis of the PACSY database of >3000 proteins with 3D structures (1,200,207 13C chemical shifts and >3 million chemical shifts in total); these data were originally derived from the Biological Magnetic Resonance Data Bank. Using relatively simple non-parametric statistics to find peak maxima in the distributions of helix, sheet, coil and turn chemical shifts, and without the use of limited “hand-picked” data sets, we show that ~94 % of the 13C NMR data and almost all 15N data are quite accurately referenced and assigned, with smaller standard deviations (0.2 and 0.8 ppm, respectively) than recognized previously. On the other hand, approximately 6 % of the 13C chemical shift data in the PACSY database are shown to be clearly misreferenced, mostly by ca. −2.4 ppm. The removal of the misreferenced data and other outliers by this purging by intrinsic quality criteria (PIQC) allows for reliable identification of secondary maxima in the two-dimensional chemical-shift distributions already pre-separated by secondary structure. We demonstrate that some of these correspond to specific regions in the Ramachandran plot, including left-handed helix dihedral angles, reflect unusual hydrogen bonding, or are due to the influence of a following proline residue. With appropriate smoothing, significantly more tightly defined chemical shift ranges are obtained for each amino acid type in the different secondary structures. These chemical shift ranges, which may be defined at any statistical threshold, can be used for amino-acid type assignment and secondary-structure analysis of chemical shifts from intra-residue cross peaks by inspection or by using a provided command

  17. Conformationally selective multidimensional chemical shift ranges in proteins from a PACSY database purged using intrinsic quality criteria.

    PubMed

    Fritzsching, Keith J; Hong, Mei; Schmidt-Rohr, Klaus

    2016-02-01

    We have determined refined multidimensional chemical shift ranges for intra-residue correlations ((13)C-(13)C, (15)N-(13)C, etc.) in proteins, which can be used to gain type-assignment and/or secondary-structure information from experimental NMR spectra. The chemical-shift ranges are the result of a statistical analysis of the PACSY database of >3000 proteins with 3D structures (1,200,207 (13)C chemical shifts and >3 million chemical shifts in total); these data were originally derived from the Biological Magnetic Resonance Data Bank. Using relatively simple non-parametric statistics to find peak maxima in the distributions of helix, sheet, coil and turn chemical shifts, and without the use of limited "hand-picked" data sets, we show that ~94% of the (13)C NMR data and almost all (15)N data are quite accurately referenced and assigned, with smaller standard deviations (0.2 and 0.8 ppm, respectively) than recognized previously. On the other hand, approximately 6% of the (13)C chemical shift data in the PACSY database are shown to be clearly misreferenced, mostly by ca. -2.4 ppm. The removal of the misreferenced data and other outliers by this purging by intrinsic quality criteria (PIQC) allows for reliable identification of secondary maxima in the two-dimensional chemical-shift distributions already pre-separated by secondary structure. We demonstrate that some of these correspond to specific regions in the Ramachandran plot, including left-handed helix dihedral angles, reflect unusual hydrogen bonding, or are due to the influence of a following proline residue. With appropriate smoothing, significantly more tightly defined chemical shift ranges are obtained for each amino acid type in the different secondary structures. These chemical shift ranges, which may be defined at any statistical threshold, can be used for amino-acid type assignment and secondary-structure analysis of chemical shifts from intra-residue cross peaks by inspection or by using a provided

  18. Conformationally selective multidimensional chemical shift ranges in proteins from a PACSY database purged using intrinsic quality criteria.

    PubMed

    Fritzsching, Keith J; Hong, Mei; Schmidt-Rohr, Klaus

    2016-02-01

    We have determined refined multidimensional chemical shift ranges for intra-residue correlations ((13)C-(13)C, (15)N-(13)C, etc.) in proteins, which can be used to gain type-assignment and/or secondary-structure information from experimental NMR spectra. The chemical-shift ranges are the result of a statistical analysis of the PACSY database of >3000 proteins with 3D structures (1,200,207 (13)C chemical shifts and >3 million chemical shifts in total); these data were originally derived from the Biological Magnetic Resonance Data Bank. Using relatively simple non-parametric statistics to find peak maxima in the distributions of helix, sheet, coil and turn chemical shifts, and without the use of limited "hand-picked" data sets, we show that ~94% of the (13)C NMR data and almost all (15)N data are quite accurately referenced and assigned, with smaller standard deviations (0.2 and 0.8 ppm, respectively) than recognized previously. On the other hand, approximately 6% of the (13)C chemical shift data in the PACSY database are shown to be clearly misreferenced, mostly by ca. -2.4 ppm. The removal of the misreferenced data and other outliers by this purging by intrinsic quality criteria (PIQC) allows for reliable identification of secondary maxima in the two-dimensional chemical-shift distributions already pre-separated by secondary structure. We demonstrate that some of these correspond to specific regions in the Ramachandran plot, including left-handed helix dihedral angles, reflect unusual hydrogen bonding, or are due to the influence of a following proline residue. With appropriate smoothing, significantly more tightly defined chemical shift ranges are obtained for each amino acid type in the different secondary structures. These chemical shift ranges, which may be defined at any statistical threshold, can be used for amino-acid type assignment and secondary-structure analysis of chemical shifts from intra-residue cross peaks by inspection or by using a provided

  19. Autoregressive moving average modeling for spectral parameter estimation from a multigradient echo chemical shift acquisition.

    PubMed

    Taylor, Brian A; Hwang, Ken-Pin; Hazle, John D; Stafford, R Jason

    2009-03-01

    The authors investigated the performance of the iterative Steiglitz-McBride (SM) algorithm on an autoregressive moving average (ARMA) model of signals from a fast, sparsely sampled, multiecho, chemical shift imaging (CSI) acquisition using simulation, phantom, ex vivo, and in vivo experiments with a focus on its potential usage in magnetic resonance (MR)-guided interventions. The ARMA signal model facilitated a rapid calculation of the chemical shift, apparent spin-spin relaxation time (T2*), and complex amplitudes of a multipeak system from a limited number of echoes (< or equal 16). Numerical simulations of one- and two-peak systems were used to assess the accuracy and uncertainty in the calculated spectral parameters as a function of acquisition and tissue parameters. The measured uncertainties from simulation were compared to the theoretical Cramer-Rao lower bound (CRLB) for the acquisition. Measurements made in phantoms were used to validate the T2* estimates and to validate uncertainty estimates made from the CRLB. We demonstrated application to real-time MR-guided interventions ex vivo by using the technique to monitor a percutaneous ethanol injection into a bovine liver and in vivo to monitor a laser-induced thermal therapy treatment in a canine brain. Simulation results showed that the chemical shift and amplitude uncertainties reached their respective CRLB at a signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) > or =5 for echo train lengths (ETLs) > or =4 using a fixed echo spacing of 3.3 ms. T2* estimates from the signal model possessed higher uncertainties but reached the CRLB at larger SNRs and/or ETLs. Highly accurate estimates for the chemical shift (<0.01 ppm) and amplitude (<1.0%) were obtained with > or =4 echoes and for T2*(<1.0%) with > or =7 echoes. We conclude that, over a reasonable range of SNR, the SM algorithm is a robust estimator of spectral parameters from fast CSI acquisitions that acquire < or =16 echoes for one- and two-peak systems. Preliminary ex vivo

  20. Autoregressive moving average modeling for spectral parameter estimation from a multigradient echo chemical shift acquisition

    PubMed Central

    Taylor, Brian A.; Hwang, Ken-Pin; Hazle, John D.; Stafford, R. Jason

    2009-01-01

    The authors investigated the performance of the iterative Steiglitz–McBride (SM) algorithm on an autoregressive moving average (ARMA) model of signals from a fast, sparsely sampled, multiecho, chemical shift imaging (CSI) acquisition using simulation, phantom, ex vivo, and in vivo experiments with a focus on its potential usage in magnetic resonance (MR)-guided interventions. The ARMA signal model facilitated a rapid calculation of the chemical shift, apparent spin-spin relaxation time (T2*), and complex amplitudes of a multipeak system from a limited number of echoes (≤16). Numerical simulations of one- and two-peak systems were used to assess the accuracy and uncertainty in the calculated spectral parameters as a function of acquisition and tissue parameters. The measured uncertainties from simulation were compared to the theoretical Cramer–Rao lower bound (CRLB) for the acquisition. Measurements made in phantoms were used to validate the T2* estimates and to validate uncertainty estimates made from the CRLB. We demonstrated application to real-time MR-guided interventions ex vivo by using the technique to monitor a percutaneous ethanol injection into a bovine liver and in vivo to monitor a laser-induced thermal therapy treatment in a canine brain. Simulation results showed that the chemical shift and amplitude uncertainties reached their respective CRLB at a signal-to-noise ratio (SNR)≥5 for echo train lengths (ETLs)≥4 using a fixed echo spacing of 3.3 ms. T2* estimates from the signal model possessed higher uncertainties but reached the CRLB at larger SNRs and∕or ETLs. Highly accurate estimates for the chemical shift (<0.01 ppm) and amplitude (<1.0%) were obtained with ≥4 echoes and for T2* (<1.0%) with ≥7 echoes. We conclude that, over a reasonable range of SNR, the SM algorithm is a robust estimator of spectral parameters from fast CSI acquisitions that acquire ≤16 echoes for one- and two-peak systems. Preliminary ex vivo and in vivo

  1. NMR Chemical Shift Ranges of Urine Metabolites in Various Organic Solvents.

    PubMed

    Görling, Benjamin; Bräse, Stefan; Luy, Burkhard

    2016-01-01

    Signal stability is essential for reliable multivariate data analysis. Urine samples show strong variance in signal positions due to inter patient differences. Here we study the exchange of the solvent of a defined urine matrix and how it affects signal and integral stability of the urinary metabolites by NMR spectroscopy. The exchange solvents were methanol, acetonitrile, dimethyl sulfoxide, chloroform, acetone, dichloromethane, and dimethyl formamide. Some of these solvents showed promising results with a single batch of urine. To evaluate further differences between urine samples, various acid, base, and salt solutions were added in a defined way mimicking to some extent inter human differences. Corresponding chemical shift changes were monitored. PMID:27598217

  2. NMR Chemical Shift Ranges of Urine Metabolites in Various Organic Solvents.

    PubMed

    Görling, Benjamin; Bräse, Stefan; Luy, Burkhard

    2016-09-02

    Signal stability is essential for reliable multivariate data analysis. Urine samples show strong variance in signal positions due to inter patient differences. Here we study the exchange of the solvent of a defined urine matrix and how it affects signal and integral stability of the urinary metabolites by NMR spectroscopy. The exchange solvents were methanol, acetonitrile, dimethyl sulfoxide, chloroform, acetone, dichloromethane, and dimethyl formamide. Some of these solvents showed promising results with a single batch of urine. To evaluate further differences between urine samples, various acid, base, and salt solutions were added in a defined way mimicking to some extent inter human differences. Corresponding chemical shift changes were monitored.

  3. Substituent efects on the carbon-13 chemical shifts in α-phenylpyridylacrylic acids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jovanović, B. Ž.; Mis̆ić-Vukovic, M.; Vajs, V. E.; Čanadi, J. J.

    1992-03-01

    The 13C N.M.R. spectra of some substituted α-phenylpyridylacrylic acids, α-phenyl, α-(3-pyrydyl) and α-(3-pyrydyl-N-oxide) cinnamic acids were determined in deuterated dimethyl sulfoxide (d 6-DMSO). It has been shown that the subsitutent chemical shifts (SCS) for C βatom ethylenic bond of the examined compounds correlated linearely with the summ of the corresponding substituent constants in the both rings (σ x + σ Y). This correlation was interpreted as evidence that the electronic effects of both substituents are involved in conjugated aromatic system.

  4. Three model space experiments on chemical reactions. [Gibbs adsorption, equilibrium shift and electrodeposition

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grodzka, P.; Facemire, B.

    1977-01-01

    Three investigations conducted aboard Skylab IV and Apollo-Soyuz involved phenomena that are of interest to the biochemistry community. The formaldehyde clock reaction and the equilibrium shift reaction experiments conducted aboard Apollo Soyuz demonstrate the effect of low-g foams or air/liquid dispersions on reaction rate and chemical equilibrium. The electrodeposition reaction experiment conducted aboard Skylab IV demonstrate the effect of a low-g environment on an electrochemical displacement reaction. The implications of the three space experiments for various applications are considered.

  5. Calculation of NMR chemical shifts. 7. Gauge-invariant INDO method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fukui, H.; Miura, K.; Hirai, A.

    A gauge-invariant INDO method based on the coupled Hartree-Fuck perturbation theory is presented and applied to the calculation of 1H and 13C chemical shifts of hydrocarbons including ring compounds. Invariance of the diamagnetic and paramagnetic shieldings with respect to displacement of the coordinate origin is discussed. Comparison between calculated and experimental results exhibits fairly good agreement, provided that the INDO parameters of Ellis et al. (J. Am. Chem. Soc.94, 4069 (1972)) are used with the inclusion of all multicenter one-electron integrals.

  6. NMR Chemical Shift Ranges of Urine Metabolites in Various Organic Solvents

    PubMed Central

    Görling, Benjamin; Bräse, Stefan; Luy, Burkhard

    2016-01-01

    Signal stability is essential for reliable multivariate data analysis. Urine samples show strong variance in signal positions due to inter patient differences. Here we study the exchange of the solvent of a defined urine matrix and how it affects signal and integral stability of the urinary metabolites by NMR spectroscopy. The exchange solvents were methanol, acetonitrile, dimethyl sulfoxide, chloroform, acetone, dichloromethane, and dimethyl formamide. Some of these solvents showed promising results with a single batch of urine. To evaluate further differences between urine samples, various acid, base, and salt solutions were added in a defined way mimicking to some extent inter human differences. Corresponding chemical shift changes were monitored. PMID:27598217

  7. Complete (1)H and (13)C NMR chemical shift assignments of mono-, di-, and trisaccharides as basis for NMR chemical shift predictions of polysaccharides using the computer program casper.

    PubMed

    Roslund, Mattias U; Säwén, Elin; Landström, Jens; Rönnols, Jerk; Jonsson, K Hanna M; Lundborg, Magnus; Svensson, Mona V; Widmalm, Göran

    2011-08-16

    The computer program casper uses (1)H and (13)C NMR chemical shift data of mono- to trisaccharides for the prediction of chemical shifts of oligo- and polysaccharides. In order to improve the quality of these predictions the (1)H and (13)C, as well as (31)P when applicable, NMR chemical shifts of 30 mono-, di-, and trisaccharides were assigned. The reducing sugars gave two distinct sets of NMR resonances due to the α- and β-anomeric forms. In total 35 (1)H and (13)C NMR chemical shift data sets were obtained from the oligosaccharides. One- and two-dimensional NMR experiments were used for the chemical shift assignments and special techniques were employed in some cases such as 2D (1)H,(13)C-HSQC Hadamard Transform methodology which was acquired approximately 45 times faster than a regular t(1) incremented (1)H,(13)C-HSQC experiment and a 1D (1)H,(1)H-CSSF-TOCSY experiment which was able to distinguish spin-systems in which the target protons were only 3.3Hz apart. The (1)H NMR chemical shifts were subsequently refined using total line-shape analysis with the PERCH NMR software. The acquired NMR data were then utilized in the casper program (http://www.casper.organ.su.se/casper/) for NMR chemical shift predictions of the O-antigen polysaccharides from Klebsiella O5, Shigella flexneri serotype X, and Salmonella arizonae O62. The data were compared to experimental data of the polysaccharides from the two former strains and the lipopolysaccharide of the latter strain showing excellent agreement between predicted and experimental (1)H and (13)C NMR chemical shifts.

  8. Characterization of the conformational equilibrium between the two major substates of RNase A using NMR chemical shifts.

    PubMed

    Camilloni, Carlo; Robustelli, Paul; De Simone, Alfonso; Cavalli, Andrea; Vendruscolo, Michele

    2012-03-01

    Following the recognition that NMR chemical shifts can be used for protein structure determination, rapid advances have recently been made in methods for extending this strategy for proteins and protein complexes of increasing size and complexity. A remaining major challenge is to develop approaches to exploit the information contained in the chemical shifts about conformational fluctuations in native states of proteins. In this work we show that it is possible to determine an ensemble of conformations representing the free energy surface of RNase A using chemical shifts as replica-averaged restraints in molecular dynamics simulations. Analysis of this surface indicates that chemical shifts can be used to characterize the conformational equilibrium between the two major substates of this protein.

  9. An analysis of the pH-dependent chemical-shift behavior of phosphorus-containing metabolites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Robitaille, Pierre-Marie L.; Robitaille, Patricia A.; Gordon Brown, G.; Brown, George G.

    The pH-dependent chemical-shift behavior of phosphorus-containing metabolites was studied. Metabolites of interest included inorganic phosphate, methyl phosphonate, phosphomonoesters, phosphodiesters, phosphonates, phosphagens, and nucleotide phosphates. The data are documented in tabular form in terms of limiting chemical shifts and appropriate p Ka values. Rearranged Henderson-Hasselbalch equations are presented, for both the one- and the two-p Ka cases.

  10. Solvation effects on chemical shifts by embedded cluster integral equation theory.

    PubMed

    Frach, Roland; Kast, Stefan M

    2014-12-11

    The accurate computational prediction of nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) parameters like chemical shifts represents a challenge if the species studied is immersed in strongly polarizing environments such as water. Common approaches to treating a solvent in the form of, e.g., the polarizable continuum model (PCM) ignore strong directional interactions such as H-bonds to the solvent which can have substantial impact on magnetic shieldings. We here present a computational methodology that accounts for atomic-level solvent effects on NMR parameters by extending the embedded cluster reference interaction site model (EC-RISM) integral equation theory to the prediction of chemical shifts of N-methylacetamide (NMA) in aqueous solution. We examine the influence of various so-called closure approximations of the underlying three-dimensional RISM theory as well as the impact of basis set size and different treatment of electrostatic solute-solvent interactions. We find considerable and systematic improvement over reference PCM and gas phase calculations. A smaller basis set in combination with a simple point charge model already yields good performance which can be further improved by employing exact electrostatic quantum-mechanical solute-solvent interaction energies. A larger basis set benefits more significantly from exact over point charge electrostatics, which can be related to differences of the solvent's charge distribution.

  11. Predicting Pt-195 NMR chemical shift using new relativistic all-electron basis set.

    PubMed

    Paschoal, D; Guerra, C Fonseca; de Oliveira, M A L; Ramalho, T C; Dos Santos, H F

    2016-10-01

    Predicting NMR properties is a valuable tool to assist the experimentalists in the characterization of molecular structure. For heavy metals, such as Pt-195, only a few computational protocols are available. In the present contribution, all-electron Gaussian basis sets, suitable to calculate the Pt-195 NMR chemical shift, are presented for Pt and all elements commonly found as Pt-ligands. The new basis sets identified as NMR-DKH were partially contracted as a triple-zeta doubly polarized scheme with all coefficients obtained from a Douglas-Kroll-Hess (DKH) second-order scalar relativistic calculation. The Pt-195 chemical shift was predicted through empirical models fitted to reproduce experimental data for a set of 183 Pt(II) complexes which NMR sign ranges from -1000 to -6000 ppm. Furthermore, the models were validated using a new set of 75 Pt(II) complexes, not included in the descriptive set. The models were constructed using non-relativistic Hamiltonian at density functional theory (DFT-PBEPBE) level with NMR-DKH basis set for all atoms. For the best model, the mean absolute deviation (MAD) and the mean relative deviation (MRD) were 150 ppm and 6%, respectively, for the validation set (75 Pt-complexes) and 168 ppm (MAD) and 5% (MRD) for all 258 Pt(II) complexes. These results were comparable with relativistic DFT calculation, 200 ppm (MAD) and 6% (MRD). © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:27510431

  12. Solvation effects on chemical shifts by embedded cluster integral equation theory.

    PubMed

    Frach, Roland; Kast, Stefan M

    2014-12-11

    The accurate computational prediction of nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) parameters like chemical shifts represents a challenge if the species studied is immersed in strongly polarizing environments such as water. Common approaches to treating a solvent in the form of, e.g., the polarizable continuum model (PCM) ignore strong directional interactions such as H-bonds to the solvent which can have substantial impact on magnetic shieldings. We here present a computational methodology that accounts for atomic-level solvent effects on NMR parameters by extending the embedded cluster reference interaction site model (EC-RISM) integral equation theory to the prediction of chemical shifts of N-methylacetamide (NMA) in aqueous solution. We examine the influence of various so-called closure approximations of the underlying three-dimensional RISM theory as well as the impact of basis set size and different treatment of electrostatic solute-solvent interactions. We find considerable and systematic improvement over reference PCM and gas phase calculations. A smaller basis set in combination with a simple point charge model already yields good performance which can be further improved by employing exact electrostatic quantum-mechanical solute-solvent interaction energies. A larger basis set benefits more significantly from exact over point charge electrostatics, which can be related to differences of the solvent's charge distribution. PMID:25377116

  13. Predicting Pt-195 NMR chemical shift using new relativistic all-electron basis set.

    PubMed

    Paschoal, D; Guerra, C Fonseca; de Oliveira, M A L; Ramalho, T C; Dos Santos, H F

    2016-10-01

    Predicting NMR properties is a valuable tool to assist the experimentalists in the characterization of molecular structure. For heavy metals, such as Pt-195, only a few computational protocols are available. In the present contribution, all-electron Gaussian basis sets, suitable to calculate the Pt-195 NMR chemical shift, are presented for Pt and all elements commonly found as Pt-ligands. The new basis sets identified as NMR-DKH were partially contracted as a triple-zeta doubly polarized scheme with all coefficients obtained from a Douglas-Kroll-Hess (DKH) second-order scalar relativistic calculation. The Pt-195 chemical shift was predicted through empirical models fitted to reproduce experimental data for a set of 183 Pt(II) complexes which NMR sign ranges from -1000 to -6000 ppm. Furthermore, the models were validated using a new set of 75 Pt(II) complexes, not included in the descriptive set. The models were constructed using non-relativistic Hamiltonian at density functional theory (DFT-PBEPBE) level with NMR-DKH basis set for all atoms. For the best model, the mean absolute deviation (MAD) and the mean relative deviation (MRD) were 150 ppm and 6%, respectively, for the validation set (75 Pt-complexes) and 168 ppm (MAD) and 5% (MRD) for all 258 Pt(II) complexes. These results were comparable with relativistic DFT calculation, 200 ppm (MAD) and 6% (MRD). © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  14. High spectral specificity of local chemical components characterization with multichannel shift-excitation Raman spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Kun; Wu, Tao; Wei, Haoyun; Wu, Xuejian; Li, Yan

    2015-01-01

    Raman spectroscopy has emerged as a promising tool for its noninvasive and nondestructive characterization of local chemical structures. However, spectrally overlapping components prevent the specific identification of hyperfine molecular information of different substances, because of limitations in the spectral resolving power. The challenge is to find a way of preserving scattered photons and retrieving hidden/buried Raman signatures to take full advantage of its chemical specificity. Here, we demonstrate a multichannel acquisition framework based on shift-excitation and slit-modulation, followed by mathematical post-processing, which enables a significant improvement in the spectral specificity of Raman characterization. The present technique, termed shift-excitation blind super-resolution Raman spectroscopy (SEBSR), uses multiple degraded spectra to beat the dispersion-loss trade-off and facilitate high-resolution applications. It overcomes a fundamental problem that has previously plagued high-resolution Raman spectroscopy: fine spectral resolution requires large dispersion, which is accompanied by extreme optical loss. Applicability is demonstrated by the perfect recovery of fine structure of the C-Cl bending mode as well as the clear discrimination of different polymorphs of mannitol. Due to its enhanced discrimination capability, this method offers a feasible route at encouraging a broader range of applications in analytical chemistry, materials and biomedicine. PMID:26350355

  15. Chemical Shift Separation with Controlled Aliasing for Hyperpolarized 13C Metabolic Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Shin, Peter J.; Larson, Peder E.Z.; Uecker, Martin; Reed, Galen D.; Kerr, Adam B.; Tropp, James; Ohliger, Michael A.; Nelson, Sarah J.; Pauly, John M.; Lustig, Michael; Vigneron, Daniel B.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose A chemical shift separation technique for hyperpolarized 13C metabolic imaging with high spatial and temporal resolution was developed. Specifically, a fast 3D pulse sequence and a reconstruction method were implemented to acquire signals from multiple 13C species simultaneously with subsequent separation into individual images. Methods A stack of flyback-EPI readouts and a set of multiband excitation RF pulses were designed to spatially modulate aliasing patterns of the acquired metabolite images, which translated the chemical shift separation problem into parallel imaging reconstruction problem. An eight-channel coil array was used for data acquisition and a parallel imaging method based on nonlinear inversion was developed to separate the aliased images. Results Simultaneous acquisitions of pyruvate and lactate in a phantom study and in vivo rat experiments were performed. The results demonstrated successful separation of the metabolite distributions into individual images having high spatial resolution. Conclusion This method demonstrated the ability to provide accelerated metabolite imaging in hyperpolarized 13C MR utilizing multi-channel coils, tailored readout, and specialized RF pulses. PMID:25298086

  16. The Contribution of Chemical Exchange to MRI Frequency Shifts in Brain Tissue

    PubMed Central

    Shmueli, Karin; Dodd, Stephen J.; Li, Tie-Qiang; Duyn, Jeff H.

    2010-01-01

    Recent high-field MRI studies based on resonance frequency contrast have revealed brain structure with unprecedented detail. Although subtle magnetic susceptibility variations caused by iron and myelin seem to be important to this contrast, recent research on protein solutions suggests that chemical exchange between water and macromolecular protons may contribute substantially to the observed gray-white matter frequency contrast. To investigate this, we performed spectroscopic MRI experiments at 14 Tesla on samples of fixed human visual cortex and fresh pig brain. To allow direct observation of any exchange-induced frequency shifts, these samples were soaked in reference chemicals (TSP and dioxane) that are assumed not to be involved in exchange. For both fresh and fixed tissues and with both reference chemicals, substantial negative exchange-induced gray-white matter frequency contrast (−6.3 to −13.5 ppb) was found, whereas intra-cortical contrast was negligible. The sign of the gray-white matter exchange-induced frequency difference was opposite to the overall gray-white matter frequency difference observed in vivo. This suggests that exchange contributes to, but is not sufficient to explain, the frequency contrast in vivo, and that tissue susceptibility differences may have a greater contribution than previously thought. The exchange-dependent contribution may report on tissue chemical composition and pH. PMID:20928888

  17. Cuticular hydrocarbon divergence in the jewel wasp Nasonia: evolutionary shifts in chemical communication channels?

    PubMed

    Buellesbach, J; Gadau, J; Beukeboom, L W; Echinger, F; Raychoudhury, R; Werren, J H; Schmitt, T

    2013-11-01

    The evolution and maintenance of intraspecific communication channels constitute a key feature of chemical signalling and sexual communication. However, how divergent chemical communication channels evolve while maintaining their integrity for both sender and receiver is poorly understood. In this study, we compare male and female cuticular hydrocarbon (CHC) profiles in the jewel wasp genus Nasonia, analyse their chemical divergence and investigate their role as species-specific sexual signalling cues. Males and females of all four Nasonia species showed unique, nonoverlapping CHC profiles unambiguously separating them. Surprisingly, male and female phylogenies based on the chemical distances between their CHC profiles differed dramatically, where only male CHC divergence parallels the molecular phylogeny of Nasonia. In particular, N. giraulti female CHC profiles were the most divergent from all other species and very different from its most closely related sibling species N. oneida. Furthermore, although our behavioural assays indicate that female CHC profiles can generally be perceived as sexual cues attracting males in Nasonia, this function has apparently been lost in the highly divergent female N. giraulti CHC profiles. Curiously, N. giraulti males are still attracted to heterospecific, but not to conspecific female CHC profiles. We suggest that this striking discrepancy has been caused by an extensive evolutionary shift in female N. giraulti CHC profiles, which are no longer used as conspecific recognition cues. Our study constitutes the first report of an apparent abandonment of a sexual recognition cue that the receiver did not adapt to.

  18. Cuticular hydrocarbon divergence in the jewel wasp Nasonia: Evolutionary shifts in chemical communication channels?

    PubMed Central

    Buellesbach, Jan; Gadau, Jürgen; Beukeboom, Leo W.; Echinger, Felix; Raychoudhury, Rhitoban; Werren, John H.; Schmitt, Thomas

    2013-01-01

    The evolution and maintenance of intraspecific communication channels constitutes a key feature of chemical signaling and sexual communication. However, how divergent chemical communication channels evolve while maintaining their integrity for both sender and receiver is poorly understood. In the present study, we compare male and female cuticular hydrocarbon (CHC) profiles in the jewel wasp genus Nasonia, analyze their chemical divergence, and investigate their role as species-specific sexual signaling cues. Males and females of all four Nasonia species showed unique, non-overlapping CHC profiles unambiguously separating them. Surprisingly, male and female phylogenies based on the chemical distances between their CHC profiles differed dramatically, where only male CHC divergence parallels the molecular phylogeny of Nasonia. In particular, N. giraulti female CHC profiles were the most divergent from all other species and very different from its most closely related sibling species N. oneida. Furthermore, although our behavioural assays indicate that female CHC can generally be perceived as sexual cues attracting males in Nasonia, this function has apparently been lost in the highly divergent female N. giraulti CHC profiles. Curiously, N. giraulti males are still attracted to heterospecific, but not to conspecific female CHC profiles. We suggest that this striking discrepancy has been caused by an extensive evolutionary shift in female N. giraulti CHC profiles, which are no longer used as conspecific recognition cues. Our study constitutes the first report of an apparent abandonment of a sexual recognition cue that the receiver did not adapt to. PMID:24118588

  19. Fluorinated Boronic Acid-Appended Bipyridinium Salts for Diol Recognition and Discrimination via (19)F NMR Barcodes.

    PubMed

    Axthelm, Jörg; Görls, Helmar; Schubert, Ulrich S; Schiller, Alexander

    2015-12-16

    Fluorinated boronic acid-appended benzyl bipyridinium salts, derived from 4,4'-, 3,4'-, and 3,3'-bipyridines, were synthesized and used to detect and differentiate diol-containing analytes at physiological conditions via (19)F NMR spectroscopy. An array of three water-soluble boronic acid receptors in combination with (19)F NMR spectroscopy discriminates nine diol-containing bioanalytes--catechol, dopamine, fructose, glucose, glucose-1-phosphate, glucose-6-phosphate, galactose, lactose, and sucrose--at low mM concentrations. Characteristic (19)F NMR fingerprints are interpreted as two-dimensional barcodes without the need of multivariate analysis techniques.

  20. Carbon-13 NMR in conformational analysis of nucleic acid fragments. Heteronuclear chemical shift correlation spectroscopy of RNA constituents.

    PubMed Central

    Lankhorst, P P; Erkelens, C; Haasnoot, C A; Altona, C

    1983-01-01

    The assignment of the non-quaternary 13C resonances by means of two-dimensional heteronuclear chemical shift correlation spectroscopy is presented for several oligoribonucleotides: The dimers m6(2)AU, m6(2)Am6(2)A and mpUm6(2)A and the trimers m6(2)AUm6(2)A and m4(2)Cm4(2)Cm6(2)A. The temperature and concentration dependency of the 13C chemical shifts are studied with emphasis on the behaviour of the dimer m6(2)AU. The present study shows that in the 5-50 mM range the concentration-dependent chemical shift changes of the ribose carbons are negligible compared to chemical shift changes due to intramolecular events. All compounds studied show a surprising correlation between the chemical shifts of the carbon atoms of the ribose ring and the sugar conformational equilibrium as expressed by the percentage N or S conformer. Thus the chemical shift data can be used to obtain the thermodynamical parameters of the two-state N/S equilibrium. Parameters deduced for m6(2)AU are Tm = 306 K and delta S = -25 cal mol-1 K-1, which values are in satisfactory agreement with results obtained earlier from 1H NMR and from Circular Dichroism. PMID:6195595

  1. Solid-state (19)F-NMR of peptides in native membranes.

    PubMed

    Koch, Katja; Afonin, Sergii; Ieronimo, Marco; Berditsch, Marina; Ulrich, Anne S

    2012-01-01

    To understand how membrane-active peptides (MAPs) function in vivo, it is essential to obtain structural information about them in their membrane-bound state. Most biophysical approaches rely on the use of bilayers prepared from synthetic phospholipids, i.e. artificial model membranes. A particularly successful structural method is solid-state NMR, which makes use of macroscopically oriented lipid bilayers to study selectively isotope-labelled peptides. Native biomembranes, however, have a far more complex lipid composition and a significant non-lipidic content (protein and carbohydrate). Model membranes, therefore, are not really adequate to address questions concerning for example the selectivity of these membranolytic peptides against prokaryotic vs eukaryotic cells, their varying activities against different bacterial strains, or other related biological issues.Here, we discuss a solid-state (19)F-NMR approach that has been developed for structural studies of MAPs in lipid bilayers, and how this can be translated to measurements in native biomembranes. We review the essentials of the methodology and discuss key objectives in the practice of (19)F-labelling of peptides. Furthermore, the preparation of macroscopically oriented biomembranes on solid supports is discussed in the context of other membrane models. Two native biomembrane systems are presented as examples: human erythrocyte ghosts as representatives of eukaryotic cell membranes, and protoplasts from Micrococcus luteus as membranes from Gram-positive bacteria. Based on our latest experimental experience with the antimicrobial peptide gramicidin S, the benefits and some implicit drawbacks of using such supported native membranes in solid-state (19)F-NMR analysis are discussed.

  2. Study of comparative transmission capacity of C-N bond by /sup 19/F NMR method

    SciTech Connect

    Pombrik, S.I.; Polunkin, E.V.; Peregudov, A.S.; Kravtsov, D.N.; Fedin, E.I.

    1982-04-20

    A study was made of the /sup 19/F NMR spectra of a number of free and N-substituted benzylanilines ArCH/sub 2/NHC/sub 6/H/sub 4/F-4 and ArCH/sub 2/N(SO/sub 2/Ph)C/sub 6/H/sub 4/F, respectively. Results indicated that the binuclear bridge grouping CH/sub 2/-N has a high transmission capacity (TC). The addition of an acidic grouping the nitrogen atom has no effect on the TC of the C-N bond.

  3. Cerebral blood flow in experimental ischemia assessed by sup 19 F magnetic resonance spectroscopy in cats

    SciTech Connect

    Brunetti, A.; Nagashima, G.; Bizzi, A.; DesPres, D.J. )

    1990-10-01

    We evaluated a 19F magnetic resonance spectroscopic technique that detects Freon-23 washout as a means of measuring cerebral blood flow in halothane-anesthetized adult cats during and after transient cerebral ischemia produced by vascular occlusion. The experiments were performed to test the ability of this recently developed method to detect postischemic flow deficits. Results were consistent with postischemic hypoperfusion. The method also proved valuable for measuring small residual flow during vascular occlusion. Our experiments indicate that this method provides simple, rapid, and repeatable flow measurements that can augment magnetic resonance examinations of cerebral metabolic parameters in the study of ischemia.

  4. Simultaneous 19F-1H medium resolution NMR spectroscopy for online reaction monitoring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zientek, Nicolai; Laurain, Clément; Meyer, Klas; Kraume, Matthias; Guthausen, Gisela; Maiwald, Michael

    2014-12-01

    Medium resolution nuclear magnetic resonance (MR-NMR) spectroscopy is currently a fast developing field, which has an enormous potential to become an important analytical tool for reaction monitoring, in hyphenated techniques, and for systematic investigations of complex mixtures. The recent developments of innovative MR-NMR spectrometers are therefore remarkable due to their possible applications in quality control, education, and process monitoring. MR-NMR spectroscopy can beneficially be applied for fast, non-invasive, and volume integrating analyses under rough environmental conditions. Within this study, a simple 1/16″ fluorinated ethylene propylene (FEP) tube with an ID of 0.04″ (1.02 mm) was used as a flow cell in combination with a 5 mm glass Dewar tube inserted into a benchtop MR-NMR spectrometer with a 1H Larmor frequency of 43.32 MHz and 40.68 MHz for 19F. For the first time, quasi-simultaneous proton and fluorine NMR spectra were recorded with a series of alternating 19F and 1H single scan spectra along the reaction time coordinate of a homogeneously catalysed esterification model reaction containing fluorinated compounds. The results were compared to quantitative NMR spectra from a hyphenated 500 MHz online NMR instrument for validation. Automation of handling, pre-processing, and analysis of NMR data becomes increasingly important for process monitoring applications of online NMR spectroscopy and for its technical and practical acceptance. Thus, NMR spectra were automatically baseline corrected and phased using the minimum entropy method. Data analysis schemes were designed such that they are based on simple direct integration or first principle line fitting, with the aim that the analysis directly revealed molar concentrations from the spectra. Finally, the performance of 1/16″ FEP tube set-up with an ID of 1.02 mm was characterised regarding the limit of detection (LOQ (1H) = 0.335 mol L-1 and LOQ (19F) = 0.130 mol L-1 for trifluoroethanol in

  5. Simultaneous (19)F-(1)H medium resolution NMR spectroscopy for online reaction monitoring.

    PubMed

    Zientek, Nicolai; Laurain, Clément; Meyer, Klas; Kraume, Matthias; Guthausen, Gisela; Maiwald, Michael

    2014-10-18

    Medium resolution nuclear magnetic resonance (MR-NMR) spectroscopy is currently a fast developing field, which has an enormous potential to become an important analytical tool for reaction monitoring, in hyphenated techniques, and for systematic investigations of complex mixtures. The recent developments of innovative MR-NMR spectrometers are therefore remarkable due to their possible applications in quality control, education, and process monitoring. MR-NMR spectroscopy can beneficially be applied for fast, non-invasive, and volume integrating analyses under rough environmental conditions. Within this study, a simple 1/16″ fluorinated ethylene propylene (FEP) tube with an ID of 0.04″ (1.02mm) was used as a flow cell in combination with a 5mm glass Dewar tube inserted into a benchtop MR-NMR spectrometer with a (1)H Larmor frequency of 43.32MHz and 40.68MHz for (19)F. For the first time, quasi-simultaneous proton and fluorine NMR spectra were recorded with a series of alternating (19)F and (1)H single scan spectra along the reaction time coordinate of a homogeneously catalysed esterification model reaction containing fluorinated compounds. The results were compared to quantitative NMR spectra from a hyphenated 500MHz online NMR instrument for validation. Automation of handling, pre-processing, and analysis of NMR data becomes increasingly important for process monitoring applications of online NMR spectroscopy and for its technical and practical acceptance. Thus, NMR spectra were automatically baseline corrected and phased using the minimum entropy method. Data analysis schemes were designed such that they are based on simple direct integration or first principle line fitting, with the aim that the analysis directly revealed molar concentrations from the spectra. Finally, the performance of 1/16″ FEP tube set-up with an ID of 1.02mm was characterised regarding the limit of detection (LOQ ((1)H)=0.335molL(-1) and LOQ ((19)F)=0.130molL(-1) for trifluoroethanol

  6. Water-fat imaging and general chemical shift imaging with spectrum modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    An, Li

    Water-fat chemical shift imaging (CSI) has been an active research area in magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) since the early 1980's. There are two main reasons for water- fat imaging. First, water-fat imaging can serve as a fat- suppression method. Removing the usually bright fatty signals not only extends the useful dynamic range of an image, but also allows better visualization of lesions or injected contrast, and removes chemical shift artifacts, which may contribute to improved diagnosis. Second, quantification of water and fat provides useful chemical information for characterizing tissues such as bone marrow, liver, and adrenal masses. A milestone in water- fat imaging is the Dixon method that can produce separate water and fat images with only two data acquisitions. In practice, however, the Dixon method is not always successful due to field inhomogeneity problems. In recent years, many variations of the Dixon method have been proposed to overcome the field inhomogeneity problem. In general, these methods can at best separate water and fat without identifying the two because the water and fat magnetization vectors are sampled symmetrically, only parallel and anti-parallel. Furthermore, these methods usually depend on two-dimensional phase unwrapping which itself is sensitive to noise and artifacts, and becomes unreliable when the images have disconnected tissues in the field-of-view (FOV). We will first introduce the basic principles of nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in chapter 1, and briefly review the existing water-fat imaging techniques in chapter 2. In chapter 3, we will introduce a new method for water-fat imaging. With three image acquisitions, a general direct phase encoding (DPE) of the chemical shift information is achieved, which allows an unambiguous determination of water and fat on a pixel by pixel basis. Details of specific implementations and noise performance will be discussed. Representative results

  7. Chemical potential shift in organic field-effect transistors identified by soft X-ray operando nano-spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Nagamura, Naoka Kitada, Yuta; Honma, Itaru; Tsurumi, Junto; Matsui, Hiroyuki; Takeya, Jun; Horiba, Koji; Oshima, Masaharu

    2015-06-22

    A chemical potential shift in an organic field effect transistor (OFET) during operation has been revealed by soft X-ray operando nano-spectroscopy analysis performed using a three-dimensional nanoscale electron-spectroscopy chemical analysis system. OFETs were fabricated using ultrathin (3 ML or 12 nm) single-crystalline C10-DNBDT-NW films on SiO{sub 2} (200 nm)/Si substrates with a backgate electrode and top source/drain Au electrodes, and C 1s line profiles under biasing at the backgate and drain electrodes were measured. When applying −30 V to the backgate, there is C 1s core level shift of 0.1 eV; this shift can be attributed to a chemical potential shift corresponding to band bending by the field effect, resulting in p-type doping.

  8. Subtle Chemical Shifts Explain the NMR Fingerprints of Oligomeric Proanthocyanidins with High Dentin Biomodification Potency.

    PubMed

    Nam, Joo-Won; Phansalkar, Rasika S; Lankin, David C; Bisson, Jonathan; McAlpine, James B; Leme, Ariene A; Vidal, Cristina M P; Ramirez, Benjamin; Niemitz, Matthias; Bedran-Russo, Ana; Chen, Shao-Nong; Pauli, Guido F

    2015-08-01

    The ability of certain oligomeric proanthocyanidins (OPACs) to enhance the biomechanical properties of dentin involves collagen cross-linking of the 1.3-4.5 nm wide space via protein-polyphenol interactions. A systematic interdisciplinary search for the bioactive principles of pine bark has yielded the trimeric PAC, ent-epicatechin-(4β→8)-epicatechin-(2β→O→7,4β→8)-catechin (3), representing the hitherto most potent single chemical entity capable of enhancing dentin stiffness. Building the case from two congeneric PAC dimers, a detailed structural analysis decoded the stereochemistry, spatial arrangement, and chemical properties of three dentin biomodifiers. Quantum-mechanics-driven (1)H iterative full spin analysis (QM-HiFSA) of NMR spectra distinguished previously unrecognized details such as higher order J coupling and provided valuable information about 3D structure. Detection and quantification of H/D-exchange effects by QM-HiFSA identified C-8 and C-6 as (re)active sites, explain preferences in biosynthetic linkage, and suggest their involvement in dentin cross-linking activity. Mapping of these molecular properties underscored the significance of high δ precision in both (1)H and (13)C NMR spectroscopy. Occurring at low- to subppb levels, these newly characterized chemical shift differences in ppb are small but diagnostic measures of dynamic processes inherent to the OPAC pharmacophores and can help augment our understanding of nanometer-scale intermolecular interactions in biomodified dentin macromolecules.

  9. Subtle Chemical Shifts Explain the NMR Fingerprints of Oligomeric Proanthocyanidins with High Dentin Biomodification Potency.

    PubMed

    Nam, Joo-Won; Phansalkar, Rasika S; Lankin, David C; Bisson, Jonathan; McAlpine, James B; Leme, Ariene A; Vidal, Cristina M P; Ramirez, Benjamin; Niemitz, Matthias; Bedran-Russo, Ana; Chen, Shao-Nong; Pauli, Guido F

    2015-08-01

    The ability of certain oligomeric proanthocyanidins (OPACs) to enhance the biomechanical properties of dentin involves collagen cross-linking of the 1.3-4.5 nm wide space via protein-polyphenol interactions. A systematic interdisciplinary search for the bioactive principles of pine bark has yielded the trimeric PAC, ent-epicatechin-(4β→8)-epicatechin-(2β→O→7,4β→8)-catechin (3), representing the hitherto most potent single chemical entity capable of enhancing dentin stiffness. Building the case from two congeneric PAC dimers, a detailed structural analysis decoded the stereochemistry, spatial arrangement, and chemical properties of three dentin biomodifiers. Quantum-mechanics-driven (1)H iterative full spin analysis (QM-HiFSA) of NMR spectra distinguished previously unrecognized details such as higher order J coupling and provided valuable information about 3D structure. Detection and quantification of H/D-exchange effects by QM-HiFSA identified C-8 and C-6 as (re)active sites, explain preferences in biosynthetic linkage, and suggest their involvement in dentin cross-linking activity. Mapping of these molecular properties underscored the significance of high δ precision in both (1)H and (13)C NMR spectroscopy. Occurring at low- to subppb levels, these newly characterized chemical shift differences in ppb are small but diagnostic measures of dynamic processes inherent to the OPAC pharmacophores and can help augment our understanding of nanometer-scale intermolecular interactions in biomodified dentin macromolecules. PMID:26214362

  10. Measurement of the 19F(α,n)22Na Cross Section for Nuclear Safeguards Science

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lowe, Marcus; Smith, M. S.; Pain, S.; Febbraro, M.; Pittman, S.; Chipps, K. A.; Thompson, S. J.; Grinder, M.; Grzywacz, R.; Smith, K.; Thornsberry, C.; Thompson, P.; Peters, W. A.; Waddell, D.; Blanchard, R.; Carls, A.; Shadrick, S.; Engelhardt, A.; Hertz-Kintish, D.; Allen, N.; Sims, H.

    2015-10-01

    Enriched uranium is commonly stored in fluoride matrices such as UF6. Alpha decays of uranium in UF6 will create neutrons via the 19F(α,n)22Na reaction. An improved cross section for this reaction will enable improved nondestructive assays of uranium content in storage cylinders at material enrichment facilities. To determine this reaction cross section, we have performed experiments using both forward and inverse kinematic techniques at the University of Notre Dame (forward) and Oak Ridge National Laboratory (inverse). Both experiments utilized the Versatile Array of Neutron Detectors at Low Energy (VANDLE) for neutron detection. The ORNL experiment also used a new ionization chamber for 22Na particle identification. Gating on the 22Na nuclei detected drastically reduced the background counts in the neutron time-of-flight spectra. The latest analysis and results will be presented for 19F beam energies ranging from 20-37 MeV. This work is funded in part by the DOE Office of Nuclear Physics, the National Nuclear Security Administration's Office of Defense Nuclear Nonproliferation R&D, and the NSF.

  11. Reassigning the Structures of Natural Products Using NMR Chemical Shifts Computed with Quantum Mechanics: A Laboratory Exercise

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Palazzo, Teresa A.; Truong, Tiana T.; Wong, Shirley M. T.; Mack, Emma T.; Lodewyk, Michael W.; Harrison, Jason G.; Gamage, R. Alan; Siegel, Justin B.; Kurth, Mark J.; Tantillo, Dean J.

    2015-01-01

    An applied computational chemistry laboratory exercise is described in which students use modern quantum chemical calculations of chemical shifts to assign the structure of a recently isolated natural product. A pre/post assessment was used to measure student learning gains and verify that students demonstrated proficiency of key learning…

  12. High-level ab-initio calculation of gas-phase NMR chemical shifts and secondary isotope effects of methanol

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Auer, Alexander A.

    2009-01-01

    In this contribution high-level ab-initio calculations of the chemical shifts of methanol including zero-point vibrational and temperature corrections are presented. For the first time, secondary isotope effects have been calculated via second order vibrational perturbation theory. In comparison with recent experimental gas-phase data and in contrast to other quantum-chemical methods the results are consistent and in very good agreement with the experimental 13C, 17O and 1H chemical shifts reported by Makulski [W. Makulski, J. Mol. Struct. 872 (2008) 81]. Secondary isotope effects can be calculated with remarkable accuracy of a few hundredths of a ppm in comparison to experiment.

  13. Identify five kinds of simple super-secondary structures with quadratic discriminant algorithm based on the chemical shifts.

    PubMed

    Kou, Gaoshan; Feng, Yonge

    2015-09-01

    The biological function of protein is largely determined by its spatial structure. The research on the relationship between structure and function is the basis of protein structure prediction. However, the prediction of super secondary structure is an important step in the prediction of protein spatial structure. Many algorithms have been proposed for the prediction of protein super secondary structure. However, the parameters used by these methods were primarily based on amino acid sequences. In this paper, we proposed a novel model for predicting five kinds of protein super secondary structures based on the chemical shifts (CSs). Firstly, we analyzed the statistical distribution of chemical shifts of six nuclei in five kinds of protein super secondary structures by using the analysis of variance (ANOVA). Secondly, we used chemical shifts of six nuclei as features, and combined with quadratic discriminant analysis (QDA) to predict five kinds of protein super secondary structures. Finally, we achieved the averaged sensitivity, specificity and the overall accuracy of 81.8%, 95.19%, 82.91%, respectively in seven-fold cross-validation. Moreover, we have performed the prediction by combining the five different chemical shifts as features, the maximum overall accuracy up to 89.87% by using the C,Cα,Cβ,N,Hα of Hα chemical shifts, which are clearly superior to that of the quadratic discriminant analysis (QDA) algorithm by using 20 amino acid compositions (AAC) as feature in the seven-fold cross-validation. These results demonstrated that chemical shifts (CSs) are indeed an outstanding parameter for the prediction of five kinds of super secondary structures. In addition, we compared the prediction of the quadratic discriminant analysis (QDA) with that of support vector machine (SVM) by using the same six CSs as features. The result suggested that the quadratic discriminant analysis method by using chemical shifts as features is a good predictor for protein super

  14. Predicting the redox state and secondary structure of cysteine residues using multi-dimensional classification analysis of NMR chemical shifts.

    PubMed

    Wang, Ching-Cheng; Lai, Wen-Chung; Chuang, Woei-Jer

    2016-09-01

    A tool for predicting the redox state and secondary structure of cysteine residues using multi-dimensional analyses of different combinations of nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) chemical shifts has been developed. A data set of cysteine [Formula: see text], (13)C(α), (13)C(β), (1)H(α), (1)H(N), and (15)N(H) chemical shifts was created, classified according to redox state and secondary structure, using a library of 540 re-referenced BioMagResBank (BMRB) entries. Multi-dimensional analyses of three, four, five, and six chemical shifts were used to derive rules for predicting the structural states of cysteine residues. The results from 60 BMRB entries containing 122 cysteines showed that four-dimensional analysis of the C(α), C(β), H(α), and N(H) chemical shifts had the highest prediction accuracy of 100 and 95.9 % for the redox state and secondary structure, respectively. The prediction of secondary structure using 3D, 5D, and 6D analyses had the accuracy of ~90 %, suggesting that H(N) and [Formula: see text] chemical shifts may be noisy and made the discrimination worse. A web server (6DCSi) was established to enable users to submit NMR chemical shifts, either in BMRB or key-in formats, for prediction. 6DCSi displays predictions using sets of 3, 4, 5, and 6 chemical shifts, which shows their consistency and allows users to draw their own conclusions. This web-based tool can be used to rapidly obtain structural information regarding cysteine residues directly from experimental NMR data.

  15. Chemical shift mapping of RNA interactions with the polypyrimidine tract binding protein

    PubMed Central

    Yuan, Xuemei; Davydova, Natalia; Conte, Maria R.; Curry, Stephen; Matthews, Stephen

    2002-01-01

    The polypyrimidine tract binding protein (PTB), a homodimer that contains four RRM-type RNA binding domains per monomer, plays important roles in both the regulation of alternative splicing and the stimulation of translation initiation as directed by the internal ribosome entry sites of certain picornaviruses. We have used chemical shift mapping experiments to probe the interactions between PTB-34, a recombinant fragment that contains the third and fourth RRM domains of the protein, and a number of short pyrimidine-rich RNA oligonucleotides. The results confirm that the RNAs interact primarily with the β-sheet surface of PTB-34, but also reveal roles for the two long flexible linkers within the protein fragment, a result that is supported by mutagenesis experiments. The mapping indicates distinct binding preferences for RRM3 and RRM4 with the former making a particularly specific interaction with the sequence UCUUC. PMID:11788707

  16. Backbone and side chain chemical shift assignments of apolipophorin III from Galleria mellonella.

    PubMed

    Crowhurst, Karin A; Horn, James V C; Weers, Paul M M

    2016-04-01

    Apolipophorin III, a 163 residue monomeric protein from the greater wax moth Galleria mellonella (abbreviated as apoLp-IIIGM), has roles in upregulating expression of antimicrobial proteins as well as binding and deforming bacterial membranes. Due to its similarity to vertebrate apolipoproteins there is interest in performing atomic resolution analysis of apoLp-IIIGM as part of an effort to better understand its mechanism of action in innate immunity. In the first step towards structural characterization of apoLp-IIIGM, 99 % of backbone and 88 % of side chain (1)H, (13)C and (15)N chemical shifts were assigned. TALOS+ analysis of the backbone resonances has predicted that the protein is composed of five long helices, which is consistent with the reported structures of apolipophorins from other insect species. The next stage in the characterization of apoLp-III from G. mellonella will be to utilize these resonance assignments in solving the solution structure of this protein.

  17. XPS Chemical Shifts for CO Adsorbed on Ni(100):. a Theoretical Study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pedocchi, L.; Rovida, G.; Russo, N.

    Starting from the observed chemical shift of C-1s and O-1s ionization potentials (IP), reported in the literature for the adsorption of CO on Ni(100), and correlated to the different CO adsorption sites at different coverages, we have carried out a theoretical investigation, using a first-principle density-functional method, to calculate ionization energies for adsorbed CO in the atop and bridge sites. In our approach, the Ni(100) surface was simulated with clusters of up to nine metal atoms of different geometry, in order to test the two adsorption sites. For each cluster, the CO adsorption geometry was optimized and the O-1s and C-1s ionizations were calculated. The main result was that the (O-1s-C-1s) difference was very well reproduced even with clusters of modest size, thus confirming the possibility to use this value as a structure-sensitive parameter.

  18. Protein apparent dielectric constant and its temperature dependence from remote chemical shift effects.

    PubMed

    An, Liaoyuan; Wang, Yefei; Zhang, Ning; Yan, Shihai; Bax, Ad; Yao, Lishan

    2014-09-17

    A NMR protocol is introduced that permits accurate measurement of minute, remote chemical shift perturbations (CSPs), caused by a mutation-induced change in the electric field. Using protein GB3 as a model system, (1)H(N) CSPs in K19A and K19E mutants can be fitted to small changes in the electric field at distal sites in the protein using the Buckingham equation, yielding an apparent dielectric constant εa of 8.6 ± 0.8 at 298 K. These CSPs, and their derived εa value, scale strongly with temperature. For example, CSPs at 313 K are about ∼30% smaller than those at 278 K, corresponding to an effective εa value of about 7.3 at 278 K and 10.5 at 313 K. Molecular dynamics simulations in explicit solvent indicate that solvent water makes a significant contribution to εa.

  19. Improving the chemical shift dispersion of multidimensional NMR spectra of intrinsically disordered proteins.

    PubMed

    Bermel, Wolfgang; Bruix, Marta; Felli, Isabella C; Kumar M V, Vasantha; Pierattelli, Roberta; Serrano, Soraya

    2013-03-01

    Intrinsically disordered proteins (IDPs) have recently attracted the attention of the scientific community challenging the well accepted structure-function paradigm. In the characterization of the dynamic features of proteins nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy (NMR) is a strategic tool of investigation. However the peculiar properties of IDPs, with the lack of a unique 3D structure and their high flexibility, have a strong impact on NMR observables (low chemical shift dispersion, efficient solvent exchange broadening) and thus on the quality of NMR spectra. Key aspects to be considered in the design of new NMR experiments optimized for the study of IDPs are discussed. A new experiment, based on direct detection of (13)C(α), is proposed.

  20. Study of wavelength-shifting chemicals for use in large-scale water Cherenkov detectors

    SciTech Connect

    Sweany, M; Bernstein, A; Dazeley, S; Dunmore, J; Felde, J; Svoboda, R; Tripathi, S M

    2011-09-21

    Cherenkov detectors employ various methods to maximize light collection at the photomultiplier tubes (PMTs). These generally involve the use of highly reflective materials lining the interior of the detector, reflective materials around the PMTs, or wavelength-shifting sheets around the PMTs. Recently, the use of water-soluble wavelength-shifters has been explored to increase the measurable light yield of Cherenkov radiation in water. These wave-shifting chemicals are capable of absorbing light in the ultravoilet and re-emitting the light in a range detectable by PMTs. Using a 250 L water Cherenkov detector, we have characterized the increase in light yield from three compounds in water: 4-Methylumbelliferone, Carbostyril-124, and Amino-G Salt. We report the gain in PMT response at a concentration of 1 ppm as: 1.88 {+-} 0.02 for 4-Methylumbelliferone, stable to within 0.5% over 50 days, 1.37 {+-} 0.03 for Carbostyril-124, and 1.20 {+-} 0.02 for Amino-G Salt. The response of 4-Methylumbelliferone was modeled, resulting in a simulated gain within 9% of the experimental gain at 1 ppm concentration. Finally, we report an increase in neutron detection performance of a large-scale (3.5 kL) gadolinium-doped water Cherenkov detector at a 4-Methylumbelliferone concentration of 1 ppm.

  1. Experimental study of resolution of proton chemical shifts in solids: Combined multiple pulse NMR and magic-angle spinning

    SciTech Connect

    Ryan, L.M.; Taylor, R.E.; Paff, A.J.; Gerstein, B.C.

    1980-01-01

    High-resolution nuclear magnetic resonance spectra of protons in rigid, randomly oriented solids have been measured using combined homonuclear dipolar decoupling (via multiple pulse techniques) and attenuation of chemical shift anisotropies (via magic-angle sample spinning). Under those conditions, isotropic proton chemical shifts were recorded for a variety of chemical species, with individual linewidths varying from about 55 to 110 Hz (1--2 ppm). Residual line broadening was due predominately to (i) magnetic-field instability and inhomogeneity, (ii) unresolved proton--proton spin couplings, (iii) chemical shift dispersion, (iv) residual dipolar broadening, and (v) lifetime broadening under the multiple pulse sequences used. The magnitudes of those effects and the current limits of resolution for this experiment in our spectrometer have been investigated. The compounds studied included organic solids (4, 4'-dimethylbenzophenone, 2, 6-dimethylbenzoic acid, and aspirin), polymers (polystyrene and polymethylmethacrylate), and the vitrain portion of a bituminous coal.

  2. Analyzing and Assigning Carbon-13 Chemical-Shift Tensors in Fructose, Sorbose, and Xylose Single Crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Fang; Phung, Cu G.; Alderman, D. W.; Grant, David M.

    Complete carbon-13 chemical-shift tensors are measured in single crystals of the monosaccharides β- D-fructopyranose [57-48-7], α- L-sorbopyranose [87-79-6], and α- D-xylopyranose [58-86-6] using the two-dimensional chemical-shift correlation technique with a multiple-axis sample-reorientation mechanism. Symmetry-constrained fitting of the experimental data extracts the tensors for the four equivalent molecules in the P2 12 12 1unit cells and the directions of the three twofold axes in the orthorhombic crystals. The standard deviations of the symmetry fits to the data are 0.30, 0.40, and 0.29 ppm for the three monosaccharide molecules, respectively. Gauge-invariant atomic orbital (GIAO) computations using the D-95 double-zeta basis set are then used to assign the experimental tensors to the carbons in the molecules and to the molecules in the unit cell. All assignment permutations and combinations are explored, and that which minimizes the RMS deviation between the experimental and computed tensors is accepted as the best assignment. The GIAO results also identify the experimental twofold axes with the crystallographic axes. Because the hydroxymethyl hydroxyl group in sorbose jumps between two positions, it is necessary to compute the tensors for both molecular configurations and then to take a weighted average of the results for comparison with the experimental data. The D-95 GIAO results have RMS deviations from the experimental tensors of 1.90 ppm for fructose, 2.61 ppm for sorbose, and 2.66 ppm for xylose. Similar computations confirm a previous assignment of the carbon-13 tensors in sucrose and yield a 2.85 ppm RMS deviation.

  3. Increased precision for analysis of protein-ligand dissociation constants determined from chemical shift titrations.

    PubMed

    Markin, Craig J; Spyracopoulos, Leo

    2012-06-01

    NMR is ideally suited for the analysis of protein-protein and protein ligand interactions with dissociation constants ranging from ~2 μM to ~1 mM, and with kinetics in the fast exchange regime on the NMR timescale. For the determination of dissociation constants (K ( D )) of 1:1 protein-protein or protein-ligand interactions using NMR, the protein and ligand concentrations must necessarily be similar in magnitude to the K ( D ), and nonlinear least squares analysis of chemical shift changes as a function of ligand concentration is employed to determine estimates for the parameters K ( D ) and the maximum chemical shift change (Δδ(max)). During a typical NMR titration, the initial protein concentration, [P (0)], is held nearly constant. For this condition, to determine the most accurate parameters for K ( D ) and Δδ(max) from nonlinear least squares analyses requires initial protein concentrations that are ~0.5 × K ( D ), and a maximum concentration for the ligand, or titrant, of ~10 × [P (0)]. From a practical standpoint, these requirements are often difficult to achieve. Using Monte Carlo simulations, we demonstrate that co-variation of the ligand and protein concentrations during a titration leads to an increase in the precision of the fitted K ( D ) and Δδ(max) values when [P (0)] > K ( D ). Importantly, judicious choice of protein and ligand concentrations for a given NMR titration, combined with nonlinear least squares analyses using two independent variables (ligand and protein concentrations) and two parameters (K ( D ) and Δδ(max)) is a straightforward approach to increasing the accuracy of measured dissociation constants for 1:1 protein-ligand interactions.

  4. A new approach to quantitative NMR: fluoroquinolones analysis by evaluating the chemical shift displacements.

    PubMed

    Michaleas, S; Antoniadou-Vyza, E

    2006-10-11

    Quantitative NMR spectroscopy is always an attractive goal as the identity and quantity could be simultaneously determined. Although significant advancements have been achieved in this field it is common that all reported quantitative NMR methods perform the analysis by utilizing the average integral intensities of selected signals. During the calculation of the area under NMR peaks several response problems can occur which should always be treated carefully to overcome inaccuracies. In the method proposed in this work the quantitative information is obtained utilizing the measurement of selected protons chemical shift displacements which is a quite straightforward and highly reproducible process. The (1)H NMR spectra of multiple fluoroquinolone (FQ) solutions revealed that the chemical shifts of protons, especially the aromatic ones, were concentration dependent for all tested compounds, as a result of extensive self-association phenomena. In the present work a novel methodology is described for the quantitation of several FQs based on this dependence. The proposed method was applied to Ciprofloxacin solutions over a wide range of concentrations. Evaluation of the obtained data presented acceptable characteristics regarding accuracy, precision, and robustness. The applicability limitations of this method were found to be posed by current instrumentation, mainly by the magnetic field frequency e.g. the slope of the response function achieved with a 400MHz instrument was twice the one achieved at 200MHz. The pH effect was negligible from pD 2.5 to 5.5. The phenomenon appeared in a pattern that can be applied for a plethora of drug categories revealing self-association phenomena in a range of concentration determined by the magnet strength of the instrument.

  5. Handling the influence of chemical shift in amplitude-modulated heteronuclear dipolar recoupling solid-state NMR.

    PubMed

    Basse, Kristoffer; Shankar, Ravi; Bjerring, Morten; Vosegaard, Thomas; Nielsen, Niels Chr; Nielsen, Anders B

    2016-09-01

    We present a theoretical analysis of the influence of chemical shifts on amplitude-modulated heteronuclear dipolar recoupling experiments in solid-state NMR spectroscopy. The method is demonstrated using the Rotor Echo Short Pulse IRrAdiaTION mediated Cross-Polarization ((RESPIRATION)CP) experiment as an example. By going into the pulse sequence rf interaction frame and employing a quintuple-mode operator-based Floquet approach, we describe how chemical shift offset and anisotropic chemical shift affect the efficiency of heteronuclear polarization transfer. In this description, it becomes transparent that the main attribute leading to non-ideal performance is a fictitious field along the rf field axis, which is generated from second-order cross terms arising mainly between chemical shift tensors and themselves. This insight is useful for the development of improved recoupling experiments. We discuss the validity of this approach and present quaternion calculations to determine the effective resonance conditions in a combined rf field and chemical shift offset interaction frame transformation. Based on this, we derive a broad-banded version of the (RESPIRATION)CP experiment. The new sequence is experimentally verified using SNNFGAILSS amyloid fibrils where simultaneous (15)N → (13)CO and (15)N → (13)Cα coherence transfer is demonstrated on high-field NMR instrumentation, requiring great offset stability. PMID:27608995

  6. Handling the influence of chemical shift in amplitude-modulated heteronuclear dipolar recoupling solid-state NMR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Basse, Kristoffer; Shankar, Ravi; Bjerring, Morten; Vosegaard, Thomas; Nielsen, Niels Chr.; Nielsen, Anders B.

    2016-09-01

    We present a theoretical analysis of the influence of chemical shifts on amplitude-modulated heteronuclear dipolar recoupling experiments in solid-state NMR spectroscopy. The method is demonstrated using the Rotor Echo Short Pulse IRrAdiaTION mediated Cross-Polarization (RESPIRATIONCP) experiment as an example. By going into the pulse sequence rf interaction frame and employing a quintuple-mode operator-based Floquet approach, we describe how chemical shift offset and anisotropic chemical shift affect the efficiency of heteronuclear polarization transfer. In this description, it becomes transparent that the main attribute leading to non-ideal performance is a fictitious field along the rf field axis, which is generated from second-order cross terms arising mainly between chemical shift tensors and themselves. This insight is useful for the development of improved recoupling experiments. We discuss the validity of this approach and present quaternion calculations to determine the effective resonance conditions in a combined rf field and chemical shift offset interaction frame transformation. Based on this, we derive a broad-banded version of the RESPIRATIONCP experiment. The new sequence is experimentally verified using SNNFGAILSS amyloid fibrils where simultaneous 15N → 13CO and 15N → 13Cα coherence transfer is demonstrated on high-field NMR instrumentation, requiring great offset stability.

  7. Predicting protein backbone chemical shifts from Cα coordinates: extracting high resolution experimental observables from low resolution models.

    PubMed

    Frank, Aaron T; Law, Sean M; Ahlstrom, Logan S; Brooks, Charles L

    2015-01-13

    Given the demonstrated utility of coarse-grained modeling and simulations approaches in studying protein structure and dynamics, developing methods that allow experimental observables to be directly recovered from coarse-grained models is of great importance. In this work, we develop one such method that enables protein backbone chemical shifts (1HN, 1Hα, 13Cα, 13C, 13Cβ, and 15N) to be predicted from Cα coordinates. We show that our Cα-based method, LARMORCα, predicts backbone chemical shifts with comparable accuracy to some all-atom approaches. More importantly, we demonstrate that LARMORCα predicted chemical shifts are able to resolve native structure from decoy pools that contain both native and non-native models, and so it is sensitive to protein structure. As an application, we use LARMORCα to characterize the transient state of the fast-folding protein gpW using recently published NMR relaxation dispersion derived backbone chemical shifts. The model we obtain is consistent with the previously proposed model based on independent analysis of the chemical shift dispersion pattern of the transient state. We anticipate that LARMORCα will find utility as a tool that enables important protein conformational substates to be identified by “parsing” trajectories and ensembles generated using coarse-grained modeling and simulations.

  8. Environment effects on the CO vibrational shifts in erbium complexes: a quantum chemical study.

    PubMed

    Ottonelli, Massimo; Musso, Gianfranco; Dellepiane, Giovanna

    2008-11-20

    The stability of lanthanide complexes and the efficiency of the energy transfer process, which makes these molecules interesting materials for technological applications, are correlated to the chemical environment surrounding the metal ion. In particular the efficiency depends on the relative position of the antenna (the ligand moiety that acts as photon absorption center) and the lanthanide ion (the emitting center), while the stability of the complex is correlated to the strength of the coordination between the rare earth and the ligands. For these reasons, knowledge of the structural properties of the complex is an interesting task to achieve. Since a large number of ligand structures hold the carboxylate group (COO(-)), which is used as an anchor for binding the antennae to the lanthanide ion, in this work we will show how the vibrational shifts of this group, induced by the interactions between the carboxylate moiety and the metal center of the lanthanide complex, can be used for obtaining in a simple way information on the structure of the chemical environment surrounding the lanthanide ion.

  9. Chemical amplification--cavity attenuated phase shift spectroscopy measurements of atmospheric peroxy radicals.

    PubMed

    Wood, Ezra C; Charest, John R

    2014-10-21

    We describe a new instrument for the quantification of atmospheric peroxy radicals (HO2, CH3O2, C2H5O2, etc.) using the chemical amplification method. Peroxy radicals are mixed with high concentrations of NO and CO, causing a chain reaction that produces a measurable increase in NO2 which is quantified by cavity attenuated phase shift (CAPS) spectroscopy, a highly sensitive spectroscopic detection technique. The instrument utilizes two identical reaction chambers, each with a dedicated CAPS NO2 sensor. Similar to all dual-channel chemical amplifiers, one reaction chamber operates in amplification or "ROx" mode and the other in background or "Ox" mode. The peroxy radical mixing ratio is determined by the difference between the two channels' NO2 readings divided by a laboratory-determined chain length. Each reaction chamber alternates between ROx and Ox mode on an anti-synchronized schedule, eliminating the effect of CAPS baseline offsets on the calculated peroxy radical concentrations. The chain length is determined by a new calibration method: peroxyacetyl and methyl peroxy radicals are produced by the photolysis of acetone and quantified as NO2 following reaction with excess NO. We demonstrate the performance of the instrument with results from ambient sampling in Amherst and several diagnostics of its precision. The detection limit while sampling ambient air at a relative humidity (RH) of 40% is 0.6 ppt (1 min average, signal-to-noise ratio =2), with an estimated accuracy of 25% (2σ).

  10. DFT calculations of 15N NMR shielding constants, chemical shifts and complexation shifts in complexes of rhodium(II) tetraformate with some nitrogenous organic ligands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leniak, Arkadiusz; Jaźwiński, Jarosław

    2015-03-01

    Benchmark calculations of 15N NMR shielding constants for a set of model complexes of rhodium(II) tetraformate with nine organic ligands using the Density Functional Theory (DFT) methods have been carried out. The calculations were performed by means of several methods: the non-relativistic, relativistic scalar ZORA, and spin-orbit ZORA approaches at the CGA-PBE/QZ4P theory level, and the GIAO NMR method using the B3PW91 functional with the 6-311++G(2d,p) basis set for C, H, N, O atoms and the Stuttgart basis set for the Rh atom. The geometry of compounds was optimised either by the same basis set as for the NMR calculations or applying the B3LYP functional with the 6-31G(2d) basis set for C, H, N, O atoms and LANL2DZ for the Rh atom. Computed 15N NMR shielding constants σ were compatible with experimental 15N chemical shifts δ of complexes exhibiting similar structure and fulfil the linear equation δ = aσ + b. The a and b parameters for all data sets have been estimated by means of linear regression analysis. In contrast to the correlation method giving "scaled" chemical shifts, the conversion of shielding constants to chemical shifts with respect to the reference shielding of CH3NO2 provided very inaccurate "raw" δ values. The application of the former to the calculation of complexation shifts Δδ (Δδ = δcompl - δlig) reproduced experimental values qualitatively or semi-quantitatively. The non-relativistic B3PW91/[6-311++G(2d,p), Stuttgart] theory level reproduced the NMR parameters as good as the more expensive relativistic CGA-PBE//QZ4P ZORA approaches.

  11. Temperature dependence of the 31P chemical shifts of nucleic acids. A prode of phosphate ester torsional conformations.

    PubMed

    Gorenstein, D G; Findlay, J B; Momii, R K; Luxon, B A; Kar, D

    1976-08-24

    The temperature dependence of the 31P chemical shifts of the ribodinucleoside monophosphates, ApA, GpC, CpC, UpU, and ApU, of the deoxyribonucleic acids, d-ApT, TpT, d-ApA, and d-pApT, and of the homopolyribonucleic acids poly(G), poly(U), poly(A) is shown to provide information on the helix-coli transition in nucleic acids. The base stacked, helical structure with a gauche,gauche phosphate ester torsional conformation is 0.2-0.6 ppm upfield from the random coil conformation. In contrast, the 31P chemical shifts of dimethyl and diethyl phosphate do not change significantly with temperature. These results support our earlier hypothesis that 31P shifts are sensitive probes of torsional conformations with phosphate esters in gauche,gauche conformations having 31P shifts upfield from nongauche conformations.

  12. Experimental evidence of an age-specific shift in chemical detection of predators in a lizard.

    PubMed

    Head, Megan L; Keogh, J Scott; Doughty, Paul

    2002-03-01

    The risk posed by predation is one of the most fundamental aspects of an animal's environment. Avoidance of predators implies an ability to obtain reliable information about the risk of predation, and for many species, chemosensory cues are likely to be an important source of such information. Chemosensory cues reliably reveal the presence of predators or their presence in the recent past. We used retreat site selection experiments to test whether the Australian scincid lizard Eulamprus heatwolei uses chemical cues for predator detection and avoidance. Both adult and juvenile lizards were given the choice of retreat sites treated with scents from invertebrate predators, as well as sympatric and allopatric snake predators. Some of the snake predators were known to eat E. heatwolei, while others did not pose a predation threat. All invertebrate predators posed a risk to juveniles, but not adults because of their size. We found that juvenile E. heatwolei avoided predator odors more strongly than adults. Juveniles avoided both invertebrate predators and snakes, and the strongest response was toward the funnel web spider, the only ambush predator used in this experiment. This result may demonstrate the importance of predator ecology in the evolution of predator detection mechanisms, with chemical cues being more useful in detecting sedentary predators than active predators. Adult lizards showed no avoidance behavior toward predator odors. This result suggests an age specific shift in predator avoidance behavior as lizards get older and become too large for many predators. However, adults showed no response to the odor from the red-bellied black snake, a known predator of adult E. heatwolei. This finding further demonstrates the importance of predator ecology when examining communication between predators and prey. Chemical cues, which are persistent long after predators have vacated the area, may not be useful in detecting the red-bellied black snake, a wide

  13. Fragment-based {sup 13}C nuclear magnetic resonance chemical shift predictions in molecular crystals: An alternative to planewave methods

    SciTech Connect

    Hartman, Joshua D.; Beran, Gregory J. O.; Monaco, Stephen; Schatschneider, Bohdan

    2015-09-14

    We assess the quality of fragment-based ab initio isotropic {sup 13}C chemical shift predictions for a collection of 25 molecular crystals with eight different density functionals. We explore the relative performance of cluster, two-body fragment, combined cluster/fragment, and the planewave gauge-including projector augmented wave (GIPAW) models relative to experiment. When electrostatic embedding is employed to capture many-body polarization effects, the simple and computationally inexpensive two-body fragment model predicts both isotropic {sup 13}C chemical shifts and the chemical shielding tensors as well as both cluster models and the GIPAW approach. Unlike the GIPAW approach, hybrid density functionals can be used readily in a fragment model, and all four hybrid functionals tested here (PBE0, B3LYP, B3PW91, and B97-2) predict chemical shifts in noticeably better agreement with experiment than the four generalized gradient approximation (GGA) functionals considered (PBE, OPBE, BLYP, and BP86). A set of recommended linear regression parameters for mapping between calculated chemical shieldings and observed chemical shifts are provided based on these benchmark calculations. Statistical cross-validation procedures are used to demonstrate the robustness of these fits.

  14. Calculated cross sections for neutron induced reactions on sup 19 F and uncertainties of parameters

    SciTech Connect

    Zhao, Z.X. . Inst. of Atomic Energy); Fu, C.Y.; Larson, D.C. )

    1990-09-01

    Nuclear model codes were used to calculate cross sections for neutron-induced reactions on {sup 19}F for incident energies from 2 to 20 MeV. The model parameters in the codes were adjusted to best reproduce experimental data and are given in this report. The calculated results are compared to measured data and the evaluated values of ENDF/B-V. The covariance matrix for several of the most sensitive model parameters is given based on the scatter of measured data around the theoretical curves and the long-range correlation error of measured data. The results of these calculations form the basis for the new ENDF/B-VI fluorine evaluation. 44 refs., 64 figs., 14 tabs.

  15. Imaging of Intratumoral Inflammation during Oncolytic Virotherapy of Tumors by 19F-Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI)

    PubMed Central

    Hess, Michael; Hofmann, Elisabeth; Seubert, Carolin; Langbein-Laugwitz, Johanna; Gentschev, Ivaylo; Sturm, Volker Jörg Friedrich; Ye, Yuxiang; Kampf, Thomas; Jakob, Peter Michael; Szalay, Aladar A.

    2013-01-01

    Background Oncolytic virotherapy of tumors is an up-coming, promising therapeutic modality of cancer therapy. Unfortunately, non-invasive techniques to evaluate the inflammatory host response to treatment are rare. Here, we evaluate 19F magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) which enables the non-invasive visualization of inflammatory processes in pathological conditions by the use of perfluorocarbon nanoemulsions (PFC) for monitoring of oncolytic virotherapy. Methodology/Principal Findings The Vaccinia virus strain GLV-1h68 was used as an oncolytic agent for the treatment of different tumor models. Systemic application of PFC emulsions followed by 1H/19F MRI of mock-infected and GLV-1h68-infected tumor-bearing mice revealed a significant accumulation of the 19F signal in the tumor rim of virus-treated mice. Histological examination of tumors confirmed a similar spatial distribution of the 19F signal hot spots and CD68+-macrophages. Thereby, the CD68+-macrophages encapsulate the GFP-positive viral infection foci. In multiple tumor models, we specifically visualized early inflammatory cell recruitment in Vaccinia virus colonized tumors. Furthermore, we documented that the 19F signal correlated with the extent of viral spreading within tumors. Conclusions/Significance These results suggest 19F MRI as a non-invasive methodology to document the tumor-associated host immune response as well as the extent of intratumoral viral replication. Thus, 19F MRI represents a new platform to non-invasively investigate the role of the host immune response for therapeutic outcome of oncolytic virotherapy and individual patient response. PMID:23441176

  16. Balanced UTE-SSFP for 19F MR Imaging of Complex Spectra

    PubMed Central

    Goette, Matthew J.; Keupp, Jochen; Rahmer, Jürgen; Lanza, Gregory M.; Wickline, Samuel A.; Caruthers, Shelton D.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose A novel technique for highly sensitive detection of multi-resonant fluorine imaging agents was designed and tested with the use of dual-frequency 19F/1H ultra-short echo times (UTE) sampled with a balanced steady-state free precession (SSFP) pulse sequence and 3D radial readout. Methods Feasibility of 3D radial balanced UTE-SSFP imaging was demonstrated for a phantom comprising liquid perfluorooctyl bromide (PFOB). Sensitivity of the pulse sequence was measured and compared to other sequences imaging the PFOB (CF2)6 line group including UTE radial gradient-echo (GRE) at α=30°, as well as Cartesian GRE, balanced SSFP, and fast spin-echo (FSE). The PFOB CF3 peak was also sampled with FSE. Results The proposed balanced UTE-SSFP technique exhibited a relative detection sensitivity of 51 μmolPFOB−1min−1/2 (α=30°), at least twice that of other sequence types with either 3D radial (UTE GRE: 20 μmolPFOB−1min−1/2) or Cartesian k-space filling (GRE: 12 μmolPFOB−1min−1/2; FSE: 16 μmolPFOB−1min−1/2 balanced SSFP: 23 μmolPFOB−1min−1/2 In vivo imaging of angiogenesis-targeted PFOB nanoparticles was demonstrated in a rabbit model of cancer on a clinical 3T scanner. Conclusion A new dual 19F/1H balanced UTE-SSFP sequence manifests high SNR, with detection sensitivity more than twofold better than traditional techniques, and alleviates imaging problems caused by dephasing in complex spectra. PMID:25163853

  17. Carbon-13 chemical-shift tensors in indigo: A two-dimensional NMR-ROCSA and DFT Study.

    PubMed

    Holmes, Sean T; Dybowski, Cecil

    2015-11-01

    The principal components of the (13)C NMR chemical-shift tensors for the eight unique carbon sites of crystalline indigo have been measured using the ROCSA pulse sequence. The chemical shifts have been assigned unambiguously to their respective nuclear sites through comparison of the experimental data to the results of density-functional calculations employing a refined X-ray diffraction structure. These measurements expand the database of measured aromatic (13)C chemical-shift tensors to the indole ring. Magnetic shielding calculations for hypoxanthine and adenosine are also reported. Comparisons of calculations that include the effect of the crystalline lattice with calculations that model indigo as an isolated molecule give an estimate of the intermolecular contribution to the magnetic shielding.

  18. Chemical shift assignments of zinc finger domain of methionine aminopeptidase 1 (MetAP1) from Homo sapiens.

    PubMed

    Rachineni, Kavitha; Arya, Tarun; Singarapu, Kiran Kumar; Addlagatta, Anthony; Bharatam, Jagadeesh

    2015-10-01

    Methionine aminopeptidase Type I (MetAP1) cleaves the initiator methionine from about 70 % of all newly synthesized proteins in almost every living cell. Human MetAP1 is a two domain protein with a zinc finger on the N-terminus and a catalytic domain on the C-terminus. Here, we report the chemical shift assignments of the amino terminal zinc binding domain (ZBD) (1-83 residues) of the human MetAP1 derived by using advanced NMR spectroscopic methods. We were able to assign the chemical shifts of ZBD of MetAP1 nearly complete, which reveal two helical fragments involving residues P44-L49 (α1) and Q59-K82 (α2). The protein structure unfolds upon complex formation with the addition of 2 M excess EDTA, indicated by the appearance of amide resonances in the random coil chemical shift region of (15)NHSQC spectrum.

  19. Carbon-13 chemical-shift tensors in indigo: A two-dimensional NMR-ROCSA and DFT Study

    PubMed Central

    Holmes, Sean T.; Dybowski, Cecil

    2016-01-01

    The principal components of the 13C NMR chemical-shift tensors for the eight unique carbon sites of crystalline indigo have been measured using the ROCSA pulse sequence. The chemical shifts have been assigned unambiguously to their respective nuclear sites through comparison of the experimental data to the results of density-functional calculations employing a refined X-ray diffraction structure. These measurements expand the database of measured aromatic 13C chemical-shift tensors to the indole ring. Magnetic shielding calculations for hypoxanthine and adenosine are also reported. Comparisons of calculations that include the effect of the crystalline lattice with calculations that model indigo as an isolated molecule give an estimate of the intermolecular contribution to the magnetic shielding. PMID:26344134

  20. [Evaluation of the Effect of Adiabatic Pulse and B1 Shim to the Radio Frequency Homogeneity in Chemical Shift Imaging].

    PubMed

    Kikuchi, Chie; Inoue, Mitsuhiro; Okawa, Kohei; Taguchi, Jyunichi; Hirota, Yoshifumi; Yanagiya, Yohei

    2016-04-01

    It is considered that the enhancement of chemical shift and the elevation of signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) induced by high magnetic fields are useful for the evaluation of metabolism using magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS). However, the reduction of the localization in MRS seems to be caused by the decreased homogeneity of radio frequency (RF) pulses, especially in chemical shift imaging (CSI). To search the influence of B1 shim mode and the significance of adiabatic pulses, we have examined the changes of RF homogeneity using 3 T magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) with the water phantom and the metabolites phantom (containing acetate and lactate) in CSI. The RF homogeneity and chemical shift artifact were obviously improved using the adiabatic pulses. Improvement of the homogeneity of RF pulses was observed when B1 shim was used. These results suggest the usefulness of CSI using adiabatic pulses and B1 shim when small amount of metabolites of target is measured in MRS. PMID:27097994

  1. Combined ligand-observe 19F and protein-observe 15N,1H-HSQC NMR suggests phenylalanine as the key Δ-somatostatin residue recognized by human protein disulfide isomerase

    PubMed Central

    Richards, Kirsty L.; Rowe, Michelle L.; Hudson, Paul B.; Williamson, Richard A.; Howard, Mark J.

    2016-01-01

    Human protein disulphide isomerase (hPDI) is an endoplasmic reticulum (ER) based isomerase and folding chaperone. Molecular detail of ligand recognition and specificity of hPDI are poorly understood despite the importance of the hPDI for folding secreted proteins and its implication in diseases including cancer and lateral sclerosis. We report a detailed study of specificity, interaction and dissociation constants (Kd) of the peptide-ligand Δ-somatostatin (AGSKNFFWKTFTSS) binding to hPDI using 19F ligand-observe and 15N,1H-HSQC protein-observe NMR methods. Phe residues in Δ-somatostatin are hypothesised as important for recognition by hPDI therefore, step-wise peptide Phe-to-Ala changes were progressively introduced and shown to raise the Kd from 103 + 47 μM until the point where binding was abolished when all Phe residues were modified to Ala. The largest step-changes in Kd involved the F11A peptide modification which implies the C-terminus of Δ-somatostatin is a prime recognition region. Furthermore, this study also validated the combined use of 19F ligand-observe and complimentary 15N,1H-HSQC titrations to monitor interactions from the protein’s perspective. 19F ligand-observe NMR was ratified as mirroring 15N protein-observe but highlighted the advantage that 19F offers improved Kd precision due to higher spectrum resolution and greater chemical environment sensitivity. PMID:26786784

  2. Origin of the conformational modulation of the 13C NMR chemical shift of methoxy groups in aromatic natural compounds.

    PubMed

    Toušek, Jaromír; Straka, Michal; Sklenář, Vladimír; Marek, Radek

    2013-01-24

    The interpretation of nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) parameters is essential to understanding experimental observations at the molecular and supramolecular levels and to designing new and more efficient molecular probes. In many aromatic natural compounds, unusual (13)C NMR chemical shifts have been reported for out-of-plane methoxy groups bonded to the aromatic ring (~62 ppm as compared to the typical value of ~56 ppm for an aromatic methoxy group). Here, we analyzed this phenomenon for a series of aromatic natural compounds using Density Functional Theory (DFT) calculations. First, we checked the methodology used to optimize the structure and calculate the NMR chemical shifts in aromatic compounds. The conformational effects of the methoxy group on the (13)C NMR chemical shift then were interpreted by the Natural Bond Orbital (NBO) and Natural Chemical Shift (NCS) approaches, and by excitation analysis of the chemical shifts, breaking down the total nuclear shielding tensor into the contributions from the different occupied orbitals and their magnetic interactions with virtual orbitals. We discovered that the atypical (13)C NMR chemical shifts observed are not directly related to a different conjugation of the lone pair of electrons of the methoxy oxygen with the aromatic ring, as has been suggested. Our analysis indicates that rotation of the methoxy group induces changes in the virtual molecular orbital space, which, in turn, correlate with the predominant part of the contribution of the paramagnetic deshielding connected with the magnetic interactions of the BD(CMet-H)→BD*(CMet-OMet) orbitals, resulting in the experimentally observed deshielding of the (13)C NMR resonance of the out-of-plane methoxy group.

  3. Multiparametric fat–water separation method for fast chemical-shift imaging guidance of thermal therapies

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Jonathan S.; Hwang, Ken-Pin; Jackson, Edward F.; Hazle, John D.; Jason Stafford, R.; Taylor, Brian A.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: A k-means-based classification algorithm is investigated to assess suitability for rapidly separating and classifying fat/water spectral peaks from a fast chemical shift imaging technique for magnetic resonance temperature imaging. Algorithm testing is performed in simulated mathematical phantoms and agar gel phantoms containing mixed fat/water regions. Methods: Proton resonance frequencies (PRFs), apparent spin-spin relaxation (T2*) times, and T1-weighted (T1-W) amplitude values were calculated for each voxel using a single-peak autoregressive moving average (ARMA) signal model. These parameters were then used as criteria for k-means sorting, with the results used to determine PRF ranges of each chemical species cluster for further classification. To detect the presence of secondary chemical species, spectral parameters were recalculated when needed using a two-peak ARMA signal model during the subsequent classification steps. Mathematical phantom simulations involved the modulation of signal-to-noise ratios (SNR), maximum PRF shift (MPS) values, analysis window sizes, and frequency expansion factor sizes in order to characterize the algorithm performance across a variety of conditions. In agar, images were collected on a 1.5T clinical MR scanner using acquisition parameters close to simulation, and algorithm performance was assessed by comparing classification results to manually segmented maps of the fat/water regions. Results: Performance was characterized quantitatively using the Dice Similarity Coefficient (DSC), sensitivity, and specificity. The simulated mathematical phantom experiments demonstrated good fat/water separation depending on conditions, specifically high SNR, moderate MPS value, small analysis window size, and low but nonzero frequency expansion factor size. Physical phantom results demonstrated good identification for both water (0.997 ± 0.001, 0.999 ± 0.001, and 0.986 ± 0.001 for DSC, sensitivity, and specificity, respectively

  4. Recoupling of chemical shift anisotropy by R-symmetry sequences in magic angle spinning NMR spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Hou, Guangjin; Byeon, In-Ja L.; Ahn, Jinwoo; Gronenborn, Angela M.; Polenova, Tatyana

    2012-01-01

    13C and 15N chemical shift (CS) interaction is a sensitive probe of structure and dynamics in a wide variety of biological and inorganic systems, and in the recent years several magic angle spinning NMR approaches have emerged for residue-specific measurements of chemical shift anisotropy (CSA) tensors in uniformly and sparsely enriched proteins. All of the currently existing methods are applicable to slow and moderate magic angle spinning (MAS) regime, i.e., MAS frequencies below 20 kHz. With the advent of fast and ultrafast MAS probes capable of spinning frequencies of 40–100 kHz, and with the superior resolution and sensitivity attained at such high frequencies, development of CSA recoupling techniques working under such conditions is necessary. In this work, we present a family of R-symmetry based pulse sequences for recoupling of 13C/15N CSA interactions that work well in both natural abundance and isotopically enriched systems. We demonstrate that efficient recoupling of either first-rank (σ1) or second-rank (σ2) spatial components of CSA interaction is attained with appropriately chosen γ-encoded RNnv symmetry sequences. The advantage of these γ-encoded RNnv-symmetry based CSA (RNCSA) recoupling schemes is that they are suitable for CSA recoupling under a wide range of MAS frequencies, including fast MAS regime. Comprehensive analysis of the recoupling properties of these RNnv symmetry sequences reveals that the σ1-CSA recoupling symmetry sequences exhibit large scaling factors; however, the partial homonuclear dipolar Hamiltonian components are symmetry allowed, which makes this family of sequences suitable for CSA measurements in systems with weak homonuclear dipolar interactions. On the other hand, the γ-encoded symmetry sequences for σ2-CSA recoupling have smaller scaling factors but they efficiently suppress the homonuclear dipole-dipole interactions. Therefore, the latter family of sequences is applicable for measurements of CSA parameters in

  5. Recoupling of chemical shift anisotropy by R-symmetry sequences in magic angle spinning NMR spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hou, Guangjin; Byeon, In-Ja L.; Ahn, Jinwoo; Gronenborn, Angela M.; Polenova, Tatyana

    2012-10-01

    13C and 15N chemical shift (CS) interaction is a sensitive probe of structure and dynamics in a wide variety of biological and inorganic systems, and in the recent years several magic angle spinning NMR approaches have emerged for residue-specific measurements of chemical shift anisotropy (CSA) tensors in uniformly and sparsely enriched proteins. All of the currently existing methods are applicable to slow and moderate magic angle spinning (MAS) regime, i.e., MAS frequencies below 20 kHz. With the advent of fast and ultrafast MAS probes capable of spinning frequencies of 40-100 kHz, and with the superior resolution and sensitivity attained at such high frequencies, development of CSA recoupling techniques working under such conditions is necessary. In this work, we present a family of R-symmetry based pulse sequences for recoupling of 13C/15N CSA interactions that work well in both natural abundance and isotopically enriched systems. We demonstrate that efficient recoupling of either first-rank (σ1) or second-rank (σ2) spatial components of CSA interaction is attained with appropriately chosen γ-encoded RNnv symmetry sequences. The advantage of these γ-encoded RNnv-symmetry based CSA (RNCSA) recoupling schemes is that they are suitable for CSA recoupling under a wide range of MAS frequencies, including fast MAS regime. Comprehensive analysis of the recoupling properties of these RNnv symmetry sequences reveals that the σ1-CSA recoupling symmetry sequences exhibit large scaling factors; however, the partial homonuclear dipolar Hamiltonian components are symmetry allowed, which makes this family of sequences suitable for CSA measurements in systems with weak homonuclear dipolar interactions. On the other hand, the γ-encoded symmetry sequences for σ2-CSA recoupling have smaller scaling factors but they efficiently suppress the homonuclear dipole-dipole interactions. Therefore, the latter family of sequences is applicable for measurements of CSA parameters in

  6. Regional Differences in Muscle Energy Metabolism in Human Muscle by 31P-Chemical Shift Imaging.

    PubMed

    Kime, Ryotaro; Kaneko, Yasuhisa; Hongo, Yoshinori; Ohno, Yusuke; Sakamoto, Ayumi; Katsumura, Toshihito

    2016-01-01

    Previous studies have reported significant region-dependent differences in the fiber-type composition of human skeletal muscle. It is therefore hypothesized that there is a difference between the deep and superficial parts of muscle energy metabolism during exercise. We hypothesized that the inorganic phosphate (Pi)/phosphocreatine (PCr) ratio of the superficial parts would be higher, compared with the deep parts, as the work rate increases, because the muscle fiber-type composition of the fast-type may be greater in the superficial parts compared with the deep parts. This study used two-dimensional 31Phosphorus Chemical Shift Imaging (31P-CSI) to detect differences between the deep and superficial parts of the human leg muscles during dynamic knee extension exercise. Six healthy men participated in this study (age 27±1 year, height 169.4±4.1 cm, weight 65.9±8.4 kg). The experiments were carried out with a 1.5-T superconducting magnet with a 5-in. diameter circular surface coil. The subjects performed dynamic one-legged knee extension exercise in the prone position, with the transmit-receive coil placed under the right quadriceps muscles in the magnet. The subjects pulled down an elastic rubber band attached to the ankle at a frequency of 0.25, 0.5 and 1 Hz for 320 s each. The intracellular pH (pHi) was calculated from the median chemical shift of the Pi peak relative to PCr. No significant difference in Pi/PCr was observed between the deep and the superficial parts of the quadriceps muscles at rest. The Pi/PCr of the superficial parts was not significantly increased with increasing work rate. Compared with the superficial areas, the Pi/PCr of the deep parts was significantly higher (p<0.05) at 1 Hz. The pHi showed no significant difference between the two parts. These results suggest that muscle oxidative metabolism is different between deep and superficial parts of quadriceps muscles during dynamic exercise. PMID:26782194

  7. Regional Differences in Muscle Energy Metabolism in Human Muscle by 31P-Chemical Shift Imaging.

    PubMed

    Kime, Ryotaro; Kaneko, Yasuhisa; Hongo, Yoshinori; Ohno, Yusuke; Sakamoto, Ayumi; Katsumura, Toshihito

    2016-01-01

    Previous studies have reported significant region-dependent differences in the fiber-type composition of human skeletal muscle. It is therefore hypothesized that there is a difference between the deep and superficial parts of muscle energy metabolism during exercise. We hypothesized that the inorganic phosphate (Pi)/phosphocreatine (PCr) ratio of the superficial parts would be higher, compared with the deep parts, as the work rate increases, because the muscle fiber-type composition of the fast-type may be greater in the superficial parts compared with the deep parts. This study used two-dimensional 31Phosphorus Chemical Shift Imaging (31P-CSI) to detect differences between the deep and superficial parts of the human leg muscles during dynamic knee extension exercise. Six healthy men participated in this study (age 27±1 year, height 169.4±4.1 cm, weight 65.9±8.4 kg). The experiments were carried out with a 1.5-T superconducting magnet with a 5-in. diameter circular surface coil. The subjects performed dynamic one-legged knee extension exercise in the prone position, with the transmit-receive coil placed under the right quadriceps muscles in the magnet. The subjects pulled down an elastic rubber band attached to the ankle at a frequency of 0.25, 0.5 and 1 Hz for 320 s each. The intracellular pH (pHi) was calculated from the median chemical shift of the Pi peak relative to PCr. No significant difference in Pi/PCr was observed between the deep and the superficial parts of the quadriceps muscles at rest. The Pi/PCr of the superficial parts was not significantly increased with increasing work rate. Compared with the superficial areas, the Pi/PCr of the deep parts was significantly higher (p<0.05) at 1 Hz. The pHi showed no significant difference between the two parts. These results suggest that muscle oxidative metabolism is different between deep and superficial parts of quadriceps muscles during dynamic exercise.

  8. Accurate ab initio prediction of NMR chemical shifts of nucleic acids and nucleic acids/protein complexes

    PubMed Central

    Victora, Andrea; Möller, Heiko M.; Exner, Thomas E.

    2014-01-01

    NMR chemical shift predictions based on empirical methods are nowadays indispensable tools during resonance assignment and 3D structure calculation of proteins. However, owing to the very limited statistical data basis, such methods are still in their infancy in the field of nucleic acids, especially when non-canonical structures and nucleic acid complexes are considered. Here, we present an ab initio approach for predicting proton chemical shifts of arbitrary nucleic acid structures based on state-of-the-art fragment-based quantum chemical calculations. We tested our prediction method on a diverse set of nucleic acid structures including double-stranded DNA, hairpins, DNA/protein complexes and chemically-modified DNA. Overall, our quantum chemical calculations yield highly/very accurate predictions with mean absolute deviations of 0.3–0.6 ppm and correlation coefficients (r2) usually above 0.9. This will allow for identifying misassignments and validating 3D structures. Furthermore, our calculations reveal that chemical shifts of protons involved in hydrogen bonding are predicted significantly less accurately. This is in part caused by insufficient inclusion of solvation effects. However, it also points toward shortcomings of current force fields used for structure determination of nucleic acids. Our quantum chemical calculations could therefore provide input for force field optimization. PMID:25404135

  9. Direct Comparison of (19)F qNMR and (1)H qNMR by Characterizing Atorvastatin Calcium Content.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yang; Liu, Zhaoxia; Yang, Huaxin; He, Lan

    2016-01-01

    Quantitative nuclear magnetic resonance (qNMR) is a powerful tool in measuring drug content because of its high speed, sensitivity, and precision. Most of the reports were based on proton qNMR ((1)H qNMR) and only a few fluorine qNMR ((19)F qNMR) were reported. No research has been conducted to directly compare the advantage and disadvantage between these two methods. In the present study, both (19)F and (1)H qNMR were performed to characterize the content of atorvastatin calcium with the same internal standard. Linearity, precision, and results from two methods were compared. Results showed that (19)F qNMR has similar precision and sensitivity to (1)H qNMR. Both methods generate similar results compared to mass balance method. Major advantage from (19)F qNMR is that the analyte signal is with less or no interference from impurities. (19)F qNMR is an excellent approach to quantify fluorine-containing analytes. PMID:27688925

  10. Direct Comparison of 19F qNMR and 1H qNMR by Characterizing Atorvastatin Calcium Content

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Yang; Liu, Zhaoxia; Yang, Huaxin

    2016-01-01

    Quantitative nuclear magnetic resonance (qNMR) is a powerful tool in measuring drug content because of its high speed, sensitivity, and precision. Most of the reports were based on proton qNMR (1H qNMR) and only a few fluorine qNMR (19F qNMR) were reported. No research has been conducted to directly compare the advantage and disadvantage between these two methods. In the present study, both 19F and 1H qNMR were performed to characterize the content of atorvastatin calcium with the same internal standard. Linearity, precision, and results from two methods were compared. Results showed that 19F qNMR has similar precision and sensitivity to 1H qNMR. Both methods generate similar results compared to mass balance method. Major advantage from 19F qNMR is that the analyte signal is with less or no interference from impurities. 19F qNMR is an excellent approach to quantify fluorine-containing analytes. PMID:27688925

  11. Direct Comparison of 19F qNMR and 1H qNMR by Characterizing Atorvastatin Calcium Content

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Yang; Liu, Zhaoxia; Yang, Huaxin

    2016-01-01

    Quantitative nuclear magnetic resonance (qNMR) is a powerful tool in measuring drug content because of its high speed, sensitivity, and precision. Most of the reports were based on proton qNMR (1H qNMR) and only a few fluorine qNMR (19F qNMR) were reported. No research has been conducted to directly compare the advantage and disadvantage between these two methods. In the present study, both 19F and 1H qNMR were performed to characterize the content of atorvastatin calcium with the same internal standard. Linearity, precision, and results from two methods were compared. Results showed that 19F qNMR has similar precision and sensitivity to 1H qNMR. Both methods generate similar results compared to mass balance method. Major advantage from 19F qNMR is that the analyte signal is with less or no interference from impurities. 19F qNMR is an excellent approach to quantify fluorine-containing analytes.

  12. Chemical shift assignment of the alternative scaffold protein IscA.

    PubMed

    Popovic, Matija; Pastore, Annalisa

    2016-04-01

    The IscA protein (11.5 kDa) is an essential component of the iron sulphur cluster biogenesis machine. In bacteria, the machine components are clustered in operons, amongst which the most important is the isc operon. Bacterial IscA has direct homologues also in eukaryotes. Like the protein IscU, IscA is thought to assist cluster formation as an alternative scaffold protein which receives the cluster before transferring it further to the final acceptors. Several crystal structures have been published. They all report an IscA dimeric form, although the packing of the protomers in the dimers differs amongst structures. No solution studies have currently been reported. Here we report the (1)H, (13)C and (15)N backbone and side-chain chemical shift assignments of the cluster-free E. coli IscA as a starting point for further studies of the structure and functions of this still poorly characterized protein. We show that IscA exists in solution as an equilibrium between different species. Spectrum assignment was thus challenging given the heterogeneous nature of the sample but doable through judicious choice of selective labelling and concentration dependent studies.

  13. Chemical Shift Encoded Water–Fat Separation Using Parallel Imaging and Compressed Sensing

    PubMed Central

    Sharma, Samir D.; Hu, Houchun H.; Nayak, Krishna S.

    2013-01-01

    Chemical shift encoded techniques have received considerable attention recently because they can reliably separate water and fat in the presence of off-resonance. The insensitivity to off-resonance requires that data be acquired at multiple echo times, which increases the scan time as compared to a single echo acquisition. The increased scan time often requires that a compromise be made between the spatial resolution, the volume coverage, and the tolerance to artifacts from subject motion. This work describes a combined parallel imaging and compressed sensing approach for accelerated water–fat separation. In addition, the use of multiscale cubic B-splines for B0 field map estimation is introduced. The water and fat images and the B0 field map are estimated via an alternating minimization. Coil sensitivity information is derived from a calculated k-space convolution kernel and l1-regularization is imposed on the coil-combined water and fat image estimates. Uniform water–fat separation is demonstrated from retrospectively undersampled data in the liver, brachial plexus, ankle, and knee as well as from a prospectively undersampled acquisition of the knee at 8.6x acceleration. PMID:22505285

  14. Multiband excitation pulses for hyperpolarized 13C dynamic chemical-shift imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Larson, Peder E. Z.; Kerr, Adam B.; Chen, Albert P.; Lustig, Michael S.; Zierhut, Matthew L.; Hu, Simon; Cunningham, Charles H.; Pauly, John M.; Kurhanewicz, John; Vigneron, Daniel B.

    2008-09-01

    Hyperpolarized 13C offers high signal-to-noise ratios for imaging metabolic activity in vivo, but care must be taken when designing pulse sequences because the magnetization cannot be recovered once it has decayed. It has a short lifetime, on the order of minutes, and gets used up by each RF excitation. In this paper, we present a new dynamic chemical-shift imaging method that uses specialized RF pulses designed to maintain most of the hyperpolarized substrate while providing adequate SNR for the metabolic products. These are multiband, variable flip angle, spectral-spatial RF pulses that use spectral selectivity to minimally excite the injected prepolarized 13C-pyruvate substrate. The metabolic products of lactate and alanine are excited with a larger flip angle to increase SNR. This excitation was followed by an RF amplitude insensitive double spin-echo and an echo-planar flyback spectral-spatial readout gradient. In vivo results in rats and mice are presented showing improvements over constant flip angle RF pulses. The metabolic products are observable for a longer window because the low pyruvate flip angle preserves magnetization, allowing for improved observation of spatially varying metabolic reactions.

  15. Visualizing brain inflammation with a shingled-leg radio-frequency head probe for 19F/1H MRI.

    PubMed

    Waiczies, Helmar; Lepore, Stefano; Drechsler, Susanne; Qadri, Fatimunnisa; Purfürst, Bettina; Sydow, Karl; Dathe, Margitta; Kühne, André; Lindel, Tomasz; Hoffmann, Werner; Pohlmann, Andreas; Niendorf, Thoralf; Waiczies, Sonia

    2013-01-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) provides the opportunity of tracking cells in vivo. Major challenges in dissecting cells from the recipient tissue and signal sensitivity constraints albeit exist. In this study, we aimed to tackle these limitations in order to study inflammation in autoimmune encephalomyelitis. We constructed a very small dual-tunable radio frequency (RF) birdcage probe tailored for (19)F (fluorine) and (1)H (proton) MR mouse neuroimaging. The novel design eliminated the need for extra electrical components on the probe structure and afforded a uniform -field as well as good SNR. We employed fluorescently-tagged (19)F nanoparticles and could study the dynamics of inflammatory cells between CNS and lymphatic system during development of encephalomyelitis, even within regions of the brain that are otherwise not easily visualized by conventional probes. (19)F/(1)H MR Neuroimaging will allow us to study the nature of immune cell infiltration during brain inflammation over an extensive period of time. PMID:23412352

  16. Current issues in the utility of 19F nuclear magnetic resonance methodologies for the assessment of tumour hypoxia.

    PubMed Central

    Robinson, Simon P; Griffiths, John R

    2004-01-01

    It is now well established that uncontrolled proliferation of tumour cells together with the chaotic and poorly regulated blood supply of solid tumours result in tissue hypoxia, and that hypoxic regions of tumours are resistant to radiotherapy and chemotherapy. The development and application of non-invasive methods to rapidly determine the degree and extent of tumour hypoxia in an individual tumour would clearly enhance cancer treatment strategies. This review describes the current status of two (19)F nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) methodologies that have been exploited to investigate tumour hypoxia, namely: (i) (19)F NMR oximetry following administration of perfluorocarbons, from which tumour p(O)(2) measurements can be made; and (ii) (19)F NMR measurements of the tumour retention of fluorinated 2-nitroimidazoles. PMID:15306411

  17. Visualizing Brain Inflammation with a Shingled-Leg Radio-Frequency Head Probe for 19F/1H MRI

    PubMed Central

    Waiczies, Helmar; Lepore, Stefano; Drechsler, Susanne; Qadri, Fatimunnisa; Purfürst, Bettina; Sydow, Karl; Dathe, Margitta; Kühne, André; Lindel, Tomasz; Hoffmann, Werner; Pohlmann, Andreas; Niendorf, Thoralf; Waiczies, Sonia

    2013-01-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) provides the opportunity of tracking cells in vivo. Major challenges in dissecting cells from the recipient tissue and signal sensitivity constraints albeit exist. In this study, we aimed to tackle these limitations in order to study inflammation in autoimmune encephalomyelitis. We constructed a very small dual-tunable radio frequency (RF) birdcage probe tailored for 19F (fluorine) and 1H (proton) MR mouse neuroimaging. The novel design eliminated the need for extra electrical components on the probe structure and afforded a uniform -field as well as good SNR. We employed fluorescently-tagged 19F nanoparticles and could study the dynamics of inflammatory cells between CNS and lymphatic system during development of encephalomyelitis, even within regions of the brain that are otherwise not easily visualized by conventional probes. 19F/1H MR Neuroimaging will allow us to study the nature of immune cell infiltration during brain inflammation over an extensive period of time. PMID:23412352

  18. Ab initio study of {sup 13}C NMR chemical shifts for the chromophores of rhodopsin and bacteriorhodopsin. 2. Comprehensive analysis of the {sup 13}C chemical shifts of protonated all-trans-retinylidene Schiff base

    SciTech Connect

    Sakurai, Minoru; Wada, Mitsuhito; Inoue, Yoshio; Tamura, Yusuke; Watanabe, Yoichi

    1996-02-01

    Theoretical analysis was performed for the {sup 13}C chemical shifts of the retinal chromophore in bacteriorhodopsin (bR) by means of ab initio NMR shielding calculation, based on the localized orbital/ local origin method. In order to comprehensively investigate the correlation between the {sup 13}C chemical shieldings of the unsaturated carbons and physicochemical perturbations relating to the spectral tuning of bacteriorhodopsin, the following three factors are taken into account in the present calculation: (1) change in strength of the hydrogen bonding between protonated retinylidene Schiff base and its counterion, (2) conformational changes about single bonds of the conjugated chain, and (3) electrostatic interactions between the Schiff base and electric dipoles. On the basis of these calculations, we successfully find a molecular model for which the shielding calculation almost completely reproduces the observed chemical shift data for the chromophore of bR. 47 refs., 13 figs.

  19. Analysis of the contributions of ring current and electric field effects to the chemical shifts of RNA bases.

    PubMed

    Sahakyan, Aleksandr B; Vendruscolo, Michele

    2013-02-21

    Ring current and electric field effects can considerably influence NMR chemical shifts in biomolecules. Understanding such effects is particularly important for the development of accurate mappings between chemical shifts and the structures of nucleic acids. In this work, we first analyzed the Pople and the Haigh-Mallion models in terms of their ability to describe nitrogen base conjugated ring effects. We then created a database (DiBaseRNA) of three-dimensional arrangements of RNA base pairs from X-ray structures, calculated the corresponding chemical shifts via a hybrid density functional theory approach and used the results to parametrize the ring current and electric field effects in RNA bases. Next, we studied the coupling of the electric field and ring current effects for different inter-ring arrangements found in RNA bases using linear model fitting, with joint electric field and ring current, as well as only electric field and only ring current approximations. Taken together, our results provide a characterization of the interdependence of ring current and electric field geometric factors, which is shown to be especially important for the chemical shifts of non-hydrogen atoms in RNA bases.

  20. Correction of erroneously packed protein's side chains in the NMR structure based on ab initio chemical shift calculations.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Tong; Zhang, John Z H; He, Xiao

    2014-09-14

    In this work, protein side chain (1)H chemical shifts are used as probes to detect and correct side-chain packing errors in protein's NMR structures through structural refinement. By applying the automated fragmentation quantum mechanics/molecular mechanics (AF-QM/MM) method for ab initio calculation of chemical shifts, incorrect side chain packing was detected in the NMR structures of the Pin1 WW domain. The NMR structure is then refined by using molecular dynamics simulation and the polarized protein-specific charge (PPC) model. The computationally refined structure of the Pin1 WW domain is in excellent agreement with the corresponding X-ray structure. In particular, the use of the PPC model yields a more accurate structure than that using the standard (nonpolarizable) force field. For comparison, some of the widely used empirical models for chemical shift calculations are unable to correctly describe the relationship between the particular proton chemical shift and protein structures. The AF-QM/MM method can be used as a powerful tool for protein NMR structure validation and structural flaw detection.

  1. Detection of methylation, acetylation and glycosylation of protein residues by monitoring (13)C chemical-shift changes: A quantum-chemical study.

    PubMed

    Garay, Pablo G; Martin, Osvaldo A; Scheraga, Harold A; Vila, Jorge A

    2016-01-01

    Post-translational modifications of proteins expand the diversity of the proteome by several orders of magnitude and have a profound effect on several biological processes. Their detection by experimental methods is not free of limitations such as the amount of sample needed or the use of destructive procedures to obtain the sample. Certainly, new approaches are needed and, therefore, we explore here the feasibility of using (13)C chemical shifts of different nuclei to detect methylation, acetylation and glycosylation of protein residues by monitoring the deviation of the (13)C chemical shifts from the expected (mean) experimental value of the non-modified residue. As a proof-of-concept, we used (13)C chemical shifts, computed at the DFT-level of theory, to test this hypothesis. Moreover, as a validation test of this approach, we compare our theoretical computations of the (13)Cε chemical-shift values against existing experimental data, obtained from NMR spectroscopy, for methylated and acetylated lysine residues with good agreement within ∼1 ppm. Then, further use of this approach to select the most suitable (13)C-nucleus, with which to determine other modifications commonly seen, such as methylation of arginine and glycosylation of serine, asparagine and threonine, shows encouraging results. PMID:27547559

  2. Detection of methylation, acetylation and glycosylation of protein residues by monitoring (13)C chemical-shift changes: A quantum-chemical study.

    PubMed

    Garay, Pablo G; Martin, Osvaldo A; Scheraga, Harold A; Vila, Jorge A

    2016-01-01

    Post-translational modifications of proteins expand the diversity of the proteome by several orders of magnitude and have a profound effect on several biological processes. Their detection by experimental methods is not free of limitations such as the amount of sample needed or the use of destructive procedures to obtain the sample. Certainly, new approaches are needed and, therefore, we explore here the feasibility of using (13)C chemical shifts of different nuclei to detect methylation, acetylation and glycosylation of protein residues by monitoring the deviation of the (13)C chemical shifts from the expected (mean) experimental value of the non-modified residue. As a proof-of-concept, we used (13)C chemical shifts, computed at the DFT-level of theory, to test this hypothesis. Moreover, as a validation test of this approach, we compare our theoretical computations of the (13)Cε chemical-shift values against existing experimental data, obtained from NMR spectroscopy, for methylated and acetylated lysine residues with good agreement within ∼1 ppm. Then, further use of this approach to select the most suitable (13)C-nucleus, with which to determine other modifications commonly seen, such as methylation of arginine and glycosylation of serine, asparagine and threonine, shows encouraging results.

  3. Detection of methylation, acetylation and glycosylation of protein residues by monitoring 13C chemical-shift changes: A quantum-chemical study

    PubMed Central

    Garay, Pablo G.; Martin, Osvaldo A.; Scheraga, Harold A.

    2016-01-01

    Post-translational modifications of proteins expand the diversity of the proteome by several orders of magnitude and have a profound effect on several biological processes. Their detection by experimental methods is not free of limitations such as the amount of sample needed or the use of destructive procedures to obtain the sample. Certainly, new approaches are needed and, therefore, we explore here the feasibility of using 13C chemical shifts of different nuclei to detect methylation, acetylation and glycosylation of protein residues by monitoring the deviation of the 13C chemical shifts from the expected (mean) experimental value of the non-modified residue. As a proof-of-concept, we used 13C chemical shifts, computed at the DFT-level of theory, to test this hypothesis. Moreover, as a validation test of this approach, we compare our theoretical computations of the 13Cε chemical-shift values against existing experimental data, obtained from NMR spectroscopy, for methylated and acetylated lysine residues with good agreement within ∼1 ppm. Then, further use of this approach to select the most suitable 13C-nucleus, with which to determine other modifications commonly seen, such as methylation of arginine and glycosylation of serine, asparagine and threonine, shows encouraging results. PMID:27547559

  4. Limiting Values of the 15N Chemical Shift of the Imidazole Ring of Histidine at High-pH§

    PubMed Central

    Vila, Jorge A.

    2012-01-01

    Tautomeric identification by direct observation of 15N chemical shifts of the imidazole ring of histidine (His) has become a common practice in NMR spectroscopy. However, such applications require knowledge of the “canonical” limiting values of the 15N chemical shift of the imidazole ring of His in which each form of His, namely the protonated (H+) and the tautomeric Nε2-H and Nδ1-H forms, respectively, is present to the extent of 100%. So far, the adopted canonical limiting values of the 15N chemical shift have been those available from model compounds. As to whether these canonical values reflect those of the individual pure forms of His is investigated here by carrying out an analysis of the second-order shielding differences, ΔΔ = |Δε − Δδ, with Δξ(ξ = ε or δ) being the DFT-computed average shielding differences between the two nitrogens of the imidazole ring of His in each pure tautomeric form. In the high-pH limit the results indicate that the (i) ΔΔ values from the DFT-computed shielding, but not from the commonly-used canonical limiting values, are in closer agreement with those obtained with experimental chemical shift data from model compounds in solution and solid-state NMR; and (ii) commonly-used canonical limiting values of the 15N chemical shifts lead to an average tautomeric equilibrium constant that differs by a factor of ~2.6 from the one computed by using DFT-based 15N limiting values, raising concern about the practice of using canonical limiting 15N values; this can be avoided by reporting tautomeric equilibrium constants computed by using only limiting 15N values for the Nε2-H tautomer. PMID:22376024

  5. Toward Relatively General and Accurate Quantum Chemical Predictions of Solid-State 17O NMR Chemical Shifts in Various Biologically Relevant Oxygen-containing Compounds

    PubMed Central

    Rorick, Amber; Michael, Matthew A.; Yang, Liu; Zhang, Yong

    2015-01-01

    Oxygen is an important element in most biologically significant molecules and experimental solid-state 17O NMR studies have provided numerous useful structural probes to study these systems. However, computational predictions of solid-state 17O NMR chemical shift tensor properties are still challenging in many cases and in particular each of the prior computational work is basically limited to one type of oxygen-containing systems. This work provides the first systematic study of the effects of geometry refinement, method and basis sets for metal and non-metal elements in both geometry optimization and NMR property calculations of some biologically relevant oxygen-containing compounds with a good variety of XO bonding groups, X= H, C, N, P, and metal. The experimental range studied is of 1455 ppm, a major part of the reported 17O NMR chemical shifts in organic and organometallic compounds. A number of computational factors towards relatively general and accurate predictions of 17O NMR chemical shifts were studied to provide helpful and detailed suggestions for future work. For the studied various kinds of oxygen-containing compounds, the best computational approach results in a theory-versus-experiment correlation coefficient R2 of 0.9880 and mean absolute deviation of 13 ppm (1.9% of the experimental range) for isotropic NMR shifts and R2 of 0.9926 for all shift tensor properties. These results shall facilitate future computational studies of 17O NMR chemical shifts in many biologically relevant systems, and the high accuracy may also help refinement and determination of active-site structures of some oxygen-containing substrate bound proteins. PMID:26274812

  6. Toward Relatively General and Accurate Quantum Chemical Predictions of Solid-State (17)O NMR Chemical Shifts in Various Biologically Relevant Oxygen-Containing Compounds.

    PubMed

    Rorick, Amber; Michael, Matthew A; Yang, Liu; Zhang, Yong

    2015-09-01

    Oxygen is an important element in most biologically significant molecules, and experimental solid-state (17)O NMR studies have provided numerous useful structural probes to study these systems. However, computational predictions of solid-state (17)O NMR chemical shift tensor properties are still challenging in many cases, and in particular, each of the prior computational works is basically limited to one type of oxygen-containing system. This work provides the first systematic study of the effects of geometry refinement, method, and basis sets for metal and nonmetal elements in both geometry optimization and NMR property calculations of some biologically relevant oxygen-containing compounds with a good variety of XO bonding groups (X = H, C, N, P, and metal). The experimental range studied is of 1455 ppm, a major part of the reported (17)O NMR chemical shifts in organic and organometallic compounds. A number of computational factors toward relatively general and accurate predictions of (17)O NMR chemical shifts were studied to provide helpful and detailed suggestions for future work. For the studied kinds of oxygen-containing compounds, the best computational approach results in a theory-versus-experiment correlation coefficient (R(2)) value of 0.9880 and a mean absolute deviation of 13 ppm (1.9% of the experimental range) for isotropic NMR shifts and an R(2) value of 0.9926 for all shift-tensor properties. These results shall facilitate future computational studies of (17)O NMR chemical shifts in many biologically relevant systems, and the high accuracy may also help the refinement and determination of active-site structures of some oxygen-containing substrate-bound proteins.

  7. Rapid monitoring of oxygenation by 19F magnetic resonance imaging: Simultaneous comparison with fluorescence quenching.

    PubMed

    Jordan, Bénédicte F; Cron, Greg O; Gallez, Bernard

    2009-03-01

    The aim of this study was to develop an MRI fluorocarbon oximetry technique using snapshot inversion recovery and compare it with fluorescence quenching fiber-optic probe oximetry (OxyLite) performed simultaneously in experimental mouse tumors. The oxygen reporter probe hexafluorobenzene (HFB) was injected directly into the tumors, along with the insertion of the OxyLite probe. Tumor oxygenation (pO(2)) was modified using carbogen or lethal doses of the anesthetic gas. MRI pO(2) maps were generated in 1.5 min with an in-plane spatial resolution of 1.88 mm. MRI and OxyLite showed consistent baseline and postmortem pO(2) values. Increases in tumor pO(2) during carbogen breathing showed similar kinetics for the two methods. The pO(2) values observed using the OxyLite corresponded with relatively hypoxic values observed by MRI. The apparent discrepancy between mean values might be due to the difference in sampling volumes of the techniques and the observation of multiple locations using (19)F MRI versus a single location using the large optical fiber. Overall, the present method provides a rapid way to map the tumor oxygenation and is particularly suitable to monitor acute changes of pO(2) in tumors.

  8. Female sea lamprey shift orientation toward a conspecific chemical cue to escape a sensory trap

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Brant, Cory O.; Johnson, Nicholas; Li, Ke; Buchinger, Tyler J.; Li, Weiming

    2016-01-01

    The sensory trap model of signal evolution hypothesizes that signalers adapt to exploit a cue used by the receiver in another context. Although exploitation of receiver biases can result in conflict between the sexes, deceptive signaling systems that are mutually beneficial drive the evolution of stable communication systems. However, female responses in the nonsexual and sexual contexts may become uncoupled if costs are associated with exhibiting a similar response to a trait in both contexts. Male sea lamprey (Petromyzon marinus) signal with a mating pheromone, 3-keto petromyzonol sulfate (3kPZS), which may be a match to a juvenile cue used by females during migration. Upstream movement of migratory lampreys is partially guided by 3kPZS, but females only move toward 3kPZS with proximal accuracy during spawning. Here, we use in-stream behavioral assays paired with gonad histology to document the transition of female preference for juvenile- and male-released 3kPZS that coincides with the functional shift of 3kPZS as a migratory cue to a mating pheromone. Females became increasingly biased toward the source of synthesized 3kPZS as their maturation progressed into the reproductive phase, at which point, a preference for juvenile odor (also containing 3kPZS naturally) ceased to exist. Uncoupling of female responses during migration and spawning makes the 3kPZS communication system a reliable means of synchronizing mate search. The present study offers a rare example of a transition in female responses to a chemical cue between nonsexual and sexual contexts, provides insights into the origins of stable communication signaling systems.

  9. Benchmark fragment-based (1)H, (13)C, (15)N and (17)O chemical shift predictions in molecular crystals.

    PubMed

    Hartman, Joshua D; Kudla, Ryan A; Day, Graeme M; Mueller, Leonard J; Beran, Gregory J O

    2016-08-21

    The performance of fragment-based ab initio(1)H, (13)C, (15)N and (17)O chemical shift predictions is assessed against experimental NMR chemical shift data in four benchmark sets of molecular crystals. Employing a variety of commonly used density functionals (PBE0, B3LYP, TPSSh, OPBE, PBE, TPSS), we explore the relative performance of cluster, two-body fragment, and combined cluster/fragment models. The hybrid density functionals (PBE0, B3LYP and TPSSh) generally out-perform their generalized gradient approximation (GGA)-based counterparts. (1)H, (13)C, (15)N, and (17)O isotropic chemical shifts can be predicted with root-mean-square errors of 0.3, 1.5, 4.2, and 9.8 ppm, respectively, using a computationally inexpensive electrostatically embedded two-body PBE0 fragment model. Oxygen chemical shieldings prove particularly sensitive to local many-body effects, and using a combined cluster/fragment model instead of the simple two-body fragment model decreases the root-mean-square errors to 7.6 ppm. These fragment-based model errors compare favorably with GIPAW PBE ones of 0.4, 2.2, 5.4, and 7.2 ppm for the same (1)H, (13)C, (15)N, and (17)O test sets. Using these benchmark calculations, a set of recommended linear regression parameters for mapping between calculated chemical shieldings and observed chemical shifts are provided and their robustness assessed using statistical cross-validation. We demonstrate the utility of these approaches and the reported scaling parameters on applications to 9-tert-butyl anthracene, several histidine co-crystals, benzoic acid and the C-nitrosoarene SnCl2(CH3)2(NODMA)2. PMID:27431490

  10. X-Ray Photoelectron and Anger Electron Spectroscopic Studies of Chemical Shifts in Amorphous Ge-Se System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ueno, Tokihiro

    1983-09-01

    The chemical shifts of the Ge 3d, 3p3/2,1/2 and Se 3d, 3p3/2,1/2 photoelectron lines were measured for the amorphous Ge-Se system and those of the Ge photoelectron lines are corrected for Auger parameter shifts. According to the valence shell potential model, the ratio of the chemical shift in the amorphous Ge-Se system to that in stoichiometric GeSe2 can be approximated by the ratio of the Ge-Se bond number in the Ge-Se system to that in GeSe2. The chemical shift ratios evaluated from the experimental results reveal bond structures at non-stoichiometric compositions. In the excess-Ge range, GeSe is composed of atomic clusters of three-fold co-ordinated Ge and Se atoms, and Ge2Se3 contains atomic clusters of Se3Ge-GeSe3 units. In the excess-Se range, GeSe3 includes GeSe4 tetrahedral units, and Se-Se chains and/or Se8 rings.

  11. (19)F(α,n) thick target yield from 3.5 to 10.0 MeV.

    PubMed

    Norman, E B; Chupp, T E; Lesko, K T; Grant, P J; Woodruff, G L

    2015-09-01

    Using a target of PbF2, the thick-target yield from the (19)F(α,n) reaction was measured from E(α)=3.5-10 MeV. From these results, we infer the thick-target neutron yields from targets of F2 and UF6 over this same alpha-particle energy range.

  12. GET-SERF, a new gradient encoded SERF experiment for the trivial edition of 1H-19F couplings.

    PubMed

    Di Pietro, Maria Enrica; Aroulanda, Christie; Merlet, Denis

    2013-09-01

    A new spatially encoded heteronuclear (1)H-(19)F selective refocusing NMR experiment (GET-SERF) is proposed. This sequence allows editing in one single 2D experiment all couplings between a selected fluorine site and all the proton nuclei of the molecule. Its efficiency is illustrated in the case of diflunisal, a difluorinated anti-inflammatory drug, in isotropic and anisotropic media.

  13. In-Vivo Detection and Tracking of T Cells in Various Organs in a Melanoma Tumor Model by 19F-Fluorine MRS/MRI

    PubMed Central

    Gonzales, Christine; Yoshihara, Hikari A. I.; Dilek, Nahzli; Leignadier, Julie; Irving, Melita; Mieville, Pascal; Helm, Lothar; Michielin, Olivier; Schwitter, Juerg

    2016-01-01

    Background 19F-MRI and 19F-MRS can identify specific cell types after in-vitro or in-vivo 19F-labeling. Knowledge on the potential to track in-vitro 19F-labeled immune cells in tumor models by 19F-MRI/MRS is scarce. Aim To study 19F-based MR techniques for in-vivo tracking of adoptively transferred immune cells after in-vitro 19F-labeling, i.e. to detect and monitor their migration non-invasively in melanoma-bearing mice. Methods Splenocytes (SP) were labeled in-vitro with a perfluorocarbon (PFC) and IV-injected into non-tumor bearing mice. In-vitro PFC-labeled ovalbumin (OVA)-specific T cells from the T cell receptor-transgenic line OT-1, activated with anti-CD3 and anti-CD28 antibodies (Tact) or OVA-peptide pulsed antigen presenting cells (TOVA-act), were injected into B16 OVA melanoma-bearing mice. The distribution of the 19F-labelled donor cells was determined in-vivo by 19F-MRI/MRS. In-vivo 19F-MRI/MRS results were confirmed by ex-vivo 19F-NMR and flow cytometry. Results SP, Tact, and TOVA-act were successfully PFC-labeled in-vitro yielding 3x1011-1.4x1012 19F-atoms/cell in the 3 groups. Adoptively transferred 19F-labeled SP, TOVA-act, and Tact were detected by coil-localized 19F-MRS in the chest, abdomen, and left flank in most animals (corresponding to lungs, livers, and spleens, respectively, with highest signal-to-noise for SP vs TOVA-act and Tact, p<0.009 for both). SP and Tact were successfully imaged by 19F-MRI (n = 3; liver). These in-vivo data were confirmed by ex-vivo high-resolution 19F-NMR-spectroscopy. By flow cytometric analysis, however, TOVA-act tended to be more abundant versus SP and Tact (liver: p = 0.1313; lungs: p = 0.1073; spleen: p = 0.109). Unlike 19F-MRI/MRS, flow cytometry also identified transferred immune cells (SP, Tact, and TOVA-act) in the tumors. Conclusion SP, Tact, and TOVA-act were successfully PFC-labeled in-vitro and detected in-vivo by non-invasive 19F-MRS/MRI in liver, lung, and spleen. The portion of 19F-labeled T cells

  14. NMR chemical shift pattern changed by ammonium sulfate precipitation in cyanobacterial phytochrome Cph1.

    PubMed

    Song, Chen; Lang, Christina; Kopycki, Jakub; Hughes, Jon; Matysik, Jörg

    2015-01-01

    Phytochromes are dimeric biliprotein photoreceptors exhibiting characteristic red/far-red photocycles. Full-length cyanobacterial phytochrome Cph1 from Synechocystis 6803 is soluble initially but tends to aggregate in a concentration-dependent manner, hampering attempts to solve the structure using NMR and crystallization methods. Otherwise, the Cph1 sensory module (Cph1Δ2), photochemically indistinguishable from the native protein and used extensively in structural and other studies, can be purified to homogeneity in >10 mg amounts at mM concentrations quite easily. Bulk precipitation of full-length Cph1 by ammonium sulfate (AmS) was expected to allow us to produce samples for solid-state magic-angle spinning (MAS) NMR from dilute solutions before significant aggregation began. It was not clear, however, what effects the process of partial dehydration might have on the molecular structure. Here we test this by running solid-state MAS NMR experiments on AmS-precipitated Cph1Δ2 in its red-absorbing Pr state carrying uniformly (13)C/(15)N-labeled phycocyanobilin (PCB) chromophore. 2D (13)C-(13)C correlation experiments allowed a complete assignment of (13)C responses of the chromophore. Upon precipitation, (13)C chemical shifts for most of PCB carbons move upfield, in which we found major changes for C4 and C6 atoms associated with the A-ring positioning. Further, the broad spectral lines seen in the AmS (13)C spectrum reflect primarily the extensive inhomogeneous broadening presumably due to an increase in the distribution of conformational states in the protein, in which less free water is available to partake in the hydration shells. Our data suggest that the effect of dehydration process indeed leads to changes of electronic structure of the bilin chromophore and a decrease in its mobility within the binding pocket, but not restricted to the protein surface. The extent of the changes induced differs from the freezing process of the solution samples routinely

  15. NMR chemical shift pattern changed by ammonium sulfate precipitation in cyanobacterial phytochrome Cph1

    PubMed Central

    Song, Chen; Lang, Christina; Kopycki, Jakub; Hughes, Jon; Matysik, Jörg

    2015-01-01

    Phytochromes are dimeric biliprotein photoreceptors exhibiting characteristic red/far-red photocycles. Full-length cyanobacterial phytochrome Cph1 from Synechocystis 6803 is soluble initially but tends to aggregate in a concentration-dependent manner, hampering attempts to solve the structure using NMR and crystallization methods. Otherwise, the Cph1 sensory module (Cph1Δ2), photochemically indistinguishable from the native protein and used extensively in structural and other studies, can be purified to homogeneity in >10 mg amounts at mM concentrations quite easily. Bulk precipitation of full-length Cph1 by ammonium sulfate (AmS) was expected to allow us to produce samples for solid-state magic-angle spinning (MAS) NMR from dilute solutions before significant aggregation began. It was not clear, however, what effects the process of partial dehydration might have on the molecular structure. Here we test this by running solid-state MAS NMR experiments on AmS-precipitated Cph1Δ2 in its red-absorbing Pr state carrying uniformly 13C/15N-labeled phycocyanobilin (PCB) chromophore. 2D 13C–13C correlation experiments allowed a complete assignment of 13C responses of the chromophore. Upon precipitation, 13C chemical shifts for most of PCB carbons move upfield, in which we found major changes for C4 and C6 atoms associated with the A-ring positioning. Further, the broad spectral lines seen in the AmS 13C spectrum reflect primarily the extensive inhomogeneous broadening presumably due to an increase in the distribution of conformational states in the protein, in which less free water is available to partake in the hydration shells. Our data suggest that the effect of dehydration process indeed leads to changes of electronic structure of the bilin chromophore and a decrease in its mobility within the binding pocket, but not restricted to the protein surface. The extent of the changes induced differs from the freezing process of the solution samples routinely used in

  16. Technical advance: monitoring the trafficking of neutrophil granulocytes and monocytes during the course of tissue inflammation by noninvasive 19F MRI.

    PubMed

    Temme, Sebastian; Jacoby, Christoph; Ding, Zhaoping; Bönner, Florian; Borg, Nadine; Schrader, Jürgen; Flögel, Ulrich

    2014-04-01

    Inflammation results in the recruitment of neutrophils and monocytes, which is crucial for the healing process. In the present study, we used (19)F MRI to monitor in vivo the infiltration of neutrophils and monocytes from the onset of inflammation to the resolution and healing phase. Matrigel, with or without LPS, was s.c.-implanted into C57BL/6 mice. This resulted in a focal inflammation lasting over a period of 20 days, with constantly decreasing LPS levels in doped matrigel plugs. After i.v. administration of (19)F containing contrast agent, (19)F MRI revealed a zonular (19)F signal in the periphery of LPS containing matrigel plugs, which was not observed in control plugs. Analysis of the (19)F signal over the observation period demonstrated the strongest (19)F signal after 24 h, which decreased to nearly zero after 20 days. The (19)F signal was mirrored by the amount of leukocytes in the matrigel, with neutrophils dominating at early time-points and macrophages at later time-points. Both populations were shown to take up the (19)F contrast agent. In conclusion, (19)F MRI, in combination with the matrigel/LPS model, permits the noninvasive analysis of neutrophil and monocyte infiltration over the complete course of inflammation in vivo. PMID:24319285

  17. Technical advance: monitoring the trafficking of neutrophil granulocytes and monocytes during the course of tissue inflammation by noninvasive 19F MRI.

    PubMed

    Temme, Sebastian; Jacoby, Christoph; Ding, Zhaoping; Bönner, Florian; Borg, Nadine; Schrader, Jürgen; Flögel, Ulrich

    2014-04-01

    Inflammation results in the recruitment of neutrophils and monocytes, which is crucial for the healing process. In the present study, we used (19)F MRI to monitor in vivo the infiltration of neutrophils and monocytes from the onset of inflammation to the resolution and healing phase. Matrigel, with or without LPS, was s.c.-implanted into C57BL/6 mice. This resulted in a focal inflammation lasting over a period of 20 days, with constantly decreasing LPS levels in doped matrigel plugs. After i.v. administration of (19)F containing contrast agent, (19)F MRI revealed a zonular (19)F signal in the periphery of LPS containing matrigel plugs, which was not observed in control plugs. Analysis of the (19)F signal over the observation period demonstrated the strongest (19)F signal after 24 h, which decreased to nearly zero after 20 days. The (19)F signal was mirrored by the amount of leukocytes in the matrigel, with neutrophils dominating at early time-points and macrophages at later time-points. Both populations were shown to take up the (19)F contrast agent. In conclusion, (19)F MRI, in combination with the matrigel/LPS model, permits the noninvasive analysis of neutrophil and monocyte infiltration over the complete course of inflammation in vivo.

  18. A NMR experiment for simultaneous correlations of valine and leucine/isoleucine methyls with carbonyl chemical shifts in proteins.

    PubMed

    Tugarinov, Vitali; Venditti, Vincenzo; Marius Clore, G

    2014-01-01

    A methyl-detected 'out-and-back' NMR experiment for obtaining simultaneous correlations of methyl resonances of valine and isoleucine/leucine residues with backbone carbonyl chemical shifts, SIM-HMCM(CGCBCA)CO, is described. The developed pulse-scheme serves the purpose of convenience in recording a single data set for all Ile(δ1), Leu(δ) and Val(γ) (ILV) methyl positions instead of acquiring two separate spectra selective for valine or leucine/isoleucine residues. The SIM-HMCM(CGCBCA)CO experiment can be used for ILV methyl assignments in moderately sized protein systems (up to ~100 kDa) where the backbone chemical shifts of (13)C(α), (13)Cβ and (13)CO are known from prior NMR studies and where some losses in sensitivity can be tolerated for the sake of an overall reduction in NMR acquisition time.

  19. Unraveling the 13C NMR Chemical Shifts in Single-Walled Carbon Nanotubes: Dependence on Diameter and Electronic Structure

    SciTech Connect

    Engtrakul, C.; Irurzun, V. M.; Gjersing, E. L.; Holt, J. M.; Larsen, B. A.; Resasco, D. E.; Blackburn, J. L.

    2012-03-14

    The atomic specificity afforded by nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy could enable detailed mechanistic information about single-walled carbon nanotube (SWCNT) functionalization as well as the noncovalent molecular interactions that dictate ground-state charge transfer and separation by electronic structure and diameter. However, to date, the polydispersity present in as-synthesized SWCNT populations has obscured the dependence of the SWCNT {sup 13}C chemical shift on intrinsic parameters such as diameter and electronic structure, meaning that no information is gleaned for specific SWCNTs with unique chiral indices. In this article, we utilize a combination of {sup 13}C labeling and density gradient ultracentrifugation (DGU) to produce an array of {sup 13}C-labeled SWCNT populations with varying diameter, electronic structure, and chiral angle. We find that the SWCNT isotropic {sup 13}C chemical shift decreases systematically with increasing diameter for semiconducting SWCNTs, in agreement with recent theoretical predictions that have heretofore gone unaddressed. Furthermore, we find that the {sup 13}C chemical shifts for small diameter metallic and semiconducting SWCNTs differ significantly, and that the full-width of the isotropic peak for metallic SWCNTs is much larger than that of semiconducting nanotubes, irrespective of diameter.

  20. Influence of temperature on 31P NMR chemical shifts of phospholipids and their metabolites I. In chloroform-methanol-water.

    PubMed

    Estrada, Rosendo; Stolowich, Neal; Yappert, M Cecilia

    2008-09-01

    Spectral overlap of (31)P NMR resonances and the lack of reproducibility in chemical shifts corresponding to phospholipids in organic solvents challenge the accuracy of band assignments and quantification. To alleviate these problems, the use of temperature coefficients is proposed. Changes in temperature enable the resolution of overlapped resonances and provide a facile approach for the computation of temperature coefficients. The coefficients were evaluated for various glycero- and sphingo-phospholipids. Their values suggest that differences in H-bonding between the phosphate and the head groups are responsible for the changes of chemical shift with temperature. Among parent phospholipids, and in addition to sphingomyelin, the smallest temperature coefficient values (closest to zero) were observed for phosphatidylcholine, phosphatidylglycerol, dihydrosphingomyelin, and cardiolipin. The highest values were exhibited by phospholipids with protonated head groups, such as phosphatidylserine and phosphatidylethanolamine. The lowest and, in fact, negative values were measured for phospholipids with an exposed phosphate group: phosphatidic acid, ceramide-1-phosphate, and dihydroceramide-1-phosphate. Diacyl, alkyl-acyl, and alkenyl-acyl phospholipids with the same head group exhibited comparable coefficients but differed slightly in chemical shifts. Compared to their parent glycerophospholipids, all lyso analogs had greater temperature coefficients, possibly due to the presence of an extra OH capable of forming a H-bond with the phosphate group. PMID:18534182

  1. Identification of zinc-ligated cysteine residues based on 13Calpha and 13Cbeta chemical shift data.

    PubMed

    Kornhaber, Gregory J; Snyder, David; Moseley, Hunter N B; Montelione, Gaetano T

    2006-04-01

    Although a significant number of proteins include bound metals as part of their structure, the identification of amino acid residues coordinated to non-paramagnetic metals by NMR remains a challenge. Metal ligands can stabilize the native structure and/or play critical catalytic roles in the underlying biochemistry. An atom's chemical shift is exquisitely sensitive to its electronic environment. Chemical shift data can provide valuable insights into structural features, including metal ligation. In this study, we demonstrate that overlapped 13Cbeta chemical shift distributions of Zn-ligated and non-metal-ligated cysteine residues are largely resolved by the inclusion of the corresponding 13Calpha chemical shift information, together with secondary structural information. We demonstrate this with a bivariate distribution plot, and statistically with a multivariate analysis of variance (MANOVA) and hierarchical logistic regression analysis. Using 287 13Calpha/13Cbeta shift pairs from 79 proteins with known three-dimensional structures, including 86 13Calpha and 13Cbeta shifts for 43 Zn-ligated cysteine residues, along with corresponding oxidation state and secondary structure information, we have built a logistic regression model that distinguishes between oxidized cystines, reduced (non-metal ligated) cysteines, and Zn-ligated cysteines. Classifying cysteines/cystines with a statistical model incorporating all three phenomena resulted in a predictor of Zn ligation with a recall, precision and F-measure of 83.7%, and an accuracy of 95.1%. This model was applied in the analysis of Bacillus subtilis IscU, a protein involved in iron-sulfur cluster assembly. The model predicts that all three cysteines of IscU are metal ligands. We confirmed these results by (i) examining the effect of metal chelation on the NMR spectrum of IscU, and (ii) inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry analysis. To gain further insight into the frequency of occurrence of non-cysteine Zn

  2. Fluorinated Amino-Derivatives of the Sesquiterpene Lactone, Parthenolide, as 19F NMR Probes in Deuterium-Free Environments

    PubMed Central

    Woods, James R.; Mo, Huaping; Bieberich, Andrew A.; Alavanja, Tanja; Colby, David A.

    2011-01-01

    The design, synthesis, and biological activity of fluorinated amino-derivatives of the sesquiterpene lactone, parthenolide, are described. A fluorinated aminoparthenolide analogue with biological activity similar to the parent natural product was discovered, and its X-ray structure was obtained. This lead compound was then studied using 19F NMR in the presence and absence of glutathione to obtain additional mechanism of action data, and it was found that the aminoparthenolide eliminates amine faster in the presence of glutathione than in the absence of glutathione. The exact changes in concentrations of fluorinated compound and amine were quantified by a concentration-reference method using 19F NMR; a major benefit of applying this strategy is that no deuterated solvents or internal standards are required to obtain accurate concentrations. These mechanistic data with glutathione may contribute to the conversion of the amino-derivative to parthenolide, the active pharmacological agent, in glutathione-rich cancer cells. PMID:22029741

  3. Method of Continuous Variation: Characterization of Alkali Metal Enolates Using 1H and 19F NMR Spectroscopies

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    The method of continuous variation in conjunction with 1H and 19F NMR spectroscopies was used to characterize lithium and sodium enolates solvated by N,N,N′,N′-tetramethylethyldiamine (TMEDA) and tetrahydrofuran (THF). A strategy developed using lithium enolates was then applied to the more challenging sodium enolates. A number of sodium enolates solvated by TMEDA or THF afford exclusively tetramers. Evidence suggests that TMEDA chelates sodium on cubic tetramers. PMID:24915602

  4. Explaining the effects of T-O-T bond angles on NMR chemical shifts in aluminosilicates: A natural bonding orbital (NBO) and natural chemical shielding (NCS) analysis.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yun; Nekvasil, Hanna; Tossell, John

    2005-04-01

    It has long been recognized that the 29Si and 27Al NMR chemical shifts for aluminosilicate crystals and glasses correlate to some extent with the T-O-T bond angle (where T is the tetrahedral atom Si or Al). With increasing T-O-T bond angle, the 29Si and 27Al NMR shieldings increase and the shifts thus become more negative. This result has been demonstrated both experimentally and through quantum computations. However, no simple qualitative explanation has ever been given for what appears to be a simple qualitative trend. We here provide such an explanation based upon quantum calculations. We have used high level ab initio NMR shielding calculations, natural bonding orbital (NBO) analysis, and natural chemical shielding (NCS) analysis, performed on model clusters with different T-O-T angles, to obtain an explanation for this trend from an electronic structure point of view. On the basis of both NBO populations and the NCS analysis, the following factors account for the correlation of shift with T-O-T angle: (1) a slight increase in population of the Al-O and Si-O bond orbital electrons and a dramatic change in bond orbital shapes and hybridization (with more s character and less bond bending as the T-O-T angle increases), (2) a movement of one of the lone pairs on O toward the vicinity of the Si or Al as the T-O-T angle increases, and (3) a change in the shielding contribution from the core 2p electrons of Al or Si. The changes in the 17O NMR shift with T-O-T angle are more complex, and the shifts are also more strongly influenced by distant atoms, but some systematic changes in O lone pair contributions can be identified.

  5. Multimodal Perfluorocarbon Nanoemulsions for 19F MRI, Ultrasonography, and Catalysis of MRgFUS-Mediated Drug Delivery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rapoport, N.; Nam, K.-H.; Christensen, D. A.; Kennedy, A. M.; Parker, D. L.; Payne, A. H.; Todd, N.; Shea, J. E.; Scaife, C. L.

    2011-09-01

    Perfluorocarbon nanoemulsions can target lipophilic therapeutic agents to solid tumors and simultaneously provide for monitoring nanocarrier biodistribution via ultrasonography and/or 19F MRI. In the first generation of block copolymer stabilized perfluorocarbon nanoemulsions, perfluoropentane (PFP) was used as the droplet forming compound. Although manifesting excellent therapeutic and ultrasound imaging properties, PFP nanoemulsions were unstable at storage, difficult to handle, and underwent droplet-to-bubble transition upon injection that was hard to control. To solve the above problems, perfluoro-15-crown-5-ether (PFCE) was used as a core forming compound in the second generation of block copolymer stabilized perfluorocarbon nanoemulsions. In the present paper, acoustic, imaging, and therapeutic properties of unloaded and paclitaxel (PTX) loaded PFCE nanoemulsions are reported. The size of paclitaxel-loaded PFCE nanodroplets (300 nm to 500 nm depending on emulsification conditions) favors their passive accumulation in tumor tissue. PFCE nanodroplets manifest both ultrasound and 19F MR contrast properties, which allows the use of multimodal imaging to monitor nanodroplet biodistribution. Ultrasonography and 19F MRI produced consistent results on nanodroplet biodistribution. Sonication with 1-MHz therapeutic ultrasound triggered reversible droplet-to-bubble transition in PFCE nanoemulsions. Microbubbles formed by acoustic vaporization underwent stable cavitation. In a pilot study on ultrasound-mediated therapy of a large breast cancer tumor, paclitaxel-loaded PFCE nanoemulsions combined with 1-MHz ultrasound (MI≥1.75) showed excellent therapeutic properties. Anticipated mechanisms of the observed effects are discussed.

  6. Studies of metabolism and disposition of potent human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) integrase inhibitors using 19F-NMR spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Monteagudo, E; Pesci, S; Taliani, M; Fiore, F; Petrocchi, A; Nizi, E; Rowley, M; Laufer, R; Summa, V

    2007-09-01

    (19)F-nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) has been extensively used in a drug-discovery programme to support the selection of candidates for further development. Data on an early lead compound, N-(4-fluorobenzyl)-5-hydroxy-1-methyl-2-(4-methylmorpholin-3-yl)-6-oxo-1,6-dihydropyrimidine-4-carboxamide (compound A (+)), and MK-0518 (N-(4-fluorobenzyl)-5-hydroxy-1-methyl-2-(1-methyl-1-{[(5-methyl-1,3,4-oxadiazol-2-yl)carbonyl]amino}ethyl)-6-oxo-1,6-dihydropyrimidine-4-carboxamide), a potent inhibitor of this series currently in phase III clinical trials, are described. The metabolic fate and excretion balance of compound A (+) and MK-0518 were investigated in rats and dogs following intravenous and oral dosing using a combination of (19)F-NMR-monitored enzyme hydrolysis and solid-phase extraction chromatography and NMR spectroscopy (SPEC-NMR). Dosing with the (3)H-labelled compound A (+) enabled the comparison of standard radiochemical analysis with (19)F-NMR spectroscopy to obtain quantitative metabolism and excretion data. Both compounds were eliminated mainly by metabolism. The major metabolite identified in rat urine and bile and in dog urine was the 5-O-glucuronide.

  7. Fragment-Linking Approach Using (19)F NMR Spectroscopy To Obtain Highly Potent and Selective Inhibitors of β-Secretase.

    PubMed

    Jordan, John B; Whittington, Douglas A; Bartberger, Michael D; Sickmier, E Allen; Chen, Kui; Cheng, Yuan; Judd, Ted

    2016-04-28

    Fragment-based drug discovery (FBDD) has become a widely used tool in small-molecule drug discovery efforts. One of the most commonly used biophysical methods in detecting weak binding of fragments is nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy. In particular, FBDD performed with (19)F NMR-based methods has been shown to provide several advantages over (1)H NMR using traditional magnetization-transfer and/or two-dimensional methods. Here, we demonstrate the utility and power of (19)F-based fragment screening by detailing the identification of a second-site fragment through (19)F NMR screening that binds to a specific pocket of the aspartic acid protease, β-secretase (BACE-1). The identification of this second-site fragment allowed the undertaking of a fragment-linking approach, which ultimately yielded a molecule exhibiting a more than 360-fold increase in potency while maintaining reasonable ligand efficiency and gaining much improved selectivity over cathepsin-D (CatD). X-ray crystallographic studies of the molecules demonstrated that the linked fragments exhibited binding modes consistent with those predicted from the targeted screening approach, through-space NMR data, and molecular modeling. PMID:26978477

  8. Thalassiosira spp. community composition shifts in response to chemical and physical forcing in the northeast Pacific Ocean

    PubMed Central

    Chappell, P. Dreux; Whitney, LeAnn P.; Haddock, Traci L.; Menden-Deuer, Susanne; Roy, Eric G.; Wells, Mark L.; Jenkins, Bethany D.

    2013-01-01

    Diatoms are genetically diverse unicellular photosynthetic eukaryotes that are key primary producers in the ocean. Many of the over 100 extant diatom species in the cosmopolitan genus Thalassiosira are difficult to distinguish in mixed populations using light microscopy. Here, we examine shifts in Thalassiosira spp. composition along a coastal to open ocean transect that encountered a 3-month-old Haida eddy in the northeast Pacific Ocean. To quantify shifts in Thalassiosira species composition, we developed a targeted automated ribosomal intergenic spacer analysis (ARISA) method to identify Thalassiosira spp. in environmental samples. As many specific fragment lengths are indicative of individual Thalassiosira spp., the ARISA method is a useful screening tool to identify changes in the relative abundance and distribution of specific species. The method also enabled us to assess changes in Thalassiosira community composition in response to chemical and physical forcing. Thalassiosira spp. community composition in the core of a 3-month-old Haida eddy remained largely (>80%) similar over a 2-week period, despite moving 24 km southwestward. Shifts in Thalassiosira species correlated with changes in dissolved iron (Fe) and temperature throughout the sampling period. Simultaneously tracking community composition and relative abundance of Thalassiosira species within the physical and chemical context they occurred allowed us to identify quantitative linkages between environmental conditions and community response. PMID:24065961

  9. Water chemical shift in 1H NMR of red cells: effects of pH when transmembrane magnetic susceptibility differences are low.

    PubMed

    Larkin, Timothy J; Bubb, William A; Kuchel, Philip W

    2008-04-01

    The (1)H magic angle spinning (MAS) NMR spectrum of water in erythrocyte suspensions shows peaks from each of the intracellular and extracellular water pools. The splitting is a true chemical shift and is brought about by the elimination of water exchange under MAS conditions due to physical separation of the two water populations. The size of the chemical shift difference is determined by the concentration of intracellular protein affecting the average extent of hydrogen bonding of water. We present here a model of the chemical shift behavior for water in erythrocytes under normal high-resolution NMR conditions based on results from MAS experiments on these cells exposed to different pH and osmotic conditions. The model accurately predicts the chemical shift of water for a static sample, and the results demonstrate that in high-resolution NMR experiments the chemical shift of water will appear to be invariant if differences in magnetic susceptibility across the cell membrane are minimal (<10% of the magnetic susceptibility of water). Thus, changes in the shape and chemical shift of the water resonance are not due to pH changes in the physiological range. The findings are fundamental to an interpretation of the mechanism of chemical shift effects on the water resonance that may occur in functional MRI.

  10. Observed and calculated 1H and 13C chemical shifts induced by the in situ oxidation of model sulfides to sulfoxides and sulfones.

    PubMed

    Dracínský, Martin; Pohl, Radek; Slavetínská, Lenka; Budesínský, Milos

    2010-09-01

    A series of model sulfides was oxidized in the NMR sample tube to sulfoxides and sulfones by the stepwise addition of meta-chloroperbenzoic acid in deuterochloroform. Various methods of quantum chemical calculations have been tested to reproduce the observed (1)H and (13)C chemical shifts of the starting sulfides and their oxidation products. It has been shown that the determination of the energy-minimized conformation is a very important condition for obtaining realistic data in the subsequent calculation of the NMR chemical shifts. The correlation between calculated and observed chemical shifts is very good for carbon atoms (even for the 'cheap' DFT B3LYP/6-31G* method) and somewhat less satisfactory for hydrogen atoms. The calculated chemical shifts induced by oxidation (the Delta delta values) agree even better with the experimental values and can also be used to determine the oxidation state of the sulfur atom (-S-, -SO-, -SO(2)-).

  11. Predicting paramagnetic 1H NMR chemical shifts and state-energy separations in spin-crossover host-guest systems.

    PubMed

    Isley, William C; Zarra, Salvatore; Carlson, Rebecca K; Bilbeisi, Rana A; Ronson, Tanya K; Nitschke, Jonathan R; Gagliardi, Laura; Cramer, Christopher J

    2014-06-14

    The behaviour of metal-organic cages upon guest encapsulation can be difficult to elucidate in solution. Paramagnetic metal centres introduce additional dispersion of signals that is useful for characterisation of host-guest complexes in solution using nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR). However, paramagnetic centres also complicate spectral assignment due to line broadening, signal integration error, and large changes in chemical shifts, which can be difficult to assign even for known compounds. Quantum chemical predictions can provide information that greatly facilitates the assignment of NMR signals and identification of species present. Here we explore how the prediction of paramagnetic NMR spectra may be used to gain insight into the spin crossover (SCO) properties of iron(II)-based metal organic coordination cages, specifically examining how the structure of the local metal coordination environment affects SCO. To represent the tetrahedral metal-organic cage, a model system is generated by considering an isolated metal-ion vertex: fac-ML3(2+) (M = Fe(II), Co(II); L = N-phenyl-2-pyridinaldimine). The sensitivity of the (1)H paramagnetic chemical shifts to local coordination environments is assessed and utilised to shed light on spin crossover behaviour in iron complexes. Our data indicate that expansion of the metal coordination sphere must precede any thermal SCO. An attempt to correlate experimental enthalpies of SCO with static properties of bound guests shows that no simple relationship exists, and that effects are likely due to nuanced dynamic response to encapsulation. PMID:24752730

  12. Pressure dependence of backbone chemical shifts in the model peptides Ac-Gly-Gly-Xxx-Ala-NH2.

    PubMed

    Erlach, Markus Beck; Koehler, Joerg; Crusca, Edson; Kremer, Werner; Munte, Claudia E; Kalbitzer, Hans Robert

    2016-06-01

    For a better understanding of nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) detected pressure responses of folded as well as unstructured proteins the availability of data from well-defined model systems are indispensable. In this work we report the pressure dependence of chemical shifts of the backbone atoms (1)H(α), (13)C(α) and (13)C' in the protected tetrapeptides Ac-Gly-Gly-Xxx-Ala-NH2 (Xxx one of the 20 canonical amino acids). Contrary to expectation the chemical shifts of these nuclei have a nonlinear dependence on pressure in the range from 0.1 to 200 MPa. The polynomial pressure coefficients B 1 and B 2 are dependent on the type of amino acid studied. The coefficients of a given nucleus show significant linear correlations suggesting that the NMR observable pressure effects in the different amino acids have at least partly the same physical cause. In line with this observation the magnitude of the second order coefficients of nuclei being direct neighbors in the chemical structure are also weakly correlated. PMID:27335085

  13. Pressure dependence of backbone chemical shifts in the model peptides Ac-Gly-Gly-Xxx-Ala-NH2.

    PubMed

    Erlach, Markus Beck; Koehler, Joerg; Crusca, Edson; Kremer, Werner; Munte, Claudia E; Kalbitzer, Hans Robert

    2016-06-01

    For a better understanding of nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) detected pressure responses of folded as well as unstructured proteins the availability of data from well-defined model systems are indispensable. In this work we report the pressure dependence of chemical shifts of the backbone atoms (1)H(α), (13)C(α) and (13)C' in the protected tetrapeptides Ac-Gly-Gly-Xxx-Ala-NH2 (Xxx one of the 20 canonical amino acids). Contrary to expectation the chemical shifts of these nuclei have a nonlinear dependence on pressure in the range from 0.1 to 200 MPa. The polynomial pressure coefficients B 1 and B 2 are dependent on the type of amino acid studied. The coefficients of a given nucleus show significant linear correlations suggesting that the NMR observable pressure effects in the different amino acids have at least partly the same physical cause. In line with this observation the magnitude of the second order coefficients of nuclei being direct neighbors in the chemical structure are also weakly correlated.

  14. 13C and 15N—Chemical Shift Anisotropy of Ampicillin and Penicillin-V Studied by 2D-PASS and CP/MAS NMR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Antzutkin, Oleg N.; Lee, Young K.; Levitt, Malcolm H.

    1998-11-01

    The principal values of the chemical shift tensors of all13C and15N sites in two antibiotics, ampicillin and penicillin-V, were determined by 2-dimensionalphaseadjustedspinningsideband (2D-PASS) and conventional CP/MAS experiments. The13C and15N chemical shift anisotropies (CSA), and their confidence limits, were evaluated using a Mathematica program. The CSA values suggest a revised assignment of the 2-methyl13C sites in the case of ampicillin. We speculate on a relationship between the chemical shift principal values of many of the13C and15N sites and the β-lactam ring conformation.

  15. Carbon-13 chemical shift tensor correlation via spin diffusion in solid tropolone using switched-angle spinning spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Larsen, R.G.; Lee, Y.K.; He, B.; Yang, J.O.; Luz, Z.; Zimmermann, H.; Pines, A.

    1995-12-08

    In switched-angle spinning spectroscopy (SAS) a sample is spun about different angles, {beta}, relative to the magnetic field, during various periods of the experiment. In the present work, SAS is combined with two-dimensional exchange spectroscopy in order to correlate carbon-13 chemical shift tensors of the carbonyl (1) and hydroxyl (2) carbons of tropolone. Experiments were performed on a sample enriched to 25 at. % in each of these sites (at different molecules). At this level of enrichment the dominant exchange mechanism between the two sites involves spin diffusion. The experiment consists of a preparation period during which the sample spins at the magic angle and the magnetization of one of the sites is quenched by means of a selective pulse sequence. During the rest of the experiment the sample spins with its axis away from the magic angle except for a short period just before the detection where the axis is switched to the magic angle in order to select the magnetization to be detected. Experiments were performed for all four possible combinations of the initial and final magnetizations, thus providing chemical shift correlations between carbons 1,1{prime}, 2, and 2{prime} in the two magnetically inequivalent (but symmetry related) molecules in the unit cell. Combining these results with the known crystal structure of tropolone (neglecting a small tilt between the perpendicular to the molecular plane and the crystallographic {bold c}-axis) provides information on the orientation and magnitude of the chemical shift tensors of the two types of carbons. The principal values (in ppm) are {sigma}{sup 1}{sub {ital xx}}=65, {sigma}{sup 1}{sub {ital yy}}=33, {sigma}{sup 1}{sub {ital zz}}={minus}98, {sigma}{sup 2}{sub {ital xx}}=77, {sigma}{sup 2}{sub {ital yy}}=17, and {sigma}{sup 2}{sub {ital zz}}={minus}94. (Abstract Truncated)

  16. Chemical shift and zone-folding effects on the energy gaps of GaAs-AlAs (001) superlattices

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, S.B. Xerox Palo Alto Research Center, 3333 Coyote Hill Road, Palo Alto, California 94304 ); Cohen, M.L.; Louie, S.G. )

    1991-04-15

    The chemical shift and zone-folding effects obtained from quasiparticle calculations for ultrathin GaAs-AlAs superlattices are incorporated within a Kronig-Penny model for superlattices of the arbitrary lattice period. We determine that superlattices with lattice periods in the range of 3{times}3 to 9{times}9 have an {ital X}-derived pseudodirect gap. This result explains both the results from first-principles calculations for ultrathin superlattices and those from experiments for a broader lattice period.

  17. 13C NMR spectra of 1,3-dipyridyl- and pyridylphenylthioureas. Chemical shift assignments and conformational implications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sudha, L. V.; Sathyanarayana, D. N.; Manogaran, S.

    The 13C NMR spectra of a series of 1,3-dipyridyl- and pyridylphenylthioureas have been obtained. Complete analyses of the experimental spectra have provided the chemical shifts and coupling constants. The spectra of dipyridylthioureas over a temperature range showed important changes which could be attributed to an intramolecular conversion between the two equivalent E,Z and Z,E conformations. The coalescence temperature of the 13C signals leads to a Δ G* of ˜ 58.0 kJ mol -1 for the dynamic process involved. The results show that pyridylphenyl thioureas exist in a single conformation at ambient temperature.

  18. A multiple pulse zero crossing NMR technique, and its application to F-19 chemical shift measurements in solids

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burum, D. P.; Elleman, D. D.; Rhim, W.-K.

    1978-01-01

    A simple multiple-pulse 'zero crossing technique' for accurately determining the first moment of a solid-state NMR spectrum is introduced. This technique was applied to obtain the F-19 chemical shift versus pressure curves up to 5 kbar for single crystals of CaF2 (0.29 + or - 0.02 ppm/kbar) and BaF2 (0.62 + or - 0.05 ppm/kbar). Results at ambient temperature and pressure are also reported for a number of other fluorine compounds. Because of its high data rate, this technique is potentially several orders of magnitude more sensitive than similar CW methods.

  19. The Effect of Molecular Conformation on the Accuracy of Theoretical (1)H and (13)C Chemical Shifts Calculated by Ab Initio Methods for Metabolic Mixture Analysis.

    PubMed

    Chikayama, Eisuke; Shimbo, Yudai; Komatsu, Keiko; Kikuchi, Jun

    2016-04-14

    NMR spectroscopy is a powerful method for analyzing metabolic mixtures. The information obtained from an NMR spectrum is in the form of physical parameters, such as chemical shifts, and construction of databases for many metabolites will be useful for data interpretation. To increase the accuracy of theoretical chemical shifts for development of a database for a variety of metabolites, the effects of sets of conformations (structural ensembles) and the levels of theory on computations of theoretical chemical shifts were systematically investigated for a set of 29 small molecules in the present study. For each of the 29 compounds, 101 structures were generated by classical molecular dynamics at 298.15 K, and then theoretical chemical shifts for 164 (1)H and 123 (13)C atoms were calculated by ab initio quantum chemical methods. Six levels of theory were used by pairing Hartree-Fock, B3LYP (density functional theory), or second order Møller-Plesset perturbation with 6-31G or aug-cc-pVDZ basis set. The six average fluctuations in the (1)H chemical shift were ±0.63, ± 0.59, ± 0.70, ± 0.62, ± 0.75, and ±0.66 ppm for the structural ensembles, and the six average errors were ±0.34, ± 0.27, ± 0.32, ± 0.25, ± 0.32, and ±0.25 ppm. The results showed that chemical shift fluctuations with changes in the conformation because of molecular motion were larger than the differences between computed and experimental chemical shifts for all six levels of theory. In conclusion, selection of an appropriate structural ensemble should be performed before theoretical chemical shift calculations for development of an accurate database for a variety of metabolites.

  20. Effect of pH, urea, peptide length, and neighboring amino acids on alanine alpha-proton random coil chemical shifts.

    PubMed

    Carlisle, Elizabeth A; Holder, Jessica L; Maranda, Abby M; de Alwis, Adamberage R; Selkie, Ellen L; McKay, Sonya L

    2007-01-01

    Accurate random coil alpha-proton chemical shift values are essential for precise protein structure analysis using chemical shift index (CSI) calculations. The current study determines the chemical shift effects of pH, urea, peptide length and neighboring amino acids on the alpha-proton of Ala using model peptides of the general sequence GnXaaAYaaGn, where Xaa and Yaa are Leu, Val, Phe, Tyr, His, Trp or Pro, and n = 1-3. Changes in pH (2-6), urea (0-1M), and peptide length (n = 1-3) had no effect on Ala alpha-proton chemical shifts. Denaturing concentrations of urea (8M) caused significant downfield shifts (0.10 +/- 0.01 ppm) relative to an external DSS reference. Neighboring aliphatic residues (Leu, Val) had no effect, whereas aromatic amino acids (Phe, Tyr, His and Trp) and Pro caused significant shifts in the alanine alpha-proton, with the extent of the shifts dependent on the nature and position of the amino acid. Smaller aromatic residues (Phe, Tyr, His) caused larger shift effects when present in the C-terminal position (approximately 0.10 vs. 0.05 ppm N-terminal), and the larger aromatic tryptophan caused greater effects in the N-terminal position (0.15 ppm vs. 0.10 C-terminal). Proline affected both significant upfield (0.06 ppm, N-terminal) and downfield (0.25 ppm, C-terminal) chemical shifts. These new Ala correction factors detail the magnitude and range of variation in environmental chemical shift effects, in addition to providing insight into the molecular level interactions that govern protein folding.

  1. Heat Integration of the Water-Gas Shift Reaction System for Carbon Sequestration Ready IGCC Process with Chemical Looping

    SciTech Connect

    Juan M. Salazara; Stephen E. Zitney; Urmila M. Diwekara

    2010-01-01

    Integrated gasification combined cycle (IGCC) technology has been considered as an important alternative for efficient power systems that can reduce fuel consumption and CO2 emissions. One of the technological schemes combines water-gas shift reaction and chemical-looping combustion as post gasification techniques in order to produce sequestration-ready CO2 and potentially reduce the size of the gas turbine. However, these schemes have not been energetically integrated and process synthesis techniques can be applied to obtain an optimal flowsheet. This work studies the heat exchange network synthesis (HENS) for the water-gas shift reaction train employing a set of alternative designs provided by Aspen energy analyzer (AEA) and combined in a process superstructure that was simulated in Aspen Plus (AP). This approach allows a rigorous evaluation of the alternative designs and their combinations avoiding all the AEA simplifications (linearized models of heat exchangers). A CAPE-OPEN compliant capability which makes use of a MINLP algorithm for sequential modular simulators was employed to obtain a heat exchange network that provided a cost of energy that was 27% lower than the base case. Highly influential parameters for the pos gasification technologies (i.e. CO/steam ratio, gasifier temperature and pressure) were calculated to obtain the minimum cost of energy while chemical looping parameters (oxidation and reduction temperature) were ensured to be satisfied.

  2. A Bayesian-probability-based method for assigning protein backbone dihedral angles based on chemical shifts and local sequences.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jun; Liu, Haiyan

    2007-01-01

    Chemical shifts contain substantial information about protein local conformations. We present a method to assign individual protein backbone dihedral angles into specific regions on the Ramachandran map based on the amino acid sequences and the chemical shifts of backbone atoms of tripeptide segments. The method uses a scoring function derived from the Bayesian probability for the central residue of a query tripeptide segment to have a particular conformation. The Ramachandran map is partitioned into representative regions at two levels of resolution. The lower resolution partitioning is equivalent to the conventional definitions of different secondary structure regions on the map. At the higher resolution level, the alpha and beta regions are further divided into subregions. Predictions are attempted at both levels of resolution. We compared our method with TALOS using the original TALOS database, and obtained comparable results. Although TALOS may produce the best results with currently available databases which are much enlarged, the Bayesian-probability-based approach can provide a quantitative measure for the reliability of predictions.

  3. Application of multivariate image analysis in QSPR study of 13C chemical shifts of naphthalene derivatives: a comparative study.

    PubMed

    Garkani-Nejad, Zahra; Poshteh-Shirani, Marziyeh

    2010-11-15

    A new implemented QSPR method, whose descriptors achieved from bidimensional images, was applied for predicting (13)C NMR chemical shifts of 25 mono substituted naphthalenes. The resulted descriptors were subjected to principal component analysis (PCA) and the most significant principal components (PCs) were extracted. MIA-QSPR (multivariate image analysis applied to quantitative structure-property relationship) modeling was done by means of principal component regression (PCR) and principal component-artificial neural network (PC-ANN) methods. Eigen value ranking (EV) and correlation ranking (CR) were used here to select the most relevant set of PCs as inputs for PCR and PC-ANN modeling methods. The results supported that the correlation ranking-principal component-artificial neural network (CR-PC-ANN) model could predict the (13)C NMR chemical shifts of all 10 carbon atoms in mono substituted naphthalenes with R(2) ≥ 0.922 for training set, R(2) ≥ 0.963 for validation set and R(2) ≥ 0.936 for the test set. Comparison of the results with other existing factor selection method revealed that less accurate results were obtained by the eigen value ranking procedure. PMID:21035668

  4. Nuclear Magnetic Resonance-Assisted Prediction of Secondary Structure for RNA: Incorporation of Direction-Dependent Chemical Shift Constraints.

    PubMed

    Chen, Jonathan L; Bellaousov, Stanislav; Tubbs, Jason D; Kennedy, Scott D; Lopez, Michael J; Mathews, David H; Turner, Douglas H

    2015-11-17

    Knowledge of RNA structure is necessary to determine structure-function relationships and to facilitate design of potential therapeutics. RNA secondary structure prediction can be improved by applying constraints from nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) experiments to a dynamic programming algorithm. Imino proton walks from NOESY spectra reveal double-stranded regions. Chemical shifts of protons in GH1, UH3, and UH5 of GU pairs, UH3, UH5, and AH2 of AU pairs, and GH1 of GC pairs were analyzed to identify constraints for the 5' to 3' directionality of base pairs in helices. The 5' to 3' directionality constraints were incorporated into an NMR-assisted prediction of secondary structure (NAPSS-CS) program. When it was tested on 18 structures, including nine pseudoknots, the sensitivity and positive predictive value were improved relative to those of three unrestrained programs. The prediction accuracy for the pseudoknots improved the most. The program also facilitates assignment of chemical shifts to individual nucleotides, a necessary step for determining three-dimensional structure.

  5. 10B-editing 1H-detection and 19F MRI strategies to optimize boron neutron capture therapy.

    PubMed

    Capuani, Silvia; Porcari, Paola; Fasano, Fabrizio; Campanella, Renzo; Maraviglia, Bruno

    2008-09-01

    Boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) is a binary radiation therapy used to treat malignant brain tumours. It is based on the nuclear reaction (10B + n th --> [11B*] --> alpha + 7Li + 2.79 MeV) that occurs when 10B captures a thermal neutron to yield alpha particles and recoiling 7Li nuclei, both responsible of tumour cells destruction by short range and high ionization energy release. The clinical success of the therapy depends on the selective accumulation of the 10B carriers in the tumour and on the high thermal neutron capture cross-section of 10B. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) methods provide the possibility of monitoring, through 10B nuclei, the metabolic and physiological processes suitable to optimize the BNCT procedure. In this study, spatial distribution mapping of borocaptate (BSH) and 4-borono-phenylalanine (BPA), the two boron carriers used in clinical trials, has been obtained. The BSH map in excised rat brain and the 19F-BPA image in vivo rat brain, representative of BPA spatial distribution, were reported. The BSH image was obtained by means of double-resonance 10B-editing 1H-detection sequence, named M-Bend, exploiting the J-coupling interaction between 10B and 1H nuclei. Conversely, the BPA map was obtained by 19F-BPA using 19F-MRI. Both images were obtained at 7 T, in C6 glioma-bearing rat brain. Our results demonstrate the powerful of non conventional MRI techniques to optimize the BNCT procedure.

  6. 10B-editing 1H-detection and 19F MRI strategies to optimize boron neutron capture therapy.

    PubMed

    Capuani, Silvia; Porcari, Paola; Fasano, Fabrizio; Campanella, Renzo; Maraviglia, Bruno

    2008-09-01

    Boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) is a binary radiation therapy used to treat malignant brain tumours. It is based on the nuclear reaction (10B + n th --> [11B*] --> alpha + 7Li + 2.79 MeV) that occurs when 10B captures a thermal neutron to yield alpha particles and recoiling 7Li nuclei, both responsible of tumour cells destruction by short range and high ionization energy release. The clinical success of the therapy depends on the selective accumulation of the 10B carriers in the tumour and on the high thermal neutron capture cross-section of 10B. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) methods provide the possibility of monitoring, through 10B nuclei, the metabolic and physiological processes suitable to optimize the BNCT procedure. In this study, spatial distribution mapping of borocaptate (BSH) and 4-borono-phenylalanine (BPA), the two boron carriers used in clinical trials, has been obtained. The BSH map in excised rat brain and the 19F-BPA image in vivo rat brain, representative of BPA spatial distribution, were reported. The BSH image was obtained by means of double-resonance 10B-editing 1H-detection sequence, named M-Bend, exploiting the J-coupling interaction between 10B and 1H nuclei. Conversely, the BPA map was obtained by 19F-BPA using 19F-MRI. Both images were obtained at 7 T, in C6 glioma-bearing rat brain. Our results demonstrate the powerful of non conventional MRI techniques to optimize the BNCT procedure. PMID:18486394

  7. NMR chemical shift perturbation mapping of DNA binding by a zinc-finger domain from the yeast transcription factor ADR1.

    PubMed Central

    Schmiedeskamp, M.; Rajagopal, P.; Klevit, R. E.

    1997-01-01

    Mutagenesis studies have revealed that the minimal DNA-binding domain of the yeast transcription factor ADR1 consists of two Cys2-His2 zinc fingers plus an additional 20 residues proximal and N-terminal to the fingers. We have assigned NMR 1H, 15N, and 13C chemical shifts for the entire minimal DNA-binding domain of ADR1 both free and bound to specific DNA. 1H chemical shift values suggest little structural difference between the zinc fingers in this construct and in single-finger constructs, and 13C alpha chemical shift index analysis indicates little change in finger structure upon DNA binding. 1H chemical shift perturbations upon DNA binding are observed, however, and these are mapped to define the protein-DNA interface. The two zinc fingers appear to bind DNA with different orientations, as the entire helix of finger 1 is perturbed, while only the extreme N-terminus of the finger 2 helix is affected. Furthermore, residues N-terminal to the first finger undergo large chemical shift changes upon DNA binding suggesting a role at the protein-DNA interface. A striking correspondence is observed between the protein-DNA interface mapped by chemical shift changes and that previously mapped by mutagenesis. PMID:9300483

  8. Ascomycotin A, a new citromycetin analogue produced by Ascomycota sp. Ind19F07 isolated from deep sea sediment.

    PubMed

    Tian, Yong-qi; Lin, Xiu-ping; Liu, Juan; Kaliyaperumal, Kumaravel; Ai, Wen; Ju, Zhi-ran; Yang, Bin; Wang, Junfeng; Yang, Xian-wen; Liu, Yonghong

    2015-01-01

    A new citromycetin analogue, ascomycotin A (1), together with eight known compounds, wortmannilactone E (2), orcinol (3), orsellinic acid (4), isosclerone (5), (3R,4S)-( - )-4-hydroxymellein (6), diorcinol (7), chaetocyclinone B (8) and 2,5-dimethoxy-3,6-di(p-methoxypheny1)-1,4-benzoquinone (9), was isolated from the fungal strain Ascomycota sp. Ind19F07, which was isolated from the deep sea sediment of the Indian Ocean. The structures of the compounds were established by spectroscopic data including 1D and 2D NMR and HR-ESI-MS. Compounds (1-9) were evaluated for antibacterial activity.

  9. The chemical bond in external electric fields: energies, geometries, and vibrational Stark shifts of diatomic molecules.

    PubMed

    Sowlati-Hashjin, Shahin; Matta, Chérif F

    2013-10-14

    It is shown that the response of molecular properties of diatomics such as the total energy, the bond length, and the vibrational Stark shift to an external homogenous electric field (EF) can be predicted from field-free observable properties such as the equilibrium bond length, the bond dissociation energy, the polarizability and dipole moment functions, and the vibrational frequency. Delley [J. Mol. Struct.: THEOCHEM 434, 229 (1998)] suggested to approximate the potential energy surface under an EF by a Morse function augmented with a EF term proportional to the internuclear separation. In this work, this term is replaced by the expression of the field-induced energy change which yields a field-perturbed Morse potential that tends to a constant asymptotic limit when the EF term itself become proportional to the sum of the polarizabilities of the separated atoms. The model is validated by comparison with direct calculations on nine diatomics, five homo-nuclear (H2, N2, O2, F2, and Cl2) and four hetero-nuclear (HF, HCl, CO, and NO), covering a range and combinations of dipole moments and polarizabilities. Calculations were conducted at the quadratic configuration interaction with single and double excitations (QCISD) and density functional theory (DFT)-B3LYP levels of theory using the 6-311++G(3df,2pd) basis set. All results agree closely at the two levels of theory except for the Stark effect of NO which is not correctly predicted by QCISD calculations as further calculations, including at the coupled cluster with single and double excitation (CCSD) level of theory, demonstrate.

  10. Shifting chemical equilibria in flow--efficient decarbonylation driven by annular flow regimes.

    PubMed

    Gutmann, Bernhard; Elsner, Petteri; Glasnov, Toma; Roberge, Dominique M; Kappe, C Oliver

    2014-10-20

    To efficiently drive chemical reactions, it is often necessary to influence an equilibrium by removing one or more components from the reaction space. Such manipulation is straightforward in open systems, for example, by distillation of a volatile product from the reaction mixture. Herein we describe a unique high-temperature/high-pressure gas/liquid continuous-flow process for the rhodium-catalyzed decarbonylation of aldehydes. The carbon monoxide released during the reaction is carried with a stream of an inert gas through the center of the tubing, whereas the liquid feed travels as an annular film along the wall of the channel. As a consequence, carbon monoxide is effectively vaporized from the liquid phase into the gas phase and stripped from the reaction mixture, thus driving the equilibrium to the product and preventing poisoning of the catalyst. This approach enables the catalytic decarbonylation of a variety of aldehydes with unprecedented efficiency with a standard coil-based flow device.

  11. Interpreting C-13 NMR spectra of technical lignins based on ionization chemical shifts

    SciTech Connect

    Akim, L.G.; Fedulina, T.G.; Shevchenko, S.M.

    1996-10-01

    Newly developed technique of C-13 NMR spectroscopy of ionized lignins in aqueous alkali has been applied to analysis of the chemical structure of technical lignins. Ionization of phenolic and carboxylic hydroxyl groups has a strong effect on the electronic structure of lignin and leads to significant changes in C-13 NMR spectra of the polymer. Comparative analysis of the spectra of organosolv and alkali lignins in neutral organic and aqueous alkaline media based on the data obtained for lignin model compounds demonstrated the usefulness and scope of applicability of the method. This method was especially useful when applied to a highly degraded alkaline lignin, enhancing our ability to analyze the poorly resolved spectrum. A technique is developed that permits the user to analyze a lignin spectrum in an aqueous alkaline solution without the accompanying spectrum in an organic solution. The research described was made possible by Grant No. NWFOOO from the International Science Foundation.

  12. Molecular structure and vibrational bands and 13C chemical shift assignments of both enmein-type diterpenoids by DFT study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Tao; Wu, Yi fang; Wang, Xue liang

    2014-01-01

    We report here theoretical and experimental studies on the molecular structure and vibrational and NMR spectra of both natural enmein type diterpenoids molecule (6, 7-seco-ent-kaurenes enmein type), isolated from the leaves of Isodon japonica (Burm.f.) Hara var. galaucocalyx (maxin) Hara. The optimized geometry, total energy, NMR chemical shifts and vibrational wavenumbers of epinodosinol and epinodosin have been determined using B3LYP method with 6-311G (d,p) basis set. A complete vibrational assignment is provided for the observed IR spectra of studied compounds. The calculated wavenumbers and 13C c.s. are in an excellent agreement with the experimental values. Quantum chemical calculations at the B3LYP/6-311G (d,p) level of theory have been carried out on studied compounds to obtain a set of molecular electronic properties (MEP,HOMO, LUMO and gap energies ΔEg). Electrostatic potential surfaces have been mapped over the electron density isosurfaces to obtain information about the size, shape, charge density distribution and chemical reactivity of the molecules.

  13. Molecular structure and vibrational bands and 13C chemical shift assignments of both enmein-type diterpenoids by DFT study.

    PubMed

    Wang, Tao; Wu, Yi fang; Wang, Xue liang

    2014-01-01

    We report here theoretical and experimental studies on the molecular structure and vibrational and NMR spectra of both natural enmein type diterpenoids molecule (6, 7-seco-ent-kaurenes enmein type), isolated from the leaves of Isodon japonica (Burm.f.) Hara var. galaucocalyx (maxin) Hara. The optimized geometry, total energy, NMR chemical shifts and vibrational wavenumbers of epinodosinol and epinodosin have been determined using B3LYP method with 6-311G (d,p) basis set. A complete vibrational assignment is provided for the observed IR spectra of studied compounds. The calculated wavenumbers and 13C c.s. are in an excellent agreement with the experimental values. Quantum chemical calculations at the B3LYP/6-311G (d,p) level of theory have been carried out on studied compounds to obtain a set of molecular electronic properties (MEP,HOMO, LUMO and gap energies ΔEg). Electrostatic potential surfaces have been mapped over the electron density isosurfaces to obtain information about the size, shape, charge density distribution and chemical reactivity of the molecules. PMID:24013676

  14. (19)F NMR studies of the leucine-isoleucine-valine binding protein: evidence that a closed conformation exists in solution.

    PubMed

    Salopek-Sondi, Branka; Vaughan, Mark D; Skeels, Matthew C; Honek, John F; Luck, Linda A

    2003-10-01

    The leucine-isoleucine-valine binding protein (LIV) found in the periplasmic space of E. coli has been used as a structural model for a number of neuronal receptors. This "venus fly trap" type protein has been characterized by crystallography in only the open form. Herein we have labeled LIV with 5-fluorotryptophan (5F-Trp) and difluoromethionine (DFM) in order to explore the structural dynamics of this protein and the application of DFM as a potential (19)F NMR structural probe for this family of proteins. Based on mass spectrometric analysis of the protein overproduced in the presence of DFM, approximately 30% of the five LIV methionine residues were randomly substituted with the fluorinated analog. Urea denaturation experiments imply a slight decrease in protein stability when DFM is incorporated into LIV. However, the fluorinated methionine did not alter leucine-binding activity upon its incorporation into the protein. Binding of L-leucine stabilizes both the unlabeled and DFM-labeled LIV, and induces the protein to adopt a three-state unfolding model in place of the two-state process observed for the free protein. The (19)F NMR spectrum of DFM-labeled LIV gave distinct resonances for the five Met residues found in LIV. 5F-Trp labeled LIV gave a well resolved spectrum for the three Trp residues. Trp to Phe mutants defined the resonances in the spectrum. The distinct narrowing in line width of the resonances when ligand was added identified the closed form of the protein.

  15. Phospho-selective mechanisms of arrestin conformations and functions revealed by unnatural amino acid incorporation and 19F-NMR

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Fan; Yu, Xiao; Liu, Chuan; Qu, Chang-Xiu; Gong, Zheng; Liu, Hong-Da; Li, Fa-Hui; Wang, Hong-Mei; He, Dong-Fang; Yi, Fan; Song, Chen; Tian, Chang-Lin; Xiao, Kun-Hong; Wang, Jiang-Yun; Sun, Jin-Peng

    2015-01-01

    Specific arrestin conformations are coupled to distinct downstream effectors, which underlie the functions of many G-protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs). Here, using unnatural amino acid incorporation and fluorine-19 nuclear magnetic resonance (19F-NMR) spectroscopy, we demonstrate that distinct receptor phospho-barcodes are translated to specific β-arrestin-1 conformations and direct selective signalling. With its phosphate-binding concave surface, β-arrestin-1 ‘reads' the message in the receptor phospho-C-tails and distinct phospho-interaction patterns are revealed by 19F-NMR. Whereas all functional phosphopeptides interact with a common phosphate binding site and induce the movements of finger and middle loops, different phospho-interaction patterns induce distinct structural states of β-arrestin-1 that are coupled to distinct arrestin functions. Only clathrin recognizes and stabilizes GRK2-specific β-arrestin-1 conformations. The identified receptor-phospho-selective mechanism for arrestin conformation and the spacing of the multiple phosphate-binding sites in the arrestin enable arrestin to recognize plethora phosphorylation states of numerous GPCRs, contributing to the functional diversity of receptors. PMID:26347956

  16. A General and Facile Strategy to Fabricate Multifunctional Nanoprobes for Simultaneous (19)F Magnetic Resonance Imaging, Optical/Thermal Imaging, and Photothermal Therapy.

    PubMed

    Hu, Gaofei; Li, Nannan; Tang, Juan; Xu, Suying; Wang, Leyu

    2016-09-01

    (19)F magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), due to its high sensitivity and negligible background, is anticipated to be a powerful noninvasive, sensitive, and accurate molecular imaging technique. However, the major challenge of (19)F MRI is to increase the number of (19)F atoms while maintaining the solubility and molecular mobility of the probe. Here, we successfully developed a facile and general strategy to synthesize the multifunctional (19)F MRI nanoprobes by encapsulating the hydrophobic inorganic nanoparticles (NPs) into a hybrid polymer micelle consisting of hydrolysates of 1H,1H,2H,2H-perfluorodecyltriethoxysilane (PDTES) and oleylamine-functionalized poly(succinimide) (PSIOAm). Due to their good water dispersibility, excellent molecular mobility resulting from the ultrathin coating, and high (19)F atom numbers, these nanoprobes generate a separate sharp singlet of (19)F nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) signal (at -82.8 ppm) with half peak width of ∼28 Hz, which is highly applicable for (19)F MRI. Significantly, by varying the inorganic core from metals (Au), oxides (Fe3O4), fluorides (NaYF4:Yb(3+)/Er(3+)), and phosphates (YPO4) to semiconductors (Cu7S4 and Ag2S, ZnS:Mn(2+)) NPs, which renders the nanoprobes' multifunctional properties such as photothermal ability (Au, Cu7S4), magnetism (Fe3O4), fluorescence (ZnS:Mn(2+)), near-infrared (NIR) fluorescence (Ag2S), and upconversion (UC) luminescence. Meanwhile, the as-prepared nanoprobes possess relatively small sizes (about 50 nm), which is beneficial for long-time circulation. The proof-of-concept in vitro (19)F NMR and photothermal ablation of ZnS:Mn(2+)@PDTES/PSIOAm and Cu7S4@PDTES/PSIOAm nanoprobes further suggest that these nanoprobes hold wide potentials for multifunctional applications in biomedical fields. PMID:27534896

  17. Superfluorinated PEI Derivative Coupled with (99m) Tc for ASGPR Targeted (19) F MRI/SPECT/PA Tri-Modality Imaging.

    PubMed

    Guo, Zhide; Gao, Mengna; Song, Manli; Li, Yesen; Zhang, Deliang; Xu, Duo; You, Linyi; Wang, Liangliang; Zhuang, Rongqiang; Su, Xinhui; Liu, Ting; Du, Jin; Zhang, Xianzhong

    2016-07-01

    Fluorinated polyethylenimine derivative labeled with radionuclide (99m) Tc is developed as a (19) F MRI/SPECT/PA multifunctional imaging agent with good asialoglycoprotein receptors (ASGPR)-targeting ability. This multifunctional agent is safe and suitable for (19) F MRI/SPECT/PA imaging and has the potential to detect hepatic diseases and to assess liver function, which provide powerful support for the development of personalized and precision medicine.

  18. A General and Facile Strategy to Fabricate Multifunctional Nanoprobes for Simultaneous (19)F Magnetic Resonance Imaging, Optical/Thermal Imaging, and Photothermal Therapy.

    PubMed

    Hu, Gaofei; Li, Nannan; Tang, Juan; Xu, Suying; Wang, Leyu

    2016-09-01

    (19)F magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), due to its high sensitivity and negligible background, is anticipated to be a powerful noninvasive, sensitive, and accurate molecular imaging technique. However, the major challenge of (19)F MRI is to increase the number of (19)F atoms while maintaining the solubility and molecular mobility of the probe. Here, we successfully developed a facile and general strategy to synthesize the multifunctional (19)F MRI nanoprobes by encapsulating the hydrophobic inorganic nanoparticles (NPs) into a hybrid polymer micelle consisting of hydrolysates of 1H,1H,2H,2H-perfluorodecyltriethoxysilane (PDTES) and oleylamine-functionalized poly(succinimide) (PSIOAm). Due to their good water dispersibility, excellent molecular mobility resulting from the ultrathin coating, and high (19)F atom numbers, these nanoprobes generate a separate sharp singlet of (19)F nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) signal (at -82.8 ppm) with half peak width of ∼28 Hz, which is highly applicable for (19)F MRI. Significantly, by varying the inorganic core from metals (Au), oxides (Fe3O4), fluorides (NaYF4:Yb(3+)/Er(3+)), and phosphates (YPO4) to semiconductors (Cu7S4 and Ag2S, ZnS:Mn(2+)) NPs, which renders the nanoprobes' multifunctional properties such as photothermal ability (Au, Cu7S4), magnetism (Fe3O4), fluorescence (ZnS:Mn(2+)), near-infrared (NIR) fluorescence (Ag2S), and upconversion (UC) luminescence. Meanwhile, the as-prepared nanoprobes possess relatively small sizes (about 50 nm), which is beneficial for long-time circulation. The proof-of-concept in vitro (19)F NMR and photothermal ablation of ZnS:Mn(2+)@PDTES/PSIOAm and Cu7S4@PDTES/PSIOAm nanoprobes further suggest that these nanoprobes hold wide potentials for multifunctional applications in biomedical fields.

  19. Chemical structure elucidation from ¹³C NMR chemical shifts: efficient data processing using bipartite matching and maximal clique algorithms.

    PubMed

    Koichi, Shungo; Arisaka, Masaki; Koshino, Hiroyuki; Aoki, Atsushi; Iwata, Satoru; Uno, Takeaki; Satoh, Hiroko

    2014-04-28

    Computer-assisted chemical structure elucidation has been intensively studied since the first use of computers in chemistry in the 1960s. Most of the existing elucidators use a structure-spectrum database to obtain clues about the correct structure. Such a structure-spectrum database is expected to grow on a daily basis. Hence, the necessity to develop an efficient structure elucidation system that can adapt to the growth of a database has been also growing. Therefore, we have developed a new elucidator using practically efficient graph algorithms, including the convex bipartite matching, weighted bipartite matching, and Bron-Kerbosch maximal clique algorithms. The utilization of the two matching algorithms especially is a novel point of our elucidator. Because of these sophisticated algorithms, the elucidator exactly produces a correct structure if all of the fragments are included in the database. Even if not all of the fragments are in the database, the elucidator proposes relevant substructures that can help chemists to identify the actual chemical structures. The elucidator, called the CAST/CNMR Structure Elucidator, plays a complementary role to the CAST/CNMR Chemical Shift Predictor, and together these two functions can be used to analyze the structures of organic compounds.

  20. 13C and 1H chemical shift assignments and conformation confirmation of trimedlure-Y via 2-D NMR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Warthen, J. D.; Waters, R. M.; McGovern, T. P.

    The conformation of 1,1-dimethylethyl 5-chloro- cis-2-methylcyclohexane-1-carboxylate (trimedlure-Y) was confirmed as 1,2,5 equatorial, axial, equatorial via 13C, 1H, APT, CSCM and COSY NMR analyses. The carbon and proton nuclei in trimedlure-Y and the previously unassigned eight cyclohexyl protons (1.50-2.60 ppm) in 1,1-dimethylethyl 5-chloro- trans-2-methylcyclohexane-1-carboxylate (trimedlure-B 1; 1,2,5 equatorial, equatorial, equatorial) were also characterized by these methods. The effects of the 2-CH 3 in the axial or equatorial conformation upon the chemical shifts of the other nuclei in the molecule are discussed.

  1. Resolving Nitrogen-15 and Proton Chemical Shifts for Mobile Segments of Elastin with Two-dimensional NMR Spectroscopy*

    PubMed Central

    Ohgo, Kosuke; Niemczura, Walter P.; Seacat, Brian C.; Wise, Steven G.; Weiss, Anthony S.; Kumashiro, Kristin K.

    2012-01-01

    In this study, one- and two-dimensional NMR experiments are applied to uniformly 15N-enriched synthetic elastin, a recombinant human tropoelastin that has been cross-linked to form an elastic hydrogel. Hydrated elastin is characterized by large segments that undergo “liquid-like” motions that limit the efficiency of cross-polarization. The refocused insensitive nuclei enhanced by polarization transfer experiment is used to target these extensive, mobile regions of this protein. Numerous peaks are detected in the backbone amide region of the protein, and their chemical shifts indicate the completely unstructured, “random coil” model for elastin is unlikely. Instead, more evidence is gathered that supports a characteristic ensemble of conformations in this rubber-like protein. PMID:22474297

  2. Non-invasive localization of thymol accumulation in Carum copticum (Apiaceae) fruits by chemical shift selective magnetic resonance imaging.

    PubMed

    Gersbach, P V; Reddy, N

    2002-08-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging was used to localize the site of essential oil accumulation in fruit of Carum copticum L. (Apiaceae). A chemical shift method is described that utilized the spectral properties of the aromatic monoterpene thymol, the major component of the essential oil, to image thymol selectively. The presence of essential oil secretory structures in the fruit and an essential oil containing a high proportion of thymol were confirmed with optical microscopy and gas chromatography-mass spectrometry, respectively. Selective imaging of whole C. copticum fruits showed that thymol accumulation was localized to the secretory structures (canals) situated in the fruit wall. The technique was considered non-invasive as the seeds used in the imaging experiments remained intact and viable.

  3. Reliable resonance assignments of selected residues of proteins with known structure based on empirical NMR chemical shift prediction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Da-Wei; Meng, Dan; Brüschweiler, Rafael

    2015-05-01

    A robust NMR resonance assignment method is introduced for proteins whose 3D structure has previously been determined by X-ray crystallography. The goal of the method is to obtain a subset of correct assignments from a parsimonious set of 3D NMR experiments of 15N, 13C labeled proteins. Chemical shifts of sequential residue pairs are predicted from static protein structures using PPM_One, which are then compared with the corresponding experimental shifts. Globally optimized weighted matching identifies the assignments that are robust with respect to small changes in NMR cross-peak positions. The method, termed PASSPORT, is demonstrated for 4 proteins with 100-250 amino acids using 3D NHCA and a 3D CBCA(CO)NH experiments as input producing correct assignments with high reliability for 22% of the residues. The method, which works best for Gly, Ala, Ser, and Thr residues, provides assignments that serve as anchor points for additional assignments by both manual and semi-automated methods or they can be directly used for further studies, e.g. on ligand binding, protein dynamics, or post-translational modification, such as phosphorylation.

  4. Portable Sequentially Shifted Excitation Raman spectroscopy as an innovative tool for in situ chemical interrogation of painted surfaces.

    PubMed

    Conti, Claudia; Botteon, Alessandra; Bertasa, Moira; Colombo, Chiara; Realini, Marco; Sali, Diego

    2016-08-01

    We present the first validation and application of portable Sequentially Shifted Excitation (SSE) Raman spectroscopy for the survey of painted layers in art. The method enables the acquisition of shifted Raman spectra and the recovery of the spectral data through the application of a suitable reconstruction algorithm. The technique has a great potentiality in art where commonly a strong fluorescence obscures the Raman signal of the target, especially when conventional portable Raman spectrometers are used for in situ analyses. Firstly, the analytical capability of portable SSE Raman spectroscopy is critically discussed using reference materials and laboratory specimens, comparing its results with other conventional high performance laboratory instruments (benchtop FT-Raman and dispersive Raman spectrometers with an external fiber optic probe); secondly, it is applied directly in situ to study the complex polychromy of Italian prestigious terracotta sculptures of the 16(th) century. Portable SSE Raman spectroscopy represents a new investigation modality in art, expanding the portfolio of non-invasive, chemically specific analytical tools.

  5. Thickness-Dependent Binding Energy Shift in Few-Layer MoS2 Grown by Chemical Vapor Deposition.

    PubMed

    Lin, Yu-Kai; Chen, Ruei-San; Chou, Tsu-Chin; Lee, Yi-Hsin; Chen, Yang-Fang; Chen, Kuei-Hsien; Chen, Li-Chyong

    2016-08-31

    The thickness-dependent surface states of MoS2 thin films grown by the chemical vapor deposition process on the SiO2-Si substrates are investigated by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. Raman and high-resolution transmission electron microscopy suggest the thicknesses of MoS2 films to be ranging from 3 to 10 layers. Both the core levels and valence band edges of MoS2 shift downward ∼0.2 eV as the film thickness increases, which can be ascribed to the Fermi level variations resulting from the surface states and bulk defects. Grainy features observed from the atomic force microscopy topographies, and sulfur-vacancy-induced defect states illustrated at the valence band spectra imply the generation of surface states that causes the downward band bending at the n-type MoS2 surface. Bulk defects in thick MoS2 may also influence the Fermi level oppositely compared to the surface states. When Au contacts with our MoS2 thin films, the Fermi level downshifts and the binding energy reduces due to the hole-doping characteristics of Au and easy charge transfer from the surface defect sites of MoS2. The shift of the onset potentials in hydrogen evolution reaction and the evolution of charge-transfer resistances extracted from the impedance measurement also indicate the Fermi level varies with MoS2 film thickness. The tunable Fermi level and the high chemical stability make our MoS2 a potential catalyst. The observed thickness-dependent properties can also be applied to other transition-metal dichalcogenides (TMDs), and facilitates the development in the low-dimensional electronic devices and catalysts. PMID:27488185

  6. Thermal unfolding in a GCN4-like leucine zipper: 13C alpha NMR chemical shifts and local unfolding curves.

    PubMed Central

    Holtzer, M E; Lovett, E G; d'Avignon, D A; Holtzer, A

    1997-01-01

    13C alpha chemical shifts and site-specific unfolding curves are reported for 12 sites on a 33-residue, GCN4-like leucine zipper peptide (GCN4-lzK), ranging over most of the chain and sampling most heptad positions. Data were derived from NMR spectra of nine synthetic, isosequential peptides bearing 99% 13C alpha at sites selected to avoid spectral overlap in each peptide. At each site, separate resonances appear for unfolded and folded forms, and most sites show resonances for two folded forms near room temperature. The observed chemical shifts suggest that 1) urea-unfolded GCN4-lzK chains are randomly coiled; 2) thermally unfolded chains include significant transient structure, except at the ends; 3) the coiled-coli structure in the folded chains is atypical near the C-terminus; 4) only those interior sites surrounded by canonical interchain salt bridges fail to show two folded forms. Local unfolding curves, obtained from integrated resonance intensities, show that 1) sites differ in structure content and in melting temperature, so the equilibrium population must comprise more than two molecular conformations; 2) there is significant end-fraying, even at the lowest temperatures, but thermal unfolding is not a progressive unwinding from the ends; 3) residues 9-16 are in the lowest melting region; 4) heptad position does not dictate stability; 5) significant unfolding occurs below room temperature, so the shallow, linear decline in backbone CD seen there has conformational significance. It seems that only a relatively complex array of conformational states could underlie these findings. PMID:9251820

  7. Thickness-Dependent Binding Energy Shift in Few-Layer MoS2 Grown by Chemical Vapor Deposition.

    PubMed

    Lin, Yu-Kai; Chen, Ruei-San; Chou, Tsu-Chin; Lee, Yi-Hsin; Chen, Yang-Fang; Chen, Kuei-Hsien; Chen, Li-Chyong

    2016-08-31

    The thickness-dependent surface states of MoS2 thin films grown by the chemical vapor deposition process on the SiO2-Si substrates are investigated by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. Raman and high-resolution transmission electron microscopy suggest the thicknesses of MoS2 films to be ranging from 3 to 10 layers. Both the core levels and valence band edges of MoS2 shift downward ∼0.2 eV as the film thickness increases, which can be ascribed to the Fermi level variations resulting from the surface states and bulk defects. Grainy features observed from the atomic force microscopy topographies, and sulfur-vacancy-induced defect states illustrated at the valence band spectra imply the generation of surface states that causes the downward band bending at the n-type MoS2 surface. Bulk defects in thick MoS2 may also influence the Fermi level oppositely compared to the surface states. When Au contacts with our MoS2 thin films, the Fermi level downshifts and the binding energy reduces due to the hole-doping characteristics of Au and easy charge transfer from the surface defect sites of MoS2. The shift of the onset potentials in hydrogen evolution reaction and the evolution of charge-transfer resistances extracted from the impedance measurement also indicate the Fermi level varies with MoS2 film thickness. The tunable Fermi level and the high chemical stability make our MoS2 a potential catalyst. The observed thickness-dependent properties can also be applied to other transition-metal dichalcogenides (TMDs), and facilitates the development in the low-dimensional electronic devices and catalysts.

  8. Zero discharge tanning: a shift from chemical to biocatalytic leather processing.

    PubMed

    Thanikaivelan, Palanisamy; Rao, Jonnalagadda Raghava; Nair, Balachandran Unni; Ramasami, Thirumalachari

    2002-10-01

    Beam house processes (Beam house processes generally mean liming-reliming processes, which employ beam.) contribute more than 60% of the total pollution from leather processing. The use of lime and sodium sulfide is of environmental concern (1, 2). Recently, the authors have developed an enzyme-based dehairing assisted with a very low amount of sodium sulfide, which completely avoids the use of lime. However, the dehaired pelt requires opening up of fiber bundles for further processing, where lime is employed to achieve this through osmotic swelling. Huge amounts of lime sludge and total solids are the main drawbacks of lime. An alternative bioprocess, based on alpha-amylase for fiber opening, has been attempted after enzymatic unhairing. This totally eliminates the use of lime in leather processing. This method enables subsequent processes and operations in leather making feasible without a deliming process. A control experiment was run in parallel using conventional liming-reliming processes. It has been found that the extent of opening up of fiber bundles using alpha-amylase is comparable to that of the control. This has been substantiated through scanning electron microscopic, stratigraphic chrome distribution analysis, and softness measurements. Performance of the leathers is shown to be on a par with leathers produced by the conventional process through physical and hand evaluation. Importantly, softness of the leathers is numerically proven to be comparable with that of control. The process also demonstrates reduction in chemical oxygen demand load by 45% and total solids load by 20% compared to the conventional process. The total dry sludge from the beam house processes is brought down from 152 to 8 kg for processing 1 ton of raw hides.

  9. Comparison of experimental and DFT-calculated NMR chemical shifts of 2-amino and 2-hydroxyl substituted phenyl benzimidazoles, benzoxazoles and benzothiazoles in four solvents using the IEF-PCM solvation model.

    PubMed

    Pierens, Gregory K; Venkatachalam, T K; Reutens, David C

    2016-04-01

    A comparative study of experimental and calculated NMR chemical shifts of six compounds comprising 2-amino and 2-hydroxy phenyl benzoxazoles/benzothiazoles/benzimidazoles in four solvents is reported. The benzimidazoles showed interesting spectral characteristics, which are discussed. The proton and carbon chemical shifts were similar for all solvents. The largest chemical shift deviations were observed in benzene. The chemical shifts were calculated with density functional theory using a suite of four functionals and basis set combinations. The calculated chemical shifts revealed a good match to the experimentally observed values in most of the solvents. The mean absolute error was used as the primary metric. The use of an additional metric is suggested, which is based on the order of chemical shifts. The DP4 probability measures were also used to compare the experimental and calculated chemical shifts for each compound in the four solvents. Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  10. Development of multicomponent hybrid density functional theory with polarizable continuum model for the analysis of nuclear quantum effect and solvent effect on NMR chemical shift

    SciTech Connect

    Kanematsu, Yusuke; Tachikawa, Masanori

    2014-04-28

    We have developed the multicomponent hybrid density functional theory [MC-(HF+DFT)] method with polarizable continuum model (PCM) for the analysis of molecular properties including both nuclear quantum effect and solvent effect. The chemical shifts and H/D isotope shifts of the picolinic acid N-oxide (PANO) molecule in chloroform and acetonitrile solvents are applied by B3LYP electron exchange-correlation functional for our MC-(HF+DFT) method with PCM (MC-B3LYP/PCM). Our MC-B3LYP/PCM results for PANO are in reasonable agreement with the corresponding experimental chemical shifts and isotope shifts. We further investigated the applicability of our method for acetylacetone in several solvents.

  11. Dynamics-based selective 2D 1H/1H chemical shift correlation spectroscopy under ultrafast MAS conditions

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Rongchun; Ramamoorthy, Ayyalusamy

    2015-01-01

    Dynamics plays important roles in determining the physical, chemical, and functional properties of a variety of chemical and biological materials. However, a material (such as a polymer) generally has mobile and rigid regions in order to have high strength and toughness at the same time. Therefore, it is difficult to measure the role of mobile phase without being affected by the rigid components. Herein, we propose a highly sensitive solid-state NMR approach that utilizes a dipolar-coupling based filter (composed of 12 equally spaced 90° RF pulses) to selectively measure the correlation of 1H chemical shifts from the mobile regions of a material. It is interesting to find that the rotor-synchronized dipolar filter strength decreases with increasing inter-pulse delay between the 90° pulses, whereas the dipolar filter strength increases with increasing inter-pulse delay under static conditions. In this study, we also demonstrate the unique advantages of proton-detection under ultrafast magic-angle-spinning conditions to enhance the spectral resolution and sensitivity for studies on small molecules as well as multi-phase polymers. Our results further demonstrate the use of finite-pulse radio-frequency driven recoupling pulse sequence to efficiently recouple weak proton-proton dipolar couplings in the dynamic regions of a molecule and to facilitate the fast acquisition of 1H/1H correlation spectrum compared to the traditional 2D NOESY (Nuclear Overhauser effect spectroscopy) experiment. We believe that the proposed approach is beneficial to study mobile components in multi-phase systems, such as block copolymers, polymer blends, nanocomposites, heterogeneous amyloid mixture of oligomers and fibers, and other materials. PMID:26026440

  12. /sup 19/F NMR study of the transmission capacity of binuclear -N(X)SO/sub 2/- bridging groups

    SciTech Connect

    Pombrik, S.I.; Golovchenko, L.S.; Peregudov, A.S.; Fedin, E.I.; Kravtsov, D.N.

    1986-12-10

    A comparative /sup 19/F NMR study of a series of model ArN(X)SO/sub 2/C/sub 6/H/sub 4/F-4 compounds (X = H, HgPh, and Na) showed that the mechanism for the transmission of the substituent electronic effects in these compounds depends on the polarity of the N/sup delta/sup -//-X/sup delta/sup +// bond. An increase in this polarity leads to an increase in the relative contribution of direct polar conjugation. The specific solvation of the mercury atom in the binuclear bridging N(HgPh)SO/sub 2/ group has only a slight effect on its transmission capacity.

  13. (19)F MRSI of capecitabine in the liver at 7 T using broadband transmit-receive antennas and dual-band RF pulses.

    PubMed

    van Gorp, Jetse S; Seevinck, Peter R; Andreychenko, Anna; Raaijmakers, Alexander J E; Luijten, Peter R; Viergever, Max A; Koopman, Miriam; Boer, Vincent O; Klomp, Dennis W J

    2015-11-01

    Capecitabine (Cap) is an often prescribed chemotherapeutic agent, successfully used to cure some patients from cancer or reduce tumor burden for palliative care. However, the efficacy of the drug is limited, it is not known in advance who will respond to the drug and it can come with severe toxicity. (19)F Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy (MRS) and Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopic Imaging (MRSI) have been used to non-invasively study Cap metabolism in vivo to find a marker for personalized treatment. In vivo detection, however, is hampered by low concentrations and the use of radiofrequency (RF) surface coils limiting spatial coverage. In this work, the use of a 7T MR system with radiative multi-channel transmit-receive antennas was investigated with the aim of maximizing the sensitivity and spatial coverage of (19)F detection protocols. The antennas were broadband optimized to facilitate both the (1)H (298 MHz) and (19)F (280 MHz) frequencies for accurate shimming, imaging and signal combination. B1(+) simulations, phantom and noise measurements showed that more than 90% of the theoretical maximum sensitivity could be obtained when using B1(+) and B1(-) information provided at the (1)H frequency for the optimization of B1(+) and B1(-) at the (19)F frequency. Furthermore, to overcome the limits in maximum available RF power, whilst ensuring simultaneous excitation of all detectable conversion products of Cap, a dual-band RF pulse was designed and evaluated. Finally, (19)F MRS(I) measurements were performed to detect (19)F metabolites in vitro and in vivo. In two patients, at 10 h (patient 1) and 1 h (patient 2) after Cap intake, (19)F metabolites were detected in the liver and the surrounding organs, illustrating the potential of the set-up for in vivo detection of metabolic rates and drug distribution in the body.

  14. (19)F NMR studies of the leucine-isoleucine-valine binding protein: evidence that a closed conformation exists in solution.

    PubMed

    Salopek-Sondi, Branka; Vaughan, Mark D; Skeels, Matthew C; Honek, John F; Luck, Linda A

    2003-10-01

    The leucine-isoleucine-valine binding protein (LIV) found in the periplasmic space of E. coli has been used as a structural model for a number of neuronal receptors. This "venus fly trap" type protein has been characterized by crystallography in only the open form. Herein we have labeled LIV with 5-fluorotryptophan (5F-Trp) and difluoromethionine (DFM) in order to explore the structural dynamics of this protein and the application of DFM as a potential (19)F NMR structural probe for this family of proteins. Based on mass spectrometric analysis of the protein overproduced in the presence of DFM, approximately 30% of the five LIV methionine residues were randomly substituted with the fluorinated analog. Urea denaturation experiments imply a slight decrease in protein stability when DFM is incorporated into LIV. However, the fluorinated methionine did not alter leucine-binding activity upon its incorporation into the protein. Binding of L-leucine stabilizes both the unlabeled and DFM-labeled LIV, and induces the protein to adopt a three-state unfolding model in place of the two-state process observed for the free protein. The (19)F NMR spectrum of DFM-labeled LIV gave distinct resonances for the five Met residues found in LIV. 5F-Trp labeled LIV gave a well resolved spectrum for the three Trp residues. Trp to Phe mutants defined the resonances in the spectrum. The distinct narrowing in line width of the resonances when ligand was added identified the closed form of the protein. PMID:12956607

  15. Incomplete fusion studies in the 19F+159Tb system at low energies and its correlation with various systematics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shuaib, Mohd.; Sharma, Vijay R.; Yadav, Abhishek; Singh, Pushpendra P.; Sharma, Manoj Kumar; Singh, Devendra P.; Kumar, R.; Singh, R. P.; Muralithar, S.; Singh, B. P.; Prasad, R.

    2016-07-01

    The excitation functions of reaction residues populated via the complete fusion and incomplete fusion process in the interaction of the 19F+159Tb system have been measured at energies ≈4 -6 MeV/nucleon, using off-line γ -ray spectroscopy. The analysis of data was done within the framework of statistical model code pace4 (a compound nucleus model). A significant fraction of incomplete fusion was observed in the production of reaction residues involving α particle(s) in the exit channels, even at energies as low as near the Coulomb barrier. The incomplete fusion strength function was deduced from the experimental excitation functions and the dependence of this strength function on various entrance channel parameters was studied. The present results show a strong dependence on the projectile α -Q value that agrees well with the existing data. To probe the dependence of incomplete fusion on entrance channel mass asymmetry, the present work was compared with the results obtained in the interaction of 12C, 16O, and 19F with nearby targets available in the literature. It was observed that the mass asymmetry linearly increases for each projectile separately and turns out to be a projectile-dependent mass-asymmetry systematics. The deduced incomplete fusion strength functions in the present work are also plotted as a function of ZPZT (Coulomb effect) and compared with the existing literature. A strong dependence of the Coulomb effect on the incomplete fusion fraction was observed. It was found that the fraction of incomplete fusion linearly increases with ZPZT and was found to be more for larger ZPZT values indicating significantly important linear systematics.

  16. A novel 19F-NMR method for the investigation of the antioxidant capacity of biomolecules and biofluids.

    PubMed

    Aime, S; Calzoni, S; Digilio, G; Giraudo, S; Fasano, M; Maffeo, D

    1999-08-01

    A new assay for the measurement of the antioxidant capacity of biomolecules by high resolution 19F-NMR spectroscopy is presented here. This method is based on the use of trifluoroacetanilidic detectors, namely trifluoroacetanilide, N-(4-hydroxyphenyl)-trifluoroacetamide and 2-hydroxy-4-trifluoroacetamidobenzoic acid. Upon hydroxyl radical attack, such fluorinated detectors yield trifluoroacetamide and trifluoroacetic acid that can be quantitatively determined by 19F-NMR spectroscopy. Trifluoroacetamide was found to be a reliable reporter of hydroxyl radical attack on the fluorinated detectors, whereas N-(4-hydroxyphenyl)-trifluoroacetamide was found to be the most sensitive detector amongst the ones considered. Therefore, N-(4-hydroxyphenyl)-trifluoroacetamide has been used in competition experiments to assess the antioxidant capacity of a number of low and high molecular weight antioxidants. The antioxidant capacity of a given compound has been scaled in terms of an adimensional parameter, kF, that represents the ratio between the scavenger abilities of the fluorinated detector and the competitor. kF values obtained for low-molecular-mass compounds fall in the range 0.17 < kF < 1.5 and are in good agreement with second order rate constants (k2OH) for the reaction of the antioxidant with hydroxyl radicals. The kF value for serum albumin is much larger (46.9) than that predicted from the reported k2OH value. This finding supports the view that the protein can very effectively scavenge hydroxyl radicals as well as secondary radicals. Human blood serum showed that its antioxidant capacity is even higher than that shown by aqueous solutions of albumin at physiologic concentration suggesting a further contribution from other macromolecular serum components. PMID:10468209

  17. Geometries and tautomerism of OHN hydrogen bonds in aprotic solution probed by H/D isotope effects on (13)C NMR chemical shifts.

    PubMed

    Tolstoy, Peter M; Guo, Jing; Koeppe, Benjamin; Golubev, Nikolai S; Denisov, Gleb S; Smirnov, Sergei N; Limbach, Hans-Heinrich

    2010-10-14

    The (1)H and (13)C NMR spectra of 17 OHN hydrogen-bonded complexes formed by CH(3)(13)COOH(D) with 14 substituted pyridines, 2 amines, and N-methylimidazole have been measured in the temperature region between 110 and 150 K using CDF(3)/CDF(2)Cl mixture as solvent. The slow proton and hydrogen bond exchange regime was reached, and the H/D isotope effects on the (13)C chemical shifts of the carboxyl group were measured. In combination with the analysis of the corresponding (1)H chemical shifts, it was possible to distinguish between OHN hydrogen bonds exhibiting a single proton position and those exhibiting a fast proton tautomerism between molecular and zwitterionic forms. Using H-bond correlations, we relate the H/D isotope effects on the (13)C chemical shifts of the carboxyl group with the OHN hydrogen bond geometries.

  18. Correlation between the Temperature Dependence of Intrsinsic Mr Parameters and Thermal Dose Measured by a Rapid Chemical Shift Imaging Technique

    PubMed Central

    Taylor, Brian A.; Elliott, Andrew M.; Hwang, Ken-Pin; Hazle, John D.; Stafford, R. Jason

    2011-01-01

    In order to investigate simultaneous MR temperature imaging and direct validation of tissue damage during thermal therapy, temperature-dependent signal changes in proton resonance frequency (PRF) shifts, R2* values, and T1-weighted amplitudes are measured from one technique in ex vivo tissue heated with a 980-nm laser at 1.5T and 3.0T. Using a multi-gradient echo acquisition and signal modeling with the Stieglitz-McBride algorithm, the temperature sensitivity coefficient (TSC) values of these parameters are measured in each tissue at high spatiotemporal resolutions (1.6×1.6×4mm3,≤5sec) at the range of 25-61 °C. Non-linear changes in MR parameters are examined and correlated with an Arrhenius rate dose model of thermal damage. Using logistic regression, the probability of changes in these parameters is calculated as a function of thermal dose to determine if changes correspond to thermal damage. Temperature calibrations demonstrate TSC values which are consistent with previous studies. Temperature sensitivity of R2* and, in some cases, T1-weighted amplitudes are statistically different before and after thermal damage occurred. Significant changes in the slopes of R2* as a function of temperature are observed. Logistic regression analysis shows that these changes could be accurately predicted using the Arrhenius rate dose model (Ω=1.01±0.03), thereby showing that the changes in R2* could be direct markers of protein denaturation. Overall, by using a chemical shift imaging technique with simultaneous temperature estimation, R2* mapping and T1-W imaging, it is shown that changes in the sensitivity of R2* and, to a lesser degree, T1-W amplitudes are measured in ex vivo tissue when thermal damage is expected to occur according to Arrhenius rate dose models. These changes could possibly be used for direct validation of thermal damage in contrast to model-based predictions. PMID:21721063

  19. Separation of quadrupolar and chemical/paramagnetic shift interactions in two-dimensional 2H (I=1) nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Antonijevic, Sasa; Wimperis, Stephen

    2005-01-01

    A novel two-dimensional 2H (spin I=1) nuclear magnetic resonance technique is introduced for determination of both quadrupole and chemical/paramagnetic shift tensors and their relative orientation. The new method is based upon the well-known quadrupolar-echo experiment and is designed to refocus the quadrupolar interaction at the end of the t1 evolution period while retaining the modulation introduced by the shift interaction. As a result, a projection of the resulting two-dimensional spectrum onto its F1 dimension yields a shift anisotropy powder lineshape free from any quadrupolar broadening. The chemical/paramagnetic shifts appear in both F1 and F2 dimensions and are thus spread along a +1 frequency gradient; hence, a projection orthogonal to this gradient yields the pure quadrupolar powder lineshape, free from all shift interaction effects. The relative orientation of the quadrupole and shift tensors can be obtained by analysis of the full two-dimensional correlation lineshape. Unlike the well-known double-quantum experiment, the new method is, in principle, equally effective for all values of the quadrupolar splitting, including zero. The properties of the new technique are demonstrated using computer simulation and methods for the extraction of quadrupole and shift tensor parameters are described. The new technique is applied to (diamagnetic) benzoic acid-d1 (C6H5CO2D) and (paramagnetic) copper(II) chloride dihydrate-d4 (CuCl2ṡ2D2O).

  20. Separation of quadrupolar and chemical/paramagnetic shift interactions in two-dimensional 2H (I=1) nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Antonijevic, Sasa; Wimperis, Stephen

    2005-01-22

    A novel two-dimensional (2)H (spin I=1) nuclear magnetic resonance technique is introduced for determination of both quadrupole and chemical/paramagnetic shift tensors and their relative orientation. The new method is based upon the well-known quadrupolar-echo experiment and is designed to refocus the quadrupolar interaction at the end of the t(1) evolution period while retaining the modulation introduced by the shift interaction. As a result, a projection of the resulting two-dimensional spectrum onto its F(1) dimension yields a shift anisotropy powder lineshape free from any quadrupolar broadening. The chemical/paramagnetic shifts appear in both F(1) and F(2) dimensions and are thus spread along a +1 frequency gradient; hence, a projection orthogonal to this gradient yields the pure quadrupolar powder lineshape, free from all shift interaction effects. The relative orientation of the quadrupole and shift tensors can be obtained by analysis of the full two-dimensional correlation lineshape. Unlike the well-known double-quantum experiment, the new method is, in principle, equally effective for all values of the quadrupolar splitting, including zero. The properties of the new technique are demonstrated using computer simulation and methods for the extraction of quadrupole and shift tensor parameters are described. The new technique is applied to (diamagnetic) benzoic acid-d(1) (C(6)H(5)CO(2)D) and (paramagnetic) copper(II) chloride dihydrate-d(4) (CuCl(2).2D(2)O). PMID:15740253

  1. High accuracy NMR chemical shift corrected for bulk magnetization as a tool for structural elucidation of dilutable microemulsions. Part 1 - Proof of concept.

    PubMed

    Hoffman, Roy E; Darmon, Eliezer; Aserin, Abraham; Garti, Nissim

    2016-02-01

    In microemulsions, changes in droplet size and shape and possible transformations occur under various conditions. They are difficult to characterize by most analytical tools because of their nano-sized structure and dynamic nature. Several methods are usually combined to obtain reliable information, guiding the scientist in understanding their physical behavior. We felt that there is a need for a technique that complements those in use today in order to provide more information on the microemulsion behavior, mainly as a function of dilution with water. The improvement of NMR chemical shift measurements independent of bulk magnetization effects makes it possible to study the very weak intermolecular chemical shift effects. In the present study, we used NMR high resolution magic angle spinning to measure the chemical shift very accurately, free of bulk magnetization effects. The chemical shift of microemulsion components is measured as a function of the water content in order to validate the method in an interesting and promising, U-type dilutable microemulsion, which had been previously studied by a variety of techniques. Phase transition points of the microemulsion (O/W, bicontinuous, W/O) and changes in droplet shape were successfully detected using high-accuracy chemical shift measurements. We analyzed the results and found them to be compatible with the previous studies, paving the way for high-accuracy chemical shifts to be used for the study of other microemulsion systems. We detected two transition points along the water dilution line of the concentrate (reverse micelles) corresponding to the transition from swollen W/O nano-droplets to bicontinuous to the O/W droplets along with the changes in the droplets' sizes and shapes. The method seems to be in excellent agreement with other previously studied techniques and shows the advantage of this easy and valid technique.

  2. MRI chemical shift imaging of the fat content of the pancreas and liver of patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus

    PubMed Central

    CHAI, JUN; LIU, PENG; JIN, ERHU; SU, TIANHAO; ZHANG, JIE; SHI, KAINING; HONG, XU; YIN, JIE; YU, HENGCHI

    2016-01-01

    The present study aimed to investigate the association between the content and distribution of fat in the pancreas and liver in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM). A total of 70 patients newly diagnosed with T2DM (T2DM group) and 30 healthy volunteers (normal control group) were enrolled in the present study. Dual-echo magnetic resonance (MR) chemical shift imaging was used to measure the fat content of the liver and the head, body and tail regions of the pancreas. In addition, the distribution of fat in the various regions of the pancreas, as well as the average fat content of the pancreas versus the liver, were compared. The fat content of the pancreatic head, body and tail regions of the T2DM group were 5.59±4.70, 4.80±3.75 and 4.89±3.86%, respectively. The fat content of these regions in the normal control group were 3.89±2.47, 3.30±2.11 and 3.23±2.23%, respectively. The average fat content of the pancreas was 5.19±3.75% for the T2DM group and 3.47±2.00% for the normal control group. The average fat content of the liver was 9.87±3.19% for the T2DM group and 7.24±2.38% for the normal control group. Therefore, the results from MR chemical shift imaging suggested that there were no significant differences in the distribution of fat between the pancreas of patients newly diagnosed with T2DM and that from the healthy population; however, the average fat content in the pancreas of the T2DM group was significantly higher (F=3.597; P<0.05), as compared with the normal control group. In addition, there was no correlation between the fat contents in the pancreas and liver in patients newly diagnosed with T2DM and the healthy population. PMID:26893633

  3. Intermolecular Interactions in Crystalline Theobromine as Reflected in Electron Deformation Density and (13)C NMR Chemical Shift Tensors.

    PubMed

    Bouzková, Kateřina; Babinský, Martin; Novosadová, Lucie; Marek, Radek

    2013-06-11

    An understanding of the role of intermolecular interactions in crystal formation is essential to control the generation of diverse crystalline forms which is an important concern for pharmaceutical industry. Very recently, we reported a new approach to interpret the relationships between intermolecular hydrogen bonding, redistribution of electron density in the system, and NMR chemical shifts (Babinský et al. J. Phys. Chem. A, 2013, 117, 497). Here, we employ this approach to characterize a full set of crystal interactions in a sample of anhydrous theobromine as reflected in (13)C NMR chemical shift tensors (CSTs). The important intermolecular contacts are identified by comparing the DFT-calculated NMR CSTs for an isolated theobromine molecule and for clusters composed of several molecules as selected from the available X-ray diffraction data. Furthermore, electron deformation density (EDD) and shielding deformation density (SDD) in the proximity of the nuclei involved in the proposed interactions are calculated and visualized. In addition to the recently reported observations for hydrogen bonding, we focus here particularly on the stacking interactions. Although the principal relations between the EDD and CST for hydrogen bonding (HB) and stacking interactions are similar, the real-space consequences are rather different. Whereas the C-H···X hydrogen bonding influences predominantly and significantly the in-plane principal component of the (13)C CST perpendicular to the HB path and the C═O···H hydrogen bonding modulates both in-plane components of the carbonyl (13)C CST, the stacking modulates the out-of-plane electron density resulting in weak deshielding (2-8 ppm) of both in-plane principal components of the CST and weak shielding (∼ 5 ppm) of the out-of-plane component. The hydrogen-bonding and stacking interactions may add to or subtract from one another to produce total values observed experimentally. On the example of theobromine, we demonstrate

  4. Calcium-43 chemical shift and electric field gradient tensor interplay: a sensitive probe of structure, polymorphism, and hydration.

    PubMed

    Widdifield, Cory M; Moudrakovski, Igor; Bryce, David L

    2014-07-14

    Calcium is the 5th most abundant element on earth, and is found in numerous biological tissues, proteins, materials, and increasingly in catalysts. However, due to a number of unfavourable nuclear properties, such as a low magnetogyric ratio, very low natural abundance, and its nuclear electric quadrupole moment, development of solid-state (43)Ca NMR has been constrained relative to similar nuclides. In this study, 12 commonly-available calcium compounds are analyzed via(43)Ca solid-state NMR and the information which may be obtained by the measurement of both the (43)Ca electric field gradient (EFG) and chemical shift tensors (the latter of which are extremely rare with only a handful of literature examples) is discussed. Combined with density functional theory (DFT) computations, this 'tensor interplay' is, for the first time for (43)Ca, illustrated to be diagnostic in distinguishing polymorphs (e.g., calcium formate), and the degree of hydration (e.g., CaCl2·2H2O and calcium tartrate tetrahydrate). For Ca(OH)2, we outline the first example of (1)H to (43)Ca cross-polarization on a sample at natural abundance in (43)Ca. Using prior knowledge of the relationship between the isotropic calcium chemical shift and the calcium quadrupolar coupling constant (CQ) with coordination number, we postulate the coordination number in a sample of calcium levulinate dihydrate, which does not have a known crystal structure. Natural samples of CaCO3 (aragonite polymorph) are used to show that the synthetic structure is present in nature. Gauge-including projector augmented-wave (GIPAW) DFT computations using accepted crystal structures for many of these systems generally result in calculated NMR tensor parameters which are in very good agreement with the experimental observations. This combination of (43)Ca NMR measurements with GIPAW DFT ultimately allows us to establish clear correlations between various solid-state (43)Ca NMR observables and selected structural parameters

  5. Shifts in controls on the temporal coherence of throughfall chemical flux in Acadia National Park, Maine, USA

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Nelson, Sarah J.; Webster, Katherine E.; Loftin, Cynthia S.; Weathers, Kathleen C.

    2013-01-01

    Major ion and mercury (Hg) inputs to terrestrial ecosystems include both wet and dry deposition (total deposition). Estimating total deposition to sensitive receptor sites is hampered by limited information regarding its spatial heterogeneity and seasonality. We used measurements of throughfall flux, which includes atmospheric inputs to forests and the net effects of canopy leaching or uptake, for ten major ions and Hg collected during 35 time periods in 1999–2005 at over 70 sites within Acadia National Park, Maine to (1) quantify coherence in temporal dynamics of seasonal throughfall deposition and (2) examine controls on these patterns at multiple scales. We quantified temporal coherence as the correlation between all possible site pairs for each solute on a seasonal basis. In the summer growing season and autumn, coherence among pairs of sites with similar vegetation was stronger than for site-pairs that differed in vegetation suggesting that interaction with the canopy and leaching of solutes differed in coniferous, deciduous, mixed, and shrub or open canopy sites. The spatial pattern in throughfall hydrologic inputs across Acadia National Park was more variable during the winter snow season, suggesting that snow re-distribution affects net hydrologic input, which consequently affects chemical flux. Sea-salt corrected calcium concentrations identified a shift in air mass sources from maritime in winter to the continental industrial corridor in summer. Our results suggest that the spatial pattern of throughfall hydrologic flux, dominant seasonal air mass source, and relationship with vegetation in winter differ from the spatial pattern of throughfall flux in these solutes in summer and autumn. The coherence approach applied here made clear the strong influence of spatial heterogeneity in throughfall hydrologic inputs and a maritime air mass source on winter patterns of throughfall flux. By contrast, vegetation type was the most important influence on

  6. Molecular structure and vibrational and chemical shift assignments of 3'-chloro-4-dimethylamino azobenzene by DFT calculations.

    PubMed

    Toy, Mehmet; Tanak, Hasan

    2016-01-01

    In the present work, a combined experimental and theoretical study on ground state molecular structure, spectroscopic and nonlinear optical properties of azo compound 3'-chloro-4-dimethlamino azobenzene are reported. The molecular geometry, vibrational wavenumbers and the first order hyperpolarizability of the title compound were calculated with the help of density functional theory computations. The optimized geometric parameters obtained by using DFT (B3LYP/6-311++G(d,p)) show good agreement with the experimental data. The vibrational transitions were identified based on the recorded FT-IR spectra in the range of 4000-400cm(-1) for solid state. The (1)H isotropic chemical shifts with respect to TMS were also calculated using the gauge independent atomic orbital (GIAO) method and compared with the experimental data. Using the TD-DFT method, electronic absorption spectra of the title compound have been predicted, and good agreement is determined with the experimental ones. To investigate the NLO properties of the title compound, the polarizability and the first hyperpolarizability were calculated using the density functional B3LYP method with the 6-311++G(d,p) basis set. According to results, the title compound exhibits non-zero first hyperpolarizability value revealing second order NLO behavior. In addition, DFT calculations of the title compound, molecular electrostatic potential and frontier molecular orbitals were also performed at 6-311++G(d,p) level of theory. PMID:25468435

  7. Chemical shifts assignments of the archaeal MC1 protein and a strongly bent 15 base pairs DNA duplex in complex.

    PubMed

    Loth, Karine; Landon, Céline; Paquet, Françoise

    2015-04-01

    MC1 is the most abundant architectural protein present in Methanosarcina thermophila CHTI55 in laboratory growth conditions and is structurally unrelated to other DNA-binding proteins. MC1 functions are to shape and to protect DNA against thermal denaturation by binding to it. Therefore, MC1 has a strong affinity for any double-stranded DNA. However, it recognizes and preferentially binds to bent DNA, such as four-way junctions and negatively supercoiled DNA minicircles. Combining NMR data, electron microscopy data, biochemistry, molecular modelisation and docking approaches, we proposed recently a new type of DNA/protein complex, in which the monomeric protein MC1 binds on the concave side of a strongly bent 15 base pairs DNA. We present here the NMR chemical shifts assignments of each partner in the complex, (1)H (15)N MC1 protein and (1)H (13)C (15)N bent duplex DNA, as first step towards the first experimental 3D structure of this new type of DNA/protein complex.

  8. Molecular structure and vibrational and chemical shift assignments of 3‧-chloro-4-dimethylamino azobenzene by DFT calculations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Toy, Mehmet; Tanak, Hasan

    2016-01-01

    In the present work, a combined experimental and theoretical study on ground state molecular structure, spectroscopic and nonlinear optical properties of azo compound 3‧-chloro-4-dimethlamino azobenzene are reported. The molecular geometry, vibrational wavenumbers and the first order hyperpolarizability of the title compound were calculated with the help of density functional theory computations. The optimized geometric parameters obtained by using DFT (B3LYP/6-311++G(d,p)) show good agreement with the experimental data. The vibrational transitions were identified based on the recorded FT-IR spectra in the range of 4000-400 cm-1 for solid state. The 1H isotropic chemical shifts with respect to TMS were also calculated using the gauge independent atomic orbital (GIAO) method and compared with the experimental data. Using the TD-DFT method, electronic absorption spectra of the title compound have been predicted, and good agreement is determined with the experimental ones. To investigate the NLO properties of the title compound, the polarizability and the first hyperpolarizability were calculated using the density functional B3LYP method with the 6-311++G(d,p) basis set. According to results, the title compound exhibits non-zero first hyperpolarizability value revealing second order NLO behavior. In addition, DFT calculations of the title compound, molecular electrostatic potential and frontier molecular orbitals were also performed at 6-311++G(d,p) level of theory.

  9. (1)H, (13)C, and (15)N chemical shifts assignments for human endothelial monocyte-activating polypeptide EMAP II.

    PubMed

    Lozhko, Dmytro; Stanek, Jan; Kazimierczuk, Krzysztof; Zawadzka-Kazimierczuk, Anna; Kozminski, Wiktor; Zhukov, Igor; Kornelyuk, Alexander

    2013-04-01

    Endothelial and monocyte-activating polypeptide II (EMAP II) is a cytokine that plays an important role in inflammation, apoptosis and angiogenesis processes in tumour tissues. Structurally, the EMAP II is a 169 amino acid residues long C-terminal domain (residues 147-312) of auxiliary tRNA binding protein p43. In spite of existence in pdb databank of two X-ray structures there are some important aspects of EMAP II cytokine function which are still not fully understood in detail. To obtain information about 3D structure and backbone dynamic processes in solution we perform structure evaluation of human EMAP II cytokine by NMR spectroscopy. The standard approach to sequence-specific backbone assignment using 3D NMR data sets was not successful in our studies and was supplemented by recently developed 4D NMR experiments with random sampling of evolution time space. Here we report the backbone and side chain (1)H, (13)C, and (15)N chemical shifts in solution for recombinant EMAP II cytokine together with secondary structure provided by TALOS + software.

  10. Centerband-only analysis of rotor-unsynchronized spin echo for measurement of lipid (31) P chemical shift anisotropy.

    PubMed

    Umegawa, Yuichi; Yamaguchi, Toshiyuki; Murata, Michio; Matsuoka, Shigeru

    2015-07-01

    Structural diversity and molecular flexibility of phospholipids are essential for biological membranes to play key roles in numerous cellular processes. Uncovering the behavior of individual lipids in membrane dynamics is crucial for understanding the molecular mechanisms underlying biological functions of cell membranes. In this paper, we introduce a simple method to investigate dynamics of lipid molecules in multi-component systems by measuring the (31) P chemical shift anisotropy (CSA) under magic angle spinning (MAS) conditions. For achieving both signal separation and CSA determination, we utilized a centerband-only analysis of rotor-unsynchronized spin echo (COARSE). This analysis is based on the curve fitting of periodic modulation of centerband intensity along the interpulse delay time in rotor-unsynchronized spin-echo experiments. The utility of COARSE was examined by using phospholipid vesicles, a three-component lipid raft model system, and archaeal purple membranes. We found that the apparent advantages of this method are high resolution and high sensitivity given by the moderate MAS speed and the one-dimensional acquisition with short spin-echo delays. COARSE provides an alternative method for CSA measurement that is effective in the investigation of lipid polymorphologies.

  11. Ultrafast magnetic-resonance-imaging velocimetry of liquid-liquid systems: overcoming chemical-shift artifacts using compressed sensing.

    PubMed

    Tayler, Alexander B; Benning, Martin; Sederman, Andrew J; Holland, Daniel J; Gladden, Lynn F

    2014-06-01

    We present simultaneous measurement of dispersed and continuous phase flow fields for liquid-liquid systems obtained using ultrafast magnetic resonance imaging. Chemical-shift artifacts, which are otherwise highly problematic for this type of measurement, are overcome using a compressed sensing based image reconstruction algorithm that accounts for off-resonant signal components. This scheme is combined with high-temporal-resolution spiral imaging (188 frames per second), which is noted for its robustness to flow. It is demonstrated that both quantitative signal intensity and phase preconditioning are preserved throughout the image reconstruction algorithm. Measurements are acquired of oil droplets of varying viscosity rising through stagnant water. From these data it is apparent that the internal droplet flow fields are heavily influenced by the droplet shape oscillations, and that the accurate modeling of droplet shape is of critical importance in the modeling of droplet-side hydrodynamics. The application of the technique to three-component systems is also demonstrated, as is the measurement of local concentration maps of a mutually soluble species (acetone in polydimethylsiloxane-water). PMID:25019881

  12. Ultrafast magnetic-resonance-imaging velocimetry of liquid-liquid systems: overcoming chemical-shift artifacts using compressed sensing.

    PubMed

    Tayler, Alexander B; Benning, Martin; Sederman, Andrew J; Holland, Daniel J; Gladden, Lynn F

    2014-06-01

    We present simultaneous measurement of dispersed and continuous phase flow fields for liquid-liquid systems obtained using ultrafast magnetic resonance imaging. Chemical-shift artifacts, which are otherwise highly problematic for this type of measurement, are overcome using a compressed sensing based image reconstruction algorithm that accounts for off-resonant signal components. This scheme is combined with high-temporal-resolution spiral imaging (188 frames per second), which is noted for its robustness to flow. It is demonstrated that both quantitative signal intensity and phase preconditioning are preserved throughout the image reconstruction algorithm. Measurements are acquired of oil droplets of varying viscosity rising through stagnant water. From these data it is apparent that the internal droplet flow fields are heavily influenced by the droplet shape oscillations, and that the accurate modeling of droplet shape is of critical importance in the modeling of droplet-side hydrodynamics. The application of the technique to three-component systems is also demonstrated, as is the measurement of local concentration maps of a mutually soluble species (acetone in polydimethylsiloxane-water).

  13. Emulsion droplet sizing using low-field NMR with chemical shift resolution and the block gradient pulse method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lingwood, I. A.; Chandrasekera, T. C.; Kolz, J.; Fridjonsson, E. O.; Johns, M. L.

    2012-01-01

    Pulsed Field Gradient (PFG) measurements are commonly used to determine emulsion droplet size distributions based on restricted self-diffusion within the emulsion droplets. Such measurement capability is readily available on commercial NMR bench-top apparatus. A significant limitation is the requirement to selectively detect signal from the liquid phase within the emulsion droplets; this is currently achieved using either relaxation or self-diffusion contrast. Here we demonstrate the use of a 1.1 T bench-top NMR magnet, which when coupled with an rf micro-coil, is able to provide sufficient chemical shift resolution such that unambiguous signal selection is achieved from the dispersed droplet phase. We also improve the accuracy of the numerical inversion process required to produce the emulsion droplet size distribution, by employing the Block Gradient Pulse (bgp) method, which partially relaxes the assumptions of a Gaussian phase distribution or infinitely short gradient pulse application inherent in current application. The techniques are successfully applied to size 3 different emulsions.

  14. Verification of threshold activation detection (TAD) technique in prompt fission neutron detection using scintillators containing 19F

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sibczynski, P.; Kownacki, J.; Moszyński, M.; Iwanowska-Hanke, J.; Syntfeld-Każuch, A.; Gójska, A.; Gierlik, M.; Kaźmierczak, Ł.; Jakubowska, E.; Kędzierski, G.; Kujawiński, Ł.; Wojnarowicz, J.; Carrel, F.; Ledieu, M.; Lainé, F.

    2015-09-01

    In the present study ⌀ 5''× 3'' and ⌀ 2''× 2'' EJ-313 liquid fluorocarbon as well as ⌀ 2'' × 3'' BaF2 scintillators were exposed to neutrons from a 252Cf neutron source and a Sodern Genie 16GT deuterium-tritium (D+T) neutron generator. The scintillators responses to β- particles with maximum endpoint energy of 10.4 MeV from the n+19F reactions were studied. Response of a ⌀ 5'' × 3'' BC-408 plastic scintillator was also studied as a reference. The β- particles are the products of interaction of fast neutrons with 19F which is a component of the EJ-313 and BaF2 scintillators. The method of fast neutron detection via fluorine activation is already known as Threshold Activation Detection (TAD) and was proposed for photofission prompt neutron detection from fissionable and Special Nuclear Materials (SNM) in the field of Homeland Security and Border Monitoring. Measurements of the number of counts between 6.0 and 10.5 MeV with a 252Cf source showed that the relative neutron detection efficiency ratio, defined as epsilonBaF2 / epsilonEJ-313-5'', is 32.0% ± 2.3% and 44.6% ± 3.4% for front-on and side-on orientation of the BaF2, respectively. Moreover, the ⌀ 5'' EJ-313 and side-on oriented BaF2 were also exposed to neutrons from the D+T neutron generator, and the relative efficiency epsilonBaF2 / epsilonEJ-313-5'' was estimated to be 39.3%. Measurements of prompt photofission neutrons with the BaF2 detector by means of data acquisition after irradiation (out-of-beam) of nuclear material and between the beam pulses (beam-off) techniques were also conducted on the 9 MeV LINAC of the SAPHIR facility.

  15. Multinucleon transfer in O,1816,19F+208Pb reactions at energies near the fusion barrier

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rafferty, D. C.; Dasgupta, M.; Hinde, D. J.; Simenel, C.; Simpson, E. C.; Williams, E.; Carter, I. P.; Cook, K. J.; Luong, D. H.; McNeil, S. D.; Ramachandran, K.; Vo-Phuoc, K.; Wakhle, A.

    2016-08-01

    Background: Nuclear reactions are complex, involving collisions between composite systems where many-body dynamics determines outcomes. Successful models have been developed to explain particular reaction outcomes in distinct energy and mass regimes, but a unifying picture remains elusive. The irreversible transfer of kinetic energy from the relative motion of the collision partners to their internal states, as is known to occur in deep inelastic collisions, has yet to be successfully incorporated explicitly into fully quantal reaction models. The influence of these processes on fusion is not yet quantitatively understood. Purpose: To investigate the population of high excitation energies in transfer reactions at sub-barrier energies, which are precursors to deep inelastic processes, and their dependence on the internuclear separation. Methods: Transfer probabilities and excitation energy spectra have been measured in collisions of O,1816,19F+208Pb , at various energies below and around the fusion barrier, by detecting the backscattered projectile-like fragments in a Δ E -E telescope. Results: The relative yields of different transfer outcomes are strongly driven by Q values, but change with the internuclear separation. In 16O+208Pb , single nucleon transfer dominates, with a strong contribution from -2 p transfer close to the Coulomb barrier, though this channel becomes less significant in relation to the -2 p 2 n transfer channel at larger separations. For 18O+208Pb , the -2 p 2 n channel is the dominant charge transfer mode at all separations. In the reactions with 19F,-3 p 2 n transfer is significant close to the barrier, but falls off rapidly with energy. Multinucleon transfer processes are shown to lead to high excitation energies (up to ˜15 MeV), which is distinct from single nucleon transfer modes which predominantly populate states at low excitation energy. Conclusions: Kinetic energy is transferred into internal excitations following transfer, with this

  16. Measurement of the properties of the astrophysically interesting 3/2+ state at 7.101 MeV in 19F

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Butt, Y. M.; Hammer, J. W.; Jaeger, M.; Kunz, R.; Mayer, A.; Parker, P. D.; Schreiter, R.; Staudt, G.

    1998-07-01

    The isospin mirror of the Jπ=3/2+ 18F+p resonance at Ex=7.070 MeV in 19Ne has been measured in 19F via the 15N(α,γ)19F reaction using the RHINOCEROS windowless gas target at the Stuttgart 4-MV Dynamitron facility. This resonance is measured to have the following properties: Ex=7.101+/-0.001 MeV, Γtot=28+/-1 keV, and a strength of ωγ=0.77+/-0.11 eV (corresponding to Γγ=0.39+/-0.06 eV).

  17. DFT-GIAO(1)H NMR chemical shifts prediction for the spectral assignment and conformational analysis of the anticholinergic drugs (-)-scopolamine and (-)-hyoscyamine.

    PubMed

    Muñoz, Marcelo A; Joseph-Nathan, Pedro

    2010-06-01

    The relatively large chemical shift differences observed in the (1)H NMR spectra of the anticholinergic drugs (-)-scopolamine 1 and (-)-hyoscyamine 2 measured in CDCl(3) are explained using a combination of systematic/molecular mechanics force field (MMFF) conformational searches and gas-phase density functional theory (DFT) single point calculations, geometry optimizations and chemical shift calculations within the gauge including/invariant atomic orbital (GIAO) approximation. These calculations show that both molecules prefer a compact conformation in which the phenyl ring of the tropic ester is positioned under the tropane bicycle, clearly suggesting that the chemical shift differences are produced by the anisotropic effect of the aromatic ring. As the calculations fairly well predict these experimental differences, diastereotopic NMR signal assignments for the two studied molecules are proposed. In addition, a cursory inspection of the published (1)H and (13)C NMR spectra of different forms of 1 and 2 in solution reveals that most of them show these diastereotopic chemical shift differences, strongly suggesting a preference for the compact conformation quite independent of the organic or aqueous nature of the solvent.

  18. Structural determination of complex natural products by quantum mechanical calculations of (13)C NMR chemical shifts: development of a parameterized protocol for terpenes.

    PubMed

    de Albuquerque, Ana Carolina Ferreira; Ribeiro, Daniel Joras; de Amorim, Mauro Barbosa

    2016-08-01

    Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy is one of the most important tools for determining the structures of organic molecules. Despite the advances made in this technique, revisions of erroneously established structures for natural products are still commonly published in the literature. In this context, the prediction of chemical shifts through ab initio and density functional theory (DFT) calculations has become a very powerful tool for assisting with the structural determination of complex organic molecules. In this work, we present the development of a protocol for (13)C chemical shift calculations of terpenes, a class of natural products that are widely distributed among plant species and are very important due to their biological and pharmacological activities. This protocol consists of GIAO-DFT calculations of chemical shifts and the application of a parameterized scaling factor in order to ensure accurate structural determination of this class of natural products. The application of this protocol to a set of five terpenes yielded accurate calculated chemical shifts, showing that this is a very attractive tool for the calculation of complex organic structures such as terpenes. PMID:27424297

  19. Probing the solvent shell with 195Pt chemical shifts: density functional theory molecular dynamics study of Pt(II) and Pt(IV) anionic complexes in aqueous solution.

    PubMed

    Truflandier, Lionel A; Autschbach, Jochen

    2010-03-17

    Ab initio molecular dynamics (aiMD) simulations based on density functional theory (DFT) were performed on a set of five anionic platinum complexes in aqueous solution. (195)Pt nuclear magnetic shielding constants were computed with DFT as averages over the aiMD trajectories, using the two-component relativistic zeroth-order regular approximation (ZORA) in order to treat relativistic effects on the Pt shielding tensors. The chemical shifts obtained from the aiMD averages are in good agreement with experimental data. For Pt(II) and Pt(IV) halide complexes we found an intermediate solvent shell interacting with the complexes that causes pronounced solvent effects on the Pt chemical shifts. For these complexes, the magnitude of solvent effects on the Pt shielding constant can be correlated with the surface charge density. For square-planar Pt complexes the aiMD simulations also clearly demonstrate the influence of closely coordinated non-equatorial water molecules on the Pt chemical shift, relating the structure of the solution around the complex to the solvent effects on the metal NMR chemical shift. For the complex [Pt(CN)(4)](2-), the solvent effects on the Pt shielding constant are surprisingly small.

  20. Determination of size and sign of hetero-nuclear coupling constants from 2D 19F-13C correlation spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ampt, Kirsten A. M.; Aspers, Ruud L. E. G.; Dvortsak, Peter; van der Werf, Ramon M.; Wijmenga, Sybren S.; Jaeger, Martin

    2012-02-01

    Fluorinated organic compounds have become increasingly important within the polymer and the pharmaceutical industry as well as for clinical applications. For the structural elucidation of such compounds, NMR experiments with fluorine detection are of great value due to the favorable NMR properties of the fluorine nucleus. For the investigation of three fluorinated compounds, triple resonance 2D HSQC and HMBC experiments were adopted to fluorine detection with carbon and/or proton decoupling to yield F-C, F-C{H}, F-C{Cacq} and F-C{H,Cacq} variants. Analysis of E.COSY type cross-peak patterns in the F-C correlation spectra led, apart from the chemical shift assignments, to determination of size and signs of the JCH, JCF, and JHF coupling constants. In addition, the fully coupled F-C HMQC spectrum of steroid 1 was interpreted in terms of E.COSY type patterns. This example shows how coupling constants due to different nuclei can be determined together with their relative signs from a single spectrum. The analysis of cross-peak patterns, as presented here, not only provides relatively straightforward routes to the determination of size and sign of hetero-nuclear J-couplings in fluorinated compounds, it also provides new and easy ways for the determination of residual dipolar couplings and thus for structure elucidation. The examples and results presented in this study may contribute to a better interpretation and understanding of various F-C correlation experiments and thereby stimulate their utilization.

  1. Fully adiabatic 31P 2D-CSI with reduced chemical shift displacement error at 7 T--GOIA-1D-ISIS/2D-CSI.

    PubMed

    Chmelík, M; Kukurová, I Just; Gruber, S; Krššák, M; Valkovič, L; Trattnig, S; Bogner, W

    2013-05-01

    A fully adiabatic phosphorus (31P) two-dimensional (2D) chemical shift spectroscopic imaging sequence with reduced chemical shift displacement error for 7 T, based on 1D-image-selected in vivo spectroscopy, combined with 2D-chemical shift spectroscopic imaging selection, was developed. Slice-selective excitation was achieved by a spatially selective broadband GOIA-W(16,4) inversion pulse with an interleaved subtraction scheme before nonselective adiabatic excitation, and followed by 2D phase encoding. The use of GOIA-W(16,4) pulses (bandwidth 4.3-21.6 kHz for 10-50 mm slices) reduced the chemical shift displacement error in the slice direction ∼1.5-7.7 fold, compared to conventional 2D-chemical shift spectroscopic imaging with Sinc3 selective pulses (2.8 kHz). This reduction was experimentally demonstrated with measurements of an MR spectroscopy localization phantom and with experimental evaluation of pulse profiles. In vivo experiments in clinically acceptable measurement times were demonstrated in the calf muscle (nominal voxel volume, 5.65 ml in 6 min 53 s), brain (10 ml, 6 min 32 s), and liver (8.33 ml, 8 min 14 s) of healthy volunteers at 7 T. High reproducibility was found in the calf muscle at 7 T. In combination with adiabatic excitation, this sequence is insensitive to the B1 inhomogeneities associated with surface coils. This sequence, which is termed GOIA-1D-ISIS/2D-CSI (goISICS), has the potential to be applied in both clinical research and in the clinical routine.

  2. Study of the metabolism of flucytosine in Aspergillus species by sup 19 F nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Chouini-Lalanne, N.; Malet-Martino, M.C.; Martino, R.; Michel, G. )

    1989-11-01

    The metabolism of flucytosine (5FC) in two Aspergillus species (Aspergillus fumigatus and A. niger) was investigated by 19F nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy. In intact mycelia, 5FC was found to be deaminated to 5-fluorouracil and then transformed into fluoronucleotides; the catabolite alpha-fluoro-beta-alanine was also detected in A. fumigatus. Neither 5-fluoroorotic acid nor 5-fluoro-2'-deoxyuridine-5'-monophosphate was detected in perchloric acid extracts after any incubation with 5FC. 5FC, 5-fluorouracil, and the classical fluoronucleotides 5-fluorouridine-5'-mono-, di-, and triphosphates were identified in the acid-soluble pool. Two hydrolysis products of 5-fluorouracil incorporated into RNA, 5-fluorouridine-2'-monophosphate and 5-fluorouridine-3'-monophosphate, were found in the acid-insoluble pool. No significant differences in the metabolic transformation of 5FC were noted in the two species of Aspergillus. The main pathway of 5FC metabolism in the two species of Aspergillus studied is thus the biotransformation into ribofluoronucleotides and the subsequent incorporation of 5-fluorouridine-5'-triphosphate into RNA.

  3. 19F Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Analysis of 5-Fluorouracil Metabolism in Four Differently Pigmented Strains of Nectria haematococca

    PubMed Central

    Parisot, Denise; Malet-Martino, Marie C.; Martino, Robert; Crasnier, Philippe

    1991-01-01

    19F nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy was used to study the metabolism of 5-fluorouracil in four strains of Nectria haematococca which displayed similar sensitivities to growth inhibition by this compound but differed in their pigmentation. The major metabolites, 5-fluorouridine and α-fluoro-β-alanine, were excreted into the medium by all four strains. The classical ribofluoronucleotides (5-fluorouridine-5′-monophosphate, -diphosphate, and -triphosphate) and α-fluoro-β-alanine were identified in the acid-soluble fraction of perchloric acid extracts of mycelia. Two hydrolysis products of 5-fluorouracil incorporated into RNA were found in the acid-insoluble pool. They were unambiguously assigned to 5-fluorouridine-2′-monophosphate and 3′-monophosphate with specific hydrolysis reactions on isolated RNA. The lack of fluorodeoxyribonucleotides and the fact that the four strains incorporated similar amounts of fluororibonucleotides into their RNAs strongly suggest an RNA-directed mechanism of cytotoxicity for 5-fluorouracil. The heavily pigmented wild type differed from the three low-pigmented strains in its low uptake of 5-fluorouracil and, consequently, in its reduced biosynthesis of 5-fluorouridine and α-fluoro-β-alanine. At present, it is not clear whether this change in 5-fluorouracil metabolism is a side effect of pigment production or results from another event. PMID:16348609

  4. Development of an 19F NMR method for the analysis of fluorinated acids in environmental water samples.

    PubMed

    Ellis, D A; Martin, J W; Muir, D C; Mabury, S A

    2000-02-15

    This investigation was carried out to evaluate 19F NMR as an analytical tool for the measurement of trifluoroacetic acid (TFA) and other fluorinated acids in the aquatic environment. A method based upon strong anionic exchange (SAX) chromatography was also optimized for the concentration of the fluoro acids prior to NMR analysis. Extraction of the analyte from the SAX column was carried out directly in the NMR solvent in the presence of the strong organic base, DBU. The method allowed the analysis of the acid without any prior cleanup steps being involved. Optimal NMR sensitivity based upon T1 relaxation times was investigated for seven fluorinated compounds in four different NMR solvents. The use of the relaxation agent chromium acetylacetonate, Cr(acac)3, within these solvent systems was also evaluated. Results show that the optimal NMR solvent differs for each fluorinated analyte. Cr(acac)3 was shown to have pronounced effects on the limits of detection of the analyte. Generally, the optimal sensitivity condition appears to be methanol-d4/2M DBU in the presence of 4 mg/mL of Cr-(acac)3. The method was validated through spike and recovery for five fluoro acids from environmentally relevant waters. Results are presented for the analysis of TFA in Toronto rainwater, which ranged from < 16 to 850 ng/L. The NMR results were confirmed by GC-MS selected-ion monitoring of the fluoroanalide derivative.

  5. A Comparison of Three Commercial Perfluorocarbon Emulsions as High-Field 19F NMR Probes of Oxygen Tension and Temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shukla, H. P.; Mason, R. P.; Woessner, D. E.; Antich, P. P.

    The increasing use of perfluorocarbons (PFCs) as probes of tissue oxygenation on the basis of the 19F spin-lattice relaxation rate ( R1) prompts comparison between several commercially available PFC blood-substitute emulsions, The relative sensitivities to both oxygen and temperature of the emulsions Oxypherol, Oxygent, and Fluosol at 7 T have been investigated, The linear response of R1 with pO 2 was confirmed for each resonance in the range 4-50°C, In general, R1 is not a linear function of temperature, and we demonstrate this for perfluorotributylamine (FTBA) over an extended range of temperatures, 239-343 K. Theoretical R1 values of FTBA were compared with experimental data by computer modeling of relaxation mechanisms, To further understand the structure-function relationships of PFCs, 2D COSY experiments were used for the assignment of resonances and as an aid in interpretation of relaxation mechanisms, Finally, the utility of Oxygent and Oxypherol for measuring tissue pO 2 in perfused rat hearts was compared before, during, and after eight minutes of global ischemia.

  6. Reaction mechanism coexistence in the 123 MeV {sup 19}F+{sup 56}Fe reaction

    SciTech Connect

    Brondi, A.; Kildir, M.; La Rana, G.; Moro, R.; Vardaci, E.; Pirrone, S.; Porto, F.; Sambataro, S.; Politi, G.; Figuera, P.

    1996-10-01

    Mass and charge identified ejectiles, spanning from {sup 11}B to {sup 22}Ne, have been detected in the 123 MeV {sup 19}F+{sup 56}Fe reaction. The coexistence of deep inelastic collision (DIC) and incomplete fusion (IF) mechanisms has been observed. The shape of the energy spectra and their behavior with angle allowed us to identify two components: The less dissipative one was dominating near the grazing angle. For both components experimental optimum {ital Q} values were derived. Two approaches based on the sum rule (SR) model of Wilczy{acute n}ski were used to calculate DIC and IF contributions to the complex fragment cross sections. Both prescriptions fit reasonably well experimental ejectile cross sections and {ital Q} optimum values. Results of the present investigation support the idea that the DIC can be treated on the same footing as IF in the SR model once the first process is confined in an inner angular momentum window, starting from the maximum fusion angular momentum, with respect to quasielastic processes. {copyright} {ital 1996 The American Physical Society.}

  7. A Miniaturized, 1.9F Integrated Optical Fiber and Stone Basket for Use in Thulium Fiber Laser Lithotripsy.

    PubMed

    Wilson, Christopher R; Hutchens, Thomas C; Hardy, Luke A; Irby, Pierce B; Fried, Nathaniel M

    2015-10-01

    The thulium fiber laser (TFL) is being explored as an alternative laser lithotripter to the standard holmium:yttrium-aluminum-garnet laser. The more uniform beam profile of the TFL enables higher power transmission through smaller fibers. In this study, a 100-μm core, 140-μm outer-diameter (OD) silica fiber with 5-mm length hollow steel tip was integrated with 1.3F (0.433-mm OD) nitinol wire basket to form a 1.9F (0.633-mm OD) device. TFL energy of 30 mJ, 500 μs pulse duration, and 500 Hz pulse rate was delivered to human uric acid stones, ex vivo. Stone ablation rates measured 1.5 ± 0.2 mg/s, comparable to 1.7 ± 0.3 mg/s using bare fiber tips separately with stone basket. With further development, this device may minimize stone retropulsion, allowing more efficient TFL lithotripsy at higher pulse rates. It may also provide increased flexibility, higher saline irrigation rates through the ureteroscope working channel, reduce fiber degradation compared with separate fiber and basket manipulation, and reduce laser-induced nitinol wire damage.

  8. The recognition of multi-class protein folds by adding average chemical shifts of secondary structure elements

    PubMed Central

    Feng, Zhenxing; Hu, Xiuzhen; Jiang, Zhuo; Song, Hangyu; Ashraf, Muhammad Aqeel

    2015-01-01

    The recognition of protein folds is an important step in the prediction of protein structure and function. Recently, an increasing number of researchers have sought to improve the methods for protein fold recognition. Following the construction of a dataset consisting of 27 protein fold classes by Ding and Dubchak in 2001, prediction algorithms, parameters and the construction of new datasets have improved for the prediction of protein folds. In this study, we reorganized a dataset consisting of 76-fold classes constructed by Liu et al. and used the values of the increment of diversity, average chemical shifts of secondary structure elements and secondary structure motifs as feature parameters in the recognition of multi-class protein folds. With the combined feature vector as the input parameter for the Random Forests algorithm and ensemble classification strategy, we propose a novel method to identify the 76 protein fold classes. The overall accuracy of the test dataset using an independent test was 66.69%; when the training and test sets were combined, with 5-fold cross-validation, the overall accuracy was 73.43%. This method was further used to predict the test dataset and the corresponding structural classification of the first 27-protein fold class dataset, resulting in overall accuracies of 79.66% and 93.40%, respectively. Moreover, when the training set and test sets were combined, the accuracy using 5-fold cross-validation was 81.21%. Additionally, this approach resulted in improved prediction results using the 27-protein fold class dataset constructed by Ding and Dubchak. PMID:26980999

  9. Intermolecular and intramolecular hydrogen bonds involving fluorine atoms: implications for recognition, selectivity, and chemical properties.

    PubMed

    Dalvit, Claudio; Vulpetti, Anna

    2012-02-01

    A correlation between 19F NMR isotropic chemical shift and close intermolecular F⋅⋅⋅H-X contacts (with X=N or O) has been identified upon analysis of the X-ray crystal structures of fluorinated molecules listed in the Cambridge Structural Database (CSD). An optimal F⋅⋅⋅X distance involving primary and shielded secondary fluorine atoms in hydrogen-bond formation along with a correlation between F⋅⋅⋅H distance and F⋅⋅⋅H-X angle were also derived from the analysis. The hydrogen bonds involving fluorine are relevant, not only for the recognition mechanism and stabilization of a preferred conformation, but also for improvement in the permeability of the molecules, as shown with examples taken from a proprietary database. Results of an analysis of the small number of fluorine-containing natural products listed in the Protein Data Bank (PDB) appear to strengthen the derived correlation between 19F NMR isotropic chemical shift and interactions involving fluorine (also known as the "rule of shielding") and provides a hypothesis for the recognition mechanism and catalytic activity of specific enzymes. Novel chemical scaffolds, based on the rule of shielding, have been designed for recognizing distinct structural motifs present in proteins. It is envisaged that this approach could find useful applications in drug design for the efficient optimization of chemical fragments or promising compounds by increasing potency and selectivity against the desired biomolecular target.

  10. (1)H and (19)F spin-lattice relaxation and CH3 or CF3 reorientation in molecular solids containing both H and F atoms.

    PubMed

    Beckmann, Peter A; Rheingold, Arnold L

    2016-04-21

    The dynamics of methyl (CH3) and fluoromethyl (CF3) groups in organic molecular (van der Waals) solids can be exploited to survey their local environments. We report solid state (1)H and (19)F spin-lattice relaxationexperiments in polycrystalline 3-trifluoromethoxycinnamic acid, along with an X-ray diffraction determination of the molecular and crystal structure, to investigate the intramolecular and intermolecular interactions that determine the properties that characterize the CF3 reorientation. The molecule is of no particular interest; it simply provides a motionless backbone (on the nuclear magnetic resonance(NMR) time scale) to investigate CF3 reorientation occurring on the NMR time scale. The effects of (19)F-(19)F and (19)F-(1)H spin-spin dipolar interactions on the complicated nonexponential NMRrelaxation provide independent inputs into determining a model for CF3 reorientation. As such, these experiments provide much more information than when only one spin species (usually (1)H) is present. In Sec. IV, which can be read immediately after the Introduction without reading the rest of the paper, we compare the barrier to CH3 and CF3 reorientation in seven organic solids and separate this barrier into intramolecular and intermolecular components. PMID:27389221

  11. (1)H and (19)F spin-lattice relaxation and CH3 or CF3 reorientation in molecular solids containing both H and F atoms.

    PubMed

    Beckmann, Peter A; Rheingold, Arnold L

    2016-04-21

    The dynamics of methyl (CH3) and fluoromethyl (CF3) groups in organic molecular (van der Waals) solids can be exploited to survey their local environments. We report solid state (1)H and (19)F spin-lattice relaxationexperiments in polycrystalline 3-trifluoromethoxycinnamic acid, along with an X-ray diffraction determination of the molecular and crystal structure, to investigate the intramolecular and intermolecular interactions that determine the properties that characterize the CF3 reorientation. The molecule is of no particular interest; it simply provides a motionless backbone (on the nuclear magnetic resonance(NMR) time scale) to investigate CF3 reorientation occurring on the NMR time scale. The effects of (19)F-(19)F and (19)F-(1)H spin-spin dipolar interactions on the complicated nonexponential NMRrelaxation provide independent inputs into determining a model for CF3 reorientation. As such, these experiments provide much more information than when only one spin species (usually (1)H) is present. In Sec. IV, which can be read immediately after the Introduction without reading the rest of the paper, we compare the barrier to CH3 and CF3 reorientation in seven organic solids and separate this barrier into intramolecular and intermolecular components.

  12. 1H and 19F spin-lattice relaxation and CH3 or CF3 reorientation in molecular solids containing both H and F atoms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beckmann, Peter A.; Rheingold, Arnold L.

    2016-04-01

    The dynamics of methyl (CH3) and fluoromethyl (CF3) groups in organic molecular (van der Waals) solids can be exploited to survey their local environments. We report solid state 1H and 19F spin-lattice relaxation experiments in polycrystalline 3-trifluoromethoxycinnamic acid, along with an X-ray diffraction determination of the molecular and crystal structure, to investigate the intramolecular and intermolecular interactions that determine the properties that characterize the CF3 reorientation. The molecule is of no particular interest; it simply provides a motionless backbone (on the nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) time scale) to investigate CF3 reorientation occurring on the NMR time scale. The effects of 19F-19F and 19F-1H spin-spin dipolar interactions on the complicated nonexponential NMR relaxation provide independent inputs into determining a model for CF3 reorientation. As such, these experiments provide much more information than when only one spin species (usually 1H) is present. In Sec. IV, which can be read immediately after the Introduction without reading the rest of the paper, we compare the barrier to CH3 and CF3 reorientation in seven organic solids and separate this barrier into intramolecular and intermolecular components.

  13. Direct mapping of 19F in 19FDG-6P in brain tissue at subcellular resolution using soft X-ray fluorescence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Poitry-Yamate, C.; Gianoncelli, A.; Kourousias, G.; Kaulich, B.; Lepore, M.; Gruetter, R.; Kiskinova, M.

    2013-10-01

    Low energy x-ray fluorescence (LEXRF) detection was optimized for imaging cerebral glucose metabolism by mapping the fluorine LEXRF signal of 19F in 19FDG, trapped as intracellular 19F-deoxyglucose-6-phosphate (19FDG-6P) at 1μm spatial resolution from 3μm thick brain slices. 19FDG metabolism was evaluated in brain structures closely resembling the general cerebral cytoarchitecture following formalin fixation of brain slices and their inclusion in an epon matrix. 2-dimensional distribution maps of 19FDG-6P were placed in a cytoarchitectural and morphological context by simultaneous LEXRF mapping of N and O, and scanning transmission x-ray (STXM) imaging. A disproportionately high uptake and metabolism of glucose was found in neuropil relative to intracellular domains of the cell body of hypothalamic neurons, showing directly that neurons, like glial cells, also metabolize glucose. As 19F-deoxyglucose-6P is structurally identical to 18F-deoxyglucose-6P, LEXRF of subcellular 19F provides a link to in vivo 18FDG PET, forming a novel basis for understanding the physiological mechanisms underlying the 18FDG PET image, and the contribution of neurons and glia to the PET signal.

  14. (19)F NMR reveals multiple conformations at the dimer interface of the nonstructural protein 1 effector domain from influenza A virus.

    PubMed

    Aramini, James M; Hamilton, Keith; Ma, Li-Chung; Swapna, G V T; Leonard, Paul G; Ladbury, John E; Krug, Robert M; Montelione, Gaetano T

    2014-04-01

    Nonstructural protein 1 of influenza A virus (NS1A) is a conserved virulence factor comprised of an N-terminal double-stranded RNA (dsRNA)-binding domain and a multifunctional C-terminal effector domain (ED), each of which can independently form symmetric homodimers. Here we apply (19)F NMR to NS1A from influenza A/Udorn/307/1972 virus (H3N2) labeled with 5-fluorotryptophan, and we demonstrate that the (19)F signal of Trp187 is a sensitive, direct monitor of the ED helix:helix dimer interface. (19)F relaxation dispersion data reveal the presence of conformational dynamics within this functionally important protein:protein interface, whose rate is more than three orders of magnitude faster than the kinetics of ED dimerization. (19)F NMR also affords direct spectroscopic evidence that Trp187, which mediates intermolecular ED:ED interactions required for cooperative dsRNA binding, is solvent exposed in full-length NS1A at concentrations below aggregation. These results have important implications for the diverse roles of this NS1A epitope during influenza virus infection.

  15. Proton-detected 3D (15)N/(1)H/(1)H isotropic/anisotropic/isotropic chemical shift correlation solid-state NMR at 70kHz MAS.

    PubMed

    Pandey, Manoj Kumar; Yarava, Jayasubba Reddy; Zhang, Rongchun; Ramamoorthy, Ayyalusamy; Nishiyama, Yusuke

    2016-01-01

    Chemical shift anisotropy (CSA) tensors offer a wealth of information for structural and dynamics studies of a variety of chemical and biological systems. In particular, CSA of amide protons can provide piercing insights into hydrogen-bonding interactions that vary with the backbone conformation of a protein and dynamics. However, the narrow span of amide proton resonances makes it very difficult to measure (1)H CSAs of proteins even by using the recently proposed 2D (1)H/(1)H anisotropic/isotropic chemical shift (CSA/CS) correlation technique. Such difficulties due to overlapping proton resonances can in general be overcome by utilizing the broad span of isotropic chemical shifts of low-gamma nuclei like (15)N. In this context, we demonstrate a proton-detected 3D (15)N/(1)H/(1)H CS/CSA/CS correlation experiment at fast MAS frequency (70kHz) to measure (1)H CSA values of unresolved amide protons of N-acetyl-(15)N-l-valyl-(15)N-l-leucine (NAVL).

  16. Calculation of vibrational branching ratios and hyperfine structure of 24Mg19F and its suitability for laser cooling and magneto-optical trapping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Liang; Yin, Yanning; Wei, Bin; Xia, Yong; Yin, Jianping

    2016-01-01

    More recently, laser cooling of the diatomic radical magnesium monofluoride (24Mg19F ) is being experimentally preformed [Appl. Phys. Express 8, 092701 (2015), 10.7567/APEX.8.092701 and Opt. Express 22, 28645 (2014), 10.1364/OE.22.028645] and was also studied theoretically [Phys. Rev. A 91, 042511 (2015), 10.1103/PhysRevA.91.042511]. However, some important problems still remain unsolved, so, in our paper, we perform further theoretical study for the feasibility of laser cooling and trapping the 24Mg19F molecule. At first, the highly diagonal Franck-Condon factors of the main transitions are verified by the closed-form approximation, Morse approximation, and Rydberg-Klein-Rees inversion methods, respectively. Afterwards, we investigate the lower X 2Σ1/2 + hyperfine manifolds using a quantum effective Hamiltonian approach and obtain the zero-field hyperfine spectrum with an accuracy of less than 30 kHz ˜5 μ K compared with the experimental results, and then find out that one cooling beam and one or two repumping beams with their first-order sidebands are enough to implement an efficient laser slowing and cooling of 24Mg19F . Meanwhile, we also calculate the accurate hyperfine structure magnetic g factors of the rotational state (X 2Σ1/2 +,N =1 ) and briefly discuss the influence of the external fields on the hyperfine structure of 24Mg19F as well as its possibility of preparing three-dimensional magneto-optical trapping. Finally we give an explanation for the difference between the Stark and Zeeman effects from the perspective of parity and time reversal symmetry. Our study shows that, besides appropriate excitation wavelengths, the short lifetime for the first excited state A 2Π1 /2 , and lighter mass, the 24Mg19F radical could be a good candidate molecule amenable to laser cooling and magneto-optical trapping.

  17. Effect of MRI tags: SPIO nanoparticles and 19F nanoemulsion on various populations of mouse mesenchymal stem cells.

    PubMed

    Muhammad, Ghulam; Jablonska, Anna; Rose, Laura; Walczak, Piotr; Janowski, Miroslaw

    2015-01-01

    Transplantation of mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) has emerged as a promising strategy for the treatment of myriad human disorders, including several neurological diseases. Superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles (SPION) and fluorine nanoemulsion (19F) are characterized by low toxicity and good sensitivity, and, as such, are among the most frequently used cell-labeling agents. However, to date, their impact across the various populations of MSCs has not been comprehensively investigated. Thus, the impact of MRI tags (independent variable) has been set as a primary endpoint. The various populations of mouse MSCs in which the effect of tag was investigated consisted of (1) tissue of cell origin: bone marrow vs. Adipose tissue; (2) age of donor: young vs. old; (3) cell culture conditions: hypoxic vs. normal vs. normal + ascorbic acid (AA); (4) exposure to acidosis: yes vs. no. The impact of those populations has been also analyzed and considered as secondary endpoints. The experimental readouts (dependent variables) included: (1) cell viability; (2) cell size; (3) cell doubling time; (4) colony formation; (5) efficiency of labeling; and (6) cell migration. We did not identify any impact of cell labeling for these investigated populations in any of the readouts. In addition, we found that the harsh microenvironment of injured tissue modeled by a culture of cells in a highly acidic environment has a profound effect on all readouts, and both age of donor and cell origin tissue also have a substantial influence on most of the readouts, while oxygen tension in the cell culture conditions has a smaller impact on MSCs. A detailed characterization of the factors that influence the quality of MSCs is vital to the proper pursuit of preclinical and clinical studies. PMID:26232992

  18. 1H and 19F NMR studies on molecular motions and phase transitions in solid triethylammonium tetrafluoroborate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ono, Hiroshi; Seki, Riki; Ikeda, Ryuichi; Ishida, Hiroyuki

    1995-02-01

    Measurements by differential thermal analysis and differential scanning calorimetry and of the spin-lattice relaxation time ( T1), the spin-spin relaxation time ( T2), and the second moment ( M2) of 1H and 19F NMR were carried out in the three solid phases of (CH 3CH 2) 3NHBF 4. X-ray powder patterns were taken in the highest-temperature phase (Phase I) existing above 367 K and the room-temperature phase (Phase II) stable between 220 and 367 K. Phase I formed a NaCl-type cubic structure with a = 11.65(3) Å, Z = 4, V = 1581(13) Å3, and Dx = 0.794 g cm -3, and was expected to be an ionic plastic phase. In this phase, the self-diffusion of anions and the isotropic reorientation of cations were observed. Phase II formed a tetragonal structure with a = 12.47(1) and c = 9.47(3) Å, Z = 4, V = 1473(6) Å3, and Dx = 0.852 g cm -3. From the present DSC and NMR results in this phase, the cations and/or anions were considered to be dynamically disordered states. The C3 reorientation of the cation about the NH bond axis was detected and, in addition, the onset of nutation of the cations and local diffusion of the anions was suggested. In the low-temperature phase (Phase III) stable below 219 K, the C3 reorientations of the three methyl groups of cations and the isotropic reorientation of anions were observed. The motional parameters for these modes were evaluated.

  19. Study of the interactions of cadmium and zinc ions with cellular calcium homoeostasis using 19F-NMR spectroscopy.

    PubMed Central

    Benters, J; Flögel, U; Schäfer, T; Leibfritz, D; Hechtenberg, S; Beyersmann, D

    1997-01-01

    The effects of the heavy-metal ions Cd2+ and Zn2+ on the homoeostasis of intracellular free Ca2+ in E367 neuroblastoma cells were examined using 19F-NMR spectroscopy with the fluorinated chelator probe 1,2-bis-(2-amino-5-fluorophenoxy)ethane-N,N,N', N'-tetra-acetic acid (5F-BAPTA). First, the technique was used to quantify the uptake and intracellular free concentrations of the heavy metals after treatment of the cells with 20 microM CdCl2 or 100 microM ZnCl2. Secondly, metal-induced transients in intracellular free Ca2+ were recorded. Addition of 20 microM CdCl2, but not 100 microM ZnCl2, evoked a transient increase in Ca2+ from a resting level of 84 nM to approx. 190 nM within 15 min after addition of the metal. Zn2+ at 20 microM completely prevented the induction of a Ca2+ transient by Cd2+. Ca2+ was mobilized by Cd2+ from intracellular organelles, since depletion of these stores by thapsigargin abolished the effect of the toxic metal. Furthermore, 20 microM Cd2+ evoked a transient rise in cellular Ins(1,4,5)P3, reaching a maximum level within 5 min after addition of the metal. These results demonstrate that perturbation of the Ins(1,4,5)P3/Ca2+ messenger system is an early and discrete cellular effect of Cd2+. PMID:9148751

  20. Evidence for the importance of 5'-deoxy-5-fluorouridine catabolism in humans from 19F nuclear magnetic resonance spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Malet-Martino, M C; Armand, J P; Lopez, A; Bernadou, J; Béteille, J P; Bon, M; Martino, R

    1986-04-01

    The use of a new methodology, 19F nuclear magnetic resonance, has allowed detection of all the fluorinated metabolites in the biofluids of patients treated with 5'-deoxy-5-fluorouridine (5'-dFUrd) injected i.v. at a dose of 10 g/m2 over 6 h. This technique, which requires no labeled drug, allows a direct study of the biological sample with no need for extraction or derivatization and a simultaneous identification and quantitation of all the different fluorinated metabolites. As well as the already known metabolites, unmetabolized 5'-dFUrd, 5-fluorouracil, and 5,6-dihydro-5-fluorouracil, the presence of alpha-fluoro-beta-ureidopropionic acid, alpha-fluoro-beta-alanine (FBAL), N-carboxy-alpha-fluoro-beta-alanine, and the fluoride anion F- is reported. The catabolic pathway proposed for 5'-dFUrd is analogous to that of 5-fluorouracil, completed with FBAL----F- step, and the plasmatic equilibrium of FBAL with N-carboxy-alpha-fluoro-beta-alanine, its N-carboxy derivative. The quantitative analysis of the different metabolites found in plasma and urine emphasizes the significance of the catabolic pathway. High concentrations of alpha-fluoro-beta ureidopropionic acid and FBAL are recovered in plasma from 3 h after the beginning of the perfusion to 1 h after its end. The global urinary excretion results show that there is a high excretion of 5'-dFUrd and metabolites. Unchanged 5'-dFUrd and FBAL are by far the major excretory products and are at nearly equal rates. The protocol followed in this study produces relatively low but persistent plasmatic concentrations of 5-fluorouracil throughout the perfusion. PMID:2936452

  1. Effect of MRI tags: SPIO nanoparticles and 19F nanoemulsion on various populations of mouse mesenchymal stem cells.

    PubMed

    Muhammad, Ghulam; Jablonska, Anna; Rose, Laura; Walczak, Piotr; Janowski, Miroslaw

    2015-01-01

    Transplantation of mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) has emerged as a promising strategy for the treatment of myriad human disorders, including several neurological diseases. Superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles (SPION) and fluorine nanoemulsion (19F) are characterized by low toxicity and good sensitivity, and, as such, are among the most frequently used cell-labeling agents. However, to date, their impact across the various populations of MSCs has not been comprehensively investigated. Thus, the impact of MRI tags (independent variable) has been set as a primary endpoint. The various populations of mouse MSCs in which the effect of tag was investigated consisted of (1) tissue of cell origin: bone marrow vs. Adipose tissue; (2) age of donor: young vs. old; (3) cell culture conditions: hypoxic vs. normal vs. normal + ascorbic acid (AA); (4) exposure to acidosis: yes vs. no. The impact of those populations has been also analyzed and considered as secondary endpoints. The experimental readouts (dependent variables) included: (1) cell viability; (2) cell size; (3) cell doubling time; (4) colony formation; (5) efficiency of labeling; and (6) cell migration. We did not identify any impact of cell labeling for these investigated populations in any of the readouts. In addition, we found that the harsh microenvironment of injured tissue modeled by a culture of cells in a highly acidic environment has a profound effect on all readouts, and both age of donor and cell origin tissue also have a substantial influence on most of the readouts, while oxygen tension in the cell culture conditions has a smaller impact on MSCs. A detailed characterization of the factors that influence the quality of MSCs is vital to the proper pursuit of preclinical and clinical studies.

  2. Evaluation of tumor ischemia in response to an indole-based vascular disrupting agent using BLI and 19F MRI

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Heling; Hallac, Rami R; Lopez, Ramona; Denney, Rebecca; MacDonough, Matthew T; Li, Li; Liu, Li; Graves, Edward E; Trawick, Mary Lynn; Pinney, Kevin G; Mason, Ralph P

    2015-01-01

    Vascular disrupting agents (VDAs) have been proposed as an effective broad spectrum approach to cancer therapy, by inducing ischemia leading to hypoxia and cell death. A novel VDA (OXi8007) was recently reported to show rapid acute selective shutdown of tumor vasculature based on color-Doppler ultrasound. We have now expanded investigations to noninvasively assess perfusion and hypoxiation of orthotopic human MDA-MB-231/luc breast tumor xenografts following the administration of OXi8007 based on dynamic bioluminescence imaging (BLI) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). BLI showed significantly lower signal four hours after the administration of OXi8007, which was very similar to the response to combretastatin A-4P (CA4P), but the effect lasted considerably longer, with the BLI signal remaining depressed at 72 hrs. Meanwhile, control tumors exhibited minimal change. Oximetry used 19F MRI of the reporter molecule hexafluorobenzene and FREDOM (Fluorocarbon Relaxometry using Echo Planar Imaging for Dynamic Oxygen Mapping) to assess pO2 distributions during air and oxygen breathing. pO2 decreased significantly upon the administration of OXi8007 during oxygen breathing (from 122 ± 64 to 34 ± 20 Torr), with further decrease upon switching the gas to air (pO2 = 17 ± 9 Torr). pO2 maps indicated intra-tumor heterogeneity in response to OXi8007, though ultimately all tumor regions became hypoxic. Both BLI and FREDOM showed the efficacy of OXi8007. The pO2 changes measured by FREDOM may be crucial for future study of combined therapy. PMID:25973335

  3. Automated data evaluation and modelling of simultaneous (19) F-(1) H medium-resolution NMR spectra for online reaction monitoring.

    PubMed

    Zientek, Nicolai; Laurain, Clément; Meyer, Klas; Paul, Andrea; Engel, Dirk; Guthausen, Gisela; Kraume, Matthias; Maiwald, Michael

    2016-06-01

    Medium-resolution nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MR-NMR) currently develops to an important analytical tool for both quality control and process monitoring. In contrast to high-resolution online NMR (HR-NMR), MR-NMR can be operated under rough environmental conditions. A continuous re-circulating stream of reaction mixture from the reaction vessel to the NMR spectrometer enables a non-invasive, volume integrating online analysis of reactants and products. Here, we investigate the esterification of 2,2,2-trifluoroethanol with acetic acid to 2,2,2-trifluoroethyl acetate both by (1) H HR-NMR (500 MHz) and (1) H and (19) F MR-NMR (43 MHz) as a model system. The parallel online measurement is realised by splitting the flow, which allows the adjustment of quantitative and independent flow rates, both in the HR-NMR probe as well as in the MR-NMR probe, in addition to a fast bypass line back to the reactor. One of the fundamental acceptance criteria for online MR-MNR spectroscopy is a robust data treatment and evaluation strategy with the potential for automation. The MR-NMR spectra are treated by an automated baseline and phase correction using the minimum entropy method. The evaluation strategies comprise (i) direct integration, (ii) automated line fitting, (iii) indirect hard modelling (IHM) and (iv) partial least squares regression (PLS-R). To assess the potential of these evaluation strategies for MR-NMR, prediction results are compared with the line fitting data derived from the quantitative HR-NMR spectroscopy. Although, superior results are obtained from both IHM and PLS-R for (1) H MR-NMR, especially the latter demands for elaborate data pretreatment, whereas IHM models needed no previous alignment. Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  4. Evaluation of (95)Mo Nuclear Shielding and Chemical Shift of [Mo6X14](2-) Clusters in the Liquid Phase.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, Thi Thuong; Jung, Julie; Trivelli, Xavier; Trébosc, Julien; Cordier, Stéphane; Molard, Yann; Le Pollès, Laurent; Pickard, Chris J; Cuny, Jérôme; Gautier, Régis

    2015-08-17

    [Mo6X14](2-) octahedral molybdenum clusters are the main building blocks of a large range of materials. Although (95)Mo nuclear magnetic resonance was proposed to be a powerful tool to characterize their structural and dynamical properties in solution, these measurements have never been complemented by theoretical studies which can limit their interpretation for complex systems. In this Article, we use quantum chemical calculations to evaluate the (95)Mo chemical shift of three clusters: [Mo6Cl14](2-), [Mo6Br14](2-), and [Mo6I14](2-). In particular, we test various computational parameters influencing the quality of the results: size of the basis set, treatment of relativistic and solvent effects. Furthermore, to provide quantum chemical calculations that are directly comparable with experimental data, we evaluate for the first time the (95)Mo nuclear magnetic shielding of the experimental reference, namely, MoO4(2-) in aqueous solution. This is achieved by combining ab initio molecular dynamics simulations with a periodic approach to evaluate the (95)Mo nuclear shieldings. The results demonstrate that, despite the difficulty to obtain accurate (95)Mo chemical shifts, relative values for a cluster series can be fairly well-reproduced by DFT calculations. We also show that performing an explicit solvent treatment for the reference compound improves by ∼50 ppm the agreement between theory and experiment. Finally, the standard deviation of ∼70 ppm that we calculate for the (95)Mo nuclear shielding of the reference provides an estimation of the accuracy we can achieve for the calculation of the (95)Mo chemical shifts using a static approach. These results demonstrate the growing ability of quantum chemical calculations to complement and interpret complex experimental measurements.

  5. First-principles calculation of spectral features, chemical shift and absolute threshold of ELNES and XANES using a plane wave pseudopotential method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mizoguchi, Teruyasu; Tanaka, Isao; Gao, Shang-Peng; Pickard, Chris J.

    2009-03-01

    Spectral features, chemical shifts, and absolute thresholds of electron energy loss near-edge structure (ELNES) and x-ray absorption near-edge structure (XANES) for selected compounds, i.e. TiO2 (rutile), TiO2 (anatase), SrTiO3, Ti2O3, Al2O3, AlN and β-Ga2O3, were calculated by a plane wave pseudopotential method. Experimental ELNES/XANES of those compounds were well reproduced when an excited pseudopotential, which includes a core hole, was used. In addition to the spectral features, it was found that chemical shifts among different compounds were also reproduced by correcting the contribution of the excited pseudopotentials to the energy of the core orbital.

  6. Free magnesium levels in normal human brain and brain tumors: sup 31 P chemical-shift imaging measurements at 1. 5 T

    SciTech Connect

    Taylor, J.S.; Vigneron, D.B.; Murphy-Boesch, J.; Nelson, S.J.; Kessler, H.B.; Coia, L.; Curran, W.; Brown, T.R. )

    1991-08-01

    The authors have studied a series of normal subjects and patients with brain tumors, by using {sup 31}P three-dimensional chemical shift imaging to obtain localized {sup 31}P spectra of the brain. A significant proportion of brain cytosolic ATP in normal brain is not complexed to Mg{sup 2+}, as indicated by the chemical shift {delta} of the {beta}-P resonance of ATP. The ATP {beta}P resonance position in brain thus is sensitive to changes in intracellular free Mg{sup 2+} concentration and in the proportion of ATP complexed with Mg because this shift lies on the rising portion of the {delta} vs. Mg{sup 2+} titration curve for ATP. They have measured the ATP {beta}-P shift and compared intracellular free Mg{sup 2+} concentration and fractions of free ATP for normal individuals and a limited series of patients with brain tumors. In four of the five spectra obtained from brain tissue containing a substantial proportion of tumor, intracellular free Mg{sup 2+} was increased, and the fraction of free ATP was decreased, compared with normal brain.

  7. 1H, 15N, and 13C chemical shift assignments of cyanobacteriochrome NpR6012g4 in the red-absorbing dark state.

    PubMed

    Yu, Qinhong; Lim, Sunghyuk; Rockwell, Nathan C; Martin, Shelley S; Clark Lagarias, J; Ames, James B

    2016-04-01

    Cyanobacteriochrome (CBCR) photosensory proteins are phytochrome homologs using bilin chromophores for light sensing across the visible spectrum. NpR6012g4 is a CBCR from Nostoc punctiforme that serves as a model for a widespread CBCR subfamily with red/green photocycles. We report NMR chemical shift assignments for both the protein backbone and side-chain resonances of the red-absorbing dark state of NpR6012g4 (BMRB no. 26582).

  8. Cross-correlation between a carbonyl C' chemical shift anisotropy and a long-range dipolar C'HA coupling in proteins using symmetrical reconversion.

    PubMed

    Loth, Karine; Pelupessy, Philippe; Bodenhausen, Geoffrey

    2003-10-01

    A new sequence is described to measure the cross-correlation rates between the chemical shift anisotropy of the carbonyl carbon-13 nucleus and the dipole-dipole interaction between this carbonyl and the alpha-proton in proteins. The sequence is based on the symmetrical reconversion principle and is insensitive to experimental errors and to violations of the secular approximation. The cross-correlation rate depends on the backbone angle psi. The advantages and limitations of the sequence are discussed.

  9. Structure, solvent, and relativistic effects on the NMR chemical shifts in square-planar transition-metal complexes: assessment of DFT approaches.

    PubMed

    Vícha, Jan; Novotný, Jan; Straka, Michal; Repisky, Michal; Ruud, Kenneth; Komorovsky, Stanislav; Marek, Radek

    2015-10-14

    The role of various factors (structure, solvent, and relativistic treatment) was evaluated for square-planar 4d and 5d transition-metal complexes. The DFT method for calculating the structures was calibrated using a cluster approach and compared to X-ray geometries, with the PBE0 functional (def2-TZVPP basis set) providing the best results, followed closely by the hybrid TPSSH and the MN12SX functionals. Calculations of the NMR chemical shifts using the two-component (2c, Zeroth-Order Regular Approximation as implemented in the ADF package) and four-component (4c, Dirac-Coulomb as implemented in the ReSpect code) relativistic approaches were performed to analyze and demonstrate the importance of solvent corrections (2c) as well as a proper treatment of relativistic effects (4c). The importance of increased exact-exchange admixture in the functional (here PBE0) for reproducing the experimental data using the current implementation of the 2c approach is partly rationalized as a compensation for the missing exchange-correlation response kernel. The kernel contribution was identified to be about 15-20% of the spin-orbit-induced NMR chemical shift, ΔδSO, which roughly corresponds to an increase in ΔδSO introduced by the artificially increased exact-exchange admixture in the functional. Finally, the role of individual effects (geometry, solvent, relativity) in the NMR chemical shift is discussed in selected complexes. Although a fully relativistic DFT approach is still awaiting the implementation of GIAOs for hybrid functionals and an implicit solvent model, it nevertheless provides reliable NMR chemical shift data at an affordable computational cost. It is expected to outperform the 2c approach, in particular for the calculation of NMR parameters in heavy-element compounds. PMID:26344822

  10. CSI 3.0: a web server for identifying secondary and super-secondary structure in proteins using NMR chemical shifts.

    PubMed

    Hafsa, Noor E; Arndt, David; Wishart, David S

    2015-07-01

    The Chemical Shift Index or CSI 3.0 (http://csi3.wishartlab.com) is a web server designed to accurately identify the location of secondary and super-secondary structures in protein chains using only nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) backbone chemical shifts and their corresponding protein sequence data. Unlike earlier versions of CSI, which only identified three types of secondary structure (helix, β-strand and coil), CSI 3.0 now identifies total of 11 types of secondary and super-secondary structures, including helices, β-strands, coil regions, five common β-turns (type I, II, I', II' and VIII), β hairpins as well as interior and edge β-strands. CSI 3.0 accepts experimental NMR chemical shift data in multiple formats (NMR Star 2.1, NMR Star 3.1 and SHIFTY) and generates colorful CSI plots (bar graphs) and secondary/super-secondary structure assignments. The output can be readily used as constraints for structure determination and refinement or the images may be used for presentations and publications. CSI 3.0 uses a pipeline of several well-tested, previously published programs to identify the secondary and super-secondary structures in protein chains. Comparisons with secondary and super-secondary structure assignments made via standard coordinate analysis programs such as DSSP, STRIDE and VADAR on high-resolution protein structures solved by X-ray and NMR show >90% agreement between those made with CSI 3.0. PMID:25979265

  11. CSI 3.0: a web server for identifying secondary and super-secondary structure in proteins using NMR chemical shifts.

    PubMed

    Hafsa, Noor E; Arndt, David; Wishart, David S

    2015-07-01

    The Chemical Shift Index or CSI 3.0 (http://csi3.wishartlab.com) is a web server designed to accurately identify the location of secondary and super-secondary structures in protein chains using only nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) backbone chemical shifts and their corresponding protein sequence data. Unlike earlier versions of CSI, which only identified three types of secondary structure (helix, β-strand and coil), CSI 3.0 now identifies total of 11 types of secondary and super-secondary structures, including helices, β-strands, coil regions, five common β-turns (type I, II, I', II' and VIII), β hairpins as well as interior and edge β-strands. CSI 3.0 accepts experimental NMR chemical shift data in multiple formats (NMR Star 2.1, NMR Star 3.1 and SHIFTY) and generates colorful CSI plots (bar graphs) and secondary/super-secondary structure assignments. The output can be readily used as constraints for structure determination and refinement or the images may be used for presentations and publications. CSI 3.0 uses a pipeline of several well-tested, previously published programs to identify the secondary and super-secondary structures in protein chains. Comparisons with secondary and super-secondary structure assignments made via standard coordinate analysis programs such as DSSP, STRIDE and VADAR on high-resolution protein structures solved by X-ray and NMR show >90% agreement between those made with CSI 3.0.

  12. Spin-orbit ZORA and four-component Dirac-Coulomb estimation of relativistic corrections to isotropic nuclear shieldings and chemical shifts of noble gas dimers.

    PubMed

    Jankowska, Marzena; Kupka, Teobald; Stobiński, Leszek; Faber, Rasmus; Lacerda, Evanildo G; Sauer, Stephan P A

    2016-02-01

    Hartree-Fock and density functional theory with the hybrid B3LYP and general gradient KT2 exchange-correlation functionals were used for nonrelativistic and relativistic nuclear magnetic shielding calculations of helium, neon, argon, krypton, and xenon dimers and free atoms. Relativistic corrections were calculated with the scalar and spin-orbit zeroth-order regular approximation Hamiltonian in combination with the large Slater-type basis set QZ4P as well as with the four-component Dirac-Coulomb Hamiltonian using Dyall's acv4z basis sets. The relativistic corrections to the nuclear magnetic shieldings and chemical shifts are combined with nonrelativistic coupled cluster singles and doubles with noniterative triple excitations [CCSD(T)] calculations using the very large polarization-consistent basis sets aug-pcSseg-4 for He, Ne and Ar, aug-pcSseg-3 for Kr, and the AQZP basis set for Xe. For the dimers also, zero-point vibrational (ZPV) corrections are obtained at the CCSD(T) level with the same basis sets were added. Best estimates of the dimer chemical shifts are generated from these nuclear magnetic shieldings and the relative importance of electron correlation, ZPV, and relativistic corrections for the shieldings and chemical shifts is analyzed. PMID:26503739

  13. Conformational Insights into the Lesion and Sequence Effects for Arylamine-Induced Translesion DNA Synthesis: 19F NMR, Surface Plasmon Resonance, and Primer Kinetic Studies

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Adduct-induced DNA damage can affect transcription efficiency and DNA replication and repair. We previously investigated the effects of the 3′-next flanking base (G*CT vs G*CA; G*, FABP, N-(2′-deoxyguanosin-8-yl)-4′-fluoro-4-aminobiphenyl; FAF, N-(2′-deoxyguanosin-8-yl)-7-fluoro-2-aminofluorene) on the conformation of arylamine-DNA lesions in relation to E. coli nucleotide excision repair (JainV., HiltonB., LinB., PatnaikS., LiangF., DarianE., ZouY., MackerellA. D.Jr., and ChoB. P. (2013) Nucleic Acids Res., 41, 869−88023180767). Here, we report the differential effects of the same pair of sequences on DNA replication in vitro by the polymerases exofree Klenow fragment (Kf-exo–) and Dpo4. We obtained dynamic 19F NMR spectra for two 19-mer modified templates during primer elongation: G*CA [d(5′-CTTACCATCG*CAACCATTC-3′)] and G*CT [d(5′-CTTACCATCG*CTACCATTC-3′)]. We found that lesion stacking is favored in the G*CT sequence compared to the G*CA counterpart. Surface plasmon resonance binding results showed consistently weaker affinities for the modified DNA with the binding strength in the order of FABP > FAF and G*CA > G*CT. Primer extension was stalled at (n) and near (n – 1 and n + 1) the lesion site, and the extent of blockage and the extension rates across the lesion were influenced by not only the DNA sequences but also the nature of the adduct’s chemical structure (FAF vs FABP) and the polymerase employed (Kf-exo– vs Dpo4). Steady-state kinetics analysis with Kf-exo– revealed the most dramatic sequence and lesion effects at the lesion (n) and postinsertion (n + 1) sites, respectively. Taken together, these results provide insights into the important role of lesion-induced conformational heterogeneity in modulating translesion DNA synthesis. PMID:24915610

  14. Synthesis and photophysical properties of biaryl-substituted nucleos(t)ides. Polymerase synthesis of DNA probes bearing solvatochromic and pH-sensitive dual fluorescent and 19F NMR labels.

    PubMed

    Riedl, Jan; Pohl, Radek; Rulíšek, Lubomír; Hocek, Michal

    2012-01-20

    The design of four new fluorinated biaryl fluorescent labels and their attachment to nucleosides and nucleoside triphosphates (dNTPs) by the aqueous cross-coupling reactions of biarylboronates is reported. The modified dNTPs were good substrates for KOD XL polymerase and were enzymatically incorporated into DNA probes. The photophysical properties of the biaryl-modified nucleosides, dNTPs, and DNA were studied systematically. The different substitution pattern of the biaryls was used for tuning of emission maxima in the broad range of 366-565 nm. Using methods of computational chemistry the emission maxima were reproduced with a satisfactory degree of accuracy, and it was shown that the large solvatochromic shifts observed for the studied probes are proportional to the differences in dipole moments of the ground (S(0)) and excited (S(1)) states that add on top of smaller shifts predicted already for these systems in vacuo. Thus, we present a set of compounds that may serve as multipurpose base-discriminating fluorophores for sensing of hairpins, deletions, and mismatches by the change of emission maxima and intensities of fluorescence and that can be also conviently studied by (19)F NMR spectroscopy. In addition, aminobenzoxazolyl-fluorophenyl-labeled nucleotides and DNA also exert dual pH-sensitive and solvatochromic fluorescence, which may imply diverse applications.

  15. Charge transfer in Li/CFx-silver vanadium oxide hybrid cathode batteries revealed by solid state 7Li and 19F nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sideris, Paul J.; Yew, Rowena; Nieves, Ian; Chen, Kaimin; Jain, Gaurav; Schmidt, Craig L.; Greenbaum, Steve G.

    2014-05-01

    Solid state 7Li and 19F magic angle spinning nuclear magnetic resonance (MAS NMR) experiments are conducted on several cathodes containing CFx-Silver vanadium oxide (CFx-Ag2V4O11) hybrid cathodes discharged to 50% depth of discharge (DoD) and stored at their open-circuit voltage for a period of one and three months. Three carbonaceous sources for the CFx phase are investigated: petroleum coke-based, fibrous, and mixed fibrous. For each hybrid cathode, a measurable increase in the relative amount of lithium fluoride is observed after a three month resting period in both the 7Li and 19F NMR spectra. These changes are attributed to lithium ion migration from the silver vanadium oxide to the CFx phase during the resting period, and help clarify the mechanism behind high power handling capability of this cathode.

  16. In situ 19F MRS measurement of RIF-1 tumor blood volume: corroboration by radioisotope-labeled [125I]-albumin and correlation to tumor size.

    PubMed

    Baldwin, N J; Wang, Y; Ng, T C

    1996-01-01

    Tumor blood volume (TBV) is an important factor in the metabolism of a tumor and in its response to therapy. Until recently, the only methods to determine TBV were highly invasive and many involved radioisotopes. In this study, a perfluorocarbon (PFC) emulsion, Oxypherol, was monitored by 19F magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS). TBVs as determined by 19F MRS of in situ and excised radiation-induced fibrosarcoma (RIF-1) tumors (n = 9), were strongly correlated with the TBV measured by a radioisotope labeled albumin method (slopes of 1.1 and 0.8 with R = 0.86 and 0.91, respectively, by linear regression). In general, the TBV as calculated from the in situ MRS measurements (n = 24) decreased from 28 to 5 ml/100 g tumor mass for tumors ranging in mass from 0.15 to 2 g. However, there was an indication of an initial increase of TBV in tumors smaller than 0.5 g.

  17. Stereospecificity of (1) H, (13) C and (15) N shielding constants in the isomers of methylglyoxal bisdimethylhydrazone: problem with configurational assignment based on (1) H chemical shifts.

    PubMed

    Afonin, Andrei V; Pavlov, Dmitry V; Ushakov, Igor A; Keiko, Natalia A

    2012-07-01

    In the (13) C NMR spectra of methylglyoxal bisdimethylhydrazone, the (13) C-5 signal is shifted to higher frequencies, while the (13) C-6 signal is shifted to lower frequencies on going from the EE to ZE isomer following the trend found previously. Surprisingly, the (1) H-6 chemical shift and (1) J(C-6,H-6) coupling constant are noticeably larger in the ZE isomer than in the EE isomer, although the configuration around the -CH═N- bond does not change. This paradox can be rationalized by the C-H⋯N intramolecular hydrogen bond in the ZE isomer, which is found from the quantum-chemical calculations including Bader's quantum theory of atoms in molecules analysis. This hydrogen bond results in the increase of δ((1) H-6) and (1) J(C-6,H-6) parameters. The effect of the C-H⋯N hydrogen bond on the (1) H shielding and one-bond (13) C-(1) H coupling complicates the configurational assignment of the considered compound because of these spectral parameters. The (1) H, (13) C and (15) N chemical shifts of the 2- and 8-(CH(3) )(2) N groups attached to the -C(CH(3) )═N- and -CH═N- moieties, respectively, reveal pronounced difference. The ab initio calculations show that the 8-(CH(3) )(2) N group conjugate effectively with the π-framework, and the 2-(CH(3) )(2) N group twisted out from the plane of the backbone and loses conjugation. As a result, the degree of charge transfer from the N-2- and N-8- nitrogen lone pairs to the π-framework varies, which affects the (1) H, (13) C and (15) N shieldings. PMID:22615146

  18. Determination of the Optimal Energy Denominator Shift Parameter of KRb Electronic States in Quantum Chemical Computations Using Perturbation Theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shundalau, M. B.; Minko, A. A.

    2016-01-01

    The influence of the energy denominator shift (EDS) parameter and the quantitative and qualitative compositions of electronic states included in CASSCF(2,14)/XMCQDPT2 ab initio calculations of the ground state equilibrium internuclear distance and dissociation energy of polar KRb was determined.

  19. Study on the compounds containing 19F and 10B atoms in a single molecule for the application to MRI and BNCT.

    PubMed

    Hattori, Yoshihide; Asano, Tomoyuki; Niki, Yoko; Kondoh, Hirofumi; Kirihata, Mitsunori; Yamaguchi, Yoshihiro; Wakamiya, Tateaki

    2006-05-15

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and boron-neutron capture therapy (BNCT) are quite attractive techniques for diagnosis and treatment of cancer, respectively. In order to progress the study on both MRI and BNCT, the novel compounds containing 19F and 10B atoms in a single molecule were designed and synthesized. In the present paper, the syntheses and the internalization rates into tumor cells of these compounds are elucidated.

  20. Experimental investigation of the 19F( n, α)16N reaction excitation function in the neutron energy range of 4 to 7.35 MeV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bondarenko, I. P.; Khryachkov, V. A.; Ivanova, T. A.; Kuz'minov, B. D.; Semenova, N. N.; Sergachev, A. I.

    2013-07-01

    The interaction of neutrons with light nuclei study is of interest for understanding nuclear-reaction mechanisms. Fluorine nuclei are worth particular attention because they are abundant in the core of the promising molten-salt reactors and can noticeably affect the chain reaction kinetics. In this work we have experimentally investigated the 19F( n, α)16N reaction cross-section at neutron energies ranging from 4 to 7.35 MeV.

  1. Polarization quantum beat spectroscopy of HCF(A1A"). I. 19F and 1H hyperfine structure and Zeeman effect.

    PubMed

    Fan, Haiyan; Ionescu, Ionela; Xin, Ju; Reid, Scott A

    2004-11-01

    To further investigate the (19)F and (1)H nuclear hyperfine structure and Zeeman effect in the simplest singlet carbene, HCF, we recorded polarization quantum beat spectra (QBS) of the pure bending levels 2(0) (n) with n = 0-7 and combination bands 1(0) (1)2(0) (n) with n = 1-6 and 2(0) (n)3(0) (1) with n = 0-3 in the HCF A(1)A(")<--X(1)A(') system. The spectra were measured under jet-cooled conditions using a pulsed discharge source, both at zero field and under application of a weak magnetic field (<30 G). Analysis yielded the nuclear spin-rotation constants C(aa) and weak field Lande g(aa) factors. Consistent with a two-state model, the majority of observed vibrational levels exhibit a linear correlation of C(aa) and g(aa), and our analysis yielded effective (a) hyperfine constants for the (19)F and (1)H nuclei (in MHz) of 728(23) and 55(2), respectively. The latter was determined here owing to the high resolving power of QBS. The vibrational state selectivity of the (19)F hyperfine constants is discussed, and we suggest that the underlying Renner-Teller interaction may play an important role.

  2. Transport-induced shifts in condensate dew-point and composition in multicomponent systems with chemical reaction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rosner, D. E.; Nagarajan, R.

    1985-01-01

    Partial heterogeneous condensation phenomena in multicomponent reacting systems are analyzed taking into consideration the chemical element transport phenomena. It is demonstrated that the dew-point surface temperature in chemically reactive systems is not a purely thermodynamic quantity, but is influenced by the multicomponent diffusion and Soret-mass diffusion phenomena. Several distinct dew-points are shown to exist in such systems and, as a result of transport constraints, the 'sharp' locus between two chemically distinct condensates is systematically moved to a difference mainstream composition.

  3. Self-Assembly of Peptide Amphiphiles Designed as Imaging Probes for 19F and Relaxation-Enhanced 1H imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Preslar, Adam Truett

    This work incorporates whole-body imaging functionality into peptide amphiphile (PA) nanostructures used for regenerative medicine to facilitate magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Two strategies were employed: 1. Conjugation of gadolinium chelates to peptide nanostructures to monitor biomaterial degradation in vivo with MRI and inductively-coupled plasma-mass spectroscopy (ICP-MS) 2. Synthesis of perfluorinated moiety-bearing peptide amphiphiles for 19F-MRI. The Gd(III) chelate gadoteridol was conjugated by copper-catalyzed "click" chemistry to a series of PAs known to form cylindrical nanostructures. By fitting nuclear magnetic resonance dispersion (NMRD) profiles to the Solomon-Bloembergen-Morgan (SBM) equations, it was observed that the water exchange parameter (tauM) depended on thermal annealing or calcium ion cross-linking. The sequence C16V 3A3E3G(Gd) exhibited an acceleration of nearly 100 ns after thermal annealing and calcium addition. These gadolinium-labeled PAs were used to track in vivo degradation of gels within the tibialis anterior muscle in a murine model. The half-life of biomaterial degradation was determined to be 13.5 days by inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS) of Gd(III). Gel implants could be monitored by MRI for eight days before the signal dispersed due to implant degradation and dilution. Additionally, nanostructures incorporating highly fluorinated domains were investigated for use as MRI contrast agents. Short, perfluoroalkyane tails of seven or eight carbon atoms in length were grafted to PA sequences containing a V2A2 beta-sheet forming sequence. The V2A2 sequence is known to drive 1D nanostructure assembly. It was found that the sequences C7F13V2A 2E2 and C7F13V2A 2K3 formed 1D assemblies in water which transition from ribbon-like to cylindrical shape as pH increases from 4.5 to 8.0. Ribbon-like nanostructures had reduced magnetic resonance signal by T 2 relaxation quenching, whereas their cylindrical counterparts

  4. Spatially resolved chemical reaction monitoring using magnetic resonance imaging.

    PubMed

    Feindel, Kirk W

    2016-06-01

    Over the previous three decades, the use of MRI for studying dynamic physical and chemical processes of materials systems has grown significantly. This mini-review provides a brief introduction to relevant principles of MRI, including methods of spatial localization, factors contributing to image contrast, and chemical shift imaging. A few historical examples of (1) H MRI for reaction monitoring will be presented, followed by a review of recent research including (1) H MRI studies of gelation and biofilms, (1) H, (7) Li, and (11) B MRI studies of electrochemical systems, in vivo glucose metabolism monitored with (19) F MRI, and in situ temperature monitoring with (27) Al MRI. Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  5. The HSP90 binding mode of a radicicol-like E-oxime from docking, binding free energy estimations, and NMR 15N chemical shifts

    PubMed Central

    Spichty, Martin; Taly, Antoine; Hagn, Franz; Kessler, Horst; Barluenga, Sofia; Winssinger, Nicolas; Karplus, Martin

    2009-01-01

    We determine the binding mode of a macrocyclic radicicol-like oxime to yeast HSP90 by combining computer simulations and experimental measurements. We sample the macrocyclic scaffold of the unbound ligand by parallel tempering simulations and dock the most populated conformations to yeast HSP90. Docking poses are then evaluated by the use of binding free energy estimations with the linear interaction energy method. Comparison of QM/MM-calculated NMR chemical shifts with experimental shift data for a selective subset of back-bone 15N provides an additional evaluation criteria. As a last test we check the binding modes against available structure-activity-relationships. We find that the most likely binding mode of the oxime to yeast HSP90 is very similar to the known structure of the radicicol-HSP90 complex. PMID:19482409

  6. Shift of optical absorption edge in SnO2 films with high concentrations of nitrogen grown by chemical vapor deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Jie; Lu, Yinmei; Meyer, Bruno K.; Hofmann, Detlev M.; Eickhoff, Martin

    2016-06-01

    The optical and electrical properties of n-type SnO2 films with high concentrations of nitrogen (SnO2:N) grown by chemical vapor deposition are studied. The carrier concentration increases from 4.1 × 1018 to 3.9 × 1019 cm-3 and the absorption edge shifts from 4.26 to 4.08 eV with increasing NH3 flow rate. Typical Urbach tails were observed from the absorption spectra and the Urbach energy increases from 0.321 to 0.526 eV with increasing NH3 flow rate. An "effective" absorption edge of about 4.61 eV was obtained for all investigated samples from fitting the extrapolations of the Urbach tails. Burstein-Moss effect, electron-impurity, and electron-electron interactions are shown to play a minor role for the shift of the absorption edges in SnO2:N thin films.

  7. The RAMANITA © method for non-destructive and in situ semi-quantitative chemical analysis of mineral solid-solutions by multidimensional calibration of Raman wavenumber shifts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, David C.

    2005-08-01

    The "RAMANITA ©" method, for semi-quantitative chemical analysis of mineral solid-solutions by multidimensional calibration of Raman wavenumber shifts and mathematical calculation by simultaneous equations, is published here in detail in English for the first time. It was conceived by the present writer 20 years ago for binary and ternary pyroxene and garnet systems. The mathematical description was set out in 1989, but in an abstract in an obscure French special publication. Detailed "step-by-step" calibration of two garnet ternaries, followed by their linking, by M. Pinet and D.C. Smith in the early 1990s provided a hexary garnet database. Much later, using this garnet database, which forms part of his personal database called RAMANITA ©, the present writer began to develop the method by improving the terminology, automating the calculations, discussing problems and experimenting with different real chemical problems in archaeometry. Although this RAMANITA © method has been very briefly mentioned in two recent books, the necessary full mathematical explanation is given only here. The method will find application in any study which requires obtaining a non-destructive semi-quantitative chemical analysis from mineral solid solutions that cannot be analysed by any destructive analytical method, in particular for archaeological, geological or extraterrestrial research projects, e.g. from gemstones or other crystalline artworks of the cultural heritage (especially by Mobile Raman Microscopy (MRM)) in situ in museums or at archaeological sites, including under water for subaquatic archaeometry; from scientifically precious mineral microinclusions (such as garnet or pyroxene within diamond); from minerals in rocks analysed in situ on planetary bodies by a rover (especially "at distance" by telescopy). Recently some other workers have begun deducing chemical compositions from Raman wavenumber shifts in multivariate chemical space, but the philosophical approach is

  8. Chemical shift magnetic resonance imaging in differentiation of benign from malignant vertebral collapse in a rural tertiary care hospital in North India

    PubMed Central

    Mittal, Puneet; Gupta, Ranjana; Mittal, Amit; Joshi, Sandeep

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is the modality of the first choice for evaluation of vertebral compression/collapse. Many MRI qualitative features help to differentiate benign from malignant collapse. We conducted this study to look for a quantitative difference in chemical shift values in benign and malignant collapse using dual-echo gradient echo in-phase/out-phase imaging. Materials and Methods: MRI examinations of a total of 38 patients were retrospectively included in the study who had vertebral compression/collapse with marrow edema in which final diagnosis was available at the time of imaging/follow-up. Signal intensity value in the region of abnormal marrow signal and adjacent normal vertebra was measured on in phase/out phase images. Signal intensity ratio (SIR) was measured by dividing signal intensity value on opposite phase images to that on in phase images. SIR was compared in normal vertebrae and benign and malignant vertebral collapse. Results: There were 21 males and 17 females with mean age of 52.4 years (range 28–76 years). Out of total 38 patients, 18 were of benign vertebral collapse and 20 of malignant vertebral collapse. SIR in normal vertebrae was 0.30 ± 0.14, 0.67 ± 0.18 in benign vertebral collapse, and 1.20 ± 0.27 in malignant vertebral collapse with significant difference in SIR of normal vertebrae versus benign collapse (P < 0.01) and in benign collapse versus malignant collapse (P < 0.01). Assuming a cutoff of <0.95 for benign collapse and ≥0.95 for malignant collapse, chemical shift imaging had a sensitivity of 90% and specificity of 94.4%. Conclusion: Chemical shift imaging is a rapid and useful sequence in differentiating benign from malignant vertebral collapse with good specificity and sensitivity. PMID:27695225

  9. Chemical shift magnetic resonance imaging in differentiation of benign from malignant vertebral collapse in a rural tertiary care hospital in North India

    PubMed Central

    Mittal, Puneet; Gupta, Ranjana; Mittal, Amit; Joshi, Sandeep

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is the modality of the first choice for evaluation of vertebral compression/collapse. Many MRI qualitative features help to differentiate benign from malignant collapse. We conducted this study to look for a quantitative difference in chemical shift values in benign and malignant collapse using dual-echo gradient echo in-phase/out-phase imaging. Materials and Methods: MRI examinations of a total of 38 patients were retrospectively included in the study who had vertebral compression/collapse with marrow edema in which final diagnosis was available at the time of imaging/follow-up. Signal intensity value in the region of abnormal marrow signal and adjacent normal vertebra was measured on in phase/out phase images. Signal intensity ratio (SIR) was measured by dividing signal intensity value on opposite phase images to that on in phase images. SIR was compared in normal vertebrae and benign and malignant vertebral collapse. Results: There were 21 males and 17 females with mean age of 52.4 years (range 28–76 years). Out of total 38 patients, 18 were of benign vertebral collapse and 20 of malignant vertebral collapse. SIR in normal vertebrae was 0.30 ± 0.14, 0.67 ± 0.18 in benign vertebral collapse, and 1.20 ± 0.27 in malignant vertebral collapse with significant difference in SIR of normal vertebrae versus benign collapse (P < 0.01) and in benign collapse versus malignant collapse (P < 0.01). Assuming a cutoff of <0.95 for benign collapse and ≥0.95 for malignant collapse, chemical shift imaging had a sensitivity of 90% and specificity of 94.4%. Conclusion: Chemical shift imaging is a rapid and useful sequence in differentiating benign from malignant vertebral collapse with good specificity and sensitivity.

  10. Association of Quadriceps Muscle Fat With Isometric Strength Measurements in Healthy Males Using Chemical Shift Encoding-Based Water-Fat Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Baum, Thomas; Inhuber, Stephanie; Dieckmeyer, Michael; Cordes, Christian; Ruschke, Stefan; Klupp, Elisabeth; Jungmann, Pia M.; Farlock, Rosanna; Eggers, Holger; Kooijman, Hendrik; Rummeny, Ernst J.; Schwirtz, Ansgar; Kirschke, Jan S.; Karampinos, Dimitrios C.

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Magnetic resonance–based assessment of quadriceps muscle fat has been proposed as surrogate marker in sarcopenia, osteoarthritis, and neuromuscular disorders. We presently investigated the association of quadriceps muscle fat with isometric strength measurements in healthy males using chemical shift encoding-based water-fat magnetic resonance imaging. Intermuscular adipose tissue fraction and intramuscular proton density fat fraction correlated significantly (P < 0.05) with isometric strength (up to r = −0.83 and −0.87, respectively). Reproducibility of intermuscular adipose tissue fraction and intramuscular proton density fat fraction was 1.5% and 5.7%, respectively. PMID:26953765

  11. Liver steatosis (LS) evaluated through chemical-shift magnetic resonance imaging liver enzymes in morbid obesity; effect of weight loss obtained with intragastric balloon gastric banding.

    PubMed

    Folini, Laura; Veronelli, Annamaria; Benetti, Alberto; Pozzato, Carlo; Cappelletti, Marco; Masci, Enzo; Micheletto, Giancarlo; Pontiroli, Antonio E

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate in morbid obesity clinical and metabolic effects related to weight loss on liver steatosis (LS), measured through chemical-shift magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and liver enzymes. Forty obese subjects (8 M/32 W; BMI 42.8 ± 7.12 kg/m(2), mean ± SD) were evaluated for LS through ultrasound (US-LS), chemical-shift MRI (MRI-LS), liver enzymes [aspartate aminotransferase (AST), alanine aminotransferase (ALT), γ-glutamyltransferase (GGT), alkaline phosphatase (ALP)], anthropometric parameters [weight, BMI, waist circumference (WC)], lipids, insulin, insulin resistance (HOMA-IR), glycated hemoglobin (HbA1c), oral glucose tolerance test, and body composition [fat mass (FM) and fat-free mass (FFM) at bio-impedance analysis (BIA)]. Anthropometric measures, MRI-LS, BIA, and biochemical parameters were reevaluated 6 months later in 18 subjects undergoing restrictive bariatric approach, i.e., intragastric balloon (BIB, n = 13) or gastric banding (LAGB, n = 5), and in 13 subjects receiving hypocaloric diet. At baseline, US-LS correlates only with MRI-LS, and the latter correlates with ALT, AST, and GGT. After 6 months, subjects undergoing BIB or LAGB had significant changes of BMI, weight, WC, ALT, AST, GGT, ALP, HbA1c, insulin, HOMA-IR, FM, FFM, and MRI-LS. Diet-treated obese subjects had no significant change of any parameter under study; change of BMI, fat mass, and fat-free mass was significantly greater in LAGB/BIB subjects than in diet-treated subjects. Change of MRI-LS showed a significant correlation with changes in weight, BMI, WC, GGT, ALP, and basal MRI-LS. Significant weight loss after BIB or LAGB is associated with decrease in chemical-shift MRI-LS and with reduction in liver enzymes; chemical-shift MRI and liver enzymes allow monitoring of LS in follow-up studies.

  12. Accurate calculation of chemical shifts in highly dynamic H2@C60 through an integrated quantum mechanics/molecular dynamics scheme.

    PubMed

    Jiménez-Osés, Gonzalo; García, José I; Corzana, Francisco; Elguero, José

    2011-05-20

    A new protocol combining classical MD simulations and DFT calculations is presented to accurately estimate the (1)H NMR chemical shifts of highly mobile guest-host systems and their thermal dependence. This strategy has been successfully applied for the hydrogen molecule trapped into C(60) fullerene, an unresolved and challenging prototypical case for which experimental values have never been reproduced. The dependence of the final values on the theoretical method and their implications to avoid over interpretation of the obtained results are carefully described.

  13. 1H, 13C, and 15N chemical shift assignments of cyanobacteriochrome NpR6012g4 in the green-absorbing photoproduct state.

    PubMed

    Lim, Sunghyuk; Yu, Qinhong; Rockwell, Nathan C; Martin, Shelley S; Lagarias, J Clark; Ames, James B

    2016-04-01

    Cyanobacteriochromes (CBCRs) are cyanobacterial photosensory proteins with a tetrapyrrole (bilin) chromophore that belong to the phytochrome superfamily. Like phytochromes, CBCRs photoconvert between two photostates with distinct spectral properties. NpR6012g4 from Nostoc punctiforme is a model system for widespread CBCRs with conserved red/green photocycles. Atomic-level structural information for the photoproduct state in this subfamily is not known. Here, we report NMR backbone chemical shift assignments of the light-activated state of NpR6012g4 (BMRB no. 26577) as a first step toward determining its atomic resolution structure. PMID:26537963

  14. Backbone chemical shift assignments for the sensor domain of the Burkholderia pseudomallei histidine kinase RisS – “missing” resonances at the dimer interface

    PubMed Central

    Buchko, Garry W.; Edwards, Thomas E.; Hewitt, Stephen N.; Phan, Isabelle Q.H.; Van Voorhis, Wesley C.; Miller, Samuel I.; Mylera, Peter J.

    2015-01-01

    Using a deuterated sample, all the observable backbone 1HN, 15N, 13Cα, and 13C′ chemical shifts for the dimeric, periplasmic sensor domain of the Burkholderia pseudomallei histidine kinase RisS were assigned. Approximately one-fifth of the amide resonances are “missing” in the 1H-15N HSQC spectrum and map primarily onto α-helices at the dimer interface observed in a crystal structure suggesting this region either undergoes intermediate timescale motion (μs – ms) and/or is heterogeneous. PMID:25957069

  15. 1H and 13C NMR Chemical Shift Assignments and Conformational Analysis for the Two Diastereomers of the Vitamin K Epoxide Reductase Inhibitor Brodifacoum

    SciTech Connect

    Cort, John R.; Cho, Herman M.

    2009-10-01

    Proton and 13C NMR chemical shift assignments and 1H-1H scalar couplings for the two diastereomers of the vitamin K epoxide reductase (VKOR) inhibitor brodifacoum have been determined from acetone solutions containing both diastereomers. Data were obtained from homo- and heteronuclear correlation spectra acquired at 1H frequencies of 750 and 900 MHz over a 268-303 K temperature range. Conformations inferred from scalar coupling and 1-D NOE measurements exhibit large differences between the diastereomers. Pacific Northwest National Laboratory is operated by Battelle for the US Department of Energy.

  16. Chemical-shift-resolved ¹⁹F NMR spectroscopy between 13.5 and 135 MHz: Overhauser-DNP-enhanced diagonal suppressed correlation spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    George, Christy; Chandrakumar, Narayanan

    2014-08-01

    Overhauser-DNP-enhanced homonuclear 2D (19)F correlation spectroscopy with diagonal suppression is presented for small molecules in the solution state at moderate fields. Multi-frequency, multi-radical studies demonstrate that these relatively low-field experiments may be operated with sensitivity rivalling that of standard 200-1000 MHz NMR spectroscopy. Structural information is accessible without a sensitivity penalty, and diagonal suppressed 2D NMR correlations emerge despite the general lack of multiplet resolution in the 1D ODNP spectra. This powerful general approach avoids the rather stiff excitation, detection, and other special requirements of high-field (19)F NMR spectroscopy.

  17. Quantitative and qualitative shifts in defensive metabolites define chemical defense investment during leaf development in Inga, a genus of tropical trees.

    PubMed

    Wiggins, Natasha L; Forrister, Dale L; Endara, María-José; Coley, Phyllis D; Kursar, Thomas A

    2016-01-01

    Selective pressures imposed by herbivores are often positively correlated with investments that plants make in defense. Research based on the framework of an evolutionary arms race has improved our understanding of why the amount and types of defenses differ between plant species. However, plant species are exposed to different selective pressures during the life of a leaf, such that expanding leaves suffer more damage from herbivores and pathogens than mature leaves. We hypothesize that this differential selective pressure may result in contrasting quantitative and qualitative defense investment in plants exposed to natural selective pressures in the field. To characterize shifts in chemical defenses, we chose six species of Inga, a speciose Neotropical tree genus. Focal species represent diverse chemical, morphological, and developmental defense traits and were collected from a single site in the Amazonian rainforest. Chemical defenses were measured gravimetrically and by characterizing the metabolome of expanding and mature leaves. Quantitative investment in phenolics plus saponins, the major classes of chemical defenses identified in Inga, was greater for expanding than mature leaves (46% and 24% of dry weight, respectively). This supports the theory that, because expanding leaves are under greater selective pressure from herbivores, they rely more upon chemical defense as an antiherbivore strategy than do mature leaves. Qualitatively, mature and expanding leaves were distinct and mature leaves contained more total and unique metabolites. Intraspecific variation was greater for mature leaves than expanding leaves, suggesting that leaf development is canalized. This study provides a snapshot of chemical defense investment in a speciose genus of tropical trees during the short, few-week period of leaf development. Exploring the metabolome through quantitative and qualitative profiling enables a more comprehensive examination of foliar chemical defense investment.

  18. Understanding Chemical versus Electrostatic Shifts in X-ray Photoelectron Spectra of Organic Self-Assembled Monolayers

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    The focus of the present article is on understanding the insight that X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) measurements can provide when studying self-assembled monolayers. Comparing density functional theory calculations to experimental data on deliberately chosen model systems, we show that both the chemical environment and electrostatic effects arising from a superposition of molecular dipoles influence the measured core-level binding energies to a significant degree. The crucial role of the often overlooked electrostatic effects in polar self-assembled monolayers (SAMs) is unambiguously demonstrated by changing the dipole density through varying the SAM coverage. As a consequence of this effect, care has to be taken when extracting chemical information from the XP spectra of ordered organic adsorbate layers. Our results, furthermore, imply that XPS is a powerful tool for probing local variations in the electrostatic energy in nanoscopic systems, especially in SAMs. PMID:26937264

  19. Final Technical Report: A Paradigm Shift in Chemical Processing: New Sustainable Chemistries for Low-VOC Coatings

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, Kenneth F.

    2006-07-26

    The project employed new processes to make emulsion polymers from reduced levels of petroleum-derived chemical feedstocks. Most waterborne paints contain spherical, emulsion polymer particles that serve as the film-forming binder phase. Our goal was to make emulsion polymer particles containing 30 percent feedstock that would function as effectively as commercial emulsions made from higher level feedstock. The processes developed yielded particles maintained their film formation capability and binding capacity while preserving the structural integrity of the particles after film formation. Rohm and Haas Company (ROH) and Archer Daniels Midland Company (ADM) worked together to employ novel polymer binders (ROH) and new, non-volatile, biomass-derived coalescing agents (ADM). The University of Minnesota Department of Chemical Engineering and Material Science utilized its unique microscopy capabilities to characterize films made from the New Emulsion Polymers (NEP).

  20. Predict mycobacterial proteins subcellular locations by incorporating pseudo-average chemical shift into the general form of Chou's pseudo amino acid composition.

    PubMed

    Fan, Guo-Liang; Li, Qian-Zhong

    2012-07-01

    Mycobacterium tuberculosis (MTB) is a pathogenic bacterial species in the genus Mycobacterium and the causative agent of most cases of tuberculosis (Berman et al., 2000). Knowledge of the localization of Mycobacterial protein may help unravel the normal function of this protein. Automated prediction of Mycobacterial protein subcellular localization is an important tool for genome annotation and drug discovery. In this work, a benchmark data set with 638 non-redundant mycobacterial proteins is constructed and an approach for predicting Mycobacterium subcellular localization is proposed by combining amino acid composition, dipeptide composition, reduced physicochemical property, evolutionary information, pseudo-average chemical shift. The overall prediction accuracy is 87.77% for Mycobacterial subcellular localizations and 85.03% for three membrane protein types in Integral membranes using the algorithm of increment of diversity combined with support vector machine. The performance of pseudo-average chemical shift is excellent. In order to check the performance of our method, the data set constructed by Rashid was also predicted and the accuracy of 98.12% was obtained. This indicates that our approach was better than other existing methods in literature.

  1. Toward structural dynamics: protein motions viewed by chemical shift modulations and direct detection of C'N multiple-quantum relaxation.

    PubMed

    Mori, Mirko; Kateb, Fatiha; Bodenhausen, Geoffrey; Piccioli, Mario; Abergel, Daniel

    2010-03-17

    Multiple quantum relaxation in proteins reveals unexpected relationships between correlated or anti-correlated conformational backbone dynamics in alpha-helices or beta-sheets. The contributions of conformational exchange to the relaxation rates of C'N coherences (i.e., double- and zero-quantum coherences involving backbone carbonyl (13)C' and neighboring amide (15)N nuclei) depend on the kinetics of slow exchange processes, as well as on the populations of the conformations and chemical shift differences of (13)C' and (15)N nuclei. The relaxation rates of C'N coherences, which reflect concerted fluctuations due to slow chemical shift modulations (CSMs), were determined by direct (13)C detection in diamagnetic and paramagnetic proteins. In well-folded proteins such as lanthanide-substituted calbindin (CaLnCb), copper,zinc superoxide dismutase (Cu,Zn SOD), and matrix metalloproteinase (MMP12), slow conformational exchange occurs along the entire backbone. Our observations demonstrate that relaxation rates of C'N coherences arising from slow backbone dynamics have positive signs (characteristic of correlated fluctuations) in beta-sheets and negative signs (characteristic of anti-correlated fluctuations) in alpha-helices. This extends the prospects of structure-dynamics relationships to slow time scales that are relevant for protein function and enzymatic activity.

  2. Fractional enrichment of proteins using [2-(13)C]-glycerol as the carbon source facilitates measurement of excited state 13Cα chemical shifts with improved sensitivity.

    PubMed

    Ahlner, Alexandra; Andresen, Cecilia; Khan, Shahid N; Kay, Lewis E; Lundström, Patrik

    2015-07-01

    A selective isotope labeling scheme based on the utilization of [2-(13)C]-glycerol as the carbon source during protein overexpression has been evaluated for the measurement of excited state (13)Cα chemical shifts using Carr-Purcell-Meiboom-Gill (CPMG) relaxation dispersion (RD) experiments. As expected, the fractional incorporation of label at the Cα positions is increased two-fold relative to labeling schemes based on [2-(13)C]-glucose, effectively doubling the sensitivity of NMR experiments. Applications to a binding reaction involving an SH3 domain from the protein Abp1p and a peptide from the protein Ark1p establish that accurate excited state (13)Cα chemical shifts can be obtained from RD experiments, with errors on the order of 0.06 ppm for exchange rates ranging from 100 to 1000 s(-1), despite the small fraction of (13)Cα-(13)Cβ spin-pairs that are present for many residue types. The labeling approach described here should thus be attractive for studies of exchanging systems using (13)Cα spin probes.

  3. Unified Electrostatic Understanding on the Solvation-Induced Changes in the CN Stretching Frequency and the NMR Chemical Shifts of a Nitrile.

    PubMed

    Torii, Hajime

    2016-09-15

    Understanding on the spectroscopic properties of a functional group is essential to use it to detect changes in the structural and/or dynamical properties through the situations of intermolecular interactions. The present study is devoted to elucidating the factors that control the solvation-induced changes in the C≡N stretching frequency and the (13)C and (15)N NMR chemical shifts of the nitrile group. It is shown that the nonelectrostatic contribution of the hydration-induced changes in the C≡N stretching frequency as previously thought, as well as the specific effect of hydrogen bonding on the (13)C and (15)N chemical shifts, actually originate from the spatially inhomogeneous nature of the electrostatic situation generated by the hydrogen-bond donating water molecule, especially by the OH bond dipole. On this basis, a unified electrostatic interaction model that encompasses the cases of both hydration and dipolar solvation is constructed. The responses of electrons in these two cases are also discussed. PMID:27547990

  4. Effect of solvent on an NMR chemical shift difference between glycyl geminal α-protons as a probe of β-turn formation of short peptides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tonan, Kenji; Ikawa, Shun-ichi

    2003-01-01

    Proton NMR spectra of short peptides with a glycyl (Gly) or N-methylglycyl (sarcosyl, Sar) residue were measured in various mixed solvents with a wide range of dielectric constants: 78.3-2.3. From analyses of the octet and quartet signals of the geminal α-protons of Gly and Sar residues, respectively, we have estimated chemical shift differences between the two α-protons, Δ δα/α'. It is found that the Δ δα/α' values increase with decreasing solvent polarity and the increasing rates depend significantly on amino acid sequences. By referring to infrared spectra and chemical shift of the terminal NH protons, δNH, of the peptides, the Δ δα/α' values were found to be a good probe of β-turn formation. From solvent-dependent change of Δ δα/α', we estimated the free energies for the β-turn formation and compared the results with those estimated from δNH. Using the resulting free energies, we have discussed effects of solvent on the β-turn formation.

  5. Correlated fluorine diffusion and ionic conduction in the nanocrystalline F(-) solid electrolyte Ba(0.6)La(0.4)F(2.4)-(19)F T1(ρ) NMR relaxation vs. conductivity measurements.

    PubMed

    Preishuber-Pflügl, F; Bottke, P; Pregartner, V; Bitschnau, B; Wilkening, M

    2014-05-28

    Chemical reactions induced by mechanical treatment may give access to new compounds whose properties are governed by chemical metastability, defects introduced and the size effects present. Their interplay may lead to nanocrystalline ceramics with enhanced transport properties being useful to act as solid electrolytes. Here, the introduction of large amounts of La into the cubic structure of BaF2 served as such an example. The ion transport properties in terms of dc-conductivity values of the F(-) anion conductor Ba1-xLaxF2+x (here with x = 0.4) considerably exceed those of pure, nanocrystalline BaF2. So far, there is only little knowledge about activation energies and jump rates of the elementary hopping processes. Here, we took advantage of both impedance spectroscopy and (19)F NMR relaxometry to get to the bottom of ion jump diffusion proceeding on short-range and long-range length scales in Ba0.6La0.4F2.4. While macroscopic transport is governed by an activation energy of 0.55 to 0.59 eV, the elementary steps of hopping seen by NMR are characterised by much smaller activation energies. Fortunately, we were able to deduce an F(-) self-diffusion coefficient by the application of spin-locking NMR relaxometry.

  6. Magnetic properties and hyperfine interactions in Cr8, Cr7Cd, and Cr7Ni molecular rings from 19F-NMR

    SciTech Connect

    Bordonali, L; Garlatti, E; Casadei, C M; Furukawa, Y; Lascialfari, A; Carretta, S; Troiani, F; Timco, G; Winpenny, R E; Borsa, F

    2014-04-14

    A detailed experimental investigation of the 19F nuclear magnetic resonance is made on single crystals of the homometallic Cr₈ antiferromagnetic molecular ring and heterometallic Cr₇Cd and Cr₇ Ni rings in the low temperature ground state. Since the F- ion is located midway between neighboring magnetic metal ions in the ring, the 19F-NMR spectra yield information about the local electronic spin density and ¹⁹F hyperfine interactions. In Cr8, where the ground state is a singlet with total spin S T = 0, the ¹⁹F-NMR spectra at 1.7 K and low external magnetic field display a single narrow line, while when the magnetic field is increased towards the first level crossing field, satellite lines appear in the ¹⁹F-NMR spectrum, indicating a progressive increase in the Boltzmann population of the first excited state S T = 1. In the heterometallic rings, Cr₇Cd and Cr₇ Ni, whose ground state is magnetic with S T = 3/2 and S T = 1/2, respectively, the ¹⁹F-NMR spectrum has a complicated structure which depends on the strength and orientation of the magnetic field, due to both isotropic and anisotropic transferred hyperfine interactions and classical dipolar interactions. From the 19F-NMR spectra in single crystals we estimated the transferred hyperfine constants for both the F⁻-Ni2⁺ and the F⁻-Cd2⁺ bonds. The values of the hyperfine constants compare well to the ones known for F⁻-Ni2⁺ in KNiF₃ and NiF₂ and for F⁻-Cr³⁺ in K₂NaCrF₆. The results are discussed in terms of hybridization of the 2s, 2p orbitals of the F⁻ ion and the d orbitals of the magnetic ion. Finally, we discuss the implications of our results for the electron-spin decoherence.

  7. 19F Nuclear Magnetic Resonance and Crystallographic Studies of 5-Fluorotryptophan-Labeled Anthrax Protective Antigen and Effects of the Receptor on Stability

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    The anthrax protective antigen (PA) is an 83 kDa protein that is one of three protein components of the anthrax toxin, an AB toxin secreted by Bacillus anthracis. PA is capable of undergoing several structural changes, including oligomerization to either a heptameric or octameric structure called the prepore, and at acidic pH a major conformational change to form a membrane-spanning pore. To follow these structural changes at a residue-specific level, we have conducted initial studies in which we have biosynthetically incorporated 5-fluorotryptophan (5-FTrp) into PA, and we have studied the influence of 5-FTrp labeling on the structural stability of PA and on binding to the host receptor capillary morphogenesis protein 2 (CMG2) using 19F nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR). There are seven tryptophans in PA, but of the four domains in PA, only two contain tryptophans: domain 1 (Trp65, -90, -136, -206, and -226) and domain 2 (Trp346 and -477). Trp346 is of particular interest because of its proximity to the CMG2 binding interface, and because it forms part of the membrane-spanning pore. We show that the 19F resonance of Trp346 is sensitive to changes in pH, consistent with crystallographic studies, and that receptor binding significantly stabilizes Trp346 to both pH and temperature. In addition, we provide evidence that suggests that resonances from tryptophans distant from the binding interface are also stabilized by the receptor. Our studies highlight the positive impact of receptor binding on protein stability and the use of 19F NMR in gaining insight into structural changes in a high-molecular weight protein. PMID:24387629

  8. NMR shielding and spin–rotation constants of {sup 175}LuX (X = {sup 19}F, {sup 35}Cl, {sup 79}Br, {sup 127}I) molecules

    SciTech Connect

    Demissie, Taye B.

    2015-12-31

    This presentation demonstrates the relativistic effects on the spin-rotation constants, absolute nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) shielding constants and shielding spans of {sup 175}LuX (X = {sup 19}F, {sup 35}Cl, {sup 79}Br, {sup 127}I) molecules. The results are obtained from calculations performed using density functional theory (non-relativistic and four-component relativistic) and coupled-cluster calculations. The spin-rotation constants are compared with available experimental values. In most of the molecules studied, relativistic effects make an order of magnitude difference on the NMR absolute shielding constants.

  9. Annual Report FY2013-- A Kinematically Complete, Interdisciplinary, and Co-Institutional Measurement of the 19F(α,n) Cross-section for Nuclear Safeguards Science

    SciTech Connect

    Peters, William A; Smith, Michael Scott; Clement, Ryan; Tan, Wanpeng; Stech, Ed; Cizewski, J A; Febbraro, Michael; Madurga Flores, Miguel

    2013-10-01

    The goal of this proposal is to enable neutron detection for precision Non-Destructive Assays (NDAs) of actinide-fluoride samples. Neutrons are continuously generated from a UFx matrix in a container or sample as a result of the interaction of alpha particles from uranium-decay α particles with fluorine nuclei in the matrix. Neutrons from 19F(α,n)22Na were once considered a poorly characterized background for assays of UFx samples via 238U spontaneous fission neutron detection [SMI2010B]. However, the yield of decay-α-driven neutrons is critical for 234,235U LEU and HEU assays, as it can used to determine both the total amount of uranium and the enrichment [BER2010]. This approach can be extremely valuable in a variety of safeguard applications, such as cylinder monitoring in underground uranium storage facilities, nuclear criticality safety studies, nuclear materials accounting, and other nonproliferation applications. The success of neutron-based assays critically depends on an accurate knowledge of the cross section of the (α,n) reaction that generates the neutrons. The 40% uncertainty in the 19F(α,n)22Na cross section currently limits the precision of such assays, and has been identified as a key factor in preventing accurate enrichment determinations [CRO2003]. The need for higher quality cross section data for (α,n) reactions has been a recurring conclusion in reviews of the nuclear data needs to support safeguards. The overarching goal of this project is to enable neutron detection to be used for precision Non- Destructive Assays (NDAs) of actinide-fluoride samples. This will significantly advance safeguards verification at existing declared facilities, nuclear materials accounting, process control, nuclear criticality safety monitoring, and a variety of other nonproliferation applications. To reach this goal, Idaho National Laboratory (INL), in partnership with Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL), Rutgers University (RU), and the University of Notre

  10. Composite-180° pulse-based symmetry sequences to recouple proton chemical shift anisotropy tensors under ultrafast MAS solid-state NMR spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Pandey, Manoj Kumar; Malon, Michal; Ramamoorthy, Ayyalusamy; Nishiyama, Yusuke

    2015-01-01

    There is considerable interest in the measurement of proton ((1)H) chemical shift anisotropy (CSA) tensors to obtain deeper insights into H-bonding interactions which find numerous applications in chemical and biological systems. However, the presence of strong (1)H/(1)H dipolar interaction makes it difficult to determine small size (1)H CSAs from the homogeneously broadened NMR spectra. Previously reported pulse sequences for (1)H CSA recoupling are prone to the effects of radio frequency field (B1) inhomogeneity. In the present work we have carried out a systematic study using both numerical and experimental approaches to evaluate γ-encoded radio frequency (RF) pulse sequences based on R-symmetries that recouple (1)H CSA in the indirect dimension of a 2D (1)H/(1)H anisotropic/isotropic chemical shift correlation experiment under ultrafast magic angle spinning (MAS) frequencies. The spectral resolution and sensitivity can be significantly improved in both frequency dimensions of the 2D (1)H/(1)H correlation spectrum without decoupling (1)H/(1)H dipolar couplings but by using ultrafast MAS rates up to 70 kHz. We successfully demonstrate that with a reasonable RF field requirement (<200 kHz) a set of symmetry-based recoupling sequences, with a series of phase-alternating 270°0-90°180 composite-180° pulses, are more robust in combating B1 inhomogeneity effects. In addition, our results show that the new pulse sequences render remarkable (1)H CSA recoupling efficiency and undistorted CSA lineshapes. Experimental results on citric acid and malonic acid comparing the efficiencies of these newly developed pulse sequences with that of previously reported CSA recoupling pulse sequences are also reported under ultrafast MAS conditions. PMID:25497846

  11. Nuclear magnetic resonance spectra and (207)Pb chemical-shift tensors of lead carboxylates relevant to soap formation in oil paintings.

    PubMed

    Catalano, Jaclyn; Yao, Yao; Murphy, Anna; Zumbulyadis, Nicholas; Centeno, Silvia A; Dybowski, Cecil

    2014-01-01

    Soap formation in traditional oil paintings occurs when heavy-metal-containing pigments, such as lead white, 2PbCO3·Pb(OH)2, and lead tin yellow type I, Pb2SnO4, react with fatty acids in the binding medium. These soaps may form aggregates that can be 100-200 μm in diameter, which swell and protrude through the paint surface, resulting in the degradation of the paint film and damage to the integrity of the artwork. The factors that trigger soap formation and the mechanism(s) of the process are not yet well understood. To elucidate these issues, chemical and structural information is necessary, which can be obtained using solid-state (207)Pb and (13)C nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR). In this article, we report (207)Pb and (13)C solid-state NMR spectra and (207)Pb chemical-shift tensors of lead carboxylates implicated in soap formation: lead stearate, lead palmitate, and lead azelate, in addition to lead oleate and lead heptanoate for comparison. The (13)C cross polarization with magic-angle spinning (MAS) spectra of these lead carboxylates show resonance doubling for the carbons closest to the lead, indicating two different conformations of the fatty acid chains in the asymmetric unit. The (207)Pb NMR spectra, from which tensors were determined, were obtained with direct excitation and spin-temperature alternation, with and without MAS, and with the wide band uniform rate smooth truncation Carr-Purcell-Meiboom-Gill pulse sequence. The results of these experiments show that the local coordination environment of lead azelate is different from lead palmitate and lead stearate and could thus be distinguished from these in a paint film displaying soap formation. In addition, comparing the (207)Pb NMR chemical-shift tensors of the lead carboxylates studied shows that crystal packing of the acyl chains may be a factor in determining the coordination environment around the lead. PMID:24666944

  12. The fluorine destruction in stars: First experimental study of the {sup 19}F(p,{alpha}){sup 16}O reaction at astrophysical energies

    SciTech Connect

    La Cognata, M.; Mukhamedzhanov, A.; Spitaleri, C.; Indelicato, I.; Aliotta, M.; Burjan, V.; Cherubini, S.; Coc, A.; Gulino, M.; Hons, Z.; Kiss, G. G.; Kroha, V.; Lamia, L.; Mrazek, J.; Palmerini, S.; Piskor, S.; Pizzone, R. G.; Puglia, S. M. R.; Rapisarda, G. G.; Romano, S.; and others

    2012-11-12

    The {sup 19}F(p,{alpha}){sup 16}O reaction is an important fluorine destruction channel in the proton-rich outer layers of asymptotic giant branch (AGB) stars and it might also play a role in hydrogendeficient post-AGB star nucleosynthesis. So far, available direct measurements do not reach the energy region of astrophysical interest (E{sub cm}{approx} 300 keV), because of the hindrance effect of the Coulomb barrier. The Trojan Horse (TH) method was thus used to access this energy region, by extracting the quasi-free contribution to the {sup 2}H({sup 19}F,{alpha}{sup 16}O)n reaction. The TH measurement of the {alpha}{sub 0} channel, which is the dominant one at such energies, shows the presence of resonant structures not observed before that cause an increase of the reaction rate at astrophysical temperatures up to a factor of 1.7, with potential important consequences for stellar nucleosynthesis.

  13. Degradation of 4-fluorobiphenyl by mycorrhizal fungi as determined by {sup 19}F nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy and {sup 14}C radiolabelling analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Green, N.A.; Meharg, A.A.; Till, C.; Troke, J.; Nicholson, J.K.

    1999-09-01

    The pathways of biotransformation of 4-fluorobiphenyl (4FBP) by the ectomycorrhizal fungus Tylospora fibrilosa and several other mycorrhizal fungi were investigated by using {sup 19}F nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy in combination with {sup 14}C radioisotope-detected high-performance liquid chromatography ({sup 14}C-HPLC). Under the conditions used in this study T. fibrillosa and some other species degraded 4FBP. {sup 14}C-HPLC profiles indicated that there were four major biotransformation products, whereas {sup 19}F NMR showed that there were six major fluorine-containing products. The authors confirmed that 4-fluorobiphen-4{prime}-ol and 4-fluorobiphen-3{prime}-ol were two of the major products formed, but no other products were conclusively identified. There was no evidence for the expected biotransformation pathway (namely, meta cleavage of the less halogenated ring), as none of the expected products of this route were found. To the best of their knowledge, this is the first report describing intermediates formed during mycorrhizal degradation of halogenated biphenyls.

  14. 15N chemical shift tensors and conformation of solid polypeptides containing 15N-labeled glycine residue by 15N NMR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shoji, Akira; Ozaki, Takuo; Fujito, Teruaki; Deguchi, Kenzo; Ando, Isao; Magoshi, Jun

    1998-01-01

    The correlation between the isotropic 15N chemical shift ( δiso) and 15N chemical shift tensor components ( δ11, δ22 and δ33) and the main-chain conformation such as the polyglycine I (PGI: β-sheet), II (PGII: 3 1-helix), α-helix and β-sheet forms of solid polypeptides [Gly∗,X] n consisting of 15N-labeled glycine (Gly∗) and other amino acids (X: natural abundance of 15N) has been studied by solid-state 15N NMR method. A series of polypeptides [Gly∗,X] n (X = glycine, L-alanine, L-leucine, L-valine, L-isoleucine, β-benzyl L-aspartate, γ-benzyl L-glutamate, ɛ-carbobenzoxy L-lysine, and sarcosine) were synthesized by the α-amino acid N-carboxy anhydride (NCA) method. Conformations of these polypeptides in the solid state were characterized on the basis of conformation-dependent 13C chemical shifts in the 13C cross-polarization-magic angle spinning (CP-MAS) NMR spectra and by the characteristic bands in the IR and far-IR spectra. The δiso, δ11, δ22 and δ33 of the polypetides were determined from the 15N CP-MAS and 15N CP-static (powder pattern) spectra. It was found that the δiso, δ11, δ22 and δ33 in the PGI form (δ 83.5, 185, 40.7 and 25 ppm, resp.) are upfield from those in the PGII form (88.5, 194, 42.1 and 29 ppm, resp.), which were reproduced by the calculated 15N shielding constants using the finite perturbation theory (FPT)-INDO method. It was also found that the δ22 of the Gly∗ of [Gly∗,X] n is closely related to the main-chain conformation and the neighboring amino acid sequence, although the δiso is almost independent of the glycine content and conformation. Consequently, the δ22 value of Gly∗ containing copolypeptides is useful for the structural (main-chain conformation and neighboring amino acid sequence) analysis in the solid state by 15N NMR, if the 15N-labeled copolypeptide or natural protein can be provided. In addition, it is shown that the δiso of the glycine residue is useful for the conformational study of some

  15. Chemical potential shift and gap-state formation in SrTiO{sub 3−δ} revealed by photoemission spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Pal, Prabir Kumar, Pramod; Aswin, V.; Dogra, Anjana; Joshi, Amish G.

    2014-08-07

    In this study, we report on investigations of the electronic structure of SrTiO{sub 3} annealed at temperature ranging between 550 and 840 °C in an ultrahigh vacuum. Annealing induced oxygen vacancies (O{sub vac}) impart considerable changes in the electronic structure of SrTiO{sub 3}. Using core-level photoemission spectroscopy, we have studied the chemical potential shift (Δμ) as a function of annealing temperature. The result shows that the chemical potential monotonously increases with electron doping in SrTiO{sub 3−δ}. The monotonous increase of the chemical potential rules out the existence of electronic phase separation in the sample. Using valence band photoemission, we have demonstrated the formation of a low density of states at the near Fermi level electronic spectrum of SrTiO{sub 3−δ}. The gap-states were observed by spectral weight transfer over a large energy scale of the stoichiometric band gap of SrTiO{sub 3} system leading finally to an insulator-metal transition. We have interpreted our results from the point of structural distortions induced by oxygen vacancies.

  16. Computational and ESR studies of electron attachment to decafluorocyclopentane, octafluorocyclobutane, and hexafluorocyclopropane: electron affinities of the molecules and the structures of their stable negative ions as determined from 13C and 19F hyperfine coupling constants.

    PubMed

    ElSohly, Adel M; Tschumper, Gregory S; Crocombe, Richard A; Wang, Jih Tzong; Williams, Ffrancon

    2005-08-01

    High-resolution ESR spectra of the ground-state negative ions of hexafluorocyclopropane (c-C3F6*-), octafluorocyclobutane (c-C4F8*-), and decafluorocyclopentane (c-C5F10*-) are reported and their isotropic 19F hyperfine coupling constants (hfcc) of 198.6 +/- 0.4 G, 147.6 +/- 0.4 G, and 117.9 +/- 0.4 G, respectively, are in inverse ratio to the total number of fluorine atoms per anion. Together with the small value of 5.2 +/- 0.4 G determined for the isotropic 13C hfcc of c-C4F8*-, these results indicate that in each case the singly occupied molecular orbital (SOMO) is delocalized over the equivalent fluorines and possesses a nodal plane through the carbon atoms of a time-averaged D(nh) structure. A series of quantum chemical computations were carried out to further characterize these anions and their neutral counterparts. Both the B3LYP density functional and second-order Møller-Plesset perturbation theory (MP2) indicate that c-C3F6*- adopts a D(3h) geometry and a (2)A2'' ground electronic state, that c-C4F8*- adopts a D(4h) geometry and a (2)A2u ground electronic state, and that c-C5F10*- adopts a C(s) structure and a (2)A' electronic state. Moreover, the 19F hyperfine coupling constants computed with the MP2 method and a high quality triple-zeta basis set are within 1% of the experimental values. Also, the values computed for the 13C hfcc of c-C4F8*- are consistent with the experimental value of 5.2 G. Therefore, in keeping with the ESR results, these negative ions derived from first-row elements can be characterized as pi* species. In addition, the hypervalency of these perfluorocycloalkane radical anions has been clarified.

  17. Relative importance of first and second derivatives of nuclear magnetic resonance chemical shifts and spin-spin coupling constants for vibrational averaging.

    PubMed

    Dracínský, Martin; Kaminský, Jakub; Bour, Petr

    2009-03-01

    Relative importance of anharmonic corrections to molecular vibrational energies, nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) chemical shifts, and J-coupling constants was assessed for a model set of methane derivatives, differently charged alanine forms, and sugar models. Molecular quartic force fields and NMR parameter derivatives were obtained quantum mechanically by a numerical differentiation. In most cases the harmonic vibrational function combined with the property second derivatives provided the largest correction of the equilibrium values, while anharmonic corrections (third and fourth energy derivatives) were found less important. The most computationally expensive off-diagonal quartic energy derivatives involving four different coordinates provided a negligible contribution. The vibrational corrections of NMR shifts were small and yielded a convincing improvement only for very accurate wave function calculations. For the indirect spin-spin coupling constants the averaging significantly improved already the equilibrium values obtained at the density functional theory level. Both first and complete second shielding derivatives were found important for the shift corrections, while for the J-coupling constants the vibrational parts were dominated by the diagonal second derivatives. The vibrational corrections were also applied to some isotopic effects, where the corrected values reasonably well reproduced the experiment, but only if a full second-order expansion of the NMR parameters was included. Contributions of individual vibrational modes for the averaging are discussed. Similar behavior was found for the methane derivatives, and for the larger and polar molecules. The vibrational averaging thus facilitates interpretation of previous experimental results and suggests that it can make future molecular structural studies more reliable. Because of the lengthy numerical differentiation required to compute the NMR parameter derivatives their analytical implementation in

  18. Chemical shift assignments and secondary structure prediction for Q4DY78, a conserved kinetoplastid-specific protein from Trypanosoma cruzi.

    PubMed

    D'Andréa, Éverton Dias; Diehl, Anne; Schmieder, Peter; Oschkinat, Hartmut; Pires, José Ricardo

    2016-10-01

    Trypanosoma cruzi, Trypanosma brucei and Leishmania spp. are kinetoplastid protozoa causative agents of Chagas disease, sleeping sickness and leishmaniasis, respectively, neglected tropical diseases estimated to infect millions of people worldwide. Their genome sequencing has revealed approximately 50 % of genes encoding hypothetical proteins of unknown function, opening possibilities for novel target identification and drug discovery. Q4DY78 is a putative essential protein from T. cruzi conserved in the related kinetoplastids and divergent from mammalian host proteins. Here we report the (1)H, (15)N, and (13)C chemical shift assignments and secondary structure analysis of the Q4DY78 protein as basis for NMR structure determination, functional analysis and drug screening.

  19. Doubly Selective Multiple Quantum Chemical Shift Imaging and T1 Relaxation Time Measurement of Glutathione (GSH) in the Human Brain In Vivo

    PubMed Central

    Choi, In-Young; Lee, Phil

    2012-01-01

    Mapping of a major antioxidant, glutathione (GSH), was achieved in the human brain in vivo using a doubly selective multiple quantum filtering based chemical shift imaging (CSI) of GSH at 3 T. Both in vivo and phantom tests in CSI and single voxel measurements were consistent with excellent suppression of overlapping signals from creatine, γ-Amino butyric acid (GABA) and macromolecules. The GSH concentration in the fronto-parietal region was 1.20 ± 0.16 µmol/g (mean ± SD, n = 7). The longitudinal relaxation time (T1) of GSH in the human brain was 397 ± 44 ms (mean ± SD, n = 5), which was substantially shorter than those of other metabolites. This GSH CSI method permits us to address regional differences of GSH in the human brain with conditions where oxidative stress has been implicated, including multiple sclerosis, aging and neurodegenerative diseases. PMID:22730142

  20. Examination of anticipated chemical shift and shape distortion effect on materials commonly used in prosthetic socket fabrication when measured using MRI: a validation study.

    PubMed

    Safari, Mohammad Reza; Rowe, Philip; Buis, Arjan

    2013-01-01

    The quality of lower-limb prosthetic socket fit is influenced by shape and volume consistency during the residual limb shape-capturing process (i.e., casting). Casting can be quantified with magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) technology. However, chemical shift artifact and image distortion may influence the accuracy of MRI when common socket/casting materials are used. We used a purpose-designed rig to examine seven different materials commonly used in socket fabrication during exposure to MRI. The rig incorporated glass marker tubes filled with water doped with 1 g/L copper sulfate (CS) and 9 plastic sample vials (film containers) to hold the specific material specimens. The specimens were scanned 9 times in different configurations. The absolute mean difference of the glass marker tube length was 1.39 mm (2.98%) (minimum = 0.13 mm [0.30%], maximum = 5.47 mm [14.03%], standard deviation = 0.89 mm). The absolute shift for all materials was <1.7 mm. This was less than the measurement tolerance of +/-2.18 mm based on voxel (three-dimensional pixel) dimensions. The results show that MRI is an accurate and repeatable method for dimensional measurement when using matter containing water. Additionally, silicone and plaster of paris plus 1 g/L CS do not show a significant shape distortion nor do they interfere with the MRI image of the residual limb.

  1. Chemical shift assignment of the intrinsically disordered N-terminus and the rubredoxin domain in the folded metal bound and unfolded oxidized state of mycobacterial protein kinase G.

    PubMed

    Wittwer, Matthias; Dames, Sonja A

    2016-10-01

    Mycobacterium tuberculosis protein kinase G (PknG) is a 82 kDa multidomain eukaryotic-like serine/threonine kinase mediating the survival of pathogenic mycobacteria within host macrophages. The N-terminal sequence preceding the catalytic kinase domain contains an approximately 75 residues long tail, which was predicted to show no regulatory secondary structure (1-75 = NORS) but harbors the major in vivo phosphorylation site (T63), and a rubredoxin-like metal binding motif (74-147 = RD). In the reduced rubredoxin motif, four conserved cysteine residues that are present as two C-X-X-C-G motifs coordinate a metal ion. The cysteines are further involved in sensing the redox environment to regulate PknG catalytic activity. Here, we report the (1)H, (13)C, and (15)N resonance assignments of the highly dynamic unstructured N-terminal region NORS and the RD in the reduced, metal bound, presumably folded and the oxidized, presumably unfolded state. Chemical shifts have been deposited at the BioMagResBank under the BMRB accession numbers 26,028 for the His-PknG1-147 with the RD in reduced, metal bound state, 26,027 for His-PknG1-75, and 26,030 and 26,029 for PknG74-147 either in the reduced, metal bound or oxidized state, respectively. The presented chemical shift assignments pave the route for the structural characterization of the regulation of PknG by redox changes and posttranslational modifications (phosphorylation).

  2. Backbone and side-chain chemical shift assignments for the C-terminal domain of Tcb2, a cytoskeletal calcium-binding protein from Tetrahymena thermophila.

    PubMed

    Kilpatrick, Adina M; Gurrola, Theodore E; Sterner, Robert C; Sleister, Heidi M; Honts, Jerry E; Fowler, C Andrew

    2016-10-01

    Tcb2 is a putative calcium-binding protein from the membrane-associated cytoskeleton of the ciliated protozoan Tetrahymena thermophila. It has been hypothesized to participate in several calcium-mediated processes in Tetrahymena, including ciliary movement, cell cortex signaling, and pronuclear exchange. Sequence analysis suggests that the protein belongs to the calmodulin family, with N- and C-terminal domains connected by a central linker, and two helix-loop-helix motifs in each domain. However, its calcium-binding properties, structure and precise biological function remain unknown. Interestingly, Tcb2 is a major component of unique contractile fibers isolated from the Tetrahymena cytoskeleton; in these fibers, addition of calcium triggers an ATP-independent type of contraction. Here we report the (1)H, (13)C and (15)N backbone and side-chain chemical shift assignments of the C-terminal domain of the protein (Tcb2-C) in the absence and presence of calcium ions. (1)H-(15)N HSQC spectra show that the domain is well folded both in the absence and presence of calcium, and undergoes a dramatic conformational change upon calcium addition. Secondary structure prediction from chemical shifts reveals an architecture encountered in other calcium-binding proteins, with paired EF-hand motifs connected by a flexible linker. These studies represent a starting point for the determination of the high-resolution solution structure of Tcb2-C at both low and high calcium levels, and, together with additional structural studies on the full-length protein, will help establish the molecular basis of Tcb2 function and unique contractile properties.

  3. Complete chemical shift assignment of the ssDNA in the filamentous bacteriophage fd reports on its conformation and on its interface with the capsid shell.

    PubMed

    Morag, Omry; Abramov, Gili; Goldbourt, Amir

    2014-02-12

    The fd bacteriophage is a filamentous virus consisting of a circular single-stranded DNA (ssDNA) wrapped by thousands of copies of a major coat protein subunit (the capsid). The coat protein subunits are mostly α-helical and curved, and are arranged in the capsid in consecutive pentamers related by a translation along the main viral axis and a rotation of ~36° (C5S2 symmetry). The DNA is right-handed and helical, but information on its structure and on its interface with the capsid is incomplete. We present here an approach for assigning the DNA nucleotides and studying its interactions with the capsid by magic-angle spinning solid-state NMR. Capsid contacts with the ssDNA are obtained using a two-dimensional (13)C-(13)C correlation experiment and a proton-mediated (31)P-(13)C polarization transfer experiment, both acquired on an aromatic-unlabeled phage sample. Our results allow us to map the residues that face the interior of the capsid and to show that the ssDNA-capsid interactions are sustained mainly by electrostatic interactions between the positively charged lysine side chains and the phosphate backbone. The use of natural abundance aromatic amino acids in the growth media facilitated the complete assignment of the four nucleotides and the observation of internucleotide contacts. Using chemical shift analysis, our study shows that structural features of the deoxyribose carbons reporting on the sugar pucker are strikingly similar to those observed recently for the Pf1 phage. However, the ssDNA-protein interface is different, and chemical shift markers of base pairing are different. This experimental approach can be utilized in other filamentous and icosahedral bacteriophages, and also in other biomolecular complexes involving structurally and functionally important DNA-protein interactions.

  4. Probing structural patterns of ion association and solvation in mixtures of imidazolium ionic liquids with acetonitrile by means of relative (1)H and (13)C NMR chemical shifts.

    PubMed

    Marekha, Bogdan A; Kalugin, Oleg N; Bria, Marc; Idrissi, Abdenacer

    2015-09-21

    Mixtures of ionic liquids (ILs) with polar aprotic solvents in different combinations and under different conditions (concentration, temperature etc.) are used widely in electrochemistry. However, little is known about the key intermolecular interactions in such mixtures depending on the nature of the constituents and mixture composition. In order to systematically address the intermolecular interactions, the chemical shift variation of (1)H and (13)C nuclei has been followed in mixtures of imidazolium ILs 1-n-butyl-3-methylimidazolium tetrafluoroborate (BmimBF4), 1-n-butyl-3-methylimidazolium hexafluorophosphate (BmimPF6), 1-n-butyl-3-methylimidazolium trifluoromethanesulfonate (BmimTfO) and 1-n-butyl-3-methylimidazolium bis(trifluoromethylsulfonyl)imide (BmimTFSI) with molecular solvent acetonitrile (AN) over the entire composition range at 300 K. The concept of relative chemical shift variation is proposed to assess the observed effects on a unified and unbiased scale. We have found that hydrogen bonds between the imidazolium ring hydrogen atoms and electronegative atoms of anions are stronger in BmimBF4 and BmimTfO ILs than those in BmimTFSI and BmimPF6. Hydrogen atom at position 2 of the imidazolium ring is substantially more sensitive to interionic hydrogen bonding than those at positions 4-5 in the case of BmimTfO and BmimTFSI ILs. These hydrogen bonds are disrupted upon dilution in AN due to ion dissociation which is more pronounced at high dilutions. Specific solvation interactions between AN molecules and IL cations are poorly manifested.

  5. On the accuracy of the GIAO-DFT calculation of 15N NMR chemical shifts of the nitrogen-containing heterocycles--a gateway to better agreement with experiment at lower computational cost.

    PubMed

    Samultsev, Dmitry O; Semenov, Valentin A; Krivdin, Leonid B

    2014-05-01

    The main factors affecting the accuracy and computational cost of the gauge-independent atomic orbital density functional theory (GIAO-DFT) calculation of (15)N NMR chemical shifts in the representative series of key nitrogen-containing heterocycles--azoles and azines--have been systematically analyzed. In the calculation of (15)N NMR chemical shifts, the best result has been achieved with the KT3 functional used in combination with Jensen's pcS-3 basis set (GIAO-DFT-KT3/pcS-3) resulting in the value of mean absolute error as small as 5 ppm for a range exceeding 270 ppm in a benchmark series of 23 compounds with an overall number of 41 different (15)N NMR chemical shifts. Another essential finding is that basically, the application of the locally dense basis set approach is justified in the calculation of (15)N NMR chemical shifts within the 3-4 ppm error that results in a dramatic decrease in computational cost. Based on the present data, we recommend GIAO-DFT-KT3/pcS-3//pc-2 as one of the most effective locally dense basis set schemes for the calculation of (15)N NMR chemical shifts.

  6. Theoretical 13C chemical shift, 14N, and 2H quadrupole coupling- constant studies of hydrogen bonding in L-alanylglycine dipeptide.

    PubMed

    Tafazzoli, M; Amini, S K

    2008-04-01

    (13)C chemical shieldings and (14)N and (2)H electric field gradient (EFG) tensors of L-alanylglycine (L-alagly) dipeptide were calculated at RHF/6-31 + + G** and B3LYP/6-31 + + G** levels of theory respectively. For these calculations a crystal structure of this dipeptide obtained from X-ray crystallography was used. Atomic coordinates of different clusters containing several L-alagly molecules were used as input files for calculations. These clusters consist of central and surrounding L-alagly molecules, the latter forming short, strong, hydrogen bonds with the central molecule. Since the calculations did not converge for these clusters, the surrounding L-alagly molecules were replaced by glycine molecules. In order to improve the accuracy of calculated chemical shifts and nuclear quadrupole coupling constants (NQCCs), different geometry-optimization strategies were applied for hydrogen nuclei. Agreement between calculated and experimental data confirms that our optimized coordinates for hydrogen nuclei are more accurate than those obtained by X-ray diffraction.

  7. FTIR and 1H MAS NMR investigations on the correlation between the frequency of stretching vibration and the chemical shift of surface OH groups of solids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brunner, Eike; Karge, H. G.; Pfeifer, H.

    1992-03-01

    The study of surface hydroxyl groups of solids, especially of zeolites, belongs to the 'classical' topics of IR spectroscopy since physico-chemical information may be derived from the wavenumber (nu) OH of the stretching vibration of the different hydroxyls. On the other hand, the last decade has seen the development of high resolution solid-state NMR spectroscopy and through the use of the so-called magic-angle-spinning technique (MAS) the signals of different hydroxyl species can be resolved in the 1H NMR spectra of solids. The chemical shift (delta) H describing the position of these lines may be used as well as (nu) OH to characterize quantitatively the strength of acidity of surface OH groups of solids. In a first comparison of (nu) OH with (delta) H for several types of surface OH groups, a linear correlation between them could be found. The aim of this paper was to prove the validity of this correlation for a wide variety of hydroxyls. The IR measurements were carried out on a Perkin-Elmer FTIR spectrometer 1800 at the Fritz Haber Institute of the Max Planck Society, Berlin, and the 1H MAS NMR spectra were recorded on a Bruker MSL- 300 at the University of Leipzig.

  8. 19F nuclear magnetic resonance studies of the coat protein of bacteriophage M13 in synthetic phospholipid vesicles and deoxycholate micelles.

    PubMed Central

    Dettman, H D; Weiner, J H; Sykes, B D

    1982-01-01

    The nonlytic, filamentous coliphage M13 offers an excellent model system for the study of membrane-protein interactions. We prepare derivatives of the protein containing fluorine-labeled amino acids and use 19F nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) to study the protein in both deoxycholate micelles and phospholipid vesicles. We have previously described the in vivo preparation of an m-fluorotyrosyl derivative of M13 coat protein and also a method for incorporation of high levels of this protein into small, uniformly sized phospholipid vesicles of defined composition. Herein we describe the in vivo preparation and the characterization of an m-fluorophenylalanine derivative. We simultaneously compare the environment and mobility of the tyrosine and phenylalanine residues (the former in the hydrophobic region of the protein and the latter in the hydrophilic regions) as influenced by bile salt detergent or lipid interactions. PMID:7055622

  9. 19F nuclear spin relaxation and spin diffusion effects in the single-ion magnet LiYF4:Ho3+

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malkin, B. Z.; Vanyunin, M. V.; Graf, M. J.; Lago, J.; Borsa, F.; Lascialfari, A.; Tkachuk, A. M.; Barbara, B.

    2008-11-01

    Temperature and magnetic field dependences of the 19F nuclear spin-lattice relaxation in a single crystal of LiYF4 doped with holmium are described by an approach based on a detailed consideration of the magnetic dipole-dipole interactions between nuclei and impurity paramagnetic ions and nuclear spin diffusion processes. The observed non-exponential long time recovery of the nuclear magnetization after saturation at intermediate temperatures is in agreement with predictions of the spin-diffusion theory in a case of the diffusion limited relaxation. At avoided level crossings in the spectrum of electron-nuclear states of Ho3 + ions, rates of nuclear spin-lattice relaxation increase due to quasi-resonant energy exchange between nuclei and paramagnetic ions in contrast to the predominant role played by electronic cross-relaxation processes in the low-frequency ac-susceptibility.

  10. Structure of mutagen nucleic acid complexes in solution. Proton chemical shifts in 9-aminoacridine complexes with dG-dC, dC-dG, and dA-dT-dG-dC-dA-dT.

    PubMed

    Reuben, J; Baker, B M; Kallenbach, N R

    1978-07-11

    The influence of self-complementary oligodeoxynucleotides on the chemical shifts of protons of the mutagenic acridine dye 9-aminoacridine has been measured. Upfield shifts indicative of intercalative binding are found in the cases of dG-dC, dC-dG, and dA-dT-dG-dC-dA-dT but not in dA-dT. Geometries for the complexes that are compatibile with the chemical-shift data and the X-ray structure of the complex between ri5C-rG and 9-aminoacridine determined by Sakore et al. [Sakore, T.D., Jain, S.C., Tsai, C., and Sobell, H.M. (1977), Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. U.S.A. 74, 188--192] can be identified using recent theoretical estimates of shifts induced by nucleotide bases.

  11. Dynamics-based selective 2D {sup 1}H/{sup 1}H chemical shift correlation spectroscopy under ultrafast MAS conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Rongchun; Ramamoorthy, Ayyalusamy

    2015-05-28

    Dynamics plays important roles in determining the physical, chemical, and functional properties of a variety of chemical and biological materials. However, a material (such as a polymer) generally has mobile and rigid regions in order to have high strength and toughness at the same time. Therefore, it is difficult to measure the role of mobile phase without being affected by the rigid components. Herein, we propose a highly sensitive solid-state NMR approach that utilizes a dipolar-coupling based filter (composed of 12 equally spaced 90° RF pulses) to selectively measure the correlation of {sup 1}H chemical shifts from the mobile regions of a material. It is interesting to find that the rotor-synchronized dipolar filter strength decreases with increasing inter-pulse delay between the 90° pulses, whereas the dipolar filter strength increases with increasing inter-pulse delay under static conditions. In this study, we also demonstrate the unique advantages of proton-detection under ultrafast magic-angle-spinning conditions to enhance the spectral resolution and sensitivity for studies on small molecules as well as multi-phase polymers. Our results further demonstrate the use of finite-pulse radio-frequency driven recoupling pulse sequence to efficiently recouple weak proton-proton dipolar couplings in the dynamic regions of a molecule and to facilitate the fast acquisition of {sup 1}H/{sup 1}H correlation spectrum compared to the traditional 2D NOESY (Nuclear Overhauser effect spectroscopy) experiment. We believe that the proposed approach is beneficial to study mobile components in multi-phase systems, such as block copolymers, polymer blends, nanocomposites, heterogeneous amyloid mixture of oligomers and fibers, and other materials.

  12. /sup 19/F nuclear magnetic resonance measurement of the distance between the E-site GTP and the high-affinity Mg/sup 2 +/ in tubulin

    SciTech Connect

    Monasterio, O.

    1987-09-22

    The distance separating the divalent metal ion high-affinity binding site and the exchangeable nucleotide binding site on tubulin was evaluated by using high-resolution /sup 19/F NMR. The /sup 31/P and /sup 19/F NMR spectra of guanosine 5'-(..gamma..-fluorotriphosphate) (GTP(..gamma..F)) were studied. Both the fluorine and the ..gamma..-phosphate were split into a doublet with a coupling constant of 936 Hz. Tubulin purified according to the method of Weisenberg was incubated with 1 mM Mn/sup 2 +/. After one cycle of assembly, Mn/sup 2 +/ only partially, i.e., 60% at the high-affinity binding site. After colchicine treatment of tubulin to stabilize it, GTP(..gamma..F) was added, and the 254-MHz fluorine-19 relaxation rates were measured within the first 4 h. Longitudinal and transversal relaxation rates were determined at two concentrations of GTP(..gamma..F) and variable concentrations of colchicine-tubulin-Mn(II) (paramagnetic complex) or the ternary complex with magnesium diamagnetic complex). The analysis of the relaxation data indicates that the rate of exchange of GTP(..gamma..F) from the exchangeable nucleotide site has a lower limit of 8.7 x 10/sup 4/ s/sup -1/ and the metal and exchangeable nucleotide binding sites are separated by an upper distance between 6 and 8 A. These data confirm that the high-affinity divalent cation site is situated in the same locus as that of the exchangeable nucleotide, forming a metal-nucleotide complex.

  13. Lewis acid-assisted isotopic 18F-19F exchange in BODIPY dyes: facile generation of positron emission tomography/fluorescence dual modality agents for tumor imaging.

    PubMed

    Liu, Shuanglong; Lin, Tzu-Pin; Li, Dan; Leamer, Lauren; Shan, Hong; Li, Zibo; Gabbaï, François P; Conti, Peter S

    2013-01-01

    Positron emission tomography (PET) is a powerful technique for imaging biological pathways in vivo, particularly those that are key targets in disease processes. In contrast, fluorescence imaging has demonstrated to be a superior method for image-guided surgery, such as tumor removal. Although the integration of PET and optical imaging could provide an attractive strategy for patient management, there is a significant shortage of established platforms/methods for PET/optical probe construction. In this study, various reaction conditions were explored to develop a simple and fast method allowing for the introduction of [(18)F]-fluoride into BODIPY dyes. Through a systematic optimization of the reaction conditions, we found that BODIPY dyes, including commercial amine-reactive BODIPY succinimidyl esters, may be converted into their radioactive analogues in the matter of minutes via a (18)F-(19)F isotopic exchange reaction promoted by a Lewis acid such as SnCl4. An integrin-targeting RGD peptide was also conjugated with [(18)F]BODIPY® R6G , derived from the commercially available BODIPY® R6G fluorescent tag, to provide a [(18)F]-RGD conjugate in 82% yield. In vivo evaluation of this imaging probe showed a discernible tumor uptake in the U87MG xenograft model. The dual modality imaging properties of the probe was confirmed by ex vivo fluorescence and microPET imaging experiments. In summary, in the matter of minutes, BODIPY dyes were converted into their "hot" radioactive analogues via a (18)F-(19)F isotopic exchange reaction promoted by a Lewis acid. This approach, which can be applied to commercial BODIPY dyes, provides easy access to positron emission tomography/fluorescence dual modality imaging agents. PMID:23471211

  14. A lanthanide complex with dual biosensing properties: CEST (chemical exchange saturation transfer) and BIRDS (biosensor imaging of redundant deviation in shifts) with europium DOTA-tetraglycinate.

    PubMed

    Coman, Daniel; Kiefer, Garry E; Rothman, Douglas L; Sherry, A Dean; Hyder, Fahmeed

    2011-12-01

    Responsive contrast agents (RCAs) composed of lanthanide(III) ion (Ln3R) complexes with a variety of1,4,7,10-tetraazacyclododecane-1,4,7,10-tetraacetate (DOTA4S) derivatives have shown great potential as molecular imaging agents for MR. A variety of LnDOTA–tetraamide complexes have been demonstrated as RCAs for molecular imaging using chemical exchange saturation transfer (CEST). The CEST method detects proton exchange between bulk water and any exchangeable sites on the ligand itself or an inner sphere of bound water that is shifted by a paramagnetic Ln3R ion bound in the core of the macrocycle. It has also been shown that molecular imaging is possible when the RCA itself is observed (i.e. not its effect on bulk water) using a method called biosensor imaging of redundant deviation in shifts (BIRDS). The BIRDS method utilizes redundant information stored in the nonexchangeable proton resonances emanating from the paramagnetic RCA for ambient factors such as temperature and/or pH.Thus, CEST and BIRDS rely on exchangeable and nonexchangeable protons, respectively, for biosensing. We posited that it would be feasible to combine these two biosensing features into the same RCA (i.e. dual CEST and BIRDS properties). A complex between europium(III) ion (Eu3R) and DOTA–tetraglycinate [DOTA–(gly)S4] was used to demonstrate that its CEST characteristics are preserved, while its BIRDS properties are also detectable. The in vitro temperature sensitivity of EuDOTA–(gly)S4 was used to show that qualitative MR contrast with CEST can be calibrated using quantitative MR mapping with BIRDS, thereby enabling quantitative molecular imaging at high spatial resolution.

  15. Internucleotide J-couplings and chemical shifts of the N-H···N hydrogen-bonds in the radiation-damaged guanine-cytosine base pairs.

    PubMed

    Li, Huifang; Zhang, Laibin; Han, Li; Sun, Wenming; Bu, Yuxiang

    2011-04-30

    Internucleotide (2h)J(NN) spin-spin couplings and chemical shifts (δ((1)H) and Δδ((15)N)) of N-H···N H-bond units in the natural and radiation-damaged G-C base pairs were predicted using the appropriate density functional theory calculations with a large basis set. Four possible series of the damaged G-C pairs (viz., dehydrogenated and deprotonated G-C pairs, GC(•-) and GC(•+) radicals) were discussed carefully in this work. Computational NMR results show that radicalization and anionization of the base pairs can yield strong effect on their (2h)J(NN) spin scalar coupling constants and the corresponding chemical shifts. Thus, variations of the NMR parameters associated with the N-H···N H-bonds may be taken as an important criterion for prejudging whether the natural G-C pair is radiation-damaged or not. Analysis shows that (2h)J(NN) couplings are strongly interrelated with the energy gaps (ΔE(LP→σ*)) and the second-order interaction energies (E(2)) between the donor N lone-pair (LP(N)) and the acceptor σ*(N-H) localized NBO orbitals, and also are sensitive to the electron density distributions over the σ*(N-H) orbital, indicating that (2h)J(NN) couplings across the N-H···N H-bonds are charge-transfer-controlled. This is well supported by variation of the electrostatic potential surfaces and corresponding charge transfer amount between G and C moieties. It should be noted that although the NMR spectra for the damaged G-C pair radicals are unavailable now and the states of the radicals are usually detected by the electron spin resonance, this study provides a correlation of the properties of the damaged DNA species with some of the electronic parameters associated with the NMR spectra for the understanding of the different state character of the damaged DNA bases.

  16. Inhibition of thermolysin by phosphonamidate transition-state analogues: measurement of 31P-15N bond lengths and chemical shifts in two enzyme-inhibitor complexes by solid-state nuclear magnetic resonance.

    PubMed

    Copié, V; Kolbert, A C; Drewry, D H; Bartlett, P A; Oas, T G; Griffin, R G

    1990-10-01

    31P and 15N chemical shifts and 31P-15N bond lengths have been measured with solid-state NMR techniques in two inhibitors of thermolysin, carbobenzoxy-Glyp-L-Leu-L-Ala (ZGpLA) and carbobenzoxy-L-Phep-L-Leu-L-Ala (ZFpLA), both as free lithium salts and when bound to the enzyme. Binding of both inhibitors to thermolysin results in large changes in the 31P chemical shifts. These changes are more dramatic for the tighter binding inhibitor ZFpLA, where a approximately 20 ppm downfield movement of the 31P isotropic chemical shift (sigma iso) is observed. This shift is due to changes in the shift tensor elements sigma 11 and sigma 22, while sigma 33 remains essentially constant. We observed a similar pattern for ZGpLA, but only a approximately 5 ppm change occurs in sigma iso. The changes in the 15N chemical shifts for both inhibitors are small upon binding, amounting to downfield shifts of 2 and 4 ppm for ZGpLA and ZFpLA, respectively. This indicates that there are no changes in the protonation state of the 15N in either the ZFpLA- or the ZGpLA-thermolysin complex. NMR distance measurements yield a P-N bond length rP-N = 1.68 +/- 0.03 A for the tight binding inhibitor ZFpLA both in its free lithium salt form and in its thermolysin-ZFpLA complex, a distance that is much shorter than the 1.90-A distance reported by X-ray crystallography studies [Holden et al. (1987) Biochemistry 26, 8542-8553].(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:2271586

  17. Inhibition of thermolysin by phosphonamidate transition-state analogues: measurement of 31P-15N bond lengths and chemical shifts in two enzyme-inhibitor complexes by solid-state nuclear magnetic resonance.

    PubMed

    Copié, V; Kolbert, A C; Drewry, D H; Bartlett, P A; Oas, T G; Griffin, R G

    1990-10-01

    31P and 15N chemical shifts and 31P-15N bond lengths have been measured with solid-state NMR techniques in two inhibitors of thermolysin, carbobenzoxy-Glyp-L-Leu-L-Ala (ZGpLA) and carbobenzoxy-L-Phep-L-Leu-L-Ala (ZFpLA), both as free lithium salts and when bound to the enzyme. Binding of both inhibitors to thermolysin results in large changes in the 31P chemical shifts. These changes are more dramatic for the tighter binding inhibitor ZFpLA, where a approximately 20 ppm downfield movement of the 31P isotropic chemical shift (sigma iso) is observed. This shift is due to changes in the shift tensor elements sigma 11 and sigma 22, while sigma 33 remains essentially constant. We observed a similar pattern for ZGpLA, but only a approximately 5 ppm change occurs in sigma iso. The changes in the 15N chemical shifts for both inhibitors are small upon binding, amounting to downfield shifts of 2 and 4 ppm for ZGpLA and ZFpLA, respectively. This indicates that there are no changes in the protonation state of the 15N in either the ZFpLA- or the ZGpLA-thermolysin complex. NMR distance measurements yield a P-N bond length rP-N = 1.68 +/- 0.03 A for the tight binding inhibitor ZFpLA both in its free lithium salt form and in its thermolysin-ZFpLA complex, a distance that is much shorter than the 1.90-A distance reported by X-ray crystallography studies [Holden et al. (1987) Biochemistry 26, 8542-8553].(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  18. High resolution spectroscopy and chemical shift imaging of hyperpolarized 129Xe dissolved in the human brain in vivo at 1.5 tesla

    PubMed Central

    Rao, Madhwesha; Stewart, Neil J.; Norquay, Graham; Griffiths, Paul D.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Upon inhalation, xenon diffuses into the bloodstream and is transported to the brain, where it dissolves in various compartments of the brain. Although up to five chemically distinct peaks have been previously observed in 129Xe rat head spectra, to date only three peaks have been reported in the human head. This study demonstrates high resolution spectroscopy and chemical shift imaging (CSI) of 129Xe dissolved in the human head at 1.5 Tesla. Methods A 129Xe radiofrequency coil was built in‐house and 129Xe gas was polarized using spin‐exchange optical pumping. Following the inhalation of 129Xe gas, NMR spectroscopy was performed with spectral resolution of 0.033 ppm. Two‐dimensional CSI in all three anatomical planes was performed with spectral resolution of 2.1 ppm and voxel size 20 mm × 20 mm. Results Spectra of hyperpolarized 129Xe dissolved in the human head showed five distinct peaks at 188 ppm, 192 ppm, 196 ppm, 200 ppm, and 217 ppm. Assignment of these peaks was consistent with earlier studies. Conclusion High resolution spectroscopy and CSI of hyperpolarized 129Xe dissolved in the human head has been demonstrated. For the first time, five distinct NMR peaks have been observed in 129Xe spectra from the human head in vivo. Magn Reson Med 75:2227–2234, 2016. © 2016 The Authors Magnetic Resonance in Medicine published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. on behalf of International Society for Magnetic Resonance in Medicine. This is an open access article under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits use, distribution and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited. PMID:27080441

  19. Correlation between ¹⁹⁵Pt chemical shifts and the electronic transitions among d orbitals in pincer NCN Pt(II) complexes: A theoretical study and application of Ramsey's equation.

    PubMed

    Hashemi, Majid

    2015-12-01

    The chemical potentials for two series of [PtCl(NCN-Z-4)] (NCN=2,6-bis[(dimethylamino)methyl]phenyl, Z=H, CHO, COOH, NH2, OH, NO2, SiMe3, I, t-Bu) and [PtCl(NCN-4-CHN-C6H4-Z'-4')] (Z'=NMe2, Me, H, Cl, CN) were calculated. The energies of platinum d orbitals were calculated by NBO analysis. Good correlations were obtained between (195)Pt chemical shifts and the spectral parameters obtained from the energies of electronic transitions between Pt d orbitals in these complexes. The correlations between (195)Pt chemical shifts and the chemical potentials were also good. The correlations were discussed based on Ramsey's equation.

  20. 13C Magic angle spinning NMR analysis and quantum chemical modeling of the bathochromic shift of astaxanthin in alpha-crustacyanin, the blue carotenoprotein complex in the carapace of the lobster Homarus gammarus.

    PubMed

    Weesie, R J; Jansen, F J; Merlin, J C; Lugtenburg, J; Britton, G; de Groot, H J

    1997-06-17

    Selective isotope enrichment, 13C magic angle spinning (MAS) NMR, and semiempirical quantum chemical modeling, have been used to analyze ligand-protein interactions associated with the bathochromic shift of astaxanthin in alpha-crustacyanin, the blue carotenoprotein complex from the carapace of the lobster Homarus gammarus. Spectra of alpha-crustacyanin were obtained after reconstitution with astaxanthins labeled with 13C at positions 4,4', 12,12', 13,13', or 20,20'. The data reveal substantial downfield shifts of 4.9 and 7.0 ppm at positions 12 and 12' in the complex, respectively. In contrast, at the 13 and 13' positions, small upfield shifts of 1.9 ppm were observed upon binding to the protein. These data are in line with previously obtained results for positions 14,14' (3.9 and 6.8 ppm downfield) and 15,15' (0.6 ppm upfield) and confirm the unequal perturbation of both halves after binding of the chromophore. However, these results also show that the main perturbation is of symmetrical origin, since the chemical shift differences exhibit a similar pattern in both halves of the astaxanthin molecule. A small downfield shift of 2.4 ppm was detected for the 4 and 4' positions. Finally, the 20,20' methyl groups are shifted 0.4 ppm upfield by the protein. The full data set provides convincing evidence that charge polarization is of importance for the bathochromic shift. The NMR shifts are compared with calculated charge densities for astaxanthin subjected to variations in protonation states of the ring-functional groups, as models of ligand-protein interactions. Taking into account the color shift and other available optical data, the current model for the mechanisms of interaction with the protein was refined. The results point toward a mechanism in which the astaxanthin is charged and subject to strong electrostatic polarizations originating from both keto groups, most likely a double protonation. PMID:9200677

  1. Determination of Relative Tensor Orientations by γ-encoded Chemical Shift Anisotropy/Heteronuclear Dipolar Coupling 3D NMR Spectroscopy in Biological Solids

    PubMed Central

    Hou, Guangjin; Paramasivam, Sivakumar; Byeon, In-Ja L.; Gronenborn, Angela M.

    2011-01-01

    In this paper, we present 3D chemical shift anisotropy (CSA)/dipolar coupling correlation experiments, based on γ-encoded R-type symmetry sequences. The γ-encoded correlation spectra are exquisitely sensitive to the relative orientation of the CSA and dipolar tensors and can provide important structural and dynamic information in peptides and proteins. We show that the first-order (m = ±1) and second-order (m = ±2) Hamiltonians in the R-symmetry recoupling sequences give rise to different correlation patterns due to their different dependencies on the crystallite orientation. The relative orientation between CSA and dipolar tensors can be determined by fitting the corresponding correlation patterns. The orientation of 15N CSA tensor in the quasi-molecular frame is determined by the relative Euler angles, αNH and βNH, when the combined symmetry schemes are applied for orientational studies of 1H-15N dipolar and 15N CSA tensors. The correlation experiments introduced here work at moderate magic angle spinning frequencies (10-20 kHz) and allow for simultaneous measurement of multiple sites of interest. We studied the orientational sensitivity of γ-encoded symmetry-based recoupling techniques numerically and experimentally. The results are demonstrated on [15N]-N-acetyl-valine (NAV) and N-formyl-Met-Leu-Phe (MLF) tripeptide. PMID:20936218

  2. Determination of the Orientation and Dynamics of Ergosterol in Model Membranes Using Uniform 13C Labeling and Dynamically Averaged 13C Chemical Shift Anisotropies as Experimental Restraints

    PubMed Central

    Soubias, O.; Jolibois, F.; Massou, S.; Milon, A.; Réat, V.

    2005-01-01

    A new strategy was established to determine the average orientation and dynamics of ergosterol in dimyristoylphosphatidylcholine model membranes. It is based on the analysis of chemical shift anisotropies (CSAs) averaged by the molecular dynamics. Static 13C CSA tensors were computed by quantum chemistry, using the gauge-including atomic-orbital approach within Hartree-Fock theory. Uniformly 13C-labeled ergosterol was purified from Pichia pastoris cells grown on labeled methanol. After reconstitution into dimyristoylphosphatidylcholine lipids, the complete 1H and 13C assignment of ergosterol's resonances was performed using a combination of magic-angle spinning two-dimensional experiments. Dynamically averaged CSAs were determined by standard side-band intensity analysis for isolated 13C resonances (C3 and ethylenic carbons) and by off-magic-angle spinning experiments for other carbons. A set of 18 constraints was thus obtained, from which the sterol's molecular order parameter and average orientation could be precisely defined. The validity of using computed CSAs in this strategy was verified on cholesterol model systems. This new method allowed us to quantify ergosterol's dynamics at three molar ratios: 16 mol % (Ld phase), 30 mol % (Lo phase), and 23 mol % (mixed phases). Contrary to cholesterol, ergosterol's molecular diffusion axis makes an important angle (14°) with the inertial axis of the rigid four-ring system. PMID:15923221

  3. H2O/OH ratio determination in hydrous aluminosilicate glasses by static proton NMR and the effect of chemical shift anisotropy.

    PubMed

    Riemer, T; Schmidt, B; Behrens, H; Dupree, R

    2000-04-01

    Static 1H NMR spectra of hydrous NaAlSi3O8 glasses have been acquired at low temperature (140 K) in order to quantitatively determine OH and H2O concentrations. Since both components overlap in the spectra, an unambiguous determination of the line shapes is required. The structurally bonded hydroxyl groups are well described by a Gaussian line and the water molecules exhibit a Pake doublet-like line shape due to the strong proton-proton dipolar interaction. However, at proton resonance frequencies used in this study (360 MHz), the Pake doublet has an asymmetric line shape due to chemical shift anisotropy (CSA), which is significant and must be included in any simulation in order to reproduce the experimental line shape successfully. The simulations for rigid water molecules dissolved in our hydrous aluminosilicate glasses result in a CSA of 30+/-5 ppm and a dipolar interaction constant of 63.8+/-2.5 kHz (i.e., dipolar coupling constant (DCC) of 42.6+/-1.7 kHz), corresponding to a proton-proton distance of r(ij) = 154+/-2 pm. In contrast to earlier work, water speciation obtained from the simulations of our 1H NMR spectra are in excellent agreement with those obtained from infrared (IR) spectroscopy.

  4. Measurement of sample temperatures under magic-angle spinning from the chemical shift and spin-lattice relaxation rate of 79Br in KBr powder

    PubMed Central

    Thurber, Kent R.; Tycko, Robert

    2009-01-01

    Accurate determination of sample temperatures in solid state nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) with magic-angle spinning (MAS) can be problematic, particularly because frictional heating and heating by radio-frequency irradiation can make the internal sample temperature significantly different from the temperature outside the MAS rotor. This paper demonstrates the use of 79Br chemical shifts and spin-lattice relaxation rates in KBr powder as temperature-dependent parameters for the determination of internal sample temperatures. Advantages of this method include high signal-to-noise, proximity of the 79Br NMR frequency to that of 13C, applicability from 20 K to 320 K or higher, and simultaneity with adjustment of the MAS axis direction. We show that spin-lattice relaxation in KBr is driven by a quadrupolar mechanism. We demonstrate a simple approach to including KBr powder in hydrated samples, such as biological membrane samples, hydrated amyloid fibrils, and hydrated microcrystalline proteins, that allows direct assessment of the effects of frictional and radio-frequency heating under experimentally relevant conditions. PMID:18930418

  5. Deuterium isotope effects on 13C and 15N chemical shifts of intramolecularly hydrogen-bonded enaminocarbonyl derivatives of Meldrum’s and Tetronic acid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ullah, Saif; Zhang, Wei; Hansen, Poul Erik

    2010-07-01

    Secondary deuterium isotope effects on 13C and 15N nuclear shieldings in a series of cyclic enamino-diesters and enamino-esters and acyclic enaminones and enamino-esters have been examined and analysed using NMR and DFT (B3LYP/6-31G(d,p)) methods. One-dimensional and two-dimensional NMR spectra of enaminocarbonyl and their deuterated analogues were recorded in CDCl 3 and CD 2Cl 2 at variable temperatures and assigned. 1JNH coupling constants for the derivatives of Meldrum's and tetronic acids reveal that they exist at the NH-form. It was demonstrated that deuterium isotope effects, for the hydrogen bonded compounds, due to the deuterium substitution at the nitrogen nucleus lead to large one-bond isotope effects at nitrogen, 1Δ 15N(D), and two-bond isotope effects on carbon nuclei, 2ΔC(ND), respectively. A linear correlations exist between 2ΔC(ND) and 1Δ 15N(D) whereas the correlation with δNH is divided into two. A good agreement between the experimentally observed 2ΔC(ND) and calculated dσ 13C/dR NH was obtained. A very good correlation between calculated NH bond lengths and observed NH chemical shifts is found. The observed isotope effects are shown to depend strongly on Resonance Assisted Hydrogen bonding.

  6. VITAL NMR: using chemical shift derived secondary structure information for a limited set of amino acids to assess homology model accuracy.

    PubMed

    Brothers, Michael C; Nesbitt, Anna E; Hallock, Michael J; Rupasinghe, Sanjeewa G; Tang, Ming; Harris, Jason; Baudry, Jerome; Schuler, Mary A; Rienstra, Chad M

    2012-01-01

    Homology modeling is a powerful tool for predicting protein structures, whose success depends on obtaining a reasonable alignment between a given structural template and the protein sequence being analyzed. In order to leverage greater predictive power for proteins with few structural templates, we have developed a method to rank homology models based upon their compliance to secondary structure derived from experimental solid-state NMR (SSNMR) data. Such data is obtainable in a rapid manner by simple SSNMR experiments (e.g., (13)C-(13)C 2D correlation spectra). To test our homology model scoring procedure for various amino acid labeling schemes, we generated a library of 7,474 homology models for 22 protein targets culled from the TALOS+/SPARTA+ training set of protein structures. Using subsets of amino acids that are plausibly assigned by SSNMR, we discovered that pairs of the residues Val, Ile, Thr, Ala and Leu (VITAL) emulate an ideal dataset where all residues are site specifically assigned. Scoring the models with a predicted VITAL site-specific dataset and calculating secondary structure with the Chemical Shift Index resulted in a Pearson correlation coefficient (-0.75) commensurate to the control (-0.77), where secondary structure was scored site specifically for all amino acids (ALL 20) using STRIDE. This method promises to accelerate structure procurement by SSNMR for proteins with unknown folds through guiding the selection of remotely homologous protein templates and assessing model quality.

  7. VITAL NMR: Using Chemical Shift Derived Secondary Structure Information for a Limited Set of Amino Acids to Assess Homology Model Accuracy

    SciTech Connect

    Brothers, Michael C; Nesbitt, Anna E; Hallock, Michael J; Rupasinghe, Sanjeewa; Tang, Ming; Harris, Jason B; Baudry, Jerome Y; Schuler, Mary A; Rienstra, Chad M

    2011-01-01

    Homology modeling is a powerful tool for predicting protein structures, whose success depends on obtaining a reasonable alignment between a given structural template and the protein sequence being analyzed. In order to leverage greater predictive power for proteins with few structural templates, we have developed a method to rank homology models based upon their compliance to secondary structure derived from experimental solid-state NMR (SSNMR) data. Such data is obtainable in a rapid manner by simple SSNMR experiments (e.g., (13)C-(13)C 2D correlation spectra). To test our homology model scoring procedure for various amino acid labeling schemes, we generated a library of 7,474 homology models for 22 protein targets culled from the TALOS+/SPARTA+ training set of protein structures. Using subsets of amino acids that are plausibly assigned by SSNMR, we discovered that pairs of the residues Val, Ile, Thr, Ala and Leu (VITAL) emulate an ideal dataset where all residues are site specifically assigned. Scoring the models with a predicted VITAL site-specific dataset and calculating secondary structure with the Chemical Shift Index resulted in a Pearson correlation coefficient (-0.75) commensurate to the control (-0.77), where secondary structure was scored site specifically for all amino acids (ALL 20) using STRIDE. This method promises to accelerate structure procurement by SSNMR for proteins with unknown folds through guiding the selection of remotely homologous protein templates and assessing model quality.

  8. 129Xe NMR chemical shift in Xe@C60 calculated at experimental conditions: essential role of the relativity, dynamics, and explicit solvent.

    PubMed

    Standara, Stanislav; Kulhánek, Petr; Marek, Radek; Straka, Michal

    2013-08-15

    The isotropic (129)Xe nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) chemical shift (CS) in Xe@C60 dissolved in liquid benzene was calculated by piecewise approximation to faithfully simulate the experimental conditions and to evaluate the role of different physical factors influencing the (129)Xe NMR CS. The (129)Xe shielding constant was obtained by averaging the (129)Xe nuclear magnetic shieldings calculated for snapshots obtained from the molecular dynamics trajectory of the Xe@C60 system embedded in a periodic box of benzene molecules. Relativistic corrections were added at the Breit-Pauli perturbation theory (BPPT) level, included the solvent, and were dynamically averaged. It is demonstrated that the contribution of internal dynamics of the Xe@C60 system represents about 8% of the total nonrelativistic NMR CS, whereas the effects of dynamical solvent add another 8%. The dynamically averaged relativistic effects contribute by 9% to the total calculated (129)Xe NMR CS. The final theoretical value of 172.7 ppm corresponds well to the experimental (129)Xe CS of 179.2 ppm and lies within the estimated errors of the model. The presented computational protocol serves as a prototype for calculations of (129)Xe NMR parameters in different Xe atom guest-host systems.

  9. ¹³C solid-state NMR analysis of the most common pharmaceutical excipients used in solid drug formulations, Part I: Chemical shifts assignment.

    PubMed

    Pisklak, Dariusz Maciej; Zielińska-Pisklak, Monika Agnieszka; Szeleszczuk, Łukasz; Wawer, Iwona

    2016-04-15

    Solid-state NMR is an excellent and useful method for analyzing solid-state forms of drugs. In the (13)C CP/MAS NMR spectra of the solid dosage forms many of the signals originate from the excipients and should be distinguished from those of active pharmaceutical ingredient (API). In this work the most common pharmaceutical excipients used in the solid drug formulations: anhydrous α-lactose, α-lactose monohydrate, mannitol, sucrose, sorbitol, sodium starch glycolate type A and B, starch of different origin, microcrystalline cellulose, hypromellose, ethylcellulose, methylcellulose, hydroxyethylcellulose, sodium alginate, magnesium stearate, sodium laurilsulfate and Kollidon(®) were analyzed. Their (13)C CP/MAS NMR spectra were recorded and the signals were assigned, employing the results (R(2): 0.948-0.998) of GIPAW calculations and theoretical chemical shifts. The (13)C ssNMR spectra for some of the studied excipients have not been published before while for the other signals in the spectra they were not properly assigned or the assignments were not correct. The results summarize and complement the data on the (13)C ssNMR analysis of the most common pharmaceutical excipients and are essential for further NMR studies of API-excipient interactions in the pharmaceutical formulations.

  10. Backbone chemical shift assignments for Xanthomonas campestris peroxiredoxin Q in the reduced and oxidized states: a dramatic change in backbone dynamics.

    PubMed

    Buchko, Garry W; Perkins, Arden; Parsonage, Derek; Poole, Leslie B; Karplus, P Andrew

    2016-04-01

    Peroxiredoxins (Prx) are ubiquitous enzymes that reduce peroxides as part of antioxidant defenses and redox signaling. While Prx catalytic activity and sensitivity to hyperoxidative inactivation depend on their dynamic properties, there are few examples where their dynamics has been characterized by NMR spectroscopy. Here, we provide a foundation for studies of the solution properties of peroxiredoxin Q from the plant pathogen Xanthomonas campestris (XcPrxQ) by assigning the observable (1)H(N), (15)N, (13)C(α), (13)C(β), and (13)C' chemical shifts for both the reduced (dithiol) and oxidized (disulfide) states. In the reduced state, most of the backbone amide resonances (149/152, 98 %) can be assigned in the XcPrxQ (1)H-(15)N HSQC spectrum. In contrast, a remarkable 51 % (77) of these amide resonances are not visible in the (1)H-(15)N HSQC spectrum of the disulfide state of the enzyme, indicating a substantial change in backbone dynamics associated with the formation of an intramolecular C48-C84 disulfide bond. PMID:26438558

  11. Heavy Halogen Atom Effect on (13)C NMR Chemical Shifts in Monohalo Derivatives of Cyclohexane and Pyran. Experimental and Theoretical Study.

    PubMed

    Neto, Alvaro Cunha; Ducati, Lucas C; Rittner, Roberto; Tormena, Cláudio F; Contreras, Rubén H; Frenking, Gernot

    2009-09-01

    As a first step, a qualitative analysis of the spin-orbit operator was performed to predict the kind of organic compounds, where it could be expected that the SO/FC (spin-orbit/Fermi contact) and SO/SD (spin-orbit/spin dipolar) yield unusually small contributions to the "heavy atom effect" on (13)C SCSs (substituent chemical shifts). This analysis led to the conclusion that compounds presenting strong hyperconjugative interactions involving the σ*C-X orbital (X = halogen) are good examples where such effects can be expected to take place. On the basis of such results, the following set of model compounds was chosen: 2-eq-halocyclohexane (2-eq), 2-ax-halocyclohexane (2-ax), and 2-ax-halopyran (3), to measure (13)C SCSs. Such experimental values, as well as those of methane and halomethanes taken from the literature, were compared to calculated values at a nonrelativistic approach using B3LYP, and at a relativistic approach with BP86 using scalar ZORA, spin-orbit ZORA, scalar PAULI, and spin-orbit PAULI. Results from relativistic calculations are in agreement with the trends predicted by the qualitative model discussed in this work.

  12. In vivo application of sub-second spiral chemical shift imaging (CSI) to hyperpolarized 13C metabolic imaging: Comparison with phase-encoded CSI

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mayer, Dirk; Yen, Yi-Fen; Levin, Yakir S.; Tropp, James; Pfefferbaum, Adolf; Hurd, Ralph E.; Spielman, Daniel M.

    2010-06-01

    A fast spiral chemical shift imaging (CSI) has been developed to address the challenge of the limited acquisition window in hyperpolarized 13C metabolic imaging. The sequence exploits the sparsity of the spectra and prior knowledge of resonance frequencies to reduce the measurement time by undersampling the data in the spectral domain. As a consequence, multiple reconstructions are necessary for any given data set as only frequency components within a selected bandwidth are reconstructed "in-focus" while components outside that band are severely blurred ("spectral tomosynthesis"). A variable-flip-angle scheme was used for optimal use of the longitudinal magnetization. The sequence was applied to sub-second metabolic imaging of the rat in vivo after injection of hyperpolarized [1- 13C]-pyruvate on a clinical 3T MR scanner. The comparison with conventional CSI based on phase encoding showed similar signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) and spatial resolution in metabolic maps for the substrate and its metabolic products lactate, alanine, and bicarbonate, despite a 50-fold reduction in scan time for the spiral CSI acquisition. The presented results demonstrate that dramatic reductions in scan time are feasible in hyperpolarized 13C metabolic imaging without a penalty in SNR or spatial resolution.

  13. ¹³C solid-state NMR analysis of the most common pharmaceutical excipients used in solid drug formulations, Part I: Chemical shifts assignment.

    PubMed

    Pisklak, Dariusz Maciej; Zielińska-Pisklak, Monika Agnieszka; Szeleszczuk, Łukasz; Wawer, Iwona

    2016-04-15

    Solid-state NMR is an excellent and useful method for analyzing solid-state forms of drugs. In the (13)C CP/MAS NMR spectra of the solid dosage forms many of the signals originate from the excipients and should be distinguished from those of active pharmaceutical ingredient (API). In this work the most common pharmaceutical excipients used in the solid drug formulations: anhydrous α-lactose, α-lactose monohydrate, mannitol, sucrose, sorbitol, sodium starch glycolate type A and B, starch of different origin, microcrystalline cellulose, hypromellose, ethylcellulose, methylcellulose, hydroxyethylcellulose, sodium alginate, magnesium stearate, sodium laurilsulfate and Kollidon(®) were analyzed. Their (13)C CP/MAS NMR spectra were recorded and the signals were assigned, employing the results (R(2): 0.948-0.998) of GIPAW calculations and theoretical chemical shifts. The (13)C ssNMR spectra for some of the studied excipients have not been published before while for the other signals in the spectra they were not properly assigned or the assignments were not correct. The results summarize and complement the data on the (13)C ssNMR analysis of the most common pharmaceutical excipients and are essential for further NMR studies of API-excipient interactions in the pharmaceutical formulations. PMID:26845204

  14. 129Xe NMR chemical shift in Xe@C60 calculated at experimental conditions: essential role of the relativity, dynamics, and explicit solvent.

    PubMed

    Standara, Stanislav; Kulhánek, Petr; Marek, Radek; Straka, Michal

    2013-08-15

    The isotropic (129)Xe nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) chemical shift (CS) in Xe@C60 dissolved in liquid benzene was calculated by piecewise approximation to faithfully simulate the experimental conditions and to evaluate the role of different physical factors influencing the (129)Xe NMR CS. The (129)Xe shielding constant was obtained by averaging the (129)Xe nuclear magnetic shieldings calculated for snapshots obtained from the molecular dynamics trajectory of the Xe@C60 system embedded in a periodic box of benzene molecules. Relativistic corrections were added at the Breit-Pauli perturbation theory (BPPT) level, included the solvent, and were dynamically averaged. It is demonstrated that the contribution of internal dynamics of the Xe@C60 system represents about 8% of the total nonrelativistic NMR CS, whereas the effects of dynamical solvent add another 8%. The dynamically averaged relativistic effects contribute by 9% to the total calculated (129)Xe NMR CS. The final theoretical value of 172.7 ppm corresponds well to the experimental (129)Xe CS of 179.2 ppm and lies within the estimated errors of the model. The presented computational protocol serves as a prototype for calculations of (129)Xe NMR parameters in different Xe atom guest-host systems. PMID:23703381

  15. Solid-state {sup 19}F and {sup 13}C NMR of room temperature fluorinated graphite and samples thermally treated under fluorine: Low-field and high-resolution studies

    SciTech Connect

    Giraudet, J.; Dubois, M.; Guerin, K.; Pinheiro, J.P.; Hamwi, A.; Stone, W.E.E.; Pirotte, P.; Masin, F. . E-mail: fmasin@ulb.ac.be

    2005-04-15

    Room temperature graphite fluorides consisting of raw material and samples post-treated in pure fluorine atmosphere in the temperature range 100-500 deg. C have been studied by solid-state NMR. Several NMR approaches have been used, both high and low-field {sup 19}F, {sup 19}F MAS and {sup 13}C MAS with {sup 19}F to {sup 13}C cross polarization. The modifications, in the graphitic lattice, of the catalytic iodine fluorides products have been examined. A transformation of the C-F bond character from semi-ionic to covalent has been found to occur at a post-treatment temperature close to 400 deg. C. It is shown that covalency increases with temperature.

  16. Shifting Attention

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ingram, Jenni

    2014-01-01

    This article examines the shifts in attention and focus as one teacher introduces and explains an image that represents the processes involved in a numeric problem that his students have been working on. This paper takes a micro-analytic approach to examine how the focus of attention shifts through what the teacher and students do and say in the…

  17. Targeting the Endocannabinoid System for Neuroprotection: A 19F-NMR Study of a Selective FAAH Inhibitor Binding with an Anandamide Carrier Protein, HSA

    PubMed Central

    Zhuang, Jianqin; Yang, De-Ping; Tian, Xiaoyu; Nikas, Spyros P.; Sharma, Rishi; Guo, Jason Jianxin; Makriyannis, Alexandros

    2013-01-01

    Fatty acid amide hydrolase (FAAH), the enzyme involved in the inactivation of the endocannabinoid anandamide (AEA), is being considered as a therapeutic target for analgesia and neuroprotection. We have developed a brain permeable FAAH inhibitor, AM5206, which has served as a valuable pharmacological tool to explore neuroprotective effects of this class of compounds. In the present work, we characterized the interactions of AM5206 with a representative AEA carrier protein, human serum albumin (HSA), using 19F nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy. Our data showed that as a drug carrier, albumin can significantly enhance the solubility of AM5206 in aqueous environment. Through a series of titration and competitive binding experiments, we also identified that AM5206 primarily binds to two distinct sites within HSA. Our results may provide insight into the mechanism of HSA-AM5206 interactions. The findings should also help in the development of suitable formulations of the lipophilic AM5206 and its congeners for their effective delivery to specific target sites in the brain. PMID:24533425

  18. In-situ analysis and quantification of swelling kinetics in glassy and rubbery networks using [sup 1]H and [sup 19]F magnetic resonance microscopies

    SciTech Connect

    Cody, G.D.; Botto, R.E. . Chemistry Div.)

    1994-04-25

    [sup 1]H and [sup 19]F magnetic resonance microscopies are used to determine the characteristics of diffusion in four different network-solvent systems. Transport of methanol in poly(ethyl methacrylate) (PEMA) and pyridine in coal is explored and compared with Fickian transport of toluene in polybutadiene rubber (PBD) and hexafluorobenzene in poly(methyl silicone) (PMS). These former two systems are characterized by sharp solvent fronts which propagate into the cores of the samples at a constant velocity. The swelling kinetics are quantified by applying a simple model which couples the kinetics of solvent diffusion to a second-order phase transition which induces network relaxation. Parameterization is accomplished with two kinetic terms and one thermodynamic parameter. These are a mass-fixed glassy diffusion coefficient, a network relaxation constant, and a critical concentration corresponding to the concentration of solvent necessary to induce a glass to rubber transition. Solvent from velocities, obtained through magnetic resonance microscopy, are used with independently derived critical concentrations to calculate the glassy diffusion coefficient and network relaxation rate constant. Kinetic swelling data are then fit with theoretical uptake curves computed using these parameters. A high-quality fit demonstrates that the proposed model successfully quantifies non-Fickian transport using a small number of physical based dynamic parameters.

  19. The effect of ethanol on hydroxyl and carbonyl groups in biopolyol produced by hydrothermal liquefaction of loblolly pine: (31)P-NMR and (19)F-NMR analysis.

    PubMed

    Celikbag, Yusuf; Via, Brian K; Adhikari, Sushil; Buschle-Diller, Gisela; Auad, Maria L

    2016-08-01

    The goal of this study was to investigate the role of ethanol and temperature on the hydroxyl and carbonyl groups in biopolyol produced from hydrothermal liquefaction of loblolly pine (Pinus spp.) carried out at 250, 300, 350 and 390°C for 30min. Water and water/ethanol mixture (1/1, wt/wt) were used as liquefying solvent in the HTL experiments. HTL in water and water/ethanol is donated as W-HTL and W/E-HTL, respectively. It was found that 300°C and water/ethanol solvent was the optimum liquefaction temperature and solvent, yielding up to 68.1wt.% bio-oil and 2.4wt.% solid residue. (31)P-NMR analysis showed that biopolyol produced by W-HTL was rich in phenolic OH while W/E-HTL produced more aliphatic OH rich biopolyols. Moreover, biopolyols with higher hydroxyl concentration were produced by W/E-HTL. Carbonyl groups were analyzed by (19)F-NMR, which showed that ethanol reduced the concentration of carbonyl groups. PMID:27126078

  20. The effect of ethanol on hydroxyl and carbonyl groups in biopolyol produced by hydrothermal liquefaction of loblolly pine: (31)P-NMR and (19)F-NMR analysis.

    PubMed

    Celikbag, Yusuf; Via, Brian K; Adhikari, Sushil; Buschle-Diller, Gisela; Auad, Maria L

    2016-08-01

    The goal of this study was to investigate the role of ethanol and temperature on the hydroxyl and carbonyl groups in biopolyol produced from hydrothermal liquefaction of loblolly pine (Pinus spp.) carried out at 250, 300, 350 and 390°C for 30min. Water and water/ethanol mixture (1/1, wt/wt) were used as liquefying solvent in the HTL experiments. HTL in water and water/ethanol is donated as W-HTL and W/E-HTL, respectively. It was found that 300°C and water/ethanol solvent was the optimum liquefaction temperature and solvent, yielding up to 68.1wt.% bio-oil and 2.4wt.% solid residue. (31)P-NMR analysis showed that biopolyol produced by W-HTL was rich in phenolic OH while W/E-HTL produced more aliphatic OH rich biopolyols. Moreover, biopolyols with higher hydroxyl concentration were produced by W/E-HTL. Carbonyl groups were analyzed by (19)F-NMR, which showed that ethanol reduced the concentration of carbonyl groups.

  1. A risk-based statistical investigation of the quantification of polymorphic purity of a pharmaceutical candidate by solid-state 19F NMR.

    PubMed

    Barry, Samantha J; Pham, Tran N; Borman, Phil J; Edwards, Andrew J; Watson, Simon A

    2012-01-27

    The DMAIC (Define, Measure, Analyse, Improve and Control) framework and associated statistical tools have been applied to both identify and reduce variability observed in a quantitative (19)F solid-state NMR (S